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Sample records for activated dislocation motion

  1. Dislocation motion and instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yichao; Chapman, Stephen Jonathan; Acharya, Amit

    2013-08-01

    The Peach-Koehler expression for the stress generated by a single (non-planar) curvilinear dislocation is evaluated to calculate the dislocation self stress. This is combined with a law of motion to give the self-induced motion of a general dislocation curve. A stability analysis of a rectilinear, uniformly translating dislocation is then performed. The dislocation is found to be susceptible to a helical instability, with the maximum growth rate occurring when the dislocation is almost, but not exactly, pure screw. The non-linear evolution of the instability is determined numerically, and implications for slip band formation and non-Schmid behavior in yielding are discussed.

  2. Strain localization in ultramylonitic marbles by simultaneous activation of dislocation motion and grain boundary sliding (Syros, Greece)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogowitz, A.; White, J. C.; Grasemann, B.

    2016-03-01

    Extreme strain localization occurred in the centre of the cross-cutting element of a flanking structure in almost pure calcite marbles from Syros, Greece. At the maximum displacement of 120 cm along the cross-cutting element, evidence of grain size sensitive deformation mechanisms can be found in the ultramylonitic marbles, which are characterized by (1) an extremely small grain size ( ˜ 3 µm), (2) grain boundary triple junctions with nearly 120° angles, (3) a weak crystallographic preferred orientation with very low texture index (J = 1.4), (4) a random misorientation angle distribution curve and (5) the presence of small cavities. Using transmission electron microscopy, a deformation sequence is observed comprising recrystallization dominantly by bulging, resulting in the development of the fine-grained ultramylonite followed by the development of a high dislocation density ( ˜ 1013 m-2) with ongoing deformation of the fine-grained ultramylonite. The arrangement of dislocations in the extremely fine-grain-sized calcite differs from microstructures created by classical dislocation creep mediated by combined glide and thermally activated climb. Instead, it exhibits extensive glide and dislocation networks characteristic of recovery accommodated by cross-slip and network-assisted dislocation movement without formation of idealized subgrain walls. The enabling of grain boundary sliding to dislocation activity is deemed central to initiating and sustaining strain softening and is argued to be an important strain localization process in calcite rocks, even at a high strain rate ( ˜ 10-9 s-1) and low temperature (300 °C).

  3. Strain localization in ultramylonitic marbles by simultaneous activation of dislocation motion and grain boundary sliding (Syros, Greece)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogowitz, A.; White, J. C.; Grasemann, B.

    2015-09-01

    Extreme strain localization occurred in the center of the cross-cutting element of a flanking structure in almost pure calcite marbles from Syros, Greece. At the maximum displacement of 120 cm along the cross-cutting element evidence of grain size sensitive deformation mechanisms can be found in the ultramylonitic marbles, which are characterized by (1) an extremely small grain size (∼3 μm), (2) grain boundary triple junctions with nearly 120° angles, (3) a weak crystallographic preferred orientation with very low texture index (J=1.4), (4) a random misorientation angle distribution curve and (5) the presence of small cavities. Using transmission electron microscopy a deformation sequence is observed comprising, first recrystallization by bulging resulting in the development of the fine-grained ultramylonite followed by the evolution of a high dislocation density (∼1013 m-2) with ongoing deformation of the fine-grained ultramylonite. The arrangement of dislocations in the extremely fine grain sized calcite differs from microstructures created by classical dislocation creep mediated by combined glide and thermally activated climb. Instead, it exhibits extensive glide and dislocation networks characteristic of recovery accommodated by cross-slip and network-assisted dislocation movement without formation of idealized subgrain walls. The enabling of grain boundary sliding to dislocation activity is deemed central to initiating and sustaining strain softening and is argued to be an important strain localization process in calcite rocks, even at high strain rate (10-9 s-1) and low temperature (300 °C).

  4. Interfacial dislocation motion and interactions in single-crystal superalloys

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, B.; Raabe, D.; Roters, F.; Arsenlis, A.

    2014-10-01

    The early stage of high-temperature low-stress creep in single-crystal superalloys is characterized by the rapid development of interfacial dislocation networks. Although interfacial motion and dynamic recovery of these dislocation networks have long been expected to control the subsequent creep behavior, direct observation and hence in-depth understanding of such processes has not been achieved. Incorporating recent developments of discrete dislocation dynamics models, we simulate interfacial dislocation motion in the channel structures of single-crystal superalloys, and investigate how interfacial dislocation motion and dynamic recovery are affected by interfacial dislocation interactions and lattice misfit. Different types of dislocation interactions are considered: self, collinear, coplanar, Lomer junction, glissile junction, and Hirth junction. The simulation results show that strong dynamic recovery occurs due to the short-range reactions of collinear annihilation and Lomer junction formation. The misfit stress is found to induce and accelerate dynamic recovery of interfacial dislocation networks involving self-interaction and Hirth junction formation, but slow down the steady interfacial motion of coplanar and glissile junction forming dislocation networks. The insights gained from these simulations on high-temperature low-stress creep of single-crystal superalloys are also discussed.

  5. Plastic dislocation motion via nonequilibrium molecular and continuum dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Hoover, W.G.; Ladd, A.J.C.; Hoover, N.E.

    1980-09-29

    The classical two-dimensional close-packed triangular lattice, with nearest-neighbor spring forces, is a convenient standard material for the investigation of dislocation motion and plastic flow. Two kinds of calculations, based on this standard material, are described here: (1) Molecular Dynamics simulations, incorporating adiabatic strains described with the help of Doll's Tensor, and (2) Continuum Dynamics simulations, incorporating periodic boundaries and dislocation interaction through stress-field superposition.

  6. Material yielding and irreversible deformation mediated by dislocation motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miguel, M.-Carmen; Laurson, L.; Alava, M. J.

    2008-08-01

    We study the collective behavior of dislocation assemblies in simplified models of plastic deformation. We first review several numerical results on long range dislocation interactions with simplified dislocation motion constraints. These typically give rise to a yielding transition separating stationary and moving dislocation phases. Furthermore, we discuss the intermittent relaxation of the plastic strain-rate observed around this transition at mesoscopic scales, and how this intermittent behavior gives rise to an average slow power law relaxation in time known in the literature as Andrade’s creep. We analyze the coherent dynamics and the average stress-strain relationship in the steady regime of plastic deformation. In this steady regime, plastic deformation proceeds in the form of plastic avalanches whose size and duration are broadly distributed and statistically characterized. One signature of the time correlations of this heterogeneous collective dislocation dynamics is a power spectrum scaling with frequency as f - a with an exponent α close to 1.5. This feature appears to be peculiar of dislocation and grain boundary motion as has been observed in other physical situations in the vicinity of a yielding transition.

  7. Dislocation

    MedlinePlus

    Joint dislocation ... It may be hard to tell a dislocated joint from a broken bone . Both are emergencies that ... to repair a ligament that tears when the joint is dislocated is needed. Injuries to nerves and ...

  8. Dislocation motion and grain boundary migration in two-dimensional tungsten disulphide.

    PubMed

    Azizi, Amin; Zou, Xiaolong; Ercius, Peter; Zhang, Zhuhua; Elías, Ana Laura; Perea-López, Néstor; Stone, Greg; Terrones, Mauricio; Yakobson, Boris I; Alem, Nasim

    2014-01-01

    Dislocations have a significant effect on mechanical, electronic, magnetic and optical properties of crystals. For a dislocation to migrate in bulk crystals, collective and simultaneous movement of several atoms is needed. In two-dimensional crystals, in contrast, dislocations occur on the surface and can exhibit unique migration dynamics. Dislocation migration has recently been studied in graphene, but no studies have been reported on dislocation dynamics for two-dimensional transition metal dichalcogenides with unique metal-ligand bonding and a three-atom thickness. This study presents dislocation motion, glide and climb, leading to grain boundary migration in a tungsten disulphide monolayer. Direct atomic-scale imaging coupled with atomistic simulations reveals a strikingly low-energy barrier for glide, leading to significant grain boundary reconstruction in tungsten disulphide. The observed dynamics are unique and different from those reported for graphene. Through strain field mapping, we also demonstrate how dislocations introduce considerable strain along the grain boundaries and at the dislocation cores.

  9. Local decomposition induced by dislocation motions inside precipitates in an Al-alloy

    PubMed Central

    Yang, B.; Zhou, Y. T.; Chen, D.; Ma, X. L.

    2013-01-01

    Dislocations in crystals are linear crystallographic defects, which move in lattice when crystals are plastically deformed. Motion of a partial dislocation may remove or create stacking fault characterized with a partial of a lattice translation vector. Here we report that motion of partial dislocations inside an intermetallic compound result in a local composition deviation from its stoichiometric ratio, which cannot be depicted with any vectors of the primary crystal. Along dislocation slip bands inside the deformed Al2Cu particles, redistribution of Cu and Al atoms leads to a local decomposition and collapse of the original crystal structure. This finding demonstrates that dislocation slip may induce destabilization in complex compounds, which is fundamentally different from that in monometallic crystals. This phenomenon of chemical unmixing of initially homogeneous multicomponent solids induced by dislocation motion might also have important implications for understanding the geologic evolvement of deep-focus peridotites in the Earth. PMID:23301160

  10. Twin Boundaries merely as Intrinsically Kinematic Barriers for Screw Dislocation Motion in FCC Metals.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiayong; Zhang, Hongwu; Ye, Hongfei; Zheng, Yonggang

    2016-03-10

    Metals with nanoscale twins have shown ultrahigh strength and excellent ductility, attributed to the role of twin boundaries (TBs) as strong barriers for the motion of lattice dislocations. Though observed in both experiments and simulations, the barrier effect of TBs is rarely studied quantitatively. Here, with atomistic simulations and continuum based anisotropic bicrystal models, we find that the long-range interaction force between coherent TBs and screw dislocations is negligible. Further simulations of the pileup behavior of screw dislocations in front of TBs suggest that screw dislocations can be blocked kinematically by TBs due to the change of slip plane, leading to the pileup of subsequent dislocations with the elastic repulsion actually from the pinned dislocation in front of the TB. Our results well explain the experimental observations that the variation of yield strength with twin thickness for ultrafine-grained copper follows the Hall-Petch relationship.

  11. Twin Boundaries merely as Intrinsically Kinematic Barriers for Screw Dislocation Motion in FCC Metals

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jiayong; Zhang, Hongwu; Ye, Hongfei; Zheng, Yonggang

    2016-01-01

    Metals with nanoscale twins have shown ultrahigh strength and excellent ductility, attributed to the role of twin boundaries (TBs) as strong barriers for the motion of lattice dislocations. Though observed in both experiments and simulations, the barrier effect of TBs is rarely studied quantitatively. Here, with atomistic simulations and continuum based anisotropic bicrystal models, we find that the long-range interaction force between coherent TBs and screw dislocations is negligible. Further simulations of the pileup behavior of screw dislocations in front of TBs suggest that screw dislocations can be blocked kinematically by TBs due to the change of slip plane, leading to the pileup of subsequent dislocations with the elastic repulsion actually from the pinned dislocation in front of the TB. Our results well explain the experimental observations that the variation of yield strength with twin thickness for ultrafine-grained copper follows the Hall-Petch relationship. PMID:26961273

  12. Twin Boundaries merely as Intrinsically Kinematic Barriers for Screw Dislocation Motion in FCC Metals.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiayong; Zhang, Hongwu; Ye, Hongfei; Zheng, Yonggang

    2016-01-01

    Metals with nanoscale twins have shown ultrahigh strength and excellent ductility, attributed to the role of twin boundaries (TBs) as strong barriers for the motion of lattice dislocations. Though observed in both experiments and simulations, the barrier effect of TBs is rarely studied quantitatively. Here, with atomistic simulations and continuum based anisotropic bicrystal models, we find that the long-range interaction force between coherent TBs and screw dislocations is negligible. Further simulations of the pileup behavior of screw dislocations in front of TBs suggest that screw dislocations can be blocked kinematically by TBs due to the change of slip plane, leading to the pileup of subsequent dislocations with the elastic repulsion actually from the pinned dislocation in front of the TB. Our results well explain the experimental observations that the variation of yield strength with twin thickness for ultrafine-grained copper follows the Hall-Petch relationship. PMID:26961273

  13. Dislocations

    MedlinePlus

    Dislocations are joint injuries that force the ends of your bones out of position. The cause is often a fall or a ... one, seek medical attention. Treatment depends on which joint you dislocate and the severity of the injury. It might include manipulations to reposition your bones, ...

  14. Column-by-column observation of dislocation motion in CdTe: Dynamic scanning transmission electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chen; Zhang, Yu-Yang; Pennycook, Timothy J.; Wu, Yelong; Lupini, Andrew R.; Paudel, Naba; Pantelides, Sokrates T.; Yan, Yanfa; Pennycook, Stephen J.

    2016-10-01

    The dynamics of partial dislocations in CdTe have been observed at the atomic scale using aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), allowing the mobility of different dislocations to be directly compared: Cd-core Shockley partial dislocations are more mobile than Te-core partials, and dislocation cores with unpaired columns have higher mobility than those without unpaired columns. The dynamic imaging also provides insight into the process by which the dislocations glide. Dislocations with dangling bonds on unpaired columns are found to be more mobile because the dangling bonds mediate the bond exchanges required for the dislocations to move. Furthermore, a screw dislocation has been resolved to dissociate into a Shockley partial-dislocation pair along two different directions, revealing a way for the screw dislocation to glide in the material. The results show that dynamic STEM imaging has the potential to uncover the details of dislocation motion not easily accessible by other means.

  15. Singular orientations and faceted motion of dislocations in body-centered cubic crystals

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Keonwook; Bulatov, Vasily V.; Cai, Wei

    2012-01-01

    Dislocation mobility is a fundamental material property that controls strength and ductility of crystals. An important measure of dislocation mobility is its Peierls stress, i.e., the minimal stress required to move a dislocation at zero temperature. Here we report that, in the body-centered cubic metal tantalum, the Peierls stress as a function of dislocation orientation exhibits fine structure with several singular orientations of high Peierls stress—stress spikes—surrounded by vicinal plateau regions. While the classical Peierls-Nabarro model captures the high Peierls stress of singular orientations, an extension that allows dislocations to bend is necessary to account for the plateau regions. Our results clarify the notion of dislocation kinks as meaningful only for orientations within the plateau regions vicinal to the Peierls stress spikes. These observations lead us to propose a Read-Shockley type classification of dislocation orientations into three distinct classes—special, vicinal, and general—with respect to their Peierls stress and motion mechanisms. We predict that dislocation loops expanding under stress at sufficiently low temperatures, should develop well defined facets corresponding to two special orientations of highest Peierls stress, the screw and the M111 orientations, both moving by kink mechanism. We propose that both the screw and the M111 dislocations are jointly responsible for the yield behavior of BCC metals at low temperatures. PMID:22949701

  16. Wavefront Motion in the Vicinity of a Phase Dislocation: "Optical Vortex"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasnetsov, M. V.; Gorshkov, V. N.; Marienko, I. G.; Soskin, M. S.

    2000-02-01

    In the scalar approximation, an analysis is made of the light field structure in the vicinity of a line of the ring phase dislocation corresponding to the zero value of the field formed by the interference of two uniaxial Gaussian beams. The formation of an “optical vortex” or the toroidal motion of a portion of a light flow around a ring phase dislocation is shown.

  17. Local decomposition induced by dislocation motions inside tetragonal Al(2)Cu compound: slip system-dependent dynamics.

    PubMed

    Chen, D; Ma, X L

    2013-11-07

    Dislocations in a crystal are usually classified into several independent slip systems. Motion of a partial dislocation in monometallic crystals may remove or create stacking fault characterized with a partial of a lattice translation vector. However, it is recently known that motion of partial dislocations in complex structure, such as that inside an intermetallic Al2Cu compound, lead to a local composition deviation from its stoichiometric ratio and the resultant structure collapse. Here we report such a local decomposition behaviors are strongly dependent on slip system of dislocations. Under applied external stress, we have studied dislocation motion behaviors in the three independent slip systems of [001](110), [100]() and [110]() within tetragonal Al2Cu crystal by using molecular dynamics method. We found dislocation motions in all these slip systems result in local decomposition but their physical details differ significantly.

  18. Cervical facet dislocation adjacent to the fused motion segment.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Kunio; Kawanishi, Masahiro; Yamada, Makoto; Tanaka, Hidekazu; Ito, Yutaka; Kuroiwa, Toshihiko

    2016-01-01

    This study reports on a case that forces re-examination of merits and demerits of anterior cervical fusion. A 79-year-old male was brought to the emergency room (ER) of our hospital after he fell and struck the occipital region of his head following excessive alcohol consumption. Four years prior, he had undergone anterior cervical discectomy and fusion of C5/6 and a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) performed 3 years after this surgery indicated that he was suffering from degeneration of C6/7 intervertebral discs. After arriving at the ER, he presented motor impairment at level C7 and lower of manual muscle testing grade 1 as well as moderate loss of physical sensation from the trunk and peripheries of both upper limbs to the peripheries of both lower limbs (Frankel B). Cervical computed tomography (CT) indicated anterior dislocation of C6/7, and MRI indicated severe spinal cord edema. We performed manipulative reduction of C6/7 with the patient under general anesthesia. Next, we performed laminectomy on C5-T1 and posterior fusion on C6/7. Postoperative CT indicated that cervical alignment had improved, and MRI indicated that the spinal cord edema observed prior to surgery had been mitigated. Three months after surgery, motor function and sensory impairment of the lower limbs had improved, and the patient was ambulatory upon discharge from the hospital (Frankel D). In the present case, although C5 and 6 were rigidly fused, degeneration of the C6/7 intervertebral disc occurred and stability was compromised. As a result, even slight trauma placed a severe dynamic burden on the facet joint of C6/7, which led to dislocation.

  19. In situ transmission electron microscopy observation of dislocation motion in 9Cr steel at elevated temperatures: influence of shear stress on dislocation behavior.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Susumu; Sakai, Takayuki

    2014-12-01

    To elucidate high-temperature plastic deformation (creep) mechanism in materials, it is essential to observe dislocation motion under tensile loading. There are many reports on in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observations in the literature; however, the relationship between the dislocation motion and shear stress in 9Cr steel is still not clear. In this study, in order to evaluate this relationship quantitatively, in situ TEM observations were carried out in conjunction with finite element method (FEM) analysis. A tensile test sample was strained at an elevated temperature (903 K) inside a transmission electron microscope, and the stress distribution in the strained sample was analyzed by FEM. The dislocation behavior was clearly found to depend on the shear stress. At a shear stress of 66 MPa, both the dislocation velocity and mobile dislocation density were low. However, a high shear stress level of 95 MPa caused a noticeable increase in the dislocation velocity and mobile dislocation density. Furthermore, in this article, we discuss the dependence of the dislocation behavior on stress. The results presented here also indicate that the relationship between the microstructure and the strength of materials can be revealed by the methods used in this work. PMID:25298228

  20. Equation of motion and subsonic-transonic transitions of rectilinear edge dislocations: A collective-variable approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pellegrini, Yves-Patrick

    2014-08-01

    A theoretical framework is proposed to derive a dynamic equation motion for rectilinear dislocations within isotropic continuum elastodynamics. The theory relies on a recent dynamic extension of the Peierls-Nabarro equation, so as to account for core-width generalized stacking-fault energy effects. The degrees of freedom of the solution of the latter equation are reduced by means of the collective-variable method, well known in soliton theory, which we reformulate in a way suitable to the problem at hand. Through these means, two coupled governing equations for the dislocation position and core width are obtained, which are combined into one single complex-valued equation of motion, of compact form. The latter equation embodies the history dependence of dislocation inertia. It is employed to investigate the motion of an edge dislocation under uniform time-dependent loading, with focus on the subsonic/transonic transition. Except in the steady-state supersonic range of velocities—which the equation does not address—our results are in good agreement with atomistic simulations on tungsten. In particular, we provide an explanation for the transition, showing that it is governed by a loading-dependent dynamic critical stress. The transition has the character of a delayed bifurcation. Moreover, various quantitative predictions are made, that could be tested in atomistic simulations. Overall, this work demonstrates the crucial role played by core-width variations in dynamic dislocation motion.

  1. Low-frequency noise from random dislocation motion in large convective systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaleski, Stéphane

    1989-03-01

    We investigate theoretically the low-frequency noise arising in layers of fluid of large horizontal extent subjected to the Rayleigh-Bénard instability. Two models built on the phase-diffusion equation are investigated. In the first the phase of the rolls obeys a diffusion equation with a white-noise forcing. This corresponds to local agitation that does not result in nucleation or annihilation of rolls. It produces an f-1 noise for two-dimensional patterns and an f-3/2 noise in the one-dimensional case. The f-1 noise can be identified with noise observed in convective patterns very close to threshold. In the second model, roll patterns where a single dislocation performs a Brownian motion are investigated. It is shown that the corresponding stochastic phase equation can be solved for an infinite domain. The result is an f-2 noise, in agreement with recent experimental observations by Croquette, Le Gal, and Pocheau [Phys. Scr. T13, 135 (1986)]. The theoretical result is also valid for an arbitrary number of dislocations performing independent random walks.

  2. Dislocation motion in {gamma} TiAl by in situ straining experiments in the HVEM

    SciTech Connect

    Messerschmidt, U.; Bartsch, M.; Haeussler, D.; Hattenhauer, R.; Aindow, M.; Jones, I.P.

    1995-08-01

    Micro-tensile specimens of coarse-grained Ti52at%Al crystals have been deformed in situ in a high voltage electron microscope at room temperature. In addition to some twinning, ``simple`` 1/2{l_angle}110] dislocations as well as super dislocations were moving, with the simple dislocations prevailing even if their orientation factor is lower than that of the super dislocations. Both types of dislocations are pinned, probably by small precipitates having a distance along the dislocations of about 100 nm. The precipitates consist most probably of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Under stress, the dislocations bow out between the obstacles. The bowing is stronger for 1/2{l_angle}110] dislocations. An effective stress of about 41 MPa is estimated from their curvature. The kinematic behavior of the dislocations is in accord with precipitation hardening. The dislocations are generated by the double-cross slip mechanism. Their density within the slip bands corresponds to a long-range internal stress of about 40 MPa. These data are consistent with the flow stress of PST crystals in the easy orientation, taken from the literature.

  3. The non-uniform motion of arbitrary dislocation distributions by climb and by glide along non-planar paths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brock, L. M.

    A S A BASIS for obtaining insight into both plastic flow in terms of dislocation motion and dynamic crack extension, the general problem of non-uniform motion of largely arbitrary dislocation distributions by climb and by glide along non-planar paths is considered. An exact solution is found in two forms: one form, vectorial in nature, shows that the essential distribution and path properties are contained in a symmetric tensor. The other form, consisting of complex functions, shows that the solution involves the inner product of the displacement discontinuity vector and complex vectors whose components normal and tangential to the path contour are related through tangent angle derivatives. Both forms illustrate that the solution has two components, one arising from the velocity discontinuity along the contour, the other arising from the displacement discontinuity at its edge and the edge speed.

  4. Texture of Nanocrystalline Nickel: Probing the Lower Size Limit of Dislocation Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Bin; Lutker, Katie; Raju, Selva Vennila; Yan, Jinyuan; Kanitpanyacharoen, Waruntorn; Lei, Jialin; Yang, Shizhong; Wenk, Hans-Rudolf; Mao, Ho-kwang; Williams, Quentin

    2012-12-01

    The size of nanocrystals provides a limitation on dislocation activity and associated stress-induced deformation. Dislocation-mediated plastic deformation is expected to become inactive below a critical particle size, which has been proposed to be between 10 and 30 nanometers according to computer simulations and transmission electron microscopy analysis. However, deformation experiments at high pressure on polycrystalline nickel suggest that dislocation activity is still operative in 3-nanometer crystals. Substantial texturing is observed at pressures above 3.0 gigapascals for 500-nanometer nickel and at greater than 11.0 gigapascals for 20-nanometer nickel. Surprisingly, texturing is also seen in 3-nanometer nickel when compressed above 18.5 gigapascals. The observations of pressure-promoted texturing indicate that under high external pressures, dislocation activity can be extended down to a few-nanometers-length scale.

  5. On the scaling behavior of hardness with ligament diameter of nanoporous-Au: Constrained motion of dislocations along the ligaments

    SciTech Connect

    Viswanath, R. N.; Polaki, S. R.; Rajaraman, R.; Abhaya, S.; Chirayath, V. A.; Amarendra, G.; Sundar, C. S.

    2014-06-09

    The scaling behavior of hardness with ligament diameter and vacancy defect concentration in nanoporous Au (np-Au) has been investigated using a combination of Vickers Hardness, Scanning electron microscopy, and positron lifetime measurements. It is shown that for np-Au, the hardness scales with the ligament diameter with an exponent of −0.3, that is, at variance with the conventional Hall-Petch exponent of −0.5 for bulk systems, as seen in the controlled experiments on cold worked Au with varying grain size. The hardness of np-Au correlates with the vacancy concentration C{sub V} within the ligaments, as estimated from positron lifetime experiments, and scales as C{sub V}{sup 1/2}, pointing to the interaction of dislocations with vacancies. The distinctive Hall-Petch exponent of −0.3 seen for np-Au, with ligament diameters in the range of 5–150 nm, is rationalized by invoking the constrained motion of dislocations along the ligaments.

  6. Variation of dislocation etch-pit geometry: An indicator of bulk microstructure and recombination activity in multicrystalline silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellanos, S.; Kivambe, M.; Hofstetter, J.; Rinio, M.; Lai, B.; Buonassisi, T.

    2014-05-01

    Dislocation clusters in multicrystalline silicon limit solar cell performance by decreasing minority carrier diffusion length. Studies have shown that the recombination strength of dislocation clusters can vary by up to two orders of magnitude, even within the same wafer. In this contribution, we combine a surface-analysis approach with bulk characterization techniques to explore the underlying root cause of variations in recombination strength among different clusters. We observe that dislocation clusters with higher recombination strength consist of dislocations with a larger variation of line vector, correlated with a higher degree of variation in dislocation etch-pit shapes (ellipticities). Conversely, dislocation clusters exhibiting the lowest recombination strength contain mostly dislocations with identical line vectors, resulting in very similar etch-pit shapes. The disorder of dislocation line vector in high-recombination clusters appears to be correlated with impurity decoration, possibly the cause of the enhanced recombination activity. Based on our observations, we conclude that the relative recombination activity of different dislocation clusters in the device may be predicted via an optical inspection of the distribution and shape variation of dislocation etch pits in the as-grown wafer.

  7. Reciprocating motion of active deformable particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarama, M.; Ohta, T.

    2016-05-01

    Reciprocating motion of an active deformable particle in a homogeneous medium is studied theoretically. For generality, we employ a simple model derived from symmetry considerations for the center-of-mass velocity and elliptical and triangular deformations in two dimensions. We carry out, for the first time, a systematic investigation of the reciprocating motion of a self-propelled particle. It is clarified that spontaneous breaking of the front-rear asymmetry is essential for the reciprocating motion. Moreover, two routes are found for the formation of the reciprocating motion. One is a bifurcation from a motionless stationary state. The other is destabilisation of an oscillatory rectilinear motion.

  8. Parallel Dislocation Simulator

    2006-10-30

    ParaDiS is software capable of simulating the motion, evolution, and interaction of dislocation networks in single crystals using massively parallel computer architectures. The software is capable of outputting the stress-strain response of a single crystal whose plastic deformation is controlled by the dislocation processes.

  9. Knee Dislocations

    PubMed Central

    Schenck, Robert C.; Richter, Dustin L.; Wascher, Daniel C.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Traumatic knee dislocation is becoming more prevalent because of improved recognition and increased exposure to high-energy trauma, but long-term results are lacking. Purpose: To present 2 cases with minimum 20-year follow-up and a review of the literature to illustrate some of the fundamental principles in the management of the dislocated knee. Study Design: Review and case reports. Methods: Two patients with knee dislocations who underwent multiligamentous knee reconstruction were reviewed, with a minimum 20-year follow-up. These patients were brought back for a clinical evaluation using both subjective and objective measures. Subjective measures include the following scales: Lysholm, Tegner activity, visual analog scale (VAS), Short Form–36 (SF-36), International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC), and a psychosocial questionnaire. Objective measures included ligamentous examination, radiographic evaluation (including Telos stress radiographs), and physical therapy assessment of function and stability. Results: The mean follow-up was 22 years. One patient had a vascular injury requiring repair prior to ligament reconstruction. The average assessment scores were as follows: SF-36 physical health, 52; SF-36 mental health, 59; Lysholm, 92; IKDC, 86.5; VAS involved, 10.5 mm; and VAS uninvolved, 2.5 mm. Both patients had excellent stability and were functioning at high levels of activity for their age (eg, hiking, skydiving). Both patients had radiographic signs of arthritis, which lowered 1 subject’s IKDC score to “C.” Conclusion: Knee dislocations have rare long-term excellent results, and most intermediate-term studies show fair to good functional results. By following fundamental principles in the management of a dislocated knee, patients can be given the opportunity to function at high levels. Hopefully, continued advances in the evaluation and treatment of knee dislocations will improve the long-term outcomes for these patients in the

  10. Behavior of dislocations in silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Sumino, Koji

    1995-08-01

    A review is given of dynamic behavior of dislocations in silicon on the basis of works of the author`s group. Topics taken up are generation, motion and multiplication of dislocations as affected by oxygen impurities and immobilization of dislocations due to impurity reaction.

  11. Subtalar Dislocation in a Basketball Player.

    PubMed

    Crosby, L A

    1989-10-01

    In brief: Easily mistaken for an ankle fracture during the initial examination, medial subtalar dislocation-also known as 'basketball foot'-requires plaster immobilization for no more than 3 weeks. To extend immobilization beyond this time can lead to reduced range of motion in the subtalar joint, making it difficult for the athlete to resume sports activities. Encouraging toe motion while the patient is still in the cast prevents tendon adhesions. In this case report, the author discusses the importance of short-term immobilization and early rehabilitation for a 21-year-old basketball player recovering from medial subtalar dislocation.

  12. Supersonic Dislocation Bursts in Silicon

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, E. N.; Zhao, S.; Bringa, E. M.; Meyers, M. A.

    2016-01-01

    Dislocations are the primary agents of permanent deformation in crystalline solids. Since the theoretical prediction of supersonic dislocations over half a century ago, there is a dearth of experimental evidence supporting their existence. Here we use non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations of shocked silicon to reveal transient supersonic partial dislocation motion at approximately 15 km/s, faster than any previous in-silico observation. Homogeneous dislocation nucleation occurs near the shock front and supersonic dislocation motion lasts just fractions of picoseconds before the dislocations catch the shock front and decelerate back to the elastic wave speed. Applying a modified analytical equation for dislocation evolution we successfully predict a dislocation density of 1.5 × 1012 cm−2 within the shocked volume, in agreement with the present simulations and realistic in regards to prior and on-going recovery experiments in silicon. PMID:27264746

  13. Supersonic Dislocation Bursts in Silicon

    DOE PAGES

    Hahn, E. N.; Zhao, S.; Bringa, E. M.; Meyers, M. A.

    2016-06-06

    Dislocations are the primary agents of permanent deformation in crystalline solids. Since the theoretical prediction of supersonic dislocations over half a century ago, there is a dearth of experimental evidence supporting their existence. Here we use non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations of shocked silicon to reveal transient supersonic partial dislocation motion at approximately 15 km/s, faster than any previous in-silico observation. Homogeneous dislocation nucleation occurs near the shock front and supersonic dislocation motion lasts just fractions of picoseconds before the dislocations catch the shock front and decelerate back to the elastic wave speed. Applying a modified analytical equation for dislocation evolutionmore » we successfully predict a dislocation density of 1.5 x 10(12) cm(-2) within the shocked volume, in agreement with the present simulations and realistic in regards to prior and on-going recovery experiments in silicon.« less

  14. Electromechanical simulations of dislocations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skiba, Oxana; Gracie, Robert; Potapenko, Stanislav

    2013-04-01

    Improving the reliability of micro-electronic devices depends in part on developing a more in-depth understanding of dislocations because dislocations are barriers to charge carriers. To this end, the quasi-static simulation of discrete dislocations dynamics in materials under mechanical and electrical loads is presented. The simulations are based on the extended finite element method, where dislocations are modelled as internal discontinuities. The strong and weak forms of the boundary value problem for the coupled system are presented. The computation of the Peach-Koehler force using the J-integral is discussed. Examples to illustrate the accuracy of the simulations are presented. The motion of the network of the dislocations under different electrical and mechanical loads is simulated. It was shown that even in weak piezoelectric materials the effect of the electric field on plastic behaviour is significant.

  15. Multipurpose active/passive motion compensation system

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, R.A.; Clements, R.E.; Davenport, M.R.

    1984-05-01

    A microprocessor-controlled active/passive motion compensation system has been developed for deploying a variety of geotechnical in-situ testing devices with mobile drilling rigs from low-cost service vessels. The light-weight rotary heave compensator incorporates a hydraulic motor as the compensator actuator and a servo-controlled closed loop pump to reduce the air storage and power requirements. Unique features of the system are the use of inertial sensors to measure three components of boat motion, the ability to run the system in active/passive or passive modes, and the ability to automatically lower the drillstring at a constant velocity while maintaining motion compensation. Quantitative measurements made during sea trials offshore California yielded motion compensation accuracy approaching 98 percent which is much better than the compensation achieved with passive systems. Results are presented from offshore in-situ testing with a cone penetrometer, a vane shear device, and a suspension PS logger. The system can also be used for other offshore applications.

  16. Giant Optical Activity of Quantum Dots, Rods, and Disks with Screw Dislocations

    PubMed Central

    Baimuratov, Anvar S.; Rukhlenko, Ivan D.; Noskov, Roman E.; Ginzburg, Pavel; Gun’ko, Yurii K.; Baranov, Alexander V.; Fedorov, Anatoly V.

    2015-01-01

    For centuries mankind has been modifying the optical properties of materials: first, by elaborating the geometry and composition of structures made of materials found in nature, later by structuring the existing materials at a scale smaller than the operating wavelength. Here we suggest an original approach to introduce optical activity in nanostructured materials, by theoretically demonstrating that conventional achiral semiconducting nanocrystals become optically active in the presence of screw dislocations, which can naturally develop during the nanocrystal growth. We show the new properties to emerge due to the dislocation-induced distortion of the crystal lattice and the associated alteration of the nanocrystal’s electronic subsystem, which essentially modifies its interaction with external optical fields. The g-factors of intraband transitions in our nanocrystals are found comparable with dissymmetry factors of chiral plasmonic complexes, and exceeding the typical g-factors of chiral molecules by a factor of 1000. Optically active semiconducting nanocrystals—with chiral properties controllable by the nanocrystal dimensions, morphology, composition and blending ratio—will greatly benefit chemistry, biology and medicine by advancing enantiomeric recognition, sensing and resolution of chiral molecules. PMID:26424498

  17. Moving Dislocations in Disordered Alloys.

    SciTech Connect

    Marian, J; Caro, A

    2006-11-18

    Using atomistic simulations of dislocation motion in Ni and Ni-Au alloys we report a detailed study of the mobility function as a function of stress, temperature and alloy composition. We analyze the results in terms of analytic models of phonon radiation and their selection rules for phonon excitation. We find a remarkable agreement between the location of the cusps in the {sigma}-v relation and the velocity of waves propagating in the direction of dislocation motion. We identify and characterize three regimes of dissipation whose boundaries are essentially determined by the direction of motion of the dislocation, rather than by its screw or edge character.

  18. Dislocation microstructures and strain-gradient plasticity with one active slip plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conti, Sergio; Garroni, Adriana; Müller, Stefan

    2016-08-01

    We study dislocation networks in the plane using the vectorial phase-field model introduced by Ortiz and coworkers, in the limit of small lattice spacing. We show that, in a scaling regime where the total length of the dislocations is large, the phase field model reduces to a simpler model of the strain-gradient type. The limiting model contains a term describing the three-dimensional elastic energy and a strain-gradient term describing the energy of the geometrically necessary dislocations, characterized by the tangential gradient of the slip. The energy density appearing in the strain-gradient term is determined by the solution of a cell problem, which depends on the line tension energy of dislocations. In the case of cubic crystals with isotropic elasticity our model shows that complex microstructures may form in which dislocations with different Burgers vector and orientation react with each other to reduce the total self-energy.

  19. Thermally activated dislocation creep model for primary water stress corrosion cracking of NiCrFe alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, M.M., Jr

    1995-12-31

    There is a growing awareness that awareness that environmentally assisted creep plays an important role in integranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) of NiCrFe alloys in the primary coolant water environment of a pressurized water reactor (PWR). The expected creep mechanism is the thermally activated glide of dislocations. This mode of deformation is favored by the relatively low temperature of PWR operation combined with the large residual stresses that are most often identified as responsible for the SCC failure of plant components. Stress corrosion crack growth rate (CGR) equations that properly reflect the influence of this mechanism of crack tip deformation are required for accurate component life predictions. A phenomenological IGSCC-CGR model, which is based on an apriori assumption that the IGSCC-CGR is controlled by a low temperature dislocation creep mechanism, is developed in this report. Obstacles to dislocation creep include solute atoms such as carbon, which increase the lattice friction force, and forest dislocations, which can be introduced by cold prestrain. Dislocation creep also may be environmentally assisted due to hydrogen absorption at the crack tip. The IGSCC-CGR model developed here is based on an assumption that crack growth occurs by repeated fracture events occurring within an advancing crack-tip creep-fracture zone. Thermal activation parameters for stress corrosion cracking are obtained by fitting the CGR model to IGSCC-CGR data obtained on NiCrFe alloys, Alloy X-750 and Alloy 600. These IGSCC-CGR activation parameters are compared to activation parameters obtained from creep and stress relaxation tests. Recently reported CGR data, which exhibit an activation energy that depends on yield stress and the applied stress intensity factor, are used to benchmark the model. Finally, the effects of matrix carbon concentration, grain boundary carbides and absorbed hydrogen concentration are discussed within context of the model.

  20. Perceived causality influences brain activity evoked by biological motion.

    PubMed

    Morris, James P; Pelphrey, Kevin A; McCarthy, Gregory

    2008-01-01

    Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we investigated brain activity in an observer who watched the hand and arm motions of an individual when that individual was, or was not, the cause of the motion. Subjects viewed a realistic animated 3D character who sat at a table containing four pistons. On Intended Motion trials, the character raised his hand and arm upwards. On Unintended Motion trials, the piston under one of the character's hands pushed the hand and arm upward with the same motion. Finally, during Non-Biological Motion control trials, a piston pushed a coffee mug upward in the same smooth motion. Hand and arm motions, regardless of intention, evoked significantly more activity than control trials in a bilateral region that extended ventrally from the posterior superior temporal sulcus (pSTS) region and which was more spatially extensive in the right hemisphere. The left pSTS near the temporal-parietal junction, robustly differentiated between the Intended Motion and Unintended Motion conditions. Here, strong activity was observed for Intended Motion trials, while Unintended Motion trials evoked similar activity as the coffee mug trials. Our results demonstrate a strong hemispheric bias in the role of the pSTS in the perception of causality of biological motion. PMID:18633843

  1. Active motion assisted by correlated stochastic torques.

    PubMed

    Weber, Christian; Radtke, Paul K; Schimansky-Geier, Lutz; Hänggi, Peter

    2011-07-01

    The stochastic dynamics of an active particle undergoing a constant speed and additionally driven by an overall fluctuating torque is investigated. The random torque forces are expressed by a stochastic differential equation for the angular dynamics of the particle determining the orientation of motion. In addition to a constant torque, the particle is supplemented by random torques, which are modeled as an Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process with given correlation time τ(c). These nonvanishing correlations cause a persistence of the particles' trajectories and a change of the effective spatial diffusion coefficient. We discuss the mean square displacement as a function of the correlation time and the noise intensity and detect a nonmonotonic dependence of the effective diffusion coefficient with respect to both correlation time and noise strength. A maximal diffusion behavior is obtained if the correlated angular noise straightens the curved trajectories, interrupted by small pirouettes, whereby the correlated noise amplifies a straightening of the curved trajectories caused by the constant torque.

  2. Drift of dislocation tripoles under ultrasound influence.

    PubMed

    Murzaev, R T; Bachurin, D V; Nazarov, A A

    2016-01-01

    Numerical simulations of dynamics of different stable dislocation tripoles under influence of monochromatic standing sound wave were performed. The basic conditions necessary for the drift and mutual rearrangements between dislocation structures were investigated. The dependence of the drift velocity of the dislocation tripoles as a function of the frequency and amplitude of the external influence was obtained. The results of the work can be useful in analysis of motion and self-organization of dislocation structure under ultrasound influence. PMID:26278625

  3. Isolated dorsal dislocation of the tarsal naviculum

    PubMed Central

    Hamdi, Kaziz; Hazem, Ben Ghozlen; Yadh, Zitoun; Faouzi, Abid

    2015-01-01

    Isolated dislocation of the tarsal naviculum is an unusual injury, scarcely reported in the literature. The naviculum is surrounded by the rigid bony and ligamentous support hence fracture dislocation is more common than isolated dislocation. The mechanism and treatment options remain unclear. In this case report, we describe a 31 year old man who sustained an isolated dorsal dislocation of the left tarsal naviculum, without fracture, when he was involved in a motor vehicle collision. The reported mechanism of the dislocation is a hyper plantar flexion force applied to the midfoot, resulting in a transient disruption of the ligamentous support of the naviculum bone, with dorsal displacement of the bone. The patient was treated with open reduction and Krischner-wire fixation of the navicular after the failure of closed reduction. The wires were removed after 6 weeks postoperatively. Physiotherapy for stiffness and midfoot pain was recommended for 2 months. At 6 months postoperatively, limping, midfoot pain and weakness were reported, no X-ray abnormalities were found. The patient returned to his obvious activities with a normal range of motion. PMID:26806978

  4. Proximal interphalangeal joint dislocations without fractures.

    PubMed

    Vicar, A J

    1988-02-01

    Injuries to the proximal interphalangeal joint are extremely common. An understanding of the complex anatomy of this joint is essential for diagnosis and treatment of proximal interphalangeal joint sprains and dislocations. Lateral injuries are among the commonest injuries in the hand. These are often stable after reduction, requiring only closed treatment. Occasionally, however, the collateral ligament can be trapped in the joint and require open reduction. Dorsal dislocations represent the most common dislocation in the hand. These, too, are usually stable after reduction and can be treated by closed methods. On occasion, however, these dislocations will be open or irreducible by closed means, requiring surgical intervention and repair of damaged structures. Complex rotary dislocations are exactly that: complex. An exact understanding of the damaged structures and causes of irreducibility frequently makes this an injury often requiring open reduction and selective repair of damaged soft tissue structures. Fortunately, prompt diagnosis, reduction, and institution of appropriate treatment can usually afford the patient good function after these injuries. It must be noted that stiffness is more common than instability, and active range-of-motion exercises instituted at the proper time are essential. These joints will often remain permanently thicker after injury in spite of optimal care, and tenderness and soreness with use may persist for 6 to 12 months.

  5. Spontaneous motion in hierarchically assembled active matter

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, Tim; Chen, Daniel T. N.; DeCamp, Stephen J.; Heymann, Michael; Dogic, Zvonimir

    2012-01-01

    With exquisite precision and reproducibility, cells orchestrate the cooperative action of thousands of nanometer-sized molecular motors to carry out mechanical tasks at much larger length scales, such as cell motility, division and replication1. Besides their biological importance, such inherently non-equilibrium processes are an inspiration for developing biomimetic active materials from microscopic components that consume energy to generate continuous motion2–4. Being actively driven, these materials are not constrained by the laws of equilibrium statistical mechanics and can thus exhibit highly sought-after properties such as autonomous motility, internally generated flows and self-organized beating5–7. Starting from extensile microtubule bundles, we hierarchically assemble active analogs of conventional polymer gels, liquid crystals and emulsions. At high enough concentration, microtubules form a percolating active network characterized by internally driven chaotic flows, hydrodynamic instabilities, enhanced transport and fluid mixing. When confined to emulsion droplets, 3D networks spontaneously adsorb onto the droplet surfaces to produce highly active 2D nematic liquid crystals whose streaming flows are controlled by internally generated fractures and self-healing, as well as unbinding and annihilation of oppositely charged disclination defects. The resulting active emulsions exhibit unexpected properties, such as autonomous motility, which are not observed in their passive analogues. Taken together, these observations exemplify how assemblages of animate microscopic objects exhibit collective biomimetic properties that are starkly different from those found in materials assembled from inanimate building blocks, challenging us to develop a theoretical framework that would allow for a systematic engineering of their far-from-equilibrium material properties. PMID:23135402

  6. Using Kinesthetic Activities to Teach Ptolemaic and Copernican Retrograde Motion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richards, Ted

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a method for teaching planetary retrograde motion, and the Ptolemaic and Copernican accounts of retrograde motion, by means of a series kinesthetic learning activities (KLAs). In the KLAs described, the students literally walk through the motions of the planets in both systems. A retrospective statistical analysis shows that…

  7. 20 CFR 663.120 - Are displaced homemakers eligible for dislocated worker activities under WIA?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Partnership Act. (b) Under the dislocated worker program in JTPA, displaced homemakers are defined as... with Dependent Children (AFDC) as well as those who had been dependent on the income of another...

  8. 20 CFR 663.120 - Are displaced homemakers eligible for dislocated worker activities under WIA?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Partnership Act. (b) Under the dislocated worker program in JTPA, displaced homemakers are defined as... with Dependent Children (AFDC) as well as those who had been dependent on the income of another...

  9. Unloading behavior of dislocations emitted from a crack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Rui-Huan; Li, J. C. M.

    1985-12-01

    Upon unloading, dislocations emitted from a crack can be retracted partially (stationary crack with lattice friction for dislocation motion) or completely (moving crack or zero friction for dislocation motion). The behavior of the plastic zone, the dislocation distribution, and the dislocation-free zone during the retraction process are studied by computer simulation. A propagating crack always moves forward upon unloading until all the dislocations are retracted. Its speed could be much faster during retraction than during the emission of dislocations. The rate of dislocation retraction or crack motion is slow in the beginning but then suddenly the crack jumps forward to retract all the rest of dislocations. This incubation period before the sudden crack surge seems to depend on the size of the dislocation-free zone.

  10. The relationship between strain geometry and geometrically necessary dislocations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Lars; Wallis, David

    2016-04-01

    The kinematics of past deformations are often a primary goal in structural analyses of strained rocks. Details of the strain geometry, in particular, can help distinguish hypotheses about large-scale tectonic phenomena. Microstructural indicators of strain geometry have been heavily utilized to investigate large-scale kinematics. However, many of the existing techniques require structures for which the initial morphology is known, and those structures must undergo the same deformation as imposed macroscopically. Many deformed rocks do not exhibit such convenient features, and therefore the strain geometry is often difficult (if not impossible) to ascertain. Alternatively, crystallographic textures contain information about the strain geometry, but the influence of strain geometry can be difficult to separate from other environmental factors that might affect slip system activity and therefore the textural evolution. Here we explore the ability for geometrically necessary dislocations to record information about the deformation geometry. It is well known that crystallographic slip due to the motion of dislocations yields macroscopic plastic strain, and the mathematics are established to relate dislocation glide on multiple slip systems to the strain tensor of a crystal. This theoretical description generally assumes that dislocations propagate across the entire crystal. However, at any point during the deformation, dislocations are present that have not fully transected the crystal, existing either as free dislocations or as dislocations organized into substructures like subgrain boundaries. These dislocations can remain in the lattice after deformation if the crystal is quenched sufficiently fast, and we hypothesize that this residual dislocation population can be linked to the plastic strain geometry in a quantitative manner. To test this hypothesis, we use high-resolution electron backscatter diffraction to measure lattice curvatures in experimentally deformed

  11. Micro-plasticity and intermittent dislocation activity in a simplified micro-structural model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derlet, P. M.; Maaß, R.

    2013-04-01

    Here we present a model to study the micro-plastic regime of a stress-strain curve. In this model an explicit dislocation population represents the mobile dislocation content and an internal shear-stress field represents a mean-field description of the immobile dislocation content. The mobile dislocations are constrained to a simple dipolar mat geometry and modelled via a dislocation dynamics (DD) algorithm, whilst the shear-stress field is chosen to be a sinusoidal function of distance along the mat direction. The sinusoidal function, defined by a periodic length and a shear-stress amplitude, is interpreted to represent a pre-existing micro-structure. These model parameters, along with the mobile dislocation density, are found to admit a diversity of micro-plastic behaviour involving intermittent plasticity in the form of a scale-free avalanche phenomenon, with an exponent and scaling-collapse for the strain-burst magnitude distribution that is in agreement with mean-field theory and similar to that seen in experiment and more complex DD simulations.

  12. Brain activity accompanying perception of implied motion in abstract paintings.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chai-Youn; Blake, Randolph

    2007-01-01

    Early 20th century artists including Duchamp and Balla tried to portray moving objects on a static canvas by superimposing objects in successive portrayals of an action. We investigated whether implied motion in those paintings is associated with activation of motion-sensitive area MT+. In Experiment 1, we found that observers rated these kinds of paintings higher in portraying motion than they did other abstract paintings in which motion is not intended. We also found that observers who had previously experienced abstract paintings with implied motion tended to give higher motion ratings to that class of paintings. In Experiment 2, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to measure brain activity of observers while viewing abstract paintings receiving the highest and the lowest motion rating scores in Experiment 1. We found MT+, but not primary visual cortex (V1), showed greater BOLD responses to abstract paintings with implied motion than to abstract paintings with little motion impression, but only in observers with prior experience viewing those kinds of paintings. These results imply that the neural machinery ordinarily engaged during perception of real visual motion is activated when people view paintings explicitly designed to convey a sense of visual motion. Experience, however, is necessary to achieve this sense of motion.

  13. The Dislocation Mechanism of Stress Corrosion Embrittlement in Ti-6Al-2Sn-4Zr-6Mo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, Tamara P.; Vorontsov, Vassili A.; Sankaran, Ananthi; Rugg, David; Lindley, Trevor C.; Dye, David

    2016-01-01

    An observation of the dislocation mechanisms operating below a naturally initiated hot-salt stress corrosion crack is presented, suggesting how hydrogen may contribute to embrittlement. The observations are consistent with the hydrogen-enhanced localized plasticity mechanism. Dislocation activity has been investigated through post-mortem examination of thin foils prepared by focused ion beam milling, lifted directly from the fracture surface. The results are in agreement with the existing studies, suggesting that hydrogen enhances dislocation motion. It is found that the presence of hydrogen in (solid) solution results in dislocation motion on slip systems that would not normally be expected to be active. A rationale is presented regarding the interplay of dislocation density and the hydrogen diffusion length.

  14. Kinematic assumptions and their consequences on the structure of field equations in continuum dislocation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silbermann, C. B.; Ihlemann, J.

    2016-03-01

    Continuum Dislocation Theory (CDT) relates gradients of plastic deformation in crystals with the presence of geometrically necessary dislocations. Therefore, the dislocation tensor is introduced as an additional thermodynamic state variable which reflects tensorial properties of dislocation ensembles. Moreover, the CDT captures both the strain energy from the macroscopic deformation of the crystal and the elastic energy of the dislocation network, as well as the dissipation of energy due to dislocation motion. The present contribution deals with the geometrically linear CDT. More precise, the focus is on the role of dislocation kinematics for single and multi-slip and its consequences on the field equations. Thereby, the number of active slip systems plays a crucial role since it restricts the degrees of freedom of plastic deformation. Special attention is put on the definition of proper, well-defined invariants of the dislocation tensor in order to avoid any spurious dependence of the resulting field equations on the coordinate system. It is shown how a slip system based approach can be in accordance with the tensor nature of the involved quantities. At first, only dislocation glide in one active slip system of the crystal is allowed. Then, the special case of two orthogonal (interacting) slip systems is considered and the governing field equations are presented. In addition, the structure and symmetry of the backstress tensor is investigated from the viewpoint of thermodynamical consistency. The results will again be used in order to facilitate the set of field equations and to prepare for a robust numerical implementation.

  15. Acute traumatic patellar dislocation.

    PubMed

    Duthon, V B

    2015-02-01

    Inaugural traumatic patellar dislocation is most often due to trauma sustained during physical or sports activity. Two-thirds of acute patellar dislocations occur in young active patients (less than 20 years old). Non-contact knee sprain in flexion and valgus is the leading mechanism in patellar dislocation, accounting for as many as 93% of all cases. The strong displacement of the patella tears the medial stabilizing structures, and notably the medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL), which is almost always injured in acute patellar dislocation, most frequently at its femoral attachment. Lateral patellar glide can be assessed with the knee in extension or 20° flexion. Displacement by more than 50% of the patellar width is considered abnormal and may induce apprehension. Plain X-ray and CT are mandatory to diagnose bony risk factors for patellar dislocation, such as trochlear dysplasia or increased tibial tubercle-trochlear groove distance (TT-TG), and plan correction. MRI gives information on cartilage and capsulo-ligamentous status for treatment planning: free bodies or osteochondral fracture have to be treated surgically. If patellar dislocation occurs in an anatomically normal knee and osteochondral fracture is ruled out on MRI, non-operative treatment is usually recommended.

  16. Using Kinesthetic Activities to Teach Ptolemaic and Copernican Retrograde Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, Ted

    2012-06-01

    This paper describes a method for teaching planetary retrograde motion, and the Ptolemaic and Copernican accounts of retrograde motion, by means of a series kinesthetic learning activities (KLAs). In the KLAs described, the students literally walk through the motions of the planets in both systems. A retrospective statistical analysis shows that students who participated in these activities performed better on examination questions pertaining to retrograde motion than students who did not. Potential explanations for this result, including the breaking of classroom routine, the effect of body movement on conceptual memory, and egocentric spatial proprioception, are considered.

  17. People can understand descriptions of motion without activating visual motion brain regions

    PubMed Central

    Dravida, Swethasri; Saxe, Rebecca; Bedny, Marina

    2013-01-01

    What is the relationship between our perceptual and linguistic neural representations of the same event? We approached this question by asking whether visual perception of motion and understanding linguistic depictions of motion rely on the same neural architecture. The same group of participants took part in two language tasks and one visual task. In task 1, participants made semantic similarity judgments with high motion (e.g., “to bounce”) and low motion (e.g., “to look”) words. In task 2, participants made plausibility judgments for passages describing movement (“A centaur hurled a spear … ”) or cognitive events (“A gentleman loved cheese …”). Task 3 was a visual motion localizer in which participants viewed animations of point-light walkers, randomly moving dots, and stationary dots changing in luminance. Based on the visual motion localizer we identified classic visual motion areas of the temporal (MT/MST and STS) and parietal cortex (inferior and superior parietal lobules). We find that these visual cortical areas are largely distinct from neural responses to linguistic depictions of motion. Motion words did not activate any part of the visual motion system. Motion passages produced a small response in the right superior parietal lobule, but none of the temporal motion regions. These results suggest that (1) as compared to words, rich language stimuli such as passages are more likely to evoke mental imagery and more likely to affect perceptual circuits and (2) effects of language on the visual system are more likely in secondary perceptual areas as compared to early sensory areas. We conclude that language and visual perception constitute distinct but interacting systems. PMID:24009592

  18. Uses of motion imagery in activity-based intelligence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lash, Thomas D.

    2013-05-01

    Activity-Based Intelligence (ABI) was defined by the Office of the Undersecretary of Defense for Intelligence as "a discipline of intelligence where the analysis and subsequent collection is focused on activity and transactions associated with an entity, population, or area of interest." ABI is inherently multi-INT, and motion imagery is a rich data source for ABI analysis. Motion imagery provides a unique temporal aspect which is critical for activity detection and classification. Additionally, motion imagery tends to have high spatial oversampling useful for determining activities and patterns above the noise threshold.

  19. Disorder-order transformation and significant dislocation motion cooperating with a surprisingly large hysteretic magnetic transition in a nickel-bisdithiolene spin system.

    PubMed

    Duan, Hai-Bao; Chen, Xuan-Rong; Yang, Hao; Ren, Xiao-Ming; Xuan, Fang; Zhou, Shi-Ming

    2013-04-01

    The compound [4'-CF3bzPy][Ni(mnt)2] (1) (where 4'-CF3bzPy = 1-(4'-(trifluoromethyl)benzyl)pyridinium and mnt(2-) = maleonitriledithiolate) was synthesized and displays a magnetic bistability with a surprisingly large thermal hysteresis loop (~49 K). X-ray crystallographic studies reveal that in the high-temperature (HT) phase the anions and cations form mixed stacks, with alternating anion dimers (AA) and cation dimers (CC) in an ...AACCAACC... fashion along the crystallographic a + b direction, and disordered CF3 groups in the cations are aligned into a molecular layer parallel to the crystallographic (001) plane. However, in the low-temperature (LT) phase, the c-axis length of the unit cell is roughly doubled, and the asymmetric unit switches from one [4'-CF3bzPy][Ni(mnt)2] pair in the HT phase to two [4'-CF3bzPy][Ni(mnt)2] pairs. Most interestingly, the CF3 group in the cations becomes ordered, and the conformation of one of two crystallographically different cations changes significantly. A dislocation motion between the neighboring molecular layers emerges as well. The analyses of the magnetic susceptibilities and the density functional theory calculations suggest that the antiferromagnetic exchange interaction within one of two types of [Ni(mnt)2]2(2-) dimers in the LT phase is much stronger than that within the [Ni(mnt)2]2(2-) dimer in the HT phase. The lattice reorganization during this phase transition is proposed to be responsible for the wide thermal hysteresis loop.

  20. Determination of the activation enthalpy for migration of dislocations in plastically deformed 8006 Al-alloy by positron annihilation lifetime technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salah, Mohammed; Abdel-Rahman, M.; Badawi, Emad A.; Abdel-Rahman, M. A.

    2016-06-01

    The activation enthalpy for migration of dislocations of plastically deformed 8006 Al-alloy was investigated by positron annihilation lifetime technique. Plastic deformation using a hydraulic press produces mainly dislocations and may produce point defects. The type of defect was studied by isochronal annealing which determines the temperature range of recovery of each type. Only one type of defect (dislocations) was observed for the investigated sample and was found to be recovered within the range 455-700 K. Isothermal annealing by slow cooling was performed through this range and used in determination of the activation enthalpy of migration of dislocations which was found to be 0.26 ± 0.01 eV.

  1. Multiscale modeling of dislocation-precipitate interactions in Fe: From molecular dynamics to discrete dislocations.

    PubMed

    Lehtinen, Arttu; Granberg, Fredric; Laurson, Lasse; Nordlund, Kai; Alava, Mikko J

    2016-01-01

    The stress-driven motion of dislocations in crystalline solids, and thus the ensuing plastic deformation process, is greatly influenced by the presence or absence of various pointlike defects such as precipitates or solute atoms. These defects act as obstacles for dislocation motion and hence affect the mechanical properties of the material. Here we combine molecular dynamics studies with three-dimensional discrete dislocation dynamics simulations in order to model the interaction between different kinds of precipitates and a 1/2〈111〉{110} edge dislocation in BCC iron. We have implemented immobile spherical precipitates into the ParaDis discrete dislocation dynamics code, with the dislocations interacting with the precipitates via a Gaussian potential, generating a normal force acting on the dislocation segments. The parameters used in the discrete dislocation dynamics simulations for the precipitate potential, the dislocation mobility, shear modulus, and dislocation core energy are obtained from molecular dynamics simulations. We compare the critical stresses needed to unpin the dislocation from the precipitate in molecular dynamics and discrete dislocation dynamics simulations in order to fit the two methods together and discuss the variety of the relevant pinning and depinning mechanisms. PMID:26871192

  2. Perilunar carpal dislocations treatment outcome.

    PubMed

    Gagała, Jacek; Tarczyńska, Marta; Kosior, Piotr

    2006-06-30

    Background. The aim of the study was to analyze late outcomes of perilunar carpal dislocations, depending on the type of the injury, time of the diagnosis and the treatment methods. Material and methods. The material is constituted by 37 patients treated in our department between 1981-2004 because of perilunar dislocation. In group were 2 women and 35 men, aged 19-56 (mean 31 years). All patients were asked for control visit. DASH and Mayo score were used to evaluate the outcome. Range of wrist motion, its stability, grip strength and X-ray pictures were analyzed. Results. Better follow-up results were observed in persons with early diagnosed dislocations of the wrist. The best outcomes were observed in group with perilunar early diagnosed dislocations, which were treated by open reduction. Posttraumatic wrist instability often was diagnosed in patients with dislocation of lunar bone and late-diagnosed transscaphoid perilunar carpal dislocations. Conclusions. The data we obtained show, that the consequences of late-diagnosed and late-treated injuries of the wrist are instability, pain, decrease in range of motion and hand skills. PMID:17592406

  3. Abdominal muscle activation changes if the purpose is to control pelvis motion or thorax motion.

    PubMed

    Vera-Garcia, Francisco J; Moreside, Janice M; McGill, Stuart M

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this study was to compare trunk muscular recruitment and lumbar spine kinematics when motion was constrained to either the thorax or the pelvis. Nine healthy women performed four upright standing planar movements (rotations, anterior-posterior translations, medial-lateral translations, and horizontal circles) while constraining pelvis motion and moving the thorax or moving the pelvis while minimizing thorax motion, and four isometric trunk exercises (conventional curl-up, reverse curl-up, cross curl-up, and reverse cross curl-up). Surface EMG (upper and lower rectus abdominis, lateral and medial aspects of external oblique, internal oblique, and latissimus dorsi) and 3D lumbar displacements were recorded. Pelvis movements produced higher EMG amplitudes of the oblique abdominals than thorax motions in most trials, and larger lumbar displacements in the medial-lateral translations and horizontal circles. Conversely, thorax movements produced larger rotational lumbar displacement than pelvis motions during rotations and higher EMG amplitudes for latissimus dorsi during rotations and anterior-posterior translations and for lower rectus abdominis during the crossed curl-ups. Thus, different neuromuscular compartments appear when the objective changes from pelvis to thorax motion. This would suggest that both movement patterns should be considered when planning spine stabilization programs, to optimize exercises for the movement and muscle activations desired.

  4. Synergistic effects on dislocation loops in reduced-activation martensitic steel investigated by single and sequential hydrogen/helium ion irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Weiping; Luo, Fengfeng; Yu, Yanxia; Zheng, Zhongcheng; Shen, Zhenyu; Guo, Liping; Ren, Yaoyao; Suo, Jinping

    2016-10-01

    Single-beam and sequential-beam irradiations were performed to investigate the H/He synergistic effect on dislocation loops in reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steels. The irradiations were carried out with 10 keV H+, 18 keV He+ and 160 keV Ar+, alone and in combination at 723 K. He+ single-beam irradiation induced much larger dislocation loops than that induced by both H+ and Ar+ single-beam irradiation. H+ post-irradiation after He+ irradiation further increased the size of dislocation loops, whilst He+ post-irradiation or Ar+ post-irradiation following H+ irradiation only slightly increased the size of dislocation loops. The experiment results indicate that pre-implanted H+ can drastically inhibit the growth while post-implanted H+ can significantly enhance the growth of dislocation loops induced by He+ irradiation. The mechanisms behind the complex synergistic phenomena between H and He and the different roles that H and He played in the growth of dislocation loops are discussed.

  5. Wavelet-based motion artifact removal for electrodermal activity.

    PubMed

    Chen, Weixuan; Jaques, Natasha; Taylor, Sara; Sano, Akane; Fedor, Szymon; Picard, Rosalind W

    2015-01-01

    Electrodermal activity (EDA) recording is a powerful, widely used tool for monitoring psychological or physiological arousal. However, analysis of EDA is hampered by its sensitivity to motion artifacts. We propose a method for removing motion artifacts from EDA, measured as skin conductance (SC), using a stationary wavelet transform (SWT). We modeled the wavelet coefficients as a Gaussian mixture distribution corresponding to the underlying skin conductance level (SCL) and skin conductance responses (SCRs). The goodness-of-fit of the model was validated on ambulatory SC data. We evaluated the proposed method in comparison with three previous approaches. Our method achieved a greater reduction of artifacts while retaining motion-artifact-free data.

  6. Video summarization using descriptors of motion activity: a motion activity based approach to key-frame extraction from video shots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Divakaran, Ajay; Radhakrishnan, Regunathan; Peker, Kadir A.

