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Sample records for activated chemical vapour

  1. Biocompatibility of chemical-vapour-deposited diamond.

    PubMed

    Tang, L; Tsai, C; Gerberich, W W; Kruckeberg, L; Kania, D R

    1995-04-01

    The biocompatibility of chemical-vapour-deposited (CVD) diamond surfaces has been assessed. Our results indicate that CVD diamond is as biocompatible as titanium (Ti) and 316 stainless steel (SS). First, the amount of adsorbed and 'denatured' fibrinogen on CVD diamond was very close to that of Ti and SS. Second, both in vitro and in vivo there appears to be less cellular adhesion and activation on the surface of CVD diamond surfaces compared to Ti and SS. This evident biocompatibility, coupled with the corrosion resistance and notable mechanical integrity of CVD diamond, suggests that diamond-coated surfaces may be highly desirable in a number of biomedical applications. PMID:7654876

  2. Antimicrobial activity of novel nanostructured Cu-SiO2 coatings prepared by chemical vapour deposition against hospital related pathogens

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    There is increasing recognition that the healthcare environment acts as an important reservoir for transmission of healthcare acquired infections (HCAI). One method of reducing environmental contamination would be use of antimicrobial materials. The antimicrobial activity of thin silica-copper films prepared by chemical vapour deposition was evaluated against standard strains of bacteria used for disinfectant testing and bacteria of current interest in HCAI. The structure of the coatings was determined using Scanning Electron Microscopy and their hardness and adhesion to the substrate determined. Antimicrobial activity was tested using a method based on BS ISO 22196:2007. The coatings had a pale green-brown colour and had a similar hardness to steel. SEM showed nano-structured aggregates of Cu within a silica matrix. A log10 reduction in viability of >5 could be obtained within 4 h for the disinfectant test strains and within 6 h for producing Acinetobacter baumannii, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia. Activity against the other hospital isolates was slower but still gave log10 reduction factors of >5 for extended spectrum β-lactamase producing Escherichia coli and >3 for vancomycin resistant Enterococcus faecium, methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa within 24 h. The results demonstrate the importance of testing antimicrobial materials destined for healthcare use against isolates of current interest in hospitals as well as standard test strains. The coatings used here can also be applied to substrates such as metals and ceramics and have potential applications where reduction of microbial environmental contamination is desirable. PMID:24007899

  3. Antimicrobial activity of novel nanostructured Cu-SiO2 coatings prepared by chemical vapour deposition against hospital related pathogens.

    PubMed

    Varghese, Sajnu; Elfakhri, Souad O; Sheel, David W; Sheel, Paul; Bolton, Frederick J Eric; Foster, Howard A

    2013-01-01

    There is increasing recognition that the healthcare environment acts as an important reservoir for transmission of healthcare acquired infections (HCAI). One method of reducing environmental contamination would be use of antimicrobial materials. The antimicrobial activity of thin silica-copper films prepared by chemical vapour deposition was evaluated against standard strains of bacteria used for disinfectant testing and bacteria of current interest in HCAI. The structure of the coatings was determined using Scanning Electron Microscopy and their hardness and adhesion to the substrate determined. Antimicrobial activity was tested using a method based on BS ISO 22196:2007. The coatings had a pale green-brown colour and had a similar hardness to steel. SEM showed nano-structured aggregates of Cu within a silica matrix. A log10 reduction in viability of >5 could be obtained within 4 h for the disinfectant test strains and within 6 h for producing Acinetobacter baumannii, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia. Activity against the other hospital isolates was slower but still gave log10 reduction factors of >5 for extended spectrum β-lactamase producing Escherichia coli and >3 for vancomycin resistant Enterococcus faecium, methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa within 24 h. The results demonstrate the importance of testing antimicrobial materials destined for healthcare use against isolates of current interest in hospitals as well as standard test strains. The coatings used here can also be applied to substrates such as metals and ceramics and have potential applications where reduction of microbial environmental contamination is desirable. PMID:24007899

  4. Growth of ZnO Nanorods on Stainless Steel Wire Using Chemical Vapour Deposition and Their Photocatalytic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Abd Aziz, Siti Nor Qurratu Aini; Pung, Swee-Yong; Ramli, Nurul Najiah; Lockman, Zainovia

    2014-01-01

    The photodegradation efficiency of ZnO nanoparticles in removal of organic pollutants deteriorates over time as a high percentage of the nanoparticles can be drained away by water during the wastewater treatment. This problem can be solved by growing the ZnO nanorods on stainless steel wire. In this work, ZnO nanorods were successfully grown on stainless steel wire by chemical vapour deposition. The SAED analysis indicates that ZnO nanorod is a single crystal and is preferentially grown in [0001] direction. The deconvoluted O 1s peak at 531.5 eV in XPS analysis is associated with oxygen deficient, revealing that the ZnO nanorods contain many oxygen vacancies. This observation is further supported by the finding of the small Iuv/Ivis ratio, that is, ~1 in the photoluminescence analysis. The growth of ZnO nanorods on stainless steel wire was governed by vapour-solid mechanism as there were no Fe particles observed at the tips of the nanorods. The photodegradation of Rhodamine B solution by ZnO nanorods followed the first-order kinetics. PMID:24587716

  5. Growth of ZnO nanorods on stainless steel wire using chemical vapour deposition and their photocatalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Abd Aziz, Siti Nor Qurratu Aini; Pung, Swee-Yong; Ramli, Nurul Najiah; Lockman, Zainovia

    2014-01-01

    The photodegradation efficiency of ZnO nanoparticles in removal of organic pollutants deteriorates over time as a high percentage of the nanoparticles can be drained away by water during the wastewater treatment. This problem can be solved by growing the ZnO nanorods on stainless steel wire. In this work, ZnO nanorods were successfully grown on stainless steel wire by chemical vapour deposition. The SAED analysis indicates that ZnO nanorod is a single crystal and is preferentially grown in [0001] direction. The deconvoluted O 1s peak at 531.5 eV in XPS analysis is associated with oxygen deficient, revealing that the ZnO nanorods contain many oxygen vacancies. This observation is further supported by the finding of the small I(uv)/I(vis) ratio, that is, ~1 in the photoluminescence analysis. The growth of ZnO nanorods on stainless steel wire was governed by vapour-solid mechanism as there were no Fe particles observed at the tips of the nanorods. The photodegradation of Rhodamine B solution by ZnO nanorods followed the first-order kinetics. PMID:24587716

  6. Ethylene vinylacetate copolymer and nanographite composite as chemical vapour sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepina, Santa; Sakale, Gita; Knite, Maris

    2013-12-01

    Polymer-nanostructured carbon composite as chemical vapour sensor is described, made by the dissolution method of a non-conductive polymer, ethylene vinylacetate copolymer, mixed with conductive nanographite particles (carbon black). Sensor exhibits relative electrical resistance change in chemical vapours, like ethanol and toluene. Since the sensor is relatively cheap, easy to fabricate, it can be used in air quality monitoring and at industries to control hazardous substance concentration in the air, for example, to protect workers from exposure to chemical spills.

  7. Infrared hyperspectral imaging for chemical vapour detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruxton, K.; Robertson, G.; Miller, W.; Malcolm, G. P. A.; Maker, G. T.; Howle, C. R.

    2012-10-01

    Active hyperspectral imaging is a valuable tool in a wide range of applications. One such area is the detection and identification of chemicals, especially toxic chemical warfare agents, through analysis of the resulting absorption spectrum. This work presents a selection of results from a prototype midwave infrared (MWIR) hyperspectral imaging instrument that has successfully been used for compound detection at a range of standoff distances. Active hyperspectral imaging utilises a broadly tunable laser source to illuminate the scene with light at a range of wavelengths. While there are a number of illumination methods, the chosen configuration illuminates the scene by raster scanning the laser beam using a pair of galvanometric mirrors. The resulting backscattered light from the scene is collected by the same mirrors and focussed onto a suitable single-point detector, where the image is constructed pixel by pixel. The imaging instrument that was developed in this work is based around an IR optical parametric oscillator (OPO) source with broad tunability, operating in the 2.6 to 3.7 μm (MWIR) and 1.5 to 1.8 μm (shortwave IR, SWIR) spectral regions. The MWIR beam was primarily used as it addressed the fundamental absorption features of the target compounds compared to the overtone and combination bands in the SWIR region, which can be less intense by more than an order of magnitude. We show that a prototype NCI instrument was able to locate hydrocarbon materials at distances up to 15 metres.

  8. Chemical vapour deposition of zeolitic imidazolate framework thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stassen, Ivo; Styles, Mark; Grenci, Gianluca; Gorp, Hans Van; Vanderlinden, Willem; Feyter, Steven De; Falcaro, Paolo; Vos, Dirk De; Vereecken, Philippe; Ameloot, Rob

    2016-03-01

    Integrating metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) in microelectronics has disruptive potential because of the unique properties of these microporous crystalline materials. Suitable film deposition methods are crucial to leverage MOFs in this field. Conventional solvent-based procedures, typically adapted from powder preparation routes, are incompatible with nanofabrication because of corrosion and contamination risks. We demonstrate a chemical vapour deposition process (MOF-CVD) that enables high-quality films of ZIF-8, a prototypical MOF material, with a uniform and controlled thickness, even on high-aspect-ratio features. Furthermore, we demonstrate how MOF-CVD enables previously inaccessible routes such as lift-off patterning and depositing MOF films on fragile features. The compatibility of MOF-CVD with existing infrastructure, both in research and production facilities, will greatly facilitate MOF integration in microelectronics. MOF-CVD is the first vapour-phase deposition method for any type of microporous crystalline network solid and marks a milestone in processing such materials.

  9. Silicon nanowire arrays as learning chemical vapour classifiers.

    PubMed

    Niskanen, A O; Colli, A; White, R; Li, H W; Spigone, E; Kivioja, J M

    2011-07-22

    Nanowire field-effect transistors are a promising class of devices for various sensing applications. Apart from detecting individual chemical or biological analytes, it is especially interesting to use multiple selective sensors to look at their collective response in order to perform classification into predetermined categories. We show that non-functionalised silicon nanowire arrays can be used to robustly classify different chemical vapours using simple statistical machine learning methods. We were able to distinguish between acetone, ethanol and water with 100% accuracy while methanol, ethanol and 2-propanol were classified with 96% accuracy in ambient conditions. PMID:21673389

  10. Microscopic characterisation of suspended graphene grown by chemical vapour deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bignardi, Luca; van Dorp, Willem F.; Gottardi, Stefano; Ivashenko, Oleksii; Dudin, Pavel; Barinov, Alexei; de Hosson, Jeff Th. M.; Stöhr, Meike; Rudolf, Petra

    2013-09-01

    We present a multi-technique characterisation of graphene grown by chemical vapour deposition (CVD) and thereafter transferred to and suspended on a grid for transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The properties of the electronic band structure are investigated by angle-resolved photoelectron spectromicroscopy, while the structural and crystalline properties are studied by TEM and Raman spectroscopy. We demonstrate that the suspended graphene membrane locally shows electronic properties comparable with those of samples prepared by micromechanical cleaving of graphite. Measurements show that the area of high quality suspended graphene is limited by the folding of the graphene during the transfer.

  11. Microscopic characterisation of suspended graphene grown by chemical vapour deposition.

    PubMed

    Bignardi, Luca; van Dorp, Willem F; Gottardi, Stefano; Ivashenko, Oleksii; Dudin, Pavel; Barinov, Alexei; De Hosson, Jeff Th M; Stöhr, Meike; Rudolf, Petra

    2013-10-01

    We present a multi-technique characterisation of graphene grown by chemical vapour deposition (CVD) and thereafter transferred to and suspended on a grid for transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The properties of the electronic band structure are investigated by angle-resolved photoelectron spectromicroscopy, while the structural and crystalline properties are studied by TEM and Raman spectroscopy. We demonstrate that the suspended graphene membrane locally shows electronic properties comparable with those of samples prepared by micromechanical cleaving of graphite. Measurements show that the area of high quality suspended graphene is limited by the folding of the graphene during the transfer. PMID:23945527

  12. Light-induced chemical vapour deposition painting with titanium dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halary-Wagner, E.; Bret, T.; Hoffmann, P.

    2003-03-01

    Light-induced chemical vapour deposits of titanium dioxide are obtained from titanium tetra-isopropoxide (TTIP) in an oxygen and nitrogen atmosphere with a long pulse (250 ns) 308 nm XeCl excimer laser using a mask projection set-up. The demonstrated advantages of this technique are: (i) selective area deposition, (ii) precise control of the deposited thickness and (iii) low temperature deposition, enabling to use a wide range of substrates. A revolving mask system enables, in a single reactor load, to deposit shapes of controlled heights, which overlap to build up a complex pattern. Interferential multi-coloured deposits are achieved, and the process limitations (available colours and resolution) are discussed.

  13. Chemical vapour deposition synthetic diamond: materials, technology and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balmer, R. S.; Brandon, J. R.; Clewes, S. L.; Dhillon, H. K.; Dodson, J. M.; Friel, I.; Inglis, P. N.; Madgwick, T. D.; Markham, M. L.; Mollart, T. P.; Perkins, N.; Scarsbrook, G. A.; Twitchen, D. J.; Whitehead, A. J.; Wilman, J. J.; Woollard, S. M.

    2009-09-01

    Substantial developments have been achieved in the synthesis of chemical vapour deposition (CVD) diamond in recent years, providing engineers and designers with access to a large range of new diamond materials. CVD diamond has a number of outstanding material properties that can enable exceptional performance in applications as diverse as medical diagnostics, water treatment, radiation detection, high power electronics, consumer audio, magnetometry and novel lasers. Often the material is synthesized in planar form; however, non-planar geometries are also possible and enable a number of key applications. This paper reviews the material properties and characteristics of single crystal and polycrystalline CVD diamond, and how these can be utilized, focusing particularly on optics, electronics and electrochemistry. It also summarizes how CVD diamond can be tailored for specific applications, on the basis of the ability to synthesize a consistent and engineered high performance product.

  14. Chemical vapour deposition synthetic diamond: materials, technology and applications.

    PubMed

    Balmer, R S; Brandon, J R; Clewes, S L; Dhillon, H K; Dodson, J M; Friel, I; Inglis, P N; Madgwick, T D; Markham, M L; Mollart, T P; Perkins, N; Scarsbrook, G A; Twitchen, D J; Whitehead, A J; Wilman, J J; Woollard, S M

    2009-09-01

    Substantial developments have been achieved in the synthesis of chemical vapour deposition (CVD) diamond in recent years, providing engineers and designers with access to a large range of new diamond materials. CVD diamond has a number of outstanding material properties that can enable exceptional performance in applications as diverse as medical diagnostics, water treatment, radiation detection, high power electronics, consumer audio, magnetometry and novel lasers. Often the material is synthesized in planar form; however, non-planar geometries are also possible and enable a number of key applications. This paper reviews the material properties and characteristics of single crystal and polycrystalline CVD diamond, and how these can be utilized, focusing particularly on optics, electronics and electrochemistry. It also summarizes how CVD diamond can be tailored for specific applications, on the basis of the ability to synthesize a consistent and engineered high performance product. PMID:21832327

  15. Photo Initiated Chemical Vapour Deposition To Increase Polymer Hydrophobicity

    PubMed Central

    Bérard, Ariane; Patience, Gregory S.; Chouinard, Gérald; Tavares, Jason R.

    2016-01-01

    Apple growers face new challenges to produce organic apples and now many cover orchards with high-density polyethylene (HDPE) nets to exclude insects, rather than spraying insecticides. However, rainwater- associated wetness favours the development of apple scabs, Venturia inaequalis, whose lesions accumulate on the leaves and fruit causing unsightly spots. Treating the nets with a superhydrophobic coating should reduce the amount of water that passes through the net. Here we treat HDPE and polyethylene terephthalate using photo-initiated chemical vapour deposition (PICVD). We placed polymer samples in a quartz tube and passed a mixture of H2 and CO through it while a UVC lamp (254 nm) illuminated the surface. After the treatment, the contact angle between water droplets and the surface increased by an average of 20°. The contact angle of samples placed 70 cm from the entrance of the tube was higher than those at 45 cm and 20 cm. The PICVD-treated HDPE achieved a contact angle of 124°. Nets spray coated with a solvent-based commercial product achieved 180° but water ingress was, surprisingly, higher than that for nets with a lower contact angle. PMID:27531048

  16. Long distance spin communication in chemical vapour deposited graphene

    PubMed Central

    Kamalakar, M. Venkata; Groenveld, Christiaan; Dankert, André; Dash, Saroj P.

    2015-01-01

    Graphene is an ideal medium for long-distance spin communication in future spintronic technologies. So far, the prospect is limited by the smaller sizes of exfoliated graphene flakes and lower spin transport properties of large-area chemical vapour-deposited (CVD) graphene. Here we demonstrate a high spintronic performance in CVD graphene on SiO2/Si substrate at room temperature. We show pure spin transport and precession over long channel lengths extending up to 16 μm with a spin lifetime of 1.2 ns and a spin diffusion length ∼6 μm at room temperature. These spin parameters are up to six times higher than previous reports and highest at room temperature for any form of pristine graphene on industrial standard SiO2/Si substrates. Our detailed investigation reinforces the observed performance in CVD graphene over wafer scale and opens up new prospects for the development of lateral spin-based memory and logic applications. PMID:25857650

  17. Long distance spin communication in chemical vapour deposited graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamalakar, M. Venkata; Groenveld, Christiaan; Dankert, André; Dash, Saroj P.

    2015-04-01

    Graphene is an ideal medium for long-distance spin communication in future spintronic technologies. So far, the prospect is limited by the smaller sizes of exfoliated graphene flakes and lower spin transport properties of large-area chemical vapour-deposited (CVD) graphene. Here we demonstrate a high spintronic performance in CVD graphene on SiO2/Si substrate at room temperature. We show pure spin transport and precession over long channel lengths extending up to 16 μm with a spin lifetime of 1.2 ns and a spin diffusion length ~6 μm at room temperature. These spin parameters are up to six times higher than previous reports and highest at room temperature for any form of pristine graphene on industrial standard SiO2/Si substrates. Our detailed investigation reinforces the observed performance in CVD graphene over wafer scale and opens up new prospects for the development of lateral spin-based memory and logic applications.

  18. Photo Initiated Chemical Vapour Deposition To Increase Polymer Hydrophobicity.

    PubMed

    Bérard, Ariane; Patience, Gregory S; Chouinard, Gérald; Tavares, Jason R

    2016-01-01

    Apple growers face new challenges to produce organic apples and now many cover orchards with high-density polyethylene (HDPE) nets to exclude insects, rather than spraying insecticides. However, rainwater- associated wetness favours the development of apple scabs, Venturia inaequalis, whose lesions accumulate on the leaves and fruit causing unsightly spots. Treating the nets with a superhydrophobic coating should reduce the amount of water that passes through the net. Here we treat HDPE and polyethylene terephthalate using photo-initiated chemical vapour deposition (PICVD). We placed polymer samples in a quartz tube and passed a mixture of H2 and CO through it while a UVC lamp (254 nm) illuminated the surface. After the treatment, the contact angle between water droplets and the surface increased by an average of 20°. The contact angle of samples placed 70 cm from the entrance of the tube was higher than those at 45 cm and 20 cm. The PICVD-treated HDPE achieved a contact angle of 124°. Nets spray coated with a solvent-based commercial product achieved 180° but water ingress was, surprisingly, higher than that for nets with a lower contact angle. PMID:27531048

  19. Carbon Nanotubes/Nanofibers by Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapour Deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teo, K. B. K.; Hash, D. B.; Bell, M. S.; Chhowalla, M.; Cruden, B. A.; Amaratunga, G. A. J.; Meyyappan, M.; Milne, W. I.

    2005-01-01

    Plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD) has been recently used for the production of vertically aligned carbon nanotubedfibers (CN) directly on substrates. These structures are potentially important technologically as electron field emitters (e.g. microguns, microwave amplifiers, displays), nanoelectrodes for sensors, filter media, superhydrophobic surfaces and thermal interface materials for microelectronics. A parametric study on the growth of CN grown by glow discharge dc-PECVD is presented. In this technique, a substrate containing thin film Ni catalyst is exposed to C2H2 and NH3 gases at 700 C. Without plasma, this process is essentially thermal CVD which produces curly spaghetti-like CN as seen in Fig. 1 (a). With the plasma generated by biasing the substrate at -6OOV, we observed that the CN align vertically during growth as shown in Fig. l(b), and that the magnitude of the applied substrate bias affects the degree of alignment. The thickness of the thin film Ni catalyst was found to determine the average diameter and inversely the length of the CN. The yield and density of the CN were controlled by the use of different diffusion barrier materials under the Ni catalyst. Patterned CN growth [Fig. l(c)], with la variation in CN diameter of 4.1% and 6.3% respectively, is achieved by lithographically defining the Ni thin film prior to growth. The shape of the structures could be varied from very straight nanotube-like to conical tip-like nanofibers by increasing the ratio of C2H2 in the gas flow. Due to the plasma decomposition of C2H2, amorphous carbon (a-C) is an undesirable byproduct which could coat the substrate during CN growth. Using a combination of depth profiled Auger electron spectroscopy to study the substrate and in-situ mass spectroscopy to examine gas phase neutrals and ions, the optimal conditions for a-C free growth of CN is determined.

  20. Chemically assisted vapour transport for bulk ZnO crystal growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santailler, Jean-Louis; Audoin, Claire; Chichignoud, Guy; Obrecht, Rémy; Kaouache, Belkhiri; Marotel, Pascal; Pelenc, Denis; Brochen, Stéphane; Merlin, Jérémy; Bisotto, Isabelle; Granier, Carole; Feuillet, Guy; Levy, François

    2010-11-01

    A chemically assisted vapour phase transport (CVT) method is proposed for the growth of bulk ZnO crystals. Thermodynamic computations have confirmed the possibility of using CO as a sublimation activator for enhancing the sublimation rate of the feed material in a large range of pressures (10 -3 to 1 atm) and temperatures (800-1200 °C). Growth runs in a specific and patented design yielded single ZnO crystals up to 46 mm in diameter and 8 mm in thickness, with growth rates up to 400 μm/h. These values are compatible with an industrial production rate. N type ZnO crystals ( μ=182 cm 2/(V s) and n=7 10 15 cm -3) obtained by this CVT method (Chemical Vapour Transport) present a high level of purity (10-30 times better than hydrothermal ZnO crystals), which may be an advantage for obtaining p-type doped layers ([Li] and [Al] <10 +15 cm -3). Structural (HR-XRD), defect density (EPD), electrical (Hall measurements) and optical (photoluminescence) properties are presented.

  1. TOPICAL REVIEW Charged nanoparticles in thin film and nanostructure growth by chemical vapour deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Nong-Moon; Lee, Dong-Kwon

    2010-12-01

    The critical role of charged nanoclusters and nanoparticles in the growth of thin films and nanostructures by chemical vapour deposition (CVD) is reviewed. Advanced nanoparticle detection techniques have shown that charged gas-phase nuclei tend to be formed under conventional processing conditions of thin films and nanostructures by thermal, hot-wire and plasma CVD. The relation between gas-phase nuclei and thin film and nanostructure growth has not been clearly understood. In this review it will be shown that many films and nanostructures, which have been believed to grow by individual atoms or molecules, actually grow by the building blocks of such charged nuclei. This new growth mechanism was revealed in an attempt to explain many puzzling phenomena involved in the gas-activated diamond CVD process. Therefore, detailed thermodynamic and kinetic analyses will be made to draw the conclusion that the well-known phenomenon of deposition of less stable diamond with simultaneous etching of stable graphite should be an indication of diamond growth exclusively by charged nuclei formed in the gas phase. A similar logic was applied to the phenomenon of simultaneous deposition and etching of silicon, which also leads to the conclusion that silicon films by CVD should grow mainly by the building blocks of charged nuclei. This new mechanism of crystal growth appears to be general in many CVD and some physical vapour deposition (PVD) processes. In plasma CVD, this new mechanism has already been utilized to open a new field of plasma-aided nanofabrication.

  2. Crystal growth of HfS 2 by chemical vapour transport with halogen (Cl, Br, I)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiechter, S.; Eckert, K.

    1988-05-01

    Single crystals of HfS 2 have been prepared by chemical vapour transport (CVT) with halogen. Depending on the transporting agent added, exergonic or endergonic transport was observed. Employing 0.5 mg/cm 3 chlorine or bromine in evacuated and sealed quartz ampoules, exergonic transport occurs. In a temperature gradient from 850 to 870 K transparent reddish-orange crystal platelets of pseudohexagonal shape (10×10×0.05 mm3) were obtained. Endergonic transport, found with iodine as transporting agent, first starts at higher temperatures (1270-1220 K). A thermochemical study of the vapour phase composition revealed that gaseous HfHal 4 and HfHal 3 ( Hal = Cl, Br) are responsible for the exergonic transport observed. Because of the higher stability of HfS 2 against iodine, CVT first starts at elevated temperatures. In the vapour phase Hfl and Hfl 2 dominate and effect a reversal of the transport direction.

  3. Chemical vapour deposition of thermochromic vanadium dioxide thin films for energy efficient glazing

    SciTech Connect

    Warwick, Michael E.A.; Binions, Russell

    2014-06-01

    Vanadium dioxide is a thermochromic material that undergoes a semiconductor to metal transitions at a critical temperature of 68 °C. This phase change from a low temperature monoclinic structure to a higher temperature rutile structure is accompanied by a marked change in infrared reflectivity and change in resistivity. This ability to have a temperature-modulated film that can limit solar heat gain makes vanadium dioxide an ideal candidate for thermochromic energy efficient glazing. In this review we detail the current challenges to such glazing becoming a commercial reality and describe the key chemical vapour deposition technologies being employed in the latest research. - Graphical abstract: Schematic demonstration of the effect of thermochromic glazing on solar radiation (red arrow represents IR radiation, black arrow represents all other solar radiation). - Highlights: • Vanadium dioxide thin films for energy efficient glazing. • Reviews chemical vapour deposition techniques. • Latest results for thin film deposition for vanadium dioxide.

  4. Surface melting of copper during graphene growth by chemical vapour deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pakhnevich, A. A.; Golod, S. V.; Prinz, V. Ya

    2015-11-01

    Evidence for the presence of a liquid phase on a copper surface during graphene growth by chemical vapour deposition at temperatures of 1000 and 1050 °C has been experimentally obtained. It was established that, first, the liquid phase forms a groove structure and bubble-like nanoobjects on the copper surface. Second, the liquid phase promotes the propagation of the wavy relief of a growing graphene film to the adjacent copper, and, third, the surface flows of the liquid phase can influence the waviness and orientation of the graphene islands. From the obtained data, it was concluded that surface melting plays an important role in graphene formation by chemical vapour deposition at temperatures below the melting point of copper.

  5. Growth of graphene films by plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baraton, Laurent; Gangloff, Laurent; Xavier, Stéphane; Cojocaru, Costel S.; Huc, Vincent; Legagneux, Pierre; Lee, Young Hee; Pribat, Didier

    2009-08-01

    Since it was isolated in 2004, graphene, the first known 2D crystal, is the object of a growing interest, due to the range of its possible applications as well as its intrinsic properties. From large scale electronics and photovoltaics to spintronics and fundamental quantum phenomena, graphene films have attracted a large community of researchers. But bringing graphene to industrial applications will require a reliable, low cost and easily scalable synthesis process. In this paper we present a new growth process based on plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. Furthermore, we show that, when the substrate is an oxidized silicon wafer covered by a nickel thin film, graphene is formed not only on top of the nickel film, but also at the interface with the supporting SiO2 layer. The films grown using this method were characterized using classical methods (Raman spectroscopy, AFM, SEM) and their conductivity is found to be close to those reported by others.

  6. Chemical vapour deposition growth and Raman characterization of graphene layers and carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Y.-C.; Rafailov, P. M.; Vlaikova, E.; Marinova, V.; Lin, S. H.; Yu, P.; Yu, S.-C.; Chi, G. C.; Dimitrov, D.; Sveshtarov, P.; Mehandjiev, V.; Gospodinov, M. M.

    2016-02-01

    Single-layer graphene films were grown by chemical vapour deposition (CVD) on Cu foil. The CVD process was complemented by plasma enhancement to grow also vertically aligned multiwalled carbon nanotubes using Ni nanoparticles as catalyst. The obtained samples were characterized by Raman spectroscopy analysis. Nature of defects in the samples and optimal growth conditions leading to achieve high quality of graphene and carbon nanotubes are discussed.

  7. Light induced chemical vapour deposition of titanium oxide thin films at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halary, E.; Benvenuti, G.; Wagner, F.; Hoffmann, P.

    2000-02-01

    High resolution patterned deposition of titania is achieved by light induced chemical vapour deposition (LICVD), by imaging a mask onto a glass substrate. A long pulse XeCl Excimer laser (308 nm) provides, by perpendicular irradiation, the energy to convert titanium tetraisopropoxide (TTIP) vapour into titanium dioxide films, in an oxygen atmosphere, on unheated glass substrates. The amorphous titania deposits contain about 6% carbon contamination according to X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements. The deposition rate increases with increasing laser fluence until a maximum value is reached, then remains constant over a wide range, and finally decreases with further fluence increase due to titania ablation or thermal effects. The film thickness increases linearly with the number of pulses after a nucleation period. The strong influence of the laser pulse repetition rate on the growth rate and the thickness profile are reported.

  8. Large gauge factor of hot wire chemical vapour deposition in-situ boron doped polycrystalline silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grech, David; Tarazona, Antulio; De Leon, Maria Theresa; Kiang, Kian S.; Zekonyte, Jurgita; Wood, Robert J. K.; Chong, Harold M. H.

    2016-04-01

    Polysilicon piezoresistors with a large longitudinal gauge factor (GF) of 44 have been achieved using in-situ boron doped hot-wire chemical vapour deposition (HWCVD). This GF is a consequence of a high quality p-type doped polysilicon with a crystal volume of 97% and an average grain size of 150 nm, estimated using Raman spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM) respectively. The measured minimum Hooge factor associated to the 1/f noise of the polysilicon piezoresistors is 1.4 × 10‑3. These results indicate that HWCVD polysilicon is a suitable piezoresistive material for micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) applications.

  9. Effect of process parameters on the chemical vapour synthesis of nanocrystalline titania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Md, Imteyaz Ahmad; Bhattacharya, S. S.

    2008-08-01

    In this investigation nanocrystalline titania powders were produced by the chemical vapour synthesis (CVS) route and characterized by standard techniques of XRD, HRTEM and BET. The effects of precursor/gas flow rates, hotwall temperature and system pressure on the particle size and distribution, as well as phase composition of the synthesized nanocrystalline titania powder, were studied. It was demonstrated that by suitably adjusting the process parameters during CVS it becomes possible to control the anatase crystallite size, specific surface area and the rutile content in the synthesized nanocrystalline titania powders.

  10. TOPICAL REVIEW: A review of plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition of carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyyappan, M.

    2009-11-01

    Plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD) has been widely discussed in the literature for the growth of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and carbon nanofibres (CNFs) in recent years. Advantages claimed include lower growth temperatures relative to thermal CVD and the ability to grow individual, free-standing, vertical CNFs instead of tower-like structures or ensembles. This paper reviews the current status of the technology including equipment, plasma chemistry, diagnostics and modelling, and mechanisms. Recent accomplishments include PECVD of single-walled CNTs and growth at low temperatures for handling delicate substrates such as glass.

  11. Giant spin Hall effect in graphene grown by chemical vapour deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balakrishnan, Jayakumar; Koon, Gavin Kok Wai; Avsar, Ahmet; Ho, Yuda; Lee, Jong Hak; Jaiswal, Manu; Baeck, Seung-Jae; Ahn, Jong-Hyun; Ferreira, Aires; Cazalilla, Miguel A.; Neto, Antonio H. Castro; Özyilmaz, Barbaros

    2014-09-01

    Advances in large-area graphene synthesis via chemical vapour deposition on metals like copper were instrumental in the demonstration of graphene-based novel, wafer-scale electronic circuits and proof-of-concept applications such as flexible touch panels. Here, we show that graphene grown by chemical vapour deposition on copper is equally promising for spintronics applications. In contrast to natural graphene, our experiments demonstrate that chemically synthesized graphene has a strong spin-orbit coupling as high as 20 meV giving rise to a giant spin Hall effect. The exceptionally large spin Hall angle ~0.2 provides an important step towards graphene-based spintronics devices within existing complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor technology. Our microscopic model shows that unavoidable residual copper adatom clusters act as local spin-orbit scatterers and, in the resonant scattering limit, induce transverse spin currents with enhanced skew-scattering contribution. Our findings are confirmed independently by introducing metallic adatoms-copper, silver and gold on exfoliated graphene samples.

  12. Chemical vapour deposition diamond coating on tungsten carbide dental cutting tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sein, H.; Ahmed, W.; Rego, C. A.; Jones, A. N.; Amar, M.; Jackson, M.; Polini, R.

    2003-10-01

    Diamond coatings on Co cemented tungsten carbide (WC-Co) hard metal tools are widely used for cutting non-ferrous metals. It is difficult to deposit diamond onto cutting tools, which generally have a complex geometry, using a single step growth process. This paper focuses on the deposition of polycrystalline diamond films onto dental tools, which possess 3D complex or cylindrical shape, employing a novel single step chemical vapour deposition (CVD) growth process. The diamond deposition is carried out in a hot filament chemical vapour deposition (HFCVD) reactor with a modified filament arrangement. The filament is mounted vertically with the drill held concentrically in between the filament coils, as opposed to the commonly used horizontal arrangement. This is a simple and inexpensive filament arrangement. In addition, the problems associated with adhesion of diamond films on WC-Co substrates are amplified in dental tools due to the very sharp edges and unpredictable cutting forces. The presence of Co, used as a binder in hard metals, generally causes poor adhesion. The amount of metallic Co on the surface can be reduced using a two step pre-treatment employing Murakami etching followed by an acid treatment. Diamond films are examined in terms of their growth rate, morphology, adhesion and cutting efficiency. We found that in the diamond coated dental tool the wear rate was reduced by a factor of three as compared to the uncoated tool.

  13. Comparison of laser-ablation and hot-wall chemical vapour deposition techniques for nanowire fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stern, E.; Cheng, G.; Guthrie, S.; Turner-Evans, D.; Broomfield, E.; Lei, B.; Li, C.; Zhang, D.; Zhou, C.; Reed, M. A.

    2006-06-01

    A comparison of the transport properties of populations of single-crystal, In2O3 nanowires (NWs) grown by unassisted hot-wall chemical vapour deposition (CVD) versus NWs grown by laser-ablation-assisted chemical vapour deposition (LA-CVD) is presented. For nominally identical growth conditions across the two systems, NWs fabricated at 850 °C with laser-ablation had significantly higher average mobilities at the 99.9% confidence level, 53.3 ± 5.8 cm2 V-1 s-1 versus 10.2 ± 1.9 cm2 V-1 s-1. It is also observed that increasing growth temperature decreases mobility for LA-CVD NWs. Transmission electron microscopy studies of CVD-fabricated samples indicate the presence of an amorphous In2O3 region surrounding the single-crystal core. Further, low-temperature measurements verify the presence of ionized impurity scattering in low-mobility CVD-grown NWs.

  14. Rational design of a binary metal alloy for chemical vapour deposition growth of uniform single-layer graphene.

    PubMed

    Dai, Boya; Fu, Lei; Zou, Zhiyu; Wang, Min; Xu, Haitao; Wang, Sheng; Liu, Zhongfan

    2011-01-01

    Controlled growth of high-quality graphene is still the bottleneck of practical applications. The widely used chemical vapour deposition process generally suffers from an uncontrollable carbon precipitation effect that leads to inhomogeneous growth and strong correlation to the growth conditions. Here we report the rational design of a binary metal alloy that effectively suppresses the carbon precipitation process and activates a self-limited growth mechanism for homogeneous monolayer graphene. As demonstrated by an Ni-Mo alloy, the designed binary alloy contains an active catalyst component for carbon source decomposition and graphene growth and a black hole counterpart for trapping the dissolved carbons and forming stable metal carbides. This type of process engineering has been used to grow strictly single-layer graphene with 100% surface coverage and excellent tolerance to variations in growth conditions. With simplicity, scalability and a very large growth window, the presented approach may facilitate graphene research and industrial applications. PMID:22045001

  15. Chemical vapour etching-based porous silicon and grooving: Application in silicon solar cells processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben Rabha, M.; Boujmil, M. F.; Saadoun, M.; Bessaïs, B.

    2005-06-01

    Sponge like porous silicon (PS) was formed by a simple and low cost chemical vapour etching (CVE) method and applied in polycrystalline silicon (mc-Si) solar cells processing. The CVE method consists of exposing Si wafers to HNO3/HF vapours. It was shown that 8 min of HNO3/HF CVE (volume ratio = 1/7) is sufficient to form optimized PS layers on the emitter of mc-Si cells. The CVE-based PS can simultaneously passivate the Si surface and serves as an effective antireflection coating (ARC). As a result, the reflectivity decreases by about 60% of its initial value and the internal quantum efficiency is improved, particularly in the short wavelength region. For acid vapours rich in HNO3 (HNO3/HF >1/4), the CVE method favours the formation of a (NH4)2SiF6 powder, which is highly soluble in water. These findings let us achieve anisotropic grooving that enables to groove mc-Si wafers locally and in depth using an adequate anti-acid mask. The CVE - based grooving technique was used to form buried metallic contacts on the rear and frontal surface of the Si wafer in order to improve the current collection in mc-Si solar cells. No alteration of the spectral response in the long wavelength range was observed in mc-Si cells with rear-buried contacts. Adjustments of theoretical spectral responses to experimental ones show an increase in the effective electron diffusion length (Ln), which was attributed to Al gettering (passivation) at grain boundaries and to the reduction of the effective thickness of the base of the cells.

  16. Structural Evolution of SiC Films During Plasma-Assisted Chemical Vapour Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Siye; Yan, Guanchao; Zhu, Xiaodong; Zhou, Haiyang

    2009-04-01

    Evolution of chemical bonding configurations for the films deposited from hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO) diluted with H2 during plasma assisted chemical vapour deposition is investigated. In the experiment a small amount of CH4 was added to adjust the plasma environment and modify the structure of the deposited films. The measurements of Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD) revealed the production of 6H-SiC embedded in the amorphous matrix without the input of CH4. As CH4 was introduced into the deposition reaction, the transition of 6H-SiC to cubic SiC in the films took place, and also the film surfaces changed from a structure of ellipsoids to cauliflower-like shapes. With a further increase of CH4 in the flow ratio, the obtained films varied from Si-C bonding dominant to a sp2/sp3 carbon-rich composition.

  17. Durability of silver nanoparticulate films within a silica matrix by flame assisted chemical vapour deposition for biocidal applications.

    PubMed

    Cook, Ian; Shee, David W; Foster, Howard A; Varghese, Sajnu

    2011-09-01

    Healthcare acquired infection (HCAI) rates have come under increasing scrutiny in recent years and been a major priority for health professionals in the UK and elsewhere. Of particular concern is the rise of so called 'superbugs', or those resistant to conventional antibiotics, such as Escherichia coli, Clostridium difficile and methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). The reasons for this rise are many and complex, but one important factor is bacterial survival rates on wards and other hospital areas. In this respect, nanostructured biocidal surfaces offer a potentially powerful weapon in the fight against HCAI. In addition to providing a toxic environment to a range of infectious disease-causing bacteria (while remaining harmless to human health), any potential bioactive coated surface is required to be durable enough to withstand regular hospital cleaning methods without a reduction in biocidal activity over time and be economically viable to mass produce. The flame assisted chemical vapour deposition (FACVD) of silver and silver/silica films offer a means of producing such surfaces. In this work, we report investigations into a wide range of experimental factors and parameters affecting film durability, including burner head design and relative water vapour content in the flame environment. The produced films were assessed in terms of durability (by scratch testing) and relative silver content using glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy (GDOES). PMID:22097580

  18. Chemical vapour deposition of zeolitic imidazolate framework thin films.

    PubMed

    Stassen, Ivo; Styles, Mark; Grenci, Gianluca; Gorp, Hans Van; Vanderlinden, Willem; Feyter, Steven De; Falcaro, Paolo; Vos, Dirk De; Vereecken, Philippe; Ameloot, Rob

    2016-03-01

    Integrating metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) in microelectronics has disruptive potential because of the unique properties of these microporous crystalline materials. Suitable film deposition methods are crucial to leverage MOFs in this field. Conventional solvent-based procedures, typically adapted from powder preparation routes, are incompatible with nanofabrication because of corrosion and contamination risks. We demonstrate a chemical vapour deposition process (MOF-CVD) that enables high-quality films of ZIF-8, a prototypical MOF material, with a uniform and controlled thickness, even on high-aspect-ratio features. Furthermore, we demonstrate how MOF-CVD enables previously inaccessible routes such as lift-off patterning and depositing MOF films on fragile features. The compatibility of MOF-CVD with existing infrastructure, both in research and production facilities, will greatly facilitate MOF integration in microelectronics. MOF-CVD is the first vapour-phase deposition method for any type of microporous crystalline network solid and marks a milestone in processing such materials. PMID:26657328

  19. Graphene growth from reduced graphene oxide by chemical vapour deposition: seeded growth accompanied by restoration.

    PubMed

    Chang, Sung-Jin; Hyun, Moon Seop; Myung, Sung; Kang, Min-A; Yoo, Jung Ho; Lee, Kyoung G; Choi, Bong Gill; Cho, Youngji; Lee, Gaehang; Park, Tae Jung

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the underlying mechanisms involved in graphene growth via chemical vapour deposition (CVD) is critical for precise control of the characteristics of graphene. Despite much effort, the actual processes behind graphene synthesis still remain to be elucidated in a large number of aspects. Herein, we report the evolution of graphene properties during in-plane growth of graphene from reduced graphene oxide (RGO) on copper (Cu) via methane CVD. While graphene is laterally grown from RGO flakes on Cu foils up to a few hundred nanometres during CVD process, it shows appreciable improvement in structural quality. The monotonous enhancement of the structural quality of the graphene with increasing length of the graphene growth from RGO suggests that seeded CVD growth of graphene from RGO on Cu surface is accompanied by the restoration of graphitic structure. The finding provides insight into graphene growth and defect reconstruction useful for the production of tailored carbon nanostructures with required properties. PMID:26961409

  20. High temperature stability of nanocrystalline anatase powders prepared by chemical vapour synthesis under varying process parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Md. Imteyaz; Fasel, Claudia; Mayer, Thomas; Bhattacharya, S. S.; Hahn, Horst

    2011-05-01

    Systematic variation in the high temperature stability of nanocrystalline anatase powders prepared by chemical vapour synthesis (CVS) using titanium (IV) isopropoxide under varying flow rates of oxygen and helium was obtained by progressively shifting the decomposition product from C 3H 6 to CO 2. The as-synthesised powders were characterised by high temperature X-ray diffraction (HTXRD), simultaneous thermo-gravimetric analyses (STA), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). It was observed that the anatase to rutile transformation temperature progressively increased for samples synthesised at higher O 2/He flow rate ratios. The improved anatase stability was attributed to the presence of incorporated carbon within the titania structure and confirmed by a high temperature carbon desorption peak.

  1. Chemical Vapour Deposition Graphene Radio-Frequency Field-Effect Transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Peng; Jin, Zhi; Guo, Jian-Nan; Pan, Hong-Liang; Liu, Xin-Yu; Ye, Tian-Chun; Wang, Hong; Wang, Guan-Zhong

    2012-05-01

    We report the dc and rf performance of graphene rf field-effect transistors, where the graphene films are grown on copper by using the chemical vapour deposition (CVD) method and transferred to SiO2/Si substrates. Composite materials, benzocyclobutene and atomic layer deposition Al2O3 are used as the gate dielectrics. The observation of n- and p-type transitions verifies the ambipolar characteristics in the graphene layers. While the intrinsic carrier mobility of CVD graphene is extracted to be 1200 cm2/V·s, the parasitic series resistances are demonstrated to have a serious impact on device performance. With a gate length of 1 μm and an extrinsic transconductance of 72 mS/mm, a cutoff frequency of 6.6 GHz and a maximum oscillation frequency of 8.8 GHz are measured for the transistors, illustrating the potential of the CVD graphene for rf applications.

  2. Elaboration of Bi 2Se 3 by metalorganic chemical vapour deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giani, A.; Al Bayaz, A.; Foucaran, A.; Pascal-Delannoy, F.; Boyer, A.

    2002-03-01

    For the first time, Bi 2Se 3 thin films were elaborated by metalorganic chemical vapour deposition (MOCVD) using trimethylbismuth (TMBi) and diethylselenium (DESe) as metalorganic sources. The MOCVD elaboration of Bi 2Se 3 was carried out in a horizontal reactor for a substrate temperature ( Tg) varying from 450°C to 500°C, a total hydrogen flow rate DT=3 l min -1, RVI/V ratio >14 and TMBi partial pressure lower than 1.10 -4 atm. By X-ray diffraction and SEM observation, we noticed the polycrystalline structure of the layers typical preferential c-orientation and confirm the hexagonal structure. The microprobe data indicate that the best stoichiometry of Bi 2Se 3 was achieved. These films always displayed n-type conduction, and the maximum value of thermoelectric power α was found to be close to -120 μV/K.

  3. Hot-wire chemical vapour deposition at low substrate temperatures for optoelectronic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakker, R.

    2010-09-01

    The need for large quantities of rapidly and cheaply produced electronic devices has increased rapidly over the past decades. The transistors and diodes that are used to build these devices are predominantly made of crystalline silicon. Since crystalline silicon is very expensive to produce on a large scale and cannot be directly deposited on plastic substrates, much research is being done on thin film amorphous or nanocrystalline semiconductors and insulators. Hot-wire chemical vapour deposition (HWCVD) is a novel, low cost, and convenient way to deposit these materials. The process can be controlled in such a way that specific chemical reactions take place and unwanted side reactions are minimized. It can easily be scaled up to produce large-area thin film electronics. Conventionally, plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD) is used to deposit semiconductors and inorganic dielectrics. Recently, HWCVD has been explored for fast deposition of such materials. An adaptation of HWCVD, initiated chemical vapour deposition (iCVD), offers the unique possibility of producing organic materials and polymers in a vacuum reactor, without the use of solvents. This technique was originally proposed at the Massachusetts institute of technology (MIT) by Prof. Karen Gleason. The iCVD process involves the creation of radicals by dissociation of a peroxide (a molecule with a ~O-O~ bond) by a heated wire in a vacuum reactor. This radical initiates a polymerization reaction of a vinyl (a molecule with a double carbon-carbon bond, ~C=C~) monomer at a substrate held at room temperature. This thesis describes a dedicated iCVD reactor for polymer deposition, installed at Utrecht University, along with a reactor with a cooled substrate holder in an existing HWCVD multi-chamber setup for low-temperature silicon nitride (SiNx) depositions. The most important features of these reactors are described and the characterization techniques are explained. This thesis contains four new

  4. Graphene growth from reduced graphene oxide by chemical vapour deposition: seeded growth accompanied by restoration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Sung-Jin; Hyun, Moon Seop; Myung, Sung; Kang, Min-A.; Yoo, Jung Ho; Lee, Kyoung G.; Choi, Bong Gill; Cho, Youngji; Lee, Gaehang; Park, Tae Jung

    2016-03-01

    Understanding the underlying mechanisms involved in graphene growth via chemical vapour deposition (CVD) is critical for precise control of the characteristics of graphene. Despite much effort, the actual processes behind graphene synthesis still remain to be elucidated in a large number of aspects. Herein, we report the evolution of graphene properties during in-plane growth of graphene from reduced graphene oxide (RGO) on copper (Cu) via methane CVD. While graphene is laterally grown from RGO flakes on Cu foils up to a few hundred nanometres during CVD process, it shows appreciable improvement in structural quality. The monotonous enhancement of the structural quality of the graphene with increasing length of the graphene growth from RGO suggests that seeded CVD growth of graphene from RGO on Cu surface is accompanied by the restoration of graphitic structure. The finding provides insight into graphene growth and defect reconstruction useful for the production of tailored carbon nanostructures with required properties.

  5. Graphene growth from reduced graphene oxide by chemical vapour deposition: seeded growth accompanied by restoration

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Sung-Jin; Hyun, Moon Seop; Myung, Sung; Kang, Min-A; Yoo, Jung Ho; Lee, Kyoung G.; Choi, Bong Gill; Cho, Youngji; Lee, Gaehang; Park, Tae Jung

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the underlying mechanisms involved in graphene growth via chemical vapour deposition (CVD) is critical for precise control of the characteristics of graphene. Despite much effort, the actual processes behind graphene synthesis still remain to be elucidated in a large number of aspects. Herein, we report the evolution of graphene properties during in-plane growth of graphene from reduced graphene oxide (RGO) on copper (Cu) via methane CVD. While graphene is laterally grown from RGO flakes on Cu foils up to a few hundred nanometres during CVD process, it shows appreciable improvement in structural quality. The monotonous enhancement of the structural quality of the graphene with increasing length of the graphene growth from RGO suggests that seeded CVD growth of graphene from RGO on Cu surface is accompanied by the restoration of graphitic structure. The finding provides insight into graphene growth and defect reconstruction useful for the production of tailored carbon nanostructures with required properties. PMID:26961409

  6. Ferromagnetic resonance of patterned chromium dioxide thin films grown by selective area chemical vapour deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durrant, C. J.; Jokubaitis, M.; Yu, W.; Mohamad, H.; Shelford, L. R.; Keatley, P. S.; Xiao, Gang; Hicken, R. J.

    2015-05-01

    A selective area chemical vapour deposition technique has been used to fabricate continuous and patterned epitaxial CrO2 thin films on (100)-oriented TiO2 substrates. Precessional magnetization dynamics were stimulated both electrically and optically, and probed by means of time-resolved Kerr microscopy and vector network analyser ferromagnetic resonance techniques. The dependence of the precession frequency and the effective damping parameter upon the static applied magnetic field were investigated. All films exhibited a large in-plane uniaxial anisotropy. The effective damping parameter was found to exhibit strong field dependence in the vicinity of the hard axis saturation field. However, continuous and patterned films were found to possess generally similar dynamic properties, confirming the suitability of the deposition technique for fabrication of future spintronic devices.

  7. Application of copper vapour lasers for controlling activity of uranium isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barmina, E. V.; Sukhov, I. A.; Lepekhin, N. M.; Priseko, Yu S.; Filippov, V. G.; Simakin, Aleksandr V.; Shafeev, Georgii A.

    2013-06-01

    Beryllium nanoparticles are generated upon ablation of a beryllium target in water by a copper vapour laser. The average size of single crystalline nanoparticles is 12 nm. Ablation of a beryllium target in aqueous solutions of uranyl chloride leads to a significant (up to 50 %) decrease in the gamma activity of radionuclides of the uranium-238 and uranium-235 series. Data on the recovery of the gamma activity of these nuclides to new steady-state values after laser irradiation are obtained. The possibility of application of copper vapour lasers for radioactive waste deactivation is discussed.

  8. Application of copper vapour lasers for controlling activity of uranium isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Barmina, E V; Sukhov, I A; Lepekhin, N M; Priseko, Yu S; Filippov, V G; Simakin, Aleksandr V; Shafeev, Georgii A

    2013-06-30

    Beryllium nanoparticles are generated upon ablation of a beryllium target in water by a copper vapour laser. The average size of single crystalline nanoparticles is 12 nm. Ablation of a beryllium target in aqueous solutions of uranyl chloride leads to a significant (up to 50 %) decrease in the gamma activity of radionuclides of the uranium-238 and uranium-235 series. Data on the recovery of the gamma activity of these nuclides to new steady-state values after laser irradiation are obtained. The possibility of application of copper vapour lasers for radioactive waste deactivation is discussed. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  9. Synthesis of Tin Nitride Sn x N y Nanowires by Chemical Vapour Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zervos, Matthew; Othonos, Andreas

    2009-09-01

    Tin nitride (Sn x N y ) nanowires have been grown for the first time by chemical vapour deposition on n-type Si(111) and in particular by nitridation of Sn containing NH4Cl at 450 °C under a steady flow of NH3. The Sn x N y nanowires have an average diameter of 200 nm and lengths ≥5 μm and were grown on Si(111) coated with a few nm’s of Au. Nitridation of Sn alone, under a flow of NH3 is not effective and leads to the deposition of Sn droplets on the Au/Si(111) surface which impedes one-dimensional growth over a wide temperature range i.e. 300-800 °C. This was overcome by the addition of ammonium chloride (NH4Cl) which undergoes sublimation at 338 °C thereby releasing NH3 and HCl which act as dispersants thereby enhancing the vapour pressure of Sn and the one-dimensional growth of Sn x N y nanowires. In addition to the action of dispersion, Sn reacts with HCl giving SnCl2 which in turn reacts with NH3 leading to the formation of Sn x N y NWs. A first estimate of the band-gap of the Sn x N y nanowires grown on Si(111) was obtained from optical reflection measurements and found to be ≈2.6 eV. Finally, intricate assemblies of nanowires were also obtained at lower growth temperatures.

  10. Vapour and Liquid-Phase Artemisia annua Essential Oil Activities against Several Clinical Strains of Candida.

    PubMed

    Santomauro, Francesca; Donato, Rosa; Sacco, Cristiana; Pini, Gabriella; Flamini, Guido; Bilia, Anna Rita

    2016-07-01

    Candida spp. are often the cause of infection in immune-compromised individuals. They are characterized by a strong resistance to antimicrobial drugs and disinfectants. The activity of Artemisia annua essential oil against Candida spp. was determined by vapour contact and microdilution assay. The oil was characterized by the presence of oxygenated monoterpenes (more than 75 % of the constituents), mainly represented by the irregular monoterpene artemisia ketone (ca. 22 %), and the widespread monoterpenes 1,8 cineole (ca. 19 %) and camphor (ca. 17 %). Other representative constituents were artemisia alcohol (5.9 %), α-pinene (5.7 %), and pinocarvone (3.0 %). Thujone, a typical toxic constituent of the Artemisia species, was not detected. The results are reported as minimum inhibitory concentration, minimum fungicidal concentration, and diameter of inhibition zone obtained by the vapour diffusion assay. We tested 10 clinical Candida strains, coming from both clinical samples and international collections. The results show that the antifungal activity of A. annua is influenced by the type of method adopted. The inhibitory action of the essential oil was, in fact, higher in the vapour than in the liquid phase. Our results show an average minimum inhibitory concentration in the liquid phase of 11.88 µL/mL, while in the vapour phase, the growth of all Candida strains tested at a concentration of 2.13 µL/cm(3) was inhibited. A strain of Candida glabrata was found to be less susceptible to the liquid medium than the vapour assay (50 µL/mL vs. 0.64 µL/cm(3), respectively). Candida albicans and Candida dubliniensis were the most susceptible to the vapour test, while Candida parapsilosis was the most resistant. PMID:27286334

  11. Fluorinated carboxylic membranes deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition for fuel cell applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thery, J.; Martin, S.; Faucheux, V.; Le Van Jodin, L.; Truffier-Boutry, D.; Martinent, A.; Laurent, J.-Y.

    Among the fuel cell technologies, the polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) are particularly promising because they are energy-efficient, clean, and fuel-flexible (i.e., can use hydrogen or methanol). The great majority of PEM fuel cells rely on a polymer electrolyte from the family of perfluorosulfonic acid membranes, nevertheless alternative materials are currently being developed, mainly to offer the alternative workout techniques which are required for the portable energy sources. Plasma polymerization represents a good solution, as it offers the possibility to deposit thin layer with an accurate and homogeneous thickness, even on 3D surfaces. In this paper, we present the results for the growth of proton conductive fluoro carboxylic membranes elaborated by plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition. These membranes present conductivity values of the same order than the one of Nafion ®. The properties of the membrane, such as the chemical composition, the ionic conductivity, the swelling behaviour and the permeability were correlated to the plasma process parameters. The membranes were integrated in fuel cells on porous substrates and we present here the results regarding the barrier effect and the power output. Barrier effect similar to those of 40 μm Nafion ® layers was reached for 10 μm thick carboxylic membranes. Power outputs around 3 mW cm -2 were measured. We discuss the results regarding the gas barrier effect and the power outputs.

  12. Characterisation of TiO 2 deposited by photo-induced chemical vapour deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaliwoh, Never; Zhang, Jun-Ying; Boyd, Ian W.

    2002-01-01

    We report the deposition of thin TiO 2 films on crystalline Si and quartz by photo-induced chemical vapour deposition (CVD) using UV excimer lamps employing a dielectric barrier discharge in krypton chloride (KrCl ∗) to provide intense narrow band radiation at λ=222 nm. The precursor used was titanium isopropoxide (TTIP). Films from around 20-510 nm in thickness with refractive indices from 2.20 to 2.54 were grown at temperatures between 50 and 350 °C. The higher refractive index values compare favourably with the value of 2.58 recorded for the bulk material. The measured deposition rate was around 50 nm/min at 350 °C. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) revealed the presence of TiO 2 through the observation of a Ti-O absorption peak and the absence of OH in films deposited at 250-350 °C indicated relatively good quality films. The phase of films deposited at 200-350 °C was anatase as determined by X-ray diffraction.

  13. Control and characterization of individual grains and grain boundaries in graphene grown by chemical vapour deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Qingkai; Jauregui, Luis A.; Wu, Wei; Colby, Robert; Tian, Jifa; Su, Zhihua; Cao, Helin; Liu, Zhihong; Pandey, Deepak; Wei, Dongguang; Chung, Ting Fung; Peng, Peng; Guisinger, Nathan P.; Stach, Eric A.; Bao, Jiming; Pei, Shin-Shem; Chen, Yong P.

    2011-06-01

    The strong interest in graphene has motivated the scalable production of high-quality graphene and graphene devices. As the large-scale graphene films synthesized so far are typically polycrystalline, it is important to characterize and control grain boundaries, generally believed to degrade graphene quality. Here we study single-crystal graphene grains synthesized by ambient chemical vapour deposition on polycrystalline Cu, and show how individual boundaries between coalescing grains affect graphene’s electronic properties. The graphene grains show no definite epitaxial relationship with the Cu substrate, and can cross Cu grain boundaries. The edges of these grains are found to be predominantly parallel to zigzag directions. We show that grain boundaries give a significant Raman ‘D’ peak, impede electrical transport, and induce prominent weak localization indicative of intervalley scattering in graphene. Finally, we demonstrate an approach using pre-patterned growth seeds to control graphene nucleation, opening a route towards scalable fabrication of single-crystal graphene devices without grain boundaries.

  14. The augmented saddle field discharge characteristics and its applications for plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Johnson; Yeghikyan, Davit; Kherani, Nazir P.

    2013-04-07

    A high ion flux parallel electrode plasma is proposed and studied in its DC configuration. By cascading a diode source region which supplies electrons and a saddle field region where these seed electrons are energized and amplified, the energy of ion bombardment on the substrate can be decoupled from the plasma density. The sufficiently large density of electrons and holes in the vicinity of the substrate raises the possibility to perform plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition on insulating materials, at low sheath voltages (around 40 V in the configuration studied), at low temperatures in which the surface mobility of film growth species may be provided by the bombardment of moderate energy ions. As a benchmarking exercise, experiments are carried out on silane discharge characteristics and deposition of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) on both silicon wafer and glass. The films grown at low anode voltages have excellent microstructures with predominantly monohydride bonds, sharp band tails, but relatively high integrated defect density in the mid 10{sup 16}/cm{sup 3} range for the particular substrate temperature of 180 Degree-Sign C, indicating that further optimizations are necessary if the electrode configuration is to be used to create a-Si:H devices.

  15. Chemical Vapour Deposition of Graphene with Re-useable Pt and Cu substrates for Flexible Electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karamat, Shumaila; Sonusen, Selda; Celik, Umit; Uysalli, Yigit; Oral, Ahmet

    2015-03-01

    Graphene has gained the attention of scientific world due to its outstanding physical properties. The future demand of flexible electronics such as solar cells, light emitting diodes, photo-detectors and touch screen technology requires more exploration of graphene properties on flexible substrates. The most interesting application of graphene is in organic light emitting diodes (OLED) where efforts are in progress to replace brittle indium tin oxide (ITO) electrode with a flexible graphene electrode because ITO raw materials are becoming increasingly expensive, and its brittle nature makes it unsuitable for flexible devices. In this work, we grow graphene on Pt and Cu substrates using chemical vapour deposition (CVD) and transferred it to a polymer material (PVA) using lamination technique. We used hydrogen bubbling method for separating graphene from Pt and Cu catalyst to reuse the substrates many times. After successful transfer of graphene on polymer samples, we checked the resistivity values of the graphene sheet which varies with growth conditions. Furthermore, Raman, atomic force microscopy (AFM), I-V and Force-displacement measurements will be presented for these samples.

  16. Quantum Hall resistance standards from graphene grown by chemical vapour deposition on silicon carbide

    PubMed Central

    Lafont, F.; Ribeiro-Palau, R.; Kazazis, D.; Michon, A.; Couturaud, O.; Consejo, C.; Chassagne, T.; Zielinski, M.; Portail, M.; Jouault, B.; Schopfer, F.; Poirier, W.

    2015-01-01

    Replacing GaAs by graphene to realize more practical quantum Hall resistance standards (QHRS), accurate to within 10−9 in relative value, but operating at lower magnetic fields than 10 T, is an ongoing goal in metrology. To date, the required accuracy has been reported, only few times, in graphene grown on SiC by Si sublimation, under higher magnetic fields. Here, we report on a graphene device grown by chemical vapour deposition on SiC, which demonstrates such accuracies of the Hall resistance from 10 T up to 19 T at 1.4 K. This is explained by a quantum Hall effect with low dissipation, resulting from strongly localized bulk states at the magnetic length scale, over a wide magnetic field range. Our results show that graphene-based QHRS can replace their GaAs counterparts by operating in as-convenient cryomagnetic conditions, but over an extended magnetic field range. They rely on a promising hybrid and scalable growth method and a fabrication process achieving low-electron-density devices. PMID:25891533

  17. Interface study between nanostructured tantalum nitride films and carbon nanotubes grown by chemical vapour deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchet-Fabre, B.; Pinault, M.; Foy, E.; Hugon, M. C.; Minéa, T.; Mayne-L'Hermite, M.

    2014-10-01

    We present the role of nitrogen content in tantalum nitride ultra-thin buffers, on the carbon nanotubes (CNTs) growth by chemical vapour deposition at 850 °C, assisted by ferrocene as catalyst source. Tantalum nitride (TaNx) films with a very large range of concentration x = [0, 1.8] and various nanostructures, from amorphous Ta(N) to Ta3N5, were deposited by Highly Pulsed Plasma Magnetron Sputtering. The buffer films are characterized after heat treatment at 850 °C, and after the CNT growth, by wide angle X-ray scattering in grazing incidence and scanning electron microscopy. The CNT diameter explored by transition electron microscopy shows an all-out value for under stoichiometric thin films (Ta1-N1-δ, Ta3-N5-δ) and a minimum value just above the stoichiometric phases (Ta1-N1+δ, Ta3-N5+δ). Firstly one shows that the buffer films under the heat treatment present surface modification highly dependent on their initial state, which influences the catalyst particles diffusion. Secondly at the stoichiometric TaN phase we show that a specific ternary phase FeTa2O6 is formed at the interface CNT/buffer, not present in the other cases, leading to a special CNT growth condition.

  18. Alumina coating on dense tungsten powder by fluidized bed metal organic chemical vapour deposition.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Philippe; Caussat, Brigitte; Ablitzer, Carine; Iltis, Xavière; Brothier, Meryl

    2011-09-01

    In order to study the feasibility of coating very dense powders by alumina using Fluidized Bed Metal Organic Chemical Vapour Deposition (FB-MOCVD), experiments were performed on a commercial tungsten powder, 75 microm in median volume diameter and 19,300 kg/m3 in grain density. The first part of the work was dedicated to the experimental study of the tungsten powder fluidization using argon as carrier gas at room temperature and at 400 degrees C. Due to the very high density of the tungsten powder, leading to low initial fixed bed heights and low bed expansions, different weights of powder were tested in order to reach satisfactory temperature profiles along the fluidized bed. Then, using argon as a fluidized bed former and aluminium acetylacetonate Al(C5O2H7)3 as a single source precursor, alumina thin films were deposited on tungsten particles at a low temperature range (e.g., 370-420 degrees C) by FB-MOCVD. The influence of the weight of powder, bed temperature and run duration was studied. Characterizations of the obtained samples were performed by various techniques including scanning electron microscopy (SEM) coupled with Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS) analyses, Field Emission Gun SEM (FEG-SEM) and Fourier Transform InfraRed (FT-IR) spectroscopy. The different analyses indicated that tungsten particles were uniformly coated by a continuous alumina thin film. The thickness of the film ranged between 25 and 80 nm, depending on the coating conditions. The alumina thin films were amorphous and contained carbon contamination. This latter may correspond to the adsorption of species resulting from incomplete decomposition of the precursor at so low deposition temperature. PMID:22097534

  19. The Role of Plasma in Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapour Deposition of Nanostructure Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hash, David B.; Meyyappan, M.; Teo, Kenneth B. K.; Lacerda, Rodrigo G.; Rupesinghe, Nalin L.

    2004-01-01

    Chemical vapour deposition (CVD) has become the preferred process for high yield growth of carbon nanotubes and nanofibres because of its ability to pattern growth through lithographic positioning of transition metal catalysts on substrates. Many potential applications of nanotubes such as field emitters [1] require not only patterned growth but also vertical alignment. Some degree of ali,ment in thermal CVD processes can be obtained when carbon nanotubes are grown closely together as a result of van der Waals interactions. The ali,onment however is marginal, and the van der Waals prerequisite makes growth of freestanding nanofibres with thermal CVD unrealizable. The application of electric fields as a means of ali,onment has been shown to overcome this limitation [2-5], and highly aligned nanostructures can be grown if electric fields on the order of 0.5 V/microns are employed. Plasma enhanced CVD in various configurations including dc, rf, microwave, inductive and electron cyclotron resonance has been pursued as a means of enabling alignment in the CVD process. However, the sheath fields for the non-dc sources are in general not sufficient for a high degree of ali,pment and an additional dc bias is usually applied to the growth substrate. This begs the question as to the actual role of the plasma. It is clear that the plasma itself is not required for aligned growth as references [3] and [4] employed fields through small applied voltages (3-20 V) across very small electrode spacings (10-100 microns) and thus avoided striking a discharge.

  20. Temporal Stability of Metal-Chloride-Doped Chemical-Vapour-Deposited Graphene.

    PubMed

    Kang, Moon H; Milne, William I; Cole, Matthew T

    2016-08-18

    Graphene has proven to be a promising material for transparent flexible electronics. In this study, we report the development of a transfer and doping scheme of large-area chemical vapour deposited (CVD) graphene. A technique to transfer the as-grown material onto mechanically flexible and optically transparent polymeric substrates using an ultraviolet adhesive (UVA) is outlined, along with the temporal stability of the sheet resistance and optical transparency following chemical doping with various metal chlorides (Mx Cly The sheet resistance (RS ) and 550 nm optical transparency (%T550 ) of the transferred un-doped graphene was 3.5 kΩ sq(-1) (±0.2 kΩ sq(-1) ) and 84.1 % (±2.9 %), respectively. Doping with AuCl3 showed a notable reduction in RS by some 71.4 % (to 0.93 kΩ sq(-1) ) with a corresponding %T550 of 77.0 %. After 200 h exposure to air at standard temperature and pressure, the increase in RS was found to be negligible (ΔRS AuCl3 =0.06 kΩ sq(-1) ), indicating that, of the considered Mx Cly species, AuCl3 doping offered the highest degree of time stability under ambient conditions. There appears a tendency of increasing RS with time for the remaining metal chlorides studied. We attribute the observed temporal shift to desorption of molecular dopants. We find that desorption was most significant in RhCl3 -doped samples whereas, in contrast, after 200 h in ambient conditions, AuCl3 -doped graphene showed only marginal desorption. The results of this study demonstrate that chemical doping of UVA-transferred graphene is a promising means for enhancing large-area CVD graphene in order to realise a viable platform for next-generation optically transparent and mechanically flexible electronics. PMID:27165783

  1. Evaluation of freestanding boron-doped diamond grown by chemical vapour deposition as substrates for vertical power electronic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Issaoui, R.; Achard, J.; Tallaire, A.; Silva, F.; Gicquel, A.; Bisaro, R.; Servet, B.; Garry, G.; Barjon, J.

    2012-03-01

    In this study, 4 × 4 mm2 freestanding boron-doped diamond single crystals with thickness up to 260 μm have been fabricated by plasma assisted chemical vapour deposition. The boron concentrations measured by secondary ion mass spectroscopy were 1018 to 1020 cm-3 which is in a good agreement with the values calculated from Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analysis, thus indicating that almost all incorporated boron is electrically active. The dependence of lattice parameters and crystal mosaicity on boron concentrations have also been extracted from high resolution x-ray diffraction experiments on (004) planes. The widths of x-ray rocking curves have globally shown the high quality of the material despite a substantial broadening of the peak, indicating a decrease of structural quality with increasing boron doping levels. Finally, the suitability of these crystals for the development of vertical power electronic devices has been confirmed by four-point probe measurements from which electrical resistivities as low as 0.26 Ω cm have been obtained.

