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Sample records for activated effector memory

  1. Curcumin serves as a human kv1.3 blocker to inhibit effector memory T lymphocyte activities.

    PubMed

    Lian, Yi-Tian; Yang, Xiao-Fang; Wang, Zhao-Hui; Yang, Yong; Yang, Ying; Shu, Yan-Wen; Cheng, Long-Xian; Liu, Kun

    2013-09-01

    Curcumin, the principal active component of turmeric, has long been used to treat various diseases in India and China. Recent studies show that curcumin can serve as a therapeutic agent for autoimmune diseases via a variety of mechanisms. Effector memory T cells (T(EM), CCR7⁻ CD45RO⁺ T lymphocyte) have been demonstrated to play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of T cell-mediated autoimmune diseases, such as multiple sclerosis (MS) or rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Kv1.3 channels are predominantly expressed in T(EM) cells and control T(EM) activities. In the present study, we examined the effect of curcumin on human Kv1.3 (hKv1.3) channels stably expressed in HEK-293 cells and its ability to inhibit proliferation and cytokine secretion of T(EM) cells isolated from patients with MS or RA. Curcumin exhibited a direct blockage of hKv1.3 channels in a time-dependent and concentration-dependent manner. Moreover, the activation curve was shifted to a more positive potential, which was consistent with an open-channel blockade. Paralleling hKv1.3 inhibition, curcumin significantly inhibited proliferation and interferon-γ secretion of T(EM) cells. Our findings demonstrate that curcumin is able to inhibit proliferation and proinflammatory cytokine secretion of T(EM) cells probably through inhibition of hKv1.3 channels, which contributes to the potency of curcumin for the treatment of autoimmune diseases. This is probably one of pharmacological mechanisms of curcumin used to treat autoimmune diseases.

  2. Molecular regulation of effector and memory T cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Chang, John T; Wherry, E John; Goldrath, Ananda W

    2015-01-01

    Immunological memory is a cardinal feature of adaptive immunity and an important goal of vaccination strategies. Here we highlight advances in the understanding of the diverse T lymphocyte subsets that provide acute and long-term protection from infection. These include new insights into the transcription factors, and the upstream ‘pioneering’ factors that regulate their accessibility to key sites of gene regulation, as well as metabolic regulators that contribute to the differentiation of effector and memory subsets; ontogeny and defining characteristics of tissue-resident memory lymphocytes; and origins of the remarkable heterogeneity exhibited by activated T cells. Collectively, these findings underscore progress in delineating the underlying pathways that control diversification in T cell responses but also reveal gaps in the knowledge, as well as the challenges that arise in the application of this knowledge to rationally elicit desired T cell responses through vaccination and immunotherapy. PMID:25396352

  3. Early effector cells survive the contraction phase in malaria infection and generate both central and effector memory T cells.

    PubMed

    Opata, Michael M; Carpio, Victor H; Ibitokou, Samad A; Dillon, Brian E; Obiero, Joshua M; Stephens, Robin

    2015-06-01

    CD4 T cells orchestrate immunity against blood-stage malaria. However, a major challenge in designing vaccines to the disease is poor understanding of the requirements for the generation of protective memory T cells (Tmem) from responding effector T cells (Teff) in chronic parasite infection. In this study, we use a transgenic mouse model with T cells specific for the merozoite surface protein (MSP)-1 of Plasmodium chabaudi to show that activated T cells generate three distinct Teff subsets with progressive activation phenotypes. The earliest observed Teff subsets (CD127(-)CD62L(hi)CD27(+)) are less divided than CD62L(lo) Teff and express memory genes. Intermediate (CD62L(lo)CD27(+)) effector subsets include the most multicytokine-producing T cells, whereas fully activated (CD62L(lo)CD27(-)) late effector cells have a terminal Teff phenotype (PD-1(+), Fas(hi), AnnexinV(+)). We show that although IL-2 promotes expansion, it actually slows terminal effector differentiation. Using adoptive transfer, we show that only early Teff survive the contraction phase and generate the terminal late Teff subsets, whereas in uninfected recipients, they become both central and effector Tmem. Furthermore, we show that progression toward full Teff activation is promoted by increased duration of infection, which in the long-term promotes Tem differentiation. Therefore, we have defined markers of progressive activation of CD4 Teff at the peak of malaria infection, including a subset that survives the contraction phase to make Tmem, and show that Ag and cytokine levels during CD4 T cell expansion influence the proportion of activated cells that can survive contraction and generate memory in malaria infection.

  4. Non-random pairing of CD46 isoforms with skewing towards BC2 and C2 in activated and memory/effector T cells

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Aida S.; Bundgaard, Bettina B.; Møller, Bjarne K.; Höllsberg, Per

    2016-01-01

    CD46 is a glycoprotein with important functions in innate and adaptive immune responses. Functionally different isoforms are generated by alternative splicing at exons 7–9 (BC and C isoforms) and exon 13 (CYT-1 and CYT-2 isoforms) giving rise to BC1, BC2, C1 and C2. We developed a novel real-time PCR assay that allows quantitative comparisons between these isoforms. Their relative frequency in CD4+ T cells from 100 donors revealed a distribution with high interpersonally variability. Importantly, the distribution between the isoforms was not random and although splicing favoured inclusion of exon 8 (BC isoforms), exclusion of exon 8 (C isoforms) was significantly linked to exclusion of exon 13 (CYT-2 isoforms). Despite inter-individual differences, CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, B cells, NK cells and monocytes expressed similar isoform profiles intra-individually. However, memory/effector CD4+ T cells had a significantly higher frequency of CYT-2 when compared with naïve CD4+ T cells. Likewise, in vitro activation of naïve and total CD4+ T cells increased the expression of CYT-2. This indicates that although splicing factors determine a certain expression profile in an individual, the profile can be modulated by external stimuli. This suggests a mechanism by which alterations in CD46 isoforms may temporarily regulate the immune response. PMID:27739531

  5. Mycobacterium bovis BCG Vaccination Induces Memory CD4+ T cells Characterized by Effector Biomarker Expression and Anti-mycobacterial Activity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The immune responses mediated by interactions between T-lymphocyte subsets and mycobacteria-infected macrophages (M-phi) are critical for control of tuberculosis (TB). Activation of M phi-mycobactericidal activity by IFN-gamma has been shown to play an important role in protection against mycobacter...

  6. Adoptive transfer of effector CD8+ T cells derived from central memory cells establishes persistent T cell memory in primates.

    PubMed

    Berger, Carolina; Jensen, Michael C; Lansdorp, Peter M; Gough, Mike; Elliott, Carole; Riddell, Stanley R

    2008-01-01

    The adoptive transfer of antigen-specific T cells that have been expanded ex vivo is being actively pursued to treat infections and malignancy in humans. The T cell populations that are available for adoptive immunotherapy include both effector memory and central memory cells, and these differ in phenotype, function, and homing. The efficacy of adoptive immunotherapy requires that transferred T cells persist in vivo, but identifying T cells that can reproducibly survive in vivo after they have been numerically expanded by in vitro culture has proven difficult. Here we show that in macaques, antigen-specific CD8(+) T cell clones derived from central memory T cells, but not effector memory T cells, persisted long-term in vivo, reacquired phenotypic and functional properties of memory T cells, and occupied memory T cell niches. These results demonstrate that clonally derived CD8+ T cells isolated from central memory T cells are distinct from those derived from effector memory T cells and retain an intrinsic capacity that enables them to survive after adoptive transfer and revert to the memory cell pool. These results could have significant implications for the selection of T cells to expand or to engineer for adoptive immunotherapy of human infections or malignancy.

  7. The phenotype and activation status of T and NK cells in porcine colostrum suggest these are central/effector memory cells.

    PubMed

    Hlavova, Karolina; Stepanova, Hana; Faldyna, Martin

    2014-12-01

    In pigs, the epitheliochorial placenta does not allow transfer of maternally derived antibodies or immune cells to the fetus. Thus, piglets are dependent on intake of colostrum for acquisition of passive immunity during the neonatal period. As well as immunoglobulin G (IgG), cellular components of colostrum, mainly lymphocytes, can enter the systemic circulation and secondary lymphoid organs of the neonate. In order to understand the function and immunological role of these cells, a flow cytometric study was undertaken to characterise the cellular profile and phenotype of T cells and NK cells present in porcine colostrum. The results indicated that the greatest numbers of lymphocytes were found on the first day of lactation. The predominant cell types in colostrum were CD8(+) single positive T cells (53.6%), followed by CD4(+)CD8(+) double positive T cells (21.1%), CD2(+)CD8(+) γδ T cells (15.0%) and NK cells (13.5%). CD4(+) single positive T cells (4.4%) and other γδ T cell subpopulations (1.8% CD2(-)CD8(-) and 0.4% CD2(+)CD8(-)) were present in colostrum at low levels. Although the profile of the T cell subpopulations during the first 3 days of lactation remained constant, the absolute numbers of T and NK cells decreased significantly in the first few hours of lactation. Expression of CCR7, CD11b, CD25, CD45RA and MHC class II was used to assess the activation status of T and NK cells in colostrum. T cell subpopulations expressed markers consistent with an effector memory phenotype, indicating that these were antigen-experienced cells. The phenotype of colostral T and NK cells suggests a role in mucosal immunity and potentially in transfer of passive immunity from sow to piglet.

  8. Autoimmune effector memory T cells: the bad and the good

    PubMed Central

    Devarajan, Priyadharshini; Chen, Zhibin

    2014-01-01

    Immunological memory is a hallmark of adaptive immunity, a defense mechanism endowed to vertebrates during evolution. However, an autoimmune pathogenic role of memory lymphocytes is also emerging with accumulating evidence, despite reasonable skepticism on their existence in a chronic setting of autoimmune damage. It is conceivable that autoimmune memory would be particularly harmful since memory cells would constantly “remember” and attack the body's healthy tissues. It is even more detrimental given the resistance of memory T cells to immunomodulatory therapies. In this review, we focus on self-antigen-reactive CD4+ effector memory T (TEM) cells, surveying the evidence for the role of the TEM compartment in autoimmune pathogenesis. We will also discuss the role of TEM cells in chronic and acute infectious disease settings and how they compare to their counterparts in autoimmune diseases. With their long-lasting potency, the autoimmune TEM cells could also play a critical role in anti-tumor immunity, which may be largely based on their reactivity to self-antigens. Therefore, although autoimmune TEM cells are “bad” due to their role in relentless perpetration of tissue damage in autoimmune disease settings, they are unlikely a by-product of industrial development along the modern surge of autoimmune disease prevalence. Rather, they may be a product of evolution for their “good” in clearing damaged host cells in chronic infections and malignant cells in cancer settings. PMID:24203440

  9. Molecular signatures distinguish human central memory from effector memory CD8 T cell subsets.

    PubMed

    Willinger, Tim; Freeman, Tom; Hasegawa, Hitoshi; McMichael, Andrew J; Callan, Margaret F C

    2005-11-01

    Memory T cells are heterogeneous in terms of their phenotype and functional properties. We investigated the molecular profiles of human CD8 naive central memory (T(CM)), effector memory (T(EM)), and effector memory RA (T(EMRA)) T cells using gene expression microarrays and phospho-protein-specific intracellular flow cytometry. We demonstrate that T(CM) have a gene expression and cytokine signaling signature that lies between that of naive and T(EM) or T(EMRA) cells, whereas T(EM) and T(EMRA) are closely related. Our data define the molecular basis for the different functional properties of central and effector memory subsets. We show that T(EM) and T(EMRA) cells strongly express genes with known importance in CD8 T cell effector function. In contrast, T(CM) are characterized by high basal and cytokine-induced STAT5 phosphorylation, reflecting their capacity for self-renewal. Altogether, our results distinguish T(CM) and T(EM)/T(EMRA) at the molecular level and are consistent with the concept that T(CM) represent memory stem cells.

  10. Active Flow Effectors for Noise and Separation Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Travis L.

    2011-01-01

    New flow effector technology for separation control and enhanced mixing is based upon shape memory alloy hybrid composite (SMAHC) technology. The technology allows for variable shape control of aircraft structures through actively deformable surfaces. The flow effectors are made by embedding shape memory alloy actuator material in a composite structure. When thermally actuated, the flow effector def1ects into or out of the flow in a prescribed manner to enhance mixing or induce separation for a variety of applications, including aeroacoustic noise reduction, drag reduction, and f1ight control. The active flow effectors were developed for noise reduction as an alternative to fixed-configuration effectors, such as static chevrons, that cannot be optimized for airframe installation effects or variable operating conditions and cannot be retracted for off-design or fail-safe conditions. Benefits include: Increased vehicle control, overall efficiency, and reduced noise throughout all f1ight regimes, Reduced flow noise, Reduced drag, Simplicity of design and fabrication, Simplicity of control through direct current stimulation, autonomous re sponse to environmental heating, fast re sponse, and a high degree of geometric stability. The concept involves embedding prestrained SMA actuators on one side of the chevron neutral axis in order to generate a thermal moment and def1ect the structure out of plane when heated. The force developed in the host structure during def1ection and the aerodynamic load is used for returning the structure to the retracted position. The chevron design is highly scalable and versatile, and easily affords active and/or autonomous (environmental) control. The technology offers wide-ranging market applications, including aerospace, automotive, and any application that requires flow separation or noise control.

  11. TLR4 ligands lipopolysaccharide and monophosphoryl lipid a differentially regulate effector and memory CD8+ T Cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Cui, Weiguo; Joshi, Nikhil S; Liu, Ying; Meng, Hailong; Kleinstein, Steven H; Kaech, Susan M

    2014-05-01

    Vaccines formulated with nonreplicating pathogens require adjuvants to help bolster immunogenicity. The role of adjuvants in Ab production has been well studied, but how they influence memory CD8(+) T cell differentiation remains poorly defined. In this study we implemented dendritic cell-mediated immunization to study the effects of commonly used adjuvants, TLR ligands, on effector and memory CD8(+) T cell differentiation in mice. Intriguingly, we found that the TLR4 ligand LPS was far more superior to other TLR ligands in generating memory CD8(+) T cells upon immunization. LPS boosted clonal expansion similar to the other adjuvants, but fewer of the activated CD8(+) T cells died during contraction, generating a larger pool of memory cells. Surprisingly, monophosphoryl lipid A (MPLA), another TLR4 ligand, enhanced clonal expansion of effector CD8(+) T cells, but it also promoted their terminal differentiation and contraction; thus, fewer memory CD8(+) T cells formed, and MPLA-primed animals were less protected against secondary infection compared with those primed with LPS. Furthermore, gene expression profiling revealed that LPS-primed effector cells displayed a stronger pro-memory gene expression signature, whereas the gene expression profile of MPLA-primed effector cells aligned closer with terminal effector CD8(+) T cells. Lastly, we demonstrated that the LPS-TLR4-derived "pro-memory" signals were MyD88, but not Toll/IL-1R domain-containing adapter inducing IFN-β, dependent. This study reveals the influential power of adjuvants on the quantity and quality of CD8(+) T cell memory, and that attention to adjuvant selection is crucial because boosting effector cell expansion may not always equate with more memory T cells or greater protection.

  12. Different Subsets of T Cells, Memory, Effector Functions, and CAR-T Immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Golubovskaya, Vita; Wu, Lijun

    2016-03-15

    This review is focused on different subsets of T cells: CD4 and CD8, memory and effector functions, and their role in CAR-T therapy--a cellular adoptive immunotherapy with T cells expressing chimeric antigen receptor. The CAR-T cells recognize tumor antigens and induce cytotoxic activities against tumor cells. Recently, differences in T cell functions and the role of memory and effector T cells were shown to be important in CAR-T cell immunotherapy. The CD4⁺ subsets (Th1, Th2, Th9, Th17, Th22, Treg, and Tfh) and CD8⁺ memory and effector subsets differ in extra-cellular (CD25, CD45RO, CD45RA, CCR-7, L-Selectin [CD62L], etc.); intracellular markers (FOXP3); epigenetic and genetic programs; and metabolic pathways (catabolic or anabolic); and these differences can be modulated to improve CAR-T therapy. In addition, CD4⁺ Treg cells suppress the efficacy of CAR-T cell therapy, and different approaches to overcome this suppression are discussed in this review. Thus, next-generation CAR-T immunotherapy can be improved, based on our knowledge of T cell subsets functions, differentiation, proliferation, and signaling pathways to generate more active CAR-T cells against tumors.

  13. Dicer Regulates the Balance of Short-Lived Effector and Long-Lived Memory CD8 T Cell Lineages

    PubMed Central

    Baumann, Florian M.; Yuzefpolskiy, Yevgeniy; Sarkar, Surojit; Kalia, Vandana

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs constitute a major post-transcriptional mechanism for controlling protein expression, and are emerging as key regulators during T cell development and function. Recent reports of augmented CD8 T cell activation and effector differentiation, and aberrant migratory properties upon ablation of Dicer/miRNAs in naïve cells have established a regulatory role of miRNAs during priming. Whether miRNAs continue to exert similar functions or are dispensable during later stages of CD8 T cell expansion and memory differentiation remains unclear. Here, we report a critical role of Dicer/miRNAs in regulating the balance of long-lived memory and short-lived terminal effector fates during the post-priming stages when CD8 T cells undergo clonal expansion to generate a large cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) pool and subsequently differentiate into a quiescent memory state. Conditional ablation of Dicer/miRNAs in early effector CD8 T cells following optimal activation and expression of granzyme B, using unique dicerfl/fl gzmb-cre mice, led to a strikingly diminished peak effector size relative to wild-type antigen-specific cells in the same infectious milieu. Diminished expansion of Dicer-ablated CD8 T cells was associated with lack of sustained antigen-driven proliferation and reduced accumulation of short-lived effector cells. Additionally, Dicer-ablated CD8 T cells exhibited more pronounced contraction after pathogen clearance and comprised a significantly smaller proportion of the memory pool, despite significantly higher proportions of CD127Hi memory precursors at the effector peak. Combined with previous reports of dynamic changes in miRNA expression as CD8 T cells differentiate from naïve to effector and memory states, these findings support distinct stage-specific roles of miRNA-dependent gene regulation during CD8 T cell differentiation. PMID:27627450

  14. IL-15 induces CD4+ effector memory T cell production and tissue emigration in nonhuman primates

    PubMed Central

    Picker, Louis J.; Reed-Inderbitzin, Edward F.; Hagen, Shoko I.; Edgar, John B.; Hansen, Scott G.; Legasse, Alfred; Planer, Shannon; Piatak, Michael; Lifson, Jeffrey D.; Maino, Vernon C.; Axthelm, Michael K.; Villinger, Francois

    2006-01-01

    HIV infection selectively targets CD4+ effector memory T (TEM) cells, resulting in dramatic depletion of CD4+ T cells in mucosal effector sites in early infection. Regeneration of the TEM cell compartment is slow and incomplete, even when viral replication is controlled by antiretroviral therapy (ART). Here, we demonstrate that IL-15 dramatically increases in vivo proliferation of rhesus macaque (RM) CD4+ and CD8+ TEM cells with little effect on the naive or central memory T (TCM) cell subsets, a response pattern that is quite distinct from that of either IL-2 or IL-7. TEM cells produced in response to IL-15 did not accumulate in blood. Rather, 5-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine (BrdU) labeling studies suggest that many of these cells rapidly disperse to extralymphoid effector sites, where they manifest (slow) decay kinetics indistinguishable from that of untreated controls. In RMs with uncontrolled SIV infection and highly activated immune systems, IL-15 did not significantly increase CD4+ TEM cell proliferation, but with virologic control and concomitant reduction in immune activation by ART, IL-15 responsiveness was again observed. These data suggest that therapeutic use of IL-15 in the setting of ART might facilitate specific restoration of the CD4+ T cell compartment that is the primary target of HIV with less risk of exhausting precursor T cell compartments or generating potentially deleterious regulatory subsets. PMID:16691294

  15. Active membrane cholesterol as a physiological effector.

    PubMed

    Lange, Yvonne; Steck, Theodore L

    2016-09-01

    Sterols associate preferentially with plasma membrane sphingolipids and saturated phospholipids to form stoichiometric complexes. Cholesterol in molar excess of the capacity of these polar bilayer lipids has a high accessibility and fugacity; we call this fraction active cholesterol. This review first considers how active cholesterol serves as an upstream regulator of cellular sterol homeostasis. The mechanism appears to utilize the redistribution of active cholesterol down its diffusional gradient to the endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria, where it binds multiple effectors and directs their feedback activity. We have also reviewed a broad literature in search of a role for active cholesterol (as opposed to bulk cholesterol or lipid domains such as rafts) in the activity of diverse membrane proteins. Several systems provide such evidence, implicating, in particular, caveolin-1, various kinds of ABC-type cholesterol transporters, solute transporters, receptors and ion channels. We suggest that this larger role for active cholesterol warrants close attention and can be tested easily.

  16. Acute exercise mobilises CD8+ T lymphocytes exhibiting an effector-memory phenotype.

    PubMed

    Campbell, John P; Riddell, Natalie E; Burns, Victoria E; Turner, Mark; van Zanten, Jet J C S Veldhuijzen; Drayson, Mark T; Bosch, Jos A

    2009-08-01

    An acute bout of exercise evokes mobilisation of lymphocytes into the bloodstream, which can be largely attributed to increases in CD8+ T lymphocytes (CD8TLs) and natural killer (NK) cells. Evidence further suggests that, even within these lymphocyte subsets, there is preferential mobilisation of cells that share certain functional and phenotypic characteristics, such as high cytotoxicity, low proliferative ability, and high tissue-migrating potential. These features are characteristic of effector-memory CD8TL subsets. The current study therefore investigated the effect of exercise on these newly-identified subsets. Thirteen healthy and physically active males (mean+/-SD: age 20.9+/-1.5 yr) attended three sessions: a control session (no exercise); cycling at 35% Watt(max) (low intensity exercise); and 85% Watt(max) (high intensity exercise). Each bout lasted 20 min. Blood samples were obtained before exercise, during the final min of exercise, and +15, and +60 min post-exercise. CD8TLs were classified into naïve, central memory (CM), effector-memory (EM), and CD45RA+ effector-memory (RAEM) using combinations of the cell surface markers CCR7, CD27, CD62L, CD57, and CD45RA. In parallel, the phenotypically distinct CD56(bright) 'regulatory' and CD56(dim) 'cytotoxic' NK subsets were quantified. The results show a strong differential mobilisation of CD8TL subsets (RAEM>EM>CM>naïve); during high intensity exercise the greatest increase was observed for RAEM CD8Tls (+450%) and the smallest for naïve cells (+84%). Similarly, CD56(dim) NK cells (+995%) were mobilised to a greater extent than CD56(bright) (+153%) NK cells. In conclusion, memory CD8TL that exhibit a high effector and tissue-migrating potential are preferentially mobilised during exercise. This finding unifies a range of independent observations regarding exercise-induced phenotypic and functional changes in circulating lymphocytes. The selective mobilisation of cytotoxic tissue-migrating subsets, both

  17. Mcl-1 regulates effector and memory CD8 T-cell differentiation during acute viral infection.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eui Ho; Neldner, Brandon; Gui, Jingang; Craig, Ruth W; Suresh, M

    2016-03-01

    Mcl-1, an anti-apoptotic member of Bcl-2 family maintains cell viability during clonal expansion of CD8 T cells, but the cell intrinsic role of Mcl-1 in contraction of effectors or the number of memory CD8 T cells is unknown. Mcl-1 levels decline during the contraction phase but rebound to high levels in memory CD8 T cells. Therefore, by overexpressing Mcl-1 in CD8 T cells we asked whether limiting levels of Mcl-1 promote contraction of effectors and constrain CD8 T-cell memory. Mcl-1 overexpression failed to affect CD8 T-cell expansion, contraction or the magnitude of CD8 T-cell memory. Strikingly, high Mcl-1 levels enhanced mTOR phosphorylation and augmented the differentiation of terminal effector cells and effector memory CD8 T cells to the detriment of poly-cytokine-producing central memory CD8 T cells. Taken together, these findings provided unexpected insights into the role of Mcl-1 in the differentiation of effector and memory CD8 T cells.

  18. Role of effector cells (CCR7(-)CD27(-)) and effector-memory cells (CCR7(-)CD27(+)) in drug-induced maculopapular exanthema.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, T D; Torres, M J; Lopez, S; Antunez, C; Gomez, E; Del Prado, M F; Canto, G; Blanca, M; Mayorga, C

    2010-01-01

    Maculopapular exanthema (MPE) induced by drugs is a T-cell mediated reaction and effector cells may play an important role in its development. We assessed the effector and cutaneous homing phenotype in peripheral blood cells from allergic patients after drug stimulation. This study included 10 patients and 10 controls. The effector phenotype (CCR7(-)CD27(+/-)), chemokine receptors (CCR4 and CCR10), and activation (CD25(low)) and regulatory markers (CD25(high)) were measured by flow cytometry in both peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and CD4-T-lymphocytes. Proliferation was determined by 5-(-6)-carboxyfluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester (CFSE) assay and the migratory capacity by a chemotaxis assay using CCL17 and CCL27. Compared to controls, CCR7(-)CD27(-) cells were increased in patients without (p=0.003) and with drug stimulation (p less than 0.001) and had significantly higher proliferation (p=0.010). CCR10 expression was increased in patients after drug stimulation in total and memory CD27(+) T-cells. Lymphocyte migration with CCL27 was higher in patients with drug stimulation (p=0.048), with a decrease in CCR7(-)CD27(-) (p less than 0.0001) and an increase in CCR7(-)CD27(+) (p=0.017). In patients, CD4-T-lymphocytes were significantly activated after drug stimulation (p less than 0.001). In conclusion, we show that effector memory CD4(+) T-cells (CCR7(-)CD27(+)) respond specifically to the drug responsible for MPE and confirm previous data about the involvement of CCR10 in cell trafficking to the skin.

  19. Persistent expansion of CD4+ effector memory T cells in Wegener's granulomatosis.

    PubMed

    Abdulahad, W H; van der Geld, Y M; Stegeman, C A; Kallenberg, C G M

    2006-09-01

    In order to test the hypothesis that Wegener's granulomatosis (WG) is associated with an ongoing immune effector response, even in remission, we examined the distribution of peripheral naive and memory T-lymphocytes in this disease, and analyzed the function-related phenotypes of the memory T-cell population. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were freshly isolated from WG-patients in remission (R-WG, n=40), active WG-patients (A-WG, n=17), and age-matched healthy controls (HCs, n=21). Expression of CD4, CD8, CD45RO, CCR7, interleukin (IL)-18Ralpha, ST2L, and FoxP3 were determined by four-color flow cytometric analysis. CD45RO and CCR7 were used for distinction between naive and memory T cells, IL-18Ralpha, ST2L, and FoxP3 for the assessment of Type1, Type2, and regulatory T-cells, respectively. In R-WG, the CD4+CD45RO+CCR7- effector memory T-cell subpopulation (TEM) was relatively increased, whereas the CD4+CD45RO-CCR7+ naive T-cell population (TNaive) was decreased as compared to HC. The distribution of naive and memory CD8+T cells did not differ between R-WG, A-WG, and HC, nor did CD4+CD45RO+CCR7+ central memory T cells (TCM). In contrast to HC, the percentage of CD4+TNaive cells in R-WG correlated negatively with age, whereas CD4+TEM cells showed a positive correlation. In R-WG, a skewing towards Type2 T cells was observed in CD4+TEM cells. No differences were detected in FoxP3+CD4+TEM cells between R-WG and A-WG, whereas the FoxP3-CD4+TEM cells were increased in R-WG and decreased in A-WG as compared to HC. Collectively, peripheral blood homeostasis of CD4+T cells is disturbed in R-WG with the persistent expansion of non-regulatory CD4+TEM cells. These cells might be involved in relapse and may constitute a target for therapy.

