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Sample records for activated chloride channel

  1. Lubiprostone: a chloride channel activator.

    PubMed

    Lacy, Brian E; Levy, L Campbell

    2007-04-01

    In January 2006 the Food and Drug Administration approved lubiprostone for the treatment of chronic constipation in men and women aged 18 and over. Lubiprostone is categorized as a prostone, a bicyclic fatty acid metabolite of prostaglandin E1. Lubiprostone activates a specific chloride channel (ClC-2) in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract to enhance intestinal fluid secretion, which increases GI transit and improves symptoms of constipation. This article reviews the role of chloride channels in the GI tract, describes the structure, function, and pharmacokinetics of lubiprostone, and discusses clinically important data on this new medication.

  2. Chloride dependence of hyperpolarization-activated chloride channel gates

    PubMed Central

    Pusch, Michael; Jordt, Sven-Eric; Stein, Valentin; Jentsch, Thomas J

    1999-01-01

    ClC proteins are a class of voltage-dependent Cl− channels with several members mutated in human diseases. The prototype ClC-0 Torpedo channel is a dimeric protein; each subunit forms a pore that can gate independently from the other one. A common slower gating mechanism acts on both pores simultaneously; slow gating activates ClC-0 at hyperpolarized voltages. The ClC-2 Cl− channel is also activated by hyperpolarization, as are some ClC-1 mutants (e.g. D136G) and wild-type (WT) ClC-1 at certain pH values.We studied the dependence on internal Cl− ([Cl−]i) of the hyperpolarization-activated gates of several ClC channels (WT ClC-0, ClC-0 mutant P522G, ClC-1 mutant D136G and an N-terminal deletion mutant of ClC-2), by patch clamping channels expressed in Xenopus oocytes.With all these channels, reducing [Cl−]i shifted activation to more negative voltages and reduced the maximal activation at most negative voltages.We also investigated the external halide dependence of WT ClC-2 using two-electrode voltage-clamp recording. Reducing external Cl− ([Cl−]o) activated ClC-2 currents. Replacing [Cl−]o by the less permeant Br− reduced channel activity and accelerated deactivation.Gating of the ClC-2 mutant K566Q in normal [Cl−]o resembled that of WT ClC-2 in low [Cl−]o, i.e. channels had a considerable open probability (Po) at resting membrane potential. Substituting external Cl− by Br− or I− led to a decrease in Po.The [Cl−]i dependence of the hyperpolarization-activated gates of various ClC channels suggests a similar gating mechanism, and raises the possibility that the gating charge for the hyperpolarization-activated gate is provided by Cl−.The external halide dependence of hyperpolarization-activated gating of ClC-2 suggests that it is mediated or modulated by anions as in other ClC channels. In contrast to the depolarization-activated fast gates of ClC-0 and ClC-1, the absence of Cl− favours channel opening. Lysine 556 may be important

  3. Phosphatase inhibitors activate normal and defective CFTR chloride channels.

    PubMed Central

    Becq, F; Jensen, T J; Chang, X B; Savoia, A; Rommens, J M; Tsui, L C; Buchwald, M; Riordan, J R; Hanrahan, J W

    1994-01-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channel is regulated by phosphorylation and dephosphorylation at multiple sites. Although activation by protein kinases has been studied in some detail, the dephosphorylation step has received little attention. This report examines the mechanisms responsible for the dephosphorylation and spontaneous deactivation ("rundown") of CFTR chloride channels excised from transfected Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) and human airway epithelial cells. We report that the alkaline phosphatase inhibitors bromotetramisole, 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine, theophylline, and vanadate slow the rundown of CFTR channel activity in excised membrane patches and reduce dephosphorylation of CFTR protein in isolated membranes. It was also found that in unstimulated cells, CFTR channels can be activated by exposure to phosphatase inhibitors alone. Most importantly, exposure of mammalian cells to phosphatase inhibitors alone activates CFTR channels that have disease-causing mutations, provided the mutant channels are present in the plasma membrane (R117H, G551D, and delta F508 after cooling). These results suggest that CFTR dephosphorylation is dynamic and that membrane-associated phosphatase activity may be a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of cystic fibrosis. Images PMID:7522329

  4. Swell activated chloride channel function in human neutrophils

    SciTech Connect

    Salmon, Michael D.; Ahluwalia, Jatinder

    2009-04-17

    Non-excitable cells such as neutrophil granulocytes are the archetypal inflammatory immune cell involved in critical functions of the innate immune system. The electron current generated (I{sub e}) by the neutrophil NADPH oxidase is electrogenic and rapidly depolarises the membrane potential. For continuous function of the NADPH oxidase, I{sub e} has to be balanced to preserve electroneutrality, if not; sufficient depolarisation would prevent electrons from leaving the cell and neutrophil function would be abrogated. Subsequently, the depolarisation generated by the neutrophil NADPH oxidase I{sub e} must be counteracted by ion transport. The finding that depolarisation required counter-ions to compensate electron transport was followed by the observation that chloride channels activated by swell can counteract the NADPH oxidase membrane depolarisation. In this mini review, we discuss the research findings that revealed the essential role of swell activated chloride channels in human neutrophil function.

  5. Tamoxifen does not inhibit the swell activated chloride channel in human neutrophils during the respiratory burst

    SciTech Connect

    Ahluwalia, Jatinder

    2008-10-31

    Effective functioning of neutrophils relies upon electron translocation through the NADPH oxidase (NOX). The electron current generated (I{sub e}) by the neutrophil NADPH oxidase is electrogenic and rapidly depolarises the membrane potential in activated human neutrophils. Swelling activated chloride channels have been demonstrated in part to counteract the depolarisation generated by the NADPH oxidase I{sub e}. In the present study, the effects of inhibitors of swell activated chloride channels on ROS production and on the swelling activated chloride conductance was investigated in activated human neutrophils. Tamoxifen (10 {mu}M), a specific inhibitor for swell activated chloride channels in neutrophils, completely inhibited both the PMA and FMLP stimulated respiratory burst. This inhibition of the neutrophil respiratory burst was not due to the blocking effect of tamoxifen on the swelling activated chloride conductance in these cells. These results demonstrate that a tamoxifen insensitive swell activated chloride channel has important significance during the neutrophil respiratory burst.

  6. Activation and inhibition of TMEM16A calcium-activated chloride channels.

    PubMed

    Ni, Yu-Li; Kuan, Ai-Seon; Chen, Tsung-Yu

    2014-01-01

    Calcium-activated chloride channels (CaCC) encoded by family members of transmembrane proteins of unknown function 16 (TMEM16) have recently been intensely studied for functional properties as well as their physiological roles as chloride channels in various tissues. One technical hurdle in studying these channels is the well-known channel rundown that frequently impairs the precision of electrophysiological measurements for the channels. Using experimental protocols that employ fast-solution exchange, we circumvented the problem of channel rundown by normalizing the Ca(2+)-induced current to the maximally-activated current obtained within a time period in which the channel rundown was negligible. We characterized the activation of the TMEM16A-encoded CaCC (also called ANO1) by Ca(2+), Sr(2+), and Ba(2+), and discovered that Mg(2+) competes with Ca(2+) in binding to the divalent-cation binding site without activating the channel. We also studied the permeability of the ANO1 pore for various anions and found that the anion occupancy in the pore-as revealed by the permeability ratios of these anions-appeared to be inversely correlated with the apparent affinity of the ANO1 inhibition by niflumic acid (NFA). On the other hand, the NFA inhibition was neither affected by the degree of the channel activation nor influenced by the types of divalent cations used for the channel activation. These results suggest that the NFA inhibition of ANO1 is likely mediated by altering the pore function but not through changing the channel gating. Our study provides a precise characterization of ANO1 and documents factors that can affect divalent cation activation and NFA inhibition of ANO1.

  7. Activation and Inhibition of TMEM16A Calcium-Activated Chloride Channels

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Yu-Li; Kuan, Ai-Seon; Chen, Tsung-Yu

    2014-01-01

    Calcium-activated chloride channels (CaCC) encoded by family members of transmembrane proteins of unknown function 16 (TMEM16) have recently been intensely studied for functional properties as well as their physiological roles as chloride channels in various tissues. One technical hurdle in studying these channels is the well-known channel rundown that frequently impairs the precision of electrophysiological measurements for the channels. Using experimental protocols that employ fast-solution exchange, we circumvented the problem of channel rundown by normalizing the Ca2+-induced current to the maximally-activated current obtained within a time period in which the channel rundown was negligible. We characterized the activation of the TMEM16A-encoded CaCC (also called ANO1) by Ca2+, Sr2+, and Ba2+, and discovered that Mg2+ competes with Ca2+ in binding to the divalent-cation binding site without activating the channel. We also studied the permeability of the ANO1 pore for various anions and found that the anion occupancy in the pore–as revealed by the permeability ratios of these anions–appeared to be inversely correlated with the apparent affinity of the ANO1 inhibition by niflumic acid (NFA). On the other hand, the NFA inhibition was neither affected by the degree of the channel activation nor influenced by the types of divalent cations used for the channel activation. These results suggest that the NFA inhibition of ANO1 is likely mediated by altering the pore function but not through changing the channel gating. Our study provides a precise characterization of ANO1 and documents factors that can affect divalent cation activation and NFA inhibition of ANO1. PMID:24489780

  8. Anoctamin Calcium-Activated Chloride Channels May Modulate Inhibitory Transmission in the Cerebellar Cortex.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weiping; Schmelzeisen, Steffen; Parthier, Daniel; Frings, Stephan; Möhrlen, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Calcium-activated chloride channels of the anoctamin (alias TMEM16) protein family fulfill critical functions in epithelial fluid transport, smooth muscle contraction and sensory signal processing. Little is known, however, about their contribution to information processing in the central nervous system. Here we examined the recent finding that a calcium-dependent chloride conductance impacts on GABAergic synaptic inhibition in Purkinje cells of the cerebellum. We asked whether anoctamin channels may underlie this chloride conductance. We identified two anoctamin channel proteins, ANO1 and ANO2, in the cerebellar cortex. ANO1 was expressed in inhibitory interneurons of the molecular layer and the granule cell layer. Both channels were expressed in Purkinje cells but, while ANO1 appeared to be retained in the cell body, ANO2 was targeted to the dendritic tree. Functional studies confirmed that ANO2 was involved in a calcium-dependent mode of ionic plasticity that reduces the efficacy of GABAergic synapses. ANO2 channels attenuated GABAergic transmission by increasing the postsynaptic chloride concentration, hence reducing the driving force for chloride influx. Our data suggest that ANO2 channels are involved in a Ca2+-dependent regulation of synaptic weight in GABAergic inhibition. Thus, in balance with the chloride extrusion mechanism via the co-transporter KCC2, ANO2 appears to regulate ionic plasticity in the cerebellum.

  9. Anoctamin Calcium-Activated Chloride Channels May Modulate Inhibitory Transmission in the Cerebellar Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Parthier, Daniel; Frings, Stephan; Möhrlen, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Calcium-activated chloride channels of the anoctamin (alias TMEM16) protein family fulfill critical functions in epithelial fluid transport, smooth muscle contraction and sensory signal processing. Little is known, however, about their contribution to information processing in the central nervous system. Here we examined the recent finding that a calcium-dependent chloride conductance impacts on GABAergic synaptic inhibition in Purkinje cells of the cerebellum. We asked whether anoctamin channels may underlie this chloride conductance. We identified two anoctamin channel proteins, ANO1 and ANO2, in the cerebellar cortex. ANO1 was expressed in inhibitory interneurons of the molecular layer and the granule cell layer. Both channels were expressed in Purkinje cells but, while ANO1 appeared to be retained in the cell body, ANO2 was targeted to the dendritic tree. Functional studies confirmed that ANO2 was involved in a calcium-dependent mode of ionic plasticity that reduces the efficacy of GABAergic synapses. ANO2 channels attenuated GABAergic transmission by increasing the postsynaptic chloride concentration, hence reducing the driving force for chloride influx. Our data suggest that ANO2 channels are involved in a Ca2+-dependent regulation of synaptic weight in GABAergic inhibition. Thus, in balance with the chloride extrusion mechanism via the co-transporter KCC2, ANO2 appears to regulate ionic plasticity in the cerebellum. PMID:26558388

  10. Effect of trimethyllead chloride on slowly activating (SV) channels in red beet (Beta vulgaris L.) taproots.

    PubMed

    Trela, Zenon; Burdach, Zbigniew; Przestalski, Stanisław; Karcz, Waldemar

    2012-12-01

    The patch-clamp technique was used to examine the effect of trimethyllead chloride (Met(3)PbCl) on SV channel activity in red beet (Beta vulgaris L.) taproot vacuoles. It was found that in the control bath the macroscopic currents showed the typical slow activation and a strong outward rectification of the steady-state currents. An addition of Met(3)PbCl to the bath solution blocked, in a concentration-dependent manner, SV currents in red beet vacuoles. The time constant τ increased several times in the presence of 100 μM trimethyllead chloride at all voltages tested. When single channel properties were analyzed, only little channel activity could be recorded in the presence of 100 μM Met(3)PbCl. Trimethyllead chloride decreased significantly (by about one order of magnitude) the open probability of single channels. The recordings of single channel activity obtained in the presence and absence of Met(3)PbCl showed that organolead only slightly (by ca. 10%) decreased the unitary conductance of single channels. It was also found that Met(3)PbCl diminished significantly the number of SV channel openings, whereas it did not change the opening times of the channels. Taken together, these results suggest that Met(3)PbCl binding site is located outside the channel selectivity filter.

  11. Requirement of calcium-activated chloride channels in the activation of mouse vomeronasal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Kim, SangSeong; Ma, Limei; Yu, C. Ron

    2011-01-01

    In terrestrial vertebrates, the vomeronasal organ (VNO) detects and transduces pheromone signals. VNO activation is thought to be mediated by the transient receptor potential C2 (TRPC2) channel. The aberrant behavioural phenotypes observed in TRPC2−/− mice are generally attributed to the lost VNO function. Recently, calcium-activated chloride channels have been shown to contribute to VNO activation. Here we show that CACCs can be activated in VNO slice preparations from the TRPC2−/− mice and this activation is blocked by pharmacological agents that inhibit intracellular Ca2+ release. Urine-evoked Cl− current is sufficient to drive spiking changes in VNO neurons from both wild-type (WT) and TRPC2−/− mice. Moreover, blocking Cl− conductance essentially abolishes VNO activation in WT neurons. These results suggest a TRPC2-independent signalling pathway in the VNO and the requirement of calcium-activated chloride channels currents to mediate pheromone activation. Our data further suggest that TRPC2−/− mice retain partial VNO function. PMID:21694713

  12. Shikonin Inhibits Intestinal Calcium-Activated Chloride Channels and Prevents Rotaviral Diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yu; Yu, Bo; Yang, Hong; Ma, Tonghui

    2016-01-01

    Secretory diarrhea remains a global health burden and causes major mortality in children. There have been some focuses on antidiarrheal therapies that may reduce fluid losses and intestinal motility in diarrheal diseases. In the present study, we identified shikonin as an inhibitor of TMEM16A chloride channel activity using cell-based fluorescent-quenching assay. The IC50 value of shikonin was 6.5 μM. Short-circuit current measurements demonstrated that shikonin inhibited Eact-induced Cl- current in a dose-dependent manner, with IC50 value of 1.5 μM. Short-circuit current measurement showed that shikonin exhibited inhibitory effect against CCh-induced Cl- currents in mouse colonic epithelia but did not affect cytoplasmic Ca2+ concentration as well as the other major enterocyte chloride channel conductance regulator. Characterization study found that shikonin inhibited basolateral K+ channel activity without affecting Na+/K+-ATPase activities. In vivo studies revealed that shikonin significantly delayed intestinal motility in mice and reduced stool water content in a neonatal mice model of rotaviral diarrhea without affecting the viral infection process in vivo. Taken together, the results suggested that shikonin inhibited enterocyte calcium-activated chloride channels, the inhibitory effect was partially through inhbition of basolateral K+ channel activity, and shikonin could be a lead compound in the treatment of rotaviral secretory diarrhea. PMID:27601995

  13. Shikonin Inhibits Intestinal Calcium-Activated Chloride Channels and Prevents Rotaviral Diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yu; Yu, Bo; Yang, Hong; Ma, Tonghui

    2016-01-01

    Secretory diarrhea remains a global health burden and causes major mortality in children. There have been some focuses on antidiarrheal therapies that may reduce fluid losses and intestinal motility in diarrheal diseases. In the present study, we identified shikonin as an inhibitor of TMEM16A chloride channel activity using cell-based fluorescent-quenching assay. The IC50 value of shikonin was 6.5 μM. Short-circuit current measurements demonstrated that shikonin inhibited Eact-induced Cl(-) current in a dose-dependent manner, with IC50 value of 1.5 μM. Short-circuit current measurement showed that shikonin exhibited inhibitory effect against CCh-induced Cl(-) currents in mouse colonic epithelia but did not affect cytoplasmic Ca(2+) concentration as well as the other major enterocyte chloride channel conductance regulator. Characterization study found that shikonin inhibited basolateral K(+) channel activity without affecting Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase activities. In vivo studies revealed that shikonin significantly delayed intestinal motility in mice and reduced stool water content in a neonatal mice model of rotaviral diarrhea without affecting the viral infection process in vivo. Taken together, the results suggested that shikonin inhibited enterocyte calcium-activated chloride channels, the inhibitory effect was partially through inhbition of basolateral K(+) channel activity, and shikonin could be a lead compound in the treatment of rotaviral secretory diarrhea.

  14. Members of the chloride intracellular ion channel protein family demonstrate glutaredoxin-like enzymatic activity.

    PubMed

    Al Khamici, Heba; Brown, Louise J; Hossain, Khondker R; Hudson, Amanda L; Sinclair-Burton, Alxcia A; Ng, Jane Phui Mun; Daniel, Elizabeth L; Hare, Joanna E; Cornell, Bruce A; Curmi, Paul M G; Davey, Mary W; Valenzuela, Stella M

    2015-01-01

    The Chloride Intracellular Ion Channel (CLIC) family consists of six evolutionarily conserved proteins in humans. Members of this family are unusual, existing as both monomeric soluble proteins and as integral membrane proteins where they function as chloride selective ion channels, however no function has previously been assigned to their soluble form. Structural studies have shown that in the soluble form, CLIC proteins adopt a glutathione S-transferase (GST) fold, however, they have an active site with a conserved glutaredoxin monothiol motif, similar to the omega class GSTs. We demonstrate that CLIC proteins have glutaredoxin-like glutathione-dependent oxidoreductase enzymatic activity. CLICs 1, 2 and 4 demonstrate typical glutaredoxin-like activity using 2-hydroxyethyl disulfide as a substrate. Mutagenesis experiments identify cysteine 24 as the catalytic cysteine residue in CLIC1, which is consistent with its structure. CLIC1 was shown to reduce sodium selenite and dehydroascorbate in a glutathione-dependent manner. Previous electrophysiological studies have shown that the drugs IAA-94 and A9C specifically block CLIC channel activity. These same compounds inhibit CLIC1 oxidoreductase activity. This work for the first time assigns a functional activity to the soluble form of the CLIC proteins. Our results demonstrate that the soluble form of the CLIC proteins has an enzymatic activity that is distinct from the channel activity of their integral membrane form. This CLIC enzymatic activity may be important for protecting the intracellular environment against oxidation. It is also likely that this enzymatic activity regulates the CLIC ion channel function.

  15. Cloning and expression of Ca2+-activated chloride channel from rat brain.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Sang Min; Park, Hye-Kyung; Yoon, In-Soo; Lee, Jun-Ho; Kim, Jong-Hoon; Jang, Choon-Gon; Lee, C Justin; Nah, Seung-Yeol

    2005-08-26

    To clone the gene product responsible for the calcium-activated chloride channel (CLCA) in rat brain cerebrum, we performed a reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) with gene-specific primers of a rat EST clone. We successfully cloned a rat brain CLCA (rbCLCA). The full-length cDNA is 2895 bp long and codes for a 902 amino acid protein. The clone consists of four transmembrane domains and shows a 79.1% of significant homology with previously reported mouse smooth muscle chloride channel sequence. We also performed RT-PCR using single neuron and glia, and various tissues to determine the tissue expression of rbCLCA. We found that rbCLCA was expressed in both neuron and glia. In peripheral organs, rbCLCA showed the predominant expressions in cerebrum, cerebellum, kidney, small intestine, and stomach but not in heart, large intestine, liver, lung, and spleen. Whole-cell patch clamp studies in HEK293 cells transfected with the clone identified a niflumic acid (a CLCA channel blocker)-sensitive and voltage-dependent chloride current but we could not observe this chloride current in mock-transfected cells. The identification of genes belonging to the CLCA family from rat brain and its functional expression will help to evaluate its physiological role in brain as anion channel.

  16. Calmodulin-dependent activation and inactivation of anoctamin calcium-gated chloride channels.

    PubMed

    Vocke, Kerstin; Dauner, Kristin; Hahn, Anne; Ulbrich, Anne; Broecker, Jana; Keller, Sandro; Frings, Stephan; Möhrlen, Frank

    2013-10-01

    Calcium-dependent chloride channels serve critical functions in diverse biological systems. Driven by cellular calcium signals, the channels codetermine excitatory processes and promote solute transport. The anoctamin (ANO) family of membrane proteins encodes three calcium-activated chloride channels, named ANO 1 (also TMEM16A), ANO 2 (also TMEM16B), and ANO 6 (also TMEM16F). Here we examined how ANO 1 and ANO 2 interact with Ca(2+)/calmodulin using nonstationary current analysis during channel activation. We identified a putative calmodulin-binding domain in the N-terminal region of the channel proteins that is involved in channel activation. Binding studies with peptides indicated that this domain, a regulatory calmodulin-binding motif (RCBM), provides two distinct modes of interaction with Ca(2+)/calmodulin, one at submicromolar Ca(2+) concentrations and one in the micromolar Ca(2+) range. Functional, structural, and pharmacological data support the concept that calmodulin serves as a calcium sensor that is stably associated with the RCBM domain and regulates the activation of ANO 1 and ANO 2 channels. Moreover, the predominant splice variant of ANO 2 in the brain exhibits Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent inactivation, a loss of channel activity within 30 s. This property may curtail ANO 2 activity during persistent Ca(2+) signals in neurons. Mutagenesis data indicated that the RCBM domain is also involved in ANO 2 inactivation, and that inactivation is suppressed in the retinal ANO 2 splice variant. These results advance the understanding of Ca(2+) regulation in anoctamin Cl(-) channels and its significance for the physiological function that anoctamin channels subserve in neurons and other cell types.

  17. Calmodulin-dependent activation and inactivation of anoctamin calcium-gated chloride channels

    PubMed Central

    Vocke, Kerstin; Dauner, Kristin; Hahn, Anne; Ulbrich, Anne; Broecker, Jana; Keller, Sandro; Frings, Stephan

    2013-01-01

    Calcium-dependent chloride channels serve critical functions in diverse biological systems. Driven by cellular calcium signals, the channels codetermine excitatory processes and promote solute transport. The anoctamin (ANO) family of membrane proteins encodes three calcium-activated chloride channels, named ANO 1 (also TMEM16A), ANO 2 (also TMEM16B), and ANO 6 (also TMEM16F). Here we examined how ANO 1 and ANO 2 interact with Ca2+/calmodulin using nonstationary current analysis during channel activation. We identified a putative calmodulin-binding domain in the N-terminal region of the channel proteins that is involved in channel activation. Binding studies with peptides indicated that this domain, a regulatory calmodulin-binding motif (RCBM), provides two distinct modes of interaction with Ca2+/calmodulin, one at submicromolar Ca2+ concentrations and one in the micromolar Ca2+ range. Functional, structural, and pharmacological data support the concept that calmodulin serves as a calcium sensor that is stably associated with the RCBM domain and regulates the activation of ANO 1 and ANO 2 channels. Moreover, the predominant splice variant of ANO 2 in the brain exhibits Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent inactivation, a loss of channel activity within 30 s. This property may curtail ANO 2 activity during persistent Ca2+ signals in neurons. Mutagenesis data indicated that the RCBM domain is also involved in ANO 2 inactivation, and that inactivation is suppressed in the retinal ANO 2 splice variant. These results advance the understanding of Ca2+ regulation in anoctamin Cl− channels and its significance for the physiological function that anoctamin channels subserve in neurons and other cell types. PMID:24081981

  18. Calcium-activated chloride channels in the apical region of mouse vomeronasal sensory neurons

    PubMed Central

    Dibattista, Michele; Amjad, Asma; Maurya, Devendra Kumar; Sagheddu, Claudia; Montani, Giorgia; Tirindelli, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    The rodent vomeronasal organ plays a crucial role in several social behaviors. Detection of pheromones or other emitted signaling molecules occurs in the dendritic microvilli of vomeronasal sensory neurons, where the binding of molecules to vomeronasal receptors leads to the influx of sodium and calcium ions mainly through the transient receptor potential canonical 2 (TRPC2) channel. To investigate the physiological role played by the increase in intracellular calcium concentration in the apical region of these neurons, we produced localized, rapid, and reproducible increases in calcium concentration with flash photolysis of caged calcium and measured calcium-activated currents with the whole cell voltage-clamp technique. On average, a large inward calcium-activated current of −261 pA was measured at −50 mV, rising with a time constant of 13 ms. Ion substitution experiments showed that this current is anion selective. Moreover, the chloride channel blockers niflumic acid and 4,4′-diisothiocyanatostilbene-2,2′-disulfonic acid partially inhibited the calcium-activated current. These results directly demonstrate that a large chloride current can be activated by calcium in the apical region of mouse vomeronasal sensory neurons. Furthermore, we showed by immunohistochemistry that the calcium-activated chloride channels TMEM16A/anoctamin1 and TMEM16B/anoctamin2 are present in the apical layer of the vomeronasal epithelium, where they largely colocalize with the TRPC2 transduction channel. Immunocytochemistry on isolated vomeronasal sensory neurons showed that TMEM16A and TMEM16B coexpress in the neuronal microvilli. Therefore, we conclude that microvilli of mouse vomeronasal sensory neurons have a high density of calcium-activated chloride channels that may play an important role in vomeronasal transduction. PMID:22732308

  19. Calcium-activated chloride channels in the apical region of mouse vomeronasal sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Dibattista, Michele; Amjad, Asma; Maurya, Devendra Kumar; Sagheddu, Claudia; Montani, Giorgia; Tirindelli, Roberto; Menini, Anna

    2012-07-01

    The rodent vomeronasal organ plays a crucial role in several social behaviors. Detection of pheromones or other emitted signaling molecules occurs in the dendritic microvilli of vomeronasal sensory neurons, where the binding of molecules to vomeronasal receptors leads to the influx of sodium and calcium ions mainly through the transient receptor potential canonical 2 (TRPC2) channel. To investigate the physiological role played by the increase in intracellular calcium concentration in the apical region of these neurons, we produced localized, rapid, and reproducible increases in calcium concentration with flash photolysis of caged calcium and measured calcium-activated currents with the whole cell voltage-clamp technique. On average, a large inward calcium-activated current of -261 pA was measured at -50 mV, rising with a time constant of 13 ms. Ion substitution experiments showed that this current is anion selective. Moreover, the chloride channel blockers niflumic acid and 4,4'-diisothiocyanatostilbene-2,2'-disulfonic acid partially inhibited the calcium-activated current. These results directly demonstrate that a large chloride current can be activated by calcium in the apical region of mouse vomeronasal sensory neurons. Furthermore, we showed by immunohistochemistry that the calcium-activated chloride channels TMEM16A/anoctamin1 and TMEM16B/anoctamin2 are present in the apical layer of the vomeronasal epithelium, where they largely colocalize with the TRPC2 transduction channel. Immunocytochemistry on isolated vomeronasal sensory neurons showed that TMEM16A and TMEM16B coexpress in the neuronal microvilli. Therefore, we conclude that microvilli of mouse vomeronasal sensory neurons have a high density of calcium-activated chloride channels that may play an important role in vomeronasal transduction.

  20. The AQP-3 water channel is a pivotal modulator of glycerol-induced chloride channel activation in nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haifeng; Deng, Zhiqin; Yang, Lili; Luo, Hai; Liu, Shanwen; Li, Yuan; Wei, Yan; Peng, Shuang; Zhu, Linyan; Wang, Liwei; Chen, Lixin

    2016-03-01

    Aquaporin (AQP) and chloride channels are ubiquitous in virtually all living cells, playing pivotal roles in cell proliferation, migration and apoptosis. We previously reported that AQP-3 aquaglyceroporin and ClC-3 chloride channels could form complexes to regulate cell volume in nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells. In this study, the roles of AQP-3 in their hetero-complexes were further investigated. Glycerol entered the cells via AQP-3 and induced two different Cl(-) currents through cell swelling-dependent or -independent pathways. The swelling-dependent Cl(-) current was significantly inhibited by pretreatment with CuCl2 and AQP-3-siRNA. After siRNA-induced AQP-3 knock-down, the 140 mM glycerol isoosmotic solution swelled cells by 22% (45% in AQP-3-intact cells) and induced a smaller Cl(-) current; this current was smaller than that activated by 8% cell volume swelling, which induced by the 140 mM glycerol hyperosmotic solution in AQP-3-intact cells. This suggests that the interaction between AQP-3 and ClC-3 plays an important role in cell volume regulation and that AQP-3 may be a modulator that opens volume-regulated chloride channels. The swelling-independent Cl(-) current, which was activated by extracellular glycerol, was reduced by CuCl2 and AQP-3-siRNA pretreatment. Dialyzing glycerol into cells via the pipette directly induced the swelling-independent Cl(-) current; however this current was blocked by AQP-3 down-regulation, suggesting AQP-3 is essential for the opening of chloride channels. In conclusion, AQP-3 is the pathway for water, glycerol and other small solutes to enter cells, and it may be an essential modulator for the gating of chloride channels.

  1. Mechanism of allosteric activation of TMEM16A/ANO1 channels by a commonly used chloride channel blocker

    PubMed Central

    Ta, Chau M; Adomaviciene, Aiste; Rorsman, Nils J G; Garnett, Hannah

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Calcium‐activated chloride channels (CaCCs) play varied physiological roles and constitute potential therapeutic targets for conditions such as asthma and hypertension. TMEM16A encodes a CaCC. CaCC pharmacology is restricted to compounds with relatively low potency and poorly defined selectivity. Anthracene‐9‐carboxylic acid (A9C), an inhibitor of various chloride channel types, exhibits complex effects on native CaCCs and cloned TMEM16A channels providing both activation and inhibition. The mechanisms underlying these effects are not fully defined. Experimental Approach Patch‐clamp electrophysiology in conjunction with concentration jump experiments was employed to define the mode of interaction of A9C with TMEM16A channels. Key Results In the presence of high intracellular Ca2+, A9C inhibited TMEM16A currents in a voltage‐dependent manner by entering the channel from the outside. A9C activation, revealed in the presence of submaximal intracellular Ca2+ concentrations, was also voltage‐dependent. The electric distance of A9C inhibiting and activating binding site was ~0.6 in each case. Inhibition occurred according to an open‐channel block mechanism. Activation was due to a dramatic leftward shift in the steady‐state activation curve and slowed deactivation kinetics. Extracellular A9C competed with extracellular Cl−, suggesting that A9C binds deep in the channel's pore to exert both inhibiting and activating effects. Conclusions and Implications A9C is an open TMEM16A channel blocker and gating modifier. These effects require A9C to bind to a region within the pore that is accessible from the extracellular side of the membrane. These data will aid the future drug design of compounds that selectively activate or inhibit TMEM16A channels. PMID:26562072

  2. Chloride Channel 3 Channels in the Activation and Migration of Human Blood Eosinophils in Allergic Asthma.

    PubMed

    Gaurav, Rohit; Bewtra, Againdra K; Agrawal, Devendra K

    2015-08-01

    Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase is responsible for respiratory burst in immune cells. Chloride channel 3 (CLC3) has been linked to the respiratory burst in eosinophils and neutrophils. The effect of cytokines and the involvement of CLC3 in the regulation of NADPH-dependent oxidative stress and on cytokine-mediated migration of eosinophils are not known. Human peripheral blood eosinophils were isolated from healthy individuals and from individuals with asthma by negative selection. Real-time PCR was used to detect the expression of NADPH oxidases in eosinophils. Intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) measurement was done with flow cytometry. Superoxide generation was measured with transforming growth factor (TGF)-β, eotaxin, and CLC3 blockers. CLC3 dependence of eosinophils in TGF-β- and eotaxin-induced migration was also examined. The messenger RNA (mRNA) transcripts of NADPH oxidase (NOX) 2, dual oxidase (DUOX) 1, and DUOX2 were detected in blood eosinophils, with very low expression of NOX1, NOX3, and NOX5 and no NOX4 mRNA. The level of NOX2 mRNA transcripts increased with disease severity in the eosinophils of subjects with asthma compared with healthy nonatopic volunteers. Change in granularity and size in eosinophils, but no change in intracellular ROS, was observed with phorbol myristate acetate (PMA). PMA, TGF-β, and eotaxin used the CLC3-dependent pathway to increase superoxide radicals. TGF-β and eotaxin induced CLC3-dependent chemotaxis of eosinophils. These findings support the requirement of CLC3 in the activation and migration of human blood eosinophils and may provide a potential novel therapeutic target to regulate eosinophil hyperactivity in allergic airway inflammation in asthma.

  3. International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology. LXXXV: Calcium-Activated Chloride Channels

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Fen; Wong, Xiuming

    2012-01-01

    Calcium-activated chloride channels (CaCCs) are widely expressed in various tissues and implicated in physiological processes such as sensory transduction, epithelial secretion, and smooth muscle contraction. Transmembrane proteins with unknown function 16 (TMEM16A) has recently been identified as a major component of CaCCs. Detailed molecular analysis of TMEM16A will be needed to understand its structure-function relationships. The role this channel plays in physiological systems remains to be established and is currently a subject of intense investigation. PMID:22090471

  4. Chloride channels as drug targets

    PubMed Central

    Verkman, Alan S.; Galietta, Luis J. V.

    2013-01-01

    Chloride channels represent a relatively under-explored target class for drug discovery as elucidation of their identity and physiological roles has lagged behind that of many other drug targets. Chloride channels are involved in a wide range of biological functions, including epithelial fluid secretion, cell-volume regulation, neuroexcitation, smooth-muscle contraction and acidification of intracellular organelles. Mutations in several chloride channels cause human diseases, including cystic fibrosis, macular degeneration, myotonia, kidney stones, renal salt wasting and hyperekplexia. Chloride-channel modulators have potential applications in the treatment of some of these disorders, as well as in secretory diarrhoeas, polycystic kidney disease, osteoporosis and hypertension. Modulators of GABAA (γ-aminobutyric acid A) receptor chloride channels are in clinical use and several small-molecule chloride-channel modulators are in preclinical development and clinical trials. Here, we discuss the broad opportunities that remain in chloride-channel-based drug discovery. PMID:19153558

  5. Location of Release Sites and Calcium-Activated Chloride Channels Relative to Calcium Channels at the Photoreceptor Ribbon Synapse

    PubMed Central

    Mercer, A. J.; Rabl, K.; Riccardi, G. E.; Brecha, N. C.; Stella, S. L.

    2011-01-01

    Vesicle release from photoreceptor ribbon synapses is regulated by L-type Ca2+ channels, which are in turn regulated by Cl− moving through calcium-activated chloride [Cl(Ca)] channels. We assessed the proximity of Ca2+ channels to release sites and Cl(Ca) channels in synaptic terminals of salamander photoreceptors by comparing fast (BAPTA) and slow (EGTA) intracellular Ca2+ buffers. BAPTA did not fully block synaptic release, indicating some release sites are <100 nm from Ca2+ channels. Comparing Cl(Ca) currents with predicted Ca2+ diffusion profiles suggested that Cl(Ca) and Ca2+ channels average a few hundred nanometers apart, but the inability of BAPTA to block Cl(Ca) currents completely suggested some channels are much closer together. Diffuse immunolabeling of terminals with an antibody to the putative Cl(Ca) channel TMEM16A supports the idea that Cl(Ca) channels are dispersed throughout the presynaptic terminal, in contrast with clustering of Ca2+ channels near ribbons. Cl(Ca) currents evoked by intracellular calcium ion concentration ([Ca2+]i) elevation through flash photolysis of DM-nitrophen exhibited EC50 values of 556 and 377 nM with Hill slopes of 1.8 and 2.4 in rods and cones, respectively. These relationships were used to estimate average submembrane [Ca2+]i in photoreceptor terminals. Consistent with control of exocytosis by [Ca2+] nanodomains near Ca2+ channels, average submembrane [Ca2+]i remained below the vesicle release threshold (∼400 nM) over much of the physiological voltage range for cones. Positioning Ca2+ channels near release sites may improve fidelity in converting voltage changes to synaptic release. A diffuse distribution of Cl(Ca) channels may allow Ca2+ influx at one site to influence relatively distant Ca2+ channels. PMID:21084687

  6. Channel properties of the splicing isoforms of the olfactory calcium-activated chloride channel Anoctamin 2.

    PubMed

    Ponissery Saidu, Samsudeen; Stephan, Aaron B; Talaga, Anna K; Zhao, Haiqing; Reisert, Johannes

    2013-06-01

    Anoctamin (ANO)2 (or TMEM16B) forms a cell membrane Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) channel that is present in cilia of olfactory receptor neurons, vomeronasal microvilli, and photoreceptor synaptic terminals. Alternative splicing of Ano2 transcripts generates multiple variants with the olfactory variants skipping exon 14 and having alternative splicing of exon 4. In the present study, 5' rapid amplification of cDNA ends analysis was conducted to characterize the 5' end of olfactory Ano2 transcripts, which showed that the most abundant Ano2 transcripts in the olfactory epithelium contain a novel starting exon that encodes a translation initiation site, whereas transcripts of the publically available sequence variant, which has an alternative and longer 5' end, were present in lower abundance. With two alternative starting exons and alternative splicing of exon 4, four olfactory ANO2 isoforms are thus possible. Patch-clamp experiments in transfected HEK293T cells expressing these isoforms showed that N-terminal sequences affect Ca(2+) sensitivity and that the exon 4-encoded sequence is required to form functional channels. Coexpression of the two predominant isoforms, one with and one without the exon 4 sequence, as well as coexpression of the two rarer isoforms showed alterations in channel properties, indicating that different isoforms interact with each other. Furthermore, channel properties observed from the coexpression of the predominant isoforms better recapitulated the native channel properties, suggesting that the native channel may be composed of two or more splicing isoforms acting as subunits that together shape the channel properties.

  7. Calmodulin regulation of TMEM16A and 16B Ca2+-activated chloride channels

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Tingting; Colecraft, Henry M

    2016-01-01

    Ca2+-activated chloride channels encoded by TMEM16A and 16B are important for regulating epithelial mucus secretion, cardiac and neuronal excitability, smooth muscle contraction, olfactory transduction, and cell proliferation. Whether and how the ubiquitous Ca2+ sensor calmodulin (CaM) regulates the activity of TMEM16A and 16B channels has been controversial and the subject of an ongoing debate. Recently, using a bioengineering approach termed ChIMP (Channel Inactivation induced by Membrane-tethering of an associated Protein) we argued that Ca2+-free CaM (apoCaM) is pre-associated with functioning TMEM16A and 16B channel complexes in live cells. Further, the pre-associated apoCaM mediates Ca2+-dependent sensitization of activation (CDSA) and Ca2+-dependent inactivation (CDI) of some TMEM16A splice variants. In this review, we discuss these findings in the context of previous and recent results relating to Ca2+-dependent regulation of TMEM16A/16B channels and the putative role of CaM. We further discuss potential future directions for these nascent ideas on apoCaM regulation of TMEM16A/16B channels, noting that such future efforts will benefit greatly from the pioneering work of Dr. David T. Yue and colleagues on CaM regulation of voltage-dependent calcium channels. PMID:26083059

  8. Calcium-activated chloride channels anoctamin 1 and 2 promote murine uterine smooth muscle contractility

    PubMed Central

    Bernstein, Kyra; Vink, Joy Y; Fu, Xiao Wen; Wakita, Hiromi; Danielsson, Jennifer; Wapner, Ronald; Gallos, George

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine the presence of calcium activated chloride channels anoctamin 1 and 2 in human and murine uterine smooth muscle and evaluate the physiologic role for these ion channels in murine myometrial contractility. Study Design We performed reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction to determine if anoctamin 1 and 2 are expressed in human and murine uterine tissue to validate the study of this protein in mouse models. Immunohistochemical staining of anoctamin 1 and 2 was then performed to determine protein expression in murine myometrial tissue. The function of anoctamin 1 and 2 in murine uterine tissue was evaluated using electrophysiological studies, organ bath, and calcium flux experiments. Results Anoctamin 1 and 2 are expressed in human and murine USM cells. Functional studies show that selective antagonism of these channels promotes relaxation of spontaneous murine uterine smooth muscle contractions. Blockade of anoctamin 1 and 2 inhibits both agonist-induced and spontaneous transient inward currents and abolishes G-protein coupled receptor (oxytocin) mediated elevations in intracellular calcium. Conclusion The calcium activated chloride channels ANO 1 and 2 are present in human and murine myometrial tissue and may provide novel potential therapeutic targets to achieve effective tocolysis. PMID:24928056

  9. Simultaneous Optical Recording in Multiple Cells by Digital Holographic Microscopy of Chloride Current Associated to Activation of the Ligand-Gated Chloride Channel GABAA Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Jourdain, Pascal; Boss, Daniel; Rappaz, Benjamin; Moratal, Corinne; Hernandez, Maria-Clemencia; Depeursinge, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Chloride channels represent a group of targets for major clinical indications. However, molecular screening for chloride channel modulators has proven to be difficult and time-consuming as approaches essentially rely on the use of fluorescent dyes or invasive patch-clamp techniques which do not lend themselves to the screening of large sets of compounds. To address this problem, we have developed a non-invasive optical method, based on digital holographic microcopy (DHM), allowing monitoring of ion channel activity without using any electrode or fluorescent dye. To illustrate this approach, GABAA mediated chloride currents have been monitored with DHM. Practically, we show that DHM can non-invasively provide the quantitative determination of transmembrane chloride fluxes mediated by the activation of chloride channels associated with GABAA receptors. Indeed through an original algorithm, chloride currents elicited by application of appropriate agonists of the GABAA receptor can be derived from the quantitative phase signal recorded with DHM. Finally, chloride currents can be determined and pharmacologically characterized non-invasively simultaneously on a large cellular sampling by DHM. PMID:23236427

  10. Channel properties of the splicing isoforms of the olfactory calcium-activated chloride channel Anoctamin 2

    PubMed Central

    Ponissery Saidu, Samsudeen; Stephan, Aaron B.; Talaga, Anna K.

    2013-01-01

    Anoctamin (ANO)2 (or TMEM16B) forms a cell membrane Ca2+-activated Cl− channel that is present in cilia of olfactory receptor neurons, vomeronasal microvilli, and photoreceptor synaptic terminals. Alternative splicing of Ano2 transcripts generates multiple variants with the olfactory variants skipping exon 14 and having alternative splicing of exon 4. In the present study, 5′ rapid amplification of cDNA ends analysis was conducted to characterize the 5′ end of olfactory Ano2 transcripts, which showed that the most abundant Ano2 transcripts in the olfactory epithelium contain a novel starting exon that encodes a translation initiation site, whereas transcripts of the publically available sequence variant, which has an alternative and longer 5′ end, were present in lower abundance. With two alternative starting exons and alternative splicing of exon 4, four olfactory ANO2 isoforms are thus possible. Patch-clamp experiments in transfected HEK293T cells expressing these isoforms showed that N-terminal sequences affect Ca2+ sensitivity and that the exon 4–encoded sequence is required to form functional channels. Coexpression of the two predominant isoforms, one with and one without the exon 4 sequence, as well as coexpression of the two rarer isoforms showed alterations in channel properties, indicating that different isoforms interact with each other. Furthermore, channel properties observed from the coexpression of the predominant isoforms better recapitulated the native channel properties, suggesting that the native channel may be composed of two or more splicing isoforms acting as subunits that together shape the channel properties. PMID:23669718

  11. A proton-activated, outwardly rectifying chloride channel in human umbilical vein endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ma Zhiyong; Zhang Wei; Chen Liang; Wang Rong; Kan Xiaohong; Sun Guizhen; Liu Chunxi; Li Li Zhang Yun

    2008-07-04

    Extracellular acidic pH-activated chloride channel I{sub Cl,acid}, has been characterized in HEK 293 cells and mammalian cardiac myocytes. This study was designed to characterize I{sub Cl,acid} in human umbilical vein endothelial cells(HUVECs). The activation and deactivation of the current rapidly and repeatedly follows the change of the extracellular solution at pH 4.3, with the threshold pH 5.3. In addition, at very positive potentials, the current displays a time-dependent facilitation. pH-response relationship for I{sub Cl,acid} revealed that EC{sub 50} is pH 4.764 with a threshold pH value of pH 5.3 and nH of 14.545. The current can be blocked by the Cl{sup -} channel inhibitor DIDS (100 {mu}M). In summary, for the first time we report the presence of proton-activated, outwardly rectifying chloride channel in HUVECs. Because an acidic environment can develop in local myocardium under pathological conditions such as myocardial ischemia, I{sub Cl,acid} would play a role in regulation of EC function under these pathological conditions.

  12. Chlorotoxin does not inhibit volume-regulated, calcium-activated and cyclic AMP-activated chloride channels

    PubMed Central

    Maertens, Chantal; Wei, Lin; Tytgat, Jan; Droogmans, Guy; Nilius, Bernd

    2000-01-01

    It was the aim of this study to look for a high-affinity and selective polypeptide toxin, which could serve as a probe for the volume-regulated anion channel (VRAC) or the calcium-activated chloride channel (CaCC). We have partially purified chlorotoxin, including new and homologous short chain insectotoxins, from the crude venom of Leiurus quinquestriatus quinquestriatus (Lqq) by means of gel filtration chromatography. Material eluting between 280 and 420 min, corresponding to fractions 15–21, was lyophilized and tested on VRAC and CaCC, using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique. We have also tested the commercially available chlorotoxin on VRAC, CaCC, the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) and on the glioma specific chloride channel (GCC). VRAC and the correspondent current, ICl,swell, was activated in Cultured Pulmonary Artery Endothelial (CPAE) cells by a 25% hypotonic solution. Neither of the fractions 16–21 significantly inhibited ICl,swell (n=4–5). Ca2+-activated Cl− currents, ICl,Ca, activated by loading T84 cells via the patch pipette with 1 μM free Ca2+, were not inhibited by any of the tested fractions (15–21), (n=2–5). Chlorotoxin (625 nM) did neither effect ICl,swell nor ICl,Ca (n=4–5). The CFTR channel, transiently transfected in COS cells and activated by a cocktail containing IBMX and forskolin, was not affected by 1.2 μM chlorotoxin (n=5). In addition, it did not affect currents through GCC. We conclude that submicromolar concentrations of chlorotoxin do not block volume-regulated, Ca2+-activated and CFTR chloride channels and that it can not be classified as a general chloride channel toxin. PMID:10683204

  13. The calcium-activated chloride channel anoctamin 1 acts as a heat sensor in nociceptive neurons.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hawon; Yang, Young Duk; Lee, Jesun; Lee, Byeongjoon; Kim, Tahnbee; Jang, Yongwoo; Back, Seung Keun; Na, Heung Sik; Harfe, Brian D; Wang, Fan; Raouf, Ramin; Wood, John N; Oh, Uhtaek

    2012-05-27

    Nociceptors are a subset of small primary afferent neurons that respond to noxious chemical, thermal and mechanical stimuli. Ion channels in nociceptors respond differently to noxious stimuli and generate electrical signals in different ways. Anoctamin 1 (ANO1 also known as TMEM16A) is a Ca(2+)-activated chloride channel that is essential for numerous physiological functions. We found that ANO1 was activated by temperatures over 44 °C with steep heat sensitivity. ANO1 was expressed in small sensory neurons and was highly colocalized with nociceptor markers, which suggests that it may be involved in nociception. Application of heat ramps to dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons elicited robust ANO1-dependent depolarization. Furthermore, knockdown or deletion of ANO1 in DRG neurons substantially reduced nociceptive behavior in thermal pain models. These results indicate that ANO1 is a heat sensor that detects nociceptive thermal stimuli in sensory neurons and possibly mediates nociception.

  14. Molecular, Biophysical, and Pharmacological Properties of Calcium-Activated Chloride Channels.

    PubMed

    Kamaleddin, Mohammad Amin

    2017-01-25

    Calcium-activated chloride channels (CaCCs) are a family of anionic transmembrane ion channels. They are mainly responsible for the movement of Cl(-) and other anions across the biological membranes and are widely expressed in different tissues. Due to the fact that Cl(-) flow into or out of the cell plays a crucial role in hyperpolarizing or depolarizing the cells, respectively, the impact of intracellular Ca(2+) concentration on these channels is attracting a lot of attentions. After summarizing the molecular, biophysical, and pharmacological properties of CaCCs, the role of CaCCs in normal cellular functions will be discussed, and I will emphasize how dysregulation of CaCCs in pathological conditions can account for different diseases. A better understanding of CaCCs and a pivotal regulatory role of Ca(2+) can shed more light on the therapeutic strategies for different neurological disorders that arise from chloride dysregulation, such as asthma, cystic fibrosis, and neuropathic pain. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  15. Study of permeation and blocker binding in TMEM16A calcium-activated chloride channels.

    PubMed

    Reyes, J P; Huanosta-Gutiérrez, A; López-Rodríguez, A; Martínez-Torres, A

    2015-01-01

    We studied the effects of mutations of positively charged amino acid residues in the pore of X. tropicalis TMEM16A calcium-activated chloride channels: K613E, K628E, K630E; R646E and R761E. The activation and deactivation kinetics were not affected, and only K613E showed a lower current density. K628E and R761E affect anion selectivity without affecting Na(+) permeation, whereas K613E, R646E and the double mutant K613E + R646E affect anion selectivity and permeability to Na(+). Furthermore, altered blockade by the chloride channel blockers anthracene-9-carboxylic acid (A-9-C), 4, 4'-Diisothiocyano-2,2'-stilbenedisulfonic acid (DIDS) and T16inh-A01 was observed. These results suggest the existence of 2 binding sites for anions within the pore at electrical distances of 0.3 and 0.5. These sites are also relevant for anion permeation and blockade.

  16. Study of permeation and blocker binding in TMEM16A calcium-activated chloride channels

    PubMed Central

    Reyes, JP; Huanosta-Gutiérrez, A; López-Rodríguez, A; Martínez-Torres, A

    2015-01-01

    We studied the effects of mutations of positively charged amino acid residues in the pore of X. tropicalis TMEM16A calcium-activated chloride channels: K613E, K628E, K630E; R646E and R761E. The activation and deactivation kinetics were not affected, and only K613E showed a lower current density. K628E and R761E affect anion selectivity without affecting Na+ permeation, whereas K613E, R646E and the double mutant K613E + R646E affect anion selectivity and permeability to Na+. Furthermore, altered blockade by the chloride channel blockers anthracene-9-carboxylic acid (A-9-C), 4, 4'-Diisothiocyano-2,2'-stilbenedisulfonic acid (DIDS) and T16inh-A01 was observed. These results suggest the existence of 2 binding sites for anions within the pore at electrical distances of 0.3 and 0.5. These sites are also relevant for anion permeation and blockade. PMID:25853341

  17. TRPC1 regulates calcium-activated chloride channels in salivary gland cells.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yuyang; Birnbaumer, Lutz; Singh, Brij B

    2015-11-01

    Calcium-activated chloride channel (CaCC) plays an important role in modulating epithelial secretion. It has been suggested that in salivary tissues, sustained fluid secretion is dependent on Ca(2+) influx that activates ion channels such as CaCC to initiate Cl(-) efflux. However direct evidence as well as the molecular identity of the Ca(2+) channel responsible for activating CaCC in salivary tissues is not yet identified. Here we provide evidence that in human salivary cells, an outward rectifying Cl(-) current was activated by increasing [Ca(2+)]i, which was inhibited by the addition of pharmacological agents niflumic acid (NFA), an antagonist of CaCC, or T16Ainh-A01, a specific TMEM16a inhibitor. Addition of thapsigargin (Tg), that induces store-depletion and activates TRPC1-mediated Ca(2+) entry, potentiated the Cl(-) current, which was inhibited by the addition of a non-specific TRPC channel blocker SKF96365 or removal of external Ca(2+). Stimulation with Tg also increased plasma membrane expression of TMEM16a protein, which was also dependent on Ca(2+) entry. Importantly, in salivary cells, TRPC1 silencing, but not that of TRPC3, inhibited CaCC especially upon store depletion. Moreover, primary acinar cells isolated from submandibular gland also showed outward rectifying Cl(-) currents upon increasing [Ca(2+)]i. These Cl(-) currents were again potentiated with the addition of Tg, but inhibited in the presence of T16Ainh-A01. Finally, acinar cells isolated from the submandibular glands of TRPC1 knockout mice showed significant inhibition of the outward Cl(-) currents without decreasing TMEM16a expression. Together the data suggests that Ca(2+) entry via the TRPC1 channels is essential for the activation of CaCC.

  18. TRPC1 regulates calcium‐activated chloride channels in salivary gland cells

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yuyang; Birnbaumer, Lutz

    2015-01-01

    Calcium‐activated chloride channel (CaCC) plays an important role in modulating epithelial secretion. It has been suggested that in salivary tissues, sustained fluid secretion is dependent on Ca2+ influx that activates ion channels such as CaCC to initiate Cl− efflux. However direct evidence as well as the molecular identity of the Ca2+ channel responsible for activating CaCC in salivary tissues is not yet identified. Here we provide evidence that in human salivary cells, an outward rectifying Cl− current was activated by increasing [Ca2+]i, which was inhibited by the addition of pharmacological agents niflumic acid (NFA), an antagonist of CaCC, or T16Ainh‐A01, a specific TMEM16a inhibitor. Addition of thapsigargin (Tg), that induces store‐depletion and activates TRPC1‐mediated Ca2+ entry, potentiated the Cl− current, which was inhibited by the addition of a non‐specific TRPC channel blocker SKF96365 or removal of external Ca2+. Stimulation with Tg also increased plasma membrane expression of TMEM16a protein, which was also dependent on Ca2+ entry. Importantly, in salivary cells, TRPC1 silencing, but not that of TRPC3, inhibited CaCC especially upon store depletion. Moreover, primary acinar cells isolated from submandibular gland also showed outward rectifying Cl− currents upon increasing [Ca2+]i. These Cl− currents were again potentiated with the addition of Tg, but inhibited in the presence of T16Ainh‐A01. Finally, acinar cells isolated from the submandibular glands of TRPC1 knockout mice showed significant inhibition of the outward Cl− currents without decreasing TMEM16a expression. Together the data suggests that Ca2+ entry via the TRPC1 channels is essential for the activation of CaCC. J. Cell. Physiol. 9999: 2848–2856, 2015. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25899321

  19. Characteristics of GABA-activated chloride channels in mammalian dorsal root ganglion neurones.

    PubMed

    Robertson, B

    1989-04-01

    1. The properties of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-activated chloride channels in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurones obtained from rats and cats were examined using the single-electrode voltage clamp in conjunction with suction-electrode techniques. 2. GABA-evoked currents showed voltage-sensitive kinetics. Time constants (tau D) were measured from voltage-jump relaxations and tau D became briefer with membrane hyperpolarization. tau D was 33 ms at -120 mV with 60 microM-GABA and changed e-fold for 188 mV. tau D decreased as GABA concentration was increased - the extrapolated tau D at 'zero' GABA concentration was approximately equal to 50 ms at -120 mV. 3. The steady-state current in GABA was curvilinear, rectifying at negative potentials. The instantaneous current was linear with symmetrical chloride concentrations (140 mM) on both sides of the cell membrane. 4. Muscimol was a more effective agonist than GABA, while piperidine-4-sulphonic acid and ethylenediamine monocarbamate were only weakly effective agonists. Taurine and glycine had no detectable agonist activity. 5. Ion substitution experiments revealed the permeability sequence I- greater than Br- greater than Cl- greater than F- greater than propionate (1.88 greater than 1.21 greater than 1.0 approximately equal to 0.1 approximately equal to 0.1). 6. The presence of iodide and bromide ions externally caused an increase in chloride efflux at membrane potentials more negative than -40 mV, and caused a prolongation of voltage-jump relaxations. Relaxations in fluoride and propionate solutions were faster than those seen in chloride.

  20. Small-molecule activators of TMEM16A, a calcium-activated chloride channel, stimulate epithelial chloride secretion and intestinal contraction

    PubMed Central

    Namkung, Wan; Yao, Zhen; Finkbeiner, Walter E.; Verkman, A. S.

    2011-01-01

    TMEM16A (ANO1) is a calcium-activated chloride channel (CaCC) expressed in secretory epithelia, smooth muscle, and other tissues. Cell-based functional screening of ∼110,000 compounds revealed compounds that activated TMEM16A CaCC conductance without increasing cytoplasmic Ca2+. By patch-clamp, N-aroylaminothiazole “activators” (Eact) strongly increased Cl− current at 0 Ca2+, whereas tetrazolylbenzamide “potentiators” (Fact) were not active at 0 Ca2+ but reduced the EC50 for Ca2+-dependent TMEM16A activation. Of 682 analogs tested, the most potent activator (Eact) and potentiator (Fact) produced large and more sustained CaCC Cl− currents than general agonists of Ca2+ signaling, with EC50 3–6 μM and Cl− conductance comparable to that induced transiently by Ca2+-elevating purinergic agonists. Analogs of activators were identified that fully inhibited TMEM16A Cl− conductance, providing further evidence for direct TMEM16A binding. The TMEM16A activators increased CaCC conductance in human salivary and airway submucosal gland epithelial cells, and IL-4 treated bronchial cells, and stimulated submucosal gland secretion in human bronchi and smooth muscle contraction in mouse intestine. Small-molecule, TMEM16A-targeted activators may be useful for drug therapy of cystic fibrosis, dry mouth, and gastrointestinal hypomotility disorders, and for pharmacological dissection of TMEM16A function.—Namkung, W., Yao, Z., Finkbeiner, W. E., Verkman, A. S. Small-molecule activators of TMEM16A, a calcium-activated chloride channel, stimulate epithelial chloride secretion and intestinal contraction. PMID:21836025

  1. Role of chloride channels in bradykinin-induced guinea pig airway vagal C-fibre activation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Min-Goo; Macglashan, Donald W; Undem, Bradley J

    2005-07-01

    We tested the hypothesis that an ionic current carried by chloride ions contributes to bradykinin (BK)-induced membrane depolarization and activation of vagal afferent C-fibres. In an ex vivo innervated trachea/bronchus preparation, BK (1 microM) consistently produced action potential discharge in vagal afferent C-fibres with receptive fields in the trachea or main stem bronchus. The Ca2+-activated Cl- channel (CLCA) inhibitor, niflumic acid (NFA, 100 microM), significantly reduced BK-induced action potential discharge to 21 +/- 7% of the control BK response. NFA did not inhibit capsaicin-induced or citric-acid-induced action potential discharge in tracheal C-fibres. The inhibitory effect of NFA was mimicked by another CLCA inhibitor, 5-nitro-2-(3-phenylpropylamino)-benzoic acid (NPPB, 100 microM). NFA also inhibited the BK-induced inward current in gramicidin-perforated whole-cell patch-clamp recordings of capsaicin-sensitive jugular ganglion neurones retrogradely labelled from the airways. NFA did not inhibit the BK-induced increase in intracellular free Ca2+. The TRPV1 inhibitor, iodo-resiniferatoxin (1 microM), also partially inhibited BK-induced action potential discharge, and the combination of iodo-resiniferatoxin and NFA virtually abolished the BK-induced action potential discharge. We concluded that in vagal afferent C-fibres, BK evokes membrane depolarization and action potential discharge through the additive effects of TRPV1 and Cl- channel activation.

  2. Calcium-activated chloride channels in bovine pulmonary artery endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Nilius, B; Prenen, J; Szücs, G; Wei, L; Tanzi, F; Voets, T; Droogmans, G

    1997-01-01

    1. We characterized Ca(2+)-activated Cl- currents in calf pulmonary artery endothelial (CPAE) cells by using a combined patch clamp and fura-2 microfluorescence technique to simultaneously measure ionic currents and the intracellular Ca2+ concentration, [Ca2+]i. 2. Various procedures that increased [Ca2+]i, such as stimulation with ATP or ionomycin, or loading the cells with Ca2+ via the patch pipette, activated a strongly outwardly rectifying current with a reversal potential close to the Cl- equilibrium potential. Changing the extracellular Cl- concentration shifted this reversal potential as predicted for a Cl- current. Buffering Ca2+ rises with BAPTA prevented ATP from activating the current. 3. Ca(2+)-activated Cl- currents could be distinguished from volume-activated Cl- currents, which were sometimes coactivated in the same cell. The latter showed much less outward rectification, their activation was voltage independent, and they could be inhibited by exposing the cells to hypertonic solutions. 4. The permeability ratio for the Ca(2+)-activated conductance of the anions iodide:chloride: gluconate was 1.71 +/- 0.06:1:0.39 +/- 0.03 (n = 12). 5. This Ca(2+)-activated Cl- current, ICl, Ca, inactivated rapidly at negative potentials and activated slowly at positive potentials. Outward tail currents were slowly decaying, while inward tail currents decayed much faster. 6. 4,4'-Diisothiocyanatostilbene-2,2'-disulphonic-acid (DIDS) and niflumic acid inhibited Icl,Ca in a voltage-dependent manner, i.e. they exerted a more potent block at positive potentials. The block by N-phenylanthracilic acid (NPA), 5-nitro-2-(3-phenylpropylamino)-benzoate (NPPB) and tamoxifen was voltage independent. Niflumic acid and tamoxifen were the most potent blockers. 7. The single-channel conductance was 7.9 +/- 0.7 pS (n = 15) at 300 mM extracellular Cl-. The channel open probability was high at positive potentials, but very small at negative potentials. 8. It is concluded that [Ca2+]i

  3. Endogenous chloride channels of insect sf9 cells. Evidence for coordinated activity of small elementary channel units

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, EH; Gabriei, SE; Stutts, MJ; Fullton, J; Price, EM; Boucher, RC

    1996-01-01

    The endogenous Cl- conductance of Spodoptera frugiperda (Sf9) cells was studied 20-35 h after plating out of either uninfected cells or cells infected by a baculovirus vector carrying the cloned beta-galactosidase gene (beta-Gal cells). With the cation Tris+ in the pipette and Na+ in the bath, the reversal potential of whole-cell currents was governed by the prevailing Cl- equilibrium potential and could be fitted by the Goldman-Hodgkin-Katz equation with similar permeabilities for uninfected and beta-Gal cells. In the frequency range 0.12 < f < 300 Hz, the power density spectrum of whole-cell Cl- currents could be fitted by three Lorentzians. Independent of membrane potential, >50% of the total variance of whole-cell current fluctuations was accounted for by the low frequency Lorentzian (fc = 0.40 +/- 0.03 Hz, n = 6). Single-Cl- channels showed complex gating kinetics with long lasting (seconds) openings interrupted by similar long closures. In the open state, channels exhibited fast burst-like closures. Since the patches normally contained more than a single channel, it was not possible to measure open and closed dwell-time distributions for comparing single-Cl- channel activity with the kinetic features of whole-cell currents. However, the power density spectrum of Cl- currents of cell-attached and excised outside-out patches contained both high and low frequency Lorentzian components, with the corner frequency of the slow component (fc = 0.40 +/- 0.02 Hz, n = 4) similar to that of whole-cell current fluctuations. Chloride channels exhibited multiple conductance states with similar Goldman-Hodgkin-Katz-type rectification. Single-channel permeabilities covered the range from approximately 0.6.10(-14) cm5/s to approximately 6.10(-14) cm3/s, corresponding to a limiting conductance (gamma 150/150) of approximately 3.5 pS and approximately 35 pS, respectively. All states reversed near the same membrane potential, and they exhibited similar halide ion selectivity, P1

  4. Novel 5-substituted benzyloxy-2-arylbenzofuran-3-carboxylic acids as calcium activated chloride channel inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Satish; Namkung, Wan; Verkman, A. S.; Sharma, Pawan K.

    2013-01-01

    Transmembrane protein 16A (TMEM16A) channels are recently discovered membrane proteins that functions as a calcium activated chloride channel (CaCC). CaCCs are major regulators of various physiological processes, such as sensory transduction, epithelial secretion, smooth muscle contraction and oocyte fertilization. Thirty novel 5-substituted benzyloxy-2-arylbenzofuran-3-carboxylic acids (B01–B30) were synthesized and evaluated for their TMEM16A inhibitory activity by using short circuit current measurements in Fischer rat thyroid (FRT) cells expressing human TMEM16A. IC50 values were calculated using YFP fluorescence plate reader assay. Final compounds, having free carboxylic group displayed significant inhibition. Eight of the novel compounds B02, B13, B21, B23, B25, B27, B28, B29 exhibit excellent CaCCs inhibition with IC50 value <6 μM, with compound B25 exhibiting the lowest IC50 value of 2.8 ± 1.3 μM. None of the tested ester analogs of final benzofuran derivatives displayed TMEM16A/CaCCs inhibition. PMID:22739085

  5. Calcium-activated chloride channel TMEM16A modulates mucin secretion and airway smooth muscle contraction

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Fen; Zhang, Hongkang; Wu, Meng; Yang, Huanghe; Kudo, Makoto; Peters, Christian J.; Woodruff, Prescott G.; Solberg, Owen D.; Donne, Matthew L.; Huang, Xiaozhu; Sheppard, Dean; Fahy, John V.; Wolters, Paul J.; Hogan, Brigid L. M.; Finkbeiner, Walter E.; Li, Min; Jan, Yuh-Nung; Jan, Lily Yeh; Rock, Jason R.

    2012-01-01

    Mucous cell hyperplasia and airway smooth muscle (ASM) hyperresponsiveness are hallmark features of inflammatory airway diseases, including asthma. Here, we show that the recently identified calcium-activated chloride channel (CaCC) TMEM16A is expressed in the adult airway surface epithelium and ASM. The epithelial expression is increased in asthmatics, particularly in secretory cells. Based on this and the proposed functions of CaCC, we hypothesized that TMEM16A inhibitors would negatively regulate both epithelial mucin secretion and ASM contraction. We used a high-throughput screen to identify small-molecule blockers of TMEM16A-CaCC channels. We show that inhibition of TMEM16A-CaCC significantly impairs mucus secretion in primary human airway surface epithelial cells. Furthermore, inhibition of TMEM16A-CaCC significantly reduces mouse and human ASM contraction in response to cholinergic agonists. TMEM16A-CaCC blockers, including those identified here, may positively impact multiple causes of asthma symptoms. PMID:22988107

  6. [Identification of a Novel Calcium (Ca^(2+))-Activated Chloride Channel Accessory Gene in Xenopus laevis].

    PubMed

    Lee, R M; Jeong, S M

    2016-01-01

    Calcium (Ca^(2+))-activated chloride channel accessories (CLCAs) are putative anion channel-related proteins with diverse physiological functions. Exploring CLCA diversity is important for prediction of gene structure and function. In an effort to identify novel CLCA genes in Xenopus laevis, we successfully cloned and characterized a Xenopus laevis cDNA predicted to encode the xCLCA3 gene. Cloning of xCLCA3 was achieved by computational analysis, rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE), and a tissue distribution analysis by semi-quantitative reverse transcription (RT) PCR or real-time PCR. We obtained a 2958 bp xCLCA3 cDNA sequence with an open reading frame encoding 943 amino acids. According to the primary structure analysis, xCLCA3 contains a predicted signal sequence, multiple sites of N-linked (N-) glycosylation, N-myristoylation, PKA, PKC, and casein kinase II phosphorylation sites, five putative hydrophobic segments, and the HExxH metalloprotease motif. Additionally, the transmembrane prediction server yielded a preserved N-terminal CLCA domain and a von Willebrand factor type A domain with one transmembrane domain in the C-terminal region. Expression analysis showed that xCLCA3 is expressed in a number of tissues, with strong expression in the brain, colon, small intestine, lung, kidney, and spleen, and poor expression in the heart and liver. These results suggest that xCLCA3 may be a candidate CLCA family member as well as a metalloprotease, rather than just an ion channel accessory protein.

  7. A comprehensive search for calcium binding sites critical for TMEM16A calcium-activated chloride channel activity

    PubMed Central

    Tien, Jason; Peters, Christian J; Wong, Xiu Ming; Cheng, Tong; Jan, Yuh Nung; Jan, Lily Yeh; Yang, Huanghe

    2014-01-01

    TMEM16A forms calcium-activated chloride channels (CaCCs) that regulate physiological processes such as the secretions of airway epithelia and exocrine glands, the contraction of smooth muscles, and the excitability of neurons. Notwithstanding intense interest in the mechanism behind TMEM16A-CaCC calcium-dependent gating, comprehensive surveys to identify and characterize potential calcium sensors of this channel are still lacking. By aligning distantly related calcium-activated ion channels in the TMEM16 family and conducting systematic mutagenesis of all conserved acidic residues thought to be exposed to the cytoplasm, we identify four acidic amino acids as putative calcium-binding residues. Alterations of the charge, polarity, and size of amino acid side chains at these sites alter the ability of different divalent cations to activate the channel. Furthermore, TMEM16A mutant channels containing double cysteine substitutions at these residues are sensitive to the redox potential of the internal solution, providing evidence for their physical proximity and solvent accessibility. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02772.001 PMID:24980701

  8. Identification of a dimerization domain in the TMEM16A calcium-activated chloride channel (CaCC)

    PubMed Central

    Tien, Jason; Lee, Hye Young; Minor, Daniel L.; Jan, Yuh Nung; Jan, Lily Yeh

    2013-01-01

    Transmembrane proteins with unknown function 16 (TMEM16A) is a calcium-activated chloride channel (CaCC) important for neuronal, exocrine, and smooth muscle functions. TMEM16A belongs to a family of integral membrane proteins that includes another CaCC, TMEM16B, responsible for controlling action potential waveform and synaptic efficacy, and a small-conductance calcium-activated nonselective cation channel, TMEM16F, linked to Scott syndrome. We find that these channels in the TMEM16 family share a homodimeric architecture facilitated by their cytoplasmic N termini. This dimerization domain is important for channel assembly in eukaryotic cells, and the in vitro association of peptides containing the dimerization domain is consistent with a homotypic protein–protein interaction. Amino acid substitutions in the dimerization domain affect functional TMEM16A-CaCC channel expression, as expected from its critical role in channel subunit assembly. PMID:23576756

  9. Revealing the activation pathway for TMEM16A chloride channels from macroscopic currents and kinetic models.

    PubMed

    Contreras-Vite, Juan A; Cruz-Rangel, Silvia; De Jesús-Pérez, José J; Figueroa, Iván A Aréchiga; Rodríguez-Menchaca, Aldo A; Pérez-Cornejo, Patricia; Hartzell, H Criss; Arreola, Jorge

    2016-07-01

    TMEM16A (ANO1), the pore-forming subunit of calcium-activated chloride channels, regulates several physiological and pathophysiological processes such as smooth muscle contraction, cardiac and neuronal excitability, salivary secretion, tumour growth and cancer progression. Gating of TMEM16A is complex because it involves the interplay between increases in intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)]i), membrane depolarization, extracellular Cl(-) or permeant anions and intracellular protons. Our goal here was to understand how these variables regulate TMEM16A gating and to explain four observations. (a) TMEM16A is activated by voltage in the absence of intracellular Ca(2+). (b) The Cl(-) conductance is decreased after reducing extracellular Cl(-) concentration ([Cl(-)]o). (c) ICl is regulated by physiological concentrations of [Cl(-)]o. (d) In cells dialyzed with 0.2 μM [Ca(2+)]i, Cl(-) has a bimodal effect: at [Cl(-)]o <30 mM TMEM16A current activates with a monoexponential time course, but above 30 mM, [Cl(-)]o ICl activation displays fast and slow kinetics. To explain the contribution of Vm, Ca(2+) and Cl(-) to gating, we developed a 12-state Markov chain model. This model explains TMEM16A activation as a sequential, direct, and Vm-dependent binding of two Ca(2+) ions coupled to a Vm-dependent binding of an external Cl(-) ion, with Vm-dependent transitions between states. Our model predicts that extracellular Cl(-) does not alter the apparent Ca(2+) affinity of TMEM16A, which we corroborated experimentally. Rather, extracellular Cl(-) acts by stabilizing the open configuration induced by Ca(2+) and by contributing to the Vm dependence of activation.

  10. Store-operated Ca2+ entry regulates Ca2+-activated chloride channels and eccrine sweat gland function.

    PubMed

    Concepcion, Axel R; Vaeth, Martin; Wagner, Larry E; Eckstein, Miriam; Hecht, Lee; Yang, Jun; Crottes, David; Seidl, Maximilian; Shin, Hyosup P; Weidinger, Carl; Cameron, Scott; Turvey, Stuart E; Issekutz, Thomas; Meyts, Isabelle; Lacruz, Rodrigo S; Cuk, Mario; Yule, David I; Feske, Stefan

    2016-11-01

    Eccrine sweat glands are essential for sweating and thermoregulation in humans. Loss-of-function mutations in the Ca2+ release-activated Ca2+ (CRAC) channel genes ORAI1 and STIM1 abolish store-operated Ca2+ entry (SOCE), and patients with these CRAC channel mutations suffer from anhidrosis and hyperthermia at high ambient temperatures. Here we have shown that CRAC channel-deficient patients and mice with ectodermal tissue-specific deletion of Orai1 (Orai1K14Cre) or Stim1 and Stim2 (Stim1/2K14Cre) failed to sweat despite normal sweat gland development. SOCE was absent in agonist-stimulated sweat glands from Orai1K14Cre and Stim1/2K14Cre mice and human sweat gland cells lacking ORAI1 or STIM1 expression. In Orai1K14Cre mice, abolishment of SOCE was associated with impaired chloride secretion by primary murine sweat glands. In human sweat gland cells, SOCE mediated by ORAI1 was necessary for agonist-induced chloride secretion and activation of the Ca2+-activated chloride channel (CaCC) anoctamin 1 (ANO1, also known as TMEM16A). By contrast, expression of TMEM16A, the water channel aquaporin 5 (AQP5), and other regulators of sweat gland function was normal in the absence of SOCE. Our findings demonstrate that Ca2+ influx via store-operated CRAC channels is essential for CaCC activation, chloride secretion, and sweat production in humans and mice.

  11. Store-operated Ca2+ entry regulates Ca2+-activated chloride channels and eccrine sweat gland function

    PubMed Central

    Concepcion, Axel R.; Vaeth, Martin; Wagner, Larry E.; Eckstein, Miriam; Hecht, Lee; Yang, Jun; Crottes, David; Seidl, Maximilian; Shin, Hyosup P.; Weidinger, Carl; Cameron, Scott; Turvey, Stuart E.; Issekutz, Thomas; Meyts, Isabelle; Lacruz, Rodrigo S.; Cuk, Mario; Yule, David I.

    2016-01-01

    Eccrine sweat glands are essential for sweating and thermoregulation in humans. Loss-of-function mutations in the Ca2+ release–activated Ca2+ (CRAC) channel genes ORAI1 and STIM1 abolish store-operated Ca2+ entry (SOCE), and patients with these CRAC channel mutations suffer from anhidrosis and hyperthermia at high ambient temperatures. Here we have shown that CRAC channel–deficient patients and mice with ectodermal tissue–specific deletion of Orai1 (Orai1K14Cre) or Stim1 and Stim2 (Stim1/2K14Cre) failed to sweat despite normal sweat gland development. SOCE was absent in agonist-stimulated sweat glands from Orai1K14Cre and Stim1/2K14Cre mice and human sweat gland cells lacking ORAI1 or STIM1 expression. In Orai1K14Cre mice, abolishment of SOCE was associated with impaired chloride secretion by primary murine sweat glands. In human sweat gland cells, SOCE mediated by ORAI1 was necessary for agonist-induced chloride secretion and activation of the Ca2+-activated chloride channel (CaCC) anoctamin 1 (ANO1, also known as TMEM16A). By contrast, expression of TMEM16A, the water channel aquaporin 5 (AQP5), and other regulators of sweat gland function was normal in the absence of SOCE. Our findings demonstrate that Ca2+ influx via store-operated CRAC channels is essential for CaCC activation, chloride secretion, and sweat production in humans and mice. PMID:27721237

  12. Volume-sensitive outwardly rectifying chloride channel blockers protect against high glucose-induced apoptosis of cardiomyocytes via autophagy activation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lin; Shen, Mingzhi; Guo, Xiaowang; Wang, Bo; Xia, Yuesheng; Wang, Ning; Zhang, Qian; Jia, Lintao; Wang, Xiaoming

    2017-03-16

    Hyperglycemia is a well-characterized contributing factor for cardiac dysfunction and heart failure among diabetic patients. Apoptosis of cardiomyocytes plays a major role during the onset and pathogenesis of diabetic cardiomyopathy (DCM). Nonetheless, the molecular machinery underlying hyperglycemia-induced cardiac damage and cell death remains elusive. In the present study, we found that chloride channel blockers, 4,4'-diisothiocya-natostilbene-2,2'- disulfonic acid (DIDS) and 4-(2-butyl-6,7-dichlor-2-cyclopentyl-indan-1-on-5-yl) oxybutyric acid (DCPIB), inhibited high glucose-activated volume-sensitive outwardly rectifying (VSOR) Cl(-) channel and improved the viability of cardiomyocytes. High glucose induced cardiomyocyte apoptosis by suppressing the autophagic stress, which can be reversed via blockade of VSOR Cl(-) channel. VSOR activation in high glucose-treated cardiomyocytes was attributed to increased intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Taken together, our study unraveled a role of VSOR chloride currents in impaired autophagy and increased apoptosis of high glucose-exposed cardiomyocyte, and has implications for a therapeutic potential of VSOR chloride channel blockers in DCM.

