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Sample records for activated chemical vapour

  1. Biocompatibility of chemical-vapour-deposited diamond.

    PubMed

    Tang, L; Tsai, C; Gerberich, W W; Kruckeberg, L; Kania, D R

    1995-04-01

    The biocompatibility of chemical-vapour-deposited (CVD) diamond surfaces has been assessed. Our results indicate that CVD diamond is as biocompatible as titanium (Ti) and 316 stainless steel (SS). First, the amount of adsorbed and 'denatured' fibrinogen on CVD diamond was very close to that of Ti and SS. Second, both in vitro and in vivo there appears to be less cellular adhesion and activation on the surface of CVD diamond surfaces compared to Ti and SS. This evident biocompatibility, coupled with the corrosion resistance and notable mechanical integrity of CVD diamond, suggests that diamond-coated surfaces may be highly desirable in a number of biomedical applications. PMID:7654876

  2. Liquid and vapour-phase antifungal activities of selected essential oils against candida albicans: microscopic observations and chemical characterization of cymbopogon citratus

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Use of essential oils for controlling Candida albicans growth has gained significance due to the resistance acquired by pathogens towards a number of widely-used drugs. The aim of this study was to test the antifungal activity of selected essential oils against Candida albicans in liquid and vapour phase and to determine the chemical composition and mechanism of action of most potent essential oil. Methods Minimum Inhibitory concentration (MIC) of different essential oils in liquid phase, assayed through agar plate dilution, broth dilution & 96-well micro plate dilution method and vapour phase activity evaluated through disc volatilization method. Reduction of C. albicans cells with vapour exposure was estimated by kill time assay. Morphological alteration in treated/untreated C. albicans cells was observed by the Scanning electron microscopy (SEM)/Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and chemical analysis of the strongest antifungal agent/essential oil has been done by GC, GC-MS. Results Lemon grass (Cymbopogon citratus) essential oil exhibited the strongest antifungal effect followed by mentha (Mentha piperita) and eucalyptus (Eucalyptus globulus) essential oil. The MIC of lemon grass essential oil in liquid phase (288 mg/l) was significantly higher than that in the vapour phase (32.7 mg/l) and a 4 h exposure was sufficient to cause 100% loss in viability of C. albicans cells. SEM/AFM of C. albicans cells treated with lemon grass essential oil at MIC level in liquid and vapour phase showed prominent shrinkage and partial degradation, respectively, confirming higher efficacy of vapour phase. GC-MS analysis revealed that lemon grass essential oil was dominated by oxygenated monoterpenes (78.2%); α-citral or geranial (36.2%) and β-citral or neral (26.5%), monoterpene hydrocarbons (7.9%) and sesquiterpene hydrocarbons (3.8%). Conclusion Lemon grass essential oil is highly effective in vapour phase against C. albicans, leading to deleterious morphological

  3. Antimicrobial activity of novel nanostructured Cu-SiO2 coatings prepared by chemical vapour deposition against hospital related pathogens

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    There is increasing recognition that the healthcare environment acts as an important reservoir for transmission of healthcare acquired infections (HCAI). One method of reducing environmental contamination would be use of antimicrobial materials. The antimicrobial activity of thin silica-copper films prepared by chemical vapour deposition was evaluated against standard strains of bacteria used for disinfectant testing and bacteria of current interest in HCAI. The structure of the coatings was determined using Scanning Electron Microscopy and their hardness and adhesion to the substrate determined. Antimicrobial activity was tested using a method based on BS ISO 22196:2007. The coatings had a pale green-brown colour and had a similar hardness to steel. SEM showed nano-structured aggregates of Cu within a silica matrix. A log10 reduction in viability of >5 could be obtained within 4 h for the disinfectant test strains and within 6 h for producing Acinetobacter baumannii, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia. Activity against the other hospital isolates was slower but still gave log10 reduction factors of >5 for extended spectrum β-lactamase producing Escherichia coli and >3 for vancomycin resistant Enterococcus faecium, methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa within 24 h. The results demonstrate the importance of testing antimicrobial materials destined for healthcare use against isolates of current interest in hospitals as well as standard test strains. The coatings used here can also be applied to substrates such as metals and ceramics and have potential applications where reduction of microbial environmental contamination is desirable. PMID:24007899

  4. Growth of ZnO Nanorods on Stainless Steel Wire Using Chemical Vapour Deposition and Their Photocatalytic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Abd Aziz, Siti Nor Qurratu Aini; Pung, Swee-Yong; Ramli, Nurul Najiah; Lockman, Zainovia

    2014-01-01

    The photodegradation efficiency of ZnO nanoparticles in removal of organic pollutants deteriorates over time as a high percentage of the nanoparticles can be drained away by water during the wastewater treatment. This problem can be solved by growing the ZnO nanorods on stainless steel wire. In this work, ZnO nanorods were successfully grown on stainless steel wire by chemical vapour deposition. The SAED analysis indicates that ZnO nanorod is a single crystal and is preferentially grown in [0001] direction. The deconvoluted O 1s peak at 531.5 eV in XPS analysis is associated with oxygen deficient, revealing that the ZnO nanorods contain many oxygen vacancies. This observation is further supported by the finding of the small Iuv/Ivis ratio, that is, ~1 in the photoluminescence analysis. The growth of ZnO nanorods on stainless steel wire was governed by vapour-solid mechanism as there were no Fe particles observed at the tips of the nanorods. The photodegradation of Rhodamine B solution by ZnO nanorods followed the first-order kinetics. PMID:24587716

  5. Chemical vapour deposition of zeolitic imidazolate framework thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stassen, Ivo; Styles, Mark; Grenci, Gianluca; Gorp, Hans Van; Vanderlinden, Willem; Feyter, Steven De; Falcaro, Paolo; Vos, Dirk De; Vereecken, Philippe; Ameloot, Rob

    2016-03-01

    Integrating metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) in microelectronics has disruptive potential because of the unique properties of these microporous crystalline materials. Suitable film deposition methods are crucial to leverage MOFs in this field. Conventional solvent-based procedures, typically adapted from powder preparation routes, are incompatible with nanofabrication because of corrosion and contamination risks. We demonstrate a chemical vapour deposition process (MOF-CVD) that enables high-quality films of ZIF-8, a prototypical MOF material, with a uniform and controlled thickness, even on high-aspect-ratio features. Furthermore, we demonstrate how MOF-CVD enables previously inaccessible routes such as lift-off patterning and depositing MOF films on fragile features. The compatibility of MOF-CVD with existing infrastructure, both in research and production facilities, will greatly facilitate MOF integration in microelectronics. MOF-CVD is the first vapour-phase deposition method for any type of microporous crystalline network solid and marks a milestone in processing such materials.

  6. Nano structured carbon nitrides prepared by chemical vapour deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karuppannan, Ramesh; Prashantha, M.

    2010-08-01

    Nanostructured carbon nitride films were prepared by pyrolysis assisted chemical vapour deposition(CVD). A two zone furnace with a temperature profile having a uniform temperature over a length of 20 cm length has been designed and developed. The precursor Azabenzimidazole was taken in a quartz tube and evaporated at 400 0C. The dense vapours enter the pyrolysis zone kept at a desired temperature and deposit on the quartz substrates. The FTIR spectrum of the prepared samples shows peaks at 1272 cm-1 (C.N stretching) and 1600 cm-1 (C=N) confirms the bonding of nitrogen with carbon. Raman D and G peaks, are observed at 1360 cm-1 and 1576 cm-1 respectively. XPS core level spectra of C 1s and N 1s show the formation of π bonding between carbon and nitrogen atoms. The size of the nano crystals estimated from the SEM images and XRD is ~100 nm. In some regions of the sample a maximum of 57 atom % of nitrogen has been observed.

  7. Light-induced chemical vapour deposition painting with titanium dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halary-Wagner, E.; Bret, T.; Hoffmann, P.

    2003-03-01

    Light-induced chemical vapour deposits of titanium dioxide are obtained from titanium tetra-isopropoxide (TTIP) in an oxygen and nitrogen atmosphere with a long pulse (250 ns) 308 nm XeCl excimer laser using a mask projection set-up. The demonstrated advantages of this technique are: (i) selective area deposition, (ii) precise control of the deposited thickness and (iii) low temperature deposition, enabling to use a wide range of substrates. A revolving mask system enables, in a single reactor load, to deposit shapes of controlled heights, which overlap to build up a complex pattern. Interferential multi-coloured deposits are achieved, and the process limitations (available colours and resolution) are discussed.

  8. Photo Initiated Chemical Vapour Deposition To Increase Polymer Hydrophobicity.

    PubMed

    Bérard, Ariane; Patience, Gregory S; Chouinard, Gérald; Tavares, Jason R

    2016-01-01

    Apple growers face new challenges to produce organic apples and now many cover orchards with high-density polyethylene (HDPE) nets to exclude insects, rather than spraying insecticides. However, rainwater- associated wetness favours the development of apple scabs, Venturia inaequalis, whose lesions accumulate on the leaves and fruit causing unsightly spots. Treating the nets with a superhydrophobic coating should reduce the amount of water that passes through the net. Here we treat HDPE and polyethylene terephthalate using photo-initiated chemical vapour deposition (PICVD). We placed polymer samples in a quartz tube and passed a mixture of H2 and CO through it while a UVC lamp (254 nm) illuminated the surface. After the treatment, the contact angle between water droplets and the surface increased by an average of 20°. The contact angle of samples placed 70 cm from the entrance of the tube was higher than those at 45 cm and 20 cm. The PICVD-treated HDPE achieved a contact angle of 124°. Nets spray coated with a solvent-based commercial product achieved 180° but water ingress was, surprisingly, higher than that for nets with a lower contact angle. PMID:27531048

  9. High crystalline quality single crystal chemical vapour deposition diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martineau, P. M.; Gaukroger, M. P.; Guy, K. B.; Lawson, S. C.; Twitchen, D. J.; Friel, I.; Hansen, J. O.; Summerton, G. C.; Addison, T. P. G.; Burns, R.

    2009-09-01

    Homoepitaxial chemical vapour deposition (CVD) on high pressure, high temperature (HPHT) synthetic diamond substrates allows the production of diamond material with controlled point defect content. In order to minimize the extended defect content, however, it is necessary to minimize the number of substrate extended defects that reach the initial growth surface and the nucleation of dislocations at the interface between the CVD layer and its substrate. X-ray topography has indicated that when type IIa HPHT synthetic substrates are used, the density of dislocations nucleating at the interface can be less than 400 cm-2. X-ray topography, photoluminescence imaging and birefringence microscopy of HPHT grown synthetic type IIa diamond clearly show that the extended defect content is growth sector dependent. lang111rang sectors contain the highest concentration of both stacking faults and dislocations but lang100rang sectors are relatively free of both. It has been shown that HPHT treatment of such material can significantly reduce the area of stacking faults and cause dislocations to move. This knowledge, coupled with an understanding of how growth sectors develop during HPHT synthesis, has been used to guide selection and processing of substrates suitable for CVD synthesis of material with high crystalline perfection and controlled point defect content.

  10. Photo Initiated Chemical Vapour Deposition To Increase Polymer Hydrophobicity

    PubMed Central

    Bérard, Ariane; Patience, Gregory S.; Chouinard, Gérald; Tavares, Jason R.

    2016-01-01

    Apple growers face new challenges to produce organic apples and now many cover orchards with high-density polyethylene (HDPE) nets to exclude insects, rather than spraying insecticides. However, rainwater- associated wetness favours the development of apple scabs, Venturia inaequalis, whose lesions accumulate on the leaves and fruit causing unsightly spots. Treating the nets with a superhydrophobic coating should reduce the amount of water that passes through the net. Here we treat HDPE and polyethylene terephthalate using photo-initiated chemical vapour deposition (PICVD). We placed polymer samples in a quartz tube and passed a mixture of H2 and CO through it while a UVC lamp (254 nm) illuminated the surface. After the treatment, the contact angle between water droplets and the surface increased by an average of 20°. The contact angle of samples placed 70 cm from the entrance of the tube was higher than those at 45 cm and 20 cm. The PICVD-treated HDPE achieved a contact angle of 124°. Nets spray coated with a solvent-based commercial product achieved 180° but water ingress was, surprisingly, higher than that for nets with a lower contact angle. PMID:27531048

  11. Photo Initiated Chemical Vapour Deposition To Increase Polymer Hydrophobicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bérard, Ariane; Patience, Gregory S.; Chouinard, Gérald; Tavares, Jason R.

    2016-08-01

    Apple growers face new challenges to produce organic apples and now many cover orchards with high-density polyethylene (HDPE) nets to exclude insects, rather than spraying insecticides. However, rainwater- associated wetness favours the development of apple scabs, Venturia inaequalis, whose lesions accumulate on the leaves and fruit causing unsightly spots. Treating the nets with a superhydrophobic coating should reduce the amount of water that passes through the net. Here we treat HDPE and polyethylene terephthalate using photo-initiated chemical vapour deposition (PICVD). We placed polymer samples in a quartz tube and passed a mixture of H2 and CO through it while a UVC lamp (254 nm) illuminated the surface. After the treatment, the contact angle between water droplets and the surface increased by an average of 20°. The contact angle of samples placed 70 cm from the entrance of the tube was higher than those at 45 cm and 20 cm. The PICVD-treated HDPE achieved a contact angle of 124°. Nets spray coated with a solvent-based commercial product achieved 180° but water ingress was, surprisingly, higher than that for nets with a lower contact angle.

  12. Long distance spin communication in chemical vapour deposited graphene

    PubMed Central

    Kamalakar, M. Venkata; Groenveld, Christiaan; Dankert, André; Dash, Saroj P.

    2015-01-01

    Graphene is an ideal medium for long-distance spin communication in future spintronic technologies. So far, the prospect is limited by the smaller sizes of exfoliated graphene flakes and lower spin transport properties of large-area chemical vapour-deposited (CVD) graphene. Here we demonstrate a high spintronic performance in CVD graphene on SiO2/Si substrate at room temperature. We show pure spin transport and precession over long channel lengths extending up to 16 μm with a spin lifetime of 1.2 ns and a spin diffusion length ∼6 μm at room temperature. These spin parameters are up to six times higher than previous reports and highest at room temperature for any form of pristine graphene on industrial standard SiO2/Si substrates. Our detailed investigation reinforces the observed performance in CVD graphene over wafer scale and opens up new prospects for the development of lateral spin-based memory and logic applications. PMID:25857650

  13. Carbon Nanotubes/Nanofibers by Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapour Deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teo, K. B. K.; Hash, D. B.; Bell, M. S.; Chhowalla, M.; Cruden, B. A.; Amaratunga, G. A. J.; Meyyappan, M.; Milne, W. I.

    2005-01-01

    Plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD) has been recently used for the production of vertically aligned carbon nanotubedfibers (CN) directly on substrates. These structures are potentially important technologically as electron field emitters (e.g. microguns, microwave amplifiers, displays), nanoelectrodes for sensors, filter media, superhydrophobic surfaces and thermal interface materials for microelectronics. A parametric study on the growth of CN grown by glow discharge dc-PECVD is presented. In this technique, a substrate containing thin film Ni catalyst is exposed to C2H2 and NH3 gases at 700 C. Without plasma, this process is essentially thermal CVD which produces curly spaghetti-like CN as seen in Fig. 1 (a). With the plasma generated by biasing the substrate at -6OOV, we observed that the CN align vertically during growth as shown in Fig. l(b), and that the magnitude of the applied substrate bias affects the degree of alignment. The thickness of the thin film Ni catalyst was found to determine the average diameter and inversely the length of the CN. The yield and density of the CN were controlled by the use of different diffusion barrier materials under the Ni catalyst. Patterned CN growth [Fig. l(c)], with la variation in CN diameter of 4.1% and 6.3% respectively, is achieved by lithographically defining the Ni thin film prior to growth. The shape of the structures could be varied from very straight nanotube-like to conical tip-like nanofibers by increasing the ratio of C2H2 in the gas flow. Due to the plasma decomposition of C2H2, amorphous carbon (a-C) is an undesirable byproduct which could coat the substrate during CN growth. Using a combination of depth profiled Auger electron spectroscopy to study the substrate and in-situ mass spectroscopy to examine gas phase neutrals and ions, the optimal conditions for a-C free growth of CN is determined.

  14. Photoluminescent Si/SiOx nanoparticle network by near atmospheric plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Q. Y.; Wang, D. X.; Guo, Y.; Ding, K.; Xu, J. Z.; Shi, J. J.; Zhang, J.

    2011-11-01

    A very fast and simple near atmospheric plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition method modulated by a pulsed negative bias voltage is newly developed to yield a Si/SiOx nanoparticle-linked network structure, which emitted enhanced 410 nm photoluminescence (PL) at room temperature. Hydrogen dissociation, oxidation and polarization of the silane plasma-generated active particles could be tuned by the magnitude of bias voltage. The porosity and oxidation of this network structure and the intensity of its PL spectrum at 410 nm were observed to increase with the bias voltage. The large surface area of the Si/SiOx nanoparticle-linked network intensified the radiative recombination centre effect and caused the PL emission enhancement.

  15. Ultrafast vapourization dynamics of laser-activated polymeric microcapsules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lajoinie, Guillaume; Gelderblom, Erik; Chlon, Ceciel; Böhmer, Marcel; Steenbergen, Wiendelt; de Jong, Nico; Manohar, Srirang; Versluis, Michel

    2014-04-01

    Precision control of vapourization, both in space and time, has many potential applications; however, the physical mechanisms underlying controlled boiling are not well understood. The reason is the combined microscopic length scales and ultrashort timescales associated with the initiation and subsequent dynamical behaviour of the vapour bubbles formed. Here we study the nanoseconds vapour bubble dynamics of laser-heated single oil-filled microcapsules using coupled optical and acoustic detection. Pulsed laser excitation leads to vapour formation and collapse, and a simple physical model captures the observed radial dynamics and resulting acoustic pressures. Continuous wave laser excitation leads to a sequence of vapourization/condensation cycles, the result of absorbing microcapsule fragments moving in and out of the laser beam. A model incorporating thermal diffusion from the capsule shell into the oil core and surrounding water reveals the mechanisms behind the onset of vapourization. Excellent agreement is observed between the modelled dynamics and experiment.

  16. Crystal growth of HfS 2 by chemical vapour transport with halogen (Cl, Br, I)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiechter, S.; Eckert, K.

    1988-05-01

    Single crystals of HfS 2 have been prepared by chemical vapour transport (CVT) with halogen. Depending on the transporting agent added, exergonic or endergonic transport was observed. Employing 0.5 mg/cm 3 chlorine or bromine in evacuated and sealed quartz ampoules, exergonic transport occurs. In a temperature gradient from 850 to 870 K transparent reddish-orange crystal platelets of pseudohexagonal shape (10×10×0.05 mm3) were obtained. Endergonic transport, found with iodine as transporting agent, first starts at higher temperatures (1270-1220 K). A thermochemical study of the vapour phase composition revealed that gaseous HfHal 4 and HfHal 3 ( Hal = Cl, Br) are responsible for the exergonic transport observed. Because of the higher stability of HfS 2 against iodine, CVT first starts at elevated temperatures. In the vapour phase Hfl and Hfl 2 dominate and effect a reversal of the transport direction.

  17. Evidence for a link between global lightning activity and upper tropospheric water vapour

    PubMed

    Price

    2000-07-20

    Tropospheric water vapour is a key element of the Earth's climate, which has direct effects as a greenhouse gas, as well as indirect effects through interaction with clouds, aerosols and tropospheric chemistry. Small changes in upper-tropospheric water vapour have a much larger impact on the greenhouse effect than small changes in water vapour in the lower atmosphere, but whether this impact is a positive or negative feedback remains uncertain. The main challenge in addressing this question is the difficulty in monitoring upper-tropospheric water vapour globally over long timescales. Here I show that upper-tropospheric water-vapour variability and global lightning activity are closely linked, suggesting that upper-tropospheric water-vapour changes can be inferred from records of global lightning activity, readily obtained from observations at a single location on the Earth's surface. This correlation reflects the fact that continental deep-convective thunderstorms transport large amounts of water vapour into the upper troposphere and thereby dominate the variations of global upper-tropospheric water vapour while producing most of the lightning on Earth. As global lightning induces Schumann resonances, an electromagnetic phenomenon in the atmosphere that can be observed easily at low cost, monitoring of these resonances might provide a convenient method for tracking upper-tropospheric water-vapour variability and hence contribute to a better understanding of the processes affecting climate change.

  18. Chemical vapour deposition of thermochromic vanadium dioxide thin films for energy efficient glazing

    SciTech Connect

    Warwick, Michael E.A.; Binions, Russell

    2014-06-01

    Vanadium dioxide is a thermochromic material that undergoes a semiconductor to metal transitions at a critical temperature of 68 °C. This phase change from a low temperature monoclinic structure to a higher temperature rutile structure is accompanied by a marked change in infrared reflectivity and change in resistivity. This ability to have a temperature-modulated film that can limit solar heat gain makes vanadium dioxide an ideal candidate for thermochromic energy efficient glazing. In this review we detail the current challenges to such glazing becoming a commercial reality and describe the key chemical vapour deposition technologies being employed in the latest research. - Graphical abstract: Schematic demonstration of the effect of thermochromic glazing on solar radiation (red arrow represents IR radiation, black arrow represents all other solar radiation). - Highlights: • Vanadium dioxide thin films for energy efficient glazing. • Reviews chemical vapour deposition techniques. • Latest results for thin film deposition for vanadium dioxide.

  19. Chemical vapour deposition growth and Raman characterization of graphene layers and carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Y.-C.; Rafailov, P. M.; Vlaikova, E.; Marinova, V.; Lin, S. H.; Yu, P.; Yu, S.-C.; Chi, G. C.; Dimitrov, D.; Sveshtarov, P.; Mehandjiev, V.; Gospodinov, M. M.

    2016-02-01

    Single-layer graphene films were grown by chemical vapour deposition (CVD) on Cu foil. The CVD process was complemented by plasma enhancement to grow also vertically aligned multiwalled carbon nanotubes using Ni nanoparticles as catalyst. The obtained samples were characterized by Raman spectroscopy analysis. Nature of defects in the samples and optimal growth conditions leading to achieve high quality of graphene and carbon nanotubes are discussed.

  20. Light induced chemical vapour deposition of titanium oxide thin films at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halary, E.; Benvenuti, G.; Wagner, F.; Hoffmann, P.

    2000-02-01

    High resolution patterned deposition of titania is achieved by light induced chemical vapour deposition (LICVD), by imaging a mask onto a glass substrate. A long pulse XeCl Excimer laser (308 nm) provides, by perpendicular irradiation, the energy to convert titanium tetraisopropoxide (TTIP) vapour into titanium dioxide films, in an oxygen atmosphere, on unheated glass substrates. The amorphous titania deposits contain about 6% carbon contamination according to X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements. The deposition rate increases with increasing laser fluence until a maximum value is reached, then remains constant over a wide range, and finally decreases with further fluence increase due to titania ablation or thermal effects. The film thickness increases linearly with the number of pulses after a nucleation period. The strong influence of the laser pulse repetition rate on the growth rate and the thickness profile are reported.

  1. Aerosol assisted chemical vapour deposition control parameters for selective deposition of tungsten oxide nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Vallejos, S; Umek, P; Blackman, C

    2011-09-01

    Tungsten oxide films were deposited via Aerosol Assisted Chemical Vapour Deposition (AACVD) from the single-source precursor W(OPh)6. Film morphology and optimum deposition temperatures for formation of quasi-one-dimensional structures is influenced by the solvent 'carrier' used for deposition of the films with bulk porous films and nanostructured needles, hollow tubes and fibres obtained dependent on the solvent used and the deposition temperature. This influence of solvent could be exploited for the synthesis of other nanomaterials, and so provide a new and versatile route to develop and integrate nanostructured materials for device applications. PMID:22097557

  2. TOPICAL REVIEW: A review of plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition of carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyyappan, M.

    2009-11-01

    Plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD) has been widely discussed in the literature for the growth of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and carbon nanofibres (CNFs) in recent years. Advantages claimed include lower growth temperatures relative to thermal CVD and the ability to grow individual, free-standing, vertical CNFs instead of tower-like structures or ensembles. This paper reviews the current status of the technology including equipment, plasma chemistry, diagnostics and modelling, and mechanisms. Recent accomplishments include PECVD of single-walled CNTs and growth at low temperatures for handling delicate substrates such as glass.

  3. Comparison of laser-ablation and hot-wall chemical vapour deposition techniques for nanowire fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stern, E.; Cheng, G.; Guthrie, S.; Turner-Evans, D.; Broomfield, E.; Lei, B.; Li, C.; Zhang, D.; Zhou, C.; Reed, M. A.

    2006-06-01

    A comparison of the transport properties of populations of single-crystal, In2O3 nanowires (NWs) grown by unassisted hot-wall chemical vapour deposition (CVD) versus NWs grown by laser-ablation-assisted chemical vapour deposition (LA-CVD) is presented. For nominally identical growth conditions across the two systems, NWs fabricated at 850 °C with laser-ablation had significantly higher average mobilities at the 99.9% confidence level, 53.3 ± 5.8 cm2 V-1 s-1 versus 10.2 ± 1.9 cm2 V-1 s-1. It is also observed that increasing growth temperature decreases mobility for LA-CVD NWs. Transmission electron microscopy studies of CVD-fabricated samples indicate the presence of an amorphous In2O3 region surrounding the single-crystal core. Further, low-temperature measurements verify the presence of ionized impurity scattering in low-mobility CVD-grown NWs.

  4. Strain and structure heterogeneity in MoS2 atomic layers grown by chemical vapour deposition.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zheng; Amani, Matin; Najmaei, Sina; Xu, Quan; Zou, Xiaolong; Zhou, Wu; Yu, Ting; Qiu, Caiyu; Birdwell, A Glen; Crowne, Frank J; Vajtai, Robert; Yakobson, Boris I; Xia, Zhenhai; Dubey, Madan; Ajayan, Pulickel M; Lou, Jun

    2014-11-18

    Monolayer molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) has attracted tremendous attention due to its promising applications in high-performance field-effect transistors, phototransistors, spintronic devices and nonlinear optics. The enhanced photoluminescence effect in monolayer MoS2 was discovered and, as a strong tool, was employed for strain and defect analysis in MoS2. Recently, large-size monolayer MoS2 has been produced by chemical vapour deposition, but has not yet been fully explored. Here we systematically characterize chemical vapour deposition-grown MoS2 by photoluminescence spectroscopy and mapping and demonstrate non-uniform strain in single-crystalline monolayer MoS2 and strain-induced bandgap engineering. We also evaluate the effective strain transferred from polymer substrates to MoS2 by three-dimensional finite element analysis. Furthermore, our work demonstrates that photoluminescence mapping can be used as a non-contact approach for quick identification of grain boundaries in MoS2.

  5. Rational design of a binary metal alloy for chemical vapour deposition growth of uniform single-layer graphene.

    PubMed

    Dai, Boya; Fu, Lei; Zou, Zhiyu; Wang, Min; Xu, Haitao; Wang, Sheng; Liu, Zhongfan

    2011-01-01

    Controlled growth of high-quality graphene is still the bottleneck of practical applications. The widely used chemical vapour deposition process generally suffers from an uncontrollable carbon precipitation effect that leads to inhomogeneous growth and strong correlation to the growth conditions. Here we report the rational design of a binary metal alloy that effectively suppresses the carbon precipitation process and activates a self-limited growth mechanism for homogeneous monolayer graphene. As demonstrated by an Ni-Mo alloy, the designed binary alloy contains an active catalyst component for carbon source decomposition and graphene growth and a black hole counterpart for trapping the dissolved carbons and forming stable metal carbides. This type of process engineering has been used to grow strictly single-layer graphene with 100% surface coverage and excellent tolerance to variations in growth conditions. With simplicity, scalability and a very large growth window, the presented approach may facilitate graphene research and industrial applications. PMID:22045001

  6. Single-source precursor for chemical vapour deposition of collapsed boron nitride nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Chengchun; Bando, Yoshio; Shen, Guozhen; Zhi, Chunyi; Golberg, Dmitri

    2006-12-01

    Ammonium tetrafluoroborate, a cheap and commonly used chemical, was successfully utilized in this study to synthesize BN-coated MgF2 nanowires and collapsed BN nanotubes, although previous investigations have indicated that the compound cannot be used as a chemical vapour deposition (CVD) reaction precursor of amorphous or crystalline BN. Our study reveals that when MgCl2 is used as a promoter a crystalline BN phase can be obtained on a large scale. The MgCl2 also controls the product morphology, resulting in collapsed BN-coated MgF2 nanowires at the first stage of CVD. The detailed morphology of the composite nanowires also depends on the reaction temperature. Increase in temperature stimulates the nanowire formation. The MgF2 inclusions can be fully removed via a simple high-temperature evaporation procedure, forming collapsed BN nanotubes of high purity and yield.

  7. Durability of silver nanoparticulate films within a silica matrix by flame assisted chemical vapour deposition for biocidal applications.

    PubMed

    Cook, Ian; Shee, David W; Foster, Howard A; Varghese, Sajnu

    2011-09-01

    Healthcare acquired infection (HCAI) rates have come under increasing scrutiny in recent years and been a major priority for health professionals in the UK and elsewhere. Of particular concern is the rise of so called 'superbugs', or those resistant to conventional antibiotics, such as Escherichia coli, Clostridium difficile and methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). The reasons for this rise are many and complex, but one important factor is bacterial survival rates on wards and other hospital areas. In this respect, nanostructured biocidal surfaces offer a potentially powerful weapon in the fight against HCAI. In addition to providing a toxic environment to a range of infectious disease-causing bacteria (while remaining harmless to human health), any potential bioactive coated surface is required to be durable enough to withstand regular hospital cleaning methods without a reduction in biocidal activity over time and be economically viable to mass produce. The flame assisted chemical vapour deposition (FACVD) of silver and silver/silica films offer a means of producing such surfaces. In this work, we report investigations into a wide range of experimental factors and parameters affecting film durability, including burner head design and relative water vapour content in the flame environment. The produced films were assessed in terms of durability (by scratch testing) and relative silver content using glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy (GDOES). PMID:22097580

  8. Synthesis of Tin Nitride SnxNyNanowires by Chemical Vapour Deposition

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Tin nitride (SnxNy) nanowires have been grown for the first time by chemical vapour deposition on n-type Si(111) and in particular by nitridation of Sn containing NH4Cl at 450 °C under a steady flow of NH3. The SnxNynanowires have an average diameter of 200 nm and lengths ≥5 μm and were grown on Si(111) coated with a few nm’s of Au. Nitridation of Sn alone, under a flow of NH3is not effective and leads to the deposition of Sn droplets on the Au/Si(111) surface which impedes one-dimensional growth over a wide temperature range i.e. 300–800 °C. This was overcome by the addition of ammonium chloride (NH4Cl) which undergoes sublimation at 338 °C thereby releasing NH3and HCl which act as dispersants thereby enhancing the vapour pressure of Sn and the one-dimensional growth of SnxNynanowires. In addition to the action of dispersion, Sn reacts with HCl giving SnCl2which in turn reacts with NH3leading to the formation of SnxNyNWs. A first estimate of the band-gap of the SnxNynanowires grown on Si(111) was obtained from optical reflection measurements and found to be ≈2.6 eV. Finally, intricate assemblies of nanowires were also obtained at lower growth temperatures. PMID:20596341

  9. Chemical vapour deposition of zeolitic imidazolate framework thin films.

    PubMed

    Stassen, Ivo; Styles, Mark; Grenci, Gianluca; Gorp, Hans Van; Vanderlinden, Willem; Feyter, Steven De; Falcaro, Paolo; Vos, Dirk De; Vereecken, Philippe; Ameloot, Rob

    2016-03-01

    Integrating metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) in microelectronics has disruptive potential because of the unique properties of these microporous crystalline materials. Suitable film deposition methods are crucial to leverage MOFs in this field. Conventional solvent-based procedures, typically adapted from powder preparation routes, are incompatible with nanofabrication because of corrosion and contamination risks. We demonstrate a chemical vapour deposition process (MOF-CVD) that enables high-quality films of ZIF-8, a prototypical MOF material, with a uniform and controlled thickness, even on high-aspect-ratio features. Furthermore, we demonstrate how MOF-CVD enables previously inaccessible routes such as lift-off patterning and depositing MOF films on fragile features. The compatibility of MOF-CVD with existing infrastructure, both in research and production facilities, will greatly facilitate MOF integration in microelectronics. MOF-CVD is the first vapour-phase deposition method for any type of microporous crystalline network solid and marks a milestone in processing such materials. PMID:26657328

  10. Hot-wire chemical vapour deposition at low substrate temperatures for optoelectronic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakker, R.

    2010-09-01

    The need for large quantities of rapidly and cheaply produced electronic devices has increased rapidly over the past decades. The transistors and diodes that are used to build these devices are predominantly made of crystalline silicon. Since crystalline silicon is very expensive to produce on a large scale and cannot be directly deposited on plastic substrates, much research is being done on thin film amorphous or nanocrystalline semiconductors and insulators. Hot-wire chemical vapour deposition (HWCVD) is a novel, low cost, and convenient way to deposit these materials. The process can be controlled in such a way that specific chemical reactions take place and unwanted side reactions are minimized. It can easily be scaled up to produce large-area thin film electronics. Conventionally, plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD) is used to deposit semiconductors and inorganic dielectrics. Recently, HWCVD has been explored for fast deposition of such materials. An adaptation of HWCVD, initiated chemical vapour deposition (iCVD), offers the unique possibility of producing organic materials and polymers in a vacuum reactor, without the use of solvents. This technique was originally proposed at the Massachusetts institute of technology (MIT) by Prof. Karen Gleason. The iCVD process involves the creation of radicals by dissociation of a peroxide (a molecule with a ~O-O~ bond) by a heated wire in a vacuum reactor. This radical initiates a polymerization reaction of a vinyl (a molecule with a double carbon-carbon bond, ~C=C~) monomer at a substrate held at room temperature. This thesis describes a dedicated iCVD reactor for polymer deposition, installed at Utrecht University, along with a reactor with a cooled substrate holder in an existing HWCVD multi-chamber setup for low-temperature silicon nitride (SiNx) depositions. The most important features of these reactors are described and the characterization techniques are explained. This thesis contains four new

  11. Graphene growth from reduced graphene oxide by chemical vapour deposition: seeded growth accompanied by restoration

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Sung-Jin; Hyun, Moon Seop; Myung, Sung; Kang, Min-A; Yoo, Jung Ho; Lee, Kyoung G.; Choi, Bong Gill; Cho, Youngji; Lee, Gaehang; Park, Tae Jung

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the underlying mechanisms involved in graphene growth via chemical vapour deposition (CVD) is critical for precise control of the characteristics of graphene. Despite much effort, the actual processes behind graphene synthesis still remain to be elucidated in a large number of aspects. Herein, we report the evolution of graphene properties during in-plane growth of graphene from reduced graphene oxide (RGO) on copper (Cu) via methane CVD. While graphene is laterally grown from RGO flakes on Cu foils up to a few hundred nanometres during CVD process, it shows appreciable improvement in structural quality. The monotonous enhancement of the structural quality of the graphene with increasing length of the graphene growth from RGO suggests that seeded CVD growth of graphene from RGO on Cu surface is accompanied by the restoration of graphitic structure. The finding provides insight into graphene growth and defect reconstruction useful for the production of tailored carbon nanostructures with required properties. PMID:26961409

  12. Application of copper vapour lasers for controlling activity of uranium isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Barmina, E V; Sukhov, I A; Lepekhin, N M; Priseko, Yu S; Filippov, V G; Simakin, Aleksandr V; Shafeev, Georgii A

    2013-06-30

    Beryllium nanoparticles are generated upon ablation of a beryllium target in water by a copper vapour laser. The average size of single crystalline nanoparticles is 12 nm. Ablation of a beryllium target in aqueous solutions of uranyl chloride leads to a significant (up to 50 %) decrease in the gamma activity of radionuclides of the uranium-238 and uranium-235 series. Data on the recovery of the gamma activity of these nuclides to new steady-state values after laser irradiation are obtained. The possibility of application of copper vapour lasers for radioactive waste deactivation is discussed. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  13. Vapour and Liquid-Phase Artemisia annua Essential Oil Activities against Several Clinical Strains of Candida.

    PubMed

    Santomauro, Francesca; Donato, Rosa; Sacco, Cristiana; Pini, Gabriella; Flamini, Guido; Bilia, Anna Rita

    2016-07-01

    Candida spp. are often the cause of infection in immune-compromised individuals. They are characterized by a strong resistance to antimicrobial drugs and disinfectants. The activity of Artemisia annua essential oil against Candida spp. was determined by vapour contact and microdilution assay. The oil was characterized by the presence of oxygenated monoterpenes (more than 75 % of the constituents), mainly represented by the irregular monoterpene artemisia ketone (ca. 22 %), and the widespread monoterpenes 1,8 cineole (ca. 19 %) and camphor (ca. 17 %). Other representative constituents were artemisia alcohol (5.9 %), α-pinene (5.7 %), and pinocarvone (3.0 %). Thujone, a typical toxic constituent of the Artemisia species, was not detected. The results are reported as minimum inhibitory concentration, minimum fungicidal concentration, and diameter of inhibition zone obtained by the vapour diffusion assay. We tested 10 clinical Candida strains, coming from both clinical samples and international collections. The results show that the antifungal activity of A. annua is influenced by the type of method adopted. The inhibitory action of the essential oil was, in fact, higher in the vapour than in the liquid phase. Our results show an average minimum inhibitory concentration in the liquid phase of 11.88 µL/mL, while in the vapour phase, the growth of all Candida strains tested at a concentration of 2.13 µL/cm(3) was inhibited. A strain of Candida glabrata was found to be less susceptible to the liquid medium than the vapour assay (50 µL/mL vs. 0.64 µL/cm(3), respectively). Candida albicans and Candida dubliniensis were the most susceptible to the vapour test, while Candida parapsilosis was the most resistant. PMID:27286334

  14. Methyldichloroborane evidenced as an intermediate in the chemical vapour deposition synthesis of boron carbide.

    PubMed

    Reinisch, G; Patel, S; Chollon, G; Leyssale, J-M; Alotta, D; Bertrand, N; Vignoles, G L

    2011-09-01

    The most recent ceramic-matrix composites (CMC) considered for long-life applications as thermostructural parts in aerospace propulsion contain, among others, boron-rich phases like boron carbide. This compound is prepared by thermal Chemical Vapour Infiltration (CVI), starting from precursors like boron halides and hydrocarbons. We present a study aiming at a precise knowledge of the gas-phase composition in a hot-zone LPCVD reactor fed with BCl3, CH4 and H2, which combines experimental and theoretical approaches. This work has brought strong evidences of the presence of Methydichloroborane (MDB, BCl2CH3) in the process. It is demonstrated that this intermediate, the presence of which had never been formally proved before, appears for processing temperatures slightly lower than the deposition temperature of boron carbide. The study features quantum chemical computations, which provide several pieces of information like thermochemical and kinetic data, as well as vibration and rotation frequencies, reaction kinetics computations, and experimental gas-phase characterization of several species by FTIR, for several processing parameter sets. The main results are presented, and the place of MDB in the reaction scheme is discussed.

  15. Chemical vapour deposition of tungsten oxide thin films from single-source precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, Warren Bradley

    This thesis describes the chemical vapour deposition (CVD) of tungsten oxide thin films on glass from a wide range of single-source precursors. Chapter 1 describes previous work that has motivated this research. Chapter 2 discusses the synthesis of conventional style candidates for single-source precursors. Reactions of WOCl4 with 3-methyl salicylic acid (MesaliH2) and 3,5-di-iso-propyl salicylic acid (di-i-PrsaliH2) yielded the ditungsten complexes [WO(Mesali)(MesaliH)2(mu-O)], 1, and [WO(di-i-Prsali)(di-i-PrsaliH)2(mu-O)], 2, and the monotungsten complex [WO(di-i-Pr sali)(di-i-PrsaliH)Cl], 3. Tungsten(VI) dioxo complexes were prepared by ligand exchange reactions of [WO2(acac)2], 4, yielding [WO2(catH)2], 5, and [WO2(malt)2], 6, (catH2 = 3,5-di-tert-butyl-catechol; maltH = maltol). Chapter 3 describes thermal analyses of the complexes 1 - 6 and tungsten hexaphenoxide, and consequently their suitability for CVD. The use of [W(OPh)6] and 2 - 6 in aerosol assisted CVD is reported in Chapter 4. Brown tungsten oxide was deposited from 2 and 3 at 600 °C; blue partially-reduced WO3-x thin films were deposited from [W(OPh)6] from 300 to 500 °C, from 4 at 600 °C and 6 at 620 °C. Sintering all of the coatings in air at 550 °C afforded yellow films of stoichiometric WO3. Raman spectroscopy and glancing angle XRD showed that coatings deposited from [W(OPh)6] at 300 °C were amorphous, whereas all the other films were the monoclinic phase gamma-tungsten oxide. Taking full advantage of the aerosol vaporisation technique led to the CVD of tungsten oxide films from polyoxometalate single-source precursors, as described in Chapter 5. The isopolyanion [nBu4N]2[W6O19], 7, afforded WO3 at 410 °C; the heteropolyanions [nBu4N]4H3[PW11O39], 8, and [nBu4N]4[PNbW11O40], 9, were used to deposit doped WO3 thin films in a highly-controlled manner at 480 °C. Thus, the unprecedented use of large, charged clusters for CVD was demonstrated. Chapter 6 describes investigations of the

  16. Quantum Hall resistance standards from graphene grown by chemical vapour deposition on silicon carbide

    PubMed Central

    Lafont, F.; Ribeiro-Palau, R.; Kazazis, D.; Michon, A.; Couturaud, O.; Consejo, C.; Chassagne, T.; Zielinski, M.; Portail, M.; Jouault, B.; Schopfer, F.; Poirier, W.

    2015-01-01

    Replacing GaAs by graphene to realize more practical quantum Hall resistance standards (QHRS), accurate to within 10−9 in relative value, but operating at lower magnetic fields than 10 T, is an ongoing goal in metrology. To date, the required accuracy has been reported, only few times, in graphene grown on SiC by Si sublimation, under higher magnetic fields. Here, we report on a graphene device grown by chemical vapour deposition on SiC, which demonstrates such accuracies of the Hall resistance from 10 T up to 19 T at 1.4 K. This is explained by a quantum Hall effect with low dissipation, resulting from strongly localized bulk states at the magnetic length scale, over a wide magnetic field range. Our results show that graphene-based QHRS can replace their GaAs counterparts by operating in as-convenient cryomagnetic conditions, but over an extended magnetic field range. They rely on a promising hybrid and scalable growth method and a fabrication process achieving low-electron-density devices. PMID:25891533

  17. Interface study between nanostructured tantalum nitride films and carbon nanotubes grown by chemical vapour deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchet-Fabre, B.; Pinault, M.; Foy, E.; Hugon, M. C.; Minéa, T.; Mayne-L'Hermite, M.

    2014-10-01

    We present the role of nitrogen content in tantalum nitride ultra-thin buffers, on the carbon nanotubes (CNTs) growth by chemical vapour deposition at 850 °C, assisted by ferrocene as catalyst source. Tantalum nitride (TaNx) films with a very large range of concentration x = [0, 1.8] and various nanostructures, from amorphous Ta(N) to Ta3N5, were deposited by Highly Pulsed Plasma Magnetron Sputtering. The buffer films are characterized after heat treatment at 850 °C, and after the CNT growth, by wide angle X-ray scattering in grazing incidence and scanning electron microscopy. The CNT diameter explored by transition electron microscopy shows an all-out value for under stoichiometric thin films (Ta1-N1-δ, Ta3-N5-δ) and a minimum value just above the stoichiometric phases (Ta1-N1+δ, Ta3-N5+δ). Firstly one shows that the buffer films under the heat treatment present surface modification highly dependent on their initial state, which influences the catalyst particles diffusion. Secondly at the stoichiometric TaN phase we show that a specific ternary phase FeTa2O6 is formed at the interface CNT/buffer, not present in the other cases, leading to a special CNT growth condition.

  18. Nano sized bismuth oxy chloride by metal organic chemical vapour deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jagdale, Pravin; Castellino, Micaela; Marrec, Françoise; Rodil, Sandra E.; Tagliaferro, Alberto

    2014-06-01

    Metal organic chemical vapour deposition (MOCVD) method was used to prepare thin films of bismuth based nano particles starting from bismuth salts. Nano sized bismuth oxy chloride (BiOCl) crystals were synthesized from solution containing bismuth chloride (BiCl3) in acetone (CH3sbnd COsbnd CH3). Self-assembly of nano sized BiOCl crystals were observed on the surface of silicon, fused silica, copper, carbon nanotubes and aluminium substrates. Various synthesis parameters and their significant impact onto the formation of self-assembled nano-crystalline BiOCl were investigated. BiOCl nano particles were characterized by X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and Micro-Raman spectroscopy. These analyses confirm that bismuth nanometer-sized crystal structures showing a single tetragonal phase were indeed bismuth oxy chloride (BiOCl) square platelets 18-250 nm thick and a few micrometres wide.

  19. Chemical Vapour Deposition of Graphene with Re-useable Pt and Cu substrates for Flexible Electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karamat, Shumaila; Sonusen, Selda; Celik, Umit; Uysalli, Yigit; Oral, Ahmet

    2015-03-01

    Graphene has gained the attention of scientific world due to its outstanding physical properties. The future demand of flexible electronics such as solar cells, light emitting diodes, photo-detectors and touch screen technology requires more exploration of graphene properties on flexible substrates. The most interesting application of graphene is in organic light emitting diodes (OLED) where efforts are in progress to replace brittle indium tin oxide (ITO) electrode with a flexible graphene electrode because ITO raw materials are becoming increasingly expensive, and its brittle nature makes it unsuitable for flexible devices. In this work, we grow graphene on Pt and Cu substrates using chemical vapour deposition (CVD) and transferred it to a polymer material (PVA) using lamination technique. We used hydrogen bubbling method for separating graphene from Pt and Cu catalyst to reuse the substrates many times. After successful transfer of graphene on polymer samples, we checked the resistivity values of the graphene sheet which varies with growth conditions. Furthermore, Raman, atomic force microscopy (AFM), I-V and Force-displacement measurements will be presented for these samples.

  20. Characterisation of TiO 2 deposited by photo-induced chemical vapour deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaliwoh, Never; Zhang, Jun-Ying; Boyd, Ian W.

    2002-01-01

    We report the deposition of thin TiO 2 films on crystalline Si and quartz by photo-induced chemical vapour deposition (CVD) using UV excimer lamps employing a dielectric barrier discharge in krypton chloride (KrCl ∗) to provide intense narrow band radiation at λ=222 nm. The precursor used was titanium isopropoxide (TTIP). Films from around 20-510 nm in thickness with refractive indices from 2.20 to 2.54 were grown at temperatures between 50 and 350 °C. The higher refractive index values compare favourably with the value of 2.58 recorded for the bulk material. The measured deposition rate was around 50 nm/min at 350 °C. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) revealed the presence of TiO 2 through the observation of a Ti-O absorption peak and the absence of OH in films deposited at 250-350 °C indicated relatively good quality films. The phase of films deposited at 200-350 °C was anatase as determined by X-ray diffraction.

  1. The augmented saddle field discharge characteristics and its applications for plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Johnson; Yeghikyan, Davit; Kherani, Nazir P.

    2013-04-07

    A high ion flux parallel electrode plasma is proposed and studied in its DC configuration. By cascading a diode source region which supplies electrons and a saddle field region where these seed electrons are energized and amplified, the energy of ion bombardment on the substrate can be decoupled from the plasma density. The sufficiently large density of electrons and holes in the vicinity of the substrate raises the possibility to perform plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition on insulating materials, at low sheath voltages (around 40 V in the configuration studied), at low temperatures in which the surface mobility of film growth species may be provided by the bombardment of moderate energy ions. As a benchmarking exercise, experiments are carried out on silane discharge characteristics and deposition of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) on both silicon wafer and glass. The films grown at low anode voltages have excellent microstructures with predominantly monohydride bonds, sharp band tails, but relatively high integrated defect density in the mid 10{sup 16}/cm{sup 3} range for the particular substrate temperature of 180 Degree-Sign C, indicating that further optimizations are necessary if the electrode configuration is to be used to create a-Si:H devices.

  2. In-line silicon epitaxy for photovoltaics using a continous chemical vapour deposition reactor.

    PubMed

    Keller, Martin; Reber, Stefan; Schillinger, Norbert; Pocza, David; Arnold, Martin

    2011-09-01

    Thin film solar cell techniques can effectively reduce the costs for photovoltaic solar power. However, most of these techniques still have the disadvantage of a comparatively low efficiency. One way to realize a thin film solar cell concept with high efficiency potential is the crystalline silicon thin-film (cSiTF) concept. Following the high-temperature approach, this concept is based on a silicon epitaxy process. This paper reports the current status of the development of a high throughput epitaxy tool at Fraunhofer ISE and presents first results. Also presented is the development of a simulation tool which is a virtual image of the real setup in order to forecast save deposition conditions. The presented epitaxy tool is the ConCVD (Continuous Chemical Vapour Deposition), in which an improved reactor setup has been installed, based on the experience gained so far. To provide insight into upcoming further advances, the industrial scale epitaxy tool ProConCVD is presented as well.

  3. Mathematical and numerical models of CdTe deposition in a pre-cracking metalorganic chemical vapour deposition reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, T. J.; McAllister, T.; Maslen, V.; Wilkins, S. W.; Faith, M.; Leech, P.

    1993-10-01

    A mathematical model is used to calculate the deposition profile of CdTe in a horizontal pre-cracker metalorganic chemical vapour deposition (MOCVD) reactor. The model is solved numerically in two dimensions, yielding the temperature profile in the reactor and the concentrations of chemical species. The calculated deposition profiles are compared with growths of CdTe on glass. With appropriate approximations, the model is reduced to a simple form which is solved analytically. This model has enabled us to identify the cause of the non-uniformity in the deposition profile as a variation in the rate of supply of metal vapour. By optimizing the reactor temperature and the gas flow rates, high-uniformity CdTe films have been grown on GaAs substrates.

  4. Alumina coating on dense tungsten powder by fluidized bed metal organic chemical vapour deposition.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Philippe; Caussat, Brigitte; Ablitzer, Carine; Iltis, Xavière; Brothier, Meryl

    2011-09-01

    In order to study the feasibility of coating very dense powders by alumina using Fluidized Bed Metal Organic Chemical Vapour Deposition (FB-MOCVD), experiments were performed on a commercial tungsten powder, 75 microm in median volume diameter and 19,300 kg/m3 in grain density. The first part of the work was dedicated to the experimental study of the tungsten powder fluidization using argon as carrier gas at room temperature and at 400 degrees C. Due to the very high density of the tungsten powder, leading to low initial fixed bed heights and low bed expansions, different weights of powder were tested in order to reach satisfactory temperature profiles along the fluidized bed. Then, using argon as a fluidized bed former and aluminium acetylacetonate Al(C5O2H7)3 as a single source precursor, alumina thin films were deposited on tungsten particles at a low temperature range (e.g., 370-420 degrees C) by FB-MOCVD. The influence of the weight of powder, bed temperature and run duration was studied. Characterizations of the obtained samples were performed by various techniques including scanning electron microscopy (SEM) coupled with Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS) analyses, Field Emission Gun SEM (FEG-SEM) and Fourier Transform InfraRed (FT-IR) spectroscopy. The different analyses indicated that tungsten particles were uniformly coated by a continuous alumina thin film. The thickness of the film ranged between 25 and 80 nm, depending on the coating conditions. The alumina thin films were amorphous and contained carbon contamination. This latter may correspond to the adsorption of species resulting from incomplete decomposition of the precursor at so low deposition temperature. PMID:22097534

  5. The Role of Plasma in Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapour Deposition of Nanostructure Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hash, David B.; Meyyappan, M.; Teo, Kenneth B. K.; Lacerda, Rodrigo G.; Rupesinghe, Nalin L.

    2004-01-01

    Chemical vapour deposition (CVD) has become the preferred process for high yield growth of carbon nanotubes and nanofibres because of its ability to pattern growth through lithographic positioning of transition metal catalysts on substrates. Many potential applications of nanotubes such as field emitters [1] require not only patterned growth but also vertical alignment. Some degree of ali,ment in thermal CVD processes can be obtained when carbon nanotubes are grown closely together as a result of van der Waals interactions. The ali,onment however is marginal, and the van der Waals prerequisite makes growth of freestanding nanofibres with thermal CVD unrealizable. The application of electric fields as a means of ali,onment has been shown to overcome this limitation [2-5], and highly aligned nanostructures can be grown if electric fields on the order of 0.5 V/microns are employed. Plasma enhanced CVD in various configurations including dc, rf, microwave, inductive and electron cyclotron resonance has been pursued as a means of enabling alignment in the CVD process. However, the sheath fields for the non-dc sources are in general not sufficient for a high degree of ali,pment and an additional dc bias is usually applied to the growth substrate. This begs the question as to the actual role of the plasma. It is clear that the plasma itself is not required for aligned growth as references [3] and [4] employed fields through small applied voltages (3-20 V) across very small electrode spacings (10-100 microns) and thus avoided striking a discharge.

  6. Vapour breakthrough behaviour of carbon tetrachloride - A simulant for chemical warfare agent on ASZMT carbon: A comparative study with whetlerite carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Avanish Kumar; Shah, Dilip K.; Mahato, T. H.; Roy, A.; Yadav, S. S.; Srivas, S. K.; Singh, Beer

    2013-06-01

    ASZMT and whetlerite carbon was prepared by impregnation of active carbon with ammonical salts of Cu (II), Ag (I), Zn (II), Mo (VI), TEDA and Cu (II), Ag (I), Cr (VI), NaOH, C5H5N respectively using incipient wetness technique. Thereafter, impregnated carbon systems were characterized using scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray, atomic absorption spectroscopy, thermogravimetry and surface characterization techniques. Impregnated carbon systems were evaluated under dynamic conditions against carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) vapour that was used as a simulant for the persistent chemical warfare agents for testing breakthrough times of filter cartridges and canisters of gas masks in the national approval test of respirators. The protective potential of ASZMT carbon was compared with the whetlerite carbon which is presently used in NBC filtration system. The effect of CCl4 concentration, test flow rate, temperature and relative humidity on the breakthrough behaviour of the impregnated carbon systems has also been studied. The study clearly indicated that the whetlerite carbon possessed breakthrough time greater than ASZMT carbon. However, ASZMT carbon provided adequate protection against CCl4 vapours and can be used as an alternative to whetlerite carbon that contain Cr(VI), which is reported to be carcinogenic and having lesser shelf life. The study indicated the breakthrough time of impregnated carbon systems were found to decrease with the increase of the CCl4 concentration and flow rate. The variation in temperature and relative humidity did not significantly affect the breakthrough behaviour of impregnated carbon systems at high vapour concentration of CCl4 whereasbreak through time of impregnated carbon systems reduced by an increase of relative humidity at low CCl4 vapour concentration.

  7. Polycyclic organic material (POM) in urban air. Fractionation, chemical analysis and genotoxicity of particulate and vapour phases in an industrial town in Finland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyysalo, Heikki; Tuominen, Jari; Wickström, Kim; Skyttä, Eija; Tikkanen, Leena; Salomaa, Sisko; Sorsa, Marja; Nurmela, Tuomo; Mattila, Tiina; Pohjola, Veijo

    Polycyclic organic material (POM) was collected by high-volume sampling on filter and on XAD-2 resin from the air of a small industrial town in Finland. Concurrent chemical analysis and the assays for genotoxic activity were performed on the particulate and the vapour phases of ambient air POM and their chemical fractions. Furthermore, correlations between seasonal meteorological parameters and POM concentrations were studied to reveal characteristic POM profiles for various emission sources. The range of total POM concentrations varied from 115 to 380 ng m -3 in late spring and from 17 to 83 ng m -3 in early winter. No direct correlation of ambient POM was seen with the temperature, but rather with the wind direction from various emission sources. Especially the low molecular weight compounds were associated with wind direction from industrial sources. Genotoxic activity, as detected by the Ames Salmonella/microsome test and the SCE assay in CHO cells, was found not only in the paniculate phase samples but also in the vapour phase. The polar fractions of some of the samples showed genotoxic activity, and also direct mutagenicity was observed with both the assay systems; these facts support the significance of compounds other than conventional polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in the samples.

  8. Aerosol assisted chemical vapour deposition of gas sensitive SnO2 and Au-functionalised SnO2 nanorods via a non-catalysed vapour solid (VS) mechanism.

    PubMed

    Vallejos, Stella; Selina, Soultana; Annanouch, Fatima Ezahra; Gràcia, Isabel; Llobet, Eduard; Blackman, Chris

    2016-01-01

    Tin oxide nanorods (NRs) are vapour synthesised at relatively lower temperatures than previously reported and without the need for substrate pre-treatment, via a vapour-solid mechanism enabled using an aerosol-assisted chemical vapour deposition method. Results demonstrate that the growth of SnO2 NRs is promoted by a compression of the nucleation rate parallel to the substrate and a decrease of the energy barrier for growth perpendicular to the substrate, which are controlled via the deposition conditions. This method provides both single-step formation of the SnO2 NRs and their integration with silicon micromachined platforms, but also allows for in-situ functionalization of the NRs with gold nanoparticles via co-deposition with a gold precursor. The functional properties are demonstrated for gas sensing, with microsensors using functionalised NRs demonstrating enhanced sensing properties towards H2 compared to those based on non-functionalised NRs. PMID:27334232

  9. Aerosol assisted chemical vapour deposition of gas sensitive SnO2 and Au-functionalised SnO2 nanorods via a non-catalysed vapour solid (VS) mechanism.

    PubMed

    Vallejos, Stella; Selina, Soultana; Annanouch, Fatima Ezahra; Gràcia, Isabel; Llobet, Eduard; Blackman, Chris

    2016-06-23

    Tin oxide nanorods (NRs) are vapour synthesised at relatively lower temperatures than previously reported and without the need for substrate pre-treatment, via a vapour-solid mechanism enabled using an aerosol-assisted chemical vapour deposition method. Results demonstrate that the growth of SnO2 NRs is promoted by a compression of the nucleation rate parallel to the substrate and a decrease of the energy barrier for growth perpendicular to the substrate, which are controlled via the deposition conditions. This method provides both single-step formation of the SnO2 NRs and their integration with silicon micromachined platforms, but also allows for in-situ functionalization of the NRs with gold nanoparticles via co-deposition with a gold precursor. The functional properties are demonstrated for gas sensing, with microsensors using functionalised NRs demonstrating enhanced sensing properties towards H2 compared to those based on non-functionalised NRs.

  10. Aerosol assisted chemical vapour deposition of gas sensitive SnO2 and Au-functionalised SnO2 nanorods via a non-catalysed vapour solid (VS) mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Vallejos, Stella; Selina, Soultana; Annanouch, Fatima Ezahra; Gràcia, Isabel; Llobet, Eduard; Blackman, Chris

    2016-01-01

    Tin oxide nanorods (NRs) are vapour synthesised at relatively lower temperatures than previously reported and without the need for substrate pre-treatment, via a vapour-solid mechanism enabled using an aerosol-assisted chemical vapour deposition method. Results demonstrate that the growth of SnO2 NRs is promoted by a compression of the nucleation rate parallel to the substrate and a decrease of the energy barrier for growth perpendicular to the substrate, which are controlled via the deposition conditions. This method provides both single-step formation of the SnO2 NRs and their integration with silicon micromachined platforms, but also allows for in-situ functionalization of the NRs with gold nanoparticles via co-deposition with a gold precursor. The functional properties are demonstrated for gas sensing, with microsensors using functionalised NRs demonstrating enhanced sensing properties towards H2 compared to those based on non-functionalised NRs. PMID:27334232

  11. Aerosol assisted chemical vapour deposition of gas sensitive SnO2 and Au-functionalised SnO2 nanorods via a non-catalysed vapour solid (VS) mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallejos, Stella; Selina, Soultana; Annanouch, Fatima Ezahra; Gràcia, Isabel; Llobet, Eduard; Blackman, Chris

    2016-06-01

    Tin oxide nanorods (NRs) are vapour synthesised at relatively lower temperatures than previously reported and without the need for substrate pre-treatment, via a vapour-solid mechanism enabled using an aerosol-assisted chemical vapour deposition method. Results demonstrate that the growth of SnO2 NRs is promoted by a compression of the nucleation rate parallel to the substrate and a decrease of the energy barrier for growth perpendicular to the substrate, which are controlled via the deposition conditions. This method provides both single-step formation of the SnO2 NRs and their integration with silicon micromachined platforms, but also allows for in-situ functionalization of the NRs with gold nanoparticles via co-deposition with a gold precursor. The functional properties are demonstrated for gas sensing, with microsensors using functionalised NRs demonstrating enhanced sensing properties towards H2 compared to those based on non-functionalised NRs.

  12. Fabrication of high density, adherent films of five-fold symmetric diamond crystals by hot filament chemical vapour deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Qiuping; Ashfold, M. N. R.; Yu, Z. M.; Ma, Li; Yin, D. F.

    2011-12-01

    Five-fold symmetric diamond crystals (FSDCs) have been grown on a large variety of substrates by hot filament chemical vapour deposition (CVD) methods. High density, adherent films of FSDCs have been prepared on carbon steel with a thermal sprayed WC-Co interlayer, and their quality, adhesion and tribological behaviour were investigated. The diamond films show excellent adhesion under Rockwell indentation testing and when subjected to high-speed, high-load, long-time reciprocating dry sliding ball-on-flat wear tests against a Si 3N 4 counter-face in ambient air.

  13. Nanoparticulate cerium dioxide and cerium dioxide-titanium dioxide composite thin films on glass by aerosol assisted chemical vapour deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qureshi, Uzma; Dunnill, Charles W.; Parkin, Ivan P.

    2009-11-01

    Two series of composite thin films were deposited on glass by aerosol assisted chemical vapour deposition (AACVD)—nanoparticulate cerium dioxide and nanoparticulate cerium dioxide embedded in a titanium dioxide matrix. The films were analysed by a range of techniques including UV-visible absorption spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive analysis by X-rays. The AACVD prepared films showed the functional properties of photocatalysis and super-hydrophilicity. The CeO 2 nanoparticle thin films displaying photocatalysis and photo-induced hydrophilicity almost comparable to that of anatase titania.

  14. Hair analysis as a useful procedure for detection of vapour exposure to chemical warfare agents: simulation of sulphur mustard with methyl salicylate.

    PubMed

    Spiandore, Marie; Piram, Anne; Lacoste, Alexandre; Josse, Denis; Doumenq, Pierre

    2014-06-01

    Chemical warfare agents (CWA) are highly toxic compounds which have been produced to kill or hurt people during conflicts or terrorist attacks. Despite the fact that their use is strictly prohibited according to international convention, populations' exposure still recently occurred. Development of markers of exposure to CWA is necessary to distinguish exposed victims from unexposed ones. We present the first study of hair usage as passive sampler to assess contamination by chemicals in vapour form. This work presents more particularly the hair adsorption capacity for methyl salicylate used as a surrogate of the vesicant sulphur mustard. Chemical vapours toxicity through the respiratory route has historically been defined through Haber's law's concentration-time (Ct) product, and vapour exposure of hair to methyl salicylate was conducted with various times or doses of exposure in the range of incapacitating and lethal Ct products corresponding to sulphur mustard. Following exposure, extraction of methyl salicylate from hair was conducted by simple soaking in dichloromethane. Methyl salicylate could be detected on hair for vapour concentration corresponding to about one fifth of the sulphur mustard concentration that would kill 50% of exposed individuals (LCt50). The amount of methyl salicylate recovered from hair increased with time or dose of exposure. It showed a good correlation with the concentration-time product, suggesting that hair could be used like a passive sampler to assess vapour exposure to chemical compounds. It introduces great perspectives concerning the use of hair as a marker of exposure to CWA.

  15. Perfluorodecyltrichlorosilane-based seed-layer for improved chemical vapour deposition of ultrathin hafnium dioxide films on graphene.

    PubMed

    Kitzmann, Julia; Göritz, Alexander; Fraschke, Mirko; Lukosius, Mindaugas; Wenger, Christian; Wolff, Andre; Lupina, Grzegorz

    2016-07-06

    We investigate the use of perfluorodecyltrichlorosilane-based self-assembled monolayer as seeding layer for chemical vapour deposition of HfO2 on large area CVD graphene. The deposition and evolution of the FDTS-based seed layer is investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Auger electron spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. Crystalline quality of graphene transferred from Cu is monitored during formation of the seed layer as well as the HfO2 growth using Raman spectroscopy. We demonstrate that FDTS-based seed layer significantly improves nucleation of HfO2 layers so that graphene can be coated in a conformal way with HfO2 layers as thin as 10 nm. Proof-of-concept experiments on 200 mm wafers presented here validate applicability of the proposed approach to wafer scale graphene device fabrication.

  16. Palm Oil as the Carbon Source for the Synthesis of Carbon Nanotubes using Floating Catalyst—Chemical Vapour Deposition Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zobir, S. A. M.; Suriani, A. B.; Khusaimi, Z.; Mamat, H.; Zainal, Z.; Sarijo, S. H.; Rusop, M.

    2011-03-01

    CNTs were synthesized using floating catalyst by dual-furnace thermal chemical vapour deposition method at 800-1000° C. Cooking oil made of palm oil was used as the carbon precursor. Ferrocene in the presence of 0.05 M zinc nitrate and a p-type silicon wafer was used as a catalyst precursor and a sample target, respectively. The deposition temperature was varied from 800-1000° C. Nitrogen gas was used as a gas carrier with a constant flow rate of 150 sccm/min. Field emission scanning electron micrographs show the formation of CNTs together with other carbons formed on the silicon substrate. Raman spectroscopy studies were also supported the formation of CNTs.

  17. Perfluorodecyltrichlorosilane-based seed-layer for improved chemical vapour deposition of ultrathin hafnium dioxide films on graphene

    PubMed Central

    Kitzmann, Julia; Göritz, Alexander; Fraschke, Mirko; Lukosius, Mindaugas; Wenger, Christian; Wolff, Andre; Lupina, Grzegorz

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the use of perfluorodecyltrichlorosilane-based self-assembled monolayer as seeding layer for chemical vapour deposition of HfO2 on large area CVD graphene. The deposition and evolution of the FDTS-based seed layer is investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Auger electron spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. Crystalline quality of graphene transferred from Cu is monitored during formation of the seed layer as well as the HfO2 growth using Raman spectroscopy. We demonstrate that FDTS-based seed layer significantly improves nucleation of HfO2 layers so that graphene can be coated in a conformal way with HfO2 layers as thin as 10 nm. Proof-of-concept experiments on 200 mm wafers presented here validate applicability of the proposed approach to wafer scale graphene device fabrication. PMID:27381715

  18. Perfluorodecyltrichlorosilane-based seed-layer for improved chemical vapour deposition of ultrathin hafnium dioxide films on graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitzmann, Julia; Göritz, Alexander; Fraschke, Mirko; Lukosius, Mindaugas; Wenger, Christian; Wolff, Andre; Lupina, Grzegorz

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the use of perfluorodecyltrichlorosilane-based self-assembled monolayer as seeding layer for chemical vapour deposition of HfO2 on large area CVD graphene. The deposition and evolution of the FDTS-based seed layer is investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Auger electron spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. Crystalline quality of graphene transferred from Cu is monitored during formation of the seed layer as well as the HfO2 growth using Raman spectroscopy. We demonstrate that FDTS-based seed layer significantly improves nucleation of HfO2 layers so that graphene can be coated in a conformal way with HfO2 layers as thin as 10 nm. Proof-of-concept experiments on 200 mm wafers presented here validate applicability of the proposed approach to wafer scale graphene device fabrication.

  19. Electron field emission characteristics of nano-catkin carbon films deposited by electron cyclotron resonance microwave plasma chemical vapour deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Guang-Rui; Wu, Bao-Jia; Jin, Zhe; Ito, Toshimichi

    2008-02-01

    This paper reported that the nano-catkin carbon films were prepared on Si substrates by means of electron cyclotron resonance microwave plasma chemical vapour deposition in a hydrogen and methane mixture. The surface morphology and the structure of the fabricated films were characterized by using scanning electron microscopes and Raman spectroscopy, respectively. The stable field emission properties with a low threshold field of 5V/μm corresponding to a current density of about 1μA/cm2 and a current density of 3.2mA/cm2 at an electric field of 10V/μm were obtained from the carbon film deposited at CH4 concentration of 8%. The mechanism that the threshold field decreased with the increase of the CH4 concentration and the high emission current appeared at the high CH4 concentration was explained by using the Fowler-Nordheim theory.

  20. Perfluorodecyltrichlorosilane-based seed-layer for improved chemical vapour deposition of ultrathin hafnium dioxide films on graphene.

    PubMed

    Kitzmann, Julia; Göritz, Alexander; Fraschke, Mirko; Lukosius, Mindaugas; Wenger, Christian; Wolff, Andre; Lupina, Grzegorz

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the use of perfluorodecyltrichlorosilane-based self-assembled monolayer as seeding layer for chemical vapour deposition of HfO2 on large area CVD graphene. The deposition and evolution of the FDTS-based seed layer is investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Auger electron spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. Crystalline quality of graphene transferred from Cu is monitored during formation of the seed layer as well as the HfO2 growth using Raman spectroscopy. We demonstrate that FDTS-based seed layer significantly improves nucleation of HfO2 layers so that graphene can be coated in a conformal way with HfO2 layers as thin as 10 nm. Proof-of-concept experiments on 200 mm wafers presented here validate applicability of the proposed approach to wafer scale graphene device fabrication. PMID:27381715

  1. Increasing the output power of single 808-nm laser diodes using diamond submounts produced by microwave plasma chemical vapour deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Ashkinazi, E E; Bezotosnyi, V V; Bondarev, Vadim Yu; Kovalenko, V I; Konov, Vitalii I; Krokhin, Oleg N; Oleshchenko, V A; Pevtsov, Valerii F; Popov, Yurii M; Popovich, A F; Ral'chenko, Viktor G; Cheshev, E A

    2012-11-30

    We have designed and fabricated submounts from synthetic diamond grown by microwave plasma chemical vapour deposition and developed an economical process for metallising such submounts. Laser diode chips having an 808-nm emission wavelength, 3-mm-long cavity and 130-mm-wide stripe contact were mounted on copper heat sinks with the use of diamond submounts differing in quality. The devices were tested for more than 150 h in continuous mode at an output power of 8 W on diamond with a thermal conductivity of 700 W m{sup -1} K{sup -1}, and no changes in their output power were detected. On diamond with a thermal conductivity of 1600 W m{sup -1} K{sup -1}, stable cw operation for 24 h at an output power of 12 W was demonstrated. (letters)

  2. In situ growth rate measurements during plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition of vertically aligned multiwall carbon nanotube films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jönsson, M.; Nerushev, O. A.; Campbell, E. E. B.