  20. Multiple layers of B cell memory with different effector functions.

    PubMed

    Dogan, Ismail; Bertocci, Barbara; Vilmont, Valérie; Delbos, Frédéric; Mégret, Jérome; Storck, Sébastien; Reynaud, Claude-Agnès; Weill, Jean-Claude

    2009-12-01

    Memory B cells are at the center of longstanding controversies regarding the presence of antigen for their survival and their re-engagement in germinal centers after secondary challenge. Using a new mouse model of memory B cell labeling dependent on the cytidine deaminase AID, we show that after immunization with a particulate antigen, B cell memory appeared in several subsets, comprising clusters of immunoglobulin M-positive (IgM(+)) and IgG1(+) B cells in germinal center-like structures that persisted up to 8 months after immunization, as well as IgM(+) and IgG1(+) B cells with a memory phenotype outside of B cell follicles. After challenge, the IgG subset differentiated into plasmocytes, whereas the IgM subset reinitiated a germinal center reaction. This model, in which B cell memory appears in several layers with different functions, reconciles previous conflicting propositions.

  1. Antigen independent differentiation and maintenance of effector-like resident memory T cells in tissues

    PubMed Central

    Casey, Kerry A; Fraser, Kathryn A; Schenkel, Jason M; Moran, Amy; Abt, Michael C; Beura, Lalit K; Lucas, Philip J; Artis, David; Wherry, E John; Hogquist, Kristin; Vezys, Vaiva; Masopust, David

    2012-01-01

    Differentiation and maintenance of recirculating effector memory CD8 T cells (TEM) depends on prolonged cognate antigen stimulation. Whether similar pathways of differentiation exist for recently identified tissue-resident effector memory T cells (TRM), which contribute to rapid local protection upon pathogen re-exposure, is unknown. Memory CD8αβ+ T cells within small intestine epithelium are well-characterized examples of TRM and they maintain a long-lived effector-like phenotype that is highly suggestive of persistent antigen stimulation. This study sought to define the sources and requirements for prolonged Ag-stimulation in programming this differentiation state, including local stimulation via cognate or cross-reactive antigens derived from pathogens, microbial flora, or dietary proteins. Contrary to expectations, we found that prolonged cognate Ag-stimulation was dispensable for intestinal TRM ontogeny. In fact, chronic antigenic stimulation skewed differentiation away from the canonical intestinal T cell phenotype. Resident memory signatures, CD69 and CD103, were expressed in many non-lymphoid tissues including intestine, stomach, kidney, reproductive tract, pancreas, brain, heart, and salivary gland, and could be driven by cytokines. Moreover, TGFβ driven CD103 expression was required for TRM maintenance within intestinal epithelium in vivo. Thus, induction and maintenance of long-lived effector-like intestinal TRM differed from classic models of TEM ontogeny, and were programmed through a novel location-dependent pathway that was required for the persistence of local immunological memory. PMID:22504644

  2. Expression of CD8alpha identifies a distinct subset of effector memory CD4+ T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Macchia, Iole; Gauduin, Marie-Claire; Kaur, Amitinder; Johnson, R Paul

    2006-10-01

    Circulating CD4+ CD8+ T lymphocytes have been described in the peripheral blood of humans and several animal species. However, the origin and functional properties of these cells remain poorly understood. In the present study, we evaluated the frequency, phenotype and function of peripheral CD4+ CD8+ T cells in rhesus macaques. Two distinct populations of CD4+ CD8+ T cells were identified: the dominant one was CD4hi CD8lo and expressed the CD8alphaalpha homodimer, while the minor population was CD4lo CD8hi and expressed the CD8alphabeta heterodimer. The majority of CD4hi CD8alphalo T cells exhibited an activated effector/memory phenotype (CCR5lo CD7- CD28- HLA-DR+) and expressed relatively high levels of granzyme B. Intracellular cytokine staining assays demonstrated that the frequency of cytomegalovirus-specific T cells was enriched five-fold in CD4hi CD8alphalo T cells compared to single-positive CD4+ T cells, whereas no consistent enrichment was observed for simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)-specific T cells. Cross-sectional studies of SIV-infected animals demonstrated that the frequency of CD4hi CD8alphalo T cells was lower in wild-type SIV-infected animals compared to uninfected controls, although prospective studies of SIV-infected animals demonstrated depletion of CD4hi CD8alphalo lymphocytes only in a subset of animals. Taken together, these data suggest that CD4+ T cells expressing CD8alpha represent an effector/memory subset of CD4+ T cells and that this cell population can be depleted during the course of SIV infection.

  3. Peripheral Tissue Homing Receptor Control of Naïve, Effector, and Memory CD8 T Cell Localization in Lymphoid and Non-Lymphoid Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Brinkman, C. Colin; Peske, J. David; Engelhard, Victor Henry

    2013-01-01

    T cell activation induces homing receptors that bind ligands on peripheral tissue vasculature, programing movement to sites of infection and injury. There are three major types of CD8 effector T cells based on homing receptor expression, which arise in distinct lymphoid organs. Recent publications indicate that naïve, effector, and memory T cell migration is more complex than once thought; while many effectors enter peripheral tissues, some re-enter lymph nodes (LN), and contain central memory precursors. LN re-entry can depend on CD62L or peripheral tissue homing receptors. Memory T cells in LN tend to express the same homing receptors as their forebears, but often are CD62Lneg. Homing receptors also control CD8 T cell tumor entry. Tumor vasculature has low levels of many peripheral tissue homing receptor ligands, but portions of it resemble high endothelial venules (HEV), enabling naïve T cell entry, activation, and subsequent effector activity. This vasculature is associated with positive prognoses in humans, suggesting it may sustain ongoing anti-tumor responses. These findings reveal new roles for homing receptors expressed by naïve, effector, and memory CD8 T cells in controlling entry into lymphoid and non-lymphoid tissues. PMID:23966998

  4. Effector memory and central memory NY-ESO-1-specific re-directed T cells for treatment of multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Schuberth, P C; Jakka, G; Jensen, S M; Wadle, A; Gautschi, F; Haley, D; Haile, S; Mischo, A; Held, G; Thiel, M; Tinguely, M; Bifulco, C B; Fox, B A; Renner, C; Petrausch, U

    2013-04-01

    The cancer-testis antigen NY-ESO-1 is a potential target antigen for immune therapy expressed in a subset of patients with multiple myeloma. We generated chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) recognizing the immunodominant NY-ESO-1 peptide 157-165 in the context of HLA-A*02:01 to re-direct autologous CD8(+) T cells towards NY-ESO-1(+) myeloma cells. These re-directed T cells specifically lysed NY-ESO-1(157-165)/HLA-A*02:01-positive cells and secreted IFNγ. A total of 40% of CCR7(-) re-directed T cells had an effector memory phenotype and 5% a central memory phenotype. Based on CCR7 cell sorting, effector and memory CAR-positive T cells were separated and CCR7(+) memory cells demonstrated after antigen-specific re-stimulation downregulation of CCR7 as sign of differentiation towards effector cells accompanied by an increased secretion of memory signature cytokines such as IL-2. To evaluate NY-ESO-1 as potential target antigen, we screened 78 bone marrow biopsies of multiple myeloma patients where NY-ESO-1 protein was found to be expressed by immunohistochemistry in 9.7% of samples. Adoptively transferred NY-ESO-1-specific re-directed T cells protected mice against challenge with endogenously NY-ESO-1-positive myeloma cells in a xenograft model. In conclusion, re-directed effector- and central memory T cells specifically recognized NY-ESO-1(157-165)/ HLA-A*02:01-positive cells resulting in antigen-specific functionality in vitro and in vivo.

  5. Neem leaf glycoprotein promotes dual generation of central and effector memory CD8(+) T cells against sarcoma antigen vaccine to induce protective anti-tumor immunity.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Sarbari; Sarkar, Madhurima; Ghosh, Tithi; Guha, Ipsita; Bhuniya, Avishek; Saha, Akata; Dasgupta, Shayani; Barik, Subhasis; Bose, Anamika; Baral, Rathindranath

    2016-03-01

    We have previously shown that Neem Leaf Glycoprotein (NLGP) mediates sustained tumor protection by activating host immune response. Now we report that adjuvant help from NLGP predominantly generates CD44(+)CD62L(high)CCR7(high) central memory (TCM; in lymph node) and CD44(+)CD62L(low)CCR7(low) effector memory (TEM; in spleen) CD8(+) T cells of Swiss mice after vaccination with sarcoma antigen (SarAg). Generated TCM and TEM participated either to replenish memory cell pool for sustained disease free states or in rapid tumor eradication respectively. TCM generated after SarAg+NLGP vaccination underwent significant proliferation and IL-2 secretion following SarAg re-stimulation. Furthermore, SarAg+NLGP vaccination helps in greater survival of the memory precursor effector cells at the peak of the effector response and their maintenance as mature memory cells, in comparison to single modality treatment. Such response is corroborated with the reduced phosphorylation of FOXO in the cytosol and increased KLF2 in the nucleus associated with enhanced CD62L, CCR7 expression of lymph node-resident CD8(+) T cells. However, spleen-resident CD8(+) T memory cells show superior efficacy for immediate memory-to-effector cell conversion. The data support in all aspects that SarAg+NLGP demonstrate superiority than SarAg vaccination alone that benefits the host by rapid effector functions whenever required, whereas, central-memory cells are thought to replenish the memory cell pool for ultimate sustained disease free survival till 60 days following post-vaccination tumor inoculation.

  6. Inhibitory action of deoxyspergualin on effector/memory T cell generation during Hymenolepis nana infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Asano, K; Muramatsu, K; Ikeda, K; Okamoto, K

    1996-10-01

    The effects of deoxyspergualin (DSG), a newly developed immunosuppressive agent, on protective immunity to Hymenolepis nana reinfection were examined in BALB/c mice. Administration of DSG at daily doses of 10.0 mg/kg to 30.0 mg/kg (but not 5.0 mg/kg) caused suppression of protective immunity when the agent was injected intraperitoneally during the induction phase of the immunity. In contrast, daily administration of 30.0 mg/kg DSG, during effector phase, could not suppress protective immunity. DSG inhibited endogenous interferon-gamma production in mesenteric lymph nodes induced by H. nana challenge infection, when the agent was injected intraperitoneally at a daily dose of 10.0 mg/kg during the induction phase of immunity. Delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH) local transfer analysis revealed that administration of DSG at 10.0 mg/kg/day into donor mice during induction phase of immunity inhibited generation of effector/memory cells that mediate DTH to H. nana egg antigen. However, DSG could not inhibit DTH effector cell activation when cells prepared from H. nana-infected, saline-injected mice were transferred into recipient treated with 10.0 mg/kg DSG. Administration of DSG at a dose of 10.0 mg/kg daily for 5 days produced large DNA fragments in mesenteric lymph node (MLN) cells. These results strongly suggest that DSG suppresses generation of effector/memory cells by apoptotic cell death but cannot suppress lymphocyte activation in vivo.

  7. Designing and testing the activities of TAL effector nucleases.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yanni; Cradick, Thomas J; Bao, Gang

    2014-01-01

    Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) have rapidly developed into a powerful tool for genome editing. To avoid labor-intensive and time-consuming experimental screening for active TALENs, a scoring system can help select optimal target sites. Here we describe a procedure to design active TALENs using a scoring system named Scoring Algorithm for Predicted TALEN Activity (SAPTA) and a method to test the activity of individual and pairs of TALENs.

  8. Specificity and Dynamics of Effector and Memory CD8 T Cell Responses in Human Tick-Borne Encephalitis Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Blom, Kim; Braun, Monika; Pakalniene, Jolita; Dailidyte, Laura; Béziat, Vivien; Lampen, Margit H.; Klingström, Jonas; Lagerqvist, Nina; Kjerstadius, Torbjörn; Michaëlsson, Jakob; Lindquist, Lars; Ljunggren, Hans-Gustaf; Sandberg, Johan K.; Mickiene, Aukse; Gredmark-Russ, Sara

    2015-01-01

    Tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV) is transferred to humans by ticks. The virus causes tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) with symptoms such as meningitis and meningoencephalitis. About one third of the patients suffer from long-lasting sequelae after clearance of the infection. Studies of the immune response during TBEV-infection are essential to the understanding of host responses to TBEV-infection and for the development of therapeutics. Here, we studied in detail the primary CD8 T cell response to TBEV in patients with acute TBE. Peripheral blood CD8 T cells mounted a considerable response to TBEV-infection as assessed by Ki67 and CD38 co-expression. These activated cells showed a CD45RA-CCR7-CD127- phenotype at day 7 after hospitalization, phenotypically defining them as effector cells. An immunodominant HLA-A2-restricted TBEV epitope was identified and utilized to study the characteristics and temporal dynamics of the antigen-specific response. The functional profile of TBEV-specific CD8 T cells was dominated by variants of mono-functional cells as the effector response matured. Antigen-specific CD8 T cells predominantly displayed a distinct Eomes+Ki67+T-bet+ effector phenotype at the peak of the response, which transitioned to an Eomes-Ki67-T-bet+ phenotype as the infection resolved and memory was established. These transcription factors thus characterize and discriminate stages of the antigen-specific T cell response during acute TBEV-infection. Altogether, CD8 T cells responded strongly to acute TBEV infection and passed through an effector phase, prior to gradual differentiation into memory cells with distinct transcription factor expression-patterns throughout the different phases. PMID:25611738

  9. CXCR5+ CCR7- CD8 T cells are early effector memory cells that infiltrate tonsil B cell follicles.

    PubMed

    Quigley, Máire F; Gonzalez, Veronica D; Granath, Anna; Andersson, Jan; Sandberg, Johan K

    2007-12-01

    Naive and central memory CD8 T cells use CCR7 to recirculate through T cell zones of secondary lymphoid organs where they can encounter antigen. Here we describe a subset of human CD8 T cells expressing CXCR5 which enables homing in response to CXCL13 produced within B cell follicles. CXCR5+ CD8 T cells were found in tonsil B cell follicles, and isolated cells migrated towards CXCL13 in vitro. They expressed CD27, CD28, CD45RO, CD69, and were CD7low, and produced IFN-gamma and granzyme A but lacked perforin, a functional profile suggesting that these cells are early effector memory cells in the context of contemporary T cell differentiation models. Receptors important in the interaction with B cells, including CD70, OX40 and ICOS, were induced upon activation, and CXCR5+ CD8 T cells could to some extent support survival and IgG production in tonsil B cells. Furthermore, CXCR5+ CD8 T cells expressed CCR5 but no CCR7, suggesting a migration pattern distinct from that of follicular CD4 T cells. The finding that a subset of early effector memory CD8 T cells use CXCR5 to locate to B cell follicles indicates that MHC class I-restricted CD8 T cells are part of the follicular T cell population.

  10. Programming tumor-reactive effector memory CD8+ T cells in vitro obviates the requirement for in vivo vaccination.

    PubMed

    Klebanoff, Christopher A; Yu, Zhiya; Hwang, Leroy N; Palmer, Douglas C; Gattinoni, Luca; Restifo, Nicholas P

    2009-08-27

    Naive and memory CD8(+) T cells can undergo programmed activation and expansion in response to a short T-cell receptor stimulus, but the extent to which in vitro programming can qualitatively substitute for an in vivo antigen stimulation remains unknown. We show that self-/tumor-reactive effector memory CD8(+) T cells (T(EM)) programmed in vitro either with peptide-pulsed antigen-presenting cells or plate-bound anti-CD3/anti-CD28 embark on a highly stereotyped response of in vivo clonal expansion and tumor destruction nearly identical to that of vaccine-stimulated T(EM) cells. This programmed response was associated with an interval of antigen-independent interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) release that facilitated the dynamic expression of the major histocompatibility complex class I restriction element H-2D(b) on responding tumor cells, leading to recognition and subsequent tumor lysis. Delaying cell transfer for more than 24 hours after stimulation or infusion of cells deficient in IFN-gamma entirely abrogated the benefit of the programmed response, whereas transfer of cells unable to respond to IFN-gamma had no detriment to antitumor immunity. These findings extend the phenomenon of a programmable effector response to memory CD8(+) T cells and have major implications for the design of current adoptive-cell transfer trials.

  11. Comparison of naïve and central memory derived CD8(+) effector cell engraftment fitness and function following adoptive transfer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiuli; Wong, ChingLam W; Urak, Ryan; Taus, Ellie; Aguilar, Brenda; Chang, Wen-Chung; Mardiros, Armen; Budde, Lihua E; Brown, Christine E; Berger, Carolina; Forman, Stephen J; Jensen, Michael C

    Human CD8(+) effector T cells derived from CD45RO(+)CD62L(+) precursors enriched for central memory (TCM) precursors retain the capacity to engraft and reconstitute functional memory upon adoptive transfer, whereas effectors derived from CD45RO(+)CD62L(-) precursors enriched for effector memory precursors do not. Here we sought to compare the engraftment fitness and function of CD8(+) effector T cells derived from CD45RA(+)CD62L(+) precursors enriched for naïve and stem cell memory precursors (TN/SCM) with that of TCM. We found that cytotoxic T cells (CTLs) derived from TCM transcribed higher levels of CD28, FOS, INFγ, Eomesodermin (Eomes), and lower levels of BCL2L11, maintained higher levels of phosphorylated AKT, and displayed enhanced sensitivity to the proliferative and anti-apoptotic effects of γ-chain cytokines compared to CTLs derived from TN/SCM. Higher frequencies of CTLs derived from TCM retained CD28 expression and upon activation secreted higher levels of IL-2. In NOD/Scid IL-2RγC(null) mice, CD8(+) TCM derived CTLs engrafted to higher frequencies in response to human IL-15 and mounted robust proliferative responses to an immunostimulatory vaccine. Similarly, CD8(+) TCM derived CD19CAR(+) CTLs exhibited superior antitumor potency following adoptive transfer compared to their CD8(+) TN/SCM derived counterparts. These studies support the use of TCM enriched cell products for adoptive therapy of cancer.

  12. Prolonged presence of effector-memory CD8 T cells in the central nervous system after dengue virus encephalitis.

    PubMed

    van der Most, Robbert G; Murali-Krishna, Kaja; Ahmed, Rafi

    2003-01-01

    Dengue virus infection in the central nervous system (CNS) of immunized mice results in a strong influx of CD8 T cells into the brain. Whereas the kinetics of the splenic antiviral response are conventional, i.e. expansion followed by a rapid drop in the frequency of specific CD8 T cells, dengue virus-specific CD8 T cells are retained in the CNS at a high frequency. These CD8 T cells display a partially activated phenotype (CD69(high), Ly-6A/E(high), CD62L(low)), characteristic for effector-memory T cells. CD43 expression, visualized by staining with the 1B11 mAb, decreased in time, suggesting that these persisting CD8 T cells differentiated into memory cells. These data add to the growing evidence implicating the CNS as a non-lymphoid tissue capable of supporting prolonged T cell survival/maintenance.

  13. Histone Acetylation Facilitates Rapid and Robust Memory CD8 T Cell Response through Differential Expression of Effector Molecules (Eomesodermin and Its Targets: Perforin and Granzyme B)1

    PubMed Central

    Araki, Yasuto; Fann, Monchou; Wersto, Robert; Weng, Nan-ping

    2008-01-01

    To understand the mechanism regulating the effector function of memory CD8 T cells, we examined expression and chromatin state of a key transcription factor (eomesodermin, EOMES) and two of its targets: perforin (PRF1) and granzyme B (GZMB). Accessible chromatin associated histone 3 lysine 9 acetylation (H3K9Ac) was found significantly higher at the proximal promoter and the first exon region of all three genes in memory CD8 T cells than in naive CD8 T cells. Correspondingly, EOMES and PRF1 were constitutively higher expressed in memory CD8 T cells than in naive CD8 T cells at resting and activated states. In contrast, higher expression of GZMB was induced in memory CD8 T cells than in naive CD8 T cells only after activation. Regardless of their constitutive or inducible expression, decreased H3K9Ac levels after treatment with a histone acetyl-transferase inhibitor (Curcumin) led to decreased expression of all three genes in activated memory CD8 T cells. These findings suggest that H3K9Ac associated accessible chromatin state serves as a corner stone for the differentially high expression of these effector genes in memory CD8 T cells. Thus, epigenetic changes mediated via histone acetylation may provide a chromatin “memory” for the rapid and robust transcriptional response of memory CD8 T cells. PMID:18523274

  14. Polarized granzyme release is required for antigen-driven transendothelial migration of human effector memory CD4 T cells.

    PubMed

    Manes, Thomas D; Pober, Jordan S

    2014-12-15

    Human effector memory CD4 T cells may transmigrate across endothelial cell (EC) monolayers either in response to inflammatory chemokines or in response to TCR recognition of Ag presented on the surface of the EC. The kinetics, morphologic manifestations, and molecular requirements of chemokine- and TCR-driven transendothelial migration (TEM) differ significantly. In this study, we report that, whereas the microtubule organizing center (MTOC) and cytosolic granules follow the nucleus across the endothelium in a uropod during chemokine-driven TEM, MTOC reorientation to the contact region between the T cell and the EC, accompanied by dynein-driven transport of granzyme-containing granules to and exocytosis at the contact region, are early events in TCR-driven, but not chemokine-driven TEM. Inhibitors of either granule function or granzyme proteolytic activity can arrest TCR-driven TEM, implying a requirement for granule discharge in the process. In the final stages of TCR-driven TEM, the MTOC precedes, rather than follows, the nucleus across the endothelium. Thus, TCR-driven TEM of effector memory CD4 T cells appears to be a novel process that more closely resembles immune synapse formation than it does conventional chemotaxis.

  15. Temporal dynamics of the primary human T cell response to yellow fever virus 17D as it matures from an effector- to a memory-type response.

    PubMed

    Blom, Kim; Braun, Monika; Ivarsson, Martin A; Gonzalez, Veronica D; Falconer, Karolin; Moll, Markus; Ljunggren, Hans-Gustaf; Michaëlsson, Jakob; Sandberg, Johan K

    2013-03-01

    The live attenuated yellow fever virus (YFV) 17D vaccine provides a good model to study immune responses to an acute viral infection in humans. We studied the temporal dynamics, composition, and character of the primary human T cell response to YFV. The acute YFV-specific effector CD8 T cell response was broad and complex; it was composed of dominant responses that persisted into the memory population, as well as of transient subdominant responses that were not detected at the memory stage. Furthermore, HLA-A2- and HLA-B7-restricted YFV epitope-specific effector cells predominantly displayed a CD45RA(-)CCR7(-)PD-1(+)CD27(high) phenotype, which transitioned into a CD45RA(+)CCR7(-)PD-1(-)CD27(low) memory population phenotype. The functional profile of the YFV-specific CD8 T cell response changed in composition as it matured from an effector- to a memory-type response, and it tended to become less polyfunctional during the course of this transition. Interestingly, activation of CD4 T cells, as well as FOXP3(+) T regulatory cells, in response to YFV vaccination preceded the kinetics of the CD8 T cell response. The present results contribute to our understanding of how immunodominance patterns develop, as well as the phenotypic and functional characteristics of the primary human T cell response to a viral infection as it evolves and matures into memory.

  16. Identification of Pertussis-Specific Effector Memory T Cells in Preschool Children

    PubMed Central

    Schure, Rose-Minke; Öztürk, Kemal; Berbers, Guy; Sanders, Elisabeth; van Twillert, Inonge; Carollo, Maria; Mascart, Françoise; Ausiello, Clara M.; van Els, Cecile A. C. M.; Smits, Kaat; Buisman, Anne-Marie

    2015-01-01

    Whooping cough remains a problem despite vaccination, and worldwide resurgence of pertussis is evident. Since cellular immunity plays a role in long-term protection against pertussis, we studied pertussis-specific T-cell responses. Around the time of the preschool acellular pertussis (aP) booster dose at 4 years of age, T-cell memory responses were compared in children who were primed during infancy with either a whole-cell pertussis (wP) or an aP vaccine. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were isolated and stimulated with pertussis vaccine antigens for 5 days. T cells were characterized by flow-based analysis of carboxyfluorescein succinimidyl ester (CFSE) dilution and CD4, CD3, CD45RA, CCR7, gamma interferon (IFN-γ), and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) expression. Before the aP preschool booster vaccination, both the proliferated pertussis toxin (PT)-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell fractions (CFSEdim) were higher in aP- than in wP-primed children. Post-booster vaccination, more pertussis-specific CD4+ effector memory cells (CD45RA− CCR7−) were induced in aP-primed children than in those primed with wP. The booster vaccination did not appear to significantly affect the T-cell memory subsets and functionality in aP-primed or wP-primed children. Although the percentages of Th1 cytokine-producing cells were alike in aP- and wP-primed children pre-booster vaccination, aP-primed children produced more Th1 cytokines due to higher numbers of proliferated pertussis-specific effector memory cells. At present, infant vaccinations with four aP vaccines in the first year of life result in pertussis-specific CD4+ and CD8+ effector memory T-cell responses that persist in children until 4 years of age and are higher than those in wP-primed children. The booster at 4 years of age is therefore questionable; this may be postponed to 6 years of age. PMID:25787136

  17. Identification of pertussis-specific effector memory T cells in preschool children.

    PubMed

    de Rond, Lia; Schure, Rose-Minke; Öztürk, Kemal; Berbers, Guy; Sanders, Elisabeth; van Twillert, Inonge; Carollo, Maria; Mascart, Françoise; Ausiello, Clara M; van Els, Cecile A C M; Smits, Kaat; Buisman, Anne-Marie

    2015-05-01

    Whooping cough remains a problem despite vaccination, and worldwide resurgence of pertussis is evident. Since cellular immunity plays a role in long-term protection against pertussis, we studied pertussis-specific T-cell responses. Around the time of the preschool acellular pertussis (aP) booster dose at 4 years of age, T-cell memory responses were compared in children who were primed during infancy with either a whole-cell pertussis (wP) or an aP vaccine. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were isolated and stimulated with pertussis vaccine antigens for 5 days. T cells were characterized by flow-based analysis of carboxyfluorescein succinimidyl ester (CFSE) dilution and CD4, CD3, CD45RA, CCR7, gamma interferon (IFN-γ), and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) expression. Before the aP preschool booster vaccination, both the proliferated pertussis toxin (PT)-specific CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cell fractions (CFSE(dim)) were higher in aP- than in wP-primed children. Post-booster vaccination, more pertussis-specific CD4(+) effector memory cells (CD45RA(-) CCR7(-)) were induced in aP-primed children than in those primed with wP. The booster vaccination did not appear to significantly affect the T-cell memory subsets and functionality in aP-primed or wP-primed children. Although the percentages of Th1 cytokine-producing cells were alike in aP- and wP-primed children pre-booster vaccination, aP-primed children produced more Th1 cytokines due to higher numbers of proliferated pertussis-specific effector memory cells. At present, infant vaccinations with four aP vaccines in the first year of life result in pertussis-specific CD4(+) and CD8(+) effector memory T-cell responses that persist in children until 4 years of age and are higher than those in wP-primed children. The booster at 4 years of age is therefore questionable; this may be postponed to 6 years of age.

