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Sample records for activated duloxetine hydrochloride

  1. Study on fluorescence characteristics of duloxetine hydrochloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiangping; Du, Yingxiang; Wu, Xiulan

    2008-12-01

    The fluorescence characteristics of duloxetine hydrochloride are studied in this paper. The fluorescence emission spectra of duloxetine demonstrate that intramolecular charge-transfer takes place between thiophene ring and napthalenyloxy group upon irradiation. The effects of excitation light, solvent system, variation of solution pH value, metal ions and vitamin C on the fluorescence spectra of duloxetine hydrochloride are elucidated, respectively. A spectrofluorometric method of quantitative determination of duloxetine in dosage form is reported for the first time, the linear range is 7.14 × 10 -8 mol/L to 1.43 × 10 -5 mol/L, the linear correlation coefficient r is equal to 0.9997, and the detection limit is 3.5 × 10 -8 mol/L. The accuracy and the precision are satisfactory.

  2. Disposable screen-printed sensors for determination of duloxetine hydrochloride

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    A screen-printed disposable electrode system for the determination of duloxetine hydrochloride (DL) was developed using screen-printing technology. Homemade printing has been characterized and optimized on the basis of effects of the modifier and plasticizers. The fabricated bi-electrode potentiometric strip containing both working and reference electrodes was used as duloxetine hydrochloride sensor. The proposed sensors worked satisfactorily in the concentration range from 1.0 × 10-6-1.0 × 10-2 mol L-1 with detection limit reaching 5.0 × 10-7 mol L-1 and adequate shelf life of 6 months. The method is accurate, precise and economical. The proposed method has been applied successfully for the analysis of the drug in pure and in its dosage forms. In this method, there is no interference from any common pharmaceutical additives and diluents. Results of the analysis were validated statistically by recovery studies. PMID:22264225

  3. Duloxetine

    MedlinePlus

    Duloxetine is used to treat depression and generalized anxiety disorder (GAD; excessive worry and tension that disrupts daily life and lasts for 6 months or longer). Duloxetine is also used to treat pain ...

  4. Development and validation of a HPTLC method for Estimation of Duloxetine Hydrochloride in Bulk Drug and in Tablet Dosage Form.

    PubMed

    Dhaneshwar, Suneela S; Deshpande, P; Patil, M; Vadnerkar, G; Dhaneshwar, S R

    2008-01-01

    Duloxetine hydrochloride is a potent dual reuptake inhibitor of serotonin and norepinephrine used to treat major depressive disorders. The present work describes a simple, precise and accurate HPTLC method for its estimation as bulk and in tablet dosage form. The chromatographic separation was carried out on precoated silica gel 60 F254 aluminium plates using mixture of chloroform:methanol (8:1 v/v) as mobile phase and densitometric evaluation of spots was carried out at 235 nm using Camag TLC Scanner-3 with win CAT 1.3.4 version software. The experimental parameters like band size of the spot applied, chamber saturation time, solvent front migration, slit width etc. were critically studied and optimum conditions were evolved. The drug was satisfactorily resolved with Rf value 0.11+/-0.01. The accuracy and reliability of the proposed method was ascertained by evaluating various validation parameters like linearity (40-200 ng/spot), precision (intra-day RSD 0.46-0.75%, inter-day RSD 0.46-1.59%), accuracy (98.72+/-0.20) and specificity according to ICH guidelines. The proposed method can analyse ten or more formulation units simultaneously on a single plate and provides a faster and cost-effective quality control tool for routine analysis of duloxetine hydrochloride as bulk drug and in tablet formulation.

  5. Development and validation of a HPTLC method for Estimation of Duloxetine Hydrochloride in Bulk Drug and in Tablet Dosage Form

    PubMed Central

    Dhaneshwar, Suneela S.; Deshpande, P.; Patil, M.; Vadnerkar, G.; Dhaneshwar, S. R.

    2008-01-01

    Duloxetine hydrochloride is a potent dual reuptake inhibitor of serotonin and norepinephrine used to treat major depressive disorders. The present work describes a simple, precise and accurate HPTLC method for its estimation as bulk and in tablet dosage form. The chromatographic separation was carried out on precoated silica gel 60 F254 aluminium plates using mixture of chloroform:methanol (8:1 v/v) as mobile phase and densitometric evaluation of spots was carried out at 235 nm using Camag TLC Scanner-3 with win CAT 1.3.4 version software. The experimental parameters like band size of the spot applied, chamber saturation time, solvent front migration, slit width etc. were critically studied and optimum conditions were evolved. The drug was satisfactorily resolved with Rf value 0.11±0.01. The accuracy and reliability of the proposed method was ascertained by evaluating various validation parameters like linearity (40-200 ng/spot), precision (intra-day RSD 0.46-0.75%, inter-day RSD 0.46-1.59%), accuracy (98.72±0.20) and specificity according to ICH guidelines. The proposed method can analyse ten or more formulation units simultaneously on a single plate and provides a faster and cost-effective quality control tool for routine analysis of duloxetine hydrochloride as bulk drug and in tablet formulation. PMID:20046720

  6. The Combination of Antidepressant Duloxetine with Piracetam in Mice does not Produce Enhancement of Nootropic Activity.

    PubMed

    Kale, Pravin Popatrao; Addepalli, Veeranjaneyulu; Sarkar, Amrita; Patel, Sonam; Savai, Jay

    2014-09-01

    There is a strong association between depression and memory impairment. The present study aims to assess the nootropic activity of duloxetine and piracetam combination. Male Swiss Albino mice were divided randomly into 4 groups. Treatment of normal saline (10 ml/kg), duloxetine (10 mg/kg), piracetam (100 mg/kg), and duloxetine (5 mg/kg) plus piracetam (50 mg/kg) were given through intra-peritoneal route to group I-IV, respectively. Transfer latency in elevated plus maze (EPM) and time spent in target quadrant in Morris water maze (MWM) were recorded. Estimation of brain monoamines in hippocampus, cerebral cortex, and whole brain were done using HPLC with fluorescence detector. Piracetam treated group showed significant decrease in transfer latency in EPM and increase in time spent in target quadrant recorded in MWM. Combination treated group failed to produce statistically significant nootropic effect in both EPM and MWM. Combination treated group failed to increase brain monoamine levels when compared against duloxetine and piracetam treated groups, separately. But there was exception of significant increase in norepinephrine levels in hippocampi when compared against duloxetine treated group. Results indicate no cognitive benefits with piracetam plus duloxetine combination. These findings can be further probed with the aim of understanding the interaction between duloxetine and piracetam as a future endeavor.

  7. Analysis of duloxetine hydrochloride and its related compounds in pharmaceutical dosage forms and in vitro dissolution studies by stability indicating UPLC.

    PubMed

    Rao, Dantu Durga; Sait, Shakil S; Reddy, A Malleswara; Chakole, Dinesh; Reddy, Y Ramakoti; Mukkanti, K

    2010-11-01

    A reproducible gradient reversed-phase ultra-performance liquid chromatographic method is developed for quantitative determination of duloxetine hydrochloride in pharmaceutical dosage forms. The method is also applicable for analysis of related substances and for study of in vitro dissolution profiles. Chromatographic separation is achieved on a 50 mm × 4.6 mm, 1.8 μm C-18 column. Mobile phase A contains a mixture of 0.01 M KH(2)PO(4) (pH 4.0) buffer, tetrahydro furan, and methanol in the ratio 67:23:10 (v/v/v), respectively, and mobile phase B contains a mixture of 0.01 M KH(2)PO(4), (pH 4.0) buffer, and acetonitrile in the ratio 60:40 (v/v), respectively. The flow rate is 0.6 mL/min, and the detection wavelength is monitored at 236 nm. Resolution of duloxetine hydrochloride and three potential impurities is greater than 2.0 for all pairs of components. The drug was subjected to ICH prescribed hydrolytic, oxidative, photolytic, and thermal stress conditions. Method is validated for linearity, specificity, accuracy, precision, ruggedness, and robustness.

  8. Clinical study of duloxetine hydrochloride combined with doxazosin for the treatment of pain disorder in chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Mingxin; Li, Hanzhong; Ji, Zhigang; Dong, Dexin; Yan, Su

    2017-01-01

    Abstract To explore the safety and efficacy of the selective 5-serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor duloxetine hydrochloride and alpha-adrenergic receptor blocker (alpha-blocker) doxazosin mesylate-controlled tablets in the treatment of pain disorder in chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS). In all, 150 patients were enrolled and 126 patients completed the study (41 patients in the doxazosin group, 41 patients in the sertraline group, and 44 patients in the duloxetine group). This was an open randomized 6-month study. CP/CPPS patients who met the diagnostic criteria were randomized into 3 groups. The patients in the duloxetine group received doxazosin 4 mg + duloxetine 30 mg once a day, and the dosage of duloxetine was increased to 60 mg after a week. The patients in the doxazosin group received doxazosin 4 mg once a day. The patients in the sertraline group received doxazosin 4 mg + sertraline 50 mg once a day. National Institutes of Health Chronic Prostatitis Symptom Index (NIH-CPSI) score, the short-form McGill Pain questionnaire (SF-MPQ), and the hospital anxiety and depression scale (HAD) were applied for evaluations during follow-up of 1, 3, and 6 months after treatment.There were slight positive significant correlations between NIH-CPSI scores and HAD scores, moderate positive significant correlations between the quality of life (QOL) and SF-MPQ, and slight positive significant correlations between HAD and QOL. The effective rate in the doxazosin group was 4.88%, 19.51%, and 56.10% after 1, 3, and 6 months, respectively (P < 0.05). The SF-MPQ score in the doxazosin group decreased to 1.80 ± 1.29, 2.66 ± 1.57, and 3.24 ± 1.67 after 1, 3, and 6 months, respectively (P < 0.05). The HAD score in the doxazosin group decreased to 2.24 ± 2.17, 4 ± 2.11, and 4.90 ± 2.62 after 1, 3, and 6 months, respectively (P < 0.05). The effective rate in the sertraline group was 9.76%, 36

  9. Clinical study of duloxetine hydrochloride combined with doxazosin for the treatment of pain disorder in chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome: An observational study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mingxin; Li, Hanzhong; Ji, Zhigang; Dong, Dexin; Yan, Su

    2017-03-01

    To explore the safety and efficacy of the selective 5-serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor duloxetine hydrochloride and alpha-adrenergic receptor blocker (alpha-blocker) doxazosin mesylate-controlled tablets in the treatment of pain disorder in chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS).In all, 150 patients were enrolled and 126 patients completed the study (41 patients in the doxazosin group, 41 patients in the sertraline group, and 44 patients in the duloxetine group). This was an open randomized 6-month study. CP/CPPS patients who met the diagnostic criteria were randomized into 3 groups. The patients in the duloxetine group received doxazosin 4 mg + duloxetine 30 mg once a day, and the dosage of duloxetine was increased to 60 mg after a week. The patients in the doxazosin group received doxazosin 4 mg once a day. The patients in the sertraline group received doxazosin 4 mg + sertraline 50 mg once a day. National Institutes of Health Chronic Prostatitis Symptom Index (NIH-CPSI) score, the short-form McGill Pain questionnaire (SF-MPQ), and the hospital anxiety and depression scale (HAD) were applied for evaluations during follow-up of 1, 3, and 6 months after treatment.There were slight positive significant correlations between NIH-CPSI scores and HAD scores, moderate positive significant correlations between the quality of life (QOL) and SF-MPQ, and slight positive significant correlations between HAD and QOL. The effective rate in the doxazosin group was 4.88%, 19.51%, and 56.10% after 1, 3, and 6 months, respectively (P < 0.05). The SF-MPQ score in the doxazosin group decreased to 1.80 ± 1.29, 2.66 ± 1.57, and 3.24 ± 1.67 after 1, 3, and 6 months, respectively (P < 0.05). The HAD score in the doxazosin group decreased to 2.24 ± 2.17, 4 ± 2.11, and 4.90 ± 2.62 after 1, 3, and 6 months, respectively (P < 0.05). The effective rate in the sertraline group was 9.76%, 36.59%, and 63

  10. Determination of duloxetine hydrochloride in the presence of process and degradation impurities by a validated stability-indicating RP-LC method.

    PubMed

    Raman, N V V S S; Harikrishna, K A; Prasad, A V S S; Reddy, K Ratnakar; Ramakrishna, K

    2010-03-11

    A stability-indicating gradient reverse phase liquid chromatographic purity and assay method for duloxetine hydrochloride (DUH) was developed and validated. DUH was subjected to the stress conditions and it is sensitive towards oxidative, acid and hydrolytic degradation. Successful separation of DUH from its two process impurities and one degradation impurity formed under stress conditions was achieved on a Symmetry C18, 250x4.6mm, 5microm column using a gradient mixture of solvent A (0.01M potassium dihydrogen orthophosphate having 0.2% triethyl amine, pH adjusted to 2.5 with orthophosphoric acid) and solvent B (20:80 v/v mixture of acetonitrile and methanol). The flow rate is 1ml/min and the detection wavelength is 230nm. The mass balance was found to be in the range of 99.2-99.7% in all the stressed conditions.

  11. Development and Validation of a Stability-Indicating RP-HPLC Method for Duloxetine Hydrochloride in its Bulk and Tablet Dosage Form

    PubMed Central

    Chhalotiya, Usmangani K.; Bhatt, Kashyap K.; Shah, Dimal A.; Baldania, Sunil L.

    2010-01-01

    The objective of the present work was to develop a stability-indicating RP-HPLC method for duloxetine hydrochloride (DUL) in the presence of its degradation products generated from forced decomposition studies. The drug substance was found to be susceptible to stress conditions of acid hydrolysis. The drug was found to be stable to dry heat, photodegradation, oxidation and basic condition attempted. Successful separation of the drug from the degradation products formed under acidic stress conditions was achieved on a Hypersil C-18 column (250 mm × 4.6 mm id, 5μm particle size) using acetonitrile: 0.01 M potassium dihydrogen phosphate buffer (pH 5.4 adjusted with orthophosphoric acid) (50:50, v/v) as the mobile phase at a flow rate of 1.0 ml/min. Quantification was achieved with photodiode array detection at 229 nm over the concentration range 1–25 μg/ml with range of recovery 99.8–101.3 % for DUL by the RP-HPLC method. Statistical analysis proved the method to be repeatable, specific, and accurate for estimation of DUL. It can be used as a stability-indicating method due to its effective separation of the drug from its degradation products, PMID:21179321

  12. Characterization of stress degradation products of duloxetine hydrochloride employing LC-UV/PDA and LC-MS/TOF studies.

    PubMed

    Chadha, Renu; Bali, Alka; Bansal, Gulshan

    2016-03-20

    Duloxetine HCl was subjected to forced degradation under conditions of hydrolysis (neutral, acidic and alkaline), oxidation, photolysis and thermal stress, as suggested in the ICH guideline Q1A(R2). The drug showed significant degradation under acidic, alkaline and aqueous hydrolytic as well as photolytic conditions. The drug remained stable under thermal and oxidative stress conditions. In total, seventeen degradation products (I-XVII) were formed under varied conditions, which could be separated by chromatography of respective degraded solutions on C18 (250 mm×4.6 mm; 5 μ, Nulceodur) column using isocratic elution method. Detection wavelength was selected as 290 nm. MS/TOF accurate mass studies were carried out to establish the complete fragmentation pathway of the drug and degradation products, which, in turn, was utilized in characterization of the products. The degradation pathway of the drug leading to generation of fifteen products I-X, XII-XIII, XV-XVII was postulated and this has not been reported so far.

  13. Effects of duloxetine on norepinephrine and serotonin transporter activity in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Chappell, Jill C; Eisenhofer, Graeme; Owens, Michael J; Haber, Harry; Lachno, D Richard; Dean, Robert A; Knadler, Mary Pat; Nemeroff, Charles B; Mitchell, Malcolm I; Detke, Michael J; Iyengar, Smriti; Pangallo, Beth; Lobo, Evelyn D

    2014-02-01

    Duloxetine selectively inhibits the serotonin (5-HT) and norepinephrine (NE) transporters (5-HTT and NET, respectively), as demonstrated in vitro and in preclinical studies; however, transporter inhibition has not been fully assessed in vivo at the approved dose of 60 mg/d. Here, the in vivo effects of dosing with duloxetine 60 mg once daily for 11 days in healthy subjects were assessed in 2 studies: (1) centrally (n = 11), by measuring concentrations of 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylglycol (DHPG), and NE in cerebrospinal fluid, and (2) versus escitalopram 20 mg/d (n = 32) in a 2-period crossover study by assessing the ΔDHPG/ΔNE ratio in plasma during orthostatic testing and by pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic modeling of reuptake inhibition using subjects' serum in cell lines expressing cloned human 5-HTT or NET. At steady state, duloxetine significantly reduced concentrations of DHPG and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (P < 0.05), but not NE, in cerebrospinal fluid; DHPG was also decreased in plasma and urine. The ΔDHPG/ΔNE ratio in plasma decreased significantly more with duloxetine than escitalopram (65% and 21%, respectively; P < 0.0001). Ex vivo reuptake inhibition of 5-HTT was comparable (EC50 = 44.5 nM) for duloxetine and escitalopram, but duloxetine inhibited NET more potently (EC50 = 116 nM and 1044 nM, respectively). Maximal predicted reuptake inhibition for 5-HTT was 84% for duloxetine and 80% for escitalopram, and that for NET was 67% and 14%, respectively. In summary, duloxetine significantly affected 5-HT and NE turnover in the central nervous system and periphery; these effects presumably occurred via inhibition of reuptake by the 5-HTT and NET, as indicated by effects on functional reuptake inhibition ex vivo.

  14. Evaluation of anti-obesity activity of duloxetine in comparison with sibutramine along with its anti-depressant activity: an experimental study in obese rats.

    PubMed

    Chudasama, H P; Bhatt, P A

    2009-11-01

    5-HT and noradrenaline are important neurotransmitters that control increase in body mass and are involved in the pathophysiology of obesity and depression. Sibutramine, an established anti-obesity agent, and duloxetine, an anti-depressant agent, are serotonin noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs). The objective of the present study was to compare the anti-obesity effect of duloxetine with sibutramine along with its effect on blood pressure and depression in obese rats. The secondary objective of the study was to determine if a relationship exists between obesity and depression. Obesity was induced by high-fat diet (HFD) in healthy male Sprague-Dawley rats. After 5 weeks of feeding HFD, animals were overweight (17.57%) with high food intake (57.15%) in comparison with normal animals. These obese animals were treated with duloxetine (30 mg x kg(-1), p.o.) and sibutramine (5 mg x kg(-1), p.o.) for 4 weeks. Control animals were treated with duloxetine alone (30 mg x kg(-1), p.o.). Our results depict that duloxetine was as effective as sibutramine in reducing food intake, body mass, and relative adiposity, and increasing rectal temperature with an added advantage of decreasing blood pressure, which sibutramine failed to do. Besides reduction in body mass, unlike sibutramine, duloxetine improved depressive state as evaluated by despair swimming test, tail suspension test, and open field test, speculating its use as an anti-obesity agent in obese-depressive animals. Since obese control animals reflected decreased locomotor activity, a positive relationship can be speculated to exist between obesity and depression. Further studies on various antidepressant models are required to confirm this relationship.

  15. Duloxetine versus other anti-depressive agents for depression

    PubMed Central

    Cipriani, Andrea; Koesters, Markus; Furukawa, Toshi A; Nosè, Michela; Purgato, Marianna; Omori, Ichiro M; Trespidi, Carlotta; Barbui, Corrado

    2014-01-01

    Background Although pharmacological and psychological interventions are both effective for major depression, in primary and secondary care settings antidepressant drugs remain the mainstay of treatment. Amongst antidepressants many different agents are available. Duloxetine hydrochloride is a dual reuptake inhibitor of serotonin and norepinephrine and has been licensed by the Food and Drug Administration in the US for major depressive disorder (MDD), generalised anxiety disorder, diabetic peripheral neuropathic pain, fibromyalgia and chronic musculoskeletal pain. Objectives To assess the evidence for the efficacy, acceptability and tolerability of duloxetine in comparison with all other antidepressant agents in the acute-phase treatment of major depression. Search methods MEDLINE (1966 to 2012), EMBASE (1974 to 2012), the Cochrane Collaboration Depression, Anxiety and Neurosis Controlled Trials Register and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials up to March 2012. No language restriction was applied. Reference lists of relevant papers and previous systematic reviews were hand-searched. Pharmaceutical company marketing duloxetine and experts in this field were contacted for supplemental data. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials allocating patients with major depression to duloxetine versus any other antidepressive agent. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently extracted data and a double-entry procedure was employed. Information extracted included study characteristics, participant characteristics, intervention details and outcome measures in terms of efficacy, acceptability and tolerability. Main results A total of 16 randomised controlled trials (overall 5735 participants) were included in this systematic review. Of these, three trials were unpublished. We found 11 studies (overall 3304 participants) comparing duloxetine with one selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) (six studies versus paroxetine, three studies

  16. Berberine hydrochloride: anticancer activity and nanoparticulate delivery system.

    PubMed

    Tan, Wen; Li, Yingbo; Chen, Meiwan; Wang, Yitao

    2011-01-01

    Berberine hydrochloride is a conventional component in Chinese medicine, and is characterized by a diversity of pharmacological effects. However, due to its hydrophobic properties, along with poor stability and bioavailability, the application of berberine hydrochloride was hampered for a long time. In recent years, the pharmaceutical preparation of berberine hydrochloride has improved to achieve good prospects for clinical application, especially for novel nanoparticulate delivery systems. Moreover, anticancer activity and novel mechanisms have been explored, the chance of regulating glucose and lipid metabolism in cancer cells showing more potential than ever. Therefore, it is expected that appropriate pharmaceutical procedures could be applied to the enormous potential for anticancer efficacy, to give some new insights into anticancer drug preparation in Chinese medicine. We accessed conventional databases, such as PubMed, Scope, and Web of Science, using "berberine hydrochloride", "anti-cancer mechanism", and "nanoparticulate delivery system" as search words, then summarized the progress in research, illustrating the need to explore reprogramming of cancer cell metabolism using nanoparticulate drug delivery systems. With increasing research on regulation of cancer cell metabolism by berberine hydrochloride and troubleshooting of issues concerning nanoparticulate delivery preparation, berberine hydrochloride is likely to become a natural component of the nanoparticulate delivery systems used for cancer therapy. Meanwhile, the known mechanisms of berberine hydrochloride, such as decreased multidrug resistance and enhanced sensitivity of chemotherapeutic drugs, along with improvement in patient quality of life, could also provide new insights into cancer cell metabolism and nanoparticulate delivery preparation.

  17. Duloxetine Eli Lilly.

    PubMed

    Anttila, Sami; Leinonen, Esa

    2002-08-01

    Duloxetine is a serotonin (5-HT) and norepinephrine (NE) uptake inhibitor in pre-registration for depression. In vivo studies demonstrate that duloxetine inhibits 5-HT and NE transporters and this may induce an antidepressant effect [159168]. In humans, duloxetine has a low affinity for most 5-HT subtypes and for muscarinic, histamine H1, alpha1-adrenergic, alpha2-adrenergic and dopamine D2 receptors [444103]. Thus, it is not surprising that the meta-analysis of four recent clinical studies suggests duloxetine is a potent and well-tolerated antidepressant [429723]. By December 2001, Lilly had filed an NDA for depression. The launch of duloxetine is planned for the second half of 2002 [434250], [436220]. In April 2002, filing for stress urinary incontinence was anticipated for later in 2002 [456894]. Analysts at Banc of America predicted in April 2002, that the drug will be launched in the first quarter of 2003. The company projects US $400 million in revenue in 2003 and anticipates duloxetine to reach peak sales of over US $1 billion [450920]. Analysts at Morgan Stanley, projected US $25 million in sales in the fourth quarter 2002, rising to US $900 million in 2006 [450937]. At the same time, Credit Suisse First Boston anticipated launch for late 2002, with US $220 million in duloxetine revenues in 2003 and US $457 million in 2004 [450936].

  18. Maintaining efficacy in the treatment of diabetic peripheral neuropathic pain: role of duloxetine

    PubMed Central

    Zilliox, Lindsay; Russell, James W

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Neuropathy is one of the most frequent complications of diabetes. Of all the symptoms associated with diabetic neuropathy, pain has the largest impact on sleep and quality of life. In the past few years further medications have been added to the available therapies for neuropathic pain. One of these medications, duloxetine hydrochloride (duloxetine), is a balanced and potent selective serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor. Methods Medline was searched from January 2005 to September 2009 using the key words duloxetine and peripheral neuropathy for clinical trials limited to human research published in English and duloxetine and pharmacology in the nervous system. Results Duloxetine has been shown to effectively reduce diabetic peripheral neuropathic pain compared to placebo at doses of 60 mg/day and 120 mg/day with minimal to moderate side effects. This effect is seen with minimal effects on glycemic control and without any clinically relevant effects on lipid control, or cardiovascular parameters. In addition, its efficacy and tolerability is comparable to other medications commonly used in the management of neuropathic pain. Furthermore, duloxetine performs favorably both in terms of quality of life and in cost utility analyses. Discussion and conclusion This article reviewed the issues related to management of diabetic peripheral neuropathic pain, the pharmacology and rationale for use of duloxetine, efficacy studies, and the safety and tolerability of treatment with duloxetine. Duloxetine is an acceptable initial or alternative treatment for patients with diabetic neuropathic pain. PMID:21437071

  19. Berberine hydrochloride: anticancer activity and nanoparticulate delivery system

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Wen; Li, Yingbo; Chen, Meiwan; Wang, Yitao

    2011-01-01

    Background Berberine hydrochloride is a conventional component in Chinese medicine, and is characterized by a diversity of pharmacological effects. However, due to its hydrophobic properties, along with poor stability and bioavailability, the application of berberine hydrochloride was hampered for a long time. In recent years, the pharmaceutical preparation of berberine hydrochloride has improved to achieve good prospects for clinical application, especially for novel nanoparticulate delivery systems. Moreover, anticancer activity and novel mechanisms have been explored, the chance of regulating glucose and lipid metabolism in cancer cells showing more potential than ever. Therefore, it is expected that appropriate pharmaceutical procedures could be applied to the enormous potential for anticancer efficacy, to give some new insights into anticancer drug preparation in Chinese medicine. Methods and results We accessed conventional databases, such as PubMed, Scope, and Web of Science, using “berberine hydrochloride”, “anti-cancer mechanism”, and “nanoparticulate delivery system” as search words, then summarized the progress in research, illustrating the need to explore reprogramming of cancer cell metabolism using nanoparticulate drug delivery systems. Conclusion With increasing research on regulation of cancer cell metabolism by berberine hydrochloride and troubleshooting of issues concerning nanoparticulate delivery preparation, berberine hydrochloride is likely to become a natural component of the nanoparticulate delivery systems used for cancer therapy. Meanwhile, the known mechanisms of berberine hydrochloride, such as decreased multidrug resistance and enhanced sensitivity of chemotherapeutic drugs, along with improvement in patient quality of life, could also provide new insights into cancer cell metabolism and nanoparticulate delivery preparation. PMID:21931477

  20. Comparative antibacterial activities of temafloxacin hydrochloride (A-62254) and two reference fluoroquinolones.

    PubMed Central

    Hardy, D J; Swanson, R N; Hensey, D M; Ramer, N R; Bower, R R; Hanson, C W; Chu, D T; Fernandes, P B

    1987-01-01

    The in vitro and in vivo properties of a new 1-difluorophenyl-6-fluoroquinolone, temafloxacin hydrochloride (A-62254), were compared with those of difloxacin and ciprofloxacin. Temafloxacin hydrochloride was as active as ciprofloxacin and difloxacin against staphylococci and as active as ciprofloxacin and 2 twofold dilutions more active than difloxacin against streptococci. Against gram-negative enteric bacteria and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, temafloxacin hydrochloride was 2 twofold dilutions more active than difloxacin but 2 to 4 twofold dilutions less active than ciprofloxacin. The MICs of temafloxacin hydrochloride and difloxacin were increased by 2 to 5 twofold dilutions in urine at pH 6.5 compared with 4 to 5 twofold-dilution increases in the MICs of ciprofloxacin. The MICs of temafloxacin hydrochloride, difloxacin, and ciprofloxacin were increased by 1 to 3 twofold dilutions in serum. The MICs of temafloxacin hydrochloride, difloxacin, and ciprofloxacin were the same or within 1 to 2 twofold dilutions at pHs 6.5, 7.2, and 8.0. When administered orally in mouse protection tests, temafloxacin hydrochloride was as active as difloxacin and 5 to 10 times more active than ciprofloxacin against infections with Staphylococcus aureus and streptococci. Against infections with gram-negative enteric bacteria and P. aeruginosa, temafloxacin hydrochloride was as active as difloxacin and ciprofloxacin. Temafloxacin hydrochloride was three times less active than difloxacin but was five times more active than ciprofloxacin against infections with Salmonella typhimurium. Temafloxacin hydrochloride was as active as difloxacin and ciprofloxacin against P. aeruginosa and Proteus mirabilis pyelonephritis in mice. The peak serum concentration and serum half-life of temafloxacin hydrochloride in mice were approximately one-half and one-sixth, respectively, that of difloxacin after oral administration. The peak serum concentration of temafloxacin hydrochloride in mice after oral

  1. Duloxetine: a review of its use in the treatment of generalized anxiety disorder.

    PubMed

    Carter, Natalie J; McCormack, Paul L

    2009-01-01

    numerous metabolites, which are inactive, are mainly excreted in the urine. The mean elimination half-life of duloxetine is approximately 12 hours. Duloxetine is a substrate for CYP1A2 and CYP2D6 and a moderate inhibitor of CYP2D6. Concomitant use of duloxetine and potent CYP1A2 inhibitors should be avoided and duloxetine should be used with caution in patients receiving drugs that are extensively metabolized by CYP2D6, particularly those with a narrow therapeutic index. Duloxetine was effective in the short-term treatment of patients with primary GAD of at least moderate severity. In four randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicentre, phase III trials, duloxetine 60-120 mg once daily for 9 or 10 weeks was significantly more effective than placebo with regard to the primary endpoint of mean change in Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale (HAM-A) total score from baseline to study endpoint. In addition, all other endpoints were generally improved from baseline to a greater extent with duloxetine 60-120 mg once daily than with placebo. Duloxetine also improved patient role functioning (assessed using Sheehan Disability Scale global impairment functioning scores), health-related quality of life and patient well-being compared with placebo. Duloxetine was effective in patients with GAD who were aged >/=65 years. Pooled results of data from the two short-term efficacy trials that also included an active comparator arm showed that the mean change in HAM-A scores with duloxetine relative to placebo were of the same magnitude as those with venlafaxine extended release versus placebo. Duloxetine 60-120 mg once daily was also more effective than placebo in preventing or delaying relapse in responders to duloxetine in a longer-term study. In this study, patients with GAD received duloxetine during a 26-week, open-label, acute treatment phase and responders were then randomized to continue on duloxetine or receive placebo during a 26-week, double-blind, continuation phase. Time to

  2. Antifungal activity of berberine hydrochloride and palmatine hydrochloride against Microsporum canis -induced dermatitis in rabbits and underlying mechanism.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Chen-Wen; Ji, Quan-An; Wei, Qiang; Liu, Yan; Bao, Guo-Lian

    2015-06-09

    Phellodendron amurense, exhibits antifungal activity mainly by bioactive components including berberine hydrochloride and palmatine hydrochloride. This study was conducted to evaluate the antifungal effects of berberine hydrochloride, palmatine hydrochloride, and a mixture of both substances against Microsporum canis in vivo and in vitro. The minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of monomers and clotrimazole were determined using 1.5 % tryptic soy agar. The effects of these drugs on Microsporum canis growth was detected by determining dry weight. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was performed to observe the effect of chemicals on cell ultrastructure. Differential mRNA expressions of eight genes of M. canis treated with berberine or palmatine or their combination at different time points were determined by real-time PCR. NADH enzyme concentration was also detected. Clinical evaluation via in-vivo antifungal assay was also performed. Skin histology PAS staining was also carried out. Results showed that MICs of berberine, palmatine and clotrimazole were 1, 1, and 0.015 mg/mL, respectively. No significant difference was observed among the growth curves of the three groups before 18 h was reached. TEM showed that these drugs could destroy the cell membrane and organelles of M. canis at different time points. After 30 h of incubation, relative mRNA expressions of the genes in the combined group were significantly higher than those in the other groups including the clotrimazole group (P < 0.05); Palmatine initially induced the mRNA up-regulation of PGAL4, FSH1, PQ-LRP, NADH1 and NDR in M. canis; by contrast, berberine maintained a high expression level of these genes to shorten fungal life cycle and eradicate M. canis. Clinical results showed that combined treatment was more effective than single administration of each monomer or clotrimazole. Hence, berberine mixed with palmatine significantly elicited antifungal activities and could be used to treat M. canis in

  3. Duloxetine-related panic attacks.

    PubMed

    Sabljić, Vladimir; Rakun, Radmir; Ružić, Klementina; Grahovac, Tanja

    2011-03-01

    Side-effects arising on the grounds of antidepressant administration pose as a substantial obstacle hindering successful depressive disorder treatment. Side-effects, especially those severe or those manifested through dramatic clinical presentations such as panic attacks, make the treatment far more difficult and shake patients' trust in both the treatment and the treating physician. This case report deals with a patient experiencing a moderately severe depressive episode, who responded to duloxetine treatment administered in the initial dose of 30 mg per day with as many as three panic attacks in two days. Upon duloxetine withdrawal, these panic attacks ceased as well. The patient continued tianeptine and alprazolam treatment during which no significant side-effects had been seen, so that she gradually recovered. Some of the available literature sources have suggested the possibility of duloxetine administration to the end of generalised anxiety disorder and panic attack treatment. However, they are outnumbered by the contributions reporting about duloxetine-related anxiety, aggressiveness and panic attacks. In line with the foregoing, further monitoring of each and every duloxetine-administered patient group needs to be pursued so as to be able to evaluate treatment benefits and weigh them against risks of anxiety or panic attack onset.

  4. Duloxetine: a review of its use in the management of major depressive disorder in older adults.

    PubMed

    Dhillon, Sohita

    2013-01-01

    Duloxetine (Cymbalta(®)) is a selective serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor indicated for the treatment of major depressive disorder (MDD). This article reviews the therapeutic efficacy and tolerability of duloxetine in older adults with MDD and summarizes its pharmacological properties. Treatment with duloxetine significantly improved several measures of cognition, depression, anxiety, pain and health-related quality-of-life (HR-QOL) in older adults with MDD in two 8-week, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials. However, no significant improvements in measures of depression were observed at week 12 (primary endpoint) of a 24-week, double-blind trial, although symptoms of depression did improve significantly at earlier timepoints. Benefit of treatment was also observed during continued therapy in the 24-week study (i.e. after the 12-week primary endpoint) and in an open-label, 52-week study, with improvements being observed in some measures of depression, pain and HR-QOL. Duloxetine was generally well tolerated in these studies, with nausea, dizziness and adverse events reflecting noradrenergic activity (e.g. dry mouth, constipation) being the most common treatment-emergent adverse events during treatment for up to 52 weeks. Duloxetine therapy had little effect on cardiovascular parameters and bodyweight. Although further well designed and long-term studies in this patient population are required to confirm the efficacy of duloxetine and to compare it with that of other antidepressants, current evidence suggests that treatment with duloxetine may be beneficial in older adults with MDD.

  5. Photoacoustic imaging to detect rat brain activation after cocaine hydrochloride injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jo, Janggun; Yang, Xinmai

    2011-03-01

    Photoacoustic imaging (PAI) was employed to detect small animal brain activation after the administration of cocaine hydrochloride. Sprague Dawley rats were injected with different concentrations (2.5, 3.0, and 5.0 mg per kg body) of cocaine hydrochloride in saline solution through tail veins. The brain functional response to the injection was monitored by photoacoustic tomography (PAT) system with horizontal scanning of cerebral cortex of rat brain. Photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) was also used for coronal view images. The modified PAT system used multiple ultrasonic detectors to reduce the scanning time and maintain a good signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). The measured photoacoustic signal changes confirmed that cocaine hydrochloride injection excited high blood volume in brain. This result shows PAI can be used to monitor drug abuse-induced brain activation.

  6. Duloxetine for the management of fibromyalgia syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Scholz, Beth A; Hammonds, Cara L; Boomershine, Chad S

    2009-01-01

    Fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) is a widespread pain condition associated with a wide range of additional symptoms including fatigue, insomnia, depression, anxiety and stiffness. Duloxetine is one of three medications currently FDA approved for use in FMS management. Duloxetine is a mixed serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (SNRI) that functions by increasing central nervous system levels of serotonin and norepinephrine. This review is a primer on use of duloxetine in FMS management and includes information on pharmacology and pharmacokinetics, a review of the three duloxetine FMS treatment trials currently in publication, a discussion of the safety and tolerability of duloxetine, and patient-focused perspectives on duloxetine use in FMS management. Duloxetine has proven efficacy in managing pain and mood symptoms in adult FMS patients with and without major depressive disorder. However, due to side effects, duloxetine must be used with caution in patients with fatigue, insomnia, gastrointestinal complaints, headache, cardiovascular disease, bleeding-risk, and in those 24 years of age and younger due to risk of suicidality. Duloxetine use should be avoided in patients with liver disease or alcoholics. As with all medications, duloxetine is best used as part of an individualized regimen that includes nonpharmacologic modalities of exercise, education and behavioral therapies. PMID:21197298

  7. A double-blind efficacy and safety study of duloxetine flexible dosing in children and adolescents with major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, Sarah D; Prakash, Apurva; Zhang, Qi; Pangallo, Beth A; Bangs, Mark E; Emslie, Graham J; March, John S

    2014-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of duloxetine flexible dose in children (7-11 years) and adolescents (12-17 years) with major depressive disorder (MDD). Patients (n=337) in this 36 week study (10 week acute and 26 week extension treatment) received duloxetine (60-120 mg once daily [QD], n=117), fluoxetine (20-40 mg QD, n=117), or placebo (n=103). Measures included: Children's Depression Rating Scale-Revised (CDRS-R), treatment-emergent adverse events (TEAEs), and Columbia-Suicide Severity Rating Scale (C-SSRS). Neither active drug (duloxetine or fluoxetine) separated significantly (p<0.05) from placebo on mean change from baseline to end-point (10 weeks) on the CDRS-R total score. There were no significant differences between the duloxetine or fluoxetine groups compared with placebo on serious AEs (SAEs), total TEAEs, or discontinuation for AE during acute treatment. There were no completed suicides or deaths, and no clinically significant electrocardiogram (ECG) abnormalities observed during the study. One fluoxetine and one duloxetine patient experienced alanine aminotransferase (ALT) three or more times the upper limit of normal, which resolved during the study. A total of 8 (7.1%) duloxetine patients, 7 (6.8%) placebo patients, and 9 (8.0%) fluoxetine patients had worsening of suicidal ideation from baseline during acute treatment. Of the patients with suicidal ideation at baseline, 15/19 (79%) duloxetine, 19/19 (100%) placebo, and 16/19 (84%) fluoxetine had improvement in suicidal ideation at end-point during acute treatment. One duloxetine and two fluoxetine patients had treatment-emergent suicidal behavior during the 36 week study. Trial results were inconclusive, as neither the investigational drug (duloxetine) nor the active control (fluoxetine) separated from placebo on the CDRS-R at 10 weeks. No new duloxetine safety signals were identified relative to those seen in adults. Clinical Trial Registry Number: NCT00849901.

  8. Duloxetine for the treatment of fibromyalgia

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Cheryl L; Mist, Scott D; Ross, Rebecca L; Jones, Kim D

    2011-01-01

    This article presents a brief review of the physiologic abnormalities seen in fibromyalgia, current theories of widespread pain, and treatment options, including emerging therapeutics, with a focus on the use of duloxetine to manage fibromyalgia symptoms. Major clinical trials that examine the efficacy and effectiveness of duloxetine to date are reviewed, and safety issues are discussed. PMID:20828282

  9. Duloxetine for the treatment of fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Wright, Cheryl L; Mist, Scott D; Ross, Rebecca L; Jones, Kim D

    2010-09-01

    This article presents a brief review of the physiologic abnormalities seen in fibromyalgia, current theories of widespread pain, and treatment options, including emerging therapeutics, with a focus on the use of duloxetine to manage fibromyalgia symptoms. Major clinical trials that examine the efficacy and effectiveness of duloxetine to date are reviewed, and safety issues are discussed.

  10. Synergistic spermicidal activity of neem seed extract, reetha saponins and quinine hydrochloride.

    PubMed

    Garg, S; Doncel, G; Chabra, S; Upadhyay, S N; Talwar, G P

    1994-08-01

    In order to identify potent spermicidal agents which are free from the side effects of currently available agents, spermicidal activity of purified neem seeds extract (Praneem), reetha saponins and quinine hydrochloride was studied individually and in combination. Sander-Cramer test was used to assess the activity on human sperm. Under the test conditions, minimum effective spermicidal concentrations for Praneem, reetha saponins and quinine hydrochloride were 25%, 0.05% and 0.346%, respectively. At these concentrations, 100% of the sperm were immobilised within 20 seconds. A positive synergistic effect in the spermicidal activity of these components, if used in combination, was observed which implies the use of reduced concentrations of each to bring about the desired action. The selected combination formulated into a suitable dosage form is likely to offer dual benefit of a potent contraceptive and an antimicrobial preparation.

  11. Erlotinib hydrochloride.

    PubMed

    Minna, John D; Dowell, Jonathan

    2005-05-01

    Erlotinib hydrochloride (Tarceva; OSI Pharmaceuticals/Genentech/Roche), a member of a class of targeted anticancer drugs that inhibit the activity of the epidermal growth factor receptor, was approved by the US FDA in November 2004 for the treatment of advanced non-small-cell lung cancer after failure of at least one prior chemotherapy regimen. It is the first such drug to demonstrate an increase in survival in Phase III trials in patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer.

  12. Duloxetine enters the brain - But why is it not found in the cerebrospinal fluid.

    PubMed

    Paulzen, Michael; Gründer, Gerhard; Veselinovic, Tanja; Wolf, Bernhard; Hiemke, Christoph; Lammertz, Sarah E

    2016-01-01

    Antidepressants enter the brain to reach their site of action in a different extent. However, there has been no study to date about duloxetine's ability to enter the brain and cerebrospinal fluid. Aim of this study was to measure blood and cerebrospinal fluid concentrations of duloxetine and to account for the distribution between the two compartments. Concentrations of duloxetine were measured in blood serum and cerebrospinal fluid of 19 patients treated with daily doses of 30-120mg. Daily doses were correlated with serum and cerebrospinal fluid concentrations and serum concentrations were correlated with concentrations in cerebrospinal fluid. Serum concentrations of duloxetine showed a moderate but significant correlation with the applied daily dose, r=+0.473, p=0.04. Duloxetine concentrations in the cerebrospinal fluid above the designated limit of quantification of 2.0ng/mL were only found in three of the 19 patients. Contrasting to own preceding studies on venlafaxine, mirtazapine and citalopram with comparably high concentrations in cerebrospinal fluid, the here presented findings indicate that duloxetine shows a very different distribution pattern. Very low concentrations in the cerebrospinal fluid may be due to the fact that the drug crosses the blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier much worse than other antidepressants do, suggesting a low ability of duloxetine to enter the brain. Alternatively, low drug concentrations may be interpreted in a sense of a missing residence time in cerebrospinal fluid due to active transport mechanisms out of this environment either back into the bloodstream or into the brain. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Duloxetine-related posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Zappella, Nathalie; Perier, François; Pico, Fernando; Palette, Catherine; Muret, Alexandre; Merceron, Sybille; Girbovan, Andrei; Marquion, Fabien; Legriel, Stephane

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) has well-established links with several drugs. Whether a link also exists with serotonin–norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor such as duloxetine is unclear. Methods: We report on a patient who developed PRES with a coma and myoclonus related to hypertensive encephalopathy a few days after starting duloxetine treatment. Magnetic resonance imaging was performed and catecholamine metabolites assayed. Results: The patient achieved a full recovery after aggressive antihypertensive therapy and intravenous anticonvulsant therapy. Conclusions: The clinical history, blood and urinary catecholamine and serotonin levels, and response to treatment strongly suggest that PRES was induced by duloxetine. Duloxetine should be added to the list of causes of PRES. PMID:27537580

  14. Berberine hydrochloride attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced endometritis in mice by suppressing activation of NF-κB signal pathway.

    PubMed

    Fu, Kaiqiang; Lv, Xiaopei; Li, Weishi; Wang, Yu; Li, Huatao; Tian, Wenru; Cao, Rongfeng

    2015-01-01

    Endometritis is a common disease in animal production and influences breeding all over the world. Berberine is one of the main alkaloids isolated from Rhizoma coptidis. Previous reports showed that berberine has anti-inflammatory potential. However, there have been a limited number of published reports on the anti-inflammatory effect of berberine hydrochloride on LPS-induced endometritis. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effects of berberine hydrochloride on LPS-induced mouse endometritis. Berberine hydrochloride was administered intraperitoneally at 1h before and 12h after LPS induction. Then, a biopsy was performed, and uterine myeloperoxidase (MPO) and nitric oxide (NO) concentrations were determined. Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) levels in the uterus homogenate were measured by ELISA. The extent of IκB-α and P65 phosphorylation was detected by Western blot. The results showed that berberine hydrochloride significantly attenuated neutrophil infiltration, suppressed myeloperoxidase activity and decreased NO, TNF-αand IL-1βproduction. Furthermore, berberine hydrochloride inhibited the phosphorylation of the NF-κB p65 subunit and the degradation of its inhibitor, IκBα. These findings suggest that berberine hydrochloride exerts potent anti-inflammatory effects on LPS-induced mouse endometritis and might be a potential therapeutic agent for endometritis.

  15. Influence of nine surfactants on the activity of oxytetracycline hydrochloride against Lipaphis erysimi Kalt.

    PubMed

    Lal, O P; Teotia, T P

    1975-12-01

    The effect of nine surfactants on the activity of oxytetracycline hydrochloride (OCT) was investigated against Lipaphis erysimi Kalt feeding on cabbage plants. All the surfactants, except Emulgator EL and Emulgator IP, at 0.1% increased the efficacy of OTC at 0.25% and the maximum reduction of 83.93% in fertility was observed for the combination OTC+Arkopal N-110. The nymphal development was delayed by various treatments. The treated adults were lighter in weight and smaller in size compared to the control insects. No photoxicity was observed in any case.

  16. Comparative antifungal efficacy of light-activated disinfection and octenidine hydrochloride with contemporary endodontic irrigants.

    PubMed

    Eldeniz, Ayce Unverdi; Guneser, Mehmet Burak; Akbulut, Makbule Bilge

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the antifungal effects of light-activated disinfection (LAD) in comparison with contemporary root canal irrigation solutions: sodium hypochlorite and 2% chlorhexidine gluconate and a new wound antiseptic, octenidine hydrochloride. Seventy extracted teeth having single root canals were contaminated with Candida albicans for 14 days. The samples were divided into five experimental (n = 10) and two control (positive and negative) groups (n = 10): (1) LAD with toluidine blue O, (2) octenidine hydrochloride (OCT), (3) 2.5% sodium hypochlorite (2.5% NaOCl), (4) 5.25% sodium hypochlorite (5.25% NaOCl) and (5) 2% chlorhexidine. Five millilitres of each test solution was applied for 3 min, and irradiation time used for LAD was 30 s. After treatment, the dentin chips were collected from inner canal walls into vials containing phosphate buffered saline, vortexed, serially diluted, seeded on Tryptic Soy Agar plates and incubated (37 °C, 48 h). The number of colony-forming units was then counted. Differences between LAD group and positive control group were statistically significant (P < 0.05). All Candida cells were totally eliminated in root canals irrigated with OCT, 2.5% NaOCl, 5.25% NaOCl and 2% chlorhexidine groups (CFU = 0). Within the limitations of this ex vivo study, LAD had minimal antimicrobial effect on C. albicans when used 30 s, and further modifications in LAD protocol are required to improve its antifungal capability. A new wound antiseptic, octenidine hydrochloride, demonstrated better potential than LAD in elimination of Candida albicans cells and may be a promising alternative to NaOCl and chlorhexidine solutions in future.

  17. Effect of duloxetine, a norepinephrine and serotonin reuptake inhibitor, on sneeze-induced urethral continence reflex in rats.

    PubMed

    Miyazato, Minoru; Kaiho, Yasuhiro; Kamo, Izumi; Chancellor, Michael B; Sugaya, Kimio; de Groat, William C; Yoshimura, Naoki

    2008-07-01

    We investigated the effect of duloxetine, a norepinephrine (NE) and serotonin (5-HT) reuptake inhibitor, on the neurally evoked urethral continence reflex induced by sneezing in rats. To clarify the role of noradrenergic and serotonergic mechanisms in preventing stress urinary incontinence (SUI) during sneezing, we examined the effect of duloxetine followed by intrathecal (it) methiothepin maleate (5-HT receptor and alpha1-adrenoceptor antagonist) or terazosin or idazoxan (selective alpha1- and alpha2-adrenoceptor antagonists, respectively). Amplitude of urethral pressure responses during sneezing (A-URS), urethral baseline pressure (UBP) at the midurethra, and sneeze-induced leak point pressure (S-LPP) were measured in normal adult female rats and rats with SUI induced by vaginal distension (VD). In normal and VD rats, intravenous application of duloxetine (1 mg/kg) increased A-URS by 35% and 34% and UBP by 21% and 34%, respectively. Sneezing-induced fluid leakage from the urethral orifice was observed in VD rats but not in normal rats. S-LPP was increased from 39.1 to 92.2 cmH2O by intravenous duloxetine in incontinent VD rats. Duloxetine-mediated enhancement of A-URS was inhibited by terazosin but not methiothepin maleate (it). In addition, simultaneous intrathecal application of methiothepin and terazosin induced a reduction in A-URS during sneezing, which was not increased by intravenous duloxetine. However, the reduced A-URS after intrathecal application of methiothepin and terazosin returned to the control level when duloxetine (iv) was applied after intrathecal idazoxan administration. These results indicate that duloxetine can prevent SUI by facilitating noradrenergic and serotonergic systems in the spinal cord to enhance the sneeze-induced active urethral closure mechanism.

  18. Comparative pain and mood effects in patients with comorbid fibromyalgia and major depressive disorder: secondary analyses of four pooled randomized controlled trials of duloxetine.

    PubMed

    Marangell, Lauren B; Clauw, Daniel J; Choy, Ernest; Wang, Fujun; Shoemaker, Scarlett; Bradley, Laurence; Mease, Philip; Wohlreich, Madelaine M

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to better understand the relationship of pain and mood in patients with fibromyalgia and comorbid major depressive disorder (MDD). Pooled data from 4 double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized trials of duloxetine hydrochloride 60-120mg/day in patients with fibromyalgia were included (N=1332). Of these, 350 (26% [147 placebo, 203 duloxetine]) had comorbid MDD (per Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition Text Revision criteria) and were included in these analyses. Primary measures included Brief Pain Inventory average pain; Hamilton Depression Rating Scale or Beck Depression Inventory. Logistic regression was used to evaluate the consistency of treatment effect across various subgroups. Path analysis was used to assess the effect of duloxetine on improvement in pain in the presence of improvement in mood and vice versa. Results indicated that 69% of improvement in pain was a direct effect of treatment, with improvement in mood accounting for 31% of pain response. In conclusion, consistent with our hypothesis, duloxetine produced a substantial direct effect on pain improvement and change in mood exerted a modest indirect effect on pain improvements in patients with fibromyalgia and MDD. Hence, both direct and indirect analgesic and antidepressant properties appear to be relevant for the treatment of these comorbid patients with duloxetine. Copyright © 2010 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Rapid Management of Trigeminal Neuralgia and Comorbid Major Depressive Disorder With Duloxetine.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Chung-Chih; Chang, Chun-Wei; Peng, Chia-Ho; Liang, Chih-Sung

    2014-08-01

    To describe a case of a patient diagnosed with major depressive disorder whose trigeminal neuralgia was unexpectedly but rapidly and efficiently responsive to duloxetine. A 37-year-old woman was diagnosed with trigeminal neuralgia, and the initial treatment with carbamazepine 800 mg/d did not improve her pain. In the following 3 years, she was poorly responsive to the combination therapy with several medications, including carbamazepine, valproate, baclofen, diclofenac, and acetaminophen. The repeated gamma knife radiosurgery still did not relieve her symptoms. She developed clinically significant depressive symptoms, and a diagnosis of major depressive disorder was made. Duloxetine 30 mg/d was initiated for the management of depression, with the dose gradually increased to 60 mg/d. Unexpectedly, at the dose of 60 mg/d, the patient reported remarkable relief in her trigeminal neuralgia within the first week. Her depressed mood gradually improved in the following 3 weeks. At the 4-year follow-up, she was gradually tapered off her medications, and her depression and trigeminal neuralgia were well managed on duloxetine 60 mg/d and carbamazepine 600 mg/d. The mechanisms may be related to duloxetine's ability to modulate norepinephrine and serotonin and antagonize N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors. The ignition hypothesis is a proposed etiology of trigeminal neuralgia, in that any individual hyperexcitable neuron can spread its discharge quickly to activate the entire population of neurons. We suggest that duloxetine exerts desynchronizing effects through its NMDA antagonism, modulating the hyperexcitable state of the trigeminal afferents. Duloxetine may be an adjuvant in treatment-resistant trigeminal neuralgia. © The Author(s) 2014.

  20. Controlled release and antibacterial activity of tetracycline hydrochloride-loaded bacterial cellulose composite membranes.

    PubMed

    Shao, Wei; Liu, Hui; Wang, Shuxia; Wu, Jimin; Huang, Min; Min, Huihua; Liu, Xiufeng

    2016-07-10

    Bacterial cellulose (BC) is widely used in biomedical applications. In this study, we prepared an antibiotic drug tetracycline hydrochloride (TCH)-loaded bacterial cellulose (BC) composite membranes, and evaluated the drug release, antibacterial activity and biocompatibility. The structure and morphology of the fabricated BC-TCH composite membranes were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The TCH release results show that the incorporation of BC matrix to load TCH is able to control the release. In vitro antibacterial assay demonstrate that the developed BC-TCH composites displayed excellent antibacterial activity solely associated with the loaded TCH drug. More importantly, the BC-TCH composite membranes display good biocompatibility. These characteristics of BC-TCH composite membranes indicate that they may successfully serve as wound dressings and other medical biomaterials.

  1. Evaluation of the antimicrobial activities of chlorhexidine gluconate, sodium hypochlorite and octenidine hydrochloride in vitro.

    PubMed

    Tirali, Resmiye E; Bodur, Haluk; Sipahi, Bilge; Sungurtekin, Elif

    2013-04-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the antimicrobial activity of sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl), chlorhexidine gluconate (CHX) and octenidine hydrochloride (OCT) in different concentrations against endodontic pathogens in vitro. Agar diffusion procedure was used to determine the antimicrobial activity of the tested materials. Enterococcus faecalis, Candida albicans and the mixture of these were used for this study. In the agar diffusion test, 5.25% NaOCl exhibited better antimicrobial effect than the other concentrations of NaOCl for all strains. All concentrations of OCT were effective against C. albicans and E. faecalis. Some 0.2% CHX was ineffective on all microorganisms. Antibacterial effectiveness of all experimental solutions decreased on the mixture of all strains. Decreasing concentrations of NaOCl resulted in significantly reduced antimicrobial effect. © 2010 The Authors. Australian Endodontic Journal © 2010 Australian Society of Endodontology.

  2. Is there a place for duloxetine?

    PubMed

    2007-04-01

    Duloxetine, a combined serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor, is licensed in the UK under two brand names for a total of three different indications. It is available as Cymbalta (jointly promoted by Boehringer Ingelheim and Lilly) for the treatment of patients with major depression, or with diabetic peripheral neuropathic pain; and as Yentreve (Lilly) for the treatment of women with "moderate to severe" stress urinary incontinence. Here we consider whether duloxetine has a role in the treatment of patients with any of these conditions.

  3. Functional photoacoustic imaging to observe regional brain activation induced by cocaine hydrochloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jo, Janggun; Yang, Xinmai

    2011-09-01

    Photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) was used to detect small animal brain activation in response to drug abuse. Cocaine hydrochloride in saline solution was injected into the blood stream of Sprague Dawley rats through tail veins. The rat brain functional change in response to the injection of drug was then monitored by the PAM technique. Images in the coronal view of the rat brain at the locations of 1.2 and 3.4 mm posterior to bregma were obtained. The resulted photoacoustic (PA) images showed the regional changes in the blood volume. Additionally, the regional changes in blood oxygenation were also presented. The results demonstrated that PA imaging is capable of monitoring regional hemodynamic changes induced by drug abuse.

  4. Duloxetine in the treatment of Major Depressive Disorder: a comparison of efficacy in patients with and without melancholic features.

    PubMed

    Mallinckrodt, Craig H; Watkin, John G; Liu, Chaofeng; Wohlreich, Madelaine M; Raskin, Joel

    2005-01-04

    The most prominent feature of melancholic depression is a near-total loss of the capacity to derive pleasure from activities or other positive stimuli. Additional symptoms can include psychomotor disturbances, anorexia, excessive guilt, and early awakening from sleep. Melancholic patients may exhibit treatment responses and outcomes that differ from those of non-melancholic patients. Pooled data from double-blind, placebo-controlled studies were utilized to compare the efficacy of duloxetine in depressed patients with and without melancholic features. Efficacy data were pooled from 8 double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trials of duloxetine. The presence of melancholic features (DSM-IV criteria) was determined using results from the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI). Patients (aged >or= 18 years) meeting DSM-IV criteria for major depressive disorder (MDD) received duloxetine (40-120 mg/d; melancholic, N = 759; non-melancholic, N = 379) or placebo (melancholic, N = 519; non-melancholic, N = 256) for up to 9 weeks. Efficacy measures included the 17-item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAMD17) total score, HAMD17 subscales (Maier, anxiety, retardation, sleep), the Clinical Global Impression of Severity (CGI-S) and Patient Global Impression of Improvement (PGI-I) scales, and Visual Analog Scales (VAS) for pain. In data from all 8 studies, duloxetine's advantage over placebo did not differ significantly between melancholic and non-melancholic patients (treatment-by-melancholic status interactions were not statistically significant). Duloxetine demonstrated significantly greater improvement in depressive symptom severity, compared with placebo, within both melancholic and non-melancholic cohorts (p duloxetine-treated male and female melancholic patients. In the two studies that

  5. Validated spectrophotometric method for the determination, spectroscopic characterization and thermal structural analysis of duloxetine with 1,2-naphthoquinone-4-sulphonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulu, Sevgi Tatar; Elmali, Fikriye Tuncel

    2012-03-01

    A novel, selective, sensitive and simple spectrophotometric method was developed and validated for the determination of the antidepressant duloxetine hydrochloride in pharmaceutical preparation. The method was based on the reaction of duloxetine hydrochloride with 1,2-naphthoquinone-4-sulphonate (NQS) in alkaline media to yield orange colored product. The formation of this complex was also confirmed by UV-visible, FTIR, 1H NMR, Mass spectra techniques and thermal analysis. This method was validated for various parameters according to ICH guidelines. Beer's law is obeyed in a range of 5.0-60 μg/mL at the maximum absorption wavelength of 480 nm. The detection limit is 0.99 μg/mL and the recovery rate is in a range of 98.10-99.57%. The proposed methods was validated and applied to the determination of duloxetine hydrochloride in pharmaceutical preparation. The results were statistically analyzed and compared to those of a reference UV spectrophotometric method.

  6. Vortioxetine, but not escitalopram or duloxetine, reverses memory impairment induced by central 5-HT depletion in rats: evidence for direct 5-HT receptor modulation.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Jesper Bornø; du Jardin, Kristian Gaarn; Song, Dekun; Budac, David; Smagin, Gennady; Sanchez, Connie; Pehrson, Alan Lars

    2014-01-01

    Depressed patients suffer from cognitive dysfunction, including memory deficits. Acute serotonin (5-HT) depletion impairs memory and mood in vulnerable patients. The investigational multimodal acting antidepressant vortioxetine is a 5-HT3, 5-HT7 and 5-HT1D receptor antagonist, 5-HT1B receptor partial agonist, 5-HT1A receptor agonist and 5-HT transporter (SERT) inhibitor that enhances memory in normal rats in novel object recognition (NOR) and conditioned fear (Mørk et al., 2013). We hypothesized that vortioxetine's 5-HT receptor mechanisms are involved in its memory effects, and therefore investigated these effects in 5-HT depleted rats. Four injections of the irreversible tryptophan hydroxylase inhibitor 4-chloro-dl-phenylalanine methyl ester hydrochloride (PCPA, 86mg/kg, s.c.) induced 5-HT depletion, as measured in hippocampal homogenate and microdialysate. The effects of acute challenge with vortioxetine or the 5-HT releaser fenfluramine on extracellular 5-HT were measured in PCPA-treated and control rats. PCPA's effects on NOR and spontaneous alternation (SA) performance were assessed along with the effects of acute treatment with 5-hydroxy-l-tryptophan (5-HTP), vortioxetine, the selective 5-HT reuptake inhibitor escitalopram, or the 5-HT norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor duloxetine. SERT occupancies were estimated by ex vivo autoradiography. PCPA depleted central 5-HT by >90% in tissue and microdialysate, and impaired NOR and SA performance. Restoring central 5-HT with 5-HTP reversed these deficits. At similar SERT occupancies (>90%) vortioxetine, but not escitalopram or duloxetine, restored memory performance. Acute fenfluramine significantly increased extracellular 5-HT in control and PCPA-treated rats, while vortioxetine did so only in control rats. Thus, vortioxetine restores 5-HT depletion impaired memory performance in rats through one or more of its receptor activities. © 2013 Published by Elsevier B.V. and ECNP.

  7. Galactorrhea during duloxetine treatment: a case report.

    PubMed

    Korkmaz, Sevda; Kuloğlu, Murat; Işık, Umut; Sağlam, Sadullah; Atmaca, Murad

    2011-01-01

    High prolactin hormone level in the blood is known as hyperprolactinemia. The most common symptom of hyperprolactinemia is galactorrhea, in which spontaneous milky discharge is seen from all ducts of the 2 mammary glands. Galactorrhea occurs due to different medical conditions, including the use of antidepressant medications. Herein we report a hyperprolactinemia case with galactorrhea due to duloxetine treatment for depression.

  8. Prescribing patterns and safety monitoring of duloxetine using the Danish Register of Medicinal Product Statistics as a source.

    PubMed

    Johansen, Anja Nygaard; Stenzhorn, Annette Aalykke; Rosenzweig, Mary; Thirstrup, Steffen; Gazerani, Parisa

    2013-12-01

    The safety and pattern of use of a medicinal product cannot be fully studied prior to its marketing. In Denmark, the Danish Health and Medicines Authority (DHMA) monitors marketed drugs. An available source is the Register of Medicinal Product Statistics (RMPS), which can possibly be used for these purposes. To investigate utilisation and potential safety issues of relatively new antidepressants containing the active ingredient duloxetine (Cymbalta(®) and Xeristar(®)) by using dispensing data available in the RMPS. A retrospective study using dispensing data was designed to estimate the size and composition of the user population and patterns of use of the antidepressants Cymbalta(®) and Xeristar(®) (active ingredient: duloxetine) in the period from 1 January 2005 to 31 December 2010. Data were retrieved from Epikur, a register subset of the RMPS. Both women and men in different age groups used duloxetine for depression. Some users switched to another antidepressant. Prescription of the drug for persons below the age of 18 years revealed a potential safety issue. Concomitant treatment with Cymbalta(®) or Xeristar(®) and fluvoxamine, isocarboxazid, Yentreve(®), or ciprofloxacin also revealed potential safety issues. The present study indicated that the RMPS is applicable in monitoring the pattern of use and potential safety issues related to duloxetine when it is prescribed for depression. Switching to other antidepressants could reflect some potential safety issues. Use of duloxetine for persons below the age of 18 years and its concomitant use with contraindicated drugs also indicated potential safety issues.

  9. Associated with intrathecal baclofen treatment and duloxetine in patients with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Ranieri, M; Putignano, P; Fiore, P; Santamato, A; Megna, G; Bellomo, R G; Cristella, G; Saggini, R; Megna, M

    2012-01-01

    Baclofen is now used in treatment of patients with severe spasticity secondary to neurological diseases through the direct infusion of the drug into the subarachnoid space with an implanted programmable pump. Among patients whose quality of life improved after the use of intrathecal systems, a very important role belongs to people with multiple sclerosis (MS): a disease that due to a great variety of symptoms and signs, seriously affects the activities of daily living. Among the clinical manifestations of MS are also found mental health problems including depression mood. The drugs most commonly offered, for treatment of depression in patients with MS, are selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), reuptake inhibitors of serotonin and norepinephrine (SNRIs) and tricyclic antidepressants (TCA). Duloxetine presents a high affinity for transporters reuptake of serotonin and noradrenalin, and exerts its activity on both molecules. In addiction, Duloxetine has demonstrated very effective in treatment of depressive disorders of mood as demonstrated by scientific evidences about the utility of Duloxetine in the modulation of painful physical symptoms associated with depression and in treatment of pain associated with diabetic neuropathy. The purpose of our study is to evaluate the effects of antidepressant therapy with duloxetine, 60 mg/day in 7 patients with multiple sclerosis treated with intrathecal baclofen for spastic modulation of tone. The experience we gained, according to data from several multicenter trials confirmed the efficacy of Baclofen intrathecally administered, especially with regards to modulation of spasticity. Our study also showed, although the limitations of a small sample size still, a good clinical response to combined treatment Baclofen intrathecal/duloxetine 60 mg/day.

  10. Imidazole derivatives. XXVII. Synthesis and radioprotective activity of substituted phenacylthioimidazoline and 3-phenyl-5,6-dihydroimidazo[2,1-B]thiazole hydrochlorides

    SciTech Connect

    Iradyan, M.A.; Aroyan, R.A.; Engoyan, A.P.

    1995-05-01

    Previously, we described the synthesis of phenacylthioimidazolines and investigated the biological properties of the corresponding hydrochlorides. It was found that some hydorchlorides exhibited quite significant sympathicolytic and mutagenic activity. Due to the low solubility of substituted phenacylthioimidazoline hydrobromides in water and the fact that they can cyclize into imidazothiazoles it was difficult to convert the hydrobromides to the corresponding hydrochlorides. For this reason the phenacylthioimidazoline hydrochlorides were synthesized in the present work by reacting the phenacyl chlorides with 2-thio-2-imidazoline. 8 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Novel glucosamine hydrochloride-rectorite nanocomposites with antioxidant and anti-ultraviolet activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaoying; Liu, Bo; Li, Xiang; Sun, Runcang

    2012-12-01

    In this study, an attempt was made to prepare novel D-glucosamine hydrochloride-rectorite (DGH-REC) nanocomposites with improved antioxidant and anti-ultraviolet activity via the solution-intercalation method. The structure and morphology of DGH-REC nanocomposites were characterized by XRD, TEM, 13C CP/MAS NMR, FT-IR, XPS and SEM. The results showed that the interlayer distance of REC was enlarged after intercalation of DGH; the largest value reached 11.76 nm, and in this case exfoliation of the REC layer was observed. Moreover, most strong crystals of DGH were greatly disrupted while two other weak crystals of DGH were stronger after intercalation of DGH into REC. More importantly, it was found that DGH-REC nanocomposites showed pronounced antioxidant activity, in contrast with DGH, and the nanocomposites had anti-ultraviolet capacity, which was not observed in DGH. Furthermore, the nanocomposites did not show apparent cytotoxicity. Therefore, DGH-REC nanocomposites have great potential in health or functional food application as compared to DGH.

  12. Duloxetine Inhibits Microglial P2X4 Receptor Function and Alleviates Neuropathic Pain after Peripheral Nerve Injury

    PubMed Central

    Yamashita, Tomohiro; Yamamoto, Shota; Zhang, Jiaming; Kometani, Miho; Tomiyama, Daisuke; Kohno, Keita; Tozaki-Saitoh, Hidetoshi; Inoue, Kazuhide; Tsuda, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    P2X4 receptors (P2X4R) are a family of ATP-gated non-selective cation channels. We previously demonstrated that activation of P2X4R in spinal microglia is crucial for neuropathic pain, a highly debilitating chronic pain condition, suggesting that P2X4R is a potential therapeutic target for treating neuropathic pain. Thus, the identification of a compound that has a potent inhibitory effect on P2X4R is an important clinical challenge. In the present study, we screened a chemical library of clinically approved drugs and show for the first time that duloxetine, a serotonin and noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor, has an inhibitory effect on rodent and human P2X4R. In primary cultured microglial cells, duloxetine also inhibited P2X4R-, but not P2X7R-, mediated responses. Moreover, intrathecal administration of duloxetine in a model of neuropathic pain produced a reversal of nerve injury-induced mechanical allodynia, a cardinal symptom of neuropathic pain. In rats that were pretreated with a serotonin-depleting agent and a noradrenaline neurotoxin, the antiallodynic effect of duloxetine was reduced, but still remained. Based on these results, we suggest that, in addition to duloxetine’s primary inhibitory action on serotonin and noradrenaline transporters, an inhibitory effect on P2X4R may be involved at least in part in an antiallodynic effect of intrathecal duloxetine in a model of neuropathic pain. PMID:27768754

  13. Cost effectiveness of duloxetine in the treatment of fibromyalgia in the United States.

    PubMed

    Beard, S M; Roskell, N; Le, T K; Zhao, Y; Coleman, A; Ang, D; Lawson, K

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate the cost effectiveness of duloxetine when considered as an alternative treatment for patients in the United States (US) being treated for fibromyalgia pain. A Markov model was used to evaluate the economic and clinical advantages of duloxetine in controlling fibromyalgia pain symptoms over a 2-year time horizon. A base-case treatment sequence was adopted from clinical guidelines, based on tricyclic antidepressants, serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors, anticonvulsants, and opioids. Treatment response was modeled using changes from baseline in pain severity, and response thresholds: full response (at least a 50% change), response (30-49% change), and no response (less than a 30% change). Clinical efficacy and discontinuation data were taken from placebo- and active-controlled trials identified in a systematic literature review and mixed-treatment comparison. Utility data were based on EQ-5D data. Additional symptom-control months (SCMs), defined as the amount of time at a response level of 30% or less, and quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) over a 2-year time horizon. For every 1000 patients, first-line duloxetine resulted in an additional 665 SCMs and 12.3 QALYs, at a cost of $582,911 (equivalent to incremental cost-effectiveness ratios [ICERs] of $877 per SCM and $47,560 per QALY). Second-line duloxetine resulted in an additional 460 SCMs and 8.7 QALYs, at a cost of $143,752 (equivalent to ICERs of $312 per SMC and $16,565 per QALY). Response data for TCAs are limited to 30% improvement levels, reported trials are small, and have low placebo response rates. The model necessarily assumes that response rates are independent of placement in the treatment sequence. The results suggest that the introduction of duloxetine into the standard treatment sequence for fibromyalgia not only provides additional patient benefits, reflected by time spent in pain control, but also is cost effective when compared with commonly adopted thresholds.

  14. Glucosamine hydrochloride

    MedlinePlus

    ... a combination of glucosamine hydrochloride, chondroitin sulfate, and manganese ascorbate. Some evidence suggests that this combination can ... amount of glucosamine or contain excessive amounts of manganese. Ask your healthcare provider about reliable brands. Special ...

  15. Microbicidal activity of octenidine hydrochloride, a new alkanediylbis[pyridine] germicidal agent.

    PubMed

    Sedlock, D M; Bailey, D M

    1985-12-01

    The potential of octenidine hydrochloride (WIN 41464-2) as a topical microbicide was measured both by in vitro death kinetics and reductions in numbers of bacteria on the skin of cynomolgus monkeys. Semilogarithmic survival curves were plotted to measure the microbicidal activity of various concentrations of octenidine against Staphylococcus aureus. The microbicidal activity of octenidine was also determined for Staphylococcus epidermidis, Proteus mirabilis, Streptococcus pyogenes, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Serratia marcescens, and Candida albicans. Death rates for the same microbial strains were compared with those obtained by using chlorhexidine gluconate. Octenidine concentrations of less than 1.5 microM (0.94 microgram/ml) caused a greater than 99% reduction of each microbial population within 15 min. Staphylococcus epidermidis was the most susceptible of the test organisms, and E. coli and C. albicans were the least susceptible. Octenidine was more active than chlorhexidine against each test strain. Skin-degerming activities of aqueous and formulated octenidine and formulated chlorhexidine were compared in single and multiple applications of these agents to the hand and foot surfaces of monkeys by using a glove-juice extraction procedure to measure the skin microflora. Aqueous octenidine, at a concentration of 0.2 to 1.6% reduced resident microflora populations from 90 to 99.98%, depending on the concentration and number of applications. Octenidine formulated at 2% in a surfactant-based vehicle exhibited significantly better skin-degerming activity than did either a nonmedicated vehicle or the Hibiclens brand of 4% chlorhexidine gluconate.