    2001-10-01

    We describe a video summarization technique that uses motion descriptors computed in the compressed domain. It can either speed up conventional color-based video summarization techniques, or rapidly generate a key-frame based summary by itself. The basic hypothesis of the work is that the intensity of motion activity of a video segment is a direct indication of its `summarizability,' which we experimentally verify using the MPEG-7 motion activity descriptor and the fidelity measure proposed in H. S. Chang, S. Sull, and S. U. Lee, `Efficient video indexing scheme for content-based retrieval,' IEEE Trans. Circuits Syst. Video Technol. 9(8), (1999). Note that the compressed domain extraction of motion activity intensity is much simpler than the color-based calculations. We are thus able to quickly identify easy to summarize segments of a video sequence since they have a low intensity of motion activity. We are able to easily summarize these segments by simply choosing their first frames. We can then apply conventional color-based summarization techniques to the remaining segments. We thus speed up color-based summarization by reducing the number of segments processed. Our results also motivate a simple and novel key-frame extraction technique that relies on a motion activity based nonuniform sampling of the frames. Our results indicate that it can either be used by itself or to speed up color-based techniques as explained earlier.

  7. Enabling Strain Hardening Simulations with Dislocation Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Arsenlis, A; Cai, W

    2006-12-20

    Numerical algorithms for discrete dislocation dynamics simulations are investigated for the purpose of enabling strain hardening simulations of single crystals on massively parallel computers. The algorithms investigated include the /(N) calculation of forces, the equations of motion, time integration, adaptive mesh refinement, the treatment of dislocation core reactions, and the dynamic distribution of work on parallel computers. A simulation integrating all of these algorithmic elements using the Parallel Dislocation Simulator (ParaDiS) code is performed to understand their behavior in concert, and evaluate the overall numerical performance of dislocation dynamics simulations and their ability to accumulate percents of plastic strain.

  8. Active motion, communicative aggregations, and the spatial closure of Umwelt.

    PubMed

    Kull, K

    2000-01-01

    On the basis of a simple model of movable organisms that are supplied by semiotic force of attraction or repulsion, several general features of spatial behavior are demonstrated: (1) the stochastic spatial distribution of actively moving organisms is unstable; (2) simple or complex aggregations of organisms appear as a result of active motion; and (3) the ability for active motion ties the organisms with place. These results show that models that apply an internalist approach can considerably simplify the theory of spatial behavior of organic systems. Explanations based on the effects of Darwinian fitness may not be necessary for understanding the origin of biological aggregations.

  9. Dislocation characterization in cold rolled stainless steel using nonlinear ultrasonic techniques: A comprehensive model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jianfeng; Xuan, Fu-zhen; Xiang, Yanxun

    2013-09-01

    Both dislocation density and character in cold rolled stainless steel cause the change of acoustic nonlinearity. An analytical model considering the different oscillating motion of edge and screw dislocations is presented for the generation of ultrasonic harmonic wave during the process of multiplication and motion of dislocation. Results reveal that the edge dislocation induces stronger acoustic nonlinearity response than screw dislocation. The new model is certified by the application to the cold rolled stainless steel.

  10. Mobility Laws in Dislocation Dynamics Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, W; Bulatov, V V

    2003-10-21

    Prediction of the plastic deformation behavior of single crystals based on the collective dynamics of dislocations has been a challenge for computational materials science for a number of years. The difficulty lies in the inability of existing dislocation dynamics (DD) codes to handle a sufficiently large number of dislocation lines, to establish a statistically representative model of crystal plasticity. A new massively-parallel DD code is developed that is capable of modeling million-dislocation systems by employing thousands of processors. We discuss an important ingredient of this code--the mobility laws dictating the behavior of individual dislocations. They are materials input for DD simulations and are constructed based on the understanding of dislocation motion at the atomistic level.

  11. Dislocation patterning in a two-dimensional continuum theory of dislocations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groma, István; Zaiser, Michael; Ispánovity, Péter Dusán

    2016-06-01

    Understanding the spontaneous emergence of dislocation patterns during plastic deformation is a long standing challenge in dislocation theory. During the past decades several phenomenological continuum models of dislocation patterning were proposed, but few of them (if any) are derived from microscopic considerations through systematic and controlled averaging procedures. In this paper we present a two-dimensional continuum theory that is obtained by systematic averaging of the equations of motion of discrete dislocations. It is shown that in the evolution equations of the dislocation densities diffusionlike terms neglected in earlier considerations play a crucial role in the length scale selection of the dislocation density fluctuations. It is also shown that the formulated continuum theory can be derived from an averaged energy functional using the framework of phase field theories. However, in order to account for the flow stress one has in that case to introduce a nontrivial dislocation mobility function, which proves to be crucial for the instability leading to patterning.

  12. Density of dislocations in CdHgTe heteroepitaxial structures on GaAs(013) and Si(013) substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidorov, Yu. G.; Yakushev, M. V.; Varavin, V. S.; Kolesnikov, A. V.; Trukhanov, E. M.; Sabinina, I. V.; Loshkarev, I. D.

    2015-11-01

    Epitaxial layers of Cd x Hg1- x Te (MCT) on GaAs(013) and Si(013) substrates were grown by molecular beam epitaxy. The introduction of ZnTe and CdTe intermediate layers into the structures made it possible to retain the orientation close to that of the substrate in MCT epitaxial layers despite the large mismatch between the lattice parameters. The structures were investigated using X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. The dislocation families predominantly removing the mismatch between the lattice parameters were found. Transmission electron microscopy revealed Γ-shaped misfit dislocations (MDs), which facilitated the annihilation of threading dislocations. The angles of rotation of the lattice due to the formation of networks of misfit dislocations were measured. It was shown that the density of threading dislocations in the active region of photodiodes is primarily determined by the network of misfit dislocations formed in the MCT/CdTe heterojunction. A decrease in the density of threading dislocations in the MCT film was achieved by cyclic annealing under conditions of the maximally facilitated nonconservative motion of dislocations. The dislocation density was determined from the etch pits.

  13. Bipolar dislocation of the clavicle.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wei; Gao, Shu-Guang; Li, Yu-Sheng; Lei, Guang-Hua

    2012-11-01

    Bipolar dislocation of the clavicle at acromioclavicular and sternoclavicular joint is an uncommon traumatic injury. The conservative treatments adopted in the past is associated with redislocation dysfunction and deformity. A 41 years old lady with bipolar dislocation of right shoulder is treated surgically by open reduction and internal fixation by oblique T-plate at sternoclavicular joint and Kirschner wire stabilization at acromioclavicular joint. The patient showed satisfactory recovery with full range of motion of the right shoulder and normal muscular strength. The case reported in view of rarity and at 2 years followup. PMID:23325981

  14. [Post-traumatic bipolar dislocation of the clavicle: is operative treatment reasonable?].

    PubMed

    Dudda, M; Kruppa, C; Schildhauer, T A

    2013-02-01

    Bipolar dislocation of the clavicle ("floating clavicle") is extremely rare. It exists no standardised treatment for this trauma and the treatment is often conservative. This is mainly an anterior displacement of the sternoclavicular joint (type III according to Allman) and a posterior dislocation of the acromioclavicular joint (type IV according to Rockwood).We report on a 60 year old male who fell onto the right shoulder. He sustained a 'floating clavicle' and had a massive dislocation, impairment of range of motion and pain. Venous congestion was observable. We stabilised the dislocated acromioclavicular joint with a Balser's plate, the sternoclavicular joint was fixed with PDS cord tension band technique around the first rip and the sternum. In addition we resected the anterior part of the distal clavicle to get a better cosmetic result. Post-operatively the patient had an excellent range of motion without any further symptoms after six weeks and one year. Venous congestion was not more observable.In most of the cases dislocations of both ends of the clavicle are treated conservatively. We recommend an operative treatment especially in young and active patients to avoid re-dislocation and to archive better cosmetic results. PMID:22367519

  15. Dynamics of discrete screw dislocations on glide directions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alicandro, R.; De Luca, L.; Garroni, A.; Ponsiglione, M.

    2016-07-01

    We consider a simple discrete model for screw dislocations in crystals. Using a variational discrete scheme we study the motion of a configuration of dislocations toward low energy configurations. We deduce an effective fully overdamped dynamics that follows the maximal dissipation criterion introduced in Cermelli and Gurtin (1999) and predicts motion along the glide directions of the crystal.

  16. Experimental Deformation of Olivine Single Crystal at Mantle P and T: Pressure Effect on Olivine Dislocation Slip-System Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, R.; Girard, J.; Chen, J.; Amiguet, E.

    2008-12-01

    Seismic velocity anisotropies observed in the upper mantle are interpreted from lattice preferred orientations (LPO) produced experimentally in olivine, which depends on the dominant dislocation slip systems. At low pressure P<3 GPa, mantle temperature (T) and in dry conditions, olivine [100] dislocation slip dominates the less active [001] slip. This tends to align crystal fast velocity [100] axis with the principal shear direction. Yet recent high-pressure deformation experiments (Couvy et al., 2004, EJM, 16, 877; Raterron et al., 2007, Am. Min., 92, 1436; Raterron et al., 2008, Phys. Earth Planet. Int., doi:10.1016/j.pepi.2008.07.026) show that [001](010) slip system dominates [100](010) system in the (P,T) range of the deep upper mantle. This may promote a shear-parallel slow-velocity [001] axis and may explain the seismic-velocity attenuation observed at depth >200 km (Mainprice et al., 2005, Nature, 433, 731). In order to further constrain the effect of P on olivine slip system activities, which is classically quantified by the activation volume V* in power creep laws, deformation experiments were carried out in poor water condition, at P>5 GPa and T=1400°C, on pure forsterite (Fo100) and San Carlos olivine crystals, using the Deformation-DIA apparatus at the X17B2 beamline of the NSLS (Upton, NY). Ten crystals were oriented in order to active either [100] slip alone or [001] slip alone in (010) plane, or both [100](001) and [001](100) systems together. Constant applied stress σ <300 MPa and specimen strain rates were monitored in situ using time-resolved x-ray diffraction and radiography, respectively, for a total of 27 investigated steady state conditions. The obtained rheological data were compared with data previously obtained in comparable T and σ conditions, but at room P, by Darot and Gueguen (1981, JGR, 86, 6219) for Fo100 and by Bai et al. (1991, JGR, 96, 2441) for San Carlos olivine. This new set of data confirms previous deformation data

  17. Dislocation Strengthening without Ductility Trade-off in Metastable Austenitic Steels

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jiabin; Jin, Yongbin; Fang, Xiaoyang; Chen, Chenxu; Feng, Qiong; Liu, Xiaowei; Chen, Yuzeng; Suo, Tao; Zhao, Feng; Huang, Tianlin; Wang, Hongtao; Wang, Xi; Fang, Youtong; Wei, Yujie; Meng, Liang; Lu, Jian; Yang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Strength and ductility are mutually exclusive if they are manifested as consequence of the coupling between strengthening and toughening mechanisms. One notable example is dislocation strengthening in metals, which invariably leads to reduced ductility. However, this trend is averted in metastable austenitic steels. A one-step thermal mechanical treatment (TMT), i.e. hot rolling, can effectively enhance the yielding strength of the metastable austenitic steel from 322 ± 18 MPa to 675 ± 15 MPa, while retaining both the formability and hardenability. It is noted that no boundaries are introduced in the optimized TMT process and all strengthening effect originates from dislocations with inherited thermal stability. The success of this method relies on the decoupled strengthening and toughening mechanisms in metastable austenitic steels, in which yield strength is controlled by initial dislocation density while ductility is retained by the capability to nucleate new dislocations to carry plastic deformation. Especially, the simplicity in processing enables scaling and industrial applications to meet the challenging requirements of emissions reduction. On the other hand, the complexity in the underlying mechanism of dislocation strengthening in this case may shed light on a different route of material strengthening by stimulating dislocation activities, rather than impeding motion of dislocations. PMID:27739481

  18. Cross-Split of Dislocations: An Athermal and Rapid Plasticity Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Kositski, Roman; Kovalenko, Oleg; Lee, Seok-Woo; Greer, Julia R.; Rabkin, Eugen; Mordehai, Dan

    2016-01-01

    The pathways by which dislocations, line defects within the lattice structure, overcome microstructural obstacles represent a key aspect in understanding the main mechanisms that control mechanical properties of ductile crystalline materials. While edge dislocations were believed to change their glide plane only by a slow, non-conservative, thermally activated motion, we suggest the existence of a rapid conservative athermal mechanism, by which the arrested edge dislocations split into two other edge dislocations that glide on two different crystallographic planes. This discovered mechanism, for which we coined a term “cross-split of edge dislocations”, is a unique and collective phenomenon, which is triggered by an interaction with another same-sign pre-existing edge dislocation. This mechanism is demonstrated for faceted α-Fe nanoparticles under compression, in which we propose that cross-split of arrested edge dislocations is resulting in a strain burst. The cross-split mechanism provides an efficient pathway for edge dislocations to overcome planar obstacles. PMID:27185327

  19. Dislocation Strengthening without Ductility Trade-off in Metastable Austenitic Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jiabin; Jin, Yongbin; Fang, Xiaoyang; Chen, Chenxu; Feng, Qiong; Liu, Xiaowei; Chen, Yuzeng; Suo, Tao; Zhao, Feng; Huang, Tianlin; Wang, Hongtao; Wang, Xi; Fang, Youtong; Wei, Yujie; Meng, Liang; Lu, Jian; Yang, Wei

    2016-10-01

    Strength and ductility are mutually exclusive if they are manifested as consequence of the coupling between strengthening and toughening mechanisms. One notable example is dislocation strengthening in metals, which invariably leads to reduced ductility. However, this trend is averted in metastable austenitic steels. A one-step thermal mechanical treatment (TMT), i.e. hot rolling, can effectively enhance the yielding strength of the metastable austenitic steel from 322 ± 18 MPa to 675 ± 15 MPa, while retaining both the formability and hardenability. It is noted that no boundaries are introduced in the optimized TMT process and all strengthening effect originates from dislocations with inherited thermal stability. The success of this method relies on the decoupled strengthening and toughening mechanisms in metastable austenitic steels, in which yield strength is controlled by initial dislocation density while ductility is retained by the capability to nucleate new dislocations to carry plastic deformation. Especially, the simplicity in processing enables scaling and industrial applications to meet the challenging requirements of emissions reduction. On the other hand, the complexity in the underlying mechanism of dislocation strengthening in this case may shed light on a different route of material strengthening by stimulating dislocation activities, rather than impeding motion of dislocations.

  20. Cross-Split of Dislocations: An Athermal and Rapid Plasticity Mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kositski, Roman; Kovalenko, Oleg; Lee, Seok-Woo; Greer, Julia R.; Rabkin, Eugen; Mordehai, Dan

    2016-05-01

    The pathways by which dislocations, line defects within the lattice structure, overcome microstructural obstacles represent a key aspect in understanding the main mechanisms that control mechanical properties of ductile crystalline materials. While edge dislocations were believed to change their glide plane only by a slow, non-conservative, thermally activated motion, we suggest the existence of a rapid conservative athermal mechanism, by which the arrested edge dislocations split into two other edge dislocations that glide on two different crystallographic planes. This discovered mechanism, for which we coined a term “cross-split of edge dislocations”, is a unique and collective phenomenon, which is triggered by an interaction with another same-sign pre-existing edge dislocation. This mechanism is demonstrated for faceted α-Fe nanoparticles under compression, in which we propose that cross-split of arrested edge dislocations is resulting in a strain burst. The cross-split mechanism provides an efficient pathway for edge dislocations to overcome planar obstacles.

  1. Contribution of complex stapes motion to cochlea activation.

    PubMed

    Eiber, Albrecht; Huber, Alexander M; Lauxmann, Michael; Chatzimichalis, Michail; Sequeira, Damien; Sim, Jae Hoon

    2012-02-01

    Classic theories of hearing have considered only a translational component (piston-like component) of the stapes motion as being the effective stimulus for cochlear activation and thus the sensation of hearing. Our previous study (Huber et al., 2008) qualitatively showed that rotational components around the long and short axes of the footplate (rocking-like components) lead to cochlear activation as well. In this study, the contribution of the piston-like and rocking-like components of the stapes motion to cochlea activation was quantitatively investigated with measurements in live guinea pigs and a related mathematical description. The isolated stapes in anesthetized guinea pigs was stimulated by a three-axis piezoelectric actuator, and 3-D motions of the stapes and compound action potential (CAP) of the cochlea were measured simultaneously. The measured values were used to fit a hypothesis of the CAP as a linear combination of the logarithms of the piston-like and rocking-like components. Both the piston-like and rocking-like components activate cochlear responses when they exceed certain thresholds. These thresholds as well as the relation between CAP and intensity of the motion component were different for piston-like and rocking-like components. The threshold was found to be higher and the sensitivity lower for the rocking-like component than the corresponding values for the piston-like component. The influence of the rocking-like component was secondary in cases of piston-dominant motions of the stapes although it may become significant for low amplitudes of the piston-like component.

  2. Analysis of dislocation pile-ups using a dislocation-based continuum theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, K.; Dickel, D.; Schmitt, S.; Sandfeld, S.; Weygand, D.; Gumbsch, P.

    2014-03-01

    The increasing demand for materials with well-defined microstructure, accompanied by the advancing miniaturization of devices, is the reason for the growing interest in physically motivated, dislocation-based continuum theories of plasticity. In recent years, various advanced continuum theories have been introduced, which are able to described the motion of straight and curved dislocation lines. The focus of this paper is the question of how to include fundamental properties of discrete dislocations during their motion and interaction in a continuum dislocation dynamics (CDD) theory. In our CDD model, we obtain elastic interaction stresses for the bundles of dislocations by a mean-field stress, which represents long-range stress components, and a short range corrective stress component, which represents the gradients of the local dislocation density. The attracting and repelling behavior of bundles of straight dislocations of the same and opposite sign are analyzed. Furthermore, considering different dislocation pile-up systems, we show that the CDD formulation can solve various fundamental problems of micro-plasticity. To obtain a mesh size independent formulation (which is a prerequisite for further application of the theory to more complex situations), we propose a discretization dependent scaling of the short range interaction stress. CDD results are compared to analytical solutions and benchmark data obtained from discrete dislocation simulations.

  3. Plastic Deformation of Transition Zone Minerals: Effect of Temperature on Dislocation Mobility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritterbex, S.; Carrez, P.; Gouriet, K.; Cordier, P.

    2014-12-01

    Mantle convection is the fundamental process by which the Earth expels its internal heat. It is controlled at the microscopic scale by the motion of crystal defects responsable for plastic deformation at high temperature and pressure conditions of the deep Earth. In this study we focus on dislocations which are usually considered as the most efficient defects contributing to intracrystalline deformation. The influence of temperature is a key parameter in determining the behaviour of dislocations. We propose a model to describe the temperature-dependent mobility of dislocations based on a computational materials science approach, connecting the atomic to the grain scale. This provides elementary knowledge to both interpret seismic anisotropy and to improve geodynamic modelling. Here we focus on plastic deformation of the transition zone minerals wadsleyite and ringwoodite, dominating the boundary separating the upper from the lower mantle, a region over which the viscosity is thought to increase rapidly. Using the Peierls-Nabarro-Galerkin model enabled us to select potential glide planes, to predict the dislocation core structures and fundamental properties of both Mg2SiO4 high-pressure polymorphs integrating the non-elastic nature of dislocations from atomic scale based calculations. Macroscopic deformation results from the mobility of these distinct dislocations. High finite mantle temperatures activates unstable double-kink configurations on the dislocation line which allow the dislocation to move under stress. The original contribution of the present work is the formulation of a mobility law for dissociated dislocations as they occur in wadsleyite and ringwoodite. This permits us to predict the critical activation enthalpy required to overcome lattice friction associated to the onset of glide. From this, the effective glide velocities can be derived as a function of stress and temperature leading to the first lower bound estimates of transition zone viscosities

  4. Internal motions prime cIAP1 for rapid activation.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Aaron H; Schoeffler, Allyn J; Matsui, Tsutomu; Weiss, Thomas M; Blankenship, John W; Zobel, Kerry; Giannetti, Anthony M; Dueber, Erin C; Fairbrother, Wayne J

    2014-12-01

    Cellular inhibitor of apoptosis 1 (cIAP1) is a ubiquitin ligase with critical roles in the control of programmed cell death and NF-κB signaling. Under normal conditions, the protein exists as an autoinhibited monomer, but proapoptotic signals lead to its dimerization, activation and proteasomal degradation. This view of cIAP1 as a binary switch has been informed by static structural studies that cannot access the protein's dynamics. Here, we use NMR spectroscopy to study micro- and millisecond motions of specific domain interfaces in human cIAP1 and use time-resolved small-angle X-ray scattering to observe the global conformational changes necessary for activation. Although motions within each interface of the 'closed' monomer are insufficient to activate cIAP1, they enable associations with catalytic partners and activation factors. We propose that these internal motions facilitate rapid peptide-induced opening and dimerization of cIAP1, which undergoes a dramatic spring-loaded structural transition. PMID:25383668

  5. Active motion induced break-up of colloidal gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szakasits, Megan; Solomon, Michael

    2015-03-01

    We found that fractal gel networks of polystyrene colloids can be broken up by active motion of Janus colloids that have been incorporated into them. Janus particles were synthesized by electron beam deposition of platinum onto one micron carboxylate modified polystyrene particles. Through addition of the divalent salt magnesium chloride, an initially stable suspension of Janus and polystyrene colloids, present in equal proportion, underwent aggregation to yield a fractal gel. The Janus colloids were activated by addition of 30% v/v hydrogen peroxide through a porous hydrogel membrane. Changes in structure and dynamics were visualized by two channel confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). By means of image analysis, we calculated the mean squared displacement (MSD) and radial distribution function (RDF) for gel samples before and after addition of hydrogen peroxide. The MSD confirmed the Janus particles we synthesized undergo active motion. The RDF and cluster size distribution of gel samples before and after addition of peroxide demonstrate how active motion broke apart the gel network into smaller clusters.

  6. Motion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brand, Judith, Ed.

    2002-01-01

    This issue of Exploratorium Magazine focuses on the topic of motion. Contents include: (1) "First Word" (Zach Tobias); (2) "Cosmic Collisions" (Robert Irion); (3) "The Mobile Cell" (Karen E. Kalumuck); (4) "The Paths of Paths" (Steven Vogel); (5) "Fragments" (Pearl Tesler); (6) "Moving Pictures" (Amy Snyder); (7) "Plants on the Go" (Katharine…

  7. Hybrid magnetic mechanism for active locomotion based on inchworm motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sung Hoon; Hashi, Shuichiro; Ishiyama, Kazushi

    2013-02-01

    Magnetic robots have been studied in the past. Insect-type micro-robots are used in various biomedical applications; researchers have developed inchworm micro-robots for endoscopic use. A biological inchworm has a looping locomotion gait. However, most inchworm micro-robots depend on a general bending, or bellows, motion. In this paper, we introduce a new robotic mechanism using magnetic force and torque control in a rotating magnetic field for a looping gait. The proposed robot is controlled by the magnetic torque, attractive force, and body mechanisms (two stoppers, flexible body, and different frictional legs). The magnetic torque generates a general bending motion. In addition, the attractive force and body mechanisms produce the robot’s looping motion within a rotating magnetic field and without the use of an algorithm for field control. We verified the device’s performance and analyzed the motion through simulations and various experiments. The robot mechanism can be applied to active locomotion for various medical robots, such as wireless endoscopes.

  8. Molecular Dynamics Studies of Dislocations in CdTe Crystals from a New Bond Order Potential.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiaowang; Ward, Donald K; Wong, Bryan M; Doty, F Patrick; Zimmerman, Jonathan A

    2012-08-23

    Cd(1-x)Zn(x)Te (CZT) crystals are the leading semiconductors for radiation detection, but their application is limited by the high cost of detector-grade materials. High crystal costs primarily result from property nonuniformity that causes low manufacturing yield. Although tremendous efforts have been made in the past to reduce Te inclusions/precipitates in CZT, this has not resulted in an anticipated improvement in material property uniformity. Moreover, it is recognized that in addition to Te particles, dislocation cells can also cause electric field perturbations and the associated property nonuniformities. Further improvement of the material, therefore, requires that dislocations in CZT crystals be understood and controlled. Here, we use a recently developed CZT bond order potential to perform representative molecular dynamics simulations to study configurations, energies, and mobilities of 29 different types of possible dislocations in CdTe (i.e., x = 1) crystals. An efficient method to derive activation free energies and activation volumes of thermally activated dislocation motion will be explored. Our focus gives insight into understanding important dislocations in the material and gives guidance toward experimental efforts for improving dislocation network structures in CZT crystals.

  9. Evolution, Interaction, and Intrinsic Properties of Dislocations in Intermetallics: Anisotropic 3D Dislocation Dynamics Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Qian

    2008-01-01

    The generation, motion, and interaction of dislocations play key roles during the plastic deformation process of crystalline solids. 3D Dislocation Dynamics has been employed as a mesoscale simulation algorithm to investigate the collective and cooperative behavior of dislocations. Most current research on 3D Dislocation Dynamics is based on the solutions available in the framework of classical isotropic elasticity. However, due to some degree of elastic anisotropy in almost all crystalline solids, it is very necessary to extend 3D Dislocation Dynamics into anisotropic elasticity. In this study, first, the details of efficient and accurate incorporation of the fully anisotropic elasticity into 3D discrete Dislocation Dynamics by numerically evaluating the derivatives of Green's functions are described. Then the intrinsic properties of perfect dislocations, including their stability, their core properties and disassociation characteristics, in newly discovered rare earth-based intermetallics and in conventional intermetallics are investigated, within the framework of fully anisotropic elasticity supplemented with the atomistic information obtained from the ab initio calculations. Moreover, the evolution and interaction of dislocations in these intermetallics as well as the role of solute segregation are presented by utilizing fully anisotropic 3D dislocation dynamics. The results from this work clearly indicate the role and the importance of elastic anisotropy on the evolution of dislocation microstructures, the overall ductility and the hardening behavior in these systems.

  10. Motion Sensor Reactivity in Physically Active Young Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Behrens, Timothy K.; Dinger, Mary K.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine whether young adults changed their physical activity (PA) behavior when wearing motion sensors. PA patterns of 119 young adults (M age = 20.82 years, SD = 1.50, M body mass index = 23.93 kg/m[superscript 2] , SD = 4.05) were assessed during 2 consecutive weeks. In Week 1, participants wore an accelerometer.…

  11. Thermally activated depinning motion of contact lines in pseudopartial wetting.

    PubMed

    Du, Lingguo; Bodiguel, Hugues; Colin, Annie

    2014-07-01

    We investigate pressure-driven motion of liquid-liquid menisci in circular tubes, for systems in pseudopartial wetting conditions. The originality of this type of wetting lies in the coexistence of a macroscopic contact angle with a wetting liquid film covering the solid surface. Focusing on small capillary numbers, we report observations of an apparent contact angle hysteresis at first sight similar to the standard partial wetting case. However, this apparent hysteresis exhibits original features. We observe very long transient regimes before steady state, up to several hundreds of seconds. Furthermore, in steady state, the velocities are nonzero, meaning that the contact line is not strongly pinned to the surface defects, but are very small. The velocity of the contact line tends to vanish near the equilibrium contact angle. These observations are consistent with the thermally activated depinning theory that has been proposed to describe partial wetting systems on disordered substrates and suggest that a single physical mechanism controls both the hysteresis (or the pinning) and the motion of the contact line. The proposed analysis leads to the conclusion that the depinning activated energy is lower with pseudopartial wetting systems than with partial wetting ones, allowing the direct observation of the thermally activated motion of the contact line. PMID:25122310

  12. The dynamics of an edge dislocation in a ferromagnetic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dezhin, V. V.; Nechaev, V. N.

    2016-08-01

    The system of equations describing the bending vibrations of the dislocation in the ferromagnetic crystal is written. Elastic and magnetostrictive properties of the ferromagnetic crystals are considered isotropic. The linearization of the resulting system produced a relatively small contribution to the magnetization from the influence of dislocation. In the linear approximation of the dislocation displacement system of equation describing vibrations of a ferromagnetic crystal with an edge dislocation is obtained. The equation of motion of an edge dislocation in a ferromagnetic crystal is found.

  13. Motion Sensor Use for Physical Activity Data: Methodological Considerations

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, Margaret; Grey, Margaret

    2015-01-01

    Background Physical inactivity continues to be a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease, and only one half of adults in the United States meet physical activity (PA) goals. PA data are often collected for surveillance or for measuring change after an intervention. One of the challenges in PA research is quantifying exactly how much and what type of PA is taking place—especially because self-report instruments have inconsistent validity. Objective The purpose is to review the elements to consider when collecting PA data via motion sensors, including the difference between PA and exercise; type of data to collect; choosing the device; length of time to monitor PA; instructions to the participants; and interpretation of the data. Methods The current literature on motion sensor research was reviewed and synthesized to summarize relevant considerations when using a motion sensor to collect PA data. Results Exercise is a division of PA that is structured, planned, and repetitive. Pedometer data includes steps taken, and calculated distance and energy expenditure. Accelerometer data includes activity counts and intensity. The device chosen depends on desired data, cost, validity, and ease of use. Reactivity to the device may influence the duration of data collection. Instructions to participants may vary depending on purpose of the study. Experts suggest pedometer data be reported as steps—since that is the direct output—and distance traveled and energy expenditure are estimated values. Accelerometer count data may be analyzed to provide information on time spent in moderate or vigorous activity. Discussion Thoughtful decision making about PA data collection using motion sensor devices is needed to advance nursing science. PMID:26126065

  14. Autonomous Motion Learning for Intra-Vehicular Activity Space Robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Yutaka; Yairi, Takehisa; Machida, Kazuo

    Space robots will be needed in the future space missions. So far, many types of space robots have been developed, but in particular, Intra-Vehicular Activity (IVA) space robots that support human activities should be developed to reduce human-risks in space. In this paper, we study the motion learning method of an IVA space robot with the multi-link mechanism. The advantage point is that this space robot moves using reaction force of the multi-link mechanism and contact forces from the wall as space walking of an astronaut, not to use a propulsion. The control approach is determined based on a reinforcement learning with the actor-critic algorithm. We demonstrate to clear effectiveness of this approach using a 5-link space robot model by simulation. First, we simulate that a space robot learn the motion control including contact phase in two dimensional case. Next, we simulate that a space robot learn the motion control changing base attitude in three dimensional case.

  15. Second yield via dislocation-induced premelting in copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, L.; Cai, Y.; He, A. M.; Luo, S. N.

    2016-05-01

    Premelting or virtual melting was proposed previously as an important deformation mechanism for high strain-rate loading. However, two questions remain outstanding: how premelting occurs exactly, and whether it plays a role in plastic deformation independent of, parasitic on, or synergetic with, dislocation motion. By virtue of double-shock compression, our large-scale molecular dynamics simulations reveal two yields in single-crystal copper, with the first yield achieved via dislocation motion, and the second, via dislocation-induced premelting as well. The clean capture of melting during dislocation motion suggests that premelting occurs on slip planes and at their intersections, facilitating gliding and leading to yield together with dislocation motion.

  16. Motion of Euglena gracilis: Active fluctuations and velocity distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanczuk, P.; Romensky, M.; Scholz, D.; Lobaskin, V.; Schimansky-Geier, L.

    2015-07-01

    We study the velocity distribution of unicellular swimming algae Euglena gracilis using optical microscopy and active Brownian particle theory. To characterize a peculiar feature of the experimentally observed distribution at small velocities we use the concept of active fluctuations, which was recently proposed for the description of stochastically self-propelled particles [Romanczuk, P. and Schimansky-Geier, L., Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 230601 (2011)]. In this concept, the fluctuating forces arise due to internal random performance of the propulsive motor. The fluctuating forces are directed in parallel to the heading direction, in which the propulsion acts. In the theory, we introduce the active motion via the depot model [Schweitzer, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 80(23), 5044 (1998)]. We demonstrate that the theoretical predictions based on the depot model with active fluctuations are consistent with the experimentally observed velocity distributions. In addition to the model with additive active noise, we obtain theoretical results for a constant propulsion with multiplicative noise.

  17. Statistics of dislocation pinning at localized obstacles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, A.; Bhattacharya, M.; Barat, P.

    2014-10-01

    Pinning of dislocations at nanosized obstacles like precipitates, voids, and bubbles is a crucial mechanism in the context of phenomena like hardening and creep. The interaction between such an obstacle and a dislocation is often studied at fundamental level by means of analytical tools, atomistic simulations, and finite element methods. Nevertheless, the information extracted from such studies cannot be utilized to its maximum extent on account of insufficient information about the underlying statistics of this process comprising a large number of dislocations and obstacles in a system. Here, we propose a new statistical approach, where the statistics of pinning of dislocations by idealized spherical obstacles is explored by taking into account the generalized size-distribution of the obstacles along with the dislocation density within a three-dimensional framework. Starting with a minimal set of material parameters, the framework employs the method of geometrical statistics with a few simple assumptions compatible with the real physical scenario. The application of this approach, in combination with the knowledge of fundamental dislocation-obstacle interactions, has successfully been demonstrated for dislocation pinning at nanovoids in neutron irradiated type 316-stainless steel in regard to the non-conservative motion of dislocations. An interesting phenomenon of transition from rare pinning to multiple pinning regimes with increasing irradiation temperature is revealed.

  18. Statistics of dislocation pinning at localized obstacles

    SciTech Connect

    Dutta, A.; Bhattacharya, M. Barat, P.

    2014-10-14

    Pinning of dislocations at nanosized obstacles like precipitates, voids, and bubbles is a crucial mechanism in the context of phenomena like hardening and creep. The interaction between such an obstacle and a dislocation is often studied at fundamental level by means of analytical tools, atomistic simulations, and finite element methods. Nevertheless, the information extracted from such studies cannot be utilized to its maximum extent on account of insufficient information about the underlying statistics of this process comprising a large number of dislocations and obstacles in a system. Here, we propose a new statistical approach, where the statistics of pinning of dislocations by idealized spherical obstacles is explored by taking into account the generalized size-distribution of the obstacles along with the dislocation density within a three-dimensional framework. Starting with a minimal set of material parameters, the framework employs the method of geometrical statistics with a few simple assumptions compatible with the real physical scenario. The application of this approach, in combination with the knowledge of fundamental dislocation-obstacle interactions, has successfully been demonstrated for dislocation pinning at nanovoids in neutron irradiated type 316-stainless steel in regard to the non-conservative motion of dislocations. An interesting phenomenon of transition from rare pinning to multiple pinning regimes with increasing irradiation temperature is revealed.

  19. Lateral subtalar dislocation.

    PubMed

    Sharda, Praveen; DuFosse, Julian

    2008-07-01

    Subtalar dislocations are rare in routine orthopedic practice. While many of these dislocations are a result of high-energy injuries such as fall from a height or traffic accidents, it is not uncommon for patients to present after slipping down a few stairs. Two types of dislocation have been described, medial and lateral. The type of dislocation is described according to the position of the foot. In lateral subtalar dislocation the head of talus is found medially and the calcaneus is dislocated laterally. The navicular may lie dorsolateral to the talus. The reverse is true of lateral dislocation. Medial dislocation has been referred to as "basketball foot" due to its preponderance in basketball players.4 The deciding factor is the inverted or everted position of the foot when the force is dissipated through the weak talonavicular and talocalcaneal ligaments. This article presents a case of an adult with lateral subtalar dislocation following a fall.

  20. Dislocation of the knee: imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Shearer, Damon; Lomasney, Laurie; Pierce, Kenneth

    2010-01-01

    Dislocations of the knee are relatively uncommon injuries. However, the incidence of this injury appears to be increasing. Knee dislocations are most often high velocity blunt injuries, with motor vehicle accidents being a frequent etiology. Other causes include falls from height, athletic injuries, farming and industrial accidents, and even low velocity mechanisms such as a misstep into a hole. Likewise, minor trauma in the morbidly obese is increasingly recognized as a mechanism of knee dislocation. Multiple forms of dislocation exist, with the common factor being disruption of the tibiofemoral articulation. Dislocation can occur in a variety of directions depending on the mechanism of injury. The most common dislocation is anterior, which may be seen in hyperextension injuries such as martial arts kicking. The "dashboard injury" of motor vehicle accidents can result in a posterior dislocation of the knee. Lateral and rotary dislocations are less common. Knee dislocation is more commonly diagnosed in men, with a mean age of 23 to 31 years old. This is the very patient population encountered by Special Operations Forces (SOF) healthcare providers. Given the mechanisms of injury noted above, it is reasonable to conclude that knee dislocations may be seen in a young, active SOF patient population, particularly those engaged in parachuting, fast-roping/rappelling, driving at high speeds during military operations, and mixed martial arts. PMID:20306414

  1. Assessment of interatomic potentials for atomistic analysis of static and dynamic properties of screw dislocations in W.

    PubMed

    Cereceda, D; Stukowski, A; Gilbert, M R; Queyreau, S; Ventelon, Lisa; Marinica, M-C; Perlado, J M; Marian, J

    2013-02-27

    Screw dislocations in bcc metals display non-planar cores at zero temperature which result in high lattice friction and thermally-activated strain rate behavior. In bcc W, electronic structure molecular statics calculations reveal a compact, non-degenerate core with an associated Peierls stress between 1.7 and 2.8 GPa. However, a full picture of the dynamic behavior of dislocations can only be gained by using more efficient atomistic simulations based on semiempirical interatomic potentials. In this paper we assess the suitability of five different potentials in terms of static properties relevant to screw dislocations in pure W. Moreover, we perform molecular dynamics simulations of stress-assisted glide using all five potentials to study the dynamic behavior of screw dislocations under shear stress. Dislocations are seen to display thermally-activated motion in most of the applied stress range, with a gradual transition to a viscous damping regime at high stresses. We find that one potential predicts a core transformation from compact to dissociated at finite temperature that affects the energetics of kink-pair production and impacts the mechanism of motion. We conclude that a modified embedded-atom potential achieves the best compromise in terms of static and dynamic screw dislocation properties, although at an expense of about ten-fold compared to central potentials. PMID:23370442

  2. Assessment of interatomic potentials for atomistic analysis of static and dynamic properties of screw dislocations in W.

    PubMed

    Cereceda, D; Stukowski, A; Gilbert, M R; Queyreau, S; Ventelon, Lisa; Marinica, M-C; Perlado, J M; Marian, J

    2013-02-27

    Screw dislocations in bcc metals display non-planar cores at zero temperature which result in high lattice friction and thermally-activated strain rate behavior. In bcc W, electronic structure molecular statics calculations reveal a compact, non-degenerate core with an associated Peierls stress between 1.7 and 2.8 GPa. However, a full picture of the dynamic behavior of dislocations can only be gained by using more efficient atomistic simulations based on semiempirical interatomic potentials. In this paper we assess the suitability of five different potentials in terms of static properties relevant to screw dislocations in pure W. Moreover, we perform molecular dynamics simulations of stress-assisted glide using all five potentials to study the dynamic behavior of screw dislocations under shear stress. Dislocations are seen to display thermally-activated motion in most of the applied stress range, with a gradual transition to a viscous damping regime at high stresses. We find that one potential predicts a core transformation from compact to dissociated at finite temperature that affects the energetics of kink-pair production and impacts the mechanism of motion. We conclude that a modified embedded-atom potential achieves the best compromise in terms of static and dynamic screw dislocation properties, although at an expense of about ten-fold compared to central potentials.

  3. Photothermally activated motion and ignition using aluminum nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Abboud, Jacques E.; Chong Xinyuan; Zhang Mingjun; Zhang Zhili; Jiang Naibo; Roy, Sukesh; Gord, James R.

    2013-01-14

    The aluminum nanoparticles (Al NPs) are demonstrated to serve as active photothermal media, to enhance and control local photothermal energy deposition via the photothermal effect activated by localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) and amplified by Al NPs oxidation. The activation source is a 2-AA-battery-powered xenon flash lamp. The extent of the photothermally activated movement of Al NPs can be {approx}6 mm. Ignition delay can be {approx}0.1 ms. Both scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy measurements of motion-only and after-ignition products confirm significant Al oxidation occurs through sintering and bursting after the flash exposure. Simulations suggest local heat generation is enhanced by LSPR. The positive-feedback effects from the local heat generation amplified by Al oxidation produce a large increase in local temperature and pressure, which enhances movement and accelerates ignition.

  4. Motion transition of active filaments: rotation without hydrodynamic interactions.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Huijun; Hou, Zhonghuai

    2014-02-21

    We investigate the dynamics of an active semiflexible filament in a bead–rod model involving dynamically the hydrodynamic interaction (HI), active force, filament flexibility and viscous drag. We find that the filament can show three distinct types of motion, namely, translation, snaking and rotation, with the variation of the rigidity or active force. The transition from translation to snaking is continuous and mainly due to transverse instability, while the snaking–rotation transition is first-order like and shown to result from a type of symmetry breaking associated with the shape kinematics. Of particular interest, we find that HI is not necessary for the rotation or snaking motion, but can enlarge remarkably the parameter regions in which they can occur. Combining with local collisions, we show that, for the parameter region where HI is essential for the maintenance of rotation curvature of a single filament, HI is also essential for the emergence of collective vortexes. Thus, our findings provide new insights into the subtle role of HI in the formation of collective structures in active systems PMID:24983114

  5. Fusion of smartphone motion sensors for physical activity recognition.

    PubMed

    Shoaib, Muhammad; Bosch, Stephan; Incel, Ozlem Durmaz; Scholten, Hans; Havinga, Paul J M

    2014-06-10

    For physical activity recognition, smartphone sensors, such as an accelerometer and a gyroscope, are being utilized in many research studies. So far, particularly, the accelerometer has been extensively studied. In a few recent studies, a combination of a gyroscope, a magnetometer (in a supporting role) and an accelerometer (in a lead role) has been used with the aim to improve the recognition performance. How and when are various motion sensors, which are available on a smartphone, best used for better recognition performance, either individually or in combination? This is yet to be explored. In order to investigate this question, in this paper, we explore how these various motion sensors behave in different situations in the activity recognition process. For this purpose, we designed a data collection experiment where ten participants performed seven different activities carrying smart phones at different positions. Based on the analysis of this data set, we show that these sensors, except the magnetometer, are each capable of taking the lead roles individually, depending on the type of activity being recognized, the body position, the used data features and the classification method employed (personalized or generalized). We also show that their combination only improves the overall recognition performance when their individual performances are not very high, so that there is room for performance improvement. We have made our data set and our data collection application publicly available, thereby making our experiments reproducible.

  6. On the Activation Volume for Dislocation Creep and Diffusion in Olivine and Other Minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karato, S.

    2006-12-01

    The activation volume is an important parameter that characterizes the pressure dependence of plastic deformation. However, experimental determination of activation volume is challenging and, for olivine, the published results range from ~0 to ~30 cm3/mol. This vast range of V* is translated into more than 10 orders of magnitude difference in viscosity in the deep upper mantle (for a given stress). The main reasons for this large discrepancy include (i) the large experimental errors in the previous experimental studies on V* due to the limited pressure range and the limited resolution of mechanical measurements and (ii) the confusions in parameterization of flow law. In this talk, I will discuss several issues in determining and interpreting V*. In addition to the issues of uncertainties in experimental measurements, one important issue in the experimental determination of V* is the choice of flow law formula. It is customary to use a power-law equation to determine V*, but the appropriateness of power-law relationship is not obvious, and two issues need to be addressed carefully. First, at stress exceeding ~200 MPa (for olivine), deviation from power- law behavior is appreciable and the exponential flow law becomes important. The transition to exponential flow law will result in (i) apparently small V* if the data were fitted to a power-law relation, and (ii) apparently negative dependence of activation enthalpy (as observed by Green and Borch (1987)). Second, the flow-law parameterization under water-saturated conditions needs to include the pressure dependence of water fugacity. When this effect is ignored, apparently small activation volume would be obtained. Third, if deform,ation is in the transient creep regime rather than in the "steady-state" creep regime, then the activation volume will be an apparent activation volume that can be significantly lower than the "true" activation volume if the transient creep behavior is pressure-dependent. I will review the

  7. Dislocation creation and void nucleation in FCC ductile metals under tensile loading: a general microscopic picture.

    PubMed

    Pang, Wei-Wei; Zhang, Ping; Zhang, Guang-Cai; Xu, Ai-Guo; Zhao, Xian-Geng

    2014-11-10

    Numerous theoretical and experimental efforts have been paid to describe and understand the dislocation and void nucleation processes that are fundamental for dynamic fracture modeling of strained metals. To date an essential physical picture on the self-organized atomic collective motions during dislocation creation, as well as the essential mechanisms for the void nucleation obscured by the extreme diversity in structural configurations around the void nucleation core, is still severely lacking in literature. Here, we depict the origin of dislocation creation and void nucleation during uniaxial high strain rate tensile processes in face-centered-cubic (FCC) ductile metals. We find that the dislocations are created through three distinguished stages: (i) Flattened octahedral structures (FOSs) are randomly activated by thermal fluctuations; (ii) The double-layer defect clusters are formed by self-organized stacking of FOSs on the close-packed plane; (iii) The stacking faults are formed and the Shockley partial dislocations are created from the double-layer defect clusters. Whereas, the void nucleation is shown to follow a two-stage description. We demonstrate that our findings on the origin of dislocation creation and void nucleation are universal for a variety of FCC ductile metals with low stacking fault energies.

  8. Crew activity and motion effects on the space station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rochon, Brian V.; Scheer, Steven A.

    1987-01-01

    Among the significant sources of internal disturbances that must be considered in the design of space station vibration control systems are the loads induced on the structure from various crew activities. Flight experiment T013, flown on the second manned mission of Skylab, measured force and moment time histories for a range of preplanned crew motions and activities. This experiment has proved itself invaluable as a source of on-orbit crew induced loads that has allowed a space station forcing function data base to be built. This will enable forced response such as acceleration and deflections, attributable to crew activity, to be calculated. The flight experiment, resultant database and structural model pre-processor, analysis examples and areas of combined research shall be described.

  9. Dislocation dynamics in hexagonal close-packed crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubry, S.; Rhee, M.; Hommes, G.; Bulatov, V. V.; Arsenlis, A.

    2016-09-01

    Extensions of the dislocation dynamics methodology necessary to enable accurate simulations of crystal plasticity in hexagonal close-packed (HCP) metals are presented. They concern the introduction of dislocation motion in HCP crystals through linear and non-linear mobility laws, as well as the treatment of composite dislocation physics. Formation, stability and dissociation of < c + a > and other dislocations with large Burgers vectors defined as composite dislocations are examined and a new topological operation is proposed to enable their dissociation. The results of our simulations suggest that composite dislocations are omnipresent and may play important roles both in specific dislocation mechanisms and in bulk crystal plasticity in HCP materials. While fully microscopic, our bulk DD simulations provide wealth of data that can be used to develop and parameterize constitutive models of crystal plasticity at the mesoscale.

  10. Dislocation dynamics in hexagonal close-packed crystals

    DOE PAGES

    Aubry, S.; Rhee, M.; Hommes, G.; Bulatov, V. V.; Arsenlis, A.

    2016-04-14

    Extensions of the dislocation dynamics methodology necessary to enable accurate simulations of crystal plasticity in hexagonal close-packed (HCP) metals are presented. They concern the introduction of dislocation motion in HCP crystals through linear and non-linear mobility laws, as well as the treatment of composite dislocation physics. Formation, stability and dissociation of and other dislocations with large Burgers vectors defined as composite dislocations are examined and a new topological operation is proposed to enable their dissociation. Furthermore, the results of our simulations suggest that composite dislocations are omnipresent and may play important roles both in specific dislocation mechanisms and in bulkmore » crystal plasticity in HCP materials. While fully microscopic, our bulk DD simulations provide wealth of data that can be used to develop and parameterize constitutive models of crystal plasticity at the mesoscale.« less

  11. Temporomandibular joint dislocation

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Naresh Kumar; Singh, Akhilesh Kumar; Pandey, Arun; Verma, Vishal; Singh, Shreya

    2015-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) dislocation is an uncommon but debilitating condition of the facial skeleton. The condition may be acute or chronic. Acute TMJ dislocation is common in clinical practice and can be managed easily with manual reduction. Chronic recurrent TMJ dislocation is a challenging situation to manage. In this article, we discuss the comprehensive review of the different treatment modalities in managing TMJ dislocation. PMID:26668447

  12. Active Motion Control of Tetrahymena pyriformis by Galvanotaxis and Geotaxis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jihoon; Byun, Doyoung; Kim, Min Jun

    2013-11-01

    Recently, there has been increasing interest in the swimming behavior of microorganisms and biologically inspired micro-robots. These microorganisms naturally accompanied by complex motions. Therefore it is important to understand the flow characteristics as well as control mechanisms. One of eukaryotic cells, the protozoa are a diverse group of unicellular organisms, many of which are motile cilia. Motile cilia are cover on the surface of cell in large numbers and beat in oriented waves. Sequential beating motions of a single cilium form metachronal strokes, producing a propagation wave, and therefore the body is achieved propulsion force. So preliminary studies are achieved to understand the flow induced by swimming microorganisms. Based on hydrodynamic results, the follow study of a few micro-scale protozoa cell, such as the Tetrahymena pyriformis, has provided active or passive control into several external stimuli. In typical control methods, the galvanotaxis and geotaxis were adopted active and passive control, respectively. The validation of galvanotaxis is used DC and AC voltage. In terms of geotaxis, corrugated microstructures were used to control in the microchannel. This research was supported by the Ministry of Education, Science and Technology (MEST, 2011-0016461), National Science Foundation (NSF) CMMI Control Systems Program (#1000255) and Army Research Office (W911NF-11-1-0490).

  13. Early articular cartilage degeneration in a developmental dislocation of the hip model results from activation of β-catenin.

    PubMed

    Ning, Bo; Sun, Jun; Yuan, Yi; Yao, Jie; Wang, Peng; Ma, Ruixue

    2014-01-01

    Developmental dislocation or dysplasia of the hip (DDH) is one of the most common deformities in children. Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most frequent long-term complication. The molecular mechanism of early articular cartilage degeneration in DDH is still unclear. It is well known that β-catenin plays a crucial role in articular cartilage degeneration. The objective of this study was to verify the relationship between β-catenin and DDH cartilage degeneration. We used a DDH model that was established by modification of swaddling position in newborn Wistar rats. The hips were isolated from the DDH model rats and untreated control group at the age of 2, 4, 6 and 8 weeks. β-Catenin gene and protein were investigated by quantitative (q)RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. Collagen X and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-13, markers of early cartilage degeneration, were assessed by qRT-PCR. Primary chondrocytes were cultured from cartilage of two groups at the age of 8 weeks. Expression of β-catenin, collagen X and MMP-13 was detected. Continued high expression of β-catenin was observed in cartilage from DDH model rats. mRNA and protein expression of β-catenin was significantly increased in primary chondrocytes of the DDH model compared with the control group. Collagen X and MMP-13 expression was higher in the cartilage and chondrocytes from DDH model rats than the control group. Our findings suggest that early cartilage degeneration in DDH may result from activation of β-catenin signaling. PMID:24817933

  14. Coupling of active motion and advection shapes intracellular cargo transport.

    PubMed

    Khuc Trong, Philipp; Guck, Jochen; Goldstein, Raymond E

    2012-07-13

    Intracellular cargo transport can arise from passive diffusion, active motor-driven transport along cytoskeletal filament networks, and passive advection by fluid flows entrained by such cargo-motor motion. Active and advective transport are thus intrinsically coupled as related, yet different representations of the same underlying network structure. A reaction-advection-diffusion system is used here to show that this coupling affects the transport and localization of a passive tracer in a confined geometry. For sufficiently low diffusion, cargo localization to a target zone is optimized either by low reaction kinetics and decoupling of bound and unbound states, or by a mostly disordered cytoskeletal network with only weak directional bias. These generic results may help to rationalize subtle features of cytoskeletal networks, for example as observed for microtubules in fly oocytes.

  15. Documenting Western Burrowing Owl Reproduction and Activity Patterns Using Motion-Activated Cameras

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, Derek B.; Greger, Paul D.

    2014-08-01

    We used motion-activated cameras to monitor the reproduction and patterns of activity of the Burrowing Owl (Athene cunicularia) above ground at 45 burrows in south-central Nevada during the breeding seasons of 1999, 2000, 2001, and 2005. The 37 broods, encompassing 180 young, raised over the four years represented an average of 4.9 young per successful breeding pair. Young and adult owls were detected at the burrow entrance at all times of the day and night, but adults were detected more frequently during afternoon/early evening than were young. Motion-activated cameras require less effort to implement than other techniques. Limitations include photographing only a small percentage of owl activity at the burrow; not detecting the actual number of eggs, young, or number fledged; and not being able to track individual owls over time. Further work is also necessary to compare the accuracy of productivity estimates generated from motion-activated cameras with other techniques.

  16. Probing the character of ultra-fast dislocations.

    PubMed

    Ruestes, C J; Bringa, E M; Rudd, R E; Remington, B A; Remington, T P; Meyers, M A

    2015-01-01

    Plasticity is often controlled by dislocation motion, which was first measured for low pressure, low strain rate conditions decades ago. However, many applications require knowledge of dislocation motion at high stress conditions where the data are sparse, and come from indirect measurements dominated by the effect of dislocation density rather than velocity. Here we make predictions based on atomistic simulations that form the basis for a new approach to measure dislocation velocities directly at extreme conditions using three steps: create prismatic dislocation loops in a near-surface region using nanoindentation, drive the dislocations with a shockwave, and use electron microscopy to determine how far the dislocations moved and thus their velocity at extreme stress and strain rate conditions. We report on atomistic simulations of tantalum that make detailed predictions of dislocation flow, and find that the approach is feasible and can uncover an exciting range of phenomena, such as transonic dislocations and a novel form of loop stretching. The simulated configuration enables a new class of experiments to probe average dislocation velocity at very high applied shear stress.

  17. Probing the character of ultra-fast dislocations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruestes, C. J.; Bringa, E. M.; Rudd, R. E.; Remington, B. A.; Remington, T. P.; Meyers, M. A.

    2015-11-01

    Plasticity is often controlled by dislocation motion, which was first measured for low pressure, low strain rate conditions decades ago. However, many applications require knowledge of dislocation motion at high stress conditions where the data are sparse, and come from indirect measurements dominated by the effect of dislocation density rather than velocity. Here we make predictions based on atomistic simulations that form the basis for a new approach to measure dislocation velocities directly at extreme conditions using three steps: create prismatic dislocation loops in a near-surface region using nanoindentation, drive the dislocations with a shockwave, and use electron microscopy to determine how far the dislocations moved and thus their velocity at extreme stress and strain rate conditions. We report on atomistic simulations of tantalum that make detailed predictions of dislocation flow, and find that the approach is feasible and can uncover an exciting range of phenomena, such as transonic dislocations and a novel form of loop stretching. The simulated configuration enables a new class of experiments to probe average dislocation velocity at very high applied shear stress.

  18. Probing the character of ultra-fast dislocations

    PubMed Central

    Ruestes, C. J.; Bringa, E. M.; Rudd, R. E.; Remington, B. A.; Remington, T. P.; Meyers, M. A.

    2015-01-01

    Plasticity is often controlled by dislocation motion, which was first measured for low pressure, low strain rate conditions decades ago. However, many applications require knowledge of dislocation motion at high stress conditions where the data are sparse, and come from indirect measurements dominated by the effect of dislocation density rather than velocity. Here we make predictions based on atomistic simulations that form the basis for a new approach to measure dislocation velocities directly at extreme conditions using three steps: create prismatic dislocation loops in a near-surface region using nanoindentation, drive the dislocations with a shockwave, and use electron microscopy to determine how far the dislocations moved and thus their velocity at extreme stress and strain rate conditions. We report on atomistic simulations of tantalum that make detailed predictions of dislocation flow, and find that the approach is feasible and can uncover an exciting range of phenomena, such as transonic dislocations and a novel form of loop stretching. The simulated configuration enables a new class of experiments to probe average dislocation velocity at very high applied shear stress. PMID:26592764

  19. Probing the character of ultra-fast dislocations

    DOE PAGES

    Rudd, R. E.; Ruestes, C. J.; Bringa, E. M.; Remington, B. A.; Remington, T. P.; Meyers, M. A.

    2015-11-23

    Plasticity is often controlled by dislocation motion, which was first measured for low pressure, low strain rate conditions decades ago. However, many applications require knowledge of dislocation motion at high stress conditions where the data are sparse, and come from indirect measurements dominated by the effect of dislocation density rather than velocity. Here we make predictions based on atomistic simulations that form the basis for a new approach to measure dislocation velocities directly at extreme conditions using three steps: create prismatic dislocation loops in a near-surface region using nanoindentation, drive the dislocations with a shockwave, and use electron microscopy tomore » determine how far the dislocations moved and thus their velocity at extreme stress and strain rate conditions. We report on atomistic simulations of tantalum that make detailed predictions of dislocation flow, and find that the approach is feasible and can uncover an exciting range of phenomena, such as transonic dislocations and a novel form of loop stretching. Furthermore, the simulated configuration enables a new class of experiments to probe average dislocation velocity at very high applied shear stress.« less

  20. Probing the character of ultra-fast dislocations

    SciTech Connect

    Rudd, R. E.; Ruestes, C. J.; Bringa, E. M.; Remington, B. A.; Remington, T. P.; Meyers, M. A.

    2015-11-23

    Plasticity is often controlled by dislocation motion, which was first measured for low pressure, low strain rate conditions decades ago. However, many applications require knowledge of dislocation motion at high stress conditions where the data are sparse, and come from indirect measurements dominated by the effect of dislocation density rather than velocity. Here we make predictions based on atomistic simulations that form the basis for a new approach to measure dislocation velocities directly at extreme conditions using three steps: create prismatic dislocation loops in a near-surface region using nanoindentation, drive the dislocations with a shockwave, and use electron microscopy to determine how far the dislocations moved and thus their velocity at extreme stress and strain rate conditions. We report on atomistic simulations of tantalum that make detailed predictions of dislocation flow, and find that the approach is feasible and can uncover an exciting range of phenomena, such as transonic dislocations and a novel form of loop stretching. Furthermore, the simulated configuration enables a new class of experiments to probe average dislocation velocity at very high applied shear stress.

  1. Acute shoulder and elbow dislocations in the athlete.

    PubMed

    Burra, Giridhar; Andrews, James R

    2002-07-01

    Dislocations of the elbow are less common than shoulder dislocations. The primary treatment is conservative, with a conscious effort toward early mobilization. Recurrence is rare, and improvement in function and motion can be expected for up to 1 year. Operative treatment should be reserved for baseball pitchers and cases of complex instability.

  2. Unwinding motion of a twisted active region filament

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, X. L.; Xue, Z. K.; Kong, D. F.; Liu, J. H.; Xu, C. L.

    2014-12-10

    To better understand the structures of active region filaments and the eruption process, we study an active region filament eruption in active region NOAA 11082 in detail on 2010 June 22. Before the filament eruption, the opposite unidirectional material flows appeared in succession along the spine of the filament. The rising of the filament triggered two B-class flares at the upper part of the filament. As the bright material was injected into the filament from the sites of the flares, the filament exhibited a rapid uplift accompanying the counterclockwise rotation of the filament body. From the expansion of the filament, we can see that the filament consisted of twisted magnetic field lines. The total twist of the filament is at least 5π obtained by using a time slice method. According to the morphology change during the filament eruption, it is found that the active region filament was a twisted flux rope and its unwinding motion was like a solar tornado. We also find that there was a continuous magnetic helicity injection before and during the filament eruption. It is confirmed that magnetic helicity can be transferred from the photosphere to the filament. Using the extrapolated potential fields, the average decay index of the background magnetic fields over the filament is 0.91. Consequently, these findings imply that the mechanism of solar filament eruption could be due to the kink instability and magnetic helicity accumulation.

  3. Assessment of hardening due to dislocation loops in bcc iron: Overview and analysis of atomistic simulations for edge dislocations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonny, G.; Terentyev, D.; Elena, J.; Zinovev, A.; Minov, B.; Zhurkin, E. E.

    2016-05-01

    Upon irradiation, iron based steels used for nuclear applications contain dislocation loops of both < 100 > and ½ < 111 > type. Both types of loops are known to contribute to the radiation hardening and embrittlement of steels. In the literature many molecular dynamics works studying the interaction of dislocations with dislocation loops are available. Recently, based on such studies, a thermo-mechanical model to threat the dislocation - dislocation loop (DL) interaction within a discrete dislocation dynamics framework was developed for ½ < 111 > loops. In this work, we make a literature review of the dislocation - DL interaction in bcc iron. We also perform molecular dynamics simulations to derive the stress-energy function for < 100 > loops. As a result we deliver the function of the activation energy versus activation stress for < 100 > loops that can be applied in a discrete dislocation dynamics framework.

  4. An unusual variant of perilunate fracture dislocations

    PubMed Central

    Morin, Matthew L.; Becker, Giles W.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Trans-scaphoid, trans-radial styloid, trans-triquetral perilunate fracture dislocations are rare. We describe a 19-year-old male who suffered this injury after crashing his bicycle. He underwent open reduction internal fixation and percutaneous pinning. Scaphoid union was achieved at 8 weeks. Near complete range of painless motion was achieved by 4 months. PMID:27583261

  5. An unusual variant of perilunate fracture dislocations.

    PubMed

    Morin, Matthew L; Becker, Giles W

    2016-01-01

    Trans-scaphoid, trans-radial styloid, trans-triquetral perilunate fracture dislocations are rare. We describe a 19-year-old male who suffered this injury after crashing his bicycle. He underwent open reduction internal fixation and percutaneous pinning. Scaphoid union was achieved at 8 weeks. Near complete range of painless motion was achieved by 4 months. PMID:27583261

  6. Stress and temperature dependence of screw dislocation mobility in {alpha}-Fe by molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, M. R.

    2011-11-01

    The low-temperature plastic yield of {alpha}-Fe single crystals is known to display a strong temperature dependence and to be controlled by the thermally activated motion of screw dislocations. In this paper, we present molecular dynamics simulations of (1/2)<111>{l_brace}112{r_brace} screw dislocation motion as a function of temperature and stress in order to extract mobility relations that describe the general dynamic behavior of screw dislocations in pure {alpha}-Fe. We find two dynamic regimes in the stress-velocity space governed by different mechanisms of motion. Consistent with experimental evidence, at low stresses and temperatures, the dislocations move by thermally activated nucleation and propagation of kink pairs. Then, at a critical stress, a temperature-dependent transition to a viscous linear regime is observed. Critical output from the simulations, such as threshold stresses and the stress dependence of the kink activation energy, are compared to experimental data and other atomistic works with generally very good agreement. Contrary to some experimental interpretations, we find that glide on {l_brace}112{r_brace} planes is only apparent, as slip always occurs by elementary kink-pair nucleation/propagation events on {l_brace}110{r_brace} planes. Additionally, a dislocation core transformation from compact to dissociated has been identified above room temperature, although its impact on the general mobility is seen to be limited. This and other observations expose the limitations of inferring or presuming dynamic behavior on the basis of only static calculations. We discuss the relevance and applicability of our results and provide a closed-form functional mobility law suitable for mesoscale computational techniques.

  7. Motion verb sentences activate left posterior middle temporal cortex despite static context.

    PubMed

    Wallentin, Mikkel; Lund, Torben Ellegaard; Ostergaard, Svend; Ostergaard, Leif; Roepstorff, Andreas

    2005-04-25

    The left posterior middle temporal region, anterior to V5/MT, has been shown to be responsive both to images with implied motion, to simulated motion, and to motion verbs. In this study, we investigated whether sentence context alters the response of the left posterior middle temporal region. 'Fictive motion' sentences are sentences in which an inanimate subject noun, semantically incapable of self movement, is coupled with a motion verb, yielding an apparent semantic contradiction (e.g. 'The path comes into the garden.'). However, this context yields no less activation in the left posterior middle temporal region than sentences in which the motion can be applied to the subject noun. We speculate that the left posterior middle temporal region activity in fictive motion sentences reflects the fact that the hearer applies motion to the depicted scenario by scanning it egocentrically.

  8. “Conjugate Channeling” Effect in Dislocation Core Diffusion: Carbon Transport in Dislocated BCC Iron

    PubMed Central

    Ishii, Akio; Li, Ju; Ogata, Shigenobu

    2013-01-01

    Dislocation pipe diffusion seems to be a well-established phenomenon. Here we demonstrate an unexpected effect, that the migration of interstitials such as carbon in iron may be accelerated not in the dislocation line direction , but in a conjugate diffusion direction. This accelerated random walk arises from a simple crystallographic channeling effect. is a function of the Burgers vector b, but not , thus a dislocation loop possesses the same everywhere. Using molecular dynamics and accelerated dynamics simulations, we further show that such dislocation-core-coupled carbon diffusion in iron has temperature-dependent activation enthalpy like a fragile glass. The 71° mixed dislocation is the only case in which we see straightforward pipe diffusion that does not depend on dislocation mobility. PMID:23593255

  9. Quantification Of 4H- To 3C-Polymorphism In Silicon Carbide (SiC) Epilayers And An Investigation Of Recombination-Enhanced Dislocation Motion In SiC By Optical Emission Microscopy (Oem) Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Speer, Kevin M.