  18. CD4 T cells with effector memory phenotype and function develop in the sterile environment of the fetus.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoming; Mozeleski, Brian; Lemoine, Sebastien; Dériaud, Edith; Lim, Annick; Zhivaki, Dania; Azria, Elie; Le Ray, Camille; Roguet, Gwenaelle; Launay, Odile; Vanet, Anne; Leclerc, Claude; Lo-Man, Richard

    2014-05-28

    The T cell compartment is considered to be naïve and dedicated to the development of tolerance during fetal development. We have identified and characterized a population of fetally developed CD4 T cells with an effector memory phenotype (TEM), which are present in cord blood. This population is polyclonal and has phenotypic features similar to those of conventional adult memory T cells, such as CD45RO expression. These cells express low levels of CD25 but are distinct from regulatory T cells because they lack Foxp3 expression. After T cell receptor activation, neonatal TEM cells readily produced tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF). We also detected interferon-γ (IFN-γ)-producing T helper 1 (TH1) cells and interleukin-4 (IL-4)/IL-13-producing TH2-like cells, but not IL-17-producing cells. We used chemokine receptor expression patterns to divide this TEM population into different subsets and identified distinct transcriptional programs using whole-genome microarray analysis. IFN-γ was found in CXCR3(+) TEM cells, whereas IL-4 was found in both CXCR3(+) TEM cells and CCR4(+) TEM cells. CCR6(+) TEM cells displayed a genetic signature that corresponded to TH17 cells but failed to produce IL-17A. However, the TH17 function of TEM cells was observed in the presence of IL-1β and IL-23. In summary, in the absence of reported pathology or any major infectious history, T cells with a memory-like phenotype develop in an environment thought to be sterile during fetal development and display a large variety of inflammatory effector functions associated with CD4 TH cells at birth.

  19. Differential impact of CD27 and 4-1BB costimulation on effector and memory CD8 T cell generation following peptide immunization.

    PubMed

    Willoughby, Jane E; Kerr, Jonathan P; Rogel, Anne; Taraban, Vadim Y; Buchan, Sarah L; Johnson, Peter W M; Al-Shamkhani, Aymen

    2014-07-01

    The factors that determine differentiation of naive CD8 T cells into memory cells are not well understood. A greater understanding of how memory cells are generated will inform of ways to improve vaccination strategies. In this study, we analyzed the CD8 T cell response elicited by two experimental vaccines comprising a peptide/protein Ag and an agonist that delivers a costimulatory signal via CD27 or 4-1BB. Both agonists increased expansion of Ag-specific CD8 T cells compared with Ag alone. However, their capacity to stimulate differentiation into effector and memory cells differed. CD27 agonists promoted increased expression of perforin and the generation of short-lived memory cells, whereas stimulation with 4-1BB agonists favored generation of stable memory. The memory-promoting effects of 4-1BB were independent of CD4 T cells and were the result of programing within the first 2 d of priming. Consistent with this conclusion, CD27 and 4-1BB-stimulated CD8 T cells expressed disparate amounts of IL-2, IFN-γ, CD25, CD71, and Gp49b as early as 3 d after in vivo activation. In addition, memory CD8 T cells, generated through priming with CD27 agonists, proliferated more extensively than did 4-1BB-generated memory cells, but these cells failed to persist. These data demonstrate a previously unanticipated link between the rates of homeostatic proliferation and memory cell attrition. Our study highlights a role for these receptors in skewing CD8 T cell differentiation into effector and memory cells and provides an approach to optimize vaccines that elicit CD8 T cell responses.

  20. miRNA Profiling of Naïve, Effector and Memory CD8 T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Haoquan; Neilson, Joel R.; Kumar, Priti; Manocha, Monika; Shankar, Premlata; Sharp, Phillip A.; Manjunath, N.

    2007-01-01

    microRNAs have recently emerged as master regulators of gene expression during development and cell differentiation. Although profound changes in gene expression also occur during antigen-induced T cell differentiation, the role of miRNAs in the process is not known. We compared the miRNA expression profiles between antigen-specific naïve, effector and memory CD8+ T cells using 3 different methods-small RNA cloning, miRNA microarray analysis and real-time PCR. Although many miRNAs were expressed in all the T cell subsets, the frequency of 7 miRNAs (miR-16, miR-21, miR-142-3p, miR-142-5p, miR-150, miR-15b and let-7f) alone accounted for ∼60% of all miRNAs, and their expression was several fold higher than the other expressed miRNAs. Global downregulation of miRNAs (including 6/7 dominantly expressed miRNAs) was observed in effector T cells compared to naïve cells and the miRNA expression levels tended to come back up in memory T cells. However, a few miRNAs, notably miR-21 were higher in effector and memory T cells compared to naïve T cells. These results suggest that concomitant with profound changes in gene expression, miRNA profile also changes dynamically during T cell differentiation. Sequence analysis of the cloned mature miRNAs revealed an extensive degree of end polymorphism. While 3′end polymorphisms dominated, heterogeneity at both ends, resembling drosha/dicer processing shift was also seen in miR-142, suggesting a possible novel mechanism to generate new miRNA and/or to diversify miRNA target selection. Overall, our results suggest that dynamic changes in the expression of miRNAs may be important for the regulation of gene expression during antigen-induced T cell differentiation. Our study also suggests possible novel mechanisms for miRNA biogenesis and function. PMID:17925868

  1. Targeting antigen to diverse APCs inactivates memory CD8+ T cells without eliciting tissue-destructive effector function.

    PubMed

    Kenna, Tony J; Waldie, Tanya; McNally, Alice; Thomson, Meagan; Yagita, Hideo; Thomas, Ranjeny; Steptoe, Raymond J

    2010-01-15

    Memory T cells develop early during the preclinical stages of autoimmune diseases and have traditionally been considered resistant to tolerance induction. As such, they may represent a potent barrier to the successful immunotherapy of established autoimmune diseases. It was recently shown that memory CD8+ T cell responses are terminated when Ag is genetically targeted to steady-state dendritic cells. However, under these conditions, inactivation of memory CD8+ T cells is slow, allowing transiently expanded memory CD8+ T cells to exert tissue-destructive effector function. In this study, we compared different Ag-targeting strategies and show, using an MHC class II promoter to drive Ag expression in a diverse range of APCs, that CD8+ memory T cells can be rapidly inactivated by MHC class II+ hematopoietic APCs through a mechanism that involves a rapid and sustained downregulation of TCR, in which the effector response of CD8+ memory cells is rapidly truncated and Ag-expressing target tissue destruction is prevented. Our data provide the first demonstration that genetically targeting Ag to a broad range of MHC class II+ APC types is a highly efficient way to terminate memory CD8+ T cell responses to prevent tissue-destructive effector function and potentially established autoimmune diseases.

  2. Transcription Factor Bcl11b Controls Effector and Memory CD8 T cell Fate Decision and Function during Poxvirus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Abboud, Georges; Stanfield, Jessica; Tahiliani, Vikas; Desai, Pritesh; Hutchinson, Tarun E.; Lorentsen, Kyle J.; Cho, Jonathan J.; Avram, Dorina; Salek-Ardakani, Shahram

    2016-01-01

    CD8+ T cells play an important role in host resistance to many viral infections, but the underlying transcriptional mechanisms governing their differentiation and functionality remain poorly defined. By using a highly virulent systemic and respiratory poxvirus infection in mice, we show that the transcription factor Bcl11b provides a dual trigger that sustains the clonal expansion of virus-specific effector CD8+ T cells, while simultaneously suppressing the expression of surface markers associated with short-lived effector cell (SLEC) differentiation. Additionally, we demonstrate that Bcl11b supports the acquisition of memory precursor effector cell (MPEC) phenotype and, thus, its absence causes near complete loss of lymphoid and lung-resident memory cells. Interestingly, despite having normal levels of T-bet and Eomesodermin, Bcl11b-deficient CD8+ T cells failed to execute effector differentiation needed for anti-viral cytokine production and degranulation, suggesting a non-redundant role of Bcl11b in regulation of this program. Thus, Bcl11b is a critical player in fate decision of SLECs and MPECs, as well as effector function and memory formation. PMID:27790219

  3. Macroautophagy regulates energy metabolism during effector T cell activation.

    PubMed

    Hubbard, Vanessa M; Valdor, Rut; Patel, Bindi; Singh, Rajat; Cuervo, Ana Maria; Macian, Fernando

    2010-12-15

    Macroautophagy is a highly conserved mechanism of lysosomal-mediated protein degradation that plays a key role in maintaining cellular homeostasis by recycling amino acids, reducing the amount of damaged proteins, and regulating protein levels in response to extracellular signals. We have found that macroautophagy is induced after effector T cell activation. Engagement of the TCR and CD28 results in enhanced microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3) processing, increased numbers of LC3-containing vesicles, and increased LC3 flux, indicating active autophagosome formation and clearance. The autophagosomes formed in stimulated T cells actively fuse with lysosomes to degrade their cargo. Using a conditional KO mouse model where Atg7, a critical gene for macroautophagy, is specifically deleted in T cells, we have found that macroautophagy-deficient effector Th cells have defective IL-2 and IFN-γ production and reduced proliferation after stimulation, with no significant increase in apoptosis. We have found that ATP generation is decreased when autophagy is blocked, and defects in activation-induced cytokine production are restored when an exogenous energy source is added to macroautophagy-deficient T cells. Furthermore, we present evidence showing that the nature of the cargo inside autophagic vesicles found in resting T cells differs from the cargo of autophagosomes in activated T cells, where mitochondria and other organelles are selectively excluded. These results suggest that macroautophagy is an actively regulated process in T cells that can be induced in response to TCR engagement to accommodate the bioenergetic requirements of activated T cells.

  4. Intranasal administration of RSV antigen-expressing MCMV elicits robust tissue-resident effector and effector memory CD8+ T cells in the lung

    PubMed Central

    Morabito, Kaitlyn M.; Ruckwardt, Tracy R.; Redwood, Alec J.; Moin, Syed M.; Price, David A.; Graham, Barney S.

    2016-01-01

    Cytomegalovirus vectors are promising delivery vehicles for vaccine strategies that aim to elicit effector CD8+ T cells. To determine how the route of immunization affects CD8+ T cell responses in the lungs of mice vaccinated with a murine cytomegalovirus vector expressing the respiratory syncytial virus matrix (M) protein, we infected CB6F1 mice via the intranasal or intraperitoneal route and evaluated the M-specific CD8+ T cell response at early and late time points. We found that intranasal vaccination generated robust and durable tissue-resident effector and effector memory CD8+ T cell populations that were undetectable after intraperitoneal vaccination. The generation of these antigen-experienced cells by intranasal vaccination resulted in earlier T cell responses, interferon gamma secretion, and viral clearance after respiratory syncytial virus challenge. Collectively, these findings validate a novel approach to vaccination that emphasizes the route of delivery as a key determinant of immune priming at the site of vulnerability. PMID:27220815

  5. Intranasal administration of RSV antigen-expressing MCMV elicits robust tissue-resident effector and effector memory CD8+ T cells in the lung.

    PubMed

    Morabito, K M; Ruckwardt, T R; Redwood, A J; Moin, S M; Price, D A; Graham, B S

    2017-03-01

    Cytomegalovirus vectors are promising delivery vehicles for vaccine strategies that aim to elicit effector CD8+ T cells. To determine how the route of immunization affects CD8+ T-cell responses in the lungs of mice vaccinated with a murine cytomegalovirus vector expressing the respiratory syncytial virus matrix (M) protein, we infected CB6F1 mice via the intranasal or intraperitoneal route and evaluated the M-specific CD8+ T-cell response at early and late time points. We found that intranasal vaccination generated robust and durable tissue-resident effector and effector memory CD8+ T-cell populations that were undetectable after intraperitoneal vaccination. The generation of these antigen-experienced cells by intranasal vaccination resulted in earlier T-cell responses, interferon gamma secretion, and viral clearance after respiratory syncytial virus challenge. Collectively, these findings validate a novel approach to vaccination that emphasizes the route of delivery as a key determinant of immune priming at the site of vulnerability.

  6. Rapid and Continued T-Cell Differentiation into Long-term Effector and Memory Stem Cells in Vaccinated Melanoma Patients.

    PubMed

    Gannon, Philippe O; Baumgaertner, Petra; Huber, Alexandre; Iancu, Emanuela M; Cagnon, Laurène; Abed Maillard, Samia; Maby-El Hajjami, Hélène; Speiser, Daniel E; Rufer, Nathalie

    2016-11-21

    Purpose: Patients with cancer benefit increasingly from T-cell-based therapies, such as adoptive T-cell transfer, checkpoint blockade, or vaccination. We have previously shown that serial vaccinations with Melan-A(MART-1)26-35 peptide, CpG-B, and incomplete Freund adjuvant (IFA) generated robust tumor-specific CD8 T-cell responses in patients with melanoma. Here, we describe the detailed kinetics of early- and long-term establishment of T-cell frequency, differentiation (into memory and effector cells), polyfunctionality, and clonotype repertoire induced by vaccination.Experimental Design: Twenty-nine patients with melanoma were treated with multiple monthly subcutaneous vaccinations consisting of CpG-B, and either the native/EAA (n = 13) or the analogue/ELA (n = 16) Melan-A(MART-1)26-35 peptide emulsified in IFA. Phenotypes and functionality of circulating Melan-A-specific CD8 T cells were assessed directly ex vivo by multiparameter flow cytometry, and TCR clonotypes were determined ex vivo by mRNA transcript analyses of individually sorted cells.Results: Our results highlight the determining impact of the initial vaccine injections on the rapid and strong induction of differentiated effector T cells in both patient cohorts. Moreover, long-term polyfunctional effector T-cell responses were associated with expansion of stem cell-like memory T cells over time along vaccination. Dominant TCR clonotypes emerged early and persisted throughout the entire period of observation. Interestingly, one highly dominant clonotype was found shared between memory and effector subsets.Conclusions: Peptide/CpG-B/IFA vaccination induced powerful long-term T-cell responses with robust effector cells and stem cell-like memory cells. These results support the further development of CpG-B-based cancer vaccines, either alone or as specific component of combination therapies. Clin Cancer Res; 1-12. ©2016 AACR.

  7. [Transcription activator-like effectors(TALEs)based genome engineering].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Mei-Wei; Duan, Cheng-Li; Liu, Jiang

    2013-10-01

    Systematic reverse-engineering of functional genome architecture requires precise modifications of gene sequences and transcription levels. The development and application of transcription activator-like effectors(TALEs) has created a wealth of genome engineering possibilities. TALEs are a class of naturally occurring DNA-binding proteins found in the plant pathogen Xanthomonas species. The DNA-binding domain of each TALE typically consists of tandem 34-amino acid repeat modules rearranged according to a simple cipher to target new DNA sequences. Customized TALEs can be used for a wide variety of genome engineering applications, including transcriptional modulation and genome editing. Such "genome engineering" has now been established in human cells and a number of model organisms, thus opening the door to better understanding gene function in model organisms, improving traits in crop plants and treating human genetic disorders.

  8. Unexpected positive control of NFκB and miR-155 by DGKα and ζ ensures effector and memory CD8+ T cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jialong; Zhang, Ping; Krishna, Sruti; Wang, Jinli; Lin, Xingguang; Huang, Hongxiang; Xie, Danli; Gorentla, Balachandra; Huang, Rick; Gao, Jimin; Li, Qi-Jing; Zhong, Xiao-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Signals from the T-cell receptor (TCR) and γ-chain cytokine receptors play crucial roles in initiating activation and effector/memory differentiation of CD8 T-cells. We report here that simultaneous deletion of both diacylglycerol kinase (DGK) α and ζ (DKO) severely impaired expansion of CD8 effector T cells and formation of memory CD8 T-cells after Listeria monocytogenes infection. Moreover, ablation of both DGKα and ζ in preformed memory CD8 T-cells triggered death and impaired homeostatic proliferation of these cells. DKO CD8 T-cells were impaired in priming due to decreased expression of chemokine receptors and migration to the draining lymph nodes. Moreover, DKO CD8 T-cells were unexpectedly defective in NFκB-mediated miR-155 transcript, leading to excessive SOCS1 expression and impaired γ-chain cytokine signaling. Our data identified a DGK-NFκB-miR-155-SOCS1 axis that bridges TCR and γ-chain cytokine signaling for robust CD8 T-cell primary and memory responses to bacterial infection. PMID:27014906

  9. TCR-driven transendothelial migration of human effector memory CD4 T cells involves Vav, Rac, and myosin IIA.

    PubMed

    Manes, Thomas D; Pober, Jordan S

    2013-04-01

    Human effector memory (EM) CD4 T cells may be recruited from the blood into a site of inflammation in response either to inflammatory chemokines displayed on or specific Ag presented by venular endothelial cells (ECs), designated as chemokine-driven or TCR-driven transendothelial migration (TEM), respectively. We have previously described differences in the morphological appearance of transmigrating T cells as well as in the molecules that mediate T cell-EC interactions distinguishing these two pathways. In this study, we report that TCR-driven TEM requires ZAP-70-dependent activation of a pathway involving Vav, Rac, and myosin IIA. Chemokine-driven TEM also uses ZAP-70, albeit in a quantitatively and spatially different manner of activation, and is independent of Vav, Rac, and mysosin IIA, depending instead on an as-yet unidentified GTP exchange factor that activates Cdc42. The differential use of small Rho family GTPases to activate the cytoskeleton is consistent with the morphological differences observed in T cells that undergo TEM in response to these distinct recruitment signals.

  10. Clonal CD8+ TCR-Vbeta expanded populations with effector memory phenotype in Churg Strauss syndrome.

    PubMed

    Guida, Giuseppe; Vallario, Antonella; Stella, Stefania; Boita, Monica; Circosta, Paola; Mariani, Sara; Prato, Giuseppina; Heffler, Enrico; Bergia, Roberta; Sottile, Antonino; Rolla, Giovanni; Cignetti, Alessandro

    2008-07-01

    Churg Strauss Syndrome (CSS) is a systemic vasculitis in which oligoclonal T cell expansions might be involved in the pathogenesis. Combined analysis of TCR-Vbeta expression profile by flow cytometry and of TCR gene rearrangement by heteroduplex PCR was used to detect and characterize T cell expansions in 8 CSS patients, 10 asthmatics and 42 healthy subjects. In all CSS patients one or two Vbeta families were expanded among CD8+ cells, with an effector memory phenotype apt to populate tissues and inflammatory sites. Heteroduplex PCR showed the presence of one or more clonal TCR rearrangements, which reveals monoclonal or oligoclonal T cells subpopulations. After purification with a Vbeta specific monoclonal antibody, each CD8+/Vbeta+ expanded family showed a single TCR rearrangement, clearly suggestive of monoclonality. All CD8+ expansions were detectable throughout the disease course. TCR-Vbeta expanded or deleted populations were not observed in asthmatic patients. Clonal CD8+/Vbeta+ T cell expansions might be useful as a disease marker.

  11. Distinct Effector Memory CD4+ T Cell Signatures in Latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection, BCG Vaccination and Clinically Resolved Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Adekambi, Toidi; Ibegbu, Chris C.; Kalokhe, Ameeta S.; Yu, Tianwei; Ray, Susan M.; Rengarajan, Jyothi

    2012-01-01

    Two billion people worldwide are estimated to be latently infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) and are at risk for developing active tuberculosis since Mtb can reactivate to cause TB disease in immune-compromised hosts. Individuals with latent Mtb infection (LTBI) and BCG-vaccinated individuals who are uninfected with Mtb, harbor antigen-specific memory CD4+ T cells. However, the differences between long-lived memory CD4+ T cells induced by latent Mtb infection (LTBI) versus BCG vaccination are unclear. In this study, we characterized the immune phenotype and functionality of antigen-specific memory CD4+ T cells in healthy BCG-vaccinated individuals who were either infected (LTBI) or uninfected (BCG) with Mtb. Individuals were classified into LTBI and BCG groups based on IFN-γ ELISPOT using cell wall antigens and ESAT-6/CFP-10 peptides. We show that LTBI individuals harbored high frequencies of late-stage differentiated (CD45RA−CD27−) antigen-specific effector memory CD4+ T cells that expressed PD-1. In contrast, BCG individuals had primarily early-stage (CD45RA−CD27+) cells with low PD-1 expression. CD27+ and CD27− as well as PD-1+ and PD-1− antigen-specific subsets were polyfunctional, suggesting that loss of CD27 expression and up-regulation of PD-1 did not compromise their capacity to produce IFN-γ, TNF-α and IL-2. PD-1 was preferentially expressed on CD27− antigen-specific CD4+ T cells, indicating that PD-1 is associated with the stage of differentiation. Using statistical models, we determined that CD27 and PD-1 predicted LTBI versus BCG status in healthy individuals and distinguished LTBI individuals from those who had clinically resolved Mtb infection after anti-tuberculosis treatment. This study shows that CD4+ memory responses induced by latent Mtb infection, BCG vaccination and clinically resolved Mtb infection are immunologically distinct. Our data suggest that differentiation into CD27−PD-1+ subsets in LTBI is driven by Mtb

  12. Exosomes: novel effectors of human platelet lysate activity.

    PubMed

    Torreggiani, E; Perut, F; Roncuzzi, L; Zini, N; Baglìo, S R; Baldini, N

    2014-09-22

    Despite the popularity of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) and platelet lysate (PL) in orthopaedic practice, the mechanism of action and the effectiveness of these therapeutic tools are still controversial. So far, the activity of PRP and PL has been associated with different growth factors (GF) released during platelet degranulation. This study, for the first time, identifies exosomes, nanosized vesicles released in the extracellular compartment by a number of elements, including platelets, as one of the effectors of PL activity. Exosomes were isolated from human PL by differential ultracentrifugation, and analysed by electron microscopy and Western blotting. Bone marrow stromal cells (MSC) treated with three different exosome concentrations (0.6 μg, 5 μg and 50 μg) showed a significant, dose-dependent increase in cell proliferation and migration compared to the control. In addition, osteogenic differentiation assays demonstrated that exosome concentration differently affected the ability of MSC to deposit mineralised matrix. Finally, the analysis of exosome protein content revealed a higher amount of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF-BB) and transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1) as compared to PL. In regards to RNA content, an enrichment of small RNAs in exosomes as compared to donor platelets has been found. These results suggest that exosomes consistently contribute to PL activity and could represent an advantageous nanodelivery system for cell-free regeneration therapies.

  13. Prostaglandin D2-loaded microspheres effectively activate macrophage effector functions.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Priscilla Aparecida Tartari; Bitencourt, Claudia da Silva; dos Santos, Daiane Fernanda; Nicolete, Roberto; Gelfuso, Guilherme Martins; Faccioli, Lúcia Helena

    2015-10-12

    Biodegradable lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA) microspheres (MS) improve the stability of biomolecules stability and allow enable their sustained release. Lipid mediators represent a strategy for improving host defense; however, most of these mediators, such as prostaglandin D2 (PGD2), have low water solubility and are unstable. The present study aimed to develop and characterize MS loaded with PGD2 (PGD2-MS) to obtain an innovative tool to activate macrophages. PGD2-MS were prepared using an oil-in-water emulsion solvent extraction-evaporation process, and the size, zeta potential, surface morphology and encapsulation efficiency were determined. It was also evaluated in vitro the phagocytic index, NF-κB activation, as well as nitric oxide and cytokine production by alveolar macrophages (AMs) in response to PGD2-MS. PGD2-MS were spherical with a diameter of 5.0±3.3 μm and regular surface, zeta potential of -13.4±5.6 mV, and 36% of encapsulation efficiency, with 16-26% release of entrapped PGD2 at 4 and 48 h, respectively. PGD2-MS were more efficiently internalized by AMs than unloaded-MS, and activated NF-κB more than free PGD2. Moreover, PGD2-MS stimulated the production of nitric oxide, TNF-α, IL-1β, and TGF-β, more than free PGD2, indicating that microencapsulation increased the activating effect of PGD2 on cells. In LPS-pre-treated AMs, PGD2-MS decreased the release of IL-6 but increased the production of nitric oxide and IL-1β. These results show that the morphological characteristics of PGD2-MS facilitated interaction with, and activation of phagocytic cells; moreover, PGD2-MS retained the biological activities of PGD2 to trigger effector mechanisms in AMs. It is suggested that PGD2-MS represent a strategy for therapeutic intervention in the lungs of immunocompromised subjects.

  14. A transcription activator-like effector toolbox for genome engineering.

    PubMed

    Sanjana, Neville E; Cong, Le; Zhou, Yang; Cunniff, Margaret M; Feng, Guoping; Zhang, Feng

    2012-01-05

    Transcription activator-like effectors (TALEs) are a class of naturally occurring DNA-binding proteins found in the plant pathogen Xanthomonas sp. The DNA-binding domain of each TALE consists of tandem 34-amino acid repeat modules that can be rearranged according to a simple cipher to target new DNA sequences. Customized TALEs can be used for a wide variety of genome engineering applications, including transcriptional modulation and genome editing. Here we describe a toolbox for rapid construction of custom TALE transcription factors (TALE-TFs) and nucleases (TALENs) using a hierarchical ligation procedure. This toolbox facilitates affordable and rapid construction of custom TALE-TFs and TALENs within 1 week and can be easily scaled up to construct TALEs for multiple targets in parallel. We also provide details for testing the activity in mammalian cells of custom TALE-TFs and TALENs using quantitative reverse-transcription PCR and Surveyor nuclease, respectively. The TALE toolbox described here will enable a broad range of biological applications.

  15. Memory CD4+ T cells are required for optimal NK cell effector functions against the opportunistic fungal pathogen Pneumocystis murina.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Michelle N; Zheng, Mingquan; Ruan, Sanbao; Kolls, Jay; D'Souza, Alain; Shellito, Judd E

    2013-01-01

    Little is known about the role of NK cells or their interplay with other immune cells during opportunistic infections. Using our murine model of Pneumocystis pneumonia, we found that loss of NK cells during immunosuppression results in substantial Pneumocystis lung burden. During early infection of C57B/6 CD4(+) T cell-depleted mice, there were significantly fewer NK cells in the lung tissue compared with CD4(+) T cell-intact animals, and the NK cells present demonstrated decreased upregulation of the activation marker NKp46 and production of the effector cytokine, IFN-γ. Furthermore, coincubation studies revealed a significant increase in fungal killing when NK cells were combined with CD4(+) T cells compared with either cell alone, which was coincident with a significant increase in perforin production by NK cells. Finally, however, we found through adoptive transfer that memory CD4(+) T cells are required for significant NK cell upregulation of the activation marker NK group 2D and production of IFN-γ, granzyme B, and perforin during Pneumocystis infection. To the best of our knowledge, this study is the first to demonstrate a role for NK cells in immunity to Pneumocystis pneumonia, as well as to establish a functional relationship between CD4(+) T cells and NK cells in the host response to an opportunistic fungal pathogen.