  16. Microbicidal activity of octenidine hydrochloride, a new alkanediylbis[pyridine] germicidal agent.

    PubMed Central

    Sedlock, D M; Bailey, D M

    1985-01-01

    The potential of octenidine hydrochloride (WIN 41464-2) as a topical microbicide was measured both by in vitro death kinetics and reductions in numbers of bacteria on the skin of cynomolgus monkeys. Semilogarithmic survival curves were plotted to measure the microbicidal activity of various concentrations of octenidine against Staphylococcus aureus. The microbicidal activity of octenidine was also determined for Staphylococcus epidermidis, Proteus mirabilis, Streptococcus pyogenes, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Serratia marcescens, and Candida albicans. Death rates for the same microbial strains were compared with those obtained by using chlorhexidine gluconate. Octenidine concentrations of less than 1.5 microM (0.94 microgram/ml) caused a greater than 99% reduction of each microbial population within 15 min. Staphylococcus epidermidis was the most susceptible of the test organisms, and E. coli and C. albicans were the least susceptible. Octenidine was more active than chlorhexidine against each test strain. Skin-degerming activities of aqueous and formulated octenidine and formulated chlorhexidine were compared in single and multiple applications of these agents to the hand and foot surfaces of monkeys by using a glove-juice extraction procedure to measure the skin microflora. Aqueous octenidine, at a concentration of 0.2 to 1.6% reduced resident microflora populations from 90 to 99.98%, depending on the concentration and number of applications. Octenidine formulated at 2% in a surfactant-based vehicle exhibited significantly better skin-degerming activity than did either a nonmedicated vehicle or the Hibiclens brand of 4% chlorhexidine gluconate. PMID:3909955

  17. Synthesis and characterization of pharmaceutical surfactant templated mesoporous silica: Its application to controlled delivery of duloxetine

    SciTech Connect

    Mani, Ganesh; Pushparaj, Hemalatha; Peng, Mei Mei; Muthiahpillai, Palanichamy; Udhumansha, Ubaidulla; Jang, Hyun Tae

    2014-03-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Usefulness of dual pharmaceutical surfactants in silica synthesis was evaluated. • Effects of concentration of secondary template (Tween-40) were studied. • Effects of fixed solvothermal condition on mesostructure formation were studied. • Duloxetine drug loading capability was studied. • Sustained release of duloxetine was evaluated. - Abstract: A new group of mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) were synthesized using combination pharmaceutical surfactants, Triton X-100 and Tween-40 as template and loaded with duloxetine hydrochloride (DX), for improving the sustained release of DX and patterns with high drug loading. Agglomerated spherical silica MSNs were synthesized by sol–gel and solvothermal methods. The calcined and drug loaded MSNs were characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD), Braunner–Emmett–Teller (BET), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), diffuse reflectance ultraviolet–visible (DRS-UV–vis) spectroscopy. MSNs with high surface area and pore volume were selected and studied for their DX loading and release. The selected MSNs can accommodate a maximum of 34% DX within it. About 90% was released at 200 h and hence, the synthesized MSNs were capable of engulfing DX and sustain its release. Further form the Ritger and Peppas, Higuchi model for mechanism drug release from all the MSN matrices follows anomalous transport or Non-Fickian diffusion with the ‘r’ and ‘n’ value 0.9 and 0.45 < n < 1, respectively. So, from this study it could be concluded that the MSNs synthesized using pharmaceutical templates were better choice of reservoir for the controlled delivery of drug which requires sustained release.

  18. Spectrofluorimetric determination of 3-methylflavone-8-carboxylic acid, the main active metabolite of flavoxate hydrochloride in human urine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaazaa, Hala E.; Mohamed, Afaf O.; Hawwam, Maha A.; Abdelkawy, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    A simple, sensitive and selective spectrofluorimetric method has been developed for the determination of 3-methylflavone-8-carboxylic acid as the main active metabolite of flavoxate hydrochloride in human urine. The proposed method was based on the measurement of the native fluorescence of the metabolite in methanol at an emission wavelength 390 nm, upon excitation at 338 nm. Moreover, the urinary excretion pattern has been calculated using the proposed method. Taking the advantage that 3-methylflavone-8-carboxylic acid is also the alkaline degradate, the proposed method was applied to in vitro determination of flavoxate hydrochloride in tablets dosage form via the measurement of its corresponding degradate. The method was validated in accordance with the ICH requirements and statistically compared to the official method with no significant difference in performance.

  19. Spectrofluorimetric determination of 3-methylflavone-8-carboxylic acid, the main active metabolite of flavoxate hydrochloride in human urine.

    PubMed

    Zaazaa, Hala E; Mohamed, Afaf O; Hawwam, Maha A; Abdelkawy, Mohamed

    2015-01-05

    A simple, sensitive and selective spectrofluorimetric method has been developed for the determination of 3-methylflavone-8-carboxylic acid as the main active metabolite of flavoxate hydrochloride in human urine. The proposed method was based on the measurement of the native fluorescence of the metabolite in methanol at an emission wavelength 390 nm, upon excitation at 338 nm. Moreover, the urinary excretion pattern has been calculated using the proposed method. Taking the advantage that 3-methylflavone-8-carboxylic acid is also the alkaline degradate, the proposed method was applied to in vitro determination of flavoxate hydrochloride in tablets dosage form via the measurement of its corresponding degradate. The method was validated in accordance with the ICH requirements and statistically compared to the official method with no significant difference in performance.

  20. Development of topical hydrogels of terbinafine hydrochloride and evaluation of their antifungal activity.

    PubMed

    Çelebi, Nevin; Ermiş, Seda; Özkan, Semiha

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to prepare hydrogels and microemulsion (ME)-based gel formulations containing 1% terbinafine hydrochloride (TER-HCL) and to evaluate the use of these formulations for the antifungal treatment of fungal infections. Three different hydrogel formulations were prepared using chitosan, Carbopol® 974 and Natrosol® 250 polymers. A pseudo-ternary phase diagram was constructed, and starting from ME formulation, a ME gel form containing 1% Carbopol 974 was prepared. We also examined the characteristic properties of the prepared hyrogels. The physical stability of hydrogels and the ME -based gels were evaluated after storage at different temperatures for a period of 3 months. The release of TER-HCL from the gels and the commercial product (Lamisil®) was carried out by using a standard dialysis membrane in phosphate buffer (pH 5.2) at 32 °C. The results of the in vitro release study showed that the Natrosol gel released the highest amount of drug, followed by Carbopol gel, chitosan gel, commercial product, and the microoemulsion-based gel in that order. In vitro examination of antifungal activity revealed that all the prepared and commercial products were effective against Candida parapsilosis, Penicillium, Aspergillus niger and Microsporum. These results indicate that the Natrosol®-based hydrogel is a good candidate for the topical delivery of TER-HCL.

  1. Duloxetine in the management of diabetic peripheral neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    Ormseth, Michelle J; Scholz, Beth A; Boomershine, Chad S

    2011-01-01

    Diabetic neuropathy affects up to 70% of diabetics, and diabetic peripheral neuropathic pain (DPNP) is the most common and debilitating of the diabetic neuropathies. DPNP significantly reduces quality of life and increases management costs in affected patients. Despite the impact of DPNP, management is poor with one-quarter of patients receiving no treatment and many treated with medications having little or no efficacy in managing DPNP. Duloxetine is one of two drugs approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration for DPNP management. Duloxetine is a serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (SNRI) proven safe, effective, and cost-saving in reducing DPNP symptoms at a dose of 60 mg/day. Duloxetine doses greater than 60 mg/day for DPNP management are not recommended since they are no more efficacious and associated with more side effects; addition of pregabalin or gabapentin for these patients may be beneficial. Side effects of duloxetine are generally mild and typical for the SNRI class including nausea, dizziness, somnolence, fatigue, sweating, dry mouth, constipation, and diarrhea. Given its other indications, duloxetine is a particularly good choice for DPNP treatment in patients with coexisting depression, anxiety, fibromyalgia, or chronic musculoskeletal pain. Duloxetine treatment had no clinically significant effect on glycemic control and did not increase the risk of cardiovascular events in diabetes patients. However, duloxetine use should be avoided in patients with hepatic disease or severe renal impairment. Given its safety, efficacy, and tolerability, duloxetine is an excellent choice for DPNP treatment in many patients. PMID:21845034

  2. LASSBio-1829 Hydrochloride: Development of a New Orally Active N-Acylhydrazone IKK2 Inhibitor with Anti-inflammatory Properties.

    PubMed

    Guedes, Isabella A; Freitas, Rosana H C N; Cordeiro, Natália M; do Nascimento, Thaís S; Valerio, Tayna S; Fernandes, Patrícia D; Dardenne, Laurent E; Fraga, Carlos A M

    2016-01-19

    Inhibitor of nuclear factor κB kinase 2 (IKK2) is suggested to be a potential target for the development of novel anti-inflammatory and anticancer drugs. In this work, we applied structure-based drug design to improve the potency of the inhibitor (E)-N'-(4-nitrobenzylidene)-2-naphthohydrazide (LASSBio-1524, 1 a: IC50 =20 μm). The molecular model built for IKK2 together with the docking methodology employed were able to provide important and consistent information with respect to the structural and chemical inhibitor characteristics that may confer potency to IKK2 inhibitors, providing important guidelines for the development of a new N-acylhydrazone (NAH) derivative. (E)-N'-(4-(1H-pyrrolo[2,3-b]pyridin-4-yl)benzylidene)-2-naphthohydrazide hydrochloride (LASSBio-1829 hydrochloride, 10) is a 7-azaindole NAH able to inhibit IKK2 with an IC50 value of 3.8 μm. LASSBio-1829 hydrochloride was found to be active in several pharmacological inflammation tests in vivo, showing its potential as an anti-inflammatory prototype.

  3. Efficacy of duloxetine add on in treatment of inflammatory bowel disease patients: A double-blind controlled study

    PubMed Central

    Daghaghzadeh, Hamed; Naji, Fateme; Afshar, Hamid; Sharbafchi, Mohammad Reza; Feizi, Awat; Maroufi, Mohsen; Tabatabaeeyan, Mahshid; Adibi, Peyman; Tavakoli, Hamid

    2015-01-01

    Background: Treating inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) with antidepressants might be of utility to improve patient's condition. The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of Duloxetine on depression, anxiety, severity of symptoms, and quality of life (QOL) in IBD patients. Materials and Methods: In a randomized, double-blind, controlled clinical trial on 2013-2014, in Alzahra Hospital (Isfahan, Iran), 44 IBD patients were chosen to receive either duloxetine (60 mg/day) or placebo. They were treated in a 12 weeks program, and all of the participants also received mesalazine, 2-4 g daily. We assessed anxiety and depression with Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, the severity of symptoms with Lichtiger Colitis Activity Index and QOL with World Health Organization Quality of Life Instruments, before and just after the treatment. The data were analyzed using Paired sample t-test and ANCOVA. Results: In 35 subjects who completed the study, the mean (standard error [SE]) scores of depression and anxiety were reduced in duloxetine more than placebo group, significantly (P = 0.041 and P = 0.049, respectively). The mean (SE) scores of severity of symptom were also reduced in duloxetine more than the placebo group, significantly (P = 0.02). The mean (SE) scores of physical, psychological, and social dimensions of QOL were increased after treatment with duloxetine more than placebo group, significantly (P = 0.001, P = 0.038, and P = 0.015, respectively). The environmental QOL was not increased significantly (P = 0.260). Conclusion: Duloxetine is probably effective and safe for reducing depression, anxiety and severity of physical symptoms. It also could increase physical, psychological, and social QOL in patients. PMID:26600836

  4. Duloxetine in the treatment of generalized anxiety disorder.

    PubMed

    Norman, Trevor R; Olver, James S

    2008-12-01

    Duloxetine, a medication with effects on both serotonin and noradrenaline transporter molecules, has recently been approved for the treatment of generalized anxiety disorder. The evidence for its efficacy lies in a limited number of double blind, placebo controlled comparisons. Statistically significant improvements in the Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale from baseline were demonstrated in all studies at doses of 60 to 120 mg per day. The significance of such changes in terms of clinical improvements compared to placebo is less certain, particularly when the effect size of the change is calculated. In comparative trials with venlafaxine, duloxetine was as effective in providing relief of anxiety symptoms. In addition to improvements in clinical symptoms duloxetine has also been associated with restitution of role function as measured by disability scales. Duloxetine use is associated with nausea, dizziness, dry mouth, constipation, insomnia, somnolence, hyperhidrosis, decreased libido and vomiting. These treatment emergent side effects were generally of mild to moderate severity and were tolerated over time. Using a tapered withdrawal schedule over two weeks in the clinical trials, duloxetine was associated with only a mild withdrawal syndrome in up to about 30% of patients compared to about 17% in placebo treated patients. Duloxetine in doses of up to 200 mg twice daily did not prolong the QTc interval in healthy volunteers. Like other agents with dual neurotransmitter actions duloxetine reduces the symptoms of generalized anxiety disorder in short term treatments. Further evidence for its efficacy and safety in long term treatment is required.

  5. Parkinsonism secondary to duloxetine use: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Bayrak, Arzu; Cetin, Bugra; Meteris, Handan; Kesebir, Sermin

    2015-01-01

    In literature, there are more than hundred cases of extrapyramidal symptoms (EPS) associated with selective serotonin reuptake intibitors (SSRI) whereas EPS case reports associated with serotonin noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors (SNRI) are in a relatively small number. A SNRI group drug duloxetine that is used for indication of major depression since 2004 is a double acting antidepressant that acts by blocking serotonin and noradrenaline reuptake. Side effects of duloxetine on extrapyramidal system are not expected due to low affinity to D2 receptors. In this case, report manifestations of parkinsonism developed in a patient who used duloxetine for major depression are presented. Since any duloxetine induced EPS case has not reported so far, we have thought that this case can contribute to the literature. PMID:28058376

  6. Comparison of neurogenic effects of fluoxetine, duloxetine and running in mice

    PubMed Central

    Marlatt, Michael W.; Lucassen, Paul J.; van Praag, Henriette

    2010-01-01

    Hippocampal neurogenesis can be regulated by extrinsic factors, such as exercise and antidepressants. While there is evidence that the serotonin re-uptake inhibitor (SSRI) fluoxetine (Prozac) enhances neurogenesis, the new dual serotonin/noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor (SNRI) duloxetine has not been evaluated in this context. In addition, it is unclear whether effects of antidepressants and running on cell genesis and behavior are of similar magnitude in mice. Here,we assessed neurogenesis and open field behavior in 2 month old female C57Bl/6 mice after 28 days of treatment with either fluoxetine (18 mg/kg), duloxetine (2, 6 or 18 mg/kg) or exercise. New cell survival, as measured by 5-bromo-2´-deoxyuridine (BrdU) labeled cells, was enhanced by 200% in the running group only. Both running and fluoxetine, but not duloxetine, increased the percentage of new cells that became neurons. In the open field test, animals treated with either drug spent less time in the center than controls and runners. In addition, fluoxetine treatment resulted in reduced locomotor activity. Together, these data not only show that the neurogenic response to exercise is much stronger than to antidepressants, but also imply a low likelihood that reported effects of these two drugs on anxiety are mediated by adult neurogenesis in C57Bl/6 mice. PMID:20381469

  7. Duloxetine and other antidepressants in the treatment of patients with fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Lesley M

    2007-09-01

    To review the use of duloxetine, a new selective serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (SNRI), and other antidepressants in the treatment of patients with fibromyalgia. Two randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind, parallel-group, 12-week trials of duloxetine in the treatment of fibromyalgia were reviewed. Other published, randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind trials, and meta-analyses of antidepressant treatment of fibromyalgia were identified by a PubMed search that was augmented by reference cross-check. Duloxetine has been shown to be an effective and safe treatment for many of the symptoms associated with fibromyalgia, particularly for women. Other selective SNRIs also show promise in the treatment of fibromyalgia. Until recently, tricyclic agents that have serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitory activity had been the most commonly studied group of antidepressants, and they are effective in treating pain and other symptoms associated with fibromyalgia, although their use may be limited by safety and tolerability concerns. There are few randomized, controlled studies of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors in fibromyalgia, and the results have been mixed. Antidepressants play an important role in the treatment of patients with fibromyalgia. Agents with dual effects on serotonin and norepinephrine appear to have more consistent benefits than selective serotonin antidepressants for the treatment of persistent pain associated with fibromyalgia.

  8. A case of retrobulbar optic neuritis caused by duloxetine.

    PubMed

    Bicer, Tolga; Kosker, Mustafa; Celikay, Osman; Gurdal, Canan

    2016-09-01

    Psychotropic medications may cause many ocular adverse effects including toxic optic neuropathy. We present a unique case of a 44-year-old woman using duloxetine who presented with unilateral visual loss due to retrobulbar neuritis. Physicians and patients should be alerted to this potential side effect. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of developing retrobulbar neuritis related to duloxetine usage.

  9. Treatment discontinuation and tolerability as a function of dose and titration of duloxetine in the treatment of major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Harada, Eiji; Shirakawa, Osamu; Satoi, Yoichi; Marangell, Lauren B; Escobar, Rodrigo

    2016-01-01

    We sought to better understand how dose and titration with duloxetine treatment may impact tolerability and treatment discontinuation in patients with major depressive disorder. We investigated Phase III duloxetine trials. Group 1 was a single placebo-controlled study with a 20 mg initial dose and a slow titration to 40 and 60 mg. Group 2 was a single study with a 40 mg initial dose and final "active" doses of 40 and 60 mg (5 mg control group), with 1-week titration. Group 3 consisted of eight placebo-controlled studies with starting doses of 40, 60, and 80 mg/day with minimal titration (final dose 40-120 mg/day). Tolerability was measured by rate of discontinuation due to adverse events (DCAE). The DCAE in Group 1 were 3.6% in the 60 mg group, 3.3% in the 40 mg group, and 3.2% in the placebo group. In Group 2, the DCAE were 15.0% in the 60 mg group, 8.1% in the 40 mg group, and 4.9% in the 5 mg group. In Group 3, the DCAE were 9.7% and 4.2% in the duloxetine and placebo groups, respectively. This study suggests that starting dose and titration may have impacted tolerability and treatment discontinuation. A lower starting dose of duloxetine and slower titration may contribute to improving treatment tolerability for patients with major depressive disorder.

  10. The role of duloxetine in the treatment of anxiety disorders

    PubMed Central

    De Berardis, Domenico; Serroni, Nicola; Carano, Alessandro; Scali, Marco; Valchera, Alessandro; Campanella, Daniela; D’Albenzio, Alessandro; Di Giuseppe, Berardo; Moschetta, Francesco Saverio; Salerno, Rosa Maria; Ferro, Filippo Maria

    2008-01-01

    Anxiety disorders (ADs) are the most common type of psychiatric disorders, with a mean incidence of 18.1% and a lifetime prevalence of 28.8%. Pharmacologic options studied for treating ADs may include benzodiazepines, tricyclic antidepressants (TCA), selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), noradrenergic and specific serotonergic drug (NaSSA) and dual-reuptake inhibitors of serotonin and norepinephrine (SNRIs). In this context, the development of SNRIs (venlafaxine and duloxetine) has been particularly useful. As a dual-acting intervention that targets two neurotransmitter systems, these medications would appePar promising for the treatment of ADs. The purpose of this review was to elucidate current facts and views about the role of duloxetine in the treatment of ADs. In February 2007, duloxetine was approved by FDA for the treatment of generalized anxiety disorder (GAD). The results of trials evaluating the use duloxetine in the treatment of GAD are supportive on its efficacy even if further studies on long-term use are needed. Apart from some interesting case reports, no large studies are, to date, present in literature about duloxetine and other ADs such as panic disorder, social anxiety disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder and post-traumatic stress disorder. Therefore, the clinical efficacy and the relative good tolerability of duloxetine may be further investigated to widen the therapeutic spectrum of ADs. PMID:19183783

  11. The role of duloxetine in the treatment of anxiety disorders.

    PubMed

    De Berardis, Domenico; Serroni, Nicola; Carano, Alessandro; Scali, Marco; Valchera, Alessandro; Campanella, Daniela; D'Albenzio, Alessandro; Di Giuseppe, Berardo; Moschetta, Francesco Saverio; Salerno, Rosa Maria; Ferro, Filippo Maria

    2008-10-01

    Anxiety disorders (ADs) are the most common type of psychiatric disorders, with a mean incidence of 18.1% and a lifetime prevalence of 28.8%. Pharmacologic options studied for treating ADs may include benzodiazepines, tricyclic antidepressants (TCA), selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), noradrenergic and specific serotonergic drug (NaSSA) and dual-reuptake inhibitors of serotonin and norepinephrine (SNRIs). In this context, the development of SNRIs (venlafaxine and duloxetine) has been particularly useful. As a dual-acting intervention that targets two neurotransmitter systems, these medications would appePar promising for the treatment of ADs. The purpose of this review was to elucidate current facts and views about the role of duloxetine in the treatment of ADs. In February 2007, duloxetine was approved by FDA for the treatment of generalized anxiety disorder (GAD). The results of trials evaluating the use duloxetine in the treatment of GAD are supportive on its efficacy even if further studies on long-term use are needed. Apart from some interesting case reports, no large studies are, to date, present in literature about duloxetine and other ADs such as panic disorder, social anxiety disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder and post-traumatic stress disorder. Therefore, the clinical efficacy and the relative good tolerability of duloxetine may be further investigated to widen the therapeutic spectrum of ADs.

  12. The safety of duloxetine during pregnancy and lactation.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Chittaranjan

    2014-12-01

    Depression is common in women, especially during pregnancy and the postpartum period. Untreated depression is associated with many adverse gestational outcomes. It is therefore important to know about the safety of different antidepressant drugs during pregnancy and lactation so that informed decisions can be made regarding treatment. This article summarizes published literature on the subject with regard to duloxetine, an antidepressant with serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibition properties. In general, it appears that the use of duloxetine during pregnancy is associated with an increase in the risk of spontaneous abortion, but no increase in other adverse outcomes, such as major fetal malformations. Late-pregnancy exposure to duloxetine may be associated with poor neonatal adaptation syndrome, but the magnitude of this risk is not known. Infant exposure to duloxetine in breast milk is less than 1% of the maternal weight-adjusted dose, suggesting that duloxetine can be safely administered to a woman who is breastfeeding her infant. In general, the very limited data available on the subject do not uncover a signal that the use of duloxetine during pregnancy or lactation increases the risk of adverse outcomes.

  13. Synthesis of silver nanoparticles in the presence of diethylaminoethyl-dextran hydrochloride polymer and their SERS activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikac, L.; Jurkin, T.; Štefanić, G.; Ivanda, Mile; Gotić, Marijan

    2017-09-01

    The silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) were synthesized upon γ-irradiation of AgNO3 precursor suspensions in the presence of diethylaminoethyl-dextran hydrochloride (DEAE-dextran) cationic polymer as a stabilizer. The dose rate of γ-irradiation was 32 kGy h-1, and absorbed doses were 30 and 60 kGy. The γ-irradiation of the precursor suspension at acidic or neutral pH conditions produced predominantly the silver(I) chloride (AgCl) particles, because of the poor solubility of AgCl already present in the precursor suspension. The origin of AgCl in the precursor suspension was due to the presence of chloride ions in DEAE-dextran hydrochloride polymer. The addition of ammonia to the precursor suspension dissolved the AgCl precipitate, and the γ-irradiation of such colourless suspension at alkali pH produced a stable aqueous suspension with rather uniform spherical AgNPs of approximately 30 nm in size. The size of AgNPs was controlled by varying the AgNO3/DEAE-dextran concentration in the suspensions. The surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) activities of synthesized AgNPs were examined using organic molecules rhodamine 6G, pyridine and 4-mercaptobenzoic acid (4-MBA). The NaBH4 was used as SERS aggregation agent. The SERS results have shown that in the presence of synthesized AgNPs, it was possible to detect low concentration of tested compounds.

  14. The effect of polyhexamethylene guanidine hydrochloride (PHMG) derivatives introduced into polylactide (PLA) on the activity of bacterial enzymes.

    PubMed

    Walczak, Maciej; Richert, Agnieszka; Burkowska-But, Aleksandra

    2014-11-01

    The present study was aimed at investigating bactericidal properties of polylactide (PLA) films containing three different polyhexamethylene guanidine hydrochloride (PHMG) derivatives and effect of the derivatives on extracellular hydrolytic enzymes and intracellular dehydrogenases. All PHMG derivatives had a slightly stronger bactericidal effect on Staphylococcus aureus than on E. coli but only PHMG granular polyethylene wax (at the concentration of at least 0.6 %) has a bactericidal effect. PHMG derivatives introduced into PLA affected the activity of microbial hydrolases to a small extent. This means that the introduction of PHMG derivatives into PLA will not reduce its enzymatic biodegradation significantly. On the other hand, PHMG derivatives introduced into PLA strongly affected dehydrogenases activity in S. aureus than in E. coli.

  15. Implications of Pain in Generalized Anxiety Disorder: Efficacy of Duloxetine

    PubMed Central

    Hartford, James T.; Endicott, Jean; Kornstein, Susan G.; Allgulander, Christer; Wohlreich, Madelaine M.; Russell, James M.; Perahia, David G. S.; Erickson, Janelle S.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To conduct a post hoc evaluation of the prevalence of clinically significant pain and the efficacy of duloxetine in patients with generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) and concurrent pain. Method: Data from two 9- to 10-week double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized clinical trials of duloxetine (60 to 120 mg) in DSM-IV–defined GAD were analyzed (study 1 was conducted from July 2004 to September 2005; study 2 was conducted from August 2004 to June 2005). Efficacy was assessed with the Hamilton Rating Scale for Anxiety (HAM-A), visual analog scales (VAS) for pain, the Hospital Anxiety Depression Scale (HADS), the Clinical Global Impressions-Improvement of Illness (CGI-I) scale, the Patient Global Impressions-Improvement (PGI-I) scale, and the Sheehan Disability Scale (SDS) global functional impairment scale. Results: Of 840 patients randomly assigned to treatment, 61.3% (302 duloxetine, 213 placebo) had VAS scores ≥ 30 mm on at least 1 of the pain scales, indicating clinically significant pain. Among those patients with concurrent pain at baseline, change from baseline to endpoint in the HAM-A total score (42.9% change in mean scores for duloxetine, 31.4% for placebo), HADS anxiety scale (40.3% vs. 22.8%), HADS depression scale (36.1% vs. 20.5%), HAM-A psychic factor (45.9% vs. 29.9%), and SDS global functional improvement score (45.5% vs. 22.1%) was significantly (all p's < .001) greater for duloxetine compared with placebo. Improvement on the CGI-I (p = .003) and PGI-I (p < .001) was also significantly greater for duloxetine. Response (HAM-A total score decrease ≥ 50%) (49% vs. 29%) and remission (HAM-A total score ≤ 7 at endpoint) (29% vs. 18%) rates were significantly greater for duloxetine compared with placebo (p < .001 and p = .041, respectively). Duloxetine demonstrated statistically significantly greater reduction in pain on all 6 VAS pain scales (all p's < .001 except headaches with p < .002) (for duloxetine, percent change in means from

  16. Duloxetine-bupropion combination for treatment-resistant atypical depression: a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Fornaro, Michele; Martino, Matteo; Mattei, Chiara; Prestia, Davide; Vinciguerra, Valentina; De Berardis, Domenico; De Pasquale, Concetta; Iasevoli, Felice; Mungo, Sergio; Fornaro, Pantaleo

    2014-08-01

    The efficacy, safety, and tolerability of combined bupropion versus placebo using duloxetine as active reference drug, in patients with a DSM-IV diagnosis of major depression with atypical features and a history of treatment resistance, were evaluated in this preliminary six-week study. Patients (n=46) had a baseline Hamilton Depression Scale (HAM-D) ≥14 and were randomly assigned to 150/300 mg/day bupropion vs. placebo, which was added to 60 to 120 mg/day duloxetine depending on baseline depression severity. Atypical features of depression were assessed using the additional eight-item module of the Structured Interview Guide for the HAM-D with the Atypical Depression Supplement. By week 6, only five (21.7%) patients receiving duloxetine+placebo vs. six (26.1%) patients on the bupropion combination achieved response. No significant difference in final HAM-D scores between the two groups was observed between those patients achieving response. The presence of a higher number of atypical features significantly predicted non-response, with the relevant binary logistic regression model correctly classifying 17 out 22 (77.3%) of non-responders [Exp(B)=0.294; p=0.016] vs. 17 out 23 (73.9%) [Exp(B)=0.353; p=0.028] non-responder cases in the "+placebo" and "+bupropion" groups, respectively. In those patients receiving bupropion, treatment-emergent adverse events leading to withdrawal were more common among those receiving lower doses of the combination drug, and no life-threating dangers were noted. Additional studies, including an adequate course of duloxetine trial, are nonetheless aimed to allow a firm conclusion about the usefulness of the combination of duloxetine and bupropion for treatment-resistant cases of major depression with atypical features. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. and ECNP. All rights reserved.

  17. The efficacy and safety of duloxetine in a multidrug regimen for chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Giannantoni, Antonella; Porena, Massimo; Gubbiotti, Marilena; Maddonni, Stefania; Di Stasi, Savino M

    2014-02-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and safety of duloxetine hydrochloride in the treatment of patients affected by chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS). Thirty-eight CP/CPPS patients completed the National Institutes of Health Chronic Prostatitis Symptom Index (NIH-CPSI) and International Index of Erectile Function-Erectile Function-5 (IIEF-5) questionnaires, uroflowmetry, and evaluation of psychologic status using Hamilton Anxiety Scale (HAM-A) and Hamilton Depression Scale (HAM-D). Patients were randomly assigned to 2 treatments groups. Treatment in group 1 consisted of a simultaneous oral administration of tamsulosin (0.4 mg/d, 60 mg/d), saw palmetto (320 mg/d), and duloxetine (60 mg/d). Treatment in group 2 consisted of tamsulosin (0.4 mg/d) and saw palmetto (320 mg/d). NIH-CPSI and IIEF-5 questionnaires, uroflowmetry, and evaluation of the psychological status were repeated at 16 weeks of follow-up. At 16 weeks, a significant improvement in NIH-CPSI pain subscore, NIH-CPSI quality of life subscore, and NIH-CPSI total score were observed in group 1 patients compared with those in group 2 (P <.01, respectively), together with a significant improvement in HAM-A and HAM-D scores (P <.01, respectively). Patients in group 2 showed a significant improvement in NIH-CPSI total score, in the urinary symptoms subscore, and in the HAM-A total score. No significant differences were observed in IIEF-5 scores in the 2 groups. Maximum flow rate significantly increased in both groups. In group 1, 20% of patients stopped the study due to adverse effects. The use of duloxetine in a multimodal treatment with an α-blocker medication and a saw palmetto extract allowed better results in controlling clinical symptoms, psychologic status and quality of life patients affected by CP/CPPS. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Effect of duloxetine in patients with fibromyalgia: tiredness subgroups

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction This study tested the hypothesis that baseline ratings of fatigue/tiredness would be negatively associated with the efficacy of duloxetine on measures of pain and functional ability in patients with fibromyalgia. Methods A post hoc analysis of pooled data from 4 double-blind, placebo-controlled studies of duloxetine in fibromyalgia was performed. The fibromyalgia impact questionnaire (FIQ) tiredness item score (0 to 10 scale) was used to define tiredness subgroups. Patients were stratified into 3 subgroups: mild (0 to 3), moderate (4 to 6), and severe (7 to 10) tiredness. Analysis of covariance models and logistic regressions were used to test treatment-by-tiredness subgroup interactions. Results Data from the first 3 months are included in this post hoc analysis (duloxetine N = 797, placebo N = 535). At baseline, the distribution of tiredness severity in the duloxetine and placebo groups respectively was 3.64% and 3.75% mild, 16.71% and 15.57% moderate, and 79.65% and 80.68% severe. Rates of clinically significant (≥30% and ≥50%) improvement in brief pain inventory (BPI) average pain were similar across the tiredness subgroups. Tiredness severity at baseline was not negatively associated with the effects of duloxetine on patients' reports of functional ability using the FIQ total score, FIQ measures of physical impairment, interference with work, pain, stiffness, and depression and the medical outcomes study short form-36 (SF-36). Conclusions Studies of duloxetine in fibromyalgia have demonstrated clinically significant improvements in pain and functional ability (FIQ, SF-36). This post hoc analysis of data shows that the efficacy of duloxetine among patients with fibromyalgia does not vary as a function of baseline ratings of fatigue/tiredness. PMID:20630058

  19. Effects of benidipine hydrochloride on autonomic nervous activity in hypertensive patients with high- and low-salt diets.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Masahiro; Nakaya, Yutaka; Uemura, Eiko; Sawa, Yuko; Iga, Akiko; Kageyama, Norihito; Nakayama, Toru; Kusunoki, Kanji; Kawano, Tomohito; Katoh, Kansei; Okamoto, Hiroshi; Nishikado, Akiyoshi; Saito, Ken; Ito, Susumu

    2003-01-01

    The effects of benidipine hydrochloride (CAS 91559-74-5, Coniel) on autonomic nervous activity in hypertensive patients with high- and low-salt diets were investigated. Six patients having a urinary sodium excretion of 80 mEq/day or less (low salt group) and 6 patients having a urinary sodium excretion of 200 mEq/day or more (high salt group) were orally given benidipine hydrochloride (4 mg). Before and four weeks after the treatment with benidipine, 24-h circadian variation in blood pressure and 24-h Holter electrocardiogram (ECG) were recorded. The low frequency power spectrum of heart rate (LF power; 0.04-0.15 Hz), high frequency power spectrum of heart rate (HF power; 0.15-0.40 Hz), and the ratio of LF to HF (LF/HF) were calculated, and these parameters were averaged every hour in every subject. HF power was significantly lower and LF/HF ratio was significantly higher in the high-salt group than in the low-salt group before the treatment. However, the benidipine treatment significantly increased the HF power in both groups, particularly in the high-salt group, and significantly decreased the LF/HF ratio in both groups. Moreover, there was no significant difference in the antihypertensive effect of benidipine between the high- and low-salt intake groups. These results suggest that benidipine favourably influences blood pressure and autonomic nervous activity in hypertensive patients with a high-salt intake. It is concluded that benidipine may be useful for improving the development of salt-induced hypertension and its accompanying haemodynamic responses.

  20. Early effects of duloxetine on emotion recognition in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Bamford, Susan; Penton-Voak, Ian; Pinkney, Verity; Baldwin, David S; Munafò, Marcus R; Garner, Matthew

    2015-05-01

    The serotonin-noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor (SNRI) duloxetine is an effective treatment for major depression and generalised anxiety disorder. Neuropsychological models of antidepressant drug action suggest therapeutic effects might be mediated by the early correction of maladaptive biases in emotion processing, including the recognition of emotional expressions. Sub-chronic administration of duloxetine (for two weeks) produces adaptive changes in neural circuitry implicated in emotion processing; however, its effects on emotional expression recognition are unknown. Forty healthy participants were randomised to receive either 14 days of duloxetine (60 mg/day, titrated from 30 mg after three days) or matched placebo (with sham titration) in a double-blind, between-groups, repeated-measures design. On day 0 and day 14 participants completed a computerised emotional expression recognition task that measured sensitivity to the six primary emotions. Thirty-eight participants (19 per group) completed their course of tablets and were included in the analysis. Results provide evidence that duloxetine, compared to placebo, may reduce the accurate recognition of sadness. Drug effects were driven by changes in participants' ability to correctly detect subtle expressions of sadness, with greater change observed in the placebo relative to the duloxetine group. These effects occurred in the absence of changes in mood. Our preliminary findings require replication, but complement recent evidence that sadness recognition is a therapeutic target in major depression, and a mechanism through which SNRIs could resolve negative biases in emotion processing to achieve therapeutic effects. © The Author(s) 2015.

  1. Early effects of duloxetine on emotion recognition in healthy volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Bamford, Susan; Penton-Voak, Ian; Pinkney, Verity; Baldwin, David S; Munafò, Marcus R; Garner, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    The serotonin-noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor (SNRI) duloxetine is an effective treatment for major depression and generalised anxiety disorder. Neuropsychological models of antidepressant drug action suggest therapeutic effects might be mediated by the early correction of maladaptive biases in emotion processing, including the recognition of emotional expressions. Sub-chronic administration of duloxetine (for two weeks) produces adaptive changes in neural circuitry implicated in emotion processing; however, its effects on emotional expression recognition are unknown. Forty healthy participants were randomised to receive either 14 days of duloxetine (60 mg/day, titrated from 30 mg after three days) or matched placebo (with sham titration) in a double-blind, between-groups, repeated-measures design. On day 0 and day 14 participants completed a computerised emotional expression recognition task that measured sensitivity to the six primary emotions. Thirty-eight participants (19 per group) completed their course of tablets and were included in the analysis. Results provide evidence that duloxetine, compared to placebo, may reduce the accurate recognition of sadness. Drug effects were driven by changes in participants’ ability to correctly detect subtle expressions of sadness, with greater change observed in the placebo relative to the duloxetine group. These effects occurred in the absence of changes in mood. Our preliminary findings require replication, but complement recent evidence that sadness recognition is a therapeutic target in major depression, and a mechanism through which SNRIs could resolve negative biases in emotion processing to achieve therapeutic effects. PMID:25759400

  2. Bupropion Hydrochloride.

    PubMed

    Khan, S R; Berendt, R T; Ellison, C D; Ciavarella, A B; Asafu-Adjaye, E; Khan, M A; Faustino, P J

    2016-01-01

    Bupropion hydrochloride is a norepinephrine-dopamine disinhibitor (NDDI) approved for the treatment of depression and smoking cessation. Bupropion is a trimethylated monocyclic phenylaminoketone second-generation antidepressant, which differs structurally from most antidepressants, and resides in a novel mechanistic class that has no direct action on the serotonin system. Comprehensive chemical, physical, and spectroscopic profiles are presented. This analytical profile provides an extensive spectroscopic investigation utilizing mass spectrometry, one- and two-dimensional NMR, solid-state NMR, IR, NIR, Raman, UV, and X-ray diffraction. The profile also includes significant wet chemistry studies for pH, solubility, solution, and plasma stability. Both HPLC and UPLC methodology are presented for bupropion and its related impurities or major metabolites. The profile concludes with an overview of biological properties that includes toxicity, drug metabolism, and pharmacokinetics. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Impact of Pretreatment With Antidepressants on the Efficacy of Duloxetine in Terms of Mood Symptoms and Functioning: An Analysis of 15 Pooled Major Depressive Disorder Studies

    PubMed Central

    Barros, Bruno R.; Schacht, Alexander; Happich, Michael; Televantou, Foula; Berggren, Lovisa; Walker, Daniel J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: This post hoc analysis aimed to determine whether patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) in duloxetine trials who were antidepressant naive or who were previously exposed to antidepressants exhibited differences in efficacy and functioning. Method: Data were pooled from 15 double-blind, placebo- and/or active-controlled duloxetine trials of adult patients with MDD conducted by Eli Lilly and Company. The individual studies took place between March 2000 and November 2009. Data were analyzed using 4 pretreatment subgroups: first-episode never treated, multiple-episode never treated, treated previously only with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), and previously treated with antidepressants other than just SSRIs. Measures included the 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS-17) total and somatic symptom subscale scores, Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) total score, and Sheehan Disability Scale total score. Response rates (50% and 30%) were based on the HDRS-17 total score and remission rates on either the HDRS-17 or MADRS total score. Results: Response and remission rates were significantly greater (P < .05 in 11 of 12 comparisons) for duloxetine versus placebo in the 4 subgroups. A trend of greater response and remission occurred for first-episode versus multiple-episode patients; both groups were generally higher than the antidepressant-treated groups. Mean changes in efficacy measures were mostly significantly greater (P < .05 in 13 of 16 comparisons) for duloxetine versus placebo within each pretreatment subgroup, with some (P < .05 in 2 of 24 comparisons) significant interaction effects between subgroups on HDRS-17 total and somatic symptoms scores. Conclusions: Duloxetine was generally superior to placebo on response and remission rates and in mean change on efficacy measures. Response and remission rates were numerically greater for first-episode versus multiple-episode and drug-treated patients. Mean change

  4. Structure activity studies of an analgesic drug tapentadol hydrochloride by spectroscopic and quantum chemical methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arjunan, V.; Santhanam, R.; Marchewka, M. K.; Mohan, S.; Yang, Haifeng

    2015-11-01

    Tapentadol is a novel opioid pain reliever drug with a dual mechanism of action, having potency between morphine and tramadol. Quantum chemical calculations have been carried out for tapentadol hydrochloride (TAP.Cl) to determine the properties. The geometry is optimised and the structural properties of the compound were determined from the optimised geometry by B3LYP method using 6-311++G(d,p), 6-31G(d,p) and cc-pVDZ basis sets. FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra are recorded in the solid phase in the region of 4000-400 and 4000-100 cm-1, respectively. Frontier molecular orbital energies, LUMO-HOMO energy gap, ionisation potential, electron affinity, electronegativity, hardness and chemical potential are also calculated. The stability of the molecule arising from hyperconjugative interactions and charge delocalisation has been analysed using NBO analysis. The 1H and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance chemical shifts of the molecule are analysed.

  5. Anti-tumor activity of phenoxybenzamine hydrochloride on malignant glioma cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xian-Bin; Jiang, Lei; Ding, Mao-Hua; Chen, Zhen-Hua; Bao, Yi; Chen, Yi; Sun, Wei; Zhang, Chen-Ran; Hu, Hong-Kang; Cai, Zhen; Lu, Cheng-Yin; Zhou, Jue-Yu; Qian, Jun; Wu, Xiao-Jun; Jin, Wei-Lin; Hu, Guo-Han

    2016-03-01

    Phenoxybenzamine hydrochloride (PHEN) is a selective antagonist of both α-adrenoceptor and calmodulin that exhibits anticancer properties. The aim of this study was to explore the anti-tumor function of PHEN in glioma. Cell proliferation assay was used to assess glioma cell growth. Migration and invasion capacity of glioma cells was monitored by wound-healing and transwell assay, respectively. Neurosphere formation test was adopted for the tumorigenesis of glioma cells, which was also confirmed by soft agar cloning formation test in vitro and a nude mouse model in vivo. Finally, we explored the potential pathway utilized by PHEN using Western blot and immunofluoresce staining. PHEN exhibited a significant inhibitory effect on the proliferation of both U251 and U87MG glioma cell lines in a positive dose-dependent manner. PHEN apparently attenuated the malignancy of glioma in terms of migration and invasion and also suppressed the tumorigenic capacity both in vitro and in vivo. Mechanism study showed that PHEN promoted tumor suppression by inhibiting the TrkB-Akt pathway. The results of the present study demonstrated that PHEN suppressed the proliferation, migration, invasion, and tumorigenesis of glioma cells, induced LINGO-1 expression, and inhibited the TrkB-Akt pathway, which may prove to be the mechanisms underlying the anti-tumor effect of PHEN on glioma cells.

  6. Study on the sonodynamic activity and mechanism of promethazine hydrochloride by multi-spectroscopic techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Ling-Ling; Wang, Xin; Liu, Bin; Wang, Jun; Sun, Ya-Guang; Xu, Shu-Kun

    2011-10-01

    In this paper, the bovine serum albumin (BSA) was selected as a target molecule, the sonodynamic damage to protein in the presence of promethazine hydrochloride (PMT) and its mechanism were studied by the means of absorption, fluorescence and circular dichroism (CD) spectra. The results of hyperchromic effect of absorption spectra and quenching of intrinsic fluorescence spectra indicate that the ultrasound-induced BSA molecules damage is enhanced by PMT. The damage degree of BSA molecules increases with the increase of ultrasonic irradiation time and PMT concentration. The results of synchronous fluorescence, three-dimensional fluorescence and CD spectra confirmed that the synergistic effects of ultrasound and PMT induced the damage of BSA molecules. The results of oxidation-extraction photometry with several reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavengers indicate that the damage of BSA molecules could be mainly due to the generation of ROS and both 1O 2 and rad OH are the important mediators of the ultrasound-induced BSA molecules damage in the presence of PMT.

  7. Antimicrobial activities of polyhexamethylene guanidine hydrochloride-based disinfectant against fungi isolated from cocoa beans and reference strains of bacteria.

    PubMed

    Mathurin, Yao K; Koffi-Nevry, Rose; Guéhi, Simplice T; Tano, Kablan; Oulé, Mathias K

    2012-06-01

    This study was conducted to assess the antibacterial and the antifungal activity of a polyhexamethylene guanidine hydrochloride (PHMGH)-based disinfectant and to determine if it could be used as a disinfectant for the treatment of cocoa beans. The activity of PHMGH was tested in vitro for efficacy against five reference strains of pathogenic bacteria and six strains of fungi isolated from cocoa beans. All the strains tested were sensitive to the disinfectant. The MICs reported were between 0.01 and 1.9 mg/ml and equal to the MBC or minimum fungicidal concentration (MFC) regardless of the strains of those microorganisms. The bacteria were more sensitive to PHMGH than were the fungi. Enterobacter cloacae was the most sensitive bacterium with a MIC and MBC of 0.01 mg/ml, whereas the genus Aspergillus was the least susceptible of the microorganisms tested, with a MIC and MFC from 1.0 to 1.9 mg/ml. The time required for the activity of PHMGH varies from 2 min for Enterobacter cloacae to 12 min for Aspergillus tamarii and generally increases with the MBC or the MFC. Through this in vitro study, the PHMGH has been proved to be bactericidal and fungicidal on the strains studied. Hence, it could probably serve as a fungicidal disinfectant for the treatment of cocoa beans after harvesting.

  8. Evaluation of toxicological impact of cartap hydrochloride on some physiological activities of a non-heterocystous cyanobacterium Leptolyngbya foveolarum.

    PubMed

    Singh, D P; Khattar, J I S; Gupta, Meenu; Kaur, Gurdeep

    2014-03-01

    The present study was aimed to the evaluation of toxicological impact of insecticide cartap hydrochloride on photosynthesis and nitrogen assimilation of a non-heterocystous cyanoprokaryote Leptolyngbya foveolarum isolated from paddy fields of Punjab, India. The microorganism tolerated commercial grade insecticide up to 80 ppm. Lower concentration (20 ppm) of cartap supported good growth with high dry weight of biomass, total protein content, photosynthetic pigments, photosynthesis and respiration compared to untreated control cultures while higher concentrations (40 and 60 ppm) inhibited these parameters in a dose dependent manner. Treatment of the microorganism with 60 ppm cartap lowered the content of photosynthetic pigments with maximum inhibitory effect on phycoerythrin (70% decrease) followed by allophycocyanin (66% decrease). Rates of photosynthesis and respiration were inhibited by 63% and 45%, respectively, while PS-I, II and whole chain activity were decreased by 45%, 67% and 40% respectively, compared to untreated control cultures. Cartap at 60 ppm decreased nitrate and nitrite uptake by 31% and 61%, respectively, whereas uptake of ammonium was slightly increased (18%) in cartap (60 ppm) treated cells. Nitrate and nitrite reductase, and glutamine synthetase activities of the microorganism decreased by 36-50% in 60 ppm cartap. The low levels of growth, photosynthetic pigments and activities of nitrogen assimilating enzymes in cells grown in nitrogen depleted medium supplement with insecticide indicated that insecticide may be used by the organism as a nitrogen source.

  9. Effects of milnacipran, duloxetine and indomethacin, in polyarthritic rats using the Randall-Selitto model.

    PubMed

    Mico, Juan Antonio; Berrocoso, Esther; Vitton, Olivier; Ladure, Philippe; Newman-Tancredi, Adrian; Bardin, Laurent; Depoortère, Ronan

    2011-09-01

    Milnacipran, a serotonin and noradrenalin reuptake inhibitor (SNRI), is efficacious in rodents in various models of acute or chronic pain (traumatic, neuropathic, inflammatory, visceral). However, its activity against arthritic pain has never been explored. Here, we assessed the activity of acute treatment with milnacipran in a polyarthritic rat model. Rats were injected in the tail base with complete Freund's adjuvant to induce a state of polyarthritis. Analgesic effects of acute treatment with intraperitoneal administration of milnacipran were then evaluated, using the Randall-Selitto model, against two levels of pressure applied to both hind paws (a lower one, addressing mechanical allodynia and a higher one, addressing mechanical hyperalgesia). The other SNRI duloxetine and the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug indomethacin were tested as positive controls. Milnacipran was significantly and dose dependently active against the decrease of paw withdrawal threshold produced by complete Freund's adjuvant for low (minimum effective dose=5 mg/kg, range tested: 2.5-10 mg/kg) and high (minimum effective dose=10 mg/kg, range tested: 5-20 mg/kg)-pressure levels. Duloxetine (20 mg/kg, intraperitoneally) was significantly active against low pressure only. Indomethacin (3 mg/kg per os) was efficacious against both pressure levels. These rodent data suggest that milnacipran should be efficacious in painful conditions associated with chronic inflammatory states, such as arthritis.

  10. Cartap Hydrochloride Poisoning.

    PubMed

    Kalyaniwala, Kimmin; Abhilash, Kpp; Victor, Peter John

    2016-08-01

    Cartap hydrochloride is a moderately hazardous nereistoxin insecticide that is increasingly used for deliberate self-harm in India. It can cause neuromuscular weakness resulting in respiratory failure. We report a patient with 4% Cartap hydrochloride poisoning who required mechanical ventilation for 36-hours. He recovered without any neurological deficits. We also review literature on Cartap hydrochloride poisoning.

  11. Multimodal antidepressant vortioxetine increases frontal cortical oscillations unlike escitalopram and duloxetine – a quantitative EEG study in rats

    PubMed Central

    Leiser, S C; Pehrson, A L; Robichaud, P J; Sanchez, C

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose EEG studies show that 5-HT is involved in regulation of sleep–wake state and modulates cortical oscillations. Vortioxetine is a 5-HT3, 5-HT7, and 5-HT1D receptor antagonist, 5-HT1B partial agonist, 5-HT1A agonist, and 5-HT transporter inhibitor. Preclinical (animal) and clinical studies with vortioxetine show positive impact on cognitive metrics involving cortical function. Here we assess vortioxetine's effect on cortical neuronal oscillations in actively awake rats. Experimental Approach Telemetric EEG recordings were obtained with the following treatments (mg·kg−1, s.c.): vehicle, vortioxetine (0.1, 1.0, 3.0, 10), 5-HT1A agonist flesinoxan (2.5), 5-HT3 antagonist ondansetron (0.30), 5-HT7 antagonist SB-269970-A (10), escitalopram (2.0), duloxetine (10) and vortioxetine plus flesinoxan. Target occupancies were determined by ex vivo autoradiography. Key Results Vortioxetine dose-dependently increased wakefulness. Flesinoxan, duloxetine, ondansetron, but not escitalopram or SB-269970-A increased wakefulness. Quantitative spectral analyses showed vortioxetine alone and with flesinoxan increased θ (4–8 Hz), α (8–12 Hz) and γ (30–50 Hz) power. Duloxetine had no effect on θ and γ, but decreased α power, while escitalopram produced no changes. Ondansetron and SB-269970 (≈31–35% occupancy) increased θ power. Flesinoxan (≈41% occupancy) increased θ and γ power. Conclusions and Implications Vortioxetine increased wakefulness and increased frontal cortical activity, most likely because of its 5-HT7 and 5-HT3 antagonism and 5-HT1A agonism. Vortioxetine differs from escitalopram and duloxetine by increasing cortical θ, α and γ oscillations. These preclinical findings suggest a role of vortioxetine in modulating cortical circuits known to be recruited during cognitive behaviours and warrant further investigation as to their clinical impact. PMID:24846338

  12. Multimodal antidepressant vortioxetine increases frontal cortical oscillations unlike escitalopram and duloxetine--a quantitative EEG study in rats.

    PubMed

    Leiser, S C; Pehrson, A L; Robichaud, P J; Sanchez, C

    2014-09-01

    EEG studies show that 5-HT is involved in regulation of sleep-wake state and modulates cortical oscillations. Vortioxetine is a 5-HT3 , 5-HT7 , and 5-HT1D receptor antagonist, 5-HT1B partial agonist, 5-HT1A agonist, and 5-HT transporter inhibitor. Preclinical (animal) and clinical studies with vortioxetine show positive impact on cognitive metrics involving cortical function. Here we assess vortioxetine's effect on cortical neuronal oscillations in actively awake rats. Telemetric EEG recordings were obtained with the following treatments (mg·kg(-1) , s.c.): vehicle, vortioxetine (0.1, 1.0, 3.0, 10), 5-HT1A agonist flesinoxan (2.5), 5-HT3 antagonist ondansetron (0.30), 5-HT7 antagonist SB-269970-A (10), escitalopram (2.0), duloxetine (10) and vortioxetine plus flesinoxan. Target occupancies were determined by ex vivo autoradiography. Vortioxetine dose-dependently increased wakefulness. Flesinoxan, duloxetine, ondansetron, but not escitalopram or SB-269970-A increased wakefulness. Quantitative spectral analyses showed vortioxetine alone and with flesinoxan increased θ (4-8 Hz), α (8-12 Hz) and γ (30-50 Hz) power. Duloxetine had no effect on θ and γ, but decreased α power, while escitalopram produced no changes. Ondansetron and SB-269970 (≈31-35% occupancy) increased θ power. Flesinoxan (≈41% occupancy) increased θ and γ power. Vortioxetine increased wakefulness and increased frontal cortical activity, most likely because of its 5-HT7 and 5-HT3 antagonism and 5-HT1A agonism. Vortioxetine differs from escitalopram and duloxetine by increasing cortical θ, α and γ oscillations. These preclinical findings suggest a role of vortioxetine in modulating cortical circuits known to be recruited during cognitive behaviours and warrant further investigation as to their clinical impact. © 2014 The British Pharmacological Society.

  13. Improvement with Duloxetine in an Adult ADHD Patient

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tourjman, Smadar Valerie; Bilodeau, Mathieu

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a common and disabling disorder among adults and is treated with stimulant and non stimulant medication. Objective: To report the case of a patient with ADHD showing good clinical response to duloxetine, a selective serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (SSNRI). Case…

  14. Efficacy, safety and tolerability of duloxetine in idiopathic trigeminal neuralgia.

    PubMed

    Anand, K S; Dhikav, V; Prasad, A; Shewtengna

    2011-04-01

    Trigeminal neuralgia (TN) is the most common type of neuralgia affecting facial region and is considered to be one of the most painful conditions. Treatment is often unsatisfactory. Newer treatment modalities are therefore being tried. Duloxetine is FDA approved drug for painful diabetic neuropathy and has been used in painful symptoms of depression as well. Safety and efficacy of duloxetine was evaluated in patients with trigeminal neuralgia; another chronically painful condition, in an open label manner. A total of 15 patients who fulfilled the diagnostic criteria of International Headache Society for Trigeminal Neuralgia were administered duloxetine 40 mg daily. The efficacy of the drug was evaluated by face scale and Likert's numerical scale. Statistically significant pain relief was reported in 9 out of 15 patients of trigeminal neuralgia. The pain relief was reported as early as in one week and was maintained for 16 weeks. The drug was well tolerated and side-effects reported were mild and reversible. No adverse drug reaction requiring hospitalisation or drug discontinuation was reported in the present study. Duloxetine showed statistically significant pain relief in trigeminal neuralgia. Double-blind, placebo-controlled studies are needed to confirm findings at a large scale.

  15. Duloxetine in the treatment of major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, David J

    2007-04-01

    Since depression impacts all body systems, antidepressant treatments should relieve both the emotional and physical symptoms of depression. Duloxetine demonstrated antidepressant efficacy at a dose of 60 mg qd in two placebo-controlled, randomized, double-blind studies and significantly improved remission rates compared with placebo. Duloxetine-treated patients had significant reduction in severity of the symptoms of depression as assessed by the HAM-D(17), anxious symptoms as measured by the HAM-A and quality of life measures compared to placebo. Duloxetine also improved somatic symptoms, particularly painful symptoms which may have contributed to significantly improved remission rates compared to placebo. Approximately 10% of the 1139 patients with major depressive disorder in placebo-controlled trials discontinued treatment due to an adverse event, compared to 4% of the 777 patients receiving placebo. In addition to nausea (1.4% incidence), which was the most common reason for discontinuation, dizziness, somnolence, and fatigue were the most common AEs reported as reasons for discontinuation and all were considered drug-related. Duloxetine treatment lacks effects on ECG, increases heart rate, and has little effect on blood pressure or weight.

  16. DNA breaking activity of the carbon-centered radical generated from 2,2'-azobis(2-amidinopropane) hydrochloride (AAPH).

    PubMed

    Hiramoto, K; Johkoh, H; Sako, K; Kikugawa, K

    1993-01-01

    When supercoiled plasmid DNA was incubated with 2,2'-azobis (2-amidinopropane)hydrochloride (AAPH) at pH 7.4 in the presence and absence of oxygen, the DNA single strands were effectively cleaved. The breaking in the presence of oxygen was not inhibited by superoxide dismutase and catalase, but inhibited by mannitol, ethanol, butyl hydroxyanisole, thiol compounds, tertiary amines and spin trapping agents N-tert-butyl-alpha-phenylnitrone (PBN) and 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide (DMPO). The breaking in the absence of oxygen was inhibited by ethanol, a tertiary amine and PBN. By electron spin resonance spin-trapping with PBN, the carbon-centered radical was detected both in the presence and the absence of oxygen. Hydroxyl radical was detected by use of DMPO only in the presence of oxygen. The DNA breaking activity of AAPH was found to be due primarily to the aliphatic carbon-centered radical. While the reactivity of carbon-centered radicals have received little attention, the aliphatic carbon-centered radical generated from AAPH was found to be highly reactive to break the DNA strands.

  17. Agomelatine and duloxetine synergistically modulates apoptotic pathway by inhibiting oxidative stress triggered intracellular calcium entry in neuronal PC12 cells: role of TRPM2 and voltage-gated calcium channels.

    PubMed

    Akpinar, Abdullah; Uğuz, Abdülhadi Cihangir; Nazıroğlu, Mustafa

    2014-05-01

    Calcium ion (Ca(2+)) is one of the universal second messengers, which acts in a wide range of cellular processes. Results of recent studies indicated that ROS generated by depression leads to loss of endoplasmic reticulum-Ca(2+) homeostasis, oxidative stress, and apoptosis. Agomelatine and duloxetine are novel antidepressant and antioxidant drugs and may reduce oxidative stress, apoptosis, and Ca(2+) entry through TRPM2 and voltage-gated calcium channels. We tested the effects of agomelatine, duloxetine, and their combination on oxidative stress, Ca(2+) influx, mitochondrial depolarization, apoptosis, and caspase values in the PC-12 neuronal cells. PC-12 neuronal cells were exposed in cell culture and exposed to appropriate non-toxic concentrations and incubation times for agomelatine were determined in the neurons by assessing cell viability. Then PC-12 cells were incubated with agomelatine and duloxetine for 24 h. Treatment of cultured PC-12 cells with agomelatine, duloxetine, and their combination results in a protection on apoptosis, caspase-3, caspase-9, mitochondrial membrane depolarization, cytosolic ROS production, glutathione peroxidase, reduced glutathione, and lipid peroxidation, values. Ca(2+) entry through non-specific TRPM2 channel blocker (2-APB) and voltage-gated Ca(2+) channel blockers (verapamil and diltiazem) was modulated by agomelatine and duloxetine. However, effects of duloxetine on the Ca(2+) entry through TRPM2 channels were higher than in agomelatine. Results of current study suggest that the agomelatine and duloxetine are useful against apoptotic cell death and oxidative stress in PC-12 cells, which seem to be dependent on mitochondrial damage and increased levels of intracellular Ca(2+) through activation of TRPM2 and voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels.

  18. Enhancement of nootropic effect of duloxetine and bupropion by caffeine in mice.

    PubMed

    Kale, Pravin Popatrao; Addepalli, Veeranjaneyulu

    2015-01-01

    The existing evidence suggests an association between depression and memory impairment. The objective of present study was to assess the effect of low dose caffeine with duloxetine and bupropion on memory. Mice were divided randomly into seven groups. Intra-peritoneal treatment of normal saline (10 ml/kg), caffeine (10 mg/kg), duloxetine (10 mg/kg), bupropion alone (10 mg/kg), caffeine + duloxetine (5 mg/kg, each), caffeine + bupropion (5 mg/kg, each), and bupropion + duloxetine (5 mg/kg, each) were given to groups I-VII, respectively. Elevated plus maze was used to evaluate transfer latency (TL) and Morris water maze was used to estimate the time spent in target quadrant. Caffeine with duloxetine treated group was better than other combination treated groups in terms of a significant decrease in TL and increase in the time spent in target quadrant recorded. Combining lower dose of caffeine with duloxetine may enhance cognitive benefits than respective monotherapies.

  19. Usefulness of duloxetine for Paclitaxel-induced peripheral neuropathy treatment in gynecological cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Otake, Akiko; Yoshino, Kiyoshi; Ueda, Yutaka; Sawada, Kenjiro; Mabuchi, Seiji; Kimura, Toshihiro; Kobayashi, Eiji; Isobe, Aki; Egawa-Takata, Tomomi; Matsuzaki, Shinya; Fujita, Masami; Kimura, Tadashi

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed at evaluating the usefulness and adverse effects of duloxetine treatment for paclitaxel-induced peripheral neuropathy in gynecological cancer patients. Medical records of gynecological cancer patients treated with duloxetine were retrospectively studied to evaluate the drug's efficacy for paclitaxel-induced peripheral neuropathy. RESULTS from 25 patients showed that an improved response was observed in 14 (56%). By univariate and multivariate analysis, the patient's age, tumor origin, regimen of chemotherapy, accumulated doses of paclitaxel or carboplatin, previous medication, maintenance dosage and timing of treatment with duloxetine were found not to be associated with the effectiveness of duloxetine treatment. Adverse effects with duloxetine were mild and well-tolerated. As an option, duloxetine can be effectively used for paclitaxel-induced peripheral neuropathy in patients with gynecological cancers, irrespective of patients' age, origin of the tumor, regimen of chemotherapy, or previous medication. Copyright© 2015 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  20. The short- and long-term effect of duloxetine on painful physical symptoms in patients with generalized anxiety disorder: results from three clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Beesdo, Katja; Hartford, James; Russell, James; Spann, Melissa; Ball, Susan; Wittchen, Hans-Ulrich

    2009-12-01

    Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) is associated with painful physical symptoms (PPS). These post hoc analyses of previous trial data assessed PPS and their response to duloxetine treatment in GAD patients. Studies 1 and 2 (n=840) were 9- to 10-week efficacy trials; study 3 (n=887) was a relapse prevention trial comprising a 26-week open-label treatment phase and a 26-week double-blind, placebo-controlled treatment continuation phase. Mean baseline visual analog scale scores (VAS, 0-100; n=1727) ranged from 26 to 37 for overall pain, headache, back pain, shoulder pain, interference with daily activities, and time in pain while awake. In studies 1 and 2, improvement on all VAS scores was greater in duloxetine-treated than in placebo-treated patients (pduloxetine (pduloxetine was efficacious in the short- and long-term treatment of PPS, which are common in GAD patients.

  1. Comprehensive quantum chemical and spectroscopic (FTIR, FT-Raman, 1H, 13C NMR) investigations of O-desmethyltramadol hydrochloride an active metabolite in tramadol - An analgesic drug

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arjunan, V.; Santhanam, R.; Marchewka, M. K.; Mohan, S.

    2014-03-01

    O-desmethyltramadol is one of the main metabolites of tramadol widely used clinically and has analgesic activity. The FTIR and FT-Raman spectra of O-desmethyl tramadol hydrochloride are recorded in the solid phase in the regions 4000-400 cm-1 and 4000-100 cm-1, respectively. The observed fundamentals are assigned to different normal modes of vibration. Theoretical studies have been performed as its hydrochloride salt. The structure of the compound has been optimised with B3LYP method using 6-31G** and cc-pVDZ basis sets. The optimised bond length and bond angles are correlated with the X-ray data. The experimental wavenumbers were compared with the scaled vibrational frequencies determined by DFT methods. The IR and Raman intensities are determined with B3LYP method using cc-pVDZ and 6-31G(d,p) basic sets. The total electron density and molecular electrostatic potential surfaces of the molecule are constructed by using B3LYP/cc-pVDZ method to display electrostatic potential (electron + nuclei) distribution. The electronic properties HOMO and LUMO energies were measured. Natural bond orbital analysis of O-desmethyltramadol hydrochloride has been performed to indicate the presence of intramolecular charge transfer. The 1H and 13C NMR chemical shifts of the molecule have been anlysed.

  2. An assessment of drug-drug interactions: the effect of desvenlafaxine and duloxetine on the pharmacokinetics of the CYP2D6 probe desipramine in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Patroneva, Albena; Connolly, Sandra M; Fatato, Penny; Pedersen, Ron; Jiang, Qin; Paul, Jeffrey; Guico-Pabia, Christine; Isler, Jennifer A; Burczynski, Michael E; Nichols, Alice I

    2008-12-01

    A number of antidepressants inhibit the activity of the cytochrome P450 2D6 enzyme system, which can lead to drug-drug interactions. Based on its metabolic profile, desvenlafaxine, administered as desvenlafaxine succinate, a new serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor, is not expected to have an impact on activity of CYP2D6. This single-center, randomized, open-label, four-period, crossover study was undertaken to evaluate the effect of multiple doses of desvenlafaxine (100 mg/day, twice the recommended therapeutic dose for major depressive disorder in the United States) and duloxetine (30 mg b.i.d.) on the pharmacokinetics (PK) of a single dose of desipramine (50 mg). A single dose of desipramine was given first to assess its PK. Desvenlafaxine or duloxetine was then administered, in a crossover design, so that steady-state levels were achieved; a single dose of desipramine was then coadministered. The geometric least-square mean ratios (coadministration versus desipramine alone) for area under the plasma concentration versus time curve (AUC) and peak plasma concentrations (C(max)) of desipramine and 2-hydroxydesipramine were compared using analysis of variance. Relative to desipramine alone, increases in AUC and C(max) of desipramine associated with duloxetine administration (122 and 63%, respectively) were significantly greater than those associated with desvenlafaxine (22 and 19%, respectively; P < 0.001). Duloxetine coadministered with desipramine was also associated with a decrease in 2-hydroxydesipramine C(max) that was significant compared with the small increase seen with desvenlafaxine and desipramine (-24 versus 9%; P < 0.001); the difference between changes in 2-hydroxydesipramine AUC did not reach statistical significance (P = 0.054). Overall, desvenlafaxine had a minimal impact on the PK of desipramine compared with duloxetine, suggesting a lower risk for CYP2D6-mediated drug interactions.

  3. A selective α2 B adrenoceptor agonist (A-1262543) and duloxetine modulate nociceptive neurones in the medial prefrontal cortex, but not in the spinal cord of neuropathic rats.

    PubMed

    Chu, K L; Xu, J; Frost, J; Li, L; Gomez, E; Dart, M J; Jarvis, M F; Meyer, M D; McGaraughty, S

    2015-05-01

    The noradrenergic system contributes to pain modulation, but the roles of its specific adrenoceptors are still being defined. We have identified a novel, potent (rat EC50  = 4.3 nM) and selective α2B receptor agonist, A-1262543, to further explore this adrenoceptor subtype's contribution to pathological nociception. Systemic administration of A-1262543 (1-10 mg/kg, intraperitoneal) dose-dependently attenuated mechanical allodynia in animals with a spinal nerve ligation injury. To further explore its mechanism of action, the activity of nociceptive neurones in the spinal cord and medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) were examined after injection of 3 mg/kg of A-1262543 (intravenous, i.v.). These effects were compared with duloxetine (3 mg/kg, i.v.), a dual noradrenaline (NA) and serotonin (5-HT) reuptake inhibitor. Systemic administration of A-1262543 or duloxetine did not alter the spontaneous or evoked firing of spinal wide dynamic range and nociceptive-specific neurones in the neuropathic rats, indicating that neither compound engaged spinal, peripheral or descending pathways. In contrast to the lack of effect on spinal neurones, both A-1262543 and duloxetine reduced the evoked and spontaneous firing of 'pain-responsive' (PR) neurones in the mPFC. Duloxetine, but not A-1262543, also inhibited the firing of pain non-responsive (nPR) neurones in the mPFC probably reflecting duloxetine's contribution to modulating non-pain endpoints. These data highlight that activation of the α2B adrenoceptor as well as inhibiting NA and 5-HT reuptake can result in modulating the ascending nociceptive system, and in particular, dampening the firing of PR neurones in the mPFC. © 2014 European Pain Federation - EFIC®

  4. Considering benefits and harms of duloxetine for treatment of stress urinary incontinence: a meta-analysis of clinical study reports

    PubMed Central

    Maund, Emma; Guski, Louise Schow; Gøtzsche, Peter C.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The European Medicines Agency makes clinical study reports publicly available and publishes reasons for not approving applications for marketing authorization. Duloxetine has been approved in Europe for the treatment of stress urinary incontinence in women. The reported adverse effects of duloxetine include mental health problems and suicidality. We obtained clinical study reports from the European Medicines Agency concerning use of this drug for stress urinary incontinence. METHODS: We performed a meta-analysis of 4 randomized placebo-controlled trials of duloxetine (involving a total of 1913 patients) submitted to the European Medicines Agency for marketing approval for the indication of stress urinary incontinence in women. We used data from the clinical study reports (totalling 6870 pages and including individual patient data) to assess benefits (including frequency of incontinence and changes in quality-of-life scores, such as Patient Global Impression of Improvement rating) and harms (both general harms, including discontinuation because of adverse events, and harms related to suicidality, violent behaviour and their potential precursors, such as akathisia and activation [stimulating effects such as insomnia, anxiety and agitation]). RESULTS: Duloxetine was significantly better than placebo in terms of percentage change in weekly incontinence episodes (mean difference −13.56%, 95% confidence interval [CI] −21.59% to −5.53%) and change in Incontinence Quality of Life total score (mean difference 3.24, 95% CI 2.00 to 4.48). However, the effect sizes were small, and a sensitivity analysis (with removal of one trial) showed that the number needed to treat for a Patient Global Impression of Improvement rating of “much better or very much better” was 8 (95% CI 6 to 13). The numbers needed to harm were 7 (95% CI 6 to 8) for discontinuing because of an adverse event and 7 (95% CI 6 to 9) for experiencing an activation event. No suicidality

  5. l-Arginine hydrochloride increases the solubility of folded and unfolded recombinant plasminogen activator rPA

    PubMed Central

    Tischer, Alexander; Lilie, Hauke; Rudolph, Rainer; Lange, Christian

    2010-01-01

    l-Arginine hydrochloride (l-ArgHCl) was found to be an effective enhancer for in vitro protein refolding more than two decades ago. A detailed understanding of the mechanism of action, by which l-ArgHCl as co-solvent is capable to effectively suppress protein aggregation, while protein stability is preserved, has remained elusive. Concepts for the effects of co-solvents, which have been established over the last decades, were found to be insufficient to completely explain the effects of l-ArgHCl on protein refolding. In this article, we present data, which clearly establish that l-ArgHCl acts on the equilibrium solubility of the native model protein recombinant plasminogen activator (rPA), while for S-carboxymethylated rPA (IAA-rPA) that served as a model protein for denatured protein states, equilibrium solubilities could not be obtained. Solid to solute free transfer energies for native rPA were lowered by up to 14 kJ mol-1 under the tested conditions. This finding is in marked contrast to a previously proposed model in which l-ArgHCl acts as a neutral crowder which exclusively has an influence on the stability of the transition state of aggregation. The effects on the apparent solubility of IAA-rPA, as well as on the aggregation kinetics of all studied protein species, that were observed in the present work could tentatively be explained within the framework of a nucleation-aggregation scheme, in which l-ArgHCl exerts a strong effect on the pre-equilibria leading to formation of the aggregation seed. PMID:20665695

  6. Prophylactic activity of mefloquine hydrochloride (WR 142 490) in drug-resistant malaria*

    PubMed Central

    Rieckmann, K. H.; Trenholme, G. M.; Williams, R. L.; Carson, P. E.; Frischer, H.; Desjardins, R. E.