  13. Volume-sensitive outwardly rectifying chloride channel blockers protect against high glucose-induced apoptosis of cardiomyocytes via autophagy activation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lin; Shen, Mingzhi; Guo, Xiaowang; Wang, Bo; Xia, Yuesheng; Wang, Ning; Zhang, Qian; Jia, Lintao; Wang, Xiaoming

    2017-01-01

    Hyperglycemia is a well-characterized contributing factor for cardiac dysfunction and heart failure among diabetic patients. Apoptosis of cardiomyocytes plays a major role during the onset and pathogenesis of diabetic cardiomyopathy (DCM). Nonetheless, the molecular machinery underlying hyperglycemia-induced cardiac damage and cell death remains elusive. In the present study, we found that chloride channel blockers, 4,4′-diisothiocya-natostilbene-2,2′- disulfonic acid (DIDS) and 4-(2-butyl-6,7-dichlor-2-cyclopentyl-indan-1-on-5-yl) oxybutyric acid (DCPIB), inhibited high glucose-activated volume-sensitive outwardly rectifying (VSOR) Cl− channel and improved the viability of cardiomyocytes. High glucose induced cardiomyocyte apoptosis by suppressing the autophagic stress, which can be reversed via blockade of VSOR Cl− channel. VSOR activation in high glucose-treated cardiomyocytes was attributed to increased intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Taken together, our study unraveled a role of VSOR chloride currents in impaired autophagy and increased apoptosis of high glucose-exposed cardiomyocyte, and has implications for a therapeutic potential of VSOR chloride channel blockers in DCM. PMID:28300155

  14. Effect of a chloride channel activator, lubiprostone, on colonic sensory and motor functions in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Sweetser, Seth; Busciglio, Irene A; Camilleri, Michael; Bharucha, Adil E; Szarka, Lawrence A; Papathanasopoulos, Athanasios; Burton, Duane D; Eckert, Deborah J; Zinsmeister, Alan R

    2009-02-01

    Lubiprostone, a bicyclic fatty acid chloride channel activator, is efficacious in treatment of chronic constipation and constipation-predominant irritable bowel syndrome. The study aim was to compare effects of lubiprostone and placebo on colonic sensory and motor functions in humans. In double-blind, randomized fashion, 60 healthy adults received three oral doses of placebo or 24 microg lubiprostone per day in a parallel-group, placebo-controlled trial. A barostat-manometry tube was placed in the left colon by flexible sigmoidoscopy and fluoroscopy. We measured treatment effects on colonic sensation and motility with validated methods, with the following end points: colonic compliance, fasting and postprandial tone and motility indexes, pain thresholds, and sensory ratings to distensions. Among participants receiving lubiprostone or placebo, 26 of 30 and 28 of 30, respectively, completed the study. There were no overall effects of lubiprostone on compliance, fasting tone, motility indexes, or sensation. However, there was a treatment-by-sex interaction effect for compliance (P = 0.02), with lubiprostone inducing decreased fasting compliance in women (P = 0.06) and an overall decreased colonic tone contraction after a standard meal relative to fasting tone (P = 0.014), with greater effect in women (P < 0.01). Numerical differences of first sensation and pain thresholds (P = 0.11 in women) in the two groups were not significant. We concluded that oral lubiprostone 24 microg does not increase colonic motor function. The findings of decreased colonic compliance and decreased postprandial colonic tone in women suggest that motor effects are unlikely to cause accelerated colonic transit with lubiprostone, although they may facilitate laxation. Effects of lubiprostone on sensitivity deserve further study.

  15. Self-cleavage of Human CLCA1 Protein by a Novel Internal Metalloprotease Domain Controls Calcium-activated Chloride Channel Activation*♦

    PubMed Central

    Yurtsever, Zeynep; Sala-Rabanal, Monica; Randolph, David T.; Scheaffer, Suzanne M.; Roswit, William T.; Alevy, Yael G.; Patel, Anand C.; Heier, Richard F.; Romero, Arthur G.; Nichols, Colin G.; Holtzman, Michael J.; Brett, Tom J.

    2012-01-01

    The chloride channel calcium-activated (CLCA) family are secreted proteins that regulate both chloride transport and mucin expression, thus controlling the production of mucus in respiratory and other systems. Accordingly, human CLCA1 is a critical mediator of hypersecretory lung diseases, such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and cystic fibrosis, that manifest mucus obstruction. Despite relevance to homeostasis and disease, the mechanism of CLCA1 function remains largely undefined. We address this void by showing that CLCA proteins contain a consensus proteolytic cleavage site recognized by a novel zincin metalloprotease domain located within the N terminus of CLCA itself. CLCA1 mutations that inhibit self-cleavage prevent activation of calcium-activated chloride channel (CaCC)-mediated chloride transport. CaCC activation requires cleavage to unmask the N-terminal fragment of CLCA1, which can independently gate CaCCs. Gating of CaCCs mediated by CLCA1 does not appear to involve proteolytic cleavage of the channel because a mutant N-terminal fragment deficient in proteolytic activity is able to induce currents comparable with that of the native fragment. These data provide both a mechanistic basis for CLCA1 self-cleavage and a novel mechanism for regulation of chloride channel activity specific to the mucosal interface. PMID:23112050

  16. Self-cleavage of human CLCA1 protein by a novel internal metalloprotease domain controls calcium-activated chloride channel activation.

    PubMed

    Yurtsever, Zeynep; Sala-Rabanal, Monica; Randolph, David T; Scheaffer, Suzanne M; Roswit, William T; Alevy, Yael G; Patel, Anand C; Heier, Richard F; Romero, Arthur G; Nichols, Colin G; Holtzman, Michael J; Brett, Tom J

    2012-12-07

    The chloride channel calcium-activated (CLCA) family are secreted proteins that regulate both chloride transport and mucin expression, thus controlling the production of mucus in respiratory and other systems. Accordingly, human CLCA1 is a critical mediator of hypersecretory lung diseases, such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and cystic fibrosis, that manifest mucus obstruction. Despite relevance to homeostasis and disease, the mechanism of CLCA1 function remains largely undefined. We address this void by showing that CLCA proteins contain a consensus proteolytic cleavage site recognized by a novel zincin metalloprotease domain located within the N terminus of CLCA itself. CLCA1 mutations that inhibit self-cleavage prevent activation of calcium-activated chloride channel (CaCC)-mediated chloride transport. CaCC activation requires cleavage to unmask the N-terminal fragment of CLCA1, which can independently gate CaCCs. Gating of CaCCs mediated by CLCA1 does not appear to involve proteolytic cleavage of the channel because a mutant N-terminal fragment deficient in proteolytic activity is able to induce currents comparable with that of the native fragment. These data provide both a mechanistic basis for CLCA1 self-cleavage and a novel mechanism for regulation of chloride channel activity specific to the mucosal interface.

  17. Calcium-activated chloride channels in müller cells acutely isolated from tiger salamander retina.

    PubMed

    Welch, Nicole C; Lalonde, Melanie R; Barnes, Steven; Kelly, Melanie E M

    2006-01-01

    Ca(2+)-activated chloride channels were identified with whole-cell patch-clamp recording techniques in salamander retinal Müller cells. Cl(Ca) channels were activated by membrane depolarizations that elicited Ca2+ influx or the application of the Ca2+ ionophore, ionomycin. The Ca channel blocker, Cd2+, abolished the Cl(Ca) channel tail currents. Increasing the duration of the depolarizing pulse resulted in enhancement of the Cl(Ca) channel tail current. Repetitive depolarizations with rapid pulses to +20 mV produced a buildup of I(Cl(Ca)), which reversed at 0 mV in symmetrical [Cl-] and at -40 mV when intracellular [Cl-] was reduced to 10% of the external concentration. I(Cl(Ca)) was blocked by the Cl channel blocker niflumic acid, while niflumic acid had no effect on voltage-gated Ca channels. These results offer the first demonstration of Cl(Ca) channels in a nonastrocytic glial cell and expand our understanding of the functional capacities of retinal glial cells.

  18. Activation of P2Y1 and P2Y2 receptors induces chloride secretion via calcium-activated chloride channels in kidney inner medullary collecting duct cells

    PubMed Central

    Rajagopal, Madhumitha; Kathpalia, Paru P.; Thomas, Sheela V.

    2011-01-01

    Dysregulation of urinary sodium chloride (NaCl) excretion can result in extracellular fluid (ECF) volume expansion and hypertension. Recent studies demonstrated that urinary nucleotide excretion increases in mice ingesting a high-salt diet and that these increases in extracellular nucleotides can signal through P2Y2 receptors in the kidney collecting duct to inhibit epithelial Na+ channels (ENaC). However, under conditions of ECF volume expansion brought about by high-dietary salt intake, ENaC activity should already be suppressed. We hypothesized that alternative pathways exist by which extracellular nucleotides control renal NaCl excretion. We used an inner medullary collecting duct (mIMCD-K2) cell line in an Ussing chamber system as a model to study additional ion transport pathways that are regulated by extracellular nucleotides. When ENaC was inhibited, the addition of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) to the basal side of cell sheets activated both P2Y1 and P2Y2 receptors, inducing a transient increase in short-circuit current (Isc); addition of ATP to the apical side activated only P2Y2 receptors, inducing first a transient and then a sustained increase in Isc. The ATP-induced increases in Isc were blocked by pretreatment with a phospholipase C (PLC) inhibitor, a calcium (Ca2+) chelator, or Ca2+-activated Cl− channel (CACC) inhibitors, suggesting that ATP signals through both PLC and intracellular Ca2+ to activate CACC. We propose that P2Y1 and P2Y2 receptors operate in tandem in IMCD cells to provide an adaptive mechanism for enhancing urinary NaCl excretion in the setting of high-dietary NaCl intake. PMID:21653634

  19. A novel chloride channel in Vicia faba guard cell vacuoles activated by the serine/threonine kinase, CDPK.

    PubMed Central

    Pei, Z M; Ward, J M; Harper, J F; Schroeder, J I

    1996-01-01

    Calcium-Dependent Protein Kinases (CDPKs) in higher plants contain a C-terminal calmodulin-like regulatory domain. Little is known regarding physiological CDPK targets. Both kinase activity and multiple Ca2+-dependent signaling pathways have been implicated in the control of stomatal guard cell movements. To determine whether CDPK or other protein kinases could have a role in guard cell signaling, purified and recombinant kinases were applied to Vicia faba guard cell vacuoles during patch-clamp experiments. CDPK activated novel vacuolar chloride (VCL) and malate conductances in guard cells. Activation was dependent on both Ca2+ and ATP. Furthermore, VCL activation occurred in the absence of Ca2+ using a Ca2+-independent, constitutively active, CDPK* mutant. Protein kinase A showed weaker activation (22% as compared with CDPK). Current reversals in whole vacuole recordings shifted with the Nernst potential for Cl-and vanished in glutamate. Single channel recordings showed a CDPK-activated 34 +/- 5 pS Cl- channel. VCL channels were activated at physiological potentials enabling Cl- uptake into vacuoles. VCL channels may provide a previously unidentified, but necessary, pathway for anion uptake into vacuoles required for stomatal opening. CDPK-activated VCL currents were also observed in red beet vacuoles suggesting that these channels may provide a more general mechanism for kinase-dependent anion uptake. PMID:8978683

  20. Interaction between 2 extracellular loops influences the activity of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator chloride channel.

    PubMed

    Broadbent, Steven D; Wang, Wuyang; Linsdell, Paul

    2014-10-01

    Activity of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channel is thought to be controlled by cytoplasmic factors. However, recent evidence has shown that overall channel activity is also influenced by extracellular anions that interact directly with the extracellular loops (ECLs) of the CFTR protein. Very little is known about the structure of the ECLs or how substances interacting with these ECLs might affect CFTR function. We used patch-clamp recording to investigate the accessibility of cysteine-reactive reagents to cysteines introduced throughout ECL1 and 2 key sites in ECL4. Furthermore, interactions between ECL1 and ECL4 were investigated by the formation of disulfide crosslinks between cysteines introduced into these 2 regions. Crosslinks could be formed between R899C (in ECL4) and a number of sites in ECL1 in a manner that was dependent on channel activity, suggesting that the relative orientation of these 2 loops changes on activation. Formation of these crosslinks inhibited channel function, suggesting that relative movement of these ECLs is important to normal channel function. Implications of these findings for the effects of mutations in the ECLs that are associated with cystic fibrosis and interactions with extracellular substances that influence channel activity are discussed.

  1. Variomics screen identifies the re-entrant loop of the calcium-activated chloride channel ANO1 that facilitates channel activation.

    PubMed

    Bill, Anke; Popa, M Oana; van Diepen, Michiel T; Gutierrez, Abraham; Lilley, Sarah; Velkova, Maria; Acheson, Kathryn; Choudhury, Hedaythul; Renaud, Nicole A; Auld, Douglas S; Gosling, Martin; Groot-Kormelink, Paul J; Gaither, L Alex

    2015-01-09

    The calcium-activated chloride channel ANO1 regulates multiple physiological processes. However, little is known about the mechanism of channel gating and regulation of ANO1 activity. Using a high-throughput, random mutagenesis-based variomics screen, we generated and functionally characterized ∼6000 ANO1 mutants and identified novel mutations that affected channel activity, intracellular trafficking, or localization of ANO1. Mutations such as S741T increased ANO1 calcium sensitivity and rendered ANO1 calcium gating voltage-independent, demonstrating a critical role of the re-entrant loop in coupling calcium and voltage sensitivity of ANO1 and hence in regulating ANO1 activation. Our data present the first unbiased and comprehensive study of the structure-function relationship of ANO1. The novel ANO1 mutants reported have diverse functional characteristics, providing new tools to study ANO1 function in biological systems, paving the path for a better understanding of the function of ANO1 and its role in health and diseases.

  2. Variomics Screen Identifies the Re-entrant Loop of the Calcium-activated Chloride Channel ANO1 That Facilitates Channel Activation*

    PubMed Central

    Bill, Anke; Popa, M. Oana; van Diepen, Michiel T.; Gutierrez, Abraham; Lilley, Sarah; Velkova, Maria; Acheson, Kathryn; Choudhury, Hedaythul; Renaud, Nicole A.; Auld, Douglas S.; Gosling, Martin; Groot-Kormelink, Paul J.; Gaither, L. Alex

    2015-01-01

    The calcium-activated chloride channel ANO1 regulates multiple physiological processes. However, little is known about the mechanism of channel gating and regulation of ANO1 activity. Using a high-throughput, random mutagenesis-based variomics screen, we generated and functionally characterized ∼6000 ANO1 mutants and identified novel mutations that affected channel activity, intracellular trafficking, or localization of ANO1. Mutations such as S741T increased ANO1 calcium sensitivity and rendered ANO1 calcium gating voltage-independent, demonstrating a critical role of the re-entrant loop in coupling calcium and voltage sensitivity of ANO1 and hence in regulating ANO1 activation. Our data present the first unbiased and comprehensive study of the structure-function relationship of ANO1. The novel ANO1 mutants reported have diverse functional characteristics, providing new tools to study ANO1 function in biological systems, paving the path for a better understanding of the function of ANO1 and its role in health and diseases. PMID:25425649

  3. Permeation Mechanisms in the TMEM16B Calcium-Activated Chloride Channels

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    TMEM16A and TMEM16B encode for Ca2+-activated Cl− channels (CaCC) and are expressed in many cell types and play a relevant role in many physiological processes. Here, I performed a site-directed mutagenesis study to understand the molecular mechanisms of ion permeation of TMEM16B. I mutated two positive charged residues R573 and K540, respectively located at the entrance and inside the putative channel pore and I measured the properties of wild-type and mutant TMEM16B channels expressed in HEK-293 cells using whole-cell and excised inside-out patch clamp experiments. I found evidence that R573 and K540 control the ion permeability of TMEM16B depending both on which side of the membrane the ion substitution occurs and on the level of channel activation. Moreover, these residues contribute to control blockage or activation by permeant anions. Finally, R573 mutation abolishes the anomalous mole fraction effect observed in the presence of a permeable anion and it alters the apparent Ca2+-sensitivity of the channel. These findings indicate that residues facing the putative channel pore are responsible both for controlling the ion selectivity and the gating of the channel, providing an initial understanding of molecular mechanism of ion permeation in TMEM16B. PMID:28046119

  4. Permeation Mechanisms in the TMEM16B Calcium-Activated Chloride Channels.

    PubMed

    Pifferi, Simone

    2017-01-01

    TMEM16A and TMEM16B encode for Ca2+-activated Cl- channels (CaCC) and are expressed in many cell types and play a relevant role in many physiological processes. Here, I performed a site-directed mutagenesis study to understand the molecular mechanisms of ion permeation of TMEM16B. I mutated two positive charged residues R573 and K540, respectively located at the entrance and inside the putative channel pore and I measured the properties of wild-type and mutant TMEM16B channels expressed in HEK-293 cells using whole-cell and excised inside-out patch clamp experiments. I found evidence that R573 and K540 control the ion permeability of TMEM16B depending both on which side of the membrane the ion substitution occurs and on the level of channel activation. Moreover, these residues contribute to control blockage or activation by permeant anions. Finally, R573 mutation abolishes the anomalous mole fraction effect observed in the presence of a permeable anion and it alters the apparent Ca2+-sensitivity of the channel. These findings indicate that residues facing the putative channel pore are responsible both for controlling the ion selectivity and the gating of the channel, providing an initial understanding of molecular mechanism of ion permeation in TMEM16B.

  5. Calcium entry via TRPC1 channels activates chloride currents in human glioma cells

    PubMed Central

    Cuddapah, Vishnu Anand; Turner, Kathryn L.; Sontheimer, Harald

    2012-01-01

    Malignant gliomas are highly-invasive brain cancers that carry a dismal prognosis. Recent studies indicate that Cl− channels facilitate glioma cell invasion by promoting hydrodynamic cell shape and volume changes. Here we asked how Cl− channels are regulated in the context of migration. Using patch-clamp recordings we show Cl− currents are activated by physiological increases of [Ca2+]i to 65 and 180 nM. Cl− currents appear to be mediated by ClC-3, a voltage-gated, CaMKII-regulated Cl− channel highly expressed by glioma cells. ClC-3 channels colocalized with TRPC1 on caveolar lipid rafts on glioma cell processes. Using perforated-patch electrophysiological recordings, we demonstrate that inducible knockdown of TRPC1 expression with shRNA significantly inhibited glioma Cl− currents in a Ca2+-dependent fashion, placing Cl− channels under the regulation of Ca2+ entry via TRPC1. In chemotaxis assays epidermal growth factor (EGF)-induced invasion was inhibition by TRPC1 knockdown to the same extent as pharmacological block of Cl− channels. Thus endogenous glioma Cl− channels are regulated by TRPC1. Cl− channels could be an important downstream target of TRPC1 in many other cells types, coupling elevations in [Ca2+]i to the shape and volume changes associated with migrating cells. PMID:23261316

  6. Chloride channels are necessary for full platelet phosphatidylserine exposure and procoagulant activity.

    PubMed

    Harper, M T; Poole, A W

    2013-12-19

    Platelets enhance thrombin generation at sites of vascular injury by exposing phosphatidylserine during necrosis-like cell death. Anoctamin 6 (Ano6) is required for Ca(2+)-dependent phosphatidylserine exposure and is defective in patients with Scott syndrome, a rare bleeding disorder. Ano6 may also form Cl(-) channels, though the role of Cl(-) fluxes in platelet procoagulant activity has not been explored. We found that Cl(-) channel blockers or removal of extracellular Cl(-) inhibited agonist-induced phosphatidylserine exposure. However, this was not due to direct inhibition of Ca(2+)-dependent scrambling since Ca(2+) ionophore-induced phosphatidylserine exposure was normal. This implies that the role of Ano6 in Ca(2+-)dependent PS exposure is likely to differ from any putative function of Ano6 as a Cl(-) channel. Instead, Cl(-) channel blockade inhibited agonist-induced Ca(2+) entry. Importantly, Cl(-) channel blockers also prevented agonist-induced membrane hyperpolarization, resulting in depolarization. We propose that Cl(-) entry through Cl(-) channels is required for this hyperpolarization, maintaining the driving force for Ca(2+) entry and triggering full phosphatidylserine exposure. This demonstrates a novel role for Cl(-) channels in controlling platelet death and procoagulant activity.

  7. The secret life of CFTR as a calcium-activated chloride channel

    PubMed Central

    Billet, Arnaud; Hanrahan, John W

    2013-01-01

    cAMP-stimulated anion conductance is defective in cystic fibrosis (CF). The regulatory domain of CFTR, the anion channel protein encoded by the CF gene, possesses an unusually high density of consensus sequences for phosphorylation by protein kinase A (14 in a stretch of <200 amino acids). Thus it is not surprising that CFTR is viewed primarily as a cAMP-stimulated anion channel, and most studies have focused on this mode of activation. However, there is growing evidence that CFTR also responds to Ca2+-mobilizing secretagogues and contributes substantially to cholinergic and purinergic responses in native tissues. G protein-coupled receptors that signal through Gαq can stimulate CFTR channels by activating Ca2+-dependent adenylyl cyclase and tyrosine kinases, and also by inhibiting protein phosphatase type 2A. Here we review evidence for these novel mechanisms of CFTR activation and discuss how they may help explain previous observations. PMID:23959675

  8. The secret life of CFTR as a calcium-activated chloride channel.

    PubMed

    Billet, Arnaud; Hanrahan, John W

    2013-11-01

    cAMP-stimulated anion conductance is defective in cystic fibrosis (CF). The regulatory domain of CFTR, the anion channel protein encoded by the CF gene, possesses an unusually high density of consensus sequences for phosphorylation by protein kinase A (14 in a stretch of <200 amino acids). Thus it is not surprising that CFTR is viewed primarily as a cAMP-stimulated anion channel, and most studies have focused on this mode of activation. However, there is growing evidence that CFTR also responds to Ca(2+)-mobilizing secretagogues and contributes substantially to cholinergic and purinergic responses in native tissues. G protein-coupled receptors that signal through Gαq can stimulate CFTR channels by activating Ca(2+)-dependent adenylyl cyclase and tyrosine kinases, and also by inhibiting protein phosphatase type 2A. Here we review evidence for these novel mechanisms of CFTR activation and discuss how they may help explain previous observations.

  9. Functional expression of the TMEM16 family of calcium-activated chloride channels in airway smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Remy, Kenneth E.; Danielsson, Jennifer; Funayama, Hiromi; Fu, Xiao Wen; Chang, Herng-Yu Sucie; Yim, Peter; Xu, Dingbang; Emala, Charles W.

    2013-01-01

    Airway smooth muscle hyperresponsiveness is a key component in the pathophysiology of asthma. Although calcium-activated chloride channel (CaCC) flux has been described in many cell types, including human airway smooth muscle (HASM), the true molecular identity of the channels responsible for this chloride conductance remains controversial. Recently, a new family of proteins thought to represent the true CaCCs was identified as the TMEM16 family. This led us to question whether members of this family are functionally expressed in native and cultured HASM. We further questioned whether expression of these channels contributes to the contractile function of HASM. We identified the mRNA expression of eight members of the TMEM16 family in HASM cells and show immunohistochemical evidence of TMEM16A in both cultured and native HASM. Functionally, we demonstrate that the classic chloride channel inhibitor, 5-nitro-2-(3-phenylpropylamino)benzoic acid (NPPB), inhibited halide flux in cultured HASM cells. Moreover, HASM cells displayed classical electrophysiological properties of CaCCs during whole cell electrophysiological recordings, which were blocked by using an antibody selective for TMEM16A. Furthermore, two distinct TMEM16A antagonists (tannic acid and benzbromarone) impaired a substance P-induced contraction in isolated guinea pig tracheal rings. These findings demonstrate that multiple members of this recently described family of CaCCs are expressed in HASM cells, they display classic electrophysiological properties of CaCCs, and they modulate contractile tone in airway smooth muscle. The TMEM16 family may provide a novel therapeutic target for limiting airway constriction in asthma. PMID:23997176

  10. GlialCAM, a CLC-2 Cl(-) channel subunit, activates the slow gate of CLC chloride channels.

    PubMed

    Jeworutzki, Elena; Lagostena, Laura; Elorza-Vidal, Xabier; López-Hernández, Tania; Estévez, Raúl; Pusch, Michael

    2014-09-02

    GlialCAM, a glial cell adhesion molecule mutated in megalencephalic leukoencephalopathy with subcortical cysts, targets the CLC-2 Cl(-) channel to cell contacts in glia and activates CLC-2 currents in vitro and in vivo. We found that GlialCAM clusters all CLC channels at cell contacts in vitro and thus studied GlialCAM interaction with CLC channels to investigate the mechanism of functional activation. GlialCAM slowed deactivation kinetics of CLC-Ka/barttin channels and increased CLC-0 currents opening the common gate and slowing its deactivation. No functional effect was seen for common gate deficient CLC-0 mutants. Similarly, GlialCAM targets the common gate deficient CLC-2 mutant E211V/H816A to cell contacts, without altering its function. Thus, GlialCAM is able to interact with all CLC channels tested, targeting them to cell junctions and activating them by stabilizing the open configuration of the common gate. These results are important to better understand the physiological role of GlialCAM/CLC-2 interaction.

  11. Emodin augments calcium activated chloride channel in colonic smooth muscle cells by Gi/Go protein.

    PubMed

    Xu, Long; Ting-Lou; Lv, Nonghua; Zhu, Xuan; Chen, Youxiang; Yang, Jing

    2009-08-01

    Emodin is a natural anthraquinone in rhubarb. It has been identified as a prokinetic drug for gastrointestinal motility in Chinese traditional medicine. Emodin contracts smooth muscle by increasing the concentration of intracellular Ca(2+). In many smooth muscles, increasing intracellular Ca(2+) activates Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) channels (ClCA). The study was aimed to investigate the effects of emodin on ClCA channels in colonic smooth muscle. 4 channel physiology signal acquire system was used to measure isometric contraction of smooth muscle strips. ClCA currents were recorded by EPC10 with perforated whole cell model. Emodin contracted strips and cells in colonic smooth muscle and augmented ClCA currents. Niflumic acid (NFA) and 4', 4'-diisothiostilbene-2, 2-disulfonic acid (DIDS) blocked the effects. Gi/Go protein inhibits protein kinase A (PKA) and protein kinase C (PKC), and PKA and PKC reduced ClCA currents. Pertussis toxin (PTX, a special inhibitor of Gi/Go protein), 8-bromoadenosine 38, 58-cyclic monophosphate (8-BrcAMP, a membrane-permeant protein kinase A activator) and Phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA, a membrane-permeant protein kinase C activator) inhibited the effects on ClCA currents significantly. Our findings suggest that emodin augments ClCA channels to contract smooth muscle in colon, and the effect is induced mostly by enhancement of membrane Gi/Go protein signal transducer pathway.

  12. Computational modeling of anoctamin 1 calcium-activated chloride channels as pacemaker channels in interstitial cells of Cajal

    PubMed Central

    Gibbons, Simon J.; Farrugia, Gianrico; Sneyd, James; Cheng, Leo K.

    2014-01-01

    Interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) act as pacemaker cells in the gastrointestinal tract by generating electrical slow waves to regulate rhythmic smooth muscle contractions. Intrinsic Ca2+ oscillations in ICC appear to produce the slow waves by activating pacemaker currents, currently thought to be carried by the Ca2+-activated Cl− channel anoctamin 1 (Ano1). In this article we present a novel model of small intestinal ICC pacemaker activity that incorporates store-operated Ca2+ entry and a new model of Ano1 current. A series of simulations were carried out with the ICC model to investigate current controversies about the reversal potential of the Ano1 Cl− current in ICC and to predict the characteristics of the other ion channels that are necessary to generate slow waves. The model results show that Ano1 is a plausible pacemaker channel when coupled to a store-operated Ca2+ channel but suggest that small cyclical depolarizations may still occur in ICC in Ano1 knockout mice. The results predict that voltage-dependent Ca2+ current is likely to be negligible during the slow wave plateau phase. The model shows that the Cl− equilibrium potential is an important modulator of slow wave morphology, highlighting the need for a better understanding of Cl− dynamics in ICC. PMID:24481603

  13. Effect of a selective chloride channel activator, lubiprostone, on gastrointestinal transit, gastric sensory, and motor functions in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Camilleri, Michael; Bharucha, Adil E; Ueno, Ryuji; Burton, Duane; Thomforde, George M; Baxter, Kari; McKinzie, Sanna; Zinsmeister, Alan R

    2006-05-01

    Chloride channels modulate gastrointestinal neuromuscular functions in vitro. Lubiprostone, a selective type 2 chloride channel (ClC-2) activator, induces intestinal secretion and has been shown to relieve constipation in clinical trials; however, the effects of lubiprostone on gastric function and whole gut transit in humans are unclear. Our aim was to compare the effects of the selective ClC-2 activator lubiprostone on maximum tolerated volume (MTV) of a meal, postprandial symptoms, gastric volumes, and gastrointestinal and colonic transit in humans. We performed a randomized, parallel-group, double-blind, placebo-controlled study evaluating the effects of lubiprostone (24 microg bid) in 30 healthy volunteers. Validated methods were used: scintigraphic gastrointestinal and colonic transit, SPECT to measure gastric volumes, and the nutrient drink ("satiation") test to measure MTV and postprandial symptoms. Lubiprostone accelerated small bowel and colonic transit, increased fasting gastric volume, and retarded gastric emptying. MTV values were reduced compared with placebo; however, the MTV was within the normal range for healthy adults in 13 of 14 participants, and there was no significant change compared with baseline measurements. Lubiprostone had no significant effect on postprandial gastric volume or aggregate symptoms but did decrease fullness 30 min after the fully satiating meal. Thus the ClC-2 activator lubiprostone accelerates small intestinal and colonic transit, which confers potential in the treatment of constipation.

  14. Effect of chloride channel activity on retinal pigment cell proliferation and migration.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jing; Zhong, Wei; Sun, Lixia; Yin, Yuan; Zheng, Yajuan

    2017-04-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the effects of chloride channels (ClC) on the proliferation and migration of retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells, a primary component of proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR) membranes. An RPE cell model of phagocytosis was established using fibronectin‑coated latex beads. Cell proliferation was measured by live cell counting. The cell cycle and phagocytosis index was assessed by flow cytometry. Intracellular calcium concentration was quantified using Fura‑2‑acetoxymethyl ester. ClCs were blocked using 5‑nitro‑2‑(3‑phenylpropylamino) benzoic acid (NPPB) and tamoxifen (TAM). NPPB and TAM were identified to inhibit the proliferation of ARPE‑19 human adult RPE cells by arresting them in the G0/G1 phase, inhibit the phagocytosis of fibronectin, and decrease intracellular calcium levels, in a dose‑dependent manner. ClCs serve important roles in mediating human RPE cell proliferation and migration. The underlying mechanisms of action of ClCs are associated with the regulation of calcium. Targeting ClCs may provide a novel strategy to inhibit PVR formation.

  15. Studies on Chloride Channels and their Modulators.

    PubMed

    Patil, Vaishali M; Gupta, Satya P

    2016-01-01

    The prime roles of mutations in the genes, encoding chloride ion channels, in various human diseases of muscle, kidney, bone and brain, such as congenital myotonia, myotonic dystrophy, cystic fibrosis, osteopetrosis, epilepsy, glioma, etc., have been well established. Chloride ion channels are also responsible for glioma progression in brain and malaria parasite in red blood cells. The present article thus emphasises on the various diseases associated with chloride channel regulation and their modulators. Studies on various chloride channels and their modulators have been discussed in detail.

  16. Regulation of the Membrane Insertion and Conductance Activity of the Metamorphic Chloride Intracellular Channel Protein CLIC1 by Cholesterol

    PubMed Central

    Valenzuela, Stella M.; Alkhamici, Heba; Brown, Louise J.; Almond, Oscar C.; Goodchild, Sophia C.; Carne, Sonia; Curmi, Paul M. G.; Holt, Stephen A.; Cornell, Bruce A.

    2013-01-01

    The Chloride Intracellular ion channel protein CLIC1 has the ability to spontaneously insert into lipid membranes from a soluble, globular state. The precise mechanism of how this occurs and what regulates this insertion is still largely unknown, although factors such as pH and redox environment are known contributors. In the current study, we demonstrate that the presence and concentration of cholesterol in the membrane regulates the spontaneous insertion of CLIC1 into the membrane as well as its ion channel activity. The study employed pressure versus area change measurements of Langmuir lipid monolayer films; and impedance spectroscopy measurements using tethered bilayer membranes to monitor membrane conductance during and following the addition of CLIC1 protein. The observed cholesterol dependent behaviour of CLIC1 is highly reminiscent of the cholesterol-dependent-cytolysin family of bacterial pore-forming proteins, suggesting common regulatory mechanisms for spontaneous protein insertion into the membrane bilayer. PMID:23457643

  17. Regulation of the membrane insertion and conductance activity of the metamorphic chloride intracellular channel protein CLIC1 by cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Valenzuela, Stella M; Alkhamici, Heba; Brown, Louise J; Almond, Oscar C; Goodchild, Sophia C; Carne, Sonia; Curmi, Paul M G; Holt, Stephen A; Cornell, Bruce A

    2013-01-01

    The Chloride Intracellular ion channel protein CLIC1 has the ability to spontaneously insert into lipid membranes from a soluble, globular state. The precise mechanism of how this occurs and what regulates this insertion is still largely unknown, although factors such as pH and redox environment are known contributors. In the current study, we demonstrate that the presence and concentration of cholesterol in the membrane regulates the spontaneous insertion of CLIC1 into the membrane as well as its ion channel activity. The study employed pressure versus area change measurements of Langmuir lipid monolayer films; and impedance spectroscopy measurements using tethered bilayer membranes to monitor membrane conductance during and following the addition of CLIC1 protein. The observed cholesterol dependent behaviour of CLIC1 is highly reminiscent of the cholesterol-dependent-cytolysin family of bacterial pore-forming proteins, suggesting common regulatory mechanisms for spontaneous protein insertion into the membrane bilayer.

  18. Expression of calcium-activated chloride channels Ano1 and Ano2 in mouse taste cells.

    PubMed

    Cherkashin, Alexander P; Kolesnikova, Alisa S; Tarasov, Michail V; Romanov, Roman A; Rogachevskaja, Olga A; Bystrova, Marina F; Kolesnikov, Stanislav S

    2016-02-01

    Specialized Ca(2+)-dependent ion channels ubiquitously couple intracellular Ca(2+) signals to a change in cell polarization. The existing physiological evidence suggests that Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) channels (CaCCs) are functional in taste cells. Because Ano1 and Ano2 encode channel proteins that form CaCCs in a variety of cells, we analyzed their expression in mouse taste cells. Transcripts for Ano1 and Ano2 were detected in circumvallate (CV) papillae, and their expression in taste cells was confirmed using immunohistochemistry. When dialyzed with CsCl, taste cells of the type III exhibited no ion currents dependent on cytosolic Ca(2+). Large Ca(2+)-gated currents mediated by TRPM5 were elicited in type II cells by Ca(2+) uncaging. When TRPM5 was inhibited by triphenylphosphine oxide (TPPO), ionomycin stimulated a small but resolvable inward current that was eliminated by anion channel blockers, including T16Ainh-A01 (T16), a specific Ano1 antagonist. This suggests that CaCCs, including Ano1-like channels, are functional in type II cells. In type I cells, CaCCs were prominently active, blockable with the CaCC antagonist CaCCinh-A01 but insensitive to T16. By profiling Ano1 and Ano2 expressions in individual taste cells, we revealed Ano1 transcripts in type II cells only, while Ano2 transcripts were detected in both type I and type II cells. P2Y agonists stimulated Ca(2+)-gated Cl(-) currents in type I cells. Thus, CaCCs, possibly formed by Ano2, serve as effectors downstream of P2Y receptors in type I cells. While the role for TRPM5 in taste transduction is well established, the physiological significance of expression of CaCCs in type II cells remains to be elucidated.

  19. Flow-activated chloride channels in vascular endothelium. Shear stress sensitivity, desensitization dynamics, and physiological implications.

    PubMed

    Gautam, Mamta; Shen, Yue; Thirkill, Twanda L; Douglas, Gordon C; Barakat, Abdul I

    2006-12-01

    Although activation of outward rectifying Cl(-) channels is one of the fastest responses of endothelial cells (ECs) to shear stress, little is known about these channels. In this study, we used whole-cell patch clamp recordings to characterize the flow-activated Cl(-) current in bovine aortic ECs (BAECs). Application of shear stress induced rapid development of a Cl(-) current that was effectively blocked by the Cl(-) channel antagonist 5-nitro-2-(3-phenopropylamino)benzoic acid (100 microM). The current initiated at a shear stress as low as 0.3 dyne/cm(2), attained its peak within minutes of flow onset, and saturated above 3.5 dynes/cm(2) approximately 2.5-3.5-fold increase over pre-flow levels). The Cl(-) current desensitized slowly in response to sustained flow, and step increases in shear stress elicited increased current only if the shear stress levels were below the 3.5 dynes/cm(2) saturation level. Oscillatory flow with a physiological oscillation frequency of 1 Hz, as occurs in disturbed flow zones prone to atherosclerosis, failed to elicit the Cl(-) current, whereas lower oscillation frequencies led to partial recovery of the current. Nonreversing pulsatile flow, generally considered protective of atherosclerosis, was as effective in eliciting the current as steady flow. Measurements using fluids of different viscosities indicated that the Cl(-) current is responsive to shear stress rather than shear rate. Blocking the flow-activated Cl(-) current abolished flow-induced Akt phosphorylation in BAECs, whereas blocking flow-sensitive K(+) currents had no effect, suggesting that flow-activated Cl(-) channels play an important role in regulating EC flow signaling.

  20. Intermediate-conductance Calcium-activated Potassium Channel KCa3.1 and Chloride Channel Modulate Chemokine Ligand (CCL19/CCL21)-induced Migration of Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Zhifei; Gaurav, Rohit; Agrawal, Devendra K

    2014-01-01

    The role of ion channels is largely unknown in chemokine-induced migration in non-excitable cells such as dendritic cells. Here, we examined the role of KCa3.1 and chloride channels in lymphatic chemokines-induced migration of dendritic cells. The amplitude and kinetics of CCL19/21-induced Ca2+ influx were associated with CCR7 expression levels, extracellular free Ca2+ and Cl−, and independent of extracellular K+. Chemokines, CCL19 and CCL21, and KCa3.1 activator, 1-EBIO, induced plasma membrane hyperpolarization and K+ efflux, which was blocked by TRAM-34, suggesting that KCa3.1 carried larger conductance than the inward CRAC. Blockade of KCa3.1, low Cl− in the medium, and low dose of DIDS impaired CCL19/CCL21-induced Ca2+ influx, cell volume change, and DC migration. High doses of DIDS completely blocked DC migration possibly by significantly disrupting mitochondrial membrane potential. In conclusion, KCa3.1 and chloride channel are critical in human DC migration by synergistically regulating membrane potential, chemokine-induced Ca2+ influx, and cell volume. PMID:25583444

  1. Clcn2 encodes the hyperpolarization-activated chloride channel in the ducts of mouse salivary glands

    PubMed Central

    Romanenko, Victor G.; Nakamoto, Tetsuji; Catalán, Marcelo A.; Gonzalez-Begne, Mireya; Schwartz, George J.; Jaramillo, Yasna; Sepúlveda, Francisco V.; Figueroa, Carlos D.; Melvin, James E.

    2008-01-01

    Transepithelial Cl− transport in salivary gland ducts is a major component of the ion reabsorption process, the final stage of saliva production. It was previously demonstrated that a Cl− current with the biophysical properties of ClC-2 channels dominates the Cl− conductance of unstimulated granular duct cells in the mouse submandibular gland. This inward-rectifying Cl− current is activated by hyperpolarization and elevated intracellular Cl− concentration. Here we show that ClC-2 immunolocalized to the basolateral region of acinar and duct cells in mouse salivary glands, whereas its expression was most robust in granular and striated duct cells. Consistent with this observation, nearly 10-fold larger ClC-2-like currents were observed in granular duct cells than the acinar cells obtained from submandibular glands. The loss of inward-rectifying Cl− current in cells from Clcn2−/− mice confirmed the molecular identity of the channel responsible for these currents as ClC-2. Nevertheless, both in vivo and ex vivo fluid secretion assays failed to identify significant changes in the ion composition, osmolality, or salivary flow rate of Clcn2−/− mice. Additionally, neither a compensatory increase in Cftr Cl− channel protein expression nor in Cftr-like Cl− currents were detected in Clcn2 null mice, nor did it appear that ClC-2 was important for blood-organ barrier function. We conclude that ClC-2 is the inward-rectifying Cl− channel in duct cells, but its expression is not apparently required for the ion reabsorption or the barrier function of salivary ductal epithelium. PMID:18801913

  2. Effects of alternative splicing on function of Bestrophin-1 calcium-activated chloride channels

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Yu-Hung; Abdullaev, Iskandar F.; Hyzinski-García, María C.; Mongin, Alexander A.

    2014-01-01

    Synopsis The proposed Ca2+-activated Cl− channel protein Bestrophin 1 (Best1) is expressed and functionally important in the retina and in the brain. Human BEST1 has two known splice variants, Best1V1 and Best1V2, which arise from alternative splicing of two exons: exon 2 splicing results in a unique N-terminal domain, whereas alternative splicing of exon 11 produces two mutually exclusive C-termini. Prior studies were limited to Best1V1 and its clinically relevant mutations. In the present work, we cloned a novel splice variant of Best1V1 missing exon 2 (Best1V1Δex2) and differing from each of the two previously identified isoforms by one alternatively spliced domain. This finding allowed us to determine the role for alternative splicing of the Best1 N- and C-termini. We heteroexpressed Best1V1Δex2 in HEK293 cells, and compared its properties to Best1V1 and Best1V2. Western blot analysis confirmed protein expression from all three splice variants. Both Best1V1 and Best1V1Δex2 successfully formed Ca2+-activated Cl− channels, demonstrating that the N-terminus encoded by exon 2 is not essential for channel function. In contrast, Best1V2 expressing cells had no detectable Ca2+-activated Cl− currents, pointing to a critical role for splicing of the C-terminus. Surface protein biotinylation demonstrated that Best1V1 and Best1V1Δex2 are trafficked to the plasma membrane, whereas Best1V2 is not. These results define the impact of alternative splicing on Best1 function, and should be taken into consideration in future modeling of the Best1 protein structure. PMID:24341532

  3. Calcium dependence and distribution of calcium-activated chloride channels in Xenopus oocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Gomez-Hernandez, J M; Stühmer, W; Parekh, A B

    1997-01-01

    1. The Ca(2+)-dependent Cl- current (ICl,Ca), expressed in the plasma membrane of Xenopus oocytes, was examined in excised inside-out macropatches using a rapid perfusion system. 2. Application of Ca(2+)-containing Ringer solution resulted in the activation of a current whose reversal potential shifted to the right by 51 +/- 5.2 mV when Cl- in the pipette solution was lowered from 119.3 to 10 mM. No currents were generated when Ca2+ was omitted from the solution. The current is therefore a Ca(2+)-activated Cl- one. 3. Following exposure to Ca2+, the half-time for activation of ICl,Ca was not voltage dependent, whereas deactivation was strongly so. 4. ICl,Ca was stable in the continuous presence of Ca2+ and showed no sign of inactivation or adaptation. 5. Comparison of the size of the currents (normalized to pipette resistance) from the animal and vegetal poles revealed that ICl,Ca had a highly polarized distribution. The current density was almost 10 times higher in the animal pole. 6. The results suggest that Cl- channels provide a continuous and reliable indication of submembranous Ca2+, at least in an excised patch, and the clustering of the Cl- channels renders it necessary to exert caution in interpreting results involving the kinetics of Ca2+ signalling, when ICl,Ca is used as the sole monitor of calcium. PMID:9279809

  4. Intermediate-conductance calcium-activated potassium channel KCa3.1 and chloride channel modulate chemokine ligand (CCL19/CCL21)-induced migration of dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Shao, Zhifei; Gaurav, Rohit; Agrawal, Devendra K

    2015-07-01

    The role of ion channels is largely unknown in chemokine-induced migration in nonexcitable cells such as dendritic cells (DCs). Here, we examined the role of intermediate-conductance calcium-activated potassium channel (KCa3.1) and chloride channel (CLC3) in lymphatic chemokine-induced migration of DCs. The amplitude and kinetics of chemokine ligand (CCL19/CCL21)-induced Ca(2+) influx were associated with chemokine receptor 7 expression levels, extracellular-free Ca(2+) and Cl(-), and independent of extracellular K(+). Chemokines (CCL19 and CCL21) and KCa3.1 activator (1-ethyl-1,3-dihydro-2H-benzimidazol-2-one) induced plasma membrane hyperpolarization and K(+) efflux, which was blocked by 1-[(2-chlorophenyl)diphenylmethyl]-1H-pyrazole, suggesting that KCa3.1 carried larger conductance than the inward calcium release-activated calcium channel. Blockade of KCa3.1, low Cl(-) in the medium, and low dose of 4,4'-diisothiocyano-2,2'-stilbenedisulfonic acid (DIDS) impaired CCL19/CCL21-induced Ca(2+) influx, cell volume change, and DC migration. High doses of DIDS completely blocked DC migration possibly by significantly disrupting mitochondrial membrane potential. In conclusion, KCa3.1 and CLC3 are critical in human DC migration by synergistically regulating membrane potential, chemokine-induced Ca(2+) influx, and cell volume.

  5. Calcium-Activated Chloride Channels (CaCCs) Regulate Action Potential and Synaptic Response in Hippocampal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wendy C.; Xiao, Shaohua; Huang, Fen; Harfe, Brian D.; Jan, Yuh Nung; Jan, Lily Yeh

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Central neurons respond to synaptic inputs from other neurons by generating synaptic potentials. Once the summated synaptic potentials reach threshold for action potential firing, the signal propagates leading to transmitter release at the synapse. The calcium influx accompanying such signaling opens calcium-activated ion channels for feedback regulation. Here we report a novel mechanism for modulating hippocampal neuronal signaling that involves calcium-activated chloride channels (CaCCs). We present the first evidence that CaCCs reside in hippocampal neurons and are in close proximity of calcium channels and NMDA receptors to shorten action potential duration, dampen excitatory synaptic potentials, impede temporal summation, and raise the threshold for action potential generation by synaptic potential. Having recently identified TMEM16A and TMEM16B as CaCCs, we further show that TMEM16B but not TMEM16A is important for hippocampal CaCC, laying the groundwork for deciphering the dynamic CaCC modulation of neuronal signaling in neurons important for learning and memory. PMID:22500639

  6. Molecular and functional analyses of two new calcium-activated chloride channel family members from mouse eye and intestine.

    PubMed

    Evans, Stella R; Thoreson, Wallace B; Beck, Carol L

    2004-10-01

    Two new calcium-activated chloride channel (CLCA) family members, mCLCA5 and mCLCA6, have been cloned from mouse eye and intestine, respectively. mCLCA5 is highly homologous to hCLCA2, and mCLCA6 is highly homologous to hCLCA4. mCLCA5 is widely expressed with strong expression in eye and spleen, whereas mCLCA6 is primarily expressed in intestine and stomach. mCLCA6 is also expressed as a splice variant lacking exon 8 and part of exon 10 in intestine and stomach. Transfection of tsA201 cells with enhanced green fluorescent protein-tagged versions of the three cDNAs reveals protein products of 155 and 65 kDa for mCLCA5 and mCLCA6 and 145 and 65 kDa for the mCLCA6 splice variant. In vitro translation of mCLCA5 generates a 90-kDa protein that does not appear to be glycosylated. mCLCA6 also generates a 90-kDa protein that is glycosylated to a 110-kDa product, whereas the mCLCA6 splice variant generates an 80-kDa product that is 100 kDa after glycosylation. Treatment of enhanced green fluorescent protein-tagged mCLCA6 with PNGase F (peptide: N-glycosidase F) to remove N-linked glycosyl groups shows a reduction in size of the 65 kDa product to 60 kDa. Consistent with the hypothesis that mCLCA5, mCLCA6, and its splice variant encode calcium-activated chloride channels, in HEK293 cells expressing CLCAs ionomycin-evoked increases in intracellular calcium stimulated a current that reversed near Cl(-) equilibrium potential, E(Cl). Furthermore, these currents were inhibited by the chloride channel blocker niflumic acid. Given the prominent role of hCLCA2 in cancer cell adhesion and the unique high level of expression of hCLCA4 in brain, the identification of their murine counterparts presents the opportunity to clarify the role of CLCAs in disease and normal cell physiology.

  7. Phosphorylation and IGF-1-mediated dephosphorylation pathways control the activity and the pharmacological properties of skeletal muscle chloride channels

    PubMed Central

    De Luca, Annamaria; Pierno, Sabata; Liantonio, Antonella; Camerino, Claudia; Conte Camerino, Diana

    1998-01-01

    In the present study we tested the hypothesis that insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) modulates resting chloride conductance (GCl) of rat skeletal muscle by activating a phosphatase and that the chloride channel, based on the activity of phosphorylating-dephosphorylating pathways, has different sensitivity to specific ligands, such as the enantiomers of 2-(p-chlorophenoxy) propionic acid (CPP).For this purpose GCl in EDL muscle isolated from adult rat was first lowered by treatment with 5 nM 4-β-phorbol 12,13 dibutyrate (4-β-PDB), presumably activating protein kinase C (PKC). The effects of IGF-1 and of the enantiomers of CPP on GCl were then tested.IGF-1 (3.3 nM) had no effect of GCl on EDL muscle fibres in normal physiological solution, whereas it completely counteracted the 30% decrease of GCl induced by 4-β-PDB. No effects of IGF-1 were observed on GCl lowered by the phosphatase inhibitor okadaic acid (0.25 μM).Ceramide, reported to activate on okadaic acid-sensitive phosphatase, mimicked the effects of IGF-1. In fact, N-acetyl-sphingosine (2.5–5 μM), not very effective in control conditions, increased the GCl lowered by the phorbol ester, but not the GCl lowered by okadaic acid.In the presence of 4-β-PDB, GCl was differently affected by the enantiomers of CPP. The S(−)-CPP was remarkably less potent in producing the concentration-dependent reduction of GCl, whereas the R(+)-CPP caused an increase of GCl at all the concentrations tested.In conclusion, the PKC-induced lowering of GCl is counteracted by IGF-1 through an okadaic acid sensitive phosphatase, and this effect can have therapeutic relevance in situations characterized by excessive channel phosphorylation. In turn the phosphorylation state of the channel can modulate the effects and the therapeutic potential of direct channel ligands. PMID:9806330

  8. Ginsenoside Rb1, a novel activator of the TMEM16A chloride channel, augments the contraction of guinea pig ileum.

    PubMed

    Guo, Shuai; Chen, Yafei; Pang, Chunli; Wang, Xuzhao; Qi, Jinlong; Mo, Li; Zhang, Hailin; An, Hailong; Zhan, Yong

    2017-01-25

    Calcium-activated chloride channels (CaCCs) play important roles in many physiological processes, and the molecular basis of CaCCs has been identified as TMEM16A in many cell types. It is well established that TMEM16A is a drug target in many diseases, including cystic fibrosis, hypertension, asthma, and various tumors. Therefore, identifying potent and specific modulators of the TMEM16A channel is crucial. In this study, we identified the first natural activator of TMEM16A from traditional Chinese medicine and explored its mechanism. Our data showed that Ginsenoside Rb1 (GRb1) can activate TMEM16A directly from the intracellular side in a dose-dependent manner at an EC50 of 38.4 ± 2.14 μM. GRb1 specifically activated TMEM16A/B, but not the other previously proposed CaCC mediators such as CFTR and bestrophin. Moreover, GRb1 promoted proliferation of CHO cells stably expressing TMEM16A, in a concentration-dependent manner. Finally, we showed that GRb1 increased the amplitude and frequency of contractions in an isolated guinea pig ileum assay in vivo. In summary, GRb1 can be considered a lead compound for the development of novel drugs for the treatment of diseases caused by TMEM16A dysfunction.

  9. Calcium-activated chloride channels as a new target to control the spiking pattern of neurons.

    PubMed

    Ha, Go Eun; Cheong, Eunji

    2017-03-03

    Neuronal firing patterns and frequencies determine the nature of encoded information in the neural circuits. Here we discuss the molecular identity and cellular mechanisms of spike-frequency adaptation in central nervous system (CNS). Spike-frequency adaptation in thalamocortical (TC) and CA1 hippocampal neurons is mediated by the Ca2+-activated Cl- channel (CACC) anoctamin-2 (ANO2). Knockdown of ANO2 in these neurons results in significantly reduced spike-frequency adaptation along with increased number of spikes. No previous study has described the finding that CACCs mediate afterhyperpolarization currents, which result in the modulation of neuronal spike patterns in the central nervous system. Therefore, our study proposes a novel role for ANO2 in spike-frequency adaptation and transmission of information in the brain.

  10. Presynaptic Localization and Possible Function of Calcium-Activated Chloride Channel Anoctamin 1 in the Mammalian Retina

    PubMed Central

    Chun, Myung-Hoon; Oh, Uhtaek; Kim, In-Beom

    2013-01-01

    Calcium (Ca2+)-activated chloride (Cl−) channels (CaCCs) play a role in the modulation of action potentials and synaptic responses in the somatodendritic regions of central neurons. In the vertebrate retina, large Ca2+-activated Cl− currents (ICl(Ca)) regulate synaptic transmission at photoreceptor terminals; however, the molecular identity of CaCCs that mediate ICl(Ca) remains unclear. The transmembrane protein, TMEM16A, also called anoctamin 1 (ANO1), has been recently validated as a CaCC and is widely expressed in various secretory epithelia and nervous tissues. Despite the fact that tmem16a was first cloned in the retina, there is little information on its cellular localization and function in the mammalian retina. In this study, we found that ANO1 was abundantly expressed as puncta in 2 synaptic layers. More specifically, ANO1 immunoreactivity was observed in the presynaptic terminals of various retinal neurons, including photoreceptors. ICl(Ca) was first detected in dissociated rod bipolar cells expressing ANO1. ICl(Ca) was abolished by treatment with the Ca2+ channel blocker Co2+, the L-type Ca2+ channel blocker nifedipine, and the Cl− channel blockers 5-nitro-2-(3-phenylpropylamino) benzoic acid (NPPB) and niflumic acid (NFA). More specifically, a recently discovered ANO1-selective inhibitor, T16Ainh-A01, and a neutralizing antibody against ANO1 inhibited ICl(Ca) in rod bipolar cells. Under a current-clamping mode, the suppression of ICl(Ca) by using NPPB and T16Ainh-A01 caused a prolonged Ca2+ spike-like depolarization evoked by current injection in dissociated rod bipolar cells. These results suggest that ANO1 confers ICl(Ca) in retinal neurons and acts as an intrinsic regulator of the presynaptic membrane potential during synaptic transmission. PMID:23840801

  11. An Apical-Membrane Chloride Channel in Human Tracheal Epithelium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welsh, Michael J.

    1986-06-01

    The mechanism of chloride transport by airway epithelia has been of substantial interest because airway and sweat gland-duct epithelia are chloride-impermeable in cystic fibrosis. The decreased chloride permeability prevents normal secretion by the airway epithelium, thereby interfering with mucociliary clearance and contributing to the morbidity and mortality of the disease. Because chloride secretion depends on and is regulated by chloride conductance in the apical cell membrane, the patch-clamp technique was used to directly examine single-channel currents in primary cultures of human tracheal epithelium. The cells contained an anion-selective channel that was not strongly voltage-gated or regulated by calcium in cell-free patches. The channel was also blocked by analogs of carboxylic acid that decrease apical chloride conductance in intact epithelia. When attached to the cell, the channel was activated by isoproterenol, although the channel was also observed to open spontaneously. However, in some cases, the channel was only observed after the patch was excised from the cell. These results suggest that this channel is responsible for the apical chloride conductance in airway epithelia.

  12. Increased TMEM16A-encoded calcium-activated chloride channel activity is associated with pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Forrest, Abigail S.; Joyce, Talia C.; Huebner, Marissa L.; Ayon, Ramon J.; Wiwchar, Michael; Joyce, John; Freitas, Natalie; Davis, Alison J.; Ye, Linda; Duan, Dayue D.; Singer, Cherie A.; Valencik, Maria L.; Greenwood, Iain A.

    2012-01-01

    Pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) are more depolarized and display higher Ca2+ levels in pulmonary hypertension (PH). Whether the functional properties and expression of Ca2+-activated Cl− channels (ClCa), an important excitatory mechanism in PASMCs, are altered in PH is unknown. The potential role of ClCa channels in PH was investigated using the monocrotaline (MCT)-induced PH model in the rat. Three weeks postinjection with a single dose of MCT (50 mg/kg ip), the animals developed right ventricular hypertrophy (heart weight measurements) and changes in pulmonary arterial flow (pulse-waved Doppler imaging) that were consistent with increased pulmonary arterial pressure and PH. Whole cell patch experiments revealed an increase in niflumic acid (NFA)-sensitive Ca2+-activated Cl− current [ICl(Ca)] density in PASMCs from large conduit and small intralobar pulmonary arteries of MCT-treated rats vs. aged-matched saline-injected controls. Quantitative RT-PCR and Western blot analysis revealed that the alterations in ICl(Ca) were accompanied by parallel changes in the expression of TMEM16A, a gene recently shown to encode for ClCa channels. The contraction to serotonin of conduit and intralobar pulmonary arteries from MCT-treated rats exhibited greater sensitivity to nifedipine (1 μM), an l-type Ca2+ channel blocker, and NFA (30 or 100 μM, with or without 10 μM indomethacin to inhibit cyclooxygenases) or T16AInh-A01 (10 μM), TMEM16A/ClCa channel inhibitors, than that of control animals. In conclusion, augmented ClCa/TMEM16A channel activity is a major contributor to the changes in electromechanical coupling of PA in this model of PH. TMEM16A-encoded channels may therefore represent a novel therapeutic target in this disease. PMID:23034390

  13. The Transition from Proliferation to Differentiation in Colorectal Cancer Is Regulated by the Calcium Activated Chloride Channel A1

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Bin; McCaig, Colin D.; Pu, Jin

    2013-01-01

    Breaking the balance between proliferation and differentiation in animal cells can lead to cancer, but the mechanisms maintaining this balance remain largely undefined. The calcium activated chloride channel A1 (CLCA1) is a member of the calcium sensitive chloride conductance family of proteins and is expressed mainly in the colon, small intestine and appendix. We show that CLCA1 plays a functional role in differentiation and proliferation of Caco-2 cells and of intestinal tissue. Caco-2 cells spontaneously differentiate either in confluent culture or when treated with butyrate, a molecule present naturally in the diet. Here, we compared CLCA1 expressional levels between patients with and without colorectal cancer (CRC) and determined the functional role of CLCA1 in differentiation and proliferation of Caco-2 cells. We showed that: 1) CLCA1 and CLCA4 expression were down-regulated significantly in CRC patients; 2) CLCA1 expression was up-regulated in Caco-2 cells induced to differentiate by confluent culture or by treatment with sodium butyrate (NaBT); 3) Knockdown of CLCA1 with siRNA significantly inhibited cell differentiation and promoted cell proliferation in Caco-2 confluent cultures, and 4) In Caco-2 3D culture, suppression of CLCA1 significantly increased cell proliferation and compromised NaBT-induced inhibition of proliferation. In conclusion, CLCA1 may contribute to promoting spontaneous differentiation and reducing proliferation of Caco-2 cells and may be a target of NaBT-induced inhibition of proliferation and therefore a potential diagnostic marker for CRC prognosis. PMID:23593331

  14. Inhibition of calcium-activated chloride channel ANO1 suppresses proliferation and induces apoptosis of epithelium originated cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Guan, Lizhao; Song, Yan; Gao, Jian; Gao, Jianjun; Wang, KeWei

    2016-11-29

    ANO1, a calcium-activated chloride channel, has been reported to be amplified or overexpressed in tissues of several cancers. However, reports on its roles in tumor progression obtained from cancer cell lines are inconsistent, suggesting that the role of ANO1 in tumorigenesis is likely dependent on either its expression level or cell-type expressing ANO1. To investigate the biological roles of ANO1 in different tumor cells, we, in this study, selected several cancer cell lines and a normal HaCaT cell line with high expression levels of ANO1, and examined the function of ANO1 in these cells using approaches of lentiviral knockdown and pharmacological inhibition. We found that ANO1 knockdown significantly inhibited cell proliferation and induced cell apoptosis in either tumor cell lines or normal HaCaT cell line. Moreover, silencing ANO1 arrested cancer cells at G1 phase of cell cycle. Treatment with ANO1 inhibitor CaCCinh-A01 reduced cell viability in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, both ANO1 inhibitors CaCCinh-A01 and T16Ainh-A01 significantly suppressed cell migration. Our findings show that ANO1 overexpression promotes cancer cell proliferation and migration; and genetic or pharmacological inhibition of ANO1 induces apoptosis and cell cycle arrest at G1 phase in different types of epithelium-originated cancer cells.

  15. Inhibition of calcium-activated chloride channel ANO1 suppresses proliferation and induces apoptosis of epithelium originated cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Lizhao; Song, Yan; Gao, Jian; Gao, Jianjun; Wang, KeWei

    2016-01-01

    ANO1, a calcium-activated chloride channel, has been reported to be amplified or overexpressed in tissues of several cancers. However, reports on its roles in tumor progression obtained from cancer cell lines are inconsistent, suggesting that the role of ANO1 in tumorigenesis is likely dependent on either its expression level or cell-type expressing ANO1. To investigate the biological roles of ANO1 in different tumor cells, we, in this study, selected several cancer cell lines and a normal HaCaT cell line with high expression levels of ANO1, and examined the function of ANO1 in these cells using approaches of lentiviral knockdown and pharmacological inhibition. We found that ANO1 knockdown significantly inhibited cell proliferation and induced cell apoptosis in either tumor cell lines or normal HaCaT cell line. Moreover, silencing ANO1 arrested cancer cells at G1 phase of cell cycle. Treatment with ANO1 inhibitor CaCCinh-A01 reduced cell viability in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, both ANO1 inhibitors CaCCinh-A01 and T16Ainh-A01 significantly suppressed cell migration. Our findings show that ANO1 overexpression promotes cancer cell proliferation and migration; and genetic or pharmacological inhibition of ANO1 induces apoptosis and cell cycle arrest at G1 phase in different types of epithelium-originated cancer cells. PMID:27732935

  16. Independent activation of ion conduction pores in the double-barreled calcium-activated chloride channel TMEM16A.

    PubMed

    Lim, Novandy K; Lam, Andy K M; Dutzler, Raimund

    2016-11-01

    The TMEM16 proteins constitute a family of membrane proteins with unusual functional breadth, including lipid scramblases and Cl(-) channels. Members of both these branches are activated by Ca(2+), acting from the intracellular side, and probably share a common architecture, which was defined in the recent structure of the lipid scramblase nhTMEM16. The structural features of subunits and the arrangement of Ca(2+)-binding sites in nhTMEM16 suggest that the dimeric protein harbors two locations for catalysis that are independent with respect to both activation and lipid conduction. Here, we ask whether a similar independence is observed in the Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) channel TMEM16A. For this purpose, we generated concatenated constructs containing subunits with distinct activation and permeation properties. Our biochemical investigations demonstrate the integrity of concatemers after solubilization and purification. During investigation by patch-clamp electrophysiology, the functional behavior of constructs containing either two wild-type (WT) subunits or one WT subunit paired with a second subunit with compromised activation closely resembles TMEM16A. This resemblance extends to ion selectivity, conductance, and the concentration and voltage dependence of channel activation by Ca(2+) Constructs combining subunits with different potencies for Ca(2+) show a biphasic activation curve that can be described as a linear combination of the properties of its constituents. The functional independence is further supported by mutation of a putative pore-lining residue that changes the conduction properties of the mutated subunit. Our results strongly suggest that TMEM16A contains two ion conduction pores that are independently activated by Ca(2+) binding to sites that are embedded within the transmembrane part of each subunit.

  17. Evidence for the participation of Ca(2+)-activated chloride channels in formalin-induced acute and chronic nociception.

    PubMed

    García, Guadalupe; Martínez-Rojas, Vladimir A; Rocha-González, Héctor I; Granados-Soto, Vinicio; Murbartián, Janet

    2014-09-04

    In this study we determined the role of Ca(2+)-activated chloride channels (CaCC) in acute and chronic nociceptive responses elicited by 1% formalin. Formalin injection produced a typical pattern of flinching behavior for about 1h. Moreover, it produced secondary allodynia and hyperalgesia in the ipsilateral and contralateral paws for at least 6 days. Local peripheral and intrathecal pre-treatment (-10 min) with the non-selective and selective CaCC blockers niflumic acid and CaCCinh-A01, respectively, prevented formalin-induced flinching behavior mainly during phase 2 of the formalin test. Furthermore, niflumic acid and CaCCinh-A01 also prevented in a dose-dependent manner the long-lasting evoked secondary mechanical allodynia and hyperalgesia in the ipsilateral and contralateral paws. Moreover, local peripheral and intrathecal post-treatment (on day 6) with both CaCC blockers decreased the established formalin-induced secondary mechanical allodynia and hyperalgesia behavior in both paws. CaCC anoctamin-1 and bestrophin-1 were detected in the dorsal root ganglia. Formalin injection increased anoctamin-1, but not bestrophin-1 protein levels at 6 days. Intrathecal injection of the CaCC inhibitor CaCCinh-A01 prevented formalin-induced anoctamin-1 increase. Data suggest that peripheral and spinal CaCC, and particularly anoctamin-1, participates in the acute nociception induced by formalin as well as in the development and maintenance of secondary mechanical allodynia and hyperalgesia. Thus, CaCC activity contributes to neuronal excitability in the process of nociception induced by formalin.

  18. Bile acids stimulate chloride secretion through CFTR and calcium-activated Cl- channels in Calu-3 airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Hendrick, Siobhán M; Mroz, Magdalena S; Greene, Catherine M; Keely, Stephen J; Harvey, Brian J

    2014-09-01

    Bile acids resulting from the aspiration of gastroesophageal refluxate are often present in the lower airways of people with cystic fibrosis and other respiratory distress diseases. Surprisingly, there is little or no information on the modulation of airway epithelial ion transport by bile acids. The secretory effect of a variety of conjugated and unconjugated secondary bile acids was investigated in Calu-3 airway epithelial cells grown under an air-liquid interface and mounted in Ussing chambers. Electrogenic transepithelial ion transport was measured as short-circuit current (Isc). The taurine-conjugated secondary bile acid, taurodeoxycholic acid (TDCA), was found to be the most potent modulator of basal ion transport. Acute treatment (5 min) of Calu-3 cells with TDCA (25 μM) on the basolateral side caused a stimulation of Isc, and removal of extracellular Cl(-) abolished this response. TDCA produced an increase in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR)-dependent current that was abolished by pretreatment with the CFTR inhibitor CFTRinh172. TDCA treatment also increased Cl(-) secretion through calcium-activated chloride (CaCC) channels and increased the Na(+)/K(+) pump current. Acute treatment with TDCA resulted in a rapid cellular influx of Ca(2+) and increased cAMP levels in Calu-3 cells. Bile acid receptor-selective activation with INT-777 revealed TGR5 localized at the basolateral membrane as the receptor involved in TDCA-induced Cl(-) secretion. In summary, we demonstrate for the first time that low concentrations of bile acids can modulate Cl(-) secretion in airway epithelial cells, and this effect is dependent on both the duration and sidedness of exposure to the bile acid.

  19. Characterization of Cardiac Anoctamin1 Ca2+-Activated Chloride Channels and Functional Role in Ischemia-Induced Arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Zhen; Wu, Ming-Ming; Wang, Chun-Yu; Li, Yan-Chao; Yu, Chang-Jiang; Gong, Yuan-Feng; Zhang, Jun; Wang, Qiu-Shi; Song, Bin-Lin; Yu, Kuai; Hartzell, H. Criss; Duan, Dayue Darrel; Zhao, Dan; Zhang, Zhi-Ren

    2015-01-01

    Anoctamin1 (ANO1) encodes a Ca2+-activated chloride (Cl−) channel (CaCC) in variety tissues of many species. Whether ANO1 expresses and functions as a CaCC in cardiomyocytes remain unknown. The objective of this study is to characterize the molecular and functional expression of ANO1 in cardiac myocytes and the role of ANO1-encoded CaCCs in ischemia-induced arrhythmias in the heart. Quantitative real-time RT-PCR, immunofluorescence staining assays, and immunohistochemistry identified the molecular expression, location, and distribution of ANO1 in mouse ventricular myocytes (mVMs). Patch-clamp recordings combined with pharmacological analyses found that ANO1 was responsible for a Ca2+-activated Cl− current (ICl.Ca) in cardiomyocytes. Myocardial ischemia led to a significant increase in the current density of ICl.Ca, which was inhibited by a specific ANO1 inhibitor, T16Ainh-A01, and an antibody targeting at the pore area of ANO1. Moreover, cardiomyocytes isolated from mice with ischemia-induced arrhythmias had an accelerated early phase 1 repolarization of action potentials (APs) and a deeper “spike and dome” compared to control cardiomyocytes from non-ischemia mice. Application of the antibody targeting at ANO1 pore prevented the ischemia-induced early phase 1 repolarization acceleration and caused a much shallower “spike and dome”. We conclude that ANO1 encodes CaCC and plays a significant role in the phase 1 repolarization of APs in mVMs. The ischemia-induced increase in ANO1 expression may be responsible for the increased density of ICl.Ca in the ischemic heart and may contribute, at least in part, to ischemia-induced arrhythmias. PMID:24962810

  20. Antagonists of the TMEM16A Calcium-Activated Chloride Channel Modulate Airway Smooth Muscle Tone and Intracellular Calcium

    PubMed Central

    Danielsson, Jennifer; Perez-Zoghbi, Jose; Bernstein, Kyra; Barajas, Matthew B.; Zhang, Yi; Kumar, Satish; Sharma, Pawan K.; Gallos, George; Emala, Charles W.

    2015-01-01

    Background Perioperative bronchospasm refractory to β-agonists continues to challenge anesthesiologists and intensivists. The TMEM16A calcium-activated chloride channel modulates airway smooth muscle (ASM) contraction. We hypothesized that TMEM16A antagonists would relax ASM contraction by modulating membrane potential and calcium flux. Methods Human ASM, guinea pig tracheal rings or mouse peripheral airways were contracted with acetylcholine (Ach) or leukotriene D4 (LTD4) and then treated with the TMEM16A antagonists: benzbromarone, T16Ainh-A01, MONNA or B25. In separate studies, guinea pig tracheal rings were contracted with Ach and then exposed to increasing concentrations of isoproterenol (0.01nM-10μM) ± benzbromarone. Plasma membrane potential and intracellular calcium concentrations were measured in human ASM cells. Results Benzbromarone was the most potent TMEM16A antagonist tested for relaxing an Ach-induced contraction in guinea pig tracheal rings (n=6). Further studies were done to investigate benzbromarone’s clinical utility. In human ASM, benzbromarone relaxed either an acetylcholine- or LTD4-induced contraction (n=8). Benzbromarone was also effective in relaxing peripheral airways (n=9) and potentiating relaxation by β-agonists (n=5–10). In cellular mechanistic studies, benzbromarone hyperpolarized human ASM cells (n=9–12) and attenuated intracellular calcium flux from both the plasma membrane and sarcoplasmic reticulum (n=6–12). Conclusions TMEM16A antagonists work synergistically with β-agonists and through a novel pathway of interrupting ion flux both at the plasma membrane and sarcoplasmic reticulum to acutely relax human airway smooth muscle. PMID:26181339

  1. Effects of Small Molecule Calcium-Activated Chloride Channel Inhibitors on Structure and Function of Accessory Cholera Enterotoxin (Ace) of Vibrio cholerae

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Tanaya; Sheikh, Irshad Ali; Chakravarty, Devlina; Chakrabarti, Pinak; Sarkar, Paramita; Saha, Tultul; Chakrabarti, Manoj K.; Hoque, Kazi Mirajul

    2015-01-01

    Cholera pathogenesis occurs due to synergistic pro-secretory effects of several toxins, such as cholera toxin (CTX) and Accessory cholera enterotoxin (Ace) secreted by Vibrio cholerae strains. Ace activates chloride channels stimulating chloride/bicarbonate transport that augments fluid secretion resulting in diarrhea. These channels have been targeted for drug development. However, lesser attention has been paid to the interaction of chloride channel modulators with bacterial toxins. Here we report the modulation of the structure/function of recombinant Ace by small molecule calcium-activated chloride channel (CaCC) inhibitors, namely CaCCinh-A01, digallic acid (DGA) and tannic acid. Biophysical studies indicate that the unfolding (induced by urea) free energy increases upon binding CaCCinh-A01 and DGA, compared to native Ace, whereas binding of tannic acid destabilizes the protein. Far-UV CD experiments revealed that the α-helical content of Ace-CaCCinh-A01 and Ace-DGA complexes increased relative to Ace. In contrast, binding to tannic acid had the opposite effect, indicating the loss of protein secondary structure. The modulation of Ace structure induced by CaCC inhibitors was also analyzed using docking and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. Functional studies, performed using mouse ileal loops and Ussing chamber experiments, corroborate biophysical data, all pointing to the fact that tannic acid destabilizes Ace, inhibiting its function, whereas DGA stabilizes the toxin with enhanced fluid accumulation in mouse ileal loop. The efficacy of tannic acid in mouse model suggests that the targeted modulation of Ace structure may be of therapeutic benefit for gastrointestinal disorders. PMID:26540279

  2. Effects of Small Molecule Calcium-Activated Chloride Channel Inhibitors on Structure and Function of Accessory Cholera Enterotoxin (Ace) of Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Tanaya; Sheikh, Irshad Ali; Chakravarty, Devlina; Chakrabarti, Pinak; Sarkar, Paramita; Saha, Tultul; Chakrabarti, Manoj K; Hoque, Kazi Mirajul

    2015-01-01

    Cholera pathogenesis occurs due to synergistic pro-secretory effects of several toxins, such as cholera toxin (CTX) and Accessory cholera enterotoxin (Ace) secreted by Vibrio cholerae strains. Ace activates chloride channels stimulating chloride/bicarbonate transport that augments fluid secretion resulting in diarrhea. These channels have been targeted for drug development. However, lesser attention has been paid to the interaction of chloride channel modulators with bacterial toxins. Here we report the modulation of the structure/function of recombinant Ace by small molecule calcium-activated chloride channel (CaCC) inhibitors, namely CaCCinh-A01, digallic acid (DGA) and tannic acid. Biophysical studies indicate that the unfolding (induced by urea) free energy increases upon binding CaCCinh-A01 and DGA, compared to native Ace, whereas binding of tannic acid destabilizes the protein. Far-UV CD experiments revealed that the α-helical content of Ace-CaCCinh-A01 and Ace-DGA complexes increased relative to Ace. In contrast, binding to tannic acid had the opposite effect, indicating the loss of protein secondary structure. The modulation of Ace structure induced by CaCC inhibitors was also analyzed using docking and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. Functional studies, performed using mouse ileal loops and Ussing chamber experiments, corroborate biophysical data, all pointing to the fact that tannic acid destabilizes Ace, inhibiting its function, whereas DGA stabilizes the toxin with enhanced fluid accumulation in mouse ileal loop. The efficacy of tannic acid in mouse model suggests that the targeted modulation of Ace structure may be of therapeutic benefit for gastrointestinal disorders.

  3. Ionotropic and metabotropic activation of a neuronal chloride channel by serotonin and dopamine in the leech Hirudo medicinalis

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Declan W; Catarsi, Stefano; Drapeau, Pierre

    1998-01-01

    Cl− channels on the pressure-sensitive (P) neuron in the leech are directly activated by synaptic release of serotonin (5-HT) and are indirectly stimulated by the cAMP second messenger pathway, suggesting an unusual dual regulation of the channels. We have investigated the mode of action of 5-HT and dopamine (DA) on a Cl− channel in adult P cells in culture by recording from cell-attached patches.5-HT increased Cl− channel activity only when included in the recording pipette and not when applied in the bath.Pipette or, more effectively, bath application of DA led to an increase in Cl− channel activity. This effect was blocked by the potent and specific dopaminergic (DA1) receptor blocker, SCH-23390.The stimulation by DA, but not by 5-HT, was also blocked by the cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor Rp-cAMP and was mimicked by the membrane-permeant cAMP analogue dibutyryl cAMP (db-cAMP).Our results show that 5-HT directly gates a Cl− channel that is also activated by DA via the cAMP pathway. This study demonstrates that a ligand-gated channel can be independently operated by another transmitter acting via a second messenger pathway. PMID:9547394

  4. CFTR and calcium-activated chloride channels in primary cultures of human airway gland cells of serous or mucous phenotype.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Horst; Illek, Beate; Sachs, Lorne; Finkbeiner, Walter E; Widdicombe, Jonathan H

    2010-10-01

    Using cell culture models, we have investigated the relative importance of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) and calcium-activated chloride channels (CaCC) in Cl secretion by mucous and serous cells of human airway glands. In transepithelial recordings in Ussing chambers, the CFTR inhibitor CFTR(inh)-172 abolished 60% of baseline Cl secretion in serous cells and 70% in mucous. Flufenamic acid (FFA), an inhibitor of CaCC, reduced baseline Cl secretion by ∼20% in both cell types. Methacholine and ATP stimulated Cl secretion in both cell types, which was largely blocked by treatment with 1,2-bis(2-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (BAPTA) and partially by mucosal FFA or CFTR(inh)-172 with the exception of methacholine responses in mucous cells, which were not blocked by FFA and partially (∼60%) by CFTR(inh)-172. The effects of ionomycin on short-circuit current (I(sc)) were less than those of ATP or methacholine. Forskolin stimulated Cl secretion only if Cl in the mucosal medium was replaced by gluconate. In whole cell patch-clamp studies of single isolated cells, cAMP-induced Cl currents were ∼3-fold greater in serous than mucous cells. Ionomycin-induced Cl currents were 13 times (serous) or 26 times (mucous) greater than those generated by cAMP and were blocked by FFA. In serous cells, mRNA for transmembrane protein 16A (TMEM16A) was ∼10 times more abundant than mRNA for CFTR. In mucous cells it was ∼100 times more abundant. We conclude: 1) serous and mucous cells both make significant contributions to gland fluid secretion; 2) baseline Cl secretion in both cell types is mediated predominantly by CFTR, but CaCC becomes increasingly important after mediator-induced elevations of intracellular Ca; and 3) the high CaCC currents seen in patch-clamp studies and the high TMEM16A expression in intact polarized cells sheets are not reflected in transepithelial current recordings.