    2007-08-01

    In situ laser reflectivity measurements are used to monitor the growth of multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) films grown by DC plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD) from an iron catalyst film deposited on a silicon wafer. In contrast to thermal CVD growth, there is no initial increase in the growth rate; instead, the initial growth rate is high (as much as 10 µm min-1) and then drops off rapidly to reach a steady level (2 µm min-1) for times beyond 1 min. We show that a limiting factor for growing thick films of multiwalled nanotubes (MWNTs) using PECVD can be the formation of an amorphous carbon layer at the top of the growing nanotubes. In situ reflectivity measurements provide a convenient technique for detecting the onset of the growth of this layer.

  3. Construction of conductive multilayer films of biogenic triangular gold nanoparticles and their application in chemical vapour sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Amit; Chaudhari, Minakshi; Sastry, Murali

    2006-05-01

    Metal nanoparticles are interesting building blocks for realizing films for a number of applications that include bio- and chemical sensing. To date, spherical metal nanoparticles have been used to generate functional electrical coatings. In this paper we demonstrate the synthesis of electrically conductive coatings using biologically prepared gold nanotriangles as the building blocks. The gold nanotriangles are prepared by the reduction of aqueous chloroaurate ions using an extract of the lemongrass plant (Cymbopogon flexuosus) which are thereafter assembled onto a variety of substrates by simple solution casting. The conductivity of the film shows a drastic fall upon mild heat treatment, leading to the formation of electrically conductive thin films of nanoparticles. We have also investigated the possibility of using the gold nanotriangle films in vapour sensing. A large fall in film resistance is observed upon exposure to polar molecules such as methanol, while little change occurs upon exposure to weakly polar molecules such as chloroform.

  4. Seasonally-Active Water on Mars: Vapour, Ice, Adsorbate, and the Possibility of Liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, M. I.

    2002-12-01

    Seasonally-active water can be defined to include any water reservoir that communicates with other reservoirs on time scales of a year or shorter. It is the interaction of these water reservoirs, under the influence of varying solar radiation and in conjunction with surface and atmospheric temperatures, that determines the phase-stability field for water at the surface, and the distribution of water in various forms below, on, and above the surface. The atmosphere is the critical, dynamical link in this cycling system, and also (fortunately) one of the easiest to observe. Viking and Mars Global Surveyor observations paint a strongly asymmetric picture of the global seasonal water cycle, tied proximately to planetary eccentricity, and the existence of residual ice caps of different composition at the two poles. The northern summer experiences the largest water vapour columns, and is associated with sublimation from the northern residual water ice cap. The southern summer residual carbon dioxide ice cap is cold trap for water. Asymmetry in the water cycle is an unsolved problem. Possible solutions may involve the current timing of perihelion (the water cap resides at the pole experiencing the longer but cooler summer), the trapping of water ice in the northern hemisphere by tropical water ice clouds, and the bias in the annual-average, zonal-mean atmospheric circulation resulting from the zonal-mean difference in the elevation of the northern and southern hemispheres. Adsorbed and frozen water have proven harder to constrain. Recent Odyssey Gamma Ray Spectrometer results suggest substantial ground ice in the mid- and high-latitudes, but this water is likely below the seasonal skin depth for two reasons: the GRS results are best fit with such a model, and GCM models of the water cycle produce dramatically unrealistic atmospheric vapour distributions when such a very near surface, GRS-like distribution is initialized - ultimately removing the water to the northern and

  5. Anti-yeast activity of mentha oil and vapours through in vitro and in vivo (real fruit juices) assays.

    PubMed

    Tyagi, Amit Kumar; Gottardi, Davide; Malik, Anushree; Guerzoni, Maria Elisabetta

    2013-04-15

    The anti-yeast activity of mentha oil and vapours was evaluated against 8 food spoiling yeasts through disc diffusion, disc volatilisation and micro broth dilution method. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum fungicidal concentration (MFC) varied from 0.28 to 2.25 and 1.13 to 4.5 mg/ml, respectively. Furthermore, the anti-yeast efficacy of mentha oil alone and in combination with thermal treatment was evaluated in a real food system i.e. mixed fruit juices. The samples treated with a combination of mentha oil at the MIC, ½ MIC and ¼ MIC levels and thermal treatment enhanced the reduction viability. Chemical characterisation of mentha oil by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) revealed that the dominant compounds were cis-menthone (27.43%), menthol (24.3%), trans-menthone (9.23%), limonene (5.84%), menthofuran (4.44%) and isomenthol (3.21%). Present results established the superior performance of integrated treatment over individual exposure for fruit juice preservation.

  6. A novel three-jet microreactor for localized metal-organic chemical vapour deposition of gallium arsenide: design and simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konakov, S. A.; Krzhizhanovskaya, V. V.

    2016-08-01

    We present a novel three-jet microreactor design for localized deposition of gallium arsenide (GaAs) by low-pressure Metal-Organic Chemical Vapour Deposition (MOCVD) for semiconductor devices, microelectronics and solar cells. Our approach is advantageous compared to the standard lithography and etching technology, since it preserves the nanostructure of the deposited material, it is less time-consuming and less expensive. We designed two versions of reactor geometry with a 10-micron central microchannel for precursor supply and with two side jets of a dilutant to control the deposition area. To aid future experiments, we performed computational modeling of a simplified-geometry (twodimensional axisymmetric) microreactor, based on Navier-Stokes equations for a laminar flow of chemically reacting gas mixture of Ga(CH3)3-AsH3-H2. Simulation results show that we can achieve a high-rate deposition (over 0.3 μm/min) on a small area (less than 30 μm diameter). This technology can be used in material production for microelectronics, optoelectronics, photovoltaics, solar cells, etc.

  7. Detection of chemical substances in water using an oxide nanowire transistor covered with a hydrophobic nanoparticle thin film as a liquid-vapour separation filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Taekyung; Lee, Jonghun; Ju, Sanghyun

    2016-08-01

    We have developed a method to detect the presence of small amounts of chemical substances in water, using a Al2O3 nanoparticle thin film covered with phosphonic acid (HDF-PA) self-assembled monolayer. The HDF-PA self-assembled Al2O3 nanoparticle thin film acts as a liquid-vapour separation filter, allowing the passage of chemical vapour while blocking liquids. Prevention of the liquid from contacting the SnO2 nanowire and source-drain electrodes is required in order to avoid abnormal operation. Using this characteristic, the concentration of chemical substances in water could be evaluated by measuring the current changes in the SnO2 nanowire transistor covered with the HDF-PA self-assembled Al2O3 nanoparticle thin film.

  8. Surface and Compositional Study of Graphene grown on Lithium Niobate (LiNbO3) substrates by Chemical Vapour Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karamat, Shumaila; Celik, Umit; Oral, Ahmet

    The diversity required in the designing of electronic devices motivated the community to always attempt for new functional materials and device structures. Graphene is considered as one of the most promising candidate materials for future electronics and carbon based devices. It is very exciting to combine graphene with new dielectric materials which exhibit multifunctional properties. Lithium Niobate exhibits ferro-, pyro-, and piezoelectric properties with large electro-optic, acousto-optic, and photoelastic coefficients as well as strong photorefractive and photovoltaic effects which made it one of the most extensively studied materials over the last 50 years. We used ambient pressure chemical vapour deposition to grow graphene on LiNbO3 substrates without any catalyst. The growth was carried out in presence of methane, argon and hydrogen. AFM imaging showed very unique structures on the surface which contains triangular domains. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was used to get information about the presence of necessary elements, their bonding with LiNbO3 substrates. Detailed characterization is under process which will be presented later.

  9. Plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition of silica onto Ti: Analysis of surface chemistry, morphology and functional hydroxyl groups

    PubMed Central

    Szili, Endre J.; Kumar, Sunil; Smart, Roger St. C.; Lowe, Rachel; Saiz, Eduardo; Voelcker, Nicolas H.

    2009-01-01

    Previously, we have developed and characterised a procedure for the deposition of thin silica films by a plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD) procedure using tetraethoxysilane (TEOS) as the main precursor. We have used the silica coatings for improving the corrosion resistance of metals and for enhancing the bioactivity of biomedical metallic implants. Recently, we have been fine-tuning the PECVD method for producing high quality and reproducible PECVD-silica (PECVD-Si) coatings on metals, primarily for biomaterial applications. In order to understand the interaction of the PECVD-Si coatings with biological species (such as proteins and cells), it is important to first analyse the properties of the silica films deposited using the optimised parameters. Therefore, this current investigation was carried out to analyse the characteristic features of PECVD-Si deposited on Ti substrates (PECVD-Si-Ti). We determined that the PECVD-Si coatings on Ti were conformal to the substrate surface, strongly adhered to the underlying substrate and were resistant to delamination. The PECVD-Si surface was composed of stoichiometric SiO2, showed a low carbon content (below 10 at.%) and was very hydrophilic (contact angle <10°). Finally, we also showed that the PECVD-Si coatings contain functional hydroxyl groups. PMID:19809536

  10. Osteoconductive Potential of Barrier NanoSiO2 PLGA Membranes Functionalized by Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapour Deposition

    PubMed Central

    Terriza, Antonia; Vilches-Pérez, Jose I.; de la Orden, Emilio; Yubero, Francisco; Gonzalez-Caballero, Juan L.; González-Elipe, Agustin R.; Vilches, José; Salido, Mercedes

    2014-01-01

    The possibility of tailoring membrane surfaces with osteoconductive potential, in particular in biodegradable devices, to create modified biomaterials that stimulate osteoblast response should make them more suitable for clinical use, hopefully enhancing bone regeneration. Bioactive inorganic materials, such as silica, have been suggested to improve the bioactivity of synthetic biopolymers. An in vitro study on HOB human osteoblasts was performed to assess biocompatibility and bioactivity of SiO2 functionalized poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) membranes, prior to clinical use. A 15 nm SiO2 layer was deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD), onto a resorbable PLGA membrane. Samples were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). HOB cells were seeded on sterilized test surfaces where cell morphology, spreading, actin cytoskeletal organization, and focal adhesion expression were assessed. As proved by the FT-IR analysis of samples, the deposition by PECVD of the SiO2 onto the PLGA membrane did not alter the composition and other characteristics of the organic membrane. A temporal and spatial reorganization of cytoskeleton and focal adhesions and morphological changes in response to SiO2 nanolayer were identified in our model. The novedous SiO2 deposition method is compatible with the standard sterilization protocols and reveals as a valuable tool to increase bioactivity of resorbable PLGA membranes. PMID:24883304

  11. Aerosol-assisted delivery of precursors for chemical vapour deposition: expanding the scope of CVD for materials fabrication.

    PubMed

    Marchand, Peter; Hassan, Iman A; Parkin, Ivan P; Carmalt, Claire J

    2013-07-14

    The production of thin films of materials has become the attention of a great deal of research throughout academia and industry worldwide owing to the array of applications which utilise them, including electronic devices, gas sensors, solar cells, window coatings and catalytic systems. Whilst a number of deposition techniques are in common use, chemical vapour deposition (CVD) is an attractive process for the production of a wide range of materials due to the control it offers over film composition, coverage and uniformity, even on large scales. Conventional CVD processes can be limited, however, by the need for suitably volatile precursors. Aerosol-assisted (AA)CVD is a solution-based process which relies on the solubility of the precursor, rather than its volatility and thus vastly extends the range of potentially applicable precursors. In addition, AACVD offers extra means to control film morphology and concurrently the properties of the deposited materials. In this perspective we discuss the AACVD process, the influence of deposition conditions on film characteristics and a number of materials and applications to which AACVD has been found beneficial. PMID:23629474

  12. Refractive index dependence on optical gap in amorphous silicon—part II. Si prepared by chemical vapour deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravindra, N. M.; Ance, C.; Ferraton, J. P.; Berger, J. M.; De Chelle, F.; Robin, S.

    1983-07-01

    In the present study, we essentially attempt to extrapolate our earlier studies (1) to amorphous silicon films prepared by chemical vapour deposition using a slightly different approach. This work assumes significance especially in view of a rather dangerous trend prevailing today to generalize model calculations without attributing any importance to the method of preparation of the films. (2-4) Here, we adopt a spectroscopic approach to analyse the various properties of the a-Si films. Some of these films are doped with boron and most of them have been subjected to post-hydrogenation. This study leads us to conclude that the Moss formula (5) is again a fairly good representative of the optical gap-refractive index variation. The scheme developed by Ravindra et al.(6) is shown to be valid for these CVD films. In the passing, we attempt to analyse the properties of films prepared at different temperatures and at different rates of deposition. The model of Revesz (7) is utilised to explain the variation in the density. Our study leads us to believe that for the CVD technique (a high temperature technique with temperatures close to that of crystallisation (8), the rate of deposition seems to be very important in determining the surface conditions of the films. Further, it is seen that on post-hydrogenation, the spectroscopic parameters as have been defined in the Wemple-Didomenico model (9) behave randomly. The study has been carried out on a large number of samples.

  13. An investigation of plasma chemistry for dc plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition of carbon nanotubes and nanofibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hash, David B.; Bell, Martin S.; Teo, Kenneth B. K.; Cruden, Brett A.; Milne, William I.; Meyyappan, M.

    2005-06-01

    The role of plasma in plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition of carbon nanotubes and nanofibres is investigated with both experimental and computational diagnostic techniques. A residual gas analysis (RGA) of a 12 mbar dc discharge with a C2H2/NH3 gas mixture is conducted near the Ni catalyst surface employed for carbon nanofibre growth. The results are corroborated with a 1D dc discharge model that solves for species densities, ion momentum, and ion, electron and neutral gas thermal energies. The effect of varying the plasma power from 0 to 200 W on the gas composition is studied. The dissociation efficiency of the plasma is demonstrated where over 50% of the feedstock is converted to a mixture of hydrogen, nitrogen and hydrogen cyanide at 200 W. Finally, the important role that endothermic ion-molecule reactions play in this conversion is, for the first time, established. Of these reactions, dissociative proton abstraction and collision-induced dissociation are of the greatest significance.

  14. Titania Coated Mica via Chemical Vapour Deposition, Post N-doped by Liquid Ammonia Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell, Michael J.; Parkin, Ivan P.

    TiO2 films were successfully grown on synthetic mica powders via Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD). The CVD rig is a cold-walled design that allows surface coverage of a powder to be successfully achieved. The TiO2 was produced by the reaction between TiCl4 and Ethyl Acetate. The powder produced could be successfully N-doped using post liquid ammonia treatment. The TiO2 powder produced could have potential applications in self-cleaning surfaces or antimicrobial paints.

  15. Strain and structure heterogeneity in MoS2 atomic layers grown by chemical vapour deposition

    DOE PAGES

    Liu, Zheng; Amani, Matin; Najmaei, Sina; Xu, Quan; Zou, Xiaolong; Zhou, Wu; Yu, Ting; Qiu, Caiyu; Birdwell, A. Glen; Crowne, Frank J.; et al

    2014-11-18

    Monolayer molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) has attracted tremendous attention due to its promising applications in high-performance field-effect transistors, phototransistors, spintronic devices, and nonlinear optics. The enhanced photoluminescence effect in monolayer MoS2 was discovered and, as a strong tool, was employed for strain and defect analysis in MoS2. Recently, large-size monolayer MoS2 has been produced by chemical vapor deposition but has not yet been fully explored. Here we systematically characterize chemical vapor deposition grown MoS2 by PL spectroscopy and mapping, and demonstrate non-uniform strain in single-crystalline monolayer MoS2 and strain-induced band gap engineering. We also evaluate the effective strain transferred from polymermore » substrates to MoS2 by three-dimensional finite element analysis. In addition, our work demonstrates that PL mapping can be used as a non-contact approach for quick identification of grain boundaries in MoS2.« less

  16. Nanofabrication using home-made RF plasma coupled chemical vapour deposition system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ong, Si Ci; Ilyas, Usman; Rawat, Rajdeep Singh

    2014-08-01

    Zinc oxide, ZnO, a popular semiconductor material with a wide band gap (3.37 eV) and high binding energy of the exciton (60 meV), has numerous applications such as in optoelectronics, chemical/biological sensors, and drug delivery. This project aims to (i) optimize the operating conditions for growth of ZnO nanostructures using the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method, and (ii) investigate the effects of coupling radiofrequency (RF) plasma to the CVD method on the quality of ZnO nanostructures. First, ZnO nanowires were synthesized using a home-made reaction setup on gold-coated and non-coated Si (100) substrates at 950 °C. XRD, SEM, EDX, and PL measurements were used for characterizations and it was found that a deposition duration of 10 minutes produced the most well-defined ZnO nanowires. SEM analysis revealed that the nanowires had diameters ranging from 30-100 mm and lengths ranging from 1-4 µm. In addition, PL analysis showed strong UV emission at 380 nm, making it suitable for UV lasing. Next, RF plasma was introduced for 30 minutes. Both remote and in situ RF plasma produced less satisfactory ZnO nanostructures with poorer crystalline structure, surface morphology, and optical properties due to etching effect of energetic ions produced from plasma. However, a reduction in plasma discharge duration to 10 minutes produced thicker and shorter ZnO nanostructures. Based on experimentation conducted, it is insufficient to conclude that RF plasma cannot aid in producing well-defined ZnO nanostructures. It can be deduced that the etching effect of energetic ions outweighed the increased oxygen radical production in RF plasma nanofabrication.

  17. Aerosol assisted chemical vapour deposition of Cu-ZnO composite from single source precursors.

    PubMed

    Shahid, Muhammad; Mazhar, Muhammad; Hamid, Mazhar; O'Brien, Paul; Malik, Mohammad A; Helliwell, Madeleine; Raftery, James

    2009-07-28

    Two heterobimetallic precursors [Zn(TFA)3(micro-OH)Cu3(dmae)3Cl].THF (1) and [Zn(TFA)4Cu3(dmae)4] (2) [dmae=N,N-dimethylaminoethanolate and TFA=trifluoroacetate], have been synthesized and characterized by their melting points, elemental analysis, FT-IR spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, TGA and single crystal X-ray diffraction methods. Both complexes were used to deposit thin films of Cu-ZnO composite on glass substrates by aerosol assisted chemical vapor deposition (AACVD) method. The films were characterized by "scotch tape" test for adhesion, thickness measurement as a function of temperature, EDX for composition, SEM for surface morphology and XRD for crystalline phases. Thin film deposition studies at 250, 325, 400, 475 degrees C indicated the increase in thickness with temperature reaching a maximum at 400 degrees C and then decreasing. EDX and PXRD results showed the uniform distribution of cubic metallic copper and hexagonal zinc oxide phases which make them useful for nanocatalysis on structured surfaces. PMID:19587992

  18. Biological properties of carbon powders synthesized using chemical vapour deposition and detonation methods.

    PubMed

    Batory, M; Batory, D; Grabarczyk, J; Kaczorowski, W; Kupcewicz, B; Mitura, K; Nasti, T H; Yusuf, N; Niedzielski, P

    2012-12-01

    Carbon powders can be synthesized using variety of CVD and detonation methods. Several interesting properties of carbon powder particles make them a very attractive material examined in many laboratories all over the world. However there is a lack of information discussing investigation of carbon powders directed to its application in pharmaceutical-cosmetic industry and medicine. Earlier investigation results proved that diamond powders present properties fighting free radicals. Presented work discusses the influence of carbon powder particles manufactured using MW/RF PACVD, RF PACVD and detonation methods onto hydro-lipid skin coat. Before the biological examinations physicochemical properties of carbon powders were determined. Grain size, shape and chemical composition of carbon powders were determined using the scanning electron microscopy. Surface functional groups were characterized by IR Fourier-transform spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Structure and phase composition were investigated by means of the Raman spectroscopy. Results of allergy tests performed on laboratory mice proved that carbon powder particles synthesized using different methods do not cause allergy. In the following stage, the group of 20 patients applied the formula including carbon powder on their face skin. The influence of carbon powder onto hydro-lipid skin coat was determined by measurement of such parameters as: pH reaction, skin temperature, lipid fotometry and level of hydration. Additionally, macro pictures of places where the cream had been applied were registered. As the result of the investigation it was found that powders synthesized using various methods present different physicochemical properties which may individually affect the face skin parameters. The noticeable improvement of hydro-lipid skin coat kilter was observed. PMID:23447955

  19. Piezoelectric effect in chemical vapour deposition-grown atomic-monolayer triangular molybdenum disulfide piezotronics.

    PubMed

    Qi, Junjie; Lan, Yann-Wen; Stieg, Adam Z; Chen, Jyun-Hong; Zhong, Yuan-Liang; Li, Lain-Jong; Chen, Chii-Dong; Zhang, Yue; Wang, Kang L

    2015-01-01

    High-performance piezoelectricity in monolayer semiconducting transition metal dichalcogenides is highly desirable for the development of nanosensors, piezotronics and photo-piezotransistors. Here we report the experimental study of the theoretically predicted piezoelectric effect in triangle monolayer MoS2 devices under isotropic mechanical deformation. The experimental observation indicates that the conductivity of MoS2 devices can be actively modulated by the piezoelectric charge polarization-induced built-in electric field under strain variation. These polarization charges alter the Schottky barrier height on both contacts, resulting in a barrier height increase with increasing compressive strain and decrease with increasing tensile strain. The underlying mechanism of strain-induced in-plane charge polarization is proposed and discussed using energy band diagrams. In addition, a new type of MoS2 strain/force sensor built using a monolayer MoS2 triangle is also demonstrated. Our results provide evidence for strain-gating monolayer MoS2 piezotronics, a promising avenue for achieving augmented functionalities in next-generation electronic and mechanical-electronic nanodevices. PMID:26109177

  20. Piezoelectric effect in chemical vapour deposition-grown atomic-monolayer triangular molybdenum disulfide piezotronics

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Junjie; Lan, Yann-Wen; Stieg, Adam Z.; Chen, Jyun-Hong; Zhong, Yuan-Liang; Li, Lain-Jong; Chen, Chii-Dong; Zhang, Yue; Wang, Kang L.

    2015-01-01

    High-performance piezoelectricity in monolayer semiconducting transition metal dichalcogenides is highly desirable for the development of nanosensors, piezotronics and photo-piezotransistors. Here we report the experimental study of the theoretically predicted piezoelectric effect in triangle monolayer MoS2 devices under isotropic mechanical deformation. The experimental observation indicates that the conductivity of MoS2 devices can be actively modulated by the piezoelectric charge polarization-induced built-in electric field under strain variation. These polarization charges alter the Schottky barrier height on both contacts, resulting in a barrier height increase with increasing compressive strain and decrease with increasing tensile strain. The underlying mechanism of strain-induced in-plane charge polarization is proposed and discussed using energy band diagrams. In addition, a new type of MoS2 strain/force sensor built using a monolayer MoS2 triangle is also demonstrated. Our results provide evidence for strain-gating monolayer MoS2 piezotronics, a promising avenue for achieving augmented functionalities in next-generation electronic and mechanical–electronic nanodevices. PMID:26109177

  1. Piezoelectric effect in chemical vapour deposition-grown atomic-monolayer triangular molybdenum disulfide piezotronics.

    PubMed

    Qi, Junjie; Lan, Yann-Wen; Stieg, Adam Z; Chen, Jyun-Hong; Zhong, Yuan-Liang; Li, Lain-Jong; Chen, Chii-Dong; Zhang, Yue; Wang, Kang L

    2015-06-25

    High-performance piezoelectricity in monolayer semiconducting transition metal dichalcogenides is highly desirable for the development of nanosensors, piezotronics and photo-piezotransistors. Here we report the experimental study of the theoretically predicted piezoelectric effect in triangle monolayer MoS2 devices under isotropic mechanical deformation. The experimental observation indicates that the conductivity of MoS2 devices can be actively modulated by the piezoelectric charge polarization-induced built-in electric field under strain variation. These polarization charges alter the Schottky barrier height on both contacts, resulting in a barrier height increase with increasing compressive strain and decrease with increasing tensile strain. The underlying mechanism of strain-induced in-plane charge polarization is proposed and discussed using energy band diagrams. In addition, a new type of MoS2 strain/force sensor built using a monolayer MoS2 triangle is also demonstrated. Our results provide evidence for strain-gating monolayer MoS2 piezotronics, a promising avenue for achieving augmented functionalities in next-generation electronic and mechanical-electronic nanodevices.

  2. a Study of Volatile Precursors for the Growth of Cadmium Sulphide and Cadmium Selenide by Metal Organic Chemical Vapour Deposition.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beer, Michael P.

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. The wide-band-gap semiconductors, cadmium sulphide and cadmium selenide, may be grown by Metal Organic Chemical Vapour Deposition (MOCVD). This method typically involves the reaction of gaseous streams of Me_2 Cd and H_2Y (Y = S, Se) over a heated substrate (usually gallium arsenide) on which the desired compound is grown as an epitaxial layer. Unfortunately, the precursors start to react in the cold zone of the reactor, that is before they reach the heated substrate. This problem is known as prereaction. The problem of prereaction is partially reduced by the use of adducts of dimethyl cadmium in place of the free dialkyl compound although the mechanism by which such adducts block prereaction is unknown. Accordingly, a study of adducts of dimethyl cadmium was undertaken with a view to determining their properties in all phases. The adduct of Me_2Cd with 2,2^ '-bipyridyl was found to be monomeric in the solid state while that with 1,4-dioxane, a volatile compound used for prereaction reduction, was found to be polymeric. A study of adducts in the gas phase using mass spectrometry and gas phase Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy gave no evidence to suggest there is any gas phase association between 1,4-dioxane and dimethyl cadmium. With the 2,2 ^'-bipyridyl adduct some evidence for partial retention of coordinate bonds upon sublimation was obtained. The solid adduct of Me _2Cd with N,N,N^' ,N^'-tetramethylethylenediamine (TMEDA) was prepared as it was hoped that the flexibility of the aliphatic Lewis base would permit the formation of an adduct containing strong co-ordinate bonds which would remain intact upon sublimation. Using gas phase electron diffraction, the structure of the adduct of Me_2Cd and TMEDA was determined. It was shown to exist in the gas phase purely as the associated monomeric species. The adduct was then employed for the growth of CdS and CdSe in an industrial MOCVD apparatus. The

  3. An in situ vapour phase hydrothermal surface doping approach for fabrication of high performance Co3O4 electrocatalysts with an exceptionally high S-doped active surface.

    PubMed

    Tan, Zhijin; Liu, Porun; Zhang, Haimin; Wang, Yun; Al-Mamun, Mohammad; Yang, Hua Gui; Wang, Dan; Tang, Zhiyong; Zhao, Huijun

    2015-04-01

    A facile in situ vapour phase hydrothermal (VPH) surface doping approach has been developed for fabrication of high performance S-doped Co3O4 electrocatalysts with an unprecedentedly high surface S content (>47%). The demonstrated VPH doping approach could be useful for enrichment of surface active sites for other metal oxide electrocatalysts. PMID:25714902

  4. High-Quality Amorphous-Crystalline Silicon Heterostructures Using the Grid-Based Triode Radio-Frequency Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapour Deposition Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahtani, Pratish

    The amorphous-crystalline silicon heterojunction (SHJ) represents a new paradigm in crystalline silicon (c-Si) photovoltaics (PV). To achieve the 27% efficiency target for SHJ PV, defects in the silicon heterointerface must be minimized by growing high-quality hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) onto the c-Si surfaces without deposition-related damage. Typically, a-Si:H is deposited using radio-frequency (RF) plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD), which in its conventional configuration directly exposes the c-Si growth surface to the ignited plasma. In this thesis, silicon heterostructures prepared by the grid-based triode RF PECVD method is investigated for the first time. The triode method allows for high-quality a-Si:H growth with the c-Si surfaces shielded from any potential plasma damage. Using a custom-built configurable PECVD facility, a systematic study was conducted and it was demonstrated that the triode method affords the preparation of a-Si:H with excellent bulk film quality and state-of-the-art passivation for c-Si surfaces. Using the triode method, an effective minority carrier lifetime (taueff) of 8.1 ms and an Auger-corrected surface recombination velocity (S) of 2.4 cm/s at an excess carrier density of 1015 cm-3 have been achieved for 1-2 ohm-cm n-type c-Si passivated with intrinsic a-Si:H. Further, using the triode method to deposit thin-layers of intrinsic and doped a-Si:H, a conventional SHJ solar cell structure was prepared and was found to exhibit an excellent implied Voc of 710 mV. Under all conditions scanned, samples prepared in the triode configuration showed improved passivation compared with samples prepared in the conventional diode configuration with the best triode prepared sample showing a nearly threefold increase in taueff and a twofold decrease in S compared with the best diode prepared sample. Furthermore, a-Si:H deposited using the triode method showed significantly improved bulk properties compared to diode

  5. A Comparative Study of the Dispersion of Multi-Wall Carbon Nanotubes Made by Arc-Discharge and Chemical Vapour Deposition.

    PubMed

    Frømyr, Tomas-Roll; Bourgeaux-Goget, Marie; Hansen, Finn Knut

    2015-05-01

    A method has been developed to characterize the dispersion of multi-wall carbon nanotubes in water using a disc centrifuge for the detection of individual carbon nanotubes, residual aggregates, and contaminants. Carbon nanotubes produced by arc-discharge have been measured and compared with carbon nanotubes produced by chemical vapour deposition. Studies performed on both pristine (see text) arc-discharge nanotubes is rather strong and that high ultra-sound intensity is required to achieve complete dispersion of carbon nanotube bundles. The logarithm of the mode of the particle size distribution of the arc-discharge carbon nanotubes was found to be a linear function of the logarithm of the total ultrasonic energy input in the dispersion process. PMID:26504969

  6. Ellipsometric and Rutherford Back scattering Spectrometry studies of SiO(X)N(Y) films elaborated by plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition technique.

    PubMed

    Mahamdi, R; Boulesbaa, M; Saci, L; Mansour, F; Molliet, C; Collet, M; Temple-Boyer, P

    2011-10-01

    Silicon oxynitride (SiO(X)N(Y)) thin films were deposited by plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition technique (PECVD) from silane (SiH4), nitrous oxide (N2O), ammonia (NH3) and nitrogen (N2) mixture. Spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE), in the range of wavelengths 450-900 nm, was used to define the film thickness and therefore the deposition rate, as well as the refractive index as a function of the N2O gaseous flow. While considering the (Si3N4, SiO2, H2 or void) heterogeneous mixture, Maxwell Garnett (MG) theory allows to fit the SE measurements and to define the volume fraction of the different phases. Finally, Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS) results showed that x = O/Si ratio increases gradually with increasing the N2O flow, allowing the correlation of the SiO(X)N(Y) films main parameters. PMID:22400311

  7. Thin films of tin(II) sulphide (SnS) by aerosol-assisted chemical vapour deposition (AACVD) using tin(II) dithiocarbamates as single-source precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kevin, Punarja; Lewis, David J.; Raftery, James; Azad Malik, M.; O'Brien, Paul

    2015-04-01

    The synthesis of the asymmetric dithiocarbamates of tin(II) with the formula [Sn(S2CNRR')2] (where R=Et, R'=n-Bu (1); R=Me, R'=n-Bu (2); R=R'=Et (3)) and their use for the deposition of SnS thin films by aerosol-assisted chemical vapour deposition (AACVD) is described. The effects of temperature and the concentration of the precursors on deposition were investigated. The stoichiometry of SnS was best at higher concentrations of precursors (250 mM) and at 450 °C. The direct electronic band gap of the SnS produced by this method was estimated from optical absorbance measurements as 1.2 eV. The composition of films was confirmed by powder X-ray diffraction (p-XRD) and energy dispersive analysis of X-rays (EDAX) spectroscopy.

  8. Fabrication of multiwalled carbon nanotubes in the channels of iron loaded three dimensional mesoporous material by catalytic chemical vapour deposition technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somanathan, T.; Gokulakrishnan, N.; Chandrasekar, G.; Pandurangan, A.

    2011-01-01

    The growth of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) was successfully achieved in the channels of three dimensional (3D) iron loaded mesoporous matrices (KIT-6) by employing catalytic chemical vapour deposition (CCVD) technique. The synthesised MWNTs, which were characterised by SEM, TEM and Raman spectroscopy, consist of thick graphene layers of about 10 nm composed of 29 graphene sheets with inner and outer diameter of ∼17 nm and ∼37 nm, respectively. The Raman spectrum showed the formation of well-graphitised MWNTs with significantly higher IG/ID ratio of 1.47 compared to commercial MWNTs. Comparatively, 2 wt% Fe loaded KIT-6 material produced a better yield of 91%, which is also highest compared with the report of MWNTs synthesis using mesoporous materials reported so far.

  9. Copper-Assisted Direct Growth of Vertical Graphene Nanosheets on Glass Substrates by Low-Temperature Plasma-Enhanced Chemical Vapour Deposition Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yifei; Jang, Haegyu; Kim, Sun Jung; Pang, Changhyun; Chae, Heeyeop

    2015-08-01

    Vertical graphene (VG) nanosheets are directly grown below 500 °C on glass substrates by a one-step copper-assisted plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD) process. A piece of copper foil is located around a glass substrate as a catalyst in the process. The effect of the copper catalyst on the vertical graphene is evaluated in terms of film morphology, growth rate, carbon density in the plasma and film resistance. The growth rate of the vertical graphene is enhanced by a factor of 5.6 with the copper catalyst with denser vertical graphene. The analysis of optical emission spectra suggests that the carbon radical density is increased with the copper catalyst. Highly conductive VG films having 800 Ω/□ are grown on glass substrates with Cu catalyst at a relatively low temperature.

  10. A Comparative Study of the Dispersion of Multi-Wall Carbon Nanotubes Made by Arc-Discharge and Chemical Vapour Deposition.

    PubMed

    Frømyr, Tomas-Roll; Bourgeaux-Goget, Marie; Hansen, Finn Knut

    2015-05-01

    A method has been developed to characterize the dispersion of multi-wall carbon nanotubes in water using a disc centrifuge for the detection of individual carbon nanotubes, residual aggregates, and contaminants. Carbon nanotubes produced by arc-discharge have been measured and compared with carbon nanotubes produced by chemical vapour deposition. Studies performed on both pristine (see text) arc-discharge nanotubes is rather strong and that high ultra-sound intensity is required to achieve complete dispersion of carbon nanotube bundles. The logarithm of the mode of the particle size distribution of the arc-discharge carbon nanotubes was found to be a linear function of the logarithm of the total ultrasonic energy input in the dispersion process.

  11. Determination and characterization of phytochelatins by liquid chromatography coupled with on line chemical vapour generation and atomic fluorescence spectrometric detection.

    PubMed

    Bramanti, Emilia; Toncelli, Daniel; Morelli, Elisabetta; Lampugnani, Leonardo; Zamboni, Roberto; Miller, Keith E; Zemetra, Joseph; D'Ulivo, Alessandro

    2006-11-10

    Liquid chromatography (LC) coupled on line with UV/visible diode array detector (DAD) and cold vapour generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry (CVGAFS) has been developed for the speciation, determination and characterization of phytochelatins (PCs). The method is based on a bidimensional approach, e.g. on the analysis of synthetic PC solutions (apo-PCs and Cd(2+)-complexed PCs) (i) by size exclusion chromatography coupled to UV diode array detector (SEC-DAD); (ii) by the derivatization of PC -SH groups in SEC fractions by p-hydroxymercurybenzoate (PHMB) and the indirect detection of PC-PHMB complexes by reversed phase liquid chromatography coupled to atomic fluorescence detector (RPLC-CVGAFS). MALDI-TOF/MS (matrix assisted laser desorption ionization time of flight mass spectrometry) analysis of underivatized synthetic PC samples was performed in order have a qualitative information of their composition. Quantitative analysis of synthetic PC solutions has been performed on the basis of peak area of PC-PHMB complexes of the mercury specific chromatogram and calibration curve of standard solution of glutathione (GSH) complexed to PHMB (GS-PHMB). The limit of quantitation (LOQ) in terms of GS-PHMB complex was 90 nM (CV 5%) with an injection volume of 35 microL, corresponding to 3.2 pmol (0.97 ng) of GSH. The method has been applied to analysis of extracts of cell cultures from Phaeodactylum tricornutum grown in Cd-containing nutrient solutions, analysed by SEC-DAD-CVGAFS and RPLC-DAD-CVGAFS.

  12. Evaluation of water vapour assimilation in the tropical upper troposphere and lower stratosphere by a chemical transport model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Payra, Swagata; Ricaud, Philippe; Abida, Rachid; El Amraoui, Laaziz; Attié, Jean-Luc; Rivière, Emmanuel; Carminati, Fabien; von Clarmann, Thomas

    2016-09-01

    The present analysis deals with one of the most debated aspects of the studies on the upper troposphere/lower stratosphere (UTLS), namely the budget of water vapour (H2O) at the tropical tropopause. Within the French project "Multiscale water budget in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere in the TROpics" (TRO-pico), a global-scale analysis has been set up based on space-borne observations, models and assimilation techniques. The MOCAGE-VALENTINA assimilation tool has been used to assimilate the Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) version 3.3 H2O measurements within the 316-5 hPa range from August 2011 to March 2013 with an assimilation window of 1 h. Diagnostics based on observations minus analysis and forecast are developed to assess the quality of the assimilated H2O fields. Comparison with an independent source of H2O measurements in the UTLS based on the space-borne Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS) observations and with meteorological ARPEGE analyses is also shown. Sensitivity studies of the analysed fields have been performed by (1) considering periods when no MLS measurements are available and (2) using H2O data from another MLS version (4.2). The studies have been performed within three different spaces in time and space coincidences with MLS (hereafter referred to as MLS space) and MIPAS (MIPAS space) observations and with the model (model space) outputs and at three different levels: 121 hPa (upper troposphere), 100 hPa (tropopause) and 68 hPa (lower stratosphere) in January and February 2012. In the MLS space, the analyses behave consistently with the MLS observations from the upper troposphere to the lower stratosphere. In the model space, the analyses are wetter than the reference atmosphere as represented by ARPEGE and MLS in the upper troposphere (121 hPa) and around the tropopause (100 hPa), but are consistent with MLS and MIPAS in the lower stratosphere (68 hPa). In the MIPAS space, the sensitivity and the

  13. Sensing response of copper phthalocyanine salt dispersed glass with organic vapours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ridhi, R.; Sachdeva, Sheenam; Saini, G. S. S.; Tripathi, S. K.

    2016-05-01

    Copper Phthalocyanine and other Metal Phthalocyanines are very flexible and tuned easily to modify their structural, spectroscopic, optical and electrical properties by either functionalizing them with various substituent groups or by replacing or adding a ligand to the central metal atom in the phthalocyanine ring and accordingly can be made sensitive and selective to various organic species or gaseous vapours. In the present work, we have dispersed Copper Phthalocyanine Salt (CuPcS) in sol-gel glass form using chemical route sol-gel method and studied its sensing mechanism with organic vapours like methanol and benzene and found that current increases onto their exposure with vapours. A variation in the activation energies was also observed with exposure of vapours.

  14. Effect of oxygen plasma on field emission characteristics of single-wall carbon nanotubes grown by plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Avshish; Parveen, Shama; Husain, Samina; Ali, Javid; Zulfequar, Mohammad; Harsh; Husain, Mushahid

    2014-02-01

    Field emission properties of single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) grown on iron catalyst film by plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition system were studied in diode configuration. The results were analysed in the framework of Fowler-Nordheim theory. The grown SWCNTs were found to be excellent field emitters, having emission current density higher than 20 mA/cm2 at a turn-on field of 1.3 V/μm. The as grown SWCNTs were further treated with Oxygen (O2) plasma for 5 min and again field emission characteristics were measured. The O2 plasma treated SWCNTs have shown dramatic improvement in their field emission properties with emission current density of 111 mA/cm2 at a much lower turn on field of 0.8 V/μm. The as grown as well as plasma treated SWCNTs were also characterized by various techniques, such as scanning electron microscopy, high resolution transmission electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy before and after O2 plasma treatment and the findings are being reported in this paper.

  15. Fine-tuning of catalytic tin nanoparticles by the reverse micelle method for direct deposition of silicon nanowires by a plasma-enhanced chemical vapour technique.

    PubMed

    Poinern, Gérrard E J; Ng, Yan-Jing; Fawcett, Derek

    2010-12-15

    The reverse micelle method was used for the reduction of a tin (Sn) salt solution to produce metallic Sn nanoparticles ranging from 85 nm to 140 nm in diameter. The reverse micellar system used in this process was hexane-butanol-cetyl trimethylammonium bromide (CTAB). The diameters of the Sn nanoparticles were proportional to the concentration of the aqueous Sn salt solution. Thus, the size of the Sn nanoparticles can easily be controlled, enabling a simple, reproducible mechanism for the growth of silicon nanowires (SiNWs) using plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD). Both the Sn nanoparticles and silicon nanowires were characterised using field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM). Further characterisations of the SiNW's were made using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and Raman spectroscopy. In addition, dynamic light scattering (DLS) was used to investigate particle size distributions. This procedure demonstrates an economical route for manufacturing reproducible silicon nanowires using fine-tuned Sn nanoparticles for possible solar cell applications.

  16. Effect of oxygen plasma on field emission characteristics of single-wall carbon nanotubes grown by plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition system

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Avshish; Parveen, Shama; Husain, Samina; Ali, Javid; Zulfequar, Mohammad; Harsh; Husain, Mushahid

    2014-02-28

    Field emission properties of single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) grown on iron catalyst film by plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition system were studied in diode configuration. The results were analysed in the framework of Fowler-Nordheim theory. The grown SWCNTs were found to be excellent field emitters, having emission current density higher than 20 mA/cm{sup 2} at a turn-on field of 1.3 V/μm. The as grown SWCNTs were further treated with Oxygen (O{sub 2}) plasma for 5 min and again field emission characteristics were measured. The O{sub 2} plasma treated SWCNTs have shown dramatic improvement in their field emission properties with emission current density of 111 mA/cm{sup 2} at a much lower turn on field of 0.8 V/μm. The as grown as well as plasma treated SWCNTs were also characterized by various techniques, such as scanning electron microscopy, high resolution transmission electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy before and after O{sub 2} plasma treatment and the findings are being reported in this paper.

  17. Effect of gas flow rates on the anatase-rutile transformation temperature of nanocrystalline TiO2 synthesised by chemical vapour synthesis.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Md Imteyaz; Bhattacharya, S S; Fasel, Claudia; Hahn, Horst

    2009-09-01

    Of the three crystallographic allotropes of nanocrystalline titania (rutile, anatase and brookite), anatase exhibits the greatest potential for a variety of applications, especially in the area of catalysis and sensors. However, with rutile being thermodynamically the most stable phase, anatase tends to transform into rutile on heating to temperatures in the range of 500 degrees C to 700 degrees C. Efforts made to stabilize the anatase phase at higher temperatures by doping with metal oxides suffer from the problems of having a large amorphous content on synthesis as well as the formation of secondary impurity phases on doping. Recent studies have suggested that the as-synthesised phase composition, crystallite size, initial surface area and processing conditions greatly influence the anatase to rutile transformation temperature. In this study nanocrystalline titania was synthesised in the anatase form bya chemical vapour synthesis (CVS) method using titanium tetra iso-propoxide (TTIP) as a precursor under varying flow rates of oxygen and helium. The anatase to rutile transformation was studied using high temperature X-ray diffraction (HTXRD) and simultaneous thermogravimetric analysis (STA), followed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). It was demonstrated that the anatase-rutile transformation temperatures were dependent on the oxygen to helium flow rate ratio during CVS and the results are presented and discussed. PMID:19928267

  18. Aerosol assisted chemical vapour deposition of ZnO films on glass with noble metal and p-type dopants; use of dopants to influence preferred orientation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walters, G.; Parkin, I. P.

    2009-04-01

    The use of aerosol assisted chemical vapour deposition (AACVD) for the formation of zinc oxide and doped ZnO films with control of preferred orientation on glass is reported. Undoped and doped ZnO host matrix films were highly transparent with visible transmission >85%. The Cu (CuO/Cu 2O) doped ZnO thin films were highly coloured and opaque. Undoped and noble metal doped ZnO films had mainly spherical morphology. Aluminium oxide/ZnO composite films had a range of morphologies from spherical to cubic. The XRD patterns for both doped and undoped ZnO films grown at substrate temperatures less than 500 °C showed strong preferred (0 0 2) crystal lattice orientation. The undoped ZnO film at 500 °C exhibited a random crystal orientation pattern for hexagonal ZnO. The introduction of small amounts of Al 2O 3 within the ZnO to form a composite significantly altered the preferred crystal orientation to (1 0 1).

  19. Heterocyclic dithiocarbamato-iron(III) complexes: single-source precursors for aerosol-assisted chemical vapour deposition (AACVD) of iron sulfide thin films.

    PubMed

    Mlowe, Sixberth; Lewis, David J; Malik, Mohammad Azad; Raftery, James; Mubofu, Egid B; O'Brien, Paul; Revaprasadu, Neerish

    2016-02-14

    Tris-(piperidinedithiocarbamato)iron(III) (1) and tris-(tetrahydroquinolinedithiocarbamato)iron(iii) (2) complexes have been synthesized and their single-crystal X-ray structures were determined. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) of the complexes showed decomposition to iron sulfide. Both complexes were then used as single-source precursors for the deposition of iron sulfide thin films by aerosol-assisted chemical vapour deposition (AACVD). Energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy confirmed the formation of iron sulfide films. The addition of tert-butyl thiol almost doubled the sulfur content in the deposited films. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images of the iron sulfide films from both complexes showed flakes/leaves/sheets, spherical granules and nanofibres. The sizes and shapes of these crystallites depended on the nature of the precursor, temperature, solvent and the amount of tert-butyl thiol used. The observed optical properties are dependent upon the variation of reaction parameters such as temperature and solvent. Powder X-ray diffraction (p-XRD) studies revealed that pyrrhotite, hexagonal (Fe0.975S), marcasite and smythite (Fe3S4) phases were differently deposited. PMID:26732865

  20. Surface engineering of artificial heart valve disks using nanostructured thin films deposited by chemical vapour deposition and sol-gel methods.

    PubMed

    Jackson, M J; Robinson, G M; Ali, N; Kousar, Y; Mei, S; Gracio, J; Taylor, H; Ahmed, W

    2006-01-01

    Pyrolytic carbon (PyC) is widely used in manufacturing commercial artificial heart valve disks (HVD). Although PyC is commonly used in HVD, it is not the best material for this application since its blood compatibility is not ideal for prolonged clinical use. As a result thrombosis often occurs and the patients are required to take anti-coagulation drugs on a regular basis in order to minimize the formation of thrombosis. However, anti-coagulation therapy gives rise to some detrimental side effects in patients. Therefore, it is extremely urgent that newer and more technically advanced materials with better surface and bulk properties are developed. In this paper, we report the mechanical properties of PyC-HVD, i.e. strength, wear resistance and coefficient of friction. The strength of the material was assessed using Brinell indentation tests. Furthermore, wear resistance and coefficient of friction values were obtained from pin-on-disk testing. The micro-structural properties of PyC were characterized using XRD, Raman spectroscopy and SEM analysis. Also in this paper we report the preparation of freestanding nanocrystalline diamond films (FSND) using the time-modulated chemical vapour deposition (TMCVD) process. Furthermore, the sol-gel technique was used to uniformly coat PyC-HVD with dense, nanocrystalline-titanium oxide (nc-TiO2) coatings. The as-grown nc-TiO2 coatings were characterized for microstructure using SEM and XRD analysis.

  1. Study of the catalyst evolution during annealing preceding the growth of carbon nanotubes by microwave plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malesevic, Alexander; Chen, Hong; Hauffman, Tom; Vanhulsel, Annick; Terryn, Herman; Van Haesendonck, Chris

    2007-11-01

    A two-step catalyst annealing process is developed in order to control the diameter of nickel catalyst particles for the growth of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) by microwave plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition (MW PECVD). Thermal annealing of a continuous nickel film in a hydrogen (H2) environment in a first step is found to be insufficient for the formation of nanometre-size, high-density catalyst particles. In a second step, a H2 MW plasma treatment decreases the catalyst diameter by a factor of two and increases the particle density by a factor of five. An x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy study of the catalyst after each step in the annealing process is presented. It is found that the catalyst particles interact with the substrate during thermal annealing, thereby forming a silicate, even if a buffer layer in between the catalyst and the substrate is intended to prevent silicate formation. The silicate formation and reduction is shown to be directly related to the CNT growth mechanism, determining whether the catalyst particles reside at the base or the tip of the growing CNTs. The catalyst particles are used for the growth of a high-density CNT coating by MW PECVD. CNTs are analysed with electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy.

  2. Broadband antireflection for a high-index substrate using SiN x /SiO2 by inductively coupled plasma chemical vapour deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Kim Peng; Ng, Doris K. T.; Wang, Qian

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents the development of broadband antireflection coating for a high-index substrate such as Si using SiN x /SiO2 by inductively coupled plasma chemical vapour deposition (ICP-CVD). The thin-film design employs a simulated annealing method for a minimal average reflectance over the wavelength range and incidence angles involved, which gives the optimized refractive index and thickness of each layer of the thin-film stack under different layer numbers. Using ICP-CVD, the SiN x material system is optimized by tuning the SiH4/N2 gas ratio. The corresponding thin-film characterization shows the precise refractive index/film thickness control in deposition, and the deposited film also has a low absorption coefficient and smooth surface. The double-layer SiN x /SiO2 coating with the optimized refractive index and thickness for broadband antireflection is demonstrated experimentally. The average reflectance of the Si surface is reduced from ~32% to ~3.17% at normal incidence for a wavelength range from 400 to 1100 nm.

  3. Strain and structure heterogeneity in MoS2 atomic layers grown by chemical vapour deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Zheng; Amani, Matin; Najmaei, Sina; Xu, Quan; Zou, Xiaolong; Zhou, Wu; Yu, Ting; Qiu, Caiyu; Birdwell, A. Glen; Crowne, Frank J.; Vajtai, Robert; Yakobson, Boris I.; Xia, Zhenhai; Dubey, Madan; Ajayan, Pulickel M.; Lou, Jun

    2014-11-18

    Monolayer molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) has attracted tremendous attention due to its promising applications in high-performance field-effect transistors, phototransistors, spintronic devices, and nonlinear optics. The enhanced photoluminescence effect in monolayer MoS2 was discovered and, as a strong tool, was employed for strain and defect analysis in MoS2. Recently, large-size monolayer MoS2 has been produced by chemical vapor deposition but has not yet been fully explored. Here we systematically characterize chemical vapor deposition grown MoS2 by PL spectroscopy and mapping, and demonstrate non-uniform strain in single-crystalline monolayer MoS2 and strain-induced band gap engineering. We also evaluate the effective strain transferred from polymer substrates to MoS2 by three-dimensional finite element analysis. In addition, our work demonstrates that PL mapping can be used as a non-contact approach for quick identification of grain boundaries in MoS2.

  4. Direct observation of electron emission from the grain boundaries of chemical vapour deposition diamond films by tunneling atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Chatterjee, Vijay; Harniman, Robert; May, Paul W.; Barhai, P. K.

    2014-04-28

    The emission of electrons from diamond in vacuum occurs readily as a result of the negative electron affinity of the hydrogenated surface due to features with nanoscale dimensions, which can concentrate electric fields high enough to induce electron emission from them. Electrons can be emitted as a result of an applied electric field (field emission) with possible uses in displays or cold-cathode devices. Alternatively, electrons can be emitted simply by heating the diamond in vacuum to temperatures as low as 350 °C (thermionic emission), and this may find applications in solar energy generation or energy harvesting devices. Electron emission studies usually use doped polycrystalline diamond films deposited onto Si or metallic substrates by chemical vapor deposition, and these films have a rough, faceted morphology on the micron or nanometer scale. Electron emission is often improved by patterning the diamond surface into sharp points or needles, the idea being that the field lines concentrate at the points lowering the barrier for electron emission. However, there is little direct evidence that electrons are emitted from these sharp tips. The few reports in the literature that have studied the emission sites suggested that emission came from the grain boundaries and not the protruding regions. We now present direct observation of the emission sites over a large area of polycrystalline diamond using tunneling atomic force microscopy. We confirm that the emission current comes mostly from the grain boundaries, which is consistent with a model for emission in which the non-diamond phase is the source of electrons with a threshold that is determined by the surrounding hydrogenated diamond surface.

  5. Very low temperature epitaxy of Ge and Ge rich SiGe alloys with Ge2H6 in a Reduced Pressure - Chemical Vapour Deposition tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubin, J.; Hartmann, J. M.; Bauer, M.; Moffatt, S.

    2016-07-01

    We have studied the very low temperature epitaxy of pure Ge and of Ge-rich SiGe alloys in a 200 mm industrial reduced pressure chemical vapour deposition tool. We have, first of all, benchmarked germane (GeH4) and digermane (Ge2H6) for the growth of pure Ge. Used Ge2H6 instead of GeH4 enabled us to dramatically increase the Ge growth rate at temperatures 425 °C and lower (5.6 nm min-1 compared to 0.14 nm min-1 at 350 °C with a Ge2H6 mass-flow one fourth that of GeH4). We have also evaluated at 400 °C, 100 Torr, the impact of the GeH4 or Ge2H6 mass-flow on the Ge growth rate. For a given Ge atomic flow, the higher surface reactivity of digermane yielded roughly five times higher growth rates than with germane. We have then combined digermane with disilane (Si2H6) or dichlorosilane (SiH2Cl2) in order to study the GeSi growth kinetics at 475 °C, 100 Torr. While the SiH2Cl2 mass-flow did not have any clear influence on the GeSi growth rate (with a 14 nm min-1 mean value, then), a Si2H6 mass-flow increase resulted in a slight GeSi growth rate increase (from 11 nm min-1 up to 14 nm min-1). Significantly higher Ge concentrations were otherwise accessed with dichlorosilane than with disilane, in the 77-82% range compared to the 39-53% range, respectively.

  6. A spectrometer on chemical vapour deposition-diamond basis for the measurement of the charge-state distribution of heavy ions in a laser-generated plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Cayzac, Witold; Frank, Alexander; Schumacher, Dennis; Roth, Markus; Blazevic, Abel; Wamers, Felix; Traeger, Michael; Berdermann, Eleni; Voss, Bernd; Hessling, Thomas

    2013-04-15

    This article reports on the development and the first applications of a new spectrometer which enables the precise and time-resolved measurement of both the energy loss and the charge-state distribution of ion beams with 10 < Z < 30 at energies of 4-8 MeV/u after their interaction with a laser-generated plasma. The spectrometer is based on five 20 Multiplication-Sign 7 mm{sup 2} large and 20 {mu}m thick polycrystalline diamond samples produced via the Chemical Vapour Deposition (CVD) process and was designed with the help of ion-optical simulations. First experiments with the spectrometer were successfully carried out at GSI using {sup 48}Ca ions at an energy of 4.8 MeV/u interacting with a carbon plasma generated by the laser irradiation of a thin foil target. Owing to the high rate capability and the short response time of the spectrometer, pulsed ion beams with 10{sup 3}-10{sup 4} ions per bunch at a bunch frequency of 108 MHz could be detected. The temporal evolution of the five main charge states of the calcium ion beams as well as the corresponding energy loss values could be measured simultaneously. Due to the outstanding properties of diamond as a particle detector, a beam energy resolution ({Delta}E/E) Almost-Equal-To 0.1% could be reached using the presented experimental method, while a precision of 10% in the energy loss and charge-state distribution data was obtained.

  7. Comparison of the Er,Cr:YSGG laser with a chemical vapour deposition bur and conventional techniques for cavity preparation: a microleakage study.

    PubMed

    Yazici, A Rüya; Yıldırım, Zeren; Antonson, Sibel A; Kilinc, Evren; Koch, Daniele; Antonson, Donald E; Dayangaç, Berrin; Ozgünaltay, Gül

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effects of the Er,Cr:YSGG laser using chemical vapour deposition (CVD) bur cavity preparation with conventional preparation methods including a diamond bur and a carbide bur on the microleakage with two different adhesive systems. A total of 40 extracted human premolars were randomly assigned to four experimental groups according to the cavity preparation technique: group I diamond bur (Diatech); group II carbide bur (Diatech); group III Er,Cr:YSGG laser (Biolase Millennium II); and group IV CVD bur (CVDentUS). Using the different preparation techniques, Class V standardized preparations were performed on the buccal and lingual surfaces with gingival margins on the dentin and occlusal margins on the enamel. Each preparation group was randomly assigned to two subgroups (five teeth, ten preparations) according to the type of adhesive: an etch-and-rinse adhesive (Adper Single Bond), and a single-step self-etch adhesive (AdheSE One). All preparations were restored with a nanohybrid composite resin in a single increment. Following thermocycling (×500; 5-55°C), the teeth were immersed in basic fuchsin and sectioned in the orovestibular direction. Dye penetration was evaluated under a light microscope by two blinded examiners. Data were statistically analysed with the Kruskal-Wallis and Wilcoxon tests (p<0.05). There were no statistically significant differences between the preparation techniques with either of the two adhesive systems (p>0.05). Comparing the enamel and dentin leakage scores within each group, no statistically significant differences were found (p>0.05). The Er,Cr:YSGG laser cavity preparation did not differ from preparation with CVD, diamond or carbide bur in terms of microleakage with the different adhesive systems.

  8. Metalorganic chemical vapour deposition of GaN layers on ZnO substrates using α-Al2O3 as a transition layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shen-Jie; Li, Nola; Yu, Hong Bo; Feng, Zhe Chuan; Summers, Christopher; Ferguson, Ian

    2009-12-01

    This work addresses the instability of a ZnO substrate during metalorganic chemical vapour deposition (MOCVD) growth of GaN by using Al2O3 films deposited by atomic layer deposition (ALD) as a stabilizing transition layer on the Zn face of ZnO (0 0 0 1) substrates. A systematic study of Al2O3 films of different thicknesses (2-90 nm) under different ALDs and post-annealing conditions was carried out. However, this paper focuses on as-deposited 20 and 50 nm Al2O3 films that were transformed to polycrystalline α-Al2O3 phases after optimal annealing at 1100 °C for 10 min and 20 min, respectively. GaN layers were grown on ZnO substrates with these α-Al2O3 transition layers by MOCVD using NH3 as a nitrogen source. Wurtzite GaN was observed by high resolution x-ray diffraction only on 20 nm Al2O3/ZnO substrates. Field-emission scanning electron microscopy showed a mirror-like surface, no etch pits and no film peeling in these samples. Room temperature photoluminescence showed a red-shift in the near band-edge emission of GaN, which may be related to oxygen incorporation forming a shallow donor-related level in GaN. Raman scattering also indicated the presence of a well-crystallized GaN layer on the 20 nm Al2O3/ZnO substrate.

  9. Perovskite tungsten bronze-type crystals of Li{sub x}WO{sub 3} grown by chemical vapour transport and their characterisation

    SciTech Connect

    Ruescher, Claus H. Dey, Kalpana R.; Debnath, Tapas; Horn, Ingo; Glaum, Robert; Hussain, Altaf

    2008-01-15

    Crystals of Li{sub x}WO{sub 3} with nominal compositions, x=0.1, 0.25, 0.3, 0.35, 0.4 and 0.45 were grown by chemical vapour transport method using HgCl{sub 2} as transporting agent. A complete transport was achieved with a temperature gradient T{sub 1}/T{sub 2}=800/700 deg. C revealing bluish-black crystals of sizes up to a few 10th of a millimeter. X-ray powder diffraction and infrared (IR) absorption spectra show Perovskite tungsten bronze of cubic symmetry (PTB{sub c}) for x=0.45 and 0.4, mixed phase of PTB{sub c} and Perovskite tungsten bronze of tetragonal symmetry (PTB{sub t}) for x=0.35, 0.3 and 0.25 and of PTB{sub t} and Perovskite tungsten bronze of orthorhombic symmetry (PTB{sub o}) for x=0.1. The structure of PTB{sub t} is explained by the off centring of the W-ions along c and tilting of the WO{sub 6} octahedra around c. Crystal slices of mixed phase (i.e. PTB{sub c} and PTB{sub t}) reveal bright and dark areas on a sub-millimeter scale which are separated by sharp interfaces. Laser ablation inductively coupled plasma optical emission (LA ICP OES) analysis on small spot sizes show the separation into Li contents of x=0.18 (bright areas) and x=0.38 (dark areas) as threshold compositions of PTB{sub t} and PTB{sub c}, respectively. Polarized reflectivity using a microscope technique in the bright area of the crystals indicates strong anisotropic absorption effects with maximum between 1000 and 6000 cm{sup -1}, which are related to optical excitations of polarons. Crystals of composition x=0.4 and 0.45 appear optically homogeneous and show an effective 'free carrier-type plasma frequency' (w{sub p}) of about 12,900 and 13,700 cm{sup -1}, respectively. - Graphical abstract: Optical microscope image (reflection mode) of Li{sub x}WO{sub 3} crystals of nominal composition x=0.35. The separation into PTB{sub cubic} (dark areas) and PTB{sub tetragonal} (bright areas) were used to determine the miscibility gap and optical properties.

  10. A liquid crystalline chirality balance for vapours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohzono, Takuya; Yamamoto, Takahiro; Fukuda, Jun-Ichi

    2014-04-01

    Chiral discrimination of vapours plays an important role in olfactory perception of biological systems and its realization by artificial sensors has been an intriguing challenge. Here, we report a simple method that tangibly visualizes the chirality of a diverse variety of molecules dissolved from vapours with high sensitivity, by making use of a structural change in a periodic microstructure of a nematic liquid crystal confined in open microchannels. This microstructure is accompanied by a topological line defect of a zigzag form with equal lengths of ‘zig’ and ‘zag.’ We find that a tiny amount of vapour of chiral molecules injected onto the liquid crystal induces the imbalance of ‘zig’ and ‘zag’ depending on its enantiomeric excess within a few seconds. Our liquid-crystal-based ‘chirality balance’ offers a simple, quick and versatile chirality-sensing/-screening method for gas-phase analysis (for example, for odours, environmental chemicals or drugs).

  11. Inorganic chemically active adsorbents (ICAAs)

    SciTech Connect

    Ally, M.R.; Tavlarides, L.

    1997-10-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) researchers are developing a technology that combines metal chelation extraction technology and synthesis chemistry. They begin with a ceramic substrate such as alumina, titanium oxide or silica gel because they provide high surface area, high mechanical strength, and radiolytic stability. One preparation method involves silylation to hydrophobize the surface, followed by chemisorption of a suitable chelation agent using vapor deposition. Another route attaches newly designed chelating agents through covalent bonding by the use of coupling agents. These approaches provide stable and selective, inorganic chemically active adsorbents (ICAAs) tailored for removal of metals. The technology has the following advantages over ion exchange: (1) higher mechanical strength, (2) higher resistance to radiation fields, (3) higher selectivity for the desired metal ion, (4) no cation exchange, (5) reduced or no interference from accompanying anions, (6) faster kinetics, and (7) easy and selective regeneration. Target waste streams include metal-containing groundwater/process wastewater at ORNL`s Y-12 Plant (multiple metals), Savannah River Site (SRS), Rocky Flats (multiple metals), and Hanford; aqueous mixed wastes at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL); and scrubber water generated at SRS and INEL. Focus Areas that will benefit from this research include Mixed Waste, and Subsurface Contaminants.

  12. From GNSS and meteorological data to NRT 4D water vapour distribution - GNSS meteorology activities at WUELS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosy, Jaroslaw; Kaplon, Jan; Rohm, Witold; Sierny, Jan; Wilgan, Karina; Hadas, Tomasz; Hordyniec, Pawel

    2014-05-01

    The GNSS and Meteo group at Wroclaw University of Environmental and Life Sciences (WUELS), Poland is continuously working on GNSS meteorology since 2010. Currently group maintain real-time (RT) service collecting GNSS and meteorological data and near real-time (NRT) services for estimation of Zenith Troposphere Delay (ZTD), Zenith Hydrostatic Delay (ZHD), Integrated Water Vapour (IWV) and GNSS tomography over the territory of Poland. Data are obtained with high resolution from EUREF Permanent Network (EPN) stations and Ground Base Augmentation System (GBAS) called ASG-EUPOS (www.asgeupos.pl). The GNSS data are available from 124 reference stations located in Poland and neighbour countries, with the average 70km distance between stations. The ground meteorological observations in the area of Poland and neighbour countries are available from: ASG-EUPOS stations included in EUREF Permanent Network (EPN), airport meteorological stations (METAR messages stations) and stations managed by national Institute of Meteorology and Water Management (SYNOP messages stations). The first part of the paper presents the methodology of ASG-EUPOS GNSS data processing for NRT ZTD and ZTD horizontal gradients estimation in double-differenced mode (under Bernese GNSS Software V5.0) as well as new results from PPP mode (under Bernese GNSS Software V5.2) and their validation with respect to Rapid and Final troposphere products. The second part is describing the quality assessment of meteorological parameters interpolation methods for determination of ZHD at GNSS sites performed on GNSS stations equipped with meteorological sensors. The third part concerns on the comparisons of ZTD from GNSS data and meteorological parameters from SYNOP stations with data from COAMPS numerical weather prediction system (NWP) and IWV calculation. The fourth part presents the development of GNSS tomography model TOMO2. The last part describes methods of above products validation and visualization over the

  13. On-line chemical vapour generation of cadmium in the presence of hexacyanochromate(III) for determination by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS)

    PubMed Central

    Yilmaz, Vedat; Rose, LaKeysha; Little, Maria D.

    2012-01-01

    A vapour generation (VG) procedure has been described for determination of Cd by ICP-MS. Volatile species of Cd were generated on-line by interacting acidic sample solution containing potassium hexacyanochromate(III), K3Cr(CN)6, with sodium borohydride (NaBH4). The hexacyanochromate(III) complex was generated on-line by reacting 0.04 mol L−1 chromium(III) nitrate and 0.16 mol L−1 potassium cyanide (KCN) solutions in water. The resulting suspension of chromium(III) hydroxide, Cr(OH)3, was fed continuously to acidic stream of sample solution in the presence of excess KCN. The experimental conditions were optimized for effective generation of volatile species of Cd. Optimum signals were obtained from reaction of sample solutions in 4% v/v HCl with 2% m/v NaBH4 solution. Presence of K3Cr(CN)6 improved the efficiency of Cd vapour generation substantially affording 15-fold higher sensitivity. This phenomenon was thought to occur through formation of reactive intermediates evolved from interaction of [Cr(CN)6]3− with NaBH4 that react with Cd(II) to increase the yield volatile Cd species. Under the optimum conditions, no significant interferences were observed from the transition metals, including Cu and Ni, up to 1.0 μg mL−1 levels. Among the hydride forming elements, Bi, Pb, Sb and Sn depressed the signals above 0.1 μg mL−1. The detection limits (3s) were 6.2 and 5.2 ng L−1 for 110Cd and 111Cd isotopes, respectively. The method was successfully applied to determination of Cd by ICP-MS in several certified reference materials, including Nearshore seawater (CASS-4), Bone ash (SRM 1400), Dogfish liver (DOLT-4) and Mussel tissue (SRM 2976). PMID:23997384

  14. Excitation mechanism and thermal emission quenching of Tb ions in silicon rich silicon oxide thin films grown by plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition—Do we need silicon nanoclusters?

    SciTech Connect

    Podhorodecki, A. Golacki, L. W.; Zatryb, G.; Misiewicz, J.; Wang, J.; Jadwisienczak, W.; Fedus, K.

    2014-04-14

    In this work, we will discuss the excitation and emission properties of Tb ions in a Silicon Rich Silicon Oxide (SRSO) matrix obtained at different technological conditions. By means of electron cyclotron resonance plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition, undoped and doped SRSO films have been obtained with different Si content (33, 35, 39, 50 at. %) and were annealed at different temperatures (600, 900, 1100 °C). The samples were characterized optically and structurally using photoluminescence (PL), PL excitation, time resolved PL, absorption, cathodoluminescence, temperature dependent PL, Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy. Based on the obtained results, we discuss how the matrix modifications influence excitation and emission properties of Tb ions.

  15. Science Activities in Energy: Chemical Energy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oak Ridge Associated Universities, TN.

    Presented is a science activities in energy package which includes 15 activities relating to chemical energy. Activities are simple, concrete experiments for fourth, fifth and sixth grades which illustrate principles and problems relating to energy. Each activity is outlined on a single card which is introduced by a question. A teacher's…

  16. The interaction of an atmospheric pressure plasma jet using argon or argon plus hydrogen peroxide vapour addition with bacillus subtilis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, San-Xi; Cheng, Cheng; Ni, Guo-Hua; Meng, Yue-Dong; Chen, Hua

    2010-10-01

    This paper reports that an atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge plasma jet, which uses argon or argon + hydrogen peroxide vapour as the working gas, is designed to sterilize the bacillus subtilis. Compared with the pure argon plasma, the bacterial inactivation efficacy has a significant improvement when hydrogen peroxide vapour is added into the plasma jet. In order to determine which factors play the main role in inactivation, several methods are used, such as determination of optical emission spectra, high temperature dry air treatment, protein leakage quantification, and scanning electron microscope. These results indicate that the possible inactivation mechanisms are the synergistic actions of chemically active species and charged species.

  17. Mitochondrial-driven sustained active water vapour absorption (WVA) in the firebrat, Thermobia domestica (Packard), during development and the moulting cycle.