    1974-01-01

    In preliminary studies with mefloquine (WR 142 490) a single dose exerted prolonged suppressive activity against a drug-resistant strain of Plasmodium falciparum. Development of patent parasitaemia was prevented when nonimmune persons were exposed to infected mosquitos 2 weeks after medication, and it was delayed when exposure occurred 3 weeks after drug administration. PMID:4619059

  7. The Use of Duloxetine in Chronic Bulimia Nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Averbuch, Robert N.

    2009-01-01

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors are routinely prescribed as off-label treatments for bulimia nervosa. There is, however, a paucity of literature addressing the efficacy of the serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors in the pharmacologic management of this disorder. This article describes a clinical situation in which duloxetine, a serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor, effectively treated a patient with long-standing bulimia nervosa, purging type, and comorbid generalized anxiety disorder. PMID:19763204

  8. Ion-activated in situ gelling systems for sustained ophthalmic delivery of ciprofloxacin hydrochloride.

    PubMed

    Balasubramaniam, J; Pandit, J K

    2003-01-01

    The poor bioavailability and therapeutic response exhibited by the conventional ophthalmic solutions due to precorneal elimination of the drug may be overcome by the use of in situ gel forming systems that are instilled as drops into the eye and undergo a sol-gel transition in the cul-de-sac. Our present work describes the formulation and evaluation of an ophthalmic delivery system of an antibacterial agent, CPH, based on the concept of ion-activated in situ gelation. Gelrite gellan gum, a novel ophthalmic vehicle that gels in the presence of mono or divalent cations, present in the lacrimal fluid was used alone and in combinations with sodium alginate as the gelling agent. The developed formulations were therapeutically efficacious and provided sustained release of the drug over an 8-hr period in vitro.

  9. Facile synthesis of Cu(II) impregnated biochar with enhanced adsorption activity for the removal of doxycycline hydrochloride from water.

    PubMed

    Liu, Su; Xu, Wei-Hua; Liu, Yun-Guo; Tan, Xiao-Fei; Zeng, Guang-Ming; Li, Xin; Liang, Jie; Zhou, Zan; Yan, Zhi-Li; Cai, Xiao-Xi

    2017-03-16

    In this study, the effect factors and mechanisms of doxycycline hydrochloride (DOX) adsorption on copper nitrate modified biochar (Cu-BC) was investigated. Cu-BC absorbent was synthesized through calcination of peanut shells biomass at 450°C and then impregnation with copper nitrate. The Cu-BC has exhibited excellent sorption efficiency about 93.22% of doxycycline hydrochloride from aqueous solution, which was double higher than that of the unmodified biochar. The experimental results suggest that the adsorption efficiency of DOX on the Cu-BC is dominated by the strong complexation, electrostatic interactions between DOX molecules and the Cu-BC samples. Comprehensively considering the cost, efficiency and the application to realistic water, the Cu-BC hold the significant potential for enhancing the effectiveness to remove DOX from water.

  10. Effects of chronic and acute methylphenidate hydrochloride (Ritalin) administration on locomotor activity, ultrasonic vocalizations, and neuromotor development in 3- to 11-day-old CD-1 mouse pups.

    PubMed

    Penner, M R; McFadyen, M P; Carrey, N; Brown, R E

    2001-11-01

    The present study examined the effects of chronic and acute treatment with methylphenidate hydrochloride (Ritalin) on isolation-induced ultrasonic vocalizations, spontaneous locomotor activity, and neuromotor coordination in 3- to 11-day-old CD-1 mouse pups. In Experiment 1, 3- to 11-day-old pups received daily injections of saline, 5 mg/kg or 20 mg/kg of methylphenidate hydrochloride, or no injection and were tested on postnatal Days 3, 5, 7, 9, and 11. Both doses of methylphenidate resulted in significant increases in locomotor activity at all ages, but had no significant effect on body weight, neuromotor development, or emission of ultrasonic vocalizations. In Experiment 2, pups were given a single dose of methylphenidate (5 or 20 mg/kg), saline, or no injection on one of postnatal Days 5, 7, 9, or 11. This acute methylphenidate treatment increased locomotor activity, but had no significant effects on ultrasonic vocalizations or neuromotor coordination. These results indicate that short-term, chronic methylphenidate treatment elevates locomotor responses, but has no immediate effects on anxietylike responses or on the development of neuromotor behavior of CD-1 mice in the first 11 days of life.

  11. Levalbuterol hydrochloride.

    PubMed

    Handley, D A; Morley, J; Vaickus, L

    1998-12-01

    Racemic salbutamol (racemic albuterol) ameliorates symptoms of asthma by activating beta-adrenoceptors on nerve, smooth muscle and inflammatory cells within the airways. Racemic salbutamol comprises equal proportions of 2 isomers: (S)-salbutamol and (R)-salbutamol, with the latter being exclusively responsible for activation of beta-adrenoceptors. Accordingly, within racemic salbutamol it is (R)-salbutamol that efficiently relieves obstruction of asthmatic airways and affords highly effective protection from bronchoconstrictor stimuli, including allergens. During regular use of racemic salbutamol, there is a progressive decline of protective efficacy and a corresponding intensification of airway responsiveness. This decline is largely absent during regular use of (R)-salbutamol. Consequently, bronchodilator responses to sub-maximal doses of (R)-salbutamol exceed responses to the equivalent dose of (R)-salbutamol given as the racemate. For example, in asthmatics with baseline FEVs activation of human eosinophils in vitro whereas, under the same conditions and concentrations, (S)-salbutamol augments activation of these cells. This property of (S)-salbutamol may explain why eosinophilia in induced sputum from subjects with allergic asthma is increased by regular use of racemic salbutamol. Similarly, the capacity of (R)-salbutamol to suppress hyperresponsiveness of the airways can be contrasted with the capacity of (S)-salbutamol to intensify

  12. The determination of crystal structures of active pharmaceutical ingredients from X-ray powder diffraction data: a brief, practical introduction, with fexofenadine hydrochloride as example.

    PubMed

    Brüning, Jürgen; Schmidt, Martin U

    2015-06-01

    This study describes the general method for the determination of the crystal structures of active pharmaceutical ingredients (API) from powder diffraction data and demonstrates its use to determine the hitherto unknown crystal structure of fexofenadine hydrochloride, a third-generation antihistamine drug. Fexofenadine hydrochloride was subjected to a series of crystallisation experiments using re-crystallisation from solvents, gas diffusion, layering with an antisolvent and gel crystallisation. Powder diffraction patterns of all samples were recorded and inspected for polymorphism and for crystallinity. All samples corresponded to the same polymorph. The crystal structure was determined from an X-ray powder diffraction pattern using a real-space method with subsequent Rietveld refinement. The structure exhibits a two-dimensional hydrogen bond network. Crystal structures of API can be determined from X-ray powder diffraction data with good reliability. Fexofenadine exhibits only one polymorphic form, which is stabilised in the crystal by strong hydrogen bonds of the type (+)N-H···Cl(-), O-H···Cl(-), and between COOH groups. © 2015 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  13. Duloxetine attenuated morphine withdrawal syndrome in the rat.

    PubMed

    Charkhpour, M; Jafari, R M; Ghavimi, H; Ghanbarzadeh, S; Parvizpur, A

    2014-08-01

    Long term exposure to morphine can induce dependence. The exact mechanisms of dependence are not yet fully understood. Many studies have been conducted to find new drugs that can prevent dependence. This study examined the effects of the chronic administration of duloxetine on the morphine withdrawal syndrome in rats. To this end, male Wistar rats (170-220 g) were randomly divided into 5 groups including one saline treated group (non-depend­ent group) and 4 morphine dependent groups. The experimental groups received additive doses of morphine for 9 days in order to induce dependence according to the following protocol: day 1:5 mg/kg/12 h, days 2 and 3: 10 mg/kg/12 h, days 4, 5:15 mg/kg/12 h, days 6 and 7: 20 mg/kg/12 h and days 8 and 9: 25 mg/kg/12 h. On the ninth day, the morning dose of morphine was only injected. It is worth noting that 30 min before the morning dose of morphine, duloxetine (10, 20, and 40 mg/kg) was injected intraperitoneally. In addition, 2 h after the last injection of morphine, the morphine withdrawal was precipitated by naloxone. The withdrawal signs were recorded for 30 min; these signs included jumping, rearing, genital grooming, abdominal writhing, wet dog shaking, and teeth grinding. The results of the study revealed that the chronic administration of duloxetine decreased all the withdrawal signs. Besides, it attenuated the total withdrawal scores significantly. Results indicate that the regulatory effects on serotonergic and noradrenergic parameters might be associated with the amelioration of the withdrawal symptoms. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  14. Netupitant and Palonosetron Hydrochloride

    Cancer.gov

    This page contains brief information about netupitant and palonosetron hydrochloride and a collection of links to more information about the use of this combination drug, research results, and ongoing clinical trials.

  15. Trifluridine and Tipiracil Hydrochloride

    Cancer.gov

    This page contains brief information about trifluridine and tipiracil hydrochloride and a collection of links to more information about the use of this combination drug, research results, and ongoing clinical trials.

  16. [A case of Paclitaxel-induced peripheral neuropathy successfully treated with duloxetine].

    PubMed

    Nagashima, Satoshi; Kiba, Takayoshi; Ogawa, Yoshikazu; Mura, Takuya; Kajiume, Sayoko; Okada, Yuuko; Morii, Nao; Takahashi, Hirotoshi; Ichiba, Yasunori; Yamashiro, Hiroyasu

    2015-05-01

    Here, we report about a 60-year-old woman with metastatic breast cancer who was successfully treated for paclitaxelinduced peripheral neuropathy with duloxetine. She was administered trastuzumab plus paclitaxel(PTX)combination therapy that was ultimately discontinued because of grade 3 peripheral neuropathy detected on day 15, according to the CTCAE (v4.0). She was administered duloxetine on day 90 after the end of the previous therapy because of the peripheral neuropathy. Thereafter, the peripheral neuropathy decreased to grade 1, which enabled PTX administration on her request. Further trials are required to confirm the efficacy of duloxetine.

  17. Investigation on the enantioseparation of duloxetine by capillary electrophoresis, NMR, and mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-López, Elena; Salgado, Antonio; Crego, Antonio L; Marina, María Luisa

    2014-10-01

    The enantiomeric separation of the antidepressant drug duloxetine was investigated by CE using 15 neutral CDs as chiral selectors. Among them, (2-hydroxypropyl)-β-CD and methyl-γ-CD gave rise to the highest enantioresolution. The enantiomer migration order for duloxetine was found to be reversed depending on the CD employed: R-duloxetine was the first-migrating enantiomer for (2-hydroxypropyl)-β-CD while it was the second-migrating enantiomer for methyl-γ-CD. NMR and MS experiments were performed in order to justify this behavior. Although the elucidation of the structure of the enantiomer-CD complexes was not possible, their averaged stoichiometry was studied and their apparent and averaged equilibrium constants were calculated. The results obtained showed that the chiral separation of duloxetine by CE depends not only on the thermodynamic stability of the enantiomer-chiral selector complexes but also on their electrophoretic mobility.

  18. Duloxetine and 8-OH-DPAT, but not fluoxetine, reduce depression-like behaviour in an animal model of chronic neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Hu, Bing; Doods, Henri; Treede, Rolf-Detlef; Ceci, Angelo

    2016-04-21

    The current study assessed whether antidepressant and/or antinociceptive drugs, duloxetine, fluoxetine as well as (±)-8-hydroxy-2-[di-n-propylamino] tetralin (8-OH-DPAT), are able to reverse depression-like behaviour in animals with chronic neuropathic pain. Chronic constriction injury (CCI) of the sciatic nerve in rats was selected as neuropathic pain model. Mechanical hypersensitivity and depression-like behaviour were evaluated 4 weeks after surgery by "electronic algometer" and forced swimming test (FST), which measured the time of immobility, and active behaviours climbing and swimming. The selective noradrenergic and serotonergic uptake blocker duloxetine (20mg/kg) and the selective 5-HT1A agonist 8-OH-DPAT (0.5mg/kg) significantly reversed both mechanical hypersensitivity and depression-like behaviour in CCI animals. Duloxetine significantly reversed depression-like behaviour in CCI rats by increasing the time of climbing and swimming, while 8-OH-DPAT attenuated depression-like behaviour mainly by increasing the time of swimming. However, the selective serotonergic uptake blocker fluoxetine (20mg/kg) failed to attenuate mechanical hypersensitivity and depression-like behaviour, possibly due to confounding pro-nociceptive actions at 5-HT3 receptors. These data suggest to target noradrenergic and 5-HT1A receptors for treatment of chronic pain and its comorbidity depression.

  19. A Randomized Placebo-Controlled Trial of Duloxetine for Central Pain in Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Slee, April

    2015-01-01

    Background: Pain is common in multiple sclerosis (MS). Duloxetine has a potential therapeutic role in treating MS-related pain. Methods: Thirty-eight MS patients were randomized 1:1 to receive duloxetine (n = 18) or matched placebo (n = 20). The dosing regimen was 30 mg daily for 1 week, then 60 mg daily for 5 weeks. The primary outcome measure was change in worst pain for week 6 relative to baseline recorded on a daily pain diary. Results: Of 38 randomized patients, 14 (78%) patients randomized to duloxetine and 18 (90%) randomized to placebo completed treatment per protocol. These participants had an average age of 55.5 years, 25% were male, and 66% had relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS). Baseline characteristics were similar. Discontinuations were due primarily to drug intolerance. Among those who completed treatment, worst pain at 6 weeks was reduced by 29% (±20%) for duloxetine versus 12% (±18%) for placebo (P = .016). Average daily pain at 6 weeks was reduced by 39% (±29%) in the duloxetine group compared to 10% (±18.8%) in the placebo group (P = .002). There were no significant changes (week 6 vs. baseline) or between-group differences for subject global impression, Beck Depression Inventory, 36-item Short Form Health Status Survey (SF-36), or sleep quality score. Conclusions: Fewer patients could tolerate duloxetine compared to placebo. Among patients who completed 6 weeks of treatment, there were significant reductions in average and worst daily pain scores with duloxetine compared to placebo. This study suggests that duloxetine has a direct pain-relieving effect in MS. PMID:25892978

  20. Treatment patterns associated with Duloxetine and Venlafaxine use for Major Depressive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Duloxetine and venlafaxine extended release (venlafaxine XR) are SNRIs indicated for the treatment of MDD. This study addresses whether duloxetine and venlafaxine XR are interchangeable in their patterns of use with patients who are depressed or are used more selectively based on treatment history, background characteristics, and presenting symptoms. Methods This was a retrospective analysis of an administrative insurance claims database. We studied patients in managed care with major depressive disorder (MDD) treated with duloxetine or venlafaxine XR. Predictors of treatment and cost were assessed using Chi-square and logistic regression analyses of demographics and past-year medication use and comorbidities. Results Patients with MDD treated with duloxetine (n = 9,641) versus venlafaxine XR (n = 8,514) tended to be older, slightly more likely to be female, and treated by a psychiatrist (P < 0.0001). In the prior year, more duloxetine patients (vs. venlafaxine XR) received ≥3 unique antidepressants (20.8% vs. 16.6%), ≥3 unique pain medications (25.5% vs. 15.6%), and had ≥8 unique diagnosed comorbid medical and psychiatric conditions (38.6% vs. 29.1%). The prior 6-month total health care costs were $1,731 higher for duloxetine than for venlafaxine XR and declined for both medications in the 6 months after treatment began. Logistic regression analysis revealed that 61% of duloxetine patients and 61% of venlafaxine XR patients were predictable from prior patient and treatment factors. Conclusions Patients with MDD treated with duloxetine tended to have a more complex and costly antecedent clinical presentation compared with venlafaxine XR patients, suggesting that physicians do not use the medications interchangeably. PMID:21281479

  1. Prescribing patterns of duloxetine in France: a prescription assessment study in real-world conditions.

    PubMed

    Augendre-Ferrante, Beatrice; Picard, Hernan; Evans, David; Arkoub, Hafida; Pamulapati, Sireesha; Perrot, Serge; Valensi, Paul; Rouillon, Frederic

    2014-01-01

    Duloxetine is a serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor approved in the European Union for the treatment of major depressive disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, and diabetic peripheral neuropathic pain in adults. This study aimed to assess the real-world conditions of duloxetine use in France. Between April 2009 and January 2010, 290 dispensing pharmacies, randomly selected from a nationally representative list, included 1,104 patients who presented a duloxetine prescription and consented to the study. Demographic, clinical, and prescription data were extracted from pharmacy records and requested from prescribing physicians. Of the 294 patients with full data available, the mean age (standard deviation) was 54.5 (13.5) years; 74.1% were female; and 86.7% presented with a renewal prescription. 73.5% of patients had major depressive disorder; 3.4% generalized anxiety disorder; and 3.4% diabetic peripheral neuropathic pain. Overall, 78.2% (95% CI: 73.1; 82.8) of patients received duloxetine for an EU-approved indication; 95.2% (95% CI: 92.1; 97.4) of patients had no contra-indication to duloxetine; and 99.0% (95% CI: 97.0; 99.8) received an approved dose. Combining these three criteria, the overall approved use of duloxetine was 73.7% (95% CI: 68.3; 78.7). The strengths and limitations of the study design are discussed.

  2. Augmentation of antidepressant effects of duloxetine and bupropion by caffeine in mice.

    PubMed

    Kale, Pravin Popatrao; Addepalli, Veeranjaneyulu

    2014-09-01

    There is an unmet need in the treatment of depression suggesting requirement of new therapeutic approaches having better efficacy and safety profile. Patients receiving antidepressant therapy generally consume caffeine in the form of tea or coffee. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the augmentation of antidepressant effects of duloxetine and/or bupropion with caffeine. Male Swiss Albino mice received treatment of normal saline (10 ml/kg), 'caffeine alone' (10mg/kg), 'duloxetine alone' (10mg/kg), 'bupropion alone' (10mg/kg), caffeine+duloxetine (5mg/kg, each), bupropion+caffeine (5mg/kg, each), and bupropion+duloxetine (5mg/kg, each) through the intra-peritoneal route. The immobility period was analyzed 30 min after the treatment in forced swim and tail suspension tests. Norepinephrine, dopamine, and serotonin levels were analyzed in hippocampus, cerebral cortex and whole brain using HPLC with fluorescence detector. Euthanasia was performed 1h after treatment. Comparison between vehicle treated group and other groups showed significant decrease in immobility in all drug treated groups in both antidepressant models. Caffeine plus duloxetine treated group was better among the combination treated groups in terms of decrease in immobility and increase in norepinephrine, dopamine, and serotonin levels in hippocampi, cerebral cortices, and whole brain when compared to their respective monotherapy treated groups. These combination approaches may help in reducing the dose of duloxetine/bupropion, and consequently lower the associated side/adverse effects.

  3. Enhancement of nootropic effect of duloxetine and bupropion by caffeine in mice

    PubMed Central

    Kale, Pravin Popatrao; Addepalli, Veeranjaneyulu

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The existing evidence suggests an association between depression and memory impairment. The objective of present study was to assess the effect of low dose caffeine with duloxetine and bupropion on memory. Materials and Methods: Mice were divided randomly into seven groups. Intra-peritoneal treatment of normal saline (10 ml/kg), caffeine (10 mg/kg), duloxetine (10 mg/kg), bupropion alone (10 mg/kg), caffeine + duloxetine (5 mg/kg, each), caffeine + bupropion (5 mg/kg, each), and bupropion + duloxetine (5 mg/kg, each) were given to groups I-VII, respectively. Elevated plus maze was used to evaluate transfer latency (TL) and Morris water maze was used to estimate the time spent in target quadrant. Results: Caffeine with duloxetine treated group was better than other combination treated groups in terms of a significant decrease in TL and increase in the time spent in target quadrant recorded. Conclusion: Combining lower dose of caffeine with duloxetine may enhance cognitive benefits than respective monotherapies. PMID:25878382

  4. A randomised, double-blind, placebo controlled, duloxetine-referenced, fixed-dose study of three dosages of Lu AA21004 in acute treatment of major depressive disorder (MDD).

    PubMed

    Baldwin, David S; Loft, Henrik; Dragheim, Marianne

    2012-07-01

    The efficacy, safety, and tolerability of Lu AA21004 versus placebo, using duloxetine as active reference, in patients with DSM-IV-TR diagnosed major depressive disorder (MDD) were evaluated in this 8-week, multi-site study. Patients (n=766) had a baseline Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) total score ≥26 and were randomly assigned (1:1:1:1:1) to 2.5, 5 or 10 mg Lu AA21004, placebo, or 60 mg duloxetine. The 5mg and 10mg doses of Lu AA21004 were tested separately versus placebo at p≤0.025 in a pre-specified order. In the pre-defined primary efficacy analysis [mean change from baseline in MADRS total score at Week 8, full analysis set, ANCOVA, last observation carried forward (LOCF)], the differences to placebo (n=145) of -1.7 (Lu AA21004 5 mg, n=155) and -1.5 points (Lu AA21004 10 mg, n=151) were not statistically significant; nor were those for Lu AA21004 2.5 mg (-1.4 points, n=155) or duloxetine (-2.0 points, n=149). Using mixed model, repeated measures (MMRM) analyses of the primary endpoint and most secondary endpoints were supportive of likely efficacy for Lu AA21004 5 mg and 10 mg and duloxetine. Treatment-emergent adverse events led to the withdrawal of 72 patients: 8% (placebo), 12% (duloxetine), and 6%, 11% and 9% in the Lu AA21004 groups (2.5 mg, 5 mg and 10 mg, respectively). The most common adverse events were nausea, headache, dizziness, and dry mouth. No clinically relevant changes were seen in vital signs, weight, ECG, or laboratory results. In summary, none of the active treatment groups, including duloxetine, separated from placebo in the primary analysis in this 'failed' study. Findings on secondary outcome measures, using MMRM instead of LOCF, were supportive of likely efficacy for Lu AA21004 5mg and 10mg and duloxetine. Lu AA21004 (2.5, 5 and 10 mg) was well tolerated. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Duloxetine compared with fluoxetine and venlafaxine: use of meta-regression analysis for indirect comparisons

    PubMed Central

    Eckert, Laurent; Lançon, Christophe

    2006-01-01

    Background Data comparing duloxetine with existing antidepressant treatments is limited. A comparison of duloxetine with fluoxetine has been performed but no comparison with venlafaxine, the other antidepressant in the same therapeutic class with a significant market share, has been undertaken. In the absence of relevant data to assess the place that duloxetine should occupy in the therapeutic arsenal, indirect comparisons are the most rigorous way to go. We conducted a systematic review of the efficacy of duloxetine, fluoxetine and venlafaxine versus placebo in the treatment of Major Depressive Disorder (MDD), and performed indirect comparisons through meta-regressions. Methods The bibliography of the Agency for Health Care Policy and Research and the CENTRAL, Medline, and Embase databases were interrogated using advanced search strategies based on a combination of text and index terms. The search focused on randomized placebo-controlled clinical trials involving adult patients treated for acute phase Major Depressive Disorder. All outcomes were derived to take account for varying placebo responses throughout studies. Primary outcome was treatment efficacy as measured by Hedge's g effect size. Secondary outcomes were response and dropout rates as measured by log odds ratios. Meta-regressions were run to indirectly compare the drugs. Sensitivity analysis, assessing the influence of individual studies over the results, and the influence of patients' characteristics were run. Results 22 studies involving fluoxetine, 9 involving duloxetine and 8 involving venlafaxine were selected. Using indirect comparison methodology, estimated effect sizes for efficacy compared with duloxetine were 0.11 [-0.14;0.36] for fluoxetine and 0.22 [0.06;0.38] for venlafaxine. Response log odds ratios were -0.21 [-0.44;0.03], 0.70 [0.26;1.14]. Dropout log odds ratios were -0.02 [-0.33;0.29], 0.21 [-0.13;0.55]. Sensitivity analyses showed that results were consistent. Conclusion Fluoxetine

  6. Protective effect of 3-(naphthalen-2-yl(propoxy)methyl)azetidine hydrochloride on hypoxia-induced toxicity by suppressing microglial activation in BV-2 cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jiae; Kim, Su-Min; Na, Jung-Min; Hahn, Hoh-Gyu; Cho, Sung-Woo; Yang, Seung-Ju

    2016-01-01

    We recently reported the anti-inflammatory effects of 3-(naphthalen-2-yl(propoxy)methyl)azetidine hydrochloride (KHG26792) on the ATP-induced activation of the NFAT and MAPK pathways through the P2X7 receptor in microglia. To further investigate the underlying mechanism of KHG26792, we studied its protective effects on hypoxia-induced toxicity in microglia. The administration of KHG26792 significantly reduced the hypoxia-induced expression and activity of caspase-3 in BV-2 microglial cells. KHG26792 also reduced hypoxia-induced inducible nitric oxide synthase protein expression, which correlated with reduced nitric oxide accumulation. In addition, KHG26792 attenuated hypoxia-induced protein nitration, reactive oxygen species production, and NADPH oxidase activity. These effects were accompanied by the suppression of hypoxia-induced protein expression of hypoxia-inducible factor 1-alpha and NADPH oxidase-2. Although the clinical relevance of our findings remains to be determined, these data results suggest that KHG26792 prevents hypoxia-induced toxicity by suppressing microglial activation. PMID:27756444

  7. Protective effect of 3-(naphthalen-2-yl(propoxy)methyl)azetidine hydrochloride on hypoxia-induced toxicity by suppressing microglial activation in BV-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jiae; Kim, Su-Min; Na, Jung-Min; Hahn, Hoh-Gyu; Cho, Sung-Woo; Yang, Seung-Ju

    2016-12-01

    We recently reported the anti-inflammatory effects of 3-(naphthalen-2-yl(propoxy)methyl)azetidine hydrochloride (KHG26792) on the ATP-induced activation of the NFAT and MAPK pathways through the P2X7 receptor in microglia. To further investigate the underlying mechanism of KHG26792, we studied its protective effects on hypoxia-induced toxicity in microglia. The administration of KHG26792 significantly reduced the hypoxia-induced expression and activity of caspase-3 in BV-2 microglial cells. KHG26792 also reduced hypoxia-induced inducible nitric oxide synthase protein expression, which correlated with reduced nitric oxide accumulation. In addition, KHG26792 attenuated hypoxiainduced protein nitration, reactive oxygen species production, and NADPH oxidase activity. These effects were accompanied by the suppression of hypoxia-induced protein expression of hypoxia-inducible factor 1-alpha and NADPH oxidase-2. Although the clinical relevance of our findings remains to be determined, these data results suggest that KHG26792 prevents hypoxia-induced toxicity by suppressing microglial activation. [BMB Reports 2016; 49(12): 687-692].

  8. Corneal critical barrier against the penetration of dexamethasone and lomefloxacin hydrochloride: evaluation by the activation energy for drug partition and diffusion in cornea.

    PubMed

    Yasueda, Shin-ichi; Higashiyama, Masayo; Yamaguchi, Masazumi; Isowaki, Akiharu; Ohtori, Akira

    2007-08-01

    The cornea is a solid barrier against drug permeation. We searched the critical barrier of corneal drug permeation using a hydrophobic drug, dexamethasone (DM), and a hydrophilic drug, lomefloxacin hydrochloride (LFLX). The activation energies for permeability of DM and LFLX across the intact cornea were 88.0 and 42.1 kJ/mol, respectively. Their activation energies for permeability across the cornea without epithelium decreased to 33.1 and 16.6 kJ/mol, respectively. The results show that epithelium is the critical barrier on the cornea against the permeation of a hydrophobic drug of DM as well as a hydrophilic drug of LFLX. The activation energy of partition for DM (66.8 kJ/mol) was approximately 3-fold larger than that of diffusion (21.2 kJ/mol). The results indicate that the partition for the hydrophobic drug of DM to the corneal epithelium is the primary barrier. Thermodynamic evaluation of activation energy for the drug permeation parameters is a good approach to investigate the mechanism of drug permeability.

  9. [Treatment of Persistent Somatoform Pain Disorder by Floating Needle Therapy and Duloxetine].

    PubMed

    Ren, Wan-wen; Zhou, Zhi-ying; Xu, Mi-mi; Long, Sen; Tang, Guang-zheng; Mao, Hong-jing; Chen, Shu-lin

    2016-02-01

    To evaluate clinical effect and safety of floating needle therapy and duloxetine in treating patients with persistent somatoform pain disorder (PSPD). Totally 108 PSPD patients were randomly assigned to the floating needle treatment group, the duloxetine treatment group, and the placebo treatment group, 36 in each group. Patients in the floating needle treatment group received floating needle therapy and placebo. Those in the duloxetine treatment group received duloxetine and simulated floating needle therapy. Those in the placebo treatment group received the placebo and simulated floating needle therapy. All treatment lasted for six weeks. Efficacy and adverse reactions were evaluated using Simple McGill pain scale (SF-MPQ) and Treatment Emergent Symptom Scale (TESS) before treatment and immediately after treatment, as well as at the end of 1st, 2nd, 4th, and 6th week of treatment, respectively. Hamilton Depression Scale (HAMD, 17 items), Hamilton Anxiety Scale (HAMA) were assessed before treatment and at the end of 1st, 2nd, 4th, and 6th week of treatment, respectively. Patients in the floating needle treatment group and the duloxetine treatment group with the total reducing score rate of SF-MPQ in Pain Rating index (PRI) ≥ 50% after 6 weeks' treatment were involved in the follow-up study. (1) Compared with the same group before treatment, SF-MPQ score, HAMD score and HAMA total scores all decreased in all the three groups at the end of 1st, 2nd, 4th, and 6th week of treatment (P < 0.05, P < 0.01). Besides , each item of SF-MPQ significantly decreased immediately after treatment in the floating needle treatment group (P < 0.01). Compared with the placebo treatment group, SF-MPQ, HAMD, and HAMA total score in the floating needle treatment group significantly decreased after 1, 2, 4, and 6 weeks of treatment (P < 0.05, P < 0.01). SF-MPQ score, HAMD score and HAMA total score in the duloxetine treatment group also significantly decreased after 2, 4, and 6 weeks of

  10. In vitro stability, potency, and dissolution of duloxetine enteric-coated pellets after exposure to applesauce, apple juice, and chocolate pudding.

    PubMed

    Wells, Kevin A; Losin, William G

    2008-07-01

    Difficulty swallowing is a common problem in the clinical setting, particularly in elderly patients, and can significantly affect an individual's ability to maintain a proper level of nutrition. The purpose of this in vitro study was to determine if mixing duloxetine enteric-coated pellets in food substances is an acceptable alternative method for administering this oral formulation to patients with swallowing difficulties. To determine whether administration in food substances with varying pH values (applesauce and apple juice, pH = approximately 3.5; chocolate pudding, pH = approximately 5.5-6.0) affects the enteric coating of the formulation, duloxetine pellets (ie, the contents of a 20-mg duloxetine capsule) were exposed to applesauce, apple juice, and chocolate pudding at room temperature and tested in triplicate for potency and impurities; for dissolution, 6 replicates were tested. To assess product stability and integrity of the enteric coating, potency, impurities, and dissolution tests of the pellets were conducted and compared with pellets not exposed to food. The duloxetine pellets were extracted from the food material using a solution of 0.1 normal (N) hydrochloric acid (HCl) prepared from concentrated HCl (commercially available) and deionized water. For the potency and impurities tests, a 40:60 solution of acetonitrile and pH 8.0 phosphate buffer was used as the sample solvent to extract the active pharmaceutical ingredient from the formulation to prepare the samples for testing. The amount of active pharmaceutical ingredient released (in vitro dissolution) from the pellets after exposure to the food substances was determined using 2 media solutions, 0.1 N HCl followed by pH 6.8 phosphate buffer. Applesauce and chocolate pudding were selected as vehicles for oral administration, while apple juice was intended to be used as a wash for a nasogastric tube. Mean (SD) potency results for the 20-mg capsule strength were 20.256 (0.066), 20.222 (0.163), and

  11. Synergistic Analgesia of Duloxetine and Celecoxib in the Mouse Formalin Test: A Combination Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Guo-Li; Lu, Gui-Jun; Yang, Jing; Wu, Sheng-Xi; Gu, Ze-Xu; Wang, Wen

    2013-01-01

    Duloxetine, a serotonin and noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor, and celecoxib, a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, are commonly used analgesics for persistent pain, however with moderate gastrointestinal side effects or analgesia tolerance. One promising analgesic strategy is to give a combined prescription, allowing the maximal or equal efficacy with fewer side effects. In the current study, the efficacy and side effects of combined administration of duloxetine and celecoxib were tested in the mouse formalin pain model. The subcutaneous (s.c.) injection of formalin into the left hindpaw induced significant somatic and emotional pain evaluated by the biphasic spontaneous flinching of the injected hindpaw and interphase ultrasonic vocalizations (USVs) during the 1 h after formalin injection, respectively. Pretreatment with intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of duloxetine or celecoxib at 1 h before formalin injection induced the dose-dependent inhibition on the second but not first phase pain responses. Combined administration of duloxetine and celecoxib showed significant analgesia for the second phase pain responses. Combination analgesia on the first phase was observed only with higher dose combination. A statistical difference between the theoretical and experimental ED50 for the second phase pain responses was observed, which indicated synergistic interaction of the two drugs. Concerning the emotional pain responses revealed with USVs, we assumed that the antinociceptive effects were almost completely derived from duloxetine, since celecoxib was ineffective when administered alone or reduced the dosage of duloxetine when given in combination. Based on the above findings, acute concomitant administration of duloxetine and celecoxib showed synergism on the somatic pain behavior but not emotional pain behaviors. PMID:24116126

  12. Synergistic analgesia of duloxetine and celecoxib in the mouse formalin test: a combination analysis.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yong-Hai; Dong, Yu-Lin; Wang, Yu-Tong; Zhao, Guo-Li; Lu, Gui-Jun; Yang, Jing; Wu, Sheng-Xi; Gu, Ze-Xu; Wang, Wen

    2013-01-01

    Duloxetine, a serotonin and noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor, and celecoxib, a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, are commonly used analgesics for persistent pain, however with moderate gastrointestinal side effects or analgesia tolerance. One promising analgesic strategy is to give a combined prescription, allowing the maximal or equal efficacy with fewer side effects. In the current study, the efficacy and side effects of combined administration of duloxetine and celecoxib were tested in the mouse formalin pain model. The subcutaneous (s.c.) injection of formalin into the left hindpaw induced significant somatic and emotional pain evaluated by the biphasic spontaneous flinching of the injected hindpaw and interphase ultrasonic vocalizations (USVs) during the 1 h after formalin injection, respectively. Pretreatment with intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of duloxetine or celecoxib at 1 h before formalin injection induced the dose-dependent inhibition on the second but not first phase pain responses. Combined administration of duloxetine and celecoxib showed significant analgesia for the second phase pain responses. Combination analgesia on the first phase was observed only with higher dose combination. A statistical difference between the theoretical and experimental ED50 for the second phase pain responses was observed, which indicated synergistic interaction of the two drugs. Concerning the emotional pain responses revealed with USVs, we assumed that the antinociceptive effects were almost completely derived from duloxetine, since celecoxib was ineffective when administered alone or reduced the dosage of duloxetine when given in combination. Based on the above findings, acute concomitant administration of duloxetine and celecoxib showed synergism on the somatic pain behavior but not emotional pain behaviors.

  13. Acute and long-term treatment of late-life major depressive disorder: duloxetine versus placebo.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Michael; Oakes, Tina Myers; Raskin, Joel; Liu, Peng; Shoemaker, Scarlett; Nelson, J Craig

    2014-01-01

    To compare the efficacy of duloxetine with placebo on depression in elderly patients with major depressive disorder. Multicenter, 24-week (12-week short-term and 12-week continuation), randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind trial. United States, France, Mexico, Puerto Rico. Age 65 years or more with major depressive disorder diagnosis (one or more previous episode); Mini-Mental State Examination score ≥20; Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale total score ≥20. Duloxetine 60 or 120 mg/day or placebo; placebo rescue possible. Primary-Maier subscale of the 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAMD-17) at week 12. Secondary-Geriatric Depression Scale, HAMD-17 total score, cognitive measures, Brief Pain Inventory (BPI), Numeric Rating Scales (NRS) for pain, Clinical Global Impression-Severity scale, Patient Global Impression of Improvement in acute phase and acute plus continuation phase of treatment. Compared with placebo, duloxetine did not show significantly greater improvement from baseline on Maier subscale at 12 weeks, but did show significantly greater improvement at weeks 4, 8, 16, and 20. Similar patterns for Geriatric Depression Scale and Clinical Global Impression-Severity scale emerged, with significance also seen at week 24. There was a significant treatment effect for all BPI items and 4 of 6 NRS pain measures in the acute phase, most BPI items and half of the NRS measures in the continuation phase. More duloxetine-treated patients completed the study (63% versus 55%). A significantly higher percentage of duloxetine-treated patients versus placebo discontinued due to adverse event (15.3% versus 5.8%). Although the antidepressant efficacy of duloxetine was not confirmed by the primary outcome, several secondary measures at multiple time points suggested efficacy. Duloxetine had significant and meaningful beneficial effects on pain. Copyright © 2014 American Association for Geriatric Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights

  14. Penehyclidine Hydrochloride Pretreatment Ameliorates Rhabdomyolysis-Induced AKI by Activating the Nrf2/HO-1 Pathway and Allevi-ating Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Wei; Huang, XuDong; Zhang, LiXia; Yang, XinJun; Wang, LiHui; Chen, YunShuang; Wang, JingHua; Wu, GuangLi

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is one of the most severe complications of rhabdomyolysis (RM). The underlying mechanisms and potential preventions need to be investigated. Penehyclidine hydrochloride (PHC) was reported to ameliorate renal ischemia-reperfusion injury, but the effect of PHC on RM-reduced AKI is unknown. In this study, we established a rat model of RM-induced AKI using an intramuscular glycerol injection in the hind limbs. Rats were pretreated with PHC before the glycerol injection, and the heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) inhibitor ZnPP was introduced to evaluate the effect of HO-1 on RM-induced AKI. PHC pretreatment ameliorated the pathological renal injury and renal dysfunction, and decreased the renal apoptosis rate in RM-induced AKI. PHC significantly up-regulated HO-1 expression, increased HO-1 enzymatic activity and decreased the accumulation of myoglobin in renal tissues. This effect was partly inhibited by ZnPP. PHC pretreatment also effectively up-regulated nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) and down-regulated glucose regulated protein 78 (GRP78) and caspase-12 at both the gene and protein levels. These results suggest that the protective effects of PHC pretreatment on RM-induced AKI occur at least in part through activating the Nrf2/HO-1 pathway and alleviating endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS) in rat renal tissues. PMID:26987113

  15. Efficacy of Duloxetine for the Treatment of Generalized Anxiety Disorder: Implications for Primary Care Physicians

    PubMed Central

    Koponen, Hannu; Allgulander, Christer; Erickson, Janelle; Dunayevich, Eduardo; Pritchett, Yili; Detke, Michael J.; Ball, Susan G.; Russell, James M.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: This study examined the efficacy and tolerability of duloxetine, a dual reuptake inhibitor of serotonin and norepinephrine, for the treatment of patients with generalized anxiety disorder (GAD). Method: Patients were ≥ 18 years old and recruited from 5 European countries, the United States, and South Africa. The study had a 9-week, multicenter, randomized, double-blind, fixed-dose, placebo-controlled, parallel-group design. A total of 513 patients (mean age = 43.8 years; 67.8% female) with a DSM-IV–defined GAD diagnosis received treatment with duloxetine 60 mg/day (N = 168), duloxetine 120 mg/day (N = 170), or placebo (N = 175). The primary efficacy measure was the Hamilton Rating Scale for Anxiety (HAM-A) total score. Secondary measures included the Sheehan Disability Scale, HAM-A psychic and somatic anxiety factor scores, and HAM-A response, remission, and sustained improvement rates. The study was conducted from July 2004 to September 2005. Results: Both groups of duloxetine-treated patients demonstrated significantly greater improvements in anxiety symptom severity compared with placebo-treated patients as measured by HAM-A total score and HAM-A psychic and somatic anxiety factor scores (p values ranged from ≤ .01 to ≤ .001). Duloxetine-treated patients had greater functional improvements in Sheehan Disability Scale global and specific domain scores (p ≤ .001) than placebo-treated patients. Both duloxetine doses also resulted in significantly greater HAM-A response, remission, and sustained improvement rates compared with placebo (p values ranged from ≤ .01 to ≤ .001). The rate of study discontinuation due to adverse events was 11.3% for duloxetine 60 mg and 15.3% for duloxetine 120 mg versus 2.3% for placebo (p ≤ .001). Conclusion: The results of this study demonstrate that duloxetine 60 mg/day and 120 mg/day were efficacious and well tolerated and thus may provide primary care physicians with a useful pharmacologic intervention for

  16. Combination of pregabalin with duloxetine for fibromyalgia: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Gilron, Ian; Chaparro, Luis E; Tu, Dongsheng; Holden, Ronald R; Milev, Roumen; Towheed, Tanveer; DuMerton-Shore, Deborah; Walker, Sarah

    2016-07-01

    Fibromyalgia is a syndrome characterized by chronic widespread pain and associated with sleep disturbance, depression, fatigue, and cognitive dysfunction. Polypharmacy is commonly used, but supportive evidence is limited. Most fibromyalgia trials focus primarily on pain reduction with monotherapy. This trial compares a pregabalin-duloxetine combination to each monotherapy. Using a randomized, double-blind, 4-period crossover design, participants received maximally tolerated doses of placebo, pregabalin, duloxetine, and pregabalin-duloxetine combination-for 6 weeks. Primary outcome was daily pain (0-10); secondary outcomes included global pain relief, Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire, SF-36 survey, Medical Outcomes Study Sleep Scale, Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II), adverse events, and other measures. Of 41 participants randomized, 39 completed ≥2 treatments. Daily pain during placebo, pregabalin, duloxetine, and combination was 5.1, 5.0, 4.1, and 3.7, respectively (P < 0.05 only for combination vs placebo, and pregabalin). Participants (%) reporting ≥moderate global pain relief were 18%, 39%, 42%, and 68%, respectively (P < 0.05 for combination vs placebo, pregabalin, and duloxetine). Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire scores were 42.9, 37.4, 36.0, and 29.8, respectively (P < 0.05 for combination vs placebo, pregabalin, and duloxetine). SF-36 scores were 50.2, 55.7, 56.0, and 61.2, respectively (P < 0.05 for combination vs placebo, pregabalin, and duloxetine). Medical Outcomes Study Sleep Scale scores were 48.9, 35.2, 46.1, and 32.1, respectively (P < 0.05 only for combination vs placebo, and duloxetine). BDI-II scores were 11.9, 9.9, 10.7, and 8.9, respectively (P < 0.05 only for combination vs placebo). Moderate-severe drowsiness was more frequent during combination vs placebo. Combining pregabalin and duloxetine for fibromyalgia improves multiple clinical outcomes vs monotherapy. Continued research should compare this and other combinations to monotherapy

  17. Treatment of seasonal affective disorder with duloxetine: an open-label study.

    PubMed

    Pjrek, E; Willeit, M; Praschak-Rieder, N; Konstantinidis, A; Semlitsch, H V; Kasper, S; Winkler, D

    2008-05-01

    The aim of this observational study was to evaluate the effects of duloxetine in the treatment of seasonal affective disorder (SAD). 26 SAD patients were treated with open-label duloxetine 60-120 mg per day over 8 weeks. Ratings included the Structured Interview Guide for the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (SAD version; SIGH-SAD) and the Clinical Global Impression (CGI). To estimate treatment effects on social functioning in SAD we employed the Social Adaptation Self Evaluation Scale (SASS), the Sheehan Disability Scale (SDS), and assessments of days lost due to illness and days with reduction in productivity. Duloxetine led to a significant improvement (p<0.001) of SIGH-SAD, CGI severity, SASS, and SDS scores. Days lost due to illness and days with reduction in productivity were significantly diminished during treatment (p<0.001). Treatment with duloxetine over 8 weeks yielded a response rate (SIGH-SAD<50% of baseline value) of 80.8% and a remission rate (SIGH-SAD<8) of 76.9% in the intention to treat sample. The drop-out rate due to side effects was 15.4%. Our preliminary results indicate that duloxetine might be effective and able to ameliorate the negative social consequences of SAD.

  18. Self-Limited Kleptomania Symptoms as a Side Effect of Duloxetine

    PubMed Central

    Gallagher, Keith E.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Impulse control disorders (ICDs) have been described as a side effect of dopamine agonists, frequently used in neurodegenerative conditions affecting the nigrostriatal pathway. Serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (e.g., duloxetine) have dose-dependent differential affinity for monoaminergic transporters, inhibiting the dopamine transporter at higher doses, thus increasing availability of synaptic dopamine, with the potential for similar impulse control side effects. Case Presentation. A 19-year-old Asian-American female with a history of depression developed new-onset stealing behaviors after an increase in her dose of duloxetine from 60 mg to 90 mg; she described these actions as “compulsive” and irresistible, later experiencing either relief or guilt, features compatible with an ICD. Her symptoms eventually subsided with continued use of 90 mg of duloxetine. Discussion. To the knowledge of the authors, this is the first report of a patient developing new-onset ICD behaviors after being placed on a higher dose of duloxetine, which can inhibit the dopamine transporter and cause difficulty with impulse control. The self-resolving nature of the symptoms may result from compensatory upregulation of dopamine transporters, increasing reuptake of dopamine. Asian populations may be at a higher risk due to the frequent occurrence of CYP2D6 polymorphisms, which decrease the conversion of duloxetine to its inactive metabolites. PMID:28018697

  19. Thermoanalytical Investigation of Terazosin Hydrochloride

    PubMed Central

    Attia, Ali Kamal; Mohamed Abdel-Moety, Mona

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Thermal analysis (TGA, DTG and DTA) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) have been used to study the thermal behavior of terazosin hydrochloride (TER). Methods: Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA/DTG), differential thermal analysis (DTA) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) were used to determine the thermal behavior and purity of the used drug. Thermodynamic parameters such as activation energy (E*), enthalpy (∆H*), entropy (∆S*) and Gibbs free energy change of the decomposition (∆G*) were calculated using different kinetic models. Results: The purity of the used drug was determined by differential scanning calorimetry (99.97%) and specialized official method (99.85%) indicating to satisfactory values of the degree of purity. Thermal analysis technique gave satisfactory results to obtain quality control parameters such as melting point (273 ºC), water content (7.49%) and ash content (zero) in comparison to what were obtained using official method: (272 ºC), (8.0%) and (0.02%) for melting point, water content and ash content, respectively. Conclusion: Thermal analysis justifies its application in quality control of pharmaceutical compounds due to its simplicity, sensitivity and low operational costs. DSC data indicated that the degree of purity of terazosin hydrochloride is similar to that found by official method. PMID:24312828

  20. Cost comparison of drug-drug and drug-condition interactions in patients with painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy treated with pregabalin versus duloxetine.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Stephen S; Udall, Margarita; Cappelleri, Joseph C; Johnson, Barbara H; Shrady, George; Chu, Bong-Chul; Silverman, Stuart L

    2013-12-15

    The frequency and financial impact of potential drug-drug interactions (DDIs) and drug-condition interactions (DCIs) in patients with painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) treated with either pregabalin or duloxetine were compared. This retrospective cohort study was conducted using a large U.S. administrative claims database. Patients selected for study inclusion had a diagnosis of DPN and were newly initiated on either pregabalin or duloxetine between July 1, 2008, and October 1, 2010. Data on potential DDIs and DCIs were collected. Health care costs were measured as the sum of gross covered payments for all medical and prescription claims incurred during the six months after the index date. The study sample comprised 2499 pregabalin users and 1354 duloxetine users. Among pregabalin users, 48 (1.8%) had at least one potential pregabalin DCI; none had potential pregabalin DDIs. Among duloxetine users, 966 (71%) had at least one potential duloxetine DDI or DCI. The frequencies of potential DDIs and DCIs differed significantly between pregabalin and duloxetine users (p < 0.001). Potential duloxetine DDIs and DCIs were associated with a significant increase in mean health care costs in duloxetine users (p = 0.002). Potential pregabalin DDIs and DCIs were not associated with additional health care costs in pregabalin users. Among patients with painful DPN treated with either pregabalin or duloxetine, the frequency of potential duloxetine DDIs and DCIs was substantially higher than that of pregabalin. Potential DDIs and DCIs were associated with significantly increased health care costs in duloxetine users.

  1. Duloxetine in the treatment of adolescents with somatoform disorders: a report of two cases.

    PubMed

    García Martín, Inés; Miranda Vicario, Eva M; Soutullo, César A

    2012-01-01

    Our goal was to evaluate the effectiveness, safety and tolerability of duloxetine in the treatment of children and adolescents with somatoform disorder. We describe two cases, those of an 11-year old girl and a 17-year old boy, evaluated in our Department after being studied by a Pediatrician and Neuropediatrician due to complex physical symptoms. The evaluations to rule out medical causes were normal. We diagnosed somatoform disorder. The pharmacological treatments with antidepressants, benzodiazepines, stimulants and mood stabilizers only produced brief and partial improvement. After switching the treatment to duloxetine (30 and 60 mg/day, respectively) both patients experienced a gradual improvement that was maintained at 7 and 14 months. Conclusion. Duloxetine may be effective and well tolerated in the treatment of adolescents with somatoform disorder. Controlled trials are need.

  2. Successful treatment by adding duloxetine to pregabalin for peripheral neuropathy induced by paclitaxel.

    PubMed

    Takenaka, Motoyasu; Iida, Hiroki; Matsumoto, Shigemi; Yamaguchi, Shinobu; Yoshimura, Noritaka; Miyamoto, Maki

    2013-11-01

    Although paclitaxel is a commonly used anticancer drug, peripheral neuropathy may develop as a side effect. Worsening of the symptoms with time may cause patients who receive paclitaxel to give up their chemotherapy. Duloxetine, a serotonin- and norepinephrine-reuptake inhibitor, has been used to treat peripheral neuropathic pain. We report the case of a 68-year-old man with gastric cancer, who underwent gastrectomy and then received 8 cycles of chemotherapy involving weekly administrations of paclitaxel. Under this paclitaxel treatment, he complained of severe peripheral neuropathy, leading to a diminished quality of life. Following treatment with a combination of duloxetine and pregabalin, a remission of his symptoms was achieved. Duloxetine plus pregabalin therapy may be useful for the peripheral neuropathy induced by paclitaxel.

  3. Duloxetine for the treatment of painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy in Venezuela: economic evaluation.

    PubMed

    Carlos, Fernando; Espejel, Luis; Novick, Diego; López, Rubén; Flores, Daniel

    2015-09-25

    Painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy affects 40-50% of patients with diabetic neuropathy, leading to impaired quality of life and substantial costs. Duloxetine and pregabalin have evidence-based support, and are formally approved for controlling painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy. We used a 12-week decision model for examining painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy first-line therapy with daily doses of duloxetine 60mg or pregabalin 300mg, under the perspective of the Instituto Venezolano de los Seguros Sociales. We gathered model parameters from published literature and expert´s opinion, focusing on the magnitude of pain relief, the presence of adverse events, the possibility of withdrawal owing to intolerable adverse events or due to lack of efficacy, and the quality-adjusted life years expected in each strategy. We analyzed direct medical costs (which are expressed in Bolívares Fuertes, BsF) comprising drug acquisition besides additional care devoted to treatment of adverse events and poor pain relief. We conducted both deterministic and probabilistic sensitivity analyses. Total expected costs per 1000 patients were BsF 1 046 146 (26%) lower with duloxetine than with pregabalin. Most of these savings (91%) corresponds to the difference in the acquisition’s cost of each medication. duloxetine also provided 23 more patients achieving good pain relief and a gain of about two quality-adjusted life years per 1000 treated. Model was robust to plausible changes in main parameters. Duloxetine remained the preferred option in 93.9% of the second-order Monte Carlo simulations. This study suggests duloxetine dominates (i.e., is more effective and lead to gains in quality-adjusted life years), remaining less costly than pregabalin for treatment of painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy.

  4. Z-505 hydrochloride, an orally active ghrelin agonist, attenuates the progression of cancer cachexia via anabolic hormones in Colon 26 tumor-bearing mice.

    PubMed

    Yoshimura, Makoto; Shiomi, Yoshihiro; Ohira, Yuta; Takei, Mineo; Tanaka, Takao

    2017-09-15

    Cancer cachexia is a progressive wasting syndrome characterized by anorexia and weight loss, specifically muscle wasting and fat depletion. There is no therapeutic agent for treatment of this syndrome. We investigated the anti-cachexia effects of Z-505 hydrochloride (Z-505), a new oral growth hormone secretagogue receptor 1a (GHSR1a) agonist, using a mouse model of cancer cachexia. We performed a calcium flux assay in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO-K1) cells stably expressing human GHSR1a to quantify the agonistic activity of Z-505. In Colon 26 tumor-bearing mice, Z-505 (300mg/kg, p.o., twice daily) was administered for 7 days to assess its anti-cachexia effects. Body weight and food intake were monitored during the period, and the skeletal muscle and epididymal fat weights were measured. Serum levels of insulin, insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and corticosterone were measured to confirm the mechanism of the anti-cachexia action of Z-505. Z-505 showed strong agonistic activity similar to that of human ghrelin, with a half maximal effective concentration (EC50) value of 0.45nM. Z-505 treatment significantly increased food intake and inhibited the progression of weight loss. Z-505 also significantly attenuated muscle wasting and fat loss, and increased circulating levels of anabolic factors such as insulin and IGF-1, but not catabolic factors such as IL-6 and corticosterone. These findings suggest that Z-505 might be effective in the treatment of cachexia via the increased anabolic hormone levels stimulated by the activation of the ghrelin receptor, GHSR1a. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. The Effects of Mepivacaine Hydrochloride on Antimicrobial Activity and Mechanical Nociceptive Threshold During Amikacin Sulfate Regional Limb Perfusion in the Horse.

    PubMed

    Colbath, Aimée C; Wittenburg, Luke A; Gold, Jenifer R; McIlwraith, C Wayne; Moorman, Valerie J

    2016-08-01

    To determine the effect of intravenous regional limb perfusion (IVRLP) with a combination of mepivacaine hydrochloride and amikacin sulfate on synovial fluid amikacin sulfate concentration, antimicrobial activity, and mechanical nociceptive threshold (MNT). Experimental study. Healthy adult horses (n=9). One IVRLP treatment was randomly administered by cephalic vein of each limb: amikacin alone (1 g amikacin in 60 mL saline) or amikacin with mepivacaine (1 g amikacin and 500 mg mepivacaine in 60 mL saline). Opposite treatments were repeated after a 24 hour wash-out period. Amikacin concentration and antimicrobial activity were determined for synovial fluid from middle carpal joints at tourniquet removal and 30 minutes following. Zone of inhibition was determined for Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli. MNT was determined at 3 dorsal metacarpal locations prior to and after sedation, after Esmarch tourniquet application, and 30 minutes after IVRLP prior to and after tourniquet removal. Two limbs from each treatment group were removed because of undetectable amikacin concentrations for a total of 14 data sets analyzed. Synovial fluid amikacin concentrations and zone of inhibition were not significantly different between treatments at any time point. MNT were significantly increased 30 minutes after IVRLP prior to and following tourniquet removal using amikacin and mepivacaine (median, range; 40.0 µg/mL, 38.7-40.0 and 40.0, 25.8-40.0, respectively) compared to amikacin alone (19.5 µg/mL, 18.7-25.6 and 15.3, 13.2-20.5, respectively). Addition of mepivacaine to amikacin for IVRLP in the horse as a means of providing analgesia without decreasing antimicrobial activity. © Copyright 2016 by The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  6. Duloxetine compliance and its association with healthcare costs among patients with diabetic peripheral neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Wu, N; Chen, S; Boulanger, L; Fraser, K; Bledsoe, S L; Zhao, Y

    2009-09-01

    Duloxetine is approved to treat diabetic peripheral neuropathic pain (DPNP) in the US. The study objective was to examine the predictors of duloxetine compliance, and its association with healthcare costs among DPNP patients. The study used administrative claims databases to identify non-depressed DPNP patients with a duloxetine prescription dispensed between October 1, 2004 and December 31, 2006. Two cohorts of patients were constructed based on compliance to duloxetine therapy over 1-year follow-up with high compliance defined as a medication possession ratio (MPR) > or =0.80. All-cause, diabetes-, and DPNP-related healthcare costs during 1-year follow-up were estimated. Logistic regressions were performed to examine how average daily dose (ADD) of duloxetine and other factors may influence compliance. Multivariate regressions were estimated to examine the association between compliance and healthcare costs. The study included 1,380 commercially insured (mean age 55 years) and 974 patients with employer-sponsored Medicare supplemental insurance (mean age 75 years). In both populations, patients with an ADD >30 mg were more likely to be compliant with the therapy compared with those with an ADD of < or =30 mg (odds ratio ranged 1.79-3.38, all p<0.05). Controlling for differences in demographics, clinical and economic characteristics, commercially insured low duloxetine compliance patients had greater all-cause ($5,334, p<0.05) and diabetes-related healthcare costs ($3,414, p<0.05) than high-compliance patients, with the biggest difference from inpatient costs (all-cause: $7,508; diabetes-related: $3,785, all p<0.05). Similar trends were found in the Medicare supplemental insured population; however, differences in all-cause healthcare costs were not significant. DPNP patients with a higher ADD of duloxetine over a 1-year follow-up period were more compliant with the therapy. Duloxetine patients with high compliance were also associated with lower healthcare costs

  7. Duloxetine in the treatment of burning mouth syndrome refractory to conventional treatment: A case report.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yeon-Dong; Lee, Ji-Hye; Shim, Jee-Hoon

    2014-06-01

    Patients with burning mouth syndrome (BMS) report burning sensation and pain involving the tongue and oral mucosa without any apparent medical or dental cause. The pathogenesis of this syndrome remains unclear and there is currently no standard treatment. BMS is, therefore, often misdiagnosed and its management is complex. This lack of clinical expertise may result in decreased health-related quality of life and increased psychological distress among patients with BMS. The present case report involves a 77-year-old female patient with BMS refractory to conventional treatment with nerve block and medication, who was successfully treated with duloxetine. Duloxetine may become a new therapeutic option in the management of BMS.

  8. In vitro activity of S-(3,4-dichlorobenzyl)isothiourea hydrochloride and novel structurally related compounds against multidrug-resistant bacteria, including Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Burkholderia cepacia complex.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, Audrey; Perry, John D; James, Arthur L; Stanforth, Stephen P; Carnell, Sonya; Wilkinson, Kathryn; Anjam Khan, C M; De Soyza, Anthony; Gould, F Kate

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to establish the antimicrobial activities of S-(3,4-dichlorobenzyl)isothiourea hydrochloride (A22) and a series of structurally related compounds against multidrug-resistant (MDR) bacteria. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of 21 compounds were determined against 18 strains of pathogenic bacteria in addition to Pseudomonas aeruginosa (n=19) and Burkholderia cepacia complex (BCC) (n=20) isolated from the sputa of cystic fibrosis patients. Selected compounds were tested against further isolates, including P. aeruginosa (n=100), BCC (n=12) and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia (n=19). The interaction of S-(4-chlorobenzyl)isothiourea hydrochloride (C2) in combination with conventional antimicrobials was examined against 10 P. aeruginosa strains. Selected compounds were also tested against Enterobacteriaceae producing NDM-1 carbapenemase (n=64) and meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) (n=37). Of the 21 compounds, 14 showed antimicrobial activity that was generally more pronounced against Gram-negative bacteria. Against P. aeruginosa, the most active compound was C2 [MIC for 50% of the organisms (MIC(50))=32μg/mL]. This compound was also the most active against BCC, with all isolates inhibited by 64μg/mL. For all ten strains of P. aeruginosa subjected to combination testing with C2 and conventional antimicrobials, a bactericidal effect was achieved with at least one combination. C2 and A22 both showed strong activity [MIC for 90% of the organisms (MIC(90))=4μg/mL] against Enterobacteriaceae that produced NDM-1 carbapenemase. Finally, S-(4-chlorobenzyl)-N-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)isothiourea hydrochloride showed good activity (MIC(90)=8μg/mL) against MRSA. This work establishes the activity of isothiourea derivatives against a broad range of clinically important MDR bacteria. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. and the International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  9. Organic Anion Transporting Polypeptide (OATP)2B1 Contributes to Gastrointestinal Toxicity of Anticancer Drug SN-38, Active Metabolite of Irinotecan Hydrochloride.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Daichi; Saito, Yoshimasa; Nakanishi, Takeo; Tamai, Ikumi

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal toxicity, such as late-onset diarrhea, is a significant concern in irinotecan hydrochloride (CPT-11)-containing regimens. Prophylaxis of late-onset diarrhea has been reported with use of Japanese traditional (Kampo) medicine containing baicalin and with the antibiotic cefixime, and this has been explained in terms of inhibition of bacterial deconjugation of SN-38-glucuronide since unconjugated SN-38 (active metabolite of CPT-11) is responsible for the gastrointestinal toxicity. It is also prerequisite for SN-38 to be accumulated in intestinal tissues to exert toxicity. Based on the fact that liver-specific organic anion transporting polypeptide (OATP)1B1, a member of the same family as OATP2B1, is known to be involved in hepatic transport of SN-38, we hypothesized that intestinal transporter OATP2B1 contributes to the accumulation of SN-38 in gastrointestinal tissues, and its inhibition would help prevent associated toxicity. We found that uptake of SN-38 by OATP2B1-expressing Xenopus oocytes was significantly higher than that by control oocytes. OATP2B1-mediated uptake of SN-38 was saturable, pH dependent, and decreased in the presence of baicalin, cefixime, or fruit juices such as apple juice. In vivo gastrointestinal toxicity of SN-38 in mice caused by oral administration for consecutive 5 days was prevented by coingestion of apple juice. Thus, OATP2B1 contributes to the uptake of SN-38 by intestinal tissues, triggering gastrointestinal toxicity. So, in addition to the reported inhibition of bacterial β-glucuronidase by cefixime or baicalin, inhibition of OATP2B1 may also contribute to prevention of gastrointestinal toxicity. Apple juice may be helpful for prophylaxis of late-onset diarrhea observed in CPT-11 therapy without disturbance of the intestinal microflora.

  10. Predictors of duloxetine response in patients with oxaliplatin-induced painful chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN): a secondary analysis of randomised controlled trial - CALGB/alliance 170601.

    PubMed

    Smith, E M L; Pang, H; Ye, C; Cirrincione, C; Fleishman, S; Paskett, E D; Ahles, T; Bressler, L R; Le-Lindqwister, N; Fadul, C E; Loprinzi, C; Shapiro, C L

    2017-03-01

    Duloxetine is an effective treatment for oxaliplatin-induced painful chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN). However, predictors of duloxetine response have not been adequately explored. The objective of this secondary and exploratory analysis was to identify predictors of duloxetine response in patients with painful oxaliplatin-induced CIPN. Patients (N = 106) with oxaliplatin-induced painful CIPN were randomised to receive duloxetine or placebo. Eligible patients had chronic CIPN pain and an average neuropathic pain score ≥4/10. Duloxetine/placebo dose was 30 mg/day for 7 days, then 60 mg/day for 4 weeks. The Brief Pain Inventory-Short Form and the EORTC QLQ-C30 were used to assess pain and quality of life, respectively. Univariate and multiple logistic regression analyses were performed to identify demographic, physiologic and psychological predictors of duloxetine response. Higher baseline emotional functioning predicted duloxetine response (≥30% reduction in pain; OR 4.036; 95% CI 0.999-16.308; p = 0.050). Based on the results from a multiple logistic regression using patient data from both the duloxetine and placebo treatment arms, duloxetine-treated patients with high emotional functioning are more likely to experience pain reduction (p = 0.026). In patients with painful, oxaliplatin-induced CIPN, emotional functioning may also predict duloxetine response. ClinicalTrials.gov, Identifier NCT00489411.

  11. Duloxetine in treatment of refractory chronic tennis elbow: Two case reports

    PubMed Central

    Wani, Zaid Ahmad; Dhar, Shabir Ahmad; Butt, Mohammad Farooq; Rather, Yasir Hassan; Sheikh, Shano

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Tennis elbow is a common musculoskeletal disorder; management options include physiotherapeutic, medical, surgical, and other forms of intervention. Some patients remain symptomatic despite best efforts. We present two patients who did not respond to medical and surgical treatments, and whose symptoms were relieved with duloxetine. This is the first report on the use of duloxetine to treat tennis elbow. Case presentation Two mentally healthy young Asian women aged 32 and 27 years, each with tennis elbow of about 18 months duration continued to suffer pain despite treatment with analgesics, local steroid injections, physiotherapy, cryotherapy, ultrasound, and surgical release, among other interventions. Both showed substantial improvement within 4 to 6 weeks of receiving monotherapy with duloxetine 60 mg/day. Both were pain-free with continued treatment at a 6-month follow-up. Conclusion Duloxetine may be a useful treatment option in patients with chronic tennis elbow, even those who have failed conventional medical, physiotherapeutic, surgical, and other forms of management. PMID:18798992

  12. Syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion: a story of duloxetine-induced hyponatraemia.

    PubMed

    Amoako, Adae Opoku; Brown, Carina; Riley, Timothy

    2015-04-24

    Hyponatraemia is the most commonly encountered electrolyte abnormality in clinical practice. Syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH) accounts for nearly 60% of all hyponatraemias. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are well known to have side effects of SIADH. There have been few reported cases of serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs) causing SIADH-induced hyponatraemia. Duloxetine is one type of SNRI used to treat several conditions, including depression and diabetic neuropathy. We present a case of a 76-year-old woman with a history of fibromyalgia who had recently been prescribed duloxetine for her condition. On admission to the hospital, her sodium decreased to a low of 118 mmol/L. Evaluation for other causes of hyponatraemia yielded negative results. Duloxetine was discontinued and after 3 days the patient's sodium increased to 130 mmol/L. The purpose of this case report is to highlight the importance of having suspicion for rare but real side effects of medications such as duloxetine.

  13. The Effect of Initial Duloxetine Dosing Strategy on Nausea in Korean Patients with Major Depressive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Min-Soo; Ahn, Yong Min; Chung, Seockhoon; Walton, Richard; Kim, Mun Sung

    2012-01-01

    Objective To assess the relative severity of nausea in patients from Korea with major depressive disorder (MDD) who were treated with duloxetine at low (30 mg) or high (60 mg) doses, with or without food, for the first week of an 8 week treatment. Methods Adult patients (n=249), with MDD and a 17-item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAMD17) score of ≥15, received open-label once daily duloxetine. At Week 0, patients were randomized to 4 groups: 30 mg with food (n=63), 60 mg with food (n=59), 30 mg without food (n=64), and 60 mg without food (n=63). At Week 1, all patients switched to duloxetine 60 mg for 7 weeks. The primary outcome measure was item 112 (nausea) of the Association for Methodology and Documentation in Psychiatry adverse event scale. Effectiveness was assessed by change in HAMD17 total score. Results Overall, 94.4% (235/249) of patients completed Week 1 and 55.0% (137/249) of patients completed the study. For Week 1, nausea was significantly less severe for patients who received 30 mg compared with 60 mg duloxetine (p=0.003), regardless of food intake. In all groups, nausea severity was highest at Week 1 and declined throughout the study. HAMD17 score was reduced in all groups and the most common adverse event reported was nausea (145/249; 58.2%). Conclusion To minimize nausea, Korean patients with MDD who require duloxetine treatment could be given 30 mg once daily, regardless of food, for the first week followed by 60 mg once daily for the course of therapy. PMID:23251205

  14. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled phase III trial of duloxetine in Japanese fibromyalgia patients.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Masato; Osada, Kenichi; Mizuno, Hiromichi; Ochiai, Toshimitsu; Alev, Levent; Nishioka, Kusuki

    2015-08-22

    Fibromyalgia is characterized by widespread pain and is often accompanied by accessory symptoms. There are limited treatment options for this condition in Japan. Therefore, we conducted a phase III study to assess the efficacy and safety of duloxetine in Japanese patients with fibromyalgia. This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group trial was conducted in Japan. Outpatients who met the American College of Rheumatology 1990 criteria for fibromyalgia and whose Brief Pain Inventory (BPI) average pain score was ≥4 were randomized to duloxetine 60 mg or placebo once daily for 14 weeks. The primary efficacy measure was the change in the BPI average pain score from baseline. Secondary efficacy, quality of life (QoL), and safety outcomes were also evaluated. Mixed-effects model repeated-measures (MMRM) analysis and last observation carried forward (LOCF) analysis of covariance were used to evaluate the primary efficacy measure. Overall, 393 patients were randomized to receive either duloxetine (n = 196) or placebo (n = 197). The MMRM analysis revealed no significant difference between duloxetine and placebo regarding the change in BPI average pain scores at week 14. Based on LOCF analysis, a statistically significant improvement in the change in BPI average pain scores at week 14 was observed for patients treated with duloxetine compared with placebo. Duloxetine treatment was associated with improved outcomes in nearly all secondary and post hoc analyses. The treatment was generally well tolerated. Somnolence, nausea, and constipation were the most common treatment-emergent adverse events in the duloxetine group. The discontinuation rates due to treatment-emergent adverse events were similar in both groups. Although the MMRM analysis did not demonstrate superiority of duloxetine over placebo, duloxetine treatment was associated with improved outcomes in secondary and post hoc analyses of the mean change in the BPI average pain score and

  15. Differential inhibition of cardiac and neuronal Na(+) channels by the selective serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors duloxetine and venlafaxine.

    PubMed

    Stoetzer, Carsten; Papenberg, Bastian; Doll, Thorben; Völker, Marc; Heineke, Joerg; Stoetzer, Marcus; Wegner, Florian; Leffler, Andreas

    2016-07-15

    Duloxetine and venlafaxine are selective serotonin-norepinephrine-reuptake-inhibitors used as antidepressants and co-analgesics. While venlafaxine rather than duloxetine induce cardiovascular side-effects, neither of the substances are regarded cardiotoxic. Inhibition of cardiac Na(+)-channels can be associated with cardiotoxicity, and duloxetine was demonstrated to block neuronal Na(+)-channels. The aim of this study was to investigate if the non-life threatening cardiotoxicities of duloxetine and venlafaxine correlate with a weak inhibition of cardiac Na(+)-channels. Effects of duloxetine, venlafaxine and amitriptyline were examined on endogenous Na(+)-channels in neuroblastoma ND7/23 cells and on the α-subunits Nav1.5, Nav1.7 and Nav1.8 with whole-cell patch clamp recordings. Tonic block of the cardiac Na(+)-channel Nav1.5 and rat-cardiomyocytes (CM) revealed a higher potency for duloxetine (Nav 1.5 IC50 14±1µM, CM IC50 27±3µM) as compared to venlafaxine (Nav 1.5 IC50 671±26µM, CM IC50 452±34µM). Duloxetine was as potent as the cardiotoxic antidepressant amitriptyline (IC50 13±1µM). While venlafaxine almost failed to induce use-dependent block on Nav1.5 and cardiomyocytes, low concentrations of duloxetine (1, 10µM) induced prominent use-dependent block similar to amitriptyline. Duloxetine, but not venlafaxine stabilized fast and slow inactivation and delayed recovery from inactivation. Duloxetine induced an unselective inhibition of neuronal Na(+)-channels (IC50 ND7/23 23±1µM, Nav1.7 19±2µM, Nav1.8 29±2). Duloxetine, but not venlafaxine inhibits cardiac Na(+)-channels with a potency similar to amitriptyline. These data indicate that an inhibition of Na(+)-channels does not predict a clinically relevant cardiotoxicity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Effects of duloxetine on microRNA expression profile in frontal lobe and hippocampus in a mouse model of depression.

    PubMed

    Pan, Bing; Liu, Yamei

    2015-01-01

    Depression is a major mood disorder affecting people worldwide. The posttranscriptional gene regulation mediated by microRNAs (miRNAs) which may have critical roles in the pathogenesis of depression. However, to date, little is known about the effects of the antidepressant drug duloxetine on miRNA expression profile in chronic unpredictable mild stress (CUMS)-induced depression model in mice. Healthy adult male Kunming mice were randomly divided into three groups: control group, model group and duloxetine group. Sucrose preference test and open field test were used to represent the behavioral change. MiRNAs levels in frontal lobe and hippocampus of mice were analyzed using miRNA microarrays assay. We observed that long-term treatment with duloxetine significantly ameliorated the CUMS procedure-induced sucrose preference decreases and mice treated with duloxetine demonstrated a reversal of the number of crossings, and rearings reduced by CUMS. A significant upregulation of miR-132 and miR-18a in hippocampus in the duloxetine treatment group compared with model group, whereas the levels of miR-134 and miR-124a were significantly downregulated. Furthermore, miR-18a showed significant upregulation in frontal lobe in the duloxetine treatment group relative to model group. Our data showed that miRNA expression profile in frontal lobe and hippocampus was affected by duloxetine in mice model of depression. The effect was especially pronounced in the hippocampus, suggesting that hippocampus might be the action site of duloxetine, which presumably worked by regulating the expression of miRNA levels.