  2. Vapour breakthrough behaviour of carbon tetrachloride - A simulant for chemical warfare agent on ASZMT carbon: A comparative study with whetlerite carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Avanish Kumar; Shah, Dilip K.; Mahato, T. H.; Roy, A.; Yadav, S. S.; Srivas, S. K.; Singh, Beer

    2013-06-01

    ASZMT and whetlerite carbon was prepared by impregnation of active carbon with ammonical salts of Cu (II), Ag (I), Zn (II), Mo (VI), TEDA and Cu (II), Ag (I), Cr (VI), NaOH, C5H5N respectively using incipient wetness technique. Thereafter, impregnated carbon systems were characterized using scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray, atomic absorption spectroscopy, thermogravimetry and surface characterization techniques. Impregnated carbon systems were evaluated under dynamic conditions against carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) vapour that was used as a simulant for the persistent chemical warfare agents for testing breakthrough times of filter cartridges and canisters of gas masks in the national approval test of respirators. The protective potential of ASZMT carbon was compared with the whetlerite carbon which is presently used in NBC filtration system. The effect of CCl4 concentration, test flow rate, temperature and relative humidity on the breakthrough behaviour of the impregnated carbon systems has also been studied. The study clearly indicated that the whetlerite carbon possessed breakthrough time greater than ASZMT carbon. However, ASZMT carbon provided adequate protection against CCl4 vapours and can be used as an alternative to whetlerite carbon that contain Cr(VI), which is reported to be carcinogenic and having lesser shelf life. The study indicated the breakthrough time of impregnated carbon systems were found to decrease with the increase of the CCl4 concentration and flow rate. The variation in temperature and relative humidity did not significantly affect the breakthrough behaviour of impregnated carbon systems at high vapour concentration of CCl4 whereasbreak through time of impregnated carbon systems reduced by an increase of relative humidity at low CCl4 vapour concentration.

  3. Polycyclic organic material (POM) in urban air. Fractionation, chemical analysis and genotoxicity of particulate and vapour phases in an industrial town in Finland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyysalo, Heikki; Tuominen, Jari; Wickström, Kim; Skyttä, Eija; Tikkanen, Leena; Salomaa, Sisko; Sorsa, Marja; Nurmela, Tuomo; Mattila, Tiina; Pohjola, Veijo

    Polycyclic organic material (POM) was collected by high-volume sampling on filter and on XAD-2 resin from the air of a small industrial town in Finland. Concurrent chemical analysis and the assays for genotoxic activity were performed on the particulate and the vapour phases of ambient air POM and their chemical fractions. Furthermore, correlations between seasonal meteorological parameters and POM concentrations were studied to reveal characteristic POM profiles for various emission sources. The range of total POM concentrations varied from 115 to 380 ng m -3 in late spring and from 17 to 83 ng m -3 in early winter. No direct correlation of ambient POM was seen with the temperature, but rather with the wind direction from various emission sources. Especially the low molecular weight compounds were associated with wind direction from industrial sources. Genotoxic activity, as detected by the Ames Salmonella/microsome test and the SCE assay in CHO cells, was found not only in the paniculate phase samples but also in the vapour phase. The polar fractions of some of the samples showed genotoxic activity, and also direct mutagenicity was observed with both the assay systems; these facts support the significance of compounds other than conventional polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in the samples.

  4. Aerosol assisted chemical vapour deposition of gas sensitive SnO2 and Au-functionalised SnO2 nanorods via a non-catalysed vapour solid (VS) mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Vallejos, Stella; Selina, Soultana; Annanouch, Fatima Ezahra; Gràcia, Isabel; Llobet, Eduard; Blackman, Chris

    2016-01-01

    Tin oxide nanorods (NRs) are vapour synthesised at relatively lower temperatures than previously reported and without the need for substrate pre-treatment, via a vapour-solid mechanism enabled using an aerosol-assisted chemical vapour deposition method. Results demonstrate that the growth of SnO2 NRs is promoted by a compression of the nucleation rate parallel to the substrate and a decrease of the energy barrier for growth perpendicular to the substrate, which are controlled via the deposition conditions. This method provides both single-step formation of the SnO2 NRs and their integration with silicon micromachined platforms, but also allows for in-situ functionalization of the NRs with gold nanoparticles via co-deposition with a gold precursor. The functional properties are demonstrated for gas sensing, with microsensors using functionalised NRs demonstrating enhanced sensing properties towards H2 compared to those based on non-functionalised NRs. PMID:27334232

  5. Aerosol assisted chemical vapour deposition of gas sensitive SnO2 and Au-functionalised SnO2 nanorods via a non-catalysed vapour solid (VS) mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallejos, Stella; Selina, Soultana; Annanouch, Fatima Ezahra; Gràcia, Isabel; Llobet, Eduard; Blackman, Chris

    2016-06-01

    Tin oxide nanorods (NRs) are vapour synthesised at relatively lower temperatures than previously reported and without the need for substrate pre-treatment, via a vapour-solid mechanism enabled using an aerosol-assisted chemical vapour deposition method. Results demonstrate that the growth of SnO2 NRs is promoted by a compression of the nucleation rate parallel to the substrate and a decrease of the energy barrier for growth perpendicular to the substrate, which are controlled via the deposition conditions. This method provides both single-step formation of the SnO2 NRs and their integration with silicon micromachined platforms, but also allows for in-situ functionalization of the NRs with gold nanoparticles via co-deposition with a gold precursor. The functional properties are demonstrated for gas sensing, with microsensors using functionalised NRs demonstrating enhanced sensing properties towards H2 compared to those based on non-functionalised NRs.

  6. Aerosol assisted chemical vapour deposition of gas sensitive SnO2 and Au-functionalised SnO2 nanorods via a non-catalysed vapour solid (VS) mechanism.

    PubMed

    Vallejos, Stella; Selina, Soultana; Annanouch, Fatima Ezahra; Gràcia, Isabel; Llobet, Eduard; Blackman, Chris

    2016-01-01

    Tin oxide nanorods (NRs) are vapour synthesised at relatively lower temperatures than previously reported and without the need for substrate pre-treatment, via a vapour-solid mechanism enabled using an aerosol-assisted chemical vapour deposition method. Results demonstrate that the growth of SnO2 NRs is promoted by a compression of the nucleation rate parallel to the substrate and a decrease of the energy barrier for growth perpendicular to the substrate, which are controlled via the deposition conditions. This method provides both single-step formation of the SnO2 NRs and their integration with silicon micromachined platforms, but also allows for in-situ functionalization of the NRs with gold nanoparticles via co-deposition with a gold precursor. The functional properties are demonstrated for gas sensing, with microsensors using functionalised NRs demonstrating enhanced sensing properties towards H2 compared to those based on non-functionalised NRs. PMID:27334232

  7. Thin-Film Deposition of Metal Oxides by Aerosol-Assisted Chemical Vapour Deposition: Evaluation of Film Crystallinity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeuchi, Masahiro; Maki, Kunisuke

    2007-12-01

    Sn-doped In2O3 (ITO) thin films are deposited on glass substrates using 0.2 M aqueous and methanol solutions of InCl3(4H2O) with 5 mol % SnCl2(2H2O) by aerosol-assisted chemical vapour deposition under positive and negative temperature gradient conditions. The film crystallinity is evaluated by determining the film thickness dependence of X-ray diffraction peak height. When using aqueous solution, the ITO films grow with the same crystallinity during the deposition, but when using methanol solution, the preferred orientation of ITO changes during the deposition.

  8. Hair analysis as a useful procedure for detection of vapour exposure to chemical warfare agents: simulation of sulphur mustard with methyl salicylate.

    PubMed

    Spiandore, Marie; Piram, Anne; Lacoste, Alexandre; Josse, Denis; Doumenq, Pierre

    2014-06-01

    Chemical warfare agents (CWA) are highly toxic compounds which have been produced to kill or hurt people during conflicts or terrorist attacks. Despite the fact that their use is strictly prohibited according to international convention, populations' exposure still recently occurred. Development of markers of exposure to CWA is necessary to distinguish exposed victims from unexposed ones. We present the first study of hair usage as passive sampler to assess contamination by chemicals in vapour form. This work presents more particularly the hair adsorption capacity for methyl salicylate used as a surrogate of the vesicant sulphur mustard. Chemical vapours toxicity through the respiratory route has historically been defined through Haber's law's concentration-time (Ct) product, and vapour exposure of hair to methyl salicylate was conducted with various times or doses of exposure in the range of incapacitating and lethal Ct products corresponding to sulphur mustard. Following exposure, extraction of methyl salicylate from hair was conducted by simple soaking in dichloromethane. Methyl salicylate could be detected on hair for vapour concentration corresponding to about one fifth of the sulphur mustard concentration that would kill 50% of exposed individuals (LCt50). The amount of methyl salicylate recovered from hair increased with time or dose of exposure. It showed a good correlation with the concentration-time product, suggesting that hair could be used like a passive sampler to assess vapour exposure to chemical compounds. It introduces great perspectives concerning the use of hair as a marker of exposure to CWA. PMID:24817050

  9. Mosaic Structure Evolution in GaN Films with Annealing Time Grown by Metalorganic Chemical Vapour Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhi-Tao; Xu, Ke; Guo, Li-Ping; Yang, Zhi-Jian; Pan, Yao-Bo; Su, Yue-Yong; Zhang, Han; Shen, Bo; Zhang, Guo-Yi

    2006-05-01

    We investigate mosaic structure evolution of GaN films annealed for a long time at 800°C grown on sapphire substrates by metalorganic chemical vapour deposition by high-resolution x-ray diffraction. The result show that residual stress in GaN films is relaxed by generating edge-type threading dislocations (TDs) instead of screw-type TDs. Compared to as-grown GaN films, the annealed ones have larger mean twist angles corresponding to higher density of edge-type TDs but smaller mean tilt angles corresponding to lower density of screw-type TDs films. Due to the increased edge-type TD density, the lateral coherence lengths of the annealed GaN films also decrease. The results obtained from chemical etching experiment and grazing-incidence x-ray diffraction (GIXRD) also support the proposed structure evolution.

  10. Properties of MgB2 films grown at various temperatures by hybrid physical chemical vapour deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ke; Veldhorst, Menno; Lee, Che-Hui; Lamborn, Daniel R.; DeFrain, Raymond; Redwing, Joan M.; Li, Qi; Xi, X. X.

    2008-09-01

    A hybrid physical-chemical vapour deposition (HPCVD) system consisting of separately controlled Mg-source heater and substrate heater is used to grow MgB2 thin films and thick films at various temperatures. We are able to grow superconducting MgB2 thin films at temperatures as low as 350 °C with a Tc0 of 35.5 K. MgB2 films up to 4 µm in thickness grown at 550 °C have Jc over 106 A cm-2 at 5 K and zero applied field. The low deposition temperature of MgB2 films is desirable for all-MgB2 tunnel junctions and MgB2 thick films are important for applications in coated conductors.

  11. Growth of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) on metallic underlayers by diffusion plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition (DPECVD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, S. M.; Gangloff, L.

    2009-10-01

    Here, we demonstrate the low-temperature (480-612 °C) synthesis of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) on different metallic underlayers (i.e., NiV, Ir, Ag, Pt, W, and Ta) using diffusion (dc) plasma-enhanced (~20 W, -600 V) chemical vapour deposition (DPECVD). The catalyst used is bi-layered Fe/Al and the feedstock used is a mixture of C 2H 2 and NH 3 (1:4). The crucial component is the diffusion of radical ions and hydrogen generated such as H 2/H +/H 2+/NH 3+/CH 2+/C 2H 2+ (which are confirmed by in-situ mass spectroscopy) from the nozzle, where it is inserted for most effective plasma diffusion between a substrate and a gas distributor.

  12. Formation of a Si Si3N4 nanocomposite from plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition multilayer structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scardera, G.; Bellet-Amalric, E.; Bellet, D.; Puzzer, T.; Pink, E.; Conibeer, G.

    2008-07-01

    This work reports on the crystallization of α-Si3N4, β-Si3N4, and silicon in plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition silicon nitride films grown with SiH4 and NH3 at 400C and annealed at 1150C. Nanometric multilayer structures, composed of alternating layers of silicon nitride and silicon-rich nitride, were used as the starting material. The final product is a thin-film Si-Si3N4 nanocomposite. The formation of this composite is verified using glancing incidence X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy. Annealing investigations indicate that the multilayer structure plays a key role in the formation of this composite and for the relatively low temperature formation of α- and β-Si3N4 nanocrystals.

  13. Perfluorodecyltrichlorosilane-based seed-layer for improved chemical vapour deposition of ultrathin hafnium dioxide films on graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitzmann, Julia; Göritz, Alexander; Fraschke, Mirko; Lukosius, Mindaugas; Wenger, Christian; Wolff, Andre; Lupina, Grzegorz

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the use of perfluorodecyltrichlorosilane-based self-assembled monolayer as seeding layer for chemical vapour deposition of HfO2 on large area CVD graphene. The deposition and evolution of the FDTS-based seed layer is investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Auger electron spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. Crystalline quality of graphene transferred from Cu is monitored during formation of the seed layer as well as the HfO2 growth using Raman spectroscopy. We demonstrate that FDTS-based seed layer significantly improves nucleation of HfO2 layers so that graphene can be coated in a conformal way with HfO2 layers as thin as 10 nm. Proof-of-concept experiments on 200 mm wafers presented here validate applicability of the proposed approach to wafer scale graphene device fabrication.

  14. Growth of large size diamond single crystals by plasma assisted chemical vapour deposition: Recent achievements and remaining challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tallaire, Alexandre; Achard, Jocelyn; Silva, François; Brinza, Ovidiu; Gicquel, Alix

    2013-02-01

    Diamond is a material with outstanding properties making it particularly suited for high added-value applications such as optical windows, power electronics, radiation detection, quantum information, bio-sensing and many others. Tremendous progresses in its synthesis by microwave plasma assisted chemical vapour deposition have allowed obtaining single crystal optical-grade material with thicknesses of up to a few millimetres. However the requirements in terms of size, purity and crystalline quality are getting more and more difficult to achieve with respect to the forecasted applications, thus pushing the synthesis method to its scientific and technological limits. In this paper, after a short description of the operating principles of the growth technique, the challenges of increasing crystal dimensions both laterally and vertically, decreasing and controlling point and extended defects as well as modulating crystal conductivity by an efficient doping will be detailed before offering some insights into ways to overcome them.

  15. Construction of conductive multilayer films of biogenic triangular gold nanoparticles and their application in chemical vapour sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Amit; Chaudhari, Minakshi; Sastry, Murali

    2006-05-01

    Metal nanoparticles are interesting building blocks for realizing films for a number of applications that include bio- and chemical sensing. To date, spherical metal nanoparticles have been used to generate functional electrical coatings. In this paper we demonstrate the synthesis of electrically conductive coatings using biologically prepared gold nanotriangles as the building blocks. The gold nanotriangles are prepared by the reduction of aqueous chloroaurate ions using an extract of the lemongrass plant (Cymbopogon flexuosus) which are thereafter assembled onto a variety of substrates by simple solution casting. The conductivity of the film shows a drastic fall upon mild heat treatment, leading to the formation of electrically conductive thin films of nanoparticles. We have also investigated the possibility of using the gold nanotriangle films in vapour sensing. A large fall in film resistance is observed upon exposure to polar molecules such as methanol, while little change occurs upon exposure to weakly polar molecules such as chloroform.

  16. Laser-induced etching of few-layer graphene synthesized by Rapid-Chemical Vapour Deposition on Cu thin films.

    PubMed

    Piazzi, Marco; Croin, Luca; Vittone, Ettore; Amato, Giampiero

    2012-12-01

    The outstanding electrical and mechanical properties of graphene make it very attractive for several applications, Nanoelectronics above all. However a reproducible and non destructive way to produce high quality, large-scale area, single layer graphene sheets is still lacking. Chemical Vapour Deposition of graphene on Cu catalytic thin films represents a promising method to reach this goal, because of the low temperatures (T < 950°C-1000°C) involved during the process and of the theoretically expected monolayer self-limiting growth. On the contrary such self-limiting growth is not commonly observed in experiments, thus making the development of techniques allowing for a better control of graphene growth highly desirable. Here we report about the local ablation effect, arising in Raman analysis, due to the heat transfer induced by the laser incident beam onto the graphene sample. PMID:23503582

  17. In situ growth rate measurements during plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition of vertically aligned multiwall carbon nanotube films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jönsson, M.; Nerushev, O. A.; Campbell, E. E. B.

    2007-08-01

    In situ laser reflectivity measurements are used to monitor the growth of multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) films grown by DC plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD) from an iron catalyst film deposited on a silicon wafer. In contrast to thermal CVD growth, there is no initial increase in the growth rate; instead, the initial growth rate is high (as much as 10 µm min-1) and then drops off rapidly to reach a steady level (2 µm min-1) for times beyond 1 min. We show that a limiting factor for growing thick films of multiwalled nanotubes (MWNTs) using PECVD can be the formation of an amorphous carbon layer at the top of the growing nanotubes. In situ reflectivity measurements provide a convenient technique for detecting the onset of the growth of this layer.

  18. Perfluorodecyltrichlorosilane-based seed-layer for improved chemical vapour deposition of ultrathin hafnium dioxide films on graphene.

    PubMed

    Kitzmann, Julia; Göritz, Alexander; Fraschke, Mirko; Lukosius, Mindaugas; Wenger, Christian; Wolff, Andre; Lupina, Grzegorz

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the use of perfluorodecyltrichlorosilane-based self-assembled monolayer as seeding layer for chemical vapour deposition of HfO2 on large area CVD graphene. The deposition and evolution of the FDTS-based seed layer is investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Auger electron spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. Crystalline quality of graphene transferred from Cu is monitored during formation of the seed layer as well as the HfO2 growth using Raman spectroscopy. We demonstrate that FDTS-based seed layer significantly improves nucleation of HfO2 layers so that graphene can be coated in a conformal way with HfO2 layers as thin as 10 nm. Proof-of-concept experiments on 200 mm wafers presented here validate applicability of the proposed approach to wafer scale graphene device fabrication. PMID:27381715

  19. Perfluorodecyltrichlorosilane-based seed-layer for improved chemical vapour deposition of ultrathin hafnium dioxide films on graphene

    PubMed Central

    Kitzmann, Julia; Göritz, Alexander; Fraschke, Mirko; Lukosius, Mindaugas; Wenger, Christian; Wolff, Andre; Lupina, Grzegorz

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the use of perfluorodecyltrichlorosilane-based self-assembled monolayer as seeding layer for chemical vapour deposition of HfO2 on large area CVD graphene. The deposition and evolution of the FDTS-based seed layer is investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Auger electron spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. Crystalline quality of graphene transferred from Cu is monitored during formation of the seed layer as well as the HfO2 growth using Raman spectroscopy. We demonstrate that FDTS-based seed layer significantly improves nucleation of HfO2 layers so that graphene can be coated in a conformal way with HfO2 layers as thin as 10 nm. Proof-of-concept experiments on 200 mm wafers presented here validate applicability of the proposed approach to wafer scale graphene device fabrication. PMID:27381715

  20. Chemical vapour deposition of undoped and spinel-doped cubic zirconia film using organometallic process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Yasutaka; Kawae, Takayuki; Nasu, Mineji

    1986-03-01

    Growth of undoped and spinel-doped ZrO 2 films on glass substrates by the vapour phase decomposition of zirconium t-butoxide (ZTB) was investigated. Undoped tetragonal and monoclinic ZrO 2 films were formed below and above 400°C, respectively. Cubic ZrO 2 films were grown when the ZrO 2 was doped with more than 5 mol% of spinel MgAl 2O 4. Magnesium aluminium isopropoxide MgAl 2 (O-i-Pr) 8 (MAI) was used as the dopant source of the spinel. The cubic films have a higher Vickers hardness than the monoclinic films by about 200-250 kg/mm 2, and are stable up to 800°C, above which they were transformed to the monoclinic phase. This is in contrast to the higher temperature stability of the spinel-doped zirconia powder with spinel content 6 mol% formed by hydrolysis of a isopropanol solution of mixed zirconium n-butoxide and MAI, where the tetragonal form of ZrO 2 was kept unchanged by annealing it up to about 1000°C. The difference is attributed to effect of surface energy control in the tetragonal powders which is absent in the cubic films produced by CVD.

  1. Seasonally-Active Water on Mars: Vapour, Ice, Adsorbate, and the Possibility of Liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, M. I.

    2002-12-01

    Seasonally-active water can be defined to include any water reservoir that communicates with other reservoirs on time scales of a year or shorter. It is the interaction of these water reservoirs, under the influence of varying solar radiation and in conjunction with surface and atmospheric temperatures, that determines the phase-stability field for water at the surface, and the distribution of water in various forms below, on, and above the surface. The atmosphere is the critical, dynamical link in this cycling system, and also (fortunately) one of the easiest to observe. Viking and Mars Global Surveyor observations paint a strongly asymmetric picture of the global seasonal water cycle, tied proximately to planetary eccentricity, and the existence of residual ice caps of different composition at the two poles. The northern summer experiences the largest water vapour columns, and is associated with sublimation from the northern residual water ice cap. The southern summer residual carbon dioxide ice cap is cold trap for water. Asymmetry in the water cycle is an unsolved problem. Possible solutions may involve the current timing of perihelion (the water cap resides at the pole experiencing the longer but cooler summer), the trapping of water ice in the northern hemisphere by tropical water ice clouds, and the bias in the annual-average, zonal-mean atmospheric circulation resulting from the zonal-mean difference in the elevation of the northern and southern hemispheres. Adsorbed and frozen water have proven harder to constrain. Recent Odyssey Gamma Ray Spectrometer results suggest substantial ground ice in the mid- and high-latitudes, but this water is likely below the seasonal skin depth for two reasons: the GRS results are best fit with such a model, and GCM models of the water cycle produce dramatically unrealistic atmospheric vapour distributions when such a very near surface, GRS-like distribution is initialized - ultimately removing the water to the northern and

  2. Well-controlled metal co-catalysts synthesised by chemical vapour impregnation for photocatalytic hydrogen production and water purification.

    PubMed

    Su, Ren; Forde, Michael M; He, Qian; Shen, Yanbin; Wang, Xueqin; Dimitratos, Nikolaos; Wendt, Stefan; Huang, Yudong; Iversen, Bo B; Kiely, Christopher J; Besenbacher, Flemming; Hutchings, Graham J

    2014-10-28

    As co-catalyst materials, metal nanoparticles (NPs) play crucial roles in heterogeneous photocatalysis. The photocatalytic performance strongly relies on the physical properties (i.e., composition, microstructure, and surface impurities) of the metal NPs. Here we report a convenient chemical vapour impregnation (CVI) approach for the deposition of monometallic-, alloyed, and core-shell structured metal co-catalysts onto the TiO2 photocatalyst. The as-synthesised metal NPs are highly dispersed on the support and show narrow size distributions, which suit photocatalysis applications. More importantly, the surfaces of the as-synthesised metal NPs are free of protecting ligands, enabling the photocatalysts to be ready to use without further treatment. The effect of the metal identity, the alloy chemical composition, and the microstructure on the photocatalytic performance has been investigated for hydrogen production and phenol decomposition. Whilst the photocatalytic H2 production performance can be greatly enhanced by using the core-shell structured co-catalyst (Pdshell-Aucore and Ptshell-Aucore), the Ptshell-Aucore modified TiO2 yields enhanced quantum efficiency but a reduced effective decomposition of phenol to CO2 compared to that of the monometallic counterparts. We consider the CVI approach provides a feasible and elegant process for the decoration of photocatalyst materials. PMID:24970298

  3. Anti-yeast activity of mentha oil and vapours through in vitro and in vivo (real fruit juices) assays.

    PubMed

    Tyagi, Amit Kumar; Gottardi, Davide; Malik, Anushree; Guerzoni, Maria Elisabetta

    2013-04-15

    The anti-yeast activity of mentha oil and vapours was evaluated against 8 food spoiling yeasts through disc diffusion, disc volatilisation and micro broth dilution method. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum fungicidal concentration (MFC) varied from 0.28 to 2.25 and 1.13 to 4.5 mg/ml, respectively. Furthermore, the anti-yeast efficacy of mentha oil alone and in combination with thermal treatment was evaluated in a real food system i.e. mixed fruit juices. The samples treated with a combination of mentha oil at the MIC, ½ MIC and ¼ MIC levels and thermal treatment enhanced the reduction viability. Chemical characterisation of mentha oil by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) revealed that the dominant compounds were cis-menthone (27.43%), menthol (24.3%), trans-menthone (9.23%), limonene (5.84%), menthofuran (4.44%) and isomenthol (3.21%). Present results established the superior performance of integrated treatment over individual exposure for fruit juice preservation. PMID:23199997

  4. Chemical Activities. Teacher Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borgford, Christie L.; Summerlin, Lee R.

    This sourcebook for chemical activities is designed to be used as a student laboratory book for both junior and senior high school students. The student's role as a knowledgeable consumer and informed citizen is stressed. Each activity includes a list of needed materials, procedures, reactions, questions, and notes for the teacher which include…

  5. Structural and Compositional Study of Graphene grown on SrTiO3 by Chemical Vapour Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karamat, Shumaila; Celik, Umit; Oral, Ahmet

    Graphene, a monolayer of sp2 bonded carbon atom, is considered as one of the most promising candidate materials for future electronics. The most critical step in graphene research is its transfer from the growth catalyst to the dielectric substrate, many unavoidable issues in the transfer process are: contamination from etchants, photoresist residues, wrinkles, and mechanical breakage. The direct growth of graphene on the substrates without using catalyst offer new opportunities in device fabrication without any transfer process. But till now, the field of direct graphene growth on dielectrics or insulating substrates is not mature like growth on metallic catalysts using CVD. We used chemical vapour deposition to grow graphene on SrTiO3 (110) substrates. The growth was carried out in presence of methane, argon and hydrogen. Raman Spectrum clearly showed the D and G peaks which were absent in bare substrate. XPS was used to get information about the presence of necessary elements, their bonding with STO substrates. AFM imaging clearly showed graphene island formation on substrates.

  6. Surface and Compositional Study of Graphene grown on Lithium Niobate (LiNbO3) substrates by Chemical Vapour Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karamat, Shumaila; Celik, Umit; Oral, Ahmet

    The diversity required in the designing of electronic devices motivated the community to always attempt for new functional materials and device structures. Graphene is considered as one of the most promising candidate materials for future electronics and carbon based devices. It is very exciting to combine graphene with new dielectric materials which exhibit multifunctional properties. Lithium Niobate exhibits ferro-, pyro-, and piezoelectric properties with large electro-optic, acousto-optic, and photoelastic coefficients as well as strong photorefractive and photovoltaic effects which made it one of the most extensively studied materials over the last 50 years. We used ambient pressure chemical vapour deposition to grow graphene on LiNbO3 substrates without any catalyst. The growth was carried out in presence of methane, argon and hydrogen. AFM imaging showed very unique structures on the surface which contains triangular domains. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was used to get information about the presence of necessary elements, their bonding with LiNbO3 substrates. Detailed characterization is under process which will be presented later.

  7. Plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition of silica onto Ti: Analysis of surface chemistry, morphology and functional hydroxyl groups

    PubMed Central

    Szili, Endre J.; Kumar, Sunil; Smart, Roger St. C.; Lowe, Rachel; Saiz, Eduardo; Voelcker, Nicolas H.

    2009-01-01

    Previously, we have developed and characterised a procedure for the deposition of thin silica films by a plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD) procedure using tetraethoxysilane (TEOS) as the main precursor. We have used the silica coatings for improving the corrosion resistance of metals and for enhancing the bioactivity of biomedical metallic implants. Recently, we have been fine-tuning the PECVD method for producing high quality and reproducible PECVD-silica (PECVD-Si) coatings on metals, primarily for biomaterial applications. In order to understand the interaction of the PECVD-Si coatings with biological species (such as proteins and cells), it is important to first analyse the properties of the silica films deposited using the optimised parameters. Therefore, this current investigation was carried out to analyse the characteristic features of PECVD-Si deposited on Ti substrates (PECVD-Si-Ti). We determined that the PECVD-Si coatings on Ti were conformal to the substrate surface, strongly adhered to the underlying substrate and were resistant to delamination. The PECVD-Si surface was composed of stoichiometric SiO2, showed a low carbon content (below 10 at.%) and was very hydrophilic (contact angle <10°). Finally, we also showed that the PECVD-Si coatings contain functional hydroxyl groups. PMID:19809536

  8. Chemical vapour deposition enhanced by atmospheric microwave plasmas: a large-scale industrial process or the next nanomanufacturing tool?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belmonte, T.; Gries, T.; Cardoso, R. P.; Arnoult, G.; Kosior, F.; Henrion, G.

    2011-04-01

    This paper describes several specific aspects of atmospheric plasma deposition carried out with a microwave resonant cavity. Deposition over a wide substrate is first studied. We show that high deposition rates (several hundreds of μm h-1) are due to localization of fluxes on the substrate by convection when slightly turbulent flows are used. Next, we describe possible routes to localize deposition over a nanometre-sized area. Scaling down atmospheric plasma deposition is possible and two strategies to reach nanometre scales are described. Finally, we study self-organization of SiO2 nanodots deposited by chemical vapour deposition at atmospheric pressure enhanced by an Ar-O2 micro-afterglow operating at high temperature (>1200 K). When the film being deposited is thin enough (~500 nm) nanodots are obtained and they can be assembled into threads to create patterned surfaces. When the coating becomes thicker (~1 µm), and for relatively high content in HMDSO, SiO2 walls forming hexagonal cells are obtained.

  9. Osteoconductive Potential of Barrier NanoSiO2 PLGA Membranes Functionalized by Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapour Deposition

    PubMed Central

    Terriza, Antonia; Vilches-Pérez, Jose I.; de la Orden, Emilio; Yubero, Francisco; Gonzalez-Caballero, Juan L.; González-Elipe, Agustin R.; Vilches, José; Salido, Mercedes

    2014-01-01

    The possibility of tailoring membrane surfaces with osteoconductive potential, in particular in biodegradable devices, to create modified biomaterials that stimulate osteoblast response should make them more suitable for clinical use, hopefully enhancing bone regeneration. Bioactive inorganic materials, such as silica, have been suggested to improve the bioactivity of synthetic biopolymers. An in vitro study on HOB human osteoblasts was performed to assess biocompatibility and bioactivity of SiO2 functionalized poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) membranes, prior to clinical use. A 15 nm SiO2 layer was deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD), onto a resorbable PLGA membrane. Samples were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). HOB cells were seeded on sterilized test surfaces where cell morphology, spreading, actin cytoskeletal organization, and focal adhesion expression were assessed. As proved by the FT-IR analysis of samples, the deposition by PECVD of the SiO2 onto the PLGA membrane did not alter the composition and other characteristics of the organic membrane. A temporal and spatial reorganization of cytoskeleton and focal adhesions and morphological changes in response to SiO2 nanolayer were identified in our model. The novedous SiO2 deposition method is compatible with the standard sterilization protocols and reveals as a valuable tool to increase bioactivity of resorbable PLGA membranes. PMID:24883304

  10. Low-temperature synthesis and characterization of helical carbon fibers by one-step chemical vapour deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Yongzhong; Chen, Jian; Fu, Qingshan; Li, Binghong; Zhang, Huazhi; Gong, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Helical carbon fibers (HCNFs) were synthesized by one-step chemical vapour deposition using cupric tartrate as a catalyst at temperature below 500 °C. The bound rubber of natural rubber (NR)/HCNFs were also prepared in this study. The results of thermogravimetry-differential scanning calorimetry (TG/DSC) for cupric tartrate nanoparticles show that the transformation of C4H4CuO6 → Cu reaction occurs at ∼250-310 °C. The characterization of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Raman spectrum for the synthesized products confirms that the synthesis of HCNFs is highly temperature-dependent. The straight fibers with the fiber diameter of 100-400 nm are obtained at 280 °C and HCNFs can be synthesized at higher temperature, with the coil diameter of 0.5-1 μm and fiber diameter of 100-200 nm at 380 °C, and the coil diameter of ∼100 nm and fiber diameter of ∼80 nm at 480 °C. The maximum of the bound-rubber content (37%) can be obtained with the addition of 100 wt.% HCNFs in NR, which indicates that the coiled configuration of HCNFs makes a noticeable contribution to the reinforcement of NR/CB system.

  11. Titania Coated Mica via Chemical Vapour Deposition, Post N-doped by Liquid Ammonia Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell, Michael J.; Parkin, Ivan P.

    TiO2 films were successfully grown on synthetic mica powders via Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD). The CVD rig is a cold-walled design that allows surface coverage of a powder to be successfully achieved. The TiO2 was produced by the reaction between TiCl4 and Ethyl Acetate. The powder produced could be successfully N-doped using post liquid ammonia treatment. The TiO2 powder produced could have potential applications in self-cleaning surfaces or antimicrobial paints.

  12. Strain and structure heterogeneity in MoS2 atomic layers grown by chemical vapour deposition

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Liu, Zheng; Amani, Matin; Najmaei, Sina; Xu, Quan; Zou, Xiaolong; Zhou, Wu; Yu, Ting; Qiu, Caiyu; Birdwell, A. Glen; Crowne, Frank J.; et al

    2014-11-18

    Monolayer molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) has attracted tremendous attention due to its promising applications in high-performance field-effect transistors, phototransistors, spintronic devices, and nonlinear optics. The enhanced photoluminescence effect in monolayer MoS2 was discovered and, as a strong tool, was employed for strain and defect analysis in MoS2. Recently, large-size monolayer MoS2 has been produced by chemical vapor deposition but has not yet been fully explored. Here we systematically characterize chemical vapor deposition grown MoS2 by PL spectroscopy and mapping, and demonstrate non-uniform strain in single-crystalline monolayer MoS2 and strain-induced band gap engineering. We also evaluate the effective strain transferred from polymermore » substrates to MoS2 by three-dimensional finite element analysis. In addition, our work demonstrates that PL mapping can be used as a non-contact approach for quick identification of grain boundaries in MoS2.« less

  13. Chemical vapour deposition of group-VIB metal dichalcogenide monolayers: engineered substrates from amorphous to single crystalline.

    PubMed

    Ji, Qingqing; Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Yanfeng; Liu, Zhongfan

    2015-05-01

    As structural analogues of graphene but with a sizeable band gap, monolayers of group-VIB transition metal dichalcogenides (MX2, M = Mo, W; X = S, Se, Te, etc.) have emerged as the ideal two dimensional prototype for exploring fundamental issues in physics such as valley polarization, and for engineering a wide range of nanoelectronic, optoelectronic and photocatalytic applications. Recently, chemical vapour deposition (CVD) was introduced as a more efficient preparation method than traditional chemical or physical exfoliation options, and has allowed for the successful synthesis of large-area MX2 monolayers possessing a large domain size, high thickness uniformity and continuity, and satisfactory crystal quality. This tutorial review therefore focuses on introducing the more recent advances in the CVD growth of MX2 (MoS2, WS2, MoS2(1-x)Se2xetc.) monolayers via the sulphurisation/decomposition of pre-deposited metal-based precursors, or the one-step reaction and deposition of gaseous metal and chalcogen feedstocks. Differences in growth behaviour caused by commonly used amorphous SiO2/Si, and newly adopted insulating single crystal substrates such as sapphire, mica and SrTiO3, are also comparatively presented. Also discussed are the essential parameters that influence the growth of MX2, such as the temperature, the source-substrate distance and the composition of the carrier gas (Ar/H2). Finally, an assessment is provided for viable future pathways for fine-tuning of the domain size and orientation, thickness uniformity, and the bandgap of MX2 and its alloys. PMID:25256261

  14. Nanofabrication using home-made RF plasma coupled chemical vapour deposition system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ong, Si Ci; Ilyas, Usman; Rawat, Rajdeep Singh

    2014-08-01

    Zinc oxide, ZnO, a popular semiconductor material with a wide band gap (3.37 eV) and high binding energy of the exciton (60 meV), has numerous applications such as in optoelectronics, chemical/biological sensors, and drug delivery. This project aims to (i) optimize the operating conditions for growth of ZnO nanostructures using the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method, and (ii) investigate the effects of coupling radiofrequency (RF) plasma to the CVD method on the quality of ZnO nanostructures. First, ZnO nanowires were synthesized using a home-made reaction setup on gold-coated and non-coated Si (100) substrates at 950 °C. XRD, SEM, EDX, and PL measurements were used for characterizations and it was found that a deposition duration of 10 minutes produced the most well-defined ZnO nanowires. SEM analysis revealed that the nanowires had diameters ranging from 30-100 mm and lengths ranging from 1-4 µm. In addition, PL analysis showed strong UV emission at 380 nm, making it suitable for UV lasing. Next, RF plasma was introduced for 30 minutes. Both remote and in situ RF plasma produced less satisfactory ZnO nanostructures with poorer crystalline structure, surface morphology, and optical properties due to etching effect of energetic ions produced from plasma. However, a reduction in plasma discharge duration to 10 minutes produced thicker and shorter ZnO nanostructures. Based on experimentation conducted, it is insufficient to conclude that RF plasma cannot aid in producing well-defined ZnO nanostructures. It can be deduced that the etching effect of energetic ions outweighed the increased oxygen radical production in RF plasma nanofabrication.

  15. Plasma and ion beam enhanced chemical vapour deposition of diamond and diamond-like carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Yongji

    WC-Co cutting tools are widely used in the machining industry. The application of diamond coatings on the surfaces of the tools would prolong the cutting lifetime and improves the manufacturing efficiency. However, direct chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of diamond coatings on WC-Co suffer from severe premature adhesion failure due to interfacial graphitization induced by the binder phase Co. In this research, a combination of hydrochloric acid (HCl) and hydrogen (H2) plasma pretreatments and a novel double interlayer of carbide forming element (CFE)/Al were developed to enhance diamond nucleation and adhesion. The results showed that both the pretreatments and interlayers were effective in forming continuous and adhesive nanocrystalline diamond coatings. The method is a promising replacement of the hazardous Murakami's regent currently used in WC-Co pretreatment with a more environmental friendly approach. Apart from coatings, diamond can be fabricated into other forms of nanostructures, such as nanotips. In this work, it was demonstrated that oriented diamond nanotip arrays can be fabricated by ion beam etching of as-grown CVD diamond. The orientation of diamond nanotips can be controlled by adjusting the direction of incident ion beam. This method overcomes the limits of other techniques in producing nanotip arrays on large areas with controlled orientation. Oriented diamond nano-tip arrays have been used to produce anisotropic frictional surface, which is successfully used in ultra-precision positioning systems. Diamond-like carbon (DLC) has many properties comparable to diamond. In this thesis, the preparation of alpha-C:H thin films by end-Hall (EH) ion source and the effects of ion energy and nitrogen doping on the microstructure and mechanical properties of the as-deposited thin films were investigated. The results have demonstrated that smooth and uniform alpha-C:H and alpha-C:H:N films with large area and reasonably high hardness and Young's modulus can be

  16. Piezoelectric effect in chemical vapour deposition-grown atomic-monolayer triangular molybdenum disulfide piezotronics

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Junjie; Lan, Yann-Wen; Stieg, Adam Z.; Chen, Jyun-Hong; Zhong, Yuan-Liang; Li, Lain-Jong; Chen, Chii-Dong; Zhang, Yue; Wang, Kang L.

    2015-01-01

    High-performance piezoelectricity in monolayer semiconducting transition metal dichalcogenides is highly desirable for the development of nanosensors, piezotronics and photo-piezotransistors. Here we report the experimental study of the theoretically predicted piezoelectric effect in triangle monolayer MoS2 devices under isotropic mechanical deformation. The experimental observation indicates that the conductivity of MoS2 devices can be actively modulated by the piezoelectric charge polarization-induced built-in electric field under strain variation. These polarization charges alter the Schottky barrier height on both contacts, resulting in a barrier height increase with increasing compressive strain and decrease with increasing tensile strain. The underlying mechanism of strain-induced in-plane charge polarization is proposed and discussed using energy band diagrams. In addition, a new type of MoS2 strain/force sensor built using a monolayer MoS2 triangle is also demonstrated. Our results provide evidence for strain-gating monolayer MoS2 piezotronics, a promising avenue for achieving augmented functionalities in next-generation electronic and mechanical–electronic nanodevices. PMID:26109177

  17. Metalorganic chemical vapour deposition of junction isolated GaAlAs/GaAs LED structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, R. R.; Ash, R. M.; Forbes, N. W.; Griffiths, R. J. M.; Jebb, D. P.

    1986-09-01

    A low-cost high-radiance Ga(1-x)Al(x)As/GaAs LED has been developed using p-n junction isolation to achieve current confinement in an inverted Burrus LED structure. Using this structure devices with a high internal quantum efficiency of 87 percent which launch up to 1.5 mW into 200-micron, 0.3 nA fiber at 150 mA and have rise and fall times of less than 5 ns, have been fabricated. The LED structure involved a two-stage growth process in which initially an n-type isolation layer was grown on a p-type substrate, followed by infill growth, through contact holes, of the inverted LED structure. This paper will describe in detail the growth and preparation of the optimized junction isolated LED structure, including growth rate and composition control, layer uniformity and deliberate interface grading. Exploration of the use of magnesium doping and triethylaluminum for precise control of active layer doping and composition will be discussed, and finally details of device characteristics and performance are presented.

  18. Rapid thermal low-pressure chemical vapour deposition of tungsten films onto InP using WF6 and H2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katz, A.; Feingold, A.; El-Roy, A.; Pearton, S. J.; Lane, E.; Nakahara, S.; Geva, M.

    1992-11-01

    Tungsten (W) films were deposited onto InP in a cold wall, rapid thermal low-pressure chemical vapour deposition (RT-LPCVD) reactor, from a tungsten hexafluoride (WF6) gas reduced by hydrogen (H2). W films of thickness 50-450 nm were deposited in the temperature range 350-550 degrees C, pressure range 0.5-4.5 Torr at deposition rates up to 4 nm s-1 with an apparent activation energy of about 1.12 eV. The film stress varied depending upon the deposition pressure, from low compressive for deposition at 0.5 Torr to moderate tensile for deposition at about 4.5 Torr. The films were aged at temperatures as high as 300 degrees C for about 800 h and exhibited an excellent mechanical stability. Post-deposition sintering of the W films at temperatures up to 600 degrees C led to reduction of the resistivity with a minimum value of about 55 mu Omega cm as a result of heating at 500 degrees C. Conditions for both selective and blanket deposition were defined, and a dry etching process for further geometrical definitions of the films was developed, providing etch rates of 40-50 nm min-1. This report reflects the first attempt to deposit W films onto III-V semiconductor at a very high rate by means of RT-LPCVD.

  19. a Study of Volatile Precursors for the Growth of Cadmium Sulphide and Cadmium Selenide by Metal Organic Chemical Vapour Deposition.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beer, Michael P.

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. The wide-band-gap semiconductors, cadmium sulphide and cadmium selenide, may be grown by Metal Organic Chemical Vapour Deposition (MOCVD). This method typically involves the reaction of gaseous streams of Me_2 Cd and H_2Y (Y = S, Se) over a heated substrate (usually gallium arsenide) on which the desired compound is grown as an epitaxial layer. Unfortunately, the precursors start to react in the cold zone of the reactor, that is before they reach the heated substrate. This problem is known as prereaction. The problem of prereaction is partially reduced by the use of adducts of dimethyl cadmium in place of the free dialkyl compound although the mechanism by which such adducts block prereaction is unknown. Accordingly, a study of adducts of dimethyl cadmium was undertaken with a view to determining their properties in all phases. The adduct of Me_2Cd with 2,2^ '-bipyridyl was found to be monomeric in the solid state while that with 1,4-dioxane, a volatile compound used for prereaction reduction, was found to be polymeric. A study of adducts in the gas phase using mass spectrometry and gas phase Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy gave no evidence to suggest there is any gas phase association between 1,4-dioxane and dimethyl cadmium. With the 2,2 ^'-bipyridyl adduct some evidence for partial retention of coordinate bonds upon sublimation was obtained. The solid adduct of Me _2Cd with N,N,N^' ,N^'-tetramethylethylenediamine (TMEDA) was prepared as it was hoped that the flexibility of the aliphatic Lewis base would permit the formation of an adduct containing strong co-ordinate bonds which would remain intact upon sublimation. Using gas phase electron diffraction, the structure of the adduct of Me_2Cd and TMEDA was determined. It was shown to exist in the gas phase purely as the associated monomeric species. The adduct was then employed for the growth of CdS and CdSe in an industrial MOCVD apparatus. The

  20. Chemical Engineering Division Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemical Engineering Education, 1978

    1978-01-01

    The 1978 ASEE Chemical Engineering Division Lecturer was Theodore Vermeulen of the University of California at Berkeley. Other chemical engineers who received awards or special recognition at a recent ASEE annual conference are mentioned. (BB)

  1. High-Quality Amorphous-Crystalline Silicon Heterostructures Using the Grid-Based Triode Radio-Frequency Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapour Deposition Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahtani, Pratish

    The amorphous-crystalline silicon heterojunction (SHJ) represents a new paradigm in crystalline silicon (c-Si) photovoltaics (PV). To achieve the 27% efficiency target for SHJ PV, defects in the silicon heterointerface must be minimized by growing high-quality hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) onto the c-Si surfaces without deposition-related damage. Typically, a-Si:H is deposited using radio-frequency (RF) plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD), which in its conventional configuration directly exposes the c-Si growth surface to the ignited plasma. In this thesis, silicon heterostructures prepared by the grid-based triode RF PECVD method is investigated for the first time. The triode method allows for high-quality a-Si:H growth with the c-Si surfaces shielded from any potential plasma damage. Using a custom-built configurable PECVD facility, a systematic study was conducted and it was demonstrated that the triode method affords the preparation of a-Si:H with excellent bulk film quality and state-of-the-art passivation for c-Si surfaces. Using the triode method, an effective minority carrier lifetime (taueff) of 8.1 ms and an Auger-corrected surface recombination velocity (S) of 2.4 cm/s at an excess carrier density of 1015 cm-3 have been achieved for 1-2 ohm-cm n-type c-Si passivated with intrinsic a-Si:H. Further, using the triode method to deposit thin-layers of intrinsic and doped a-Si:H, a conventional SHJ solar cell structure was prepared and was found to exhibit an excellent implied Voc of 710 mV. Under all conditions scanned, samples prepared in the triode configuration showed improved passivation compared with samples prepared in the conventional diode configuration with the best triode prepared sample showing a nearly threefold increase in taueff and a twofold decrease in S compared with the best diode prepared sample. Furthermore, a-Si:H deposited using the triode method showed significantly improved bulk properties compared to diode

  2. Thin films of tin(II) sulphide (SnS) by aerosol-assisted chemical vapour deposition (AACVD) using tin(II) dithiocarbamates as single-source precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kevin, Punarja; Lewis, David J.; Raftery, James; Azad Malik, M.; O'Brien, Paul

    2015-04-01

    The synthesis of the asymmetric dithiocarbamates of tin(II) with the formula [Sn(S2CNRR')2] (where R=Et, R'=n-Bu (1); R=Me, R'=n-Bu (2); R=R'=Et (3)) and their use for the deposition of SnS thin films by aerosol-assisted chemical vapour deposition (AACVD) is described. The effects of temperature and the concentration of the precursors on deposition were investigated. The stoichiometry of SnS was best at higher concentrations of precursors (250 mM) and at 450 °C. The direct electronic band gap of the SnS produced by this method was estimated from optical absorbance measurements as 1.2 eV. The composition of films was confirmed by powder X-ray diffraction (p-XRD) and energy dispersive analysis of X-rays (EDAX) spectroscopy.

  3. Ellipsometric and Rutherford Back scattering Spectrometry studies of SiO(X)N(Y) films elaborated by plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition technique.

    PubMed

    Mahamdi, R; Boulesbaa, M; Saci, L; Mansour, F; Molliet, C; Collet, M; Temple-Boyer, P

    2011-10-01

    Silicon oxynitride (SiO(X)N(Y)) thin films were deposited by plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition technique (PECVD) from silane (SiH4), nitrous oxide (N2O), ammonia (NH3) and nitrogen (N2) mixture. Spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE), in the range of wavelengths 450-900 nm, was used to define the film thickness and therefore the deposition rate, as well as the refractive index as a function of the N2O gaseous flow. While considering the (Si3N4, SiO2, H2 or void) heterogeneous mixture, Maxwell Garnett (MG) theory allows to fit the SE measurements and to define the volume fraction of the different phases. Finally, Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS) results showed that x = O/Si ratio increases gradually with increasing the N2O flow, allowing the correlation of the SiO(X)N(Y) films main parameters. PMID:22400311

  4. Fabrication of multiwalled carbon nanotubes in the channels of iron loaded three dimensional mesoporous material by catalytic chemical vapour deposition technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somanathan, T.; Gokulakrishnan, N.; Chandrasekar, G.; Pandurangan, A.

    2011-01-01

    The growth of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) was successfully achieved in the channels of three dimensional (3D) iron loaded mesoporous matrices (KIT-6) by employing catalytic chemical vapour deposition (CCVD) technique. The synthesised MWNTs, which were characterised by SEM, TEM and Raman spectroscopy, consist of thick graphene layers of about 10 nm composed of 29 graphene sheets with inner and outer diameter of ∼17 nm and ∼37 nm, respectively. The Raman spectrum showed the formation of well-graphitised MWNTs with significantly higher IG/ID ratio of 1.47 compared to commercial MWNTs. Comparatively, 2 wt% Fe loaded KIT-6 material produced a better yield of 91%, which is also highest compared with the report of MWNTs synthesis using mesoporous materials reported so far.

  5. Copper-Assisted Direct Growth of Vertical Graphene Nanosheets on Glass Substrates by Low-Temperature Plasma-Enhanced Chemical Vapour Deposition Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yifei; Jang, Haegyu; Kim, Sun Jung; Pang, Changhyun; Chae, Heeyeop

    2015-08-01

    Vertical graphene (VG) nanosheets are directly grown below 500 °C on glass substrates by a one-step copper-assisted plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD) process. A piece of copper foil is located around a glass substrate as a catalyst in the process. The effect of the copper catalyst on the vertical graphene is evaluated in terms of film morphology, growth rate, carbon density in the plasma and film resistance. The growth rate of the vertical graphene is enhanced by a factor of 5.6 with the copper catalyst with denser vertical graphene. The analysis of optical emission spectra suggests that the carbon radical density is increased with the copper catalyst. Highly conductive VG films having 800 Ω/□ are grown on glass substrates with Cu catalyst at a relatively low temperature.

  6. An investigation into the optimum thickness of titanium dioxide thin films synthesized by using atmospheric pressure chemical vapour deposition for use in photocatalytic water oxidation.

    PubMed

    Hyett, Geoffrey; Darr, Jawwad A; Mills, Andrew; Parkin, Ivan P

    2010-09-10

    Twenty eight films of titanium dioxide of varying thickness were synthesised by using atmospheric pressure chemical vapour deposition (CVD) of titanium(IV) chloride and ethyl acetate onto glass and titanium substrates. Fixed reaction conditions at a substrate temperature of 660 °C were used for all depositions, with varying deposition times of 5-60 seconds used to control the thickness of the samples. A sacrificial electron acceptor system composed of alkaline sodium persulfate was used to determine the rate at which these films could photo-oxidise water in the presence of 365 nm light. The results of this work showed that the optimum thickness for CVD films on titanium substrates for the purposes of water oxidation was ≈200 nm, and that a platinum coating on the reverse of such samples leads to a five-fold increase in the observed rate of water oxidation. PMID:20645333

  7. Optimization of growth temperature of multi-walled carbon nanotubes fabricated by chemical vapour deposition and their application for arsenic removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mageswari, S.; Kalaiselvan, S.; Syed Shabudeen, P. S.; Sivakumar, N.; Karthikeyan, S.

    2014-12-01

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes have been synthesized at different temperatures ranging from 550 °C to 750 °C on silica supported Fe-Mo catalyst by chemical vapour deposition technique using Cymbopogen flexuous oil under nitrogen atmosphere. The as-grown MWNTs were characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM), high resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM), X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD) and Raman spectral studies. The HRTEM and Raman spectroscopic studies confirmed the evolution of MWNTs with the outer diameter between 20 and 40 nm. The possibility of using as-grown MWNTs as an adsorbent for removal of As (V) ions from drinking water was studied. Adsorption isotherm data were interpreted by the Langmuir and Freundlich equations. Kinetic data were studied using Elovich, pseudo-first order and pseudo-second order equations in order to elucidate the reaction mechanism.

  8. A water-vapour giga-maser in the active galaxy TXFS2226-184.

    PubMed

    Koekemoer, A M; Henkel, C; Greenhill, L J; Dey, A; van Breugel, W; Codella, C; Antonucci, R

    1995-12-14

    Active galactic nuclei are thought to be powered by gas falling into a massive black hole; the different types of active galaxy may arise because we view them through a thick torus of molecular gas at varying angles of inclination. One way to determine whether the black hole is surrounded by a torus, which would obscure the accretion disk around the black hole along certain lines of sight, is to search for water masers, as these exist only in regions with plentiful molecular gas. Since the first detection of an extra-galactic water maser in 1979, they have come to be associated primarily with active galaxies, and have even been used to probe the mass of the central engine. Here we report the detection of a water giga-maser in the radio galaxy TXFS2226-184. The strength of the emission supports a recently proposed theory of maser pumping that allows for even more powerful masers, which might be detectable at cosmological distances. Water masers may accordingly provide a way to determine distances to galaxies outside the usual distance ladder, providing an independent calibration of the Hubble constant. PMID:7501016

  9. Substrate patterning with NiOx nanoparticles and hot-wire chemical vapour deposition of WO3x and carbon nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houweling, Z. S.

    2011-10-01

    The first part of the thesis treats the formation of nickel catalyst nanoparticles. First, a patterning technique using colloids is employed to create ordered distributions of monodisperse nanoparticles. Second, nickel films are thermally dewetted, which produces mobile species that self-arrange in non-ordered distributions of polydisperse particles. Third, the mobility of the nickel species is successfully reduced by the addition of air during the dewetting and the use of a special anchoring layer. Thus, non-ordered distributions of self-arranged monodisperse nickel oxide nanoparticles (82±10 nm x 16±2 nm) are made. Studies on nickel thickness, dewetting time and dewetting temperature are conducted. With these particle templates, graphitic carbon nanotubes are synthesised using catalytic hot-wire chemical vapour deposition (HWCVD), demonstrating the high-temperature processability of the nanoparticles. The second part of this thesis treats the non-catalytic HWCVD of tungsten oxides (WO3-x). Resistively heated tungsten filaments exposed to an air flow at subatmospheric pressures, produce tungsten oxide vapour species, which are collected on substrates and are subsequently characterised. First, a complete study on the process conditions is conducted, whereby the effects of filament radiation, filament temperature, process gas pressure and substrate temperature, are investigated. The thus controlled growth of nanogranular smooth amorphous and crystalline WO3-x thin films is presented for the first time. Partially crystalline smooth hydrous WO3-x thin films consisting of 20 nm grains can be deposited at very high rates. The synthesis of ultrafine powders with particle sizes of about 7 nm and very high specific surface areas of 121.7±0.4 m2·g-1 at ultrahigh deposition rates of 36 µm·min-1, is presented. Using substrate heating to 600°C or more, while using air pressures of 3·10-5 mbar to 0.1 mbar, leads to pronounced crystal structures, from nanowires, to

  10. Breakthrough of toluene vapours in granular activated carbon filled packed bed reactor.

    PubMed

    Mohan, N; Kannan, G K; Upendra, S; Subha, R; Kumar, N S

    2009-09-15

    The objective of this research was to determine the toluene removal efficiency and breakthrough time using commercially available coconut shell-based granular activated carbon in packed bed reactor. To study the effect of toluene removal and break point time of the granular activated carbon (GAC), the parameters studied were bed lengths (2, 3, and 4 cm), concentrations (5, 10, and 15 mg l(-1)) and flow rates (20, 40, and 60 ml/min). The maximum percentage removal of 90% was achieved and the maximum carbon capacity for 5 mg l(-1) of toluene, 60 ml/min flow rate and 3 cm bed length shows 607.14 mg/g. The results of dynamic adsorption in a packed bed were consistent with those of equilibrium adsorption by gravimetric method. The breakthrough time and quantity shows that GAC with appropriate surface area can be utilized for air cleaning filters. The result shows that the physisorption plays main role in toluene removal. PMID:19369003

  11. Sensing response of copper phthalocyanine salt dispersed glass with organic vapours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ridhi, R.; Sachdeva, Sheenam; Saini, G. S. S.; Tripathi, S. K.

    2016-05-01

    Copper Phthalocyanine and other Metal Phthalocyanines are very flexible and tuned easily to modify their structural, spectroscopic, optical and electrical properties by either functionalizing them with various substituent groups or by replacing or adding a ligand to the central metal atom in the phthalocyanine ring and accordingly can be made sensitive and selective to various organic species or gaseous vapours. In the present work, we have dispersed Copper Phthalocyanine Salt (CuPcS) in sol-gel glass form using chemical route sol-gel method and studied its sensing mechanism with organic vapours like methanol and benzene and found that current increases onto their exposure with vapours. A variation in the activation energies was also observed with exposure of vapours.

  12. Fabrication of 160-nm T-gate metamorphic AlInAs/GaInAs HEMTs on GaAs substrates by metal organic chemical vapour deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hai-Ou; Huang, Wei; Tang Chak, Wah; Deng, Xiao-Fang; Lau Kei, May

    2011-06-01

    The fabrication and performance of 160-nm gate-length metamorphic AlInAs/GaInAs high electron mobility transistors (mHEMTs) grown on GaAs substrate by metal organic chemical vapour deposition (MOCVD) are reported. By using a novel combined optical and e-beam photolithography technology, submicron mHEMTs devices have been achieved. The devices exhibit good DC and RF performance. The maximum current density was 817 mA/mm and the maximum transconductance was 828 mS/mm. The non-alloyed Ohmic contact resistance Rc was as low as 0.02 Ω-mm. The unity current gain cut-off frequency (fT) and the maximum oscillation frequency (fmax) were 146 GHz and 189 GHz, respectively. This device has the highest fT yet reported for a 160-nm gate-length HEMTs grown by MOCVD. The output conductance is 28.9 mS/mm, which results in a large voltage gain of 28.6. Also, an input capacitance to gate-drain feedback capacitance ratio, Cgs/Cgd, of 4.3 is obtained in the device.

  13. Effect of gas flow rates on the anatase-rutile transformation temperature of nanocrystalline TiO2 synthesised by chemical vapour synthesis.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Md Imteyaz; Bhattacharya, S S; Fasel, Claudia; Hahn, Horst

    2009-09-01

    Of the three crystallographic allotropes of nanocrystalline titania (rutile, anatase and brookite), anatase exhibits the greatest potential for a variety of applications, especially in the area of catalysis and sensors. However, with rutile being thermodynamically the most stable phase, anatase tends to transform into rutile on heating to temperatures in the range of 500 degrees C to 700 degrees C. Efforts made to stabilize the anatase phase at higher temperatures by doping with metal oxides suffer from the problems of having a large amorphous content on synthesis as well as the formation of secondary impurity phases on doping. Recent studies have suggested that the as-synthesised phase composition, crystallite size, initial surface area and processing conditions greatly influence the anatase to rutile transformation temperature. In this study nanocrystalline titania was synthesised in the anatase form bya chemical vapour synthesis (CVS) method using titanium tetra iso-propoxide (TTIP) as a precursor under varying flow rates of oxygen and helium. The anatase to rutile transformation was studied using high temperature X-ray diffraction (HTXRD) and simultaneous thermogravimetric analysis (STA), followed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). It was demonstrated that the anatase-rutile transformation temperatures were dependent on the oxygen to helium flow rate ratio during CVS and the results are presented and discussed. PMID:19928267

  14. Fine-tuning of catalytic tin nanoparticles by the reverse micelle method for direct deposition of silicon nanowires by a plasma-enhanced chemical vapour technique.

    PubMed

    Poinern, Gérrard E J; Ng, Yan-Jing; Fawcett, Derek

    2010-12-15

    The reverse micelle method was used for the reduction of a tin (Sn) salt solution to produce metallic Sn nanoparticles ranging from 85 nm to 140 nm in diameter. The reverse micellar system used in this process was hexane-butanol-cetyl trimethylammonium bromide (CTAB). The diameters of the Sn nanoparticles were proportional to the concentration of the aqueous Sn salt solution. Thus, the size of the Sn nanoparticles can easily be controlled, enabling a simple, reproducible mechanism for the growth of silicon nanowires (SiNWs) using plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD). Both the Sn nanoparticles and silicon nanowires were characterised using field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM). Further characterisations of the SiNW's were made using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and Raman spectroscopy. In addition, dynamic light scattering (DLS) was used to investigate particle size distributions. This procedure demonstrates an economical route for manufacturing reproducible silicon nanowires using fine-tuned Sn nanoparticles for possible solar cell applications. PMID:20887996

  15. Broadband antireflection for a high-index substrate using SiN x /SiO2 by inductively coupled plasma chemical vapour deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Kim Peng; Ng, Doris K. T.; Wang, Qian

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents the development of broadband antireflection coating for a high-index substrate such as Si using SiN x /SiO2 by inductively coupled plasma chemical vapour deposition (ICP-CVD). The thin-film design employs a simulated annealing method for a minimal average reflectance over the wavelength range and incidence angles involved, which gives the optimized refractive index and thickness of each layer of the thin-film stack under different layer numbers. Using ICP-CVD, the SiN x material system is optimized by tuning the SiH4/N2 gas ratio. The corresponding thin-film characterization shows the precise refractive index/film thickness control in deposition, and the deposited film also has a low absorption coefficient and smooth surface. The double-layer SiN x /SiO2 coating with the optimized refractive index and thickness for broadband antireflection is demonstrated experimentally. The average reflectance of the Si surface is reduced from ~32% to ~3.17% at normal incidence for a wavelength range from 400 to 1100 nm.

  16. A chemical assessment of the suitability of allyl- iso-propyltelluride as a Te precursor for metal organic vapour phase epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hails, Janet E.; Cole-Hamilton, David J.; Stevenson, John; Bell, William; Foster, Douglas F.; Ellis, David

    2001-04-01

    The chemical studies, which led to the testing of allyl- iso-propyltelluride (allylTePr i) as a Te precursor in metal organic vapour phase epitaxy are presented. The pyrolysis in hydrogen of allylTePr i gave products including 1,5-hexadiene, propane and propene. Co-pyrolysis of dimethylcadmium (Me 2Cd) and allylTePr i gave the hydrocarbons expected from the pyrolysis of the individual precursors plus additional hydrocarbons including 2-methylpropane and 1-butene. Plots of percentage decomposition versus temperature, which proved extremely useful in determining the likely growth temperatures for both CdTe and HgTe, showed that allylTePr i is less stable than both Pr 2iTe (di- iso-propyltelluride) and Me 2Cd. The possible role of Hg in the growth of CdTe is also discussed. The chemistry of allylTePr i is well suited for use as an efficient precursor for epitaxial growth of tellurium containing semiconductors since there is very little formation of other organotellurium compounds on pyrolysis.

  17. Reactive Chemical Vapour Deposition of Titanium Carbide from H2-TiCl4 Gas Mixture on Pyrocarbon: A Comprehensive Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ledain, O.; Woelffel, W.; Roger, J.; Vignoles, G.; Maillé, L.; Jacques, S.

    In Reactive Chemical Vapour Deposition (RCVD), the absence of one element of the deposited carbide in the initial gas phase involves the consumption/conversion of the solid substrate. In this way, the growth of a continuous carbide layer on the substrate requires solid-phase diffusion of the reagent. In this work, a parametric study of the RCVD of titanium carbide from pyrocarbon (PyC) and an H2-TiCl4 mixture has been carried out. Conversion ratio, PyC consumption and carbide layer growth kinetics have been determined at 1000̊C. The influence of the H2/TiCl4 dilution ratio has been also investigated. The apparent inter-diffusion coefficient of the carbon through the TiC deposited layer and the direct apparent reaction rate were determined from a comparison between simulations based on a Deal-Grove-type model and the experimental results. The study has been completed with FTIR spectrometry analyses of the gases.

  18. Study of the catalyst evolution during annealing preceding the growth of carbon nanotubes by microwave plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malesevic, Alexander; Chen, Hong; Hauffman, Tom; Vanhulsel, Annick; Terryn, Herman; Van Haesendonck, Chris

    2007-11-01

    A two-step catalyst annealing process is developed in order to control the diameter of nickel catalyst particles for the growth of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) by microwave plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition (MW PECVD). Thermal annealing of a continuous nickel film in a hydrogen (H2) environment in a first step is found to be insufficient for the formation of nanometre-size, high-density catalyst particles. In a second step, a H2 MW plasma treatment decreases the catalyst diameter by a factor of two and increases the particle density by a factor of five. An x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy study of the catalyst after each step in the annealing process is presented. It is found that the catalyst particles interact with the substrate during thermal annealing, thereby forming a silicate, even if a buffer layer in between the catalyst and the substrate is intended to prevent silicate formation. The silicate formation and reduction is shown to be directly related to the CNT growth mechanism, determining whether the catalyst particles reside at the base or the tip of the growing CNTs. The catalyst particles are used for the growth of a high-density CNT coating by MW PECVD. CNTs are analysed with electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy.

  19. Surface engineering of artificial heart valve disks using nanostructured thin films deposited by chemical vapour deposition and sol-gel methods.

    PubMed

    Jackson, M J; Robinson, G M; Ali, N; Kousar, Y; Mei, S; Gracio, J; Taylor, H; Ahmed, W

    2006-01-01

    Pyrolytic carbon (PyC) is widely used in manufacturing commercial artificial heart valve disks (HVD). Although PyC is commonly used in HVD, it is not the best material for this application since its blood compatibility is not ideal for prolonged clinical use. As a result thrombosis often occurs and the patients are required to take anti-coagulation drugs on a regular basis in order to minimize the formation of thrombosis. However, anti-coagulation therapy gives rise to some detrimental side effects in patients. Therefore, it is extremely urgent that newer and more technically advanced materials with better surface and bulk properties are developed. In this paper, we report the mechanical properties of PyC-HVD, i.e. strength, wear resistance and coefficient of friction. The strength of the material was assessed using Brinell indentation tests. Furthermore, wear resistance and coefficient of friction values were obtained from pin-on-disk testing. The micro-structural properties of PyC were characterized using XRD, Raman spectroscopy and SEM analysis. Also in this paper we report the preparation of freestanding nanocrystalline diamond films (FSND) using the time-modulated chemical vapour deposition (TMCVD) process. Furthermore, the sol-gel technique was used to uniformly coat PyC-HVD with dense, nanocrystalline-titanium oxide (nc-TiO2) coatings. The as-grown nc-TiO2 coatings were characterized for microstructure using SEM and XRD analysis. PMID:16980288

  20. Heterocyclic dithiocarbamato-iron(III) complexes: single-source precursors for aerosol-assisted chemical vapour deposition (AACVD) of iron sulfide thin films.

    PubMed

    Mlowe, Sixberth; Lewis, David J; Malik, Mohammad Azad; Raftery, James; Mubofu, Egid B; O'Brien, Paul; Revaprasadu, Neerish

    2016-02-14

    Tris-(piperidinedithiocarbamato)iron(III) (1) and tris-(tetrahydroquinolinedithiocarbamato)iron(iii) (2) complexes have been synthesized and their single-crystal X-ray structures were determined. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) of the complexes showed decomposition to iron sulfide. Both complexes were then used as single-source precursors for the deposition of iron sulfide thin films by aerosol-assisted chemical vapour deposition (AACVD). Energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy confirmed the formation of iron sulfide films. The addition of tert-butyl thiol almost doubled the sulfur content in the deposited films. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images of the iron sulfide films from both complexes showed flakes/leaves/sheets, spherical granules and nanofibres. The sizes and shapes of these crystallites depended on the nature of the precursor, temperature, solvent and the amount of tert-butyl thiol used. The observed optical properties are dependent upon the variation of reaction parameters such as temperature and solvent. Powder X-ray diffraction (p-XRD) studies revealed that pyrrhotite, hexagonal (Fe0.975S), marcasite and smythite (Fe3S4) phases were differently deposited. PMID:26732865

  1. Impact of Mo and Ce on growth of single-walled carbon nanotubes by chemical vapour deposition using MgO-supported Fe catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Hendawy, Abdel-Nasser A.; Andrews, Robert J.; Alexander, Andrew J.

    2009-05-01

    A series of nine catalysts containing Ce/Fe and Mo/Fe at various loadings on MgO supports have been studied as catalysts for chemical vapour deposition (CVD) of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) using a methane carbon source. Our results show that the Ce/Fe system is very suitable as a catalyst that favours SWCNT growth, and we question the special importance that has been attributed to Mo as an additive to Fe-based catalysts for SWCNT growth, as it appears that Ce is equally effective. Our results indicate that dehydroaromatization (DHA) is not a defining step for the growth mechanism, as has been suggested for Mo/Fe systems previously, and show that Ce and Mo do not seriously perturb the well-known Fe/MgO system for growth of high quality SWCNT. Using Raman spectroscopy, we have shown that the Ce/Fe/MgO catalyst system favours growth of SWCNTs with a different distribution of chiralities compared to the analogous Mo/Fe/MgO system.

  2. Polyethylene Oxide Films Polymerized by Radio Frequency Plasma-Enhanced Chemical Vapour Phase Deposition and Its Adsorption Behaviour of Platelet-Rich Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Wen-Juan; Xie, Fen-Yan; Chen, Qiang; Weng, Jing

    2008-10-01

    We present polyethylene oxide (PEO) functional films polymerized by rf plasma-enhanced vapour chemical deposition (rf-PECVD) on p-Si (100) surface with precursor ethylene glycol dimethyl ether (EGDME) and diluted Ar in pulsed plasma mode. The influences of discharge parameters on the film properties and compounds are investigated. The film structure is analysed by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. The water contact angle measurement and atomic force microscope (AFM) are employed to examine the surface polarity and to detect surface morphology, respectively. It is concluded that the smaller duty cycle in pulsed plasma mode contributes to the rich C-O-C (EO) group on the surfaces. As an application, the adsorption behaviour of platelet-rich plasma on plasma polymerization films performed in-vitro is explored. The shapes of attached cells are studied in detail by an optic invert microscope, which clarifies that high-density C-O-C groups on surfaces are responsible for non-fouling adsorption behaviour of the PEO films.

  3. Effect of oxygen plasma on field emission characteristics of single-wall carbon nanotubes grown by plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition system

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Avshish; Parveen, Shama; Husain, Samina; Ali, Javid; Zulfequar, Mohammad; Harsh; Husain, Mushahid

    2014-02-28

    Field emission properties of single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) grown on iron catalyst film by plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition system were studied in diode configuration. The results were analysed in the framework of Fowler-Nordheim theory. The grown SWCNTs were found to be excellent field emitters, having emission current density higher than 20 mA/cm{sup 2} at a turn-on field of 1.3 V/μm. The as grown SWCNTs were further treated with Oxygen (O{sub 2}) plasma for 5 min and again field emission characteristics were measured. The O{sub 2} plasma treated SWCNTs have shown dramatic improvement in their field emission properties with emission current density of 111 mA/cm{sup 2} at a much lower turn on field of 0.8 V/μm. The as grown as well as plasma treated SWCNTs were also characterized by various techniques, such as scanning electron microscopy, high resolution transmission electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy before and after O{sub 2} plasma treatment and the findings are being reported in this paper.