  5. New selective inhibitors of calcium-activated chloride channels … T16Ainh-A01, CaCCinh-A01 and MONNA … what do they inhibit?

    PubMed Central

    Boedtkjer, D M B; Kim, S; Jensen, A B; Matchkov, V M; Andersson, K E

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose T16Ainh-A01, CaCCinh-A01 and MONNA are identified as selective inhibitors of the TMEM16A calcium-activated chloride channel (CaCC). The aim of this study was to examine the chloride-specificity of these compounds on isolated resistance arteries in the presence and absence (±) of extracellular chloride. Experimental Approach Isolated resistance arteries were maintained in a myograph and tension recorded, in some instances combined with microelectrode impalement for membrane potential measurements or intracellular calcium monitoring using fura-2. Voltage-dependent calcium currents (VDCC) were measured in A7r5 cells with voltage-clamp electrophysiology using barium as a charge carrier. Key Results Rodent arteries preconstricted with noradrenaline or U46619 were concentration-dependently relaxed by T16Ainh-A01 (0.1–10 μM): IC50 and maximum relaxation were equivalent in ±chloride (30 min aspartate substitution) and the T16Ainh-A01-induced vasorelaxation ±chloride were accompanied by membrane hyperpolarization and lowering of intracellular calcium. However, agonist concentration–response curves ±chloride, with 10 μM T16Ainh-A01 present, achieved similar maximum constrictions although agonist-sensitivity decreased. Contractions induced by elevated extracellular potassium were concentration-dependently relaxed by T16Ainh-A01 ±chloride. Moreover, T16Ainh-A01 inhibited VDCCs in A7r5 cells in a concentration-dependent manner. CaCCinh-A01 and MONNA (0.1–10 μM) induced vasorelaxation ±chloride and both compounds lowered maximum contractility. MONNA, 10 μM, induced substantial membrane hyperpolarization under resting conditions. Conclusions and Implications T16Ainh-A01, CaCCinh-A01 and MONNA concentration-dependently relax rodent resistance arteries, but an equivalent vasorelaxation occurs when the transmembrane chloride gradient is abolished with an impermeant anion. These compounds therefore display poor selectivity for TMEM16A

  6. Chloride channels of glycine and GABA receptors with blockers: Monte Carlo minimization and structure-activity relationships.

    PubMed Central

    Zhorov, B S; Bregestovski, P D

    2000-01-01

    GABA and glycine receptors (GlyRs) are pentameric ligand-gated ion channels that respond to the inhibitory neurotransmitters by opening a chloride-selective central pore lined with five M2 segments homologous to those of alpha(1) GlyR/ ARVG(2')LGIT(6')TVLTMTTQSSGSR. The activity of cyanotriphenylborate (CTB) and picrotoxinin (PTX), the best-studied blockers of the Cl(-) pores, depends essentially on the subunit composition of the receptors, in particular, on residues in positions 2' and 6' that form the pore-facing rings R(2') and R(6'). Thus, CTB blocks alpha(1) and alpha(1)/beta, but not alpha(2) GlyRs (Rundström, N., V. Schmieden, H. Betz, J. Bormann, and D. Langosch. 1994. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 91:8950-8954). PTX blocks homomeric receptors (alpha(1) GlyR and rat rho(1) GABAR), but weakly antagonizes heteromeric receptors (alpha(1)/beta GlyR and rho(1)/rho(2) GABAR) (Pribilla, I., T. Takagi, D. Langosch, J. Bormann, and H. Betz. 1992. EMBO J. 11:4305-4311; Zhang D., Z. H. Pan, X. Zhang, A. D. Brideau, and S. A. Lipton. 1995. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 92:11756-11760). Using as a template the kinked-helices model of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor in the open state (Tikhonov, D. B., and B. S. Zhorov. 1998. Biophys. J. 74:242-255), we have built homology models of GlyRs and GABARs and calculated Monte Carlo-minimized energy profiles for the blockers pulled through the pore. The profiles have shallow minima at the wide extracellular half of the pore, a barrier at ring R(6'), and a deep minimum between rings R(6') and R(2') where the blockers interact with five M2s simultaneously. The star-like CTB swings necessarily on its way through ring R(6') and its activity inversely correlates with the barrier at R(6'): Thr(6')s and Ala(2')s in alpha(2) GlyR confine the swinging by increasing the barrier, while Gly(2')s in alpha(1) GlyR and Phe(6')s in beta GlyR shrink the barrier. PTX has an egg-like shape with an isopropenyl group at the elongated end and

  7. Activation of the Ano1 (TMEM16A) chloride channel by calcium is not mediated by calmodulin

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jinqiu; Qu, Zhiqiang; Cui, Yuan-Yuan; Hartzell, H. Criss

    2014-01-01

    The Ca2+-activated Cl channel anoctamin-1 (Ano1; Tmem16A) plays a variety of physiological roles, including epithelial fluid secretion. Ano1 is activated by increases in intracellular Ca2+, but there is uncertainty whether Ca2+ binds directly to Ano1 or whether phosphorylation or additional Ca2+-binding subunits like calmodulin (CaM) are required. Here we show that CaM is not necessary for activation of Ano1 by Ca2+ for the following reasons. (a) Exogenous CaM has no effect on Ano1 currents in inside-out excised patches. (b) Overexpression of Ca2+-insensitive mutants of CaM have no effect on Ano1 currents, whereas they eliminate the current mediated by the small-conductance Ca2+-activated K+ (SK2) channel. (c) Ano1 does not coimmunoprecipitate with CaM, whereas SK2 does. Furthermore, Ano1 binds very weakly to CaM in pull-down assays. (d) Ano1 is activated in excised patches by low concentrations of Ba2+, which does not activate CaM. In addition, we conclude that reversible phosphorylation/dephosphorylation is not required for current activation by Ca2+ because the current can be repeatedly activated in excised patches in the absence of ATP or other high-energy compounds. Although Ano1 is blocked by the CaM inhibitor trifluoperazine (TFP), we propose that TFP inhibits the channel in a CaM-independent manner because TFP does not inhibit Ano1 when applied to the cytoplasmic side of excised patches. These experiments lead us to conclude that CaM is not required for activation of Ano1 by Ca2+. Although CaM is not required for channel opening by Ca2+, work of other investigators suggests that CaM may have effects in modulating the biophysical properties of the channel. PMID:24420770

  8. The novel isoxazoline ectoparasiticide fluralaner: selective inhibition of arthropod γ-aminobutyric acid- and L-glutamate-gated chloride channels and insecticidal/acaricidal activity.

    PubMed

    Gassel, Michael; Wolf, Christian; Noack, Sandra; Williams, Heike; Ilg, Thomas

    2014-02-01

    Isoxazolines are a novel class of parasiticides that are potent inhibitors of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-gated chloride channels (GABACls) and L-glutamate-gated chloride channels (GluCls). In this study, the effects of the isoxazoline drug fluralaner on insect and acarid GABACl (RDL) and GluCl and its parasiticidal potency were investigated. We report the identification and cDNA cloning of Rhipicephalus (R.) microplus RDL and GluCl genes, and their functional expression in Xenopus laevis oocytes. The generation of six clonal HEK293 cell lines expressing Rhipicephalus microplus RDL and GluCl, Ctenocephalides felis RDL-A285 and RDL-S285, as well as Drosophila melanogaster RDLCl-A302 and RDL-S302, combined with the development of a membrane potential fluorescence dye assay allowed the comparison of ion channel inhibition by fluralaner with that of established insecticides addressing RDL and GluCl as targets. In these assays fluralaner was several orders of magnitude more potent than picrotoxinin and dieldrin, and performed 5-236 fold better than fipronil on the arthropod RDLs, while a rat GABACl remained unaffected. Comparative studies showed that R. microplus RDL is 52-fold more sensitive than R. microplus GluCl to fluralaner inhibition, confirming that the GABA-gated chloride channel is the primary target of this new parasiticide. In agreement with the superior RDL on-target activity, fluralaner outperformed dieldrin and fipronil in insecticidal screens on cat fleas (Ctenocephalides felis), yellow fever mosquito larvae (Aedes aegypti) and sheep blowfly larvae (Lucilia cuprina), as well as in acaricidal screens on cattle tick (R. microplus) adult females, brown dog tick (Rhipicephalus sanguineus) adult females and Ornithodoros moubata nymphs. These findings highlight the potential of fluralaner as a novel ectoparasiticide.

  9. Regulated trafficking of the CFTR chloride channel.

    PubMed

    Kleizen, B; Braakman, I; de Jonge, H R

    2000-08-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), the ABC transporter encoded by the cystic fibrosis gene, is localized in the apical membrane of epithelial cells where it functions as a cyclic AMP-regulated chloride channel and as a regulator of other ion channels and transporters. Whereas a key role of cAMP-dependent phosphorylation in CFTR-channel gating has been firmly established, more recent studies have provided clear evidence for the existence of a second level of cAMP regulation, i.e. the exocytotic recruitment of CFFR to the plasma membrane and its endocytotic retrieval. Regulated trafficking of the CFTR Cl- channel has sofar been demonstrated only in a subset of CFTR-expressing cell types. However, with the introduction of more sensitive methods to measure CFTR cycling and submembrane localization, it might turn out to be a more general phenomenon that could contribute importantly to both the regulation of CFTR-mediated chloride transport itself and to the regulation of other transporters and CFTR-modulated cellular functions. This review aims to summarize the present state of knowledge regarding polarized and regulated CFTR trafficking and endosomal recycling in epithelial cells, to discuss present gaps in our understanding of these processes at the cellular and molecular level, and to consider its possible implications for cystic fibrosis.

  10. Calcium-calmodulin does not alter the anion permeability of the mouse TMEM16A calcium-activated chloride channel

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yawei; Kuan, Ai-Seon

    2014-01-01

    The transmembrane protein TMEM16A forms a Ca2+-activated Cl− channel that is permeable to many anions, including SCN−, I−, Br−, Cl−, and HCO3−, and has been implicated in various physiological functions. Indeed, controlling anion permeation through the TMEM16A channel pore may be critical in regulating the pH of exocrine fluids such as the pancreatic juice. The anion permeability of the TMEM16A channel pore has recently been reported to be modulated by Ca2+-calmodulin (CaCaM), such that the pore of the CaCaM-bound channel shows a reduced ability to discriminate between anions as measured by a shift of the reversal potential under bi-ionic conditions. Here, using a mouse TMEM16A clone that contains the two previously identified putative CaM-binding motifs, we were unable to demonstrate such CaCaM-dependent changes in the bi-ionic potential. We confirmed the activity of CaCaM used in our study by showing CaCaM modulation of the olfactory cyclic nucleotide–gated channel. We suspect that the different bi-ionic potentials that were obtained previously from whole-cell recordings in low and high intracellular [Ca2+] may result from different degrees of bi-ionic potential shift secondary to a series resistance problem, an ion accumulation effect, or both. PMID:24981232

  11. Chloride Channels: Often enigmatic, rarely predictable

    PubMed Central

    Duran, Charity; Thompson, Christopher H.; Xiao, Qinghuan; Hartzell, Criss

    2010-01-01

    Until recently, anion (Cl−) channels have received considerably less attention than cation channels. One reason for this may be that many Cl− channels perform functions that might be considered cell biological, like fluid secretion and cell volume regulation, whereas cation channels have historically been associated with cellular excitability that typically happens more rapidly. In this review, we discuss the recent explosion of interest in Cl− channels with special emphasis on new and often surprising developments over the last 5 years. This is exemplified by the findings that more than half of the ClC family members are antiporters, and not channels as was previously thought, and that bestrophins, previously prime candidates for Ca2+-activated Cl− channels, have been supplanted by the newly discovered anoctamins and now hold a tenuous position in the Cl− channel world. PMID:19827947

  12. General anesthetic octanol and related compounds activate wild-type and delF508 cystic fibrosis chloride channels.

    PubMed

    Marcet, Brice; Becq, Frédéric; Norez, Caroline; Delmas, Patrick; Verrier, Bernard

    2004-03-01

    1. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl(-) channel is defective during cystic fibrosis (CF). Activators of the CFTR Cl(-) channel may be useful for therapy of CF. Here, we demonstrate that a range of general anesthetics like normal-alkanols (n-alkanols) and related compounds can stimulate the Cl(-) channel activity of wild-type CFTR and delF508-CFTR mutant. 2. The effects of n-alkanols like octanol on CFTR activity were measured by iodide ((125)I) efflux and patch-clamp techniques on three distinct cellular models: (1). CFTR-expressing Chinese hamster ovary cells, (2). human airway Calu-3 epithelial cells and (3). human airway JME/CF15 epithelial cells which express the delF508-CFTR mutant. 3. Our data show for the first time that n-alkanols activate both wild-type CFTR and delF508-CFTR mutant. Octanol stimulated (125)I efflux in a dose-dependent manner in CFTR-expressing cells (wild-type and delF508) but not in cell lines lacking CFTR. (125)I efflux and Cl(-) currents induced by octanol were blocked by glibenclamide but insensitive to 4,4'-diisothiocyanatostilbene-2,2'-disulfonic acid, as expected for a CFTR Cl(-) current. 4. CFTR activation by octanol was neither due to cell-to-cell uncoupling properties of octanol nor to an intracellular cAMP increase. CFTR activation by octanol requires phosphorylation by protein kinase-A (PKA) since it was prevented by H-89, a PKA inhibitor. 5. n-Alkanols chain length was an important determinant for channel activation, with rank order of potencies: 1-heptanol<1-octanol<2-octanol<1-decanol. Our findings may be of valuable interest for developing novel therapeutic strategies for CF.

  13. P2X4 Activation Modulates Volume-sensitive Outwardly Rectifying Chloride Channels in Rat Hepatoma Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Varela, Diego; Penna, Antonello; Simon, Felipe; Eguiguren, Ana Luisa; Leiva-Salcedo, Elías; Cerda, Oscar; Sala, Francisco; Stutzin, Andrés

    2010-01-01

    Volume-sensitive outwardly rectifying (VSOR) Cl− channels are critical for the regulatory volume decrease (RVD) response triggered upon cell swelling. Recent evidence indicates that H2O2 plays an essential role in the activation of these channels and that H2O2 per se activates the channels under isotonic isovolumic conditions. However, a significant difference in the time course for current onset between H2O2-induced and hypotonicity-mediated VSOR Cl− activation is observed. In several cell types, cell swelling induced by hypotonic challenges triggers the release of ATP to the extracellular medium, which in turn, activates purinergic receptors and modulates cell volume regulation. In this study, we have addressed the effect of purinergic receptor activation on H2O2-induced and hypotonicity-mediated VSOR Cl− current activation. Here we show that rat hepatoma cells (HTC) exposed to a 33% hypotonic solution responded by rapidly activating VSOR Cl− current and releasing ATP to the extracellular medium. In contrast, cells exposed to 200 μm H2O2 VSOR Cl− current onset was significantly slower, and ATP release was not detected. In cells exposed to either 11% hypotonicity or 200 μm H2O2, exogenous addition of ATP in the presence of extracellular Ca2+ resulted in a decrease in the half-time for VSOR Cl− current onset. Conversely, in cells that overexpress a dominant-negative mutant of the ionotropic receptor P2X4 challenged with a 33% hypotonic solution, the half-time for VSOR Cl− current onset was significantly slowed down. Our results indicate that, at high hypotonic imbalances, swelling-induced ATP release activates the purinergic receptor P2X4, which in turn modulates the time course of VSOR Cl− current onset in a extracellular Ca2+-dependent manner. PMID:20056605

  14. GTP-Binding Proteins Inhibit cAMP Activation of Chloride Channels in Cystic Fibrosis Airway Epithelial Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwiebert, Erik M.; Kizer, Neil; Gruenert, Dieter C.; Stanton, Bruce A.

    1992-11-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a genetic disease characterized, in part, by defective regulation of Cl^- secretion by airway epithelial cells. In CF, cAMP does not activate Cl^- channels in the apical membrane of airway epithelial cells. We report here whole-cell patch-clamp studies demonstrating that pertussis toxin, which uncouples heterotrimeric GTP-binding proteins (G proteins) from their receptors, and guanosine 5'-[β-thio]diphosphate, which prevents G proteins from interacting with their effectors, increase Cl^- currents and restore cAMP-activated Cl^- currents in airway epithelial cells isolated from CF patients. In contrast, the G protein activators guanosine 5'-[γ-thio]triphosphate and AlF^-_4 reduce Cl^- currents and inhibit cAMP from activating Cl^- currents in normal airway epithelial cells. In CF cells treated with pertussis toxin or guanosine 5'-[β-thio]diphosphate and in normal cells, cAMP activates a Cl^- conductance that has properties similar to CF transmembrane-conductance regulator Cl^- channels. We conclude that heterotrimeric G proteins inhibit cAMP-activated Cl^- currents in airway epithelial cells and that modulation of the inhibitory G protein signaling pathway may have the therapeutic potential for improving cAMP-activated Cl^- secretion in CF.

  15. Lack of conventional ATPase properties in CFTR chloride channel gating.

    PubMed

    Schultz, B D; Bridges, R J; Frizzell, R A

    1996-05-01

    CFTR shares structural homology with the ABC transporter superfamily of proteins which hydrolyze ATP to effect the transport of compounds across cell membranes. Some superfamily members are characterized as P-type ATPases because ATP-dependent transport is sensitive to the presence of vanadate. It has been widely postulated that CFTR hydrolyzes ATP to gate its chloride channel. However, direct evidence of CFTR hydrolytic activity in channel gating is lacking and existing circumstantial evidence is contradictory. Therefore, we evaluated CFTR chloride channel activity under conditions known to inhibit the activity of ATPases; i.e., in the absence of divalent cations and in the presence of a variety of ATPase inhibitors. Removal of the cytosolic cofactor, Mg2+, reduced both the opening and closing rates of CFTR suggesting that Mg2+ plays a modulatory role in channel gating. However, channels continued to both open and close showing that Mg2+ is not an absolute requirement for channel activity. The nonselective P-type ATPase inhibitor, vanadate, did not alter the gating of CFTR when used at concentrations which completely inhibit the activity of other ABC transporters (1 mM). Higher concentrations of vanadate (10 mM) blocked the closing of CFTR, but did not affect the opening of the channel. As expected, more selective P-type (Sch28080, ouabain), V-type (bafilomycin A1, SCN-) and F-type (oligomycin) ATPase inhibitors did not affect either the opening or closing of CFTR. Thus, CFTR does not share a pharmacological inhibition profile with other ATPases and channel gating occurs in the apparent absence of hydrolysis, although with altered kinetics. Vanadate inhibition of channel closure might suggest that a hydrolytic step is involved although the requirement for a high concentration raises the possibility of previously uncharacterized effects of this compound. Most conservatively, the requirement for high concentrations of vanadate demonstrates that the binding site for

  16. TMEM16A Inhibitors Reveal TMEM16A as a Minor Component of Calcium-activated Chloride Channel Conductance in Airway and Intestinal Epithelial Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Namkung, Wan; Phuan, Puay-Wah; Verkman, A. S.

    2011-01-01

    TMEM16A (ANO1) functions as a calcium-activated chloride channel (CaCC). We developed pharmacological tools to investigate the contribution of TMEM16A to CaCC conductance in human airway and intestinal epithelial cells. A screen of ∼110,000 compounds revealed four novel chemical classes of small molecule TMEM16A inhibitors that fully blocked TMEM16A chloride current with an IC50 < 10 μm, without interfering with calcium signaling. Following structure-activity analysis, the most potent inhibitor, an aminophenylthiazole (T16Ainh-A01), had an IC50 of ∼1 μm. Two distinct types of inhibitors were identified. Some compounds, such as tannic acid and the arylaminothiophene CaCCinh-A01, fully inhibited CaCC current in human bronchial and intestinal cells. Other compounds, including T16Ainh-A01 and digallic acid, inhibited total CaCC current in these cells poorly, but blocked mainly an initial, agonist-stimulated transient chloride current. TMEM16A RNAi knockdown also inhibited mainly the transient chloride current. In contrast to the airway and intestinal cells, all TMEM16A inhibitors fully blocked CaCC current in salivary gland cells. We conclude that TMEM16A carries nearly all CaCC current in salivary gland epithelium, but is a minor contributor to total CaCC current in airway and intestinal epithelia. The small molecule inhibitors identified here permit pharmacological dissection of TMEM16A/CaCC function and are potential development candidates for drug therapy of hypertension, pain, diarrhea, and excessive mucus production. PMID:21084298

  17. Contribution of calcium-activated chloride channel to elevated pulmonary artery pressure in pulmonary arterial hypertension induced by high pulmonary blood flow.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kai; Chen, Chuansi; Ma, Jianfa; Lao, Jinquan; Pang, Yusheng

    2015-01-01

    The correlation between calcium-activated chloride channel (CaCC) and pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) induced by high pulmonary blood flow remains uncertain. In this study, we investigated the possible role and effects of CaCC in this disease. Sixty rats were randomly assigned to normal, sham, and shunt groups. Rats in the shunt group underwent abdominal aorta and inferior vena cava shunt surgery. The pulmonary artery pressure was measured by catheterization. Pathological changes, right ventricle hypertrophy index (RVHI), arterial wall area/vessel area (W/V), and arterial wall thickness/vessel external diameter (T/D) were analyzed by optical microscopy. Electrophysiological characteristics of pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) were investigated using patch clamp technology. After 11 weeks of shunting, PAH and pulmonary vascular structural remodeling (PVSR) developed, accompanied by increased pulmonary pressure and pathological interstitial pulmonary changes. Compared with normal and sham groups, pulmonary artery pressure, RVHI, W/V, and T/D of the shunt group rats increased significantly. Electrophysiological results showed primary CaCC characteristics. Compared with normal and sham groups, membrane capacitance and current density of PASMCs in the shunt group increased significantly, which were subsequently attenuated following chloride channel blocker niflumic acid (NFA) treatment. To conclude, CaCC contributed to PAH induced by high pulmonary blood flow and may represent a potential target for treatment of PAH.

  18. Contribution of calcium-activated chloride channel to elevated pulmonary artery pressure in pulmonary arterial hypertension induced by high pulmonary blood flow

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kai; Chen, Chuansi; Ma, Jianfa; Lao, Jinquan; Pang, Yusheng

    2015-01-01

    The correlation between calcium-activated chloride channel (CaCC) and pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) induced by high pulmonary blood flow remains uncertain. In this study, we investigated the possible role and effects of CaCC in this disease. Sixty rats were randomly assigned to normal, sham, and shunt groups. Rats in the shunt group underwent abdominal aorta and inferior vena cava shunt surgery. The pulmonary artery pressure was measured by catheterization. Pathological changes, right ventricle hypertrophy index (RVHI), arterial wall area/vessel area (W/V), and arterial wall thickness/vessel external diameter (T/D) were analyzed by optical microscopy. Electrophysiological characteristics of pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) were investigated using patch clamp technology. After 11 weeks of shunting, PAH and pulmonary vascular structural remodeling (PVSR) developed, accompanied by increased pulmonary pressure and pathological interstitial pulmonary changes. Compared with normal and sham groups, pulmonary artery pressure, RVHI, W/V, and T/D of the shunt group rats increased significantly. Electrophysiological results showed primary CaCC characteristics. Compared with normal and sham groups, membrane capacitance and current density of PASMCs in the shunt group increased significantly, which were subsequently attenuated following chloride channel blocker niflumic acid (NFA) treatment. To conclude, CaCC contributed to PAH induced by high pulmonary blood flow and may represent a potential target for treatment of PAH. PMID:25755701

  19. Anoctamin 1 (Tmem16A) Ca2+-activated chloride channel stoichiometrically interacts with an ezrin-radixin-moesin network.

    PubMed

    Perez-Cornejo, Patricia; Gokhale, Avanti; Duran, Charity; Cui, Yuanyuan; Xiao, Qinghuan; Hartzell, H Criss; Faundez, Victor

    2012-06-26

    The newly discovered Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) channel (CaCC), Anoctamin 1 (Ano1 or TMEM16A), has been implicated in vital physiological functions including epithelial fluid secretion, gut motility, and smooth muscle tone. Overexpression of Ano1 in HEK cells or Xenopus oocytes is sufficient to generate Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) currents, but the details of channel composition and the regulatory factors that control channel biology are incompletely understood. We used a highly sensitive quantitative SILAC proteomics approach to obtain insights into stoichiometric protein networks associated with the Ano1 channel. These studies provide a comprehensive footprint of putative Ano1 regulatory networks. We find that Ano1 associates with the signaling/scaffolding proteins ezrin, radixin, moesin, and RhoA, which link the plasma membrane to the cytoskeleton with very high stoichiometry. Ano1, ezrin, and moesin/radixin colocalize apically in salivary gland epithelial cells, and overexpression of moesin and Ano1 in HEK cells alters the subcellular localization of both proteins. Moreover, interfering RNA for moesin modifies Ano1 current without affecting its surface expression level. Another network associated with Ano1 includes the SNARE and SM proteins VAMP3, syntaxins 2 and -4, and syntaxin-binding proteins munc18b and munc18c, which are integral to translocation of vesicles to the plasma membrane. A number of other regulatory proteins, including GTPases, Ca(2+)-binding proteins, kinases, and lipid-interacting proteins are enriched in the Ano1 complex. These data provide stoichiometrically prioritized information about mechanisms regulating Ano1 function and trafficking to polarized domains of the plasma membrane.

  20. Nanomolar-Potency Aminophenyl-1,3,5-triazine Activators of the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) Chloride Channel for Prosecretory Therapy of Dry Eye Diseases.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sujin; Phuan, Puay-Wah; Felix, Christian M; Tan, Joseph-Anthony; Levin, Marc H; Verkman, Alan S

    2017-02-09

    Dry eye disorders are a significant health problem for which limited therapeutic options are available. CFTR is a major prosecretory chloride channel at the ocular surface. We previously identified, by high-throughput screening, aminophenyl-1,3,5-triazine CFTRact-K089 (1) that activated CFTR with EC50 ≈ 250 nM, which when delivered topically increased tear fluid secretion in mice and showed efficacy in an experimental dry eye model. Here, functional analysis of aminophenyl-1,3,5-triazine analogs elucidated structure-activity relationships for CFTR activation and identified substantially more potent analogs than 1. The most potent compound, 12, fully activated CFTR chloride conductance with EC50 ≈ 30 nM, without causing cAMP or calcium elevation. 12 was rapidly metabolized by hepatic microsomes, which supports its topical use. Single topical administration of 25 pmol of 12 increased tear volume in wild-type mice with sustained action for 8 h and was without effect in CFTR-deficient mice. Topically delivered 12 may be efficacious in human dry eye diseases.

  1. Functional architecture of the CFTR chloride channel.

    PubMed

    Linsdell, Paul

    2014-02-01

    Cystic fibrosis is caused by mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), a member of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) family of membrane transport proteins. CFTR is unique among ABC proteins in that it functions not as an active transporter but as an ATP-gated Cl(-) channel. As an ion channel, the function of the CFTR transmembrane channel pore that mediates Cl(-) movement has been studied in great detail. On the other hand, only low resolution structural data is available on the transmembrane parts of the protein. The structure of the channel pore has, however, been modeled on the known structure of active transporter ABC proteins. Currently, significant barriers exist to building a unified view of CFTR pore structure and function. Reconciling functional data on the channel with indirect structural data based on other proteins with very different transport functions and substrates has proven problematic. This review summarizes current structural and functional models of the CFTR Cl(-) channel pore, including a comprehensive review of previous electrophysiological investigations of channel structure and function. In addition, functional data on the three-dimensional arrangement of pore-lining helices, as well as contemporary hypotheses concerning conformational changes in the pore that occur during channel opening and closing, are discussed. Important similarities and differences between different models of the pore highlight current gaps in our knowledge of CFTR structure and function. In order to fill these gaps, structural and functional models of the membrane-spanning pore need to become better integrated.

  2. A pure chloride channel mutant of CLC-5 causes Dent's disease via insufficient V-ATPase activation.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Nobuhiko; Yamada, Hideomi; Yamazaki, Osamu; Suzuki, Masashi; Nakamura, Motonobu; Suzuki, Atsushi; Ashida, Akira; Yamamoto, Daisuke; Kaku, Yoshitsugu; Sekine, Takashi; Seki, George; Horita, Shoko

    2016-07-01

    Dent's disease is characterized by defective endocytosis in renal proximal tubules (PTs) and caused by mutations in the 2Cl(-)/H(+) exchanger, CLC-5. However, the pathological role of endosomal acidification in endocytosis has recently come into question. To clarify the mechanism of pathogenesis for Dent's disease, we examined the effects of a novel gating glutamate mutation, E211Q, on CLC-5 functions and endosomal acidification. In Xenopus oocytes, wild-type (WT) CLC-5 showed outward-rectifying currents that were inhibited by extracellular acidosis, but E211Q and an artificial pure Cl(-) channel mutant, E211A, showed linear currents that were insensitive to extracellular acidosis. Moreover, depolarizing pulse trains induced a robust reduction in the surface pH of oocytes expressing WT CLC-5 but not E211Q or E211A, indicating that the E211Q mutant functions as a pure Cl(-) channel similar to E211A. In HEK293 cells, E211A and E211Q stimulated endosomal acidification and hypotonicity-inducible vacuolar-type H(+)-ATPase (V-ATPase) activation at the plasma membrane. However, the stimulatory effects of these mutants were reduced compared with WT CLC-5. Furthermore, gene silencing experiments confirmed the functional coupling between V-ATPase and CLC-5 at the plasma membrane of isolated mouse PTs. These results reveal for the first time that the conversion of CLC-5 from a 2Cl(-)/H(+) exchanger into a Cl(-) channel induces Dent's disease in humans. In addition, defective endosomal acidification as a result of insufficient V-ATPase activation may still be important in the pathogenesis of Dent's disease.

  3. The Ca2+-activated chloride channel anoctamin-2 mediates spike-frequency adaptation and regulates sensory transmission in thalamocortical neurons

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Go Eun; Lee, Jaekwang; Kwak, Hankyul; Song, Kiyeong; Kwon, Jea; Jung, Soon-Young; Hong, Joohyeon; Chang, Gyeong-Eon; Hwang, Eun Mi; Shin, Hee-Sup; Lee, C. Justin; Cheong, Eunji

    2016-01-01

    Neuronal firing patterns, which are crucial for determining the nature of encoded information, have been widely studied; however, the molecular identity and cellular mechanisms of spike-frequency adaptation are still not fully understood. Here we show that spike-frequency adaptation in thalamocortical (TC) neurons is mediated by the Ca2+-activated Cl− channel (CACC) anoctamin-2 (ANO2). Knockdown of ANO2 in TC neurons results in significantly reduced spike-frequency adaptation along with increased tonic spiking. Moreover, thalamus-specific knockdown of ANO2 increases visceral pain responses. These results indicate that ANO2 contributes to reductions in spike generation in highly activated TC neurons and thereby restricts persistent information transmission. PMID:27991499

  4. Dehydrocostuslactone, a sesquiterpene lactone activates wild-type and ΔF508 mutant CFTR chloride channel.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xue; Zhang, Yao-Fang; Yu, Bo; Yang, Shuang; Luan, Jian; Liu, Xin; Yang, Hong

    2013-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) represents the main cAMP-activated Cl⁻ channel expressed in the apical membrane of serous epithelial cells. Both deficiency and overactivation of CFTR may cause fluid and salt secretion related diseases. The aim of this study was to identify natural compounds that are able to stimulate wild-type (wt) and ΔF508 mutant CFTR channel activities in CFTR-expressing Fischer rat thyroid (FRT) cells. We found that dehydrocostuslactone [DHC, (3aS, 6aR, 9aR, 9bS)-decahydro-3,6,9-tris (methylene) azuleno [4,5-b] furan-2(3H)-one)] dose dependently potentiates both wt and ΔF508 mutant CFTR-mediated iodide influx in cell-based fluorescent assays and CFTR-mediated Cl⁻ currents in short-circuit current studies, and the activations could be reversed by the CFTR inhibitor CFTRinh-172. Maximal CFTR-mediated apical Cl⁻ current secretion in CFTR-expressing FRT cells was stimulated by 100 μM DHC. Determination of intracellular cAMP content showed that DHC modestly but significantly increased cAMP level in FRT cells, but cAMP elevation effects contributed little to DHC-stimulated iodide influx. DHC also stimulated CFTR-mediated apical Cl⁻ current secretion in FRT cells expressing ΔF508-CFTR. Subsequent studies demonstrated that activation of CFTR by DHC is forskolin dependent. DHC represents a new class of CFTR potentiators that may have therapeutic potential in CFTR-related diseases.

  5. Gating the Selectivity Filter in ClC Chloride Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutzler, Raimund; Campbell, Ernest B.; MacKinnon, Roderick

    2003-04-01

    ClC channels conduct chloride (Cl-) ions across cell membranes and thereby govern the electrical activity of muscle cells and certain neurons, the transport of fluid and electrolytes across epithelia, and the acidification of intracellular vesicles. The structural basis of ClC channel gating was studied. Crystal structures of wild-type and mutant Escherichia coli ClC channels bound to a monoclonal Fab fragment reveal three Cl- binding sites within the 15-angstrom neck of an hourglass-shaped pore. The Cl- binding site nearest the extracellular solution can be occupied either by a Cl- ion or by a glutamate carboxyl group. Mutations of this glutamate residue in Torpedo ray ClC channels alter gating in electrophysiological assays. These findings reveal a form of gating in which the glutamate carboxyl group closes the pore by mimicking a Cl- ion.

  6. Hypotonicity activates a native chloride current in Xenopus oocytes

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    Xenopus oocytes are frequently utilized for in vivo expression of cellular proteins, especially ion channel proteins. A thorough understanding of the endogenous conductances and their regulation is paramount for proper characterization of expressed channel proteins. Here we detail a novel chloride current (ICl.swell) responsive to hypotonicity in Xenopus oocytes using the two-electrode voltage clamp technique. Reducing the extracellular osmolarity by 50% elicited a calcium-independent chloride current having an anion conductivity sequence identical with swelling-induced chloride currents observed in epithelial cells. The hypotonicity-activated current was blocked by chloride channel blockers, trivalent lanthanides, and nucleotides. G- protein, cAMP-PKA, and arachidonic acid signaling cascades were not involved in ICl.swell activation. ICl.swell is distinct from both stretch-activated nonselective cation channels and the calcium- activated chloride current in oocytes and may play a critical role in volume regulation in Xenopus oocytes. PMID:8189203

  7. Multiple effects of anthracene-9-carboxylic acid on the TMEM16B/anoctamin2 calcium-activated chloride channel.

    PubMed

    Cherian, O Lijo; Menini, Anna; Boccaccio, Anna

    2015-04-01

    Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) currents (CaCCs) play important roles in many physiological processes. Recent studies have shown that TMEM16A/anoctamin1 and TMEM16B/anoctamin2 constitute CaCCs in several cell types. Here we have investigated for the first time the extracellular effects of the Cl(-) channel blocker anthracene-9-carboxylic acid (A9C) and of its non-charged analogue anthracene-9-methanol (A9M) on TMEM16B expressed in HEK 293T cells, using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique. A9C caused a voltage-dependent block of outward currents and inhibited a larger fraction of the current as depolarization increased, whereas the non-charged A9M produced a small, not voltage dependent block of outward currents. A similar voltage-dependent block by A9C was measured both when TMEM16B was activated by 1.5 and 13μM Ca(2+). However, in the presence of 1.5μM Ca(2+) (but not in 13μM Ca(2+)), A9C also induced a strong potentiation of tail currents measured at -100mV after depolarizing voltages, as well as a prolongation of the deactivation kinetics. On the contrary, A9M did not produce potentiation of tail currents, showing that the negative charge is required for potentiation. Our results provide the first evidence that A9C has multiple effects on TMEM16B and that the negative charge of A9C is necessary both for voltage-dependent block and for potentiation. Future studies are required to identify the molecular mechanisms underlying these complex effects of A9C on TMEM16B. Understanding these mechanisms will contribute to the elucidation of the structure and functional properties of TMEM16B channels.

  8. Chloride conducting light activated channel GtACR2 can produce both cessation of firing and generation of action potentials in cortical neurons in response to light.

    PubMed

    Malyshev, A Y; Roshchin, M V; Smirnova, G R; Dolgikh, D A; Balaban, P M; Ostrovsky, M A

    2017-02-15

    Optogenetics is a powerful technique in neuroscience that provided a great success in studying the brain functions during the last decade. Progress of optogenetics crucially depends on development of new molecular tools. Light-activated cation-conducting channelrhodopsin2 was widely used for excitation of cells since the emergence of optogenetics. In 2015 a family of natural light activated chloride channels GtACR was identified which appeared to be a very promising tool for using in optogenetics experiments as a cell silencer. Here we examined properties of GtACR2 channel expressed in the rat layer 2/3 pyramidal neurons by means of in utero electroporation. We have found that despite strong inhibition the light stimulation of GtACR2-positive neurons can surprisingly lead to generation of action potentials, presumably initiated in the axonal terminals. Thus, when using the GtACR2 in optogenetics experiments, its ability to induce action potentials should be taken into account. Our results also open an interesting possibility of using the GtACR2 both as cell silencer and cell activator in the same experiment varying the pattern of light stimulation.

  9. Interactions between permeation and gating in the TMEM16B/anoctamin2 calcium-activated chloride channel.

    PubMed

    Betto, Giulia; Cherian, O Lijo; Pifferi, Simone; Cenedese, Valentina; Boccaccio, Anna; Menini, Anna

    2014-06-01

    At least two members of the TMEM16/anoctamin family, TMEM16A (also known as anoctamin1) and TMEM16B (also known as anoctamin2), encode Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) channels (CaCCs), which are found in various cell types and mediate numerous physiological functions. Here, we used whole-cell and excised inside-out patch-clamp to investigate the relationship between anion permeation and gating, two processes typically viewed as independent, in TMEM16B expressed in HEK 293T cells. The permeability ratio sequence determined by substituting Cl(-) with other anions (PX/PCl) was SCN(-) > I(-) > NO3 (-) > Br(-) > Cl(-) > F(-) > gluconate. When external Cl(-) was substituted with other anions, TMEM16B activation and deactivation kinetics at 0.5 µM Ca(2+) were modified according to the sequence of permeability ratios, with anions more permeant than Cl(-) slowing both activation and deactivation and anions less permeant than Cl(-) accelerating them. Moreover, replacement of external Cl(-) with gluconate, or sucrose, shifted the voltage dependence of steady-state activation (G-V relation) to more positive potentials, whereas substitution of extracellular or intracellular Cl(-) with SCN(-) shifted G-V to more negative potentials. Dose-response relationships for Ca(2+) in the presence of different extracellular anions indicated that the apparent affinity for Ca(2+) at +100 mV increased with increasing permeability ratio. The apparent affinity for Ca(2+) in the presence of intracellular SCN(-) also increased compared with that in Cl(-). Our results provide the first evidence that TMEM16B gating is modulated by permeant anions and provide the basis for future studies aimed at identifying the molecular determinants of TMEM16B ion selectivity and gating.

  10. Interactions between permeation and gating in the TMEM16B/anoctamin2 calcium-activated chloride channel

    PubMed Central

    Betto, Giulia; Cherian, O. Lijo; Pifferi, Simone; Cenedese, Valentina; Menini, Anna

    2014-01-01

    At least two members of the TMEM16/anoctamin family, TMEM16A (also known as anoctamin1) and TMEM16B (also known as anoctamin2), encode Ca2+-activated Cl− channels (CaCCs), which are found in various cell types and mediate numerous physiological functions. Here, we used whole-cell and excised inside-out patch-clamp to investigate the relationship between anion permeation and gating, two processes typically viewed as independent, in TMEM16B expressed in HEK 293T cells. The permeability ratio sequence determined by substituting Cl− with other anions (PX/PCl) was SCN− > I− > NO3− > Br− > Cl− > F− > gluconate. When external Cl− was substituted with other anions, TMEM16B activation and deactivation kinetics at 0.5 µM Ca2+ were modified according to the sequence of permeability ratios, with anions more permeant than Cl− slowing both activation and deactivation and anions less permeant than Cl− accelerating them. Moreover, replacement of external Cl− with gluconate, or sucrose, shifted the voltage dependence of steady-state activation (G-V relation) to more positive potentials, whereas substitution of extracellular or intracellular Cl− with SCN− shifted G-V to more negative potentials. Dose–response relationships for Ca2+ in the presence of different extracellular anions indicated that the apparent affinity for Ca2+ at +100 mV increased with increasing permeability ratio. The apparent affinity for Ca2+ in the presence of intracellular SCN− also increased compared with that in Cl−. Our results provide the first evidence that TMEM16B gating is modulated by permeant anions and provide the basis for future studies aimed at identifying the molecular determinants of TMEM16B ion selectivity and gating. PMID:24863931

  11. Inhibitory role of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate on TMEM16A-encoded calcium-activated chloride channels in rat pulmonary artery

    PubMed Central

    Pritchard, H A T; Leblanc, N; Albert, A P; Greenwood, I A

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Calcium-activated chloride channels (CaCCs) are key depolarizing mechanisms that have an important role in vascular smooth muscle contraction. Here, we investigated whether these channels are regulated by phosphatidylinositol (4,5) bisphosphate [P(4,5)P2], a known regulator of various ion channels. Experimental Approach Calcium-activated Cl− currents (IClCa) were recorded by patch clamp electrophysiology of rat isolated pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells. TMEM16A protein-phosphoinositide interaction was studied by co-immunoprecipitation and phosphoinositide binding arrays on protein lysates from whole pulmonary arteries and HEK293 cells overexpressing TMEM16A, the molecular correlate. Key Results PI(4,5)P2 and other phospholipids were shown to bind directly to TMEM16A isolated from whole pulmonary artery (PA) and TMEM16A-eGFP expressed in HEK293 cells. Agents that reduced PI(4,5)P2 levels through different routes [PLC activation, PI4K inhibition, PI(4,5)P2 scavenging and absorption] all increased IClCa evoked by solutions containing clamped-free [Ca2+], whereas enrichment of activating solutions with PI(4,5)P2 inhibited IClca in PA smooth muscle cells with approximately 50% reduction at 1 μM. Conclusions and Implications These data are the first to show a negative regulation of TMEM16A-encoded CaCCs by PI(4,5)P2 and propose that control of PI(4,5)P2 levels is a key determinant of arterial physiology. PMID:24834965

  12. Inhibition of Calcium-Activated Chloride Channel ANO1/TMEM16A Suppresses Tumor Growth and Invasion in Human Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Linghan; Liu, Wen; Guan, Lizhao; Lu, Min; Wang, KeWei

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer or pulmonary carcinoma is primarily derived from epithelial cells that are thin and line on the alveolar surfaces of the lung for gas exchange. ANO1/TMEM16A, initially identified from airway epithelial cells, is a member of Ca2+-activated Cl- channels (CaCCs) that function to regulate epithelial secretion and cell volume for maintenance of ion and tissue homeostasis. ANO1/TMEM16A has recently been shown to be highly expressed in several epithelium originated carcinomas. However, the role of ANO1 in lung cancer remains unknown. In this study, we show that inhibition of calcium-activated chloride channel ANO1/TMEM16A suppresses tumor growth and invasion in human lung cancer. ANO1 is upregulated in different human lung cancer cell lines. Knocking-down ANO1 by small hairpin RNAs inhibited proliferation, migration and invasion of GLC82 and NCI-H520 cancel cells evaluated by CCK-8, would-healing, transwell and 3D soft agar assays. ANO1 protein is overexpressed in 77.3% cases of human lung adenocarcinoma tissues detected by immunohistochemistry. Furthermore, the tumor growth in nude mice implanted with GLC82 cells was significantly suppressed by ANO1 silencing. Taken together, our findings provide evidence that ANO1 overexpression contributes to tumor growth and invasion of lung cancer; and suppressing ANO1 overexpression may have therapeutic potential in lung cancer therapy. PMID:26305547

  13. Inhibition of Calcium-Activated Chloride Channel ANO1/TMEM16A Suppresses Tumor Growth and Invasion in Human Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Jia, Linghan; Liu, Wen; Guan, Lizhao; Lu, Min; Wang, KeWei

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer or pulmonary carcinoma is primarily derived from epithelial cells that are thin and line on the alveolar surfaces of the lung for gas exchange. ANO1/TMEM16A, initially identified from airway epithelial cells, is a member of Ca2+-activated Cl- channels (CaCCs) that function to regulate epithelial secretion and cell volume for maintenance of ion and tissue homeostasis. ANO1/TMEM16A has recently been shown to be highly expressed in several epithelium originated carcinomas. However, the role of ANO1 in lung cancer remains unknown. In this study, we show that inhibition of calcium-activated chloride channel ANO1/TMEM16A suppresses tumor growth and invasion in human lung cancer. ANO1 is upregulated in different human lung cancer cell lines. Knocking-down ANO1 by small hairpin RNAs inhibited proliferation, migration and invasion of GLC82 and NCI-H520 cancel cells evaluated by CCK-8, would-healing, transwell and 3D soft agar assays. ANO1 protein is overexpressed in 77.3% cases of human lung adenocarcinoma tissues detected by immunohistochemistry. Furthermore, the tumor growth in nude mice implanted with GLC82 cells was significantly suppressed by ANO1 silencing. Taken together, our findings provide evidence that ANO1 overexpression contributes to tumor growth and invasion of lung cancer; and suppressing ANO1 overexpression may have therapeutic potential in lung cancer therapy.

  14. Four basic residues critical for the ion selectivity and pore blocker sensitivity of TMEM16A calcium-activated chloride channels.

    PubMed

    Peters, Christian J; Yu, Haibo; Tien, Jason; Jan, Yuh Nung; Li, Min; Jan, Lily Yeh

    2015-03-17

    TMEM16A (transmembrane protein 16) (Anoctamin-1) forms a calcium-activated chloride channel (CaCC) that regulates a broad array of physiological properties in response to changes in intracellular calcium concentration. Although known to conduct anions according to the Eisenman type I selectivity sequence, the structural determinants of TMEM16A anion selectivity are not well-understood. Reasoning that the positive charges on basic residues are likely contributors to anion selectivity, we performed whole-cell recordings of mutants with alanine substitution for basic residues within the putative pore region and identified four residues on four different putative transmembrane segments that significantly increased the permeability of the larger halides and thiocyanate relative to that of chloride. Because TMEM16A permeation properties are known to shift with changes in intracellular calcium concentration, we further examined the calcium dependence of anion selectivity. We found that WT TMEM16A but not mutants with alanine substitution at those four basic residues exhibited a clear decline in the preference for larger anions as intracellular calcium was increased. Having implicated these residues as contributing to the TMEM16A pore, we scrutinized candidate small molecules from a high-throughput CaCC inhibitor screen to identify two compounds that act as pore blockers. Mutations of those four putative pore-lining basic residues significantly altered the IC50 of these compounds at positive voltages. These findings contribute to our understanding regarding anion permeation of TMEM16A CaCC and provide valuable pharmacological tools to probe the channel pore.

  15. Four basic residues critical for the ion selectivity and pore blocker sensitivity of TMEM16A calcium-activated chloride channels

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Christian J.; Yu, Haibo; Tien, Jason; Jan, Yuh Nung; Li, Min; Jan, Lily Yeh

    2015-01-01

    TMEM16A (transmembrane protein 16) (Anoctamin-1) forms a calcium-activated chloride channel (CaCC) that regulates a broad array of physiological properties in response to changes in intracellular calcium concentration. Although known to conduct anions according to the Eisenman type I selectivity sequence, the structural determinants of TMEM16A anion selectivity are not well-understood. Reasoning that the positive charges on basic residues are likely contributors to anion selectivity, we performed whole-cell recordings of mutants with alanine substitution for basic residues within the putative pore region and identified four residues on four different putative transmembrane segments that significantly increased the permeability of the larger halides and thiocyanate relative to that of chloride. Because TMEM16A permeation properties are known to shift with changes in intracellular calcium concentration, we further examined the calcium dependence of anion selectivity. We found that WT TMEM16A but not mutants with alanine substitution at those four basic residues exhibited a clear decline in the preference for larger anions as intracellular calcium was increased. Having implicated these residues as contributing to the TMEM16A pore, we scrutinized candidate small molecules from a high-throughput CaCC inhibitor screen to identify two compounds that act as pore blockers. Mutations of those four putative pore-lining basic residues significantly altered the IC50 of these compounds at positive voltages. These findings contribute to our understanding regarding anion permeation of TMEM16A CaCC and provide valuable pharmacological tools to probe the channel pore. PMID:25733897

  16. Synthesis and evaluation of 5,6-disubstituted thiopyrimidine aryl aminothiazoles as inhibitors of the calcium-activated chloride channel TMEM16A/Ano1.

    PubMed

    Piechowicz, Katarzyna A; Truong, Eric C; Javed, Kashif M; Chaney, Rachelle R; Wu, Johnny Y; Phuan, Puay W; Verkman, Alan S; Anderson, Marc O

    2016-12-01

    Transmembrane protein 16A (TMEM16A), also called Ano1, is a Ca(2+) activated Cl(-) channel expressed widely in mammalian epithelia, as well as in vascular smooth muscle and some tumors and electrically excitable cells. TMEM16A inhibitors have potential utility for treatment of disorders of epithelial fluid and mucus secretion, hypertension, some cancers and other diseases. 4-Aryl-2-amino thiazole T16Ainh-01 was previously identified by high-throughput screening. Here, a library of 47 compounds were prepared that explored the 5,6-disubstituted pyrimidine scaffold found in T16Ainh-01. TMEM16A inhibition activity was measured using fluorescence plate reader and short-circuit current assays. We found that very little structural variation of T16Ainh-01 was tolerated, with most compounds showing no activity at 10 μM. The most potent compound in the series, 9bo, which substitutes 4-methoxyphenyl in T16Ainh-01 with 2-thiophene, had IC50 ∼1 μM for inhibition of TMEM16A chloride conductance.

  17. Synthesis and evaluation of 5,6-disubstituted thiopyrimidine aryl aminothiazoles as inhibitors of the calcium-activated chloride channel TMEM16A/Ano1

    PubMed Central

    Piechowicz, Katarzyna A.; Truong, Eric C.; Javed, Kashif M.; Chaney, Rachelle R.; Wu, Johnny Y.; Phuan, Puay W.; Verkman, Alan S.; Anderson, Marc O.

    2016-01-01

    Transmembrane protein 16A (TMEM16A), also called Ano1, is a Ca2+ activated Cl− channel expressed widely in mammalian epithelia, as well as in vascular smooth muscle and some tumors and electrically excitable cells. TMEM16A inhibitors have potential utility for treatment of disorders of epithelial fluid and mucus secretion, hypertension, some cancers and other diseases. 4-Aryl-2-amino thiazole T16Ainh-01 was previously identified by high-throughput screening. Here, a library of 47 compounds were prepared that explored the 5,6-disubstituted pyrimidine scaffold found in T16Ainh-01. TMEM16A inhibition activity was measured using fluorescence plate reader and short-circuit current assays. We found that very little structural variation of T16Ainh-01 was tolerated, with most compounds showing no activity at 10 µM. The most potent compound in the series, 9bo, which substitutes 4-methoxyphenyl in T16Ainh-01 with 2-thiophene, had IC50 ~1 µM for inhibition of TMEM16A chloride conductance. PMID:26796863

  18. Regulation of Fast-Spiking Basket Cell Synapses by the Chloride Channel ClC–2

    PubMed Central

    Földy, Csaba; Lee, Sang-Hun; Morgan, Robert J.; Soltesz, Ivan

    2010-01-01

    Parvalbumin-expressing, fast-spiking basket cells play key roles in the generation of synchronous, rhythmic population activities in the hippocampus. Here we show that GABAA receptor-mediated synaptic inputs from murine parvalbumin-expressing basket cells are selectively modulated by the membrane voltage- and intracellular chloride-dependent chloride channel ClC–2. These data demonstrate a novel cell type-specific regulation of intracellular chloride homeostasis in the perisomatic region of hippocampal pyramidal neurons. PMID:20676104

  19. Chloride channel and chloride conductance regulator domains of CFTR, the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator

    PubMed Central

    Schwiebert, Erik M.; Morales, Marcelo M.; Devidas, Sreenivas; Egan, Marie E.; Guggino, William B.

    1998-01-01

    CFTR is a cyclic AMP (cAMP)-activated chloride (Cl−) channel and a regulator of outwardly rectifying Cl− channels (ORCCs) in airway epithelia. CFTR regulates ORCCs by facilitating the release of ATP out of cells. Once released from cells, ATP stimulates ORCCs by means of a purinergic receptor. To define the domains of CFTR important for Cl− channel function and/or ORCC regulator function, mutant CFTRs with N- and C-terminal truncations and selected individual amino acid substitutions were created and studied by transfection into a line of human airway epithelial cells from a cystic fibrosis patient (IB3–1) or by injection of in vitro transcribed complementary RNAs (cRNAs) into Xenopus oocytes. Two-electrode voltage clamp recordings, 36Cl− efflux assays, and whole cell patch-clamp recordings were used to assay for the Cl− channel function of CFTR and for its ability to regulate ORCCs. The data showed that the first transmembrane domain (TMD-1) of CFTR, especially predicted α-helices 5 and 6, forms an essential part of the Cl− channel pore, whereas the first nucleotide-binding and regulatory domains (NBD1/R domain) are essential for its ability to regulate ORCCs. Finally, the data show that the ability of CFTR to function as a Cl− channel and a conductance regulator are not mutually exclusive; one function could be eliminated while the other was preserved. PMID:9482946

  20. Chloride channels involve in hydrogen peroxide-induced apoptosis of PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Wanhong; Zhu, Linyan; Bai, Zhiquan; Zhang, Haifeng; Mao, Jianwen; Chen, Lixin; Wang, Liwei

    2009-10-02

    Chloride channel activity is one of the critical factors responsible for cell apoptotic volume decrease (AVD). However, the roles of chloride channels in apoptosis have not been fully understood. In the current study, we assessed the role of chloride channels in hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2))-induced apoptosis of pheochromocytoma cells (PC12). Extracellular application of H(2)O(2) activated a chloride current and induced cell volume decrease in a few minutes. Incubation of cells with H(2)O(2) elevated significantly the membrane permeability to the DNA dye Hoechst 33258 in 1h and induced apoptosis of most PC12 cells tested in 24h. The chloride channel blocker NPPB (5-nitro-2-(3-phenylpropylamino)-benzoate) prevented appearance of H(2)O(2)-induced high membrane permeability and cell shrinkage, suppressed H(2)O(2)-activated chloride currents and protected PC12 cells from apoptosis induced by H(2)O(2). The results suggest that chloride channels may contribute to H(2)O(2)-induced apoptosis by ways of elevation of membrane permeability and AVD in PC12 cells.

  1. Up-Regulation of Interleukin-9 and the Interleukin-9-Associated Calcium-Activated Chloride Channel hCLCA1 in Nasal Mucosa Following In Vivo Allergen Challenge

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    Interleukin (IL)-9 is a pleiotropic T helper 2-type cytokine that has been shown to be up-regulated in allergic airway disease, including asthma. IL-9 has been demonstrated to be a potent stimulus for the production and secretion of mucus from airway epithelial cells via induction of a calcium-activated chloride channel, hCLCA1. The objective of this study was to investigate the expression of IL-9 and hCLCA1 following allergen challenge in the nasal mucosa of allergic rhinitis patients. Nasal biopsies were obtained from allergic rhinitis patients out of allergen season both before (baseline) and after local antigen challenge with either ragweed or diluent (control). Immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization were used to assess IL-9 protein and hCLCA1 messenger ribonucleic acid. Eosinophils and T cells were detected using immunohistochemistry. IL-9 and hCLCA1 were very low at baseline, and expression was significantly up-regulated following ragweed challenge. Whereas the number of eosinophils increased after allergen challenge, T-cell counts did not change significantly. The results of this study demonstrate the relationship between specific allergen challenge and expression of both IL-9 and hCLCA1, suggesting a possible mechanism for the increased production of mucus from airway epithelial cells in allergic rhinitis. PMID:20525149

  2. The Porcine Chloride Channel Calcium-Activated Family Member pCLCA4a Mirrors Lung Expression of the Human hCLCA4

    PubMed Central

    Plog, Stephanie; Grötzsch, Tanja; Klymiuk, Nikolai; Kobalz, Ursula; Gruber, Achim D.

    2012-01-01

    Pig models of cystic fibrosis (CF) have recently been established that are expected to mimic the human disease closer than mouse models do. The human CLCA (originally named chloride channels, calcium-activated) member hCLCA4 is considered a potential modifier of disease severity in CF, but its murine ortholog, mCLCA6, is not expressed in the mouse lung. Here, we have characterized the genomic structure, protein processing, and tissue expression patterns of the porcine ortholog to hCLCA4, pCLCA4a. The genomic structure and cellular protein processing of pCLCA4a were found to closely mirror those of hCLCA4 and mCLCA6. Similar to human lung, pCLCA4a mRNA was strongly expressed in porcine lungs, and the pCLCA4a protein was immunohistochemically detected on the apical membranes of tracheal and bronchial epithelial cells. This stands in sharp contrast to mouse mCLCA6, which has been detected exclusively in intestinal epithelia but not the murine lung. The results may add to the understanding of species-specific differences in the CF phenotype and support the notion that the CF pig model may be more suitable than murine models to study the role of hCLCA4. PMID:22205680

  3. Insecticide sensitivity of native chloride and sodium channels in a mosquito cell line.

    PubMed

    Jenson, Lacey J; Anderson, Troy D; Bloomquist, Jeffrey R

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the utility of cultured Anopheles gambiae Sua1B cells for insecticide screening applications without genetic engineering or other treatments. Sua1B cells were exposed to the known insecticidal compounds lindane and DIDS, which inhibited cell growth at micromolar concentrations. In patch clamp studies, DIDS produced partial inhibition (69%) of chloride current amplitudes, and an IC50 of 5.1μM was determined for Sua1B cells. A sub-set of chloride currents showed no response to DIDS; however, inhibition (64%) of these currents was achieved using a low chloride saline solution, confirming their identity as chloride channels. In contrast, lindane increased chloride current amplitude (EC50=116nM), which was reversed when cells were bathed in calcium-free extracellular solution. Voltage-sensitive chloride channels were also inhibited by the presence of fenvalerate, a type 2 pyrethroid, but not significantly blocked by type 1 allethrin, an effect not previously shown in insects. Although no evidence of fast inward currents typical of sodium channels was observed, studies with fenvalerate in combination with veratridine, a sodium channel activator, revealed complete inhibition of cell growth that was best fit by a two-site binding model. The high potency effect was completely inhibited in the presence of tetrodotoxin, a specific sodium channel blocker, suggesting the presence of some type of sodium channel. Thus, Sua1B cells express native insect ion channels with potential utility for insecticide screening.

  4. Stimulation effect of wide type CFTR chloride channel by the naturally occurring flavonoid tangeretin.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yu; Yu, Bo; Wang, Xue; Sui, Yujie; Zhang, Yaofang; Yang, Shuang; Yang, Hong; Ma, Tonghui

    2014-12-01

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is a cAMP-activated chloride channel expressed in the apical membrane of serous epithelial cells. Both deficiency and overactivation of CFTR may cause fluid and salt secretion related diseases. In the present study, we identified tangeretin from Pericarpium Citri Reticulatae Viride as a CFTR activator using high-throughput screening based on FRT cell-based fluorescence assay. The activation effect of tangeretin on CFTR chloride channel and the possible underlying mechanisms were investigated. Fluorescence quenching tests showed that tangeretin dose- and time-dependently activated CFTR chloride channel, the activity had rapid and reversible characteristics and the activation effect could be completely reversed by the CFTR specific blocker CFTRinh-172. Primary mechanism studies indicated that the activation effect of tangeretin on CFTR chloride channel was FSK dependent as well as had additional effect with FSK and IBMX suggesting that tangeretin activates CFTR by direct interacting with the protein. Ex-vivo tests revealed that tangeretin could accelerate the speed of the submucosal gland fluid secretion. Short-circuit current measurement demonstrated that tangeretin activated rat colonic mucosa chloride current. Thus, CFTR Cl(-) channel is a molecular target of natural compound tangeretin. Tangeretin may have potential use for the treatment of CFTR-related diseases like cystic fibrosis, bronchiectasis and habitual constipation.

  5. Mechanism of HERG potassium channel inhibition by tetra-n-octylammonium bromide and benzethonium chloride

    SciTech Connect

    Long, Yan; Lin, Zuoxian; Xia, Menghang; Zheng, Wei; Li, Zhiyuan

    2013-03-01

    Tetra-n-octylammonium bromide and benzethonium chloride are synthetic quaternary ammonium salts that are widely used in hospitals and industries for the disinfection and surface treatment and as the preservative agent. Recently, the activities of HERG channel inhibition by these compounds have been found to have potential risks to induce the long QT syndrome and cardiac arrhythmia, although the mechanism of action is still elusive. This study was conducted to investigate the mechanism of HERG channel inhibition by these compounds by using whole-cell patch clamp experiments in a CHO cell line stably expressing HERG channels. Tetra-n-octylammonium bromide and benzethonium chloride exhibited concentration-dependent inhibitions of HERG channel currents with IC{sub 50} values of 4 nM and 17 nM, respectively, which were also voltage-dependent and use-dependent. Both compounds shifted the channel activation I–V curves in a hyperpolarized direction for 10–15 mV and accelerated channel activation and inactivation processes by 2-fold. In addition, tetra-n-octylammonium bromide shifted the inactivation I–V curve in a hyperpolarized direction for 24.4 mV and slowed the rate of channel deactivation by 2-fold, whereas benzethonium chloride did not. The results indicate that tetra-n-octylammonium bromide and benzethonium chloride are open-channel blockers that inhibit HERG channels in the voltage-dependent, use-dependent and state-dependent manners. - Highlights: ► Tetra-n-octylammonium and benzethonium are potent HERG channel inhibitors. ► Channel activation and inactivation processes are accelerated by the two compounds. ► Both compounds are the open-channel blockers to HERG channels. ► HERG channel inhibition by both compounds is use-, voltage- and state dependent. ► The in vivo risk of QT prolongation needs to be studied for the two compounds.

  6. Glutamate transporter-associated anion channels adjust intracellular chloride concentrations during glial maturation.

    PubMed

    Untiet, Verena; Kovermann, Peter; Gerkau, Niklas J; Gensch, Thomas; Rose, Christine R; Fahlke, Christoph

    2017-02-01

    Astrocytic volume regulation and neurotransmitter uptake are critically dependent on the intracellular anion concentration, but little is known about the mechanisms controlling internal anion homeostasis in these cells. Here we used fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) with the chloride-sensitive dye MQAE to measure intracellular chloride concentrations in murine Bergmann glial cells in acute cerebellar slices. We found Bergmann glial [Cl(-) ]int to be controlled by two opposing transport processes: chloride is actively accumulated by the Na(+) -K(+) -2Cl(-) cotransporter NKCC1, and chloride efflux through anion channels associated with excitatory amino acid transporters (EAATs) reduces [Cl(-) ]int to values that vary upon changes in expression levels or activity of these channels. EAATs transiently form anion-selective channels during glutamate transport, and thus represent a class of ligand-gated anion channels. Age-dependent upregulation of EAATs results in a developmental chloride switch from high internal chloride concentrations (51.6 ± 2.2 mM, mean ± 95% confidence interval) during early development to adult levels (35.3 ± 0.3 mM). Simultaneous blockade of EAAT1/GLAST and EAAT2/GLT-1 increased [Cl(-) ]int in adult glia to neonatal values. Moreover, EAAT activation by synaptic stimulations rapidly decreased [Cl(-) ]int . Other tested chloride channels or chloride transporters do not contribute to [Cl(-) ]int under our experimental conditions. Neither genetic removal of ClC-2 nor pharmacological block of K(+) -Cl(-) cotransporter change resting Bergmann glial [Cl(-) ]int in acute cerebellar slices. We conclude that EAAT anion channels play an important and unexpected role in adjusting glial intracellular anion concentration during maturation and in response to cerebellar activity. GLIA 2017;65:388-400.

  7. Inhibition of nitrite-induced toxicity in channel catfish by calcium chloride and sodium chloride

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tommasso J.R., Wright; Simco, B.A.; Davis, K.B.

    1980-01-01

    Environmental chloride has been shown to inhibit methemoglobin formation in fish, thereby offering a protective effect against nitrite toxicity. Channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) were simultaneously exposed to various environmental nitrite and chloride levels (as either CaCl2 or NaCl) in dechlorinated tap water (40 mg/L total hardness, 47 mg/L alkalinity, 4 mg/L chloride, pH = 6.9-7.1, and temperature 21-24°C). Methemoglobin levels in fish simultaneously exposed to 2.5 mg/L nitrite and up to 30 mg/L chloride as either CaCl2 or NaCl were similar but significantly lower than in unprotected fish. Exposure to 10 mg/L nitrite and 60 mg/L chloride resulted in methemoglobin levels similar to those of the controls; most unprotected fish died. Fish exposed to 10 mg/L nitrite had significantly lower methemoglobin levels when protected with 15.0 mg/L chloride as CaCl2 than with NaCl. Fish exposed to nitrite in the presence of 60 mg/L chloride (as either CaCl2 or NaCl) had similar 24-h LC50 values that were significantly elevated above those obtained in the absence of chloride. Calcium had little effect on tolerance to nitrite toxicity in channel catfish in contrast to its large effect reported in steelhead trout (Salmo gairdneri).

  8. Comparative Proteomics of Ovarian Cancer Aggregate Formation Reveals an Increased Expression of Calcium-activated Chloride Channel Regulator 1 (CLCA1)*

    PubMed Central

    Musrap, Natasha; Tuccitto, Alessandra; Karagiannis, George S.; Saraon, Punit; Batruch, Ihor; Diamandis, Eleftherios P.

    2015-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is a lethal gynecological disease that is characterized by peritoneal metastasis and increased resistance to conventional chemotherapies. This increased resistance and the ability to spread is often attributed to the formation of multicellular aggregates or spheroids in the peritoneal cavity, which seed abdominal surfaces and organs. Given that the presence of metastatic implants is a predictor of poor survival, a better understanding of how spheroids form is critical to improving patient outcome, and may result in the identification of novel therapeutic targets. Thus, we attempted to gain insight into the proteomic changes that occur during anchorage-independent cancer cell aggregation. As such, an ovarian cancer cell line, OV-90, was cultured in adherent and non-adherent conditions using stable isotope labeling with amino acids in cell culture (SILAC). Anchorage-dependent cells (OV-90AD) were grown in tissue culture flasks, whereas anchorage-independent cells (OV-90AI) were grown in suspension using the hanging-drop method. Cellular proteins from both conditions were then identified using LC-MS/MS, which resulted in the quantification of 1533 proteins. Of these, 13 and 6 proteins were up-regulated and down-regulated, respectively, in aggregate-forming cells compared with cells grown as monolayers. Relative gene expression and protein expression of candidates were examined in other cell line models of aggregate formation (TOV-112D and ES-2), which revealed an increased expression of calcium-activated chloride channel regulator 1 (CLCA1). Moreover, inhibitor and siRNA transfection studies demonstrated an apparent effect of CLCA1 on cancer cell aggregation. Further elucidation of the role of CLCA1 in the pathogenesis of ovarian cancer is warranted. PMID:26004777

  9. Comparative Proteomics of Ovarian Cancer Aggregate Formation Reveals an Increased Expression of Calcium-activated Chloride Channel Regulator 1 (CLCA1).

    PubMed

    Musrap, Natasha; Tuccitto, Alessandra; Karagiannis, George S; Saraon, Punit; Batruch, Ihor; Diamandis, Eleftherios P

    2015-07-10

    Ovarian cancer is a lethal gynecological disease that is characterized by peritoneal metastasis and increased resistance to conventional chemotherapies. This increased resistance and the ability to spread is often attributed to the formation of multicellular aggregates or spheroids in the peritoneal cavity, which seed abdominal surfaces and organs. Given that the presence of metastatic implants is a predictor of poor survival, a better understanding of how spheroids form is critical to improving patient outcome, and may result in the identification of novel therapeutic targets. Thus, we attempted to gain insight into the proteomic changes that occur during anchorage-independent cancer cell aggregation. As such, an ovarian cancer cell line, OV-90, was cultured in adherent and non-adherent conditions using stable isotope labeling with amino acids in cell culture (SILAC). Anchorage-dependent cells (OV-90AD) were grown in tissue culture flasks, whereas anchorage-independent cells (OV-90AI) were grown in suspension using the hanging-drop method. Cellular proteins from both conditions were then identified using LC-MS/MS, which resulted in the quantification of 1533 proteins. Of these, 13 and 6 proteins were up-regulated and down-regulated, respectively, in aggregate-forming cells compared with cells grown as monolayers. Relative gene expression and protein expression of candidates were examined in other cell line models of aggregate formation (TOV-112D and ES-2), which revealed an increased expression of calcium-activated chloride channel regulator 1 (CLCA1). Moreover, inhibitor and siRNA transfection studies demonstrated an apparent effect of CLCA1 on cancer cell aggregation. Further elucidation of the role of CLCA1 in the pathogenesis of ovarian cancer is warranted.

  10. The ClC-0 chloride channel is a 'broken' Cl-/H+ antiporter.

    PubMed

    Lísal, Jirí; Maduke, Merritt

    2008-08-01

    Ion channels have historically been viewed as distinct from secondary active transporters. However, the recent discovery that the CLC 'chloride channel' family is made up of both channels and active transporters has led to the hypothesis that the ion-transport mechanisms of these two types of membrane proteins may be similar. Here we use single-channel analysis to demonstrate that ClC-0 channel gating (opening and closing) involves the transmembrane movement of protons. This result indicates that ClC-0 is a 'broken' Cl(-)/H(+) antiporter in which one of the conformational states has become leaky for chloride ions. This finding clarifies the evolutionary relationship between the channels and transporters and conveys that similar mechanisms and analogous protein movements are used by both.

  11. Cytoprotection of kidney epithelial cells by compounds that target amino acid gated chloride channels.

    PubMed

    Venkatachalam, M A; Weinberg, J M; Patel, Y; Saikumar, P; Dong, Z

    1996-02-01

    Glycine, strychnine and certain chloride channel blockers were reported to protect cells against lethal cell injury. These effects have been attributed to interactions with membrane proteins related to CNS glycine gated chloride channel receptors. We have investigated the pharmacology of these actions. Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) epithelial cells were depleted of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) by incubation in glucose free medium containing a mitochondrial uncoupler. Medium Ca2+ was adjusted to 100 nM in the presence of an ionophore such that intracellular Ca2+ did not increase, and Ca(2+)-related injury mechanisms were inhibited. This permitted more sensitive quantitation of protection against cell injury attributable to glycine or other agents whose actions might be related to those of the amino acid. Two classes of compounds showed cytoprotective activity in this system: (1) ligands at chloride channel receptors, such as glycine, strychnine and avermectin B1a; (2) chloride channel blockers, including cyanotriphenylboron and niflumic acid, both of which are known to bind to channel domains of CNS glycine receptors. Morphological and functional studies showed that the compounds preserved plasma membrane integrity, but permitted cell swelling. Substitution of medium chloride by gluconate, or chloride salts by sucrose, did not substantially modify lethal damage or its prevention by glycine or other drugs. The compounds did not modify ATP declines. At least for some compounds, cytoprotection appeared to be specific to structural features on the molecules. These observations are consistent with the hypothesis that a plasma membrane protein related to glycine-gated chloride channel receptors plays a significant role in cell injury, but indicate that the mechanisms of injury and protection by compounds active in this system are not related to chloride fluxes.

  12. Epithelial Sodium and Chloride Channels and Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wen; Ji, Hong-Long

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To focus on the asthmatic pathogenesis and clinical manifestations related to epithelial sodium channel (ENaC)/chlorine ion channel. Data Sources: The data analyzed in this review were the English articles from 1980 to 2015 from journal databases, primarily PubMed and Google Scholar. The terms used in the literature search were: (1) ENaCs; cystic fibrosis (CF) transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR); asthma/asthmatic, (2) ENaC/sodium salt; CF; asthma/asthmatic, (3) CFTR/chlorine ion channels; asthma/asthmatic, (4) ENaC/sodium channel/scnn1a/scnn1b/scnn1g/scnn1d/amiloride-sensitive/amiloride-inhibtable sodium channels/sodium salt; asthma/asthmatic, lung/pulmonary/respiratory/tracheal/alveolar, and (5) CFTR; CF; asthma/asthmatic (ti). Study Selection: These studies included randomized controlled trials or studies covering asthma pathogenesis and clinical manifestations related to ENaC/chlorine ion channels within the last 25 years (from 1990 to 2015). The data involving chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and CF obtained from individual studies were also reviewed by the authors. Results: Airway surface liquid dehydration can cause airway inflammation and obstruction. ENaC and CFTR are closely related to the airway mucociliary clearance. Ion transporters may play a critical role in pathogenesis of asthmatic exacerbations. Conclusions: Ion channels have been the center of many studies aiming to understand asthmatic pathophysiological mechanisms or to identify therapeutic targets for better control of the disease. PMID:26265620

  13. Chloride channels in cancer: Focus on chloride intracellular channel 1 and 4 (CLIC1 AND CLIC4) proteins in tumor development and as novel therapeutic targets.

    PubMed

    Peretti, Marta; Angelini, Marina; Savalli, Nicoletta; Florio, Tullio; Yuspa, Stuart H; Mazzanti, Michele

    2015-10-01

    In recent decades, growing scientific evidence supports the role of ion channels in the development of different cancers. Both potassium selective pores and chloride permeabilities are considered the most active channels during tumorigenesis. High rate of proliferation, active migration, and invasiveness into non-neoplastic tissues are specific properties of neoplastic transformation. All these actions require partial or total involvement of chloride channel activity. In this context, this class of membrane proteins could represent valuable therapeutic targets for the treatment of resistant tumors. However, this encouraging premise has not so far produced any valid new channel-targeted antitumoral molecule for cancer treatment. Problematic for drug design targeting ion channels is their vital role in normal cells for essential physiological functions. By targeting these membrane proteins involved in pathological conditions, it is inevitable to cause relevant side effects in healthy organs. In light of this, a new protein family, the chloride intracellular channels (CLICs), could be a promising class of therapeutic targets for its intrinsic individualities: CLIC1 and CLIC4, in particular, not only are overexpressed in specific tumor types or their corresponding stroma but also change localization and function from hydrophilic cytosolic to integral transmembrane proteins as active ionic channels or signal transducers during cell cycle progression in certain cases. These changes in intracellular localization, tissue compartments, and channel function, uniquely associated with malignant transformation, may offer a unique target for cancer therapy, likely able to spare normal cells. This article is part of a special issue itled "Membrane Channels and Transporters in Cancers."

  14. Protein kinase C theta (PKCθ) modulates the ClC-1 chloride channel activity and skeletal muscle phenotype: a biophysical and gene expression study in mouse models lacking the PKCθ.

    PubMed

    Camerino, Giulia Maria; Bouchè, Marina; De Bellis, Michela; Cannone, Maria; Liantonio, Antonella; Musaraj, Kejla; Romano, Rossella; Smeriglio, Piera; Madaro, Luca; Giustino, Arcangela; De Luca, Annamaria; Desaphy, Jean-François; Camerino, Diana Conte; Pierno, Sabata

    2014-12-01

    In skeletal muscle, the resting chloride conductance (gCl), due to the ClC-1 chloride channel, controls the sarcolemma electrical stability. Indeed, loss-of-function mutations in ClC-1 gene are responsible of myotonia congenita. The ClC-1 channel can be phosphorylated and inactivated by protein kinases C (PKC), but the relative contribution of each PKC isoforms is unknown. Here, we investigated on the role of PKCθ in the regulation of ClC-1 channel expression and activity in fast- and slow-twitch muscles of mouse models lacking PKCθ. Electrophysiological studies showed an increase of gCl in the PKCθ-null mice with respect to wild type. Muscle excitability was reduced accordingly. However, the expression of the ClC-1 channel, evaluated by qRT-PCR, was not modified in PKCθ-null muscles suggesting that PKCθ affects the ClC-1 activity. Pharmacological studies demonstrated that although PKCθ appreciably modulates gCl, other isoforms are still active and concur to this role. The modification of gCl in PKCθ-null muscles has caused adaptation of the expression of phenotype-specific genes, such as calcineurin and myocyte enhancer factor-2, supporting the role of PKCθ also in the settings of muscle phenotype. Importantly, the lack of PKCθ has prevented the aging-related reduction of gCl, suggesting that its modulation may represent a new strategy to contrast the aging process.