  16. Early coupled up-regulation of interleukin-12 receptor beta-1 in CD8+ central memory and effector T cells for better clinical outcomes in liver transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Uemoto, S; Ozawa, K; Kaido, T; Mori, A; Fujimoto, Y; Ogawa, K

    2015-08-01

    This study aimed to investigate the role of initial priming of interleukin (IL)-12 receptor beta-1 in CD8(+) central memory T cells (initial IL-12RTCM priming) and CCR7-negative subsets (CNS) in effector cell expansion and clinical outcome after living donor liver transplantation (LDLT). One hundred and six patients who underwent LDLT were classified into the following three groups according to hierarchical clustering of CD8(+) CD45 isoforms before LDLT: I, naive-dominant; II, effector memory-dominant; and III, effector-dominant. The pre-existing CD8(+) effector cells (TE ) and activated immune status increased progressively from group I to group II to group III. Groups I, II and III received tacrolimus (Tac)/glucocorticoid (GC) regimens. Eighteen group III recipients received Tac/mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) and were defined as group IV. Initial IL-12RTCM priming was slightly, moderately and markedly decreased in droups I, II, and III, respectively. Initial priming of IL-12Rβ1 in CNS was decreased markedly in the three groups with marked decreases of TE , perforin and interferon (IFN)-γ; all parameters were restored by up-regulation of IL-12Rβ1(+) TCM through the self-renewal of TCM . The lag time required until coupled up-regulation of IL-12Rβ1 of TCM and CNS to above baseline was 12, 20 and 32 days in groups I, II and III, respectively. Inferior clinical outcomes were associated with increasing lag time. In contrast, the initial priming of IL-12Rβ1 in TCM and CNS remained above baseline in group IV due to MMF-mediated increase of IL-12Rβ1. Early coupled up-regulation of TCM and CNS leads to efficient TE differentiation and optimal clinical outcomes.

  17. Epidermal Fatty Acid Binding Protein (E-FABP) Is Not Required for the Generation or Maintenance of Effector and Memory T Cells following Infection with Listeria monocytogenes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bing; Schmidt, Nathan W.

    2016-01-01

    Following activation of naïve T cells there are dynamic changes in the metabolic pathways used by T cells to support both the energetic needs of the cell and the macromolecules required for growth and proliferation. Among other changes, lipid metabolism undergoes dynamic transitions between fatty acid oxidation and fatty acid synthesis as cells progress from naïve to effector and effector to memory T cells. The hydrophobic nature of lipids requires that they be bound to protein chaperones within a cell. Fatty acid binding proteins (FABPs) represent a large class of lipid chaperones, with epidermal FABP (E-FABP) expressed in T cells. The objective of this study was to determine the contribution of E-FABP in antigen-specific T cell responses. Following infection with Listeria monocytogenes, we observed similar clonal expansion, contraction and formation of memory CD8 T cells in WT and E-FABP-/- mice, which also exhibited similar phenotypic and functional characteristics. Analysis of Listeria-specific CD4 T cells also revealed no defect in the expansion, contraction, and formation of memory CD4 T cells in E-FABP-/- mice. These data demonstrate that E-FABP is dispensable for antigen-specific T cell responses following a bacterial infection. PMID:27588422

  18. Parallel Profiles of Inflammatory and Effector Memory T Cells in Visceral Fat and Liver of Obesity-Associated Cancer Patients.

    PubMed

    Conroy, Melissa J; Galvin, Karen C; Doyle, Suzanne L; Kavanagh, Maria E; Mongan, Ann-Marie; Cannon, Aoife; Moore, Gillian Y; Reynolds, John V; Lysaght, Joanne

    2016-10-01

    In the midst of a worsening obesity epidemic, the incidence of obesity-associated morbidities, including cancer, diabetes, cardiac and liver disease is increasing. Insights into mechanisms underlying pathological obesity-associated inflammation are lacking. Both the omentum, the principal component of visceral fat, and liver of obese individuals are sites of excessive inflammation, but to date the T cell profiles of both compartments have not been assessed or compared in a patient cohort with obesity-associated disease. We have previously identified that omentum is enriched with inflammatory cytokines, chemokines and T cells. Here, we compared the inflammatory profile of T cells in the omentum and liver of patients with the obesity-associated malignancy oesophageal adenocarcinoma (OAC). Furthermore, we assessed the secreted cytokine profile in OAC patient serum, omentum and liver to assess systemic and local inflammation. We observed parallel T cell cytokine profiles and phenotypes in the omentum and liver of OAC patients, in particular CD69(+) and inflammatory effector memory T cells. This study reflects similar processes of inflammation and T cell activation in the omentum and liver, and may suggest common targets to modulate pathological inflammation at these sites.

  19. Expanded CD8+ T cells of murine and human CLL are driven into a senescent KLRG1+ effector memory phenotype.

    PubMed

    Göthert, Joachim Rudolf; Eisele, Lewin; Klein-Hitpass, Ludger; Weber, Stefanie; Zesewitz, Marie-Louise; Sellmann, Ludger; Röth, Alexander; Pircher, Hanspeter; Dührsen, Ulrich; Dürig, Jan

    2013-11-01

    Altered numbers and functions of T cells have previously been demonstrated in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) patients. However, dynamics and specific T-cell subset alterations have not been studied in great detail. Therefore, we studied CLL blood lymphocyte subsets of individual patients in a longitudinal manner. Dynamic expansions of blood CD4 + and CD8 + T-cell numbers were consistently associated with a progressively increasing CLL leukemic compartment. Interestingly, the T-cell subset expansion over time was more pronounced in CD38 + CLL. Additionally, we performed gene expression profiling of CD3 + T cells of CLL patients and normal donors. Using gene set enrichment analysis, we found significant enrichment of genes with higher expression in CLL T cells within CD8+ effector memory and terminal effector T-cell gene signatures. In agreement with these data, we observed a marked expansion of phenotypic CD8 + effector memory T cells in CLL by flow cytometry. Moreover, we observed that increments of CD8 + effector memory T cells in human CLL and also mouse CLL (Eμ-TCL1 model) were due to an expansion of the inhibitory killer cell lectin-like receptor G1 (KLRG1) expressing cellular subset. Furthermore, higher plasma levels of the natural KLRG1 ligand E-cadherin were detected in CLL patients compared to normal donor controls. The predominance of KLRG1+ expression within CD8+ T cells in conjunction with increased systemic soluble E-cadherin might significantly contribute to CLL immune dysfunction and might additionally represent an important component of the CLL microenvironment.

  20. Application of Long-term cultured Interferon-γ Enzyme-linked Immunospot Assay for Assessing Effector and Memory T Cell Responses in Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Maggioli, Mayara F.; Palmer, Mitchell V.; Vordermeier, H. Martin; Whelan, Adam O.; Fosse, James M.; Nonnecke, Brian J.; Waters, W. Ray

    2015-01-01

    Effector and memory T cells are generated through developmental programing of naïve cells following antigen recognition. If the infection is controlled up to 95 % of the T cells generated during the expansion phase are eliminated (i.e., contraction phase) and memory T cells remain, sometimes for a lifetime. In humans, two functionally distinct subsets of memory T cells have been described based on the expression of lymph node homing receptors. Central memory T cells express C-C chemokine receptor 7 and CD45RO and are mainly located in T-cell areas of secondary lymphoid organs. Effector memory T cells express CD45RO, lack CCR7 and display receptors associated with lymphocyte homing to peripheral or inflamed tissues. Effector T cells do not express either CCR7 or CD45RO but upon encounter with antigen produce effector cytokines, such as interferon-γ. Interferon-γ release assays are used for the diagnosis of bovine and human tuberculosis and detect primarily effector and effector memory T cell responses. Central memory T cell responses by CD4+ T cells to vaccination, on the other hand, may be used to predict vaccine efficacy, as demonstrated with simian immunodeficiency virus infection of non-human primates, tuberculosis in mice, and malaria in humans. Several studies with mice and humans as well as unpublished data on cattle, have demonstrated that interferon-γ ELISPOT assays measure central memory T cell responses. With this assay, peripheral blood mononuclear cells are cultured in decreasing concentration of antigen for 10 to 14 days (long-term culture), allowing effector responses to peak and wane; facilitating central memory T cells to differentiate and expand within the culture. PMID:26275095

  1. Functionalized liposomes loaded with siRNAs targeting ion channels in effector memory T cells as a potential therapy for autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Hajdu, Péter; Chimote, Ameet A.; Thompson, Tyler; Koo, Youngmi; Yun, Yeoheung; Conforti, Laura

    2013-01-01

    Effector memory T cells (TM) play a key role in the pathology of certain autoimmune disorders. The activity of effector TM cells is under the control of Kv1.3 ion channels, which facilitate the Ca2+ influx necessary for T cell activation and function, i.e. cytokine release and proliferation. Consequently, the knock-down of Kv1.3 expression in effector TM’s may be utilized as a therapy for the treatment of autoimmune diseases. In this study we synthesized lipid unilamellar nanoparticles (NPs) that can selectively deliver Kv1.3 siRNAs into TM cells in vitro. NPs made from a mixture of phosphatidylcholine, pegylated/biotinylated phosphoethanolamine and cholesterol were functionalized with biotinylated-CD45RO (cell surface marker of TM’s) antibodies via fluorophore-conjugated streptavidin (CD45RO-NPs). Incubation of T cells with CD45RO-NPs resulted into the selective attachment and endocytosis of the NPs into TM’s. Furthermore, the siRNA against Kv1.3, encapsulated into the CD45RO-NPs, was released into the cytosol. Consequently, the expression of Kv1.3 channels decreased significantly in TM’s, which led to a remarkable decrease in Ca2+ influx. Our results can form the basis of an innovative therapeutic approach in autoimmunity. PMID:24075407

  2. Application of long-term cultured interferon-gamma enzyme-linked immunospot assay for assessing effector and memory T cell responses in cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Effector and memory T cells are generated through developmental programing of naïve cells following antigen recognition. If the infection is controlled, up to 95% of the T cells generated during the expansion phase are eliminated (i.e., contraction phase) and memory T cells remain, sometimes for a l...

  3. Obesity-Induced Metabolic Stress Leads to Biased Effector Memory CD4(+) T Cell Differentiation via PI3K p110δ-Akt-Mediated Signals.

    PubMed

    Mauro, Claudio; Smith, Joanne; Cucchi, Danilo; Coe, David; Fu, Hongmei; Bonacina, Fabrizia; Baragetti, Andrea; Cermenati, Gaia; Caruso, Donatella; Mitro, Nico; Catapano, Alberico L; Ammirati, Enrico; Longhi, Maria P; Okkenhaug, Klaus; Norata, Giuseppe D; Marelli-Berg, Federica M

    2017-03-07

    Low-grade systemic inflammation associated to obesity leads to cardiovascular complications, caused partly by infiltration of adipose and vascular tissue by effector T cells. The signals leading to T cell differentiation and tissue infiltration during obesity are poorly understood. We tested whether saturated fatty acid-induced metabolic stress affects differentiation and trafficking patterns of CD4(+) T cells. Memory CD4(+) T cells primed in high-fat diet-fed donors preferentially migrated to non-lymphoid, inflammatory sites, independent of the metabolic status of the hosts. This was due to biased CD4(+) T cell differentiation into CD44(hi)-CCR7(lo)-CD62L(lo)-CXCR3(+)-LFA1(+) effector memory-like T cells upon priming in high-fat diet-fed animals. Similar phenotype was observed in obese subjects in a cohort of free-living people. This developmental bias was independent of any crosstalk between CD4(+) T cells and dendritic cells and was mediated via direct exposure of CD4(+) T cells to palmitate, leading to increased activation of a PI3K p110δ-Akt-dependent pathway upon priming.

  4. Increased Numbers of Circulating CD8 Effector Memory T Cells before Transplantation Enhance the Risk of Acute Rejection in Lung Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    San Segundo, David; Ballesteros, María Ángeles; Naranjo, Sara; Zurbano, Felipe; Miñambres, Eduardo; López-Hoyos, Marcos

    2013-01-01

    The effector and regulatory T cell subpopulations involved in the development of acute rejection episodes in lung transplantation remain to be elucidated. Twenty-seven lung transplant candidates were prospectively monitored before transplantation and within the first year post-transplantation. Regulatory, Th17, memory and naïve T cells were measured in peripheral blood of lung transplant recipients by flow cytometry. No association of acute rejection with number of peripheral regulatory T cells and Th17 cells was found. However, effector memory subsets in acute rejection patients were increased during the first two months post-transplant. Interestingly, patients waiting for lung transplant with levels of CD8+ effector memory T cells over 185 cells/mm3 had a significant increased risk of rejection [OR: 5.62 (95% CI: 1.08-29.37), p=0.04]. In multivariate analysis adjusted for age and gender the odds ratio for rejection was: OR: 5.89 (95% CI: 1.08-32.24), p=0.04. These data suggest a correlation between acute rejection and effector memory T cells in lung transplant recipients. The measurement of peripheral blood CD8+ effector memory T cells prior to lung transplant may define patients at high risk of acute lung rejection. PMID:24236187

  5. TLR agonists are highly effective at eliciting functional memory CTLs of effector memory phenotype in peptide immunization

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Given the importance of memory cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) in eliminating altered self-cells, including virus-infected and tumor cells, devising effective vaccination strategies for generating memory CTLs is a priority in the field of immunology. Herein, we elaborate upon a novel boosting approac...

  6. Human effector T cells derived from central memory cells rather than CD8(+)T cells modified by tumor-specific TCR gene transfer possess superior traits for adoptive immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Wu, Fenglin; Zhang, Wenfeng; Shao, Hongwei; Bo, Huaben; Shen, Han; Li, Jiandong; Liu, Yichen; Wang, Teng; Ma, Wenli; Huang, Shulin

    2013-10-10

    Adoptive cell therapy provides an attractive treatment of cancer, and our expanding capacity to target tumor antigens is driven by genetically engineered human T lymphocytes that express genes encoding tumor-specific T cell receptors (TCRs). The intrinsic properties of cultured T cells used for therapy were reported to have tremendous influences on their persistence and antitumor efficacy in vivo. In this study, we isolated CD8(+) central memory T cells from peripheral blood lymphocytes of healthy donors, and then transferred with the gene encoding TCR specific for tumor antigen using recombinant adenovirus vector Ad5F35-TRAV-TRBV. We found effector T cells derived from central memory T cells improved cell viability, maintained certain level of CD62L expression, and reacquired the CD62L(+)CD44(high) phenotype of central memory T cells after effector T cells differentiation. We then compared the antitumor reactivity of central memory T cells and CD8(+)T cells after TCR gene transferred. The results indicated that tumor-specific TCR gene being transferred to central memory T cells effectively increased the specific killing of antigen positive tumor cells and the expression of cytolytic granule protein. Furthermore, TCR gene transferred central memory T cells were more effective than TCR gene transferred CD8(+)T cells in CTL activity and effector cytokine secretion. These results implicated that isolating central memory T cells rather than CD8(+)T cells for insertion of gene encoding tumor-specific TCR may provide a superior tumor-reactive T cell population for adoptive transfer.

  7. Epigenomics of T cell activation, differentiation and memory

    PubMed Central

    Cuddapah, Suresh; Barski, Artem; Zhao, Keji

    2010-01-01

    Activation of T cells is an essential step in the immunological response to infection. While activation of naïve T cells results in proliferation and slow differentiation into cytokine-producing effector cells, antigen engagement with memory cells leads to cytokine production immediately. Even though the cell surface signaling events are similar in both the cases, the outcome is different, suggesting that distinct regulatory mechanisms may exist downstream of the activation signals. Recent advances in the understanding of global epigenetic patterns in T cells have resulted in the appreciation of the role of epigenetic mechanisms in processes such as activation and differentiation. In this review we discuss recent data suggesting that naïve T cell activation, differentiation and lineage commitment results in epigenetic changes and a fine balance between different histone modifications is required. On the other hand, memory T cells are poised and do not require epigenetic changes for short-term activation. PMID:20226645

  8. Tumor-Specific Effector CD8+ T Cells That Can Establish Immunological Memory in Humans after Adoptive Transfer Are Marked by Expression of IL7 Receptor and c-myc.

    PubMed

    Chandran, Smita S; Paria, Biman C; Srivastava, Abhishek K; Rothermel, Luke D; Stephens, Daniel J; Kammula, Udai S

    2015-08-15

    The optimal T-cell attributes for adoptive cancer immunotherapy are unclear. Recent clinical trials of ex vivo-expanded tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes indicated that differentiated T effector cells can elicit durable antitumor responses in some patients with cancer, with their antitumor activity tightly correlated with their persistence in the host. Thus, there is great interest in the definition of intrinsic biomarkers that can predict the conversion of short-lived tumor antigen-specific T effector cells into long-lived T memory cells. Long-term persistence of ex vivo-expanded tumor-specific CD8+ T effector clones has been reported in refractory metastatic melanoma patients after adoptive T-cell transfer. By using highly homogeneous clone populations from these preparations, we performed a comparative transcriptional profiling to define preinfusion molecular attributes that can be ascribed to an effector-to-memory transition. Through this route, we discovered that preinfusion T-cell clones that expressed the IL7 receptor (IL7R) and c-myc were more likely to persist longer after adoptive transfer to patients. The predictive value of these two biomarkers was strengthened by using IL7R protein, IL7-induced pSTAT5, and c-myc mRNA expression to prospectively identify human tumor-specific T effector clones capable of engraftment into immunodeficient mice. Overall, our findings reveal IL7R and c-myc expression as intrinsic biomarkers that can predict the fate of CD8+ T effector cells after adoptive transfer.

  9. Targeting Effector Memory T Cells with the Small Molecule Kv1.3 Blocker PAP-1 Suppresses Allergic Contact Dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Azam, Philippe; Sankaranarayanan, Ananthakrishnan; Homerick, Daniel; Griffey, Stephen; Wulff, Heike

    2007-01-01

    The voltage-gated potassium channel Kv1.3 has been recently identified as a molecular target that allows for selective pharmacological suppression of effector memory T (TEM) cells without affecting the function of naïve and central memory T cells. We here investigated whether PAP-1, a small molecule Kv1.3 blocker (EC50 = 2nM), could suppress allergic contact dermatitis (ACD). In a rat model of ACD, we first confirmed that the infiltrating cells in the elicitation phase are indeed CD8+ CD45RC− memory T cells with high Kv1.3 expression. In accordance with its selective effect on TEM cells, PAP-1 did not impair sensitization, but potently suppressed oxazolone-induced inflammation by inhibiting the infiltration of CD8+ T cells and reducing the production of the inflammatory cytokines IFN- γ, IL-2, and IL-17 when administered intraperitoneally or orally during the elicitation phase. PAP-1 was equally effective when applied topically, demonstrating that it effectively penetrates skin. We further show that PAP-1 is not a sensitizer or an irritant and exhibits no toxicity in a 28-day toxicity study. Based on these results we propose that PAP-1 could potentially be developed into a drug for the topical treatment of inflammatory skin diseases such as psoriasis. PMID:17273162

  10. Human CD4+ central and effector memory T cells produce IL-21: effect on cytokine-driven proliferation of CD4+ T cell subsets.

    PubMed

    Onoda, Tadashi; Rahman, Mizanur; Nara, Hidetoshi; Araki, Akemi; Makabe, Koki; Tsumoto, Kouhei; Kumagai, Izumi; Kudo, Toshio; Ishii, Naoto; Tanaka, Nobuyuki; Sugamura, Kazuo; Hayasaka, Kiyoshi; Asao, Hironobu

    2007-10-01

    IL-21 regulates certain functions of T cells, B cells, NK cells and dendritic cells. Although activated CD4(+) T cells produce IL-21, data identifying the specific CD4(+) T cell subsets that produce IL-21 are conflicting. In a previous study, mouse IL-21 message was detected in T(H)2, whereas human IL-21 (hIL-21) message was found in both T(H)1 and follicular helper T cells. To identify the IL-21-secreting cell populations in human, we established a hybridoma cell line producing an anti-hIL-21 mAb. Intracellular hIL-21-staining experiments showed that hIL-21 was mainly expressed in activated CD4(+) central memory T cells and in activated CD4(+) effector memory T cells, but not in activated CD4(+) naive T cells. Moreover, IL-21 was produced upon activation by some IFN-gamma-producing T(H)1-polarized cells and some IL-17-producing T(H)17-polarized cells, but not by IL-4-producing T(H)2-polarized cells. These results suggest that specific CD4(+) T cell populations produce IL-21. In the functional analysis, we found that IL-21 significantly enhanced the cytokine-driven proliferation of CD4(+) helper T cells synergistically with IL-7 and IL-15 without T cell activation stimuli. Taken together, IL-21 produced from CD4(+) memory T cells may have a supportive role in the maintenance of CD4(+) T cell subsets.

  11. Predominance of heterosubtypic IFN-γ-only-secreting effector memory T cells in pandemic H1N1 naive adults

    PubMed Central

    Sridhar, Saranya; Begom, Shaima; Bermingham, Alison; Ziegler, Thedi; Roberts, Kim L.; Barclay, Wendy S.; Openshaw, Peter; Lalvani, Ajit

    2015-01-01

    The 2009/10 pandemic (pH1N1) highlighted the need for vaccines conferring heterosubtypic immunity against antigenically shifted influenza strains. Although cross-reactive T cells are strong candidates for mediating heterosubtypic immunity, little is known about the population-level prevalence, frequency, and cytokine-secretion profile of heterosubtypic T cells to pH1N1. To assess this, pH1N1 sero-negative adults were recruited. Single-cell IFN-γ and IL-2 cytokine-secretion profiles to internal proteins of pH1N1 or live virus were enumerated and characterised. Heterosubtypic T cells recognising pH1N1 core proteins were widely prevalent, being detected in 90% (30 of 33) of pH1N1-näive individuals. Although the last exposure to influenza was greater than 6 months ago, the frequency and proportion of the IFN-γ-only-secreting T-cell subset was significantly higher than the IL-2-only-secreting subset. CD8+ IFN-γ-only-secreting heterosubtypic T cells were predominantly CCR7−CD45RA− effector-memory phenotype, expressing the tissue-homing receptor CXCR3 and degranulation marker CD107. Receipt of the 2008–09 influenza vaccine did not alter the frequency of these heterosubtypic T cells, highlighting the inability of current vaccines to maintain this heterosubtypic T-cell pool. The surprisingly high prevalence of pre-existing circulating pH1N1-specific CD8+ IFN-γ-only-secreting effector memory T cells with cytotoxic and lung-homing potential in pH1N1-seronegative adults may partly explain the low case fatality rate despite high rates of infection of the pandemic in young adults. PMID:22777887

  12. Characterization of Effector and Memory T Cell Subsets in the Immune Response to Bovine Tuberculosis in Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Maggioli, Mayara F.; Palmer, Mitchell V.; Thacker, Tyler C.; Vordermeier, H. Martin; Waters, W. Ray

    2015-01-01

    Cultured IFN-γ ELISPOT assays are primarily a measure of central memory T cell (Tcm) responses with humans; however, this important subset of lymphocytes is poorly characterized in cattle. Vaccine-elicited cultured IFN-γ ELISPOT responses correlate with protection against bovine tuberculosis in cattle. However, whether this assay measures cattle Tcm responses or not is uncertain. The objective of the present study was to characterize the relative contribution of Tcm (CCR7+, CD62Lhi, CD45RO+), T effector memory (Tem, defined as: CCR7-, CD62Llow/int, CD45RO+), and T effector cells (CCR7-, CD62L-/low, CD45RO-), in the immune response to Mycobacterium bovis. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from infected cattle were stimulated with a cocktail of M. bovis purified protein derivative, rTb10.4 and rAg85A for 13 days with periodic addition of fresh media and rIL-2. On day 13, cultured PBMC were re-stimulated with medium alone, rESAT-6:CFP10 or PPDb with fresh autologous adherent cells for antigen presentation. Cultured cells (13 days) or fresh PBMCs (ex vivo response) from the same calves were analyzed for IFN-γ production, proliferation, and CD4, CD45RO, CD62L, CD44, and CCR7 expression via flow cytometry after overnight stimulation. In response to mycobacterial antigens, ~75% of CD4+ IFN-γ+ cells in long-term cultures expressed a Tcm phenotype while less than 10% of the ex vivo response consisted of Tcm cells. Upon re-exposure to antigen, long-term cultured cells were highly proliferative, a distinctive characteristic of Tcm, and the predominant phenotype within the long-term cultures switched from Tcm to Tem. These findings suggest that proliferative responses of Tcm cells to some extent occurs simultaneously with reversion to effector phenotypes (mostly Tem). The present study characterizes Tcm cells of cattle and their participation in the response to M. bovis infection. PMID:25879774

  13. Balancing energetic and cognitive resources: memory use during search depends on the orienting effector.

    PubMed

    Solman, Grayden J F; Kingstone, Alan

    2014-09-01

    Search outside the laboratory involves tradeoffs among a variety of internal and external exploratory processes. Here we examine the conditions under which item specific memory from prior exposures to a search array is used to guide attention during search. We extend the hypothesis that memory use increases as perceptual search becomes more difficult by turning to an ecologically important type of search difficulty - energetic cost. Using optical motion tracking, we introduce a novel head-contingent display system, which enables the direct comparison of search using head movements and search using eye movements. Consistent with the increased energetic cost of turning the head to orient attention, we discover greater use of memory in head-contingent versus eye-contingent search, as reflected in both timing and orienting metrics. Our results extend theories of memory use in search to encompass embodied factors, and highlight the importance of accounting for the costs and constraints of the specific motor groups used in a given task when evaluating cognitive effects.

  14. Effector and memory T cell subsets in the response to bovine tuberculosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Long-term (i.e., 14 days) cultured IFN-gamma ELISPOT assays of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) are used to access T cell central memory (Tcm) responses in both cattle and humans. With bovine tuberculosis, vaccine-elicited long-term IFN-gamma ELISPOT response correlates with protection; how...

  15. Effector and memory T cell subsets in the response to bovine tuberculosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Long-term (i.e., 14d) cultured IFN-gamma ELISPOT assays of PBMC are used as a correlate of T cell central memory (Tcm) responses in cattle and humans. With bovine tuberculosis, vaccine-elicited Tcm responses correlate with protection against experimental Mycobacterium bovis infection. The objective ...

  16. NK cells require antigen-specific memory CD4+ T cells to mediate superior effector functions during HSV-2 recall responses in vitro.

    PubMed

    Chen, Branson; Lee, Amanda J; Chew, Marianne V; Ashkar, Ali A

    2016-12-14

    Natural killer (NK) cells have an important role in mounting protective innate responses against genital herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) infections. However their role as effectors in adaptive immune responses against HSV-2 is unclear. Here, we demonstrate that NK cells from C57BL/6 mice in an ex vivo splenocyte culture produce significantly more interferon γ (IFN-γ) upon re-exposure to HSV-2 antigens in a mouse model of genital HSV-2 immunization. We find that naïve NK cells do not require any prior stimulation or priming to be activated to produce IFN-γ. Our results demonstrate that HSV-2-experienced CD4(+) T cells have a crucial role in coordinating NK cell activation and that their presence during HSV-2 antigen presentation is required to activate NK cells in this model of secondary immune response. We also examined the requirement of cell-to-cell contacts for both CD4(+) T cells and NK cells. NK cells are dependent on direct interactions with other HSV-2-experienced splenocytes, and CD4(+) T cells need to be in close proximity to NK cells to activate them. This study revealed that NK cells do not exhibit any memory toward HSV-2 antigens and, in fact, require specific interactions with HSV-2-experienced CD4(+) T cells to produce IFN-γ.