    2004-01-01

    quantifying and mapping defects on both the substrate and mesa surfaces, and of quantifying polymorphic changes in the grown materials. In addition, an optical emission microscopy (OEM) system is developed that will facilitate comprehensive study of recombination-enhanced dislocation motion (REDM).

  10. Viewing the motion of human body parts activates different regions of premotor, temporal, and parietal cortex.

    PubMed

    Wheaton, Kylie J; Thompson, James C; Syngeniotis, Ari; Abbott, David F; Puce, Aina

    2004-05-01

    Activation of premotor and temporoparietal cortex occurs when we observe others movements, particularly relating to objects. Viewing the motion of different body parts without the context of an object has not been systematically evaluated. During a 3T fMRI study, 12 healthy subjects viewed human face, hand, and leg motion, which was not directed at or did not involve an object. Activation was identified relative to static images of the same human face, hand, and leg in both individual subject and group average data. Four clear activation foci emerged: (1) right MT/V5 activated to all forms of viewed motion; (2) right STS activated to face and leg motion; (3) ventral premotor cortex activated to face, hand, and leg motion in the right hemisphere and to leg motion in the left hemisphere; and (4) anterior intraparietal cortex (aIP) was active bilaterally to viewing hand motion and in the right hemisphere leg motion. In addition, in the group data, a somatotopic activation pattern for viewing face, hand, and leg motion occurred in right ventral premotor cortex. Activation patterns in STS and aIP were more complex--typically activation foci to viewing two types of human motion showed some overlap. Activation in individual subjects was similar; however, activation to hand motion also occurred in the STS with a variable location across subjects--explaining the lack of a clear activation focus in the group data. The data indicate that there are selective responses to viewing motion of different body parts in the human brain that are independent of object or tool use.

  11. A field theory of piezoelectric media containing dislocations

    SciTech Connect

    Taupin, V. Fressengeas, C.; Ventura, P.; Lebyodkin, M.

    2014-04-14

    A field theory is proposed to extend the standard piezoelectric framework for linear elastic solids by accounting for the presence and motion of dislocation fields and assessing their impact on the piezoelectric properties. The proposed theory describes the incompatible lattice distortion and residual piezoelectric polarization fields induced by dislocation ensembles, as well as the dynamic evolution of these fields through dislocation motion driven by coupled electro-mechanical loading. It is suggested that (i) dislocation mobility may be enhanced or inhibited by the electric field, depending on the polarity of the latter, (ii) plasticity mediated by dislocation motion allows capturing long-term time-dependent properties of piezoelectric polarization. Due to the continuity of the proposed electro-mechanical framework, the stress/strain and polarization fields are smooth even in the dislocation core regions. The theory is applied to gallium nitride layers for validation. The piezoelectric polarization fields associated with bulk screw/edge dislocations are retrieved and surface potential modulations are predicted. The results are extended to dislocation loops.

  12. Does motion-related brain functional connectivity reflect both artifacts and genuine neural activity?

    PubMed

    Pujol, Jesus; Macià, Dídac; Blanco-Hinojo, Laura; Martínez-Vilavella, Gerard; Sunyer, Jordi; de la Torre, Rafael; Caixàs, Assumpta; Martín-Santos, Rocío; Deus, Joan; Harrison, Ben J

    2014-11-01

    Imaging research on functional connectivity is uniquely contributing to characterize the functional organization of the human brain. Functional connectivity measurements, however, may be significantly influenced by head motion that occurs during image acquisition. The identification of how motion influences such measurements is therefore highly relevant to the interpretation of a study's results. We have mapped the effect of head motion on functional connectivity in six different populations representing a wide range of potential influences of motion on functional connectivity. Group-level voxel-wise maps of the correlation between a summary head motion measurement and functional connectivity degree were estimated in 80 young adults, 71 children, 53 older adults, 20 patients with Down syndrome, 24 with Prader-Willi syndrome and 20 with Williams syndrome. In highly compliant young adults, motion correlated with functional connectivity measurements showing a system-specific anatomy involving the sensorimotor cortex, visual areas and default mode network. Further characterization was strongly indicative of these changes expressing genuine neural activity related to motion, as opposed to pure motion artifact. In the populations with larger head motion, results were more indicative of widespread artifacts, but showing notably distinct spatial distribution patterns. Group-level regression of motion effects was efficient in removing both generalized changes and changes putatively related to neural activity. Overall, this study endorses a relatively simple approach for mapping distinct effects of head motion on functional connectivity. Importantly, our findings support the intriguing hypothesis that a component of motion-related changes may reflect system-specific neural activity.

  13. Activity-based exploitation of Full Motion Video (FMV)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kant, Shashi

    2012-06-01

    Video has been a game-changer in how US forces are able to find, track and defeat its adversaries. With millions of minutes of video being generated from an increasing number of sensor platforms, the DOD has stated that the rapid increase in video is overwhelming their analysts. The manpower required to view and garner useable information from the flood of video is unaffordable, especially in light of current fiscal restraints. "Search" within full-motion video has traditionally relied on human tagging of content, and video metadata, to provision filtering and locate segments of interest, in the context of analyst query. Our approach utilizes a novel machine-vision based approach to index FMV, using object recognition & tracking, events and activities detection. This approach enables FMV exploitation in real-time, as well as a forensic look-back within archives. This approach can help get the most information out of video sensor collection, help focus the attention of overburdened analysts form connections in activity over time and conserve national fiscal resources in exploiting FMV.

  14. Ripple dislocation slip in wrinkled gold film deposited on polydimethylsiloxane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, C. B.; Chuang, Y. F.; Liu, Y. H.; Lee, Sanboh; Chou, Y. T.

    2011-07-01

    The motion of ripple dislocations in a wrinkled thin film of gold deposited on polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) was investigated. The deposition was made under tensile load along the first direction on the PDMS plate. After the tensile load was released, a ripple pattern and ripple dislocations were formed on the surface. Upon reloading in the second direction, these ripple dislocations were able to slip. At a given tensile load, the speed of slip decreased as the loading time increased, and finally reached a constant value, which was increasing with the applied load. The measured data were interpreted with a dynamic model based on Newton's law of motion. Interaction of ripple dislocations was also observed. It was shown that a pair of positive and negative ripple dislocations of equal strength could annihilate each other or form a dipole, depending on the magnitude of the applied load.

  15. Pattern formation in a minimal model of continuum dislocation plasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandfeld, Stefan; Zaiser, Michael

    2015-09-01

    The spontaneous emergence of heterogeneous dislocation patterns is a conspicuous feature of plastic deformation and strain hardening of crystalline solids. Despite long-standing efforts in the materials science and physics of defect communities, there is no general consensus regarding the physical mechanism which leads to the formation of dislocation patterns. In order to establish the fundamental mechanism, we formulate an extremely simplified, minimal model to investigate the formation of patterns based on the continuum theory of fluxes of curved dislocations. We demonstrate that strain hardening as embodied in a Taylor-type dislocation density dependence of the flow stress, in conjunction with the structure of the kinematic equations that govern dislocation motion under the action of external stresses, is already sufficient for the formation of dislocation patterns that are consistent with the principle of similitude.

  16. Bilateral Anterior Shoulder Dislocation

    PubMed Central

    Siu, Yuk Chuen; Lui, Tun Hing

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Unilateral anterior shoulder dislocation is one of the most common problems encountered in orthopedic practice. However, simultaneous bilateral anterior dislocation of the shoulders is quite rare. Case Presentation: We report a case of a 75-year-old woman presented with simultaneous bilateral anterior shoulder dislocation following a trauma, complicated with a traction injury to the posterior cord of the brachial plexus. Conclusions: Bilateral anterior shoulder dislocation is very rare. The excessive traction force during closed reduction may lead to nerve palsy. Clear documentation of neurovascular status and adequate imaging before and after a reduction should be performed. PMID:25685749

  17. Quantum dynamics of a single dislocation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Gennes, Pierre-Gilles

    We discuss the zero temperature motions of an edge dislocation in a quantum solid (e.g., He4). If the dislocation has one kink (equal in length to its Burgers vector b) the kink has a creation energy U and can move along the line with a certain transfer integral t. When t and U are of comparable magnitude, two opposite kinks can form an extended bound state, with a size l. The overall shape of the dislocation in the ground state is then associated with a random walk of persistence length l (along the line) and hop sizes b. We also discuss the motions of kinks under an applied shear stress σ: the glide velocity is proportional to exp(-σ*/σ), where σ* is a characteristic stress, controlled by tunneling processes. Mouvements quantiques d'une dislocation. On analyse le mouvement à température nulle d'une dislocation coin dans un solide quantique (He4). La dislocation peut avoir un cran (d'énergie U) dans son plan de glissement. Le cran peut avancer ou reculer le long de la dislocation par effet tunnel, avec une certaine intégrale de transfert t. Deux crans de signe opposé peuvent former un état lié. En présence d'une contrainte extérieure σ, la ligne doit avancer avec une vitesse ~exp(-σ*/σ) où σ* est une contrainte seuil, contrôlée par l'effet tunnel.

  18. Active dipole clusters: From helical motion to fission.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, Andreas; Popowa, Katarina; Löwen, Hartmut

    2015-07-01

    The structure of a finite particle cluster is typically determined by total energy minimization. Here we consider the case where a cluster of soft-sphere dipoles becomes active, i.e., when the individual particles exhibit an additional self-propulsion along their dipole moments. We numerically solve the overdamped equations of motion for soft-sphere dipoles in a solvent. Starting from an initial metastable dipolar cluster, the self-propulsion generates a complex cluster dynamics. The final cluster state has in general a structure widely different to the initial one, the details depend on the model parameters and on the protocol of how the self-propulsion is turned on. The center of mass of the cluster moves on a helical path, the details of which are governed by the initial cluster magnetization. An instantaneous switch to a high self-propulsion leads to fission of the cluster. However, fission does not occur if the self-propulsion is increased slowly to high strengths. Our predictions can be verified through experiments with self-phoretic colloidal Janus particles and for macroscopic self-propelled dipoles in a highly viscous solvent.

  19. Implied motion because of instability in Hokusai Manga activates the human motion-sensitive extrastriate visual cortex: an fMRI study of the impact of visual art.

    PubMed

    Osaka, Naoyuki; Matsuyoshi, Daisuke; Ikeda, Takashi; Osaka, Mariko

    2010-03-10

    The recent development of cognitive neuroscience has invited inference about the neurosensory events underlying the experience of visual arts involving implied motion. We report functional magnetic resonance imaging study demonstrating activation of the human extrastriate motion-sensitive cortex by static images showing implied motion because of instability. We used static line-drawing cartoons of humans by Hokusai Katsushika (called 'Hokusai Manga'), an outstanding Japanese cartoonist as well as famous Ukiyoe artist. We found 'Hokusai Manga' with implied motion by depicting human bodies that are engaged in challenging tonic posture significantly activated the motion-sensitive visual cortex including MT+ in the human extrastriate cortex, while an illustration that does not imply motion, for either humans or objects, did not activate these areas under the same tasks. We conclude that motion-sensitive extrastriate cortex would be a critical region for perception of implied motion in instability.

  20. Traumatic proximal tibiofibular dislocation.

    PubMed

    Burgos, J; Alvarez-Montero, R; Gonzalez-Herranz, P; Rapariz, J M

    1997-01-01

    Proximal tibiofibular dislocation is an exceptional lesion. Rarer still is its presentation in childhood. We describe the clinical case of a 6-year-old boy, the victim of a road accident. He had a tibiofibular dislocation associated with a metaphyseal fracture of the tibia.

  1. Unsteady aerodynamic modeling for arbitrary motions. [for active control techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, J. W.

    1977-01-01

    Results indicating that unsteady aerodynamic loads derived under the assumption of simple harmonic motions executed by airfoil or wing can be extended to arbitrary motions are summarized. The generalized Theodorsen (1953) function referable to loads due to simple harmonic oscillations of a wing section in incompressible flow, the Laplace inversion integral for unsteady aerodynamic loads, calculations of root loci of aeroelastic loads, and analysis of generalized compressible transient airloads are discussed.

  2. Core structures analyses of (a+c)-edge dislocations in wurtzite GaN through atomistic simulations and Peierls–Nabarro model

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Cheng; Meng, Fanchao; Song, Jun

    2015-05-21

    The core structures and slip characteristics of (a+c)-edge dislocations on pyramidal planes in wurtzite GaN were investigated employing molecular dynamics simulations. Multiple stable core configurations are identified for dislocations along the glide and shuffle planes. The corresponding generalized-stacking-fault energy (GSFE) curves for the glide and shuffle slips are calculated. The GSFE curves, combined with the Peierls–Nabarro model, demonstrate that the shuffle slip is favored over the glide slip given the markedly lower Peierls energy and stress of the shuffle slip. Our findings also indicate that in general slip motions for (a+c)-edge dislocations are only possible at elevated temperature, and the necessity of further studies of thermally activated processes to better understand the dynamics of (a+c) dislocations in GaN.

  3. Effective mobility of dislocations from systematic coarse-graining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kooiman, M.; Hütter, M.; Geers, MGD

    2015-06-01

    The dynamics of large amounts of dislocations governs the plastic response of crystalline materials. In this contribution we discuss the relation between the mobility of discrete dislocations and the resulting flow rule for coarse-grained dislocation densities. The mobilities used in literature on these levels are quite different, for example in terms of their intrinsic the stress dependence. To establish the relation across the scales, we have derived the macroscopic evolution equations of dislocation densities from the equations of motion of individual dislocations by means of systematic coarse-graining. From this, we can identify a memory kernel relating the driving force and the flux of dislocations. This kernel can be considered as an effective macroscopic mobility with two contributions; a direct contribution related to the overdamped motion of individual dislocations, and an emergent contribution that arises from time correlations of fluctuations in the Peach-Koehler force. Scaling analysis shows that the latter contribution is dominant for dislocations in metals at room temperature. We also discuss several concerns related to the separation of timescales.

  4. A computational method for dislocation-precipitate interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Akiyuki; Ghoniem, Nasr M.

    A new computational method for the elastic interaction between dislocations and precipitates is developed and applied to the solution of problems involving dislocation cutting and looping around precipitates. Based on the superposition principle, the solution to the dislocation-precipitate interaction problem is obtained as the sum of two solutions: (1) a dislocation problem with image stresses from interfaces between the dislocation and the precipitate, and (2) a correction solution for the elastic problem of a precipitate with an initial strain distribution. The current development is based on a combination of the parametric dislocation dynamics (PDD) and the boundary element method (BEM) with volume integrals.The method allows us to calculate the stress field both inside and outside precipitates of elastic moduli different from the matrix, and that may have initial coherency strain fields. The numerical results of the present method show good convergence and high accuracy when compared to a known analytical solution, and they are also in good agreement with molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Sheared copper precipitates (2.5 nm in diameter) are shown to lose some of their resistance to dislocation motion after they are cut by leading dislocations in a pileup. Successive cutting of precipitates by the passage of a dislocation pileup reduces the resistance to about half its original value, when the number of dislocations in the pileup exceeds about 10. The transition from the shearable precipitate regime to the Orowan looping regime occurs for precipitate-to-matrix elastic modulus ratios above approximately 3-4, with some dependence on the precipitate size. The effects of precipitate size, spacing, and elastic modulus mismatch with the host matrix on the critical shear stress (CSS) to dislocation motion are presented.

  5. Observation of dislocations and twins in explosively compacted alumina

    SciTech Connect

    Yust, C.S.; Harris, L.A.

    1980-01-01

    The microstructure at the half-radius position of a polycrystalline alumina rod formed by explosive compaction has been studied by transmission electron microscopy. The as-compacted lattice is composed of differently misoriented bands aligned predominantly in one direction. Such bands may correspond to frequently observed shock lamellae. The band edges are defined by dislocation arrays lying on the basal planes of the hexagonal alumina lattice. The dislocations have Burgers vectors of the type (1120) and (1010), which are the Burgers vectors of slip dislocations in the basal plane. Basal plane twinning is also observed, and the twin boundaries are found to contain interfacial dislocations. While dislocation generation occurs primarily on basal planes, some dislocation activity is also noted on prism, (1100), and on rhombohedral, (1101), planes. Nonbasal twinning, however, has not been detected. The lattice damage is discussed in terms of possible dislocation and twinning mechanisms.

  6. Sports-related shoulder dislocations: a state-hospital experience.

    PubMed

    Hazmy, C H Wan; Parwathi, A

    2005-07-01

    This retrospective study was conducted in a state hospital set-up and aimed at identifying the incidence of sports-related shoulder dislocations and their characteristics and the sports events involved. All patients with shoulder dislocation related to sporting activities admitted to the hospital from January 1999 to December 2002 were included in the study. There were 18 sports-related shoulder dislocations out of 106 all shoulder dislocations admitted during this 4-year period. The average age of the patients was 25.4 years. All but two were male. All were anterior dislocations. Recurrent dislocation constitutes 78% of the cases with an average of 3 times re-dislocation. Rugby and badminton were the major contributors to the injuries followed by volleyball, soccer and swimming. Conservative treatment was successfully instituted for 88% of the patients and 12% opted for surgical intervention.

  7. Sports-related shoulder dislocations: a state-hospital experience.

    PubMed

    Hazmy, C H Wan; Parwathi, A

    2005-07-01

    This retrospective study was conducted in a state hospital set-up and aimed at identifying the incidence of sports-related shoulder dislocations and their characteristics and the sports events involved. All patients with shoulder dislocation related to sporting activities admitted to the hospital from January 1999 to December 2002 were included in the study. There were 18 sports-related shoulder dislocations out of 106 all shoulder dislocations admitted during this 4-year period. The average age of the patients was 25.4 years. All but two were male. All were anterior dislocations. Recurrent dislocation constitutes 78% of the cases with an average of 3 times re-dislocation. Rugby and badminton were the major contributors to the injuries followed by volleyball, soccer and swimming. Conservative treatment was successfully instituted for 88% of the patients and 12% opted for surgical intervention. PMID:16381278

  8. Postural activity and motion sickness during video game play in children and adults.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chih-Hui; Pan, Wu-Wen; Tseng, Li-Ya; Stoffregen, Thomas A

    2012-03-01

    Research has confirmed that console video games give rise to motion sickness in many adults. During exposure to console video games, there are differences in postural activity (movement of the head and torso) between participants who later experience motion sickness and those who do not, confirming a prediction of the postural instability theory of motion sickness. Previous research has not addressed relations between video games, movement and motion sickness in children. We evaluated the nauseogenic properties of a commercially available console video game in both adults and 10-year-old children. Individuals played the game for up to 50 min and were instructed to discontinue immediately if they experienced any symptoms of motion sickness, however mild. During game play, we monitored movement of the head and torso. Motion sickness was reported by 67% of adults and by 56% of children; these rates did not differ. As a group, children moved more than adults. Across age groups, the positional variability of the head and torso increased over time during game play. In addition, we found differences in movement between participants who later reported motion sickness and those who did not. Some of these differences were general across age groups but we also found significant differences between the movement of adults and children who later reported motion sickness. The results confirm that console video games can induce motion sickness in children and demonstrate that changes in postural activity precede the onset of subjective symptoms of motion sickness in children.

  9. Medial dislocation of the medial meniscus.

    PubMed

    Chan, S K L; Robb, C A; Singh, T; Chugh, S

    2010-01-01

    We present the first reported case of symptomatic medial dislocation of the medial meniscus in a patient who had no previous history of trauma and who had an otherwise normal knee. The treatment of instability of the medial meniscus is controversial and studies have indicated that certain individuals without a firm meniscal bony insertion may be predisposed to meniscal dislocation. In our patient, the meniscal instability interfered with daily activities. Operative stabilisation by reconstruction of the meniscotibial ligaments cured the symptoms.

  10. Effective temperature and spontaneous collective motion of active matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shenshen; Wolynes, Peter

    2012-02-01

    Spontaneous directed motion, a hallmark of cell biology, is unusual in classical statistical physics. Here we study, using both numerical and analytical methods, organized motion in models of the cytoskeleton in which constituents are driven by energy-consuming motors. Although systems driven by small-step motors are described by an effective temperature and are thus quiescent, at higher order in step size, both homogeneous and inhomogeneous, flowing and oscillating behavior emerges. Motors that respond with a negative susceptibility to imposed forces lead to an apparent negative temperature system in which beautiful structures form resembling the asters seen in cell division.

  11. Cyclic Degradation of Co49Ni21Ga30 High-Temperature Shape Memory Alloy: On the Roles of Dislocation Activity and Chemical Order

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krooß, P.; Kadletz, P. M.; Somsen, C.; Gutmann, M. J.; Chumlyakov, Y. I.; Schmahl, W. W.; Maier, H. J.; Niendorf, T.

    2016-03-01

    Conventional shape memory alloys (SMAs), such as binary Ni-Ti, are typically limited to service temperatures below 100 °C. Recent studies on Co-Ni-Ga high-temperature SMAs revealed the potential that these alloys can be used up to temperatures of about 400 °C. Analysis of the cyclic functional properties showed that degradation in these alloys is mainly triggered by intensive dislocation motion. However, data on the cyclic stress-strain response and the mechanisms leading to functional degradation of Co-Ni-Ga above 300 °C were missing in open literature. Current results reveal that above 300 °C diffusion-controlled mechanisms, e.g., precipitation of secondary phases and changes in the chemical degree of order, seem to dictate cyclic instability. Detailed neutron and transmission electron microscopy analyses following superelastic cycling in a temperature range of 200-400 °C were employed to characterize the changes in degradation behavior above 300 °C.

  12. The effects of Juchumseogi and Juchumseo Jireugi motions of taekwondo on muscle activation of paraspinal muscles

    PubMed Central

    Baek, Jongmyeng; Lee, Jaeseok; Kim, Jonghyun; Kim, Jeonghun; Han, Dongwook; Byun, Sunghak

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study is to examine the effects of Juchumseogi and Juchumseo Jireugi motions on muscle activation of the paraspinal muscles. [Subjects] The subjects of this study were 20 healthy male students who listened to an explanation of the study methods and the purpose of the experiment, and agreed to participate in the study. [Methods] Muscle activation measurements of the paraspinal muscles at C3, T7, and L3 were taken while standing still and while performing Juchumseogi and Juchumseo Jireugi movements. The Juchumseogi and Juchumseo Jireugi motions were performed 3 times, and its mean value was used for analysis. [Results] The right and left muscle activation of paraspinal muscles induced by Juchumseogi and Juchumseo Jireugi motions in C3 and T7 were significantly higher than those induced by just standing. Muscle activation of paraspinal muscles induced by Juchumseo Jireugi motions in C3, T7, and L3 were significantly higher than those induced by Juchumseogi alone. The right and left muscle activation of paraspinal muscles induced by Juchumseo Jireugi motion in C3, T7, and L3 were significantly higher than those induced by standing and Juchumseogi alone. [Conclusion] This study demonstrated that Juchumseogi and Juchumseo Jireugi motions of Taekwondo could increase muscle activation of paraspinal muscles, and Juchumseo Jireugi motions were more effective for enhancing muscle activation of paraspinal muscles. PMID:26504295

  13. The effects of Juchumseogi and Juchumseo Jireugi motions of taekwondo on muscle activation of paraspinal muscles.

    PubMed

    Baek, Jongmyeng; Lee, Jaeseok; Kim, Jonghyun; Kim, Jeonghun; Han, Dongwook; Byun, Sunghak

    2015-09-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study is to examine the effects of Juchumseogi and Juchumseo Jireugi motions on muscle activation of the paraspinal muscles. [Subjects] The subjects of this study were 20 healthy male students who listened to an explanation of the study methods and the purpose of the experiment, and agreed to participate in the study. [Methods] Muscle activation measurements of the paraspinal muscles at C3, T7, and L3 were taken while standing still and while performing Juchumseogi and Juchumseo Jireugi movements. The Juchumseogi and Juchumseo Jireugi motions were performed 3 times, and its mean value was used for analysis. [Results] The right and left muscle activation of paraspinal muscles induced by Juchumseogi and Juchumseo Jireugi motions in C3 and T7 were significantly higher than those induced by just standing. Muscle activation of paraspinal muscles induced by Juchumseo Jireugi motions in C3, T7, and L3 were significantly higher than those induced by Juchumseogi alone. The right and left muscle activation of paraspinal muscles induced by Juchumseo Jireugi motion in C3, T7, and L3 were significantly higher than those induced by standing and Juchumseogi alone. [Conclusion] This study demonstrated that Juchumseogi and Juchumseo Jireugi motions of Taekwondo could increase muscle activation of paraspinal muscles, and Juchumseo Jireugi motions were more effective for enhancing muscle activation of paraspinal muscles.

  14. Medial subtalar dislocation.

    PubMed

    Kinik, H; Oktay, O; Arikan, M; Mergen, E

    1999-01-01

    We report a medial subtalar dislocation without fracture in an eighteen year old male injured during basketball game. He was successfully treated with closed reduction and cast immobilization. At one year follow-up he was symptomless.

  15. Analysis of neck muscle activity and comparison of head movement and body movement during rotational motion.

    PubMed

    Sirikantharajah, Shahini; Valter McConville, Kristiina M; Zolfaghari, Nika

    2015-08-01

    The neck is a very delicate part of the body that is highly prone to whiplash injuries, during jerk. A lot of the research relating to whiplash injuries performed to date has been tested in environments with linear motions and have mostly applied their work to car collisions. Whiplash injuries can also affect disabled individuals during falls, bed transfers, and while travelling in wheelchairs. The primary objective of this paper was to focus on neck and body behaviour during rotational motion, rather than linear motion which has been often associated with car collisions. This paper takes the current motion signal processing technique a step further by computing the differential between head and body motion. Neck electromyogram (EMG) and angular velocity data of the head and body were acquired simultaneously from 20 subjects, as they were rotated 45 degrees in the forward pitch plane, with and without visual input, in a motion simulator. The centre of rotation (COR) on the simulator was located behind the subject Results showed that neck muscle behaviour was affected by the forward rotations, as well as visual input. Anterior neck muscles were most active during forward rotations and trials including VR. Maximum effective muscle power and activity of 10.54% and 55.72 (mV/mV)·s were reached respectively. Furthermore, during forward rotations the motion profiles started off with dominance in body motion, followed by dominance in head motion.

  16. Analysis of neck muscle activity and comparison of head movement and body movement during rotational motion.

    PubMed

    Sirikantharajah, Shahini; Valter McConville, Kristiina M; Zolfaghari, Nika

    2015-08-01

    The neck is a very delicate part of the body that is highly prone to whiplash injuries, during jerk. A lot of the research relating to whiplash injuries performed to date has been tested in environments with linear motions and have mostly applied their work to car collisions. Whiplash injuries can also affect disabled individuals during falls, bed transfers, and while travelling in wheelchairs. The primary objective of this paper was to focus on neck and body behaviour during rotational motion, rather than linear motion which has been often associated with car collisions. This paper takes the current motion signal processing technique a step further by computing the differential between head and body motion. Neck electromyogram (EMG) and angular velocity data of the head and body were acquired simultaneously from 20 subjects, as they were rotated 45 degrees in the forward pitch plane, with and without visual input, in a motion simulator. The centre of rotation (COR) on the simulator was located behind the subject Results showed that neck muscle behaviour was affected by the forward rotations, as well as visual input. Anterior neck muscles were most active during forward rotations and trials including VR. Maximum effective muscle power and activity of 10.54% and 55.72 (mV/mV)·s were reached respectively. Furthermore, during forward rotations the motion profiles started off with dominance in body motion, followed by dominance in head motion. PMID:26737049

  17. Effects of attention and perceptual uncertainty on cerebellar activity during visual motion perception.

    PubMed

    Baumann, Oliver; Mattingley, Jason B

    2014-02-01

    Recent clinical and neuroimaging studies have revealed that the human cerebellum plays a role in visual motion perception, but the nature of its contribution to this function is not understood. Some reports suggest that the cerebellum might facilitate motion perception by aiding attentive tracking of visual objects. Others have identified a particular role for the cerebellum in discriminating motion signals in perceptually uncertain conditions. Here, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging to determine the degree to which cerebellar involvement in visual motion perception can be explained by a role in sustained attentive tracking of moving stimuli in contrast to a role in visual motion discrimination. While holding the visual displays constant, we manipulated attention by having participants attend covertly to a field of random-dot motion or a colored spot at fixation. Perceptual uncertainty was manipulated by varying the percentage of signal dots contained within the random-dot arrays. We found that attention to motion under high perceptual uncertainty was associated with strong activity in left cerebellar lobules VI and VII. By contrast, attending to motion under low perceptual uncertainty did not cause differential activation in the cerebellum. We found no evidence to support the suggestion that the cerebellum is involved in simple attentive tracking of salient moving objects. Instead, our results indicate that specific subregions of the cerebellum are involved in facilitating the detection and discrimination of task-relevant moving objects under conditions of high perceptual uncertainty. We conclude that the cerebellum aids motion perception under conditions of high perceptual demand.

  18. Dislocation electrical conductivity of synthetic diamond films

    SciTech Connect

    Samsonenko, S. N. Samsonenko, N. D.

    2009-05-15

    A relationship between the electric resistance of single-crystal homoepitaxial and polycrystalline diamond films and their internal structure has been investigated. It is established that the electrical conductivity of undoped homoepitaxial and polycrystalline diamond films is directly related to the dislocation density in them. A relation linking the resistivity {rho} ({approx}10{sup 13}-10{sup 15} {omega} cm) with the dislocation density {gamma} ({approx}10{sup 14}-4 x 10{sup 16} m{sup -2}) is obtained. The character of this correlation is similar for both groups of homoepitaxial and polycrystalline diamond films. Thin ({approx}1-8 {mu}m) homoepitaxial and polycrystalline diamond films with small-angle dislocation boundaries between mosaic blocks exhibit dislocation conductivity. The activation energy of dislocation acceptor centers was calculated from the temperature dependence of the conductivity and was found to be {approx}0.3 eV. The conduction of thick diamond films (h > 10 {mu}m) with the resistivity {rho} {approx} 10{sup 8} {omega} cm is determined by the conduction of intercrystallite boundaries, which have a nondiamond hydrogenated structure. The electronic properties of the diamond films are compared with those of natural semiconductor diamonds of types IIb and Ic, in which dislocation acceptor centers have activation energies in the range 0.2-0.35 eV and are responsible for hole conduction.

  19. Tuning active Brownian motion with shot-noise energy pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiasconaro, Alessandro; Gudowska-Nowak, Ewa; Ebeling, Werner

    2009-01-01

    The main aim of this work is to explore the possibility of modeling the biological energy support mediated by absorption of ATP (adenosine triphosphate) as an energetic shot noise. We develop a general model with discrete input of energy pulses and study shot-noise-driven ratchets. We consider these ratchets as prototypes of Brownian motors driven by energy-rich ATP molecules. Our model is a stochastic machine able to acquire energy from the environment and convert it into kinetic energy of motion. We present characteristic features and demonstrate the possibility of tuning these motors by adapting the mean frequency of the discrete energy inputs, which are described as a special shot noise. In particular, the effect of stochastically driven directionality and uphill flux in systems acquiring energy from the shot noise is analyzed. As a possible application we consider the motion of kinesin on a microtubule under a constant load force.

  20. Dislocation gliding and cross-hatch morphology formation in AIII-BV epitaxial heterostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Kovalskiy, V. A. Vergeles, P. S.; Eremenko, V. G.; Fokin, D. A.

    2014-12-08

    An approach for understanding the origin of cross-hatch pattern (CHP) on the surface of lattice mismatched GaMnAs/InGaAs samples grown on GaAs (001) substrates is developed. It is argued that the motion of threading dislocations in the (111) slip planes during the relaxation of InGaAs buffer layer is more complicated process and its features are similar to the ones of dislocation half-loops gliding in plastically deformed crystals. The heterostructures were characterized by atomic force microscopy and electron beam induced current (EBIC). Detailed EBIC experiments revealed contrast features, which cannot be accounted for by the electrical activity of misfit dislocations at the buffer/substrate interface. We attribute these features to specific extended defects (EDs) generated by moving threading dislocations in the partially relaxed InGaAs layers. We believe that the core topology, surface reconstruction, and elastic strains from these EDs accommodated in slip planes play an important role in the CHP formation. The study of such electrically active EDs will allow further understanding of degradation and changes in characteristics of quantum devices based on strained heterostructures.

  1. Dislocation gliding and cross-hatch morphology formation in AIII-BV epitaxial heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalskiy, V. A.; Vergeles, P. S.; Eremenko, V. G.; Fokin, D. A.; Dorokhin, M. V.; Danilov, Yu. A.; Zvonkov, B. N.

    2014-12-01

    An approach for understanding the origin of cross-hatch pattern (CHP) on the surface of lattice mismatched GaMnAs/InGaAs samples grown on GaAs (001) substrates is developed. It is argued that the motion of threading dislocations in the {111} slip planes during the relaxation of InGaAs buffer layer is more complicated process and its features are similar to the ones of dislocation half-loops gliding in plastically deformed crystals. The heterostructures were characterized by atomic force microscopy and electron beam induced current (EBIC). Detailed EBIC experiments revealed contrast features, which cannot be accounted for by the electrical activity of misfit dislocations at the buffer/substrate interface. We attribute these features to specific extended defects (EDs) generated by moving threading dislocations in the partially relaxed InGaAs layers. We believe that the core topology, surface reconstruction, and elastic strains from these EDs accommodated in slip planes play an important role in the CHP formation. The study of such electrically active EDs will allow further understanding of degradation and changes in characteristics of quantum devices based on strained heterostructures.

  2. Localized, Non-Harmonic Active Flap Motions for Low Frequency In-Plane Rotor Noise Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sim, Ben W.; Potsdam, Mark; Kitaplioglu, Cahit; LeMasurier, Philip; Lorber, Peter; Andrews, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    A first-of-its-kind demonstration of the use of localized, non-harmonic active flap motions, for suppressing low frequency, in-plane rotor noise, is reported in this paper. Operational feasibility is verified via testing of the full-scale AATD/Sikorsky/UTRC active flap demonstration rotor in the NFAC's 40- by 80-Foot anechoic wind tunnel. Effectiveness of using localized, non-harmonic active flap motions are compared to conventional four-per-rev harmonic flap motions, and also active flap motions derived from closed-loop acoustics implementations. All three approaches resulted in approximately the same noise reductions over an in-plane three-by-three microphone array installed forward and near in-plane of the rotor in the nearfield. It is also reported that using an active flap in this localized, non-harmonic manner, resulted in no more that 2% rotor performance penalty, but had the tendency to incur higher hub vibration levels.

  3. Physical Activity Recognition Based on Motion in Images Acquired by a Wearable Camera.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hong; Li, Lu; Jia, Wenyan; Fernstrom, John D; Sclabassi, Robert J; Mao, Zhi-Hong; Sun, Mingui

    2011-06-01

    A new technique to extract and evaluate physical activity patterns from image sequences captured by a wearable camera is presented in this paper. Unlike standard activity recognition schemes, the video data captured by our device do not include the wearer him/herself. The physical activity of the wearer, such as walking or exercising, is analyzed indirectly through the camera motion extracted from the acquired video frames. Two key tasks, pixel correspondence identification and motion feature extraction, are studied to recognize activity patterns. We utilize a multiscale approach to identify pixel correspondences. When compared with the existing methods such as the Good Features detector and the Speed-up Robust Feature (SURF) detector, our technique is more accurate and computationally efficient. Once the pixel correspondences are determined which define representative motion vectors, we build a set of activity pattern features based on motion statistics in each frame. Finally, the physical activity of the person wearing a camera is determined according to the global motion distribution in the video. Our algorithms are tested using different machine learning techniques such as the K-Nearest Neighbor (KNN), Naive Bayesian and Support Vector Machine (SVM). The results show that many types of physical activities can be recognized from field acquired real-world video. Our results also indicate that, with a design of specific motion features in the input vectors, different classifiers can be used successfully with similar performances.

  4. Physical Activity Recognition Based on Motion in Images Acquired by a Wearable Camera

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hong; Li, Lu; Jia, Wenyan; Fernstrom, John D.; Sclabassi, Robert J.; Mao, Zhi-Hong; Sun, Mingui

    2011-01-01

    A new technique to extract and evaluate physical activity patterns from image sequences captured by a wearable camera is presented in this paper. Unlike standard activity recognition schemes, the video data captured by our device do not include the wearer him/herself. The physical activity of the wearer, such as walking or exercising, is analyzed indirectly through the camera motion extracted from the acquired video frames. Two key tasks, pixel correspondence identification and motion feature extraction, are studied to recognize activity patterns. We utilize a multiscale approach to identify pixel correspondences. When compared with the existing methods such as the Good Features detector and the Speed-up Robust Feature (SURF) detector, our technique is more accurate and computationally efficient. Once the pixel correspondences are determined which define representative motion vectors, we build a set of activity pattern features based on motion statistics in each frame. Finally, the physical activity of the person wearing a camera is determined according to the global motion distribution in the video. Our algorithms are tested using different machine learning techniques such as the K-Nearest Neighbor (KNN), Naive Bayesian and Support Vector Machine (SVM). The results show that many types of physical activities can be recognized from field acquired real-world video. Our results also indicate that, with a design of specific motion features in the input vectors, different classifiers can be used successfully with similar performances. PMID:21779142

  5. Moment tensors of a dislocation in a porous medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhi; Hu, Hengshan

    2016-06-01

    A dislocation can be represented by a moment tensor for calculating seismic waves. However, the moment tensor expression was derived in an elastic medium and cannot completely describe a dislocation in a porous medium. In this paper, effective moment tensors of a dislocation in a porous medium are derived. It is found that the dislocation is equivalent to two independent moment tensors, i.e., the bulk moment tensor acting on the bulk of the porous medium and the isotropic fluid moment tensor acting on the pore fluid. Both of them are caused by the solid dislocation as well as the fluid-solid relative motion corresponding to fluid injection towards the surrounding rocks (or fluid outflow) through the fault plane. For a shear dislocation, the fluid moment tensor is zero, and the dislocation is equivalent to a double couple acting on the bulk; for an opening dislocation or fluid injection, the two moment tensors are needed to describe the source. The fluid moment tensor only affects the radiated compressional waves. By calculating the ratio of the radiation fields generated by unit fluid moment tensor and bulk moment tensor, it is found that the fast compressional wave radiated by the bulk moment tensor is much stronger than that radiated by the fluid moment tensor, while the slow compressional wave radiated by the fluid moment tensor is several times stronger than that radiated by the bulk moment tensor.

  6. Linking Nanoscales and Dislocation Shielding to the Ductile-Brittle Transition of Silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hintsala, Eric; Teresi, Claire; Gerberich, William W.

    2016-06-01

    The ductile-brittle transition of nano/microscale silicon is explored at low-temperature, high stress conditions. A pathway to eventual mechanism maps describing this ductile-brittle transition behavior using sample size, strain rate, and temperature is outlined. First, a discussion of variables controlling the BDT in silicon is given and discussed in the context of development of eventual modeling that could simultaneously incorporate all their effects. For description of energy dissipation by dislocation nucleation from a crack tip, three critical input parameters are identified: the effective stress, activation volume, and activation energy for dislocation motion. These are discussed individually relating to the controlling variables for the BDT. Lastly, possibilities for measuring these parameters experimentally are also described.

  7. Motion sickness susceptibility in parabolic flight and velocity storage activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dizio, Paul; Lackner, James R.

    1991-01-01

    In parabolic flight experiments, postrotary nystagmus is as found to be differentially suppressed in free fall (G) and in a high gravitoinertial force (1.8 G) background relative to 1 G. In addition, the influence of postrotary head movements on nystagmus suppression was found to be contingent on G-dependency of the velocity storage and dumping mechanisms. Here, susceptibility to motion sickness during head movements in 0 G and 1.8 G was rank-correlated with the following: (1) the decay time constant of the slow phase velocity of postrotary nystagmus under 1 G, no head movement, baseline conditions, (2) the extent of time constant reduction elicited in 0 G and 1.8 G; (3) the extent of time constant reduction elicited by head tilts in 1 G; and (4) changes in the extent of time constants reduction in 0 G and 1.8 G over repeated tests. Susceptibility was significantly correlated with the extent to which a head movement reduced the time constant in 1 G, was weakly correlated with the baseline time constant, but was not correlated with the extent of reduction in 0 G or 1.8 G. This pattern suggests a link between mechanisms evoking symptoms of space motion sickness and the mechanisms of velocity storage and dumping. Experimental means of evaluating this link are described.

  8. Comparison of dislocation density tensor fields derived from discrete dislocation dynamics and crystal plasticity simulations of torsion

    DOE PAGES

    Jones, Reese E.; Zimmerman, Jonathan A.; Po, Giacomo; Mandadapu, Kranthi

    2016-02-01

    Accurate simulation of the plastic deformation of ductile metals is important to the design of structures and components to performance and failure criteria. Many techniques exist that address the length scales relevant to deformation processes, including dislocation dynamics (DD), which models the interaction and evolution of discrete dislocation line segments, and crystal plasticity (CP), which incorporates the crystalline nature and restricted motion of dislocations into a higher scale continuous field framework. While these two methods are conceptually related, there have been only nominal efforts focused at the global material response that use DD-generated information to enhance the fidelity of CPmore » models. To ascertain to what degree the predictions of CP are consistent with those of DD, we compare their global and microstructural response in a number of deformation modes. After using nominally homogeneous compression and shear deformation dislocation dynamics simulations to calibrate crystal plasticity ow rule parameters, we compare not only the system-level stress-strain response of prismatic wires in torsion but also the resulting geometrically necessary dislocation density fields. To establish a connection between explicit description of dislocations and the continuum assumed with crystal plasticity simulations we ascertain the minimum length-scale at which meaningful dislocation density fields appear. Furthermore, our results show that, for the case of torsion, that the two material models can produce comparable spatial dislocation density distributions.« less

  9. Posteroinferior acromioclavicular dislocation with supraspinatus tear. A case report.

    PubMed

    Yanagisawa, K; Hamada, K; Gotoh, M; Miyazaki, S; Fukuda, H

    1998-08-01

    A 20-year-old man was treated for posteroinferior acromioclavicular dislocation. The diagnosis was based on standard radiographs and intraoperative findings. The distal end of the clavicle had impaled the supraspinatus muscle. Open reduction was performed 2 weeks after injury, followed by wire fixation of the acromioclavicular joint and repair of the torn superior acromioclavicular ligament and coracoclavicular ligaments. Two years after the procedure, standard radiographs revealed normal anatomic alignment of the acromioclavicular joint, with pain free range of motion. Active elevation in the scapular plane was 180 degrees, active external rotation was 80 degrees in the anatomic position, and passive internal rotation was to the T5 vertebra. The patient returned to playing baseball and tennis and was satisfied with the postoperative result.

  10. Atomistic simulations of dislocation pileup: Grain boundaries interaction

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Jian

    2015-05-27

    Here, using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, we studied the dislocation pileup–grain boundary (GB) interactions. Two Σ11 asymmetrical tilt grain boundaries in Al are studied to explore the influence of orientation relationship and interface structure on dislocation activities at grain boundaries. To mimic the reality of a dislocation pileup in a coarse-grained polycrystalline, we optimized the dislocation population in MD simulations and developed a predict-correct method to create a dislocation pileup in MD simulations. MD simulations explored several kinetic processes of dislocations–GB reactions: grain boundary sliding, grain boundary migration, slip transmission, dislocation reflection, reconstruction of grain boundary, and the correlation ofmore » these kinetic processes with the available slip systems across the GB and atomic structures of the GB.« less

  11. Atomistic simulations of dislocation pileup: Grain boundaries interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jian

    2015-05-27

    Here, using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, we studied the dislocation pileup–grain boundary (GB) interactions. Two Σ11 asymmetrical tilt grain boundaries in Al are studied to explore the influence of orientation relationship and interface structure on dislocation activities at grain boundaries. To mimic the reality of a dislocation pileup in a coarse-grained polycrystalline, we optimized the dislocation population in MD simulations and developed a predict-correct method to create a dislocation pileup in MD simulations. MD simulations explored several kinetic processes of dislocations–GB reactions: grain boundary sliding, grain boundary migration, slip transmission, dislocation reflection, reconstruction of grain boundary, and the correlation of these kinetic processes with the available slip systems across the GB and atomic structures of the GB.

  12. Tracking of EEG activity using motion estimation to understand brain wiring.

    PubMed

    Nisar, Humaira; Malik, Aamir Saeed; Ullah, Rafi; Shim, Seong-O; Bawakid, Abdullah; Khan, Muhammad Burhan; Subhani, Ahmad Rauf

    2015-01-01

    The fundamental step in brain research deals with recording electroencephalogram (EEG) signals and then investigating the recorded signals quantitatively. Topographic EEG (visual spatial representation of EEG signal) is commonly referred to as brain topomaps or brain EEG maps. In this chapter, full search full search block motion estimation algorithm has been employed to track the brain activity in brain topomaps to understand the mechanism of brain wiring. The behavior of EEG topomaps is examined throughout a particular brain activation with respect to time. Motion vectors are used to track the brain activation over the scalp during the activation period. Using motion estimation it is possible to track the path from the starting point of activation to the final point of activation. Thus it is possible to track the path of a signal across various lobes.

  13. sEMG during Whole-Body Vibration Contains Motion Artifacts and Reflex Activity

    PubMed Central

    Lienhard, Karin; Cabasson, Aline; Meste, Olivier; Colson, Serge S.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether the excessive spikes observed in the surface electromyography (sEMG) spectrum recorded during whole-body vibration (WBV) exercises contain motion artifacts and/or reflex activity. The occurrence of motion artifacts was tested by electrical recordings of the patella. The involvement of reflex activity was investigated by analyzing the magnitude of the isolated spikes during changes in voluntary background muscle activity. Eighteen physically active volunteers performed static squats while the sEMG was measured of five lower limb muscles during vertical WBV using no load and an additional load of 33 kg. In order to record motion artifacts during WBV, a pair of electrodes was positioned on the patella with several layers of tape between skin and electrodes. Spectral analysis of the patella signal revealed recordings of motion artifacts as high peaks at the vibration frequency (fundamental) and marginal peaks at the multiple harmonics were observed. For the sEMG recordings, the root mean square of the spikes increased with increasing additional loads (p < 0.05), and was significantly correlated to the sEMG signal without the spikes of the respective muscle (r range: 0.54 - 0.92, p < 0.05). This finding indicates that reflex activity might be contained in the isolated spikes, as identical behavior has been found for stretch reflex responses evoked during direct vibration. In conclusion, the spikes visible in the sEMG spectrum during WBV exercises contain motion artifacts and possibly reflex activity. Key points The spikes observed in the sEMG spectrum during WBV exercises contain motion artifacts and possibly reflex activity The motion artifacts are more pronounced in the first spike than the following spikes in the sEMG spectrum Reflex activity during WBV exercises is enhanced with an additional load of approximately 50% of the body mass PMID:25729290

  14. 20 CFR 663.115 - What are the eligibility criteria for core services for dislocated workers in the adult and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... services for dislocated workers in the adult and dislocated worker programs? 663.115 Section 663.115 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR ADULT AND DISLOCATED WORKER ACTIVITIES UNDER TITLE I OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT Delivery of Adult and Dislocated Worker...

  15. Console video games, postural activity, and motion sickness during passive restraint.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chih-Hui; Pan, Wu-Wen; Chen, Fu-Chen; Stoffregen, Thomas A

    2013-08-01

    We examined the influence of passive restraint on postural activity and motion sickness in individuals who actively controlled a potentially nauseogenic visual motion stimulus (a driving video game). Twenty-four adults (20.09 ± 1.56 years; 167.80 ± 7.94 cm; 59.02 ± 9.18 kg) were recruited as participants. Using elastic bands, standing participants were passively restrained at the head, shoulders, hips, and knees. During restraint, participants played (i.e., controlled) a driving video game (a motorcycle race), for 50 min. During game play, we recorded the movement of the head and torso, using a magnetic tracking system. Following game play, participants answered a forced choice, yes/no question about whether they were motion sick, and were assigned to sick and well groups on this basis. In addition, before and after game play, participants completed the Simulator Sickness Questionnaire, which provided numerical ratings of the severity of individual symptoms. Five of 24 participants (20.83 %) reported motion sickness. Participants moved despite being passively restrained. Both the magnitude and the temporal dynamics of movement differed between the sick and well groups. The results show that passive restraint of the body can reduce motion sickness when the nauseogenic visual stimulus is under participants' active control and confirm that motion sickness is preceded by distinct patterns of postural activity even during passive restraint.

  16. Effects of attention and perceptual uncertainty on cerebellar activity during visual motion perception.

    PubMed

    Baumann, Oliver; Mattingley, Jason B

    2014-02-01

    Recent clinical and neuroimaging studies have revealed that the human cerebellum plays a role in visual motion perception, but the nature of its contribution to this function is not understood. Some reports suggest that the cerebellum might facilitate motion perception by aiding attentive tracking of visual objects. Others have identified a particular role for the cerebellum in discriminating motion signals in perceptually uncertain conditions. Here, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging to determine the degree to which cerebellar involvement in visual motion perception can be explained by a role in sustained attentive tracking of moving stimuli in contrast to a role in visual motion discrimination. While holding the visual displays constant, we manipulated attention by having participants attend covertly to a field of random-dot motion or a colored spot at fixation. Perceptual uncertainty was manipulated by varying the percentage of signal dots contained within the random-dot arrays. We found that attention to motion under high perceptual uncertainty was associated with strong activity in left cerebellar lobules VI and VII. By contrast, attending to motion under low perceptual uncertainty did not cause differential activation in the cerebellum. We found no evidence to support the suggestion that the cerebellum is involved in simple attentive tracking of salient moving objects. Instead, our results indicate that specific subregions of the cerebellum are involved in facilitating the detection and discrimination of task-relevant moving objects under conditions of high perceptual uncertainty. We conclude that the cerebellum aids motion perception under conditions of high perceptual demand. PMID:23982589

  17. Thermal stress induced dislocation distribution in directional solidification of Si for PV application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiptner, Karolin; Gao, Bing; Harada, Hirofumi; Miyamura, Yoshiji; Fukuzawa, Masayuki; Kakimoto, Koichi; Sekiguchi, Takashi

    2014-12-01

    This paper presents the limitation of the cast technique for silicon growth and the obstacle to reduce the dislocation density below 103 cm-2. The thermal stress induced dislocation density, independent of other dislocation sources, is determined and the result suggests that local dislocation densities as high as 104 cm-2 are readily introduced alone in the cooling period of the crystal growth. Areas of high residual strain and dislocation densities are identified and presented. The experimental results are correlated with numerical simulation based on a three-dimensional Haasen-Alexander-Sumino (HAS) model. The dislocation introduction is caused by an activation of different slip systems in different ingot areas.

  18. The visual perception of natural motion: abnormal task-related neural activity in DYT1 dystonia.

    PubMed

    Sako, Wataru; Fujita, Koji; Vo, An; Rucker, Janet C; Rizzo, John-Ross; Niethammer, Martin; Carbon, Maren; Bressman, Susan B; Uluğ, Aziz M; Eidelberg, David

    2015-12-01

    Although primary dystonia is defined by its characteristic motor manifestations, non-motor signs and symptoms have increasingly been recognized in this disorder. Recent neuroimaging studies have related the motor features of primary dystonia to connectivity changes in cerebello-thalamo-cortical pathways. It is not known, however, whether the non-motor manifestations of the disorder are associated with similar circuit abnormalities. To explore this possibility, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging to study primary dystonia and healthy volunteer subjects while they performed a motion perception task in which elliptical target trajectories were visually tracked on a computer screen. Prior functional magnetic resonance imaging studies of healthy subjects performing this task have revealed selective activation of motor regions during the perception of 'natural' versus 'unnatural' motion (defined respectively as trajectories with kinematic properties that either comply with or violate the two-thirds power law of motion). Several regions with significant connectivity changes in primary dystonia were situated in proximity to normal motion perception pathways, suggesting that abnormalities of these circuits may also be present in this disorder. To determine whether activation responses to natural versus unnatural motion in primary dystonia differ from normal, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging to study 10 DYT1 dystonia and 10 healthy control subjects at rest and during the perception of 'natural' and 'unnatural' motion. Both groups exhibited significant activation changes across perceptual conditions in the cerebellum, pons, and subthalamic nucleus. The two groups differed, however, in their responses to 'natural' versus 'unnatural' motion in these regions. In healthy subjects, regional activation was greater during the perception of natural (versus unnatural) motion (P < 0.05). By contrast, in DYT1 dystonia subjects, activation was relatively greater

  19. Congenital hip dislocation (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... by a blow, fall, or other trauma, a dislocation can also occur from birth. The cause is unknown but genetic factors may play a role. Problems resulting from very mild developmental dysplasia of the hip may not become apparent until the person is ...

  20. Dislocated Worker Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1988

    Due to the severe economic decline in the automobile manufacturing industry in southeastern Michigan, a Dislocated Workers Program has been developed through the partnership of the Flint Area Chamber of Commerce, three community colleges, the National Center for Research in Vocational Education, the Michigan State Department of Education, the…

  1. Dorsal radiocarpal fracture dislocation.

    PubMed

    Tanzer, T L; Horne, J G

    1980-11-01

    A case of a rare radiocarpal fracture dislocation in a 17-year-old girl, with persisting loss of radiocarpal joint space following reduction under hematoma block, is described. The wrist joint was exposed, and two osteochondral fragments were rotated 90 degrees and secured with 2.7-mm AO screws. Satisfactory healing followed 3 months postinjury.

  2. The influence of yaw motion on the perception of active vs passive visual curvilinear displacement.

    PubMed

    Savona, Florian; Stratulat, Anca Melania; Roussarie, Vincent; Bourdin, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    Self-motion perception, which partly determines the realism of dynamic driving simulators, is based on multisensory integration. However, it remains unclear how the brain integrates these cues to create adequate motion perception, especially for curvilinear displacements. In the present study, the effect of visual, inertial and visuo-inertial cues (concordant or discordant bimodal cues) on self-motion perception was analyzed. Subjects were asked to evaluate (externally produced) or produce (self-controlled) curvilinear displacements as accurately as possible. The results show systematic overestimation of displacement, with better performance for active subjects than for passive ones. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that participants used unimodal or bimodal cues differently in performing their activity. When passive, subjects systematically integrated visual and inertial cues even when discordant, but with weightings that depended on the dynamics. On the contrary, active subjects were able to reject the inertial cue when the discordance became too high, producing self-motion perception on the basis of more reliable information. Thereby, multisensory integration seems to follow a non-linear integration model of, i.e., the cues' weight changes with the cue reliability and/or the intensity of the stimuli, as reported by previous studies. These results represent a basis for the adaptation of motion cueing algorithms are developed for dynamic driving simulators, by taking into account the dynamics of simulated motion in line with the status of the participants (driver or passenger).

  3. Effects of eating on vection-induced motion sickness, cardiac vagal tone, and gastric myoelectric activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uijtdehaage, S. H.; Stern, R. M.; Koch, K. L.

    1992-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of food ingestion on motion sickness severity and its physiological mechanisms. Forty-six fasted subjects were assigned either to a meal group or to a no-meal group. Electrogastrographic (EGG) indices (normal 3 cpm activity and abnormal 4-9 cpm tachyarrhythmia) and respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) were measured before and after a meal and during a subsequent exposure to a rotating drum in which illusory self-motion was induced. The results indicated that food intake enhanced cardiac parasympathetic tone (RSA) and increased gastric 3 cpm activity. Postprandial effects on motion sickness severity remain equivocal due to group differences in RSA baseline levels. During drum rotation, dysrhythmic activity of the stomach (tachyarrhythmia) and vagal withdrawal were observed. Furthermore, high levels of vagal tone prior to drum rotation predicted a low incidence of motion sickness symptoms, and were associated positively with gastric 3 cpm activity and negatively with tachyarrhythmia. These data suggest that enhanced levels of parasympathetic activity can alleviate motion sickness symptoms by suppressing, in part, its dysrhythmic gastric underpinnings.

  4. Topological modes bound to dislocations in mechanical metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulose, Jayson; Chen, Bryan Gin-Ge; Vitelli, Vincenzo

    2015-02-01

    Mechanical metamaterials are artificial structures with unusual properties, such as negative Poisson ratio, bistability or tunable vibrational properties, that originate in the geometry of their unit cell. Often at the heart of such unusual behaviour is a soft mode: a motion that does not significantly stretch or compress the links between constituent elements. When activated by motors or external fields, soft modes become the building blocks of robots and smart materials. Here, we demonstrate the existence of topological soft modes that can be positioned at desired locations in a metamaterial while being robust against a wide range of structural deformations or changes in material parameters. These protected modes, localized at dislocations in deformed kagome and square lattices, are the mechanical analogue of topological states bound to defects in electronic systems. We create physical realizations of the topological modes in prototypes of kagome lattices built out of rigid triangular plates. We show mathematically that they originate from the interplay between two Berry phases: the Burgers vector of the dislocation and the topological polarization of the lattice. Our work paves the way towards engineering topologically protected nanomechanical structures for molecular robotics or information storage and read-out.

  5. Embodied Semiotic Activities and Their Role in the Construction of Mathematical Meaning of Motion Graphs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Botzer, Galit; Yerushalmy, Michal

    2008-01-01

    This paper examines the relation between bodily actions, artifact-mediated activities, and semiotic processes that students experience while producing and interpreting graphs of two-dimensional motion in the plane. We designed a technology-based setting that enabled students to engage in embodied semiotic activities and experience two modes of…

  6. Your Students Can Be Rocket Scientists! A Galaxy of Great Activities about Astronauts, Gravity, and Motion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kepler, Lynne

    1994-01-01

    Presents activities for a springtime Space Day that can teach students about astronauts, gravity, and motion. Activities include creating a paper bag spacecraft to study liftoff and having students simulate gravity's effects by walking in various manners and recording pulse rates. A list of resources is included. (SM)

  7. Dislocation Structure and Mobility in hcp ^{4}He.

    PubMed

    Landinez Borda, Edgar Josué; Cai, Wei; de Koning, Maurice

    2016-07-22

    Using path-integral Monte Carlo simulations, we assess the core structure and mobility of the screw and edge basal-plane dislocations in hcp ^{4}He. Our findings provide key insights into recent interpretations of giant plasticity and mass flow junction experiments. First, both dislocations are dissociated into nonsuperfluid Shockley partial dislocations separated by ribbons of stacking fault, suggesting that they are unlikely to act as one-dimensional channels that may display Lüttinger-liquid-like behavior. Second, the centroid positions of the partial cores are found to fluctuate substantially, even in the absence of applied shear stresses. This implies that the lattice resistance to motion of the partial dislocations is negligible, consistent with the recent experimental observations of giant plasticity. Further results indicate that both the structure of the partial cores and the zero-point fluctuations play a role in this extreme mobility. PMID:27494477

  8. Dislocation Structure and Mobility in hcp 4He

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landinez Borda, Edgar Josué; Cai, Wei; de Koning, Maurice

    2016-07-01

    Using path-integral Monte Carlo simulations, we assess the core structure and mobility of the screw and edge basal-plane dislocations in hcp 4He. Our findings provide key insights into recent interpretations of giant plasticity and mass flow junction experiments. First, both dislocations are dissociated into nonsuperfluid Shockley partial dislocations separated by ribbons of stacking fault, suggesting that they are unlikely to act as one-dimensional channels that may display Lüttinger-liquid-like behavior. Second, the centroid positions of the partial cores are found to fluctuate substantially, even in the absence of applied shear stresses. This implies that the lattice resistance to motion of the partial dislocations is negligible, consistent with the recent experimental observations of giant plasticity. Further results indicate that both the structure of the partial cores and the zero-point fluctuations play a role in this extreme mobility.

  9. Dislocation Structure and Mobility in hcp He4

    DOE PAGES

    Landinez Borda, Edgar Josue; Cai, Wei; de Koning, Maurice

    2016-07-20

    We assess the core structure and mobility of the screw and edge basal-plane dislocations in hcp 4He using path-integral Monte Carlo simulations. Our findings provide key insights into recent interpretations of giant plasticity and mass flow junction experiments. First, both dislocations are dissociated into nonsuperfluid Shockley partial dislocations separated by ribbons of stacking fault, suggesting that they are unlikely to act as one-dimensional channels that may display Lüttinger-liquid-like behavior. Second, the centroid positions of the partial cores are found to fluctuate substantially, even in the absence of applied shear stresses. This implies that the lattice resistance to motion of themore » partial dislocations is negligible, consistent with the recent experimental observations of giant plasticity. Our results indicate that both the structure of the partial cores and the zero-point fluctuations play a role in this extreme mobility.« less

  10. Transtriquetral perihamate fracture-dislocation: case report.

    PubMed

    Moraes, Frederico Barra de; Ferreira, Rodrigo Cunha; Geraldino, Stéphanie Zago; Farias, Renato Silva; Silva, Ricardo Pereira da; Kuwae, Mário Yoshihide

    2016-01-01

    The wrist is a region that is very vulnerable to injuries of the extremities. Among these injuries, fractures of the pyramidal bone (or triquetrum) in association with dislocation of the hamate and carpal instability are uncommon. They are generally correlated with high-energy trauma and may be associated with neurovascular deficits, muscle-tendon disorders, skin lesions or injuries to other carpal bones. Thus, in this report, one of these rare cases of transtriquetral perihamate fracture-dislocation with carpal instability is presented, diagnosed by means of radiography on the right wrist of the patient who presented pain, edema and limitation of flexion-extension of the carpus after trauma to the region. The stages of attending to the case are described, from the initial consultation to the surgical treatment and physiotherapy, which culminated in restoration of the strength and range of motion of the wrist.

  11. Morphometrical investigations on the reproductive activity of the ovaries in rats subjected to immobilization and to motion activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Konstantinov, N.; Cheresharov, L.; Toshkova, S.

    1982-01-01

    Wistar-strain white female rats were divided into three groups, with the first group subjected to motion loading, the second used as control, and the third group was immobilized. A considerable reduction in numbers of corpora lutea was observed in the immobilized group, together with smaller numbers of embryos, high percent of embryo mortality, fetal growth retardation, and endometrium disorders. The control group showed no deviation from normal conditions, and there was slight improvement in reproductive activity of animals under motion loading.

  12. Traumatic bilateral posterior hip dislocation in 10 year old male child.

    PubMed

    Garg, Vipul; Singh, Ajay Pal; Singh, Arun Pal; Bajaj, P S

    2014-09-01

    Traumatic bilateral posterior hip dislocation in skeletally immature patient is reported very less in literature. We report a 10 yr old boy presented to us following farmyard injury with bilateral posterior hip dislocation, which was reduced manually under sedation with uneventful follow-up and complete hip range of motion at 2 year. PMID:25983489

  13. Multimodal integration of self-motion cues in the vestibular system: active versus passive translations.

    PubMed

    Carriot, Jerome; Brooks, Jessica X; Cullen, Kathleen E

    2013-12-11

    The ability to keep track of where we are going as we navigate through our environment requires knowledge of our ongoing location and orientation. In response to passively applied motion, the otolith organs of the vestibular system encode changes in the velocity and direction of linear self-motion (i.e., heading). When self-motion is voluntarily generated, proprioceptive and motor efference copy information is also available to contribute to the brain's internal representation of current heading direction and speed. However to date, how the brain integrates these extra-vestibular cues with otolith signals during active linear self-motion remains unknown. Here, to address this question, we compared the responses of macaque vestibular neurons during active and passive translations. Single-unit recordings were made from a subgroup of neurons at the first central stage of sensory processing in the vestibular pathways involved in postural control and the computation of self-motion perception. Neurons responded far less robustly to otolith stimulation during self-generated than passive head translations. Yet, the mechanism underlying the marked cancellation of otolith signals did not affect other characteristics of neuronal responses (i.e., baseline firing rate, tuning ratio, orientation of maximal sensitivity vector). Transiently applied perturbations during active motion further established that an otolith cancellation signal was only gated in conditions where proprioceptive sensory feedback matched the motor-based expectation. Together our results have important implications for understanding the brain's ability to ensure accurate postural and motor control, as well as perceptual stability, during active self-motion.