    PubMed

    Noble-Nesbitt, John

    2010-05-01

    Rapid pre-functional mitochondrial biogenesis in the short-lived first-instar nymph occurs in the cells of the developing posterior rectal sacs which when mature are the organs believed to be responsible for sustained active water vapour absorption (WVA) in the firebrat Thermobia domestica (Packard). During the second instar, the mitochondria migrate apically and begin to associate with deep portasome-studded infolds of the apical plasma membrane (apm), just as WVA starts sporadically. By mid to late in the third instar the mature mitochondria-apm apical complex is fully developed, with elongated tubular mitochondria vertically packed hexagonally in transverse section and adpressed to the deeply pleated infolds of the apm, giving the greatest known concentration of mitochondria. This coincides with peak mass-specific WVA. During moults, WVA temporarily ceases as the sac cells secrete a new cuticle overlying the sac epithelium. Their apical complex fully regresses. Mitochondria migrate perinuclearly. The apm is pinched-off into numerous small portasome-studded pouches which remain sequestered within the cytoplasm. Towards the end of the moult the apm pouches reassemble into deeply pleated infolds into which the mitochondria migrate and elongate, rapidly re-establishing the hexagonal array of the apical complex. This coincides with the recommencement of WVA. PMID:20223239

  18. Chemical Potentials and Activities: An Electrochemical Introduction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wetzel, T. L.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Describes a laboratory experiment which explores the effects of adding inert salts to electrolytic cells and demonstrates the difference between concentration and chemical activity. Examines chemical potentials as the driving force of reactions. Provides five examples of cell potential and concentration change. (JM)

  19. Seasonal and site-specific variation in vapour and aerosol phase PAHs over Flanders (Belgium) and their relation with anthropogenic activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravindra, Khaiwal; Bencs, László; Wauters, Eric; de Hoog, Johan; Deutsch, Felix; Roekens, Edward; Bleux, Nico; Berghmans, Patrick; Van Grieken, René

    The concentrations of 16 US-EPA criteria polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were monitored during various seasons at six different cities/locations in the northern part of Belgium. Pressurized liquid extraction (PLE) was used for the fast recovery of PAHs from quartz fibre filters (QFFs) and polyurethane foams (PUFs) in less than 30 min with minimum solvent consumption prior to their analysis with high-performance liquid chromatography. The concentrations of PAHs varied significantly at the studied sites and showed relation to different anthropogenic activities, such as vehicular emission (diesel/gasoline), incinerator, petroleum/oil burning, coke production, and wood/coal combustion. The annual average PAH concentration ranged from 17 (at a rural site) to 114 ng m -3 (near a petroleum harbour and industry). Most of the human carcinogenic PAHs were found to be associated with suspended particulate matter, which forms around ˜55% of the total PAH levels in aerosols. Relatively higher concentrations of PAHs were detected in aerosol samples during winter compared with other seasons, whereas no clear seasonal trend was observed for the vapour phase PAHs. This fraction is likely to be more local in origin; hence, it can be used as a site-specific characteristic. The site-specific concentrations of individual PAHs were also used in diagnostic ratio evaluations and in principal component analysis to find their relation with various anthropogenic activities. These results show that the vehicular emission is a major source of PAHs in Flanders, although other anthropogenic sources, as above, have also an impact on the total PAH levels.

  20. Resonant and nonresonant vibrational excitation of ammonia molecules in the growth of gallium nitride using laser-assisted metal organic chemical vapour deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golgir, Hossein Rabiee; Zhou, Yun Shen; Li, Dawei; Keramatnejad, Kamran; Xiong, Wei; Wang, Mengmeng; Jiang, Li Jia; Huang, Xi; Jiang, Lan; Silvain, Jean Francois; Lu, Yong Feng

    2016-09-01

    The influence of exciting ammonia (NH3) molecular vibration in the growth of gallium nitride (GaN) was investigated by using an infrared laser-assisted metal organic chemical vapor deposition method. A wavelength tunable CO2 laser was used to selectively excite the individual vibrational modes. Resonantly exciting the NH-wagging mode (v2) of NH3 molecules at 9.219 μm led to a GaN growth rate of 84 μm/h, which is much higher than the reported results. The difference between the resonantly excited and conventional thermally populated vibrational states was studied via resonant and nonresonant vibrational excitations of NH3 molecules. Resonant excitation of various vibrational modes was achieved at 9.219, 10.35, and 10.719 μm, respectively. Nonresonant excitation was conducted at 9.201 and 10.591 μm, similar to conventional thermal heating. Compared to nonresonant excitation, resonant excitation noticeably promotes the GaN growth rate and crystalline quality. The full width at half maximum value of the XRD rocking curves of the GaN (0002) and GaN (10-12) diffraction peaks decreased at resonant depositions and reached its minimum value of 45 and 53 arcmin, respectively, at the laser wavelength of 9.219 μm. According to the optical emission spectroscopic studies, resonantly exciting the NH3 v2 mode leads to NH3 decomposition at room temperature, reduces the formation of the TMGa:NH3 adduct, promotes the supply of active species in GaN formation, and, therefore, results in the increased GaN growth rate.

  1. [CO2-gas exchange of mosses following water vapour uptake].

    PubMed

    Lange, O L

    1969-03-01

    The CO2-gas exchange of dry mosses which were exposed to air of high water vapour content has been followed. Some moss species behave as do lichens and aerophilic green algae: they are able to take up enough water vapour to make a rather high photosynthetic activity possible. Other species lack this ability. They need liquid water for reactivation of photosynthesis, as do poikilohydric ferns and phanerogams. In this respect too the mosses are located between the real thallophytes and the cormophytes. From this point of view they are useful objects for studying the relationships between water vapour reactivation, morphological organisation and ecological capability.

  2. [CO2-gas exchange of mosses following water vapour uptake].

    PubMed

    Lange, O L

    1969-03-01

    The CO2-gas exchange of dry mosses which were exposed to air of high water vapour content has been followed. Some moss species behave as do lichens and aerophilic green algae: they are able to take up enough water vapour to make a rather high photosynthetic activity possible. Other species lack this ability. They need liquid water for reactivation of photosynthesis, as do poikilohydric ferns and phanerogams. In this respect too the mosses are located between the real thallophytes and the cormophytes. From this point of view they are useful objects for studying the relationships between water vapour reactivation, morphological organisation and ecological capability. PMID:24504355

  3. A liquid crystalline chirality balance for vapours

    PubMed Central

    Ohzono, Takuya; Yamamoto, Takahiro; Fukuda, Jun-ichi

    2014-01-01

    Chiral discrimination of vapours plays an important role in olfactory perception of biological systems and its realization by artificial sensors has been an intriguing challenge. Here, we report a simple method that tangibly visualizes the chirality of a diverse variety of molecules dissolved from vapours with high sensitivity, by making use of a structural change in a periodic microstructure of a nematic liquid crystal confined in open microchannels. This microstructure is accompanied by a topological line defect of a zigzag form with equal lengths of ‘zig’ and ‘zag.’ We find that a tiny amount of vapour of chiral molecules injected onto the liquid crystal induces the imbalance of ‘zig’ and ‘zag’ depending on its enantiomeric excess within a few seconds. Our liquid-crystal-based ‘chirality balance’ offers a simple, quick and versatile chirality-sensing/-screening method for gas-phase analysis (for example, for odours, environmental chemicals or drugs). PMID:24781531

  4. Activated coconut shell charcoal carbon using chemical-physical activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budi, Esmar; Umiatin, Nasbey, Hadi; Bintoro, Ridho Akbar; Wulandari, Futri; Erlina

    2016-02-01

    The use of activated carbon from natural material such as coconut shell charcoal as metal absorbance of the wastewater is a new trend. The activation of coconut shell charcoal carbon by using chemical-physical activation has been investigated. Coconut shell was pyrolized in kiln at temperature about 75 - 150 °C for about 6 hours in producing charcoal. The charcoal as the sample was shieved into milimeter sized granule particle and chemically activated by immersing in various concentration of HCl, H3PO4, KOH and NaOH solutions. The samples then was physically activated using horizontal furnace at 400°C for 1 hours in argon gas environment with flow rate of 200 kg/m3. The surface morphology and carbon content of activated carbon were characterized by using SEM/EDS. The result shows that the pores of activated carbon are openned wider as the chemical activator concentration is increased due to an excessive chemical attack. However, the pores tend to be closed as further increasing in chemical activator concentration due to carbon collapsing.

  5. Generation of continuous wave terahertz frequency radiation from metal-organic chemical vapour deposition grown Fe-doped InGaAs and InGaAsP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohandas, Reshma A.; Freeman, Joshua R.; Rosamond, Mark C.; Hatem, Osama; Chowdhury, Siddhant; Ponnampalam, Lalitha; Fice, Martyn; Seeds, Alwyn J.; Cannard, Paul J.; Robertson, Michael J.; Moodie, David G.; Cunningham, John E.; Davies, A. Giles; Linfield, Edmund H.; Dean, Paul

    2016-04-01

    We demonstrate the generation of continuous wave terahertz (THz) frequency radiation from photomixers fabricated on both Fe-doped InGaAs and Fe-doped InGaAsP, grown by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition. The photomixers were excited using a pair of distributed Bragg reflector lasers with emission around 1550 nm, and THz radiation was emitted over a bandwidth of greater than 2.4 THz. Two InGaAs and four InGaAsP wafers with different Fe doping concentrations were investigated, with the InGaAs material found to outperform the InGaAsP in terms of emitted THz power. The dependencies of the emitted power on the photomixer applied bias, incident laser power, and material doping level were also studied.

  6. Collective Surfing of Chemically Active Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masoud, Hassan; Shelley, Michael J.

    2014-03-01

    We study theoretically the collective dynamics of immotile particles bound to a 2D surface atop a 3D fluid layer. These particles are chemically active and produce a chemical concentration field that creates surface-tension gradients along the surface. The resultant Marangoni stresses create flows that carry the particles, possibly concentrating them. For a 3D diffusion-dominated concentration field and Stokesian fluid we show that the surface dynamics of active particle density can be determined using nonlocal 2D surface operators. Remarkably, we also show that for both deep or shallow fluid layers this surface dynamics reduces to the 2D Keller-Segel model for the collective chemotactic aggregation of slime mold colonies. Mathematical analysis has established that the Keller-Segel model can yield finite-time, finite-mass concentration singularities. We show that such singular behavior occurs in our finite-depth system, and study the associated 3D flow structures.

  7. Collective surfing of chemically active particles.

    PubMed

    Masoud, Hassan; Shelley, Michael J

    2014-03-28

    We study theoretically the collective dynamics of immotile particles bound to a 2D surface atop a 3D fluid layer. These particles are chemically active and produce a chemical concentration field that creates surface-tension gradients along the surface. The resultant Marangoni stresses create flows that carry the particles, possibly concentrating them. For a 3D diffusion-dominated concentration field and Stokesian fluid we show that the surface dynamics of active particle density can be determined using nonlocal 2D surface operators. Remarkably, we also show that for both deep or shallow fluid layers this surface dynamics reduces to the 2D Keller-Segel model for the collective chemotactic aggregation of slime mold colonies. Mathematical analysis has established that the Keller-Segel model can yield finite-time, finite-mass concentration singularities. We show that such singular behavior occurs in our finite-depth system, and study the associated 3D flow structures. PMID:24724685

  8. Growth of n-type polycrystalline pyrite (FeS 2) films by metalorganic chemical vapour deposition and their electrical characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oertel, J.; Ellmer, K.; Bohne, W.; Röhrich, J.; Tributsch, H.

    1999-03-01

    The compound semiconductor pyrite (FeS 2) has attracted attention as a possible absorber material for thin film solar cells. In this article it is shown for the first time that polycrystalline pyrite films which normally show p-type conductivity, can in situ be doped n-type by using cobalt as a dopant above a concentration of 0.3 at%. The chemical cobalt concentration - determined by high energy heavy ion Rutherford backscattering analysis - is proportional to the cobalt-to-iron ratio in the gas phase. The carrier concentrations are very high (>10 20 cm -3) and the Seebeck coefficients are low (<70 μV/K), pointing at degenerated semiconductor properties. The carrier transport in the films can be described by the grain barrier limited transport model described by Seto (1975). From the temperature dependence of the Hall mobility, barrier heights of 7-37 meV have been determined. The trap density in the grain barriers is about 2×10 13 cm -2, a value which is much higher than in polycrystalline silicon or CdS-films.

  9. Chemical activation through super energy transfer collisions.

    PubMed

    Smith, Jonathan M; Nikow, Matthew; Ma, Jianqiang; Wilhelm, Michael J; Han, Yong-Chang; Sharma, Amit R; Bowman, Joel M; Dai, Hai-Lung

    2014-02-01

    Can a molecule be efficiently activated with a large amount of energy in a single collision with a fast atom? If so, this type of collision will greatly affect molecular reactivity and equilibrium in systems where abundant hot atoms exist. Conventional expectation of molecular energy transfer (ET) is that the probability decreases exponentially with the amount of energy transferred, hence the probability of what we label "super energy transfer" is negligible. We show, however, that in collisions between an atom and a molecule for which chemical reactions may occur, such as those between a translationally hot H atom and an ambient acetylene (HCCH) or sulfur dioxide, ET of chemically significant amounts of energy commences with surprisingly high efficiency through chemical complex formation. Time-resolved infrared emission observations are supported by quasi-classical trajectory calculations on a global ab initio potential energy surface. Results show that ∼10% of collisions between H atoms moving with ∼60 kcal/mol energy and HCCH result in transfer of up to 70% of this energy to activate internal degrees of freedom.

  10. On-line speciation of inorganic and methyl mercury in waters and fish tissues using polyaniline micro-column and flow injection-chemical vapour generation-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (FI-CVG-ICPMS).

    PubMed

    Krishna, M V Balarama; Chandrasekaran, K; Karunasagar, D

    2010-04-15

    A simple and efficient method for the determination of ultra-trace amounts of inorganic mercury (iHg) and methylmercury (MeHg) in waters and fish tissues was developed using a micro-column filled with polyaniline (PANI) coupled online to flow injection-chemical vapour generation-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (FI-CVG-ICPMS) system. Preliminary studies indicated that inorganic and methyl mercury species could be separated on PANI column in two different speciation approaches. At pH <3, only iHg could be sorbed and almost no adsorption of MeHg was found (speciation procedure 1). If the sample solution pH is approximately 7, both MeHg and iHg species could be sorbed on the PANI column. Subsequently both the Hg species were selectively eluted with 2% HCl and a mixture of 2% HCl and 0.02% thiourea respectively (speciation procedure 2). The adsorption percentage of iHg on the PANI column was unchanged even with acidity of the sample solution increased to 6 mol L(-1). Therefore, an acidic solution (5 mol L(-1) HCl), used for ultra-sound assisted extraction of the mercury species from biological samples, was used directly to separate MeHg from iHg in the fish tissues (tuna fish ERM-CE 463, ERM-CE 464 and IAEA-350) by PANI column using speciation procedure 1. The determined values were in good agreement with certified values. Under optimal conditions, the limits of detection (LODs) were 2.52 pg and 3.24 pg for iHg and MeHg (as Hg) respectively. The developed method was applied successfully to the direct determination of iHg and MeHg in various waters (tap water, lake water, ground water and sea-water) and the recoveries for the spiked samples were in the range of 96-102% for both the Hg species. PMID:20188947

  11. Experimental and theoretical rationalization of the growth mechanism of silicon quantum dots in non-stoichiometric SiN x : role of chlorine in plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mon-Pérez, E.; Salazar, J.; Ramos, E.; Santoyo Salazar, J.; López Suárez, A.; Dutt, A.; Santana, G.; Marel Monroy, B.

    2016-11-01

    Silicon quantum dots (Si-QDs) embedded in an insulator matrix are important from a technological and application point of view. Thus, being able to synthesize them in situ during the matrix growth process is technologically advantageous. The use of SiH2Cl2 as the silicon precursor in the plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD) process allows us to obtain Si-QDs without post-thermal annealing. Foremost in this work, is a theoretical rationalization of the mechanism responsible for Si-QD generation in a film including an analysis of the energy released by the extraction of HCl and the insertion of silylene species into the terminal surface bonds. From the results obtained using density functional theory (DFT), we propose an explanation of the mechanism responsible for the formation of Si-QDs in non-stoichiometric SiN x starting from chlorinated precursors in a PECVD system. Micrograph images obtained through transmission electron microscopy confirmed the presence of Si-QDs, even in nitrogen-rich (N-rich) samples. The film stoichiometry was controlled by varying the growth parameters, in particular the NH3/SiH2Cl2 ratio and hydrogen dilution. Experimental and theoretical results together show that using a PECVD system, along with chlorinated precursors it is possible to obtain Si-QDs at a low substrate temperature without annealing treatment. The optical property studies carried out in the present work highlight the prospects of these thin films for down shifting and as an antireflection coating in silicon solar cells.

  12. On-line speciation of inorganic and methyl mercury in waters and fish tissues using polyaniline micro-column and flow injection-chemical vapour generation-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (FI-CVG-ICPMS).

    PubMed

    Krishna, M V Balarama; Chandrasekaran, K; Karunasagar, D

    2010-04-15

    A simple and efficient method for the determination of ultra-trace amounts of inorganic mercury (iHg) and methylmercury (MeHg) in waters and fish tissues was developed using a micro-column filled with polyaniline (PANI) coupled online to flow injection-chemical vapour generation-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (FI-CVG-ICPMS) system. Preliminary studies indicated that inorganic and methyl mercury species could be separated on PANI column in two different speciation approaches. At pH <3, only iHg could be sorbed and almost no adsorption of MeHg was found (speciation procedure 1). If the sample solution pH is approximately 7, both MeHg and iHg species could be sorbed on the PANI column. Subsequently both the Hg species were selectively eluted with 2% HCl and a mixture of 2% HCl and 0.02% thiourea respectively (speciation procedure 2). The adsorption percentage of iHg on the PANI column was unchanged even with acidity of the sample solution increased to 6 mol L(-1). Therefore, an acidic solution (5 mol L(-1) HCl), used for ultra-sound assisted extraction of the mercury species from biological samples, was used directly to separate MeHg from iHg in the fish tissues (tuna fish ERM-CE 463, ERM-CE 464 and IAEA-350) by PANI column using speciation procedure 1. The determined values were in good agreement with certified values. Under optimal conditions, the limits of detection (LODs) were 2.52 pg and 3.24 pg for iHg and MeHg (as Hg) respectively. The developed method was applied successfully to the direct determination of iHg and MeHg in various waters (tap water, lake water, ground water and sea-water) and the recoveries for the spiked samples were in the range of 96-102% for both the Hg species.

  13. Biological and chemical studies on overheated brewed coffee.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Y; Shibamoto, T; Wei, C I; Fernando, S

    1987-03-01

    Vapour formed from overheated decaffeinated coffee was condensed and tested for mutagenicity using the Ames assay in Salmonella typhimurium strains TA98 and TA100. Vapour produced at 73 and 100 degrees C exhibited no mutagenicity. The basic fraction of vapour produced at 350 degrees C showed weak mutagenicity towards strains TA98 with metabolic activation. The chemical analysis of this fraction identified pyridines and pyrazines as the major constituents. None of the compounds identified in this fraction has been reported as mutagenic when tested in the Ames assay. PMID:3570110

  14. Alcohol vapour detection at the three phase interface using enzyme-conducting polymer composites.

    PubMed

    Winther-Jensen, Orawan; Kerr, Robert; Winther-Jensen, Bjorn

    2014-02-15

    Immobilisation of enzymes on a breathable electrode can be useful for various applications where the three-phase interface between gas or chemical vapour, electrolyte and electrode is crucial for the reaction. In this paper, we report the further development of the breathable electrode concept by immobilisation of alcohol dehydrogenase into vapour-phase polymerised poly(3,4-ethylene dioxythiophene) that has been coated onto a breathable membrane. Typical alcohol sensing, whereby the coenzyme β-Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) is employed as a redox-mediator, was successfully used as a model reaction for the oxidation of ethanol. This indicates that the ethanol vapour from the backside of the membrane has access to the active enzyme embedded in the electrode. The detecting range of the sensor is suitable for the detection of ethanol in fruit juices and for the baseline breath ethanol concentration of drunken driving. After continuous operation for 4.5h the system only showed a 20% decrease in the current output. The electrodes maintained 62% in current output after being refrigerated for 76 days. This work is continuing the progress of the immobilisation of specific enzymes for certain electrochemical reactions whereby the three-phase interface has to be maintained and/or the simultaneous separation of gas from liquid is required.

  15. Vapour Intrusion into Buildings - A Literature Review

    EPA Science Inventory

    This chapter provides a review of recent research on vapour intrusion of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) into buildings. The chapter builds on a report from Tillman and Weaver (2005) which reviewed the literature on vapour intrusion through 2005. Firstly, the term ‘vapour intru...

  16. Active Chemical Thermodynamics promoted by activity of cortical actin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Bhaswati; Chaudhuri, Abhishek; Gowrishankar, Kripa; Rao, Madan

    2011-03-01

    The spatial distribution and dynamics of formation and breakup of the nanoclusters of cell surface proteins is controlled by the active remodeling dynamics of the underlying cortical actin. To explain these observations, we have proposed a novel mechanism of nanoclustering, involving the transient binding to and advection along constitutively occuring ``asters'' of cortical actin. We study the consequences of such active actin-based clustering, in the context of chemical reactions involving conformational changes of cell surface proteins. We find that the active remodeling of cortical actin, can give rise to a dramatic increase in efficiency and extent of conformational spread, even at low levels of expression at the cell surface. We define a activity temperature (τa) arising due to actin activities which can be used to describe chemical thermodynamics of the system. We plot TTT (time-temparature-transformation) curves and compute the Arrhenius factors which depend on τa . With this, the active asters can be treated as enzymes whose enzymatic reaction rate can be related to the activity.

  17. Preparation of activated carbon by chemical activation under vacuum.

    PubMed

    Juan, Yang; Ke-Qiang, Qiu

    2009-05-01

    Activated carbons especially used for gaseous adsorption were prepared from Chinesefir sawdust by zinc chloride activation under vacuum condition. The micropore structure, adsorption properties, and surface morphology of activated carbons obtained under atmosphere and vacuum were investigated. The prepared activated carbons were characterized by SEM, FTIR, and nitrogen adsorption. It was found that the structure of the starting material is kept after activation. The activated carbon prepared under vacuum exhibited higher values of the BET surface area (up to 1079 m2 g(-1)) and total pore volume (up to 0.5665 cm3 g(-1)) than those of the activated carbon obtained under atmosphere. This was attributed to the effect of vacuum condition that reduces oxygen in the system and limits the secondary reaction of the organic vapor. The prepared activated carbon has well-developed microstructure and high microporosity. According to the data obtained, Chinese fir sawdust is a suitable precursor for activated carbon preparation. The obtained activated carbon could be used as a low-cost adsorbent with favorable surface properties. Compared with the traditional chemical activation, vacuum condition demands less energy consumption, simultaneity, and biomass-oil is collected in the procedure more conveniently. FTIR analysis showed that heat treatment would result in the aromatization of the carbon structure. PMID:19534162

  18. Low Temperature Growth of In2O3and InN Nanocrystals on Si(111) via Chemical Vapour Deposition Based on the Sublimation of NH4Cl in In

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Indium oxide (In2O3) nanocrystals (NCs) have been obtained via atmospheric pressure, chemical vapour deposition (APCVD) on Si(111) via the direct oxidation of In with Ar:10% O2at 1000 °C but also at temperatures as low as 500 °C by the sublimation of ammonium chloride (NH4Cl) which is incorporated into the In under a gas flow of nitrogen (N2). Similarly InN NCs have also been obtained using sublimation of NH4Cl in a gas flow of NH3. During oxidation of In under a flow of O2the transfer of In into the gas stream is inhibited by the formation of In2O3around the In powder which breaks up only at high temperatures, i.e.T > 900 °C, thereby releasing In into the gas stream which can then react with O2leading to a high yield formation of isolated 500 nm In2O3octahedrons but also chains of these nanostructures. No such NCs were obtained by direct oxidation forTG < 900 °C. The incorporation of NH4Cl in the In leads to the sublimation of NH4Cl into NH3and HCl at around 338 °C which in turn produces an efficient dispersion and transfer of the whole In into the gas stream of N2where it reacts with HCl forming primarily InCl. The latter adsorbs onto the Si(111) where it reacts with H2O and O2leading to the formation of In2O3nanopyramids on Si(111). The rest of the InCl is carried downstream, where it solidifies at lower temperatures, and rapidly breaks down into metallic In upon exposure to H2O in the air. Upon carrying out the reaction of In with NH4Cl at 600 °C under NH3as opposed to N2, we obtain InN nanoparticles on Si(111) with an average diameter of 300 nm. PMID:20596336

  19. The Seasonal Cycle of Water Vapour on Mars from Assimilation of Thermal Emission Spectrometer Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steele, Liam J.; Lewis, Stephen R.; Patel, Manish R.; Montmessin, Franck; Forget, Francois; Smith, Michael D.

    2014-01-01

    We present for the first time an assimilation of Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) water vapour column data into a Mars global climate model (MGCM). We discuss the seasonal cycle of water vapour, the processes responsible for the observed water vapour distribution, and the cross-hemispheric water transport. The assimilation scheme is shown to be robust in producing consistent reanalyses, and the global water vapour column error is reduced to around 2-4 pr micron depending on season. Wave activity is shown to play an important role in the water vapour distribution, with topographically steered flows around the Hellas and Argyre basins acting to increase transport in these regions in all seasons. At high northern latitudes, zonal wavenumber 1 and 2 stationary waves during northern summer are responsible for spreading the sublimed water vapour away from the pole. Transport by the zonal wavenumber 2 waves occurs primarily to the west of Tharsis and Arabia Terra and, combined with the effects of western boundary currents, this leads to peak water vapour column abundances here as observed by numerous spacecraft. A net transport of water to the northern hemisphere over the course of one Mars year is calculated, primarily because of the large northwards flux of water vapour which occurs during the local dust storm around L(sub S) = 240-260deg. Finally, outlying frost deposits that surround the north polar cap are shown to be important in creating the peak water vapour column abundances observed during northern summer.

  20. Light propagation through atomic vapours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siddons, Paul

    2014-05-01

    This tutorial presents the theory necessary to model the propagation of light through an atomic vapour. The history of atom-light interaction theories is reviewed, and examples of resulting applications are provided. A numerical model is developed and results presented. Analytic solutions to the theory are found, based on approximations to the numerical work. These solutions are found to be in excellent agreement with experimental measurements.

  1. Metabolic activity and water vapour absorption in the mealworm Tenebrio molitor L. (Coleoptera, Tenebrionidae): real-time measurements by two-channel microcalorimetry.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Lars L; Ramløv, Hans; Westh, Peter

    2004-01-01

    This work describes a new calorimetric method in which the metabolic heat production and water exchange rates of an insect larva are measured simultaneously and in real time. The experimental set-up is based on two independent calorimetric cells, which are perfused by a stream of air at controlled relative humidity (RH). The resolution for metabolic heat flow and water flux is 1 microW and 5 microg h(-1), respectively. The method was used to investigate water vapour absorption (WVA) in drought-stressed larvae of the common mealworm Tenebrio molitor. It was found that during exposure to a linear increment in RH of 3% per hour, the larvae initiated WVA upon passing a threshold value of 92.7+/-0.6%RH. The rate of water absorption subsequently increased to reach a maximal level of 86+/-6 microg h(-1), 10-15 h after passing the threshold value. Concomitantly, the RH in the calorimetric cell was reduced to 88.6+/-0.5%. The metabolic heat production of the larvae was 5-6 J h(-1) g(-1) wet mass in the initial part of the experiment. However, this value doubled 2-3 h prior to the onset of WVA, when the RH had reached 88%. This increase in metabolic heat production gradually tapered off over the following 24 h of WVA, during which time WVA remained high. Animals exposed to RH protocols that did not induce WVA showed no such anomalies in metabolic heat flow. This may suggest that the increased metabolism reflects the preparation of the WVA apparatus. Finally, the method was used to quantify water losses in the microgram range associated with wriggling and tracheal ventilation.

  2. Condensation of water vapour on moss-dominated biological soil crust, NW China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xin-Ping; Pan, Yan-Xia; Hu, Rui; Zhang, Ya-Feng; Zhang, Hao

    2014-03-01

    Characteristics of water vapour condensation, including the onset, duration, and amount of water vapour condensation on moss-dominated biological soil crust (BSC) and dune sand were studied under simulated conditions with varying air temperature and relative humidity. The simulations were performed in a plant growth chamber using an electronic balance recording the weight of condensation. There was a positive linear correlation between the water vapour condensation and relative humidity while the mean temperature was negatively linearly related to amounts of water vapour condensation for both soil surfaces. The amount of water vapour condensation on BSC and dune sand can be described by the difference between air temperature and dew point with an exponential function, indicating that when the difference of air temperature and dew point exceeds a value of 35.3◦C, there will be zero water vapour condensed on BSC. In contrast, when the difference of air temperature and dew point exceeds a value of 20.4◦C, the water vapour condensation will be zero for dune sand. In general, when the air is fully saturated with water and the dew point is equal to the current air temperature, the water vapour condensed on BSC attained its maximum value of 0.398 mm, whereas it was 0.058 mm for dune sand. In comparison, water vapour condensed on BSC was at a relatively high temperature and low relative humidity, while we did not detect water vapour condensation on the dune sand under the similar conditions. Physical and chemical analyses of the samples pointed to a greater porosity, high content of fine particles, and high salinity for BSC compared to the dune sand. These results highlight that soil physicochemical properties are the likely factors influencing the mechanism of water vapour condensation under specific meteorological conditions, as onset was earlier and the duration was longer for water vapour condensation on BSC in comparison with that of dune sand. This contributed to

  3. Isothermal vapour flow in extremely dry soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todman, L. C.; Ireson, A. M.; Butler, A. P.; Templeton, M. R.

    2012-04-01

    In dry soils hydraulic connectivity within the liquid water phase decreases and vapour flow becomes a significant transport mechanism for water. The temperature or solute concentration of the liquid phase affects the vapour pressure of the surrounding air, thus temperature or solute gradients can drive vapour flows. However, in extremely dry soils where water is retained by adsorptive forces rather than capillarity, vapour flows can also occur. In such soils tiny changes in water content significantly affect the equilibrium vapour pressure in the soil, and hence small differences in water content can initiate vapour pressure gradients. In many field conditions this effect may be negligible compared to vapour flows driven by other factors. However, flows of this type are particularly significant in a new type of subsurface irrigation system which uses pervaporation, via a polymer tubing, as the mechanism for water supply. In this system, water enters the soil in vapour phase. Experiments were performed in laboratory conditions using marine sand that had previously been oven dried and cooled. This dry sand was used to represent the desert conditions in which this irrigation system is intended for use. Experimental results show that isothermal vapour flows can significantly affect the performance of such irrigation systems due to the rapid transport of water through the soil via the vapour phase. When the irrigation pipe was buried at a depth of 10cm a vapour flow from the soil surface was observed in less than 2 hours. These flows therefore affect the loss of mass into the atmosphere and thus must be considered when evaluating the availability of water for the irrigated crop. The experiments also provide a rare opportunity to observe isothermal vapour flows initiating from a subsurface source. Such experiments allow the significance of these flows to be quantified and potentially applied to other areas of arid zone hydrology.

  4. A group contribution method for estimating the vapour pressures of α-pinene oxidation products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capouet, M.; Müller, J.-F.

    2006-05-01

    A prediction method based on group contribution principles is proposed for estimating the vapour pressure of α-pinene oxidation products. Temperature dependent contributions are provided for the following chemical groups: carbonyl, nitrate, hydroxy, hydroperoxy, acyl peroxy nitrate and carboxy. On the basis of observed vapour pressure differences between isomers of diols and dinitrates, a simple refinement is introduced in the method to account for the influence of substitutions on the vapour pressure for alcohols and nitrates. The vapour pressures predicted with this new method have been compared with the predictions from UNIFAC (Asher et al., 2002). Given the large uncertainties of the vapour pressure data for the least volatile compounds, further experimental studies of subcooled vapour pressures of multifunctional compounds at ambient temperatures are required for better parameterizations. Among the α-pinene products identified to date, pinic acid and hydroxy pinonic acid are predicted to be the least volatile compounds, with estimated vapour pressures of 3×10-6 torr and 6×10-7 torr, respectively. The vapour pressure of the other primary products range from 10-5 to 10-3 torr, with hydroxy hydroperoxides presenting the lowest values. Noting that multifunctional carboxylic acids, in particular pinic acid, are believed to be mostly present as dimers in laboratory conditions, we suggest that the partial vapour pressure of the pinic acid dimer should be close to the experimental subcooled vapour pressure for pinic acid (estimated at ~10-6 torr) due to its large contribution to the total concentration (dimer+monomer) in experimental conditions.

  5. Towards outperforming conventional sensor arrays with fabricated individual photonic vapour sensors inspired by Morpho butterflies

    PubMed Central

    Potyrailo, Radislav A.; Bonam, Ravi K.; Hartley, John G.; Starkey, Timothy A.; Vukusic, Peter; Vasudev, Milana; Bunning, Timothy; Naik, Rajesh R.; Tang, Zhexiong; Palacios, Manuel A.; Larsen, Michael; Le Tarte, Laurie A.; Grande, James C.; Zhong, Sheng; Deng, Tao

    2015-01-01

    Combining vapour sensors into arrays is an accepted compromise to mitigate poor selectivity of conventional sensors. Here we show individual nanofabricated sensors that not only selectively detect separate vapours in pristine conditions but also quantify these vapours in mixtures, and when blended with a variable moisture background. Our sensor design is inspired by the iridescent nanostructure and gradient surface chemistry of Morpho butterflies and involves physical and chemical design criteria. The physical design involves optical interference and diffraction on the fabricated periodic nanostructures and uses optical loss in the nanostructure to enhance the spectral diversity of reflectance. The chemical design uses spatially controlled nanostructure functionalization. Thus, while quantitation of analytes in the presence of variable backgrounds is challenging for most sensor arrays, we achieve this goal using individual multivariable sensors. These colorimetric sensors can be tuned for numerous vapour sensing scenarios in confined areas or as individual nodes for distributed monitoring. PMID:26324320

  6. Venus Water Vapour Profiles Obtained by SOIR/VEx

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamberlain, Sarah; Wilquet, Valerie; Mahieux, Arnaud; Robert, Severine; Thomas, Ian; Carine Vandaele, Ann; Bertaux, Jean-Loup

    2015-04-01

    We present up-to-date observations of the water vapour profile at the Venus terminator, between altitudes of 70 - 110km. The data were obtained by the Solar Occultation in the InfraRed (SOIR) instrument on board Venus Express (VEx). The SOIR instrument allows observations of trace gas profiles at altitudes within the Venus lower thermosphere and mesosphere. Due to the observational technique, all observations are taken at the Venus terminator, on either or both of the evening and morning side of the planet and covering almost all latitudes. These are key locations for study as the mesosphere/thermosphere altitudes correspond to the transition in dynamical regime from a retrograde zonal flow to sub-solar to antisolar flow (approximately 90 km) and at these altitudes we expect a steeper than normal temperature gradient across the terminator which would drive chemical reactions and dynamical flows. Water vapour in the mesosphere is involved in the cloud formation process and contributes to several chemical cycles. Isotopologue ratio studies also contribute towards understanding the evolution of the Venus climate and atmosphere. Determining the abundance, distribution and variability of water vapour is therefore a key element to understanding the development, maintenance and links between dynamical features, important chemical cycles and the evolution of the Venus atmosphere. Both water vapour isotopologues are targeted simultaneously in the majority of dedicated SOIR water vapour observations. H2O is detected between 70 - 110km and HDO is detected between 70 - 95km altitude. Early SOIR water vapour observations were published in 2007 and 2008. Previous results show a depletion in the volume mixing ratio (VMR) at 85km in both HDO and H2O and an increase in HDO/H2O ratio above the clouds. No noticeable temporal variability was detected. Numerous subsequent H2O and HDO SOIR observations have been obtained between 2007 - 2014 and with recent improvements in instrument

  7. Detection of explosive vapour using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, X.; Ahmad, S. R.

    2009-11-01

    A commercially available nano-structured gold substrate was used for activating surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). Raman spectra of the vapour of explosive material, triacetonetriperoxide (TATP), at trace concentrations produced from adsorbed molecules on such surfaces have been studied. Prominent Raman lines of the explosive molecular species were recorded at a sample temperature of ˜35°C, which is near to human body temperature. For this study, the concentration of the adsorbed TATP molecules on the nano-structured surface was varied by heating the sample to different temperatures and exposing the substrate to the sample vapour for different lengths of time. The intensities of the Raman lines have been found to increase with the increase in temperature and also with the increase in the duration of exposure for a fixed temperature. However, as expected, the Raman intensities have been found to saturate at higher temperatures and longer exposures. These saturation effects of the strengths of the Raman lines in the SERS of TATP vapour have been investigated in this paper. The results indicate that the optimisation for vapour deposition on the surface could be a crucial factor for any quantitative estimate of the concentration of the molecular species adsorbed on the nano-structured substrates.

  8. SOME CHEMICAL PROPERTIES UNDERLYING ARSENIC'S BIOLOGICAL ACTIVITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT

    In this paper some of the chemical properties of arsenicals (atomic
    and molecular orbitals, electronegativity, valence state, changes between
    valence state, nucleophilicity, the hard/soft acid/base principle) that may
    account for some of the b...

  9. Mercury vapour suppression by various liquid media.

    PubMed

    Sutow, E J; Foong, W C; Rizkalla, A S; Jones, D W; Power, N L

    1994-09-01

    Fresh and used photographic fixer, Merconvap and water were evaluated for their ability to suppress the vapourization of mercury. Mercury vapour concentration above the four test storage liquids was measured at various times between 10 min and 335 days, using a mercury vapour measuring instrument. The data were analysed using a Student-Newman-Keuls multiple comparison test (P = 0.05). The results showed that fresh and used fixer and Merconvap suppressed the vapourization of mercury to below the detection limit of the measuring instrument (0.01 mg/m3). Water was much less effective compared with the other liquids and showed an increase in mercury vapour concentration with log t. PMID:7996339

  10. ILO activities in the area of chemical safety.

    PubMed

    Obadia, Isaac

    2003-08-21

    The ILO has been active in the area of safety in the use of chemicals at work since the year of its creation in 1919, including the development of international treaties and other technical instruments, the provision of technical assistance to its member States, and the development of chemical safety information systems. The two key ILO standards in this area are the Conventions on safety in the use of chemicals at work (No. 170, 1990), and the Prevention of Major Industrial Accidents (No. 174, 1993). The ILO Programme on occupational safety, health and environment (Safe Work) is currently responsible for ILO chemical safety activities. In the past two decades, most of ILO work in this area has been carried out within the context of inter-agency collaboration frameworks linking the ILO, WHO, UNEP, FAO, UNIDO, UNITAR, and the OECD, including the International Programme on Chemical Safety (IPCS), the Inter-Organisation Programme for the Sound Management of Chemicals (IOMC), and the Intergovernmental Forum on Chemical Safety (IFCS). Apart from the regular development, updating and dissemination of chemical safety information data bases such as the IPCS International Chemical Cards, the elaboration of a Globally harmonized system for the classification and labelling of Chemicals (GHS) has been the most outstanding achievement of this international collaboration on chemical safety.

  11. ILO activities in the area of chemical safety.

    PubMed

    Obadia, Isaac

    2003-08-21

    The ILO has been active in the area of safety in the use of chemicals at work since the year of its creation in 1919, including the development of international treaties and other technical instruments, the provision of technical assistance to its member States, and the development of chemical safety information systems. The two key ILO standards in this area are the Conventions on safety in the use of chemicals at work (No. 170, 1990), and the Prevention of Major Industrial Accidents (No. 174, 1993). The ILO Programme on occupational safety, health and environment (Safe Work) is currently responsible for ILO chemical safety activities. In the past two decades, most of ILO work in this area has been carried out within the context of inter-agency collaboration frameworks linking the ILO, WHO, UNEP, FAO, UNIDO, UNITAR, and the OECD, including the International Programme on Chemical Safety (IPCS), the Inter-Organisation Programme for the Sound Management of Chemicals (IOMC), and the Intergovernmental Forum on Chemical Safety (IFCS). Apart from the regular development, updating and dissemination of chemical safety information data bases such as the IPCS International Chemical Cards, the elaboration of a Globally harmonized system for the classification and labelling of Chemicals (GHS) has been the most outstanding achievement of this international collaboration on chemical safety. PMID:12909402

  12. Water vapour in the UT/LS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiller, C.

    2003-04-01

    The water vapour abundance increased at all levels in the stratosphere during the last decades. Though the observed increase cannot be explained quantitatively, the water vapour distribution and underlying processes seem to be sufficiently understood in the overworld. In the lowermost stratosphere and in the tropical tropopause layer, however, the complex transport and temperature patterns on different scales result in a high variability and strong gradients of the water vapour distribution. The long-term increase of water vapour seems to be apparent also in the lowermost stratosphere, but its significance is decreasing towards the tropopause. In this presentation, measurements of water vapour in the extratropical UT/LS from several airborne campaigns are discussed and compared to distribution patterns obtained from satellite data sets. A mixing layer with H2O mixing ratios up to 100 ppmv is found above the tropopause, frequently resulting in saturation of these air masses. A seasonal cycle of the water content with a late spring and summer maximum is apparent in the LS. The role of jet streams moistening the lowermost stratosphere will be discussed. In a second part, water vapour distributions in the tropics as the stratospheric source region are presented. As an example, measurements over the Indian ocean are discussed where temperatures and water vapour mixing ratios as low as in the classical 'fountain' region over Micronesia occurred. Frequently, ongoing dehydration was observed in the TTL up to the tropopause, independent on deep convection cells.

  13. Molecular emission in chemically active protostellar outflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefloch, B.

    2011-12-01

    Protostellar outflows play an important role in the dynamical and chemical evolution of cloud through shocks. The Herschel Space Observatory (HSO) brings new insight both on the molecular content and the physical conditions in protostellar shocks through high spectral and angular resolution studies of the emission of major gas cooling agents and hydrides. The Herschel/CHESS key-program is carrying out an in depth study of the prototypical shock region L1157-B1. Analysis of the line profiles detected allows to constrain the formation/destruction route of various molecular species, in relation with the predictions of MHD shock models. The Herschel/WISH key-program investigates the properties and origin of water emission in a broad sample of protostellar outflows and envelopes. Implications of the first results for future studies on mass-loss phenomena are discussed.

  14. The ESA DUE GlobVapour Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schröder, M.; ESA Due Globvapour Project Team

    2010-12-01

    The European Space Agency (ESA) Data User Element (DUE) project series aims at bridging the gap between research projects and the sustainable provision of Earth Observation (EO) climate data products at an information level that fully responds to the operational needs of user communities. The ultimate objective of GlobVapour is to provide long-term coherent water vapour data sets exploiting the synergistic capabilities of different EO missions aiming at improved accuracies and enhanced temporal and spatial sampling better than those provided by the single sources. The project seeks to utilize the increasing potential of the synergistic capabilities of past, existing and upcoming satellite missions (ERS-1 and -2, ENVISAT, METOP, MSG as well as relevant non-European missions and in-situ data) in order to meet the increasing needs for coherent long-term water vapour datasets required by the scientific community. GlobVapour develops, validates and applies novel water vapour climate data sets derived from various sensors. More specifically, the primary objectives of the GlobVapour project are: 1)The development of multi-annual global water vapour data sets inclusive of error estimates based on carefully calibrated and inter-calibrated radiances. 2)The validation of the water vapour products against ground based, airborne and other satellite based measurements. 3) The provision of an assessment of the quality of different IASI water vapour profile algorithms developed by the project partners and other groups. 4) The provision of a complete processing system that can further strengthen operational production of the developed products. 5) A demonstration of the use of the products in the field of climate modelling, including applying alternative ways of climate model validation using forward radiation operators. 6) The promotion of the strategy of data set construction and the data sets themselves to the global research and operational community. The ultimate goal of the

  15. Active disturbance rejection controller for chemical reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Both, Roxana; Dulf, Eva H.; Muresan, Cristina I.

    2015-03-10

    In the petrochemical industry, the synthesis of 2 ethyl-hexanol-oxo-alcohols (plasticizers alcohol) is of high importance, being achieved through hydrogenation of 2 ethyl-hexenal inside catalytic trickle bed three-phase reactors. For this type of processes the use of advanced control strategies is suitable due to their nonlinear behavior and extreme sensitivity to load changes and other disturbances. Due to the complexity of the mathematical model an approach was to use a simple linear model of the process in combination with an advanced control algorithm which takes into account the model uncertainties, the disturbances and command signal limitations like robust control. However the resulting controller is complex, involving cost effective hardware. This paper proposes a simple integer-order control scheme using a linear model of the process, based on active disturbance rejection method. By treating the model dynamics as a common disturbance and actively rejecting it, active disturbance rejection control (ADRC) can achieve the desired response. Simulation results are provided to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  16. Liquid vapour spinodal of pure helium 4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imre, Attila R.; Kraska, Thomas

    2008-10-01

    Unlike gases, liquids can be overheated or stretched only up to a limit. The determination of the mean-field thermodynamic stability limit-the so-called spinodal-is a very difficult theoretical and a more-or-less impossible experimental task. Based on a recent semi-empirical method, the spinodal pressure of helium-4 at given temperature is determined, using liquid-vapour surface tension, interface thickness and vapour pressure data.

  17. Active Emulsions: Synchronization of Chemical Oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraden, Seth

    2012-02-01

    We explore the dynamical behavior of emulsions consisting of nanoliter volume droplets of the oscillatory Belousov-Zhabotinsky (BZ) reaction separated by a continuous oil phase. Some of the aqueous BZ reactants partition into the oil leading to chemical coupling of the drops. We use microfluidics to vary the size, composition and topology of the drops in 1D and 2D. Addition of a light sensitive catalyst to the drops and illumination with a computer projector allows each drop to be individually perturbed. A variety of synchronous regimes are found that systematically vary with the coupling strength and whether coupling is dominated by activatory or inhibitory species. In 1D we observe in- and anti-phase oscillations, stationary Turing patterns in which drops stop oscillating, but form spatially periodic patterns of drops in the oxidized and reduced states, and more complex combinations of stationary and oscillatory drops. In 2D, the attractors are more complex and vary with network topology and coupling strength. For hexagonal lattices as a function of increasing coupling strength we observe right and left handed rotating oscillations, mixed oscillatory and Turing states and finally full Turing states. Reaction -- diffusion models based on a simplified description of the BZ chemistry and diffusion of messenger species reproduce a number of the experimental results. For a range of parameters, a simplified phase oscillator model provides an intuitive understanding of the complex synchronization patterns. [4pt] ``Coupled oscillations in a 1D emulsion of Belousov--Zhabotinsky droplets,'' Jorge Delgado, Ning Li, Marcin Leda, Hector O. Gonzalez-Ochoa, Seth Fraden and Irving R. Epstein, Soft Matter, 7, 3155 (2011).

  18. An assessment of vapour pressure estimation methods.

    PubMed

    O'Meara, Simon; Booth, Alastair Murray; Barley, Mark Howard; Topping, David; McFiggans, Gordon

    2014-09-28

    Laboratory measurements of vapour pressures for atmospherically relevant compounds were collated and used to assess the accuracy of vapour pressure estimates generated by seven estimation methods and impacts on predicted secondary organic aerosol. Of the vapour pressure estimation methods that were applicable to all the test set compounds, the Lee-Kesler [Reid et al., The Properties of Gases and Liquids, 1987] method showed the lowest mean absolute error and the Nannoolal et al. [Nannoonal et al., Fluid Phase Equilib., 2008, 269, 117-133] method showed the lowest mean bias error (when both used normal boiling points estimated using the Nannoolal et al. [Nannoolal et al., Fluid Phase Equilib., 2004, 226, 45-63] method). The effect of varying vapour pressure estimation methods on secondary organic aerosol (SOA) mass loading and composition was investigated using an absorptive partitioning equilibrium model. The Myrdal and Yalkowsky [Myrdal and Yalkowsky, Ind. Eng. Chem. Res., 1997, 36, 2494-2499] vapour pressure estimation method using the Nannoolal et al. [Nannoolal et al., Fluid Phase Equilib., 2004, 226, 45-63] normal boiling point gave the most accurate estimation of SOA loading despite not being the most accurate for vapour pressures alone. PMID:25105180

  19. Mapping of tritium emissions using absorption vapour samplers.

    PubMed

    Vodila, Gergely; Molnár, Mihály; Veres, Mihály; Svingor, Eva; Futó, István; Barnabás, István; Kapitány, Sándor

    2009-02-01

    Püspökszilágy Radioactive Waste Treatment and Disposal Facility (RWTDF) is a typical near-surface engineered repository designated to store low- and intermediate-level wastes from various institutes, research facilities and hospitals in Hungary. Two automatic combined (14)C-tritium sampling units installed at the facility sample the air 2 m above surface. The one installed near the vaults detects tritium (T) activities two orders of magnitude higher than the far reference sampling unit. To localize the T emissions, 19 small absorption vapour samplers filled with silica gel were settled onto the ground surface. After the saturation of the silica gel, the water was recovered and its T concentration was measured with a low-background liquid scintillation counter. The absorption vapour samplers are cheap, simple and easy-to-use. We present the samplers and the T distribution map constructed from the data, which helps to localize the T emission. PMID:19027205

  20. Activated chemical defenses suppress herbivory on freshwater red algae.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Keri M; Hay, Mark E

    2013-04-01

    The rapid life cycles of freshwater algae are hypothesized to suppress selection for chemical defenses against herbivores, but this notion remains untested. Investigations of chemical defenses are rare for freshwater macrophytes and absent for freshwater red algae. We used crayfish to assess the palatability of five freshwater red algae relative to a palatable green alga and a chemically defended aquatic moss. We then assessed the roles of structural, nutritional, and chemical traits in reducing palatability. Both native and non-native crayfish preferred the green alga Cladophora glomerata to four of the five red algae. Batrachospermum helminthosum, Kumanoa holtonii, and Tuomeya americana employed activated chemical defenses that suppressed feeding by 30-60 % following damage to algal tissues. Paralemanea annulata was defended by its cartilaginous structure, while Boldia erythrosiphon was palatable. Activated defenses are thought to reduce ecological costs by expressing potent defenses only when actually needed; thus, activation might be favored in freshwater red algae whose short-lived gametophytes must grow and reproduce rapidly over a brief growing season. The frequency of activated chemical defenses found here (three of five species) is 3-20× higher than for surveys of marine algae or aquatic vascular plants. If typical for freshwater red algae, this suggests that (1) their chemical defenses may go undetected if chemical activation is not considered and (2) herbivory has been an important selective force in the evolution of freshwater Rhodophyta. Investigations of defenses in freshwater rhodophytes contribute to among-system comparisons and provide insights into the generality of plant-herbivore interactions and their evolution.

  1. AFLATOXIN B2: CHEMICAL IDENTITY AND BIOLOGICAL ACTIVITY.

    PubMed

    CHANG, S B; ABDEL-KADER, M M; WICK, E L; WOGAN, G N

    1963-11-29

    Aflatoxin B(2), a blue-fluorescent metabolite of Aspergillus flavus, was isolated from cultures grown on crushed wheat. Chemical structure of the compound was elucidated as dihydroaflatoxin B(1). Biological activity was determined in day-old male white Pekin ducklings. The criteria of activity were reduction in growth and liver size and the extent of bile-duct hyperplasia.

  2. Changes in thyroid peroxidase activity in response to various chemicals.

    PubMed

    Song, Mee; Kim, Youn-Jung; Park, Yong-Keun; Ryu, Jae-Chun

    2012-08-01

    Thyroperoxidase (TPO) is a large heme-containing glycoprotein that catalyzes the transfer of iodine to thyroglobulin during thyroid hormone (TH) synthesis. Previously, we established an in vitro assay for TPO activity based on human recombinant TPO (hrTPO) stably transfected into human follicular thyroid carcinoma (FTC-238) cells. It is important to determine whether environmental chemicals can disrupt TPO activity because it is an important factor in the TH axis. In this study, we used our assay to examine the changes in TPO activity in response to various chemicals, including benzophenones (BPs), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and persistent organic pollutants (POPs). Overall, BPs, PAHs, and POPs slightly altered TPO activity at low doses, as compared with the positive controls methimazole (MMI), genistein, and 2,2',4,4'-tetrahydroxy BP. Benzophenone, benzhydrol, 3-methylchloranthracene, pyrene, benzo(k)fluoranthene, benzo(e)pyrene, perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS), perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), and heptachlor decreased TPO activity, while 2,4-dihydroxy BP, 2,2'-dihydroxy-4-methoxy BP, and dibenzo(a,h)anthracene increased TPO activity. From these data, we can predict the disruption of TPO activity by various chemicals as a sensitive TH end point. TPO activity should be considered when enacting measures to regulate environmental exposure to thyroid-disrupting chemicals. PMID:22699773

  3. Spontaneous and specific activation of chemical bonds in macromolecular fluids.

    PubMed

    Park, Insun; Shirvanyants, David; Nese, Alper; Matyjaszewski, Krzysztof; Rubinstein, Michael; Sheiko, Sergei S

    2010-09-01

    Mechanical activation of chemical bonds typically involves the application of external forces, which implies a broad distribution of bond tensions. We demonstrate that controlling the flow profile of a macromolecular fluid generates and delineates mechanical force concentration, enabling a hierarchical activation of chemical bonds on different length scales from the macroscopic to the molecular. Bond tension is spontaneously generated within brushlike macromolecules as they spread on a solid substrate. The molecular architecture creates an uneven distribution of tension in the covalent bonds, leading to spatially controlled bond scission. By controlling the flow rate and the gradient of the film pressure, one can sever the flowing macromolecules with high precision. Specific chemical bonds are activated within distinct macromolecules located in a defined area of a thin film. Furthermore, the flow-controlled loading rate enables quantitative analysis of the bond activation parameters.

  4. Guiding Catalytically Active Particles with Chemically Patterned Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uspal, W. E.; Popescu, M. N.; Dietrich, S.; Tasinkevych, M.

    2016-07-01

    Catalytically active Janus particles suspended in solution create gradients in the chemical composition of the solution along their surfaces, as well as along any nearby container walls. The former leads to self-phoresis, while the latter gives rise to chemiosmosis, providing an additional contribution to self-motility. Chemiosmosis strongly depends on the molecular interactions between the diffusing chemical species and the wall. We show analytically, using an approximate "point-particle" approach, that by chemically patterning a planar substrate one can direct the motion of Janus particles: the induced chemiosmotic flows can cause particles to either "dock" at the chemical step between the two materials or follow a chemical stripe. These theoretical predictions are confirmed by full numerical calculations. Generically, docking occurs for particles which tend to move away from their catalytic caps, while stripe following occurs in the opposite case. Our analysis reveals the physical mechanisms governing this behavior.

  5. Vapour transport of rare earth elements (REE) in volcanic gas: Evidence from encrustations at Oldoinyo Lengai

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbert, C. D.; Williams-Jones, A. E.

    2008-10-01

    Fumarolic encrustations and natrocarbonatite lava from the active crater of Oldoinyo Lengai volcano, Tanzania, were sampled and analysed. Two types of encrustation were distinguished on the basis of their REE content, enriched (~ 2800-5600 × [REE chondrite]) and depleted (~ 100-200 × [REE chondrite]) relative to natrocarbonatite (1700-1900 × [REE chondrite]. REE-enriched encrustations line the walls of actively degassing fumaroles, whereas REE-depleted encrustations occur mainly along cracks in and as crusts on cooling natrocarbonatite lava flows; one of the low REE encrustation samples was a stalactite from the wall of a possible fumarole. The encrustations are interpreted to have different origins, the former precipitating from volcanic gas and the latter from meteoric/ground water converted to steam by the heat of the overlying lava flow(s). REE-profiles of encrustations and natrocarbonatite are parallel, suggesting that there was no preferential mobilization of specific REE by either volcanic vapour or meteoric water vapour. The elevated REE-content of the first group of encrustations suggests that direct REE-transport from natrocarbonatite to volcanic vapour is possible. The REE trends observed in samples precipitating directly from the volcanic vapour cannot be explained by dry volatility based on the available data as there is no evidence in the encrustation compositions of the greatly enhanced volatility predicted for Yb and Eu. The observed extreme REE-fractionation with steep La/Sm slopes parallel to those of the natrocarbonatite reflects solvation and complexation reactions in the vapour phase that did not discriminate amongst the different REE or similar transport of REE in both the natrocarbonatite magma and its exsolving vapour. The low concentrations of REE in the encrustations produced by meteoric vapour suggest that the temperature was too low or that this vapour did not contain the ligands necessary to permit significant mobilization of the REE.

  6. Land cover change and water vapour flows: learning from Australia.

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Line; Dunlop, Michael; Foran, Barney

    2003-01-01

    Australia is faced with large-scale dryland salinization problems, largely as a consequence of the clearing of native vegetation for cropland and grassland. We estimate the change in continental water vapour flow (evapotranspiration) of Australia during the past 200 years. During this period there has been a substantial decrease in woody vegetation and a corresponding increase in croplands and grasslands. The shift in land use has caused a ca. 10% decrease in water vapour flows from the continent. This reduction corresponds to an annual freshwater flow of almost 340 km(3). The society-induced alteration of freshwater flows is estimated at more than 15 times the volume of run-off freshwater that is diverted and actively managed in the Australian society. These substantial water vapour flow alterations were previously not addressed in water management but are now causing serious impacts on the Australian society and local economies. Global and continental freshwater assessments and policy often neglects the interplay between freshwater flows and landscape dynamics. Freshwater issues on both regional and global levels must be rethought and the interplay between terrestrial ecosystems and freshwater better incorporated in freshwater and ecosystem management. PMID:14728792

  7. Formation and Yield of Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Synthesized via Chemical Vapour Deposition Routes Using Different Metal-Based Catalysts of FeCoNiAl, CoNiAl and FeNiAl-LDH

    PubMed Central

    Hussein, Mohd Zobir; Mohamad Jaafar, Adila; Hj. Yahaya, Asmah; Masarudin, Mas Jaffri; Zainal, Zulkarnain

    2014-01-01

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were prepared via chemical vapor deposition (CVD) using a series of different catalysts, derived from FeCoNiAl, CoNiAl and FeNiAl layered double hydroxides (LDHs). Catalyst-active particles were obtained by calcination of LDHs at 800 °C for 5 h. Nitrogen and hexane were used as the carrier gas and carbon source respectively, for preparation of MWCNTs using CVD methods at 800 °C. MWCNTs were allowed to grow for 30 min on the catalyst spread on an alumina boat in a quartz tube. The materials were subsequently characterized through X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, surface area analysis, field emission scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. It was determined that size and yield of MWCNTs varied depending on the type of LDH catalyst precursor that is used during synthesis. MWCNTs obtained using CoNiAl-LDH as the catalyst precursor showed smaller diameter and higher yield compared to FeCoNiAl and FeNiAl LDHs. PMID:25380526

  8. Formation and yield of multi-walled carbon nanotubes synthesized via chemical vapour deposition routes using different metal-based catalysts of FeCoNiAl, CoNiAl and FeNiAl-LDH.

    PubMed

    Hussein, Mohd Zobir; Jaafar, Adila Mohamad; Yahaya, Asmah Hj; Masarudin, Mas Jaffri; Zainal, Zulkarnain

    2014-01-01

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were prepared via chemical vapor deposition (CVD) using a series of different catalysts, derived from FeCoNiAl, CoNiAl and FeNiAl layered double hydroxides (LDHs). Catalyst-active particles were obtained by calcination of LDHs at 800 °C for 5 h. Nitrogen and hexane were used as the carrier gas and carbon source respectively, for preparation of MWCNTs using CVD methods at 800 °C. MWCNTs were allowed to grow for 30 min on the catalyst spread on an alumina boat in a quartz tube. The materials were subsequently characterized through X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, surface area analysis, field emission scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. It was determined that size and yield of MWCNTs varied depending on the type of LDH catalyst precursor that is used during synthesis. MWCNTs obtained using CoNiAl-LDH as the catalyst precursor showed smaller diameter and higher yield compared to FeCoNiAl and FeNiAl LDHs. PMID:25380526

  9. Quantitative genetic activity graphical profiles for use in chemical evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Waters, M.D.; Stack, H.F.; Garrett, N.E.; Jackson, M.A.

    1990-12-31

    A graphic approach, terms a Genetic Activity Profile (GAP), was developed to display a matrix of data on the genetic and related effects of selected chemical agents. The profiles provide a visual overview of the quantitative (doses) and qualitative (test results) data for each chemical. Either the lowest effective dose or highest ineffective dose is recorded for each agent and bioassay. Up to 200 different test systems are represented across the GAP. Bioassay systems are organized according to the phylogeny of the test organisms and the end points of genetic activity. The methodology for producing and evaluating genetic activity profile was developed in collaboration with the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). Data on individual chemicals were compiles by IARC and by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Data are available on 343 compounds selected from volumes 1-53 of the IARC Monographs and on 115 compounds identified as Superfund Priority Substances. Software to display the GAPs on an IBM-compatible personal computer is available from the authors. Structurally similar compounds frequently display qualitatively and quantitatively similar profiles of genetic activity. Through examination of the patterns of GAPs of pairs and groups of chemicals, it is possible to make more informed decisions regarding the selection of test batteries to be used in evaluation of chemical analogs. GAPs provided useful data for development of weight-of-evidence hazard ranking schemes. Also, some knowledge of the potential genetic activity of complex environmental mixtures may be gained from an assessment of the genetic activity profiles of component chemicals. The fundamental techniques and computer programs devised for the GAP database may be used to develop similar databases in other disciplines. 36 refs., 2 figs.

  10. An Investigation of Tertiary Students' Understanding of Evaporation, Condensation and Vapour Pressure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gopal, Hemant; Kleinsmidt, Jacques; Case, Jennifer; Musonge, Paul

    2004-01-01

    Based on a purposive sample of 15 second-year chemical engineering students, this study investigates students' conceptions of evaporation, condensation and vapour pressure. During individual interviews the students were questioned on three tasks that had been designed around these topics. Qualitative analysis of student responses showed a range of…

  11. An Investigation of Tertiary Students' Understanding of Evaporation, Condensation and Vapour Pressure. Research Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gopal, Hemant; Kleinsmidt, Jacques; Case, Jennifer; Musonge, Paul

    2004-01-01

    Based on a purposive sample of 15 second-year chemical engineering students, this study investigates students' conceptions of evaporation, condensation and vapour pressure. During individual interviews the students were questioned on three tasks that had been designed around these topics. Qualitative analysis of student responses showed a range of…

  12. Modelling vapour transport in Surtseyan bombs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGuinness, Mark J.; Greenbank, Emma; Schipper, C. Ian

    2016-05-01

    We address questions that arise if a slurry containing liquid water is enclosed in a ball of hot viscous vesicular magma ejected as a bomb in the context of a Surtseyan eruption. We derive a mathematical model for transient changes in temperature and pressure due to flashing of liquid water to vapour inside the bomb. The magnitude of the transient pressure changes that are typically generated are calculated together with their dependence on material properties. A single criterion to determine whether the bomb will fragment as a result of the pressure changes is derived. Timescales for ejection of water vapour from a bomb that remains intact are also revealed.

  13. Chemical constituents, antimicrobial and antimalarial activities of Zanthoxylum monophyllum.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Guzmán, Raquel; Fulks, Laura C Johansmann; Radwan, Mohamed M; Burandt, Charles L; Ross, Samir A

    2011-09-01

    From the leaves and bark of Zanthoxylum monophyllum, a new lignan, 3-methoxy-3',4'-methylenedioxylignan-4,8,9,9'-tetraol (1), has been isolated along with 22 known compounds (2- 23), fifteen of them reported for the first time from Z. monophyllum. Their chemical structures were elucidated using detailed spectroscopic studies and chemical analysis. All compounds were evaluated for antimicrobial and antiprotozoal activities. Alkaloids BIS-[6-(5,6-dihydro-chelerythrinyl)] ether (2) and 6-ethoxy-chelerythrine (4) exhibited strong activity against Aspergillus fumigatus and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Compound 4-methoxy-N-methyl-2-quinolone (9) exhibited significant activity against MRSA (IC50 value of 8.0 µM) while compound 5,8,4'-trihydroxy-3,7,3'-trimethoxyflavone (10) showed weak activity against Plasmodium falciparum.

  14. Chemical Components and Cardiovascular Activities of Valeriana spp.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Heng-Wen; Wei, Ben-Jun; He, Xuan-Hui; Liu, Yan; Wang, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Valeriana spp. is a flowering plant that is well known for its essential oils, iridoid compounds such as monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes, flavonoids, alkaloids, amino acids, and lignanoids. Valeriana spp. exhibits a wide range of biological activities such as lowering blood pressure and heart rate, antimyocardial ischemia reperfusion injury, antiarrhythmia, and regulation of blood lipid levels. This review focuses on the chemical constituents and cardiovascular activities of Valeriana spp. PMID:26788113

  15. Bioorthogonal Chemical Activation of Kinases in Living Systems

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Selective manipulation of protein kinases under living conditions is highly desirable yet extremely challenging, particularly in a gain-of-function fashion. Here we employ our recently developed bioorthogonal cleavage reaction as a general strategy for intracellular activation of individual kinases. Site-specific incorporation of trans-cyclooctene-caged lysine in place of the conserved catalytic lysine, in conjunction with the cleavage partner dimethyl-tetrazine, allowed efficient lysine decaging with the kinase activity chemically rescued in living systems. PMID:27280167

  16. Total Chemical Synthesis of Biologically Active Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor

    SciTech Connect

    Mandal, Kalyaneswar; Kent, Stephen B.H.

    2011-09-15

    The 204-residue covalent-dimer vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, see picture) with full mitogenic activity was prepared from three unprotected peptide segments by one-pot native chemical ligations. The covalent structure of the synthetic VEGF was confirmed by precise mass measurement, and the three-dimensional structure of the synthetic protein was determined by high-resolution X-ray crystallography.

  17. Revising organic vapour respirator cartridge change schedule: a case study of a paint plant in Iran.

    PubMed

    Karimi, Ali; Jahangiri, Mehdi; Zare Derisi, Forough; Nourozi, Mohammad Amin

    2013-01-01

    After having revised the change schedule for organic vapour respirator cartridges in a paint plant in Iran, we established that it did not provide adequate protection against organic vapours at some workplaces and needed shortening from (48 to 72) h to 4 h. The revision also showed that relying on odour thresholds as the primary means to determine the time to change a chemical cartridge was not effective and that the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) MultiVapor service life software program could be applied to develop cartridge change schedules adjusted to specific workplaces.

  18. Revising organic vapour respirator cartridge change schedule: a case study of a paint plant in Iran.

    PubMed

    Karimi, Ali; Jahangiri, Mehdi; Zare Derisi, Forough; Nourozi, Mohammad Amin

    2013-01-01

    After having revised the change schedule for organic vapour respirator cartridges in a paint plant in Iran, we established that it did not provide adequate protection against organic vapours at some workplaces and needed shortening from (48 to 72) h to 4 h. The revision also showed that relying on odour thresholds as the primary means to determine the time to change a chemical cartridge was not effective and that the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) MultiVapor service life software program could be applied to develop cartridge change schedules adjusted to specific workplaces. PMID:23585165

  19. Structure activity relationships to assess new chemicals under TSCA

    SciTech Connect

    Auletta, A.E.

    1990-12-31

    Under Section 5 of the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA), manufacturers must notify the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) 90 days before manufacturing, processing, or importing a new chemical substance. This is referred to as a premanufacture notice (PMN). The PMN must contain certain information including chemical identity, production volume, proposed uses, estimates of exposure and release, and any health or environmental test data that are available to the submitter. Because there is no explicit statutory authority that requires testing of new chemicals prior to their entry into the market, most PMNs are submitted with little or no data. As a result, EPA has developed special techniques for hazard assessment of PMN chemicals. These include (1) evaluation of available data on the chemical itself, (2) evaluation of data on analogues of the PMN, or evaluation of data on metabolites or analogues of metabolites of the PMN, (3) use of quantitative structure activity relationships (QSARs), and (4) knowledge and judgement of scientific assessors in the interpretation and integration of the information developed in the course of the assessment. This approach to evaluating potential hazards of new chemicals is used to identify those that are most in need of addition review of further testing. It should not be viewed as a replacement for testing. 4 tabs.

  20. Propolis volatile compounds: chemical diversity and biological activity: a review

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Propolis is a sticky material collected by bees from plants, and used in the hive as building material and defensive substance. It has been popular as a remedy in Europe since ancient times. Nowadays, propolis use in over-the-counter preparations, “bio”-cosmetics and functional foods, etc., increases. Volatile compounds are found in low concentrations in propolis, but their aroma and significant biological activity make them important for propolis characterisation. Propolis is a plant-derived product: its chemical composition depends on the local flora at the site of collection, thus it offers a significant chemical diversity. The role of propolis volatiles in identification of its plant origin is discussed. The available data about chemical composition of propolis volatiles from different geographic regions are reviewed, demonstrating significant chemical variability. The contribution of volatiles and their constituents to the biological activities of propolis is considered. Future perspectives in research on propolis volatiles are outlined, especially in studying activities other than antimicrobial. PMID:24812573

  1. Chemical constituents of Solanum coagulans and their antimicrobial activities.

    PubMed

    Qin, Xu-Jie; Lunga, Paul-Keilah; Zhao, Yun-Li; Liu, Ya-Ping; Luo, Xiao-Dong

    2016-04-01

    The present study aimed at determining the chemical constituents of Solanum coagulans and their antimicrobial activities. The compounds were isolated by various chromatographic techniques and their structures were elucidated on the basis of extensive spectroscopic analysis, chemical methods, and comparison with reported spectroscopic data. One new phenolic glycoside, methyl salicylate 2-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl-(1→2)-β-D-glucopyranoside (1), together with 12 known compounds (2-13), were isolated from the aerial parts of Solanum coagulans. Compound 1 was a new phenolic glycoside, and 2-6 were isolated from Solanum genus for the first time. The antimicrobial activities of the isolated compounds were also evaluated. Compound 7 showed remarkable antifungal activity against T. mentagrophytes, M. gypseum and E. floccosum with MIC values being 3.13, 1.56 and 3.13 μg·mL(-1), respectively. PMID:27114320

  2. Saturated Vapour Pressure and Refrigeration - Part I

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bunker, C. A.

    1973-01-01

    The first part of a two-part article describes an experimental approach that can be used in teaching the concept of saturated vapour pressure. This leads to a discussion of refrigeration cycles in the second part of the article. (JR)

  3. Water Vapour Abundance and Distribution in the Lower Venusian Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamberlain, S.; Bailey, J.