  17. Mechanism of IRSp53 inhibition and combinatorial activation by Cdc42 and downstream effectors

    PubMed Central

    Kast, David J; Yang, Changsong; Disanza, Andrea; Boczkowska, Malgorzata; Madasu, Yadaiah; Scita, Giorgio; Svitkina, Tatyana; Dominguez, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    The Rho family GTPase effector IRSp53 has essential roles in filopodia formation and neuronal development, but its regulatory mechanism is poorly understood. IRSp53 contains a membrane-binding BAR domain followed by an unconventional CRIB motif that overlaps with a proline-rich region (CRIB–PR) and an SH3 domain that recruits actin cytoskeleton effectors. Using a fluorescence reporter assay, we show that human IRSp53 adopts a closed inactive conformation that opens synergistically with the binding of human Cdc42 to the CRIB–PR and effector proteins, such as the tumor-promoting factor Eps8, to the SH3 domain. The crystal structure of Cdc42 bound to the CRIB–PR reveals a new mode of effector binding to Rho family GTPases. Structure-inspired mutations disrupt autoinhibition and Cdc42 binding in vitro and decouple Cdc42- and IRSp53-dependent filopodia formation in cells. The data support a combinatorial mechanism of IRSp53 activation. PMID:24584464

  18. Peripheral blood-derived virus-specific memory stem T cells mature to functional effector memory subsets with self-renewal potency.

    PubMed

    Schmueck-Henneresse, Michael; Sharaf, Radwa; Vogt, Katrin; Weist, Benjamin J D; Landwehr-Kenzel, Sybille; Fuehrer, Henrike; Jurisch, Anke; Babel, Nina; Rooney, Cliona M; Reinke, Petra; Volk, Hans-Dieter

    2015-06-01

    Memory T cells expressing stem cell-like properties have been described recently. The capacity of self-renewal and differentiation into various memory/effector subsets make them attractive for adoptive T cell therapy to combat severe virus infections and tumors. The very few reports on human memory stem T cells (T(SCM)) are restricted to analyses on polyclonal T cells, but extensive data on Ag-specific T(SCM )are missing. This might be due to their very low frequency limiting their enrichment and characterization. In this article, we provide functional and phenotypic data on human viral-specific T(SCM), defined as CD8(+)CD45RA(+)CCR7(+)CD127(+)CD95(+). Whereas <1% of total T cells express the T(SCM) phenotype, human CMV-specific T(SCM) can be detected at frequencies similar to those seen in other subsets, resulting in ∼ 1 /10,000 human CMV-specific T(SCM). A new virus-specific expansion protocol of sort-purified T(SCM) reveals both upregulation of various T cell subset markers and preservation of their stem cell phenotype in a significant proportion, indicating both self-renewal and differentiation potency of virus-specific T cells sharing their TCR repertoire. Furthermore, we describe a simplified culture protocol that allows fast expansion of virus-specific T(SCM) starting from a mixed naive T/T(SCM) pool of PBLs. Due to the clinical-grade compatibility, this might be the basis for novel cell therapeutic options in life-threatening courses of viral and tumor disease.

  19. Effector, memory and naïve CD8+ T cells in peripheral blood and pleural effusion from lung adenocarcinoma patients.

    PubMed

    Prado-Garcia, Heriberto; Aguilar-Cazares, Dolores; Flores-Vergara, Hector; Mandoki, Juan Jose; Lopez-Gonzalez, Jose Sullivan

    2005-03-01

    The proportions of naïve, memory and effector CD8+ T cells in peripheral blood and pleural effusion from lung adenocarcinoma patients were studied. CD8+ T subsets were identified by using a combination of the following antibodies: anti-CD45RA, anti-CD45RO, anti-CD27 and anti-CD28, as well as antibodies to other markers. Fas-positive cells were determined in each CD8+ T subset. Also, the intracellular cytokine patterns of CD4+ and CD8+ lymphocytes from pleural effusion were analysed. In naïve, memory and effector CD8+ T subsets no significant differences were observed in peripheral blood between healthy donors and cancer patients. In contrast, a high proportion of cells with memory phenotype (CD45RA-CD45RO+CD27+CD28+) and a low proportion of cells with effector phenotype (CD45RA+CD45RO-CD27-CD28-) were found in pleural effusion with respect to peripheral blood (P<0.001). The altered proportions of CD8+ T subsets in pleural effusion were not mediated by type 2 cytokines produced by CD4+ or CD8+ lymphocytes. In the effector CD8+ T subset, from peripheral blood as well as from pleural effusion, a low percentage of perforin-expressing cells was observed compared to granzyme A-expressing cells. Additionally, a high percentage of naïve CD8+ T cells expressing Fas was found. Our data suggest that: (i) terminal-differentiation process of CD8+ T cells is blocked, and (ii) early Fas-expression in CD8+ T cells, which was reflected even in peripheral blood, may lead to apoptosis of naïve cells when they reach the effector stage. All these processes may contribute to the inadequate antitumour immune response found in lung carcinoma patients.

  20. TNFSF10/TRAIL regulates human T4 effector memory lymphocyte radiosensitivity and predicts radiation-induced acute and subacute dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Baijer, Jan; Déchamps, Nathalie; Perdry, Hervé; Morales, Pablo; Kerns, Sarah; Vasilescu, Alexandre; Baulande, Sylvain; Azria, David; Roméo, Paul Henri; Schmitz, Annette

    2016-01-01

    Sensitivity of T4 effector-memory (T4EM) lymphocytes to radiation-induced apoptosis shows heritability compatible with a Mendelian mode of transmission. Using gene expression studies and flow cytometry, we show a higher TNF-Related Apoptosis Inducing Ligand (TRAIL/TNFSF10) mRNA level and a higher level of membrane bound TRAIL (mTRAIL) on radiosensitive compared to radioresistant T4EM lymphocytes. Functionally, we show that mTRAIL mediates a pro-apoptotic autocrine signaling after irradiation of T4EM lymphocytes linking mTRAIL expression to T4EM radiosensitivity. Using single marker and multimarker Family-Based Association Testing, we identified 3 SNPs in the TRAIL gene that are significantly associated with T4EM lymphocytes radiosensitivity. Among these 3 SNPs, two are also associated with acute and subacute dermatitis after radiotherapy in breast cancer indicating that T4EM lymphocytes radiosensitivity may be used to predict response to radiotherapy. Altogether, these results show that mTRAIL level regulates the response of T4EM lymphocytes to ionizing radiation and suggest that TRAIL/TNFSF10 genetic variants hold promise as markers of individual radiosensitivity. PMID:26982083

  1. ECM components guide IL-10 producing regulatory T-cell (TR1) induction from effector memory T-cell precursors.

    PubMed

    Bollyky, Paul L; Wu, Rebecca P; Falk, Ben A; Lord, James D; Long, S Alice; Preisinger, Anton; Teng, Brandon; Holt, Gregory E; Standifer, Nathan E; Braun, Kathleen R; Xie, Cindy Fang; Samuels, Peter L; Vernon, Robert B; Gebe, John A; Wight, Thomas N; Nepom, Gerald T

    2011-05-10

    We describe a role for ECM as a biosensor for inflammatory microenvironments that plays a critical role in peripheral immune tolerance. We show that hyaluronan (HA) promotes induction of Foxp3- IL-10-producing regulatory T cells (TR1) from conventional T-cell precursors in both murine and human systems. This is, to our knowledge, the first description of an ECM component inducing regulatory T cells. Intact HA, characteristic of healing tissues, promotes induction of TR1 capable of abrogating disease in an IL-10-dependent mouse colitis model whereas fragmentary HA, typical of inflamed tissues, does not, indicating a decisive role for tissue integrity in this system. The TR1 precursor cells in this system are CD4(+)CD62L(-)FoxP3(-), suggesting that effector memory cells assume a regulatory phenotype when they encounter their cognate antigen in the context of intact HA. Matrix integrity cues might thereby play a central role in maintaining peripheral tolerance. This TR1 induction is mediated by CD44 cross-linking and signaling through p38 and ERK1/2. This induction is suppressed, also in a CD44-dependent manner, by osteopontin, a component of chronically inflamed ECM, indicating that CD44 signaling serves as a nexus for fate decisions regarding TR1 induction. Finally, we demonstrate that TR1 induction signals can be recapitulated using synthetic matrices. These results reveal important roles for the matrix microenvironment in immune regulation and suggest unique strategies for immunomodulation.

  2. Expansion of dysfunctional Tim-3-expressing effector memory CD8+ T cells during simian immunodeficiency virus infection in rhesus macaques.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Tsuyoshi; Burwitz, Benjamin J; Chew, Glen M; Reed, Jason S; Pathak, Reesab; Seger, Elizabeth; Clayton, Kiera L; Rini, James M; Ostrowski, Mario A; Ishii, Naoto; Kuroda, Marcelo J; Hansen, Scott G; Sacha, Jonah B; Ndhlovu, Lishomwa C

    2014-12-01

    The T cell Ig- and mucin domain-containing molecule-3 (Tim-3) negative immune checkpoint receptor demarcates functionally exhausted CD8(+) T cells arising from chronic stimulation in viral infections like HIV. Tim-3 blockade leads to improved antiviral CD8(+) T cell responses in vitro and, therefore, represents a novel intervention strategy to restore T cell function in vivo and protect from disease progression. However, the Tim-3 pathway in the physiologically relevant rhesus macaque SIV model of AIDS remains uncharacterized. We report that Tim-3(+)CD8(+) T cell frequencies are significantly increased in lymph nodes, but not in peripheral blood, in SIV-infected animals. Tim-3(+)PD-1(+)CD8(+) T cells are similarly increased during SIV infection and positively correlate with SIV plasma viremia. Tim-3 expression was found primarily on effector memory CD8(+) T cells in all tissues examined. Tim-3(+)CD8(+) T cells have lower Ki-67 content and minimal cytokine responses to SIV compared with Tim-3(-)CD8(+) T cells. During acute-phase SIV replication, Tim-3 expression peaked on SIV-specific CD8(+) T cells by 2 wk postinfection and then rapidly diminished, irrespective of mutational escape of cognate Ag, suggesting non-TCR-driven mechanisms for Tim-3 expression. Thus, rhesus Tim-3 in SIV infection partially mimics human Tim-3 in HIV infection and may serve as a novel model for targeted studies focused on rejuvenating HIV-specific CD8(+) T cell responses.

  3. Generation of knockout rabbits using transcription activator-like effector nucleases.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Fan, Nana; Song, Jun; Zhong, Juan; Guo, Xiaogang; Tian, Weihua; Zhang, Quanjun; Cui, Fenggong; Li, Li; Newsome, Philip N; Frampton, Jon; Esteban, Miguel A; Lai, Liangxue

    2014-01-01

    Zinc-finger nucleases and transcription activator-like effector nucleases are novel gene-editing platforms contributing to redefine the boundaries of modern biological research. They are composed of a non-specific cleavage domain and a tailor made DNA-binding module, which enables a broad range of genetic modifications by inducing efficient DNA double-strand breaks at desired loci. Among other remarkable uses, these nucleases have been employed to produce gene knockouts in mid-size and large animals, such as rabbits and pigs, respectively. This approach is cost effective, relatively quick, and can produce invaluable models for human disease studies, biotechnology or agricultural purposes. Here we describe a protocol for the efficient generation of knockout rabbits using transcription activator-like effector nucleases, and a perspective of the field.

  4. Overcoming transcription activator-like effector (TALE) DNA binding domain sensitivity to cytosine methylation.

    PubMed

    Valton, Julien; Dupuy, Aurélie; Daboussi, Fayza; Thomas, Séverine; Maréchal, Alan; Macmaster, Rachel; Melliand, Kevin; Juillerat, Alexandre; Duchateau, Philippe

    2012-11-09

    Within the past 2 years, transcription activator-like effector (TALE) DNA binding domains have emerged as the new generation of engineerable platform for production of custom DNA binding domains. However, their recently described sensitivity to cytosine methylation represents a major bottleneck for genome engineering applications. Using a combination of biochemical, structural, and cellular approaches, we were able to identify the molecular basis of such sensitivity and propose a simple, drug-free, and universal method to overcome it.

  5. Rapid parallel flow cytometry assays of active GTPases using effector beads.

    PubMed

    Buranda, Tione; BasuRay, Soumik; Swanson, Scarlett; Agola, Jacob; Bondu, Virginie; Wandinger-Ness, Angela

    2013-11-15

    We describe a rapid assay for measuring the cellular activity of small guanine triphosphatases (GTPases) in response to a specific stimulus. Effector-functionalized beads are used to quantify in parallel multiple GTP-bound GTPases in the same cell lysate by flow cytometry. In a biologically relevant example, five different Ras family GTPases are shown for the first time to be involved in a concerted signaling cascade downstream of receptor ligation by Sin Nombre hantavirus.

  6. Sterile Immunity to Malaria after DNA Prime/Adenovirus Boost Immunization Is Associated with Effector Memory CD8+T Cells Targeting AMA1 Class I Epitopes

    PubMed Central

    Sedegah, Martha; Hollingdale, Michael R.; Farooq, Fouzia; Ganeshan, Harini; Belmonte, Maria; Kim, Yohan; Peters, Bjoern; Sette, Alessandro; Huang, Jun; McGrath, Shannon; Abot, Esteban; Limbach, Keith; Shi, Meng; Soisson, Lorraine; Diggs, Carter; Chuang, Ilin; Tamminga, Cindy; Epstein, Judith E.; Villasante, Eileen; Richie, Thomas L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Fifteen volunteers were immunized with three doses of plasmid DNA encoding P. falciparum circumsporozoite protein (CSP) and apical membrane antigen-1 (AMA1) and boosted with human adenovirus-5 (Ad) expressing the same antigens (DNA/Ad). Four volunteers (27%) demonstrated sterile immunity to controlled human malaria infection and, overall, protection was statistically significantly associated with ELISpot and CD8+ T cell IFN-γ activities to AMA1 but not CSP. DNA priming was required for protection, as 18 additional subjects immunized with Ad alone (AdCA) did not develop sterile protection. Methodology/Principal Findings We sought to identify correlates of protection, recognizing that DNA-priming may induce different responses than AdCA alone. Among protected volunteers, two and three had higher ELISpot and CD8+ T cell IFN-γ responses to CSP and AMA1, respectively, than non-protected volunteers. Unexpectedly, non-protected volunteers in the AdCA trial showed ELISpot and CD8+ T cell IFN-γ responses to AMA1 equal to or higher than the protected volunteers. T cell functionality assessed by intracellular cytokine staining for IFN-γ, TNF-α and IL-2 likewise did not distinguish protected from non-protected volunteers across both trials. However, three of the four protected volunteers showed higher effector to central memory CD8+ T cell ratios to AMA1, and one of these to CSP, than non-protected volunteers for both antigens. These responses were focused on discrete regions of CSP and AMA1. Class I epitopes restricted by A*03 or B*58 supertypes within these regions of AMA1 strongly recalled responses in three of four protected volunteers. We hypothesize that vaccine-induced effector memory CD8+ T cells recognizing a single class I epitope can confer sterile immunity to P. falciparum in humans. Conclusions/Significance We suggest that better understanding of which epitopes within malaria antigens can confer sterile immunity and design of vaccine approaches

  7. The Yersinia pestis Effector YopM Inhibits Pyrin Inflammasome Activation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Donghai; Gavrilin, Mikhail A.; Alnemri, Emad S.; Johnson, Peter F.; Lee, Bettina; Mecsas, Joan; Kayagaki, Nobuhiko; Goguen, Jon D.; Lien, Egil

    2016-01-01

    Type III secretion systems (T3SS) are central virulence factors for many pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria, and secreted T3SS effectors can block key aspects of host cell signaling. To counter this, innate immune responses can also sense some T3SS components to initiate anti-bacterial mechanisms. The Yersinia pestis T3SS is particularly effective and sophisticated in manipulating the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1β and IL-18, which are typically processed into their mature forms by active caspase-1 following inflammasome formation. Some effectors, like Y. pestis YopM, may block inflammasome activation. Here we show that YopM prevents Y. pestis induced activation of the Pyrin inflammasome induced by the RhoA-inhibiting effector YopE, which is a GTPase activating protein. YopM blocks YopE-induced Pyrin-mediated caspase-1 dependent IL-1β/IL-18 production and cell death. We also detected YopM in a complex with Pyrin and kinases RSK1 and PKN1, putative negative regulators of Pyrin. In contrast to wild-type mice, Pyrin deficient mice were also highly susceptible to an attenuated Y. pestis strain lacking YopM, emphasizing the importance of inhibition of Pyrin in vivo. A complex interplay between the Y. pestis T3SS and IL-1β/IL-18 production is evident, involving at least four inflammasome pathways. The secreted effector YopJ triggers caspase-8- dependent IL-1β activation, even when YopM is present. Additionally, the presence of the T3SS needle/translocon activates NLRP3 and NLRC4-dependent IL-1β generation, which is blocked by YopK, but not by YopM. Taken together, the data suggest YopM specificity for obstructing the Pyrin pathway, as the effector does not appear to block Y. pestis-induced NLRP3, NLRC4 or caspase-8 dependent caspase-1 processing. Thus, we identify Y. pestis YopM as a microbial inhibitor of the Pyrin inflammasome. The fact that so many of the Y. pestis T3SS components are participating in regulation of IL-1β/IL-18 release suggests

  8. Activating Attachments Reduces Memories of Traumatic Images

    PubMed Central

    Foord, Rachael

    2016-01-01

    Emotional memories, and especially intrusive memories, are a common feature of many psychological disorders, and are overconsolidated by stress. Attachment theory posits that activation of mental representations of attachment figures can reduce stress and boost coping. This study tested the proposition that attachment activation would reduce consolidation of emotional and intrusive memories. Sixty-seven undergraduate students viewed subliminal presentations of traumatic and neutral images, which were preceded by subliminal presentations of either attachment-related images or non-attachment-related images; free recall and intrusive memories were assessed two days later. Participants with low avoidant attachment tendencies who received the attachment primes recalled fewer memories and reported fewer intrusions than those who received the non-attachment primes. Unexpectedly, those with high anxious attachment tendencies reported fewer memories. These findings generally accord with attachment theory, and suggest that consolidation of emotional memories can be moderated by activation of attachment representations. PMID:27631498

  9. ECM components guide IL-10 producing regulatory T-cell (TR1) induction from effector memory T-cell precursors

    PubMed Central

    Bollyky, Paul L.; Wu, Rebecca P.; Falk, Ben A.; Lord, James D.; Long, S. Alice; Preisinger, Anton; Teng, Brandon; Holt, Gregory E.; Standifer, Nathan E.; Braun, Kathleen R.; Xie, Cindy Fang; Samuels, Peter L.; Vernon, Robert B.; Gebe, John A.; Wight, Thomas N.; Nepom, Gerald T.

    2011-01-01

    We describe a role for ECM as a biosensor for inflammatory microenvironments that plays a critical role in peripheral immune tolerance. We show that hyaluronan (HA) promotes induction of Foxp3- IL-10–producing regulatory T cells (TR1) from conventional T-cell precursors in both murine and human systems. This is, to our knowledge, the first description of an ECM component inducing regulatory T cells. Intact HA, characteristic of healing tissues, promotes induction of TR1 capable of abrogating disease in an IL-10–dependent mouse colitis model whereas fragmentary HA, typical of inflamed tissues, does not, indicating a decisive role for tissue integrity in this system. The TR1 precursor cells in this system are CD4+CD62L−FoxP3−, suggesting that effector memory cells assume a regulatory phenotype when they encounter their cognate antigen in the context of intact HA. Matrix integrity cues might thereby play a central role in maintaining peripheral tolerance. This TR1 induction is mediated by CD44 cross-linking and signaling through p38 and ERK1/2. This induction is suppressed, also in a CD44-dependent manner, by osteopontin, a component of chronically inflamed ECM, indicating that CD44 signaling serves as a nexus for fate decisions regarding TR1 induction. Finally, we demonstrate that TR1 induction signals can be recapitulated using synthetic matrices. These results reveal important roles for the matrix microenvironment in immune regulation and suggest unique strategies for immunomodulation. PMID:21518860

  10. Real-time tracking of cell cycle progression during CD8+ effector and memory T-cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Kinjyo, Ichiko; Qin, Jim; Tan, Sioh-Yang; Wellard, Cameron J.; Mrass, Paulus; Ritchie, William; Doi, Atsushi; Cavanagh, Lois L.; Tomura, Michio; Sakaue-Sawano, Asako; Kanagawa, Osami; Miyawaki, Atsushi; Hodgkin, Philip D.; Weninger, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    The precise pathways of memory T-cell differentiation are incompletely understood. Here we exploit transgenic mice expressing fluorescent cell cycle indicators to longitudinally track the division dynamics of individual CD8+ T cells. During influenza virus infection in vivo, naive T cells enter a CD62Lintermediate state of fast proliferation, which continues for at least nine generations. At the peak of the anti-viral immune response, a subpopulation of these cells markedly reduces their cycling speed and acquires a CD62Lhi central memory cell phenotype. Construction of T-cell family division trees in vitro reveals two patterns of proliferation dynamics. While cells initially divide rapidly with moderate stochastic variations of cycling times after each generation, a slow-cycling subpopulation displaying a CD62Lhi memory phenotype appears after eight divisions. Phenotype and cell cycle duration are inherited by the progeny of slow cyclers. We propose that memory precursors cell-intrinsically modulate their proliferative activity to diversify differentiation pathways. PMID:25709008

  11. IgE epitope proximity determines immune complex shape and effector cell activation capacity

    PubMed Central

    Gieras, Anna; Linhart, Birgit; Roux, Kenneth H.; Dutta, Moumita; Khodoun, Marat; Zafred, Domen; Cabauatan, Clarissa R.; Lupinek, Christian; Weber, Milena; Focke-Tejkl, Margarete; Keller, Walter; Finkelman, Fred D.; Valenta, Rudolf

    2016-01-01

    Background IgE-allergen complexes induce mast cell and basophil activation and thus immediate allergic inflammation. They are also important for IgE-facilitated allergen presentation to T cells by antigen-presenting cells. Objective To investigate whether the proximity of IgE binding sites on an allergen affects immune complex shape and subsequent effector cell activation in vitro and in vivo. Methods We constructed artificial allergens by grafting IgE epitopes in different numbers and proximity onto a scaffold protein. The shape of immune complexes formed between artificial allergens and the corresponding IgE was studied by negative-stain electron microscopy. Allergenic activity was determined using basophil activation assays. Mice were primed with IgE, followed by injection of artificial allergens to evaluate their in vivo allergenic activity. Severity of systemic anaphylaxis was measured by changes in body temperature. Results We could demonstrate simultaneous binding of 4 IgE antibodies in close vicinity to each other. The proximity of IgE binding sites on allergens influenced the shape of the resulting immune complexes and the magnitude of effector cell activation and in vivo inflammation. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that the proximity of IgE epitopes on an allergen affects its allergenic activity. We thus identified a novel mechanism by which IgE-allergen complexes regulate allergic inflammation. This mechanism should be important for allergy and other immune complex–mediated diseases. PMID:26684291

  12. Sandia Cognitive Runtime Engine with Active Memory

    SciTech Connect

    Xavier, Patrick; Chen, Michael C.; Hart, Brian; Hart, Derek; Lippitt, Carl; Wolfenbarger, Paul; Waymire, Russel

    2005-12-01

    The SCREAM (Sandia Cognitive Runtime Engine with Active memory) software implements a subset of a Cognitive Famework developed at Sandia National Laboratories. The software is implemented in the Umbra simulation and modular software framework, which is C++-based. SCREAM components include a Concept Instance Driver, Semantic Activation Network, Concept Database, Context Recognizer, Context Database, Episodic Memory, Egocentric Spatial Memory, Allocentric Spatial Memory, Comparator, and a Context to Abstract Action converter. At initialization, modules load the data files that together specify all the components of a particular cognitive model, such as concept declarations, context declarations, spreading activation weights, and context/situation-cue-patterns.

  13. Nano-particle vaccination combined with TLR-7 and -9 ligands triggers memory and effector CD8⁺ T-cell responses in melanoma patients.

    PubMed

    Goldinger, Simone M; Dummer, Reinhard; Baumgaertner, Petra; Mihic-Probst, Daniela; Schwarz, Katrin; Hammann-Haenni, Anya; Willers, Joerg; Geldhof, Christine; Prior, John O; Kündig, Thomas M; Michielin, Olivier; Bachmann, Martin F; Speiser, Daniel E

    2012-11-01

    Optimal vaccine strategies must be identified for improving T-cell vaccination against infectious and malignant diseases. MelQbG10 is a virus-like nano-particle loaded with A-type CpG-oligonucleotides (CpG-ODN) and coupled to peptide(16-35) derived from Melan-A/MART-1. In this phase IIa clinical study, four groups of stage III-IV melanoma patients were vaccinated with MelQbG10, given (i) with IFA (Montanide) s.c.; (ii) with IFA s.c. and topical Imiquimod; (iii) i.d. with topical Imiquimod; or (iv) as intralymph node injection. In total, 16/21 (76%) patients generated ex vivo detectable Melan-A/MART-1-specific T-cell responses. T-cell frequencies were significantly higher when IFA was used as adjuvant, resulting in detectable T-cell responses in all (11/11) patients, with predominant generation of effector-memory-phenotype cells. In turn, Imiquimod induced higher proportions of central-memory-phenotype cells and increased percentages of CD127(+) (IL-7R) T cells. Direct injection of MelQbG10 into lymph nodes resulted in lower T-cell frequencies, associated with lower proportions of memory and effector-phenotype T cells. Swelling of vaccine site draining lymph nodes, and increased glucose uptake at PET/CT was observed in 13/15 (87%) of evaluable patients, reflecting vaccine triggered immune reactions in lymph nodes. We conclude that the simultaneous use of both Imiquimod and CpG-ODN induced combined memory and effector CD8(+) T-cell responses.

  14. Chronic Alcohol Ingestion Delays T Cell Activation and Effector Function in Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Margoles, Lindsay M.; Mittal, Rohit; Klingensmith, Nathan J.; Lyons, John D.; Liang, Zhe; Serbanescu, Mara A.; Wagener, Maylene E.