  4. Formation of low pressure chemically vapour deposited W thin film on silicon dioxide for gate electrode application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sone, Jae Hyun; Kim, Sun-Oo; Kim, Ki-Joon; Kim, Hyoung Sub; Kim, Hyeong Joon

    1994-12-01

    We have investigated the feasibility that low pressure chemically vapor deposited W can be used as a gate electrode material of metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) field effect transistors. We improved adhesion of the W film to SiO2 by using a pulsing injection of source gas. The pulsing injection of the reactant gas enhances the desorption of byproduct gases from the surface of the growing film and thus more W nuclei formed on SiO2. Tungsten thin films were deposited on the SiO2/Si with a deposition rate of 1000-2000 A/min. The deposition was carried out at various temperatures of 300-750 C and various SiH4:WF6 ratios of 0.6-1.5. The higher adhesion strength and resistivity of W thin films were achieved at the higher SiH4:WF6 ratio and higher deposition temperature. X-ray diffraction analysis showed that the crystal structure of all W films, deposited at various temperatures, was alpha-W in spite of either high reactant gas ratio or high temperature. Since W thin films had good adhesion to SiO2, MOS structure capacitors were fabricated with a W electrode via wet chemical processes and their electrical properties were also characterized. The extreme value distribution function of dielectric breakdown strength indicates that the thin SiO2 layer was significantly degraded by the diffused F ions. However, the stacked gate dielectric of SiO2 and Si3N4 layers instead of the single SiO2 layer was not degraded by the W gate electrode, since the Si3N4 layer protected SiO2 from chemical attack or restricted the F diffusion during deposition of the W gate electrode.

  5. Strain and structure heterogeneity in MoS2 atomic layers grown by chemical vapour deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Zheng; Amani, Matin; Najmaei, Sina; Xu, Quan; Zou, Xiaolong; Zhou, Wu; Yu, Ting; Qiu, Caiyu; Birdwell, A. Glen; Crowne, Frank J.; Vajtai, Robert; Yakobson, Boris I.; Xia, Zhenhai; Dubey, Madan; Ajayan, Pulickel M.; Lou, Jun

    2014-11-18

    Monolayer molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) has attracted tremendous attention due to its promising applications in high-performance field-effect transistors, phototransistors, spintronic devices, and nonlinear optics. The enhanced photoluminescence effect in monolayer MoS2 was discovered and, as a strong tool, was employed for strain and defect analysis in MoS2. Recently, large-size monolayer MoS2 has been produced by chemical vapor deposition but has not yet been fully explored. Here we systematically characterize chemical vapor deposition grown MoS2 by PL spectroscopy and mapping, and demonstrate non-uniform strain in single-crystalline monolayer MoS2 and strain-induced band gap engineering. We also evaluate the effective strain transferred from polymer substrates to MoS2 by three-dimensional finite element analysis. In addition, our work demonstrates that PL mapping can be used as a non-contact approach for quick identification of grain boundaries in MoS2.

  6. Growth of complex SiGe/Ge superlattices by reduced pressure chemical vapour deposition at low temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halpin, John E.; Rhead, Stephen D.; Sanchez, Ana M.; Myronov, Maksym; Leadley, David R.

    2015-11-01

    In this work the growth of complex n-type, high Ge content superlattice structures by reduced pressure chemical vapor deposition is presented. The structures feature 50 repeats of a 14 layer period, which includes a main quantum well that is between 13 and 21 nm wide. The total epitaxy thickness is approximately 8 μm. Diffusion and segregation in the structures was minimized by using a low growth temperature. Materials characterization shows the structures to be of good crystalline quality, with the thickness of all layers close to the design, abrupt interfaces, and uniformity throughout the structures. High angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy is shown to be an ideal technique for measuring layer thickness and interface quality in these structures.

  7. Direct observation of electron emission from the grain boundaries of chemical vapour deposition diamond films by tunneling atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Chatterjee, Vijay; Harniman, Robert; May, Paul W.; Barhai, P. K.

    2014-04-28

    The emission of electrons from diamond in vacuum occurs readily as a result of the negative electron affinity of the hydrogenated surface due to features with nanoscale dimensions, which can concentrate electric fields high enough to induce electron emission from them. Electrons can be emitted as a result of an applied electric field (field emission) with possible uses in displays or cold-cathode devices. Alternatively, electrons can be emitted simply by heating the diamond in vacuum to temperatures as low as 350 °C (thermionic emission), and this may find applications in solar energy generation or energy harvesting devices. Electron emission studies usually use doped polycrystalline diamond films deposited onto Si or metallic substrates by chemical vapor deposition, and these films have a rough, faceted morphology on the micron or nanometer scale. Electron emission is often improved by patterning the diamond surface into sharp points or needles, the idea being that the field lines concentrate at the points lowering the barrier for electron emission. However, there is little direct evidence that electrons are emitted from these sharp tips. The few reports in the literature that have studied the emission sites suggested that emission came from the grain boundaries and not the protruding regions. We now present direct observation of the emission sites over a large area of polycrystalline diamond using tunneling atomic force microscopy. We confirm that the emission current comes mostly from the grain boundaries, which is consistent with a model for emission in which the non-diamond phase is the source of electrons with a threshold that is determined by the surrounding hydrogenated diamond surface.

  8. Very low temperature epitaxy of Ge and Ge rich SiGe alloys with Ge2H6 in a Reduced Pressure - Chemical Vapour Deposition tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubin, J.; Hartmann, J. M.; Bauer, M.; Moffatt, S.

    2016-07-01

    We have studied the very low temperature epitaxy of pure Ge and of Ge-rich SiGe alloys in a 200 mm industrial reduced pressure chemical vapour deposition tool. We have, first of all, benchmarked germane (GeH4) and digermane (Ge2H6) for the growth of pure Ge. Used Ge2H6 instead of GeH4 enabled us to dramatically increase the Ge growth rate at temperatures 425 °C and lower (5.6 nm min-1 compared to 0.14 nm min-1 at 350 °C with a Ge2H6 mass-flow one fourth that of GeH4). We have also evaluated at 400 °C, 100 Torr, the impact of the GeH4 or Ge2H6 mass-flow on the Ge growth rate. For a given Ge atomic flow, the higher surface reactivity of digermane yielded roughly five times higher growth rates than with germane. We have then combined digermane with disilane (Si2H6) or dichlorosilane (SiH2Cl2) in order to study the GeSi growth kinetics at 475 °C, 100 Torr. While the SiH2Cl2 mass-flow did not have any clear influence on the GeSi growth rate (with a 14 nm min-1 mean value, then), a Si2H6 mass-flow increase resulted in a slight GeSi growth rate increase (from 11 nm min-1 up to 14 nm min-1). Significantly higher Ge concentrations were otherwise accessed with dichlorosilane than with disilane, in the 77-82% range compared to the 39-53% range, respectively.

  9. A dilute Cu(Ni) alloy for synthesis of large-area Bernal stacked bilayer graphene using atmospheric pressure chemical vapour deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madito, M. J.; Bello, A.; Dangbegnon, J. K.; Oliphant, C. J.; Jordaan, W. A.; Momodu, D. Y.; Masikhwa, T. M.; Barzegar, F.; Fabiane, M.; Manyala, N.

    2016-01-01

    A bilayer graphene film obtained on copper (Cu) foil is known to have a significant fraction of non-Bernal (AB) stacking and on copper/nickel (Cu/Ni) thin films is known to grow over a large-area with AB stacking. In this study, annealed Cu foils for graphene growth were doped with small concentrations of Ni to obtain dilute Cu(Ni) alloys in which the hydrocarbon decomposition rate of Cu will be enhanced by Ni during synthesis of large-area AB-stacked bilayer graphene using atmospheric pressure chemical vapour deposition. The Ni doped concentration and the Ni homogeneous distribution in Cu foil were confirmed with inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry and proton-induced X-ray emission. An electron backscatter diffraction map showed that Cu foils have a single (001) surface orientation which leads to a uniform growth rate on Cu surface in early stages of graphene growth and also leads to a uniform Ni surface concentration distribution through segregation kinetics. The increase in Ni surface concentration in foils was investigated with time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry. The quality of graphene, the number of graphene layers, and the layers stacking order in synthesized bilayer graphene films were confirmed by Raman and electron diffraction measurements. A four point probe station was used to measure the sheet resistance of graphene films. As compared to Cu foil, the prepared dilute Cu(Ni) alloy demonstrated the good capability of growing large-area AB-stacked bilayer graphene film by increasing Ni content in Cu surface layer.

  10. Perovskite tungsten bronze-type crystals of Li{sub x}WO{sub 3} grown by chemical vapour transport and their characterisation

    SciTech Connect

    Ruescher, Claus H. Dey, Kalpana R.; Debnath, Tapas; Horn, Ingo; Glaum, Robert; Hussain, Altaf

    2008-01-15

    Crystals of Li{sub x}WO{sub 3} with nominal compositions, x=0.1, 0.25, 0.3, 0.35, 0.4 and 0.45 were grown by chemical vapour transport method using HgCl{sub 2} as transporting agent. A complete transport was achieved with a temperature gradient T{sub 1}/T{sub 2}=800/700 deg. C revealing bluish-black crystals of sizes up to a few 10th of a millimeter. X-ray powder diffraction and infrared (IR) absorption spectra show Perovskite tungsten bronze of cubic symmetry (PTB{sub c}) for x=0.45 and 0.4, mixed phase of PTB{sub c} and Perovskite tungsten bronze of tetragonal symmetry (PTB{sub t}) for x=0.35, 0.3 and 0.25 and of PTB{sub t} and Perovskite tungsten bronze of orthorhombic symmetry (PTB{sub o}) for x=0.1. The structure of PTB{sub t} is explained by the off centring of the W-ions along c and tilting of the WO{sub 6} octahedra around c. Crystal slices of mixed phase (i.e. PTB{sub c} and PTB{sub t}) reveal bright and dark areas on a sub-millimeter scale which are separated by sharp interfaces. Laser ablation inductively coupled plasma optical emission (LA ICP OES) analysis on small spot sizes show the separation into Li contents of x=0.18 (bright areas) and x=0.38 (dark areas) as threshold compositions of PTB{sub t} and PTB{sub c}, respectively. Polarized reflectivity using a microscope technique in the bright area of the crystals indicates strong anisotropic absorption effects with maximum between 1000 and 6000 cm{sup -1}, which are related to optical excitations of polarons. Crystals of composition x=0.4 and 0.45 appear optically homogeneous and show an effective 'free carrier-type plasma frequency' (w{sub p}) of about 12,900 and 13,700 cm{sup -1}, respectively. - Graphical abstract: Optical microscope image (reflection mode) of Li{sub x}WO{sub 3} crystals of nominal composition x=0.35. The separation into PTB{sub cubic} (dark areas) and PTB{sub tetragonal} (bright areas) were used to determine the miscibility gap and optical properties.

  11. Inorganic chemically active adsorbents (ICAAs)

    SciTech Connect

    Ally, M.R.; Tavlarides, L.

    1997-10-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) researchers are developing a technology that combines metal chelation extraction technology and synthesis chemistry. They begin with a ceramic substrate such as alumina, titanium oxide or silica gel because they provide high surface area, high mechanical strength, and radiolytic stability. One preparation method involves silylation to hydrophobize the surface, followed by chemisorption of a suitable chelation agent using vapor deposition. Another route attaches newly designed chelating agents through covalent bonding by the use of coupling agents. These approaches provide stable and selective, inorganic chemically active adsorbents (ICAAs) tailored for removal of metals. The technology has the following advantages over ion exchange: (1) higher mechanical strength, (2) higher resistance to radiation fields, (3) higher selectivity for the desired metal ion, (4) no cation exchange, (5) reduced or no interference from accompanying anions, (6) faster kinetics, and (7) easy and selective regeneration. Target waste streams include metal-containing groundwater/process wastewater at ORNL`s Y-12 Plant (multiple metals), Savannah River Site (SRS), Rocky Flats (multiple metals), and Hanford; aqueous mixed wastes at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL); and scrubber water generated at SRS and INEL. Focus Areas that will benefit from this research include Mixed Waste, and Subsurface Contaminants.

  12. A liquid crystalline chirality balance for vapours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohzono, Takuya; Yamamoto, Takahiro; Fukuda, Jun-Ichi

    2014-04-01

    Chiral discrimination of vapours plays an important role in olfactory perception of biological systems and its realization by artificial sensors has been an intriguing challenge. Here, we report a simple method that tangibly visualizes the chirality of a diverse variety of molecules dissolved from vapours with high sensitivity, by making use of a structural change in a periodic microstructure of a nematic liquid crystal confined in open microchannels. This microstructure is accompanied by a topological line defect of a zigzag form with equal lengths of ‘zig’ and ‘zag.’ We find that a tiny amount of vapour of chiral molecules injected onto the liquid crystal induces the imbalance of ‘zig’ and ‘zag’ depending on its enantiomeric excess within a few seconds. Our liquid-crystal-based ‘chirality balance’ offers a simple, quick and versatile chirality-sensing/-screening method for gas-phase analysis (for example, for odours, environmental chemicals or drugs).

  13. Science Activities in Energy: Chemical Energy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oak Ridge Associated Universities, TN.

    Presented is a science activities in energy package which includes 15 activities relating to chemical energy. Activities are simple, concrete experiments for fourth, fifth and sixth grades which illustrate principles and problems relating to energy. Each activity is outlined on a single card which is introduced by a question. A teacher's…

  14. Epitaxial growth of antiphase boundary free GaAs layer on 300 mm Si(001) substrate by metalorganic chemical vapour deposition with high mobility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alcotte, R.; Martin, M.; Moeyaert, J.; Cipro, R.; David, S.; Bassani, F.; Ducroquet, F.; Bogumilowicz, Y.; Sanchez, E.; Ye, Z.; Bao, X. Y.; Pin, J. B.; Baron, T.

    2016-04-01

    Metal organic chemical vapor deposition of GaAs on standard nominal 300 mm Si(001) wafers was studied. Antiphase boundary (APB) free epitaxial GaAs films as thin as 150 nm were obtained. The APB-free films exhibit an improvement of the room temperature photoluminescence signal with an increase of the intensity of almost a factor 2.5. Hall effect measurements show an electron mobility enhancement from 200 to 2000 cm2/V s. The GaAs layers directly grown on industrial platform with no APBs are perfect candidates for being integrated as active layers for nanoelectronic as well as optoelectronic devices in a CMOS environment.

  15. From GNSS and meteorological data to NRT 4D water vapour distribution - GNSS meteorology activities at WUELS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosy, Jaroslaw; Kaplon, Jan; Rohm, Witold; Sierny, Jan; Wilgan, Karina; Hadas, Tomasz; Hordyniec, Pawel

    2014-05-01

    The GNSS and Meteo group at Wroclaw University of Environmental and Life Sciences (WUELS), Poland is continuously working on GNSS meteorology since 2010. Currently group maintain real-time (RT) service collecting GNSS and meteorological data and near real-time (NRT) services for estimation of Zenith Troposphere Delay (ZTD), Zenith Hydrostatic Delay (ZHD), Integrated Water Vapour (IWV) and GNSS tomography over the territory of Poland. Data are obtained with high resolution from EUREF Permanent Network (EPN) stations and Ground Base Augmentation System (GBAS) called ASG-EUPOS (www.asgeupos.pl). The GNSS data are available from 124 reference stations located in Poland and neighbour countries, with the average 70km distance between stations. The ground meteorological observations in the area of Poland and neighbour countries are available from: ASG-EUPOS stations included in EUREF Permanent Network (EPN), airport meteorological stations (METAR messages stations) and stations managed by national Institute of Meteorology and Water Management (SYNOP messages stations). The first part of the paper presents the methodology of ASG-EUPOS GNSS data processing for NRT ZTD and ZTD horizontal gradients estimation in double-differenced mode (under Bernese GNSS Software V5.0) as well as new results from PPP mode (under Bernese GNSS Software V5.2) and their validation with respect to Rapid and Final troposphere products. The second part is describing the quality assessment of meteorological parameters interpolation methods for determination of ZHD at GNSS sites performed on GNSS stations equipped with meteorological sensors. The third part concerns on the comparisons of ZTD from GNSS data and meteorological parameters from SYNOP stations with data from COAMPS numerical weather prediction system (NWP) and IWV calculation. The fourth part presents the development of GNSS tomography model TOMO2. The last part describes methods of above products validation and visualization over the

  16. Chemical Potentials and Activities: An Electrochemical Introduction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wetzel, T. L.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Describes a laboratory experiment which explores the effects of adding inert salts to electrolytic cells and demonstrates the difference between concentration and chemical activity. Examines chemical potentials as the driving force of reactions. Provides five examples of cell potential and concentration change. (JM)

  17. Excitation mechanism and thermal emission quenching of Tb ions in silicon rich silicon oxide thin films grown by plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition—Do we need silicon nanoclusters?

    SciTech Connect

    Podhorodecki, A. Golacki, L. W.; Zatryb, G.; Misiewicz, J.; Wang, J.; Jadwisienczak, W.; Fedus, K.

    2014-04-14

    In this work, we will discuss the excitation and emission properties of Tb ions in a Silicon Rich Silicon Oxide (SRSO) matrix obtained at different technological conditions. By means of electron cyclotron resonance plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition, undoped and doped SRSO films have been obtained with different Si content (33, 35, 39, 50 at. %) and were annealed at different temperatures (600, 900, 1100 °C). The samples were characterized optically and structurally using photoluminescence (PL), PL excitation, time resolved PL, absorption, cathodoluminescence, temperature dependent PL, Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy. Based on the obtained results, we discuss how the matrix modifications influence excitation and emission properties of Tb ions.

  18. Excitation mechanism and thermal emission quenching of Tb ions in silicon rich silicon oxide thin films grown by plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition—Do we need silicon nanoclusters?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podhorodecki, A.; Golacki, L. W.; Zatryb, G.; Misiewicz, J.; Wang, J.; Jadwisienczak, W.; Fedus, K.; Wojcik, J.; Wilson, P. R. J.; Mascher, P.

    2014-04-01

    In this work, we will discuss the excitation and emission properties of Tb ions in a Silicon Rich Silicon Oxide (SRSO) matrix obtained at different technological conditions. By means of electron cyclotron resonance plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition, undoped and doped SRSO films have been obtained with different Si content (33, 35, 39, 50 at. %) and were annealed at different temperatures (600, 900, 1100 °C). The samples were characterized optically and structurally using photoluminescence (PL), PL excitation, time resolved PL, absorption, cathodoluminescence, temperature dependent PL, Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy. Based on the obtained results, we discuss how the matrix modifications influence excitation and emission properties of Tb ions.

  19. Activated coconut shell charcoal carbon using chemical-physical activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budi, Esmar; Umiatin, Nasbey, Hadi; Bintoro, Ridho Akbar; Wulandari, Futri; Erlina

    2016-02-01

    The use of activated carbon from natural material such as coconut shell charcoal as metal absorbance of the wastewater is a new trend. The activation of coconut shell charcoal carbon by using chemical-physical activation has been investigated. Coconut shell was pyrolized in kiln at temperature about 75 - 150 °C for about 6 hours in producing charcoal. The charcoal as the sample was shieved into milimeter sized granule particle and chemically activated by immersing in various concentration of HCl, H3PO4, KOH and NaOH solutions. The samples then was physically activated using horizontal furnace at 400°C for 1 hours in argon gas environment with flow rate of 200 kg/m3. The surface morphology and carbon content of activated carbon were characterized by using SEM/EDS. The result shows that the pores of activated carbon are openned wider as the chemical activator concentration is increased due to an excessive chemical attack. However, the pores tend to be closed as further increasing in chemical activator concentration due to carbon collapsing.

  20. Seasonal and site-specific variation in vapour and aerosol phase PAHs over Flanders (Belgium) and their relation with anthropogenic activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravindra, Khaiwal; Bencs, László; Wauters, Eric; de Hoog, Johan; Deutsch, Felix; Roekens, Edward; Bleux, Nico; Berghmans, Patrick; Van Grieken, René

    The concentrations of 16 US-EPA criteria polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were monitored during various seasons at six different cities/locations in the northern part of Belgium. Pressurized liquid extraction (PLE) was used for the fast recovery of PAHs from quartz fibre filters (QFFs) and polyurethane foams (PUFs) in less than 30 min with minimum solvent consumption prior to their analysis with high-performance liquid chromatography. The concentrations of PAHs varied significantly at the studied sites and showed relation to different anthropogenic activities, such as vehicular emission (diesel/gasoline), incinerator, petroleum/oil burning, coke production, and wood/coal combustion. The annual average PAH concentration ranged from 17 (at a rural site) to 114 ng m -3 (near a petroleum harbour and industry). Most of the human carcinogenic PAHs were found to be associated with suspended particulate matter, which forms around ˜55% of the total PAH levels in aerosols. Relatively higher concentrations of PAHs were detected in aerosol samples during winter compared with other seasons, whereas no clear seasonal trend was observed for the vapour phase PAHs. This fraction is likely to be more local in origin; hence, it can be used as a site-specific characteristic. The site-specific concentrations of individual PAHs were also used in diagnostic ratio evaluations and in principal component analysis to find their relation with various anthropogenic activities. These results show that the vehicular emission is a major source of PAHs in Flanders, although other anthropogenic sources, as above, have also an impact on the total PAH levels.

  1. Activity Therapy Services and Chemical Dependency Rehabilitation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, Mark R.; Townsley, Robin K.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses how music, occupational, and recreation therapies can contribute to comprehensive treatment programs for chemical dependency. Sees prime contribution of activity therapy as lying in nature of experiential education, applying insight gained in counseling sessions and discussion groups to practical real-life situations. (Author/NB)

  2. [CO2-gas exchange of mosses following water vapour uptake].

    PubMed

    Lange, O L

    1969-03-01

    The CO2-gas exchange of dry mosses which were exposed to air of high water vapour content has been followed. Some moss species behave as do lichens and aerophilic green algae: they are able to take up enough water vapour to make a rather high photosynthetic activity possible. Other species lack this ability. They need liquid water for reactivation of photosynthesis, as do poikilohydric ferns and phanerogams. In this respect too the mosses are located between the real thallophytes and the cormophytes. From this point of view they are useful objects for studying the relationships between water vapour reactivation, morphological organisation and ecological capability. PMID:24504355

  3. Collective surfing of chemically active particles.

    PubMed

    Masoud, Hassan; Shelley, Michael J

    2014-03-28

    We study theoretically the collective dynamics of immotile particles bound to a 2D surface atop a 3D fluid layer. These particles are chemically active and produce a chemical concentration field that creates surface-tension gradients along the surface. The resultant Marangoni stresses create flows that carry the particles, possibly concentrating them. For a 3D diffusion-dominated concentration field and Stokesian fluid we show that the surface dynamics of active particle density can be determined using nonlocal 2D surface operators. Remarkably, we also show that for both deep or shallow fluid layers this surface dynamics reduces to the 2D Keller-Segel model for the collective chemotactic aggregation of slime mold colonies. Mathematical analysis has established that the Keller-Segel model can yield finite-time, finite-mass concentration singularities. We show that such singular behavior occurs in our finite-depth system, and study the associated 3D flow structures. PMID:24724685

  4. Collective Surfing of Chemically Active Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masoud, Hassan; Shelley, Michael J.

    2014-03-01

    We study theoretically the collective dynamics of immotile particles bound to a 2D surface atop a 3D fluid layer. These particles are chemically active and produce a chemical concentration field that creates surface-tension gradients along the surface. The resultant Marangoni stresses create flows that carry the particles, possibly concentrating them. For a 3D diffusion-dominated concentration field and Stokesian fluid we show that the surface dynamics of active particle density can be determined using nonlocal 2D surface operators. Remarkably, we also show that for both deep or shallow fluid layers this surface dynamics reduces to the 2D Keller-Segel model for the collective chemotactic aggregation of slime mold colonies. Mathematical analysis has established that the Keller-Segel model can yield finite-time, finite-mass concentration singularities. We show that such singular behavior occurs in our finite-depth system, and study the associated 3D flow structures.

  5. Structural and chemical transformations in the products of the interaction of silica gel with vapours of TiCl4 and H2O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koshtyal, Yury M.; Malkov, Anatoly A.; Taulemesse, Jean-Marie; Petrov, Sergey N.; Krasilin, Andrei A.; Malygin, Anatoly A.

    2014-01-01

    Titanium oxide structures were synthesised by a molecular layering method on the surface of silica (ShSKG, SBET = 270 m2/g, V = 0.94 cm3/g, d = 14 nm). The change in the mass of the sample during the deposition was measured in situ. The samples were characterised by elemental analysis of Ti (photocolorimetry) and Cl (mercurimetry), scanning electron microscopy, and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. In this study, the effect of the temperature (200 °C, 500 °C) and number of synthesis cycles (1-4) on the distribution of titanium oxide structures over a cross-section of silica was investigated, along with the chemical composition and the microstructure of the modified silica samples.

  6. Generation of continuous wave terahertz frequency radiation from metal-organic chemical vapour deposition grown Fe-doped InGaAs and InGaAsP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohandas, Reshma A.; Freeman, Joshua R.; Rosamond, Mark C.; Hatem, Osama; Chowdhury, Siddhant; Ponnampalam, Lalitha; Fice, Martyn; Seeds, Alwyn J.; Cannard, Paul J.; Robertson, Michael J.; Moodie, David G.; Cunningham, John E.; Davies, A. Giles; Linfield, Edmund H.; Dean, Paul

    2016-04-01

    We demonstrate the generation of continuous wave terahertz (THz) frequency radiation from photomixers fabricated on both Fe-doped InGaAs and Fe-doped InGaAsP, grown by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition. The photomixers were excited using a pair of distributed Bragg reflector lasers with emission around 1550 nm, and THz radiation was emitted over a bandwidth of greater than 2.4 THz. Two InGaAs and four InGaAsP wafers with different Fe doping concentrations were investigated, with the InGaAs material found to outperform the InGaAsP in terms of emitted THz power. The dependencies of the emitted power on the photomixer applied bias, incident laser power, and material doping level were also studied.

  7. Chemical activity of simple basic peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brack, André; Barbier, Bernard

    1990-03-01

    Alternating all-L poly(leucyl-lysyl) increases markedly the rate of hydrolysis of oligoribonucleotides. Pure D poly (leucyl-lysyl) is as active as the all-L polymer. The homochiral polypeptides adopt aβ-sheet structure when complexed to the oligonucleotides. Alternating poly(D,L-Leu-D,L-Lys) made of racemic amino acids is much less efficient and is unable to adopt aβ-sheet structure. A set of alternating poly (leucyl-lysyl) ranging from the racemic to the homochiral all-L polymer has been checked. Their conformations can be described as a mixture of random coil andβ-sheet conformations, the amount ofβ-sheet increasing with the optical purity of the polymer. The hydrolytic activity follows the proportion ofβ-sheets, suggesting that the chemical activity is related to the geometry of the chain. Short peptides were prepared in order to evaluate the critical chain length required for the hydrolytic activity. A decapeptide is long enough to present 90% of the activity of the corresponding polypeptide.

  8. Active Chemical Thermodynamics promoted by activity of cortical actin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Bhaswati; Chaudhuri, Abhishek; Gowrishankar, Kripa; Rao, Madan

    2011-03-01

    The spatial distribution and dynamics of formation and breakup of the nanoclusters of cell surface proteins is controlled by the active remodeling dynamics of the underlying cortical actin. To explain these observations, we have proposed a novel mechanism of nanoclustering, involving the transient binding to and advection along constitutively occuring ``asters'' of cortical actin. We study the consequences of such active actin-based clustering, in the context of chemical reactions involving conformational changes of cell surface proteins. We find that the active remodeling of cortical actin, can give rise to a dramatic increase in efficiency and extent of conformational spread, even at low levels of expression at the cell surface. We define a activity temperature (τa) arising due to actin activities which can be used to describe chemical thermodynamics of the system. We plot TTT (time-temparature-transformation) curves and compute the Arrhenius factors which depend on τa . With this, the active asters can be treated as enzymes whose enzymatic reaction rate can be related to the activity.

  9. Antitumor activity of chemical modified natural compounds.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, M M

    1991-01-01

    Search of new activity substances starting from chemotherapeutic agents, continuously appears in international literature. Perhaps this search has been done more frequently in the field of antitumor chemotherapy on account of the unsuccess in saving advanced stage patients. The new point in this matter during the last decade was computer aid in planning more rational drugs. In near future "the accessibility of super computers and emergence of computer net systems, will open new avenues to rational drug design" (Portoghese, P. S., J. Med. Chem. 1989, 32, 1). Unknown pharmacological active compounds synthetized by plants can be found even without this electronic devices, as traditional medicine has pointed out in many countries, and give rise to a new drug. These compounds used as found in nature or after chemical modifications have produced successful experimental medicaments as FAA, "flavone acetic acid" with good results as inhibitors of slow growing animal tumors currently in preclinical evaluation for human treatment. In this lecture some international contributions in the field of chemical modified compounds as antineoplastic drugs will be examined, particularly those done by Brazilian researches. PMID:1842015

  10. Preparation of activated carbon by chemical activation under vacuum.

    PubMed

    Juan, Yang; Ke-Qiang, Qiu

    2009-05-01

    Activated carbons especially used for gaseous adsorption were prepared from Chinesefir sawdust by zinc chloride activation under vacuum condition. The micropore structure, adsorption properties, and surface morphology of activated carbons obtained under atmosphere and vacuum were investigated. The prepared activated carbons were characterized by SEM, FTIR, and nitrogen adsorption. It was found that the structure of the starting material is kept after activation. The activated carbon prepared under vacuum exhibited higher values of the BET surface area (up to 1079 m2 g(-1)) and total pore volume (up to 0.5665 cm3 g(-1)) than those of the activated carbon obtained under atmosphere. This was attributed to the effect of vacuum condition that reduces oxygen in the system and limits the secondary reaction of the organic vapor. The prepared activated carbon has well-developed microstructure and high microporosity. According to the data obtained, Chinese fir sawdust is a suitable precursor for activated carbon preparation. The obtained activated carbon could be used as a low-cost adsorbent with favorable surface properties. Compared with the traditional chemical activation, vacuum condition demands less energy consumption, simultaneity, and biomass-oil is collected in the procedure more conveniently. FTIR analysis showed that heat treatment would result in the aromatization of the carbon structure. PMID:19534162

  11. Biological and chemical studies on overheated brewed coffee.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Y; Shibamoto, T; Wei, C I; Fernando, S

    1987-03-01

    Vapour formed from overheated decaffeinated coffee was condensed and tested for mutagenicity using the Ames assay in Salmonella typhimurium strains TA98 and TA100. Vapour produced at 73 and 100 degrees C exhibited no mutagenicity. The basic fraction of vapour produced at 350 degrees C showed weak mutagenicity towards strains TA98 with metabolic activation. The chemical analysis of this fraction identified pyridines and pyrazines as the major constituents. None of the compounds identified in this fraction has been reported as mutagenic when tested in the Ames assay. PMID:3570110

  12. On-line speciation of inorganic and methyl mercury in waters and fish tissues using polyaniline micro-column and flow injection-chemical vapour generation-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (FI-CVG-ICPMS).

    PubMed

    Krishna, M V Balarama; Chandrasekaran, K; Karunasagar, D

    2010-04-15

    A simple and efficient method for the determination of ultra-trace amounts of inorganic mercury (iHg) and methylmercury (MeHg) in waters and fish tissues was developed using a micro-column filled with polyaniline (PANI) coupled online to flow injection-chemical vapour generation-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (FI-CVG-ICPMS) system. Preliminary studies indicated that inorganic and methyl mercury species could be separated on PANI column in two different speciation approaches. At pH <3, only iHg could be sorbed and almost no adsorption of MeHg was found (speciation procedure 1). If the sample solution pH is approximately 7, both MeHg and iHg species could be sorbed on the PANI column. Subsequently both the Hg species were selectively eluted with 2% HCl and a mixture of 2% HCl and 0.02% thiourea respectively (speciation procedure 2). The adsorption percentage of iHg on the PANI column was unchanged even with acidity of the sample solution increased to 6 mol L(-1). Therefore, an acidic solution (5 mol L(-1) HCl), used for ultra-sound assisted extraction of the mercury species from biological samples, was used directly to separate MeHg from iHg in the fish tissues (tuna fish ERM-CE 463, ERM-CE 464 and IAEA-350) by PANI column using speciation procedure 1. The determined values were in good agreement with certified values. Under optimal conditions, the limits of detection (LODs) were 2.52 pg and 3.24 pg for iHg and MeHg (as Hg) respectively. The developed method was applied successfully to the direct determination of iHg and MeHg in various waters (tap water, lake water, ground water and sea-water) and the recoveries for the spiked samples were in the range of 96-102% for both the Hg species. PMID:20188947

  13. A eutectic gold vapour laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tou, T. Y.; Cheak, K. E.; Low, K. S.

    This paper presents a eutectic gold vapour laser (EGVL) which uses the eutectic alloy of gold and silicon, Au/3.15Si, as the lasant. It was observed that, at low input power operation, the presence of the silicon vapour could increase the output of the 627.8 nm laser line by (50-60)% when compared with a gold vapour laser (GVL) which uses pure gold as the lasant. The improved laser output for the EGVL may be explained by an increased electron density, as a result of Penning ionization of silicon atoms. However, for higher input power operation, the EGVL showed a slower rate of increase in its laser output power and was overtaken by GVLs at a tube operating temperature of around 1650°C. This may be explained by a lowering of the electron temperature owing to increasing inelastic collisions between the electrons and silicon atoms which, although excited, may not produce additional electrons.

  14. Vapour Intrusion into Buildings - A Literature Review

    EPA Science Inventory

    This chapter provides a review of recent research on vapour intrusion of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) into buildings. The chapter builds on a report from Tillman and Weaver (2005) which reviewed the literature on vapour intrusion through 2005. Firstly, the term ‘vapour intru...

  15. Vapour growth and characterization of beta indium sesquitelluride crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reshmi, P. M.; Kunjomana, A. G.; Chandrasekharan, K. A.; Teena, M.

    2014-05-01

    Physical Vapour Deposition (PVD) provides stoichiometric crystals of different morphology, depending upon the materials, geometry of ampoules, temperature profiles, growth parameters and kinetics of crystallization. The crystal forms such as needles, platelets and spherulites of beta indium sesquitelluride (β-In2Te3) were produced by controlling the temperature of source and growth zones. The X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) and chemical analysis of the spherulitic crystals confirmed zinc blende structure with beta phase. Their resistivity (135.16 Ω cm) at room temperature (300 K) was determined by van der Pauw method. The temperature dependence of DC conductivity was investigated using the conventional two-probe technique. The variation of dielectric constant (ε1) and dielectric loss (tan δ) with temperature has been studied for different frequencies (1 kHz-1 MHz). The AC conductivity, σac(ω) was found to vary with angular frequency as ωs, where s is the frequency exponent. The values of s lie very close to unity and show a slight decrease with increase in temperature, which indicate a Correlated Barrier Hopping (CBH) between centres forming Intimate Valence Alternation Pairs (IVAP). The activation energy for conduction ranges from 0.187 eV to 0.095 eV. The microhardness of β-In2Te3 spherulites is found to be 353.5 kg/mm2, which is higher than that of other semiconducting chalcogenides. The results thus obtained on crystals grown from vapour phase open up ample possibilities for radiation detector applications.

  16. The seasonal cycle of water vapour on Mars from assimilation of Thermal Emission Spectrometer data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steele, Liam J.; Lewis, Stephen R.; Patel, Manish R.; Montmessin, Franck; Forget, François; Smith, Michael D.

    2014-07-01

    We present for the first time an assimilation of Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) water vapour column data into a Mars global climate model (MGCM). We discuss the seasonal cycle of water vapour, the processes responsible for the observed water vapour distribution, and the cross-hemispheric water transport. The assimilation scheme is shown to be robust in producing consistent reanalyses, and the global water vapour column error is reduced to around 2-4 pr μm depending on season. Wave activity is shown to play an important role in the water vapour distribution, with topographically steered flows around the Hellas and Argyre basins acting to increase transport in these regions in all seasons. At high northern latitudes, zonal wavenumber 1 and 2 stationary waves during northern summer are responsible for spreading the sublimed water vapour away from the pole. Transport by the zonal wavenumber 2 waves occurs primarily to the west of Tharsis and Arabia Terra and, combined with the effects of western boundary currents, this leads to peak water vapour column abundances here as observed by numerous spacecraft. A net transport of water to the northern hemisphere over the course of one Mars year is calculated, primarily because of the large northwards flux of water vapour which occurs during the local dust storm around LS=240-260°. Finally, outlying frost deposits that surround the north polar cap are shown to be important in creating the peak water vapour column abundances observed during northern summer.

  17. The Seasonal Cycle of Water Vapour on Mars from Assimilation of Thermal Emission Spectrometer Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steele, Liam J.; Lewis, Stephen R.; Patel, Manish R.; Montmessin, Franck; Forget, Francois; Smith, Michael D.

    2014-01-01

    We present for the first time an assimilation of Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) water vapour column data into a Mars global climate model (MGCM). We discuss the seasonal cycle of water vapour, the processes responsible for the observed water vapour distribution, and the cross-hemispheric water transport. The assimilation scheme is shown to be robust in producing consistent reanalyses, and the global water vapour column error is reduced to around 2-4 pr micron depending on season. Wave activity is shown to play an important role in the water vapour distribution, with topographically steered flows around the Hellas and Argyre basins acting to increase transport in these regions in all seasons. At high northern latitudes, zonal wavenumber 1 and 2 stationary waves during northern summer are responsible for spreading the sublimed water vapour away from the pole. Transport by the zonal wavenumber 2 waves occurs primarily to the west of Tharsis and Arabia Terra and, combined with the effects of western boundary currents, this leads to peak water vapour column abundances here as observed by numerous spacecraft. A net transport of water to the northern hemisphere over the course of one Mars year is calculated, primarily because of the large northwards flux of water vapour which occurs during the local dust storm around L(sub S) = 240-260deg. Finally, outlying frost deposits that surround the north polar cap are shown to be important in creating the peak water vapour column abundances observed during northern summer.

  18. Light propagation through atomic vapours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siddons, Paul

    2014-05-01

    This tutorial presents the theory necessary to model the propagation of light through an atomic vapour. The history of atom-light interaction theories is reviewed, and examples of resulting applications are provided. A numerical model is developed and results presented. Analytic solutions to the theory are found, based on approximations to the numerical work. These solutions are found to be in excellent agreement with experimental measurements.

  19. Electron Transport in Water Vapour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawaguchi, Satoru; Satoh, Kohki; Itoh, Hidenori

    2015-09-01

    Sets of electron collision cross sections for water vapour previously reported are examined by comparing calculated electron swarm parameters with measured parameters. Further, reliable cross section set of water vapour is estimated by the electron swarm method using Monte Carlo simulation to ensure the accuracy of the swarm parameter calculation. The values of an electron drift velocity, a longitudinal diffusion coefficient, and an effective ionisation coefficient calculated from Yousfi and Benabdessadok's set and those calculated from Itikawa and Mason's set do not necessarily agree with measured data. A new cross section set of water vapour, which consists of three kinds of rotational excitation, two kinds of vibrational excitation, three kinds of electron attachment, twenty-six kinds of electronic excitation, and six kinds of ionisation cross sections, and an elastic collision cross section, is estimated, and an anisotropic electron scattering for elastic and rotational excitation collision is considered. The swarm parameters calculated from the estimated cross section set is in good agreement with measured data in a wide range of reduced electric field.

  20. Antimicrobial action of essential oil vapours and negative air ions against Pseudomonas fluorescens.

    PubMed

    Tyagi, A K; Malik, A

    2010-10-15

    The aim of this study was to investigate the antibacterial activity of essential oil (in liquid as well as in vapour phase) and negative air ions (NAI) against Pseudomonas fluorescens. The combined effect of NAI with essential oil vapour was also investigated to determine kill time and morphological changes in bacterial cells. The MIC of Cymbopogon citratus (0.567 mg/ml), Mentha arvensis (0.567 mg/ml), Mentha piperita (1.125 mg/ml) and Eucalyptus globulus (2.25 mg/ml) was studied via the agar dilution method. To estimate the antibacterial activity of essential oils in the vapour phase, agar plates inoculated with P. fluorescens were incubated with various concentrations of each essential oil vapour and zone of inhibition was recorded. Further, in order to assess the kill time, P. fluorescens inoculated agar plates were exposed to selected bactericidal essential oil vapour and NAI, separately, in an air-tight chamber. A continuous decrease in bacterial count was observed over time. A significant enhancement in the bactericidal action was observed by exposure to the combination of essential oil vapour and NAI as compared to their individual action. Scanning electron microscopy was used to study the alteration in morphology of P. fluorescens cells after exposure to C. citratus oil vapour, NAI, and combination of C. citratus oil vapour and NAI. Maximum morphological deformation was found due to the combined effect of C. citratus oil vapour and NAI. This study demonstrates that the use of essential oils in the vapour phase is more advantageous than the liquid phase. Further the antibacterial effect of the essential oil vapours can be significantly enhanced by the addition of NAI. The work described here offers a novel and efficient approach for control of bacterial contamination that could be applied for food stabilization practices. PMID:20850191

  1. SOME CHEMICAL PROPERTIES UNDERLYING ARSENIC'S BIOLOGICAL ACTIVITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT

    In this paper some of the chemical properties of arsenicals (atomic
    and molecular orbitals, electronegativity, valence state, changes between
    valence state, nucleophilicity, the hard/soft acid/base principle) that may
    account for some of the b...

  2. Condensation of water vapour on moss-dominated biological soil crust, NW China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xin-Ping; Pan, Yan-Xia; Hu, Rui; Zhang, Ya-Feng; Zhang, Hao

    2014-03-01

    Characteristics of water vapour condensation, including the onset, duration, and amount of water vapour condensation on moss-dominated biological soil crust (BSC) and dune sand were studied under simulated conditions with varying air temperature and relative humidity. The simulations were performed in a plant growth chamber using an electronic balance recording the weight of condensation. There was a positive linear correlation between the water vapour condensation and relative humidity while the mean temperature was negatively linearly related to amounts of water vapour condensation for both soil surfaces. The amount of water vapour condensation on BSC and dune sand can be described by the difference between air temperature and dew point with an exponential function, indicating that when the difference of air temperature and dew point exceeds a value of 35.3◦C, there will be zero water vapour condensed on BSC. In contrast, when the difference of air temperature and dew point exceeds a value of 20.4◦C, the water vapour condensation will be zero for dune sand. In general, when the air is fully saturated with water and the dew point is equal to the current air temperature, the water vapour condensed on BSC attained its maximum value of 0.398 mm, whereas it was 0.058 mm for dune sand. In comparison, water vapour condensed on BSC was at a relatively high temperature and low relative humidity, while we did not detect water vapour condensation on the dune sand under the similar conditions. Physical and chemical analyses of the samples pointed to a greater porosity, high content of fine particles, and high salinity for BSC compared to the dune sand. These results highlight that soil physicochemical properties are the likely factors influencing the mechanism of water vapour condensation under specific meteorological conditions, as onset was earlier and the duration was longer for water vapour condensation on BSC in comparison with that of dune sand. This contributed to

  3. Towards outperforming conventional sensor arrays with fabricated individual photonic vapour sensors inspired by Morpho butterflies

    PubMed Central

    Potyrailo, Radislav A.; Bonam, Ravi K.; Hartley, John G.; Starkey, Timothy A.; Vukusic, Peter; Vasudev, Milana; Bunning, Timothy; Naik, Rajesh R.; Tang, Zhexiong; Palacios, Manuel A.; Larsen, Michael; Le Tarte, Laurie A.; Grande, James C.; Zhong, Sheng; Deng, Tao

    2015-01-01

    Combining vapour sensors into arrays is an accepted compromise to mitigate poor selectivity of conventional sensors. Here we show individual nanofabricated sensors that not only selectively detect separate vapours in pristine conditions but also quantify these vapours in mixtures, and when blended with a variable moisture background. Our sensor design is inspired by the iridescent nanostructure and gradient surface chemistry of Morpho butterflies and involves physical and chemical design criteria. The physical design involves optical interference and diffraction on the fabricated periodic nanostructures and uses optical loss in the nanostructure to enhance the spectral diversity of reflectance. The chemical design uses spatially controlled nanostructure functionalization. Thus, while quantitation of analytes in the presence of variable backgrounds is challenging for most sensor arrays, we achieve this goal using individual multivariable sensors. These colorimetric sensors can be tuned for numerous vapour sensing scenarios in confined areas or as individual nodes for distributed monitoring. PMID:26324320

  4. ILO activities in the area of chemical safety.

    PubMed

    Obadia, Isaac

    2003-08-21

    The ILO has been active in the area of safety in the use of chemicals at work since the year of its creation in 1919, including the development of international treaties and other technical instruments, the provision of technical assistance to its member States, and the development of chemical safety information systems. The two key ILO standards in this area are the Conventions on safety in the use of chemicals at work (No. 170, 1990), and the Prevention of Major Industrial Accidents (No. 174, 1993). The ILO Programme on occupational safety, health and environment (Safe Work) is currently responsible for ILO chemical safety activities. In the past two decades, most of ILO work in this area has been carried out within the context of inter-agency collaboration frameworks linking the ILO, WHO, UNEP, FAO, UNIDO, UNITAR, and the OECD, including the International Programme on Chemical Safety (IPCS), the Inter-Organisation Programme for the Sound Management of Chemicals (IOMC), and the Intergovernmental Forum on Chemical Safety (IFCS). Apart from the regular development, updating and dissemination of chemical safety information data bases such as the IPCS International Chemical Cards, the elaboration of a Globally harmonized system for the classification and labelling of Chemicals (GHS) has been the most outstanding achievement of this international collaboration on chemical safety. PMID:12909402

  5. Influence of process parameters on the surface and chemical properties of activated carbon obtained from biochar by chemical activation.

    PubMed

    Angın, Dilek; Altintig, Esra; Köse, Tijen Ennil

    2013-11-01

    Activated carbons were produced from biochar obtained through pyrolysis of safflower seed press cake by chemical activation with zinc chloride. The influences of process variables such as the activation temperature and the impregnation ratio on textural and chemical-surface properties of the activated carbons were investigated. Also, the adsorptive properties of activated carbons were tested using methylene blue dye as the targeted adsorbate. The experimental data indicated that the adsorption isotherms are well described by the Langmuir equilibrium isotherm equation. The optimum conditions resulted in activated carbon with a monolayer adsorption capacity of 128.21 mg g(-1) and carbon content 76.29%, while the BET surface area and total pore volume corresponded to 801.5m(2)g(-1) and 0.393 cm(3)g(-1), respectively. This study demonstrated that high surface area activated carbons can be prepared from the chemical activation of biochar with zinc chloride as activating agents. PMID:24080293

  6. Molecular emission in chemically active protostellar outflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefloch, B.

    2011-12-01

    Protostellar outflows play an important role in the dynamical and chemical evolution of cloud through shocks. The Herschel Space Observatory (HSO) brings new insight both on the molecular content and the physical conditions in protostellar shocks through high spectral and angular resolution studies of the emission of major gas cooling agents and hydrides. The Herschel/CHESS key-program is carrying out an in depth study of the prototypical shock region L1157-B1. Analysis of the line profiles detected allows to constrain the formation/destruction route of various molecular species, in relation with the predictions of MHD shock models. The Herschel/WISH key-program investigates the properties and origin of water emission in a broad sample of protostellar outflows and envelopes. Implications of the first results for future studies on mass-loss phenomena are discussed.

  7. The method of decreasing of chemical activity of coals

    SciTech Connect

    Korobetskii, I.A.; Nazimov, S.A.

    1998-07-01

    The investigations of the tendency of coal products to self-ignite show the decreasing of chemical activity of this product after its modification in cool oxygen plasma. A new method for the passivation of coal products was suggested.

  8. Method of decreasing of chemical activity of coals

    SciTech Connect

    Korobetskii, I.A.; Nazimov, S.A.

    1998-04-01

    The investigations of tendency of coal products to selfignition show the decreasing of chemical activity of this product after its modification in cool oxygen plasma. Was suggested a new method of coal products passivation.

  9. Active disturbance rejection controller for chemical reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Both, Roxana; Dulf, Eva H.; Muresan, Cristina I.

    2015-03-10

    In the petrochemical industry, the synthesis of 2 ethyl-hexanol-oxo-alcohols (plasticizers alcohol) is of high importance, being achieved through hydrogenation of 2 ethyl-hexenal inside catalytic trickle bed three-phase reactors. For this type of processes the use of advanced control strategies is suitable due to their nonlinear behavior and extreme sensitivity to load changes and other disturbances. Due to the complexity of the mathematical model an approach was to use a simple linear model of the process in combination with an advanced control algorithm which takes into account the model uncertainties, the disturbances and command signal limitations like robust control. However the resulting controller is complex, involving cost effective hardware. This paper proposes a simple integer-order control scheme using a linear model of the process, based on active disturbance rejection method. By treating the model dynamics as a common disturbance and actively rejecting it, active disturbance rejection control (ADRC) can achieve the desired response. Simulation results are provided to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  10. Active Emulsions: Synchronization of Chemical Oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraden, Seth

    2012-02-01

    We explore the dynamical behavior of emulsions consisting of nanoliter volume droplets of the oscillatory Belousov-Zhabotinsky (BZ) reaction separated by a continuous oil phase. Some of the aqueous BZ reactants partition into the oil leading to chemical coupling of the drops. We use microfluidics to vary the size, composition and topology of the drops in 1D and 2D. Addition of a light sensitive catalyst to the drops and illumination with a computer projector allows each drop to be individually perturbed. A variety of synchronous regimes are found that systematically vary with the coupling strength and whether coupling is dominated by activatory or inhibitory species. In 1D we observe in- and anti-phase oscillations, stationary Turing patterns in which drops stop oscillating, but form spatially periodic patterns of drops in the oxidized and reduced states, and more complex combinations of stationary and oscillatory drops. In 2D, the attractors are more complex and vary with network topology and coupling strength. For hexagonal lattices as a function of increasing coupling strength we observe right and left handed rotating oscillations, mixed oscillatory and Turing states and finally full Turing states. Reaction -- diffusion models based on a simplified description of the BZ chemistry and diffusion of messenger species reproduce a number of the experimental results. For a range of parameters, a simplified phase oscillator model provides an intuitive understanding of the complex synchronization patterns. [4pt] ``Coupled oscillations in a 1D emulsion of Belousov--Zhabotinsky droplets,'' Jorge Delgado, Ning Li, Marcin Leda, Hector O. Gonzalez-Ochoa, Seth Fraden and Irving R. Epstein, Soft Matter, 7, 3155 (2011).

  11. Mercury vapour suppression by various liquid media.

    PubMed

    Sutow, E J; Foong, W C; Rizkalla, A S; Jones, D W; Power, N L

    1994-09-01

    Fresh and used photographic fixer, Merconvap and water were evaluated for their ability to suppress the vapourization of mercury. Mercury vapour concentration above the four test storage liquids was measured at various times between 10 min and 335 days, using a mercury vapour measuring instrument. The data were analysed using a Student-Newman-Keuls multiple comparison test (P = 0.05). The results showed that fresh and used fixer and Merconvap suppressed the vapourization of mercury to below the detection limit of the measuring instrument (0.01 mg/m3). Water was much less effective compared with the other liquids and showed an increase in mercury vapour concentration with log t. PMID:7996339

  12. Activated chemical defenses suppress herbivory on freshwater red algae.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Keri M; Hay, Mark E

    2013-04-01

    The rapid life cycles of freshwater algae are hypothesized to suppress selection for chemical defenses against herbivores, but this notion remains untested. Investigations of chemical defenses are rare for freshwater macrophytes and absent for freshwater red algae. We used crayfish to assess the palatability of five freshwater red algae relative to a palatable green alga and a chemically defended aquatic moss. We then assessed the roles of structural, nutritional, and chemical traits in reducing palatability. Both native and non-native crayfish preferred the green alga Cladophora glomerata to four of the five red algae. Batrachospermum helminthosum, Kumanoa holtonii, and Tuomeya americana employed activated chemical defenses that suppressed feeding by 30-60 % following damage to algal tissues. Paralemanea annulata was defended by its cartilaginous structure, while Boldia erythrosiphon was palatable. Activated defenses are thought to reduce ecological costs by expressing potent defenses only when actually needed; thus, activation might be favored in freshwater red algae whose short-lived gametophytes must grow and reproduce rapidly over a brief growing season. The frequency of activated chemical defenses found here (three of five species) is 3-20× higher than for surveys of marine algae or aquatic vascular plants. If typical for freshwater red algae, this suggests that (1) their chemical defenses may go undetected if chemical activation is not considered and (2) herbivory has been an important selective force in the evolution of freshwater Rhodophyta. Investigations of defenses in freshwater rhodophytes contribute to among-system comparisons and provide insights into the generality of plant-herbivore interactions and their evolution. PMID:23011851

  13. Changes in thyroid peroxidase activity in response to various chemicals.

    PubMed

    Song, Mee; Kim, Youn-Jung; Park, Yong-Keun; Ryu, Jae-Chun

    2012-08-01

    Thyroperoxidase (TPO) is a large heme-containing glycoprotein that catalyzes the transfer of iodine to thyroglobulin during thyroid hormone (TH) synthesis. Previously, we established an in vitro assay for TPO activity based on human recombinant TPO (hrTPO) stably transfected into human follicular thyroid carcinoma (FTC-238) cells. It is important to determine whether environmental chemicals can disrupt TPO activity because it is an important factor in the TH axis. In this study, we used our assay to examine the changes in TPO activity in response to various chemicals, including benzophenones (BPs), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and persistent organic pollutants (POPs). Overall, BPs, PAHs, and POPs slightly altered TPO activity at low doses, as compared with the positive controls methimazole (MMI), genistein, and 2,2',4,4'-tetrahydroxy BP. Benzophenone, benzhydrol, 3-methylchloranthracene, pyrene, benzo(k)fluoranthene, benzo(e)pyrene, perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS), perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), and heptachlor decreased TPO activity, while 2,4-dihydroxy BP, 2,2'-dihydroxy-4-methoxy BP, and dibenzo(a,h)anthracene increased TPO activity. From these data, we can predict the disruption of TPO activity by various chemicals as a sensitive TH end point. TPO activity should be considered when enacting measures to regulate environmental exposure to thyroid-disrupting chemicals. PMID:22699773

  14. Guiding Catalytically Active Particles with Chemically Patterned Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uspal, W. E.; Popescu, M. N.; Dietrich, S.; Tasinkevych, M.

    2016-07-01

    Catalytically active Janus particles suspended in solution create gradients in the chemical composition of the solution along their surfaces, as well as along any nearby container walls. The former leads to self-phoresis, while the latter gives rise to chemiosmosis, providing an additional contribution to self-motility. Chemiosmosis strongly depends on the molecular interactions between the diffusing chemical species and the wall. We show analytically, using an approximate "point-particle" approach, that by chemically patterning a planar substrate one can direct the motion of Janus particles: the induced chemiosmotic flows can cause particles to either "dock" at the chemical step between the two materials or follow a chemical stripe. These theoretical predictions are confirmed by full numerical calculations. Generically, docking occurs for particles which tend to move away from their catalytic caps, while stripe following occurs in the opposite case. Our analysis reveals the physical mechanisms governing this behavior.

  15. Quantitative genetic activity graphical profiles for use in chemical evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Waters, M.D.; Stack, H.F.; Garrett, N.E.; Jackson, M.A.

    1990-12-31

    A graphic approach, terms a Genetic Activity Profile (GAP), was developed to display a matrix of data on the genetic and related effects of selected chemical agents. The profiles provide a visual overview of the quantitative (doses) and qualitative (test results) data for each chemical. Either the lowest effective dose or highest ineffective dose is recorded for each agent and bioassay. Up to 200 different test systems are represented across the GAP. Bioassay systems are organized according to the phylogeny of the test organisms and the end points of genetic activity. The methodology for producing and evaluating genetic activity profile was developed in collaboration with the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). Data on individual chemicals were compiles by IARC and by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Data are available on 343 compounds selected from volumes 1-53 of the IARC Monographs and on 115 compounds identified as Superfund Priority Substances. Software to display the GAPs on an IBM-compatible personal computer is available from the authors. Structurally similar compounds frequently display qualitatively and quantitatively similar profiles of genetic activity. Through examination of the patterns of GAPs of pairs and groups of chemicals, it is possible to make more informed decisions regarding the selection of test batteries to be used in evaluation of chemical analogs. GAPs provided useful data for development of weight-of-evidence hazard ranking schemes. Also, some knowledge of the potential genetic activity of complex environmental mixtures may be gained from an assessment of the genetic activity profiles of component chemicals. The fundamental techniques and computer programs devised for the GAP database may be used to develop similar databases in other disciplines. 36 refs., 2 figs.

  16. Physical properties of vapour grown indium monotelluride platelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunjomana, A. G.; Chandrasekharan, K. A.; Teena, M.

    2015-02-01

    Indium monotelluride (InTe) crystals were grown from vapour phase under different temperature gradients by employing physical vapour deposition (PVD) method. The morphology of these crystals such as whiskers, needles, platelets etc., strongly depends on the temperature distribution in the horizontal dual zone furnace. InTe platelets were deposited by setting the temperature of the charge (TC) and growth (TS) zones at 1073 K and 773 K (ΔT=300 K), respectively, for different growth periods (24 h, 48 h, 72 h and 96 h). The surface growth features have been analyzed by scanning electron microscopes, which indicate layer growth mechanism for all the crystals. Various crystals grown under ΔT=200 K and 300 K (retaining TS invariant) were examined by X-ray diffraction and elemental analysis. InTe samples exhibited consistent lattice parameters, density and atomic percentage, establishing stoichiometry and chemical homogeneity. The results obtained for Seebeck coefficient, electrical conductivity, power factor, dislocation density and microhardness are found to be reproducible as well. The vapour deposited InTe platelets are mechanically stable and possess high value of TEP, which ensure their practical application in thermoelectric power generation.

  17. Bioorthogonal Chemical Activation of Kinases in Living Systems

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Selective manipulation of protein kinases under living conditions is highly desirable yet extremely challenging, particularly in a gain-of-function fashion. Here we employ our recently developed bioorthogonal cleavage reaction as a general strategy for intracellular activation of individual kinases. Site-specific incorporation of trans-cyclooctene-caged lysine in place of the conserved catalytic lysine, in conjunction with the cleavage partner dimethyl-tetrazine, allowed efficient lysine decaging with the kinase activity chemically rescued in living systems. PMID:27280167

  18. Chemical Components and Cardiovascular Activities of Valeriana spp.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Heng-Wen; Wei, Ben-Jun; He, Xuan-Hui; Liu, Yan; Wang, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Valeriana spp. is a flowering plant that is well known for its essential oils, iridoid compounds such as monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes, flavonoids, alkaloids, amino acids, and lignanoids. Valeriana spp. exhibits a wide range of biological activities such as lowering blood pressure and heart rate, antimyocardial ischemia reperfusion injury, antiarrhythmia, and regulation of blood lipid levels. This review focuses on the chemical constituents and cardiovascular activities of Valeriana spp. PMID:26788113

  19. Total Chemical Synthesis of Biologically Active Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor

    SciTech Connect

    Mandal, Kalyaneswar; Kent, Stephen B.H.

    2011-09-15

    The 204-residue covalent-dimer vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, see picture) with full mitogenic activity was prepared from three unprotected peptide segments by one-pot native chemical ligations. The covalent structure of the synthetic VEGF was confirmed by precise mass measurement, and the three-dimensional structure of the synthetic protein was determined by high-resolution X-ray crystallography.

  20. Ring closure dynamics for a chemically active polymer.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Debarati; Thakur, Snigdha; Tao, Yu-Guo; Kapral, Raymond

    2014-12-21

    The principles that underlie the motion of colloidal particles in concentration gradients and the propulsion of chemically-powered synthetic nanomotors are used to design active polymer chains. The active chains contain catalytic and noncatalytic monomers, or beads, at the ends or elsewhere along the polymer chain. A chemical reaction at the catalytic bead produces a self-generated concentration gradient and the noncatalytic bead responds to this gradient by a diffusiophoretic mechanism that causes these two beads to move towards each other. Because of this chemotactic response, the dynamical properties of these active polymer chains are very different from their inactive counterparts. In particular, we show that ring closure and loop formation are much more rapid than those for inactive chains, which rely primarily on diffusion to bring distant portions of the chain in close proximity. The mechanism presented in this paper can be extended to other chemical systems which rely on diffusion to bring reagents into contact for reactions to occur. This study suggests the possibility that synthetic systems could make use of chemically-powered active motion or chemotaxis to effectively carry out complex transport tasks in reaction dynamics, much like those that molecular motors perform in biological systems. PMID:25365034

  1. EVALUATION AND DEMONSTRATION OF THE CHEMICALLY ACTIVE FLUID BED

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of the operation of a 17-MW Chemically Active Fluid Bed (CAFB) demonstration unit, retrofitted to a natural gas boiler. The CAFB process gasifies high-sulfur, high-metals-content liquid and solid fuels. Residual oil, lignite, and bituminous coal were gasi...

  2. QUANTITATIVE GENETIC ACTIVITY GRAPHICAL PROFILES FOR USE IN CHEMICAL EVALUATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A graphic approach termed a Genetic Activity Profile (GAP) has been developed to display a matrix of data on the genetic and related effects of selected chemical agents. he profiles provide a visual overview of the quantitative (doses) and qualitative (test results) data for each...

  3. Chemical and structural features influencing the biological activity of curcumin.

    PubMed

    Priyadarsini, K Indira

    2013-01-01

    Curcumin, a polyphenolic natural product, exhibits therapeutic activity against a number of diseases, attributed mainly to its chemical structure and unique physical, chemical, and biological properties. It is a diferuloyl methane molecule [1,7-bis (4-hydroxy-3- methoxyphenyl)-1,6-heptadiene-3,5-dione)] containing two ferulic acid residues joined by a methylene bridge. It has three important functionalities: an aromatic o-methoxy phenolic group, α, β-unsaturated β-diketo moiety and a seven carbon linker. Extensive research in the last two decades has provided evidence for the role of these different functional groups in its crucial biological activities. A few highlights of chemical structural features associated with the biological activity of curcumin are: The o-methoxyphenol group and methylenic hydrogen are responsible for the antioxidant activity of curcumin, and curcumin donates an electron/ hydrogen atom to reactive oxygen species. Curcumin interacts with a number of biomolecules through non-covalent and covalent binding. The hydrogen bonding and hydrophobicity of curcumin, arising from the aromatic and tautomeric structures along with the flexibility of the linker group are responsible for the non-covalent interactions. The α, β-unsaturated β-diketone moiety covalently interacts with protein thiols, through Michael reaction. The β-diketo group forms chelates with transition metals, there by reducing the metal induced toxicity and some of the metal complexes exhibit improved antioxidant activity as enzyme mimics. New analogues with improved activity are being developed with modifications on specific functional groups of curcumin. The physico-chemical and structural features associated with some of the biological activities of curcumin and important analogues are summarized in this article. PMID:23116315

  4. Structure activity relationships to assess new chemicals under TSCA

    SciTech Connect

    Auletta, A.E.

    1990-12-31

    Under Section 5 of the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA), manufacturers must notify the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) 90 days before manufacturing, processing, or importing a new chemical substance. This is referred to as a premanufacture notice (PMN). The PMN must contain certain information including chemical identity, production volume, proposed uses, estimates of exposure and release, and any health or environmental test data that are available to the submitter. Because there is no explicit statutory authority that requires testing of new chemicals prior to their entry into the market, most PMNs are submitted with little or no data. As a result, EPA has developed special techniques for hazard assessment of PMN chemicals. These include (1) evaluation of available data on the chemical itself, (2) evaluation of data on analogues of the PMN, or evaluation of data on metabolites or analogues of metabolites of the PMN, (3) use of quantitative structure activity relationships (QSARs), and (4) knowledge and judgement of scientific assessors in the interpretation and integration of the information developed in the course of the assessment. This approach to evaluating potential hazards of new chemicals is used to identify those that are most in need of addition review of further testing. It should not be viewed as a replacement for testing. 4 tabs.

  5. Sensitive detection of chemical agents and toxic industrial chemicals using active open-path FTIRs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, William T.

    2004-03-01

    Active open-path FTIR sensors provide more sensitive detection of chemical agents than passive FTIRs, such as the M21 RSCAAL and JSLSCAD, and at the same time identify and quantify toxic industrial chemicals (TIC). Passive FTIRs are bistatic sensors relying on infrared sources of opportunity. Utilization of earth-based sources of opportunity limits the source temperatures available for passive chemical-agent FTIR sensors to 300° K. Active FTIR chemical-agent sensors utilize silicon carbide sources, which can be operated at 1500° K. The higher source temperature provides more than an 80-times increase in the infrared radiant flux emitted per unit area in the 7 to 14 micron spectral fingerprint region. Minimum detection limits are better than 5 μgm/m3 for GA, GB, GD, GF and VX. Active FTIR sensors can (1) assist first responders and emergency response teams in their assessment of and reaction to a terrorist threat, (2) provide information on the identification of the TIC present and their concentrations and (3) contribute to the understanding and prevention of debilitating disorders analogous to the Gulf War Syndrome for military and civilian personnel.

  6. Formation and Yield of Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Synthesized via Chemical Vapour Deposition Routes Using Different Metal-Based Catalysts of FeCoNiAl, CoNiAl and FeNiAl-LDH

    PubMed Central

    Hussein, Mohd Zobir; Mohamad Jaafar, Adila; Hj. Yahaya, Asmah; Masarudin, Mas Jaffri; Zainal, Zulkarnain

    2014-01-01

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were prepared via chemical vapor deposition (CVD) using a series of different catalysts, derived from FeCoNiAl, CoNiAl and FeNiAl layered double hydroxides (LDHs). Catalyst-active particles were obtained by calcination of LDHs at 800 °C for 5 h. Nitrogen and hexane were used as the carrier gas and carbon source respectively, for preparation of MWCNTs using CVD methods at 800 °C. MWCNTs were allowed to grow for 30 min on the catalyst spread on an alumina boat in a quartz tube. The materials were subsequently characterized through X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, surface area analysis, field emission scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. It was determined that size and yield of MWCNTs varied depending on the type of LDH catalyst precursor that is used during synthesis. MWCNTs obtained using CoNiAl-LDH as the catalyst precursor showed smaller diameter and higher yield compared to FeCoNiAl and FeNiAl LDHs. PMID:25380526

  7. Formation and yield of multi-walled carbon nanotubes synthesized via chemical vapour deposition routes using different metal-based catalysts of FeCoNiAl, CoNiAl and FeNiAl-LDH.

    PubMed

    Hussein, Mohd Zobir; Jaafar, Adila Mohamad; Yahaya, Asmah Hj; Masarudin, Mas Jaffri; Zainal, Zulkarnain

    2014-01-01

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were prepared via chemical vapor deposition (CVD) using a series of different catalysts, derived from FeCoNiAl, CoNiAl and FeNiAl layered double hydroxides (LDHs). Catalyst-active particles were obtained by calcination of LDHs at 800 °C for 5 h. Nitrogen and hexane were used as the carrier gas and carbon source respectively, for preparation of MWCNTs using CVD methods at 800 °C. MWCNTs were allowed to grow for 30 min on the catalyst spread on an alumina boat in a quartz tube. The materials were subsequently characterized through X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, surface area analysis, field emission scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. It was determined that size and yield of MWCNTs varied depending on the type of LDH catalyst precursor that is used during synthesis. MWCNTs obtained using CoNiAl-LDH as the catalyst precursor showed smaller diameter and higher yield compared to FeCoNiAl and FeNiAl LDHs. PMID:25380526

  8. Chemical constituents of Solanum coagulans and their antimicrobial activities.

    PubMed

    Qin, Xu-Jie; Lunga, Paul-Keilah; Zhao, Yun-Li; Liu, Ya-Ping; Luo, Xiao-Dong

    2016-04-01

    The present study aimed at determining the chemical constituents of Solanum coagulans and their antimicrobial activities. The compounds were isolated by various chromatographic techniques and their structures were elucidated on the basis of extensive spectroscopic analysis, chemical methods, and comparison with reported spectroscopic data. One new phenolic glycoside, methyl salicylate 2-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl-(1→2)-β-D-glucopyranoside (1), together with 12 known compounds (2-13), were isolated from the aerial parts of Solanum coagulans. Compound 1 was a new phenolic glycoside, and 2-6 were isolated from Solanum genus for the first time. The antimicrobial activities of the isolated compounds were also evaluated. Compound 7 showed remarkable antifungal activity against T. mentagrophytes, M. gypseum and E. floccosum with MIC values being 3.13, 1.56 and 3.13 μg·mL(-1), respectively. PMID:27114320

  9. Chemical tools for probing histone deacetylase (HDAC) activity.

    PubMed

    Minoshima, Masafumi; Kikuchi, Kazuya

    2015-01-01

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) enzymes are responsible for removing epigenetic markers on histone proteins, which results in chromatin inactivation and gene repression. An evaluation of HDAC activity is essential for not only determining the physiological function of HDACs, but also for developing HDAC-targeting drugs. This review focuses on the chemical tools used to detect HDAC activity. We highlight activity-based probes and positron emission tomography probes based on the chemical structure of the inhibitors. We also summarize fluorogenic probes used in single-step methods for HDAC detection. These fluorogenic probes are designed based on the nucleophilicity of the amino group, aggregation via electrostatic interactions, and changes in the DNA binding properties. These fluorogenic systems may enable facile and rapid screening to evaluate HDAC inhibitors, which will contribute to the development of epigenetic drugs. PMID:25864671

  10. Propolis volatile compounds: chemical diversity and biological activity: a review

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Propolis is a sticky material collected by bees from plants, and used in the hive as building material and defensive substance. It has been popular as a remedy in Europe since ancient times. Nowadays, propolis use in over-the-counter preparations, “bio”-cosmetics and functional foods, etc., increases. Volatile compounds are found in low concentrations in propolis, but their aroma and significant biological activity make them important for propolis characterisation. Propolis is a plant-derived product: its chemical composition depends on the local flora at the site of collection, thus it offers a significant chemical diversity. The role of propolis volatiles in identification of its plant origin is discussed. The available data about chemical composition of propolis volatiles from different geographic regions are reviewed, demonstrating significant chemical variability. The contribution of volatiles and their constituents to the biological activities of propolis is considered. Future perspectives in research on propolis volatiles are outlined, especially in studying activities other than antimicrobial. PMID:24812573

  11. Vapour transport of rare earth elements (REE) in volcanic gas: Evidence from encrustations at Oldoinyo Lengai

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbert, C. D.; Williams-Jones, A. E.