    2012-04-01

    We present ground-based observations and modelling studies of water vapour abundance and distribution in the Venusian lower atmosphere through analysis of absorption band depths within the 1.18 μm window. The lower atmosphere of Venus is difficult to study by both in situ and remote instruments. This is due to the planet wide cloud cover that obscures visual wavelengths and surface pressures approaching 100 times that of the Earth. In 1984 ground based observations resulted in the discovery of atmospheric windows on the Venusian nightside (Allen and Crawford, 1984). Here, near infrared radiation originating at the surface and lower atmosphere, pass relatively unimpeded through the Venus clouds. This discovery enabled remote studies of the Venusian subcloud region. Determining the abundance and distribution of water vapour is key to understanding the development, maintenance and links between major radiative and dynamical features of the Venus atmosphere. Water vapour in the lower atmosphere plays an important role in heat transfer and is pertinent to the runaway greenhouse effect and dynamical superrotation observed on Venus. Detailed studies of water vapour abundance and distribution throughout the lower atmosphere of Venus are therefore needed in order to develop accurate chemical, radiative and dynamical models. Ground-based spatially resolved near infrared spectroscopic observations of the Venusian nightside have been obtained from Siding Spring Observatory at each inferior conjunction since 2002. Observations have been made using the IRIS2 instrument on the Anglo-Australian Telescope and CASPIR on the 2.3m ANU telescope. The model VSTAR (Bailey and Kedziora-Chudczer 2012) is used to simulate the observed Venus spectra as seen through the Earth's atmosphere and best fit water vapour abundances are found for approximately 300 locations across the Venus nightside disk. Recent improvements in ground-based near-infrared instruments allow a substantial improvement

  4. Guiding catalytically active particles with chemically patterned surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uspal, William; Popescu, Mihail; Dietrich, Siegfried; Tasinkevych, Mykola

    Catalytically active Janus particles in solution create gradients in the chemical composition of the solution along their surfaces, as well as along any nearby container walls. The former leads to self-phoresis, while the latter gives rise to chemi-osmosis, providing an additional contribution to self-motility. Chemi-osmosis strongly depends on the molecular interactions between the diffusing chemical species and the wall. We show analytically, using an approximate ``point-particle'' approach, that by chemically patterning a planar substrate (e.g., by adsorbing two different materials) one can direct the motion of Janus particles: the induced chemi-osmotic flows can cause particles to either ``dock'' at a chemical step between the two materials, or to follow a chemical stripe. These theoretical predictions are confirmed by full numerical calculations. Generically, docking occurs for particles which tend to move away from their catalytic caps, while stripe-following occurs in the opposite case. Our analysis reveals the physical mechanisms governing this behavior.

  5. Mining Chemical Activity Status from High-Throughput Screening Assays

    PubMed Central

    Soufan, Othman; Ba-alawi, Wail; Afeef, Moataz; Essack, Magbubah; Rodionov, Valentin; Kalnis, Panos; Bajic, Vladimir B.

    2015-01-01

    High-throughput screening (HTS) experiments provide a valuable resource that reports biological activity of numerous chemical compounds relative to their molecular targets. Building computational models that accurately predict such activity status (active vs. inactive) in specific assays is a challenging task given the large volume of data and frequently small proportion of active compounds relative to the inactive ones. We developed a method, DRAMOTE, to predict activity status of chemical compounds in HTP activity assays. For a class of HTP assays, our method achieves considerably better results than the current state-of-the-art-solutions. We achieved this by modification of a minority oversampling technique. To demonstrate that DRAMOTE is performing better than the other methods, we performed a comprehensive comparison analysis with several other methods and evaluated them on data from 11 PubChem assays through 1,350 experiments that involved approximately 500,000 interactions between chemicals and their target proteins. As an example of potential use, we applied DRAMOTE to develop robust models for predicting FDA approved drugs that have high probability to interact with the thyroid stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR) in humans. Our findings are further partially and indirectly supported by 3D docking results and literature information. The results based on approximately 500,000 interactions suggest that DRAMOTE has performed the best and that it can be used for developing robust virtual screening models. The datasets and implementation of all solutions are available as a MATLAB toolbox online at www.cbrc.kaust.edu.sa/dramote and can be found on Figshare. PMID:26658480

  6. Anti-inflammatory activity and chemical profile of Galphimia glauca.

    PubMed

    González-Cortazar, Manasés; Herrera-Ruiz, Maribel; Zamilpa, Alejandro; Jiménez-Ferrer, Enrique; Marquina, Silvia; Alvarez, Laura; Tortoriello, Jaime

    2014-01-01

    Galphimia glauca, commonly known as "flor de estrella", is a plant species used in Mexican traditional medicine for the treatment of different diseases that have an acute or chronic inflammatory process in common. Aerial parts of this plant contain nor-seco-triterpenoids with anxiolytic properties, which have been denominated galphimines. Other compounds identified in the plant are tetragalloyl-quinic acid, gallic acid, and quercetin, which are able to inhibit the bronchial obstruction induced by platelet-activating factor. The objective of this work was to evaluate the anti-inflammatory effect of crude extracts from G. glauca and, by means of bioguided chemical separation, to identify the compounds responsible for this pharmacological activity. n-Hexane, ethyl acetate, dichloromethane, and methanol extracts showed an important anti-inflammatory effect. Chemical separation of the active methanol extract allowed us to identify the nor-seco-triterpenes galphimine-A (1) and galphimine-E (3) as the anti-inflammatory principles. Analysis of structure-activity relationships evidenced that the presence of an oxygenated function in C6 is absolutely necessary to show activity. In this work, the isolation and structural elucidation of two new nor-seco-triterpenes denominated as galphimine-K (4) and galphimine-L (5), together with different alkanes, fatty acids, as well as three flavonoids (17-19), are described, to our knowledge for the first time, from Galphimia glauca.

  7. Biologically active LIL proteins built with minimal chemical diversity

    PubMed Central

    Heim, Erin N.; Marston, Jez L.; Federman, Ross S.; Edwards, Anne P. B.; Karabadzhak, Alexander G.; Petti, Lisa M.; Engelman, Donald M.; DiMaio, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    We have constructed 26-amino acid transmembrane proteins that specifically transform cells but consist of only two different amino acids. Most proteins are long polymers of amino acids with 20 or more chemically distinct side-chains. The artificial transmembrane proteins reported here are the simplest known proteins with specific biological activity, consisting solely of an initiating methionine followed by specific sequences of leucines and isoleucines, two hydrophobic amino acids that differ only by the position of a methyl group. We designate these proteins containing leucine (L) and isoleucine (I) as LIL proteins. These proteins functionally interact with the transmembrane domain of the platelet-derived growth factor β-receptor and specifically activate the receptor to transform cells. Complete mutagenesis of these proteins identified individual amino acids required for activity, and a protein consisting solely of leucines, except for a single isoleucine at a particular position, transformed cells. These surprisingly simple proteins define the minimal chemical diversity sufficient to construct proteins with specific biological activity and change our view of what can constitute an active protein in a cellular context. PMID:26261320

  8. Insect-gene-activity detection system for chemical and biological warfare agents and toxic industrial chemicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackie, Ryan S.; Schilling, Amanda S.; Lopez, Arturo M.; Rayms-Keller, Alfredo

    2002-02-01

    Detection of multiple chemical and biological weapons (CBW) agents and/or complex mixtures of toxic industrial chemicals (TIC) is imperative for both the commercial and military sectors. In a military scenario, a multi-CBW attack would create confusion, thereby delaying decontamination and therapeutic efforts. In the commercial sector, polluted sites invariably contain a mixture of TIC. Novel detection systems capable of detecting CBW and TIC are sorely needed. While it may be impossible to build a detector capable of discriminating all the possible combinations of CBW, a detection system capable of statistically predicting the most likely composition of a given mixture is within the reach of current emerging technologies. Aquatic insect-gene activity may prove to be a sensitive, discriminating, and elegant paradigm for the detection of CBW and TIC. We propose to systematically establish the expression patterns of selected protein markers in insects exposed to specific mixtures of chemical and biological warfare agents to generate a library of biosignatures of exposure. The predicting capabilities of an operational library of biosignatures of exposures will allow the detection of emerging novel or genetically engineered agents, as well as complex mixtures of chemical and biological weapons agents. CBW and TIC are discussed in the context of war, terrorism, and pollution.

  9. STRUCTURE-ACTIVITY RELATIONSHIP STUIDES AND THEIR ROLE IN PREDICTING AND INVESTIGATING CHEMICAL TOXICITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Structure-Activity Relationship Studies and their Role in Predicting and Investigating Chemical Toxicity

    Structure-activity relationships (SAR) represent attempts to generalize chemical information relative to biological activity for the twin purposes of generating insigh...

  10. Biological monitoring to assess dermal exposure to ethylene oxide vapours during an incidental release.

    PubMed

    Boogaard, Peter J; van Puijvelde, Mathieu J P; Urbanus, Jan H

    2014-12-15

    During a short incident in an ethylene oxide (EO) producing plant, EO vapour was released under high pressure. Operators wore full respiratory protection during repairs to fix the leak. To check the adequacy of the applied personal protective equipment and to address concerns about potential dermal exposure and subsequent uptake of EO, biological monitoring was applied by determination of the haemoglobin adducts of EO in blood. Based on the results of the biomonitoring, a risk assessment of dermal exposure to EO vapour was made. Calculations to estimate dermal exposure, based on two recently published models and using the relevant physical-chemical properties of EO, indicate that the dermal contribution to total exposure is expected to be negligible under normal operating circumstances. However, the models indicate that under accidental circumstances of product spillage, when high air concentrations can build up quickly and where incident response is conducted under respiratory protection with independently supplied air, the systemic exposure resulting from dermal absorption may reach levels of concern. The model estimates were compared to the actual biomonitoring data in the operators involved in the accidental release of EO vapour. The results suggest that when incidental exposures to high EO vapour concentrations (several thousand ppm) occur during periods in excess of 20-30 min, additional risk management measures, such as wearing chemical impervious suits, should be considered to control dermal uptake of EO.

  11. Sila-fulleranes: promising chemically active fullerene analogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsusi, Farah; Qasemnazhand, Mohammad

    2016-07-01

    Density-functional theory (DFT) was applied to investigate the geometry and electronic properties of bare Si60 and H-terminated Si-fullerene. DFT predicts outward sites on a bare Si60 cage. By using π-orbital axis analysis (POAV), it is shown that these sites result from a strong tendency of silicon atoms to form sp3 hybridization bonds. Natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis confirms the sp3 hybridization nature of Si-Si bonds in Si-fulleranes. The quantum confinement effect (QCE) does not affect band gap (BG) so strongly in the size between 1 and 1.7 nm. In contrast, the geometry and symmetry of the cage have a significant influence on the BG. In contrast to their carbon analogs, pentagon rings increase the stability of the cages. Functionalized Si-cages are stable and can be chemically very active. The electronic properties are highly sensitive to the surface chemistry via functionalization with different chemical groups. As a result, BGs and chemical activities of these cages can be drastically tuned through the chemistry of the surface.

  12. Sila-fulleranes: promising chemically active fullerene analogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsusi, Farah; Qasemnazhand, Mohammad

    2016-07-01

    Density-functional theory (DFT) was applied to investigate the geometry and electronic properties of bare Si60 and H-terminated Si-fullerene. DFT predicts outward sites on a bare Si60 cage. By using π-orbital axis analysis (POAV), it is shown that these sites result from a strong tendency of silicon atoms to form sp3 hybridization bonds. Natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis confirms the sp3 hybridization nature of Si–Si bonds in Si-fulleranes. The quantum confinement effect (QCE) does not affect band gap (BG) so strongly in the size between 1 and 1.7 nm. In contrast, the geometry and symmetry of the cage have a significant influence on the BG. In contrast to their carbon analogs, pentagon rings increase the stability of the cages. Functionalized Si-cages are stable and can be chemically very active. The electronic properties are highly sensitive to the surface chemistry via functionalization with different chemical groups. As a result, BGs and chemical activities of these cages can be drastically tuned through the chemistry of the surface.

  13. Sila-fulleranes: promising chemically active fullerene analogs.

    PubMed

    Marsusi, Farah; Qasemnazhand, Mohammad

    2016-07-01

    Density-functional theory (DFT) was applied to investigate the geometry and electronic properties of bare Si60 and H-terminated Si-fullerene. DFT predicts outward sites on a bare Si60 cage. By using π-orbital axis analysis (POAV), it is shown that these sites result from a strong tendency of silicon atoms to form sp(3) hybridization bonds. Natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis confirms the sp(3) hybridization nature of Si-Si bonds in Si-fulleranes. The quantum confinement effect (QCE) does not affect band gap (BG) so strongly in the size between 1 and 1.7 nm. In contrast, the geometry and symmetry of the cage have a significant influence on the BG. In contrast to their carbon analogs, pentagon rings increase the stability of the cages. Functionalized Si-cages are stable and can be chemically very active. The electronic properties are highly sensitive to the surface chemistry via functionalization with different chemical groups. As a result, BGs and chemical activities of these cages can be drastically tuned through the chemistry of the surface. PMID:27240656

  14. Textile damage caused by vapour cloud explosions.

    PubMed

    Was-Gubala, J; Krauss, W

    2004-01-01

    The aim of the project was to investigate the damage to garments caused by particular vapour cloud explosions. The authors would like to be able to provide investigators with specific information on how to link clothes to a specific type of crime: a particular case study was the inspiration for the examinations. Experiments were carried out in the fire reconstruction chamber of the laboratory using a selection of 26 clothes and 15 household garments differing in colour, fibre composition and textile construction.

  15. Influences of chemical activators on incinerator bottom ash.

    PubMed

    Qiao, X C; Cheeseman, C R; Poon, C S

    2009-02-01

    This research has applied different chemical activators to mechanically and thermally treated fine fraction (<14 mm) of incinerator bottom ash (IBA), in order to investigate the influences of chemical activators on this new pozzolanic material. IBA has been milled and thermally treated at 800 degrees C (TIBA). The TIBA produced was blended with Ca(OH)(2) and evaluated for setting time, reactivity and compressive strength after the addition of 0.0565 mole of Na(2)SO(4), K(2)SO(4), Na(2)CO(3), K(2)CO(3), NaOH, KOH and CaCl(2) into 100g of binder (TIBA+Ca(OH)(2)). The microstructures of activated IBA and hydrated samples have been characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and thermogravimetry (TG) analysis. Thermal treatment is found to produce gehlenite (Ca(2)Al(2)SiO(7)), wollastonite (CaSiO(3)) and mayenite (Ca(12)Al(14)O(33)) phases. The thermally treated IBA samples are significantly more reactive than the milled IBA. The addition of Na(2)CO(3) can increase the compressive strength and calcium hydroxide consumption at 28-day curing ages. However, the addition of Na(2)SO(4), K(2)SO(4), K(2)CO(3), NaOH and KOH reduces the strength and hydration reaction. Moreover, these chemicals produce more porous samples due to increased generation of hydrogen gas. The addition of CaCl(2) has a negative effect on the hydration of TIBA samples. Calcium aluminium oxide carbonate sulphide hydrate (Ca(4)Al(2)O(6)(CO(3))(0.67)(SO(3))(0.33)(H(2)O)(11)) is the main hydration product in the samples with activated IBA, except for the sample containing CaCl(2). PMID:18718749

  16. Influences of chemical activators on incinerator bottom ash.

    PubMed

    Qiao, X C; Cheeseman, C R; Poon, C S

    2009-02-01

    This research has applied different chemical activators to mechanically and thermally treated fine fraction (<14 mm) of incinerator bottom ash (IBA), in order to investigate the influences of chemical activators on this new pozzolanic material. IBA has been milled and thermally treated at 800 degrees C (TIBA). The TIBA produced was blended with Ca(OH)(2) and evaluated for setting time, reactivity and compressive strength after the addition of 0.0565 mole of Na(2)SO(4), K(2)SO(4), Na(2)CO(3), K(2)CO(3), NaOH, KOH and CaCl(2) into 100g of binder (TIBA+Ca(OH)(2)). The microstructures of activated IBA and hydrated samples have been characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and thermogravimetry (TG) analysis. Thermal treatment is found to produce gehlenite (Ca(2)Al(2)SiO(7)), wollastonite (CaSiO(3)) and mayenite (Ca(12)Al(14)O(33)) phases. The thermally treated IBA samples are significantly more reactive than the milled IBA. The addition of Na(2)CO(3) can increase the compressive strength and calcium hydroxide consumption at 28-day curing ages. However, the addition of Na(2)SO(4), K(2)SO(4), K(2)CO(3), NaOH and KOH reduces the strength and hydration reaction. Moreover, these chemicals produce more porous samples due to increased generation of hydrogen gas. The addition of CaCl(2) has a negative effect on the hydration of TIBA samples. Calcium aluminium oxide carbonate sulphide hydrate (Ca(4)Al(2)O(6)(CO(3))(0.67)(SO(3))(0.33)(H(2)O)(11)) is the main hydration product in the samples with activated IBA, except for the sample containing CaCl(2).

  17. Chemical activation of a food deprivation signal extends lifespan.

    PubMed

    Lucanic, Mark; Garrett, Theo; Yu, Ivan; Calahorro, Fernando; Asadi Shahmirzadi, Azar; Miller, Aaron; Gill, Matthew S; Hughes, Robert E; Holden-Dye, Lindy; Lithgow, Gordon J

    2016-10-01

    Model organisms subject to dietary restriction (DR) generally live longer. Accompanying this lifespan extension are improvements in overall health, based on multiple metrics. This indicates that pharmacological treatments that mimic the effects of DR could improve health in humans. To find new chemical structures that extend lifespan, we screened 30 000 synthetic, diverse drug-like chemicals in Caenorhabditis elegans and identified several structurally related compounds that acted through DR mechanisms. The most potent of these NP1 impinges upon a food perception pathway by promoting glutamate signaling in the pharynx. This results in the overriding of a GPCR pathway involved in the perception of food and which normally acts to decrease glutamate signals. Our results describe the activation of a dietary restriction response through the pharmacological masking of a novel sensory pathway that signals the presence of food. This suggests that primary sensory pathways may represent novel targets for human pharmacology. PMID:27220516

  18. Pereskia aculeata Muller (Cactaceae) Leaves: Chemical Composition and Biological Activities

    PubMed Central

    Souza, Lucèia Fàtima; Caputo, Lucia; Inchausti De Barros, Ingrid Bergman; Fratianni, Florinda; Nazzaro, Filomena; De Feo, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    The aims of this work were to study the chemical composition of the essential oil from the leaves of Pereskia aculeata and to evaluate some biological activities of three leaf extracts. The phenolic content, antioxidant activity, and in vitro antimicrobial and antifungal activities were determined. The methanol extract showed antioxidant activity (EC50 7.09 mg/mL) and high polyphenols content (15.04 ± 0.31 mg gallic acid equivalents (GAE)/g). The petroleum ether extract exhibited potent antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli, whereas the chloroform extract showed inhibitory activity against Bacillus cereus and Staphylococcus aureus. The petroleum ether and methanol extracts were more effective in inhibiting the growth of Aspergillus versicolor. The possible cytotoxicity of extracts on neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cancer cell line and the influence on adenylate cyclase (ADCY) expression was also studied. P. aculeata chloroform extract showed antiproliferative activity with an IC50 value of 262.83 µg/mL. Treatments of SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells with 100 µg/mL of methanol extract significantly reduced ADCY1 expression. PMID:27598154

  19. Pereskia aculeata Muller (Cactaceae) Leaves: Chemical Composition and Biological Activities.

    PubMed

    Souza, Lucèia Fàtima; Caputo, Lucia; Inchausti De Barros, Ingrid Bergman; Fratianni, Florinda; Nazzaro, Filomena; De Feo, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    The aims of this work were to study the chemical composition of the essential oil from the leaves of Pereskia aculeata and to evaluate some biological activities of three leaf extracts. The phenolic content, antioxidant activity, and in vitro antimicrobial and antifungal activities were determined. The methanol extract showed antioxidant activity (EC50 7.09 mg/mL) and high polyphenols content (15.04 ± 0.31 mg gallic acid equivalents (GAE)/g). The petroleum ether extract exhibited potent antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli, whereas the chloroform extract showed inhibitory activity against Bacillus cereus and Staphylococcus aureus. The petroleum ether and methanol extracts were more effective in inhibiting the growth of Aspergillus versicolor. The possible cytotoxicity of extracts on neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cancer cell line and the influence on adenylate cyclase (ADCY) expression was also studied. P. aculeata chloroform extract showed antiproliferative activity with an IC50 value of 262.83 µg/mL. Treatments of SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells with 100 µg/mL of methanol extract significantly reduced ADCY1 expression. PMID:27598154

  20. Tomographic retrieval of water vapour and temperature around polar mesospheric clouds using Odin-SMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, O. M.; Eriksson, P.; Urban, J.; Murtagh, D.; Hultgren, K.; Gumbel, J.

    2014-11-01

    A special observation mode of the Odin satellite provides the first simultaneous measurements of water vapour, temperature and polar mesospheric cloud (PMC) brightness over a large geographical area while still resolving both horizontal and vertical structures in the clouds and background atmosphere. The observation mode has been activated during June, July and August of 2010, 2011 and 2014, and for latitudes between 50 and 82° N. This paper focuses on the water vapour and temperature measurements carried out with Odin's sub-millimetre radiometer (SMR). The tomographic retrieval approach used provides water vapour and temperature between 75-90 km with a vertical resolution of about 2.5 km and a horizontal resolution of about 200 km. The precision of the measurements is estimated to 0.5 ppm for water vapour and 3 K for temperature. Due to limited information about the pressure at the measured altitudes, the results have large uncertainties (> 3 ppm) in the retrieved water vapour. These errors, however, influence mainly the mean atmosphere retrieved for each orbit, and variations around this mean are still reliably captured by the measurements. SMR measurements are performed using two different mixer chains, denoted as frequency mode 19 and 13. Systematic differences between the two frontends have been noted. A first comparison with the Solar Occultation For Ice Experiment instrument (SOFIE) on-board the Aeronomy of Ice in the Mesosphere (AIM) satellite and the Fourier Transform Spectrometer of the Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE-FTS) on-board SCISAT indicates that the measurements using the frequency mode 19 have a significant low bias in both temperature (> 20 K) and water vapour (> 1 ppm), while the measurements using frequency mode 13 agree with the other instruments considering estimated errors. PMC brightness data are provided by the OSIRIS, Odin's other sensor. Combined SMR and OSIRIS data for some example orbits are considered. For these orbits

  1. Tomographic retrieval of water vapour and temperature around polar mesospheric clouds using Odin-SMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, O. M.; Eriksson, P.; Urban, J.; Murtagh, D.; Hultgren, K.; Gumbel, J.

    2015-05-01

    A special observation mode of the Odin satellite provides the first simultaneous measurements of water vapour, temperature and polar mesospheric cloud (PMC) brightness over a large geographical area while still resolving both horizontal and vertical structures in the clouds and background atmosphere. The observation mode was activated during June, July and August of 2010 and 2011, and for latitudes between 50 and 82° N. This paper focuses on the water vapour and temperature measurements carried out with Odin's sub-millimetre radiometer (SMR). The tomographic retrieval approach used provides water vapour and temperature between 75 and 90 km with a vertical resolution of about 2.5 km and a horizontal resolution of about 200 km. The precision of the measurements is estimated to 0.2 ppmv for water vapour and 2 K for temperature. Due to limited information about the pressure at the measured altitudes, the results have large uncertainties (> 3 ppmv) in the retrieved water vapour. These errors, however, influence mainly the mean atmosphere retrieved for each orbit, and variations around this mean are still reliably captured by the measurements. SMR measurements are performed using two different mixer chains, denoted as frequency mode 19 and 13. Systematic differences between the two frontends have been noted. A first comparison with the Solar Occultation For Ice Experiment instrument (SOFIE) on-board the Aeronomy of Ice in the Mesosphere (AIM) satellite and the Fourier Transform Spectrometer of the Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE-FTS) on-board SCISAT indicates that the measurements using the frequency mode 19 have a significant low bias in both temperature (> 15 K) and water vapour (> 0.5 ppmv), while the measurements using frequency mode 13 agree with the other instruments considering estimated errors. PMC brightness data is provided by OSIRIS, Odin's other sensor. Combined SMR and OSIRIS data for some example orbits is considered. For these orbits, effects of

  2. Prediction of clothing thermal insulation and moisture vapour resistance of the clothed body walking in wind.

    PubMed

    Qian, Xiaoming; Fan, Jintu

    2006-11-01

    Clothing thermal insulation and moisture vapour resistance are the two most important parameters in thermal environmental engineering, functional clothing design and end use of clothing ensembles. In this study, clothing thermal insulation and moisture vapour resistance of various types of clothing ensembles were measured using the walking-able sweating manikin, Walter, under various environmental conditions and walking speeds. Based on an extensive experimental investigation and an improved understanding of the effects of body activities and environmental conditions, a simple but effective direct regression model has been established, for predicting the clothing thermal insulation and moisture vapour resistance under wind and walking motion, from those when the manikin was standing in still air. The model has been validated by using experimental data reported in the previous literature. It has shown that the new models have advantages and provide very accurate prediction.

  3. Chemical Signaling and Functional Activation in Colloidosome-Based Protocells.

    PubMed

    Sun, Shiyong; Li, Mei; Dong, Faqin; Wang, Shengjie; Tian, Liangfei; Mann, Stephen

    2016-04-13

    An aqueous-based microcompartmentalized model involving the integration of partially hydrophobic Fe(III)-rich montmorillonite (FeM) clay particles as structural and catalytic building blocks for colloidosome membrane assembly, self-directed membrane remodeling, and signal-induced protocell communication is described. The clay colloidosomes exhibit size- and charge-selective permeability, and show dual catalytic functions involving spatially confined enzyme-mediated dephosphorylation and peroxidase-like membrane activity. The latter is used for the colloidosome-mediated synthesis and assembly of a temperature-responsive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)(PNIPAM)/clay-integrated hybrid membrane. In situ PNIPAM elaboration of the membrane is coupled to a glucose oxidase (GOx)-mediated signaling pathway to establish a primitive model of chemical communication and functional activation within a synthetic "protocell community" comprising a mixed population of GOx-containing silica colloidosomes and alkaline phosphatase (ALP)-containing FeM-clay colloidosomes. Triggering the enzyme reaction in the silica colloidosomes gives a hydrogen peroxide signal that induces polymer wall formation in a coexistent population of the FeM-clay colloidosomes, which in turn generates self-regulated membrane-gated ALP-activity within the clay microcompartments. The emergence of new functionalities in inorganic colloidosomes via chemical communication between different protocell populations provides a first step toward the realization of interacting communities of synthetic functional microcompartments. PMID:26923794

  4. Metal Vapour Lasers: Physics, Engineering and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Little, Christopher E.

    1999-03-01

    Metal Vapour Lasers Christopher E. Little University of St Andrews, St Andrews, Scotland Since the first successful demonstration of a metal vapour laser (MVL) in 1962, this class of laser has become widely used in a broad range of fields including precision materials processing, isotope separation and medicine. The MVLs that are used today have a range of impressive characteristics that are not readily available using other technologies. In particular, the combination of high average output powers, pulse recurrence frequencies and beam quality available from green/yellow Cu vapour lasers (CVLs) and Cu bromide lasers, coupled with the high-quality, multiwatt ultraviolet (265-289 nm) radiation that can be produced using simple nonlinear optical techniques, means that Cu lasers will continue to be important for many years. Metal Vapour Lasers covers all the most commercially important and scientifically interesting pulsed and continuous wave (CW) gas-discharge MVLs, and includes device histories, operating characteristics, engineering, kinetics, commercial exploitation and applications. Short descriptions of gas discharges and excitation techniques make this volume self-consistent. A comprehensive bibliography is also provided. The greater part of this book is devoted to CVLs and their variants, including new sealed-off, high-power 'kinetically enhanced' CVLs and Cu bromide lasers. However, many other self-terminating MVLs are also discussed, including the red AuVL, green/infrared MnVL and infrared BaVL. Pulsed, high-gain, high average power lasers in the UV/violet (373.7, 430.5 nm) spectral regions are represented by Sr¯+ and Ca¯+ discharge-afterglow recombination lasers. The most commercially successful of the MVLs - the CW, UV/blue cataphoretic He-Cd¯+ ion laser - is described. Hollow cathode lasers are represented in two guises: 'white light' (blue/green/red) He-Cd¯+ ion lasers and UV/infrared Ne/He-Cu¯+ ion lasers. This unique volume is an

  5. Regular Wave Propagation Out of Noise in Chemical Active Media

    SciTech Connect

    Alonso, S.; Sendina-Nadal, I.; Perez-Munuzuri, V.; Sancho, J. M.; Sagues, F.

    2001-08-13

    A pacemaker, regularly emitting chemical waves, is created out of noise when an excitable photosensitive Belousov-Zhabotinsky medium, strictly unable to autonomously initiate autowaves, is forced with a spatiotemporal patterned random illumination. These experimental observations are also reproduced numerically by using a set of reaction-diffusion equations for an activator-inhibitor model, and further analytically interpreted in terms of genuine coupling effects arising from parametric fluctuations. Within the same framework we also address situations of noise-sustained propagation in subexcitable media.

  6. Variability of water vapour in the Arctic stratosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thölix, L.; Backman, L.; Kivi, R.; Karpechko, A.

    2015-08-01

    This study evaluates the stratospheric water vapour distribution and variability in the Arctic. A FinROSE chemistry climate model simulation covering years 1990-2013 is compared to observations (satellite and frostpoint hygrometer soundings) and the sources of stratospheric water vapour are studied. According to observations and the simulations the water vapour concentration in the Arctic stratosphere started to increase after year 2006, but around 2011 the concentration started to decrease. Model calculations suggest that the increase in water vapour during 2006-2011 (at 56 hPa) is mostly explained by transport related processes, while the photochemically produced water vapour plays a relatively smaller role. The water vapour trend in the stratosphere may have contributed to increased ICE PSC occurrence. The increase of water vapour in the precense of the low winter temperatures in the Arctic stratosphere led to more frequent occurrence of ICE PSCs in the Arctic vortex. The polar vortex was unusually cold in early 2010 and allowed large scale formation of the polar stratospheric clouds. The cold pool in the stratosphere over the Northern polar latitudes was large and stable and a large scale persistent dehydration was observed. Polar stratospheric ice clouds and dehydration were observed at Sodankylä with accurate water vapour soundings in January and February 2010 during the LAPBIAT atmospheric sounding campaign. The observed changes in water vapour were reproduced by the model. Both the observed and simulated decrease of the water vapour in the dehydration layer was up to 1.5 ppm.

  7. [Qualitative Determination of Organic Vapour Using Violet and Visible Spectrum].

    PubMed

    Jiang, Bo; Hu, Wen-zhong; Liu, Chang-jian; Zheng, Wei; Qi, Xiao-hui; Jiang, Ai-li; Wang, Yan-ying

    2015-12-01

    Vapours of organic matters were determined qualitatively employed with ultraviolet-visible absorption spectroscopy. Vapours of organic matters were detected using ultraviolet-visible spectrophotometer employing polyethylene film as medium, the ultraviolet and visible absorption spectra of vegetable oil vapours of soybean oil, sunflower seed oil, peanut oil, rapeseed oil, sesame oil, cotton seed oil, tung tree seed oil, and organic compound vapours of acetone, ethyl acetate, 95% ethanol, glacial acetic acid were obtained. Experimental results showed that spectra of the vegetable oil vapour and the organic compound vapour could be obtained commendably, since ultra violet and visible spectrum of polyethylene film could be deducted by spectrograph zero setting. Different kinds of vegetable oils could been distinguished commendably in the spectra since the λ(max), λ(min), number of absorption peak, position, inflection point in the ultra violet and visible spectra obtained from the vapours of the vegetable oils were all inconsistent, and the vapours of organic compounds were also determined perfectly. The method had a good reproducibility, the ultraviolet and visible absorption spectra of the vapours of sunflower seed oil in 10 times determination were absolutely the same. The experimental result indicated that polyethylene film as a kind of medium could be used for qualitative analysis of ultraviolet and visible absorption spectroscopy. The method for determination of the vapours of the vegetable oils and organic compounds had the peculiarities of fast speed analysis, well reproducibility, accuracy and reliability and low cost, and so on. Ultraviolet and visible absorption spectrum of organic vapour could provide feature information of material vapour and structural information of organic compound, and provide a novel test method for identifying vapour of compound and organic matter.

  8. [Qualitative Determination of Organic Vapour Using Violet and Visible Spectrum].

    PubMed

    Jiang, Bo; Hu, Wen-zhong; Liu, Chang-jian; Zheng, Wei; Qi, Xiao-hui; Jiang, Ai-li; Wang, Yan-ying

    2015-12-01

    Vapours of organic matters were determined qualitatively employed with ultraviolet-visible absorption spectroscopy. Vapours of organic matters were detected using ultraviolet-visible spectrophotometer employing polyethylene film as medium, the ultraviolet and visible absorption spectra of vegetable oil vapours of soybean oil, sunflower seed oil, peanut oil, rapeseed oil, sesame oil, cotton seed oil, tung tree seed oil, and organic compound vapours of acetone, ethyl acetate, 95% ethanol, glacial acetic acid were obtained. Experimental results showed that spectra of the vegetable oil vapour and the organic compound vapour could be obtained commendably, since ultra violet and visible spectrum of polyethylene film could be deducted by spectrograph zero setting. Different kinds of vegetable oils could been distinguished commendably in the spectra since the λ(max), λ(min), number of absorption peak, position, inflection point in the ultra violet and visible spectra obtained from the vapours of the vegetable oils were all inconsistent, and the vapours of organic compounds were also determined perfectly. The method had a good reproducibility, the ultraviolet and visible absorption spectra of the vapours of sunflower seed oil in 10 times determination were absolutely the same. The experimental result indicated that polyethylene film as a kind of medium could be used for qualitative analysis of ultraviolet and visible absorption spectroscopy. The method for determination of the vapours of the vegetable oils and organic compounds had the peculiarities of fast speed analysis, well reproducibility, accuracy and reliability and low cost, and so on. Ultraviolet and visible absorption spectrum of organic vapour could provide feature information of material vapour and structural information of organic compound, and provide a novel test method for identifying vapour of compound and organic matter. PMID:26964229

  9. Active membrane having uniform physico-chemically functionalized ion channels

    DOEpatents

    Gerald, II, Rex E; Ruscic, Katarina J; Sears, Devin N; Smith, Luis J; Klingler, Robert J; Rathke, Jerome W

    2012-09-24

    The present invention relates to a physicochemically-active porous membrane for electrochemical cells that purports dual functions: an electronic insulator (separator) and a unidirectional ion-transporter (electrolyte). The electrochemical cell membrane is activated for the transport of ions by contiguous ion coordination sites on the interior two-dimensional surfaces of the trans-membrane unidirectional pores. One dimension of the pore surface has a macroscopic length (1 nm-1000 .mu.m) and is directed parallel to the direction of an electric field, which is produced between the cathode and the anode electrodes of an electrochemical cell. The membrane material is designed to have physicochemical interaction with ions. Control of the extent of the interactions between the ions and the interior pore walls of the membrane and other materials, chemicals, or structures contained within the pores provides adjustability of the ionic conductivity of the membrane.

  10. Chemical activation of the mechanotransduction channel Piezo1

    PubMed Central

    Syeda, Ruhma; Xu, Jie; Dubin, Adrienne E; Coste, Bertrand; Mathur, Jayanti; Huynh, Truc; Matzen, Jason; Lao, Jianmin; Tully, David C; Engels, Ingo H; Petrassi, H Michael; Schumacher, Andrew M; Montal, Mauricio; Bandell, Michael; Patapoutian, Ardem

    2015-01-01

    Piezo ion channels are activated by various types of mechanical stimuli and function as biological pressure sensors in both vertebrates and invertebrates. To date, mechanical stimuli are the only means to activate Piezo ion channels and whether other modes of activation exist is not known. In this study, we screened ∼3.25 million compounds using a cell-based fluorescence assay and identified a synthetic small molecule we termed Yoda1 that acts as an agonist for both human and mouse Piezo1. Functional studies in cells revealed that Yoda1 affects the sensitivity and the inactivation kinetics of mechanically induced responses. Characterization of Yoda1 in artificial droplet lipid bilayers showed that Yoda1 activates purified Piezo1 channels in the absence of other cellular components. Our studies demonstrate that Piezo1 is amenable to chemical activation and raise the possibility that endogenous Piezo1 agonists might exist. Yoda1 will serve as a key tool compound to study Piezo1 regulation and function. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07369.001 PMID:26001275

  11. Understanding vapour plume structure in indoor environments for the detection of explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foat, Tim

    2015-11-01

    Dogs remain the most effective method for the detection of explosives in many situations yet the spatially, temporally and chemically varying signature that they sense cannot easily be quantified. Vapour plumes can be highly unsteady and intermittent and the problem is further complicated in indoor spaces where turbulent, transitional and laminar regions may exist and where there may be no dominant flow direction. Intermittent plumes can have peak concentrations that are considerably higher than the time averaged values. As dogs can sample the air at 5 Hz it is possible that these unsteady fluctuations play a key part in their detection process. A low Reynolds number (Re less than 5000 at the inlet) benchmark test case for indoor airflow has been studied using large-eddy simulation computational fluid dynamics. Fixed concentration vapour sources have been included on the floor of the room and the resulting vapour dispersion has been modelled. Sources with different surface areas have been included and their instantaneous and mean concentration profiles compared. The results from this study will provide insight into canine detection of vapour in indoor environments.

  12. Biological activities and chemical composition of lichens from Serbia

    PubMed Central

    Kosanic, Marijana; Rankovic, Branislav; Stanojkovic, Tatjana; Vasiljevic, Perica; Manojlovic, Nedeljko

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate chemical composition of acetone extracts of the lichens Parmelia arseneana and Acarospora fuscata and in vitro antioxidant, antimicrobial, and anticancer activities of these extracts and gyrophoric acid isolated from A. fuscata. The HPLC-UV method was used for the identification of secondary metabolites. Stictic acid, norstictic acid, gyrophoric acid, usnic acid, atranorin and chloroatranorin were identified in the A. fuscata. In P. arseneana, we detected stictic acid, norstictic acid, usnic acid and atranorin, while gyrophoric acid was not identified. Antioxidant activity was evaluated by measuring the scavenging capacity of tested samples on DPPH and superoxide anion radicals, reducing the power of samples and determination of total phenolic compounds in extracts. As a result of the study, gyrophoric acid was found to have the largest DPPH radical scavenging activity with an IC50 value of 105.75 µg/ml. Moreover, the tested samples had an effective superoxide anion radical scavenging and reducing power. The total content of phenol in extracts was determined as pyrocatechol equivalent. The antimicrobial activity was estimated by determination of the minimal inhibitory concentration by the broth microdilution method. The most active was also gyrophoric acid, with minimum inhibitory concentration values ranging from 0.019 to 1.25 mg/ml. Anticancer activity was tested against LS174 (human colon carcinoma cell line), A549 (human lung carcinoma cell line), Fem-x (malignant melanoma cell line), and a chronic myelogeneous leukaemia K562 cell line using the MTT method. Extract of P. arseneana expressed the strongest anticancer activity against all cell lines with IC50 values ranging from 11.61 to 47.06 µg/ml. PMID:26417336

  13. Biological activities and chemical composition of lichens from Serbia.

    PubMed

    Kosanic, Marijana; Rankovic, Branislav; Stanojkovic, Tatjana; Vasiljevic, Perica; Manojlovic, Nedeljko

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate chemical composition of acetone extracts of the lichens Parmelia arseneana and Acarospora fuscata and in vitro antioxidant, antimicrobial, and anticancer activities of these extracts and gyrophoric acid isolated from A. fuscata. The HPLC-UV method was used for the identification of secondary metabolites. Stictic acid, norstictic acid, gyrophoric acid, usnic acid, atranorin and chloroatranorin were identified in the A. fuscata. In P. arseneana, we detected stictic acid, norstictic acid, usnic acid and atranorin, while gyrophoric acid was not identified. Antioxidant activity was evaluated by measuring the scavenging capacity of tested samples on DPPH and superoxide anion radicals, reducing the power of samples and determination of total phenolic compounds in extracts. As a result of the study, gyrophoric acid was found to have the largest DPPH radical scavenging activity with an IC50 value of 105.75 µg/ml. Moreover, the tested samples had an effective superoxide anion radical scavenging and reducing power. The total content of phenol in extracts was determined as pyrocatechol equivalent. The antimicrobial activity was estimated by determination of the minimal inhibitory concentration by the broth microdilution method. The most active was also gyrophoric acid, with minimum inhibitory concentration values ranging from 0.019 to 1.25 mg/ml. Anticancer activity was tested against LS174 (human colon carcinoma cell line), A549 (human lung carcinoma cell line), Fem-x (malignant melanoma cell line), and a chronic myelogeneous leukaemia K562 cell line using the MTT method. Extract of P. arseneana expressed the strongest anticancer activity against all cell lines with IC50 values ranging from 11.61 to 47.06 µg/ml. PMID:26417336

  14. Influences of chemical activators on incinerator bottom ash

    SciTech Connect

    Qiao, X.C. Cheeseman, C.R.; Poon, C.S.

    2009-02-15

    This research has applied different chemical activators to mechanically and thermally treated fine fraction (<14 mm) of incinerator bottom ash (IBA), in order to investigate the influences of chemical activators on this new pozzolanic material. IBA has been milled and thermally treated at 800 deg. C (TIBA). The TIBA produced was blended with Ca(OH){sub 2} and evaluated for setting time, reactivity and compressive strength after the addition of 0.0565 mole of Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, K{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}, K{sub 2}CO{sub 3}, NaOH, KOH and CaCl{sub 2} into 100 g of binder (TIBA+Ca(OH){sub 2}). The microstructures of activated IBA and hydrated samples have been characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and thermogravimetry (TG) analysis. Thermal treatment is found to produce gehlenite (Ca{sub 2}Al{sub 2}SiO{sub 7}), wollastonite (CaSiO{sub 3}) and mayenite (Ca{sub 12}Al{sub 14}O{sub 33}) phases. The thermally treated IBA samples are significantly more reactive than the milled IBA. The addition of Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} can increase the compressive strength and calcium hydroxide consumption at 28-day curing ages. However, the addition of Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, K{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, K{sub 2}CO{sub 3}, NaOH and KOH reduces the strength and hydration reaction. Moreover, these chemicals produce more porous samples due to increased generation of hydrogen gas. The addition of CaCl{sub 2} has a negative effect on the hydration of TIBA samples. Calcium aluminium oxide carbonate sulphide hydrate (Ca{sub 4}Al{sub 2}O{sub 6}(CO{sub 3}){sub 0.67}(SO{sub 3}){sub 0.33}(H{sub 2}O){sub 11}) is the main hydration product in the samples with activated IBA, except for the sample containing CaCl{sub 2}.

  15. Evaluation of antiseptic antiviral activity of chemical agents.

    PubMed

    Geller, Chloé; Finance, Chantal; Duval, Raphaël Emmanuel

    2011-06-01

    Antiviral antisepsis and disinfection are crucial for preventing the environmental spread of viral infections. Emerging viruses and associated diseases, as well as nosocomial viral infections, have become a real issue in medical fields, and there are very few efficient and specific treatments available to fight most of these infections. Another issue is the potential environmental resistance and spread of viral particles. Therefore, it is essential to properly evaluate the efficacy of antiseptics-disinfectants (ATS-D) on viruses. ATS-D antiviral activity is evaluated by (1) combining viruses and test product for an appropriately defined and precise contact time, (2) neutralizing product activity, and (3) estimating the loss of viral infectivity. A germicide can be considered to have an efficient ATS-D antiviral activity if it induces a >3 or >4 log(10) reduction (American and European regulatory agency requirements, respectively) in viral titers in a defined contact time. This unit describes a global methodology for evaluating chemical ATS-D antiviral activity.

  16. Speciation and chemical activities in superheated sodium borate solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Weres, O. )

    1993-06-01

    The system H[sub 2]O-B[sub 2]O[sub 3]-Na[sub 2]O has been studied experimentally at 277[degrees] and 317[degrees]C. The activities of water and boric acid have been determined at mole ratios Na/B from 0 to 1.5, and total dissolved solids 3 to 80 weight percent. The activity of boric acid has been fitted to within experimental error using a speciation model with eight complex species. This model is consistent with the model previously published by Mesmer et al. The electrolyte properties of the liquid are modelled using the Pitzer-Simonson Model of very concentrated electrolyte solutions. The calculated values of water activity agree with experiment, and the activity of NaOH and pOH have also been calculated. These data will allow prediction of the composition and chemical behavior of sodium borate liquids that may accumulate in the superheated crevices within a steam generator. A modified form of the model is provided for use with MULTEQ. The potassium borate system also was briefly studied at 317[degrees]C, and is adequately described by a model with five complex species. The potassium borate liquid is more alkaline at K/B = 1 than a sodium borate liquid at the same mole ratio, but pOH in the two systems is the same at lower mole ratios.

  17. Textile damage caused by vapour cloud explosions.

    PubMed

    Was-Gubala, J; Krauss, W

    2004-01-01

    The aim of the project was to investigate the damage to garments caused by particular vapour cloud explosions. The authors would like to be able to provide investigators with specific information on how to link clothes to a specific type of crime: a particular case study was the inspiration for the examinations. Experiments were carried out in the fire reconstruction chamber of the laboratory using a selection of 26 clothes and 15 household garments differing in colour, fibre composition and textile construction. PMID:15527183

  18. Variability of water vapour in the Arctic stratosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thölix, Laura; Backman, Leif; Kivi, Rigel; Karpechko, Alexey Yu.

    2016-04-01

    This study evaluates the stratospheric water vapour distribution and variability in the Arctic. A FinROSE chemistry transport model simulation covering the years 1990-2014 is compared to observations (satellite and frost point hygrometer soundings), and the sources of stratospheric water vapour are studied. In the simulations, the Arctic water vapour shows decadal variability with a magnitude of 0.8 ppm. Both observations and the simulations show an increase in the water vapour concentration in the Arctic stratosphere after the year 2006, but around 2012 the concentration started to decrease. Model calculations suggest that this increase in water vapour is mostly explained by transport-related processes, while the photochemically produced water vapour plays a relatively smaller role. The increase in water vapour in the presence of the low winter temperatures in the Arctic stratosphere led to more frequent occurrence of ice polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) in the Arctic vortex. We perform a case study of ice PSC formation focusing on January 2010 when the polar vortex was unusually cold and allowed large-scale formation of PSCs. At the same time a large-scale persistent dehydration was observed. Ice PSCs and dehydration observed at Sodankylä with accurate water vapour soundings in January and February 2010 during the LAPBIAT (Lapland Atmosphere-Biosphere facility) atmospheric measurement campaign were well reproduced by the model. In particular, both the observed and simulated decrease in water vapour in the dehydration layer was up to 1.5 ppm.

  19. Advances in mechanisms of activation and deactivation of environmental chemicals.

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, J A; Faletto, M B

    1993-01-01

    Environmental chemicals are both activated and detoxified by phase I and phase II enzymes. The principal enzymes involved in phase I reactions are the cytochrome P-450s. The phase II enzymes include hydrolase and the conjugative enzymes such as glucuronyltransferases, glutathione transferases, N-acetyltransferase, and sulfotransferase. Although other phase I and phase II enzymes exist, the present review is limited to these enzymes. Once thought to be a single enzyme, multiple cytochrome P-450 enzymes have been purified and characterized from many different species across the evolutionary tree. The application of molecular biology techniques to this field has identified more than 150 cytochrome P-450 genes to date. At least 20-30 cytochrome P-450 enzymes appear to exist in each mammalian species, and many polymorphisms in these enzymes are being identified. The cytochrome P-450 enzymes can now be expressed in recombinant form using cDNA expression systems. The phase II conjugative enzymes add a hydrophilic moiety such as sulfate, glucuronide, or acetate to compounds, which increases their water solubility and facilitates their excretion. However, conjugates of a number of compounds also result in more reactive electrophilic species, which appear to be the ultimate carcinogens. Many of these phase II enzymes also represent families of enzymes, and polymorphisms can affect the ability of these enzymes to metabolize chemicals. Whenever possible, we have reviewed knowledge of the human enzymes involved in particular pathways. PMID:8354165

  20. [Chemical constituents from Callicarpa nudiflora and their cytotoxic activities].

    PubMed

    Ma, Yan-Chun; Zhang, Min; Xu, Wen-Tong; Feng, Shi-Xiu; Lei, Ming; Yi, Bo

    2014-08-01

    The chemical consitituents from cytotoxic fraction of the Callicarpa nudiflora extract were isolated and purified by a combination of HP-20 macroporous resin, silica gel and Sephadex LH-20 column chromatographies. The structures were elucidated on the basis of the spectroscopic data and comparison of their spectroscopic data with reported data. The cytotoxicity was evaluated by the MTT assay. The 50% and 70% EtOH elutions of EtOH-extract showed significant cytotoxic activities, leading to the isolation of twelve compounds, which were identified as luteoloside(1), lutedin-4'-O-β-D-glucoside(2), 6-hydroxyluteolin-7-O-β-glucoside(3), lutedin-7-O-neohesperidoside(4), rhoifolin (5), luteolin-7, 4'-di-O-glucoside (6), forsythoside B (7), acteoside (8), alyssonoside (9), catalpol(10), nudifloside(11), and leonuride(12). Compounds 3-6, 10 and 12 were isolated from this genus for the first time, and compound 9 was isolated from this plant for the first time. The cytotoxicity assay demonstrated that flavonoids 1-6, in various concentrations, showed monolithic proliferation inhibitory activities against Hela, A549 and MCF-7 cell lines. Compounds 3, 5 and iridoid glycoside 11 possessed higher cytotoxicacivities. In short, flavonoids are the main components of cytotoxic extract from C. nudiflora, while phenylethanoid glycosides are the predominant ingredient but inactive to cancer cell lines. In addition, the minor iridoid glycoside expressed weak cytotoxic activity.

  1. Flaxseed hull: Chemical composition and antioxidant activity during development.

    PubMed

    Herchi, Wahid; Al Hujaili, Abdullah D; Sakouhi, Faouzi; Sebei, Khaled; Trabelsi, Hajer; Kallel, Habib; Boukhchina, Sadok

    2014-01-01

    Changes in the chemical composition and antioxidant activity of flaxseed hull during maturation were investigated. P129 hull variety was studied at four maturation stages (St1, St2, St3, and St4). Significant variation in proximate composition and flaxseed hull oil characteristics were observed. A significant increase in the carbohydrates content of the hull was observed during development. The main methyl esters were linolenic acid (48.95 - 51.52 %), oleic acid (20.27-23.41%) and linoleic acid (15.62-17.70%). The highest polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) were found to be 67.14 % at the first stage of maturity (St1). Flaxseed hull oil was of good quality, containing an abundance of omega-3 essential fatty acids. The iodine value increased, while the saponification value of oil decreased during seed development. The decrease in ascorbic acid content was steady. The maximum level of total phenolic acid content (128.3 mg/100 g oil) was reached at 7 DAF. The antioxidant activity of oilseed was assessed by means of 2, 2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical-scavenging assay. Radical scavenging activity for green hull was 52.74% and mature hull was 69.32%. PMID:24919478

  2. Advances in the chemical analysis and biological activities of chuanxiong.

    PubMed

    Li, Weixia; Tang, Yuping; Chen, Yanyan; Duan, Jin-Ao

    2012-01-01

    Chuanxiong Rhizoma (Chuan-Xiong, CX), the dried rhizome of Ligusticum chuanxiong Hort. (Umbelliferae), is one of the most popular plant medicines in the World. Modern research indicates that organic acids, phthalides, alkaloids, polysaccharides, ceramides and cerebrosides are main components responsible for the bioactivities and properties of CX. Because of its complex constituents, multidisciplinary techniques are needed to validate the analytical methods that support CX's use worldwide. In the past two decades, rapid development of technology has advanced many aspects of CX research. The aim of this review is to illustrate the recent advances in the chemical analysis and biological activities of CX, and to highlight new applications and challenges. Emphasis is placed on recent trends and emerging techniques. PMID:22955453

  3. Chemical constituents and biological activities of the genus Linaria (Scrophulariaceae).

    PubMed

    Cheriet, Thamere; Mancini, Ines; Seghiri, Ramdane; Benayache, Fadila; Benayache, Samir

    2015-01-01

    This is a review on 95 references dealing with the genus Linaria (Scrophularioideae-Antirrhineae tribe), a known genus of the Scrophulariaceae family, which comprises about 200 species mainly distributed in Europe, Asia and North Africa. The use of some Linaria species in folk medicine has attracted the attention for chemical and biological studies. This report is aimed to be a comprehensive overview on the isolated or identified known and often new metabolites from the 41 Linaria species so far cited. It is organised presenting first the phytochemical classes of alkaloids, polyphenols including flavonoids, the latter being quite diffused and mostly present as flavones, flavonols and their glycosides, and terpenoids including iridoids and steroids. Second, the results from biological investigation on plant extracts, pure natural products isolated from Linaria species and some synthetic derivatives are reported, with antitumour, anti-acetylcholinesterase, anti-inflammatory and analgesic, antioxidant and antibacterial activities. PMID:25674928

  4. Thymus vulgaris essential oil: chemical composition and antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Borugă, O; Jianu, C; Mişcă, C; Goleţ, I; Gruia, A T; Horhat, F G

    2014-01-01

    The study was designed to determine the chemical composition and antimicrobial properties of the essential oil of Thymus vulgaris cultivated in Romania. The essential oil was isolated in a yield of 1.25% by steam distillation from the aerial part of the plant and subsequently analyzed by GC-MS. The major components were p-cymene (8.41%), γ-terpinene (30.90%) and thymol (47.59%). Its antimicrobial activity was evaluated on 7 common food-related bacteria and fungus by using the disk diffusion method. The results demonstrate that the Thymus vulgaris essential oil tested possesses strong antimicrobial properties, and may in the future represent a new source of natural antiseptics with applications in the pharmaceutical and food industry. PMID:25870697

  5. Activity based chemical proteomics: profiling proteases as drug targets.

    PubMed

    Heal, William Percy; Wickramasinghe, Sasala Roshinie; Tate, Edward William

    2008-09-01

    The pivotal role of proteases in many diseases has generated considerable interest in their basic biology, and in the potential to target them for chemotherapy. Although fundamental to the initiation and progression of diseases such as cancer, diabetes, arthritis and malaria, in many cases their precise role remains unknown. Activity-based chemical proteomics-an emerging field involving a combination of organic synthesis, biochemistry, cell biology, biophysics and bioinformatics-allows the detection, visualisation and activity quantification of whole families or selected sub-sets of proteases based upon their substrate specificity. This approach can be applied for drug target/lead identification and validation, the fundamentals of drug discovery. The activity-based probes discussed in this review contain three key features; a 'warhead' (binds irreversibly but selectively to the active site), a 'tag' (allowing enzyme 'handling', with a combination of fluorescent, affinity and/or radio labels), and a linker region between warhead and tag. From the design and synthesis of the linker arise some of the latest developments discussed here; not only can the physical properties (e.g., solubility, localisation) of the probe be tuned, but the inclusion of a cleavable moiety allows selective removal of tagged enzyme from affinity beads etc. The design and synthesis of recently reported probes is discussed, including modular assembly of highly versatile probes via solid phase synthesis. Recent applications of activity-based protein profiling to specific proteases (serine, threonine, cysteine and metalloproteases) are reviewed as are demonstrations of their use in the study of disease function in cancer and malaria.

  6. Cytotoxic activity and chemical constituents of Anthemis mirheydari.

    PubMed

    Jassbi, Amir Reza; Firuzi, Omidreza; Miri, Ramin; Salhei, Sajad; Zare, Somayeh; Zare, Mehdi; Masroorbabanari, Mehdi; Chandran, Jima N; Schneider, Bernd; Baldwin, Ian T

    2016-10-01

    Context The genus Anthemis L. (Asteraceae) comprises about 195 species which are widely used in the pharmaceutical, cosmetic and food industries. Objective Anthemis mirheydari Iranshar, an endemic plant from Iran, was investigated for its cytotoxic properties and chemical constituents. Materials and methods The whole parts of the plant (320 g) were extracted by dichloromethane and methanol for four days, successively. The cytotoxic activity of both dichloromethane and methanol extracts were assayed by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide colorimetric methods against three human cancer cell lines including LS180, MCF-7 and MOLT-4. Different concentrations (10-100 μg/mL) of the plant extracts were tested to obtain IC50 values. The dichloromethane extract of A. mirheydari was subjected to silica gel-column and thin layer chromatography for purification of its chemical constituents and the isolated compounds were further tested against MOLT-4 cells. The structures of the pure compounds were elucidated using different spectral data including nuclear magnetic resonance and electron impact mass spectra. Results The IC50 values of the dichloromethane extract were 30.8 ± 6.7, 25.2 ± 6.5 and 8.6 ± 1.1 μg/mL (means ± standard error) for the above-mentioned cell lines, respectively. Two triterpenoids, taraxasterol (1) and pseudotaraxasterol (2), one sterol, β-sitosterol (3) and one coumarin, 7-methoxycoumarin (4) were isolated from the extract. The IC50 of the mixture of compounds 1 and 2 as well as compounds 3 and 4 were higher (>100 μM) than that reported for the dichloromethane extract against MOLT-4 cells. Conclusion The dichloromethane extract was the most active one among the tested material.

  7. Dynamic model for selective metabolic activation in chemical carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Selkirk, J.K.; MacLeod, M.C.

    1980-01-01

    Theoretical calculations predict the relative ease of formation of carbonium ions from 7,8-dihydro-7,8-dihydroxybenzo(a)pyrene-9,10-oxide or from either of the 2 symmetrical bay regions of B(e)P, and suggest their attraction to cellular nucleophiles. When both isomers were metabolized by hamster embryo fibroblasts (HEF) and the products analyzed, the results showed that the probable reason for benzo(e)pyrene's lack of carcinogenicity was its metabolic preference to attack the molecule away from the bay-region area. Particularly striking was the absence of any evidence for the formation of a significant amount of B(e)P-9,10-dihydrodiol. This suggests a metabolic basis for the relative lack of carcinogenic and mutagenic activity of B(e)P. The reason for this is not clear but may be due to physical or chemical factors such as membrane solubility or stereochemical requirements of the active site of the enzyme. The bay-region theory of PAH carcinogenesis predicts that carbonium ion formation from 9,10-dihydro-9,10-dihydroxybenzo(e)pyrene-11, 12-oxide, if formed, would be energetically favorable. Thus, the inability of HEF and microcomes to form B(e)P-9,10-dihydrodiol, the precursor of its potentially highly reactive diol-epoxide, would explain the relative inertness of B(e)P in several biological systems. As the subtle biochemical interactions of the various carcinogen intermediates become clarified, it becomes apparent that susceptibility and resistance to malignant transformation are based on a complex set of both chemical and physical parameters. It is becoming clear that metabolism kinetics, membrane interaction, and the role of nuclear metabolism help dictate the passage of the carcinogen and its reactive intermediates into and through the metabolic machinery of the cell. (ERB)

  8. Active sampling technique to enhance chemical signature of buried explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovell, John S.; French, Patrick D.

    2004-09-01

    Deminers and dismounted countermine engineers commonly use metal detectors, ground penetrating radar and probes to locate mines. Many modern landmines have a very low metal content, which severely limits the effectiveness of metal detectors. Canines have also been used for landmine detection for decades. Experiments have shown that canines smell the explosives which are known to leak from most types of landmines. The fact that dogs can detect landmines indicates that vapor sensing is a viable approach to landmine detection. Several groups are currently developing systems to detect landmines by "sniffing" for the ultra-trace explosive vapors above the soil. The amount of material that is available to passive vapor sensing systems is limited to no more than the vapor in equilibrium with the explosive related chemicals (ERCs) distributed in the surface soils over and near the landmine. The low equilibrium vapor pressure of TNT in the soil/atmosphere boundary layer and the limited volume of the boundary layer air imply that passive chemical vapor sensing systems require sensitivities in the picogram range, or lower. ADA is working to overcome many of the limitations of passive sampling methods, by the use of an active sampling method that employs a high-powered (1,200+ joules) strobe lamp to create a highly amplified plume of vapor and/or ERC-bearing fine particulates. Initial investigations have demonstrated that this approach can amplify the detectability of TNT by two or three orders of magnitude. This new active sampling technique could be used with any suitable explosive sensor.

  9. INCREASED ENDOCRINE ACTIVITY OF XENOBIOTIC CHEMICALS AS MEDIATED BY METABOLIC ACTIVATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    This research is part of an effort to develop in vitro assays and QSARs applicable to untested chemicals on EPA inventories through study of estrogen receptor (ER) binding and estrogen mediated gene expression in fish. The current effort investigates metabolic activation of chemi...

  10. High performance vapour-cell frequency standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gharavipour, M.; Affolderbach, C.; Kang, S.; Bandi, T.; Gruet, F.; Pellaton, M.; Mileti, G.

    2016-06-01

    We report our investigations on a compact high-performance rubidium (Rb) vapour-cell clock based on microwave-optical double-resonance (DR). These studies are done in both DR continuous-wave (CW) and Ramsey schemes using the same Physics Package (PP), with the same Rb vapour cell and a magnetron-type cavity with only 45 cm3 external volume. In the CW-DR scheme, we demonstrate a DR signal with a contrast of 26% and a linewidth of 334 Hz; in Ramsey-DR mode Ramsey signals with higher contrast up to 35% and a linewidth of 160 Hz have been demonstrated. Short-term stabilities of 1.4×10-13 τ-1/2 and 2.4×10-13 τ-1/2 are measured for CW-DR and Ramsey-DR schemes, respectively. In the Ramsey-DR operation, thanks to the separation of light and microwave interactions in time, the light-shift effect has been suppressed which allows improving the long-term clock stability as compared to CW-DR operation. Implementations in miniature atomic clocks are considered.

  11. Properties of meso-Erythritol; phase state, accommodation coefficient and saturation vapour pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emanuelsson, Eva; Tschiskale, Morten; Bilde, Merete

    2016-04-01

    Introduction Saturation vapour pressure and the associated temperature dependence (enthalpy ΔH), are key parameters for improving predictive atmospheric models. Generally, the atmospheric aerosol community lack experimentally determined values of these properties for relevant organic aerosol compounds (Bilde et al., 2015). In this work we have studied the organic aerosol component meso-Erythritol. Methods Sub-micron airborne particles of meso-Erythritol were generated by nebulization from aqueous solution, dried, and a mono disperse fraction of the aerosol was selected using a differential mobility analyser. The particles were then allowed to evaporate in the ARAGORN (AaRhus Atmospheric Gas phase OR Nano particle) flow tube. It is a temperature controlled 3.5 m long stainless steel tube with an internal diameter of 0.026 m (Bilde et al., 2003, Zardini et al., 2010). Changes in particle size as function of evaporation time were determined using a scanning mobility particle sizer system. Physical properties like air flow, temperature, humidity and pressure were controlled and monitored on several places in the setup. The saturation vapour pressures were then inferred from the experimental results in the MATLAB® program AU_VaPCaP (Aarhus University_Vapour Pressure Calculation Program). Results Following evaporation, meso-Erythriol under some conditions showed a bimodal particle size distribution indicating the formation of particles of two different phase states. The issue of physical phase state, along with critical assumptions e.g. the accommodation coefficient in the calculations of saturation vapour pressures of atmospheric relevant compounds, will be discussed. Saturation vapour pressures from the organic compound meso-Erythritol will be presented at temperatures between 278 and 308 K, and results will be discussed in the context of atmospheric chemistry. References Bilde, M. et al., (2015), Chemical Reviews, 115 (10), 4115-4156. Bilde, M. et. al., (2003

  12. Is there a solar signal in lower stratospheric water vapour?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schieferdecker, Tobias; Lossow, Stefan; Stiller, Gabriele; von Clarmann, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    A merged time series of stratospheric water vapour built from the Halogen Occultation Instrument (HALOE) and the Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS) data between 60 deg S and 60 deg N and 15 to 30 km, and covering the years 1992 to 2012, was analysed by multivariate linear regression, including an 11-year solar cycle proxy. Lower stratospheric water vapour was found to reveal a phase-shifted anti-correlation with the solar cycle, with lowest water vapour after solar maximum. The phase shift is composed of an inherent constant time lag of about 2 years and a second component following the stratospheric age of air. The amplitudes of the water vapour response are largest close to the tropical tropopause (up to 0.35 ppmv) and decrease with altitude and latitude. Including the solar cycle proxy in the regression results in linear trends of water vapour being negative over the full altitude/latitude range, while without the solar proxy, positive water vapour trends in the lower stratosphere were found. We conclude from these results that a solar signal seems to be generated at the tropical tropopause which is most likely imprinted on the stratospheric water vapour abundances and transported to higher altitudes and latitudes via the Brewer-Dobson circulation. Hence it is concluded that the tropical tropopause temperature at the final dehydration point of air may also be governed to some degree by the solar cycle. The negative water vapour trends obtained when considering the solar cycle impact on water vapour abundances can possibly solve the "water vapour conundrum" of increasing stratospheric water vapour abundances despite constant or even decreasing tropopause temperatures.

  13. Is there a solar signal in lower stratospheric water vapour?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schieferdecker, T.; Lossow, S.; Stiller, G. P.; von Clarmann, T.

    2015-09-01

    A merged time series of stratospheric water vapour built from the Halogen Occultation Instrument (HALOE) and the Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS) data between 60° S and 60° N and 15 to 30 km and covering the years 1992 to 2012 was analysed by multivariate linear regression, including an 11-year solar cycle proxy. Lower stratospheric water vapour was found to reveal a phase-shifted anti-correlation with the solar cycle, with lowest water vapour after solar maximum. The phase shift is composed of an inherent constant time lag of about 2 years and a second component following the stratospheric age of air. The amplitudes of the water vapour response are largest close to the tropical tropopause (up to 0.35 ppmv) and decrease with altitude and latitude. Including the solar cycle proxy in the regression results in linear trends of water vapour being negative over the full altitude/latitude range, while without the solar proxy, positive water vapour trends in the lower stratosphere were found. We conclude from these results that a solar signal seems to be generated at the tropical tropopause which is most likely imprinted on the stratospheric water vapour abundances and transported to higher altitudes and latitudes via the Brewer-Dobson circulation. Hence it is concluded that the tropical tropopause temperature at the final dehydration point of air may also be governed to some degree by the solar cycle. The negative water vapour trends obtained when considering the solar cycle impact on water vapour abundances can possibly solve the "water vapour conundrum" of increasing stratospheric water vapour abundances despite constant or even decreasing tropopause temperatures.

  14. Atmospheric pressure chemical vapour deposition of vanadium oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manning, Troy Darrell

    The APCVD of vanadium(IV) oxide thin films from halide precursors was investigated. It was found that the phase of vanadium oxide obtained could be controlled by the reactor temperature and precursor ratio. For vanadium(IV) chloride and water, reactor temperatures > 550 °C and an excess of water over VCI4 was required to produce VO2 thin films. For vanadium(V) oxytrichloride and water, reactor temperatures > 550 °C and an excess of water over VOCI3 also produced VO2 but required low total gas flow rates (< 1 L min 1) for complete coverage of the substrate. Vanadium(IV) oxide thin films doped with metal ions (W, Cr, Nb, Ti, Mo or Sn) were also prepared by the APCVD process in order to reduce the thermochromic transition temperature (TC) from 68 °C for the undoped material to < 30 °C. The most successful dopant was tungsten, introduced into the VOCl3, and water system as WCI6, which lowered T to 5 °C for a 3 atom% tungsten doped thin film. Tungsten (VI) ethoxide was introduced into the VCI4 and water system and reduced TC, of VO2, to 42 °C for a 1 atom% tungsten doped thin film. Chromium, introduced as CrCO2Cl2, formed a chromium vanadium oxide that did not display any thermochromic properties. Niobium, introduced as NbCl5 into the VOCl3 system, reduced TC of VO2, but the amount of niobium introduced could not be easily controlled. Molybdenum, introduced as MoCI5, also reduced TC of VO2, but the form of the molybdenum appeared to be different from that required for complete control of TC, Titanium, introduced as TiCl4, produced phase segregated films of VO2 and TiO2, with interesting multifunctional properties and a reduced TC. Tin, introduced as SnCl4, also formed a phase segregated material of VO2, and SnO2, with a slightly reduced TC.

  15. Relation between chemical composition or antioxidant activity and antihypertensive activity for six essential oils.

    PubMed

    Yvon, Yan; Raoelison, Emmanuel Guy; Razafindrazaka, René; Randriantsoa, Adolphe; Romdhane, Mehrez; Chabir, Naziha; Mkaddem, Mounira Guedri; Bouajila, Jalloul

    2012-08-01

    Six essential oils (EOs), Juniperus phoenicea (leaves and berries), Thymus capitatus, Lauris nobilis, Melaleuca armillaris, and Eucalyptus gracilis, were screened for their antioxidant and antihypertensive activity as well as their chemical compositions. We identified and quantified 24 compounds (representing 99.8% of total oil) for J. phoenicea leaves, 14 compounds (representing 98.8% of total oil) for J. phoenicea berries, 11 compounds (representing 99.6% of total oil) for T. capitatus, 32 compounds (representing 98.9% of total oil) for L. nobilis, 32 compounds (representing 98.7% of total oil) for M. armillaris, and 26 compounds (representing 99.3% of total oil) for E. gracilis. In the 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) assay, the antioxidant activity was in the range of 0.59 to 2183.6 mg/L, whereas T. capitatus (1.24 ± 0.05 mg/L) gave the best activity in the 2,2'-azinobis-3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonate assay. Antihypertensive activity was evaluated by testing the vasorelaxing capacity of EOs on rat aorta precontracted by phenylephrine (10(-6) M). T. capitatus and L. nobilis were most active for an antihypertensive activity (29 ± 3 and 59 ± 2 mg/L, respectively). Correlations between chemical composition or antioxidant activity and/or antihypertensive activity were studied. Significant correlation has been found for antihypertensive activity and p-cymene (R(2) = 0.86), β-elemene (R(2) = 0.90), and β-myrcene (R(2) = 0.76). A good correlation has been found between antihypertensive activity and antioxidant activity by DPPH assay (R(2) = 0.98). Antioxidant activity can contribute to the prevention of the increase of the blood pressure. According to the literature, no study has been reported until now of correlation between antihypertensive activity and antioxidant activity. Natural EOs can find its interest and application in a medicinal area. PMID:22860587

  16. Chemical activation by mechanochemical mixing, microwave, and ultrasonic irradiation

    EPA Science Inventory

    The use of emerging MW-assisted chemistry techniques in conjunction with benign reaction media is dramatically reducing chemical waste ad reaction times in several organic syntheses and chemical transformations. This editorial comments on the recent developments in mechanochemica...