    2016-01-01

    Sepsis is the leading cause of death in intensive care units in the US, and it is known that chronic alcohol use is associated with higher incidence of sepsis, longer ICU stays, and higher mortality from sepsis. Both sepsis and chronic alcohol use are associated with immune deficits such as decreased lymphocyte numbers, impaired innate immunity, delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions, and susceptibility to infections; however, understanding of specific pathways of interaction or synergy between these two states of immune dysregulation is lacking. This study therefore sought to elucidate mechanisms underlying the immune dysregulation observed during sepsis in the setting of chronic alcohol exposure. Using a murine model of chronic ethanol ingestion followed by sepsis induction via cecal ligation and puncture, we determined that while CD4+ and CD8+ T cells isolated from alcohol fed mice eventually expressed the same cellular activation markers (CD44, CD69, and CD43) and effector molecules (IFN-γ, TNF) as their water fed counterparts, there was an overall delay in the acquisition of these phenotypes. This early lag in T cell activation was associated with significantly reduced IL-2 production at a later timepoint in both the CD4+ and CD8+ T cell compartments in alcohol sepsis, as well as with a reduced accumulation of CD8dim activated effectors. Taken together, these data suggest that delayed T cell activation may result in qualitative differences in the immune response to sepsis in the setting of chronic alcohol ingestion. PMID:27861506

  15. Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs): a highly efficient and versatile tool for genome editing.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ning; Zhao, Huimin

    2013-07-01

    Transcription activator-like effector (TALE) nucleases (TALENs) have recently emerged as a revolutionary genome editing tool in many different organisms and cell types. The site-specific chromosomal double-strand breaks introduced by TALENs significantly increase the efficiency of genomic modification. The modular nature of the TALE central repeat domains enables researchers to tailor DNA recognition specificity with ease and target essentially any desired DNA sequence. Here, we comprehensively review the development of TALEN technology in terms of scaffold optimization, DNA recognition, and repeat array assembly. In addition, we provide some perspectives on the future development of this technology.

  16. The application of transcription activator-like effector nucleases for genome editing in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Yi, Peishan; Li, Wei; Ou, Guangshuo

    2014-08-01

    The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans has been a powerful model system for biomedical research in the past decades, however, the efficient genetic tools are still demanding for gene knockout, knock-in or conditional gene mutations. Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) that comprise a sequence-specific DNA-binding domain fused to a FokI nuclease domain facilitate the targeted genome editing in various cell types or organisms. Here we summarize the recent progresses and protocols using TALENs in C. elegans that generate gene mutations and knock-ins in the germ line and the conditional gene knockout in somatic tissues.

  17. Genome Modification of Pluripotent Cells by Using Transcription Activator-Like Effector Nucleases (TALENs).

    PubMed

    Taheri-Ghahfarokhi, Amir; Malaver-Ortega, Luis F; Sumer, Huseyin

    2015-01-01

    Interest is increasing in transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) as a tool to introduce targeted double-strand breaks into the large genomes of human and animal cell lines. The produced DNA lesions stimulate DNA repair pathways, error-prone but dominant non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) and accurate but less occurring homology-directed repair (HDR), and as a result targeted genes can be modified. Here, we describe a modified Golden-Gate cloning method for generating TALENs and also details for targeting genes in mouse embryonic stem cells. The protocol described here can be used for modifying the genome of a broad range of pluripotent cell lines.

  18. CD20+ T cells have a predominantly Tc1 effector memory phenotype and are expanded in the ascites of patients with ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    de Bruyn, Marco; Wiersma, Valerie R; Wouters, Maartje C A; Samplonius, Douwe F; Klip, Harry G; Helfrich, Wijnand; Nijman, Hans W; Eggleton, Paul; Bremer, Edwin

    2015-01-01

    Recently, a small subset of T cells that expresses the B cell marker CD20 has been identified in healthy volunteers and in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis. The origin of these CD20-positive T cells as well as their relevance in human disease remains unclear. Here, we identified that after functional B cell/T cell interaction CD20 molecules are transferred to the cell surface of T cells by trogocytosis together with the established trogocytosis marker HLA-DR. Further, the presence of CD20 on isolated CD20+ T cells remained stable for up to 48h of ex vivo culture. These CD20+ T cells almost exclusively produced IFNγ (∼70% vs. ∼20% in the CD20− T cell population) and were predominantly (CD8+) effector memory T cells (∼60–70%). This IFNγ producing and effector memory phenotype was also determined for CD20+ T cells as detected in the peripheral blood and ascitic fluids of ovarian cancer (OC) patients. In the latter, the percentage of CD20+ T cells was further strongly increased (from ∼6% in peripheral blood to 23% in ascitic fluid). Taken together, the data presented here indicate that CD20 is transferred to T cells upon intimate T cell/B cell interaction. Further, CD20+ T cells are of memory and IFNγ producing phenotype and are present in increased amounts in ascitic fluid of OC patients. PMID:26137418

  19. Distinct activities of Bartonella henselae type IV secretion effector proteins modulate capillary-like sprout formation.

    PubMed

    Scheidegger, F; Ellner, Y; Guye, P; Rhomberg, T A; Weber, H; Augustin, H G; Dehio, C

    2009-07-01

    The zoonotic pathogen Bartonella henselae (Bh) can lead to vasoproliferative tumour lesions in the skin and inner organs known as bacillary angiomatosis and bacillary peliosis. The knowledge on the molecular and cellular mechanisms involved in this pathogen-triggered angiogenic process is confined by the lack of a suitable animal model and a physiologically relevant cell culture model of angiogenesis. Here we employed a three-dimensional in vitro angiogenesis assay of collagen gel-embedded endothelial cell (EC) spheroids to study the angiogenic properties of Bh. Spheroids generated from Bh-infected ECs displayed a high capacity to form sprouts, which represent capillary-like projections into the collagen gel. The VirB/VirD4 type IV secretion system and a subset of its translocated Bartonella effector proteins (Beps) were found to profoundly modulate this Bh-induced sprouting activity. BepA, known to protect ECs from apoptosis, strongly promoted sprout formation. In contrast, BepG, triggering cytoskeletal rearrangements, potently inhibited sprouting. Hence, the here established in vitro model of Bartonella- induced angiogenesis revealed distinct and opposing activities of type IV secretion system effector proteins, which together with a VirB/VirD4-independent effect may control the angiogenic activity of Bh during chronic infection of the vasculature.

  20. Effector and Suppressor Circuits of the Immune Response are Activated in vivo by Different Mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamoto, Hiroyuki; Kripke, Margaret L.

    1987-06-01

    The application of fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) onto the skin of mice induces a contact hypersensitivity immune response. Lymph nodes draining the skin painted with FITC contain fluorescent cells that induce contact hypersensitivity to FITC when injected into normal mice. The antigen-presenting cells responsible for activating the effector pathway of the contact hypersensitivity response express Ia histocompatibility determinants and are resistant to inactivation with γ -radiation. Exposing the skin to low doses of UV radiation (280-320 nm) before the application of FITC suppresses the contact hypersensitivity response to FITC. Cells present in the draining lymph nodes of these mice induce suppressor T lymphocytes when injected into normal recipients. The inducer cells in the draining lymph nodes are Thy 1+,Ia- and are inactivated by γ -radiation. These studies demonstrate that different mechanisms are involved in the in vivo activation of effector and suppressor immune responses, and they suggest that the mode of initial antigen presentation determines which immunologic circuit will be activated in response to a contact-sensitizing antigen.

  1. Effector and suppressor circuits of the immune response are activated in vivo by different mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Okamoto, H.; Kripke, M.L.

    1987-06-01

    The application of fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) onto the skin of mice induces a contact hypersensitivity immune response. Lymph nodes draining the skin painted with FITC contain fluorescent cells that induce contact hypersensitivity to FITC when injected into normal mice. The antigen-presenting cells responsible for activating the effector pathway of the contact hypersensitivity response express Ia histocompatibility determinants and are resistant to inactivation with gamma-radiation. Exposing the skin to low doses of UV radiation (280-320 nm) before the application of FITC suppresses the contact hypersensitivity response to FITC. Cells present in the draining lymph nodes of these mice induce suppressor T lymphocytes when injected into normal recipients. The inducer cells in the draining lymph nodes are Thy 1+, Ia- and are inactivated by gamma-radiation. These studies demonstrate that different mechanisms are involved in the in vivo activation of effector and suppressor immune responses, and they suggest that the mode of initial antigen presentation determines which immunologic circuit will be activated in response to a contact-sensitizing antigen.

  2. High Quality Long-Term CD4+ and CD8+ Effector Memory Populations Stimulated by DNA-LACK/MVA-LACK Regimen in Leishmania major BALB/c Model of Infection

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Sampedro, Lucas; Gómez, Carmen Elena; Mejías-Pérez, Ernesto; S. Sorzano, Carlos Oscar; Esteban, Mariano

    2012-01-01

    Heterologous vaccination based on priming with a plasmid DNA vector and boosting with an attenuated vaccinia virus MVA recombinant, with both vectors expressing the Leishmania infantum LACK antigen (DNA-LACK and MVA-LACK), has shown efficacy conferring protection in murine and canine models against cutaneus and visceral leishmaniasis, but the immune parameters of protection remain ill defined. Here we performed by flow cytometry an in depth analysis of the T cell populations induced in BALB/c mice during the vaccination protocol DNA-LACK/MVA-LACK, as well as after challenge with L. major parasites. In the adaptive response, there is a polyfunctional CD4+ and CD8+ T cell activation against LACK antigen. At the memory phase the heterologous vaccination induces high quality LACK-specific long-term CD4+ and CD8+ effector memory cells. After parasite challenge, there is a moderate boosting of LACK-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. Anti-vector responses were largely CD8+-mediated. The immune parameters induced against LACK and triggered by the combined vaccination DNA/MVA protocol, like polyfunctionality of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells with an effector phenotype, could be relevant in protection against leishmaniasis. PMID:22715418

  3. Editing of the heavy chain gene of Bombyx mori using transcription activator like effector nucleases.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yujun; Nakagaki, Masao

    2014-07-18

    The silk gland of Bombyx mori represents an established in vivo system for producing recombinant proteins. However, low yields of recombinant proteins have limited the system's further development because endogenous silk proteins were present. Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) tool which work in pairs to bind and cleave DNA at specific sites, have recently been shown to be effective for genome editing in various organisms, including silkworms. To improve the yield of recombinant proteins synthesized in the silkworm by eliminated competition with endogenous fibroin synthesis, the heavy chain (H-chain) gene was knocked out using transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs). A pair of TALENs that targets the 1st exon in the H-chain gene was synthesized and microinjected into silkworm embryos; the injected silkworms were screened for H-chain gene knock out (H-KO) based on their sericin cocoon-making characteristics. Sequence analysis revealed that the H-chain of the mutation was successfully edited. The TALENs was very efficient in editing the genome DNA of silkworm. By being eliminated competition with the H-chain, the production of recombinant proteins would be expected to increase markedly if this H-KO system is used.

  4. TAL effectors and activation of predicted host targets distinguish Asian from African strains of the rice pathogen Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzicola while strict conservation suggests universal importance of five TAL effectors.

    PubMed

    Wilkins, Katherine E; Booher, Nicholas J; Wang, Li; Bogdanove, Adam J

    2015-01-01

    Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzicola (Xoc) causes the increasingly important disease bacterial leaf streak of rice (BLS) in part by type III delivery of repeat-rich transcription activator-like (TAL) effectors to upregulate host susceptibility genes. By pathogen whole genome, single molecule, real-time sequencing and host RNA sequencing, we compared TAL effector content and rice transcriptional responses across 10 geographically diverse Xoc strains. TAL effector content is surprisingly conserved overall, yet distinguishes Asian from African isolates. Five TAL effectors are conserved across all strains. In a prior laboratory assay in rice cv. Nipponbare, only two contributed to virulence in strain BLS256 but the strict conservation indicates all five may be important, in different rice genotypes or in the field. Concatenated and aligned, TAL effector content across strains largely reflects relationships based on housekeeping genes, suggesting predominantly vertical transmission. Rice transcriptional responses did not reflect these relationships, and on average, only 28% of genes upregulated and 22% of genes downregulated by a strain are up- and down- regulated (respectively) by all strains. However, when only known TAL effector targets were considered, the relationships resembled those of the TAL effectors. Toward identifying new targets, we used the TAL effector-DNA recognition code to predict effector binding elements in promoters of genes upregulated by each strain, but found that for every strain, all upregulated genes had at least one. Filtering with a classifier we developed previously decreases the number of predicted binding elements across the genome, suggesting that it may reduce false positives among upregulated genes. Applying this filter and eliminating genes for which upregulation did not strictly correlate with presence of the corresponding TAL effector, we generated testable numbers of candidate targets for four of the five strictly conserved TAL

  5. TAL effectors and activation of predicted host targets distinguish Asian from African strains of the rice pathogen Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzicola while strict conservation suggests universal importance of five TAL effectors

    PubMed Central

    Wilkins, Katherine E.; Booher, Nicholas J.; Wang, Li; Bogdanove, Adam J.

    2015-01-01

    Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzicola (Xoc) causes the increasingly important disease bacterial leaf streak of rice (BLS) in part by type III delivery of repeat-rich transcription activator-like (TAL) effectors to upregulate host susceptibility genes. By pathogen whole genome, single molecule, real-time sequencing and host RNA sequencing, we compared TAL effector content and rice transcriptional responses across 10 geographically diverse Xoc strains. TAL effector content is surprisingly conserved overall, yet distinguishes Asian from African isolates. Five TAL effectors are conserved across all strains. In a prior laboratory assay in rice cv. Nipponbare, only two contributed to virulence in strain BLS256 but the strict conservation indicates all five may be important, in different rice genotypes or in the field. Concatenated and aligned, TAL effector content across strains largely reflects relationships based on housekeeping genes, suggesting predominantly vertical transmission. Rice transcriptional responses did not reflect these relationships, and on average, only 28% of genes upregulated and 22% of genes downregulated by a strain are up- and down- regulated (respectively) by all strains. However, when only known TAL effector targets were considered, the relationships resembled those of the TAL effectors. Toward identifying new targets, we used the TAL effector-DNA recognition code to predict effector binding elements in promoters of genes upregulated by each strain, but found that for every strain, all upregulated genes had at least one. Filtering with a classifier we developed previously decreases the number of predicted binding elements across the genome, suggesting that it may reduce false positives among upregulated genes. Applying this filter and eliminating genes for which upregulation did not strictly correlate with presence of the corresponding TAL effector, we generated testable numbers of candidate targets for four of the five strictly conserved TAL

  6. Relevance of long-lived CD8+ T effector memory cells for protective immunity elicited by heterologous prime-boost vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Vasconcelos, José R.; Dominguez, Mariana R.; Araújo, Adriano F.; Ersching, Jonatan; Tararam, Cibele A.; Bruna-Romero, Oscar; Rodrigues, Mauricio M.

    2012-01-01

    Owing to the importance of major histocompatibility complex class Ia-restricted CD8+ T cells for host survival following viral, bacterial, fungal, or parasitic infection, it has become largely accepted that these cells should be considered in the design of a new generation of vaccines. For the past 20 years, solid evidence has been provided that the heterologous prime-boost regimen achieves the best results in terms of induction of long-lived protective CD8+ T cells against a variety of experimental infections. Although this regimen has often been used experimentally, as is the case for many vaccines, the mechanism behind the efficacy of this vaccination regimen is still largely unknown. The main purpose of this review is to examine the characteristics of the protective CD8+ T cells generated by this vaccination regimen. Part of its efficacy certainly relies on the generation and maintenance of large numbers of specific lymphocytes. Other specific characteristics may also be important, and studies on this direction have only recently been initiated. So far, the characterization of these protective, long-lived T cell populations suggests that there is a high frequency of polyfunctional T cells; these cells cover a large breadth and display a T effector memory (TEM) phenotype. These TEM cells are capable of proliferating after an infectious challenge and are highly refractory to apoptosis due to a control of the expression of pro-apoptotic receptors such as CD95. Also, they do not undergo significant long-term immunological erosion. Understanding the mechanisms that control the generation and maintenance of the protective activity of these long-lived TEM cells will certainly provide important insights into the physiology of CD8+ T cells and pave the way for the design of new or improved vaccines. PMID:23264773

  7. Key Role of Effector Memory CD4+ T Lymphocytes in a Short-Incubation Heparin-Binding Hemagglutinin Gamma Interferon Release Assay for the Detection of Latent Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Wyndham-Thomas, Chloé; Corbière, Véronique; Dirix, Violette; Smits, Kaatje; Domont, Fanny; Libin, Myriam; Loyens, Marc; Locht, Camille

    2014-01-01

    The treatment of latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) in target populations is one of the current WHO strategies for preventing active tuberculosis (TB) infection and reducing the Mycobacterium tuberculosis reservoir. Therefore, powerful LTBI screening tools are indispensable. A gamma interferon release assay (IGRA) in response to the stimulation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells by the latency antigen native heparin-binding hemagglutinin (nHBHA-IGRA) has proven its potential for this purpose. We have evaluated its possible optimization through a reduction of incubation time from 96 to 24 h, while compensating for this by adding interleukin 7 (IL-7) to the medium. We have also investigated the phenotypes of the gamma interferon (IFN-γ)-producing cells after both short and long incubation times. One hundred thirty-one nonimmunocompromised patients were recruited from 3 Brussels-based university hospitals. They were divided into 1 of 4 subgroups according to their M. tuberculosis infection status (LTBI, TB infection, undetermined M. tuberculosis infection status, and noninfected controls). The novel 24-h nHBHA-IGRA was performed for all subjects, and a simultaneous 96-h classical HBHA-IGRA was performed for 79 individuals. The results showed a good correlation between the two tests, and the novel 24-h nHBHA-IGRA maintained the principal advantages of the classical test, namely, a high specificity for LTBI diagnosis, an absence of interference of Mycobacterium bovis BCG vaccination during infancy, and a relative discrimination between LTBI and TB infection. Whereas the commercialized IGRAs show a greater sensitivity for recent than for remote M. tuberculosis infections, the 24-h nHBHA-IGRA appears to have comparable diagnostic powers for recent and remote LTBI. The IFN-γ detected by the 24-h nHBHA-IGRA was mainly secreted by effector memory CD4+ T lymphocytes, a finding suggestive of continuous HBHA presentation during latency. PMID:24391135

  8. GITR ligand-costimulation activates effector and regulatory functions of CD4{sup +} T cells

    SciTech Connect

    Igarashi, Hanna; Cao, Yujia; Iwai, Hideyuki; Piao, Jinhua; Kamimura, Yosuke; Hashiguchi, Masaaki; Amagasa, Teruo; Azuma, Miyuki

    2008-05-16

    Engagement of glucocorticoid-induced TNFR-related protein (GITR) enables the costimulation of both CD25{sup -}CD4{sup +} effector (Teff) and CD25{sup +}CD4{sup +} regulatory (Treg) cells; however, the effects of GITR-costimulation on Treg function remain controversial. In this study, we examined the effects of GITR ligand (GITRL) binding on the respective functions of CD4{sup +} T cells. GITRL-P815 transfectants efficiently augmented anti-CD3-induced proliferation and cytokine production by Teff cells. Proliferation and IL-10 production in Treg were also enhanced by GITRL transfectants when exogenous IL-2 and stronger CD3 stimulation was provided. Concomitant GITRL-costimulation of Teff and Treg converted the anergic state of Treg into a proliferating state, maintaining and augmenting their function. Thus, GITRL-costimulation augments both effector and regulatory functions of CD4{sup +} T cells. Our results suggest that highly activated and increased ratios of Treg reverse the immune-enhancing effects of GITRL-costimulation in Teff, which may be problematic for therapeutic applications using strong GITR agonists.

  9. Characterization of in vitro antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity activity of therapeutic antibodies - impact of effector cells.

    PubMed

    Chung, Shan; Lin, Yuwen L; Reed, Chae; Ng, Carl; Cheng, Zhijie Jey; Malavasi, Fabio; Yang, Jihong; Quarmby, Valerie; Song, An

    2014-05-01

    Antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) is an important mechanism of action implicated in the clinical efficacy of several therapeutic antibodies. In vitro ADCC assays employing effector cells capable of inducing lysis of target cells bound by antibodies are routinely performed to support the research and development of therapeutic antibodies. ADCC assays are commonly performed using peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), natural killer (NK) cells or engineered cell lines as effector cells. In this study we evaluated the impact of different effector cell types including primary PBMCs, primary NK cells, engineered NK cell lines, and an engineered reporter cell line, on the in vitro ADCC activity of two glycoforms of a humanized IgG1 antibody. The results of this study show the differential effects on both the efficacy and potency of the antibodies by different effector cells and the finding that both the allotype and the expression level of CD16a affect the potency of effector cells in ADCC assays. Our results also show that engineered NK or reporter cell lines provide reduced variability compared to primary effector cells for in vitro ADCC assays.

  10. Decreased Numbers of CD4+ Naive and Effector Memory T Cells, and CD8+ Naïve T Cells, are Associated with Trichloroethylene Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Hosgood, H. Dean; Zhang, Luoping; Tang, Xiaojiang; Vermeulen, Roel; Qiu, Chuangyi; Shen, Min; Smith, Martyn T.; Ge, Yichen; Ji, Zhiying; Xiong, Jun; He, Jian; Reiss, Boris; Liu, Songwang; Xie, Yuxuan; Guo, Weihong; Galvan, Noe; Li, Laiyu; Hao, Zhenyue; Rothman, Nathaniel; Huang, Hanlin; Lan, Qing

    2012-01-01

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) is a volatile chlorinated organic compound that is commonly used as a solvent for lipophilic compounds. Although recognized as an animal carcinogen, TCE’s carcinogenic potential in humans is still uncertain. We have carried out a cross-sectional study of 80 workers exposed to TCE and 96 unexposed controls matched on age and sex in Guangdong, China to study TCE’s early biologic effects. We previously reported that the total lymphocyte count and each of the major lymphocyte subsets (i.e., CD4+ T cells, CD8+ T cells, natural killer cells, and B cells) were decreased in TCE-exposed workers compared to controls, suggesting a selective effect on lymphoid progenitors, and/or lymphocyte survival. To explore which T lymphocyte subsets are affected in the same study population, we investigated the effect of TCE exposure on the numbers of CD4+ naïve and memory T cells, CD8+ naïve and memory T cells, and regulatory T cells by FACS analysis. Linear regression of each subset was used to test for differences between exposed workers and controls adjusting for potential confounders. We observed that CD4+ and CD8+ naïve T cell counts were about 8% (p = 0.056) and 17% (p = 0.0002) lower, respectively, among exposed workers. CD4+ effector memory T cell counts were decreased by about 20% among TCE-exposed workers compared to controls (p = 0.001). The selective targeting of TCE on CD8+ naive and possibly CD4+ naive T cells, and CD4+ effector memory T cells, provide further insights into the immunosuppression-related response of human immune cells upon TCE exposure. PMID:22649769

  11. Targeted Editing of Myostatin Gene in Sheep by Transcription Activator-like Effector Nucleases.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xinxia; Ni, Wei; Chen, Chuangfu; Sai, Wujiafu; Qiao, Jun; Sheng, Jingliang; Zhang, Hui; Li, Guozhong; Wang, Dawei; Hu, Shengwei

    2016-03-01

    Myostatin (MSTN) is a secreted growth factor expressed in skeletal muscle and adipose tissue that negatively regulates skeletal muscle mass. Gene knockout of MSTN can result in increasing muscle mass in sheep. The objectives were to investigate whether myostatin gene can be edited in sheep by transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) in tandem with single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides (ssODNs). We designed a pair of TALENs to target a highly conserved sequence in the coding region of the sheep MSTN gene. The activity of the TALENs was verified by using luciferase single-strand annealing reporter assay in HEK 293T cell line. Co-transfection of TALENs and ssODNs oligonucleotides induced precise gene editing of myostatin gene in sheep primary fibroblasts. MSTN gene-edited cells were successfully used as nuclear donors for generating cloned embryos. TALENs combined with ssDNA oligonucleotides provide a useful approach for precise gene modification in livestock animals.

  12. Targeted Editing of Myostatin Gene in Sheep by Transcription Activator-like Effector Nucleases

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xinxia; Ni, Wei; Chen, Chuangfu; Sai, Wujiafu; Qiao, Jun; Sheng, Jingliang; Zhang, Hui; Li, Guozhong; Wang, Dawei; Hu, Shengwei

    2016-01-01

    Myostatin (MSTN) is a secreted growth factor expressed in skeletal muscle and adipose tissue that negatively regulates skeletal muscle mass. Gene knockout of MSTN can result in increasing muscle mass in sheep. The objectives were to investigate whether myostatin gene can be edited in sheep by transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) in tandem with single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides (ssODNs). We designed a pair of TALENs to target a highly conserved sequence in the coding region of the sheep MSTN gene. The activity of the TALENs was verified by using luciferase single-strand annealing reporter assay in HEK 293T cell line. Co-transfection of TALENs and ssODNs oligonucleotides induced precise gene editing of myostatin gene in sheep primary fibroblasts. MSTN gene-edited cells were successfully used as nuclear donors for generating cloned embryos. TALENs combined with ssDNA oligonucleotides provide a useful approach for precise gene modification in livestock animals. PMID:26950874

  13. Active forgetting of olfactory memories in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Berry, Jacob A; Davis, Ronald L

    2014-01-01

    Failure to remember, or forgetting, is a phenomenon familiar to everyone and despite more than a century of scientific inquiry, why we forget what we once knew remains unclear. If the brain marshals significant resources to form and store memories, why is it that these memories become lost? In the last century, psychological studies have divided forgetting into decay theory, in which memory simply dissipates with time, and interference theory, in which additional learning or mental activity hinders memory by reducing its stability or retrieval (for review, Dewar et al., 2007; Wixted, 2004). Importantly, these psychological models of forgetting posit that forgetting is a passive property of the brain and thus a failure of the brain to retain memories. However, recent neuroscience research on olfactory memory in Drosophila has offered evidence for an alternative conclusion that forgetting is an "active" process, with specific, biologically regulated mechanisms that remove existing memories (Berry et al., 2012; Shuai et al., 2010). Similar to the bidirectional regulation of cell number by mitosis and apoptosis, protein concentration by translation and lysosomal or proteomal degradation, and protein phosphate modification by kinases and phosphatases, biologically regulated memory formation and removal would be yet another example in biological systems where distinct and separate pathways regulate the creation and destruction of biological substrates.

  14. Efficient targeted mutagenesis in medaka using custom-designed transcription activator-like effector nucleases.

    PubMed

    Ansai, Satoshi; Sakuma, Tetsushi; Yamamoto, Takashi; Ariga, Hiroyoshi; Uemura, Norihito; Takahashi, Ryosuke; Kinoshita, Masato

    2013-03-01

    Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) have become powerful tools for targeted genome editing. Here we demonstrate efficient targeted mutagenesis in medaka (Oryzias latipes), which serves as an excellent vertebrate model for genetics and genomics. We designed and constructed a pair of TALENs targeting the medaka DJ-1 gene, a homolog of human DJ-1 (PARK7). These TALENs induced a number of insertions and deletions in the injected embryos with extremely high efficiency. This induction of mutations occurred in a dose-dependent manner. All screened G0 fish injected with the TALENs transmitted the TALEN-induced mutations to the next generation with high efficiency (44-100%). We also confirmed that these TALENs induced site-specific mutations because none of the mutations were found at potential off-target sites. In addition, the DJ-1 protein was lost in DJ-1(Δ7/Δ7) fish that carried a TALEN-induced frameshift mutation in both alleles. We also investigated the effect of the N- and C-terminal regions of the transcription activator-like (TAL) effector domain on the gene-disrupting activity of DJ1-TALENs and found that 287 amino acids at the N terminus and 63 amino acids at the C terminus of the TAL domain exhibited the highest disrupting activity in the injected embryos. Our results suggest that TALENs enable us to rapidly and efficiently establish knockout medaka strains. This is the first report of targeted mutagenesis in medaka using TALENs. The TALEN technology will expand the potential of medaka as a model system for genetics and genomics.