    2008-10-01

    Fumarolic encrustations and natrocarbonatite lava from the active crater of Oldoinyo Lengai volcano, Tanzania, were sampled and analysed. Two types of encrustation were distinguished on the basis of their REE content, enriched (~ 2800-5600 × [REE chondrite]) and depleted (~ 100-200 × [REE chondrite]) relative to natrocarbonatite (1700-1900 × [REE chondrite]. REE-enriched encrustations line the walls of actively degassing fumaroles, whereas REE-depleted encrustations occur mainly along cracks in and as crusts on cooling natrocarbonatite lava flows; one of the low REE encrustation samples was a stalactite from the wall of a possible fumarole. The encrustations are interpreted to have different origins, the former precipitating from volcanic gas and the latter from meteoric/ground water converted to steam by the heat of the overlying lava flow(s). REE-profiles of encrustations and natrocarbonatite are parallel, suggesting that there was no preferential mobilization of specific REE by either volcanic vapour or meteoric water vapour. The elevated REE-content of the first group of encrustations suggests that direct REE-transport from natrocarbonatite to volcanic vapour is possible. The REE trends observed in samples precipitating directly from the volcanic vapour cannot be explained by dry volatility based on the available data as there is no evidence in the encrustation compositions of the greatly enhanced volatility predicted for Yb and Eu. The observed extreme REE-fractionation with steep La/Sm slopes parallel to those of the natrocarbonatite reflects solvation and complexation reactions in the vapour phase that did not discriminate amongst the different REE or similar transport of REE in both the natrocarbonatite magma and its exsolving vapour. The low concentrations of REE in the encrustations produced by meteoric vapour suggest that the temperature was too low or that this vapour did not contain the ligands necessary to permit significant mobilization of the REE.

  12. Land cover change and water vapour flows: learning from Australia.

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Line; Dunlop, Michael; Foran, Barney

    2003-01-01

    Australia is faced with large-scale dryland salinization problems, largely as a consequence of the clearing of native vegetation for cropland and grassland. We estimate the change in continental water vapour flow (evapotranspiration) of Australia during the past 200 years. During this period there has been a substantial decrease in woody vegetation and a corresponding increase in croplands and grasslands. The shift in land use has caused a ca. 10% decrease in water vapour flows from the continent. This reduction corresponds to an annual freshwater flow of almost 340 km(3). The society-induced alteration of freshwater flows is estimated at more than 15 times the volume of run-off freshwater that is diverted and actively managed in the Australian society. These substantial water vapour flow alterations were previously not addressed in water management but are now causing serious impacts on the Australian society and local economies. Global and continental freshwater assessments and policy often neglects the interplay between freshwater flows and landscape dynamics. Freshwater issues on both regional and global levels must be rethought and the interplay between terrestrial ecosystems and freshwater better incorporated in freshwater and ecosystem management. PMID:14728792

  13. Dynamics of self-propelled nanomotors in chemically active media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thakur, Snigdha; Kapral, Raymond

    2011-07-01

    Synthetic chemically powered nanomotors often rely on the environment for their fuel supply. The propulsion properties of such motors can be altered if the environment in which they move is chemically active. The dynamical properties of sphere dimer motors, composed of linked catalytic and noncatalytic monomers, are investigated in active media. Chemical reactions occur at the catalytic monomer and the reactant or product of this reaction is involved in cubic autocatalytic or linear reactions that take place in the bulk phase environment. For these reactions, as the bulk phase reaction rates increase, the motor propulsion velocity decreases. For the cubic autocatalytic reaction, this net effect arises from a competition between a reduction of the nonequilibrium concentration gradient that leads to smaller velocity and the generation of fuel in the environment that tends to increase the motor propulsion. The role played by detailed balance in determining the form of the concentration gradient in the motor vicinity in the active medium is studied. Simulations are carried out using reactive multiparticle collision dynamics and compared with theoretical models to obtain further insight into sphere dimer dynamics in active media.

  14. Guiding catalytically active particles with chemically patterned surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uspal, William; Popescu, Mihail; Dietrich, Siegfried; Tasinkevych, Mykola

    Catalytically active Janus particles in solution create gradients in the chemical composition of the solution along their surfaces, as well as along any nearby container walls. The former leads to self-phoresis, while the latter gives rise to chemi-osmosis, providing an additional contribution to self-motility. Chemi-osmosis strongly depends on the molecular interactions between the diffusing chemical species and the wall. We show analytically, using an approximate ``point-particle'' approach, that by chemically patterning a planar substrate (e.g., by adsorbing two different materials) one can direct the motion of Janus particles: the induced chemi-osmotic flows can cause particles to either ``dock'' at a chemical step between the two materials, or to follow a chemical stripe. These theoretical predictions are confirmed by full numerical calculations. Generically, docking occurs for particles which tend to move away from their catalytic caps, while stripe-following occurs in the opposite case. Our analysis reveals the physical mechanisms governing this behavior.

  15. The growth of n-type GaSb by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition : effects of two-band conduction on carrier concentrations and donor activation.

    SciTech Connect

    Cederberg, Jeffrey George; Biefeld, Robert Malcolm

    2003-06-01

    n-type GaSb has been prepared by metal-organic chemical vapour deposition with tellurium donors using diethyltelluride as the dopant precursor. The maximum carrier concentration achieved was 1.7 x 10{sup 18} cm{sup -3}, as measured by van der Pauw-Hall effect measurements, for an atomic tellurium concentration of 1.8 x 10{sup 19} cm{sup -3}. The apparent low activation of tellurium donors is explained by a model that considers the effect of electrons occupying both the {Lambda} and L bands in GaSb due to the small energy difference between the {Lambda} and L conduction band minima. The model also accounts for the apparent increase in the carrier concentration determined by van der Pauw-Hall effect measurements at cryogenic temperatures.

  16. Mining Chemical Activity Status from High-Throughput Screening Assays

    PubMed Central

    Soufan, Othman; Ba-alawi, Wail; Afeef, Moataz; Essack, Magbubah; Rodionov, Valentin; Kalnis, Panos; Bajic, Vladimir B.

    2015-01-01

    High-throughput screening (HTS) experiments provide a valuable resource that reports biological activity of numerous chemical compounds relative to their molecular targets. Building computational models that accurately predict such activity status (active vs. inactive) in specific assays is a challenging task given the large volume of data and frequently small proportion of active compounds relative to the inactive ones. We developed a method, DRAMOTE, to predict activity status of chemical compounds in HTP activity assays. For a class of HTP assays, our method achieves considerably better results than the current state-of-the-art-solutions. We achieved this by modification of a minority oversampling technique. To demonstrate that DRAMOTE is performing better than the other methods, we performed a comprehensive comparison analysis with several other methods and evaluated them on data from 11 PubChem assays through 1,350 experiments that involved approximately 500,000 interactions between chemicals and their target proteins. As an example of potential use, we applied DRAMOTE to develop robust models for predicting FDA approved drugs that have high probability to interact with the thyroid stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR) in humans. Our findings are further partially and indirectly supported by 3D docking results and literature information. The results based on approximately 500,000 interactions suggest that DRAMOTE has performed the best and that it can be used for developing robust virtual screening models. The datasets and implementation of all solutions are available as a MATLAB toolbox online at www.cbrc.kaust.edu.sa/dramote and can be found on Figshare. PMID:26658480

  17. Chemical basis of the photosensitizing activity of angelicins.

    PubMed

    Dall'Acqua, F; Vedaldi, D; Caffieri, S; Guiotto, A; Bordin, F; Rodighiero, G

    1984-12-01

    Angelicins are a group of compounds that show marked photobiologic activity on various substrates; some of them have been proposed as potential agents for the photochemotherapy of skin diseases. A good correlation exists between the photosensitizing activity of these compounds and their capacity to induce monofunctional lesions to DNA; therefore, we believe the chemical nature of these photolesions, we isolated from the products of hydrolysis of the photocombinations between 5 angelicins (angelicin, 4-methyl, 5-methyl, 5'-methyl, and 5,5'-dimethylangelicin) and DNA, the corresponding new fluorescent monoadducts between the 4',5'-double bond of the furocoumarins and the 5,6-double bond of thymine. PMID:6531039

  18. An Investigation of Tertiary Students' Understanding of Evaporation, Condensation and Vapour Pressure. Research Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gopal, Hemant; Kleinsmidt, Jacques; Case, Jennifer; Musonge, Paul

    2004-01-01

    Based on a purposive sample of 15 second-year chemical engineering students, this study investigates students' conceptions of evaporation, condensation and vapour pressure. During individual interviews the students were questioned on three tasks that had been designed around these topics. Qualitative analysis of student responses showed a range of…

  19. An Investigation of Tertiary Students' Understanding of Evaporation, Condensation and Vapour Pressure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gopal, Hemant; Kleinsmidt, Jacques; Case, Jennifer; Musonge, Paul

    2004-01-01

    Based on a purposive sample of 15 second-year chemical engineering students, this study investigates students' conceptions of evaporation, condensation and vapour pressure. During individual interviews the students were questioned on three tasks that had been designed around these topics. Qualitative analysis of student responses showed a range of…

  20. Chemical structure and immunobiological activity of Porphyromonas gingivalis lipid A.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Tomohiko; Asai, Yasuyuki; Makimura, Yutaka; Tamai, Riyoko

    2007-01-01

    In 1933, Boivin et al. extracted an endotoxin from Salmonella typhimurium for the first time, after which a variety of chemical and biological studies on endotoxins have been performed. In 1952, the structural and functional properties of endotoxic lipopolysaccharide (LPS), extracted by a hot phenol and water method devised by Westphal et al., were reported, which led to a number of studies of Gram-negative bacteria in regards to the host defense mechanism. Since 1960, the unique chemical structure and biological activity of Bacteroides species LPS have received a great deal of attention, and there is a long history of such studies. In addition, among oral bacterial strains that have received attention as causative periodontopathic bacteria, many have been classified as Bacteroides species. In particular, a number of researchers have investigated whether LPS of Porphyromonas gingivalis (formerly Bacteroides gingivalis), a black-pigmented oral anaerobic rod, is a virulent factor of the bacterium. The active center of the LPS of these Bacteroides species, the lipid A molecule, is known to be an active participant in endotoxic activation, though its other biological activities are weak, due to its unique chemical structure and action as an antagonist of LPS. On the other hand, many reports have noted that the LPS of those species activate cells in C3H/HeJ mice, which generally do not respond to LPS. We were the first to reveal the chemical structure of P. gingivalis lipid A and, together with other researchers, reported that P. gingivalis LPS and its lipid A have activities toward C3H/HeJ mice. Since that time, because of the popularity of Toll-like receptor (TLR) studies, a great deal of evidence has been reported indicating that P. gingivalis LPS and its lipid A are ligands that act on TLR2. In order to solve such problems as heterogeneity and contamination of the biologically active components of P. gingivalis lipid A, we produced a chemical synthesis counterpart

  1. Insect-gene-activity detection system for chemical and biological warfare agents and toxic industrial chemicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackie, Ryan S.; Schilling, Amanda S.; Lopez, Arturo M.; Rayms-Keller, Alfredo

    2002-02-01

    Detection of multiple chemical and biological weapons (CBW) agents and/or complex mixtures of toxic industrial chemicals (TIC) is imperative for both the commercial and military sectors. In a military scenario, a multi-CBW attack would create confusion, thereby delaying decontamination and therapeutic efforts. In the commercial sector, polluted sites invariably contain a mixture of TIC. Novel detection systems capable of detecting CBW and TIC are sorely needed. While it may be impossible to build a detector capable of discriminating all the possible combinations of CBW, a detection system capable of statistically predicting the most likely composition of a given mixture is within the reach of current emerging technologies. Aquatic insect-gene activity may prove to be a sensitive, discriminating, and elegant paradigm for the detection of CBW and TIC. We propose to systematically establish the expression patterns of selected protein markers in insects exposed to specific mixtures of chemical and biological warfare agents to generate a library of biosignatures of exposure. The predicting capabilities of an operational library of biosignatures of exposures will allow the detection of emerging novel or genetically engineered agents, as well as complex mixtures of chemical and biological weapons agents. CBW and TIC are discussed in the context of war, terrorism, and pollution.

  2. STRUCTURE-ACTIVITY RELATIONSHIP STUIDES AND THEIR ROLE IN PREDICTING AND INVESTIGATING CHEMICAL TOXICITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Structure-Activity Relationship Studies and their Role in Predicting and Investigating Chemical Toxicity

    Structure-activity relationships (SAR) represent attempts to generalize chemical information relative to biological activity for the twin purposes of generating insigh...

  3. Modelling vapour transport in Surtseyan bombs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGuinness, Mark J.; Greenbank, Emma; Schipper, C. Ian

    2016-05-01

    We address questions that arise if a slurry containing liquid water is enclosed in a ball of hot viscous vesicular magma ejected as a bomb in the context of a Surtseyan eruption. We derive a mathematical model for transient changes in temperature and pressure due to flashing of liquid water to vapour inside the bomb. The magnitude of the transient pressure changes that are typically generated are calculated together with their dependence on material properties. A single criterion to determine whether the bomb will fragment as a result of the pressure changes is derived. Timescales for ejection of water vapour from a bomb that remains intact are also revealed.

  4. Chemically programmed bispecific antibodies that recruit and activate T cells.

    PubMed

    Cui, Huiting; Thomas, Joshua D; Burke, Terrence R; Rader, Christoph

    2012-08-17

    Bispecific antibodies (biAbs) that mediate cytotoxicity by recruiting and activating endogenous immune cells are an emerging class of next-generation antibody therapeutics. Of particular interest are biAbs of relatively small size (∼50 kDa) that can redirect cytotoxic T cells through simultaneous binding of tumor cells. Here we describe a conceptually unique class of biAbs in which the tumor cell specificity of a humanized antibody fragment that recognizes CD3 on T cells is chemically programmed through a C-terminal selenocysteine (Sec) residue. We demonstrate that through chemically programmed specificity for integrin α(4)β(1) or folate receptor 1 (FOLR1), and common specificity for CD3, these hybrid molecules exert potent and specific in vitro and ex vivo cytotoxicity toward tumor cell lines and primary tumor cells in the presence of primary T cells. Importantly, the generic nature of chemical programming allows one to apply our approach to virtually any specificity, promising a broad utility of chemically programmed biAbs in cancer therapy. PMID:22761439

  5. Sila-fulleranes: promising chemically active fullerene analogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsusi, Farah; Qasemnazhand, Mohammad

    2016-07-01

    Density-functional theory (DFT) was applied to investigate the geometry and electronic properties of bare Si60 and H-terminated Si-fullerene. DFT predicts outward sites on a bare Si60 cage. By using π-orbital axis analysis (POAV), it is shown that these sites result from a strong tendency of silicon atoms to form sp3 hybridization bonds. Natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis confirms the sp3 hybridization nature of Si–Si bonds in Si-fulleranes. The quantum confinement effect (QCE) does not affect band gap (BG) so strongly in the size between 1 and 1.7 nm. In contrast, the geometry and symmetry of the cage have a significant influence on the BG. In contrast to their carbon analogs, pentagon rings increase the stability of the cages. Functionalized Si-cages are stable and can be chemically very active. The electronic properties are highly sensitive to the surface chemistry via functionalization with different chemical groups. As a result, BGs and chemical activities of these cages can be drastically tuned through the chemistry of the surface.

  6. Sila-fulleranes: promising chemically active fullerene analogs.

    PubMed

    Marsusi, Farah; Qasemnazhand, Mohammad

    2016-07-01

    Density-functional theory (DFT) was applied to investigate the geometry and electronic properties of bare Si60 and H-terminated Si-fullerene. DFT predicts outward sites on a bare Si60 cage. By using π-orbital axis analysis (POAV), it is shown that these sites result from a strong tendency of silicon atoms to form sp(3) hybridization bonds. Natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis confirms the sp(3) hybridization nature of Si-Si bonds in Si-fulleranes. The quantum confinement effect (QCE) does not affect band gap (BG) so strongly in the size between 1 and 1.7 nm. In contrast, the geometry and symmetry of the cage have a significant influence on the BG. In contrast to their carbon analogs, pentagon rings increase the stability of the cages. Functionalized Si-cages are stable and can be chemically very active. The electronic properties are highly sensitive to the surface chemistry via functionalization with different chemical groups. As a result, BGs and chemical activities of these cages can be drastically tuned through the chemistry of the surface. PMID:27240656

  7. Influences of chemical activators on incinerator bottom ash.

    PubMed

    Qiao, X C; Cheeseman, C R; Poon, C S

    2009-02-01

    This research has applied different chemical activators to mechanically and thermally treated fine fraction (<14 mm) of incinerator bottom ash (IBA), in order to investigate the influences of chemical activators on this new pozzolanic material. IBA has been milled and thermally treated at 800 degrees C (TIBA). The TIBA produced was blended with Ca(OH)(2) and evaluated for setting time, reactivity and compressive strength after the addition of 0.0565 mole of Na(2)SO(4), K(2)SO(4), Na(2)CO(3), K(2)CO(3), NaOH, KOH and CaCl(2) into 100g of binder (TIBA+Ca(OH)(2)). The microstructures of activated IBA and hydrated samples have been characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and thermogravimetry (TG) analysis. Thermal treatment is found to produce gehlenite (Ca(2)Al(2)SiO(7)), wollastonite (CaSiO(3)) and mayenite (Ca(12)Al(14)O(33)) phases. The thermally treated IBA samples are significantly more reactive than the milled IBA. The addition of Na(2)CO(3) can increase the compressive strength and calcium hydroxide consumption at 28-day curing ages. However, the addition of Na(2)SO(4), K(2)SO(4), K(2)CO(3), NaOH and KOH reduces the strength and hydration reaction. Moreover, these chemicals produce more porous samples due to increased generation of hydrogen gas. The addition of CaCl(2) has a negative effect on the hydration of TIBA samples. Calcium aluminium oxide carbonate sulphide hydrate (Ca(4)Al(2)O(6)(CO(3))(0.67)(SO(3))(0.33)(H(2)O)(11)) is the main hydration product in the samples with activated IBA, except for the sample containing CaCl(2). PMID:18718749

  8. Chemical activation of a food deprivation signal extends lifespan.

    PubMed

    Lucanic, Mark; Garrett, Theo; Yu, Ivan; Calahorro, Fernando; Asadi Shahmirzadi, Azar; Miller, Aaron; Gill, Matthew S; Hughes, Robert E; Holden-Dye, Lindy; Lithgow, Gordon J

    2016-10-01

    Model organisms subject to dietary restriction (DR) generally live longer. Accompanying this lifespan extension are improvements in overall health, based on multiple metrics. This indicates that pharmacological treatments that mimic the effects of DR could improve health in humans. To find new chemical structures that extend lifespan, we screened 30 000 synthetic, diverse drug-like chemicals in Caenorhabditis elegans and identified several structurally related compounds that acted through DR mechanisms. The most potent of these NP1 impinges upon a food perception pathway by promoting glutamate signaling in the pharynx. This results in the overriding of a GPCR pathway involved in the perception of food and which normally acts to decrease glutamate signals. Our results describe the activation of a dietary restriction response through the pharmacological masking of a novel sensory pathway that signals the presence of food. This suggests that primary sensory pathways may represent novel targets for human pharmacology. PMID:27220516

  9. Pereskia aculeata Muller (Cactaceae) Leaves: Chemical Composition and Biological Activities.

    PubMed

    Souza, Lucèia Fàtima; Caputo, Lucia; Inchausti De Barros, Ingrid Bergman; Fratianni, Florinda; Nazzaro, Filomena; De Feo, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    The aims of this work were to study the chemical composition of the essential oil from the leaves of Pereskia aculeata and to evaluate some biological activities of three leaf extracts. The phenolic content, antioxidant activity, and in vitro antimicrobial and antifungal activities were determined. The methanol extract showed antioxidant activity (EC50 7.09 mg/mL) and high polyphenols content (15.04 ± 0.31 mg gallic acid equivalents (GAE)/g). The petroleum ether extract exhibited potent antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli, whereas the chloroform extract showed inhibitory activity against Bacillus cereus and Staphylococcus aureus. The petroleum ether and methanol extracts were more effective in inhibiting the growth of Aspergillus versicolor. The possible cytotoxicity of extracts on neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cancer cell line and the influence on adenylate cyclase (ADCY) expression was also studied. P. aculeata chloroform extract showed antiproliferative activity with an IC50 value of 262.83 µg/mL. Treatments of SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells with 100 µg/mL of methanol extract significantly reduced ADCY1 expression. PMID:27598154

  10. Chemical constituents from Swietenia macrophylla bark and their antioxidant activity.

    PubMed

    Falah, S; Suzuki, T; Katayama, T

    2008-08-15

    Chemical constituents of the bark of Swietenia macrophylla King (Meliaceae) was investigated not only to develop further bark utilization but also to understand the biochemical function of the bark in the forest environment. A new phenylpropanoid-substituted catechin, namely, swietemacrophyllanin [(2R*,3S*,7"R*)-catechin-8,7"-7,2"-epoxy-(methyl 4",5"-dihydroxyphenylpropanoate)] (1) was isolated from the bark of S. macrophylla together with two known compounds, catechin (2) and epicatechin (3). The structure of 1 was elucidated by spectroscopic data and by comparison of the NMR data with those of catiguanins A and B, phenylpropanoid-substituted epicatechins. The 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) free radical scavenging activity of the isolated compounds indicated that all of the three compounds have strong activity compared with trolox as a reference. Swietemacrophyllanin (1) had the strongest activity with a 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) value of 56 microg mL(-1). PMID:19266907

  11. Saturated Vapour Pressure and Refrigeration - Part I

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bunker, C. A.

    1973-01-01

    The first part of a two-part article describes an experimental approach that can be used in teaching the concept of saturated vapour pressure. This leads to a discussion of refrigeration cycles in the second part of the article. (JR)

  12. The vapour pressures of pure substances

    SciTech Connect

    Boublik, T.; Fried, V.; Hala, E.

    1984-01-01

    In this book a set of experimental vapour pressure data is collected. In addition, smoothed values of the pressures, as obtained by fitting the data to the Antoine equation, are presented together with the calculated boiling points and sets of the Antoine constants for each component.

  13. Chemical Signaling and Functional Activation in Colloidosome-Based Protocells.

    PubMed

    Sun, Shiyong; Li, Mei; Dong, Faqin; Wang, Shengjie; Tian, Liangfei; Mann, Stephen

    2016-04-13

    An aqueous-based microcompartmentalized model involving the integration of partially hydrophobic Fe(III)-rich montmorillonite (FeM) clay particles as structural and catalytic building blocks for colloidosome membrane assembly, self-directed membrane remodeling, and signal-induced protocell communication is described. The clay colloidosomes exhibit size- and charge-selective permeability, and show dual catalytic functions involving spatially confined enzyme-mediated dephosphorylation and peroxidase-like membrane activity. The latter is used for the colloidosome-mediated synthesis and assembly of a temperature-responsive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)(PNIPAM)/clay-integrated hybrid membrane. In situ PNIPAM elaboration of the membrane is coupled to a glucose oxidase (GOx)-mediated signaling pathway to establish a primitive model of chemical communication and functional activation within a synthetic "protocell community" comprising a mixed population of GOx-containing silica colloidosomes and alkaline phosphatase (ALP)-containing FeM-clay colloidosomes. Triggering the enzyme reaction in the silica colloidosomes gives a hydrogen peroxide signal that induces polymer wall formation in a coexistent population of the FeM-clay colloidosomes, which in turn generates self-regulated membrane-gated ALP-activity within the clay microcompartments. The emergence of new functionalities in inorganic colloidosomes via chemical communication between different protocell populations provides a first step toward the realization of interacting communities of synthetic functional microcompartments. PMID:26923794

  14. Atypical Hydrogen Uptake on Chemically Activated, Ultramicroporous Carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Bhat, Vinay V; Contescu, Cristian I; Gallego, Nidia C; Baker, Frederick S

    2010-01-01

    Hydrogen adsorption at near-ambient temperatures on ultramicroporous carbon (UMC), derived through secondary chemical activation from a wood-based activated carbon was studied using volumetric and gravimetric methods. The results showed that physisorption is accompanied by a process of different nature that causes slow uptake at high pressures and hysteresis on desorption. In combination, this results in unusually high levels of hydrogen uptake at near-ambient temperatures and pressures (e.g. up to 0.8 wt % at 25 oC and 2 MPa). The heat of adsorption corresponding to the slow process leading to high uptake (17 20 kJ/mol) is higher than usually reported for carbon materials, but the adsorption kinetics is slow, and the isotherms exhibit pronounced hysteresis. These unusual properties were attributed to contributions from polarization-enhanced physisorption caused by traces of alkali metals residual from chemical activation. The results support the hypothesis that polarization-induced physisorption in high surface area carbons modified with traces of alkali metal ions is an alternate route for increasing the hydrogen storage capacity of carbon adsorbents.

  15. Transient assembly of active materials fueled by a chemical reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boekhoven, Job; Hendriksen, Wouter E.; Koper, Ger J. M.; Eelkema, Rienk; van Esch, Jan H.

    2015-09-01

    Fuel-driven self-assembly of actin filaments and microtubules is a key component of cellular organization. Continuous energy supply maintains these transient biomolecular assemblies far from thermodynamic equilibrium, unlike typical synthetic systems that spontaneously assemble at thermodynamic equilibrium. Here, we report the transient self-assembly of synthetic molecules into active materials, driven by the consumption of a chemical fuel. In these materials, reaction rates and fuel levels, instead of equilibrium composition, determine properties such as lifetime, stiffness, and self-regeneration capability. Fibers exhibit strongly nonlinear behavior including stochastic collapse and simultaneous growth and shrinkage, reminiscent of microtubule dynamics.

  16. Fabrication of optically active nanostructures by chemical methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moran, Cristin Erin

    A new method of fabricating long-range, planar arrays of discrete, submicron metal structures on glass or SiO2/Si surfaces has been developed without the use of resist masks or chemical etching. The approach combines microcontact printing and electroless plating for the controlled deposition of islands or lines of gold or silver. The metallic structures are varied in size, separation and shape by using a variety of commercial diffraction gratings to mold the polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) elastomer stamps. An assortment of distinct geometrical patterns have been fabricated and imaged on a range of length scales using scanning probe, scanning electron, and optical microscopies. Additionally, the same chemical techniques can be used to pattern surfaces with biomolecules and ordered arrays of metal nanoshells. These arrays of metal nanostructures support surface plasmon propagation and also show plasmon-plasmon interactions dependent on the geometry of the metal features. These structures were used to investigate the effects of molecular functionalization on the excitation and propagation properties of the surface plasmons that are supported by this geometry. Distinct variations in the dispersion and energy gaps of surface plasmons on these structures due to chemical functionalization of the metal structures is observed. A second type of optically active structure, rare-earth doped silica particles, has been synthesized using wet chemistry. The polydispersity of the particles can be controlled by changing the concentration of dopant salt. These particles may be useful for microlaser or display technologies.

  17. Photocatalytic property of titanium dioxide thin films deposited by radio frequency magnetron sputtering in argon and water vapour plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sirghi, L.; Hatanaka, Y.; Sakaguchi, K.

    2015-10-01

    The present work is investigating the photocatalytic activity of TiO2 thin films deposited by radiofrequency magnetron sputtering of a pure TiO2 target in Ar and Ar/H2O (pressure ratio 40/3) plasmas. Optical absorption, structure, surface morphology and chemical structure of the deposited films were comparatively studied. The films were amorphous and included a large amount of hydroxyl groups (about 5% of oxygen atoms were bounded to hydrogen) irrespective of the intentional content of water in the deposition chamber. Incorporation of hydroxyl groups in the film deposited in pure Ar plasma is explained as contamination of the working gas with water molecules desorbed by plasma from the deposition chamber walls. However, intentional input of water vapour into the discharge chamber decreased the deposition speed and roughness of the deposited films. The good photocatalytic activity of the deposited films could be attributed hydroxyl groups in their structures.

  18. Chemical activation of the mechanotransduction channel Piezo1

    PubMed Central

    Syeda, Ruhma; Xu, Jie; Dubin, Adrienne E; Coste, Bertrand; Mathur, Jayanti; Huynh, Truc; Matzen, Jason; Lao, Jianmin; Tully, David C; Engels, Ingo H; Petrassi, H Michael; Schumacher, Andrew M; Montal, Mauricio; Bandell, Michael; Patapoutian, Ardem

    2015-01-01

    Piezo ion channels are activated by various types of mechanical stimuli and function as biological pressure sensors in both vertebrates and invertebrates. To date, mechanical stimuli are the only means to activate Piezo ion channels and whether other modes of activation exist is not known. In this study, we screened ∼3.25 million compounds using a cell-based fluorescence assay and identified a synthetic small molecule we termed Yoda1 that acts as an agonist for both human and mouse Piezo1. Functional studies in cells revealed that Yoda1 affects the sensitivity and the inactivation kinetics of mechanically induced responses. Characterization of Yoda1 in artificial droplet lipid bilayers showed that Yoda1 activates purified Piezo1 channels in the absence of other cellular components. Our studies demonstrate that Piezo1 is amenable to chemical activation and raise the possibility that endogenous Piezo1 agonists might exist. Yoda1 will serve as a key tool compound to study Piezo1 regulation and function. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07369.001 PMID:26001275

  19. Active membrane having uniform physico-chemically functionalized ion channels

    DOEpatents

    Gerald, II, Rex E; Ruscic, Katarina J; Sears, Devin N; Smith, Luis J; Klingler, Robert J; Rathke, Jerome W

    2012-09-24

    The present invention relates to a physicochemically-active porous membrane for electrochemical cells that purports dual functions: an electronic insulator (separator) and a unidirectional ion-transporter (electrolyte). The electrochemical cell membrane is activated for the transport of ions by contiguous ion coordination sites on the interior two-dimensional surfaces of the trans-membrane unidirectional pores. One dimension of the pore surface has a macroscopic length (1 nm-1000 .mu.m) and is directed parallel to the direction of an electric field, which is produced between the cathode and the anode electrodes of an electrochemical cell. The membrane material is designed to have physicochemical interaction with ions. Control of the extent of the interactions between the ions and the interior pore walls of the membrane and other materials, chemicals, or structures contained within the pores provides adjustability of the ionic conductivity of the membrane.

  20. [Advances on chemical constituents and pharmacological activity of genus Scilla].

    PubMed

    Fan, Meng-Yang; Wang, Yan-Min; Wang, Zhi-Min; Gao, Hui-Min

    2014-01-01

    The genus Scilla consists of 90 species widely distributed in Europe, Asia and Africa, one and its variant of which can be found in China Some species of the genus have been used in traditional medicine to treat various diseases related to inflammation and pain. Phytochemical studies have demonstrated the presence of triterpene and tritepenoid saponins derived from eucosterol, bufadienolides, alkaloids, stilbenoids and lignan in the plants of this genus. Various bioactivities such as antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, anti-tumor and glycosidase inhibitory activities, have been reported. In this review, the advance of chemical constituents and pharmacological activities of the Scilla species are summarized for further development and utilization of the resource. PMID:24761625

  1. Simulation of the isotopic composition of stratospheric water vapour - Part 2: Investigation of HDO / H2O variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichinger, R.; Jöckel, P.; Lossow, S.

    2015-06-01

    Studying the isotopic composition of water vapour in the lower stratosphere can reveal the driving mechanisms of changes in the stratospheric water vapour budget and therefore help to explain the trends and variations of stratospheric water vapour during recent decades. We equipped a global chemistry climate model with a description of the water isotopologue HDO, comprising its physical and chemical fractionation effects throughout the hydrological cycle. We use this model to improve our understanding of the processes which determine the patterns in the stratospheric water isotope composition and in the water vapour budget itself. The link between the water vapour budget and its isotopic composition in the tropical stratosphere is presented through their correlation in a simulated 21-year time series. The two quantities depend on the same processes; however, they are influenced with different strengths. A sensitivity experiment shows that fractionation effects during the oxidation of methane have a damping effect on the stratospheric tape recorder signal in the water isotope ratio. Moreover, the chemically produced high water isotope ratios overshadow the tape recorder in the upper stratosphere. Investigating the origin of the boreal-summer signal of isotopically enriched water vapour reveals that in-mixing of old stratospheric air from the extratropics and the intrusion of tropospheric water vapour into the stratosphere complement each other in order to create the stratospheric isotope ratio tape recorder signal. For this, the effect of ice lofting in monsoon systems is shown to play a crucial role. Furthermore, we describe a possible pathway of isotopically enriched water vapour through the tropopause into the tropical stratosphere.

  2. Biological activities and chemical composition of lichens from Serbia

    PubMed Central

    Kosanic, Marijana; Rankovic, Branislav; Stanojkovic, Tatjana; Vasiljevic, Perica; Manojlovic, Nedeljko

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate chemical composition of acetone extracts of the lichens Parmelia arseneana and Acarospora fuscata and in vitro antioxidant, antimicrobial, and anticancer activities of these extracts and gyrophoric acid isolated from A. fuscata. The HPLC-UV method was used for the identification of secondary metabolites. Stictic acid, norstictic acid, gyrophoric acid, usnic acid, atranorin and chloroatranorin were identified in the A. fuscata. In P. arseneana, we detected stictic acid, norstictic acid, usnic acid and atranorin, while gyrophoric acid was not identified. Antioxidant activity was evaluated by measuring the scavenging capacity of tested samples on DPPH and superoxide anion radicals, reducing the power of samples and determination of total phenolic compounds in extracts. As a result of the study, gyrophoric acid was found to have the largest DPPH radical scavenging activity with an IC50 value of 105.75 µg/ml. Moreover, the tested samples had an effective superoxide anion radical scavenging and reducing power. The total content of phenol in extracts was determined as pyrocatechol equivalent. The antimicrobial activity was estimated by determination of the minimal inhibitory concentration by the broth microdilution method. The most active was also gyrophoric acid, with minimum inhibitory concentration values ranging from 0.019 to 1.25 mg/ml. Anticancer activity was tested against LS174 (human colon carcinoma cell line), A549 (human lung carcinoma cell line), Fem-x (malignant melanoma cell line), and a chronic myelogeneous leukaemia K562 cell line using the MTT method. Extract of P. arseneana expressed the strongest anticancer activity against all cell lines with IC50 values ranging from 11.61 to 47.06 µg/ml. PMID:26417336

  3. Contributions of Organic Vapours to Atmospheric Nanoparticle Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, L.; Xu, W.; Khalizov, A. F.; Zhang, R.

    2010-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosol particles alter radiative balance of the earth-atmosphere system, impact the regional and global climate, and pose negative effects on human health. Aerosol nucleation events have been frequently observed under various tropospheric conditions and account for a major fraction of the total aerosol population. Although a number of studies suggest that organics are involved in both new particle formation and their subsequent growth, the fundamental chemical processes responsible for organic vapours’ contribution remain poorly understood. This work will focus on laboratory studies on the role of various organic vapours in sulphuric acid nanoparticles growth. Sulfuric acid nanoparticles of 4-20 nm diameter size are generated from homogeneous binary nucleation of H2SO4 and H2O vapors in a laminar flow reactor. The growth factor of H2SO4 nanoparticles exposed to organics including methyglyoxal, ethanol, 1-butanol, 1-heptanol, 1-decanol, and cis-pinonic acid is measured using a nano-tandem differential mobility analyzer (nano-TDMA). Also studied is the potential synergistic effect in the presence of two or more organic vapours to which sulphuric acid nanoparticles are exposed. The chemical compositions of H2SO4 particles exposed to the organics are analyzed by a thermal desorption-ion drift-chemical ionization mass spectrometer (TD-ID-CIMS), and the spectroscopic evolution of functional groups in H2SO4 particles of ~40 nm diameter size, deposited on ZnSe crystal and subsequently exposed to organics, is studied using attenuated total reflection-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FT-IR). The combined techniques are used to elucidate the key factors in controlling atmospheric nanoparticle growth.

  4. Influences of chemical activators on incinerator bottom ash

    SciTech Connect

    Qiao, X.C. Cheeseman, C.R.; Poon, C.S.

    2009-02-15

    This research has applied different chemical activators to mechanically and thermally treated fine fraction (<14 mm) of incinerator bottom ash (IBA), in order to investigate the influences of chemical activators on this new pozzolanic material. IBA has been milled and thermally treated at 800 deg. C (TIBA). The TIBA produced was blended with Ca(OH){sub 2} and evaluated for setting time, reactivity and compressive strength after the addition of 0.0565 mole of Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, K{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}, K{sub 2}CO{sub 3}, NaOH, KOH and CaCl{sub 2} into 100 g of binder (TIBA+Ca(OH){sub 2}). The microstructures of activated IBA and hydrated samples have been characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and thermogravimetry (TG) analysis. Thermal treatment is found to produce gehlenite (Ca{sub 2}Al{sub 2}SiO{sub 7}), wollastonite (CaSiO{sub 3}) and mayenite (Ca{sub 12}Al{sub 14}O{sub 33}) phases. The thermally treated IBA samples are significantly more reactive than the milled IBA. The addition of Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} can increase the compressive strength and calcium hydroxide consumption at 28-day curing ages. However, the addition of Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, K{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, K{sub 2}CO{sub 3}, NaOH and KOH reduces the strength and hydration reaction. Moreover, these chemicals produce more porous samples due to increased generation of hydrogen gas. The addition of CaCl{sub 2} has a negative effect on the hydration of TIBA samples. Calcium aluminium oxide carbonate sulphide hydrate (Ca{sub 4}Al{sub 2}O{sub 6}(CO{sub 3}){sub 0.67}(SO{sub 3}){sub 0.33}(H{sub 2}O){sub 11}) is the main hydration product in the samples with activated IBA, except for the sample containing CaCl{sub 2}.

  5. Detection of metal vapour in the high-current phase of a pseudospark switch by resonance absorption of laser light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lins, Günter; Verleger, Jobst

    1996-03-01

    The electron emission mechanism which is active at the cathode of a pseudospark switch leads to thermal overloading of emission sites followed by the evaporation of cathode material. As a consequence, metal vapour should be present very shortly after the beginning of current flow. However, it has never been possible to observe metal vapour by laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) prior to the cessation of current. In the present work resonance absorption of laser light was used to detect molybdenum vapour from the cathode during the high-current phase of a pseudospark switch. To observe the narrow-band absorption the laser light which had passed the switch was introduced into a molybdenum hollow cathode lamp where it caused fluorescence from molybdenum vapour. The intensity of the fluorescence light from the hollow cathode lamp was proportional to the intensity of the laser light left after the absorption process in the pseudospark. For a current amplitude of 12 kA and a pulse duration of 0022-3727/29/3/040/img1, it is shown that molybdenum vapour is definitely present shortly after the current maximum, well before the current stops flowing. The neutral vapour density in the high-current phase is estimated to amount to at least 0022-3727/29/3/040/img2. It is concluded that LIF fails to detect metal vapour prior to the cessation of current, mainly because the fluorescence process is severely disturbed by electronic collisions which deplete the upper fluorescence level.

  6. Speciation and chemical activities in superheated sodium borate solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Weres, O. )

    1993-06-01

    The system H[sub 2]O-B[sub 2]O[sub 3]-Na[sub 2]O has been studied experimentally at 277[degrees] and 317[degrees]C. The activities of water and boric acid have been determined at mole ratios Na/B from 0 to 1.5, and total dissolved solids 3 to 80 weight percent. The activity of boric acid has been fitted to within experimental error using a speciation model with eight complex species. This model is consistent with the model previously published by Mesmer et al. The electrolyte properties of the liquid are modelled using the Pitzer-Simonson Model of very concentrated electrolyte solutions. The calculated values of water activity agree with experiment, and the activity of NaOH and pOH have also been calculated. These data will allow prediction of the composition and chemical behavior of sodium borate liquids that may accumulate in the superheated crevices within a steam generator. A modified form of the model is provided for use with MULTEQ. The potassium borate system also was briefly studied at 317[degrees]C, and is adequately described by a model with five complex species. The potassium borate liquid is more alkaline at K/B = 1 than a sodium borate liquid at the same mole ratio, but pOH in the two systems is the same at lower mole ratios.

  7. EDITORIAL Metal vapour in atmospheric-pressure arcs Metal vapour in atmospheric-pressure arcs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Anthony B.

    2010-11-01

    Metal vapour has a significant, and in some cases dominant, influence in many applications of atmospheric-pressure plasmas, including arc welding, circuit interruption and mineral processing. While the influence of metal vapour has long been recognized, it is only recently that diagnostic and computational tools have been sufficiently well-developed to allow this influence to be more thoroughly examined and understood. Some unexpected findings have resulted: for example, that the presence of metal vapour in gas-metal arc welding leads to local minima in the temperature and current density in the centre of the arc. It has become clear that the presence of metal vapour, as well as having intrinsic scientific interest, plays an important role in determining the values of critical parameters in industrial applications, such as the weld penetration in arc welding and the extinction time in circuit breakers. In gas-tungsten arc welding, metal vapour concentrations are formed by evaporation of the weld pool, and are relatively low, typically at most a few per cent. Moreover, the convective flow of the plasma near the weld pool tends to direct the metal vapour plume radially outwards. In gas-metal arc welding, in contrast, metal vapour concentrations can reach over 50%. In this case, the metal vapour is produced mainly by evaporation of the wire electrode, and the strong downwards convective flow below the electrode concentrates the metal vapour in the central region of the arc. The very different metal concentrations and distributions in the two welding processes mean that the metal vapour has markedly different influences on the arc. In gas-tungsten arc welding, the current density distribution is broadened near the weld pool by the influence of the metal vapour on the electrical conductivity of the plasma, and the arc voltage is decreased. In contrast, in gas-metal arc welding, the arc centre is cooled by increased radiative emission and the arc voltage is increased. In

  8. Chemical constituents and antibacterial activity of Melastoma malabathricum L.

    PubMed

    Wong, Keng-Chong; Hag Ali, Dafaalla Mohamed; Boey, Peng-Lim

    2012-01-01

    The aqueous methanolic extracts of Melastoma malabathricum L. exhibited antibacterial activity when assayed against seven microorganisms by the agar diffusion method. Solvent fractionation afforded active chloroform and ethyl acetate fractions from the leaves and the flowers, respectively. A phytochemical study resulted in the identification of ursolic acid (1), 2α-hydroxyursolic acid (2), asiatic acid (3), β-sitosterol 3-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (4) and the glycolipid glycerol 1,2-dilinolenyl-3-O-β-D-galactopyanoside (5) from the chloroform fraction. Kaempferol (6), kaempferol 3-O-α-L-rhamnopyranoside (7), kaempferol 3-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (8), kaempferol 3-O-β-D-galactopyranoside (9), kaempferol 3-O-(2″,6″-di-O-E-p-coumaryl)-β-D-galactopyranoside (10), quercetin (11) and ellagic acid (12) were found in the ethyl acetate fraction. The structures of these compounds were determined by chemical and spectral analyses. Compounds 1-4, the flavonols (6 and 11) and ellagic acid (12) were found to be active against some of the tested microorganisms, while the kaempferol 3-O-glycosides (7-9) did not show any activity, indicating the role of the free 3-OH for antibacterial activity. Addition of p-coumaryl groups results in mild activity for 10 against Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus cereus. Compounds 2-5, 7 and 9-12 are reported for the first time from M. malabathricum. Compound 10 is rare, being reported only once before from a plant, without assignment of the double bond geometry in the p-coumaryl moiety. PMID:21834640

  9. Chemical Fingerprints of Star Forming Regions and Active Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Beaupuits, Juan-Pablo

    2010-10-01

    This thesis is devoted to the study of the physical conditions of the interstellar medium (ISM) in active galactic nuclei (AGNs) and Galactic star-forming regions, using mostly single-dish millimeter observations. I first study the excitation conditions of dense gas in a group of Seyfert galaxies using radiative transfer models (Chapter 2). I then study the galaxy NGC 1068, and try to distinguish signatures of the contributions from the AGN and the starburst ring by incorporating observations of high-J transitions of dense gas tracers (Chapter 3). Later, I venture into the mid-infrared spectral region to study different aspects of the AGN and starburst components in the galaxy NGC 4945 (Chapter 4). In Chapter 5 I delve into theoretical aspects of the dynamical evolution of gas in an AGN torus. I use a 3D hydrodynamic simulation with chemical abundances driven by X-rays. The aim is to understand the effects of X-ray irradiation by the AGN on the temperature, formation and destruction of the molecular gas. I finally explore a Galactic star-forming region, the Omega Nebula, with high resolution single dish observations, to study the properties of the warm gas and to constrain chemical models (Chapters 6 and 7).

  10. Suppression of Chemically Induced and Spontaneous Mouse Oocyte Activation by AMP-Activated Protein Kinase1

    PubMed Central

    Ya, Ru; Downs, Stephen M.

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Oocyte activation is an important process triggered by fertilization that initiates embryonic development. However, parthenogenetic activation can occur either spontaneously or with chemical treatments. The LT/Sv mouse strain is genetically predisposed to spontaneous activation. LT oocytes have a cell cycle defect and are ovulated at the metaphase I stage instead of metaphase II. A thorough understanding of the female meiosis defects in this strain remains elusive. We have reported that AMP-activated protein kinase (PRKA) has an important role in stimulating meiotic resumption and promoting completion of meiosis I while suppressing premature parthenogenetic activation. Here we show that early activation of PRKA during the oocyte maturation period blocked chemically induced activation in B6SJL oocytes and spontaneous activation in LT/SvEiJ oocytes. This inhibitory effect was associated with high levels of MAPK1/3 activity. Furthermore, stimulation of PRKA partially rescued the meiotic defects of LT/Sv mouse oocytes in concert with correction of abnormal spindle pole localization of PRKA and loss of prolonged spindle assembly checkpoint activity. Altogether, these results confirm a role for PRKA in helping sustain the MII arrest in mature oocytes and suggest that dysfunctional PRKA contributes to meiotic defects in LT/SvEiJ oocytes. PMID:23390161

  11. A water vapour monitor at Paranal Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerber, Florian; Rose, Thomas; Chacón, Arlette; Cuevas, Omar; Czekala, Harald; Hanuschik, Reinhard; Momany, Yazan; Navarrete, Julio; Querel, Richard R.; Smette, Alain; van den Ancker, Mario E.; Cure, Michel; Naylor, David A.

    2012-09-01

    We present the performance characteristics of a water vapour monitor that has been permanently deployed at ESO's Paranal observatory as a part of the VISIR upgrade project. After a careful analysis of the requirements and an open call for tender, the Low Humidity and Temperature Profiling microwave radiometer (LHATPRO), manufactured by Radiometer Physics GmbH (RPG), has been selected. The unit measures several channels across the strong water vapour emission line at 183 GHz, necessary for resolving the low levels of precipitable water vapour (PWV) that are prevalent on Paranal (median ~2.5 mm). The unit comprises the above humidity profiler (183-191 GHz), a temperature profiler (51-58 GHz), and an infrared radiometer (~10 μm) for cloud detection. The instrument has been commissioned during a 2.5 week period in Oct/Nov 2011, by comparing its measurements of PWV and atmospheric profiles with the ones obtained by 22 radiosonde balloons. In parallel an IR radiometer (Univ. Lethbridge) has been operated, and various observations with ESO facility spectrographs have been taken. The RPG radiometer has been validated across the range 0.5 - 9 mm demonstrating an accuracy of better than 0.1 mm. The saturation limit of the radiometer is about 20 mm. Currently, the radiometer is being integrated into the Paranal infrastructure to serve as a high time-resolution monitor in support of VLT science operations. The water vapour radiometer's ability to provide high precision, high time resolution information on this important aspect of the atmosphere will be most useful for conducting IR observations with the VLT under optimal conditions.

  12. [Chemical constituents from Callicarpa nudiflora and their cytotoxic activities].

    PubMed

    Ma, Yan-Chun; Zhang, Min; Xu, Wen-Tong; Feng, Shi-Xiu; Lei, Ming; Yi, Bo

    2014-08-01

    The chemical consitituents from cytotoxic fraction of the Callicarpa nudiflora extract were isolated and purified by a combination of HP-20 macroporous resin, silica gel and Sephadex LH-20 column chromatographies. The structures were elucidated on the basis of the spectroscopic data and comparison of their spectroscopic data with reported data. The cytotoxicity was evaluated by the MTT assay. The 50% and 70% EtOH elutions of EtOH-extract showed significant cytotoxic activities, leading to the isolation of twelve compounds, which were identified as luteoloside(1), lutedin-4'-O-β-D-glucoside(2), 6-hydroxyluteolin-7-O-β-glucoside(3), lutedin-7-O-neohesperidoside(4), rhoifolin (5), luteolin-7, 4'-di-O-glucoside (6), forsythoside B (7), acteoside (8), alyssonoside (9), catalpol(10), nudifloside(11), and leonuride(12). Compounds 3-6, 10 and 12 were isolated from this genus for the first time, and compound 9 was isolated from this plant for the first time. The cytotoxicity assay demonstrated that flavonoids 1-6, in various concentrations, showed monolithic proliferation inhibitory activities against Hela, A549 and MCF-7 cell lines. Compounds 3, 5 and iridoid glycoside 11 possessed higher cytotoxicacivities. In short, flavonoids are the main components of cytotoxic extract from C. nudiflora, while phenylethanoid glycosides are the predominant ingredient but inactive to cancer cell lines. In addition, the minor iridoid glycoside expressed weak cytotoxic activity. PMID:25509294

  13. Antibacterial activity of silver bionanocomposites synthesized by chemical reduction route

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The aim of this study is to investigate the functions of polymers and size of nanoparticles on the antibacterial activity of silver bionanocomposites (Ag BNCs). In this research, silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) were incorporated into biodegradable polymers that are chitosan, gelatin and both polymers via chemical reduction method in solvent in order to produce Ag BNCs. Silver nitrate and sodium borohydride were employed as a metal precursor and reducing agent respectively. On the other hand, chitosan and gelatin were added as a polymeric matrix and stabilizer. The antibacterial activity of different sizes of silver nanoparticles was investigated against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria by the disk diffusion method using Mueller-Hinton Agar. Results The properties of Ag BNCs were studied as a function of the polymer weight ratio in relation to the use of chitosan and gelatin. The morphology of the Ag BNCs films and the distribution of the Ag NPs were also characterized. The diameters of the Ag NPs were measured and their size is less than 20 nm. The antibacterial trait of silver/chitosan/gelatin bionanocomposites was investigated. The silver ions released from the Ag BNCs and their antibacterial activities were scrutinized. The antibacterial activities of the Ag BNC films were examined against Gram-negative bacteria (E. coli and P. aeruginosa) and Gram-positive (S. aureus and M. luteus) by diffusion method using Muller-Hinton agar. Conclusions The antibacterial activity of Ag NPs with size less than 20 nm was demonstrated and showed positive results against Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. The Ag NPs stabilized well in the polymers matrix. PMID:22967920

  14. Thymus vulgaris essential oil: chemical composition and antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Borugă, O; Jianu, C; Mişcă, C; Goleţ, I; Gruia, A T; Horhat, F G

    2014-01-01

    The study was designed to determine the chemical composition and antimicrobial properties of the essential oil of Thymus vulgaris cultivated in Romania. The essential oil was isolated in a yield of 1.25% by steam distillation from the aerial part of the plant and subsequently analyzed by GC-MS. The major components were p-cymene (8.41%), γ-terpinene (30.90%) and thymol (47.59%). Its antimicrobial activity was evaluated on 7 common food-related bacteria and fungus by using the disk diffusion method. The results demonstrate that the Thymus vulgaris essential oil tested possesses strong antimicrobial properties, and may in the future represent a new source of natural antiseptics with applications in the pharmaceutical and food industry. PMID:25870697

  15. Dynamic model for selective metabolic activation in chemical carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Selkirk, J.K.; MacLeod, M.C.

    1980-01-01

    Theoretical calculations predict the relative ease of formation of carbonium ions from 7,8-dihydro-7,8-dihydroxybenzo(a)pyrene-9,10-oxide or from either of the 2 symmetrical bay regions of B(e)P, and suggest their attraction to cellular nucleophiles. When both isomers were metabolized by hamster embryo fibroblasts (HEF) and the products analyzed, the results showed that the probable reason for benzo(e)pyrene's lack of carcinogenicity was its metabolic preference to attack the molecule away from the bay-region area. Particularly striking was the absence of any evidence for the formation of a significant amount of B(e)P-9,10-dihydrodiol. This suggests a metabolic basis for the relative lack of carcinogenic and mutagenic activity of B(e)P. The reason for this is not clear but may be due to physical or chemical factors such as membrane solubility or stereochemical requirements of the active site of the enzyme. The bay-region theory of PAH carcinogenesis predicts that carbonium ion formation from 9,10-dihydro-9,10-dihydroxybenzo(e)pyrene-11, 12-oxide, if formed, would be energetically favorable. Thus, the inability of HEF and microcomes to form B(e)P-9,10-dihydrodiol, the precursor of its potentially highly reactive diol-epoxide, would explain the relative inertness of B(e)P in several biological systems. As the subtle biochemical interactions of the various carcinogen intermediates become clarified, it becomes apparent that susceptibility and resistance to malignant transformation are based on a complex set of both chemical and physical parameters. It is becoming clear that metabolism kinetics, membrane interaction, and the role of nuclear metabolism help dictate the passage of the carcinogen and its reactive intermediates into and through the metabolic machinery of the cell. (ERB)

  16. Active sampling technique to enhance chemical signature of buried explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovell, John S.; French, Patrick D.

    2004-09-01

    Deminers and dismounted countermine engineers commonly use metal detectors, ground penetrating radar and probes to locate mines. Many modern landmines have a very low metal content, which severely limits the effectiveness of metal detectors. Canines have also been used for landmine detection for decades. Experiments have shown that canines smell the explosives which are known to leak from most types of landmines. The fact that dogs can detect landmines indicates that vapor sensing is a viable approach to landmine detection. Several groups are currently developing systems to detect landmines by "sniffing" for the ultra-trace explosive vapors above the soil. The amount of material that is available to passive vapor sensing systems is limited to no more than the vapor in equilibrium with the explosive related chemicals (ERCs) distributed in the surface soils over and near the landmine. The low equilibrium vapor pressure of TNT in the soil/atmosphere boundary layer and the limited volume of the boundary layer air imply that passive chemical vapor sensing systems require sensitivities in the picogram range, or lower. ADA is working to overcome many of the limitations of passive sampling methods, by the use of an active sampling method that employs a high-powered (1,200+ joules) strobe lamp to create a highly amplified plume of vapor and/or ERC-bearing fine particulates. Initial investigations have demonstrated that this approach can amplify the detectability of TNT by two or three orders of magnitude. This new active sampling technique could be used with any suitable explosive sensor.

  17. Vapour liquid equilibrium of a pure fluid from test particle method in combination with NpT molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Möller, Dietmar; Fischer, Johann

    In order to determine the vapour liquid equilibrium of a pure fluid, the liquid and the vapour branch of the isotherms in the chemical potential μ vs pressure p-diagram, are constructed explicitly. The liquid branch is obtained by molecular dynamics simulations in an NpT-ensemble into which test particles are inserted to calculate the chemical potential. The vapour branch is obtained at lower temperatures by using the second virial coefficient, at higher temperatures it is determined again by simulations. As an example the two-centre Lennard-Jones fluid with elongation L = 0·505 is considered at temperatures ranging from 0·69 to 0·92 of the estimated critical temperature. As expected, the inaccuracies of the liquid chemical potential increase with decreasing temperature as a consequence of the increasing saturated density. The uncertainties in μ/RT range from 0·02 at the highest to 0·10 at the lowest temperature which creates an uncertainty in the reduced vapour pressure Pσ3/ɛ of the order of 0·002. Within that uncertainty, the vapour pressures agree with those obtained previously from perturbation theory. The saturated liquid densities agree within 2 per cent which is consistent with a previous comparison between perturbation theory and experimental results for fluorine. Finally, we note that all simulations were performed with vectorized codes on a CYBER 205.

  18. Prediction of clothing thermal insulation and moisture vapour resistance of the clothed body walking in wind.

    PubMed

    Qian, Xiaoming; Fan, Jintu

    2006-11-01

    Clothing thermal insulation and moisture vapour resistance are the two most important parameters in thermal environmental engineering, functional clothing design and end use of clothing ensembles. In this study, clothing thermal insulation and moisture vapour resistance of various types of clothing ensembles were measured using the walking-able sweating manikin, Walter, under various environmental conditions and walking speeds. Based on an extensive experimental investigation and an improved understanding of the effects of body activities and environmental conditions, a simple but effective direct regression model has been established, for predicting the clothing thermal insulation and moisture vapour resistance under wind and walking motion, from those when the manikin was standing in still air. The model has been validated by using experimental data reported in the previous literature. It has shown that the new models have advantages and provide very accurate prediction. PMID:16857703

  19. Chemical labelling of active serum thioester proteins for quantification.

    PubMed

    Holm, Lotta; Ackland, Gareth L; Edwards, Mark R; Breckenridge, Ross A; Sim, Robert B; Offer, John

    2012-02-01

    The complement serum proteins C3 and C4 and the protease inhibitor α-2 macroglobulin are all members of the C3/α-2M thioester protein family, an evolutionarily ancient and conserved family that contains an intrachain thioester bond. The chemistry of the thioester bond is a key to the function of the thioester proteins. All these proteins function by covalently linking to their target by acyl transfer of the protein via the thioester moiety. We show that the signature thioester bond can be targeted with nucleophiles linked to a bioreporter molecule, site-specifically modifying the whole, intact thioester protein. Conditions were optimised to label selectively and efficiently pull-down unprocessed thioester-containing proteins from serum. We demonstrated pull-down of full-length C3, α-2M and C4 from sera in high salt, using a biotinylated nucleophile and streptavidin-coated resin, confirmed by MALDI-TOF MS identification of the gel bands. The potential for the development of a quantitative method for measuring active C3 in serum was investigated in patient sera pre and post operation. Quantifying active C3 in clinical assays using current methods is difficult. Methods based on antibody detection (e.g. nephelometry) do not distinguish between active C3 and inactive breakdown products. C3-specific haemolytic assays can be used, but these require use of relatively unstable reagents. The current work represents a promising robust, enzyme- and antibody-free chemical method for detecting active thioester proteins in blood, plasma or serum. PMID:21852021

  20. Metal Vapour Lasers: Physics, Engineering and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Little, Christopher E.

    1999-03-01

    Metal Vapour Lasers Christopher E. Little University of St Andrews, St Andrews, Scotland Since the first successful demonstration of a metal vapour laser (MVL) in 1962, this class of laser has become widely used in a broad range of fields including precision materials processing, isotope separation and medicine. The MVLs that are used today have a range of impressive characteristics that are not readily available using other technologies. In particular, the combination of high average output powers, pulse recurrence frequencies and beam quality available from green/yellow Cu vapour lasers (CVLs) and Cu bromide lasers, coupled with the high-quality, multiwatt ultraviolet (265-289 nm) radiation that can be produced using simple nonlinear optical techniques, means that Cu lasers will continue to be important for many years. Metal Vapour Lasers covers all the most commercially important and scientifically interesting pulsed and continuous wave (CW) gas-discharge MVLs, and includes device histories, operating characteristics, engineering, kinetics, commercial exploitation and applications. Short descriptions of gas discharges and excitation techniques make this volume self-consistent. A comprehensive bibliography is also provided. The greater part of this book is devoted to CVLs and their variants, including new sealed-off, high-power 'kinetically enhanced' CVLs and Cu bromide lasers. However, many other self-terminating MVLs are also discussed, including the red AuVL, green/infrared MnVL and infrared BaVL. Pulsed, high-gain, high average power lasers in the UV/violet (373.7, 430.5 nm) spectral regions are represented by Sr¯+ and Ca¯+ discharge-afterglow recombination lasers. The most commercially successful of the MVLs - the CW, UV/blue cataphoretic He-Cd¯+ ion laser - is described. Hollow cathode lasers are represented in two guises: 'white light' (blue/green/red) He-Cd¯+ ion lasers and UV/infrared Ne/He-Cu¯+ ion lasers. This unique volume is an

  1. Variability of water vapour in the Arctic stratosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thölix, L.; Backman, L.; Kivi, R.; Karpechko, A.

    2015-08-01

    This study evaluates the stratospheric water vapour distribution and variability in the Arctic. A FinROSE chemistry climate model simulation covering years 1990-2013 is compared to observations (satellite and frostpoint hygrometer soundings) and the sources of stratospheric water vapour are studied. According to observations and the simulations the water vapour concentration in the Arctic stratosphere started to increase after year 2006, but around 2011 the concentration started to decrease. Model calculations suggest that the increase in water vapour during 2006-2011 (at 56 hPa) is mostly explained by transport related processes, while the photochemically produced water vapour plays a relatively smaller role. The water vapour trend in the stratosphere may have contributed to increased ICE PSC occurrence. The increase of water vapour in the precense of the low winter temperatures in the Arctic stratosphere led to more frequent occurrence of ICE PSCs in the Arctic vortex. The polar vortex was unusually cold in early 2010 and allowed large scale formation of the polar stratospheric clouds. The cold pool in the stratosphere over the Northern polar latitudes was large and stable and a large scale persistent dehydration was observed. Polar stratospheric ice clouds and dehydration were observed at Sodankylä with accurate water vapour soundings in January and February 2010 during the LAPBIAT atmospheric sounding campaign. The observed changes in water vapour were reproduced by the model. Both the observed and simulated decrease of the water vapour in the dehydration layer was up to 1.5 ppm.

  2. Chemical activation by mechanochemical mixing, microwave, and ultrasonic irradiation

    EPA Science Inventory

    The use of emerging MW-assisted chemistry techniques in conjunction with benign reaction media is dramatically reducing chemical waste ad reaction times in several organic syntheses and chemical transformations. This editorial comments on the recent developments in mechanochemica...

  3. Removal of toxic chemicals from water with activated carbon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dawson, V.K.; Marking, L.L.; Bills, T.D.

    1976-01-01

    Activated carbon was effective in removing fish toxicants and anesthetics from water solutions. Its capacity to adsorb 3-trifluoromethyl-4-nitrophenol (TFM), antimycin, NoxfishA? (5% rotenone), Dibrorms, juglone, MSa??222, and benzocaine ranged from 0.1 to 64 mg per gram of carbon. The adsorptive capacity (end point considered as a significant discharge) of activated carbon for removal of TFM was determined at column depths of 15, 30, and 60 cm; temperatures of 7, 12, 17, and 22 C; pH's of 6.5, 7.5, 8.5, and 9.5; and flow rates of 50, 78, 100, 200, and 940 ml/min. Adsorptive capacity increased when the contact time was increased by reducing the flow rate or increasing the column depth. The adsorptive capacity was not significantly influenced by temperature but was substantially higher at pH 6.5 than at the other pH's tested. A practical and efficient filter for purifying chemically treated water was developed.

  4. [Qualitative Determination of Organic Vapour Using Violet and Visible Spectrum].

    PubMed

    Jiang, Bo; Hu, Wen-zhong; Liu, Chang-jian; Zheng, Wei; Qi, Xiao-hui; Jiang, Ai-li; Wang, Yan-ying

    2015-12-01

    Vapours of organic matters were determined qualitatively employed with ultraviolet-visible absorption spectroscopy. Vapours of organic matters were detected using ultraviolet-visible spectrophotometer employing polyethylene film as medium, the ultraviolet and visible absorption spectra of vegetable oil vapours of soybean oil, sunflower seed oil, peanut oil, rapeseed oil, sesame oil, cotton seed oil, tung tree seed oil, and organic compound vapours of acetone, ethyl acetate, 95% ethanol, glacial acetic acid were obtained. Experimental results showed that spectra of the vegetable oil vapour and the organic compound vapour could be obtained commendably, since ultra violet and visible spectrum of polyethylene film could be deducted by spectrograph zero setting. Different kinds of vegetable oils could been distinguished commendably in the spectra since the λ(max), λ(min), number of absorption peak, position, inflection point in the ultra violet and visible spectra obtained from the vapours of the vegetable oils were all inconsistent, and the vapours of organic compounds were also determined perfectly. The method had a good reproducibility, the ultraviolet and visible absorption spectra of the vapours of sunflower seed oil in 10 times determination were absolutely the same. The experimental result indicated that polyethylene film as a kind of medium could be used for qualitative analysis of ultraviolet and visible absorption spectroscopy. The method for determination of the vapours of the vegetable oils and organic compounds had the peculiarities of fast speed analysis, well reproducibility, accuracy and reliability and low cost, and so on. Ultraviolet and visible absorption spectrum of organic vapour could provide feature information of material vapour and structural information of organic compound, and provide a novel test method for identifying vapour of compound and organic matter. PMID:26964229

  5. THE USE OF STRUCTURE-ACTIVITY RELATIONSHIPS IN INTEGRATING THE CHEMISTRY AND TOXICOLOGY OF ENDOCRINE DISRUPTING CHEMICALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Structure activity relationships (SARs) are based on the principle that structurally similar chemicals should have similar biological activity. SARs relate specifically-defined toxicological activity of chemicals to their molecular structure and physico-chemical properties. To de...

  6. Chemical Composition and Antioxidant Activities of Broussonetia papyrifera Fruits

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jie; Liu, Shao-fang; Zhang, Chu-shu; Yu, Li-na; Bi, Jie; Zhu, Feng; Yang, Qing-li

    2012-01-01

    Fruits of Broussonetia papyrifera from South China were analyzed for their total chemical composition, and antioxidant activities in ethanol and aqueous extracts. In the fruit of this plant, the crude protein, crude fat and carbohydrates was 7.08%, 3.72% and 64.73% of dry weight, respectively. The crude protein, crude fat and carbohydrates were 15.71%, 20.51% and 36.09% of dry weight, respectively. Fatty acid and amino acid composition of the fruit were analyzed. Unsaturated fatty acid concentration was 70.6% of the total fatty acids. The percentage of the essential amino acids (EAAs) was 40.60% of the total amino acids. Furthermore, B. papyrifera fruit are rich in many mineral elements and vitamins. Total phenolic content was assessed using the Folin-Ciocalteau assay, whereas antioxidant activities were assessed by measuring the ability of the two extracts to scavenge DPPH radicals, inhibit peroxidation, and chelate ferric ions. Their reducing power was also assessed. Results indicated that the aqueous extract of B. papyrifera was a more potent reducing agent and radical-scavenger than the ethanol extract. GC–MS analysis of the ethanol extract showed the presence of some acid-containing compounds. The changes in total phenolic content and antioxidant capacity in B. papyrifera from four different regions grown under normal conditions were assessed. The antioxidant activity of different extracts was positively associated with their total phenolic content. These results suggest that the fruit of B. papyrifera could be used in dietary supplement preparations, or as a food additive, for nutritional gain, or to prevent oxidation in food products. PMID:22389678

  7. Brazilian Propolis: Correlation Between Chemical Composition and Antimicrobial Activity

    PubMed Central

    Salomão, Kelly; Pereira, Paulo Roberto S.; Campos, Leila C.; Borba, Cintia M.; Cabello, Pedro H.; Marcucci, Maria Cristina

    2008-01-01

    The chemical composition of ethanol extracts from samples of Brazilian propolis (EEPs) determined by HPLC and their activity against Trypanosoma cruzi, Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Klebisiella pneumoniae, Candida albicans, Sporothrix schenckii and Paracoccidioides brasiliensis were determined. Based on the predominant botanical origin in the region of samples' collection, the 10 extracts were separated into three groups: A (B. dracunculifolia + Auraucaria spp), B (B. dracunculifolia) and C (Araucaria spp). Analysis by the multiple regression of all the extracts together showed a positive correlation, higher concentrations leading to higher biological effect, of S. aureus with p-coumaric acid (PCUM) and 3-(4-hydroxy-3-(oxo-butenyl)-phenylacrylic acid (DHCA1) and of trypomastigotes of T. cruzi with 3,5-diprenyl-4-hydroxycinnamic acid derivative 4 (DHCA4) and 2,2-dimethyl-6-carboxyethenyl-2H-1-benzopyran (DCBEN). When the same approach was employed for each group, due to the small number of observations, the statistical test gave unreliable results. However, an overall analysis revealed for group A an association of S. aureus with caffeic acid (CAF) and dicaffeoylquinic acid 3 (CAFQ3), of S. pneumoniae with CAFQ3 and monocaffeoylquinic acid 2 (CAFQ2) and of T. cruzi also with CAFQ3. For group B, a higher activity against S. pneumoniae was associated DCBEN and for T. cruzi with CAF. For group C no association was observed between the anitmicrobial effect and any component of the extracts. The present study reinforces the relevance of PCUM and derivatives, especially prenylated ones and also of caffeolyquinic acids, on the biological activity of Brazilian propolis. PMID:18830454

  8. Understanding vapour plume structure in indoor environments for the detection of explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foat, Tim

    2015-11-01

    Dogs remain the most effective method for the detection of explosives in many situations yet the spatially, temporally and chemically varying signature that they sense cannot easily be quantified. Vapour plumes can be highly unsteady and intermittent and the problem is further complicated in indoor spaces where turbulent, transitional and laminar regions may exist and where there may be no dominant flow direction. Intermittent plumes can have peak concentrations that are considerably higher than the time averaged values. As dogs can sample the air at 5 Hz it is possible that these unsteady fluctuations play a key part in their detection process. A low Reynolds number (Re less than 5000 at the inlet) benchmark test case for indoor airflow has been studied using large-eddy simulation computational fluid dynamics. Fixed concentration vapour sources have been included on the floor of the room and the resulting vapour dispersion has been modelled. Sources with different surface areas have been included and their instantaneous and mean concentration profiles compared. The results from this study will provide insight into canine detection of vapour in indoor environments.