  17. Chemically modified RNA activated matrices enhance bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Elangovan, Satheesh; Khorsand, Behnoush; Do, Anh-Vu; Hong, Liu; Dewerth, Alexander; Kormann, Michael; Ross, Ryan D; Sumner, D Rick; Allamargot, Chantal; Salem, Aliasger K

    2015-11-28

    There exists a dire need for improved therapeutics to achieve predictable bone regeneration. Gene therapy using non-viral vectors that are safe and efficient at transfecting target cells is a promising approach to overcoming the drawbacks of protein delivery of growth factors. Here, we investigated the transfection efficiency, cytotoxicity, osteogenic potential and in vivo bone regenerative capacity of chemically modified ribonucleic acid (cmRNA) (encoding BMP-2) complexed with polyethylenimine (PEI) and made comparisons with PEI complexed with conventional plasmid DNA (encoding BMP-2). The polyplexes were fabricated at an amine (N) to phosphate (P) ratio of 10 and characterized for transfection efficiency using human bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs). The osteogenic potential of BMSCs treated with these polyplexes was validated by determining the expression of bone-specific genes, osteocalcin and alkaline phosphatase as well as through the detection of bone matrix deposition. Using a calvarial bone defect model in rats, it was shown that PEI-cmRNA (encoding BMP-2)-activated matrices promoted significantly enhanced bone regeneration compared to PEI-plasmid DNA (BMP-2)-activated matrices. Our proof of concept study suggests that scaffolds loaded with non-viral vectors harboring cmRNA encoding osteogenic proteins may be a powerful tool for stimulating bone regeneration with significant potential for clinical translation. PMID:26415855

  18. Chemical properties and antioxidant and antimicrobial activities of Slovenian propolis.

    PubMed

    Mavri, Ana; Abramovič, Helena; Polak, Tomaž; Bertoncelj, Jasna; Jamnik, Polona; Smole Možina, Sonja; Jeršek, Barbara

    2012-08-01

    The chemical composition as well as the antioxidant and antimicrobial activities of two EtOH extracts of propolis (PEEs) from Slovenia were determined. EtOH was used as extracting solvent at 70 and 96%, providing the extracts PEE70 and PEE96, respectively. The extraction with 70% EtOH was more efficient than that with 96% EtOH, as the PEE70 was richer in total phenolic compounds than the PEE96. The Slovenian propolis was characterized by different phenolic acids and flavonoids. The PEE96 was slightly richer in three specific compounds, i.e., caffeic acid, ferulic acid, and luteolin, while all other substances detected showed higher contents in the PEE70. The PEE70 showed a stronger reducing power and ability to scavenge free radicals and metal ions than the PEE96. Both PEEs were in the main more effective against Gram-positive bacteria than against fungi and Gram-negative bacteria like Salmonella and Escherichia coli, with the exception of Campylobacter. The PEE96 decreased the intracellular oxidation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae in a dose-dependent manner. The antimicrobial activities and antioxidant properties were related to the total phenolic contents. The two PEEs have the potential for use as natural antimicrobial and antioxidant additives in foods.

  19. THE USE OF STRUCTURE-ACTIVITY RELATIONSHIPS IN INTEGRATING THE CHEMISTRY AND TOXICOLOGY OF ENDOCRINE DISRUPTING CHEMICALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Structure activity relationships (SARs) are based on the principle that structurally similar chemicals should have similar biological activity. SARs relate specifically-defined toxicological activity of chemicals to their molecular structure and physico-chemical properties. To de...

  20. Do Training Programs Work? An Assessment of Pharmacists Activities in the Field of Chemical Dependency.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooks, Valerie G.; Brock, Tina Penick; Ahn, Jungeun

    2001-01-01

    Seeks to determine if pharmacists who attended a chemical dependency training program were performing more chemical dependency related activities. Results reveal that participants were more likely to perform the following activities: lecture to community groups about chemical dependency; participate in a pharmacists' recovery program; provide…

  1. Brazilian Propolis: Correlation Between Chemical Composition and Antimicrobial Activity

    PubMed Central

    Salomão, Kelly; Pereira, Paulo Roberto S.; Campos, Leila C.; Borba, Cintia M.; Cabello, Pedro H.; Marcucci, Maria Cristina

    2008-01-01

    The chemical composition of ethanol extracts from samples of Brazilian propolis (EEPs) determined by HPLC and their activity against Trypanosoma cruzi, Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Klebisiella pneumoniae, Candida albicans, Sporothrix schenckii and Paracoccidioides brasiliensis were determined. Based on the predominant botanical origin in the region of samples' collection, the 10 extracts were separated into three groups: A (B. dracunculifolia + Auraucaria spp), B (B. dracunculifolia) and C (Araucaria spp). Analysis by the multiple regression of all the extracts together showed a positive correlation, higher concentrations leading to higher biological effect, of S. aureus with p-coumaric acid (PCUM) and 3-(4-hydroxy-3-(oxo-butenyl)-phenylacrylic acid (DHCA1) and of trypomastigotes of T. cruzi with 3,5-diprenyl-4-hydroxycinnamic acid derivative 4 (DHCA4) and 2,2-dimethyl-6-carboxyethenyl-2H-1-benzopyran (DCBEN). When the same approach was employed for each group, due to the small number of observations, the statistical test gave unreliable results. However, an overall analysis revealed for group A an association of S. aureus with caffeic acid (CAF) and dicaffeoylquinic acid 3 (CAFQ3), of S. pneumoniae with CAFQ3 and monocaffeoylquinic acid 2 (CAFQ2) and of T. cruzi also with CAFQ3. For group B, a higher activity against S. pneumoniae was associated DCBEN and for T. cruzi with CAF. For group C no association was observed between the anitmicrobial effect and any component of the extracts. The present study reinforces the relevance of PCUM and derivatives, especially prenylated ones and also of caffeolyquinic acids, on the biological activity of Brazilian propolis. PMID:18830454

  2. Vapour phase dehydration of glycerol to acrolein over tungstated zirconia catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao Ginjupalli, Srinivasa; Mugawar, Sowmya; Rajan N., Pethan; Kumar Balla, Putra; Chary Komandur, V. R.

    2014-08-01

    Tetragonal (TZ) and monoclinic (MZ) polymorphs of zirconia supports were synthesised by sol-gel method followed by variation of the calcination temperature. Tungstated (10 wt% WO3) supported on the zirconia polymorphs were prepared by impregnation method by using ammonium metatungstate precursor. The physico-chemical properties of the calcined catalysts were characterised by X-ray diffraction, UV-vis diffused reflectance spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), surface area and pore size distribution measurements to gain insight into the effect of morphology of the catalyst textural properties, and structure. The surface acidic properties have been determined by NH3 TPD method and also with FT-IR spectra of pyridine adsorption. Vapour phase dehydration of glycerol to acrolein was employed to investigate the catalytic functionalities. Glycerol conversion and acrolein selectivity was mainly dependent on the fraction of moderate acid sites with majority of them are due to Brønsted acidic sites. Monoclinic zirconia based catalysts have shown the highest activity and acrolein selectivity compared to the corresponding tetragonal zirconia catalysts.

  3. Solvent vapour monitoring in work space by solid phase micro extraction.

    PubMed

    Li, K; Santilli, A; Goldthorp, M; Whiticar, S; Lambert, P; Fingas, M

    2001-05-01

    Solid phase micro extraction (SPME) is a fast, solvent-less alternative to conventional charcoal tube sampling/carbon disulfide extraction for volatile organic compounds (VOC). In this work, SPME was compared to the active sampling technique in a typical lab atmosphere. Two different types of fibre coatings were evaluated for solvent vapour at ambient concentration. A general purpose 100 microm film polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) fibre was found to be unsuitable for VOC work, despite the thick coating. The mixed-phase carboxen/PDMS fibre was found to be suitable. Sensitivity of the SPME was far greater than charcoal sorbent tube method. Calibration studies using typical solvent such as dichloromethane (DCM), benzene (B) and toluene (T) showed an optimal exposure time of 5 min, with a repeatability of less than 20% for a broad spectrum of organic vapour. Minimum detectable amount for DCM is in the range of 0.01 microg/l (0.003 ppmv). Variation among different fibres was generally within 30% at a vapour concentration of 1 microg DCM/l, which was more than adequate for field monitoring purpose. Adsorption characteristics and calibration procedures were studied. An actual application of SPME was carried out to measure background level of solvent vapour at a bench where DCM was used extensively. Agreement between the SPME and the charcoal sampling method was generally within a factor of two. No DCM concentration was found to be above the regulatory limit of 50 ppmv. PMID:11267747

  4. Age and structure of a model vapour-deposited glass

    PubMed Central

    Reid, Daniel R.; Lyubimov, Ivan; Ediger, M. D.; de Pablo, Juan J.

    2016-01-01

    Glass films prepared by a process of physical vapour deposition have been shown to have thermodynamic and kinetic stability comparable to those of ordinary glasses aged for thousands of years. A central question in the study of vapour-deposited glasses, particularly in light of new knowledge regarding anisotropy in these materials, is whether the ultra-stable glassy films formed by vapour deposition are ever equivalent to those obtained by liquid cooling. Here we present a computational study of vapour deposition for a two-dimensional glass forming liquid using a methodology, which closely mimics experiment. We find that for the model considered here, structures that arise in vapour-deposited materials are statistically identical to those observed in ordinary glasses, provided the two are compared at the same inherent structure energy. We also find that newly deposited hot molecules produce cascades of hot particles that propagate far into the film, possibly influencing the relaxation of the material. PMID:27762262

  5. A solar signal in lower stratospheric water vapour?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schieferdecker, T.; Lossow, S.; Stiller, G. P.; von Clarmann, T.

    2015-04-01

    A merged time series of stratospheric water vapour built from HALOE and MIPAS data between 60° S and 60° N and 15 to 30 km and covering the years 1992 to 2012 was analyzed by multivariate linear regression including an 11 year solar cycle proxy. Lower stratospheric water vapour was found to reveal a phase-shifted anti-correlation with the solar cycle, with lowest water vapour after solar maximum. The phase shift is composed of an inherent constant time lag of about 2 years and a second component following the stratospheric age of air. The amplitudes of the water vapour response are largest close to the tropical tropopause (up to 0.35 ppmv) and decrease with altitude and latitude. Including the solar cycle proxy in the regression results in linear trends of water vapour being negative over the full altitude/latitude range, while without the solar proxy positive water wapour trends in the lowermost stratosphere were found. We conclude from these results that a solar signal generated at the tropical tropopause is imprinted on the stratospheric water vapour abundances and transported to higher altitudes and latitudes via the Brewer-Dobson circulation. Hence it is concluded that the tropical tropopause temperature at the final dehydration point of air is also governed to some degree by the solar cycle. The negative water vapour trends obtained when considering the solar cycle impact on water vapour abundances can solve the water vapour conundrum of increasing stratospheric water vapour abundances at constant or even decreasing tropopause temperatures.

  6. PREDICTING TOXICOLOGICAL ENDPOINTS OF CHEMICALS USING QUANTITATIVE STRUCTURE-ACTIVITY RELATIONSHIPS (QSARS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSARs) are being developed to predict the toxicological endpoints for untested chemicals similar in structure to chemicals that have known experimental toxicological data. Based on a very large number of predetermined descriptors, a...

  7. Localisation of an Unknown Number of Land Mines Using a Network of Vapour Detectors

    PubMed Central

    Chhadé, Hiba Haj; Abdallah, Fahed; Mougharbel, Imad; Gning, Amadou; Julier, Simon; Mihaylova, Lyudmila

    2014-01-01

    We consider the problem of localising an unknown number of land mines using concentration information provided by a wireless sensor network. A number of vapour sensors/detectors, deployed in the region of interest, are able to detect the concentration of the explosive vapours, emanating from buried land mines. The collected data is communicated to a fusion centre. Using a model for the transport of the explosive chemicals in the air, we determine the unknown number of sources using a Principal Component Analysis (PCA)-based technique. We also formulate the inverse problem of determining the positions and emission rates of the land mines using concentration measurements provided by the wireless sensor network. We present a solution for this problem based on a probabilistic Bayesian technique using a Markov chain Monte Carlo sampling scheme, and we compare it to the least squares optimisation approach. Experiments conducted on simulated data show the effectiveness of the proposed approach. PMID:25384008

  8. Localisation of an unknown number of land mines using a network of vapour detectors.

    PubMed

    Chhadé, Hiba Haj; Abdallah, Fahed; Mougharbel, Imad; Gning, Amadou; Julier, Simon; Mihaylova, Lyudmila

    2014-11-06

    We consider the problem of localising an unknown number of land mines using concentration information provided by a wireless sensor network. A number of vapour sensors/detectors, deployed in the region of interest, are able to detect the concentration of the explosive vapours, emanating from buried land mines. The collected data is communicated to a fusion centre. Using a model for the transport of the explosive chemicals in the air, we determine the unknown number of sources using a Principal Component Analysis (PCA)-based technique. We also formulate the inverse problem of determining the positions and emission rates of the land mines using concentration measurements provided by the wireless sensor network. We present a solution for this problem based on a probabilistic Bayesian technique using a Markov chain Monte Carlo sampling scheme, and we compare it to the least squares optimisation approach. Experiments conducted on simulated data show the effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  9. Developments in vapour cloud explosion blast modeling.

    PubMed

    Mercx, W P; van den Berg, A C; Hayhurst, C J; Robertson, N J; Moran, K C

    2000-01-01

    TNT Equivalency methods are widely used for vapour cloud explosion blast modeling. Presently, however, other types of models are available which do not have the fundamental objections TNT Equivalency models have. TNO Multi-Energy method is increasingly accepted as a more reasonable alternative to be used as a simple and practical method. Computer codes based on computational fluid dynamics (CFD) like AutoReaGas, developed by TNO and Century Dynamics, could be used also in case a more rigorous analysis is required. Application of the Multi-Energy method requires knowledge of two parameters describing the explosion: a charge size and a charge strength. During the last years, research has led to an improved determination of the charge strength (i.e., the class number or source overpressure) to be chosen to apply the blast charts. A correlation has been derived relating the charge strength to a set of parameters describing the boundary conditions of the flammable cloud and the fuel in the cloud. A simple approach may not be satisfactory in all situations. The overpressure distribution inside a vapour cloud explosion is generally not homogeneous and the presence of obstructions causes directional blast propagation in the near field. A CFD approach, in which the actual situation is modeled, supplies case-specific results. An overview of the key aspects relevant to the application of the Multi-Energy method and CFD modeling is provided. Then the application of the two methods is demonstrated for an example problem involving the calculation of the explosion blast load on a structure at some distance from the explosion in an offshore platform complex.

  10. Formation and decomposition of chemically activated and stabilized hydrazine.

    PubMed

    Asatryan, Rubik; Bozzelli, Joseph W; da Silva, Gabriel; Swinnen, Saartje; Nguyen, Minh Tho

    2010-06-01

    Recombination of two amidogen radicals, NH(2) (X(2)B1), is relevant to hydrazine formation, ammonia oxidation and pyrolysis, nitrogen reduction (fixation), and a variety of other N/H/X combustion, environmental, and interstellar processes. We have performed a comprehensive analysis of the N(2)H(4) potential energy surface, using a variety of theoretical methods, with thermochemical kinetic analysis and master equation simulations used to treat branching to different product sets in the chemically activated NH(2) + NH(2) process. For the first time, iminoammonium ylide (NH(3)NH), the less stable isomer of hydrazine, is involved in the kinetic modeling of N(2)H(4). A new, low-energy pathway is identified for the formation of NH(3) plus triplet NH, via initial production of NH(3)NH followed by singlet-triplet intersystem crossing. This new reaction channel results in the formation of dissociated products at a relatively rapid rate at even moderate temperatures and above. A further novel pathway is described for the decomposition of activated N(2)H(4), which eventually leads to the formation of the simple products N(2) + 2H(2), via H(2) elimination to cis-N(2)H(2). This process, termed as "dihydrogen catalysis", may have significant implications in the formation and decomposition chemistry of hydrazine and ammonia in diverse environments. In this mechanism, stereoselective attack of cis-N(2)H(2) by molecular hydrogen results in decomposition to N(2) with a fairly low barrier. The reverse termolecular reaction leading to the gas-phase formation of cis-N(2)H(2) + H(2) achieves non-heterogeneous catalytic nitrogen fixation with a relatively low activation barrier (77 kcal mol(-1)), much lower than the 125 kcal mol(-1) barrier recently reported for bimolecular addition of H(2) to N(2). This termolecular reaction is an entropically disfavored path, but it does describe a new means of activating the notoriously unreactive N(2). We design heterogeneous analogues of this

  11. Chemical and thermal modulation of molecular motor activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Weili

    Molecular motors of kinesin and dynein families are responsible for various intracellular activities, from long distance movement of organelles, vesicles, protein complexes, and mRNAs to powering mitotic processes. They can take nanometer steps using chemical energy from the hydrolysis of ATP (adenosine triphosphate), and their dysfunction is involved in many neurodegenerative diseases that require long distance transport of cargos. Here I report on the study of the properties of molecular motors at a single-molecule level using optical trappings. I first studied the inhibition properties of kinesin motors by marine natural compound adociasulfates. I showed that adociasulfates compete with microtubules for binding to kinesins and thus inhibit kinesins' activity. Although adociasulfates are a strong inhibitor for all kinesin members, they show a much higher inhibition effect for conventional kinesins than for mitotic kinesins. Thus adociasulfates can be used to specifically inhibit conventional kinesins. By comparing the inhibition of kinesins by two structurally similar adociasulfates, one can see that the negatively charged sulfate residue of adociasulfates can be replaced by other negative residues and thus make it possible for adociasulfate-derived compounds to be more cell permeable. Kinesins and dyneins move cargos towards opposite directions along a microtubule. Cargos with both kinesins and dyneins attached often move bidirectionally due to undergoing a tug-of-war between the oppositely moving kinesin and dynein motors. Here I studied the effect of temperature on microtubule-based kinesin and dynein motor transport. While kinesins' and dyneins' velocities are closely matched above 15 °C, below this temperature the dyneins' velocity decreases much faster than the kinesins'. The kinesins' and dyneins' forces do not measurably change with temperature. The results suggest that temperature has significant effects on bidirectional transport and can be used to

  12. Plant polyphenols: chemical properties, biological activities, and synthesis.

    PubMed

    Quideau, Stéphane; Deffieux, Denis; Douat-Casassus, Céline; Pouységu, Laurent

    2011-01-17

    Eating five servings of fruits and vegetables per day! This is what is highly recommended and heavily advertised nowadays to the general public to stay fit and healthy! Drinking green tea on a regular basis, eating chocolate from time to time, as well as savoring a couple of glasses of red wine per day have been claimed to increase life expectancy even further! Why? The answer is in fact still under scientific scrutiny, but a particular class of compounds naturally occurring in fruits and vegetables is considered to be crucial for the expression of such human health benefits: the polyphenols! What are these plant products really? What are their physicochemical properties? How do they express their biological activity? Are they really valuable for disease prevention? Can they be used to develop new pharmaceutical drugs? What recent progress has been made toward their preparation by organic synthesis? This Review gives answers from a chemical perspective, summarizes the state of the art, and highlights the most significant advances in the field of polyphenol research.

  13. Two-phase flow in a chemically active porous medium

    SciTech Connect

    Darmon, Alexandre Dauchot, Olivier; Benzaquen, Michael; Salez, Thomas

    2014-12-28

    We study the problem of the transformation of a given reactant species into an immiscible product species, as they flow through a chemically active porous medium. We derive the equation governing the evolution of the volume fraction of the species, in a one-dimensional macroscopic description, identify the relevant dimensionless numbers, and provide simple models for capillary pressure and relative permeabilities, which are quantities of crucial importance when tackling multiphase flows in porous media. We set the domain of validity of our models and discuss the importance of viscous coupling terms in the extended Darcy’s law. We investigate numerically the steady regime and demonstrate that the spatial transformation rate of the species along the reactor is non-monotonous, as testified by the existence of an inflection point in the volume fraction profiles. We obtain the scaling of the location of this inflection point with the dimensionless lengths of the problem. Eventually, we provide key elements for optimization of the reactor.

  14. Plant polyphenols: chemical properties, biological activities, and synthesis.

    PubMed

    Quideau, Stéphane; Deffieux, Denis; Douat-Casassus, Céline; Pouységu, Laurent

    2011-01-17

    Eating five servings of fruits and vegetables per day! This is what is highly recommended and heavily advertised nowadays to the general public to stay fit and healthy! Drinking green tea on a regular basis, eating chocolate from time to time, as well as savoring a couple of glasses of red wine per day have been claimed to increase life expectancy even further! Why? The answer is in fact still under scientific scrutiny, but a particular class of compounds naturally occurring in fruits and vegetables is considered to be crucial for the expression of such human health benefits: the polyphenols! What are these plant products really? What are their physicochemical properties? How do they express their biological activity? Are they really valuable for disease prevention? Can they be used to develop new pharmaceutical drugs? What recent progress has been made toward their preparation by organic synthesis? This Review gives answers from a chemical perspective, summarizes the state of the art, and highlights the most significant advances in the field of polyphenol research. PMID:21226137

  15. Adsorption of copper cyanide on chemically active adsorbents

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J.S.; Deorkar, N.V.; Tavlarides, L.L.

    1998-07-01

    An inorganic chemically active adsorbent (ICAA), SG(1)-TEPA (tetraethylenepentaamine)-propyl, is developed for removal, recovery, and recycling of copper cyanide from industrial waste streams. Equilibrium studies are executed to determine and model adsorption of the copper cyanide complex from aqueous solutions in a batch and packed column. It appears that adsorption is dependent on anionic copper cyanide species and the basicity of the ligand. Aqueous-phase equilibrium modeling shows that monovalent (Cu(CN){sub 2}{sup {minus}}), divalent (Cu(CN){sub 3}{sup 2{minus}}), and trivalent (Cu(CN){sub 4}{sup 3{minus}}) species of copper cyanide exist in the solution, depending on the pH and the concentration of total cyanide ions. Batch adsorption data are modeled using a modified multicomponent Langmuir isotherm which includes aqueous-phase speciation and basicity of the SG(1)-TEPA-propyl. This developed model is applied with a mass balance equation to describe the adsorption of copper cyanide complexes in a packed column.

  16. The ignitability of petrol vapours and potential for vapour phase explosion by use of TASER® law enforcement electronic control device.

    PubMed

    Clarke, C; Andrews, S P

    2014-12-01

    An experimental study was made of the potential of the TASER-X26™ law enforcement electronic control device to ignite petrol vapours if used by an officer to incapacitate a person soaked in petrol, or within a flammable atmosphere containing petrol vapour. Bench scale tests have shown that a wooden mannequin with pig skin covering the chest was a suitable representation of a human target. Full scale tests using the mannequin have shown that the arc from a TASER-X26™ is capable of igniting petrol/air vapours on a petrol-soaked person. Further tests in a 1/5 scale and a full scale compartment have shown that if a TASER is used within a compartment, a petrol vapour explosion (deflagration) may be achieved. It is evident from this research that if used in a flammable vapour rich environment, the device could prove fatal not only to the target but the TASER® operator as well.

  17. Heat-activated Plasmonic Chemical Sensors for Harsh Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, Michael; Oh, Sang-Hyun

    2015-12-01

    A passive plasmonics based chemical sensing system to be used in harsh operating environments was investigated and developed within this program. The initial proposed technology was based on combining technologies developed at the SUNY Polytechnic Institute Colleges of Nanoscale Science and Engineering (CNSE) and at the University of Minnesota (UM). Specifically, a passive wireless technique developed at UM was to utilize a heat-activated plasmonic design to passively harvest the thermal energy from within a combustion emission stream and convert this into a narrowly focused light source. This plasmonic device was based on a bullseye design patterned into a gold film using focused ion beam methods (FIB). Critical to the design was the use of thermal stabilizing under and overlayers surrounding the gold film. These stabilizing layers were based on both atomic layer deposited films as well as metal laminate layers developed by United Technologies Aerospace Systems (UTAS). While the bullseye design was never able to be thermally stabilized for operating temperatures of 500oC or higher, an alternative energy harvesting design was developed by CNSE within this program. With this new development, plasmonic sensing results are presented where thermal energy is harvested using lithographically patterned Au nanorods, replacing the need for an external incident light source. Gas sensing results using the harvested thermal energy are in good agreement with sensing experiments, which used an external incident light source. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) was used to reduce the wavelength parameter space from 665 variables down to 4 variables with similar levels of demonstrated selectivity. The method was further improved by patterning rods which harvested energy in the near infrared, which led to a factor of 10 decrease in data acquisition times as well as demonstrated selectivity with a reduced wavelength data set. The combination of a plasmonic-based energy harvesting

  18. Synergistic activation of estrogen receptor with combinations of environmental chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, S.F.; Klotz, D.M.; Collins, B.M.

    1996-06-07

    Certain chemicals in the environment are estrogenic. The low potencies of the compounds, when studied singly, suggest that they may have little effect on biological systems. The estrogenic potencies of combinations of such chemicals were screened in a simple yeast estrogen potencies of combination of such chemicals were screened in a simple yeast estrogen systems (YES) containing human estrogen receptor (hER). Combinations of two weak environmental estrogens, such as dieldrin, endosulfan, or toxaphene, were 100 times as potent in hER-mediated transactivation as any chemical alone. Hydroxylated polychlorinated biphenyls shown previously to synergistically alter sexual development in turtles also synergized in the YES. The synergistic interaction of chemical mixtures with the estrogen receptor may have profound environmental implications. These results may represent a previously uncharacterized level of regulation of estrogen-associated responses. 32 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. Advanced deposition model for thermal activated chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Dang

    Thermal Activated Chemical Vapor Deposition (TACVD) is defined as the formation of a stable solid product on a heated substrate surface from chemical reactions and/or dissociation of gaseous reactants in an activated environment. It has become an essential process for producing solid film, bulk material, coating, fibers, powders and monolithic components. Global market of CVD products has reached multi billions dollars for each year. In the recent years CVD process has been extensively used to manufacture semiconductors and other electronic components such as polysilicon, AlN and GaN. Extensive research effort has been directed to improve deposition quality and throughput. To obtain fast and high quality deposition, operational conditions such as temperature, pressure, fluid velocity and species concentration and geometry conditions such as source-substrate distance need to be well controlled in a CVD system. This thesis will focus on design of CVD processes through understanding the transport and reaction phenomena in the growth reactor. Since the in situ monitor is almost impossible for CVD reactor, many industrial resources have been expended to determine the optimum design by semi-empirical methods and trial-and-error procedures. This approach has allowed the achievement of improvements in the deposition sequence, but begins to show its limitations, as this method cannot always fulfill the more and more stringent specifications of the industry. To resolve this problem, numerical simulation is widely used in studying the growth techniques. The difficulty of numerical simulation of TACVD crystal growth process lies in the simulation of gas phase and surface reactions, especially the latter one, due to the fact that very limited kinetic information is available in the open literature. In this thesis, an advanced deposition model was developed to study the multi-component fluid flow, homogeneous gas phase reactions inside the reactor chamber, heterogeneous surface

  20. Chemical constituents and antihistamine activity of Bixa orellana leaf extract

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Bixa orellana L. has been traditionally used in Central and South America to treat a number of ailments, including internal inflammation, and in other tropical countries like Malaysia as treatment for gastric ulcers and stomach discomfort. The current study aimed to determine the major chemical constituents of the aqueous extract of B. orellana (AEBO) and to evaluate the antihistamine activity of AEBO during acute inflammation induced in rats. Methods Acute inflammation was produced by subplantar injection of 0.1 mL of 0.1% histamine into the right hind paw of each rat in the control and treatment groups. The degree of edema was measured before injection and at the time points of 30, 60, 120, 180, 240 and 300 min after injection. Changes of peritoneal vascular permeability were studied using Evans blue dye as a detector. Vascular permeability was evaluated by the amount of dye leakage into the peritoneal cavity in rats. To evaluate the inhibitory effect of AEBO on biochemical mediators of vascular permeability, the levels of nitric oxide (NO) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) were determined in histamine-treated paw tissues. The major constituents of AEBO were determined by gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis. Results AEBO produced a significant inhibition of histamine-induced paw edema starting at 60 min time point, with maximal percentage of inhibition (60.25%) achieved with a dose of 150 mg/kg of AEBO at 60 min time point. Up to 99% of increased peritoneal vascular permeability produced by histamine was successfully suppressed by AEBO. The expression of biochemical mediators of vascular permeability, NO and VEGF, was also found to be downregulated in the AEBO treated group. Gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis revealed that the major constituent in AEBO was acetic acid. Conclusions The experimental findings demonstrated that the anti-inflammatory activity of AEBO was due to its inhibitory

  1. Combined Chemical Activation and Fenton Degradation to Convert Waste Polyethylene into High-Value Fine Chemicals.

    PubMed

    Chow, Cheuk-Fai; Wong, Wing-Leung; Ho, Keith Yat-Fung; Chan, Chung-Sum; Gong, Cheng-Bin

    2016-07-01

    Plastic waste is a valuable organic resource. However, proper technologies to recover usable materials from plastic are still very rare. Although the conversion/cracking/degradation of certain plastics into chemicals has drawn much attention, effective and selective cracking of the major waste plastic polyethylene is extremely difficult, with degradation of C-C/C-H bonds identified as the bottleneck. Pyrolysis, for example, is a nonselective degradation method used to crack plastics, but it requires a very high energy input. To solve the current plastic pollution crisis, more effective technologies are needed for converting plastic waste into useful substances that can be fed into the energy cycle or used to produce fine chemicals for industry. In this study, we demonstrate a new and effective chemical approach by using the Fenton reaction to convert polyethylene plastic waste into carboxylic acids under ambient conditions. Understanding the fundamentals of this new chemical process provides a possible protocol to solve global plastic-waste problems.

  2. Preparation of activated carbon from cherry stones by chemical activation with ZnCl 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olivares-Marín, M.; Fernández-González, C.; Macías-García, A.; Gómez-Serrano, V.

    2006-06-01

    Cherry stones (CS), an industrial product generated abundantly in the Valle del Jerte (Cáceres province, Spain), were used as precursor in the preparation of activated carbon by chemical activation with ZnCl 2. The influence of process variables such as the carbonisation temperature and the ZnCl 2:CS ratio (impregnation ratio) on textural and chemical-surface properties of the products obtained was studied. Such products were characterised texturally by adsorption of N 2 at -196 °C, mercury porosimetry and density measurements. Information on the surface functional groups and structures of the carbons was provided by FT-IR spectroscopy. Activated carbon with a high development of surface area and porosity is prepared. When using the 4:1 impregnation ratio, the specific surface area (BET) of the resultant carbon is as high as 1971 m 2 g -1. The effect of the increase in the impregnation ratio on the porous structure of activated carbon is stronger than that of the rise in the carbonisation temperature, whereas the opposite applies to the effect on the surface functional groups and structures.

  3. Active targeting in a random porous medium by chemical swarm robots with secondary chemical signaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grančič, Peter; Štěpánek, František

    2011-08-01

    The multibody dynamics of a system of chemical swarm robots in a porous environment is investigated. The chemical swarm robots are modeled as Brownian particles capable of delivering an encapsulated chemical payload toward a given target location and releasing it in response to an external stimulus. The presence of chemical signals (chemo-attractant) in the system plays a crucial role in coordinating the collective movement of the particles via chemotaxis. For a number of applications, such as distributed chemical processing and targeted drug delivery, the understanding of factors that govern the collective behavior of the particles, especially their ability to localize a given target, is of immense importance. A hybrid modeling methodology based on the combination of the Brownian dynamics method and diffusion problem coupled through the chemotaxis phenomena is used to analyze the impact of a varying signaling threshold and the strength of chemotaxis on the ability of the chemical robots to fulfill their target localization mission. The results demonstrate that the selected performance criteria (the localization half time and the success rate) can be improved when an appropriate signaling process is chosen. Furthermore, for an optimum target localization strategy, the topological complexity of the porous environment needs to be reflected.

  4. METABOLISM AND METABOLIC ACTIVATION OF CHEMICALS: IN-SILICO SIMULATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The role of metabolism in prioritizing chemicals according to their potential adverse health effects is extremely important because innocuous parents can be transformed into toxic metabolites. This work presents the TIssue MEtabolism Simulator (TIMES) platform for simulating met...

  5. Hot-wire detector for chemically active materials used in gas chromatography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Hot-filament detector analyzes chemically active materials used in gas chromatography. The detector reacts chemically with the effluent vapors in the gas chromatographic apparatus to change the electrical resistance of the filament as a function of the affluent composition. Due to the changes produced by chemical action on the filament, the system is often calibrated.

  6. Pattern recognition applied to vapour-phase infrared spectra: characteristics of νOH bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalsovszky, G.; Holly, S.

    1988-05-01

    With the commercial availability of infrared spectrum libraries in computer accessible form, a new application of these libraries, the investigation of structure-spectrum correlations, has become possible in addition to the conventional application, the identification of unknown substances on the basis of spectral search in the library. This paper deals with the νOH bands of alcohols, also including diols and diol monoether type compounds, investigating correlations between chemical structure and the features of spectra. For monoalcohols, the frequencies measured in dilute solution and vapour phase, respectively, are correlated; the former were taken from literature, the latter from the vapour phase spectrum library of EPA. For the other types of compound, vapour phase νOH frequencies of free and hydrogen bonded hydroxy groups were studied, and the differences correlated with the hydrogen bonded structures. Peak maxima were determined by a peak picking program; in the case of overlapping bands Fourier self-deconvolution was applied prior to peak picking. For more seriously overlapping bands least-squares curve fitting was applied. In studying correlations, a cluster analysis method (KMEANS) was also used.

  7. The impact of deep overshooting convection on the water vapour and trace gas distribution in the TTL and lower stratosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frey, W.; Schofield, R.; Hoor, P. M.; Ravegnani, F.; Ulanovsky, A.; Viciani, S.; D'Amato, F.; Lane, T. P.

    2014-12-01

    Overshooting convection penetrating the tropical tropopause layer (TTL) and the lower stratosphere has a significant impact on the redistribution of water vapour and further trace gases. This is of importance for the stratospheric water vapour budget, which plays a central role in radiative and chemical processes. Modelling studies and in situ measurements show the hydration potential of convective overshooting partly by direct injection of ice particles into the stratosphere and subsequent sublimation. However, processes leading to dehydration of the TTL may also impact the stratospheric humidity by limiting the amount of water vapour carried aloft. While the large scale drives some of the dehydrating processes, others are of convective origin, for example gravity waves and cooling associated with overshooting turrets. Furthermore, downdrafts may transport dry and ozone rich air masses from the stratosphere into the TTL. Improving our understanding of overshooting convection and its influence on TTL water vapour will ultimately place better constraints on the budget of water vapour in the stratosphere.In this study we use three-dimensional cloud resolving (WRF-ARW) simulations of a deep convective thunderstorm (Hector) to study the redistribution of water vapour and trace gases in the upper TTL/lower stratosphere. Passive tracers are initialised to investigate the transport of air masses. The simulations focus on an Hector event that has been probed by aircraft during the SCOUT-O3 field campaign. Observations were performed in and around overshoots that even penetrated the stratosphere. These observations as well as the model simulations show downward transport and mixing of air masses from the stratosphere, though less strong and more localised in the simulation. Furthermore, the simulations shows a layering of hydrated and dehydrated air masses post-convection in the upper TTL and lower stratosphere. Here we use the model to explain the processes causing the

  8. Trends and transport of water vapour in the middle atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urban, Joachim

    2012-07-01

    J. Urban with data contributions from the SAGE, HALOE, Odin, MIPAS, ACE, MLS, and SABER teams The evolution and spatio-temporal variability of water vapour in the tropical tropopause region, stratosphere, and mesosphere is analyzed using "historical" (SAGE-II, UARS/HALOE) and "recent" (Odin/SMR, TIMED/SABER, ENVISAT/MIPAS, ACE/FTS, Aura/MLS) satellite limb measurements. Water vapour mixing ratios in the tropical lower stratosphere are correlated with changes of the very variable tropical tropopause cold-point temperatures and the water vapour entry signal is further modulated and altered by transport and mixing of air masses. A water vapour signal originating and ascending in the tropical tropopause region can within certain limits be followed through the stratosphere and mesosphere allowing us for example to test consistency with "age-of-air" estimates and present understanding of poleward transport in this atmospheric region.

  9. Plastic optical fibre sensor for detecting vapour phase alcohol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morisawa, Masayuki; Amemiya, Yumiko; Kohzu, Hidenori; Liang, Chuan Xin; Muto, Shinzo

    2001-07-01

    New plastic optical fibre sensors for detecting alcohol vapour have been studied. A certain kind of polymer such as a Novolac resin causes swelling when it is exposed to alcohol vapour. This effect produces a change in the polymer refractive index. Based on this principle, the plastic optical fibre (POF) type sensor head was fabricated by coating Novolac-resin and Novolac/Fe:SO complex film as a cladding layer on the plastic fibre core. When this sensor head was exposed to ethanol and methanol vapour, the light intensity passing through the sensor head changed remarkably depending on the vapour pressure. The sensor response was also found to be fast, stable and reproducible.

  10. Activated carbons obtained from sewage sludge by chemical activation: gas-phase environmental applications.

    PubMed

    Boualem, T; Debab, A; Martínez de Yuso, A; Izquierdo, M T

    2014-07-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the adsorption capacity for toluene and SO2 of low cost activated carbons prepared from sewage sludge by chemical activation at different impregnation ratios. Samples were characterized by proximate and ultimate analyses, thermogravimetry, infrared spectroscopy and N2 adsorption. Because of the low carbon content of the raw material, the development of porosity in the activated carbons was mainly of a mesoporous nature, with surface areas lower than 300 m(2)/g. The study of gas-phase applications for activated carbons from sewage sludge was carried out using both an organic and an inorganic compound in order to screen for possible applications. Toluene adsorption capacity at saturation was around 280 mg/g, which is a good level of performance given the high ash content of the activated carbons. However, dynamic experiments at low toluene concentration presented diffusion problems resulting from low porosity development. SO2 adsorption capacity is associated with average micropore size, which can be controlled by the impregnation ratio used to prepare the activated carbons.

  11. 75 FR 6386 - Pesticide Products; Registration Applications for a New Active Ingredient Chemical; Demiditraz

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-09

    ... register pesticide products containing active ingredients not included in any previously registered pesticide products. Pursuant to the provisions of section 3(c)(4) of the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and... AGENCY Pesticide Products; Registration Applications for a New Active Ingredient Chemical;...

  12. Variability of winter-time middle atmospheric water vapour over the Arctic as observed with a ground-based microwave radiometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tschanz, Brigitte; Kivi, Rigel; Rüfenacht, Rolf; Kämpfer, Niklaus

    2014-05-01

    Middle atmospheric water vapour has a long chemical lifetime and can therefore be used as a tracer for dynamics. The ground-based microwave radiometer MIAWARA-C is designed for the use on campaigns and measures profiles of water vapour in the upper stratosphere and mesosphere and thus provides valuable data for the investigation of atmospheric processes. It has been operational for five years and has successfully participated in measurement campaigns under various climatic conditions in Germany, Switzerland, California, Finland and on la Réunion. The temporal resolution of the obtained water vapour profiles approximately 2 hours depending on tropospheric conditions. During two campaigns from January to June 2010 and from July 2011 to April 2013 in Sodankylä, Finland, MIAWARA-C monitored time series of polar middle atmospheric water vapour for three winters with three Sudden Stratospheric Warmings (SSW) occurring in early 2010, 2012 and 2013. The obtained time series are used to study the effects of the three SSWs on middle-atmospheric water vapour. During an SSW, humid mid- to low-latitude air is transported towards the polar region resulting in a fast increase in water vapour. The descent of water vapour after the SSW allows the estimation of the descent rate over the polar region as the normal wintertime circulation reforms. Results from the three SSWs are compared. The ground-based water vapour data is combined with sonde data of the Finnish Meteorological Institute and ground-based microwave wind measurements for one winter in order to obtain a more complete picture of the dynamics in the polar winter atmosphere.

  13. Adsorption studies of methylene blue and phenol onto vetiver roots activated carbon prepared by chemical activation.

    PubMed

    Altenor, Sandro; Carene, Betty; Emmanuel, Evens; Lambert, Jacques; Ehrhardt, Jean-Jacques; Gaspard, Sarra

    2009-06-15

    Vetiver roots have been utilized for the preparation of activated carbon (AC) by chemical activation with different impregnation ratios of phosphoric acid, X(P) (gH(3)PO(4)/g precursor): 0.5:1; 1:1 and 1.5:1. Textural characterization, determined by nitrogen adsorption at 77K shows that mixed microporous and mesoporous structures activated carbons (ACs) with high surface area (>1000 m(2)/g) and high pore volume (up to 1.19 cm(3)/g) can be obtained. The surface chemical properties of these ACs were investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Boehm titration. Their textural and chemical characteristics were compared to those of an AC sample obtained by steam activation of vetiver roots. Classical molecules used for characterizing liquid phase adsorption, phenol and methylene blue (MB), were used. Adsorption kinetics of MB and phenol have been studied using commonly used kinetic models, i.e., the pseudo-first-order model, the pseudo-second-order model, the intraparticle diffusion model and as well the fractal, BWS (Brouers, Weron and Sotolongo) kinetic equation. The correlation coefficients (R(2)) and the normalized standard deviation Deltaq (%) were determined showing globally, that the recently derived fractal kinetic equation could best describe the adsorption kinetics for the adsorbates tested here, indicating a complex adsorption mechanism. The experimental adsorption isotherms of these molecules on the activated carbon were as well analysed using four isotherms: the classical Freundlich, Langmuir, Redlich-Peterson equations, but as well the newly published deformed Weibull Brouers-Sotolongo isotherm. The results obtained from the application of the equations show that the best fits were achieved with the Brouers-Sotolongo equation and with the Redlich-Peterson equation. Influence of surface functional groups towards MB adsorption is as well studied using various ACs prepared from vetiver roots and sugar cane bagasse. Opposite effects governing MB

  14. LIMITED-USE CHEMICAL PROTECTIVE CLOTHING FOR EPA SUPERFUND ACTIVITIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Because contractor field personnel complained about the poor durability and fit of limited-use chemical protective clothing (CPC) most commonly used at hazardous waste site operations, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) initiated a study to • characterize use of CPC...

  15. Creating internal conductivity in dry biological SEM samples by a simple vapour treatment.

    PubMed

    Ensikat, H-J; Weigend, M

    2014-12-01

    Internal sample conductivity in scanning electron microscopy can be a valuable alternative to metal coating. Proton conductivity may be used for this purpose. Many solid materials with active hydrogen atoms, such as hydrogen- and ammonium-salts, organic acids, and even ice, are protonic conductors or semiconductors. Here we present a method to generate proton conductivity in dry biological materials. A simple treatment with hydrogen chloride gas or hydrochloric acid vapour for a few minutes provides sufficient conductivity for many samples. After a removal of excess hydrogen chloride vapour with a vacuum desiccator, the objects may be examined in the SEM without metal coating. The use of internally conductive samples extends the range of easy-to-perform SEM preparation techniques. It is advantageous for material contrast imaging of uncoated samples, and it can be used in combination with metal coating to enhance conductivity on difficult samples with complex overlapping surfaces, where simple metal coating does not reliably eliminate charging problems. PMID:25204567

  16. Chemically active organically doped sol-gel materials: enzymatic sensors, chemical sensors, and photoactive materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avnir, David; Braun, S.; Lev, Ovadia; Ottolenghi, M.

    1992-12-01

    Organically-doped porous sol-gel matrices of optical grade have evolved in recent years into a wide class of materials with diverse applications. We review recent progress made in our laboratories in three domains of applications: the trapping of enzymes with the consequent design of (e.g. glucose) sensors; the development of chemical sensors; and the design of photoactive material for (solar) light energy conversion.

  17. Effect of water pollutants and other chemicals upon ribonuclease activity in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Christensen, G.M.; Olson, D.L.

    1981-12-01

    Ribonuclease was treated in vitro with 73 chemicals, many of which are environmental pollutants, including inorganic, organic, and metal-organic chemicals, pesticides and other biocides, alkyl and aryl industrial pollutants, and certain additional chemicals, to determine their effect upon enzyme activity. Palladium (II and IV) and gold (III) were the strongest inhibitors of RNase activity. Other strong inhibitors, in decreasing order of effect, were: sodium dodecyl sulfate, silver (I), EDTA, mercury (II), copper (II), thiram (fungicide), platinum (IV), malathion (pesticide), lead (II), and beryllium (II). Intermediate effects were found with other inorganic cations, many anions, and some other chemicals. A number of compounds of different chemical types caused no measureable effect. None of the chemicals tested caused a measureable activation of this enzyme.

  18. Genetic activity profiles in the testing and evaluation of chemical mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Waters, M.D.; Claxton, L.D.; Stack, H.F.; Brady, A.L.; Graedel, T.E. )

    1990-01-01

    Some knowledge of the potential genetic activity of a complex environmental mixture may be gained from an assessment of the genetic activity of its component chemicals. The expanded Genetic Activity Profile (GAP) data base provides a computer-generated graphic representation of genetic bioassay data as a function of dose of the substance tested. In addition, the Atmospheric Chemical Compound (ACC) data-base contains information on chemical structures, properties, detection methods, and sources of chemicals found in ambient air. Using the combined data bases, the quantity of an individual chemical present within a mixture or fraction of a mixture may be related to the quantity (lowest effective dose, LED) of the chemical, by itself, required to demonstrate a positive response in one or more genetic bioassays. 19 references.

  19. Chemical modification of capuramycins to enhance antibacterial activity

    PubMed Central

    Bogatcheva, Elena; Dubuisson, Tia; Protopopova, Marina; Einck, Leo; Nacy, Carol A.; Reddy, Venkata M.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To extend capuramycin spectrum of activity beyond mycobacteria and improve intracellular drug activity. Methods Three capuramycin analogues (SQ997, SQ922 and SQ641) were conjugated with different natural and unnatural amino acids or decanoic acid (DEC) through an ester bond at one or more available hydroxyl groups. In vitro activity of the modified compounds was determined against Mycobacterium spp. and representative Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Intracellular activity was evaluated in J774A.1 mouse macrophages infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (H37Rv). Results Acylation of SQ997 and SQ641 with amino undecanoic acid (AUA) improved in vitro activity against most of the bacteria tested. Conjugation of SQ922 with DEC, but not AUA, improved its activity against Gram-positive bacteria. In the presence of efflux pump inhibitor phenylalanine arginine β-naphthyl amide, MICs of SQ997-AUA, SQ641-AUA and SQ922-DEC compounds improved even further against drug-susceptible and drug-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. In Gram-negative bacteria, EDTA-mediated permeabilization caused 4- to 16-fold enhancement of the activity of AUA-conjugated SQ997, SQ922 and SQ641. Conjugation of all three capuramycin analogues with AUA improved intracellular killing of H37Rv in murine macrophages. Conclusions Conjugation of capuramycin analogues with AUA or DEC enhanced in vitro activity, extended the spectrum of activity in Gram-positive bacteria and increased intracellular activity against H37Rv. PMID:21186194

  20. Activated persulfate for organic chemical degradation: A review.

    PubMed

    Matzek, Laura W; Carter, Kimberly E

    2016-05-01

    Activated persulfate reactions have widespread application for groundwater and environmental remediation, as many of these reactions involve destruction of environmental contaminants. Within the last five years, knowledge of activated persulfate degradation reactions has grown to include novel means of activating persulfate for enhanced removal of organic species. These current studies cover a long list of organic analytes, including pharmaceuticals, pesticides, halogenated compounds and dyes. An extensive review of recently published experimental parameters and results for the destruction of organic compounds via activated persulfate is presented. Focus is placed on emerging methodologies and manipulation of traditional activation techniques. Knowledge gaps are identified and discussed, as despite the number of publications on this subject, more broad-reaching guidelines are needed for optimizing applications of activated persulfate in water treatment.

  1. Measurements of Isotopic Composition of Vapour on the Antarctic Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casado, M.; Landais, A.; Masson-Delmotte, V.; Genthon, C.; Prie, F.; Kerstel, E.; Kassi, S.; Arnaud, L.; Steen-Larsen, H. C.; Vignon, E.

    2015-12-01

    The oldest ice core records are obtained on the East Antarctic plateau. The composition in stable isotopes of water (δ18O, δD, δ17O) permits to reconstruct the past climatic conditions over the ice sheet and also at the evaporation source. Paleothermometer accuracy relies on good knowledge of processes affecting the isotopic composition of surface snow in Polar Regions. Both simple models such as Rayleigh distillation and global atmospheric models with isotopes provide good prediction of precipitation isotopic composition in East Antarctica but post deposition processes can alter isotopic composition on site, in particular exchanges with local vapour. To quantitatively interpret the isotopic composition of water archived in ice cores, it is thus essential to study the continuum water vapour - precipitation - surface snow - buried snow. While precipitation and snow sampling are routinely performed in Antarctica, climatic conditions in Concordia, very cold (-55°C in average) and very dry (less than 1000ppmv), impose difficult conditions to measure the water vapour isotopic composition. New developments in infrared spectroscopy enable now the measurement of isotopic composition in water vapour traces (down to 20ppmv). Here we present the results of a campaign of measurement of isotopic composition in Concordia in 2014/2015. Two infrared spectrometers have been deployed or the first time on top of the East Antarctic Plateau allowing a continuous vapour measurement for a month. Comparison of the results from infrared spectroscopy with cryogenic trapping validates the relevance of the method to measure isotopic composition in dry conditions. Identification of different behaviour of isotopic composition in the water vapour associated to turbulent or stratified regime indicates a strong impact of meteorological processes in local vapour/snow interaction.

  2. Oncogene activation in spontaneous and chemically induced rodent tumors: implications for risk analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, S.H.; Stowers, S.J.; Patterson, R.M.; Maronpot, R.R.; Anderson, M.W.

    1988-06-01

    The validity of rodent tumor end points in assessing the potential hazards of chemical exposure to humans is a somewhat controversial but very important issue since most chemicals are classified as potentially hazardous to humans on the basis of long-term carcinogenesis studies in rodents. The ability to distinguish between genotoxic, cytotoxic, or receptor-mediated promotion effects of chemical treatment would aid in the interpretation of rodent carcinogenesis data. Activated oncogenes in spontaneously occurring and chemically induced rodent tumors were examined and compared as one approach to determine the mechanism by which chemical treatment caused an increased incidence of rodent tumors. Different patterns of activated oncogenes were found not only in spontaneous versus chemically induced mouse liver tumors but also in a variety of spontaneous rat tumors versus chemically induced rat lung tumors. In the absence of cytotoxic effects, it could be argued that the chemicals in question activated protooncogenes by a direct genotoxic mechanism. These results provided a basis for the analysis of activated oncogenes in spontaneous and chemically induced rodent tumors to provide information at a molecular level to aid in the extrapolation of rodent carcinogenesis data to human risk assessment.

  3. Chemical transformations on botryane skeleton. Effect on the cytotoxic activity.

    PubMed

    Reino, José L; Durán-Patrón, Rosa; Segura, Inmaculada; Hernández-Galán, Rosario; Riese, Hans H; Collado, Isidro G

    2003-03-01

    Eighteen compounds with a botryane skeleton have been obtained through chemical transformations of various toxins from the fungus Botrytis cinerea. During the course of these transformations, the C-10 carbon of the botryane skeleton was found to exhibit an interesting high regioselectivity to oxidizing and reducing agents. In addition, the cytotoxicity of 27 botryane derivatives was determined in vitro against Hs578T, MDA-MB-231, HT-1080, U87-MG, IMR-90, and HUVEC cell lines. The results of this study confirm that the cytotoxicity of botrydial (1) and its derivatives is related to the presence of a 1,5-dialdehyde functionality.

  4. Chemical trends in the activation energies of DX centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumagai, O.; Kawai, H.; Mori, Y.; Kaneko, K.

    1984-12-01

    The activation energies of DX centers in AlGaAs doped with six different impurities (S, Se, Te, Si, Ge, and Sn) are measured by deep level transient spectroscopy. Remarkable trends are established, in which the activation energies of DX centers with group IV impurities become shallower as the mass number of the impurity increases, while those with group VI impurities remain constant.

  5. Estrogenic activity of dental materials and bisphenol-A related chemicals in vitro.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Y; Nakamura, M

    2000-09-01

    Twenty-eight chemicals used as dental materials and bisphenol-A related chemicals were diluted with DMSO to concentrations ranging from 10(-7) to 10(-3) M and tested for estrogenicity. Bisphenol-A (BPA), bisphenol-F (BPF) and bisphenol-A-bischloroformate (BPACF) showed estrogenic activity using the yeast two-hybrid system, and BPA, BPF, BPACF and bisphenol-S (BPS) showed estrogenic activity using the fluorescence polarization system. However, none of the remaining chemicals and none of the dental materials showed any activity at concentrations between 10(-7) and 10(-3) M. Although BPA, BPF, BPACF, bisphenol-A-dimethacrylate and BPS showed estrogenic activity in the E-screen test, the remaining chemicals did not. Thus, most of the chemicals showed consistent results, either positive or negative, by the three testing methods, while two chemicals showed conflicting results. Further studies, together with in vivo and epidemiological examinations, are required. Elucidation of the structure-activity relationships of these chemicals is also needed to estimate the estrogenicity of a chemical from its structure.

  6. A new chemical probe for phosphatidylinositol kinase activity.

    PubMed

    Sherratt, Allison R; Nasheri, Neda; McKay, Craig S; O'Hara, Shifawn; Hunt, Ashley; Ning, Zhibin; Figeys, Daniel; Goto, Natalie K; Pezacki, John Paul

    2014-06-16

    Phosphatidylinositol kinases (PIKs) are key enzymatic regulators of membrane phospholipids and membrane environments that control many aspects of cellular function, from signal transduction to secretion, through the Golgi apparatus. Here, we have developed a photoreactive "clickable" probe, PIK-BPyne, to report the activity of PIKs. We investigated the selectivity and efficiency of the probe to both inhibit and label PIKs, and we compared PIK-BPyne to a wortmannin activity-based probe also known to target PIKs. We found that PIK-BPyne can act as an effective in situ activity-based probe, and for the first time, report changes in PI4K-IIIβ activity induced by the hepatitis C virus. These results establish the utility of PIK-BPyne for activity-based protein profiling studies of PIK function in native biological systems. PMID:24850173

  7. Vapour extraction (VAPEX) process for recovery of heavy oil and bitumen

    SciTech Connect

    Jha, K.N.; Butler, R.M.; Lim, G.B.

    1995-12-31

    For over 90% of the vast resources of bitumen and heavy oil in Canada, in situ recovery processes have to be developed to produce and utilize them efficiently and economically. Thermal recovery processes using steam, although effective for thick reservoirs with good quality sands, are increasingly proving to be uneconomical, particularly for thin, shaley, or bottom water reservoirs. The inefficiency is caused by large heat losses, high water requirement, extensive surface facilities, and adverse environmental impact. To overcome these problems, a new non-thermal vapour extraction (VAPEX) process has been developed. The process is closely related to the Steam-Assisted Gravity Drainage (SAGD) concept. However, in the VAPEX process the steam chamber is replaced with a chamber containing light hydrocarbon vapours close to its dew point at the reservoir pressure. If the pressure used is close to the saturation pressure of hydrocarbons, deasphalting may occur in the reservoir causing a substantial reduction in viscosity and heavy metal contents. Experiments conducted in a Hele-Shaw cell and in a 2D physical scaled model using Lloydminster, Cold Lake, and Peace River heavy oil/bitumen and ethane, propane, and butane as solvents demonstrated that this process is very promising technically as well as economically. An active aquifer underlying the bitumen zone made the reservoir more valuable because of spreading of the solvent vapour directly underneath the formation which increased the vapour-bitumen contact extensively. The investigation was extended from a dual horizontal continuous injection/production well strategy described above to a single horizontal well cyclic process for the Cold Lake reservoir in a 3D physical scaled model. The tests illustrated that ethane was an effective solvent in producing Cold Lake bitumen and that the cyclic VAPEX process has the potential to be a breakthrough recovery technology.

  8. Functional Imaging of Chemically Active Surfaces with Optical Reporter Microbeads

    PubMed Central

    Ahuja, Punkaj; Nair, Sumitha; Narayan, Sreenath; Gratzl, Miklós

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a novel approach to allow for continuous imaging of concentration fields that evolve at surfaces due to release, uptake, and mass transport of molecules, without significant interference of the concentration fields by the chemical imaging itself. The technique utilizes optical “reporter” microbeads immobilized in a thin layer of transparent and inert hydrogel on top of the surface. The hydrogel has minimal density and therefore diffusion in and across it is like in water. Imaging the immobilized microbeads over time provides quantitative concentration measurements at each location where an optical reporter resides. Using image analysis in post-processing these spatially discrete measurements can be transformed into contiguous maps of the dynamic concentration field across the entire surface. If the microbeads are small enough relative to the dimensions of the region of interest and sparsely applied then chemical imaging will not noticeably affect the evolution of concentration fields. In this work colorimetric optode microbeads a few micrometers in diameter were used to image surface concentration distributions on the millimeter scale. PMID:26332766

  9. Indonesian propolis: chemical composition, biological activity and botanical origin.

    PubMed

    Trusheva, Boryana; Popova, Milena; Koendhori, Eko Budi; Tsvetkova, Iva; Naydenski, Christo; Bankova, Vassya

    2011-03-01

    From a biologically active extract of Indonesian propolis from East Java, 11 compounds were isolated and identified: four alk(en)ylresorcinols (obtained as an inseparable mixture) (1-4) were isolated for the first time from propolis, along with four prenylflavanones (6-9) and three cycloartane-type triterpenes (5, 10 and 11). The structures of the components were elucidated based on their spectral properties. All prenylflavanones demonstrated significant radical scavenging activity against diphenylpicrylhydrazyl radicals, and compound 6 showed significant antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus. For the first time Macaranga tanarius L. and Mangifera indica L. are shown as plant sources of Indonesian propolis.

  10. Some chemical composition and biological activity of northern Argentine propolis.

    PubMed

    Isla, Maria I; Paredes-Guzman, Julio F; Nieva-Moreno, M I; Koo, H; Park, Yong K

    2005-02-23

    Twenty-five samples of propolis were collected from seven different regions in northern Argentina; ethanolic extracts of propolis were prepared from all samples, and the respective samples were examined for UV absorption spectra, RPHPTLC, RPHPLC, antimicrobial activity, antiradical activity, and total phenolic content. It was found that 16 of the 25 samples showed a phenolic profile similar to that found in samples from southern Brazil and corresponding to poplar-based propolis and that the rest of the samples showed a different profile and higher antimicrobial and antiradical activities.

  11. Nanofluidic transport governed by the liquid/vapour interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jongho; Laoui, Tahar; Karnik, Rohit

    2014-04-01

    Liquid/vapour interfaces govern the behaviour of a wide range of systems but remain poorly understood, leaving ample margin for the exploitation of intriguing functionalities for applications. Here, we systematically investigate the role of liquid/vapour interfaces in the transport of water across apposing liquid menisci in osmosis membranes comprising short hydrophobic nanopores that separate two fluid reservoirs. We show experimentally that mass transport is limited by molecular reflection from the liquid/vapour interface below a certain length scale, which depends on the transmission probability of water molecules across the nanopores and on the condensation probability of a water molecule incident on the liquid surface. This fundamental yet elusive condensation property of water is measured under near-equilibrium conditions and found to decrease from 0.36 +/- 0.21 at 30 °C to 0.18 +/- 0.09 at 60 °C. These findings define the regime in which liquid/vapour interfaces govern nanofluidic transport and have implications for understanding mass transport in nanofluidic devices, droplets and bubbles, biological components and porous media involving liquid/vapour interfaces.

  12. Coumarin heterocyclic derivatives: chemical synthesis and biological activity.

    PubMed

    Medina, Fernanda G; Marrero, Joaquín G; Macías-Alonso, Mariana; González, Magdalena C; Córdova-Guerrero, Iván; Teissier García, Ariana G; Osegueda-Robles, Soraya

    2015-09-23

    This review highlights the broad range of science that has arisen from the synthesis of coumarin-linked and fused heterocycle derivatives. Specific topics include their synthesis and biological activity.

  13. Hydrogeology, chemical and microbial activity measurement through deep permafrost.

    PubMed

    Stotler, Randy L; Frape, Shaun K; Freifeld, Barry M; Holden, Brian; Onstott, Tullis C; Ruskeeniemi, Timo; Chan, Eric

    2011-01-01

    Little is known about hydrogeochemical conditions beneath thick permafrost, particularly in fractured crystalline rock, due to difficulty in accessing this environment. The purpose of this investigation was to develop methods to obtain physical, chemical, and microbial information about the subpermafrost environment from a surface-drilled borehole. Using a U-tube, gas and water samples were collected, along with temperature, pressure, and hydraulic conductivity measurements, 420 m below ground surface, within a 535 m long, angled borehole at High Lake, Nunavut, Canada, in an area with 460-m-thick permafrost. Piezometric head was well above the base of the permafrost, near land surface. Initial water samples were contaminated with drill fluid, with later samples <40% drill fluid. The salinity of the non-drill fluid component was <20,000 mg/L, had a Ca/Na ratio above 1, with δ(18) O values ∼5‰ lower than the local surface water. The fluid isotopic composition was affected by the permafrost-formation process. Nonbacteriogenic CH(4) was present and the sample location was within methane hydrate stability field. Sampling lines froze before uncontaminated samples from the subpermafrost environment could be obtained, yet the available time to obtain water samples was extended compared to previous studies. Temperature measurements collected from a distributed temperature sensor indicated that this issue can be overcome easily in the future. The lack of methanogenic CH(4) is consistent with the high sulfate concentrations observed in cores. The combined surface-drilled borehole/U-tube approach can provide a large amount of physical, chemical, and microbial data from the subpermafrost environment with few, controllable, sources of contamination.

  14. Hydrogeology, chemical and microbial activity measurement through deep permafrost

    SciTech Connect

    Stotler, R.L.; Frape, S.K.; Freifeld, B.M.; Holden, B.; Onstott, T.C.; Ruskeeniemi, T.; Chan, E.

    2010-04-01

    Little is known about hydrogeochemical conditions beneath thick permafrost, particularly in fractured crystalline rock, due to difficulty in accessing this environment. The purpose of this investigation was to develop methods to obtain physical, chemical, and microbial information about the subpermafrost environment from a surface-drilled borehole. Using a U-tube, gas and water samples were collected, along with temperature, pressure, and hydraulic conductivity measurements, 420 m below ground surface, within a 535 m long, angled borehole at High Lake, Nunavut, Canada, in an area with 460-m-thick permafrost. Piezometric head was well above the base of the permafrost, near land surface. Initial water samples were contaminated with drill fluid, with later samples <40% drill fluid. The salinity of the non-drill fluid component was <20,000 mg/L, had a Ca/Na ratio above 1, with {delta}{sup 18}O values {approx}5{per_thousand} lower than the local surface water. The fluid isotopic composition was affected by the permafrost-formation process. Nonbacteriogenic CH{sub 4} was present and the sample location was within methane hydrate stability field. Sampling lines froze before uncontaminated samples from the subpermafrost environment could be obtained, yet the available time to obtain water samples was extended compared to previous studies. Temperature measurements collected from a distributed temperature sensor indicated that this issue can be overcome easily in the future. The lack of methanogenic CH{sub 4} is consistent with the high sulfate concentrations observed in cores. The combined surface-drilled borehole/U-tube approach can provide a large amount of physical, chemical, and microbial data from the subpermafrost environment with few, controllable, sources of contamination.

  15. Hydrogeology, Chemical and Microbial Activity Measurement Through Deep Permafrost

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stotler, R.L.; Frape, S.K.; Freifeld, B.M.; Holden, B.; Onstott, T.C.; Ruskeeniemi, T.; Chan, E.

    2011-01-01

    Little is known about hydrogeochemical conditions beneath thick permafrost, particularly in fractured crystalline rock, due to difficulty in accessing this environment. The purpose of this investigation was to develop methods to obtain physical, chemical, and microbial information about the subpermafrost environment from a surface-drilled borehole. Using a U-tube, gas and water samples were collected, along with temperature, pressure, and hydraulic conductivity measurements, 420 m below ground surface, within a 535 m long, angled borehole at High Lake, Nunavut, Canada, in an area with 460-m-thick permafrost. Piezometric head was well above the base of the permafrost, near land surface. Initial water samples were contaminated with drill fluid, with later samples <40% drill fluid. The salinity of the non-drill fluid component was <20,000 mg/L, had a Ca/Na ratio above 1, with ??18O values ???5??? lower than the local surface water. The fluid isotopic composition was affected by the permafrost-formation process. Nonbacteriogenic CH4 was present and the sample location was within methane hydrate stability field. Sampling lines froze before uncontaminated samples from the subpermafrost environment could be obtained, yet the available time to obtain water samples was extended compared to previous studies. Temperature measurements collected from a distributed temperature sensor indicated that this issue can be overcome easily in the future. The lack of methanogenic CH4 is consistent with the high sulfate concentrations observed in cores. The combined surface-drilled borehole/U-tube approach can provide a large amount of physical, chemical, and microbial data from the subpermafrost environment with few, controllable, sources of contamination. ?? 2010 The Author(s). Journal compilation ?? 2010 National Ground Water Association.

  16. HIGH-DIMENSIONAL PROFILING OF TRANSCRIPTION FACTOR ACTIVITY DIFFERENTIATES TOXCAST CHEMICAL GROUPS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The ToxCast™ project at the U.S. EPA uses a diverse battery of high throughput screening assays and informatics models to rapidly characterize the activity of chemicals. A central goal of the project is to provide empirical evidence to aid in the prioritization of chemicals for a...

  17. Foeniculum vulgare essential oils: chemical composition, antioxidant and antimicrobial activities.

    PubMed

    Miguel, Maria Graça; Cruz, Cláudia; Faleiro, Leonor; Simões, Mariana T F; Figueiredo, Ana Cristina; Barroso, José G; Pedro, Luis G

    2010-02-01

    The essential oils from Foeniculum vulgare commercial aerial parts and fruits were isolated by hydrodistillation, with different distillation times (30 min, 1 h, 2 h and 3 h), and analyzed by GC and GC-MS. The antioxidant ability was estimated using four distinct methods. Antibacterial activity was determined by the agar diffusion method. Remarkable differences, and worrying from the quality and safety point of view, were detected in the essential oils. trans-Anethole (31-36%), alpha-pinene (14-20%) and limonene (11-13%) were the main components of the essentials oil isolated from F. vulgare dried aerial parts, whereas methyl chavicol (= estragole) (79-88%) was dominant in the fruit oils. With the DPPH method the plant oils showed better antioxidant activity than the fruits oils. With the TBARS method and at higher concentrations, fennel essential oils showed a pro-oxidant activity. None of the oils showed a hydroxyl radical scavenging capacity > 50%, but they showed an ability to inhibit 5-lipoxygenase. The essential oils showed a very low antimicrobial activity. In general, the essential oils isolated during 2 h were as effective, from the biological activity point of view, as those isolated during 3 h.

  18. Chemical Constituents Antioxidant and Anticholinesterasic Activity of Tabernaemontana catharinensis

    PubMed Central

    Moura, Sidnei; Echeverrigaray, Sergio

    2013-01-01

    The present work aimed to analyze the alkaloid content of the ethanolic extract of Tabernaemontana catharinensis (Apocynaceae family) and its fractions as well as to evaluate their antioxidant and anticholinesterasic activities. The analyses of the ethanolic extract of T. catharinensis by mass spectrometry allowed identifying the presence of the alkaloids 16-epi-affinine, coronaridine-hydroxyindolenine, voachalotine, voacristine-hydroxyindolenine, and 12-methoxy-n-methyl-voachalotine, as well as an alkaloid with m/z 385.21 whose spectrum suggests a derivative of voacristine or voacangine. The extract and its alkaloid rich fractions showed antioxidant activity, especially those that contain the alkaloid m/z 385.21 or 16-epi-affinine with DPPH scavenging activity (IC50) between 37.18 and 74.69 μg/mL. Moreover, the extract and its fractions exhibited anticholinesterasic activity, particularly the fractions characterized by the presence of 12-methoxy-n-methyl-voachalotine, with IC50 = 2.1 to 2.5 μg/mL. Fractions with 16-epi-affinine combined good antioxidant (IC50 = 65.59 to 74.69 μg/mL) and anticholinesterasic (IC50 = 7.7 to 8.3 μg/mL) activities, representing an option for further studies aimed at treating neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:23983637

  19. Chemical Bond Activation Observed with an X-ray Laser.

    PubMed

    Beye, Martin; Öberg, Henrik; Xin, Hongliang; Dakovski, Georgi L; Dell'Angela, Martina; Föhlisch, Alexander; Gladh, Jörgen; Hantschmann, Markus; Hieke, Florian; Kaya, Sarp; Kühn, Danilo; LaRue, Jerry; Mercurio, Giuseppe; Minitti, Michael P; Mitra, Ankush; Moeller, Stefan P; Ng, May Ling; Nilsson, Anders; Nordlund, Dennis; Nørskov, Jens; Öström, Henrik; Ogasawara, Hirohito; Persson, Mats; Schlotter, William F; Sellberg, Jonas A; Wolf, Martin; Abild-Pedersen, Frank; Pettersson, Lars G M; Wurth, Wilfried

    2016-09-15

    The concept of bonding and antibonding orbitals is fundamental in chemistry. The population of those orbitals and the energetic difference between the two reflect the strength of the bonding interaction. Weakening the bond is expected to reduce this energetic splitting, but the transient character of bond-activation has so far prohibited direct experimental access. Here we apply time-resolved soft X-ray spectroscopy at a free-electron laser to directly observe the decreased bonding-antibonding splitting following bond-activation using an ultrashort optical laser pulse. PMID:27584914

  20. Application of the Activity Framework for Assessing Aquatic Ecotoxicology Data for Organic Chemicals.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Paul; Dawick, James; Lampi, Mark; Lemaire, Philippe; Presow, Shaun; van Egmond, Roger; Arnot, Jon A; Mackay, Donald; Mayer, Philipp; Galay Burgos, Malyka

    2015-10-20

    Toxicological research in the 1930s gave the first indications of the link between narcotic toxicity and the chemical activity of organic chemicals. More recently, chemical activity has been proposed as a novel exposure parameter that describes the fraction of saturation and that quantifies the potential for partitioning and diffusive uptake. In the present study, more than 2000 acute and chronic algal, aquatic invertebrates and fish toxicity data, as well as water solubility and melting point values, were collected from a series of sources. The data were critically reviewed and grouped by mode of action (MoA). We considered 660 toxicity data to be of acceptable quality. The 328 data which applied to the 72 substances identified as MoA 1 were then evaluated within the activity-toxicity framework: EC50 and LC50 values for all three taxa correlated generally well with (subcooled) liquid solubilities. Acute toxicity was typically exerted within the chemical activity range of 0.01-0.1, whereas chronic toxicity was exerted in the range of 0.001-0.01. These results confirm that chemical activity has the potential to contribute to the determination, interpretation and prediction of toxicity to aquatic organisms. It also has the potential to enhance regulation of organic chemicals by linking results from laboratory tests, monitoring and modeling programs. The framework can provide an additional line of evidence for assessing aquatic toxicity, for improving the design of toxicity tests, reducing animal usage and addressing chemical mixtures.