  17. Daunorubicin Hydrochloride and Cytarabine Liposome

    Cancer.gov

    This page contains brief information about daunorubicin hydrochloride and cytarabine liposome and a collection of links to more information about the use of this drug, research results, and ongoing clinical trials.

  18. Evidences for amelioration of reserpine-induced fibromyalgia in rat by low dose of gamma irradiation and duloxetine.

    PubMed

    Shibrya, Eman E; Radwan, Rasha R; Abd El Fattah, Mai A; Shabaan, Esmat A; Kenawy, Sanaa A

    2017-05-01

    Fibromyalgia is a prevalent disorder characterized by chronic widespread pain and complex symptoms. This study was conducted to investigate the potential therapeutic effect of low-dose irradiation (LDI) alone or in combination with duloxetine on the reserpine-induced fibromyalgia in rats. Fibromyalgia was induced by administration of reserpine (1 mg/kg/s.c) for 3 consecutive days. Duloxetine (30 mg/kg, p.o) was administered 60 min before a forced swimming test (FST), and rats were exposed to a single dose of γ-radiation (0.5 Gy) 1 day before the FST. Reserpine significantly increased immobility time in the FST, decreased the amount of 5-hydroxytryptamine, dopamine, and norepinephrine in cerebral cortex. It also increased malondialdehyde and nitric oxide and reduced glutathione contents in brain tissue. LDI alone or combined with duloxetine completely antagonized reserpine-induced fibromyalgia as assessed by the measured parameters. One of the most significant findings in this study was that the therapeutic effect of duloxetine was more pronounced by its combination with LDI. A possible mechanism of action of LDI and duloxetine responsible for their therapeutic effect was discussed. On the basis of the presented evidences, it could be concluded that LDI alone or combined with duloxetine could be of value in the management of fibromyalgia.

  19. A six-month double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized clinical trial of duloxetine for the treatment of fibromyalgia

    PubMed Central

    Chappell, Amy S; Bradley, Laurence A; Wiltse, Curtis; Detke, Michael J; D’Souza, Deborah N; Spaeth, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Assess the efficacy of duloxetine 60/120 mg (N = 162) once daily compared with placebo (N = 168) in the treatment of patients with fibromyalgia, during six months of treatment. Methods: This was a phase-III, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group study assessing the efficacy and safety of duloxetine. Results: There were no significant differences between treatment groups on the co-primary efficacy outcome measures, change in the Brief Pain Inventory (BPI) average pain severity from baseline to endpoint (P = 0.053) and the Patient’s Global Impressions of Improvement (PGI-I) at endpoint (P = 0.073). Duloxetine-treated patients improved significantly more than placebo-treated patients on the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire pain score, BPI least pain score and average interference score, Clinical Global Impressions of Severity scale, area under the curve of pain relief, Multidimensional Fatigue Inventory mental fatigue dimension, Beck Depression Inventory-II total score, and 36-item Short Form Health Survey mental component summary and mental health score. Nausea was the most common treatment-emergent adverse event in the duloxetine group. Overall discontinuation rates were similar between groups. Conclusions: Although duloxetine 60/120 mg/day failed to demonstrate significant improvement over placebo on the co-primary outcome measures, in this supportive study, duloxetine demonstrated significant improvement compared with placebo on numerous secondary measures. PMID:20428412

  20. Predictors of Treatment with Duloxetine or Venlafaxine XR among Adult Patients Treated for Depression in Primary Care Practices in the United Kingdom

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Nianwen; Durden, Emily; Torres, Amelito; Cao, Zhun; Happich, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Background. Knowledge about real-world use of duloxetine and venlafaxine XR to treat depression in the UK is limited. Aims. To identify predictors of duloxetine or venlafaxine XR initiation. Method. Adult depressed patients who initiated duloxetine or venlafaxine XR between January 1, 2006 and September 30, 2007 were identified in the UK's General Practice Research Database. Demographic and clinical predictors of treatment initiation with duloxetine and venlafaxine XR were identified using logistic regression. Results. Patients initiating duloxetine (n = 909) were 4 years older than venlafaxine XR recipients (n = 1286). Older age, preexisting unexplained pain, respiratory disease, and pre-period use of anticonvulsants, opioids, and antihyperlipidemics were associated with increased odds of initiating duloxetine compared to venlafaxine XR. Pre-period anxiety disorder was associated with decreased odds of receiving duloxetine. Conclusion. Initial treatment choice with duloxetine versus venlafaxine XR was primarily driven by patient-specific mental and medical health characteristics. General practitioners in the UK favor duloxetine over venlafaxine XR when pain conditions coexist with depression. PMID:22720149

  1. An open treatment trial of duloxetine in elderly patients with dysthymic disorder

    PubMed Central

    Kerner, Nancy; D’Antonio, Kristina; Pelton, Gregory H; Salcedo, Elianny; Ferrar, Jennifer; Roose, Steven P

    2014-01-01

    Objective: We evaluated the efficacy and side effects of the selective serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor antidepressant duloxetine in older adults with dysthymic disorder. Methods: Patients ≥ 60 years old with dysthymic disorder received flexible dose duloxetine 20–120 mg daily in an open-label 12-week trial. The main outcomes were change from baseline to 12 weeks in 24-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale scores and Treatment Emergent Symptoms Scale scores. Response required ≥ 50% decline in Hamilton Depression Rating Scale scores with a Clinical Global Impression of much improved or better, and remission required final Hamilton Depression Rating Scale ≤ 6. Intent-to-treat analyses were conducted with the last observation carried forward. Results: In 30 patients, the mean age was 70.7 (standard deviation (SD) = 7.6) years and 56.7% were female. In intent-to-treat analyses, there were 16 responders (53.3%) and 10 remitters (33.3%). Of these, 19 patients completed the trial. The mean maximum dose was 76.3 mg (SD = 38.5) in the total sample and 101 mg (SD = 17.9) in completers. In the total sample, the mean final dose was 51 mg (SD = 27.2) and correlated significantly with decline in Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (p < .03); decline in Hamilton Depression Rating Scale correlated significantly with decline in Treatment Emergent Symptoms Scale (p < .001). Daily doses above 60 mg were associated with greater improvement and well tolerated. This result was partly confounded by early dropouts having received low doses. Demographic and medical comorbidities, including cardiac disease and hypertension, were not related to response. Somatic side effects were common prior to duloxetine treatment and improved rather than worsened with duloxetine. There were no serious adverse events. Conclusion: Duloxetine at relatively high doses showed moderate efficacy in elderly patients with dysthymic disorder and was well tolerated in successful completers

  2. Interaction of articaine hydrochloride with prokaryotic membrane lipids.

    PubMed

    Lygre, Henning; Moe, Grete; Nerdal, Willy; Holmsen, Holm

    2009-01-01

    Local anesthetics are the most commonly used drugs in dentistry, with a wide range of effects, including antimicrobial activity. High antimicrobial effects have recently been reported on oral microbes from articaine hydrochloride, revealed by the minimum inhibitory concentration and minimal bactericidal concentration. Additionally, articaine has recently been used as an alkaline component in endodontic materials with a proposed antibacterial activity. However, the detailed mechanisms of action have not been discussed. We determined the Langmuir surface pressure/molecular area isotherms of prokaryotic lipid monolayers, as well as the phospholipid phase transitions, by employing differential scanning calorimetry on unilamellar prokaryotic liposomes (bilayers). Articaine hydrochloride was found to interact with the prokaryotic membrane lipids in both monolayers and bilayers. An increase of the phospholipid molecular area of acidic glycerophospholipids as well as a decrease in phase transition temperature and enthalpy were found with increasing articaine hydrochloride concentration. The thermodynamic changes by adding articaine hydrochloride to prokaryotic membrane lipids are potentially related to the effects observed from antimicrobial peptides resulting from membrane insertion, aggregate composition, pore formation, and lysis. Interaction of articaine hydrochloride with prokaryotic membrane lipids is indicated. Hence, further research is necessary to gain insight into where these compounds exert their effects at the molecular level.

  3. 21 CFR 522.1222b - Ketamine hydrochloride with promazine hydrochloride and aminopentamide hydrogen sulfate injection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... hydrochloride and aminopentamide hydrogen sulfate injection. 522.1222b Section 522.1222b Food and Drugs FOOD AND... hydrochloride with promazine hydrochloride and aminopentamide hydrogen sulfate injection. (a) Chemical name... hydrochloride, 10- phenothiazine monohydrochloride, and aminopentamide hydrogen sulfate. (b) Specifications....

  4. 21 CFR 522.1222b - Ketamine hydrochloride with promazine hydrochloride and aminopentamide hydrogen sulfate injection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... hydrochloride and aminopentamide hydrogen sulfate injection. 522.1222b Section 522.1222b Food and Drugs FOOD AND... hydrochloride with promazine hydrochloride and aminopentamide hydrogen sulfate injection. (a) Chemical name... hydrochloride, 10- phenothiazine monohydrochloride, and aminopentamide hydrogen sulfate. (b) Specifications. The...

  5. Validated Colorimetric Assay of Clonidine Hydrochloride from Pharmaceutical Preparations

    PubMed Central

    Corciova, Andreia

    2016-01-01

    Clonidine hydrochloride is an antihypertensive agent used for migraine prophylaxis, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, menopausal flushing and Tourette syndrome. The quantity of the active substance in pharmaceutical preparations must be within specific limits, in agreement with the respective label claim. Therefore, the aim of this study was to establish the conditions for two spectrophotometric methods for clonidine determination, based on the formation of the ion pair complex between clonidine hydrochloride and thymol blue/bromophenol blue. A Jasco UV-Vis 530 spectrophotometer was used for the analysis and the maxim absorbance was measured at 418 nm/448 nm against blank solution. After validation, the methods were used for quantification of clonidine hydrochloride in two commercial samples (tablets). The recovery of active substance varies between 98.06 and 100.13 % without interferences from the excipients. PMID:27610155

  6. Validated Colorimetric Assay of Clonidine Hydrochloride from Pharmaceutical Preparations.

    PubMed

    Corciova, Andreia

    2016-01-01

    Clonidine hydrochloride is an antihypertensive agent used for migraine prophylaxis, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, menopausal flushing and Tourette syndrome. The quantity of the active substance in pharmaceutical preparations must be within specific limits, in agreement with the respective label claim. Therefore, the aim of this study was to establish the conditions for two spectrophotometric methods for clonidine determination, based on the formation of the ion pair complex between clonidine hydrochloride and thymol blue/bromophenol blue. A Jasco UV-Vis 530 spectrophotometer was used for the analysis and the maxim absorbance was measured at 418 nm/448 nm against blank solution. After validation, the methods were used for quantification of clonidine hydrochloride in two commercial samples (tablets). The recovery of active substance varies between 98.06 and 100.13 % without interferences from the excipients.

  7. Vortioxetine versus Duloxetine in the Treatment of Patients with Major Depressive Disorder: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials.

    PubMed

    Li, Guangjian; Wang, Xu; Ma, Dihui

    2016-07-01

    Vortioxetine and duloxetine are two new antidepressant drugs that have been used clinically in the treatment of major depressive disorder (MDD). The objectives of this meta-analysis were to evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of vortioxetine compared with duloxetine in MDD. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) published in PubMed, EMBASE, Web of Science, and ClinicalTrials.gov were systematically reviewed to compare vortioxetine with duloxetine in terms of efficacy and tolerability in patients with MDD. Results were expressed as the risk ratio (RR) with 95 % confidence intervals (CIs), and weighted mean difference (WMD). Pooled estimates were calculated by using a fixed-effects model or a randomized-effects model, depending on the heterogeneity among studies. A total of five RCTs involving 2287 patients met the inclusion criteria and were included in this meta-analysis. Pooled results showed that duloxetine was associated with a higher response rate than vortioxetine, as well as showing a similar remission rate with vortioxetine. The changes from baseline in the Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS), 24-item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAM-D24), Clinical Global Impression-Improvement scale (CGI-I), CGI-Severity scale (CGI-S), Sheehan Disability Scale (SDS), and Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale (HAM-A) scores were significantly greater in the duloxetine group than in the vortioxetine group. The incidence of treatment-emergent adverse events was significantly higher in the duloxetine group than in the vortioxetine group. Duloxetine was more effective but less well-tolerated than vortioxetine in MDD. Considering the potential limitations of this meta-analysis, more large-scale RCTs are needed to confirm these findings.

  8. Iontophoretic transdermal delivery of buspirone hydrochloride in hairless mouse skin.

    PubMed

    Al-Khalili, Mohammad; Meidan, Victor M; Michniak, Bozena B

    2003-01-01

    The transdermal delivery of buspirone hydrochloride across hairless mouse skin and the combined effect of iontophoresis and terpene enhancers were evaluated in vitro using Franz diffusion cells. Iontophoretic delivery was optimized by evaluating the effect of drug concentration, current density, and pH of the vehicle solution. Increasing the current density from 0.05 to 0.1 mA/cm2 resulted in doubling of the iontophoretic flux of buspirone hydrochloride, while increasing drug concentration from 1% to 2% had no effect on flux. Using phosphate buffer to adjust the pH of the drug solution decreased the buspirone hydrochloride iontophoretic flux relative to water solutions. Incorporating buspirone hydrochloride into ethanol:water (50:50 vol/vol) based gel formulations using carboxymethylcellulose and hydroxypropylmethylcellulose had no effect on iontophoretic delivery. Incorporation of three terpene enhancers (menthol, cineole, and terpineol) into the gel resulted in a synergistic effect when combined with iontophoresis. Menthol was the most active enhancer, and when combined with iontophoresis it was possible to deliver 10 mg/cm2/day of buspirone hydrochloride.

  9. Open-label study of duloxetine for the treatment of obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Dougherty, Darin D; Corse, Andrew K; Chou, Tina; Duffy, Amanda; Arulpragasam, Amanda R; Deckersbach, Thilo; Jenike, Michael A; Keuthen, Nancy J

    2015-01-01

    This study sought to investigate the efficacy of duloxetine for the treatment of obsessive-compulsive disorder (DSM-IV). Twenty individuals were enrolled in a 17-week, open-label trial of duloxetine at Massachusetts General Hospital. Data were collected between March 2007 and September 2012. Study measures assessing obsessive-compulsive disorder symptoms, quality of life, depression, and anxiety were administered at baseline and weeks 1, 5, 9, 13, and 17. The primary outcome measures were the Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale and Clinical Global Improvement scale. For the 12 study completers, pre- and posttreatment analyses revealed significant improvements (P<.05) on clinician- and self-rated measures of obsessive-compulsive disorder symptoms and quality of life. Among the 12 completers, more than one-half (n=7) satisfied full medication response criteria. Intention-to-treat analyses (n=20) showed similar improvements (P<.05) on primary and secondary study outcome measures. The results of this study suggest that duloxetine may provide a significant reduction in symptoms for patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00464698; http://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT00464698?term=NCT00464698&rank=1. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of CINP.

  10. Delirium associated with concomitant use of duloxetine and bupropion in an elderly patient.

    PubMed

    Ma, Szu-Pin; Tsai, Chia-Jui; Chang, Cheng-Chen; Hsu, Wen-Yu

    2017-03-01

    Delirium is common in daily practice. Drug-induced delirium constitutes approximately one-third of all cases of delirium. In cases characterized by the limited efficacy of a single antidepressant, a combination of two antidepressants is required, which may induce a complex drug-drug interaction. We reviewed a case of duloxetine- and bupropion-related delirium in an elderly male patient in our clinical practice. The patient was diagnosed with major depressive disorder and was treated with duloxetine. However, he developed delirium 10 days after bupropion was added to his treatment regimen. Three days after the cessation of bupropion, his delirious condition gradually improved. Duloxetine and bupropion are both cytochrome P450 2D6 inhibitors that may result in a higher level of hydroxybupropion. An increased level of hydroxybupropion may cause the elevation of dopamine and a risk of subsequent delirium. We should be aware of the risk of delirium induced by drug-drug interactions. © 2016 The Authors. Psychogeriatrics © 2016 Japanese Psychogeriatric Society.

  11. 21 CFR 582.5676 - Pyridoxine hydrochloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Pyridoxine hydrochloride. 582.5676 Section 582.5676 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5676 Pyridoxine hydrochloride. (a) Product. Pyridoxine hydrochloride. (b...

  12. 21 CFR 582.5676 - Pyridoxine hydrochloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Pyridoxine hydrochloride. 582.5676 Section 582.5676 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5676 Pyridoxine hydrochloride. (a) Product. Pyridoxine hydrochloride. (b...

  13. 21 CFR 582.5875 - Thiamine hydrochloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Thiamine hydrochloride. 582.5875 Section 582.5875 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5875 Thiamine hydrochloride. (a) Product. Thiamine hydrochloride. (b) Conditions of use...

  14. 21 CFR 582.5875 - Thiamine hydrochloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Thiamine hydrochloride. 582.5875 Section 582.5875 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5875 Thiamine hydrochloride. (a) Product. Thiamine hydrochloride. (b) Conditions of use...

  15. Occupancy of Norepinephrine Transporter by Duloxetine in Human Brains Measured by Positron Emission Tomography with (S,S)-[18F]FMeNER-D2.

    PubMed

    Moriguchi, Sho; Takano, Harumasa; Kimura, Yasuyuki; Nagashima, Tomohisa; Takahata, Keisuke; Kubota, Manabu; Kitamura, Soichiro; Ishii, Tatsuya; Ichise, Masanori; Zhang, Ming-Rong; Shimada, Hitoshi; Mimura, Masaru; Meyer, Jeffrey H; Higuchi, Makoto; Suhara, Tetsuya

    2017-08-03

    The norepinephrine transporter in the brain has been targeted in the treatment of psychiatric disorders. Duloxetine is a serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor that has been widely used for the treatment of depression. However, the relationship between dose and plasma concentration of duloxetine and norepinephrine transporter occupancy in the human brain has not been determined. In this study, we examined norepinephrine transporter occupancy by different doses of duloxetine. We calculated norepinephrine transporter occupancies from 2 positron emission tomography scans using (S,S)-[18F]FMeNER-D2 before and after a single oral dose of duloxetine (20 mg, n = 3; 40 mg, n = 3; 60 mg, n =2). Positron emission tomography scans were performed from 120 to 180 minutes after an i.v. bolus injection of (S,S)-[18F]FMeNER-D2. Venous blood samples were taken to measure the plasma concentration of duloxetine just before and after the second positron emission tomography scan. Norepinephrine transporter occupancy by duloxetine was 29.7% at 20 mg, 30.5% at 40 mg, and 40.0% at 60 mg. The estimated dose of duloxetine inducing 50% norepinephrine transporter occupancy was 76.8 mg, and the estimated plasma drug concentration inducing 50% norepinephrine transporter occupancy was 58.0 ng/mL. Norepinephrine transporter occupancy by clinical doses of duloxetine was approximately 30% to 40% in human brain as estimated using positron emission tomography with (S,S)-[18F]FMeNER-D2.

  16. Conformation and conformational exchange of Olopatadine hydrochloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Lian-di; Zhu, Chuan-jun; Yang, Chun-hui; Cui, Yu-xin

    2008-12-01

    Besides the assignments of the 13C and 1H shifts by 1D and 2D NMR, the experiment 1H spectra of Olopatadine hydrochloride were recorded at temperature range 228-338 K. The variable-temperature spectra revealed a dynamic NMR effect which is attributed to conformational interconversion of the drug. At low temperature, the solution was shown to contain two conformers and the ration of them was 1:1. A conformational process with a free energy of activation of 56.7 kJ mol -1, coalescence temperature 298 K, was interpreted as geminal 1H exchange. Using molecule simulation, conformational candidates for two conformers are proposed.

  17. Probing the Interaction between Acotiamide Hydrochloride and Pepsin by Multispectral Methods, Electrochemical Measurements, and Docking Studies.

    PubMed

    He, Jiawei; Ma, Xianglin; Wang, Qing; Huang, Yanmei; Li, Hui

    2016-07-01

    The interaction between acotiamide hydrochloride and pepsin was systematically characterized by fluorescence and electrochemical approaches. Fluorescence lifetime measurements showed that acotiamide hydrochloride quenched the intrinsic fluorescence of pepsin with a new complex formation via static mode, which was reconfirmed by cyclic voltammetry results. Both of the binding number and binding constants were calculated from differential pulse voltammetry analysis and fluorescence spectroscopy. The values obtained from the above two methods displayed a relatively high degree of consistency. Thermodynamic parameters suggested that acotiamide hydrochloride interacted with pepsin spontaneously by hydrogen bonding and van der Waals interactions. These results were consistent with the results obtained from molecular docking analysis. As revealed by synchronous fluorescence, three-dimensional fluorescence, Fourier transform infrared spectrometry, and circular dichroism spectra, acotiamide hydrochloride could affect the microenvironment and slightly change the secondary structure of pepsin. Furthermore, acotiamide hydrochloride can inhibit pepsin activity in vitro, as explained by the molecular docking.

  18. Real-world comparison of health care utilization between duloxetine and pregabalin initiators with fibromyalgia

    PubMed Central

    Peng, X; Sun, P; Novick, D; Andrews, J; Sun, S

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To compare health care utilization of duloxetine initiators and pregabalin initiators among fibromyalgia patients in a real-world setting. Methods A retrospective cohort study was conducted based on a US national commercial health claims database (2006–2009). Fibromyalgia patients who initiated duloxetine or pregabalin in 2008, aged 18–64 years, and who maintained continuous health insurance coverage 1 year before and 1 year after initiation were assigned to duloxetine or pregabalin cohorts on the basis of their initiated agent. Patients who had pill coverage of the agents over the course of 90 days preceding the initiation were excluded. The two comparative cohorts were constructed using propensity score greedy match methods. Descriptive analysis and paired t-test were performed to compare health care utilization rates in the postinitiation year and the changes of these rates from the preinitiation year to the postinitiation year. Results Both matched cohorts (n=1,265 pairs) had a similar mean initiation age (49–50 years), percentage of women (87%–88%), and prevalence of baseline comorbid conditions (neuropathic pain other than diabetic peripheral neuropathic pain, low back pain, cardiovascular disease, hypertension, headache or migraine, and osteoarthritis). In the preinitiation year, both cohorts had similar inpatient, outpatient, and medication utilization rates (inpatient, 15.7%–16.1%; outpatient, 100.0%; medication, 97.9%–98.7%). The utilization rates diverged in the postinitiation year, with the pregabalin cohort using more fibromyalgia-related inpatient care (3.2% versus 2.2%; P<0.05), any inpatient care (19.3% versus 16.8%; P<0.05), and fibromyalgia-related outpatient care (62.1% versus 51.8%; P<0.05). From the preinitiation period to the postinitiation period, the duloxetine cohort experienced decreases in certain utilization rates, whereas the pregabalin cohort had increases (percentage of patients with a fibromyalgia

  19. Switching to duloxetine from selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors in non- or partial responders: Results from a Spanish sample.

    PubMed

    Irene, Romera; Luis, Montejo Angel; Helena, Delgado-Cohen; David, Perahia; Ramon, Domenech Josep; Inmaculada, Gilaberte

    2009-01-01

    Objectives. To evaluate the efficacy and safety of switching from a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) to duloxetine in non- or partial responders. Methods. This is a post-hoc analysis of the pooled data of the Spanish sample from an open-label, multicentre study. Additionally, a 6-month continuation safety phase was performed. Results. A total of 156 patients were switched to duloxetine from SSRIs. More than 83% completed the acute phase, of whom 75% went into the continuation phase. At baseline, the mean duration of SSRI treatment was 71.2 weeks and the HAM-D17 mean score was 22.4. In the acute-phase, symptoms severity significantly improved after 10 weeks of duloxetine treatment as measured by mean change from baseline in HAM-D17 total score (-10.5; P<0.001) and all secondary efficacy measures, including painful symptoms. Response (≥50% decrease in HAM-D17 total score) and remission rates (HAM-D17 total score ≤ 7) were 52.9 and 27.7%, respectively. The most common adverse events reported in both phases were headache (11.5% [acute]; 6.1% [continuation]) and nausea (6.4% [acute]; 5.1% [continuation]). Conclusions. In a population of Spanish SSRI non- and partial responders, switch to duloxetine was associated with significant improvement in emotional and painful symptoms of depression. Duloxetine was well tolerated and safe during both phases.

  20. Efficacy of duloxetine in the treatment of generalized anxiety disorder in patients with clinically significant pain symptoms.

    PubMed

    Russell, James M; Weisberg, Risa; Fava, Maurizio; Hartford, James T; Erickson, Janelle S; D'Souza, Deborah N

    2008-01-01

    Anxiety disorders often are accompanied by painful physical symptoms. This report assessed the effectiveness of duloxetine in improving anxiety symptoms, pain severity, and patient functioning in adults diagnosed with generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), who presented with clinically significant pain symptoms. Data were pooled from two multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical studies evaluating the efficacy of duloxetine 60-120 mg once daily compared with placebo in the treatment of GAD. The primary patient population for these analyses was patients with baseline Visual Analog Scale (VAS) overall pain severity score > or =30. Of the 798 randomized patients that had baseline VAS scores, approximately 44.4% of GAD patients were identified as having baseline VAS overall pain severity score > or =30 (duloxetine N=208, placebo N=146). Duloxetine-treated patients had significantly greater improvement compared with placebo-treated patients on anxiety symptoms (measured by Hamilton Anxiety Scale total score), on patient functioning (measured by the Sheehan Disability Scale Global Functional Impairment Score and across all Sheehan Disability Scale domains), and on all VAS pain items. Patients achieving remission at endpoint, and patients with lower scores on the Clinical Global Impression of Improvement and Patient Global Impression of Improvement scales had greater improvement in VAS pain severity scores. These results suggest that in patients with GAD who present with clinically significant pain symptoms, duloxetine is effective in reducing anxiety symptoms, pain severity, and in improving patient functioning.

  1. Induction of alkaline phosphatase in Escherichia coli: effect of procaine hydrochloride.

    PubMed Central

    Tribhuwan, R C; Pradhan, D S

    1977-01-01

    The effect of procaine hydrochloride, an anesthetic known to alter membrane structure, on the induced formation of alkaline phosphatase, a periplasmic enzyme, in Escherichia coli was investigated. Procaine hydrochloride specifically arrested the appearance of active alkaline phosphatase while permitting the induction of another enzyme, beta-galactosidase, which is internally localized. Evidence has been obtained to show that procaine hydrochloride does not arrest synthesis of inactive monomer subunits of the enzyme, indicating that the drug interferes in the conversion of monomer subunits to an active dimer enzyme. Images PMID:328482

  2. Efficacy and Tolerability of Duloxetine Treatment in Elderly Patients with Major Depressive Disorder and Concurrent Anxiety Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Raskin, Joel; Wiltse, Curtis; Walker, Daniel; Brawman-Mintzer, Olga

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To compare the efficacy and tolerability of duloxetine 60mg/day versus placebo in treating elderly patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) and concurrent anxiety symptoms. Methods: Patients (≥65) were randomized to eight weeks of treatment with duloxetine 60mg/day (n=207) or placebo (n=104). Anxiety measures were analyzed for all patients, by age (<75 and ≥75), and in patients having concurrent high anxiety (HAMD17, item 10; Psychic Anxiety baseline score of 2, 3, or 4). Psychic Anxiety, Somatic Anxiety item 11, and the Anxiety/Somatization subscale were analyzed for all patients and subgroups by mean change from baseline to endpoint and repeated measures. Tolerability was assessed via treatment-emergent adverse events (TEAEs), and adverse events were reported as the reason for discontinuation. The analyses presented are primarily post hoc in nature. Results: Duloxetine produced significantly greater reductions than placebo in Psychic Anxiety (least-squares mean change: -0.62 vs. -0.18, p<0.001) and the Anxiety/Somatization subscale (-1.88 vs. -0.99, p=0.002). Repeated measures analyses showed separation between the treatment groups beginning at Week 1 for Psychic Anxiety and Week 4 for the Anxiety/Somatization subscale. Significant improvement occurred in the <75 and ≥75 age groups for Psychic Anxiety, but only the <75 group for the Anxiety/Somatization subscale. Duloxetine-treated patients with high anxiety showed significant improvement compared with placebo-treated patients on Psychic Anxiety, Anxiety/Somatization subscale, the 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAMD17) total score, and several other measures. Duloxetine and placebo had similar TEAE rates and discontinuation rates due to adverse events. Conclusion: Duloxetine (60mg/day) was efficacious and tolerable in elderly patients with MDD and concurrent anxiety symptoms. PMID:20711334

  3. Safety and tolerability of duloxetine in the treatment of patients with fibromyalgia: pooled analysis of data from five clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Choy, Ernest H S; Mease, Philip J; Kajdasz, Daniel K; Wohlreich, Madelaine M; Crits-Christoph, Paul; Walker, Daniel J; Chappell, Amy S

    2009-09-01

    The purpose of this report is to describe the overall safety profile of both short- and longer-term duloxetine treatment of fibromyalgia. Data from four double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled studies (two with 6-month open-label extension phases) and a 1-year, open-label safety study were included. Safety measures included treatment-emergent adverse events (TEAEs), adverse events leading to discontinuation, serious adverse events (SAEs), clinical laboratory tests, vital signs, and electrocardiograms. The most common TEAEs for short-term treatment with duloxetine were nausea (29.3%), headache (20.0%), dry mouth (18.2%), insomnia (14.5%), fatigue (13.5%), constipation (14.5%), diarrhea (11.6%), and dizziness (11.0%; all p < 0.05 vs. placebo). Most TEAEs emerged early and were mild to moderate in severity. The profile of adverse events in patients enrolled at least 6 months, and for patients in the 1-year study, was similar to that found in the short-term treatment studies, with no new adverse events emerging at a notable rate. About 20% of patients discontinued due to adverse events in the short-term treatment studies and in the 1-year study. SAEs were uncommon, and none occurred at a significantly higher frequency for duloxetine compared with placebo. Mean changes in vital signs and weight were small. Rates of treatment-emergent potentially clinically significant (PCS) vital sign, laboratory, and electrocardiogram measures were low, with only PCS rates of alanine aminotransferase being significantly higher for duloxetine compared with placebo in the placebo-controlled treatment studies. In the 1-year study, four patients (1.1%) had suicide-related behavior. The data provided here summarize short- and long-term safety from five clinical studies in patients treated with duloxetine for fibromyalgia. In addition, postmarketing surveillance continues for adverse events reported with duloxetine in fibromyalgia, as in other indications.

  4. Compatibility of cholecalciferol, haloperidol, imipramine hydrochloride, levodopa/carbidopa, lorazepam, minocycline hydrochloride, tacrolimus monohydrate, terbinafine, tramadol hydrochloride and valsartan in SyrSpend SF PH4 oral suspensions.

    PubMed

    Polonini, H C; Silva, S L; Cunha, C N; Brandão, M A F; Ferreira, A O

    2016-04-01

    A challenge with compounding oral liquid formulations is the limited availability of data to support the physical, chemical and microbiological stability of the formulation. This poses a patient safety concern and a risk for medication errors. The objective of this study was to evaluate the compatibility of the following active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) in 10 oral suspensions, using SyrSpend SF PH4 (liquid) as the suspending vehicle: cholecalciferol 50,000 IU/mL, haloperidol 0.5 mg/mL, imipramine hydrochloride 5.0 mg/mL, levodopa/carbidopa 5.0/1.25 mg/mL, lorazepam 1.0 mg/mL, minocycline hydrochloride 10.0 mg/mL, tacrolimus monohydrate 1.0 mg/mL, terbinafine 25.0 mg/mL, tramadol hydrochloride 10.0 mg/mL and valsartan 4.0 mg/mL. The suspensions were stored both refrigerated (2 - 8 degrees C) and at controlled room temperature (20 - 25 degrees C). This is the first stability study for these APIs in SyrSpend SF PH4 (liquid). Further, the stability of haloperidol,ilmipramine hydrochloride, minocycline, and valsartan in oral suspension has not been previously reported in the literature. Compatibility was assessed by measuring percent recovery at varying time points throughout a 90 days period. Quantification of the APIs was performed by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC-UV). Given the percentage of recovery of the APIs within the suspensions, the beyond-use date of the final preparations was found to be at least 90 days for most suspensions both refrigerated and at room temperature. Exceptions were: Minocycline hydrochloride at both storage temperatures (60 days), levodopa/carbidopa at room temperature (30 days), and lorazepam at room temperature (60 days). This suggests that compounded suspensions of APIs from different pharmacological classes in SyrSpend SF PH4 (liquid) are stable.

  5. [Neuropharmacological studies on tolperisone hydrochloride (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Fujii, Y; Ishii, Y; Suzuki, T; Murayama, S

    1979-10-01

    Neuropharmacological properties of tolperisone hydrochloride (2,4'-dimethyl-3-piperidinopropiophenone hydrochloride) were investigated in mice, rats and cats. Tolperisone inhibited the spontaneous movement and methamphetamine-induced hyperactivity in mice and the ED50 was approx. 50 mg/kg, s.c. At this dose, tolperisone did not prolong the pentobarbital-induced sleeping time. Tolperisone inhibited convulsions induced by pentylenetetrazol, nicotine and maximum electric shock, but did not affect convulsions induced by strychnine and picrotoxin. Tolperisone induced muscle relaxation in mice and rats in several pharmacological tests, but did not affect neuro-muscular transmission. Tolperisone did not affect conditioned avoidance response in rats and methamphetamine-induced rotational behaviour in nigro-lesioned rats. Tolperisone reduced decerebrated rigidity in cats with i.v. administration of 5 approximately 10 mg/kg and intraduodenal administration of 50 approximately 100 mg/kg. Tolperisone elicited a slight drowsy pattern in the spontaneous EEG of cats at 5 approximately 10 mg/kg, i.v., and inhibited the EEG arousal response and pressor response to stimulation of mesencephalic reticular formation or posterior hypothalamic area. These results suggest that inhibition of the activity in the gamma pathway descending from the mesencephalic reticular formation may be involved in the mechanism of muscle relaxant action of tolperisone.

  6. Might different cytokine trends in depressed patients receiving duloxetine indicate differential biological backgrounds.

    PubMed

    Fornaro, Michele; Rocchi, Giulio; Escelsior, Andrea; Contini, Paola; Martino, Matteo

    2013-03-05

    Correlational studies investigating neurohormonal-cytokine modulation by antidepressants suggest, among others, variations in cytokines balances as state markers of different biological subtypes of major depressive disorder (MDD) and response predictors to specific treatments. Objective of the study was to investigate cytokines modulation by duloxetine, a relatively newer SNRI with "clean" dual serotonin/norepinephrine mechanism. 30 MDD patients and 32 healthy controls were assessed using Hamilton Depression Scale (HAM-D) and monitored for levels of IL-1β, IL-2, IL-4, IL-10, IL-12, IFN-γ and TNF-α, at baseline, week 6 and week 12 of duloxetine treatment (60mg/day) and at baseline, respectively. Early responders (ER: defined at week 6 by reduction >50% of baseline HAM-D score) and early non-responders (ENR) showed opposite trends in cytokine levels during duloxetine treatment: ENR were characterized by baseline Th2 shift compared to controls (lower IL-1β, IFN-γ and TNF-α) with increase in Th1 cytokines levels during treatment (increase of IL-1β, IL-12, IFN-γ, IL-1β/IL-10 and TNF-α/IL-10, decrease of IL-10), achieving clinical response at week 12; ER were characterized by baseline Th2-to-Th1 relative switch compared to ENR (higher IL-1β, IL-1β/IL-10 and TNF-α/IL-10) with reduction in Th1 cytokines levels during treatment (decrease of TNF-α and TNF-α/IL-10), achieving clinical response at week 6. Small sample size. In accordance to early clinical response, duloxetine treatment could divide depressed patients into at least 2 subgroups characterized by clinical and laboratory differentiated behavior, suggesting different neurobiological background within depressive syndrome differentially sensitive to different drug components: pro-serotonergic effect and increase in Th1 cytokines in ENR vs. pro-noradrenergic effect and decrease in Th1 cytokines in ER. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Efficacy of duloxetine on cognition, depression, and pain in elderly patients with major depressive disorder: an 8-week, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Raskin, Joel; Wiltse, Curtis G; Siegal, Alan; Sheikh, Javaid; Xu, Jimmy; Dinkel, James J; Rotz, Benjamin T; Mohs, Richard C

    2007-06-01

    This study compared the effects of duloxetine, 60 mg/day, versus placebo on cognition, depression, and pain in elderly patients with recurrent major depressive disorder. Patients were randomly assigned (2:1) to duloxetine, 60 mg/day (N=207), or placebo (N=104) for 8 weeks in a double-blind study. The primary outcome measure was a prespecified composite cognitive score composed of four individual tests. Secondary measures included the Geriatric Depression Scale, the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale, the Visual Analogue Scale assessing pain, and standard safety and tolerability assessments. Patients had a median age of 72 years (range=65-90). Duloxetine demonstrated significantly greater improvement in the composite cognitive score versus placebo (least-squares mean change from baseline to endpoint: 1.95 versus 0.76), driven by improved verbal learning and memory. Duloxetine treatment showed significantly greater baseline-to-endpoint reductions in both Hamilton depression scale (-6.49 versus -3.72) and Geriatric Depression Scale (-4.07 versus -1.34) total scores compared with placebo. Hamilton depression scale response (37.3% versus 18.6%) and remission (27.4% versus 14.7%) rates at endpoint were significantly higher for duloxetine than for placebo. Duloxetine significantly improved Visual Analogue Scale scores for back pain and time in pain while awake versus placebo. Significantly fewer patients receiving duloxetine withdrew from the study because of lack of efficacy (2.9% versus 9.6%); the incidences of discontinuation due to adverse events were similar for duloxetine and placebo (9.7% versus 8.7%). Duloxetine improved cognition, depression, and some pain measures and was safe and well tolerated in elderly patients with recurrent major depressive disorder.

  8. Action of tilidine hydrochloride and morphine hydrochloride on ventilatory control in normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Maranetra, N; Pain, M C

    1976-03-20

    The action of tilidine hydrochloride and morphine hydrochloride on the ventilatory response to inhaled carbon dioxide has been assessed in 10 normal volunteers. In doses of 50 mg and 100 mg given intravenously, tilidine hydrochloride induced less respiratory depression than 10 mg of morphine given intravenously. Side effects were not different or troublesome with either drug. Depending on its relative pain-relieving property, tilidine hydrochloride may have advantages over morphine as an analgesic.

  9. A randomized, double-blind, duloxetine-referenced study comparing efficacy and tolerability of 2 fixed doses of vortioxetine in the acute treatment of adults with MDD.

    PubMed

    Mahableshwarkar, Atul R; Jacobsen, Paula L; Chen, Yinzhong; Serenko, Michael; Trivedi, Madhukar H

    2015-06-01

    Vortioxetine has reduced depressive symptoms in adults with major depressive disorder (MDD) in multiple clinical trials. The aim of this study is to evaluate the efficacy, safety, and tolerability of vortioxetine 15 and 20 mg vs placebo in adults with MDD. Patients were randomized 1:1:1:1 to vortioxetine 15 mg, vortioxetine 20 mg, duloxetine 60 mg (active reference), or placebo. The primary efficacy endpoint was mean change in Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) total score at week 8 (MMRM). Safety/tolerability assessments included physical examinations, vital signs, laboratory evaluations, electrocardiograms, adverse events (AEs), Columbia-Suicide Severity Rating Scale, Arizona Sexual Experiences Scale, and Discontinuation-Emergent Signs and Symptoms checklist. Six hundred and fourteen patients were randomized. Mean changes in MADRS scores were -12.83 (±0.834), -14.30 (±0.890), -15.57 (±0.880), and -16.90 (±0.884) for placebo, vortioxetine 15 mg (P = .224), vortioxetine 20 mg (P = .023), and duloxetine 60 mg (P < .001) (P vs placebo), respectively. AEs reported by ≥5 % of vortioxetine patients included nausea, headache, diarrhea, dizziness, dry mouth, constipation, vomiting, insomnia, fatigue, and upper respiratory infection. Treatment-emergent sexual dysfunction, suicidal ideation or behavior, and discontinuation symptoms were not significantly different between vortioxetine and placebo. Vortioxetine 20 mg significantly reduced MADRS total scores after 8 weeks of treatment. Both vortioxetine doses were well tolerated. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier NCT01153009; www.clinicaltrials.gov/ .

  10. Neuroprotective effect of penehyclidine hydrochloride on focal cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury★

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Cuicui; Wang, Junke

    2013-01-01

    Penehyclidine hydrochloride can promote microcirculation and reduce vascular permeability. However, the role of penehyclidine hydrochloride in cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury remains unclear. In this study, in vivo middle cerebral artery occlusion models were established in experimental rats, and penehyclidine hydrochloride pretreatment was given via intravenous injection prior to model establishment. Tetrazolium chloride, terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate-biotin nick end labeling and immunohistochemical staining showed that, penehyclidine hydrochloride pretreatment markedly attenuated neuronal histopathological changes in the cortex, hippocampus and striatum, reduced infarction size, increased the expression level of Bcl-2, decreased the expression level of caspase-3, and inhibited neuronal apoptosis in rats with cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury. Xanthine oxidase and thiobarbituric acid chromogenic results showed that penehyclidine hydrochloride upregulated the activity of superoxide dismutase and downregulated the concentration of malondialdehyde in the ischemic cerebral cortex and hippocampus, as well as reduced the concentration of extracellular excitatory amino acids in rats with cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury. In addition, penehyclidine hydrochloride inhibited the expression level of the NR1 subunit in hippocampal nerve cells in vitro following oxygen-glucose deprivation, as detected by PCR. Experimental findings indicate that penehyclidine hydrochloride attenuates neuronal apoptosis and oxidative stress injury after focal cerebral ischemia-reperfusion, thus exerting a neuroprotective effect. PMID:25206707

  11. Duloxetine in OsteoArthritis (DOA) study: study protocol of a pragmatic open-label randomised controlled trial assessing the effect of preoperative pain treatment on postoperative outcome after total hip or knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Blikman, T; Rienstra, W; van Raaij, T M; ten Hagen, A J; Dijkstra, B; Zijlstra, W P; Bulstra, S K; van den Akker-Scheek, I; Stevens, M

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Residual pain is a major factor in patient dissatisfaction following total hip arthroplasty or total knee arthroplasty (THA/TKA). The proportion of patients with unfavourable long-term residual pain is high, ranging from 7% to 34%. There are studies indicating that a preoperative degree of central sensitisation (CS) is associated with poorer postoperative outcomes and residual pain. It is thus hypothesised that preoperative treatment of CS could enhance postoperative outcomes. Duloxetine has been shown to be effective for several chronic pain syndromes, including knee osteoarthritis (OA), in which CS is most likely one of the underlying pain mechanisms. This study aims to evaluate the postoperative effects of preoperative screening and targeted duloxetine treatment of CS on residual pain compared with care-as-usual. Methods and analysis This multicentre, pragmatic, prospective, open-label, randomised controlled trial includes patients with idiopathic hip/knee OA who are on a waiting list for primary THA/TKA. Patients at risk for CS will be randomly allocated to the preoperative duloxetine treatment programme group or the care-as-usual control group. The primary end point is the degree of postoperative pain 6 months after THA/TKA. Secondary end points at multiple time points up to 12 months postoperatively are: pain, neuropathic pain-like symptoms, (pain) sensitisation, pain catastrophising, joint-associated problems, physical activity, health-related quality of life, depressive and anxiety symptoms, and perceived improvement. Data will be analysed on an intention-to-treat basis. Ethics and dissemination The study is approved by the local Medical Ethics Committee (METc 2014/087) and will be conducted according to the principles of the Declaration of Helsinki (64th, 2013) and the Good Clinical Practice standard (GCP), and in compliance with the Medical Research Involving Human Subjects Act (WMO). Trial registration number 2013-004313-41; Pre

  12. Nanostructured lipid-carrageenan hybrid carriers (NLCCs) for controlled delivery of mitoxantrone hydrochloride to enhance anticancer activity bypassing the BCRP-mediated efflux.

    PubMed

    Ling, Guixia; Zhang, Tianhong; Zhang, Peng; Sun, Jin; He, Zhonggui

    2016-08-01

    Novel nanostructured lipid-carrageenan hybrid carriers (NLCCs) were exploited for controlled delivery of water soluble chemotherapeutic agent mitoxantrone hydrochloride (MTO) with high loading capacity, sustained release property, and potential for improving oral bioavailability and antitumor efficacy. By introducing the negative polymer of carrageenan, MTO was highly incorporated into NLCCs with encapsulation efficiency of 95.8% by electrostatic interaction. In vivo pharmacokinetics of MTO solution (MTO-Sol) and MTO-NLCCs in rats demonstrated that the apparent bioavailability of MTO-NLCCs was increased to approximate 3.5-fold compared to that of MTO-Sol. The cytotoxicity investigations by MTT method indicated that NLCCs could significantly enhanced the antitumor efficacy against resistant MCF-7/MX cells. The relative cellular association of MTO-NLCCs was 9.2-fold higher than that of MTO-Sol in breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) over-expressing MCF-7/MX cells, implying that BCRP-mediated drug efflux was diminished by the introduction of NLCCs. The endocytosis inhibition study implied that the NLCCs entered the MCF-7/MX cells by clathrin-mediated endocytosis process, which can bypass the efflux of MTO mediated by BCRP. The new developed NLCCs provide an effective strategy for oral delivery of water-soluble MTO with improved encapsulation efficiency, oral bioavailability, and cytotoxicity against resistant breast cancer cells.

  13. Predictors of duloxetine response in patients with oxaliplatin-induced painful chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN): a secondary analysis of randomised controlled trial – CALGB/alliance 170601

    PubMed Central

    SMITH, E.M.L.; PANG, H.; YE, C.; CIRRINCIONE, C.; FLEISHMAN, S.; PASKETT, E.D.; AHLES, T.; BRESSLER, L.R.; LE-LINDQWISTER, N.; FADUL, C.E.; LOPRINZI, C.; SHAPIRO, C.L.

    2016-01-01

    Duloxetine is an effective treatment for oxaliplatin-induced painful chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN). However, predictors of duloxetine response have not been adequately explored. The objective of this secondary and exploratory analysis was to identify predictors of duloxetine response in patients with painful oxaliplatin-induced CIPN. Patients (N = 106) with oxaliplatin-induced painful CIPN were randomised to receive duloxetine or placebo. Eligible patients had chronic CIPN pain and an average neuropathic pain score ≥4/10. Duloxetine/placebo dose was 30 mg/day for 7 days, then 60 mg/day for 4 weeks. The Brief Pain Inventory-Short Form and the EORTC QLQ-C30 were used to assess pain and quality of life, respectively. Univariate and multiple logistic regression analyses were performed to identify demographic, physiologic and psychological predictors of duloxetine response. Higher baseline emotional functioning predicted duloxetine response (≥30% reduction in pain; OR 4.036; 95% CI 0.999–16.308; p = 0.050). Based on the results from a multiple logistic regression using patient data from both the duloxetine and placebo treatment arms, duloxetine-treated patients with high emotional functioning are more likely to experience pain reduction (p = 0.026). In patients with painful, oxaliplatin-induced CIPN, emotional functioning may also predict duloxetine response. ClinicalTrials.gov, Identifier NCT00489411 PMID:26603828

  14. Stability of amrinone and digoxin, procainamide hydrochloride, propranolol hydrochloride, sodium bicarbonate, potassium chloride, or verapamil hydrochloride in intravenous admixtures.

    PubMed

    Riley, C M; Junkin, P

    1991-06-01

    The stability of amrinone and digoxin, procainamide hydrochloride, propranolol hydrochloride, sodium bicarbonate, potassium chloride, or verapamil hydrochloride in intravenous admixtures was studied. Admixtures of amrinone and digoxin were studied at one concentration. Amrinone admixtures with propranolol hydrochloride, sodium bicarbonate, potassium chloride, and verapamil hydrochloride were studied at two concentrations. In general, 0.45% sodium chloride injection was used as the diluent; 5% dextrose injection was also used for the procainamide hydrochloride experiments. Duplicate solutions of each test admixture and single-drug control admixture were prepared and stored for four hours at 22-23 degrees C under fluorescent light. Samples were analyzed by visual inspection, tested for pH, and assayed by high-performance liquid chromatography. Admixtures containing amrinone 1.25 or 2.5 mg/mL (as the lactate salt) and sodium bicarbonate 37.5 mg/mL precipitated immediately or within 10 minutes. No changes in pH or visual appearance were noted for amrinone admixtures with procainamide hydrochloride, digoxin, propranolol hydrochloride, potassium chloride, and verapamil hydrochloride. Appreciable degradation of both amrinone and procainamide was observed after four hours when the two were mixed in 5% dextrose. No degradation of amrinone or procainamide was seen when the 5% dextrose was replaced by 0.45% sodium chloride. Amrinone and sodium bicarbonate were incompatible in intravenous admixtures. Amrinone was compatible with digoxin, propranolol hydrochloride, potassium chloride, and verapamil hydrochloride. Amrinone and procainamide were compatible in 0.45% sodium chloride injection but not in 5% dextrose injection.

  15. Isolation and identification of two unknown impurities from the raw material of clindamycin hydrochloride.

    PubMed

    Sun, Qiushi; Li, Yue; Qin, Li

    2014-10-01

    Clindamycin hydrochloride belongs to the antibiotic family of lincomycin. It has the same antibacterial spectrum as lincomycin, but the antibacterial activity is four to eight times stronger than that of lincomycin. There have been some adverse reactions in clinical use of clindamycin hydrochloride and its finished drug products. The impurities in drugs are directly related to their safety. In this study, two unknown impurities were isolated from the raw material of clindamycin hydrochloride through various chromatographic methods. Their structures were identified as clindamycin isomer (impurity 1) and dehydroclindamycin (impurity 2) by mass spectrometry and NMR spectroscopy. Both of them were found for the first time. The two impurities exhibit a similar but lower antibacterial activity compared with clindamycin hydrochloride.

  16. First-Trimester Pregnancy Exposure to Venlafaxine or Duloxetine and Risk of Major Congenital Malformations: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Lassen, Dorte; Ennis, Zandra Nymand; Damkier, Per

    2016-01-01

    Major depressive disorder is common among women in child-bearing age, and medical treatment is subject to substantial discussions and controversies. For Selective Serotonin reuptake inhibitors, SSRIs, a vast amount of data are available. For the newer antidepressant group of serotonin and noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors, SNRIs, significantly less data are available. Following the PRISMA guideline for systematic reviews, we performed a systematic search on the risk of major congenital malformations after first trimester in utero exposure to venlafaxine or duloxetine. We identified eight cohort studies reporting on the outcome upon in utero exposure to venlafaxine or duloxetine during the first trimester. The cumulated data for venlafaxine were 3186 exposed infants and 107 major malformations, resulting in a relative risk estimate and 95% confidence interval of 1.12 (0.92-1.35). The corresponding data for duloxetine were 668 infants and 16 major malformations, resulting in a relative risk estimate and 95% confidence interval of 0.80 (0.46-1.29). First-trimester in utero exposure to venlafaxine is not associated with an increased risk of major congenital malformations. The amount of data for duloxetine are significantly smaller but does not suggest a clinically important increased risk. © 2015 Nordic Association for the Publication of BCPT (former Nordic Pharmacological Society).

  17. Rescue Pharmacotherapy With Duloxetine for Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor Nonresponders in Late-Life Depression: Outcome and Tolerability

    PubMed Central

    Karp, Jordan F.; Whyte, Ellen M.; Lenze, Eric J.; Dew, Mary A.; Begley, Amy; Miller, Mark D.; Reynolds, Charles F.

    2010-01-01

    Background Up to 50% of depressed older adults either do not adequately respond to or are unable to tolerate treatment with a serotonin-specific reuptake inhibitor. On the basis of previous experience with serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors, we predicted at least a 50% response rate to open-label treatment with duloxetine in subjects who were resistant to treatment with the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) escitalopram. Method Community-dwelling subjects aged 65 years or older with current nonpsychotic major depressive disorder as established by the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV received escitalopram under protocolized conditions between April 2004 and September 2006. Subjects who failed to meet response criteria or relapsed after achieving an initial response were subsequently switched to open treatment with duloxetine up to 120 mg/day. Side effects were assessed at every visit. Results Subjects (N = 40) switched to duloxetine had a mean (SD) age of 74.4 (7.0) years and a baseline (before escitalopram) 17-item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAM-D-17) score of 20.0 (3.5) and were predominantly female (65.0%) and white (82.5%). The mean (SD) maximum dose of duloxetine was 93.0 (27.8) mg/day. Subjects received this maximum dose for a median duration of 6.9 weeks. Fifty percent of subjects (N = 20) met criteria for full response, 17.5% (N = 7) were partial responders, and 32.5% (N = 13) did not respond. The median time to response was 12.0 weeks (95% CI = 8.4 to 14.6). Five of the subjects (12.5%) discontinued duloxetine because of intolerable side effects. Discussion These open-label data suggest that duloxetine at doses up to 120 mg/day is a well-tolerated and potentially effective treatment for older adults who fail to respond to an adequate trial of an SSRI. These results are preliminary, and future controlled studies are required to test the efficacy of rescue pharmacotherapy with duloxetine. Trial Registration

  18. [Combination of dialectic and behavioral therapy (DBT) and duloxetin in kleptomania].

    PubMed

    Rudel, Astrid; Hubert, Cornelia; Juckel, Georg; Edel, Marc-Andreas

    2009-09-01

    Kleptomania is characterized by repetitive stealing of things not needed for personal use. Comorbidity with affective disorders, personality disorders and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is often described. Pharmacological treatment options are serotonin reuptake inhibitors, naltrexone or mood stabilizers. There are no controlled studies for cognitive-behavioral (CBT) and psychodynamic psychotherapies. However, literature suggests that patients respond to CBT, especially when combined with pharmacological strategies. Dialectical behavioral therapy (DBT) is successfully applied in the treatment of borderline personality disorder. and, in a modified manner, of ADHD. We report a treatment of an in-patient with kleptomania, depressive episode, combined personality disorder and ADHD. Under combined treatment with DBT, which has been successfully used in the treatment of impulsive disorders, and duloxetine, the patient's urge to steal decreased markedly, and no corresponding actions were detectable in follow-up examinations. Particularly for the kleptomania subtype with comorbid ADHD and / or personality disorder, DBT may be a promising approach. In addition, duloxetine as a serotonin-epinephrine reuptake inhibitor (SNRI) might fit into a complementary treatment strategy.

  19. Comparing the Effects of Sertraline with Duloxetine for Depression Severity and Symptoms: A Double-Blind, Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Mowla, Arash; Dastgheib, Seyed Ali; Razeghian Jahromi, Leila

    2016-07-01

    Selecting the most effective treatment for major depressive disorder (MDD) is a challenge for clinicians. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of sertraline with duloxetine on major depression signs and symptoms. The trial was a 6-week, randomized, controlled, double-blind study. Sixty-three patients with diagnosis of MDD according to DSM-IV-TR criteria were randomly assigned to receive either duloxetine (31 patients) or sertraline (32 patients). The mean dosage of duloxetine was 55 mg/day (range 40-60 mg/day) and the mean dosage of sertraline was 146 mg/day (range 50-200 mg/day). Subjects were assessed at baseline, and at the end of week 6. Depression severity and symptoms were assessed by 21-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAM-D). Of 63 patients who were randomized to treatment, 54 patients including 28 in the sertraline group and 26 in the duloxetine group completed the trial. The HAM-D total score for both groups was significantly reduced at the end of the trial period without significant difference from each other (p = 0.463). Of the symptoms studied, psychomotor retardation, general somatic symptoms and sexual problems improved more in the duloxetine group. On the other hand, agitation, anxiety symptoms and hypochondriasis ameliorated better in the sertraline group. There was no difference between the two groups regarding the other symptoms. Our study shows that the antidepressant mechanism of action has influence on its effects on different signs and symptoms. Clinician awareness of an antidepressant's special effects can help in selecting appropriate medicine.

  20. Rapid onset of syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion induced by duloxetine in an elderly type 2 diabetic patient with painful diabetic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Kamei, Shinji; Kaneto, Hideaki; Tanabe, Akihito; Irie, Shintaro; Hirata, Yurie; Shimoda, Masashi; Kohara, Kenji; Mune, Tomoatsu; Kaku, Kohei

    2015-05-01

    Diabetic neuropathy is the most common diabetic complication. Duloxetine, a serotonin noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor (SNRI), is widely used for the treatment of diabetic painful neuropathy (DPN) because of the efficacy and safety profile. Syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion, which is strongly associated duloxetine, is a rare but occasionally life-threatening adverse effect. Here, we report a case of syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion that rapidly developed after starting duloxetine in an elderly Japanese female type 2 diabetes mellitus patient. Furthermore, we discuss the possible relationship between the onset of syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion and the gene polymorphism of cytochrome P450 isoform 1A2 and 2D6, both of which are responsible for duloxetine metabolism.

  1. Stability of milrinone and digoxin, furosemide, procainamide hydrochloride, propranolol hydrochloride, quinidine gluconate, or verapamil hydrochloride in 5% dextrose injection.

    PubMed

    Riley, C M

    1988-10-01

    The stability of milrinone and digoxin, furosemide, procainamide hydrochloride, propranolol hydrochloride, quinidine gluconate, or verapamil hydrochloride in 5% dextrose injection containing milrinone was studied. Milrinone admixtures with digoxin, furosemide, propranolol hydrochloride, quinidine gluconate, and verapamil hydrochloride were studied at two concentrations. Admixtures of milrinone and procainamide hydrochloride were studied at four concentrations. Duplicate solutions of each admixture and each control were prepared and stored in glass containers for four hours at room temperature (22-23 degrees C), under normal fluorescent lights. The samples were analyzed immediately by visual inspection, tested for pH, and assayed by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Milrinone 0.35 mg/mL-furosemide 4 mg/mL and milrinone 0.1 mg/mL-furosemide 5 mg/mL admixtures precipitated immediately after preparation and were not studied by HPLC. No changes in pH or visual appearance were observed in the remaining admixtures after storage at room temperature for four hours. Admixtures containing milrinone 0.175 or 0.2 mg/mL and procainamide hydrochloride 1, 2, or 4 mg/mL satisfied the USP standard for procainamide hydrochloride injection USP assay after one hour but failed this test in all cases after four hours. No degradation of milrinone was observed in any of the admixtures containing procainamide hydrochloride. Milrinone and furosemide are incompatible in 5% dextrose injection and should be administered separately. The remaining admixtures were compatible, and all except those containing procainamide hydrochloride were stable for four hours at room temperature.

  2. Biowaiver monographs for immediate release solid oral dosage forms: ciprofloxacin hydrochloride.

    PubMed

    Olivera, M E; Manzo, R H; Junginger, H E; Midha, K K; Shah, V P; Stavchansky, S; Dressman, J B; Barends, D M

    2011-01-01

    Literature data relevant to the decision to allow a waiver of in vivo bioequivalence (BE) testing for the approval of new multisource and reformulated immediate release (IR) solid oral dosage forms containing ciprofloxacin hydrochloride as the only active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) are reviewed. Ciprofloxacin hydrochloride's solubility and permeability, its therapeutic use and index, pharmacokinetics, excipient interactions and reported BE/bioavailability (BA) problems were taken into consideration. Solubility and BA data indicate that ciprofloxacin hydrochloride is a BCS Class IV drug. Therefore, a biowaiver based approval of ciprofloxacin hydrochloride containing IR solid oral dosage forms cannot be recommended for either new multisource drug products or for major scale-up and postapproval changes (variations) to existing drug products. 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association

  3. Desipramine hydrochloride overdose

    MedlinePlus

    ... measure and monitor the patient's vital signs, including temperature, pulse, breathing rate, and blood pressure. Tests may be done to check the person's heart function. Symptoms will be treated. The person may receive: Activated charcoal Breathing support, including a tube through the mouth ...

  4. Duloxetine and Subacute Pain after Knee Arthroplasty when Added to a Multimodal Analgesic Regimen: A Randomized, Placebo-controlled, Triple-blinded Trial.

    PubMed

    YaDeau, Jacques T; Brummett, Chad M; Mayman, David J; Lin, Yi; Goytizolo, Enrique A; Padgett, Douglas E; Alexiades, Michael M; Kahn, Richard L; Jules-Elysee, Kethy M; Fields, Kara G; Goon, Amanda K; Gadulov, Yuliya; Westrich, Geoffrey

    2016-09-01

    Duloxetine is effective for chronic musculoskeletal and neuropathic pain, but there are insufficient data to recommend the use of antidepressants for postoperative pain. The authors hypothesized that administration of duloxetine for 15 days would reduce pain with ambulation at 2 weeks after total knee arthroplasty. In this triple-blinded, randomized, placebo-controlled trial, patients received either duloxetine or placebo for 15 days, starting from the day of surgery. Patients also received a comprehensive multimodal analgesic regimen including neuraxial anesthesia, epidural analgesia, an adductor canal block, meloxicam, and oxycodone/acetaminophen as needed. The primary outcome was the pain score (0 to 10 numeric rating scale) with ambulation on postoperative day 14. One hundred six patients were randomized and analyzed. On day 14, duloxetine had no effect on pain with ambulation; mean pain was 3.8 (SD, 2.3) for placebo versus 3.5 (SD, 2.1) for duloxetine (difference in means [95% CI], 0.4 [-0.5 to 1.2]; P = 0.386). Symptoms potentially attributable to duloxetine discontinuation at study drug completion (nausea, anxiety) occurred among nine patients (duloxetine) and five patients (placebo); this was not statistically significant (P = 0.247). Statistically significant secondary outcomes included opioid consumption (difference in mean milligram oral morphine equivalents [95% CI], 8.7 [3.3 to 14.1], P = 0.002 by generalized estimating equation) over the postoperative period and nausea on day 1 (P = 0.040). There was no difference in other side effects or in anxiety and depression scores. When included as a part of a multimodal analgesic regimen for knee arthroplasty, duloxetine does not reduce subacute pain with ambulation.

  5. Duloxetine in treating generalized anxiety disorder in adults: A meta-analysis of published randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yingli; Huang, Guoping; Yang, Shichang; Liang, Wei; Zhang, Lei; Wang, Changhong

    2016-09-01

    We carried out a meta-analysis of published randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trails to assess the efficacy and tolerability of duloxetine in treating generalized anxiety disorder (GAD). A literature search was conducted using PubMed, ISI Web of Science, Medline, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials databases until October 2014. The search terms used were "anxiety or anxious or generalized anxiety disorder" and "duloxetine or Cymbalta." Meta-analysis was conducted using Revman 5.1. A fixed-effects model was carried out on the response rates, remission rates, and symptom improvement. Risk ratio (RR) and mean difference (MD) were calculated. The overall effect size was calculated with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Seven studies (n = 2,674) were found eligible for inclusion in analysis. Six studies provided data on response, which showed a significant difference between duloxetine and placebo (n = 1,975, RR = 1.48, 95% CI, 1.34-1.63). Remission rates revealed significant superiority of duloxetine (n = 2,399, RR = 1.60, 95% CI, 1.43-1.80). Change from baseline scores on Hamilton Rating Scale for Anxiety showed a reduction in anxiety symptoms to be significantly efficient for duloxetine (n = 1,135, MD = 3.34, 95% CI, 2.37-4.32). Duloxetine increased statistically Sheehan Disability Scale total score (n = 1,652, MD = 2.84, 95% CI, 2.08-3.60). The discontinuation of the duloxetine was not significantly different from that of the placebo. Duloxetine is moderately effective in treating GAD with improvement in overall function and well tolerability. © 2015 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  6. 21 CFR 522.883 - Etorphine hydrochloride injection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... milliliter of etorphine hydrochloride injection, veterinary, contains 1 mg of etorphine hydrochloride in... use the drug unless diprenorphine hydrochloride injection, veterinary, as provided for in § 522.723, is available for use in reversing the effects of etorphine hydrochloride injection, veterinary....

  7. 21 CFR 522.1462 - Naloxone hydrochloride injection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Naloxone hydrochloride injection. 522.1462 Section... § 522.1462 Naloxone hydrochloride injection. (a) Specifications. Naloxone hydrochloride injection is an aqueous sterile solution containing 0.4 milligram of naloxone hydrochloride per milliliter. (b)...

  8. 21 CFR 522.1462 - Naloxone hydrochloride injection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Naloxone hydrochloride injection. 522.1462 Section... § 522.1462 Naloxone hydrochloride injection. (a) Specifications. Naloxone hydrochloride injection is an aqueous sterile solution containing 0.4 milligram of naloxone hydrochloride per milliliter. (b)...

  9. 21 CFR 522.1462 - Naloxone hydrochloride injection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Naloxone hydrochloride injection. 522.1462 Section... § 522.1462 Naloxone hydrochloride injection. (a) Specifications. Naloxone hydrochloride injection is an aqueous sterile solution containing 0.4 milligram of naloxone hydrochloride per milliliter. (b) Sponsor...

  10. Efficacy of Duloxetine in the Early Management of Urinary Continence after Radical Prostatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Alan, Cabir; Eren, Ali E.; Ersay, Ahmet R.; Kocoglu, Hasan; Basturk, Gokhan; Demirci, Emrah

    2015-01-01

    Aim To evaluate the efficacy of early duloxetine therapy in stress urinary incontinence occurring after radical prostatectomy (RP). Material and Method Patients that had RP were randomly divided into 2 groups following the removal of the urinary catheter. Group A patients (n = 28) had pelvic floor exercise and duloxetine therapy. Group B patients (n = 30) had only pelvic floor exercise. The incontinence status of the patients and number of pads were recorded and 1-hour pad test and Turkish validation of International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire-Short Form test were applied to the patients at the follow-up. Results When the dry state of the patients was evaluated, 5, 17, 3, and 2 of 28 Group A patients stated that they were completely dry in the 3rd, 6th, 9th and 12th month respectively and pad use was stopped. There was no continence in 30 Group B in the first 3 months. Twelve, 6, and 8 patients stated that they were completely dry in the 6th, 9th and 12th month, respectively. But 3 of 4 patients in whom dryness could not be provided were using a mean of 7.6 pads in the first day and a mean of 1.3 pads after 1 year. When pad use of the patients was evaluated, the mean monthly number of pad use was determined to be 6.2 (4-8) in the initial evaluation, 2.7 (0-5) in the in 3rd month, 2 (0-3) in the 6th month and 1.6 (0-2) pad/d in the 9th month in the group taking medicine. The mean monthly number of pads used was determined to be 5.8 (4-8) in the initial evaluation, 4.3 (3-8) in the 3rd month, 3 (0-6) in the 6th month and 1.6 (0-6) pad/d in the 9th month in the group not taking medicine. Conclusion According to the results, early duloxetine therapy in stress urinary incontinence that occurred after RP provided early continence. PMID:26195963

  11. Development and validation of chemometrics-assisted spectrophotometry and liquid chromatography methods for the simultaneous determination of the active ingredients in two multicomponent mixtures containing chlorpheniramine maleate and phenylpropanolamine hydrochloride.

    PubMed

    Hadad, Ghada M; El-Gindy, Alaa; Mahmoud, Waleed M M

    2007-01-01

    Multivariate spectrophotometric calibration and liquid chromatography (LC) methods were used for the simultaneous determination of the active ingredients in 2 multicomponent mixtures containing chlorpheniramine maleate and phenylpropanolamine hydrochloride with ibuprofen and caffeine (mixture 1) or with propyphenazone (mixture 2). For the multivariate spectrophotometric calibration methods, principal component regression (PCR) and partial least squares (PLS-1), a calibration set of the mixtures consisting of the components of each mixture was prepared in distilled water. A leave-1-out cross-validation procedure was used to find the optimum numbers of latent variables. Analytical parameters such as sensitivity, selectivity, analytical sensitivity, limit of quantitation, and limit of detection were determined for both PLS-1 and PCR. The LC method depends on the use of a cyanopropyl column with the mobile phase acetonitrile-12 mM ammonium acetate, pH 5.0 (25 + 75, v/v), for mixture 1 or acetonitrile-10 mM potassium dihydrogen phosphate, pH 4.7 (45 + 55, v/v), for mixture 2; the UV detector was set at 212 nm. In spite of the presence of a high degree of spectral overlap of these components, they were rapidly and simultaneously determined with high accuracy and precision, with no interference from the matrix excipients. The proposed methods were successfully applied to the analysis of pharmaceutical formulations and laboratory-prepared mixtures containing the 2 multicomponent combinations.

  12. Effect of dexmedetomidine hydrochloride on tiletamine hydrochloride-zolazepam hydrochloride anesthesia in alpacas.

    PubMed

    Seddighi, Reza; Odoi, Agricola; Doherty, Thomas J

    2016-10-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate the effect of IM administration of a tiletamine hydrochloride-zolazepam hydrochloride (TZ) combination with either dexmedetomidine hydrochloride or saline (0.9% NaCl) solution (SS) on the motor response to claw clamping, selected cardiorespiratory variables, and quality of recovery from anesthesia in alpacas. ANIMALS 5 adult sexually intact male alpacas. PROCEDURES Each alpaca was given the TZ combination (2 mg/kg) with dexmedetomidine (5 [D5], 10 [D10], 15 [D15], or 20 [D20] µg/kg) or SS IM at 1-week intervals (5 experiments); motor response to claw clamping was assessed, and characteristics of anesthesia, recovery from anesthesia, and selected cardiorespiratory variables were recorded. RESULTS Mean ± SEM duration of lack of motor response to claw clamping was longest when alpacas received treatments D15 (30.9 ± 5.9 minutes) and D20 (40.8 ± 5.9 minutes). Duration of lateral recumbency was significantly longer with dexmedetomidine administration. The longest time (81.3 ± 10.4 minutes) to standing was observed when alpacas received treatment D20. Following treatment SS, 4 alpacas moved in response to claw clamping at the 5-minute time point. Heart rate decreased from pretreatment values in all alpacas when dexmedetomidine was administered. Treatments D10, D15, and D20 decreased Pao2, compared with treatment SS, during the first 15 minutes. During recovery, muscle stiffness and multiple efforts to regain a sternal position were observed in 3 SS-treated and 1 D5-treated alpacas; all other recoveries were graded as excellent. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE In TZ-anesthetized alpacas, dexmedetomidine (10, 15, and 20 µg/kg) administered IM increased the duration of lack of motor response to claw clamping, compared with the effect of SS.

  13. Modified Synthesis of Erlotinib Hydrochloride

    PubMed Central

    Barghi, Leila; Aghanejad, Ayuob; Valizadeh, Hadi; Barar, Jaleh; Asgari, Davoud

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: An improved and economical method has been described for the synthesis of erlotinib hydrochloride, as a useful drug in treatment of non-small-cell lung cancer. Method: Erlotinib hydrochloride was synthesized in seven steps starting from 3, 4-dihydroxy benzoic acid. In this study, we were able to modify one of the key steps which involved the reduction of the 6-nitrobenzoic acid derivative to 6-aminobenzoic acid derivative. An inexpensive reagent such as ammonium formate was used as an in situ hydrogen donor in the presence of palladium/charcoal (Pd/C) instead of hydrogen gas at high pressure. Result: This proposed method proceeded with 92% yield at room temperature. Synthesis of erlotinib was completed in 7 steps with overall yield of 44%. Conclusion: From the results obtained it can be concluded that the modified method eliminated the potential danger associated with the use of hydrogen gas in the presence of flammable catalysts. It should be mentioned that the catalyst was recovered after the reaction and could be used again. PMID:24312780

  14. Yohimbine hydrochloride as an antagonist to xylazine hydrochloride-ketamine hydrochloride immobilization of white-tailed deer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mech, L.D.; DelGiudice, G.D.; Karns, P.D.; Seal, U.S.

    1985-01-01

    Thirteen captive and one free-ranging white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) were immobilized one to six times each with ketamine hydrochloride and xylazine hydrochloride during winter and spring in northern Minnesota. Administration of 0.09 to 0.53 mg of yohimbine hydrochloride per kg IV after each trial reversed the immobilization. The deer raised their heads within a median time of 2.0 min, stood in 6.0 min and walked away in 9.5 min. No adverse side effects were observed for several weeks following the immobilization.