  14. Spontaneous Motion in Hierarchically Assembled Active Cellular Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Daniel

    2013-03-01

    With exquisite precision and reproducibility, cells orchestrate the cooperative action of thousands of nanometer-sized molecular motors to carry out mechanical tasks at much larger length scales, such as cell motility, division and replication. Besides their biological importance, such inherently far-from-equilibrium processes are an inspiration for the development of soft materials with highly sought after biomimetic properties such as autonomous motility and self-healing. I will describe our exploration of such a class of biologically inspired soft active materials. Starting from extensile bundles comprised of microtubules and kinesin, we hierarchically assemble active analogs of polymeric gels, liquid crystals and emulsions. At high enough concentration, microtubule bundles form an active gel network capable of generating internally driven chaotic flows that enhance transport and fluid mixing. When confined to emulsion droplets, these 3D networks buckle onto the water-oil interface forming a dense thin film of bundles exhibiting cascades of collective buckling, fracture, and self-healing driven by internally generated stresses from the kinesin clusters. When compressed against surfaces, this active nematic cortex exerts traction stresses that propel the locomotion of the droplet. Taken together, these observations exemplify how assemblies of animate microscopic objects exhibit collective biomimetic properties that are fundamentally distinct from those found in materials assembled from inanimate building blocks. These assemblies, in turn, enable the generation of a new class of materials that exhibit macroscale flow phenomena emerging from nanoscale components.

  15. Dislocation pileup as a representation of strain accumulation on a strike-slip fault

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Savage, J.C.

    2006-01-01

    The conventional model of strain accumulation on a vertical transform fault is a discrete screw dislocation in an elastic half-space with the Burgers vector of the dislocation increasing at the rate of relative plate motion. It would be more realistic to replace that discrete dislocation by a dislocation distribution, presumably a pileup in which the individual dislocations are in equilibrium. The length of the pileup depends upon the applied stress and the amount of slip that has occurred at depth. I argue here that the dislocation pileup (the transition on the fault from no slip to slip at the full plate rate) occupies a substantial portion of the lithosphere thickness. A discrete dislocation at an adjustable depth can reproduce the surface deformation profile predicted by a pileup so closely that it will be difficult to distinguish between the two models. The locking depth (dislocation depth) of that discrete dislocation approximation is substantially (???30%) larger than that (depth to top of the pileup) in the pileup model. Thus, in inverting surface deformation data using the discrete dislocation model, the locking depth in the model should not be interpreted as the true locking depth. Although dislocation pileup models should provide a good explanation of the surface deformation near the fault trace, that explanation may not be adequate at greater distances from the fault trace because approximating the expected horizontally distributed deformation at subcrustal depths by uniform slip concentrated on the fault is not justified.

  16. Effects of edge dislocations on interstitial helium and helium cluster behavior in α-Fe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y. X.; Xu, Q.; Yoshiie, T.; Pan, Z. Y.

    2008-05-01

    The properties of interstitial He in the vicinity of an edge dislocation were studied using molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. The distribution of the binding energy of a single interstitial He to the dislocation with and without a jog is calculated. The results show that the distribution of the binding energy is governed by the elastic interaction between the interstitial He and the dislocation. The interstitial He is strongly attracted to the dislocation in the tensile region of the dislocation. The jog acts as a stronger sink to absorb interstitial He. The binding energy to the jog is even larger than that of the dislocation. A small He cluster (composed of three interstitial He atoms) was trapped by the dislocation core in the form of a chain along the dislocation line. The dislocation changes the migration behavior of the He cluster, and provides a pipe for the small cluster to exhibit one-dimensional motion. The diffusion of the He cluster in the dislocation is faster than in the defect-free iron, where the He cluster migrates three-dimensionally (3D). If the dislocation is decorated by a jog, the small cluster sinks deep into the jog. The jog prevents the He cluster from escaping.

  17. Strength and Dislocation Structure Evolution of Small Metals under Vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngan, Alfonso

    2015-03-01

    It is well-known that ultrasonic vibration can soften metals, and this phenomenon has been widely exploited in industrial applications concerning metal forming and bonding. In this work, we explore the effects of a superimposed small oscillatory load on metal plasticity, from the nano- to macro-size range, and from audible to ultrasonic frequency ranges. Macroscopic and nano-indentation were performed on aluminum, copper and molybdenum, and the results show that the simultaneous application of oscillatory stresses can lower the hardness of these samples. More interestingly, EBSD and TEM observations show that subgrain formation and reduction in dislocation density generally occurred when stress oscillations were applied. These findings point to an important knowledge gap in metal plasticity - the existing understanding of ultrasound softening in terms of the vibrations either imposing additional stress waves to augment the quasi-static applied load, or heating up the metal, whereas the metal's intrinsic deformation resistance or dislocation interactive processes are assumed unaltered by the ultrasound, is proven wrong by the present results. Furthermore, in the case of nanoindentation, the Continuous Stiffness Measurement technique for contact stiffness measurement assumes that the imposed signal-carrier oscillations do not intrinsically alter the material properties of the specimen, and again, the present results prove that this can be wrong. To understand the enhanced subgrain formation and dislocation annihilation, Discrete Dislocation Dynamics (DDD) simulations were carried out and these show that when an oscillatory stress is superimposed on a quasi-static applied stress, reversals of motion of dislocations may occur, and these allow the dislocations to revisit repeatedly suitable configurations for annihilation. DDD, however, was unable to predict the observed subgrain formation presumably because the number of dislocations that can be handled is not large

  18. Activation of the Human MT Complex by Motion in Depth Induced by a Moving Cast Shadow

    PubMed Central

    Katsuyama, Narumi; Usui, Nobuo; Taira, Masato

    2016-01-01

    A moving cast shadow is a powerful monocular depth cue for motion perception in depth. For example, when a cast shadow moves away from or toward an object in a two-dimensional plane, the object appears to move toward or away from the observer in depth, respectively, whereas the size and position of the object are constant. Although the cortical mechanisms underlying motion perception in depth by cast shadow are unknown, the human MT complex (hMT+) is likely involved in the process, as it is sensitive to motion in depth represented by binocular depth cues. In the present study, we examined this possibility by using a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) technique. First, we identified the cortical regions sensitive to the motion of a square in depth represented via binocular disparity. Consistent with previous studies, we observed significant activation in the bilateral hMT+, and defined functional regions of interest (ROIs) there. We then investigated the activity of the ROIs during observation of the following stimuli: 1) a central square that appeared to move back and forth via a moving cast shadow (mCS); 2) a segmented and scrambled cast shadow presented beside the square (sCS); and 3) no cast shadow (nCS). Participants perceived motion of the square in depth in the mCS condition only. The activity of the hMT+ was significantly higher in the mCS compared with the sCS and nCS conditions. Moreover, the hMT+ was activated equally in both hemispheres in the mCS condition, despite presentation of the cast shadow in the bottom-right quadrant of the stimulus. Perception of the square moving in depth across visual hemifields may be reflected in the bilateral activation of the hMT+. We concluded that the hMT+ is involved in motion perception in depth induced by moving cast shadow and by binocular disparity. PMID:27597999

  19. Activation of the Human MT Complex by Motion in Depth Induced by a Moving Cast Shadow.

    PubMed

    Katsuyama, Narumi; Usui, Nobuo; Taira, Masato

    2016-01-01

    A moving cast shadow is a powerful monocular depth cue for motion perception in depth. For example, when a cast shadow moves away from or toward an object in a two-dimensional plane, the object appears to move toward or away from the observer in depth, respectively, whereas the size and position of the object are constant. Although the cortical mechanisms underlying motion perception in depth by cast shadow are unknown, the human MT complex (hMT+) is likely involved in the process, as it is sensitive to motion in depth represented by binocular depth cues. In the present study, we examined this possibility by using a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) technique. First, we identified the cortical regions sensitive to the motion of a square in depth represented via binocular disparity. Consistent with previous studies, we observed significant activation in the bilateral hMT+, and defined functional regions of interest (ROIs) there. We then investigated the activity of the ROIs during observation of the following stimuli: 1) a central square that appeared to move back and forth via a moving cast shadow (mCS); 2) a segmented and scrambled cast shadow presented beside the square (sCS); and 3) no cast shadow (nCS). Participants perceived motion of the square in depth in the mCS condition only. The activity of the hMT+ was significantly higher in the mCS compared with the sCS and nCS conditions. Moreover, the hMT+ was activated equally in both hemispheres in the mCS condition, despite presentation of the cast shadow in the bottom-right quadrant of the stimulus. Perception of the square moving in depth across visual hemifields may be reflected in the bilateral activation of the hMT+. We concluded that the hMT+ is involved in motion perception in depth induced by moving cast shadow and by binocular disparity. PMID:27597999

  20. Activation of the Human MT Complex by Motion in Depth Induced by a Moving Cast Shadow.

    PubMed

    Katsuyama, Narumi; Usui, Nobuo; Taira, Masato

    2016-01-01

    A moving cast shadow is a powerful monocular depth cue for motion perception in depth. For example, when a cast shadow moves away from or toward an object in a two-dimensional plane, the object appears to move toward or away from the observer in depth, respectively, whereas the size and position of the object are constant. Although the cortical mechanisms underlying motion perception in depth by cast shadow are unknown, the human MT complex (hMT+) is likely involved in the process, as it is sensitive to motion in depth represented by binocular depth cues. In the present study, we examined this possibility by using a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) technique. First, we identified the cortical regions sensitive to the motion of a square in depth represented via binocular disparity. Consistent with previous studies, we observed significant activation in the bilateral hMT+, and defined functional regions of interest (ROIs) there. We then investigated the activity of the ROIs during observation of the following stimuli: 1) a central square that appeared to move back and forth via a moving cast shadow (mCS); 2) a segmented and scrambled cast shadow presented beside the square (sCS); and 3) no cast shadow (nCS). Participants perceived motion of the square in depth in the mCS condition only. The activity of the hMT+ was significantly higher in the mCS compared with the sCS and nCS conditions. Moreover, the hMT+ was activated equally in both hemispheres in the mCS condition, despite presentation of the cast shadow in the bottom-right quadrant of the stimulus. Perception of the square moving in depth across visual hemifields may be reflected in the bilateral activation of the hMT+. We concluded that the hMT+ is involved in motion perception in depth induced by moving cast shadow and by binocular disparity.

  1. 20 CFR 663.105 - When must adults and dislocated workers be registered?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false When must adults and dislocated workers be... LABOR ADULT AND DISLOCATED WORKER ACTIVITIES UNDER TITLE I OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT Delivery of Adult and Dislocated Worker Services Through the One-Stop Delivery System § 663.105 When must adults...

  2. 20 CFR 663.105 - When must adults and dislocated workers be registered?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false When must adults and dislocated workers be... LABOR (CONTINUED) ADULT AND DISLOCATED WORKER ACTIVITIES UNDER TITLE I OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT Delivery of Adult and Dislocated Worker Services Through the One-Stop Delivery System § 663.105 When...

  3. 20 CFR 663.105 - When must adults and dislocated workers be registered?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false When must adults and dislocated workers be... LABOR (CONTINUED) ADULT AND DISLOCATED WORKER ACTIVITIES UNDER TITLE I OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT Delivery of Adult and Dislocated Worker Services Through the One-Stop Delivery System § 663.105 When...

  4. 20 CFR 663.105 - When must adults and dislocated workers be registered?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false When must adults and dislocated workers be... LABOR (CONTINUED) ADULT AND DISLOCATED WORKER ACTIVITIES UNDER TITLE I OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT Delivery of Adult and Dislocated Worker Services Through the One-Stop Delivery System § 663.105 When...

  5. 20 CFR 663.105 - When must adults and dislocated workers be registered?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false When must adults and dislocated workers be... LABOR ADULT AND DISLOCATED WORKER ACTIVITIES UNDER TITLE I OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT Delivery of Adult and Dislocated Worker Services Through the One-Stop Delivery System § 663.105 When must adults...

  6. MAGNETIC HELICITY TRANSPORTED BY FLUX EMERGENCE AND SHUFFLING MOTIONS IN SOLAR ACTIVE REGION NOAA 10930

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y.; Kitai, R.; Takizawa, K. E-mail: zhangyin@bao.ac.cn

    2012-06-01

    We present a new methodology which can determine magnetic helicity transport by the passage of helical magnetic field lines from the sub-photosphere and the shuffling motions of footpoints of preexisting coronal field lines separately. It is well known that only the velocity component, which is perpendicular to the magnetic field ({upsilon}{sub B}), has contributed to the helicity accumulation. Here, we demonstrate that {upsilon}{sub B} can be deduced from a horizontal motion and vector magnetograms under a simple relation of {upsilon}{sub t} = {mu}{sub t} + ({upsilon}{sub n}/B{sub n} ) B{sub t}, as suggested by Demoulin and Berger. Then after dividing {upsilon}{sub B} into two components, as one is tangential and the other is normal to the solar surface, we can determine both terms of helicity transport. Active region (AR) NOAA 10930 is analyzed as an example during its solar disk center passage by using data obtained by the Spectropolarimeter and the Narrowband Filter Imager of Solar Optical Telescope on board Hinode. We find that in our calculation the helicity injection by flux emergence and shuffling motions have the same sign. During the period we studied, the main contribution of helicity accumulation comes from the flux emergence effect, while the dynamic transient evolution comes from the shuffling motions effect. Our observational results further indicate that for this AR the apparent rotational motion in the following sunspot is the real shuffling motions on the solar surface.

  7. Investigation of dislocation behavior in micron and sub-micron thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunter, Abigail

    Plastic deformation in crystalline materials is mediated by dislocation motion and their interaction with defects, such as second phase particles, dislocations, grain boundaries and voids. In addition, grain boundaries, free and passivated surfaces have a significant impact on the evolution of dislocations and their intricate structures. In polycrystalline materials, the influence of dislocation motion and interactions results in unique mechanical properties, such as high yield stress and fracture strength and a dependency on grain size. It is observed that for an average grain size in the micron and sub-micron regime, the yield stress increases as the grain size decreases following a power law. This size effect is known as Hall Petch effect. A reliable computational model that describes the mechanical response and failure mechanisms of micron and sub-micron scale devices should incorporate these size effects. A three-dimensional phase field dislocation dynamics model (3D PFDD) is developed. This is a dislocation based plasticity model that accounts for the motion and interactions of individual dislocations with material defects and interfaces, such as obstacles, and grain boundaries. This model is a valuable and efficient research tool that will help to understand plastic deformation on the mesoscopic level, bridging the gap between microscopic and macroscopic studies. For the research presented here, this model is used specifically to understand and simulate dislocation behavior in fcc (face-centered cubic) metal thin films, similar to those used in micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS). Incorporating microstructure, such as grain boundaries, is key to accurately predicting deformation behavior in any system. Plastic deformation is affected by both the thickness of the film layers and by the resolution of the film's internal microstructure. In MEMS devices and components that are generally on the micron scale (hundreds of microns in size), the internal

  8. Spontaneous chiral symmetry breaking in collective active motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breier, Rebekka E.; Selinger, Robin L. B.; Ciccotti, Giovanni; Herminghaus, Stephan; Mazza, Marco G.

    2016-02-01

    Chiral symmetry breaking is ubiquitous in biological systems, from DNA to bacterial suspensions. A key unresolved problem is how chiral structures may spontaneously emerge from achiral interactions. We study a simple model of active swimmers in three dimensions that effectively incorporates hydrodynamic interactions. We perform large-scale molecular dynamics simulations (up to 106 particles) and find long-lived metastable collective states that exhibit chiral organization although the interactions are achiral. We elucidate under which conditions these chiral states will emerge and grow to large scales. To explore the complex phase space available to the system, we perform nonequilibrium quenches on a one-dimensional Lebwohl-Lasher model with periodic boundary conditions to study the likelihood of formation of chiral structures.

  9. Image-based synchronization of force and bead motion in active electromagnetic microrheometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Chang-Young; Saleh, Omar A.

    2014-12-01

    In the past, electromagnetic tweezers have been used to make active microrheometers. An active microrheometer measures the dynamic mechanical properties of a material from the motion of embedded particles under external force, e.g. a sinusoidal magnetic force generated by a sinusoidal current on a coil. The oscillating amplitude and the phase lag of the motion are then used to estimate the material’s dynamic mechanical properties. The phase lag, in particular, requires precise synchronization of the particle motion with the external force. In previous works, synchronization difficulties have arisen from measuring two parameters with two instruments, one of them being a camera. We solved the synchronization issue by measuring two parameters with a single instrument, the camera alone. From captured images, particles can be tracked in three dimensions through an image-analysis algorithm while the current on the coil can be measured from the brightness of the image; this enables simultaneous synchronization of the phases of the driving current on the electromagnet coil and the motion of the magnetic probe particle. We calibrate the phase delay between the magnetic force and the particle’s motion in glycerol and confirm the calibration with a Hall probe. The technique is further tested by measuring the shear modulus of a polyacrylamide gel, and comparing the results to those obtained using a conventional rheometer.

  10. Active linear head motion improves dynamic visual acuity in pursuing a high-speed moving object.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Tatsuhisa; Yamashita, Masayuki; Suzuki, Toshihiro; Hisa, Yasuo; Wada, Yoshiro

    2009-04-01

    We usually move both our eyes and our head when pursuing a high-speed moving object. However, the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR), evoked by head motion, seems to disturb smooth pursuit eye movement because the VOR stabilizes the gaze against head motion. To determine whether head motion is advantageous for pursuing a high-speed moving object, we examined dynamic visual acuity (DVA) for a high-speed (80 degrees /s) rightward moving object with and without active linear rightward head motion (HM) at a maximum of 50 cm/s in nine healthy subjects. Furthermore, we analyzed eye and head movements to investigate the contribution of linear VOR (LVOR) and smooth eye movement under these conditions. In most subjects, active linear head motion improved DVA for a high-speed moving object. Subjects with higher DVA scores under HM had robust rightward gaze (eye + head) velocities (>60 cm/s), i.e., rightward smooth eye movements (>10 degrees /s). With the head stationary (HS), faster smooth eye movements (>40 degrees /s) were generated when the subjects pursued a high-speed moving object. They also showed anticipatory smooth eye movements under conditions HM and HS. However, the level of suppression of their LVOR abilities was equal to that of the others. These results suggest that the ability to generate anticipatory smooth pursuit eye movements for following a high-speed moving object against the LVOR is a determining factor for improvement of DVA under HM.

  11. Prospective active marker motion correction improves statistical power in BOLD fMRI.

    PubMed

    Muraskin, Jordan; Ooi, Melvyn B; Goldman, Robin I; Krueger, Sascha; Thomas, William J; Sajda, Paul; Brown, Truman R

    2013-03-01

    Group level statistical maps of blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) signals acquired using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) have become a basic measurement for much of systems, cognitive and social neuroscience. A challenge in making inferences from these statistical maps is the noise and potential confounds that arise from the head motion that occurs within and between acquisition volumes. This motion results in the scan plane being misaligned during acquisition, ultimately leading to reduced statistical power when maps are constructed at the group level. In most cases, an attempt is made to correct for this motion through the use of retrospective analysis methods. In this paper, we use a prospective active marker motion correction (PRAMMO) system that uses radio frequency markers for real-time tracking of motion, enabling on-line slice plane correction. We show that the statistical power of the activation maps is substantially increased using PRAMMO compared to conventional retrospective correction. Analysis of our results indicates that the PRAMMO acquisition reduces the variance without decreasing the signal component of the BOLD (beta). Using PRAMMO could thus improve the overall statistical power of fMRI based BOLD measurements, leading to stronger inferences of the nature of processing in the human brain.

  12. Evidence of left-lateral active motion at the North America-Caribbean plate boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leroy, S. D.; Ellouz, N.; Corbeau, J.; Rolandone, F.; Mercier De Lepinay, B. F.; Meyer, B.; Momplaisir, R.; Granja, J. L.; Battani, A.; Burov, E. B.; Clouard, V.; Deschamps, R.; Gorini, C.; Hamon, Y.; LE Pourhiet, L.; Loget, N.; Lucazeau, F.; Pillot, D.; Poort, J.; Tankoo, K.; Cuevas, J. L.; Alcaide, J.; Poix, C. J.; Mitton, S.; Rodriguez, Y.; Schmitz, J.; Munoz Martin, A.

    2014-12-01

    The North America-Caribbean plate boundary is one of the least-known among large plate boundaries. Although it was identified early on as an example of a strike-slip fault in the north of Hispaniola, its structure and rate of motion remains poorly constrained. We present the first direct evidence for active sinistral strike-slip motion along this fault, based on swath seafloor mapping of the northern Haiti area. There is evidence for ~16.5 km of apparent strike-slip motion along the mapped segment of the Septentrional fault zone off Cap Haitien town which is terminated to the east onland Dominican republic and in the west to southern Cuban margin. By evaluating these new constraints within the context of geodetic models of global plate motions, we estimate an activity of the fault since 2 Ma with an angular velocity for the Caribbean plate relative to the North America predicted 6-12 mmyr-1 sinistral motion along the Septentrional fault zone. This transform fault was initiated around 20 million years ago in its western segment and since 2 Ma in its eastern segment in response to a regional reorganization of plate velocities and directions, which induced a change in configuration of plate boundaries.

  13. Dislocation filtering in GaN nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Colby, Robert; Liang, Zhiwen; Wildeson, Isaac H; Ewoldt, David A; Sands, Timothy D; García, R Edwin; Stach, Eric A

    2010-05-12

    Dislocation filtering in GaN by selective area growth through a nanoporous template is examined both by transmission electron microscopy and numerical modeling. These nanorods grow epitaxially from the (0001)-oriented GaN underlayer through the approximately 100 nm thick template and naturally terminate with hexagonal pyramid-shaped caps. It is demonstrated that for a certain window of geometric parameters a threading dislocation growing within a GaN nanorod is likely to be excluded by the strong image forces of the nearby free surfaces. Approximately 3000 nanorods were examined in cross-section, including growth through 50 and 80 nm diameter pores. The very few threading dislocations not filtered by the template turn toward a free surface within the nanorod, exiting less than 50 nm past the base of the template. The potential active region for light-emitting diode devices based on these nanorods would have been entirely free of threading dislocations for all samples examined. A greater than 2 orders of magnitude reduction in threading dislocation density can be surmised from a data set of this size. A finite element-based implementation of the eigenstrain model was employed to corroborate the experimentally observed data and examine a larger range of potential nanorod geometries, providing a simple map of the different regimes of dislocation filtering for this class of GaN nanorods. These results indicate that nanostructured semiconductor materials are effective at eliminating deleterious extended defects, as necessary to enhance the optoelectronic performance and device lifetimes compared to conventional planar heterostructures. PMID:20397703

  14. Complex Human Activity Recognition Using Smartphone and Wrist-Worn Motion Sensors.

    PubMed

    Shoaib, Muhammad; Bosch, Stephan; Incel, Ozlem Durmaz; Scholten, Hans; Havinga, Paul J M

    2016-03-24

    The position of on-body motion sensors plays an important role in human activity recognition. Most often, mobile phone sensors at the trouser pocket or an equivalent position are used for this purpose. However, this position is not suitable for recognizing activities that involve hand gestures, such as smoking, eating, drinking coffee and giving a talk. To recognize such activities, wrist-worn motion sensors are used. However, these two positions are mainly used in isolation. To use richer context information, we evaluate three motion sensors (accelerometer, gyroscope and linear acceleration sensor) at both wrist and pocket positions. Using three classifiers, we show that the combination of these two positions outperforms the wrist position alone, mainly at smaller segmentation windows. Another problem is that less-repetitive activities, such as smoking, eating, giving a talk and drinking coffee, cannot be recognized easily at smaller segmentation windows unlike repetitive activities, like walking, jogging and biking. For this purpose, we evaluate the effect of seven window sizes (2-30 s) on thirteen activities and show how increasing window size affects these various activities in different ways. We also propose various optimizations to further improve the recognition of these activities. For reproducibility, we make our dataset publicly available.

  15. Complex Human Activity Recognition Using Smartphone and Wrist-Worn Motion Sensors.

    PubMed

    Shoaib, Muhammad; Bosch, Stephan; Incel, Ozlem Durmaz; Scholten, Hans; Havinga, Paul J M

    2016-01-01

    The position of on-body motion sensors plays an important role in human activity recognition. Most often, mobile phone sensors at the trouser pocket or an equivalent position are used for this purpose. However, this position is not suitable for recognizing activities that involve hand gestures, such as smoking, eating, drinking coffee and giving a talk. To recognize such activities, wrist-worn motion sensors are used. However, these two positions are mainly used in isolation. To use richer context information, we evaluate three motion sensors (accelerometer, gyroscope and linear acceleration sensor) at both wrist and pocket positions. Using three classifiers, we show that the combination of these two positions outperforms the wrist position alone, mainly at smaller segmentation windows. Another problem is that less-repetitive activities, such as smoking, eating, giving a talk and drinking coffee, cannot be recognized easily at smaller segmentation windows unlike repetitive activities, like walking, jogging and biking. For this purpose, we evaluate the effect of seven window sizes (2-30 s) on thirteen activities and show how increasing window size affects these various activities in different ways. We also propose various optimizations to further improve the recognition of these activities. For reproducibility, we make our dataset publicly available. PMID:27023543

  16. Complex Human Activity Recognition Using Smartphone and Wrist-Worn Motion Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Shoaib, Muhammad; Bosch, Stephan; Incel, Ozlem Durmaz; Scholten, Hans; Havinga, Paul J. M.

    2016-01-01

    The position of on-body motion sensors plays an important role in human activity recognition. Most often, mobile phone sensors at the trouser pocket or an equivalent position are used for this purpose. However, this position is not suitable for recognizing activities that involve hand gestures, such as smoking, eating, drinking coffee and giving a talk. To recognize such activities, wrist-worn motion sensors are used. However, these two positions are mainly used in isolation. To use richer context information, we evaluate three motion sensors (accelerometer, gyroscope and linear acceleration sensor) at both wrist and pocket positions. Using three classifiers, we show that the combination of these two positions outperforms the wrist position alone, mainly at smaller segmentation windows. Another problem is that less-repetitive activities, such as smoking, eating, giving a talk and drinking coffee, cannot be recognized easily at smaller segmentation windows unlike repetitive activities, like walking, jogging and biking. For this purpose, we evaluate the effect of seven window sizes (2–30 s) on thirteen activities and show how increasing window size affects these various activities in different ways. We also propose various optimizations to further improve the recognition of these activities. For reproducibility, we make our dataset publicly available. PMID:27023543

  17. Open Galeazzi fracture with ipsilateral elbow dislocation.

    PubMed

    Adanır, Oktay; Yüksel, Serdar; Beytemur, Ozan; Güleç, M Akif

    2016-08-01

    Combination of the Galeazzi fracture and dislocation of the elbow joint in same extremity is very rare. In this article, we report a 26-year-old male patient with a posterolateral dislocation of the elbow and ipsilateral volar type Galeazzi fracture. We performed closed reduction for the elbow dislocation during admission to the emergency department. Patient was taken to the operating room in the sixth hour of his application to emergency department and open wound on the ulnovolar region of the wrist was closed primarily after irrigation and debridement. We performed open reduction and internal fixation of the radial fracture with a dynamic compression plate. After fixation, we evaluated the stability of the elbow joint and distal radioulnar joint. Distal radioulnar joint was unstable under fluoroscopic examination and fixed with one 1.8 mm Kirschner wire in a pronated position. Then, elbow joint was stable. One year after surgery, patient had no pain or sings of instability. At the last follow-up, range of motion of the elbow was 10°-135° and forearm pronation and supination were 70°.

  18. Open Galeazzi fracture with ipsilateral elbow dislocation.

    PubMed

    Adanır, Oktay; Yüksel, Serdar; Beytemur, Ozan; Güleç, M Akif

    2016-08-01

    Combination of the Galeazzi fracture and dislocation of the elbow joint in same extremity is very rare. In this article, we report a 26-year-old male patient with a posterolateral dislocation of the elbow and ipsilateral volar type Galeazzi fracture. We performed closed reduction for the elbow dislocation during admission to the emergency department. Patient was taken to the operating room in the sixth hour of his application to emergency department and open wound on the ulnovolar region of the wrist was closed primarily after irrigation and debridement. We performed open reduction and internal fixation of the radial fracture with a dynamic compression plate. After fixation, we evaluated the stability of the elbow joint and distal radioulnar joint. Distal radioulnar joint was unstable under fluoroscopic examination and fixed with one 1.8 mm Kirschner wire in a pronated position. Then, elbow joint was stable. One year after surgery, patient had no pain or sings of instability. At the last follow-up, range of motion of the elbow was 10°-135° and forearm pronation and supination were 70°. PMID:27499325

  19. Congenital Dislocation of the Hip

    PubMed Central

    Premi, J. M.

    1976-01-01

    The implications of a diagnosis of congenital dislocation of the hip and the importance of the role of the family physician in early detection and treatment are identified. A review of the salient clinical features of congenital dislocation of the hip is undertaken. The results of a survey carried out in the author's practice on an unusual incidence of congenital dislocated hip are reviewed. PMID:21308053

  20. Pathological tremor and voluntary motion modeling and online estimation for active compensation.

    PubMed

    Bo, Antônio Padilha Lanari; Poignet, Philippe; Geny, Christian

    2011-04-01

    This paper presents an algorithm to perform online tremor characterization from motion sensors measurements, while filtering the voluntary motion performed by the patient. In order to estimate simultaneously both nonstationary signals in a stochastic filtering framework, pathological tremor was represented by a time-varying harmonic model and voluntary motion was modeled as an auto-regressive moving-average (ARMA) model. Since it is a nonlinear problem, an extended Kalman filter (EKF) was used. The developed solution was evaluated with simulated signals and experimental data from patients with different pathologies. Also, the results were comprehensively compared with alternative techniques proposed in the literature, evidencing the better performance of the proposed method. The algorithm presented in this paper may be an important tool in the design of active tremor compensation systems.

  1. Active faults, stress field and plate motion along the Indo-Eurasian plate boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakata, Takashi; Otsuki, Kenshiro; Khan, S. H.

    1990-09-01

    The active faults of the Himalayas and neighboring areas are direct indicators of Recent and sub-Recent crustal movements due to continental collision between the Indian and Eurasian plates. The direction of the maximum horizontal shortening or horizontal compressive stress axes deduced from the strike and type of active faulting reveals a characteristic regional stress field along the colliding boundary. The trajectories of the stress axes along the transcurrent faults and the Eastern Himalayan Front, are approximately N-S, parallel to the relative motion of the two plates. However, along the southern margin of the Eurasian plate, they are NE-SW in the Western Himalayan Front and NW-SE to E-W in the Kirthar-Sulaiman Front, which is not consistent with the direction of relative plate motion. A simple model is proposed in order to explain the regional stress pattern. In this model, the tectonic sliver between the transcurrent faults and the plate margin, is dragged northward by the oblique convergence of the Indian plate. Thus, the direction of relative motion between the tectonic sliver and the Indian plate changes regionally, causing local compressive stress fields. Judging from the long-term slip rates along the active faults, the relative motion between the Indian and Eurasian plates absorbed in the colliding zone is about one fourth of its total amount; the rest may be consumed along the extensive strike-slip faults in Tibet and China.

  2. Population activity in the human dorsal pathway predicts the accuracy of visual motion detection.

    PubMed

    Donner, Tobias H; Siegel, Markus; Oostenveld, Robert; Fries, Pascal; Bauer, Markus; Engel, Andreas K

    2007-07-01

    A person's ability to detect a weak visual target stimulus varies from one viewing to the next. We tested whether the trial-to-trial fluctuations of neural population activity in the human brain are related to the fluctuations of behavioral performance in a "yes-no" visual motion-detection task. We recorded neural population activity with whole head magnetoencephalography (MEG) while subjects searched for a weak coherent motion signal embedded in spatiotemporal noise. We found that, during motion viewing, MEG activity in the 12- to 24-Hz ("beta") frequency range is higher, on average, before correct behavioral choices than before errors and that it predicts correct choices on a trial-by-trial basis. This performance-predictive activity is not evident in the prestimulus baseline and builds up slowly after stimulus onset. Source reconstruction revealed that the performance-predictive activity is expressed in the posterior parietal and dorsolateral prefrontal cortices and, less strongly, in the visual motion-sensitive area MT+. The 12- to 24-Hz activity in these key stages of the human dorsal visual pathway is correlated with behavioral choice in both target-present and target-absent conditions. Importantly, in the absence of the target, 12- to 24-Hz activity tends to be higher before "no" choices ("correct rejects") than before "yes" choices ("false alarms"). It thus predicts the accuracy, and not the content, of subjects' upcoming perceptual reports. We conclude that beta band activity in the human dorsal visual pathway indexes, and potentially controls, the efficiency of neural computations underlying simple perceptual decisions.

  3. Active contour-based visual tracking by integrating colors, shapes, and motions.

    PubMed

    Hu, Weiming; Zhou, Xue; Li, Wei; Luo, Wenhan; Zhang, Xiaoqin; Maybank, Stephen

    2013-05-01

    In this paper, we present a framework for active contour-based visual tracking using level sets. The main components of our framework include contour-based tracking initialization, color-based contour evolution, adaptive shape-based contour evolution for non-periodic motions, dynamic shape-based contour evolution for periodic motions, and the handling of abrupt motions. For the initialization of contour-based tracking, we develop an optical flow-based algorithm for automatically initializing contours at the first frame. For the color-based contour evolution, Markov random field theory is used to measure correlations between values of neighboring pixels for posterior probability estimation. For adaptive shape-based contour evolution, the global shape information and the local color information are combined to hierarchically evolve the contour, and a flexible shape updating model is constructed. For the dynamic shape-based contour evolution, a shape mode transition matrix is learnt to characterize the temporal correlations of object shapes. For the handling of abrupt motions, particle swarm optimization is adopted to capture the global motion which is applied to the contour in the current frame to produce an initial contour in the next frame.

  4. Active contour-based visual tracking by integrating colors, shapes, and motions.

    PubMed

    Hu, Weiming; Zhou, Xue; Li, Wei; Luo, Wenhan; Zhang, Xiaoqin; Maybank, Stephen

    2013-05-01

    In this paper, we present a framework for active contour-based visual tracking using level sets. The main components of our framework include contour-based tracking initialization, color-based contour evolution, adaptive shape-based contour evolution for non-periodic motions, dynamic shape-based contour evolution for periodic motions, and the handling of abrupt motions. For the initialization of contour-based tracking, we develop an optical flow-based algorithm for automatically initializing contours at the first frame. For the color-based contour evolution, Markov random field theory is used to measure correlations between values of neighboring pixels for posterior probability estimation. For adaptive shape-based contour evolution, the global shape information and the local color information are combined to hierarchically evolve the contour, and a flexible shape updating model is constructed. For the dynamic shape-based contour evolution, a shape mode transition matrix is learnt to characterize the temporal correlations of object shapes. For the handling of abrupt motions, particle swarm optimization is adopted to capture the global motion which is applied to the contour in the current frame to produce an initial contour in the next frame. PMID:23288333

  5. On the relationship between photospheric footpoint motions and coronal heating in solar active regions

    SciTech Connect

    Van Ballegooijen, A. A.; Asgari-Targhi, M.; Berger, M. A.

    2014-05-20

    Coronal heating theories can be classified as either direct current (DC) or alternating current (AC) mechanisms, depending on whether the coronal magnetic field responds quasi-statically or dynamically to the photospheric footpoint motions. In this paper we investigate whether photospheric footpoint motions with velocities of 1-2 km s{sup –1} can heat the corona in active regions, and whether the corona responds quasi-statically or dynamically to such motions (DC versus AC heating). We construct three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic models for the Alfvén waves and quasi-static perturbations generated within a coronal loop. We find that in models where the effects of the lower atmosphere are neglected, the corona responds quasi-statically to the footpoint motions (DC heating), but the energy flux into the corona is too low compared to observational requirements. In more realistic models that include the lower atmosphere, the corona responds more dynamically to the footpoint motions (AC heating) and the predicted heating rates due to Alfvén wave turbulence are sufficient to explain the observed hot loops. The higher heating rates are due to the amplification of Alfvén waves in the lower atmosphere. We conclude that magnetic braiding is a highly dynamic process.

  6. Superclimb of Dislocations in Solid 4He

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuklov, Anatoly

    2011-03-01

    Edge dislocation with superfluid core can perform superclimb -- non-conservative motion (climb) assisted by superflow along its core. Such dislocation, with Burgers vector along the C-axis, has been found in ab initio simulations of hcp solid 4. Uniform network of superclimbing dislocations can induce isochoric compressibility which is finite (in contrast to ideal solid where it vanishes) and, practically, independent of the network density. Here N is total number of atoms and is chemical potential. Such giant response has been observed by Ray and Hallock during superfluid flow events through solid He4. Study of superclimbing dislocation within the model of Granato-Lücke string, subjected to Peierls potential and to vanishing bias by , has found that exhibits wide peak in the intermediate range of temperatures (T) - above some determined by Peierls energy and below above which superfluidity of the core essentially vanishes. Non-Luttinger type behavior characterized by K scaling as some power χ of dislocation length is observed in the wide peak region. Biasing superclimbing dislocation by finite μ (due to a contact with liquid through vycor electrodes,) can induce core roughening caused by thermally assisted tunneling of jog-antijog pairs through the barrier produced by combination of Peierls potential and the bias. The threshold for this effect scales as with some power a~ 1.7. The roughening is found to be hysteretic below some temperature Thyst , with TR determining temperature of thermal roughening, He exhibits strong and narrow resonant peak leading to a dip in the core superfluid sound velocity. This mechanism is proposed as an explanation for a strong and narrow dip observed in critical superflow rate. It is found that the dip characteristics are sensitive to the bias by μ and, therefore, this can be used as a test for the proposed mechanism. It is also predicted that the dip depth at given μc ~ 1 /La should be periodic in χ with the period T . This

  7. Investigation of dislocations in Nb-doped SrTiO{sub 3} by electron-beam-induced current and transmission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jun Sekiguchi, Takashi; Li, Jianyong; Ito, Shun; Yi, Wei; Ogura, Atsushi

    2015-03-09

    This paper aims to clarify the electrical activities of dislocations in Nb-doped SrTiO{sub 3} substrates and the role of dislocations in the resistance switching phenomenon in Pt/SrTiO{sub 3} Schottky contacts. The electrical activities of dislocations have been studied by electron-beam-induced current (EBIC) technique. EBIC has found that dislocations can exhibit dark or bright contrast depending on their character and band bending condition. The character of dislocations has been analysed based on chemical etching and transmission electron microscopy. These data suggested that not all the dislocations contribute to the switching phenomenon. The active dislocations for resistance switching were discussed.

  8. Investigation of dislocations in Nb-doped SrTiO3 by electron-beam-induced current and transmission electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jun; Sekiguchi, Takashi; Li, Jianyong; Ito, Shun; Yi, Wei; Ogura, Atsushi

    2015-03-01

    This paper aims to clarify the electrical activities of dislocations in Nb-doped SrTiO3 substrates and the role of dislocations in the resistance switching phenomenon in Pt/SrTiO3 Schottky contacts. The electrical activities of dislocations have been studied by electron-beam-induced current (EBIC) technique. EBIC has found that dislocations can exhibit dark or bright contrast depending on their character and band bending condition. The character of dislocations has been analysed based on chemical etching and transmission electron microscopy. These data suggested that not all the dislocations contribute to the switching phenomenon. The active dislocations for resistance switching were discussed.

  9. MR-based motion correction for PET imaging using wired active MR microcoils in simultaneous PET-MR: Phantom study

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Chuan; Brady, Thomas J.; El Fakhri, Georges; Ouyang, Jinsong; Ackerman, Jerome L.; Petibon, Yoann

    2014-04-15

    Purpose: Artifacts caused by head motion present a major challenge in brain positron emission tomography (PET) imaging. The authors investigated the feasibility of using wired active MR microcoils to track head motion and incorporate the measured rigid motion fields into iterative PET reconstruction. Methods: Several wired active MR microcoils and a dedicated MR coil-tracking sequence were developed. The microcoils were attached to the outer surface of an anthropomorphic{sup 18}F-filled Hoffman phantom to mimic a brain PET scan. Complex rotation/translation motion of the phantom was induced by a balloon, which was connected to a ventilator. PET list-mode and MR tracking data were acquired simultaneously on a PET-MR scanner. The acquired dynamic PET data were reconstructed iteratively with and without motion correction. Additionally, static phantom data were acquired and used as the gold standard. Results: Motion artifacts in PET images were effectively removed by wired active MR microcoil based motion correction. Motion correction yielded an activity concentration bias ranging from −0.6% to 3.4% as compared to a bias ranging from −25.0% to 16.6% if no motion correction was applied. The contrast recovery values were improved by 37%–156% with motion correction as compared to no motion correction. The image correlation (mean ± standard deviation) between the motion corrected (uncorrected) images of 20 independent noise realizations and static reference was R{sup 2} = 0.978 ± 0.007 (0.588 ± 0.010, respectively). Conclusions: Wired active MR microcoil based motion correction significantly improves brain PET quantitative accuracy and image contrast.

  10. Dislocation and fracture-dislocation of the carpometacarpal joints.

    PubMed

    Jebson, P J; Engber, W D; Lange, R H

    1994-02-01

    Dislocations and fracture-dislocations of the carpometacarpal joints are rare. Diagnosis requires a high index of suspicion, careful examination, and appropriate radiography. Treatment is controversial and is based upon the injury pattern and the surgeon's experience and preference. This article reviews the pertinent anatomy, mechanism of injury, evaluation, and treatment of patients with carpometacarpal joint injuries.

  11. Active vibration isolation of macro-micro motion stage disturbances using a floating stator platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lufan; Long, Zhili; Cai, Jiandong; Liu, Yang; Fang, Jiwen; Wang, Michael Yu

    2015-10-01

    Macro-micro motion stage is mainly applied in microelectronics manufacturing to realize a high-acceleration, high-speed and nano-positioning motion. The high acceleration and nano-positioning accuracy would be influenced by the vibration of the motion stage. In the paper, a concept of floating stage is introduced in the macro-micro motion for isolating vibration disturbances. The design model of the floating stage is established and its theoretical analyses including natural frequency, transient and frequency response analyses are investigated, in order to demonstrate the feasibility of the floating stator platform as a vibration isolator for the macro-micro motion stage. Moreover, an optimal design of the floating stator is conducted and then verified by experiments. In order to characterize and quantify the performance of isolation obtained from the traditional fixed stator and the floating stator, the acceleration responses at different accelerations, speeds and displacements are measured in x, y and z directions. The theoretical and experimental analyses in time and frequency domains indicate that the floating stator platform is effective to actively isolate the vibration in the macro-micro motion stage. In macro-micro motion stage, high acceleration motion is provided by VCM. Vibration is induced from VCM, that is, VCM is a source system, the vibration response or force is felt by a receiver system. Generally, VCM is fixed on the base, which means that the base is the receiver system which absorbs or transfers the vibration. However, the vibration cannot completely disappear and the base vibration is inevitable. In the paper, a floated stator platform as isolation system is developed to decrease or isolate vibration between VCM and base. The floated stator platform consists of damper, stopper, floated lock, spring, limiter, sub base, etc. Unlike the traditional stator of VCM fixed on the base, the floated stator can be moved on the linear guide under vibration

  12. Complementary limb motion estimation for the control of active knee prostheses.

    PubMed

    Vallery, Heike; Burgkart, Rainer; Hartmann, Cornelia; Mitternacht, Jürgen; Riener, Robert; Buss, Martin

    2011-02-01

    To restore walking after transfemoral amputation, various actuated exoprostheses have been developed, which control the knee torque actively or via variable damping. In both cases, an important issue is to find the appropriate control that enables user-dominated gait. Recently, we suggested a generic method to deduce intended motion of impaired or amputated limbs from residual human body motion. Based on interjoint coordination in physiological gait, statistical regression is used to estimate missing motion. In a pilot study, this complementary limb motion estimation (CLME) strategy is applied to control an active knee exoprosthesis. A motor-driven prosthetic knee with one degree of freedom has been realized, and one above-knee amputee has used it with CLME. Performed tasks are walking on a treadmill and alternating stair ascent and descent. The subject was able to walk on the treadmill at varying speeds, but needed assistance with the stairs, especially to descend. The promising results with CLME are compared with the subject's performance with her own prosthesis, the C-Leg from Otto Bock.

  13. Complementary limb motion estimation for the control of active knee prostheses.

    PubMed

    Vallery, Heike; Burgkart, Rainer; Hartmann, Cornelia; Mitternacht, Jürgen; Riener, Robert; Buss, Martin

    2011-02-01

    To restore walking after transfemoral amputation, various actuated exoprostheses have been developed, which control the knee torque actively or via variable damping. In both cases, an important issue is to find the appropriate control that enables user-dominated gait. Recently, we suggested a generic method to deduce intended motion of impaired or amputated limbs from residual human body motion. Based on interjoint coordination in physiological gait, statistical regression is used to estimate missing motion. In a pilot study, this complementary limb motion estimation (CLME) strategy is applied to control an active knee exoprosthesis. A motor-driven prosthetic knee with one degree of freedom has been realized, and one above-knee amputee has used it with CLME. Performed tasks are walking on a treadmill and alternating stair ascent and descent. The subject was able to walk on the treadmill at varying speeds, but needed assistance with the stairs, especially to descend. The promising results with CLME are compared with the subject's performance with her own prosthesis, the C-Leg from Otto Bock. PMID:21303189

  14. Biocatalyst activity in nonaqueous environments correlates with centisecond-range protein motions.

    PubMed

    Eppler, Ross K; Hudson, Elton P; Chase, Shannon D; Dordick, Jonathan S; Reimer, Jeffrey A; Clark, Douglas S

    2008-10-14

    Recent studies exploring the relationship between enzymatic catalysis and protein dynamics in the aqueous phase have yielded evidence that dynamics and enzyme activity are strongly correlated. Given that protein dynamics are significantly attenuated in organic solvents and that proteins exhibit a wide range of motions depending on the specific solvent environment, the nonaqueous milieu provides a unique opportunity to examine the role of protein dynamics in enzyme activity. Variable-temperature kinetic measurements, X-band electron spin resonance spectroscopy, (1)H NMR relaxation, and (19)F NMR spectroscopy experiments were performed on subtilisin Carlsberg colyophilized with several inorganic salts and suspended in organic solvents. The results indicate that salt activation induces a greater degree of transition-state flexibility, reflected by a more positive DeltaDeltaS(dagger), for the more active biocatalyst preparations in organic solvents. In contrast, DeltaDeltaH(dagger) was negligible regardless of salt type or salt content. Electron spin resonance spectroscopy and (1)H NMR relaxation measurements, including spin-lattice relaxation, spin-lattice relaxation in the rotating frame, and longitudinal magnetization exchange, revealed that the enzyme's turnover number (k(cat)) was strongly correlated with protein motions in the centisecond time regime, weakly correlated with protein motions in the millisecond regime, and uncorrelated with protein motions on the piconanosecond timescale. In addition, (19)F chemical shift measurements and hyperfine tensor measurements of biocatalyst formulations inhibited with 4-fluorobenzenesulfonyl fluoride and 4-ethoxyfluorophosphinyl-oxy-TEMPO, respectively, suggest that enzyme activation was only weakly affected by changes in active-site polarity. PMID:18840689

  15. Examining the Magnetic Field Strength and the Horizontal and Vertical Motions in an Emerging Active Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chia-Hsien; Chen, Yu-Che

    2016-03-01

    Earlier observational studies have used the time evolution of emerging magnetic flux regions at the photosphere to infer their subsurface structures, assuming that the flux structure does not change significantly over the near-surface layer. In this study, we test the validity of this assumption by comparing the horizontal and vertical motions of an emerging active region. The two motions would be correlated if the emerging structure is rigid. The selected active region (AR) NOAA 11645 is not embedded in detectable preexisting magnetic field. The observed horizontal motion is quantified by the separation of the two AR polarities and the width of the region. The vertical motion is derived from the magnetic buoyancy theory. Our results show that the separation of the polarities is fastest at the beginning with a velocity of {≈ }4 Mm hr^{-1} and decreases to ≤ 1 Mm hr^{-1} after the main growing phase of flux emergence. The derived thick flux-tube buoyant velocity is between 1 and 3 Mm hr^{-1}, while the thin flux-tube approximation results in an unreasonably high buoyant velocity, consistent with the expectation that the approximation is inappropriate at the surface layer. The observed horizontal motion is not found to directly correlate with either the magnetic field strength or the derived buoyant velocities. However, the percentage of the horizontally oriented fields and the temporal derivatives of the field strength and the buoyant velocity show some positive correlations with the separation velocity. The results of this study imply that the assumption that the emerging active region is the cross section of a rising flux tube whose structure can be considered rigid as it rises through the near-surface layer should be taken with caution.

  16. Misfit dislocations in epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Merwe, Jan H.

    2002-08-01

    This article on epitaxy highlights the following: the definition and some historical milestones; the introduction by Frenkel and Kontorowa (FK) of a truncated Fourier series to model the periodic interaction at crystalline interfaces; the invention by Frank and van der Merwe (FvdM)—using the FK model—of (interfacial) misfit dislocations as an important mechanism in accommodating misfit at epilayer-substrate interfaces; the generalization of the FvdM theory to multilayers; the application of the parabolic model by Jesser and van der Merwe to describe, for growing multilayers and superlattices, the impact of Fourier coefficients in the realization of epitaxial orientations and the stability of modes of misfit accommodation; the involvement of intralayer interaction in the latter—all features that impact on the attainment of perfection in crystallinity of thin films, a property that is so vital in the fabrication of useful uniformly thick epilayers (uniformity being another technological requirement), which also depends on misfit accommodation through the interfacial energy that function strongly in the criterion for growth modes, proposed by Bauer; and the ingenious application of the Volterra model by Matthews and others to describe misfit accommodation by dislocations in growing epilayers.

  17. Treatment of chronic radial head dislocations in children.

    PubMed

    Belangero, W D; Livani, B; Zogaib, R K

    2007-04-01

    From 1990 to 2005 our department treated nine patients with chronic radial head dislocation by an ulnar osteotomy and indirect reduction by interosseous membrane. The patients varied in age from 2 years and 8 months to 10 years, and the time from the injury to operation ranged from 40 days to 3 years. The range of functional motion and carrying angle was restored in all nine patients, and no complications, such as recurrent dislocation, infection, or neurovascular injury were observed. This technique has proven to be a successful approach to treating such cases, with a low range of complications and good functional results. PMID:16741732

  18. Coupling of postural activity with motion of a ship at sea.

    PubMed

    Varlet, Manuel; Bardy, Benoît G; Chen, Fu-Chen; Alcantara, Cristina; Stoffregen, Thomas A

    2015-05-01

    On land, body sway during stance becomes coupled with imposed oscillations of the illuminated environment or of the support surface. This coupling appears to have the function of stabilizing the body relative to the illuminated or inertial environment. In previous research, the stimulus has been limited to motion in a single axis. Little is known about our ability to couple postural activity with complex, multi-axis oscillations. On a ship at sea, we evaluated postural activity using measures of body movement, as such, and we separately evaluated a direct measure of coupling between body movement and ship motion. Participants were tested while facing fore-aft and athwartship. We compared postural activity between participants who had been seasick at the beginning of the voyage and those who had not. Coupling of postural activity with ship motion differed between body axes as a function of body orientation relative to the ship. In addition, coupling differed between participants who had been seasick at the beginning of the voyage and those who had not. We discuss the results in terms of implications for general theories of postural control, and for prediction of susceptibility to seasickness in individuals.

  19. Meridional motions of sunspots from 1947.9 to 1985.0. II - Latitude motions dependent on SPOT type and phase of the activity cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lustig, G.; Hanslmeier, A.

    1987-01-01

    The dependence of the meridional motions of sunspots on sunspot-type and phase in the solar activity cycle for the time interval 1947.9-1985.0 is examined; this was done also with the sunspot data from the solar-observatory Kanzelhoehe. For the total time interval, investigations for each cycle were carried out only for the elder or long lasting G, H, and J sunspot groups and distinctions between similar sunspot types AB, C, D, EF, GHJ (Zuerich-classification). The meridional motions about the different activity maxima were also examined. In all investigations in the period from 1947.9 to 1985.0 a tendency to a southdrift can be observed on both hemispheres of the sun, but the mean meridional motions are between the error-bars not very significantly different from zero.

  20. Dislocation Creep in Magnesium Calcite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, L.; Xiao, X.; Evans, B. J.

    2003-12-01

    To investigate the effect of dissolved Mg on plastic deformation of calcite, we performed triaxial deformation experiments on synthetic calcite with varying amount of Mg content. Mixtures of powders of calcite and dolomite were isostatically hot pressed (HIP) at 850° C and 300 MPa confining pressure for different intervals (2 to 20hrs) resulting in homogeneous aggregates of high-magnesium calcite; Mg content varied from 0.07 to 0.17 mol%. Creep tests were performed at differential stresses from 20 to 160 MPa at 700 to 800° C. Grain sizes before and after deformation were determined from the images obtained from scanning electron microscope (SEM) and optical microscope. Grain sizes are in the range of 5 to 20 microns depending on the HIP time, and decrease with increasing magnesium content. Both BSE images and chemical analysis suggest that all dolomite are dissolved and the Mg distribution is homogeneous through the sample, after 2 hrs HIP. At stresses below 40 MPa, the samples deformed in diffusion region (Coble creep), as described previously by Herwegh. The strength decreases with increasing magnesium content, owing to the difference of grain size. At stresses above 80 MPa, the stress exponent is greater than 3, indicating an increased contribution of dislocation creep. The transition between diffusion to dislocation creep occurs at higher stresses for the samples with higher magnesium content and smaller grain size. Preliminary data suggests a slight increase in strength with increasing magnesium content, but more tests are needed to verify this effect. In a few samples, some strain weakening may have been evident. The activation energy in the transition region (at 80 MPa) is ˜200 KJ/mol with no dependence on magnesium content, agreeing with previous measurements of diffusion creep in natural and synthetic marbles.

  1. Dislocation of the distal phalanx epiphysis in toddlers.

    PubMed

    Waters, P M; Benson, L S

    1993-07-01

    Two cases of physeal fracture dislocation of the distal phalanx are reviewed. Each injury occurred in a toddler, was originally undiagnosed, and appeared years later as a dorsal mass in a fore-shortened digit with decreased distal interphalangeal joint motion. In each case x-ray films revealed a dislocated epiphysis, accounting for the enlarging dorsal prominence and the phalangeal growth disturbance. These cases demonstrate that dislocation of the distal phalanx epiphysis can occur with a crush injury and may be difficult to detect before development of the ossification center. Careful physical examination and a high index of suspicion will increase the likelihood of early diagnosis. Early open reduction may prevent the late complications of deformity and stiffness. PMID:8349960

  2. Clinical features and surgical outcomes following closed reduction of arytenoid dislocation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung Won; Park, Ki Nam; Welham, Nathan V.

    2014-01-01

    Importance Arytenoid dislocation is a rare condition characterized by vocal fold immobility and is easily mistaken as recurrent laryngeal nerve paralysis. Objective To describe presenting features, multimodal diagnostic evaluation, and surgical outcomes following closed reduction (CR) of arytenoid dislocation. Design, Setting and Participants Prospective case series at a single academic medical center. Evaluation and treatment data were obtained from 22 consecutive patients with arytenoid dislocation over a 7-year period. Interventions Patients underwent direct laryngoscopy and CR of the dislocated arytenoid, with adjunct injection laryngoplasty or botulinum toxin administration in select cases. Main outcomes and measures Initial diagnosis was confirmed using flexible laryngeal endoscopy with stroboscopy, computed tomography, electromyography, and interoperative palpation. Arytenoid motion (primary outcome measure) and vocal function data (secondary outcome measures) were collected before treatment and up to 6 months after treatment. Results Key history features included emergent intubation, elective intubation and external laryngeal trauma. Sixteen patients (73%) had anterior and 6 patients (27%) had posterior dislocation. One patient experienced spontaneous recovery. Following CR, with or without adjunct therapy, 18 of the remaining patients (86%) exhibited arytenoid motion recovery with concomitant voice improvement. Recovery was sustained at 6 months after CR. Closed Reduction performed within 21 days of the presumed dislocation event was associated with a superior arytenoid motion recovery rate. Conclusions and Relevance These data represent the largest clinical series on arytenoid dislocation with complete vocal function data and follow-up at 6 months after CR. These findings also corroborate existing evidence for early surgical intervention. PMID:25257336

  3. Measuring surface dislocation nucleation in defect-scarce nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lisa Y; He, Mo-rigen; Shin, Jungho; Richter, Gunther; Gianola, Daniel S

    2015-07-01

    Linear defects in crystalline materials, known as dislocations, are central to the understanding of plastic deformation and mechanical strength, as well as control of performance in a variety of electronic and photonic materials. Despite nearly a century of research on dislocation structure and interactions, measurements of the energetics and kinetics of dislocation nucleation have not been possible, as synthesizing and testing pristine crystals absent of defects has been prohibitively challenging. Here, we report experiments that directly measure the surface dislocation nucleation strengths in high-quality 〈110〉 Pd nanowhiskers subjected to uniaxial tension. We find that, whereas nucleation strengths are weakly size- and strain-rate-dependent, a strong temperature dependence is uncovered, corroborating predictions that nucleation is assisted by thermal fluctuations. We measure atomic-scale activation volumes, which explain both the ultrahigh athermal strength as well as the temperature-dependent scatter, evident in our experiments and well captured by a thermal activation model. PMID:25985457

  4. Conical Euler simulation and active suppression of delta wing rocking motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Elizabeth M.; Batina, John T.

    1990-01-01

    A conical Euler code was developed to study unsteady vortex-dominated flows about rolling highly-swept delta wings, undergoing either forced or free-to-roll motions including active roll suppression. The flow solver of the code involves a multistage Runge-Kutta time-stepping scheme which uses a finite volume spatial discretization of the Euler equations on an unstructured grid of triangles. The code allows for the additional analysis of the free-to-roll case, by including the rigid-body equation of motion for its simultaneous time integration with the governing flow equations. Results are presented for a 75 deg swept sharp leading edge delta wing at a freestream Mach number of 1.2 and at alpha equal to 10 and 30 deg angle of attack. A forced harmonic analysis indicates that the rolling moment coefficient provides: (1) a positive damping at the lower angle of attack equal to 10 deg, which is verified in a free-to-roll calculation; (2) a negative damping at the higher angle of attack equal to 30 deg at the small roll amplitudes. A free-to-roll calculation for the latter case produces an initially divergent response, but as the amplitude of motion grows with time, the response transitions to a wing-rock type of limit cycle oscillation. The wing rocking motion may be actively suppressed, however, through the use of a rate-feedback control law and antisymmetrically deflected leading edge flaps. The descriptions of the conical Euler flow solver and the free-to-roll analysis are presented. Results are also presented which give insight into the flow physics associated with unsteady vortical flows about forced and free-to-roll delta wings, including the active roll suppression of this wing-rock phenomenon.

  5. The driving force for glide of a threading dislocation in a strained epitaxial layer on a substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freund, L. B.

    T HE PROCESS of epitaxial growth of a very thin layer onto a substrate crystal is considered for the particular situation in which the layer and substrate materials have the same crystal structure and orientation but different lattice parameters. Under these conditions, the layer grows with an intrinsic elastic strain determined by the mismatch in lattice parameters. The associated stress in the crystalline layer provides a driving force for the nucleation and motion of defects, primarily dislocations. The focus here is on the glide of a dislocation extending from the free surface of the layer to the layer-substrate interface, the so-called threading dislocation. A general definition of driving force for glide of a threading dislocation is introduced on the basis of work arguments. The definition is then applied to calculate the driving force for steady motion of an isolated threading dislocation in a strained layer, and the result includes Matthews' critical thickness concept as one of its features. Next, a kinetic equation for glide of a dislocation in semiconductor materials is proposed to estimate the glide rate of a threading dislocation in these low mobility materials. Finally, for the case of cubic materials, the general definition of driving force is applied to estimate the additional driving force on a threading dislocation due to an encounter with a dislocation on an intersecting glide plane. The results indicate that this effect is significant in blocking the glide of a threading dislocation for large mismatch strains and for layer thicknesses near the critical thickness.

  6. Reactions between a 1/2⟨111⟩ screw dislocation and ⟨100⟩ interstitial dislocation loops in alpha-iron modelled at atomic scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terentyev, D.; Bacon, D. J.; Osetsky, Yu. N.

    2010-03-01

    Interstitial dislocation loops with Burgers vector of ? type are observed in α-iron irradiated by neutrons or heavy ions, and their population increases with increasing temperature. Their effect on motion of a ? edge dislocation was reported earlier 1. Results are presented of a molecular dynamics study of interactions between a ? screw dislocation and ? loops in iron at temperature in the range 100 to 600 K. A variety of reaction mechanisms and outcomes are observed and classified in terms of the resulting dislocation configuration and the maximum stress required for the dislocation to break away. The highest obstacle resistance arises when the loop is absorbed to form a helical turn on the screw dislocation line, for the dislocation cannot glide away until the turn closes and a loop is released with the same Burgers vector as the line. Other than one situation found, in which no dislocation-loop reaction occurs, the weakest obstacle strength is found when the original ? loop is restored at the end of the reaction. The important role of the cross-slip and the influence of model boundary conditions are emphasised and demonstrated by examples.

  7. Effect of Fe impurity on the dislocations in 4H-SiC: Insights from electrical and optical characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Bin; Sekiguchi, Takashi; Matsuhata, Hirofumi; Ohyanagi, Takasumi; Kinoshita, Akimasa; Okumura, Hajime

    2014-01-01

    The effect of Fe impurity on the dissociation and motion behavior of basal plane dislocations (BPDs) in 4H-SiC homoepitaxial layers was investigated by electron-beam-induced current (EBIC) and cathodoluminescence (CL) techniques. Under the electron-beam irradiation, the BPDs dissociated to C- and Si-core partials, and these two partials were connected by another partial termed as X in this study. Stacking faults (SFs) were formed among these partials. The recombination activities of the BPDs and partials were enhanced with the existence of Fe impurity. The SFs near the surface region showed obvious dark contrast in EBIC, which was different from that observed in the clean samples. The X partial kept moving with sustained electron-beam irradiation whereas this partial in the clean samples stopped motion when it was connected to the sample surface. The dark contrast of the SFs and the peculiar motion behavior of the X partial are discussed with the CL results.

  8. Dislocation following total knee arthroplasty: A report of six cases

    PubMed Central

    Villanueva, Manuel; Ríos-Luna, Antonio; Pereiro, Javier; Fahandez-Saddi, Homid; Pérez-Caballer, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    Background: Dislocation following total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is the worst form of instability. The incidence is from 0.15 to 0.5%. We report six cases of TKA dislocation and analyze the patterns of dislocation and the factors related to each of them. Materials and Methods: Six patients with dislocation of knee following TKA are reported. The causes for the dislocations were an imbalance of the flexion gap (n=4), an inadequate selection of implants (n=1), malrotation of components (n=1) leading to incompetence of the extensor mechanism, or rupture of the medial collateral ligament (MCC). The patients presented complained of pain, giving way episodes, joint effusion and difficulty in climbing stairs. Five patients suffered posterior dislocation while one anterior dislocation. An urgent closed reduction of dislocation was performed under general anaesthesia in all patients. All patients were operated for residual instability by revision arthroplasty after a period of conservative treatment. Results: One patient had deep infection and knee was arthrodesed. Two patients have a minimal residual lag for active extension, including a patient with a previous patellectomy. Result was considered excellent or good in four cases and fair in one, without residual instability. Five out of six patients in our series had a cruciate retaining (CR) TKA designs: four were revised to a posterior stabilized (PS) TKA and one to a rotating hinge design because of the presence of a ruptured MCL. Conclusion: Further episodes of dislocation or instability will be prevented by identifying and treating major causes of instability. The increase in the level of constraint and correction of previous technical mistakes is mandatory. PMID:20924487

  9. Active control of heave motion for TLP-type offshore platform under random waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battista, Ronaldo C.; Alves, Rosane M.

    1999-05-01

    In deep waters scenarios Tension Leg Platforms (TLP), under severe sea/wind conditions, may experience large response amplitudes of the hull motion. Large heave amplitudes caused by random dynamic loads appear as one of the most deleterious effects to the structural safety and integrity of the most critical components: mooring system and the handing risers. In a preliminary design reduction of these amplitudes is in general tentatively sought by compromised measures and concurrent design criteria like: high flutuability and deck payload vs. tendons and risers submerged weight; deck hydrodynamic vs. length variation of pretension tendons, etc. This paper shows that active control system may be installed inside the hull to attenuate dynamic amplitudes in heave motion. Optimal control theory are applicated for the idealization of mechanism to reduce the dynamic response amplitude, improving the safety conditions and increasing service life of tendons and risers, insuring the system functioning at all. The uncontrolled and controlled dynamic behaviors of a TLP prototype are investigated by using simplified mathematical models. The numerical results lead to the conclusion that active systems have good performance and efficiency in reducing and controlling the heave motion amplitudes and consequently the stress variations in tendons and risers of a TLP.