  1. CO2-fluxing collapses metal mobility in magmatic vapour

    DOE PAGES

    van Hinsberg, V. J.; Berlo, K.; Migdisov, A. A.; Williams-Jones, A. E.

    2016-05-18

    Magmatic systems host many types of ore deposits, including world-class deposits of copper and gold. Magmas are commonly an important source of metals and ore-forming fluids in these systems. In many magmatic-hydrothermal systems, low-density aqueous fluids, or vapours, are significant metal carriers. Such vapours are water-dominated shallowly, but fluxing of CO2-rich vapour exsolved from deeper magma is now recognised as ubiquitous during open-system magma degassing. Furthermore, we show that such CO2-fluxing leads to a sharp drop in element solubility, up to a factor of 10,000 for Cu, and thereby provides a highly efficient, but as yet unrecognised mechanism for metalmore » deposition.« less

  2. The ignitability of petrol vapours and potential for vapour phase explosion by use of TASER® law enforcement electronic control device.

    PubMed

    Clarke, C; Andrews, S P

    2014-12-01

    An experimental study was made of the potential of the TASER-X26™ law enforcement electronic control device to ignite petrol vapours if used by an officer to incapacitate a person soaked in petrol, or within a flammable atmosphere containing petrol vapour. Bench scale tests have shown that a wooden mannequin with pig skin covering the chest was a suitable representation of a human target. Full scale tests using the mannequin have shown that the arc from a TASER-X26™ is capable of igniting petrol/air vapours on a petrol-soaked person. Further tests in a 1/5 scale and a full scale compartment have shown that if a TASER is used within a compartment, a petrol vapour explosion (deflagration) may be achieved. It is evident from this research that if used in a flammable vapour rich environment, the device could prove fatal not only to the target but the TASER® operator as well. PMID:25498927

  3. Chemical Modification of Papain and Subtilisin: An Active Site Comparison

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    St-Vincent, Mireille; Dickman, Michael

    2004-01-01

    An experiment using methyle methanethiosulfonate (MMTS) and phenylmethylsulfonyl flouride (PMSF) to specifically modify the cysteine and serine residues in the active sites of papain and subtilism respectively is demonstrated. The covalent modification of these enzymes and subsequent rescue of papain shows the beginning biochemist that proteins…

  4. Genipin as a novel chemical activator of EBV lytic cycle.

    PubMed

    Son, Myoungki; Lee, Minjung; Ryu, Eunhyun; Moon, Aree; Jeong, Choon-Sik; Jung, Yong Woo; Park, Gyu Hwan; Sung, Gi-Ho; Cho, Hyosun; Kang, Hyojeung

    2015-02-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is a ubiquitous gammaherpesvirus that causes acute infection and establishes life-long latency. EBV causes several human cancers, including Burkitt's lymphoma, nasopharyngeal and gastric carcinoma. Antiviral agents can be categorized as virucides, antiviral chemotherapeutic agents, and immunomodulators. Most antiviral agents affect actively replicating viruses, but not their latent forms. Novel antiviral agents must be active on both the replicating and the latent forms of the virus. Gardenia jasminoides is an evergreen flowering plant belonging to the Rubiaceae family and is most commonly found growing wild in Vietnam, Southern China, Taiwan, Japan, Myanmar, and India. Genipin is an aglycone derived from an iridoid glycoside called geniposide, which is present in large quantities in the fruit of G. jasminoides. In this study, genipin was evaluated for its role as an antitumor and antiviral agent that produces inhibitory effects against EBV and EBV associated gastric carcinoma (EBVaGC). In SNU719 cells, one of EBVaGCs, genipin caused significant cytotoxicity (70 μM), induced methylation on EBV C promoter and tumor suppressor gene BCL7A, arrested cell-cycle progress (S phases), upregulated EBV latent/lytic genes in a dose-dependent manner, stimulated EBV progeny production, activated EBV F promoter for EBV lytic activation, and suppressed EBV infection. These results indicated that genipin could be a promising candidate for antiviral and antitumor agents against EBV and EBVaGC. PMID:25626372

  5. Antifungal activities and chemical composition of some medicinal plants.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, A; Nazari, H; Imani, S; Amrollahi, H

    2014-06-01

    The use of and search for drugs and dietary supplements derived from plants have accelerated in recent years. Ethnopharmacologists, botanists, microbiologists and natural-products scientists are combing the earth for phytochemicals and leads, which could be developed for treatment of infectious diseases. The aim of this study was to investigate the antifungal activities of the essential oils of some medicinal plants such as Stachys pubescens, Thymus kotschyanus, Thymus daenensis and Bupleurum falcatum against Fusarium oxysporum, Aspergillus flavus and Alternaria alternata. The essential oils were used to evaluate their MICs and MFCs compared to the amphotricin B as a standard drug. The essential oils were also analyzed by GC/MS. Essential oils isolated from the S. pubescens, T. kotschyanus and B. falcatum showed strong antifungal activities. The essential oil of T. daenensis exhibited a moderate activity against the selected fungi in comparison with the other plants' essential oils. In addition, the results showed that 26, 23, 22 and 15 components were identified from the essential oils of T. kotschyanus, S. pubescens, T. daenensis and B. falcatum, respectively. These oils exhibited a noticeable antifungal activity against the selected fungi. Regarding obtained results and that natural antimicrobial substances are inexpensive and have fewer side effects, they convey potential for implementation in fungal pathogenic systems.

  6. Antifungal activities and chemical composition of some medicinal plants.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, A; Nazari, H; Imani, S; Amrollahi, H

    2014-06-01

    The use of and search for drugs and dietary supplements derived from plants have accelerated in recent years. Ethnopharmacologists, botanists, microbiologists and natural-products scientists are combing the earth for phytochemicals and leads, which could be developed for treatment of infectious diseases. The aim of this study was to investigate the antifungal activities of the essential oils of some medicinal plants such as Stachys pubescens, Thymus kotschyanus, Thymus daenensis and Bupleurum falcatum against Fusarium oxysporum, Aspergillus flavus and Alternaria alternata. The essential oils were used to evaluate their MICs and MFCs compared to the amphotricin B as a standard drug. The essential oils were also analyzed by GC/MS. Essential oils isolated from the S. pubescens, T. kotschyanus and B. falcatum showed strong antifungal activities. The essential oil of T. daenensis exhibited a moderate activity against the selected fungi in comparison with the other plants' essential oils. In addition, the results showed that 26, 23, 22 and 15 components were identified from the essential oils of T. kotschyanus, S. pubescens, T. daenensis and B. falcatum, respectively. These oils exhibited a noticeable antifungal activity against the selected fungi. Regarding obtained results and that natural antimicrobial substances are inexpensive and have fewer side effects, they convey potential for implementation in fungal pathogenic systems. PMID:24768063

  7. Incorporating Nondrug Social & Recreational Activities in Outpatient Chemical Dependency Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siporin, Sheldon; Baron, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    "Contingency Management programs (CMP) and non-drug social and recreational activities (NDSRA) are interventions premised on behavior theory that rely on external sources of reinforcement alternative to drug-based forms to decrease drug use. CMP usually employs vouchers as reinforcement for negative toxicologies. Despite research support, CMP…

  8. Essential oil from Artemisia phaeolepis: chemical composition and antimicrobial activities.

    PubMed

    Ben Hsouna, Anis; Ben Halima, Nihed; Abdelkafi, Slim; Hamdi, Naceur

    2013-01-01

    Artemisia phaeolepis, a perennial herb with a strong volatile odor, grows on the grasslands of Mediterranean region. Essential oil obtained from Artemisia phaeolepis was analyzed by gas chromatography-flame ionization detection and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. A total of 79 components representing 98.19% of the total oil were identified, and the main compounds in the oil were found to be eucalyptol (11.30%), camphor (8.21%), terpine-4-ol (7.32%), germacrene D (6.39), caryophyllene oxide (6.34%), and caryophyllene (5.37%). The essential oil showed definite inhibitory activity against 10 strains of test microorganisms. Eucalyptol, camphor, terpine-4-ol, caryophyllene, germacrene D and caryophyllene oxide were also examined as the major components of the oil. Camphor showed the strongest antimicrobial activity; terpine-4-ol, eucalyptol, caryophyllene and germacrene D were moderately active and caryophyllene oxide was weakly active. The study revealed that the antimicrobial properties of the essential oil can be attributed to the synergistic effects of its diverse major and minor components. PMID:24292348

  9. Genipin as a novel chemical activator of EBV lytic cycle.

    PubMed

    Son, Myoungki; Lee, Minjung; Ryu, Eunhyun; Moon, Aree; Jeong, Choon-Sik; Jung, Yong Woo; Park, Gyu Hwan; Sung, Gi-Ho; Cho, Hyosun; Kang, Hyojeung

    2015-02-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is a ubiquitous gammaherpesvirus that causes acute infection and establishes life-long latency. EBV causes several human cancers, including Burkitt's lymphoma, nasopharyngeal and gastric carcinoma. Antiviral agents can be categorized as virucides, antiviral chemotherapeutic agents, and immunomodulators. Most antiviral agents affect actively replicating viruses, but not their latent forms. Novel antiviral agents must be active on both the replicating and the latent forms of the virus. Gardenia jasminoides is an evergreen flowering plant belonging to the Rubiaceae family and is most commonly found growing wild in Vietnam, Southern China, Taiwan, Japan, Myanmar, and India. Genipin is an aglycone derived from an iridoid glycoside called geniposide, which is present in large quantities in the fruit of G. jasminoides. In this study, genipin was evaluated for its role as an antitumor and antiviral agent that produces inhibitory effects against EBV and EBV associated gastric carcinoma (EBVaGC). In SNU719 cells, one of EBVaGCs, genipin caused significant cytotoxicity (70 μM), induced methylation on EBV C promoter and tumor suppressor gene BCL7A, arrested cell-cycle progress (S phases), upregulated EBV latent/lytic genes in a dose-dependent manner, stimulated EBV progeny production, activated EBV F promoter for EBV lytic activation, and suppressed EBV infection. These results indicated that genipin could be a promising candidate for antiviral and antitumor agents against EBV and EBVaGC.

  10. Push for new materials, chemicals from biomass sparks active R and D

    SciTech Connect

    Borman, S. )

    1990-09-01

    This paper discusses how a resurgence of interest in the production of new materials, chemicals, and fuels from biomass resources such as wood, cellulose, lignin, starch, and chitin is sparking active R and D efforts in these areas. Biobased materials and chemicals currently under development include composites of conventional plastics with lignocellulosics (chemicals from wood and other plant sources); lignocellulosic nonwoven mates that can be pressed into rigid shapes to form doors, walls, and even auto body parts; phenolic chemicals produced from wood waste and bark; membranes made from chitosan (a substance derived from crustacean shells); and biodegradable plastics containing starch.

  11. The activity of a variety of chemical compounds against experimental tetanus

    PubMed Central

    Laurence, D. R.; Webster, R. A.

    1958-01-01

    A range of chemical compounds, mostly with central nervous system depressant activity, have been tested against experimental tetanus in the rabbit. A number of the more potent tested, including mephenesin, betanaphthoxyethanol, barbiturates and phenothiazine derivatives, have been accurately assayed by a method of quantitative electromyography. Phenothiazine derivatives were found to be the most potent anticonvulsants and of these acetylpromazine had the greatest activity. The difficulties of direct comparison of the potency of substances from different chemical groups is discussed. PMID:13584740

  12. Intercomparison of TCCON and MUSICA Water Vapour Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weaver, D.; Strong, K.; Deutscher, N. M.; Schneider, M.; Blumenstock, T.; Robinson, J.; Notholt, J.; Sherlock, V.; Griffith, D. W. T.; Barthlott, S.; García, O. E.; Smale, D.; Palm, M.; Jones, N. B.; Hase, F.; Kivi, R.; Ramos, Y. G.; Yoshimura, K.; Sepúlveda, E.; Gómez-Peláez, Á. J.; Gisi, M.; Kohlhepp, R.; Warneke, T.; Dohe, S.; Wiegele, A.; Christner, E.; Lejeune, B.; Demoulin, P.

    2014-12-01

    We present an intercomparison between the water vapour products from the Total Carbon Column Observing Network (TCCON) and the MUlti-platform remote Sensing of Isotopologues for investigating the Cycle of Atmospheric water (MUSICA), two datasets from ground-based Fourier Transform InfraRed (FTIR) spectrometers with good global representation. Where possible, comparisons to radiosondes are also included. The near-infrared TCCON measurements are optimized to provide precise monitoring of greenhouse gases for carbon cycle studies; however, TCCON's retrievals also produce water vapour products. The mid-infrared MUSICA products result from retrievals optimized to give precise and accurate information about H2O, HDO, and δD. The MUSICA water vapour products have been validated by extensive intercomparisons with H2O and δD in-situ measurements made from ground, radiosonde, and aircraft (Schneider et al. 2012, 2014), as well as by intercomparisons with satellite-based H2O and δD remote sensing measurements (Wiegele et al., 2014). This dataset provides a valuable reference point for other measurements of water vapour. This study is motivated by the limited intercomparisons performed for TCCON water vapour products and limited characterisation of their uncertainties. We compare MUSICA and TCCON products to assess the potential for TCCON measurements to contribute to studies of the water cycle, water vapour's role in climate and use as a tracer for atmospheric dynamics, and to evaluate the performance of climate models. The TCCON and MUSICA products result from measurements taken using the same FTIR instruments, enabling a comparison with constant instrumentation. The retrieval techniques differ, however, in their method and a priori information. We assess the impact of these differences and characterize the comparability of the TCCON and MUSICA datasets.

  13. Hypoglycemic activity evaluation and chemical study on hollyhock flowers.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Jin, Lijun; Chen, Qiu; Wu, Zhizhen; Dong, Yongzhe; Han, Lifeng; Wang, Tao

    2015-04-01

    Hollyhock (Althaea rosea (Linn.) Cavan) belongs to Althaea genus, Malvaceae family, is a perennial garden plant distributed throughout the world in warm temperate and tropical regions, which was used as anti-diabetes ingredient in traditional Chinese medicine. In the process of our research, ethanolic extract of hollyhock flower (HFE) was found to decrease serum triglyceride and glucose levels significantly in KK-A(y) mice after oral administration for 8weeks. Meanwhile, gene expressions on AMPK, IRS2, PI3K, AKT and GLUT4 in liver were remarkably up-regulated. Three new dihydroflavonol glycosides, named as roseaflavanonolosides A (1), B (2), and C (3), together with two known ones were obtained from HFE. Their structures were elucidated by chemical and spectroscopic methods. Hepatic cell glucose uptake experiment was performed using 2-NBDG as a glucose uptake indicator. At the dosage of 20μg/mL for 1-5, the glucose uptake increasing level was nearly 30%-40% in HepG2 cells. We partly revealed the glucose metabolism regulation effect may relate to dihydroflavonols in hollyhock flower.

  14. The Role of Water Vapour in Earth's Energy Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allan, Richard P.

    2012-07-01

    Water vapour modulates energy flows in Earth's climate system through transfer of latent heat by evaporation and condensation and by modifying the flows of radiative energy both in the longwave and shortwave portions of the electromagnetic spectrum. This article summarizes the role of water vapour in Earth's energy flows with particular emphasis on (1) the powerful thermodynamic constraint of the Clausius Clapeyron equation, (2) dynamical controls on humidity above the boundary layer (or free-troposphere), (3) uncertainty in continuum absorption in the relatively transparent "window" regions of the radiative spectrum and (4) implications for changes in the atmospheric hydrological cycle.

  15. Spontaneuos and Parametric Processes in Warm Rubidium Vapours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dąbrowski, M.; Parniak, M.; Pęcak, D.; Chrapkiewicz, R.; Wasilewski, W.

    2014-12-01

    Warm rubidium vapours are known to be a versatile medium for a variety of experiments in atomic physics and quantum optics. Here we present experimental results on producing the frequency converted light for quantum applications based on spontaneous and stimulated processes in rubidium vapours. In particular, we study the efficiency of spontaneously initiated stimulated Raman scattering in the Λ-level configuration and conditions of generating the coherent blue light assisted by multi-photon transitions in the diamond-level configuration. Our results will be helpful in search for new types of interfaces between light and atomic quantum memories.

  16. Assessing the impact of chemicals on activated sludge microorganisms

    SciTech Connect

    Yancey, D.

    1996-10-01

    Aerobic biological processes utilize microorganisms, primarily bacteria, but including protozoa, to degrade colloidal or fine particulate matter and dissolved organics, resulting in carbon dioxide, water, and new cell biomass. Such processes produce settleable solids that can be removed in sedimentation tanks. The most commonly used biological treatment process is the activated sludge process. The organisms in this process are key players of effective wastewater treatment. Upon close inspection of the wastewater, a variety of protozoa can be observed having different sizes, shapes, life cycles, and roles in the processes. A procedure has been developed to monitor the toxicity of wastewaters to specific classes of organisms. This procedure will help evaluate and prevent upsets of activated sludge treatment systems.

  17. Chemical constituents of two sages with free radical scavenging activity.

    PubMed

    Demirezer, Omur L; Gurbuz, Perihan; Kuruuzum-Uz, Ayşe; Guvenalp, Zuhal; Kazaz, Cavit; Donmez, Ali A

    2012-02-01

    From the aerial parts of Salvia trichoclada Bentham and S. verticillata L. one new and two known phenolic acids, 3-(3',4'-dihydroxyphenyl)-2-hydroxymethyl propionic acid (1), 3-(3',4'-dihydroxyphenyl) lactic acid (2), and rosmarinic acid (3); two flavonoids, apigenin 4'-methyl ether 7-O-glucuronide (4), and luteolin 7-O-beta glucuronide (5); two lupan type triterpene aglycones, lupeol (6), and 30-hydroxylup-20 (29)-en-3-on (7); an oleanane-type triterpene acid, oleanolic acid (8); and an ursan-type triterpene acid, ursolic acid (9) were isolated. The structures of the compounds were elucidated by spectroscopic analysis. Different extracts of the plants were examined for their free radical scavenging activities by DPPH (2,2-Diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl) assay. Some of the polar extracts showed high free radical scavenging activity.

  18. Hangman Catalysis for Photo- and Photoelectro- Chemical Activation of Water

    SciTech Connect

    Nocera, Daniel

    2014-04-15

    The focus of this DOE program is solar fuels – specifically the chemistry for hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) and oxygen evolution reaction (OER) from water and the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) to water These three reactions are at the heart of renewable energy conversion. The bond-making and bond-breaking chemistry that underpins these transformations is not well understood. We are developing insight into such chemistry by creating a series of ligand constructs that poise an acid-base functionality over a redox active metal platform. These “hangman” ligands utilize the acid-base functionality to form a secondary coordination sphere that can assist proton movement and facilitate substrate assembly and activation within the molecular cleft. The grant period funding cycle focused on synthesis and reactivity of hangman porphyrins and corroles for HER, OER and ORR.

  19. Trypanocidal nitroimidazole derivatives: relationships among chemical structure and genotoxic activity.

    PubMed

    Buschini, Annamaria; Giordani, Federica; de Albuquerque, Cristina Northfleet; Pellacani, Claudia; Pelosi, Giorgio; Rossi, Carlo; Zucchi, Tânia Maria Araújo Domingues; Poli, Paola

    2007-05-15

    Human American trypanosomiasis is resurgent in Latin Americans, and new drugs are urgently required as current medications suffer from a number of drawbacks. Some nitroheterocycles have been demonstrated to exert a potent activity against trypanosomes. However, host toxicity issues halted their development as trypanocides. As part of the efforts to develop new compounds in order to treat parasitic infections, it is important to define their structure-activity relationship. In this study, 5-nitromegazol and two of its analogues, 4-nitromegazol, and 1-methyl-5-nitro-2-imidazolecarboxaldehyde 5-nitroimidazole-thiosemicarbazone, were tested and compared for in vitro induction of DNA damage in human leukocytes by the comet assay, performed at different pHs to better identify the types of damage. Specific oxidatively generated damage to DNA was also measured by using the comet assay with endonucleases. DNA damage was found in 5-nitromegazol-treated cells: oxidative stress appeared as the main source of DNA damage. 4-Nitromegazol did not produce any significant effect, thus confirming that 4-nitroimidazoles isomers have no important biological activity. The 5-nitroimidazole-thiosemicarbazone induced DNA damage with a higher efficiency than 5-nitromegazol. The central role in the reduction process played by the acidic hydrazine proton present in the thiosemicarbazone group but not in the cyclic (thiadiazole) form can contribute to rationalise our results. Given its versatility, thiosemicarbazone moiety could be involved in different reactions with nitrogenous bases (nucleophilic and/or electrophilic attacks).

  20. Toxicity of organic chemicals and their mixtures to activated sludge microorganisms

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, E.; Sun, B.; Prakash, J.; Nirmalakhandan, N.

    1996-05-01

    Toxicity of eight- and 10-component mixtures of several organic chemicals to activated sludge (A/S) microorganisms was analyzed. The joint toxic effects of the tested chemicals were found to be simply additive. The quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) technique using molecular connectivity indices was used to develop single variable models to fit single chemical toxicity data. A QSAR-based approach is proposed to predict the concentrations of components in equitoxic mixtures that would jointly cause 50% inhibition of the A/S microorganisms. The validity of this predictive approach was demonstrated by comparing the predicted concentrations against those found experimentally.

  1. Hematite Surface Activation by Chemical Addition of Tin Oxide Layer.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Waldemir M; Souza, Flavio L

    2016-09-01

    In this study, the effect of tin (Sn(4+) ) modification on the surface of hematite electrodes synthesized by an aqueous solution route at different times (2, 5, 10, 18, and 24 h) is investigated. As confirmed from X-ray diffraction results, the as-synthesized electrode exhibits an oxyhydroxide phase, which is converted into a pure hematite phase after being subjected to additional thermal treatment at 750 °C for 30 min. The tin-modified hematite electrode is prepared by depositing a solution of Sn(4+) precursor on the as-synthesized electrode, followed by thermal treatment under the same abovementioned conditions. This modification results in an enhancement of the photocurrent response for all hematite electrodes investigated and attains the highest values of around 1.62 and 2.3 mA cm(-2) at 1.23 and 1.4 V versus RHE, respectively, for electrodes obtained in short synthesis times (2 h). Contact angle measurements suggest that the deposition of Sn(4+) on the hematite electrode provides a more hydrophilic surface, which favors a chemical reaction at the interface between the electrode and electrolyte. This result generates new perspectives for understanding the deposition of Sn(4+) on the hematite electrode surface, which is in contrast with several studies previously reported; these studies state that the enhancement in photocurrent density is related to either the induction of an increased donor charge density or shift in the flat-band potential, which favors charge separation.

  2. Active Chemical Sensing With Partially Observable Markov Decision Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gosangi, Rakesh; Gutierrez-Osuna, Ricardo

    2009-05-01

    We present an active-perception strategy to optimize the temperature program of metal-oxide sensors in real time, as the sensor reacts with its environment. We model the problem as a partially observable Markov decision process (POMDP), where actions correspond to measurements at particular temperatures, and the agent is to find a temperature sequence that minimizes the Bayes risk. We validate the method on a binary classification problem with a simulated sensor. Our results show that the method provides a balance between classification rate and sensing costs.

  3. Chemical constituents and biological activities of two Iranian Cystoseira species.

    PubMed

    Yegdaneh, Afsaneh; Ghannadi, Alireza; Dayani, Ladan

    2016-07-01

    The marine environment represents approximately half of the global biodiversity and could provide unlimited biological resources for the production of therapeutic drugs. Marine seaweeds comprise few thousands of species representing a considerable part of the littoral biomass. Extracts of the Cystoseira indica and Cystoseira merica were subjected to phytochemical and cytotoxicity evaluation. The amount of total phenol was determined with Folin-Ciocalteu reagent. Cytotoxicity was characterized by IC50 of human cancer cell lines including MCF-7 (human breast adenocarcinoma), HeLa (cervical carcinoma), and HT-29 (human colon adenocarcinoma) using Sulforhodamin assay. Antioxidant activities were evaluated using 2,2-diphenylpicrylhydrazyl (DPPH) method. The analysis revealed that tannins, saponins, sterols and triterpenes were the most abundant constituents in these Cystoseira species while cyanogenic and cardiac glycosides were the least ones. C. indica had the higher content of total phenolics and also showed higher antioxidant activity. Cytotoxic results showed that both species inhibited cell growth effectively, especially against MCF-7 cell line. The present findings suggest potential pharmacological applications of selected seaweeds but require further investigation and identification of their bioactive principles. PMID:27651811

  4. Chemical constituents and biological activities of two Iranian Cystoseira species

    PubMed Central

    Yegdaneh, Afsaneh; Ghannadi, Alireza; Dayani, Ladan

    2016-01-01

    The marine environment represents approximately half of the global biodiversity and could provide unlimited biological resources for the production of therapeutic drugs. Marine seaweeds comprise few thousands of species representing a considerable part of the littoral biomass. Extracts of the Cystoseira indica and Cystoseira merica were subjected to phytochemical and cytotoxicity evaluation. The amount of total phenol was determined with Folin-Ciocalteu reagent. Cytotoxicity was characterized by IC50 of human cancer cell lines including MCF-7 (human breast adenocarcinoma), HeLa (cervical carcinoma), and HT-29 (human colon adenocarcinoma) using Sulforhodamin assay. Antioxidant activities were evaluated using 2,2-diphenylpicrylhydrazyl (DPPH) method. The analysis revealed that tannins, saponins, sterols and triterpenes were the most abundant constituents in these Cystoseira species while cyanogenic and cardiac glycosides were the least ones. C. indica had the higher content of total phenolics and also showed higher antioxidant activity. Cytotoxic results showed that both species inhibited cell growth effectively, especially against MCF-7 cell line. The present findings suggest potential pharmacological applications of selected seaweeds but require further investigation and identification of their bioactive principles. PMID:27651811

  5. Chemical constituents of Anacolosa pervilleana and their antiviral activities.

    PubMed

    Bourjot, Mélanie; Leyssen, Pieter; Eydoux, Cécilia; Guillemot, Jean-Claude; Canard, Bruno; Rasoanaivo, Philippe; Guéritte, Françoise; Litaudon, Marc

    2012-09-01

    In an effort to identify novel inhibitors of Chikungunya (CHIKV) and Dengue (DENV) virus replication, a systematic study with 820 ethyl acetate extracts of Madagascan plants was performed in a virus-cell-based assay for CHIKV and a DENV NS5 RNA-dependant RNA polymerase (RdRp) assay. The extract obtained from the leaves of Anacolosa pervilleana was selected for its significant activity in both assays. One new (E)-tridec-2-en-4-ynedioic acid named anacolosine (1), together with three known acetylenic acids, the octadeca-9,11,13-triynoic acid (2), (13E)-octadec-13-en-9,11-diynoic acid (3), (13E)-octadec-13-en-11-ynoic acid (4), two terpenoids, lupenone (5) and β-amyrone (6), and one cyanogenic glycoside, (S)-sambunigrin (7) were isolated. Their structures were elucidated by comprehensive analyses of NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry data. The inhibitory potency of these compounds was evaluated on CHIKV, DENV RdRp and West-Nile polymerase virus (WNV RdRp). Both terpenoids showed a moderate activity against CHIKV (EC(50) 77 and 86 μM, respectively) and the acetylenic acids produced IC(50) values around 3 μM in the DENV RdRp assay. PMID:22613073

  6. Chemical constituents and biological activities of two Iranian Cystoseira species

    PubMed Central

    Yegdaneh, Afsaneh; Ghannadi, Alireza; Dayani, Ladan

    2016-01-01

    The marine environment represents approximately half of the global biodiversity and could provide unlimited biological resources for the production of therapeutic drugs. Marine seaweeds comprise few thousands of species representing a considerable part of the littoral biomass. Extracts of the Cystoseira indica and Cystoseira merica were subjected to phytochemical and cytotoxicity evaluation. The amount of total phenol was determined with Folin-Ciocalteu reagent. Cytotoxicity was characterized by IC50 of human cancer cell lines including MCF-7 (human breast adenocarcinoma), HeLa (cervical carcinoma), and HT-29 (human colon adenocarcinoma) using Sulforhodamin assay. Antioxidant activities were evaluated using 2,2-diphenylpicrylhydrazyl (DPPH) method. The analysis revealed that tannins, saponins, sterols and triterpenes were the most abundant constituents in these Cystoseira species while cyanogenic and cardiac glycosides were the least ones. C. indica had the higher content of total phenolics and also showed higher antioxidant activity. Cytotoxic results showed that both species inhibited cell growth effectively, especially against MCF-7 cell line. The present findings suggest potential pharmacological applications of selected seaweeds but require further investigation and identification of their bioactive principles.

  7. X-ray imaging of chemically active valence electrons during a pericyclic reaction.

    PubMed

    Bredtmann, Timm; Ivanov, Misha; Dixit, Gopal

    2014-11-26

    Time-resolved imaging of chemically active valence electron densities is a long-sought goal, as these electrons dictate the course of chemical reactions. However, X-ray scattering is always dominated by the core and inert valence electrons, making time-resolved X-ray imaging of chemically active valence electron densities extremely challenging. Here we demonstrate an effective and robust method, which emphasizes the information encoded in weakly scattered photons, to image chemically active valence electron densities. The degenerate Cope rearrangement of semibullvalene, a pericyclic reaction, is used as an example to visually illustrate our approach. Our work also provides experimental access to the long-standing problem of synchronous versus asynchronous bond formation and breaking during pericyclic reactions.

  8. X-ray imaging of chemically active valence electrons during a pericyclic reaction

    PubMed Central

    Bredtmann, Timm; Ivanov, Misha; Dixit, Gopal

    2014-01-01

    Time-resolved imaging of chemically active valence electron densities is a long-sought goal, as these electrons dictate the course of chemical reactions. However, X-ray scattering is always dominated by the core and inert valence electrons, making time-resolved X-ray imaging of chemically active valence electron densities extremely challenging. Here we demonstrate an effective and robust method, which emphasizes the information encoded in weakly scattered photons, to image chemically active valence electron densities. The degenerate Cope rearrangement of semibullvalene, a pericyclic reaction, is used as an example to visually illustrate our approach. Our work also provides experimental access to the long-standing problem of synchronous versus asynchronous bond formation and breaking during pericyclic reactions. PMID:25424639

  9. Immune activation affects chemical sexual ornaments of male Iberian wall lizards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López, Pilar; Gabirot, Marianne; Martín, José

    2009-01-01

    Many animals use chemical signals in sexual selection, but it is not clear how these sexual traits might have evolved to signal honestly male condition. It is possible that there is a trade-off between maintaining the immune system and the elaboration of ornaments. We experimentally challenged the immune system of male Iberian wall lizards, Podarcis hispanica, with a bacterial antigen (lipopolysaccharide), without pathogenic effects, to explore whether the immune activation affected chemical ornaments. Immune activation resulted in decreased proportions of a major chemical in femoral secretions (cholesta-5,7-dien-3-ol = provitamin D3) known to be selected in scent of males by females and which active form (vitamin D) has a variety of important effects on immune system function. This result suggests the existence of a potential trade-off between physiological regulation of the immune system and the allocation of essential nutrients (vitamins) to sexual chemical ornaments in male lizards.

  10. Effects of predator chemical cues and behavioral biorhythms on foraging activity of terrestrial salamanders.

    PubMed

    Maerz, J C; Panebianco, N L; Madison, D M

    2001-07-01

    Red-backed salamanders, Plethodon cinereus, show a variety of alarm responses to chemical cues from eastern garter snakes, Thamnophis sirtalis. We measured the foraging activity of red-backed salamanders exposed to water soiled by a garter snake (fed P. cinereus) or to unsoiled water. Salamanders exposed to snake-soiled water showed less foraging activity than salamanders exposed to unsoiled water; therefore, predators could have nonlethal effects on salamander populations. Our results also show additional factors influenced salamander foraging activity. Salamander foraging activity and responsiveness to chemical cues do not appear to have been affected by sex or food deprivation. Salamander foraging activity does appear to have been influenced by activity biorhythms. Foraging activity of animals in both treatments showed a bimodal periodicity that is consistent with natural activity patterns controlled by internal biorhythms. Exposure to snake-soiled water significantly reduced foraging activity during periods of peak foraging activity, but had a subtler effect on foraging activity during natural lulls in activity. We suggest that both activity biorhythms and exposure to chemical cues are important factors affecting salamander foraging behavior.

  11. Fungal phytotoxins with potential herbicidal activity: chemical and biological characterization.

    PubMed

    Cimmino, Alessio; Masi, Marco; Evidente, Marco; Superchi, Stefano; Evidente, Antonio

    2015-12-19

    Covering: 2007 to 2015 Fungal phytotoxins are secondary metabolites playing an important role in the induction of disease symptoms interfering with host plant physiological processes. Although fungal pathogens represent a heavy constraint for agrarian production and for forest and environmental heritage, they can also represent an ecofriendly alternative to manage weeds. Indeed, the phytotoxins produced by weed pathogenic fungi are an efficient tool to design natural, safe bioherbicides. Their use could avoid that of synthetic pesticides causing resistance in the host plants and the long term impact of residues in agricultural products with a risk to human and animal health. The isolation and structural and biological characterization of phytotoxins produced by pathogenic fungi for weeds, including parasitic plants, are described. Structure activity relationships and mode of action studies for some phytotoxins are also reported to elucidate the herbicide potential of these promising fungal metabolites.

  12. Fungal phytotoxins with potential herbicidal activity: chemical and biological characterization.

    PubMed

    Cimmino, Alessio; Masi, Marco; Evidente, Marco; Superchi, Stefano; Evidente, Antonio

    2015-12-19

    Covering: 2007 to 2015 Fungal phytotoxins are secondary metabolites playing an important role in the induction of disease symptoms interfering with host plant physiological processes. Although fungal pathogens represent a heavy constraint for agrarian production and for forest and environmental heritage, they can also represent an ecofriendly alternative to manage weeds. Indeed, the phytotoxins produced by weed pathogenic fungi are an efficient tool to design natural, safe bioherbicides. Their use could avoid that of synthetic pesticides causing resistance in the host plants and the long term impact of residues in agricultural products with a risk to human and animal health. The isolation and structural and biological characterization of phytotoxins produced by pathogenic fungi for weeds, including parasitic plants, are described. Structure activity relationships and mode of action studies for some phytotoxins are also reported to elucidate the herbicide potential of these promising fungal metabolites. PMID:26443032

  13. Extended Functional Groups (EFG): An Efficient Set for Chemical Characterization and Structure-Activity Relationship Studies of Chemical Compounds.

    PubMed

    Salmina, Elena S; Haider, Norbert; Tetko, Igor V

    2015-01-01

    The article describes a classification system termed "extended functional groups" (EFG), which are an extension of a set previously used by the CheckMol software, that covers in addition heterocyclic compound classes and periodic table groups. The functional groups are defined as SMARTS patterns and are available as part of the ToxAlerts tool (http://ochem.eu/alerts) of the On-line CHEmical database and Modeling (OCHEM) environment platform. The article describes the motivation and the main ideas behind this extension and demonstrates that EFG can be efficiently used to develop and interpret structure-activity relationship models. PMID:26703557

  14. The influence of low concentrations of irritants on skin barrier function as determined by water vapour loss.

    PubMed

    van der Valk, P G; Nater, J P; Bleumink, E

    1985-01-01

    The effect of some irritants on the barrier function of the skin was assessed by means of water vapour loss measurements. 100 microliter of the test substance in distilled water were applied to the skin for a period of 48 h, using large Finn chambers. The exposures were done in a test panel of 42 subjects. Sodium lauryl sulfate (2%), cocobetaine (2%), crotonaldehyde (0.75%) with sodium lauryl sulfate (0.5%) and dimethyl sulfoxide (50%) markedly influenced water vapour loss. Sodium hydroxide (1%) had less effect on water vapour loss, although the increase was significant (p less than 0.05). Phenol (5%) and benzalkonium chloride (0.2%) did not significantly influence the loss of water through the skin. It is concluded that subclinical effects of chemicals on the barrier function may be of importance in the development of irritant contact dermatitis, but that this capacity is probably not the only factor which determines the potential of a substance to contribute to the development of irritant contact dermatitis. A chemical which has little or no effect on the function of the horny layer may have a toxic effect on the viable cells of deeper layers of the skin. This toxic effect may also be an important subclinical factor in the development of irritant contact dermatitis.

  15. The boiling liquid expanding vapour explosion (BLEVE): mechanism, consequence assessment, management.

    PubMed

    Abbasi, Tasneem; Abbasi, S A

    2007-03-22

    Among the most devastating of accidents likely in chemical process industry is the boiling liquid expanding vapour explosion (BLEVE). It is accompanied by highly destructive blast waves and missiles. In most situations there is also a fireball or a toxic gas cloud. The damaging effect of BLEVEs is reflected in the fact that the 80-odd major BLEVEs that have occurred between 1940 and 2005 have claimed over a 1000 lives and have injured over 10,000 persons besides harming property worth billions of dollars. Release of toxic chemicals like chlorine and phosgene from BLEVEs have damaged large chunks of areas surrounding the BLEVE site. This paper presents an overview of the mechanism, the causes, the consequences, and the preventive strategies associated with BLEVEs. PMID:17113225

  16. Polysaccharides from Arctium lappa L.: Chemical structure and biological activity.

    PubMed

    Carlotto, Juliane; de Souza, Lauro M; Baggio, Cristiane H; Werner, Maria Fernanda de P; Maria-Ferreira, Daniele; Sassaki, Guilherme L; Iacomini, Marcello; Cipriani, Thales R

    2016-10-01

    The plant Arctium lappa L. is popularly used to relieve symptoms of inflammatory disorders. A crude polysaccharide fraction (SAA) resulting of aqueous extraction of A. lappa leaves showed a dose dependent anti-edematogenic activity on carrageenan-induced paw edema, which persisted for up to 48h. Sequential fractionation by ultrafiltration at 50kDa and 30kDa cut-off membranes yielded three fractions, namely RF50, RF30, and EF30. All these maintained the anti-edematogenic effect, but RF30 showed a more potent action, inhibiting 57% of the paw edema at a dose of 4.9mg/kg. The polysaccharide RF30 contained galacturonic acid, galactose, arabinose, rhamnose, glucose, and mannose in a 7:4:2:1:2:1 ratio and had a Mw of 91,000g/mol. Methylation analysis and NMR spectroscopy indicated that RF30 is mainly constituted by a type I rhamnogalacturonan branched by side chains of types I and II arabinogalactans, and arabinan. PMID:27311502

  17. Study of antimalarial activity of chemical constituents from Diospyros quaesita.

    PubMed

    Ma, Cui-Ying; Musoke, Sebisubi Fred; Tan, Ghee Teng; Sydara, Kongmany; Bouamanivong, Somsanith; Southavong, Bounhoong; Soejarto, D Doel; Fong, Harry H S; Zhang, Hong-Jie

    2008-11-01

    Bioassay-directed fractionation led to the isolation of seven compounds from a sample of the dried leaves, twigs, and branches of Diospyros quaesita Thw. (Ebenaceae). One of the isolates, betulinic acid 3-caffeate (1), showed in vitro antimalarial activity against Plasmodium falciparum clones D(6) (chloroquine-sensitive) and W(2) (chloroquine-resistant) with IC(50) values of 1.40 and 0.98 microM, respectively. Evaluation of compound 1 in the human oral epidermoid (KB) cancer cell line revealed cytotoxicity at ED(50) of 4.0 microM. In an attempt to reduce the cytotoxicity of 1, the acetylated derivative 1a and betulinic acid (1b) were prepared. Of the seven isolates, diospyrosin (2) was determined to be a new neolignan. In addition to 1, other known compounds isolated in this study were pinoresinol, lariciresinol, N-benzoyl-L-phenylalaninol, scopoletin, and poriferast-5-en-3beta,7alpha-diol. The structure of 2 was elucidated based on spectroscopic data analysis including 1D- and 2D-NMR, and HR-ESI-MS. PMID:19035573

  18. Polysaccharides from Arctium lappa L.: Chemical structure and biological activity.

    PubMed

    Carlotto, Juliane; de Souza, Lauro M; Baggio, Cristiane H; Werner, Maria Fernanda de P; Maria-Ferreira, Daniele; Sassaki, Guilherme L; Iacomini, Marcello; Cipriani, Thales R

    2016-10-01

    The plant Arctium lappa L. is popularly used to relieve symptoms of inflammatory disorders. A crude polysaccharide fraction (SAA) resulting of aqueous extraction of A. lappa leaves showed a dose dependent anti-edematogenic activity on carrageenan-induced paw edema, which persisted for up to 48h. Sequential fractionation by ultrafiltration at 50kDa and 30kDa cut-off membranes yielded three fractions, namely RF50, RF30, and EF30. All these maintained the anti-edematogenic effect, but RF30 showed a more potent action, inhibiting 57% of the paw edema at a dose of 4.9mg/kg. The polysaccharide RF30 contained galacturonic acid, galactose, arabinose, rhamnose, glucose, and mannose in a 7:4:2:1:2:1 ratio and had a Mw of 91,000g/mol. Methylation analysis and NMR spectroscopy indicated that RF30 is mainly constituted by a type I rhamnogalacturonan branched by side chains of types I and II arabinogalactans, and arabinan.

  19. The effects of activation temperature on physico-chemical characteristics of activated carbons derived from biomass wastes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutrisno, Bachrun; Hidayat, Arif

    2015-12-01

    This research focused on investigating in the effect of activation temperature on the physico-chemical properties of palm empty fruit bunch (PEFB) based activated carbon prepared by physical activation with carbon dioxide. The activation temperature was studied in the range of 400-800°C by keeping the activation temperature at 800°C for 120 min. It was found that the porous properties of activated carbon decreased with an increase in carbonization temperature. The activated carbons prepared at the highest activation temperature at 800°C and activation time of 120 min gave the activated carbon with the highest of BET surface area and pore volume of 938 m2/g and 0.4502 cm3/g, respectively

  20. No sodium in the vapour plumes of Enceladus.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Nicholas M; Burger, Matthew H; Schaller, Emily L; Brown, Michael E; Johnson, Robert E; Kargel, Jeffrey S; Dougherty, Michele K; Achilleos, Nicholas A

    2009-06-25

    The discovery of water vapour and ice particles erupting from Saturn's moon Enceladus fuelled speculation that an internal ocean was the source. Alternatively, the source might be ice warmed, melted or crushed by tectonic motions. Sodium chloride (that is, salt) is expected to be present in a long-lived ocean in contact with a rocky core. Here we report a ground-based spectroscopic search for atomic sodium near Enceladus that places an upper limit on the mixing ratio in the vapour plumes orders of magnitude below the expected ocean salinity. The low sodium content of escaping vapour, together with the small fraction of salt-bearing particles, argues against a situation in which a near-surface geyser is fuelled by a salty ocean through cracks in the crust. The lack of observable sodium in the vapour is consistent with a wide variety of alternative eruption sources, including a deep ocean, a freshwater reservoir, or ice. The existing data may be insufficient to distinguish between these hypotheses.

  1. Distillation with Vapour Compression. An Undergraduate Experimental Facility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pritchard, Colin

    1986-01-01

    Discusses the need to design distillation columns that are more energy efficient. Describes a "design and build" project completed by two college students aimed at demonstrating the principles of vapour compression distillation in a more energy efficient way. General design specifications are given, along with suggestions for teaching and…

  2. No sodium in the vapour plumes of Enceladus.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Nicholas M; Burger, Matthew H; Schaller, Emily L; Brown, Michael E; Johnson, Robert E; Kargel, Jeffrey S; Dougherty, Michele K; Achilleos, Nicholas A

    2009-06-25

    The discovery of water vapour and ice particles erupting from Saturn's moon Enceladus fuelled speculation that an internal ocean was the source. Alternatively, the source might be ice warmed, melted or crushed by tectonic motions. Sodium chloride (that is, salt) is expected to be present in a long-lived ocean in contact with a rocky core. Here we report a ground-based spectroscopic search for atomic sodium near Enceladus that places an upper limit on the mixing ratio in the vapour plumes orders of magnitude below the expected ocean salinity. The low sodium content of escaping vapour, together with the small fraction of salt-bearing particles, argues against a situation in which a near-surface geyser is fuelled by a salty ocean through cracks in the crust. The lack of observable sodium in the vapour is consistent with a wide variety of alternative eruption sources, including a deep ocean, a freshwater reservoir, or ice. The existing data may be insufficient to distinguish between these hypotheses. PMID:19553993

  3. Impact of major volcanic eruptions on stratospheric water vapour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Löffler, M.; Brinkop, S.; Jöckel, P.

    2015-12-01

    Volcanic eruptions can have significant impact on the earth's weather and climate system. Besides the subsequent tropospheric changes also the stratosphere is influenced by large eruptions. Here changes in stratospheric water vapour after the two major volcanic eruptions of El Chichón in Mexico in 1982 and Mount Pinatubo on the Philippines in 1991 are investigated with chemistry-climate model simulations. This study is based on two simulations with specified dynamics of the EMAC model, performed within the Earth System Chemistry integrated Modelling (ESCiMo) project, of which only one includes the volcanic forcing through prescribed aerosol optical properties. The results show a significant increase in stratospheric water vapour after the eruptions, resulting from increased heating rates and the subsequent changes in stratospheric and tropopause temperatures in the tropics. The tropical vertical advection and the South Asian summer monsoon are identified as important sources for the additional water vapour in the stratosphere. Additionally, volcanic influences on the tropospheric water vapour and ENSO are evident.

  4. Impact of major volcanic eruptions on stratospheric water vapour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Löffler, Michael; Brinkop, Sabine; Jöckel, Patrick

    2016-05-01

    Volcanic eruptions can have a significant impact on the Earth's weather and climate system. Besides the subsequent tropospheric changes, the stratosphere is also influenced by large eruptions. Here changes in stratospheric water vapour after the two major volcanic eruptions of El Chichón in Mexico in 1982 and Mount Pinatubo on the Philippines in 1991 are investigated with chemistry-climate model simulations. This study is based on two simulations with specified dynamics of the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts Hamburg - Modular Earth Submodel System (ECHAM/MESSy) Atmospheric Chemistry (EMAC) model, performed within the Earth System Chemistry integrated Modelling (ESCiMo) project, of which only one includes the long-wave volcanic forcing through prescribed aerosol optical properties. The results show a significant increase in stratospheric water vapour induced by the eruptions, resulting from increased heating rates and the subsequent changes in stratospheric and tropopause temperatures in the tropics. The tropical vertical advection and the South Asian summer monsoon are identified as sources for the additional water vapour in the stratosphere. Additionally, volcanic influences on tropospheric water vapour and El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) are evident, if the long-wave forcing is strong enough. Our results are corroborated by additional sensitivity simulations of the Mount Pinatubo period with reduced nudging and reduced volcanic aerosol extinction.

  5. THE INTERACTION OF VAPOUR PHASE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS WITH INDOOR SINKS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The interaction of indoor air pollutants with interior surfaces (i.e., sinks) is a well known, but poorly understood, phenomenon. Studies have shown that re-emissions of adsorbed organic vapours can contribute to elevated concentrations of organics in indoor environments. Researc...

  6. Breakdown and dc discharge in low-pressure water vapour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivoš, J.; Škoro, N.; Marić, D.; Malović, G.; Petrović, Z. Lj

    2015-10-01

    In this paper we report studies of basic properties of breakdown, low-current Townsend discharge and high-current discharge regimes in water vapour. Paschen curves and the corresponding distributions of emission intensities at low current were recorded in the range of pd (pressure x electrode gap) from 0.1 to 10 Torrcm covering the region of Paschen minimum. From the experimental profiles we obtained effective ionization coefficient of water vapour for the E/N range 650 Td-7 kTd and fitted the results by using the extended Townsend analytical formula. Using the obtained ionization coefficient, we calculated the effective yield of secondary electrons from the copper cathode. Results of the measurements of Volt-Ampere characteristics in water vapour were presented together with the images of the axial structure of the discharge in a wide range of discharge currents for two pd values. Recorded profiles showed development of the spatial structure of the discharge in different operating regimes. We were able to identify conditions where processes induced by heavy particles, probably fast hydrogen atoms, are dominant in inducing emission from the discharge. Finally, standard scaling laws were tested for low current and glow discharges in water vapour.

  7. Ellipsometry study of (0001) cadmium crystal faces during vapour growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauch, M.; Quentel, G.

    1981-07-01

    Ellipsometry analysis of (0001) cadium faces during vapour growth reveal periodic fluctuations of the dielectric constant which are related to supersaturation. We show that they can be interpreted by the instability of monoatomic step trains produced by spiral growth. Such a model of surface roughness is also treated using the effective medium approximation of Bruggeman, which corroborates the experimental results.

  8. ESA DUE GlobVapour water vapor products: Validation

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, Nadine; Schroeder, Marc; Stengel, Martin; Lindstrot, Ramus; Preusker, Rene; Collaboration: ESA DUE GlobVapour Consortium

    2013-05-10

    The main objective of the European Space Agency (ESA) Data User Element (DUE) GlobVapour project was the development of multi-annual global water vapor data sets. Since water vapour is a key climate variable it is important to have a good understanding of its behavior in the climate system. The ESA DUE GlobVapour project provides water vapor data, including error estimates, based on carefully calibrated and inter-calibrated satellite radiances in response to user requirements for long time series satellite observations. ESA DUE GlobVapour total columnar water vapor (TCWV) products derived from GOME/SCIA/GOME-2 (1996-2008) and SSM/I+MERIS (2003-2008) have been validated for the mentioned period, using satellite-based (AIRS, ATOVS) and ground-based measurements (radiosondes and microwave radiometer). The validation results are discussed in the following. The technical specifications on bias (1 kg/m{sup 2} for SSMI+MERIS and 2 kg/m{sup 2} for GOME/SCIA/GOME-2) are generally met. For more information, documents and data download follow the link: www.globvapour.info.

  9. Turkish Undergraduates' Misconceptions of Evaporation, Evaporation Rate, and Vapour Pressure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canpolat, Nurtac

    2006-01-01

    This study focused on students' misconceptions related to evaporation, evaporation rate, and vapour pressure. Open-ended diagnostic questions were used with 107 undergraduates in the Primary Science Teacher Training Department in a state university in Turkey. In addition, 14 students from that sample were interviewed to clarify their written…

  10. Copper vapour laser with an efficient semiconductor pump generator having comparable pump pulse and output pulse durations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yurkin, A. A.

    2016-03-01

    We report the results of experimental studies of a copper vapour laser with a semiconductor pump generator capable of forming virtually optimal pump pulses with a current rise steepness of about 40 A ns-1 in a KULON LT-1.5CU active element. To maintain the operating temperature of the active element's channel, an additional heating pulsed oscillator is used. High efficiency of the pump generator is demonstrated.

  11. Chemical and biological activity of leaf extracts of Chromolaena leivensis.

    PubMed

    Torrenegra, Ruben D; Rodríguez, Oscar E

    2011-07-01

    The flavonoids 3,5-dihydroxy-7-methoxy-flavanone, 3,5-dihydroxy-7-methoxyflavone and 3,5,7-trihydroxy-6-methoxyflavone were isolated from the leaves of C. leivensis. Preliminary observations in K562 cells (human erythroleukemia) using the trypan blue test, showed a 90% viability at a concentration of 100 microg/mL; however, further testing of the flavonoids at concentrations of 25, 50 and 100 microg/mL showed toxicity affecting the morphology of human erythroleukemia cells (K562) and human melanoma cells (A375). Induction of apoptosis was produced by 3,5-dihydroxy-7-methoxyflavone at 72 hours after treatment with arrest in the G2 / M phase of the cell cycle. The A375 cells treated with 50 microg/mL of 3,5-dihydroxy-7-methoxy-flavanone for 24, 48 and 72 hours, display effects on the behavior of the cell cycle. The flavonoid 3,5-dihydroxy-7-methoxyflavone has activity on the mitochondrial membrane at concentrations of 25, 50 and 100 microg/mL, at time intervals of 8 to 12 hours. The flavonoids 3,5-dihydroxy-7-methoxy-flavanone and 3,5-dihydroxy-7-methoxyflavone at a concentration of 25 microg/mL increased the expression of costimulatory molecules corresponding to the phenotype presented by mature dendritic cells with differentiation markers CD40, CD83, CD86 and HLA-DR. The two flavonoids at concentrations between 0.39 and 100 microg/mL slightly increased the proliferation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells in the presence and in the absence of phytohemagglutinin. These flavonoids at concentrations of 50 and 100 microg/mL slightly increased the proliferation of fibroblasts.

  12. "SimChemistry" as an Active Learning Tool in Chemical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bolton, Kim; Saalman, Elisabeth; Christie, Michael; Ingerman, Ake; Linder, Cedric

    2008-01-01

    The publicly available free computer program, "SimChemistry," was used as an active learning tool in the chemical engineering curriculum at the University College of Boras, Sweden. The activity involved students writing their own simulation programs on topics in the area of molecular structure and interactions. Evaluation of the learning…

  13. [The effect of selected tannery chemical compounds on selected bacteria of activated sludge].

    PubMed

    Mendrycka, M; Mierzejewski, J; Lidacki, A; Smiechowski, K

    2000-01-01

    Influence of tannery chemical compounds on the selected bacteria of the activated sludge was investigated. The chromium compounds must be diluted to 1:15-1:20 to loss its activity on the bacteria. Other compounds like: natrium chloratum, natrium formate and greased oils have any influence on the growth of the selected bacteria. PMID:11286092

  14. Using Laboratory Chemicals to Imitate Illicit Drugs in a Forensic Chemistry Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hasan, Shawn; Bromfield-Lee, Deborah; Oliver-Hoyo, Maria T.; Cintron-Maldonado, Jose A.

    2008-01-01

    This forensic chemistry activity utilizes presumptive forensic testing procedures and laboratory chemicals that produce screening results similar to controlled substances. For obvious reasons, obtaining heavily regulated controlled substances to create an undergraduate student activity is not practical for most educational institutions. We were…

  15. Regeneration of bleaching clay waste by chemical activation with chloride salts.

    PubMed

    Tsai, W T; Chen, H P; Hsieh, M F; Sun, H F; Lai, C W

    2003-04-01

    Spent bleaching earth (SBE) was regenerated by chemical activation with low cost and low pollution chlorides as activating agents. Under the conditions of activation temperature of 600d egrees C and holding time of 1 h investigated, results show that fresh bleaching earth and regenerated bleaching earth are type IV with hysteresis loops corresponding to type H3 from nitrogen adsorption-desorption isotherms, indicating slit-shaped mesoporous structure. It is also found that the effect of the regeneration treatment studied in the present work on the pore structures and chemical properties of the resulting solids is negligible compared to the fresh bleaching earth. On the other hand, the pore properties of these chemically activated solids are higher than those of the sample regenerated from heat regeneration, but only approximate 45% of surface area are reclaimed. It implies that the carbon residues could be retained within pores and/or clogs the entrance of pores, resulting in a decrease in pore properties.

  16. Improved Chemical Structure-Activity Modeling Through Data Augmentation.

    PubMed

    Cortes-Ciriano, Isidro; Bender, Andreas

    2015-12-28

    Extending the original training data with simulated unobserved data points has proven powerful to increase both the generalization ability of predictive models and their robustness against changes in the structure of data (e.g., systematic drifts in the response variable) in diverse areas such as the analysis of spectroscopic data or the detection of conserved domains in protein sequences. In this contribution, we explore the effect of data augmentation in the predictive power of QSAR models, quantified by the RMSE values on the test set. We collected 8 diverse data sets from the literature and ChEMBL version 19 reporting compound activity as pIC50 values. The original training data were replicated (i.e., augmented) N times (N ∈ 0, 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10), and these replications were perturbed with Gaussian noise (μ = 0, σ = σnoise) on either (i) the pIC50 values, (ii) the compound descriptors, (iii) both the compound descriptors and the pIC50 values, or (iv) none of them. The effect of data augmentation was evaluated across three different algorithms (RF, GBM, and SVM radial) and two descriptor types (Morgan fingerprints and physicochemical-property-based descriptors). The influence of all factor levels was analyzed with a balanced fixed-effect full-factorial experiment. Overall, data augmentation constantly led to increased predictive power on the test set by 10-15%. Injecting noise on (i) compound descriptors or on (ii) both compound descriptors and pIC50 values led to the highest drop of RMSEtest values (from 0.67-0.72 to 0.60-0.63 pIC50 units). The maximum increase in predictive power provided by data augmentation is reached when the training data is replicated one time. Therefore, extending the original training data with one perturbed repetition thereof represents a reasonable trade-off between the increased performance of the models and the computational cost of data augmentation, namely increase of (i) model complexity due to the need for optimizing

  17. Evaluating the vapour shift concept in agriculture: some aspects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, S.; Metselaar, K.; van Dam, J. C.; Klik, A.

    2009-04-01

    Human population growth leads to an increasing pressure on freshwater resources. By 2050 Falkenmark et al. (2004) estimate a global water deficit for crop production of 5800 km3.y-1. This has important consequences for management of fresh water resources at different scales, and new strategies at different scales are required. One of the strategies suggested is that of managing crops in such a way that the use of rainfall and irrigation is shifted as much as possible from evaporation towards transpiration, a so-called vapour shift. The suggested savings are in the order of 330 km3.y-1, and are based on estimates of the magnitude of three processes: Reducing early season evaporation; increasing canopy cover; and increasing yield levels. The vapour shift concept was evaluated empirically, and in a simulation study. The empirical evaluation using results for wheat, maize, millet, cotton, and barley suggests the estimate of potential savings is 37% lower than the estimate by Falkenmark et al. (2004). The uncertainty is large and due to the limited number of experiments in which a separation of evapotranspiration in evaporation and transpiration has been made over the entire growing season. This suggests that theoretical support for the vapour shift concept should become more important. In the simulation approach two management options, mulching and planting density, are evaluated for a site in India for an irrigated wheat crop using a simulation approach for water limited crop yield. Given the simulation model used, and the management options investigated, the assumption implicit in the vapour shift concept - decreasing evaporation with increasing yield level - does not hold in irrigated areas, or in areas in which water is the most limiting factor. This suggests that vapour shift will be largest in those areas where nutrients and pests- and diseases are still limiting or reducing crop yields, and measures are taken to reduce those limitations.

  18. Vapour-liquid equilibrium relationship between toluene and mixed surfactants.

    PubMed

    Tian, Senlin; Li, Yingjie; Mo, Hong; Ning, Ping

    2012-01-01

    Micellar partitioning of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in surfactant solutions and its effects on vapour-liquid equilibrium is fundamental to the overall design and implementation ofsurfactant-enhanced remediation. Knowledge of the vapour-liquid equilibrium partitioning coefficients for VOCs, especially in contaminated soils and groundwater in which they exist, is required. Headspace experiments were performed to quantify the effect of three mixed surfactants, cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (CTMAB) with tetrabutylammonium bromide (TBAB), sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS) with Triton X-405 (TX405), and CTMAB with Triton X-100 (TX100), on the apparent Henry's constants (Hc) of toluene at temperatures ranging from 25 degrees C to 40 degrees C. The Hc values were significantly reduced in the presence of all three mixed surfactants at concentrations above their critical micelle concentrations (CMC). Mixed micellar partitioning, showing effects on the vapour-liquid equilibrium of toluene, was primarily responsible for the significant reduction of Hc in their mixed systems. The mixed surfactants CTMAB-TX100 had the greatest effect on Hc above the CMC, followed by SDS-TX405, then CTMAB-TBAB. Mixed systems of CTMAB-TX100 decreased Hc at concentrations significantly lower than the SDS-TX405 and CTMAB-TBAB concentrations, because of to the lower CMC of CTMAB-TX100. Vapour-liquid equilibrium data were also tested against the model (Hc = H/(1 + K(X - CMC)) that described the partitioning of VOCs in vapour-water-micelle phases. The correlation of Hc with mixed surfactant concentrations (X) and CMC can be utilized as an effective tool to predict the Hc by mixed surfactants. PMID:22988616

  19. Vapour-liquid equilibrium relationship between toluene and mixed surfactants.

    PubMed

    Tian, Senlin; Li, Yingjie; Mo, Hong; Ning, Ping

    2012-01-01

    Micellar partitioning of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in surfactant solutions and its effects on vapour-liquid equilibrium is fundamental to the overall design and implementation ofsurfactant-enhanced remediation. Knowledge of the vapour-liquid equilibrium partitioning coefficients for VOCs, especially in contaminated soils and groundwater in which they exist, is required. Headspace experiments were performed to quantify the effect of three mixed surfactants, cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (CTMAB) with tetrabutylammonium bromide (TBAB), sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS) with Triton X-405 (TX405), and CTMAB with Triton X-100 (TX100), on the apparent Henry's constants (Hc) of toluene at temperatures ranging from 25 degrees C to 40 degrees C. The Hc values were significantly reduced in the presence of all three mixed surfactants at concentrations above their critical micelle concentrations (CMC). Mixed micellar partitioning, showing effects on the vapour-liquid equilibrium of toluene, was primarily responsible for the significant reduction of Hc in their mixed systems. The mixed surfactants CTMAB-TX100 had the greatest effect on Hc above the CMC, followed by SDS-TX405, then CTMAB-TBAB. Mixed systems of CTMAB-TX100 decreased Hc at concentrations significantly lower than the SDS-TX405 and CTMAB-TBAB concentrations, because of to the lower CMC of CTMAB-TX100. Vapour-liquid equilibrium data were also tested against the model (Hc = H/(1 + K(X - CMC)) that described the partitioning of VOCs in vapour-water-micelle phases. The correlation of Hc with mixed surfactant concentrations (X) and CMC can be utilized as an effective tool to predict the Hc by mixed surfactants.

  20. Legal requirements and guidelines for the control of harmful laser generated particles, vapours and gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horsey, John

    2015-07-01

    This paper is a review of the Health and Safety laws and guidelines relating to laser generated emissions into the workplace and outside environment with emphasis on the differences between legal requirements and guideline advice. The types and nature of contaminants released by various laser processes (i.e. cutting, coding, engraving, marking etc) are discussed, together with the best methods for controlling them to within legal exposure limits. A brief description of the main extract air filtration techniques, including the principles of particulate removal and the action of activated carbon for gas/vapour/odour filtration, is given.

  1. Investigation of the chemical composition-antibacterial activity relationship of essential oils by chemometric methods.

    PubMed

    Miladinović, Dragoljub L; Ilić, Budimir S; Mihajilov-Krstev, Tatjana M; Nikolić, Nikola D; Miladinović, Ljiljana C; Cvetković, Olga G

    2012-05-01

    The antibacterial effects of Thymus vulgaris (Lamiaceae), Lavandula angustifolia (Lamiaceae), and Calamintha nepeta (Lamiaceae) Savi subsp. nepeta var. subisodonda (Borb.) Hayek essential oils on five different bacteria were estimated. Laboratory control strain and clinical isolates from different pathogenic media were researched by broth microdilution method, with an emphasis on a chemical composition-antibacterial activity relationship. The main constituents of thyme oil were thymol (59.95%) and p-cymene (18.34%). Linalool acetate (38.23%) and β-linalool (35.01%) were main compounds in lavender oil. C. nepeta essential oil was characterized by a high percentage of piperitone oxide (59.07%) and limonene (9.05%). Essential oils have been found to have antimicrobial activity against all tested microorganisms. Classification and comparison of essential oils on the basis of their chemical composition and antibacterial activity were made by utilization of appropriate chemometric methods. The chemical principal component analysis (PCA) and hierachical cluster analysis (HCA) separated essential oils into two groups and two sub-groups. Thyme essential oil forms separate chemical HCA group and exhibits highest antibacterial activity, similar to tetracycline. Essential oils of lavender and C. nepeta in the same chemical HCA group were classified in different groups, within antibacterial PCA and HCA analyses. Lavender oil exhibits higher antibacterial ability in comparison with C. nepeta essential oil, probably based on the concept of synergistic activity of essential oil components. PMID:22389175

  2. Structural features of endocrine active chemicals--A comparison of in vivo and in vitro data.

    PubMed

    Lewin, Geertje; Escher, Sylvia E; van der Burg, Bart; Simetska, Nelly; Mangelsdorf, Inge

    2015-08-01

    Studies on reproductive toxicity need high numbers of test animals. Therefore, we investigated whether chemical structural features (SF) in combination with in vitro data on specific adverse outcome pathways (AOPs) may be used for predicting reproductive toxicity of untested chemicals. Using the OECD Toolbox and expert judgment, we identified 89 structure groups for 275 chemicals for which the results of prenatal developmental toxicity or multigeneration studies were present in the Fraunhofer database on Fertility and Developmental Toxicity in experimental animals (FeDTex) database. Likewise, we evaluated 220 chemicals which had been tested in reporter gene assays on endocrine ((anti)estrogenic and (anti)androgenic) properties in the CALUX(®) test battery. There was a large spread of effect levels for substances within the chemical structure groups for both, in vivo and in vitro results. The groups of highest concern (diphenyl derivatives, planar conjugated systems with fused rings, phenols and organophosphates) correlated quite well, however, between the in vivo and in vitro data on estrogenic activity. For the 56 chemicals represented in both databases, lowest effect doses in vivo correlated well with the estrogenic activity in vitro. These results suggest that a panel of assays covering relevant AOPs and data on metabolism and toxicokinetics may allow prediction of relative reproductive or development toxicity potency within the identified chemical structure groups.

  3. Structure-activity relationships: quantitative techniques for predicting the behavior of chemicals in the ecosystem

    SciTech Connect

    Nirmalakhandan, N.; Speece, R.E.

    1988-06-01

    Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationships (QSARs) are used increasingly to screen and predict the toxicity and the fate of chemicals released into the environment. The impetus to use QSAR methods in this area has been the large number of synthetic chemicals introduced into the ecosystem via intensive agriculture and industrialization. Because of the costly and time-consuming nature of environmental fate testing, QSARs have been effectively used to screen large classes of chemical compounds and flag those that appear to warrant more thorough testing.

  4. 15 CFR 712.1 - Round to zero rule that applies to activities involving Schedule 1 chemicals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... activities involving Schedule 1 chemicals. 712.1 Section 712.1 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade (Continued) BUREAU OF INDUSTRY AND SECURITY, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE CHEMICAL WEAPONS CONVENTION REGULATIONS ACTIVITIES INVOLVING SCHEDULE 1 CHEMICALS § 712.1 Round to...

  5. 15 CFR 712.1 - Round to zero rule that applies to activities involving Schedule 1 chemicals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... activities involving Schedule 1 chemicals. 712.1 Section 712.1 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade (Continued) BUREAU OF INDUSTRY AND SECURITY, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE CHEMICAL WEAPONS CONVENTION REGULATIONS ACTIVITIES INVOLVING SCHEDULE 1 CHEMICALS § 712.1 Round to...

  6. 15 CFR 712.1 - Round to zero rule that applies to activities involving Schedule 1 chemicals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... activities involving Schedule 1 chemicals. 712.1 Section 712.1 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade (Continued) BUREAU OF INDUSTRY AND SECURITY, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE CHEMICAL WEAPONS CONVENTION REGULATIONS ACTIVITIES INVOLVING SCHEDULE 1 CHEMICALS § 712.1 Round to...

  7. 15 CFR 712.1 - Round to zero rule that applies to activities involving Schedule 1 chemicals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... activities involving Schedule 1 chemicals. 712.1 Section 712.1 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade (Continued) BUREAU OF INDUSTRY AND SECURITY, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE CHEMICAL WEAPONS CONVENTION REGULATIONS ACTIVITIES INVOLVING SCHEDULE 1 CHEMICALS § 712.1 Round to...

  8. 15 CFR 712.1 - Round to zero rule that applies to activities involving Schedule 1 chemicals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... activities involving Schedule 1 chemicals. 712.1 Section 712.1 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade (Continued) BUREAU OF INDUSTRY AND SECURITY, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE CHEMICAL WEAPONS CONVENTION REGULATIONS ACTIVITIES INVOLVING SCHEDULE 1 CHEMICALS § 712.1 Round to...

  9. [Relationship among soil enzyme activities, vegetation state, and soil chemical properties of coal cinder yard].

    PubMed

    Wang, Youbao; Zhang, Li; Liu, Dengyi

    2003-01-01

    From field investigation and laboratory analysis, the relationships among soil enzyme activities, vegetation state and soil chemical properties of coal cinder yard in thermal power station were studied. The results showed that vegetation on coal cinder yard was distributed in scattered patch mainly with single species of plant, and herbs were the dominant species. At the same time, the activity of three soil enzymes had a stronger relativity to environment conditions, such as vegetation state and soil chemical properties. The sensitivity of three soil enzymes to environmental stress was in order of urease > sucrase > catalase. The relativity of three soil enzymes to environmental factor was in order of sucrase > urease > catalase. Because of urease being the most susceptible enzyme to environmental conditions, and it was marked or utmost marked interrelated with vegetation state and soil chemical properties, urease activity could be used as an indicator for the reclamation of wasteland.

  10. Analysis of essential oils from Voacanga africana seeds at different hydrodistillation extraction stages: chemical composition, antioxidant activity and antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiong; Yang, Dongliang; Liu, Jiajia; Ren, Na

    2015-01-01

    In this study, essential oils from Voacanga africana seeds at different extraction stages were investigated. In the chemical composition analysis, 27 compounds representing 86.69-95.03% of the total essential oils were identified and quantified. The main constituents in essential oils were terpenoids, alcohols and fatty acids accounting for 15.03-24.36%, 21.57-34.43% and 33.06-57.37%, respectively. Moreover, the analysis also revealed that essential oils from different extraction stages possessed different chemical compositions. In the antioxidant evaluation, all analysed oils showed similar antioxidant behaviours, and the concentrations of essential oils providing 50% inhibition of DPPH-scavenging activity (IC50) were about 25 mg/mL. In the antimicrobial experiments, essential oils from different extraction stages exhibited different antimicrobial activities. The antimicrobial activity of oils was affected by extraction stages. By controlling extraction stages, it is promising to obtain essential oils with desired antimicrobial activities.