  15. Functioning in patients with major depression treated with duloxetine or a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor in East Asia

    PubMed Central

    Novick, Diego; Montgomery, William; Haro, Josep Maria; Moneta, Maria Victoria; Zhu, Gang; Yue, Li; Hong, Jihyung; Dueñas, Héctor; Brugnoli, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To assess and compare the levels of functioning in patients with major depressive disorder treated with either duloxetine with a daily dose of ≤60 mg or a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) as monotherapy for up to 6 months in a naturalistic setting in East Asia. In addition, this study examined the impact of painful physical symptoms (PPS) on the effects of these treatments. Patients and methods Data for this post hoc analysis were taken from a 6-month prospective observational study involving 1,549 patients with major depressive disorder without sexual dysfunction. The present analysis focused on a subgroup of patients from East Asia (n=587). Functioning was measured using the Sheehan Disability Scale (SDS). Depression severity was assessed using the 16-item Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology-Self Report. PPS were rated using the modified Somatic Symptom Inventory. A mixed model with repeated measures was fitted to compare the levels of functioning between duloxetine-treated (n=227) and SSRI-treated (n=225) patients, adjusting for baseline patient characteristics. Results The mean SDS total score was similar between the two treatment cohorts (15.46 [standard deviation =6.11] in the duloxetine cohort and 16.36 [standard deviation =6.53] in the SSRI cohort, P=0.077) at baseline. Both descriptive and regression analyses confirmed improvement in functioning in both groups during follow-up, but duloxetine-treated patients achieved better functioning. At 24 weeks, the estimated mean SDS total score was 4.48 (standard error =0.80) in the duloxetine cohort, which was statistically significantly lower (ie, better functioning) than that of 6.76 (standard error =0.77) in the SSRI cohort (P<0.001). This treatment difference was more apparent in the subgroup of patients with PPS at baseline. Similar patterns were also observed for SDS subscores (work, social life, and family life). Conclusion Depressed patients treated with duloxetine achieved

  16. Safety and efficacy of tramadol hydrochloride on treatment of premature ejaculation.

    PubMed

    Eassa, Bayoumy I; El-Shazly, Mohamed A

    2013-01-01

    Premature ejaculation (PE) is the most common sexual disorder. It affects 20%-30% of adult men; the aetiology of this condition has not yet been elucidated. The aim of this study is to evaluate the efficacy, safety, tolerability, undesirable effects and improved satisfaction with sexual intercourse with tramadol hydrochloride at different dosages for the treatment of PE. A total of 300 patients who presented with lifelong (primary) PE were included in this study. The study was performed for 28 weeks, in which placebo (starch tablet) was given for 4 weeks, and active ingredient (tramadol hydrochloride) was administered at different therapeutic dosages for 24 weeks. Patients were divided into three equal groups, each consisting of 100 patients. The first group (A) was given tramadol hydrochloride capsule 25 mg. The second group (B) was given tramadol hydrochloride capsule 50 mg. The third group (C) was given tramadol hydrochloride capsule 100 mg. All of the 300 participants included completed the study voluntarily. The age of the patients varied from 25 to 50 years. After the treatment period, the recorded data were collected for each group and analysed. The results showed a highly significant increase in the mean intravaginal ejaculatory latency time (IELT) in all groups compared to baseline data (P<0.0001). We concluded that using tramadol hydrochloride at different doses on demand for the treatment of PE is effective, safe and tolerable, with minimal undesirable effects, and approval for this indication should be sought.

  17. Using crystal structure prediction to rationalize the hydration propensities of substituted adamantane hydrochloride salts.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Sharmarke; Karothu, Durga Prasad; Naumov, Panče

    2016-08-01

    The crystal energy landscapes of the salts of two rigid pharmaceutically active molecules reveal that the experimental structure of amantadine hydrochloride is the most stable structure with the majority of low-energy structures adopting a chain hydrogen-bond motif and packings that do not have solvent accessible voids. By contrast, memantine hydrochloride which differs in the substitution of two methyl groups on the adamantane ring has a crystal energy landscape where all structures within 10 kJ mol(-1) of the global minimum have solvent-accessible voids ranging from 3 to 14% of the unit-cell volume including the lattice energy minimum that was calculated after removing water from the hydrated memantine hydrochloride salt structure. The success in using crystal structure prediction (CSP) to rationalize the different hydration propensities of these substituted adamantane hydrochloride salts allowed us to extend the model to predict under blind test conditions the experimental crystal structures of the previously uncharacterized 1-(methylamino)adamantane base and its corresponding hydrochloride salt. Although the crystal structure of 1-(methylamino)adamantane was correctly predicted as the second ranked structure on the static lattice energy landscape, the crystallization of a Z' = 3 structure of 1-(methylamino)adamantane hydrochloride reveals the limits of applying CSP when the contents of the crystallographic asymmetric unit are unknown.

  18. Temperature and concentration dependences of density and refraction of aqueous duloxetine solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deosarkar, S. D.; Deoraye, S. M.; Kalyankar, T. M.

    2014-07-01

    Present paper reports the measured densities (ρ) and refractive indices ( n D) of aqueous solutions of Duloxetine drug in wide range of molal concentrations ( m = 0.0101-0.1031 mol kg-1) and at different temperatures (297.15, 302.15, and 307.15 K). Apparent molar volumes (φv) of drug were calculated from density data and fitted to Masson's relation and partial molar volumes (φ{v/0}) were evaluated at different temperatures. Concentration dependence of refractive index ( n D = Kc + n {D/0}) at experimental temperature has been studied. Density and refractive index data has been used for the calculation of specific refractions ( R D). Experimental (ρ and n D) and calculated (φv, φ{v/0}, and R D) properties have been interpreted in terms of concentration and temperature effects on structural fittings and drug-water interactions.

  19. Immobilization of porcupines with tiletamine hydrochloride and zolazepam hydrochloride (Telazol).

    PubMed

    Hale, M B; Griesemer, S J; Fuller, T K

    1994-07-01

    Immobilization of North American porcupines (Erethizon dorsatum) with tiletamine hydrochloride (HCl) and zolazepam HCl (Telazol) was evaluated in central Massachusetts (USA) during 1991 and 1992. Doses between 9 and 11 mg/kg resulted in a mean (+/- SD) induction time of 3.2 +/- 1.3 min and a mean (+/- SD) immobilization time of 44.2 +/- 19.5 min. Induction time did not differ by dose, sex, capture method, or porcupine weight. Immobilization time differed by dose and porcupine weight but not by sex or capture method. Tiletamine HCl and zolazepam HCl seems to be an effective combination of drugs for immobilizing porcupines as long as sufficient time is allowed for recovery.

  20. Immobilization of swift foxes with ketamine hydrochloride-xylazine hydrochloride

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Telesco, R.L.; Sovada, Marsha A.

    2002-01-01

    There is an increasing need to develop field immobilization techniques that allow researchers to handle safely swift foxes (Vulpes velox) with minimal risk of stress or injury. We immobilized captive swift foxes to determine the safety and effectiveness of ketamine hydrochloride and xylazine hydrochloride at different dosages. We attempted to determine appropriate dosages to immobilize swift foxes for an adequate field-handling period based on three anesthesia intervals (induction period, immobilization period, and recovery period) and physiologic responses (rectal temperature, respiration rate, and heart rate). Between October 1998–July 1999, we conducted four trials, evaluating three different dosage ratios of ketamine and xylazine (2.27:1.2, 5.68:1.2, and 11.4:1.2 mg/kg ketamine:mg/kg xylazine, respectively), followed by a fourth trial with a higher dosage at the median ratio (11.4 mg/kg ketamine:2.4 mg/kg xylazine). We found little difference in induction and recovery periods among trials 1–3, but immobilization time increased with increasing dosage (P<0.08). Both the immobilization period and recovery period increased in trial 4 compared with trials 1–3 (P≤0.03). There was a high variation in responses of individual foxes across trials, making it difficult to identify an appropriate dosage for field handling. Heart rate and respiration rates were depressed but all physiologic measures remained within normal parameters established for domestic canids. We recommend a dosage ratio of 10 mg/kg ketamine to 1 mg/kg xylazine to immobilize swift foxes for field handling.

  1. A randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blinded trial of duloxetine in the treatment of general fatigue in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Lesley M; Blom, Thomas J; Welge, Jeffrey A; Mariutto, Elizabeth; Heller, Alicia

    2015-01-01

    To assess the efficacy and safety of duloxetine in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome. A 12-week, randomized, double-blind study was designed to compare duloxetine 60-120 mg/d (n = 30) with placebo (n = 30) for efficacy and safety in the treatment of patients with chronic fatigue syndrome. The primary outcome measure was the Multidimensional Fatigue Inventory general fatigue subscale (range: 4-20, with higher scores indicating greater fatigue). Secondary measures were the remaining Multidimensional Fatigue Inventory subscales, Brief Pain Inventory, Medical Outcomes Study Short Form-36, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Symptom Inventory, Patient Global Impression of Improvement, and Clinical Global Impression of Severity. The primary analysis of efficacy for continuous variables was a longitudinal analysis of the intent-to-treat sample, with treatment-by-time interaction as the measure of effect. The improvement in the Multidimensional Fatigue Inventory general fatigue scores for the duloxetine group was not significantly greater than for the placebo group (P = 0.23; estimated difference between groups at week 12 = -1.0 [95% CI: -2.8, 0.7]). The duloxetine group was significantly superior to the placebo group on the Multidimensional Fatigue Inventory mental fatigue score, Brief Pain Inventory average pain severity and interference scores, Short Form-36 bodily pain domain, and Clinical Global Impression of Severity score. Duloxetine was generally well tolerated. The primary efficacy measure of general fatigue did not significantly improve with duloxetine when compared with placebo. Significant improvement in secondary measures of mental fatigue, pain, and global measure of severity suggests that duloxetine may be efficacious for some chronic fatigue syndrome symptom domains, but larger controlled trials are needed to confirm these results. Copyright © 2015 The Academy of Psychosomatic Medicine. Published by

  2. Response to duloxetine in chronic low back pain: exploratory post hoc analysis of a Japanese Phase III randomized study.

    PubMed

    Tsuji, Toshinaga; Itoh, Naohiro; Ishida, Mitsuhiro; Ochiai, Toshimitsu; Konno, Shinichi

    2017-01-01

    Duloxetine is efficacious for chronic low back pain (CLBP). This post hoc analysis of a Japanese randomized, placebo-controlled trial (ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT01855919) assessed whether patients with CLBP with early pain reduction or treatment-related adverse events of special interest (TR-AESIs; nausea, somnolence, constipation) have enhanced responses to duloxetine. Patients (N = 456) with CLBP for ≥6 months and Brief Pain Inventory (BPI) average pain severity score of ≥4 were randomized (1:1) to duloxetine 60 mg/day or placebo for 14 weeks. Primary outcome was change from baseline in BPI average pain severity score (pain reduction). Subgroup analyses included early pain reduction (≥30%, 10%-30%, or <10% at Week 4) and early TR-AESIs (with or without TR-AESIs by Week 2). Measures included changes from baseline in BPI average pain severity score and BPI Interference scores (quality of life; QOL), and response rate (≥30% or ≥50% pain reduction at Week 14). Patients with ≥30% early pain reduction (n = 108) or early TR-AESIs (n = 50) had significantly greater improvements in pain and QOL than placebo-treated patients (n = 226), whereas patients with 10%-30% (n = 63) or <10% (n = 48) pain reduction did not; patients without early TR-AESIs (n = 180) had significant improvements in pain at Week 14. Response rates (≥30%/≥50% pain reduction) were 94.4%/82.4%, 66.7%/49.2%, and 25.0%/18.8% for patients with ≥30%, 10%-30%, and <10% early pain reduction, respectively, 74.0%/64.0% for patients with early TR-AESIs, 67.2%/54.4% for patients without early TR-AESIs, and 52.2%/39.4% for placebo. Early pain reduction or TR-AESIs may predict which CLBP patients are most likely to respond to duloxetine with improvements in pain and QOL.

  3. Evaluation of genetic models for response in a randomized clinical trial of duloxetine in major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Houston, John P; Zou, Wei; Aris, Virginie; Fijal, Bonnie; Chen, Peining; Heinloth, Alexandra N; Martinez, James

    2012-11-30

    In self-identified white patients with major depressive disorder (N=126) treated with open-label duloxetine (60-120 mg/d), a significant association of (P=0.020) of a composite risk score (based on SLC6A2 rs5569 [G1287A] AA, HTR1A rs6295 [C(-1019)G] GG, and COMT rs174697 AA/AG) with 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale total score change from baseline to 12 weeks was observed.

  4. 21 CFR 184.1676 - Pyridoxine hydrochloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... hydrochloride that is prepared by chemical synthesis. (b) The ingredient meets the specifications of the Food...)(31) of this chapter; plant protein products as defined in § 170.3(n)(33) of this chapter; and snack...

  5. 21 CFR 184.1676 - Pyridoxine hydrochloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... hydrochloride that is prepared by chemical synthesis. (b) The ingredient meets the specifications of the Food...)(31) of this chapter; plant protein products as defined in § 170.3(n)(33) of this chapter; and snack...

  6. 21 CFR 184.1676 - Pyridoxine hydrochloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... hydrochloride that is prepared by chemical synthesis. (b) The ingredient meets the specifications of the Food...)(31) of this chapter; plant protein products as defined in § 170.3(n)(33) of this chapter; and snack...

  7. A novel asymmetric synthesis of cinacalcet hydrochloride

    PubMed Central

    Gorentla, Laxminarasimhulu; Dubey, Pramod K

    2012-01-01

    Summary A novel route to asymmetric synthesis of cinacalcet hydrochloride by the application of (R)-tert-butanesulfinamide and regioselective N-alkylation of the naphthyl ethyl sulfinamide intermediate is described. PMID:23019473

  8. Protein stabilization by urea and guanidine hydrochloride.

    PubMed

    Bhuyan, Abani K

    2002-11-12

    The urea, guanidine hydrochloride, salt, and temperature dependence of the rate of dissociation of CO from a nonequilibrium state of CO-bound native ferrocytochrome c has been studied at pH 7. The heme iron of ferrocytochrome c in the presence of denaturing concentrations of guanidine hydrochloride (GdnHCl) and urea prepared in 0.1 M phosphate, pH 7, binds CO. When the unfolded protein solution is diluted 101-fold into CO-free folding buffer, the protein chain refolds completely, leaving the CO molecule bonded to the heme iron. Subsequently, slow thermal dissociation of the CO molecule yields to the heme coordination of the native M80 ligand. Thus, the reaction monitors the rate of thermal conversion of the CO-liganded native ferrocytochrome c to the M80-liganded native protein. The rate of this reaction, k(diss), shows a characteristic dependence on the presence of nondenaturing concentrations of the denaturants in the reaction medium. The rate decreases by approximately 1.9-3-fold as the concentration of GdnHCl in the refolding medium increases from nearly 0 to approximately 2.1 M. Similarly, the rate decreases by 1.8-fold as the urea concentration is raised from 0.l to approximately 5 M. At still higher concentrations of the denaturants the denaturing effect sets in, the protein is destabilized, and hence the CO dissociation rate increases sharply. The activation energy of the reaction, E(a), increases when the denaturant concentration in the reaction medium is raised: from 24.1 to 28.3 kcal mol(-1) for a 0.05-2.1 M rise in GdnHCl and from 25.2 to 26.9 kcal mol(-1) for a 0.1-26.9 M increase in urea. Corresponding to these increases in denaturant concentrations are also increases in the activation entropy, S(diss)/R, where R is the gas constant of the reaction. The denaturant dependence of these kinetic and thermodynamic parameters of the CO dissociation reaction suggests that binding interactions with GdnHCl and urea can increase the structural and energetic

  9. Effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of transmural collaborative care with consultation letter (TCCCL) and duloxetine for major depressive disorder (MDD) and (sub)chronic pain in collaboration with primary care: design of a randomized placebo-controlled multi-Centre trial: TCC:PAINDIP

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    treatment according to a 'Graded Activity' protocol. A psychiatrist provides duloxetine or placebo and pain medication according to algorithms, and also monitors pain and depressive symptoms. In condition c), the psychiatrist prescribes duloxetine without collaborative care. After 12 weeks, the patient is referred back to the general practitioner with a consultation letter, with information for further treatment of the patient. Discussion This study enables us to show the value of a closely monitored integrated treatment model above usual pharmacological treatment. Furthermore, a comparison with a placebo arm enables us to evaluate effectiveness of duloxetine in this population in a real life setting. Also, this study will provide evidence-based treatments and tools for their implementation in practice. This will facilitate generalization and implementation of results of this study. Moreover, patients included in this study are screened for pain symptoms, differentiating between nociceptive and neuropathic pain. Therefore, pain relief can be thoroughly evaluated. Trial registration NTR1089 PMID:23705849

  10. UV/VIS spectrophotometric methods for determination of caffeine and phenylephrine hydrochloride in complex pharmaceutical preparations. Validation of the methods.

    PubMed

    Muszalska, I; Zajac, M; Wróbel, G; Nogowska, M

    2000-01-01

    The contents of active substances were determined in a preparation TP-4 (tablets) containing paracetamol, ascorbic acid, caffeine and phenylephrine hydrochloride. For determination of caffeine and phenylephrine hydrochloride, UV/VIS spectrophotometric method was used. The VIS spectrophotometric method based on the reaction of phenylephrine with ninhydrine in sulphuric acid (1.127 kg/l). Validation of methods performed for model mixtures proved those methods were accurate, precise, repeatable and linear in the range from 50% to 150% of the amount declared in the preparation. The content of caffeine and phenylephrine hydrochloride in TP-4, Thompyrin, Panadol Extra, Ring N satisfies the FP V demands.

  11. Effects of olopatadine hydrochloride nasal spray 0.6% in the treatment of seasonal allergic rhinitis: a phase III, multicenter, randomized, double-blind, active- and placebo-controlled study in adolescents and adults.

    PubMed

    Shah, Shailen R; Nayak, Anjuli; Ratner, Paul; Roland, Peter; Michael Wall, G

    2009-01-01

    Seasonal allergic rhinitis (SAR) is an allergen-induced inflammatory reaction that occurs during periods of high pollen count. Current treatments for SAR include allergen avoidance, systemic antihistamines, and steroidal and nonsteroidal intranasal sprays. Olopatadine is a selective antihistamine and an inhibitor of proinflammatory mediators from human mast cells. An intranasal formulation of olopatadine has been developed for the treatment of SAR. The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy and tolerability of olopatadine hydrochloride nasal spray 0.6% (OLO) relative to azelastine hydrochloride nasal spray 0.1% (AZE) and an inactive vehicle in the treatment of SAR. This Phase III, multicenter, randomized, double-blind, active- and placebo-controlled, parallel-group study was conducted at 21 centers across the United States. Eligible patients were aged > or =12 years and had a history of SAR and verified allergy to a prevalent local allergen. After a run-in period during which inactive vehicle was administered, patients were randomly assigned to OLO, AZE (active control), or inactive vehicle (identical to OLO; placebo control), 2 sprays in each nostril BID for 16 days. The timing of enrollment was correlated with the start of the allergy season at each site. Symptoms were recorded twice daily in an electronic diary. Efficacy assessments included changes in mean daily reflective total nasal symptom scores (TNSS). Tolerability was evaluated based on adverse events (AEs) and nasal, physical, and cardiovascular parameters. A total of 544 patients were randomized. The mean age was 36 years (range, 12-77 years); men and boys represented 32.2% of the population; and the patients were predominantly white (75.4%). The mean reductions from baseline in reflective TNSS were 26.8%, 29.9%, and 18.4% with OLO, AZE, and inactive vehicle, respectively (P = 0.003 OLO vs inactive vehicle; 95% CI, -2.5% to 8.7% OLO vs AZE [non-inferiority]). The most commonly reported treatment

  12. Biowaiver monographs for immediate release solid oral dosage forms based on biopharmaceutics classification system (BCS) literature data: verapamil hydrochloride, propranolol hydrochloride, and atenolol.

    PubMed

    Vogelpoel, H; Welink, J; Amidon, G L; Junginger, H E; Midha, K K; Möller, H; Olling, M; Shah, V P; Barends, D M

    2004-08-01

    Literature data related to the Biopharmaceutics Classification System (BCS) are presented on verapamil hydrochloride, propranolol hydrochloride, and atenolol in the form of BCS-monographs. Data on the qualitative composition of immediate release (IR) tablets containing these active substances with a Marketing Authorization (MA) in the Netherlands (NL) are also provided; in view of these MA's the assumption was made that these tablets were bioequivalent to the innovator product. The development of a database with BCS-related data is announced by the International Pharmaceutical Federation (FIP).

  13. Evaluation of the effect of duloxetine treatment on functioning as measured by the Sheehan disability scale: pooled analysis of data from six randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical studies.

    PubMed

    Mancini, Michele; Sheehan, David V; Demyttenaere, Koen; Amore, Mario; Deberdt, Walter; Quail, Deborah; Sagman, Doron

    2012-11-01

    The purpose of this work is to describe the effect of duloxetine on functioning as measured by the Sheehan disability scale (SDS) compared with placebo in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD). Pooled data from six randomized, parallel, double-blind, placebo-controlled duloxetine studies in adult MDD patients were analyzed at the short-term (7-13 weeks) and the long-term (>24 weeks) endpoint. The primary variable was the SDS total score. Secondary variables included functional remission (SDS total ≤ 6) rates, Hamilton rating scale for depression total score, and pain visual analog scale. Analysis of covariance and logistic regression methods were used to assess differences in treatment and identify prognostic baseline factors. In total, 2496 patients (1424 duloxetine; 1072 placebo) were included. The between-treatment difference of -2.52 between duloxetine and placebo in the SDS total score at the short-term endpoint was statistically significant in favor of duloxetine vs. placebo (95% confidence interval: -3.17, -1.87; P < 0.001). The endpoint functional remission rates were 39.5% with duloxetine and 28.7% with placebo. Time since first depression episode, antidepressant pretreatment (yes/no), baseline visual analog scale pain (≤30 / >30 mm), and sex were significant prognostic factors. The effect of duloxetine was maintained at the long-term endpoint. Duloxetine is effective in improving MDD patients' functioning. Further antidepressant studies focusing on functioning would be helpful.

  14. Randomized, Double-blind, Placebo-controlled Phase III Trial of Duloxetine Monotherapy in Japanese Patients With Chronic Low Back Pain

    PubMed Central

    Konno, Shinichi; Oda, Natsuko; Ochiai, Toshimitsu; Alev, Levent

    2016-01-01

    Study Design. A 14-week, randomized, double-blind, multicenter, placebo-controlled study of Japanese patients with chronic low back pain (CLBP) who were randomized to either duloxetine 60 mg once daily or placebo. Objective. This study aimed to assess the efficacy and safety of duloxetine monotherapy in Japanese patients with CLBP. Summary of Background Data. In Japan, duloxetine is approved for the treatment of depression, diabetic neuropathic pain, and pain associated with fibromyalgia; however, no clinical study of duloxetine has been conducted for CLBP. Methods. The primary efficacy measure was the change in the Brief Pain Inventory (BPI) average pain score from baseline to Week 14. Secondary efficacy measures included BPI pain (worst pain, least pain, pain right now), Patient's Global Impression of Improvement, Clinical Global Impressions of Severity, and Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire, among other measures, and safety and tolerability. Results. In total, 458 patients were randomized to receive either duloxetine (n = 232) or placebo (n = 226). The BPI average pain score improved significantly in the duloxetine group compared with that in the placebo group at Week 14 [−2.43 ± 0.11 vs. −1.96 ± 0.11, respectively; between-group difference (95% confidence interval), − 0.46 [−0.77 to−0.16]; P = 0.0026]. The duloxetine group showed significant improvement in many secondary measures compared with the placebo group, including BPI pain (least pain, pain right now) (between-group difference: −1.69 ± 0.10, P = 0.0009; −2.42 ± 0.12, P P = 0.0230, respectively), Patient's Global Impression of Improvement (2.46 ± 0.07, P = 0.0026), Clinical Global Impressions of Severity (−1.46 ± 0.06, P = 0.0019), and Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire (−3.86 ± 0.22, P = 0.0439). Adverse events occurring at a significantly higher incidence in the duloxetine group were somnolence

  15. Effect of duloxetine on pain, function, and quality of life among patients with chemotherapy-induced painful peripheral neuropathy: a randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Ellen M. Lavoie; Pang, Herbert; Cirrincione, Constance; Fleishman, Stewart; Paskett, Electra D.; Ahles, Tim; Bressler, Linda R.; Fadul, Camilo E.; Knox, Chetaye; Le-Lindqwister, Nguyet; Gilman, Paul B.; Shapiro, Charles L.

    2013-01-01

    Context There are no known effective treatments for painful chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN). Objective The primary objective was to determine the effect of duloxetine 60 mg daily on CIPN “average” pain severity Design Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover Setting Eight National Cancer Institute (NCI)-funded cooperative research networks recruited patients from community and academic settings between April 2008 and March 2011. Study follow-up was completed July 2012. Patients 231 patients ≥ 25 years of age were randomized (stratified by chemotherapy drug and CIPN comorbid risk) to receive either duloxetine followed by placebo or placebo followed by duloxetine. Eligible patients reported ≥ Grade 1 sensory CIPN per the NCI Common Toxicity Criteria for Adverse Events and ≥ 4/10 average CIPN-related pain following paclitaxel or oxaliplatin treatment. 81% completed the initial treatment period. Intervention The initial treatment consisted of duloxetine/placebo 30mg/one capsule daily for the first week, then 60mg/two capsules for four additional weeks Outcome Measure The primary hypothesis was that duloxetine would be more effective than placebo in decreasing CIPN pain. Pain severity was assessed using the Brief Pain Inventory-Short Form “average pain” item [0 (no pain) – 10 (as bad as can imagine)]. Results Individuals receiving duloxetine as initial treatment (weeks 1–5) reported a larger mean decrease in average pain (1.06; 95% CI: 0.72, 1.40) compared to placebo-treated patients (0.34; 95% CI: 0.01, 0.66) (p = 0.003) (effect size = 0.513). The observed mean difference in the average pain score between the duloxetine and placebo groups was 0.73 (95% CI: 0.26, 1.20). 59% of duloxetine-treated patients compared to 38% of placebo-treated patients reported decreased pain of any amount. Conclusions Among patients with painful CIPN, the use of duloxetine compared with placebo for 5 weeks resulted in a greater reduction in

  16. 21 CFR 522.1222b - Ketamine hydrochloride with promazine hydrochloride and aminopentamide hydrogen sulfate injection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... recommended dose from 15 to 20 milligrams ketamine base per pound of body weight, depending on the effect... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ketamine hydrochloride with promazine hydrochloride and aminopentamide hydrogen sulfate injection. 522.1222b Section 522.1222b Food and Drugs FOOD...

  17. 21 CFR 522.1222b - Ketamine hydrochloride with promazine hydrochloride and aminopentamide hydrogen sulfate injection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... recommended dose from 15 to 20 milligrams ketamine base per pound of body weight, depending on the effect... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ketamine hydrochloride with promazine hydrochloride and aminopentamide hydrogen sulfate injection. 522.1222b Section 522.1222b Food and Drugs FOOD...

  18. Brain region-specific effects of short-term treatment with duloxetine, venlafaxine, milnacipran and sertraline on monoamine metabolism in rats.

    PubMed

    Muneoka, Katsumasa; Shirayama, Yukihiko; Takigawa, Morikuni; Shioda, Seiji

    2009-03-01

    We examined brain region-specific changes in monoamines and metabolites, and their ratios, after short-term administration of antidepressants to rats. Serotonin noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs; duloxetine, venlafaxine, milnacipran) and a serotonin-selective reuptake inhibitor (SSRI; sertraline) elevated serotonin (5-HT) levels in the midbrain (MB). Duloxetine and venlafaxine increased 5-HT levels in the brainstem and 5-HT terminal areas, whereas milnacipran and sertraline increased levels in the brainstem only. Significant reductions in 5-HT turnover were observed in various forebrain regions, including the hippocampus and hypothalamus, after treatment with all of the tested drugs except for milnacipran. In addition, there was reduced 5-HT turnover in the dorsolateral frontal cortex (dlFC), the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), and both the dlFC and the mPFC after treatment with duloxetine, sertraline, and venlafaxine, respectively. Venlafaxine significantly increased dopamine (DA) levels in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) and the substantia nigra and decreased DA turnover in the NAc. Similar changes were observed after treatment with duloxetine and sertraline in the NAc, whereas milnacipran increased DA levels in the mPFC. Limited increases in noradrenaline levels were detected after treatment with duloxetine, venlafaxine, or sertraline, but not after treatment with milnacipran. These results show that SNRIs and SSRIs induced region-specific monoaminergic changes after short-term treatment.

  19. Antinociceptive Effects of the Serotonin and Noradrenaline Reuptake Inhibitors Milnacipran and Duloxetine on Vincristine-Induced Neuropathic Pain Model in Mice.

    PubMed

    Katsuyama, Soh; Aso, Hiromu; Otowa, Akira; Yagi, Tomomi; Kishikawa, Yukinaga; Komatsu, Takaaki; Sakurada, Tsukasa; Nakamura, Hitoshi

    2014-01-01

    Vincristine is an anticancer drug used to treat a variety of cancer types, but it frequently causes peripheral neuropathy. Neuropathic pain is often associated with the appearance of abnormal sensory signs, such as allodynia. Milnacipran and duloxetine, serotonin/noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors, have shown efficacy against several chronic pain syndromes. In this study, we investigated the attenuation of vincristine-induced mechanical allodynia in mice by milnacipran and duloxetine. To induce peripheral neuropathy, vincristine was administered once per day (0.1 mg/kg, intraperitoneally (i.p.)) for 7 days. Mechanical allodynia was evaluated by measuring the withdrawal response to stimulation with a von Frey filament. In vincristine-treated mice, mechanical allodynia was observed on days 3-28 of vincristine administration. A single administration of milnacipran (40 mg/kg, i.p.) or duloxetine (20 mg/kg, i.p.) had no effect on vincristine-induced mechanical allodynia. However, repeated administration of milnacipran (20 or 40 mg/kg, once per day, i.p.) or duloxetine (5, 10, or 20 mg/kg, once per day, i.p.) for 7 days significantly reduced vincristine-induced mechanical allodynia. These results suggest that chronic vincristine administration induces mechanical allodynia, and that repeated milnacipran and duloxetine administration may be an effective approach for the treatment of neuropathic pain caused by vincristine treatment for cancer.

  20. The effects of Dalmane /flurazepam hydrochloride/ on human EEG characteristics.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, J. D., Jr.; Carrie, J. R. G.; Borda, R. P.; Kellaway, P.

    1973-01-01

    Evaluation of the changes in the waking EEGs of six healthy male subjects who received 30 mg daily oral doses of flurazepam hydrochloride for two weeks. A placebo was then substituted for flurazepam for another two weeks. An increase in beta activity with a maximum in fronto-central leads was observed during the test period. A small increase in the mean wavelength of the alpha and theta activities in the central-occipital derivations was also apparent in the subjects during the period.

  1. The effects of Dalmane /flurazepam hydrochloride/ on human EEG characteristics.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, J. D., Jr.; Carrie, J. R. G.; Borda, R. P.; Kellaway, P.

    1973-01-01

    Evaluation of the changes in the waking EEGs of six healthy male subjects who received 30 mg daily oral doses of flurazepam hydrochloride for two weeks. A placebo was then substituted for flurazepam for another two weeks. An increase in beta activity with a maximum in fronto-central leads was observed during the test period. A small increase in the mean wavelength of the alpha and theta activities in the central-occipital derivations was also apparent in the subjects during the period.

  2. [The Discovery, Research and Development of Etelcalcetide Hydrochloride, the World 1st Intravenous Calcimimetics.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Atsuto; Harada, Kazutsune

    Etelcalcetide hydrochloride is the first intravenous calcimimetics agent for secondary hyperparathyroidism (SHPT). Etelcalcetide hydrochloride is to be administered through dialysis circuit by physician or medical staff upon completion of dialysis and such administration is expected to reduce the burden of medication in patients. From the nonclinical study results, etelcalcetide functions as an allosteric activator of calcium-sensing receptor(CaSR). Etelcalcetide suppressed PTH secretion both in vitro and in vivo. In a rat model of chronic renal insufficiency, etelcalcetide suppressed SHPT disorders, such as parathyroid gland hypertrophy, bone disorder, and ectopic calcification. In conclusion, etelcalcetide hydrochloride is expected to exhibit therapeutic effect against each SHPT condition by decreasing blood PTH concentrations via CaSR-agonist activity in the clinical situation.

  3. Pregabalin, the lidocaine plaster and duloxetine in patients with refractory neuropathic pain: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Patients frequently fail to receive adequate pain relief from, or are intolerant of, first-line therapies prescribed for neuropathic pain (NeP). This refractory chronic pain causes psychological distress and impacts patient quality of life. Published literature for treatment in refractory patients is sparse and often published as conference abstracts only. The aim of this study was to identify published data for three pharmacological treatments: pregabalin, lidocaine plaster, and duloxetine, which are typically used at 2nd line or later in UK patients with neuropathic pain. Methods A systematic review of the literature databases MEDLINE, EMBASE and CCTR was carried out and supplemented with extensive conference and grey literature searching. Studies of any design (except single patient case studies) that enrolled adult patients with refractory NeP were included in the review and qualitatively assessed. Results Seventeen studies were included in the review: nine of pregabalin, seven of the lidocaine plaster, and one of duloxetine. No head-to-head studies of these treatments were identified. Only six studies included treatments within UK licensed indications and dose ranges. Reported efficacy outcomes were not consistent between studies. Pain scores were most commonly assessed in studies including pregabalin; trials of pregabalin and the lidocaine plaster reported the proportion of responders. Significant improvements in the total, sensory and affective scores of the Short-form McGill Pain Questionnaire, and in function interference, sleep interference and pain associated distress, were associated with pregabalin treatment; limited or no quality of life data were available for the other two interventions. Limitations to the review are the small number of included studies, which are generally small, of poor quality and heterogeneous in patient population and study design. Conclusions Little evidence is available relevant to the treatment of refractory

  4. Chromatographic Determination of Cyclopentolate Hydrochloride and Phenylephrine Hydrochloride in the Presence of Their Potential Degradation Products.

    PubMed

    Rezk, Mamdouh R; Fayed, Ahmed S; Marzouk, Hoda M; Abbas, Samah S

    2017-03-01

    Two sensitive, selective, and precise stability-indicating methods have been developed for the simultaneous determination of the active pharmaceutical ingredients cyclopentolate hydrochloride (CLO) and phenylephrine hydrochloride (PHE) in their pure forms and in the presence of their degradation products. The methods were applied for the determination of CLO and PHE in a pharmaceutical formulation. Method A was based on isocratic elution HPLC determination. Separation was achieved using a Waters Spherisorb ODS2 C18 analytical column (5 μm particle size) and a mobile phase of 0.1% heptane-1-sulphonic acid sodium salt in methanol-water (80 + 20, v/v). The flow rate was 1.0 mL/min and detection was performed at 210 nm. Method B was an HPTLC- densitometric method using HPTLC silica gel 60 F254 plates and an optimized mobile phase of ethyl acetate-methanol-ammonia (8 + 2 + 0.1, v/v/v). The separated spots were densitometrically scanned at 210 nm. Polynomial equations were used for regression. The developed methods are suitable for the determination of CLO and PHE in their binary mixture and in the presence of their corresponding degradation products. The two methods were validated in compliance with International Conference on Harmonization guidelines and successfully applied for the determination of CLO and PHE as synthetically prepared in laboratory mixtures and in the presence of their possible degradation products. CLO alkaline degradation products were stated as potential impurities in British Pharmacopoeia. The degradation products were separated and identified by mass spectra. Postulation of a PHE oxidative degradation pathway was suggested. The obtained results were statistically analyzed and compared with those obtained by applying the official methods for both drugs.

  5. Octenidine hydrochloride in hydatid disease.

    PubMed

    Altindis, Mustafa; Arikan, Yuksel; Cetinkaya, Zafer; Polat, Coskun; Yilmaz, Sezgin; Akbulut, Gökhan; Dilek, Osman Nuri; Gokce, Ozcan

    2004-01-01

    Hydatid disease is still endemic in many devoloping countries and continues to be an important cause of morbidity. The objective of this study was to determine the in vitro scolicidal effects of octenidine hydrochloride in different concentrations using different exposure times. After hydatid cyst liquid was left to precipitate for 1 h to obtain cystic sand, various concentrations of octenidine (undiluted, 1% and 0.1% diluted) were added to concentrated hydatid cyst sediments for 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 45, and 60 min, and scolicidal effects of octenidine were compared with 20% saline and control group for the same times. It was found that undiluted octenidine had a strong scolicidal effect at 15 min compared to saline at 20%. One percent octenidine had a scolicidal effect at 30 min. However, 0.1% octenidine did not have enough scolicidal effect in 1 h. It was concluded that undiluted and 1% diluted octenidine might be used for scolicidal purpose in the treatment of hydatid disease.

  6. Duloxetine in OsteoArthritis (DOA) study: study protocol of a pragmatic open-label randomised controlled trial assessing the effect of preoperative pain treatment on postoperative outcome after total hip or knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Blikman, T; Rienstra, W; van Raaij, T M; ten Hagen, A J; Dijkstra, B; Zijlstra, W P; Bulstra, S K; van den Akker-Scheek, I; Stevens, M

    2016-03-01

    Residual pain is a major factor in patient dissatisfaction following total hip arthroplasty or total knee arthroplasty (THA/TKA). The proportion of patients with unfavourable long-term residual pain is high, ranging from 7% to 34%. There are studies indicating that a preoperative degree of central sensitisation (CS) is associated with poorer postoperative outcomes and residual pain. It is thus hypothesised that preoperative treatment of CS could enhance postoperative outcomes. Duloxetine has been shown to be effective for several chronic pain syndromes, including knee osteoarthritis (OA), in which CS is most likely one of the underlying pain mechanisms. This study aims to evaluate the postoperative effects of preoperative screening and targeted duloxetine treatment of CS on residual pain compared with care-as-usual. This multicentre, pragmatic, prospective, open-label, randomised controlled trial includes patients with idiopathic hip/knee OA who are on a waiting list for primary THA/TKA. Patients at risk for CS will be randomly allocated to the preoperative duloxetine treatment programme group or the care-as-usual control group. The primary end point is the degree of postoperative pain 6 months after THA/TKA. Secondary end points at multiple time points up to 12 months postoperatively are: pain, neuropathic pain-like symptoms, (pain) sensitisation, pain catastrophising, joint-associated problems, physical activity, health-related quality of life, depressive and anxiety symptoms, and perceived improvement. Data will be analysed on an intention-to-treat basis. The study is approved by the local Medical Ethics Committee (METc 2014/087) and will be conducted according to the principles of the Declaration of Helsinki (64th, 2013) and the Good Clinical Practice standard (GCP), and in compliance with the Medical Research Involving Human Subjects Act (WMO). 2013-004313-41; Pre-results. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already

  7. pH-Responsive chimaeric pepsomes based on asymmetric poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly(l-leucine)-b-poly(l-glutamic acid) triblock copolymer for efficient loading and active intracellular delivery of doxorubicin hydrochloride.

    PubMed

    Chen, Peipei; Qiu, Min; Deng, Chao; Meng, Fenghua; Zhang, Jian; Cheng, Ru; Zhong, Zhiyuan

    2015-04-13

    pH-Responsive chimaeric polypeptide-based polymersomes (refer to as pepsomes) were designed and developed from asymmetric poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly(l-leucine)-b-poly(l-glutamic acid) (PEG-PLeu-PGA, PEG is longer than PGA) triblock copolymers for efficient encapsulation and triggered intracellular delivery of doxorubicin hydrochloride (DOX·HCl). PEG-PLeu-PGA was conveniently prepared by sequential ring-opening polymerization of l-leucine N-carboxyanhydride and γ-benzyl-l-glutamate N-carboxyanhydride using PEG-NH2 as an initiator followed by deprotection. Pepsomes formed from PEG-PLeu-PGA had unimodal distribution and small sizes of 64-71 nm depending on PLeu block lengths. Interestingly, these chimaeric pepsomes while stable at pH 7.4 were quickly disrupted at pH 5.0, likely due to alternation of ionization state of the carboxylic groups in PGA that shifts PGA blocks from hydrophilic and random coil structure into hydrophobic and α-helical structure. DOX·HCl could be actively loaded into the watery core of pepsomes with a high loading efficiency. Remarkably, the in vitro release studies revealed that release of DOX·HCl was highly dependent on pH, in which about 24.0% and 75.7% of drug was released at pH 7.4 and 5.0, respectively, at 37 °C in 24 h. MTT assays demonstrated that DOX·HCl-loaded pepsomes exhibited high antitumor activity, similar to free DOX·HCl in RAW 264.7 cells. Moreover, they were also potent toward drug-resistant MCF-7 cancer cells (MCF-7/ADR). Confocal microscopy studies showed that DOX·HCl-loaded pepsomes delivered and released drug into the cell nuclei of MCF-7/ADR cells in 4 h, while little DOX·HCl fluorescence was observed in MCF-7/ADR cells treated with free drug under otherwise the same conditions. These chimaeric pepsomes with facile synthesis, efficient drug loading, and pH-triggered drug release behavior are an attractive alternative to liposomes for targeted cancer chemotherapy.

  8. Comparative efficacy and tolerability of duloxetine, pregabalin, and milnacipran for the treatment of fibromyalgia: a Bayesian network meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young Ho; Song, Gwan Gyu

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the relative efficacy and tolerability of duloxetine, pregabalin, and milnacipran at the recommended doses in patients with fibromyalgia. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) examining the efficacy and safety of duloxetine 60 mg, pregabalin 300 mg, pregabalin 150 mg, milnacipran 200 mg, and milnacipran 100 mg compared to placebo in patients with fibromyalgia were included in this Bayesian network meta-analysis. Nine RCTs including 5140 patients met the inclusion criteria. The proportion of patients with >30 % improvement from baseline in pain was significantly higher in the duloxetine 60 mg, pregabalin 300 mg, milnacipran 100 mg, and milnacipran 200 mg groups than in the placebo group [pairwise odds ratio (OR) 2.33, 95 % credible interval (CrI) 1.50-3.67; OR 1.68, 95 % CrI 1.25-2.28; OR 1.62, 95 % CrI 1.16-2.25; and OR 1.61; 95 % CrI 1.15-2.24, respectively]. Ranking probability based on the surface under the cumulative ranking curve (SUCRA) indicated that duloxetine 60 mg had the highest probability of being the best treatment for achieving the response level (SUCRA = 0.9431), followed by pregabalin 300 mg (SUCRA = 0.6300), milnacipran 100 mg (SUCRA = 0.5680), milnacipran 200 mg (SUCRA = 0.5617), pregabalin 150 mg (SUCRA = 0.2392), and placebo (SUCRA = 0.0580). The risk of withdrawal due to adverse events was lower in the placebo group than in the pregabalin 300 mg, duloxetine 60 mg, milnacipran 100 mg, and milnacipran 200 mg groups. However, there was no significant difference in the efficacy and tolerability between the medications at the recommended doses. Duloxetine 60 mg, pregabalin 300 mg, milnacipran 100 mg, and milnacipran 200 mg were more efficacious than placebo. However, there was no significant difference in the efficacy and tolerability between the medications at the recommended doses.

  9. 21 CFR 182.1047 - Glutamic acid hydrochloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Glutamic acid hydrochloride. 182.1047 Section 182...) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Multiple Purpose GRAS Food Substances § 182.1047 Glutamic acid hydrochloride. (a) Product. Glutamic acid hydrochloride. (b) (c) Limitations, restrictions, or explanation. This...

  10. 21 CFR 182.1047 - Glutamic acid hydrochloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Glutamic acid hydrochloride. 182.1047 Section 182.1047 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Food Substances § 182.1047 Glutamic acid hydrochloride. (a) Product. Glutamic acid hydrochloride. (b...

  11. 21 CFR 182.1047 - Glutamic acid hydrochloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Glutamic acid hydrochloride. 182.1047 Section 182.1047 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Food Substances § 182.1047 Glutamic acid hydrochloride. (a) Product. Glutamic acid hydrochloride. (b...

  12. 21 CFR 182.1047 - Glutamic acid hydrochloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Glutamic acid hydrochloride. 182.1047 Section 182.1047 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Food Substances § 182.1047 Glutamic acid hydrochloride. (a) Product. Glutamic acid hydrochloride. (b...

  13. 40 CFR 721.10687 - Fatty acid amide hydrochlorides (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Fatty acid amide hydrochlorides... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10687 Fatty acid amide hydrochlorides (generic). (a) Chemical substance... fatty acid amide hydrochlorides (PMNs P-13-201, P-13-203, P-13-204, P-13-205, P-13-206, P-13-207,...

  14. A retrospective, matched cohort study of potential drug-drug interaction prevalence and opioid utilization in a diabetic peripheral neuropathy population initiated on pregabalin or duloxetine.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Jeffrey J; Sadosky, Alesia B; Ten Eyck, Laura L; Mudumby, Pallavi; Cappelleri, Joseph C; Ndehi, Lilian; Suehs, Brandon T; Parsons, Bruce

    2015-04-15

    Anticipating and controlling drug-drug interactions (DDIs) in older patients with painful diabetic peripheral neuropaty (pDPN) presents a significant challenge to providers. The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of newly initiated pregabalin or duloxetine treatment on Medicare Advantage Prescription Drug (MAPD) plan pDPN patients' encounters with potential drug-drug interactions, the healthcare cost and utilization consequences of those interactions, and opioid utilization. Study subjects required a pregabalin or duloxetine pharmacy claim between 07/01/2008-06/30/2012 (index event), ≥1 inpatient or ≥2 outpatient medical claims with pDPN diagnosis between 01/01/2008-12/31/2012, and ≥12 months pre- and ≥6 post-index enrollment. Propensity score matching was used to balance the pregabalin and duloxetine cohorts on pre-index demographics and comorbidities. Potential DDIs were defined by Micromedex 2.0 and identified by prescription claims. Six-month post-index healthcare utilization (HCU) and costs were calculated using pharmacy and medical claims. No significant differences in pre-index demographics or comorbidities were found between pregabalin subjects (n = 446) and duloxetine subjects (n = 446). Potential DDI prevalence was significantly greater (p < 0.0001) among duoxetine subjects (56.7%) than among pregabalin subjects (2.9%). There were no significant differences in HCU or costs between pregablin subjects with and without a potential DDI. By contrast, duloxetine subjects with a potential DDI had higher mean all-cause costs ($13,908 vs. $9,830; p = 0.001), more subjects with ≥1 inpatient visits (35.6% vs 25.4%; p = 0.02), and more subjects with ≥1 emergency room visits (32.8% vs. 20.7%; p = 0.005) in comparison to duloxetine subjects without a potential DDI. There was a trend toward a difference between pregabalin and duloxetine subjects in their respective pre-versus-post differences in milligrams (mg) of

  15. Anti-biofilm activity of A22 ((S-3,4-dichlorobenzyl) isothiourea hydrochloride) against Pseudomonas aeruginosa: Influence on biofilm formation, motility and bioadhesion.

    PubMed

    Bonez, Pauline Cordenonsi; Rossi, Grazielle Guidolin; Bandeira, Jardel Rodrigo; Ramos, Andiara Prates; Mizdal, Caren Rigon; Agertt, Vanessa Albertina; Dalla Nora, Eloísa Salete Segatto; de Souza, Márcia Ebling; Dos Santos Alves, Camilla Fillippi; Dos Santos, Fallon Siqueira; Gündel, André; de Almeida Vaucher, Rodrigo; Santos, Roberto Christ Vianna; de Campos, Marli Matiko Anraku

    2017-10-01

    Bacterial biofilms are involved in various medical infections and for this reason it is of great importance understanding adhesion mechanisms of involved microorganisms is essential to develop new strategies of prevention and control. Different approaches have been used for preventing biofilm related infections in health care settings, such as use of surface coatings agents in medical implants. In this context, is necessary to explore new compounds with anti-biofilm activity. Thus, this study evaluated for the first time the action of A22 against biofilms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 strain and multi-resistant clinical isolates on biotic and abiotic surfaces. A22 acts as inhibitor of the MreB protein of the bacterial cell wall, causing the rods to change shape to the coccoid form. In this work, A22 at subinhibitory concentrations was able to prevent biofilm formation, and atomic force microscopy images showed that A22 was highly effective in inhibiting adhesion on polyethylene surfaces. Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 exhibited a strong ability to adhere to HeLa cells, and A22 inhibited the aggregation after 4 h of exposure. Swarming and twitching motilities were significantly altered by A22 at subinhibitory concentrations. Thus, by changing the shape of the bacterial cell, many properties can be affected, such as motility, surface adhesion and biofilm formation. This work presents A22 as a promising novel antibacterial or surface coating agent of medical materials. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Kinetics membrane disruption due to drug interactions of chlorpromazine hydrochloride.

    PubMed

    Nussio, Matthew R; Sykes, Matthew J; Miners, John O; Shapter, Joseph G

    2009-01-20

    Drug-membrane interactions assume considerable importance in pharmacokinetics and drug metabolism. Here, we present the interaction of chlorpromazine hydrochloride (CPZ) with supported phospholipid bilayers. It was demonstrated that CPZ binds rapidly to phospholipid bilayers, disturbing the molecular ordering of the phospholipids. These interactions were observed to follow first order kinetics, with an activation energy of approximately 420 kJ mol(-1). Time-dependent membrane disruption was also observed for the interaction with CPZ, such that holes appeared in the phospholipid bilayer after the interaction of CPZ. For this process of membrane disruption, "lag-burst" kinetics was demonstrated.

  17. Biowaiver monographs for immediate release solid oral dosage forms: amitriptyline hydrochloride.

    PubMed

    Manzo, R H; Olivera, M E; Amidon, G L; Shah, V P; Dressman, J B; Barends, D M

    2006-05-01

    Literature data relevant to the decision to allow a waiver of in vivo bioequivalence (BE) testing for the approval of immediate release (IR) solid oral dosage forms containing amitriptyline hydrochloride are reviewed. Its therapeutic uses, its pharmacokinetic properties, the possibility of excipient interactions and reported BE/bioavailability (BA) problems are also taken into consideration. Literature data indicates that amitriptyline hydrochloride is a highly permeable active pharmaceutical ingredient (API). Data on the solubility according to the current Biopharmaceutics Classification System (BCS) were not fully available and consequently amitriptyline hydrochloride could not be definitively assigned to either BCS Class I or BCS Class II. But all evidence taken together, a biowaiver can currently be recommended provided that IR tablets are formulated with excipients used in existing approved products and that the dissolution meets the criteria defined in the Guidances.

  18. Synthesis, spectral, and anti-microbial studies of thioiminium iodides and amine hydrochlorides.

    PubMed

    Britto, Sebastian; Renaud, Philippe; Nallu, Maruthai

    2014-01-01

    To avoid the undesired deprotonation during the addition of organolithium and organomagnesium reagents to ketones, the thioiminium salts, easily prepared from lactams and amides are converted into 2,2-disubstituted and 2-monosubstituted amines by reaction with simple nucleophiles such as organocerium and organocopper reagents. The reaction of thioiminium iodides with organocerium reagents derived by transmetalation of corresponding lithium reagents with anhydrous cerium(III) chloride has been investigated. These thioiminium iodides act as good electrophiles and accept alkylceriums towards bisaddition. The newly synthesized amines have been characterized by 1H and 13C NMR, IR and mass spectra. The amines have been converted into their hydrochlorides and characterized by COSY. These hydrochlorides have been subjected to antimicrobial screening with clinically isolated microorganisms, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Salmonella typhi and Candida albicans. The hydrochlorides show quite good activity against these bacteria and fungus.

  19. Thermal Analysis Investigation of Dapoxetine and Vardenafil Hydrochlorides using Molecular Orbital Calculations.

    PubMed

    Attia, Ali Kamal; Souaya, Eglal R; Soliman, Ethar A

    2015-11-01

    Thermal analysis techniques have been used to study the thermal behavior of dapoxetine and vardenafil hydrochlorides and confirmed using semi-empirical molecular orbital calculations. Thermogravimetric analysis, derivative thermogravimetry, differential thermal analysis and differential scanning calorimetry were used to determine the thermal behavior and purity of the drugs under investigation. Thermodynamic parameters such as activation energy, enthalpy, entropy and Gibbs free energy were calculated. Thermal behavior of DAP and VAR were confirmed using by semi-empirical molecular orbital calculations. The purity values were found to be 99.97% and 99.95% for dapoxetine and vardenafil hydrochlorides, respectively. The purity of dapoxetine and vardenafil hydrochlorides is similar to that found by reported methods according to DSC data. Thermal analysis justifies its application in quality control of pharmaceutical compounds due to its simplicity, sensitivity and low operational costs.

  20. Duloxetine for the treatment of mood disorder in cancer patients: a 12-week case-control clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Torta, Riccardo; Leombruni, Paolo; Borio, Roberto; Castelli, Lorys

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the efficacy and tolerability of duloxetine in cancer patients with mood disorder (MD) by means of a comparison with a matched control group of patients with MD without medical illness. Fifty-nine consecutive patients with MD were enrolled in this prospective case-control study and received duloxetine 60/120 mg per day for 12 weeks. Twenty-seven patients were affected by cancer, whereas 32 had an MD without cancer. All the patients were assessed by means of efficacy and effectiveness tolerability scales for depression (Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale), anxiety (State-Trait Anxiety Inventory-Y1/Y2) and severity of symptoms (Clinical Global Impression (CGI)-Severity) at baseline (T0), after 4 weeks (T1) and 12 weeks (T2). The CGI-Improvement, CGI-Effectiveness Index and Dosage Record Treatment Emergent Symptom Scale were administered at T1 and T2. A significant global improvement in all the efficacy measures was found. The results showed no significant interaction 'Time X Group', suggesting a similar improvement in efficacy scores for cancer-depressed patients and depressed patients without cancer. No difference was found between the two groups with regard to drop-out percentage, effectiveness and tolerability. Although the results of this case-control study are preliminary, they suggest that duloxetine can be considered a good option for the treatment of MD in cancer patients. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Does early improvement in depressive symptoms predict subsequent remission in patients with depression who are treated with duloxetine?

    PubMed Central

    Sueki, Akitsugu; Suzuki, Eriko; Takahashi, Hitoshi; Ishigooka, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Purpose In this prospective study, we examined whether early reduction in depressive symptoms predicts later remission to duloxetine in the treatment of depression, as monitored using the Montgomery–Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS). Patients and methods Among the 106 patients who were enrolled in this study, 67 were included in the statistical analysis. A clinical evaluation using the MADRS was performed at weeks 0, 4, 8, 12, and 16 after commencing treatment. For each time point, the MADRS total score was separated into three components: dysphoria, retardation, and vegetative scores. Results Remission was defined as an MADRS total score of ≤10 at end point. From our univariate logistic regression analysis, we found that improvements in both the MADRS total score and the dysphoria score at week 4 had a significant interaction with subsequent remission. Furthermore, age and sex were significant predictors of remission. There was an increase of approximately 4% in the odds of remission for each unit increase in age, and female sex had an odds of remission of 0.318 times that of male sex (remission rate for men was 73.1% [19/26] and for women 46.3% [19/41]). However, in the multivariate model using the change from baseline in the total MADRS, dysphoria, retardation, and vegetative scores at week 4, in which age and sex were included as covariates, only sex retained significance, except for an improvement in the dysphoria score. Conclusion No significant interaction was found between early response to duloxetine and eventual remission in this study. Sex difference was found to be a predictor of subsequent remission in patients with depression who were treated with duloxetine, with the male sex having greater odds of remission. PMID:27307739

  2. Validation of the geriatric anxiety inventory in a duloxetine clinical trial for elderly adults with generalized anxiety disorder.

    PubMed

    Ball, Susan G; Lipsius, Sarah; Escobar, Rodrigo

    2015-09-01

    The Generalized Anxiety Inventory (GAI) has been developed for use in the assessment of anxiety symptoms in older adults (≥ 65 years), but previous validation work has not examined the psychometric qualities of the instrument in relation to treatment. The objective of this study was to examine the performance of the GAI for its internal reliability, convergent and divergent validity, and its sensitivity to treatment. Elderly patients with generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) participated in a 10-week double-blind study of duloxetine treatment for patients with GAD. Anxiety symptoms were assessed with the Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale (HAMA), the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) anxiety and depression subscales, and the GAI. Internal reliability of the GAI was assessed with Cronbach's α. Correlations among the HAMA, HADS, and GAI scores were analyzed to determine convergent and divergent validity. Patients were also compared on remission status using recommended cut-off scores for the GAI. Patients with GAD, who were at least 65 years of age, were randomly assigned to double-blind treatment with either duloxetine (N = 151) or placebo (N = 140) for 10 weeks acute therapy. The mean change on the GAI was significantly greater with duloxetine compared with placebo treatment (-8.36 vs. -4.96, respectively, p ≤ 0.001). The GAI demonstrated good internal consistency, good convergent and divergent validity, but suggested cut-off values for caseness with the GAI did not correspond to remission status as measured by the HAMA. Within an elderly patient population with GAD, the GAI demonstrated sound psychometric qualities and sensitivity to change with treatment.

  3. Human serum paraoxonase-1 (hPON1): in vitro inhibition effects of moxifloxacin hydrochloride, levofloxacin hemihidrate, cefepime hydrochloride, cefotaxime sodium and ceftizoxime sodium.

    PubMed

    Türkeş, Cüneyt; Söyüt, Hakan; Beydemir, Şükrü

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the effects of antibacterial drugs (moxifloxacin hydrochloride, levofloxacin hemihidrate, cefepime hydrochloride, cefotaxime sodium and ceftizoxime sodium) on human serum paraoxonase-1 (hPON1) enzyme activity from human serum in vitro conditions. For this purpose, hPON1 enzyme was purified from human serum using simple chromatographic methods. The antibacterial drugs exhibited inhibitory effects on hPON1 at low concentrations. Ki constants were calculated to be 2.641 ± 0.040 mM, 5.525 ± 0.817 mM, 35.092 ± 1.093 mM, 252.762 ± 5.749 mM and 499.244 ± 10.149 mM, respectively. The inhibition mechanism of moxifloxacin hydrochloride was competitive, whereas levofloxacin hemihidrate, cefepime hydrochloride, cefotaxime sodium and ceftizoxime sodium were noncompetitive inhibitors.

  4. Chromatographic Determination of Aminoacridine Hydrochloride, Lidocaine Hydrochloride and Lidocaine Toxic Impurity in Oral Gel.

    PubMed

    Bebawy, Lories I; Elghobashy, Mohamed R; Abbas, Samah S; Shokry, Rafeek F

    2016-04-01

    Two sensitive and selective analytical methods were developed for simultaneous determination of aminoacridine hydrochloride and lidocaine hydrochloride in bulk powder and pharmaceutical formulation. Method A was based on HPLC separation of the cited drugs with determination of the toxic lidocaine-related impurity 2,6-dimethylaniline. The separation was achieved using reversed-phase column C18, 250 × 4.6 mm, 5 µm particle size and mobile phase consisting of 0.05 M disodium hydrogen phosphate dihydrate (pH 6.0 ± 0.2 adjusted with phosphoric acid) and acetonitrile (55 : 45, v/v). Quantitation was achieved with UV detection at 240 nm. Linear calibration curve was in the range of 1.00-10.00, 13.20-132.00 and 1.32-13.20 µg mL(-1) for aminoacridine hydrochloride, lidocaine hydrochloride and 2,6-dimethylaniline, respectively. Method B was based on TLC separation of the cited drugs followed by densitometric measurement at 365 nm on the fluorescent mode for aminoacridine hydrochloride and 220 nm on the absorption mode for lidocaine hydrochloride. The separation was carried out using ethyl acetate-methanol-acetic acid (65 : 30 : 5 by volume) as a developing system. The calibration curve was in the range of 25.00-250.00 ng spot(-1) and 0.99-9.90 µg spot(-1) for aminoacridine hydrochloride and lidocaine hydrochloride, respectively. The results obtained were statistically analyzed and compared with those obtained by applying the manufacturer's method. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Chromatographic Determination of Aminoacridine Hydrochloride, Lidocaine Hydrochloride and Lidocaine Toxic Impurity in Oral Gel

    PubMed Central

    Bebawy, Lories I.; Elghobashy, Mohamed R.; Abbas, Samah S.; Shokry, Rafeek F.

    2016-01-01

    Two sensitive and selective analytical methods were developed for simultaneous determination of aminoacridine hydrochloride and lidocaine hydrochloride in bulk powder and pharmaceutical formulation. Method A was based on HPLC separation of the cited drugs with determination of the toxic lidocaine-related impurity 2,6-dimethylaniline. The separation was achieved using reversed-phase column C18, 250 × 4.6 mm, 5 µm particle size and mobile phase consisting of 0.05 M disodium hydrogen phosphate dihydrate (pH 6.0 ± 0.2 adjusted with phosphoric acid) and acetonitrile (55 : 45, v/v). Quantitation was achieved with UV detection at 240 nm. Linear calibration curve was in the range of 1.00–10.00, 13.20–132.00 and 1.32–13.20 µg mL−1 for aminoacridine hydrochloride, lidocaine hydrochloride and 2,6-dimethylaniline, respectively. Method B was based on TLC separation of the cited drugs followed by densitometric measurement at 365 nm on the fluorescent mode for aminoacridine hydrochloride and 220 nm on the absorption mode for lidocaine hydrochloride. The separation was carried out using ethyl acetate–methanol–acetic acid (65 : 30 : 5 by volume) as a developing system. The calibration curve was in the range of 25.00–250.00 ng spot−1 and 0.99–9.90 µg spot−1 for aminoacridine hydrochloride and lidocaine hydrochloride, respectively. The results obtained were statistically analyzed and compared with those obtained by applying the manufacturer's method. PMID:26671412

  6. Fate and transport of the ß-adrenergic agonist ractopamine hydrochloride in soil-water systems

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The feed additive ractopamine hydrochloride was fortified at four concentrations into batch vials containing soils that differed in both biological activity and organic matter (OM). Sampling of the liquid layer for 14 d demonstrated that ractopamine rapidly dissipated from the liquid layer. Less t...

  7. 21 CFR 556.410 - Metoserpate hydrochloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS TOLERANCES FOR RESIDUES OF NEW ANIMAL DRUGS IN FOOD Specific Tolerances for Residues of New Animal Drugs § 556.410 Metoserpate hydrochloride. A tolerance of 0.02 part per...

  8. 21 CFR 556.580 - Robenidine hydrochloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS TOLERANCES FOR RESIDUES OF NEW ANIMAL DRUGS IN FOOD Specific Tolerances for Residues of New Animal Drugs § 556.580 Robenidine hydrochloride. Tolerances are established...

  9. 21 CFR 556.410 - Metoserpate hydrochloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS TOLERANCES FOR RESIDUES OF NEW ANIMAL DRUGS IN FOOD Specific Tolerances for Residues of New Animal Drugs § 556.410 Metoserpate hydrochloride. A tolerance of 0.02 part per...

  10. 21 CFR 556.580 - Robenidine hydrochloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS TOLERANCES FOR RESIDUES OF NEW ANIMAL DRUGS IN FOOD Specific Tolerances for Residues of New Animal Drugs § 556.580 Robenidine hydrochloride. Tolerances are established...

  11. 21 CFR 556.410 - Metoserpate hydrochloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS TOLERANCES FOR RESIDUES OF NEW ANIMAL DRUGS IN FOOD Specific Tolerances for Residues of New Animal Drugs § 556.410 Metoserpate hydrochloride. A tolerance of 0.02 part per...

  12. 21 CFR 556.350 - Levamisole hydrochloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS TOLERANCES FOR RESIDUES OF NEW ANIMAL DRUGS IN FOOD Specific Tolerances for Residues of New Animal Drugs § 556.350 Levamisole hydrochloride. A tolerance of 0.1 part per...

  13. 21 CFR 556.350 - Levamisole hydrochloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS TOLERANCES FOR RESIDUES OF NEW ANIMAL DRUGS IN FOOD Specific Tolerances for Residues of New Animal Drugs § 556.350 Levamisole hydrochloride. A tolerance of 0.1 part per...

  14. 21 CFR 556.410 - Metoserpate hydrochloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS TOLERANCES FOR RESIDUES OF NEW ANIMAL DRUGS IN FOOD Specific Tolerances for Residues of New Animal Drugs § 556.410 Metoserpate hydrochloride. A tolerance of 0.02 part per...

  15. 21 CFR 556.350 - Levamisole hydrochloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS TOLERANCES FOR RESIDUES OF NEW ANIMAL DRUGS IN FOOD Specific Tolerances for Residues of New Animal Drugs § 556.350 Levamisole hydrochloride. A tolerance of 0.1 part per...

  16. 21 CFR 556.350 - Levamisole hydrochloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS TOLERANCES FOR RESIDUES OF NEW ANIMAL DRUGS IN FOOD Specific Tolerances for Residues of New Animal Drugs § 556.350 Levamisole hydrochloride. A tolerance of 0.1 part per...

  17. 21 CFR 556.580 - Robenidine hydrochloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS TOLERANCES FOR RESIDUES OF NEW ANIMAL DRUGS IN FOOD Specific Tolerances for Residues of New Animal Drugs § 556.580 Robenidine hydrochloride. Tolerances are established...

  18. Cartap hydrochloride poisoning: A clinical experience

    PubMed Central

    Boorugu, Hari K.; Chrispal, Anugrah

    2012-01-01

    Cartap hydrochloride, a nereistoxin analog, is a commonly used low toxicity insecticide. We describe a patient who presented to the emergency department with alleged history of ingestion of Cartap hydrochloride as an act of deliberate self-harm. The patient was managed conservatively. To our knowledge this is the first case report of Cartap hydrochloride suicidal poisoning. Cartap toxicity has been considered to be minimal, but a number of animal models have shown significant neuromuscular toxicity resulting in respiratory failure. It is hypothesized that the primary effect of Cartap hydrochloride is through inhibition of the [3H]-ryanodine binding to the Ca2+ release channel in the sarcoplasmic reticulum in a dose-dependent manner and promotion of extracellular Ca2+ influx and induction of internal Ca2+ release. This results in tonic diaphragmatic contraction rather than paralysis. This is the basis of the clinical presentation of acute Cartap poisoning as well as the treatment with chelators namely British Anti Lewisite and sodium dimercaptopropane sulfonate. PMID:22557838

  19. Cartap hydrochloride poisoning: A clinical experience.

    PubMed

    Boorugu, Hari K; Chrispal, Anugrah

    2012-01-01

    Cartap hydrochloride, a nereistoxin analog, is a commonly used low toxicity insecticide. We describe a patient who presented to the emergency department with alleged history of ingestion of Cartap hydrochloride as an act of deliberate self-harm. The patient was managed conservatively. To our knowledge this is the first case report of Cartap hydrochloride suicidal poisoning. Cartap toxicity has been considered to be minimal, but a number of animal models have shown significant neuromuscular toxicity resulting in respiratory failure. It is hypothesized that the primary effect of Cartap hydrochloride is through inhibition of the [(3)H]-ryanodine binding to the Ca(2+) release channel in the sarcoplasmic reticulum in a dose-dependent manner and promotion of extracellular Ca(2+) influx and induction of internal Ca(2+) release. This results in tonic diaphragmatic contraction rather than paralysis. This is the basis of the clinical presentation of acute Cartap poisoning as well as the treatment with chelators namely British Anti Lewisite and sodium dimercaptopropane sulfonate.

  20. 21 CFR 582.5676 - Pyridoxine hydrochloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Pyridoxine hydrochloride. 582.5676 Section 582.5676 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients...

  1. A clinical evaluation of benzydamine hydrochloride.

    PubMed

    Hunter, K M

    1978-04-01

    A double-blind clinical trial of the effects of the use of benzydamine hydrochloride for patients undergoing the surgical removal of impacted lower third molar teeth showed no significant effects on swelling and trismus between control and experimental groups, although a significant reduction in the post-operative consumption of analgesics was noted.

  2. 21 CFR 520.2002 - Propiopromazine hydrochloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Propiopromazine hydrochloride. 520.2002 Section 520.2002 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.2002...

  3. 21 CFR 520.2002 - Propiopromazine hydrochloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Propiopromazine hydrochloride. 520.2002 Section 520.2002 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.2002...

  4. 21 CFR 520.2002 - Propiopromazine hydrochloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Propiopromazine hydrochloride. 520.2002 Section 520.2002 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.2002...

  5. 21 CFR 520.2002 - Propiopromazine hydrochloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Propiopromazine hydrochloride. 520.2002 Section 520.2002 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.2002...

  6. The respiratory effects of tilidine hydrochloride.

    PubMed

    Moyes, D G; Kingston, H G

    1975-07-26

    A standard 50-mg dose of tilidine hydrochloride (Valoron) was administered to 20 patients in the postoperative phase of open-heart surgery. No significant change in respiratory status, as measured by arterial blood gas analysis, was demonstrated with this dosage.

  7. 21 CFR 556.580 - Robenidine hydrochloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Robenidine hydrochloride. 556.580 Section 556.580 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... million in skin and fat. (b) 0.1 part per million (negligible residue) in edible tissues other than skin...

  8. 21 CFR 556.580 - Robenidine hydrochloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Robenidine hydrochloride. 556.580 Section 556.580 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... million in skin and fat. (b) 0.1 part per million (negligible residue) in edible tissues other than skin...

  9. 21 CFR 522.1077 - Gonadorelin hydrochloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Gonadorelin hydrochloride. 522.1077 Section 522.1077 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS IMPLANTATION OR INJECTABLE DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS §...

  10. Butaclamol hydrochloride in newly admitted schizophrenics.

    PubMed

    Hollister, L E; Davis, K L; Berger, P A

    1975-01-01

    Butaclamol hydrochloride, a new type of antipsychotic drug, was evaluated by an uncontrolled study of 13 newly admitted schizophrenic patients. The drug had antipsychotic effects as well as a strong propensity for evoking extrapyramidal side effects. With the maximal daily doses of 30 mg used in this study, therapeutic results obtained were probably somewhat less than optimal.

  11. Impaired noradrenaline homeostasis in rats with painful diabetic neuropathy as a target of duloxetine analgesia

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Painful diabetic neuropathy (PDN) is a serious complication of diabetes mellitus that affects a large number of patients in many countries. The molecular mechanisms underlying the exaggerated nociception in PDN have not been established. Recently, duloxetine (DLX), a serotonin and noradrenaline re-uptake inhibitor, has been recommended as one of the first-line treatments of PDN in the United States Food and Drug Administration, the European Medicines Agency and the Japanese Guideline for the Pharmacologic Management of Neuropathic pain. Because selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors show limited analgesic effects in PDN, we examined whether the potent analgesic effect of DLX contributes toward improving the pathologically aberrant noradrenaline homeostasis in diabetic models. Results In streptozotocin (STZ) (50 mg/kg, i.v.)-induced diabetic rats that exhibited robust mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia, DLX (10 mg/kg, i.p.) significantly and markedly increased the nociceptive threshold. The analgesic effect of DLX was nullified by the prior administration of N-(2-chloroethyl)-N-ethyl-2-bromobenzylamine (DSP-4) (50 mg/kg, i.p.), which drastically eliminated dopamine-beta-hydroxylase- and norepinephrine transporter-immunopositive fibers in the lumbar spinal dorsal horn and significantly reduced the noradrenaline content in the lumbar spinal cord. The treatment with DSP-4 alone markedly lowered the nociceptive threshold in vehicle-treated non-diabetic rats; however, this pro-nociceptive effect was occluded in STZ-treated diabetic rats. Furthermore, STZ-treated rats exhibited a higher amount of dopamine-beta-hydroxylase- and norepinephrine transporter-immunopositive fibers in the dorsal horn and noradrenaline content in the spinal cord compared to vehicle-treated rats. Conclusions Impaired noradrenaline-mediated regulation of the spinal nociceptive network might underlie exaggerated nociception in PDN. DLX might exert its analgesic effect by

  12. Pharmacodynamics of norepinephrine reuptake inhibition: Modeling the peripheral and central effects of atomoxetine, duloxetine, and edivoxetine on the biomarker 3,4-dihydroxyphenylglycol in humans.

    PubMed

    Kielbasa, William; Lobo, Evelyn

    2015-12-01

    Norepinephrine, a neurotransmitter in the autonomic sympathetic nervous system, is deaminated by monoamine oxidase to 3,4-dihydroxyphenylglycol (DHPG). Inhibition of the NE transporter (NET) using DHPG as a biomarker was evaluated using atomoxetine, duloxetine, and edivoxetine as probe NET inhibitors. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic data were obtained from healthy subjects (n = 160) from 5 clinical trials. An indirect response model was used to describe the relationship between drug plasma concentration and DHPG concentration in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). The baseline plasma DHPG concentration (1130-1240 ng/mL) and Imax (33%-37%) were similar for the 3 drugs. The unbound plasma drug IC50 (IC50U ) based on plasma DHPG was 0.973 nM for duloxetine, 0.136 nM for atomoxetine, and 0.041 nM for edivoxetine. The baseline CSF DHPG concentration (1850-2260 ng/mL) was similar for the 3 drugs, but unlike plasma DHPG, the Imax for DHPG was 38% for duloxetine, 53% for atomoxetine, and75% for edivoxetine. The IC50U based on CSF DHPG was 2.72 nM for atomoxetine, 1.22 nM for duloxetine, and 0.794 nM for edivoxetine. These modeling results provide insights into the pharmacology of NET inhibitors and the use of DHPG as a biomarker.