  9. PREDICTING TOXICOLOGICAL ENDPOINTS OF CHEMICALS USING QUANTITATIVE STRUCTURE-ACTIVITY RELATIONSHIPS (QSARS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSARs) are being developed to predict the toxicological endpoints for untested chemicals similar in structure to chemicals that have known experimental toxicological data. Based on a very large number of predetermined descriptors, a...

  10. Modelling the budget of middle atmospheric water vapour isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahn, A.; Franz, P.; Bechtel, C.; Groo, J.-U.; Rckmann, T.

    2006-06-01

    A one-dimensional chemistry model is applied to study the stable hydrogen (D) and stable oxygen isotope (17O, 18O) composition of water vapour in stratosphere and mesosphere. In the troposphere, this isotope composition is determined by "physical'' fractionation effects, that are phase changes (e.g. during cloud formation), diffusion processes (e.g. during evaporation from the ocean), and mixing of air masses. Due to these processes water vapour entering the stratosphere first shows isotope depletions in D/H relative to ocean water, which are ~5 times of those in 18O/16O, and secondly is mass-dependently fractionated (MDF), i.e. changes in the isotope ratio 17O/16O are ~0.52 times of those of 18O/16O. In contrast, in the stratosphere and mesosphere "chemical'' fractionation mechanisms, that are the production of HO due to the oxidation of methane, re-cycling of H2O via the HOx family, and isotope exchange reactions considerably enhance the isotope ratios in the water vapour imported from the troposphere. The model reasonably predicts overall enhancements of the stable isotope ratios in H2O by up to ~25% for D/H, ~8.5% for 17O/16O, and ~14% for 18O/16O in the mesosphere relative to the tropopause values. The 17O/16O and 18O/16O ratios in H2O are shown to be a measure of the relative fractions of HOx that receive the O atom either from the reservoirs O2 or O3. Throughout the middle atmosphere, MDF O2 is the major donator of oxygen atoms incorporated in OH and HO2 and thus in H2O. In the stratosphere the known mass-independent fractionation (MIF) signal in O3 is in a first step transferred to the NOx family and only in a second step to HOx and H2O. In contrast to CO2, O(1D) only plays a minor role in this MIF transfer. The major uncertainty in our calculation arises from poorly quantified isotope exchange reaction rate coefficients and kinetic isotope fractionation factors.

  11. Chemical and thermal modulation of molecular motor activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Weili

    Molecular motors of kinesin and dynein families are responsible for various intracellular activities, from long distance movement of organelles, vesicles, protein complexes, and mRNAs to powering mitotic processes. They can take nanometer steps using chemical energy from the hydrolysis of ATP (adenosine triphosphate), and their dysfunction is involved in many neurodegenerative diseases that require long distance transport of cargos. Here I report on the study of the properties of molecular motors at a single-molecule level using optical trappings. I first studied the inhibition properties of kinesin motors by marine natural compound adociasulfates. I showed that adociasulfates compete with microtubules for binding to kinesins and thus inhibit kinesins' activity. Although adociasulfates are a strong inhibitor for all kinesin members, they show a much higher inhibition effect for conventional kinesins than for mitotic kinesins. Thus adociasulfates can be used to specifically inhibit conventional kinesins. By comparing the inhibition of kinesins by two structurally similar adociasulfates, one can see that the negatively charged sulfate residue of adociasulfates can be replaced by other negative residues and thus make it possible for adociasulfate-derived compounds to be more cell permeable. Kinesins and dyneins move cargos towards opposite directions along a microtubule. Cargos with both kinesins and dyneins attached often move bidirectionally due to undergoing a tug-of-war between the oppositely moving kinesin and dynein motors. Here I studied the effect of temperature on microtubule-based kinesin and dynein motor transport. While kinesins' and dyneins' velocities are closely matched above 15 °C, below this temperature the dyneins' velocity decreases much faster than the kinesins'. The kinesins' and dyneins' forces do not measurably change with temperature. The results suggest that temperature has significant effects on bidirectional transport and can be used to

  12. Two-phase flow in a chemically active porous medium

    SciTech Connect

    Darmon, Alexandre Dauchot, Olivier; Benzaquen, Michael; Salez, Thomas

    2014-12-28

    We study the problem of the transformation of a given reactant species into an immiscible product species, as they flow through a chemically active porous medium. We derive the equation governing the evolution of the volume fraction of the species, in a one-dimensional macroscopic description, identify the relevant dimensionless numbers, and provide simple models for capillary pressure and relative permeabilities, which are quantities of crucial importance when tackling multiphase flows in porous media. We set the domain of validity of our models and discuss the importance of viscous coupling terms in the extended Darcy’s law. We investigate numerically the steady regime and demonstrate that the spatial transformation rate of the species along the reactor is non-monotonous, as testified by the existence of an inflection point in the volume fraction profiles. We obtain the scaling of the location of this inflection point with the dimensionless lengths of the problem. Eventually, we provide key elements for optimization of the reactor.

  13. Chemical synthesis and immunosuppressive activity of dipalmitoyl phosphatidylinositol hexamannoside.

    PubMed

    Ainge, Gary D; Compton, Benjamin J; Hayman, Colin M; Martin, William John; Toms, Steven M; Larsen, David S; Harper, Jacquie L; Painter, Gavin F

    2011-06-17

    Phosphatidylinositol mannosides (PIMs) isolated from mycobacteria have been identified as an important class of phosphoglycolipids with significant immune-modulating properties. We present here the synthesis of dipalmitoyl phosphatidylinositol hexamannoside (PIM(6)) 1 and the first reported functional biology of a synthetic PIM(6). Key steps in the synthetic protocol included the selective glycosylation of an inositol 2,6-diol with a suitably protected mannosyl donor and construction of the glycan core utilizing a [3 + 4] thio-glycosylation strategy. The target 1 was purified by reverse phase chromatography and characterized by standard spectroscopic methods, HPLC, and chemical modification by deacylation to dPIM(6). The (1)H NMR spectrum of synthetic dPIM(6) obtained from 1 matched that of dPIM(6) obtained from nature. PIM(6) (1) exhibited dendritic cell-dependent suppression of CD8(+) T cell expansion in a human mixed lymphocyte reaction consistent with the well established immunosuppressive activity of whole mycobacteria. PMID:21574597

  14. Adsorption of copper cyanide on chemically active adsorbents

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J.S.; Deorkar, N.V.; Tavlarides, L.L.

    1998-07-01

    An inorganic chemically active adsorbent (ICAA), SG(1)-TEPA (tetraethylenepentaamine)-propyl, is developed for removal, recovery, and recycling of copper cyanide from industrial waste streams. Equilibrium studies are executed to determine and model adsorption of the copper cyanide complex from aqueous solutions in a batch and packed column. It appears that adsorption is dependent on anionic copper cyanide species and the basicity of the ligand. Aqueous-phase equilibrium modeling shows that monovalent (Cu(CN){sub 2}{sup {minus}}), divalent (Cu(CN){sub 3}{sup 2{minus}}), and trivalent (Cu(CN){sub 4}{sup 3{minus}}) species of copper cyanide exist in the solution, depending on the pH and the concentration of total cyanide ions. Batch adsorption data are modeled using a modified multicomponent Langmuir isotherm which includes aqueous-phase speciation and basicity of the SG(1)-TEPA-propyl. This developed model is applied with a mass balance equation to describe the adsorption of copper cyanide complexes in a packed column.

  15. Internal Activation of Peptidyl Prolyl Thioesters in Native Chemical Ligation.

    PubMed

    Gui, Yue; Qiu, Lingqi; Li, Yaohao; Li, Hongxing; Dong, Suwei

    2016-04-13

    Prolyl thioesters have shown significantly lower reactivities in native chemical ligation (NCL) in comparison to that of the alanyl thioester. This report describes a mild and efficient internal activation protocol of peptidyl prolyl thioesters in NCL without using any thiol-based additives, where the introduction of a 4-mercaptan substituent on the C-terminal proline significantly improves the reactivity of prolyl thioesters via the formation of a bicyclic thiolactone intermediate. The kinetic data indicate that the reaction rate is comparable to that of the reported data of alanyl thioesters, and the mechanistic studies suggest that the ligation of two peptide segments proceeds through an NCL-like pathway instead of a direct aminolysis, which ensures the chemoselectivity and compatibility of various amino acid side chains. This 4-mercaptoprolyl thioester-based protocol also allows an efficient one-pot ligation-desulfurization procedure. The utility of this method has been further demonstrated in the synthesis of a proline-rich region of Wilms tumor protein 1. PMID:26982082

  16. 75 FR 6386 - Pesticide Products; Registration Applications for a New Active Ingredient Chemical; Demiditraz

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-09

    ... AGENCY Pesticide Products; Registration Applications for a New Active Ingredient Chemical; Demiditraz.... Product name: Demiditraz Technical. Active ingredient: Insecticide and Demiditraz at 100%. Proposed...., Kalamazoo, MI 49001. Product name: CA Acaricide. Active ingredient: Insecticide and Demiditraz at...

  17. The Water Vapour Radiometer at Effelsberg

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, A. L.; Teuber, U.; Keller, R.

    We have installed a scanning 18 GHz to 26 GHz water vapour radiometer on the focus cabin of the Effelsberg 100 m telescope for tropospheric phase, delay and opacity correction during high-frequency VLBI observations. It is based on the design by Tahmoush & Rogers (2000) but with noise injection for calibration, weather-proof housing, and temperature stabilization. The radiometer is delivering data into an archive since July 2003, from which they are available for download. The data will be delivered automatically to PIs of EVN experiments in a calibration table attached by the EVN calibration pipeline. This paper describes the radiometer and its performance.

  18. Textile damage caused by vapour cloud explosions.

    PubMed

    Was-Gubala, J; Krauss, W

    2004-01-01

    The aim of the project was to investigate the damage to garments caused by particular vapour cloud explosions. The authors would like to be able to provide investigators with specific information on how to link clothes to a specific type of crime: a particular case study was the inspiration for the examinations. Experiments were carried out in the fire reconstruction chamber of the laboratory using a selection of 26 clothes and 15 household garments differing in colour, fibre composition and textile construction. PMID:15527183

  19. Variability of water vapour in the Arctic stratosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thölix, Laura; Backman, Leif; Kivi, Rigel; Karpechko, Alexey Yu.

    2016-04-01

    This study evaluates the stratospheric water vapour distribution and variability in the Arctic. A FinROSE chemistry transport model simulation covering the years 1990-2014 is compared to observations (satellite and frost point hygrometer soundings), and the sources of stratospheric water vapour are studied. In the simulations, the Arctic water vapour shows decadal variability with a magnitude of 0.8 ppm. Both observations and the simulations show an increase in the water vapour concentration in the Arctic stratosphere after the year 2006, but around 2012 the concentration started to decrease. Model calculations suggest that this increase in water vapour is mostly explained by transport-related processes, while the photochemically produced water vapour plays a relatively smaller role. The increase in water vapour in the presence of the low winter temperatures in the Arctic stratosphere led to more frequent occurrence of ice polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) in the Arctic vortex. We perform a case study of ice PSC formation focusing on January 2010 when the polar vortex was unusually cold and allowed large-scale formation of PSCs. At the same time a large-scale persistent dehydration was observed. Ice PSCs and dehydration observed at Sodankylä with accurate water vapour soundings in January and February 2010 during the LAPBIAT (Lapland Atmosphere-Biosphere facility) atmospheric measurement campaign were well reproduced by the model. In particular, both the observed and simulated decrease in water vapour in the dehydration layer was up to 1.5 ppm.

  20. Heat-activated Plasmonic Chemical Sensors for Harsh Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, Michael; Oh, Sang-Hyun

    2015-12-01

    A passive plasmonics based chemical sensing system to be used in harsh operating environments was investigated and developed within this program. The initial proposed technology was based on combining technologies developed at the SUNY Polytechnic Institute Colleges of Nanoscale Science and Engineering (CNSE) and at the University of Minnesota (UM). Specifically, a passive wireless technique developed at UM was to utilize a heat-activated plasmonic design to passively harvest the thermal energy from within a combustion emission stream and convert this into a narrowly focused light source. This plasmonic device was based on a bullseye design patterned into a gold film using focused ion beam methods (FIB). Critical to the design was the use of thermal stabilizing under and overlayers surrounding the gold film. These stabilizing layers were based on both atomic layer deposited films as well as metal laminate layers developed by United Technologies Aerospace Systems (UTAS). While the bullseye design was never able to be thermally stabilized for operating temperatures of 500oC or higher, an alternative energy harvesting design was developed by CNSE within this program. With this new development, plasmonic sensing results are presented where thermal energy is harvested using lithographically patterned Au nanorods, replacing the need for an external incident light source. Gas sensing results using the harvested thermal energy are in good agreement with sensing experiments, which used an external incident light source. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) was used to reduce the wavelength parameter space from 665 variables down to 4 variables with similar levels of demonstrated selectivity. The method was further improved by patterning rods which harvested energy in the near infrared, which led to a factor of 10 decrease in data acquisition times as well as demonstrated selectivity with a reduced wavelength data set. The combination of a plasmonic-based energy harvesting

  1. Atmospheric pressure chemical vapour deposition of vanadium oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manning, Troy Darrell

    The APCVD of vanadium(IV) oxide thin films from halide precursors was investigated. It was found that the phase of vanadium oxide obtained could be controlled by the reactor temperature and precursor ratio. For vanadium(IV) chloride and water, reactor temperatures > 550 °C and an excess of water over VCI4 was required to produce VO2 thin films. For vanadium(V) oxytrichloride and water, reactor temperatures > 550 °C and an excess of water over VOCI3 also produced VO2 but required low total gas flow rates (< 1 L min 1) for complete coverage of the substrate. Vanadium(IV) oxide thin films doped with metal ions (W, Cr, Nb, Ti, Mo or Sn) were also prepared by the APCVD process in order to reduce the thermochromic transition temperature (TC) from 68 °C for the undoped material to < 30 °C. The most successful dopant was tungsten, introduced into the VOCl3, and water system as WCI6, which lowered T to 5 °C for a 3 atom% tungsten doped thin film. Tungsten (VI) ethoxide was introduced into the VCI4 and water system and reduced TC, of VO2, to 42 °C for a 1 atom% tungsten doped thin film. Chromium, introduced as CrCO2Cl2, formed a chromium vanadium oxide that did not display any thermochromic properties. Niobium, introduced as NbCl5 into the VOCl3 system, reduced TC of VO2, but the amount of niobium introduced could not be easily controlled. Molybdenum, introduced as MoCI5, also reduced TC of VO2, but the form of the molybdenum appeared to be different from that required for complete control of TC, Titanium, introduced as TiCl4, produced phase segregated films of VO2 and TiO2, with interesting multifunctional properties and a reduced TC. Tin, introduced as SnCl4, also formed a phase segregated material of VO2, and SnO2, with a slightly reduced TC.

  2. Chemical vapour deposition: Transition metal carbides go 2D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gogotsi, Yury

    2015-11-01

    The unique properties of 2D materials, such as graphene or transition metal dichalcogenides, have been attracting much attention in the past decade. Now, metallically conductive and even superconducting transition metal carbides are entering the game.

  3. Preparation of fungal conidia impacts their susceptibility to inactivation by ethanol vapours.

    PubMed

    Dao, Thien; Dantigny, Philippe

    2009-11-15

    A common protocol employed for the preparation of conidia employs flooding a fungal colony grown on semi-solid media under optimum conditions with an aqueous solution. In contrast, conidia produced in a natural environment are usually not hydrated when disseminated in air and can be produced under water stress. In order to simulate the latter conditions, cultures were grown at different water activities and conidia were dry-harvested on the lid by turning the dishes upside-down then gently tapping the bottom of the box. This study aimed at assessing the effect of the preparation of fungal conidia on their inactivation by ethanol vapours. Firstly ethanol vapours (either 0.30 or 0.45 kPa) were applied to conidia obtained from the standardised protocol and to dry-harvested conidia for some species of Penicillium. While all dry-harvested conidia remained viable after 24 h of treatment, about 1.0, 3.5 and 2.5 log(10) reductions were observed for hydrated conidia of Penicillium chrysogenum, Penicillium digitatum and Penicillium italicum respectively. Secondly ethanol vapours (0.67 kPa) were applied to dry-harvested conidia obtained from cultures grown at 0.99 a(w) and at reduced water activities. For all species, the susceptibility to ethanol vapours of conidia obtained at 0.99 a(w) was significantly greater than that of conidia obtained at reduced water activities. Conidia produced in a natural environment under non-optimal conditions would be much more resistant to ethanol vapours than those produced in the laboratory. This phenomenon may be due to a reduced intracellular water activity of dry-harvested conidia. PMID:19762103

  4. The influence of chemical chaperones on enzymatic activity under thermal and chemical stresses: common features and variation among diverse chemical families.

    PubMed

    Levy-Sakin, Michal; Berger, Or; Feibish, Nir; Sharon, Noa; Schnaider, Lee; Shmul, Guy; Amir, Yaniv; Buzhansky, Ludmila; Gazit, Ehud

    2014-01-01

    Molecular and chemical chaperones are key components of the two main mechanisms that ensure structural stability and activity under environmental stresses. Yet, chemical chaperones are often regarded only as osmolytes and their role beyond osmotic regulation is not fully understood. Here, we systematically studied a large group of chemical chaperones, representatives of diverse chemical families, for their protective influence under either thermal or chemical stresses. Consistent with previous studies, we observed that in spite of the structural similarity between sugars and sugar alcohols, they have an apparent difference in their protective potential. Our results support the notion that the protective activity is mediated by the solvent and the presence of water is essential. In the current work we revealed that i) polyols and sugars have a completely different profile of protective activity toward trifluoroethanol and thermal stress; ii) minor changes in solvent composition that do not affect enzyme activity, yet have a great effect on the ability of osmolytes to act as protectants and iii) increasing the number of active groups of carbohydrates makes them better protectants while increasing the number of active groups of methylamines does not, as revealed by attempts to synthesize de novo designed methylamines with multiple functional groups. PMID:24520396

  5. The Influence of Chemical Chaperones on Enzymatic Activity under Thermal and Chemical Stresses: Common Features and Variation among Diverse Chemical Families

    PubMed Central

    Feibish, Nir; Sharon, Noa; Schnaider, Lee; Shmul, Guy; Amir, Yaniv; Buzhansky, Ludmila; Gazit, Ehud

    2014-01-01

    Molecular and chemical chaperones are key components of the two main mechanisms that ensure structural stability and activity under environmental stresses. Yet, chemical chaperones are often regarded only as osmolytes and their role beyond osmotic regulation is not fully understood. Here, we systematically studied a large group of chemical chaperones, representatives of diverse chemical families, for their protective influence under either thermal or chemical stresses. Consistent with previous studies, we observed that in spite of the structural similarity between sugars and sugar alcohols, they have an apparent difference in their protective potential. Our results support the notion that the protective activity is mediated by the solvent and the presence of water is essential. In the current work we revealed that i) polyols and sugars have a completely different profile of protective activity toward trifluoroethanol and thermal stress; ii) minor changes in solvent composition that do not affect enzyme activity, yet have a great effect on the ability of osmolytes to act as protectants and iii) increasing the number of active groups of carbohydrates makes them better protectants while increasing the number of active groups of methylamines does not, as revealed by attempts to synthesize de novo designed methylamines with multiple functional groups. PMID:24520396

  6. High performance vapour-cell frequency standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gharavipour, M.; Affolderbach, C.; Kang, S.; Bandi, T.; Gruet, F.; Pellaton, M.; Mileti, G.

    2016-06-01

    We report our investigations on a compact high-performance rubidium (Rb) vapour-cell clock based on microwave-optical double-resonance (DR). These studies are done in both DR continuous-wave (CW) and Ramsey schemes using the same Physics Package (PP), with the same Rb vapour cell and a magnetron-type cavity with only 45 cm3 external volume. In the CW-DR scheme, we demonstrate a DR signal with a contrast of 26% and a linewidth of 334 Hz; in Ramsey-DR mode Ramsey signals with higher contrast up to 35% and a linewidth of 160 Hz have been demonstrated. Short-term stabilities of 1.4×10-13 τ-1/2 and 2.4×10-13 τ-1/2 are measured for CW-DR and Ramsey-DR schemes, respectively. In the Ramsey-DR operation, thanks to the separation of light and microwave interactions in time, the light-shift effect has been suppressed which allows improving the long-term clock stability as compared to CW-DR operation. Implementations in miniature atomic clocks are considered.

  7. Advanced deposition model for thermal activated chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Dang

    Thermal Activated Chemical Vapor Deposition (TACVD) is defined as the formation of a stable solid product on a heated substrate surface from chemical reactions and/or dissociation of gaseous reactants in an activated environment. It has become an essential process for producing solid film, bulk material, coating, fibers, powders and monolithic components. Global market of CVD products has reached multi billions dollars for each year. In the recent years CVD process has been extensively used to manufacture semiconductors and other electronic components such as polysilicon, AlN and GaN. Extensive research effort has been directed to improve deposition quality and throughput. To obtain fast and high quality deposition, operational conditions such as temperature, pressure, fluid velocity and species concentration and geometry conditions such as source-substrate distance need to be well controlled in a CVD system. This thesis will focus on design of CVD processes through understanding the transport and reaction phenomena in the growth reactor. Since the in situ monitor is almost impossible for CVD reactor, many industrial resources have been expended to determine the optimum design by semi-empirical methods and trial-and-error procedures. This approach has allowed the achievement of improvements in the deposition sequence, but begins to show its limitations, as this method cannot always fulfill the more and more stringent specifications of the industry. To resolve this problem, numerical simulation is widely used in studying the growth techniques. The difficulty of numerical simulation of TACVD crystal growth process lies in the simulation of gas phase and surface reactions, especially the latter one, due to the fact that very limited kinetic information is available in the open literature. In this thesis, an advanced deposition model was developed to study the multi-component fluid flow, homogeneous gas phase reactions inside the reactor chamber, heterogeneous surface

  8. Characterization of aqueous interactions of copper-doped phosphate-based glasses by vapour sorption.

    PubMed

    Stähli, Christoph; Shah Mohammadi, Maziar; Waters, Kristian E; Nazhat, Showan N

    2014-07-01

    Owing to their adjustable dissolution properties, phosphate-based glasses (PGs) are promising materials for the controlled release of bioinorganics, such as copper ions. This study describes a vapour sorption method that allowed for the investigation of the kinetics and mechanisms of aqueous interactions of PGs of the formulation 50P2O5-30CaO-(20-x)Na2O-xCuO (x=0, 1, 5 and 10mol.%). Initial characterization was performed using (31)P magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance and attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Increasing CuO content resulted in chemical shifts of the predominant Q(2) NMR peak and of the (POP)as and (PO(-)) Fourier transform infrared absorptions, owing to the higher strength of the POCu bond compared to PONa. Vapour sorption and desorption were gravimetrically measured in PG powders exposed to variable relative humidity (RH). Sorption was negligible below 70% RH and increased exponentially with RH from 70 to 90%, where it exhibited a negative correlation with CuO content. Vapour sorption in 0% and 1% CuO glasses resulted in phosphate chain hydration and hydrolysis, as evidenced by protonated Q(0)(1H) and Q(1)(1H) species. Dissolution rates in deionized water showed a linear correlation (R(2)>0.99) with vapour sorption. Furthermore, cation release rates could be predicted based on dissolution rates and PG composition. The release of orthophosphate and short polyphosphate species corroborates the action of hydrolysis and was correlated with pH changes. In conclusion, the agreement between vapour sorption and routine characterization techniques in water demonstrates the potential of this method for the study of PG aqueous reactions. PMID:24681371

  9. Properties of meso-Erythritol; phase state, accommodation coefficient and saturation vapour pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emanuelsson, Eva; Tschiskale, Morten; Bilde, Merete

    2016-04-01

    Introduction Saturation vapour pressure and the associated temperature dependence (enthalpy ΔH), are key parameters for improving predictive atmospheric models. Generally, the atmospheric aerosol community lack experimentally determined values of these properties for relevant organic aerosol compounds (Bilde et al., 2015). In this work we have studied the organic aerosol component meso-Erythritol. Methods Sub-micron airborne particles of meso-Erythritol were generated by nebulization from aqueous solution, dried, and a mono disperse fraction of the aerosol was selected using a differential mobility analyser. The particles were then allowed to evaporate in the ARAGORN (AaRhus Atmospheric Gas phase OR Nano particle) flow tube. It is a temperature controlled 3.5 m long stainless steel tube with an internal diameter of 0.026 m (Bilde et al., 2003, Zardini et al., 2010). Changes in particle size as function of evaporation time were determined using a scanning mobility particle sizer system. Physical properties like air flow, temperature, humidity and pressure were controlled and monitored on several places in the setup. The saturation vapour pressures were then inferred from the experimental results in the MATLAB® program AU_VaPCaP (Aarhus University_Vapour Pressure Calculation Program). Results Following evaporation, meso-Erythriol under some conditions showed a bimodal particle size distribution indicating the formation of particles of two different phase states. The issue of physical phase state, along with critical assumptions e.g. the accommodation coefficient in the calculations of saturation vapour pressures of atmospheric relevant compounds, will be discussed. Saturation vapour pressures from the organic compound meso-Erythritol will be presented at temperatures between 278 and 308 K, and results will be discussed in the context of atmospheric chemistry. References Bilde, M. et al., (2015), Chemical Reviews, 115 (10), 4115-4156. Bilde, M. et. al., (2003

  10. Is there a solar signal in lower stratospheric water vapour?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schieferdecker, Tobias; Lossow, Stefan; Stiller, Gabriele; von Clarmann, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    A merged time series of stratospheric water vapour built from the Halogen Occultation Instrument (HALOE) and the Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS) data between 60 deg S and 60 deg N and 15 to 30 km, and covering the years 1992 to 2012, was analysed by multivariate linear regression, including an 11-year solar cycle proxy. Lower stratospheric water vapour was found to reveal a phase-shifted anti-correlation with the solar cycle, with lowest water vapour after solar maximum. The phase shift is composed of an inherent constant time lag of about 2 years and a second component following the stratospheric age of air. The amplitudes of the water vapour response are largest close to the tropical tropopause (up to 0.35 ppmv) and decrease with altitude and latitude. Including the solar cycle proxy in the regression results in linear trends of water vapour being negative over the full altitude/latitude range, while without the solar proxy, positive water vapour trends in the lower stratosphere were found. We conclude from these results that a solar signal seems to be generated at the tropical tropopause which is most likely imprinted on the stratospheric water vapour abundances and transported to higher altitudes and latitudes via the Brewer-Dobson circulation. Hence it is concluded that the tropical tropopause temperature at the final dehydration point of air may also be governed to some degree by the solar cycle. The negative water vapour trends obtained when considering the solar cycle impact on water vapour abundances can possibly solve the "water vapour conundrum" of increasing stratospheric water vapour abundances despite constant or even decreasing tropopause temperatures.

  11. Is there a solar signal in lower stratospheric water vapour?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schieferdecker, T.; Lossow, S.; Stiller, G. P.; von Clarmann, T.

    2015-09-01

    A merged time series of stratospheric water vapour built from the Halogen Occultation Instrument (HALOE) and the Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS) data between 60° S and 60° N and 15 to 30 km and covering the years 1992 to 2012 was analysed by multivariate linear regression, including an 11-year solar cycle proxy. Lower stratospheric water vapour was found to reveal a phase-shifted anti-correlation with the solar cycle, with lowest water vapour after solar maximum. The phase shift is composed of an inherent constant time lag of about 2 years and a second component following the stratospheric age of air. The amplitudes of the water vapour response are largest close to the tropical tropopause (up to 0.35 ppmv) and decrease with altitude and latitude. Including the solar cycle proxy in the regression results in linear trends of water vapour being negative over the full altitude/latitude range, while without the solar proxy, positive water vapour trends in the lower stratosphere were found. We conclude from these results that a solar signal seems to be generated at the tropical tropopause which is most likely imprinted on the stratospheric water vapour abundances and transported to higher altitudes and latitudes via the Brewer-Dobson circulation. Hence it is concluded that the tropical tropopause temperature at the final dehydration point of air may also be governed to some degree by the solar cycle. The negative water vapour trends obtained when considering the solar cycle impact on water vapour abundances can possibly solve the "water vapour conundrum" of increasing stratospheric water vapour abundances despite constant or even decreasing tropopause temperatures.

  12. Preparation of activated carbon from cherry stones by chemical activation with ZnCl 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olivares-Marín, M.; Fernández-González, C.; Macías-García, A.; Gómez-Serrano, V.

    2006-06-01

    Cherry stones (CS), an industrial product generated abundantly in the Valle del Jerte (Cáceres province, Spain), were used as precursor in the preparation of activated carbon by chemical activation with ZnCl 2. The influence of process variables such as the carbonisation temperature and the ZnCl 2:CS ratio (impregnation ratio) on textural and chemical-surface properties of the products obtained was studied. Such products were characterised texturally by adsorption of N 2 at -196 °C, mercury porosimetry and density measurements. Information on the surface functional groups and structures of the carbons was provided by FT-IR spectroscopy. Activated carbon with a high development of surface area and porosity is prepared. When using the 4:1 impregnation ratio, the specific surface area (BET) of the resultant carbon is as high as 1971 m 2 g -1. The effect of the increase in the impregnation ratio on the porous structure of activated carbon is stronger than that of the rise in the carbonisation temperature, whereas the opposite applies to the effect on the surface functional groups and structures.

  13. Active targeting in a random porous medium by chemical swarm robots with secondary chemical signaling.

    PubMed

    Grančič, Peter; Štěpánek, František

    2011-08-01

    The multibody dynamics of a system of chemical swarm robots in a porous environment is investigated. The chemical swarm robots are modeled as brownian particles capable of delivering an encapsulated chemical payload toward a given target location and releasing it in response to an external stimulus. The presence of chemical signals (chemo-attractant) in the system plays a crucial role in coordinating the collective movement of the particles via chemotaxis. For a number of applications, such as distributed chemical processing and targeted drug delivery, the understanding of factors that govern the collective behavior of the particles, especially their ability to localize a given target, is of immense importance. A hybrid modeling methodology based on the combination of the brownian dynamics method and diffusion problem coupled through the chemotaxis phenomena is used to analyze the impact of a varying signaling threshold and the strength of chemotaxis on the ability of the chemical robots to fulfill their target localization mission. The results demonstrate that the selected performance criteria (the localization half time and the success rate) can be improved when an appropriate signaling process is chosen. Furthermore, for an optimum target localization strategy, the topological complexity of the porous environment needs to be reflected. PMID:21929036

  14. Active targeting in a random porous medium by chemical swarm robots with secondary chemical signaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grančič, Peter; Štěpánek, František

    2011-08-01

    The multibody dynamics of a system of chemical swarm robots in a porous environment is investigated. The chemical swarm robots are modeled as Brownian particles capable of delivering an encapsulated chemical payload toward a given target location and releasing it in response to an external stimulus. The presence of chemical signals (chemo-attractant) in the system plays a crucial role in coordinating the collective movement of the particles via chemotaxis. For a number of applications, such as distributed chemical processing and targeted drug delivery, the understanding of factors that govern the collective behavior of the particles, especially their ability to localize a given target, is of immense importance. A hybrid modeling methodology based on the combination of the Brownian dynamics method and diffusion problem coupled through the chemotaxis phenomena is used to analyze the impact of a varying signaling threshold and the strength of chemotaxis on the ability of the chemical robots to fulfill their target localization mission. The results demonstrate that the selected performance criteria (the localization half time and the success rate) can be improved when an appropriate signaling process is chosen. Furthermore, for an optimum target localization strategy, the topological complexity of the porous environment needs to be reflected.

  15. METABOLISM AND METABOLIC ACTIVATION OF CHEMICALS: IN-SILICO SIMULATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The role of metabolism in prioritizing chemicals according to their potential adverse health effects is extremely important because innocuous parents can be transformed into toxic metabolites. This work presents the TIssue MEtabolism Simulator (TIMES) platform for simulating met...

  16. Nano-porous indium oxide transistor sensor for the detection of ethanol vapours at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seetha, M.; Mangalaraj, D.

    2012-01-01

    Porous indium oxide thin film prepared by the dip coating technique has been used in the construction of a field effect transistor. The coating solution was prepared from indium chloride precursor. The average particle size of the dip coated thin film was found to be 25 nm. Scanning electron microscopic images show the porous nature of the film, and the root mean square roughness of the film calculated using atomic force microscope was 24 nm. A transistor has been constructed by evaporating metal Aluminium as source and drain electrodes on the indium oxide active layer and employing the silicon substrate itself as a gate. The sensor response of the constructed transistor was tested with ethanol, ammonia and acetone vapours. The sensor showed good response to ethanol vapours even at 5-ppm level, and the time for response and recovery of the gas was nearly 1 min. Response to ammonia and acetone was comparatively poor. When the gate voltage was increased from 0 to 300 mV, a considerable increase in the source-drain current was observed. As the temperature of the sensing element increased, response to ethanol vapours also increased. There was nearly a linear variation in the transistor response for 100 ppm of ethanol vapours when the gate voltage was swept from 0 to 300 mV. The sensor response of the transistor increases with the gas concentration. The constructed transistor was found to be selectively sensitive to ethanol; therefore it can be implemented to work as a breath alcohol checker.

  17. Chemical properties and toxicity of soils contaminated by mining activity.

    PubMed

    Agnieszka, Baran; Tomasz, Czech; Jerzy, Wieczorek

    2014-09-01

    This research is aimed at assessing the total content and soluble forms of metals (zinc, lead and cadmium) and toxicity of soils subjected to strong human pressure associated with mining of zinc and lead ores. The research area lay in the neighbourhood of the Bolesław Mine and Metallurgical Plant in Bukowno (Poland). The study obtained total cadmium concentration between 0.29 and 51.91 mg, zinc between 7.90 and 3,614 mg, and that of lead between 28.4 and 6844 mg kg(-1) of soil d.m. The solubility of the heavy metals in 1 mol dm(-3) NH4NO3 was 1-49% for zinc, 5-45% for cadmium, and <1-10% for lead. In 1 mol HCl dm(-3), the solubility of the studied metals was much higher and obtained values depending on the collection site, from 45 to 92% for zinc, from 74 to 99%, and from 79 to 99% for lead. The lower solubility of the heavy metals in 1 mol dm(-3) NH4NO3 than 1 mol HCl dm(-3) is connected with that, the ammonium nitrate has low extraction power, and it is used in determining the bioavailable (active) form of heavy metals. Toxicity assessment of the soil samples was performed using two tests, Phytotoxkit and Microtox(®). Germination index values were between 22 and 75% for Sinapis alba, between 28 and 100% for Lepidium sativum, and between 10 and 28% for Sorghum saccharatum. Depending on the studied soil sample, Vibrio fischeri luminescence inhibition was 20-96%. The sensitivity of the test organisms formed the following series: S. saccharatum > S. alba = V. fischeri > L. sativum. Significant positive correlations (p ≤ 0.05) of the total and soluble contents of the metals with luminescence inhibition in V. fischeri and root growth inhibition in S. saccharatum were found. The general trend observed was an increase in metal toxicity measured by the biotest with increasing available metal contents in soils. All the soil samples were classified into toxicity class III, which means that they are toxic and present severe danger. Biotest are a good complement to

  18. Comparison of the Cytotoxic Potential of Cigarette Smoke and Electronic Cigarette Vapour Extract on Cultured Myocardial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Farsalinos, Konstantinos E.; Romagna, Giorgio; Allifranchini, Elena; Ripamonti, Emiliano; Bocchietto, Elena; Todeschi, Stefano; Tsiapras, Dimitris; Kyrzopoulos, Stamatis; Voudris, Vassilis

    2013-01-01

    Background: Electronic cigarettes (ECs) have been marketed as an alternative-to-smoking habit. Besides chemical studies of the content of EC liquids or vapour, little research has been conducted on their in vitro effects. Smoking is an important risk factor for cardiovascular disease and cigarette smoke (CS) has well-established cytotoxic effects on myocardial cells. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the cytotoxic potential of the vapour of 20 EC liquid samples and a “base” liquid sample (50% glycerol and 50% propylene glycol, with no nicotine or flavourings) on cultured myocardial cells. Included were 4 samples produced by using cured tobacco leaves in order to extract the tobacco flavour. Methods: Cytotoxicity was tested according to the ISO 10993-5 standard. By activating an EC device at 3.7 volts (6.2 watts—all samples, including the “base” liquid) and at 4.5 volts (9.2 watts—four randomly selected samples), 200 mg of liquid evaporated and was extracted in 20 mL of culture medium. Cigarette smoke (CS) extract from three tobacco cigarettes was produced according to ISO 3308 method (2 s puffs of 35 mL volume, one puff every 60 s). The extracts, undiluted (100%) and in four dilutions (50%, 25%, 12.5%, and 6.25%), were applied to myocardial cells (H9c2); percent-viability was measured after 24 h incubation. According to ISO 10993-5, viability of <70% was considered cytotoxic. Results: CS extract was cytotoxic at extract concentrations >6.25% (viability: 76.9 ± 2.0% at 6.25%, 38.2 ± 0.5% at 12.5%, 3.1 ± 0.2% at 25%, 5.2 ± 0.8% at 50%, and 3.9 ± 0.2% at 100% extract concentration). Three EC extracts (produced by tobacco leaves) were cytotoxic at 100% and 50% extract concentrations (viability range: 2.2%–39.1% and 7.4%–66.9% respectively) and one (“Cinnamon-Cookies” flavour) was cytotoxic at 100% concentration only (viability: 64.8 ± 2.5%). Inhibitory concentration 50 was >3 times lower in CS extract compared to the worst

  19. A solar signal in lower stratospheric water vapour?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schieferdecker, T.; Lossow, S.; Stiller, G. P.; von Clarmann, T.

    2015-04-01

    A merged time series of stratospheric water vapour built from HALOE and MIPAS data between 60° S and 60° N and 15 to 30 km and covering the years 1992 to 2012 was analyzed by multivariate linear regression including an 11 year solar cycle proxy. Lower stratospheric water vapour was found to reveal a phase-shifted anti-correlation with the solar cycle, with lowest water vapour after solar maximum. The phase shift is composed of an inherent constant time lag of about 2 years and a second component following the stratospheric age of air. The amplitudes of the water vapour response are largest close to the tropical tropopause (up to 0.35 ppmv) and decrease with altitude and latitude. Including the solar cycle proxy in the regression results in linear trends of water vapour being negative over the full altitude/latitude range, while without the solar proxy positive water wapour trends in the lowermost stratosphere were found. We conclude from these results that a solar signal generated at the tropical tropopause is imprinted on the stratospheric water vapour abundances and transported to higher altitudes and latitudes via the Brewer-Dobson circulation. Hence it is concluded that the tropical tropopause temperature at the final dehydration point of air is also governed to some degree by the solar cycle. The negative water vapour trends obtained when considering the solar cycle impact on water vapour abundances can solve the water vapour conundrum of increasing stratospheric water vapour abundances at constant or even decreasing tropopause temperatures.

  20. Localisation of an Unknown Number of Land Mines Using a Network of Vapour Detectors

    PubMed Central

    Chhadé, Hiba Haj; Abdallah, Fahed; Mougharbel, Imad; Gning, Amadou; Julier, Simon; Mihaylova, Lyudmila

    2014-01-01

    We consider the problem of localising an unknown number of land mines using concentration information provided by a wireless sensor network. A number of vapour sensors/detectors, deployed in the region of interest, are able to detect the concentration of the explosive vapours, emanating from buried land mines. The collected data is communicated to a fusion centre. Using a model for the transport of the explosive chemicals in the air, we determine the unknown number of sources using a Principal Component Analysis (PCA)-based technique. We also formulate the inverse problem of determining the positions and emission rates of the land mines using concentration measurements provided by the wireless sensor network. We present a solution for this problem based on a probabilistic Bayesian technique using a Markov chain Monte Carlo sampling scheme, and we compare it to the least squares optimisation approach. Experiments conducted on simulated data show the effectiveness of the proposed approach. PMID:25384008

  1. Electron swarm parameters in water vapour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, H.; Date, H.; Shimozuma, M.

    2007-04-01

    Electron swarm parameters, such as the drift velocity and the ionization coefficient, in water vapour have been measured for relatively wide ranges in reduced electric fields (E/N) at room temperature. The drift velocity (Wm) was obtained based upon the arrival-time spectra of electrons by using a double-shutter drift tube for the E/N from 60 to 1000 Td, while the first and second ionization coefficients (α and γ) were determined by the steady-state Townsend method from 50 to 3000 Td. A comparison between the results and other data in the literature shows that our results for both the drift velocity and the effective ionization coefficient are lower than those of the other data in the above ranges.

  2. Developments in vapour cloud explosion blast modeling.

    PubMed

    Mercx, W P; van den Berg, A C; Hayhurst, C J; Robertson, N J; Moran, K C

    2000-01-01

    TNT Equivalency methods are widely used for vapour cloud explosion blast modeling. Presently, however, other types of models are available which do not have the fundamental objections TNT Equivalency models have. TNO Multi-Energy method is increasingly accepted as a more reasonable alternative to be used as a simple and practical method. Computer codes based on computational fluid dynamics (CFD) like AutoReaGas, developed by TNO and Century Dynamics, could be used also in case a more rigorous analysis is required. Application of the Multi-Energy method requires knowledge of two parameters describing the explosion: a charge size and a charge strength. During the last years, research has led to an improved determination of the charge strength (i.e., the class number or source overpressure) to be chosen to apply the blast charts. A correlation has been derived relating the charge strength to a set of parameters describing the boundary conditions of the flammable cloud and the fuel in the cloud. A simple approach may not be satisfactory in all situations. The overpressure distribution inside a vapour cloud explosion is generally not homogeneous and the presence of obstructions causes directional blast propagation in the near field. A CFD approach, in which the actual situation is modeled, supplies case-specific results. An overview of the key aspects relevant to the application of the Multi-Energy method and CFD modeling is provided. Then the application of the two methods is demonstrated for an example problem involving the calculation of the explosion blast load on a structure at some distance from the explosion in an offshore platform complex. PMID:10677667

  3. [Advances in studies on chemical constituents and biological activities of Desmodium species].

    PubMed

    Liu, Chao; Wu, Ying; Zhang, Qian-Jun; Kang, Wen-Yi; Zhang, Long; Zhou, Qing-Di

    2013-12-01

    The chemical constituents isolated from Desmodium species (Leguminosae) included terpenoids, flavonoids, steroids, alkaloids compounds. Modem pharmacological studies have showed that the Desmodium species have antioxidant, antibacterial, anti-inflammatory, hepatoprotective, diuretic, antipyretic, analgesic and choleretic activity. This article mainly has reviewed the research advances of chemical constituents and biological activities of Desmodium species since 2003. PMID:24791478

  4. Combined Chemical Activation and Fenton Degradation to Convert Waste Polyethylene into High-Value Fine Chemicals.

    PubMed

    Chow, Cheuk-Fai; Wong, Wing-Leung; Ho, Keith Yat-Fung; Chan, Chung-Sum; Gong, Cheng-Bin

    2016-07-01

    Plastic waste is a valuable organic resource. However, proper technologies to recover usable materials from plastic are still very rare. Although the conversion/cracking/degradation of certain plastics into chemicals has drawn much attention, effective and selective cracking of the major waste plastic polyethylene is extremely difficult, with degradation of C-C/C-H bonds identified as the bottleneck. Pyrolysis, for example, is a nonselective degradation method used to crack plastics, but it requires a very high energy input. To solve the current plastic pollution crisis, more effective technologies are needed for converting plastic waste into useful substances that can be fed into the energy cycle or used to produce fine chemicals for industry. In this study, we demonstrate a new and effective chemical approach by using the Fenton reaction to convert polyethylene plastic waste into carboxylic acids under ambient conditions. Understanding the fundamentals of this new chemical process provides a possible protocol to solve global plastic-waste problems. PMID:27168079

  5. Adsorption studies of methylene blue and phenol onto vetiver roots activated carbon prepared by chemical activation.

    PubMed

    Altenor, Sandro; Carene, Betty; Emmanuel, Evens; Lambert, Jacques; Ehrhardt, Jean-Jacques; Gaspard, Sarra

    2009-06-15

    Vetiver roots have been utilized for the preparation of activated carbon (AC) by chemical activation with different impregnation ratios of phosphoric acid, X(P) (gH(3)PO(4)/g precursor): 0.5:1; 1:1 and 1.5:1. Textural characterization, determined by nitrogen adsorption at 77K shows that mixed microporous and mesoporous structures activated carbons (ACs) with high surface area (>1000 m(2)/g) and high pore volume (up to 1.19 cm(3)/g) can be obtained. The surface chemical properties of these ACs were investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Boehm titration. Their textural and chemical characteristics were compared to those of an AC sample obtained by steam activation of vetiver roots. Classical molecules used for characterizing liquid phase adsorption, phenol and methylene blue (MB), were used. Adsorption kinetics of MB and phenol have been studied using commonly used kinetic models, i.e., the pseudo-first-order model, the pseudo-second-order model, the intraparticle diffusion model and as well the fractal, BWS (Brouers, Weron and Sotolongo) kinetic equation. The correlation coefficients (R(2)) and the normalized standard deviation Deltaq (%) were determined showing globally, that the recently derived fractal kinetic equation could best describe the adsorption kinetics for the adsorbates tested here, indicating a complex adsorption mechanism. The experimental adsorption isotherms of these molecules on the activated carbon were as well analysed using four isotherms: the classical Freundlich, Langmuir, Redlich-Peterson equations, but as well the newly published deformed Weibull Brouers-Sotolongo isotherm. The results obtained from the application of the equations show that the best fits were achieved with the Brouers-Sotolongo equation and with the Redlich-Peterson equation. Influence of surface functional groups towards MB adsorption is as well studied using various ACs prepared from vetiver roots and sugar cane bagasse. Opposite effects governing MB

  6. LIMITED-USE CHEMICAL PROTECTIVE CLOTHING FOR EPA SUPERFUND ACTIVITIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Because contractor field personnel complained about the poor durability and fit of limited-use chemical protective clothing (CPC) most commonly used at hazardous waste site operations, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) initiated a study to characterize use of CPC; de...

  7. LIMITED-USE CHEMICAL PROTECTIVE CLOTHING FOR EPA SUPERFUND ACTIVITIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Because contractor field personnel complained about the poor durability and fit of limited-use chemical protective clothing (CPC) most commonly used at hazardous waste site operations, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) initiated a study to • characterize use of CPC...

  8. Chemical and enzymatic reductive activation of acylfulvene to isomeric cytotoxic reactive intermediates

    PubMed Central

    Pietsch, Kathryn E.; Neels, James F.; Yu, Xiang; Gong, Jiachang; Sturla, Shana J.

    2011-01-01

    Acylfulvenes, a class of semisynthetic analogues of the sesquiterpene natural product illudin S, are cytotoxic towards cancer cells. The minor structural changes between illudin S and AFs translate to an improved therapeutic window in preclinical cell-based assays and xenograft models. AFs are, therefore, unique tools for addressing the chemical and biochemical basis of cytotoxic selectivity. AFs elicit cytotoxic responses by alkylation of biological targets, including DNA. While AFs are capable of direct alkylation, cytosolic reductive bioactivation to an electrophilic intermediate is correlated with enhanced cytotoxicity. Data obtained in this study illustrates chemical aspects of the process of AF activation. By tracking reaction mechanisms with stable isotope-labeled reagents, enzymatic versus chemical activation pathways for AF were compared for reactions involving the NADPH-dependent enzyme prostaglandin reductase 1 (PTGR1) or sodium borohydride, respectively. These two processes resulted in isomeric products that appear to give rise to similar patterns of DNA modification. The chemically activated isomer has been newly isolated and chemically characterized in this study, including an assessment of its relative stereochemistry, and stability at varying pH and under bioassay conditions. In mammalian cancer cells, this chemically activated analog was shown to not rely on further cellular activation to significantly enhance cytotoxic potency, in contrast to the requirements of AF. On the basis of this study, we anticipate that the chemically activated form of AF will serve as a useful chemical probe for evaluating biomolecular interactions independent of enzyme-mediated activation. PMID:21939268

  9. Antimicrobial activity and chemical composition of some essential oils.

    PubMed

    Aridoğan, Buket Cicioğlu; Baydar, Hasan; Kaya, Selçuk; Demirci, Mustafa; Ozbaşar, Demir; Mumcu, Ethem

    2002-12-01

    In this study the composition and antimicrobial properties of essential oils obtained from Origanum onites, Mentha piperita, Juniperus exalsa, Chrysanthemum indicum, Lavandula hybrida, Rosa damascena, Echinophora tenuifolia, Foeniculum vulgare were examined. To evaluate the in vitro antibacterial activities of these eight aromatic extracts; their in vitro antimicrobial activities were determined by disk diffusion testing, according to the NCCLS criteria. Escherichia coli (ATTC 25922), Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 25923) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (ATTC 27853 were used as standard test bacterial strains. Origanum onites recorded antimicrobial activity against all test bacteria, and was strongest against Staphylococcus aureus. For Rosa damascena, Mentha piperita and Lavandula hybrida antimicrobial activity was recorded only to Staphylococcus aureus. Juniperus exalsa, and Chrysanthemum indicum exhibited antibacterial activities against both Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli. We also examined the in vitro antimicrobial activities of some components of the essential oils and found some components with antimicrobial activity. PMID:12510839

  10. Chemical modification of capuramycins to enhance antibacterial activity

    PubMed Central

    Bogatcheva, Elena; Dubuisson, Tia; Protopopova, Marina; Einck, Leo; Nacy, Carol A.; Reddy, Venkata M.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To extend capuramycin spectrum of activity beyond mycobacteria and improve intracellular drug activity. Methods Three capuramycin analogues (SQ997, SQ922 and SQ641) were conjugated with different natural and unnatural amino acids or decanoic acid (DEC) through an ester bond at one or more available hydroxyl groups. In vitro activity of the modified compounds was determined against Mycobacterium spp. and representative Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Intracellular activity was evaluated in J774A.1 mouse macrophages infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (H37Rv). Results Acylation of SQ997 and SQ641 with amino undecanoic acid (AUA) improved in vitro activity against most of the bacteria tested. Conjugation of SQ922 with DEC, but not AUA, improved its activity against Gram-positive bacteria. In the presence of efflux pump inhibitor phenylalanine arginine β-naphthyl amide, MICs of SQ997-AUA, SQ641-AUA and SQ922-DEC compounds improved even further against drug-susceptible and drug-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. In Gram-negative bacteria, EDTA-mediated permeabilization caused 4- to 16-fold enhancement of the activity of AUA-conjugated SQ997, SQ922 and SQ641. Conjugation of all three capuramycin analogues with AUA improved intracellular killing of H37Rv in murine macrophages. Conclusions Conjugation of capuramycin analogues with AUA or DEC enhanced in vitro activity, extended the spectrum of activity in Gram-positive bacteria and increased intracellular activity against H37Rv. PMID:21186194

  11. Activated persulfate for organic chemical degradation: A review.

    PubMed

    Matzek, Laura W; Carter, Kimberly E

    2016-05-01

    Activated persulfate reactions have widespread application for groundwater and environmental remediation, as many of these reactions involve destruction of environmental contaminants. Within the last five years, knowledge of activated persulfate degradation reactions has grown to include novel means of activating persulfate for enhanced removal of organic species. These current studies cover a long list of organic analytes, including pharmaceuticals, pesticides, halogenated compounds and dyes. An extensive review of recently published experimental parameters and results for the destruction of organic compounds via activated persulfate is presented. Focus is placed on emerging methodologies and manipulation of traditional activation techniques. Knowledge gaps are identified and discussed, as despite the number of publications on this subject, more broad-reaching guidelines are needed for optimizing applications of activated persulfate in water treatment. PMID:26938680

  12. Trace vapour detection at room temperature using Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Chou, Alison; Radi, Babak; Jaatinen, Esa; Juodkazis, Saulius; Fredericks, Peter M

    2014-04-21

    A miniaturized flow-through system consisting of a gold coated silicon substrate based on enhanced Raman spectroscopy has been used to study the detection of vapour from model explosive compounds. The measurements show that the detectability of the vapour molecules at room temperature depends sensitively on the interaction between the molecule and the substrate. The results highlight the capability of a flow system combined with Raman spectroscopy for detecting low vapour pressure compounds with a limit of detection of 0.2 ppb as demonstrated by the detection of bis(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate, a common polymer additive emitted from a commercial polyvinyl chloride (PVC) tubing at room temperature. PMID:24588003

  13. Evaluation of Kinase Activity Profiling Using Chemical Proteomics.

    PubMed

    Ruprecht, Benjamin; Zecha, Jana; Heinzlmeir, Stephanie; Médard, Guillaume; Lemeer, Simone; Kuster, Bernhard

    2015-12-18

    Protein kinases are important mediators of intracellular signaling and are reversibly activated by phosphorylation. Immobilized kinase inhibitors can be used to enrich these often low-abundance proteins, to identify targets of kinase inhibitors, or to probe their selectivity. It has been suggested that the binding of kinases to affinity beads reflects a kinase's activation status, a concept that is under considerable debate. To assess the merits of the idea, we performed a series of experiments including quantitative phosphoproteomics and purification of kinases by single or mixed affinity matrices from signaling activated or resting cancer cells. The data show that mixed affinity beads largely bind kinases independent of their activation status, and experiments using individual immobilized kinase inhibitors show mixed results in terms of preference for binding the active or inactive conformation. Taken together, activity- or conformation-dependent binding to such affinity resins depends (i) on the kinase, (ii) on the affinity probe, and (iii) on the activation status of the lysate or cell. As a result, great caution should be exercised when inferring kinase activity from such binding data. The results also suggest that assaying kinase activity using binding data is restricted to a limited number of well-chosen cases. PMID:26378887

  14. Oncogene activation in spontaneous and chemically induced rodent tumors: implications for risk analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, S.H.; Stowers, S.J.; Patterson, R.M.; Maronpot, R.R.; Anderson, M.W.

    1988-06-01

    The validity of rodent tumor end points in assessing the potential hazards of chemical exposure to humans is a somewhat controversial but very important issue since most chemicals are classified as potentially hazardous to humans on the basis of long-term carcinogenesis studies in rodents. The ability to distinguish between genotoxic, cytotoxic, or receptor-mediated promotion effects of chemical treatment would aid in the interpretation of rodent carcinogenesis data. Activated oncogenes in spontaneously occurring and chemically induced rodent tumors were examined and compared as one approach to determine the mechanism by which chemical treatment caused an increased incidence of rodent tumors. Different patterns of activated oncogenes were found not only in spontaneous versus chemically induced mouse liver tumors but also in a variety of spontaneous rat tumors versus chemically induced rat lung tumors. In the absence of cytotoxic effects, it could be argued that the chemicals in question activated protooncogenes by a direct genotoxic mechanism. These results provided a basis for the analysis of activated oncogenes in spontaneous and chemically induced rodent tumors to provide information at a molecular level to aid in the extrapolation of rodent carcinogenesis data to human risk assessment.

  15. Simulation of the isotopic composition of stratospheric water vapour - Part 1: Description and evaluation of the EMAC model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichinger, R.; Jockel, P.; Brinkop, S.; Werner, M.; Lossow, S.

    2015-05-01

    This modelling study aims at an improved understanding of the processes that determine the water vapour budget in the stratosphere by means of the investigation of water isotope ratios. An additional (and separate from the actual) hydrological cycle has been introduced into the chemistry-climate model EMAC, including the water isotopologues HDO and H218O and their physical fractionation processes. Additionally an explicit computation of the contribution of methane oxidation to H2O and HDO has been incorporated. The model expansions allow detailed analyses of water vapour and its isotope ratio with respect to deuterium throughout the stratosphere and in the transition region to the troposphere. In order to assure the correct representation of the water isotopologues in the model's hydrological cycle, the expanded system has been evaluated in several steps. The physical fractionation effects have been evaluated by comparison of the simulated isotopic composition of precipitation with measurements from a ground-based network (GNIP) and with the results from the isotopologue-enabled general circulation model ECHAM5-wiso. The model's representation of the chemical HDO precursor CH3D in the stratosphere has been confirmed by a comparison with chemical transport models (1-D, CHEM2D) and measurements from radiosonde flights. Finally, the simulated stratospheric HDO and the isotopic composition of water vapour have been evaluated, with respect to retrievals from three different satellite instruments (MIPAS, ACE-FTS, SMR). Discrepancies in stratospheric water vapour isotope ratios between two of the three satellite retrievals can now partly be explained.

  16. Simulation of the isotopic composition of stratospheric water vapour - Part 1: Description and evaluation of the EMAC model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichinger, R.; Jöckel, P.; Brinkop, S.; Werner, M.; Lossow, S.

    2014-09-01

    This modelling study aims on an improved understanding of the processes, that determine the water vapour budget in the stratosphere by means of the investigation of water isotope ratios. At first, a separate hydrological cycle has been introduced into the chemistry-climate model EMAC, including the water isotopologues HDO and H218O and their physical fractionation processes. Additionally an explicit computation of the contribution of methane oxidation to HDO has been incorporated. The model expansions allow detailed analyses of water vapour and its isotope ratio with respect to deuterium throughout the stratosphere and in the transition region to the troposphere. In order to assure the correct representation of the water isotopologues in the model's hydrological cycle, the expanded system has been evaluated in several steps. The physical fractionation effects have been evaluated by comparison of the simulated isotopic composition of precipitation with measurements from a ground-based network (GNIP) and with the results from the isotopologue-enabled general circulation model ECHAM5-wiso. The model's representation of the chemical HDO precursor CH3D in the stratosphere has been confirmed by a comparison with chemical transport models (CHEM1D, CHEM2D) and measurements from radiosonde flights. Finally, the simulated stratospheric HDO and the isotopic composition of water vapour have been evaluated, with respect to retrievals from three different satellite instruments (MIPAS, ACE-FTS, SMR). Discrepancies in stratospheric water vapour isotope ratios between two of the three satellite retrievals can now partly be explained.

  17. A new chemical probe for phosphatidylinositol kinase activity.

    PubMed

    Sherratt, Allison R; Nasheri, Neda; McKay, Craig S; O'Hara, Shifawn; Hunt, Ashley; Ning, Zhibin; Figeys, Daniel; Goto, Natalie K; Pezacki, John Paul

    2014-06-16

    Phosphatidylinositol kinases (PIKs) are key enzymatic regulators of membrane phospholipids and membrane environments that control many aspects of cellular function, from signal transduction to secretion, through the Golgi apparatus. Here, we have developed a photoreactive "clickable" probe, PIK-BPyne, to report the activity of PIKs. We investigated the selectivity and efficiency of the probe to both inhibit and label PIKs, and we compared PIK-BPyne to a wortmannin activity-based probe also known to target PIKs. We found that PIK-BPyne can act as an effective in situ activity-based probe, and for the first time, report changes in PI4K-IIIβ activity induced by the hepatitis C virus. These results establish the utility of PIK-BPyne for activity-based protein profiling studies of PIK function in native biological systems. PMID:24850173

  18. Phospholipase A2 Activity Triggers the Wound-Activated Chemical Defense in the Diatom Thalassiosira rotula

    PubMed Central

    Pohnert, Georg

    2002-01-01

    The activation of oxylipin-based chemical defense in the diatom Thalassiosira rotula is initiated by phospholipases that act immediately after cell damage. This lipase activity is responsible for the preferential release of free mono- and polyunsaturated fatty acids. Among these, eicosatetraenoic- and eicosapentaenoic acid are further converted by lipoxygenases to reactive defensive metabolites such as the antiproliferative α,β,γ,δ-unsaturated aldehydes 2,4-decadienal and 2,4,7-decatrienal. We show that mainly saturated free fatty acids are present in the intact diatom T. rotula, whereas the amount of free polyunsaturated eicosanoids is drastically increased in the first minutes after wounding. Using fluorescent probes, the main enzyme activity responsible for initiation of the aldehyde-generating lipase/lipoxygenase/hydroperoxide lyase cascade was characterized as a phospholipase A2. All enzymes involved in this specific defensive reaction are active in seawater over several minutes. Thus, the mechanism allows the unicellular algae to overcome restrictions arising out of potential dilution of defensive metabolites. Only upon predation are high local concentrations of aldehydes formed in the vicinity of the herbivores, whereas in times of low stress, cellular resources can be invested in the formation of eicosanoid-rich phospholipids. In contrast to higher plants, which use lipases acting on galactolipids to release C18 fatty acids for production of leaf-volatile aldehydes, diatoms rely on phospholipids and the transformation of C20 fatty acids to form 2,4-decadienal and 2,4,7-decatrienal as an activated defense. PMID:12011342

  19. The chemical nature of the hypothalamocortical activation underlying drinking behavior.

    PubMed

    Batuev, A S; Gafurov, B G

    1993-01-01

    The injection of cholinergic substances (carbocholine, carbathin [karbatin], acetylcholine) into the lateral field of the hypothalamus of cats is accompanied by the appearance in the electrohypothalamogram of characteristic hypersynchronized activity and drinking behavior. The swallowing of water temporarily stops the hypersynchronized activity; the injection of adrenaline into the hypothalamus elicits the same effect. The injection of the same cholinergic preparations into the posterior sigmoid gyrus of the cerebral cortex is accompanied by similar, but less pronounced bioelectrical and behavioral effects. The presentation of a closed drink dispenser containing water to the animals against the background of cholinergic activation of the hypothalamus or cortex leads to desynchronization of the bioelectrical activity and suppression of the bursts of hypersynchronized activity. The drinking behavior of cats which appears on the basis of centrally created thirst motivation reflects the activity of a primary dominant focus in the hypothalamus and of a secondary dominant focus in the sensorimotor cortex. These foci are cholinergic in nature. The cessation of the drinking behavior may be related to the activation of adrenergic mechanisms of the same brain structures. PMID:8464543

  20. Functional Imaging of Chemically Active Surfaces with Optical Reporter Microbeads

    PubMed Central

    Ahuja, Punkaj; Nair, Sumitha; Narayan, Sreenath; Gratzl, Miklós

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a novel approach to allow for continuous imaging of concentration fields that evolve at surfaces due to release, uptake, and mass transport of molecules, without significant interference of the concentration fields by the chemical imaging itself. The technique utilizes optical “reporter” microbeads immobilized in a thin layer of transparent and inert hydrogel on top of the surface. The hydrogel has minimal density and therefore diffusion in and across it is like in water. Imaging the immobilized microbeads over time provides quantitative concentration measurements at each location where an optical reporter resides. Using image analysis in post-processing these spatially discrete measurements can be transformed into contiguous maps of the dynamic concentration field across the entire surface. If the microbeads are small enough relative to the dimensions of the region of interest and sparsely applied then chemical imaging will not noticeably affect the evolution of concentration fields. In this work colorimetric optode microbeads a few micrometers in diameter were used to image surface concentration distributions on the millimeter scale. PMID:26332766

  1. The impact of deep overshooting convection on the water vapour and trace gas distribution in the TTL and lower stratosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frey, W.; Schofield, R.; Hoor, P. M.; Ravegnani, F.; Ulanovsky, A.; Viciani, S.; D'Amato, F.; Lane, T. P.

    2014-12-01

    Overshooting convection penetrating the tropical tropopause layer (TTL) and the lower stratosphere has a significant impact on the redistribution of water vapour and further trace gases. This is of importance for the stratospheric water vapour budget, which plays a central role in radiative and chemical processes. Modelling studies and in situ measurements show the hydration potential of convective overshooting partly by direct injection of ice particles into the stratosphere and subsequent sublimation. However, processes leading to dehydration of the TTL may also impact the stratospheric humidity by limiting the amount of water vapour carried aloft. While the large scale drives some of the dehydrating processes, others are of convective origin, for example gravity waves and cooling associated with overshooting turrets. Furthermore, downdrafts may transport dry and ozone rich air masses from the stratosphere into the TTL. Improving our understanding of overshooting convection and its influence on TTL water vapour will ultimately place better constraints on the budget of water vapour in the stratosphere.In this study we use three-dimensional cloud resolving (WRF-ARW) simulations of a deep convective thunderstorm (Hector) to study the redistribution of water vapour and trace gases in the upper TTL/lower stratosphere. Passive tracers are initialised to investigate the transport of air masses. The simulations focus on an Hector event that has been probed by aircraft during the SCOUT-O3 field campaign. Observations were performed in and around overshoots that even penetrated the stratosphere. These observations as well as the model simulations show downward transport and mixing of air masses from the stratosphere, though less strong and more localised in the simulation. Furthermore, the simulations shows a layering of hydrated and dehydrated air masses post-convection in the upper TTL and lower stratosphere. Here we use the model to explain the processes causing the

  2. Photocatalytic degradation of toluene vapour using fixed bed multichannel photoreactors equipped with TiO2-coated fabrics.

    PubMed

    Park, O H; Na, H Y

    2008-09-01

    The feasibility of producing TiO2-coated fabric using nonwoven polyester as a photocatalyst support was examined through investigations on (i) changes in the fabric properties after coating with TiO2, (ii) the toluene removal capacity of a multichannel TiO2/fabric/UV reactor in removing the toluene vapour with and without O3 addition, and (iii) the photocatalytic effect of regenerated TiO2. The value and usefulness of a multichannel photoreactor as a main reactor or a supplementary device to improve the efficiency of VOC (volatile organic chemicals) removal in a photoreacting fabric filter, which was originally invented to simultaneously remove fine dust and VOCs, was manifested through investigations of the multichannel effect in the treatment of large volumes of air containing toluene as a sample VOC vapour. The parallel-flow photoreactor was manufactured by fixing TiO2-coated fabrics in parallel along the gas flow and installing UV sources for every channel. Photocatalytic degradation of toluene vapour was investigated with respect to various operational parameters such as reaction time, photocatalyst load, vapour load and number of channels. Toluene vapour was taken as a sample VOC because it is a non-biodegradable toxic organic substance, and the UV/TiO2 process was tested as an alternative process to biofiltration. As a result of this study, it was confirmed that nonwoven polyester can be used as a photocatalyst support, and the multichannel photoreactor, equipped with TiO2-coated fabrics, is a useful device that can economically and efficiently treat a larger vapour load by providing more channels with ozone addition and by arranging the reactor units in series. PMID:18844127

  3. Coumarin heterocyclic derivatives: chemical synthesis and biological activity.

    PubMed

    Medina, Fernanda G; Marrero, Joaquín G; Macías-Alonso, Mariana; González, Magdalena C; Córdova-Guerrero, Iván; Teissier García, Ariana G; Osegueda-Robles, Soraya

    2015-09-23

    This review highlights the broad range of science that has arisen from the synthesis of coumarin-linked and fused heterocycle derivatives. Specific topics include their synthesis and biological activity. PMID:26151411

  4. Chemically sulfated natural galactomannans with specific antiviral and anticoagulant activities.

    PubMed

    Muschin, Tegshi; Budragchaa, Davaanyam; Kanamoto, Taisei; Nakashima, Hideki; Ichiyama, Koji; Yamamoto, Naoki; Shuqin, Han; Yoshida, Takashi

    2016-08-01

    Naturally occurring galactomannans were sulfated to give sulfated galactomannans with degrees of substitution of 0.7-1.4 per sugar unit and molecular weights of M¯n=0.6×10(4)-2.4×10(4). Sulfated galactomannans were found to have specific biological activities in vitro such as anticoagulant, anti-HIV and anti-Dengue virus activities. The biological activities were compared with those of standard dextran and curdlan sulfates, which are polysaccharides with potent antiviral activity and low cytotoxicity. It was found that sulfated galactomannans had moderate to high anticoagulant activity, 13.4-36.6unit/mg, compared to that of dextran and curdlan sulfates, 22.7 and 10.0unit/mg, and high anti-HIV and anti-Dengue virus activities, 0.04-0.8μg/mL and 0.2-1.1μg/mL, compared to those curdlan sulfates, 0.1μg/mL, respectively. The cytotoxicity on MT-4 and LCC-MK2 cells was low. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) of sulfated galactomannans revealed strong interaction with poly-l-lysine as a model compound of virus proteins, and suggested that the specific biological activities might originate in the electrostatic interaction of negatively charged sulfate groups of sulfated galactomannans and positively charged amino groups of surface proteins of viruses. These results suggest that sulfated galactomannans effectively prevented the infection of cells by viruses and the degree of substitution and molecular weights played important roles in the biological activities. PMID:27154517

  5. Hydrogeology, Chemical and Microbial Activity Measurement Through Deep Permafrost

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stotler, R.L.; Frape, S.K.; Freifeld, B.M.; Holden, B.; Onstott, T.C.; Ruskeeniemi, T.; Chan, E.

    2011-01-01

    Little is known about hydrogeochemical conditions beneath thick permafrost, particularly in fractured crystalline rock, due to difficulty in accessing this environment. The purpose of this investigation was to develop methods to obtain physical, chemical, and microbial information about the subpermafrost environment from a surface-drilled borehole. Using a U-tube, gas and water samples were collected, along with temperature, pressure, and hydraulic conductivity measurements, 420 m below ground surface, within a 535 m long, angled borehole at High Lake, Nunavut, Canada, in an area with 460-m-thick permafrost. Piezometric head was well above the base of the permafrost, near land surface. Initial water samples were contaminated with drill fluid, with later samples <40% drill fluid. The salinity of the non-drill fluid component was <20,000 mg/L, had a Ca/Na ratio above 1, with ??18O values ???5??? lower than the local surface water. The fluid isotopic composition was affected by the permafrost-formation process. Nonbacteriogenic CH4 was present and the sample location was within methane hydrate stability field. Sampling lines froze before uncontaminated samples from the subpermafrost environment could be obtained, yet the available time to obtain water samples was extended compared to previous studies. Temperature measurements collected from a distributed temperature sensor indicated that this issue can be overcome easily in the future. The lack of methanogenic CH4 is consistent with the high sulfate concentrations observed in cores. The combined surface-drilled borehole/U-tube approach can provide a large amount of physical, chemical, and microbial data from the subpermafrost environment with few, controllable, sources of contamination. ?? 2010 The Author(s). Journal compilation ?? 2010 National Ground Water Association.