  15. Spatial Distribution of Calcium-Gated Chloride Channels in Olfactory Cilia

    PubMed Central

    French, Donald A.; Badamdorj, Dorjsuren; Kleene, Steven J.

    2010-01-01

    Background In vertebrate olfactory receptor neurons, sensory cilia transduce odor stimuli into changes in neuronal membrane potential. The voltage changes are primarily caused by the sequential openings of two types of channel: a cyclic-nucleotide-gated (CNG) cationic channel and a calcium-gated chloride channel. In frog, the cilia are 25 to 200 µm in length, so the spatial distributions of the channels may be an important determinant of odor sensitivity. Principal Findings To determine the spatial distribution of the chloride channels, we recorded from single cilia as calcium was allowed to diffuse down the length of the cilium and activate the channels. A computational model of this experiment allowed an estimate of the spatial distribution of the chloride channels. On average, the channels were concentrated in a narrow band centered at a distance of 29% of the ciliary length, measured from the base of the cilium. This matches the location of the CNG channels determined previously. This non-uniform distribution of transduction proteins is consistent with similar findings in other cilia. Conclusions On average, the two types of olfactory transduction channel are concentrated in the same region of the cilium. This may contribute to the efficient detection of weak stimuli. PMID:21209888

  16. cAMP-activated chloride channels in a CFTR-transfected pancreatic adenocarcinoma-derived cell line, pANS6.

    PubMed

    Smith, A N; Wardle, C J; Winpenny, J P; Verdon, B; Gray, M A; Argent, B E; Harris, A

    1995-06-09

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma cell lines rarely express the CFTR gene, despite the high levels of CFTR protein that are present in primary pancreatic duct cells. We have attempted to generate a non-CF pancreatic adenocarcinoma cell line that stably produces high levels of CFTR mRNA and protein by transfecting a vector containing the CFTR cDNA, driven by a strong mammalian promoter, into the poorly differentiated pancreatic adenocarcinoma cell line, Panc-1. The pANS6 pancreatic duct cell line expresses substantial levels of CFTR mRNA, but little CFTR protein. Despite this we were able to detect low conductance chloride channels in 40% of patches, stimulated with cAMP, that have similar biophysical properties to CFTR.

  17. Modulation of Chloride Channel Functions by the Plant Lignan Compounds Kobusin and Eudesmin

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yu; Yu, Bo; Fang, Fang; Cao, Huanhuan; Ma, Tonghui; Yang, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Plant lignans are diphenolic compounds widely present in vegetables, fruits, and grains. These compounds have been demonstrated to have protective effect against cancer, hypertension and diabetes. In the present study, we showed that two lignan compounds, kobusin and eudesmin, isolated from Magnoliae Flos, could modulate intestinal chloride transport mediated by cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) and calcium-activated chloride channels (CaCCs). The compounds activated CFTR channel function in both FRT cells and in HT-29 cells. The modulating effects of kobusin and eudesmin on the activity of CaCCgie (CaCC expressed in gastrointestinal epithelial cells) were also investigated, and the result showed that both compounds could stimulate CaCCgie-mediated short-circuit currents and the stimulation was synergistic with ATP. In ex vivo studies, both compounds activated CFTR and CaCCgie chloride channel activities in mouse colonic epithelia. Remarkably, the compounds showed inhibitory effects toward ANO1/CaCC-mediated short-circuit currents in ANO1/CaCC-expressing FRT cells, with IC50 values of 100 μM for kobusin and 200 μM for eudesmin. In charcoal transit study, both compounds mildly reduced gastrointestinal motility in mice. Taken together, these results revealed a new kind of activity displayed by the lignan compounds, one that is concerned with the modulation of chloride channel function. PMID:26635857

  18. Differences in antibacterial activity of benzalkonium chloride.

    PubMed

    Richards, R M; Mizrahi, L M

    1978-03-01

    Benzalkonium solutions obtained from different manufacturers were shown to have different activities. This difference in activity was related to the composition of the benzalkonium chloride. The potential seriousness of this situation is emphasized, and a recommendation is made that the official monographs on benzalkonium chloride be amended appropriately, noting the apparently superior antibacterial activity of the tetradecyl (C14) homolog.

  19. Monoclonal Antibodies to the Apical Chloride Channel in Necturus Gallbladder Inhibit the Chloride Conductance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finn, Arthur L.; Tsai, Lih-Min; Falk, Ronald J.

    1989-10-01

    Monoclonal antibodies raised by injecting Necturus gallbladder cells into mice were tested for their ability to inhibit the apical chloride conductance induced by elevation of cellular cAMP. Five of these monoclonal antibodies bound to the apical cells, as shown by indirect immunofluorescence microscopy, and inhibited the chloride conductance; one antibody that bound only to subepithelial smooth muscle, by indirect immunofluorescence microscopy, showed no inhibition of chloride transport. The channel or a closely related molecule is present in the membrane whether or not the pathway is open, since, in addition to inhibiting the conductance of the open channel, the antibody also bound to the membrane in the resting state and prevented subsequent opening of the channel. The antibody was shown to recognize, by ELISA, epitopes from the Necturus gallbladder and small intestine. Finally, by Western blot analysis of Necturus gallbladder homogenates, the antibody was shown to recognize two protein bands of Mr 219,000 and Mr 69,000. This antibody should permit isolation and characterization of this important ion channel.

  20. Mitochondrial chloride channels: electrophysiological characterization and pH induction of channel pore dilation.

    PubMed

    Misak, Anton; Grman, Marian; Malekova, Lubica; Novotova, Marta; Markova, Jana; Krizanova, Olga; Ondrias, Karol; Tomaskova, Zuzana

    2013-09-01

    Physiological and pathological functions of mitochondria are highly dependent on the properties and regulation of mitochondrial ion channels. There is still no clear understanding of the molecular identity, regulation, and properties of anion mitochondrial channels. The inner membrane anion channel (IMAC) was assumed to be equivalent to mitochondrial centum picosiemens (mCS). However, the different properties of IMAC and mCS channels challenges this opinion. In our study, we characterized the single-channel anion selectivity and pH regulation of chloride channels from purified cardiac mitochondria. We observed that channel conductance decreased in the order: Cl⁻ > Br⁻ > I⁻ > chlorate ≈ formate > acetate, and that gluconate did not permeate under control conditions. The selectivity sequence was Br⁻ ≥ chlorate ≥ I⁻ ≥ Cl⁻ ≥ formate ≈ acetate. Measurement of the concentration dependence of chloride conductance revealed altered channel gating kinetics, which was demonstrated by prolonged mean open time value with increasing chloride concentration. The observed mitochondrial chloride channels were in many respects similar to those of mCS, but not those of IMAC. Surprisingly, we observed that acidic pH increased channel conductance and that an increase of pH from 7.4 to 8.5 reduced it. The gluconate current appeared and gradually increased when pH decreased from pH 7.0 to 5.6. Our results indicate that pH regulates the channel pore diameter in such a way that dilation increases with more acidic pH. We assume this newly observed pH-dependent anion channel property may be involved in pH regulation of anion distribution in different mitochondrial compartments.

  1. Conformational changes opening and closing the CFTR chloride channel: insights from cysteine scanning mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    El Hiani, Yassine; Linsdell, Paul

    2014-12-01

    Cystic fibrosis, the most common lethal genetic disease affecting young people in North America, is caused by failure of the chloride ion channel known as CFTR (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator). CFTR belongs to the large family of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) membrane transporters. In CFTR, ATP-driven events at the nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs) open and close a gate that controls chloride permeation. However, the conformational changes concomitant with opening and closing of the CFTR gate are unknown. Diverse techniques including substituted cysteine accessibility method, disulfide cross-linking, and patch-clamp recording have been used to explore CFTR channel structure. Here, we consider the architecture of both the open and the closed CFTR channel. We review how CFTR channel structure changes between the closed and the open channel conformations and portray the relative function of both cytoplasmic and vestigial gates during the gating cycle. Understanding how the CFTR channel gates chloride permeation is central for understanding how CFTR defects lead to CF. Such knowledge opens the door for novel ways to maximize CFTR channel activity in a CF setting.

  2. A synthetic chloride channel restores chloride conductance in human cystic fibrosis epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Shen, Bing; Li, Xiang; Wang, Fei; Yao, Xiaoqiang; Yang, Dan

    2012-01-01

    Mutations in the gene-encoding cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) cause defective transepithelial transport of chloride (Cl(-)) ions and fluid, thereby becoming responsible for the onset of cystic fibrosis (CF). One strategy to reduce the pathophysiology associated with CF is to increase Cl(-) transport through alternative pathways. In this paper, we demonstrate that a small synthetic molecule which forms Cl(-) channels to mediate Cl(-) transport across lipid bilayer membranes is capable of restoring Cl(-) permeability in human CF epithelial cells; as a result, it has the potential to become a lead compound for the treatment of human diseases associated with Cl(-) channel dysfunction.

  3. A Synthetic Chloride Channel Restores Chloride Conductance in Human Cystic Fibrosis Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fei; Yao, Xiaoqiang; Yang, Dan

    2012-01-01

    Mutations in the gene-encoding cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) cause defective transepithelial transport of chloride (Cl−) ions and fluid, thereby becoming responsible for the onset of cystic fibrosis (CF). One strategy to reduce the pathophysiology associated with CF is to increase Cl− transport through alternative pathways. In this paper, we demonstrate that a small synthetic molecule which forms Cl− channels to mediate Cl− transport across lipid bilayer membranes is capable of restoring Cl− permeability in human CF epithelial cells; as a result, it has the potential to become a lead compound for the treatment of human diseases associated with Cl− channel dysfunction. PMID:22514656

  4. Mapping of long-range INS promoter interactions reveals a role for calcium-activated chloride channel ANO1 in insulin secretion.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhixiong; Lefevre, Gaelle M; Gavrilova, Oksana; Foster St Claire, Mark B; Riddick, Gregory; Felsenfeld, Gary

    2014-11-25

    We used circular chromatin conformation capture (4C) to identify a physical contact in human pancreatic islets between the region near the insulin (INS) promoter and the ANO1 gene, lying 68 Mb away on human chromosome 11, which encodes a Ca(2+)-dependent chloride ion channel. In response to glucose, this contact was strengthened and ANO1 expression increased, whereas inhibition of INS gene transcription by INS promoter targeting siRNA decreased ANO1 expression, revealing a regulatory effect of INS promoter on ANO1 expression. Knockdown of ANO1 expression caused decreased insulin secretion in human islets, establishing a physical proximity-dependent feedback loop involving INS transcription, ANO1 expression, and insulin secretion. To explore a possible role of ANO1 in insulin metabolism, we carried out experiments in Ano1(+/-) mice. We observed reduced serum insulin levels and insulin-to-glucose ratios in high-fat diet-fed Ano1(+/-) mice relative to Ano1(+/+) mice fed the same diet. Our results show that determination of long-range contacts within the nucleus can be used to detect novel and physiologically relevant mechanisms. They also show that networks of long-range physical contacts are important to the regulation of insulin metabolism.

  5. Mapping of long-range INS promoter interactions reveals a role for calcium-activated chloride channel ANO1 in insulin secretion

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zhixiong; Lefevre, Gaelle M.; Gavrilova, Oksana; Foster St. Claire, Mark B.; Riddick, Gregory; Felsenfeld, Gary

    2014-01-01

    We used circular chromatin conformation capture (4C) to identify a physical contact in human pancreatic islets between the region near the insulin (INS) promoter and the ANO1 gene, lying 68 Mb away on human chromosome 11, which encodes a Ca2+-dependent chloride ion channel. In response to glucose, this contact was strengthened and ANO1 expression increased, whereas inhibition of INS gene transcription by INS promoter targeting siRNA decreased ANO1 expression, revealing a regulatory effect of INS promoter on ANO1 expression. Knockdown of ANO1 expression caused decreased insulin secretion in human islets, establishing a physical proximity-dependent feedback loop involving INS transcription, ANO1 expression, and insulin secretion. To explore a possible role of ANO1 in insulin metabolism, we carried out experiments in Ano1+/− mice. We observed reduced serum insulin levels and insulin-to-glucose ratios in high-fat diet–fed Ano1+/− mice relative to Ano1+/+ mice fed the same diet. Our results show that determination of long-range contacts within the nucleus can be used to detect novel and physiologically relevant mechanisms. They also show that networks of long-range physical contacts are important to the regulation of insulin metabolism. PMID:25385647

  6. The voltage dependence of the TMEM16B/anoctamin2 calcium-activated chloride channel is modified by mutations in the first putative intracellular loop

    PubMed Central

    Cenedese, Valentina; Betto, Giulia; Celsi, Fulvio; Cherian, O. Lijo; Pifferi, Simone

    2012-01-01

    Ca2+-activated Cl− channels (CaCCs) are involved in several physiological processes. Recently, TMEM16A/anoctamin1 and TMEM16B/anoctamin2 have been shown to function as CaCCs, but very little information is available on the structure–function relations of these channels. TMEM16B is expressed in the cilia of olfactory sensory neurons, in microvilli of vomeronasal sensory neurons, and in the synaptic terminals of retinal photoreceptors. Here, we have performed the first site-directed mutagenesis study on TMEM16B to understand the molecular mechanisms of voltage and Ca2+ dependence. We have mutated amino acids in the first putative intracellular loop and measured the properties of the wild-type and mutant TMEM16B channels expressed in HEK 293T cells using the whole cell voltage-clamp technique in the presence of various intracellular Ca2+ concentrations. We mutated E367 into glutamine or deleted the five consecutive glutamates 386EEEEE390 and 399EYE401. The EYE deletion did not significantly modify the apparent Ca2+ dependence nor the voltage dependence of channel activation. E367Q and deletion of the five glutamates did not greatly affect the apparent Ca2+ affinity but modified the voltage dependence, shifting the conductance–voltage relations toward more positive voltages. These findings indicate that glutamates E367 and 386EEEEE390 in the first intracellular putative loop play an important role in the voltage dependence of TMEM16B, thus providing an initial structure–function study for this channel. PMID:22412191

  7. Chloride transport in functionally active phagosomes isolated from Human neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Aiken, Martha L.; Painter, Richard G.; Zhou, Yun; Wang, Guoshun

    2012-01-01

    Chloride anion is critical for hypochlorous acid (HOCl) production and microbial killing in neutrophil phagosomes. However, the molecular mechanism by which this anion is transported to the organelle is poorly understood. In this report, membrane-enclosed and functionally active phagosomes were isolated from human neutrophils by using opsonized paramagnetic latex microspheres and a rapid magnetic separation method. The phagosomes recovered were highly enriched for specific protein markers associated with this organelle such as lysosomal-associated membrane protein-1, myeloperoxidase (MPO), lactoferrin, and NADPH oxidase. When FITC–dextran was included in the phagocytosis medium, the majority of the isolated phagosomes retained the fluorescent label after isolation, indicative of intact membrane structure. Flow cytometric measurement of acridine orange, a fluorescent pH indicator, in the purified phagosomes demonstrated that the organelle in its isolated state was capable of transporting protons to the phagosomal lumen via the vacuolar-type ATPase proton pump (V-ATPase). When NADPH was supplied, the isolated phagosomes constitutively oxidized dihydrorhodamine 123, indicating their ability to produce hydrogen peroxide. The preparations also showed a robust production of HOCl within the phagosomal lumen when assayed with the HOCl-specific fluorescent probe R19-S by flow cytometry. MPO-mediated iodination of the proteins covalently conjugated to the phagocytosed beads was quantitatively measured. Phagosomal uptake of iodide and protein iodination were significantly blocked by chloride channel inhibitors, including CFTRinh-172 and NPPB. Further experiments determined that the V-ATPase-driving proton flux into the isolated phagosomes required chloride cotransport, and the cAMP-activated CFTR chloride channel was a major contributor to the chloride transport. Taken together, the data suggest that the phagosomal preparation described herein retains ion transport

  8. Two tonoplast MATE proteins function as turgor-regulating chloride channels in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haiwen; Zhao, Fu-Geng; Tang, Ren-Jie; Yu, Yuexuan; Song, Jiali; Wang, Yuan; Li, Legong; Luan, Sheng

    2017-02-15

    The central vacuole in a plant cell occupies the majority of the cellular volume and plays a key role in turgor regulation. The vacuolar membrane (tonoplast) contains a large number of transporters that mediate fluxes of solutes and water, thereby adjusting cell turgor in response to developmental and environmental signals. We report that two tonoplast Detoxification efflux carrier (DTX)/Multidrug and Toxic Compound Extrusion (MATE) transporters, DTX33 and DTX35, function as chloride channels essential for turgor regulation in Arabidopsis Ectopic expression of each transporter in Nicotiana benthamiana mesophyll cells elicited a large voltage-dependent inward chloride current across the tonoplast, showing that DTX33 and DTX35 each constitute a functional channel. Both channels are highly expressed in Arabidopsis tissues, including root hairs and guard cells that experience rapid turgor changes during root-hair elongation and stomatal movements. Disruption of these two genes, either in single or double mutants, resulted in shorter root hairs and smaller stomatal aperture, with double mutants showing more severe defects, suggesting that these two channels function additively to facilitate anion influx into the vacuole during cell expansion. In addition, dtx35 single mutant showed lower fertility as a result of a defect in pollen-tube growth. Indeed, patch-clamp recording of isolated vacuoles indicated that the inward chloride channel activity across the tonoplast was impaired in the double mutant. Because MATE proteins are widely known transporters of organic compounds, finding MATE members as chloride channels expands the functional definition of this large family of transporters.

  9. Two tonoplast MATE proteins function as turgor-regulating chloride channels in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Haiwen; Zhao, Fu-Geng; Tang, Ren-Jie; Yu, Yuexuan; Song, Jiali; Wang, Yuan; Li, Legong; Luan, Sheng

    2017-01-01

    The central vacuole in a plant cell occupies the majority of the cellular volume and plays a key role in turgor regulation. The vacuolar membrane (tonoplast) contains a large number of transporters that mediate fluxes of solutes and water, thereby adjusting cell turgor in response to developmental and environmental signals. We report that two tonoplast Detoxification efflux carrier (DTX)/Multidrug and Toxic Compound Extrusion (MATE) transporters, DTX33 and DTX35, function as chloride channels essential for turgor regulation in Arabidopsis. Ectopic expression of each transporter in Nicotiana benthamiana mesophyll cells elicited a large voltage-dependent inward chloride current across the tonoplast, showing that DTX33 and DTX35 each constitute a functional channel. Both channels are highly expressed in Arabidopsis tissues, including root hairs and guard cells that experience rapid turgor changes during root-hair elongation and stomatal movements. Disruption of these two genes, either in single or double mutants, resulted in shorter root hairs and smaller stomatal aperture, with double mutants showing more severe defects, suggesting that these two channels function additively to facilitate anion influx into the vacuole during cell expansion. In addition, dtx35 single mutant showed lower fertility as a result of a defect in pollen-tube growth. Indeed, patch-clamp recording of isolated vacuoles indicated that the inward chloride channel activity across the tonoplast was impaired in the double mutant. Because MATE proteins are widely known transporters of organic compounds, finding MATE members as chloride channels expands the functional definition of this large family of transporters. PMID:28202726

  10. Luminal cholinergic signalling in airway lining fluid: a novel mechanism for activating chloride secretion via Ca2+-dependent Cl− and K+ channels

    PubMed Central

    Hollenhorst, Monika I; Lips, Katrin S; Wolff, Miriam; Wess, Jürgen; Gerbig, Stefanie; Takats, Zoltan; Kummer, Wolfgang; Fronius, Martin

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Recent studies detected the expression of proteins involved in cholinergic metabolism in airway epithelial cells, although the function of this non-neuronal cholinergic system is not known in detail. Thus, this study focused on the effect of luminal ACh as a regulator of transepithelial ion transport in epithelial cells. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH RT-PCR experiments were performed using mouse tracheal epithelial cells for ChAT and organic cation transporter (OCT) transcripts. Components of tracheal airway lining fluid were analysed with desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) MS. Effects of nicotine on mouse tracheal epithelial ion transport were examined with Ussing-chamber experiments. KEY RESULTS Transcripts encoding ChAT and OCT1–3 were detected in mouse tracheal epithelial cells. The DESI experiments identified ACh in the airway lining fluid. Luminal ACh induced an immediate, dose-dependent increase in the transepithelial ion current (EC50: 23.3 µM), characterized by a transient peak and sustained plateau current. This response was not affected by the Na+-channel inhibitor amiloride. The Cl−-channel inhibitor niflumic acid or the K+-channel blocker Ba2+ attenuated the ACh effect. The calcium ionophore A23187 mimicked the ACh effect. Luminal nicotine or muscarine increased the ion current. Experiments with receptor gene-deficient animals revealed the participation of muscarinic receptor subtypes M1 and M3. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS The presence of luminal ACh and activation of transepithelial ion currents by luminal ACh receptors identifies a novel non-neuronal cholinergic pathway in the airway lining fluid. This pathway could represent a novel drug target in the airways. PMID:22300281

  11. Mechanically Activated Ion Channels

    PubMed Central

    Ranade, Sanjeev S.; Syeda, Ruhma; Patapoutian, Ardem

    2015-01-01

    Mechanotransduction, the conversion of physical forces into biochemical signals, is an essential component of numerous physiological processes including not only conscious senses of touch and hearing, but also unconscious senses such as blood pressure regulation. Mechanically activated (MA) ion channels have been proposed as sensors of physical force, but the identity of these channels and an understanding of how mechanical force is transduced has remained elusive. A number of recent studies on previously known ion channels along with the identification of novel MA ion channels have greatly transformed our understanding of touch and hearing in both vertebrates and invertebrates. Here, we present an updated review of eukaryotic ion channel families that have been implicated in mechanotransduction processes and evaluate the qualifications of the candidate genes according to specified criteria. We then discuss the proposed gating models for MA ion channels and highlight recent structural studies of mechanosensitive potassium channels. PMID:26402601

  12. Mechanically Activated Ion Channels.

    PubMed

    Ranade, Sanjeev S; Syeda, Ruhma; Patapoutian, Ardem

    2015-09-23

    Mechanotransduction, the conversion of physical forces into biochemical signals, is essential for various physiological processes such as the conscious sensations of touch and hearing, and the unconscious sensation of blood flow. Mechanically activated (MA) ion channels have been proposed as sensors of physical force, but the identity of these channels and an understanding of how mechanical force is transduced has remained elusive. A number of recent studies on previously known ion channels along with the identification of novel MA ion channels have greatly transformed our understanding of touch and hearing in both vertebrates and invertebrates. Here, we present an updated review of eukaryotic ion channel families that have been implicated in mechanotransduction processes and evaluate the qualifications of the candidate genes according to specified criteria. We then discuss the proposed gating models for MA ion channels and highlight recent structural studies of mechanosensitive potassium channels.

  13. CFTR chloride channel is a molecular target of the natural cancer preventive agent resveratrol.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shuang; Yu, B O; Sui, Yujie; Zhang, Yaofang; Wang, Xue; Hou, Shuguang; Ma, Tonghui; Yang, Hong

    2013-09-01

    The naturally occurring polyphenol compound resveratrol (RES) has been receiving wide attention because of its variety of health benefits and favourable biological activities. Previous studies have shown that RES could induce intestinal chloride secretion in mouse jejunum and stimulate cAMP-dependent Cl- secretion in T84, primary cultured murine nasal septal and human sinonasal epithelial cells, but the precise molecular target is not clear. We therefore tested the hypothesis that RES may stimulate the activity of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channel. Using cell-based fluorescent assays, transepithelial short-circuit current measurements and excised inside-out patch-clamp analysis; we found that RES dose-dependently potentiate CFTR Cl- channel activities, which was reversed by CFTR inhibitors CFTR(inh)-172 and GlyH101. Transepithelial Cl- secretion by CFTR-expressing FRT cells was stimulated by RES with half maximal concentration -80 microM. Intracellular cAMP content was not elevated by RES in FRT cells. Excised inside-out patch-clamp analysis indicated that RES significantly increased the chloride currents of CFTR. In ex vivo studies, RES stimulated the transmucosal chloride current of rat colon by short-circuit current assay. These data suggested that CFTR is a molecular target of RES. Our findings add a new molecular target to RES, and RES may represent a novel class of therapeutic lead compounds in treating CFTR-related diseases including CF and habitual constipation.

  14. Identification of natural coumarin compounds that rescue defective DeltaF508-CFTR chloride channel gating.

    PubMed

    Xu, Li-Na; Na, Wan-Li; Liu, Xin; Hou, Shu-Guang; Lin, Sen; Yang, Hong; Ma, Tong-Hui

    2008-08-01

    1. Deletion of phenylalanine at position 508 (DeltaF508) of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channel is the most common mutation causing cystic fibrosis (CF). Effective pharmacological therapy of CF caused by the DeltaF508-CFTR mutation requires the rescue of both intracellular processing and channel gating defects. 2. We identified a class of natural coumarin compounds that can correct the defective DeltaF508-CFTR chloride channel gating by screening a collection of 386 single natural compounds from Chinese medicinal herbs. Screening was performed with an iodide influx assay in Fischer rat thyroid epithelial cells coexpressing DeltaF508-CFTR and an iodide-sensitive fluorescent indicator (YFP-H148Q/I152L). 3. Dose-dependent potentiation of defective DeltaF508-CFTR chloride channel gating by five coumarin compounds was demonstrated by the fluorescent iodide influx assay and confirmed by an Ussing chamber short-circuit current assay. Activation was fully abolished by the specific CFTR inhibitor CFTR(inh)-172. Two potent compounds, namely imperatorin and osthole, have activation K(d) values of approximately 10 micromol/L, as determined by the short-circuit current assay. The active coumarin compounds do not elevate intracellular cAMP levels. Activation of DeltaF508-CFTR by the coumarin compounds requires cAMP agonist, suggesting direct interaction with the mutant CFTR molecule. Kinetics analysis indicated rapid activation of DeltaF508-CFTR by the coumarin compounds, with half-maximal activation of < 5 min. The activating effect was fully reversed for all five active compounds 45 min after washout. 4. In conclusion, the natural coumarin DeltaF508-CFTR activators may represent a new class of natural lead compounds for the development of pharmacological therapies for CF caused by the DeltaF508 mutation.

  15. Inhibition of herpes simplex virus type 1 entry by chloride channel inhibitors tamoxifen and NPPB

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Kai; Chen, Maoyun; Xiang, Yangfei; Ma, Kaiqi; Jin, Fujun; Wang, Xiao; Wang, Xiaoyan; Wang, Shaoxiang; Wang, Yifei

    2014-04-18

    Highlights: • We analyze the anti-HSV potential of chloride channel inhibitors. • Tamoxifen and NPPB show anti-HSV-1 and anti-ACV-resistant HSV-1 activities. • HSV-1 infection induces intracellular chloride concentration increasing. • Tamoxifen and NPPB inhibit HSV-1 early infection. • Tamoxifen and NPPB prevent the fusion process of HSV-1. - Abstract: Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infection is very common worldwide and can cause significant health problems from periodic skin and corneal lesions to encephalitis. Appearance of drug-resistant viruses in clinical therapy has made exploring novel antiviral agents emergent. Here we show that chloride channel inhibitors, including tamoxifen and 5-nitro-2-(3-phenyl-propylamino) benzoic acid (NPPB), exhibited extensive antiviral activities toward HSV-1 and ACV-resistant HSV viruses. HSV-1 infection induced chloride ion influx while treatment with inhibitors reduced the increase of intracellular chloride ion concentration. Pretreatment or treatment of inhibitors at different time points during HSV-1 infection all suppressed viral RNA synthesis, protein expression and virus production. More detailed studies demonstrated that tamoxifen and NPPB acted as potent inhibitors of HSV-1 early entry step by preventing viral binding, penetration and nuclear translocation. Specifically the compounds appeared to affect viral fusion process by inhibiting virus binding to lipid rafts and interrupting calcium homeostasis. Taken together, the observation that tamoxifen and NPPB can block viral entry suggests a stronger potential for these compounds as well as other ion channel inhibitors in antiviral therapy against HSV-1, especially the compound tamoxifen is an immediately actionable drug that can be reused for treatment of HSV-1 infections.

  16. Chloride and potassium channels in cystic fibrosis airway epithelia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welsh, Michael J.; Liedtke, Carole M.

    1986-07-01

    Cystic fibrosis, the most common lethal genetic disease in Caucasians, is characterized by a decreased permeability in sweat gland duct and airway epithelia. In sweat duct epithelium, a decreased Cl- permeability accounts for the abnormally increased salt content of sweat1. In airway epithelia a decreased Cl- permeability, and possibly increased sodium absorption, may account for the abnormal respiratory tract fluid2,3. The Cl- impermeability has been localized to the apical membrane of cystic fibrosis airway epithelial cells4. The finding that hormonally regulated Cl- channels make the apical membrane Cl- permeable in normal airway epithelial cells5 suggested abnormal Cl- channel function in cystic fibrosis. Here we report that excised, cell-free patches of membrane from cystic fibrosis epithelial cells contain Cl- channels that have the same conductive properties as Cl- channels from normal cells. However, Cl- channels from cystic fibrosis cells did not open when they were attached to the cell. These findings suggest defective regulation of Cl- channels in cystic fibrosis epithelia; to begin to address this issue, we performed two studies. First, we found that isoprenaline, which stimulates Cl- secretion, increases cellular levels of cyclic AMP in a similar manner in cystic fibrosis and non-cystic fibrosis epithelial cells. Second, we show that adrenergic agonists open calcium-activated potassium channels, indirectly suggesting that calcium-dependent stimulus-response coupling is intact in cystic fibrosis. These data suggest defective regulation of Cl- channels at a site distal to cAMP accumulation.

  17. Structure of a CLC chloride ion channel by cryo-electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Park, Eunyong; Campbell, Ernest B; MacKinnon, Roderick

    2017-01-26

    CLC proteins transport chloride (Cl(-)) ions across cellular membranes to regulate muscle excitability, electrolyte movement across epithelia, and acidification of intracellular organelles. Some CLC proteins are channels that conduct Cl(-) ions passively, whereas others are secondary active transporters that exchange two Cl(-) ions for one H(+). The structural basis underlying these distinctive transport mechanisms is puzzling because CLC channels and transporters are expected to share the same architecture on the basis of sequence homology. Here we determined the structure of a bovine CLC channel (CLC-K) using cryo-electron microscopy. A conserved loop in the Cl(-) transport pathway shows a structure markedly different from that of CLC transporters. Consequently, the cytosolic constriction for Cl(-) passage is widened in CLC-K such that the kinetic barrier previously postulated for Cl(-)/H(+) transporter function would be reduced. Thus, reduction of a kinetic barrier in CLC channels enables fast flow of Cl(-) down its electrochemical gradient.

  18. Fluid shear stress enhances the cell volume decrease of osteoblast cells by increasing the expression of the ClC-3 chloride channel

    PubMed Central

    LIU, LI; CAI, SIYI; QIU, GUIXING; LIN, JIN

    2016-01-01

    ClC-3 is a volume-sensitive chloride channel that is responsible for cell volume adjustment and regulatory cell volume decrease (RVD). In order to evaluate the effects of fluid shear stress (FSS) stimulation on the osteoblast ClC-3 chloride channel, MC3T3-E1 cells were stimulated by FSS in the experimental group. Fluorescence quantitative polymerase chain reaction was used to detect changes in ClC-3 mRNA expression, the chloride ion fluorescent probe N-(ethoxycarbonylmethyl)-6-methoxyquinolinium bromide (MQAE) was used to detect the chloride channel activity, and whole-cell patch clamping was used to monitor the changes in the volume-sensitive chloride current activated by a hypotonic environment following mechanical stimulation. The results show that the expression of the osteoblast chloride channel ClC-3 was significantly higher in the FSS group compared with the control group. MQAE fluorescence intensity was significantly reduced in the FSS group compared to the control group, suggesting that mechanical stimulation increased chloride channel activity and increased the efflux of intracellular chloride ions. Image analysis of osteoblast volume changes showed that osteoblast RVD was enhanced by mechanical stimulation. Whole-cell patch clamping showed that the osteoblast volume-sensitive chloride current was larger in the stimulated group compared to the control group, suggesting that elevated ClC-3 chloride channel expression results in an increased volume-sensitive chloride current. In conclusion, FSS stimulation enhances the RVD of osteoblast cell by increasing the expression of the ClC-3 and enhancing the chloride channel activity. PMID:27073622

  19. Fluid shear stress enhances the cell volume decrease of osteoblast cells by increasing the expression of the ClC-3 chloride channel.

    PubMed

    Liu, L I; Cai, Siyi; Qiu, Guixing; Lin, Jin

    2016-04-01

    ClC-3 is a volume-sensitive chloride channel that is responsible for cell volume adjustment and regulatory cell volume decrease (RVD). In order to evaluate the effects of fluid shear stress (FSS) stimulation on the osteoblast ClC-3 chloride channel, MC3T3-E1 cells were stimulated by FSS in the experimental group. Fluorescence quantitative polymerase chain reaction was used to detect changes in ClC-3 mRNA expression, the chloride ion fluorescent probe N-(ethoxycarbonylmethyl)-6-methoxyquinolinium bromide (MQAE) was used to detect the chloride channel activity, and whole-cell patch clamping was used to monitor the changes in the volume-sensitive chloride current activated by a hypotonic environment following mechanical stimulation. The results show that the expression of the osteoblast chloride channel ClC-3 was significantly higher in the FSS group compared with the control group. MQAE fluorescence intensity was significantly reduced in the FSS group compared to the control group, suggesting that mechanical stimulation increased chloride channel activity and increased the efflux of intracellular chloride ions. Image analysis of osteoblast volume changes showed that osteoblast RVD was enhanced by mechanical stimulation. Whole-cell patch clamping showed that the osteoblast volume-sensitive chloride current was larger in the stimulated group compared to the control group, suggesting that elevated ClC-3 chloride channel expression results in an increased volume-sensitive chloride current. In conclusion, FSS stimulation enhances the RVD of osteoblast cell by increasing the expression of the ClC-3 and enhancing the chloride channel activity.

  20. Glutamate-gated chloride channels inhibit juvenile hormone biosynthesis in the cockroach, Diploptera punctata.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hsin-Ping; Lin, Shu-Chen; Lin, Chi-Yen; Yeh, Shih-Rung; Chiang, Ann-Shyn

    2005-11-01

    Juvenile hormone (JH) synthesized and released from endocrine gland corpus allatum (CA) plays an important role in insect metamorphosis, vitellogenesis and reproduction. Glutamate is a major neurotransmitter in the nervous system and its activated receptors possess excitatory and inhibitory forms in muscle fibers of invertebrates. Previously, we have shown that the rise of intracellular calcium through excitatory glutamate receptors, N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) and non-NMDA-type channels stimulates JH synthesis in the cockroach, Diploptera punctata. Here, we demonstrate the occurrence of inhibitory chloride permeable glutamate (GluCl) receptors on CA cell membranes. Application of the GluCl channel activators, ibotenic acid (Ibo) and ivermectin, but not gamma-aminobutyric acid caused a decline in JH synthesis in glands of either high or low activity during the gonadotrophic cycle. Also, while recording the membrane potential of the isolated whole CA glands intracellularly, Ibo induced a hyperpolarizated response. Both changes in the membrane potential and inhibition of JH synthesis could be abolished by the application of the chloride channel blocker picrotoxin. Finally, we found both excitatory and inhibitory glutamate receptors cause antagonistic effects on rates of JH synthesis. These results indicate a novel function of GluCl channels in the inhibition of JH synthesis that could be a potential pathway for developing a new generation of insecticides.

  1. ClC-K chloride channels: emerging pathophysiology of Bartter syndrome type 3.

    PubMed

    Andrini, Olga; Keck, Mathilde; Briones, Rodolfo; Lourdel, Stéphane; Vargas-Poussou, Rosa; Teulon, Jacques

    2015-06-15

    The mutations in the CLCNKB gene encoding the ClC-Kb chloride channel are responsible for Bartter syndrome type 3, one of the four variants of Bartter syndrome in the genetically based nomenclature. All forms of Bartter syndrome are characterized by hypokalemia, metabolic alkalosis, and secondary hyperaldosteronism, but Bartter syndrome type 3 has the most heterogeneous presentation, extending from severe to very mild. A relatively large number of CLCNKB mutations have been reported, including gene deletions and nonsense or missense mutations. However, only 20 CLCNKB mutations have been functionally analyzed, due to technical difficulties regarding ClC-Kb functional expression in heterologous systems. This review provides an overview of recent progress in the functional consequences of CLCNKB mutations on ClC-Kb chloride channel activity. It has been observed that 1) all ClC-Kb mutants have an impaired expression at the membrane; and 2) a minority of the mutants combines reduced membrane expression with altered pH-dependent channel gating. Although further investigation is needed to fully characterize disease pathogenesis, Bartter syndrome type 3 probably belongs to the large family of conformational diseases, in which the mutations destabilize channel structure, inducing ClC-Kb retention in the endoplasmic reticulum and accelerated channel degradation.

  2. A functional tandem between transient receptor potential canonical channels 6 and calcium-dependent chloride channels in human epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Bertrand, Johanna; Dannhoffer, Luc; Antigny, Fabrice; Vachel, Laura; Jayle, Christophe; Vandebrouck, Clarisse; Becq, Frédéric; Norez, Caroline

    2015-10-15

    TRPC6 plays important human physiological functions, notably in artery and arterioles constriction, in regulation of vascular volume and in bronchial muscle constriction. It is implicated in pulmonary hypertension, cardiovascular disease, and focal segmental glomerulosclerosis and seems to play a role in cancer development. Previously, we identified Guanabenz, an α2-adrenergic agonist used for hypertension treatment (Wytensin®), as an activator of calcium-dependent chloride channels (CaCC) in human Cystic Fibrosis (CF) nasal epithelial cells by transiently increasing [Ca2+]i via an influx of extracellular Ca2+. In this study, using assays to measure chloride channel activity, we show that guanabenz is an activator of CaCC in freshly dissociated human bronchial epithelial cells from three CF patients with various genotypes (F508del/F508del, F508del/R1066C, F508del/H1085R). We further characterised the effect of guanabenz and show that it is independent of α-adrenergic receptors, is inhibited by the TRPC family inhibitor SKF-96365 but not by the TRPV family inhibitor ruthenium red. Using western-blotting, Ca2+ measurements and iodide efflux assay, we found that TRPC1 siRNA has no effect on guanabenz induced responses whereas TRPC6 siRNA prevented the guanabenz-dependent Ca2+ influx and the CaCC-dependent activity stimulated by guanabenz. In conclusion, we show that TRPC6 channel is pivotal for the activation of CaCC by guanabenz through a α2-adrenergic-independent pathway in human airway epithelial cells. We suggest propose a functional coupling between TRPC6 and CaCC and guanabenz as a potential TRPC6 activator for exploring TRPC6 and CaCC channel functions and corresponding channelopathies.

  3. State-dependent blocker interactions with the CFTR chloride channel: implications for gating the pore.

    PubMed

    Linsdell, Paul

    2014-12-01

    Chloride permeation through the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl(-) channel is subject to voltage-dependent open-channel block by a diverse range of cytoplasmic anions. However, in most cases the ability of these blocking substances to influence the pore opening and closing process has not been reported. In the present work, patch clamp recording was used to investigate the state-dependent block of CFTR by cytoplasmic Pt(NO2)4(2-) ions. Two major effects of Pt(NO2)4(2-) were identified. First, this anion caused fast, voltage-dependent block of open channels, leading to an apparent decrease in single-channel current amplitude. Secondly, Pt(NO2)4(2-) also decreased channel open probability due to an increase in interburst closed times. Interestingly, mutations in the pore that weakened (K95Q) or strengthened (I344K, V345K) interactions with Pt(NO2)4(2-) altered blocker effects both on Cl(-) permeation and on channel gating, suggesting that both these effects are a consequence of Pt(NO2)4(2-) interaction with a single site within the pore. Experiments at reduced extracellular Cl(-) concentration hinted that Pt(NO2)4(2-) may have a third effect, possibly increasing channel activity by interfering with channel closure. These results suggest that Pt(NO2)4(2-) can enter from the cytoplasm into the pore inner vestibule of both open and closed CFTR channels, and that Pt(NO2)4(2-) bound in the inner vestibule blocks Cl(-) permeation as well as interfering with channel opening and, perhaps, channel closure. Implications for the location of the channel gate in the pore, and the operation of this gate, are discussed.

  4. ClC-3 chloride channel functions as a mechanically sensitive channel in osteoblasts.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huan; Wang, Rong; Wang, Zhe; Liu, Qian; Mao, Yong; Duan, Xiaohong

    2015-12-01

    Mechanical stimulation usually causes the volume changes of osteoblasts. Whether these volume changes could be sensed by the ClC-3 chloride channel, a volume-sensitive ion channel, and further promote the osteodifferentiation in osteoblasts has not been determined. In this study, we applied persistent static compression on MC3T3-E1 cells to detect the expression changes of ClC-3, osteogenic markers, as well as some molecules related with signaling transduction pathway. We tested the key role of ClC-3 in transferring the mechanical signal to osteoinduction by ClC-3 overexpressing and siRNA technique. We found that ClC-3 level was up-regulated by mechanical stimulation in MC3T3-E1 cells. Mechanical force also up-regulated the mRNA level of osteogenic markers such as alkaline phosphatase (Alp), bone sialoprotein (Bsp), and osteocalcin (Oc), which could be blocked or strengthened by Clcn3 siRNA or overexpressing, and Alp expression was more sensitive to the changes of ClC-3 level. We also found that runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2), transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1), and Wnt pathway might be involved in ClC-3 mediated mechanical transduction in osteoblasts. The data from the current study suggest that the ClC-3 chloride channel acts as a mechanically sensitive channel to regulate osteodifferentiation in osteoblasts.

  5. Effect of Trimethyltin Chloride on Slow Vacuolar (SV) Channels in Vacuoles from Red Beet (Beta vulgaris L.) Taproots.

    PubMed

    Trela, Zenon; Burdach, Zbigniew; Siemieniuk, Agnieszka; Przestalski, Stanisław; Karcz, Waldemar

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, patch-clamp techniques have been used to investigate the effect of trimethyltin chloride (Met3SnCl) on the slow vacuolar (SV) channels in vacuoles from red beet (Beta vulgaris L.) taproots. Activity of SV channels has been measured in whole-vacuole and cytosolic side-out patch configurations. It was found that addition of trimethyltin chloride to the bath solution suppressed, in a concentration-dependent manner, SV currents in red beet vacuoles. The time constant, τ, increased significantly in the presence of the organotin. When single channel activity was analyzed, only little channel activity could be recorded at 100 μM Met3SnCl. Trimethyltin chloride added to the bath medium significantly decreased (by ca. threefold at 100 μM Met3SnCl and at 100 mV voltage, as compared to the control medium) the open probability of single channels. Single channel recordings obtained in the presence and absence of trimethyltin chloride showed that the organotin only slightly (by <10%) decreased the unitary conductance of single channels. It was also found that Met3SnCl significantly diminished the number of SV channel openings, whereas it did not change the opening times of the channels. Taking into account the above and the fact that under the here applied experimental conditions (pH = 7.5) Met3SnCl is a non-dissociated (more lipophilic) compound, we suggest that the suppression of SV currents observed in the presence of the organotin results probably from its hydrophobic properties allowing this compound to translocate near the selectivity filter of the channel.

  6. Effect of Trimethyltin Chloride on Slow Vacuolar (SV) Channels in Vacuoles from Red Beet (Beta vulgaris L.) Taproots

    PubMed Central

    Trela, Zenon; Burdach, Zbigniew; Siemieniuk, Agnieszka; Przestalski, Stanisław; Karcz, Waldemar

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, patch-clamp techniques have been used to investigate the effect of trimethyltin chloride (Met3SnCl) on the slow vacuolar (SV) channels in vacuoles from red beet (Beta vulgaris L.) taproots. Activity of SV channels has been measured in whole-vacuole and cytosolic side-out patch configurations. It was found that addition of trimethyltin chloride to the bath solution suppressed, in a concentration-dependent manner, SV currents in red beet vacuoles. The time constant, τ, increased significantly in the presence of the organotin. When single channel activity was analyzed, only little channel activity could be recorded at 100 μM Met3SnCl. Trimethyltin chloride added to the bath medium significantly decreased (by ca. threefold at 100 μM Met3SnCl and at 100 mV voltage, as compared to the control medium) the open probability of single channels. Single channel recordings obtained in the presence and absence of trimethyltin chloride showed that the organotin only slightly (by <10%) decreased the unitary conductance of single channels. It was also found that Met3SnCl significantly diminished the number of SV channel openings, whereas it did not change the opening times of the channels. Taking into account the above and the fact that under the here applied experimental conditions (pH = 7.5) Met3SnCl is a non-dissociated (more lipophilic) compound, we suggest that the suppression of SV currents observed in the presence of the organotin results probably from its hydrophobic properties allowing this compound to translocate near the selectivity filter of the channel. PMID:26317868

  7. The ClC-3 chloride channel associated with microtubules is a target of paclitaxel in its induced-apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haifeng; Li, Huarong; Yang, Lili; Deng, Zhiqin; Luo, Hai; Ye, Dong; Bai, Zhiquan; Zhu, Linyan; Ye, Wencai; Wang, Liwei; Chen, Lixin

    2013-01-01

    Recent evidences show that cationic fluxes play a pivotal role in cell apoptosis. In this study, the roles of Cl(-) channels in paclitaxel-induced apoptosis were investigated in nasopharyngeal carcinoma CNE-2Z cells. Chloride current and apoptosis were induced by paclitaxel and inhibited by chloride channel blockers. Paclitaxel-activated current possessed similar properties to volume-activated chloride current. After ClC-3 was knocked-down by ClC-3-siRNA, hypotonicity-activated and paclitaxel-induced chloride currents were obviously decreased, indicating that the chloride channel involved in paclitaxel-induced apoptosis may be ClC-3. In early apoptotic cells, ClC-3 was up-regulated significantly; over-expressed ClC-3 was accumulated in cell membrane to form intercrossed filaments, which were co-localized with α-tubulins; changes of ultrastructures and decrease of flexibility in cell membrane were detected by atomic force microscopy. These suggest that ClC-3 is a critical target of paclitaxel and the involvement of ClC-3 in apoptosis may be associated with its accumulation with membrane microtubules and its over activation.

  8. TMEM16A(a)/anoctamin-1 Shares a Homodimeric Architecture with CLC Chloride Channels*

    PubMed Central

    Fallah, Ghada; Römer, Thomas; Detro-Dassen, Silvia; Braam, Ursula; Markwardt, Fritz; Schmalzing, Günther

    2011-01-01

    TMEM16A/anoctamin-1 has been identified as a protein with the classic properties of a Ca2+-activated chloride channel. Here, we used blue native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (BN-PAGE) and chemical cross-linking to assess the quaternary structure of the mouse TMEM16A(a) and TMEM16A(ac) splice variants as well as a genetically concatenated TMEM16A(a) homodimer. The constructs carried hexahistidyl (His) tags to allow for their purification using a nondenaturing metal affinity resin. Neither His-tagging nor head-to-tail concatenation of two copies of TMEM16A(a) noticeably affected Ca2+-induced measured macroscopic Cl− currents compared with the wild-type TMEM16A(a) channel. The digitonin-solubilized, nondenatured TMEM16A(a) protein migrated in the BN-PAGE gel as a homodimer, as judged by comparison with the concatenated TMEM16A(a) homodimer and channel proteins of known oligomeric structures (e.g. the voltage-gated Cl− channel CLC-1). Cross-linking with glutaraldehyde corroborated the homodimeric structure of TMEM16A(a). The TMEM16A(a) homodimer detected in Xenopus laevis oocytes and HEK 293 cells dissociated into monomers following denaturation with SDS, and reducing versus nonreducing SDS-PAGE provided no evidence for the presence of intersubunit disulfide bonds. Together, our data demonstrate that the Ca2+-activated chloride channel member TMEM16A shares an obligate homodimeric architecture with the hCLC-1 channel. PMID:20974900

  9. Anion conductance selectivity mechanism of the CFTR chloride channel.

    PubMed

    Linsdell, Paul

    2016-04-01

    All ion channels are able to discriminate between substrate ions to some extent, a process that involves specific interactions between permeant anions and the so-called selectivity filter within the channel pore. In the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) anion-selective channel, both anion relative permeability and anion relative conductance are dependent on anion free energy of hydration--anions that are relatively easily dehydrated tend to show both high permeability and low conductance. In the present work, patch clamp recording was used to investigate the relative conductance of different anions in CFTR, and the effect of mutations within the channel pore. In constitutively-active E1371Q-CFTR channels, the anion conductance sequence was Cl(-) > NO3(-) > Br(-) > formate > SCN(-) > I(-). A mutation that disrupts anion binding in the inner vestibule of the pore (K95Q) disrupted anion conductance selectivity, such that anions with different permeabilities showed almost indistinguishable conductances. Conversely, a mutation at the putative narrowest pore region that is known to disrupt anion permeability selectivity (F337A) had minimal effects on anion relative conductance. Ion competition experiments confirmed that relatively tight binding of permeant anions resulted in relatively low conductance. These results suggest that the relative affinity of ion binding in the inner vestibule of the pore controls the relative conductance of different permeant anions in CFTR, and that the pore has two physically distinct anion selectivity filters that act in series to control anion conductance selectivity and anion permeability selectivity respectively.

  10. Inhibition of herpes simplex virus type 1 entry by chloride channel inhibitors tamoxifen and NPPB.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Kai; Chen, Maoyun; Xiang, Yangfei; Ma, Kaiqi; Jin, Fujun; Wang, Xiao; Wang, Xiaoyan; Wang, Shaoxiang; Wang, Yifei

    2014-04-18

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infection is very common worldwide and can cause significant health problems from periodic skin and corneal lesions to encephalitis. Appearance of drug-resistant viruses in clinical therapy has made exploring novel antiviral agents emergent. Here we show that chloride channel inhibitors, including tamoxifen and 5-nitro-2-(3-phenyl-propylamino) benzoic acid (NPPB), exhibited extensive antiviral activities toward HSV-1 and ACV-resistant HSV viruses. HSV-1 infection induced chloride ion influx while treatment with inhibitors reduced the increase of intracellular chloride ion concentration. Pretreatment or treatment of inhibitors at different time points during HSV-1 infection all suppressed viral RNA synthesis, protein expression and virus production. More detailed studies demonstrated that tamoxifen and NPPB acted as potent inhibitors of HSV-1 early entry step by preventing viral binding, penetration and nuclear translocation. Specifically the compounds appeared to affect viral fusion process by inhibiting virus binding to lipid rafts and interrupting calcium homeostasis. Taken together, the observation that tamoxifen and NPPB can block viral entry suggests a stronger potential for these compounds as well as other ion channel inhibitors in antiviral therapy against HSV-1, especially the compound tamoxifen is an immediately actionable drug that can be reused for treatment of HSV-1 infections.

  11. Regulation of CFTR chloride channel macroscopic conductance by extracellular bicarbonate.

    PubMed

    Li, Man-Song; Holstead, Ryan G; Wang, Wuyang; Linsdell, Paul

    2011-01-01

    The CFTR contributes to Cl⁻ and HCO₃⁻ transport across epithelial cell apical membranes. The extracellular face of CFTR is exposed to varying concentrations of Cl⁻ and HCO₃⁻ in epithelial tissues, and there is evidence that CFTR is sensitive to changes in extracellular anion concentrations. Here we present functional evidence that extracellular Cl⁻ and HCO₃⁻ regulate anion conduction in open CFTR channels. Using cell-attached and inside-out patch-clamp recordings from constitutively active mutant E1371Q-CFTR channels, we show that voltage-dependent inhibition of CFTR currents in intact cells is significantly stronger when the extracellular solution contains HCO₃⁻ than when it contains Cl⁻. This difference appears to reflect differences in the ability of extracellular HCO₃⁻ and Cl⁻ to interact with and repel intracellular blocking anions from the pore. Strong block by endogenous cytosolic anions leading to reduced CFTR channel currents in intact cells occurs at physiologically relevant HCO₃⁻ concentrations and membrane potentials and can result in up to ∼50% inhibition of current amplitude. We propose that channel block by cytosolic anions is a previously unrecognized, physiologically relevant mechanism of channel regulation that confers on CFTR channels sensitivity to different anions in the extracellular fluid. We further suggest that this anion sensitivity represents a feedback mechanism by which CFTR-dependent anion secretion could be regulated by the composition of the secretions themselves. Implications for the mechanism and regulation of CFTR-dependent secretion in epithelial tissues are discussed.

  12. Novel expression of a functional glycine receptor chloride channel that attenuates contraction in airway smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Yim, Peter D.; Gallos, George; Xu, Dingbang; Zhang, Yi; Emala, Charles W.

    2011-01-01

    Airway smooth muscle (ASM) contraction is an important component of the pathophysiology of asthma. Taurine, an agonist of glycine receptor chloride (GlyR Cl−) channels, was found to relax contracted ASM, which led us to question whether functional GlyR Cl− channels are expressed in ASM. Messenger RNA for β (GLRB), α1 (GLRA1), α2 (GLRA2), and α4 (GLRA4) subunits were found in human (Homo sapiens) and guinea pig (Cavia porcellus) tracheal smooth muscle. Immunoblotting confirmed the protein expression of GLRA1 and GLRB subunits in ASM. Electrical activity of cultured human ASM cells was assessed using a fluorescent potentiometric dye and electrophysiological recordings. Glycine increased current and significantly increased fluorescence in a dose-dependent manner. The GlyR Cl− channel antagonist strychnine significantly blocked the effects of glycine on potentiometric fluorescence in ASM cells. Guinea pig airway ring relaxation of ACh-induced contractions by isoproterenol was significantly left-shifted in the presence of glycine. This effect of glycine was blocked by pretreatment with the GlyR Cl− channel antagonist strychnine. Glycine treatment during tachykinin- and acetylcholine-induced contractions significantly decreased the maintenance of muscle force compared to control. GlyR Cl− channels are expressed on ASM and regulate smooth muscle force and offer a novel target for therapeutic relaxation of ASM.—Yim, P. D., Gallos, G., Xu, D., Zhang, Y., Emala, C. W. Novel expression of a functional glycine receptor chloride channel that attenuates contraction in airway smooth muscle. PMID:21282206

  13. Characterization of the mouse ClC-K1/Barttin chloride channel.

    PubMed

    L'Hoste, Sébastien; Diakov, Alexei; Andrini, Olga; Genete, Mathieu; Pinelli, Laurent; Grand, Teddy; Keck, Mathilde; Paulais, Marc; Beck, Laurent; Korbmacher, Christoph; Teulon, Jacques; Lourdel, Stéphane

    2013-11-01

    Several Cl(-) channels have been described in the native renal tubule, but their correspondence with ClC-K1 and ClC-K2 channels (orthologs of human ClC-Ka and ClC-Kb), which play a major role in transcellular Cl(-) absorption in the kidney, has yet to be established. This is partly because investigation of heterologous expression has involved rat or human ClC-K models, whereas characterization of the native renal tubule has been done in mice. Here, we investigate the electrophysiological properties of mouse ClC-K1 channels heterologously expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes and in HEK293 cells with or without their accessory Barttin subunit. Current amplitudes and plasma membrane insertion of mouse ClC-K1 were enhanced by Barttin. External basic pH or elevated calcium stimulated currents followed the anion permeability sequence Cl(-)>Br(-)>NO3(-)>I(-). Single-channel recordings revealed a unit conductance of ~40pS. Channel activity in cell-attached patches increased with membrane depolarization (voltage for half-maximal activation: ~-65mV). Insertion of the V166E mutation, which introduces a glutamate in mouse ClC-K1, which is crucial for channel gating, reduced the unit conductance to ~20pS. This mutation shifted the depolarizing voltage for half-maximal channel activation to ~+25mV. The unit conductance and voltage dependence of wild-type and V166E ClC-K1 were not affected by Barttin. Owing to their strikingly similar properties, we propose that the ClC-K1/Barttin complex is the molecular substrate of a chloride channel previously detected in the mouse thick ascending limb (Paulais et al., J Membr. Biol, 1990, 113:253-260).

  14. The Split Personality of Glutamate Transporters: A Chloride Channel and a Transporter.

    PubMed

    Cater, Rosemary J; Ryan, Renae M; Vandenberg, Robert J

    2016-03-01

    Transporters and ion channels are conventionally categorised into distinct classes of membrane proteins. However, some membrane proteins have a split personality and can function as both transporters and ion channels. The excitatory amino acid transporters (EAATs) in particular, function as both glutamate transporters and chloride (Cl(-)) channels. The EAATs couple the transport of glutamate to the co-transport of three Na(+) ions and one H(+) ion into the cell, and the counter-transport of one K(+) ion out of the cell. The EAAT Cl(-) channel is activated by the binding of glutamate and Na(+), but is thermodynamically uncoupled from glutamate transport and involves molecular determinants distinct from those responsible for glutamate transport. Several crystal structures of an EAAT archaeal homologue, GltPh, at different stages of the transport cycle, alongside numerous functional studies and molecular dynamics simulations, have provided extensive insights into the mechanism of substrate transport via these transporters. However, the molecular determinants involved in Cl(-) permeation, and the mechanism by which this channel is activated are not entirely understood. Here we will discuss what is currently known about the molecular determinants involved in EAAT-mediated Cl(-) permeation and the mechanisms that underlie their split personality.

  15. The nuclear chloride ion channel NCC27 is involved in regulation of the cell cycle

    PubMed Central

    Valenzuela, Stella M; Mazzanti, Michele; Tonini, Raffaella; Qiu, Min Ru; Warton, Kristina; Musgrove, Elizabeth A; Campbell, Terence J; Breit, Samuel N

    2000-01-01

    NCC27 is a nuclear chloride ion channel, identified in the PMA-activated U937 human monocyte cell line. NCC27 mRNA is expressed in virtually all cells and tissues and the gene encoding NCC27 is also highly conserved. Because of these factors, we have examined the hypothesis that NCC27 is involved in cell cycle regulation. Electrophysiological studies in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO-K1) cells indicated that NCC27 chloride conductance varied according to the stage of the cell cycle, being expressed only on the plasma membrane of cells in G2/M phase. We also demonstrate that Cl− ion channel blockers known to block NCC27 led to arrest of CHO-K1 cells in the G2/M stage of the cell cycle, the same stage at which this ion channel is selectively expressed on the plasma membrane. These data strongly support the hypothesis that NCC27 is involved, in some as yet undetermined manner, in regulation of the cell cycle. PMID:11195932

  16. [Post-translational ligation of split CFTR severed before TMD2 and its chloride channel function].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Fuxiang; Gong, Xiandi; Liu, Zelong; Yang, Shude; Qu, Huige; Chi, Xiaoyan

    2010-12-01

    Mutations of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene leads to cystic fibrosis, an autosomal recessive genetic disorder affecting a number of organs including the lung airways, pancreas and sweat glands. In order to investigate the post-translational ligation of CFTR with reconstructed functional chloride ion channel and the split Ssp DnaB intein-mediated protein trans-splicing was explored to co-deliver CFTR gene into eukaryotic cells with two vectors. The human CFTR cDNA was split after Glu838 codon before the second transmembrane dome (TMD2) into two halves of N- and C-parts and fused with the coding sequences of split Ssp DnaB intein. Pair of eukaryotic expression vectors pEGFP-NInt and pEYFP-IntC were constructed by inserting them into the vectors pEGFP-N1 and pEYFP-N1 respectively. The transient expression was carried out for observing the ligation of CFTR by Western blotting and recording the chloride current by patch clamps when cotransfection of the pair of vectors into baby hamster kidney (BHK) cells. The results showed that an obvious protein band proven to be ligated intact CFTR can be seen and a higher chloride current and activity of chloride channel were recorded after cotransfection. These data demonstrated that split Ssp DnaB intein could be used as a strategy in delivering CFTR gene by two vectors providing evidence for application of dual adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors to overcome the limitation of packaging size in cystic fibrosis gene therapy.

  17. Characterization of the Chloride Channel-Like, AtCLCg, Involved in Chloride Tolerance in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Chi Tam; Agorio, Astrid; Jossier, Mathieu; Depré, Sylvain; Thomine, Sébastien; Filleur, Sophie

    2016-04-01

    In plant cells, anion channels and transporters are essential for key functions such as nutrition, ion homeostasis and resistance to biotic or abiotic stresses. We characterized AtCLCg, a member of the chloride channel (CLC) family in Arabidopsis localized in the vacuolar membrane. When grown on NaCl or KCl, atclcg knock-out mutants showed a decrease in biomass. In the presence of NaCl, these mutants overaccumulate chloride in shoots. No difference in growth was detected in response to osmotic stress by mannitol. These results suggest a physiological function of AtCLCg in the chloride homeostasis during NaCl stress. AtCLCg shares a high degree of identity (62%) with AtCLCc, another vacuolar CLC essential for NaCl tolerance. However, the atclcc atclccg double mutant is not more sensitive to NaCl than single mutants. As the effects of both mutations are not additive, gene expression analyses were performed and revealed that: (i)AtCLCg is expressed in mesophyll cells, hydathodes and phloem while AtCLCc is expressed in stomata; and (ii)AtCLCg is repressed in the atclcc mutant background, and vice versa. Altogether these results demonstrate that both AtCLCc and AtCLCg are important for tolerance to excess chloride but not redundant, and form part of a regulatory network controlling chloride sensitivity.

  18. Anion exchanger and chloride channel in cat carotid body chemotransduction.

    PubMed

    Iturriaga, R; Mokashi, A; Lahiri, S

    1998-05-28

    In order to test the hypothesis that carotid body (CB) chemoreception depends on the functions of anion channels and HCO3-/Cl- exchangers, we studied the effects of the anion channel blocker anthracene-9-carboxylic acid (9-ANC), the carbonic anhydrase inhibitor methazolamide, and the HCO3-/Cl- exchanger blocker 4,4 diisothiocyanatostilbene-2-2'disulfonic acid (DIDS) on the chemosensory discharges of cat CB, perfused-superfused in vitro at 36.5 +/- 0.5 degrees C, with a modified Tyrode solution. The chemosensory responses to hypoxia (PO2 approximately 50 Torr), hypercapnia (PCO2 approximately 60 Torr, pH = 7.10), nicotine (2-4 nmol) and NaCN (20-40 nmol) were recorded. 9-ANC (2 microM) and DIDS (10 microM) decreased the chemosensory baseline activity, and eliminated the initial peak responses to hypercapnia and hypoxia and increased the time to achieve it. Methazolamide (0.13 mM) did not alter the effect of 9-ANC. The steady state responses to hypoxia and hypercapnia were not diminished after 9-ANC but DIDS lowered the responses. Responses to NaCN effects were all diminished but those to nicotine were not affected. The results suggest that the functions of anion channels and HCO3-/Cl- exchangers are important for the resting dischargers and for the fast responses to hypoxia and hypercapnia.

  19. Gating the glutamate gate of CLC-2 chloride channel by pore occupancy

    PubMed Central

    De Jesús-Pérez, José J.; Castro-Chong, Alejandra; Shieh, Ru-Chi; Hernández-Carballo, Carmen Y.; De Santiago-Castillo, José A.

    2016-01-01

    CLC-2 channels are dimeric double-barreled chloride channels that open in response to hyperpolarization. Hyperpolarization activates protopore gates that independently regulate the permeability of the pore in each subunit and the common gate that affects the permeability through both pores. CLC-2 channels lack classic transmembrane voltage–sensing domains; instead, their protopore gates (residing within the pore and each formed by the side chain of a glutamate residue) open under repulsion by permeant intracellular anions or protonation by extracellular H+. Here, we show that voltage-dependent gating of CLC-2: (a) is facilitated when permeant anions (Cl−, Br−, SCN−, and I−) are present in the cytosolic side; (b) happens with poorly permeant anions fluoride, glutamate, gluconate, and methanesulfonate present in the cytosolic side; (c) depends on pore occupancy by permeant and poorly permeant anions; (d) is strongly facilitated by multi-ion occupancy; (e) is absent under likely protonation conditions (pHe = 5.5 or 6.5) in cells dialyzed with acetate (an impermeant anion); and (f) was the same at intracellular pH 7.3 and 4.2; and (g) is observed in both whole-cell and inside-out patches exposed to increasing [Cl−]i under unlikely protonation conditions (pHe = 10). Thus, based on our results we propose that hyperpolarization activates CLC-2 mainly by driving intracellular anions into the channel pores, and that protonation by extracellular H+ plays a minor role in dislodging the glutamate gate. PMID:26666914

  20. Gating the glutamate gate of CLC-2 chloride channel by pore occupancy.

    PubMed

    De Jesús-Pérez, José J; Castro-Chong, Alejandra; Shieh, Ru-Chi; Hernández-Carballo, Carmen Y; De Santiago-Castillo, José A; Arreola, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    CLC-2 channels are dimeric double-barreled chloride channels that open in response to hyperpolarization. Hyperpolarization activates protopore gates that independently regulate the permeability of the pore in each subunit and the common gate that affects the permeability through both pores. CLC-2 channels lack classic transmembrane voltage-sensing domains; instead, their protopore gates (residing within the pore and each formed by the side chain of a glutamate residue) open under repulsion by permeant intracellular anions or protonation by extracellular H(+). Here, we show that voltage-dependent gating of CLC-2: (a) is facilitated when permeant anions (Cl(-), Br(-), SCN(-), and I(-)) are present in the cytosolic side; (b) happens with poorly permeant anions fluoride, glutamate, gluconate, and methanesulfonate present in the cytosolic side; (c) depends on pore occupancy by permeant and poorly permeant anions; (d) is strongly facilitated by multi-ion occupancy; (e) is absent under likely protonation conditions (pHe = 5.5 or 6.5) in cells dialyzed with acetate (an impermeant anion); and (f) was the same at intracellular pH 7.3 and 4.2; and (g) is observed in both whole-cell and inside-out patches exposed to increasing [Cl(-)]i under unlikely protonation conditions (pHe = 10). Thus, based on our results we propose that hyperpolarization activates CLC-2 mainly by driving intracellular anions into the channel pores, and that protonation by extracellular H(+) plays a minor role in dislodging the glutamate gate.

  1. Chloride channels mediate sodium sulphide-induced relaxation in rat uteri

    PubMed Central

    Mijušković, Ana; Kokić, Aleksandra Nikolić; Dušić, Zorana Oreščanin; Slavić, Marija; Spasić, Mihajlo B; Blagojević, Duško

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Hydrogen sulphide reduces uterine contractility and is of potential interest as a treatment for uterine disorders. The aim of this study was to explore the mechanism of sodium sulphide (Na2S)-induced relaxation of rat uterus, investigate the importance of redox effects and ion channel-mediated mechanisms, and any interactions between these two mechanisms. Experimental Approach Organ bath studies were employed to assess the pharmacological effects of Na2S in uterine strips by exposing them to Na2S with or without Cl− channel blockers (DIDS, NFA, IAA-94, T16Ainh-A01, TA), raised KCl (15 and 75 mM), K+ channel inhibitors (glibenclamide, TEA, 4-AP), L-type Ca2+ channel activator (S-Bay K 8644), propranolol and methylene blue. The activities of antioxidant enzymes were measured in homogenates of treated uteri. The expression of bestrophin channel 1 (BEST-1) was determined by Western blotting and RT-PCR. Key Results Na2S caused concentration-dependent reversible relaxation of spontaneously active and calcium-treated uteri, affecting both amplitude and frequency of contractions. Uteri exposed to 75 mM KCl were less sensitive to Na2S compared with uteri in 15 mM KCl. Na2S-induced relaxations were abolished by DIDS, but unaffected by other modulators or by the absence of extracellular HCO3−, suggesting the involvement of chloride ion channels. Na2S in combination with different modulators provoked specific changes in the anti-oxidant profiles of uteri. The expression of BEST-1, both mRNA and protein, was demonstrated in rat uteri. Conclusions and Implications The relaxant effects of Na2S in rat uteri are mediated mainly via a DIDS-sensitive Cl−-pathway. Components of the relaxation are redox- and Ca2+-dependent. PMID:25857480

  2. Mercury toxicity in the shark (Squalus acanthias) rectal gland: apical CFTR chloride channels are inhibited by mercuric chloride.

    PubMed

    Ratner, Martha A; Decker, Sarah E; Aller, Stephen G; Weber, Gerhard; Forrest, John N

    2006-03-01

    In the shark rectal gland, basolateral membrane proteins have been suggested as targets for mercury. To examine the membrane polarity of mercury toxicity, we performed experiments in three preparations: isolated perfused rectal glands, primary monolayer cultures of rectal gland epithelial cells, and Xenopus oocytes expressing the shark cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channel. In perfused rectal glands we observed: (1) a dose-dependent inhibition by mercury of forskolin/3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX)-stimulated chloride secretion; (2) inhibition was maximal when mercury was added before stimulation with forskolin/IBMX; (3) dithiothrietol (DTT) and glutathione (GSH) completely prevented inhibition of chloride secretion. Short-circuit current (Isc) measurements in monolayers of rectal gland epithelial cells were performed to examine the membrane polarity of this effect. Mercuric chloride inhibited Isc more potently when applied to the solution bathing the apical vs. the basolateral membrane (23 +/- 5% and 68 +/- 5% inhibition at 1 and 10 microM HgCl2 in the apical solution vs. 2 +/- 0.9% and 14 +/- 5% in the basolateral solution). This inhibition was prevented by pre-treatment with apical DTT or GSH; however, only the permeant reducing agent DTT reversed mercury inhibition when added after exposure. When the shark rectal gland CFTR channel was expressed in Xenopus oocytes and chloride conductance was measured by two-electrode voltage clamping, we found that 1 microM HgCl2 inhibited forskolin/IBMX conductance by 69.2 +/- 2.0%. We conclude that in the shark rectal gland, mercury inhibits chloride secretion by interacting with the apical membrane and that CFTR is the likely site of this action.

  3. Spatiotemporal Coupling of cAMP Transporter to CFTR Chloride Channel Function in the Gut Epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chunying; Krishnamurthy, Partha C.; Penmatsa, Himabindu; Marrs, Kevin L.; Wang, Xue Qing; Zaccolo, Manuela; Jalink, Kees; Li, Min; Nelson, Deborah J.; Schuetz, John D.; Naren, Anjaparavanda P.

    2007-01-01

    SUMMARY Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is a cAMP-regulated chloride channel localized at apical cell membranes and exists in macromolecular complexes with a variety of signaling and transporter molecules. Here we report that the multidrug resistance protein 4 (MRP4), a cAMP transporter, is functionally and physically associates with CFTR. Adenosine-stimulated CFTR-mediated chloride currents are potentiated by MRP4 inhibition, and this potentiation is directly coupled to attenuated cAMP efflux through the apical cAMP transporter. CFTR single-channel recordings and FRET-based intracellular cAMP dynamics suggest that a compartmentalized coupling of cAMP transporter and CFTR occurs via the PDZ scaffolding protein, PDZK1, forming a macromolecular complex at apical surfaces of gut epithelia. Disrupting this complex abrogates the functional coupling of cAMP transporter activity to CFTR function. MRP4 knockout mice are more prone to CFTR-mediated secretory diarrhea. Our findings have important implications for disorders such as inflammatory bowel disease and secretory diarrhea. PMID:18045536

  4. Spatiotemporal coupling of cAMP transporter to CFTR chloride channel function in the gut epithelia.

    PubMed

    Li, Chunying; Krishnamurthy, Partha C; Penmatsa, Himabindu; Marrs, Kevin L; Wang, Xue Qing; Zaccolo, Manuela; Jalink, Kees; Li, Min; Nelson, Deborah J; Schuetz, John D; Naren, Anjaparavanda P

    2007-11-30

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is a cAMP-regulated chloride channel localized at apical cell membranes and exists in macromolecular complexes with a variety of signaling and transporter molecules. Here, we report that the multidrug resistance protein 4 (MRP4), a cAMP transporter, functionally and physically associates with CFTR. Adenosine-stimulated CFTR-mediated chloride currents are potentiated by MRP4 inhibition, and this potentiation is directly coupled to attenuated cAMP efflux through the apical cAMP transporter. CFTR single-channel recordings and FRET-based intracellular cAMP dynamics suggest that a compartmentalized coupling of cAMP transporter and CFTR occurs via the PDZ scaffolding protein, PDZK1, forming a macromolecular complex at apical surfaces of gut epithelia. Disrupting this complex abrogates the functional coupling of cAMP transporter activity to CFTR function. Mrp4 knockout mice are more prone to CFTR-mediated secretory diarrhea. Our findings have important implications for disorders such as inflammatory bowel disease and secretory diarrhea.

  5. CLC-3 chloride channels moderate long-term potentiation at Schaffer collateral–CA1 synapses

    PubMed Central

    Farmer, Laurel M; Le, Brandy N; Nelson, Deborah J

    2013-01-01

    The chloride channel CLC-3 is expressed in the brain on synaptic vesicles and postsynaptic membranes. Although CLC-3 is broadly expressed throughout the brain, the CLC-3 knockout mouse shows complete, selective postnatal neurodegeneration of the hippocampus, suggesting a crucial role for the channel in maintaining normal brain function. CLC-3 channels are functionally linked to NMDA receptors in the hippocampus; NMDA receptor-dependent Ca2+ entry, activation of Ca2+/calmodulin kinase II and subsequent gating of CLC-3 link the channels via a Ca2+-mediated feedback loop. We demonstrate that loss of CLC-3 at mature synapses increases long-term potentiation from 135 ± 4% in the wild-type slice preparation to 154 ± 7% above baseline (P < 0.001) in the knockout; therefore, the contribution of CLC-3 is to reduce synaptic potentiation by ∼40%. Using a decoy peptide representing the Ca2+/calmodulin kinase II phosphorylation site on CLC-3, we show that phosphorylation of CLC-3 is required for its regulatory function in long-term potentiation. CLC-3 is also expressed on synaptic vesicles; however, our data suggest functionally separable pre- and postsynaptic roles. Thus, CLC-3 confers Cl− sensitivity to excitatory synapses, controls the magnitude of long-term potentiation and may provide a protective limit on Ca2+ influx. PMID:23165767

  6. CLC-3 chloride channels moderate long-term potentiation at Schaffer collateral-CA1 synapses.

    PubMed

    Farmer, Laurel M; Le, Brandy N; Nelson, Deborah J

    2013-02-15

    The chloride channel CLC-3 is expressed in the brain on synaptic vesicles and postsynaptic membranes. Although CLC-3 is broadly expressed throughout the brain, the CLC-3 knockout mouse shows complete, selective postnatal neurodegeneration of the hippocampus, suggesting a crucial role for the channel in maintaining normal brain function. CLC-3 channels are functionally linked to NMDA receptors in the hippocampus; NMDA receptor-dependent Ca(2+) entry, activation of Ca(2+)/calmodulin kinase II and subsequent gating of CLC-3 link the channels via a Ca(2+)-mediated feedback loop. We demonstrate that loss of CLC-3 at mature synapses increases long-term potentiation from 135 ± 4% in the wild-type slice preparation to 154 ± 7% above baseline (P < 0.001) in the knockout; therefore, the contribution of CLC-3 is to reduce synaptic potentiation by ∼40%. Using a decoy peptide representing the Ca(2+)/calmodulin kinase II phosphorylation site on CLC-3, we show that phosphorylation of CLC-3 is required for its regulatory function in long-term potentiation. CLC-3 is also expressed on synaptic vesicles; however, our data suggest functionally separable pre- and postsynaptic roles. Thus, CLC-3 confers Cl(-) sensitivity to excitatory synapses, controls the magnitude of long-term potentiation and may provide a protective limit on Ca(2+) influx.

  7. Projection structure of a ClC-type chloride channel at 6.5Å resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mindell, Joseph A.; Maduke, Merritt; Miller, Christopher; Grigorieff, Nikolaus

    2001-01-01

    Virtually all cells in all eukaryotic organisms express ion channels of the ClC type, the only known molecular family of chloride-ion-selective channels. The diversity of ClC channels highlights the multitude and range of functions served by gated chloride-ion conduction in biological membranes, such as controlling electrical excitability in skeletal muscle, maintaining systemic blood pressure, acidifying endosomal compartments, and regulating electrical responses of GABA (γ-aminobutyric acid)-containing interneurons in the central nervous system. Previously, we expressed and purified a prokaryotic ClC channel homologue. Here we report the formation of two-dimensional crystals of this ClC channel protein reconstituted into phospholipid bilayer membranes. Cryo-electron microscopic analysis of these crystals yields a projection structure at 6.5Å resolution, which shows off-axis water-filled pores within the dimeric channel complex.