  13. Duloxetine Add-On to Risperidone for Treatment of Negative Symptoms in Patients with Stable Schizophrenia: Randomized Double-Blind Placebo-Controlled Study.

    PubMed

    Nikbakhat, M-R; Arabzadeh, S; Zeinoddini, A; Khalili, Z; Rezaei, F; Mohammadinejad, P; Ghaleiha, A; Akhondzadeh, S

    2016-07-01

    Although the pathogenesis of symptoms of schizophrenia is largely unknown, a variety of neurotransmitters are implicated, including serotonin and norepinephrine. Here we investigate the effectiveness of duloxetine as a serotonin-norepinephrine inhibitor in the treatment of negative symptoms. We performed a double-blind clinical trial on 64 patients with stable schizophrenia and no prominent symptoms of depression. Patients received risperidone (up to 6 mg/day) plus either duloxetine (60 mg/day) or placebo. Psychotic symptoms were assessed by the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) at the onset of the trial, and at 2, 4, 6 and 8 weeks of therapy. Compared to the placebo group, the duloxetine group showed significantly higher improvement in negative symptoms (p<0.001), PANSS total (p<0.001), and the general psychopathology subscale scores (p=0.001), but no significant difference in positive symptoms (p=0.13). The side effect profiles of the 2 treatment regimens were not significantly different. Duloxetine adjuvant to risperidone seems to be a tolerable and efficacious treatment for primary negative symptoms of schizophrenia. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  14. Duloxetine Reduces Oxidative Stress, Apoptosis, and Ca(2+) Entry Through Modulation of TRPM2 and TRPV1 Channels in the Hippocampus and Dorsal Root Ganglion of Rats.

    PubMed

    Demirdaş, Arif; Nazıroğlu, Mustafa; Övey, İshak Suat

    2016-07-21

    Overload of Ca(2+) entry and excessive oxidative stress in neurons are the two main causes of depression. Activation of transient receptor potential (TRP) vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) and TRP melastatin 2 (TRPM2) during oxidative stress has been linked to neuronal survival. Duloxetine (DULOX) in neurons reduced the effects of Ca(2+) entry and reactive oxygen species (ROS) through glutamate receptors, and this reduction of effects may also occur through TRPM2 and TRPV1 channels. In order to better characterize the actions of DULOX in peripheral pain and hippocampal oxidative injury through modulation of TRPM2 and TRPV1, we tested the effects of DULOX on apoptosis and oxidative stress in the hippocampal and dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons of rats. Freshly isolated hippocampal and DRG neurons were incubated for 24 h with DULOX. In whole-cell patch-clamp and intracellular-free calcium ([Ca(2+)]) concentration (Fura-2) experiments, cumene hydroperoxide and ADP-ribose-induced TRPM2 currents in the neurons were inhibited by N-(p-amylcinnamoyl) anthranilic acid (ACA) and capsaicin-induced TRPV1 currents were inhibited by capsazepine (CPZ) incubations. TRPM2 and TRPV1 channel current densities, [Ca(2+)] concentration, apoptosis, caspase 3, caspase 9, mitochondrial depolarization, and intracellular ROS production values in the neurons were lower in the DULOX group than in controls. In addition, the above values were further decreased by DULOX + CPZ and DULOX + ACA treatments. In conclusion, TRPM2 and TRPV1 channels are involved in Ca(2+) entry-induced neuronal death and modulation of the activity of these channels by DULOX treatment may account for their neuroprotective activity against apoptosis, excessive ROS production, and Ca(2+) entry.

  15. Health-related quality of life in patients with depression treated with duloxetine or a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor in a naturalistic outpatient setting

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Jihyung; Novick, Diego; Montgomery, William; Moneta, Maria Victoria; Dueñas, Héctor; Peng, Xiaomei; Haro, Josep Maria

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To assess the levels of quality of life (QoL) in major depressive disorder (MDD) patients treated with either duloxetine or a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) as monotherapy for up to 6 months in a naturalistic clinical setting mostly in the Middle East, East Asia, and Mexico. Patients and methods Data for this post hoc analysis were taken from a 6-month prospective observational study involving 1,549 MDD patients without sexual dysfunction. QoL was measured using the EQ-5D instrument. Depression severity was measured using the Clinical Global Impression of Severity and the 16-item Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology Self-Report (QIDS-SR16), while pain severity was measured using the pain items of the Somatic Symptom Inventory. Regression analyses were performed to compare the levels of QoL between duloxetine-treated (n=556) and SSRI-treated (n=776) patients, adjusting for baseline patient characteristics. Results These MDD patients, on average, had moderately impaired QoL at baseline, and the level of QoL impairment was similar between the duloxetine and SSRI groups (EQ-5D score of 0.46 [SD =0.32] in the former and 0.47 [SD =0.33] in the latter, P=0.066). Both descriptive and regression analyses confirmed QoL improvements in both groups during follow-up, but duloxetine-treated patients achieved higher QoL. At 24 weeks, the estimated mean EQ-5D score was 0.90 in the duloxetine cohort, which was statistically significantly higher than that of 0.83 in the SSRI cohort (P<0.001). Notably, pain severity at baseline was also statistically significantly associated with poorer QoL during follow-up (P<0.001). In addition, this association was observed in the subgroup of SSRI-treated patients (P<0.001), but not in that of duloxetine-treated patients (P=0.479). Conclusion Depressed patients treated with duloxetine achieved higher QoL, compared to those treated with SSRIs, possibly in part due to its moderating effect on the link between pain and

  16. Altruism, personal benefit, and anxieties: a phenomenological study of healthy volunteers' experiences in a placebo‐controlled trial of duloxetine

    PubMed Central

    Kwakye, Isaac N.; Garner, Matthew; Baldwin, David S.; Bamford, Susan; Pinkney, Verity

    2016-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to develop an in‐depth understanding of healthy volunteers' experiences of mental health trials. Methods A qualitative study was nested within a healthy volunteer placebo‐controlled trial of duloxetine, a psychotropic drug used for treating patients with major depression and generalized anxiety disorder. Eight participants were interviewed, and data were analyzed using interpretative phenomenological analysis. Results Interviewees described volunteering for the trial because they were interested in research, wanted the monetary incentive, wanted to help researchers, and wanted to be part of something. On entering the trial, participants considered the possible risks and described feeling anxious, excited, and determined; they had some clear expectations and some loosely held hopes about what would happen. During the trial, participants were curious about whether they were taking duloxetine or placebo, self‐monitored their bodies' reactions, and guessed which treatment they received. On being un‐blinded to treatment allocation after completing the trial, some participants' guesses were confirmed, but others were surprised, and a few were disappointed. Conclusions Small changes to advertising/consent materials to reflect volunteers' motivations could improve recruitment rates to similar trials; “active” placebos might be particularly useful for maintaining blinding in healthy volunteer trials; and sensitive procedures are needed for un‐blinding participants to treatment allocation. © 2016 The Authors. Human Psychopharmacology: Clinical and Experimental published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27378326

  17. Treatment of allergic conjunctivitis with olopatadine hydrochloride eye drops.

    PubMed

    Uchio, Eiichi

    2008-09-01

    Olopatadine hydrochloride exerts a wide range of pharmacological actions such as histamine H(1) receptor antagonist action, chemical mediator suppressive action, and eosinophil infiltration suppressive action. Olopatadine hydrochloride 0.1% ophthalmic solution (Patanol((R))) was introduced to the market in Japan in October 2006. In a conjunctival allergen challenge (CAC) test, olopatadine hydrochloride 0.1% ophthalmic solution significantly suppressed ocular itching and hyperemia compared with levocabastine hydrochloride 0.05% ophthalmic solution, and the number of patients who complained of ocular discomfort was lower in the olopatadine group than in the levocabastine group. Conjunctival cell membrane disruption was observed in vitro in the ketotifen fumarate group, epinastine hydrochloride group, and azelastine hydrochloride group, but not in the olopatadine hydrochloride 0.1% ophthalmic solution group, which may potentially explain the lower discomfort felt by patients on instillation. Many other studies in humans have revealed the superiority of olopatadine 0.1% hydrochloride eye drops to several other anti-allergic eye drops. Overseas, olopatadine hydrochloride 0.2% ophthalmic solution for a once-daily regimen has been marketed under the brand name of Pataday((R)). It is expected that olopatadine hydrochloride ophthalmic solutions may be used in patients with a more severe spectrum of allergic conjunctival diseases, such as vernal keratoconjunctivitis or atopic keratoconjunctivitis, in the near future.

  18. Treatment of allergic conjunctivitis with olopatadine hydrochloride eye drops

    PubMed Central

    Uchio, Eiichi

    2008-01-01

    Olopatadine hydrochloride exerts a wide range of pharmacological actions such as histamine H1 receptor antagonist action, chemical mediator suppressive action, and eosinophil infiltration suppressive action. Olopatadine hydrochloride 0.1% ophthalmic solution (Patanol®) was introduced to the market in Japan in October 2006. In a conjunctival allergen challenge (CAC) test, olopatadine hydrochloride 0.1% ophthalmic solution significantly suppressed ocular itching and hyperemia compared with levocabastine hydrochloride 0.05% ophthalmic solution, and the number of patients who complained of ocular discomfort was lower in the olopatadine group than in the levocabastine group. Conjunctival cell membrane disruption was observed in vitro in the ketotifen fumarate group, epinastine hydrochloride group, and azelastine hydrochloride group, but not in the olopatadine hydrochloride 0.1% ophthalmic solution group, which may potentially explain the lower discomfort felt by patients on instillation. Many other studies in humans have revealed the superiority of olopatadine 0.1% hydrochloride eye drops to several other anti-allergic eye drops. Overseas, olopatadine hydrochloride 0.2% ophthalmic solution for a once-daily regimen has been marketed under the brand name of Pataday®. It is expected that olopatadine hydrochloride ophthalmic solutions may be used in patients with a more severe spectrum of allergic conjunctival diseases, such as vernal keratoconjunctivitis or atopic keratoconjunctivitis, in the near future. PMID:19668750

  19. Dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction based on solidification of floating organic droplets followed by high performance liquid chromatography for the determination of duloxetine in human plasma.

    PubMed

    Suh, Joon Hyuk; Lee, Yun Young; Lee, Hee Joo; Kang, Myunghee; Hur, Yeoun; Lee, Sun Neo; Yang, Dong-Hyug; Han, Sang Beom

    2013-03-05

    A novel dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction method based on solidification of floating organic droplets (DLLME-SFO) technique was developed for the determination of duloxetine in human plasma samples by high performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection (HPLC-FLD). During the extraction procedure, plasma protein was precipitated by using a mixture of zinc sulfate solution and acetonitrile. After the protein precipitation step, duloxetine in an alkaline sample solution was quickly extracted by DLLME-SFO with 50 μL of 1-undecanol (extractant). Disperser was unnecessary because the small amount of remaining acetonitrile, which acts as a protein precipitating reagent, was also employed as a disperser; therefore, organic solvent consumption was reduced as much as possible. The emulsion was centrifuged and then fine droplets were floated to the top of the sample solution. The floated droplets were solidified in an ice bath and easily transferred. Various DLLME-SFO parameters such as extractant type, extractant amount, ionic strength, pH and extraction time were optimized. The chromatographic separation of duloxetine was carried out using ethanol as mobile phase. Validation of the method was performed with respect to linearity, intra- and inter-day accuracy and precision, limit of quantification (LOQ), and recovery. Calibration curves for duloxetine showed good linearity with correlation coefficients (r²) higher than 0.99. The method showed good precision and accuracy, with intra- and inter-assay coefficients of variation less than 15% (LOQ: less than 20%) at all concentrations. The recovery was carried out following the standard addition procedure with yields ranging from 59.6 to 65.5%. A newly developed environmentally friendly method was successfully applied to the pharmacokinetic study of duloxetine in human plasma and was shown to be an alternative green approach compared with the conventional solid-phase microextraction (SPME) and dispersive

  20. A subtle grey-matter increase in first-episode, drug-naive major depressive disorder with panic disorder after 6 weeks' duloxetine therapy.

    PubMed

    Lai, Chien-Han; Hsu, Yuan-Yu

    2011-03-01

    We designed this study to investigate the modulating effects of duloxetine on symptoms and grey matter of patients with major depressive disorder combined with panic disorder. We also aimed to discover if there was any persistence of grey-matter deficits after remission and to find 'trait markers' for this comorbidity. High-resolution magnetic resonance imaging and voxel-based morphometric measurements were performed on 15 patients at baseline and remitted status (week 6) compared to 15 healthy control subjects who were scanned twice within 6 wk. The rating scales of depressive and panic symptoms improved with statistical significance (corrected p<0.001). A widespread pattern of grey-matter deficits in infero-frontal, limbic, occipital, temporo-parietal, cerebellar areas (trait marker regions) in drug-naive patients were observed compared to controls at baseline (family-wise error corrected p<0.0002). There were no significant changes of grey matter in healthy controls over the 6-wk period. Duloxetine-induced increases of grey matter were very subtle in left infero-frontal cortex, right fusiform gyrus, and right cerebellum VIIIa areas (state marker regions) after 6-wk therapy (uncorrected p<0.0005). Duloxetine did not increase grey matter to the level of control subjects and grey-matter deficits in patients appear largely unaffected by duloxetine. We suggest that short-term duloxetine therapy improved the clinical symptoms of patients with major depressive disorder combined with panic disorder. These improvements might be related to a modest increase of grey matter in state marker regions of the brain. The deficits of trait marker regions were more evident and are likely to be important for pathogenesis.

  1. Antinociceptive effects of AS1069562, the (+)-isomer of indeloxazine, on spinal hypersensitivity induced by intrathecal injection of prostaglandin in mice: comparison with duloxetine and amitriptyline.

    PubMed

    Murai, Nobuhito; Tsukamoto, Mina; Tamura, Seiji; Aoki, Toshiaki; Matsuoka, Nobuya

    2014-06-15

    The (+)-isomer of indeloxazine AS1069562 exerts multiple pharmacological actions including the inhibition of serotonin (5-HT) and norepinephrine reuptake and analgesia in experimental animal pain models. Here, we evaluated the antinociceptive effects of AS1069562 and the antidepressants duloxetine and amitriptyline in mouse models of prostaglandin-induced spinal hypersensitivity. Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and F2α (PGF2α) were intrathecally administered to induce spinal hypersensitivity, causing tactile allodynia in mice. Allodynia induced by PGF2α but not by PGE2 was suppressed by desensitization of C-fibers with systemic pretreatment with resiniferatoxin. C-fiber hyperexcitability might therefore play a role in allodynia induced by PGF2α but not PGE2. In the PGE2-induced allodynia model, AS1069562 and duloxetine significantly suppressed allodynia, whereas amitriptyline did not. In the PGF2α-induced allodynia model, AS1069562 and amitriptyline significantly ameliorated allodynia, whereas duloxetine did not. To demonstrate the broad effects of AS1069562 compared to duloxetine, additional studies were conducted to elucidate other target mechanisms of AS1069562 beyond 5-HT and norepinephrine reuptake inhibition. AS1069562 exhibited affinity for both 5-HT1A and 5-HT3 receptors, and the analgesic effect of AS1069562 on PGF2α-induced allodynia was significantly blocked by the 5-HT1A receptor antagonist (S)-WAY100135 and the 5-HT3 receptor agonist SR57227. Taken together, these results indicate that AS1069562 inhibits both C-fiber- and non-C-fiber-dependent prostaglandin-induced allodynia, while duloxetine inhibits only non-C-fiber-triggered allodynia, and amitriptyline inhibits only C-fiber-triggered allodynia. These broad antinociceptive effects of AS1069562 may be due not only to 5-HT and norepinephrine reuptake inhibition but also to its effects on 5-HT receptors such as 5-HT1A and 5-HT3 receptors.

  2. Is duloxetine's effect on painful physical symptoms in depression an indirect result of improvement of depressive symptoms? Pooled analyses of three randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Harada, Eiji; Tokuoka, Hirofumi; Fujikoshi, Shinji; Funai, Jumpei; Wohlreich, Madelaine M; Ossipov, Michael H; Iwata, Nakao

    2016-03-01

    In treating Major Depressive Disorder with associated painful physical symptoms (PPS), the effect of duloxetine on PPS has been shown to decompose into a direct effect on PPS and an indirect effect on PPS via depressive symptoms (DS) improvement. To evaluate the changes in relative contributions of the direct and indirect effects over time, we analyzed pooled data from 3 randomized double-blind studies comparing duloxetine 60 mg/d with placebo in patients with major depressive disorder and PPS. Changes from baseline in Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale total and Brief Pain Inventory-Short Form average pain score were assessed over 8 weeks. Path analysis examined the (1) direct effect of treatment on PPS and/or indirect effect on PPS via DS improvement and (2) direct effect of treatment on DS and/or indirect effect on DS via PPS improvement. At week 1, the direct effect of duloxetine on PPS (75.3%) was greater than the indirect effect through DS improvement (24.7%) but became less (22.6%) than the indirect effect (77.4%) by week 8. Initially, the direct effect of duloxetine on PPS was markedly greater than its indirect effect, whereas later the indirect effect predominated. Conversely, at week 1, the direct effect of treatment on DS (46.4%) was less than the indirect effect (53.6%), and by week 8 it superseded (62.6%) the indirect effect (37.4%). Thus, duloxetine would relieve PPS directly in the initial phase and indirectly via improving DS in the later phase.

  3. Influence of insecticidal derivative (cartap hydrochloride) from the marine polycheate on certain enzyme systems of the fresh water fish Oreochromis mossambicus.

    PubMed

    Palanivelu, V; Vijayavel, K; Balasubramanian, S Ezhilarasi; Balasubramanian, M P

    2005-04-01

    The activities of phosphatases and transaminases were studied in muscle and liver of the fresh water fish, Oreochromis mossambicus on exposure to different sublethal concentrations (0.25, 0.5, 0.75 and 1 mgl(-1)) of cartap hydrochloride (insecticidal derivative from marine polycheate) for 96 h. There was an overall decrease in phosphatases and transaminases activity in muscle and liver of the fish subjected to cartap hydrochloride.

  4. [Examination of effectiveness of olopatadine hydrochloride in atopic dermatitis].

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Tadamichi; Mashiko, Maki; Shimizu, Hiroshi

    2005-02-01

    Subjective/objective symptoms (itching, papula, erythema, lichenification, desquamation, scratching, erosion) and the levels of IgE, LDH, interleukin (IL) -6, thymus and activation-regulated chemokine (TARC) were compared before and after administering olopatadine hydrochloride (ALLELOCK tablets) to 17 atopic dermatitis (AD) patients. Subject/objective symptoms improved significantly after administering the agent, and the total dosage of the combined topical steroids was also significantly decreased after administration (p<0.05), although IgE, IL-6 and LDH levels did not change, TARC was significantly decreased (p<0.05). The correlation between the levels of IgE, IL-6, LDH and TARC before and after the administration was examined. There was a positive correlation between IgE and TARC (r=0.62, p<0.01) and between IL-6 and TARC (r=0.78, p<0.01). Olopatadine hydrochloride is therefore useful in improving the symptoms in AD, and TARC may be used as an indicator of the symptom improvement.

  5. Solid Lipid Nanoparticles of a Water Soluble Drug, Ciprofloxacin Hydrochloride

    PubMed Central

    Shah, M.; Agrawal, Y. K.; Garala, K.; Ramkishan, A.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to understand and investigate the relationship between experimental factors and their responses in the preparation of ciprofloxacin hydrochloride based solid lipid nanoparticles. A quadratic relationship was studied by developing central composite rotatable design. Amount of lipid and drug, stirring speed and stirring time were selected as experimental factors while particle size, zeta potential and drug entrapment were used as responses. Prior to the experimental design, a qualitative prescreening study was performed to check the effect of various solid lipids and their combinations. Results showed that changing the amount of lipid, stirring speed and stirring time had a noticeable influence on the entrapment efficiencies and particle size of the prepared solid lipid nanoparticles. The particle size of a solid lipid nanoparticle was in the range of 159-246 nm and drug encapsulation efficiencies were marginally improved by choosing a binary mixture of physically incompatible solid lipids. Release of ciprofloxacin hydrochloride from solid lipid nanoparticle was considerably slow, and it shows Higuchi matrix model as the best fitted model. Study of solid lipid nanoparticle suggested that the lipid based carrier system could potentially be exploited as a delivery system with improved drug entrapment efficiency and controlled drug release for water soluble actives. PMID:23716872

  6. Yohimbine hydrochloride reversal of ketamine hydrochloride and xylazine hydrochloride immobilization of Bengal tigers and effects on hematology and serum chemistries.

    PubMed

    Seal, U S; Armstrong, D L; Simmons, L G

    1987-04-01

    Six bengal tigers (Panthera tigris tigris) were immobilized five times at 2-wk intervals with ketamine hydrochloride (ketamine) and xylazine hydrochloride (xylazine) mixtures at different dose levels. Hematology and serum chemistry analyses on blood samples collected at each immobilization remained normal during the study. There were acute changes in hematocrit, chloride, potassium, glucose, and bilirubin as a function of xylazine dose level. The effect of yohimbine hydrochloride (yohimbine) on the depth and duration of immobilization was evaluated in a crossover design with every animal serving as its own control at each dose. Administration of yohimbine resulted in recovery of the animals within 4-8 min in contrast to greater than 60 min with no yohimbine treatment. There were no adverse effects noted with the yohimbine treatment and the tigers did not exhibit a relapse over the next 24 hr. Yohimbine at a dose of 5-15 mg per adult tiger provided effective reversal of 50-150 mg of xylazine per tiger.

  7. Application of physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling in predicting drug–drug interactions for sarpogrelate hydrochloride in humans

    PubMed Central

    Min, Jee Sun; Kim, Doyun; Park, Jung Bae; Heo, Hyunjin; Bae, Soo Hyeon; Seo, Jae Hong; Oh, Euichaul; Bae, Soo Kyung

    2016-01-01

    Background Evaluating the potential risk of metabolic drug–drug interactions (DDIs) is clinically important. Objective To develop a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model for sarpogrelate hydrochloride and its active metabolite, (R,S)-1-{2-[2-(3-methoxyphenyl)ethyl]-phenoxy}-3-(dimethylamino)-2-propanol (M-1), in order to predict DDIs between sarpogrelate and the clinically relevant cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2D6 substrates, metoprolol, desipramine, dextromethorphan, imipramine, and tolterodine. Methods The PBPK model was developed, incorporating the physicochemical and pharmacokinetic properties of sarpogrelate hydrochloride, and M-1 based on the findings from in vitro and in vivo studies. Subsequently, the model was verified by comparing the predicted concentration-time profiles and pharmacokinetic parameters of sarpogrelate and M-1 to the observed clinical data. Finally, the verified model was used to simulate clinical DDIs between sarpogrelate hydrochloride and sensitive CYP2D6 substrates. The predictive performance of the model was assessed by comparing predicted results to observed data after coadministering sarpogrelate hydrochloride and metoprolol. Results The developed PBPK model accurately predicted sarpogrelate and M-1 plasma concentration profiles after single or multiple doses of sarpogrelate hydrochloride. The simulated ratios of area under the curve and maximum plasma concentration of metoprolol in the presence of sarpogrelate hydrochloride to baseline were in good agreement with the observed ratios. The predicted fold-increases in the area under the curve ratios of metoprolol, desipramine, imipramine, dextromethorphan, and tolterodine following single and multiple sarpogrelate hydrochloride oral doses were within the range of ≥1.25, but <2-fold, indicating that sarpogrelate hydrochloride is a weak inhibitor of CYP2D6 in vivo. Collectively, the predicted low DDIs suggest that sarpogrelate hydrochloride has limited potential for causing

  8. 40 CFR 721.10682 - Fatty acid amide hydrochlorides (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Fatty acid amide hydrochlorides... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10682 Fatty acid amide hydrochlorides (generic). (a) Chemical substances... fatty acid amide hydrochlorides (PMNs P-13-63, P-13-64, P-13-65, P-13-69, P-13-70, P-13-71, P-13-72,...

  9. Coding of adverse events of suicidality in clinical study reports of duloxetine for the treatment of major depressive disorder: descriptive study

    PubMed Central

    Tendal, Britta; Hróbjartsson, Asbjørn; Lundh, Andreas; Gøtzsche, Peter C

    2014-01-01

    Objective To assess the effects of coding and coding conventions on summaries and tabulations of adverse events data on suicidality within clinical study reports. Design Systematic electronic search for adverse events of suicidality in tables, narratives, and listings of adverse events in individual patients within clinical study reports. Where possible, for each event we extracted the original term reported by the investigator, the term as coded by the medical coding dictionary, medical coding dictionary used, and the patient’s trial identification number. Using the patient’s trial identification number, we attempted to reconcile data on the same event between the different formats for presenting data on adverse events within the clinical study report. Setting 9 randomised placebo controlled trials of duloxetine for major depressive disorder submitted to the European Medicines Agency for marketing approval. Data sources Clinical study reports obtained from the EMA in 2011. Results Six trials used the medical coding dictionary COSTART (Coding Symbols for a Thesaurus of Adverse Reaction Terms) and three used MedDRA (Medical Dictionary for Regulatory Activities). Suicides were clearly identifiable in all formats of adverse event data in clinical study reports. Suicide attempts presented in tables included both definitive and provisional diagnoses. Suicidal ideation and preparatory behaviour were obscured in some tables owing to the lack of specificity of the medical coding dictionary, especially COSTART. Furthermore, we found one event of suicidal ideation described in narrative text that was absent from tables and adverse event listings of individual patients. The reason for this is unclear, but may be due to the coding conventions used. Conclusion Data on adverse events in tables in clinical study reports may not accurately represent the underlying patient data because of the medical dictionaries and coding conventions used. In clinical study reports, the

  10. Coding of adverse events of suicidality in clinical study reports of duloxetine for the treatment of major depressive disorder: descriptive study.

    PubMed

    Maund, Emma; Tendal, Britta; Hróbjartsson, Asbjørn; Lundh, Andreas; Gøtzsche, Peter C

    2014-06-04

    To assess the effects of coding and coding conventions on summaries and tabulations of adverse events data on suicidality within clinical study reports. Systematic electronic search for adverse events of suicidality in tables, narratives, and listings of adverse events in individual patients within clinical study reports. Where possible, for each event we extracted the original term reported by the investigator, the term as coded by the medical coding dictionary, medical coding dictionary used, and the patient's trial identification number. Using the patient's trial identification number, we attempted to reconcile data on the same event between the different formats for presenting data on adverse events within the clinical study report. 9 randomised placebo controlled trials of duloxetine for major depressive disorder submitted to the European Medicines Agency for marketing approval. Clinical study reports obtained from the EMA in 2011. Six trials used the medical coding dictionary COSTART (Coding Symbols for a Thesaurus of Adverse Reaction Terms) and three used MedDRA (Medical Dictionary for Regulatory Activities). Suicides were clearly identifiable in all formats of adverse event data in clinical study reports. Suicide attempts presented in tables included both definitive and provisional diagnoses. Suicidal ideation and preparatory behaviour were obscured in some tables owing to the lack of specificity of the medical coding dictionary, especially COSTART. Furthermore, we found one event of suicidal ideation described in narrative text that was absent from tables and adverse event listings of individual patients. The reason for this is unclear, but may be due to the coding conventions used. Data on adverse events in tables in clinical study reports may not accurately represent the underlying patient data because of the medical dictionaries and coding conventions used. In clinical study reports, the listings of adverse events for individual patients and narratives

  11. Quantitative HPLC Analysis of a Psychotherapeutic Medication: Simultaneous Determination of Amitriptyline Hydrochloride and Perphenazine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferguson, Glenda K.

    1998-12-01

    A quantitative high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) laboratory experiment which entails the isocratic separation and simultaneous determination of the two active components of a commercial antipsychotic tablet has been developed. The prescription formulation used in this experiment contains amitriptyline hydrochloride (a tricyclic antidepressant) and perphenazine (a tranquilizer). Our experiment makes use of a straightforward HPLC separation on a cyanopropyl-packed column with an acetonitrile:methanol:aqueous monopotassium phosphate mobile phase pumped at a flow rate of 2.0 mL/min. Analytes are detected by UV absorbance at 215 nm. These conditions yield highly symmetrical and well-resolved peaks in less than 5 min after the injection of a mixture. In the experiment, students are given amitriptyline hydrochloride-perphenazine tablets without the manufacturer's labeled composition claim and a stock solution mixture with known concentrations of amitriptyline hydrochloride and perphenazine. They prepare four standards and a pharmaceutical sample of unknown concentration, assay each solution in quadruplicate, and plot average peak areas of the concentrations of the known solutions in the construction of a standard curve. From the mathematical relationships that result, the average masses of amitriptyline hydrochloride and perphenazine in the prescription tablet are determined. Finally, the standard deviations of the mean masses are calculated. The entire laboratory procedure and statistical data analysis can be completed in a single 3-hour period.

  12. Biowaiver monographs for immediate release solid oral dosage forms: mefloquine hydrochloride.

    PubMed

    Strauch, S; Jantratid, E; Dressman, J B; Junginger, H E; Kopp, S; Midha, K K; Shah, V P; Stavchansky, S; Barends, D M

    2011-01-01

    Literature data relevant to the decision to allow a waiver of in vivo bioequivalence (BE) testing for the approval of immediate release solid oral dosage forms containing mefloquine hydrochloride as the only active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) are reviewed. The solubility and permeability data of mefloquine hydrochloride as well as its therapeutic use and therapeutic index, its pharmacokinetic properties, data related to the possibility of excipient interactions and reported BE/bioavailability studies were taken into consideration. Mefloquine hydrochloride is not a highly soluble API. Since no data on permeability are available, it cannot be classified according to the Biopharmaceutics Classification System with certainty. Additionally, several studies in the literature failed to demonstrate BE of existing products. For these reasons, the biowaiver cannot be justified for the approval of new multisource drug products containing mefloquine hydrochloride. However, scale-up and postapproval changes (HHS-FDA SUPAC) levels 1 and 2 and most EU type I variations may be approvable without in vivo BE, using the dissolution tests described in these regulatory documents.

  13. pH-Solubility Profiles of Organic Bases and Their Hydrochloride Salts.

    PubMed

    Serajuddin, A T; Mufson, D

    1985-03-01

    Knowledge of comparative solubility profiles of a base and its hydrochloride salt is important in selecting one form over the other for dosage form design. The studies with two model bases, namely, tiaramide and papaverine, showed that, except during phase transition from a base to a salt or vice versa, the pH-solubility profiles are identical whether a base or a salt are used. The solubilities were determined by equilibration after addition of hydrochloric acid or sodium hydroxide solutions to suspensions of bases and salts. With the addition of hydrochloric acid solution, the pH values of the suspensions of tiaramide and papaverine dropped to 5.0 ± 0.1 and 4.0 ± 0.1, respectively, and then remained constant until supersaturated solutions were formed. After nucleation of supersaturated solutions with the addition of hydrochloride salt or the reduction of temperature, the precipitation of hydrochloride salt occurred. The solubilities of salts decreased at low pH due to common ion effect. The K(o) sp values, however, did not remain constant and the solubility profiles showed positive deviations from the theoretical ones. These may be due to a possible self-association and the resultant difference between the solubilities and activities of the compounds in solutions. The reported differences between the solubilities of bases and their respective hydrochloride salts at a particular pH and the lack of common ion effects on the solubilities and dissolution rates of bases are explained.

  14. [Antiseptics on the base of Octenidine Hydrochloride].

    PubMed

    Malinovskií, N N; Reshetnikov, E A; Rubashnaia, I E; Mal'nikova, G N; Mitiukov, A P

    1997-01-01

    Comparative evaluation of laboratory and clinical investigation of antiseptic preparations on the base of octenidin-hydrochloride and bigluconate chlorhexidine in 537 patients was carried out. Statistically valid decrease in dissemination through the operation field and surgical wound after application of octenidin containing solutions was determined. It was established as well that these preparations were more effective fools of protection of the operation wound from its microbial contamination in comparison with antiseptic solutions widely spread to date in surgical practice.

  15. Nalfurafine hydrochloride to treat pruritus: a review

    PubMed Central

    Inui, Shigeki

    2015-01-01

    Uremic pruritus has a great negative influence on quality of life in hemodialysis (HD) patients and, importantly, negatively affects mortality risk. Recently, nalfurafine hydrochloride, an opioid κ-selective agonist, has been officially approved for resistant pruritus in HD patients on the basis of a well-evidenced clinical trial in Japan. From clinical observation, it has been suggested that the upper neuron system plays a role in its pathogenesis. According to previous experimental results, using mice injected with opioids, dynorphin suppresses itch through binding κ-opioid receptors, suggesting that κ-opioid opioid receptor agonists act as potential therapeutic reagents for pruritus in HD patients. In Japan, a large-scale placebo-controlled study was performed to examine the efficacy and safety of oral nalfurafine hydrochloride for intractable pruritus in 337 HD patients. Two daily doses of 2.5 or 5 μg nalfurafine or placebo were orally administered for 2 weeks, and clinical responses were analyzed. The results showed that the mean decrease in the visual analog scale for pruritus from baseline was 22 mm in the 5 μg nalfurafine hydrochloride group (n=114) and 23 mm in the 2.5 μg group (n=112). These reductions were statistically significant compared with 13 mm, which is the mean decrease of visual analog scale in the placebo group (n=111), demonstrating that nalfurafine is an effective and safe drug for uremic pruritus in HD patients. Moreover, another open-label trial (n=145) examining the long-term effect of 5 μg oral nalfurafine revealed the maintenance of the antipruritic effect of nalfurafine for 52 weeks. In addition, on the basis of recent data showing κ-opioid receptor expression in the epidermis of atopic dermatitis and psoriasis, nalfurafine hydrochloride also can be potentially used for these two skin diseases. PMID:26005355

  16. Habituation to zipeprol hydrochloride during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Slobodkin, D; Thompson, D; Levin, G; Jesurun, C A

    1992-01-01

    Zipeprol hydrochloride is a synthetic antitussive agent that has shown little evidence of addictive potential in animal studies. Despite this, several reports of abuse and abuse-related over-dosage have been published. Abuse of this drug has now become a problem in the United States-Mexico border region. We report the specific case of a pregnant woman habituated to zipeprol without evidence of other drug abuse and an abstinence syndrome observed in her newborn infant.

  17. Sinomenine hydrochloride protects against polymicrobial sepsis via autophagy.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yu; Gao, Min; Wang, Wenmei; Lang, Yuejiao; Tong, Zhongyi; Wang, Kangkai; Zhang, Huali; Chen, Guangwen; Liu, Meidong; Yao, Yongming; Xiao, Xianzhong

    2015-01-23

    Sepsis, a systemic inflammatory response to infection, is the major cause of death in intensive care units (ICUs). The mortality rate of sepsis remains high even though the treatment and understanding of sepsis both continue to improve. Sinomenine (SIN) is a natural alkaloid extracted from Chinese medicinal plant Sinomenium acutum, and its hydrochloride salt (Sinomenine hydrochloride, SIN-HCl) is widely used to treat rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, its role in sepsis remains unclear. In the present study, we investigated the role of SIN-HCl in sepsis induced by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) in BALB/c mice and the corresponding mechanism. SIN-HCl treatment improved the survival of BALB/c mice that were subjected to CLP and reduced multiple organ dysfunction and the release of systemic inflammatory mediators. Autophagy activities were examined using Western blotting. The results showed that CLP-induced autophagy was elevated, and SIN-HCl treatment further strengthened the autophagy activity. Autophagy blocker 3-methyladenine (3-MA) was used to investigate the mechanism of SIN-HCl in vitro. Autophagy activities were determined by examining the autophagosome formation, which was shown as microtubule-associated protein light chain 3 (LC3) puncta with green immunofluorescence. SIN-HCl reduced lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammatory cytokine release and increased autophagy in peritoneal macrophages (PM). 3-MA significantly decreased autophagosome formation induced by LPS and SIN-HCl. The decrease of inflammatory cytokines caused by SIN-HCl was partially aggravated by 3-MA treatment. Taken together, our results indicated that SIN-HCl could improve survival, reduce organ damage, and attenuate the release of inflammatory cytokines induced by CLP, at least in part through regulating autophagy activities.

  18. Sinomenine Hydrochloride Protects against Polymicrobial Sepsis via Autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yu; Gao, Min; Wang, Wenmei; Lang, Yuejiao; Tong, Zhongyi; Wang, Kangkai; Zhang, Huali; Chen, Guangwen; Liu, Meidong; Yao, Yongming; Xiao, Xianzhong

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis, a systemic inflammatory response to infection, is the major cause of death in intensive care units (ICUs). The mortality rate of sepsis remains high even though the treatment and understanding of sepsis both continue to improve. Sinomenine (SIN) is a natural alkaloid extracted from Chinese medicinal plant Sinomenium acutum, and its hydrochloride salt (Sinomenine hydrochloride, SIN-HCl) is widely used to treat rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, its role in sepsis remains unclear. In the present study, we investigated the role of SIN-HCl in sepsis induced by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) in BALB/c mice and the corresponding mechanism. SIN-HCl treatment improved the survival of BALB/c mice that were subjected to CLP and reduced multiple organ dysfunction and the release of systemic inflammatory mediators. Autophagy activities were examined using Western blotting. The results showed that CLP-induced autophagy was elevated, and SIN-HCl treatment further strengthened the autophagy activity. Autophagy blocker 3-methyladenine (3-MA) was used to investigate the mechanism of SIN-HCl in vitro. Autophagy activities were determined by examining the autophagosome formation, which was shown as microtubule-associated protein light chain 3 (LC3) puncta with green immunofluorescence. SIN-HCl reduced lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammatory cytokine release and increased autophagy in peritoneal macrophages (PM). 3-MA significantly decreased autophagosome formation induced by LPS and SIN-HCl. The decrease of inflammatory cytokines caused by SIN-HCl was partially aggravated by 3-MA treatment. Taken together, our results indicated that SIN-HCl could improve survival, reduce organ damage, and attenuate the release of inflammatory cytokines induced by CLP, at least in part through regulating autophagy activities. PMID:25625512

  19. The efficacy of duloxetine, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and opioids in osteoarthritis: a systematic literature review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background This meta-analysis assessed the efficacy of duloxetine versus other oral treatments used after failure of acetaminophen for management of patients with osteoarthritis. Methods A systematic literature review of English language articles was performed in PUBMED, EMBASE, MedLine In-Process, Cochrane Library, and ClinicalTrials.gov between January 1985 and March 2013. Randomized controlled trials of duloxetine and all oral non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and opioids were included if treatment was ≥12 weeks and the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Index (WOMAC) total score was available. Studies were assessed for quality using the assessment tool from the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence guidelines for single technology appraisal submissions. WOMAC baseline and change from baseline total scores were extracted and standardized. A frequentist meta-analysis, meta-regression, and indirect comparison were performed using the DerSimonian-Laird and Bucher methods. Bayesian analyses with and without adjustment for study-level covariates were performed using noninformative priors. Results Thirty-two publications reported 34 trials (2 publications each reported 2 trials) that met inclusion criteria. The analyses found all treatments except oxycodone (frequentist) and hydromorphone (frequentist and Bayesian) to be more effective than placebo. Indirect comparisons to duloxetine found no significant differences for most of the compounds. Some analyses showed evidence of a difference with duloxetine for etoricoxib (better), tramadol and oxycodone (worse), but without consistent results between analyses. Forest plots revealed positive trends in overall efficacy improvement with baseline scores. Adjusting for baseline, the probability duloxetine is superior to other treatments ranges between 15% to 100%. Limitations of this study include the low number of studies included in the analyses, the inclusion of only English language

  20. In vitro and in vivo genotoxicity assessment of the dopamine receptor antagonist molindone hydrochloride.

    PubMed

    Krishna, Gopala; Gopalakrishnan, Gopa; Goel, Saryu

    2016-05-01

    Molindone hydrochloride is a dihydroindolone neuroleptic with dopamine D2 and D5 receptor antagonist activity. As an integral component of its preclinical safety evaluation, molindone hydrochloride was evaluated in a series of in vitro and in vivo genetic toxicology assays. In the bacterial reverse gene mutation assays employing four Salmonella tester strains (TA98, TA100, TA1535, and TA1537) and the E. coli tester strain WP2uvrA, molindone hydrochloride was negative in all strains, except TA100, in which it induced a positive response (up to 3-fold) in the presence of rat liver S9. With human S9, a small (2-fold), but nonreproducible, increase in revertants was observed in TA100 at the highest concentration of molindone tested (5,000 µg/plate). The mutagenicity was completely abrogated by the addition of glutathione and UDP-glucuronic acid to rat liver S9, suggesting detoxification of the mutagenic metabolite(s) by Phase II conjugation reactions, pathways commonly operational in humans. Molindone hydrochloride did not induce chromosomal aberrations in human lymphocyte cultures, did not elicit a positive response in a rat bone marrow micronucleus test for clastogencity/aneugenicity, and did not give a positive response in the rat liver comet assay for DNA damage. Collectively, the weight of evidence from these studies, combined with a large margin of safety and efficient detoxification through Phase II conjugation supports the interpretation that molindone hydrochloride does not pose a genotoxic risk to humans at the anticipated clinical dose levels. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Sedative and cardiopulmonary effects of medetomidine hydrochloride and xylazine hydrochloride and their reversal with atipamezole hydrochloride in calves.

    PubMed

    Rioja, Eva; Kerr, Carolyn L; Enouri, Saad S; McDonell, Wayne N

    2008-03-01

    To assess the sedative and cardiopulmonary effects of medetomidine and xylazine and their reversal with atipamezole in calves. 25 calves. A 2-phase (7-day interval) study was performed. Sedative characteristics (phase I) and cardiopulmonary effects (phase II) of medetomidine hydrochloride and xylazine hydrochloride administration followed by atipamezole hydrochloride administration were evaluated. In both phases, calves were randomly allocated to receive 1 of 4 treatments IV: medetomidine (0.03 mg/kg) followed by atipamezole (0.1 mg/kg; n = 6), xylazine (0.3 mg/kg) followed by atipamezole (0.04 mg/kg; 7), medetomidine (0.03 mg/kg) followed by saline (0.9% NaCl; 6) solution (10 mL), and xylazine (0.3 mg/kg) followed by saline solution (10 mL; 6). Atipamezole or saline solution was administered 20 minutes after the first injection. Cardiopulmonary variables were recorded at intervals for 35 minutes after medetomidine or xylazine administration. At the doses evaluated, xylazine and medetomidine induced a similar degree of sedation in calves; however, the duration of medetomidine-associated sedation was longer. Compared with pretreatment values, heart rate, cardiac index, and PaO(2) decreased, whereas central venous pressure, PaCO(2), and pulmonary artery pressures increased with medetomidine or xylazine. Systemic arterial blood pressures and vascular resistance increased with medetomidine and decreased with xylazine. Atipamezole reversed the sedative and most of the cardiopulmonary effects of both drugs. At these doses, xylazine and medetomidine induced similar degrees of sedation and cardiopulmonary depression in calves, although medetomidine administration resulted in increases in systemic arterial blood pressures. Atipamezole effectively reversed medetomidine- and xylazine-associated sedative and cardiopulmonary effects in calves.

  2. A phosphate binding assay for sevelamer hydrochloride by ion chromatography.

    PubMed

    Mazzeo, J R; Peters, R M; Hanus, M R; Chen, X; Norton, K A

    1999-05-01

    Sevelamer hydrochloride is a cross-linked polymeric amine; it is the active ingredient of Renagel capsules. Renagel is indicated for the control of hyperphosphatemia in patients with end-stage renal disease. An in vitro phosphate-binding assay is required to measure the drug's efficacy. The assay developed for this purpose involves mixing the drug (polymer) with a solution of known phosphate concentration, filtering off the polymer-phosphate complex, and quantitating the unbound phosphate concentration by ion chromatography. The binding capacity, reported as mmol of phosphate bound g of polymer(-1), is calculated from the calculated amount of bound phosphate and the weight of polymer used. The method has been validated for accuracy, precision, linearity, range, and ruggedness.

  3. Adsorption of dodecylamine hydrochloride on graphene oxide in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Peng; Li, Hongqiang; Song, Shaoxian; Weng, Xiaoqing; He, Dongsheng; Zhao, Yunliang

    Cationic surfactants in water are difficult to be degraded, leading to serious water pollution. In this work, graphene oxide (GO) was used as an adsorbent for removing Dodecylamine Hydrochloride (DACl), a representative cationic surfactant. X-ray diffraction (XRD), FT-IR spectroscopy and atomic force microscope (AFM) were used to characterize the prepared GO. The adsorption of DACl on GO have been investigated through measurements of adsorption capacity, zeta potential, FTIR, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The experimental results have shown that the adsorption kinetics could be described as a rate-limiting pseudo second-order process, and the adsorption isotherm agreed well with the Freundlich model. GO was a good adsorbent for DACl removal, compared with coal fly ash and powdered activated carbon. The adsorption process was endothermic, and could be attributed to electrostatic interaction and hydrogen bonding between DACl and GO.

  4. Effect of Ractopamine Hydrochloride and Zilpaterol Hydrochloride on tenderness of longissimus steaks of Bos Taurus steers

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Objectives: Three experiments were conducted to determine 1) the interaction of ractopamine hydrochloride (RH) inclusion rate (0 or 300 mg·hd-1·d-1 for last 30 to 34 d before harvest) and dietary protein level (13.5 or 17.5% CP) on LM slice shear force (SSF) at 14 d postmortem (Exp. 1); 2) the inter...

  5. 78 FR 34108 - Determination That SUBOXONE (Buprenorphine Hydrochloride and Naloxone Hydrochloride) Sublingual...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-06

    ... (buprenorphine hydrochloride (HCl) and naloxone HCl) sublingual tablets, 2 milligrams (mg)/0.5 mg and 8 mg/2 mg... sublingual tablets, 2 mg/0.5 mg and 8 mg/2 mg, if all other legal and regulatory requirements are met. FOR... (buprenorphine HCl and naloxone HCl) sublingual tablets, 2 mg/0.5 mg and 8 mg/2 mg,......

  6. 40 CFR 721.4460 - Amidinothiopropionic acid hydrochloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Amidinothiopropionic acid... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4460 Amidinothiopropionic acid hydrochloride. (a) Chemical substance and... amidinothiopropionic acid hydrochloride (PMN P-91-102) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant...

  7. 21 CFR 520.1242 - Levamisole hydrochloride oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Levamisole hydrochloride oral dosage forms. 520... SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.1242 Levamisole hydrochloride oral dosage forms....

  8. 21 CFR 520.2098 - Selegiline hydrochloride tablets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.2098 Selegiline... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Selegiline hydrochloride tablets. 520.2098 Section... selegiline hydrochloride. (b) Sponsor. See No. 000069 in § 510.600(c) of this chapter. (c) (d) Conditions...

  9. 21 CFR 520.2098 - Selegiline hydrochloride tablets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Selegiline hydrochloride tablets. 520.2098 Section... hydrochloride tablets. (a) Specifications. Each tablet contains either 2, 5, 10, 15, or 30 milligrams of... use—Dogs—(1) Dosage. 1 milligram per kilogram (0.45 milligram per pound) of body weight....

  10. 21 CFR 520.863 - Ethylisobutrazine hydrochloride tablets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ethylisobutrazine hydrochloride tablets. 520.863... Ethylisobutrazine hydrochloride tablets. (a) Specifications. Each tablet contains either 10 milligrams or 50.... (c) Conditions of use. (1) It is administered orally to dogs as a tranquilizer.1 1 These...

  11. 21 CFR 520.2098 - Selegiline hydrochloride tablets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Selegiline hydrochloride tablets. 520.2098 Section... hydrochloride tablets. (a) Specifications. Each tablet contains either 2, 5, 10, 15, or 30 milligrams of... use—Dogs—(1) Dosage. 1 milligram per kilogram (0.45 milligram per pound) of body weight....

  12. 21 CFR 520.863 - Ethylisobutrazine hydrochloride tablets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ethylisobutrazine hydrochloride tablets. 520.863... Ethylisobutrazine hydrochloride tablets. (a) Specifications. Each tablet contains either 10 milligrams or 50.... (c) Conditions of use. (1) It is administered orally to dogs as a tranquilizer.1 1 These...

  13. 21 CFR 520.863 - Ethylisobutrazine hydrochloride tablets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ethylisobutrazine hydrochloride tablets. 520.863... Ethylisobutrazine hydrochloride tablets. (a) Specifications. Each tablet contains either 10 milligrams or 50.... (c) Conditions of use. (1) It is administered orally to dogs as a tranquilizer.1 1 These...

  14. 21 CFR 520.863 - Ethylisobutrazine hydrochloride tablets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ethylisobutrazine hydrochloride tablets. 520.863... Ethylisobutrazine hydrochloride tablets. (a) Specifications. Each tablet contains either 10 milligrams or 50.... (c) Conditions of use. (1) It is administered orally to dogs as a tranquilizer.1 1 These...

  15. 21 CFR 520.863 - Ethylisobutrazine hydrochloride tablets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ethylisobutrazine hydrochloride tablets. 520.863... Ethylisobutrazine hydrochloride tablets. (a) Specifications. Each tablet contains either 10 milligrams or 50.... (c) Conditions of use. (1) It is administered orally to dogs as a tranquilizer.1 1 These...

  16. 21 CFR 522.863 - Ethylisobutrazine hydrochloride injection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... dosage level of 1 to 2 milligrams of ethylisobutrazine hydrochloride per pound of body weight to effect.1... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ethylisobutrazine hydrochloride injection. 522.863 Section 522.863 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN...

  17. 21 CFR 522.863 - Ethylisobutrazine hydrochloride injection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... dosage level of 1 to 2 milligrams of ethylisobutrazine hydrochloride per pound of body weight to effect.1... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ethylisobutrazine hydrochloride injection. 522.863 Section 522.863 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN...

  18. 21 CFR 522.863 - Ethylisobutrazine hydrochloride injection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... dosage level of 1 to 2 milligrams of ethylisobutrazine hydrochloride per pound of body weight to effect.1... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ethylisobutrazine hydrochloride injection. 522.863 Section 522.863 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN...

  19. 21 CFR 522.2002 - Propiopromazine hydrochloride injection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Propiopromazine hydrochloride injection. 522.2002 Section 522.2002 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... § 522.2002 Propiopromazine hydrochloride injection. (a) Chemical name. 1-Propanone, 1- phenothiazine-2...

  20. 21 CFR 522.2002 - Propiopromazine hydrochloride injection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Propiopromazine hydrochloride injection. 522.2002 Section 522.2002 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... § 522.2002 Propiopromazine hydrochloride injection. (a) Chemical name. 1-Propanone, 1- phenothiazine-2...

  1. 21 CFR 522.2002 - Propiopromazine hydrochloride injection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Propiopromazine hydrochloride injection. 522.2002 Section 522.2002 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... § 522.2002 Propiopromazine hydrochloride injection. (a) Chemical name. 1-Propanone, 1- phenothiazine-2...

  2. Acute Oral Toxicity of Guanidine Hydrochloride in Mice

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-12-29

    guanidine hydrochloride in male and female Institute of Cancer Research (ICR) mice. MATERIALS Test Substance Chemical Name: Guanidine hydrochloride Chemical ... Abstract Service Registry No.: 050-01-1 LAIR Code Number: TP28 Physical State: White powder Morgan et al.--2 Molecular Structure: NH2 + H2N- C-NH2 Cl

  3. 21 CFR 522.1222 - Ketamine hydrochloride injectable dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ketamine hydrochloride injectable dosage forms... SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS IMPLANTATION OR INJECTABLE DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 522.1222 Ketamine hydrochloride injectable dosage forms....

  4. 21 CFR 522.1222 - Ketamine hydrochloride injectable dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ketamine hydrochloride injectable dosage forms... SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS IMPLANTATION OR INJECTABLE DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 522.1222 Ketamine hydrochloride injectable dosage forms....

  5. 21 CFR 522.1222 - Ketamine hydrochloride injectable dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ketamine hydrochloride injectable dosage forms... SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS IMPLANTATION OR INJECTABLE DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 522.1222 Ketamine hydrochloride injectable dosage forms....

  6. 21 CFR 522.1222 - Ketamine hydrochloride injectable dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ketamine hydrochloride injectable dosage forms... SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS IMPLANTATION OR INJECTABLE DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 522.1222 Ketamine hydrochloride injectable dosage forms....

  7. Duloxetine, a Selective Noradrenaline Reuptake Inhibitor, Increased Plasma Levels of 3-Methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylglycol but Not Homovanillic Acid in Patients with Major Depressive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Atake, Kiyokazu; Hori, Hikaru; Katsuki, Asuka; Ikenouchi-Sugita, Atsuko; Umene-Nakano, Wakako; Nakamura, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Objective We investigated the effects of duloxetine on the plasma levels of catecholamine metabolites and serum brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in 64 patients with major depressive disorder (MDD). Methods Major depressive episode was diagnosed using the Structured Clinical Interview for the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-fourth edition (DSM-IV) according to the DSM-IV text revision (DSM-IV-TR) criteria. The severity of depression was evaluated using the 17-item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAMD-17). Blood sampling and clinical evaluation were performed on days 0, 28, and 56. Results Duloxetine treatment for 8 weeks significantly increased the plasma 3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylglycol (MHPG) levels but not the homovanillic acid (HVA) levels in responders with MDD. Conclusion These results imply that noradrenaline plays an important role in alleviating depressive symptoms. PMID:24851119

  8. [Terahertz time-domain spectroscopy of ractopamine hydrochloride].

    PubMed

    Chen, Xi-ai; Huang, Ping-jie; Hou, Di-bo; Kang, Xu-sheng; Zhang, Guang-xin; Zhou, Ze-kui

    2011-03-01

    The terahertz spectra of Ractopamine hydrochloride in the range of 0.2 to 2.2 THz was obtained by THz time-domain spectroscopy, and the absorption and refraction spectra of Ractopamine hydrochloride was got meanwhile. The structure and vibrational frequencies of Ractopamine molecule in the THz range were simulated by density functional theory. The difference between experimental and theoretical results was analyzed. And assisted by Gaussian View 3.09, the origin of the vibrational frequencies was recognized. The results show that besides the intramolecular vibrations, THz absorption of Ractopamine hydrochloride originated from the intermolecular hydrogen bond network and Van der Waals force between molecules. This study demonstrated the feasibility of time-domain terahertz spectroscopy for the identification of Ractopamine hydrochloride and provided a new way for the detection of Ractopamine hydrochloride.

  9. Efficacy and safety of duloxetine for treatment of fibromyalgia in patients with or without major depressive disorder: Results from a 6-month, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, fixed-dose trial.

    PubMed

    Russell, I Jon; Mease, Philip J; Smith, Timothy R; Kajdasz, Daniel K; Wohlreich, Madelaine M; Detke, Michael J; Walker, Daniel J; Chappell, Amy S; Arnold, Lesley M

    2008-06-01

    The primary objectives of this study were to assess the efficacy and safety of duloxetine for reducing pain severity in fibromyalgia patients with or without current major depressive disorder. This was a 6-month, multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study. In total, 520 patients meeting American College of Rheumatology criteria for fibromyalgia were randomly assigned to duloxetine (20 mg/day, 60 mg/day, or 120 mg/day) or placebo, administered once daily, for 6 months (after 3 months, the duloxetine 20-mg/day group titrated to 60 mg/day). The co-primary outcome measures were the Brief Pain Inventory (BPI) average pain severity score and Patient Global Impressions of Improvement (PGI-I) score. Safety was assessed via treatment-emergent adverse events, and changes in vital sign, laboratory, and ECG measures. Compared with placebo-treated patients, those patients treated with duloxetine 120 mg/day improved significantly more on the co-primary outcome measures at 3 months (change in BPI score [-2.31 vs -1.39, P<0.001] and PGI-I [2.89 vs 3.39, P=0.004]) and at 6 months (change in BPI [-2.26 vs -1.43, P=0.003] and PGI-I [2.93 vs 3.37, P=0.012]). Compared with placebo, treatment with duloxetine 60 mg/day also significantly improved the co-primary measures at 3 months and BPI at 6 months. Duloxetine was efficacious in patients both with and without major depressive disorder. There were no clinically significant differences between treatment groups in changes in vital signs, laboratory measures, or ECG measures. Study results demonstrated that duloxetine at doses of 60 mg/day and 120 mg/day appears to be safe and efficacious in patients with fibromyalgia.

  10. Naratriptan hydrochloride in extemporaneosly compounded oral suspensions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y P; Trissel, L A; Fox, J L

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the pharmaceutical acceptability and chemical stability of naratriptan hydrochloride in three extemporaneously compounded suspension formulations. The naratriptan-hydrochloride oral suspensions were prepared from 2.5-mg commercial tablets yielding a nominal naratriptan concentration of 0.5 mg/mL. The suspension vehicles selected for testing were Syrpalta, an equal-parts mixture of Ora-Plus and Ora-Sweet, and an equal-parts mixture of Ora-Plus and Ora-Sweet SF. The tablets were crushed and thoroughly triturated to a fine powder using a porcelain mortar and pestle. The powder was incorporated into a portion of the Syrpalta or Ora-Plus suspension vehicle and mixed until homogeneous. The mixtures were then brought to volume with Syrpalta, Ora-Sweet or Ora-Sweet SF, as appropriate. The suspensions were packaged in amber, plastic, screw-cap prescription bottles and stored at 23 deg C for seven days and 4 deg C for 90 days. An adequate suspension was never achieved in Syrpalta. The crushed-tablet powder did not produce a uniformly dispersed mixture and exhibited clumping and a high rate of sedimentation. A distinct layer of the solid tablet material settled immediately after shaking. Over the next four hours, a densely packed, yellow, caked layer formed at the bottom of the containers, making resuspension difficult. During storage, the caking became worse. Chemical analysis was not performed. The Ora-Plus and Ora-Sweet or Ora-Sweet SF suspensions had a slight greenish cast and were resuspended without difficulty by shaking for approximately ten seconds, yielding easily poured and homogeneous mixtures throughout the study. Visible settling and layering did not begin for four hours with the Ora-Sweet suspension and 24 hours for the Ora-Sweet SF suspension. High pressure liquid chromatographic analysis found that the naratriptan concentration in both suspension-vehicle combinations exhibited little or no loss for seven days at 23

  11. Does Duloxetine Improve Cognitive Function Independently of Its Antidepressant Effect in Patients with Major Depressive Disorder and Subjective Reports of Cognitive Dysfunction?

    PubMed Central

    Greer, Tracy L.; Sunderajan, Prabha; Grannemann, Bruce D.; Kurian, Benji T.; Trivedi, Madhukar H.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Cognitive deficits are commonly reported by patients with major depressive disorder (MDD). Duloxetine, a dual serotonin/noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor, may improve cognitive deficits in MDD. It is unclear if cognitive improvements occur independently of antidepressant effects with standard antidepressant medications. Methods. Thirty participants with MDD who endorsed cognitive deficits at screening received 12-week duloxetine treatment. Twenty-one participants completed treatment and baseline and posttreatment cognitive testing. The Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery was used to assess the following cognitive domains: attention, visual memory, executive function/set shifting and working memory, executive function/spatial planning, decision making and response control, and verbal learning and memory. Results. Completers showed significant cognitive improvements across several domains on tasks assessing psychomotor function and mental processing speed, with additional improvements in visual and verbal learning and memory, and affective decision making and response control. Overall significance tests for executive function tasks were also significant, although individual tasks were not, perhaps due to the small sample size. Most notably, cognitive improvements were observed independently of symptom reduction on all domains except verbal learning and memory. Conclusions. Patients reporting baseline cognitive deficits achieved cognitive improvements with duloxetine treatment, most of which were independent of symptomatic improvement. This trial is registered with NCT00933439. PMID:24563781

  12. Relationship between major depressive disorder and associated painful physical symptoms: analysis of data from two pooled placebo-controlled, randomized studies of duloxetine.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Michael J; Sheehan, David; Gaynor, Paula J; Marangell, Lauren B; Tanaka, Yoko; Lipsius, Sarah; Ohara, Fumihiro; Namiki, Chihiro

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between painful physical symptoms (PPS) and outcomes in major depressive disorder (MDD). Post-hoc analysis of two identically designed 8-week trials compared the efficacy of 60 mg/day duloxetine (N=523) with that of placebo (N=532) in treating PPS associated with MDD. The Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) total score, the Brief Pain Inventory (BPI) average pain score, and the Sheehan Disability Scale global functional impairment score assessed depression symptoms, pain, and functioning, respectively. Remission was defined as a MADRS score of 10 or less, and the BPI response subgroup was defined as a 50% or greater reduction from baseline. Path analyses assessed relationships among variables. Duloxetine-treated patients who had a 50% or greater reduction in BPI score at endpoint had higher rates of remission. Path analysis indicated that 16% of likelihood of remission in depression symptoms was because of the direct effect of treatment, 41% because of pain reduction, and 43% because of functional improvement. Path analysis also indicated that 51% of improvement in functioning was attributed to pain improvement and 43% to mood improvement. Results demonstrate that improvement in pain and mood contributes to functional improvement, and pain reduction and functional improvement increase the likelihood of remission of depressive symptoms with duloxetine treatment in patients with both MDD and PPS at baseline.

  13. The effects of a novel anti-arrhythmic drug, acehytisine hydrochloride, on the human ether-a-go-go related gene K channel and its trafficking.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xingfu; Yang, Yanmin; Zhu, Jun; Dai, Yan; Pu, Jielin

    2009-02-01

    Many drugs cause severe side-effects such as long QT syndromes by blocking the human ether-a-go-go related gene (HERG) K(+) channels and/or disrupting HERG protein trafficking. Acehytisine hydrochloride is an anti-arrhythmic drug in phase IV clinical trial. To study whether acehytisine hydrochloride affects HERG channel activity and protein trafficking, we expressed HERG in human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK293) cells and recorded HERG channel currents with a whole-cell patch clamp technique. We also measured the protein levels by Western blot analysis. We found that acehytisine hydrochloride inhibited HERG step current (I(HERG)) in a concentration-dependent manner. However, it had little effect on the tail current (I(tail)). In addition, acehytisine hydrochloride accelerated channel inactivation and slowed recovery from inactivation. In contrast, it did not inhibit HERG protein (135 and 155 kD) trafficking, although it reduced the 155 kD band density at 2500 microM. Moreover, the F656C mutation in the S6 domain abolished acehytisine hydrochloride inhibition on the I(HERG) and enhanced the inhibitive effects on the trafficking of the 155 kD band. Acehytisine hydrochloride interrupted HERG protein trafficking at 1000 and 2500 microM. Our data showed that acehytisine hydrochloride could inhibit I(HERG), but had no effects on I(tail) until the concentration was above 1000 microM. Therefore, acehytisine hydrochloride may not induce QT interval prolongation and could be a promising anti-arrhythmic drug without severe side-effects.

  14. Imaging pain relief in osteoarthritis (IPRO): protocol of a double-blind randomised controlled mechanistic study assessing pain relief and prediction of duloxetine treatment outcome.

    PubMed

    Reckziegel, Diane; Bailey, Helen; Cottam, William J; Tench, Christopher R; Mahajan, Ravi P; Walsh, David A; Knaggs, Roger D; Auer, Dorothee P

    2017-06-26

    Osteoarthritis (OA) pain is a major cause of long-term disability and chronic pain in the adult population. One in five patients does not receive satisfactory pain relief, which reflects the complexity of chronic pain and the current lack of understanding of mechanisms of chronic pain. Recently, duloxetine has demonstrated clinically relevant pain relief, but only in half of treated patients with OA. Here, the aim is to investigate the neural mechanisms of pain relief and neural signatures that may predict treatment response to duloxetine in chronic knee OA pain. This is an ongoing single-centre randomised placebo-controlled mechanistic study (2:1 (placebo) allocation), using a multimodal neuroimaging approach, together with psychophysiological (quantitative sensory testing), genetics and questionnaire assessments. Eighty-one subjects with chronic knee OA pain are planned to power for between-group comparisons (placebo, duloxetine responder and duloxetine non-responder). Participants have a baseline assessment and, following 6 weeks of duloxetine (30 mg for 2 weeks, then 60 mg for 4 weeks), a follow-up evaluation. Brain imaging is performed at 3T with blood-oxygen-level dependent functional MRI at rest and during pin-prick nociceptive stimulation for main outcome assessment; arterial spin labelling and structural imaging (T1-weighted) for secondary outcome assessment. Questionnaires evaluate pain, negative affect, quality of sleep and cognition. The study has been approved by the East Midlands, Nottingham and is being carried out under the principles of the Declaration of Helsinki (64th, 2013) and Good Clinical Practice standards. Results will be disseminated in peer-reviewed journals and at scientific conferences. This trial is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT02208778).This work was supported by Arthritis Research UK (Grant 18769). © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights

  15. Identification of polymorphism in ethylone hydrochloride: synthesis and characterization.

    PubMed

    Maheux, Chad R; Alarcon, Idralyn Q; Copeland, Catherine R; Cameron, T Stanley; Linden, Anthony; Grossert, J Stuart

    2016-08-01

    Ethylone, a synthetic cathinone with psychoactive properties, is a designer drug which has appeared on the recreational drug market in recent years. Since 2012, illicit shipments of ethylone hydrochloride have been intercepted with increasing frequency at the Canadian border. Analysis has revealed that ethylone hydrochloride exists as two distinct polymorphs. In addition, several minor impurities were detected in some seized exhibits. In this study, the two conformational polymorphs of ethylone hydrochloride have been synthesized and fully characterized by FTIR, FT-Raman, powder XRD, GC-MS, ESI-MS/MS and NMR ((13) C CPMAS, (1) H, (13) C). The two polymorphs can be distinguished by vibrational spectroscopy, solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. The FTIR data are applied to the identification of both polymorphs of ethylone hydrochloride (mixed with methylone hydrochloride) in a laboratory submission labelled as 'Ocean Snow Ultra'. The data presented in this study will assist forensic scientists in the differentiation of the two ethylone hydrochloride polymorphs. This report, alongside our recent article on the single crystal X-ray structure of a second polymorph of this synthetic cathinone, is the first to confirm polymorphism in ethylone hydrochloride. © 2015 Canada Border Services Agency. Drug Testing and Analysis published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. © 2015 Canada Border Services Agency. Drug Testing and Analysis published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Identification of polymorphism in ethylone hydrochloride: synthesis and characterization

    PubMed Central

    Alarcon, Idralyn Q.; Copeland, Catherine R.; Cameron, T. Stanley; Linden, Anthony; Grossert, J. Stuart

    2015-01-01

    Ethylone, a synthetic cathinone with psychoactive properties, is a designer drug which has appeared on the recreational drug market in recent years. Since 2012, illicit shipments of ethylone hydrochloride have been intercepted with increasing frequency at the Canadian border. Analysis has revealed that ethylone hydrochloride exists as two distinct polymorphs. In addition, several minor impurities were detected in some seized exhibits. In this study, the two conformational polymorphs of ethylone hydrochloride have been synthesized and fully characterized by FTIR, FT‐Raman, powder XRD, GC‐MS, ESI‐MS/MS and NMR (13C CPMAS, 1H, 13C). The two polymorphs can be distinguished by vibrational spectroscopy, solid‐state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and X‐ray diffraction. The FTIR data are applied to the identification of both polymorphs of ethylone hydrochloride (mixed with methylone hydrochloride) in a laboratory submission labelled as 'Ocean Snow Ultra’. The data presented in this study will assist forensic scientists in the differentiation of the two ethylone hydrochloride polymorphs. This report, alongside our recent article on the single crystal X‐ray structure of a second polymorph of this synthetic cathinone, is the first to confirm polymorphism in ethylone hydrochloride. © 2015 Canada Border Services Agency. Drug Testing and Analysis published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. © 2015 Canada Border Services Agency. Drug Testing and Analysis published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26344849

  17. Hydrochloride salt co-crystals: preparation, characterization and physicochemical studies.

    PubMed

    Parmar, Vijaykumar K; Shah, Shailesh A

    2013-01-01

    Co-crystallization approach for modification of physicochemical properties of hydrochloride salt is presented. The objective of this investigation was to study the effect of co-crystallization with different co-crystal formers on physicochemical properties of fluoxetine hydrochloride (FH). FH was screened for co-crystallization with a series of carboxylic acid co-formers by slow evaporation method. Photomicrographs and melting points of crystalline phases were determined. The co-crystals were characterized by FTIR, DSC and PXRD methods. Solubility of co-crystals was determined in water and buffer solutions. Powder and intrinsic dissolution profiles were assessed for co-crystals. Physical mixtures of drug and co-formers were used for comparisons at characterizations and physicochemical properties evaluation stages. Four co-crystals of FH viz. Fluoxetine hydrochloride-maleic acid (FH-MA), Fluoxetine hydrochloride-glutaric acid (FH-GA), Fluoxetine hydrochloride-L-tartaric acid (FH-LTA) and Fluoxetine hydrochloride-DL-tartaric acid (FH-DLTA) were obtained from screening experiments. Physical characterization showed that they have unique crystal morphology, thermal, spectroscopic and X-ray diffraction properties. Solubility and dissolution studies showed that Fluoxetine hydrochloride-maleic acid co-crystal possess high aqueous solubility in distilled water, pH 4.6, 7.0 buffer solutions and dissolution rate in distilled water than that of pure drug. Co-crystal formation approach can be used for ionic API to tailor its physical properties.

  18. Pharmacokinetics of high-dose oral thiamine hydrochloride in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Smithline, Howard A; Donnino, Michael; Greenblatt, David J

    2012-02-04

    High dose oral thiamine may have a role in treating diabetes, heart failure, and hypermetabolic states. The purpose of this study was to determine the pharmacokinetic profile of oral thiamine hydrochloride at 100 mg, 500 mg and 1500 mg doses in healthy subjects. This was a randomized, double-blind, single-dose, 4-way crossover study. Pharmacokinetic measures were calculated. The AUC₀₋₁₀ hr and C(max) values increased nonlinearly between 100 mg and 1500 mg. The slope of the AUC₀₋₁₀ hr vs dose, as well as the C(max) vs dose, plots are steepest at the lowest thiamine doses. Our study demonstrates that high blood levels of thiamine can be achieved rapidly with oral thiamine hydrochloride. Thiamine is absorbed by both an active and nonsaturable passive process. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00981877.

  19. Pharmacokinetics of high-dose oral thiamine hydrochloride in healthy subjects

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background High dose oral thiamine may have a role in treating diabetes, heart failure, and hypermetabolic states. The purpose of this study was to determine the pharmacokinetic profile of oral thiamine hydrochloride at 100 mg, 500 mg and 1500 mg doses in healthy subjects. Methods This was a randomized, double-blind, single-dose, 4-way crossover study. Pharmacokinetic measures were calculated. Results The AUC0-10 hr and Cmax values increased nonlinearly between100 mg and 1500 mg. The slope of the AUC0-10 hr vs dose, as well as the Cmax vs dose, plots are steepest at the lowest thiamine doses. Conclusion Our study demonstrates that high blood levels of thiamine can be achieved rapidly with oral thiamine hydrochloride. Thiamine is absorbed by both an active and nonsaturable passive process. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00981877 PMID:22305197

  20. Quantitation of meperidine hydrochloride in pharmaceutical dosage forms by high-performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Das Gupta, V

    1983-06-01

    A high-performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) method for the quantitative determination of meperidine hydrochloride in pharmaceutical dosage forms was developed. The method is reproducible and precise with relative standard deviations (based on six readings) of 1.2% with hydroxyzine and 0.93% with hydroxyprogesterone caproate as the internal standards. A variety of other active and inactive ingredients which were mixed with meperidine hydrochloride did not interfere with the assay procedure. Among the ingredients tested were acetaminophen, atropine sulfate, disodium edetate, metacresol, phenol, promethazine, and sodium metabisulfite. This method appears to be stability-indicating since a hydrolyzed sample of meperidine showed zero potency and a new peak with a different retention time.

  1. [The use of natural and synthetic hydrophilic polymers in the formulation of metformin hydrochloride tablets with different profile release].