  6. Hydrogeology, chemical and microbial activity measurement through deep permafrost

    SciTech Connect

    Stotler, R.L.; Frape, S.K.; Freifeld, B.M.; Holden, B.; Onstott, T.C.; Ruskeeniemi, T.; Chan, E.

    2010-04-01

    Little is known about hydrogeochemical conditions beneath thick permafrost, particularly in fractured crystalline rock, due to difficulty in accessing this environment. The purpose of this investigation was to develop methods to obtain physical, chemical, and microbial information about the subpermafrost environment from a surface-drilled borehole. Using a U-tube, gas and water samples were collected, along with temperature, pressure, and hydraulic conductivity measurements, 420 m below ground surface, within a 535 m long, angled borehole at High Lake, Nunavut, Canada, in an area with 460-m-thick permafrost. Piezometric head was well above the base of the permafrost, near land surface. Initial water samples were contaminated with drill fluid, with later samples <40% drill fluid. The salinity of the non-drill fluid component was <20,000 mg/L, had a Ca/Na ratio above 1, with {delta}{sup 18}O values {approx}5{per_thousand} lower than the local surface water. The fluid isotopic composition was affected by the permafrost-formation process. Nonbacteriogenic CH{sub 4} was present and the sample location was within methane hydrate stability field. Sampling lines froze before uncontaminated samples from the subpermafrost environment could be obtained, yet the available time to obtain water samples was extended compared to previous studies. Temperature measurements collected from a distributed temperature sensor indicated that this issue can be overcome easily in the future. The lack of methanogenic CH{sub 4} is consistent with the high sulfate concentrations observed in cores. The combined surface-drilled borehole/U-tube approach can provide a large amount of physical, chemical, and microbial data from the subpermafrost environment with few, controllable, sources of contamination.

  7. The isotope composition of water vapour: A powerful tool to study transport and chemistry of middle atmospheric water vapour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bechtel, Ch.; Zahn, A.

    2003-07-01

    A one-dimensional chemistry model is applied to study the stable hydrogen (D) and stable oxygen isotope (17O, 18O) composition of water vapour in stratosphere and mesosphere. The stable isotope ratios of tropospheric H2O are determined by "physical'' fractionation effects, i.e. phase changes, diffusion processes, and mixing of air masses. Due to these processes water vapour entering the stratosphere (i) is mass-dependently fractionated (MDF), i.e. shifts in the isotope ratio 17O/16O are ~0.52 times of those of 18O/16O and (ii) shows isotope shifts in D/H, which are ~5 times of those in 18O/16O. In stratosphere and mesosphere "chemical'' fractionation, that are the oxidation of methane, re-cycling of H2O via the HOx family, and isotope exchange reactions are shown to considerably enhance the isotope ratios in the imported tropospheric H2O. Enrichments relative to the isotope ratios at the tropopause are used to derive the partitioning of tropospheric (unmodified), re-cycled and in situ generated H2O. The model reasonably predicts overall increases of the stable isotope ratios in H2O by ~23% for D/H, ~8.5% for 17O/16O, and ~14% for 18O/16O. The17O/16O and 18O/16O ratios in H2O are shown to be a measure of the partitioning of HOx that receives its O atom either from the reservoirs O2 or O3. In the entire middle atmosphere, MDF O2 is the major donator of oxygen atoms incorporated in OH and HO2 and thus in H2O. It is demonstrated that in the stratosphere mass-independent fractionation (MIF) in O3 in a first step is transferred to the NOx family and only in a second step to HOx and H2O. In contrast to CO2, O(1D) only plays a minor role in this MIF transfer. The major uncertainty in our calculation arises from the many badly quantified isotope exchange reactions and kinetic isotope fractionation factors.

  8. HIGH-DIMENSIONAL PROFILING OF TRANSCRIPTION FACTOR ACTIVITY DIFFERENTIATES TOXCAST CHEMICAL GROUPS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The ToxCast™ project at the U.S. EPA uses a diverse battery of high throughput screening assays and informatics models to rapidly characterize the activity of chemicals. A central goal of the project is to provide empirical evidence to aid in the prioritization of chemicals for a...

  9. STRUCTURE-ACTIVITY RELATIONSHIPS FOR SCREENING ORGANIC CHEMICALS FOR POTENTIAL ECOTOXICITY EFFECTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper presents structure-activity relationships (QSAR) for estimating the bioconcentration factor and acute toxicity of some classes of industrial chemicals using only the n-octanol/water partition coefficient (Log P) which is derived from chemical structure. The bioconcentra...

  10. Chemical Constituents Antioxidant and Anticholinesterasic Activity of Tabernaemontana catharinensis

    PubMed Central

    Moura, Sidnei; Echeverrigaray, Sergio

    2013-01-01

    The present work aimed to analyze the alkaloid content of the ethanolic extract of Tabernaemontana catharinensis (Apocynaceae family) and its fractions as well as to evaluate their antioxidant and anticholinesterasic activities. The analyses of the ethanolic extract of T. catharinensis by mass spectrometry allowed identifying the presence of the alkaloids 16-epi-affinine, coronaridine-hydroxyindolenine, voachalotine, voacristine-hydroxyindolenine, and 12-methoxy-n-methyl-voachalotine, as well as an alkaloid with m/z 385.21 whose spectrum suggests a derivative of voacristine or voacangine. The extract and its alkaloid rich fractions showed antioxidant activity, especially those that contain the alkaloid m/z 385.21 or 16-epi-affinine with DPPH scavenging activity (IC50) between 37.18 and 74.69 μg/mL. Moreover, the extract and its fractions exhibited anticholinesterasic activity, particularly the fractions characterized by the presence of 12-methoxy-n-methyl-voachalotine, with IC50 = 2.1 to 2.5 μg/mL. Fractions with 16-epi-affinine combined good antioxidant (IC50 = 65.59 to 74.69 μg/mL) and anticholinesterasic (IC50 = 7.7 to 8.3 μg/mL) activities, representing an option for further studies aimed at treating neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:23983637

  11. CHEMICALLY ACTIVE FLUID BED FOR SOX CONTROL. VOLUME I. PROCESS EVALUATION STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes selected process evaluation studies supporting the development of an atmospheric-pressure, fluidized-bed, chemically active gasification process, using a regenerative limestone sulfur sorbent to produce low- to intermediate-Btu fuel gas. Limestone sorbent sel...

  12. Variability of winter-time middle atmospheric water vapour over the Arctic as observed with a ground-based microwave radiometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tschanz, Brigitte; Kivi, Rigel; Rüfenacht, Rolf; Kämpfer, Niklaus

    2014-05-01

    Middle atmospheric water vapour has a long chemical lifetime and can therefore be used as a tracer for dynamics. The ground-based microwave radiometer MIAWARA-C is designed for the use on campaigns and measures profiles of water vapour in the upper stratosphere and mesosphere and thus provides valuable data for the investigation of atmospheric processes. It has been operational for five years and has successfully participated in measurement campaigns under various climatic conditions in Germany, Switzerland, California, Finland and on la Réunion. The temporal resolution of the obtained water vapour profiles approximately 2 hours depending on tropospheric conditions. During two campaigns from January to June 2010 and from July 2011 to April 2013 in Sodankylä, Finland, MIAWARA-C monitored time series of polar middle atmospheric water vapour for three winters with three Sudden Stratospheric Warmings (SSW) occurring in early 2010, 2012 and 2013. The obtained time series are used to study the effects of the three SSWs on middle-atmospheric water vapour. During an SSW, humid mid- to low-latitude air is transported towards the polar region resulting in a fast increase in water vapour. The descent of water vapour after the SSW allows the estimation of the descent rate over the polar region as the normal wintertime circulation reforms. Results from the three SSWs are compared. The ground-based water vapour data is combined with sonde data of the Finnish Meteorological Institute and ground-based microwave wind measurements for one winter in order to obtain a more complete picture of the dynamics in the polar winter atmosphere.

  13. Chemical Modification of Papain and Subtilisin: An Active Site Comparison

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    St-Vincent, Mireille; Dickman, Michael

    2004-01-01

    An experiment using methyle methanethiosulfonate (MMTS) and phenylmethylsulfonyl flouride (PMSF) to specifically modify the cysteine and serine residues in the active sites of papain and subtilism respectively is demonstrated. The covalent modification of these enzymes and subsequent rescue of papain shows the beginning biochemist that proteins…

  14. Antifungal activities and chemical composition of some medicinal plants.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, A; Nazari, H; Imani, S; Amrollahi, H

    2014-06-01

    The use of and search for drugs and dietary supplements derived from plants have accelerated in recent years. Ethnopharmacologists, botanists, microbiologists and natural-products scientists are combing the earth for phytochemicals and leads, which could be developed for treatment of infectious diseases. The aim of this study was to investigate the antifungal activities of the essential oils of some medicinal plants such as Stachys pubescens, Thymus kotschyanus, Thymus daenensis and Bupleurum falcatum against Fusarium oxysporum, Aspergillus flavus and Alternaria alternata. The essential oils were used to evaluate their MICs and MFCs compared to the amphotricin B as a standard drug. The essential oils were also analyzed by GC/MS. Essential oils isolated from the S. pubescens, T. kotschyanus and B. falcatum showed strong antifungal activities. The essential oil of T. daenensis exhibited a moderate activity against the selected fungi in comparison with the other plants' essential oils. In addition, the results showed that 26, 23, 22 and 15 components were identified from the essential oils of T. kotschyanus, S. pubescens, T. daenensis and B. falcatum, respectively. These oils exhibited a noticeable antifungal activity against the selected fungi. Regarding obtained results and that natural antimicrobial substances are inexpensive and have fewer side effects, they convey potential for implementation in fungal pathogenic systems. PMID:24768063

  15. Genipin as a novel chemical activator of EBV lytic cycle.

    PubMed

    Son, Myoungki; Lee, Minjung; Ryu, Eunhyun; Moon, Aree; Jeong, Choon-Sik; Jung, Yong Woo; Park, Gyu Hwan; Sung, Gi-Ho; Cho, Hyosun; Kang, Hyojeung

    2015-02-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is a ubiquitous gammaherpesvirus that causes acute infection and establishes life-long latency. EBV causes several human cancers, including Burkitt's lymphoma, nasopharyngeal and gastric carcinoma. Antiviral agents can be categorized as virucides, antiviral chemotherapeutic agents, and immunomodulators. Most antiviral agents affect actively replicating viruses, but not their latent forms. Novel antiviral agents must be active on both the replicating and the latent forms of the virus. Gardenia jasminoides is an evergreen flowering plant belonging to the Rubiaceae family and is most commonly found growing wild in Vietnam, Southern China, Taiwan, Japan, Myanmar, and India. Genipin is an aglycone derived from an iridoid glycoside called geniposide, which is present in large quantities in the fruit of G. jasminoides. In this study, genipin was evaluated for its role as an antitumor and antiviral agent that produces inhibitory effects against EBV and EBV associated gastric carcinoma (EBVaGC). In SNU719 cells, one of EBVaGCs, genipin caused significant cytotoxicity (70 μM), induced methylation on EBV C promoter and tumor suppressor gene BCL7A, arrested cell-cycle progress (S phases), upregulated EBV latent/lytic genes in a dose-dependent manner, stimulated EBV progeny production, activated EBV F promoter for EBV lytic activation, and suppressed EBV infection. These results indicated that genipin could be a promising candidate for antiviral and antitumor agents against EBV and EBVaGC. PMID:25626372

  16. Incorporating Nondrug Social & Recreational Activities in Outpatient Chemical Dependency Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siporin, Sheldon; Baron, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    "Contingency Management programs (CMP) and non-drug social and recreational activities (NDSRA) are interventions premised on behavior theory that rely on external sources of reinforcement alternative to drug-based forms to decrease drug use. CMP usually employs vouchers as reinforcement for negative toxicologies. Despite research support, CMP…

  17. Push for new materials, chemicals from biomass sparks active R and D

    SciTech Connect

    Borman, S. )

    1990-09-01

    This paper discusses how a resurgence of interest in the production of new materials, chemicals, and fuels from biomass resources such as wood, cellulose, lignin, starch, and chitin is sparking active R and D efforts in these areas. Biobased materials and chemicals currently under development include composites of conventional plastics with lignocellulosics (chemicals from wood and other plant sources); lignocellulosic nonwoven mates that can be pressed into rigid shapes to form doors, walls, and even auto body parts; phenolic chemicals produced from wood waste and bark; membranes made from chitosan (a substance derived from crustacean shells); and biodegradable plastics containing starch.

  18. Chemical constituents and larvicidal activity of Hymenaea courbaril fruit peel.

    PubMed

    Aguiar, José Cláudio D; Santiago, Gilvandete M P; Lavor, Patrícia L; Veras, Helenicy N H; Ferreira, Yana S; Lima, Michele A A; Arriaga, Angela M C; Lemos, Telma L G; Lima, Jefferson Q; de Jesus, Hugo C R; Alves, Péricles B; Braz-Filho, Raimundo

    2010-12-01

    The chemical compositions of the essential oils from the peel of ripe and unripe fruits of Hymenaea courbaril L., obtained by hydrodistillation, were analyzed by GC and GC-MS. The main constituents of the essential oil from the peel of the ripe fruits were the sesquiterpenes alpha-copaene (11.1%), spathulenol (10.1%) and beta-selinene (8.2%), while germacrene-D (31.9%), beta-caryophyllene (27.1%) and bicyclogermacrene (6.5%) were the major compounds in the oil from unripe fruits. The essential oils were tested against Aedes aegypti larvae and showed LC50 values of 14.8 +/- 0.4 microg/mL and 28.4 +/- 0.3 microg/mL for the ripe and unripe fruit peel oils, respectively. From the peel of the ripe fruits, the diterpenes zanzibaric acid and isoozic acid were isolated, along with the sesquiterpene caryolane-1,9beta-diol. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of this sesquiterpene in the genus. The structures of all compounds isolated were identified on the basis of their spectral data (IR, MS, 1D- and 2D-NMR) and by comparison with literature spectral data. PMID:21299135

  19. Antimicrobial activity and chemical investigation of Brazilian Drosera.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Dalva Trevisan; Andrei, César Cornélio; Saridakis, Halha Ostrensky; Faria, Terezinha de Jesus; Vinhato, Elisângela; Carvalho, Kátia Eliane; Daniel, Juliana Feijó Souza; Machado, Sílvio Luiz; Saridakis, Dennis Panayotis; Braz-Filho, Raimundo

    2004-11-01

    The antimicrobial activity of three different extracts (hexanic, ethyl acetate, methanol) obtained from Brazilian Drosera species (D. communis, D. montana var. montana, D. brevifolia, D. villosa var. graomogolensis, D. villosa var. villosa, Drosera sp. 1, and Drosera sp. 2 ) were tested against Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 25923), Enterococcus faecium (ATCC23212), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (ATCC27853), Escherichia coli (ATCC11229), Salmonella choleraesuis (ATCC10708), Klebsiella pneumoniae (ATCC13883), and Candida albicans (a human isolate). Better antimicrobial activity was observed with D. communis and D. montana var. montana ethyl acetate extracts. Phytochemical analyses from D. communis, D. montana var. montana and D. brevifolia yielded 5-hydroxy-2-methyl-1,4-naphthoquinone (plumbagin); long chain aliphatic hydrocarbons were isolated from D. communis and from D. villosa var. villosa, a mixture of long chain aliphatic alcohols and carboxylic acids, was isolated from D. communis and 3b-O-acetylaleuritolic acid from D. villosa var. villosa. PMID:15654434

  20. Hangman Catalysis for Photo- and Photoelectro- Chemical Activation of Water

    SciTech Connect

    Nocera, Daniel

    2014-04-15

    The focus of this DOE program is solar fuels – specifically the chemistry for hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) and oxygen evolution reaction (OER) from water and the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) to water These three reactions are at the heart of renewable energy conversion. The bond-making and bond-breaking chemistry that underpins these transformations is not well understood. We are developing insight into such chemistry by creating a series of ligand constructs that poise an acid-base functionality over a redox active metal platform. These “hangman” ligands utilize the acid-base functionality to form a secondary coordination sphere that can assist proton movement and facilitate substrate assembly and activation within the molecular cleft. The grant period funding cycle focused on synthesis and reactivity of hangman porphyrins and corroles for HER, OER and ORR.

  1. Effect of chemicals on fungal alpha-amylase activity.

    PubMed

    Ali, F S; Abdel-Moneim, A A

    1989-01-01

    The effect of 8 growth regulators at concentrations of 1,000, 5,000 and 10,000 ppm on the activity of fungal (Aspergillus flavus var. columnaris) alpha-amylase was studied. Indol acetic acid (IAA) and naphthalene acetic acid (NAA) inhibited alpha-amylase activity by 2% and 7% at 1,000 ppm. The other 6 growth regulators, indol butyric acid (IBA), gibberellic acid, cumarin, cycocel (CCC), atonik-G and kylar, did not inhibit but stimulated alpha-amylase activity (0 to 9%) at 1,000 ppm. All growth regulators studied inhibited alpha-amylase activity at 5,000 and 10,000 ppm concentration except kylar. The effect of organic acids and formaldehyde at 0.01, 0.005, and 0.001 M was studied. Acetic acid stimulated alpha-amylase at all concentrations, but formic acid, oxalic acid, lactic acid and citric acid inhibited alpha-amylase activity by 91, 100, 100 and 79%, respectively, at a concentration of 0.01 M, while by 31, 100, 15 and 20%, respectively, at 0.005 M. Formaldehyde induced 7, 3 and 2% inhibition at 0.01, 0.005 and 0.001 M, respectively. At 0.01 M either sorbitol or fructose inhibited alpha-amylase by 8%, Maltose 7%, sucrose 6%, phenol, glucose and galactose each by 5%, ethanol, glycerol, arabinose and sodium benzoate each by 4%, isopropanol and mannitol 1%, but methanol and ammonium citrate dibasic did not inhibit alpha-amylase. The results indicate that CuCl2, SnCl2, AgNO3 and Fe2(SO4)3 were the strongest inhibitors, followed by Cd(C2H3O2), HgCl2, Na2-EDTA, Na2HPO4, and CaCl2 in decreasing order. NaCl, NaBr and Mn SO4 did not inhibit alpha-amylase at concentrations from 10 mM to 0.01 mM. PMID:2515680

  2. Large enhancement of photocatalytic activity by chemical etching of TiO2 crystallized glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Kazuki; Takahashi, Yoshihiro; Ihara, Rie; Terakado, Nobuaki; Fujiwara, Takumi; Kato, Hideki; Kakihana, Masato

    2014-10-01

    The authors aim to report the largest enhancement of photocatalytic activity by chemical etching in anatase-type TiO2 crystallized glass. Optimization of several conditions for crystallization behavior and chemical etching to realize the nano-structured ceramics (NSC) has been performed in the crystallized glass. NSC-fabrication by chemical etching in the crystallized glass is one of the most effective solutions to provide bulk materials with high specific surface area. We have found that the best condition for the NSC fabrication as a novel bulk photocatalyst in our glass system, and have obtained 16 times higher catalytic activity than that of non-etched one.

  3. Chemical constituents of Anacolosa pervilleana and their antiviral activities.

    PubMed

    Bourjot, Mélanie; Leyssen, Pieter; Eydoux, Cécilia; Guillemot, Jean-Claude; Canard, Bruno; Rasoanaivo, Philippe; Guéritte, Françoise; Litaudon, Marc

    2012-09-01

    In an effort to identify novel inhibitors of Chikungunya (CHIKV) and Dengue (DENV) virus replication, a systematic study with 820 ethyl acetate extracts of Madagascan plants was performed in a virus-cell-based assay for CHIKV and a DENV NS5 RNA-dependant RNA polymerase (RdRp) assay. The extract obtained from the leaves of Anacolosa pervilleana was selected for its significant activity in both assays. One new (E)-tridec-2-en-4-ynedioic acid named anacolosine (1), together with three known acetylenic acids, the octadeca-9,11,13-triynoic acid (2), (13E)-octadec-13-en-9,11-diynoic acid (3), (13E)-octadec-13-en-11-ynoic acid (4), two terpenoids, lupenone (5) and β-amyrone (6), and one cyanogenic glycoside, (S)-sambunigrin (7) were isolated. Their structures were elucidated by comprehensive analyses of NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry data. The inhibitory potency of these compounds was evaluated on CHIKV, DENV RdRp and West-Nile polymerase virus (WNV RdRp). Both terpenoids showed a moderate activity against CHIKV (EC(50) 77 and 86 μM, respectively) and the acetylenic acids produced IC(50) values around 3 μM in the DENV RdRp assay. PMID:22613073

  4. Prompt activation of telomerase by chemical carcinogens in rats detected with a modified TRAP assay.

    PubMed

    Miura, M; Karasaki, Y; Abe, T; Higashi, K; Ikemura, K; Gotoh, S

    1998-05-01

    The maintenance of telomere length is crucial for survival of cells. Telomerase is an RNA-containing reverse transcriptase, which is responsible for elongation of shortened telomeres. Telomerase reactivation has been suggested to be involved in malignant progressions. To study on the involvement of telomerase activation in in vivo carcinogenesis, we first modified the original TRAP assay by changing the primer designs and the labeling method of PCR products to an end-labeling method. Second, we investigated the activation of telomerase in different organs after treatments of rats with various chemical carcinogens. Very early after the beginning of the treatment, telomerase activity in the liver, kidney, and lung was increased. In most cases, telomerase activation occurred in the primary or favorite target organs. The present results suggest that telomerase activation occurs promptly when animals are exposed to chemical carcinogens, which may contribute to in vivo chemical carcinogenesis. PMID:9600060

  5. X-ray imaging of chemically active valence electrons during a pericyclic reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bredtmann, Timm; Ivanov, Misha; Dixit, Gopal

    2014-11-01

    Time-resolved imaging of chemically active valence electron densities is a long-sought goal, as these electrons dictate the course of chemical reactions. However, X-ray scattering is always dominated by the core and inert valence electrons, making time-resolved X-ray imaging of chemically active valence electron densities extremely challenging. Here we demonstrate an effective and robust method, which emphasizes the information encoded in weakly scattered photons, to image chemically active valence electron densities. The degenerate Cope rearrangement of semibullvalene, a pericyclic reaction, is used as an example to visually illustrate our approach. Our work also provides experimental access to the long-standing problem of synchronous versus asynchronous bond formation and breaking during pericyclic reactions.

  6. X-ray imaging of chemically active valence electrons during a pericyclic reaction

    PubMed Central

    Bredtmann, Timm; Ivanov, Misha; Dixit, Gopal

    2014-01-01

    Time-resolved imaging of chemically active valence electron densities is a long-sought goal, as these electrons dictate the course of chemical reactions. However, X-ray scattering is always dominated by the core and inert valence electrons, making time-resolved X-ray imaging of chemically active valence electron densities extremely challenging. Here we demonstrate an effective and robust method, which emphasizes the information encoded in weakly scattered photons, to image chemically active valence electron densities. The degenerate Cope rearrangement of semibullvalene, a pericyclic reaction, is used as an example to visually illustrate our approach. Our work also provides experimental access to the long-standing problem of synchronous versus asynchronous bond formation and breaking during pericyclic reactions. PMID:25424639

  7. Immune activation affects chemical sexual ornaments of male Iberian wall lizards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López, Pilar; Gabirot, Marianne; Martín, José

    2009-01-01

    Many animals use chemical signals in sexual selection, but it is not clear how these sexual traits might have evolved to signal honestly male condition. It is possible that there is a trade-off between maintaining the immune system and the elaboration of ornaments. We experimentally challenged the immune system of male Iberian wall lizards, Podarcis hispanica, with a bacterial antigen (lipopolysaccharide), without pathogenic effects, to explore whether the immune activation affected chemical ornaments. Immune activation resulted in decreased proportions of a major chemical in femoral secretions (cholesta-5,7-dien-3-ol = provitamin D3) known to be selected in scent of males by females and which active form (vitamin D) has a variety of important effects on immune system function. This result suggests the existence of a potential trade-off between physiological regulation of the immune system and the allocation of essential nutrients (vitamins) to sexual chemical ornaments in male lizards.

  8. Identifying the structural requirements for chromosomal aberration by incorporating molecular flexibility and metabolic activation of chemicals.

    PubMed

    Mekenyan, Ovanes; Todorov, Milen; Serafimova, Rossitsa; Stoeva, Stoyanka; Aptula, Aynur; Finking, Robert; Jacob, Elard

    2007-12-01

    Modeling the potential of chemicals to induce chromosomal damage has been hampered by the diversity of mechanisms which condition this biological effect. The direct binding of a chemical to DNA is one of the underlying mechanisms that is also responsible for bacterial mutagenicity. Disturbance of DNA synthesis due to inhibition of topoisomerases and interaction of chemicals with nuclear proteins associated with DNA (e.g., histone proteins) were identified as additional mechanisms leading to chromosomal aberrations (CA). A comparative analysis of in vitro genotoxic data for a large number of chemicals revealed that more than 80% of chemicals that elicit bacterial mutagenicity (as indicated by the Ames test) also induce CA; alternatively, only 60% of chemicals that induce CA have been found to be active in the Ames test. In agreement with this relationship, a battery of models is developed for modeling CA. It combines the Ames model for bacterial mutagenicity, which has already been derived and integrated into the Optimized Approach Based on Structural Indices Set (OASIS) tissue metabolic simulator (TIMES) platform, and a newly derived model accounting for additional mechanisms leading to CA. Both models are based on the classical concept of reactive alerts. Some of the specified alerts interact directly with DNA or nuclear proteins, whereas others are applied in a combination of two- or three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship models assessing the degree of activation of the alerts from the rest of the molecules. The use of each of the alerts has been justified by a mechanistic interpretation of the interaction. In combination with a rat liver S9 metabolism simulator, the model explained the CA induced by metabolically activated chemicals that do not elicit activity in the parent form. The model can be applied in two ways: with and without metabolic activation of chemicals. PMID:18052113

  9. Fungal phytotoxins with potential herbicidal activity: chemical and biological characterization.

    PubMed

    Cimmino, Alessio; Masi, Marco; Evidente, Marco; Superchi, Stefano; Evidente, Antonio

    2015-12-19

    Covering: 2007 to 2015 Fungal phytotoxins are secondary metabolites playing an important role in the induction of disease symptoms interfering with host plant physiological processes. Although fungal pathogens represent a heavy constraint for agrarian production and for forest and environmental heritage, they can also represent an ecofriendly alternative to manage weeds. Indeed, the phytotoxins produced by weed pathogenic fungi are an efficient tool to design natural, safe bioherbicides. Their use could avoid that of synthetic pesticides causing resistance in the host plants and the long term impact of residues in agricultural products with a risk to human and animal health. The isolation and structural and biological characterization of phytotoxins produced by pathogenic fungi for weeds, including parasitic plants, are described. Structure activity relationships and mode of action studies for some phytotoxins are also reported to elucidate the herbicide potential of these promising fungal metabolites. PMID:26443032

  10. Chemical Determinants of antimalarial activity of reversed siderophores.

    PubMed Central

    Tsafack, A; Libman, J; Shanzer, A; Cabantchik, Z I

    1996-01-01

    Reversed siderophores (RSFs) are artificial hydroxamate-based iron chelators designed after the natural siderophore ferrichrome. The modular molecular design of RSF derivatives allowed the synthesis of various congeners with controlled iron-binding capacities and partition coefficients. These two physicochemical properties were assessed by a novel fluorescent method and were found to be the major determinants of RSF permeation across erythrocyte membranes and scavenging of compartmentalized iron. The partition coefficient apparently conferred upon RSFs two major features: (i) the ability to rapidly access iron pools of in vitro-grown Plasmodium falciparum at all developmental stages and to mobilize intracellular iron and transfer it to the medium and (ii) the ability to suppress parasite growth at all developmental stages. These features of RSFs were assessed by quantitative determination of the structure-activity relationships of the biological activities and partition coefficients spanning a wide range of values. The most effective RSF containing the aromatic group of phenylalanine (RSFm2phe) showed 50% inhibitory concentration of 0.60 +/- 0.03 nmol/ml in a 48-h test and a 2-h onset of inhibition of ring development at 5 nmol/ml. The lipophilic compound RSFm2phe and the lipophilic and esterase-cleavable compound RSFm2pee inhibited parasite growth at all developmental stages whether inhibition was assessed in a continuous mode or after discontinuing drug administration. The antimalarial effects of RSFm2phe and cleavable RSFm2pee were potentiated in the presence of desferrioxamine (DFO) at concentrations at which DFO alone had no effect on parasite growth. These studies provide experimental evidence indicating that the effective and persistent antimalarial actions of RSFs are associated with drug access to infected cells and scavenging of iron from intracellular parasites. Moreover, the optimal antimalarial actions of RSFs are apparently also determined by improved

  11. Measurements of Isotopic Composition of Vapour on the Antarctic Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casado, M.; Landais, A.; Masson-Delmotte, V.; Genthon, C.; Prie, F.; Kerstel, E.; Kassi, S.; Arnaud, L.; Steen-Larsen, H. C.; Vignon, E.

    2015-12-01

    The oldest ice core records are obtained on the East Antarctic plateau. The composition in stable isotopes of water (δ18O, δD, δ17O) permits to reconstruct the past climatic conditions over the ice sheet and also at the evaporation source. Paleothermometer accuracy relies on good knowledge of processes affecting the isotopic composition of surface snow in Polar Regions. Both simple models such as Rayleigh distillation and global atmospheric models with isotopes provide good prediction of precipitation isotopic composition in East Antarctica but post deposition processes can alter isotopic composition on site, in particular exchanges with local vapour. To quantitatively interpret the isotopic composition of water archived in ice cores, it is thus essential to study the continuum water vapour - precipitation - surface snow - buried snow. While precipitation and snow sampling are routinely performed in Antarctica, climatic conditions in Concordia, very cold (-55°C in average) and very dry (less than 1000ppmv), impose difficult conditions to measure the water vapour isotopic composition. New developments in infrared spectroscopy enable now the measurement of isotopic composition in water vapour traces (down to 20ppmv). Here we present the results of a campaign of measurement of isotopic composition in Concordia in 2014/2015. Two infrared spectrometers have been deployed or the first time on top of the East Antarctic Plateau allowing a continuous vapour measurement for a month. Comparison of the results from infrared spectroscopy with cryogenic trapping validates the relevance of the method to measure isotopic composition in dry conditions. Identification of different behaviour of isotopic composition in the water vapour associated to turbulent or stratified regime indicates a strong impact of meteorological processes in local vapour/snow interaction.

  12. Extended Functional Groups (EFG): An Efficient Set for Chemical Characterization and Structure-Activity Relationship Studies of Chemical Compounds.

    PubMed

    Salmina, Elena S; Haider, Norbert; Tetko, Igor V

    2015-01-01

    The article describes a classification system termed "extended functional groups" (EFG), which are an extension of a set previously used by the CheckMol software, that covers in addition heterocyclic compound classes and periodic table groups. The functional groups are defined as SMARTS patterns and are available as part of the ToxAlerts tool (http://ochem.eu/alerts) of the On-line CHEmical database and Modeling (OCHEM) environment platform. The article describes the motivation and the main ideas behind this extension and demonstrates that EFG can be efficiently used to develop and interpret structure-activity relationship models. PMID:26703557

  13. The effects of activation temperature on physico-chemical characteristics of activated carbons derived from biomass wastes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutrisno, Bachrun; Hidayat, Arif

    2015-12-01

    This research focused on investigating in the effect of activation temperature on the physico-chemical properties of palm empty fruit bunch (PEFB) based activated carbon prepared by physical activation with carbon dioxide. The activation temperature was studied in the range of 400-800°C by keeping the activation temperature at 800°C for 120 min. It was found that the porous properties of activated carbon decreased with an increase in carbonization temperature. The activated carbons prepared at the highest activation temperature at 800°C and activation time of 120 min gave the activated carbon with the highest of BET surface area and pore volume of 938 m2/g and 0.4502 cm3/g, respectively

  14. UTLS water vapour from SCIAMACHY limb measurementsV3.01 (2002-2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weigel, K.; Rozanov, A.; Azam, F.; Bramstedt, K.; Damadeo, R.; Eichmann, K.-U.; Gebhardt, C.; Hurst, D.; Kraemer, M.; Lossow, S.; Read, W.; Spelten, N.; Stiller, G. P.; Walker, K. A.; Weber, M.; Bovensmann, H.; Burrows, J. P.

    2016-01-01

    The SCanning Imaging Absorption spectroMeter for Atmospheric CHartographY (SCIAMACHY) aboard the Envisat satellite provided measurements from August 2002 until April 2012. SCIAMACHY measured the scattered or direct sunlight using different observation geometries. The limb viewing geometry allows the retrieval of water vapour at about 10-25 km height from the near-infrared spectral range (1353-1410 nm). These data cover the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UTLS), a region in the atmosphere which is of special interest for a variety of dynamical and chemical processes as well as for the radiative forcing. Here, the latest data version of water vapour (V3.01) from SCIAMACHY limb measurements is presented and validated by comparisons with data sets from other satellite and in situ measurements. Considering retrieval tests and the results of these comparisons, the V3.01 data are reliable from about 11 to 23 km and the best results are found in the middle of the profiles between about 14 and 20 km. Above 20 km in the extra tropics V3.01 is drier than all other data sets. Additionally, for altitudes above about 19 km, the vertical resolution of the retrieved profile is not sufficient to resolve signals with a short vertical structure like the tape recorder. Below 14 km, SCIAMACHY water vapour V3.01 is wetter than most collocated data sets, but the high variability of water vapour in the troposphere complicates the comparison. For 14-20 km height, the expected errors from the retrieval and simulations and the mean differences to collocated data sets are usually smaller than 10 % when the resolution of the SCIAMACHY data is taken into account. In general, the temporal changes agree well with collocated data sets except for the Northern Hemisphere extratropical stratosphere, where larger differences are observed. This indicates a possible drift in V3.01 most probably caused by the incomplete treatment of volcanic aerosols in the retrieval. In all other regions a

  15. CO2 adsorption on chemically modified activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Caglayan, Burcu Selen; Aksoylu, A Erhan

    2013-05-15

    CO2 adsorption capacity of a commercial activated carbon was improved by using HNO3 oxidation, air oxidation, alkali impregnation and heat treatment under helium gas atmosphere. The surface functional groups produced were investigated by diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectrometer (DRIFTS). CO2 adsorption capacities of the samples were determined by gravimetric analyses for 25-200°C temperature range. DRIFTS studies revealed the formation of carboxylic acid groups on the HNO3 oxidized adsorbents. Increased aromatization and uniform distribution of the Na particles were observed on the samples prepared by Na2CO3 impregnation onto HNO3 oxidized AC support. The adsorption capacities of the nonimpregnated samples were increased by high temperature helium treatments or by increasing the adsorption temperature; both leading to decomposition of surface oxygen groups, forming sites that can easily adsorb CO2. The adsorption capacity loss due to cyclic adsorption/desorption procedures was overcome with further surface stabilization of Na2CO3 modified samples with high temperature He treatments. With Na2CO3 impregnation the mass uptakes of the adsorbents at 20 bars and 25 °C were improved by 8 and 7 folds and at 1 bar were increased 15 and 16 folds, on the average, compared to their air oxidized and nitric acid oxidized supports, respectively. PMID:23500788

  16. Polysaccharides from Arctium lappa L.: Chemical structure and biological activity.

    PubMed

    Carlotto, Juliane; de Souza, Lauro M; Baggio, Cristiane H; Werner, Maria Fernanda de P; Maria-Ferreira, Daniele; Sassaki, Guilherme L; Iacomini, Marcello; Cipriani, Thales R

    2016-10-01

    The plant Arctium lappa L. is popularly used to relieve symptoms of inflammatory disorders. A crude polysaccharide fraction (SAA) resulting of aqueous extraction of A. lappa leaves showed a dose dependent anti-edematogenic activity on carrageenan-induced paw edema, which persisted for up to 48h. Sequential fractionation by ultrafiltration at 50kDa and 30kDa cut-off membranes yielded three fractions, namely RF50, RF30, and EF30. All these maintained the anti-edematogenic effect, but RF30 showed a more potent action, inhibiting 57% of the paw edema at a dose of 4.9mg/kg. The polysaccharide RF30 contained galacturonic acid, galactose, arabinose, rhamnose, glucose, and mannose in a 7:4:2:1:2:1 ratio and had a Mw of 91,000g/mol. Methylation analysis and NMR spectroscopy indicated that RF30 is mainly constituted by a type I rhamnogalacturonan branched by side chains of types I and II arabinogalactans, and arabinan. PMID:27311502

  17. Removal of BTEX vapours from waste gas streams using silica aerogels of different hydrophobicity.

    PubMed

    Standeker, Suzana; Novak, Zoran; Knez, Zeljko

    2009-06-15

    Silica aerogels are alternative adsorbents to activated carbon (AC) for the removal and the recovery of organic vapours from gas streams. The adsorption capacity measurements of different silica aerogels were done by mini-column method. Continuous adsorption measurements show that silica aerogels are excellent adsorbents of BTEX vapours from waste gas stream. Compared to the most used adsorbents, such as AC and silica gel, aerogels exhibit capacities which enormously exceed that of both commonly used adsorbents. By increasing the degree of hydrophobicity, aerogels become less effective, but they do not adsorb water vapour from gas stream. Silica monolith aerogels with different degrees of hydrophobicity by incorporating methyltrimethoxysilane (MTMS) or trimethylethoxysilane (TMES) in standard sol-gel synthesis were prepared. Excellent properties of aerogels, obtained with the sol-gel synthesis, were preserved with supercritical drying with CO(2). The degree of hydrophobicity of the aerogels was tested by measuring the contact angle (theta) of a water droplet with the aerogel surface. The aerogels were also characterised by FTIR, nitrogen sorption and DSC/TG measurements. PMID:19095355

  18. RESEARCH NOTE WCA repulsive and attractive contributions to the thermodynamic properties at the vapour-liquid equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuadros, F.; Mulero, A.; Faundez, C. A.

    The Lennard-Jones attractive and repulsive contributions of intermolecular forces (as separated in the Weeks-Chandler-Andersen (WCA) theory) to the pressure and chemical potential of coexisting vapour and liquid phases are obtained by using an equation of state recently proposed by us. Some comments are given about the computer simulation results obtained by Plackov and Sadus (1997, Fluid Phase Equilib., 134, 77) using the McQuarrie-Katz separation of the intermolecular potential.

  19. Using Laboratory Chemicals to Imitate Illicit Drugs in a Forensic Chemistry Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hasan, Shawn; Bromfield-Lee, Deborah; Oliver-Hoyo, Maria T.; Cintron-Maldonado, Jose A.

    2008-01-01

    This forensic chemistry activity utilizes presumptive forensic testing procedures and laboratory chemicals that produce screening results similar to controlled substances. For obvious reasons, obtaining heavily regulated controlled substances to create an undergraduate student activity is not practical for most educational institutions. We were…

  20. "SimChemistry" as an Active Learning Tool in Chemical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bolton, Kim; Saalman, Elisabeth; Christie, Michael; Ingerman, Ake; Linder, Cedric

    2008-01-01

    The publicly available free computer program, "SimChemistry," was used as an active learning tool in the chemical engineering curriculum at the University College of Boras, Sweden. The activity involved students writing their own simulation programs on topics in the area of molecular structure and interactions. Evaluation of the learning…

  1. MULTI-FACTOR POTENCY SCHEME FOR COMPARING THE CARCINOGENIC ACTIVITY OF CHEMICALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A scheme for ranking the quantitative activity `of chemical carcinogens is described. his activity scheme uses as its base, dose potency measured as TD50, which after conversion into an inverse log scale, a decile scale, is adjusted by weighing factors that describe other paramet...

  2. CHARACTERIZATION OF ACTIVATED CARBONS' PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL PROPERTIES IN RELATION TO THEIR MERCURY ADSORPTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper gives results of a characterization of the physical and chemical properties of the activated carbons used for elemental mercury (Hgo) adsorption, in order to understand the role of oxygen surface functional groups on the mechanism of Hgo adsorption by activated carbons....

  3. Chemical proteomic probes for profiling cytochrome P450 activities and drug interactions in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Aaron T.; Cravatt, Benjamin F.

    2007-01-01

    The cytochrome P450 (P450) superfamily metabolizes many endogenous signaling molecules and drugs. P450 enzymes are regulated by post-translational mechanisms in vivo, which hinders their functional characterization by conventional genomic or proteomic methods. Here, we describe a chemical proteomic strategy to profile P450 activities directly in living systems. Derivatization of a mechanism-based inhibitor with a “clickable” handle provided an activity-based probe that labels multiple P450s both in proteomic extracts and in vivo. This probe was used to record alterations in liver P450 activities triggered by chemical agents, including inducers of P450 expression and direct P450 inhibitors. The chemical proteomic strategy described herein thus offers a versatile method to monitor P450 activities and small molecule interactions in any biological system and, through doing so, should facilitate the functional characterization of this large and diverse enzyme class. PMID:17884636

  4. Structure-activity comparison of hydrazine to other Nasotoxic chemicals. Final report, August-October 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Godin, C.S.; Wall, H.G.

    1992-08-01

    The biotransformation of 19 chemicals that have caused nasal epithelial toxicity in-long-term carcinogenesis experiments in laboratory rodents was compared with the biotransformation of hydrazine, in order to determine if these chemicals share common metabolic pathways. Ten of the 19 chemicals were tumorigenic; four were epoxides or epoxide-formers; three were metabolized to reactive aldehydes; and one was metabolized to a lactone ring. The two remaining chemicals, p-cresidene and 2,6-xylidene, possess an amino group that can undergo biotransformation to reactive metabolites in a way similar to hydrazine, but there is no evidence to support this hypothesis. Therefore, none of the 19 chemicals are metabolized in a way similar to hydrazine.... Structure-activity, Hydrazine, Nasotoxicity, Carcinogenicity.

  5. Investigation of the chemical composition-antibacterial activity relationship of essential oils by chemometric methods.

    PubMed

    Miladinović, Dragoljub L; Ilić, Budimir S; Mihajilov-Krstev, Tatjana M; Nikolić, Nikola D; Miladinović, Ljiljana C; Cvetković, Olga G

    2012-05-01

    The antibacterial effects of Thymus vulgaris (Lamiaceae), Lavandula angustifolia (Lamiaceae), and Calamintha nepeta (Lamiaceae) Savi subsp. nepeta var. subisodonda (Borb.) Hayek essential oils on five different bacteria were estimated. Laboratory control strain and clinical isolates from different pathogenic media were researched by broth microdilution method, with an emphasis on a chemical composition-antibacterial activity relationship. The main constituents of thyme oil were thymol (59.95%) and p-cymene (18.34%). Linalool acetate (38.23%) and β-linalool (35.01%) were main compounds in lavender oil. C. nepeta essential oil was characterized by a high percentage of piperitone oxide (59.07%) and limonene (9.05%). Essential oils have been found to have antimicrobial activity against all tested microorganisms. Classification and comparison of essential oils on the basis of their chemical composition and antibacterial activity were made by utilization of appropriate chemometric methods. The chemical principal component analysis (PCA) and hierachical cluster analysis (HCA) separated essential oils into two groups and two sub-groups. Thyme essential oil forms separate chemical HCA group and exhibits highest antibacterial activity, similar to tetracycline. Essential oils of lavender and C. nepeta in the same chemical HCA group were classified in different groups, within antibacterial PCA and HCA analyses. Lavender oil exhibits higher antibacterial ability in comparison with C. nepeta essential oil, probably based on the concept of synergistic activity of essential oil components. PMID:22389175

  6. Activity profiles of 309 ToxCast™ chemicals evaluated across 292 biochemical targets.

    PubMed

    Knudsen, Thomas B; Houck, Keith A; Sipes, Nisha S; Singh, Amar V; Judson, Richard S; Martin, Matthew T; Weissman, Arthur; Kleinstreuer, Nicole C; Mortensen, Holly M; Reif, David M; Rabinowitz, James R; Setzer, R Woodrow; Richard, Ann M; Dix, David J; Kavlock, Robert J

    2011-03-28

    Understanding the potential health risks posed by environmental chemicals is a significant challenge elevated by the large number of diverse chemicals with generally uncharacterized exposures, mechanisms, and toxicities. The present study is a performance evaluation and critical analysis of assay results for an array of 292 high-throughput cell-free assays aimed at preliminary toxicity evaluation of 320 environmental chemicals in EPA's ToxCast™ project (Phase I). The chemicals (309 unique, 11 replicates) were mainly precursors or the active agent of commercial pesticides, for which a wealth of in vivo toxicity data is available. Biochemical HTS (high-throughput screening) profiled cell and tissue extracts using semi-automated biochemical and pharmacological methodologies to evaluate a subset of G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), CYP450 enzymes (CYPs), kinases, phosphatases, proteases, HDACs, nuclear receptors, ion channels, and transporters. The primary screen tested all chemicals at a relatively high concentration 25 μM concentration (or 10 μM for CYP assays), and a secondary screen re-tested 9132 chemical-assay pairs in 8-point concentration series from 0.023 to 50 μM (or 0.009-20 μM for CYPs). Mapping relationships across 93,440 chemical-assay pairs based on half-maximal activity concentration (AC50) revealed both known and novel targets in signaling and metabolic pathways. The primary dataset, summary data and details on quality control checks are available for download at http://www.epa.gov/ncct/toxcast/. PMID:21251949

  7. Value of monitoring Nrf2 activity for the detection of chemical and oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Mutter, Fiona E.; Park, B. Kevin; Copple, Ian M.

    2015-01-01

    Beyond specific limits of exposure, chemical entities can provoke deleterious effects in mammalian cells via direct interaction with critical macromolecules or by stimulating the accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). In particular, these chemical and oxidative stresses can underpin adverse reactions to therapeutic drugs, which pose an unnecessary burden in the clinic and pharmaceutical industry. Novel pre-clinical testing strategies are required to identify, at an earlier stage in the development pathway, chemicals and drugs that are likely to provoke toxicity in humans. Mammalian cells can adapt to chemical and oxidative stress via the action of the transcription factor nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), which up-regulates the expression of numerous cell defence genes and has been shown to protect against a variety of chemical toxicities. Here, we provide a brief overview of the Nrf2 pathway and summarize novel experimental models that can be used to monitor changes in Nrf2 pathway activity and thus understand the functional consequences of such perturbations in the context of chemical and drug toxicity. We also provide an outlook on the potential value of monitoring Nrf2 activity for improving the pre-clinical identification of chemicals and drugs with toxic liability in humans. PMID:26551708

  8. CO2-fluxing collapses metal mobility in magmatic vapour

    DOE PAGESBeta

    van Hinsberg, V. J.; Berlo, K.; Migdisov, A. A.; Williams-Jones, A. E.

    2016-05-18

    Magmatic systems host many types of ore deposits, including world-class deposits of copper and gold. Magmas are commonly an important source of metals and ore-forming fluids in these systems. In many magmatic-hydrothermal systems, low-density aqueous fluids, or vapours, are significant metal carriers. Such vapours are water-dominated shallowly, but fluxing of CO2-rich vapour exsolved from deeper magma is now recognised as ubiquitous during open-system magma degassing. Furthermore, we show that such CO2-fluxing leads to a sharp drop in element solubility, up to a factor of 10,000 for Cu, and thereby provides a highly efficient, but as yet unrecognised mechanism for metalmore » deposition.« less

  9. A Mechanical System for Dispensing Known Amounts of Insecticidal Vapours*

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, J. A.; Pearce, G. W.; Quarterman, K. D.

    1961-01-01

    The requirements for a self-contained semi-automatic insecticidal vapour dispenser for use in the disinsection of aircraft are presented. A prototype device meeting these requirements is described and data on its performance, using DDVP (O,O-dimethyl-2,2-dichlorovinyl phosphate) as the insecticide, are given. In this system a miniature air compressor forces air through a membrane impregnated with DDVP, and the vapour-laden air exits into the cabin through a tubular distribution system equipped with orifices. The vapour output is governed by the volume and the temperature of the air passing through the membrane, and the system is adaptable to all types of aircraft at present in use or projected for the near future. The system can also be adapted for use in the disinsection of other closed or semi-closed spaces. PMID:13789905

  10. Adsorption of n-alkane vapours at the water surface.

    PubMed

    Biscay, Frédéric; Ghoufi, Aziz; Malfreyt, Patrice

    2011-06-21

    Monte Carlo simulations are reported here to predict the surface tension of the liquid-vapour interface of water upon adsorption of alkane vapours (methane to hexane). A decrease of the surface tension has been established from n-pentane. A correlation has been evidenced between the decrease of the surface tension and the absence of specific arrangement at the water surface for n-pentane and n-hexane. The thermodynamic stability of the adsorption layer and the absence of film for longer alkanes have been checked through the calculation of a potential of mean force. This complements the work recently published [Ghoufi et al., Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2010, 12, 5203] concerning the adsorption of methane at the water surface. The decrease of the surface tension has been interpreted in terms of the degree of hydrogen bonding of water molecules at the liquid-vapour interface upon adsorption. PMID:21584320

  11. The ignitability of petrol vapours and potential for vapour phase explosion by use of TASER® law enforcement electronic control device.

    PubMed

    Clarke, C; Andrews, S P

    2014-12-01

    An experimental study was made of the potential of the TASER-X26™ law enforcement electronic control device to ignite petrol vapours if used by an officer to incapacitate a person soaked in petrol, or within a flammable atmosphere containing petrol vapour. Bench scale tests have shown that a wooden mannequin with pig skin covering the chest was a suitable representation of a human target. Full scale tests using the mannequin have shown that the arc from a TASER-X26™ is capable of igniting petrol/air vapours on a petrol-soaked person. Further tests in a 1/5 scale and a full scale compartment have shown that if a TASER is used within a compartment, a petrol vapour explosion (deflagration) may be achieved. It is evident from this research that if used in a flammable vapour rich environment, the device could prove fatal not only to the target but the TASER® operator as well. PMID:25498927

  12. Non-invasive quantification of skin injury resulting from exposure to sulphur mustard and Lewisite vapours.

    PubMed

    Chilcott, R P; Brown, R F; Rice, P

    2000-05-01

    The severity and progression of skin lesions resulting from exposure to the chemical warfare agents Lewisite (L) and sulphur mustard (SM) have been investigated using the non-invasive biophysical methods of evaporimetry and reflectance spectroscopy in large white pigs in vivo. Erythema (redness) expressed immediately after exposure to L or SM vapours appeared to be related to the lesion severity as demonstrated by histopathological analysis. Skin brightness correlated well with scab formation whereas blueness (cyanosis) did not appreciably alter throughout the study. Rates of transepidermal water loss (TEWL) changed both with occlusion (during vapour exposure) and also mirrored the progression of macroscopic skin injury after 12 h. Whilst no single parameter could be used in isolation to ascertain the severity and subsequent progression of the skin lesions, measurement of erythema, skin brightness and TEWL could provide quantitative, non-invasive methods for determining the efficacy of antidotes or therapies to prevent the toxic effects of chemical warfare agents. However, neither colourimetry or TEWL provided a clinical evaluation of such lesions that were comparable with the prognostic capabilities of laser Doppler imaging. PMID:10741590

  13. Intercomparison of TCCON and MUSICA Water Vapour Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weaver, D.; Strong, K.; Deutscher, N. M.; Schneider, M.; Blumenstock, T.; Robinson, J.; Notholt, J.; Sherlock, V.; Griffith, D. W. T.; Barthlott, S.; García, O. E.; Smale, D.; Palm, M.; Jones, N. B.; Hase, F.; Kivi, R.; Ramos, Y. G.; Yoshimura, K.; Sepúlveda, E.; Gómez-Peláez, Á. J.; Gisi, M.; Kohlhepp, R.; Warneke, T.; Dohe, S.; Wiegele, A.; Christner, E.; Lejeune, B.; Demoulin, P.

    2014-12-01

    We present an intercomparison between the water vapour products from the Total Carbon Column Observing Network (TCCON) and the MUlti-platform remote Sensing of Isotopologues for investigating the Cycle of Atmospheric water (MUSICA), two datasets from ground-based Fourier Transform InfraRed (FTIR) spectrometers with good global representation. Where possible, comparisons to radiosondes are also included. The near-infrared TCCON measurements are optimized to provide precise monitoring of greenhouse gases for carbon cycle studies; however, TCCON's retrievals also produce water vapour products. The mid-infrared MUSICA products result from retrievals optimized to give precise and accurate information about H2O, HDO, and δD. The MUSICA water vapour products have been validated by extensive intercomparisons with H2O and δD in-situ measurements made from ground, radiosonde, and aircraft (Schneider et al. 2012, 2014), as well as by intercomparisons with satellite-based H2O and δD remote sensing measurements (Wiegele et al., 2014). This dataset provides a valuable reference point for other measurements of water vapour. This study is motivated by the limited intercomparisons performed for TCCON water vapour products and limited characterisation of their uncertainties. We compare MUSICA and TCCON products to assess the potential for TCCON measurements to contribute to studies of the water cycle, water vapour's role in climate and use as a tracer for atmospheric dynamics, and to evaluate the performance of climate models. The TCCON and MUSICA products result from measurements taken using the same FTIR instruments, enabling a comparison with constant instrumentation. The retrieval techniques differ, however, in their method and a priori information. We assess the impact of these differences and characterize the comparability of the TCCON and MUSICA datasets.

  14. Effect of various chemicals on the aldehyde dehydrogenase activity of the rat liver cytosol.

    PubMed

    Marselos, M; Vasiliou, V

    1991-01-01

    The cytosolic activity of aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) was studied in the rat liver, after acute administration of various carcinogenic and chemically related compounds. Male Wistar rats were treated with 27 different chemicals, including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, aromatic amines, nitrosamines, azo dyes, as well as with some known direct-acting carcinogens. The cytosolic ALDH activity of the liver was determined either with propionaldehyde and NAD (P/NAD), or with benzaldehyde and NADP (B/NADP). The activity of ALDH remained unaffected after treatment with 1-naphthylamine, nitrosamines and also with the direct-acting chemical carcinogens tested. On the contrary, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, polychlorinated biphenyls (Arochlor 1254) and 2-naphthylamine produced a remarkable increase of ALDH. In general, the response to the effectors was disproportionate between the two types of enzyme activity, being much in favour for the B/NADP activity. This fact resulted to an inversion of the ratio B/NADP vs. P/NAD, which under constitutive conditions is lower than 1. In this respect, the most potent compounds were found to be polychlorinated biphenyls, 3-methylcholanthrene, benzo(a)pyrene and 1,2,5,6-dibenzoanthracene. Our results suggest that the B/NADP activity of the soluble ALDH is greatly induced after treatment with compounds possessing aromatic ring(s) in their molecule. It is not known, if this response of the hepatocytes is related with the process of chemical carcinogenesis. PMID:2060039

  15. Analysis of essential oils from Voacanga africana seeds at different hydrodistillation extraction stages: chemical composition, antioxidant activity and antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiong; Yang, Dongliang; Liu, Jiajia; Ren, Na

    2015-01-01

    In this study, essential oils from Voacanga africana seeds at different extraction stages were investigated. In the chemical composition analysis, 27 compounds representing 86.69-95.03% of the total essential oils were identified and quantified. The main constituents in essential oils were terpenoids, alcohols and fatty acids accounting for 15.03-24.36%, 21.57-34.43% and 33.06-57.37%, respectively. Moreover, the analysis also revealed that essential oils from different extraction stages possessed different chemical compositions. In the antioxidant evaluation, all analysed oils showed similar antioxidant behaviours, and the concentrations of essential oils providing 50% inhibition of DPPH-scavenging activity (IC50) were about 25 mg/mL. In the antimicrobial experiments, essential oils from different extraction stages exhibited different antimicrobial activities. The antimicrobial activity of oils was affected by extraction stages. By controlling extraction stages, it is promising to obtain essential oils with desired antimicrobial activities. PMID:25686854

  16. A Global Genomic Screening Strategy Reveals Genetic and Chemical Activators ofPeroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor alpha (PPARalpha)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A comprehensive survey of chemical, diet and genetic perturbations that activate PPARalpha in the mouse liver has not been carried out but would be useful to identify the factors that may contribute to PPARalpha-dependent liver tumors. A gene signature dependent on PPARalpha ac...

  17. Anti-arthritic active fraction of Capparis spinosa L. fruits and its chemical constituents.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xiaolu; Lu, Jincai; Xin, Hailiang; Zhang, Lei; Wang, Yuliang; Tang, Kexuan

    2011-03-01

    The aim of this study was to ascertain the anti-arthritic active fraction of Capparis spinosa L. (Capparidaceae) fruits and its chemical constituents. The adjuvant arthritic rat model was developed to evaluate the anti-arthritic effects of different fractions of ethanol extraction from C. spinosa L. The fraction eluted by ethanol-water (50:50, v/v) had the most significant anti-arthritic activity. The chemical constituents of this fraction were therefore studied; seven known compounds were isolated and identified as: P-hydroxy benzoic acid; 5-(hydroxymethyl) furfural; bis(5-formylfurfuryl) ether; daucosterol; α-D-fructofuranosides methyl; uracil; and stachydrine. PMID:21372539

  18. Chemical intra-Mediterranean variation and insecticidal activity of Crithmum maritimum.

    PubMed

    Tsoukatou, M; Tsitsimpikou, C; Vagias, C; Roussis, V

    2001-01-01

    The chemical composition of the volatile metabolites of Crithmum maritimum harvested from several geographic localities along the Mediterranean coasts was studied by GC and GC-MSD. The major oil constituents were found to be dillapiole, gamma-terpinene, sabinene, limonene and beta-phellandrene. The Western populations were richer in dillapiole, whereas the Southern collections were characterized by increased amounts of thymol methyl ether and gamma-terpinene. The Italian chemical profiles differentiated by the significant contributions of carvacrol methyl ether and isoterpinolene. The essential oils were also investigated for their insecticidal activity and their repellency against Pheidole pallidula (Nylander) ants and found to possess significant activity. PMID:11371010

  19. Screening chemicals for thyroid-disrupting activity: A critical comparison of mammalian and amphibian models.

    PubMed

    Pickford, Daniel B

    2010-11-01

    In order to minimize risks to human and environmental health, chemical safety assessment programs are being reinforced with toxicity tests more specifically designed for detecting endocrine disrupters. This includes the necessity to detect thyroid-disrupting chemicals, which may operate through a variety of modes of action, and have potential to impair neurological development in humans, with resulting deficits of individual and social potential. Mindful of these concerns, the consensus favors in vivo models for both hazard characterization (testing) and hazard identification (screening) steps, in order to minimize false negatives. Owing to its obligate dependence on thyroid hormones, it has been proposed that amphibian metamorphosis be used as a generalized vertebrate model for thyroid function in screening batteries for detection of thyroid disrupters. However, it seems unlikely that such an assay would ever fully replace in vivo mammalian assays currently being validated for human health risk assessment: in its current form the amphibian metamorphosis screening assay would not provide capacity for reliably detecting other modes of endocrine-disrupting activity. Conversely, several candidate mammalian screening assays appear to offer robust capacity to detect a variety of modes of endocrine-disrupting activity, including thyroid activity. To assess whether omission of an amphibian metamorphosis assay from an in vivo screening battery would generate false negatives, the response of amphibian and mammalian assays to a variety known thyroid disrupters, as reported in peer-reviewed literature or government agency reports, was critically reviewed. Of the chemicals investigated from the literature selected (41), more had been tested in mammalian studies with thyroid-relevant endpoints (32) than in amphibian assays with appropriate windows of exposure and developmental endpoints (27). One chemical (methoxychlor) was reported to exhibit thyroid activity in an appropriate

  20. 15 CFR 712.1 - Round to zero rule that applies to activities involving Schedule 1 chemicals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade (Continued) BUREAU OF INDUSTRY AND SECURITY, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE CHEMICAL WEAPONS CONVENTION REGULATIONS ACTIVITIES INVOLVING SCHEDULE 1 CHEMICALS § 712.1 Round to...

  1. 15 CFR 712.1 - Round to zero rule that applies to activities involving Schedule 1 chemicals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade (Continued) BUREAU OF INDUSTRY AND SECURITY, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE CHEMICAL WEAPONS CONVENTION REGULATIONS ACTIVITIES INVOLVING SCHEDULE 1 CHEMICALS § 712.1 Round to...

  2. 15 CFR 712.1 - Round to zero rule that applies to activities involving Schedule 1 chemicals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade (Continued) BUREAU OF INDUSTRY AND SECURITY, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE CHEMICAL WEAPONS CONVENTION REGULATIONS ACTIVITIES INVOLVING SCHEDULE 1 CHEMICALS § 712.1 Round to...

  3. 15 CFR 712.1 - Round to zero rule that applies to activities involving Schedule 1 chemicals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade (Continued) BUREAU OF INDUSTRY AND SECURITY, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE CHEMICAL WEAPONS CONVENTION REGULATIONS ACTIVITIES INVOLVING SCHEDULE 1 CHEMICALS § 712.1 Round to...

  4. 15 CFR 712.1 - Round to zero rule that applies to activities involving Schedule 1 chemicals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade (Continued) BUREAU OF INDUSTRY AND SECURITY, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE CHEMICAL WEAPONS CONVENTION REGULATIONS ACTIVITIES INVOLVING SCHEDULE 1 CHEMICALS § 712.1 Round to...

  5. Gamma irradiation effect on the chemical composition and the antioxidant activity of Ipomoea batatas L

    SciTech Connect

    Tahir, D. Halide, H. Kurniawan, D.; Wahab, A. W.

    2014-09-25

    The chemical composition and antioxidant activity of Ipomoea batatas L. (sweet potato) were studied by x-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and by the 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging capacity. The irradiation treatment was performed by using Cs-137 as a gamma sources in experimental equipment. Treatment by irradiation emerges as a possible conservation technique that has been tested successfully in several food products. The amount of chemical composition was changed and resulting new chemical for absorbed dose 40 mSv. Interestingly, it was found that gamma irradiation significantly increased the antioxidant activity, as measured by DPPH radical scavenging capacity. The antioxidant activity of Ipomoea batatas L. extract was dramatically increased in the non-irradiated sample to the sample irradiated at 40 mSv. These results indicate that gamma irradiation of Ipomoea batatas L. extract can enhance its antioxidant activity through the formation of a new chemical compound. Based on these results, increased antioxidant activity of Ipomoea batatas L. extracts by gamma rays can be applied to various industries, especially cosmetics, foodstuffs, and pharmaceuticals.

  6. Gamma irradiation effect on the chemical composition and the antioxidant activity of Ipomoea batatas L.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahir, D.; Halide, H.; Wahab, A. W.; Kurniawan, D.

    2014-09-01

    The chemical composition and antioxidant activity of Ipomoea batatas L. (sweet potato) were studied by x-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and by the 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging capacity. The irradiation treatment was performed by using Cs-137 as a gamma sources in experimental equipment. Treatment by irradiation emerges as a possible conservation technique that has been tested successfully in several food products. The amount of chemical composition was changed and resulting new chemical for absorbed dose 40 mSv. Interestingly, it was found that gamma irradiation significantly increased the antioxidant activity, as measured by DPPH radical scavenging capacity. The antioxidant activity of Ipomoea batatas L. extract was dramatically increased in the non-irradiated sample to the sample irradiated at 40 mSv. These results indicate that gamma irradiation of Ipomoea batatas L. extract can enhance its antioxidant activity through the formation of a new chemical compound. Based on these results, increased antioxidant activity of Ipomoea batatas L. extracts by gamma rays can be applied to various industries, especially cosmetics, foodstuffs, and pharmaceuticals.

  7. The water vapour radiometer of Paranal: homogeneity of precipitable water vapour from two years of operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerber, Florian; Querel, Richard R.; Neureiter, Bianca

    2015-04-01

    A Low Humidity and Temperature Profiling (LHATPRO) microwave radiometer, manufactured by Radiometer Physics GmbH (RPG), is used to monitor sky conditions over ESO's Paranal observatory in support of VLT science operations. The unit measures several channels across the strong water vapour emission line at 183 GHz, necessary for resolving the low levels of precipitable water vapour (PWV) that are prevalent on Paranal (median ∼2.4 mm). The instrument consists of a humidity profiler (183-191 GHz), a temperature profiler (51-58 GHz), and an infrared camera (∼10 μm) for cloud detection. We present a statistical analysis of the homogeneity of all-sky PWV using 24 months of PWV observations. The question we tried to address was whether PWV is homogeneous enough across the sky such that service mode observations with the VLT can routinely be conducted with a user-provided constraint for PWV measured at zenith. We find the PWV over Paranal to be remarkably homogeneous across the sky down to 27.5° elevation with a median variation of 0.07 mm (rms). The homogeneity is a function of the absolute PWV but the relative variation is fairly constant at 2 to 3% (rms). Such variations will not be a significant issue for analysis of astronomical data. Users at ESO can specify PWV - measured at zenith - as an ambient constraint in service mode to enable, for instance, very demanding observations in the infrared. We conclude that in general it will not be necessary to add another observing constraint for PWV homogeneity to ensure integrity of observations. For demanding observations requiring very low PWV, where the relative variation is higher, the optimum support could be provided by observing with the LHATPRO in the same line-of-sight simultaneously. Such a mode of operations has already been tested but will have to be justified in terms of scientific gain before implementation can be considered. We plan to extend our analysis of PWV variations covering a larger parameters space

  8. Identification of chemical modulators of the constitutive activated receptor (CAR) in a gene expression compendium

    PubMed Central

    Oshida, Keiyu; Vasani, Naresh; Jones, Carlton; Moore, Tanya; Hester, Susan; Nesnow, Stephen; Auerbach, Scott; Geter, David R.; Aleksunes, Lauren M.; Thomas, Russell S.; Applegate, Dawn; Klaassen, Curtis D.; Corton, J. Christopher

    2015-01-01

    The nuclear receptor family member constitutive activated receptor (CAR) is activated by structurally diverse drugs and environmentally-relevant chemicals leading to transcriptional regulation of genes involved in xenobiotic metabolism and transport. Chronic activation of CAR increases liver cancer incidence in rodents, whereas suppression of CAR can lead to steatosis and insulin insensitivity. Here, analytical methods were developed to screen for chemical treatments in a gene expression compendium that lead to alteration of CAR activity. A gene expression biomarker signature of 83 CAR-dependent genes was identified using microarray profiles from the livers of wild-type and CAR-null mice after exposure to three structurally-diverse CAR activators (CITCO, phenobarbital, TCPOBOP). A rank-based algorithm (Running Fisher’s algorithm (p-value ≤ 10-4)) was used to evaluate the similarity between the CAR biomarker signature and a test set of 28 and 32 comparisons positive or negative, respectively, for CAR activation; the test resulted in a balanced accuracy of 97%. The biomarker signature was used to identify chemicals that activate or suppress CAR in an annotated mouse liver/primary hepatocyte gene expression database of ~1850 comparisons. CAR was activated by 1) activators of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) in wild-type but not AhR-null mice, 2) pregnane X receptor (PXR) activators in wild-type and to lesser extents in PXR-null mice, and 3) activators of PPARα in wild-type and PPARα-null mice. CAR was consistently activated by five conazole fungicides and four perfluorinated compounds. Comparison of effects in wild-type and CAR-null mice showed that the fungicide propiconazole increased liver weight and hepatocyte proliferation in a CAR-dependent manner, whereas the perfluorinated compound perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) increased these endpoints in a CAR-independent manner. A number of compounds suppressed CAR coincident with increases in markers of

  9. Identification of chemical modulators of the constitutive activated receptor (CAR) in a gene expression compendium.

    PubMed

    Oshida, Keiyu; Vasani, Naresh; Jones, Carlton; Moore, Tanya; Hester, Susan; Nesnow, Stephen; Auerbach, Scott; Geter, David R; Aleksunes, Lauren M; Thomas, Russell S; Applegate, Dawn; Klaassen, Curtis D; Corton, J Christopher

    2015-01-01

    The nuclear receptor family member constitutive activated receptor (CAR) is activated by structurally diverse drugs and environmentally-relevant chemicals leading to transcriptional regulation of genes involved in xenobiotic metabolism and transport. Chronic activation of CAR increases liver cancer incidence in rodents, whereas suppression of CAR can lead to steatosis and insulin insensitivity. Here, analytical methods were developed to screen for chemical treatments in a gene expression compendium that lead to alteration of CAR activity. A gene expression biomarker signature of 83 CAR-dependent genes was identified using microarray profiles from the livers of wild-type and CAR-null mice after exposure to three structurally-diverse CAR activators (CITCO, phenobarbital, TCPOBOP). A rank-based algorithm (Running Fisher's algorithm (p-value ≤ 10(-4))) was used to evaluate the similarity between the CAR biomarker signature and a test set of 28 and 32 comparisons positive or negative, respectively, for CAR activation; the test resulted in a balanced accuracy of 97%. The biomarker signature was used to identify chemicals that activate or suppress CAR in an annotated mouse liver/primary hepatocyte gene expression database of ~1850 comparisons. CAR was activated by 1) activators of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) in wild-type but not AhR-null mice, 2) pregnane X receptor (PXR) activators in wild-type and to lesser extents in PXR-null mice, and 3) activators of PPARα in wild-type and PPARα-null mice. CAR was consistently activated by five conazole fungicides and four perfluorinated compounds. Comparison of effects in wild-type and CAR-null mice showed that the fungicide propiconazole increased liver weight and hepatocyte proliferation in a CAR-dependent manner, whereas the perfluorinated compound perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) increased these endpoints in a CAR-independent manner. A number of compounds suppressed CAR coincident with increases in markers of

  10. Relationship between redox activity and chemical speciation of size-fractionated particulate matter

    PubMed Central

    Ntziachristos, Leonidas; Froines, John R; Cho, Arthur K; Sioutas, Constantinos

    2007-01-01

    Background Although the mechanisms of airborne particulate matter (PM) related health effects remain incompletely understood, one emerging hypothesis is that these adverse effects derive from oxidative stress, initiated by the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) within affected cells. Typically, ROS are formed in cells through the reduction of oxygen by biological reducing agents, with the catalytic assistance of electron transfer enzymes and redox active chemical species such as redox active organic chemicals and metals. The purpose of this study was to relate the electron transfer ability, or redox activity, of the PM samples to their content in polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and various inorganic species. The redox activity of the samples has been shown to correlate with the induction of the stress protein, hemeoxygenase-1. Results Size-fractionated (i.e. < 0.15; < 2.5 and 2.5 – 10 μm in diameter) ambient PM samples were collected from four different locations in the period from June 2003 to July 2005, and were chemically analyzed for elemental and organic carbon, ions, elements and trace metals and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. The redox activity of the samples was evaluated by means of the dithiothreitol activity assay and was related to their chemical speciation by means of correlation analysis. Our analysis indicated a higher redox activity on a per PM mass basis for ultrafine (< 0.15 μm) particles compared to those of larger sizes. The PM redox activity was highly correlated with the organic carbon (OC) content of PM as well as the mass fractions of species such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), and selected metals. Conclusion The results of this work demonstrate the utility of the dithiothreitol assay for quantitatively assessing the redox potential of airborne particulate matter from a wide range of sources. Studies to characterize the redox activity of PM from various sources throughout the Los Angeles basin are currently

  11. Preparation and characterization of CS-g-PNIPAAm microgels and application in a water vapour-permeable fabric.

    PubMed

    Wang, Weiling; Yu, Weidong

    2015-01-01

    Chitosan-graft-poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (CS-g-PNIPAAm) was synthesised using sonication with and without the crosslinker, N,N'-methylenebisacrylamide (MBA). FTIR, variable-temperature (1)H NMR spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, UV-vis spectrophotometry, differential scanning calorimetry, and dynamic light scattering were used to characterize the microgels' chemical constituents, structures, morphologies, lower critical solution temperatures (LCSTs), and thermo- and pH-responsiveness. The chemical structures of the two CS-g-PNIPAAm materials were found to be similar and both exhibited dual responsiveness towards temperature and pH. The microgel containing MBA had a higher LCST, smaller diameter, and more compact structure, but exhibited opposite pH- and similar thermo-responsiveness. Although the structure of the microgel particles prepared without crosslinking was unstable, the stability of the crosslinked microgel particles enabled them to be finished onto fabric. Because the microgel prepared with MBA retains thermosensitivity, it can be used to impart controllable water vapour permeability properties. The incorporation of the MBA-crosslinked CS-g-PNIPAAm microgel particles in cotton fabric was accomplished by a simple pad-dry-cure procedure from an aqueous microparticle dispersion. The water vapour permeation of the finished fabric was measured at 25 and 40°C and 50 and 90% relative humidities. The finished fabric displayed an obviously high water vapour permeability at 40°C. PMID:25965451

  12. Thermo-poro-mechanics of chemically active creeping faults: 2. Transient considerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veveakis, E.; Poulet, T.; Alevizos, S.