  8. Conductance-voltage relations in large-conductance chloride channels in proliferating L6 myoblasts.

    PubMed

    Hurnák, O; Zachar, J

    1994-06-01

    Large-conductance chloride channels (maxi-Cl channels) were studied in cultured myoblasts (L6 rat muscle cell line); in excised (inside-out) and in cell attached membrane patches using a conventional patch clamp method. The incidence of maxi-Cl channels was substantially higher in proliferating myoballs, then in quiescent (bottom-attached) myoblasts (90% and 50% percent of examined cells, respectively). The maxi-Cl channels in myoballs were present both in cell attached and excised patches. The channel conductance at symmetric [Cl] = 150 mmol/l was 359 +/- 42 pS (n = 74) in quiescent cells and 439 +/- 10 pS (n = 6) in proliferating myoballs respectively. The conductance of the channel in quiescent cells increased with chloride concentration in symmetric NaCl rich solutions according to Michaelis-Menten curve with the saturation limiting conductance of about 640 pS (gmax) and Km = 112 mmol/l. The shift of the reversal potential upon increasing the pipette concentration of NaCl from 150 to 250 mmol/l was consistent with PNa/PCl = 0.1. Neither the conductance nor the activation of the channel were dependent on the presence of calcium ions. The bell-shaped steady state channel conductance-voltage relationship is asymmetric and can be fitted by two Boltzmann equations with different Vh and k constants; -25.6 mV and -6.8 mV, respectively, for the negative side and +49.6 mV and +13.7 mV for the positive side in quiescent cells. The corresponding values in proliferating myoballs were as follows: -15.5 mV and -2.4 mV, respectively, for the negative side and +31.4 mV and +6.8 mV for the positive side. From the maximum slopes of the Popen versus V curves an estimate was made of the charges for the gates that close at negative (3.5) or positive (1.7) potentials, respectively, in quiescent cells. The corresponding values in myoballs were 10.6 and 3.7, respectively. The probability of one gate to be open was dependent on the state of activation of the opposite gate as determined

  9. Regulatory-auxiliary subunits of CLC chloride channel-transport proteins.

    PubMed

    Barrallo-Gimeno, Alejandro; Gradogna, Antonella; Zanardi, Ilaria; Pusch, Michael; Estévez, Raúl

    2015-09-15

    The CLC family of chloride channels and transporters is composed by nine members, but only three of them, ClC-Ka/b, ClC-7 and ClC-2, have been found so far associated with auxiliary subunits. These CLC regulatory subunits are small proteins that present few common characteristics among them, both structurally and functionally, and their effects on the corresponding CLC protein are different. Barttin, a protein with two transmembrane domains, is essential for the membrane localization of ClC-K proteins and their activity in the kidney and inner ear. Ostm1 is a protein with a single transmembrane domain and a highly glycosylated N-terminus. Unlike the other two CLC auxiliary subunits, Ostm1 shows a reciprocal relationship with ClC-7 for their stability. The subcellular localization of Ostm1 depends on ClC-7 and not the other way around. ClC-2 is active on its own, but GlialCAM, a transmembrane cell adhesion molecule with two extracellular immunoglobulin (Ig)-like domains, regulates its subcellular localization and activity in glial cells. The common theme for these three proteins is their requirement for a proper homeostasis, since their malfunction leads to distinct diseases. We will review here their properties and their role in normal chloride physiology and the pathological consequences of their improper function.

  10. Evidence for a role of GABA- and glutamate-gated chloride channels in olfactory memory.

    PubMed

    Boumghar, Katia; Couret-Fauvel, Thomas; Garcia, Mikael; Armengaud, Catherine

    2012-11-01

    In the honeybee, we investigated the role of transmissions mediated by GABA-gated chloride channels and glutamate-gated chloride channels (GluCls) of the mushroom bodies (MBs) on olfactory learning using a single-trial olfactory conditioning paradigm. The GABAergic antagonist picrotoxin (PTX) or the GluCl antagonist L-trans-pyrrolidine-2,4-dicarboxylic acid (L-trans-PDC) was injected alone or in combination into the α-lobes of MBs. PTX impaired early long-term olfactory memory when injected before conditioning or before testing. L-trans-PDC alone induced no significant effect on learning and memory but induced a less specific response to the conditioned odor. When injected before PTX, L-trans-PDC was able to modulate PTX effects. These results emphasize the role of MB GABA-gated chloride channels in consolidation processes and strongly support that GluCls are involved in the perception of the conditioned stimulus.

  11. Hormonally controlled chloride movement across Drosophila tubules is via ion channels in stellate cells.

    PubMed

    O'Donnell, M J; Rheault, M R; Davies, S A; Rosay, P; Harvey, B J; Maddrell, S H; Kaiser, K; Dow, J A

    1998-04-01

    Anion conductance across the Drosophila melanogaster Malpighian (renal) tubule was investigated by a combination of physiological and transgenic techniques. Patch-clamp recordings identified clusters of 4, 4'-diisothiocyanostilbene-2,2'-disulfonic acid (DIDS)-sensitive "maxi-chloride" channels in a small domain of the apical membrane. Fluid secretion assays demonstrated sensitivity to the chloride channel blockers 5-nitro-2-(3-phenylpropylamino)benzoic acid, diphenylamine-2-carboxylate, anthracene-9-carboxylic acid, and niflumic acid. Electrophysiological analysis showed that the calcium-mediated increase in anion conductance was blocked by the same agents. Vibrating probe analysis revealed a small number of current density hot spots, coincident with "stellate" cells, that were abolished by low-chloride saline or the same chloride channel blockers. GAL-4-targeted expression of an aequorin transgene revealed that the neurohormone leucokinin elicits a rapid increase in intracellular calcium levels in stellate cells that precedes the fastest demonstrable physiological effect. Taken together, these data show that leucokinins act on stellate cells through intracellular calcium to increase transcellular chloride conductance through channels. As electrogenic cation conductance is confined to principal cells, the two pathways are spatially segregated in this tissue.

  12. Cloning and functional expression of a plant voltage-dependent chloride channel.

    PubMed Central

    Lurin, C; Geelen, D; Barbier-Brygoo, H; Guern, J; Maurel, C

    1996-01-01

    Plant cell membrane anion channels participate in basic physiological functions, such as cell volume regulation and signal transduction. However, nothing is known about their molecular structure. Using a polymerase chain reaction strategy, we have cloned a tobacco cDNA (CIC-Nt1) encoding a 780-amino acid protein with several putative transmembrane domains. CIC-Nt1 displays 24 to 32% amino acid identity with members of the animal voltage-dependent chloride channel (CIC) family, whose archetype is CIC-0 from the Torpedo marmorata electric organ. Injection of CIC-Nt1 complementary RNA into Xenopus oocytes elicited slowly activating inward currents upon membrane hyperpolarization more negative than -120 mV. These currents were carried mainly by anions, modulated by extracellular anions, and totally blocked by 10 mM extracellular calcium. The identification of CIC-Nt1 extends the CIC family to higher plants and provides a molecular probe for the study of voltage-dependent anion channels in plants. PMID:8624442

  13. Mutations at the signature sequence of CFTR create a Cd(2+)-gated chloride channel.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaohui; Bompadre, Silvia G; Li, Min; Hwang, Tzyh-Chang

    2009-01-01

    The canonical sequence LSGGQ, also known as the signature sequence, defines the adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-binding cassette transporter superfamily. Crystallographic studies reveal that the signature sequence, together with the Walker A and Walker B motifs, forms the ATP-binding pocket upon dimerization of the two nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs) in a head-to-tail configuration. The importance of the signature sequence is attested by the fact that a glycine to aspartate mutation (i.e., G551D) in cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) results in a severe phenotype of cystic fibrosis. We previously showed that the G551D mutation completely eliminates ATP-dependent gating of the CFTR chloride channel. Here, we report that micromolar [Cd(2+)] can dramatically increase the activity of G551D-CFTR in the absence of ATP. This effect of Cd(2+) is not seen in wild-type channels or in G551A. Pretreatment of G551D-CFTR with the cysteine modification reagent 2-aminoethyl methane thiosulfonate hydrobromide protects the channel from Cd(2+) activation, suggesting an involvement of endogenous cysteine residue(s) in mediating this effect of Cd(2+). The mutants G551C, L548C, and S549C, all in the signature sequence of CFTR's NBD1, show robust response to Cd(2+). On the other hand, negligible effects of Cd(2+) were seen with T547C, Q552C, and R553C, indicating that a specific region of the signature sequence is involved in transmitting the signal of Cd(2+) binding to the gate. Collectively, these results suggest that the effect of Cd(2+) is mediated by a metal bridge formation between yet to be identified cysteine residue(s) and the engineered aspartate or cysteine in the signature sequence. We propose that the signature sequence serves as a switch that transduces the signal of ligand binding to the channel gate.

  14. Double Blockade of Glioma Cell Proliferation and Migration by Temozolomide Conjugated with NPPB, a Chloride Channel Blocker.

    PubMed

    Park, Miri; Song, Chiman; Yoon, Hojong; Choi, Kee-Hyun

    2016-03-16

    Glioblastoma is the most common and aggressive primary malignant brain tumor. Temozolomide (TMZ), a chemotherapeutic agent combined with radiation therapy, is used as a standard treatment. The infiltrative nature of glioblastoma, however, interrupts effective treatment with TMZ and increases the tendency to relapse. Voltage-gated chloride channels have been identified as crucial regulators of glioma cell migration and invasion by mediating cell shape and volume change. Accordingly, chloride current inhibition by 5-nitro-2-(3-phenylpropylamino)-benzoate (NPPB), a chloride channel blocker, suppresses cell movement by diminishing the osmotic cell volume regulation. In this study, we developed a novel compound, TMZ conjugated with NPPB (TMZ-NPPB), as a potential anticancer drug. TMZ-NPPB blocked chloride currents in U373MG, a severely invasive human glioma cell line, and suppressed migration and invasion of U373MG cells. Moreover, TMZ-NPPB exhibited DNA modification activity similar to that of TMZ, and surprisingly showed remarkably enhanced cytotoxicity relative to TMZ by inducing apoptotic cell death via DNA damage. These findings indicate that TMZ-NPPB has a dual function in blocking both proliferation and migration of human glioma cells, thereby suggesting its potential to overcome challenges in current glioblastoma therapy.

  15. P2Y purinergic receptor regulation of CFTR chloride channels in mouse cardiac myocytes.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto-Mizuma, Shintaro; Wang, Ge-Xin; Hume, Joseph R

    2004-05-01

    The intracellular signalling pathways and molecular mechanisms responsible for P2-purinoceptor-mediated chloride (Cl(-)) currents (I(Cl,ATP)) were studied in mouse ventricular myocytes. In standard NaCl-containing extracellular solutions, extracellular ATP (100 microm) activated two different currents, I(Cl,ATP) with a linear I-V relationship in symmetrical Cl(-) solutions, and an inwardly rectifying cation conductance (cationic I(ATP)). Cationic I(ATP) was selectively inhibited by Gd(3+) and Zn(2+), or by replacement of extracellular NaCl by NMDG; I(Cl,ATP) was Cl(-) selective, and inhibited by replacement of extracellular Cl(-) by Asp(-); both currents were prevented by suramin or DIDS pretreatment. In GTPgammaS-loaded cells, I(Cl,ATP) was irreversibly activated by ATP, but cationic I(ATP) was still regulated reversibly. GDPbetaS prevented activation of the I(Cl,ATP,) even though pertussis toxin pretreatment did not modulate I(Cl,ATP). These results suggest that activation of I(Cl,ATP) occurs via a G-protein coupled P2Y purinergic receptor. The I(Cl,ATP) persistently activated by GTPgammaS, was inhibited by glibenclamide but not by DIDS, thus exhibiting known pharmacological properties of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl(-) channels. In ventricular cells of cftr(-/-) mice, extracellular ATP activated cationic I(ATP), but failed to activate any detectable I(Cl,ATP). These results provide compelling evidence that activation of CFTR Cl(-) channels in mouse heart are coupled to G-protein coupled P2Y purinergic receptors.

  16. Prolactin stimulates sodium and chloride ion channels in A6 renal epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Greenlee, Megan M.; Mitzelfelt, Jeremiah D.; Duke, Billie Jeanne; Al-Khalili, Otor; Bao, Hui-Fang

    2015-01-01

    Many hormonal pathways contribute to the regulation of renal epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) function, a key process for maintaining blood volume and controlling blood pressure. In the present study, we examined whether the peptide hormone prolactin (PRL) regulates ENaC function in renal epithelial cells (A6). Basolateral application of several different concentrations of PRL dramatically stimulated the transepithelial current in A6 cells, increasing both amiloride-sensitive (ENaC) and amiloride-insensitive currents. Using cell-attached patch clamp, we determined that PRL increased both the number (N) and open probability (Po) of ENaC present in the apical membrane. Inhibition of PKA with H-89 abolished the effect of PRL on amiloride-sensitive and insensitive transepithelial currents and eliminated the increase in ENaC NPo with PRL exposure. PRL also increased cAMP in A6 cells, consistent with signaling through the cAMP-dependent PKA pathway. We also identified that PRL induced activity of a 2-pS anion channel with outward rectification, electrophysiological properties consistent with ClC4 or ClC5. RT-PCR only detected ClC4, but not ClC5 transcripts. Here, we show for the first time that PRL activates sodium and chloride transport in renal epithelial cells via ENaC and ClC4. PMID:25587116

  17. Myotonia caused by mutations in the muscle chloride channel gene CLCN1.

    PubMed

    Pusch, Michael

    2002-04-01

    Pure non-syndromic, non-dystrophic myotonia in humans is caused by mutations in the genes coding for the skeletal muscle sodium channel (SCN5A) or the skeletal muscle chloride channel (CLCN1) with similar phenotypes. Chloride-channel myotonia can be dominant (Thomsen-type myotonia) or recessive (Becker-type myotonia). More than 60 myotonia-causing mutations in the CLCN1 gene have been identified, with only a few of them being dominant. A common phenotype of dominant mutations is a dominant negative effect of mutant subunits in mutant-WT heterodimers, causing a large shift of the steady-state open probability voltage-dependence towards more positive, unphysiological voltages. The study of the properties of disease causing mutations has helped in understanding the functional properties of the CLC-1 channel that is part of a nine-member gene family of chloride channels. The large body of knowledge obtained for CLC-1 may also help to better understand the other CLC channels, three of which are also involved in genetic diseases.

  18. Permeation and Block of the Skeletal Muscle Chloride Channel, ClC-1, by Foreign Anions

    PubMed Central

    Rychkov, G.Y.; Pusch, M.; Roberts, M.L.; Jentsch, T.J.; Bretag, A.H.

    1998-01-01

    A distinctive feature of the voltage-dependent chloride channels ClC-0 (the Torpedo electroplaque chloride channel) and ClC-1 (the major skeletal muscle chloride channel) is that chloride acts as a ligand to its own channel, regulating channel opening and so controlling the permeation of its own species. We have now studied the permeation of a number of foreign anions through ClC-1 using voltage-clamp techniques on Xenopus oocytes and Sf9 cells expressing human (hClC-1) or rat (rClC-1) isoforms, respectively. From their effect on channel gating, the anions presented in this paper can be divided into three groups: impermeant or poorly permeant anions that can not replace Cl− as a channel opener and do not block the channel appreciably (glutamate, gluconate, HCO3−, BrO3−); impermeant anions that can open the channel and show significant block (methanesulfonate, cyclamate); and permeant anions that replace Cl− at the regulatory binding site but impair Cl− passage through the channel pore (Br−, NO3−, ClO3−, I−, ClO4−, SCN−). The permeability sequence for rClC-1, SCN− ∼ ClO4− > Cl− > Br− > NO3− ∼ ClO3− > I− >> BrO3− > HCO3− >> methanesulfonate ∼ cyclamate ∼ glutamate, was different from the sequence determined for blocking potency and ability to shift the Popen curve, SCN− ∼ ClO4− > I− > NO3− ∼ ClO3− ∼ methanesulfonate > Br− > cyclamate > BrO3− > HCO3− > glutamate, implying that the regulatory binding site that opens the channel is different from the selectivity center and situated closer to the external side. Channel block by foreign anions is voltage dependent and can be entirely accounted for by reduction in single channel conductance. Minimum pore diameter was estimated to be ∼4.5 Å. Anomalous mole-fraction effects found for permeability ratios and conductance in mixtures of Cl− and SCN− or ClO4− suggest a multi-ion pore. Hydrophobic interactions with the wall of the channel pore may

  19. Molecular and functional characterization of a calcium-sensitive chloride channel from mouse lung.

    PubMed

    Gandhi, R; Elble, R C; Gruber, A D; Schreur, K D; Ji, H L; Fuller, C M; Pauli, B U

    1998-11-27

    A protein (mCLCA1) has been cloned from a mouse lung cDNA library that bears strong sequence homology with the recently described bovine tracheal, Ca2+-sensitive chloride channel protein (bCLCA1), bovine lung endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (Lu-ECAM-1), and the human intestinal Ca2+-sensitive chloride channel protein (hCLCA1). In vitro, its 3.1-kilobase message translates into a 100-kDa protein that can be glycosylated to an approximately 125-kDa product. SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis from lysates of mCLCA1 cDNA-transfected transformed human embryonic kidney cells (HEK293) reveals proteins of 130, 125, and 90 kDa as well as a protein triplet in the 32-38 kDa size range. Western analyses with antisera raised against Lu-ECAM-1 peptides show that the N-terminal region of the predicted open reading frame is present only in the larger size proteins (i.e. 130, 125, and 90 kDa), whereas the C-terminal region of the open reading frame is observed in the 32-38 kDa size proteins, suggesting a posttranslational, proteolytic processing of a precursor protein (125/130 kDa) into 90 kDa and 32-38 kDa components similar to that reported for Lu-ECAM-1. Hydrophobicity analyses predict four transmembrane domains for the 90-kDa protein. The mCLCA1 mRNA is readily detected by Northern analysis and by in situ hybridization in the respiratory epithelia of trachea and bronchi. Transient expression of mCLCA1 in HEK293 cells was associated with an increase in whole cell Cl- current that could be activated by Ca2+ and ionomycin and inhibited by 4, 4'-diisothiocyanatostilbene-2,2'-disulfonic acid, dithiothreitol, and niflumic acid. The discovery of mCLCA1 opens the door for further investigating the possible contribution of a Ca2+-sensitive chloride conductance to the pathogenesis of cystic fibrosis.

  20. The ABC protein turned chloride channel whose failure causes cystic fibrosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gadsby, David C.; Vergani, Paola; Csanády, László

    2006-03-01

    CFTR chloride channels are encoded by the gene mutated in patients with cystic fibrosis. These channels belong to the superfamily of ABC transporter ATPases. ATP-driven conformational changes, which in other ABC proteins fuel uphill substrate transport across cellular membranes, in CFTR open and close a gate to allow transmembrane flow of anions down their electrochemical gradient. New structural and biochemical information from prokaryotic ABC proteins and functional information from CFTR channels has led to a unifying mechanism explaining those ATP-driven conformational changes.

  1. The ABC protein turned chloride channel whose failure causes cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Gadsby, David C; Vergani, Paola; Csanády, László

    2006-03-23

    CFTR chloride channels are encoded by the gene mutated in patients with cystic fibrosis. These channels belong to the superfamily of ABC transporter ATPases. ATP-driven conformational changes, which in other ABC proteins fuel uphill substrate transport across cellular membranes, in CFTR open and close a gate to allow transmembrane flow of anions down their electrochemical gradient. New structural and biochemical information from prokaryotic ABC proteins and functional information from CFTR channels has led to a unifying mechanism explaining those ATP-driven conformational changes.

  2. Inducible and titratable silencing of Caenorhabditis elegans neurons in vivo with histamine-gated chloride channels.

    PubMed

    Pokala, Navin; Liu, Qiang; Gordus, Andrew; Bargmann, Cornelia I

    2014-02-18

    Recent progress in neuroscience has been facilitated by tools for neuronal activation and inactivation that are orthogonal to endogenous signaling systems. We describe here a chemical-genetic approach for inducible silencing of Caenorhabditis elegans neurons in intact animals, using the histamine-gated chloride channel HisCl1 from Drosophila and exogenous histamine. Administering histamine to freely moving C. elegans that express HisCl1 transgenes in neurons leads to rapid and potent inhibition of neural activity within minutes, as assessed by behavior, functional calcium imaging, and electrophysiology of neurons expressing HisCl1. C. elegans does not use histamine as an endogenous neurotransmitter, and exogenous histamine has little apparent effect on wild-type C. elegans behavior. HisCl1-histamine silencing of sensory neurons, interneurons, and motor neurons leads to behavioral effects matching their known functions. In addition, the HisCl1-histamine system can be used to titrate the level of neural activity, revealing quantitative relationships between neural activity and behavioral output. We use these methods to dissect escape circuits, define interneurons that regulate locomotion speed (AVA, AIB) and escape-related omega turns (AIB), and demonstrate graded control of reversal length by AVA interneurons and DA/VA motor neurons. The histamine-HisCl1 system is effective, robust, compatible with standard behavioral assays, and easily combined with optogenetic tools, properties that should make it a useful addition to C. elegans neurotechnology.

  3. Inducible and titratable silencing of Caenorhabditis elegans neurons in vivo with histamine-gated chloride channels

    PubMed Central

    Pokala, Navin; Liu, Qiang; Gordus, Andrew; Bargmann, Cornelia I.

    2014-01-01

    Recent progress in neuroscience has been facilitated by tools for neuronal activation and inactivation that are orthogonal to endogenous signaling systems. We describe here a chemical-genetic approach for inducible silencing of Caenorhabditis elegans neurons in intact animals, using the histamine-gated chloride channel HisCl1 from Drosophila and exogenous histamine. Administering histamine to freely moving C. elegans that express HisCl1 transgenes in neurons leads to rapid and potent inhibition of neural activity within minutes, as assessed by behavior, functional calcium imaging, and electrophysiology of neurons expressing HisCl1. C. elegans does not use histamine as an endogenous neurotransmitter, and exogenous histamine has little apparent effect on wild-type C. elegans behavior. HisCl1-histamine silencing of sensory neurons, interneurons, and motor neurons leads to behavioral effects matching their known functions. In addition, the HisCl1-histamine system can be used to titrate the level of neural activity, revealing quantitative relationships between neural activity and behavioral output. We use these methods to dissect escape circuits, define interneurons that regulate locomotion speed (AVA, AIB) and escape-related omega turns (AIB), and demonstrate graded control of reversal length by AVA interneurons and DA/VA motor neurons. The histamine-HisCl1 system is effective, robust, compatible with standard behavioral assays, and easily combined with optogenetic tools, properties that should make it a useful addition to C. elegans neurotechnology. PMID:24550306

  4. Control of volume-sensitive chloride channel inactivation by the coupled action of intracellular chloride and extracellular protons.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Carballo, Carmen Y; De Santiago-Castillo, José A; Rosales-Saavedra, Teresa; Pérez-Cornejo, Patricia; Arreola, Jorge

    2010-08-01

    The volume-sensitive chloride current (I(ClVol)) exhibit a time-dependent decay presumably due to channel inactivation. In this work, we studied the effects of chloride ions (Cl(-)) and H(+) ions on I(ClVol) decay recorded in HEK-293 and HL-60 cells using the whole-cell patch clamp technique. Under control conditions ([Cl(-)](e) = [Cl(-)](i) = 140 mM and pH(i) = pH(e) = 7.3), I(ClVol) in HEK cells shows a large decay at positive voltages but in HL-60 cells I(ClVol) remained constant independently of time. In HEK-293 cells, simultaneously raising the [Cl(-)](e) and [Cl(-)](i) from 25 to 140 mM (with pH(e) = pH(i) = 7.3) increased the fraction of inactivated channels (FIC). This effect was reproduced by elevating [Cl(-)](i) while keeping the [Cl(-)](e) constant. Furthermore, a decrease in pH(e) from 7.3 to 5.5 accelerated current decay and increased FIC when [Cl(-)] was 140 mM but not 25 mM. In HL-60 cells, a slight I(ClVol) decay was seen when the pH(e) was reduced from 7.3 to 5.5. Our data show that inactivation of I(ClVol) can be controlled by changing either the Cl(-) or H(+) concentration or both. Based on our results and previously published data, we have built a model that explains VRAC inactivation. In the model the H(+) binding site is located outside the electrical field near the extracellular entry whilst the Cl(-) binding site is intracellular. The model depicts inactivation as a pore constriction that happens by simultaneous binding of H(+) and Cl(-) ions to the channel followed by a voltage-dependent conformational change that ultimately causes inactivation.

  5. Dynamic properties of calcium-activated chloride currents in Xenopus laevis oocytes.

    PubMed

    M De la Fuente, Ildefonso; Malaina, Iker; Pérez-Samartín, Alberto; Boyano, María Dolores; Pérez-Yarza, Gorka; Bringas, Carlos; Villarroel, Álvaro; Fedetz, María; Arellano, Rogelio; Cortes, Jesus M; Martínez, Luis

    2017-02-13

    Chloride is the most abundant permeable anion in the cell, and numerous studies in the last two decades highlight the great importance and broad physiological role of chloride currents mediated anion transport. They participate in a multiplicity of key processes, as for instance, the regulation of electrical excitability, apoptosis, cell cycle, epithelial secretion and neuronal excitability. In addition, dysfunction of Cl(-) channels is involved in a variety of human diseases such as epilepsy, osteoporosis and different cancer types. Historically, chloride channels have been of less interest than the cation channels. In fact, there seems to be practically no quantitative studies of the dynamics of chloride currents. Here, for the first time, we have quantitatively studied experimental calcium-activated chloride fluxes belonging to Xenopus laevis oocytes, and the main results show that the experimental Cl(-) currents present an informational structure characterized by highly organized data sequences, long-term memory properties and inherent "crossover" dynamics in which persistent correlations arise at short time intervals, while anti-persistent behaviors become dominant in long time intervals. Our work sheds some light on the understanding of the informational properties of ion currents, a key element to elucidate the physiological functional coupling with the integrative dynamics of metabolic processes.

  6. Dynamic properties of calcium-activated chloride currents in Xenopus laevis oocytes

    PubMed Central

    M. De la Fuente, Ildefonso; Malaina, Iker; Pérez-Samartín, Alberto; Boyano, María Dolores; Pérez-Yarza, Gorka; Bringas, Carlos; Villarroel, Álvaro; Fedetz, María; Arellano, Rogelio; Cortes, Jesus M.; Martínez, Luis

    2017-01-01

    Chloride is the most abundant permeable anion in the cell, and numerous studies in the last two decades highlight the great importance and broad physiological role of chloride currents mediated anion transport. They participate in a multiplicity of key processes, as for instance, the regulation of electrical excitability, apoptosis, cell cycle, epithelial secretion and neuronal excitability. In addition, dysfunction of Cl− channels is involved in a variety of human diseases such as epilepsy, osteoporosis and different cancer types. Historically, chloride channels have been of less interest than the cation channels. In fact, there seems to be practically no quantitative studies of the dynamics of chloride currents. Here, for the first time, we have quantitatively studied experimental calcium-activated chloride fluxes belonging to Xenopus laevis oocytes, and the main results show that the experimental Cl− currents present an informational structure characterized by highly organized data sequences, long-term memory properties and inherent “crossover” dynamics in which persistent correlations arise at short time intervals, while anti-persistent behaviors become dominant in long time intervals. Our work sheds some light on the understanding of the informational properties of ion currents, a key element to elucidate the physiological functional coupling with the integrative dynamics of metabolic processes. PMID:28198817

  7. Biochemical and biophysical approaches to study the structure and function of the chloride channel (ClC) family of proteins.

    PubMed

    Abeyrathne, Priyanka D; Chami, Mohamed; Stahlberg, Henning

    2016-01-01

    The chloride channel (ClC) protein family comprises both chloride (Cl(-)) channels and chloride/proton (Cl(-)/H(+)) antiporters. In prokaryotes and eukaryotes, these proteins mediate the movement of Cl(-) ions across the membrane. In eukaryotes, ClC proteins play a role in the stabilization of membrane potential, epithelial ion transport, hippocampal neuroprotection, cardiac pacemaker activity and vesicular acidification. Moreover, mutations in the genes encoding ClC proteins can cause genetic disease in humans. In prokaryotes, the Cl(-)/H(+) antiporters, such as ClC-ec1 found in Escherichia coli promote proton expulsion in the extreme acid-resistance response common to enteric bacteria. To date, structural and functional studies of the prokaryotic protein have revealed unique structural features, including complicated transmembrane topology with 18 α-helices in each subunit and an anion-coordinating region in each subunit. Several different approaches such as X-ray crystallography, NMR, biochemical studies, and molecular dynamics simulations have been applied to the study of ClC proteins. Continued study of the unique structure and function of this diverse family of proteins has the potential to lead to the development of novel therapeutic targets for neuronal, renal, bone, and food-borne diseases.

  8. Neuronal chloride accumulation and excitatory GABA underlie aggravation of neonatal epileptiform activities by phenobarbital.

    PubMed

    Nardou, Romain; Yamamoto, Sumii; Chazal, Geneviève; Bhar, Asma; Ferrand, Nadine; Dulac, Olivier; Ben-Ari, Yehezkel; Khalilov, Ilgam

    2011-04-01

    Phenobarbital produces its anti-epileptic actions by increasing the inhibitory drive of γ-aminobutyric acid. However, following recurrent seizures, γ-aminobutyric acid excites neurons because of a persistent increase of chloride raising the important issue of whether phenobarbital could aggravate persistent seizures. Here we compared the actions of phenobarbital on initial and established ictal-like events in an in vitro model of mirror focus. Using the in vitro three-compartment chamber preparation with the two hippocampi and their commissural fibres placed in three different chambers, kainate was applied to one hippocampus and phenobarbital contralaterally, either after one ictal-like event or after many recurrent ictal-like events that produce an epileptogenic mirror focus. Field, perforated patch and single-channel recordings were used to determine the effects of γ-aminobutyric acid and their modulation by phenobarbital, and alterations of the chloride cotransporters were investigated using sodium-potassium-chloride cotransporter 1 and potassium chloride cotransporter 2 antagonists, potassium chloride cotransporter 2 immunocytochemistry and sodium-potassium-chloride cotransporter 1 knockouts. Phenobarbital reduced initial ictal-like events and prevented the formation of a mirror focus when applied from the start. In contrast, phenobarbital aggravated epileptiform activities when applied after many ictal-like events by enhancing the excitatory actions of γ-aminobutyric acid due to increased chloride. The accumulation of chloride and the excitatory actions of γ-aminobutyric acid in mirror foci neurons are mediated by the sodium-potassium-chloride cotransporter 1 chloride importer and by downregulation and internalization of the chloride-exporter potassium-chloride cotransporter 2. Finally, concomitant applications of the sodium-potassium-chloride cotransporter 1 antagonist bumetanide and phenobarbital decreased excitatory actions of γ-aminobutyric acid and

  9. Active primary lithium thionyl chloride battery for artillery applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldwin, Arlen R.; Delnick, Frank M.; Miller, David L.

    1990-03-01

    Sandia National Laboratories and Eagle Picher Industries have successfully developed an Active Lithium Thionyl Chloride (ALTC) power battery for unique artillery applications. Details of the design and the results of safety and performance will be presented.

  10. Dissecting a regulatory calcium-binding site of CLC-K kidney chloride channels

    PubMed Central

    Gradogna, Antonella; Fenollar-Ferrer, Cristina

    2012-01-01

    The kidney and inner ear CLC-K chloride channels, which are involved in salt absorption and endolymph production, are regulated by extracellular Ca2+ in the millimolar concentration range. Recently, Gradogna et al. (2010. J. Gen. Physiol. http://dx.doi.org/10.1085/jgp.201010455) identified a pair of acidic residues (E261 and D278) located in the loop between helices I and J as forming a putative intersubunit Ca2+-binding site in hClC-Ka. In this study, we sought to explore the properties of the binding site in more detail. First, we verified that the site is conserved in hClC-Kb and rClC-K1. In addition, we could confer Ca2+ sensitivity to the Torpedo marmorata ClC-0 channel by exchanging its I–J loop with that from ClC-Ka, demonstrating a direct role of the loop in Ca2+ binding. Based on a structure of a bacterial CLC and a new sequence alignment, we built homology models of ClC-Ka. The models suggested additional amino acids involved in Ca2+ binding. Testing mutants of these residues, we could restrict the range of plausible models and positively identify two more residues (E259 and E281) involved in Ca2+ coordination. To investigate cation specificity, we applied extracellular Zn2+, Mg2+, Ba2+, Sr2+, and Mn2+. Zn2+ blocks ClC-Ka as well as its Ca2+-insensitive mutant, suggesting that Zn2+ binds to a different site. Mg2+ does not activate CLC-Ks, but the channels are activated by Ba2+, Sr2+, and Mn2+ with a rank order of potency of Ca2+ > Ba2+ > Sr2+ = Mn2+ for the human CLC-Ks. Dose–response analysis indicates that the less potent Ba2+ has a lower affinity rather than a lower efficacy. Interestingly, rClC-K1 shows an altered rank order (Ca2+ > Sr2+ >> Ba2+), but homology models suggest that residues outside the I–J loop are responsible for this difference. Our detailed characterization of the regulatory Ca2+-binding site provides a solid basis for the understanding of the physiological modulation of CLC-K channel function in the kidney and inner ear. PMID

  11. Dissecting a regulatory calcium-binding site of CLC-K kidney chloride channels.

    PubMed

    Gradogna, Antonella; Fenollar-Ferrer, Cristina; Forrest, Lucy R; Pusch, Michael

    2012-12-01

    The kidney and inner ear CLC-K chloride channels, which are involved in salt absorption and endolymph production, are regulated by extracellular Ca(2+) in the millimolar concentration range. Recently, Gradogna et al. (2010. J. Gen. Physiol. http://dx.doi.org/10.1085/jgp.201010455) identified a pair of acidic residues (E261 and D278) located in the loop between helices I and J as forming a putative intersubunit Ca(2+)-binding site in hClC-Ka. In this study, we sought to explore the properties of the binding site in more detail. First, we verified that the site is conserved in hClC-Kb and rClC-K1. In addition, we could confer Ca(2+) sensitivity to the Torpedo marmorata ClC-0 channel by exchanging its I-J loop with that from ClC-Ka, demonstrating a direct role of the loop in Ca(2+) binding. Based on a structure of a bacterial CLC and a new sequence alignment, we built homology models of ClC-Ka. The models suggested additional amino acids involved in Ca(2+) binding. Testing mutants of these residues, we could restrict the range of plausible models and positively identify two more residues (E259 and E281) involved in Ca(2+) coordination. To investigate cation specificity, we applied extracellular Zn(2+), Mg(2+), Ba(2+), Sr(2+), and Mn(2+). Zn(2+) blocks ClC-Ka as well as its Ca(2+)-insensitive mutant, suggesting that Zn(2+) binds to a different site. Mg(2+) does not activate CLC-Ks, but the channels are activated by Ba(2+), Sr(2+), and Mn(2+) with a rank order of potency of Ca(2+) > Ba(2+) > Sr(2+) = Mn(2+) for the human CLC-Ks. Dose-response analysis indicates that the less potent Ba(2+) has a lower affinity rather than a lower efficacy. Interestingly, rClC-K1 shows an altered rank order (Ca(2+) > Sr(2+) > Ba(2+)), but homology models suggest that residues outside the I-J loop are responsible for this difference. Our detailed characterization of the regulatory Ca(2+)-binding site provides a solid basis for the understanding of the physiological modulation of CLC

  12. Silent S-Type Anion Channel Subunit SLAH1 Gates SLAH3 Open for Chloride Root-to-Shoot Translocation.

    PubMed

    Cubero-Font, Paloma; Maierhofer, Tobias; Jaslan, Justyna; Rosales, Miguel A; Espartero, Joaquín; Díaz-Rueda, Pablo; Müller, Heike M; Hürter, Anna-Lena; Al-Rasheid, Khaled A S; Marten, Irene; Hedrich, Rainer; Colmenero-Flores, José M; Geiger, Dietmar

    2016-08-22

    Higher plants take up nutrients via the roots and load them into xylem vessels for translocation to the shoot. After uptake, anions have to be channeled toward the root xylem vessels. Thereby, xylem parenchyma and pericycle cells control the anion composition of the root-shoot xylem sap [1-6]. The fact that salt-tolerant genotypes possess lower xylem-sap Cl(-) contents compared to salt-sensitive genotypes [7-10] indicates that membrane transport proteins at the sites of xylem loading contribute to plant salinity tolerance via selective chloride exclusion. However, the molecular mechanism of xylem loading that lies behind the balance between NO3(-) and Cl(-) loading remains largely unknown. Here we identify two root anion channels in Arabidopsis, SLAH1 and SLAH3, that control the shoot NO3(-)/Cl(-) ratio. The AtSLAH1 gene is expressed in the root xylem-pole pericycle, where it co-localizes with AtSLAH3. Under high soil salinity, AtSLAH1 expression markedly declined and the chloride content of the xylem sap in AtSLAH1 loss-of-function mutants was half of the wild-type level only. SLAH3 anion channels are not active per se but require extracellular nitrate and phosphorylation by calcium-dependent kinases (CPKs) [11-13]. When co-expressed in Xenopus oocytes, however, the electrically silent SLAH1 subunit gates SLAH3 open even in the absence of nitrate- and calcium-dependent kinases. Apparently, SLAH1/SLAH3 heteromerization facilitates SLAH3-mediated chloride efflux from pericycle cells into the root xylem vessels. Our results indicate that under salt stress, plants adjust the distribution of NO3(-) and Cl(-) between root and shoot via differential expression and assembly of SLAH1/SLAH3 anion channel subunits.

  13. Allosteric modulation by benzodiazepines of GABA-gated chloride channels of an identified insect motor neurone.

    PubMed

    Buckingham, Steven D; Higashino, Yoshiaki; Sattelle, David B

    2009-11-01

    The actions of benzodiazepines were studied on the responses to GABA of the fast coxal depressor (D(f)) motor neurone of the cockroach, Periplaneta americana. Ro5-4864, diazepam and clonazepam were investigated. Responses to GABA receptors were enhanced by both Ro5-4864 and diazepam, whereas clonazepam, a potent-positive allosteric modulator of human GABA(A) receptors, was ineffective on the native insect GABA receptors of the D(f) motor neurone. Thus, clear pharmacological differences exist between insect and mammalian native GABA-gated chloride channels with respect to the actions of benzodiazepines. The results enhance our understanding of invertebrate GABA-gated chloride channels which have recently proved important in (a) comparative studies aimed at identifying human allosteric drug-binding sites and (b) understanding the actions of compounds used to control ectoparasites and insect crop pests.

  14. Chloride channels are involved in sperm motility and are downregulated in spermatozoa from patients with asthenozoospermia.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shan-Wen; Li, Yuan; Zou, Li-Li; Guan, Yu-Tao; Peng, Shuang; Zheng, Li-Xin; Deng, Shun-Mei; Zhu, Lin-Yan; Wang, Li-Wei; Chen, Li-Xin

    2016-06-03

    Human spermatozoa encounter an osmotic decrease from 330 to 290 mOsm l-1 when passing through the female reproductive tract. We aimed to evaluate the role of chloride channels in volume regulation and sperm motility from patients with asthenozoospermia. Spermatozoa were purified using Percoll density gradients. Sperm volume was measured as the forward scatter signal using flow cytometry. Sperm motility was analyzed using computer-aided sperm analysis (CASA). When transferred from an isotonic solution (330 mOsm l-1 ) to a hypotonic solution (290 mOsm l-1 ), cell volume was not changed in spermatozoa from normozoospermic men; but increased in those from asthenozoospermic samples. The addition of the chloride channel blockers, 4,4'-diisothiocyanatostilbene-2,2'- isulfonic acid (DIDS) or 5-nitro-2-(3-phenylpropylamino) benzoic acid (NPPB) to the hypotonic solution caused the normal spermatozoa to swell but did not increase the volume of those from the asthenozoospermic semen. DIDS and NPPB decreased sperm motility in both sets of semen samples. The inhibitory effect of NPPB on normal sperm motility was much stronger than on spermatozoa from the asthenozoospermic samples. Both sperm types expressed ClC-3 chloride channels, but the expression levels in the asthenozoospermic samples were much lower, especially in the neck and mid-piece areas. Spermatozoa from men with asthenozoospermia demonstrated lower volume regulating capacity, mobility, and ClC-3 expression levels (especially in the neck) than did normal spermatozoa. Thus, chloride channels play important roles in the regulation of sperm volume and motility and are downregulated in cases of asthenozoospermia.

  15. Effects of chloride channel blockers on hypoxic injury in rat proximal tubules.

    PubMed

    Reeves, W B

    1997-05-01

    These studies examined the pathways and consequences of chloride uptake into proximal tubule cells during in vitro hypoxia. The chloride channel blocker diphenylamine-2-carboxylate (DPC) markedly reduced the degree of hypoxia-induced membrane damage as measured by the release of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). DPC reduced the release of LDH from hypoxic tubules from 38 +/- 2.7% to 16 +/- 1.7% after 30 minutes of hypoxia (P < 0.001, N = 16) and also reduced 36Cl- uptake by hypoxic tubules. The reduction in LDH release was not associated with better preservation of cell ATP content or with protection against hypoxia-induced DNA damage. Other Cl- channel blockers, such as niflumic acid, 5-nitro-2-(3-phenylpropylamino)-benzoate (NPPB) and 2-[(2-cyclopentyl-6,7-dichloro-2,3-dihyrdo-2-methyl-1-oxo-1H-in den-5-yl)oxy] acetic acid (IAA-94) provided even greater protection than DPC and were as effective as 2 mM glycine. The Cl- channel blockers appear to act late in the course of hypoxic injury since DNA damage, an early manifestation of injury, is not prevented by the blockers and since addition of the Cl- channel blocker after the hypoxic injury has begun reduces further membrane damage. These results support the conclusion that transport through Cl- channels contributes to hypoxic cell injury in proximal tubular cells.

  16. Evolution, Expression, and Function of Nonneuronal Ligand-Gated Chloride Channels in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Remnant, Emily J.; Williams, Adam; Lumb, Chris; Yang, Ying Ting; Chan, Janice; Duchêne, Sebastian; Daborn, Phillip J.; Batterham, Philip; Perry, Trent

    2016-01-01

    Ligand-gated chloride channels have established roles in inhibitory neurotransmission in the nervous systems of vertebrates and invertebrates. Paradoxically, expression databases in Drosophila melanogaster have revealed that three uncharacterized ligand-gated chloride channel subunits, CG7589, CG6927, and CG11340, are highly expressed in nonneuronal tissues. Furthermore, subunit copy number varies between insects, with some orders containing one ortholog, whereas other lineages exhibit copy number increases. Here, we show that the Dipteran lineage has undergone two gene duplications followed by expression-based functional differentiation. We used promoter-GFP expression analysis, RNA-sequencing, and in situ hybridization to examine cell type and tissue-specific localization of the three D. melanogaster subunits. CG6927 is expressed in the nurse cells of the ovaries. CG7589 is expressed in multiple tissues including the salivary gland, ejaculatory duct, malpighian tubules, and early midgut. CG11340 is found in malpighian tubules and the copper cell region of the midgut. Overexpression of CG11340 increased sensitivity to dietary copper, and RNAi and ends-out knockout of CG11340 resulted in copper tolerance, providing evidence for a specific nonneuronal role for this subunit in D. melanogaster. Ligand-gated chloride channels are important insecticide targets and here we highlight copy number and functional divergence in insect lineages, raising the potential that order-specific receptors could be isolated within an effective class of insecticide targets. PMID:27172217

  17. [Ionic mechanisms of the effects of phenibut and GABA unrelated to changes in the function of chloride channels].

    PubMed

    Komissarov, I V; Abramets, I I

    1985-01-01

    It is established that beta-phenyl-GABA (phenibut) and partly GABA elicit direct depolarization of the isolated spinal cord motoneurons. The depolarizing effect of phenibut and a depolarizing component of GABA action do not alter in the presence of picrotoxin (10(-5) mol/l) and in the chloride-deficient medium. This depolarizing phenibut effect which is not bound with activation of GABAA-receptors and chloride channels coupled with them does not alter in Na+-deficient medium, enhances in the medium with excess of K+ ions (10 mol/l) and in presence of imidazol (5 . 10(-4) mol/l) and is completely abolished in the Ca2+-deficient medium with 2 mmol/l of Mn2+ or in the presence of 10(-4) mol/l theophylline. It is supposed that phenibut and partly GABA diminish intracellular concentration of cAMP via GABAB-receptor activation and decrease functional activity of voltage-dependent Ca2+-ionic channels and Ca2+-activated outward K+-currents.

  18. Protective effect of a calcium channel blocker "diltiazem" on aluminum chloride-induced dementia in mice.

    PubMed

    Rani, Anu; Neha; Sodhi, Rupinder K; Kaur, Amanpreet

    2015-11-01

    Many studies report that heavy metals such as aluminum are involved in amyloid beta aggregation and neurotoxicity. Further, high concentration of aluminum in the brain deregulates calcium signaling which contributes to synaptic dysfunction and halts neuronal communication which ultimately leads to the development of Alzheimer's disease. Recently, diltiazem, a calcium channel blocker clinically used in angina, is reported to decrease amyloid beta production by inhibiting calcium influx, decreasing inflammation and oxidative stress. However, the probable role of this drug in aluminum chloride (AlCl3)-induced experimental dementia is yet to be explored. Therefore, the present study is designed to investigate the effect of AlCl3-induced dementia in mice. Morris water maze test and elevated plus maze were utilized to evaluate learning and memory. Various biochemical estimations including brain acetylcholinesterase activity (AChE), brain total protein, thiobarbituric acid-reactive species (TBARS) level, reduced glutathione (GSH) level, nitrate/nitrite, and superoxide dismutase (SOD) were measured. AlCl3 significantly impaired learning and memory and increased brain AChE, brain total protein, TBARS, and nitrate/nitrite and decreased brain GSH or SOD. On the other hand, treatment with diltiazem significantly reversed AlCl3-induced behavioral and biochemical deficits. The present study indicates the beneficial role of diltiazem in AlCl3-induced dementia.

  19. P-glycoprotein Mediates Postoperative Peritoneal Adhesion Formation by Enhancing Phosphorylation of the Chloride Channel-3

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Lulu; Li, Qin; Lin, Guixian; Huang, Dan; Zeng, Xuxin; Wang, Xinwei; Li, Ping; Jin, Xiaobao; Zhang, Haifeng; Li, Chunmei; Chen, Lixin; Wang, Liwei; Huang, Shulin; Shao, Hongwei; Xu, Bin; Mao, Jianwen

    2016-01-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is encoded by the multidrug resistance (MDR1) gene and is well studied as a multi-drug resistance transporter. Peritoneal adhesion formation following abdominal surgery remains an important clinical problem. Here, we found that P-gp was highly expressed in human adhesion fibroblasts and promoted peritoneal adhesion formation in a rodent model. Knockdown of P-gp expression by intraperitoneal injection of MDR1-targeted siRNA significantly reduced both the peritoneal adhesion development rate and adhesion grades. Additionally, we found that operative injury up-regulated P-gp expression in peritoneal fibroblasts through the TGF-β1/Smad signaling pathway and histone H3 acetylation. The overexpression of P-gp accelerated migration and proliferation of fibroblasts via volume-activated Cl- current and cell volume regulation by enhancing phosphorylation of the chloride channel-3. Therefore, P-gp plays a critical role in postoperative peritoneal adhesion formation and may be a valuable therapeutic target for preventing the formation of peritoneal adhesions. PMID:26877779

  20. Regulation of CLC-1 chloride channel biosynthesis by FKBP8 and Hsp90β

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Yi-Jheng; Huang, Jing-Jia; Wu, Hao-Han; Hsieh, Hsin-Ying; Wu, Chia-Ying; Chen, Shu-Ching; Chen, Tsung-Yu; Tang, Chih-Yung

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in human CLC-1 chloride channel are associated with the skeletal muscle disorder myotonia congenita. The disease-causing mutant A531V manifests enhanced proteasomal degradation of CLC-1. We recently found that CLC-1 degradation is mediated by cullin 4 ubiquitin ligase complex. It is currently unclear how quality control and protein degradation systems coordinate with each other to process the biosynthesis of CLC-1. Herein we aim to ascertain the molecular nature of the protein quality control system for CLC-1. We identified three CLC-1-interacting proteins that are well-known heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90)-associated co-chaperones: FK506-binding protein 8 (FKBP8), activator of Hsp90 ATPase homolog 1 (Aha1), and Hsp70/Hsp90 organizing protein (HOP). These co-chaperones promote both the protein level and the functional expression of CLC-1 wild-type and A531V mutant. CLC-1 biosynthesis is also facilitated by the molecular chaperones Hsc70 and Hsp90β. The protein stability of CLC-1 is notably increased by FKBP8 and the Hsp90β inhibitor 17-allylamino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin (17-AAG) that substantially suppresses cullin 4 expression. We further confirmed that cullin 4 may interact with Hsp90β and FKBP8. Our data are consistent with the idea that FKBP8 and Hsp90β play an essential role in the late phase of CLC-1 quality control by dynamically coordinating protein folding and degradation. PMID:27580824

  1. Regulation of CLC-1 chloride channel biosynthesis by FKBP8 and Hsp90β.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yi-Jheng; Huang, Jing-Jia; Wu, Hao-Han; Hsieh, Hsin-Ying; Wu, Chia-Ying; Chen, Shu-Ching; Chen, Tsung-Yu; Tang, Chih-Yung

    2016-09-01

    Mutations in human CLC-1 chloride channel are associated with the skeletal muscle disorder myotonia congenita. The disease-causing mutant A531V manifests enhanced proteasomal degradation of CLC-1. We recently found that CLC-1 degradation is mediated by cullin 4 ubiquitin ligase complex. It is currently unclear how quality control and protein degradation systems coordinate with each other to process the biosynthesis of CLC-1. Herein we aim to ascertain the molecular nature of the protein quality control system for CLC-1. We identified three CLC-1-interacting proteins that are well-known heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90)-associated co-chaperones: FK506-binding protein 8 (FKBP8), activator of Hsp90 ATPase homolog 1 (Aha1), and Hsp70/Hsp90 organizing protein (HOP). These co-chaperones promote both the protein level and the functional expression of CLC-1 wild-type and A531V mutant. CLC-1 biosynthesis is also facilitated by the molecular chaperones Hsc70 and Hsp90β. The protein stability of CLC-1 is notably increased by FKBP8 and the Hsp90β inhibitor 17-allylamino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin (17-AAG) that substantially suppresses cullin 4 expression. We further confirmed that cullin 4 may interact with Hsp90β and FKBP8. Our data are consistent with the idea that FKBP8 and Hsp90β play an essential role in the late phase of CLC-1 quality control by dynamically coordinating protein folding and degradation.

  2. Characterization of the target of ivermectin, the glutamate-gated chloride channel, from Anopheles gambiae

    PubMed Central

    Meyers, Jacob I.; Gray, Meg; Kuklinski, Wojtek; Johnson, Lucas B.; Snow, Christopher D.; Black, William C.; Partin, Kathryn M.; Foy, Brian D.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The use of insecticide-treated nets and indoor residual insecticides targeting adult mosquito vectors is a key element in malaria control programs. However, mosquito resistance to the insecticides used in these applications threatens malaria control efforts. Recently, the mass drug administration of ivermectin (IVM) has been shown to kill Anopheles gambiae mosquitoes and disrupt Plasmodium falciparum transmission in the field. We cloned the molecular target of IVM from A. gambiae, the glutamate-gated chloride channel (AgGluCl), and characterized its transcriptional patterns, protein expression and functional responses to glutamate and IVM. AgGluCl cloning revealed an unpredicted fourth splice isoform as well as a novel exon and splice site. The predicted gene products contained heterogeneity in the N-terminal extracellular domain and the intracellular loop region. Responses to glutamate and IVM were measured using two-electrode voltage clamp on Xenopus laevis oocytes expressing AgGluCl. IVM induced non-persistent currents in AgGluCl-a1 and did not potentiate glutamate responses. In contrast, AgGluCl-b was insensitive to IVM, suggesting that the AgGluCl gene could produce IVM-sensitive and -insensitive homomultimers from alternative splicing. AgGluCl isoform-specific transcripts were measured across tissues, ages, blood feeding status and sex, and were found to be differentially transcribed across these physiological variables. Lastly, we stained adult, female A. gambiae for GluCl expression. The channel was expressed in the antenna, Johnston's organ, supraesophageal ganglion and thoracic ganglia. In summary, we have characterized the first GluCl from a mosquito, A. gambiae, and described its unique activity and expression with respect to it as the target of the insecticide IVM. PMID:25994631

  3. Characterization of the target of ivermectin, the glutamate-gated chloride channel, from Anopheles gambiae.

    PubMed

    Meyers, Jacob I; Gray, Meg; Kuklinski, Wojtek; Johnson, Lucas B; Snow, Christopher D; Black, William C; Partin, Kathryn M; Foy, Brian D

    2015-05-15

    The use of insecticide-treated nets and indoor residual insecticides targeting adult mosquito vectors is a key element in malaria control programs. However, mosquito resistance to the insecticides used in these applications threatens malaria control efforts. Recently, the mass drug administration of ivermectin (IVM) has been shown to kill Anopheles gambiae mosquitoes and disrupt Plasmodium falciparum transmission in the field. We cloned the molecular target of IVM from A. gambiae, the glutamate-gated chloride channel (AgGluCl), and characterized its transcriptional patterns, protein expression and functional responses to glutamate and IVM. AgGluCl cloning revealed an unpredicted fourth splice isoform as well as a novel exon and splice site. The predicted gene products contained heterogeneity in the N-terminal extracellular domain and the intracellular loop region. Responses to glutamate and IVM were measured using two-electrode voltage clamp on Xenopus laevis oocytes expressing AgGluCl. IVM induced non-persistent currents in AgGluCl-a1 and did not potentiate glutamate responses. In contrast, AgGluCl-b was insensitive to IVM, suggesting that the AgGluCl gene could produce IVM-sensitive and -insensitive homomultimers from alternative splicing. AgGluCl isoform-specific transcripts were measured across tissues, ages, blood feeding status and sex, and were found to be differentially transcribed across these physiological variables. Lastly, we stained adult, female A. gambiae for GluCl expression. The channel was expressed in the antenna, Johnston's organ, supraesophageal ganglion and thoracic ganglia. In summary, we have characterized the first GluCl from a mosquito, A. gambiae, and described its unique activity and expression with respect to it as the target of the insecticide IVM.

  4. Upregulation of apical sodium-chloride cotransporter and basolateral chloride channels is responsible for the maintenance of salt-sensitive hypertension.

    PubMed

    Capasso, Giovambattista; Rizzo, Maria; Garavaglia, Maria Lisa; Trepiccione, Francesco; Zacchia, Miriam; Mugione, Alessandra; Ferrari, Patrizia; Paulmichl, Markus; Lang, Florian; Loffing, Johannes; Carrel, Monique; Damiano, Sara; Wagner, Carsten A; Bianchi, Giuseppe; Meyer, Giuliano

    2008-08-01

    We investigated which of the NaCl transporters are involved in the maintenance of salt-sensitive hypertension. Milan hypertensive (MHS) rats were studied 3 mo after birth. In MHS, compared with normotensive strain (MNS), mRNA abundance, quantified by competitive PCR on isolated tubules, was unchanged, both for Na+/H+ isoform 3 (NHE3) and Na+-K+-2Cl- (NKCC2), but higher (119%, n = 5, P < 0.005) for Na+-Cl- (NCC) in distal convoluted tubules (DCT). These results were confirmed by Western blots, which revealed: 1) unchanged NHE3 in the cortex and NKCC2 in the outer medulla; 2) a significant increase (52%, n = 6, P < 0.001) of NCC in the cortex; 3) alpha- and beta-sodium channels [epithelial Na+ channel (ENaC)] unaffected in renal cortex and slightly reduced in the outer medulla, while gamma-ENaC remained unchanged. Pendrin protein expression was unaffected. The role of NCC was reinforced by immunocytochemical studies showing increased NCC on the apical membrane of DCT cells of MHS animals, and by clearance experiments demonstrating a larger sensitivity (P < 0.001) to bendroflumethiazide in MHS rats. Kidney-specific chloride channels (ClC-K) were studied by Western blot experiments on renal cortex and by patch-clamp studies on primary culture of DCT dissected from MNS and MHS animals. Electrophysiological characteristics of ClC-K channels were unchanged in MHS rats, but the number of active channels in a patch was 0.60 +/- 0.21 (n = 35) in MNS rats and 2.17 +/- 0.59 (n = 23) in MHS rats (P < 0.05). The data indicate that, in salt-sensitive hypertension, there is a strong upregulation, both of NCC and ClC-K along the DCT, which explains the persistence of hypertension.

  5. The AQP-3 water channel and the ClC-3 chloride channel coordinate the hypotonicity-induced swelling volume in nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haifeng; Li, Huarong; Liu, Enqi; Guang, Yutao; Yang, Lili; Mao, Jianwen; Zhu, Linyan; Chen, Lixin; Wang, Liwei

    2014-12-01

    Cell volume regulation is a fundamental activity to maintain cell survival, and aquaporins and chloride channels play important roles in this process. However, the interactions between these channels are far from clear. In this study, the interactions between AQP-3 and ClC-3 were investigated in CNE-1 and CNE-2Z nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells, which are well and poorly differentiated, respectively. The correlation coefficient of AQP-3 and ClC-3 protein phylogenetic trees was 0.319. In CNE-1 cells, there are overlapping distributions of AQP-3 and ClC-3, mainly in the plasma membrane. This was confirmed by the co-immunoprecipitation of AQP-3 and ClC-3, showing that they could be interlinked and form complexes. AQP-3 over-expression had no significant effects on swelling-induced Cl(-) currents (ICl,swell); however, ICl,swell could be inhibited by aquaporin blockers, anti-AQP-3 antibodies and AQP-3-siRNAs. In addition, the AQP-3 expression was decreased by down-regulation of ClC-3 expression, indicating that ClC-3 can modulate the expression of AQP-3 proteins. The effects of aquaporin blockers, anti-AQP-3 antibodies and AQP-3 over-expression on ICl,swell in CNE-2Z cells were consistent with those in CNE-1 cells. In conclusion, AQP-3 and ClC-3 are functionally-related integral membrane channel proteins, and their interactions are involved in cell volume regulation in CNE-1 and CNE-2Z cells. The opening of ClC-3 transports Cl(-) across the cell membrane and then drives the efflux of water through AQP-3 channels and ion channels; AQP-3 may interact with ClC-3 in order to regulate the effluxes of chloride and water.

  6. Benzopyrimido-pyrrolo-oxazine-dione (R)-BPO-27 Inhibits CFTR Chloride Channel Gating by Competition with ATP

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yonjung; Anderson, Marc O.; Park, Jinhong; Lee, Min Goo; Namkung, Wan

    2015-01-01

    We previously reported that benzopyrimido-pyrrolo-oxazinedione BPO-27 [6-(5-bromofuran-2-yl)-7,9-dimethyl-8,10-dioxo-11-phenyl-7,8,9,10-tetrahydro-6H-benzo[b]pyrimido [4′,5′:3,4]pyrrolo [1,2-d][1,4]oxazine-2-carboxylic acid] inhibits the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channel with low nanomolar potency and reduces cystogenesis in a model of polycystic kidney disease. We used computational chemistry and patch-clamp to show that enantiomerically pure (R)-BPO-27 inhibits CFTR by competition with ATP, whereas (S)-BPO-27 is inactive. Docking computations using a homology model of CFTR structure suggested that (R)-BPO-27 binds near the canonical ATP binding site, and these findings were supported by molecular dynamics simulations showing a lower binding energy for the (R) versus (S) stereoisomers. Three additional lower-potency BPO-27 analogs were modeled in a similar fashion, with the binding energies predicted in the correct order. Whole-cell patch-clamp studies showed linear CFTR currents with a voltage-independent (R)-BPO-27 block mechanism. Single-channel recordings in inside-out patches showed reduced CFTR channel open probability and increased channel closed time by (R)-BPO-27 without altered unitary channel conductance. At a concentration of (R)-BPO-27 that inhibited CFTR chloride current by ∼50%, the EC50 for ATP activation of CFTR increased from 0.27 to 1.77 mM but was not changed by CFTRinh-172 [4-[[4-oxo-2-thioxo-3-[3-trifluoromethyl)phenyl]-5-thiazolidinylidene]methyl]benzoic acid], a thiazolidinone CFTR inhibitor that acts at a site distinct from the ATP binding site. Our results suggest that (R)-BPO-27 inhibition of CFTR involves competition with ATP. PMID:26174774

  7. Benzopyrimido-pyrrolo-oxazine-dione (R)-BPO-27 Inhibits CFTR Chloride Channel Gating by Competition with ATP.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yonjung; Anderson, Marc O; Park, Jinhong; Lee, Min Goo; Namkung, Wan; Verkman, A S

    2015-10-01

    We previously reported that benzopyrimido-pyrrolo-oxazinedione BPO-27 [6-(5-bromofuran-2-yl)-7,9-dimethyl-8,10-dioxo-11-phenyl-7,8,9,10-tetrahydro-6H-benzo[b]pyrimido [4',5':3,4]pyrrolo [1,2-d][1,4]oxazine-2-carboxylic acid] inhibits the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channel with low nanomolar potency and reduces cystogenesis in a model of polycystic kidney disease. We used computational chemistry and patch-clamp to show that enantiomerically pure (R)-BPO-27 inhibits CFTR by competition with ATP, whereas (S)-BPO-27 is inactive. Docking computations using a homology model of CFTR structure suggested that (R)-BPO-27 binds near the canonical ATP binding site, and these findings were supported by molecular dynamics simulations showing a lower binding energy for the (R) versus (S) stereoisomers. Three additional lower-potency BPO-27 analogs were modeled in a similar fashion, with the binding energies predicted in the correct order. Whole-cell patch-clamp studies showed linear CFTR currents with a voltage-independent (R)-BPO-27 block mechanism. Single-channel recordings in inside-out patches showed reduced CFTR channel open probability and increased channel closed time by (R)-BPO-27 without altered unitary channel conductance. At a concentration of (R)-BPO-27 that inhibited CFTR chloride current by ∼50%, the EC50 for ATP activation of CFTR increased from 0.27 to 1.77 mM but was not changed by CFTRinh-172 [4-[[4-oxo-2-thioxo-3-[3-trifluoromethyl)phenyl]-5-thiazolidinylidene]methyl]benzoic acid], a thiazolidinone CFTR inhibitor that acts at a site distinct from the ATP binding site. Our results suggest that (R)-BPO-27 inhibition of CFTR involves competition with ATP.

  8. S-Nitrosylation Regulates Nuclear Translocation of Chloride Intracellular Channel Protein CLIC4*

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Mariam; Shukla, Anjali; Amin, Palak; Niedelman, Wendy; Lee, Jessica; Jividen, Kasey; Phang, Juanita M.; Ding, Jinhui; Suh, Kwang S.; Curmi, Paul M. G.; Yuspa, Stuart H.

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear translocation of chloride intracellular channel protein CLIC4 is essential for its role in Ca2+-induced differentiation, stress-induced apoptosis, and modulating TGF-β signaling in mouse epidermal keratinocytes. However, post-translational modifications on CLIC4 that govern nuclear translocation and thus these activities remain to be elucidated. The structure of CLIC4 is dependent on the redox environment, in vitro, and translocation may depend on reactive oxygen and nitrogen species in the cell. Here we show that NO directly induces nuclear translocation of CLIC4 that is independent of the NO-cGMP pathway. Indeed, CLIC4 is directly modified by NO through S-nitrosylation of a cysteine residue, as measured by the biotin switch assay. NO enhances association of CLIC4 with the nuclear import proteins importin α and Ran. This is likely a result of the conformational change induced by S-nitrosylated CLIC4 that leads to unfolding of the protein, as exhibited by CD spectra analysis and trypsinolysis of the modified protein. Cysteine mutants of CLIC4 exhibit altered nitrosylation, nuclear residence, and stability, compared with the wild type protein likely as a consequence of altered tertiary structure. Moreover, tumor necrosis factor α-induced nuclear translocation of CLIC4 is dependent on nitric-oxide synthase activity. Inhibition of nitric-oxide synthase activity inhibits tumor necrosis factor α-induced nitrosylation and association with importin α and Ran and ablates CLIC4 nuclear translocation. These results suggest that S-nitrosylation governs CLIC4 structure, its association with protein partners, and thus its intracellular distribution. PMID:20504765

  9. ClC-1 chloride channels: state-of-the-art research and future challenges

    PubMed Central

    Imbrici, Paola; Altamura, Concetta; Pessia, Mauro; Mantegazza, Renato; Desaphy, Jean-François; Camerino, Diana Conte

    2015-01-01

    The voltage-dependent ClC-1 chloride channel belongs to the CLC channel/transporter family. It is a homodimer comprising two individual pores which can operate independently or simultaneously according to two gating modes, the fast and the slow gate of the channel. ClC-1 is preferentially expressed in the skeletal muscle fibers where the presence of an efficient Cl- homeostasis is crucial for the correct membrane repolarization and propagation of action potential. As a consequence, mutations in the CLCN1 gene cause dominant and recessive forms of myotonia congenita (MC), a rare skeletal muscle channelopathy caused by abnormal membrane excitation, and clinically characterized by muscle stiffness and various degrees of transitory weakness. Elucidation of the mechanistic link between the genetic defects and the disease pathogenesis is still incomplete and, at this time, there is no specific treatment for MC. Still controversial is the subcellular localization pattern of ClC-1 channels in skeletal muscle as well as its modulation by some intracellular factors. The expression of ClC-1 in other tissues such as in brain and heart and the possible assembly of ClC-1/ClC-2 heterodimers further expand the physiological properties of ClC-1 and its involvement in diseases. A recent de novo CLCN1 truncation mutation in a patient with generalized epilepsy indeed postulates an unexpected role of this channel in the control of neuronal network excitability. This review summarizes the most relevant and state-of-the-art research on ClC-1 chloride channels physiology and associated diseases. PMID:25964741

  10. ClC-1 chloride channels: state-of-the-art research and future challenges.

    PubMed

    Imbrici, Paola; Altamura, Concetta; Pessia, Mauro; Mantegazza, Renato; Desaphy, Jean-François; Camerino, Diana Conte

    2015-01-01

    The voltage-dependent ClC-1 chloride channel belongs to the CLC channel/transporter family. It is a homodimer comprising two individual pores which can operate independently or simultaneously according to two gating modes, the fast and the slow gate of the channel. ClC-1 is preferentially expressed in the skeletal muscle fibers where the presence of an efficient Cl(-) homeostasis is crucial for the correct membrane repolarization and propagation of action potential. As a consequence, mutations in the CLCN1 gene cause dominant and recessive forms of myotonia congenita (MC), a rare skeletal muscle channelopathy caused by abnormal membrane excitation, and clinically characterized by muscle stiffness and various degrees of transitory weakness. Elucidation of the mechanistic link between the genetic defects and the disease pathogenesis is still incomplete and, at this time, there is no specific treatment for MC. Still controversial is the subcellular localization pattern of ClC-1 channels in skeletal muscle as well as its modulation by some intracellular factors. The expression of ClC-1 in other tissues such as in brain and heart and the possible assembly of ClC-1/ClC-2 heterodimers further expand the physiological properties of ClC-1 and its involvement in diseases. A recent de novo CLCN1 truncation mutation in a patient with generalized epilepsy indeed postulates an unexpected role of this channel in the control of neuronal network excitability. This review summarizes the most relevant and state-of-the-art research on ClC-1 chloride channels physiology and associated diseases.

  11. The Arabidopsis Thylakoid Chloride Channel AtCLCe Functions in Chloride Homeostasis and Regulation of Photosynthetic Electron Transport

    PubMed Central

    Herdean, Andrei; Nziengui, Hugues; Zsiros, Ottó; Solymosi, Katalin; Garab, Győző; Lundin, Björn; Spetea, Cornelia

    2016-01-01

    Chloride ions can be translocated across cell membranes through Cl− channels or Cl−/H+ exchangers. The thylakoid-located member of the Cl− channel CLC family in Arabidopsis thaliana (AtCLCe) was hypothesized to play a role in photosynthetic regulation based on the initial photosynthetic characterization of clce mutant lines. The reduced nitrate content of Arabidopsis clce mutants suggested a role in regulation of plant nitrate homeostasis. In this study, we aimed to further investigate the role of AtCLCe in the regulation of ion homeostasis and photosynthetic processes in the thylakoid membrane. We report that the size and composition of proton motive force were mildly altered in two independent Arabidopsis clce mutant lines. Most pronounced effects in the clce mutants were observed on the photosynthetic electron transport of dark-adapted plants, based on the altered shape and associated parameters of the polyphasic OJIP kinetics of chlorophyll a fluorescence induction. Other alterations were found in the kinetics of state transition and in the macro-organization of photosystem II supercomplexes, as indicated by circular dichroism measurements. Pre-treatment with KCl but not with KNO3 restored the wild-type photosynthetic phenotype. Analyses by transmission electron microscopy revealed a bow-like arrangement of the thylakoid network and a large thylakoid-free stromal region in chloroplast sections from the dark-adapted clce plants. Based on these data, we propose that AtCLCe functions in Cl− homeostasis after transition from light to dark, which affects chloroplast ultrastructure and regulation of photosynthetic electron transport. PMID:26904077

  12. Fast and Slow Gating Relaxations in the Muscle Chloride Channel Clc-1

    PubMed Central

    Accardi, Alessio; Pusch, Michael

    2000-01-01

    Gating of the muscle chloride channel CLC-1 involves at least two processes evidenced by double-exponential current relaxations when stepping the voltage to negative values. However, there is little information about the gating of CLC-1 at positive voltages. Here, we analyzed macroscopic gating of CLC-1 over a large voltage range (from −160 to +200 mV). Activation was fast at positive voltages but could be easily followed using envelope protocols that employed a tail pulse to −140 mV after stepping the voltage to a certain test potential for increasing durations. Activation was biexponential, demonstrating the presence of two gating processes. Both time constants became exponentially faster at positive voltages. A similar voltage dependence was also seen for the fast gate time constant of CLC-0. The voltage dependence of the time constant of the fast process of CLC-1, τf, was steeper than that of the slow one, τs (apparent activation valences were zf ∼ −0.79 and zs ∼ −0.42) such that at +200 mV the two processes became kinetically distinct by almost two orders of magnitude (τf ∼ 16 μs, τs ∼ 1 ms). This voltage dependence is inconsistent with a previously published gating model for CLC-1 (Fahlke, C., A. Rosenbohm, N. Mitrovic, A.L. George, and R. Rüdel. 1996. Biophys. J. 71:695–706). The kinetic difference at 200 mV allowed us to separate the steady state open probabilities of the two processes assuming that they reflect two parallel (not necessarily independent) gates that have to be open simultaneously to allow ion conduction. Both open probabilities could be described by Boltzmann functions with gating valences around one and with nonzero “offsets” at negative voltages, indicating that the two “gates” never close completely. For comparison with single channel data and to correlate the two gating processes with the two gates of CLC-0, we characterized their voltage, pHint, and [Cl]ext dependence, and the dominant myotonia inducing

  13. State-dependent access of anions to the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator chloride channel pore.

    PubMed

    Fatehi, Mohammad; Linsdell, Paul

    2008-03-07

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl(-) channel is gated by intracellular factors; however, conformational changes in the channel pore associated with channel activation have not been identified. We have used patch clamp recording to investigate the state-dependent accessibility of substituted cysteine residues in the CFTR channel pore to a range of cysteine-reactive reagents applied to the extracellular side of the membrane. Using functional modification of the channel current-voltage relationship as a marker of modification, we find that several positively charged reagents are able to penetrate deeply into the pore from the outside irrespective of whether or not the channels have been activated. In contrast, access of three anionic cysteine-reactive reagents, the methanesulfonate sodium (2-sulfonatoethyl)methanesulfonate, the organic mercurial p-chloromercuriphenylsulfonic acid, and the permeant anion Au(CN)(2)(-), to several different sites in the pore is strictly limited prior to channel activation. This suggests that in nonactivated channels some ion selectivity mechanism exists to exclude anions yet permit cations into the channel pore from the extracellular solution. We suggest that activation of CFTR channels involves a conformational change in the pore that removes a strong selectivity against anion entry from the extracellular solution. We propose further that this conformational change occurs in advance of channel opening, suggesting that multiple distinct closed pore conformations exist.

  14. Arsenic promotes ubiquitinylation and lysosomal degradation of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channels in human airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Bomberger, Jennifer M; Coutermarsh, Bonita A; Barnaby, Roxanna L; Stanton, Bruce A

    2012-05-18

    Arsenic exposure significantly increases respiratory bacterial infections and reduces the ability of the innate immune system to eliminate bacterial infections. Recently, we observed in the gill of killifish, an environmental model organism, that arsenic exposure induced the ubiquitinylation and degradation of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), a chloride channel that is essential for the mucociliary clearance of respiratory pathogens in humans. Accordingly, in this study, we tested the hypothesis that low dose arsenic exposure reduces the abundance and function of CFTR in human airway epithelial cells. Arsenic induced a time- and dose-dependent increase in multiubiquitinylated CFTR, which led to its lysosomal degradation, and a decrease in CFTR-mediated chloride secretion. Although arsenic had no effect on the abundance or activity of USP10, a deubiquitinylating enzyme, siRNA-mediated knockdown of c-Cbl, an E3 ubiquitin ligase, abolished the arsenic-stimulated degradation of CFTR. Arsenic enhanced the degradation of CFTR by increasing phosphorylated c-Cbl, which increased its interaction with CFTR, and subsequent ubiquitinylation of CFTR. Because epidemiological studies have shown that arsenic increases the incidence of respiratory infections, this study suggests that one potential mechanism of this effect involves arsenic-induced ubiquitinylation and degradation of CFTR, which decreases chloride secretion and airway surface liquid volume, effects that would be proposed to reduce mucociliary clearance of respiratory pathogens.

  15. The ClC-3 chloride channel and osmoregulation in the European sea bass, Dicentrarchus labrax.

    PubMed

    Bossus, Maryline; Charmantier, Guy; Blondeau-Bidet, Eva; Valletta, Bianca; Boulo, Viviane; Lorin-Nebel, Catherine

    2013-07-01

    Dicentrarchus labrax migrates between sea (SW), brackish and fresh water (FW) where chloride concentrations and requirements for chloride handling change: in FW, fish absorb chloride and restrict renal losses; in SW, they excrete chloride. In this study, the expression and localization of ClC-3 and Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase (NKA) were studied in fish adapted to SW, or exposed to FW from 10 min to 30 days. In gills, NKA-α1 subunit expression transiently increased from 10 min and reached a stabilized intermediate expression level after 24 h in FW. ClC-3 co-localized with NKA in the basolateral membrane of mitochondria-rich cells (MRCs) at all conditions. The intensity of MRC ClC-3 immunostaining was significantly higher (by 50 %) 1 h after the transfer to FW, whereas the branchial ClC-3 protein expression was 30 % higher 7 days after the transfer as compared to SW. This is consistent with the increased number of immunopositive MRCs (immunostained for NKA and ClC-3). However, the ClC-3 mRNA expression was significantly lower in FW gills. In the kidney, after FW transfer, a transient decrease in NKA-α1 subunit expression was followed by significantly higher stable levels from 24 h. The low ClC-3 protein expression detected at both salinities was not observed by immunocytochemistry in the SW kidney; ClC-3 was localized in the basal membrane of the collecting ducts and tubules 7 and 30 days after transfer to FW. Renal ClC-3 mRNA expression, however, seemed higher in SW than in FW. The potential role of this chloride channel ClC-3 in osmoregulatory and osmosensing mechanisms is discussed.

  16. Inhibition of GABA-gated chloride channels by 12,14-dichlorodehydroabietic acid in mammalian brain

    PubMed Central

    Nicholson, Russell A; Lees, George; Zheng, Jian; Verdon, Bernard

    1999-01-01

    12,14-dichlorodehydroabietic acid (12,14-Cl2DHA) reduced GABA-stimulated uptake of 36Cl− into mouse brain synaptoneurosomes suggesting inhibition of mammalian GABAA receptor function. 12,14-Cl2DHA did not affect the binding of [3H]-muscimol to brain membranes but displaced specifically bound [3H]-EBOB. The inhibitory effect on [3H]-EBOB binding was not reversible. 12,14-Cl2DHA reduced the availability of [3H]-EBOB binding sites (Bmax) without changing the KD of the radioligand for remaining sites. 12,14-Cl2DHA did not affect the rate of association of [3H]-EBOB with its chloride channel receptor, but increased the initial rate of [3H]-EBOB dissociation. 12,14-Cl2DHA enhanced the incidence of EPSCs when rapidly applied to cultured rat cortical neurones. Longer exposures produced block of IPSCs with marked increases in the frequency of EPSCs and min EPSCs. 12,14-Cl2DHA also irreversibly suppressed chloride currents evoked by pulses of exogenous GABA in these cells. Ultimately, 12,14-Cl2DHA inhibited all synaptic traffic and action currents in current clamped cells indicating that, in contrast to picrotoxinin (which causes paroxysmal bursting), it is not fully selective for the GABAA receptor-chloride channel complex. The depolarizing block seen with 12,14-Cl2DHA in amphotericin-perforated preparations implicates loss of Ca2+ buffering in the polarity change and this may account for inhibition of spontaneous action potentials. Our investigation demonstrates that 12,14-Cl2DHA blocks GABA-dependent chloride entry in mammalian brain and operates as a non-competitive insurmountable GABAA antagonist. The mechanism likely involves either irreversible binding of 12,14-Cl2DHA to the trioxabicyclooctane recognition site or a site that is allosterically coupled to it. We cannot exclude, however, the possibility that 12,14-Cl2DHA causes localized proteolysis or more extensive conformational change within a critical subunit of the chloride channel. PMID:10204999

  17. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator: a chloride channel gated by ATP binding and hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Bompadre, Silvia G; Hwang, Tzyh-Chang

    2007-08-25

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is a chloride channel that belongs to the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter superfamily. Defective function of CFTR is responsible for cystic fibrosis (CF), the most common lethal autosomal recessive disorder in Caucasian populations. The disease is manifested in defective chloride transport across the epithelial cells in various tissues. To date, more than 1400 different mutations have been identified as CF-associated. CFTR is regulated by phosphorylation in its regulatory (R) domain, and gated by ATP binding and hydrolysis at its two nucleotide-binding domains (NBD1 and NBD2). Recent studies reveal that the NBDs of CFTR may dimerize as observed in other ABC proteins. Upon dimerization of CFTR's two NBDs, in a head-to-tail configuration, the two ATP-binding pockets (ABP1 and ABP2) are formed by the canonical Walker A and B motifs from one NBD and the signature sequence from the partner NBD. Mutations of the amino acids that interact with ATP reveal that the two ABPs play distinct roles in controlling ATP-dependent gating of CFTR. It was proposed that binding of ATP to the ABP2, which is formed by the Walker A and B in NBD2 and the signature sequence in NBD1, is critical for catalyzing channel opening. While binding of ATP to the ABP1 alone may not increase the opening rate, it does contribute to the stabilization of the open channel conformation. Several disease-associated mutations of the CFTR channel are characterized by gating defects. Understanding how CFTR's two NBDs work together to gate the channel could provide considerable mechanistic information for future pharmacological studies, which could pave the way for tailored drug design for therapeutical interventions in CF.