  10. Dislocation after total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Wazir, N N; Shan, Y; Mukundala, V V; Gunalan, R

    2007-05-01

    Two cases of dislocation of total knee arthroplasty presented to us within the same week. The first patient is a 71-year-old woman who underwent bilateral primary total knee arthroplasty. The left knee dislocated three weeks after the surgery. Due to failure of conservative measures, she underwent revision total knee arthroplasty. The other patient is a 72-year-old woman presenting ten years after primary total knee arthroplasty, with a traumatic dislocation of the knee joint. She was treated as an outpatient with closed manipulative reduction.

  11. Buckling of dislocation in graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Yin; Wang, Shaofeng; Bai, Jianhui; Wang, Rui

    2016-10-01

    The buckling of dislocation in graphene is discussed through the lattice theory of dislocation and elastic theory. The approximate solution of the buckling is obtained based on the inner stress distribution caused by different structure of dislocations and is proved to be suitable by the simulation. The position of the highest buckling is predicted to be at the vertex of the pentagon far away from the heptagon. The buckling is strongly influenced by the internal stress and the distance between the extrusive area and stretching area, as well as the critical stress σc. The SW defect is proved to be unbuckled due to its strong interaction between extrusion and stretching.

  12. Dislocation dynamics simulations of plasticity at small scales

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Caizhi

    2010-01-01

    As metallic structures and devices are being created on a dimension comparable to the length scales of the underlying dislocation microstructures, the mechanical properties of them change drastically. Since such small structures are increasingly common in modern technologies, there is an emergent need to understand the critical roles of elasticity, plasticity, and fracture in small structures. Dislocation dynamics (DD) simulations, in which the dislocations are the simulated entities, offer a way to extend length scales beyond those of atomistic simulations and the results from DD simulations can be directly compared with the micromechanical tests. The primary objective of this research is to use 3-D DD simulations to study the plastic deformation of nano- and micro-scale materials and understand the correlation between dislocation motion, interactions and the mechanical response. Specifically, to identify what critical events (i.e., dislocation multiplication, cross-slip, storage, nucleation, junction and dipole formation, pinning etc.) determine the deformation response and how these change from bulk behavior as the system decreases in size and correlate and improve our current knowledge of bulk plasticity with the knowledge gained from the direct observations of small-scale plasticity. Our simulation results on single crystal micropillars and polycrystalline thin films can march the experiment results well and capture the essential features in small-scale plasticity. Furthermore, several simple and accurate models have been developed following our simulation results and can reasonably predict the plastic behavior of small scale materials.

  13. Arm position influences the activation patterns of trunk muscles during trunk range-of-motion movements.

    PubMed

    Siu, Aaron; Schinkel-Ivy, Alison; Drake, Janessa Dm

    2016-10-01

    To understand the activation patterns of the trunk musculature, it is also important to consider the implications of adjacent structures such as the upper limbs, and the muscles that act to move the arms. This study investigated the effects of arm positions on the activation patterns and co-activation of the trunk musculature and muscles that move the arm during trunk range-of-motion movements (maximum trunk axial twist, flexion, and lateral bend). Fifteen males and fifteen females, asymptomatic for low back pain, performed maximum trunk range-of-motion movements, with three arm positions for axial twist (loose, crossed, abducted) and two positions for flexion and lateral bend (loose, crossed). Electromyographical data were collected for eight muscles bilaterally, and activation signals were cross-correlated between trunk muscles and the muscles that move the arms (upper trapezius, latissimus dorsi). Results revealed consistently greater muscle co-activation (higher cross-correlation coefficients) between the trunk muscles and upper trapezius for the abducted arm position during maximum trunk axial twist, while results for the latissimus dorsi-trunk pairings were more dependent on the specific trunk muscles (either abdominal or back) and latissimus dorsi muscle (either right or left side), as well as the range-of-motion movement. The findings of this study contribute to the understanding of interactions between the upper limbs and trunk, and highlight the influence of arm positions on the trunk musculature. In addition, the comparison of the present results to those of individuals with back or shoulder conditions may ultimately aid in elucidating underlying mechanisms or contributing factors to those conditions.

  14. Limits of Dislocation-based Deformation of Ni

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Follstaedt, David; Knapp, James; Hugo, Richard; Kung, Harriet

    2001-11-01

    How small can metallic grains be and still deform by dislocation glide? This question is critical to understanding the mechanical properties of nanocrystalline Ni and for enhancing yield strength and hardness while maintaining ductility. As grain size is reduced in the micrometer range, the hardness of Ni scales as H = Ho + kd-1/2 in accordance with the dislocation-based Hall-Petch relation; however, below 100-50 nm the observed hardness no longer increases. Theoretical treatments indicate that intergranular types of deformation will replace dislocation motion at a few 10's of nanometers. To probe this limit, we have prepared a nearly ideal Ni material with very fine, uniform grain size and uncontaminated grain boundaries by using pulsed laser deposition. In situ tensile straining in the TEM directly shows dislocation motion in grains as small as 20 nm. Moreover, the material exhibits excellent ductility, consistent with this mechanism. We also find high yield strengths (2.4 GPa) and hardnesses (10 GPa) that agree with extensions of the Hall-Petch mechanism down to 12 nm grain-size. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  15. Dislocation Detection Through Harmonic Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinhardt, B. T.; Kropf, M.; Boudraeu, K.; Guers, M. J.; Tittmann, B. R.

    2010-02-01

    A fundamental goal of ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation is to characterize material defects before failure. During material fatigue, dislocations tend to nucleate, becoming sources of stress concentration. Eventually, cracks start to form and lead to material failure. Recent research has indicated that nonlinear harmonic generation can be used to distinguish between materials of high and low dislocation densities. This research reports nonlinear harmonic generation measurements to distinguish between those areas of high and low dislocation densities in copper bars. The copper bars were subjected to flexural fatigue. Periodic scans were taken in order to track dislocation development during the fatigue life of the material. We show that this technique provides improved early detection for critical components of failure.

  16. Atomic scale study of the life cycle of a dislocation in graphene from birth to annihilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehtinen, O.; Kurasch, S.; Krasheninnikov, A. V.; Kaiser, U.

    2013-06-01

    Dislocations, one of the key entities in materials science, govern the properties of any crystalline material. Thus, understanding their life cycle, from creation to annihilation via motion and interaction with other dislocations, point defects and surfaces, is of fundamental importance. Unfortunately, atomic-scale investigations of dislocation evolution in a bulk object are well beyond the spatial and temporal resolution limits of current characterization techniques. Here we overcome the experimental limits by investigating the two-dimensional graphene in an aberration-corrected transmission electron microscope, exploiting the impinging energetic electrons both to image and stimulate atomic-scale morphological changes in the material. The resulting transformations are followed in situ, atom-by-atom, showing the full life cycle of a dislocation from birth to annihilation. Our experiments, combined with atomistic simulations, reveal the evolution of dislocations in two-dimensional systems to be governed by markedly long-ranging out-of-plane buckling.

  17. 20 CFR 663.115 - What are the eligibility criteria for core services for dislocated workers in the adult and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... services for dislocated workers in the adult and dislocated worker programs? 663.115 Section 663.115 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) ADULT AND DISLOCATED WORKER ACTIVITIES UNDER TITLE I OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT Delivery of Adult and...

  18. 20 CFR 663.115 - What are the eligibility criteria for core services for dislocated workers in the adult and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... services for dislocated workers in the adult and dislocated worker programs? 663.115 Section 663.115 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) ADULT AND DISLOCATED WORKER ACTIVITIES UNDER TITLE I OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT Delivery of Adult and...

  19. 20 CFR 663.115 - What are the eligibility criteria for core services for dislocated workers in the adult and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... services for dislocated workers in the adult and dislocated worker programs? 663.115 Section 663.115 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) ADULT AND DISLOCATED WORKER ACTIVITIES UNDER TITLE I OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT Delivery of Adult and...

  20. Predicting muscle activation patterns from motion and anatomy: modelling the skull of Sphenodon (Diapsida: Rhynchocephalia)

    PubMed Central

    Curtis, Neil; Jones, Marc E. H.; Evans, Susan E.; Shi, JunFen; O'Higgins, Paul; Fagan, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    The relationship between skull shape and the forces generated during feeding is currently under widespread scrutiny and increasingly involves the use of computer simulations such as finite element analysis. The computer models used to represent skulls are often based on computed tomography data and thus are structurally accurate; however, correctly representing muscular loading during food reduction remains a major problem. Here, we present a novel approach for predicting the forces and activation patterns of muscles and muscle groups based on their known anatomical orientation (line of action). The work was carried out for the lizard-like reptile Sphenodon (Rhynchocephalia) using a sophisticated computer-based model and multi-body dynamics analysis. The model suggests that specific muscle groups control specific motions, and that during certain times in the bite cycle some muscles are highly active whereas others are inactive. The predictions of muscle activity closely correspond to data previously recorded from live Sphenodon using electromyography. Apparent exceptions can be explained by variations in food resistance, food size, food position and lower jaw motions. This approach shows considerable promise in advancing detailed functional models of food acquisition and reduction, and for use in other musculoskeletal systems where no experimental determination of muscle activity is possible, such as in rare, endangered or extinct species. PMID:19474084

  1. Modeling meiotic chromosome pairing: nuclear envelope attachment, telomere-led active random motion, and anomalous diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, Wallace F.; Fung, Jennifer C.

    2016-04-01

    The recognition and pairing of homologous chromosomes during meiosis is a complex physical and molecular process involving a combination of polymer dynamics and molecular recognition events. Two highly conserved features of meiotic chromosome behavior are the attachment of telomeres to the nuclear envelope and the active random motion of telomeres driven by their interaction with cytoskeletal motor proteins. Both of these features have been proposed to facilitate the process of homolog pairing, but exactly what role these features play in meiosis remains poorly understood. Here we investigate the roles of active motion and nuclear envelope tethering using a Brownian dynamics simulation in which meiotic chromosomes are represented by a Rouse polymer model subjected to tethering and active forces at the telomeres. We find that tethering telomeres to the nuclear envelope slows down pairing relative to the rates achieved by unattached chromosomes, but that randomly directed active forces applied to the telomeres speed up pairing dramatically in a manner that depends on the statistical properties of the telomere force fluctuations. The increased rate of initial pairing cannot be explained by stretching out of the chromosome conformation but instead seems to correlate with anomalous diffusion of sub-telomeric regions.

  2. Cyclic degradation of titanium-tantalum high-temperature shape memory alloys — the role of dislocation activity and chemical decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niendorf, T.; Krooß, P.; Somsen, C.; Rynko, R.; Paulsen, A.; Batyrshina, E.; Frenzel, J.; Eggeler, G.; Maier, H. J.

    2015-05-01

    Titanium-tantalum shape memory alloys (SMAs) are promising candidates for actuator applications at elevated temperatures. They may even succeed in substituting ternary nickel-titanium high temperature SMAs, which are either extremely expensive or difficult to form. However, titanium-tantalum alloys show rapid functional and structural degradation under cyclic thermo-mechanical loading. The current work reveals that degradation is not only governed by the evolution of the ω-phase. Dislocation processes and chemical decomposition of the matrix at grain boundaries also play a major role.

  3. Active breathing control (ABC): Determination and reduction of breathing-induced organ motion in the chest

    SciTech Connect

    Gagel, Bernd . E-mail: BGagel@UKAachen.de; Demirel, Cengiz M.P.; Kientopf, Aline; Pinkawa, Michael; Piroth, Marc; Stanzel, Sven; Breuer, Christian; Asadpour, Branka; Jansen, Thomas; Holy, Richard; Wildberger, Joachim E.; Eble, Michael J.

    2007-03-01

    Purpose: Extensive radiotherapy volumes for tumors of the chest are partly caused by interfractional organ motion. We evaluated the feasibility of respiratory observation tools using the active breathing control (ABC) system and the effect on breathing cycle regularity and reproducibility. Methods and Materials: Thirty-six patients with unresectable tumors of the chest were selected for evaluation of the ABC system. Computed tomography scans were performed at various respiratory phases starting at the same couch position without patient movement. Threshold levels were set at minimum and maximum volume during normal breathing cycles and at a volume defined as shallow breathing, reflecting the subjective maximal tolerable reduction of breath volume. To evaluate the extent of organ movement, 13 landmarks were considering using commercial software for image coregistration. In 4 patients, second examinations were performed during therapy. Results: Investigating the differences in a normal breathing cycle versus shallow breathing, a statistically significant reduction of respiratory motion in the upper, middle, and lower regions of the chest could be detected, representing potential movement reduction achieved through reduced breath volume. Evaluating interfraction reproducibility, the mean displacement ranged between 0.24 mm (chest wall/tracheal bifurcation) to 3.5 mm (diaphragm) for expiration and shallow breathing and 0.24 mm (chest wall) to 5.25 mm (diaphragm) for normal inspiration. Conclusions: By modifying regularity of the respiratory cycle through reduction of breath volume, a significant and reproducible reduction of chest and diaphragm motion is possible, enabling reduction of treatment planning margins.

  4. Processing 3D form and 3D motion: respective contributions of attention-based and stimulus-driven activity.

    PubMed

    Paradis, A-L; Droulez, J; Cornilleau-Pérès, V; Poline, J-B

    2008-12-01

    This study aims at segregating the neural substrate for the 3D-form and 3D-motion attributes in structure-from-motion perception, and at disentangling the stimulus-driven and endogenous-attention-driven processing of these attributes. Attention and stimulus were manipulated independently: participants had to detect the transitions of one attribute--form, 3D motion or colour--while the visual stimulus underwent successive transitions of all attributes. We compared the BOLD activity related to form and 3D motion in three conditions: stimulus-driven processing (unattended transitions), endogenous attentional selection (task) or both stimulus-driven processing and attentional selection (attended transitions). In all conditions, the form versus 3D-motion contrasts revealed a clear dorsal/ventral segregation. However, while the form-related activity is consistent with previously described shape-selective areas, the activity related to 3D motion does not encompass the usual "visual motion" areas, but rather corresponds to a high-level motion system, including IPL and STS areas. Second, we found a dissociation between the neural processing of unattended attributes and that involved in endogenous attentional selection. Areas selective for 3D-motion and form showed either increased activity at transitions of these respective attributes or decreased activity when subjects' attention was directed to a competing attribute. We propose that both facilitatory and suppressive mechanisms of attribute selection are involved depending on the conditions driving this selection. Therefore, attentional selection is not limited to an increased activity in areas processing stimulus properties, and may unveil different functional localization from stimulus modulation.

  5. Dislocation sources in ordered intermetallics

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, M.H.; Appel, F.; Wagner, R.; Mecking, H.

    1996-09-01

    An overview on the current understanding of dislocation sources and multiplication mechanisms is made for ordered intermetallic alloys of the L1{sub 2}, B2, and D0{sub 19} structures. In L1{sub 2} alloys, a large disparity of edge/screw segments in their relative mobility reduces the efficiency of a Frank-Read Type multiplication mechanism. In Fe-40%Al of the B2 structure, a variety of dislocation sources are available for <111> slip, including ones resulting from condensation of thermal vacancies. In NiAl with the relatively high APB energy, <100> dislocations may result from the dislocation decomposition reactions, the prismatic punching out from inclusion particles, and/or steps and coated layers of the surface. Internal interfaces often provide sites for dislocation multiplication, e.g., grain boundaries, sub-boundaries in Ni{sub 3}Ga, NiAl and Ti{sub 3}Al, and antiphase domain boundaries in Ti{sub 3}Al. As for the crack tip as a dislocation source, extended SISFs trailed by super-Shockley partials emanating form the cracks in Ni{sub 3}Al and Co{sub 3}Ti are discussed in view of a possible toughening mechanism.

  6. Development of Kinematic Graphs of Median Nerve during Active Finger Motion: Implications of Smartphone Use

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background Certain hand activities cause deformation and displacement of the median nerve at the carpal tunnel due to the gliding motion of tendons surrounding it. As smartphone usage escalates, this raises the public’s concern whether hand activities while using smartphones can lead to median nerve problems. Objective The aims of this study were to 1) develop kinematic graphs and 2) investigate the associated deformation and rotational information of median nerve in the carpal tunnel during hand activities. Methods Dominant wrists of 30 young adults were examined with ultrasonography by placing a transducer transversely on their wrist crease. Ultrasound video clips were recorded when the subject performing 1) thumb opposition with the wrist in neutral position, 2) thumb opposition with the wrist in ulnar deviation and 3) pinch grip with the wrist in neutral position. Six still images that were separated by 0.2-second intervals were then captured from the ultrasound video for the determination of 1) cross-sectional area (CSA), 2) flattening ratio (FR), 3) rotational displacement (RD) and 4) translational displacement (TD) of median nerve in the carpal tunnel, and these collected information of deformation, rotational and displacement of median nerve were compared between 1) two successive time points during a single hand activity and 2) different hand motions at the same time point. Finally, kinematic graphs were constructed to demonstrate the mobility of median nerve during different hand activities. Results Performing different hand activities during this study led to a gradual reduction in CSA of the median nerve, with thumb opposition together with the wrist in ulnar deviation causing the greatest extent of deformation of the median nerve. Thumb opposition with the wrist in ulnar deviation also led to the largest extent of TD when compared to the other two hand activities of this study. Kinematic graphs showed that the motion pathways of median nerve during

  7. Respiratory Motion of The Heart and Positional Reproducibility Under Active Breathing Control

    SciTech Connect

    Jagsi, Reshma; Moran, Jean M.; Kessler, Marc L.; Marsh, Robin B. C; Balter, James M.; Pierce, Lori J. . E-mail: ljpierce@umich.edu

    2007-05-01

    Purpose: To reduce cardiotoxicity from breast radiotherapy (RT), innovative techniques are under investigation. Information about cardiac motion with respiration and positional reproducibility under active breathing control (ABC) is necessary to evaluate these techniques. Methods and Materials: Patients requiring loco-regional RT for breast cancer were scanned by computed tomography using an ABC device at various breath-hold states, before and during treatment. Ten patients were studied. For each patient, 12 datasets were analyzed. Mutual information-based regional rigid alignment was used to determine the magnitude and reproducibility of cardiac motion as a function of breathing state. For each scan session, motion was quantified by evaluating the displacement of a point along the left anterior descending artery (LAD) with respect to its position at end expiration. Long-term positional reproducibility was also assessed. Results: Displacement of the LAD was greatest in the inferior direction, moderate in the anterior direction, and lowest in the left-right direction. At shallow breathing states, the average displacement of LAD position was up to 6 mm in the inferior direction. The maximum displacement in any patient was 2.8 cm in the inferior direction, between expiration and deep-inspiration breath hold. At end expiration, the long-term reproducibility (SD) of the LAD position was 3 mm in the A-P, 6 mm in the S-I, and 4 mm in the L-R directions. At deep-inspiration breath hold, long-term reproducibility was 3 mm in the A-P, 7 mm in the S-I, and 3 mm in the L-R directions. Conclusions: These data demonstrate the extent of LAD displacement that occurs with shallow breathing and with deep-inspiration breath hold. This information may guide optimization studies considering the effects of respiratory motion and reproducibility of cardiac position on cardiac dose, both with and without ABC.

  8. Observation of Dislocation Behavior in Graphite by Using Ultrasonic Atomic Force Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuji, Toshihiro; Irihama, Hiroshi; Yamanaka, Kazushi

    We verify that ultrasonic atomic force microscopy (UAFM) can detect and evaluate subsurface objects with a resolution of around 10nm. We first show that the resonance frequency of UAFM cantilever shows a measurable change due to subsurface low-elasticity layer by a finite element analysis. We then proved the ability of subsurface imaging in a highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) specimen. We found a new type of dislocation motion. As a load was applied to the tip, apparent edge-type dislocations (Frank partial dislocations) moved to the direction of climb over distances of 47nm and returned to the original position as the load was removed. To explain this motion, we propose a possible model where the extra half-plane of the dislocation is elastically compressed to shorten its length due to the normal load applied by the tip.

  9. Relationships between Paraspinal Muscle Activity and Lumbar Inter-Vertebral Range of Motion.

    PubMed

    du Rose, Alister; Breen, Alan

    2016-01-01

    Control of the lumbar spine requires contributions from both the active and passive sub-systems. Identifying interactions between these systems may provide insight into the mechanisms of low back pain. However, as a first step it is important to investigate what is normal. The purpose of this study was to explore the relationships between the lumbar inter-vertebral range of motion and paraspinal muscle activity during weight-bearing flexion in healthy controls using quantitative fluoroscopy (QF) and surface electromyography (sEMG). Contemporaneous lumbar sEMG and QF motion sequences were recorded during controlled active flexion of 60° using electrodes placed over Longissimus thoracis pars thoracis (TES), Longissimus thoracis pars lumborum (LES), and Multifidus (LMU). Normalised root mean square (RMS) sEMG amplitude data were averaged over five epochs, and the change in amplitude between epochs was calculated. The sEMG ratios of LMU/LES LMU/TES and LES/TES were also determined. QF was used to measure the maximum inter-vertebral range of motion from L2-S1, and correlation coefficients were calculated between sEMG amplitude variables and these measurements. Intra- and inter-session sEMG amplitude repeatability was also assessed for all three paraspinal muscles. The sEMG amplitude measurements were highly repeatable, and sEMG amplitude changes correlated significantly with L4-5 and L5-S1 IV-RoMmax (r = -0.47 to 0.59). The sEMG amplitude ratio of LES/TES also correlated with L4-L5 IV-RoMmax (r = -0.53). The relationships found may be important when considering rehabilitation for low back pain. PMID:27417592

  10. Relationships between Paraspinal Muscle Activity and Lumbar Inter-Vertebral Range of Motion

    PubMed Central

    du Rose, Alister; Breen, Alan

    2016-01-01

    Control of the lumbar spine requires contributions from both the active and passive sub-systems. Identifying interactions between these systems may provide insight into the mechanisms of low back pain. However, as a first step it is important to investigate what is normal. The purpose of this study was to explore the relationships between the lumbar inter-vertebral range of motion and paraspinal muscle activity during weight-bearing flexion in healthy controls using quantitative fluoroscopy (QF) and surface electromyography (sEMG). Contemporaneous lumbar sEMG and QF motion sequences were recorded during controlled active flexion of 60° using electrodes placed over Longissimus thoracis pars thoracis (TES), Longissimus thoracis pars lumborum (LES), and Multifidus (LMU). Normalised root mean square (RMS) sEMG amplitude data were averaged over five epochs, and the change in amplitude between epochs was calculated. The sEMG ratios of LMU/LES LMU/TES and LES/TES were also determined. QF was used to measure the maximum inter-vertebral range of motion from L2-S1, and correlation coefficients were calculated between sEMG amplitude variables and these measurements. Intra- and inter-session sEMG amplitude repeatability was also assessed for all three paraspinal muscles. The sEMG amplitude measurements were highly repeatable, and sEMG amplitude changes correlated significantly with L4-5 and L5-S1 IV-RoMmax (r = −0.47 to 0.59). The sEMG amplitude ratio of LES/TES also correlated with L4-L5 IV-RoMmax (r = −0.53). The relationships found may be important when considering rehabilitation for low back pain. PMID:27417592

  11. Extract the Relational Information of Static Features and Motion Features for Human Activities Recognition in Videos

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Both static features and motion features have shown promising performance in human activities recognition task. However, the information included in these features is insufficient for complex human activities. In this paper, we propose extracting relational information of static features and motion features for human activities recognition. The videos are represented by a classical Bag-of-Word (BoW) model which is useful in many works. To get a compact and discriminative codebook with small dimension, we employ the divisive algorithm based on KL-divergence to reconstruct the codebook. After that, to further capture strong relational information, we construct a bipartite graph to model the relationship between words of different feature set. Then we use a k-way partition to create a new codebook in which similar words are getting together. With this new codebook, videos can be represented by a new BoW vector with strong relational information. Moreover, we propose a method to compute new clusters from the divisive algorithm's projective function. We test our work on the several datasets and obtain very promising results. PMID:27656199

  12. Extract the Relational Information of Static Features and Motion Features for Human Activities Recognition in Videos

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Both static features and motion features have shown promising performance in human activities recognition task. However, the information included in these features is insufficient for complex human activities. In this paper, we propose extracting relational information of static features and motion features for human activities recognition. The videos are represented by a classical Bag-of-Word (BoW) model which is useful in many works. To get a compact and discriminative codebook with small dimension, we employ the divisive algorithm based on KL-divergence to reconstruct the codebook. After that, to further capture strong relational information, we construct a bipartite graph to model the relationship between words of different feature set. Then we use a k-way partition to create a new codebook in which similar words are getting together. With this new codebook, videos can be represented by a new BoW vector with strong relational information. Moreover, we propose a method to compute new clusters from the divisive algorithm's projective function. We test our work on the several datasets and obtain very promising results.

  13. Movement of basal plane dislocations in GaN during electron beam irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Yakimov, E. B.; Vergeles, P. S.; Polyakov, A. Y.; Lee, In-Hwan; Pearton, S. J.

    2015-03-30

    The movement of basal plane segments of dislocations in low-dislocation-density GaN films grown by epitaxial lateral overgrowth as a result of irradiation with the probing beam of a scanning electron microscope was detected by means of electron beam induced current. Only a small fraction of the basal plane dislocations was susceptible to such changes and the movement was limited to relatively short distances. The effect is explained by the radiation enhanced dislocation glide for dislocations pinned by two different types of pinning sites: a low-activation-energy site and a high-activation-energy site. Only dislocation segments pinned by the former sites can be moved by irradiation and only until they meet the latter pinning sites.

  14. Factors affecting the functional results of open reduction and internal fixation for fracture-dislocations of the proximal interphalangeal joint.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Kentaro; Kino, Yoshitake; Yajima, Hiroki

    2015-01-01

    To clarify the factors affecting functional results of fracture-dislocations of the proximal interphalangeal (PIP) joint treated by open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF), 60 patients, including 38 patients with a dorsal fracture-dislocation and 22 with a pilon fracture, were analysed. The mean ratio of articular surface involvement was 48.5% and a depressed central fragment existed in 75.3% of the cases. ORIF was performed in 47 patients through a lateral approach using Kirschner wires and in 13 through a palmar approach using a plate or screws. The mean flexion, extension and range of motion (ROM) of the PIP joint was 89.5°, 11.5° and 78.0°, respectively. Stepwise regression analysis revealed that a delayed start of active motion exercise after surgery, elderly age and ulnar ray digit were factors affecting functional outcomes. Although ORIF allows accurate restoration of the articular surfaces, an early start of motion exercise is essential for good results.

  15. Bilateral posterior shoulder dislocation after electrical shock: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Ketenci, Ismail Emre; Duymus, Tahir Mutlu; Ulusoy, Ayhan; Yanik, Hakan Serhat; Mutlu, Serhat; Durakbasa, Mehmet Oguz

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Posterior dislocation of the shoulder is a rare and commonly missed injury. Unilateral dislocations occur mostly due to trauma. Bilateral posterior shoulder dislocations are even more rare and result mainly from epileptic seizures. Electrical injury is a rare cause of posterior shoulder dislocation. Injury mechanism in electrical injury is similar to epileptic seizures, where the shoulder is forced to internal rotation, flexion and adduction. Presentation of case This report presents a case of bilateral posterior shoulder dislocation after electrical shock. We were able to find a few individual case reports describing this condition. The case was acute and humeral head impression defects were minor. Our treatment in this case consisted of closed reduction under general anesthesia and applying of orthoses which kept the shoulders in abduction and external rotation. A rehabilitation program was begun after 3 weeks of immobilization. After 6 months of injury the patient has returned to work. 20 months postoperatively, at final follow-up, he was painless and capable of performing all of his daily activities. Discussion The amount of bilateral shoulder dislocations after electrical injury is not reported but is known to be very rare. The aim of this case presentation is to report an example for this rare entity, highlight the difficulties in diagnosis and review the treatment options. Conclusion Physical examination and radiographic evaluation are important for quick and accurate diagnosis. PMID:26904192

  16. In Situ Observation on Dislocation-Controlled Sublimation of Mg Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Yu, Qian; Mao, Min-Min; Li, Qing-Jie; Fu, Xiao-Qian; Tian, He; Li, Ji-Xue; Mao, Scott X; Zhang, Ze

    2016-02-10

    Sublimation is an important endothermic phase transition in which the atoms break away from their neighbors in the crystal lattice and are removed into the gas phase. Such debonding process may be significantly influenced by dislocations, the crystal defect that changes the bonding environment of local atoms. By performing systematic defects characterization and in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) tests on a core--shell MgO-Mg system, which enables us to "modulate" the internal dislocation density, we investigated the role of dislocations on materials' sublimation with particular focus on the sublimation kinetics and mechanism. It was observed that the sublimation rate increases significantly with dislocation density. As the density of screw dislocations is high, the intersection of screw dislocation spirals creates a large number of monatomic ledges, resulting in a "liquid-like" motion of solid-gas interface, which significantly deviates from the theoretically predicted sublimation plane. Our calculation based on density functional theory demonstrated that the remarkable change of sublimation rate with dislocation density is due to the dramatic reduction in binding energy of the monatomic ledges. This study provides direct observation to improve our understanding on this fundamental phase transition as well as to shed light on tuning materials' sublimation by "engineering" dislocation density in applications. PMID:26799861

  17. Semi-active control of the rocking motion of monolithic art objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceravolo, Rosario; Pecorelli, Marica Leonarda; Zanotti Fragonara, Luca

    2016-07-01

    The seismic behaviour of many art objects and obelisks can be analysed in the context of the seismic response of rigid blocks. Starting from the pioneering works by Housner, a large number of analytical studies of the rigid block dynamics were proposed. In fact, despite its apparent simplicity, the motion of a rigid block involves a number of complex dynamic phenomena such as impacts, sliding, uplift and geometric nonlinearities. While most of the current strategies to avoid toppling consist in preventing rocking motion, in this paper a novel semi-active on-off control strategy for protecting monolithic art objects was investigated. The control procedure under study follows a feedback-feedforward scheme that is realised by switching the stiffness of the anchorages located at the two lower corner of the block between two values. Overturning spectra have been calculated in order to clarify the benefits of applying a semi-active control instead of a passive control strategy. In accordance with similar studies, the numerical investigation took into account the dynamic response of blocks with different slenderness and size subject to one-sine pulse excitation.

  18. Reliability of the universal goniometer for assessing active cervical range of motion in asymptomatic healthy persons

    PubMed Central

    Farooq, Muhammad Nazim; Bandpei, Mohammad A. Mohseni; Ali, Mudassar; Khan, Ghazanfar Ali

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To determine within-rater and between-rater reliability of the universal goniometer (UG) for measuring active cervical range of motion (ACROM) in asymptomatic healthy subjects. Methods: Nineteen healthy subjects were tested in an identical seated position. Two raters used UG to measure active cervical movements of flexion, extension, right side flexion, left side flexion, right rotation and left rotation. Each motion was measured twice by each of the two raters and was re-measured all over again after one week. Data analysis was performed using the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). Results: The results demonstrated excellent within-session (ICC2,1 = 0.83 to 0.98) and between-session (ICC2,2 = 0.79 to 0.97) intra-rater reliability and excellent inter-rater reliability (ICC2,2 = 0.79 to 0.92). Conclusion: Considering above results it is concluded that UG is a reliable tool for assessing ACROM in a clinical setting for healthy subjects. PMID:27182261

  19. Electron scattering due to threading edge dislocations in n-type wurtzite GaN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Jeong Ho; Lu, Jun-Qiang; Johnson, H. T.

    2006-02-01

    The effect of electrically active VGa-ON threading edge dislocations on drift and Hall mobilities in n-type epitaxial wurtzite (WZ) GaN is investigated theoretically. The charge distribution along the dislocation core is first obtained by means of a density-functional theory atomistic calculation; the two N atoms near the missing Ga atom at the dislocation core are found to be electron acceptors. An accurate analytical expression for dislocation electrostatic strength is then derived for the case of up to -2q charge per structural unit of the threading dislocation core. This strength factor is determined by minimizing the total increase of free energy per site of the partially charged dislocation line. Two different models of scattering potentials for charged dislocation lines are then used to determine the dislocation effect on in-plane electron mobility, and closed-form solutions for the dislocation contribution to drift and Hall mobilities are derived for the more accurate potential. By estimating the effects of other scattering mechanisms, the total mobility is then compared with available experimental data. It is found that for free-carrier concentrations higher than 1016 cm-3, reducing dislocation density below ndis=108 cm-2 has little beneficial effect on total mobility for typical WZ GaN samples.

  20. Discrete dislocation plasticity analysis of the wedge indentation of films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balint, D. S.; Deshpande, V. S.; Needleman, A.; Van der Giessen, E.

    2006-11-01

    The plane strain indentation of single crystal films on a rigid substrate by a rigid wedge indenter is analyzed using discrete dislocation plasticity. The crystals have three slip systems at ±35.3∘ and 90∘ with respect to the indentation direction. The analyses are carried out for three values of the film thickness, 2, 10 and 50 μm, and with the dislocations all of edge character modeled as line singularities in a linear elastic material. The lattice resistance to dislocation motion, dislocation nucleation, dislocation interaction with obstacles and dislocation annihilation are incorporated through a set of constitutive rules. Over the range of indentation depths considered, the indentation pressure for the 10 and 50 μm thick films decreases with increasing contact size and attains a contact size-independent value for contact lengths A>4 μm. On the other hand, for the 2 μm films, the indentation pressure first decreases with increasing contact size and subsequently increases as the plastic zone reaches the rigid substrate. For the 10 and 50 μm thick films sink-in occurs around the indenter, while pile-up occurs in the 2 μm film when the plastic zone reaches the substrate. Comparisons are made with predictions obtained from other formulations: (i) the contact size-independent indentation pressure is compared with that given by continuum crystal plasticity; (ii) the scaling of the indentation pressure with indentation depth is compared with the relation proposed by Nix and Gao [1998. Indentation size effects in crystalline materials: a law for strain gradient plasticity. J. Mech. Phys. Solids 43, 411-423]; and (iii) the computed contact area is compared with that obtained from the estimation procedure of Oliver and Pharr [1992. An improved technique for determining hardness and elastic-modulus using load and displacement sensing indentation experiments, J. Mater. Res. 7, 1564-1583].

  1. Sternoclavicular dislocation: case report and surgical technique.

    PubMed

    Terra, Bernardo Barcellos; Rodrigues, Leandro Marano; Pádua, David Victoria Hoffmann; Martins, Marcelo Giovanini; Teixeira, João Carlos de Medeiros; De Nadai, Anderson

    2015-01-01

    Sternoclavicular dislocations account for less than 5% of all dislocations of the scapular belt. Most cases of anterior dislocation of the sternoclavicular joint do not present symptoms. However, some patients may develop chronic anterior instability and remain symptomatic, and surgical treatment is indicated in these cases. There is a scarcity of reports in the literature relating to reconstruction using the long palmar tendon in cases of traumatic anterior instability. Although rare, these injuries deserve rapid diagnosis and efficient treatment in order to avoid future complications. The aim of this report was to report on a case of a motocross competitor who developed chronic traumatic anterior instability of the sternoclavicular joint and underwent surgical reconstruction using the autogenous long palmar tendon. The patient was a 33-year-old man with a history of anterior dislocation of the sternoclavicular subsequent to a fall during a maneuver in a motocross competition. Conservative treatment was instituted initially, consisting of use of a functional sling to treat the symptoms for 3 weeks, along with physiotherapeutic rehabilitation for 3 months. We chose to use a modification of the "figure of eight" technique based on the studies by Spencer and Kuhn. A longitudinal incision of approximately 10 cm was made at the level of the sternoclavicular joint. The graft from the ipsilateral long palmar tendon was passed through the orifices in the form of a modified "figure of eight" and its ends were sutured together. The patient was immobilized using an American sling for 4 weeks. After 6 months of follow-up, the patient no longer presented pain or instability when movement of the sternoclavicular joint was required. Minor discomfort and slight prominence of the sternoclavicular joint continued to be present but did not affect the patient's activities. Thus, the patient was able to return to racing 6 months after the operation. Our study presented a case of

  2. Congenital dislocation of the knee.

    PubMed

    Ko, J Y; Shih, C H; Wenger, D R

    1999-01-01

    Between February 1988 and June 1995, 24 congenital dislocations of the knee joints (17 patients) were reduced with closed methods including immediate reduction, serial casting, or traction in patients from 10 min to 26 days old. At an average follow-up of 4 years and 10 months, an excellent or good result was achieved if there were no associated anomalies. Fair or poor results were the result of delayed treatment or associated musculoskeletal anomalies including arthrogryposis multiplex congenita or Larsen's syndrome. Routine check of the hip dislocation is suggested. Diagnosis with manual testing was difficult, and other methods such as radiography or sonography were suggested in combination to detect hip dysplasia. The dislocated knee should be reduced before treating the hip dislocation. Concomitant treatment of the congenital dislocation of the knee and the hip with Pavlik harness provided satisfactory results. When late, progressive, genu valgus deformity occurred because of global instability of the knee and asymmetric physeal growth, reconstruction of the medial structures of the knee and prolonged bracing provided good results. PMID:10088699

  3. Modeling hydrogen transport by dislocations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dadfarnia, Mohsen; Martin, May L.; Nagao, Akihide; Sofronis, Petros; Robertson, Ian M.

    2015-05-01

    Recent experimental studies of the microstructure beneath fracture surfaces of specimens fractured in the presence of high concentrations of hydrogen suggest that the dislocation structure and hydrogen transported by mobile dislocations play important roles in establishing the local conditions that promote failure. The experiments demonstrate that hydrogen is responsible for the copious plasticity in large volumes of material before the onset of fracture and further afield from a crack tip. A revised model for hydrogen transport that accounts for hydrogen carried by dislocations along with stress driven diffusion and trapping at other microstructural defects is proposed. With the use of this new model, numerical simulation results for transient hydrogen profiles in the neighborhood of a crack tip are presented. Based on hydrogen-enhanced dislocation mobility and density, the results indicate that dislocation transport can contribute to the elevation of the local hydrogen concentrations ahead of the crack to levels above those predicted by the classical diffusion model and to distributions that extend farther afield.

  4. Dislocations and other topological oddities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pieranski, Pawel

    2016-03-01

    We will show that the book Dislocations by Jacques Friedel, published half a century ago, can still be recommended, in agreement with the author's intention, as a textbook "for research students at University and for students at engineering schools as well as for research engineers". Indeed, today dislocations are known to occur not only in solid crystals but also in many other systems discovered more recently such as colloidal crystals or liquid crystals having periodic structures. Moreover, the concept of dislocations is an excellent starting point for lectures on topological defects occurring in systems equipped with order parameters resulting from broken symmetries: disclinations in nematic or hexatic liquid crystals, dispirations in chiral smectics or disorientations in lyotropic liquid crystals. The discussion of dislocations in Blue Phases will give us an opportunity to call on mind Sir Charles Frank, friend of Jacques Friedel since his Bristol years, who called these ephemeral mesophases "topological oddities". Being made of networks of disclinations, Blue Phases are similar to Twist Grain Boundary (TGB) smectic phases, which are made of networks of screw dislocations and whose existence was predicted by de Gennes in 1972 on the basis of the analogy between smectics and superconductors. We will stress that the book by Jacques Friedel contains seeds of this analogy.

  5. Active and passive Brownian motion of charged particles in two-dimensional plasma models

    SciTech Connect

    Dunkel, Joern; Ebeling, Werner; Trigger, Sergey A.

    2004-10-01

    The dynamics of charged Coulomb grains in a plasma is numerically and analytically investigated. Analogous to recent experiments, it is assumed that the grains are trapped in an external parabolic field. Our simulations are based on a Langevin model, where the grain-plasma interaction is realized by a velocity-dependent friction coefficient and a velocity-independent diffusion coefficient. In addition to the ordinary case of positive (passive) friction between grains and plasma, we also discuss the effects of negative (active) friction. The latter case seems particularly interesting, since recent analytical calculations have shown that friction coefficients with negative parts may appear in some models of ion absorption by grains as well as in models of ion-grain scattering. Such negative friction may cause active Brownian motions of the grains. As our computer simulations show, the influence of negative friction leads to the formation of various stationary modes (rotations, oscillations), which, to some extent, can also be estimated analytically.

  6. Dislocation-density function dynamics - An all-dislocation, full-dynamics approach for modeling intensive dislocation structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, H. S.; Ngan, A. H. W.

    2016-06-01

    It has long been recognized that a successful strategy for computational plasticity will have to bridge across the meso scale in which the interactions of high quantities of dislocations dominate. In this work, a new meso-scale scheme based on the full dynamics of dislocation-density functions is proposed. In this scheme, the evolution of the dislocation-density functions is derived from a coarse-graining procedure which clearly defines the relationship between the discrete-line and density representations of the dislocation microstructure. Full dynamics of the dislocation-density functions are considered based on an "all-dislocation" concept in which statistically stored dislocations are preserved and treated in the same way as geometrically necessary dislocations. Elastic interactions between dislocations in a 3D space are treated in accordance with Mura's formula for eigen stress. Dislocation generation is considered as a consequence of dislocations to maintain their connectivity, and a special scheme is devised for this purpose. The model is applied to simulate a number of intensive microstructures involving discrete dislocation events, including loop expansion and shrinkage under applied and self stress, dipole annihilation, and Orowan looping. The scheme can also handle high densities of dislocations present in extensive microstructures.

  7. Dislocated shoulder - aftercare

    MedlinePlus

    ... NOT return to activities that place too much stress on your shoulder joint. Ask your provider first. These activities include most sports activities using your arms, gardening, heavy lifting, or ...

  8. Detailed formation processes of stable dislocations in graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Gun-Do; Yoon, Euijoon; He, Kuang; Robertson, Alex W.; Warner, Jamie H.

    2014-11-01

    We use time-dependent HRTEM to reveal that stable dislocation pairs in graphene are formed from an initial complex multi-vacancy cluster that undergoes multiple bond rotations and adatom incorporation. In the process, it is found that the transformation from the formed complex multi-vacancy cluster can proceed without the increase of vacancy because many atoms and dimers are not only evaporated but also actively adsorbed. In tight-binding molecular dynamics simulations, it is confirmed that adatoms play an important role in the reconstruction of non-hexagonal rings into hexagonal rings. From density functional theory calculations, it is also found from simulations that there is a favorable distance between two dislocations pointing away from each other (i.e. formed from atom loss). For dislocation pairs pointing away from each other, the hillock-basin structure is more stable than the hillock-hillock structure for dislocation pairs pointing away from each other (i.e. formed from atom loss).We use time-dependent HRTEM to reveal that stable dislocation pairs in graphene are formed from an initial complex multi-vacancy cluster that undergoes multiple bond rotations and adatom incorporation. In the process, it is found that the transformation from the formed complex multi-vacancy cluster can proceed without the increase of vacancy because many atoms and dimers are not only evaporated but also actively adsorbed. In tight-binding molecular dynamics simulations, it is confirmed that adatoms play an important role in the reconstruction of non-hexagonal rings into hexagonal rings. From density functional theory calculations, it is also found from simulations that there is a favorable distance between two dislocations pointing away from each other (i.e. formed from atom loss). For dislocation pairs pointing away from each other, the hillock-basin structure is more stable than the hillock-hillock structure for dislocation pairs pointing away from each other (i.e. formed from

  9. Thermal and Kinetic Properties of Motions in a Prominence Activation and Nearby Loop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kucera, Therese; Landi, E.

    2005-01-01

    We perform a quantitative analysis of the thermal properties of a prominence activation and motions in a nearby loop. In order to make measurements of the quickly moving features seen in prominences in the UV we use the SOHO/SUMER spectrograph to take a time series of exposures from a single pointing position, providing a measurement of spectral line properties as a function of time and position along the slit. The lines observed cover a broad range of temperatures from 80,000 - 1.6 million K. These measurements are combined with TRACE movies in transition region and coronal temperature bands to obtain more complete information concerning prominence structure and motions. The resulting observations allow us to analyze the thermal and kinetic energy of the moving sources as functions of time. The loop and prominence are most apparent in lines formed at temperatures below 250,000 K. We find that in most cases the temperature distribution of plasma in a moving feature changes relatively little over time periods of about 20 minutes.

  10. The feasibility of shoulder motion tracking during activities of daily living using inertial measurement units.

    PubMed

    Kirking, Bryan; El-Gohary, Mahmoud; Kwon, Young

    2016-09-01

    Measurements of shoulder kinematics during activities of daily living (ADL) can be used to evaluate patient function before and after treatment and help define device testing conditions. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the feasibility of using wearable inertial measurement units (IMUs) to track shoulder joint angles while performing actual ADLs outside of laboratory simulations. IMU data of 5 subjects with normal shoulders was collected for 4h at the subjects' workplace and up to 4h off-work. An Unscented Kalman Filter (UKF) enhanced with gyroscope bias modeling and zero velocity updates demonstrated an accuracy of about 2° and was used to estimate relative upper arm angles from the IMU data. The overall averaged 95th percentile angles were: flexion 128.8°, abduction 128.4°, and external rotation 69.5°. These peaks angles are similar to other investigator's reports using laboratory simulations of ADLs measured with optical and electromagnetic technologies. Additionally, with a Fourier transform the 50th percentile frequency was determined and used to extrapolate the typical number of arm cycles in a 10year period to be 649,000. Application of the UKF with the additional drift correction made substantial improvements in shoulder tracking performance and this feasibility data suggests that IMUs with the UKF are suitable for extended use outside of laboratory settings. The data provides a novel description of arm motion during ADLs including an estimate for the 10 year cycle count of upper arm motion. PMID:27371783

  11. Development of magnetically preloaded air bearings for a linear slide: active compensation of three degrees of freedom motion errors.

    PubMed

    Ro, Seung-Kook; Kim, Soohyun; Kwak, Yoonkeun; Park, Chun-Hong

    2008-03-01

    This article describes a linear air-bearing stage that uses active control to compensate for its motion errors. The active control is based on preloads generated by magnetic actuators, which were designed to generate nominal preloads for the air bearings using permanent magnets to maintain the desired stiffness while changing the air-bearing clearance by varying the magnetic flux generated by the current in electromagnetic coils. A single-axis linear stage with a linear motor and 240 mm of travel range was built to verify this design concept and used to test its performance. The motion of the table in three directions was controlled with four magnetic actuators driven by current amplifiers and a DSP (Digital Signal Processor)-based digital controller. The motion errors were measured using a laser interferometer combined with a two-probe method, and had 0.085 microm of repeatability for the straightness error. As a result of feed-forward active compensation, the errors were reduced from 1.09 to 0.11 microm for the vertical motion, from 9.42 to 0.18 arcsec for the pitch motion, and from 2.42 to 0.18 arcsec for the roll motion. PMID:18377049

  12. Control of a Virtual Vehicle Influences Postural Activity and Motion Sickness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dong, Xiao; Yoshida, Ken; Stoffregen, Thomas A.

    2011-01-01

    Everyday experience suggests that drivers are less susceptible to motion sickness than passengers. In the context of inertial motion (i.e., physical displacement), this effect has been confirmed in laboratory research using whole body motion devices. We asked whether a similar effect would occur in the context of simulated vehicles in a visual…

  13. Irreducible dislocation of the knee.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, R A; Bellafiore, V A; Corzatt, R D

    1999-11-01

    Irreducible knee dislocation is a rare injury. This case report describes a knee dislocation in a 39-year-old male U.S. Army noncommissioned officer who was injured while playing in a softball game. Arthroscopy showed the medial collateral ligament and capsule to be locked in the intercondylar notch, covering the medial femoral condyle. Arthrotomy and open reduction were required. Staged posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using patellar tendon autograft was later performed. Review of the magnetic resonance imaging scan showed the irreducible lesion. The diagnostic clinical and radiographic features of this unusual injury are described.

  14. Surface Rebound of Relativistic Dislocations Directly and Efficiently Initiates Deformation Twinning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qing-Jie; Li, Ju; Shan, Zhi-Wei; Ma, Evan

    2016-10-01

    Under ultrahigh stresses (e.g., under high strain rates or in small-volume metals) deformation twinning (DT) initiates on a very short time scale, indicating strong spatial-temporal correlations in dislocation dynamics. Using atomistic simulations, here we demonstrate that surface rebound of relativistic dislocations directly and efficiently triggers DT under a wide range of laboratory experimental conditions. Because of its stronger temporal correlation, surface rebound sustained relay of partial dislocations is shown to be dominant over the conventional mechanism of thermally activated nucleation of twinning dislocations.

  15. Isolated acute dislocation of the proximal tibiofibular joint.

    PubMed

    Iosifidis, Michael I; Giannoulis, Ioannis; Tsarouhas, Alexandros; Traios, Stavros

    2008-06-01

    Lesions of knee's lateral side are less common than medial injuries. The anatomy of the lateral ligaments and the presence of additional structures (eg, fibula head) can cause diagnostic problems. Isolated dislocation of the proximal tibiofibular joint is unusual; therefore, it may be overlooked in the emergency department. Many cases are missed due to failure of diagnosis. This type of injury is common in athletes whose sports require twisting motions of the flexed knee (eg, wrestling, parachute jumping, judo, gymnastics, skiing, rugby, football, soccer, track, baseball, basketball, racquetball, and roller-skating). Anterolateral dislocation of the proximal tibiofibular joint is seemingly rare in soccer players, as less than a handful cases have been reported in the literature. The diagnosis can be made by clinical examination, plain knee radiographs, and, sometimes, computed tomography (CT) scanning for further confirmation. Treatment usually consists of closed or open reduction. In complicated cases, however, arthrodesis or resection of the fibular head may be required. This article reports a rare case of acute isolated anterolateral dislocation of the proximal tibiofibular joint in a soccer player and discusses the joint anatomy, types of dislocations, mechanisms of injury, and treatment options.

  16. Dislocation nonlinearity and nonlinear wave processes in polycrystals with dislocations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazarov, V. E.

    2016-09-01

    Based on the modification of the linear part of the Granato-Lücke dislocation theory of absorption, the equation of state of polycrystalline solids with dissipative and reactive nonlinearity has been derived. The nonlinear effects of the interaction and self-action of longitudinal elastic waves in such media have been theoretically studied.

  17. HIP MUSCLE ACTIVATION AND KNEE FRONTAL PLANE MOTION DURING WEIGHT BEARING THERAPEUTIC EXERCISES

    PubMed Central

    Lubahn, Amanda J.; Tyson, Tiffany L.; Merkitch, Kenneth W.; Reutemann, Paul; Chestnut, John Mark

    2011-01-01

    Purpose/Background: Hip abduction strengthening exercises may be critical in the prevention and rehabilitation of both overuse and traumatic injuries where knee frontal plane alignment is considered to be important. The purpose of the current investigation was to examine the muscular activation of the gluteus maximus and gluteus medius during the double-leg squat (DLS), single-leg squat (SLS), or front step-up (FSU), and the same exercises when an added load was used to pull the knee medially. Methods: Eighteen healthy females (ages 18-26) performed six exercises: DLS, DLS with load, FSU, FSU with load, SLS, and SLS with load. Integrated and peak surface electromyography of gluteus maximus and gluteus medius of the dominant leg were recorded and normalized. Motion analysis was used to measure knee abduction angle during each exercise. Results: SLS had the highest integrated and peak activation for both muscles, regardless of load. Adding load, only increased DLS integrated gluteus maximus activation (p=0.019). Load did not increase integrated gluteus medius or peak gluteus maximus activation. Adding load decreased SLS peak gluteus medius activation (p=0.003). Adding load increased peak knee abduction angle during DLS (p=0.013), FSU (p=0.000), and SLS (p=0.011). Conclusions: Overall, the SLS was most effective exercise for activating the gluteus maximus and gluteus medius. Applied knee load does not appear to increase muscle activation during SLS and FSU. DLS with an applied load may be more beneficial in activating the gluteus maximus. Overall, the use of applied loads appears to promote poorer musculoskeletal alignment in terms of peak knee valgus angle. Level of Evidence: 3 PMID:21713231

  18. Dislocation-induced chirality of semiconductor nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Baimuratov, Anvar S; Rukhlenko, Ivan D; Gun'ko, Yurii K; Baranov, Alexander V; Fedorov, Anatoly V

    2015-03-11

    Optical activity is a common natural phenomenon, which occurs in individual molecules, biomolecules, biological species, crystalline solids, liquid crystals, and various nanosized objects, leading to numerous important applications in almost every field of modern science and technology. Because this activity can hardly be altered, creation of artificial active media with controllable optical properties is of paramount importance. Here, for the first time to the best of our knowledge, we theoretically demonstrate that optical activity can be inherent to many semiconductor nanowires, as it is induced by chiral dislocations naturally developing during their growth. By assembling such nanowires in two- or three-dimensional periodic lattices, one can create optically active quantum supercrystals whose activity can be varied in many ways owing to the size quantization of the nanowires' energy spectra. We believe that this research is of particular importance for the future development of semiconducting nanomaterials and their applications in nanotechnology, chemistry, biology, and medicine.

  19. Dopamine Activation Preserves Visual Motion Perception Despite Noise Interference of Human V5/MT

    PubMed Central

    Yousif, Nada; Fu, Richard Z.; Abou-El-Ela Bourquin, Bilal; Bhrugubanda, Vamsee; Schultz, Simon R.

    2016-01-01

    When processing sensory signals, the brain must account for noise, both noise in the stimulus and that arising from within its own neuronal circuitry. Dopamine receptor activation is known to enhance both visual cortical signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR) and visual perceptual performance; however, it is unknown whether these two dopamine-mediated phenomena are linked. To assess this, we used single-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) applied to visual cortical area V5/MT to reduce the SNR focally and thus disrupt visual motion discrimination performance to visual targets located in the same retinotopic space. The hypothesis that dopamine receptor activation enhances perceptual performance by improving cortical SNR predicts that dopamine activation should antagonize TMS disruption of visual perception. We assessed this hypothesis via a double-blinded, placebo-controlled study with the dopamine receptor agonists cabergoline (a D2 agonist) and pergolide (a D1/D2 agonist) administered in separate sessions (separated by 2 weeks) in 12 healthy volunteers in a William's balance-order design. TMS degraded visual motion perception when the evoked phosphene and the visual stimulus overlapped in time and space in the placebo and cabergoline conditions, but not in the pergolide condition. This suggests that dopamine D1 or combined D1 and D2 receptor activation enhances cortical SNR to boost perceptual performance. That local visual cortical excitability was unchanged across drug conditions suggests the involvement of long-range intracortical interactions in this D1 effect. Because increased internal noise (and thus lower SNR) can impair visual perceptual learning, improving visual cortical SNR via D1/D2 agonist therapy may be useful in boosting rehabilitation programs involving visual perceptual training. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT In this study, we address the issue of whether dopamine activation improves visual perception despite increasing sensory noise in the visual cortex

  20. Driving technology for improving motion quality of active-matrix organic light-emitting diode display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jongbin; Kim, Minkoo; Kim, Jong-Man; Kim, Seung-Ryeol; Lee, Seung-Woo

    2014-09-01

    This paper reports transient response characteristics of active-matrix organic light emitting diode (AMOLED) displays for mobile applications. This work reports that the rising responses look like saw-tooth waveform and are not always faster than those of liquid crystal displays. Thus, a driving technology is proposed to improve the rising transient responses of AMOLED based on the overdrive (OD) technology. We modified the OD technology by combining it with a dithering method because the conventional OD method cannot successfully enhance all the rising responses. Our method can improve all the transitions of AMOLED without modifying the conventional gamma architecture of drivers. A new artifact is found when OD is applied to certain transitions. We propose an optimum OD selection method to mitigate the artifact. The implementation results show the proposed technology can successfully improve motion quality of scrolling texts as well as moving pictures in AMOLED displays.

  1. Aftershock activity of the 2015 Gorkha, Nepal, earthquake determined using the Kathmandu strong motion seismographic array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichiyanagi, Masayoshi; Takai, Nobuo; Shigefuji, Michiko; Bijukchhen, Subeg; Sasatani, Tsutomu; Rajaure, Sudhir; Dhital, Megh Raj; Takahashi, Hiroaki

    2016-02-01

    The characteristics of aftershock activity of the 2015 Gorkha, Nepal, earthquake (Mw 7.8) were evaluated. The mainshock and aftershocks were recorded continuously by the international Kathmandu strong motion seismographic array operated by Hokkaido University and Tribhuvan University. Full waveform data without saturation for all events enabled us to clarify aftershock locations and decay characteristics. The aftershock distribution was determined using the estimated local velocity structure. The hypocenter distribution in the Kathmandu metropolitan region was well determined and indicated earthquakes located shallower than 12 km depth, suggesting that aftershocks occurred at depths shallower than the Himalayan main thrust fault. Although numerical investigation suggested less resolution for the depth component, the regional aftershock epicentral distribution of the entire focal region clearly indicated earthquakes concentrated in the eastern margin of the major slip region of the mainshock. The calculated modified Omori law's p value of 1.35 suggests rapid aftershock decay and a possible high temperature structure in the aftershock region.

  2. Recommended survey designs for occupancy modelling using motion-activated cameras: insights from empirical wildlife data

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Jesse S.; Gerber, Brian D.

    2014-01-01

    Motion-activated cameras are a versatile tool that wildlife biologists can use for sampling wild animal populations to estimate species occurrence. Occupancy modelling provides a flexible framework for the analysis of these data; explicitly recognizing that given a species occupies an area the probability of detecting it is often less than one. Despite the number of studies using camera data in an occupancy framework, there is only limited guidance from the scientific literature about survey design trade-offs when using motion-activated cameras. A fuller understanding of these trade-offs will allow researchers to maximise available resources and determine whether the objectives of a monitoring program or research study are achievable. We use an empirical dataset collected from 40 cameras deployed across 160 km2 of the Western Slope of Colorado, USA to explore how survey effort (number of cameras deployed and the length of sampling period) affects the accuracy and precision (i.e., error) of the occupancy estimate for ten mammal and three virtual species. We do this using a simulation approach where species occupancy and detection parameters were informed by empirical data from motion-activated cameras. A total of 54 survey designs were considered by varying combinations of sites (10–120 cameras) and occasions (20–120 survey days). Our findings demonstrate that increasing total sampling effort generally decreases error associated with the occupancy estimate, but changing the number of sites or sampling duration can have very different results, depending on whether a species is spatially common or rare (occupancy = ψ) and easy or hard to detect when available (detection probability = p). For rare species with a low probability of detection (i.e., raccoon and spotted skunk) the required survey effort includes maximizing the number of sites and the number of survey days, often to a level that may be logistically unrealistic for many studies. For common species with

  3. Active range of motion outcomes after reconstruction of burned wrist and hand deformities.

    PubMed

    Afifi, Ahmed M; Mahboub, Tarek A; Ibrahim Fouad, Amr; Azari, Kodi; Khalil, Haitham H; McCarthy, James E

    2016-06-01

    This works aim is to evaluate the efficacy of skin grafts and flaps in reconstruction of post-burn hand and wrist deformities. A prospective study of 57 burn contractures of the wrist and dorsum of the hand was performed. Flaps were used only if there was a non-vascularized structure after contracture release, otherwise a skin graft was used. Active range of motion (ROM) was used to assess hand function. The extension deformity cohort uniformly underwent skin graft following contracture release with a mean improvement of 71 degrees (p<0.0001). The flexion deformity cohort was treated with either skin grafts (8 patients) or flaps (9 patients) with a mean improvement of 44 degrees (p<0.0001). Skin grafts suffice for dorsal hand contractures to restore functional wrist ROM. For flexion contractures, flaps were more likely for contractures >6 months. Early release of burn contracture is advisable to avoid deep structure contracture.

  4. A Circular Motion Activity with Hot Wheels® Rev-Ups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Glenn

    2009-02-01

    Hot Wheels® Rev-Ups provide a pedagogically engaging and inexpensive culminating activity for the application of circular motion with constant speed in introductory mechanics. The introductory Rev-Up, shown in Fig. 1, consists of a very durable car with two strong magnets built into the front and back of the car. The track is a piece of flexible plastic with a built-in metallic strip through its center that can then be formed into a circle. Pushing the car forward several times on a flat surface allows the car to move in a vertical circle when placed inside the track. What makes this toy attractive is that the gearing system allows the car to move at a relatively constant speed for about three to five seconds before slowing down appreciably.

  5. Recommended survey designs for occupancy modelling using motion-activated cameras: insights from empirical wildlife data.

    PubMed

    Shannon, Graeme; Lewis, Jesse S; Gerber, Brian D

    2014-01-01

    Motion-activated cameras are a versatile tool that wildlife biologists can use for sampling wild animal populations to estimate species occurrence. Occupancy modelling provides a flexible framework for the analysis of these data; explicitly recognizing that given a species occupies an area the probability of detecting it is often less than one. Despite the number of studies using camera data in an occupancy framework, there is only limited guidance from the scientific literature about survey design trade-offs when using motion-activated cameras. A fuller understanding of these trade-offs will allow researchers to maximise available resources and determine whether the objectives of a monitoring program or research study are achievable. We use an empirical dataset collected from 40 cameras deployed across 160 km(2) of the Western Slope of Colorado, USA to explore how survey effort (number of cameras deployed and the length of sampling period) affects the accuracy and precision (i.e., error) of the occupancy estimate for ten mammal and three virtual species. We do this using a simulation approach where species occupancy and detection parameters were informed by empirical data from motion-activated cameras. A total of 54 survey designs were considered by varying combinations of sites (10-120 cameras) and occasions (20-120 survey days). Our findings demonstrate that increasing total sampling effort generally decreases error associated with the occupancy estimate, but changing the number of sites or sampling duration can have very different results, depending on whether a species is spatially common or rare (occupancy = ψ) and easy or hard to detect when available (detection probability = p). For rare species with a low probability of detection (i.e., raccoon and spotted skunk) the required survey effort includes maximizing the number of sites and the number of survey days, often to a level that may be logistically unrealistic for many studies. For common species with

  6. Synergic co-activation of muscles in elbow flexion via fractional Brownian motion.

    PubMed

    Chang, Shyang; Hsyu, Ming-Chun; Cheng, Hsiu-Yao; Hsieh, Sheng-Hwu

    2008-12-31

    In reflex and volitional actions, co-activations of agonist and antagonist muscles are believed to be present. Recent studies indicate that such co-activations can be either synergic or dyssynergic. The aim of this paper is to investigate if the co-activations of biceps brachii, brachialis, and triceps brachii during volitional elbow flexion are in the synergic or dyssynergic state. In this study, two groups with each containing six healthy male volunteers participated. Each person of the first group performed 30 trials of volitional elbow flexion while each of the second group performed 30 trials of passive elbow flexion as control experiments. Based on the model of fractional Brownian motion, the intensity and frequency information of the surface electromyograms (EMGs) could be extracted simultaneously. No statistically significant changes were found in the control group. As to the other group, results indicated that the surface EMGs of all five muscle groups were temporally synchronized in frequencies with persistent intensities during each elbow flexion. In addition, the mean values of fractal dimensions for rest and volitional flexion states revealed significant differences with P < 0.01. The obtained positive results suggest that these muscle groups work together synergically to facilitate elbow flexion during the co-activations.

  7. Spinal Motion and Muscle Activity during Active Trunk Movements - Comparing Sheep and Humans Adopting Upright and Quadrupedal Postures.

    PubMed

    Valentin, Stephanie; Licka, Theresia F

    2016-01-01

    Sheep are used as models for the human spine, yet comparative in vivo data necessary for validation is limited. The purpose of this study was therefore to compare spinal motion and trunk muscle activity during active trunk movements in sheep and humans. Three-dimensional kinematic data as well as surface electromyography (sEMG) of spinal flexion and extension was compared in twenty-four humans in upright (UR) and 4-point kneeling (KN) postures and in 17 Austrian mountain sheep. Kinematic markers were attached over the sacrum, posterior iliac spines, and spinous and transverse processes of T5, T8, T11, L2 and L5 in humans and over the sacrum, tuber sacrale, T5, T8, T12, L3 and L7 in sheep. The activity of erector spinae (ES), rectus abdominis (RA), obliquus externus (OE), and obliquus internus (OI) were collected. Maximum sEMG (MOE) was identified for each muscle and trial, and reported as a percentage (MOE%) of the overall maximally observed sEMG from all trials. Spinal range of motion was significantly smaller in sheep compared to humans (UR / KN) during flexion (sheep: 6-11°; humans 12-34°) and extension (sheep: 4°; humans: 11-17°). During extension, MOE% of ES was greater in sheep (median: 77.37%) than UR humans (24.89%), and MOE% of OE and OI was greater in sheep (OE 76.20%; OI 67.31%) than KN humans (OE 21.45%; OI 19.34%), while MOE% of RA was lower in sheep (21.71%) than UR humans (82.69%). During flexion, MOE% of RA was greater in sheep (83.09%) than humans (KN 47.42%; UR 41.38%), and MOE% of ES in sheep (45.73%) was greater than KN humans (14.45%), but smaller than UR humans (72.36%). The differences in human and sheep spinal motion and muscle activity suggest that caution is warranted when ovine data are used to infer human spine biomechanics.