    PubMed

    Kołodziejczyk, Michał Krzysztof; Kołodziejska, Justyna; Zgoda, Marian Mikołaj

    2012-01-01

    Metformin hydrochloride after buformin and phenformin belongs to the group of biguanid derivatives used as oral anti-diabetic drugs. The object of the study is the technological analysis and the potential effect of biodegradable macromolecular polymers on the technological and therapeutic parameters of oral anti-diabetic medicinal products with metformin hydrochloride: Siofor, Formetic, Glucophage, Metformax in doses of 500mg and 1000mg and Glucophage XR in a dose of 500 mg of modified release. Market therapeutic products containing 500 and 1000 mg of metformin hydrochloride in a normal formulation and 500 mg of metformin hydrochloride in a formulation of modified release were analyzed. Following research methods were used: technological analysis of tablets, study of disintegration time of tablets, evaluation of pharmaceutical availability of metformin hydrochloride from tested therapeutic products, mathematical and kinetic analysis of release profiles of metformin hydrochloride, statistical analysis of mean differences of release coefficients. The percentage of excipients in the XR formulation is higher and constitutes 50.5% of a tablet mass. However, in standard formulations the percentage is lower, between 5.5% and 12.76%. On the basis of the results of disintegration time studies, the analysed therapeutic products can be divided into two groups, regardless the dose. The first one are preparations with faster (not fast!) disintegration: Glucophage i Metformax. The second group are preparations with slower disintegration, more balanced in the aspect of a high dose of the biologically active substance: Formetic and Siofor. Products with a lower content of excipients (Metformax, Glucophage) disintegrate in a faster way. The disintegration rate of the products with a higher content of excipients (Formetic, Siofor) is slower. The appearance of metformin hydrochloride concentration in the gastrointestinal contents, balanced in time, caused by a slower disintegration

  2. Taste Masking and Molecular Properties of Metformin Hydrochloride-Indion 234 Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Bhoyar, PK; Amgaonkar, YM

    2011-01-01

    Metformin hydrochloride is an oral antidiabetic biguinide agent, used in the management of non-insulin-dependent (type-2) diabetes mellitus. The purpose of present work was to formulate tasteless complexes of metformin hydrochloride with indion 234 and to evaluate molecular properties of drug complexes. The drug loading onto ion-exchange resin was optimized for mixing time, activation, effect of pH, mode of mixing, ratio of drug to resin, and temperature. Drug resin complexes (DRC) were evaluated for taste masking and characterized by x-ray diffraction study and infrared spectroscopy. Metformin hydrochloride release from DRC is obtained at salivary and gastric pH and in the presence of electrolytes. The efficient drug loading was evident in batch process using activated indion 234 with a pH of 3.5 and drug-resin ratio of 1:1.2, while temperature enhances the complexation process. Infrared spectroscopy revealed complexation of –NH (drug) with indion 234. DRC are amorphous in nature. Drug release from DRC in salivary pH was insufficient to impart bitter taste. Volunteers rated the complex as tasteless and agreeable. Complete drug release was observed at gastric pH in 3 h. The drug release was accelerated in the presence of electrolytes. Indion 234 is inexpensive, and the simple technique is effective for bitterness masking of metformin. PMID:21731355

  3. Taste masking and molecular properties of metformin hydrochloride-indion 234 complexes.

    PubMed

    Bhoyar, Pk; Amgaonkar, Ym

    2011-04-01

    Metformin hydrochloride is an oral antidiabetic biguinide agent, used in the management of non-insulin-dependent (type-2) diabetes mellitus. The purpose of present work was to formulate tasteless complexes of metformin hydrochloride with indion 234 and to evaluate molecular properties of drug complexes. The drug loading onto ion-exchange resin was optimized for mixing time, activation, effect of pH, mode of mixing, ratio of drug to resin, and temperature. Drug resin complexes (DRC) were evaluated for taste masking and characterized by x-ray diffraction study and infrared spectroscopy. Metformin hydrochloride release from DRC is obtained at salivary and gastric pH and in the presence of electrolytes. The efficient drug loading was evident in batch process using activated indion 234 with a pH of 3.5 and drug-resin ratio of 1:1.2, while temperature enhances the complexation process. Infrared spectroscopy revealed complexation of -NH (drug) with indion 234. DRC are amorphous in nature. Drug release from DRC in salivary pH was insufficient to impart bitter taste. Volunteers rated the complex as tasteless and agreeable. Complete drug release was observed at gastric pH in 3 h. The drug release was accelerated in the presence of electrolytes. Indion 234 is inexpensive, and the simple technique is effective for bitterness masking of metformin.

  4. Simultaneous UV Spectrophotometric Estimation of Ambroxol Hydrochloride and Levocetirizine Dihydrochloride

    PubMed Central

    Prabhu, S. Lakshmana; Shirwaikar, A. A.; Shirwaikar, Annie; Kumar, C. Dinesh; Kumar, G. Aravind

    2008-01-01

    A novel, simple, sensitive and rapid spectrophotometric method has been developed for simultaneous estimation of ambroxol hydrochloride and levocetirizine dihydrochloride. The method involved solving simultaneous equations based on measurement of absorbance at two wavelengths 242 nm and 231 nm, the γ max of ambroxol hydrochloride and levocetirizine dihydrochloride, respectively. Beer's law was obeyed in the concentration range 10–50 μg/ml and 8–24 μg/ml for ambroxol hydrochloride and levocetirizine dihydrochloride respectively. Results of the method were validated statistically and by recovery studies. PMID:20046721

  5. Effect of ractopamine hydrochloride and zilpaterol hydrochloride on cardiac electrophysiologic and hematologic variables in finishing steers.

    PubMed

    Frese, Daniel A; Reinhardt, Christopher D; Bartle, Steven J; Rethorst, David N; Bawa, Bhupinder; Thomason, Justin D; Loneragan, Guy H; Thomson, Daniel U

    2016-09-15

    OBJECTIVE To investigate the effects of dietary supplementation with the β-adrenoceptor agonists ractopamine hydrochloride and zilpaterol hydrochloride on ECG and clinicopathologic variables of finishing beef steers. DESIGN Randomized controlled trial. ANIMALS 30 Angus steers. PROCEDURES Steers were grouped by body weight and randomly assigned to receive 1 of 3 diets for 23 days: a diet containing no additive (control diet) or a diet containing ractopamine hydrochloride (300 mg/steer/d) or zilpaterol hydrochloride (8.3 mg/kg [3.8 mg/lb] of feed on a dry-matter basis), beginning on day 0. Steers were instrumented with an ambulatory ECG monitor on days -2, 6, 13, and 23, and continuous recordings were obtained for 72, 24, 24, and 96 hours, respectively. At the time of instrumentation, blood samples were obtained for CBC and serum biochemical and blood lactate analysis. Electrocardiographic recordings were evaluated for mean heart rate and arrhythmia rates. RESULTS Steers fed zilpaterol or ractopamine had greater mean heart rates than those fed the control diet. Mean heart rates were within reference limits for all steers, with the exception of those in the ractopamine group on day 14, in which mean heart rate was high. No differences in arrhythmia rates were identified among the groups, nor were any differences identified when arrhythmias were classified as single, paired, or multiple (> 2) beats. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results suggested that dietary supplementation of cattle with ractopamine or zilpaterol at FDA-approved doses had no effect on arrhythmia rates but caused an increase in heart rate that remained within reference limits.

  6. Spectroscopy study of ephedrine hydrochloride and papaverine hydrochloride in terahertz range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Fusheng; Shen, Jingling; Wang, Guangqin; Liang, Meiyan

    2008-12-01

    The terahertz(THz) fingerprint spectra of Ephedrine Hydrochloride and Papaverine Hydrochloride have been measured using THz time-domain Spectroscopy (THz-TDS) system in the region of 0.2~2.6 THz. To explain the spectra, both gas-phase simulation methods and solid-state simulation methods were performed in the efforts to extract pictures of the molecular interior vibrational modes. By comparing the results of various gas-phase simulation methods, It was found that using the semi-empirical theory is more applicable than the density functional theory (DFT) for some chemical compounds. In the solid-state calculations, solid-state density functional theory (DFT) was employed to obtain the vibration frequencies and Difference-Dipole Method (DDM) was used to calculate the corresponding infrared (IR) intensity. In the process of calculating the IR intensity of Papaverine Hydrochloride in terahertz range, we found that the results by Hirshfeld partitioning method agree better with the experiments than the ones derived from Mulliken atomic charges. Moreover, the accuracy of simulation results depends on the basis sets and grid size being chosen.

  7. Economic evaluation of duloxetine as a first-line treatment for painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Carlos, Fernando; Ramírez-Gámez, Jocelyn; Dueñas, Héctor; Galindo-Suárez, Rosa María; Ramos, Elisa

    2012-01-01

    To perform an economic evaluation of duloxetine, pregabalin, and both branded and generic gabapentin for managing pain in patients with painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy (PDPN) in Mexico. The analysis was conducted using a 3-month decision model, which compares duloxetine 60 mg once daily (DUL), pregabalin 150 mg twice daily (PGB), and gabapentin 600 mg three-times daily (GBP) for PDPN patients with moderate-to-severe pain. A systematic review was performed and placebo-adjusted risk ratios for achieving good pain relief (GPR), adverse events (AE), and withdrawal owing to intolerable AE were calculated. Direct medical costs included drug acquisition and additional visits due to lack of efficacy (poor pain relief) or intolerable AE. Unit costs were taken from local sources. Adherence rates were used to estimate the expected drug costs. All costs are expressed in 2010 Mexican Pesos (MXN). Utility values drawn from published literature were applied to health states. The proportion of patients with GPR and quality-adjusted life years (QALY) were assessed. Branded-GBP was dominated by all the other options. PGB was more costly and less effective than DUL. Compared with branded-GBP and PGB, DUL led to savings of 1.01 and 1.74 million MXN (per 1000 patients). The incremental cost per QALY gained with DUL used instead of generic-GBP was $102 433 MXN. This amount is slightly lower than the estimated gross domestic product per capita in Mexico for 2010. During a second-order Monte Carlo simulation, DUL had the highest probability of being cost-effective (61%), followed by generic-GBP (25%) and PGB (14%). Study limitations include a short timeframe and using data from different dosage schemes for GBP and PGB. This study suggests that DUL provides overall savings and better health outcomes compared with branded-GBP and PGB. Administering DUL rather than generic-GBP is a cost-effective intervention to manage PDPN in Mexico.

  8. Supramolecular assembly in the epiisopiloturine hydrochloride salt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mafud, Ana Carolina; Reinheimer, Eric W.; Lima, Filipe Camargo Dalmatti Alves; Batista, Larissa Fernandes; de Paula, Karina; Véras, Leiz Maria Costa; de Souza de Almeida Leite, José Roberto; Venancio, Tiago; Mascarenhas, Yvonne Primerano

    2017-05-01

    Epiisopiloturine hydrochloride (Epi-HCl) salt was synthetized from epiisopiloturine, an in vivo anthelmintic compound against Schistosoma mansoni worms. Despite there being no acute toxicity in mammalian cells, the compound's water insolubility makes its administration difficult. In this communication, we report the characterization of Epi-HCl its features by spectroscopy, thermal analysis, and PXRD. The single crystals suitable to X-ray diffraction were grown by slow evaporation technique. To better understand the nature of Epi-HCl' solid state, SS-NMR was also used. The salt's intramolecular structure was maintained via cation-pi intramolecular interactions, which in conjunction with hydrogen bonding, gives rise to an extended supramolecular assembly. The interatomic distances within the cations and environment around the chloride anion vary as function of temperature, suggesting a packing relaxation.

  9. A novel formulation for mebeverine hydrochloride.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Hamid, Sameh M; Abdel-Hady, Seham E; El-Shamy, Abdel-Hamid A; El-Dessouky, Hadir F

    2007-10-01

    The antispasmodic drug mebeverine hydrochloride was formulated into a film-forming gel to be used as a topical local anesthetic. A mixture of cellulose derivatives was used as a base. Additives were used to enhance the release as well as the residence time. Formulations were characterized in terms of drug release, mucoadhesion and rheology. Clinically, the selected formula has shown faster onset (p = 0.0156), longer duration (p = 0.0313), better film residence (p = 0.0313), and no foreign body sensation (p = 0.0313) in comparison to Solcoseryl dental paste. Histopathological examination showed no change in inflammatory cells count, concluding that this topical anesthetic is efficacious and safe orally.

  10. 21 CFR 522.723 - Diprenorphine hydrochloride injection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) Specifications. Each milliliter of diprenorphine hydrochloride injection, veterinary, contains 2 mg of... injection, veterinary, the use of which is provided for in § 522.883, in wild and exotic animals. (2) It...

  11. 21 CFR 520.1660b - Oxytetracycline hydrochloride capsules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... containing 125 or 250 milligrams of oxytetracycline hydrochloride. Oxytetracycline is the antibiotic substance produced by growth of Streptomyces rimosus or the same antibiotic substance produced by any other... continuation of compatible antibiotic therapy following parenteral oxytetracycline administration where...

  12. 21 CFR 520.1660b - Oxytetracycline hydrochloride capsules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... containing 125 or 250 milligrams of oxytetracycline hydrochloride. Oxytetracycline is the antibiotic substance produced by growth of Streptomyces rimosus or the same antibiotic substance produced by any other... continuation of compatible antibiotic therapy following parenteral oxytetracycline administration where...

  13. 21 CFR 520.1660b - Oxytetracycline hydrochloride capsules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... containing 125 or 250 milligrams of oxytetracycline hydrochloride. Oxytetracycline is the antibiotic substance produced by growth of Streptomyces rimosus or the same antibiotic substance produced by any other... continuation of compatible antibiotic therapy following parenteral oxytetracycline administration where...

  14. 21 CFR 522.1642 - Oxymorphone hydrochloride injection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... milligrams of oxymorphone hydrochloride per milliliter of aqueous solution containing 0.8 percent sodium chloride. (b) Sponsor. See No. 060951 in § 510.600(c) of this chapter. (c) Conditions of use. (1) The...

  15. 21 CFR 522.1642 - Oxymorphone hydrochloride injection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... milligrams of oxymorphone hydrochloride per milliliter of aqueous solution containing 0.8 percent sodium chloride. (b) Sponsor. See No. 060951 in § 510.600(c) of this chapter. (c) Conditions of use. (1) The...

  16. 21 CFR 522.1642 - Oxymorphone hydrochloride injection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... milligrams of oxymorphone hydrochloride per milliliter of aqueous solution containing 0.8 percent sodium chloride. (b) Sponsor. See No. 060951 in § 510.600(c) of this chapter. (c) Conditions of use. (1) The...

  17. 21 CFR 520.1242e - Levamisole hydrochloride effervescent tablets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...: (1) Amount. The equivalent of 8 milligrams of levamisole hydrochloride per kilogram of body weight... thoroughly. Allow 1 gallon of medicated water for each 100 pounds body weight of pigs to be treated. No other...

  18. 21 CFR 520.1660b - Oxytetracycline hydrochloride capsules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... containing 125 or 250 milligrams of oxytetracycline hydrochloride. Oxytetracycline is the antibiotic substance produced by growth of Streptomyces rimosus or the same antibiotic substance produced by any other... continuation of compatible antibiotic therapy following parenteral oxytetracycline administration where rapidly...

  19. 21 CFR 520.1660b - Oxytetracycline hydrochloride capsules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... containing 125 or 250 milligrams of oxytetracycline hydrochloride. Oxytetracycline is the antibiotic substance produced by growth of Streptomyces rimosus or the same antibiotic substance produced by any other... continuation of compatible antibiotic therapy following parenteral oxytetracycline administration where rapidly...

  20. 21 CFR 520.2345a - Tetracycline hydrochloride capsules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... organisms sensitive to tetracycline hydrochloride, such as bacterial gastroenteritis due to E. coli and urinary tract infections due to Staphylococcus spp. and E. coli. (3) Limitations. Federal law restricts...

  1. 21 CFR 520.2345a - Tetracycline hydrochloride capsules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... organisms sensitive to tetracycline hydrochloride, such as bacterial gastroenteritis due to E. coli and urinary tract infections due to Staphylococcus spp. and E. coli. (3) Limitations. Federal law restricts...

  2. 21 CFR 520.2345a - Tetracycline hydrochloride capsules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... organisms sensitive to tetracycline hydrochloride, such as bacterial gastroenteritis due to E. coli and urinary tract infections due to Staphylococcus spp. and E. coli. (3) Limitations. Federal law restricts...

  3. 21 CFR 520.2345a - Tetracycline hydrochloride capsules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... organisms sensitive to tetracycline hydrochloride, such as bacterial gastroenteritis due to E. coli and urinary tract infections due to Staphylococcus spp. and E. coli. (3) Limitations. Federal law restricts...

  4. 21 CFR 520.2345a - Tetracycline hydrochloride capsules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... organisms sensitive to tetracycline hydrochloride, such as bacterial gastroenteritis due to E. coli and urinary tract infections due to Staphylococcus spp. and E. coli. (3) Limitations. Federal law restricts...

  5. In vitro and in silico investigation of electrospun terbinafine hydrochloride-loaded buccal nanofibrous sheets.

    PubMed

    Szabó, Péter; Daróczi, Tünde Beáta; Tóth, Gergő; Zelkó, Romána

    2016-11-30

    Terbinafine hydrochloride-loaded nanofibrous buccal films were formulated with the aim to improve the solubility and dissolution behavior; thus, the local effectiveness of the antifungal agent. Poly(vinyl alcohol) and chitosan polymer composites were selected as delivery base in order to enhance the mucoadhesion of the fibrous films. The dissolution of terbinafine hydrochloride was carried out applying a stainless steel disc assembly and the terbinafine concentration was determined by HPLC-MS in selective ion monitoring mode. The prediction of the absorption behavior of the prepared fibrous samples in the human oral cavity was modeled using GastroPlus™ software. The result indicates that the fibrous films enabled fast and complete dissolution of the active agent. The drug absorption from the oral cavity could be minimized by the employment of the proper oral transit model. Because of the limited absorption of terbinafine hydrochloride from the oral mucosa the formulation can be beneficial in local administration in the case of hold and expectorate administration mode.

  6. Inhibition of psoriatic cell proliferation in in vitro skin models by amiprilose hydrochloride.

    PubMed

    Chapman, M L; Dimitrijevich, S D; Hevelone, J C; Goetz, D; Cohen, J; Wise, G E; Gracy, R W

    1990-10-01

    Amiprilose hydrochloride, a 3-substituted glucose derivative, was found to inhibit the proliferation of human fibroblasts and keratinocytes originating from psoriatic lesions. Fibroblasts and keratinocytes were obtained from skin biopsies of normal donors, and from the biopsies of active/involved and uninvolved sites of psoriatic donors. The cells were cultured as monolayers or as components of tissue equivalent models. Keratinocytes and fibroblasts originating from biopsies of psoriatically involved areas were shown to proliferate at a significantly higher rate than those derived from uninvolved areas. The antiproliferative effect of amiprilose hydrochloride was not observed with normal keratinocytes or fibroblasts from the skin of healthy donors or from uninvolved areas of psoriatic donors. Amiprilose hydrochloride was not cytotoxic to any of these cells at levels below 0.1%. The combination of the low cytotoxicity and the selective antiproliferative effect indicates that this compound may be a useful antipsoriatic agent. The use of monolayer cultures and tissue equivalent models in this study illustrates the utility of such a progressive strategy in the evaluation of potential topical pharmaceuticals.

  7. Catechol-O-methyltransferase Val158Met genotype and the clinical responses to duloxetine treatment or plasma levels of 3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylglycol and homovanillic acid in Japanese patients with major depressive disorder

    PubMed Central

    Atake, Kiyokazu; Yoshimura, Reiji; Hori, Hikaru; Katsuki, Asuka; Nakamura, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This study investigated the relationships among the plasma levels of catecholamine metabolites, the clinical response to duloxetine treatment, and Val158Met polymorphism of the catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) gene. Subjects and methods Sixty-four patients and 30 healthy control subjects were recruited. Major depressive episodes were diagnosed using the Structured Clinical Interview for the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, Text Revision criteria. The severity of depression was evaluated using the 17-item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAMD17). Patients whose HAMD17 scores were 15 or greater were enrolled in the study. Blood sampling and clinical evaluation were performed at week 0 and week 8. The levels of plasma catecholamine metabolites were measured using high-performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection. Genotyping was performed using direct sequencing. Results Thirty of 45 patients (67%) responded to duloxetine treatment during the 8 weeks of treatment. The baseline plasma levels of 3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylglycol (MHPG), but not homovanillic acid (HVA), were lower in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) who had the Val/Val genotype than in patients who were Met-carriers. Patients with MDD and the Val/Val genotype, but not Met carriers, had increased plasma levels of MHPG after 8 weeks of duloxetine treatment. The baseline plasma MHPG levels in healthy control subjects with the Val/Val genotype were significantly higher than those in patients with MDD. Among the subjects in the MDD group with the Val/Val genotype, the plasma MHPG levels increased to the same degree as in the healthy control subjects with the Val/Val genotype after 8 weeks of duloxetine treatment. Conclusion The relationship among the COMT Val158Met polymorphism, plasma levels of catecholamine metabolites, and responses to duloxetine is complex. Nevertheless, our results suggest that patients with MDD and the

  8. Duloxetine and pregabalin: high-dose monotherapy or their combination? The "COMBO-DN study"--a multinational, randomized, double-blind, parallel-group study in patients with diabetic peripheral neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Tesfaye, Solomon; Wilhelm, Stefan; Lledo, Alberto; Schacht, Alexander; Tölle, Thomas; Bouhassira, Didier; Cruccu, Giorgio; Skljarevski, Vladimir; Freynhagen, Rainer

    2013-12-01

    This multicentre, double-blind, parallel-group study in diabetic peripheral neuropathic pain addressed whether, in patients not responding to standard doses of duloxetine or pregabalin, combining both medications is superior to increasing each drug to its maximum recommended dose. For initial 8-week therapy, either 60 mg/day duloxetine (groups 1, 2) or 300 mg/day pregabalin (groups 3, 4) was given. Thereafter, in the 8-week combination/high-dose therapy period, only nonresponders received 120 mg/day duloxetine (group 1), a combination of 60 mg/day duloxetine and 300 mg/day pregabalin (groups 2, 3), or 600 mg/day pregabalin (group 4). Primary outcome (Brief Pain Inventory Modified Short Form [BPI-MSF] 24-hour average pain change after combination/high-dose therapy) was analyzed comparing combination (groups 2, 3 pooled) with high-dose monotherapy (groups 1, 4 pooled). Secondary end points included response rates, BPI-MSF severity items, and comparison of duloxetine and pregabalin in BPI-MSF average pain. Eight hundred four patients were evaluated for initial therapy and 339 for combination/high-dose therapy. There were no significant differences between combination and high-dose monotherapy regarding BPI-MSF average pain (mean change: combination: -2.35; high-dose monotherapy: -2.16; P = 0.370) and most secondary end points, which, however, consistently favoured combination therapy. Fifty-percent response rates were 52.1% for combination and 39.3% for high-dose monotherapy (P = 0.068). In exploratory analyses of the initial 8-week therapy uncorrected for multiple comparisons, 60 mg/day duloxetine was found superior to 300 mg/day pregabalin (P < 0.001). Both drugs and their combination were well tolerated. Although not significantly superior to high-dose monotherapy, combination therapy was considered to be effective, safe, and well tolerated.

  9. The dissolution kinetics of sulfamethoxazol, trimethoprim and oxytetracycline hydrochloride from multicomponent solid dispersion capsules ("Sulfoxytrim").

    PubMed

    Zuń, M; Czarnecki, W

    2000-01-01

    Release profiles and dissolution kinetics of active substance, viz. sulfamethoxazol (SMO), trimethoprim (TMP), and oxytetracycline hydrochloride (OTC) from capsulated multicomponent dispersions was studied in a flow-cell apparatus at 37 degrees C by using a dissolution medium of 0.1 mol/l HCl. The results revealed that the relative dissolution efficiency (DE) and dissolution profiles of one active ingredient were affected by the presence of the two others. Vitamin C added caused the decreased the dissolution rate constants (K) and DE--values of all the active substances studied.

  10. Canine olfactory sensitivity to cocaine hydrochloride and methyl benzoate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waggoner, L. Paul; Johnston, James M.; Williams, Marc; Jackson, Jan; Jones, Meredith H.; Boussom, Teresa; Petrousky, James A.

    1997-02-01

    Methyl benzoate is a consistent product of cocaine hydrochloride exposed to humid air. The detection responses of dogs trained to detect illicit cocaine hydrochloride may be controlled by vapor from cocaine, methyl benzoate, or other constituents of illicit cocaine. The present study addressed the following questions: 1) How capable are dogs of detecting methyl benzoate compared to cocaine hydrochloride, 2) When dogs are trained to detect methyl benzoate, do they respond to cocaine hydrochloride as being the same or different from methyl benzoate. These questions were investigated using random source dogs trained and tested under laboratory conditions. Odor stimuli were generated and delivered by a vapor generation systems, the outputs from which were characterized by thermal desorption GC/MS. ONe group of dogs was trained to discriminate pharmaceutical grade and illicit cocaine hydrochloride from clean air and tested using a two lever procedure to determine their sensitivity to these substances. A second group of dogs was trained to discriminate between methyl benzoate and clean air and tested for their sensitivity to the substance. The dogs in this second group were then tested using a three lever procedure to determine their sensitivity to these substances. A second group of dogs was trained to discriminate between methyl benzoate and clean air and tested for their sensitivity to the substance. The dogs in this second group were then tested using a three lever procedure to determine whether they responded to cocaine hydrochloride as the same or different from methyl benzoate.

  11. Stability of propranolol hydrochloride suspension compounded from tablets.

    PubMed

    Henry, D W; Repta, A J; Smith, F M; White, S J

    1986-06-01

    The stability of a propranolol hydrochloride suspension compounded from commercially available tablets was studied. Propranolol hydrochloride 10-mg tablets were triturated to a powder and incorporated into a commercially available suspension vehicle to yield a suspension with a theoretical propranolol hydrochloride concentration of 1 mg/mL. The suspension was divided into portions and stored in amber glass bottles at either room (25 degrees C) or refrigerated (2 degrees C) temperature for four months. The concentration of propranolol hydrochloride in the samples was determined by a stability-indicating, high-performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) assay at 0, 30, 60, 90, and 120 days. Also at these times, the pH of the samples was measured, and the samples were inspected visually for evidence of microbial growth and ease of resuspension. The concentration of propranolol hydrochloride in the samples remained within 90% of the initial concentration throughout the study period. No important changes in the pH of the samples and no visible evidence of microbial growth were noted. This extemporaneous suspension of propranolol hydrochloride compounded from commercially available tablets is stable for at least four months when stored at room or refrigerated temperature.

  12. The role of the NMDA receptors and l-arginine-nitric oxide-cyclic guanosine monophosphate pathway in the antidepressant-like effect of duloxetine in the forced swimming test.

    PubMed

    Zomkowski, Andréa D E; Engel, Daiane; Cunha, Mauricio P; Gabilan, Nelson H; Rodrigues, Ana Lúcia S

    2012-12-01

    Duloxetine is a selective serotonin and noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor used as antidepressant. However, its mechanisms of action are not fully understood. This study investigated the effect of duloxetine in the mouse forced swimming test (FST) and in the tail suspension test (TST) and the involvement of the NMDA receptors and the l-arginine-NO-cGMP pathway in its effect in the FST. Duloxetine reduced the immobility time both in the FST and in the TST (dose range of 1-30mg/kg, i.p.), without changing locomotion in an open-field. Duloxetine administered orally (1-30mg/kg) also reduced the immobility time in the FST. The effect of duloxetine (10mg/kg, p.o.) in the FST was prevented by pre-treatment with NMDA (0.1pmol/site, i.c.v.), d-serine (30μg/site, i.c.v.), (l-arginine (750mg/kg, i.p.), S-nitroso-N-acetyl-penicillamine (SNAP, 25μg/site, i.c.v) or sildenafil (5mg/kg, i.p.). The administration of MK-801 (0.001mg/kg, i.p.), 7-nitroindazole (50mg/kg, i.p.), methylene blue (20mg/kg, i.p.) or 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazole[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ) (30pmol/site i.c.v.) in combination with a sub-effective dose of duloxetine (0.3mg/kg, p.o.) reduced the immobility time in the FST. Moreover, the administration of duloxetine (10mg/kg) produced a reduction in NOx levels in the hippocampus and cerebral cortex. Altogether the results suggest that the effect of duloxetine in the FST is dependent on either a blockade of NMDA receptors or an inhibition of NO. In addition, our results further reinforce the role of NMDA receptors and l-arginine-NO-cGMP pathway, besides the monoaminergic systems, in the mechanism of action of current prescribed antidepressant agents.

  13. Efficacy of Duloxetine on Painful Physical Symptoms in Major Depressive Disorder for Patients With Clinically Significant Painful Physical Symptoms at Baseline: A Meta-Analysis of 11 Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Desaiah, Durisala; Spann, Melissa E.; Zhang, Qi; Russell, James M.; Robinson, Michael J.; Demyttenaere, Koen

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To review efficacy of duloxetine for physical symptoms and depressive illness in patients with at least mild to moderate major depressive disorder (MDD; DSM-IV) and clinically significant painful physical symptoms at baseline. Data Sources: Global database of duloxetine clinical trials (Eli Lilly and Company). Study Selection: All 11 acute, double-blind, placebo-controlled studies of duloxetine (7 with duloxetine 60-mg doses and 4 with non–60-mg doses) in the database that used a scale to measure painful physical symptoms and were completed before March 17, 2011. Data Extraction: For each study, patients with clinically significant pain levels at baseline (Visual Analog Scale overall pain rating ≥ 30, Numerical Rating Scale score ≥ 3, or Brief Pain Inventory 24-hour average pain rating ≥ 3) were selected in order to determine the effect sizes of duloxetine (compared with placebo for each trial) on the pain and depression measures. Overall effect sizes for both painful physical symptoms and MDD were obtained from the mean of individual-trial effect sizes, and each effect size was weighted relative to the number of patients within each study. Data Synthesis: The overall mean effect sizes were as follows: painful physical symptoms—60-mg trials, 0.29 (95% CI, 0.06 to 0.52); non–60-mg trials, 0.13 (95% CI, −0.19 to 0.45); MDD—60-mg trials, 0.29 (95% CI, 0.18 to 0.40); non–60-mg trials, 0.16 (95% CI, 0.00 to 0.32). Across the 11 studies, the weighted effect size for painful physical symptoms was 0.26 (95% CI, 0.00 to 0.51) and for MDD, 0.25 (95% CI, 0.16 to 0.34). Conclusions: According to this meta-analysis, duloxetine 60 mg once daily is as effective in improving painful physical symptoms as it is for depression in patients with MDD and clinically significant painful physical symptoms. The results of this meta-analysis indicate that duloxetine has small effect sizes in reducing painful physical symptoms and depressive symptoms in patients

  14. Comparison of neurotropic effects of L-glutamic acid and its new derivative β-phenylglutamic acid hydrochloride (RGPU-135, glutarone).

    PubMed

    Tyurenkov, I N; Bagmetova, V V; Chernysheva, Yu V; Merkushenkova, O V

    2014-04-01

    In contrast to L-glutamic acid (200 mg/kg), β-phenylglutamic acid hydrochloride (26 mg/kg) produces no anticonvulsant effects during generalized convulsions induced by "maximum electric shock". However, β-phenylglutamic acid hydrochloride was more potent than L-glutamic acid in increasing survival rate, promoting recovery of spontaneous motor activity, and maintainance locomotor and exploratory activity in the open field test and cognitive functions in conditioned passive avoidance test, i.e. exhibited neuroprotective activity. This substance did not change the threshold of pain induced by electric stimulation of paws (up to vocalization) and thermal tail stimulation (tail-flick), whereas L-glutamic acid decreased this parameter. β-Phenylglutamic acid suppressed aggression in the test for provoked unmotivated aggression, while L-glutamic acid enhanced it. Due to these neurotropic effects, β-phenylglutamic acid hydrochloride can be used as the basis for the development of drugs with antidepressant, anxiolytic, and neuroprotective actions.

  15. Efficacy and tolerance of repeated oral doses of tolperisone hydrochloride in the treatment of painful reflex muscle spasm: results of a prospective placebo-controlled double-blind trial.

    PubMed

    Pratzel, H G; Alken, R G; Ramm, S

    1996-10-01

    The efficacy and safety of oral tolperisone hydrochloride (Mydocalm) in the treatment of painful reflex muscle spasm was assessed in a prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. A total of 138 patients, aged between 20 and 75 years, with painful reflex muscle spasm associated with diseases of the spinal column or proximal joints were enrolled in eight rehabilitation centers. Patients were randomized to receive either 300 mg tolperisone hydrochloride or placebo for a period of 21 days. Both treatment groups recovered during the 3 weeks rehabilitation program. However, tolperisone hydrochloride proved to be significantly superior to placebo: the change score of the pressure pain threshold as the primary target parameter significantly increased during therapy with tolperisone hydrochloride (P = 0.03, valid-case-analysis) compared to the results obtained on placebo treatment. The overall assessment of efficacy by the patient also demonstrated significant differences in favor of tolperisone hydrochloride. Best results were seen in patients aged between 40 and 60 years with a history of complaints shorter than 1 year and with concomitant physical therapy. The evaluation of safety data, i.e., adverse events, biochemical and hematological laboratory parameters, demonstrated no differences between tolperisone hydrochloride and placebo. As a conclusion tolperisone hydrochloride represents an effective and safe treatment of painful reflex muscle spasm without the typical side effects of centrally active muscle relaxants.

  16. A Post Hoc Analysis of D-Threo-Methylphenidate Hydrochloride (Focalin) Versus D,l-Threo-Methylphenidate Hydrochloride (Ritalin)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiss, Margaret; Wasdell, Michael; Patin, John

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate clinical measures of the benefit/risk ratio in a post hoc analysis of a clinical trial of d-threo-methylphenidate hydrochloride (d-MPH) and d,l-threo-methylphenidate hydrochloride (d,l-MPH). Method: Data from a phase III clinical trial was used to compare equimolar doses of d-MPH and d,l-MPH treatment for…

  17. A Post Hoc Analysis of D-Threo-Methylphenidate Hydrochloride (Focalin) Versus D,l-Threo-Methylphenidate Hydrochloride (Ritalin)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiss, Margaret; Wasdell, Michael; Patin, John

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate clinical measures of the benefit/risk ratio in a post hoc analysis of a clinical trial of d-threo-methylphenidate hydrochloride (d-MPH) and d,l-threo-methylphenidate hydrochloride (d,l-MPH). Method: Data from a phase III clinical trial was used to compare equimolar doses of d-MPH and d,l-MPH treatment for…

  18. The use of tiletamine hydrochloride and zolazepam hydrochloride for sedation of the mountain brushtial possum, Trichosurus caninus Ogilby (Phalangeridae: Marsupialia).

    PubMed

    Viggers, K L; Lindenmayer, D B

    1995-06-01

    A combination of tiletamine hydrochloride and zolazepam hydrochloride in a 1:1 ration by weight was used successfully to sedate mountain brushtail possums, Trichosurus caninus, in the field. A standard total dose of 50 to 60 mg provided adequate sedation for the completion of a range of handling procedures. We describe the induction time, dose rate and side-effects associated with the use of tiletamine and zolazepam in T caninus.

  19. Quinpirole hydrochloride, a potential anti-parkinsonism drug.

    PubMed

    Koller, W; Herbster, G; Anderson, D; Wack, R; Gordon, J

    1987-08-01

    Quinpirole hydrochloride, a putative dopamine agonist, was investigated in animal models of central dopaminergic activity, to evaluate its possible role in the treatment of Parkinson's disease. The drug induced stereotyped sniffing in rats but, unlike apomorphine, did not produce a maximal behavioural response (stereotyped gnawing). Pretreatment with neuroleptics blocked the stereotypy induced by quinpirole. Quinpirole reversed the effects of reserpine and alpha-methyl-paratyrosine, caused dose-dependent contralateral rotations in rats with unilateral lesions of the substantia nigra induced by 6-hydroxydopamine and induced vomiting in dogs. Small doses of quinpirole decreased locomotor activity, an effect presumably mediated by pre-synaptic autoreceptors. Quinpirole bound to D2 dopamine receptors in the striatum of the rat. The chronic injection of both subthreshold and suprathreshold doses, failed to induce behavioral supersensitivity. These data indicate that quinpirole can stimulate central dopaminergic receptors, and that it is a partial agonist with direct-acting properties. Quinpirole differs from other dopaminergic drugs and may be useful for the therapy of Parkinson's disease.

  20. Simultaneous determination of pseudoephedrine hydrochloride, chlorpheniramine maleate, and dextromethorphan hydrobromide by second-derivative photodiode array spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Murtha, J L; Julian, T N; Radebaugh, G W

    1988-08-01

    The simultaneous determination of the active ingredients in multicomponent pharmaceutical products normally requires the use of a separation technique, such as HPLC or GC, followed by quantitation. Presented here is a rapid, validated, analytical method that does not require prior separation for the simultaneous determination of three drugs, pseudoephedrine hydrochloride, chlorpheniramine maleate, and dextromethorphan hydrobromide, in a tablet formulation. A diode array spectrophotometer, capable of multicomponent analysis, was used for the quantitation. The utility of this method was demonstrated in two ways: the analysis of a chewable pediatric tablet (formulation CP) containing 7.5 mg of pseudoephedrine hydrochloride, 0.5 mg of chlorpheniramine maleate, and 2.5 mg of dextromethorphan hydrobromide, and the dissolution analysis of a hydroxypropyl methylcellulose-based sustained-release tablet (formulation SR) containing 120 mg of pseudoephedrine hydrochloride, 8 mg of chlorpheniramine maleate, and 60 mg of dextromethorphan hydrobromide. The sensitivity of this assay is 7.5 micrograms/mL for pseudoephedrine hydrochloride, 1.0 micrograms/mL for chlorpheniramine maleate, and 5.0 micrograms/mL for dextromethorphan hydrobromide, using the second-derivative spectra of the absorbance with respect to wavelength. Determinations were made in 0.1 M sodium acetate buffer at pH 5.0 using a 1-cm quartz cell. Absorbance spectra, and their first and second derivatives, from 240 to 300 nm were used for the determination. The results obtained by this method compared favorably with the results obtained by a validated HPLC method.

  1. Duloxetine and care management treatment of older adults with comorbid major depressive disorder and chronic low back pain: results of an open-label pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Karp, Jordan F.; Weiner, Debra K.; Dew, Mary A.; Begley, Amy; Miller, Mark D.; Reynolds, Charles F.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: In older adults, major depressive disorder (MDD) and chronic low back pain (CLBP) are common and mutually exacerbating. We predicted that duloxetine pharmacotherapy and Depression and Pain Care Management (DPCM) would result in (1) significant improvement in MDD and CLBP and (2) significant improvements in health-related quality of life, anxiety, disability, self-efficacy, and sleep quality. Design and Intervention: Twelve week open-label study using duloxetine up to 120 mg/day + DPCM. Setting: Outpatient late-life depression research clinic. Patients: Thirty community-dwelling adults >60 years old. Outcome Measures: Montgomery Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) and McGill Pain Questionnaire-Short Form (MPQ-SF). Results: 46.7% (n = 14) of the sample had a depression remission. All subjects who met criteria for the depression remission also had a pain response. 93.3% (n = 28) had a significant pain response. Of the subjects who met criteria for a low back pain response, 50% (n = 14) also met criteria for the depression remission. The mean time to depression remission was 7.6 (SE = 0.6) weeks. The mean time to pain response was 2.8 (SE = 0.5) weeks. There were significant improvements in mental health-related quality of life, anxiety, sleep quality, somatic complaints, and both self-efficacy for pain management and for coping with symptoms. Physical health-related quality of life, back pain-related disability, and self-efficacy for physical functioning did not improve. Conclusions: Serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors like duloxetine delivered with DPCM may be a good choice to treat these linked conditions in older adults. Treatments that target low self-efficacy for physical function and improving disability may further increase response rates. PMID:19750557

  2. Effect of sertraline hydrochloride on dialysis hypotension.

    PubMed

    Dheenan, S; Venkatesan, J; Grubb, B P; Henrich, W L

    1998-04-01

    Hemodialysis hypotension (HH) is a very common disorder and has a multifactorial etiology. Autonomic dysfunction occurs in up to 50% of patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and plays a key role in HH in some patients. Sertraline hydrochloride, a central nervous system serotonin reuptake inhibitor, has been shown to be an effective treatment of hypotension caused by autonomic dysfunction in disorders such as neurocardiogenic syncope and idiopathic orthostatic hypotension. This study sought to determine whether sertraline was effective in ameliorating HH. A retrospective chart analysis was performed that included nine consecutive patients (aged > or = 54 years, time on hemodialysis > or = 2.2 years) placed on sertraline (50 to 100 mg/d) for depression who also had HH (defined as prehemodialysis systolic blood pressure [SBP] < or = 100 mm Hg, > or = 40 mm Hg decrease in SBP during hemodialysis, SBP <90 mm Hg, any diastolic blood pressure <40 mm Hg, or a decrease in blood pressure-causing symptoms) before treatment with sertraline. The data from a 6-week pre-sertraline period were compared with the data from a 6-week sertraline period (defined as 6 weeks after drug begun). Blood pressure medications were unchanged during the trial period of sertraline. However, nadir mean arterial pressure recorded during a given dialysis session in the pre-sertraline period (55+/-4 mm Hg) was significantly lower than that recorded in the sertraline period (68+/-5 mm Hg; P < 0.05). In addition, the number of hypotensive episodes (same definition as HH) per dialysis session during the sertraline period was significantly lower than that during the pre-sertraline period (mean, 0.6+/-0.2 episodes per session v 1.4+/-0.3 episodes per session; P < 0.005). The number of therapeutic interventions required for hypotension during the sertraline period was also significantly less than that during the pre-sertraline period (mean, 1.7+/-0.8 interventions v 11.0+/-3.0 interventions; P < 0

  3. Combination therapy for erectile dysfunction: a randomized, double blind, unblinded active-controlled, cross-over study of the pharmacodynamics and safety of combined oral formulations of apomorphine hydrochloride, phentolamine mesylate and papaverine hydrochloride in men with moderate to severe erectile dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Lammers, P I; Rubio-Aurioles, E; Castell, R; Castaneda, J; Ponce de Leon, R; Hurley, D; Lipezker, M; Loehr, L A; Lowrey, F

    2002-02-01

    Oral therapy has become first line treatment for patients with mild to moderate erectile dysfunction (ED). Studies have shown that sildenafil may not be effective in all patients, and has been associated with a variety of adverse effects and an adverse interaction with nitrates and inhibitors of cytochrome P450 enzymes. The objective was to compare the efficacy and safety of three different oral combinations with the highest dose of sildenafil in men with moderate to severe ED. Randomized, double blind, unblinded active-controlled, Phase II study was carried out at three sites in Mexico. After a 4-week placebo run-in period, patients received all four of the following treatments using a 4-way cross-over design: 40 mg phentolamine (PM) +6 mg apomorphine (Apo); 40 mg PM +150 mg papaverine (Pap); 40 mg PM +6 mg Apo +150 mg Pap (Tricombo); 100 mg sildenafil (SC). With the exception of sildenafil tablets, all study medication was blinded. Moderate to severe ED was defined as a less than 50% vaginal penetration success rate during the placebo run-in period. A total of 44 patients were enrolled, of whom 36 completed all four treatment periods. All treatments produced a significant effect in primary efficacy variable (Sexual Encounter Profile) compared to baseline, however, no statistically significant differences were found between treatments. A significant period effect was observed. Also, the four treatments were found not to differ significantly in five out of six secondary efficacy variables. The lowest incidence of treatment-related adverse events (AE) occurred in the 40 mg PM +6 mg Apo group (9.8%), followed by 100 mg SC (15%), and the other two combinations (16.7 and 17.5%, respectively). Nasocongestion and headache were the most frequently reported AE. An oral combination of vasoactive agents may provide an alternative approach to sildenafil. Based on these results a combination of phentolamine and apomorphine warrants further clinical investigation.

  4. The antimycotic drugs itraconazole and terbinafine hydrochloride induce the production of human β-defensin-3 in human keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Kanda, Naoko; Kano, Rui; Ishikawa, Takeko; Watanabe, Shinichi

    2011-04-01

    The antimicrobial peptide human β-defensin-3 (hBD-3) is produced by epidermal keratinocytes, and exhibits broad killing activity against bacteria or fungi. Prostaglandin D(2) enhances hBD-3 production in human keratinocytes by stimulating a transcription factor, activator protein-1 via chemoattractant receptor-homologous molecule expressed on T helper 2 cells (CRTH2). Prostaglandin H(2), a precursor of prostaglandin D(2) can be converted to thromboxane A(2). Certain antimycotic drugs act on keratinocytes and modulate their production of chemokines. In this in vitro study, we examined the effects of antimycotics on hBD-3 production in human keratinocytes. Antimycotics itraconazole and terbinafine hydrochloride increased hBD-3 secretion and mRNA levels in parallel to the enhanced activity of activator protein-1, expression and phosphorylation of activator protein-1 component, c-Fos, but fluconazole was ineffective. These effects were abrogated by CRTH2 antagonist. Itraconazole and terbinafine hydrochloride increased prostaglandin D(2) release from keratinocytes and reduced the release of thromboxane B(2), a thromboxane A(2) metabolite. The conditioned medium from itraconazole or terbinafine hydrochloride-treated keratinocytes inhibited the growth of Candida albicans dependently on hBD-3. These results suggest that itraconazole and terbinafine hydrochloride may enhance c-Fos expression and phosphorylation, activator protein-1 activity and hBD-3 production by increasing prostaglandin D(2) release from keratinocytes. These antimycotic drugs may suppress thromboxane A(2) synthesis and redirect the conversion of prostaglandin H(2) towards prostaglandin D(2). The induction of hBD-3 in keratinocytes is another possible mechanism for the antimycrobial effects of these drugs, which may augment the cutaneous defense activity against infection.

  5. In vitro inhibitory effects of palonosetron hydrochloride, bevacizumab and cyclophosphamide on purified paraoxonase-I (hPON1) from human serum.

    PubMed

    Türkeş, Cüneyt; Söyüt, Hakan; Beydemir, Şükrü

    2016-03-01

    In this study, we investigated the effects of the drugs, palonosetron hydrochloride, bevacizumab and cyclophosphamide, on human serum paraoxonase-I (hPON1) enzyme activity in in vitro conditions. The enzyme was purified ∼231-fold with 34.2% yield by using ammonium sulphate precipitation, DEAE-Sephadex A-50 ion-exchange chromatography and Sephadex G-200 gel-filtration chromatography from human serum. hPON1 exhibited a single protein band on the SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The inhibition studies were performed on paraoxonase activity of palonosetron hydrochloride, bevacizumab and cyclophosphamide. Ki constants were found as 0.033±0.001, 0.054±0.003 mM and 3.419±0.518 mM, respectively. Compared to the inhibition rates of the drugs, palonosetron hydrochloride has the maximum inhibition rate. However, inhibition mechanisms of the drugs were determined as noncompetitive by Lineweaver-Burk curves.

  6. Solvent screening and crystal habit of metformin hydrochloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benmessaoud, Ibtissem; Koutchoukali, Ouahiba; Bouhelassa, Mohamed; Nouar, Abderrahim; Veesler, Stéphane

    2016-10-01

    A multi-well setup with video-microscopy was used to study the influence of solvent on solubility, nucleation, and crystallization of an Active Pharmaceutical Ingredient (API): metformin hydrochloride (MET.HCl). Starting with 13 solvents covering a wide variety of polarity and proticity, we found 63 crystallization medium for MET.HCl solid generation: good solvents, good co-solvents and anti-solvent systems. For toxicological reasons, we limited the number of crystallization medium to 18: 3 good solvents (class 3), 3 good co-solvent systems and 12 anti-solvent systems. In order to study the influence of crystallization medium on nucleation temperature, crystal habit and polymorphism of MET.HCl, crystallization was studied by a cooling temperature method. Different crystal habits were observed by optical and scanning electron microscopies, and solid phase were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction, indicating that all the crystals correspond to the thermodynamic stable polymorphic form A of MET.HCl. Finally, the enthalpy of fusion and the melting temperature of MET.HCl were determined by DSC and confirmed the X-ray powder diffraction results.

  7. Properties of olopatadine hydrochloride, a new antiallergic/antihistaminic drug.

    PubMed

    Ohmori, Kenji; Hasegawa, Kazuhide; Tamura, Tadafumi; Miyake, Kiyomi; Matsubara, Masahiro; Masaki, Shigehiro; Karasawa, Akira; Urayama, Naoko; Horikoshi, Kaori; Kajita, Jiro; Hasegawa, Masanori; Taniguchi, Koji; Komada, Toshio; Kawamoto, Yuji

    2004-01-01

    Olopatadine hydrochloride (CAS 140462-76-6, KW-4679, AL-4943A; hereinafter referred to as olopatadine) is a novel antiallergic drug that is a selective histamine H1 receptor antagonist possessing inhibitory effects on the release of inflammatory lipid mediators such as leukotriene and thromboxane from human polymorphonuclear leukocytes and eosinophils. Olopatadine also inhibits the tachykininergic contractions in guinea pig bronchi by prejunctional inhibition of peripheral sensory nerves. Oral administration of olopatadine at doses of 0.03 mg/kg or higher reduces the symptoms of experimental allergic cutaneous responses and rhinoconjunctivitis in sensitized animals. Preclinical and clinical evaluations have demonstrated that olopatadine is a safe drug. After oral administration to healthy volunteers, olopatadine was rapidly and extensively absorbed. Unlike most other antiallergic drugs which are eliminated via hepatic metabolism, olopatadine is mainly excreted into urine. Olopatadine did not affect cytochrome P450 activities in human liver microsomes and consequently drug-drug metabolic interactions are unlikely. In double-masked clinical trials, olopatadine was shown to be effective at alleviating symptoms of allergic diseases. The drug (Allelock) was approved in Japan for the treatment of allergic rhinitis, chronic urticaria, eczema dermatitis, prurigo, cutaneous pruritus, psoriasis vulgaris and erythema exsudativum multiforme in December, 2000. An ophthalmic solution of olopatadine is also useful for the treatment of allergic conjunctivitis: this formulation (Patanol) was approved in the USA and the European Union for the treatment of seasonal and perennial allergic conjunctivitis in 1996 and 2002, respectively.

  8. Isoxsuprine hydrochloride in the horse: a review.

    PubMed

    Erkert, R S; Macallister, C G

    2002-04-01

    Isoxsuprine hydrochloride has been suggested for use in horses for treatment of navicular syndrome and laminitis. The drug has been shown to be a beta-adrenoreceptor antagonist with beta-adrenoreceptor agonistic properties, with both characteristics contributing to vasodilation and uterine relaxation. In addition, the drug is capable of decreasing blood viscosity and platelet aggregation. Studies have shown i.v. isoxsuprine to have a plasma half-life of <3 h with a large apparent volume of distribution. Cardiovascular effects resolve rapidly following i.v. administration, but are absent with oral dosing. Oral bioavailability is 2.2% with a high first pass effect. Isoxsuprine has an apparent affinity for melanin that may contribute to extended renal excretion. Clinical trials appear to support the use of isoxsuprine for treatment of navicular disease. However, poor bioavailability, lack of cardiovascular effects following oral administration, superficial support in clinical trials, and new evidence regarding the pathogenesis of navicular syndrome indicate that the use of isoxsuprine for treatment of navicular syndrome or laminitis is questionable at best.

  9. Stability of cefozopran hydrochloride in aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Zalewski, Przemysław; Skibiński, Robert; Paczkowska, Magdalena; Garbacki, Piotr; Talaczyńska, Alicja; Cielecka-Piontek, Judyta; Jelińska, Anna

    2016-01-01

    The influence of pH on the stability of cefozopran hydrochloride (CZH) was investigated in the pH range of 0.44-13.00. Six degradation products were identified with a hybrid ESI-Q-TOF mass spectrometer. The degradation of CZH as a result of hydrolysis was a pseudo-first-order reaction. As general acid-base hydrolysis of CZH was not occurred in the solutions of hydrochloric acid, sodium hydroxide, acetate, borate and phosphate buffers, kobs = kpH because specific acid-base catalysis was observed. Specific acid-base catalysis of CZH consisted of the following reactions: hydrolysis of CZH catalyzed by hydrogen ions (kH+), hydrolysis of dications (k1H2O), monocations (k2H2O) and zwitter ions (k3H2O) and hydrolysis of zwitter ions (k1OH-) and monoanions (k2OH-) of CZH catalyzed by hydroxide ions. The total rate of the reaction was equal to the sum of partial reactions: [Formula: see text]. CZH similarly like other fourth generation cephalosporin was most stable at slightly acidic and neutral pH and less stable in alkaline pH. The cleavage of the β-lactam ring resulting from a nucleophilic attack on the carbonyl carbon in the β-lactam moiety is the preferred degradation pathway of β-lactam antibiotics in aqueous solutions.

  10. Influence of Polymer Type on the Physical Properties and Release Profile of Papaverine Hydrochloride From Hard Gelatin Capsules.

    PubMed

    Polski, Andrzej; Iwaniak, Karol; Kasperek, Regina; Modrzewska, Joanna; Sobótka-Polska, Karolina; Sławińska, Karolina; Poleszak, Ewa

    2015-01-01

    The capsule is one of the most important solid dosage forms in the pharmaceutical industry. It is easier and faster to produce than a tablet, because it requires fewer excipients. Generally, capsules are easy to swallow and mask any unpleasant taste of the substances used while their release profiles can be easily modified. Papaverine hydrochloride was used as a model substance to show different release profiles using different excipients. The main aim of the study was to analyze the impact of using different polymers on the release profile of papaverine hydrochloride from hard gelatin capsules. Six series of hard gelatin capsules containing papaverine hydrochloride as a model drug and different excipients were made. Then, the angle of repose, flow rate, mass flow rate and volume flow rate of the powders used for capsule production were analyzed. The uniform weight and disintegration time of the capsules were studied. The dissolution study was performed in a basket apparatus, while the amount of papaverine hydrochloride released was determined spectrophotometrically at 251 nm. Only one formula of powder had satisfactory flow properties, while all formulas had good Hausner ratios. The best properties were from powder containing polyvinylpyrrolidone 10k. The disintegration time of capsules varied from 1:30 min to 2:00 min. As required by Polish Pharmacopoeia X, 80% of the active substance in all cases was released within 15 minutes. The capsules with polyvinylpyrrolidone 10k were characterized by the longest release. On the other hand, capsules containing microcrystalline cellulose had the fastest release profile. Using 10% of different polymers, without changing the other excipients, had a significant impact on the physical properties of the powders and papaverine hydrochloride release profile. The two most preferred capsule formulations contained either polyvinylpyrrolidone 10k or microcrystalline cellulose.

  11. Immobilization of polar bears (Ursus maritimus Phipps) with a mixture of tiletamine hydrochloride and zolazepam hydrochloride.

    PubMed

    Haigh, J C; Stirling, I; Broughton, E

    1985-01-01

    A 1:1 mixture of tiletamine hydrochloride and zolazepam hydrochloride was tested on 39 polar bears in and near Churchill, Manitoba, Canada during October 1983. The mean dose for satisfactory immobilization with a single injection was 5.1 mg/kg. Bears showed signs of ataxia from 1-3 min following injection and were usually sitting within 4 min. The mean induction time, taken as the adoption of sternal recumbency, was 5.1 min. Maximum relaxation was usually seen by about 20 min post-injection. The duration of immobilization appeared to be related to the dose of drug received. In bears that received a dose near the mean, recumbency lasted about 2 hr. Cubs of the year recovered more quickly than adults. Preliminary results indicated that the bears did not suffer respiratory depression and were able to thermoregulate while immobilized. Bears could be handled safely while under the effects of the drug and workers could readily evaluate the state of their sedation by their reactions. The drug did not appear to provide good analgesia at the doses tested.

  12. Immobilizing wild mountain lions (Felis concolor) with ketamine hydrochloride and xylazine hydrochloride.

    PubMed

    Logan, K A; Thorne, E T; Irwin, L L; Skinner, R

    1986-01-01

    A mixture of 120 mg ketamine hydrochloride (KHCL)/20 mg xylazine hydrochloride (XHCL)/ml was used to immobilize 37 wild mountain lions (Felis concolor) 46 times. Observations were recorded during 37 trials that included kittens, adult females, and adult males. Dosages were based on 11 mg KHCL and 1.8 mg XHCL/kg estimated body weight. Actual doses for 24 lions requiring a single injection for immobilization ranged from 4.7-15.8 mg KHCL/kg and 0.8-2.6 mg XHCL/kg. Induction, duration, and recovery times did not differ (P greater than 0.05) between the sex and age classes. Two kittens were overdosed with the drug combination, but the effects were not life threatening. Eleven other lions, nine of which were initially underdosed, required additional injections of the drug combination for safe handling. Immobilization was characterized initially by semi-consciousness, open eyelids, pupillary dilation, and muscle rigidity. Later, most lions appeared unconscious, muscles relaxed, and breathing slowed considerably. No convulsions or hypersalivation occurred. The KHCL/XHCL mixture given at approximately 11 mg KHCL and 1.8 mg XHCL/kg body weight proved useful for immobilizing wild mountain lions for research purposes. Suggestions for case of immobilized cats are included.

  13. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic interactions among haloperidol, carteolol hydrochloride and biperiden hydrochloride.

    PubMed

    Isawa, S; Murasaki, M; Miura, S; Yoshioka, M; Uchiumi, M; Kumagai, Y; Aoki, S; Hisazumi, H; Kudo, S

    1999-07-01

    A beta-adrenoceptor blocker and an anticholinergic agent are often prescribed concomitantly for the treatment of neuroleptic-induced akathisia. The aim of this study was to investigate possible pharmacokinetic interactions of neuroleptic haloperidol with the beta-blocker carteolol and the anticholinergic biperiden. In a 5-step, open-labeled, oral single-dose study, eight healthy male volunteers received 2 mg haloperidol, 10 mg carteolol hydrochloride, and 2 mg biperiden hydrochloride: first each drug alone, then a combination of haloperidol and carteolol, and then all three drugs concurrently. Serum concentrations of haloperidol, carteolol, and biperiden were determined up to 24 hr postdosing, and a safety evaluation was conducted throughout the study. Carteolol increased the area under the haloperidol serum concentration-time curve (AUC0-t) 1.4-fold (P = 0.0014) and decreased the serum clearance of haloperidol up to 67% (P = 0.0127). Biperiden reduced the serum haloperidol concentrations increased by the administration of carteolol. No significant changes of the serum pharmacokinetics of carteolol and biperiden were found as a result of any drug combinations. Adverse events of the central nervous system such as sleepiness and changes in pupil size were observed, but all were mild with clinical insignificance.

  14. Effectiveness of duloxetine compared with pregabalin and gabapentin in diabetic peripheral neuropathic pain: results from a German observational study.

    PubMed

    Happich, Michael; Schneider, Edith; Boess, Frank G; Wilhelm, Stefan; Schacht, Alexander; Birklein, Frank; Ziegler, Dan

    2014-10-01

    This study aimed to compare the effectiveness of duloxetine (DLX) and the anticonvulsants pregabalin (PGB) and gabapentin (GBP) for the treatment of diabetic peripheral neuropathic pain (DPNP) in routine clinical care. Data from a 6-month, noninterventional study involving 2575 patients in whom treatment of DPNP was initiated with or changed to DLX, PGB, or GBP (n=1523) were analyzed post hoc; patients treated with other medications or combinations were excluded from this analysis. Propensity scoring was used to compare patient groups, assessing Brief Pain Inventory (BPI), Clinical and Patient Global Impression (CGI/PGI), the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), the Sheehan Disability Scale (SDS), and the Short Form Health Survey (SF 12). Mean median daily dosage over 6 months was 53.9 mg for DLX (N=931), 173.5 mg for PGB (N=248), and 727.8 mg for GBP (N=351). BPI average pain severity (last observation carried forward, mean [SD]) decreased by 2.3 [2.30] points for DLX patients, and by 1.9 [2.22] in PGB, and 1.1 [2.15] in GBP patients. This difference remained statistically significant (DLX vs. PGB: P=0.029; DLX vs. GBP: P<0.001) after adjustment by propensity scores. Similar findings were also seen for the BPI interference score, CGI and PGI, the HADS anxiety score, the HADS depression score. When compared with DLX, the low doses of PGB and GBP used in this noninterventional study might have contributed to the lower effectiveness found for both anticonvulsants in the treatment of patients with DPNP.

  15. Development and Validation of a Stability-Indicating RP-UPLC Method for the Estimation of Impurities in Cinacalcet Hydrochloride API and its Formulation.

    PubMed

    Sunil Reddy, Pingili; Raju, Thummala Veera Raghava; Raju, Penmetsa Satyanarayana; Varma, Nadimpalli Sunil; Babu, Kondra Sudhakar

    2015-01-01

    A sensitive, stability-indicating, gradient reversed-phase ultra-performance liquid chromatography method has been developed for the quantitative estimation of cinacalcet hydrochloride impurities in active pharmaceutical ingredients and pharmaceutical formulations. Efficient chromatographic separation was achieved on an Acquity BEH Shield RP18, 100 × 2.1 mm, 1.7 µm column with the mobile phase containing pH 6.6 phosphate buffer and acetonitrile. The flow rate of the mobile phase was 0.3 mL min(-1) with a column temperature of 35°C and detection wavelength at 223 nm. The relative response factor values of (+)-R-1-(1-Naphthyl)ethylamine, regioisomer, diastereomer isomer-1, and diastereomer isomer-2 were 1.79, 0.99, 0.89, and 0.88, respectively. The cinacalcet hydrochloride formulation sample was subjected to the stress conditions of acid, base, oxidative, hydrolytic, thermal, humidity, and photolytic degradation. Cinacalcet hydrochloride was found to degrade significantly under the peroxide stress conditions. The degradation products were well-resolved from cinacalcet hydrochloride and its impurities. The peak purity test results confirmed that the cinacalcet hydrochloride peak was homogenous in all stress samples and the mass balance was found to be more than 96%, thus proving the stability-indicating power of the method. The developed method was validated according to ICH guidelines.

  16. Pharmacokinetic interactions between Japanese traditional medicine (kampo) and modern medicine (III). Effect of Sho-seiryu-to on the pharmacokinetics of azelastine hydrochloride in rats.

    PubMed

    Makino, Toshiaki; Inagaki, Takahiro; Komatsu, Ken-Ichi; Kano, Yoshihiro

    2004-05-01

    Sho-seiryu-to (SST) is widely used herbal formula in Japanese traditional medicine (kampo) to treat allergic diseases. Since Japanese physicians frequently prescribe this formula combined with azelastine hydrochloride, one of anti-histamine and anti-allergic medicines, we evaluated the pharmacokinetic interactions between SST and azelastine hydrochloride in rats to obtain the drug information for the prevention from disadvantage or adverse effects by their combined therapy. Oral administration of SST did not influence the plasma concentration profile of azelastine after its intravaneous injection, suggesting that SST would not change the activities of metabolic enzymes such as cytochrome P450s. However, maximum concentration (C(max)) of azelastine after oral administration of azelastine hydrochloride was significantly reduced and mean residence time (MRT) was significantly lengthened when SST was orally administered at 20 times amount of human daily dosage. There was not significant difference in the area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC), suggesting that SST might delay the absorption of azelastine without affecting the extent of bioavailability. Since this delay was independent of ephedrine that is a main constituent of SST and that a suppressor for gastric transit, SST might form unsoluble complex with azelastine to reduce its absorption. At the double of human daily dose, SST did not made the absorption of azelastine delay. The possibility that SST reduce the absorption of azelastine hydrochloride could not be denied completely, however, it is suggested that SST would not cause pharmacokinetic interaction with azelastine hydrochloride clinically.

  17. Development and Validation of a Stability-Indicating RP-UPLC Method for the Estimation of Impurities in Cinacalcet Hydrochloride API and its Formulation

    PubMed Central

    Sunil Reddy, Pingili; Raju, Thummala Veera Raghava; Raju, Penmetsa Satyanarayana; Varma, Nadimpalli Sunil; Babu, Kondra Sudhakar

    2015-01-01

    A sensitive, stability-indicating, gradient reversed-phase ultra-performance liquid chromatography method has been developed for the quantitative estimation of cinacalcet hydrochloride impurities in active pharmaceutical ingredients and pharmaceutical formulations. Efficient chromatographic separation was achieved on an Acquity BEH Shield RP18, 100 × 2.1 mm, 1.7 µm column with the mobile phase containing pH 6.6 phosphate buffer and acetonitrile. The flow rate of the mobile phase was 0.3 mL min−1 with a column temperature of 35°C and detection wavelength at 223 nm. The relative response factor values of (+)-R-1-(1-Naphthyl)ethylamine, regioisomer, diastereomer isomer-1, and diastereomer isomer-2 were 1.79, 0.99, 0.89, and 0.88, respectively. The cinacalcet hydrochloride formulation sample was subjected to the stress conditions of acid, base, oxidative, hydrolytic, thermal, humidity, and photolytic degradation. Cinacalcet hydrochloride was found to degrade significantly under the peroxide stress conditions. The degradation products were well-resolved from cinacalcet hydrochloride and its impurities. The peak purity test results confirmed that the cinacalcet hydrochloride peak was homogenous in all stress samples and the mass balance was found to be more than 96%, thus proving the stability-indicating power of the method. The developed method was validated according to ICH guidelines. PMID:26839840

  18. 77 FR 7583 - Determination That WILPO (phentermine hydrochloride) Tablets, 8 Milligrams, Was Not Withdrawn...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-13

    ... determined that WILPO (phentermine hydrochloride) Tablets, 8 Milligrams (mg), was not withdrawn from sale for... Applications (ANDAs) for phentermine hydrochloride tablets, 8 mg, if all other legal and regulatory... does not refer to a listed drug. WILPO (phentermine hydrochloride) Tablets, 8 mg is the subject of...

  19. Spectrophotometric determination of meclizine hydrochloride and pyridoxine hydrochloride in laboratory prepared mixtures and in their pharmaceutical preparation.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Maha M; Elzanfaly, Eman S; El-Zeiny, Mohamed B; Ramadan, Nesreen K; Kelani, Khadiga M

    2017-05-05

    In this paper, three rapid, simple, accurate and precise spectrophotometric methods were developed for the determination of meclizine hydrochloride in the presence of pyridoxine hydrochloride without previous separation. The methods under study are dual wavelength (DWL), ratio difference (RD) and continuous wavelet transform (CWT). On the other hand, pyridoxine hydrochloride (PYH) was determined directly at 291nm. The methods obey Beer's law in the range of (5-50μg/mL) for both compounds. All the methods were validated according to the ICH guidelines where the accuracy was found to be 98.29, 99.59, 100.42 and 100.62% for DWL, RD, CWT and PYH; respectively. Moreover the precision of the methods were calculated in terms of %RSD and it was found to be 0.545, 0.372, 1.287 and 0.759 for DWL, RD,CWT and PYH; respectively. The selectivity of the proposed methods was tested using laboratory prepared mixtures and assessed by applying the standard addition technique. So, they can be used for the routine analysis of pyridoxine hydrochloride and meclizine hydrochloride in quality-control laboratories.

  20. Spectrophotometric determination of meclizine hydrochloride and pyridoxine hydrochloride in laboratory prepared mixtures and in their pharmaceutical preparation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibrahim, Maha M.; Elzanfaly, Eman S.; El-Zeiny, Mohamed B.; Ramadan, Nesreen K.; Kelani, Khadiga M.

    2017-05-01

    In this paper, three rapid, simple, accurate and precise spectrophotometric methods were developed for the determination of meclizine hydrochloride in the presence of pyridoxine hydrochloride without previous separation. The methods under study are dual wavelength (DWL), ratio difference (RD) and continuous wavelet transform (CWT). On the other hand, pyridoxine hydrochloride (PYH) was determined directly at 291 nm. The methods obey Beer's law in the range of (5-50 μg/mL) for both compounds. All the methods were validated according to the ICH guidelines where the accuracy was found to be 98.29, 99.59, 100.42 and 100.62% for DWL, RD, CWT and PYH; respectively. Moreover the precision of the methods were calculated in terms of %RSD and it was found to be 0.545, 0.372, 1.287 and 0.759 for DWL, RD,CWT and PYH; respectively. The selectivity of the proposed methods was tested using laboratory prepared mixtures and assessed by applying the standard addition technique. So, they can be used for the routine analysis of pyridoxine hydrochloride and meclizine hydrochloride in quality-control laboratories.

  1. Temperature-dependent THz vibrational spectra of clenbuterol hydrochloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, YuPing; Lei, XiangYun; Yue, Ai; Zhang, Zhenwei

    2013-04-01

    Using the high-resolution Terahertz Time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) and the standard sample pellet technique, the far-infrared vibrational spectra of clenbuterol hydrochloride (CH), a β 2-adrenergic agonist for decreasing fat deposition and enhancing protein accretion, were measured in temperature range of 77-295 K. Between 0.2 and 3.6 THz (6.6-120.0 cm-1), seven highly resolved spectral features, strong line-narrowing and a frequency blue-shift were observed with cooling. However, ractopamine hydrochloride, with some structural and pharmacological similarities to clenbuterol hydrochloride, showed no spectral features, indicating high sensitivity and strong specificity of THz-TDS. These results could be used for the rapid and nondestructive CH residual detection in food safety control.

  2. Colestipol hydrochloride prophylaxis of diarrhea during pelvic radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Stryker, J.A.; Chung, C.K.; Layser, J.D.

    1983-02-01

    Thirty-three patients were randomized prior to pelvic radiotherapy to receive the bile acid-sequestering resin colestipol hydrochloride, 5 grams qid, during the entire time of their therapy or diphenoxylate hydrochloride and atropine sulfate 2.5-20 mg per day (control) if they experienced diarrhea. The colestipol patients also took diphenoxylate if they had diarrhea. The patients in the colestipol group often experienced nausea, vomiting, and abdominal cramps and 8 were forced to discontinue the drug. There was no difference in the weekly stool frequency between the colestipol and the control patients but the colestipol patients who took at least 50% of the prescribed dose required fewer diphenoxylate tablets than the controls. The data suggest that colestipol hydrochloride is not of value in preventing radiation-induced diarrhea because of the side effects associated with the drug, but the theory on which the use of bile acid-sequestering agents is based may be correct.

  3. Simultaneous programmed temperature GLC assay of phenol, chloroxylenol, and lidocaine hydrochloride in topical antiseptic cream.

    PubMed

    Palermo, P J; Lundberg, J B

    1978-11-01

    A simultaneous programmed temperature GLC assay for the active ingredients in a topical antiseptic cream is described. The sample is extracted directly using a dimethyl sulfoxide solution of p-cresol, 4-chlorophenol, and 2-amino-4-phenylthiazole as internal standards for phenol, chloroxylenol, and lidocaine hydrochloride, respectively. The resulting solution is chromatographed by temperature programming on an OV-225 column from 90 to 225 degrees. The internal standard calculation is accomplished using peak heights or peak areas. The relative standard deviation of all assays is less than 2%.

  4. The effect of excipients on the stability and phase transition rate of xylazine hydrochloride and zopiclone.

    PubMed

    Krūkle-Bērziņa, Kristīne; Actiņš, Andris

    2015-03-25

    The compatibility of thermodynamically unstable polymorph of two active pharmaceutical compounds (xylazine hydrochloride form X and zopiclone form C) with different excipients was investigated. The effects of the excipient and its amount in the sample on the thermal properties and possible chemical interactions were studied. The most commonly used excipients in the pharmaceutical industry - calcium carbonate, lactose hydrate, cellulose, magnesium stearate hydrate and calcium stearate hydrate were selected for this study. The dependence of the phase transition rate from an unstable to a more stable polymorph on the excipients and their amounts in the initial sample was analysed at 80°C, and the corresponding phase transition rate constants were calculated.

  5. Feasibility of amlodipine besylate, chloroquine phosphate, dapsone, phenytoin, pyridoxine hydrochloride, sulfadiazine, sulfasalazine, tetracycline hydrochloride, trimethoprim and zonisamide in SyrSpend(®) SF PH4 oral suspensions.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Anderson O; Polonini, Hudson C; Silva, Sharlene L; Patrício, Fernando B; Brandão, Marcos Antônio F; Raposo, Nádia R B

    2016-01-25

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of 10 commonly used active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) compounded in oral suspensions using an internationally used suspending vehicle (SyrSpend(®) SF PH4 liquid): (i) amlodipine, (as besylate) 1.0mg/mL; (ii) chloroquine phosphate,15.0 mg/mL; (iii) dapsone, 2.0 mg/mL; (iv) phenytoin, 15.0 mg/mL; (v) pyridoxine hydrochloride, 50.0 mg/mL; (vi) sulfadiazine, 100.0 mg/mL; (vii) sulfasalazine, 100.0 mg/mL; (viii) tetracycline hydrochloride, 25.0 mg/mL; (ix) trimethoprim, 10.0 mg/mL; and (x) zonisamide, 10.0 mg/mL. All suspensions were stored both at controlled refrigeration (2-8 °C) and controlled room temperature (20-25 °C). Feasibility was assessed by measuring the percent recovery at varying time points throughout a 90-day period. API quantification was performed by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC-UV), via a stability-indicating method. Given the percentage of recovery of the APIs within the suspensions, the expiration date of the final products (API+vehicle) was at least 90 days for all suspensions with regard to both the controlled temperatures. This suggests that the vehicle is stable for compounding APIs from different pharmacological classes.