  11. A Global Genomic Screening Strategy Reveals Genetic and Chemical Activators ofPeroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor alpha (PPARalpha)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A comprehensive survey of chemical, diet and genetic perturbations that activate PPARalpha in the mouse liver has not been carried out but would be useful to identify the factors that may contribute to PPARalpha-dependent liver tumors. A gene signature dependent on PPARalpha ac...

  12. CDRUG: a web server for predicting anticancer activity of chemical compounds.

    PubMed

    Li, Gong-Hua; Huang, Jing-Fei

    2012-12-15

    Cancer is the leading cause of death worldwide. Screening anticancer candidates from tens of millions of chemical compounds is expensive and time-consuming. A rapid and user-friendly web server, known as CDRUG, is described here to predict the anticancer activity of chemical compounds. In CDRUG, a hybrid score was developed to measure the similarity of different compounds. The performance analysis shows that CDRUG has the area under curve of 0.878, indicating that CDRUG is effective to distinguish active and inactive compounds.

  13. Quantifying biological activity in chemical terms: a pharmacology primer to describe drug effect.

    PubMed

    Kenakin, Terry

    2009-04-17

    Drugs can initiate, inhibit, modulate, or potentiate basal activity in cells to produce physiological effects. The interplay between the fundamental affinity and efficacy of drugs with the functional texture imposed on the receptor by the cell (e.g., variation in basal set points or cytosolic signal proteins) generates behaviors for drugs in different tissues that can cause apparently capricious variation between tissues under various physiological conditions. This poses a problem for pharmacologists studying drugs in test systems to predict effects in therapeutic ones. De-emphasis of tissue-specific drug behaviors by reducing drug effects to chemical terms can, to a large extent, reduce the effects of variances in biological systems (changing basal set points, genetic and biochemical variability, etc.). This Perspective discusses the application of four major pharmacodynamic parameters (affinity, efficacy, orthosteric vs allosteric binding, and rate of dissociation of drug from the biological target) to the quantification of biological activity to furnish chemical structure-activity relationships (SARs). These four parameters can be used to quantify effects in test systems and predict subsequent activity in a therapeutic setting. Because at least three different SARs are involved in the drug discovery process (primary therapeutic activity, pharmacokinetics, and safety), with more possible if target selectivity is required, some simple statistical approaches to multivariate structure-activity studies (i.e., primary activity plus selectivity data) also are considered. In total, these data can provide system-independent data to characterize biological activity of molecules in chemical terms that can greatly reduce biologically induced variability.

  14. Gamma irradiation effect on the chemical composition and the antioxidant activity of Ipomoea batatas L.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahir, D.; Halide, H.; Wahab, A. W.; Kurniawan, D.

    2014-09-01

    The chemical composition and antioxidant activity of Ipomoea batatas L. (sweet potato) were studied by x-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and by the 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging capacity. The irradiation treatment was performed by using Cs-137 as a gamma sources in experimental equipment. Treatment by irradiation emerges as a possible conservation technique that has been tested successfully in several food products. The amount of chemical composition was changed and resulting new chemical for absorbed dose 40 mSv. Interestingly, it was found that gamma irradiation significantly increased the antioxidant activity, as measured by DPPH radical scavenging capacity. The antioxidant activity of Ipomoea batatas L. extract was dramatically increased in the non-irradiated sample to the sample irradiated at 40 mSv. These results indicate that gamma irradiation of Ipomoea batatas L. extract can enhance its antioxidant activity through the formation of a new chemical compound. Based on these results, increased antioxidant activity of Ipomoea batatas L. extracts by gamma rays can be applied to various industries, especially cosmetics, foodstuffs, and pharmaceuticals.

  15. Gamma irradiation effect on the chemical composition and the antioxidant activity of Ipomoea batatas L

    SciTech Connect

    Tahir, D. Halide, H. Kurniawan, D.; Wahab, A. W.

    2014-09-25

    The chemical composition and antioxidant activity of Ipomoea batatas L. (sweet potato) were studied by x-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and by the 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging capacity. The irradiation treatment was performed by using Cs-137 as a gamma sources in experimental equipment. Treatment by irradiation emerges as a possible conservation technique that has been tested successfully in several food products. The amount of chemical composition was changed and resulting new chemical for absorbed dose 40 mSv. Interestingly, it was found that gamma irradiation significantly increased the antioxidant activity, as measured by DPPH radical scavenging capacity. The antioxidant activity of Ipomoea batatas L. extract was dramatically increased in the non-irradiated sample to the sample irradiated at 40 mSv. These results indicate that gamma irradiation of Ipomoea batatas L. extract can enhance its antioxidant activity through the formation of a new chemical compound. Based on these results, increased antioxidant activity of Ipomoea batatas L. extracts by gamma rays can be applied to various industries, especially cosmetics, foodstuffs, and pharmaceuticals.

  16. Quantitative structure-activity relationships for chemical toxicity to environmental bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Blum, D.J.; Speece, R.E. )

    1991-10-01

    Quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSARs) were developed for nonreactive chemical toxicity to each of four groups of bacteria of importance in environmental engineering: aerobic heterotrophs, methanogens, Nitrosomonas, and Microtox. The QSARs were based on chemicals covering a range of structures and including important environmental pollutants (i.e., chlorinated and other substituted benzenes, phenols, and aliphatic hydrocarbons). QSARs were developed for each chemical class and for combinations of chemical classes. Three QSAR methods (groups of chemical describing parameters) were evaluated for their accuracy and ease of use: log P, linear solvation energy relationships (LSER), and molecular connectivity. Successful QSARs were found for each group of bacteria and by each method, with correlation coefficients (adjusted r2) between 0.79 and 0.95. LSER QSARs incorporated the widest range of chemicals with the greatest accuracy. Log P and molecular connectivity QSARs are easier to use because their parameters are readily available. Outliers from the QSARs likely due to reactive toxicity included acryls, low pKa compounds, and aldehydes. Nitro compounds and chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons and alcohols showed enhanced toxicity to the methanogens only. Chemicals with low IC50 concentrations (log IC50 mumol/liter less than 1.5) were often outliers for Nitrosomonas. QSARs were validated statistically and with literature data. A suggested method is provided for use of the QSARs.

  17. Developmental competence of parthenogenetic mouse and human embryos after chemical or electrical activation.

    PubMed

    Versieren, Karen; Heindryckx, Björn; Lierman, Sylvie; Gerris, Jan; De Sutter, Petra

    2010-12-01

    Parthenogenetic reconstruction is one major strategy to create patient-specific stem cells. The aim of this study was to find the best artificial activation protocol for parthenogenetic activation of mouse and human oocytes comparing different methods. In a first set of experiments, in-vivo matured mouse oocytes and human failed-fertilized, in-vitro and in-vivo matured oocytes were artificially activated by a chemical (ionomycin) or electrical stimulus. In a second set of experiments, a combination of activating agents (electrical pulses followed by ionomycin or SrCl(2)) was applied in an aim to improve developmental competence. All embryos were evaluated daily until day 6 after activation. Mouse blastocysts were differentially stained to evaluate blastocyst quality. For mouse oocytes and human failed-fertilized oocytes, blastocyst development was significantly higher after electrical activation (P<0.05). For human in-vitro and in-vivo matured oocytes, blastocyst formation was only obtained after electrical activation of in-vitro matured oocytes. After combining activating agents, no differences in development could be observed. In conclusion, this study revealed that for both mouse and human oocytes development to the blastocyst stage was significantly better after electrical activation compared with chemical activation. Combining activating agents had no further positive effect on developmental potential.

  18. Removal of vapour phase PCDD/Fs in electric arc furnace steelmaking emissions by sorption using plastics.

    PubMed

    Ooi, Tze Chean; Ewan, Bruce C R; Cliffe, Keith R; Anderson, David R; Fisher, Raymond; Thompson, Dennis

    2008-08-01

    Plastics are potentially suitable for the removal of vapour phase PCDD/Fs in emissions from the electric arc furnace (EAF) steelmaking process. Three different commercial plastics, i.e. polypropylene BE170MO (Borealis A/S, Denmark), polypropylene in the form of 5 mm spheres (The Precision Plastic Ball Co. Ltd., UK) and polyethylene LD605BA (ExxonMobil Chemical, Belgium), have been studied using a novel experimental apparatus for the removal of vapour phase PCDD/Fs. Polypropylene BE170MO was identified to be the most suitable product amongst the three plastics in terms of PCDD/F sorption and potential industrial application. The optimum temperature for PCDD/F sorption on polypropylene BE170MO was below 90 degrees C for a removal efficiency of >99% at an average vapour phase PCDD/F concentration of 3.5 ng I-TEQ/Nm(3). At 130 degrees C, 53% of the PCDD/Fs trapped on polypropylene BE170MO were desorbed.

  19. Identification of chemical modulators of the constitutive activated receptor (CAR) in a gene expression compendium

    PubMed Central

    Oshida, Keiyu; Vasani, Naresh; Jones, Carlton; Moore, Tanya; Hester, Susan; Nesnow, Stephen; Auerbach, Scott; Geter, David R.; Aleksunes, Lauren M.; Thomas, Russell S.; Applegate, Dawn; Klaassen, Curtis D.; Corton, J. Christopher

    2015-01-01

    The nuclear receptor family member constitutive activated receptor (CAR) is activated by structurally diverse drugs and environmentally-relevant chemicals leading to transcriptional regulation of genes involved in xenobiotic metabolism and transport. Chronic activation of CAR increases liver cancer incidence in rodents, whereas suppression of CAR can lead to steatosis and insulin insensitivity. Here, analytical methods were developed to screen for chemical treatments in a gene expression compendium that lead to alteration of CAR activity. A gene expression biomarker signature of 83 CAR-dependent genes was identified using microarray profiles from the livers of wild-type and CAR-null mice after exposure to three structurally-diverse CAR activators (CITCO, phenobarbital, TCPOBOP). A rank-based algorithm (Running Fisher’s algorithm (p-value ≤ 10-4)) was used to evaluate the similarity between the CAR biomarker signature and a test set of 28 and 32 comparisons positive or negative, respectively, for CAR activation; the test resulted in a balanced accuracy of 97%. The biomarker signature was used to identify chemicals that activate or suppress CAR in an annotated mouse liver/primary hepatocyte gene expression database of ~1850 comparisons. CAR was activated by 1) activators of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) in wild-type but not AhR-null mice, 2) pregnane X receptor (PXR) activators in wild-type and to lesser extents in PXR-null mice, and 3) activators of PPARα in wild-type and PPARα-null mice. CAR was consistently activated by five conazole fungicides and four perfluorinated compounds. Comparison of effects in wild-type and CAR-null mice showed that the fungicide propiconazole increased liver weight and hepatocyte proliferation in a CAR-dependent manner, whereas the perfluorinated compound perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) increased these endpoints in a CAR-independent manner. A number of compounds suppressed CAR coincident with increases in markers of

  20. Collisional thulium vapour gas-discharge laser

    SciTech Connect

    Gerasimov, V A; Pavlinskii, A V

    2004-01-31

    A collisional laser on a system of atomic levels based on the principle proposed by Gould is built for the first time. The population of the upper laser level and relaxation of the lower level occur upon inelastic collisions of excited thulium atoms with helium atoms. The lower-level relaxation occurs in a reaction with an energy defect of > 13000 cm{sup -1}. (active media. lasers)

  1. Effect of temperature and relative humidity on the water vapour permeability and mechanical properties of cassava starch and soy protein concentrate based edible films.

    PubMed

    Chinma, C E; Ariahu, C C; Alakali, J S

    2015-04-01

    The effect of temperature and relative humidity on the water vapour permeability (WVP) and mechanical properties of cassava starch and soy protein concentrate (SPC) based edible films containing 20 % glycerol level were studied. Tensile strength and elastic modulus of edible films increased with increase in temperature and decreased with increase in relative humidity, while elongation at break decreased. Water vapour permeability of the films increased (2.6-4.3 g.mm/m(2).day.kPa) with increase in temperature and relative humidity. The temperature dependence of water vapour permeation of cassava starch-soy protein concentrate films followed Arrhenius relationship. Activation energy (Ea) of water vapour permeation of cassava starch-soy protein concentrate edible films ranged from 1.9 to 5.3 kJ/mol (R (2)  ≥ 0.93) and increased with increase in SPC addition. The Ea values were lower for the bio-films than for polyvinylidene chloride, polypropylene and polyethylene which are an indication of low water vapour permeability of the developed biofilms compared to those synthetic films.

  2. The performance of supercapacitor electrodes developed from chemically activated carbon produced from waste tea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inal, I. Isil Gurten; Holmes, Stuart M.; Banford, Anthony; Aktas, Zeki

    2015-12-01

    Highly microporous and mesoporous activated carbons were produced from waste tea for application as supercapacitor electrodes, utilising a chemical activation method involving treatment with either K2CO3 or H3PO4. The area, pore structure characteristics and surface functionality of the activated carbons were evaluated to investigate the influence on electrochemical performance. The performance of the activated carbons as supercapacitor electrodes was tested by cyclic voltammetry (CV), impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and galvanostatic charge-discharge (GCD) measurements, in an aqueous electrolyte. The results showed that the pore structure and type of the activated carbon have significant impact on the supercapacitor performance. Both waste tea-based activated carbon electrodes showed good cyclic stability. However, despite its lower specific surface area the highly microporous activated carbon produced with K2CO3, exhibited much better capacitive performance than that of the mesoporous activated carbon produced with H3PO4.

  3. Essential Oil Composition of Phagnalon sordidum (L.) from Corsica, Chemical Variability and Antimicrobial Activity.

    PubMed

    Brunel, Marion; Vitrac, Caroline; Costa, Jean; Mzali, Fatima; Vitrac, Xavier; Muselli, Alain

    2016-03-01

    The chemical composition of Phagnalon sordidum (L.) essential oil was investigated for the first time using gas chromatography and chromatography/mass spectrometry. Seventy-six compounds, which accounted for 87.9% of the total amount, were identified in a collective essential oil of P. sordidum from Corsica. The main essential oil components were (E)-β-caryophyllene (14.4%), β-pinene (11.0%), thymol (9.0%), and hexadecanoic acid (5.3%). The chemical compositions of essential oils from 19 Corsican locations were investigated. The study of the chemical variability using statistical analysis allowed identifying direct correlation between the three populations of P. sordidum widespread in Corsica and the essential oil compositions they produce. The in vitro antimicrobial activity of P. sordidum essential oil was evaluated and it exhibited a notable activity on a large panel of clinically significant microorganisms.

  4. Clustering and rule-based classifications of chemical structures evaluated in the biological activity space.

    PubMed

    Schuffenhauer, Ansgar; Brown, Nathan; Ertl, Peter; Jenkins, Jeremy L; Selzer, Paul; Hamon, Jacques

    2007-01-01

    Classification methods for data sets of molecules according to their chemical structure were evaluated for their biological relevance, including rule-based, scaffold-oriented classification methods and clustering based on molecular descriptors. Three data sets resulting from uniformly determined in vitro biological profiling experiments were classified according to their chemical structures, and the results were compared in a Pareto analysis with the number of classes and their average spread in the profile space as two concurrent objectives which were to be minimized. It has been found that no classification method is overall superior to all other studied methods, but there is a general trend that rule-based, scaffold-oriented methods are the better choice if classes with homogeneous biological activity are required, but a large number of clusters can be tolerated. On the other hand, clustering based on chemical fingerprints is superior if fewer and larger classes are required, and some loss of homogeneity in biological activity can be accepted.

  5. Idaho Chemical Processing Plant low-activity waste grout stabilization development program FY-97 status report

    SciTech Connect

    Herbst, A.K.; Marshall, D.W.; McCray, J.A.

    1998-02-01

    The general purpose of the Grout Development Program is to solidify and stabilize the liquid low-activity wastes (LAW) generated at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP). It is anticipated that LAW will be produced from the following: (1) chemical separation of the tank farm high-activity sodium-bearing waste, (2) retrieval, dissolution, and chemical separation of the aluminum, zirconium, and sodium calcines, (3) facility decontamination processes, and (4) process equipment waste. Grout formulation studies for sodium-bearing LAW, including decontamination and process equipment waste, continued this fiscal year. A second task was to develop a grout formulation to solidify potential process residual heels in the tank farm vessels when the vessels are closed.

  6. Chemical features of Ganoderma polysaccharides with antioxidant, antitumor and antimicrobial activities.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Isabel C F R; Heleno, Sandrina A; Reis, Filipa S; Stojkovic, Dejan; Queiroz, Maria João R P; Vasconcelos, M Helena; Sokovic, Marina

    2015-06-01

    Ganoderma genus comprises one of the most commonly studied species worldwide, Ganoderma lucidum. However, other Ganoderma species have been also reported as important sources of bioactive compounds. Polysaccharides are important contributors to the medicinal properties reported for Ganoderma species, as demonstrated by the numerous publications, including reviews, on this matter. Yet, what are the chemical features of Ganoderma polysaccharides that have bioactivity? In the present manuscript, the chemical features of Ganoderma polysaccharides with reported antioxidant, antitumor and antimicrobial activities (the most studied worldwide) are analyzed in detail. The composition of sugars (homo- versus hetero-glucans and other polysaccharides), type of glycosidic linkages, branching patterns, and linkage to proteins are discussed. Methods for extraction, isolation and identification are evaluated and, finally, the bioactivity of polysaccharidic extracts and purified compounds are discussed. The integration of data allows deduction of structure-activity relationships and gives clues to the chemical aspects involved in Ganoderma bioactivity.

  7. Target Fishing for Chemical Compounds using Target-Ligand Activity data and Ranking based Methods

    PubMed Central

    Wale, Nikil; Karypis, George

    2009-01-01

    In recent years the development of computational techniques that identify all the likely targets for a given chemical compound, also termed as the problem of Target Fishing, has been an active area of research. Identification of likely targets of a chemical compound helps to understand problems such as toxicity, lack of efficacy in humans, and poor physical properties associated with that compound in the early stages of drug discovery. In this paper we present a set of techniques whose goal is to rank or prioritize targets in the context of a given chemical compound such that most targets that this compound may show activity against appear higher in the ranked list. These methods are based on our extensions to the SVM and Ranking Perceptron algorithms for this problem. Our extensive experimental study shows that the methods developed in this work outperform previous approaches by 2% to 60% under different evaluation criterions. PMID:19764745

  8. Leidenfrost point and estimate of the vapour layer thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gianino, Concetto

    2008-11-01

    In this article I describe an experiment involving the Leidenfrost phenomenon, which is the long lifetime of a water drop when it is deposited on a metal that is much hotter than the boiling point of water. The experiment was carried out with high-school students. The Leidenfrost point is measured and the heat laws are used to estimate the thickness of the vapour layer, d≈0.06 mm, which prevents the drop from touching the hotplate.

  9. Infrared Laser Optoacoustic Detection Of Gases And Vapours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, S. A.; Cummins, P. G.; Bone, S. A.; Davies, P. B.

    1988-10-01

    Mid-infrared laser optoacoustic spectroscopy has been used to detect a variety of gases and vapours. Performance was calibrated using the signal from a known concentration of ethene, and then the method applied to the perfume alcohol geraniol. Detection limits were found to be 1 ppb for ethene and 70 ppb for geraniol on their strongest absorption lines for a few seconds measurement time.

  10. Chemical modification studies on arginine kinase: essential cysteine and arginine residues at the active site.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wen-Jing; Li, Miao; Wang, Xiao-Yun

    2007-12-01

    Chemical modification was used to elucidate the essential amino acids in the catalytic activity of arginine kinase (AK) from Migratoria manilensis. Among six cysteine (Cys) residues only one Cys residue was determined to be essential in the active site by Tsou's method. Furthermore, the AK modified by DTNB can be fully reactivated by dithiothreitol (DTT) in a monophasic kinetic course. At the same time, this reactivation can be slowed down in the presence of ATP, suggesting that the essential Cys is located near the ATP binding site. The ionizing groups at the AK active site were studied and the standard dissociation enthalpy (DeltaH degrees ) was 12.38kcal/mol, showing that the dissociation group may be the guanidino of arginine (Arg). Using the specific chemical modifier phenylglyoxal (PG) demonstrated that only one Arg, located near the ATP binding site, is essential for the activity of AK. PMID:17765964

  11. Chemical compositions and antioxidant activities of water extracts of Chinese propolis.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xiali; Chen, Bin; Luo, Liping; Zhang, Xi; Dai, Ximo; Gong, Shangji

    2011-12-14

    The present study investigated the chemical composition and antioxidant activity of the water extract of propolis (WEP) collected from 26 locations in China. Spectrophotometry was used to determine the physicochemical properties and the chemical constituents of WEP. Phenolic compounds in WEP were identified by RP-HPLC-DAD with reference standards. The antioxidant activities [characterized by reducing power and 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) scavenging ability] of WEP were also measured. Results show that epicatechin, p-coumaric acid, morin, 3,4-dimethoxycinnamic acid, naringenin, ferulic acid, cinnamic acid, pinocembrin, and chrysin are the major functional phenolic compounds in Chinese WEPs. Furthermore, most WEPs show strong antioxidant activities, which are significantly correlated with E(1cm)(1%), an index for the estimation of the quality of WEP. WEPs also contain many more active constituents than ethanol extracts of propolis. PMID:22026502

  12. Research on the chemical inactivation of antibiotic activity in assays of sterility and contamination of pharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Negretti, F; Casetta, P

    1991-01-01

    Membrane filtration, frequently used for removing antibacterial activity in assays of sterility and contamination of the antibiotics, presents the drawback of adsorption of antibiotic to membrane. The washing with large volumes of peptone water removes partially interferences with microbial growth. We evaluated the inactivating action of some chemical substances (albumin, calcium pantothenate, heparin, hydroxylamine, tri-valent iron) on the antimicrobial activity of membranes employed for antibiotic filtration. The results are not positive for the use of chemical substances in the antibiotic activity neutralization. In fact the per cent reduction of inhibition zones ranges from -61.5% to +20.0% and the inhibiting activity on the growth of colony forming units (CFU) oscillates from 89.6% to 100%. Discovery of new neutralizing substances and severe measures of asepsis in pharmaceutical production are recommended. PMID:12041793

  13. Modeling Chemical Detection Sensitivities of Active and Passive Remote Sensing Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Scharlemann, E T

    2003-07-28

    During nearly a decade of remote sensing programs under the auspices of the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE), LLNL has developed a set of performance modeling codes--called APRS--for both Active and Passive Remote Sensing systems. These codes emphasize chemical detection sensitivity in the form of minimum detectable quantities with and without background spectral clutter and in the possible presence of other interfering chemicals. The codes have been benchmarked against data acquired in both active and passive remote sensing programs at LLNL and Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The codes include, as an integral part of the performance modeling, many of the data analysis techniques developed in the DOE's active and passive remote sensing programs (e.g., ''band normalization'' for an active system, principal component analysis for a passive system).

  14. Anaerobic digestion of waste activated sludge pretreated by a combined ultrasound and chemical process.

    PubMed

    Seng, Bunrith; Khanal, Samir Kumar; Visvanathan, Chettiyappan

    2010-03-01

    Waste activated sludge (WAS) requires a long digestion time because of a rate-limiting hydrolysis step - the first phase of anaerobic digestion. Pretreatment of WAS facilitates the hydrolysis step and improves the digestibility. This study examined the effects of ultrasonic, chemical, and combined chemical-ultrasonic pretreatments on WAS disintegration and its subsequent digestion at different solids retention times (SRTs). The efficient conditions for each pretreatment were evaluated based on per cent soluble chemical oxygen demand (%SCOD). The results showed that the combined chemical-ultrasonic pretreatment resulted in better WAS disintegration, based on %SCOD release, compared with individual chemical and ultrasonic pretreatments. At the optimum operating conditions of the combined chemical-ultrasonic pretreatment (NaOH dose of 10 mg g(-1) TS (total solids) and specific energy input of 3.8 kJ g(-1)TS), the %SCOD release was 18.1% +/- 0.5%, whereas 13.5% +/- 0.9%, 13.0% +/- 0.5% and 1.1% +/- 0.1% corresponded to individual chemical (50 mg g(-1) TS) and ultrasonic (3.8 kJ g(-1) TS) pretreatments and control (without pretreatment), respectively. The anaerobic digestion studies in continuous stirred tank reactors showed an increase in methane production of 23.4% +/- 1.3% and 31.1 +/- 1.2% for digesters fed with WAS pretreated with ultrasonic and combined chemical-ultrasonic, respectively, with respect to controls at the effective SRT of 15 days. The highest total solids removal was achieved in the digester fed with ultrasonic pretreated WAS (16.6% +/- 0.3%), whereas the highest volatile solids removal was achieved from the digester fed with combined chemical-ultrasonic pretreated WAS (24.8 +/- 0.4%). The findings from this study are a useful contribution to new pretreatment techniques in the field of sludge treatment technology through anaerobic digestion.

  15. Secondary Metabolites from the Marine Algal-Derived Endophytic Fungi: Chemical Diversity and Biological Activity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peng; Li, Xin; Wang, Bin-Gui

    2016-06-01

    Marine algal-derived endophytic fungi have attracted considerable attention in the most recent two decades due to their prolific production of structurally diverse secondary metabolites with various biological activities. This review summarizes a total of 182 natural products isolated from marine algal-derived endophytic fungi in the past two decades. The emphasis is on the unique chemical diversity of these metabolic products, together with relevant biological activities.

  16. Evaluation of surface waters associated with animal feeding operations for estrogenic chemicals and activity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Estrogens and estrogenic activity (EA) were evaluated in surface waters associated with animal feeding operations. Water was sampled at 19 sites in 12 states using discrete (n=41) and POCIS (n=19) sampling methods. Estrogenic chemicals measured in unfiltered water by GC/MS2 included: estrone (E1),17...

  17. Combining phosphate and bacteria removal on chemically active filter membranes allows prolonged storage of drinking water.

    PubMed

    Rotzetter, A C C; Kellenberger, C R; Schumacher, C M; Mora, C; Grass, R N; Loepfe, M; Luechinger, N A; Stark, W J

    2013-11-13

    A chemically active filtration membrane with incorporated lanthanum oxide nanoparticles enables the removal of bacteria and phosphate at the same time and thus provides a simple device for preparation of drinking water and subsequent safe storage without using any kind of disinfectants.

  18. Lantana montevidensis Essential Oil: Chemical Composition and Mosquito Repellent Activity against Aedes aegypti

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The essential oil (EO) of Lantana montevidensis (Spreng.) Briq. (L. sellowiana Link & Otto) was investigated for its chemical composition and mosquito repellent activity. The essential oil obtained by hydrodistillation of aerial plant parts was analyzed by GC-FID and GC-MS. The major constituents we...

  19. Fluorinated Alcohols as Activators for the Solvent-Free Chemical Fixation of Carbon Dioxide into Epoxides.

    PubMed

    Gennen, Sandro; Alves, Margot; Méreau, Raphaël; Tassaing, Thierry; Gilbert, Bernard; Detrembleur, Christophe; Jerome, Christine; Grignard, Bruno

    2015-06-01

    The addition of fluorinated alcohols to onium salts provides highly efficient organocatalysts for the chemical fixation of CO2 into epoxides under mild experimental conditions. The combination of online kinetic studies, NMR titrations and DFT calculations allows understanding this synergistic effect that provides an active organocatalyst for CO2 /epoxides coupling.

  20. Functional, photochemically active, and chemically asymmetric membranes by interfacial polymerization of derivatized multifunctional prepolymers

    DOEpatents

    Lonsdale, Harold K.; Wamser, Carl C.

    1990-01-01

    The preparation of a novel class of thin film membranes by interfacial polymerization is disclosed, said membranes incorporating as part of their polymeric structure the functionality of monomeric or oligomeric precursors. Specific embodiments include porphyrin and phthalocyanine derivatives that are photochemically or electrochemically active, as well as chemically asymmetric membranes.

  1. Functional, photochemically active, and chemically asymmetric membranes by interfacial polymerization of derivatized multifunctional prepolymers

    DOEpatents

    Lonsdale, Harold K.; Wamser, Carl C.

    1988-01-01

    The preparation of a novel class of thin film membranes by interfacial polymerization is disclosed, said membanes incorporating as part of their polymeric structure the functionality of monomeric or oligomeric precursors. Specific embodiments include porphyrin and phthalocyanime derivatives that are photochemically or electrochemically active, as well as chemically asymmetric membranes.

  2. Fenton-Driven Chemical Regeneration of MTBE-Spent Granular Activated Carbon -- A Pilot Study

    EPA Science Inventory

    MTBE-spent granular activated carbon (GAC) underwent 3 adsorption/oxidation cycles. Pilot-scale columns were intermittently placed on-line at a ground water pump and treat facility, saturated with MTBE, and regenerated with H2O2 under different chemical, physical, and operational...

  3. Phoenix dactylifera L. spathe essential oil: Chemical composition and repellent activity against the yellow fever mosquito

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Date palm, Phoenix dactylifera L. (Arecaceae), grows commonly in the Arabian Peninsula and is traditionally used to treat various diseases. The aim of the present study was to identify chemical composition of the essential oil and to investigate the repellent activity. The essential oil of P. dacty...

  4. Functional, photochemically active, and chemically asymmetric membranes by interfacial polymerization of derivatized multifunctional prepolymers

    DOEpatents

    Lonsdale, H.K.; Wamser, C.C.

    1990-04-17

    The preparation of a novel class of thin film membranes by interfacial polymerization is disclosed, said membranes incorporating as part of their polymeric structure the functionality of monomeric or oligomeric precursors. Specific embodiments include porphyrin and phthalocyanine derivatives that are photochemically or electrochemically active, as well as chemically asymmetric membranes.

  5. Application of Protein Expression Profiling to Screen Chemicals for Androgenic Activity.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Protein expression changes can be used for detection of biomarkers that can be applied diagnostically to screen chemicals for endocrine modifying activity. In this study, Surface Enhanced Laser Desorption/Ionization Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (SELDI-TOF-MS) coupled with a s...

  6. Estimating Toxicity Pathway Activating Doses for High Throughput Chemical Risk Assessments

    EPA Science Inventory

    Estimating a Toxicity Pathway Activating Dose (TPAD) from in vitro assays as an analog to a reference dose (RfD) derived from in vivo toxicity tests would facilitate high throughput risk assessments of thousands of data-poor environmental chemicals. Estimating a TPAD requires def...

  7. Endocrine active chemicals and endocrine disruption in Minnesota streams and lakes: implications for aquatic resources, 1994-2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, Kathy E.; Schoenfuss, Heiko L.; Barber, Larry B.; Writer, Jeff H.; Blazer, Vicki; Keisling, Richard L.; Ferrey, Mark L.

    2010-01-01

    Although these studies indicate that wastewater-treatment plant effluent is a conduit for endocrine active chemicals to surface waters, endocrine active chemicals also were present in surface waters with no obvious wastewater-treatment plant effluent sources. Endocrine active chemicals were detected and indicators of endocrine disruption in fish were measured at numerous sites upstream from discharge of wastewater-treatment plant effluent. These observations indicate that other unidentified sources of endocrine active chemicals exist, such as runoff from land surfaces, atmospheric deposition, inputs from onsite septic systems, or other groundwater sources. Alternatively, some endocrine active chemicals may not yet have been identified or measured. The presence of biological indicators of endocrine disruption in male fish indicates that the fish are exposed to endocrine active chemicals. However indicators of endocrine disruption in male fish does not indicate an effect on fish reproduction or changes in fish populations.

  8. Structure and properties of molecular and ionic clusters in vapour over caesium fluoride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mwanga, Stanley F.; Pogrebnaya, Tatiana P.; Pogrebnoi, Alexander M.

    2015-06-01

    The properties of neutral molecules Cs2F2, Cs3F3, and Cs4F4, and positive and negative cluster ions Cs2F+, CsF2-, Cs3F2+, Cs2F3-, Cs4F3+, and Cs5F4+ were studied by several of quantum chemical methods implementing density function theory and Möller-Plesset perturbation theory of second and fourth orders. For all species, the equilibrium geometrical structure and vibrational spectra were determined. Different isomers have been revealed for the trimer neutral molecule Cs3F3; pentaatomic, both positive and negative, Cs3F2+, Cs2F3-; and heptaatomic Cs4F3+ ions. The most abundant isomers in the saturated vapour were determined. Enthalpies of dissociation reactions and enthalpies of formation of the species were obtained.

  9. Recovery of microbial diversity and activity during bioremediation following chemical oxidation of diesel contaminated soils.

    PubMed

    Sutton, Nora B; Langenhoff, Alette A M; Lasso, Daniel Hidalgo; van der Zaan, Bas; van Gaans, Pauline; Maphosa, Farai; Smidt, Hauke; Grotenhuis, Tim; Rijnaarts, Huub H M

    2014-03-01

    To improve the coupling of in situ chemical oxidation and in situ bioremediation, a systematic analysis was performed of the effect of chemical oxidation with Fenton's reagent, modified Fenton's reagent, permanganate, or persulfate, on microbial diversity and activity during 8 weeks of incubation in two diesel-contaminated soils (peat and fill). Chemical oxidant and soil type affected the microbial community diversity and biodegradation activity; however, this was only observed following treatment with Fenton's reagent and modified Fenton's reagent, and in the biotic control without oxidation. Differences in the highest overall removal efficiencies of 69 % for peat (biotic control) and 59 % for fill (Fenton's reagent) were partially explained by changes in contaminant soil properties upon oxidation. Molecular analysis of 16S rRNA and alkane monooxygenase (alkB) gene abundances indicated that oxidation with Fenton's reagent and modified Fenton's reagent negatively affected microbial abundance. However, regeneration occurred, and final relative alkB abundances were 1-2 orders of magnitude higher in chemically treated microcosms than in the biotic control. 16S rRNA gene fragment fingerprinting with DGGE and prominent band sequencing illuminated microbial community composition and diversity differences between treatments and identified a variety of phylotypes within Alpha-, Beta-, and Gammaproteobacteria. Understanding microbial community dynamics during coupled chemical oxidation and bioremediation is integral to improved biphasic field application.

  10. Active chlorine and nitric oxide formation from chemical rocket plume afterburning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leone, D. M.; Turns, S. R.

    Chlorine and oxides of nitrogen (NO(x)) released into the atmosphere contribute to acid rain (ground level or low-altitude sources) and ozone depletion from the stratosphere (high-altitude sources). Rocket engines have the potential for forming or activating these pollutants in the rocket plume. For instance, H2/O2 rockets can produce thermal NO(x) in their plumes. Emphasis, in the past, has been placed on determining the impact of chlorine release on the stratosphere. To date, very little, if any, information is available to understand what contribution NO(x) emissions from ground-based engine testing and actual rocket launches have on the atmosphere. The goal of this work is to estimate the afterburning emissions from chemical rocket plumes and determine their local stratospheric impact. Our study focuses on the space shuttle rocket motors, which include both the solid rocket boosters (SRB's) and the liquid propellant main engines (SSME's). Rocket plume afterburning is modeled employing a one-dimensional model incorporating two chemical kinetic systems: chemical and thermal equilibria with overlayed nitric oxide chemical kinetics (semi equilibrium) and full finite-rate chemical kinetics. Additionally, the local atmospheric impact immediately following a launch is modeled as the emissions diffuse and chemically react in the stratosphere.

  11. Active chlorine and nitric oxide formation from chemical rocket plume afterburning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leone, D. M.; Turns, S. R.

    1994-01-01

    Chlorine and oxides of nitrogen (NO(x)) released into the atmosphere contribute to acid rain (ground level or low-altitude sources) and ozone depletion from the stratosphere (high-altitude sources). Rocket engines have the potential for forming or activating these pollutants in the rocket plume. For instance, H2/O2 rockets can produce thermal NO(x) in their plumes. Emphasis, in the past, has been placed on determining the impact of chlorine release on the stratosphere. To date, very little, if any, information is available to understand what contribution NO(x) emissions from ground-based engine testing and actual rocket launches have on the atmosphere. The goal of this work is to estimate the afterburning emissions from chemical rocket plumes and determine their local stratospheric impact. Our study focuses on the space shuttle rocket motors, which include both the solid rocket boosters (SRB's) and the liquid propellant main engines (SSME's). Rocket plume afterburning is modeled employing a one-dimensional model incorporating two chemical kinetic systems: chemical and thermal equilibria with overlayed nitric oxide chemical kinetics (semi equilibrium) and full finite-rate chemical kinetics. Additionally, the local atmospheric impact immediately following a launch is modeled as the emissions diffuse and chemically react in the stratosphere.

  12. GABA-A receptor antagonists increase firing, bursting and synchrony of spontaneous activity in neuronal networks grown on microelectrode arrays: a step towards chemical "fingerprinting"

    EPA Science Inventory

    Assessment of effects on spontaneous network activity in neurons grown on MEAs is a proposed method to screen chemicals for potential neurotoxicity. In addition, differential effects on network activity (chemical "fingerprints") could be used to classify chemical modes of action....

  13. Poplar-type Propolis: Chemical Composition, Botanical Origin and Biological Activity.

    PubMed

    Ristivojević, Petar; Trifković, Jelena; Andrić, Filip; Milojković-Opsenica, Dusanka

    2015-11-01

    Propolis is one of the most used natural products known for centuries for its beneficial effects. Due to significant differences in chemical composition of samples originating from different geographic and climatic zones it is crucial to characterize reliably each type of propolis. This article comprises the latest findings concerning the poplar type propolis, i.e. it gives a cross section of chemical composition, botanical origin and biological activity of poplar type propolis in order to encourage further investigations that would indicate its beneficial effects.

  14. The antimicrobial activity of embalming chemicals and topical disinfectants on the microbial flora of human remains.

    PubMed

    Burke, P A; Sheffner, A L

    1976-10-01

    The antimicrobial activity of embalming chemicals an topical disinfectants was evaluated to determine the degree of disinfection achieved during the embalming of human remains. The administration of arterial and cavity embalming chemicals resulted in a 99% reduction of the postmortem microbial population after 2 hours of contact. This level of disinfection was maintained for the 24 hours test period. Topical disinfection of the body orifices was also observed. Therefore, it is probable that present embalming practices reduce the hazard from transmission of potentially infectious microbial agents within the immediate environment of embalmed human remains.

  15. Removal of endocrine-disrupting chemicals in activated sludge treatment works.

    PubMed

    Johnson, A C; Sumpter, J P

    2001-12-15

    The release of endocrine-disrupting chemicals into the aquatic environment has raised the awareness of the central role played by sewage treatment in lowland water quality. This review focuses on the activated sludge process, which is commonly used to treat sewage in large towns and cities and which successfully removes the bulk of the organic compounds that enter the works. However, not all compounds are completely broken down or converted to biomass. For example, the estrogenic alkylphenols and steroid estrogens found in effluent are the breakdown products of incomplete breakdown of their respective parent compounds. Batch microcosm studies have indicated that estrone, ethinylestradiol, and alkylphenols will not be completely eliminated in activated sludge over typical treatment times. Field data suggest that the activated sludge treatment process can consistently remove over 85% of estradiol, estriol, and ethinylestradiol. The removal performance for estrone appears to be less and is more variable. Because of its relatively high hydrophobicity, the accumulation of alkylphenol in sludge has been observed. Although it has not been examined, accumulation of ethinylestradiol in sludge is a possibility due to its recalcitrance and hydrophobicity. A comparison between the concentrations of some of the major endocrine-active chemicals in effluents and their biological potencies has been made, to direct attention to the chemicals of most concern. While water purification techniques such as UV or activated charcoal could significantly remove these microorganic contaminants, the high costs involved suggest that research into the potential for treatment optimization should receive more attention. PMID:11775141

  16. The chemical chaperones tauroursodeoxycholic and 4-phenylbutyric acid accelerate thyroid hormone activation and energy expenditure

    PubMed Central

    da-Silva, Wagner S.; Ribich, Scott; e Drigo, Rafael Arrojo; Castillo, Melany; Patty, Mary-Elizabeth; Bianco, Antonio C.

    2011-01-01

    Exposure of cell lines endogenously expressing the thyroid hormone activating enzyme type 2 deiodinase (D2) to the chemical chaperones tauroursodeoxycholic acid (TUDCA) or 4-phenylbutiric acid (4-PBA) increases D2 expression, activity and T3 production. In brown adipocytes, TUDCA or 4-PBA induced T3-dependent genes and oxygen consumption (~2-fold), an effect partially lost in D2 knockout cells. In wild type, but not in D2 knockout mice, administration of TUDCA lowered the respiratory quotient, doubled brown adipose tissue D2 activity and normalized the glucose intolerance associated with high fat feeding. Thus, D2 plays a critical role in the metabolic effects of chemical chaperones. PMID:21237159

  17. Chemical composition and antibacterial activity of Opuntia ficus-indica f. inermis (cactus pear) flowers.

    PubMed

    Ennouri, Monia; Ammar, Imene; Khemakhem, Bassem; Attia, Hamadi

    2014-08-01

    Opuntia ficus-indica f. inermis (cactus pear) flowers have wide application in folk medicine. However, there are few reports focusing on their biological activity and were no reports on their chemical composition. The nutrient composition and hexane extracts of Opuntia flowers at 4 flowering stages and their antibacterial and antifungal activities were investigated. The chemical composition showed considerable amounts of fiber, protein, and minerals. Potassium (K) was the predominant mineral followed by calcium (Ca), magnesium (Mg), sodium (Na), iron (Fe), and zinc (Zn). The main compounds in the various hexane extracts were 9.12-octadecadienoic acid (29-44%) and hexadecanoic acid (8.6-32%). The antibacterial activity tests showed that O. inermis hexane extracts have high effectiveness against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus, making this botanical source a potential contender as a food preservative or food control additive.

  18. Spatiotemporal regulation of chemical reaction kinetics of cell surface molecules by active remodeling of cortical actin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharyya, Bhaswati; Chaudhuri, Abhishek; Gowrishankar, Kripa; Mayor, Satyajit; Rao, Madan

    2010-03-01

    Cell surface proteins such as lipid tethered GPI-anchored proteins and Ras-proteins are distributed as monomers and nanoclusters on the surface of living cells. Recent work from our laboratory suggests that the spatial distribution and dynamics of formation and breakup of these nanoclusters is controlled by the active remodeling dynamics of the underlying cortical actin. To explain these observations, we propose a novel mechanism of nanoclustering, involving the transient binding to and advection along constitutively occuring ``asters'' of cortical actin. Here we study the consequences of such active actin based clustering, in the context of chemical reactions involving conformational changes of cell surface proteins. We find that active remodeling of cortical actin, can give rise to a dramatic increase in the reaction efficiency and output levels. In general, such actin driven clustering of membrane proteins could be a cellular mechanism to spatiotemporally regulate and amplify local chemical reaction rates, in the context of signalling and endocytosis.

  19. Activated chemical defense in marine sponges--a case study on Aplysinella rhax.

    PubMed

    Thoms, Carsten; Schupp, Peter J

    2008-09-01

    Activated chemical defense, i.e., the rapid conversion of precursor molecules to defensive compounds following tissue damage, has been well documented for terrestrial and marine plants; but evidence for its presence in sessile marine invertebrates remains scarce. We observed a wound-activated conversion of psammaplin A sulfate to psammaplin A in tissue of the tropical sponge Aplysinella rhax. The conversion is rapid (requiring only seconds), the turnover rate increases with increasing wounding activity (e.g., approximately 20% after tissue stabbing vs. approximately 85% after tissue grinding), and is likely enzyme-catalyzed (no reaction in the absence of water and inhibition of the conversion by heat). Fish feeding assays with the pufferfish Canthigaster solandri, an omnivorous sponge predator, revealed an increased anti-feeding activity by the conversion product psammaplin A compared to the precursor psammaplin A sulfate. We propose that the wound-activated formation of psammaplin A in A. rhax is an activated defense targeted against predator species that are not efficiently repelled by the sponge's constitutive chemical defense. Recent observations of conversion reactions also in other sponge species indicate that more activated defenses may exist in this phylum. Based on the findings of this study, we address the question whether activated defenses may be more common in sponges--and perhaps also in other sessile marine invertebrates--than hitherto believed.

  20. Influence of Copper Nanoparticles on the Physical-Chemical Properties of Activated Sludge

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hong; Zheng, Xiong; Chen, Yinguang; Li, Mu; Liu, Kun; Li, Xiang

    2014-01-01

    The physical-chemical properties of activated sludge, such as flocculating ability, hydrophobicity, surface charge, settleability, dewaterability and bacteria extracellular polymer substances (EPS), play vital roles in the normal operation of wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). The nanoparticles released from commercial products will enter WWTPs and can induce potential adverse effects on activated sludge. This paper focused on the effects of copper nanoparticles (CuNPs) on these specific physical-chemical properties of activated sludge. It was found that most of these properties were unaffected by the exposure to lower CuNPs concentration (5 ppm), but different observation were made at higher CuNPs concentrations (30 and 50 ppm). At the higher CuNPs concentrations, the sludge surface charge increased and the hydrophobicity decreased, which were attributed to more Cu2+ ions released from the CuNPs. The carbohydrate content of EPS was enhanced to defense the toxicity of CuNPs. The flocculating ability was found to be deteriorated due to the increased cell surface charge, the decreased hydrophobicity, and the damaged cell membrane. The worsened flocculating ability made the sludge flocs more dispersed, which further increased the toxicity of the CuNPs by increasing the availability of the CuNPs to the bacteria present in the sludge. Further investigation indicated that the phosphorus removal efficiency decreased at higher CuNPs concentrations, which was consistent with the deteriorated physical-chemical properties of activated sludge. It seems that the physical-chemical properties can be used as an indicator for determining CuNPs toxicity to the bacteria in activated sludge. This work is important because bacteria toxicity effects to the activated sludge caused by nanoparticles may lead to the deteriorated treatment efficiency of wastewater treatment, and it is therefore necessary to find an easy way to indicate this toxicity. PMID:24663333

  1. Influence of copper nanoparticles on the physical-chemical properties of activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hong; Zheng, Xiong; Chen, Yinguang; Li, Mu; Liu, Kun; Li, Xiang

    2014-01-01

    The physical-chemical properties of activated sludge, such as flocculating ability, hydrophobicity, surface charge, settleability, dewaterability and bacteria extracellular polymer substances (EPS), play vital roles in the normal operation of wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). The nanoparticles released from commercial products will enter WWTPs and can induce potential adverse effects on activated sludge. This paper focused on the effects of copper nanoparticles (CuNPs) on these specific physical-chemical properties of activated sludge. It was found that most of these properties were unaffected by the exposure to lower CuNPs concentration (5 ppm), but different observation were made at higher CuNPs concentrations (30 and 50 ppm). At the higher CuNPs concentrations, the sludge surface charge increased and the hydrophobicity decreased, which were attributed to more Cu2+ ions released from the CuNPs. The carbohydrate content of EPS was enhanced to defense the toxicity of CuNPs. The flocculating ability was found to be deteriorated due to the increased cell surface charge, the decreased hydrophobicity, and the damaged cell membrane. The worsened flocculating ability made the sludge flocs more dispersed, which further increased the toxicity of the CuNPs by increasing the availability of the CuNPs to the bacteria present in the sludge. Further investigation indicated that the phosphorus removal efficiency decreased at higher CuNPs concentrations, which was consistent with the deteriorated physical-chemical properties of activated sludge. It seems that the physical-chemical properties can be used as an indicator for determining CuNPs toxicity to the bacteria in activated sludge. This work is important because bacteria toxicity effects to the activated sludge caused by nanoparticles may lead to the deteriorated treatment efficiency of wastewater treatment, and it is therefore necessary to find an easy way to indicate this toxicity.

  2. Chemical Modulation of the Biological Activity of Reutericyclin: a Membrane-Active Antibiotic from Lactobacillus reuteri

    PubMed Central

    Cherian, Philip T.; Wu, Xiaoqian; Maddox, Marcus M.; Singh, Aman P.; Lee, Richard E.; Hurdle, Julian G.

    2014-01-01

    Whilst the development of membrane-active antibiotics is now an attractive therapeutic concept, progress in this area is disadvantaged by poor knowledge of the structure-activity relationship (SAR) required for optimizing molecules to selectively target bacteria. This prompted us to explore the SAR of the Lactobacillus reuteri membrane-active antibiotic reutericyclin, modifying three key positions about its tetramic acid core. The SAR revealed that lipophilic analogs were generally more active against Gram-positive pathogens, but introduction of polar and charged substituents diminished their activity. This was confirmed by cytometric assays showing that inactive compounds failed to dissipate the membrane potential. Radiolabeled substrate assays indicated that dissipation of the membrane potential by active reutericyclins correlated with inhibition of macromolecular synthesis in cells. However, compounds with good antibacterial activities also showed cytotoxicity against Vero cells and hemolytic activity. Although this study highlights the challenge of optimizing membrane-active antibiotics, it shows that by increasing antibacterial potency the selectivity index could be widened, allowing use of lower non-cytotoxic doses. PMID:24739957

  3. Estrogenic activity assessment of environmental chemicals using in vitro assays: identification of two new estrogenic compounds.

    PubMed Central

    Lascombe, I; Beffa, D; Rüegg, U; Tarradellas, J; Wahli, W

    2000-01-01

    Environmental chemicals with estrogenic activities have been suggested to be associated with deleterious effects in animals and humans. To characterize estrogenic chemicals and their mechanisms of action, we established in vitro and cell culture assays that detect human estrogen receptor [alpha] (hER[alpha])-mediated estrogenicity. First, we assayed chemicals to determine their ability to modulate direct interaction between the hER[alpha] and the steroid receptor coactivator-1 (SRC-1) and in a competition binding assay to displace 17ss-estradiol (E(2)). Second, we tested the chemicals for estrogen-associated transcriptional activity in the yeast estrogen screen and in the estrogen-responsive MCF-7 human breast cancer cell line. The chemicals investigated in this study were o,p'-DDT (racemic mixture and enantiomers), nonylphenol mixture (NPm), and two poorly analyzed compounds in the environment, namely, tris-4-(chlorophenyl)methane (Tris-H) and tris-4-(chlorophenyl)methanol (Tris-OH). In both yeast and MCF-7 cells, we determined estrogenic activity via the estrogen receptor (ER) for o,p'-DDT, NPm, and for the very first time, Tris-H and Tris-OH. However, unlike estrogens, none of these xenobiotics seemed to be able to induce ER/SRC-1 interactions, most likely because the conformation of the activated receptor would not allow direct contacts with this coactivator. However, these compounds were able to inhibit [(3)H]-E(2) binding to hER, which reveals a direct interaction with the receptor. In conclusion, the test compounds are estrogen mimics, but their molecular mechanism of action appears to be different from that of the natural hormone as revealed by the receptor/coactivator interaction analysis. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 PMID:10903615

  4. Localized sources of water vapour on the dwarf planet (1) Ceres.

    PubMed

    Küppers, Michael; O'Rourke, Laurence; Bockelée-Morvan, Dominique; Zakharov, Vladimir; Lee, Seungwon; von Allmen, Paul; Carry, Benoît; Teyssier, David; Marston, Anthony; Müller, Thomas; Crovisier, Jacques; Barucci, M Antonietta; Moreno, Raphael

    2014-01-23

    The 'snowline' conventionally divides Solar System objects into dry bodies, ranging out to the main asteroid belt, and icy bodies beyond the belt. Models suggest that some of the icy bodies may have migrated into the asteroid belt. Recent observations indicate the presence of water ice on the surface of some asteroids, with sublimation a potential reason for the dust activity observed on others. Hydrated minerals have been found on the surface of the largest object in the asteroid belt, the dwarf planet (1) Ceres, which is thought to be differentiated into a silicate core with an icy mantle. The presence of water vapour around Ceres was suggested by a marginal detection of the photodissociation product of water, hydroxyl (ref. 12), but could not be confirmed by later, more sensitive observations. Here we report the detection of water vapour around Ceres, with at least 10(26) molecules being produced per second, originating from localized sources that seem to be linked to mid-latitude regions on the surface. The water evaporation could be due to comet-like sublimation or to cryo-volcanism, in which volcanoes erupt volatiles such as water instead of molten rocks. PMID:24451541

  5. Localized sources of water vapour on the dwarf planet (1) Ceres.

    PubMed

    Küppers, Michael; O'Rourke, Laurence; Bockelée-Morvan, Dominique; Zakharov, Vladimir; Lee, Seungwon; von Allmen, Paul; Carry, Benoît; Teyssier, David; Marston, Anthony; Müller, Thomas; Crovisier, Jacques; Barucci, M Antonietta; Moreno, Raphael

    2014-01-23

    The 'snowline' conventionally divides Solar System objects into dry bodies, ranging out to the main asteroid belt, and icy bodies beyond the belt. Models suggest that some of the icy bodies may have migrated into the asteroid belt. Recent observations indicate the presence of water ice on the surface of some asteroids, with sublimation a potential reason for the dust activity observed on others. Hydrated minerals have been found on the surface of the largest object in the asteroid belt, the dwarf planet (1) Ceres, which is thought to be differentiated into a silicate core with an icy mantle. The presence of water vapour around Ceres was suggested by a marginal detection of the photodissociation product of water, hydroxyl (ref. 12), but could not be confirmed by later, more sensitive observations. Here we report the detection of water vapour around Ceres, with at least 10(26) molecules being produced per second, originating from localized sources that seem to be linked to mid-latitude regions on the surface. The water evaporation could be due to comet-like sublimation or to cryo-volcanism, in which volcanoes erupt volatiles such as water instead of molten rocks.

  6. Nonperfect mixing affects synchronization on a large number of chemical oscillators immersed in a chemically active time-dependent chaotic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Muñuzuri, V.; Garaboa-Paz, D.; Muñuzuri, A. P.

    2016-07-01

    The problem of synchronization of finite-size chemical oscillators described by active inertial particles is addressed for situations in which they are immersed in a reacting nonstationary chaotic flow. Active substances in the fluid will be modeled by Lagrangian particles closely following the fluid streamlines. Their interaction with the active inertial particles as well as the properties of the fluid dynamics will result in modifying the synchronization state of the chemical oscillators. This behavior is studied in terms of the exchange rate between the Lagrangian and inertial particles, and the finite-time Lyapunov exponents characterizing the flow. The coherence of the population of oscillators is determined by means of the order parameter introduced by Kuramoto. The different dynamics observed for the inertial particles (chemical oscillators) and Lagrangian particles (describing chemicals in the flow) lead to nonlinear interactions and patches of synchronized regions within the domain.

  7. Nonperfect mixing affects synchronization on a large number of chemical oscillators immersed in a chemically active time-dependent chaotic flow.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Muñuzuri, V; Garaboa-Paz, D; Muñuzuri, A P

    2016-07-01

    The problem of synchronization of finite-size chemical oscillators described by active inertial particles is addressed for situations in which they are immersed in a reacting nonstationary chaotic flow. Active substances in the fluid will be modeled by Lagrangian particles closely following the fluid streamlines. Their interaction with the active inertial particles as well as the properties of the fluid dynamics will result in modifying the synchronization state of the chemical oscillators. This behavior is studied in terms of the exchange rate between the Lagrangian and inertial particles, and the finite-time Lyapunov exponents characterizing the flow. The coherence of the population of oscillators is determined by means of the order parameter introduced by Kuramoto. The different dynamics observed for the inertial particles (chemical oscillators) and Lagrangian particles (describing chemicals in the flow) lead to nonlinear interactions and patches of synchronized regions within the domain. PMID:27575213

  8. Influence of water and water vapour on the characteristics of KI treated HgI 2 detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponpon, J. P.; Amann, M.; Sieskind, M.

    After being cleaned using a potassium iodide solution in water followed by a water rinse, the surface of mercuric iodide is covered by a chemical complex identified as being KHgI 3·H 2O. This compound can adsorb large quantities of water and its electrical properties are strongly sensitive to water and water vapour. The consequences on the manufacturing and storing conditions (especially the relative humidity), of mercuric iodide-based devices are therefore of great concern. They are illustrated by the study of the electrical and spectrometric properties of HgI 2 nuclear radiation detectors.

  9. Photoreduction of SERS-active metallic nanostructures on chemically patterned ferroelectric crystals.

    PubMed

    Carville, N Craig; Manzo, Michele; Damm, Signe; Castiella, Marion; Collins, Liam; Denning, Denise; Weber, Stefan A L; Gallo, Katia; Rice, James H; Rodriguez, Brian J

    2012-08-28

    Photodeposition of metallic nanostructures onto ferroelectric surfaces is typically based on patterning local surface reactivity via electric field poling. Here, we demonstrate metal deposition onto substrates which have been chemically patterned via proton exchange (i.e., without polarization reversal). The chemical patterning provides the ability to tailor the electrostatic fields near the surface of lithium niobate crystals, and these engineered fields are used to fabricate metallic nanostructures. The effect of the proton exchange process on the piezoelectric and electrostatic properties of the surface is characterized using voltage-modulated atomic force microscopy techniques, which, combined with modeling of the electric fields at the surface of the crystal, reveal that the deposition occurs preferentially along the boundary between ferroelectric and proton-exchanged regions. The metallic nanostructures have been further functionalized with a target probe molecule, 4-aminothiophenol, from which surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) signal is detected, demonstrating the suitability of chemically patterned ferroelectrics as SERS-active templates.

  10. Effect of mechanical activation on structure changes and reactivity in further chemical modification of lignin.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiaohong; Zhang, Yanjuan; Hu, Huayu; Huang, Zuqiang; Yang, Mei; Chen, Dong; Huang, Kai; Huang, Aimin; Qin, Xingzhen; Feng, Zhenfei

    2016-10-01

    Lignin was treated by mechanical activation (MA) in a customized stirring ball mill, and the structure and reactivity in further esterification were studied. The chemical structure and morphology of MA-treated lignin and the esterified products were analyzed by chemical analysis combined with UV/vis spectrometer, FTIR,NMR, SEM and particle size analyzer. The results showed that MA contributed to the increase of aliphatic hydroxyl, phenolic hydroxyl, carbonyl and carboxyl groups but the decrease of methoxyl groups. Moreover, MA led to the decrease of particle size and the increase of specific surface area and roughness of surface in lignin. The reactivity of lignin was enhanced significantly for the increase of hydroxyl content and the improvement of mass transfer in chemical reaction caused by the changes of molecular structure and morphological structure. The process of MA is green and simple, and is an effective method for enhancing the reactivity of lignin. PMID:27344951

  11. Physical and chemical activation of reduced graphene oxide for enhanced adsorption and catalytic oxidation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shizhen; Peng, Wenchao; Sun, Hongqi; Wang, Shaobin

    2014-01-21

    Physical and chemical activation of reduced graphene oxide (RGO) using different reagents, CO2, ZnCl2 and CO2/ZnCl2, to obtain highly porous and metal-free carbonaceous materials was carried out and their adsorption and catalytic behavior were investigated. Physical activation using CO2 was proved to be much more effective than chemical ZnCl2 activation, and increased the specific surface area (SSA) of RGO from ~200 to higher than 600 m(2) g(-1). Methylene blue (MB) was then used to evaluate the adsorption and catalytic activity of the activated RGO (A-RGO) materials with peroxymonosulfate (PMS) as an oxidant. It was found that the SSA and oxygen containing groups are two important factors determining the adsorptive and catalytic performance of the A-RGO materials. RGO by physicochemical CO2/ZnCl2 activation presented the best adsorption and RGO by physical CO2 activation exhibited the highest catalytic degradation of MB.

  12. Chemical analysis of Greek pollen - Antioxidant, antimicrobial and proteasome activation properties

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Pollen is a bee-product known for its medical properties from ancient times. In our days is increasingly used as health food supplement and especially as a tonic primarily with appeal to the elderly to ameliorate the effects of ageing. In order to evaluate the chemical composition and the biological activity of Greek pollen which has never been studied before, one sample with identified botanical origin from sixteen different common plant taxa of Greece has been evaluated. Results Three different extracts of the studied sample of Greek pollen, have been tested, in whether could induce proteasome activities in human fibroblasts. The water extract was found to induce a highly proteasome activity, showing interesting antioxidant properties. Due to this activity the aqueous extract was further subjected to chemical analysis and seven flavonoids have been isolated and identified by modern spectral means. From the methanolic extract, sugars, lipid acids, phenolic acids and their esters have been also identified, which mainly participate to the biosynthetic pathway of pollen phenolics. The total phenolics were estimated with the Folin-Ciocalteau reagent and the total antioxidant activity was determined by the DPPH method while the extracts and the isolated compounds were also tested for their antimicrobial activity by the dilution technique. Conclusions The Greek pollen is rich in flavonoids and phenolic acids which indicate the observed free radical scavenging activity, the effects of pollen on human fibroblasts and the interesting antimicrobial profile. PMID:21699688

  13. Activity Enhancement Based on the Chemical Equilibrium of Multiple-Subunit Nitrile Hydratase from Bordetella petrii.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yi; Liu, Ping; Lin, Lu; Zhao, Yueqin; Zhong, Wenjuan; Wu, Lunjie; Zhou, Zhemin; Sun, Weifeng

    2016-09-01

    The maturation mechanism of nitrile hydratase (NHase) of Pseudomonas putida NRRL-18668 was discovered and named as "self-subunit swapping." Since the NHase of Bordetella petrii DSM 12804 is similar to that of P. putida, the NHase maturation of B. petrii is proposed to be the same as that of P. putida. However, there is no further information on the application of NHase according to these findings. We successfully rapidly purified NHase and its activator through affinity his tag, and found that the cell extracts of NHase possessed multiple types of protein ingredients including α, β, α2β2, and α(P14K)2 who were in a state of chemical equilibrium. Furthermore, the activity was significantly enhanced through adding extra α(P14K)2 to the cell extracts of NHase according to the chemical equilibrium. Our findings are useful for the activity enhancement of multiple-subunit enzyme and for the first time significantly increased the NHase activity according to the chemical equilibrium.

  14. Chemical composition and lipoxygenase activity in soybeans (Glycine max L. Merr.) submitted to gamma irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barros, Érica Amanda de; Broetto, Fernando; Bressan, Dayanne F.; Sartori, Maria M. P.; Costa, Vladimir E.

    2014-05-01

    Soybeans are an important food due to their functional and nutritional characteristics. However, consumption by western populations is limited by the astringent taste of soybeans and their derivatives which results from the action of lipoxygenase, an enzyme activated during product processing. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of gamma irradiation on the chemical composition and specific activity of lipoxygenase in different soybean cultivars. Soybeans were stored in plastic bags and irradiated with doses of 2.5, 5 and 10 kGy. The chemical composition (moisture, protein, lipids, ashes, crude fiber, and carbohydrates) and lipoxygenase specific activity were determined for each sample. Gamma irradiation induced a small increase of protein and lipid content in some soybean cultivars, which did not exceed the highest content of 5% and 26%, respectively, when compared to control. Lipoxygenase specific activity decreased in the three cultivars with increasing gamma irradiation dose. In conclusion, the gamma irradiation doses used are suitable to inactivate part of lipoxygenase while not causing expressive changes in the chemical composition of the cultivars studied.

  15. Chemical Structure-Biological Activity Models for Pharmacophores’ 3D-Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Putz, Mihai V.; Duda-Seiman, Corina; Duda-Seiman, Daniel; Putz, Ana-Maria; Alexandrescu, Iulia; Mernea, Maria; Avram, Speranta

    2016-01-01

    Within medicinal chemistry nowadays, the so-called pharmaco-dynamics seeks for qualitative (for understanding) and quantitative (for predicting) mechanisms/models by which given chemical structure or series of congeners actively act on biological sites either by focused interaction/therapy or by diffuse/hazardous influence. To this aim, the present review exposes three of the fertile directions in approaching the biological activity by chemical structural causes: the special computing trace of the algebraic structure-activity relationship (SPECTRAL-SAR) offering the full analytical counterpart for multi-variate computational regression, the minimal topological difference (MTD) as the revived precursor for comparative molecular field analyses (CoMFA) and comparative molecular similarity indices analysis (CoMSIA); all of these methods and algorithms were presented, discussed and exemplified on relevant chemical medicinal systems as proton pump inhibitors belonging to the 4-indolyl,2-guanidinothiazole class of derivatives blocking the acid secretion from parietal cells in the stomach, the 1-[(2-hydroxyethoxy)-methyl]-6-(phenylthio)thymine congeners’ (HEPT ligands) antiviral activity against Human Immunodeficiency Virus of first type (HIV-1) and new pharmacophores in treating severe genetic disorders (like depression and psychosis), respectively, all involving 3D pharmacophore interactions. PMID:27399692

  16. Quantitative structure-activity relationship models of chemical transformations from matched pairs analyses.

    PubMed

    Beck, Jeremy M; Springer, Clayton

    2014-04-28

    The concepts of activity cliffs and matched molecular pairs (MMP) are recent paradigms for analysis of data sets to identify structural changes that may be used to modify the potency of lead molecules in drug discovery projects. Analysis of MMPs was recently demonstrated as a feasible technique for quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) modeling of prospective compounds. Although within a small data set, the lack of matched pairs, and the lack of knowledge about specific chemical transformations limit prospective applications. Here we present an alternative technique that determines pairwise descriptors for each matched pair and then uses a QSAR model to estimate the activity change associated with a chemical transformation. The descriptors effectively group similar transformations and incorporate information about the transformation and its local environment. Use of a transformation QSAR model allows one to estimate the activity change for novel transformations and therefore returns predictions for a larger fraction of test set compounds. Application of the proposed methodology to four public data sets results in increased model performance over a benchmark random forest and direct application of chemical transformations using QSAR-by-matched molecular pairs analysis (QSAR-by-MMPA).

  17. Chemical Structure-Biological Activity Models for Pharmacophores' 3D-Interactions.

    PubMed

    Putz, Mihai V; Duda-Seiman, Corina; Duda-Seiman, Daniel; Putz, Ana-Maria; Alexandrescu, Iulia; Mernea, Maria; Avram, Speranta

    2016-01-01

    Within medicinal chemistry nowadays, the so-called pharmaco-dynamics seeks for qualitative (for understanding) and quantitative (for predicting) mechanisms/models by which given chemical structure or series of congeners actively act on biological sites either by focused interaction/therapy or by diffuse/hazardous influence. To this aim, the present review exposes three of the fertile directions in approaching the biological activity by chemical structural causes: the special computing trace of the algebraic structure-activity relationship (SPECTRAL-SAR) offering the full analytical counterpart for multi-variate computational regression, the minimal topological difference (MTD) as the revived precursor for comparative molecular field analyses (CoMFA) and comparative molecular similarity indices analysis (CoMSIA); all of these methods and algorithms were presented, discussed and exemplified on relevant chemical medicinal systems as proton pump inhibitors belonging to the 4-indolyl,2-guanidinothiazole class of derivatives blocking the acid secretion from parietal cells in the stomach, the 1-[(2-hydroxyethoxy)-methyl]-6-(phenylthio)thymine congeners' (HEPT ligands) antiviral activity against Human Immunodeficiency Virus of first type (HIV-1) and new pharmacophores in treating severe genetic disorders (like depression and psychosis), respectively, all involving 3D pharmacophore interactions. PMID:27399692

  18. [Salt resistance and its mechanism of cucumber under effects of exogenous chemical activators].

    PubMed

    Song, Shiqing; Liu, Wei; Guo, Shirong; Shang, Qingmao; Zhang, Zhigang

    2006-10-01

    With root injection and foliar spray, this paper studied the effects of different concentrations salicylic acid, brassinolide, chitosan and spermidine on the growth, morphogenesis, and physiological and biochemical characters of cucumber ( Cucumis sativus L. ) seedlings under 200 mmol x L(-1) NaCl stress. The results showed that at proper concentrations, these four exogenous chemical activators could markedly decrease the salt stress index and mortality of cucumber seedlings, and the decrement induced by 0. 01 mg x L (-1) brassinolide was the largest, being 63. 0% and 75. 0% , respectively. The activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) , peroxidase (POD) and catalase (CAT) increased significantly, resulting in a marked decrease of malondialdehyde (MDA) content and electrolyte leakage. The dry weight water content and morphogenesis of cucumber seedlings improved, and the stem diameter, leaf number, and healthy index increased significantly. All of these suggested that exogenous chemical activators at proper concentrations could induce the salt resistance of cucumber, and mitigate the damage degree of salt stress. The salt resistance effect of test exogenous chemical activators decreased in the sequence of 0.005 -0.05 mg (L-1) brassinolide, 150 -250 mg x L (-1) spermidine, 100 -200 mg x L(-1) chitosan, and 50 -150 mg x L(-1) salicylic acid. PMID:17209385

  19. Metabolomic Assessment of Induced and Activated Chemical Defence in the Invasive Red Alga Gracilaria vermiculophylla

    PubMed Central

    Nylund, Göran M.; Weinberger, Florian; Rempt, Martin; Pohnert, Georg

    2011-01-01

    In comparison with terrestrial plants the mechanistic knowledge of chemical defences is poor for marine macroalgae. This restricts our understanding in the chemically mediated interactions that take place between algae and other organisms. Technical advances such as metabolomics, however, enable new approaches towards the characterisation of the chemically mediated interactions of organisms with their environment. We address defence responses in the red alga Gracilaria vermiculophylla using mass spectrometry based metabolomics in combination with bioassays. Being invasive in the north Atlantic this alga is likely to possess chemical defences according to the prediction that well-defended exotics are most likely to become successful invaders in systems dominated by generalist grazers, such as marine macroalgal communities. We investigated the effect of intense herbivore feeding and simulated herbivory by mechanical wounding of the algae. Both processes led to similar changes in the metabolic profile. Feeding experiments with the generalist isopod grazer Idotea baltica showed that mechanical wounding caused a significant increase in grazer resistance. Structure elucidation of the metabolites of which some were up-regulated more than 100 times in the wounded tissue, revealed known and novel eicosanoids as major components. Among these were prostaglandins, hydroxylated fatty acids and arachidonic acid derived conjugated lactones. Bioassays with pure metabolites showed that these eicosanoids are part of the innate defence system of macroalgae, similarly to animal systems. In accordance with an induced defence mechanism application of extracts from wounded tissue caused a significant increase in grazer resistance and the up-regulation of other pathways than in the activated defence. Thus, this study suggests that G. vermiculophylla chemically deters herbivory by two lines of defence, a rapid wound-activated process followed by a slower inducible defence. By unravelling

  20. Metabolomic assessment of induced and activated chemical defence in the invasive red alga Gracilaria vermiculophylla.