  8. Spinal Motion and Muscle Activity during Active Trunk Movements – Comparing Sheep and Humans Adopting Upright and Quadrupedal Postures

    PubMed Central

    Valentin, Stephanie; Licka, Theresia F.

    2016-01-01

    Sheep are used as models for the human spine, yet comparative in vivo data necessary for validation is limited. The purpose of this study was therefore to compare spinal motion and trunk muscle activity during active trunk movements in sheep and humans. Three-dimensional kinematic data as well as surface electromyography (sEMG) of spinal flexion and extension was compared in twenty-four humans in upright (UR) and 4-point kneeling (KN) postures and in 17 Austrian mountain sheep. Kinematic markers were attached over the sacrum, posterior iliac spines, and spinous and transverse processes of T5, T8, T11, L2 and L5 in humans and over the sacrum, tuber sacrale, T5, T8, T12, L3 and L7 in sheep. The activity of erector spinae (ES), rectus abdominis (RA), obliquus externus (OE), and obliquus internus (OI) were collected. Maximum sEMG (MOE) was identified for each muscle and trial, and reported as a percentage (MOE%) of the overall maximally observed sEMG from all trials. Spinal range of motion was significantly smaller in sheep compared to humans (UR / KN) during flexion (sheep: 6–11°; humans 12–34°) and extension (sheep: 4°; humans: 11–17°). During extension, MOE% of ES was greater in sheep (median: 77.37%) than UR humans (24.89%), and MOE% of OE and OI was greater in sheep (OE 76.20%; OI 67.31%) than KN humans (OE 21.45%; OI 19.34%), while MOE% of RA was lower in sheep (21.71%) than UR humans (82.69%). During flexion, MOE% of RA was greater in sheep (83.09%) than humans (KN 47.42%; UR 41.38%), and MOE% of ES in sheep (45.73%) was greater than KN humans (14.45%), but smaller than UR humans (72.36%). The differences in human and sheep spinal motion and muscle activity suggest that caution is warranted when ovine data are used to infer human spine biomechanics. PMID:26741136

  9. Characterization of dislocations in GaN layer grown on 4-inch Si(111) with AlGaN/AlN strained layer superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugawara, Yoshihiro; Ishikawa, Yukari; Watanabe, Arata; Miyoshi, Makoto; Egawa, Takashi

    2016-05-01

    Dislocations in a GaN layer grown on 4-in. Si(111) with AlGaN/AlN strained layer superlattices using a horizontal metal–organic chemical vapor deposition system were characterized by transmission electron microscopy and scanning transmission electron microscopy. Pure screw dislocations were not found in the observed area but mixed and edge dislocations were found. The dislocation density in the GaN layer decreased from the bottom (∼2 × 1010 cm‑2) to the top (∼6 × 109 cm‑2). Some dislocations were inclined from the c-axis, and half-loop dislocations were observed in the GaN layer. Plan-view weak-beam dark-field analysis indicated that the dislocation inclination was caused by climb and glide motions.

  10. Dislocation Mechanics of High-Rate Deformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, Ronald W.; Li, Qizhen

    2015-10-01

    Four topics associated with constitutive equation descriptions of rate-dependent metal plastic deformation behavior are reviewed in honor of previous research accomplished on the same issues by Professor Marc Meyers along with colleagues and students, as follow: (1) increasing strength levels attributed to thermally activated dislocation migration at higher loading rates; (2) inhomogeneous adiabatic shear banding; (3) controlling mechanisms of deformation in shock as compared with shock-less isentropic compression experiments and (4) Hall-Petch-based grain size-dependent strain rate sensitivities exhibited by nanopolycrystalline materials. Experimental results are reviewed on the topics for a wide range of metals.

  11. Single crystal plasticity by modeling dislocation density rate behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, Benjamin L; Bronkhorst, Curt; Beyerlein, Irene; Cerreta, E. K.; Dennis-Koller, Darcie

    2010-12-23

    The goal of this work is to formulate a constitutive model for the deformation of metals over a wide range of strain rates. Damage and failure of materials frequently occurs at a variety of deformation rates within the same sample. The present state of the art in single crystal constitutive models relies on thermally-activated models which are believed to become less reliable for problems exceeding strain rates of 10{sup 4} s{sup -1}. This talk presents work in which we extend the applicability of the single crystal model to the strain rate region where dislocation drag is believed to dominate. The elastic model includes effects from volumetric change and pressure sensitive moduli. The plastic model transitions from the low-rate thermally-activated regime to the high-rate drag dominated regime. The direct use of dislocation density as a state parameter gives a measurable physical mechanism to strain hardening. Dislocation densities are separated according to type and given a systematic set of interactions rates adaptable by type. The form of the constitutive model is motivated by previously published dislocation dynamics work which articulated important behaviors unique to high-rate response in fcc systems. The proposed material model incorporates thermal coupling. The hardening model tracks the varying dislocation population with respect to each slip plane and computes the slip resistance based on those values. Comparisons can be made between the responses of single crystals and polycrystals at a variety of strain rates. The material model is fit to copper.

  12. Simultaneous double interphalangeal dislocation in one finger.

    PubMed

    Takami, H; Takahashi, S; Ando, M

    2000-01-01

    Isolated dislocation of the proximal or distal interphalangeal joint of a finger is common, but simultaneous dislocation of both joints is rare. Three cases of simultaneous dislocations of both interphalangeal joints in the same finger are reported. Closed reduction was easily achieved in all cases.

  13. Dislocated Workers: Neighbors, Friends, Relatives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blessington, Robert

    1989-01-01

    Worker dislocation is a major problem in Wisconsin. Services needed include provision of coping mechanisms, job search methods, and retraining. A partnership between the state and the Wisconsin American Federation of Labor-Congress of Industrial Organizations was created to provide these services and referrals, as well as preventive training…

  14. Financial Dislocations among Divorcing Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Little, Marilyn J.

    Extensive economic changes may be brought about by divorce. In an attempt to demonstrate that the degree of financial dislocation following divorce depends on three factors--custody arrangements, wife's employment, and social class--data on men's and women's employment, income, and support payments were gathered for 222 divorcing families. Total…

  15. Dynamic analysis of astronaut motions in microgravity: Applications for Extravehicular Activity (EVA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, Dava J.

    1995-01-01

    Simulations of astronaut motions during extravehicular activity (EVA) tasks were performed using computational multibody dynamics methods. The application of computational dynamic simulation to EVA was prompted by the realization that physical microgravity simulators have inherent limitations: viscosity in neutral buoyancy tanks; friction in air bearing floors; short duration for parabolic aircraft; and inertia and friction in suspension mechanisms. These limitations can mask critical dynamic effects that later cause problems during actual EVA's performed in space. Methods of formulating dynamic equations of motion for multibody systems are discussed with emphasis on Kane's method, which forms the basis of the simulations presented herein. Formulation of the equations of motion for a two degree of freedom arm is presented as an explicit example. The four basic steps in creating the computational simulations were: system description, in which the geometry, mass properties, and interconnection of system bodies are input to the computer; equation formulation based on the system description; inverse kinematics, in which the angles, velocities, and accelerations of joints are calculated for prescribed motion of the endpoint (hand) of the arm; and inverse dynamics, in which joint torques are calculated for a prescribed motion. A graphical animation and data plotting program, EVADS (EVA Dynamics Simulation), was developed and used to analyze the results of the simulations that were performed on a Silicon Graphics Indigo2 computer. EVA tasks involving manipulation of the Spartan 204 free flying astronomy payload, as performed during Space Shuttle mission STS-63 (February 1995), served as the subject for two dynamic simulations. An EVA crewmember was modeled as a seven segment system with an eighth segment representing the massive payload attached to the hand. For both simulations, the initial configuration of the lower body (trunk, upper leg, and lower leg) was a neutral

  16. Comparison of electromyographic activity and range of neck motion in violin students with and without neck pain during playing.

    PubMed

    Park, Kyue-nam; Kwon, Oh-yun; Ha, Sung-min; Kim, Su-jung; Choi, Hyun-jung; Weon, Jong-hyuck

    2012-12-01

    Neck pain is common in violin students during a musical performance. The purpose of this study was to compare electromyographic (EMG) activity in superficial neck muscles with neck motion when playing the violin as well as neck range of motion (ROM) at rest, between violin students with and without neck pain. Nine violin students with neck pain and nine age- and gender-matched subjects without neck pain were recruited. Muscle activity of the bilateral upper trapezius, sternocleidomastoid, and superficial cervical extensor muscles was measured using surface EMG. Kinematic data on neck motion while playing and active neck ROM were also measured using a three-dimensional motion analysis system. Independent t-tests were used to compare EMG activity with kinematic data between groups. These analyses revealed that while playing, both the angle of left lateral bending and leftward rotation of the cervical spine were significantly greater in the neck pain group than among those without neck pain. Similarly, EMG activity of the left upper trapezius, both cervical extensors, and both sternocleidomastoid muscles were significantly greater in the neck pain group. The active ROM of left axial rotation was significantly lower in the neck pain group. These results suggest that an asymmetric playing posture and the associated increased muscle activity as well as decreased neck axial rotation may contribute to neck pain in violin students. PMID:23247874

  17. Comparison of electromyographic activity and range of neck motion in violin students with and without neck pain during playing.

    PubMed

    Park, Kyue-nam; Kwon, Oh-yun; Ha, Sung-min; Kim, Su-jung; Choi, Hyun-jung; Weon, Jong-hyuck

    2012-12-01

    Neck pain is common in violin students during a musical performance. The purpose of this study was to compare electromyographic (EMG) activity in superficial neck muscles with neck motion when playing the violin as well as neck range of motion (ROM) at rest, between violin students with and without neck pain. Nine violin students with neck pain and nine age- and gender-matched subjects without neck pain were recruited. Muscle activity of the bilateral upper trapezius, sternocleidomastoid, and superficial cervical extensor muscles was measured using surface EMG. Kinematic data on neck motion while playing and active neck ROM were also measured using a three-dimensional motion analysis system. Independent t-tests were used to compare EMG activity with kinematic data between groups. These analyses revealed that while playing, both the angle of left lateral bending and leftward rotation of the cervical spine were significantly greater in the neck pain group than among those without neck pain. Similarly, EMG activity of the left upper trapezius, both cervical extensors, and both sternocleidomastoid muscles were significantly greater in the neck pain group. The active ROM of left axial rotation was significantly lower in the neck pain group. These results suggest that an asymmetric playing posture and the associated increased muscle activity as well as decreased neck axial rotation may contribute to neck pain in violin students.

  18. A Dynamic Discrete Dislocation Plasticity Method for the Dimulation of Plastic Relaxation under Shock Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurrutxaga-Lerma, Benat; Sutton, Adrian; Eakins, Daniel; Balint, Daniel; Dini, Daniele

    2013-06-01

    This talk intends to offer some insight as to how Discrete Dislocation Plasticity (DDP) can be adapted to simulate plastic relaxation processes under weak shock loading and high strain rates. In those circumstances, dislocations are believed to be the main cause of plastic relaxation in crystalline solids. Direct simulation of dislocations as the dynamic agents of plastic relaxation in those cases remains a challenge. DDP, where dislocations are modelled as discrete discontinuities in elastic continuum media, is often unable to adequately simulate plastic relaxation because it treats dislocation motion quasi-statically, thus neglecting the time-dependent nature of the elastic fields and assuming that they instantaneously acquire the shape and magnitude predicted by elastostatics. Under shock loading, this assumption leads to several artefacts that can only be overcome with a fully time-dependent formulation of the elastic fields. In this talk one of such formulations for the creation, annihilation and arbitrary motion of straight edge dislocations will be presented. These solutions are applied in a two-dimensional model of time-dependent plastic relaxation under shock loading, and some relevant results will be presented. EPSRC CDT in Theory and Simulation of Materials

  19. Wearable motion sensors to continuously measure real-world physical activities

    PubMed Central

    Dobkin, Bruce H.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review Rehabilitation for sensorimotor impairments aims to improve daily activities, walking, exercise, and motor skills. Monitoring of practice and measuring outcomes, however, is usually restricted to laboratory-based procedures and self-reports. Mobile health devices may reverse these confounders of daily care and research trials. Recent findings Wearable, wireless motion sensor data, analyzed by activity pattern-recognition algorithms, can describe the type, quantity, and quality of mobility-related activities in the community. Data transmission from sensors to the cell phone and Internet enable continuous monitoring. Remote access to laboratory-quality data about walking speed, duration and distance, gait asymmetry and smoothness of movements, as well as cycling, exercise, and skills practice, opens new opportunities to engage patients in progressive, personalized therapies with feedback about performance. Clinical trial designs will be able to include remote verification of the integrity of complex physical interventions and compliance with practice, as well as capture repeated, ecologically sound, ratio-scale outcome measures. Summary Given the progressively falling cost of miniaturized wearable gyroscopes, accelerometers, and other physiologic sensors, as well as inexpensive data transmission, sensing systems may become as ubiquitous as cell phones for health care. Neurorehabilitation can develop these mobile health platforms for daily care and clinical trials to improve exercise and fitness, skills learning, and physical functioning. PMID:24136126

  20. Reducing dislocations in semiconductors utilizing repeated thermal cycling during multistage epitaxial growth

    DOEpatents

    Fan, John C. C.; Tsaur, Bor-Yeu; Gale, Ronald P.; Davis, Frances M.

    1986-12-30

    Dislocation densities are reduced in growing semiconductors from the vapor phase by employing a technique of interrupting growth, cooling the layer so far deposited, and then repeating the process until a high quality active top layer is achieved. The method of interrupted growth, coupled with thermal cycling, permits dislocations to be trapped in the initial stages of epitaxial growth.

  1. Reducing dislocations in semiconductors utilizing repeated thermal cycling during multistage epitaxial growth

    DOEpatents

    Fan, John C. C.; Tsaur, Bor-Yeu; Gale, Ronald P.; Davis, Frances M.

    1992-02-25

    Dislocation densities are reduced in growing semiconductors from the vapor phase by employing a technique of interrupting growth, cooling the layer so far deposited, and then repeating the process until a high quality active top layer is achieved. The method of interrupted growth, coupled with thermal cycling, permits dislocations to be trapped in the initial stages of epitaxial growth.

  2. 20 CFR 663.800 - What are supportive services for adults and dislocated workers?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false What are supportive services for adults and..., DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) ADULT AND DISLOCATED WORKER ACTIVITIES UNDER TITLE I OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT Supportive Services § 663.800 What are supportive services for adults and dislocated...

  3. 20 CFR 663.300 - What are training services for adults and dislocated workers?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false What are training services for adults and..., DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) ADULT AND DISLOCATED WORKER ACTIVITIES UNDER TITLE I OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT Training Services § 663.300 What are training services for adults and dislocated...

  4. 20 CFR 663.300 - What are training services for adults and dislocated workers?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false What are training services for adults and..., DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) ADULT AND DISLOCATED WORKER ACTIVITIES UNDER TITLE I OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT Training Services § 663.300 What are training services for adults and dislocated...

  5. 20 CFR 663.200 - What are intensive services for adults and dislocated workers?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false What are intensive services for adults and..., DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) ADULT AND DISLOCATED WORKER ACTIVITIES UNDER TITLE I OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT Intensive Services § 663.200 What are intensive services for adults and dislocated workers?...

  6. 20 CFR 663.200 - What are intensive services for adults and dislocated workers?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false What are intensive services for adults and..., DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) ADULT AND DISLOCATED WORKER ACTIVITIES UNDER TITLE I OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT Intensive Services § 663.200 What are intensive services for adults and dislocated workers?...

  7. 20 CFR 663.300 - What are training services for adults and dislocated workers?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false What are training services for adults and..., DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) ADULT AND DISLOCATED WORKER ACTIVITIES UNDER TITLE I OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT Training Services § 663.300 What are training services for adults and dislocated...

  8. 20 CFR 663.800 - What are supportive services for adults and dislocated workers?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false What are supportive services for adults and..., DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) ADULT AND DISLOCATED WORKER ACTIVITIES UNDER TITLE I OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT Supportive Services § 663.800 What are supportive services for adults and dislocated...

  9. 20 CFR 663.300 - What are training services for adults and dislocated workers?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false What are training services for adults and..., DEPARTMENT OF LABOR ADULT AND DISLOCATED WORKER ACTIVITIES UNDER TITLE I OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT Training Services § 663.300 What are training services for adults and dislocated workers? Training...

  10. 20 CFR 663.200 - What are intensive services for adults and dislocated workers?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false What are intensive services for adults and..., DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) ADULT AND DISLOCATED WORKER ACTIVITIES UNDER TITLE I OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT Intensive Services § 663.200 What are intensive services for adults and dislocated workers?...

  11. 20 CFR 663.800 - What are supportive services for adults and dislocated workers?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false What are supportive services for adults and..., DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) ADULT AND DISLOCATED WORKER ACTIVITIES UNDER TITLE I OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT Supportive Services § 663.800 What are supportive services for adults and dislocated...

  12. 20 CFR 663.800 - What are supportive services for adults and dislocated workers?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false What are supportive services for adults and..., DEPARTMENT OF LABOR ADULT AND DISLOCATED WORKER ACTIVITIES UNDER TITLE I OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT Supportive Services § 663.800 What are supportive services for adults and dislocated workers?...

  13. 20 CFR 663.200 - What are intensive services for adults and dislocated workers?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false What are intensive services for adults and..., DEPARTMENT OF LABOR ADULT AND DISLOCATED WORKER ACTIVITIES UNDER TITLE I OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT Intensive Services § 663.200 What are intensive services for adults and dislocated workers? (a)...

  14. 20 CFR 663.200 - What are intensive services for adults and dislocated workers?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What are intensive services for adults and..., DEPARTMENT OF LABOR ADULT AND DISLOCATED WORKER ACTIVITIES UNDER TITLE I OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT Intensive Services § 663.200 What are intensive services for adults and dislocated workers? (a)...

  15. 20 CFR 663.300 - What are training services for adults and dislocated workers?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What are training services for adults and..., DEPARTMENT OF LABOR ADULT AND DISLOCATED WORKER ACTIVITIES UNDER TITLE I OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT Training Services § 663.300 What are training services for adults and dislocated workers? Training...

  16. A parallelogram-based compliant remote-center-of-motion stage for active parallel alignment.

    PubMed

    Qu, Jianliang; Chen, Weihai; Zhang, Jianbin

    2014-09-01

    Parallel alignment stage with remote-center-of-motion (RCM) is of key importance in precision out-of-plane aligning since it can eliminate the harmful lateral displacement generated at the output platform. This paper presents the development of a parallelogram-based compliant RCM stage for active parallel alignment. Different from conventional parallelogram-based RCM mechanism, the proposed stage is designed with compliant mechanisms, which endows the stage with many attractive merits when used in precision micro-/nanomanipulations. A symmetric double-parallelogram mechanism (SDPM) based on flexure hinges is developed as the rotary guiding component to realize desired RCM function. Due to the geometrical constraint of the SDPM, the operating space of the stage can be easily adjusted by bending the input links without loss of rotational precision. The stage is driven by a piezoelectric actuator and its output motion is measured by non-contact displacement sensors. Based on pseudo-rigid-body simplification method, the analytical models predicting kinematics, statics, and dynamics of the RCM stage have been established. Besides, the dimensional optimization is conducted in order to maximize the first resonance frequency of the stage. After that, finite element analysis is conducted to validate the established models and the prototype of the stage is fabricated for performance tests. The experimental results show that the developed RCM stage has a rotational range of 1.45 mrad while the maximum center shift of the RCM point is as low as 1 μm, which validate the effectiveness of the proposed scheme.

  17. A parallelogram-based compliant remote-center-of-motion stage for active parallel alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Jianliang; Chen, Weihai; Zhang, Jianbin

    2014-09-01

    Parallel alignment stage with remote-center-of-motion (RCM) is of key importance in precision out-of-plane aligning since it can eliminate the harmful lateral displacement generated at the output platform. This paper presents the development of a parallelogram-based compliant RCM stage for active parallel alignment. Different from conventional parallelogram-based RCM mechanism, the proposed stage is designed with compliant mechanisms, which endows the stage with many attractive merits when used in precision micro-/nanomanipulations. A symmetric double-parallelogram mechanism (SDPM) based on flexure hinges is developed as the rotary guiding component to realize desired RCM function. Due to the geometrical constraint of the SDPM, the operating space of the stage can be easily adjusted by bending the input links without loss of rotational precision. The stage is driven by a piezoelectric actuator and its output motion is measured by non-contact displacement sensors. Based on pseudo-rigid-body simplification method, the analytical models predicting kinematics, statics, and dynamics of the RCM stage have been established. Besides, the dimensional optimization is conducted in order to maximize the first resonance frequency of the stage. After that, finite element analysis is conducted to validate the established models and the prototype of the stage is fabricated for performance tests. The experimental results show that the developed RCM stage has a rotational range of 1.45 mrad while the maximum center shift of the RCM point is as low as 1 μm, which validate the effectiveness of the proposed scheme.

  18. Motion compensation for brain PET imaging using wireless MR active markers in simultaneous PET-MR: phantom and non-human primate studies

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chuan; Ackerman, Jerome L.; Petibon, Yoann; Normandin, Marc D.; Brady, Thomas J.; El Fakhri, Georges; Ouyang, Jinsong

    2014-01-01

    Brain PET scanning plays an important role in the diagnosis, prognostication and monitoring of many brain diseases. Motion artifacts from head motion are one of the major hurdles in brain PET. In this work, we propose to use wireless MR active markers to track head motion in real time during a simultaneous PET-MR brain scan and incorporate the motion measured by the markers in the listmode PET reconstruction. Several wireless MR active markers and a dedicated fast MR tracking pulse sequence module were built. Data were acquired on an ACR Flangeless PET phantom with multiple spheres and a non-human primate with and without motion. Motions of the phantom and monkey’s head were measured with the wireless markers using a dedicated MR tracking sequence module. The motion PET data were reconstructed using list-mode reconstruction with and without motion correction. Static reference was used as gold standard for quantitative analysis. The motion artifacts, which were prominent on the images without motion correction, were eliminated by the wireless marker based motion correction in both the phantom and monkey experiments. Quantitative analysis was performed on the phantom motion data from 24 independent noise realizations. The reduction of bias of sphere-to-background PET contrast by active marker based motion correction ranges from 26% to 64% and 17% to 25% for hot (i.e., radioactive) and cold (i.e., non-radioactive) spheres, respectively. The motion correction improved the channelized Hotelling observer signal-to-noise ratio of the spheres by 1.2 to 6.9 depending on their locations and sizes. The proposed wireless MR active marker based motion correction technique removes the motion artifacts in the reconstructed PET images and yields accurate quantitative values. PMID:24418501

  19. Motion compensation for brain PET imaging using wireless MR active markers in simultaneous PET-MR: phantom and non-human primate studies.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chuan; Ackerman, Jerome L; Petibon, Yoann; Normandin, Marc D; Brady, Thomas J; El Fakhri, Georges; Ouyang, Jinsong

    2014-05-01

    Brain PET scanning plays an important role in the diagnosis, prognostication and monitoring of many brain diseases. Motion artifacts from head motion are one of the major hurdles in brain PET. In this work, we propose to use wireless MR active markers to track head motion in real time during a simultaneous PET-MR brain scan and incorporate the motion measured by the markers in the listmode PET reconstruction. Several wireless MR active markers and a dedicated fast MR tracking pulse sequence module were built. Data were acquired on an ACR Flangeless PET phantom with multiple spheres and a non-human primate with and without motion. Motions of the phantom and monkey's head were measured with the wireless markers using a dedicated MR tracking sequence module. The motion PET data were reconstructed using list-mode reconstruction with and without motion correction. Static reference was used as gold standard for quantitative analysis. The motion artifacts, which were prominent on the images without motion correction, were eliminated by the wireless marker based motion correction in both the phantom and monkey experiments. Quantitative analysis was performed on the phantom motion data from 24 independent noise realizations. The reduction of bias of sphere-to-background PET contrast by active marker based motion correction ranges from 26% to 64% and 17% to 25% for hot (i.e., radioactive) and cold (i.e., non-radioactive) spheres, respectively. The motion correction improved the channelized Hotelling observer signal-to-noise ratio of the spheres by 1.2 to 6.9 depending on their locations and sizes. The proposed wireless MR active marker based motion correction technique removes the motion artifacts in the reconstructed PET images and yields accurate quantitative values.

  20. Scale dependence of interface dislocation storage governing the frictional sliding of single asperities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Zhiwen; Zhang, Wei; Gao, Yanfei

    2016-08-01

    Single-asperity friction tests have found a critical dependence of friction stress on the nanoscale contact size, as successfully explained by the nucleation of interface dislocations as opposed to concurrent sliding of all the interfacial atoms in contact. Modeling and simulation results, however, vary when the motion and interactions of multiple dislocations dominate at a larger scale regime. A Rice-Peierls framework is employed to investigate the multiplication and storage of interface dislocations, and the critical conditions for dislocation initiation and steady-state gliding are determined numerically. Our findings identify the key parameters that govern various friction mechanisms in the Hurtado-Kim and Deshpande-Needleman-van der Giessen models.

  1. Electrical wind force-driven and dislocation-templated amorphization in phase-change nanowires.

    PubMed

    Nam, Sung-Wook; Chung, Hee-Suk; Lo, Yu Chieh; Qi, Liang; Li, Ju; Lu, Ye; Johnson, A T Charlie; Jung, Yeonwoong; Nukala, Pavan; Agarwal, Ritesh

    2012-06-22

    Phase-change materials undergo rapid and reversible crystalline-to-amorphous structural transformation and are being used for nonvolatile memory devices. However, the transformation mechanism remains poorly understood. We have studied the effect of electrical pulses on the crystalline-to-amorphous phase change in a single-crystalline Ge(2)Sb(2)Te(5) (GST) nanowire memory device by in situ transmission electron microscopy. We show that electrical pulses produce dislocations in crystalline GST, which become mobile and glide in the direction of hole-carrier motion. The continuous increase in the density of dislocations moving unidirectionally in the material leads to dislocation jamming, which eventually induces the crystalline-to-amorphous phase change with a sharp interface spanning the entire nanowire cross section. The dislocation-templated amorphization explains the large on/off resistance ratio of the device.

  2. Innovative use of computer-assisted tomography in the management of an irreducible anterior shoulder dislocation

    PubMed Central

    Nandra, Rajpal S.; Uppal, Harpal; Matharu, Gulraj; Brooks, Stuart; Srinivasan, Kapakuntra

    2011-01-01

    Anterior dislocation of the shoulder is a common injury which is often reduced in the emergency department, without specialist orthopedic input. We report a case of an irreducible locked anterior glenohumeral dislocation with impaction of the humeral head onto the antero-inferior glenoid rim and subsequent generation of a Hill–Sachs lesion. To our knowledge, we describe the first reported case of using computer-assisted tomography to generate a sequence of movements to safely disimpact the locked dislocation without causing further iatrogenic injury or a fracture through the humeral articular surface. This novel image-assisted closed reduction technique spared the patient from the morbidity associated with performing open reduction surgery. At 6-month follow-up, the patient reported no re-dislocations, returned to work and had excellent range of motion. PMID:22058641

  3. Scale dependence of interface dislocation storage governing the frictional sliding of single asperities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Zhiwen; Zhang, Wei; Gao, Yanfei

    2016-08-01

    Single-asperity friction tests have found a critical dependence of friction stress on the nanoscale contact size, as successfully explained by the nucleation of interface dislocations as opposed to concurrent sliding of all the interfacial atoms in contact. Modeling and simulation results, however, vary when the motion and interactions of multiple dislocations dominate at a larger scale regime. A Rice–Peierls framework is employed to investigate the multiplication and storage of interface dislocations, and the critical conditions for dislocation initiation and steady-state gliding are determined numerically. Our findings identify the key parameters that govern various friction mechanisms in the Hurtado–Kim and Deshpande–Needleman–van der Giessen models.

  4. Dislocation-Mediated Deformation in Solid Langmuir Monolayers: Plastic Bending and Tilt Boundary.

    PubMed

    Hatta, E

    2015-09-01

    The shear response of three types of textures (mosaic, striation, and stripe) in 10,12-pentacosadiynoic acid solid Langmuir monolayers has been investigated with Brewster angle microscopy. Low temperature mosaic textures respond to an applied stress elastically. Upon the application of shear the change of contrast appears in the form of propagation of fronts roughly perpendicularly to the shear direction within a single domain reversibly, while the domain shape keeps constant since it is presumably frozen kinetically. The striation and stripe textures at high temperatures show a viscoplastic behavior (plastic bending) in its rheological response, being consistent with the formation of a dislocation wall (tilt boundary) through dislocation dynamics (dislocation glide and climb). The stress-induced formation of a tilt boundary provides a manifestation of the collective motion of a number of dislocations.

  5. A Newtonian interpretation of configurational forces on dislocations and cracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballarini, Roberto; Royer-Carfagni, Gianni

    2016-10-01

    Configurational forces are fundamental concepts in the description of the motion of dislocations, cracks and other defects that introduce singularities within the solid state. They are defined by considering variations in energies associated with the movement of such defects, and are therefore different from the classical forces that enter the balance laws of classical Newtonian mechanics. Here, it is demonstrated how a configurational force can be viewed as the resultant of the (Newtonian) contact forces acting on the perturbed shape of an object of substance equivalent to the defect, and evaluated in the limit of the shape being restored to the primitive configuration. The expressions for the configurational forces on the paradigmatic examples of cracks and dislocations are in agreement with those determined using classical variational arguments. This finding opens a new prospective in the use of configurational forces by permitting their physical and intuitive visualization.

  6. Treatment of chronic radial head dislocations in children

    PubMed Central

    Belangero, W. D.; Zogaib, R. K.

    2006-01-01

    From 1990 to 2005 our department treated nine patients with chronic radial head dislocation by an ulnar osteotomy and indirect reduction by interosseous membrane. The patients varied in age from 2 years and 8 months to 10 years, and the time from the injury to operation ranged from 40 days to 3 years. The range of functional motion and carrying angle was restored in all nine patients, and no complications, such as recurrent dislocation, infection, or neurovascular injury were observed. This technique has proven to be a successful approach to treating such cases, with a low range of complications and good functional results. PMID:16741732

  7. Paediatric biepicondylar elbow fracture dislocation - a case report.

    PubMed

    Meta, Mahendrakumar; Miller, David

    2010-01-01

    Paediatric elbow biepicondylar fracture dislocations are very rare injuries and have been only published in two independent case reviews. We report a case of 13 years old boy, who sustained this unusual injury after a fall on outstretched hand resulting in an unstable elbow fracture dislocation. Closed reduction was performed followed by delayed ORIF (Open Reduction and Internal Fixation) with K wires. Final follow-up at 14 weeks revealed a stable elbow and satisfactory function with full supination-pronation, range of motion from 0°-120° of flexion and normal muscle strength. This type of injury needs operative treatment and fixation to restore stability and return to normal or near normal elbow function. The method of fixation (screws or K wires) may depend on size and number of fracture fragments. PMID:20950437

  8. Complications following dislocations of the proximal interphalangeal joint.

    PubMed

    Mangelson, John J; Stern, Peter J; Abzug, Joshua M; Chang, James; Osterman, A Lee

    2014-01-01

    Dorsal fracture-dislocations of the proximal interphalangeal joint are challenging injuries to treat and are associated with many complications. The determination of stability is crucial to appropriate management. Stable injuries can usually be treated nonsurgically, whereas unstable injuries typically require surgical stabilization. Many surgical techniques have been used, including extension block pinning, volar plate arthroplasty, open reduction and internal fixation, external fixation, and hemihamate autografting. Because stiffness and flexion contracture are frequent complications, every effort should be made to initiate early motion while maintaining concentric reduction. Other complications include redislocation, chronic swelling, swan neck and coronal plane deformities, and pin tract infections. Assessing injury characteristics, including chronicity, the percentage of articular surface fractured, and the degree of comminution, and understanding complications will help in determining the most appropriate treatment. Chronic dislocations and those injuries in which painful arthritis develops can be successfully treated with salvage procedures, including arthroplasty and arthrodesis. PMID:24720300

  9. Management of Acute Patellar Dislocation: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Enix, Dennis E.; Sudkamp, Kasey; Scali, Frank; Keating, Robbyn; Welk, Aaron

    2015-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this case study is to describe the evaluation and management of patellar dislocations and the different approaches used from providers in different countries. Clinical Features An individual dislocated her left patella while traveling abroad and received subsequent care in Thailand, China, and the United States. Intervention and Outcome Nonoperative treatment protocols including manual closed reduction of the patella, casting of the leg, and rehabilitation exercises were employed. Conclusion Receipt of care when abroad can be challenging. The patient’s knee range of motion and pain continued to improve when she was diligent about performing the home exercise program. This case highlights the importance of a thorough examination, a proper regimen of care, and patient counseling to ensure a full recovery and minimize the chance of re-injury. PMID:26778935

  10. Ground Motion Simulation for a Large Active Fault System using Empirical Green's Function Method and the Strong Motion Prediction Recipe - a Case Study of the Noubi Fault Zone -

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuriyama, M.; Kumamoto, T.; Fujita, M.

    2005-12-01

    propagation. Moreover, it was clarified that the horizontal velocities by assuming the cascade model was underestimated more than one standard deviation of empirical relation by Si and Midorikawa (1999). The scaling and cascade models showed an approximately 6.4-fold difference for the case, in which the rupture started along the southeastern edge of the Umehara Fault at observation point GIF020. This difference is significantly large in comparison with the effect of different rupture starting points, and shows that it is important to base scenario earthquake assumptions on active fault datasets before establishing the source characterization model. The distribution map of seismic intensity for the 1891 Noubi Earthquake also suggests that the synthetic waveforms in the southeastern Noubi Fault zone may be underestimated. Our results indicate that outer fault parameters (e.g., earthquake moment) related to the construction of scenario earthquakes influence strong motion prediction, rather than inner fault parameters such as the rupture starting point. Based on these methods, we will predict strong motion for approximately 140 to 150 km of the Itoigawa-Shizuoka Tectonic Line.

  11. Theoretical study of kinks on screw dislocation in silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pizzagalli, L.; Pedersen, A.; Arnaldsson, A.; Jónsson, H.; Beauchamp, P.

    2008-02-01

    Theoretical calculations of the structure, formation, and migration of kinks on a nondissociated screw dislocation in silicon have been carried out using density functional theory calculations as well as calculations based on interatomic potential functions. The results show that the structure of a single kink is characterized by a narrow core and highly stretched bonds between some of the atoms. The formation energy of a single kink ranges from 0.9to1.36eV , and is of the same order as that for kinks on partial dislocations. However, the kinks migrate almost freely along the line of an undissociated dislocation unlike what is found for partial dislocations. The effect of stress has also been investigated in order to compare with previous silicon deformation experiments which have been carried out at low temperature and high stress. The energy barrier associated with the formation of a stable kink pair becomes as low as 0.65eV for an applied stress on the order of 1GPa , indicating that displacements of screw dislocations likely occur via thermally activated formation of kink pairs at room temperature.

  12. Hip arthroscopy versus open surgical dislocation for femoroacetabular impingement

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Dagang; Chen, Long; Wang, Guanglin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: This meta-analysis aims to evaluate the efficacy and safety of hip arthroscopy versus open surgical dislocation for treating femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) through published clinical trials. Methods: We conducted a comprehensive literature search using PUBMED, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials databases for relevant studies on hip arthroscopy and open surgical dislocation as treatment options for FAI. Results: Compared with open surgical dislocation, hip arthroscopy resulted in significantly higher Nonarthritic Hip Scores (NAHS) at 3- and 12-month follow-ups, a significant improvement in NAHS from preoperation to 3 months postoperation, and a significantly lower reoperation rate. Open surgical dislocation resulted in a significantly improved alpha angle by the Dunn view in patients with cam osteoplasty from preoperation to postoperation, compared with hip arthroscopy. This meta-analysis demonstrated no significant differences in the modified Harris Hip Score, Hip Outcome Score-Activities of Daily Living, or Hip Outcome Score-Sport Specific Subscale at 12 months of follow-up, or in complications (including nerve damage, wound infection, and wound dehiscence). Conclusion: Hip arthroscopy resulted in higher NAHS and lower reoperation rates, but had less improvement in alpha angle in patients with cam osteoplasty, than open surgical dislocation. PMID:27741133

  13. Peak muscle activation, joint kinematics, and kinetics during elliptical and stepping movement pattern on a Precor Adaptive Motion Trainer.

    PubMed

    Rogatzki, Matthew J; Kernozek, Thomas W; Willson, John D; Greany, John F; Hong, Di-An; Porcari, John R

    2012-06-01

    Kinematic, kinetic, and electromyography data were collected from the biceps femoris, rectus femoris (RF), gluteus maximus, and erector spinae (ES) during a step and elliptical exercise at a standardized workload with no hand use. Findings depicted 95% greater ankle plantar flexion (p = .01), 29% more knee extension (p = .003), 101% higher peak knee flexor moments (p < .001) 54% greater hip extensor moments (p < .001), 268% greater anterior joint reaction force (p = .009), 37% more RF activation (p < .001), and 200 % more ES activation (p <. 001) for the elliptical motion. Sixteen percent more hip flexion (p < .001), 42% higher knee extensor moments (p < .001), and 54% greater hip flexor moments (p = .041) occurred during the step motion. Biomechanical differences between motions should be considered when planning an exercise regimen. PMID:22808700

  14. Cortical activation to object shape and speed of motion during the first year

    PubMed Central

    Wilcox, Teresa; Hawkins, Laura B.; Hirskkowitz, Amy; Boas, David A.

    2014-01-01

    A great deal is known about the functional organization of cortical networks that mediate visual object processing in the adult. The current research is part of a growing effort to identify the functional maturation of these pathways in the developing brain. The current research used near-infrared spectroscopy to investigate functional activation of the infant cortex during the processing of featural information (shape) and spatiotemporal information (speed of motion) during the first year of life. Our investigation focused on two areas that were implicated in previous studies: anterior temporal cortex and posterior parietal cortex. Neuroimaging data were collected with 207 infants across three age groups: 3 to 6 months (Experiment 1), 7 to 8 months (Experiment 2), and 10 to 12 months (Experiments 3 and 4). The neuroimaging data revealed age-related changes in patterns of activation to shape and speed information, mostly involving posterior parietal areas, some of which were predicted and others that were not. We suggest that these changes reflect age-related differences in the perceptual and/or cognitive processes engaged during the task. PMID:24821531

  15. Active knee range of motion assessment in elite track and field athletes: normative values

    PubMed Central

    Malliaropoulos, Nikos; Kakoura, Lena; Tsitas, Kostas; Christodoulou, Dimitris; Siozos, Alexandros; Malliaras, Peter; Maffulli, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background flexibility is an important physical characteristic in athletes in terms of performance and injury prevention. Active Range Of Motion (AROM) was assessed in elite Greek track and field athletes. Methods prospective cohort study was carried out. In the period 2000–2010, the AROM was measured bilaterally with the Active Knee Extension (AKE) test during an in-season period with a goniometer in 127 athletes. Results male runners and jumpers had a higher mean AROM than throwers, but this result was not statistically significant. Female jumpers had a higher mean AROM than both runners and throwers, but the difference was also not statistically significant. Conclusion in athletes, mean posterior thigh muscle flexibility is likely to be between 72.3° and 73.9°. Posterior thigh muscle flexibility is associated with performance, the higher the AROM, the better performance is achieved athletes have generally high AROM, and this may be a result of their increased muscle flexibility. The normative values of posterior thigh flexibility may assist in better monitoring rehabilitation of the posterior thigh muscle injuries and be useful in pre-season screening of athletes’ flexibility. PMID:26605196

  16. Evolution of muscle activity patterns driving motions of the jaw and hyoid during chewing in Gnathostomes.

    PubMed

    Konow, Nicolai; Herrel, Anthony; Ross, Callum F; Williams, Susan H; German, Rebecca Z; Sanford, Christopher P J; Gintof, Chris

    2011-08-01

    Although chewing has been suggested to be a basal gnathostome trait retained in most major vertebrate lineages, it has not been studied broadly and comparatively across vertebrates. To redress this imbalance, we recorded EMG from muscles powering anteroposterior movement of the hyoid, and dorsoventral movement of the mandibular jaw during chewing. We compared muscle activity patterns (MAP) during chewing in jawed vertebrate taxa belonging to unrelated groups of basal bony fishes and artiodactyl mammals. Our aim was to outline the evolution of coordination in MAP. Comparisons of activity in muscles of the jaw and hyoid that power chewing in closely related artiodactyls using cross-correlation analyses identified reorganizations of jaw and hyoid MAP between herbivores and omnivores. EMG data from basal bony fishes revealed a tighter coordination of jaw and hyoid MAP during chewing than seen in artiodactyls. Across this broad phylogenetic range, there have been major structural reorganizations, including a reduction of the bony hyoid suspension, which is robust in fishes, to the acquisition in a mammalian ancestor of a muscle sling suspending the hyoid. These changes appear to be reflected in a shift in chewing MAP that occurred in an unidentified anamniote stem-lineage. This shift matches observations that, when compared with fishes, the pattern of hyoid motion in tetrapods is reversed and also time-shifted relative to the pattern of jaw movement.

  17. Solute drag on perfect and extended dislocations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sills, R. B.; Cai, W.

    2016-04-01

    The drag force exerted on a moving dislocation by a field of mobile solutes is studied in the steady state. The drag force is numerically calculated as a function of the dislocation velocity for both perfect and extended dislocations. The sensitivity of the non-dimensionalized force-velocity curve to the various controlling parameters is assessed, and an approximate analytical force-velocity expression is given. A non-dimensional parameter S characterizing the strength of the solute-dislocation interaction, the background solute fraction ?, and the dislocation character angle ?, are found to have the strongest influence on the force-velocity curve. Within the model considered here, a perfect screw dislocation experiences no solute drag, but an extended screw dislocation experiences a non-zero drag force that is about 10 to 30% of the drag on an extended edge dislocation. The solutes can change the spacing between the Shockley partials in both stationary and moving extended dislocations, even when the stacking fault energy remains unaltered. Under certain conditions, the solutes destabilize an extended dislocation by either collapsing it into a perfect dislocation or causing the partials to separate unboundedly. It is proposed that the latter instability may lead to the formation of large faulted areas and deformation twins in low stacking fault energy materials containing solutes, consistent with experimental observations of copper and stainless steel containing hydrogen.

  18. Surgical hip dislocation for treatment of cam femoroacetabular impingement

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhary, Milind M; Chaudhary, Ishani M; Vikas, KN; KoKo, Aung; Zaw, Than; Siddhartha, A

    2015-01-01

    Background: Cam femoroacetabular impingement is caused by a misshapen femoral head with a reduced head neck offset, commonly in the anterolateral quadrant. Friction in flexion, adduction and internal rotation causes limitation of the hip movements and pain progressively leading to labral and chondral damage and osteoarthritis. Surgical hip dislocation described by Ganz permits full exposure of the hip without damaging its blood supply. An osteochondroplasty removes the bump at the femoral head neck junction to recreate the offset for impingement free movement. Materials and Methods: Sixteen patients underwent surgery with surgical hip dislocation for the treatment of cam femoroacetabular impingement by open osteochondroplasty over last 6 years. Eight patients suffered from sequelae of avascular necrosis (AVN). Three had a painful dysplastic hip. Two had sequelae of Perthes disease. Three had combined cam and pincer impingement caused by retroversion of acetabulum. All patients were operated by the trochanteric flip osteotomy with attachments of gluteus medius and vastus lateralis, dissection was between the piriformis and gluteus minimus preserving the external rotators. Z-shaped capsular incision and dislocation of the hip was done in external rotation. Three cases also had subtrochanteric osteotomy. Two cases of AVN also had an intraarticular femoral head reshaping osteotomy. Results: Goals of treatment were achieved in all patients. No AVN was detected after a 6 month followup. There were no trochanteric nonunions. Hip range of motion improved in all and Harris hip score improved significantly in 15 of 16 cases. Mean alpha angle reduced from 86.13° (range 66°–108°) to 46.35° (range 39°–58°). Conclusion: Cam femoroacetabular Impingement causing pain and limitation of hip movements was treated by open osteochondroplasty after surgical hip dislocation. This reduced pain, improved hip motion and gave good to excellent results in the short term. PMID

  19. Theory of interacting dislocations on cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amir, Ariel; Paulose, Jayson; Nelson, David R.

    2013-04-01

    We study the mechanics and statistical physics of dislocations interacting on cylinders, motivated by the elongation of rod-shaped bacterial cell walls and cylindrical assemblies of colloidal particles subject to external stresses. The interaction energy and forces between dislocations are solved analytically, and analyzed asymptotically. The results of continuum elastic theory agree well with numerical simulations on finite lattices even for relatively small systems. Isolated dislocations on a cylinder act like grain boundaries. With colloidal crystals in mind, we show that saddle points are created by a Peach-Koehler force on the dislocations in the circumferential direction, causing dislocation pairs to unbind. The thermal nucleation rate of dislocation unbinding is calculated, for an arbitrary mobility tensor and external stress, including the case of a twist-induced Peach-Koehler force along the cylinder axis. Surprisingly rich phenomena arise for dislocations on cylinders, despite their vanishing Gaussian curvature.

  20. Interaction between phase transformations and dislocations at the nanoscale. Part 1. General phase field approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levitas, Valery I.; Javanbakht, Mahdi

    2015-09-01

    Thermodynamically consistent, three-dimensional (3D) phase field approach (PFA) for coupled multivariant martensitic transformations (PTs), including cyclic PTs, variant-variant transformations (i.e., twinning), and dislocation evolution is developed at large strains. One of our key points is in the justification of the multiplicative decomposition of the deformation gradient into elastic, transformational, and plastic parts. The plastic part includes four mechanisms: dislocation motion in martensite along slip systems of martensite and slip systems of austenite inherited during PT and dislocation motion in austenite along slip systems of austenite and slip systems of martensite inherited during reverse PT. The plastic part of the velocity gradient for all these mechanisms is defined in the crystal lattice of the austenite utilizing just slip systems of austenite and inherited slip systems of martensite, and just two corresponding types of order parameters. The explicit expressions for the Helmholtz free energy and the transformation and plastic deformation gradients are presented to satisfy the formulated conditions related to homogeneous thermodynamic equilibrium states of crystal lattice and their instabilities. In particular, they result in a constant (i.e., stress- and temperature-independent) transformation deformation gradient and Burgers vectors. Thermodynamic treatment resulted in the determination of the driving forces for change of the order parameters for PTs and dislocations. It also determined the boundary conditions for the order parameters that include a variation of the surface energy during PT and exit of dislocations. Ginzburg-Landau equations for dislocations include variation of properties during PTs, which in turn produces additional contributions from dislocations to the Ginzburg-Landau equations for PTs. A complete system of coupled PFA and mechanics equations is presented. A similar theory can be developed for PFA to dislocations and other

  1. Clinical Effect of Acute Complete Acromioclavicular Joint Dislocation Treated with Micro-Movable and Anatomical Acromioclavicular Plate

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qingjun; Miao, Jianyun; Lin, Bin; Guo, Zhimin

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: We evaluated the long-term clinical results of acute complete acromioclavicular dislocations treated with micro-movable and anatomical acromioclavicular plate. Methods: Open reduction and internal fixation was performed using the MAAP in 16 patients (10 males, 6 females; mean age 36 years; range16 to 63 years) with acute complete acromioclavicular joint dislocation. Radiographic evaluations were routinely conducted every 3 weeks until 3 months postoperatively. The MAAP were removed under local anesthesia after 3 months postoperatively. We evaluated the functional results by using the constant scoring system and radiological results in the last follow-up time. The mean follow up was 26 months (range 16 to 38 months). Results: The mean Constant score was 94 (range, 78 to 100). The results were excellent in 12 patients (75.0%), good in 3 patients (18.8%) and satisfactory in 1patient (6.2%). Three patients with scores of 80 to 90 had mild pain during activity, but have not affected the shoulder range of motion. One patient has both some pain and limited range of motion of shoulder joint. All patients but one have returned to their preoperative work without any limitations. Compared to the contralateral side, radiography showed anatomical reposition in the vertical plane in 14 cases, slight loss of reduction in 2 older patients. Conclusion: We recommend the MAAP fixation for surgical treatment of acute complete acromioclavicular joint dislocation as it could provide satisfactory shoulder functions and clinical results, with lower complication rate. However, it is necessary to continue to observe the clinical effects of this fixation technique. PMID:23091410

  2. Atomistic mechanisms of intermittent plasticity in metals: dislocation avalanches and defect cluster pinning.

    PubMed

    Niiyama, Tomoaki; Shimokawa, Tomotsugu

    2015-02-01

    Intermittent plastic deformation in crystals with power-law behaviors has been reported in previous experimental studies. The power-law behavior is reminiscent of self-organized criticality, and mesoscopic models have been proposed that describe this behavior in crystals. In this paper, we show that intermittent plasticity in metals under tensile deformation can be observed in molecular dynamics models, using embedded atom method potentials for Ni, Cu, and Al. Power-law behaviors of stress drop and waiting time of plastic deformation events are observed. It is shown that power-law behavior is due to dislocation avalanche motions in Cu and Ni. A different mechanism of dislocation pinning is found in Al. These different stress relaxation mechanisms give different power-law exponents. We propose a probabilistic model to describe the novel dislocation motion in Al and analytically deduce the power-law behavior.

  3. Dislocation mutual interactions mediated by mobile impurities and the conditions for plastic instabilities.

    PubMed

    Leoni, Fabio; Zapperi, Stefano

    2014-02-01

    Metallic alloys, such as Al and Cu or mild steel, display plastic instabilities in a well-defined range of temperatures and deformation rates, a phenomenon known as the Portevin-Le Chatelelier effect. The stick-slip behavior, or serration, typical of this effect is due to the discontinuous motion of dislocations as they interact with solute atoms. Here we study a simple model of interacting dislocations and show how the classical Einstein fluctuation-dissipation relation can be used to define the temperature over a range of model parameters and to construct a phase diagram of serration that can be compared to experimental results. Furthermore, by performing analytic calculations and numerically integrating the equations of motion, we clarify the crucial role played by dislocation mutual interactions in serration. PMID:25353478

  4. Atomistic mechanisms of intermittent plasticity in metals: dislocation avalanches and defect cluster pinning.

    PubMed

    Niiyama, Tomoaki; Shimokawa, Tomotsugu

    2015-02-01

    Intermittent plastic deformation in crystals with power-law behaviors has been reported in previous experimental studies. The power-law behavior is reminiscent of self-organized criticality, and mesoscopic models have been proposed that describe this behavior in crystals. In this paper, we show that intermittent plasticity in metals under tensile deformation can be observed in molecular dynamics models, using embedded atom method potentials for Ni, Cu, and Al. Power-law behaviors of stress drop and waiting time of plastic deformation events are observed. It is shown that power-law behavior is due to dislocation avalanche motions in Cu and Ni. A different mechanism of dislocation pinning is found in Al. These different stress relaxation mechanisms give different power-law exponents. We propose a probabilistic model to describe the novel dislocation motion in Al and analytically deduce the power-law behavior. PMID:25768512

  5. 20 CFR 663.110 - What are the eligibility criteria for core services for adults in the adult and dislocated worker...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... services for adults in the adult and dislocated worker programs? 663.110 Section 663.110 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) ADULT AND DISLOCATED WORKER ACTIVITIES UNDER TITLE I OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT Delivery of Adult and Dislocated...

  6. 20 CFR 663.110 - What are the eligibility criteria for core services for adults in the adult and dislocated worker...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... services for adults in the adult and dislocated worker programs? 663.110 Section 663.110 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR ADULT AND DISLOCATED WORKER ACTIVITIES UNDER TITLE I OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT Delivery of Adult and Dislocated Worker Services...

  7. 20 CFR 663.110 - What are the eligibility criteria for core services for adults in the adult and dislocated worker...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... services for adults in the adult and dislocated worker programs? 663.110 Section 663.110 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) ADULT AND DISLOCATED WORKER ACTIVITIES UNDER TITLE I OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT Delivery of Adult and Dislocated...

  8. 20 CFR 663.110 - What are the eligibility criteria for core services for adults in the adult and dislocated worker...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... services for adults in the adult and dislocated worker programs? 663.110 Section 663.110 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) ADULT AND DISLOCATED WORKER ACTIVITIES UNDER TITLE I OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT Delivery of Adult and Dislocated...

  9. 20 CFR 663.100 - What is the role of the adult and dislocated worker programs in the One-Stop delivery system?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 CFR part 662. Consistent with those provisions: (1) Core services for adults and dislocated... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What is the role of the adult and dislocated... AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR ADULT AND DISLOCATED WORKER ACTIVITIES UNDER TITLE...

  10. Experiments on the motion of gas bubbles in turbulence generated by an active grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poorte, R. E. G.; Biesheuvel, A.

    2002-06-01

    The random motion of nearly spherical bubbles in the turbulent flow behind a grid is studied experimentally. In quiescent water these bubbles rise at high Reynolds number. The turbulence is generated by an active grid of the design of Makita (1991), and can have turbulence Reynolds number R[lambda] of up to 200. Minor changes in the geometry of the grid and in its mode of operation improves the isotropy of the turbulence, compared with that reported by Makita (1991) and Mydlarski & Warhaft (1996). The trajectory of each bubble is measured with high spatial and temporal resolution with a specially developed technique that makes use of a position-sensitive detector. Bubble statistics such as the mean rise velocity and the root-mean-square velocity fluctuations are obtained by ensemble averaging over many identical bubbles. The resulting bubble mean rise velocity is significantly reduced (up to 35%) compared with the quiescent conditions. The vertical bubble velocity fluctuations are found to be non-Gaussian, whereas the horizontal displacements are Gaussian for all times. The diffusivity of bubbles is considerably less than that of fluid particles. These findings are qualitatively consistent with results obtained through theoretical analysis and numerical simulations by Spelt & Biesheuvel (1997).

  11. A framework for activity detection in wide-area motion imagery

    SciTech Connect

    Porter, Reid B; Ruggiero, Christy E; Morrison, Jack D

    2009-01-01

    Wide-area persistent imaging systems are becoming increasingly cost effective and now large areas of the earth can be imaged at relatively high frame rates (1-2 fps). The efficient exploitation of the large geo-spatial-temporal datasets produced by these systems poses significant technical challenges for image and video analysis and data mining. In recent years there has been significant progress made on stabilization, moving object detection and tracking and automated systems now generate hundreds to thousands of vehicle tracks from raw data, with little human intervention. However, the tracking performance at this scale, is unreliable and average track length is much smaller than the average vehicle route. This is a limiting factor for applications which depend heavily on track identity, i.e. tracking vehicles from their points of origin to their final destination. In this paper we propose and investigate a framework for wide-area motion imagery (W AMI) exploitation that minimizes the dependence on track identity. In its current form this framework takes noisy, incomplete moving object detection tracks as input, and produces a small set of activities (e.g. multi-vehicle meetings) as output. The framework can be used to focus and direct human users and additional computation, and suggests a path towards high-level content extraction by learning from the human-in-the-loop.

  12. Field-Aligned Current Sheet Motion and Its Correlation with Solar Wind Conditions and Geomagnetic Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.; Le, G.; Boardsen, S. A.; Slavin, J. A.; Strangeway, R. J.

    2008-05-01

    Field-aligned currents (FACs) are the currents flowing into and out of the ionosphere which connect to the magnetosphere. They provide an essential linkage between the solar wind - magnetosphere system and the ionosphere, and the understanding of these currents is important for global magnetosphere dynamics and space weather prediction. The three spacecraft ST-5 constellation provides an unprecedented opportunity to study in situ FAC dynamics in time scales (10 sec to 10 min) that can not be achieved previously with single spacecraft studies or large-spaced conjugate spacecraft studies. In this study, we use the magnetic field observations during the whole ST-5 mission and their corresponding solar wind conditions to study the dependence of FAC current sheet motion and intensity on solar wind conditions. FAC peak current densities show very good correlations with some solar wind parameters, including IMF Bz, dynamic pressure, Ey, and some IMF angles, but not with other parameters. Instant FAC speeds show generally much weaker dependence on solar wind conditions comparing to FAC peak current densities. This obvious uncorrelation between FAC peak current densities and speeds implies that FAC peak current densities are more consistently controlled by solar wind conditions and geomagnetic activities, while FAC speeds are more oscillatory, sometimes with higher speeds during quieter times and lower speeds during more turbulent times.

  13. THE CHROMOSPHERIC ACTIVITY, AGE, METALLICITY, AND SPACE MOTIONS OF 36 WIDE BINARIES

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, J. K.; Oswalt, T. D.; Rudkin, M.; Zhao, G.; Chen, Y. Q. E-mail: toswalt@fit.edu E-mail: gzhao@bao.ac.cn

    2011-04-15

    We present the chromospheric activity (CA) levels, metallicities, and full space motions for 41 F, G, K, and M dwarf stars in 36 wide binary systems. Thirty-one of the binaries contain a white dwarf (WD) component. In such binaries, the total age can be estimated by adding the cooling age of the WD to an estimate of the progenitor's main-sequence lifetime. To better understand how CA correlates to stellar age, 14 cluster member stars were also observed. Our observations demonstrate for the first time that, in general, CA decays with age from 50 Myr to at least 8 Gyr for stars with 1.0 {<=} V - I {<=} 2.4. However, little change occurs in the CA level for stars with V - I < 1.0 between 1 Gyr and 5 Gyr, consistent with the results of Pace et al. Our sample also exhibits a negative correlation between the stellar age and metallicity, a positive correlation between the stellar age and W space velocity component, and the W velocity dispersion increases with age. Finally, the population membership of these wide binaries is examined based upon their U, V, W kinematics, metallicity, and CA. We conclude that wide binaries are similar to field and cluster stars in these respects. More importantly, they span a much more continuous range in age and metallicity than is afforded by nearby clusters.

  14. Noise-enhanced stability and double stochastic resonance of active Brownian motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Chunhua; Zhang, Chun; Zeng, Jiakui; Liu, Ruifen; Wang, Hua

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, we study the transient and resonant properties of active Brownian particles (ABPs) in the Rayleigh-Helmholtz (RH) and Schweitzer-Ebeling-Tilch (SET) models, which is driven by the simultaneous action of multiplicative and additive noise and periodic forcing. It is shown that the cross-correlation between two noises (λ) can break the symmetry of the potential to generate motion of the ABPs. In case of no correlation between two noises, the mean first passage time (MFPT) is a monotonic decrease depending on the multiplicative noise, however in case of correlation between two noises, the MFPT exhibits a maximum, depending on the multiplicative noise for both models, this maximum for MFPT identifies the noise-enhanced stability (NES) effect of the ABPs. By comparing with case of no correlation (λ =0.0 ), we find two maxima in the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) depending on the cross-correlation intensity, i.e. the double stochastic resonance is shown in both models. For the RH model, the SNR exhibits two maxima depending on the multiplicative noise for small cross-correlation intensity, while in the SET model, it exhibits only a maximum depending on the multiplicative noise. Whether λ =0.0 or not, the MFPT is a monotonic decrease, and the SNR exhibits a maximum, depending on the additive noise in both models.

  15. Fabric Active Transducer Stimulated by Water Motion for Self-Powered Wearable Device.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Soon-Hyung; Kim, Won Keun; Park, Junwoo; Yang, YoungJun; Yoo, Byungwook; Han, Chul Jong; Kim, Youn Sang

    2016-09-21

    The recent trend of energy-harvesting devices is an adoption of fabric materials with flexible and stretchable according to the increase of wearable electronics. But it is a difficult process to form a core structure of dielectric layer or electrode on fabric materials. In particular, a fabric-based energy-harvesting device in contact with water has not been studied, though there are many challenging issues including insulation and water absorption in a harsh environment. So we propose an effective method to obtain an electrical energy from the water contact using our new fabric energy harvesting device. Our water motion active transducer (WMAT) is designed to obtain electrical energy from the variable capacitance through the movement and contact of water droplet. In this paper, we succeeded in generating an electrical energy with peak to peak power of 280 μW using a 30 μL of water droplet with the fabric WMAT device of 70 mm × 50 mm dimension. Furthermore, we specially carried out spray-coating and transfer processes instead of the conventional spin-coating process on fabric materials to overcome the limitation of its uneven morphology and porous and deformable assembly. PMID:27564593

  16. Personalized Multilayer Daily Life Profiling Through Context Enabled Activity Classification and Motion Reconstruction: An Integrated System Approach.

    PubMed

    Xu, James Y; Wang, Yan; Barrett, Mick; Dobkin, Bruce; Pottie, Greg J; Kaiser, William J

    2016-01-01

    Profiling the daily activity of a physically disabled person in the community would enable healthcare professionals to monitor the type, quantity, and quality of their patients' compliance with recommendations for exercise, fitness, and practice of skilled movements, as well as enable feedback about performance in real-world situations. Based on our early research in in-community activity profiling, we present in this paper an end-to-end system capable of reporting a patient's daily activity at multiple levels of granularity: 1) at the highest level, information on the location categories a patient is able to visit; 2) within each location category, information on the activities a patient is able to perform; and 3) at the lowest level, motion trajectory, visualization, and metrics computation of each activity. Our methodology is built upon a physical activity prescription model coupled with MEMS inertial sensors and mobile device kits that can be sent to a patient at home. A novel context-guided activity-monitoring concept with categorical location context is used to achieve enhanced classification accuracy and throughput. The methodology is then seamlessly integrated with motion reconstruction and metrics computation to provide comprehensive layered reporting of a patient's daily life. We also present an implementation of the methodology featuring a novel location context detection algorithm using WiFi augmented GPS and overlays, with motion reconstruction and visualization algorithms for practical in-community deployment. Finally, we use a series of experimental field evaluations to confirm the accuracy of the system. PMID:25546868

  17. Personalized Multilayer Daily Life Profiling Through Context Enabled Activity Classification and Motion Reconstruction: An Integrated System Approach.

    PubMed

    Xu, James Y; Wang, Yan; Barrett, Mick; Dobkin, Bruce; Pottie, Greg J; Kaiser, William J

    2016-01-01

    Profiling the daily activity of a physically disabled person in the community would enable healthcare professionals to monitor the type, quantity, and quality of their patients' compliance with recommendations for exercise, fitness, and practice of skilled movements, as well as enable feedback about performance in real-world situations. Based on our early research in in-community activity profiling, we present in this paper an end-to-end system capable of reporting a patient's daily activity at multiple levels of granularity: 1) at the highest level, information on the location categories a patient is able to visit; 2) within each location category, information on the activities a patient is able to perform; and 3) at the lowest level, motion trajectory, visualization, and metrics computation of each activity. Our methodology is built upon a physical activity prescription model coupled with MEMS inertial sensors and mobile device kits that can be sent to a patient at home. A novel context-guided activity-monitoring concept with categorical location context is used to achieve enhanced classification accuracy and throughput. The methodology is then seamlessly integrated with motion reconstruction and metrics computation to provide comprehensive layered reporting of a patient's daily life. We also present an implementation of the methodology featuring a novel location context detection algorithm using WiFi augmented GPS and overlays, with motion reconstruction and visualization algorithms for practical in-community deployment. Finally, we use a series of experimental field evaluations to confirm the accuracy of the system.

  18. Three-dimensional formulation of dislocation climb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Yejun; Xiang, Yang; Quek, Siu Sin; Srolovitz, David J.

    2015-10-01

    We derive a Green's function formulation for the climb of curved dislocations and multiple dislocations in three-dimensions. In this new dislocation climb formulation, the dislocation climb velocity is determined from the Peach-Koehler force on dislocations through vacancy diffusion in a non-local manner. The long-range contribution to the dislocation climb velocity is associated with vacancy diffusion rather than from the climb component of the well-known, long-range elastic effects captured in the Peach-Koehler force. Both long-range effects are important in determining the climb velocity of dislocations. Analytical and numerical examples show that the widely used local climb formula, based on straight infinite dislocations, is not generally applicable, except for a small set of special cases. We also present a numerical discretization method of this Green's function formulation appropriate for implementation in discrete dislocation dynamics (DDD) simulations. In DDD implementations, the long-range Peach-Koehler force is calculated as is commonly done, then a linear system is solved for the climb velocity using these forces. This is also done within the same order of computational cost as existing discrete dislocation dynamics methods.

  19. Extremely reduced motion in front of screens: investigating real-world physical activity of adolescents by accelerometry and electronic diary.