  18. The Contribution of Raised Intraneuronal Chloride to Epileptic Network Activity

    PubMed Central

    Alfonsa, Hannah; Merricks, Edward M.; Codadu, Neela K.; Cunningham, Mark O.; Deisseroth, Karl; Racca, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Altered inhibitory function is an important facet of epileptic pathology. A key concept is that GABAergic activity can become excitatory if intraneuronal chloride rises. However, it has proved difficult to separate the role of raised chloride from other contributory factors in complex network phenomena, such as epileptic pathology. Therefore, we asked what patterns of activity are associated with chloride dysregulation by making novel use of Halorhodopsin to load clusters of mouse pyramidal cells artificially with Cl−. Brief (1–10 s) activation of Halorhodopsin caused substantial positive shifts in the GABAergic reversal potential that were proportional to the charge transfer during the illumination and in adult neocortical pyramidal neurons decayed with a time constant of τ = 8.0 ± 2.8s. At the network level, these positive shifts in EGABA produced a transient rise in network excitability, with many distinctive features of epileptic foci, including high-frequency oscillations with evidence of out-of-phase firing (Ibarz et al., 2010). We show how such firing patterns can arise from quite small shifts in the mean intracellular Cl− level, within heterogeneous neuronal populations. Notably, however, chloride loading by itself did not trigger full ictal events, even with additional electrical stimulation to the underlying white matter. In contrast, when performed in combination with low, subepileptic levels of 4-aminopyridine, Halorhodopsin activation rapidly induced full ictal activity. These results suggest that chloride loading has at most an adjunctive role in ictogenesis. Our simulations also show how chloride loading can affect the jitter of action potential timing associated with imminent recruitment to an ictal event (Netoff and Schiff, 2002). PMID:25995461

  19. A chloride channel from lobster walking leg nerves. Characterization of single-channel properties in planar bilayers

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    A novel, small conductance of Cl- channel was characterized by incorporation into planar bilayers from a plasma membrane preparation of lobster walking leg nerves. Under conditions of symmetrical 100 mM NaCl, 10 mM Tris-HCl, pH 7.4, single Cl- channels exhibit rectifying current-voltage (I-V) behavior with a conductance of 19.2 +/- 0.8 pS at positive voltages and 15.1 +/- 1.6 pS in the voltage range of -40 to 0 mV. The channel exhibits a negligible permeability for Na+ compared with Cl- and displays the following sequence of anion permeability relative to Cl- as measured under near bi-ionic conditions: I- (2.7) greater than NO3- (1.8) greater than Br- (1.5) greater than Cl- (1.0) greater than CH3CO2- (0.18) greater than HCO3- (0.10) greater than gluconate (0.06) greater than F- (0.05). The unitary conductance saturates with increasing Cl- concentration in a Michaelis-Menten fashion with a Km of 100 mM and gamma max = 33 pS at positive voltage. The I-V curve is similar in 10 mM Tris or 10 mM HEPES buffer, but substitution of 100 mM NaCl with 100 mM tetraethylammonium chloride on the cis side results in increased rectification with a 40% reduction in current at negative voltages. The gating of the channel is weakly voltage dependent with an open-state probability of 0.23 at -75 mV and 0.64 at +75 mV. Channel gating is sensitive to cis pH with an increased opening probability observed for a pH change of 7.4 to 11 and nearly complete inhibition for a pH change of 7.4 to 6.0. The lobster Cl- channel is reversibly blocked by the anion transport inhibitors, SITS (4-acetamido, 4'-isothiocyanostilbene-2,2'-disulfonic acid) and NPPB (5- nitro-2-(3-phenylpropylamino)benzoic acid). Many of these characteristics are similar to those previously described for small conductance Cl- channels in various vertebrate cells, including epithelia. These functional comparisons suggest that this invertebrate Cl- channel is an evolutionary prototype of a widely distributed class of small

  20. Superoxide radicals increase transforming growth factor-{beta}1 and collagen release from human lung fibroblasts via cellular influx through chloride channels

    SciTech Connect

    Qi Shufan Hartog, Gertjan J.M. den; Bast, Aalt

    2009-05-15

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been implicated in the pathogenesis of fibrosis. However, it remains unclear which ROS is the major cause. We hypothesize that superoxide elicits specific toxicity to human lung fibroblasts and plays an important role in the development of pulmonary fibrosis. In this study, superoxide generated from xanthine and xanthine oxidase activated lung fibroblasts by increasing the release of TGF-{beta}1 and collagen. This was associated with increased levels of intracellular superoxide. SOD and tempol, by scavenging respectively extracellular and intracellular superoxide, prevented the activation of fibroblasts induced by exposure to exogenous superoxide, whereas catalase did not. Moreover, hydrogen peroxide did not activate fibroblasts. Apparently, superoxide rather than hydrogen peroxide is involved in the regulation of TGF-{beta}1 and collagen release in lung fibroblasts. The chloride channel blocker, DIDS, inhibited the increase of intracellular superoxide levels induced by exogenous superoxide and consequently prevented the activation of fibroblasts. This suggests that the cellular influx of superoxide through chloride channels is essential for superoxide-induced activation of fibroblasts. ERK1/2 and p38 MAPKs are involved in the intracellular pathway leading to superoxide-induced fibroblasts activation. Superoxide possesses until now undiscovered specific pro-fibrotic properties in human lung fibroblasts. This takes place via the cellular influx of superoxide through chloride channels rather than via the formation of hydrogen peroxide.

  1. Adenosine regulates a chloride channel via protein kinase C and a G protein in a rabbit cortical collecting duct cell line.

    PubMed Central

    Schwiebert, E M; Karlson, K H; Friedman, P A; Dietl, P; Spielman, W S; Stanton, B A

    1992-01-01

    We examined the regulation by adenosine of a 305-pS chloride (Cl-) channel in the apical membrane of a continuous cell line derived from rabbit cortical collecting duct (RCCT-28A) using the patch clamp technique. Stimulation of A1 adenosine receptors by N6-cyclohexyladenosine (CHA) activated the channel in cell-attached patches. Phorbol 12,13-didecanoate and 1-oleoyl 2-acetylglycerol, activators of protein kinase C (PKC), mimicked the effect of CHA, whereas the PKC inhibitor H7 blocked the action of CHA. Stimulation of A1 adenosine receptors also increased the production of diacylglycerol, an activator of PKC. Exogenous PKC added to the cytoplasmic face of inside-out patches also stimulated the Cl- channel. Alkaline phosphatase reversed PKC activation. These results show that stimulation of A1 adenosine receptors activates a 305-pS Cl-channel in the apical membrane by a phosphorylation-dependent pathway involving PKC. In previous studies, we showed that the protein G alpha i-3 activated the 305-pS Cl- channel (Schwiebert et al. 1990. J. Biol. Chem. 265:7725-7728). We, therefore, tested the hypothesis that PKC activates the channel by a G protein-dependent pathway. In inside-out patches, pertussis toxin blocked PKC activation of the channel. In contrast, H7 did not prevent G protein activation of the channel. We conclude that adenosine activates a 305-pS Cl- channel in the apical membrane of RCCT-28A cells by a membrane-delimited pathway involving an A1 adenosine receptor, phospholipase C, diacylglycerol, PKC, and a G protein. Because we have shown, in previous studies, that this Cl- channel participates in the regulatory volume decrease subsequent to cell swelling, adenosine release during ischemic cell swelling may activate the Cl-channel and restore cell volume. Images PMID:1311718

  2. Separate fractions of mRNA from Torpedo electric organ induce chloride channels and acetylcholine receptors in Xenopus oocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Sumikawa, K; Parker, I; Amano, T; Miledi, R

    1984-01-01

    Poly(A)+ mRNA extracted from the electric organ of Torpedo was fractionated by sucrose density gradient centrifugation. After injection into Xenopus oocytes one mRNA fraction induced the appearance of chloride channels in the oocyte membrane. Many of these channels were normally open, and the ensuing chloride current kept the resting potential of injected oocytes close to the chloride equilibrium potential. When the membrane was hyperpolarized, the chloride current was reduced. A separate fraction of mRNA induced the incorporation of acetylcholine receptors into the oocyte membrane. When translated in a cell-free system this fraction directed the synthesis of the alpha, beta, gamma, and delta subunits of the acetylcholine receptor. In contrast, the mRNA fraction that induced the chloride channels caused the synthesis of the delta subunit, a very small amount of alpha, and no detectable beta or gamma subunits. This suggests that the size of the mRNA coding for the chloride channel is similar to the preponderant species of mRNA coding for the delta subunit of the acetylcholine receptor. Images Fig. 1. PMID:6094179

  3. CFTR chloride channel in the apical compartments: spatiotemporal coupling to its interacting partners.

    PubMed

    Li, Chunying; Naren, Anjaparavanda P

    2010-04-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is a cAMP-regulated chloride channel located primarily at the apical or luminal surfaces of epithelial cells in the airway, intestine, pancreas, kidney, sweat gland, as well as male reproductive tract, where it plays a crucial role in transepithelial fluid homeostasis. CFTR dysfunction can be detrimental and may result in life-threatening disorders. CFTR hypofunctioning because of genetic defects leads to cystic fibrosis, the most common lethal genetic disease in Caucasians, whereas CFTR hyperfunctioning resulting from various infections evokes secretory diarrhea, the leading cause of mortality in early childhood. Therefore, maintaining a dynamic balance between CFTR up-regulating processes and CFTR down-regulating processes is essential for maintaining fluid and body homeostasis. Accumulating evidence suggests that protein-protein interactions play a critical role in the fine-tuned regulation of CFTR function. A growing number of proteins have been reported to interact directly or indirectly with CFTR chloride channel, suggesting that CFTR might be coupled spatially and temporally to a wide variety of interacting partners including ion channels, receptors, transporters, scaffolding proteins, enzyme molecules, signaling molecules, and effectors. Most interactions occur primarily between the opposing terminal tails (amino or carboxyl) of CFTR protein and its binding partners, either directly or mediated through various PDZ scaffolding proteins. These dynamic interactions impact the channel function, as well as localization and processing of CFTR protein within cells. This article reviews the most recent progress and findings about the interactions between CFTR and its binding partners through PDZ scaffolding proteins, as well as the spatiotemporal regulation of CFTR-containing macromolecular signaling complexes in the apical compartments of polarized cells lining the secretory epithelia.

  4. Synthesis of 4-thiophen-2'-yl-1,4-dihydropyridines as potentiators of the CFTR chloride channel.

    PubMed

    Cateni, Francesca; Zacchigna, Marina; Pedemonte, Nicoletta; Galietta, Luis J V; Mazzei, Marco T; Fossa, Paola; Giampieri, Michele; Mazzei, Mauro

    2009-12-01

    The gating of the CFTR chloride channel is altered by a group of mutations that cause cystic fibrosis. This gating defect may be corrected by small molecules called potentiators. Some 1,4-dihydropyridine (DHP) derivatives, bearing a thiophen-2-yl and a furanyl ring at the 4-position of the nucleus, were prepared and tested as CFTR potentiators. In particular, we evaluated the ability of novel DHPs to enhance the activity of the rescued DeltaF508-CFTR as measured with a functional assay based on the halide-sensitive yellow fluorescent protein. Most DHPs showed an effect comparable to or better than that of the reference compound genistein. The potency was instead significantly improved, with some compounds, such as 3g, 3h, 3n, 4a, 4b, and 4d, having a half effective concentration in the submicromolar range. CoMFA analysis gave helpful suggestions to improve the activity of DHPs.

  5. Slow conversions among subconductance states of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator chloride channel.

    PubMed Central

    Tao, T; Xie, J; Drumm, M L; Zhao, J; Davis, P B; Ma, J

    1996-01-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channel exhibits multiple subconductance states. To study the regulation of conductance states of the CFTR channel, we expressed the wild-type CFTR protein in HEK 293 cells, and isolated microsomal membrane vesicles for reconstitution studies in lipid bilayer membranes. A single CFTR channel had a dominant conductance of 7.8 pS (H), plus two sub-open states with conductances of approximately 6 pS (M) and 2.7 pS (L) in 200 mM KCl with 1 mM MgCl2 (intracellular) and 50 mM KCl with no MgCl2 (extracellular), with pH maintained at 7.4 by 10 mM HEPES-Tris on both sides of the channel. In 200 mM KCl, both H and L states could be measured in stable single-channel recordings, whereas M could not. Spontaneous transitions between H and L were slow; it took 4.5 min for L-->H, and 3.2 min for H-->L. These slow conversions among subconductance states of the CFTR channel were affected by extracellular Mg; in the presence of millimolar Mg, the channel remained stable in the H state. Similar phenomena were also observed with endogenous CFTR channels in T84 cells. In high-salt conditions (1.5 M KCl), all three conductance states of the expressed CFTR channel, 12.1 pS, 8.2 pS, and 3.6 pS, became stable and seemed to gate independently from each other. The existence of multiple stable conductance states associated with the CFTR channel suggests two possibilities: either a single CFTR molecule can exist in multiple configurations with different conductance values, or the CFTR channel may contain multimers of the 170-kDa CFTR protein, and different conductance states are due to different aggregation states of the CFTR protein. Images FIGURE 4 FIGURE 8 PMID:8789091

  6. Slow conversions among subconductance states of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator chloride channel.

    PubMed

    Tao, T; Xie, J; Drumm, M L; Zhao, J; Davis, P B; Ma, J

    1996-02-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channel exhibits multiple subconductance states. To study the regulation of conductance states of the CFTR channel, we expressed the wild-type CFTR protein in HEK 293 cells, and isolated microsomal membrane vesicles for reconstitution studies in lipid bilayer membranes. A single CFTR channel had a dominant conductance of 7.8 pS (H), plus two sub-open states with conductances of approximately 6 pS (M) and 2.7 pS (L) in 200 mM KCl with 1 mM MgCl2 (intracellular) and 50 mM KCl with no MgCl2 (extracellular), with pH maintained at 7.4 by 10 mM HEPES-Tris on both sides of the channel. In 200 mM KCl, both H and L states could be measured in stable single-channel recordings, whereas M could not. Spontaneous transitions between H and L were slow; it took 4.5 min for L-->H, and 3.2 min for H-->L. These slow conversions among subconductance states of the CFTR channel were affected by extracellular Mg; in the presence of millimolar Mg, the channel remained stable in the H state. Similar phenomena were also observed with endogenous CFTR channels in T84 cells. In high-salt conditions (1.5 M KCl), all three conductance states of the expressed CFTR channel, 12.1 pS, 8.2 pS, and 3.6 pS, became stable and seemed to gate independently from each other. The existence of multiple stable conductance states associated with the CFTR channel suggests two possibilities: either a single CFTR molecule can exist in multiple configurations with different conductance values, or the CFTR channel may contain multimers of the 170-kDa CFTR protein, and different conductance states are due to different aggregation states of the CFTR protein.

  7. Calcium-activated chloride currents in olfactory sensory neurons from mice lacking bestrophin-2.

    PubMed

    Pifferi, Simone; Dibattista, Michele; Sagheddu, Claudia; Boccaccio, Anna; Al Qteishat, Ahmed; Ghirardi, Filippo; Tirindelli, Roberto; Menini, Anna

    2009-09-01

    Olfactory sensory neurons use a chloride-based signal amplification mechanism to detect odorants. The binding of odorants to receptors in the cilia of olfactory sensory neurons activates a transduction cascade that involves the opening of cyclic nucleotide-gated channels and the entry of Ca(2+) into the cilia. Ca(2+) activates a Cl(-) current that produces an efflux of Cl(-) ions and amplifies the depolarization. The molecular identity of Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) channels is still elusive, although some bestrophins have been shown to function as Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) channels when expressed in heterologous systems. In the olfactory epithelium, bestrophin-2 (Best2) has been indicated as a candidate for being a molecular component of the olfactory Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) channel. In this study, we have analysed mice lacking Best2. We compared the electrophysiological responses of the olfactory epithelium to odorant stimulation, as well as the properties of Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) currents in wild-type (WT) and knockout (KO) mice for Best2. Our results confirm that Best2 is expressed in the cilia of olfactory sensory neurons, while odorant responses and Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) currents were not significantly different between WT and KO mice. Thus, Best2 does not appear to be the main molecular component of the olfactory channel. Further studies are required to determine the function of Best2 in the cilia of olfactory sensory neurons.

  8. Calcium-activated chloride currents in olfactory sensory neurons from mice lacking bestrophin-2

    PubMed Central

    Pifferi, Simone; Dibattista, Michele; Sagheddu, Claudia; Boccaccio, Anna; Al Qteishat, Ahmed; Ghirardi, Filippo; Tirindelli, Roberto; Menini, Anna

    2009-01-01

    Olfactory sensory neurons use a chloride-based signal amplification mechanism to detect odorants. The binding of odorants to receptors in the cilia of olfactory sensory neurons activates a transduction cascade that involves the opening of cyclic nucleotide-gated channels and the entry of Ca2+ into the cilia. Ca2+ activates a Cl− current that produces an efflux of Cl− ions and amplifies the depolarization. The molecular identity of Ca2+-activated Cl− channels is still elusive, although some bestrophins have been shown to function as Ca2+-activated Cl− channels when expressed in heterologous systems. In the olfactory epithelium, bestrophin-2 (Best2) has been indicated as a candidate for being a molecular component of the olfactory Ca2+-activated Cl− channel. In this study, we have analysed mice lacking Best2. We compared the electrophysiological responses of the olfactory epithelium to odorant stimulation, as well as the properties of Ca2+-activated Cl− currents in wild-type (WT) and knockout (KO) mice for Best2. Our results confirm that Best2 is expressed in the cilia of olfactory sensory neurons, while odorant responses and Ca2+-activated Cl− currents were not significantly different between WT and KO mice. Thus, Best2 does not appear to be the main molecular component of the olfactory channel. Further studies are required to determine the function of Best2 in the cilia of olfactory sensory neurons. PMID:19622610

  9. Calcium Activation of Mougeotia Potassium Channels 1

    PubMed Central

    Lew, Roger R.; Serlin, Bruce S.; Schauf, Charles L.; Stockton, Marsha E.

    1990-01-01

    Phytochrome mediates chloroplast movement in the alga Mougeotia, possibly via changes in cytosolic calcium. It is known to regulate a calcium-activated potassium channel in the algal plasma membrane. As part of a characterization of the potassium channel, we examined the properties of calcium activation. The calcium ionophore A23187 activates the channel at external [Ca2+] as low as 20 micromolar. However, external [Ca2+] is not required for activation of the channel by photoactivated phytochrome. Furthermore, when an inhibitor of calcium release from internal stores, 8-(diethylamino)-octyl-3,4,5-trimethoxybenzoate, hydrochloride (TMB-8), is present, red light no longer stimulates channel activity. We conclude that phytochrome activates the plasma membrane potassium channel by releasing calcium from intracellular calcium vesicles; the elevated cytosolic calcium then stimulates channel activity by an unknown mechanism. In the presence of TMB-8, red light does induce chloroplast rotation; thus, potassium channel activation may not be coupled to chloroplast rotation. PMID:16667356

  10. Huntington disease skeletal muscle is hyperexcitable owing to chloride and potassium channel dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Waters, Christopher W; Varuzhanyan, Grigor; Talmadge, Robert J; Voss, Andrew A

    2013-05-28

    Huntington disease is a progressive and fatal genetic disorder with debilitating motor and cognitive defects. Chorea, rigidity, dystonia, and muscle weakness are characteristic motor defects of the disease that are commonly attributed to central neurodegeneration. However, no previous study has examined the membrane properties that control contraction in Huntington disease muscle. We show primary defects in ex vivo adult skeletal muscle from the R6/2 transgenic mouse model of Huntington disease. Action potentials in diseased fibers are more easily triggered and prolonged than in fibers from WT littermates. Furthermore, some action potentials in the diseased fibers self-trigger. These defects occur because of decreases in the resting chloride and potassium conductances. Consistent with this, the expression of the muscle chloride channel, ClC-1, in Huntington disease muscle was compromised by improper splicing and a corresponding reduction in total Clcn1 (gene for ClC-1) mRNA. Additionally, the total Kcnj2 (gene for the Kir2.1 potassium channel) mRNA was reduced in disease muscle. The resulting muscle hyperexcitability causes involuntary and prolonged contractions that may contribute to the chorea, rigidity, and dystonia that characterize Huntington disease.

  11. Cadmium regulates the expression of the CFTR chloride channel in human airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Rennolds, Jessica; Butler, Susie; Maloney, Kevin; Boyaka, Prosper N; Davis, Ian C; Knoell, Daren L; Parinandi, Narasimham L; Cormet-Boyaka, Estelle

    2010-07-01

    Cadmium is a toxic heavy metal ranked seventh on the Priority List of Hazardous Substances. As a byproduct of smelters, cadmium is a prevalent environmental contaminant. It is also a major component of cigarette smoke, and its inhalation is associated with decreased pulmonary function, lung cancer, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Ion channels, including the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), play a central role in maintaining fluid homeostasis and lung functions. CFTR is mostly expressed in epithelial cells, and little is known about the effect of cadmium exposure on lung epithelial cell function. We show that exposure to cadmium decreases the expression of the CFTR protein and subsequent chloride transport in human airway epithelial cells in vitro. Impairment of CFTR protein expression was also observed in vivo in the lung of mice after intranasal instillation of cadmium. We established that the inhibitory effect of cadmium was not a nonspecific effect of heavy metals, as nickel had no effect on CFTR protein levels. Finally, we show that selected antioxidants, including alpha-tocopherol (vitamin E), but not N-acetylcysteine, can prevent the cadmium-induced suppression of CFTR. In summary, we have identified cadmium as a regulator of the CFTR chloride channel present in lung epithelial cells. Future strategies to prevent the deleterious effect of cadmium on epithelial cells and lung functions may benefit from the finding that alpha-tocopherol protects CFTR expression and function.

  12. Effects of pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide-27 (PACAP) and vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) on chloride in HT29 cells studied by X-ray microanalysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, W; Roomans, G M

    1999-01-01

    The colon cancer cell line HT29 is a useful model to study intestinal chloride secretion. These cells have both cAMP-activated and calcium-activated chloride channels. Changes in elemental content of the cells after stimulation with agonists were determined by X-ray microanalysis in the scanning or scanning transmission electron microscope. Exposure of HT29 cells to pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide-27 (PACAP) caused a transient decrease in the cellular Cl and K concentrations, indicating (net) efflux of chloride. The effect of PACAP is inhibited by somatostatin, which is known to inhibit cAMP-activated as well as calcium-activated chloride secretion and by U-73122, an inhibitor of phospholipase C. Alloxan, an inhibitor of adenylate cyclase, did not significantly affect the PACAP-induced loss of chloride. The calcium-chelating agent EGTA inhibited the PACAP-induced loss of chloride, indicating the need for extracellular calcium ions. Also vasointestinal polypeptide (VIP) caused a decrease of the cellular chloride concentration in HT29 cells. VIP-induced loss of chloride could be inhibited by pre-treating the cells with somatostatin or UK14,304, an alpha-2 adrenergic agonist that has been shown previously to inhibit purinergically activated chloride efflux. Our results indicate that there is cross-talk between the cAMP- and the calcium-activated pathways for chloride secretion in HT29 cells.

  13. Single voltage-dependent chloride-selective channels of large conductance in cultured rat muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Blatz, A L; Magleby, K L

    1983-01-01

    Single-channel currents of an anion-selective channel in the plasma membrane of cultured rat muscle cells (myotubes) were recorded with the patch-clamp technique (Hamill, O.P., A. Marty, E. Neher, B. Sakmann, and F.J. Sigworth, 1981. Pfluegers Arch. Eur. J. Physiol., 391:85-100). The channel is selective for Cl- over cations, and has an unusually large single-channel conductance of approximately 430 pS in symmetrical 143 mM KCl. The channel is often active at 0 mV, opening and closing spontaneously. When active, steps from 0 mV to either negative or positive membrane potentials close the channel to an apparent inactivated state. The mean effective time that a channel is open before it inactivates is approximately 1.19 s for steps to -30 mV and 0.48 s for steps to +30 mV. Returning the membrane potential to 0 mV results in recovery from inactivation. Calcium ions are not required for channel activity. PMID:6311302

  14. Thermally activated TRPV3 channels.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jialie; Hu, Hongzhen

    2014-01-01

    TRPV3 is a temperature-sensitive transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channel. The TRPV3 protein functions as a Ca(2+)-permeable nonselective cation channel with six transmembrane domains forming a tetrameric complex. TRPV3 is known to be activated by warm temperatures, synthetic small-molecule chemicals, and natural compounds from plants. Its function is regulated by a variety of physiological factors including extracellular divalent cations and acidic pH, intracellular adenosine triphosphate, membrane voltage, and arachidonic acid. TRPV3 shows a broad expression pattern in both neuronal and non-neuronal tissues including epidermal keratinocytes, epithelial cells in the gut, endothelial cells in blood vessels, and neurons in dorsal root ganglia and CNS. TRPV3 null mice exhibit abnormal hair morphogenesis and compromised skin barrier function. Recent advances suggest that TRPV3 may play critical roles in inflammatory skin disorders, itch, and pain sensation. Thus, identification of selective TRPV3 activators and inhibitors could potentially lead to beneficial pharmacological interventions in several diseases. The intent of this review is to summarize our current knowledge of the tissue expression, structure, function, and mechanisms of activation of TRPV3.

  15. Metal chlorides loaded on activated carbon to capture elemental mercury.

    PubMed

    Shen, Zhemin; Ma, Jing; Mei, Zhijian; Zhang, Jianda

    2010-01-01

    Activated carbon (AC) was considered to be an effective sorbent to control mercury in combustion systems. However, its capture capacity was low and it required a high carbon-to-mercury mass ratio. AC loaded with catalyst showed a high elemental mercury (Hg0) capture capacity due to large surface area of AC and high oxidization ability of catalyst. In this study, several metal chlorides and metal oxides were used to promote the sorption capacity of AC. As a result, metal chlorides were better than metal oxides loaded on AC to remove gaseous mercury. X-ray diffractometer (XRD), thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA) and specific surface area by Brunauer-Emmett-Teller method (BET) analysis showed the main mechanisms: first, AC had an enormous surface area for loading enough MClx; second, Cl and MxOy were generated during pyrogenation of MClx; finally, there were lots of active elements such as Cl and MxOy which could react with elemental mercury and convert it to mercury oxide and mercury chloride. The HgO and HgCl2 might be released from AC's porous structure by thermo regeneration. A catalytic chemisorption mechanism predominates the sorption process of elemental mercury. As Co and Mn were valence variable metal elements, their catalytic effect on Hg0 oxidization may accelerate both oxidation and halogenation of Hg0. The sorbents loaded with metal chlorides possessed a synergistic function of catalytic effect of valence variable metal and chlorine oxidation.

  16. Ovine congenital myotonia associated with a mutation in the muscle chloride channel gene.

    PubMed

    Monteagudo, Luis Vicente; Tejedor, María Teresa; Ramos, Juan José; Lacasta, Delia; Ferrer, Luis Miguel

    2015-04-01

    Congenital myotonia (CM) is characterised by a delay in muscular relaxation after sudden contractions. In a recent outbreak of ovine CM affecting 1% of new-born lambs in a Spanish flock of Rasa Aragonesa sheep, a comparative pathology approach was taken: because a mutation in the muscle chloride channel gene (CLCN1) was identified as responsible for CM in goats, the same gene was sequenced in the affected lambs. A non-synonymous single nucleotide variation (SNV) in the second exon of CLCN1 was associated with this pathology. Rams carrying this SNV heterozygously were thereafter identified and replaced by wild-type homozygous young males. No additional CM cases were detected in subsequent lambing seasons.

  17. Mutational scanning of potassium, sodium and chloride ion channels in malignant migrating partial seizures in infancy.

    PubMed

    Coppola, Giangennaro; Veggiotti, Pierangelo; Del Giudice, Emanuele Miraglia; Bellini, Giulia; Longaretti, Francesca; Taglialatela, Maurizio; Pascotto, Antonio

    2006-03-01

    The mutational analysis of potassium (KCNQ2, KCNQ3), sodium (SCN1A, SCN2A), and chloride (CLCN2) ion channels was performed in three children with typical features of the recently described syndrome of migrating partial seizures in infancy. Mutational analysis was performed by PCR and automatic sequencing. The coding regions, including the exon-intron boundaries, were amplified in the patients using appropriate primers sets. No mutations associated to migrating partial seizures have been found. Mutational screening of CLCN2 gene, revealed a homozygous mutation G2003C (exon 17), leading to a Ser/Thr substitution at the codon 668, in two of the three patients. The same variation has been found in 38 out of 100 control alleles. The identification of the genetic basis of this new epileptic encephalopathy requires further studies that might be enforced by familial cases.

  18. Functional and molecular identification of a TASK-1 potassium channel regulating chloride secretion through CFTR channels in the shark rectal gland: implications for cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Telles, Connor J; Decker, Sarah E; Motley, William W; Peters, Alexander W; Mehr, Ali Poyan; Frizzell, Raymond A; Forrest, John N

    2016-12-01

    In the shark rectal gland (SRG), apical chloride secretion through CFTR channels is electrically coupled to a basolateral K(+) conductance whose type and molecular identity are unknown. We performed studies in the perfused SRG with 17 K(+) channel inhibitors to begin this search. Maximal chloride secretion was markedly inhibited by low-perfusate pH, bupivicaine, anandamide, zinc, quinidine, and quinine, consistent with the properties of an acid-sensitive, four-transmembrane, two-pore-domain K(+) channel (4TM-K2P). Using PCR with degenerate primers to this family, we identified a TASK-1 fragment in shark rectal gland, brain, gill, and kidney. Using 5' and 3' rapid amplification of cDNA ends PCR and genomic walking, we cloned the full-length shark gene (1,282 bp), whose open reading frame encodes a protein of 375 amino acids that was 80% identical to the human TASK-1 protein. We expressed shark and human TASK-1 cRNA in Xenopus oocytes and characterized these channels using two-electrode voltage clamping. Both channels had identical current-voltage relationships (outward rectifying) and a reversal potential of -90 mV. Both were inhibited by quinine, bupivicaine, and acidic pH. The pKa for current inhibition was 7.75 for shark TASK-1 vs. 7.37 for human TASK-1, values similar to the arterial pH for each species. We identified this protein in SRG by Western blot and confocal immunofluorescent microscopy and detected the protein in SRG and human airway cells. Shark TASK-1 is the major K(+) channel coupled to chloride secretion in the SRG, is the oldest 4TM 2P family member identified, and is the first TASK-1 channel identified to play a role in setting the driving force for chloride secretion in epithelia. The detection of this potassium channel in mammalian lung tissue has implications for human biology and disease.

  19. Myotonia and the muscle chloride channel: dominant mutations show variable penetrance and founder effect.

    PubMed

    Koty, P P; Pegoraro, E; Hobson, G; Marks, H G; Turel, A; Flagler, D; Cadaldini, M; Angelini, C; Hoffman, E P

    1996-10-01

    The delayed relaxation or sustained contraction of skeletal muscle-myotonia-is frequently seen in myotonic dystrophy and sodium channelopathies (hyperkalemic periodic paralysis, paramyotonia congenita). Many cases of congenital myotonia without other clinical symptoms have been associated with mutations in the muscle chloride channel gene. Most cases reported to date show a recessive inheritance pattern, with loss of function of the corresponding protein. Six families have been reported with dominantly inherited myotonia and mutations of the chloride channel gene. Here we report clinical and molecular data on 38 family members from four new families with dominantly inherited myotonia congenita. Three families show a previously characterized G230E mutation, and we show that these three share a common affected ancestor despite living in different regions of the United States (linkage disequilibrium). One Italian family is shown to have a novel dominant mutation-I290M. This is the sixth mutation identified in Thomsen's myotonia. Genotype/phenotype correlations in these four families showed that both of the dominant mutations resulted in a mild clinical picture in 90% of the patients, and no symptoms in 10% of mutation-positive patients. The EMG was the clinical feature that most closely correlated with mutation data; however, 3 of 16 (19%) mutation-positive patients tested negative by electromyography at least once, and 1 (6%) tested negative despite multiple tests. Only about half (55%) of the mutation-positive patients tested positive for percussion myotonia. Most of the clinically symptomatic individuals stated that cold temperatures and stress substantially worsened their myotonia. Our data show that dominantly inherited Thomsen's myotonia is most often a very mild disorder that shows considerable clinical heterogeneity.

  20. Identification and characterization of the zebrafish ClC-2 chloride channel orthologs.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Rius, Carla; Gaitán-Peñas, Héctor; Estévez, Raúl; Barrallo-Gimeno, Alejandro

    2015-08-01

    ClC-2 is a Cl(-) channel that belongs to the CLC family of chloride channel/transport proteins. ClC-2 molecular role is not clear, and Clcn2 knockout mice develop blindness, sterility, and leukodystrophy by unknown reasons. ClC-2 is associated in the brain with the adhesion molecule GlialCAM, which is defective in a type of leukodystrophy, involving ClC-2 in the homeostasis of myelin. To get more insight into the functions of ClC-2, we have identified in this work the three ClC-2 orthologs in zebrafish. clcn2a and clcn2b resulted from the teleost-specific whole genome duplication, while clcn2c arose from a gene duplication from clcn2b. The expression patterns in adult tissues and embryos of zebrafish clcn2 paralogs support their subfunctionalization after the duplications, with clcn2a being enriched in excitable tissues and clcn2c in ionocytes. All three zebrafish clc-2 proteins interact with human GLIALCAM, that is able to target them to cell junctions, as it does with mammalian ClC-2. We could detect clc-2a and clc-2b inward rectified chloride currents with different voltage-dependence and kinetics in Xenopus oocytes, while clc-2c remained inactive. Interestingly, GlialCAM proteins did not modify clc-2b inward rectification. Then, our work extends the repertoire of ClC-2 proteins and provides new tools for structure-function and physiology studies.

  1. Conformational change opening the CFTR chloride channel pore coupled to ATP-dependent gating.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wuyang; Linsdell, Paul

    2012-03-01

    Opening and closing of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channel are controlled by ATP binding and hydrolysis by its nucleotide binding domains (NBDs). This is presumed to control opening of a single "gate" within the permeation pathway, however, the location of such a gate has not been described. We used patch clamp recording to monitor access of cytosolic cysteine reactive reagents to cysteines introduced into different transmembrane (TM) regions in a cysteine-less form of CFTR. The rate of modification of Q98C (TM1) and I344C (TM6) by both [2-sulfonatoethyl] methanethiosulfonate (MTSES) and permeant Au(CN)(2)(-) ions was reduced when ATP concentration was reduced from 1mM to 10μM, and modification by MTSES was accelerated when 2mM pyrophosphate was applied to prevent channel closure. Modification of K95C (TM1) and V345C (TM6) was not affected by these manoeuvres. We also manipulated gating by introducing the mutations K464A (in NBD1) and E1371Q (in NBD2). The rate of modification of Q98C and I344C by both MTSES and Au(CN)(2)(-) was decreased by K464A and increased by E1371Q, whereas modification of K95C and V345C was not affected. These results suggest that access from the cytoplasm to K95 and V345 is similar in open and closed channels. In contrast, modifying ATP-dependent channel gating alters access to Q98 and I344, located further into the pore. We propose that ATP-dependent gating of CFTR is associated with the opening and closing of a gate within the permeation pathway at the level of these pore-lining amino acids.

  2. Agonist-activated ion channels

    PubMed Central

    Colquhoun, David

    2006-01-01

    This paper looks at ion channels as an example of the pharmacologist's stock in trade, the action of an agonist on a receptor to produce a response. Looked at in this way, ion channels have been helpful because they are still the only system which is simple enough for quantitative investigation of transduction mechanisms. A short history is given of attempts to elucidate what happens between the time when agonist first binds, and the time when the channel opens. PMID:16402101

  3. A role for chloride in the suppressive effect of acetylcholine on afferent vestibular activity.

    PubMed

    Pantoja, A M; Holt, J C; Guth, P S

    1997-10-01

    Afferents of the frog semicircular canal (SCC) respond to acetylcholine (ACh) application (0.3-1.0 mM) with a facilitation of their activity while frog saccular afferents respond with suppression (Guth et al., 1994). All recordings are of resting (i.e., non-stimulated) multiunit activity as previously reported (Guth et al., 1994). Substitution of 80% of external chloride (Cl-) by large, poorly permeant anions of different structures (isethionate, methanesulfonate, methylsulfate, and gluconate) reduced the suppressive effect of ACh in the frog saccular afferents. This substitution did not affect the facilitatory response of SCC afferents to ACh. Chloride channel blockers were also used to test further whether Cl- is involved in the ACh suppressive effect. These included: niflumic and flufenamic acids, picrotoxin, 5-nitro-2-(-3-phenylpropylamino)benzoic acid (NPPB), and 4,4'-dinitrostilbene-2,2'-disulfonic acid (DNDS). As with the Cl- substitutions, all of these agents reduced the suppressive response to ACh in the saccule, but not the facilitatory response seen in the SCC. The suppressive effect of ACh on saccular afferents is considered to be due to activation of a nicotinic-like receptor (Guth et al., 1994; Guth and Norris, 1996). Taking into account the effects of both Cl- substitutions and Cl- channel blockers, we conclude that changes in Cl- availability influence the suppressive effect of ACh and that therefore Cl- may be involved in this effect.

  4. Characteristics of chloride currents activated by noradrenaline in rabbit ear artery cells.

    PubMed

    Amédée, T; Large, W A; Wang, Q

    1990-09-01

    1. Responses to noradrenaline were studied in isolated rabbit ear artery cells with the nystatin method of whole-cell patch-clamp recording. With this technique it was possible to obtain reproducible responses to noradrenaline which was not possible with traditional whole-cell recording. 2. With NaCl as the major constituent of the bathing solution (potassium-free pipette and external solutions) the reversal potential (Er) of the noradrenaline-evoked current was about 0 mV. When external chloride was replaced by thiocyanate, iodide, nitrate and bromide, Er was shifted to more negative potentials which indicates that a chloride conductance increase contributes to the current activated by noradrenaline. 3. When sodium was substituted by Tris, N-methyl-D-glucamine, choline or barium, Er of the noradrenaline-evoked current did not alter. This result suggests that a cation conductance is not implicated in the response to noradrenaline recorded with the nystatin method of whole-cell recording. 4. The chloride current activated by noradrenaline was blocked by the selective alpha 1-adrenoceptor antagonist prazosin but was not affected by the alpha 2-adrenoceptor antagonist yohimbine. 5. When cells were exposed to zero calcium bathing solutions the amplitude of the current elicited by noradrenaline was unaffected when measured within 1-2 min in zero calcium conditions. Continued exposure to 0 Ca + 1 mM-EGTA solution reversibly abolished the chloride current to noradrenaline. 6. In the presence of caffeine, which releases Ca2+ from internal stores and itself induced an inward current (at a holding potential of -50 mV), noradrenaline did not elicit a current. These data suggest that the chloride current evoked by noradrenaline results from an increase in intracellular concentration of calcium derived from internal stores. 7. The chloride channel blocking agents 4,4'-diisothiocyanatostilbene-2,2'-disulphonic acid (DIDS; 0.5 mM) and furosemide (0.5 mM) produced partial

  5. Modeling spontaneous activity in the developing spinal cord using activity-dependent variations of intracellular chloride.

    PubMed

    Marchetti, Cristina; Tabak, Joel; Chub, Nikolai; O'Donovan, Michael J; Rinzel, John

    2005-04-06

    We investigated how spontaneous activity is generated in developing, hyperexcitable networks. We focused our study on the embryonic chick spinal cord, a preparation that exhibits rhythmic discharge on multiple timescales: slow episodes (lasting minutes) and faster intraepisode cycling (approximately 1 Hz frequency). For this purpose, we developed a mean field model of a recurrent network with slow chloride dynamics and a fast depression variable. We showed that the model, in addition to providing a biophysical mechanism for the slow dynamics, was able to account for the experimentally observed activity. The model made predictions on how interval and duration of episodes are affected when changing chloride-mediated synaptic transmission or chloride flux across cell membrane. These predictions guided experiments, and the model results were compared with experimental data obtained with electrophysiological recordings. We found agreement when transmission was affected through changes in synaptic conductance and good qualitative agreement when chloride flux was varied through changes in external chloride concentration or in the rate of the Na+-K+-2Cl- cotransporter. Furthermore, the model made predictions about the time course of intracellular chloride concentration and chloride reversal potential and how these are affected by changes in synaptic conductance. Based on the comparison between modeling and experimental results, we propose that chloride dynamics could be an important mechanism in rhythm generation in the developing chick spinal cord.

  6. A voltage-dependent chloride channel fine-tunes photosynthesis in plants

    PubMed Central

    Herdean, Andrei; Teardo, Enrico; Nilsson, Anders K.; Pfeil, Bernard E.; Johansson, Oskar N.; Ünnep, Renáta; Nagy, Gergely; Zsiros, Ottó; Dana, Somnath; Solymosi, Katalin; Garab, Győző; Szabó, Ildikó; Spetea, Cornelia; Lundin, Björn

    2016-01-01

    In natural habitats, plants frequently experience rapid changes in the intensity of sunlight. To cope with these changes and maximize growth, plants adjust photosynthetic light utilization in electron transport and photoprotective mechanisms. This involves a proton motive force (PMF) across the thylakoid membrane, postulated to be affected by unknown anion (Cl−) channels. Here we report that a bestrophin-like protein from Arabidopsis thaliana functions as a voltage-dependent Cl− channel in electrophysiological experiments. AtVCCN1 localizes to the thylakoid membrane, and fine-tunes PMF by anion influx into the lumen during illumination, adjusting electron transport and the photoprotective mechanisms. The activity of AtVCCN1 accelerates the activation of photoprotective mechanisms on sudden shifts to high light. Our results reveal that AtVCCN1, a member of a conserved anion channel family, acts as an early component in the rapid adjustment of photosynthesis in variable light environments. PMID:27216227

  7. Benzodiazepine agonist and inverse agonist actions on GABAA receptor-operated chloride channels. I. Acute effects of ethanol

    SciTech Connect

    Buck, K.J.; Harris, R.A. )

    1990-05-01

    Acute exposure to ethanol was found to enhance the ability of a benzodiazepine (BZ) inverse agonist, methyl-6,7-dimethoxy-4-ethyl-beta-carboline-3-carboxylate (DMCM), to reduce muscimol-activated 36Cl- uptake by membranes isolated from mouse cerebral cortex. Pretreatment in vivo with a hypnotic dose of ethanol (but not a subhypnotic dose), or exposure to a corresponding concentration in vitro, was effective. This increase in sensitivity of gamma-aminobutyric acid receptor-operated chloride channels to the actions of DMCM was due to an increase in both the potency and efficacy of DMCM. Sensitization to DMCM was reversible and was not observed 24 hr after a single injection of ethanol. Pretreatment with ethanol (10, 50 and 100 mM) in vitro produced sensitization to DMCM in a concentration-dependent manner, similar to that produced by in vivo exposure; this increase in sensitivity did not develop if the membranes were pretreated with ethanol at 0 degrees C. Similarly, in vitro exposure to pentobarbital (200 microM) or flunitrazepam (1 microM) enhanced the actions of the inverse agonist Ro15-4513 (ethyl-8-azido-5,6-dihydro-5-methyl-6-oxo-4H-imidazo(1,5a)(1,4)BZ-3- carboxylate). Acute ethanol exposure did not alter low-affinity gamma-aminobutyric acidA receptor binding or muscimol action, or the ability of a BZ agonist, flunitrazepam, to augment muscimol-activated chloride flux. Ethanol exposure did not alter (3H)flumazenil (Ro15-1788) binding to central BZ receptors, its displacement by DMCM or allosteric modulation of DMCM binding by muscimol (muscimol-shift).

  8. Identification and functional characterization of a voltage-gated chloride channel and its novel splice variant in taste bud cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Liquan; Cao, Jie; Wang, Hong; Vo, Lynn A; Brand, Joseph G

    2005-10-28

    Taste bud cells are epithelial cells with neuronal properties. Voltage-dependent ion channels have been physiologically described in these cells. Here, we report the molecular identification and functional characterization of a voltage-gated chloride channel (ClC-4) and its novel splice variant (ClC-4A) from taste bud cells. ClC-4A skipped an exon near its 5'-end, incurring the loss of 60 amino acids at the N terminus. In situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry localized these two channels' transcripts and proteins to a subset of taste bud cells. Electrophysiological recordings of the heterologously expressed channels in Xenopus oocytes showed that ClC-4 and ClC-4A have opposite sensitivity to pH and unique ion selectivity. The chloride channel blockers niflumic acid and 5-nitro-2-(3-phenylpropylamino)benzoic acid had a slight or no inhibitory effect on the conductance of ClC-4, but both blockers inhibited ClC-4A, suggesting that ClC-4A is a candidate channel for an acid-induced 5-nitro-2-(3-phenylpropylamino)benzoic acid-sensitive current. Furthermore, these two channels may play a role in bitter-, sweet-, and umami-mediated taste transmission by regulating transmitter uptake into synaptic vesicles.

  9. Secreted CLCA1 modulates TMEM16A to activate Ca(2+)-dependent chloride currents in human cells.

    PubMed

    Sala-Rabanal, Monica; Yurtsever, Zeynep; Nichols, Colin G; Brett, Tom J

    2015-03-17

    Calcium-activated chloride channel regulator 1 (CLCA1) activates calcium-dependent chloride currents; neither the target, nor mechanism, is known. We demonstrate that secreted CLCA1 activates calcium-dependent chloride currents in HEK293T cells in a paracrine fashion, and endogenous TMEM16A/Anoctamin1 conducts the currents. Exposure to exogenous CLCA1 increases cell surface levels of TMEM16A and cellular binding experiments indicate CLCA1 engages TMEM16A on the surface of these cells. Altogether, our data suggest that CLCA1 stabilizes TMEM16A on the cell surface, thus increasing surface expression, which results in increased calcium-dependent chloride currents. Our results identify the first Cl(-) channel target of the CLCA family of proteins and establish CLCA1 as the first secreted direct modifier of TMEM16A activity, delineating a unique mechanism to increase currents. These results suggest cooperative roles for CLCA and TMEM16 proteins in influencing the physiology of multiple tissues, and the pathology of multiple diseases, including asthma, COPD, cystic fibrosis, and certain cancers.

  10. The ClC-K2 Chloride Channel Is Critical for Salt Handling in the Distal Nephron.

    PubMed

    Hennings, J Christopher; Andrini, Olga; Picard, Nicolas; Paulais, Marc; Huebner, Antje K; Cayuqueo, Irma Karen Lopez; Bignon, Yohan; Keck, Mathilde; Cornière, Nicolas; Böhm, David; Jentsch, Thomas J; Chambrey, Régine; Teulon, Jacques; Hübner, Christian A; Eladari, Dominique

    2017-01-01

    Chloride transport by the renal tubule is critical for blood pressure (BP), acid-base, and potassium homeostasis. Chloride uptake from the urinary fluid is mediated by various apical transporters, whereas basolateral chloride exit is thought to be mediated by ClC-Ka/K1 and ClC-Kb/K2, two chloride channels from the ClC family, or by KCl cotransporters from the SLC12 gene family. Nevertheless, the localization and role of ClC-K channels is not fully resolved. Because inactivating mutations in ClC-Kb/K2 cause Bartter syndrome, a disease that mimics the effects of the loop diuretic furosemide, ClC-Kb/K2 is assumed to have a critical role in salt handling by the thick ascending limb. To dissect the role of this channel in detail, we generated a mouse model with a targeted disruption of the murine ortholog ClC-K2. Mutant mice developed a Bartter syndrome phenotype, characterized by renal salt loss, marked hypokalemia, and metabolic alkalosis. Patch-clamp analysis of tubules isolated from knockout (KO) mice suggested that ClC-K2 is the main basolateral chloride channel in the thick ascending limb and in the aldosterone-sensitive distal nephron. Accordingly, ClC-K2 KO mice did not exhibit the natriuretic response to furosemide and exhibited a severely blunted response to thiazide. We conclude that ClC-Kb/K2 is critical for salt absorption not only by the thick ascending limb, but also by the distal convoluted tubule.

  11. Structural dynamics of soluble chloride intracellular channel protein CLIC1 examined by amide hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Stoychev, Stoyan H; Nathaniel, Christos; Fanucchi, Sylvia; Brock, Melissa; Li, Sheng; Asmus, Kyle; Woods, Virgil L; Dirr, Heini W

    2009-09-08

    Chloride intracellular channel protein 1 (CLIC1) functions as an anion channel in plasma and nuclear membranes when its soluble monomeric form converts to an integral-membrane form. The transmembrane region of CLIC1 is located in its thioredoxin-like domain 1, but the mechanism whereby the protein converts to its membrane conformation has yet to be determined. Since channel formation in membranes is enhanced at low pH (5 to 5.5), a condition that is found at the surface of membranes, the structural dynamics of soluble CLIC1 was studied at pH 7 and at pH 5.5 in the absence of membranes by amide hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (DXMS). Rapid hydrogen exchange data indicate that CLIC1 displays a similar core structure at these pH values. Domain 1 is less stable than the all-helical domain 2, and, while the structure of domain 1 remains intact, its conformational flexibility is further increased in an acidic environment (pH 5.5). In the absence of membrane, an acidic environment appears to prime the solution structure of CLIC1 by destabilizing domain 1 in order to lower the activation energy barrier for its conversion to the membrane-insertion conformation. The significantly enhanced H/D-exchange rates at pH 5.5 displayed by two segments (peptides 11-31 and 68-82) could be due to the protonation of acidic residues in salt bridges. One of these segments (peptide 11-31) includes part of the transmembrane region which, in the solution structure, consists of helix alpha1. This helix is intrinsically stable and is most likely retained in the membrane conformation. Strand beta2, another element of the transmembrane region, displays a propensity to form a helical structure and has putative N- and C-capping motifs, suggesting that it too most likely forms a helix in a lipid bilayer.

  12. Inhibition of the voltage-dependent chloride channel of Torpedo electric organ by diisopropylfluorophosphate and its reversal by oximes

    SciTech Connect

    Abalis, I.M.; Chiang, P.K.; Wirtz, R.A.; Andre, R.G.

    1986-05-01

    Diisopropylfluorophosphate (DFP), a potent organophosphate inhibitor of cholinesterases, was found to inhibit the specific binding of (/sup 35/S)t-butylbicyclophosphorothionate (TBPS), specific chloride channels ligand, to the electric organ membranes of Torpedo, with a Ki of 21 +/- 3 ..mu..M. The binding sites of (/sup 35/S)TBPS in the Torpedo membranes were found not to be GABA receptors or nicotinic acetylcholine receptors as previously described. Interestingly, a stimulation of the binding of (/sup 35/S)TBPS was observed in the presence of atropine and three oximes, monopyridinium oxime 2-PAM, bispyridinium bis-oxime TMB-4 and H-oxime HI-6. The maximal stimulation was 300-500% of control, after which, the stimulation was reversed at higher concentrations. The three oximes protected by more than 95% the inhibition by 1 mM DFP of the binding of (/sup 35/S)TBPS to the voltage-dependent chloride channel. However, atropine protected only 20% of the inhibited channel. These results, thus, suggest that the protection against the toxic effects of DFP or other anticholinesterase agents by the tested oximes may not be solely a result of the reactivation of cholinesterases but also the protection of the voltage-dependent chloride channel.

  13. Expression of CLC-K chloride channels in the rat cochlea.

    PubMed

    Qu, Chunyan; Liang, Fenghe; Hu, Wei; Shen, Zhijun; Spicer, Samuel S; Schulte, Bradley A

    2006-03-01

    Current models of the lateral K+ recycling pathway in the mammalian cochlea include two multicellular transport networks separated from one another by three interstitial gaps. The first gap is between outer hair cells and Deiters cells, the second is between outer sulcus cells and type II spiral ligament fibrocytes and the third is between intermediate and marginal cells in the stria vascularis. K+ taken up by cells bordering these interstitial spaces is accompanied by Cl-. Maintaining appropriate electrolyte balance and membrane potentials in these cells requires a mechanism for exit of the resorbed Cl-. One possible candidate for regulating this Cl- efflux is ClC-K, a chloride channel previously thought to be kidney specific. Here, we demonstrate the expression of both known isoforms of ClC-K in the organ of Corti, spiral ligament and stria vascularis of the rat cochlea by immunohistochemical, Western blot and RT-PCR analysis. These results indicate a role for ClC-K in mediating Cl- recycling in the cochlea. The widespread expression of both ClC-K isoforms in the cochlea may help to explain the symptoms of Bartter's syndrome Type III, a mutation in the hClC-Kb gene (human homologue of ClC-K2), which results in renal salt wasting without deafness. These data support the hypothesis that both isoforms of ClC-K are co-expressed in some cell membranes and account for the preservation of hearing in the presence of a mutation in only one channel isoform.

  14. BK channel activation: structural and functional insights

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Urvi S.; Cui, Jianmin

    2010-01-01

    The voltage and Ca2+ activated K+ (BK) channels are involved in the regulation of neurotransmitter release and neuronal excitability. Structurally, BK channels are homologous to voltage- and ligand-gated K+ channels, having a voltage sensor and pore as the membrane-spanning domain and a cytosolic domain containing metal binding sites. Recently published electron cryomicroscopy (cryo-EM) and X-ray crystallographic structures of the BK channel provided the first look into the assembly of these domains, corroborating the close interactions among these domains during channel gating that have been suggested by functional studies. This review discusses these latest findings and an emerging new understanding about BK channel gating and implications for diseases such as epilepsy, in which mutations in BK channel genes have been associated. PMID:20663573

  15. MBNL and CELF proteins regulate alternative splicing of the skeletal muscle chloride channel CLCN1.

    PubMed

    Kino, Yoshihiro; Washizu, Chika; Oma, Yoko; Onishi, Hayato; Nezu, Yuriko; Sasagawa, Noboru; Nukina, Nobuyuki; Ishiura, Shoichi

    2009-10-01

    The expression and function of the skeletal muscle chloride channel CLCN1/ClC-1 is regulated by alternative splicing. Inclusion of the CLCN1 exon 7A is aberrantly elevated in myotonic dystrophy (DM), a genetic disorder caused by the expansion of a CTG or CCTG repeat. Increased exon 7A inclusion leads to a reduction in CLCN1 function, which can be causative of myotonia. Two RNA-binding protein families--muscleblind-like (MBNL) and CUG-BP and ETR-3-like factor (CELF) proteins--are thought to mediate the splicing misregulation in DM. Here, we have identified multiple factors that regulate the alternative splicing of a mouse Clcn1 minigene. The inclusion of exon 7A was repressed by MBNL proteins while promoted by an expanded CUG repeat or CELF4, but not by CUG-BP. Mutation analyses suggested that exon 7A and its flanking region mediate the effect of MBNL1, whereas another distinct region in intron 6 mediates that of CELF4. An exonic splicing enhancer essential for the inclusion of exon 7A was identified at the 5' end of this exon, which might be inhibited by MBNL1. Collectively, these results provide a mechanistic model for the regulation of Clcn1 splicing, and reveal novel regulatory properties of MBNL and CELF proteins.

  16. Myotonia congenita-associated mutations in chloride channel-1 affect zebrafish body wave swimming kinematics.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Wei; Tian, Jing; Burgunder, Jean-Marc; Hunziker, Walter; Eng, How-Lung

    2014-01-01

    Myotonia congenita is a human muscle disorder caused by mutations in CLCN1, which encodes human chloride channel 1 (CLCN1). Zebrafish is becoming an increasingly useful model for human diseases, including muscle disorders. In this study, we generated transgenic zebrafish expressing, under the control of a muscle specific promoter, human CLCN1 carrying mutations that have been identified in human patients suffering from myotonia congenita. We developed video analytic tools that are able to provide precise quantitative measurements of movement abnormalities in order to analyse the effect of these CLCN1 mutations on adult transgenic zebrafish swimming. Two new parameters for body-wave kinematics of swimming reveal changes in body curvature and tail offset in transgenic zebrafish expressing the disease-associated CLCN1 mutants, presumably due to their effect on muscle function. The capability of the developed video analytic tool to distinguish wild-type from transgenic zebrafish could provide a useful asset to screen for compounds that reverse the disease phenotype, and may be applicable to other movement disorders besides myotonia congenita.

  17. Subunit stoichiometry and arrangement in a heteromeric glutamate-gated chloride channel

    PubMed Central

    Degani-Katzav, Nurit; Gortler, Revital; Gorodetzki, Lilach; Paas, Yoav

    2016-01-01

    The invertebrate glutamate-gated chloride-selective receptors (GluClRs) are ion channels serving as targets for ivermectin (IVM), a broad-spectrum anthelmintic drug used to treat human parasitic diseases like river blindness and lymphatic filariasis. The native GluClR is a heteropentamer consisting of α and β subunit types, with yet unknown subunit stoichiometry and arrangement. Based on the recent crystal structure of a homomeric GluClαR, we introduced mutations at the intersubunit interfaces where Glu (the neurotransmitter) binds. By electrophysiological characterization of these mutants, we found heteromeric assemblies with two equivalent Glu-binding sites at β/α intersubunit interfaces, where the GluClβ and GluClα subunits, respectively, contribute the “principal” and “complementary” components of the putative Glu-binding pockets. We identified a mutation in the IVM-binding site (far away from the Glu-binding sites), which significantly increased the sensitivity of the heteromeric mutant receptor to both Glu and IVM, and improved the receptor subunits’ cooperativity. We further characterized this heteromeric GluClR mutant as a receptor having a third Glu-binding site at an α/α intersubunit interface. Altogether, our data unveil heteromeric GluClR assemblies having three α and two β subunits arranged in a counterclockwise β-α-β-α-α fashion, as viewed from the extracellular side, with either two or three Glu-binding site interfaces. PMID:26792524

  18. Species dependent dual modulation of the benzodiazepine/GABA receptor chloride channel by dihydroergosine

    SciTech Connect

    Pericic, D.; Tvrdeic, A. )

    1990-01-01

    Dihydroergosine enhanced the incidence of bicuculline induced convulsions in female rats, while 100 mg/kg of dihydroergosine given to female mice made 45% convulsive dose of bicuculline to be subconvulsive. The same dose of dihydroergosine enhanced in mice the latency of bicuculline-induced convulsions. Although, in in vitro experiments dihydroergosine showed very weak ability to prevent the binding of {sup 3}H-muscimol, the drug was able to diminish and to augment the IC{sub 50} of bicuculline and GABA when added to crude synaptosomal pellet of the rat and mouse brain respectively. Lower concentrations of dihydroergosine stimulated and higher inhibited {sup 3}H-TBOB binding to the crude synaptosomal pellet of the rat brain. In the preparation of mouse brain dihydroergosine produced only inhibition of {sup 3}H-TBOB binding. Only slight quantitative differences were observed in bicuculline-induced stimulation and in GABA- and diazepam-induced inhibition of {sup 3}H-TBOB binding between the two species. The results suggest that the opposite species-dependent effects of dihydroergosine on bicuculline-induced convulsions are due to the ability of this drug to modulate species-dependently the benzodiazepine/GABA receptor chloride channel complex.

  19. BK channel activators and their therapeutic perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Bentzen, Bo H.; Olesen, Søren-Peter; Rønn, Lars C. B.; Grunnet, Morten

    2014-01-01

    The large conductance calcium- and voltage-activated K+ channel (KCa1.1, BK, MaxiK) is ubiquitously expressed in the body, and holds the ability to integrate changes in intracellular calcium and membrane potential. This makes the BK channel an important negative feedback system linking increases in intracellular calcium to outward hyperpolarizing potassium currents. Consequently, the channel has many important physiological roles including regulation of smooth muscle tone, neurotransmitter release and neuronal excitability. Additionally, cardioprotective roles have been revealed in recent years. After a short introduction to the structure, function and regulation of BK channels, we review the small organic molecules activating BK channels and how these tool compounds have helped delineate the roles of BK channels in health and disease. PMID:25346695

  20. Benzodiazepine agonist and inverse agonist actions on GABAA receptor-operated chloride channels. II. Chronic effects of ethanol

    SciTech Connect

    Buck, K.J.; Harris, R.A. )

    1990-05-01

    Mice were made tolerant to and dependent on ethanol by administration of a liquid diet. Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor-dependent uptake of 36Cl- by mouse cortical microsacs was used to study the actions of benzodiazepine (BZ) agonists and inverse agonists. Chronic exposure to ethanol attenuated the ability of a BZ agonist, flunitrazepam, to augment muscimol-stimulated uptake of 36Cl- and enhanced the actions of BZ inverse agonists, Ro15-4513 (ethyl-8-azido-5,6-dihydro-5-methyl-6-oxo-4H-imidazo(1,4)-benzodiazepine - 3-carboxylate) and DMCM (methyl-6,7-dimethoxy-4-ethyl-beta-carboline-3-carboxylate), to inhibit GABAA receptor-operated chloride channels. Augmentation of chloride flux by pentobarbital was not reduced by chronic ethanol exposure. Attenuation of flunitrazepam efficacy was transient and returned to control levels within 6 to 24 hr after withdrawal from ethanol, but increased sensitivity to Ro15-4513 was observed as long as 8 days after withdrawal. Chronic exposure to ethanol did not alter (3H)SR 95531 (2-(3'-carbethoxy-2'propyl)-3-amino-6-p-methoxyphenylpyridazinium bromide) binding to low-affinity GABAA receptors or muscimol stimulation of chloride flux; and did not alter (3H)Ro15-4513 or (3H)flunitrazepam binding to central BZ receptors or allosteric modulation of this binding by muscimol (i.e., muscimol-shift). These results suggest that chronic exposure to ethanol reduces coupling between BZ agonist sites and the chloride channel, and may be responsible for the development of cross-tolerance between ethanol and BZ agonists. In contrast, coupling between BZ inverse agonist sites and the chloride channel is increased.

  1. Downregulation of chloride channel ClC-2 by Janus kinase 3.

    PubMed

    Warsi, Jamshed; Elvira, Bernat; Hosseinzadeh, Zohreh; Shumilina, Ekaterina; Lang, Florian

    2014-05-01

    Janus kinase-3 (JAK3) fosters proliferation and counteracts apoptosis of lymphocytes and tumor cells. The gain of function mutation (A572V)JAK3 has been discovered in acute megakaryoplastic leukemia. JAK3 is inactivated by replacement of lysine by alanine in the catalytic subunit ((K855A)JAK3). Regulation of cell proliferation and apoptosis involves altered activity of Cl(-) channels. The present study, thus, explored whether JAK3 modifies the function of the small conductance Cl(-) channel ClC-2. To this end, ClC-2 was expressed in Xenopus oocytes with or without wild-type JAK3, (A568V)JAK3 or (K851A)JAK3, and the Cl(-) channel activity determined by dual-electrode voltage clamp. Channel protein abundance in the cell membrane was determined utilizing chemiluminescence. As a result, expression of ClC-2 was followed by a marked increase of cell membrane conductance. The conductance was significantly decreased following coexpression of JAK3 or (A568V)JAK3, but not by coexpression of (K851A)JAK3. Exposure of the oocytes expressing ClC-2 together with (A568V)JAK3 to the JAK3 inhibitor WHI-P154 (4-[(3'-bromo-4'-hydroxyphenyl)amino]-6,7-dimethoxyquinazoline, 22 μM) increased the conductance. Coexpression of (A568V)JAK3 decreased the ClC-2 protein abundance in the cell membrane of ClC-2 expressing oocytes. The decline of conductance in ClC-2 and (A568V)JAK3 coexpressing oocytes following inhibition of channel protein insertion by brefeldin A (5 μM) was similar in oocytes expressing ClC-2 with (A568V)JAK3 and oocytes expressing ClC-2 alone, indicating that (A568V)JAK3 might slow channel protein insertion into rather than accelerating channel protein retrieval from the cell membrane. In conclusion, JAK3 downregulates ClC-2 activity and thus counteracts Cl(-) exit-an effect possibly influencing cell proliferation and apoptosis.

  2. Lactic acid restores skeletal muscle force in an in vitro fatigue model: are voltage-gated chloride channels involved?

    PubMed

    Bandschapp, Oliver; Soule, Charles L; Iaizzo, Paul A

    2012-04-01

    High interstitial K(+) concentration ([K(+)]) has been reported to impede normal propagation of electrical impulses along the muscle cell membrane (sarcolemma) and then also into the transverse tubule system; this is one considered underlying mechanism associated with the development of muscle fatigue. Interestingly, the extracellular buildup of lactic acid, once considered an additional cause for muscle fatigue, was recently shown to have force-restoring effects in such conditions. Specifically, it was proposed that elevated lactic acid (and intracellular acidosis) may lead to inhibition of voltage-gated chloride channels, thereby reestablishing better excitability of the muscle cell sarcolemma. In the present study, using an in vitro muscle contractile experimental setup to study functionally viable rectus abdominis muscle preparations obtained from normal swine, we examined the effects of 20 mM lactic acid and 512 μM 9-anthracenecarboxylic acid (9-AC; a voltage-gated chloride channel blocker) on the force recovery of K(+)-depressed (10 mM K(+)) twitch forces. We observed a similar muscle contractile restoration after both treatments. Interestingly, at elevated [K(+)], myotonia (i.e., hyperexcitability or afterdepolarizations), usually present in skeletal muscle with inherent or induced chloride channel dysfunctions, was not observed in the presence of either lactic acid or 9-AC. In part, these data confirm previous studies showing a force-restoring effect of lactic acid in high-[K(+)] conditions. In addition, we observed similar restorative effects of lactic acid and 9-AC, implicating a beneficial mechanism via voltage-gated chloride channel modulation.

  3. BK channels: multiple sensors, one activation gate.

    PubMed

    Yang, Huanghe; Zhang, Guohui; Cui, Jianmin

    2015-01-01

    Ion transport across cell membranes is essential to cell communication and signaling. Passive ion transport is mediated by ion channels, membrane proteins that create ion conducting pores across cell membrane to allow ion flux down electrochemical gradient. Under physiological conditions, majority of ion channel pores are not constitutively open. Instead, structural region(s) within these pores breaks the continuity of the aqueous ion pathway, thereby serves as activation gate(s) to control ions flow in and out. To achieve spatially and temporally regulated ion flux in cells, many ion channels have evolved sensors to detect various environmental stimuli or the metabolic states of the cell and trigger global conformational changes, thereby dynamically operate the opening and closing of their activation gate. The sensors of ion channels can be broadly categorized as chemical sensors and physical sensors to respond to chemical (such as neural transmitters, nucleotides and ions) and physical (such as voltage, mechanical force and temperature) signals, respectively. With the rapidly growing structural and functional information of different types of ion channels, it is now critical to understand how ion channel sensors dynamically control their gates at molecular and atomic level. The voltage and Ca(2+) activated BK channels, a K(+) channel with an electrical sensor and multiple chemical sensors, provide a unique model system for us to understand how physical and chemical energy synergistically operate its activation gate.

  4. Chloride intracellular channel-4 is a determinant of native collateral formation in skeletal muscle and brain.

    PubMed

    Chalothorn, Dan; Zhang, Hua; Smith, Jennifer E; Edwards, John C; Faber, James E

    2009-07-02

    The capacity of the collateral circulation to lessen injury in occlusive vascular disease depends on the density and caliber of native (preexisting) collaterals, as well as their ability to outwardly remodel in ischemia. Native collateral conductance varies widely among healthy individuals, yet little is known about what specifies collateral formation. Chloride intracellular channel (CLIC)4 protein is required for endothelial cell hollowing, a process necessary for vessel formation during embryogenesis and ischemia. Whether CLIC4 has other physiological roles in vascular biology is uncertain. We studied collateral formation and remodeling in mice deficient in CLIC1 and CLIC4. Vascular responses to femoral artery ligation were similar in Clic1(-/-) and wild-type mice. In contrast, immediately after ligation perfusion dropped more in Clic4(-/-) than wild-type mice, suggesting fewer preexisting collaterals, a finding confirmed by angiography, greater ischemia, and worse recovery of perfusion; however, collateral remodeling was unaffected. Likewise, native cerebral collateral density in Clic4(-/-) (but not Clic1(-/-)) mice was reduced, resulting in severe infarctions. This was associated with impaired perinatal formation and stabilization of nascent collaterals. Clic4 hemizygous mice had intermediate deficits in the above parameters, suggesting a gene-dose effect. Ischemia augmented CLIC1 and CLIC4 expression similarly in wild-type mice. However, CLIC1 increased 3-fold more in Clic4(-/-) mice, suggesting compensation. Despite greater ischemia in Clic4(-/-) mice, hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and angiopoietin-2 increased less compared to wild-type, suggesting CLIC4 exerts influences upstream of hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha-VEGF signaling. Hence, CLIC4 represents the second gene that, along with VEGF shown by us previously, specifies native collateral formation.

  5. Functional Reconstitution and Channel Activity Measurements of Purified Wildtype and Mutant CFTR Protein

    PubMed Central

    Eckford, Paul D. W.; Li, Canhui; Bear, Christine E.

    2015-01-01

    The Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) is a unique channel-forming member of the ATP Binding Cassette (ABC) superfamily of transporters. The phosphorylation and nucleotide dependent chloride channel activity of CFTR has been frequently studied in whole cell systems and as single channels in excised membrane patches. Many Cystic Fibrosis-causing mutations have been shown to alter this activity. While a small number of purification protocols have been published, a fast reconstitution method that retains channel activity and a suitable method for studying population channel activity in a purified system have been lacking. Here rapid methods are described for purification and functional reconstitution of the full-length CFTR protein into proteoliposomes of defined lipid composition that retains activity as a regulated halide channel. This reconstitution method together with a novel flux-based assay of channel activity is a suitable system for studying the population channel properties of wild type CFTR and the disease-causing mutants F508del- and G551D-CFTR. Specifically, the method has utility in studying the direct effects of phosphorylation, nucleotides and small molecules such as potentiators and inhibitors on CFTR channel activity. The methods are also amenable to the study of other membrane channels/transporters for anionic substrates. PMID:25867140

  6. Constitutive Activation of the Shaker Kv Channel

    PubMed Central

    Sukhareva, Manana; Hackos, David H.; Swartz, Kenton J.

    2003-01-01

    In different types of K+ channels the primary activation gate is thought to reside near the intracellular entrance to the ion conduction pore. In the Shaker Kv channel the gate is closed at negative membrane voltages, but can be opened with membrane depolarization. In a previous study of the S6 activation gate in Shaker (Hackos, D.H., T.H. Chang, and K.J. Swartz. 2002. J. Gen. Physiol. 119:521–532.), we found that mutation of Pro 475 to Asp results in a channel that displays a large macroscopic conductance at negative membrane voltages, with only small increases in conductance with membrane depolarization. In the present study we explore the mechanism underlying this constitutively conducting phenotype using both macroscopic and single-channel recordings, and probes that interact with the voltage sensors or the intracellular entrance to the ion conduction pore. Our results suggest that constitutive conduction results from a dramatic perturbation of the closed-open equilibrium, enabling opening of the activation gate without voltage-sensor activation. This mechanism is discussed in the context of allosteric models for activation of Kv channels and what is known about the structure of this critical region in K+ channels. PMID:14557403

  7. The Cullin 4A/B-DDB1-Cereblon E3 Ubiquitin Ligase Complex Mediates the Degradation of CLC-1 Chloride Channels

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yi-An; Peng, Yi-Jheng; Hu, Meng-Chun; Huang, Jing-Jia; Chien, Yun-Chia; Wu, June-Tai; Chen, Tsung-Yu; Tang, Chih-Yung

    2015-01-01

    Voltage-gated CLC-1 chloride channels play a critical role in controlling the membrane excitability of skeletal muscles. Mutations in human CLC-1 channels have been linked to the hereditary muscle disorder myotonia congenita. We have previously demonstrated that disease-associated CLC-1 A531V mutant protein may fail to pass the endoplasmic reticulum quality control system and display enhanced protein degradation as well as defective membrane trafficking. Currently the molecular basis of protein degradation for CLC-1 channels is virtually unknown. Here we aim to identify the E3 ubiquitin ligase of CLC-1 channels. The protein abundance of CLC-1 was notably enhanced in the presence of MLN4924, a specific inhibitor of cullin-RING E3 ligases. Subsequent investigation with dominant-negative constructs against specific subtypes of cullin-RING E3 ligases suggested that CLC-1 seemed to serve as the substrate for cullin 4A (CUL4A) and 4B (CUL4B). Biochemical examinations further indicated that CUL4A/B, damage-specific DNA binding protein 1 (DDB1), and cereblon (CRBN) appeared to co-exist in the same protein complex with CLC-1. Moreover, suppression of CUL4A/B E3 ligase activity significantly enhanced the functional expression of the A531V mutant. Our data are consistent with the idea that the CUL4A/B-DDB1-CRBN complex catalyses the polyubiquitination and thus controls the degradation of CLC-1 channels. PMID:26021757

  8. The Cullin 4A/B-DDB1-Cereblon E3 Ubiquitin Ligase Complex Mediates the Degradation of CLC-1 Chloride Channels.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-An; Peng, Yi-Jheng; Hu, Meng-Chun; Huang, Jing-Jia; Chien, Yun-Chia; Wu, June-Tai; Chen, Tsung-Yu; Tang, Chih-Yung

    2015-05-29

    Voltage-gated CLC-1 chloride channels play a critical role in controlling the membrane excitability of skeletal muscles. Mutations in human CLC-1 channels have been linked to the hereditary muscle disorder myotonia congenita. We have previously demonstrated that disease-associated CLC-1 A531V mutant protein may fail to pass the endoplasmic reticulum quality control system and display enhanced protein degradation as well as defective membrane trafficking. Currently the molecular basis of protein degradation for CLC-1 channels is virtually unknown. Here we aim to identify the E3 ubiquitin ligase of CLC-1 channels. The protein abundance of CLC-1 was notably enhanced in the presence of MLN4924, a specific inhibitor of cullin-RING E3 ligases. Subsequent investigation with dominant-negative constructs against specific subtypes of cullin-RING E3 ligases suggested that CLC-1 seemed to serve as the substrate for cullin 4A (CUL4A) and 4B (CUL4B). Biochemical examinations further indicated that CUL4A/B, damage-specific DNA binding protein 1 (DDB1), and cereblon (CRBN) appeared to co-exist in the same protein complex with CLC-1. Moreover, suppression of CUL4A/B E3 ligase activity significantly enhanced the functional expression of the A531V mutant. Our data are consistent with the idea that the CUL4A/B-DDB1-CRBN complex catalyses the polyubiquitination and thus controls the degradation of CLC-1 channels.

  9. Mechanism of interaction of niflumic acid with heterologously expressed kidney CLC-K chloride channels.

    PubMed

    Picollo, Alessandra; Liantonio, Antonella; Babini, Elena; Camerino, Diana Conte; Pusch, Michael

    2007-04-01

    CLC-K Cl(-) channels belong to the CLC protein family. In kidney and inner ear, they are involved in transepithelial salt transport. Mutations in ClC-Kb lead to Bartter's syndrome, and mutations in the associated subunit barttin produce Bartter's syndrome and deafness. We have previously found that 3-phenyl-CPP blocks hClC-Ka and rClC-K1 from the extracellular side in the pore entrance. Recently, we have shown that niflumic acid (NFA), a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory fenamate, produces biphasic behavior on human CLC-K channels that suggests the presence of two functionally different binding sites: an activating site and a blocking site. Here, we investigate in more detail the interaction of NFA on CLC-K channels. Mutants that altered block by 3-phenyl-2-(p-chlorophenoxy)propionic acid (CPP) had no effect on NFA block, indicating that the inhibition binding site of NFA is different from that of 3-phenyl-CPP and flufenamic acid. Moreover, NFA does not compete with extracellular Cl(-) ions, suggesting that the binding sites of NFA are not located deep in the pore. Differently from ClC-Ka, on the rat homologue ClC-K1, NFA has only an inhibitory effect. We developed a quantitative model to describe the complex action of NFA on ClC-Ka. The model predicts that ClC-Ka possesses two NFA binding sites: when only one site is occupied, NFA increases ClC-Ka currents, whereas the occupation of both binding sites leads to channel block.

  10. Active intestinal chloride secretion in human carriers of cystic fibrosis mutations: an evaluation of the hypothesis that heterozygotes have subnormal active intestinal chloride secretion.

    PubMed

    Högenauer, C; Santa Ana, C A; Porter, J L; Millard, M; Gelfand, A; Rosenblatt, R L; Prestidge, C B; Fordtran, J S

    2000-12-01

    To explain the very high frequency of cystic fibrosis (CF) mutations in most populations of European descent, it has been proposed that CF heterozygotes have a survival advantage when infected with Vibrio cholerae or Escherichia coli, the toxins of which induce diarrhea by stimulation of active intestinal chloride secretion. Two assumptions underlie this hypothesis: (1) chloride conductance by the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is the rate-limiting step for active intestinal chloride secretion at all levels of expression, from approximately zero in patients with CF to normal levels in people who are not carriers of a mutation; and (2) heterozygotes have smaller amounts of functional intestinal CFTR than do people who are not carriers, and heterozygotes therefore secrete less chloride when exposed to secretagogues. The authors used an intestinal perfusion technique to measure in vivo basal and prostaglandin-stimulated jejunal chloride secretion in normal subjects, CF heterozygotes, and patients with CF. Patients with CF had essentially no active chloride secretion in the basal state, and secretion was not stimulated by a prostaglandin analogue. However, CF heterozygotes secreted chloride at the same rate as did people without a CF mutation. If heterozygotes are assumed to have less-than-normal intestinal CFTR function, these results mean that CFTR expression is not rate limiting for active chloride secretion in heterozygotes. The results do not support the theory that the very high frequency of CF mutations is due to a survival advantage that is conferred on heterozygotes who contract diarrheal illnesses mediated by intestinal hypersecretion of chloride.