    PubMed

    Nylund, Göran M; Weinberger, Florian; Rempt, Martin; Pohnert, Georg

    2011-01-01

    In comparison with terrestrial plants the mechanistic knowledge of chemical defences is poor for marine macroalgae. This restricts our understanding in the chemically mediated interactions that take place between algae and other organisms. Technical advances such as metabolomics, however, enable new approaches towards the characterisation of the chemically mediated interactions of organisms with their environment. We address defence responses in the red alga Gracilaria vermiculophylla using mass spectrometry based metabolomics in combination with bioassays. Being invasive in the north Atlantic this alga is likely to possess chemical defences according to the prediction that well-defended exotics are most likely to become successful invaders in systems dominated by generalist grazers, such as marine macroalgal communities. We investigated the effect of intense herbivore feeding and simulated herbivory by mechanical wounding of the algae. Both processes led to similar changes in the metabolic profile. Feeding experiments with the generalist isopod grazer Idotea baltica showed that mechanical wounding caused a significant increase in grazer resistance. Structure elucidation of the metabolites of which some were up-regulated more than 100 times in the wounded tissue, revealed known and novel eicosanoids as major components. Among these were prostaglandins, hydroxylated fatty acids and arachidonic acid derived conjugated lactones. Bioassays with pure metabolites showed that these eicosanoids are part of the innate defence system of macroalgae, similarly to animal systems. In accordance with an induced defence mechanism application of extracts from wounded tissue caused a significant increase in grazer resistance and the up-regulation of other pathways than in the activated defence. Thus, this study suggests that G. vermiculophylla chemically deters herbivory by two lines of defence, a rapid wound-activated process followed by a slower inducible defence. By unravelling

  1. Activation of chemical promutagens by Selenastrum capricornutum in the plant cell/microbe coincubation assay

    SciTech Connect

    Gentile, J.M.; Lippert, M.; Johnson, P.; Shafer, T. )

    1990-05-01

    The critical balance of organisms living in aquatic environments is influenced by the presence and relationship of plants to those environments. However, even though plants occupy a fundamental trophic level within aquatic ecosystems, few studies have focused upon the effect of xenobiotics on aquatic plants, and even fewer studies have dealt with xenobiotic metabolism by aquatic plants. It is well established that plants can metabolize chemicals into mutagens. The impact of these unique plant-activated chemical mutagens on ecosystems, food chains and, ultimately, human health is an important question that will require intensive and integrative investigation. The plant cell/microbe coincubation assay is particularly advantageous for use with unicellular algae. The conditions of this assay are such that chemical metabolism and subsequent mutagen detection can be followed in intact algal cells under simulated field conditions. The purpose of this research was to demonstrate that a unicellular algal species could be used effectively in the plant cell/microbe coincubation assay to activate model chemical mutagens.

  2. [Advances in research of chemical constituents and pharmacological activities of common used spices].

    PubMed

    Sun, Chao-nan; Zhu, Yuan; Xu, Xi-ming; Yu, Jiang-nan

    2014-11-01

    Spices have enjoyed a long history and a worldwide application. Of particular interest is the pharmaceutical value of spices in addition to its basic seasoning function in cooking. Concretely, equipped with complex chemical compositions, spices are of significant importance in pharmacologic actions, like antioxidant, antibacterial, antitumor, as well as therapeutical effects in gastrointestinal disorders and cardiovascular disease. Although increasing evidences in support of its distinct role in the medical field has recently reported, little information is available for substantive, thorough and sophisticated researches on its chemical constituents and pharmacological activities, especially mechanism of these actions. Therefore, in popular wave of studies directed at a single spice, this review presents systematic studies on the chemical constituents and pharmacological activities associated with common used spices, together with current typical individual studies on functional mechanism, in order to pave the way for the exploitation and development of new medicines derived from the chemical compounds of spice (such as, piperine, curcumin, geniposide, cinnamaldehyde, cinnamic acid, linalool, estragole, perillaldehyde, syringic acid, crocin).

  3. Modeling the effect of water activity and storage temperature on chemical stability of coffee brews.

    PubMed

    Manzocco, Lara; Nicoli, Maria Cristina

    2007-08-01

    This work was addressed to study the chemical stability of coffee brew derivatives as a function of water activity (aw) and storage temperature. To this purpose, coffee brew was freeze-dried, equilibrated at increasing aw values, and stored for up to 10 months at different temperatures from -30 to 60 degrees C. The chemical stability of the samples was assessed by measuring H3O+ formation during storage. Independently of storage temperature, the rate of H3O+ formation was considerably low only when aw was reduced below 0.5 (94% w/w). Beyond this critical boundary, the rate increased, reaching a maximum value at ca. 0.8 aw (78% w/w). Further hydration up to the aw of the freshly prepared beverage significantly increased chemical stability. It was suggested that mechanisms other than lactones' hydrolysis, probably related to nonenzymatic browning pathways, could contribute to the observed increase in acidity during coffee staling. The temperature dependence of H3O+ formation was well-described by the Arrhenius equation in the entire aw range considered. However, aw affected the apparent activation energy and frequency factor. These effects were described by simple equations that were used to set up a modified Arrhenius equation. This model was validated by comparing experimental values, not used to generate the model, with those estimated by the model itself. The model allowed efficient prediction of the chemical stability of coffee derivatives on the basis of only the aw value and storage temperature. PMID:17658750

  4. Chemical aspects of the trapping and recovery of uranium hexafluoride and fluorine during remediation activities

    SciTech Connect

    Del Cul, G.D.; Toth, L.M.

    1996-10-01

    Decontamination and decommission activities related to the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) involve the trapping and recovery of radiolitically generated uranium hexafluoride and fluorine. Although fission product radiolysis was known to generate F{sub 2}, the formation of UF{sub 6} and its transport from the fuel salt was unexpected. Some of these gaseous radiolysis products have been moving through the gas piping to a charcoal bed since the reactor was shut down in 1969. Current and planned remediation and clean-up activities involve the trapping of the gaseous products, deactivation and treatment of the activated charcoal bed, stabilization and reconditioning of the fuel salt, and recovery of the uranium. The chemical aspects of these processes, including radiolytic generation mechanisms, reactions between uranium hexafluoride and fluorine and trapping materials such as activated charcoal, activated alumina, and sodium fluoride, along with the analytical techniques used for the characterization of the materials and process control will be described.

  5. Chemical Composition, Antioxidant, and Antimicrobial Activities of Lichen Umbilicaria cylindrica (L.) Delise (Umbilicariaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Manojlovic, Nedeljko T.; Vasiljevic, Perica J.; Maskovic, Pavle Z.; Juskovic, Marina; Bogdanovic-Dusanovic, Gordana

    2012-01-01

    The phytochemical analysis of methanol and chloroform extracts of Umbilicaria cylindrica was determined by HPLC-UV method. The predominant phenolic compound in both extracts was depsidone, salazinic acid (1). Besides salazinic acid, the tested extracts of U. cylindrica contain norstictic acid (2), methyl-β-orcinol carboxylate (3), ethyl haematommate (4), atranorin (5), and usnic acid (6), in different amounts and relations. The lichen extracts showed comparable and strong antioxidant activity, exhibited higher DPPH and hydroxyl radical scavengings, chelating activity, and inhibitory activity towards lipid peroxidation. The lichen extracts demonstrated important antimicrobial activity against eight strains with MIC values from 15.62 to 62.50 μg/mL. This is the first report of the detail chemical composition and antioxidant activity of the lichen Umbilicaria cylindrica, and the results suggest that this lichen can be used as a new source of the natural antioxidants and the substances with antimicrobial features. PMID:21915186

  6. Chemical Composition, Antioxidant, and Antimicrobial Activities of Lichen Umbilicaria cylindrica (L.) Delise (Umbilicariaceae).

    PubMed

    Manojlovic, Nedeljko T; Vasiljevic, Perica J; Maskovic, Pavle Z; Juskovic, Marina; Bogdanovic-Dusanovic, Gordana

    2012-01-01

    The phytochemical analysis of methanol and chloroform extracts of Umbilicaria cylindrica was determined by HPLC-UV method. The predominant phenolic compound in both extracts was depsidone, salazinic acid (1). Besides salazinic acid, the tested extracts of U. cylindrica contain norstictic acid (2), methyl-β-orcinol carboxylate (3), ethyl haematommate (4), atranorin (5), and usnic acid (6), in different amounts and relations. The lichen extracts showed comparable and strong antioxidant activity, exhibited higher DPPH and hydroxyl radical scavengings, chelating activity, and inhibitory activity towards lipid peroxidation. The lichen extracts demonstrated important antimicrobial activity against eight strains with MIC values from 15.62 to 62.50 μg/mL. This is the first report of the detail chemical composition and antioxidant activity of the lichen Umbilicaria cylindrica, and the results suggest that this lichen can be used as a new source of the natural antioxidants and the substances with antimicrobial features. PMID:21915186

  7. A Study of a QCM Sensor Based on TiO2 Nanostructures for the Detection of NO2 and Explosives Vapours in Air

    PubMed Central

    Procek, Marcin; Stolarczyk, Agnieszka; Pustelny, Tadeusz; Maciak, Erwin

    2015-01-01

    The paper deals with investigations concerning the construction of sensors based on a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) containing a TiO2 nanostructures sensor layer. A chemical method of synthesizing these nanostructures is presented. The prepared prototype of the QCM sensing system, as well as the results of tests for detecting low NO2 concentrations in an atmosphere of synthetic air have been described. The constructed NO2 sensors operate at room temperature, which is a great advantage, because resistance sensors based on wide gap semiconductors often require much higher operation temperatures, sometimes as high as 500 °C. The sensors constructed by the authors can be used, among other applications, in medical and chemical diagnostics, and also for the purpose of detecting explosive vapours. Reactions of the sensor to nitroglycerine vapours are presented as an example of its application. The influence of humidity on the operation of the sensor was studied. PMID:25912352

  8. Chemical Constituents and Antimicrobial Activity of Indian Green Leafy Vegetable Cardiospermum halicacabum.

    PubMed

    Jeyadevi, R; Sivasudha, T; Ilavarasi, A; Thajuddin, N

    2013-06-01

    The present study was carried out to analyze chemical constituents and antibacterial activity of ethanolic leaf extract of Cardiospermum halicacabum (ECH). The FT-IR spectrum confirmed the presence of alcohols, phenols, alkanes, alkynes, aliphatic ester and flavonoids in ECH. The GC-MS analysis revealed that ECH contained about twenty four compounds. The major chemical compounds identified were cyclohexane-1, 4, 5-triol-3-one-1-carboxylic acid, benzene acetic acid, caryophyllene, phytol and neophytadiene. The ECH was screened for its antibacterial activity against different bacterial strains and anti fungal activity against Candida albicans by agar well diffusion and minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) assay. ECH exhibited antibacterial and antifungal activity. All the tested bacterial strains showed MIC values ranging from 80 to 125 μg of extract/ml and C. albicans showed 190 μg of extract/ml as a MIC. The maximum activity ECH was observed against human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus followed by Escherichia coli and the fish pathogen Aeromonas hydrophila. ECH exhibited moderate activity against some of the tested multidrug resistant strains. PMID:24426110

  9. Chemical composition and antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and antiproliferation activities of pomegranate (Punica granatum) flowers.

    PubMed

    Bekir, Jalila; Mars, Mohamed; Vicendo, Patricia; Fterrich, Amira; Bouajila, Jalloul

    2013-06-01

    The chemical composition, antioxidant (DPPH and ABTS assays), anti-inflammatory (5-LOX), and cytotoxic (MCF-7) activities from flowers of seven pomegranate varieties (Punica granatum) were investigated. The highest phenolics (330.9±11.3 mg gallic acid equivalent/g dry weight (dw)), flavonoids (29.5±0.8 mg quercetin equivalent/g dw), tannins (30.6±0.6 mg catechin equivalent/g dw), and anthocyanins (0.70±0.03 mg cyanidin-3-glucoside equivalent/g dw) content were determined in the Chetoui (CH) variety. It was found that Garsi (GR) (IC₅₀=4.9±0.2 mg/L by ABTS assay) and Zaghwani (ZG) (IC₅₀=3.9±0.2 mg/L by ABTS assay) varieties exhibited the highest antioxidant activity. For the anti-inflammatory activity, all varieties were active; the ZH variety was the strongest (2.5±0.1 mg/L). The CH, ES, and RA pomegranate varieties were not active against human breast cancer cells MCF-7, whereas inhibition was more evident with extracts from ZH and GR varieties (IC₅₀=33.00±2.64 and 35.00±4.58 mg/L, respectively). Statistical analysis showed that the variety factor influenced significantly (P<.01) the chemical composition and biological activities of pomegranate flowers.

  10. Chemical States of Bacterial Spores: Heat Resistance and Its Kinetics at Intermediate Water Activity

    PubMed Central

    Alderton, Gordon; Snell, Neva

    1970-01-01

    Bacterial spore heat resistance at intermediate water activity, like aqueous and strictly dry heat resistance, is a property manipulatable by chemical pretreatments of the dormant mature spore. Heat resistances differ widely, and survival is prominently nonlogarithmic for both chemical forms of the spore. Log survival varies approximately as the cube of time for the resistant state of Bacillus stearothermophilus spores and as the square of time for the sensitive state. A method for measuring heat resistance at intermediate humidity was designed to provide direct and unequivocal control of water vapor concentration with quick equilibration, maintenance of known spore state, and dispersion of spores singly for valid survivor counting. Temperature characteristics such as z, Ea, and Q10 cannot be determined in the usual sense (as a spore property) for spores encapsulated with a constant weight of water. Effect on spore survival of temperature induced changes of water activity in such systems is discussed. PMID:5418938

  11. Chemical Composition and Antibacterial Activity of Essential Oils of Two Species of Lamiaceae against Phytopathogenic Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Gormez, Arzu; Bozari, Sedat; Yanmis, Derya; Gulluce, Medine; Sahin, Fikrettin; Agar, Guleray

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we aimed to determine chemical composition and antibacterial activities of Satureja hortensis and Calamintha nepeta against to 20 phytopathogenic bacteria causing serious crop loss. The essential oils of S. hortensis and C. nepeta were isolated by the hydrodistillation method and the chemical composition of the essential oils were analyzed by GC-MS. The antibacterial properties of the essential oils were evaluated against 20 phytopathogenic bacteria through Disc diffusion assay and micro dilution assay. The results revealed that the essential oils of S. hortensis and C. nepeta have significant antibacterial activity. Furthermore, the findings of the study are valuable for future investigations focusing on the alternative natural compounds to control plant diseases. PMID:26373171

  12. Preparation of porous bio-char and activated carbon from rice husk by leaching ash and chemical activation.

    PubMed

    Ahiduzzaman, Md; Sadrul Islam, A K M

    2016-01-01

    Preparation porous bio-char and activated carbon from rice husk char study has been conducted in this study. Rice husk char contains high amount silica that retards the porousness of bio-char. Porousness of rice husk char could be enhanced by removing the silica from char and applying heat at high temperature. Furthermore, the char is activated by using chemical activation under high temperature. In this study no inert media is used. The study is conducted at low oxygen environment by applying biomass for consuming oxygen inside reactor and double crucible method (one crucible inside another) is applied to prevent intrusion of oxygen into the char. The study results shows that porous carbon is prepared successfully without using any inert media. The adsorption capacity of material increased due to removal of silica and due to the activation with zinc chloride compared to using raw rice husk char. The surface area of porous carbon and activated carbon are found to be 28, 331 and 645 m(2) g(-1) for raw rice husk char, silica removed rice husk char and zinc chloride activated rice husk char, respectively. It is concluded from this study that porous bio-char and activated carbon could be prepared in normal environmental conditions instead of inert media. This study shows a method and possibility of activated carbon from agro-waste, and it could be scaled up for commercial production. PMID:27536531

  13. Chemically defined medium enhances bioelectric activity in mouse spinal cord-dorsal root ganglion cultures.

    PubMed

    Habets, A M; Baker, R E; Brenner, E; Romijn, H J

    1981-02-23

    Co-cultures of mouse spinal cord with dorsal root ganglion (DRG) cultures were grown either in horse serum (HS)-supplemented medium or in a serum-free, chemically defined medium (CDM). The cytoarchitecture of cord--DRG explants was fully retained in CDM, with little or no distortion due to flattening of the explant, as is invariably observed in HS-supplemented cultures. Functional properties such as bioelectric activity and DRG--spinal cord interconnectivity were well sustained in CDM.

  14. Chemical Composition and Biological Activities of Fragrant Mexican Copal (Bursera spp.).

    PubMed

    Gigliarelli, Giulia; Becerra, Judith X; Curini, Massimo; Marcotullio, Maria Carla

    2015-01-01

    Copal is the Spanish word used to describe aromatic resins from several genera of plants. Mexican copal derives from several Bursera spp., Protium copal, some Pinus spp. (e.g., P. pseudostrobus) and a few Fabaceae spp. It has been used for centuries as incense for religious ceremonies, as a food preservative, and as a treatment for several illnesses. The aim of this review is to analyze the chemical composition and biological activity of commercial Mexican Bursera copal. PMID:26703535

  15. Modelling of evaporation of a dispersed liquid component in a chemically active gas flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kryukov, V. G.; Naumov, V. I.; Kotov, V. Yu.

    1994-01-01

    A model has been developed to investigate evaporation of dispersed liquids in chemically active gas flow. Major efforts have been directed at the development of algorithms for implementing this model. The numerical experiments demonstrate that, in the boundary layer, significant changes in the composition and temperature of combustion products take place. This gives the opportunity to more correctly model energy release processes in combustion chambers of liquid-propellant rocket engines, gas-turbine engines, and other power devices.

  16. Chemical Constituents from the Fruiting Bodies of Hexagonia apiaria and Their Anti-inflammatory Activity.

    PubMed

    Thang, Tran Dinh; Kuo, Ping-Chung; Ngoc, Nguyen Thi Bich; Hwang, Tsong-Long; Yang, Mei-Lin; Ta, Shih-Huang; Lee, E-Jian; Kuo, Dai-Huang; Hung, Nguyen Huy; Tuan, Nguyen Ngoc; Wu, Tian-Shung

    2015-11-25

    A chemical investigation of the fruiting bodies of Hexagonia apiaria resulted in the identification of nine compounds including five new triterpenoids, hexagonins A-E (1-5), along with four known compounds. The purified constituents were examined for their anti-inflammatory activity. Among the tested compounds, hexatenuin A displayed the most significant inhibition of superoxide anion generation and elastase release. These triterpenoids may have potentials as anti-inflammatory agents. PMID:26575215

  17. Effect of chemical activation of 10% carbamide peroxide gel in tooth bleaching.

    PubMed

    Batista, Graziela Ribeiro; Arantes, Paula Tamiao; Attin, Thomas; Wiegand, Annette; Torres, Carlos Rocha

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of chemical agents to increase the bleaching effectiveness of 10% carbamide peroxide. Two hundred and ninety enamel-dentin discs were prepared from bovine incisors. The color measurement was performed by a spectrophotometer using the CIE L*a*b*system. The groups were divided according to the bleaching treatment: negative control group (NC): without bleaching; positive control group (PC): bleached with 10% carbamide peroxide gel without any chemical activator; Manganese gluconate (MG); Manganese chloride (MC); Ferrous gluconate (FG); Ferric chloride (FC); and Ferrous sulphate (FS). Three different concentrations (MG, MC, FG, FC: 0.01, 0.02 and 0.03% w/w; FS: 0.001, 0.002 and 0.003% w/w) for each agent were tested. The bleaching gel was applied on the specimens for 8 h, after which they were immersed in artificial saliva for 16 h, during 14 days. Color assessments were made after 7 and 14 days. The data were analyzed by repeated measures analysis of variance and Tukey's test (5%). Generally, the test groups were unable to increase the bleaching effect (ΔE) significantly compared to the PC group. Only for ΔL, significant higher values compared to the PC group could be seen after 7 days in groups MG (0.02%), and FS (0.002 and 0.003%). The NC group showed significantly lower values than all tested groups. It was concluded that for home bleaching procedures, the addition of chemical activators did not produce a bleaching result significantly higher than the use of 10% carbamide peroxide without activation, and that the concentration of chemical activators used did not significantly influence the effectiveness of treatment.

  18. Chemical composition and antibacterial activity of essential oil of Pulicaria odora L.

    PubMed

    Hanbali, Fadwa E L; Akssira, Mohamed; Ezoubeiri, Aicha; Gadhi, Chems Eddoha A; Mellouki, Fouad; Benherraf, Ahmed; Blazquez, Amparo M; Boira, Herminio

    2005-07-14

    The chemical composition of the volatile oil constituent from Pulicaria odora L. roots has been analyzed by GC/MS. Twenty-seven components were identified, being thymol (47.83%) and its derivative isobutyrate (30.05%) the main constituents in the oil. Furthermore, the oil was tested against seven bacteria at different concentrations. Results showed that the oil exhibited a significant antibacterial activity.

  19. Structure activity relationship studies on chemically non-reactive glycine sulfonamide inhibitors of diacylglycerol lipase.

    PubMed

    Chupak, Louis S; Zheng, Xiaofan; Hu, Shuanghua; Huang, Yazhong; Ding, Min; Lewis, Martin A; Westphal, Ryan S; Blat, Yuval; McClure, Andrea; Gentles, Robert G

    2016-04-01

    N-Benzylic-substituted glycine sulfonamides that reversibly inhibit diacylglycerol (DAG) lipases are reported. Detailed herein are the structure activity relationships, profiling characteristics and physico-chemical properties for the first reported series of DAG lipase (DAGL) inhibitors that function without covalent attachment to the enzyme. Highly potent examples are presented that represent valuable tool compounds for studying DAGL inhibition and constitute important leads for future medicinal chemistry efforts.

  20. Chemical Composition and Biological Activities of Fragrant Mexican Copal (Bursera spp.).

    PubMed

    Gigliarelli, Giulia; Becerra, Judith X; Curini, Massimo; Marcotullio, Maria Carla

    2015-12-12

    Copal is the Spanish word used to describe aromatic resins from several genera of plants. Mexican copal derives from several Bursera spp., Protium copal, some Pinus spp. (e.g., P. pseudostrobus) and a few Fabaceae spp. It has been used for centuries as incense for religious ceremonies, as a food preservative, and as a treatment for several illnesses. The aim of this review is to analyze the chemical composition and biological activity of commercial Mexican Bursera copal.

  1. Removal efficiency of vapour/particulate phase PAHs by using alternative protective respirators in PAHs exposure workers.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hsiu-Ling; Yang, Chien-Hung; Lin, Ming-Hsiu

    2012-06-15

    Due to the high heat environment in foundry industries, it is difficult for foundry workers to wear masks during their workday. Thus, how to prevent inhaling vapour or the particulate phase of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) is important for occupational hazard management. The present study assesses the characteristics of PAHs emission in foundry and plastic industries to evaluate the removal efficiencies of PAHs while workers use alternative personal protective equipment. The highest 1-hydroxypyrene (1-OHP) level was found for workers who used a cotton-fabric face mask (1.19 μg/g creatinine) and activated-carbon face mask (1.16 μg/g creatinine), compared to a lower level in workers who wore a surgical face mask (0.27 μg/g creatinine) and a N95 respirator (0.51 μg/g creatinine). The urinary 1-OHP in end-of-shift samples correlated to the airborne vapour phase Bapeq, but not for the particulate phase Bapeq in the foundry industry. This is probably because workers wore personal protective equipment that only removed the particulate phase PAH. The current study suggests that future work focus on developing an appropriate and comfortable respirator with high removal efficiency for ultrafine particulates and vapour phase PAHs simultaneously in PAH work environments. PMID:22525483

  2. Experimental study of multipass copper vapour laser amplifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Karpukhin, Vyacheslav T; Malikov, Mikhail M

    2008-12-31

    Repetitively pulsed multipass copper vapour amplifiers are studied experimentally. A considerable increase in the peak power of laser pulses was achieved by using a special scheme of the amplifier. It is found that the main reasons preventing an increase in the peak power during many passages of the beam are the competitive development of lasing from spontaneous seeds in a parasitic resonator formed by the fold mirrors of a multipass amplifier, a decrease in the amplification during the last passages, and an increase in the pulse width at the amplifier output. (lasers. amplifiers)

  3. A diamond-windowed IR-cell for inorganic vapours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rytter, E.; Hvistendahl, J.; Tomita, T.

    An evacuable cell system which can be used for recording infrared spectra of corrosive vapours has been developed. The cell body is made of gold-plated nickel, and sealing of the diamond windows is performed with gold O-rings. The excellent transmittance of type IIa diamond makes it possible to scan the far infrared region below 1500 cm -1. Furthermore, isothermal conditions can be maintained up to approximately 600°C before the windows turn opaque. Use of minor exchangeable parts gives the opportunity of both transmission and emission spectroscopy.

  4. Plasma formation in water vapour layers in high conductivity liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelsey, C. P.; Schaper, L.; Stalder, K. R.; Graham, W. G.

    2011-10-01

    The vapour layer development stage of relatively low voltage plasmas in conducting solutions has already been well explored. The nature of the discharges formed within the vapour layer however is still largely unexplored. Here we examine the nature of such discharges through a combination of fast imaging and spatially, temporally resolved spectroscopy and electrical characterisation. The experimental setup used is a pin-to-plate discharge configuration with a -350V, 200 μs pulse applied at a repetition rate of 2Hz. A lens, followed by beam splitter allows beams to one Andor ICCD camera to capture images of the plasma emission with a second camera at the exit of a high resolution spectrometer. Through synchronization of the camera images at specified times after plasma ignition (as determined from current-voltage characteristics) they can be correlated with the spectra features. Initial measurements reveal two apparently different plasma formations. Stark broadening of the hydrogen Balmer beta line indicate electron densities of 3 to 5 ×1020 m-3 for plasmas produced early in the voltage pulse and an order of magnitude less for the later plasmas. The vapour layer development stage of relatively low voltage plasmas in conducting solutions has already been well explored. The nature of the discharges formed within the vapour layer however is still largely unexplored. Here we examine the nature of such discharges through a combination of fast imaging and spatially, temporally resolved spectroscopy and electrical characterisation. The experimental setup used is a pin-to-plate discharge configuration with a -350V, 200 μs pulse applied at a repetition rate of 2Hz. A lens, followed by beam splitter allows beams to one Andor ICCD camera to capture images of the plasma emission with a second camera at the exit of a high resolution spectrometer. Through synchronization of the camera images at specified times after plasma ignition (as determined from current

  5. Combined Dial Sounding of Ozone, Water Vapour and Aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trickl, Thomas; Vogelmann, Hannes

    2016-06-01

    Routine high-quality lidar measurements of ozone, water vapour and aerosol at Garmisch-Partenkirchen since 2007 have made possible more comprehensive atmospheric studies and lead to a growing insight concerning the most frequently occurring long-range transport pathways. In this contribution we present as examples results on stratospheric layers travelling in the free troposphere for extended periods of time without eroding. In particular, we present a case of an intrusion layer that subsided over as many as fifteen days and survived the interference by strong Canadian fires. These results impose a challenge on atmospheric modelling that grossly overestimates free-tropospheric mixing.

  6. Synthesis of sulfonated porous carbon nanospheres solid acid by a facile chemical activation route

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Binbin Guo, Yanzhen; Yin, Hang; Zhang, Shouren; Yang, Baocheng

    2015-01-15

    Generally, porous carbon nanospheres materials are usually prepared via a template method, which is a multi-steps and high-cost strategy. Here, we reported a porous carbon nanosphere solid acid with high surface area and superior porosity, as well as uniform nanospheical morphology, which prepared by a facile chemical activation with ZnCl{sub 2} using resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) resins spheres as precursor. The activation of RF resins spheres by ZnCl{sub 2} at 400 °C brought high surface area and large volume, and simultaneously retained numerous oxygen-containing and hydrogen-containing groups due to the relatively low processing temperature. The presence of these functional groups is favorable for the modification of –SO{sub 3}H groups by a followed sulfonation treating with sulphuric acid and organic sulfonic acid. The results of N{sub 2} adsorption–desorption and electron microscopy clearly showed the preservation of porous structure and nanospherical morphology. Infrared spectra certified the variation of surface functional groups after activation and the successful modification of –SO{sub 3}H groups after sulfonation. The acidities of catalysts were estimated by an indirect titration method and the modified amount of –SO{sub 3}H groups were examined by energy dispersive spectra. The results suggested sulfonated porous carbon nanospheres catalysts possessed high acidities and –SO{sub 3}H densities, which endowed their significantly catalytic activities for biodiesel production. Furthermore, their excellent stability and recycling property were also demonstrated by five consecutive cycles. - Graphical abstract: Sulfonated porous carbon nanospheres with high surface area and superior catalytic performance were prepared by a facile chemical activation route. - Highlights: • Porous carbon spheres solid acid prepared by a facile chemical activation. • It owns high surface area, superior porosity and uniform spherical morphology. • It possesses

  7. Linking algal growth inhibition to chemical activity: baseline toxicity required 1% of saturation.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Stine N; Mayer, Philipp

    2015-02-01

    Recently, high-quality data were published on the algal growth inhibition caused by 50 non-polar narcotic compounds, of which 39 were liquid compounds with defined water solubility. In the present study, the toxicity data for these liquids were applied to challenge the chemical activity range for baseline toxicity. First, the reported effective concentrations (EC50) were divided by the respective water solubilities (S water), since the obtained EC50/S water ratio essentially equals the effective chemical activity (Ea50). The majority of EC50/S water ratios were within the expected chemical activity range of 0.01-0.1 for baseline toxicity, and none of the ratios were significantly below 0.01. On a practical level, these findings suggest EC50 values for baseline toxicity to be at or above 1% of liquid solubility, which would have been accurate or conservative for all 39 liquids with defined water solubility in the applied dataset. On an environmental risk assessment level, predicted no-effect concentrations (PNECs) for baseline toxicity could even be set as a percentage of saturation, which can easily be extended to mixtures. However, EC50 values well below 1% of liquid saturation can still occur and would be a direct indication of excess toxicity.

  8. Improvement of photocatalytic activity of brookite titanium dioxide nanorods by surface modification using chemical etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Linjie; Menendez-Flores, Victor M.; Murakami, Naoya; Ohno, Teruhisa

    2012-05-01

    Surface morphology of brookite titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanorods was modified by chemical etching with aqueous hydrogen (H2O2)-ammonia (NH3) or sulfuric acid (H2SO4) solution. The brookite nanorods after chemical etching were characterized by TEM, SAED, FE-SEM, XRD and specific surface area measurements. Brookite nanorods after chemical etching with H2O2-NH3 solution exposed new crystal faces in the tips, and nanorods with sharper tips were observed. On the other hand, etching with H2SO4 at 200 °C induced morphological changes in the tip faces and broadened the angle between tip faces as a result of dissolution along the [0 0 1] direction, though brookite nanorods were only slightly etched after etching with H2SO4 at room temperature. Photocatalytic activity of brookite nanorods was tested by toluene decomposition in gas phase under ultraviolet irradiation. Brookite nanorods etched with H2O2-NH3 solution showed higher photocatalytic activity than that of brookite nanorods before etching. In the case of H2SO4 etching at 200 °C, brookite nanorods after etching exhibited lower photocatalytic activity. One reason for this may be that the formation of newly exposed crystal faces by H2O2-NH3 etching improved separation of redox sites due to their strong oxidation ability.

  9. Chemical stability of plasmon-active silver tips for tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalbacova, Jana; Rodriguez, Raul D.; Desale, Vivek; Schneider, Maximilian; Amin, Ihsan; Jordan, Rainer; Zahn, Dietrich R. T.

    2015-01-01

    Silver nanostructures are used in tip- and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy due to their high electric field enhancement over almost the entire visible spectral range. However, the low chemical stability of silver, compared to other noble metals, promotes silver sulfide and sulfate formation which decreases its plasmonic activity. This is why silver tips are usually prepared on the same day of the experiments or are disregarded in favour of gold that is chemically more stable. Since silver degradation cannot be avoided, we hypothesized that a protection layer may be able to minimize or control degradation. In this contribution, we report the successful preparation of 4-biphenylthiol and 4'-nitro-4-biphenylthiol self-assembled monolayers on silver tips in order to protect them against tarnishing and to investigate the effect on the life-time of the plasmonic activity. The electrochemically etched wire surface was probed via Raman spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The best long term stability and resistance against corrosion was shown by a monolayer of 4-biphenylthiol formed from dimethylformamide which did not display any degradation of the metallic tip during the observed period. Here, we demonstrate an easy and straightforward approach towards increasing the chemical stability of silver TERS-active probes.

  10. Chemical composition and biological activity of ripe pumpkin fruits (Cucurbita pepo L.) cultivated in Egyptian habitats.

    PubMed

    Badr, Sherif E A; Shaaban, Mohamed; Elkholy, Yehya M; Helal, Maher H; Hamza, Akila S; Masoud, Mohamed S; El Safty, Mounir M

    2011-09-01

    The chemical composition and biological activity of three parts (rind, flesh and seeds) of pumpkin fruits (Cucurbita pepo L.) cultivated in Egypt were studied. Chemical analysis of fibre, protein, β-carotene, carbohydrates, minerals and fatty acids present in the rind, flesh, seeds and defatted seeds meal was conducted. Chemical, GC-MS and biological assays of organic extracts of the main fruit parts, rind and flesh established their unique constituents. Chromatographic purification of the extracts afforded triglyceride fatty acid mixture (1), tetrahydro-thiophene (2), linoleic acid (3), calotropoleanly ester (4), cholesterol (5) and 13(18)-oleanen-3-ol (6). GC-MS analysis of the extract's unpolar fraction revealed the existence of dodecane and tetradecane. Structures of the isolated compounds (1-6) were confirmed by NMR and EI-MS spectrometry. Antimicrobial, antiviral and antitumour activities of the fruit parts were discussed. The promising combined extract of rind and flesh was biologically studied for microbial and cytotoxic activities in comparison with the whole isolated components.

  11. Tracking SERS-active nanoprobe intracellular uptake for chemical and biological sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregas, Molly K.; Yan, Fei; Scaffidi, Jonathan; Wang, Hsin-Neng; Khoury, Christopher; Zhang, Yan; Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    2007-09-01

    A critical aspect of the use of nanoprobes for intracellular studies in chemical and biological sensing involves a fundamental understanding of their uptake and trajectory in cells. In this study, we describe experiments using surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy and mapping to track cellular uptake of plasmonics-active labeled nanoparticles. Three different Raman-active labels with positive, negative, and neutral charges were conjugated to silver colloidal nanoparticles with the aim of spatially and temporally profiling intracellular delivery and tracking of nanoprobes during uptake in single mammalian cells. 1-D Raman spectra and 2-D Raman mapping are used to identify and locate the probes via their SERS signal intensities. Because Raman spectroscopy is very specific for identification of chemical and molecular signatures, the development of functionalized plasmonics-active nanoprobes capable of exploring intracellular spaces and processes has the ability to provide specific information on the effects of biological and chemical pollutants in the intracellular environment. The results indicate that this technique will allow study of when, where, and how these substances affect cells and living organisms.

  12. Condensed complexes, rafts, and the chemical activity of cholesterol in membranes

    PubMed Central

    Radhakrishnan, Arun; Anderson, Thomas G.; McConnell, Harden M.

    2000-01-01

    Epifluorescence microscopy studies of mixtures of phospholipids and cholesterol at the air–water interface often exhibit coexisting liquid phases. The properties of these liquids point to the formation of “condensed complexes” between cholesterol and certain phospholipids, such as sphingomyelin. It is found that monolayers that form complexes can incorporate a low concentration of a ganglioside GM1. This glycolipid is visualized by using a fluorescently labeled B subunit of cholera toxin. Three coexisting liquid phases are found by using this probe together with a fluorescent phospholipid probe. The three liquid phases are identified as a phospholipid-rich phase, a cholesterol-rich phase, and a condensed complex-rich phase. The cholera toxin B labeled ganglioside GM1 is found exclusively in the condensed complex-rich phase. Condensed complexes are likely present in animal cell membranes, where they should facilitate the formation of specialized domains such as rafts. Condensed complexes also have a major effect in determining the chemical activity of cholesterol. It is suggested that this chemical activity plays an essential role in the regulation of cholesterol biosynthesis. Gradients in the chemical activity of cholesterol should likewise govern the rates and direction of intracellular intermembrane cholesterol transport. PMID:11050164

  13. Effect of operating temperature on transient behaviour of a biofilter treating waste-air containing n-butanol vapour during intermittent loading.

    PubMed

    Feizi, Farzaneh; Nasernejad, Bahram; Zamir, Seyed Morteza

    2016-01-01

    Transient-state removal of n-butanol vapour was investigated in a biofilter (BF) packed with compost and lava rock at different operating temperatures in the range of 30-45°C under intermittent loading (8 h per day). Adsorption on the inactive bed and biodegradation in the microbial-active bed were studied separately at an empty bed residence time (EBRT) of 1 min and inlet concentrations of 2.6-3.2 g m(-3), respectively. According to the transient experiments, the highest removal efficiency (RE) around 86% was obtained at 40°C due to a high microbial activity. Comparison of CO2 production and pure adsorption of n-butanol showed that adsorption was the major mechanism in the start-up of BF at each operating condition; although the impact of adsorption declined as temperature increased from 30°C to 45°C. The process was reaction limited at all operating conditions. Based on the determination of stoichiometric coefficients of n-butanol biodegradation, the CO2 production level was significantly lower than that of the chemical oxidation process which resulted in a decrease in environmental pollution.

  14. NMR crystallography of enzyme active sites: probing chemically detailed, three-dimensional structure in tryptophan synthase.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Leonard J; Dunn, Michael F

    2013-09-17

    NMR crystallography--the synergistic combination of X-ray diffraction, solid-state NMR spectroscopy, and computational chemistry--offers unprecedented insight into three-dimensional, chemically detailed structure. Initially, researchers used NMR crystallography to refine diffraction data from organic and inorganic solids. Now we are applying this technique to explore active sites in biomolecules, where it reveals chemically rich detail concerning the interactions between enzyme site residues and the reacting substrate. Researchers cannot achieve this level of detail from X-ray, NMR,or computational methodologies in isolation. For example, typical X-ray crystal structures (1.5-2.5 Å resolution) of enzyme-bound intermediates identify possible hydrogen-bonding interactions between site residues and substrate but do not directly identify the protonation states. Solid-state NMR can provide chemical shifts for selected atoms of enzyme-substrate complexes, but without a larger structural framework in which to interpret them only empirical correlations with local chemical structure are possible. Ab initio calculations and molecular mechanics can build models for enzymatic processes, but they rely on researcher-specified chemical details. Together, however, X-ray diffraction, solid-state NMR spectroscopy, and computational chemistry can provide consistent and testable models for structure and function of enzyme active sites: X-ray crystallography provides a coarse framework upon which scientists can develop models of the active site using computational chemistry; they can then distinguish these models by comparing calculated NMR chemical shifts with the results of solid-state NMR spectroscopy experiments. Conceptually, each technique is a puzzle piece offering a generous view of the big picture. Only when correctly pieced together, however, can they reveal the big picture at the highest possible resolution. In this Account, we detail our first steps in the development of

  15. Active-medium inhomogeneities and optical quality of radiation of supersonic chemical oxygen-iodine lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Boreysho, A S; Druzhinin, S L; Lobachev, V V; Savin, A V; Strakhov, S Yu; Trilis, A V

    2007-09-30

    Optical inhomogeneities of the active medium of a supersonic chemical oxygen-iodine laser (COIL) and their effect on the radiation parameters are studied in the case when an unstable resonator is used. Classification of optical inhomogeneities and the main factors affecting the quality of COIL radiation are considered. The results of numerical simulation of a three-dimensional gas-dynamic active medium and an unstable optical resonator in the diffraction approximation are presented. The constraints in the fabrication of large-scale COILs associated with a deterioration of the optical quality of radiation are determined. (lasers)

  16. Chemical and biochemical activities of sonochemically synthesized poly(N-isopropyl acrylamide)/silica nanocomposite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdhury, Pranesh; Saha, Swadhin Kr; Guha, Arun; Saha, Samar Kr

    2012-11-01

    Poly(N-isopropyl acrylamide) (PNIPA) grafted mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MPSNP) leading to novel inorganic/organic core-shell nanocomposite has been synthesized sonochemically in an aqueous medium without additives like cross-linker, hydrophobic agent, organic solvent. The colloidal stability of MPSNP is enhanced significantly due to encapsulation of the polymer. The composites are characterized by TEM, FTIR and TGA. The chemical and biochemical activities of the sonochemically synthesized materials have been studied in the light of reaction with acid-base, protein adsorption, antimicrobial activity, biocompatibility and nonthrombogenic property. Advantages of sonochemical synthesis compared to other techniques have been evaluated.

  17. Gas dynamics of the active medium of a supersonic cw HF chemical laser

    SciTech Connect

    Fedorov, Igor' A; Rotinyan, Mikhail A; Krivitskii, A M

    2000-12-31

    Gas-dynamic characteristics of a 5-kW supersonic cw HF chemical laser with a nozzle array of size 25 cm x 2.8 cm and the nozzle - nozzle mixing scheme were experimentally studied. The distributions of Mach numbers, static pressure, total pressure behind the normal shock, and the loss of total pressure were measured in the flow of an active medium in wide ranges of variation of the flow rate of secondary fuel (hydrogen) and pressure in the atomic-fluorine generator. The energy parameters of the laser were found to be interrelated with the gas dynamics and the optical quality of the active laser medium. (lasers)

  18. An Update on Oligosaccharides and Their Esters from Traditional Chinese Medicines: Chemical Structures and Biological Activities

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiang-Yang; Wang, Ru-Feng; Liu, Bin

    2015-01-01

    A great number of naturally occurring oligosaccharides and oligosaccharide esters have been isolated from traditional Chinese medicinal plants, which are used widely in Asia and show prominent curative effects in the prevention and treatment of kinds of diseases. Numerous in vitro and in vivo experiments have revealed that oligosaccharides and their esters exhibited various activities, including antioxidant, antidepressant, cytotoxic, antineoplastic, anti-inflammatory, neuroprotective, cerebral protective, antidiabetic, plant growth-regulatory, and immunopotentiating activities. This review summarizes the investigations on the distribution, chemical structures, and bioactivities of natural oligosaccharides and their esters from traditional Chinese medicines between 2003 and 2013. PMID:25861364

  19. Eupatorium capillifolium essential oil: chemical composition antifungal activity and insecticidal activity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Natural plant extracts often contain compounds that are useful in pest management applications. The essential oil of Eupatorium capillifolium (dog-fennel) was investigated for antifungal and insecticidal activities. Essential oil obtained by hydrodistillation of aerial parts was analyzed by gas chro...

  20. Effects of ultraviolet irradiation, pulsed electric field, hot water and ethanol vapours treatment on functional properties of mung bean sprouts.

    PubMed

    Goyal, Ankit; Siddiqui, Saleem; Upadhyay, Neelam; Soni, Jyoti

    2014-04-01

    The present investigation was conducted with the objective to study the effects of various treatments and storage conditions on ascorbic acid, total phenols, antioxidant activity and polyphenol oxidase activity of mung bean sprouts. The sprouts subjected to various treatments viz., pulsed electric field (PEF) (10,000 V for 10 s), hot water dip (HWD) (50 °C for 2 min), ethanol vapours (1 h) and UV-Irradiation (10 kJm(-2) in laminar flow chamber for 1 h); and then stored at room (25 ± 1 °C) and low (7 ± 1 °C) temperature conditions. The sprouts were analyzed regularly at 24 h interval till end of shelf life. Different treatments given to sprouts resulted in differential effect on various parameters. The ascorbic acid, total phenols and antioxidant activity were highest in ethanol vapours treated sprouts. There was a general decrease in polyphenol oxidase activity by various treatments. During storage ascorbic acid, total phenols and antioxidant activity of sprouts first increased and then decreased significantly, however, for polyphenol oxidase activity a progressive increase with increase in storage period was observed. The trends were similar at room and low temperature storage conditions. Thus, it can be concluded that the ethanol vapours significantly improved the ascorbic acid content, total phenols and antioxidant activity of mung bean sprouts, both at room as well as low temperature conditions of storage. PMID:24741164

  1. Omani propolis: chemical profiling, antibacterial activity and new propolis plant sources

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Propolis (bee glue) is a resinous honeybee product having a long history of application in many countries as a traditional remedy for treating wounds, burns, soar throat, stomach disorders, etc. It has been proved to possess beneficial biological effects, including antimicrobial, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, cytotoxic, antiulcer, and many others. Bees gather propolis from diverse resinous plant parts and in different phytogeographic regions its chemical composition might vary significantly. In this article we report the results of the first study on the chemical profiles of propolis from Oman, its plant origin and antibacterial activity. Results The chemical profiles of Omani propolis extracts were obtained by GC-MS analysis after silylation. Over 50 individual compounds were identified in the samples, belonging to different compound types: sugars, polyols, hydroxy acids, fatty acids, cardanols and cardols, anacardic acids, flavan derivatives, triterpenes, prenylated flavanones and chalcones. The profiles were dissimilar from other known propolis types. They demonstrate that although Oman is not a large country, the plant sources of propolis vary significantly, even in the same apiary and the same season. Based on chemical profiles, and isolation and identification of major marker compounds (new propolis constituents), new plant sources of propolis were found: Azadiracta indica (neem tree) and Acacia spp. (most probably A. nilotica). The ethanol extracts of the studied propolis samples demonstrated activity against S. aureus (MIC < 100 μg. mL-1) and E. coli (MIC < 380 μg. mL-1). Conclusion Omani propolis is different form the known propolis types and demonstrates significant chemical diversity. Its most important plant source is the resin of Azadirachta indica, and as a result its typical components are С5-prenyl flavanones. Other plant sources have been identified, too, playing some role in resin collection by bees in Oman: Acacia spp

  2. Parameters of immunity acute phase reaction in men in relation to exposure duration to mercury vapours.

    PubMed

    Moszczynski, P; Moszczynski, P; Słowinski, S; Bem, S; Bartus, R

    1991-01-01

    The study was carried out in 89 men aged 21 to 57 years with a history of exposure to mercury vapour from 2 to 26 years during occupational work involving chlorine production by the method of mercury electrolysis. The workers were divided into three groups depending on the duration of occupational exposure: 1) 32 workers with a short history of exposure 2-10 years, 2) 37 workers with medium-long exposure - 11-20 years, and 3) 20 workers with a history of long exposure - 21-26 years. The urinary concentrations of mercury in these individuals was 73 +/- 60 microliters x 1(-1), and in blood this concentration was not exceeding 50 microliters x 1(-1). The control group comprised 40 men aged 17 to 52 years. They had not had any occupational exposure to chemicals, or harmful physical factors. On the basis of clinical, haematological and biochemical studies 89 workers with occupational exposure to mercury vapour were regarded as clinically healthy. None of them had any symptoms and signs of the complete neurasthenic syndrome or organic brain injury. Increased nervous excitability was the complaint of 24 workers, 9 had headaches, sleep disturbances were reported by 5, and a feeling of tiredness and apathy was mentioned by 5 men. EEG recording demonstrated 81 normal tracings, and moderately pathological records in 8 men. The parameters of immunity and proteins acute phase reaction were determined, measuring the concentration of immunoglobulins, lysozyme, C3c, C4, alpha 1-acid glycoprotein, haptoglobin and ceruloplasmin in serum. A lower level of IgA, IgG and lysozyme was only noted in individuals with occupational exposure exceeding 20 years.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1725175

  3. Parameters of immunity acute phase reaction in men in relation to exposure duration to mercury vapours.

    PubMed

    Moszczynski, P; Moszczynski, P; Słowinski, S; Bem, S; Bartus, R

    1991-01-01

    The study was carried out in 89 men aged 21 to 57 years with a history of exposure to mercury vapour from 2 to 26 years during occupational work involving chlorine production by the method of mercury electrolysis. The workers were divided into three groups depending on the duration of occupational exposure: 1) 32 workers with a short history of exposure 2-10 years, 2) 37 workers with medium-long exposure - 11-20 years, and 3) 20 workers with a history of long exposure - 21-26 years. The urinary concentrations of mercury in these individuals was 73 +/- 60 microliters x 1(-1), and in blood this concentration was not exceeding 50 microliters x 1(-1). The control group comprised 40 men aged 17 to 52 years. They had not had any occupational exposure to chemicals, or harmful physical factors. On the basis of clinical, haematological and biochemical studies 89 workers with occupational exposure to mercury vapour were regarded as clinically healthy. None of them had any symptoms and signs of the complete neurasthenic syndrome or organic brain injury. Increased nervous excitability was the complaint of 24 workers, 9 had headaches, sleep disturbances were reported by 5, and a feeling of tiredness and apathy was mentioned by 5 men. EEG recording demonstrated 81 normal tracings, and moderately pathological records in 8 men. The parameters of immunity and proteins acute phase reaction were determined, measuring the concentration of immunoglobulins, lysozyme, C3c, C4, alpha 1-acid glycoprotein, haptoglobin and ceruloplasmin in serum. A lower level of IgA, IgG and lysozyme was only noted in individuals with occupational exposure exceeding 20 years.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  4. Chemical graphs, molecular matrices and topological indices in chemoinformatics and quantitative structure-activity relationships.

    PubMed

    Ivanciuc, Ovidiu

    2013-06-01

    Chemical and molecular graphs have fundamental applications in chemoinformatics, quantitative structureproperty relationships (QSPR), quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSAR), virtual screening of chemical libraries, and computational drug design. Chemoinformatics applications of graphs include chemical structure representation and coding, database search and retrieval, and physicochemical property prediction. QSPR, QSAR and virtual screening are based on the structure-property principle, which states that the physicochemical and biological properties of chemical compounds can be predicted from their chemical structure. Such structure-property correlations are usually developed from topological indices and fingerprints computed from the molecular graph and from molecular descriptors computed from the three-dimensional chemical structure. We present here a selection of the most important graph descriptors and topological indices, including molecular matrices, graph spectra, spectral moments, graph polynomials, and vertex topological indices. These graph descriptors are used to define several topological indices based on molecular connectivity, graph distance, reciprocal distance, distance-degree, distance-valency, spectra, polynomials, and information theory concepts. The molecular descriptors and topological indices can be developed with a more general approach, based on molecular graph operators, which define a family of graph indices related by a common formula. Graph descriptors and topological indices for molecules containing heteroatoms and multiple bonds are computed with weighting schemes based on atomic properties, such as the atomic number, covalent radius, or electronegativity. The correlation in QSPR and QSAR models can be improved by optimizing some parameters in the formula of topological indices, as demonstrated for structural descriptors based on atomic connectivity and graph distance. PMID:23701000

  5. Chemical composition and antibacterial activity of essential oils from the Tunisian Allium nigrum L.

    PubMed Central

    Rouis-Soussi, Lamia Sakka; Ayeb-Zakhama, Asma El; Mahjoub, Aouni; Flamini, Guido; Jannet, Hichem Ben; Harzallah-Skhiri, Fethia

    2014-01-01

    The chemical composition of the essential oils of different Allium nigrum L. organs and the antibacterial activity were evaluated. The study is particularly interesting because hitherto there are no reports on the antibacterial screening of this species with specific chemical composition. Therefore, essential oils from different organs (flowers, stems, leaves and bulbs) obtained separately by hydrodistillation were analyzed using gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC–MS). The antibacterial activity was evaluated using the disc and microdilution assays. In total, 39 compounds, representing 90.8-96.9 % of the total oil composition, were identified. The major component was hexadecanoic acid (synonym: palmitic acid) in all the A. nigrum organs oils (39.1-77.2 %). We also noted the presence of some sesquiterpenes, mainly germacrene D (12.8 %) in leaves oil) and some aliphatic compounds such as n-octadecane (30.5 %) in bulbs oil. Isopentyl isovalerate, 14-oxy-α-muurolene and germacrene D were identified for the first time in the genus Allium L. All the essential oils exhibited antimicrobial activity, especially against Enterococcus faecalis and Staphylococcus aureus. The oil obtained from the leaves exhibited an interesting antibacterial activity, with a Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) of 62.50 µg/mL against these two latter strains. The findings showed that the studied oils have antibacterial activity, and thus great potential for their application in food preservation and natural health products. PMID:26417280

  6. Biological activities and chemical constituents of some mangrove species from Sundarban estuary: An overview

    PubMed Central

    Simlai, Aritra; Roy, Amit

    2013-01-01

    This review represents the studies performed on some beneficial mangrove plants such as Ceriops decandra, Xylocarpus granatum, Xylocarpus moluccensis, Excoecaria agallocha, Sarcolobus globosus, Sonneratia caseolaris and Acanthus ilicifolius from the Sundarban estuary spanning India and Bangladesh with regard to their biological activities and chemical investigations till date. Sundarban is the largest single chunk of mangrove forest in the world. The forest is a source of livelihood to numerous people of the region. Several of its plant species have very large applications in the traditional folk medicine; various parts of these plants are used by the local people as cure for various ailments. Despite such enormous potential, remarkably few reports are available on these species regarding their biological activities and the active principles responsible for such activities. Though some chemical studies have been made on the mangrove plants of this estuary, reports pertaining to their activity-structure relationship are few in number. An attempt has been made in this review to increase the awareness for the medicinal significance as well as conservation and utilization of these mangrove species as natural rich sources of novel bioactive agents. PMID:24347925

  7. Optimization of nickel adsorption from aqueous solution by using activated carbon prepared from waste apricot by chemical activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdoğan, S.; Önal, Y.; Akmil-Başar, C.; Bilmez-Erdemoğlu, S.; Sarıcı-Özdemir, Ç.; Köseoğlu, E.; İçduygu, G.

    2005-12-01

    Waste apricot supplied by Malatya apricot plant (Turkey) was activated by using chemical activation method and K 2CO 3 was chosen for this purpose. Activation temperature was varied over the temperature range of 400-900 °C and N 2 atmosphere was used with 10 °C/min heat rate. The maximum surface area (1214 m 2/g) and micropore volume (0.355 cm 3/g) were obtained at 900 °C, but activated carbon was predominantly microporous at 700 °C. The resulting activated carbons were used for removal of Ni(II) ions from aqueous solution and adsorption properties have been investigated under various conditions such as pH, activation temperature, adsorbent dosage and nickel concentration. Adsorption parameters were determined by using Langmuir model. Optimal condition was determined as; pH 5, 0.7 g/10 ml adsorbent dosage, 10 mg/l Ni(II) concentration and 60 min contact time. The results indicate that the effective uptake of Ni(II) ions was obtained by activating the carbon at 900 °C.

  8. The effects of chemically modifying serum apolipoproteins on their ability to activate lipoprotein lipase.

    PubMed Central

    Dodds, P F; Lopez-Johnston, A; Welch, V A; Gurr, M I

    1987-01-01

    Lipoprotein lipase activity was measured in an acetone-dried-powder preparation from rat epididymal adipose tissue using pig serum or pig serum lipoprotein, which had been chemically modified, as activator. Modification of acidic amino acids of lipoproteins with NN-dimethyl-1,3-diamine resulted in a complete loss of ability to activate lipoprotein lipase. Modification of 34% of lipoprotein arginine groups with cyclohexanedione resulted in the loss of 75% of the activation of lipoprotein lipase; approx. 42% of the original activity was recovered after reversal of the modification. This effect was dependent on the cyclohexanedione concentration. Modification of 48% of lipoprotein lysine groups with malonaldehyde decreased the maximum activation by 20%, but three times as much lipoprotein was required to achieve this. Non-enzymic glycosylation of lipoprotein with glucose, under a variety of conditions resulting in up to 28 nmol of glucose/mg of protein, had no effect upon the ability to activate lipoprotein lipase. In contrast non-enzymic sialylation resulted in a time-dependent loss of up to 60% of ability to activate lipoprotein lipase. Reductive methylation and acetoacetylation of serum did not affect the ability to activate lipoprotein lipase. The results are compared to the effects of similar modifications to low density lipoproteins on receptor-mediated endocytosis. PMID:3593262

  9. Chemical composition, antimicrobial and antioxidant activities of essential oils from organically cultivated fennel cultivars.

    PubMed

    Shahat, Abdelaaty A; Ibrahim, Abeer Y; Hendawy, Saber F; Omer, Elsayed A; Hammouda, Faiza M; Abdel-Rahman, Fawzia H; Saleh, Mahmoud A

    2011-02-01

    Essential oils of the fruits of three organically grown cultivars of Egyptian fennel (Foeniculum vulgare var. azoricum, Foeniculum vulgare var. dulce and Foeniculum vulgare var. vulgare) were examined for their chemical constituents, antimicrobial and antioxidant activities. Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry analysis of the essential oils revealed the presence of 18 major monoterpenoids in all three cultivars but their percentage in each oil were greatly different. trans-Anethole, estragole, fenchone and limonene were highly abundant in all of the examined oils. Antioxidant activities of the essential oils were evaluated using the DPPH radical scavenging, lipid peroxidation and metal chelating assays. Essential oils from the azoricum and dulce cultivars were more effective antioxidants than that from the vulgare cultivar. Antimicrobial activities of each oil were measured against two species of fungi, two species of Gram negative and two species of Gram positive bacteria. All three cultivars showed similar antimicrobial activity.

  10. Physical and chemical limitations to preparation of beta radioactive stents by direct neutron activation.

    PubMed

    Petelenz, Barbara; Rajchel, Bogusław; Bilski, Paweł; Misiak, Ryszard; Bartyzel, Mirosław; Wilczek, Krzysztof; Alber, Dorothea

    2003-02-01

    Pure beta emitters are the sources of choice for intracoronary irradiations in restenosis prevention. In this work we reconsidered preparation of low activity 32P sources by ion-implantation of stable 31P into highly biocompatible pure titanium stents, followed by neutron activation. Gamma-spectrometrical analysis has shown that during activations with high thermal neutrons flux production of gamma-active long-lived contaminants is much beyond the dosimetrically acceptable limit, mainly due to the competing (n,p) reactions induced by the fast neutrons on isotopes of the bulk stent material, and to a lesser extent due to (n,gamma) reactions on chemical impurities. A potential applicability of this method for obtaining alternative beta radioactive stents is discussed.

  11. Importance of structural and chemical heterogeneity of activated carbon surfaces for adsorption of dibenzothiophene

    SciTech Connect

    Ania, C.O.; Bandosz, T.J.

    2005-08-16

    The performance of various activated carbons obtained from different carbon precursors (i.e., plastic waste, coal, and wood) as adsorbents for the desulfurization of liquid hydrocarbon fuels was evaluated. To increase surface heterogeneity, the carbon surface was modified by oxidation with ammonium persulfate. The results showed the importance of activated carbon pore sizes and surface chemistry for the adsorption of dibenzothiophene (DBT) from liquid phase. Adsorption of DBT on activated carbons is governed by two types of contributions: physical and chemical interactions. The former include dispersive interactions in the microporous network of the carbons. While the volume of micropores governs the amount physisorbed, mesopores control the kinetics of the process. On the other hand, introduction of surface functional groups enhances the performance of the activated carbons as a result of specific interactions between the acidic centers of the carbon and the basic structure of DBT molecule as well as sulfur-sulfur interactions.

  12. Chemical acceleration of a neutral granulated blast-furnace slag activated by sodium carbonate

    SciTech Connect

    Kovtun, Maxim Kearsley, Elsabe P. Shekhovtsova, Julia

    2015-06-15

    This paper presents results of a study on chemical acceleration of a neutral granulated blast-furnace slag activated using sodium carbonate. As strength development of alkali-activated slag cements containing neutral GBFS and sodium carbonate as activator at room temperature is known to be slow, three accelerators were investigated: sodium hydroxide, ordinary Portland cement and a combination of silica fume and slaked lime. In all cements, the main hydration product is C–(A)–S–H, but its structure varies between tobermorite and riversideite depending on the accelerator used. Calcite and gaylussite are present in all systems and they were formed due to either cation exchange reaction between the slag and the activator, or carbonation. With accelerators, compressive strength up to 15 MPa can be achieved within 24 h in comparison to 2.5 MPa after 48 h for a mix without an accelerator.

  13. Chemical composition and antibacterial activity of essential oils from different parts of Leonurus japonicus Houtt.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Liang; Peng, Cheng; Zhou, Qin-Mei; Wan, Feng; Xie, Xiao-Fang; Guo, Li; Li, Xiao-Hong; He, Cheng-Jun; Dai, Ou

    2013-01-01

    The herb and fruits of Leonurus japonicus Houtt., named "Yimucao" and "Chongweizi", respectively, in Chinese, have been widely used in China as gynecological medicines. The components of the essential oils obtained by hydrodistillation were investigated by GC-MS. The antibacterial activity of the essential oils was determined by micro-dilution assay. The results showed large variations in the chemical composition and antibacterial activity of the oils. The oil of "Yimucao" showed antibacterial activity against various Gram-positive bacteria and consisted mainly of sesquiterpenes and diterpenes, with phytone, phytol, caryophyllene oxide and β-caryophyllene being the most significant constituents, whereas the oil of "Chongweizi", mainly made up of bornyl acetate and aliphatic hydrocarbons, was inactive in the antibacterial assay. Further study of the main compounds in "Yimucao oil" showed that β-caryophyllene had wide-spectrum activity against Gram-positive bacteria. PMID:23344204

  14. Pattern formation in chemically interacting active rotors with self-propulsion.

    PubMed

    Liebchen, Benno; Cates, Michael E; Marenduzzo, Davide

    2016-09-21

    We demonstrate that active rotations in chemically signalling particles, such as autochemotactic E. coli close to walls, create a route for pattern formation based on a nonlinear yet deterministic instability mechanism. For slow rotations, we find a transient persistence of the uniform state, followed by a sudden formation of clusters contingent on locking of the average propulsion direction by chemotaxis. These clusters coarsen, which results in phase separation into a dense and a dilute region. Faster rotations arrest phase separation leading to a global travelling wave of rotors with synchronized roto-translational motion. Our results elucidate the physics resulting from the competition of two generic paradigms in active matter, chemotaxis and active rotations, and show that the latter provides a tool to design programmable self-assembly of active matter, for example to control coarsening.

  15. Chemical composition and antibacterial activity of essential oils from different parts of Leonurus japonicus Houtt.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Liang; Peng, Cheng; Zhou, Qin-Mei; Wan, Feng; Xie, Xiao-Fang; Guo, Li; Li, Xiao-Hong; He, Cheng-Jun; Dai, Ou

    2013-01-01

    The herb and fruits of Leonurus japonicus Houtt., named "Yimucao" and "Chongweizi", respectively, in Chinese, have been widely used in China as gynecological medicines. The components of the essential oils obtained by hydrodistillation were investigated by GC-MS. The antibacterial activity of the essential oils was determined by micro-dilution assay. The results showed large variations in the chemical composition and antibacterial activity of the oils. The oil of "Yimucao" showed antibacterial activity against various Gram-positive bacteria and consisted mainly of sesquiterpenes and diterpenes, with phytone, phytol, caryophyllene oxide and β-caryophyllene being the most significant constituents, whereas the oil of "Chongweizi", mainly made up of bornyl acetate and aliphatic hydrocarbons, was inactive in the antibacterial assay. Further study of the main compounds in "Yimucao oil" showed that β-caryophyllene had wide-spectrum activity against Gram-positive bacteria.

  16. Pattern formation in chemically interacting active rotors with self-propulsion.

    PubMed

    Liebchen, Benno; Cates, Michael E; Marenduzzo, Davide

    2016-09-21

    We demonstrate that active rotations in chemically signalling particles, such as autochemotactic E. coli close to walls, create a route for pattern formation based on a nonlinear yet deterministic instability mechanism. For slow rotations, we find a transient persistence of the uniform state, followed by a sudden formation of clusters contingent on locking of the average propulsion direction by chemotaxis. These clusters coarsen, which results in phase separation into a dense and a dilute region. Faster rotations arrest phase separation leading to a global travelling wave of rotors with synchronized roto-translational motion. Our results elucidate the physics resulting from the competition of two generic paradigms in active matter, chemotaxis and active rotations, and show that the latter provides a tool to design programmable self-assembly of active matter, for example to control coarsening. PMID:27526180

  17. Chemical composition, antimicrobial, antiradical and anticholinesterase activity of the essential oil of Pulicaria stephanocarpa from Soqotra.

    PubMed

    Ali, Nasser A Awadh; Crouch, Rebecca A; Al-Fatimi, Mohamed A; Arnold, Norbert; Teichert, Axel; Setzer, William N; Wessjohann, Ludger

    2012-01-01

    The chemical composition of the hydrodistilled leaf essential oil from Pulicaria stephanocarpa Balf. Fil was determined by GC-MS analysis, and its antimicrobial, antioxidant and anticholinesterase (AChE) activities were evaluated. Eighty-three compounds were identified representing 97.2% of the total oil. (E)-Caryophyllene 13.4%, (E)-nerolidol 8.5%, caryophyllene oxide 8.5%, alpha-cadinol 8.2% spathulenol 6.8% and tau-cadinol 4.7%, were the main components. Antimicrobial activity of the oil, evaluated using the disc diffusion and broth dilution methods, demonstrated the highest susceptibility on Gram-positive bacteria and Candida albicans. The free radical scavenging ability of the oil was assessed by the DPPH assay to show antiradical activity with IC50 of 330 microg/mL. Moreover, the oil revealed an AChE inhibitory activity of 47% at a concentration of 200 microg/mL using Ellman's method.

  18. Can vaccinia virus be replaced by MVA virus for testing virucidal activity of chemical disinfectants?

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Vaccinia virus strain Lister Elstree (VACV) is a test virus in the DVV/RKI guidelines as representative of the stable enveloped viruses. Since the potential risk of laboratory-acquired infections with VACV persists and since the adverse effects of vaccination with VACV are described, the replacement of VACV by the modified vaccinia Ankara strain (MVA) was studied by testing the activity of different chemical biocides in three German laboratories. Methods The inactivating properties of different chemical biocides (peracetic acid, aldehydes and alcohols) were tested in a quantitative suspension test according to the DVV/RKI guideline. All tests were performed with a protein load of 10% fetal calf serum with both viruses in parallel using different concentrations and contact times. Residual virus was determined by endpoint dilution method. Results The chemical biocides exhibited similar virucidal activity against VACV and MVA. In three cases intra-laboratory differences were determined between VACV and MVA - 40% (v/v) ethanol and 30% (v/v) isopropanol are more active against MVA, whereas MVA seems more stable than VACV when testing with 0.05% glutardialdehyde. Test accuracy across the three participating laboratories was high. Remarkably inter-laboratory differences in the reduction factor were only observed in two cases. Conclusions Our data provide valuable information for the replacement of VACV by MVA for testing chemical biocides and disinfectants. Because MVA does not replicate in humans this would eliminate the potential risk of inadvertent inoculation with vaccinia virus and disease in non-vaccinated laboratory workers. PMID:20573218

  19. Chemical composition, nutritional value, and antioxidant activities of eight mulberry cultivars from China

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Linghong; Wu, Xiangyang; Zhu, Maomao; Zhao, Weiguo; Li, Fang; Zou, Ye; Yang, Liuqing

    2012-01-01

    Background: Mulberry (Morus, Moraceae) is widely distributed in the temperate, subtropical, or tropical regions of the world, while there are no conclusive reports on the chemical composition, nutritional value, and antioxidant properties of mulberry cultivars from China. Objective: To investigate chemical properties and to determine proximate nutritive compounds of the eight mulberry cultivars. Materials and Methods: Chemical properties (including moisture, ash, total dry matter, total soluble solids, pH, and total titratable acidity) of the eight mulberry cultivars were investigated. Proximate nutritive compounds (including crude protein, crude fat, mineral elements, total anthocyanins, total polyphenols, total flavonoids, and total sugars) were also determined. Results: The results indicated that the moisture contents were 70.0-87.4%, the crude protein contents 1.62-5.54%, and the crude fat contents from 1.23-2.23%. The major fatty acids in mulberry fruits were linoleic acid (C18:2) and palmitic acid (C16:0), 26.40-74.77% and 9.29-22.26%, respectively. Mulberry fruit is also a good source of minerals and the potassium content (521.37-1718.60 mg/100g DW) is especially higher than that of other elements. Compared with other species, the Morus atropurpurea Roxb. had relatively high total polyphenols content (189.67-246.00 mg GAE/100mg) and anthocyanins content (114.67-193.00 mg/100mg). There was a good linear correlation between antioxidant activity and total polyphenols content. Conclusion: Significant differences of the chemical composition, nutritional value, and antioxidant activities among the mulberry cultivars were observed, the Morus atropurpurea Roxb. showed considerable high nutritional value and antioxidant activity which could be developed for functional food that benefits human health. PMID:23060696

  20. Total chemical synthesis of enzymatically active human type II secretory phospholipase A2

    PubMed Central

    Hackeng, Tilman M.; Mounier, Carine M.; Bon, Cassian; Dawson, Philip E.; Griffin, John H.; Kent, Stephen B. H.

    1997-01-01

    Human group II secretory phospholipase A2 (sPLA2) is an enzyme found in the α granules of platelets and at inflammatory sites. Although its physiological function is unclear, sPLA2 can inhibit blood coagulation reactions independent of its lipolytic action. To study the molecular basis of PLA2 activities, we developed a total chemical synthesis of sPLA2 by chemical ligation of large unprotected peptides. The synthetic segments PLA2-(1–58)-αCOSCH2COOH and PLA2-(59–124) were prepared by stepwise solid-phase peptide synthesis and ligated to yield a peptide bond between Gly58 and Cys59. The 124-residue polypeptide product (mass: 13,920 ± 2 Da) was folded to yield one major product (mass: 13,905 ± 1 Da), the loss of 15 ± 3 Da reflecting the formation of seven disulfide bonds. Circular dichroism studies of synthetic sPLA2 showed α-helix, β-structure, and random coil contents consistent with those found in the crystal structure of sPLA2. Synthetic sPLA2 had kcat and Km values identical to those of recombinant sPLA2 for hydrolysis of 1,2-bis(heptanoylthio)-phosphatidylcholine. Synthetic sPLA2, like recombinant sPLA2, inhibited thrombin generation from prothrombinase complex (factors Xa, V, II, Ca2+, and phospholipids). In the absence of phospholipids, both synthetic and recombinant sPLA2 inhibited by 70% prothrombin activation by factors Xa, Va, and Ca2+. Thus, synthetic sPLA2 is a phospholipid-independent anticoagulant like recombinant or natural sPLA2. This study demonstrates that chemical synthesis of sPLA2 yields a fully active native-like enzyme and offers a straightforward tool to provide sPLA2 analogs for structure–activity studies of anticoagulant, lipolytic, or inflammatory activities. PMID:9223275