    PubMed

    Streb, Judith; Kammer, Thomas; Spitzer, Manfred; Hille, Katrin

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports accelerometer and electronic dairy data on typical daily activities of 139 school students from grade six and nine. Recordings covered a typical school day for each student and lasted on average for 23 h. Screen activities (watching television and using the computer) are compared to several other activities performed while sitting (e.g., playing, eating, sitting in school, and doing homework). Body movement was continuously recorded by four accelerometers and transformed into a motion sore. Our results show that extremely low motion scores, as if subjects were freezing, emerge to a greater extent in front of screens compared to other investigated activities. Given the substantial amount of time young people spend in front of screens and the rising obesity epidemic, our data suggest a mechanism for the association of screen time and obesity. PMID:25955531

  20. Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNL) Weigh-In-Motion (WIM) Configuration and Data Management Activities

    SciTech Connect

    Abercrombie, Robert K; Sheldon, Frederick T; Schlicher, Bob G

    2006-01-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) involvement in the Weigh-in-Motion (WIM) research with both government agencies and private companies dates back to 1989. The discussion here will focus on the US Army's current need for an automated WIM system to weigh and determine the center-of-balance for military wheeled vehicles and cargo and the expanded uses of WIM data. ORNL is addressing configuration and data management issues as they relate to deployments for both military and humanitarian activities. The transition from the previous WIM Gen I to the current Gen II system illustrates a configuration and data management solution that ensures data integration, integrity, coherence and cost effectiveness. Currently, Army units use portable and fixed scales, tape measures, and calculators to determine vehicle axle, total weights and center of balance for vehicles prior to being transshipped via railcar, ship, or airlifted. Manually weighing and measuring all vehicles subject to these transshipment operations is time-consuming, labor-intensive, hazardous and is prone to human errors (e.g., misreading scales and tape measures, calculating centers of balance and wheel, axle, and vehicle weights, recording data, and transferring data from manually prepared work sheets into an electronic data base and aggravated by adverse weather conditions). Additionally, in the context of the military, the timeliness, safety, success, and effectiveness of airborne heavy-drop operations can be significantly improved by the use of an automated system to weigh and determine center of balance of vehicles while they are in motion. The lack of a standardized airlift-weighing system for joint service use also creates redundant weighing requirements at the cost of scarce resources and time. This case study can be judiciously expanded into commercial operations related to safety and enforcement. The WIM program will provide a means for the Army to automatically identify/weigh and monitor

  1. Treatment of Rockwood type III acromioclavicular joint dislocation using autogenous semitendinosus tendon graft and endobutton technique

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Gang; Peng, Chao-An; Sun, Hua-Bin; Xiao, Jing; Zhu, Kang

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to evaluate the therapeutic effect of autogenous semitendinosus graft and endobutton technique, and compare with hook plate in treatment of Rockwood type III acromioclavicular (AC) joint dislocation. Methods From April 2012 to April 2013, we treated 46 patients with Rockwood type III AC joint dislocation. Patients were randomly divided into two groups: Group A was treated using a hook plate and Group B with autogenous semitendinosus graft and endobutton technique. All participants were followed up for 12 months. Radiographic examinations were performed every 2 months postoperatively, and clinical evaluation was performed using the Constant–Murley score at the last follow-up. Results Results indicated that patients in Group B showed higher mean scores (90.3±5.4) than Group A (80.4±11.5) in terms of Constant–Murley score (P=0.001). Group B patients scored higher in terms of pain (P=0.002), activities (P=0.02), range of motion (P<0.001), and strength (P=0.004). In Group A, moderate pain was reported by 2 (8.7%) and mild pain by 8 (34.8%) patients. Mild pain was reported by 1 (4.3%) patient in Group B. All patients in Group B maintained complete reduction, while 2 (8.7%) patients in Group A experienced partial reduction loss. Two patients (8.7%) encountered acromial osteolysis on latest radiographs, with moderate shoulder pain and limited range of motion. Conclusion Autogenous semitendinosus graft and endobutton technique showed better results compared with the hook plate method and exhibited advantages of fewer complications such as permanent pain and acromial osteolysis. PMID:26811685

  2. Motion patterns in activities of daily living: 3- year longitudinal follow-up after total shoulder arthroplasty using an optical 3D motion analysis system

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Total shoulder arthroplasty (TSA) can improve function in osteoarthritic shoulders, but the ability to perform activities of daily living (ADLs) can still remain impaired. Routinely, shoulder surgeons measure range of motion (ROM) using a goniometer. Objective data are limited, however, concerning functional three-dimensional changes in ROM in ADLs after TSA in patients with degenerative glenohumeral osteoarthritis. Methods This study included ten consecutive patients, who received TSA for primary glenohumeral osteoarthritis. The patients were examined the day before, 6 months, and 3 years after shoulder replacement as well. We compared them with a control group (n = 10) without any shoulder pathology and measured shoulder movement by 3D motion analysis using a novel 3 D model. The measurement included static maximum values, the ability to perform and the ROM of the ADLs “combing the hair”, “washing the opposite armpit”, “tying an apron”, and “taking a book from a shelf”. Results Six months after surgery, almost all TSA patients were able to perform the four ADLs (3 out of 40 tasks could not be performed by the 10 patients); 3 years postoperatively all patients were able to carry out all ADLs (40 out of 40 tasks possible). In performing the ADLs, comparison of the pre- with the 6-month and 3-year postoperative status of the TSA group showed that the subjects did not fully use the available maximum flexion/extension ROM in performing the four ADLs. The ROM used for flexion/extension did not change significantly (preoperatively 135°-0° -34° vs. 3 years postoperatively 131° -0° -53°). For abduction/adduction, ROM improved significantly from 33°-0° -27° preoperatively to 76° -0° -35° postoperatively. Compared to the controls (118°) the TSA group used less ROM for abduction to perform the four ADLs 3 years postoperatively. Conclusion TSA improves the ability to perform ADL and the individual ROM in ADLs in patients with

  3. MOJAVE. X. PARSEC-SCALE JET ORIENTATION VARIATIONS AND SUPERLUMINAL MOTION IN ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    SciTech Connect

    Lister, M. L.; Richards, J. L.; Aller, M. F.; Aller, H. D.; Homan, D. C.; Kellermann, K. I.; Kovalev, Y. Y.

    2013-11-01

    We describe the parsec-scale kinematics of 200 active galactic nucleus (AGN) jets based on 15 GHz Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) data obtained between 1994 August 31 and 2011 May 1. We present new VLBA 15 GHz images of these and 59 additional AGNs from the MOJAVE and 2 cm Survey programs. Nearly all of the 60 most heavily observed jets show significant changes in their innermost position angle over a 12-16 yr interval, ranging from 10° to 150° on the sky, corresponding to intrinsic variations of ∼0.°5 to ∼2°. The BL Lac jets show smaller variations than quasars. Roughly half of the heavily observed jets show systematic position angle trends with time, and 20 show indications of oscillatory behavior. The time spans of the data sets are too short compared to the fitted periods (5-12 yr), however, to reliably establish periodicity. The rapid changes and large jumps in position angle seen in many cases suggest that the superluminal AGN jet features occupy only a portion of the entire jet cross section and may be energized portions of thin instability structures within the jet. We have derived vector proper motions for 887 moving features in 200 jets having at least five VLBA epochs. For 557 well-sampled features, there are sufficient data to additionally study possible accelerations. We find that the moving features are generally non-ballistic, with 70% of the well-sampled features showing either significant accelerations or non-radial motions. Inward motions are rare (2% of all features), are slow (<0.1 mas yr{sup –1}), are more prevalent in BL Lac jets, and are typically found within 1 mas of the unresolved core feature. There is a general trend of increasing apparent speed with distance down the jet for both radio galaxies and BL Lac objects. In most jets, the speeds of the features cluster around a characteristic value, yet there is a considerable dispersion in the distribution. Orientation variations within the jet cannot fully account for the

  4. MOJAVE. X. Parsec-scale Jet Orientation Variations and Superluminal Motion in Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lister, M. L.; Aller, M. F.; Aller, H. D.; Homan, D. C.; Kellermann, K. I.; Kovalev, Y. Y.; Pushkarev, A. B.; Richards, J. L.; Ros, E.; Savolainen, T.

    2013-11-01

    We describe the parsec-scale kinematics of 200 active galactic nucleus (AGN) jets based on 15 GHz Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) data obtained between 1994 August 31 and 2011 May 1. We present new VLBA 15 GHz images of these and 59 additional AGNs from the MOJAVE and 2 cm Survey programs. Nearly all of the 60 most heavily observed jets show significant changes in their innermost position angle over a 12-16 yr interval, ranging from 10° to 150° on the sky, corresponding to intrinsic variations of ~0.°5 to ~2°. The BL Lac jets show smaller variations than quasars. Roughly half of the heavily observed jets show systematic position angle trends with time, and 20 show indications of oscillatory behavior. The time spans of the data sets are too short compared to the fitted periods (5-12 yr), however, to reliably establish periodicity. The rapid changes and large jumps in position angle seen in many cases suggest that the superluminal AGN jet features occupy only a portion of the entire jet cross section and may be energized portions of thin instability structures within the jet. We have derived vector proper motions for 887 moving features in 200 jets having at least five VLBA epochs. For 557 well-sampled features, there are sufficient data to additionally study possible accelerations. We find that the moving features are generally non-ballistic, with 70% of the well-sampled features showing either significant accelerations or non-radial motions. Inward motions are rare (2% of all features), are slow (<0.1 mas yr-1), are more prevalent in BL Lac jets, and are typically found within 1 mas of the unresolved core feature. There is a general trend of increasing apparent speed with distance down the jet for both radio galaxies and BL Lac objects. In most jets, the speeds of the features cluster around a characteristic value, yet there is a considerable dispersion in the distribution. Orientation variations within the jet cannot fully account for the dispersion, implying

  5. Impingement and Dislocation in Total HIP Arthroplasty: Mechanisms and Consequences

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Thomas D; Elkins, Jacob M; Pedersen, Douglas R; Callaghan, John J

    2014-01-01

    In contemporary total hip arthroplasty, instability has been a complication in approximately 2% to 5% of primary surgeries and 5% to 10% of revisions. Due to the reduction in the incidence of wear-induced osteolysis that has been achieved over the last decade, instability now stands as the single most common reason for revision surgery. Moreover, even without frank dislocation, impingement and subluxation are implicated in a set of new concerns arising with advanced bearings, associated with the relatively unforgiving nature of many of those designs. Against that backdrop, the biomechanical factors responsible for impingement, subluxation, and dislocation remain under-investigated relative to their burden of morbidity. This manuscript outlines a 15-year program of laboratory and clinical research undertaken to improve the scientific basis for understanding total hip impingement and dislocation. The broad theme has been to systematically evaluate the role of surgical factors, implant design factors, and patient factors in predisposing total hip constructs to impinge, sublux, and/or dislocate. Because this class of adverse biomechanical events had not lent itself well to study with existing approaches, it was necessary to develop (and validate) a series of new research methodologies, relying heavily on advanced finite element formulations. Specific areas of focus have included identifying the biomechanical challenges posed by dislocation-prone patient activities, quantifying design parameter effects and component surgical positioning effects for conventional metal-on-polyethylene implant constructs, and the impingement/dislocation behavior of non-conventional constructs, quantifying the stabilizing role of the hip capsule (and of surgical repairs of capsule defects), and systematically studying impingement and edge loading of hard-on-hard bearings, fracture of ceramic liners, confounding effects of patient obesity, and subluxation-mediated worsening of third body

  6. Cortical activation associated with determination of depth order during transparent motion perception: A normalized integrative fMRI-MEG study.

    PubMed

    Natsukawa, Hiroaki; Kobayashi, Tetsuo

    2015-10-01

    When visual patterns drifting in different directions and/or at different speeds are superimposed on the same plane, observers perceive transparent surfaces on planes of different depths. This phenomenon is known as transparent motion perception. In this study, cortical activities were measured using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and magnetoencephalography (MEG) to reveal the cortical dynamics associated with determination of depth order during transparent motion perception. In addition, offline eye movement measurements were performed to determine the latencies of the start of both pursuit eye movements and depth attention that are important in determination of the depth order. MEG and fMRI data were analyzed by a normalized integrative fMRI-MEG method that enables reconstruction of time-varying dipole moments of activated regions from MEG signals. Statistical analysis of fMRI data was performed to identify activated regions. The activated regions were used as spatial constraints for the reconstruction using the integrative fMRI-MEG method. We focused on the period between latencies (216-405 ms) determined by eye movement experiment, which are related to determination of the depth order. The results of integrative analysis revealed that significant neural activities were observed in the visual association area, the human middle temporal area, the intraparietal sulcus, the lateral occipital cortex, and the anterior cingulate cortex between 216 and 405 ms. These results suggest that initial eye movement and accompanying cortical activations during focused duration play an important role in determining the depth order during transparent motion perception.

  7. Dislocation related droop in InGaN/GaN light emitting diodes investigated via cathodoluminescence

    SciTech Connect

    Pozina, Galia; Ciechonski, Rafal; Bi, Zhaoxia; Samuelson, Lars; Monemar, Bo

    2015-12-21

    Today's energy saving solutions for general illumination rely on efficient white light emitting diodes (LEDs). However, the output efficiency droop experienced in InGaN based LEDs with increasing current injection is a serious limitation factor for future development of bright white LEDs. We show using cathodoluminescence (CL) spatial mapping at different electron beam currents that threading dislocations are active as nonradiative recombination centers only at high injection conditions. At low current, the dislocations are inactive in carrier recombination due to local potentials, but these potentials are screened by carriers at higher injection levels. In CL images, this corresponds to the increase of the dark contrast around dislocations with the injection (excitation) density and can be linked with droop related to the threading dislocations. Our data indicate that reduction of droop in the future efficient white LED can be achieved via a drastic reduction of the dislocation density by using, for example, bulk native substrates.

  8. Influence of surface active substances on bubble motion and collision with various interfaces.

    PubMed

    Malysa, K; Krasowska, M; Krzan, M

    2005-06-30

    Bubble motion as a function of distance from a point of its detachment and phenomena occurring during the bubble approach and collision with liquid/gas and liquid/solid interfaces in pure water and solutions of various surface active substances are described and discussed. It is showed that presence of surface active substance has a profound influence on values of the terminal velocity and profiles of the local velocity. At low solutions concentrations there are three distinct stages in the bubble motion: (i) a rapid acceleration, (ii) a maximum velocity value followed by its monotonic decrease, and (iii) attainment of the terminal velocity, while at high concentrations (and in pure water) there are only stages (i) and (iii). It is showed that the bubble terminal velocity decreases rapidly at low surfactant concentration, but there can be found some characteristic concentrations (adsorption coverage's) above which the velocity almost stopped to decrease. Immobilization of the bubble surface resulting from adsorption of the surface active substances (surface tension gradients inducement) causes over twofold lowering of the bubble velocity. Presence of the maximum on the local velocity profiles is an indication that a stationary non-uniform distribution of adsorption coverage (needed for immobilization the bubble interface) was not established there. When the rising bubble arrives at liquid/gas interface or liquid/solid interface there can be formed either foam or wetting film or three-phase contact (TPC). It is showed that prior to the foam and/or wetting film formation the bubble colliding with the interfaces can bounce backward and simultaneously its shape pulsates rapidly with a frequency over 1000 Hz. It is rather unexpected that even in the case of the free surface the bubble's shape and consequently its surface area can vary so rapidly. It shows straightforward that on such a rapidly distorted interface the adsorption coverage can be very different from that

  9. Personalization algorithm for real-time activity recognition using PDA, wireless motion bands, and binary decision tree.

    PubMed

    Pärkkä, Juha; Cluitmans, Luc; Ermes, Miikka

    2010-09-01

    Inactive and sedentary lifestyle is a major problem in many industrialized countries today. Automatic recognition of type of physical activity can be used to show the user the distribution of his daily activities and to motivate him into more active lifestyle. In this study, an automatic activity-recognition system consisting of wireless motion bands and a PDA is evaluated. The system classifies raw sensor data into activity types online. It uses a decision tree classifier, which has low computational cost and low battery consumption. The classifier parameters can be personalized online by performing a short bout of an activity and by telling the system which activity is being performed. Data were collected with seven volunteers during five everyday activities: lying, sitting/standing, walking, running, and cycling. The online system can detect these activities with overall 86.6% accuracy and with 94.0% accuracy after classifier personalization.

  10. Hydrostatic Pressure Studies Distinguish Global from Local Protein Motions in C-H Activation by Soybean Lipoxygenase-1.

    PubMed

    Hu, Shenshen; Cattin-Ortolá, Jérôme; Munos, Jeffrey W; Klinman, Judith P

    2016-08-01

    The proposed contributions of distinct classes of local versus global protein motions during enzymatic bond making/breaking processes has been difficult to verify. We employed soybean lipoxygenase-1 as a model system to investigate the impact of high pressure at variable temperatures on the hydrogen-tunneling properties of the wild-type protein and three single-site mutants. For all variants, pressure dramatically elevates the enthalpies of activation for the C-H activation. In contrast, the primary kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) for C-H activation and their corresponding temperature dependencies remain unchanged up to ca. 700 bar. The differential impact of elevated hydrostatic pressure on the temperature dependencies of rate constants versus substrate KIEs provides direct evidence for two distinct classes of protein motions: local, isotope-dependent donor-acceptor distance-sampling modes, and a more global, isotope-independent search for productive protein conformational sub-states. PMID:27348724

  11. Temperature Dependent Dislocation Mobility in MgSiO3 Perovskite: An Atomic Scale Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraych, A.; Hirel, P.; Carrez, P.; Cordier, P.

    2014-12-01

    Heat transfer through the mantle is carried by convection, which involves plastic flow of the mantle constituents. Among these constituents, (Mg,Fe,Al)(Si,Al)O3 perovskite is known to be the most abundant. This material is deformed at very low strain rate (from 10-12 to 10-16 s-1), and under extreme pressure and temperature conditions (from 30 to 140GPa, 1500 to 4000°C). Its plastic behaviour is challenging to reproduce experimentally, but crucial for a better understanding of the Earth's dynamic. The recent progress in modelling the behaviours of materials, which until now have been mostly used on metals, are applied here on MgSiO3 perovskite (Mg-Pv). We characterize dislocations at the atomic scale, as the first step of a multi-scale modelling approach on Mg-Pv plastic deformation. We model dislocations with [100] and [010] Burgers vectors (described within the Pbnm space group), which are the shortest lattice parameters in the orthorhombic structure. Dislocation cores are determined to be described at various pressures. The resistance to glide of the dislocations is quantified indicating that [100](010) and [010](100) are the easiest slip systems in Mg-Pv over the full pressure range of the lower mantle. The effect of temperature is introduced by assimilating the thermal activation on dislocation lines to vibrations of a string lying into a potential valley. These vibrations allow the dislocation to overcome locally the energy barrier that represents the lattice friction, and then propagates under the effect of stress. With this model, by combining elastic theory of dislocations and calculations at the atomic scale, a first expression of the strain rate produced by dislocation glide is provided.Left figure : Thermally activated propagation of dislocation over the energy barrierRight figure : Shape of the crossing dislocation obtained from atomic scale modelling

  12. Worker Dislocation. Case Studies of Causes and Cures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Robert F., Ed.

    Case studies were made of the following dislocated worker programs: Cummins Engine Company Dislocated Worker Project; GM-UAW Metropolitan Pontiac Retraining and Employment Program; Minnesota Iron Range Dislocated Worker Project; Missouri Dislocated Worker Program Job Search Assistance, Inc.; Hillsborough, North Carolina, Dislocated Worker Project;…

  13. Closed Reduction of “Irreducible” Posterolateral Knee Dislocation - A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Tateda, Satoshi; Takahashi, Atsushi; Aizawa, Toshimi; Umehara, Jutaro

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Posterolateral rotary knee dislocation is a rare orthopedic injury that is considered to be irreducible by closed reduction because of soft tissue incarceration. Here, we present a case of posterolateral rotary knee dislocation, which was reduced by closed manipulation. Case report: The patientwas a 33-year-old man who sustained a twisting injury to his right knee that was diagnosed as posterolateral rotary knee dislocation by plain radiographs and the characteristic physical finding known as a dimple sign. Under general anesthesia, the knee dislocation was reduced by closed manipulation with internal rotation of the lower leg at knee flexion and reproduced by valgus and external rotation stress. There were was complete tear of posterior cruciate ligament, and partial tear of the anterior cruciate ligament which were not reconstructed. The medial collateral ligament that was detached from the femoral footprint was repaired. One year postoperatively, the range of motion was 0–145°. There was no knee symptom and no ligament instability. Conclusion: This is the first report of a successful closed reduction for posterolateral knee dislocation. The mechanism of dislocation was considered valgus and external rotation stress during knee flexion. PMID:27299118

  14. Dislocation mechanism for transformation between cubic ice Ic and hexagonal ice Ih

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hondoh, T.

    2015-11-01

    Cubic ice Ic is metastable, yet can form by the freezing of supercooled water, vapour deposition at low temperatures and by depressurizing high-pressure forms of ice. Its structure differs from that of common hexagonal ice Ih in the order its molecular layers are stacked. This stacking order, however, typically has considerable disorder; that is, not purely cubic, but alternating in hexagonal and cubic layers. In time, stacking-disordered ice gradually decreases in cubicity (fraction having cubic structure), transforming to hexagonal ice. But, how does this disorder originate and how does it transform to hexagonal ice? Here we use numerical data on dislocations in hexagonal ice Ih to show that (1) stacking-disordered ice (or Ic) can be viewed as fine-grained polycrystalline ice with a high density of extended dislocations, each a widely extended stacking fault bounded by partial dislocations, and (2) the transformation from ice Ic to Ih is caused by the reaction and motion of these partial dislocations. Moreover, the stacking disorder may be in either a higher stored energy state consisting of a sub-boundary network arrangement of partial dislocations bounding stacking faults, or a lower stored energy state consisting of a grain structure with a high density of stacking faults, but without bounding partial dislocations. Each state transforms to Ih differently, with a duration to fully transform that strongly depends on temperature and crystal grain size. The results are consistent with the observed transformation rates, transformation temperatures and wide range in heat of transformation.

  15. In situ observation of dislocation nucleation and escape in a submicrometre aluminium single crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Sang Ho; Legros, Marc; Kiener, Daniel; Dehm, Gerhard

    2009-02-01

    `Smaller is stronger' does not hold true only for nanocrystalline materials but also for single crystals. It is argued that this effect is caused by geometrical constraints on the nucleation and motion of dislocations in submicrometre-sized crystals. Here, we report the first in situ transmission electron microscopy tensile tests of a submicrometre aluminium single crystal that are capable of providing direct insight into source-controlled dislocation plasticity in a submicrometre crystal. Single-ended sources emit dislocations that escape the crystal before being able to multiply. As dislocation nucleation and loss rates are counterbalanced at about 0.2 events per second, the dislocation density remains statistically constant throughout the deformation at strain rates of about 10-4s-1. However, a sudden increase in strain rate to 10-3s-1 causes a noticeable surge in dislocation density as the nucleation rate outweighs the loss rate. This observation indicates that the deformation of submicrometre crystals is strain-rate sensitive.

  16. Robust atomistic calculation of dislocation line tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szajewski, B. A.; Pavia, F.; Curtin, W. A.

    2015-12-01

    The line tension Γ of a dislocation is an important and fundamental property ubiquitous to continuum scale models of metal plasticity. However, the precise value of Γ in a given material has proven difficult to assess, with literature values encompassing a wide range. Here results from a multiscale simulation and robust analysis of the dislocation line tension, for dislocation bow-out between pinning points, are presented for two widely-used interatomic potentials for Al. A central part of the analysis involves an effective Peierls stress applicable to curved dislocation structures that markedly differs from that of perfectly straight dislocations but is required to describe the bow-out both in loading and unloading. The line tensions for the two interatomic potentials are similar and provide robust numerical values for Al. Most importantly, the atomic results show notable differences with singular anisotropic elastic dislocation theory in that (i) the coefficient of the \\text{ln}(L) scaling with dislocation length L differs and (ii) the ratio of screw to edge line tension is smaller than predicted by anisotropic elasticity. These differences are attributed to local dislocation core interactions that remain beyond the scope of elasticity theory. The many differing literature values for Γ are attributed to various approximations and inaccuracies in previous approaches. The results here indicate that continuum line dislocation models, based on elasticity theory and various core-cut-off assumptions, may be fundamentally unable to reproduce full atomistic results, thus hampering the detailed predictive ability of such continuum models.

  17. Microdiffraction Analysis of Hierarchical Dislocation Organization

    SciTech Connect

    Barabash, R.I.; Ice, G.E.

    2007-12-19

    This article describes how x-ray microdiffraction is influenced by the number, kind, and organization of dislocations. Particular attention is placed on micro-Laue diffraction, where polychromatic x-rays are diffracted into characteristic Laue patterns that are sensitive to the dislocation content and arrangement. Diffraction is considered for various stages of plastic deformation. For early stages of plastic deformation with random dislocation spacing, the intensity in reciprocal space is redistributed about Laue spots with a length scale proportional to the number of dislocations within the sample volume and with a characteristic shape that depends on the kinds of dislocations and the momentum transfer vector. Unpaired dislocations that contribute to lattice rotations cause the largest redistribution of scattered intensity. In later stages of plastic deformation, strong interactions between individual dislocations cause them to organize into correlated arrangements. Here again, xray diffraction Laue spots are broadened in proportion to the number of excess (unpaired) dislocations inside the wall and to the total number of unpaired walls, but the broadening can be discontinuous. With microdiffraction it is possible to quantitatively test models of dislocation organization.

  18. Congenital dislocation of the patella - clinical case.

    PubMed

    Miguel Sá, Pedro; Raposo, Filipa; Santos Carvalho, Manuel; Alegrete, Nuno; Coutinho, Jorge; Costa, Gilberto

    2016-01-01

    Congenital patellar dislocation is a rare condition in which the patella is permanently dislocated and cannot be reduced manually. The patella develops normally as a sesamoid bone of the femur. This congenital dislocation results from failure of the internal rotation of the myotome that forms the femur, quadriceps muscle and extensor apparatus. It usually manifests immediately after birth, although in some rare cases, the diagnosis may be delayed until adolescence or adulthood. Early diagnosis is important, thereby allowing surgical correction and avoiding late sequelae, including early degenerative changes in the knee. A case of permanent dislocation of the patella is presented here, in a female child aged seven years.

  19. Active control of the attitude motion and structural vibration of a flexible satellite by jet thrusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Mokin

    A Lagrangian formulation is used to obtain the equations of motion of a flexible satellite in a tree-type geometry. The flexible satellite model is the geosynchronous INSAT-II type satellite with a flexible balance beam and a flexible solar panel attached to the rigid main body. In deriving the equations of motion, the orbital motion, the librational motion, and the structural motion of flexible bodies are involved. The assumed-modes method is used to express the deflections of the flexible structures in the form of a finite series of space-dependent admissible functions multiplied by time-dependent amplitudes. The kinetic energy, potential energy, strain energy, and virtual work of the flexible satellite are evaluated as functions of time in terms of the generalized coordinates. Then, by substituting them into Lagrange's equations for discrete systems, the governing equations of motion of the flexible satellite are obtained as a set of second-order nonlinear ordinary differential equations. The attitude motion and the structural motion of the flexible satellite are coupled motions with one another. Uncontrolled dynamics show that the librational and structural motions are oscillatory and undamped motions. The stability and performance of the flexible satellite needs to be improved by designing control systems. A control objective is proposed to improve the stability and performance for pointing accuracy maneuver by controlling the librational motions and flexible modes simultaneously. For the control objective, a control system is synthesized, using feedback linearization control, thrust determination, thrust management, and pulse-width pulse-frequency modulation. Feedback linearization for second-order nonlinear systems is used to obtain a stable feedback control system for the pointing-accuracy control. A stable feedback control system is obtained by adjusting the diagonal matrices of the linear second-order system. Jet thrusters are used as the primary

  20. Using Motion-Sensor Games to Encourage Physical Activity for Adults with Intellectual Disability.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Michael J; Taylor, David; Gamboa, Patricia; Vlaev, Ivo; Darzi, Ara

    2016-01-01

    Adults with Intellectual Disability (ID) are at high risk of being in poor health as a result of exercising infrequently; recent evidence indicates this is often due to there being a lack of opportunities to exercise. This pilot study involved an investigation of the use of motion-sensor game technology to enable and encourage exercise for this population. Five adults (two female; 3 male, aged 34-74 [M = 55.20, SD = 16.71] with ID used motion-sensor games to conduct exercise at weekly sessions at a day-centre. Session attendees reported to have enjoyed using the games, and that they would like to use the games in future. Interviews were conducted with six (four female; two male, aged 27-51 [M = 40.20, SD = 11.28]) day-centre staff, which indicated ways in which the motion-sensor games could be improved for use by adults with ID, and barriers to consider in relation to their possible future implementation. Findings indicate motion-sensor games provide a useful, enjoyable and accessible way for adults with ID to exercise. Future research could investigate implementation of motion-sensor games as a method for exercise promotion for this population on a larger scale.

  1. Mechanically Activated Motion of a Single Self-Propelled Polymeric Microcapsule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolmakov, German; Schaefer, Alexander; Aranson, Igor; Balazs, Anna

    2011-03-01

    Using a hybrid computational approach, we demonstrate that a single nanoparticle-filled microcapsule on a rigid substrate can undergo self-sustained motion in response to initial mechanical deformation. Nanoparticles released from the capsule modify the underlying substrate and the adhesion gradients of the nanoparticle concentration formed at the surface sustain the motion of the capsule. The permeability of the microcapsule's shell increases with its deformation and therefore, more deformed microcapsules release nanoparticles at higher rates. An initial, non-uniform mechanical deformation of the capsule by an applied force causes an asymmetry in the nanoparticle distribution on the substrate that initiates the microcapsule motion. We also develop a two-dimensional model of the phenomenon within the phase-field approximation and compare the results of the two approaches.

  2. Quantum dislocations in solid Helium-4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleinikava, Darya

    In this thesis the following problems on properties of solid 4He are considered: (i) the role of long-range interactions in suppression of dislocation roughening at T = 0; (ii) the combined effect of 3He impurities and Peierls potential on shear modulus softening; (iii) the dislocation superclimb and its connection to the phenomenon of "giant isochoric compressibility"; (iv) non-linear dislocation response to the applied stress and stress-induces dislocation roughening as a I-order phase transition in 1D at finite temperature. First we investigate the effect of long-range interactions on the state of edge dislocation at T = 0. Such interactions are induced by elastic forces of the solid. We found that quantum roughening transition of a dislocation at T = 0 is completely suppressed by arbitrarily small long-range interactions between kinks. A heuristic argument is presented and the result has been verified by numerical Monte-Carlo simulations using Worm Algorithm in J-current model. It was shown that the Peierls potential plays a crucial role in explaining the elastic properties of dislocations, namely shear modulus softening phenomenon. The crossover from T = 0 to finite temperatures leads to intrinsic softening of the shear modulus and is solely controlled by kink typical energy. It was demonstrated that the mechanism, involving only the binding of 3He impurities to the dislocations, requires an unrealistically high concentrations of defects (or impurities) in order to explain the shear modulus phenomenon and therefore an inclusion of Peierls potential in consideration is required. Superclimbing dislocations, that is the edge dislocations with the superfluidity along the core, were investigated. The theoretical prediction that superclimb is responsible for the phenomenon of "giant isochoric compressibility" was confirmed by Monte-Carlo simulations. It was demonstrated that the isochoric compressibility is suppressed at low temperatures. The dependence of

  3. Extension of the stability of motions in a combustion chamber by non- linear active control based on hysteresis

    SciTech Connect

    Knoop, P.; Culick, F.E.C.; Zukoski, E.E.

    1996-07-01

    This report presents the first quantitative data establishing the details of hysteresis whose existence in dynamical behavior was reported by Sterling and Zukoski. The new idea was demonstrated that the presence of dynamical hysteresis provides opportunity for a novel strategy of active nonlinear control of unsteady motions in combustors. A figure shows the hysteresis exhibited for the amplitude of pressure oscillations as a function of equivalence ratio in a combustor having a recirculation zone, in this case a dump combustor.

  4. Dislocated interests and climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Steven J.; Diffenbaugh, Noah

    2016-06-01

    The predicted effects of climate change on surface temperatures are now emergent and quantifiable. The recent letter by Hansen and Sato (2016 Environ. Res. Lett. 11 034009) adds to a growing number of studies showing that warming over the past four decades has shifted the distribution of temperatures higher almost everywhere, with the largest relative effects on summer temperatures in developing regions such as Africa, South America, southeast Asia, and the Middle East (e.g., Diffenbaugh and Scherer 2011 Clim. Change 107 615-24 Anderson 2011 Clim. Change 108 581; Mahlstein et al 2012 Geophys. Res. Lett. 39 L21711). Hansen and Sato emphasize that although these regions are warming disproportionately, their role in causing climate change—measured by cumulative historical CO2 emissions produced—is small compared to the US and Europe, where the relative change in temperatures has been less. This spatial and temporal mismatch of climate change impacts and the burning of fossil fuels is a critical dislocation of interests that, as the authors note, has ‘substantial implications for global energy and climate policies.’ Here, we place Hansen and Sato’s ‘national responsibilities’ into a broader conceptual framework of problematically dislocated interests, and briefly discuss the related challenges for global climate mitigation efforts.

  5. Dislocated interests and climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Steven J.; Diffenbaugh, Noah

    2016-06-01

    The predicted effects of climate change on surface temperatures are now emergent and quantifiable. The recent letter by Hansen and Sato (2016 Environ. Res. Lett. 11 034009) adds to a growing number of studies showing that warming over the past four decades has shifted the distribution of temperatures higher almost everywhere, with the largest relative effects on summer temperatures in developing regions such as Africa, South America, southeast Asia, and the Middle East (e.g., Diffenbaugh and Scherer 2011 Clim. Change 107 615–24 Anderson 2011 Clim. Change 108 581; Mahlstein et al 2012 Geophys. Res. Lett. 39 L21711). Hansen and Sato emphasize that although these regions are warming disproportionately, their role in causing climate change—measured by cumulative historical CO2 emissions produced—is small compared to the US and Europe, where the relative change in temperatures has been less. This spatial and temporal mismatch of climate change impacts and the burning of fossil fuels is a critical dislocation of interests that, as the authors note, has ‘substantial implications for global energy and climate policies.’ Here, we place Hansen and Sato’s ‘national responsibilities’ into a broader conceptual framework of problematically dislocated interests, and briefly discuss the related challenges for global climate mitigation efforts.

  6. Treatment of Chronic Acromioclavicular Joint Dislocation in a Paraplegic Patient with the Weaver-Dunn Procedure and a Hook-Plate

    PubMed Central

    Godry, Holger; Citak, Mustafa; Königshausen, Matthias; Schildhauer, Thomas A.; Seybold, Dominik

    2016-01-01

    In case of patients with spinal cord injury and concomitant acromioclavicular (AC) joint-dislocation the treatment is challenging, as in this special patient group the function of the shoulder joint is critical because patients depend on the upper limb for mobilization and wheelchair-locomotion. Therefore the goal of this study was to examine, if the treatment of chronic AC-joint dislocation using the Weaver-Dunn procedure augmented with a hook-plate in patients with a spinal cord injury makes early postoperative wheelchair mobilization and the wheelchair transfer with full weight-bearing possible. In this case the Weaver-Dunn procedure with an additive hook-plate was performed in a 34-year-old male patient with a complete paraplegia and a posttraumatic chronic AC-joint dislocation. The patient was allowed to perform his wheelchair transfers with full weight bearing on the first post-operative day. The removal of the hook-plate was performed four months after implantation. At the time of follow-up the patient could use his operated shoulder with full range of motion without restrictions in his activities of daily living or his wheel-chair transfers. PMID:27433301

  7. Treatment of Chronic Acromioclavicular Joint Dislocation in a Paraplegic Patient with the Weaver-Dunn Procedure and a Hook-Plate.

    PubMed

    Godry, Holger; Citak, Mustafa; Königshausen, Matthias; Schildhauer, Thomas A; Seybold, Dominik

    2016-06-27

    In case of patients with spinal cord injury and concomitant acromioclavicular (AC) joint-dislocation the treatment is challenging, as in this special patient group the function of the shoulder joint is critical because patients depend on the upper limb for mobilization and wheelchair-locomotion. Therefore the goal of this study was to examine, if the treatment of chronic AC-joint dislocation using the Weaver-Dunn procedure augmented with a hook-plate in patients with a spinal cord injury makes early postoperative wheelchair mobilization and the wheelchair transfer with full weight-bearing possible. In this case the Weaver-Dunn procedure with an additive hook-plate was performed in a 34-year-old male patient with a complete paraplegia and a posttraumatic chronic AC-joint dislocation. The patient was allowed to perform his wheelchair transfers with full weight bearing on the first post-operative day. The removal of the hook-plate was performed four months after implantation. At the time of follow-up the patient could use his operated shoulder with full range of motion without restrictions in his activities of daily living or his wheel-chair transfers. PMID:27433301

  8. Contrast Affects fMRI Activity in Middle Temporal Cortex Related to Center–Surround Interaction in Motion Perception

    PubMed Central

    Turkozer, Halide B.; Pamir, Zahide; Boyaci, Huseyin

    2016-01-01

    As the size of a high contrast drifting Gabor patch increases, perceiving its direction of motion becomes harder. However, the same behavioral effect is not observed for a low contrast Gabor patch. Neuronal mechanisms underlying this size–contrast interaction are not well understood. Here using psychophysical methods and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we investigated the neural correlates of this behavioral effect. In the behavioral experiments, motion direction discrimination thresholds were assessed for drifting Gabor patches with different sizes and contrasts. Thresholds increased significantly as the size of the stimulus increased for high contrast (65%) but did not change for low contrast (2%) stimuli. In the fMRI experiment, cortical activity was recorded while observers viewed drifting Gabor patches with different contrasts and sizes. We found that the activity in middle temporal (MT) area increased with size at low contrast, but did not change at high contrast. Taken together, our results show that MT activity reflects the size–contrast interaction in motion perception. PMID:27065922

  9. Temperature dependence of [100](010) and [001](010) dislocation mobility in natural olivine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lin; Blaha, Stephan; Pintér, Zsanett; Farla, Robert; Kawazoe, Takaaki; Miyajima, Nobuyoshi; Michibayashi, Katsuyoshi; Katsura, Tomoo

    2016-05-01

    Dislocation recovery experiments were conducted on pre-deformed olivine single crystals at 1450 to 1760 K, room pressure, and oxygen partial pressures near the Ni-NiO buffer to determine the annihilation rates for [100] and [001] dislocations on the (010) plane. Olivine single crystals were first deformed to activate the desired slip systems under simple shear geometry and then annealed at target conditions. The edge and screw dislocations with Burgers vectors, b, of [100] and [001], respectively, both elongated in the [001] direction were produced by the deformation. The dislocation annihilation rate constants of both types of dislocations are identical within 0.3 log unit. The activation energies for both dislocations are also identical, i.e., ∼400 kJ/mol, which is also identical to that of the Si self-diffusion coefficient. This correspondence suggests that olivine dislocation creep controlled by a diffusion-controlled process under low-stress and high-temperature conditions. This study offers a potential insight into the formation of AG-type fabric in olivine.

  10. Patellar dislocation in the United States: role of sex, age, race, and athletic participation.

    PubMed

    Waterman, Brian R; Belmont, Philip J; Owens, Brett D

    2012-03-01

    Patellar instability has been extensively studied in selected, high-risk cohorts, but the epidemiology in the general population remains unclear. A longitudinal, prospective epidemiological database was used to determine the incidence and demographic risk factors for patellar dislocations presenting to emergency departments of the United States. The National Electronic Injury Surveillance System was queried for all patellar dislocations presenting to emergency departments between 2003 and 2008. Incidence rate ratios (IRRs) were then calculated with respect to sex, age, and race. The hypothesis was that patellar dislocation is influenced by sex, age, race, and athletic participation. An estimated 40,544 patellar dislocations occurred among an at-risk population of 1,774,210,081 person-years for an incidence rate of 2.29 per 100,000 person-years in the United States. When compared with males, females showed no significant overall or age-stratified differences in the rates of patellar dislocation (IRR 0.85, 95% CI 0.71, 1.00; p = 0.08; p > 0.05). Peak incidence of patellar dislocation occurred between 15 and 19 years of age (11.19/100,000 person-years). When compared with Hispanic race, black and white race were associated with significantly higher rates of patellar dislocation (IRR 4.30 [95% CI 1.63, 6.97; p = 0.02], IRR 4.02 [95% CI 1.06, 6.98; p = 0.03], respectively). Nearly half (51.9%) of all patellar dislocation occurred during athletic activity, with basketball (18.2%), soccer (6.9%), and football (6.3%) associated with the highest percentage of patellar dislocation during athletics. Age between 15 and 19 years is associated with higher rates of patellar dislocation. Sex is not a significant risk factor for patellar dislocation. Black and white race are a significant risk factor for patellar dislocation when compared with Hispanic race. Half of all patellar dislocation occurs during athletic activity. This study was conducted on the Level of evidence II.

  11. Physics of active jamming during collective cellular motion in a monolayer.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Simon; Hannezo, Edouard; Elgeti, Jens; Joanny, Jean-François; Silberzan, Pascal; Gov, Nir S

    2015-12-15

    Although collective cell motion plays an important role, for example during wound healing, embryogenesis, or cancer progression, the fundamental rules governing this motion are still not well understood, in particular at high cell density. We study here the motion of human bronchial epithelial cells within a monolayer, over long times. We observe that, as the monolayer ages, the cells slow down monotonously, while the velocity correlation length first increases as the cells slow down but eventually decreases at the slowest motions. By comparing experiments, analytic model, and detailed particle-based simulations, we shed light on this biological amorphous solidification process, demonstrating that the observed dynamics can be explained as a consequence of the combined maturation and strengthening of cell-cell and cell-substrate adhesions. Surprisingly, the increase of cell surface density due to proliferation is only secondary in this process. This analysis is confirmed with two other cell types. The very general relations between the mean cell velocity and velocity correlation lengths, which apply for aggregates of self-propelled particles, as well as motile cells, can possibly be used to discriminate between various parameter changes in vivo, from noninvasive microscopy data.

  12. Physics of active jamming during collective cellular motion in a monolayer

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Simon; Hannezo, Edouard; Elgeti, Jens; Joanny, Jean-François; Silberzan, Pascal; Gov, Nir S.

    2015-01-01

    Although collective cell motion plays an important role, for example during wound healing, embryogenesis, or cancer progression, the fundamental rules governing this motion are still not well understood, in particular at high cell density. We study here the motion of human bronchial epithelial cells within a monolayer, over long times. We observe that, as the monolayer ages, the cells slow down monotonously, while the velocity correlation length first increases as the cells slow down but eventually decreases at the slowest motions. By comparing experiments, analytic model, and detailed particle-based simulations, we shed light on this biological amorphous solidification process, demonstrating that the observed dynamics can be explained as a consequence of the combined maturation and strengthening of cell−cell and cell−substrate adhesions. Surprisingly, the increase of cell surface density due to proliferation is only secondary in this process. This analysis is confirmed with two other cell types. The very general relations between the mean cell velocity and velocity correlation lengths, which apply for aggregates of self-propelled particles, as well as motile cells, can possibly be used to discriminate between various parameter changes in vivo, from noninvasive microscopy data. PMID:26627719

  13. Application of a novel spinal posture and motion measurement system in active and static sitting.

    PubMed

    Pries, Esther; Dreischarf, Marcel; Bashkuev, Maxim; Schmidt, Hendrik

    2015-01-01

    The quantification of work-related musculoskeletal risk factors is of great importance; however, only a few tools allow objective, unrestricted measurements of spinal posture and motion in workplaces. This study was performed to evaluate the applicability of the Epionics system in a sedentary workplace. The system is mobile and wireless and assesses lumbar lordosis, pelvic orientation and spinal motion, without restricting subjects in their movements. In total, 10 males were monitored while sitting for 2 h on static and dynamic office chairs and on an exercise ball, to evaluate the effect of dynamic sitting. The volunteers were able to perform their work unhampered. No differences among the tested furniture could be detected with respect to either the lordosis or the number of spinal movements after habituation to the furniture; however, differences in pelvic orientation were statistically significant. The results of the present study indicate that Epionics may be useful for the quantitative assessment of work-related risk factors. Practitioner Summary: Only a few tools allow objective, unrestricted measurements of spinal posture and motion in the workplace. Epionics SPINE measures lumbar lordosis, pelvic orientation and spinal motion under nearly unrestricted conditions and can be used to quantify work-related musculoskeletal risk factors. We demonstrated the use of this tool in the workplace-analysis. PMID:25712870

  14. Physics of active jamming during collective cellular motion in a monolayer.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Simon; Hannezo, Edouard; Elgeti, Jens; Joanny, Jean-François; Silberzan, Pascal; Gov, Nir S

    2015-12-15

    Although collective cell motion plays an important role, for example during wound healing, embryogenesis, or cancer progression, the fundamental rules governing this motion are still not well understood, in particular at high cell density. We study here the motion of human bronchial epithelial cells within a monolayer, over long times. We observe that, as the monolayer ages, the cells slow down monotonously, while the velocity correlation length first increases as the cells slow down but eventually decreases at the slowest motions. By comparing experiments, analytic model, and detailed particle-based simulations, we shed light on this biological amorphous solidification process, demonstrating that the observed dynamics can be explained as a consequence of the combined maturation and strengthening of cell-cell and cell-substrate adhesions. Surprisingly, the increase of cell surface density due to proliferation is only secondary in this process. This analysis is confirmed with two other cell types. The very general relations between the mean cell velocity and velocity correlation lengths, which apply for aggregates of self-propelled particles, as well as motile cells, can possibly be used to discriminate between various parameter changes in vivo, from noninvasive microscopy data. PMID:26627719

  15. Dislocation generation during early stage sintering.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheehan, J. E.; Lenel, F. V.; Ansell, G. S.

    1973-01-01

    Discussion of the effects of capillarity-induced stresses on dislocations during early stage sintering. A special version of Hirth's (1963) theoretical calculation procedures modified to describe dislocation nucleation on planes meeting the sintering body's neck surface obliquely is shown to predict plastic flow at stress levels know to exist between micron size metal particles in the early stages of sintering.

  16. A rare variant of knee dislocation

    PubMed Central

    HUSSIN, P.; MAWARDI, M.; AB HALIM, A.H.

    2016-01-01

    Knee dislocation is a rare injury. It represents less than 0.2% of orthopaedic injuries. This case reports a rare form of knee dislocation caused by the impact of a high-energy trauma. In these cases the appropriate assessment and management is needed to ensure that patient receives the proper treatment. PMID:27381692

  17. Obesity. A risk factor for knee dislocation.

    PubMed

    Marin, E L; Bifulco, S S; Fast, A

    1990-06-01

    Complete dislocation of the knee joint is a severe injury that is commonly the result of high-velocity injuries and often associated with disruption of the popliteal artery. We report two cases in which obesity appeared to be the principal cause of knee dislocation with vascular compromise. Preventive measures in extremely obese patients are recommended.

  18. Community College Adjustment among Dislocated Workers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwitzer, Alan M.; Duggan, Molly H.; Laughlin, Janet T.; Walker, Martha A.

    2011-01-01

    Community colleges often are catalysts for economic and workforce development in localities with high unemployment or large numbers of dislocated workers. Increasingly, dislocated workers--individuals who have experienced job loss due to occupational closings, reduced workforces, or severe local economic downturns--are enrolling in educational and…

  19. Dislocation of the cuboid bone without fracture.

    PubMed

    Gough, D T; Broderick, D F; Januzik, S J; Cusack, T J

    1988-10-01

    A 37-year-old man presented following an inversion plantar flexion injury to the left foot and ankle. Dislocation of the cuboid without associated fracture was identified and successfully treated by closed reduction. The patient was immobilized in a walking cast for seven weeks after surgery and no further dislocation occurred.

  20. Geometric approach to dislocation and disclination theory

    SciTech Connect

    Nesterov, A.I.; Ovchinnikov, S.G.

    1988-05-01

    Cartan structure equations are used to create a four-dimensional geometric description of dislocations in continuum theory. It is shown that the dislocation distribution is determined by the torsion tensor, while the disclination distribution is determined by the curvature tensor. An analogy to electrodynamics is offered.

  1. [Bipolar forearm dislocation or floating forearm (a case report)].

    PubMed

    Daoudi, A; Elibrahimi, A; Loudiyi, W D; Elmrini, A; Chakour, K; Boutayeb, F

    2009-02-01

    Bipolar dislocation of the forearm or floating forearm is a rare injury. It combines concomitant elbow and wrist dislocation. Only six cases have been reported in the literature. The diagnosis of wrist dislocation may initially be missed and therefore the prognosis will be worse. The authors report a case of a bipolar dislocation with a posterior dislocation of the elbow and a perilunate dislocation of the wrist.

  2. Initial dislocation structure and dynamic dislocation multiplication in Mo single crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Hsiung, L M; Lassila, D H

    2000-03-22

    Initial dislocation structure in annealed high-purity Mo single crystals and deformation substructure in a crystal subjected to 1% compression have been examined and studied in order to investigate dislocation multiplication mechanisms in the early stages of plastic deformation. The initial dislocation density is in a range of 10{sup 6} {approx} 10{sup 7} cm{sup -2}, and the dislocation structure is found to contain many grown-in superjogs along dislocation lines. The dislocation density increases to a range of 10{sup 8} {approx} 10{sup 9} cm{sup -2}, and the average jog height is also found to increase after compressing for a total strain of 1%. It is proposed that the preexisting jogged screw dislocations can act as (multiple) dislocation multiplication sources when deformed under quasi-static conditions. Both the jog height and length of link segment (between jogs) can increase by stress-induced jog coalescence, which takes place via the lateral migration (drift) of superjogs driven by unbalanced line-tension partials acting on link segments of unequal lengths. Applied shear stress begins to push each link segment to precede dislocation multiplication when link length and jog height are greater than critical lengths. This dynamic dislocation multiplication source is subsequently verified by direct simulations of dislocation dynamics under stress to be crucial in the early stages of plastic deformation in Mo single crystals.

  3. Double Dislocation of Interphalangeal Joints Accompanied with Contralateral Shoulder Dislocation: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Raval, Pradyumna Ramchandra; Jariwala, Arpit

    2016-02-01

    Dislocation of any joint is an orthopaedic emergency and needs immediate attention by the attending physician. A delay in reducing a dislocated joint can lead to disastrous complications both immediately as well as in the long run. Although anterior dislocation of a shoulder joint is by far the commonest dislocation encountered by any emergency care physician, other joints may also get dislocated. In certain cases two joints may get dislocated simultaneously. Such dislocation is known as a double dislocation. Double dislocation of the proximal interphalangeal joint and the distal interphalangeal joint in the same finger is a rare injury. High impact loading at the fingertip is the primary cause in most cases and it is often associated with younger individuals playing contact sports. The right little finger is the digit commonly involved and this injury is evident in football players more often than not. Although closed reduction is a preferred treatment, it may not be always successful. Time of presentation, tendon interposition, associated swelling and co-existent phalangeal fractures are certain key impediments to a successful closed reduction manoeuvre. In patients with an open injury, a thorough wash out and appropriate antibiotic cover is mandatory. We report a rare case of double dislocation of the interphalangeal joints accompanied with contralateral shoulder dislocation in an elderly man sustained after a fall which was treated successfully with closed reduction and early mobilization. PMID:27028386

  4. Glide dislocation nucleation from dislocation nodes at semi-coherent {111} Cu–Ni interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Shao, Shuai; Wang, Jian; Beyerlein, Irene J.; Misra, Amit

    2015-07-23

    Using atomistic simulations and dislocation theory on a model system of semi-coherent {1 1 1} interfaces, we show that misfit dislocation nodes adopt multiple atomic arrangements corresponding to the creation and redistribution of excess volume at the nodes. We identified four distinctive node structures: volume-smeared nodes with (i) spiral or (ii) straight dislocation patterns, and volume-condensed nodes with (iii) triangular or (iv) hexagonal dislocation patterns. Volume-smeared nodes contain interfacial dislocations lying in the Cu–Ni interface but volume-condensed nodes contain two sets of interfacial dislocations in the two adjacent interfaces and jogs across the atomic layer between the two adjacent interfaces. Finally, under biaxial tension/compression applied parallel to the interface, we show that the nucleation of lattice dislocations is preferred at the nodes and is correlated with the reduction of excess volume at the nodes.

  5. Glide dislocation nucleation from dislocation nodes at semi-coherent {111} Cu–Ni interfaces

    DOE PAGES

    Shao, Shuai; Wang, Jian; Beyerlein, Irene J.; Misra, Amit

    2015-07-23

    Using atomistic simulations and dislocation theory on a model system of semi-coherent {1 1 1} interfaces, we show that misfit dislocation nodes adopt multiple atomic arrangements corresponding to the creation and redistribution of excess volume at the nodes. We identified four distinctive node structures: volume-smeared nodes with (i) spiral or (ii) straight dislocation patterns, and volume-condensed nodes with (iii) triangular or (iv) hexagonal dislocation patterns. Volume-smeared nodes contain interfacial dislocations lying in the Cu–Ni interface but volume-condensed nodes contain two sets of interfacial dislocations in the two adjacent interfaces and jogs across the atomic layer between the two adjacent interfaces.more » Finally, under biaxial tension/compression applied parallel to the interface, we show that the nucleation of lattice dislocations is preferred at the nodes and is correlated with the reduction of excess volume at the nodes.« less

  6. Microstructural evidence for the transition from dislocation creep to dislocation-accommodated grain boundary sliding in naturally deformed plagioclase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miranda, Elena A.; Hirth, Greg; John, Barbara E.

    2016-11-01

    We use quantitative microstructural analysis including misorientation analysis based on electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) data to investigate deformation mechanisms of naturally deformed plagioclase in an amphibolite gabbro mylonite. The sample is from lower oceanic crust exposed near the Southwest Indian Ridge, and it has a high ratio of recrystallized matrix grains to porphyroclasts. Microstructures preserved in porphyroclasts suggest that early deformation was achieved principally by dislocation creep with subgrain rotation recrystallization; recrystallized grain (average diameter ∼8 μm) microstructures indicate that subsequent grain boundary sliding (GBS) was active in the continued deformation of the recrystallized matrix. The recrystallized matrix shows four-grain junctions, randomized misorientation axes, and a shift towards higher angles for neighbor-pair misorientations, all indicative of GBS. The matrix grains also exhibit a shape preferred orientation, a weak lattice preferred orientation consistent with slip on multiple slip systems, and intragrain microstructures indicative of dislocation movement. The combination of these microstructures suggest deformation by dislocation-accommodated GBS (DisGBS). Strain localization within the recrystallized matrix was promoted by a transition from grain size insensitive dislocation creep to grain size sensitive GBS, and sustained by the maintenance of a small grain size during superplasticity.

  7. Internal stresses, dislocation mobility and ductility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saada, G.

    1991-06-01

    The description of plastic deformation must take into account individual mechanisms and heterogeneity of plastic strain. Influence of dislocation interaction with forest dislocations and of cross slip are connected with the organization of dipole walls. The latter are described and their development is explained as a consequence of edge effects. Applications are discussed. La description de la déformation plastique doit prendre en compte les interactions individuelles des dislocations et l'hétérogénéité à grande échelle de la déformation plastique. Les interactions des dislocations mobiles avec la forêt de dislocations, le glissement dévié, ont pour effet la création de parois dipolaires. Celles-ci sont décrites et leur développement est appliqué à partir des effets de bord.

  8. Motion sickness in migraine sufferers.

    PubMed

    Marcus, Dawn A; Furman, Joseph M; Balaban, Carey D

    2005-12-01

    Motion sickness commonly occurs after exposure to actual motion, such as car or amusement park rides, or virtual motion, such as panoramic movies. Motion sickness symptoms may be disabling, significantly limiting business, travel and leisure activities. Motion sickness occurs in approximately 50% of migraine sufferers. Understanding motion sickness in migraine patients may improve understanding of the physiology of both conditions. Recent literature suggests important relationships between the trigeminal system and vestibular nuclei that may have implications for both motion sickness and migraine. Studies demonstrating an important relationship between serotonin receptors and motion sickness susceptibility in both rodents and humans suggest possible new motion sickness prevention therapies.

  9. Neural correlates of apparent motion perception of impoverished facial stimuli: A comparison of ERP and ERSP activity

    PubMed Central

    Kolchinsky, Artemy; Puce, Aina

    2014-01-01

    Our brains readily decode human movements, as shown by neural responses to face and body motion. N170 event-related potentials (ERPs) are earlier and larger to mouth opening movements relative to closing in both line-drawn and natural faces, and gaze aversions relative to direct gaze in natural faces (Puce and Perrett, 2003; Puce et al., 2000). Here we extended this work by recording both ERP and oscillatory EEG activity (event-related spectral perturbations, ERSPs) to line-drawn faces depicting eye and mouth movements (Eyes: Direct vs Away; Mouth: Closed vs Open) and non-face motion controls. Neural activity was measured in 2 occipitotemporal clusters of 9 electrodes, one in each hemisphere. Mouth opening generated larger N170s than mouth closing, replicating earlier work. Eye motion elicited robust N170s that did not differ between gaze conditions. Control condition differences were seen, and generated the largest N170. ERSP difference plots across conditions in the occipitotemporal electrode clusters (Eyes: Direct vs Away; Mouth: Closed vs Open) showed statistically significant differences in beta and gamma bands for gaze direction changes and mouth opening at similar post-stimulus times and frequencies. In contrast, control stimuli showed activity in the gamma band with a completely different time profile and hemispheric distribution to facial stimuli. ERSP plots were generated in two 9 electrode clusters centered on central sites, C3 and C4. In the left cluster for all stimulus conditions, broadband beta suppression persisted from about 250 ms post-motion onset. In the right cluster, beta suppression was seen for control conditions only. Statistically significant differences between conditions were confined between 4 – 15 Hz, unlike occipitotemporal sites where differences occurred at much higher frequencies (high beta/gamma). Our data indicate that N170 amplitude is sensitive to the amount of movement in the visual field, independent of stimulus type. In

  10. Closed posteromedial dislocation of the ankle without fracture: a case report.

    PubMed

    Lertwanich, Pisit; Santanapipatkul, Polasant; Harnroonroj, Thossart

    2008-07-01

    Ankle dislocation without fracture is an extremely rare injury. Open dislocations were more common in the previous reports. The authors report a case of closed posteromedial dislocation of the ankle in a 24-year-old basketball player. Closed reduction was performed. The ankle was initially immobilized with the short leg cast before using the functional brace. Details of the rehabilitation program were described. Follow up examination at one-year demonstrated good clinical and functional results confirmed with the inversion stress radiographs. The patient can participate in sports activities at the same level as pre-injury.

  11. Entropic effect on the rate of dislocation nucleation.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Seunghwa; Kang, Keonwook; Cai, Wei

    2011-03-29

    Dislocation nucleation is essential to our understanding of plastic deformation, ductility, and mechanical strength of crystalline materials. Molecular dynamics simulation has played an important role in uncovering the fundamental mechanisms of dislocation nucleation, but its limited timescale remains a significant challenge for studying nucleation at experimentally relevant conditions. Here we show that dislocation nucleation rates can be accurately predicted over a wide range of conditions by determining the activation free energy from umbrella sampling. Our data reveal very large activation entropies, which contribute a multiplicative factor of many orders of magnitude to the nucleation rate. The activation entropy at constant strain is caused by thermal expansion, with negligible contribution from the vibrational entropy. The activation entropy at constant stress is significantly larger than that at constant strain, as a result of thermal softening. The large activation entropies are caused by anharmonic effects, showing the limitations of the harmonic approximation widely used for rate estimation in solids. Similar behaviors are expected to occur in other nucleation processes in solids. PMID:21402933

  12. Clinimetric evaluation of active range of motion measures in patients with non-specific neck pain: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    van den Heuvel, Sylvia P.; Staal, J. Bart; Smits-Engelsman, Bouwien C. M.

    2008-01-01

    The study is to provide a critical analysis of the research literature on clinimetric properties of instruments that can be used in daily practice to measure active cervical range of motion (ACROM) in patients with non-specific neck pain. A computerized literature search was performed in Medline, Cinahl and Embase from 1982 to January 2007. Two reviewers independently assessed the clinimetric properties of identified instruments using a criteria list. The search identified a total of 33 studies, investigating three different types of measurement instruments to determine ACROM. These instruments were: (1) different types of goniometers/inclinometers, (2) visual estimation, and (3) tape measurements. Intra- and inter-observer reliability was demonstrated for the cervical range of motion instrument (CROM), Cybex electronic digital instrument (EDI-320) and a single inclinometer. The presence of agreement was assessed for the EDI-320 and a single inclinometer. The CROM received a positive rating for construct validity. When clinical acceptability is taken into account both the CROM and the single inclinometer can be considered appropriate instruments for measuring the active range of motion in patients with non-specific neck pain in daily practice. Reliability is the aspect most frequently evaluated. Agreement, validity and responsiveness are documented less frequently. PMID:18427843

  13. Atlantoaxial dislocation and Down's syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Whaley, W J; Gray, W D

    1980-01-01

    The phenotypic features of Down's syndrome are easily recognized and include characteristic facial features, hypotonia, ligament laxity, transverse palmar creases and mental subnormality. Associated manifestations and complications are also familiar and involve almost every organ system. Congenital heart defects, bowel malformations and a tendency to leukemia are common attendant problems. Less common, however, are defects of the skeletal system; in fact, the most recent edition of a standard pediatric textbook makes no mention of anomalies of the vertebral column. The purpose of this paper is to call attention to the association between Down's syndrome and atlantoaxial dislocation, which in our patient resulted in quadriplegia and eventually death. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 2 PMID:6448087

  14. Recurrent Dislocation of the Patella

    PubMed Central

    Benítez, Gustavo

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate results of medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) reconstruction associated with lateral release and advancement of vastus medialis in recurrent dislocation of the patella. Methods: We retrospectively evaluated 11 patients with a mean follow-up of 19 months. Mean age was 23, mainly women. We did MPFL reconstruction with semitendinosus or gracilis tendon depending on BMI, associated with advancement of vastus medialis and lateral release. Results: Mean Kujala score improved from 46,54 pts. preoperative to 88,36 postoperative. Our main complication was 1 patient with rigid knee, who required movilization under anesthesia and arthroscopic arthrolisis to improve her outcome. Conclusion: The combination of this techniques are a good alternative to treat patients with recurrent patella disclocation, with good short and mid-term results. Biomechanic intra and postop complications of MPFL reconstruction are related to patellar fixation, anatomic positioning of femoral tunnel and knee position of the graft fixation.

  15. Dislocation-obstacle interactions in aluminum alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Blythe Gore

    Dislocation-obstacle interactions play a significant role in determining the mechanical response of a material. Because higher stresses are needed for dislocations to bypass obstacles, these interactions reduce dislocation mobility and increase the yield strength of a material, as well as improve the work-hardening rate and the resistance to coarsening. The phenomenon of dislocation-obstacle interactions can be advantageous, as in the case of particle-strengthening to increase the creep strength of a material, or disadvantageous, as in embrittlement of a metal due to radiation-induced defects. In order to accelerate the time from development to implementation of a new material, optimize production parameters, and accurately predict the behavior of a material while in service, it is necessary to develop robust material models based on fundamental physical inputs. Through careful experimentation, the nature of dislocation-obstacle interactions can be assessed, allowing key physical parameters to be identified and clarified. These can serve as the basis for developing new and accurate material models. This thesis examines two types of dislocation-obstacle interactions: dislocation-particle interactions during creep deformation, and dislocation-loop interactions during deformation at room temperature. Dislocation-particle interaction studies in Al-Zn-Mg-Cu-Zr, Al-4Mg-0.3Sc, and Al-0.3Sc showed that temperature, coherency, and particle size play a role in determining the dominant bypass mechanism, and that interactions are more complex than what is considered in current models. A new mechanism for elevated temperature bypass of particles during creep deformation was revealed, in which dislocations interact directly with the particle-matrix interface, altering the interfacial structure, and affecting subsequent dislocation interactions. These results are discussed in relation to macroscopic behavior in steady-state creep experiments. In addition, dislocation

  16. Judo-related traumatic posterior sternoclavicular joint dislocation in a child.

    PubMed

    Galanis, Nikiforos; Anastasiadis, Prodromos; Grigoropoulou, Foteini; Kirkos, John; Kapetanos, George

    2014-05-01

    Judo is a combat sport with high risk of injury. We present a rare case of traumatic left posterior sternoclavicular (SC) joint dislocation, inflicted to a 12-year-old boy during a judo contest. An extensive literature review did not reveal any case of posterior SC joint dislocation in judo. The patient was treated with closed reduction under general anesthesia. At 2-year follow-up, his left upper extremity had full range of motion, and he did not complain of any residual symptoms. He decided to discontinue judo training; however, he participates in other physically demanding sports. Although not often encountered, posterior SC joint dislocation is a challenging and critical medical problem that can be fatal if not promptly diagnosed and treated on time and should be considered in the differential diagnosis of trauma-related anterior chest pain. PMID:24172655

  17. Peierls potential of screw dislocations in bcc transition metals: Predictions from density functional theory

    SciTech Connect

    Weinberger, Christopher R.; Tucker, Garritt J.; Foiles, Stephen M.