  15. Efficient Targeted Mutagenesis in Medaka Using Custom-Designed Transcription Activator-Like Effector Nucleases

    PubMed Central

    Ansai, Satoshi; Sakuma, Tetsushi; Yamamoto, Takashi; Ariga, Hiroyoshi; Uemura, Norihito; Takahashi, Ryosuke; Kinoshita, Masato

    2013-01-01

    Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) have become powerful tools for targeted genome editing. Here we demonstrate efficient targeted mutagenesis in medaka (Oryzias latipes), which serves as an excellent vertebrate model for genetics and genomics. We designed and constructed a pair of TALENs targeting the medaka DJ-1 gene, a homolog of human DJ-1 (PARK7). These TALENs induced a number of insertions and deletions in the injected embryos with extremely high efficiency. This induction of mutations occurred in a dose-dependent manner. All screened G0 fish injected with the TALENs transmitted the TALEN-induced mutations to the next generation with high efficiency (44–100%). We also confirmed that these TALENs induced site-specific mutations because none of the mutations were found at potential off-target sites. In addition, the DJ-1 protein was lost in DJ-1Δ7/Δ7 fish that carried a TALEN-induced frameshift mutation in both alleles. We also investigated the effect of the N- and C-terminal regions of the transcription activator-like (TAL) effector domain on the gene-disrupting activity of DJ1-TALENs and found that 287 amino acids at the N terminus and 63 amino acids at the C terminus of the TAL domain exhibited the highest disrupting activity in the injected embryos. Our results suggest that TALENs enable us to rapidly and efficiently establish knockout medaka strains. This is the first report of targeted mutagenesis in medaka using TALENs. The TALEN technology will expand the potential of medaka as a model system for genetics and genomics. PMID:23288935

  16. Exploring the transcription activator-like effectors scaffold versatility to expand the toolbox of designer nucleases

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The past decade has seen the emergence of several molecular tools that render possible modification of cellular functions through accurate and easy addition, removal, or exchange of genomic DNA sequences. Among these technologies, transcription activator-like effectors (TALE) has turned out to be one of the most versatile and incredibly robust platform for generating targeted molecular tools as demonstrated by fusion to various domains such as transcription activator, repressor and nucleases. Results In this study, we generated a novel nuclease architecture based on the transcription activator-like effector scaffold. In contrast to the existing Tail to Tail (TtT) and head to Head (HtH) nuclease architectures based on the symmetrical association of two TALE DNA binding domains fused to the C-terminal (TtT) or N-terminal (HtH) end of FokI, this novel architecture consists of the asymmetrical association of two different engineered TALE DNA binding domains fused to the N- and C-terminal ends of FokI (TALE::FokI and FokI::TALE scaffolds respectively). The characterization of this novel Tail to Head (TtH) architecture in yeast enabled us to demonstrate its nuclease activity and define its optimal target configuration. We further showed that this architecture was able to promote substantial level of targeted mutagenesis at three endogenous loci present in two different mammalian cell lines. Conclusion Our results demonstrated that this novel functional TtH architecture which requires binding to only one DNA strand of a given endogenous locus has the potential to extend the targeting possibility of FokI-based TALE nucleases. PMID:24997498

  17. Malaria-associated atypical memory B cells exhibit markedly reduced B cell receptor signaling and effector function.

    PubMed

    Portugal, Silvia; Tipton, Christopher M; Sohn, Haewon; Kone, Younoussou; Wang, Jing; Li, Shanping; Skinner, Jeff; Virtaneva, Kimmo; Sturdevant, Daniel E; Porcella, Stephen F; Doumbo, Ogobara K; Doumbo, Safiatou; Kayentao, Kassoum; Ongoiba, Aissata; Traore, Boubacar; Sanz, Inaki; Pierce, Susan K; Crompton, Peter D

    2015-05-08

    Protective antibodies in Plasmodium falciparum malaria are only acquired after years of repeated infections. Chronic malaria exposure is associated with a large increase in atypical memory B cells (MBCs) that resemble B cells expanded in a variety of persistent viral infections. Understanding the function of atypical MBCs and their relationship to classical MBCs will be critical to developing effective vaccines for malaria and other chronic infections. We show that VH gene repertoires and somatic hypermutation rates of atypical and classical MBCs are indistinguishable indicating a common developmental history. Atypical MBCs express an array of inhibitory receptors and B cell receptor (BCR) signaling is stunted in atypical MBCs resulting in impaired B cell responses including proliferation, cytokine production and antibody secretion. Thus, in response to chronic malaria exposure, atypical MBCs appear to differentiate from classical MBCs becoming refractory to BCR-mediated activation and potentially interfering with the acquisition of malaria immunity.

  18. ICOS is required for the generation of both central and effector CD4(+) memory T-cell populations following acute bacterial infection.

    PubMed

    Marriott, Clare L; Carlesso, Gianluca; Herbst, Ronald; Withers, David R

    2015-06-01

    Interactions between ICOS and ICOS ligand (ICOSL) are essential for the development of T follicular helper (Tfh) cells and thus the formation and maintenance of GC reactions. Given the conflicting reports on the requirement of other CD4(+) T-cell populations for ICOS signals, we have employed a range of in vivo approaches to dissect requirements for ICOS signals in mice during an endogenous CD4(+) T-cell response and contrasted this with CD28 signals. Genetic absence of ICOSL only modestly reduced the total number of antigen-specific CD4(+) T cells at the peak of the primary response, but resulted in a severely diminished number of both T central memory and T effector memory cells. Treatment with blocking anti-ICOS mAb during the primary response recapitulated these effects and caused a more substantial reduction than blocking CD28 signals with CTLA4Ig. During the memory phase of the response further signals through ICOS or CD28 were not required for survival. However, upon secondary challenge only Tfh cell expansion remained heavily ICOS-dependent, while CD28 signals were required for optimal expansion of all subsets. These data demonstrate the importance of ICOS signals specifically for memory CD4(+) T-cell formation, while highlighting the potential of therapeutically targeting this pathway.

  19. Comparing zinc finger nucleases and transcription activator-like effector nucleases for gene targeting in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Beumer, Kelly J; Trautman, Jonathan K; Christian, Michelle; Dahlem, Timothy J; Lake, Cathleen M; Hawley, R Scott; Grunwald, David J; Voytas, Daniel F; Carroll, Dana

    2013-10-03

    Zinc-finger nucleases have proven to be successful as reagents for targeted genome manipulation in Drosophila melanogaster and many other organisms. Their utility has been limited, however, by the significant failure rate of new designs, reflecting the complexity of DNA recognition by zinc fingers. Transcription activator-like effector (TALE) DNA-binding domains depend on a simple, one-module-to-one-base-pair recognition code, and they have been very productively incorporated into nucleases (TALENs) for genome engineering. In this report we describe the design of TALENs for a number of different genes in Drosophila, and we explore several parameters of TALEN design. The rate of success with TALENs was substantially greater than for zinc-finger nucleases , and the frequency of mutagenesis was comparable. Knockout mutations were isolated in several genes in which such alleles were not previously available. TALENs are an effective tool for targeted genome manipulation in Drosophila.

  20. Efficient targeted gene disruption in Xenopus embryos using engineered transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs).

    PubMed

    Lei, Yong; Guo, Xiaogang; Liu, Yun; Cao, Yang; Deng, Yi; Chen, Xiongfeng; Cheng, Christopher H K; Dawid, Igor B; Chen, Yonglong; Zhao, Hui

    2012-10-23

    Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) are an approach for directed gene disruption and have been proved to be effective in various animal models. Here, we report that TALENs can induce somatic mutations in Xenopus embryos with reliably high efficiency and that such mutations are heritable through germ-line transmission. We modified the Golden Gate method for TALEN assembly to make the product suitable for RNA transcription and microinjection into Xenopus embryos. Eight pairs of TALENs were constructed to target eight Xenopus genes, and all resulted in indel mutations with high efficiencies of up to 95.7% at the targeted loci. Furthermore, mutations induced by TALENs were highly efficiently passed through the germ line to F(1) frogs. Together with simple and reliable PCR-based approaches for detecting TALEN-induced mutations, our results indicate that TALENs are an effective tool for targeted gene editing/knockout in Xenopus.

  1. Generation of gene disruptions by transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) in Xenopus tropicalis embryos.

    PubMed

    Lei, Yong; Guo, Xiaogang; Deng, Yi; Chen, Yonglong; Zhao, Hui

    2013-05-10

    Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) are novel engineered DNA nucleases, and have been proven to be effective for gene specific targeting in various species. Recently we reported gene disruptions in Xenopus embryos by using TALENs. Here we summarize the protocol that is used in our studies for gene disruption. This protocol covers selection of TALEN targeting sites, TALEN assembly with a modified Golden Gate method, and injection of TALEN mRNAs into Xenopus tropicalis embryos. We also provide details for detection of somatic and germ line transmitted mutations. And finally, we briefly describe establishment of knockout Xenopus lines. This protocol will facilitate broader applications of TALENs in studies of Xenopus biology.

  2. Engineering designer transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) by REAL or REAL-Fast assembly.

    PubMed

    Reyon, Deepak; Khayter, Cyd; Regan, Maureen R; Joung, J Keith; Sander, Jeffry D

    2012-10-01

    Engineered transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) are broadly useful tools for performing targeted genome editing in a wide variety of organisms and cell types including plants, zebrafish, C. elegans, rat, human somatic cells, and human pluripotent stem cells. Here we describe detailed protocols for the serial, hierarchical assembly of TALENs that require neither PCR nor specialized multi-fragment ligations and that can be implemented by any laboratory. These restriction enzyme and ligation (REAL)-based protocols can be practiced using plasmid libraries and user-friendly, Web-based software that both identifies target sites in sequences of interest and generates printable graphical guides that facilitate assembly of TALENs. With the described platform of reagents, protocols, and software, researchers can easily engineer multiple TALENs within 2 weeks using standard cloning techniques.

  3. Locked and proteolysis-based transcription activator-like effector (TALE) regulation

    PubMed Central

    Lonzarić, Jan; Lebar, Tina; Majerle, Andreja; Manček-Keber, Mateja; Jerala, Roman

    2016-01-01

    Development of orthogonal, designable and adjustable transcriptional regulators is an important goal of synthetic biology. Their activity has been typically modulated through stimulus-induced oligomerization or interaction between the DNA-binding and activation/repression domain. We exploited a feature of the designable Transcription activator-like effector (TALE) DNA-binding domain that it winds around the DNA which allows to topologically prevent it from binding by intramolecular cyclization. This new approach was investigated through noncovalent ligand-induced cyclization or through a covalent split intein cyclization strategy, where the topological inhibition of DNA binding by cyclization and its restoration by a proteolytic release of the topologic constraint was expected. We show that locked TALEs indeed have diminished DNA binding and regain full transcriptional activity by stimulation with the rapamycin ligand or site-specific proteolysis of the peptide linker, with much higher level of activation than rapamycin-induced heterodimerization. Additionally, we demonstrated reversibility, activation of genomic targets and implemented logic gates based on combinations of protein cyclization, proteolytic cleavage and ligand-induced dimerization, where the strongest fold induction was achieved by the proteolytic cleavage of a repression domain from a linear TALE. PMID:26748097

  4. Ultrahigh Enzyme Activity Assembled in Layered Double Hydroxides via Mg(2+)-Allosteric Effector.

    PubMed

    Wang, Min; Huang, Shu-Wan; Xu, Dan; Bao, Wen-Jing; Xia, Xing-Hua

    2015-06-02

    It is well-known that some metal ions could be allosteric effectors of allosteric enzymes to activate/inhibit the catalytic activities of enzymes. In nanobiocatalytic systems constructed based on the positive metal ion-induced allosteric effect, the incorporated enzymes will be activated and thus exhibit excellent catalytic performance. Herein, we present an environmentally friendly strategy to construct a novel allosteric effect-based β-galactosidase/Mg-Al layered double hydroxide (β-gal/Mg-Al-LDH) nanobiocatalytic system via the delamination-reconstruction method. The intercalated β-gal in the LDH galleries changes its conformation significantly due to the Mg(2+)-induced allosteric interactions and other weak interactions, which causes the activation of enzymatic activity. The β-gal/Mg-Al-LDH nanobiocatalytic system shows much higher catalytic activity and affinity toward its substrate and about 30 times higher catalytic reaction velocity than the free β-gal, which suggests that Mg(2+)-induced allosteric effect plays a vital role in the improvement of enzymatic performance.

  5. Molecular determinants of resistance activation and suppression by Phytophthora infestans effector IPI-O

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The potato late blight pathogen, Phytophthora infestans, is able to rapidly evolve to overcome resistance genes. The pathogen accomplishes this by secreting an arsenal of proteins, termed effectors, that function to modify host cells. Although hundreds of candidate effectors have been identified in ...

  6. RipAY, a Plant Pathogen Effector Protein, Exhibits Robust γ-Glutamyl Cyclotransferase Activity When Stimulated by Eukaryotic Thioredoxins*

    PubMed Central

    Fujiwara, Shoko; Kawazoe, Tomoki; Ohnishi, Kouhei; Kitagawa, Takao; Popa, Crina; Valls, Marc; Genin, Stéphane; Nakamura, Kazuyuki; Kuramitsu, Yasuhiro; Tanaka, Naotaka; Tabuchi, Mitsuaki

    2016-01-01

    The plant pathogenic bacterium Ralstonia solanacearum injects more than 70 effector proteins (virulence factors) into the host plant cells via the needle-like structure of a type III secretion system. The type III secretion system effector proteins manipulate host regulatory networks to suppress defense responses with diverse molecular activities. Uncovering the molecular function of these effectors is essential for a mechanistic understanding of R. solanacearum pathogenicity. However, few of the effectors from R. solanacearum have been functionally characterized, and their plant targets remain largely unknown. Here, we show that the ChaC domain-containing effector RipAY/RSp1022 from R. solanacearum exhibits γ-glutamyl cyclotransferase (GGCT) activity to degrade the major intracellular redox buffer, glutathione. Heterologous expression of RipAY, but not other ChaC family proteins conserved in various organisms, caused growth inhibition of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and the intracellular glutathione level was decreased to ∼30% of the normal level following expression of RipAY in yeast. Although active site mutants of GGCT activity were non-toxic, the addition of glutathione did not reverse the toxicity, suggesting that the toxicity might be a consequence of activity against other γ-glutamyl compounds. Intriguingly, RipAY protein purified from a bacterial expression system did not exhibit any GGCT activity, whereas it exhibited robust GGCT activity upon its interaction with eukaryotic thioredoxins, which are important for intracellular redox homeostasis during bacterial infection in plants. Our results suggest that RipAY has evolved to sense the host intracellular redox environment, which triggers its enzymatic activity to create a favorable environment for R. solanacearum infection. PMID:26823466

  7. Enhanced Effector Responses in Activated CD8+ T Cells Deficient in Diacylglycerol Kinases

    PubMed Central

    Riese, Matthew J.; Wang, Liang-Chuan S.; Moon, Edmund K.; Joshi, Rohan P.; Ranganathan, Anjana; June, Carl H.; Koretzky, Gary A.; Albelda, Steven M.

    2013-01-01

    Recent clinical trials have shown promise in the use of chimeric antigen receptor(CAR)-transduced T cells; however, augmentation of their activity may broaden their clinical utility and improve their efficacy. We hypothesized that, since CAR action requires proteins essential for TCR signal transduction, deletion of negative regulators of these signaling pathways would enhance CAR signaling and effector T cell function. We tested CAR activity and function in T cells that lacked one or both isoforms of diacylglycerol kinase (dgk) expressed highly in T cells, dgkα and dgkζ, enzymes that metabolize the second messenger diacylglycerol (DAG) and limit Ras/ERK activation. We found that primary murine T cells transduced with CARs specific for the human tumor antigen mesothelin demonstrated greatly enhanced cytokine production and cytotoxicity when co-cultured with a murine mesothelioma line that stably expresses mesothelin. Additionally, we found that dgk-deficient CAR-transduced T cells were more effective in limiting the growth of implanted tumors, both concurrent with and after establishment of tumor. Consistent with our studies in mice, pharmacologic inhibition of dgks also augments function of primary human T cells transduced with CARs. These results suggest that deletion of negative regulators of TCR signaling enhances the activity and function of CAR-expressing T cells and identify dgks as potential targets for improving the clinical potential of CARs. PMID:23576561

  8. Draft genome sequence of Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. glycines 8ra possessing transcription activator-like effectors used for genetic engineering.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ju-Hoon; Shin, Hakdong; Park, Hye-Jee; Ryu, Sangryeol; Han, Sang-Wook

    2014-06-10

    Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. glycines 8ra is a causal agent of bacterial pustule disease in soybean. This bacterium possesses transcription activator-like (TAL) effectors which are useful for genetic/protein engineering applications in higher organisms including plants and humans. Here, we report that the draft genome sequence consists of 5,337,885-bp double-stranded DNA encoding 4674 open reading frames (ORFs) in 13 different contigs. This genome sequence would be useful in applications of TAL effectors in genetic engineering and in elucidating virulence factors against plants.

  9. Transcription Activator-Like Effector Nucleases (TALEN)-Mediated Targeted DNA Insertion in Potato Plants.

    PubMed

    Forsyth, Adrienne; Weeks, Troy; Richael, Craig; Duan, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Targeted DNA integration into known locations in the genome has potential advantages over the random insertional events typically achieved using conventional means of genetic modification. Specifically integrated transgenes are guaranteed to co-segregate, and expression level is more predictable, which makes downstream characterization and line selection more manageable. Because the site of DNA integration is known, the steps to deregulation of transgenic crops may be simplified. Here we describe a method that combines transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN)-mediated induction of double strand breaks (DSBs) and non-autonomous marker selection to insert a transgene into a pre-selected, transcriptionally active region in the potato genome. In our experiment, TALEN was designed to create a DSB in the genome sequence following an endogenous constitutive promoter. A cytokinin vector was utilized for TALENs expression and prevention of stable integration of the nucleases. The donor vector contained a gene of interest cassette and a promoter-less plant-derived herbicide resistant gene positioned near the T-DNA left border which was used to select desired transgenic events. Our results indicated that TALEN induced T-DNA integration occurred with high frequency and resulting events have consistent expression of the gene of interest. Interestingly, it was found that, in most lines integration took place through one sided homology directed repair despite the minimal homologous sequence at the right border. An efficient transient assay for TALEN activity verification is also described.

  10. Transcription Activator-Like Effector Nucleases (TALEN)-Mediated Targeted DNA Insertion in Potato Plants

    PubMed Central

    Forsyth, Adrienne; Weeks, Troy; Richael, Craig; Duan, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Targeted DNA integration into known locations in the genome has potential advantages over the random insertional events typically achieved using conventional means of genetic modification. Specifically integrated transgenes are guaranteed to co-segregate, and expression level is more predictable, which makes downstream characterization and line selection more manageable. Because the site of DNA integration is known, the steps to deregulation of transgenic crops may be simplified. Here we describe a method that combines transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN)-mediated induction of double strand breaks (DSBs) and non-autonomous marker selection to insert a transgene into a pre-selected, transcriptionally active region in the potato genome. In our experiment, TALEN was designed to create a DSB in the genome sequence following an endogenous constitutive promoter. A cytokinin vector was utilized for TALENs expression and prevention of stable integration of the nucleases. The donor vector contained a gene of interest cassette and a promoter-less plant-derived herbicide resistant gene positioned near the T-DNA left border which was used to select desired transgenic events. Our results indicated that TALEN induced T-DNA integration occurred with high frequency and resulting events have consistent expression of the gene of interest. Interestingly, it was found that, in most lines integration took place through one sided homology directed repair despite the minimal homologous sequence at the right border. An efficient transient assay for TALEN activity verification is also described. PMID:27826306

  11. Initial burst of viremia related to CD8 effector memory T cells after living donor liver transplantation in hepatitis C virus-infected recipients.

    PubMed

    Takada, Yasutsugu; Ozawa, Kazue; Egawa, Hiroto; Teramukai, Satoshi; Mori, Akira; Kaido, Toshimi; Kasahara, Mureo; Ogawa, Kohei; Ono, Masako; Sato, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Koichi; Uemoto, Shinji

    2010-08-01

    The post-transplant immune responses, viremia, and allograft histology after living donor liver transplantation were studied in 39 hepatitis C virus (HCV)-infected recipients. The recipients were classified into the following groups according to a hierarchical clustering of their preoperative CD8CD45 T-cell isoforms: group I, naive-dominant; group II, effector memory-dominant; and group III, effector-dominant. Plasma HCV-RNA rapidly increased and then peaked as an initial burst around postoperative day (POD) 25 in group I, on POD 40 in group II, and on POD 55 in group III. The initial burst of viremia was suppressed by the high expression of CD8+CD28-CD27- subsets. The progression of fibrosis > or =F2 was significantly more frequent for those patients with the highest viremia levels. Moreover, the initial T-cell immune response became less important throughout time, and new immune responses emerged after 2 months that modified the host-virus interaction. It is suggested that the interferon (IFN)-alpha/ribavirin therapy starting 2 months may be an effective option and now is undertaken.

  12. Phenotypic and Functional Characterization of Herpes Simplex Virus Glycoprotein B Epitope-Specific Effector and Memory CD8+ T Cells from Symptomatic and Asymptomatic Individuals with Ocular Herpes

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Arif A.; Srivastava, Ruchi; Spencer, Doran; Garg, Sumit; Fremgen, Daniel; Vahed, Hawa; Lopes, Patricia P.; Pham, Thanh T.; Hewett, Charlie; Kuang, Jasmine; Ong, Nicolas; Huang, Lei; Scarfone, Vanessa M.; Nesburn, Anthony B.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) glycoprotein B (gB)-specific CD8+ T cells protect mice from herpes infection and disease. However, whether and which HSV-1 gB-specific CD8+ T cells play a key role in the “natural” protection seen in HSV-1-seropositive healthy asymptomatic (ASYMP) individuals (who have never had clinical herpes disease) remain to be determined. In this study, we have dissected the phenotypes and the functions of HSV-1 gB-specific CD8+ T cells from HLA-A*02:01 positive, HSV-1 seropositive ASYMP and symptomatic (SYMP) individuals (with a history of numerous episodes of recurrent ocular herpes disease). We found the following. (i) Healthy ASYMP individuals maintained a significantly higher proportion of differentiated HSV-1 gB-specific effector memory CD8+ T cells (TEM cells) (CD45RAlow CCR7low CD44high CD62Llow). In contrast, SYMP patients had frequent less-differentiated central memory CD8+ T cells (TCM cells) (CD45RAlow CCR7high CD44low CD62Lhigh). (ii) ASYMP individuals had significantly higher proportions of multifunctional effector CD8+ T cells which responded mainly to gB342–350 and gB561–569 “ASYMP” epitopes, and simultaneously produced IFN-γ, CD107a/b, granzyme B, and perforin. In contrast, effector CD8+ T cells from SYMP individuals were mostly monofunctional and were directed mainly against nonoverlapping gB17–25 and gB183–191 “SYMP” epitopes. (iii) Immunization of an HLA-A*02:01 transgenic mouse model of ocular herpes with “ASYMP” CD8+ TEM cell epitopes, but not with “SYMP” CD8+ TCM cell epitopes, induced a strong CD8+ T cell-dependent protective immunity against ocular herpes infection and disease. Our findings provide insights into the role of HSV-specific CD8+ TEM cells in protection against herpes and should be considered in the development of an effective vaccine. IMPORTANCE A significantly higher proportion of differentiated and multifunctional HSV-1 gB-specific effector memory CD8+ T cells (TEM

  13. Rapid and efficient assembly of transcription activator-like effector genes by USER cloning.

    PubMed

    Wang, Song; Li, Wei; Wang, Shuo; Hu, Baoyang

    2014-06-20

    Transcription activator-like effectors (TALEs) that were related to bacteria immune system have lately been employed in a promising approach of precise gene targeting. Because of the repetitive characteristics of TALEs, existing TALE assembly methods are either very complicated, time-consuming, or too tricky to be handled in common labs. Here, we reported a rapid, efficient and easy method for TALE assembly. This method takes advantage of uracil-specific excision reagent (USER), an enzyme that can cleave DNA constructs and create long, unique single-strand DNA overhangs. Upon USER treatment, the overhangs on each individual TALE repeat unit can be rejoined hierarchically to form pentamers in a ligation-independent manner. Eventually, three pentamers are assembled into a full TALE construct by Golden Gate cloning. TALE nucleases (TALENs) generated with this method exhibit high genome-editing activity in human cells such as HEK293FT cells. Using this method, we have successfully synthesized three TALEN pairs targeting endogenous Tet1 locus, and proved that all can specifically target Tet1 gene, though in various degree. Comparing to other methods of TALEN assembly, this one is much less labor intensive and fairly faster, and positive clones can be obtained at high efficiency within only two days. We thus contribute to an easier approach for effective TALENs synthesis, which may highly facilitate the wide application of TALEN technology in genome editing, especially for human cells that require precise targeting.

  14. Improved somatic mutagenesis in zebrafish using transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs).

    PubMed

    Moore, Finola E; Reyon, Deepak; Sander, Jeffry D; Martinez, Sarah A; Blackburn, Jessica S; Khayter, Cyd; Ramirez, Cherie L; Joung, J Keith; Langenau, David M

    2012-01-01

    Zinc Finger Nucleases (ZFNs) made by Context-Dependent Assembly (CoDA) and Transcription Activator-Like Effector Nucleases (TALENs) provide robust and user-friendly technologies for efficiently inactivating genes in zebrafish. These designer nucleases bind to and cleave DNA at particular target sites, inducing error-prone repair that can result in insertion or deletion mutations. Here, we assess the relative efficiencies of these technologies for inducing somatic DNA mutations in mosaic zebrafish. We find that TALENs exhibited a higher success rate for obtaining active nucleases capable of inducing mutations than compared with CoDA ZFNs. For example, all six TALENs tested induced DNA mutations at genomic target sites while only a subset of CoDA ZFNs exhibited detectable rates of mutagenesis. TALENs also exhibited higher mutation rates than CoDA ZFNs that had not been pre-screened using a bacterial two-hybrid assay, with DNA mutation rates ranging from 20%-76.8% compared to 1.1%-3.3%. Furthermore, the broader targeting range of TALENs enabled us to induce mutations at the methionine translation start site, sequences that were not targetable using the CoDA ZFN platform. TALENs exhibited similar toxicity to CoDA ZFNs, with >50% of injected animals surviving to 3 days of life. Taken together, our results suggest that TALEN technology provides a robust alternative to CoDA ZFNs for inducing targeted gene-inactivation in zebrafish, making it a preferred technology for creating targeted knockout mutants in zebrafish.