  11. Chloride channels in stellate cells are essential for uniquely high secretion rates in neuropeptide-stimulated Drosophila diuresis.

    PubMed

    Cabrero, Pablo; Terhzaz, Selim; Romero, Michael F; Davies, Shireen A; Blumenthal, Edward M; Dow, Julian A T

    2014-09-30

    Epithelia frequently segregate transport processes to specific cell types, presumably for improved efficiency and control. The molecular players underlying this functional specialization are of particular interest. In Drosophila, the renal (Malpighian) tubule displays the highest per-cell transport rates known and has two main secretory cell types, principal and stellate. Electrogenic cation transport is known to reside in the principal cells, whereas stellate cells control the anion conductance, but by an as-yet-undefined route. Here, we resolve this issue by showing that a plasma membrane chloride channel, encoded by ClC-a, is exclusively expressed in the stellate cell and is required for Drosophila kinin-mediated induction of diuresis and chloride shunt conductance, evidenced by chloride ion movement through the stellate cells, leading to depolarization of the transepithelial potential. By contrast, ClC-a knockdown had no impact on resting secretion levels. Knockdown of a second CLC gene showing highly abundant expression in adult Malpighian tubules, ClC-c, did not impact depolarization of transepithelial potential after kinin stimulation. Therefore, the diuretic action of kinin in Drosophila can be explained by an increase in ClC-a-mediated chloride conductance, over and above a resting fluid transport level that relies on other (ClC-a-independent) mechanisms or routes. This key segregation of cation and anion transport could explain the extraordinary fluid transport rates displayed by some epithelia.

  12. Niflumic acid inhibits chloride conductance of rat skeletal muscle by directly inhibiting the CLC-1 channel and by increasing intracellular calcium

    PubMed Central

    Liantonio, A; Giannuzzi, V; Picollo, A; Babini, E; Pusch, M; Conte Camerino, D

    2006-01-01

    Background and purpose: Given the crucial role of the skeletal muscle chloride conductance (gCl), supported by the voltage-gated chloride channel CLC-1, in controlling muscle excitability, the availability of ligands modulating CLC-1 are of potential medical as well as toxicological importance. Here, we focused our attention on niflumic acid (NFA), a molecule belonging to the fenamates group of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID). Experimental approach: Rat muscle Cl− conductance (gCl) and heterologously expressed CLC-1 currents were evaluated by means of current-clamp (using two-microelectrodes) and patch-clamp techniques, respectively. Fura-2 fluorescence was used to determine intracellular calcium concentration, [Ca2+]i, in native muscle fibres. Key results: NFA inhibited native gCl with an IC50 of 42 μM and blocked CLC-1 by interacting with an intracellular binding site. Additionally, NFA increased basal [Ca2+]i in myofibres by promoting a mitochondrial calcium efflux that was not dependent on cyclooxygenase or CLC-1. A structure-activity study revealed that the molecular conditions that mediate the two effects are different. Pretreatment with the Ca-dependent protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor chelerythrine partially inhibited the NFA effect. Therefore, in addition to direct channel block, NFA also inhibits gCl indirectly by promoting PKC activation. Conclusions and Implications: These cellular effects of NFA on skeletal muscle demonstrate that it is possible to modify CLC-1 and consequently gCl directly by interacting with channel proteins and indirectly by interfering with the calcium-dependent regulation of the channel. The effect of NFA on mitochondrial calcium stores suggests that NSAIDs, widely used drugs, could have potentially dangerous side-effects. PMID:17128287

  13. [Suppression of activity of Candida albicans proteinases by cobalt chloride].

    PubMed

    Kutyreva, M P; Mukhametzianova, A R; Ulakhovich, N A

    2012-01-01

    Influence of cobalt (II) chloride on the system of Candida albicans proteinase (SAP C. alb.) (both in solution and immobilized on a surface of nitrocellulose membranes) has been investigated. In solution cobalt chloride inactivated inducible but not constitute enzyme. In the heterogenous sytem proteolitical effect of the cobalt ion on inductible proteinase was also observed.

  14. Disuse of rat muscle in vivo reduces protein kinase C activity controlling the sarcolemma chloride conductance

    PubMed Central

    Pierno, Sabata; Desaphy, Jean-François; Liantonio, Antonella; De Luca, Annamaria; Zarrilli, Antonia; Mastrofrancesco, Lisa; Procino, Giuseppe; Valenti, Giovanna; Conte Camerino, Diana

    2007-01-01

    Muscle disuse produced by hindlimb unloading (HU) induces severe atrophy and slow-to-fast fibre type transition of the slow-twitch soleus muscle (Sol). After 2 weeks HU, the resting ClC-1 chloride conductance (gCl) of sarcolemma, which controls muscle excitability, increases in Sol toward a value typical of the fast-twitch EDL muscle. After 3 days of HU, the gCl increases as well before initiation of fibre type transition. Since ClC-1 channels are acutely silenced by PKC-dependent phosphorylation, we studied the modulation of gCl by PKC and serine–threonine phosphatase in Sol during HU, using a number of pharmacological tools. We show that a fraction of ClC-1 channels of control Sol are maintained in an inactive state by PKC basal activity, which contributes to the lower gCl in control Sol compared to EDL. After 14 days of HU, PKC/phosphatase manipulation produces effects on Sol gCl that corroborate the partial slow-to-fast transition. After 3 days of HU, the early increase of gCl in Sol is entirely attributable to a reduction of PKC activity and/or activation of phosphatase, maintaining ClC-1 channels in a fully active state. Accordingly, we found that HU reduces expression of PKCα, ɛ, and θ isoenzymes in Sol and EDL muscles and reduces total PKC activity. Moreover, we show that the rheobase current is increased in Sol muscle fibres as soon as after 3 days of HU, most probably in relation to the increased gCl. In conclusion, Sol muscle disuse is characterized by a rapid reduction of PKC activity, which reduces muscle excitability and is likely to contribute to disuse-induced muscle impairment. PMID:17855757

  15. Activation of TRPV1 channels inhibits mechanosensitive Piezo channel activity by depleting membrane phosphoinositides.

    PubMed

    Borbiro, Istvan; Badheka, Doreen; Rohacs, Tibor

    2015-02-10

    Capsaicin is an activator of the heat-sensitive TRPV1 (transient receptor potential vanilloid 1) ion channels and has been used as a local analgesic. We found that activation of TRPV1 channels with capsaicin either in dorsal root ganglion neurons or in a heterologous expression system inhibited the mechanosensitive Piezo1 and Piezo2 channels by depleting phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P2] and its precursor phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate [PI(4)P] from the plasma membrane through Ca(2+)-induced phospholipase Cδ (PLCδ) activation. Experiments with chemically inducible phosphoinositide phosphatases and receptor-induced activation of PLCβ indicated that inhibition of Piezo channels required depletion of both PI(4)P and PI(4,5)P2. The mechanically activated current amplitudes decreased substantially in the excised inside-out configuration, where the membrane patch containing Piezo1 channels is removed from the cell. PI(4,5)P2 and PI(4)P applied to these excised patches inhibited this decrease. Thus, we concluded that Piezo channel activity requires the presence of phosphoinositides, and the combined depletion of PI(4,5)P2 and PI(4)P reduces channel activity. In addition to revealing a role for distinct membrane lipids in mechanosensitive ion channel regulation, these data suggest that inhibition of Piezo2 channels may contribute to the analgesic effect of capsaicin.

  16. Modulation of divalent cation-activated chloride ion currents.

    PubMed

    Scott, R H; McGuirk, S M; Dolphin, A C

    1988-07-01

    1. Voltage-sensitive calcium channel currents carried by Ca2+ (ICa) or Ba2+ (IBa) were followed by tail currents carried by Cl- ions in approximately 45% of cultured dorsal root ganglion neurones. 2. Extracellular application of (-)-baclofen (100 microM) inhibited IBa and ICl(Ba). Bay K 8644 (5 microM) potentiated both currents. 3. Intracellular GTP-gamma-S increased the proportion of neurones in which ICl(Ba) was recorded. In addition, the activation by GTP-gamma-S of a pertussis toxin-sensitive GTP binding (G)-protein resulted in a steady increase in the Cl- tail current with time, despite a concurrent reduction in IBa. 4. Extracellular application of 10mM caffeine selectively reduced ICl(Ba) without significant change in IBa. When Ca2+ was the charge carrier, caffeine had little effect on ICl(Ca), and increased the inactivation of ICa. 5. We conclude that, in addition to being regulated by divalent cation entry through Ca2+ channels, the Cl- current is also regulated by G-protein activation. The mechanism of activation of ICl(Ba) may involve Ca2+ release from intracellular stores.

  17. Basolateral sorting of chloride channel 2 is mediated by interactions between a dileucine motif and the clathrin adaptor AP-1

    PubMed Central

    de la Fuente-Ortega, Erwin; Gravotta, Diego; Bay, Andres Perez; Benedicto, Ignacio; Carvajal-Gonzalez, Jose Maria; Lehmann, Guillermo L.; Lagos, Carlos F.; Rodríguez-Boulan, Enrique

    2015-01-01

    In spite of the many key cellular functions of chloride channels, the mechanisms that mediate their subcellular localization are largely unknown. ClC-2 is a ubiquitous chloride channel usually localized to the basolateral domain of epithelia that regulates cell volume, ion transport, and acid–base balance; mice knocked out for ClC-2 are blind and sterile. Previous work suggested that CLC-2 is sorted basolaterally by TIFS812LL, a dileucine motif in CLC-2's C-terminal domain. However, our in silico modeling of ClC-2 suggested that this motif was buried within the channel's dimerization interface and identified two cytoplasmically exposed dileucine motifs, ESMI623LL and QVVA635LL, as candidate sorting signals. Alanine mutagenesis and trafficking assays support a scenario in which ESMI623LL acts as the authentic basolateral signal of ClC-2. Silencing experiments and yeast three-hybrid assays demonstrated that both ubiquitous (AP-1A) and epithelium-specific (AP-1B) forms of the tetrameric clathrin adaptor AP-1 are capable of carrying out basolateral sorting of ClC-2 through interactions of ESMI623LL with a highly conserved pocket in their γ1-σ1A hemicomplex. PMID:25739457

  18. The ClC-7 Chloride Channel Is Downregulated by Hypoosmotic Stress in Human Chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Kurita, Takashi; Yamamura, Hisao; Suzuki, Yoshiaki; Giles, Wayne R; Imaizumi, Yuji

    2015-07-01

    Articular chondrocytes in osteoarthritis (OA) patients are exposed to hypoosmotic stress because the osmolality of this synovial fluid is significantly decreased. Hypoosmotic stress can cause an efflux of Cl(-) and an associated decrease of cell volume. We have previously reported that a Cl(-) conductance contributes to the regulation of resting membrane potential and thus can alter intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) in human chondrocytes. The molecular identity and pathologic function of these Cl(-) channels, however, remained to be determined. Here, we show that the ClC-7 Cl(-) channel is strongly expressed in a human chondrocyte cell line (OUMS-27) and that it is responsible for Cl(-) currents that are activated by extracellular acidification (pH 5.0). These acid-sensitive currents are inhibited by 4,4'-diisothiocyanatostilbene-2,2'-disulfonic acid (DIDS; IC50 = 13 μM) and are markedly reduced by small-interfering RNA-induced knockdown of ClC-7. DIDS hyperpolarized these chondrocytes, and this was followed by an increase in [Ca(2+)]i. ClC-7 knockdown caused a similar hyperpolarization of the membrane potential. Short-term culture (48 hours) in hypoosmotic medium (270 mOsm) reduced the expression of ClC-7 and decreased the acid-sensitive currents. Interestingly, these hypoosmotic culture conditions, or ClC-7 knockdown, resulted in enhanced cell death. Taken together, our results show that the significant hyperpolarization due to ClC-7 impairment in chondrocytes can significantly increase [Ca(2+)]i and cell death. Thus, downregulation of ClC-7 channels during the hypoosmotic stress that accompanies OA progression is one important concept of the complex etiology of OA. These findings suggest novel targets for therapeutic intervention(s) and drug development for OA.

  19. Rattlesnake Phospholipase A2 Increases CFTR-Chloride Channel Current and Corrects ∆F508CFTR Dysfunction: Impact in Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Faure, Grazyna; Bakouh, Naziha; Lourdel, Stéphane; Odolczyk, Norbert; Premchandar, Aiswarya; Servel, Nathalie; Hatton, Aurélie; Ostrowski, Maciej K; Xu, Haijin; Saul, Frederick A; Moquereau, Christelle; Bitam, Sara; Pranke, Iwona; Planelles, Gabrielle; Teulon, Jacques; Herrmann, Harald; Roldan, Ariel; Zielenkiewicz, Piotr; Dadlez, Michal; Lukacs, Gergely L; Sermet-Gaudelus, Isabelle; Ollero, Mario; Corringer, Pierre-Jean; Edelman, Aleksander

    2016-07-17

    Deletion of Phe508 in the nucleotide binding domain (∆F508-NBD1) of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR; a cyclic AMP-regulated chloride channel) is the most frequent mutation associated with cystic fibrosis. This mutation affects the maturation and gating of CFTR protein. The search for new high-affinity ligands of CFTR acting as dual modulators (correctors/activators) presents a major challenge in the pharmacology of cystic fibrosis. Snake venoms are a rich source of natural multifunctional proteins, potential binders of ion channels. In this study, we identified the CB subunit of crotoxin from Crotalus durissus terrificus as a new ligand and allosteric modulator of CFTR. We showed that CB interacts with NBD1 of both wild type and ∆F508CFTR and increases their chloride channel currents. The potentiating effect of CB on CFTR activity was demonstrated using electrophysiological techniques in Xenopus laevis oocytes, in CFTR-HeLa cells, and ex vivo in mouse colon tissue. The correcting effect of CB was shown by functional rescue of CFTR activity after 24-h ΔF508CFTR treatments with CB. Moreover, the presence of fully glycosylated CFTR was observed. Molecular docking allowed us to propose a model of the complex involving of the ABCβ and F1-like ATP-binding subdomains of ΔF508-NBD1. Hydrogen-deuterium exchange analysis confirmed stabilization in these regions, also showing allosteric stabilization in two other distal regions. Surface plasmon resonance competition studies showed that CB disrupts the ∆F508CFTR-cytokeratin 8 complex, allowing for the escape of ∆F508CFTR from degradation. Therefore CB, as a dual modulator of ΔF508CFTR, constitutes a template for the development of new anti-CF agents.

  20. A solid phase honey-like channel method for synthesizing urea-ammonium chloride cocrystals on industrial scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Bingchun; Mao, Meiling; Liu, Yanhong; Guo, Jinyu; Li, Jing; Liu, Erbao

    2016-05-01

    Unanticipated a new and simple urea-ammonium chloride cocrystal synthesis method on industrial scale was found during attempts to produce a kind of granulated compound fertilizer. The aggregation of fertilizer powder can make the interaction among particles from loose to close, which generate mechanical pressure and in turn act as the driving force to benefit cocrystal growth. Additionally, the honeycomb-like channels constructed by other coexisting compound make the water evaporates more moderate, which can help the formation of supersaturated solution at suitable rate, further promote the growth of cocrystal. This approach possibly opens a new route toward the developing methodologies for cocrystal synthesis.

  1. Salt, chloride, bleach, and innate host defense

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guoshun; Nauseef, William M.

    2015-01-01

    Salt provides 2 life-essential elements: sodium and chlorine. Chloride, the ionic form of chlorine, derived exclusively from dietary absorption and constituting the most abundant anion in the human body, plays critical roles in many vital physiologic functions, from fluid retention and secretion to osmotic maintenance and pH balance. However, an often overlooked role of chloride is its function in innate host defense against infection. Chloride serves as a substrate for the generation of the potent microbicide chlorine bleach by stimulated neutrophils and also contributes to regulation of ionic homeostasis for optimal antimicrobial activity within phagosomes. An inadequate supply of chloride to phagocytes and their phagosomes, such as in CF disease and other chloride channel disorders, severely compromises host defense against infection. We provide an overview of the roles that chloride plays in normal innate immunity, highlighting specific links between defective chloride channel function and failures in host defense. PMID:26048979

  2. Salt, chloride, bleach, and innate host defense.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guoshun; Nauseef, William M

    2015-08-01

    Salt provides 2 life-essential elements: sodium and chlorine. Chloride, the ionic form of chlorine, derived exclusively from dietary absorption and constituting the most abundant anion in the human body, plays critical roles in many vital physiologic functions, from fluid retention and secretion to osmotic maintenance and pH balance. However, an often overlooked role of chloride is its function in innate host defense against infection. Chloride serves as a substrate for the generation of the potent microbicide chlorine bleach by stimulated neutrophils and also contributes to regulation of ionic homeostasis for optimal antimicrobial activity within phagosomes. An inadequate supply of chloride to phagocytes and their phagosomes, such as in CF disease and other chloride channel disorders, severely compromises host defense against infection. We provide an overview of the roles that chloride plays in normal innate immunity, highlighting specific links between defective chloride channel function and failures in host defense.

  3. Explaining Calcium-Dependent Gating of Anoctamin-1 Chloride Channels Requires a Revised Topology

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Kuai; Duran, Charity; Qu, Zhiqiang; Cui, Yuan-Yuan; Hartzell, H. Criss

    2013-01-01

    Rationale Ca2+-activated Cl channels (CaCCs) play pivotal roles in the cardiovascular system: they regulate vascular smooth muscle tone and participate in cardiac action potential repolarization in some species. CaCCs were recently discovered to be encoded by members of the Anoctamin (Ano, also called Tmem16) superfamily, but the mechanisms of Ano1 gating by Ca2+ remain enigmatic. Objective The objective was to identify regions of Ano1 involved in channel gating by Ca2+. Methods and results The Ca2+ sensitivity of Ano1 was estimated from rates of current activation and deactivation in excised patches rapidly switched between zero and high Ca2+ on the cytoplasmic side. Mutation of glutamates E702 and E705 dramatically altered Ca2+ sensitivity. E702 and E705 are predicted to be in an extracellular loop, but antigenic epitopes introduced into this loop are not accessible to extracellular antibodies, suggesting this loop is intracellular. Cytoplasmically-applied membrane-impermeant sulfhydryl reagents alter the Ca2+ sensitivity of Ano1 E702C and E705C, as expected if E702 and E705 are intracellular. Substituted cysteine accessibility mutagenesis of the putative re-entrant loop suggests that E702 and E705 are located adjacent to the Cl conduction pathway. Conclusions We propose an alternative model of Ano1 topology based on mutagenesis, epitope accessibility, and cysteine-scanning accessibility. These data contradict the popular re-entrant loop model by showing that the putative 4th extracellular loop (ECL 4) is intracellular and may contain a Ca2+ binding site. These studies provide new perspectives on regulation of Ano1 by Ca2+. PMID:22394518

  4. Low expression of the ClC-2 chloride channel during postnatal development: a mechanism for the paradoxical depolarizing action of GABA and glycine in the hippocampus.

    PubMed Central

    Mladinić, M; Becchetti, A; Didelon, F; Bradbury, A; Cherubini, E

    1999-01-01

    In early postnatal development, during the period of synapse formation, gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and glycine, the main inhibitory transmitters in the adult brain, paradoxically excite and depolarize neuronal membranes by an outward flux of chloride. The mechanisms of chloride homeostasis are not fully understood. It is known that in adult neurons intracellular chloride accumulation is prevented by a particular type of chloride channel, the ClC-2. This channel strongly rectifies in the inward direction at potentials negative to ECl thus ensuring chloride efflux. We have tested the hypothesis that in the developing hippocampus, a differential expression or regulation of ClC-2 channels may contribute to the depolarizing action of GABA and glycine. We have cloned a truncated form of ClC-2 (ClC-2nh) from the neonatal hippocampus which lacks the 157 bp corresponding to exon 2. In situ hybridization experiments show that ClC-2nh is the predominant form of ClC-2 mRNA in the neonatal brain. ClC-2nh mRNA is unable to encode a full-length protein due to a frameshift, consequently it does not induce any currents upon injection into Xenopus oocytes. Low expression of the full-length ClC-2 channel, could alter chloride homeostasis, lead to accumulation of [Cl-]i and thereby contribute to the depolarizing action of GABA and glycine during early development. PMID:10418163

  5. A monomer is the minimum functional unit required for channel and ATPase activity of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator.

    PubMed

    Ramjeesingh, M; Li, C; Kogan, I; Wang, Y; Huan, L J; Bear, C E

    2001-09-04

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) normally functions as a phosphorylation-regulated chloride channel on the apical surface of epithelial cells, and lack of this function is the primary cause for the fatal disease cystic fibrosis (CF). Previous studies showed that purified, reconstituted CFTR can function as a chloride channel and, further, that its intrinsic ATPase activity is required to regulate opening and closing of the channel gate. However, these previous studies did not identify the quaternary structure required to mediate conduction and catalysis. Our present studies show that CFTR molecules may self-associate in CHO and Sf9 membranes, as complexes close to the predicted size of CFTR dimers can be captured by chemical cross-linking reagents and detected using nondissociative PAGE. However, CFTR function does not require a multimeric complex for function as we determined that purified, reconstituted CFTR monomers are sufficient to mediate regulated chloride conduction and ATPase activity.

  6. Drastic reduction of the slow gate of human muscle chloride channel (ClC-1) by mutation C277S

    PubMed Central

    Accardi, Alessio; Ferrera, Loretta; Pusch, Michael

    2001-01-01

    Single channel measurements suggest that the human muscle chloride channel ClC-1 presumably has a double barrelled structure, with a fast single protopore gate and a slow common pore gate similar to that of ClC-0, the chloride channel from Torpedo. The single point mutation C212S has been shown to abolish the slow gating of ClC-0 locking the slow gate in the open state. In order to test the hypothesis that the slow gating process found in ClC-1 corresponds to the well characterised slow gate found in ClC-0 we investigated the gating effects in ClC-1 of the homologous mutation corresponding to C212S, C277S. We found that the mutation C277S strongly reduced the slow component of macroscopic gating relaxations at negative and at positive voltages. Time constants of the fast gating relaxations were not affected by the mutation but the minimal open probability of the fast gate at negative voltages was slightly reduced to 0.08 compared with the WT value of 0.22. Additionally, we characterised the block of WT ClC-1 and mutant C277S by the S(—) enantiomer of CPB (2-(p-chlorophenoxy) butyric acid), and found that the block is practically unaffected by the mutation suggesting that CPB does not interact with the slow gate of ClC-1. We conclude that the slow and fast gating processes of ClC-1, respectively, reflect the slow common pore gate and the single protopore gate of the double-barrelled ClC-1 channel. PMID:11483705

  7. Drastic reduction of the slow gate of human muscle chloride channel (ClC-1) by mutation C277S.

    PubMed

    Accardi, A; Ferrera, L; Pusch, M

    2001-08-01

    1. Single channel measurements suggest that the human muscle chloride channel ClC-1 presumably has a double barrelled structure, with a fast single protopore gate and a slow common pore gate similar to that of ClC-0, the chloride channel from Torpedo. The single point mutation C212S has been shown to abolish the slow gating of ClC-0 locking the slow gate in the open state. In order to test the hypothesis that the slow gating process found in ClC-1 corresponds to the well characterised slow gate found in ClC-0 we investigated the gating effects in ClC-1 of the homologous mutation corresponding to C212S, C277S. 2. We found that the mutation C277S strongly reduced the slow component of macroscopic gating relaxations at negative and at positive voltages. 3. Time constants of the fast gating relaxations were not affected by the mutation but the minimal open probability of the fast gate at negative voltages was slightly reduced to 0.08 compared with the WT value of 0.22. 4. Additionally, we characterised the block of WT ClC-1 and mutant C277S by the S(-) enantiomer of CPB (2-(p-chlorophenoxy) butyric acid), and found that the block is practically unaffected by the mutation suggesting that CPB does not interact with the slow gate of ClC-1. 5. We conclude that the slow and fast gating processes of ClC-1, respectively, reflect the slow common pore gate and the single protopore gate of the double-barrelled ClC-1 channel.

  8. Active dendrites, potassium channels and synaptic plasticity.

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Daniel; Christie, Brian R; Frick, Andreas; Gray, Richard; Hoffman, Dax A; Schexnayder, Lalania K; Watanabe, Shigeo; Yuan, Li-Lian

    2003-01-01

    The dendrites of CA1 pyramidal neurons in the hippocampus express numerous types of voltage-gated ion channel, but the distributions or densities of many of these channels are very non-uniform. Sodium channels in the dendrites are responsible for action potential (AP) propagation from the axon into the dendrites (back-propagation); calcium channels are responsible for local changes in dendritic calcium concentrations following back-propagating APs and synaptic potentials; and potassium channels help regulate overall dendritic excitability. Several lines of evidence are presented here to suggest that back-propagating APs, when coincident with excitatory synaptic input, can lead to the induction of either long-term depression (LTD) or long-term potentiation (LTP). The induction of LTD or LTP is correlated with the magnitude of the rise in intracellular calcium. When brief bursts of synaptic potentials are paired with postsynaptic APs in a theta-burst pairing paradigm, the induction of LTP is dependent on the invasion of the AP into the dendritic tree. The amplitude of the AP in the dendrites is dependent, in part, on the activity of a transient, A-type potassium channel that is expressed at high density in the dendrites and correlates with the induction of the LTP. Furthermore, during the expression phase of the LTP, there are local changes in dendritic excitability that may result from modulation of the functioning of this transient potassium channel. The results support the view that the active properties of dendrites play important roles in synaptic integration and synaptic plasticity of these neurons. PMID:12740112

  9. Chloride channel ClC-3 in gills of the euryhaline teleost, Tetraodon nigroviridis: expression, localization and the possible role of chloride absorption

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Cheng-Hao; Hwang, Lie-Yueh; Lee, Tsung-Han

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Previous studies have reported the mechanisms of ion absorption and secretion by diverse membrane transport proteins in gills of various teleostean species. To date, however, the chloride channel expressed in the basolateral membrane of mitochondrion-rich (MR) cells for Cl− uptake in freshwater (FW) fish is still unknown. In this study, the combination of bioinformatics tools [i.e. National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) database, Tetraodon nigroviridis (spotted green pufferfish) genome database (Genoscope), BLAT and BLASTn] were used to identify the gene of ClC-3 (TnClC-3), a member of the CLC chloride channel family in the T. nigroviridis genome. RT-PCR analysis revealed that the gene encoding for the ClC-3 protein was widely expressed in diverse tissues (i.e. gill, kidney, intestine, liver and brain) of FW- and seawater (SW)-acclimated pufferfish. In whole-mount double immunofluorescent staining, branchial ClC-3-like immunoreactive protein was localized to the basolateral membrane of Na+/K+-ATPase (NKA) immunoreactive cells in both the FW- and SW-acclimated pufferfish. In response to salinity, the levels of transcript of branchial TnClC-3 were similar between FW and SW fish. Moreover, the membrane fraction of ClC-3-like protein in gills was 2.7-fold higher in FW compared with SW pufferfish. To identify whether the expression of branchial ClC-3-like protein specifically responded to lower environmental [Cl−], the pufferfish were acclimated to artificial waters either with a normal (control) or lower Cl− concentration (low-Cl). Immunoblotting of membrane fractions of gill ClC-3-like protein showed the expression was about 4.3-fold higher in pufferfish acclimated to the low-Cl environment than in the control group. Furthermore, branchial ClC-3-like protein was rapidly elevated in response to acute changes of environmental salinity or [Cl−]. Taken together, pufferfish ClC-3-like protein was expressed in the basolateral membrane of gill

  10. Activation of Ca(2+) -activated Cl(-) channel ANO1 by localized Ca(2+) signals.

    PubMed

    Jin, Xin; Shah, Sihab; Du, Xiaona; Zhang, Hailin; Gamper, Nikita

    2016-01-01

    Ca(2+)-activated chloride channels (CaCCs) regulate numerous physiological processes including epithelial transport, smooth muscle contraction and sensory processing. Anoctamin-1 (ANO1, TMEM16A) is a principal CaCC subunit in many cell types, yet our understanding of the mechanisms of ANO1 activation and regulation are only beginning to emerge. Ca(2+) sensitivity of ANO1 is rather low and at negative membrane potentials the channel requires several micromoles of intracellular Ca(2+) for activation. However, global Ca(2+) levels in cells rarely reach such levels and, therefore, there must be mechanisms that focus intracellular Ca(2+) transients towards the ANO1 channels. Recent findings indeed indicate that ANO1 channels often co-localize with sources of intracellular Ca(2+) signals. Interestingly, it appears that in many cell types ANO1 is particularly tightly coupled to the Ca(2+) release sites of the intracellular Ca(2+) stores. Such preferential coupling may represent a general mechanism of ANO1 activation in native tissues.

  11. The anti-MMP activity of benzalkonium chloride

    PubMed Central

    Tezvergil-Mutluay, Arzu; Mutluay, M. Murat; Gu, Li-sha; Zhang, Kai; Agee, Kelli A.; Carvalho, Ricardo M.; Manso, Adriana; Carrilho, Marcela; Tay, Franklin R.; Breschi, Lorenzo; Suh, Byoung-In; Pashley, David H.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Objective This study evaluated the ability of benzalkonium chloride (BAC) to bind to dentine and to inhibit soluble recombinant MMPs and bound dentine matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). Methods Dentine powder was prepared from extracted human molars. Half was left mineralized; the other half was completely demineralized. The binding of BAC to dentine powder was followed by measuring changes in the supernatant concentration using UV spectrometry. The inhibitory effects of BAC on rhMMP-2, -8 and -9 were followed using a commercially available in vitro proteolytic assay. Matrix-bound endogenous MMP-activity was evaluated in completely demineralized beams. Each beam was either dipped into BAC and then dropped into 1 mL of a complete medium (CM) or they were placed in 1 mL of CM containing BAC for 30 d. After 30 d, changes in the dry mass of the beams or in the hydroxyproline (HYP) content of hydrolyzates of the media were quantitated as indirect measures of matrix collagen hydrolysis by MMPs. Results Demineralized dentine powder took up 10-times more BAC than did mineralized powder. Water rinsing removed about 50% of the bound BAC, while rinsing with 0.5 M NaCl removed more than 90% of the bound BAC. BAC concentrations 0.5 wt% produced 100% inhibition of soluble recombinant MMP-2, -8 or -9, and inhibited matrix-bound MMPs between 55-66% when measured as mass loss or 76-81% when measured as solubilization of collagen peptide fragments. Conclusions BAC is effective at inhibiting both soluble recombinant MMPs and matrix-bound dentine MMPs in the absence of resins. PMID:20951183

  12. Identifying interacting proteins of a Caenorhabditis elegans voltage-gated chloride channel CLH-1 using GFP-Trap and mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zi-Liang; Jiang, Jing; Yin, Jiang-An; Cai, Shi-Qing

    2014-06-25

    Chloride channels belong to a superfamily of ion channels that permit passive passage of anions, mainly chloride, across cell membrane. They play a variety of important physiological roles in regulation of cytosolic pH, cell volume homeostasis, organic solute transport, cell migration, cell proliferation, and differentiation. However, little is known about the functional regulation of these channels. In this study, we generated an integrated transgenic worm strain expressing green fluorescence protein (GFP) fused CLC-type chloride channel 1 (CLH-1::GFP), a voltage-gated chloride channel in Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans). CLH-1::GFP was expressed in some unidentified head neurons and posterior intestinal cells of C. elegans. Interacting proteins of CLH-1::GFP were purified by GFP-Trap, a novel system for efficient isolation of GFP fusion proteins and their interacting factors. Mass spectrometry (MS) analysis revealed that a total of 27 high probability interacting proteins were co-trapped with CLHp-1::GFP. Biochemical evidence showed that eukaryotic translation elongation factor 1 (EEF-1), one of these co-trapped proteins identified by MS, physically interacted with CLH-1, in consistent with GFP-Trap experiments. Further immunostaining data revealed that the protein level of CLH-1 was significantly increased upon co-expression with EEF-1. These results suggest that the combination of GFP-Trap purification with MS is an excellent tool to identify novel interacting proteins of voltage-gated chloride channels in C. elegans. Our data also show that EEF-1 is a regulator of voltage-gated chloride channel CLH-1.

  13. An mRNA encoding a putative GABA-gated chloride channel is expressed in the human cardiac conduction system.

    PubMed

    Garret, M; Bascles, L; Boue-Grabot, E; Sartor, P; Charron, G; Bloch, B; Margolskee, R F

    1997-04-01

    GABA-gated chloride channels are the main inhibitory neurotransmitter receptors in the CNS. Conserved domains among members of previously described GABAA receptor subunits were used to design degenerate sense and antisense oligonucleotides. A PCR product from this amplification was used to isolate a full-length cDNA. The predicted protein has many of the features shared by other members of the ligand-gated ion channel family. This channel subunit has significant amino acid identity (25-40%) with members of GABAA and GABAC receptor subunits and thus may represent a new subfamily of the GABA receptor channel. Although we cannot rule out that this clone encodes a receptor for an unidentified ligand, it was termed GABA chi. This gene is mainly expressed in placenta and in heart; however, placenta appears to express only an unspliced mRNA. In situ hybridization reveals that the GABA chi subunit mRNA is present in the electrical conduction system of the human heart. Our results suggest that novel GABA receptors expressed outside of the CNS may regulate cardiac function.

  14. Contribution of a leucine residue in the first transmembrane segment to the selectivity filter region in the CFTR chloride channel.

    PubMed

    Negoda, Alexander; El Hiani, Yassine; Cowley, Elizabeth A; Linsdell, Paul

    2017-05-01

    The anion selectivity and conductance of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channel are determined predominantly by interactions between permeant anions and the narrow region of the channel pore. This narrow region has therefore been described as functioning as the "selectivity filter" of the channel. Multiple pore-lining transmembrane segments (TMs) have previously been shown to contribute to the selectivity filter region. However, little is known about the three-dimensional organization of this region, or how multiple TMs combine to determine its functional properties. In the present study we have used patch clamp recording to identify changes in channel function associated with the formation of disulfide cross-links between cysteine residues introduced into different TMs within the selectivity filter. Cysteine introduced at position L102 in TM1 was able to form disulfide bonds with F337C and T338C in TM6, two positions that are known to play key roles in determining anion permeation properties. Consistent with this proximal arrangement of L102, F337 and T338, different mutations at L102 altered anion selectivity and conductance properties in a way that suggests that this residue plays an important role in determining selectivity filter function, albeit a much lesser role than that of F337. These results suggest an asymmetric three-dimensional arrangement of the key selectivity filter region of the pore, as well as having important implications regarding the molecular mechanism of anion permeation.

  15. Molecular determinants of anion selectivity in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator chloride channel pore.

    PubMed Central

    Linsdell, P; Evagelidis, A; Hanrahan, J W

    2000-01-01

    Ionic selectivity in many cation channels is achieved over a short region of the pore known as the selectivity filter, the molecular determinants of which have been identified in Ca(2+), Na(+), and K(+) channels. However, a filter controlling selectivity among different anions has not previously been identified in any Cl(-) channel. In fact, because Cl(-) channels are only weakly selective among small anions, and because their selectivity has proved so resistant to site-directed mutagenesis, the very existence of a discrete anion selectivity filter has been called into question. Here we show that mutation of a putative pore-lining phenylalanine residue, F337, in the sixth membrane-spanning region of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl(-) channel, dramatically alters the relative permeabilities of different anions in the channel. Specifically, mutations that reduce the size of the amino acid side chain present at this position virtually abolish the relationship between anion permeability and hydration energy, a relationship that characterizes the anion selectivity not only of wild-type CFTR, but of most classes of Cl(-) channels. These results suggest that the pore of CFTR may indeed contain a specialized region, analogous to the selectivity filter of cation channels, at which discrimination between different permeant anions takes place. Because F337 is adjacent to another amino acid residue, T338, which also affects anion selectivity in CFTR, we suggest that selectivity is predominantly determined over a physically discrete region of the pore located near these important residues. PMID:10827976

  16. Regulation of TRPM8 channel activity

    PubMed Central

    Yudin, Yevgen; Rohacs, Tibor

    2011-01-01

    Transient Receptor Potential Melastatin 8 (TRPM8) is a Ca2+ permeable non-selective cation channel directly activated by cold temperatures and chemical agonists such as menthol. It is a well established sensor of environmental cold temperatures, found in peripheral sensory neurons, where its activation evokes depolarization and action potentials. The activity of TRPM8 is regulated by a number of cellular signaling pathways, most notably by phosphoinositides and the activation of phospholipase C. This review will summarize current knowledge on the physiological and pathophysiological roles of TRPM8 and its regulation by various intracellular messenger molecules and signaling pathways. PMID:22061619

  17. Parasitoid wasp sting: a cocktail of GABA, taurine, and beta-alanine opens chloride channels for central synaptic block and transient paralysis of a cockroach host.

    PubMed

    Moore, Eugene L; Haspel, Gal; Libersat, Frederic; Adams, Michael E

    2006-07-01

    The wasp Ampulex compressa injects venom directly into the prothoracic ganglion of its cockroach host to induce a transient paralysis of the front legs. To identify the biochemical basis for this paralysis, we separated venom components according to molecular size and tested fractions for inhibition of synaptic transmission at the cockroach cercal-giant synapse. Only fractions in the low molecular weight range (<2 kDa) caused synaptic block. Dabsylation of venom components and analysis by HPLC and MALDI-TOF-MS revealed high levels of GABA (25 mM), and its receptor agonists beta-alanine (18 mM), and taurine (9 mM) in the active fractions. Each component produces transient block of synaptic transmission at the cercal-giant synapse and block of efferent motor output from the prothoracic ganglion, which mimics effects produced by injection of whole venom. Whole venom evokes picrotoxin-sensitive chloride currents in cockroach central neurons, consistent with a GABAergic action. Together these data demonstrate that Ampulex utilizes GABAergic chloride channel activation as a strategy for central synaptic block to induce transient and focal leg paralysis in its host.

  18. Lubiprostone activates non-CFTR-dependent respiratory epithelial chloride secretion in cystic fibrosis mice.

    PubMed

    MacDonald, Kelvin D; McKenzie, Karen R; Henderson, Mark J; Hawkins, Charles E; Vij, Neeraj; Zeitlin, Pamela L

    2008-11-01

    Periciliary fluid balance is maintained by the coordination of sodium and chloride channels in the apical membranes of the airways. In the absence of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR), chloride secretion is diminished and sodium reabsorption exaggerated. ClC-2, a pH- and voltage-dependent chloride channel, is present on the apical membranes of airway epithelial cells. We hypothesized that ClC-2 agonists would provide a parallel pathway for chloride secretion. Using nasal potential difference (NPD) measurements, we quantified lubiprostone-mediated Cl(-) transport in sedated cystic fibrosis null (gut-corrected), C57Bl/6, and A/J mice during nasal perfusion of lubiprostone (a putative ClC-2 agonist). Baseline, amiloride-inhibited, chloride-free gluconate-substituted Ringer with amiloride and low-chloride Ringer plus lubiprostone (at increasing concentrations of lubiprostone) were perfused, and the NPD was continuously recorded. A clear dose-response relationship was detected in all murine strains. The magnitude of the NPD response to 20 muM lubiprostone was -5.8 +/- 2.1 mV (CF, n = 12), -8.1 +/- 2.6 mV (C57Bl/6 wild-type, n = 12), and -5.3 +/- 1.2 mV (AJ wild-type, n = 8). A cohort of ClC-2 knockout mice did not respond to 20 muM lubiprostone (n = 6, P = 0.27). In C57Bl/6 mice, inhibition of CFTR with topical application of CFTR inhibitor-172 did not abolish the lubiprostone response, thus confirming the response seen is independent of CFTR regulation. RT-PCR confirmed expression of ClC-2 mRNA in murine lung homogenate. The direct application of lubiprostone in the CF murine nasal airway restores nearly normal levels of chloride secretion in nasal epithelia.

  19. Mosquitocidal properties of IgG targeting the glutamate-gated chloride channel in three mosquito disease vectors (Diptera: Culicidae).

    PubMed

    Meyers, Jacob I; Gray, Meg; Foy, Brian D

    2015-05-15

    The glutamate-gated chloride channel (GluCl) is a highly sensitive insecticide target of the avermectin class of insecticides. As an alternative to using chemical insecticides to kill mosquitoes, we tested the effects of purified immunoglobulin G (IgG) targeting the extracellular domain of GluCl from Anopheles gambiae (AgGluCl) on the survivorship of three key mosquito disease vectors: Anopheles gambiae s.s., Aedes aegypti and Culex tarsalis. When administered through a single blood meal, anti-AgGluCl IgG reduced the survivorship of A. gambiae in a dose-dependent manner (LC50: 2.82 mg ml(-1), range 2.68-2.96 mg ml(-1)) but not A. aegypti or C. tarsalis. We previously demonstrated that AgGluCl is only located in tissues of the head and thorax of A. gambiae. To verify that AgGluCl IgG is affecting target antigens found outside the midgut, we injected it directly into the hemocoel via intrathoracic injection. A single, physiologically relevant concentration of anti-AgGluCl IgG injected into the hemocoel equally reduced mosquito survivorship of all three species. To test whether anti-AgGluCl IgG was entering the hemocoel of each of these mosquitoes, we fed mosquitoes a blood meal containing anti-AgGluCl IgG and subsequently extracted their hemolymph. We only detected IgG in the hemolymph of A. gambiae, suggesting that resistance of A. aegypti and C. tarsalis to anti-AgGluCl IgG found in blood meals is due to deficient IgG translocation across the midgut. We predicted that anti-AgGluCl IgG's mode of action is by antagonizing GluCl activity. To test this hypothesis, we fed A. gambiae blood meals containing anti-AgGluCl IgG and the GluCl agonist ivermectin (IVM). Anti-AgGluCl IgG attenuated the mosquitocidal effects of IVM, suggesting that anti-AgGluCl IgG antagonizes IVM-induced activation of GluCl. Lastly, we stained adult, female A. aegypti and C. tarsalis for GluCl expression. Neuronal GluCl expression in these mosquitoes was similar to previously reported A

  20. Probing Oxygen Activation Sites in Two Flavoprotein Oxidases Using Chloride as an Oxygen Surrogate

    SciTech Connect

    Kommoju, Phaneeswara-Rao; Chen, Zhi-wei; Bruckner, Robert C.; Mathews, F. Scott; Jorns, Marilyn Schuman

    2011-08-16

    A single basic residue above the si-face of the flavin ring is the site of oxygen activation in glucose oxidase (GOX) (His516) and monomeric sarcosine oxidase (MSOX) (Lys265). Crystal structures of both flavoenzymes exhibit a small pocket at the oxygen activation site that might provide a preorganized binding site for superoxide anion, an obligatory intermediate in the two-electron reduction of oxygen. Chloride binds at these polar oxygen activation sites, as judged by solution and structural studies. First, chloride forms spectrally detectable complexes with GOX and MSOX. The protonated form of His516 is required for tight binding of chloride to oxidized GOX and for rapid reaction of reduced GOX with oxygen. Formation of a binary MSOX-chloride complex requires Lys265 and is not observed with Lys265Met. Binding of chloride to MSOX does not affect the binding of a sarcosine analogue (MTA, methylthioactetate) above the re-face of the flavin ring. Definitive evidence is provided by crystal structures determined for a binary MSOX-chloride complex and a ternary MSOX-chloride-MTA complex. Chloride binds in the small pocket at a position otherwise occupied by a water molecule and forms hydrogen bonds to four ligands that are arranged in approximate tetrahedral geometry: Lys265:NZ, Arg49:NH1, and two water molecules, one of which is hydrogen bonded to FAD:N5. The results show that chloride (i) acts as an oxygen surrogate, (ii) is an effective probe of polar oxygen activation sites, and (iii) provides a valuable complementary tool to the xenon gas method that is used to map nonpolar oxygen-binding cavities.

  1. Iron-Catalyzed Activation of Chloride from Saline Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittmer, Julian; Bleicher, Sergej; Ofner, Johannes; Zetzsch, Cornelius

    2015-04-01

    Iron (Fe) occurs in highly saline media (e.g. sea salt aerosol, salt brines etc.). High salinity, low pH, and organic constituents promote the dissolution of iron, forming photosensitive complexes that are responsible for a gaseous Cl production when irradiated by sunlight [1]. We studied the production of atomic Cl, Br and OH radicals from modeled salt pans [2] and artificial sea-salt aerosols containing Fe(III) ions or pyrogenic Fe2O3particles (Sicotrans Orange, BASF) at various compositions in a Teflon smog-chamber. The samples were either spread on a Teflon sheet or they were nebulized from dilute brines (most abundant particle diameter: ~0.4 μm, initial surface area: up to 3-10-2 cm2cm-3) and exposed to simulated sunlight at 60-90% relative humidity. The photochemical formation of Cl, OH and Br (if possible) in the gas phase was quantified by the radical clock method [3] resulting in time profiles of the radical-production rates and total productions. Simultaneous monitoring of the aerosol surface area enabled us to determine the initial Cl production rate per cm2 aerosol surface. Whereas no significant Cl production was detected employing a molar Cl-/Fe(III) ratio of 13, it increased to ~2.8-1017 atoms cm-2s-1 (at a ratio of 101), ~4.1-1017 atoms cm-2s-1(at a ratio of 53) and ~1.9-1018 atoms cm-2s-1(at a ratio of 13). The presence of NO2 (~20 ppb) or O3 (630 ppb) in the gas phase additionally increased the Fe(III)-induced chloride activation to ~7-1018 atoms cm-2s-1 and ~9-1018 atoms cm-2s-1(at a Cl-/Fe(III) ratio of 13), respectively. SO2 slightly restrained the Cl formation. Artificial sea salt aerosols doped with Fe2O3 (Cl-/Fetot ~13) did not result in detectable Cl concentrations. However, decreasing the pH below 2 favored the dissolution of Fe and led to Cl production rates comparable to the Fe(III) experiments. These observations are in accord with the speciation of the photolabile, aqueous Fe(III) complexes obtained from an equilibrium model (PHREEQC

  2. [Preparation and optimum process of walnut peel activated carbon by zinc chloride as activating agent].

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao-hong; Wang, Xing-wei; Zhao, Bo; Lü, Jun-fang; Kang, Ni-na; Zhang, Yao-jun

    2014-12-01

    Walnut peel as raw material, zinc chloride was used as activating agent for preparation walnut peel activated carbon in the muffle furnace in this experiment, using orthogonal design. Yield, the specific surface area and iodine number of walnut peel activated carbon were determined at all designed experimental conditions and the optimum technological condition of preparation was obtained. By analysis of aperture, infrared spectra and the content of acidic group in surface with Boehm, walnut peel activated carbon of prepared at the optimum condition was characterized. The results showed the optimum technological parameters of preparation: activation temperature (600 °C), activation time (1 h), the concentration of zinc chloride (50%), the particle size (60 mesh). The specific surface area of walnut peel activated carbon obtained at optimum condition was mounting to 1258.05 m2 · g(-1), the ratio of medium porous 32.18%. Therefore, walnut peel can be used in the preparation of the high-quality activated carbon of large surface area. Agricultural wastes, as walnut peel, not only were implemented recycle, but also didn't make any pollution. Meanwhile, a cheap adsorbent was provided and it was of great significance to open a new source of activated carbon.

  3. Novel residues lining the CFTR chloride channel pore identified by functional modification of introduced cysteines.

    PubMed

    Fatehi, Mohammad; Linsdell, Paul

    2009-04-01

    Substituted cysteine accessibility mutagenesis (SCAM) has been used widely to identify pore-lining amino acid side chains in ion channel proteins. However, functional effects on permeation and gating can be difficult to separate, leading to uncertainty concerning the location of reactive cysteine side chains. We have combined SCAM with investigation of the charge-dependent effects of methanethiosulfonate (MTS) reagents on the functional permeation properties of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl(-) channels. We find that cysteines substituted for seven out of 21 continuous amino acids in the eleventh and twelfth transmembrane (TM) regions can be modified by external application of positively charged [2-(trimethylammonium)ethyl] MTS bromide (MTSET) and negatively charged sodium [2-sulfonatoethyl] MTS (MTSES). Modification of these cysteines leads to changes in the open channel current-voltage relationship at both the macroscopic and single-channel current levels that reflect specific, charge-dependent effects on the rate of Cl(-) permeation through the channel from the external solution. This approach therefore identifies amino acid side chains that lie within the permeation pathway. Cysteine mutagenesis of pore-lining residues also affects intrapore anion binding and anion selectivity, giving more information regarding the roles of these residues. Our results demonstrate a straightforward method of screening for pore-lining amino acids in ion channels. We suggest that TM11 contributes to the CFTR pore and that the extracellular loop between TMs 11 and 12 lies close to the outer mouth of the pore.

  4. Dissection of the Mechanical Impedance Components of the Outer Hair Cell Using a Chloride-Channel Blocker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harasztosi, Csaba; Gummer, Anthony W.

    2011-11-01

    The voltage-dependent chloride-channel blocker anthracene-9-carboxylic acid (9AC) has been found to reduce the imaginary but not the real part of the mechanical impedance of the organ of Corti, suggesting that the effective stiffness of outer hair cells (OHCs) is reduced by 9AC. To examine whether 9AC interacts directly with the motor protein prestin to reduce the membrane component of the impedance, the patch-clamp technique in whole-cell configuration was used to measure the nonlinear capacitance (NLC) of isolated OHCs and, as control, prestin-transfected human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK293) cells. Extracellular application of 9AC significantly reduced the NLC of both OHCs and HEK293 cells. Intracellular 9AC did not influence the blocking effect of the extracellular applied drug. These results suggest that 9AC interacts directly with prestin, reducing the effective stiffness of the motor, and that the interaction is extracellular.

  5. Ca2+-activated K channels in parotid acinar cells

    PubMed Central

    Romanenko, Victor G; Thompson, Jill

    2010-01-01

    Fluid secretion relies on a close interplay between Ca2+-activated Cl and K channels. Salivary acinar cells contain both large conductance, BK, and intermediate conductance, IK1, K channels. Physiological fluid secretion occurs with only modest (<500 nM) increases in intracellular Ca2+ levels but BK channels in many cell types and in heterologous expression systems require very high concentrations for significant activation. We report here our efforts to understand this apparent contradiction. We determined the Ca2+ dependence of IK1 and BK channels in mouse parotid acinar cells. IK1 channels activated with an apparent Ca2+ affinity of about 350 nM and a hill coefficient near 3. Native parotid BK channels activated at similar Ca2+ levels unlike the BK channels in other cell types. Since the parotid BK channel is encoded by an uncommon splice variant, we examined this clone in a heterologous expression system. In contrast to the native parotid channel, activation of this expressed “parslo” channel required very high levels of Ca2+. In order to understand the functional basis for the special properties of the native channels, we analyzed the parotid BK channel in the context of the horrigan-Aldrich model of BK channel gating. We found that the shifted activation of parotid BK channels resulted from a hyperpolarizing shift of the voltage dependence of voltage sensor activation and channel opening and included a large change in the coupling of these two processes. PMID:20519930

  6. Interactions between permeant and blocking anions inside the CFTR chloride channel pore.

    PubMed

    Linsdell, Paul

    2015-07-01

    Binding of cytoplasmic anionic open channel blockers within the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl(-) channel is antagonized by extracellular Cl(-). In the present work, patch clamp recording was used to investigate the interaction between extracellular Cl(-) (and other anions) and cytoplasmic Pt(NO2)4(2-) ions inside the CFTR channel pore. In constitutively open (E1371Q-CFTR) channels, these different anions bind to two separate sites, located in the outer and inner vestibules of the pore respectively, in a mutually antagonistic fashion. A mutation in the inner vestibule (I344K) that greatly increased Pt(NO2)4(2-) binding affinity also greatly strengthened antagonistic Cl(-):blocker interactions as well as the voltage-dependence of block. Quantitative analysis of ion binding affinity suggested that the I344K mutation strengthened interactions not only with intracellular Pt(NO2)4(2-) ions but also with extracellular Cl(-), and that altered blocker Cl(-)- and voltage-dependence were due to the introduction of a novel type of antagonistic ion:ion interaction inside the pore that was independent of Cl(-) binding in the outer vestibule. It is proposed that this mutation alters the arrangement of anion binding sites inside the pore, allowing both Cl(-) and Pt(NO2)4(2-) to bind concurrently within the inner vestibule in a strongly mutually antagonistic fashion. However, the I344K mutation does not increase single channel conductance following disruption of Cl(-) binding in the outer vestibule in R334Q channels. Implications for the arrangement of ion binding sites in the pore, and their functional consequences for blocker binding and for rapid Cl(-) permeation, are discussed.

  7. The tyrosine kinase p60c-src regulates the fast gate of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator chloride channel.

    PubMed

    Fischer, H; Machen, T E

    1996-12-01

    The role of the tyrosine kinase p60c-src on the gating of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channel was investigated with the cell-attached and excised patch clamp technique in conjunction with current noise analysis of recordings containing multiple channels per patch. Spectra of CFTR-generated current noise contained a low-frequency and a high-frequency Lorentzian noise component. In the cell-attached mode, the high-frequency Lorentzian was significantly dependent on the membrane potential, while the low-frequency Lorentzian was unaffected. Excision of forskolin-stimulated patches into ATP-containing solution significantly reduced the amplitude of the voltage-dependent high-frequency Lorentzian. Addition of the tyrosine kinase p60c-src to excised, active, CFTR-containing membrane patches increased mean currents by 54%, increased the corner frequency of the low-frequency Lorentzian, and recovered the high-frequency Lorentzian and its characteristics. Treatment with lambda-phosphatase inactivated src-induced currents and changes in gating. When active patches were excised under conditions in which patch-associated tyrosine phosphatases were blocked with sodium vanadate, the high-frequency gating remained relatively unchanged. The results suggest that CFTR's open probability and its voltage-dependent fast gate are dependent on tyrosine phosphorylation, and that membrane-associated tyrosine phosphatases are responsible for inactivation of the fast gate after patch excision.

  8. Effect of calcium chloride, zinc chloride, and water infusion on metmyoglobin reducing activity and fresh lamb color.

    PubMed

    Bekhit, A E D; Ilian, M A; Morton, J D; Vanhanan, L; Sedcole, J R; Bickerstaffe, R

    2005-09-01

    Calcium chloride (CaCl2), zinc chloride (ZnCl2), or water infusions were used to investigate the biochemical factors that affect fresh lamb color, and to examine the role of metmyoglobin-reducing activity in regulating this important quality attribute. Immediately after exsanguination, lamb carcasses (n = 6 per treatment) were infused (10% of BW) with 0.3 M CaCl2, 0.05 M ZnCl2, or water via a catheter inserted into the left carotid artery. The right LM was excised at 24-h postmortem and divided into two halves. The caudal portion was cut into 2.5-cm-thick chops and displayed for 6 d under 1,076 lx of white fluorescent lighting at 2 degrees C, whereas the cranial half was vacuum-packaged and stored at 2 degrees C for 3 wk before retail display. Objective color measurements and samples for biochemical analysis were taken at 0, 1, 3, and 6 d of display. In infused carcasses, pH decline was more rapid (P < 0.05) than in untreated controls, and it was greatest for CaCl2-infused carcasses. Calcium chloride-infused carcasses had lower (P < 0.01) NAD and higher (P < 0.001) NADPH concentrations than water- and ZnCl2-infused or untreated control carcasses. The negative effects of calcium infusion on fresh lamb color, higher (P < 0.01) metmyoglobin accumulation rate, and lower (P < 0.01) L*, a*, and b* color measurements could be explained by the lower amounts of unbound water (P < 0.01), shorter sarcomere length (P < 0.01), lower NAD concentrations (P < 0.01), and higher lipid peroxidation (P < 0.01). Zinc and water-infusions produced less (P < 0.01) lipid oxidation and improved the color and color stability of fresh lamb (P < 0.001). Rate of lipid oxidation in LM chops was greater (P < 0.01) after 3 wk of vacuum-packaged storage than 24-h postmortem. Metmyoglobin-reducing activities (sarcoplasmic and myofibrillar) were decreased in response to infusion treatments (P < 0.001), and ZnCl2 infusion resulted in the lowest metmyoglobin-reducing activities (P < 0.001). A

  9. Chloride influx provokes lamellipodium formation in microglial cells.

    PubMed

    Zierler, Susanna; Frei, Eva; Grissmer, Stephan; Kerschbaum, Hubert H

    2008-01-01

    Lamellipodium extension and retraction is the driving force for cell migration. Although several studies document that activation of chloride channels are essential in cell migration, little is known about their contribution in lamellipodium formation. To address this question, we characterized chloride channels and transporters by whole cell recording and RT-PCR, respectively, as well as quantified lamellipodium formation in murine primary microglial cells as well as the microglial cell-line, BV-2, using time-lapse microscopy. The repertoire of chloride conducting pathways in BV-2 cells included, swelling-activated chloride channels as well as the KCl cotransporters, KCC1, KCC2, KCC3, and KCC4. Swelling-activated chloride channels were either activated by a hypoosmotic solution or by a high KCl saline, which promotes K(+) and Cl(-) influx instead of efflux by KCCs. Conductance through swelling-activated chloride channels was completely blocked by flufenamic acid (200 microM), SITS (1 mM) and DIOA (10 microM). By exposing primary microglial cells or BV-2 cells to a high KCl saline, we observed a local swelling, which developed into a prominent lamellipodium. Blockade of chloride influx by flufenamic acid (200 microM) or DIOA (10 microM) as well as incubation of cells in a chloride-free high K(+) saline suppressed formation of a lamellipodium. We assume that local swellings, established by an increase in chloride influx, are a general principle in formation of lamellipodia in eukaryotic cells.

  10. Expression of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator corrects defective chloride channel regulation in cystic fibrosis airway epithelial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rich, Devra P.; Anderson, Matthew P.; Gregory, Richard J.; Cheng, Seng H.; Paul, Sucharita; Jefferson, Douglas M.; McCann, John D.; Klinger, Katherine W.; Smith, Alan E.; Welsh, Michael J.

    1990-09-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) was expressed in cultured cystic fibrosis airway epithelial cells and Cl- channel activation assessed in single cells using a fluorescence microscopic assay and the patch-clamp technique. Expression of CFTR, but not of a mutant form of CFTR (ΔF508), corrected the Cl- channel defect. Correction of the phenotypic defect demonstrates a causal relationship between mutations in the CFTR gene and defective Cl- transport which is the hallmark of the disease.

  11. Assignment of the genes encoding the human chloride channels, CLCNKA and CLCNKB, to 1p36 and of CLCN3 to 4q32-q33 by in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Saito-Ohara, Fumiko; Uchida, Shinichi; Takeuchi, Yasuo

    1996-09-01

    This report describes the localization of the genes encoding the human chloride channels, CLCNKA and CLCNKB, to human chromosome 1p36 and of CLCN3 to human chromosome 4q32-33 using fluorescence in situ hybridization. Mutations in these voltage-gated chloride channel genes have been implicated in various hereditary diseases. 18 refs., 1 fig.

  12. Inhibitory effect of taurine on veratridine-evoked D-[3H]aspartate release from murine corticostriatal slices: involvement of chloride channels and mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Molchanova, Svetlana M; Oja, Simo S; Saransaari, Pirjo

    2007-01-26

    may attenuate D-[3H]aspartate release by regulation of mitochondrial Ca2+ sequestration and by activation of a chloride channel, but not that governed by GABA(A) or strychnine-sensitive glycine receptors.

  13. Impact of Volcanic Activity on AMC Channel Operations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-13

    IMPACT OF VOLCANIC ACTIVITY ON AMC CHANNEL OPERATIONS GRADUATE RESEARCH PROJECT Matthew D... VOLCANIC ACTIVITY ON AMC CHANNEL OPERATIONS GRADUATE RESEARCH PROJECT Presented to the Faculty Department of Operational Sciences...AFIT-ENS-GRP-14-J-11 IMPACT OF VOLCANIC ACTIVITY ON AMC CHANNEL OPERATIONS Matthew D. Meshanko, BS, MA Major, USAF

  14. The CLC-2 Chloride Channel Modulates ECM Synthesis, Differentiation, and Migration of Human Conjunctival Fibroblasts via the PI3K/Akt Signaling Pathway.

    PubMed

    Sun, Lixia; Dong, Yaru; Zhao, Jing; Yin, Yuan; Zheng, Yajuan

    2016-06-09

    Recent evidence suggests that chloride channels are critical for cell proliferation, migration, and differentiation. We examined the effects of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 on chloride channel expression and associations with human conjunctival fibroblast (HConF) biology. To investigate the potential role of chloride channel (CLC)-2 in migration, transition to myofibroblasts and extracellular matrix (ECM) synthesis of HconF, a small interfering RNA (siRNA) approach was applied. TGF-β1-induced migration and transition of fibroblasts to myofibroblasts characterized by α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) expression, supported by increased endogenous expression of CLC-2 protein and mRNA transcripts. ECM (collagen I and fibronectin) synthesis in HConF was enhanced by TGF-β1. CLC-2 siRNA treatment reduced TGF-β1-induced cell migration, transition of fibroblasts to myofibroblasts, and ECM synthesis of HConF. CLC-2 siRNA treatment in the presence of TGF-β1 inhibited phosphorylation of PI3K and Akt in HConF. These findings demonstrate that CLC-2 chloride channels are important for TGF-β1-induced migration, differentiation, and ECM synthesis via PI3K/Akt signaling in HConF.

  15. Voltage-dependent gating mechanism for single fast chloride channels from rat skeletal muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, D S; Magleby, K L

    1992-01-01

    1. A voltage-dependent gating mechanism for the fast Cl- channel was developed from the analysis of single-channel current records obtained with the patch clamp technique from primary cultures of rat skeletal muscle. Up to 10(6) open and shut intervals were analysed from each of five different excised patches of membrane containing a single fast Cl- channel. 2. Rate constants for a kinetic scheme with six closed and two open states (scheme I) were estimated at a given voltage by maximum likelihood fitting of open and closed dwell-time distributions obtained at that voltage. This procedure was then repeated for data obtained at each of three to eight different membrane potentials for each channel. 3. Plots of the estimated rate constants against membrane potential typically appeared linear on semilogarithmic co-ordinates, consistent with rate constants that are exponentially dependent on voltage. 4. Regression analysis of these plots yielded two parameters for each rate constant: the value of the rate constant at -50 mV (B) and its voltage sensitivity (A). The dwell-time distributions predicted with these parameters and scheme I gave a good description of the experimental dwell-time distributions at all the studied voltages, lending further support for an exponential dependence of rate constants on membrane potential. 5. Estimates of A and B were also obtained by simultaneously fitting dwell-time distributions obtained at three to eight different voltages, in order to better define these parameters. Predicted dwell-time distributions obtained with these estimates and scheme I could approach the theoretical best description of the data for discrete-state Markov models. 6. Eight to twelve of the fourteen rate constants in scheme I appeared voltage sensitive, with effective gating charges ranging from about -1.5 to +1.0 units of electronic charge. 7. The estimated rate constants and their voltage sensitivities for the five analysed channels were generally similar, but

  16. Permeability of wild-type and mutant cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator chloride channels to polyatomic anions.

    PubMed

    Linsdell, P; Tabcharani, J A; Rommens, J M; Hou, Y X; Chang, X B; Tsui, L C; Riordan, J R; Hanrahan, J W

    1997-10-01

    Permeability of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channel to polyatomic anions of known dimensions was studied in stably transfected Chinese hamster ovary cells by using the patch clamp technique. Biionic reversal potentials measured with external polyatomic anions gave the permeability ratio (P/P) sequence NO > Cl > HCO > formate > acetate. The same selectivity sequence but somewhat higher permeability ratios were obtained when anions were tested from the cytoplasmic side. Pyruvate, propanoate, methane sulfonate, ethane sulfonate, and gluconate were not measurably permeant (P/P < 0.06) from either side of the membrane. The relationship between permeability ratios from the outside and ionic diameters suggests a minimum functional pore diameter of approximately 5.3 A. Permeability ratios also followed a lyotropic sequence, suggesting that permeability is dependent on ionic hydration energies. Site-directed mutagenesis of two adjacent threonines in TM6 to smaller, less polar alanines led to a significant (24%) increase in single channel conductance and elevated permeability to several large anions, suggesting that these residues do not strongly bind permeating anions, but may contribute to the narrowest part of the pore.

  17. Inhibition of collateral artery growth by mibefradil: possible role of volume-regulated chloride channels.

    PubMed

    Ziegelhoeffer, Tibor; Scholz, Dimitri; Friedrich, Christian; Helisch, Armin; Wagner, Shawn; Fernandez, Borja; Schaper, Wolfgang

    2003-01-01

    Endothelial cell swelling is one of the earliest hallmarks of arteriogenesis, the growth and maturation of collaterals. Mibefradil was found to block endothelial Cl(-) channels that control the volume of endothelial cells. Thus the authors investigated whether the blockade of volume-controlling endothelial cell channels would translate into an inhibition of arteriogenesis. In BALB/c mice, the right femoral artery was ligated and the animals received either mibefradil or solvent (phosphate-buffered saline [PBS]) via osmotic minipumps. Laser Doppler perfusion ratio (R/L) of ligated versus nonligated distal hindlimb increased from 0.06 +/- 0.01 (immediately after ligation) to 0.25 +/- 0.02 (day 7) in the PBS group and only from 0.07 +/- 0.02 to 0.13 +/- 0.02 in the mibefradil group (p <.01). Collateral artery diameters were significantly smaller in the mibefradil group (61 +/- 4.7 microm) versus controls (77.3 +/- 0.9 microm) (p <.05). Relative hemoglobin oxygen saturation measurements confirmed these findings (p <.02). The inhibition of arteriogenesis in the mibefradil group suggests that endothelial Cl(-) channels are involved in the initiation of arteriogenesis.

  18. Identification and Functional Expression of a Glutamate- and Avermectin-Gated Chloride Channel from Caligus rogercresseyi, a Southern Hemisphere Sea Louse Affecting Farmed Fish

    PubMed Central

    Niemeyer, María Isabel; Marabolí, Vanessa; González-Nilo, F. Danilo; Teulon, Jacques; Sepúlveda, Francisco V.; Cid, L. Pablo

    2014-01-01

    Parasitic sea lice represent a major sanitary threat to marine salmonid aquaculture, an industry accounting for 7% of world fish production. Caligus rogercresseyi is the principal sea louse species infesting farmed salmon and trout in the southern hemisphere. Most effective control of Caligus has been obtained with macrocyclic lactones (MLs) ivermectin and emamectin. These drugs target glutamate-gated chloride channels (GluCl) and act as irreversible non-competitive agonists causing neuronal inhibition, paralysis and death of the parasite. Here we report the cloning of a full-length CrGluClα receptor from Caligus rogercresseyi. Expression in Xenopus oocytes and electrophysiological assays show that CrGluClα is activated by glutamate and mediates chloride currents blocked by the ligand-gated anion channel inhibitor picrotoxin. Both ivermectin and emamectin activate CrGluClα in the absence of glutamate. The effects are irreversible and occur with an EC50 value of around 200 nM, being cooperative (nH = 2) for ivermectin but not for emamectin. Using the three-dimensional structure of a GluClα from Caenorabditis elegans, the only available for any eukaryotic ligand-gated anion channel, we have constructed a homology model for CrGluClα. Docking and molecular dynamics calculations reveal the way in which ivermectin and emamectin interact with CrGluClα. Both drugs intercalate between transmembrane domains M1 and M3 of neighbouring subunits of a pentameric structure. The structure displays three H-bonds involved in this interaction, but despite similarity in structure only of two these are conserved from the C. elegans crystal binding site. Our data strongly suggest that CrGluClα is an important target for avermectins used in the treatment of sea louse infestation in farmed salmonids and open the way for ascertaining a possible mechanism of increasing resistance to MLs in aquaculture industry. Molecular modeling could help in the design of new, more efficient

  19. Interaction of hydrophobic anions with the rat skeletal muscle chloride channel ClC-1: effects on permeation and gating

    PubMed Central

    Rychkov, Grigori Y; Pusch, Michael; Roberts, Michael L; Bretag, Allan H

    2001-01-01

    Permeation of a range of hydrophobic anions through the rat skeletal muscle chloride channel, rClC-1, expressed in Sf-9 (a Spodoptera frugiperda insect cell line) cells has been studied using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique. Bi-ionic reversal potentials measured with external application of foreign anions gave the following permeability sequence: Cl− (1) ≫ benzoate (0·15) ≫ hexanoate (0·12) ≫ butyrate (0·09) ≫ propionate (0·047) x∼ formate (0·046). Anions with larger hydrophobic moieties were more permeant, which suggested that ClC-1 selectivity for hydrophobic anions is dominated by their interaction with a hydrophobic region in the external mouth of the pore. All anions studied when applied from outside show an apparently paradoxical voltage-dependent block of inward currents; this voltage-dependent block could be qualitatively described by a discrete-state permeation model with two binding sites and three barriers. Effects of the external anions with aliphatic side-chains on the apparent open probability (Po) suggested that they are unable to gate the channel, but can modulate ClC-1 gating, probably, by changing Cl− affinity to the gating site. Effects of internal application of benzoate, hexanoate or propionate mimicked those of increasing internal pH, and similarly depended on the channel protonation from the external side. Results for internal benzoate support the concept of a negatively charged cytoplasmic particle being involved in the ClC-1 gating mechanism sensitive to the internal pH. PMID:11158270

  20. Metal interactions with voltage- and receptor-activated ion channels.

    PubMed Central

    Vijverberg, H P; Oortgiesen, M; Leinders, T; van Kleef, R G

    1994-01-01

    Effects of Pb and several other metal ions on various distinct types of voltage-, receptor- and Ca-activated ion channels have been investigated in cultured N1E-115 mouse neuroblastoma cells. Experiments were performed using the whole-cell voltage clamp and single-channel patch clamp techniques. External superfusion of nanomolar to submillimolar concentrations of Pb causes multiple effects on ion channels. Barium current through voltage-activated Ca channels is blocked by micromolar concentrations of Pb, whereas voltage-activated Na current appears insensitive. Neuronal type nicotinic acetylcholine receptor-activated ion current is blocked by nanomolar concentrations of Pb and this block is reversed at micromolar concentrations. Serotonin 5-HT3 receptor-activated ion current is much less sensitive to Pb. In addition, external superfusion with micromolar concentrations of Pb as well as of Cd and aluminum induces inward current, associated with the direct activation of nonselective cation channels by these metal ions. In excised inside-out membrane patches of neuroblastoma cells, micromolar concentrations of Ca activate small (SK) and big (BK) Ca-activated K channels. Internally applied Pb activates SK and BK channels more potently than Ca, whereas Cd is approximately equipotent to Pb with respect to SK channel activation, but fails to activate BK channels. The results show that metal ions cause distinct, selective effects on the various types of ion channels and that metal ion interaction sites of ion channels may be highly selective for particular metal ions. PMID:7531139

  1. Molecular diversity of GABA-gated chloride channels in the rat anterior pituitary.

    PubMed

    Boué-Grabot, E; Dufy, B; Garret, M

    1995-12-15

    mRNA expression of GABA-gated Cl(-)-channels in rat antepituitary was evaluated by using an reverse-transcribed (RT)-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) method with degenerate and specific oligonucleotides. The main result of our findings is that the antepituitary expresses mRNAs encoding alpha 4 and rho 1 GABA receptor subunits. These two subunits are believed to be, respectively, constituents of benzodiazepine-insensitive GABAA and GABAC receptors in the CNS. This molecular analysis is consistent with the pharmacological diversity of GABA receptors in pituitary cells.

  2. Epilepsy-Related Slack Channel Mutants Lead to Channel Over-Activity by Two Different Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Tang, Qiong-Yao; Zhang, Fei-Fei; Xu, Jie; Wang, Ran; Chen, Jian; Logothetis, Diomedes E; Zhang, Zhe

    2016-01-05

    Twelve sodium-activated potassium channel (KCNT1, Slack) genetic mutants have been identified from severe early-onset epilepsy patients. The changes in biophysical properties of these mutants and the underlying mechanisms causing disease remain elusive. Here, we report that seven of the 12 mutations increase, whereas one mutation decreases, the channel's sodium sensitivity. Two of the mutants exhibit channel over-activity only when the intracellular Na(+) ([Na(+)]i) concentration is ∼80 mM. In contrast, single-channel data reveal that all 12 mutants increase the maximal open probability (Po). We conclude that these mutant channels lead to channel over-activity predominantly by increasing the ability of sodium binding to activate the channel, which is indicated by its maximal Po. The sodium sensitivity of these epilepsy causing mutants probably determines the [Na(+)]i concentration at which these mutants exert their pathological effects.

  3. Layer by layer growth of silver chloride nanoparticle within the pore channels of SBA-15/SO3H mesoporous silica (AgClNP/SBA-15/SO3K): Synthesis, characterization and antibacterial properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rostamnia, Sadegh; Doustkhah, Esmail; Estakhri, Saba; Karimi, Ziba

    2016-02-01

    The growth of silver chloride nanoparticles within the pore channels of functionalized SBA-15 mesoporous was achieved by sequential dipping steps in alternating bath of potassium chloride and silver nitrate under ultrasound irradiation at pH=9. The effects of sequential dipping steps in growth of the AgCl nanoparticles have been studied. The growth and formation of AgCl nanoparticles inside the sulfonated SBA-15 were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transformation infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Antibacterial activity of the synthesized materials was investigated against Escherichia coli (E.coli) using the conventional diffusion-disc method. The materials showed high antibacterial activity.

  4. Spectrum of mutations in the major human skeletal muscle chloride channel gene (CLCN1) leading to myotonia.

    PubMed Central

    Meyer-Kleine, C; Steinmeyer, K; Ricker, K; Jentsch, T J; Koch, M C

    1995-01-01

    Autosomal dominant myotonia congenita and autosomal recessive generalized myotonia (GM) are genetic disorders characterized by the symptom of myotonia, which is based on an electrical instability of the muscle fiber membrane. Recently, these two phenotypes have been associated with mutations in the major muscle chloride channel gene CLCN1 on human chromosome 7q35. We have systematically screened the open reading frame of the CLCN1 gene for mutations by SSC analysis (SSCA) in a panel of 24 families and 17 single unrelated patients with human myotonia. By direct sequencing of aberrant SSCA conformers were revealed 15 different mutations in a total of 18 unrelated families and 13 single patients. Of these, 10 were novel (7 missense mutations, 2 mutations leading to frameshift, and 1 mutation predicted to affect normal splicing). In our overall sample of 94 GM chromosomes we were able to detect 48 (51%) mutant GM alleles. Three mutations (F413C), R894X, and a 14-bp deletion in exon 13) account for 32% of the GM chromosomes in the German population. Our finding that A437T is probably a polymorphism is in contrast to a recent report that the recessive phenotype GM is associated with this amino acid change. We also demonstrate that the R894X mutation may act as a recessive or a dominant mutation in the CLCN1 gene, probably depending on the genetic background. Functional expression of the R894X mutant in Xenopus oocytes revealed a large reduction, but not complete abolition, of chloride currents. Further, it had a weak dominant negative effect on wild-type currents in coexpression studies. Reduction of currents predicted for heterozygous carriers are close to the borderline value, which is sufficient to elicit myotonia. Images Figure 4 PMID:8533761

  5. Spectrum of mutations in the major human skeletal muscle chloride channel gene (CLCN1) leading to myotonia

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer-Kleine, C.; Koch, M.C.; Steinmeyer, K.

    1995-12-01

    Autosomal dominant myotonia congenita and autosomal recessive generalized myotonia (GM) are genetic disorders characterized by the symptom of myotonia, which is based on an electrical instability of the muscle fiber membrane. Recently, these two phenotypes have been associated with mutations in the major muscle chloride channel gene CLCN1 on human chromosome 7q35. We have systematically screened the open reading frame of the CLCN1 gene for mutations by SSC analysis (SSCA) in a panel of 24 families and 17 single unrelated patients with human myotonia. By direct sequencing of aberrant SSCA conformers we revealed 15 different mutations in a total of 18 unrelated families and 13 single patients. Of these, 10 were novel (7 missense mutations, 2 mutations leading to frameshift, and 1 mutation predicted to affect normal splicing). In our overall sample of 94 GM chromsomes we were able to detect 48 (50%) mutant GM alleles. Three mutations (F413C, R894X, and a 14-bp deletion in exon 13) account for 32% of the GM chromosomes in the German population. Our finding that A437T is probably a polymorphism is in contrast to a recent report that the recessive phenotype GM is associated with this amino acid change. We also demonstrate that the R894X mutation may act as a recessive or a dominant mutation in the CLCN1 gene, probably depending on the genetic background. Functional expression of the R894X mutant in Xenopus oocytes revealed a large reduction, but not complete abolition, of chloride currents. Further, it had a weak dominant negative effect on wild-type currents in coexpression studies. Reduction of currents predicted for heterozygous carriers are close to the borderline value, which is sufficient to elicit myotonia. 31 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. Identification of positive charges situated at the outer mouth of the CFTR chloride channel pore.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jing-Jun; Fatehi, Mohammad; Linsdell, Paul

    2008-11-01

    We have used site-directed mutagenesis and functional analysis to identify positively charged amino acid residues in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl(-) channel that interact with extracellular anions. Mutation of two positively charged arginine residues in the first extracellular loop (ECL) of CFTR, R104, and R117, as well as lysine residue K335 in the sixth transmembrane region, leads to inward rectification of the current-voltage relationship and decreased single channel conductance. These effects are dependent on the charge of the substituted side chain and on the Cl(-) concentration, suggesting that these positive charges normally act to concentrate extracellular Cl(-) ions near the outer mouth of the pore. Side chain charge-dependent effects are mimicked by manipulating charge in situ by mutating these amino acids to cysteine followed by covalent modification with charged cysteine-reactive reagents, confirming the location of these side chains within the pore outer vestibule. State-independent modification of R104C and R117C suggests that these residues are located at the outermost part of the pore. We suggest that ECL1 contributes to the CFTR pore external vestibule and that positively charged amino acid side chains in this region act to attract Cl(-) ions into the pore. In contrast, we find no evidence that fixed positive charges in other ECLs contribute to the permeation properties of the pore.