    2014-06-01

    This work studies the transient behavior of a chemically active, fluid-saturated fault zone under shear. These fault zones are displaying a plethora of responses spanning from ultrafast instabilities, like thermal pressurization, to extremely slow creep localization events on geological timescales. These instabilities can be described by a single model of a rate-dependent and thermally dependent fault, prone to fluid release reactions at critical temperatures which was introduced in our companion work. In this study we integrate it in time to provide regimes of stable creep, nonperiodic and periodic seismic slip events due to chemical pressurization, depending on the physical properties of the fault material. It is shown that this chemically induced seismic slip takes place in an extremely localized band, several orders of magnitude narrower than the initial shear zone, which is indeed the signature field observation. Furthermore, in the field and in laboratory experiments the ultralocalized deformation is embedded in a chemical process zone that forms part of the shear zone. The width of this zone is shown here to depend on the net activation energy of the chemical reaction. The larger the difference in forward and backward activation energies, the narrower is the chemical process zone. We apply the novel findings to invert the physical parameters from a 16year GPS observation of the Cascadia episodic tremor and slip events and show that this sequence is the fundamental mode of a serpentinite oscillator defined by slow strain localization accompanying shear heating and chemical dehydration reaction at the critical point, followed by diffusion and backward reaction leading the system back to slow slip.

  13. Idaho Chemical Processing Plant low-activity waste grout stabilization development program FY-97 status report

    SciTech Connect

    Herbst, A.K.; Marshall, D.W.; McCray, J.A.

    1998-02-01

    The general purpose of the Grout Development Program is to solidify and stabilize the liquid low-activity wastes (LAW) generated at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP). It is anticipated that LAW will be produced from the following: (1) chemical separation of the tank farm high-activity sodium-bearing waste, (2) retrieval, dissolution, and chemical separation of the aluminum, zirconium, and sodium calcines, (3) facility decontamination processes, and (4) process equipment waste. Grout formulation studies for sodium-bearing LAW, including decontamination and process equipment waste, continued this fiscal year. A second task was to develop a grout formulation to solidify potential process residual heels in the tank farm vessels when the vessels are closed.

  14. Essential Oil Composition of Phagnalon sordidum (L.) from Corsica, Chemical Variability and Antimicrobial Activity.

    PubMed

    Brunel, Marion; Vitrac, Caroline; Costa, Jean; Mzali, Fatima; Vitrac, Xavier; Muselli, Alain

    2016-03-01

    The chemical composition of Phagnalon sordidum (L.) essential oil was investigated for the first time using gas chromatography and chromatography/mass spectrometry. Seventy-six compounds, which accounted for 87.9% of the total amount, were identified in a collective essential oil of P. sordidum from Corsica. The main essential oil components were (E)-β-caryophyllene (14.4%), β-pinene (11.0%), thymol (9.0%), and hexadecanoic acid (5.3%). The chemical compositions of essential oils from 19 Corsican locations were investigated. The study of the chemical variability using statistical analysis allowed identifying direct correlation between the three populations of P. sordidum widespread in Corsica and the essential oil compositions they produce. The in vitro antimicrobial activity of P. sordidum essential oil was evaluated and it exhibited a notable activity on a large panel of clinically significant microorganisms. PMID:26916729

  15. Chemical composition and antibacterial activity of essential oil and extracts of Citharexylum spinosum flowers from Thailand.

    PubMed

    Mar, Ae; Pripdeevech, Patcharee

    2014-05-01

    The chemical composition and antibacterial and antioxidant activities of the essential oil and various solvent extracts of Citharexylum spinosum flowers are reported. The chemical compositions were determined by GC-MS with 151 volatile constituents identified. Methyl benzoate, piperitone, maltol, and maple furanone were the major constituents. All extracts were tested for their antibacterial activity against eight microorganisms. The flower oil had the greatest antibacterial activity against all bacterial strains (MIC values of 31.2 microg/mL), while the other solvent extracts had MIC values ranging from 31.2 to 1000 microg/mL. The essential oil had the highest antioxidant activity and total phenol content with IC50 values of 62.7 and 107.3 microg/mL, respectively. PMID:25026728

  16. Chemical modification studies on arginine kinase: essential cysteine and arginine residues at the active site.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wen-Jing; Li, Miao; Wang, Xiao-Yun

    2007-12-01

    Chemical modification was used to elucidate the essential amino acids in the catalytic activity of arginine kinase (AK) from Migratoria manilensis. Among six cysteine (Cys) residues only one Cys residue was determined to be essential in the active site by Tsou's method. Furthermore, the AK modified by DTNB can be fully reactivated by dithiothreitol (DTT) in a monophasic kinetic course. At the same time, this reactivation can be slowed down in the presence of ATP, suggesting that the essential Cys is located near the ATP binding site. The ionizing groups at the AK active site were studied and the standard dissociation enthalpy (DeltaH degrees ) was 12.38kcal/mol, showing that the dissociation group may be the guanidino of arginine (Arg). Using the specific chemical modifier phenylglyoxal (PG) demonstrated that only one Arg, located near the ATP binding site, is essential for the activity of AK. PMID:17765964

  17. Research on the chemical inactivation of antibiotic activity in assays of sterility and contamination of pharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Negretti, F; Casetta, P

    1991-01-01

    Membrane filtration, frequently used for removing antibacterial activity in assays of sterility and contamination of the antibiotics, presents the drawback of adsorption of antibiotic to membrane. The washing with large volumes of peptone water removes partially interferences with microbial growth. We evaluated the inactivating action of some chemical substances (albumin, calcium pantothenate, heparin, hydroxylamine, tri-valent iron) on the antimicrobial activity of membranes employed for antibiotic filtration. The results are not positive for the use of chemical substances in the antibiotic activity neutralization. In fact the per cent reduction of inhibition zones ranges from -61.5% to +20.0% and the inhibiting activity on the growth of colony forming units (CFU) oscillates from 89.6% to 100%. Discovery of new neutralizing substances and severe measures of asepsis in pharmaceutical production are recommended. PMID:12041793

  18. Modeling Chemical Detection Sensitivities of Active and Passive Remote Sensing Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Scharlemann, E T

    2003-07-28

    During nearly a decade of remote sensing programs under the auspices of the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE), LLNL has developed a set of performance modeling codes--called APRS--for both Active and Passive Remote Sensing systems. These codes emphasize chemical detection sensitivity in the form of minimum detectable quantities with and without background spectral clutter and in the possible presence of other interfering chemicals. The codes have been benchmarked against data acquired in both active and passive remote sensing programs at LLNL and Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The codes include, as an integral part of the performance modeling, many of the data analysis techniques developed in the DOE's active and passive remote sensing programs (e.g., ''band normalization'' for an active system, principal component analysis for a passive system).

  19. Impact of major volcanic eruptions on stratospheric water vapour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Löffler, M.; Brinkop, S.; Jöckel, P.

    2015-12-01

    Volcanic eruptions can have significant impact on the earth's weather and climate system. Besides the subsequent tropospheric changes also the stratosphere is influenced by large eruptions. Here changes in stratospheric water vapour after the two major volcanic eruptions of El Chichón in Mexico in 1982 and Mount Pinatubo on the Philippines in 1991 are investigated with chemistry-climate model simulations. This study is based on two simulations with specified dynamics of the EMAC model, performed within the Earth System Chemistry integrated Modelling (ESCiMo) project, of which only one includes the volcanic forcing through prescribed aerosol optical properties. The results show a significant increase in stratospheric water vapour after the eruptions, resulting from increased heating rates and the subsequent changes in stratospheric and tropopause temperatures in the tropics. The tropical vertical advection and the South Asian summer monsoon are identified as important sources for the additional water vapour in the stratosphere. Additionally, volcanic influences on the tropospheric water vapour and ENSO are evident.

  20. No sodium in the vapour plumes of Enceladus.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Nicholas M; Burger, Matthew H; Schaller, Emily L; Brown, Michael E; Johnson, Robert E; Kargel, Jeffrey S; Dougherty, Michele K; Achilleos, Nicholas A

    2009-06-25

    The discovery of water vapour and ice particles erupting from Saturn's moon Enceladus fuelled speculation that an internal ocean was the source. Alternatively, the source might be ice warmed, melted or crushed by tectonic motions. Sodium chloride (that is, salt) is expected to be present in a long-lived ocean in contact with a rocky core. Here we report a ground-based spectroscopic search for atomic sodium near Enceladus that places an upper limit on the mixing ratio in the vapour plumes orders of magnitude below the expected ocean salinity. The low sodium content of escaping vapour, together with the small fraction of salt-bearing particles, argues against a situation in which a near-surface geyser is fuelled by a salty ocean through cracks in the crust. The lack of observable sodium in the vapour is consistent with a wide variety of alternative eruption sources, including a deep ocean, a freshwater reservoir, or ice. The existing data may be insufficient to distinguish between these hypotheses. PMID:19553993

  1. Turkish Undergraduates' Misconceptions of Evaporation, Evaporation Rate, and Vapour Pressure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canpolat, Nurtac

    2006-01-01

    This study focused on students' misconceptions related to evaporation, evaporation rate, and vapour pressure. Open-ended diagnostic questions were used with 107 undergraduates in the Primary Science Teacher Training Department in a state university in Turkey. In addition, 14 students from that sample were interviewed to clarify their written…

  2. Distillation with Vapour Compression. An Undergraduate Experimental Facility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pritchard, Colin

    1986-01-01

    Discusses the need to design distillation columns that are more energy efficient. Describes a "design and build" project completed by two college students aimed at demonstrating the principles of vapour compression distillation in a more energy efficient way. General design specifications are given, along with suggestions for teaching and…

  3. ESA DUE GlobVapour water vapor products: Validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Nadine; Schröder, Marc; Lindstrot, Ramus; Preusker, Rene; Stengel, Martin; ESA DUE GlobVapour Consortium

    2013-05-01

    The main objective of the European Space Agency (ESA) Data User Element (DUE) GlobVapour project was the development of multi-annual global water vapor data sets. Since water vapour is a key climate variable it is important to have a good understanding of its behavior in the climate system. The ESA DUE GlobVapour project provides water vapor data, including error estimates, based on carefully calibrated and inter-calibrated satellite radiances in response to user requirements for long time series satellite observations. ESA DUE GlobVapour total columnar water vapor (TCWV) products derived from GOME/SCIA/GOME-2 (1996-2008) and SSM/I+MERIS (2003-2008) have been validated for the mentioned period, using satellite-based (AIRS, ATOVS) and ground-based measurements (radiosondes and microwave radiometer). The validation results are discussed in the following. The technical specifications on bias (1 kg/m2 for SSMI+MERIS and 2 kg/m2 for GOME/SCIA/GOME-2) are generally met. For more information, documents and data download follow the link: www.globvapour.info.

  4. Disinsection of Aircraft with a Mechanical Dispenser of DDVP Vapour*

    PubMed Central

    Schoof, H. F.; Jensen, J. A.; Porter, J. E.; Maddock, D. R.

    1961-01-01

    In-flight and on-ground tests in commercial aircraft have demonstrated the feasibility of using DDVP (O,O-dimethyl-2,2-dichlorovinyl phosphate) vapour for disinsection purposes. Treatment of the passenger compartments of DC-6 and DC-7 aeroplanes was accomplished by passing cabin air through a fibrous cartridge impregnated with DDVP. The DDVP-charged air stream was distributed from the cartridge into the passenger compartment through small orifices, spaced 3 feet apart, in metal tubing suspended at ceiling height along the longitudinal axis of the cabin. Further distribution of the vapour was effected by the air currents of the ventilating system. During in-flight tests, vapour concentrations of 0.20 and 0.24 μg of DDVP per litre of air gave 100% mortalities of caged houseflies located at 12 sites at three different levels and exposed for 30 minutes. No effect of the vapour was noticed on the cholinesterase levels of three individuals exposed to the treatment during 24 tests. Imagesp624-a PMID:13748488

  5. THE INTERACTION OF VAPOUR PHASE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS WITH INDOOR SINKS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The interaction of indoor air pollutants with interior surfaces (i.e., sinks) is a well known, but poorly understood, phenomenon. Studies have shown that re-emissions of adsorbed organic vapours can contribute to elevated concentrations of organics in indoor environments. Researc...

  6. ESA DUE GlobVapour water vapor products: Validation

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, Nadine; Schroeder, Marc; Stengel, Martin; Lindstrot, Ramus; Preusker, Rene; Collaboration: ESA DUE GlobVapour Consortium

    2013-05-10

    The main objective of the European Space Agency (ESA) Data User Element (DUE) GlobVapour project was the development of multi-annual global water vapor data sets. Since water vapour is a key climate variable it is important to have a good understanding of its behavior in the climate system. The ESA DUE GlobVapour project provides water vapor data, including error estimates, based on carefully calibrated and inter-calibrated satellite radiances in response to user requirements for long time series satellite observations. ESA DUE GlobVapour total columnar water vapor (TCWV) products derived from GOME/SCIA/GOME-2 (1996-2008) and SSM/I+MERIS (2003-2008) have been validated for the mentioned period, using satellite-based (AIRS, ATOVS) and ground-based measurements (radiosondes and microwave radiometer). The validation results are discussed in the following. The technical specifications on bias (1 kg/m{sup 2} for SSMI+MERIS and 2 kg/m{sup 2} for GOME/SCIA/GOME-2) are generally met. For more information, documents and data download follow the link: www.globvapour.info.

  7. Breakdown and dc discharge in low-pressure water vapour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivoš, J.; Škoro, N.; Marić, D.; Malović, G.; Petrović, Z. Lj

    2015-10-01

    In this paper we report studies of basic properties of breakdown, low-current Townsend discharge and high-current discharge regimes in water vapour. Paschen curves and the corresponding distributions of emission intensities at low current were recorded in the range of pd (pressure x electrode gap) from 0.1 to 10 Torrcm covering the region of Paschen minimum. From the experimental profiles we obtained effective ionization coefficient of water vapour for the E/N range 650 Td-7 kTd and fitted the results by using the extended Townsend analytical formula. Using the obtained ionization coefficient, we calculated the effective yield of secondary electrons from the copper cathode. Results of the measurements of Volt-Ampere characteristics in water vapour were presented together with the images of the axial structure of the discharge in a wide range of discharge currents for two pd values. Recorded profiles showed development of the spatial structure of the discharge in different operating regimes. We were able to identify conditions where processes induced by heavy particles, probably fast hydrogen atoms, are dominant in inducing emission from the discharge. Finally, standard scaling laws were tested for low current and glow discharges in water vapour.

  8. Impact of major volcanic eruptions on stratospheric water vapour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Löffler, Michael; Brinkop, Sabine; Jöckel, Patrick

    2016-05-01

    Volcanic eruptions can have a significant impact on the Earth's weather and climate system. Besides the subsequent tropospheric changes, the stratosphere is also influenced by large eruptions. Here changes in stratospheric water vapour after the two major volcanic eruptions of El Chichón in Mexico in 1982 and Mount Pinatubo on the Philippines in 1991 are investigated with chemistry-climate model simulations. This study is based on two simulations with specified dynamics of the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts Hamburg - Modular Earth Submodel System (ECHAM/MESSy) Atmospheric Chemistry (EMAC) model, performed within the Earth System Chemistry integrated Modelling (ESCiMo) project, of which only one includes the long-wave volcanic forcing through prescribed aerosol optical properties. The results show a significant increase in stratospheric water vapour induced by the eruptions, resulting from increased heating rates and the subsequent changes in stratospheric and tropopause temperatures in the tropics. The tropical vertical advection and the South Asian summer monsoon are identified as sources for the additional water vapour in the stratosphere. Additionally, volcanic influences on tropospheric water vapour and El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) are evident, if the long-wave forcing is strong enough. Our results are corroborated by additional sensitivity simulations of the Mount Pinatubo period with reduced nudging and reduced volcanic aerosol extinction.

  9. Chemical composition and biological activity of the essential oil of rhizome of Zingiber zerumbet (L.) smith

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Technical Abstract: The aim was designed to study the biological activity and chemical composition of essential oil of Zingiber zerumbet (L.) Smith. The essential oil extracted from the rhizome of the plant was analysed by gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy and its major components amounting t...

  10. Chemical synthesis of nucleoside-gamma-[32P]triphosphates of high specific activity.

    PubMed

    Janecka, A; Panusz, H; Pankowski, J; Koziołkiewicz, W

    1980-01-01

    A simple chemical procedure for the preparation of four common ribonucleoside 5-gamma-[32P]triphosphates of high specific activity (up to 10 Ci/mmole) based on the condensation of orthophosphoric acid with the corresponding nucleoside 5-diphosphate in the presence of ethyl chloroformate as well as the methods of purification and identification of the products are described. PMID:7375446

  11. VAPORIZATION TECHNIQUE TO MEASURE MUTAGENIC ACTIVITY OF VOLATILE ORGANIC CHEMICALS IN THE AMES/'SALOMELLA' ASSAY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of the research was to develop and characterize a sensitive test method to detect mutagenic activity of volatile liquid organic chemicals (i.e., volatiles) in the Ames/Salmonella assay. A Tedlar bag vaporization technique was developed which increased contact time bet...

  12. Evaluation of surface waters associated with animal feeding operations for estrogenic chemicals and activity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Estrogens and estrogenic activity (EA) were evaluated in surface waters associated with animal feeding operations. Water was sampled at 19 sites in 12 states using discrete (n=41) and POCIS (n=19) sampling methods. Estrogenic chemicals measured in unfiltered water by GC/MS2 included: estrone (E1),17...

  13. Combining phosphate and bacteria removal on chemically active filter membranes allows prolonged storage of drinking water.

    PubMed

    Rotzetter, A C C; Kellenberger, C R; Schumacher, C M; Mora, C; Grass, R N; Loepfe, M; Luechinger, N A; Stark, W J

    2013-11-13

    A chemically active filtration membrane with incorporated lanthanum oxide nanoparticles enables the removal of bacteria and phosphate at the same time and thus provides a simple device for preparation of drinking water and subsequent safe storage without using any kind of disinfectants. PMID:23913409

  14. Chemical forms of selenium affect glutatione peroxidase activity in human Caco-2 cell model

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The bioavailability of selenium (Se) is complicated because there are multiple naturally occurring chemical forms of this element in nature. Assessing the ability of a Se source to restore GPX1 activity in laboratory animals and humans is the most commonly used method. To search for an alternative (...

  15. Estimating Toxicity Pathway Activating Doses for High Throughput Chemical Risk Assessments

    EPA Science Inventory

    Estimating a Toxicity Pathway Activating Dose (TPAD) from in vitro assays as an analog to a reference dose (RfD) derived from in vivo toxicity tests would facilitate high throughput risk assessments of thousands of data-poor environmental chemicals. Estimating a TPAD requires def...

  16. Fenton-Driven Chemical Regeneration of MTBE-Spent Granular Activated Carbon -- A Pilot Study

    EPA Science Inventory

    MTBE-spent granular activated carbon (GAC) underwent 3 adsorption/oxidation cycles. Pilot-scale columns were intermittently placed on-line at a ground water pump and treat facility, saturated with MTBE, and regenerated with H2O2 under different chemical, physical, and operational...

  17. Functional, photochemically active, and chemically asymmetric membranes by interfacial polymerization of derivatized multifunctional prepolymers

    DOEpatents

    Lonsdale, Harold K.; Wamser, Carl C.

    1988-01-01

    The preparation of a novel class of thin film membranes by interfacial polymerization is disclosed, said membanes incorporating as part of their polymeric structure the functionality of monomeric or oligomeric precursors. Specific embodiments include porphyrin and phthalocyanime derivatives that are photochemically or electrochemically active, as well as chemically asymmetric membranes.

  18. Functional, photochemically active, and chemically asymmetric membranes by interfacial polymerization of derivatized multifunctional prepolymers

    DOEpatents

    Lonsdale, H.K.; Wamser, C.C.

    1990-04-17

    The preparation of a novel class of thin film membranes by interfacial polymerization is disclosed, said membranes incorporating as part of their polymeric structure the functionality of monomeric or oligomeric precursors. Specific embodiments include porphyrin and phthalocyanine derivatives that are photochemically or electrochemically active, as well as chemically asymmetric membranes.

  19. Functional, photochemically active, and chemically asymmetric membranes by interfacial polymerization of derivatized multifunctional prepolymers

    DOEpatents

    Lonsdale, Harold K.; Wamser, Carl C.

    1990-01-01

    The preparation of a novel class of thin film membranes by interfacial polymerization is disclosed, said membranes incorporating as part of their polymeric structure the functionality of monomeric or oligomeric precursors. Specific embodiments include porphyrin and phthalocyanine derivatives that are photochemically or electrochemically active, as well as chemically asymmetric membranes.

  20. EFFECT OF WATER POLLUTANTS AND OTHER CHEMICALS UPON THE ACTIVITY OF LIPASE 'IN VITRO'

    EPA Science Inventory

    Lipase preparations were treated in vitro with 100 chemicals of various classes, many of which are environmental pollutants, to determine their effect upon enzyme activity. The greatest inhibition was caused by mercuric ion and certain heavy metal cations; almost as inhibiting we...

  1. Phoenix dactylifera L. spathe essential oil: Chemical composition and repellent activity against the yellow fever mosquito

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Date palm, Phoenix dactylifera L. (Arecaceae), grows commonly in the Arabian Peninsula and is traditionally used to treat various diseases. The aim of the present study was to identify chemical composition of the essential oil and to investigate the repellent activity. The essential oil of P. dacty...

  2. Application of Protein Expression Profiling to Screen Chemicals for Androgenic Activity.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Protein expression changes can be used for detection of biomarkers that can be applied diagnostically to screen chemicals for endocrine modifying activity. In this study, Surface Enhanced Laser Desorption/Ionization Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (SELDI-TOF-MS) coupled with a s...

  3. FIRST TRIALS OF CHEMICALLY ACTIVE FLUIDIZED-BED (CAFB) PILOT PLANT ON COAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a minirun, carried out on a 0.75-MWe continuous, chemically active fluidized-bed (CAFB) pilot plant during July-August 1976, as part of a program to extend the CAFB process to operate on coal. After 8.5 hours of gasification on Texas lignite and Illino...

  4. Lantana montevidensis Essential Oil: Chemical Composition and Mosquito Repellent Activity against Aedes aegypti

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The essential oil (EO) of Lantana montevidensis (Spreng.) Briq. (L. sellowiana Link & Otto) was investigated for its chemical composition and mosquito repellent activity. The essential oil obtained by hydrodistillation of aerial plant parts was analyzed by GC-FID and GC-MS. The major constituents we...

  5. CHEMICALLY ACTIVE FLUID BED PROCESS FOR SULPHUR REMOVAL DURING GASIFICATION OF CARBONACEOUS FUELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report covers the final 3 years of a 9-year program to evaluate the Chemically Active Fluid Bed (CAFB) process for gasification and desulfurization of liquid and solid fuels in a fluidized bed of hot lime. A range of alternative fuels, including three coals and a lignite, wer...

  6. Endocrine active chemicals and endocrine disruption in Minnesota streams and lakes: implications for aquatic resources, 1994-2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, Kathy E.; Schoenfuss, Heiko L.; Barber, Larry B.; Writer, Jeff H.; Blazer, Vicki; Keisling, Richard L.; Ferrey, Mark L.

    2010-01-01

    Although these studies indicate that wastewater-treatment plant effluent is a conduit for endocrine active chemicals to surface waters, endocrine active chemicals also were present in surface waters with no obvious wastewater-treatment plant effluent sources. Endocrine active chemicals were detected and indicators of endocrine disruption in fish were measured at numerous sites upstream from discharge of wastewater-treatment plant effluent. These observations indicate that other unidentified sources of endocrine active chemicals exist, such as runoff from land surfaces, atmospheric deposition, inputs from onsite septic systems, or other groundwater sources. Alternatively, some endocrine active chemicals may not yet have been identified or measured. The presence of biological indicators of endocrine disruption in male fish indicates that the fish are exposed to endocrine active chemicals. However indicators of endocrine disruption in male fish does not indicate an effect on fish reproduction or changes in fish populations.

  7. Single DNA molecule stretching measures the activity of chemicals that target the HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein

    PubMed Central

    Cruceanu, Margareta; Stephen, Andrew G.; Beuning, Penny J.; Gorelick, Robert J.; Fisher, Robert J.; Williams, Mark C.

    2006-01-01

    We develop a biophysical method for investigating chemical compounds that target the nucleic acid chaperone activity of HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein (NCp7). We used an optical tweezers instrument to stretch single λ-DNA molecules through the helix-to-coil transition in the presence of NCp7 and various chemical compounds. The change in the helix-coil transition width induced by wild-type NCp7 and its zinc finger variants correlates with in vitro nucleic acid chaperone activity measurements and in vivo assays. The compound-NC interaction measured here reduces NCp7’s capability to alter the transition width. Purified compounds from the NCI Diversity set, 119889, 119911, and 119913 reduce the chaperone activity of 5 nM NC in aqueous solution at 10 nM, 25 nM, and 100 nM concentration, respectively. Similarly, gallein reduced the activity of 4 nM NC at 100 nM concentration. Further analysis allows us to dissect the impact of each compound on both sequence-specific and non-sequence-specific DNA binding of NC, two of the main components of NC’s nucleic acid chaperone activity. These results suggest that DNA stretching experiments can be used to screen chemical compounds targeting NC proteins, and to further explore the mechanisms by which these compounds interact with NC and alter its nucleic acid chaperone activity. PMID:17034752

  8. Legal requirements and guidelines for the control of harmful laser generated particles, vapours and gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horsey, John

    2015-07-01

    This paper is a review of the Health and Safety laws and guidelines relating to laser generated emissions into the workplace and outside environment with emphasis on the differences between legal requirements and guideline advice. The types and nature of contaminants released by various laser processes (i.e. cutting, coding, engraving, marking etc) are discussed, together with the best methods for controlling them to within legal exposure limits. A brief description of the main extract air filtration techniques, including the principles of particulate removal and the action of activated carbon for gas/vapour/odour filtration, is given.

  9. Evaluating the vapour shift concept in agriculture: some aspects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, S.; Metselaar, K.; van Dam, J. C.; Klik, A.

    2009-04-01

    Human population growth leads to an increasing pressure on freshwater resources. By 2050 Falkenmark et al. (2004) estimate a global water deficit for crop production of 5800 km3.y-1. This has important consequences for management of fresh water resources at different scales, and new strategies at different scales are required. One of the strategies suggested is that of managing crops in such a way that the use of rainfall and irrigation is shifted as much as possible from evaporation towards transpiration, a so-called vapour shift. The suggested savings are in the order of 330 km3.y-1, and are based on estimates of the magnitude of three processes: Reducing early season evaporation; increasing canopy cover; and increasing yield levels. The vapour shift concept was evaluated empirically, and in a simulation study. The empirical evaluation using results for wheat, maize, millet, cotton, and barley suggests the estimate of potential savings is 37% lower than the estimate by Falkenmark et al. (2004). The uncertainty is large and due to the limited number of experiments in which a separation of evapotranspiration in evaporation and transpiration has been made over the entire growing season. This suggests that theoretical support for the vapour shift concept should become more important. In the simulation approach two management options, mulching and planting density, are evaluated for a site in India for an irrigated wheat crop using a simulation approach for water limited crop yield. Given the simulation model used, and the management options investigated, the assumption implicit in the vapour shift concept - decreasing evaporation with increasing yield level - does not hold in irrigated areas, or in areas in which water is the most limiting factor. This suggests that vapour shift will be largest in those areas where nutrients and pests- and diseases are still limiting or reducing crop yields, and measures are taken to reduce those limitations.

  10. Active chlorine and nitric oxide formation from chemical rocket plume afterburning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leone, D. M.; Turns, S. R.

    1994-01-01

    Chlorine and oxides of nitrogen (NO(x)) released into the atmosphere contribute to acid rain (ground level or low-altitude sources) and ozone depletion from the stratosphere (high-altitude sources). Rocket engines have the potential for forming or activating these pollutants in the rocket plume. For instance, H2/O2 rockets can produce thermal NO(x) in their plumes. Emphasis, in the past, has been placed on determining the impact of chlorine release on the stratosphere. To date, very little, if any, information is available to understand what contribution NO(x) emissions from ground-based engine testing and actual rocket launches have on the atmosphere. The goal of this work is to estimate the afterburning emissions from chemical rocket plumes and determine their local stratospheric impact. Our study focuses on the space shuttle rocket motors, which include both the solid rocket boosters (SRB's) and the liquid propellant main engines (SSME's). Rocket plume afterburning is modeled employing a one-dimensional model incorporating two chemical kinetic systems: chemical and thermal equilibria with overlayed nitric oxide chemical kinetics (semi equilibrium) and full finite-rate chemical kinetics. Additionally, the local atmospheric impact immediately following a launch is modeled as the emissions diffuse and chemically react in the stratosphere.

  11. The expert system for toxicity prediction of chemicals based on structure-activity relationship.

    PubMed Central

    Nakadate, M; Hayashi, M; Sofuni, T; Kamata, E; Aida, Y; Osada, T; Ishibe, T; Sakamura, Y; Ishidate, M

    1991-01-01

    The prediction systems of chemical toxicity has been developed by means of structure-activity relationship based on the computerized fact database (BL-DB). Numbers and ratio of elements, side chains, bonding, position, and microenvironment of side chains were used as structural factors of the chemical for the prediction. Such information was obtained from the BL-DB database by Wiswesser line-formula chemical notation. In the present study, the Salmonella/microsome assay was chosen as indicative of the target toxicity of chemicals. A set of chemicals specified with mutagenicity data was retrieved, and necessary information was extracted and transferred to the working file. Rules of the relations between characteristics of chemical structure and the assay result are extracted as parameters for rules by experts on the rearranged data set. These were analyzed statistically by the discriminant analysis and the prediction with the rules were evaluated by the elimination method. Eight kinds of rules to predict Salmonella/microsome assay were constructed, and currently results of the assay on aliphatic and heterocyclic compounds can be predicted as accurately as +90%. PMID:1820282

  12. Active chlorine and nitric oxide formation from chemical rocket plume afterburning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leone, D. M.; Turns, S. R.

    Chlorine and oxides of nitrogen (NO(x)) released into the atmosphere contribute to acid rain (ground level or low-altitude sources) and ozone depletion from the stratosphere (high-altitude sources). Rocket engines have the potential for forming or activating these pollutants in the rocket plume. For instance, H2/O2 rockets can produce thermal NO(x) in their plumes. Emphasis, in the past, has been placed on determining the impact of chlorine release on the stratosphere. To date, very little, if any, information is available to understand what contribution NO(x) emissions from ground-based engine testing and actual rocket launches have on the atmosphere. The goal of this work is to estimate the afterburning emissions from chemical rocket plumes and determine their local stratospheric impact. Our study focuses on the space shuttle rocket motors, which include both the solid rocket boosters (SRB's) and the liquid propellant main engines (SSME's). Rocket plume afterburning is modeled employing a one-dimensional model incorporating two chemical kinetic systems: chemical and thermal equilibria with overlayed nitric oxide chemical kinetics (semi equilibrium) and full finite-rate chemical kinetics. Additionally, the local atmospheric impact immediately following a launch is modeled as the emissions diffuse and chemically react in the stratosphere.

  13. Water vapour is a pre-oviposition attractant for the malaria vector Anopheles gambiae sensu stricto

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background To date no semiochemicals affecting the pre-oviposition behaviour of the malaria vector Anopheles gambiae sensu lato have been described. Water vapour must be the major chemical signal emanating from a potential larval habitat, and although one might expect that gravid An. gambiae s.l. detect and respond to water vapour in their search for an aquatic habitat, this has never been experimentally confirmed for this species. This study aimed to investigate the role of relative humidity or water vapour as a general cue for inducing gravid An. gambiae sensu stricto to make orientated movements towards the source. Methods Three experiments were carried out with insectary-reared An. gambiae s.s. One with unfed females and two with gravid females during their peak oviposition time in the early evening. First, unfed females and gravid females were tested separately in still air where a humidity difference was established between opposite ends of a WHO bioassay tube and mosquitoes released individually in the centre of the tube. Movement of mosquitoes to either low or high humidity was recorded. Additionally, gravid mosquitoes were released into a larger air-flow olfactometer and responses measured towards collection chambers that contained cups filled with water or empty cups. Results Unfed females equally dispersed in the small bioassay tubes to areas of high and low humidity (mean 50% (95% confidence interval (CI) 38-62%). In contrast, gravid females were 2.4 times (95% CI 1.3-4.7) more likely to move towards high humidity than unfed females. The results were even more pronounced in the airflow olfactometer. Gravid females were 10.6 times (95% CI 5.4-20.8) more likely to enter the chamber with water than a dry chamber. Conclusions Water vapour is a strong pre-oviposition attractant to gravid An. gambiae s.s. in still and moving air and is likely to be a general cue used by mosquitoes for locating aquatic habitats. PMID:24120083

  14. Enhanced water vapour flow in silica microchannels and interdiffusive water vapour flow through anodic aluminium oxide (AAO) membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Wenwen; McKenzie, David R.

    2015-12-01

    Enhanced liquid water flows through carbon nanotubes reinvigorated the study of moisture permeation through membranes and micro- and nano-channels. The study of water vapour through micro-and nano-channels has been neglected even though water vapour is as important as liquid water for industry, especially for encapsulation of electronic devices. Here we measure moisture flow rates in silica microchannels and interdiffusive water vapour flows in anodic aluminium oxide (AAO) membrane channels for the first time. We construct theory for the flow rates of the dominant modes of water transport through four previously defined standard configurations and benchmark it against our new measurements. The findings show that measurements of leak behaviour made using other molecules, such as helium, are not reliable. Single phase water vapour flow is overestimated by a helium measurement, while Washburn or capillary flow is underestimated or for all channels when boundary slip applies, to an extent that depends on the slip length for the liquid phase flows.

  15. GABA-A receptor antagonists increase firing, bursting and synchrony of spontaneous activity in neuronal networks grown on microelectrode arrays: a step towards chemical "fingerprinting"

    EPA Science Inventory

    Assessment of effects on spontaneous network activity in neurons grown on MEAs is a proposed method to screen chemicals for potential neurotoxicity. In addition, differential effects on network activity (chemical "fingerprints") could be used to classify chemical modes of action....

  16. Removal of endocrine-disrupting chemicals in activated sludge treatment works.

    PubMed

    Johnson, A C; Sumpter, J P

    2001-12-15

    The release of endocrine-disrupting chemicals into the aquatic environment has raised the awareness of the central role played by sewage treatment in lowland water quality. This review focuses on the activated sludge process, which is commonly used to treat sewage in large towns and cities and which successfully removes the bulk of the organic compounds that enter the works. However, not all compounds are completely broken down or converted to biomass. For example, the estrogenic alkylphenols and steroid estrogens found in effluent are the breakdown products of incomplete breakdown of their respective parent compounds. Batch microcosm studies have indicated that estrone, ethinylestradiol, and alkylphenols will not be completely eliminated in activated sludge over typical treatment times. Field data suggest that the activated sludge treatment process can consistently remove over 85% of estradiol, estriol, and ethinylestradiol. The removal performance for estrone appears to be less and is more variable. Because of its relatively high hydrophobicity, the accumulation of alkylphenol in sludge has been observed. Although it has not been examined, accumulation of ethinylestradiol in sludge is a possibility due to its recalcitrance and hydrophobicity. A comparison between the concentrations of some of the major endocrine-active chemicals in effluents and their biological potencies has been made, to direct attention to the chemicals of most concern. While water purification techniques such as UV or activated charcoal could significantly remove these microorganic contaminants, the high costs involved suggest that research into the potential for treatment optimization should receive more attention. PMID:11775141

  17. Chemical composition and antibacterial activity of Opuntia ficus-indica f. inermis (cactus pear) flowers.

    PubMed

    Ennouri, Monia; Ammar, Imene; Khemakhem, Bassem; Attia, Hamadi

    2014-08-01

    Opuntia ficus-indica f. inermis (cactus pear) flowers have wide application in folk medicine. However, there are few reports focusing on their biological activity and were no reports on their chemical composition. The nutrient composition and hexane extracts of Opuntia flowers at 4 flowering stages and their antibacterial and antifungal activities were investigated. The chemical composition showed considerable amounts of fiber, protein, and minerals. Potassium (K) was the predominant mineral followed by calcium (Ca), magnesium (Mg), sodium (Na), iron (Fe), and zinc (Zn). The main compounds in the various hexane extracts were 9.12-octadecadienoic acid (29-44%) and hexadecanoic acid (8.6-32%). The antibacterial activity tests showed that O. inermis hexane extracts have high effectiveness against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus, making this botanical source a potential contender as a food preservative or food control additive. PMID:24650181

  18. Aerobic Damage to [FeFe]-Hydrogenases: Activation Barriers for the Chemical Attachment of O2**

    PubMed Central

    Kubas, Adam; De Sancho, David; Best, Robert B; Blumberger, Jochen

    2014-01-01

    [FeFe]-hydrogenases are the best natural hydrogen-producing enzymes but their biotechnological exploitation is hampered by their extreme oxygen sensitivity. The free energy profile for the chemical attachment of O2 to the enzyme active site was investigated by using a range-separated density functional re-parametrized to reproduce high-level ab initio data. An activation free-energy barrier of 13 kcal mol−1 was obtained for chemical bond formation between the di-iron active site and O2, a value in good agreement with experimental inactivation rates. The oxygen binding can be viewed as an inner-sphere electron-transfer process that is strongly influenced by Coulombic interactions with the proximal cubane cluster and the protein environment. The implications of these results for future mutation studies with the aim of increasing the oxygen tolerance of this enzyme are discussed. PMID:24615978

  19. LASERS: Efficient chemical oxygen — iodine laser with a high total pressure of the active medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zagidullin, M. V.; Nikolaev, V. D.; Svistun, M. I.; Khvatov, N. A.; Heiger, G. D.; Madden, T. J.

    2001-01-01

    A new concept of obtaining a high total pressure of the active medium of a chemical oxygen — iodine laser (OIL) is proposed and verified. The nozzle unit of the laser consists of the alternating vertical arrays of cylindrical nozzles to produce high-pressure nitrogen jets, plane slotted nozzles for the flow of O2(1Δ) oxygen, and vertical arrays of cylindrical nozzles to inject the N2 — I2 mixture between the first two streams. For a molar chlorine flow rate of 39.2 mmol s-1, the output power was 700 W and the chemical efficiency was 19.7 %. The combined use of the ejector nozzle unit proposed to obtain the active medium and a super-sonic diffuser allows a significant simplification of the ejection system for the exhaust active medium of the OIL.

  20. Spatiotemporal regulation of chemical reaction kinetics of cell surface molecules by active remodeling of cortical actin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharyya, Bhaswati; Chaudhuri, Abhishek; Gowrishankar, Kripa; Mayor, Satyajit; Rao, Madan

    2010-03-01

    Cell surface proteins such as lipid tethered GPI-anchored proteins and Ras-proteins are distributed as monomers and nanoclusters on the surface of living cells. Recent work from our laboratory suggests that the spatial distribution and dynamics of formation and breakup of these nanoclusters is controlled by the active remodeling dynamics of the underlying cortical actin. To explain these observations, we propose a novel mechanism of nanoclustering, involving the transient binding to and advection along constitutively occuring ``asters'' of cortical actin. Here we study the consequences of such active actin based clustering, in the context of chemical reactions involving conformational changes of cell surface proteins. We find that active remodeling of cortical actin, can give rise to a dramatic increase in the reaction efficiency and output levels. In general, such actin driven clustering of membrane proteins could be a cellular mechanism to spatiotemporally regulate and amplify local chemical reaction rates, in the context of signalling and endocytosis.

  1. Evaluation of mycobactericidal activity of selected chemical disinfectants and antiseptics according to European standards

    PubMed Central

    Bocian, Ewa; Grzybowska, Wanda; Tyski, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Background The history of the investigation of standardized mycobactericidal activity of disinfectants and antiseptics is not very long. There is growing interest among the manufacturers of disinfectants in carrying out research on the antimicrobial activities in accordance with European standards (EN). This research could facilitate the introduction of high-quality disinfectants to the market. The aim of this study was to evaluate the mycobactericidal activity of selected chemical disinfectants and antiseptics used in the medical and veterinary fields. Material/Methods This study included 19 products submitted to the National Medicines Institute in Poland for evaluation of mycobactericidal activity. These products contain in their composition active substances belonging to different chemical groups, including aldehydes, alcohols, amines, quaternary ammonium compounds, phenols, guanidine, and oxidizing compounds. This study, conducted according to the manufacturers’ description of the preparations, was carried out in accordance with European standards, which also met the Polish standards: PN-EN 14204: 2013, PN-EN 14348: 2006, and PN-EN 14563: 2012. Results Tested products for disinfection and antiseptics containing active substances from different chemical groups showed high mycobactericidal activity and met the requirements of the appropriate European standards in most cases. In the case of products containing guanidine and amine compounds, the concentration of active ingredients used in the test and the test conditions specified by the manufacturer did not provide the mycobactericidal activity required by the standards. Conclusions Prior to the launch of a new product on the market, it is important to establish the appropriate usage and testing conditions of the preparation, such as its practical concentration, contact time, and environment condition (clean or dirty). PMID:24755666

  2. Chemical Modulation of the Biological Activity of Reutericyclin: a Membrane-Active Antibiotic from Lactobacillus reuteri

    PubMed Central

    Cherian, Philip T.; Wu, Xiaoqian; Maddox, Marcus M.; Singh, Aman P.; Lee, Richard E.; Hurdle, Julian G.

    2014-01-01

    Whilst the development of membrane-active antibiotics is now an attractive therapeutic concept, progress in this area is disadvantaged by poor knowledge of the structure-activity relationship (SAR) required for optimizing molecules to selectively target bacteria. This prompted us to explore the SAR of the Lactobacillus reuteri membrane-active antibiotic reutericyclin, modifying three key positions about its tetramic acid core. The SAR revealed that lipophilic analogs were generally more active against Gram-positive pathogens, but introduction of polar and charged substituents diminished their activity. This was confirmed by cytometric assays showing that inactive compounds failed to dissipate the membrane potential. Radiolabeled substrate assays indicated that dissipation of the membrane potential by active reutericyclins correlated with inhibition of macromolecular synthesis in cells. However, compounds with good antibacterial activities also showed cytotoxicity against Vero cells and hemolytic activity. Although this study highlights the challenge of optimizing membrane-active antibiotics, it shows that by increasing antibacterial potency the selectivity index could be widened, allowing use of lower non-cytotoxic doses. PMID:24739957

  3. Influence of Copper Nanoparticles on the Physical-Chemical Properties of Activated Sludge

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hong; Zheng, Xiong; Chen, Yinguang; Li, Mu; Liu, Kun; Li, Xiang

    2014-01-01

    The physical-chemical properties of activated sludge, such as flocculating ability, hydrophobicity, surface charge, settleability, dewaterability and bacteria extracellular polymer substances (EPS), play vital roles in the normal operation of wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). The nanoparticles released from commercial products will enter WWTPs and can induce potential adverse effects on activated sludge. This paper focused on the effects of copper nanoparticles (CuNPs) on these specific physical-chemical properties of activated sludge. It was found that most of these properties were unaffected by the exposure to lower CuNPs concentration (5 ppm), but different observation were made at higher CuNPs concentrations (30 and 50 ppm). At the higher CuNPs concentrations, the sludge surface charge increased and the hydrophobicity decreased, which were attributed to more Cu2+ ions released from the CuNPs. The carbohydrate content of EPS was enhanced to defense the toxicity of CuNPs. The flocculating ability was found to be deteriorated due to the increased cell surface charge, the decreased hydrophobicity, and the damaged cell membrane. The worsened flocculating ability made the sludge flocs more dispersed, which further increased the toxicity of the CuNPs by increasing the availability of the CuNPs to the bacteria present in the sludge. Further investigation indicated that the phosphorus removal efficiency decreased at higher CuNPs concentrations, which was consistent with the deteriorated physical-chemical properties of activated sludge. It seems that the physical-chemical properties can be used as an indicator for determining CuNPs toxicity to the bacteria in activated sludge. This work is important because bacteria toxicity effects to the activated sludge caused by nanoparticles may lead to the deteriorated treatment efficiency of wastewater treatment, and it is therefore necessary to find an easy way to indicate this toxicity. PMID:24663333

  4. Determination of Chemical States of Mercury on Activated Carbon Using XANES

    SciTech Connect

    Takaoka, Masaki; Takeda, Nobuo; Oshita, Kazuyuki; Yamamoto, Takashi; Tanaka, Tsunehiro; Uruga, Tomoya

    2007-02-02

    Although the adsorption of mercury vapor onto activated carbon is a widely used technology to prevent environmental release, the adsorption mechanism is not clearly understood. In this study, we determined the chemical states of mercury on two kinds of activated carbon using X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) to elucidate the adsorption mechanism. The adsorption experiments of elemental mercury onto activated carbon were conducted under air and nitrogen atmospheres at temperatures of 20 and 160 deg. C. Two types of activated carbon were prepared. X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) measurements were carried out on beamline BL01B1 at SPring-8. Hg-LIII edge XANES spectra suggested that chemical adsorption of elemental mercury on the activated carbon occurred in the 20-160 deg. C temperature range. According to the XANES spectra, a difference occurred in the chemical states of mercury between AC no. 1 and AC no. 2. The Hg XANES spectra on AC no. 1 were similar to those of Hg2Cl2 and HgS, and the Hg XANES spectra on AC no. 2 were similar to that of HgO, which suggested that nitric acid treatment removed sulfur from AC no. 1 and functional groups that were strong oxidizers on the surface of AC no. 2 created HgO. According to the EXAFS oscillation, a difference occurred in the chemical states of mercury on AC no. 1 between 20 and 160 deg. C. We found that impurities and oxidant functional groups on activated carbon play key roles in mercury adsorption.

  5. Estrogenic activity assessment of environmental chemicals using in vitro assays: identification of two new estrogenic compounds.

    PubMed Central

    Lascombe, I; Beffa, D; Rüegg, U; Tarradellas, J; Wahli, W

    2000-01-01

    Environmental chemicals with estrogenic activities have been suggested to be associated with deleterious effects in animals and humans. To characterize estrogenic chemicals and their mechanisms of action, we established in vitro and cell culture assays that detect human estrogen receptor [alpha] (hER[alpha])-mediated estrogenicity. First, we assayed chemicals to determine their ability to modulate direct interaction between the hER[alpha] and the steroid receptor coactivator-1 (SRC-1) and in a competition binding assay to displace 17ss-estradiol (E(2)). Second, we tested the chemicals for estrogen-associated transcriptional activity in the yeast estrogen screen and in the estrogen-responsive MCF-7 human breast cancer cell line. The chemicals investigated in this study were o,p'-DDT (racemic mixture and enantiomers), nonylphenol mixture (NPm), and two poorly analyzed compounds in the environment, namely, tris-4-(chlorophenyl)methane (Tris-H) and tris-4-(chlorophenyl)methanol (Tris-OH). In both yeast and MCF-7 cells, we determined estrogenic activity via the estrogen receptor (ER) for o,p'-DDT, NPm, and for the very first time, Tris-H and Tris-OH. However, unlike estrogens, none of these xenobiotics seemed to be able to induce ER/SRC-1 interactions, most likely because the conformation of the activated receptor would not allow direct contacts with this coactivator. However, these compounds were able to inhibit [(3)H]-E(2) binding to hER, which reveals a direct interaction with the receptor. In conclusion, the test compounds are estrogen mimics, but their molecular mechanism of action appears to be different from that of the natural hormone as revealed by the receptor/coactivator interaction analysis. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 PMID:10903615

  6. [Progress in study of chemical constituents and anti-tumor activities of Cnidium monnieri].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ze-wei; Liu, Pei-xun

    2005-09-01

    The main pharmacological constituents of Chinese traditional medicine herb Cnidium monnieri are coumarin compounds and volatile oil. In addition, it contains monoterpene polyols, glucides, as well as recently discovered sesquiterpene components. In recent years, rather active investigations of its anti-tumor were performed at home and abroad. C. monnieri possesses multi-aspect and comprehensive anti-tumor functions, involving directly tumor-inhibitory activity, anti-mutagenicity, reversing multi-drug tolerance of tumor, as well as improving immune functions and so on. In this review, chemical constituents, anti-tumor activities and relevant investigations of Fructus Cnidii were summarized recent decade. PMID:16323535

  7. Coupling of physical erosion and chemical weathering after phases of intense human activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoonejans, Jerome; Vanacker, Veerle; Opfergelt, Sophie; Ameijeiras-Mariño, Yolanda; Kubik, Peter W.

    2014-05-01

    with long-term 10Be derived denudation rates, and tectonic uplift rates. Our data do not provide direct evidence of an imbalance between soil production and chemical weathering, despite more than 2000 years of intense human activity.

  8. Nonperfect mixing affects synchronization on a large number of chemical oscillators immersed in a chemically active time-dependent chaotic flow.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Muñuzuri, V; Garaboa-Paz, D; Muñuzuri, A P

    2016-07-01

    The problem of synchronization of finite-size chemical oscillators described by active inertial particles is addressed for situations in which they are immersed in a reacting nonstationary chaotic flow. Active substances in the fluid will be modeled by Lagrangian particles closely following the fluid streamlines. Their interaction with the active inertial particles as well as the properties of the fluid dynamics will result in modifying the synchronization state of the chemical oscillators. This behavior is studied in terms of the exchange rate between the Lagrangian and inertial particles, and the finite-time Lyapunov exponents characterizing the flow. The coherence of the population of oscillators is determined by means of the order parameter introduced by Kuramoto. The different dynamics observed for the inertial particles (chemical oscillators) and Lagrangian particles (describing chemicals in the flow) lead to nonlinear interactions and patches of synchronized regions within the domain. PMID:27575213

  9. Nonperfect mixing affects synchronization on a large number of chemical oscillators immersed in a chemically active time-dependent chaotic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Muñuzuri, V.; Garaboa-Paz, D.; Muñuzuri, A. P.

    2016-07-01

    The problem of synchronization of finite-size chemical oscillators described by active inertial particles is addressed for situations in which they are immersed in a reacting nonstationary chaotic flow. Active substances in the fluid will be modeled by Lagrangian particles closely following the fluid streamlines. Their interaction with the active inertial particles as well as the properties of the fluid dynamics will result in modifying the synchronization state of the chemical oscillators. This behavior is studied in terms of the exchange rate between the Lagrangian and inertial particles, and the finite-time Lyapunov exponents characterizing the flow. The coherence of the population of oscillators is determined by means of the order parameter introduced by Kuramoto. The different dynamics observed for the inertial particles (chemical oscillators) and Lagrangian particles (describing chemicals in the flow) lead to nonlinear interactions and patches of synchronized regions within the domain.

  10. Activated Carbons From Grape Seeds By Chemical Activation With Potassium Carbonate And Potassium Hydroxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okman, Irem; Karagöz, Selhan; Tay, Turgay; Erdem, Murat

    2014-02-01

    Activated carbons were produced from grape seed using either potassium carbonate (K2CO3) or potassium hydroxide (KOH). The carbonization experiments were accomplished at 600 and 800 °C. The effects of the experimental conditions (i.e., type of activation reagents, reagent concentrations, and carbonization temperatures) on the yields and the properties of these activated carbons were analyzed under identical conditions. An increase in the temperature at the same concentrations for both K2CO3 and KOH led to a decrease in the yields of the activated carbons. The lowest activated carbon yields were obtained at 800 °C at the highest reagent concentration (100 wt%) for both K2CO3 and KOH. The activated carbon with the highest surface area of 1238 m2g-1 was obtained at 800 °C in K2CO3 concentration of 50 wt% while KOH produced the activated carbon with the highest surface area of 1222 m2g-1 in a concentration of 25wt% at 800 °C. The obtained activated carbons were mainly microporous.

  11. Chemical modification and antioxidant activities of polysaccharide from mushroom Inonotus obliquus.

    PubMed

    Ma, Lishuai; Chen, Haixia; Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Ning; Fu, Lingling

    2012-06-20

    Chemical modification polysaccharides exerted potent biological property which was related to the physicochemical properties. In the present study, polysaccharides from Inonotus obliquus were modified by suflation, acetylation and carboxymethylation. The physicochemical and antioxidant properties of I. obliquus polysaccharide (IOPS) and its derivatives were comparatively investigated by chemical methods, gas chromatography, size exclusion chromatography, scanning electron micrograph, infrared spectra and circular dichroism spectra, and ferric reducing power assay and lipid peroxidation inhibition assay, respectively. Results showed that physicochemical and antioxidant properties of IOPS were differed each other after the chemical modification of suflation, acetylation and carboxymethylation. Among the three derivatives, acetylationed polysaccharide (Ac-IOPS) resulted in lower molecular weight distribution, lower intrinsic viscosity, a hyperbranched conformation, higher antioxidant abilities on ferric-reducing power and lipid peroxidation inhibition activity compared with the native polysaccharide IOPS. Ac-IOPS might be explored as a novel potential antioxidant for human consumption. PMID:24750732

  12. Effect of mechanical activation on structure changes and reactivity in further chemical modification of lignin.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiaohong; Zhang, Yanjuan; Hu, Huayu; Huang, Zuqiang; Yang, Mei; Chen, Dong; Huang, Kai; Huang, Aimin; Qin, Xingzhen; Feng, Zhenfei

    2016-10-01

    Lignin was treated by mechanical activation (MA) in a customized stirring ball mill, and the structure and reactivity in further esterification were studied. The chemical structure and morphology of MA-treated lignin and the esterified products were analyzed by chemical analysis combined with UV/vis spectrometer, FTIR,NMR, SEM and particle size analyzer. The results showed that MA contributed to the increase of aliphatic hydroxyl, phenolic hydroxyl, carbonyl and carboxyl groups but the decrease of methoxyl groups. Moreover, MA led to the decrease of particle size and the increase of specific surface area and roughness of surface in lignin. The reactivity of lignin was enhanced significantly for the increase of hydroxyl content and the improvement of mass transfer in chemical reaction caused by the changes of molecular structure and morphological structure. The process of MA is green and simple, and is an effective method for enhancing the reactivity of lignin. PMID:27344951

  13. Chemical analysis of Greek pollen - Antioxidant, antimicrobial and proteasome activation properties

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Pollen is a bee-product known for its medical properties from ancient times. In our days is increasingly used as health food supplement and especially as a tonic primarily with appeal to the elderly to ameliorate the effects of ageing. In order to evaluate the chemical composition and the biological activity of Greek pollen which has never been studied before, one sample with identified botanical origin from sixteen different common plant taxa of Greece has been evaluated. Results Three different extracts of the studied sample of Greek pollen, have been tested, in whether could induce proteasome activities in human fibroblasts. The water extract was found to induce a highly proteasome activity, showing interesting antioxidant properties. Due to this activity the aqueous extract was further subjected to chemical analysis and seven flavonoids have been isolated and identified by modern spectral means. From the methanolic extract, sugars, lipid acids, phenolic acids and their esters have been also identified, which mainly participate to the biosynthetic pathway of pollen phenolics. The total phenolics were estimated with the Folin-Ciocalteau reagent and the total antioxidant activity was determined by the DPPH method while the extracts and the isolated compounds were also tested for their antimicrobial activity by the dilution technique. Conclusions The Greek pollen is rich in flavonoids and phenolic acids which indicate the observed free radical scavenging activity, the effects of pollen on human fibroblasts and the interesting antimicrobial profile. PMID:21699688

  14. Determining the chemical activity of hydrophobic organic compounds in soil using polymer coated vials

    PubMed Central

    Reichenberg, Fredrik; Smedes, Foppe; Jönsson, Jan-Åke; Mayer, Philipp

    2008-01-01

    Background In soils contaminated by hydrophobic organic compounds, the concentrations are less indicative of potential exposure and distribution than are the associated chemical activities, fugacities and freely dissolved concentrations. The latter can be measured by diffusive sampling into thin layers of polymer, as in, for example, solid phase micro-extraction. Such measurements require equilibrium partitioning of analytes into the polymer while ensuring that the sample is not depleted. We introduce the validation of these requirements based on parallel sampling into polymer layers of different thicknesses. Results Equilibrium sampling devices were made by coating glass vials internally with 3–12 μm thick layers of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). These were filled with slurries of a polluted soil and gently agitated for 5 days. The concentrations of 7 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the PDMS were measured. Validation confirmed fulfilment of the equilibrium sampling requirements and high measurement precision. Finally, chemical activities of the PAHs in the soil were determined from their concentrations and activity coefficients in the PDMS. Conclusion PAHs' thermodynamic activities in a soil test material were determined via a method of uptake into PDMS. This can be used to assess chemical exposure and predict diffusion and partitioning processes. PMID:18460193

  15. Determining chemical activity of (semi)volatile compounds by headspace solid-phase microextraction.

    PubMed

    Legind, Charlotte N; Karlson, Ulrich; Burken, Joel G; Reichenberg, Fredrik; Mayer, Philipp

    2007-04-01

    This research introduces a new analytical methodology for measuring chemical activity of nonpolar (semi)volatile organic compounds in different sample matrices using automated solid-phase microextraction (SPME). The chemical activity of an analyte is known to determine its equilibrium concentration in the SPME fiber coating. On this basis, SPME was utilized for the analytical determination of chemical activity, fugacity, and freely dissolved concentration using these steps: (1) a sample is brought into a vial, (2) the SPME fiber is introduced into the headspace and equilibrated with the sample, (3) the SPME fiber is injected into the GC for thermal desorption and analysis, and (4) the method is calibrated by SPME above partitioning standards in methanol. Model substances were BTEX, naphthalene, and alkanes, which were measured in a variety of sample types: liquid polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), wood, soil, and nonaqueous phase liquid (NAPL). Variable sample types (i.e., matrices) had no influence on sampling kinetics because diffusion through the headspace was rate limiting for the overall sampling process. Sampling time was 30 min, and relative standard deviations were generally below 5% for homogeneous solutions and somewhat higher for soil and NAPL. This type of activity measurement is fast, reliable, almost solvent free, and applicable for mixed-media sampling. PMID:17313185

  16. Effect of amine activators on the properties of chemical cured dental composites.

    PubMed

    Mathew, L; Joseph, R; Krishnan, V K

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the reactivity and the effect of concentration of three tertiary amines upon the mechanical properties of a chemical curing dental composite. Chemical cured composite pastes were prepared by keeping peroxide concentration constant at 1 wt% (by weight of resin mixture) and by varying the amine/peroxide molar ratio from 0.25 to 1.5. Composite samples were prepared for all three amine pastes aged for 1, 15, 30, 45, and 60 d stored at 8, 22, and 37 degrees C. The loss in activity of the tertiary amine with time was measured. Changes in compressive strength, diametral tensile strength, and microhardness were also measured. A sharp decrease in working and setting times corresponding to increased activity was noticed with an increased amine content. The activity was found to vary in the order N,N-dimethyl p-toluidine (DMPT) > 2-(4-dimethylaminophenyl)ethanol (DMAPEA) > N,Ndiethanol p-toluidine (DEPT). DMPT is found to be more temperature sensitive than DMAPEA and DEPT. However, DEPT is found to provide better storage stability out of all three amines tested. Each amine was found to possess optimum concentrations at which the mechanical properties showed maximum values. DEPT is preferred for long-term storage stability in chemical-cured dental composites where aging tends to reduce the activity of the amine. PMID:9067811

  17. Chemical Structure-Biological Activity Models for Pharmacophores’ 3D-Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Putz, Mihai V.; Duda-Seiman, Corina; Duda-Seiman, Daniel; Putz, Ana-Maria; Alexandrescu, Iulia; Mernea, Maria; Avram, Speranta

    2016-01-01

    Within medicinal chemistry nowadays, the so-called pharmaco-dynamics seeks for qualitative (for understanding) and quantitative (for predicting) mechanisms/models by which given chemical structure or series of congeners actively act on biological sites either by focused interaction/therapy or by diffuse/hazardous influence. To this aim, the present review exposes three of the fertile directions in approaching the biological activity by chemical structural causes: the special computing trace of the algebraic structure-activity relationship (SPECTRAL-SAR) offering the full analytical counterpart for multi-variate computational regression, the minimal topological difference (MTD) as the revived precursor for comparative molecular field analyses (CoMFA) and comparative molecular similarity indices analysis (CoMSIA); all of these methods and algorithms were presented, discussed and exemplified on relevant chemical medicinal systems as proton pump inhibitors belonging to the 4-indolyl,2-guanidinothiazole class of derivatives blocking the acid secretion from parietal cells in the stomach, the 1-[(2-hydroxyethoxy)-methyl]-6-(phenylthio)thymine congeners’ (HEPT ligands) antiviral activity against Human Immunodeficiency Virus of first type (HIV-1) and new pharmacophores in treating severe genetic disorders (like depression and psychosis), respectively, all involving 3D pharmacophore interactions. PMID:27399692

  18. Chemical composition and lipoxygenase activity in soybeans (Glycine max L. Merr.) submitted to gamma irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barros, Érica Amanda de; Broetto, Fernando; Bressan, Dayanne F.; Sartori, Maria M. P.; Costa, Vladimir E.

    2014-05-01

    Soybeans are an important food due to their functional and nutritional characteristics. However, consumption by western populations is limited by the astringent taste of soybeans and their derivatives which results from the action of lipoxygenase, an enzyme activated during product processing. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of gamma irradiation on the chemical composition and specific activity of lipoxygenase in different soybean cultivars. Soybeans were stored in plastic bags and irradiated with doses of 2.5, 5 and 10 kGy. The chemical composition (moisture, protein, lipids, ashes, crude fiber, and carbohydrates) and lipoxygenase specific activity were determined for each sample. Gamma irradiation induced a small increase of protein and lipid content in some soybean cultivars, which did not exceed the highest content of 5% and 26%, respectively, when compared to control. Lipoxygenase specific activity decreased in the three cultivars with increasing gamma irradiation dose. In conclusion, the gamma irradiation doses used are suitable to inactivate part of lipoxygenase while not causing expressive changes in the chemical composition of the cultivars studied.

  19. Chemical Structure-Biological Activity Models for Pharmacophores' 3D-Interactions.

    PubMed

    Putz, Mihai V; Duda-Seiman, Corina; Duda-Seiman, Daniel; Putz, Ana-Maria; Alexandrescu, Iulia; Mernea, Maria; Avram, Speranta

    2016-01-01

    Within medicinal chemistry nowadays, the so-called pharmaco-dynamics seeks for qualitative (for understanding) and quantitative (for predicting) mechanisms/models by which given chemical structure or series of congeners actively act on biological sites either by focused interaction/therapy or by diffuse/hazardous influence. To this aim, the present review exposes three of the fertile directions in approaching the biological activity by chemical structural causes: the special computing trace of the algebraic structure-activity relationship (SPECTRAL-SAR) offering the full analytical counterpart for multi-variate computational regression, the minimal topological difference (MTD) as the revived precursor for comparative molecular field analyses (CoMFA) and comparative molecular similarity indices analysis (CoMSIA); all of these methods and algorithms were presented, discussed and exemplified on relevant chemical medicinal systems as proton pump inhibitors belonging to the 4-indolyl,2-guanidinothiazole class of derivatives blocking the acid secretion from parietal cells in the stomach, the 1-[(2-hydroxyethoxy)-methyl]-6-(phenylthio)thymine congeners' (HEPT ligands) antiviral activity against Human Immunodeficiency Virus of first type (HIV-1) and new pharmacophores in treating severe genetic disorders (like depression and psychosis), respectively, all involving 3D pharmacophore interactions. PMID:27399692

  20. [Salt resistance and its mechanism of cucumber under effects of exogenous chemical activators].

    PubMed

    Song, Shiqing; Liu, Wei; Guo, Shirong; Shang, Qingmao; Zhang, Zhigang

    2006-10-01

    With root injection and foliar spray, this paper studied the effects of different concentrations salicylic acid, brassinolide, chitosan and spermidine on the growth, morphogenesis, and physiological and biochemical characters of cucumber ( Cucumis sativus L. ) seedlings under 200 mmol x L(-1) NaCl stress. The results showed that at proper concentrations, these four exogenous chemical activators could markedly decrease the salt stress index and mortality of cucumber seedlings, and the decrement induced by 0. 01 mg x L (-1) brassinolide was the largest, being 63. 0% and 75. 0% , respectively. The activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) , peroxidase (POD) and catalase (CAT) increased significantly, resulting in a marked decrease of malondialdehyde (MDA) content and electrolyte leakage. The dry weight water content and morphogenesis of cucumber seedlings improved, and the stem diameter, leaf number, and healthy index increased significantly. All of these suggested that exogenous chemical activators at proper concentrations could induce the salt resistance of cucumber, and mitigate the damage degree of salt stress. The salt resistance effect of test exogenous chemical activators decreased in the sequence of 0.005 -0.05 mg (L-1) brassinolide, 150 -250 mg x L (-1) spermidine, 100 -200 mg x L(-1) chitosan, and 50 -150 mg x L(-1) salicylic acid. PMID:17209385

  1. Metabolomic Assessment of Induced and Activated Chemical Defence in the Invasive Red Alga Gracilaria vermiculophylla

    PubMed Central

    Nylund, Göran M.; Weinberger, Florian; Rempt, Martin; Pohnert, Georg

    2011-01-01

    In comparison with terrestrial plants the mechanistic knowledge of chemical defences is poor for marine macroalgae. This restricts our understanding in the chemically mediated interactions that take place between algae and other organisms. Technical advances such as metabolomics, however, enable new approaches towards the characterisation of the chemically mediated interactions of organisms with their environment. We address defence responses in the red alga Gracilaria vermiculophylla using mass spectrometry based metabolomics in combination with bioassays. Being invasive in the north Atlantic this alga is likely to possess chemical defences according to the prediction that well-defended exotics are most likely to become successful invaders in systems dominated by generalist grazers, such as marine macroalgal communities. We investigated the effect of intense herbivore feeding and simulated herbivory by mechanical wounding of the algae. Both processes led to similar changes in the metabolic profile. Feeding experiments with the generalist isopod grazer Idotea baltica showed that mechanical wounding caused a significant increase in grazer resistance. Structure elucidation of the metabolites of which some were up-regulated more than 100 times in the wounded tissue, revealed known and novel eicosanoids as major components. Among these were prostaglandins, hydroxylated fatty acids and arachidonic acid derived conjugated lactones. Bioassays with pure metabolites showed that these eicosanoids are part of the innate defence system of macroalgae, similarly to animal systems. In accordance with an induced defence mechanism application of extracts from wounded tissue caused a significant increase in grazer resistance and the up-regulation of other pathways than in the activated defence. Thus, this study suggests that G. vermiculophylla chemically deters herbivory by two lines of defence, a rapid wound-activated process followed by a slower inducible defence. By unravelling

  2. Computational reverse chemical ecology: Virtual screening and predicting behaviorally active semiochemicals for Bactrocera dorsalis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Semiochemical is a generic term used for a chemical substance that influences the behaviour of an organism. It is a common term used in the field of chemical ecology to encompass pheromones, allomones, kairomones, attractants and repellents. Insects have mastered the art of using semiochemicals as communication signals and rely on them to find mates, host or habitat. This dependency of insects on semiochemicals has allowed chemical ecologists to develop environment friendly pest management strategies. However, discovering semiochemicals is a laborious process that involves a plethora of behavioural and analytical techniques, making it expansively time consuming. Recently, reverse chemical ecology approach using odorant binding proteins (OBPs) as target for elucidating behaviourally active compounds is gaining eminence. In this scenario, we describe a “computational reverse chemical ecology” approach for rapid screening of potential semiochemicals. Results We illustrate the high prediction accuracy of our computational method. We screened 25 semiochemicals for their binding potential to a GOBP of B. dorsalis using molecular docking (in silico) and molecular dynamics. Parallely, compounds were subjected to fluorescent quenching assays (Experimental). The correlation between in silico and experimental data were significant (r2 = 0.9408; P < 0.0001). Further, predicted compounds were subjected to behavioral bioassays and were found to be highly attractive to insects. Conclusions The present study provides a unique methodology for rapid screening and predicting behaviorally active semiochemicals. This methodology may be developed as a viable approach for prospecting active semiochemicals for pest control, which otherwise is a laborious process. PMID:24640964

  3. Activation of chemical promutagens by Selenastrum capricornutum in the plant cell/microbe coincubation assay

    SciTech Connect

    Gentile, J.M.; Lippert, M.; Johnson, P.; Shafer, T. )

    1990-05-01

    The critical balance of organisms living in aquatic environments is influenced by the presence and relationship of plants to those environments. However, even though plants occupy a fundamental trophic level within aquatic ecosystems, few studies have focused upon the effect of xenobiotics on aquatic plants, and even fewer studies have dealt with xenobiotic metabolism by aquatic plants. It is well established that plants can metabolize chemicals into mutagens. The impact of these unique plant-activated chemical mutagens on ecosystems, food chains and, ultimately, human health is an important question that will require intensive and integrative investigation. The plant cell/microbe coincubation assay is particularly advantageous for use with unicellular algae. The conditions of this assay are such that chemical metabolism and subsequent mutagen detection can be followed in intact algal cells under simulated field conditions. The purpose of this research was to demonstrate that a unicellular algal species could be used effectively in the plant cell/microbe coincubation assay to activate model chemical mutagens.