    2013-02-01

    It is well known that screw dislocation motion dominates the plastic deformation in body-centered-cubic metals at low temperatures. The nature of the nonplanar structure of screw dislocations gives rise to high lattice friction, which results in strong temperature and strain rate dependence of plastic flow. Thus the nature of the Peierls potential, which is responsible for the high lattice resistance, is an important physical property of the material. However, current empirical potentials give a complicated picture of the Peierls potential. Here, we investigate the nature of the Peierls potential using density functional theory in the bcc transition metals. The results show that the shape of the Peierls potential is sinusoidal for every material investigated. Furthermore, we show that the magnitude of the potential scales strongly with the energy per unit length of the screw dislocation in the material.

  18. Management of sternoclavicular dislocation in young children: considerations about diagnosis and treatment of four cases.

    PubMed

    Gil-Albarova, J; Rebollo-González, S; Gómez-Palacio, V E; Herrera, A

    2013-08-01

    The records of 4 children of under 14 years of age treated at our institution for traumatic sternoclavicular dislocation (SCJ) were reviewed. Closed reduction in posterior SCJ after computed tomography (CT) was successful as immediate procedure. For anterior SCJ instability, open reduction and SCJ reconstruction obtained satisfactory results. Conservative treatment of SCJ subluxation for asymptomatic children was sufficient. Radiographs in "serendipity view" were useful for confirming reduction and stability in children. No postoperative CT was needed for this purpose. Closed reduction in posterior SCJ dislocation and surgical treatment in anterior SCJ dislocation in young children can provide stability and a satisfactory return to a normal function, but with some limitation when intense or competitive shoulder motion is required during sport. Young children and parents should be aware about this possibility. Conservative treatment of SCJ subluxation for asymptomatic children is useful. Reflection is required regarding the correct imaging examination after treatment to check stable reduction in a SCJ injury. PMID:23314981

  19. Atomistic studies of jogged screw dislocations in {gamma}-TiAl alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, K.Y.; Li, M.; Zhou, S.J.

    1999-03-01

    The behavior of jogged screw dislocations in {gamma}-TiAl alloys has been investigated with large-scale molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The authors find a new mechanism for formation of pinning points in jogged screw dislocations. They also find that the critical height for the jogs in the {+-}[{bar 1}10] directions on the (001) plane to move nonconservatively is between 3r{sub 0} and 4r{sub 0}, where r{sub 0} is the nearest neighbor distance of aluminum atoms. Interstitials and vacancies are created during the nonconservative motions of the jogs. In addition, the formation of dislocation dipole and loops around the jogs is also observed.

  20. 20 CFR 663.610 - Does the statutory priority for use of adult funds also apply to dislocated worker funds?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Does the statutory priority for use of adult... TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) ADULT AND DISLOCATED WORKER ACTIVITIES UNDER TITLE... priority for use of adult funds also apply to dislocated worker funds? No, the statutory priority...

  1. 20 CFR 663.610 - Does the statutory priority for use of adult funds also apply to dislocated worker funds?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Does the statutory priority for use of adult... TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) ADULT AND DISLOCATED WORKER ACTIVITIES UNDER TITLE... priority for use of adult funds also apply to dislocated worker funds? No, the statutory priority...

  2. 20 CFR 663.145 - What services are WIA title I adult and dislocated workers formula funds used to provide?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false What services are WIA title I adult and... TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) ADULT AND DISLOCATED WORKER ACTIVITIES UNDER TITLE I OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT Delivery of Adult and Dislocated Worker Services Through the...

  3. 20 CFR 663.145 - What services are WIA title I adult and dislocated workers formula funds used to provide?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false What services are WIA title I adult and... TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) ADULT AND DISLOCATED WORKER ACTIVITIES UNDER TITLE I OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT Delivery of Adult and Dislocated Worker Services Through the...

  4. 20 CFR 663.145 - What services are WIA title I adult and dislocated workers formula funds used to provide?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false What services are WIA title I adult and... TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) ADULT AND DISLOCATED WORKER ACTIVITIES UNDER TITLE I OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT Delivery of Adult and Dislocated Worker Services Through the...

  5. 20 CFR 663.145 - What services are WIA title I adult and dislocated workers formula funds used to provide?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false What services are WIA title I adult and... TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR ADULT AND DISLOCATED WORKER ACTIVITIES UNDER TITLE I OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT Delivery of Adult and Dislocated Worker Services Through the One-Stop...

  6. 20 CFR 663.610 - Does the statutory priority for use of adult funds also apply to dislocated worker funds?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Does the statutory priority for use of adult... TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) ADULT AND DISLOCATED WORKER ACTIVITIES UNDER TITLE... priority for use of adult funds also apply to dislocated worker funds? No, the statutory priority...

  7. 20 CFR 663.610 - Does the statutory priority for use of adult funds also apply to dislocated worker funds?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Does the statutory priority for use of adult... TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR ADULT AND DISLOCATED WORKER ACTIVITIES UNDER TITLE I OF THE... adult funds also apply to dislocated worker funds? No, the statutory priority applies to adult funds...

  8. 20 CFR 663.610 - Does the statutory priority for use of adult funds also apply to dislocated worker funds?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Does the statutory priority for use of adult... TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR ADULT AND DISLOCATED WORKER ACTIVITIES UNDER TITLE I OF THE... adult funds also apply to dislocated worker funds? No, the statutory priority applies to adult funds...

  9. 20 CFR 663.145 - What services are WIA title I adult and dislocated workers formula funds used to provide?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What services are WIA title I adult and... TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR ADULT AND DISLOCATED WORKER ACTIVITIES UNDER TITLE I OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT Delivery of Adult and Dislocated Worker Services Through the One-Stop...

  10. A model emitting dislocation group from crack tip with stress singularity and its application to brittle-ductile transition

    SciTech Connect

    Yokobori, Toshimitsu A.Jr. . Dept. of Mechatronics and Precision Engineering); Isogai, Takeshi; Yokobori, Takeo . School of Science and Engineering)

    1993-05-01

    Taking into account the stress singularity near the crack tip, computer simulation of dislocation emission and motion has been carried out. A model is proposed in which the source emitting the dislocation group is located near by the crack tip. The numerical method has been used by programming to adjust time increment automatically. By this model and the analytical method, the converged solution has been obtained. The main results are as follows: The region where any dislocation does not exist along the slip plane near the stressed source, namely, dislocation free zone (DFZ) is found to appear. Also it has been found that inverse pile-up of dislocation against the tip of DFZ will appear. The formula is obtained correlating the maximum dislocation density with DFZ length. With increase of stress rate and decrease of the value of [mu]/[tau][sup *][sub 0], the inverse pile-up at the tip of DFZ becomes more significant. Based on these results, a new fracture criterion for brittle fracture is proposed assuming critical local stress requisite within DFZ, where high stress concentration is induced by dynamic inverse pile-up of dislocations.

  11. Increasing preoperative dislocations and total time of dislocation affect surgical management of anterior shoulder instability

    PubMed Central

    Denard, Patrick J.; Dai, Xuesong; Burkhart, Stephen S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Our purpose was to determine the relationship between number of preoperative shoulder dislocations and total dislocation time and the need to perform bone deficiency procedures at the time of primary anterior instability surgery. Our hypothesis was that need for bone deficiency procedures would increase with the total number and hours of dislocation. Materials and Methods: A retrospective review was performed of primary instability surgeries performed by a single surgeon. Patients with <25% glenoid bone loss were treated with an isolated arthroscopic Bankart repair. Those who also had an engaging Hill-Sachs lesion underwent arthroscopic Bankart repair with remplissage. Patients with >25% glenoid bone loss were treated with Latarjet reconstruction. Number of dislocations and total dislocation time were examined for their relationship with the treatment method. Results: Ten arthroscopic Bankart repairs, 13 arthroscopic Bankart plus remplissage procedures, and 9 Latarjet reconstructions were available for review. Total dislocations (P = 0.012) and total hours of dislocation (P = 0.019) increased from the Bankart, to the remplissage, to the Latarjet groups. Patients with a total dislocation time of 5 h or more were more likely to require a Latarjet reconstruction (P = 0.039). Patients with only 1 preoperative dislocation were treated with an isolated Bankart repair in 64% (7 of 11) of cases, whereas those with 2 or more dislocations required a bone loss procedure in 86% (18 of 21) of cases (P = 0.013). Conclusion: Increasing number of dislocations and total dislocation time are associated with the development of glenoid and humeral head bony lesions that alter surgical management of anterior shoulder instability. The necessity for the addition of a remplissage to an arthroscopic Bankart repair or the use of a Latarjet reconstruction increases with only 1 recurrent dislocation. Level of evidence: Level III, retrospective comparative study. PMID:25709237

  12. Thermodynamic forces in single crystals with dislocations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Goethem, Nicolas

    2014-06-01

    A simple model for the evolution of macroscopic dislocation regions in a single crystal is presented. This model relies on maximal dissipation principle within Kröner's geometric description of the dislocated crystal. Mathematical methods and tools from shape optimization theory provide equilibrium relations at the dislocation front, similarly to previous work achieved on damage modelling (J Comput Phys 33(16):5010-5044, 2011). The deformation state variable is the incompatible strain as related to the dislocation density tensor by a relation involving the Ricci curvature of the crystal underlying elastic metric. The time evolution of the model variables follows from a novel interpretation of the Einstein-Hilbert flow in terms of dislocation microstructure energy. This flow is interpreted as the dissipation of non-conservative dislocations, due to the climb mechanism, modelled by an average effect of mesoscopic dislocations moving normal to their glide planes by adding or removing points defects. The model equations are a fourth-order tensor parabolic equation involving the operator "incompatibility," here appearing as a tensorial counterpart of the scalar Laplacian. This work encompasses and generalizes results previously announced (C R Acad Sci Paris Ser I 349:923-927, 2011), with in addition a series of physical interpretations to give a meaning to the newly introduced concepts.

  13. Simulations of dislocation pile-ups at assymetric tilt boundaries in aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    Valone, Steven; Wang, Jian M; Hoagland, Richard C; Germann, Timothy C

    2011-01-21

    Materials deformation processes are increasingly approachable through the both conventional and accelerated molecular dynamics. In one deformation process, dislocation pile-up at a grain boundary, a greater understanding is required as to how dislocations transmit through grain boundaries, causing plastic deformation, or reflect and reconstruct the grain boundary, but with no macroscopic deformation. Here dislocation pile-ups in an alwninum bicrystal with an asymmetric tilt grain boundary are simulated atomistically, introducing effects of dislocation interactions beyond linear elastic ones. The observed responses as functions of the number of explicitly modeled dislocations and the magnitude of the applied stress are discussed. Typical conditions for the simulations consist of thermal relaxation room temperature, five active dislocations inserted within a 6.5-million-atom cell, and an additional fourteen dislocations represented within the atomistic simulation by their elastic strain fields. The dislocations are initially distributed according to linear elastic estimates of their positions in a double-ended pile-up from a chosen far-field stress. The whole cell is allowed to relax according to a procedure to be described. In the ensuing simulations, the system is propagated for some substantial period of time (lOs of ps), followed by small increments of strain. After a number of such increments, we observe all of the anticipated events. Usually several of the closest dislocations are absorbed into the grain boundary, resulting in varying amounts of reconstruction. Reflections from the boundary are common and show a strong dependence on sample thickness. Transmission events are seen on both slip systems in the other grain. The particulars of these events will be described as well.

  14. Motion Sickness

    MedlinePlus

    ... people traveling by car, train, airplanes and especially boats. Motion sickness can start suddenly, with a queasy ... motion sickness. For example, down below on a boat, your inner ear senses motion, but your eyes ...

  15. Lower Extremity Strength and Active Range of Motion in College Baseball Pitchers: A Comparison between Stance Leg and Kick Leg.

    PubMed

    Tippett, S R

    1986-01-01

    The role of the lower extremities and torso is vital in the pitching mechanism. However, a review of the literature reveals information primarily dealing with the upper extremity's role in throwing. This pilot study was conducted to: 1) determine selected lower extremity strength and range of motion measurements in sixteen college baseball pitchers, and 2) compare measurements in the stance leg to the kick leg. When preseason profiling is not possible, clinical norms for those treating college pitchers can be valuable in proper rehabilitation of the lower extremity. Also, by determining trends in lower extremity strength and motion when comparing kick (plant) leg to stance (drive) leg, a better understanding of lower extremity kinematics in the pitching act can be appreciated. Statistically significant differences were found in the active range of motion in plantarflexion, hip internal rotation, and hip extension of the stance leg, as well as hip flexion of the kick leg. lsokinetic evaluations at slow and fast speeds revealed significant differences in the strength of ankle dorsiflexors and hip flexors at slow speeds of the kick leg. Strength of the hamstrings on the kick leg was significant at fast speeds as was strength of the hip external rotators on the stance leg. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 1986;8(1):10-14.

  16. Distribution of distances between dislocations in different types of dislocation substructures in deformed Cu-Al alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trishkina, L.; Cherkasova, T.; Zboykova, N.; Koneva, N.; Kozlov, E.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the investigation was the determination of the statistic description of dislocation distribution in each dislocation substructures component forming after different deformation degrees in the Cu-Al alloys. The dislocation structures were investigated by the transmission diffraction electron microscopy method. In the work the statistic description of distance distribution between the dislocations, dislocation barriers and dislocation tangles in the deformed Cu-Al alloys with different concentration of Al and test temperature at the grain size of 100 µm was carried out. It was established that the above parameters influence the dislocation distribution in different types of the dislocation substructures (DSS): dislocation chaos, dislocation networks without disorientation, nondisoriented and disoriented cells, in the walls and inside the cells. The distributions of the distances between dislocations in the investigated alloys for each DSS type formed at certain deformation degrees and various test temperatures were plotted.

  17. Monteggia fracture-dislocations: A Historical Review

    PubMed Central

    Rehim, Shady A.; Maynard, Mallory A.; Sebastin, Sandeep J.; Chung, Kevin C.

    2014-01-01

    The eponym Monteggia fracture-dislocation originally referred to a fracture of the shaft of the ulna accompanied by anterior dislocation of the radial head that was described by Giovanni Battista Monteggia of Italy in 1814. Subsequently, a further classification system based on the direction of the radial head dislocation and associated fractures of the radius and ulna was proposed by Jose Luis Bado of Uruguay in 1958. This article investigates the evolution of treatment, classification, and outcomes of the Monteggia injury and sheds light on the lives and contributions of Monteggia and Bado. PMID:24792923

  18. Using motion-sensor camera technology to infer seasonal activity and thermal niche of the desert tortoise (Gopherus agassizii)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Agha, Mickey; Augustine, Benjamin; Lovich, Jeffrey E.; Delaney, David F.; Sinervo, Barry; Murphy, Mason O.; Ennen, Joshua R.; Briggs, Jessica R.; Cooper, Robert J.; Price, Steven J.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the relationships between environmental variables and wildlife activity is an important part of effective management. The desert tortoise (Gopherus agassizii), an imperiled species of arid environments in the southwest US, may have increasingly restricted windows for activity due to current warming trends. In summer 2013, we deployed 48 motion sensor cameras at the entrances of tortoise burrows to investigate the effects of temperature, sex, and day of the year on the activity of desert tortoises. Using generalized estimating equations, we found that the relative probability of activity was associated with temperature (linear and quadratic), sex, and day of the year. Sex effects showed that male tortoises are generally more active than female tortoises. Temperature had a quadratic effect, indicating that tortoise activity was heightened at a range of temperatures. In addition, we found significant support for interactions between sex and day of the year, and sex and temperature as predictors of the probability of activity. Using our models, we were able to estimate air temperatures and times (days and hours) that were associated with maximum activity during the study. Because tortoise activity is constrained by environmental conditions such as temperature, it is increasingly vital to conduct studies on how tortoises vary their activity throughout the Sonoran Desert to better understand the effects of a changing climate.

  19. Using motion-sensor camera technology to infer seasonal activity and thermal niche of the desert tortoise (Gopherus agassizii).

    PubMed

    Agha, Mickey; Augustine, Benjamin; Lovich, Jeffrey E; Delaney, David; Sinervo, Barry; Murphy, Mason O; Ennen, Joshua R; Briggs, Jessica R; Cooper, Robert; Price, Steven J

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the relationships between environmental variables and wildlife activity is an important part of effective management. The desert tortoise (Gopherus agassizii), an imperiled species of arid environments in the southwest US, may have increasingly restricted windows for activity due to current warming trends. In summer 2013, we deployed 48 motion sensor cameras at the entrances of tortoise burrows to investigate the effects of temperature, sex, and day of the year on the activity of desert tortoises. Using generalized estimating equations, we found that the relative probability of activity was associated with temperature (linear and quadratic), sex, and day of the year. Sex effects showed that male tortoises are generally more active than female tortoises. Temperature had a quadratic effect, indicating that tortoise activity was heightened at a range of temperatures. In addition, we found significant support for interactions between sex and day of the year, and sex and temperature as predictors of the probability of activity. Using our models, we were able to estimate air temperatures and times (days and hours) that were associated with maximum activity during the study. Because tortoise activity is constrained by environmental conditions such as temperature, it is increasingly vital to conduct studies on how tortoises vary their activity throughout the Sonoran Desert to better understand the effects of a changing climate.

  20. Fundamentals in generalized elasticity and dislocation theory of quasicrystals: Green tensor, dislocation key-formulas and dislocation loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazar, Markus; Agiasofitou, Eleni

    2014-12-01

    The present work provides fundamental quantities in generalized elasticity and dislocation theory of quasicrystals. In a clear and straightforward manner, the three-dimensional Green tensor of generalized elasticity theory and the extended displacement vector for an arbitrary extended force are derived. Next, in the framework of dislocation theory of quasicrystals, the solutions of the field equations for the extended displacement vector and the extended elastic distortion tensor are given; that is, the generalized Burgers equation for arbitrary sources and the generalized Mura-Willis formula, respectively. Moreover, important quantities of the theory of dislocations as the Eshelby stress tensor, Peach-Koehler force, stress function tensor and the interaction energy are derived for general dislocations. The application to dislocation loops gives rise to the generalized Burgers equation, where the displacement vector can be written as a sum of a line integral plus a purely geometric part. Finally, using the Green tensor, all other dislocation key-formulas for loops, known from the theory of anisotropic elasticity, like the Peach-Koehler stress formula, Mura-Willis equation, Volterra equation, stress function tensor and the interaction energy are derived for quasicrystals.

  1. Dislocations in a quantum crystal. Solid helium: A model and an exception

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balibar, Sébastien; Beamish, John; Fefferman, Andrew; Haziot, Ariel; Rojas, Xavier; Souris, Fabien

    2016-03-01

    Solid helium is paradoxical: it is both a model and an exception. It is a model for crystal properties mainly because of its extreme purity which makes universal phenomena simpler and easier to identify. It is also exceptional because the large quantum fluctuations of atoms around the nodes in their crystal lattice allow these phenomena to occur at very low temperature with a large amplitude. As noticed by Jacques Friedel in 2013, the properties of helium 4 crystals illustrate how the motion of dislocations may reduce their shear elastic modulus, as it does in all hexagonal close packed (hcp) crystals including metals. But this motion takes place without any dissipation in the limit of T = 0 and in the absence of impurities, which is now exceptional and leads to an elastic anomaly at low temperature, which was called "giant plasticity" by Haziot et al. in 2013. More recently, we have discovered that, in helium-4 crystals, helium-3 impurities are not necessarily fixed pinning centers for dislocations. Even at relatively large velocities, dislocations are able to move dressed with impurities somehow as a necklace of atomic pearls through the periodic lattice. This illustrates what is really quantum in these crystals: it is mainly the dynamics of their dislocations and the behavior of impurities. xml:lang="fr"

  2. Distributional and regularized radiation fields of non-uniformly moving straight dislocations, and elastodynamic Tamm problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazar, Markus; Pellegrini, Yves-Patrick

    2016-11-01

    This work introduces original explicit solutions for the elastic fields radiated by non-uniformly moving, straight, screw or edge dislocations in an isotropic medium, in the form of time-integral representations in which acceleration-dependent contributions are explicitly separated out. These solutions are obtained by applying an isotropic regularization procedure to distributional expressions of the elastodynamic fields built on the Green tensor of the Navier equation. The obtained regularized field expressions are singularity-free, and depend on the dislocation density rather than on the plastic eigenstrain. They cover non-uniform motion at arbitrary speeds, including faster-than-wave ones. A numerical method of computation is discussed, that rests on discretizing motion along an arbitrary path in the plane transverse to the dislocation, into a succession of time intervals of constant velocity vector over which time-integrated contributions can be obtained in closed form. As a simple illustration, it is applied to the elastodynamic equivalent of the Tamm problem, where fields induced by a dislocation accelerated from rest beyond the longitudinal wave speed, and thereafter put to rest again, are computed. As expected, the proposed expressions produce Mach cones, the dynamic build-up and decay of which is illustrated by means of full-field calculations.

  3. The Interaction of Dislocations and Radiation-Induced Obstacles at High-Strain Rate

    SciTech Connect

    Young, J A; Wirth, B D; Robach, J; Robertson, I

    2003-07-14

    Improved understanding of the plastic deformation of metals during high strain rate shock loading is key to predicting their resulting material properties. This paper presents the results of molecular dynamics simulations that identify the deformation modes of aluminum over a range of applied shear stresses and examines the interaction between dislocations and irradiation induced obstacles. These simulations show that while super-sonic dislocation motion can occur during impact loading, the finite dimensions of the materials render this motion transient. Larger applied loads do not stabilize supersonic dislocations, but instead lead an alternate deformation mode, namely twinning. Finally, the atomistic mechanisms that underlie the observed changes in the mechanical properties of metals as a function of irradiation are examined. Specifically, simulations of the interactions between moving edge dislocations and nanometer-sized helium bubbles provide insight into increases of the critical shear stresses but also reveal the effect of internal gas pressure on the deformation mode. The information gained in these studies provides fundamental insight into materials behavior, as well as important inputs for multi-scale models of materials deformation.

  4. The weight of computer mouse affects the wrist motion and forearm muscle activity during fast operation speed task.

    PubMed

    Chen, Han-Ming; Lee, Chang-Sian; Cheng, Chih-Hsiu

    2012-06-01

    The frequent use of the computer mouse was reported to be associated with the development of the musculoskeletal disorders in the wrist, forearm, and shoulder regions. This study was to examine the effect of the mouse weights and operation speeds on the wrist motion and muscle activity. 25 subjects (20 males and 5 females) were instructed to repetitively point-and-click the mouse between two targets displaced in the monitor with five different weighted mice (weights around 70, 100, 130, 160, and 190 g) at the fast (50 repetition/min) and slow (25 repetition/min) operation speeds. Surface electromyographic activity of the extensor carpi radialis, extensor carpi ulnaris, extensor digitorum, and upper trapezius muscles were recorded, and the electrogoniometer was used to register the wrist motions. The results showed that the maximal ulnar deviation was not significantly different among the examined conditions. The wrist movement range and the forearm muscle activities showed a V-shape tendency with the lowest value in the mouse weight of 130 g. This tendency was diminished during the slow speed tasks. The results suggested that the proper mouse weight could benefit the users in terms of increasing the movement efficiency and decreasing the muscular costs.

  5. Automated identification and indexing of dislocations in crystal interfaces

    DOE PAGES

    Stukowski, Alexander; Bulatov, Vasily V.; Arsenlis, Athanasios

    2012-10-31

    Here, we present a computational method for identifying partial and interfacial dislocations in atomistic models of crystals with defects. Our automated algorithm is based on a discrete Burgers circuit integral over the elastic displacement field and is not limited to specific lattices or dislocation types. Dislocations in grain boundaries and other interfaces are identified by mapping atomic bonds from the dislocated interface to an ideal template configuration of the coherent interface to reveal incompatible displacements induced by dislocations and to determine their Burgers vectors. Additionally, the algorithm generates a continuous line representation of each dislocation segment in the crystal andmore » also identifies dislocation junctions.« less

  6. Automated identification and indexing of dislocations in crystal interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Stukowski, Alexander; Bulatov, Vasily V.; Arsenlis, Athanasios

    2012-10-31

    Here, we present a computational method for identifying partial and interfacial dislocations in atomistic models of crystals with defects. Our automated algorithm is based on a discrete Burgers circuit integral over the elastic displacement field and is not limited to specific lattices or dislocation types. Dislocations in grain boundaries and other interfaces are identified by mapping atomic bonds from the dislocated interface to an ideal template configuration of the coherent interface to reveal incompatible displacements induced by dislocations and to determine their Burgers vectors. Additionally, the algorithm generates a continuous line representation of each dislocation segment in the crystal and also identifies dislocation junctions.

  7. Developmental Dislocation (Dysplasia) of the Hip (DDH)

    MedlinePlus

    ... developmental dysplasia (dislocation) of the hip (DDH), the hip joint has not formed normally. The ball is loose ... be taken to provide detailed pictures of the hip joint. Treatment When DDH is detected at birth, it ...

  8. Functional treatment of patellar dislocation in an athletic population.

    PubMed

    Garth, W P; Pomphrey, M; Merrill, K

    1996-01-01

    Fifty-eight athletically active study participants with 69 knees that had experienced patellar dislocations were available for followup after being selected for a functional rehabilitation program without antecedent immobilization. Follow-up evaluation was at a minimum of 24 months after onset of treatment and averaged 46.2 months. Good or excellent results occurred in 39 (66%) knees treated after an initial patellar dislocation and in 15 (50%) knees with a chronic history of patellar instability. Twenty-six percent of the 69 knees had experienced recurrent patellar instability at followup. Overall, 42 patients (73%) were satisfied with their knees after this nonsurgical management. Anatomic predisposition and onset of bilateral instability at an early age were found to be significant factors associated with a less favorable outcome.

  9. Dislocation dynamics simulations of interactions between gliding dislocations and radiation induced prismatic loops in zirconium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drouet, Julie; Dupuy, Laurent; Onimus, Fabien; Mompiou, Frédéric; Perusin, Simon; Ambard, Antoine

    2014-06-01

    The mechanical behavior of Pressurized Water Reactor fuel cladding tubes made of zirconium alloys is strongly affected by neutron irradiation due to the high density of radiation induced dislocation loops. In order to investigate the interaction mechanisms between gliding dislocations and loops in zirconium, a new nodal dislocation dynamics code, adapted to Hexagonal Close Packed metals, has been used. Various configurations have been systematically computed considering different glide planes, basal or prismatic, and different characters, edge or screw, for gliding dislocations with -type Burgers vectors. Simulations show various interaction mechanisms such as (i) absorption of a loop on an edge dislocation leading to the formation of a double super-jog, (ii) creation of a helical turn, on a screw dislocation, that acts as a strong pinning point or (iii) sweeping of a loop by a gliding dislocation. It is shown that the clearing of loops is more favorable when the dislocation glides in the basal plane than in the prismatic plane explaining the easy dislocation channeling in the basal plane observed after neutron irradiation by transmission electron microscopy.

  10. Dislocation Content Measured Via 3D HR-EBSD Near a Grain Boundary in an AlCu Oligocrystal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruggles, Timothy; Hochhalter, Jacob; Homer, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Interactions between dislocations and grain boundaries are poorly understood and crucial to mesoscale plasticity modeling. Much of our understanding of dislocation-grain boundary interaction comes from atomistic simulations and TEM studies, both of which are extremely limited in scale. High angular resolution EBSD-based continuum dislocation microscopy provides a way of measuring dislocation activity at length scales and accuracies relevant to crystal plasticity, but it is limited as a two-dimensional technique, meaning the character of the grain boundary and the complete dislocation activity is difficult to recover. However, the commercialization of plasma FIB dual-beam microscopes have made 3D EBSD studies all the more feasible. The objective of this work is to apply high angular resolution cross correlation EBSD to a 3D EBSD data set collected by serial sectioning in a FIB to characterize dislocation interaction with a grain boundary. Three dimensional high angular resolution cross correlation EBSD analysis was applied to an AlCu oligocrystal to measure dislocation densities around a grain boundary. Distortion derivatives associated with the plasma FIB serial sectioning were higher than expected, possibly due to geometric uncertainty between layers. Future work will focus on mitigating the geometric uncertainty and examining more regions of interest along the grain boundary to glean information on dislocation-grain boundary interaction.

  11. Atomistic modeling of dislocation-interface interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jian; Valone, Steven M; Beyerlein, Irene J; Misra, Amit; Germann, T. C.

    2011-01-31

    Using atomic scale models and interface defect theory, we first classify interface structures into a few types with respect to geometrical factors, then study the interfacial shear response and further simulate the dislocation-interface interactions using molecular dynamics. The results show that the atomic scale structural characteristics of both heterophases and homophases interfaces play a crucial role in (i) their mechanical responses and (ii) the ability of incoming lattice dislocations to transmit across them.

  12. Dislocation shielding of a cohesive crack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhandakkar, Tanmay K.; Chng, Audrey C.; Curtin, W. A.; Gao, Huajian

    2010-04-01

    Dislocation interaction with a cohesive crack is of increasing importance to computational modelling of crack nucleation/growth and related toughening mechanisms in confined structures and under cyclic fatigue conditions. Here, dislocation shielding of a Dugdale cohesive crack described by a rectangular traction-separation law is studied. The shielding is completely characterized by three non-dimensional parameters representing the effective fracture toughness, the cohesive strength, and the distance between the dislocations and the crack tip. A closed form analytical solution shows that, while the classical singular crack model predicts that a dislocation can shield or anti-shield a crack depending on the sign of its Burgers vector, at low cohesive strengths a dislocation always shields the cohesive crack irrespective of the Burgers vector. A numerical study shows the transition in shielding from the classical solution of Lin and Thomson (1986) in the high strength limit to the solution in the low strength limit. An asymptotic analysis yields an approximate analytical model for the shielding over the full range of cohesive strengths. A discrete dislocation (DD) simulation of a large (>10 3) number of edge dislocations interacting with a cohesive crack described by a trapezoidal traction-separation law confirms the transition in shielding, showing that the cohesive crack does behave like a singular crack at very high cohesive strengths (˜7 GPa), but that significant deviations in shielding between singular and cohesive crack predictions arise at cohesive strengths around 1GPa, consistent with the analytic models. Both analytical and numerical studies indicate that an appropriate crack tip model is essential for accurately quantifying dislocation shielding for cohesive strengths in the GPa range.

  13. Congenital Dislocation of the Hip

    PubMed Central

    Specht, Elmer E.

    1976-01-01

    Congenital dislocation or subluxation of the hip (congenital acetabular dysplasia) is a complete or partial displacement of the femoral head out of the acetabulum. The physical signs essential for diagnosis are age related. In newborns the tests for instability are the most sensitive. After the neonatal period, and until the age of walking, tightness of the adductor muscles is the most reliable sign. Early diagnosis is vital for successful treatment of this partially genetically determined condition. Various therapeutic measures, ranging from abduction splinting to open reduction and osteotomy, may be required. Following diagnosis in the first month of life, the average treatment time in one recent series was only 2.3 months from initiation of therapy to attainment of a normal hip. When the diagnosis was not made until 3 to 6 months of age, ten months of treatment was required to achieve the same outcome. When the diagnosis is not made, or the treatment is not begun until after the age of 6, a normal hip will probably not develop in any patient. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4.Figure 5.Figure 6.Figure 7.Figure 8.Figure 9. PMID:1251603

  14. Reconstruction of active regular motion in amoeba extract: dynamic cooperation between sol and gel states.

    PubMed

    Nishigami, Yukinori; Ichikawa, Masatoshi; Kazama, Toshiya; Kobayashi, Ryo; Shimmen, Teruo; Yoshikawa, Kenichi; Sonobe, Seiji

    2013-01-01

    Amoeboid locomotion is one of the typical modes of biological cell migration. Cytoplasmic sol-gel conversion of an actomyosin system is thought to play an important role in locomotion. However, the mechanisms underlying sol-gel conversion, including trigger, signal, and regulating factors, remain unclear. We developed a novel model system in which an actomyosin fraction moves like an amoeba in a cytoplasmic extract. Rheological study of this model system revealed that the actomyosin fraction exhibits shear banding: the sol-gel state of actomyosin can be regulated by shear rate or mechanical force. Furthermore, study of the living cell indicated that the shear-banding property also causes sol-gel conversion with the same order of magnitude as that of shear rate. Our results suggest that the inherent sol-gel transition property plays an essential role in the self-regulation of autonomous translational motion in amoeba.

  15. Reconstruction of Active Regular Motion in Amoeba Extract: Dynamic Cooperation between Sol and Gel States

    PubMed Central

    Kazama, Toshiya; Kobayashi, Ryo; Shimmen, Teruo; Yoshikawa, Kenichi; Sonobe, Seiji

    2013-01-01

    Amoeboid locomotion is one of the typical modes of biological cell migration. Cytoplasmic sol–gel conversion of an actomyosin system is thought to play an important role in locomotion. However, the mechanisms underlying sol–gel conversion, including trigger, signal, and regulating factors, remain unclear. We developed a novel model system in which an actomyosin fraction moves like an amoeba in a cytoplasmic extract. Rheological study of this model system revealed that the actomyosin fraction exhibits shear banding: the sol–gel state of actomyosin can be regulated by shear rate or mechanical force. Furthermore, study of the living cell indicated that the shear-banding property also causes sol–gel conversion with the same order of magnitude as that of shear rate. Our results suggest that the inherent sol–gel transition property plays an essential role in the self-regulation of autonomous translational motion in amoeba. PMID:23940560

  16. Chronic Knee Dislocation After Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Ross, John P; Brown, Nicholas M; Levine, Brett R

    2015-12-01

    Knee dislocation after total knee arthroplasty (TKA), although rare, is a dangerous injury that can lead to neurovascular compromise and permanent disability. Chronic dislocation after TKA is even less common and is defined as dislocation that is present for 4 weeks or more. There are few reports of its management. Chronic dislocation may be complicated further by concomitant extensor mechanism disruption, ligamentous instability, and/or capsular contracture. This article describes 3 cases of chronically dislocated TKAs and the challenges encountered in treating this difficult problem. A higher level of constraint was required to maintain knee stability, and an extensor mechanism allograft was needed in 2 of the 3 reported patients. The preferred technique at the authors' institution is a complete allograft composite, tensioned in full extension. In the setting of a chronically dislocated TKA, the authors now recommend revision surgery with an enhanced measure of constraint (constrained condylar device or hinged knee prosthesis), reconstruction of the extensor mechanism when necessary, and restoration of the joint while compensating for concomitant bony defects. Even when surgeons follow these principles, it is important to inform the patient that long-term outcomes will likely be inferior to those of revision surgery for other causes.

  17. Investigation of the Dynamics of a Screw Dislocation in Copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolupaeva, S. N.; Petelina, Yu. P.; Polosukhin, K. A.; Petelin, A. E.

    2015-08-01

    A modification of the mathematical model of forming the crystallographic shear band is proposed in which the strength of elastic interaction between all dislocations of the forming dislocation pileups is taken into account in addition to the Peach-Keller force; lattice, impurity, and dislocation friction; linear tension; viscous braking; and intensity of generation of point defects behind kinks. The model is used to investigate the influence of the dislocation density on the time characteristics of the formation of dislocation loops in copper.

  18. Surgical treatment for irreducible pediatric subaxial cervical unilateral facet dislocation: case report.

    PubMed

    Qu, Wei; Hao, Dingjun; Wu, Qining; Song, Zongrang; Liu, Jijun

    2016-05-01

    Unilateral facet dislocation at the subaxial cervical spine (C3-7) in children younger than 8 years of age is rare. The authors describe a surgical approach for irreducible subaxial cervical unilateral facet dislocation (SCUFD) at C3-4 in a 5-year-old boy and present a literature review. A dorsal unilateral approach was applied, and a biodegradable plate was used for postreduction fixation without fusion after failed conservative treatment. There was complete resolution of symptoms and restored cervical stability. Two years after surgery, the patient had recovered range of motion in C3-4. In selected cases of cervical spine injury in young children, a biodegradable plate can maintain reduction until healing occurs, obviate the need to remove an implant, and recover the motion of the injured segment. PMID:26722755

  19. The effects of lower extremity muscle activation and passive range of motion on single leg squat performance.

    PubMed

    Mauntel, Timothy C; Begalle, Rebecca L; Cram, Tyler R; Frank, Barnett S; Hirth, Christopher J; Blackburn, Troy; Padua, Darin A

    2013-07-01

    Knee valgus is a potential risk factor for lower extremity (LE) injuries. Clinical movement screenings and passive range of motion (PROM) measurements may help identify neuromuscular patterns, which contribute to knee valgus. The purpose of this study was to compare LE muscle activation and PROM between subjects who display visual medial knee displacement (MKD) during a single leg squat (SLS) and those who do not. We hypothesized that muscular activation and PROM would differ between the groups. Forty physically active adults (20 controls, 20 MKDs) participated in this study. Subjects completed 10 LE PROM assessments and performed 5 SLS trials while electromyography (EMG) data were collected from 8 LE muscles. Three separate multivariate analysis of variance were used to identify group differences in EMG data, muscle coactivation, and PROM. Results during the SLS indicated hip coactivation ratios revealed smaller gluteus medius to hip adductor (GMed:Hip Add) (p = 0.028) and gluteus maximus to hip adductor (GMax:Hip Add) coactivation ratios (p = 0.007) compared with the control group. Also, the MKD group displayed significantly less passive ankle dorsiflexion with the knee extended (p = 0.047) and flexed (p = 0.034), and greater talar glide motion (p = 0.012). The findings of this study indicate that MKD during a SLS seems to be influenced by decreased coactivation of the gluteal to the hip adductor muscles and restricted dorsiflexion. Therefore, conditioning, rehabilitation, and injury prevention programs should focus on decreasing hip adductor activity, increasing hip abductor and external rotator activity, and increasing ankle dorsiflexion in hopes to decrease the incidence of these injuries. PMID:23096063

  20. Complexity reduction in the H.264/AVC using highly adaptive fast mode decision based on macroblock motion activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdellah, Skoudarli; Mokhtar, Nibouche; Amina, Serir

    2015-11-01

    The H.264/AVC video coding standard is used in a wide range of applications from video conferencing to high-definition television according to its high compression efficiency. This efficiency is mainly acquired from the newly allowed prediction schemes including variable block modes. However, these schemes require a high complexity to select the optimal mode. Consequently, complexity reduction in the H.264/AVC encoder has recently become a very challenging task in the video compression domain, especially when implementing the encoder in real-time applications. Fast mode decision algorithms play an important role in reducing the overall complexity of the encoder. In this paper, we propose an adaptive fast intermode algorithm based on motion activity, temporal stationarity, and spatial homogeneity. This algorithm predicts the motion activity of the current macroblock from its neighboring blocks and identifies temporal stationary regions and spatially homogeneous regions using adaptive threshold values based on content video features. Extensive experimental work has been done in high profile, and results show that the proposed source-coding algorithm effectively reduces the computational complexity by 53.18% on average compared with the reference software encoder, while maintaining the high-coding efficiency of H.264/AVC by incurring only 0.097 dB in total peak signal-to-noise ratio and 0.228% increment on the total bit rate.

  1. A Statistical Analysis of Activity-Based and Traditional Introductory Algebra Physics Using the Force and Motion Conceptual Evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trecia Markes, Cecelia

    2006-03-01

    With a three-year FIPSE grant, it has been possible at the University of Nebraska at Kearney (UNK) to develop and implement activity- based introductory physics at the algebra level. It has generally been recognized that students enter physics classes with misconceptions about motion and force. Many of these misconceptions persist after instruction. Pretest and posttest responses on the ``Force and Motion Conceptual Evaluation'' (FMCE) are analyzed to determine the effectiveness of the activity- based method of instruction relative to the traditional (lecture/lab) method of instruction. Data were analyzed to determine the following: student understanding at the beginning of the course, student understanding at the end of the course, how student understanding is related to the type of class taken, student understanding based on gender and type of class. Some of the tests used are the t-test, the chi-squared test, and analysis of variance. The results of these tests will be presented, and their implications will be discussed.

  2. Topological modes bound to lattice dislocations in mechanical metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulose, Jayson; Chen, Bryan; Vitelli, Vincenzo

    2015-03-01

    The mechanical rigidity of frameworks - nodes connected by springs or rigid bars - underlies the structural integrity of bridges, the response of granular materials, and the design of metamaterials with unusual mechanical properties. A fundamental question governing rigidity is the existence of mechanisms: motions that do not significantly stretch or compress the constituent elements of the structure. We demonstrate a novel way to introduce approximate mechanisms at desired locations in a metamaterial, by exploiting the properties of a recently introduced class of topological metamaterials. These are special periodic frameworks which exhibit localized edge modes, analogous to the electronic edge states of topological insulators. We show that dislocations in such metamaterials are associated with soft modes of topological origin. The existence of the modes is determined by the interplay between two Berry phases - the Burgers vector of the dislocation and a topological ``polarization'' characterizing the underlying lattice. Simple prototypes built out of triangular plates joined by hinges provide a visual demonstration of these modes. Supported by FOM and D-ITP.

  3. Motion mitigation for lung cancer patients treated with active scanning proton therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Grassberger, Clemens; Dowdell, Stephen; Sharp, Greg; Paganetti, Harald

    2015-05-15

    Purpose: Motion interplay can affect the tumor dose in scanned proton beam therapy. This study assesses the ability of rescanning and gating to mitigate interplay effects during lung treatments. Methods: The treatments of five lung cancer patients [48 Gy(RBE)/4fx] with varying tumor size (21.1–82.3 cm{sup 3}) and motion amplitude (2.9–30.6 mm) were simulated employing 4D Monte Carlo. The authors investigated two spot sizes (σ ∼ 12 and ∼3 mm), three rescanning techniques (layered, volumetric, breath-sampled volumetric) and respiratory gating with a 30% duty cycle. Results: For 4/5 patients, layered rescanning 6/2 times (for the small/large spot size) maintains equivalent uniform dose within the target >98% for a single fraction. Breath sampling the timing of rescanning is ∼2 times more effective than the same number of continuous rescans. Volumetric rescanning is sensitive to synchronization effects, which was observed in 3/5 patients, though not for layered rescanning. For the large spot size, rescanning compared favorably with gating in terms of time requirements, i.e., 2x-rescanning is on average a factor ∼2.6 faster than gating for this scenario. For the small spot size however, 6x-rescanning takes on average 65% longer compared to gating. Rescanning has no effect on normal lung V{sub 20} and mean lung dose (MLD), though it reduces the maximum lung dose by on average 6.9 ± 2.4/16.7 ± 12.2 Gy(RBE) for the large and small spot sizes, respectively. Gating leads to a similar reduction in maximum dose and additionally reduces V{sub 20} and MLD. Breath-sampled rescanning is most successful in reducing the maximum dose to the normal lung. Conclusions: Both rescanning (2–6 times, depending on the beam size) as well as gating was able to mitigate interplay effects in the target for 4/5 patients studied. Layered rescanning is superior to volumetric rescanning, as the latter suffers from synchronization effects in 3/5 patients studied. Gating minimizes the

  4. Motion mitigation for lung cancer patients treated with active scanning proton therapy

    PubMed Central

    Grassberger, Clemens; Dowdell, Stephen; Sharp, Greg; Paganetti, Harald

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Motion interplay can affect the tumor dose in scanned proton beam therapy. This study assesses the ability of rescanning and gating to mitigate interplay effects during lung treatments. Methods: The treatments of five lung cancer patients [48 Gy(RBE)/4fx] with varying tumor size (21.1–82.3 cm3) and motion amplitude (2.9–30.6 mm) were simulated employing 4D Monte Carlo. The authors investigated two spot sizes (σ ∼ 12 and ∼3 mm), three rescanning techniques (layered, volumetric, breath-sampled volumetric) and respiratory gating with a 30% duty cycle. Results: For 4/5 patients, layered rescanning 6/2 times (for the small/large spot size) maintains equivalent uniform dose within the target >98% for a single fraction. Breath sampling the timing of rescanning is ∼2 times more effective than the same number of continuous rescans. Volumetric rescanning is sensitive to synchronization effects, which was observed in 3/5 patients, though not for layered rescanning. For the large spot size, rescanning compared favorably with gating in terms of time requirements, i.e., 2x-rescanning is on average a factor ∼2.6 faster than gating for this scenario. For the small spot size however, 6x-rescanning takes on average 65% longer compared to gating. Rescanning has no effect on normal lung V20 and mean lung dose (MLD), though it reduces the maximum lung dose by on average 6.9 ± 2.4/16.7 ± 12.2 Gy(RBE) for the large and small spot sizes, respectively. Gating leads to a similar reduction in maximum dose and additionally reduces V20 and MLD. Breath-sampled rescanning is most successful in reducing the maximum dose to the normal lung. Conclusions: Both rescanning (2–6 times, depending on the beam size) as well as gating was able to mitigate interplay effects in the target for 4/5 patients studied. Layered rescanning is superior to volumetric rescanning, as the latter suffers from synchronization effects in 3/5 patients studied. Gating minimizes the irradiated volume

  5. Dislocations and Plasticity in bcc Transition Metals at High Pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, L H; Tang, M; Moriarty, J A

    2009-01-23

    Using first-principles electronic structure calculations, quantum-based atomistic simulations and atomistically informed dislocation dynamics (DD) simulations, we have studied individual dislocation behavior and the multiscale modeling of single-crystal plasticity in the prototype bcc transition metals Ta, Mo and V under both ambient and high pressure conditions. The primary focus in this work is on the pressure-dependent structure, mobility and interaction of a/2<111> screw dislocations, which dominate the plastic deformation properties of these materials. At the electronic scale, first-principles calculations of elasticity, ideal strength and generalized stacking fault energy surfaces have been used to validate quantum-based multi-ion interatomic potentials. At the atomistic scale, these potentials have been used in flexible Green's function boundary condition simulations to study the core structure, Peierls stress {tau}{sub P}, thermally activated kink-pair formation and mobility below {tau}{sub P}, and phonon-drag mobility above {tau}{sub P}. These results have then been distilled into analytic velocity laws and used directly in predictive microscale DD simulations of flow stress and resolved yield stress over wide ranges of pressure, temperature and strain rate.

  6. Block-like motion of Tibetan Plateau: Evidences from active faults , GPS velocities and recent earthquake slips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, X.; Cheng, J.

    2012-12-01

    continuous models have been proposed to explain GPS observations in many active regions. Here we first describe a division of active blocks in the Tibetan plateau and its adjacent regions in detail from recently published and unpublished maps showing distribution of active faults, discuss basic features of boundary faults around the blocks, block-like motions and their interior deformation patterns in the Quaternary. Then we examine present-day vectors and mechanical parameters of the active blocks both from the GPS observations and recent earthquake slips. All these analyses demonstrate that the block-like motion prevail in the Tibetan Plateau.

  7. Toying with Motion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galus, Pamela J.

    2002-01-01

    Presents a variety of activities that support the development of an understanding of Newton's laws of motion. Activities use toy cars, mobile roads, and a seat-of-nails. Includes a scoring rubric. (DDR)

  8. Application of Hyperelastic-based Active Mesh Model in Cardiac Motion Recovery.

    PubMed

    Yousefi-Banaem, Hossein; Kermani, Saeed; Daneshmehr, Alireza; Saneie, Hamid

    2016-01-01

    Considering the nonlinear hyperelastic or viscoelastic nature of soft tissues has an important effect on modeling results. In medical applications, accounting nonlinearity begets an ill posed problem, due to absence of external force. Myocardium can be considered as a hyperelastic material, and variational approaches are proposed to estimate stiffness matrix, which take into account the linear and nonlinear properties of myocardium. By displacement estimation of some points in the four-dimensional cardiac magnetic resonance imaging series, using a similarity criterion, the elementary deformations are estimated, then using the Moore-Penrose inverse matrix approach, all point deformations are obtained. Using this process, the cardiac wall motion is quantized to mechanically determine local parameters to investigate the cardiac wall functionality. This process was implemented and tested over 10 healthy and 20 patients with myocardial infarction. In all patients, the process was able to precisely determine the affected region. The proposed approach was also compared with linear one and the results demonstrated its superiority respect to the linear model. PMID:27563570

  9. Active Flow Control of the Near Wake of an Axisymmetric Body in Prescribed Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambert, Thomas; Vukasinovic, Bojan; Glezer, Ari

    2014-11-01

    Controlled interactions between fluidic actuators and the cross flow over the aft end of a wire-mounted axisymmetric moving wind tunnel bluff body model are exploited for modification of its near wake and thereby its global unsteady aerodynamic loads. The model is supported by eight servo-controlled wires, each including a miniature inline force transducer for measurements of the time-resolved tension. The body moves along a prescribed trajectory controllable in six degrees of freedom using closed loop feedback from an external camera system. Actuation is effected by an integrated azimuthally-segmented array of four aft-facing synthetic jet modules around the perimeter of the tail end. In the present investigations, the aerodynamic loads are controlled during time-periodic axial and rotational motions with varying reduced frequencies of up to 0.259. It is shown that this flow control approach modifies the near wake and induces aerodynamic loads that are comparable to the baseline model dynamic loads. Control of the model's unsteady aerodynamic characteristics may be adopted for in flight stabilization.

  10. Application of Hyperelastic-based Active Mesh Model in Cardiac Motion Recovery

    PubMed Central

    Yousefi-Banaem, Hossein; Kermani, Saeed; Daneshmehr, Alireza; Saneie, Hamid

    2016-01-01

    Considering the nonlinear hyperelastic or viscoelastic nature of soft tissues has an important effect on modeling results. In medical applications, accounting nonlinearity begets an ill posed problem, due to absence of external force. Myocardium can be considered as a hyperelastic material, and variational approaches are proposed to estimate stiffness matrix, which take into account the linear and nonlinear properties of myocardium. By displacement estimation of some points in the four-dimensional cardiac magnetic resonance imaging series, using a similarity criterion, the elementary deformations are estimated, then using the Moore–Penrose inverse matrix approach, all point deformations are obtained. Using this process, the cardiac wall motion is quantized to mechanically determine local parameters to investigate the cardiac wall functionality. This process was implemented and tested over 10 healthy and 20 patients with myocardial infarction. In all patients, the process was able to precisely determine the affected region. The proposed approach was also compared with linear one and the results demonstrated its superiority respect to the linear model. PMID:27563570

  11. Myocardial metabolism, perfusion, wall motion and electrical activity in Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Perloff, J.K.; Henze, E.; Schelbert, H.R.

    1982-01-01

    The cardiomyopathy of Duchenne's muscular dystrophy originates in the posterobasal left ventricle and extends chiefly to the contiguous lateral wall. Ultrastructural abnormalities in these regions precede connective tissue replacement. We postulated that a metabolic fault coincided with or antedated the subcellular abnormality. Accordingly, regional left ventricular metabolism, perfusion and wall motion were studied using positron computed tomography and metabolic isotopes supplemented by thallium perfusion scans, equilibrium radionuclide angiography and M-mode and two-dimensional echocardiography. To complete the assessment, electrocardiograms, vectorcardiograms, 24 hour taped electrocardiograms and chest x-rays were analyzed. Positron computed tomography utilizing F-18 2-fluoro 2-deoxyglucose (FDG) provided the first conclusive evidence supporting the hypothesis of a premorphologic regional metabolic fault. Thus, cardiac involvement in duchenne dystrophy emerges as a unique form of heart disease, genetically targeting specific regions of ventricular myocardium for initial metabolic and subcellular changes. Reported ultrastructural abnormalities of the impulse and conduction systems provide, at least in part, a basis for the clinically observed sinus node, intraatrial, internodal, AV nodal and infranodal disorders.

  12. Using structure-from-motion for monitoring active lava flows and domes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Mike R.; Robson, Stuart; Varley, Nick

    2016-04-01

    3-D reconstruction software based on structure-from-motion (SfM) algorithms can substantially reduce the requirements and learning curve for generating topographic data from photographs, and thus offers strong potential for data collection in many dynamic environments. Unfortunately, SfM-based software tends not to provide the rigorous metrics that are used to assess the quality of results in conventional photogrammetry software. Here, we use examples of repeat oblique airborne acquisitions from a volcanic dome (Volcán de Colima, Mexico) and terrestrial time-lapse stereo-photography (Mt. Etna, Sicily) to examine the sensitivity of results to imaging characteristics and SfM processing procedures. At Volcán de Colima, photographs were acquired with a relatively favourable convergent geometry, from an opened window in a light aircraft. However, hazards prevent the deployment of ground control, so the derived topographic shape relies entirely on the image tie points generated automatically by the software. In contrast, at Mt. Etna, control targets could be used but, with only two (mildly convergent) cameras, the image geometry is naturally weaker that at Colima. We use both of these cases to explore some of the challenges involved with understanding the error inherent in projects processed using SfM-based approaches. Results are compared with those achieved using a rigorous close-range photogrammetry package.

  13. Novel Cross-Slip Mechanism of Pyramidal Screw Dislocations in Magnesium.

    PubMed

    Itakura, Mitsuhiro; Kaburaki, Hideo; Yamaguchi, Masatake; Tsuru, Tomohito

    2016-06-01

    Compared to cubic metals, whose primary slip mode includes twelve equivalent systems, the lower crystalline symmetry of hexagonal close-packed metals results in a reduced number of equivalent primary slips and anisotropy in plasticity, leading to brittleness at the ambient temperature. At higher temperatures, the ductility of hexagonal close-packed metals improves owing to the activation of secondary ⟨c+a⟩ pyramidal slip systems. Thus, understanding the fundamental properties of corresponding dislocations is essential for the improvement of ductility at the ambient temperature. Here, we present the results of large-scale ab initio calculations for ⟨c+a⟩ pyramidal screw dislocations in magnesium and show that their slip behavior is a stark counterexample to the conventional wisdom that a slip plane is determined by the stacking fault plane of dislocations. A stacking fault between dissociated partial dislocations can assume a nonplanar shape with a negligible energy cost and can migrate normal to its plane by a local shuffling of atoms. Partial dislocations dissociated on a {21[over ¯]1[over ¯]2} plane "slither" in the {011[over ¯]1} plane, dragging the stacking fault with them in response to an applied shear stress. This finding resolves the apparent discrepancy that both {21[over ¯]1[over ¯]2} and {011[over ¯]1} slip traces are observed in experiments while ab initio calculations indicate that dislocations preferably dissociate in the {21[over ¯]1[over ¯]2} planes. PMID:27314728

  14. Transmission electron microscope study of dislocations in orthopyroxene (Mg, Fe)2Si2O6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Duysen, J. C.; Doukhan, N.; Doukhan, J. C.

    1985-02-01

    The orthopyroxene crystal structure can be viewed as the stacking of alternating tetrahedral and octahedral layers parallel to the (100) plane. Easy glide occurs in the (100) plane at the level of the octahedral layer to prevent breakage of the strong Si-O bonds. Dislocations with c and b Burgers vectors have been activated in (100) by room temperature indentation in an orthoenstatite gem quality single crystal. Investigations in transmission electron microscopy show that the b dislocations ( b≃9 Å) are not dissociated while the c's ( c=5.24 Å) are dissociated into four partials. This result is interpreted by considering the oxygen sublattice as a distorted FCC one. The four c partials are thus Shockley partials bounding three stacking faults. For the two outer ones, synchroshear of the cations is necessary to keep unchanged their sixfold coordination; the oxygen sublattice is locally transformed into a HCP lattice. This accounts for the observed low splitting (≃100 Å) of these faults as compared to the median one (≃500 Å) which does not affect the oxygen sublattice and does not require cation synchroshear. In a Fe rich orthopyroxene (eulite), semi coherent exsolution lamellae have been studied. Either only c edge dislocations or both b and c edge dislocations occur in the phase boundaries depending upon the thickness of the lamellae. Only the c dislocations are dissociated. From the observed spacing between these mismatch dislocations a crude estimate of the exsolution temperature is proposed T ex ≃ 700° C.

  15. Novel Cross-Slip Mechanism of Pyramidal Screw Dislocations in Magnesium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itakura, Mitsuhiro; Kaburaki, Hideo; Yamaguchi, Masatake; Tsuru, Tomohito

    2016-06-01

    Compared to cubic metals, whose primary slip mode includes twelve equivalent systems, the lower crystalline symmetry of hexagonal close-packed metals results in a reduced number of equivalent primary slips and anisotropy in plasticity, leading to brittleness at the ambient temperature. At higher temperatures, the ductility of hexagonal close-packed metals improves owing to the activation of secondary ⟨c +a ⟩ pyramidal slip systems. Thus, understanding the fundamental properties of corresponding dislocations is essential for the improvement of ductility at the ambient temperature. Here, we present the results of large-scale ab initio calculations for ⟨c +a ⟩ pyramidal screw dislocations in magnesium and show that their slip behavior is a stark counterexample to the conventional wisdom that a slip plane is determined by the stacking fault plane of dislocations. A stacking fault between dissociated partial dislocations can assume a nonplanar shape with a negligible energy cost and can migrate normal to its plane by a local shuffling of atoms. Partial dislocations dissociated on a {2 1 ¯ 1 ¯ 2 } plane "slither" in the {01 1 ¯1 } plane, dragging the stacking fault with them in response to an applied shear stress. This finding resolves the apparent discrepancy that both {2 1 ¯1 ¯2 } and {01 1 ¯1 } slip traces are observed in experiments while ab initio calculations indicate that dislocations preferably dissociate in the {2 1 ¯1 ¯2 } planes.

  16. Modeling and classifying human activities from trajectories using a class of space-varying parametric motion fields.

    PubMed

    Nascimento, Jacinto C; Marques, Jorge S; Lemos, João M

    2013-05-01

    Many approaches to trajectory analysis, such as clustering or classification, use probabilistic generative models, thus not requiring trajectory alignment/registration. Switched linear dynamical models (e.g., HMMs) have been used in this context, due to their ability to describe different motion regimes. However, these models are not suitable for handling space-dependent dynamics that are more naturally captured by nonlinear models. As is well known, these are more difficult to identify. In this paper, we propose a new way of modeling trajectories, based on a mixture of parametric motion vector fields that depend on a small number of parameters. Switching among these fields follows a probabilistic mechanism, characterized by a field of stochastic matrices. This approach allows representing a wide variety of trajectories and modeling space-dependent behaviors without using global nonlinear dynamical models. Experimental evaluation is conducted in both synthetic and real scenarios. The latter concerning with human trajectory modeling for activity classification, a central task in video surveillance.

  17. Three-dimensional motion estimation using genetic algorithms from image sequence in an active stereo vision system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dipanda, Albert; Ajot, Jerome; Woo, Sanghyuk

    2003-06-01

    This paper proposes a method for estimating 3D rigid motion parameters from an image sequence of a moving object. The 3D surface measurement is achieved using an active stereovision system composed of a camera and a light projector, which illuminates objects to be analyzed by a pyramid-shaped laser beam. By associating the laser rays and the spots in the 2D image, the 3D points corresponding to these spots are reconstructed. Each image of the sequence provides a set of 3D points, which is modeled by a B-spline surface. Therefore, estimating the motion between two images of the sequence boils down to matching two B-spline surfaces. We consider the matching environment as an optimization problem and find the optimal solution using Genetic Algorithms. A chromosome is encoded by concatenating six binary coded parameters, the three angles of rotation and the x-axis, y-axis and z-axis translations. We have defined an original fitness function to calculate the similarity measure between two surfaces. The matching process is performed iteratively: the number of points to be matched grows as the process advances and results are refined until convergence. Experimental results with a real image sequence are presented to show the effectiveness of the method.

  18. Modeling and classifying human activities from trajectories using a class of space-varying parametric motion fields.

    PubMed

    Nascimento, Jacinto C; Marques, Jorge S; Lemos, João M

    2013-05-01

    Many approaches to trajectory analysis, such as clustering or classification, use probabilistic generative models, thus not requiring trajectory alignment/registration. Switched linear dynamical models (e.g., HMMs) have been used in this context, due to their ability to describe different motion regimes. However, these models are not suitable for handling space-dependent dynamics that are more naturally captured by nonlinear models. As is well known, these are more difficult to identify. In this paper, we propose a new way of modeling trajectories, based on a mixture of parametric motion vector fields that depend on a small number of parameters. Switching among these fields follows a probabilistic mechanism, characterized by a field of stochastic matrices. This approach allows representing a wide variety of trajectories and modeling space-dependent behaviors without using global nonlinear dynamical models. Experimental evaluation is conducted in both synthetic and real scenarios. The latter concerning with human trajectory modeling for activity classification, a central task in video surveillance. PMID:23380856

  19. A one year long continuous record of seismic activity and surface motion at the tongue of Rhonegletscher (Valais, Switzerland)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalban Canassy, Pierre; Röösli, Claudia; Walter, Fabian; Gabbi, Jeannette

    2014-05-01

    A critical gap in our current understanding of glaciers is how high sub-glacial water pressure controls the coupling of the glacier to its bed. Processes at the base of a glacier are inherently difficult to investigate due to their remoteness. Investigation of the sub-glacial environment with passive seismic methods is an innovative, rapidly growing interdisciplinary and promising endeavor. In combination with observations of surface motion and basal water pressure, this method is ideally suited to localize and quantify frictional and fracture processes which occur during periods of rapidly changing sub-glacial water pressure with consequent stress redistribution at the contact interface between ice and bed. Here we present the results of the first one-year-long glacier seismic monitoring performed on an Alpine glacier to our knowledge. Together with records of surface motion and hydrological measurements, we examine whether seasonal changes can be captured by seismic recording. Experiments were carried out from June 2012 to July 2013 on Rhonegletscher (Valais, Switzerland), by means of 3 three-components seismometers settled close to the tongue in 2 meters boreholes. An additional array of eleven sensors installed at the ice surface was also maintained during September 2012, in order to achieve more accurate icequakes locations. A high seismic emission is observed on Rhonegletscher, with icequakes located close to the surface or in the vicinity of the bedrock. The temporal distribution of seismic activity is shown to nicely reflect the seasonal evolution of the glacier hydrology, with a dramatic seismic release in early spring. During summer, released seismic activity is generally driven by diurnal ice/snow melting cycle. In winter, snow-cover conditions are associated with a reduced seismic release, with nevertheless some unexpected activity possibly related to snow-pack metamorphism. Based on icequake locations derived from data recorded in September, we discuss

  20. Motion-related artefacts in EEG predict neuronally plausible patterns of activation in fMRI data

    PubMed Central

    Jansen, Marije; White, Thomas P.; Mullinger, Karen J.; Liddle, Elizabeth B.; Gowland, Penny A.; Francis, Susan T.; Bowtell, Richard; Liddle, Peter F.

    2012-01-01

    The simultaneous acquisition and subsequent analysis of EEG and fMRI data is challenging owing to increased noise levels in the EEG data. A common method to integrate data from these two modalities is to use aspects of the EEG data, such as the amplitudes of event-related potentials (ERP) or oscillatory EEG activity, to predict fluctuations in the fMRI data. However, this relies on the acquisition of high quality datasets to ensure that only the correlates of neuronal activity are being studied. In this study, we investigate the effects of head-motion-related artefacts in the EEG signal on the predicted T2*-weighted signal variation. We apply our analyses to two independent datasets: 1) four participants were asked to move their feet in the scanner to generate small head movements, and 2) four participants performed an episodic memory task. We created T2*-weighted signal predictors from indicators of abrupt head motion using derivatives of the realignment parameters, from visually detected artefacts in the EEG as well as from three EEG frequency bands (theta, alpha and beta). In both datasets, we found little correlation between the T2*-weighted signal and EEG predictors that were not convolved with the canonical haemodynamic response function (cHRF). However, all convolved EEG predictors strongly correlated with the T2*-weighted signal variation in various regions including the bilateral superior temporal cortex, supplementary motor area, medial parietal cortex and cerebellum. The finding that movement onset spikes in the EEG predict T2*-weighted signal intensity only when the time course of movements is convolved with the cHRF, suggests that the correlated signal might reflect a BOLD response to neural activity associated with head movement. Furthermore, the observation that broad-spectral EEG spikes tend to occur at the same time as abrupt head movements, together with the finding that abrupt movements and EEG spikes show similar correlations with the T2