  6. Duloxetine prevents the effects of prenatal stress on depressive-like and anxiety-like behavior and hippocampal expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines in adult male offspring rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaosong; Wang, Qi; Wang, Yan; Hu, Jingmin; Jiang, Han; Cheng, Wenwen; Ma, Yuchao; Liu, Mengxi; Sun, Anji; Zhang, Xinxin; Li, Xiaobai

    2016-12-01

    Stress during pregnancy may cause neurodevelopmental and psychiatric disorders. However, the mechanisms are largely unknown. Currently, pro-inflammatory cytokines have been identified as a risk factor for depression and anxiety disorder. Unfortunately, there is very little research on the long-term effects of prenatal stress on the neuroinflammatory system of offspring. Moreover, the relationship between antidepressant treatment and cytokines in the central nervous system, especially in the hippocampus, an important emotion modulation center, is unclear. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine the effects of prenatal chronic mild stress during development on affective-like behaviors and hippocampal cytokines in adult offspring, and to verify whether antidepressant (duloxetine) administration from early adulthood could prevent the harmful consequences. To do so, prenatally stressed and non-stressed Sprague-Dawley rats were treated with either duloxetine (10mg/kg/day) or vehicle from postnatal day 60 for 21days. Adult offspring were divided into four groups: 1) prenatal stress+duloxetine treatment, 2) prenatal stress+vehicle, 3) duloxetine treatment alone, and 4) vehicle alone. Adult offspring were assessed for anxiety-like behavior using the open field test and depression-like behavior using the forced swim test. Brains were analyzed for pro-inflammatory cytokine markers in the hippocampus via real-time PCR. Results demonstrate that prenatal stress-induced anxiety- and depression-like behaviors are associated with an increase in hippocampal inflammatory mediators, and duloxetine administration prevents the increased hippocampal pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-6 and anxiety- and depression-like behavior in prenatally stressed adult offspring. This research provides important evidence on the long-term effect of PNS exposure during development in a model of maternal adversity to study the pathogenesis of depression and its therapeutic interventions

  7. Olopatadine hydrochloride suppresses hot flashes induced by topical treatment with tacrolimus ointment in rats.

    PubMed

    Satake, Kyosuke; Ikeda, Junichi; Tamura, Tadafumi; Amano, Toru; Kobayashi, Katsuya

    2015-10-15

    Tacrolimus ointment is prescribed for patients with atopic dermatitis, although it is known to cause transient burning sensations and hot flashes in the applied skin. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of olopatadine hydrochloride (olopatadine), an antiallergic agent with a histamine H1 receptor (H1R) antagonistic activity, on the incidence of hot flashes induced by topical treatment with tacrolimus ointment in rats. Consequently, the skin temperature was increased by the topical application of tacrolimus ointment in rats, and the rise in skin temperature was inhibited by pretreatment with olopatadine in a dose-dependent manner. Inhibitory effect of olopatadine on tacrolimus-induced skin temperature elevation was significantly more potent than that of cetirizine hydrochloride, other antiallergic agent with H1R antagonistic activity, at doses in which both agents exhibit comparable H1R antagonistic activity in rats. These results suggest that H1R antagonistic activity-independent mechanism contribute to the inhibitory effect of olopatadine on tacrolimus-induced skin temperature elevation. Olopatadine also significantly inhibited increases in vascular permeability and nerve growth factor production in the skin induced by topical tacrolimus treatment. Thus, the onset of hot flashes in rats is quantitatively determined by measuring the skin temperature and olopatadine attenuates hot flashes induced by topical tacrolimus ointment in rats, suggesting that the combination application with olopatadine and tacrolimus ointment is useful for improving medication adherence with tacrolimus ointment treatment in patients with atopic dermatitis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. A new HPLC method to determine Donepezil hydrochloride in tablets.

    PubMed

    Pappa, Horacio; Farrú, Romina; Vilanova, Paula Otaño; Palacios, Marcelo; Pizzorno, María Teresa

    2002-01-01

    A HPLC stability-indicating assay for Donepezil hydrochloride in tablets was developed and validated. Donepezil hydrochloride is a reversible inhibitor of acetylcholinesterase, indicated for the treatment of mild to moderate dementia of the Alzheimer's type. The HPLC method was performed with a reversed phase C18 column, detection at 268 nm and a mixture of methanol, phosphate buffer 0.02 M and triethylamine (50:50:0.5) as mobile phase. Typical retention time for Donepezil was 9 min. The method was statistically validated for linearity, accuracy, precision and selectivity following ICH recommendations. Due to its simplicity and accuracy, the method can be used for routine quality control analysis.

  9. Degradation of Verapamil hydrochloride in water by gliding arc discharge.

    PubMed

    Krishna, Syam; Maslani, Alan; Izdebski, Tomasz; Horakova, Marta; Klementova, Sarka; Spatenka, Petr

    2016-06-01

    This study investigated the influence of gliding arc plasma discharge on the degradation of Verapamil hydrochloride in water. The plasma discharge was characterized by means of optical emission spectroscopy. Spectra of various atomic and molecular species were observed. Aqueous solution of Verapamil hydrochloride was exposed to gliding arc discharge operated in continuous discharge at atmospheric pressure and room temperature. The identification of Verapamil, the degradation mechanisms of Verapamil and its transformation products were performed using liquid chromatography - mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS). Experimental results indicate that the atmospheric pressure gliding arc plasma treatment has noticeable effects on Verapamil with satisfactory degradation efficiency. Plausible mechanisms of the degradation were discussed.

  10. A Clinical Study of Efficacy of 4% Articaine Hydrochloride Versus 2% Lignocaine Hydrochloride in Dentistry

    PubMed Central

    Darawade, Dattatraya A; Kumar, Santosh; Budhiraja, Shilpa; Mittal, Manoj; Mehta, Tanvi N

    2014-01-01

    Background: Articaine in an anesthetic agent, which is used less frequently in dentistry. It differs from other agents due to the presence of a thiophene ring in its molecular structure. Few groups of researchers claim that it is superior to lignocaine. Hence, the purpose of this study was to compare the efficacy of 4% articaine hydrochloride and 2% lignocaine hydrochloride in the orthodontic extraction. Materials and Methods: The study was carried out in 50 patients who needed the orthodontic extraction in the age group from 15 to 25 years. Experimental sites were injected with 0.5-1 ml of 4% articaine HCL containing 1:100000 adrenaline, incrementally in the buccal vestibule without palatal anaesthesia. Control sites were injected with 0.8-1 ml of 2% lignocaine HCL containing 1:100000 adrenaline, incrementally in the buccal vestibule. All the parameters, that is volume, duration, time of anesthesia and pain rating were noted and statistically compared. Result: When statistically compared mean volume of articaine (0.779 ± 0.1305) was less than lignocaine (1.337 ± 0.2369). Mean time of onset of articaine was 1.012 ± 0.2058 min, Whereas that of was 1.337 ± 0.2369. Pain rating showed not much difference, but in the lignocaine group palatal anesthesia was required in all the patients. Finally, the mean duration of anesthesia in articaine group was 69.08 ± 18.247, whereas in the lignocaine group was 55.66 ± 6.414. Conclusion: Articaine has proved its usefulness in all regards. Literatures have proved its usefulness. Like other anesthetic, it is safe and more effective. It surpasses the need of additional palatal anesthesia. Rapid inactivation in liver and plasma reduces the risk of the drug overdose. All the above factors make it an ideal anesthetic agent to be used in dentistry. PMID:25395799

  11. Octenidine hydrochloride for the care of central venous catheter insertion sites in severely immunocompromised patients.

    PubMed

    Tietz, Andreas; Frei, Reno; Dangel, Marc; Bolliger, Dora; Passweg, Jakob R; Gratwohl, Alois; Widmer, Andreas E

    2005-08-01

    To determine the efficacy and tolerability of octenidine hydrochloride, a non-alcoholic skin antiseptic, for the care of central venous catheter (CVC) insertion sites. Prospective, observational study. Bone marrow transplantation unit of a university hospital. All consecutive patients with a nontunneled CVC were enrolled prospectively after informed consent. Octenidine hydrochloride (0.1%) was applied for disinfection at the CVC insertion site during dressing changes. The following cultures were performed weekly as well as at the occurrence of any systemic inflammatory response syndrome criteria: cultures of the skin surrounding the CVC entry site, cultures of the three-way hub connected to the CVC, blood cultures, and cultures of the CVC tip on removal. Enhanced microbiological methods (skin swabs of a 24-cm2 standardized area, roll plate, and sonication of catheter tips) were applied. One hundred thirty-five CVCs were inserted in 62 patients during the study period and remained for a mean period of 19.1 days, corresponding to 2,462 catheter-days. Bacterial density at the insertion site declined substantially over time, and most cultures became negative 2 weeks after insertion. Only 6 patients had a documented catheter-related bloodstream infection. The incidence density was 2.39 catheter infections per 1,000 catheter-days. No side effects were noted with application of the antiseptic. Disinfection with a skin antiseptic that contains octenidine hydrochloride is highly active and well tolerated. It leads to a decrease in skin colonization over time and may be a new option for CVC care.

  12. Inhibitory gene expression of the Cav3.1 T-type calcium channel to improve neuronal injury induced by lidocaine hydrochloride.

    PubMed

    Wen, Xianjie; Xu, Shiyuan; Zhang, Qingguo; Li, Xiaohong; Liang, Hua; Yang, Chenxiang; Wang, Hanbing; Liu, Hongzhen

    2016-03-15

    Cav3.1 is a low-voltage-activated (LVA) calcium channel that plays a key role in regulating intracellular calcium ion levels. In this study, we observed the effects of lidocaine hydrochloride on the pshRNA-CACNA1G-SH-SY5Y cells that silenced Cav3.1 mRNA by RNA interference, and investigated the roles of p38 MAPK in these effects. We constructed the pNC-puro-CACNA1G-SH-SY5Y cells and pshRNA-CACNA1G -SH-SY5Y cells by the RNA interference. All the cells were cultured with or without 10mM lidocaine hydrochloride for 24 h. The cell morphology, cell viability, Cav3.1 and p38 protein expression, cell apoptosis rate and intracellular calcium ion concentration were detected. We found that all cells treated with 10mM lidocaine hydrochloride for 24 h showed cellular rounding, axonal regression, and cellular floating. Compared with the cells in SH-SY5Y+Lido group and NC+Lido group, those in the RNAi+Lido group showed similar changes, but of smaller magnitude. Additionally, following lidocaine hydrochloride all cells displayed increased Cav3.1 and p38 MAPK protein, apoptosis rate, and intracellular calcium ion levels; however,these changes in the RNAi+Lido group were less pronounced than in the SH-SY5Y+Lido and NC+Lido groups. The cell viability decreased following lidocaine hydrochloride treatment, but viability of the cells in the RNAi+Lido group was higher than in the SH-SY5Y+Lido and NC+Lido groups. The results showed that Cav3.1 may be involved in neuronal injury induced by lidocaine hydrochloride and that p38 MAPK phosphorylation was reduced upon Cav3.1 gene silencing. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis caused by terazosin hydrochloride.

    PubMed

    Speck, Laura M; Wilkerson, Michael G; Perri, Anthony J; Kelly, Brent C

    2008-04-01

    Acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis (AGEP) is a rare cutaneous eruption mainly provoked by drugs. A case of AGEP in a 74-year-old male that was attributed to the ingestion of terazosin hydrochloride is presented. This is the first reported case of this association in medical literature. The history, clinical presentation, and pathogenesis of AGEP are discussed.

  14. Amides and Hydrazides from Amine and Hydrazine Hydrochlorides.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shama, Sami A.; Tran, Thuan L.

    1978-01-01

    This safe and efficient procedure for the synthesis of N-substituted amides and hydrazides is a modification of the Schotten-Bausmann procedure in which the amine or hydrazide is replaced by the corresponding hydrochloride salt, and the use of alkali is eliminated. (Author/BB)

  15. Stability of propranolol hydrochloride in SyrSpend SF.

    PubMed

    Geiger, Christine M; Voudrie, Mark A; Sorenson, Bridget

    2012-01-01

    Propranolol hydrochloride is a beta blocker used to treat high blood pressure, abnormal heart rhythms, heart disease, pheochromocytoma, and certain types of tremors. Propranolol is marketed by Wyeth (now a part of Pfizer) and AstraZeneca under the brand names Inderal, Inderal LA, Avlocardyl, Deralin, Dociton, Inderalici, InnoPran XL, Sumial, Anaprilium, Bedranol SR (Sandoz). It is also available generically from several manufacturers. Propranolol hydrochloride is available as tablet, capsule, and oral liquid dosage forms in several strengths. Some patients are unable to tolerate oral tablets and capsules, challenging compounding pharmacies to seek alternative dosing options; namely oral solutions and suspensions. The objective of this study was to determine the stability of propranolol hydrochloride in SyrSpend SF. The drug was compounded into a 1-mg/mL suspension using SyrSpend SF and subsequently stored in a low-actinic plastic prescription bottle at room temperature conditions. Six samples were assayed at each specific time point extending to 90 days by a stability-indicating high-performance liquid chromatography method. The method was validated for its specificity through forced-degradation studies. Based on the data collected, when protected from light at room temperature, the beyond-use date of propranolol hydrochloride in SyrSpend SF was shown to be at least 90 days.

  16. The prolonged release of oxytetracycline hydrochloride from ethylcellulose microcapsules.

    PubMed

    Mesiha, M S; Aboutaleb, A E

    1982-07-01

    Oxytetracycline hydrochloride microcapsules were prepared by separation of ethylcellulose from cyclohexane solution following cooling. Incomplete release was found when testing the dissolution rate in water. Interaction of the polymer with oxytetracycline was elucidated by IR spectroscopy. More release of the drug in water agreed with the diffusional model, but in acid it was more complex.

  17. 21 CFR 520.2582 - Triflupromazine hydrochloride tablets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Triflupromazine hydrochloride tablets. 520.2582 Section 520.2582 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS §...

  18. 21 CFR 520.2582 - Triflupromazine hydrochloride tablets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Triflupromazine hydrochloride tablets. 520.2582 Section 520.2582 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS §...

  19. 21 CFR 520.2582 - Triflupromazine hydrochloride tablets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Triflupromazine hydrochloride tablets. 520.2582 Section 520.2582 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS §...

  20. 21 CFR 522.2474 - Tolazoline hydrochloride injection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Tolazoline hydrochloride injection. 522.2474 Section 522.2474 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS IMPLANTATION OR INJECTABLE DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL...

  1. 21 CFR 520.2582 - Triflupromazine hydrochloride tablets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Triflupromazine hydrochloride tablets. 520.2582 Section 520.2582 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS §...

  2. 21 CFR 522.2474 - Tolazoline hydrochloride injection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Tolazoline hydrochloride injection. 522.2474 Section 522.2474 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS IMPLANTATION OR INJECTABLE DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL...

  3. Asthma due to inhaled chemical agents--amprolium hydrochloride.

    PubMed

    Greene, S A; Freedman, S

    1976-03-01

    A man with no previous history of allergy or chest disease developed asthma after exposure to a heavy atmospheric concentration of amprolium hydrochloride which is a constituent of a poultry-food additive. Subsequent experimental exposure produced an immediate asthmatic reaction which was inhibited by sodium cromoglycate.

  4. 21 CFR 520.2582 - Triflupromazine hydrochloride tablets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Triflupromazine hydrochloride tablets. 520.2582 Section 520.2582 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS §...

  5. Amides and Hydrazides from Amine and Hydrazine Hydrochlorides.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shama, Sami A.; Tran, Thuan L.

    1978-01-01

    This safe and efficient procedure for the synthesis of N-substituted amides and hydrazides is a modification of the Schotten-Bausmann procedure in which the amine or hydrazide is replaced by the corresponding hydrochloride salt, and the use of alkali is eliminated. (Author/BB)

  6. Study on the syhthesis process of tetracaine hydrochloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wenli; Zhao, Jie; Cui, Yujie

    2017-05-01

    Tetrachloride hydrochloride is a local anesthetic with long-acting ester, and it is usually present in the form of a hydrochloride salt. Firsleb first synthesized the tetracaine by experiment in 1928, which is one of the recognized clinical potent anesthetics. This medicine has the advantages of stable physical and chemical properties, the rapid role and long maintenance. Tetracaine is also used for ophthalmic surface anesthesia as one of the main local anesthetic just like conduction block anesthesia, mucosal surface anesthesia and epidural anesthesia. So far, the research mainly engaged in its clinical application research, and the research strength is relatively small in the field of synthetic technology. The general cost of the existing production process is high, and the yield is low. In addition, the reaction time is long and the reaction conditions are harsh. In this paper, a new synthetic method was proposed for the synthesis of tetracaine hydrochloride. The reaction route has the advantages of few steps, high yield, short reaction time and mild reaction conditions. The cheap p-nitrobenzoic acid was selected as raw material. By esterification with ethanol and reaction with n-butyraldehyde (the reaction process includes nitro reduction, aldol condensation and hydrogenation reduction), the intermediate was transesterified with dimethylaminoethanol under basic conditions. Finally, the PH value was adjusted in the ethanol solvent. After experiencing 4 steps reaction, the crude tetracaine hydrochloride was obtained.

  7. 40 CFR 180.276 - Formetanate hydrochloride; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... for residues. 180.276 Section 180.276 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS TOLERANCES AND EXEMPTIONS FOR PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Specific Tolerances § 180.276 Formetanate hydrochloride; tolerances for residues. (a) General. Tolerances...

  8. 21 CFR 522.863 - Ethylisobutrazine hydrochloride injection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ethylisobutrazine hydrochloride injection. 522.863 Section 522.863 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS IMPLANTATION OR INJECTABLE DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL...

  9. 21 CFR 522.313b - Ceftiofur hydrochloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ceftiofur hydrochloride. 522.313b Section 522.313b Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS IMPLANTATION OR INJECTABLE DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS §...

  10. 21 CFR 522.536 - Detomidine hydrochloride injection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Detomidine hydrochloride injection. 522.536 Section 522.536 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS IMPLANTATION OR INJECTABLE DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL...

  11. 21 CFR 522.313b - Ceftiofur hydrochloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ceftiofur hydrochloride. 522.313b Section 522.313b Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS IMPLANTATION OR INJECTABLE DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS §...

  12. 21 CFR 522.536 - Detomidine hydrochloride injection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Detomidine hydrochloride injection. 522.536 Section 522.536 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS IMPLANTATION OR INJECTABLE DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL...

  13. 21 CFR 522.313b - Ceftiofur hydrochloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ceftiofur hydrochloride. 522.313b Section 522.313b Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS IMPLANTATION OR INJECTABLE DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS §...

  14. 21 CFR 522.723 - Diprenorphine hydrochloride injection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Diprenorphine hydrochloride injection. 522.723 Section 522.723 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS IMPLANTATION OR INJECTABLE DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL...

  15. 21 CFR 522.313b - Ceftiofur hydrochloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ceftiofur hydrochloride. 522.313b Section 522.313b Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS IMPLANTATION OR INJECTABLE DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS §...

  16. 21 CFR 522.883 - Etorphine hydrochloride injection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Etorphine hydrochloride injection. 522.883 Section 522.883 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS IMPLANTATION OR INJECTABLE DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL...

  17. 21 CFR 522.723 - Diprenorphine hydrochloride injection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Diprenorphine hydrochloride injection. 522.723 Section 522.723 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS IMPLANTATION OR INJECTABLE DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL...

  18. 21 CFR 522.723 - Diprenorphine hydrochloride injection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Diprenorphine hydrochloride injection. 522.723 Section 522.723 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS IMPLANTATION OR INJECTABLE DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL...

  19. 21 CFR 522.536 - Detomidine hydrochloride injection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Detomidine hydrochloride injection. 522.536 Section 522.536 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS IMPLANTATION OR INJECTABLE DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL...

  20. 21 CFR 522.313b - Ceftiofur hydrochloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ceftiofur hydrochloride. 522.313b Section 522.313b Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS IMPLANTATION OR INJECTABLE DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS §...

  1. 21 CFR 522.883 - Etorphine hydrochloride injection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Etorphine hydrochloride injection. 522.883 Section 522.883 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS IMPLANTATION OR INJECTABLE DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL...

  2. 21 CFR 522.883 - Etorphine hydrochloride injection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Etorphine hydrochloride injection. 522.883 Section 522.883 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS IMPLANTATION OR INJECTABLE DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL...

  3. 21 CFR 522.536 - Detomidine hydrochloride injection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Detomidine hydrochloride injection. 522.536 Section 522.536 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS IMPLANTATION OR INJECTABLE DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL...

  4. Cradle-to-gate life cycle inventory of vancomycin hydrochloride.

    PubMed

    Ponder, Celia; Overcash, Michael

    2010-02-15

    A life cycle analysis on the cradle-to-gate production of vancomycin hydrochloride, which begins at natural resource extraction and spans through factory (gate) production, not only shows all inputs, outputs, and energy usage to manufacture the product and all related supply chain chemicals, but can highlight where process changes would have the greatest impact on raw material and energy consumption and emissions. Vancomycin hydrochloride is produced by a low-yield fermentation process that accounts for 47% of the total cradle-to-gate energy. The fermentation step consumes the most raw materials and energy cradle-to-gate. Over 75% of the total cradle-to-gate energy consumption is due to steam use; sterilization within fermentation is the largest user of steam. Aeration and agitation in the fermentation vessels use 65% of the cradle-to-gate electrical energy. To reduce raw materials, energy consumption, and the associated environmental footprint of producing vancomycin hydrochloride, other sterilization methods, fermentation media, nutrient sources, or synthetic manufacture should be investigated. The reported vancomycin hydrochloride life cycle inventory is a part of a larger life cycle study of the environmental consequences of the introduction of biocide-coated medical textiles for the prevention of MRSA (methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus) nosocomial infections.

  5. Preparation of Mucoadhesive Oral Patches Containing Tetracycline Hydrochloride and Carvacrol for Treatment of Local Mouth Bacterial Infections and Candidiasis

    PubMed Central

    Obaidat, Rana M.; Bader, Ammar; Al-Rajab, Wafa; Abu Sheikha, Ghassan; Obaidat, Aiman A.

    2011-01-01

    The specific aim of this work was to prepare mucoadhesive patches containing tetracycline hydrochloride and carvacrol in an attempt to develop a novel oral drug delivery system for the treatment of mouth infections. The bilayered patches were prepared using ethyl cellulose as a backing layer and carbopol 934 as a matrix mucoadhesive layer. Patches were prepared with different loading amounts of tetracycline hydrochloride and carvacrol. The antimicrobial activity was assessed for the prepared patches using the disc-diffusion method against the yeast Candida albicans and five bacterial strains, including Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, Bacillus cereus, Staphylococcus aureus, and Bacillus bronchispti. In this work, we highlighted the possibility of occurrence of a synergistic action between carvacrol and tetracycline. The best formulation was selected based on microbiological tests, drug release, ex-vivo mucoadhesive performance, and swelling index. Physical characteristics of the selected formulations were determined. These included pH, patch thickness, weight uniformity, content uniformity, folding endurance, and patch stability. PMID:21617783

  6. Midregional pro-adrenomedullin as a predictor for therapeutic response to midodrine hydrochloride in children with postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fengwen; Li, Xueying; Ochs, Todd; Chen, Li; Liao, Ying; Tang, Chaoshu; Jin, Hongfang; Du, Junbao

    2012-07-24

    This study was designed to explore the predictive value of the midregional fragment of pro-adrenomedullin (MR-proADM) in assessing the therapeutic efficacy of midodrine hydrochloride for children with postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS). Midodrine hydrochloride is an important therapeutic option for children with POTS. However, there has not been any method to predict response to the drug. The MR-proADM is produced in equimolar amounts to adrenomedullin (ADM), and directly reflects levels of the rapidly degraded active peptide, ADM. Fifty-seven children with POTS were designated as the POTS group. Twenty healthy children served as the control group. The children in the POTS group received midodrine hydrochloride treatment. The plasma concentration of MR-proADM was measured, using a sandwich immunoluminometric assay. A receiver-operating characteristic curve was used to explore the predictive value of MR-proADM. Plasma levels of MR-proADM were significantly higher in children with POTS (75.0 [62.5 to 96.0] pg/ml) than in the control group (58.5 [50.3 to 69.0] pg/ml). Plasma levels of MR-proADM in responders to midodrine hydrochloride was significantly higher than that of nonresponders (76.0 [66.0 to 91.0] pg/ml vs. 59.0 [54.0 to 65.5] pg/ml, p < 0.01]. A receiver-operating characteristic curve on the predictive value of MR-proADM showed that the area under the curve was 0.879 with a 95% confidence interval of 0.761 to 0.997. Using a cutoff value for MR-proADM of 61.5 pg/ml produced both high sensitivity (100%) and specificity (71.6%) in predicting the efficacy of midodrine hydrochloride therapy for treating POTS. MR-proADM can help guide midodrine hydrochloride therapy in the management of POTS in children. Copyright © 2012 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Early discontinuation and suboptimal dosing of duloxetine treatment in patients with major depressive disorder: analysis from a US third-party payer perspective.

    PubMed

    Cui, Zhanglin; Faries, Douglas E; Gelwicks, Steven; Novick, Diego; Liu, Xianchen

    2012-01-01

    Little is known about early discontinuation of duloxetine therapy or the effect that initial dose has on discontinuation in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD). Data from a private payer insurance claim database included 6132 patients with MDD who started duloxetine between 7/1/2005 and 6/30/2006, had no prescription for duloxetine in the previous 3 months, and were enrolled for 12 months before and after initiation. Chi-square tests, t-tests, and logistic regression were used to compare demographic, clinical, and healthcare cost data stratified by length of continuation. Early discontinuation was defined as continuation ≤30 days. Healthcare costs, persistence, and adherence were compared between patients with suboptimal initial dose (<40 mg/day) and those with recommended initial dose (40-60 mg/day). Discontinuation rates were 16.8% at ≤30 days, 16.7% at 31-90 days, 14.9% at 91-180 days, and 51.6% at >180 days. Suboptimal initial dose, younger age, male gender, prior benzodiazepine use, insomnia, psychiatric disorders, infectious diseases, digestive disorders, genitourinary disorders, and injury/poisoning increased the likelihood of early discontinuation (Odds ratios [ORs]: 1.18-2.16), while recent use of SSRIs or venlafaxine XR decreased the likelihood (ORs: 0.67-0.68). Compared with patients who persisted with therapy for >180 days, patients who discontinued early had more hospital admissions, longer hospital stays, and more ER visits during the 1-year follow-up (all p-values <0.01). Patients with an initial dose <40 mg/day had shorter persistence (p < 0.001) and lower rates of adherence (p < 0.001) compared with patients with an initial dose of 40-60 mg/day. Limitations of this study were those of all analyses based on data from insurance claim databases. Early discontinuation was associated with increased healthcare utilization. Demographic and clinical predictors of early discontinuation were identified that may help target care

  8. Development of hypertension and effects of benazepril hydrochloride in a canine remnant kidney model of chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Mishina, Mika; Watanabe, Toshifumi

    2008-05-01

    In order to determine whether hypertension would develop in dogs with chronic renal failure, we performed 7/8 renal ablation in 6 healthy dogs and compared pre- and post-ablation blood pressures determined by telemetry. One month after the renal ablation, blood urea nitrogen and creatinine were significantly increased (p<0.05), creatinine clearance was decreased (p<0.05), and blood pressure was increased significantly (p<0.05). Simultaneously, plasma renin activity, angiotensin I and II, and aldosterone were elevated significantly (p<0.05) compared with the values obtained from 11 healthy dogs with intact renal function. The dogs with induced renal failure and hypertension were administered an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor, benazepril hydrochloride, once daily for 2 weeks at 2 mg/kg body weight, and changes in blood pressure and the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone (RAA) system were determined. During the administration of benazepril hydrochloride, blood pressure, angiotensin II and aldosterone decreased significantly (p<0.05) and, upon discontinuation of administration, increased to the pre-administration levels (p<0.05). Plasma renin activity and angiotensin I showed no significant changes throughout the administration study. These results provide experimental evidence that hypertension develops in dogs with chronic renal failure through mechanisms involving the RAA system and demonstrate that benazepril hydrochloride improves renal hypertension in dogs.

  9. Guanidine hydrochloride embedded polyurethanes as antimicrobial and absorptive wound dressing membranes with promising cytocompatibility.

    PubMed

    Sahraro, Maryam; Yeganeh, Hamid; Sorayya, Marziyeh

    2016-02-01

    Preparation and assessments of novel absorptive wound dressing materials with efficient antimicrobial activity as well as very good cytocompatibility were described in this work. An amine terminated poly(hexamethylene guanidine hydrochloride) was prepared and used as curing agent of different epoxy-terminated polyurethane prepolymers. The structures of prepared materials were elucidated by evaluation of their (1)H NMR and FTIR spectra. The recorded tensile strength of membranes confirmed the excellent dimensional stability of the film type dressings even at fully hydrated conditions. Therefore, these dressings could protect the wound bed from external forces during the healing period. The structurally optimized dressing membranes could preserve the desired moist environment over the wounded area, as a result of their balanced equilibrium, water absorption and water vapor transmission rate. Therefore, a very good condition for stimulation of self-healing of wound bed was attained. Also, owing to the presence of guanidine hydrochloride moieties embedded into the structure of dressings, efficient antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Candida albicans were detected. In vitro cytotoxicity assay of the prepared dressings revealed cytocompatibility of these materials against fibroblast cells. Therefore, they could support cell growth and proliferation at the wounded area.

  10. Teratologic and postnatal evaluation of aniline hydrochloride in the Fischer 344 rat.

    PubMed

    Price, C J; Tyl, R W; Marks, T A; Paschke, L L; Ledoux, T A; Reel, J R

    1985-03-15

    Timed-pregnant Fischer 344 rats were dosed by gavage with aniline hydrochloride (10, 30, or 100 mg/kg/day), a positive control agent (hydroxyurea, 200 mg/kg/day), or vehicle (distilled water) on gestational days (gd) 7 through 20 or gd 7 through parturition. At termination on gd 20 confirmed-pregnant dams exhibited characteristic signs of aniline HCl toxicity, i.e., methemoglobinemia, increased relative spleen weight, decreased red blood cell (RBC) count, and hematological changes indicative of increased hematopoietic activity. High-dose dams exhibited mild methemoglobinemia, increased relative spleen weight, and increased RBC size at termination on postnatal day (pnd) 30. At termination on gd 20, fetuses from aniline-treated dams exhibited increased relative liver weight and enhanced hematopoietic activity, but no evidence of an embryolethal or teratogenic effect was observed. Postnatal signs of toxicity in litters from aniline-treated dams (i.e., decreased body weight, elevated relative liver weight, and elevated relative spleen weight) were transient, and no evidence of toxicity was observed in pups surviving to pnd 60. Hydroxyurea (200 mg/kg/day) administered by gavage proved to be an excellent positive control for embryotoxicity, maternal toxicity, teratogenicity, and postnatal maturational deficits in the Fischer 344 rat. In conclusion, aniline hydrochloride was not teratogenic to Fischer 344 rats, even at maternally toxic doses; transient signs of toxicity were observed postnatally in the offspring in conjunction with mild, but persistent signs of maternal toxicity through pnd 30.

  11. Chemical Immobilization of Sloth Bears (Melursus ursinus) with Ketamine Hydrochloride and Xylazine Hydrochloride: Hematology and Serum Biochemical Values.

    PubMed

    Veeraselvam, M; Sridhar, R; Perumal, P; Jayathangaraj, M G

    2014-01-01

    The present study was conducted to define the physiological responses of captive sloth bears immobilized with ketamine hydrochloride and xylazine hydrochloride and to determine and compare the values of hematology and serum biochemical parameters between sexes. A total of 15 sloth bears were immobilized using combination of ketamine hydrochloride and xylazine hydrochloride drugs at the dose rate of 5.0 milligram (mg) per kg body weight and 2.0 mg per kg body weight, respectively. The use of combination of these drugs was found satisfactory for the chemical immobilization of captive sloth bears. There were no significant differences observed in induction time and recovery time and physiological parameters such as heart rate, respiratory rate, and rectal temperature between sexes. Health related parameters comprising hematological values like packed cell volume (PCV), hemoglobin (Hb), red blood cell count (RBC), erythrocyte indices, and so forth and biochemical values like total protein, blood urea nitrogen (BUN), creatinine, alkaline amino-transferase (ALT), aspartate amino-transferase (AST), and so forth were estimated in 11 (5 males and 6 females) apparently healthy bears. Comparison between sexes revealed significant difference in PCV (P < 0.05) and mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (MCHC) (P < 0.05). The study might help to evaluate health profiles of sloth bears for appropriate line treatment.

  12. Dexmethylphenidate--Novartis/Celgene. Focalin, D-MPH, D-methylphenidate hydrochloride, D-methylphenidate, dexmethylphenidate, dexmethylphenidate hydrochloride.

    PubMed

    2002-01-01

    Celgene has developed a chirally pure form of methylphenidate (Ritalin), called dexmethylphenidate [d-methylphenidate, d-methylphenidate hydrochloride, d-MPH; Focalin]. The drug has been launched in the USA and is undergoing registration in Canada for the treatment of children with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Dexmethylphenidate is the single isomer version of racemic methylphenidate (Ritalin), which contains the active d isomer of Ritalin. Dexmethylphenidate acts via the inhibition of reuptake of norepinephrine and dopamine. Research is ongoing to further clarify the mode of therapeutic action in ADHD. Dexmethylphenidate was developed with the aim of reducing drug load, adverse events and drug interactions. Dexmethylphenidate provides effective management of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder at half the dose of Ritalin. In April 2000, worldwide rights (excluding Canada) to dexmethylphenidate were granted to Novartis. Celgene has also granted Novartis rights to all related intellectual properties and patents. Novartis will fund all remaining development and marketing expenses required for regulatory approval and commercialisation of dexmethylphenidate. Crystaal Corporation, the marketing division of Biovail Corporation International, has exclusive Canadian marketing rights for all formulations of dexmethylphenidate. Novartis launched dexmethylphenidate (Focalin) in the USA during Q1 2002. It is available as a D-shaped tablet (2.5, 5 and 10 mg doses). Novartis had planned to use the tradename Ritadex, however the FDA recommended an alternative name due to potential prescribing errors with Ritalin. The finalized tradename to be used is Focalin. In July 2001, a new drug submission was filed with Canada's Therapeutic Products Programme for dexmethylphenidate in the treatment of attention-deficit disorder and attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder. Novartis is also developing an extended-release version of chirally pure dexmethylphenidate

  13. Effects of zilpaterol hydrochloride and zilpaterol hydrochloride withdrawal time on beef carcass cutability, composition, and tenderness.

    PubMed

    Shook, J N; VanOverbeke, D L; Kinman, L A; Krehbiel, C R; Holland, B P; Streeter, M N; Yates, D A; Hilton, G G

    2009-11-01

    The impact of zilpaterol hydrochloride (ZH) on carcass yield, composition, and tenderness was evaluated using 384 beef steers in a randomized complete block design. Main effects were the addition of 0 or 8.3 mg/kg of ZH for the final 20 d of feeding and each inclusion level was paired with withdrawal periods of 3, 10, 17, or 24 d. The 2 animals with BW closest to the pen average were selected for carcass fabrication to determine carcass yield, composition, and tenderness. The carcasses from animals fed ZH had greater (P = 0.008) individual side weights. Carcass fat determinations were unchanged (P = 0.70) by ZH. Weights of the strip loin (P = 0.01), peeled tenderloin (P = 0.02), and top sirloin butt (P < 0.001) were all improved with ZH. When expressed as a proportion of carcass weight, ZH increased percentage of carcass in the top sirloin butt (P = 0.006), bottom sirloin tri-tip (P = 0.02), top inside round (P = 0.002), bottom round flat (P = 0.001), and flank steak (P = 0.02). A longer withdrawal time (WT) increased (P < 0.001) carcass weights. Shoulder clod weights were greatest (P < 0.001) with 17-d WT from ZH, whereas chuck roll weights were greatest (P = 0.02) at 17 and 24 d of WT. Peeled tenderloins, top sirloin butts, and eye of rounds responded to WT, with increased (P < 0.001) weights seen at 10 d of WT as compared with all other WT. Shear force values were greater at each of the 3 aging times, 7 d (P < 0.001), 14 d (P < 0.001), and 21 d (P = 0.003), in steaks from ZH-fed steers compared with control steers. Protein percentages were greater in ZH steaks (P = 0.03) and ZH ground beef trim (P < 0.001). Percent moisture was increased (P < 0.001) in strip loin steaks at 3 and 10 d WT. Ground beef trim had an increase (P = 0.04) in percent moisture and a decrease (P = 0.01) in percent fat at 10 d WT. Carcass weights and yields were improved with ZH feeding and may continue to improve even up to 10 d after withdrawal of the supplement. Tenderness was slightly

  14. SSR126768A (4-chloro-3-[(3R)-(+)-5-chloro-1-(2,4-dimethoxybenzyl)-3-methyl-2-oxo-2,3-dihydro-1H-indol-3-yl]-N-ethyl-N-(3-pyridylmethyl)-benzamide, hydrochloride): a new selective and orally active oxytocin receptor antagonist for the prevention of preterm labor.

    PubMed

    Serradeil-Le Gal, Claudine; Valette, Gérard; Foulon, Loïc; Germain, Guy; Advenier, Charles; Naline, Emmanuel; Bardou, Marc; Martinolle, Jean-Pierre; Pouzet, Brigitte; Raufaste, Danielle; Garcia, Corinne; Double-Cazanave, Eléonore; Pauly, Maxime; Pascal, Marc; Barbier, Alain; Scatton, Bernard; Maffrand, Jean-Pierre; Le Fur, Gérard

    2004-04-01

    4-chloro-3-[(3R)-(+)-5-chloro-1-(2,4-dimethoxybenzyl)-3-methyl-2-oxo-2,3-dihydro-1H-indol-3-yl]-N-ethyl-N-(3-pyridylmethyl)benzamide, hydrochloride (SSR126768A), a new potent and selective, orally active oxytocin (OT) receptor antagonist was characterized in several biochemical and pharmacological models. In binding studies, SSR126768A showed nanomolar affinity for rat and human recombinant and native OT receptors (K(i) = 0.44 nM) and exhibited much lower affinity for V(1a), V(1b), and V(2) receptors. In addition, it did not interact with a large number of other receptors, enzymes, and ion channels (1 microM). In autoradiographic experiments performed on at-term human pregnant uterus sections, SSR126768A dose dependently displaced [I(125)]d(CH(2))(5)[Tyr(Me)(2), Thr(4), Orn(8) (125)I-Tyr-NH(2)(9)]VT in situ labeling to OT receptors highly expressed in these tissues. In functional studies, SSR126768A behaved as a full antagonist and potently antagonized OT-induced intracellular Ca(2+) increase (K(i) = 0.50 nM) and prostaglandin release (K(i) = 0.45 nM) in human uterine smooth muscle cells. In rat isolated myometrium, OT-induced uterine contractions were competitively antagonized by SSR126768A (pA(2) = 8.47). Similarly, in human pregnant myometrial strips, SSR126768A inhibited the contractile uterine response to OT. In conscious telemetrated rats, oral administration of SSR126768A (1-10 mg/kg) produced a competitive inhibition of the dose response to OT on uterine contractions up to 24 h at 3 mg/kg p.o.; no tachyphylaxis was observed after 4-day repeated treatment. Finally, SSR126768A (30 mg/kg p.o.) significantly delayed parturition in pregnant rats in labor similar to ritodrine (10 mg/kg p.o.). Thus, SSR126768A is a potent, highly selective, orally active OT receptor antagonist with a long duration of action. This molecule could find therapeutic application as a tocolytic agent for acute and chronic oral management of preterm labor.

  15. Effects of Duloxetine Treatment on Cognitive Flexibility and BDNF Expression in the mPFC of Adult Male Mice Exposed to Social Stress during Adolescence.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hang; Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Fan; Yuan, San-Na; Shao, Feng; Wang, Weiwen

    2016-01-01

    Early stress is a significant risk factor for the onset of mood disorders such as depression during adulthood. Impairments in cognitive flexibility mediated by prefrontal cortex (PFC) dysfunction are increasingly recognized as important etiological and pathological factors in the development of depression. Our previous study demonstrated that social defeat stress during early adolescence produced delayed deficits in cognitive flexibility in adult mice. The potential molecular mechanisms underlying these long-term consequences remain unclear. One candidate molecule is brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), which plays a vital role in neural development and synaptic plasticity. In this study, we initially examined the effects of adolescent social stress on cognitive flexibility and PFC BDNF expression within a week after the last stress exposure and 6 weeks later during adulthood. Adolescent (PND 28) male mice were subjected to stress or control manipulation for 10 days. The attentional set-shifting task (AST) was used to assess cognitive flexibility. Levels of BDNF mRNA and protein in the PFC were examined after behavioral testing. The results demonstrated that previously stressed mice exhibited delayed extra-dimensional set-shifting deficits in AST when tested as adults but not when tested as adolescents. Consistent with the cognitive alterations, adolescent stress induced dynamic alterations in BDNF expression in the medial PFC (mPFC), with a transient increase observed shortly after the stress, followed by a decrease 6 weeks later during adulthood. Next, we further determined the effects of chronic treatment with the antidepressant duloxetine during early adulthood on cognitive and molecular alterations induced by adolescent stress. Compared with the controls, duloxetine treatment reversed the cognitive deficits and increased the BDNF protein expression in the mPFC during adulthood in previously stressed mice. These findings demonstrated that BDNF expression

  16. Effects of Duloxetine Treatment on Cognitive Flexibility and BDNF Expression in the mPFC of Adult Male Mice Exposed to Social Stress during Adolescence

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Hang; Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Fan; Yuan, San-na; Shao, Feng; Wang, Weiwen

    2016-01-01

    Early stress is a significant risk factor for the onset of mood disorders such as depression during adulthood. Impairments in cognitive flexibility mediated by prefrontal cortex (PFC) dysfunction are increasingly recognized as important etiological and pathological factors in the development of depression. Our previous study demonstrated that social defeat stress during early adolescence produced delayed deficits in cognitive flexibility in adult mice. The potential molecular mechanisms underlying these long-term consequences remain unclear. One candidate molecule is brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), which plays a vital role in neural development and synaptic plasticity. In this study, we initially examined the effects of adolescent social stress on cognitive flexibility and PFC BDNF expression within a week after the last stress exposure and 6 weeks later during adulthood. Adolescent (PND 28) male mice were subjected to stress or control manipulation for 10 days. The attentional set-shifting task (AST) was used to assess cognitive flexibility. Levels of BDNF mRNA and protein in the PFC were examined after behavioral testing. The results demonstrated that previously stressed mice exhibited delayed extra-dimensional set-shifting deficits in AST when tested as adults but not when tested as adolescents. Consistent with the cognitive alterations, adolescent stress induced dynamic alterations in BDNF expression in the medial PFC (mPFC), with a transient increase observed shortly after the stress, followed by a decrease 6 weeks later during adulthood. Next, we further determined the effects of chronic treatment with the antidepressant duloxetine during early adulthood on cognitive and molecular alterations induced by adolescent stress. Compared with the controls, duloxetine treatment reversed the cognitive deficits and increased the BDNF protein expression in the mPFC during adulthood in previously stressed mice. These findings demonstrated that BDNF expression

  17. Comparison of the antifungal efficacy of terbinafine hydrochloride and ciclopirox olamine containing formulations against the dermatophyte Trichophyton rubrum in an infected nail plate model.

    PubMed

    Täuber, Anja; Müller-Goymann, Christel C

    2014-07-07

    Onychomycosis is a fungal infection mostly induced by dermatophytes such as Trichophyton rubrum. Due to slow nail growth, the treatment takes 3-9 months depending on the nail size and infected area. Hence, high efficacy of the active ingredient without systemic side effects is of major interest. To test the efficacy of an antifungal formulation, an appropriate in vitro model reflecting the in vivo situation as close as possible is required. In this study, a variety of antifungal formulations, i.e., commercial ones (Ciclopoli and Lamisil cream), those used in compounding pharmacies (Pentravan) as well as poloxamer 407-based systems, have been evaluated in an infected nail plate model. The active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) were ciclopirox olamine and terbinafine hydrochloride. The poloxamer 407-based formulations consisted of poloxamer 407, double distilled water, propylene glycol, isopropyl alcohol, medium chain triglycerides and either 1% ciclopirox olamine or 1% terbinafine hydrochloride as API, respectively. Former studies have shown high permeation rates of terbinafine hydrochloride from similar poloxamer 407-based formulations with dimethyl isosorbide instead of propylene glycol. The present contribution shows superior inhibition of T. rubrum growth from poloxamer 407-based formulations in comparison to the commercial Lamisil cream. Moreover, poloxamer 407-based formulations were equally effective as the nail lacquer Ciclopoli even though the poloxamer formulations contained only 1% of the drug instead of 8% in the marketed lacquer. Poloxamer 407-based systems containing ciclopirox olamine proved to be about as effective as similar terbinafine hydrochloride systems.

  18. Randomized clinical trial of tetracycline hydrochloride bandage and paste treatments for resolution of lesions and pain associated with digital dermatitis in dairy cattle.

    PubMed

    Cutler, J H Higginson; Cramer, G; Walter, J J; Millman, S T; Kelton, D F

    2013-01-01

    Digital dermatitis is an infectious disease that causes lameness in dairy cattle, a primary welfare concern of the dairy industry. One of the common treatments for this painful hoof disease is through the application of an antibiotic bandage that must be removed following treatment. The objectives of this randomized clinical trial were to determine if topical application of tetracycline hydrochloride in a paste would be as therapeutically effective for the treatment of digital dermatitis as a powdered form of tetracycline hydrochloride held in place by a bandage, and to quantify pain associated with digital dermatitis lesions. Two hundred and fourteen Holstein cow hooves with digital dermatitis lesions were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 treatments: a tetracycline hydrochloride paste, tetracycline hydrochloride powder held in place with a bandage for 2 d, or a negative (untreated) control. Lesions were examined at 2 time periods: 3 to 7 d posttreatment and 8 to 12 d posttreatment to determine healing rates. Nociceptive thresholds were measured using a pressure algometer to quantify the pain at the lesion site. The tetracycline hydrochloride paste was as effective as the powdered bandage treatment in terms of healing rates, with 47.4 and 57.1% hooves healed at 8 to 12 d posttreatment, respectively. Both treatments were more effective than the control, in which no lesions healed 8 to 12 d following initial examination. Mean (±SE) nociceptive thresholds for active, healing, and healed lesions differed, with limb-withdrawal response occurring at 7.45 (±0.67) kg, 12.84 (±1.85) kg, and censored to 25 kg (maximum value of algometer) of force applied, respectively. However, active lesions were not consistently associated with pain, as maximum force was tolerated when applied to 19% of active lesions, perhaps due to variability in stoicism between individual cattle or due to changes in pain during the progression of infection. In conclusion, tetracycline hydrochloride paste

  19. Differential expression on mitochondrial tryparedoxin peroxidase (mTcTXNPx) in Trypanosoma cruzi after ferrocenyl diamine hydrochlorides treatments.

    PubMed

    Kohatsu, Andréa A N; Silva, Flávia A J; Francisco, Acácio I; Rimoldi, Aline; Silva, Marco T A; Vargas, Maria D; Rosa, João A da; Cicarelli, Regina M B

    Resistance to benznidazole in certain strains of Trypanosoma cruzi may be caused by the increased production of enzymes that act on the oxidative metabolism, such as mitochondrial tryparedoxin peroxidase which catalyses the reduction of peroxides. This work presents cytotoxicity assays performed with ferrocenyl diamine hydrochlorides in six different strains of T. cruzi epimastigote forms (Y, Bolivia, SI1, SI8, QMII, and SIGR3). The last four strains have been recently isolated from triatominae and mammalian host (domestic cat). The expression of mitochondrial tryparedoxin peroxidase was analyzed by the Western blotting technique using polyclonal antibody anti mitochondrial tryparedoxin peroxidase obtained from a rabbit immunized with the mitochondrial tryparedoxin peroxidase recombinant protein. All the tested ferrocenyl diamine hydrochlorides were more cytotoxic than benznidazole. The expression of the 25.5kDa polypeptide of mitochondrial tryparedoxin peroxidase did not increase in strains that were more resistant to the ferrocenyl compounds (SI8 and SIGR3). In addition, a 58kDa polypeptide was also recognized in all strains. Ferrocenyl diamine hydrochlorides showed trypanocidal activity and the expression of 25.5kDa mitochondrial tryparedoxin peroxidase is not necessarily increased in some T. cruzi strains. Most likely, other mechanisms, in addition to the over expression of this antioxidative enzyme, should be involved in the escape of parasites from cytotoxic oxidant agents.

  20. Development and evaluation of a sublingual film of the antiemetic granisetron hydrochloride.

    PubMed

    Kalia, Vani; Garg, Tarun; Rath, Gautam; Goyal, Amit Kumar

    2016-05-01

    The objective of this study was to develop an oral transmucosal formulation of an antiemetic drug that can not only serve in the active form but also provide a controlled release profile. In this study, sublingual films based on the biodegradable and water-soluble polymers, that is HPMCK-4M and PVPK-30, were developed by the solvent casting method, and were loaded with the antiemetic drug granisetron hydrochloride (granisetron HCl). The entrapment efficiency of the developed formulation was found to be 86%. The in vitro profile showed an instant release of the drug from the sublingual film, in a pattern following the first order kinetics array. The in vivo studies showed that granisetron HCl was delivered in its active state and showed effective results, as compared to its activity in the marketed formulation.

  1. Buffered nanoemulsion for nose to brain delivery of ziprasidone hydrochloride: preformulation and pharmacodynamic evaluation.

    PubMed

    Bahadur, Shiv; Pathak, Kamla

    2012-11-01

    The study was undertaken to develop buffered nanoemulsion of ziprasidone hydrochloride (fifth generation antipshychotic) and evaluate its potential for efficacious nose to brain delivery drug delivery in animal models. Homogeneous buffered ziprasidone nanoemulsions (BZNE) were prepared by aqueous (phosphate buffer, pH 8.0) titration method using capmul MCM, labrasol and transcutol as oil, surfactant and cosurfactant respectively. The NEs (F1-F7) were characterized for pharmaceutical characteristics (% transmittance, PDI value, Zeta potential, globule size, viscosity and diffusion coefficient) and F6 with mean globule size of 145.24 ± 4.75nm (PDI = 0.186 ± 0.40) and diffusion coefficient of 0.1901± 0.04cm2/min was thermodynamically stable and was developed as buffered mucoadhesive nanoemulsions. The buffered mucoadhesive NE (βmax = 0.57) that contained 0.5% by weight of chitosan (BZMNE) exhibited 1.79 times higher diffusion coefficient (0.3418 ± 0.03) than BZNE. Pharmacodynamic study confirmed the superiority of BZMNE over BZNE in locomotor activity test (p < 0.05) and paw test (p < 0.05). Nasal ciliotoxicity study revealed the optimized BZMNE to be free from acute toxicity. Conclusively, a stable and efficacious buffered mucoadhesive NE of ziprasidone hydrochloride, that can be safely administered by intranasal route was developed.

  2. Intranasal delivery of tapentadol hydrochloride-loaded chitosan nanoparticles: formulation, characterisation and its in vivo evaluation.

    PubMed

    Javia, Ankit; Thakkar, Hetal

    2017-09-18

    The aim of the present investigation was to formulate tapentadol hydrochloride-loaded chitosan nanoparticles (CS-NPs) for nose to brain delivery. Chitosan nanoparticles were prepared using ionotropic gelation technique. Optimisation of the formulation and process parameters was done using Box-Behnken Design. The entrapment efficiency, drug loading, Z-average size and zeta potential of the optimised batch were 63.49 ± 1.61%, 17.25 ± 1.38%w/w, 201.2 ± 1.5 nm and +49.3 mV, respectively. In-vitro release study showed 84.04 ± 1.53% drug release after 28 h, while ex vivo studies indicated higher permeation of CS-NPs through nasal mucosa. The nanoparticles exhibited good mucoadhesiveness, haemocompatibility and safety as evidenced by histopathology. The results of the pharmacodynamic study revealed prolongation of the analgesic activity. The intranasal instillation of CS-NPs resulted in the higher concentrations in brain compared to the drug solution and intravenous administration of CS-NPs. In a nutshell, intranasal administration of tapentadol hydrochloride-loaded CS-NPs is a promising approach for effective pain management.

  3. Formulation and evaluation of sustained release floating capsules of nicardipine hydrochloride.

    PubMed

    Moursy, N M; Afifi, N N; Ghorab, D M; El-Saharty, Y

    2003-01-01

    Nicardipine hydrochloride, a calcium channel blocker with significant vasodilating and antihypertensive activities, was formulated in this work as sustained release floating capsules. A hydrocolloid of high viscosity grade was used for the floating systems. The inclusion of sodium bicarbonate to allow evolution of CO2 to aid buoyancy was studied. Polymers that retard drug release were included as coprecipitates with the drug and/or as additives in the formulated capsules. Both simple powder mixing of the ingredients and granule preparation via wet granulation were used. Seven capsule formulae were prepared. The prepared capsules were evaluated in vitro by testing drug dissolution, floating time and the kinetics of drug release. In vitro evaluation of a commercially available conventional 20 mg capsule of nicardipine hydrochloride, "Micard", was carried out for comparison. The hydrocolloid used succeeded in effecting capsule buoyancy. Floating time increased with increasing the proportion of the hydrocolloid. Inclusion of sodium bicarbonate increased buoyancy. All of the seven floating capsule formulae prepared proved efficient in controlling drug release. The sustained release floating capsule formulation of choice was evaluated in vivo in comparison to "Micard" capsules using rabbits. Reversed phase HPLC with UV detection was used for drug determination in rabbit plasma. Plasma concentration time curves revealed a longer drug duration for administration in the sustained release formula than the conventional "Micard" capsule being 16 h in the former versus 8 h for the latter.

  4. Characterization of nicardipine hydrochloride-induced cell injury in human vascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Ochi, Masanori; Kawai, Yoshiko; Tanaka, Yoshiyuki; Toyoda, Hiromu

    2015-02-01

    Nicardipine hydrochloride (NIC), a dihydropyridine calcium-channel blocking agent, has been widely used for the treatment of hypertension. Especially, nicardipine hydrochloride injection is used as first-line therapy for emergency treatment of abnormally high blood pressure. Although NIC has an attractive pharmacological profile, one of the dose-limiting factors of NIC is severe peripheral vascular injury after intravenous injection. The goal of this study was to better understand and thereby reduce NIC-mediated vascular injury. Here, we investigated the mechanism of NIC-induced vascular injury using human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HMVECs). NIC decreased cell viability and increased percent of dead cells in a dose-dependent manner (10-30 μg/mL). Although cell membrane injury was not significant over 9 hr exposure, significant changes of cell morphology and increases in vacuoles in HMVECs were observed within 30 min of NIC exposure (30 μg/mL). Autophagosome labeling with monodansylcadaverine revealed increased autophagosomes in the NIC-treated cells, whereas caspase 3/7 activity was not increased in the NIC-treated cells (30 μg/mL). Additionally, NIC-induced reduction of cell viability was inhibited by 3-methyladenine, an inhibitor of autophagosome formation. These findings suggest that NIC causes severe peripheral venous irritation via induction of autophagic cell death and that inhibition of autophagy could contribute to the reduction of NIC-induced vascular injury.

  5. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, duloxetine-referenced, fixed-dose study comparing the efficacy and safety of Lu AA21004 in elderly patients with major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Katona, Cornelius; Hansen, Thomas; Olsen, Christina Kurre

    2012-07-01

    The efficacy and tolerability of Lu AA21004 at 5 mg/day, a novel multimodal antidepressant, were assessed in elderly patients with recurrent major depressive disorder. Patients were randomly assigned (1:1:1) to Lu AA21004 5 mg/day, duloxetine 60 mg/day (reference) or to placebo in an 8-week double-blind study. The primary efficacy measure was the 24-item Hamilton Depression Scale (HAM-D(24)) total score (analysis of covariance, last observation carried forward). Patients (mean age 70.6 years) had a mean baseline HAM-D(24) score of 29.0. Lu AA21004 showed significantly (P = 0.0011) greater improvement on the primary efficacy endpoint compared with placebo at week 8 (3.3 points). Duloxetine also showed superiority to placebo at week 8, thereby validating the study. HAM-D(24) response (53.2 vs. 35.2%) and HAM-D(17) remission (29.2 vs. 19.3%) rates at endpoint were higher for Lu AA21004 than for placebo. Lu AA21004 showed superiority to placebo in cognition tests of speed of processing, verbal learning and memory. The withdrawal rate due to adverse events was 5.8% (Lu AA21004), 9.9% (duloxetine) and 2.8% (placebo). Whereas nausea was the only adverse event with a significantly higher incidence on treatment with Lu AA21004 (21.8%) compared with placebo (8.3%), the incidence of nausea, constipation, dry mouth, hyperhidrosis and somnolence was higher for duloxetine. In conclusion, Lu AA21004 was efficacious and well tolerated in the treatment of elderly patients with recurrent major depressive disorder.

  6. Fundamentals of ionic conductivity relaxation gained from study of procaine hydrochloride and procainamide hydrochloride at ambient and elevated pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojnarowska, Z.; Swiety-Pospiech, A.; Grzybowska, K.; Hawelek, L.; Paluch, M.; Ngai, K. L.

    2012-04-01

    The pharmaceuticals, procaine hydrochloride and procainamide hydrochloride, are glass-forming as well as ionically conducting materials. We have made dielectric measurements at ambient and elevated pressures to characterize the dynamics of the ion conductivity relaxation in these pharmaceuticals, and calorimetric measurements for the structural relaxation. Perhaps due to their special chemical and physical structures, novel features are found in the ionic conductivity relaxation of these pharmaceuticals. Data of conductivity relaxation in most ionic conductors when represented by the electric loss modulus usually show a single resolved peak in the electric modulus loss M″(f ) spectra. However, in procaine hydrochloride and procainamide hydrochloride we find in addition another resolved loss peak at higher frequencies over a temperature range spanning across Tg. The situation is analogous to many non-ionic glass-formers showing the presence of the structural α-relaxation together with the Johari-Goldstein (JG) β-relaxation. Naturally the analogy leads us to name the slower and faster processes resolved in procaine hydrochloride and procainamide hydrochloride as the primary α-conductivity relaxation and the secondary β-conductivity relaxation, respectively. The analogy of the β-conductivity relaxation in procaine HCl and procainamide HCl with JG β-relaxation in non-ionic glass-formers goes further by the finding that the β-conductivity is strongly related to the α-conductivity relaxation at temperatures above and below Tg. At elevated pressure but compensated by raising temperature to maintain α-conductivity relaxation time constant, the data show invariance of the ratio between the β- and the α-conductivity relaxation times to changes of thermodynamic condition. This property indicates that the β-conductivity relaxation has fundamental importance and is indispensable as the precursor of the α-conductivity relaxation, analogous to the relation found

  7. Acute renal injury induced by valacyclovir hydrochloride: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yanning; Cong, Yuxi; Teng, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Acyclovir has been a frequently used antiviral agent in the clinical treatment of leukemia, acute encephalitis, malignant tumor and herpes simplex. The adverse effects of this drug have been widely described in clinical practice. In the present study, a case of a 35-year-old female patient diagnosed with herpes simplex, who developed acute renal injury following treatment with valacyclovir hydrochloride, is described. Kidney biopsy, light microscopy and laboratory examination were performed, and all findings revealed the signs of evident vacuolar degeneration of capillary endothelial and renal tubular epithelial cells, erythrocyte aggregation in partial renal tubule and microvilli exfoliation from epithelial cells. Renal interstitial edema was clearly identified. The clinical evidence observed from this female patient indicated that renal functions should be closely monitored during valacyclovir hydrochloride administration. A variety of effective measures, such as hydration, alkalizing urine, promoting the discharge of medication and the use of antagonists are recommended following the administration of antiviral agents. PMID:28101180

  8. Linear scleroderma after contusion and injection of mepivacaine hydrochloride.

    PubMed

    Ueda, Takashi; Niiyama, Shiro; Amoh, Yasuyuki; Katsuoka, Kensei

    2010-05-15

    A 36-year-old woman initially was treated for a contusion by local injection of mepivacaine hydrochloride into the left dorsum of the foot. Approximately 3 months after the injury and injection, linear sclerotic plaques originating from the site of contusion and injection were recognized. These progressed in extent and severity over a period of 3 years, when she presented to our clinic. By biopsy, swelling of collagen fibers in the lower dermis was revealed and the condition was diagnosed as linear scleroderma. Our present case had multiple linear sclerotic plaques of the left lower extremity, the distribution of which was consistent with Blaschko lines. It was also revealed that the initial sclerotic plaque was at the site of the contusion and local mepivacaine hydrochloride injection. Our present case is interesting in that the findings suggest a correlation between linear scleroderma plaque occurrence and the contusion or injection of mepivacaine.

  9. Olopatadine hydrochloride inhibits capsaicin-induced flare response in humans.

    PubMed

    Shindo, Masahisa; Yoshida, Yuichi; Yamamoto, Osamu

    2011-01-01

    Capsaicin, a vanilloid, has the potential for releasing substance P (SP) from sensory nerves. Topical application of capsaicin induces a flare response in the skin. However, it has not been clarified whether the release of SP is involved in the process of flare response or not. A potent antihistamine drug, olopatadine hydrochloride, is known to have inhibitory action against the release of SP. We examined the effects of olopatadine (at a dose of 5 mg) on skin reaction induced by topical application of capsaicin in 10 healthy subjects. The scores of capsaicin-induced flare responses after olopatadine administration were significantly lower at 30 min than at baseline. Our findings suggest that olopatadine hydrochloride could inhibit capsaicin-induced flare responses. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. Structural and Physicochemical Studies of Olopatadine Hydrochloride Conformational Polymorphs.

    PubMed

    Łaszcz, Marta; Trzcińska, Kinga; Witkowska, Anna; Ciesielska, Agnieszka; Badowska-Rosłonek, Katarzyna; Kuziak, Krzysztof

    2016-08-01

    Crystal and molecular structures of 2 conformational polymorphs (forms I and II) of olopatadine hydrochloride, an antiallergic agent, are presented. Both crystal modifications crystallize in the monoclinic crystal system with 1 olopatadine hydrochloride molecule in the Z configuration in the asymmetric unit. Molecules are arranged into the centrosymmetric association through the interactions of the intermolecular strong and weak hydrogen bonds of N-H…Cl, O-H…Cl and C-H…Cl, C-H…O types. Conformational change between polymorphs is proved by calculations of a maximum torsion angle deviation (max[Δθ]) and a root-mean-square deviation between the atomic positions (rmsd[r]). The physicochemical characterization of polymorphs is performed by X-ray powder diffraction, infrared and Raman spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry. The comparison of the melting points and heats of fusions shows that the forms are monotropically related. Copyright © 2016 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Effect of topical application of phenylephrine hydrochloride on hyperplastic gingivitis.

    PubMed

    Pernsteiner, C L; Ash, M M

    1977-08-01

    A double blind study was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of Phenodent Type A (brand of phenylephrine hydrochloride) on decongesting hyperplastic gingivitis. Three solutions were used: a 0.5% a placebo, and a 0.25% concentration of phenylephrine hydrochloride. The periodontal disease index was used to score variables which might have an effect on gingival response to local irritants. Impressions were taken and casts were made on 45 subjects at 0, 1, 3, and 6-week intervals. An instrument with accuracy of 0.001 inch was constructed to measure the changes in the interdental papillae of the stone casts. No significant reduction of gingival volume was established for any of the three solutions.

  12. Guanidine hydrochloride denaturation of glycosylated and deglycosylated stem bromelain.

    PubMed

    Rasheedi, Sheeba; Haq, Soghra Khatun; Khan, Rizwan Hasan

    2003-10-01

    Glycosylation is one of the major naturally occurring covalent modifications of proteins. We have used stem bromelain, a thiol protease with a single, N-glycosylated polypeptide chain as a model to investigate the role of glycosylation of proteins. Periodate oxidation was used to obtain the deglycosylated form of the enzyme. Denaturation studies in the presence of guanidine hydrochloride (Gn*HCl) were performed using fluorescence and circular dichroism spectroscopy. The glycosylated stem bromelain was found to be stabilized by 1.9 kcal/mol as compared to the deglycosylated one. At a given concentration of denaturant, the fraction of denatured protein was higher in the case of deglycosylated stem bromelain. In short, deglycosylated bromelain showed more susceptibility towards guanidine hydrochloride denaturation, indicating the contribution of the carbohydrate part of the glycoprotein to the stability of the enzyme.

  13. Asymmetric Synthesis of (+)-anti- and (-)-syn-Mefloquine Hydrochloride.

    PubMed

    Rastelli, Ettore J; Coltart, Don M

    2016-10-21

    The asymmetric (er > 99:1) total synthesis of (+)-anti- and (-)-syn-mefloquine hydrochloride from a common intermediate is described. The Sharpless asymmetric dihydroxylation is the key asymmetric transformation used in the synthesis of this intermediate. It is carried out on an olefin that is accessed in three steps from commercially available materials, making the overall synthetic sequence very concise. The common diol intermediate derived from the Sharpless asymmetric dihydroxylation is converted into either a trans- or cis-epoxide, and these are subsequently converted to (+)-anti- and (-)-syn-mefloquine, respectively. X-ray crystallographic analysis of derivatives of (+)-anti- and (-)-syn-mefloquine is used to lay to rest a 40 year argument regarding the absolute stereochemistry of the mefloquines. A formal asymmetric (er > 99:1) synthesis of (+)-anti-mefloquine hydrochloride is also presented that uses a Sharpless asymmetric epoxidation as a key step.

  14. Management of hepatic cysts by percutaneous drainage and instillation of tetracycline hydrochloride.

    PubMed

    McFarlane, M E; Venugopal, R; McDonald, A; Ewing, R; Newnham, M S; Johnson, L

    2001-09-01

    This paper reports two cases of benign hepatic cysts successfully treated by the instillation of tetracycline hydrochloride. The patients presented with solitary large symptomatic hepatic cysts and underwent ultrasound guided needle aspiration followed by the instillation of tetracycline hydrochloride. The cyst size diminished without complication and the patients have remained symptom free. We review the treatment of this uncommon entity and propose that injection of tetracycline hydrochloride is an effective nonoperative treatment of symptomatic solitary hepatic cysts.

  15. Clinical, histologic, and bacteriologic findings in dairy cows with digital dermatitis (footwarts) one month after topical treatment with lincomycin hydrochloride or oxytetracycline hydrochloride.

    PubMed

    Berry, Steven L; Read, Deryck H; Walker, Richard L; Famula, Thomas R

    2010-09-01

    To compare the effectiveness of lincomycin and oxytetracycline for treatment of digital dermatitis (DD) in dairy cows through gross visual examination, histologic evaluation, and bacteriologic evaluation. Randomized controlled clinical trial. 25 cows with DD lesions from a commercial Holstein dairy herd. Cows with DD lesions were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 groups: topical treatment with 10 g of lincomycin hydrochloride (n = 11), topical treatment with 10 g of oxytetracycline hydrochloride (11), and no treatment (3) on days 1 and 2 (d1). Biopsy specimens were obtained for histologic examination from DD lesions prior to treatment and 28 or 31 days (d30) after treatment for histologic examination. Cows were clinically examined on d1, days 12 or 14 (d14), and d30. No difference was evident in clinical responses to lincomycin and oxytetracycline, so data were pooled; at d30, 8 of 11 of lincomycin-treated lesions and 7 of 11 oxytetracycline-treated lesions appeared visually healed, respectively. Gross visual examination suggested 73% (16/22) of treated cows were healed at d14 and 68% (15/22) of treated cows were healed on d30. Of the 15 lesions that appeared healed on d30, 7 of 15 were classified histologically as active (ulceration and bacterial invasion; 2/15) or incipient (5/15). Clinical responses to lincomycin and oxytetracycline did not differ. Agreement was good between gross visual and histologic assessments of DD lesions before treatment; agreement 1 month after treatment was variable. Histologic evaluation could not distinguish incomplete healing from lesion recurrence.

  16. Buspirone hydrochloride in the treatment of an atypical paraphilia.

    PubMed

    Fedoroff, J P

    1992-08-01

    A case report involving buspirone hydrochloride in the successful treatment of a patient with an atypical paraphilia and transvestic fetishism is presented. Treatment outcome was assessed by the patient's self-report as well as by retrospective examination of detailed notes about paraphilia fantasies which unknown to the therapists, had been kept by the patient. Preliminary evidence indicates that buspirone appears to effectively treat some paraphilias.

  17. Tetracycline hydrochloride: A potential clinical drug for radioprotection.

    PubMed

    Alok, Amit; Chaudhury, N K

    2016-02-05

    Radiation exposure in planned scenario necessarily requires radioprotector for protection against radiation injuries in tissues and organs. A large number of potential radioprotectors have been investigated but no approved radioprotector is available. Hence, in quest for radioprotector, repurposing of clinical drug is an approach which aims at finding the radioprotective potential of known drugs so that in case of untoward accident the knowledge could be translated to drug usage. In this study, we have investigated the radical scavenging properties of tetracycline pertaining to radioprotection. Our study suggests that tetracycline hydrochloride efficiently scavenges free radicals in ABTS (2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulphonic acid), DPPH (2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl) and FRAP (ferric reducing antioxidant power) assays. Hydroxyl radical scavenging assay has demonstrated its ability to scavenge gamma radiation induced free radicals by lowering the formation of malondialdehyde. Radiation causes damage to macromolecules and hence the protection offered by tetracycline hydrochloride to DNA and protein shows its radioprotective potential. Plasmid DNA relaxation study with pBR322 has shown that tetracycline hydrochloride confers dose modification factor (DMF) of 2 and 4 at 100 μM and 250 μM concentration respectively. Tetracycline hydrochloride has also protected bovine serum albumin (BSA) from radiation induced degradation. The ex vivo studies for lipid peroxidation and mitochondrial membrane potential further substantiate our findings. The whole body animal survival study has shown the drug to offer 20% protection at a lethal radiation dose of 9 Gy. This study demonstrates the radioprotective potential of the drug by providing some insight into ex vivo and in vivo efficacy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Neuroleptic malignant syndrome possibly caused by molindone hydrochloride.

    PubMed

    Gradon, J D

    1991-10-01

    The case of a patient who developed neuroleptic malignant syndrome (NMS) on three separate occasions is presented. Her third bout of this syndrome possibly was caused by molindone hydrochloride. This medication has been reported only once previously to cause NMS. The pharmacology of molindone is reviewed and a complicating factor in this case--the recent onset of hypothyroidism--is discussed together with its implication in the development of the clinical manifestations of this syndrome.

  19. Control of recurrent supraventricular tachycardia with amiodarone hydrochloride.

    PubMed Central

    Swan, J. H.; Chisholm, A. W.

    1976-01-01

    Amiodarone hydrochloride, a new antiarrhythmic agent, controlled a recurrent supraventricular arrhythmia, refractory to conventional medical treatment, in a 57-year-old patient with an anomalous conduction system and idiopathic cardiomyopathy. For the 11 months that the patient has been taking the drug her arrhythmia has not recurred. This drug has produced no important side effects in this patient. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 2 PMID:943223

  20. Review of moxifloxacin hydrochloride ophthalmic solution in the treatment of bacterial eye infections

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Darlene

    2008-01-01

    Moxifloxacin hydrochloride ophthalmic solution 0.5% (Vigamox®) is the ocular formulation/adaptation of moxifloxacin. Moxifloxacin is a broad spectrum 8-methoxyfluoroquinolone which terminates bacterial growth by binding to DNA gyrase (topoisomerase II) and topoisomerase IV, essential bacterial enzymes involved in the replication, translation, repair and recombination of deoxyribonucleic acid. Affinity for both enzymes improves potency and reduces the probability of selecting resistant bacterial subpopulations. Vigamox is a bactericidal, concentration dependent, anti-infective. It is preservative free, and well tolerated with minimal ocular side effects. It provides increased penetration into ocular tissues and fluids with improved activity against Streptococci and Staphylococci species and moderate to excellent activity against clinically relevant, gram-negative ocular pathogens. PMID:19668391