  7. Cytoplasmic pathway followed by chloride ions to enter the CFTR channel pore.

    PubMed

    El Hiani, Yassine; Negoda, Alexander; Linsdell, Paul

    2016-05-01

    Most ATP-binding cassette (ABC) proteins function as ATP-dependent membrane pumps. One exception is the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), an ABC protein that functions as a Cl(-) ion channel. As such, the CFTR protein must form a continuous pathway for the movement of Cl(-) ions from the cytoplasm to the extracellular solution when in its open channel state. Extensive functional investigations have characterized most parts of this Cl(-) permeation pathway. However, one region remains unexplored-the pathway connecting the cytoplasm to the membrane-spanning pore. We used patch clamp recording and extensive substituted cysteine accessibility mutagenesis to identify amino acid side-chains in cytoplasmic regions of CFTR that lie close to the pathway taken by Cl(-) ions as they pass from the cytoplasm through this pathway. Our results suggest that Cl(-) ions enter the permeation pathway via a single lateral tunnel formed by the cytoplasmic parts of the protein, and then follow a fairly direct central pathway towards the membrane-spanning parts of the protein. However, this pathway is not lined continuously by any particular part of the protein; instead, the contributions of different cytoplasmic regions of the protein appear to change as the permeation pathway approaches the membrane, which appears to reflect the ways in which different cytoplasmic regions of the protein are oriented towards its central axis. Our results allow us to define for the first time the complete Cl(-) permeation pathway in CFTR, from the cytoplasm to the extracellular solution.

  8. Donnan effect on chloride ion distribution as a determinant of body fluid composition that allows action potentials to spread via fast sodium channels.

    PubMed

    Kurbel, Sven

    2011-05-30

    Proteins in any solution with a pH value that differs from their isoelectric point exert both an electric Donnan effect (DE) and colloid osmotic pressure. While the former alters the distribution of ions, the latter forces water diffusion. In cells with highly Cl--permeable membranes, the resting potential is more dependent on the cytoplasmic pH value, which alters the Donnan effect of cell proteins, than on the current action of Na/K pumps. Any weak (positive or negative) electric disturbances of their resting potential are quickly corrected by chloride shifts.In many excitable cells, the spreading of action potentials is mediated through fast, voltage-gated sodium channels. Tissue cells share similar concentrations of cytoplasmic proteins and almost the same exposure to the interstitial fluid (IF) chloride concentration. The consequence is that similar intra- and extra-cellular chloride concentrations make these cells share the same Nernst value for Cl-.Further extrapolation indicates that cells with the same chloride Nernst value and high chloride permeability should have similar resting membrane potentials, more negative than -80 mV. Fast sodium channels require potassium levels >20 times higher inside the cell than around it, while the concentration of Cl- ions needs to be >20 times higher outside the cell.When osmotic forces, electroneutrality and other ions are all taken into account, the overall osmolarity needs to be near 280 to 300 mosm/L to reach the required resting potential in excitable cells. High plasma protein concentrations keep the IF chloride concentration stable, which is important in keeping the resting membrane potential similar in all chloride-permeable cells. Probable consequences of this concept for neuron excitability, erythrocyte membrane permeability and several features of circulation design are briefly discussed.

  9. Chloride intracellular channel 4 is required for maturation of the cerebral collateral circulation.

    PubMed

    Lucitti, Jennifer L; Tarte, Natalie J; Faber, James E

    2015-10-01

    The number and diameter of native collaterals in tissues of healthy mice vary widely, resulting in large differences in tissue injury in occlusive diseases. Recent studies suggest similar variation may exist in humans. Collateral variation in mice is determined by genetic background-dependent differences in embryonic collateral formation, by variation in maturation of the nascent collaterals, and by environmental factors such as aging that cause collateral rarefaction in the adult. Recently, formation of the collateral circulation in the brain was found to involve a unique VEGF-A-dependent "arteriolar" angiogenic sprouting-like mechanism. Elsewhere, chloride intracellular protein 4 (CLIC4) was implicated but not investigated directly, prompting the present study. Deletion of Clic4 had no effect on embryonic collaterogenesis. However, during collateral maturation from embryonic day 18.5 to postnatal day 7, reduced mural cell investment was observed and excessive pruning of collaterals occurred. Growth in collateral diameter was reduced. This resulted in 50% fewer collaterals of smaller diameter in the adult and thus larger infarct volume after middle cerebral artery occlusion. During collateral maturation, CLIC4 deficiency resulted in reduced expression of Vegfr2, Vegfr1, Vegfc, and mural cell markers, but not notch-pathway genes. Overexpression of VEGF-A in Clic4(-/-) mice had no effect on collaterogenesis, but rescued the above defects in collateral maturation by preventing mural cell loss and collateral pruning, thus restoring collateral number and diameter and reducing stroke severity in the adult. CLIC4 is not required for collaterogenesis but is essential for perinatal maturation of nascent collaterals through a mechanism that supports VEGF signaling.

  10. Chloride intracellular channel 4 is required for maturation of the cerebral collateral circulation

    PubMed Central

    Lucitti, Jennifer L.; Tarte, Natalie J.

    2015-01-01

    The number and diameter of native collaterals in tissues of healthy mice vary widely, resulting in large differences in tissue injury in occlusive diseases. Recent studies suggest similar variation may exist in humans. Collateral variation in mice is determined by genetic background-dependent differences in embryonic collateral formation, by variation in maturation of the nascent collaterals, and by environmental factors such as aging that cause collateral rarefaction in the adult. Recently, formation of the collateral circulation in the brain was found to involve a unique VEGF-A-dependent “arteriolar” angiogenic sprouting-like mechanism. Elsewhere, chloride intracellular protein 4 (CLIC4) was implicated but not investigated directly, prompting the present study. Deletion of Clic4 had no effect on embryonic collaterogenesis. However, during collateral maturation from embryonic day 18.5 to postnatal day 7, reduced mural cell investment was observed and excessive pruning of collaterals occurred. Growth in collateral diameter was reduced. This resulted in 50% fewer collaterals of smaller diameter in the adult and thus larger infarct volume after middle cerebral artery occlusion. During collateral maturation, CLIC4 deficiency resulted in reduced expression of Vegfr2, Vegfr1, Vegfc, and mural cell markers, but not notch-pathway genes. Overexpression of VEGF-A in Clic4−/− mice had no effect on collaterogenesis, but rescued the above defects in collateral maturation by preventing mural cell loss and collateral pruning, thus restoring collateral number and diameter and reducing stroke severity in the adult. CLIC4 is not required for collaterogenesis but is essential for perinatal maturation of nascent collaterals through a mechanism that supports VEGF signaling. PMID:26276819

  11. Chloride channel ClC-5 binds to aspartyl aminopeptidase to regulate renal albumin endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Aven; Slattery, Craig; Nikolic-Paterson, David J; Hryciw, Deanne H; Wilk, Sherwin; Wilk, Elizabeth; Zhang, Yuan; Valova, Valentina A; Robinson, Phillip J; Kelly, Darren J; Poronnik, Philip

    2015-04-01

    ClC-5 is a chloride/proton exchanger that plays an obligate role in albumin uptake by the renal proximal tubule. ClC-5 forms an endocytic complex with the albumin receptor megalin/cubilin. We have identified a novel ClC-5 binding partner, cytosolic aspartyl aminopeptidase (DNPEP; EC 3.4.11.21), that catalyzes the release of N-terminal aspartate/glutamate residues. The physiological role of DNPEP remains largely unresolved. Mass spectrometric analysis of proteins binding to the glutathione-S-transferase (GST)-ClC-5 C terminus identified DNPEP as an interacting partner. Coimmunoprecipitation confirmed that DNPEP and ClC-5 also associated in cells. Further experiments using purified GST-ClC-5 and His-DNPEP proteins demonstrated that the two proteins bound directly to each other. In opossum kidney (OK) cells, confocal immunofluorescence studies revealed that DNPEP colocalized with albumin-containing endocytic vesicles. Overexpression of wild-type DNPEP increased cell-surface levels of ClC-5 and albumin uptake. Analysis of DNPEP-immunoprecipitated products from rat kidney lysate identified β-actin and tubulin, suggesting a role for DNPEP in cytoskeletal maintenance. A DNase I inhibition assay showed a significant decrease in the amount of G actin when DNPEP was overexpressed in OK cells, suggesting a role for DNPEP in stabilizing the cytoskeleton. DNPEP was not present in the urine of healthy rats; however, it was readily detected in the urine in rat models of mild and heavy proteinuria (diabetic nephropathy and anti-glomerular basement membrane disease, respectively). Urinary levels of DNPEP were found to correlate with the severity of proteinuria. Therefore, we have identified another key molecular component of the albumin endocytic machinery in the renal proximal tubule and describe a new role for DNPEP in stabilizing the actin cytoskeleton.

  12. Salmon lice (Lepeophtheirus salmonis) showing varying emamectin benzoate susceptibilities differ in neuronal acetylcholine receptor and GABA-gated chloride channel mRNA expression

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Caligid copepods, also called sea lice, are fish ectoparasites, some species of which cause significant problems in the mariculture of salmon, where the annual cost of infection is in excess of €300 million globally. At present, caligid control on farms is mainly achieved using medicinal treatments. However, the continued use of a restricted number of medicine actives potentially favours the development of drug resistance. Here, we report transcriptional changes in a laboratory strain of the caligid Lepeophtheirus salmonis (Krøyer, 1837) that is moderately (~7-fold) resistant to the avermectin compound emamectin benzoate (EMB), a component of the anti-salmon louse agent SLICE® (Merck Animal Health). Results Suppression subtractive hybridisation (SSH) was used to enrich transcripts differentially expressed between EMB-resistant (PT) and drug-susceptible (S) laboratory strains of L. salmonis. SSH libraries were subjected to 454 sequencing. Further L. salmonis transcript sequences were available as expressed sequence tags (EST) from GenBank. Contiguous sequences were generated from both SSH and EST sequences and annotated. Transcriptional responses in PT and S salmon lice were investigated using custom 15 K oligonucleotide microarrays designed using the above sequence resources. In the absence of EMB exposure, 359 targets differed in transcript abundance between the two strains, these genes being enriched for functions such as calcium ion binding, chitin metabolism and muscle structure. γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-gated chloride channel (GABA-Cl) and neuronal acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) subunits showed significantly lower transcript levels in PT lice compared to S lice. Using RT-qPCR, the decrease in mRNA levels was estimated at ~1.4-fold for GABA-Cl and ~2.8-fold for nAChR. Salmon lice from the PT strain showed few transcriptional responses following acute exposure (1 or 3 h) to 200 μg L-1 of EMB, a drug concentration tolerated by PT lice, but

  13. Bisandrographolide from Andrographis paniculata activates TRPV4 channels.

    PubMed

    Smith, Paula L; Maloney, Katherine N; Pothen, Randy G; Clardy, Jon; Clapham, David E

    2006-10-06

    Many transient receptor potential (TRP) channels are activated or blocked by various compounds found in plants; two prominent examples include the activation of TRPV1 channels by capsaicin and the activation of TRPM8 channels by menthol. We sought to identify additional plant compounds that are active on other types of TRP channels. We screened a library of extracts from 50 Chinese herbal plants using a calcium-imaging assay to find compounds active on TRPV3 and TRPV4 channels. An extract from the plant Andrographis paniculata potently activated TRPV4 channels. The extract was fractionated further, and the active compound was identified as bisandrographolide A (BAA). We used purified compound to characterize the activity of BAA on certain TRPV channel subtypes. Although BAA activated TRPV4 channels with an EC(50) of 790-950 nm, it did not activate or block activation of TRPV1, TRPV2, or TRPV3 channels. BAA activated a large TRPV4-like current in immortalized mouse keratinocytes (308 cells) that have been shown to express TRPV4 protein endogenously. This compound also activated TRPV4 currents in cell-free outside-out patches from HEK293T cells overexpressing TRPV4 cDNA, suggesting that BAA can activate the channel in a membrane-delimited manner. Another related compound, andrographolide, found in abundance in the plant Andrographis was unable to activate or block activation of TRPV4 channels. These experiments show that BAA activates TRPV4 channels, and we discuss the possibility that activation of TRPV4 by BAA could play a role in some of the effects of Andrographis extract described in traditional medicine.

  14. ClC Channels and Transporters: Structure, Physiological Functions, and Implications in Human Chloride Channelopathies

    PubMed Central

    Poroca, Diogo R.; Pelis, Ryan M.; Chappe, Valérie M.

    2017-01-01

    The discovery of ClC proteins at the beginning of the 1990s was important for the development of the Cl- transport research field. ClCs form a large family of proteins that mediate voltage-dependent transport of Cl- ions across cell membranes. They are expressed in both plasma and intracellular membranes of cells from almost all living organisms. ClC proteins form transmembrane dimers, in which each monomer displays independent ion conductance. Eukaryotic members also possess a large cytoplasmic domain containing two CBS domains, which are involved in transport modulation. ClC proteins function as either Cl- channels or Cl-/H+ exchangers, although all ClC proteins share the same basic architecture. ClC channels have two gating mechanisms: a relatively well-studied fast gating mechanism, and a slow gating mechanism, which is poorly defined. ClCs are involved in a wide range of physiological processes, including regulation of resting membrane potential in skeletal muscle, facilitation of transepithelial Cl- reabsorption in kidneys, and control of pH and Cl- concentration in intracellular compartments through coupled Cl-/H+ exchange mechanisms. Several inherited diseases result from C1C gene mutations, including myotonia congenita, Bartter’s syndrome (types 3 and 4), Dent’s disease, osteopetrosis, retinal degeneration, and lysosomal storage diseases. This review summarizes general features, known or suspected, of ClC structure, gating and physiological functions. We also discuss biophysical properties of mammalian ClCs that are directly involved in the pathophysiology of several human inherited disorders, or that induce interesting phenotypes in animal models. PMID:28386229

  15. ClC Channels and Transporters: Structure, Physiological Functions, and Implications in Human Chloride Channelopathies.

    PubMed

    Poroca, Diogo R; Pelis, Ryan M; Chappe, Valérie M

    2017-01-01

    The discovery of ClC proteins at the beginning of the 1990s was important for the development of the Cl(-) transport research field. ClCs form a large family of proteins that mediate voltage-dependent transport of Cl(-) ions across cell membranes. They are expressed in both plasma and intracellular membranes of cells from almost all living organisms. ClC proteins form transmembrane dimers, in which each monomer displays independent ion conductance. Eukaryotic members also possess a large cytoplasmic domain containing two CBS domains, which are involved in transport modulation. ClC proteins function as either Cl(-) channels or Cl(-)/H(+) exchangers, although all ClC proteins share the same basic architecture. ClC channels have two gating mechanisms: a relatively well-studied fast gating mechanism, and a slow gating mechanism, which is poorly defined. ClCs are involved in a wide range of physiological processes, including regulation of resting membrane potential in skeletal muscle, facilitation of transepithelial Cl(-) reabsorption in kidneys, and control of pH and Cl(-) concentration in intracellular compartments through coupled Cl(-)/H(+) exchange mechanisms. Several inherited diseases result from C1C gene mutations, including myotonia congenita, Bartter's syndrome (types 3 and 4), Dent's disease, osteopetrosis, retinal degeneration, and lysosomal storage diseases. This review summarizes general features, known or suspected, of ClC structure, gating and physiological functions. We also discuss biophysical properties of mammalian ClCs that are directly involved in the pathophysiology of several human inherited disorders, or that induce interesting phenotypes in animal models.

  16. A quantized mechanism for activation of pannexin channels

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Yu-Hsin; Jin, Xueyao; Medina, Christopher B.; Leonhardt, Susan A.; Kiessling, Volker; Bennett, Brad C.; Shu, Shaofang; Tamm, Lukas K.; Yeager, Mark; Ravichandran, Kodi S.; Bayliss, Douglas A.

    2017-01-01

    Pannexin 1 (PANX1) subunits form oligomeric plasma membrane channels that mediate nucleotide release for purinergic signalling, which is involved in diverse physiological processes such as apoptosis, inflammation, blood pressure regulation, and cancer progression and metastasis. Here we explore the mechanistic basis for PANX1 activation by using wild type and engineered concatemeric channels. We find that PANX1 activation involves sequential stepwise sojourns through multiple discrete open states, each with unique channel gating and conductance properties that reflect contributions of the individual subunits of the hexamer. Progressive PANX1 channel opening is directly linked to permeation of ions and large molecules (ATP and fluorescent dyes) and occurs during both irreversible (caspase cleavage-mediated) and reversible (α1 adrenoceptor-mediated) forms of channel activation. This unique, quantized activation process enables fine tuning of PANX1 channel activity and may be a generalized regulatory mechanism for other related multimeric channels. PMID:28134257

  17. Copper and protons directly activate the zinc-activated channel.

    PubMed

    Trattnig, Sarah M; Gasiorek, Agnes; Deeb, Tarek Z; Ortiz, Eydith J Comenencia; Moss, Stephen J; Jensen, Anders A; Davies, Paul A

    2016-03-01

    The zinc-activated channel (ZAC) is a cationic ion channel belonging to the superfamily of Cys-loop receptors, which consists of pentameric ligand-gated ion channels. ZAC is the least understood member of this family so in the present study we sought to characterize the properties of this channel further. We demonstrate that not only zinc (Zn(2+)) but also copper (Cu(2+)) and protons (H(+)) are agonists of ZAC, displaying potencies and efficacies in the rank orders of H(+)>Cu(2+)>Zn(2+) and H(+)>Zn(2+)>Cu(2+), respectively. The responses elicited by Zn(2+), Cu(2+) and H(+) through ZAC are all characterized by low degrees of desensitization. In contrast, currents evoked by high concentrations of the three agonists comprise distinctly different activation and decay components, with transitions to and from an open state being significantly faster for H(+) than for the two metal ions. The permeabilities of ZAC for Na(+) and K(+) relative to Cs(+) are indistinguishable, whereas replacing all of extracellular Na(+) and K(+) with the divalent cations Ca(2+) or Mg(2+) results in complete elimination of Zn(2+)-activated currents at both negative and positive holding potentials. This indicates that ZAC is non-selectively permeable to monovalent cations, whereas Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) inhibit the channel. In conclusion, this is the first report of a Cys-loop receptor being gated by Zn(2+), Cu(2+) and H(+). ZAC could be an important mediator of some of the wide range of physiological functions regulated by or involving Zn(2+), Cu(2+) and H(+).

  18. Identification of sites responsible for the potentiating effect of niflumic acid on ClC-Ka kidney chloride channels

    PubMed Central

    Zifarelli, G; Liantonio, A; Gradogna, A; Picollo, A; Gramegna, G; De Bellis, M; Murgia, AR; Babini, E; Conte Camerino, D; Pusch, M

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose: ClC-K kidney Cl− channels are important for renal and inner ear transepithelial Cl− transport, and are potentially interesting pharmacological targets. They are modulated by niflumic acid (NFA), a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, in a biphasic way: NFA activates ClC-Ka at low concentrations, but blocks the channel above ∼1 mM. We attempted to identify the amino acids involved in the activation of ClC-Ka by NFA. Experimental approach: We used site-directed mutagenesis and two-electrode voltage clamp analysis of wild-type and mutant channels expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Guided by the crystal structure of a bacterial CLC homolog, we screened 97 ClC-Ka mutations for alterations of NFA effects. Key results: Mutations of five residues significantly reduced the potentiating effect of NFA. Two of these (G167A and F213A) drastically altered general gating properties and are unlikely to be involved in NFA binding. The three remaining mutants (L155A, G345S and A349E) severely impaired or abolished NFA potentiation. Conclusions and implications: The three key residues identified (L155, G345, A349) are localized in two different protein regions that, based on the crystal structure of bacterial CLC homologs, are expected to be exposed to the extracellular side of the channel, relatively close to each other, and are thus good candidates for being part of the potentiating NFA binding site. Alternatively, the protein region identified mediates conformational changes following NFA binding. Our results are an important step towards the development of ClC-Ka activators for treating Bartter syndrome types III and IV with residual channel activity. PMID:20649569

  19. Phylogenetic shadowing of a histamine-gated chloride channel involved in insect vision.

    PubMed

    Iovchev, Mladen; Boutanaev, Alexander; Ivanov, Ivaylo; Wolstenholme, Adrian; Nurminsky, Dmitry; Semenov, Eugene

    2006-01-01

    A recently identified gene, hclA (synonym: ort), codes for an ionotrophic histamine receptor subunit in Drosophila melanogaster, and known hclA mutations lead to defects in the visual system, neurologic disorders and changed responsiveness to neurotoxins. To investigate whether this novel class of receptors is common across the Insecta, we analysed the genomes of 15 other insect species (Diptera, Hymenoptera, Coleoptera, Lepidoptera) and revealed orthologs of hclA in all of them. The predicted receptor domain of HCLA is extensively conserved (86-100% of identity) among the 16 proteins. Minor changes in the amino acid sequence that includes the putative transmembrane domains (TMs) 1-3 were found in non-drosophilid species only. Substantial amino acid variability was observed in the signal polypeptides, the intracellular loop domains and in TM4, in good accordance with known data on sequence variations in ligand-gated ion channels. Pairwise comparisons revealed three consensus sequences for N-glycosylation, conserved in HCLAs of all species studied, as well as a drosophilid-specific putative phosphorylation site. Real-time PCR analysis demonstrated that hclA-mRNA is abundant in heads of adult Drosophila. However, species- and sex-specific variations of the hclA expression levels were also observed.

  20. Inhibition of the gravitropic response of snapdragon spikes by the calcium-channel blocker lanthanum chloride.

    PubMed

    Friedman, H; Meir, S; Rosenberger, I; Halevy, A H; Kaufman, P B; Philosoph-Hadas, S

    1998-10-01

    The putative Ca(2+)-channel blocker LaCl3 prevented the gravitropic bending of cut snapdragon (Antirrhinum majus L.) spikes (S. Philosoph-Hadas, S. Meir, I. Rosenberger, A.H. Halevy [1996] Plant Physiol 110: 301-310) and inhibited stem curvature to a greater extent than vertical and horizontal stem elongation at the bending zone. This might indicate that LaCl3, which modulates cytosolic Ca2+, does not influence general stem-growth processes but may specifically affect other gravity-associated processes occurring at the stem-bending zone. Two such specific gravity-dependent events were found to occur in the bending zone of snapdragon spikes: sedimentation of starch-containing chloroplasts at the bottom of stem cortex cells, as seen in cross-sections, and establishment of an ethylene gradient across the stem. Our results show that the lateral sedimentation of chloroplasts associated with gravity sensing was prevented in cross-sections taken from the bending zone of LaCl3-treated and subsequently gravistimulated spikes and that LaCl3 completely prevented the gravity-induced, asymmetric ethylene production established across the stem-bending zone. These data indicate that LaCl3 inhibits stem curvature of snapdragon spikes by preventing several gravity-dependent processes. Therefore, we propose that the gravitropic response of shoots could be mediated through a Ca(2+)-dependent pathway involving modulation of cytosolic Ca2+ at various stages.

  1. Unique Contributions of an Arginine Side Chain to Ligand Recognition in a Glutamate-gated Chloride Channel*

    PubMed Central

    Lynagh, Timothy; Komnatnyy, Vitaly V.

    2017-01-01

    Glutamate recognition by neurotransmitter receptors often relies on Arg residues in the binding site, leading to the assumption that charge-charge interactions underlie ligand recognition. However, assessing the precise chemical contribution of Arg side chains to protein function and pharmacology has proven to be exceedingly difficult in such large and complex proteins. Using the in vivo nonsense suppression approach, we report the first successful incorporation of the isosteric, titratable Arg analog, canavanine, into a neurotransmitter receptor in a living cell, utilizing a glutamate-gated chloride channel from the nematode Haemonchus contortus. Our data unveil a surprisingly small contribution of charge at a conserved arginine side chain previously suggested to form a salt bridge with the ligand, glutamate. Instead, our data show that Arg contributes crucially to ligand sensitivity via a hydrogen bond network, where Arg interacts both with agonist and with a conserved Thr side chain within the receptor. Together, the data provide a new explanation for the reliance of neurotransmitter receptors on Arg side chains and highlight the exceptional capacity of unnatural amino acid incorporation for increasing our understanding of ligand recognition. PMID:28096462

  2. Disrupting MLC1 and GlialCAM and ClC-2 interactions in leukodystrophy entails glial chloride channel dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Hoegg-Beiler, Maja B; Sirisi, Sònia; Orozco, Ian J; Ferrer, Isidre; Hohensee, Svea; Auberson, Muriel; Gödde, Kathrin; Vilches, Clara; de Heredia, Miguel López; Nunes, Virginia; Estévez, Raúl; Jentsch, Thomas J

    2014-03-19

    Defects in the astrocytic membrane protein MLC1, the adhesion molecule GlialCAM or the chloride channel ClC-2 underlie human leukoencephalopathies. Whereas GlialCAM binds ClC-2 and MLC1, and modifies ClC-2 currents in vitro, no functional connections between MLC1 and ClC-2 are known. Here we investigate this by generating loss-of-function Glialcam and Mlc1 mouse models manifesting myelin vacuolization. We find that ClC-2 is unnecessary for MLC1 and GlialCAM localization in brain, whereas GlialCAM is important for targeting MLC1 and ClC-2 to specialized glial domains in vivo and for modifying ClC-2's biophysical properties specifically in oligodendrocytes (OLs), the cells chiefly affected by vacuolization. Unexpectedly, MLC1 is crucial for proper localization of GlialCAM and ClC-2, and for changing ClC-2 currents. Our data unmask an unforeseen functional relationship between MLC1 and ClC-2 in vivo, which is probably mediated by GlialCAM, and suggest that ClC-2 participates in the pathogenesis of megalencephalic leukoencephalopathy with subcortical cysts.

  3. Functional Architecture of the Cytoplasmic Entrance to the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator Chloride Channel Pore.

    PubMed

    El Hiani, Yassine; Linsdell, Paul

    2015-06-19

    As an ion channel, the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator must form a continuous pathway for the movement of Cl(-) and other anions between the cytoplasm and the extracellular solution. Both the structure and the function of the membrane-spanning part of this pathway are well defined. In contrast, the structure of the pathway that connects the cytoplasm to the membrane-spanning regions is unknown, and functional roles for different parts of the protein forming this pathway have not been described. We used patch clamp recording and substituted cysteine accessibility mutagenesis to identify positively charged amino acid side chains that attract cytoplasmic Cl(-) ions to the inner mouth of the pore. Our results indicate that the side chains of Lys-190, Arg-248, Arg-303, Lys-370, Lys-1041, and Arg-1048, located in different intracellular loops of the protein, play important roles in the electrostatic attraction of Cl(-) ions. Mutation and covalent modification of these residues have charge-dependent effects on the rate of Cl(-) permeation, demonstrating their functional role in maximization of Cl(-) flux. Other nearby positively charged side chains were not involved in electrostatic interactions with Cl(-). The location of these Cl(-)-attractive residues suggests that cytoplasmic Cl(-) ions enter the pore via a lateral portal located between the cytoplasmic extensions to the fourth and sixth transmembrane helices; a secondary, functionally less relevant portal might exist between the extensions to the 10th and 12th transmembrane helices. These results define the cytoplasmic mouth of the pore and show how it attracts Cl(-) ions from the cytoplasm.

  4. Human spermatozoa possess a calcium-dependent chloride channel that may participate in the acrosomal reaction

    PubMed Central

    Orta, Gerardo; Ferreira, Gonzalo; José, Omar; Treviño, Claudia L; Beltrán, Carmen; Darszon, Alberto

    2012-01-01

    Motility, maturation and the acrosome reaction (AR) are fundamental functions of mammalian spermatozoa. While travelling through the female reproductive tract, spermatozoa must mature through a process named capacitation, so that they can reach the egg and undergo the AR, an exocytotic event necessary to fertilize the egg. Though Cl− is important for sperm capacitation and for the AR, not much is known about the molecular identity of the Cl− transporters involved in these processes. We implemented a modified perforated patch-clamp strategy to obtain whole cell recordings sealing on the head of mature human spermatozoa. Our whole cell recordings revealed the presence of a Ca2+-dependent Cl− current. The biophysical characteristics of this current and its sensitivity to niflumic acid (NFA) and 4,4′-diisothiocyano-2,2′-stilbene disulphonic acid (DIDIS) are consistent with those displayed by the Ca2+-dependent Cl− channel from the anoctamin family (TMEM16). Whole cell patch clamp recordings in the cytoplasmic droplet of human spermatozoa corroborated the presence of these currents, which were sensitive to NFA and to a small molecule TMEM16A inhibitor (TMEM16Ainh, an aminophenylthiazole). Importantly, the human sperm AR induced by a recombinant human glycoprotein from the zona pellucida, rhZP3, displayed a similar sensitivity to NFA, DIDS and TMEM16Ainh as the sperm Ca2+-dependent Cl− currents. Our findings indicate the presence of Ca2+-dependent Cl− currents in human spermatozoa, that TMEM16A may contribute to these currents and also that sperm Ca2+-dependent Cl− currents may participate in the rhZP3-induced AR. PMID:22473777

  5. Functional Architecture of the Cytoplasmic Entrance to the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator Chloride Channel Pore*

    PubMed Central

    El Hiani, Yassine; Linsdell, Paul

    2015-01-01

    As an ion channel, the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator must form a continuous pathway for the movement of Cl− and other anions between the cytoplasm and the extracellular solution. Both the structure and the function of the membrane-spanning part of this pathway are well defined. In contrast, the structure of the pathway that connects the cytoplasm to the membrane-spanning regions is unknown, and functional roles for different parts of the protein forming this pathway have not been described. We used patch clamp recording and substituted cysteine accessibility mutagenesis to identify positively charged amino acid side chains that attract cytoplasmic Cl− ions to the inner mouth of the pore. Our results indicate that the side chains of Lys-190, Arg-248, Arg-303, Lys-370, Lys-1041, and Arg-1048, located in different intracellular loops of the protein, play important roles in the electrostatic attraction of Cl− ions. Mutation and covalent modification of these residues have charge-dependent effects on the rate of Cl− permeation, demonstrating their functional role in maximization of Cl− flux. Other nearby positively charged side chains were not involved in electrostatic interactions with Cl−. The location of these Cl−-attractive residues suggests that cytoplasmic Cl− ions enter the pore via a lateral portal located between the cytoplasmic extensions to the fourth and sixth transmembrane helices; a secondary, functionally less relevant portal might exist between the extensions to the 10th and 12th transmembrane helices. These results define the cytoplasmic mouth of the pore and show how it attracts Cl− ions from the cytoplasm. PMID:25944907

  6. Synthesis of a new series of 4-aryl-1,4-dihydropyridines with calcium channel blocking and vasodilatory activity.

    PubMed

    Jain, P; Narang, G; Jindal, D P; Bansal, R; Calle, C; Carron, R; Pemberton, K; Harvey, A L

    2006-05-01

    Synthesis of a new series of 4-aryl-1,4-dihydropyridines possessing potential calcium channel blocking activity along with good vasodilatory profile is reported. The compounds were synthesized using modified Hantzsch condensation of various aldehydes with methyl 3-aminocrotonate in the presence of a catalytic amount of trifluoroacetic acid and subsequent alkylation with various hydrochlorides of dialkylaminoalkyl chlorides. In vitro calcium channel blocking activity has been evaluated in cultures of neonatal rat cortical neurons by measuring the inhibitory response at L-type calcium channels activated by veratridine. Many compounds exhibited moderate to significant calcium channel blockade around 1 microM. The vasodilatory activity was assessed on isolated rat thoracic aortic rings precontracted by phenylephrine/KCl (30 mM). Most of the compounds produced a concentration-dependent inhibition of the contractile response.

  7. Intracellular chloride activities in canine tracheal epithelium. Direct evidence for sodium-coupled intracellular chloride accumulation in a chloride-secreting epithelium.

    PubMed Central

    Welsh, M J

    1983-01-01

    Canine tracheal epithelium secretes Cl via an electrogenic transport process that appears to apply to a wide variety of secretory epithelia. To examine the mechanisms involved, intracellular chloride activity, acCl, was measured with Cl-selective intracellular microelectrodes. The results indicate that when the rate of secretion was minimal acCl was 37 mM; with stimulation of secretion the intracellular voltage depolarized, but acCl was not significantly altered, at 39 mM. These findings indicate that: (a) Cl is accumulated across the basolateral membrane under nonsecreting and secreting conditions at an activity 3.8 and 2.4 times, respectively, that predicted for an equilibrium distribution; (b) Cl exit across the apical membrane may be passive with an electrochemical driving force of 22 mV; and (c) stimulation of secretion enhanced the rate of Cl entry across the basolateral membrane, since Cl transport increased without a change in acCl. In the absence of Na in the extracellular fluid, acCl approached the value expected for an equilibrium distribution. This finding suggests that "uphill" entry of Cl into the cell against its electrochemical gradient is dependent upon, and energized by, the entry of Na down its gradient. Submucosal bumetanide, a loop diuretic, also decreased the rate of Cl secretion and decreased acCl, indicating an inhibition of Cl entry. These findings indicate that Cl entry into the cell is directed against its electrochemical gradient and is mediated by a Na-coupled, bumetanide-inhibitable, transport process at the basolateral membrane and that Cl may exit passively down a favorable electrochemical gradient across the apical membrane. PMID:6853719

  8. Activation of volume-regulated Cl− channels by ACh and ATP in Xenopus follicles

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Samartín, Alberto L; Miledi, Ricardo; Arellano, Rogelio O

    2000-01-01

    Osmolarity-dependent ionic currents from follicle-enclosed Xenopus oocytes (follicles) were studied using electrophysiological techniques. Whole follicle currents were monitored using a two-electrode voltage clamp and single-channel activity was measured using the patch-clamp technique.In follicles held at -60 mV two chloride currents were activated in external hyposmotic solutions. One was the habitual volume-regulated current elicited by external hyposmolarity (ICl,swell), and the second was a slow and smooth current (Sin) generated by ACh or ATP application.In follicles, the permeability ratios for different anions with respect to Cl− were similar for both ICl,swell and Sin, with a sequence of: SCN− > I− > Br−≥ NO3−≥ Cl− > gluconate ≥ cyclamate > acetate > SO42−.Extracellular ATP blocked the outward component of Sin. Also, extracellular pH modulated the inactivation kinetics of Sin elicited by ACh; e.g. inactivation at +80 mV was ∼100% slower at pH 8.0 compared with that at pH 6.0.Lanthanides inhibited ICl,swell and Sin. La3+ completely inhibited ICl,swell with a half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 17 ± 1.9 μm, while Sin was blocked up to 55% with an apparent IC50 of 36 ± 2.6 μm.Patch-clamp recordings in follicular cells showed that hyposmotic challenge opened inward single-channel currents. The single channel conductance (4.7 ± 0.4 pS) had a linear current-voltage relationship with a reversal membrane potential close to −20 mV. This single-channel activity was increased by application of ACh or ATP.The ICl,swell generation was not affected by pirenzepine or metoctramine, and did not affect the purinergic activation of the chloride current named Fin. Thus, ICl,swell was not generated via neurotransmitters released during cellular swelling.All together, equal discrimination for different anions, similar modulatory effects by extracellular pH, the blocking effects by ATP and La3+, and the same single-channel activity

  9. Neuronal Ca2+-Activated K+ Channels Limit Brain Infarction and Promote Survival

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Yiliu; Gu, Ning; Rundén-Pran, Elise; Ruth, Peter; Sausbier, Matthias; Storm, Johan F.

    2010-01-01

    Neuronal calcium-activated potassium channels of the BK type are activated by membrane depolarization and intracellular Ca2+ ions. It has been suggested that these channels may play a key neuroprotective role during and after brain ischemia, but this hypothesis has so far not been tested by selective BK-channel manipulations in vivo. To elucidate the in vivo contribution of neuronal BK channels in acute focal cerebral ischemia, we performed middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) in mice lacking BK channels (homozygous mice lacking the BK channel alpha subunit, BK−/−). MCAO was performed in BK−/− and WT mice for 90 minutes followed by a 7-hour-reperfusion period. Coronal 1 mm thick sections were stained with 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride to reveal the infarction area. We found that transient focal cerebral ischemia by MCAO produced larger infarct volume, more severe neurological deficits, and higher post-ischemic mortality in BK−/− mice compared to WT littermates. However, the regional cerebral blood flow was not significantly different between genotypes as measured by Laser Doppler (LD) flowmetry pre-ischemically, intra-ischemically, and post-ischemically, suggesting that the different impact of MCAO in BK−/− vs. WT was not due to vascular BK channels. Furthermore, when NMDA was injected intracerebrally in non-ischemic mice, NMDA-induced neurotoxicity was found to be larger in BK−/− mice compared to WT. Whole-cell patch clamp recordings from CA1 pyramidal cells in organotypic hippocampal slice cultures revealed that BK channels contribute to rapid action potential repolarization, as previously found in acute slices. When these cultures were exposed to ischemia-like conditions this induced significantly more neuronal death in BK−/− than in WT cultures. These results indicate that neuronal BK channels are important for protection against ischemic brain damage. PMID:21209897

  10. Single Na+ channels activated by veratridine and batrachotoxin

    PubMed Central

    1987-01-01

    Voltage-sensitive Na+ channels from rat skeletal muscle plasma membrane vesicles were inserted into planar lipid bilayers in the presence of either of the alkaloid toxins veratridine (VT) or batrachotoxin (BTX). Both of these toxins are known to cause persistent activation of Na+ channels. With BTX as the channel activator, single channels remain open nearly all the time. Channels activated with VT open and close on a time scale of 1-10 s. Increasing the VT concentration enhances the probability of channel opening, primarily by increasing the rate constant of opening. The kinetics and voltage dependence of channel block by 21-sulfo-11-alpha-hydroxysaxitoxin are identical for VT and BTX, as is the ionic selectivity sequence determined by bi-ionic reversal potential (Na+ approximately Li+ greater than K+ greater than Rb+ greater than Cs+). However, there are striking quantitative differences in open channel conduction for channels in the presence of the two activators. Under symmetrical solution conditions, the single channel conductance for Na+ is about twice as high with BTX as with VT. Furthermore, the symmetrical solution single channel conductances show a different selectivity for BTX (Na+ greater than Li+ greater than K+) than for VT (Na+ greater than K+ greater than Li+). Open channel current-voltage curves in symmetrical Na+ and Li+ are roughly linear, while those in symmetrical K+ are inwardly rectifying. Na+ currents are blocked asymmetrically by K+ with both BTX and VT, but the voltage dependence of K+ block is stronger with BTX than with VT. The results show that the alkaloid neurotoxins not only alter the gating process of the Na+ channel, but also affect the structure of the open channel. We further conclude that the rate-determining step for conduction by Na+ does not occur at the channel's "selectivity filter," where poorly permeating ions like K+ are excluded. PMID:2435846

  11. Calcium influx through stretch-activated channels mediates microfilament reorganization in osteoblasts under simulated weightlessness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Mingzhi; Yang, Zhouqi; Li, Jingbao; Xu, Huiyun; Li, Shengsheng; Zhang, Wei; Qian, Airong; Shang, Peng

    2013-06-01

    We have explored the role of Ca2+ signaling in microfilament reorganization of osteoblasts induced by simulated weightlessness using a random positioning machine (RPM). The RPM-induced alterations of cell morphology, microfilament distribution, cell proliferation, cell migration, cytosol free calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i), and protein expression in MG63 osteoblasts were investigated. Simulated weightlessness reduced cell size, disrupted microfilament, inhibited cellular proliferation and migration, and induced an increase in [Ca2+]i in MG63 human osteosarcoma cells. Gadolinium chloride (Gd), an inhibitor for stretch-activated channels, attenuated the increase in [Ca2+]i and microfilament disruption. Further, the expression of calmodulin was significantly increased by simulated weightlessness, and an inhibitor of calmodulin, W-7, aggravated microfilament disruption. Our findings demonstrate that simulated weightlessness induces Ca2+ influx through stretch-activated channels, then results in microfilament disruption.

  12. MiR-101 and miR-144 Regulate the Expression of the CFTR Chloride Channel in the Lung

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Fatemat; Nuovo, Gerard J.; Crawford, Melissa; Boyaka, Prosper N.; Kirkby, Stephen; Nana-Sinkam, Serge P.; Cormet-Boyaka, Estelle

    2012-01-01

    The Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane conductance Regulator (CFTR) is a chloride channel that plays a critical role in the lung by maintaining fluid homeostasis. Absence or malfunction of CFTR leads to Cystic Fibrosis, a disease characterized by chronic infection and inflammation. We recently reported that air pollutants such as cigarette smoke and cadmium negatively regulate the expression of CFTR by affecting several steps in the biogenesis of CFTR protein. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have recently received a great deal of attention as both biomarkers and therapeutics due to their ability to regulate multiple genes. Here, we show that cigarette smoke and cadmium up-regulate the expression of two miRNAs (miR-101 and miR-144) that are predicted to target CFTR in human bronchial epithelial cells. When premature miR-101 and miR-144 were transfected in human airway epithelial cells, they directly targeted the CFTR 3′UTR and suppressed the expression of the CFTR protein. Since miR-101 was highly up-regulated by cigarette smoke in vitro, we investigated whether such increase also occurred in vivo. Mice exposed to cigarette smoke for 4 weeks demonstrated an up-regulation of miR-101 and suppression of CFTR protein in their lungs. Finally, we show that miR-101 is highly expressed in lung samples from patients with severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) when compared to control patients. Taken together, these results suggest that chronic cigarette smoking up-regulates miR-101 and that this miRNA could contribute to suppression of CFTR in the lungs of COPD patients. PMID:23226399

  13. Cloning and characterization of genes encoding alpha and beta subunits of glutamate-gated chloride channel protein in Cylicocyclus nassatus.

    PubMed

    Tandon, Ritesh; LePage, Keith T; Kaplan, Ray M

    2006-11-01

    The invertebrate glutamate-gated chloride channels (GluCls) are receptor molecules and targets for the avermectin-milbemycin (AM) group of anthelmintics. Mutations in GluCls are associated with ivermectin resistance in the soil dwelling nematode Caenorhabditis elegans and the parasitic nematode Cooperia oncophora. In this study, full-length cDNAs encoding alpha and beta subunits of GluCl were cloned and sequenced in Cylicocyclus nassatus, a common and important cyathostomin nematode parasite of horses. Both genes possess the sequence characteristics typical of GluCls, and phylogenetic analysis confirms that these genes are evolutionarily closely related to GluCls of other nematodes and flies. Complete coding sequences of C. nassatus GluCl-alpha and GluCl-beta were subcloned into pTL1 mammalian expression vector, and proteins were expressed in COS-7 cells. Ivermectin-binding characteristics were determined by incubating COS-7 cell membranes expressing C. nassatus GluCl-alpha and GluCl-beta proteins with [(3)H]ivermectin. In competitive binding experiments, fitting the data to a one site competition model, C. nassatus GluCl-alpha was found to bind [(3)H]ivermectin with a high amount of displaceable binding (IC(50)=208 pM). Compared to the mock-transfected COS-7 cells, the means of [(3)H]ivermectin binding were significantly different for C. nassatus GluCl-alpha and the Haemonchus contortus GluCl (HcGluCla) (p=0.018 and 0.023, respectively) but not for C. nassatus GluCl-beta (p=0.370). This is the first report of orthologs of GluCl genes and in vitro expression of an ivermectin-binding protein in a cyathostomin species. These data suggest the likelihood of a similar mechanism of action of AM drugs in these parasites, and suggest that mechanisms of resistance may also be similar.

  14. A point mutation in the glutamate-gated chloride channel of Plutella xylostella is associated with resistance to abamectin.

    PubMed

    Wang, X; Wang, R; Yang, Y; Wu, S; O'Reilly, A O; Wu, Y

    2016-04-01

    The diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella, is a global pest of cruciferous vegetables. Abamectin resistance in a field population of P. xylostella was introgressed into the susceptible Roth strain. The resulting introgression strain Roth-Abm showed 11 000-fold resistance to abamectin compared with Roth. An A309V substitution at the N-terminus of the third transmembrane helix (M3) of the glutamate-gated chloride channel of P. xylostella (PxGluCl) was identified in Roth-Abm. The frequency of the V309 allele of PxGluCl was 94.7% in Roth-Abm, whereas no such allele was detected in Roth. A subpopulation of Roth-Abm was kept without abamectin selection for 20 generations to produce a revertant strain, Roth-Abm-D. Abamectin resistance in Roth-Abm-D declined to 1150-fold compared with Roth, with the V309 allele frequency decreased to 9.6%. After treatment of the Roth-Abm-D strain with 80 mg/l abamectin the V309 allele frequency in the survivors increased to 55%. This demonstrates that the A309V mutation in PxGluCl is strongly associated with a 10-fold increase in abamectin resistance in Roth-Abm relative to Roth-Abm-D. Homology modelling and automated ligand docking results suggest that the A309V substitution allosterically modifies the abamectin-binding site, as opposed to directly eliminating a key binding contact. Other resistance mechanisms to abamectin in Roth-Abm are discussed besides the A309V mutation of PxGluCl.

  15. MiR-101 and miR-144 regulate the expression of the CFTR chloride channel in the lung.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Fatemat; Nuovo, Gerard J; Crawford, Melissa; Boyaka, Prosper N; Kirkby, Stephen; Nana-Sinkam, Serge P; Cormet-Boyaka, Estelle

    2012-01-01

    The Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane conductance Regulator (CFTR) is a chloride channel that plays a critical role in the lung by maintaining fluid homeostasis. Absence or malfunction of CFTR leads to Cystic Fibrosis, a disease characterized by chronic infection and inflammation. We recently reported that air pollutants such as cigarette smoke and cadmium negatively regulate the expression of CFTR by affecting several steps in the biogenesis of CFTR protein. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have recently received a great deal of attention as both biomarkers and therapeutics due to their ability to regulate multiple genes. Here, we show that cigarette smoke and cadmium up-regulate the expression of two miRNAs (miR-101 and miR-144) that are predicted to target CFTR in human bronchial epithelial cells. When premature miR-101 and miR-144 were transfected in human airway epithelial cells, they directly targeted the CFTR 3'UTR and suppressed the expression of the CFTR protein. Since miR-101 was highly up-regulated by cigarette smoke in vitro, we investigated whether such increase also occurred in vivo. Mice exposed to cigarette smoke for 4 weeks demonstrated an up-regulation of miR-101 and suppression of CFTR protein in their lungs. Finally, we show that miR-101 is highly expressed in lung samples from patients with severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) when compared to control patients. Taken together, these results suggest that chronic cigarette smoking up-regulates miR-101 and that this miRNA could contribute to suppression of CFTR in the lungs of COPD patients.

  16. Active Transport of Chloride by the Giant Neuron of the Aplysia Abdominal Ganglion

    PubMed Central

    Russell, J. M.; Brown, A. M.

    1972-01-01

    Internal chloride activity, aiCl, and membrane potential, Em, were measured simultaneously in 120 R2 giant neurons of Aplysia californica. aiCl was 37.0 ± 0.8 mM, Em was -49.3 ± 0.4 mv, and ECl calculated using the Nernst equation was -56.2 ± 0.5 mv. Such values were maintained for as long as 6 hr of continuous recording in untreated neurons. Cooling to 1°–4°C caused aiCl to increase at such a rate that 30–80 min after cooling began, ECl equalled Em. The two then remained equal for as long as 6 hr. Rewarming to 20°C caused aiCl to decline, and ECl became more negative than Em once again. Exposure to 100 mM K+-artificial seawater caused a rapid increase of aiCl. Upon return to control seawater, aiCl declined despite an unfavorable electrochemical gradient and returned to its control values. Therefore, we conclude that chloride is actively transported out of this neuron. The effects of ouabain and 2,4-dinitrophenol were consistent with a partial inhibitory effect. Chloride permeability calculated from net chloride flux using the constant field equation ranged from 4.0 to 36 x 10-8 cm/sec. PMID:4644325

  17. Surface-Bonded Antimicrobial Activity of an Organosilicon Quaternary Ammonium Chloride

    PubMed Central

    Isquith, A. J.; Abbott, E. A.; Walters, P. A.

    1972-01-01

    The hydrolysis product of 3-(trimethoxysilyl)-propyldimethyloctadecyl ammonium chloride exhibited antimicrobial activity against a broad range of microorganisms while chemically bonded to a variety of surfaces. The chemical was not removed from surfaces by repeated washing with water, and its antimicrobial activity could not be attributed to a slow release of the chemical, but rather to the surface-bonded chemical. Images PMID:4650597

  18. ( sup 3 H)PN200-110 and ( sup 3 H)ryanodine binding and reconstitution of ion channel activity with skeletal muscle membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, S.L.; Alvarez, R.M.; Fill, M.; Hawkes, M.J.; Brush, K.L.; Schilling, W.P.; Stefani, E. )

    1989-11-15

    Skeletal muscle membranes derived either from the tubular (T) network or from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) were characterized with respect to the binding of the dihydropyridine, ({sup 3}H)PN200-110, and the alkaloid, ({sup 3}H)ryanodine; polypeptide composition; and ion channel activity. Conditions for optimizing the binding of these radioligands are discussed. A bilayer pulsing technique is described and is used to examine the channels present in these membranes. Fusion of T-tubule membranes into bilayers revealed the presence of chloride channels and dihydropyridine-sensitive calcium channels with three distinct conductances. The dihydropyridine-sensitive channels were further characterized with respect to their voltage dependence. Pulsing experiments indicated that two different populations of dihydropyridine-sensitive channels existed. Fusion of heavy SR vesicles revealed three different ion channels; the putative calcium release channel, a potassium channel, and a chloride channel. Thus, this fractionation procedure provides T-tubules and SR membranes which, with radioligand binding and single channel recording techniques, provide a useful tool to study the characteristics of skeletal muscle ion channels and their possible role in excitation-contraction coupling.

  19. Uterine Contractility in the Nonpregnant Mouse: Changes During the Estrous Cycle and Effects of Chloride Channel Blockade.

    PubMed

    Dodds, Kelsi N; Staikopoulos, Vasiliki; Beckett, Elizabeth A H

    2015-06-01

    Mechanisms involved in the generation of spontaneous uterine contractions are not fully understood. Kit-expressing interstitial cells of Cajal are pacemakers of contractile rhythm in other visceral organs, and recent studies describe a role for Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) currents as the initiating conductance in these cells. The existence and role of similar specialized pacemaker cells in the nonpregnant uterus remains undetermined. Spontaneous contractility patterns were characterized throughout the estrous cycle in isolated, nonpregnant mouse uteri using spatiotemporal mapping and tension recordings. During proestrus, estrus, and diestrus, contraction origin predominated in the oviduct end of the uterus, suggesting the existence of a dominant pacemaker site. Propagation speed of contractions during estrus and diestrus were significantly slower than in proestrus and metestrus. Five major patterns of activity were predominantly exhibited in particular stages: quiescent (diestrus), high-frequency phasic (proestrus), low-frequency phasic (estrus), multivariant (metestrus), and complex. Kit-immunopositive cells reminiscent of pacemaking ICCs were not consistently observed within the uterus. Niflumic acid (10 μM), anthracene-9-carboxylic acid (0.1-1 mM), and 5-nitro-2-(3-phenylpropylamino)benzoic acid (10 μM) each reduced the frequency of spontaneous contractions, suggesting involvement of Cl(-) channels in generating spontaneous uterine motor activity. It is unlikely that this conductance is generated by the Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) channels, anoctamin-1 and CLCA4, as immunohistochemical labeling did not reveal protein expression within muscle or pacemaker cell networks. In summary, these results suggest that spontaneous uterine contractions may be generated by a Kit-negative pacemaker cell type or uterine myocytes, likely involving the activity of a yet-unidentified Cl(-) channel.

  20. Regulation of Sodium Channel Activity by Capping of Actin Filaments

    PubMed Central

    Shumilina, Ekaterina V.; Negulyaev, Yuri A.; Morachevskaya, Elena A.; Hinssen, Horst; Khaitlina, Sofia Yu

    2003-01-01

    Ion transport in various tissues can be regulated by the cortical actin cytoskeleton. Specifically, involvement of actin dynamics in the regulation of nonvoltage-gated sodium channels has been shown. Herein, inside-out patch clamp experiments were performed to study the effect of the heterodimeric actin capping protein CapZ on sodium channel regulation in leukemia K562 cells. The channels were activated by cytochalasin-induced disruption of actin filaments and inactivated by G-actin under ionic conditions promoting rapid actin polymerization. CapZ had no direct effect on channel activity. However, being added together with G-actin, CapZ prevented actin-induced channel inactivation, and this effect occurred at CapZ/actin molar ratios from 1:5 to 1:100. When actin was allowed to polymerize at the plasma membrane to induce partial channel inactivation, subsequent addition of CapZ restored the channel activity. These results can be explained by CapZ-induced inhibition of further assembly of actin filaments at the plasma membrane due to the modification of actin dynamics by CapZ. No effect on the channel activity was observed in response to F-actin, confirming that the mechanism of channel inactivation does not involve interaction of the channel with preformed filaments. Our data show that actin-capping protein can participate in the cytoskeleton-associated regulation of sodium transport in nonexcitable cells. PMID:12686620

  1. Cl-out is a novel cooperative optogenetic tool for extruding chloride from neurons.

    PubMed

    Alfonsa, Hannah; Lakey, Jeremy H; Lightowlers, Robert N; Trevelyan, Andrew J

    2016-11-17

    Chloride regulation affects brain function in many ways, for instance, by dictating the GABAergic reversal potential, and thereby influencing neuronal excitability and spike timing. Consistent with this, there is increasing evidence implicating chloride in a range of neurological conditions. Investigations about these conditions, though, are made difficult by the limited range of tools available to manipulate chloride levels. In particular, there has been no way to actively remove chloride from neurons; we now describe an optogenetic strategy, 'Cl-out', to do exactly this. Cl-out achieves its effect by the cooperative action of two different component opsins: the proton pump, Archaerhodopsin and a chloride channel opsin. The removal of chloride happens when both are activated together, using Archaerhodopsin as an optical voltage clamp to provide the driving force for chloride removal through the concurrently opened, chloride channels. We further show that this novel optogenetic strategy can reverse an in vitro epileptogenic phenotype.

  2. Cl-out is a novel cooperative optogenetic tool for extruding chloride from neurons

    PubMed Central

    Alfonsa, Hannah; Lakey, Jeremy H.; Lightowlers, Robert N.; Trevelyan, Andrew J.

    2016-01-01

    Chloride regulation affects brain function in many ways, for instance, by dictating the GABAergic reversal potential, and thereby influencing neuronal excitability and spike timing. Consistent with this, there is increasing evidence implicating chloride in a range of neurological conditions. Investigations about these conditions, though, are made difficult by the limited range of tools available to manipulate chloride levels. In particular, there has been no way to actively remove chloride from neurons; we now describe an optogenetic strategy, ‘Cl-out', to do exactly this. Cl-out achieves its effect by the cooperative action of two different component opsins: the proton pump, Archaerhodopsin and a chloride channel opsin. The removal of chloride happens when both are activated together, using Archaerhodopsin as an optical voltage clamp to provide the driving force for chloride removal through the concurrently opened, chloride channels. We further show that this novel optogenetic strategy can reverse an in vitro epileptogenic phenotype. PMID:27853135

  3. Mechanisms of Activation of Voltage-Gated Potassium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Grizel, A. V.; Glukhov, G. S.; Sokolova, O. S.

    2014-01-01

    Voltage-gated potassium ion channels (Kv) play an important role in a variety of cellular processes, including the functioning of excitable cells, regulation of apoptosis, cell growth and differentiation, the release of neurotransmitters and hormones, maintenance of cardiac activity, etc. Failure in the functioning of Kv channels leads to severe genetic disorders and the development of tumors, including malignant ones. Understanding the mechanisms underlying Kv channels functioning is a key factor in determining the cause of the diseases associated with mutations in the channels, and in the search for new drugs. The mechanism of activation of the channels is a topic of ongoing debate, and a consensus on the issue has not yet been reached. This review discusses the key stages in studying the mechanisms of functioning of Kv channels and describes the basic models of their activation known to date. PMID:25558391

  4. Neutral redox-active hydrogen- and halogen-bonding [2]rotaxanes for the electrochemical sensing of chloride.

    PubMed

    Lim, Jason Y C; Cunningham, Matthew J; Davis, Jason J; Beer, Paul D

    2014-12-14

    The first examples of redox-active ferrocene-functionalised neutral [2]rotaxanes have been synthesised via chloride anion templation. (1)H NMR spectroscopic titrations reveal that these [2]rotaxane host systems recognize chloride selectively over other halides and oxoanions in highly-competitive aqueous media. By replacing the hydrogen bonding prototriazole units of the rotaxane axle component with iodotriazole halogen bond-donor groups, the degree of chloride selectivity of the [2]rotaxanes is modulated. Electrochemical voltammetric experiments demonstrate that the rotaxanes can sense chloride via cathodic perturbations of the respective rotaxanes' ferrocene-ferrocenium redox-couple upon anion addition.

  5. Fast activation of dihydropyridine-sensitive calcium channels of skeletal muscle. Multiple pathways of channel gating

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Dihydropyridine (DHP) receptors of the transverse tubule membrane play two roles in excitation-contraction coupling in skeletal muscle: (a) they function as the voltage sensor which undergoes fast transition to control release of calcium from sarcoplasmic reticulum, and (b) they provide the conducting unit of a slowly activating L-type calcium channel. To understand this dual function of the DHP receptor, we studied the effect of depolarizing conditioning pulse on the activation kinetics of the skeletal muscle DHP-sensitive calcium channels reconstituted into lipid bilayer membranes. Activation of the incorporated calcium channel was imposed by depolarizing test pulses from a holding potential of -80 mV. The gating kinetics of the channel was studied with ensemble averages of repeated episodes. Based on a first latency analysis, two distinct classes of channel openings occurred after depolarization: most had delayed latencies, distributed with a mode of 70 ms (slow gating); a small number of openings had short first latencies, < 12 ms (fast gating). A depolarizing conditioning pulse to +20 mV placed 200 ms before the test pulse (-10 mV), led to a significant increase in the activation rate of the ensemble averaged-current; the time constant of activation went from tau m = 110 ms (reference) to tau m = 45 ms after conditioning. This enhanced activation by the conditioning pulse was due to the increase in frequency of fast open events, which was a steep function of the intermediate voltage and the interval between the conditioning pulse and the test pulse. Additional analysis demonstrated that fast gating is the property of the same individual channels that normally gate slowly and that the channels adopt this property after a sojourn in the open state. The rapid secondary activation seen after depolarizing prepulses is not compatible with a linear activation model for the calcium channel, but is highly consistent with a cyclical model. A six- state cyclical model is

  6. Synthesis and structure-activity relationship of aminoarylthiazole derivatives as correctors of the chloride transport defect in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Pesce, Emanuela; Bellotti, Marta; Liessi, Nara; Guariento, Sara; Damonte, Gianluca; Cichero, Elena; Galatini, Andrea; Salis, Annalisa; Gianotti, Ambra; Pedemonte, Nicoletta; Zegarra-Moran, Olga; Fossa, Paola; Galietta, Luis J V; Millo, Enrico

    2015-06-24

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is a chloride channel present in the membrane of epithelial cells. Mutations affecting the CFTR gene cause cystic fibrosis (CF), a multi-organ severe disease. The most common CF mutation, F508del, impairs the processing and activity (gating) of CFTR protein. Other mutations, like G551D, only cause a gating defect. Processing and gating defects can be targeted by small molecules called generically correctors and potentiators, respectively. Aminoarylthiazoles (AATs) represent an interesting class of compounds that includes molecules with dual activity, as correctors and potentiators. With the aim to improve the activity profile of AATs, we have now designed and synthesized a library of novel compounds in order to establish an initial SAR that may provide indications about the chemical groups that are beneficial or detrimental for rescue activity. The new compounds were tested as correctors and potentiators in CFBE41o-expressing F508del-CFTR using a functional assay. A dual active compound, AAT-4a, characterized by improved efficacy and marked synergy when combined with the corrector VX-809 has been identified. Moreover, by computational methods, a possible binding site for AATs in nucleotide binding domain NBD1 has been detected. These results will direct the synthesis of new analogues with possibly improved activity.

  7. Molecular mechanism of pharmacological activation of BK channels

    PubMed Central

    Gessner, Guido; Cui, Yong-Mei; Otani, Yuko; Ohwada, Tomohiko; Soom, Malle; Hoshi, Toshinori; Heinemann, Stefan H.

    2012-01-01

    Large-conductance voltage- and Ca2+-activated K+ (Slo1 BK) channels serve numerous cellular functions, and their dysregulation is implicated in various diseases. Drugs activating BK channels therefore bear substantial therapeutic potential, but their deployment has been hindered in part because the mode of action remains obscure. Here we provide mechanistic insight into how the dehydroabietic acid derivative Cym04 activates BK channels. As a representative of NS1619-like BK openers, Cym04 reversibly left-shifts the half-activation voltage of Slo1 BK channels. Using an established allosteric BK gating model, the Cym04 effect can be simulated by a shift of the voltage sensor and the ion conduction gate equilibria toward the activated and open state, respectively. BK activation by Cym04 occurs in a splice variant-specific manner; it does not occur in such Slo1 BK channels using an alternative neuronal exon 9, which codes for the linker connecting the transmembrane segment S6 and the cytosolic RCK1 domain—the S6/RCK linker. In addition, Cym04 does not affect Slo1 BK channels with a two-residue deletion within this linker. Mutagenesis and model-based gating analysis revealed that BK openers, such as Cym04 and NS1619 but not mallotoxin, activate BK channels by functionally interacting with the S6/RCK linker, mimicking site-specific shortening of this purported passive spring, which transmits force from the cytosolic gating ring structure to open the channel's gate. PMID:22331907

  8. Effects of toluene, acrolein and vinyl chloride on motor activity of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Tatum-Gibbs, K R; McKee, J M; Higuchi, M; Bushnell, P J

    2015-01-01

    The data generated by current high-throughput assays for chemical toxicity require information to link effects at molecular targets to adverse outcomes in whole animals. In addition, more efficient methods for testing volatile chemicals are needed. Here we begin to address these issues by determining the utility of measuring behavioral responses of Drosophila melanogaster to airborne volatile organic compounds (VOCs) as a potential model system for discovering adverse outcome pathways and as a method to test for toxicity. In these experiments, we measured motor activity in male and female flies to determine concentration-effect functions for three VOCs that differ in their mode of action: toluene, a narcotic; acrolein, an irritant; and vinyl chloride, a hepatocarcinogen. These experiments were conducted in Flyland, an outbred population of flies derived from 40 lines of the Drosophila Genetics Reference Panel (DGRP) (Mackay et al., 2012), in preparation for subsequent experiments with individual lines of the DGRP. Systematic, concentration-related changes in activity were observed with toluene, but not with acrolein; high concentrations of vinyl chloride reduced activity by a small amount. Despite higher activity levels in males than in females under control conditions, the sexes were equally sensitive to toluene. Transient increases in activity at the onset and offset of exposure to toluene and vinyl chloride suggested that the flies detected changes in air quality at concentrations that did not persistently suppress activity. The effects and potency of toluene are consistent with those observed in rodents. The lack of clear concentration-related changes in response to acrolein and vinyl chloride shows limitations of this method is for screening toxicity attributed to VOCs. This abstract does not reflect U.S. EPA policy.

  9. Activity blockade and GABAA receptor blockade produce synaptic scaling through chloride accumulation in embryonic spinal motoneurons and interneurons.

    PubMed

    Lindsly, Casie; Gonzalez-Islas, Carlos; Wenner, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Synaptic scaling represents a process whereby the distribution of a cell's synaptic strengths are altered by a multiplicative scaling factor. Scaling is thought to be a compensatory response that homeostatically controls spiking activity levels in the cell or network. Previously, we observed GABAergic synaptic scaling in embryonic spinal motoneurons following in vivo blockade of either spiking activity or GABAA receptors (GABAARs). We had determined that activity blockade triggered upward GABAergic scaling through chloride accumulation, thus increasing the driving force for these currents. To determine whether chloride accumulation also underlies GABAergic scaling following GABAAR blockade we have developed a new technique. We expressed a genetically encoded chloride-indicator, Clomeleon, in the embryonic chick spinal cord, which provides a non-invasive fast measure of intracellular chloride. Using this technique we now show that chloride accumulation underlies GABAergic scaling following blockade of either spiking activity or the GABAAR. The finding that GABAAR blockade and activity blockade trigger scaling via a common mechanism supports our hypothesis that activity blockade reduces GABAAR activation, which triggers synaptic scaling. In addition, Clomeleon imaging demonstrated the time course and widespread nature of GABAergic scaling through chloride accumulation, as it was also observed in spinal interneurons. This suggests that homeostatic scaling via chloride accumulation is a common feature in many neuronal classes within the embryonic spinal cord and opens the possibility that this process may occur throughout the nervous system at early stages of development.

  10. Allosterism and Structure in Thermally Activated Transient Receptor Potential Channels.

    PubMed

    Diaz-Franulic, Ignacio; Poblete, Horacio; Miño-Galaz, Germán; González, Carlos; Latorre, Ramón

    2016-07-05

    The molecular sensors that mediate temperature changes in living organisms are a large family of proteins known as thermosensitive transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channels. These membrane proteins are polymodal receptors that can be activated by cold or hot temperatures, depending on the channel subtype, voltage, and ligands. The stimuli sensors are allosterically coupled to a pore domain, increasing the probability of finding the channel in its ion conductive conformation. In this review we first discuss the allosteric coupling between the temperature and voltage sensor modules and the pore domain, and then discuss the thermodynamic foundations of thermo-TRP channel activation. We provide a structural overview of the molecular determinants of temperature sensing. We also posit an anisotropic thermal diffusion model that may explain the large temperature sensitivity of TRP channels. Additionally, we examine the effect of several ligands on TRP channel function and the evidence regarding their mechanisms of action.

  11. Hypoglycemia-activated K+ channels in hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Tromba, C; Salvaggio, A; Racagni, G; Volterra, A

    1992-08-31

    Channels linking the electrical and metabolic activities of cells (KATP channels) have been described in various tissues, including some brain areas (hypothalamus, cerebral cortex and substantia nigra). Here we report the existence in hippocampal neurons of K+ permeant channels whose activity is regulated by extracellular glucose. They are open at the cell resting potential and respond to transient hypoglycemia with a reversible increase in activity. The one type so far characterized has a conductance of approximately 100 pS in isotonic K+, is inhibited by the sulphonylurea glibenclamide (1 microM), and is activated by the potassium channel opener lemakalim (0.1-1 microM). These data provide a direct demonstration of the presence, in hippocampal neurons, of glucose-sensitive channels that could belong to the KATP family.

  12. Sequential interaction of chloride and proton ions with the fast gate steer the voltage-dependent gating in ClC-2 chloride channels

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Rodríguez, Jorge E; De Santiago-Castillo, José A; Contreras-Vite, Juan Antonio; Nieto-Delgado, Pablo G; Castro-Chong, Alejandra; Arreola, Jorge

    2012-01-01

    The interaction of either H+ or Cl− ions with the fast gate is the major source of voltage (Vm) dependence in ClC Cl− channels. However, the mechanism by which these ions confer Vm dependence to the ClC-2 Cl− channel remains unclear. By determining the Vm dependence of normalized conductance (Gnorm(Vm)), an index of open probability, ClC-2 gating was studied at different [H+]i, [H+]o and [Cl−]i. Changing [H+]i by five orders of magnitude whilst [Cl−]i/[Cl−]o = 140/140 or 10/140 mm slightly shifted Gnorm(Vm) to negative Vm without altering the onset kinetics; however, channel closing was slower at acidic pHi. A similar change in [H+]o with [Cl−]i/[Cl−]o = 140/140 mm enhanced Gnorm in a bell-shaped manner and shifted Gnorm(Vm) curves to positive Vm. Importantly, Gnorm was >0 with [H+]o = 10−10 m but channel closing was slower when [H+]o or [Cl−]i increased implying that ClC-2 was opened without protonation and that external H+ and/or internal Cl− ions stabilized the open conformation. The analysis of kinetics and steady-state properties at different [H+]o and [Cl−]i was carried out using a gating Scheme coupled to Cl− permeation. Unlike previous results showing Vm-dependent protonation, our analysis revealed that fast gate protonation was Vm and Cl− independent and the equilibrium constant for closed–open transition of unprotonated channels was facilitated by elevated [Cl−]i in a Vm-dependent manner. Hence a Vm dependence of pore occupancy by Cl− induces a conformational change in unprotonated closed channels, before the pore opens, and the open conformation is stabilized by Cl− occupancy and Vm-independent protonation. PMID:22753549

  13. The outwardly rectifying chloride channel in rat peritoneal mast cells is regulated by serine/threonine kinases and phosphatases.

    PubMed

    Seebeck, Jörg; Tritschler, Stefan; Roloff, Tim; Kruse, Marie-Luise; Schmidt, Wolfgang E; Ziegler, Albrecht

    2002-02-01

    A slowly activating, outwardly rectifying Cl- channel (ORCC) has been described in rat peritoneal mast cells (RPMCs). This channel is activated by intracellular application of cAMP, an effect that might be mediated by a PKA-type serine/threonine protein kinase. To test this hypothesis, whole-cell patch-clamp experiments (nystatin-perforated patch) were performed and 8-bromoadenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphothioate, Sp-enantiomer (Sp-8Br-cAMPS), a cell membrane-permeable activator of PKA, and three inhibitors of different serine/threonine protein phosphatases (okadaic acid, cantharidin, calyculin A), were tested. In RPMCs application of repetitive series of step hyper- and depolarizations (holding potential 0 mV, test potentials -80 to +80 mV, step size +20 mV) induced a slowly increasing, [half-maximal activation time ( t0.5) 11.0+/-1.1 min, Imax (at +80 mV) 18.7+/-3.1 pA pF-1], DIDS-sensitive, outwardly rectifying Cl- current I(Cl,OR). The activation of this current could be accelerated by Sp-8Br-cAMPS, okadaic acid or cantharidin in the extracellular solution. Co-application of Sp-8Br-cAMPS and okadaic acid increased Imax supra-additively. Calyculin A and higher concentrations of cantharidin inhibited the Cl- current via unknown mechanisms. Our findings suggest that I(Cl,OR) in RPMCs is activated by a PKA-type protein kinase, a process which is antagonized functionally by okadaic acid- and cantharidin-sensitive protein phosphatases.

  14. Comparative biocidal activity of peracetic acid, benzalkonium chloride and ortho-phthalaldehyde on 77 bacterial strains.

    PubMed

    Bridier, A; Briandet, R; Thomas, V; Dubois-Brissonnet, F

    2011-07-01

    Despite numerous reports on biocide activities, it is often difficult to have a reliable and relevant overview of bacterial resistance to disinfectants because each work challenges a limited number of strains and tested methods are often different. The aim of this study was to evaluate the bactericidal activity of three different disinfectants commonly used in industrial or medical environments (peracetic acid, benzalkonium chloride and ortho-phthalaldehyde) against 77 bacterial strains from different origins using one standard test method (NF EN 1040). Results highlight the existence of high interspecific variability of resistance to disinfectants and, contrary to widespread belief, Gram-positive strains generally appeared more resistant than Gram-negative strains. Resistance was also variable among strains of the same species such as Bacillus subtilis to peracetic acid, Pseudomonas aeruginosa to benzalkonium chloride and Staphylococcus aureus to ortho-phthalaldehyde.

  15. The Ca2+-activated Cl- channel ANO1/TMEM16A regulates primary ciliogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ruppersburg, Chelsey Chandler; Hartzell, H Criss

    2014-06-01

    Many cells possess a single, nonmotile, primary cilium highly enriched in receptors and sensory transduction machinery that plays crucial roles in cellular morphogenesis. Although sensory transduction requires ion channels, relatively little is known about ion channels in the primary cilium (with the exception of TRPP2). Here we show that the Ca(2+)-activated Cl ((-)) channel anoctamin-1 (ANO1/TMEM16A) is located in the primary cilium and that blocking its channel function pharmacologically or knocking it down with short hairpin RNA interferes with ciliogenesis. Before ciliogenesis, the channel becomes organized into a torus-shaped structure ("the nimbus") enriched in proteins required for ciliogenesis, including the small GTPases Cdc42 and Arl13b and the exocyst complex component Sec6. The nimbus excludes F-actin and coincides with a ring of acetylated microtubules. The nimbus appears to form before, or independent of, apical docking of the mother centriole. Our data support a model in which the nimbus provides a scaffold for staging of ciliary components for assembly very early in ciliogenesis and chloride transport by ANO1/TMEM16A is required for the genesis or maintenance of primary cilia.

  16. Ethanol potentiation of GABAergic transmission in cultured spinal cord neurons involves gamma-aminobutyric acidA-gated chloride channels

    SciTech Connect

    Mehta, A.K.; Ticku, M.K.

    1988-08-01

    The interaction of ethanol with gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-mediated 36-Cl-influx and its modulation by various drugs was investigated in C57 mice spinal cord cultured neurons. Ethanol (5-100 mM) potentiated the effect of GABA on /sup 36/Cl-influx; whereas at concentrations greater than or equal to 50 mM ethanol activated Cl- channels directly. The effect of ethanol was specific for GABAA receptor-gated Cl- channels, as ethanol did not potentiate glycine-induced /sup 36/Cl-influx in the same neurons. Both the enhancing and direct effects of ethanol on /sup 36/Cl-influx were blocked by GABA antagonists like bicuculline, picrotoxinin and inverse agonists of the benzodiazepine site like the imidazodiazepine R015-4513 (ethyl-8-azido-5,6-dihydro-5-methyl-6-oxo-4H-imidazo (1,5 alpha), (1,4)benzodiazepine-3-carboxylate) and N-methyl-beta-carboline-3-carboxamide (FG-7142). Ethanol potentiating effect of GABA-induced /sup 36/Cl-influx was also reversed by methyl-6,7-dimethyl-4-ethyl-beta-carboline-3-carboxylate. The effects of the inverse agonists were blocked by the benzodiazepine receptor antagonist R015-1788. Both R015-4513 and FG-7142 reversed direct and GABA potentiating effects of ethanol effect at concentrations lower than those that exhibit inverse agonistic activity in the /sup 36/Cl-influx assay in cultured neurons. These results suggest that ethanol facilitation of GABAAergic transmission involves GABA receptor-gated Cl- channels and that this interaction may be responsible for some of the pharmacological effects of ethanol.

  17. Molecular determinants of agonist selectivity in glutamate-gated chloride channels which likely explain the agonist selectivity of the vertebrate glycine and GABAA-ρ receptors.

    PubMed

    Blarre, Thomas; Bertrand, Hugues-Olivier; Acher, Francine C; Kehoe, JacSue

    2014-01-01

    Orthologous Cys-loop glutamate-gated chloride channels (GluClR's) have been cloned and described electrophysiologically and pharmacologically in arthropods and nematodes (both members of the invertebrate ecdysozoan superphylum). Recently, GluClR's from Aplysia californica (a mollusc from the lophotrochozoan superphylum) have been cloned and similarly studied. In spite of sharing a common function, the ecdysozoan and lophotrochozoan receptors have been shown by phylogenetic analyses to have evolved independently. The recent crystallization of the GluClR from C. elegans revealed the binding pocket of the nematode receptor. An alignment of the protein sequences of the nematode and molluscan GluClRs showed that the Aplysia receptor does not contain all of the residues defining the binding mode of the ecdysozoan receptor. That the two receptors have slightly different binding modes is not surprising since earlier electrophysiological and pharmacological experiments had suggested that they were differentially responsive to certain agonists. Knowledge of the structure of the C. elegans GluClR has permitted us to generate a homology model of the binding pocket of the Aplysia receptor. We have analyzed the differences between the two binding modes and evaluated the relative significance of their non-common residues. We have compared the GluClRs electrophysiologically and pharmacologically and we have used site-directed mutagenesis on both receptor types to test predictions made from the model. Finally, we propose an explanation derived from the model for why the nematode receptors are gated only by glutamate, whereas the molluscan receptors can also be activated by β-alanine, GABA and taurine. Like the Aplysia receptor, the vertebrate glycine and GABAA-ρ receptors also respond to these other agonists. An alignment of the sequences of the molluscan and vertebrate receptors shows that the reasons we have given for the ability of the other agonists to activate the Aplysia

  18. Flow-activated ion channels in vascular endothelium.

    PubMed

    Gautam, Mamta; Gojova, Andrea; Barakat, Abdul I

    2006-01-01

    The ability of vascular endothelial cells (ECs) to respond to fluid mechanical forces associated with blood flow is essential for flow-mediated vasoregulation and arterial wall remodeling. Abnormalities in endothelial responses to flow also play a role in the development of atherosclerosis. Although our understanding of the endothelial signaling pathways stimulated by flow has greatly increased over the past two decades, the mechanisms by which ECs sense flow remain largely unknown. Activation of flow-sensitive ion channels is among the fastest known endothelial responses to flow; therefore, these ion channels have been proposed as candidate flow sensors. This review focuses on: 1) describing the various types of flow-sensitive ion