  4. Chemical Composition and Antioxidant Activities of Three Polysaccharide Fractions from Pine Cones

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ren-Bo; Yang, Xin; Wang, Jing; Zhao, Hai-Tian; Lu, Wei-Hong; Cui, Jie; Cheng, Cui-Lin; Zou, Pan; Huang, Wei-Wei; Wang, Pu; Li, Wen-Jing; Hu, Xing-Long

    2012-01-01

    The traditional method of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for monosaccharide component analysis with pretreatment of acetylation is described with slight modifications and verified in detail in this paper. It was then successfully applied to the quantitative analysis of component monosaccharides in polysaccharides extracted from the pine cones. The results demonstrated that the three pine cone polysaccharides all consisted of ribose, rhamnose, arabinose, xylose, mannose, glucose and galactose in different molar ratios. According to the recovery experiment, the described method was proved accurate and practical for the analysis of pine cone polysaccharides, meeting the need in the field of chemical analysis of Pinus plants. Furthermore; the chemical characteristics, such as neutral sugar, uronic acids, amino acids, molecular weights, and antioxidant activities of the polysaccharides were investigated by chemical and instrumental methods. The results showed that the chemical compositions of the polysaccharides differed from each other, especially in the content of neutral sugar and uronic acid. In the antioxidant assays, the polysaccharide fractions exhibited effective scavenging activities on ABTS radical and hydroxyl radical, with their antioxidant capabilities decreasing in the order of PKP > PAP > PSP. Therefore, although the polysaccharide fractions had little effect on superoxide radical scavenging, they still have potential to be developed as natural antioxidant agents in functional foods or medicine. PMID:23203063

  5. Chemical aspects of the trapping and recovery of uranium hexafluoride and fluorine during remediation activities

    SciTech Connect

    Del Cul, G.D.; Toth, L.M.

    1996-10-01

    Decontamination and decommission activities related to the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) involve the trapping and recovery of radiolitically generated uranium hexafluoride and fluorine. Although fission product radiolysis was known to generate F{sub 2}, the formation of UF{sub 6} and its transport from the fuel salt was unexpected. Some of these gaseous radiolysis products have been moving through the gas piping to a charcoal bed since the reactor was shut down in 1969. Current and planned remediation and clean-up activities involve the trapping of the gaseous products, deactivation and treatment of the activated charcoal bed, stabilization and reconditioning of the fuel salt, and recovery of the uranium. The chemical aspects of these processes, including radiolytic generation mechanisms, reactions between uranium hexafluoride and fluorine and trapping materials such as activated charcoal, activated alumina, and sodium fluoride, along with the analytical techniques used for the characterization of the materials and process control will be described.

  6. Chemical Composition, Antioxidant, and Antimicrobial Activities of Lichen Umbilicaria cylindrica (L.) Delise (Umbilicariaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Manojlovic, Nedeljko T.; Vasiljevic, Perica J.; Maskovic, Pavle Z.; Juskovic, Marina; Bogdanovic-Dusanovic, Gordana

    2012-01-01

    The phytochemical analysis of methanol and chloroform extracts of Umbilicaria cylindrica was determined by HPLC-UV method. The predominant phenolic compound in both extracts was depsidone, salazinic acid (1). Besides salazinic acid, the tested extracts of U. cylindrica contain norstictic acid (2), methyl-β-orcinol carboxylate (3), ethyl haematommate (4), atranorin (5), and usnic acid (6), in different amounts and relations. The lichen extracts showed comparable and strong antioxidant activity, exhibited higher DPPH and hydroxyl radical scavengings, chelating activity, and inhibitory activity towards lipid peroxidation. The lichen extracts demonstrated important antimicrobial activity against eight strains with MIC values from 15.62 to 62.50 μg/mL. This is the first report of the detail chemical composition and antioxidant activity of the lichen Umbilicaria cylindrica, and the results suggest that this lichen can be used as a new source of the natural antioxidants and the substances with antimicrobial features. PMID:21915186

  7. A new test method for measuring the water vapour permeability of fabrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jianhua; Qian, Xiaoming

    2007-09-01

    The water vapour permeability of textile fabrics is a critical determinant of wearer comfort. Existing test methods are either time consuming or require large amounts of material. A new test apparatus was developed for characterizing the water vapour permeability of fabrics. An aluminium cylinder covered with waterproof and vapour permeable PTFE laminate is used for generating water vapour source on one side of the sample. A dry nitrogen sweep gas stream is used to carry water vapour away. The calculation of the rate of water vapour transmission across the fabric is based on the measurement of the relative humidity of the outgoing nitrogen stream. This new measuring apparatus offers a short test time and calls for a small sample size. The comparison measurements show that the test results correlated well with those obtained from ISO 11092 and ASTM E96. Therefore, this test method provides a new technique to accurately and precisely characterize the water vapour transport properties of fabrics.

  8. Redox activity and chemical interactions of metal oxide nano- and micro-particles with dithiothreitol (DTT).

    PubMed

    Nicolas, Johny; Jaafar, Malek; Sepetdjian, Elizabeth; Saad, Walid; Sioutas, Constantinos; Shihadeh, Alan; Saliba, Najat A

    2015-11-01

    The wide application and production of nanotechnology have increased the interest in studying the toxicity of nano- and micro-sized particles escaping into air from various aspects of the production process. Metal oxides (MOs) are one particular class of particles that exist abundantly in ambient PM. Studies show an emphasis on biological mechanisms by which inhalation exposure to MOs leads to disease. However, different biological assays provide different redox activity rankings making it difficult to assess the contributions of various MOs to measures of aggregate toxicity in multi-pollutant systems such as ambient PM. Therefore, research to evaluate the chemical interaction between these particles and molecules that are relevant to cellular redox activity can help in establishing indicators of reactivity. In particular, this study assesses the redox activity of six MOs mainly emitted from anthropogenic industrial activities using the dithiothreitol (DTT) assay. DTT is commonly used in acellular assays due to its analogous structure to cellular glutathione. The structural and chemical behaviors between active MOs and DTT were elucidated using FTIR, NMR, and BET methods. The results indicate that the health risk (redox activity) associated with MOs is mainly a function of their surface reactivity demonstrated by the ability of the oxidized (S-H) bond in DTT to form a stable bond with the MO surface. PMID:26406549

  9. Chemical Constituents and Antimicrobial Activity of Indian Green Leafy Vegetable Cardiospermum halicacabum.

    PubMed

    Jeyadevi, R; Sivasudha, T; Ilavarasi, A; Thajuddin, N

    2013-06-01

    The present study was carried out to analyze chemical constituents and antibacterial activity of ethanolic leaf extract of Cardiospermum halicacabum (ECH). The FT-IR spectrum confirmed the presence of alcohols, phenols, alkanes, alkynes, aliphatic ester and flavonoids in ECH. The GC-MS analysis revealed that ECH contained about twenty four compounds. The major chemical compounds identified were cyclohexane-1, 4, 5-triol-3-one-1-carboxylic acid, benzene acetic acid, caryophyllene, phytol and neophytadiene. The ECH was screened for its antibacterial activity against different bacterial strains and anti fungal activity against Candida albicans by agar well diffusion and minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) assay. ECH exhibited antibacterial and antifungal activity. All the tested bacterial strains showed MIC values ranging from 80 to 125 μg of extract/ml and C. albicans showed 190 μg of extract/ml as a MIC. The maximum activity ECH was observed against human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus followed by Escherichia coli and the fish pathogen Aeromonas hydrophila. ECH exhibited moderate activity against some of the tested multidrug resistant strains. PMID:24426110

  10. Preparation of porous bio-char and activated carbon from rice husk by leaching ash and chemical activation.

    PubMed

    Ahiduzzaman, Md; Sadrul Islam, A K M

    2016-01-01

    Preparation porous bio-char and activated carbon from rice husk char study has been conducted in this study. Rice husk char contains high amount silica that retards the porousness of bio-char. Porousness of rice husk char could be enhanced by removing the silica from char and applying heat at high temperature. Furthermore, the char is activated by using chemical activation under high temperature. In this study no inert media is used. The study is conducted at low oxygen environment by applying biomass for consuming oxygen inside reactor and double crucible method (one crucible inside another) is applied to prevent intrusion of oxygen into the char. The study results shows that porous carbon is prepared successfully without using any inert media. The adsorption capacity of material increased due to removal of silica and due to the activation with zinc chloride compared to using raw rice husk char. The surface area of porous carbon and activated carbon are found to be 28, 331 and 645 m(2) g(-1) for raw rice husk char, silica removed rice husk char and zinc chloride activated rice husk char, respectively. It is concluded from this study that porous bio-char and activated carbon could be prepared in normal environmental conditions instead of inert media. This study shows a method and possibility of activated carbon from agro-waste, and it could be scaled up for commercial production. PMID:27536531

  11. Catalytic activity of platinum on ruthenium electrodes with modified (electro)chemical states.

    PubMed

    Park, Kyung-Won; Sung, Yung-Eun

    2005-07-21

    Using Pt on Ru thin-film electrodes with various (electro)chemical states designed by the sputtering method, the effect of Ru states on the catalytic activity of Pt was investigated. The chemical and electrochemical properties of Pt/Ru thin-film samples were confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and cyclic voltammetry. In addition, Pt nanoparticles on Ru metal or oxide for an actual fuel cell system showed an effect of Ru states on the catalytic activity of Pt in methanol electrooxidation. Finally, it was concluded that such an enhancement of methanol electrooxidation on the Pt is responsible for Ru metallic and/or oxidation sites compared to pure Pt without any Ru state. PMID:16852701

  12. Chemical Composition and Antibacterial Activity of Essential Oils of Two Species of Lamiaceae against Phytopathogenic Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Gormez, Arzu; Bozari, Sedat; Yanmis, Derya; Gulluce, Medine; Sahin, Fikrettin; Agar, Guleray

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we aimed to determine chemical composition and antibacterial activities of Satureja hortensis and Calamintha nepeta against to 20 phytopathogenic bacteria causing serious crop loss. The essential oils of S. hortensis and C. nepeta were isolated by the hydrodistillation method and the chemical composition of the essential oils were analyzed by GC-MS. The antibacterial properties of the essential oils were evaluated against 20 phytopathogenic bacteria through Disc diffusion assay and micro dilution assay. The results revealed that the essential oils of S. hortensis and C. nepeta have significant antibacterial activity. Furthermore, the findings of the study are valuable for future investigations focusing on the alternative natural compounds to control plant diseases. PMID:26373171

  13. Collisional thulium vapour gas-discharge laser

    SciTech Connect

    Gerasimov, V A; Pavlinskii, A V

    2004-01-31

    A collisional laser on a system of atomic levels based on the principle proposed by Gould is built for the first time. The population of the upper laser level and relaxation of the lower level occur upon inelastic collisions of excited thulium atoms with helium atoms. The lower-level relaxation occurs in a reaction with an energy defect of > 13000 cm{sup -1}. (active media. lasers)

  14. Effect of temperature and relative humidity on the water vapour permeability and mechanical properties of cassava starch and soy protein concentrate based edible films.

    PubMed

    Chinma, C E; Ariahu, C C; Alakali, J S

    2015-04-01

    The effect of temperature and relative humidity on the water vapour permeability (WVP) and mechanical properties of cassava starch and soy protein concentrate (SPC) based edible films containing 20 % glycerol level were studied. Tensile strength and elastic modulus of edible films increased with increase in temperature and decreased with increase in relative humidity, while elongation at break decreased. Water vapour permeability of the films increased (2.6-4.3 g.mm/m(2).day.kPa) with increase in temperature and relative humidity. The temperature dependence of water vapour permeation of cassava starch-soy protein concentrate films followed Arrhenius relationship. Activation energy (Ea) of water vapour permeation of cassava starch-soy protein concentrate edible films ranged from 1.9 to 5.3 kJ/mol (R (2)  ≥ 0.93) and increased with increase in SPC addition. The Ea values were lower for the bio-films than for polyvinylidene chloride, polypropylene and polyethylene which are an indication of low water vapour permeability of the developed biofilms compared to those synthetic films. PMID:25829623

  15. Modelling of evaporation of a dispersed liquid component in a chemically active gas flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kryukov, V. G.; Naumov, V. I.; Kotov, V. Yu.

    1994-01-01

    A model has been developed to investigate evaporation of dispersed liquids in chemically active gas flow. Major efforts have been directed at the development of algorithms for implementing this model. The numerical experiments demonstrate that, in the boundary layer, significant changes in the composition and temperature of combustion products take place. This gives the opportunity to more correctly model energy release processes in combustion chambers of liquid-propellant rocket engines, gas-turbine engines, and other power devices.

  16. Chemical Constituents from the Fruiting Bodies of Hexagonia apiaria and Their Anti-inflammatory Activity.

    PubMed

    Thang, Tran Dinh; Kuo, Ping-Chung; Ngoc, Nguyen Thi Bich; Hwang, Tsong-Long; Yang, Mei-Lin; Ta, Shih-Huang; Lee, E-Jian; Kuo, Dai-Huang; Hung, Nguyen Huy; Tuan, Nguyen Ngoc; Wu, Tian-Shung

    2015-11-25

    A chemical investigation of the fruiting bodies of Hexagonia apiaria resulted in the identification of nine compounds including five new triterpenoids, hexagonins A-E (1-5), along with four known compounds. The purified constituents were examined for their anti-inflammatory activity. Among the tested compounds, hexatenuin A displayed the most significant inhibition of superoxide anion generation and elastase release. These triterpenoids may have potentials as anti-inflammatory agents. PMID:26575215

  17. Chemical techniques for pretreating and regenerating active slag filters for improved phosphorus removal.

    PubMed

    Pratt, C; Shilton, A; Haverkamp, R G; Pratt, S

    2011-07-01

    Active slag filters are an emerging technology for removing phosphorus (P) from wastewaters. Recent research revealed that adsorption onto Fe oxides/oxyhydroxides at near-neutral pH and oxidizing Eh is the key mechanism of P removal by melter slag filters. Currently, filter lifespan is limited by available adsorption sites. This study examined whether the performance and longevity of active filters could be improved via chemical treatment to create additional reactive sites as well as regenerate exhausted ones. Fresh original melter slag as well as slag from an exhausted full-scale filter was tested. Chemical reagents that could manipulate the pH/Eh of the slag granule surfaces and potentially activate them for further P removal were used, namely hydrochloric acid (HCI), sodium hydroxide (NaOH) and sodium dithionite (Na2S2O4). Waste stabilization pond effluent was then applied to the treated slag to assess the effectiveness of the treatments at improving P removal. Fresh slag treated with Na2S204 and HCl, respectively, retained 1.9 and 1.4 times more P from the effluent than the untreated fresh slag. These reagents were even more effective at regenerating the exhausted slag, increasing total retained P by a factor of 13 and six, respectively, compared with untreated slag. Sodium hydroxide was ineffective at increasing P removal. The higher P retention by the 'treated exhausted slag' compared with the 'treated fresh media' indicates that adsorption sites on melter slag filters become increasingly reactive with time. This research is the first study to provide evidence that P retention by active slag filters can be increased by both (1) chemical pre treatment and (2) chemical post-treatment once their P removal is exhausted, thereby potentially transforming them from a single use system to a more viable, reusable treatment technology. PMID:21882558

  18. Effect of chemical activation of 10% carbamide peroxide gel in tooth bleaching.

    PubMed

    Batista, Graziela Ribeiro; Arantes, Paula Tamiao; Attin, Thomas; Wiegand, Annette; Torres, Carlos Rocha

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of chemical agents to increase the bleaching effectiveness of 10% carbamide peroxide. Two hundred and ninety enamel-dentin discs were prepared from bovine incisors. The color measurement was performed by a spectrophotometer using the CIE L*a*b*system. The groups were divided according to the bleaching treatment: negative control group (NC): without bleaching; positive control group (PC): bleached with 10% carbamide peroxide gel without any chemical activator; Manganese gluconate (MG); Manganese chloride (MC); Ferrous gluconate (FG); Ferric chloride (FC); and Ferrous sulphate (FS). Three different concentrations (MG, MC, FG, FC: 0.01, 0.02 and 0.03% w/w; FS: 0.001, 0.002 and 0.003% w/w) for each agent were tested. The bleaching gel was applied on the specimens for 8 h, after which they were immersed in artificial saliva for 16 h, during 14 days. Color assessments were made after 7 and 14 days. The data were analyzed by repeated measures analysis of variance and Tukey's test (5%). Generally, the test groups were unable to increase the bleaching effect (ΔE) significantly compared to the PC group. Only for ΔL, significant higher values compared to the PC group could be seen after 7 days in groups MG (0.02%), and FS (0.002 and 0.003%). The NC group showed significantly lower values than all tested groups. It was concluded that for home bleaching procedures, the addition of chemical activators did not produce a bleaching result significantly higher than the use of 10% carbamide peroxide without activation, and that the concentration of chemical activators used did not significantly influence the effectiveness of treatment. PMID:23390623

  19. Chemical Composition and Biological Activities of Fragrant Mexican Copal (Bursera spp.).

    PubMed

    Gigliarelli, Giulia; Becerra, Judith X; Curini, Massimo; Marcotullio, Maria Carla

    2015-01-01

    Copal is the Spanish word used to describe aromatic resins from several genera of plants. Mexican copal derives from several Bursera spp., Protium copal, some Pinus spp. (e.g., P. pseudostrobus) and a few Fabaceae spp. It has been used for centuries as incense for religious ceremonies, as a food preservative, and as a treatment for several illnesses. The aim of this review is to analyze the chemical composition and biological activity of commercial Mexican Bursera copal. PMID:26703535

  20. Relationship of spontaneous chemical transformation of arylsulfonylhydrazones of 2-pyridinecarboxaldehyde 1-oxide to anticancer activity.

    PubMed

    Shiba, D A; May, J A; Sartorelli, A C

    1983-05-01

    The arylsulfonyl-hydrazones of 2-pyridinecarboxaldehyde 1-oxide represent a relatively new class of antineoplastic agents with the potential for clinical usefulness. The requirement for spontaneous chemical transformation of these agents to exert anticancer activity was evaluated using as the prototype the most potent member of this class synthesized to date, the 3,4-dimethoxybenzene sulfonylhydrazone of 2-pyridinecarboxaldehyde 1-oxide (3,4-DSP. 3,4-DSP was chemically unstable, decomposing with a half-life of 19 min in 0.01 M potassium phosphate buffer (pH 7.4) at 37 degrees. The major chemical decomposition product was identified as 2-pyridylcarbinol 1-oxide by comparison with the authentic compound. This carbinol is hypothesized to be formed via the intramolecular abstraction of hydrogen from the arylsulfonyl-hydrazone, a process that leads to the release of 3,4-dimethoxybenzenesulfinic acid and the formation of 1-oxidopyridin-2-yldiazomethane, which subsequently reacts with water. The diazomethane intermediate is a potent alkylating agent which, if generated in cells, would have the potential to alkylate nucleophilic groups of biologically important macromolecules. The proposed reactive species was trapped using both 4-(4-nitrobenzyl)pyridine (NBP) and morpholine, and the latter product was characterized by mass spectroscopy. The importance of the chemical formation of an alkylating species to cytotoxicity was demonstrated by studies in which solutions of 3,4-DSP were "aged" prior to addition to L1210 leukemia cells in culture and prior to incubation with NBP. The "aging" of 3,4-DSP for 20 min resulted in a 4-fold decrease in cytotoxicity, and aging for 1 to 3 hr led to complete loss of cytotoxicity. Correspondingly, a 20-min aging period decreased alkylation of NBP by 51%, and 3-hr aging resulted in essentially no alkylation of the nucleophile. Further support for the above proposed chemical activation pathway was provided by correlations between in vitro

  1. Synthesis of sulfonated porous carbon nanospheres solid acid by a facile chemical activation route

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Binbin Guo, Yanzhen; Yin, Hang; Zhang, Shouren; Yang, Baocheng

    2015-01-15

    Generally, porous carbon nanospheres materials are usually prepared via a template method, which is a multi-steps and high-cost strategy. Here, we reported a porous carbon nanosphere solid acid with high surface area and superior porosity, as well as uniform nanospheical morphology, which prepared by a facile chemical activation with ZnCl{sub 2} using resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) resins spheres as precursor. The activation of RF resins spheres by ZnCl{sub 2} at 400 °C brought high surface area and large volume, and simultaneously retained numerous oxygen-containing and hydrogen-containing groups due to the relatively low processing temperature. The presence of these functional groups is favorable for the modification of –SO{sub 3}H groups by a followed sulfonation treating with sulphuric acid and organic sulfonic acid. The results of N{sub 2} adsorption–desorption and electron microscopy clearly showed the preservation of porous structure and nanospherical morphology. Infrared spectra certified the variation of surface functional groups after activation and the successful modification of –SO{sub 3}H groups after sulfonation. The acidities of catalysts were estimated by an indirect titration method and the modified amount of –SO{sub 3}H groups were examined by energy dispersive spectra. The results suggested sulfonated porous carbon nanospheres catalysts possessed high acidities and –SO{sub 3}H densities, which endowed their significantly catalytic activities for biodiesel production. Furthermore, their excellent stability and recycling property were also demonstrated by five consecutive cycles. - Graphical abstract: Sulfonated porous carbon nanospheres with high surface area and superior catalytic performance were prepared by a facile chemical activation route. - Highlights: • Porous carbon spheres solid acid prepared by a facile chemical activation. • It owns high surface area, superior porosity and uniform spherical morphology. • It possesses

  2. Tracking SERS-active nanoprobe intracellular uptake for chemical and biological sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregas, Molly K.; Yan, Fei; Scaffidi, Jonathan; Wang, Hsin-Neng; Khoury, Christopher; Zhang, Yan; Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    2007-09-01

    A critical aspect of the use of nanoprobes for intracellular studies in chemical and biological sensing involves a fundamental understanding of their uptake and trajectory in cells. In this study, we describe experiments using surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy and mapping to track cellular uptake of plasmonics-active labeled nanoparticles. Three different Raman-active labels with positive, negative, and neutral charges were conjugated to silver colloidal nanoparticles with the aim of spatially and temporally profiling intracellular delivery and tracking of nanoprobes during uptake in single mammalian cells. 1-D Raman spectra and 2-D Raman mapping are used to identify and locate the probes via their SERS signal intensities. Because Raman spectroscopy is very specific for identification of chemical and molecular signatures, the development of functionalized plasmonics-active nanoprobes capable of exploring intracellular spaces and processes has the ability to provide specific information on the effects of biological and chemical pollutants in the intracellular environment. The results indicate that this technique will allow study of when, where, and how these substances affect cells and living organisms.

  3. Infrared Laser Optoacoustic Detection Of Gases And Vapours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, S. A.; Cummins, P. G.; Bone, S. A.; Davies, P. B.

    1988-10-01

    Mid-infrared laser optoacoustic spectroscopy has been used to detect a variety of gases and vapours. Performance was calibrated using the signal from a known concentration of ethene, and then the method applied to the perfume alcohol geraniol. Detection limits were found to be 1 ppb for ethene and 70 ppb for geraniol on their strongest absorption lines for a few seconds measurement time.

  4. Leidenfrost point and estimate of the vapour layer thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gianino, Concetto

    2008-11-01

    In this article I describe an experiment involving the Leidenfrost phenomenon, which is the long lifetime of a water drop when it is deposited on a metal that is much hotter than the boiling point of water. The experiment was carried out with high-school students. The Leidenfrost point is measured and the heat laws are used to estimate the thickness of the vapour layer, d≈0.06 mm, which prevents the drop from touching the hotplate.

  5. Eupatorium capillifolium essential oil: chemical composition antifungal activity and insecticidal activity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Natural plant extracts often contain compounds that are useful in pest management applications. The essential oil of Eupatorium capillifolium (dog-fennel) was investigated for antifungal and insecticidal activities. Essential oil obtained by hydrodistillation of aerial parts was analyzed by gas chro...

  6. An Update on Oligosaccharides and Their Esters from Traditional Chinese Medicines: Chemical Structures and Biological Activities

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiang-Yang; Wang, Ru-Feng; Liu, Bin

    2015-01-01

    A great number of naturally occurring oligosaccharides and oligosaccharide esters have been isolated from traditional Chinese medicinal plants, which are used widely in Asia and show prominent curative effects in the prevention and treatment of kinds of diseases. Numerous in vitro and in vivo experiments have revealed that oligosaccharides and their esters exhibited various activities, including antioxidant, antidepressant, cytotoxic, antineoplastic, anti-inflammatory, neuroprotective, cerebral protective, antidiabetic, plant growth-regulatory, and immunopotentiating activities. This review summarizes the investigations on the distribution, chemical structures, and bioactivities of natural oligosaccharides and their esters from traditional Chinese medicines between 2003 and 2013. PMID:25861364

  7. Activation of chemicals into mutagens by green plants: a preliminary discussion.

    PubMed Central

    Plewa, M J

    1978-01-01

    This paper is a review of recent studies that demonstrate the activation of chemicals (especially pesticides into mutagens by green plants. Such activation of pesticides may be hazardous to the public health because of their widespread use in agriculture and the current lack of information that exists about such processes. The mutagenic properties of the s-triazine herbicides (atrazine, simazine, and cyanazine) as exhibited in various assay systems are discussed. In vivo, in vitro, and in situ plant assays are presented, and the maize wx locus assay is discussed. PMID:367774

  8. Chemical and biochemical activities of sonochemically synthesized poly(N-isopropyl acrylamide)/silica nanocomposite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdhury, Pranesh; Saha, Swadhin Kr; Guha, Arun; Saha, Samar Kr

    2012-11-01

    Poly(N-isopropyl acrylamide) (PNIPA) grafted mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MPSNP) leading to novel inorganic/organic core-shell nanocomposite has been synthesized sonochemically in an aqueous medium without additives like cross-linker, hydrophobic agent, organic solvent. The colloidal stability of MPSNP is enhanced significantly due to encapsulation of the polymer. The composites are characterized by TEM, FTIR and TGA. The chemical and biochemical activities of the sonochemically synthesized materials have been studied in the light of reaction with acid-base, protein adsorption, antimicrobial activity, biocompatibility and nonthrombogenic property. Advantages of sonochemical synthesis compared to other techniques have been evaluated.

  9. Percutaneous absorption of 2-butoxyethanol vapour in human subjects.

    PubMed Central

    Johanson, G; Boman, A

    1991-01-01

    Four male volunteers were exposed at rest for two periods of two hours, separated by a one hour exposure free interval, to 50 ppm 2-butoxyethanol (BE) vapour generated in an exposure chamber. During the first two hour period the men were exposed by mouth only via a respiratory valve connected by tubes to the exposure chamber. During the second exposure period the men were exposed by skin only while sitting inside the exposure chamber, naked except for shorts, and wearing a respiratory protection mask supplied with compressed air. Capillary blood samples were collected at regular intervals and analysed for BE by a gas chromatographic method. Two experiments separated by at least two weeks were carried out with each volunteer, one at "normal" (23 degrees C, 29% relative humidity) and one at raised (33 degrees C, 71% relative humidity) air temperature and humidity in the chamber. The average concentration in blood and the calculated rate of uptake of BE were about three to four times higher during dermal exposure than during inhalation exposure. These experiments suggest that dermal uptake of BE accounts for about 75% (45-85% in individual experiments) of the total uptake during whole body exposure to BE vapour. Thus it appears that the use of a respiratory protection mask will not protect efficiently against exposure to BE vapours. A tendency towards increased percutaneous absorption rate was seen in the raised temperature and humidity condition. PMID:1954157

  10. Preparation and characterization of activated carbon from reedy grass leaves by chemical activation with H3PO4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jianzhong; Chen, Lingzhi; Qu, Hongqiang; Jiao, Yunhong; Xie, Jixing; Xing, Guangen

    2014-11-01

    Activated carbons were produced from reedy grass leaves by chemical activation with H3PO4 in N2 atmosphere and their characteristics were investigated. The effects of activation temperature and time were examined. Adsorption capacity was demonstrated with BET and iodine number. Micropore volume and pore size distribution of activated carbons were characterized by N2 adsorption isotherms. The surface area and iodine number of the activated carbons produced at 500 °C for 2 h were 1474 m2/g and 1128 mg/g, respectively. Thermal decomposition of pure reedy grass leaves and H3PO4-impregnated reedy grass leaves have been investigated with thermogravimetric/mass spectroscopy (TG-MS) technique. It was found that the temperature and intensity of maximum evolution of H2O and CO2 of H3PO4-impregnated reedy grass leaves were lower than that of pure reedy grass leaves. This implies that H3PO4 as an activating reagent changed the thermal degradation of the reedy grass leaves, stabilized the cellulose structure, leading to a subsequent change in the evolution of porosity. The results of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Fourier-infrared spectroscopy analysis indicate that the produced activated carbons have rich functional groups on surface.

  11. Optimization of nickel adsorption from aqueous solution by using activated carbon prepared from waste apricot by chemical activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdoğan, S.; Önal, Y.; Akmil-Başar, C.; Bilmez-Erdemoğlu, S.; Sarıcı-Özdemir, Ç.; Köseoğlu, E.; İçduygu, G.

    2005-12-01

    Waste apricot supplied by Malatya apricot plant (Turkey) was activated by using chemical activation method and K 2CO 3 was chosen for this purpose. Activation temperature was varied over the temperature range of 400-900 °C and N 2 atmosphere was used with 10 °C/min heat rate. The maximum surface area (1214 m 2/g) and micropore volume (0.355 cm 3/g) were obtained at 900 °C, but activated carbon was predominantly microporous at 700 °C. The resulting activated carbons were used for removal of Ni(II) ions from aqueous solution and adsorption properties have been investigated under various conditions such as pH, activation temperature, adsorbent dosage and nickel concentration. Adsorption parameters were determined by using Langmuir model. Optimal condition was determined as; pH 5, 0.7 g/10 ml adsorbent dosage, 10 mg/l Ni(II) concentration and 60 min contact time. The results indicate that the effective uptake of Ni(II) ions was obtained by activating the carbon at 900 °C.

  12. Omani propolis: chemical profiling, antibacterial activity and new propolis plant sources

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Propolis (bee glue) is a resinous honeybee product having a long history of application in many countries as a traditional remedy for treating wounds, burns, soar throat, stomach disorders, etc. It has been proved to possess beneficial biological effects, including antimicrobial, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, cytotoxic, antiulcer, and many others. Bees gather propolis from diverse resinous plant parts and in different phytogeographic regions its chemical composition might vary significantly. In this article we report the results of the first study on the chemical profiles of propolis from Oman, its plant origin and antibacterial activity. Results The chemical profiles of Omani propolis extracts were obtained by GC-MS analysis after silylation. Over 50 individual compounds were identified in the samples, belonging to different compound types: sugars, polyols, hydroxy acids, fatty acids, cardanols and cardols, anacardic acids, flavan derivatives, triterpenes, prenylated flavanones and chalcones. The profiles were dissimilar from other known propolis types. They demonstrate that although Oman is not a large country, the plant sources of propolis vary significantly, even in the same apiary and the same season. Based on chemical profiles, and isolation and identification of major marker compounds (new propolis constituents), new plant sources of propolis were found: Azadiracta indica (neem tree) and Acacia spp. (most probably A. nilotica). The ethanol extracts of the studied propolis samples demonstrated activity against S. aureus (MIC < 100 μg. mL-1) and E. coli (MIC < 380 μg. mL-1). Conclusion Omani propolis is different form the known propolis types and demonstrates significant chemical diversity. Its most important plant source is the resin of Azadirachta indica, and as a result its typical components are С5-prenyl flavanones. Other plant sources have been identified, too, playing some role in resin collection by bees in Oman: Acacia spp

  13. Biological activities and chemical constituents of some mangrove species from Sundarban estuary: An overview

    PubMed Central

    Simlai, Aritra; Roy, Amit

    2013-01-01

    This review represents the studies performed on some beneficial mangrove plants such as Ceriops decandra, Xylocarpus granatum, Xylocarpus moluccensis, Excoecaria agallocha, Sarcolobus globosus, Sonneratia caseolaris and Acanthus ilicifolius from the Sundarban estuary spanning India and Bangladesh with regard to their biological activities and chemical investigations till date. Sundarban is the largest single chunk of mangrove forest in the world. The forest is a source of livelihood to numerous people of the region. Several of its plant species have very large applications in the traditional folk medicine; various parts of these plants are used by the local people as cure for various ailments. Despite such enormous potential, remarkably few reports are available on these species regarding their biological activities and the active principles responsible for such activities. Though some chemical studies have been made on the mangrove plants of this estuary, reports pertaining to their activity-structure relationship are few in number. An attempt has been made in this review to increase the awareness for the medicinal significance as well as conservation and utilization of these mangrove species as natural rich sources of novel bioactive agents. PMID:24347925

  14. Antimicrobial Activity and Chemical Composition of Essential Oil From the Seeds of Artemisia aucheri Boiss

    PubMed Central

    Asghari, Gholamreza; Jalali, Mohamad; Sadoughi, Ehsan

    2012-01-01

    Background Artemisia aerial parts are well known for antimicrobial activities including anti malaria. Objectives This study was carried out to evaluate the antimicrobial activity and chemical composition of essential oil from the seeds of Artemisia aucheri Boiss (Asteraceae). Materials and Methods Essential oil was extracted from the powdered seeds of Artemisia aucheri by hydrodistillation. Antimicrobial activity against five bacterial species was tested using the disc diffusion method, and the chemical composition of the essential oil was analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Results The essential oil of Artemisia aucheri seed showed activity against Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, and Listeria monocytogenes. The essential oil constituents identified by GC-MS were as follows: decane, ρ-cymene, 1,8-cineole, linalool, ρ-mentha-8-ol, triene, borneol, lavandulol, bornyl acetate, chrysanthenyl acetate, dehydro aromadenderene, and caryophyllene oxide. Most of these compounds are also found in the aerial parts of Artemisia aucheri. Conclusions Variation in the compositions of essential oils from Artemisia aucheri, and thus variation in the antimicrobial activity of these oils, may be due to the plant parts used for essential oil prepration. PMID:24624145

  15. Pachira glabra Pasq. essential oil: chemical constituents, antimicrobial and insecticidal activities.

    PubMed

    Lawal, Oladipupo A; Ogunwande, Isiaka A; Salvador, Atinuke F; Sanni, Adetayo A; Opoku, Andy R

    2014-01-01

    The chemical composition of essential oil obtained by hydrodistillation of the leaves of Pachira glabra Pasq., (PgEO) has been studied by Gas Chromatography (GC) and Gas Chromatography coupled with Mass Spectrometry (GC/MS). Thirty three constituents representing 98.4% of total contents were identified from the essential oil. The major constituents of oil were limonene (23.2%), β-caryophyllene (14.5%), phtyol (8.5%) and β-bisabolene (6.3%). The antimicrobial activity of the PgEO was evaluated against a panel of ten bacteria and three fungal strain using agar diffusion and broth microdilution methods. Results have shown that the PgEO exhibited moderate to strong antimicrobial activity against the tested microorganisms except Citrobacter youagae, Micrococcus spp. and Proteus spp. The activity zones of inhibition (ZI) and minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) ranged between 13.7 mm-24.0 mm and 0.3 mg/mL-2.5 mg/mL, respectively. The insecticidal activity of PgEO was assayed against the adult Sitophilus zeamais. The lethal concentrations (LC50 and LC90) of the PgEO showed it to be toxic against adult S. zeamais at 32.2 and 53.7 mg/mL, respectively. This is the first report on the chemical composition and in vitro biological activities of essential oil of P. glabra growing in Nigeria. PMID:24881772

  16. Biological activities and chemical constituents of some mangrove species from Sundarban estuary: An overview.

    PubMed

    Simlai, Aritra; Roy, Amit

    2013-07-01

    This review represents the studies performed on some beneficial mangrove plants such as Ceriops decandra, Xylocarpus granatum, Xylocarpus moluccensis, Excoecaria agallocha, Sarcolobus globosus, Sonneratia caseolaris and Acanthus ilicifolius from the Sundarban estuary spanning India and Bangladesh with regard to their biological activities and chemical investigations till date. Sundarban is the largest single chunk of mangrove forest in the world. The forest is a source of livelihood to numerous people of the region. Several of its plant species have very large applications in the traditional folk medicine; various parts of these plants are used by the local people as cure for various ailments. Despite such enormous potential, remarkably few reports are available on these species regarding their biological activities and the active principles responsible for such activities. Though some chemical studies have been made on the mangrove plants of this estuary, reports pertaining to their activity-structure relationship are few in number. An attempt has been made in this review to increase the awareness for the medicinal significance as well as conservation and utilization of these mangrove species as natural rich sources of novel bioactive agents. PMID:24347925

  17. SARConnect: A Tool to Interrogate the Connectivity Between Proteins, Chemical Structures and Activity Data

    PubMed Central

    Eriksson, Mats; Nilsson, Ingemar; Kogej, Thierry; Southan, Christopher; Johansson, Martin; Tyrchan, Christian; Muresan, Sorel; Blomberg, Niklas; Bjäreland, Marcus

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The access and use of large-scale structure-activity relationships (SAR) is increasing as the range of targets and availability of bioactive compound-to-protein mappings expands. However, effective exploitation requires merging and normalisation of activity data, mappings to target classifications as well as visual display of chemical structure relationships. This work describes the development of the application “SARConnect” to address these issues. We discuss options for delivery and analysis of large-scale SAR data together with a set of use-cases to illustrate the design choices and utility. The main activity sources of ChEMBL,1 GOSTAR2 and AstraZeneca’s internal system IBIS, had already been integrated in Chemistry Connect.3 For target relationships we selected human UniProtKB/Swiss-Prot4 as our primary source of a heuristic target classification. Similarly, to explore chemical relationships we combined several methods for framework and scaffold analysis into a unified, hierarchical classification where ease of navigation was the primary goal. An application was built on TIBCO Spotfire to retrieve data for visual display. Consequently, users can explore relationships between target, activity and structure across internal, external and commercial sources that encompass approximately 3 million compounds, 2000 human proteins and 10 million activity values. Examples showing the utility of the application are given. PMID:23308082

  18. Chemical composition and antibacterial activity of essential oils from the Tunisian Allium nigrum L.

    PubMed Central

    Rouis-Soussi, Lamia Sakka; Ayeb-Zakhama, Asma El; Mahjoub, Aouni; Flamini, Guido; Jannet, Hichem Ben; Harzallah-Skhiri, Fethia

    2014-01-01

    The chemical composition of the essential oils of different Allium nigrum L. organs and the antibacterial activity were evaluated. The study is particularly interesting because hitherto there are no reports on the antibacterial screening of this species with specific chemical composition. Therefore, essential oils from different organs (flowers, stems, leaves and bulbs) obtained separately by hydrodistillation were analyzed using gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC–MS). The antibacterial activity was evaluated using the disc and microdilution assays. In total, 39 compounds, representing 90.8-96.9 % of the total oil composition, were identified. The major component was hexadecanoic acid (synonym: palmitic acid) in all the A. nigrum organs oils (39.1-77.2 %). We also noted the presence of some sesquiterpenes, mainly germacrene D (12.8 %) in leaves oil) and some aliphatic compounds such as n-octadecane (30.5 %) in bulbs oil. Isopentyl isovalerate, 14-oxy-α-muurolene and germacrene D were identified for the first time in the genus Allium L. All the essential oils exhibited antimicrobial activity, especially against Enterococcus faecalis and Staphylococcus aureus. The oil obtained from the leaves exhibited an interesting antibacterial activity, with a Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) of 62.50 µg/mL against these two latter strains. The findings showed that the studied oils have antibacterial activity, and thus great potential for their application in food preservation and natural health products. PMID:26417280

  19. Nonequilibrium study of the intrinsic free-energy profile across a liquid-vapour interface.

    PubMed

    Braga, Carlos; Muscatello, Jordan; Lau, Gabriel; Müller, Erich A; Jackson, George

    2016-01-28

    We calculate an atomistically detailed free-energy profile across a heterogeneous system using a nonequilibrium approach. The path-integral formulation of Crooks fluctuation theorem is used in conjunction with the intrinsic sampling method to calculate the free-energy profile for the liquid-vapour interface of the Lennard-Jones fluid. Free-energy barriers are found corresponding to the atomic layering in the liquid phase as well as a barrier associated with the presence of an adsorbed layer as revealed by the intrinsic density profile. Our findings are in agreement with profiles calculated using Widom's potential distribution theorem applied to both the average and the intrinsic profiles as well as the literature values for the excess chemical potential. PMID:26827224

  20. The effects of chemically modifying serum apolipoproteins on their ability to activate lipoprotein lipase.

    PubMed Central

    Dodds, P F; Lopez-Johnston, A; Welch, V A; Gurr, M I

    1987-01-01

    Lipoprotein lipase activity was measured in an acetone-dried-powder preparation from rat epididymal adipose tissue using pig serum or pig serum lipoprotein, which had been chemically modified, as activator. Modification of acidic amino acids of lipoproteins with NN-dimethyl-1,3-diamine resulted in a complete loss of ability to activate lipoprotein lipase. Modification of 34% of lipoprotein arginine groups with cyclohexanedione resulted in the loss of 75% of the activation of lipoprotein lipase; approx. 42% of the original activity was recovered after reversal of the modification. This effect was dependent on the cyclohexanedione concentration. Modification of 48% of lipoprotein lysine groups with malonaldehyde decreased the maximum activation by 20%, but three times as much lipoprotein was required to achieve this. Non-enzymic glycosylation of lipoprotein with glucose, under a variety of conditions resulting in up to 28 nmol of glucose/mg of protein, had no effect upon the ability to activate lipoprotein lipase. In contrast non-enzymic sialylation resulted in a time-dependent loss of up to 60% of ability to activate lipoprotein lipase. Reductive methylation and acetoacetylation of serum did not affect the ability to activate lipoprotein lipase. The results are compared to the effects of similar modifications to low density lipoproteins on receptor-mediated endocytosis. PMID:3593262

  1. Chemical acceleration of a neutral granulated blast-furnace slag activated by sodium carbonate

    SciTech Connect

    Kovtun, Maxim Kearsley, Elsabe P. Shekhovtsova, Julia

    2015-06-15

    This paper presents results of a study on chemical acceleration of a neutral granulated blast-furnace slag activated using sodium carbonate. As strength development of alkali-activated slag cements containing neutral GBFS and sodium carbonate as activator at room temperature is known to be slow, three accelerators were investigated: sodium hydroxide, ordinary Portland cement and a combination of silica fume and slaked lime. In all cements, the main hydration product is C–(A)–S–H, but its structure varies between tobermorite and riversideite depending on the accelerator used. Calcite and gaylussite are present in all systems and they were formed due to either cation exchange reaction between the slag and the activator, or carbonation. With accelerators, compressive strength up to 15 MPa can be achieved within 24 h in comparison to 2.5 MPa after 48 h for a mix without an accelerator.

  2. Ascaroside activity in Caenorhabditis elegans is highly dependent on chemical structure

    PubMed Central

    Hollister, Kyle A.; Conner, Elizabeth S.; Zhang, Xinxing; Spell, Mark; Bernard, Gary M.; Patel, Pratik; de Carvalho, Ana Carolina G.V.; Butcher, Rebecca A.; Ragains, Justin R.

    2015-01-01

    The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans secretes ascarosides, structurally diverse derivatives of the 3,6-dideoxysugar ascarylose, and uses them in chemical communication. At high population densities, specific ascarosides, which are together known as the dauer pheromone, trigger entry into the stress-resistant dauer larval stage. In order to study the structure-activity relationships for the ascarosides, we synthesized a panel of ascarosides and tested them for dauer-inducing activity. This panel includes a number of natural ascarosides that were detected in crude pheromone extract, but as yet have no assigned function, as well as many unnatural ascaroside derivatives. Most of these ascarosides, some of which have significant structural similarity to the natural dauer pheromone components, have very little dauer-inducing activity. Our results provide a primer to ascaroside structure-activity relationships and suggest that slight modifications to ascaroside structure dramatically influence binding to the relevant G protein-coupled receptors that control dauer formation. PMID:23920482

  3. Importance of structural and chemical heterogeneity of activated carbon surfaces for adsorption of dibenzothiophene

    SciTech Connect

    Ania, C.O.; Bandosz, T.J.

    2005-08-16

    The performance of various activated carbons obtained from different carbon precursors (i.e., plastic waste, coal, and wood) as adsorbents for the desulfurization of liquid hydrocarbon fuels was evaluated. To increase surface heterogeneity, the carbon surface was modified by oxidation with ammonium persulfate. The results showed the importance of activated carbon pore sizes and surface chemistry for the adsorption of dibenzothiophene (DBT) from liquid phase. Adsorption of DBT on activated carbons is governed by two types of contributions: physical and chemical interactions. The former include dispersive interactions in the microporous network of the carbons. While the volume of micropores governs the amount physisorbed, mesopores control the kinetics of the process. On the other hand, introduction of surface functional groups enhances the performance of the activated carbons as a result of specific interactions between the acidic centers of the carbon and the basic structure of DBT molecule as well as sulfur-sulfur interactions.

  4. Chemical Signals of Synthetic Disaccharide Derivatives Dominate Rhamnolipids at Controlling Multiple Bacterial Activities.

    PubMed

    Singh, Nischal; Shetye, Gauri S; Zheng, Hewen; Sun, Jiayue; Luk, Yan-Yeung

    2016-01-01

    Microbes secrete molecules that modify their environment. Here, we demonstrate a class of synthetic disaccharide derivatives (DSDs) that mimics and dominates the activity of naturally secreted rhamnolipids by Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The DSDs exhibit the dual function of activating and inhibiting the swarming motility through a concentration-dependent activity reversal that is characteristic of signaling molecules. Whereas DSDs tethered with a saturated farnesyl group exhibit inhibition of both biofilm formation and swarming motility, with higher activities than rhamnolipids, a saturated farnesyl tethered with a sulfonate group only inhibits swarming motility but promote biofilm formation. These results identified important structural elements for controlling swarming motility, biofilm formation, and bacterial adhesion and suggest an effective chemical approach to control intertwined signaling processes that are important for biofilm formation and motilities. PMID:26511780

  5. Pattern formation in chemically interacting active rotors with self-propulsion.

    PubMed

    Liebchen, Benno; Cates, Michael E; Marenduzzo, Davide

    2016-09-21

    We demonstrate that active rotations in chemically signalling particles, such as autochemotactic E. coli close to walls, create a route for pattern formation based on a nonlinear yet deterministic instability mechanism. For slow rotations, we find a transient persistence of the uniform state, followed by a sudden formation of clusters contingent on locking of the average propulsion direction by chemotaxis. These clusters coarsen, which results in phase separation into a dense and a dilute region. Faster rotations arrest phase separation leading to a global travelling wave of rotors with synchronized roto-translational motion. Our results elucidate the physics resulting from the competition of two generic paradigms in active matter, chemotaxis and active rotations, and show that the latter provides a tool to design programmable self-assembly of active matter, for example to control coarsening. PMID:27526180

  6. Chemical composition, nutritional value, and antioxidant activities of eight mulberry cultivars from China

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Linghong; Wu, Xiangyang; Zhu, Maomao; Zhao, Weiguo; Li, Fang; Zou, Ye; Yang, Liuqing

    2012-01-01

    Background: Mulberry (Morus, Moraceae) is widely distributed in the temperate, subtropical, or tropical regions of the world, while there are no conclusive reports on the chemical composition, nutritional value, and antioxidant properties of mulberry cultivars from China. Objective: To investigate chemical properties and to determine proximate nutritive compounds of the eight mulberry cultivars. Materials and Methods: Chemical properties (including moisture, ash, total dry matter, total soluble solids, pH, and total titratable acidity) of the eight mulberry cultivars were investigated. Proximate nutritive compounds (including crude protein, crude fat, mineral elements, total anthocyanins, total polyphenols, total flavonoids, and total sugars) were also determined. Results: The results indicated that the moisture contents were 70.0-87.4%, the crude protein contents 1.62-5.54%, and the crude fat contents from 1.23-2.23%. The major fatty acids in mulberry fruits were linoleic acid (C18:2) and palmitic acid (C16:0), 26.40-74.77% and 9.29-22.26%, respectively. Mulberry fruit is also a good source of minerals and the potassium content (521.37-1718.60 mg/100g DW) is especially higher than that of other elements. Compared with other species, the Morus atropurpurea Roxb. had relatively high total polyphenols content (189.67-246.00 mg GAE/100mg) and anthocyanins content (114.67-193.00 mg/100mg). There was a good linear correlation between antioxidant activity and total polyphenols content. Conclusion: Significant differences of the chemical composition, nutritional value, and antioxidant activities among the mulberry cultivars were observed, the Morus atropurpurea Roxb. showed considerable high nutritional value and antioxidant activity which could be developed for functional food that benefits human health. PMID:23060696

  7. The chemical precipitation of nickel on ion exchangers and active carbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khorol'Skaya, S. V.; Zolotukhina, E. V.; Polyanskii, L. N.; Peshkov, S. V.; Kravchenko, T. A.; Krysanov, V. A.

    2010-12-01

    The chemical precipitation of nickel in the form of poorly soluble precipitates in ion exchanger matrices and on active carbons from solutions of nickel chloride and chemical nickel plating electrolytes was studied. The sorption of nickel ions from a solution of nickel chloride occurs most effectively on Purolite D24002 macroporous chelate forming ion exchanger, KU-23-15/100 sulfo cation exchanger, and KU-2-8 gel sulfo cation exchanger. Nickel enters sulfo cation exchangers in the form of counterions, and is adsorbed on Purolite D24002 largely because of complex formation. The subsequent precipitation of nickel in the solid state in matrix pores liberates ionogenic centers, which allows repeated sorption cycles to be performed. After three chemical precipitation cycles under static conditions, the amount of nickel is higher by 170-250% than the ion exchange capacity of the sorbents. The electrolyte of chemical nickel plating contains nickel predominantly in the form of negatively charged and neutral complexes with glycine, which cannot form bonds with the matrices under study. It is therefore reasonable to perform sorption at decreased solution pH values.

  8. Toxmatch--a chemical classification and activity prediction tool based on similarity measures.

    PubMed

    Gallegos-Saliner, Ana; Poater, Albert; Jeliazkova, Nina; Patlewicz, Grace; Worth, Andrew P

    2008-11-01

    Chemical similarity forms the underlying basis for the development of (Quantitative) Structure-Activity Relationships ((Q)SARs), expert systems and chemical groupings. Recently a new software tool to facilitate chemical similarity calculations named Toxmatch was developed. Toxmatch encodes a number of similarity indices to help in the systematic development of chemical groupings, including endpoint specific groupings and read-across, and the comparison of model training and test sets. Two rule-based classification schemes were additionally implemented, namely: the Verhaar scheme for assigning mode of action for aquatic toxicants and the BfR rulebase for skin irritation and corrosion. In this study, a variety of different descriptor-based similarity indices were used to evaluate and compare the BfR training set with respect to its test set. The descriptors utilised in this comparison were the same as those used to derive the original BfR rules i.e. the descriptors selected were relevant for skin irritation/corrosion. The Euclidean distance index was found to be the most predictive of the indices in assessing the performance of the rules. PMID:18617309

  9. Effects of biologically-active chemical mixtures on fish in a wastewater-impacted urban stream

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barber, L.B.; Brown, G.K.; Nettesheim, T.G.; Murphy, E.W.; Bartell, S.E.; Schoenfuss, H.L.

    2011-01-01

    Stream flow in urban aquatic ecosystems often is maintained by water-reclamation plant (WRP) effluents that contain mixtures of natural and anthropogenic chemicals that persist through the treatment processes. In effluent-impacted streams, aquatic organisms such as fish are continuously exposed to biologically-active chemicals throughout their life cycles. The North Shore Channel of the Chicago River (Chicago, Illinois) is part of an urban ecosystem in which > 80% of the annual flow consists of effluent from the North Side WRP. In this study, multiple samplings of the effluent and stream water were conducted and fish (largemouth bass and carp) were collected on 2 occasions from the North Shore Channel. Fish also were collected once from the Outer Chicago Harbor in Lake Michigan, a reference site not impacted by WRP discharges. Over 100 organic chemicals with differing behaviors and biological effects were measured, and 23 compounds were detected in all of the water samples analyzed. The most frequently detected and highest concentration (> 100 ??g/L) compounds were ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid and 4-nonylphenolmono-to-tetraethoxycarboxylic acids. Other biologically-active chemicals including bisphenol A, 4-nonylphenol, 4-nonylphenolmono-to-tetraethoxylates, 4- tert-octylphenol, and 4- tert-octylphenolmono-to-tetraethoxylates were detected at lower concentrations (< 5 ??g/L). The biogenic steroidal hormones 17??-estradiol, estrone, testosterone, 4-androstene-3,17-dione, and cis-androsterone were detected at even lower concentrations (< 0.005 ??g/L). There were slight differences in concentrations between the North Side WRP effluent and the North Shore Channel, indicating minimal in-stream attenuation. Fish populations are continuously exposed to mixtures of biologically-active chemicals because of the relative persistency of the chemicals with respect to stream hydraulic residence time, and the lack of a fresh water source for dilution. The majority of male fish

  10. Effects of biologically-active chemical mixtures on fish in a wastewater-impacted urban stream.

    PubMed

    Barber, Larry B; Brown, Gregory K; Nettesheim, Todd G; Murphy, Elizabeth W; Bartell, Stephen E; Schoenfuss, Heiko L

    2011-10-15

    Stream flow in urban aquatic ecosystems often is maintained by water-reclamation plant (WRP) effluents that contain mixtures of natural and anthropogenic chemicals that persist through the treatment processes. In effluent-impacted streams, aquatic organisms such as fish are continuously exposed to biologically-active chemicals throughout their life cycles. The North Shore Channel of the Chicago River (Chicago, Illinois) is part of an urban ecosystem in which >80% of the annual flow consists of effluent from the North Side WRP. In this study, multiple samplings of the effluent and stream water were conducted and fish (largemouth bass and carp) were collected on 2 occasions from the North Shore Channel. Fish also were collected once from the Outer Chicago Harbor in Lake Michigan, a reference site not impacted by WRP discharges. Over 100 organic chemicals with differing behaviors and biological effects were measured, and 23 compounds were detected in all of the water samples analyzed. The most frequently detected and highest concentration (>100μg/L) compounds were ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid and 4-nonylphenolmono-to-tetraethoxycarboxylic acids. Other biologically-active chemicals including bisphenol A, 4-nonylphenol, 4-nonylphenolmono-to-tetraethoxylates, 4-tert-octylphenol, and 4-tert-octylphenolmono-to-tetraethoxylates were detected at lower concentrations (<5μg/L). The biogenic steroidal hormones 17β-estradiol, estrone, testosterone, 4-androstene-3,17-dione, and cis-androsterone were detected at even lower concentrations (<0.005μg/L). There were slight differences in concentrations between the North Side WRP effluent and the North Shore Channel, indicating minimal in-stream attenuation. Fish populations are continuously exposed to mixtures of biologically-active chemicals because of the relative persistency of the chemicals with respect to stream hydraulic residence time, and the lack of a fresh water source for dilution. The majority of male fish exhibited

  11. Egyptian propolis: 3. Antioxidant, antimicrobial activities and chemical composition of propolis from reclaimed lands.

    PubMed

    Hegazi, Ahmed G; Abd El Hady, Faten K

    2002-01-01

    The free radical scavenging effect of two propolis samples collected from reclaimed land, Egypt as well as of vitamin C and caffeic acid in 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) free radical system was determined. The antimicrobial (Staphylococcus aureus; Escherichia coli and Candida albicans) activity was also investigated. The results of the free radical scavenging effect of El-Saff and Ismailia propolis showed a concentration-dependent activity. The antioxidant activity was varied according to the examined material. It was obvious that caffeic acid and vitamin C showed the highest activity if compared with the propolis samples. El- Saff propolis had a higher antioxidant activity than Ismailia propolis, it showed a higher antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus and a higher anti-fungal activity against Candida albicans. While the Ismailia propolis had a higher antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli, than El-Saff propolis. The chemical composition of propolis samples was investigated by GC/MS, where 75 compounds were identified, 22 being new for propolis. The Ismailia propolis was characterized by the presence of a highly significant amount of aromatic acid esters (47.3%) and triterpenoids (17.3%), while El-Saff propolis contained 3% and 1.9% respectively. The new esters belonged to 4-methoxyhydrocinnamic acid, hydroferulic acid and ferulic acid. El-Saff propolis had a very high significant amount (27%) of 2,6-bis-(pentanyloxy)-4-pentanylphenethanol, which is also a new compound for propolis. PMID:12064746

  12. Chemical Profiling Using Uplc Q-Tof/Ms and Antioxidant Activities of Fortunella Fruits.

    PubMed

    Tan, Si; Zhao, Xijuan; Yang, Ying; Ke, Zunli; Zhou, Zhiqin

    2016-07-01

    The fruits of Fortunella Swingle are widely consumed as fresh fruits and traditional medicine in China. China is the origin center and has the largest cultivated area of the genus Fortunella. In this study, the chemical compositions of ethanol extracts of the major Fortunella cultivated types including Fortunella japonica Swingle, Fortunella margarita Swingle, Fortunella crassifolia Swingle 1 (Lanshang) and Fortunella crassifolia Swingle 2 (Liuyang) were determined using ultra performance liquid chromatography coupled with quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC Q-TOF/MS) method, and their antioxidant activities were evaluated. 12 compounds were identified and 5 compounds were tentatively characterized. The results showed that the chemical compositions of the ethanol extracts of 4 Fortunella cultivated types were largely the same. 3', 5'-di-C-glucopyranosylphloretin was the predominant flavonoid in Fortunella fruits, and Fortunella margarita Swingle had higher contents of flavonoids than other species. In addition, the data demonstrated high antioxidant activities of Fortunella fruits. The developed method could be available to rapidly analyze the chemical compounds in Fortunella fruits and its products. This study will provide information for further quality assessment and utilization of Fortunella resources. PMID:27243926

  13. Chemical composition and antioxidant activity of a Lebanese plant Euphorbia macroclada schyzoceras

    PubMed Central

    Farhan, Hussein; Rammal, Hassan; Hijazi, Akram; Daher, Ahmad; Reda, Mohamad; Annan, Hussein; Chokr, Ali; Bassal, Ali; Badran, Bassam; Ghaloub, Abdulameer Nasser

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine the chemical composition, total phenolic and total flavonoid contents of the crude extracts from leaves and stems of a Lebanese plant Euphorbia macroclada schyzoceras (E. macroclada), and to evaluate their antioxidant potential using DPPH, H2O2, and chelating of ferrous ions tests. Methods Quantification of the total phenolic and total flavonoid contents of the crude extracts from leaves and stems and the antioxidant activities were evaluated using spectrophotometric analyses. The chemical composition has been estimated using different techniques such as IR, LC/MS and NMR. Results Ethanolic extract from leaves of E. macroclada was better than aqueous extract and showed higher content in total phenolic and total flavonoid than found in the stems. On the other hand, using DPPH and H2O2 tests, this extract from leaves showed higher antioxidant capacity than aqueous extract. However, using the chelating of ferrous ions test, the antioxidant activity of the aqueous extract of both stems and leaves was stronger than that of ethanolic once. The chemical composition of the whole plant showed the presence of some aromatic compounds and fatty acids. Conclusions Both ethanolic and water extracts from both parts of this plant are effective and have good antioxidant power. So, this plant can be used in the prevention of a number of diseases related to oxidative stress. PMID:23836193

  14. Active coherent laser spectrometer for remote detection and identification of chemicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacLeod, Neil A.; Weidmann, Damien

    2012-10-01

    Currently, there exists a capability gap for the remote detection and identification of threat chemicals. We report here on the development of an Active Coherent Laser Spectrometer (ACLaS) operating in the thermal infrared and capable of multi-species stand-off detection of chemicals at sub ppm.m levels. A bench top prototype of the instrument has been developed using distributed feedback mid-infrared quantum cascade lasers as spectroscopic sources. The instrument provides active eye-safe illumination of a topographic target and subsequent spectroscopic analysis through optical heterodyne detection of the diffuse backscattered field. Chemical selectivity is provided by the combination of the narrow laser spectral bandwidth (typically < 2 MHz) and frequency tunability that allows the recording of the full absorption spectrum of any species within the instrument line of sight. Stand-off detection at distances up to 12 m has been demonstrated on light molecules such as H2O, CH4 and N2O. A physical model of the stand-off detection scenario including ro-vibrational molecular absorption parameters was used in conjunction with a fitting algorithm to retrieve quantitative mixing ratio information on multiple absorbers.

  15. Activities of the Institute of Chemical Processing of Coal at Zabrze

    SciTech Connect

    Dreszer, K.

    1995-12-31

    The Institute of Chemical Processing of Coal at Zabrze was established in 1955. The works on carbochemical technologies have been, therefore, carried out at the Institute for 40 years. The targets of the Institute`s activities are research, scientific and developing works regarding a sensible utilization of fuels via their processing into more refined forms, safe environment, highly efficient use of energy carriers and technological products of special quality. The Institute of Chemical Processing of Coal has been dealing with the following: optimized use of home hard coals; improvement of classic coal coking technologies, processing and utilization of volatile coking products; production technologies of low emission rate fuels for communal management; analyses of coal processing technologies; new technologies aimed at increasing the efficiency of coal utilization for energy-generating purposes, especially in industry and studies on the ecological aspects of these processes; production technologies of sorbents and carbon activating agents and technologies of the utilization; rationalization of water and wastes management in the metallurgical and chemical industries in connection with removal of pollution especially dangerous to the environment from wastes; utilization technologies of refined materials (electrode cokes, binders, impregnating agents) for making electrodes, refractories and new generation construction carbon materials; production technologies of high quality bituminous and bituminous and resin coating, anti-corrosive and insulation materials; environmentally friendly utilization technologies for power station, mine and other wastes, and dedusting processes in industrial gas streams.

  16. Altering the interfacial activation mechanism of a lipase by solid-phase selective chemical modification.

    PubMed

    López-Gallego, Fernando; Abian, Olga; Guisán, Jose Manuel

    2012-09-01

    This study presents a combined protein immobilization, directed mutagenesis, and site-selective chemical modification approach, which was used to create a hyperactivated semisynthetic variant of BTL2. Various alkane chains were tethered at three different positions in order to mimic the lipase interfacial activation exogenously triggered by detergents. Optimum results were obtained when a dodecane chain was introduced at position 320 by solid-phase site-selective chemical modification. The resulting semisynthetic variant showed a 2.5-fold higher activity than the wild-type nonmodified variant in aqueous conditions. Remarkably, this is the maximum hyperactivation ever observed for BTL2 in the presence of detergents such as Triton X-100. We present evidence to suggest that the endogenous dodecane chain hyperactivates the enzyme in a similar fashion as an exogenous detergent molecule. In this way, we also observe a faster irreversible enzyme inhibition and an altered detergent sensitivity profile promoted by the site-selective chemical modification. These findings are also supported by fluorescence studies, which reveal that the structural conformation changes of the semisynthetic variant are different to those of the wild type, an effect that is more pronounced in the presence of detergent. Finally, the optimal immobilized semisynthetic variant was successfully applied to the selective synthesis of oxiran-2-yl butyrate. Significantly, this biocatalyst is 12-fold more efficient than the immobilized wild-type enzyme, producing the S-enantiomer with higher enantiospecificity (ee = 92%). PMID:22876885

  17. Development of structure-activity relationship rules for predicting carcinogenic potential of chemicals.

    PubMed

    Woo, Y T; Lai, D Y; Argus, M F; Arcos, J C

    1995-09-01

    Since the inception of Section 5 (Premanufacturing/Premarketing Notification, PMN) of the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA), structure-activity relationship (SAR) analysis has been effectively used by U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Structure Activity Team (SAT) in the assessment of potential carcinogenic hazard of new chemicals for which test data are not available. To capture, systematize and codify the Agency's predictive expertise in order to make it more widely available to assessors outside the TSCA program, a cooperative project was initiated to develop a knowledge rule-based expert system to mimic the thinking and reasoning of the SAT. In this communication, we describe the overall structure of this expert system, discuss the scientific bases and principles of SAR analysis of chemical carcinogens used in the development of SAR knowledge rules, and delineate the major factors/rules useful for assessing the carcinogenic potential of fibers, polymers, metals/metalloids and several major classes of organic chemicals. An integrative approach using available short-term predictive tests and non-cancer toxicological data to supplement SAR analysis has also been described. PMID:7570659

  18. Comparative Study of Chemical Composition and Biological Activity of Yellow, Green, Brown, and Red Brazilian Propolis

    PubMed Central

    Machado, Christiane Schineider; Mokochinski, João Benhur; de Lira, Tatiana Onofre; de Oliveira, Fátima de Cassia Evangelista; Cardoso, Magda Vieira; Ferreira, Roseane Guimarães; Sawaya, Alexandra Christine Helena Frankland; Ferreira, Antonio Gilberto; Pessoa, Cláudia; Cuesta-Rubio, Osmany; Monteiro, Marta Chagas; de Campos, Mônica Soares

    2016-01-01

    The chemical composition and biological activity of a sample of yellow propolis from Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil (EEP-Y MS), were investigated for the first time and compared with green, brown, and red types of Brazilian propolis and with a sample of yellow propolis from Cuba. Overall, EEP-Y MS had different qualitative chemical profiles, as well as different cytotoxic and antimicrobial activities when compared to the other types of propolis assessed in this study and it is a different chemotype of Brazilian propolis. Absence of phenolic compounds and the presence of mixtures of aliphatic compounds in yellow propolis were determined by analysing 1H-NMR spectra and fifteen terpenes were identified by GC-MS. EEP-Y MS showed cytotoxic activity against human tumour strain OVCAR-8 but was not active against Gram-negative or Gram-positive bacteria. Our results confirm the difficulty of establishing a uniform quality standard for propolis from diverse geographical origins. The most appropriate pharmacological applications of yellow types of propolis must be further investigated. PMID:27525023

  19. Comparative Study of Chemical Composition and Biological Activity of Yellow, Green, Brown, and Red Brazilian Propolis.

    PubMed

    Machado, Christiane Schineider; Mokochinski, João Benhur; de Lira, Tatiana Onofre; de Oliveira, Fátima de Cassia Evangelista; Cardoso, Magda Vieira; Ferreira, Roseane Guimarães; Sawaya, Alexandra Christine Helena Frankland; Ferreira, Antonio Gilberto; Pessoa, Cláudia; Cuesta-Rubio, Osmany; Monteiro, Marta Chagas; de Campos, Mônica Soares; Torres, Yohandra Reyes

    2016-01-01

    The chemical composition and biological activity of a sample of yellow propolis from Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil (EEP-Y MS), were investigated for the first time and compared with green, brown, and red types of Brazilian propolis and with a sample of yellow propolis from Cuba. Overall, EEP-Y MS had different qualitative chemical profiles, as well as different cytotoxic and antimicrobial activities when compared to the other types of propolis assessed in this study and it is a different chemotype of Brazilian propolis. Absence of phenolic compounds and the presence of mixtures of aliphatic compounds in yellow propolis were determined by analysing (1)H-NMR spectra and fifteen terpenes were identified by GC-MS. EEP-Y MS showed cytotoxic activity against human tumour strain OVCAR-8 but was not active against Gram-negative or Gram-positive bacteria. Our results confirm the difficulty of establishing a uniform quality standard for propolis from diverse geographical origins. The most appropriate pharmacological applications of yellow types of propolis must be further investigated. PMID:27525023

  20. Chemical Diversity and Antimicrobial Activity of Salvia multicaulis Vahl Essential Oils.

    PubMed

    Fahed, Layal; Stien, Didier; Ouaini, Naïm; Eparvier, Véronique; El Beyrouthy, Marc

    2016-05-01

    The chemical compositions and antimicrobial activities of the essential oils (EOs) of aerial parts of Salvia multicaulis Vahl, collected during the same week from two different Lebanese regions, were investigated. The EOs were obtained by hydrodistillation using a Clevenger-type apparatus and characterized by GC and GC/MS analyses. The minimum inhibitory concentrations of these EOs were determined against one Gram-negative and two Gram-positive bacteria, one yeast, and five dermatophytes using the broth microdilution technique. One EO was notably active against Staphylococcus aureus, methicillin-resistant S. aureus, and all of the Trichophyton species tested. Nerolidol was found to be the major compound in the active oil; nerolidol was also absent from the inactive oil. This study demonstrated that nerolidol shows antimicrobial activity and therefore significantly contributes to the antimicrobial potential of the oil. The chemical diversity of worldwide S. multicaulis EOs was analyzed, revealing that the EOs of this study belong to two different chemotypes found in the literature. The nerolidol chemotype appears to be restricted to Lebanon, and it can be used as antimicrobial agent against external bacterial and fungal infections. PMID:27038067