  15. High-efficiency and heritable gene targeting in mouse by transcription activator-like effector nucleases.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Zhongwei; Liu, Meizhen; Chen, Zhaohua; Shao, Yanjiao; Pan, Hongjie; Wei, Gaigai; Yu, Chao; Zhang, Long; Li, Xia; Wang, Ping; Fan, Heng-Yu; Du, Bing; Liu, Bin; Liu, Mingyao; Li, Dali

    2013-06-01

    Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) are a powerful new approach for targeted gene disruption in various animal models, but little is known about their activities in Mus musculus, the widely used mammalian model organism. Here, we report that direct injection of in vitro transcribed messenger RNA of TALEN pairs into mouse zygotes induced somatic mutations, which were stably passed to the next generation through germ-line transmission. With one TALEN pair constructed for each of 10 target genes, mutant F0 mice for each gene were obtained with the mutation rate ranged from 13 to 67% and an average of ∼40% of total healthy newborns with no significant differences between C57BL/6 and FVB/N genetic background. One TALEN pair with single mismatch to their intended target sequence in each side failed to yield any mutation. Furthermore, highly efficient germ-line transmission was obtained, as all the F0 founders tested transmitted the mutations to F1 mice. In addition, we also observed that one bi-allele mutant founder of Lepr gene, encoding Leptin receptor, had similar diabetic phenotype as db/db mouse. Together, our results suggest that TALENs are an effective genetic tool for rapid gene disruption with high efficiency and heritability in mouse with distinct genetic background.

  16. Comprehensive analysis of the specificity of transcription activator-like effector nucleases.

    PubMed

    Juillerat, Alexandre; Dubois, Gwendoline; Valton, Julien; Thomas, Séverine; Stella, Stefano; Maréchal, Alan; Langevin, Stéphanie; Benomari, Nassima; Bertonati, Claudia; Silva, George H; Daboussi, Fayza; Epinat, Jean-Charles; Montoya, Guillermo; Duclert, Aymeric; Duchateau, Philippe

    2014-04-01

    A key issue when designing and using DNA-targeting nucleases is specificity. Ideally, an optimal DNA-targeting tool has only one recognition site within a genomic sequence. In practice, however, almost all designer nucleases available today can accommodate one to several mutations within their target site. The ability to predict the specificity of targeting is thus highly desirable. Here, we describe the first comprehensive experimental study focused on the specificity of the four commonly used repeat variable diresidues (RVDs; NI:A, HD:C, NN:G and NG:T) incorporated in transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALEN). The analysis of >15 500 unique TALEN/DNA cleavage profiles allowed us to monitor the specificity gradient of the RVDs along a TALEN/DNA binding array and to present a specificity scoring matrix for RVD/nucleotide association. Furthermore, we report that TALEN can only accommodate a relatively small number of position-dependent mismatches while maintaining a detectable activity at endogenous loci in vivo, demonstrating the high specificity of these molecular tools. We thus envision that the results we provide will allow for more deliberate choices of DNA binding arrays and/or DNA targets, extending our engineering capabilities.

  17. Cancer cell-binding peptide fused Fc domain activates immune effector cells and blocks tumor growth

    PubMed Central

    Mobergslien, Anne; Peng, Qian; Vasovic, Vlada; Sioud, Mouldy

    2016-01-01

    Therapeutic strategies aiming at mobilizing immune effector cells to kill tumor cells independent of tumor mutational load and MHC expression status are expected to benefit cancer patients. Recently, we engineered various peptide-Fc fusion proteins for directing Fcg receptor-bearing immune cells toward tumor cells. Here, we investigated the immunostimulatory and anti-tumor effects of one of the engineered Fc fusion proteins (WN-Fc). In contrast to the Fc control, soluble WN-Fc-1 fusion protein activated innate immune cells (e.g. monocytes, macrophages, dendritic cells, NK cells), resulting in cytokine production and surface display of the lytic granule marker CD107a on NK cells. An engineered Fc-fusion variant carrying two peptide sequences (WN-Fc-2) also activated immune cells and bound to various cancer cell types with high affinity, including the murine 4T1 breast carcinoma cells. When injected into 4T1 tumor-bearing BALB/c mice, both peptide-Fc fusions accumulated in tumor tissues as compared to other organs such as the lungs. Moreover, treatment of 4T1 tumor-bearing BALB/c mice by means of two intravenous injections of the WN-Fc fusion proteins inhibited tumor growth with WN-Fc-2 being more effective than WN-Fc-1. Treatment resulted in tumor infiltration by T cells and NK cells. These new engineered WN-Fc fusion proteins may be a promising alternative to existing immunotherapies for cancer. PMID:27713158

  18. High-efficiency and heritable gene targeting in mouse by transcription activator-like effector nucleases

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Zhongwei; Liu, Meizhen; Chen, Zhaohua; Shao, Yanjiao; Pan, Hongjie; Wei, Gaigai; Yu, Chao; Zhang, Long; Li, Xia; Wang, Ping; Fan, Heng-Yu; Du, Bing; Liu, Bin; Liu, Mingyao; Li, Dali

    2013-01-01

    Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) are a powerful new approach for targeted gene disruption in various animal models, but little is known about their activities in Mus musculus, the widely used mammalian model organism. Here, we report that direct injection of in vitro transcribed messenger RNA of TALEN pairs into mouse zygotes induced somatic mutations, which were stably passed to the next generation through germ-line transmission. With one TALEN pair constructed for each of 10 target genes, mutant F0 mice for each gene were obtained with the mutation rate ranged from 13 to 67% and an average of ∼40% of total healthy newborns with no significant differences between C57BL/6 and FVB/N genetic background. One TALEN pair with single mismatch to their intended target sequence in each side failed to yield any mutation. Furthermore, highly efficient germ-line transmission was obtained, as all the F0 founders tested transmitted the mutations to F1 mice. In addition, we also observed that one bi-allele mutant founder of Lepr gene, encoding Leptin receptor, had similar diabetic phenotype as db/db mouse. Together, our results suggest that TALENs are an effective genetic tool for rapid gene disruption with high efficiency and heritability in mouse with distinct genetic background. PMID:23630316

  19. [Mechanisms of in vivo suppressive effect of togaviridae and bunyaviridae on the activity of effectors of graft vs host reaction].

    PubMed

    Khozinskiĭ, V V; Semenov, B F

    1982-02-01

    Experiments on mice demonstrated the ability of 3 flaviviruses and 1 bunyavirus to suppress the activity of the effectors of the graft-versus-host (GVH) reaction. The conditions of the suppression of the primary immunological recognition were shown to differ in infections caused by different viruses. In experimental flavivirus infections caused by Langat, dengue 2 or yellow fever (strain 17D) viruses T-suppressor cells were activated, and their activity was realized only in respect to syngeneic or semisyngeneic target cells. In mice infected with Tahyna virus (a bunyavirus) no suppressor cells capable of suppressing the activity of the effectors of the GVH reaction were detected. The suppression of this reaction, not linked with the activity of the detected T-suppressor cells, was observed in the Langat virus infection under conditions of bilateral incompatibility when both the donor and the recipient were infected.

  20. Transcription activator-like effector nucleases enable efficient plant genome engineering.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong; Zhang, Feng; Li, Xiaohong; Baller, Joshua A; Qi, Yiping; Starker, Colby G; Bogdanove, Adam J; Voytas, Daniel F

    2013-01-01

    The ability to precisely engineer plant genomes offers much potential for advancing basic and applied plant biology. Here, we describe methods for the targeted modification of plant genomes using transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs). Methods were optimized using tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) protoplasts and TALENs targeting the acetolactate synthase (ALS) gene. Optimal TALEN scaffolds were identified using a protoplast-based single-strand annealing assay in which TALEN cleavage creates a functional yellow fluorescent protein gene, enabling quantification of TALEN activity by flow cytometry. Single-strand annealing activity data for TALENs with different scaffolds correlated highly with their activity at endogenous targets, as measured by high-throughput DNA sequencing of polymerase chain reaction products encompassing the TALEN recognition sites. TALENs introduced targeted mutations in ALS in 30% of transformed cells, and the frequencies of targeted gene insertion approximated 14%. These efficiencies made it possible to recover genome modifications without selection or enrichment regimes: 32% of tobacco calli generated from protoplasts transformed with TALEN-encoding constructs had TALEN-induced mutations in ALS, and of 16 calli characterized in detail, all had mutations in one allele each of the duplicate ALS genes (SurA and SurB). In calli derived from cells treated with a TALEN and a 322-bp donor molecule differing by 6 bp from the ALS coding sequence, 4% showed evidence of targeted gene replacement. The optimized reagents implemented in plant protoplasts should be useful for targeted modification of cells from diverse plant species and using a variety of means for reagent delivery.

  1. Rh D blood group conversion using transcription activator-like effector nucleases.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Hoon; Kim, Hyun O; Baek, Eun J; Kurita, Ryo; Cha, Hyuk-Jin; Nakamura, Yukio; Kim, Hyongbum

    2015-06-16

    Group O D-negative blood cells are universal donors in transfusion medicine and methods for converting other blood groups into this universal donor group have been researched. However, conversion of D-positive cells into D-negative is yet to be achieved, although conversion of group A or B cells into O cells has been reported. The Rh D blood group is determined by the RHD gene, which encodes a 12-transmembrane domain protein. Here we convert Rh D-positive erythroid progenitor cells into D-negative cells using RHD-targeting transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs). After transfection of TALEN-encoding plasmids, RHD-knockout clones are obtained. Erythroid-lineage cells differentiated from these knockout erythroid progenitor cells do not agglutinate in the presence of anti-D reagents and do not express D antigen, as assessed using flow cytometry. Our programmable nuclease-induced blood group conversion opens new avenues for compatible donor cell generation in transfusion medicine.

  2. Transcription activator like effector (TALE)-directed piggyBac transposition in human cells.

    PubMed

    Owens, Jesse B; Mauro, Damiano; Stoytchev, Ilko; Bhakta, Mital S; Kim, Moon-Soo; Segal, David J; Moisyadi, Stefan

    2013-10-01

    Insertional therapies have shown great potential for combating genetic disease and safer methods would undoubtedly broaden the variety of possible illness that can be treated. A major challenge that remains is reducing the risk of insertional mutagenesis due to random insertion by both viral and non-viral vectors. Targetable nucleases are capable of inducing double-stranded breaks to enhance homologous recombination for the introduction of transgenes at specific sequences. However, off-target DNA cleavages at unknown sites can lead to mutations that are difficult to detect. Alternatively, the piggyBac transposase is able perform all of the steps required for integration; therefore, cells confirmed to contain a single copy of a targeted transposon, for which its location is known, are likely to be devoid of aberrant genomic modifications. We aimed to retarget transposon insertions by comparing a series of novel hyperactive piggyBac constructs tethered to a custom transcription activator like effector DNA-binding domain designed to bind the first intron of the human CCR5 gene. Multiple targeting strategies were evaluated using combinations of both plasmid-DNA and transposase-protein relocalization to the target sequence. We demonstrated user-defined directed transposition to the CCR5 genomic safe harbor and isolated single-copy clones harboring targeted integrations.

  3. Genome Editing in Astyanax mexicanus Using Transcription Activator-like Effector Nucleases (TALENs).

    PubMed

    Kowalko, Johanna E; Ma, Li; Jeffery, William R

    2016-06-20

    Identifying alleles of genes underlying evolutionary change is essential to understanding how and why evolution occurs. Towards this end, much recent work has focused on identifying candidate genes for the evolution of traits in a variety of species. However, until recently it has been challenging to functionally validate interesting candidate genes. Recently developed tools for genetic engineering make it possible to manipulate specific genes in a wide range of organisms. Application of this technology in evolutionarily relevant organisms will allow for unprecedented insight into the role of candidate genes in evolution. Astyanax mexicanus (A. mexicanus) is a species of fish with both surface-dwelling and cave-dwelling forms. Multiple independent lines of cave-dwelling forms have evolved from ancestral surface fish, which are interfertile with one another and with surface fish, allowing elucidation of the genetic basis of cave traits. A. mexicanus has been used for a number of evolutionary studies, including linkage analysis to identify candidate genes responsible for a number of traits. Thus, A. mexicanus is an ideal system for the application of genome editing to test the role of candidate genes. Here we report a method for using transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) to mutate genes in surface A. mexicanus. Genome editing using TALENs in A. mexicanus has been utilized to generate mutations in pigmentation genes. This technique can also be utilized to evaluate the role of candidate genes for a number of other traits that have evolved in cave forms of A. mexicanus.

  4. Rh D blood group conversion using transcription activator-like effector nucleases

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young-Hoon; Kim, Hyun O.; Baek, Eun J.; Kurita, Ryo; Cha, Hyuk-Jin; Nakamura, Yukio; Kim, Hyongbum

    2015-01-01

    Group O D-negative blood cells are universal donors in transfusion medicine and methods for converting other blood groups into this universal donor group have been researched. However, conversion of D-positive cells into D-negative is yet to be achieved, although conversion of group A or B cells into O cells has been reported. The Rh D blood group is determined by the RHD gene, which encodes a 12-transmembrane domain protein. Here we convert Rh D-positive erythroid progenitor cells into D-negative cells using RHD-targeting transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs). After transfection of TALEN-encoding plasmids, RHD-knockout clones are obtained. Erythroid-lineage cells differentiated from these knockout erythroid progenitor cells do not agglutinate in the presence of anti-D reagents and do not express D antigen, as assessed using flow cytometry. Our programmable nuclease-induced blood group conversion opens new avenues for compatible donor cell generation in transfusion medicine. PMID:26078220

  5. Generation of myostatin B knockout yellow catfish (Tachysurus fulvidraco) using transcription activator-like effector nucleases.

    PubMed

    Dong, Zhangji; Ge, Jiachun; Xu, Zhiqiang; Dong, Xiaohua; Cao, Shasha; Pan, Jianlin; Zhao, Qingshun

    2014-06-01

    Myostatin (Mstn), a member of the transforming growth factor β superfamily, plays an inhibiting role in mammalian muscle growth. Mammals like human, cattle, mouse, sheep, and dog carrying null alleles of Mstn display a double-muscle phenotype. Mstn is conserved in fish; however, little is known whether the fish with mutated mstn display a similar phenotype to mammals because of the lack of mutant fish with mstn null alleles. Previously, we knocked out one of the duplicated copies of myostatin gene (mstna) in yellow catfish using zinc-finger nucleases. In this study, we report the identification of the second myostatin gene (mstnb) and knockout of mstnb in yellow catfish. The gene comprises three exons. It is predicted to encode 373 amino acid residues. The predicted protein exhibits 59.3% identity with yellow catfish Mstna and 57.3% identity with human MSTN. Employing TALEN (transcription activator-like effector nucleases) technology, we obtained two founders (from four randomly selected founders) of yellow catfish carrying the mutated mstnb gene in their germ cells. Totally, six mutated alleles of mstnb were obtained from the founders. Among the six alleles, four are nonframeshift and two are frameshift mutation. The frameshift mutated alleles include mstnb(nju22), an 8 bp deletion, and mstnb(nju24), a complex type of mutation comprising a 7 bp deletion and a 12 bp insertion. They are predicted to encode function null Mstnb. Our results will help to understand the roles of mstn genes in fish growth.

  6. Direct observation of transcription activator-like effector (TALE) protein dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuculis, Luke; Abil, Zhanar; Zhao, Huimin; Schroeder, Charles M.

    2014-03-01

    In this work, we describe a single molecule assay to probe the site-search dynamics of transcription activator-like effector (TALE) proteins along DNA. In modern genetics, the ability to selectively edit the human genome is an unprecedented development, driven by recent advances in targeted nuclease proteins. Specific gene editing can be accomplished using TALE proteins, which are programmable DNA-binding proteins that can be fused to a nuclease domain. In this way, TALENs are a leading technology that has shown great success in the genomic editing of pluripotent stem cells. A major hurdle facing clinical implementation, however, is the potential for deleterious off-target binding events. For these reasons, a molecular-level understanding of TALE binding and target sequence search on DNA is essential. To this end, we developed a single-molecule fluorescence imaging assay that provides a first-of-its-kind view of the 1-D diffusion of TALE proteins along stretched DNA. Taken together with co-crystal structures of DNA-bound TALEs, our results suggest a rotationally-coupled, major groove tracking model for diffusion. We further report diffusion constants for TALE proteins as a function of salt concentration, consistent with previously described models of 1-D protein diffusion.

  7. Piperine, a Pungent Alkaloid from Black Pepper, Inhibits B Lymphocyte Activation and Effector Functions.

    PubMed

    Soutar, David A; Doucette, Carolyn D; Liwski, Robert S; Hoskin, David W

    2017-03-01

    Piperine has several well-documented anti-inflammatory properties; however, little is known regarding its effect on humoral immunity. In this study, we describe the immunosuppressive effect of piperine on B lymphocytes, which are integral to the humoral immune response. Mouse B cells were cultured in the absence or presence of non-cytotoxic concentrations (25, 50, and 100 μM) of piperine during T-dependent or T-independent stimulation. Piperine inhibited B cell proliferation by causing G0/G1 phase cell cycle arrest in association with reduced expression of cyclin D2 and D3. The inhibitory effect of piperine was not mediated through transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 ion channel (TRPV1) because piperine also inhibited the proliferation of B cells from TRPV1-deficient mice. Expression of class II major histocompatibility complex molecules and costimulatory CD40 and CD86 on B lymphocytes was reduced in the presence of piperine, as was B cell-mediated antigen presentation to syngeneic T cells. In addition, piperine inhibited B cell synthesis of interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-10 cytokines, as well as IgM, IgG2b, and IgG3 immunoglobulins. The inhibitory effect of piperine on B lymphocyte activation and effector function warrants further investigation for possible application in the treatment of pathologies related to inappropriate humoral immune responses. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. World War II Memorial Learning Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tennessee State Dept. of Education, Nashville.

    These learning activities can help students get the most out of a visit to the Tennessee World War II Memorial, a group of ten pylons located in Nashville (Tennessee). Each pylon contains informational text about the events of World War II. The ten pylons are listed as: (1) "Pylon E-1--Terror: America Enters the War against Fascism, June…

  9. Characterization of effector and memory T cell subsets in the immune response to bovine tuberculosis in cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vaccine-elicited long-term cultured IFN-gamma ELISPOT responses correlate with protection against bovine tuberculosis in cattle. With humans, cultured IFN-gamma ELISPOT assays are primarily a measure of central memory T cell (Tcm) responses; however, this important subset of lymphocytes is poorly ch...

  10. The representation of response effector and response location in episodic memory for newly acquired actions: evidence from retrieval-induced forgetting.

    PubMed

    Reppa, Irene; Worth, E Rhian; Greville, W James; Saunders, Jo

    2013-06-01

    Information retrieval can cause forgetting for related but non-retrieved information. Such retrieval-induced forgetting (RIF) has been previously found for semantically and episodically related information. The current study used RIF to examine whether response effector and location are encoded explicitly in action memory. Participants learned unique touchscreen responses to ten novel objects. Correct actions to each object involved left-hand or right-hand pushing of one of four possible object buttons. After learning, participants practiced two of the ten object-specific sequences. Unpracticed actions could share hand only, button only, both hand and button, or neither hand nor button, with the practiced actions. Subsequent testing showed significant RIF (in retrieval accuracy and speed measures) for actions that shared hand only, button only, or both hand and button with the practiced action. The results have implications for understanding the representations mediating episodic action memory, and for the potential of RIF as a tool for elucidating feature-based representations in this and other domains.

  11. CD27 Promotes Survival of Activated T Cells and Complements CD28 in Generation and Establishment of the Effector T Cell Pool

    PubMed Central

    Hendriks, Jenny; Xiao, Yanling; Borst, Jannie

    2003-01-01

    CD27, like CD28, acts in concert with the T cell receptor to support T cell expansion. Using CD27−/− mice, we have shown earlier that CD27 determines the magnitude of primary and memory T cell responses to influenza virus. Here, we have examined the relative contributions of CD27 and CD28 to generation of the virus-specific effector T cell pool and its establishment at the site of infection (the lung), using CD27−/−, CD28−/−, and CD27/CD28−/− mice. We find that primary and memory CD8+ T cell responses to influenza virus are dependent on the collective contribution of both receptors. In the primary response, CD27 and CD28 impact to a similar extent on expansion of virus-specific T cells in draining lymph nodes. CD27 is the principle determinant for accumulation of virus-specific T cells in the lung because it can sustain this response in CD28−/− mice. Unlike CD28, CD27 does not affect cell cycle activity, but promotes survival of activated T cells throughout successive rounds of division at the site of priming and may do so at the site of infection as well. CD27 was found to rescue CD28−/− T cells from death at the onset of division, explaining its capacity to support a T cell response in absence of CD28. PMID:14581610

  12. Associative memory model with spontaneous neural activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurikawa, Tomoki; Kaneko, Kunihiko

    2012-05-01

    We propose a novel associative memory model wherein the neural activity without an input (i.e., spontaneous activity) is modified by an input to generate a target response that is memorized for recall upon the same input. Suitable design of synaptic connections enables the model to memorize input/output (I/O) mappings equaling 70% of the total number of neurons, where the evoked activity distinguishes a target pattern from others. Spontaneous neural activity without an input shows chaotic dynamics but keeps some similarity with evoked activities, as reported in recent experimental studies.

  13. Modulation of membrane phosphoinositide dynamics by the phosphatidylinositide 4-kinase activity of the Legionella LepB effector.

    PubMed

    Dong, Na; Niu, Miao; Hu, Liyan; Yao, Qing; Zhou, Rui; Shao, Feng

    2016-12-12

    Legionella pneumophila, the causative bacterium for Legionnaires' disease, hijacks host membrane trafficking for the maturation of the Legionella-containing vacuole (LCV). The LCV membrane mainly contains PtdIns4P, which is important for anchoring many secreted Legionella effectors onto the LCV. Here, we identify a cryptic functional domain (LepB_NTD) preceding the well-characterized RabGAP domain in the Legionella Dot/Icm type IV secretion system effector LepB. LepB_NTD alone is toxic to yeast and can disrupt the Golgi in mammalian cells. The crystal structure reveals an unexpected kinase fold and catalytic motif important for LepB_NTD function in eukaryotes. Cell biology-guided biochemical analyses uncovered a lipid kinase activity in LepB_NTD that specifically converts PtdIns3P into PtdIns(3,4)P2. PtdIns(3,4)P2 is efficiently hydrolysed into PtdIns4P by another Dot/Icm effector SidF that is known to possess phosphoinositide phosphatase activity. Consistently, SidF is capable of counteracting the cellular functions of LepB_NTD. Genetic analyses show a requirement for LepB kinase activity as well as lipid phosphatase activity of SidF for PtdIns4P biosynthesis on the LCV membrane. Our study identifies an unprecedented phosphatidylinositide 4-kinase activity from bacteria and highlights a sophisticated manipulation of host phosphoinositide metabolism by a bacterial pathogen.

  14. A transcription activator-like effector from Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzicola elicits dose-dependent resistance in rice.

    PubMed

    Hummel, Aaron W; Wilkins, Katherine E; Wang, Li; Cernadas, R Andres; Bogdanove, Adam J

    2017-01-01

    Xanthomonas spp. reduce crop yields and quality worldwide. During infection of their plant hosts, many strains secrete transcription activator-like (TAL) effectors, which enter the host cell nucleus and activate specific corresponding host genes at effector binding elements (EBEs) in the promoter. TAL effectors may contribute to disease by activating the expression of susceptibility genes or trigger resistance associated with the hypersensitive reaction (HR) by activating an executor resistance (R) gene. The rice bacterial leaf streak pathogen X. oryzae pv. oryzicola (Xoc) is known to suppress host resistance, and no host R gene has been identified against it, despite considerable effort. To further investigate Xoc suppression of host resistance, we conducted a screen of effectors from BLS256 and identified Tal2a as an HR elicitor in rice when delivered heterologously by a strain of the closely related rice bacterial blight pathogen X. oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo) or by the soybean pathogen X. axonopodis pv. glycines. The HR required the Tal2a activation domain, suggesting an executor R gene. Tal2a activity was differentially distributed among geographically diverse Xoc isolates, being largely conserved among Asian isolates. We identified four genes induced by Tal2a in next-generation RNA sequencing experiments and confirmed them using quantitative real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). However, neither individual nor collective activation of these genes by designer TAL effectors resulted in HR. A tal2a knockout mutant of BLS256 showed virulence comparable with the wild-type, but plasmid-based overexpression of tal2a at different levels in the wild-type reduced virulence in a directly corresponding way. Overall, the results reveal that host resistance suppression by Xoc plays a critical role in pathogenesis. Further, the dose-dependent avirulence activity of Tal2a and the apparent lack of a single canonical target that accounts for HR point to

  15. E2~Ub conjugates regulate the kinase activity of Shigella effector OspG during pathogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Pruneda, Jonathan N.; Smith, F. Donelson; Daurie, Angela; Swaney, Danielle L.; Villén, Judit; Scott, John D.; Stadnyk, Andrew W.; Le Trong, Isolde; Stenkamp, Ronald E.; Klevit, Rachel E.; Rohde, John R.; Brzovic, Peter S.

    2014-01-20

    Pathogenic bacteria introduce effector proteins directly into the cytosol of eukaryotic cells to promote invasion and colonization. OspG, a Shigella spp. effector kinase, plays a role in this process by helping to suppress the host inflammatory response. OspG has been reported to bind host E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzymes activated with ubiquitin (E2~Ub), a key enzyme complex in ubiquitin transfer pathways. A cocrystal structure of the OspG/UbcH5c~Ub complex reveals that complex formation has important ramifications for the activity of both OspG and the UbcH5c~Ub conjugate. OspG is a minimal kinase domain containing only essential elements required for catalysis. UbcH5c~Ub binding stabilizes an active conformation of the kinase, greatly enhancing OspG kinase activity. In contrast, interaction with OspG stabilizes an extended, less reactive form of UbcH5c~Ub. Recognizing conserved E2 features, OspG can interact with at least ten distinct human E2s~Ub. Mouse oral infection studies indicate that E2~Ub conjugates act as novel regulators of OspG effector kinase function in eukaryotic host cells.

  16. Relation of Physical Activity to Memory Functioning in Older Adults: The Memory Workout Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rebok, George W.; Plude, Dana J.

    2001-01-01

    The Memory Workout, a CD-ROM program designed to help older adults increase changes in physical and cognitive activity influencing memory, was tested with 24 subjects. Results revealed a significant relationship between exercise time, exercise efficacy, and cognitive function, as well as interest in improving memory and physical activity.…

  17. Rapid and Rigorous IL-17A Production by a Distinct Subpopulation of Effector Memory T Lymphocytes Constitutes a Novel Mechanism of Toxic Shock Syndrome Immunopathology.

    PubMed

    Szabo, Peter A; Goswami, Ankur; Mazzuca, Delfina M; Kim, Kyoungok; O'Gorman, David B; Hess, David A; Welch, Ian D; Young, Howard A; Singh, Bhagirath; McCormick, John K; Haeryfar, S M Mansour

    2017-04-01

    Toxic shock syndrome (TSS) is caused by staphylococcal and streptococcal superantigens (SAgs) that provoke a swift hyperinflammatory response typified by a cytokine storm. The precipitous decline in the host's clinical status and the lack of targeted therapies for TSS emphasize the need to identify key players of the storm's initial wave. Using a humanized mouse model of TSS and human cells, we herein demonstrate that SAgs elicit in vitro and in vivo IL-17A responses within hours. SAg-triggered human IL-17A production was characterized by remarkably high mRNA stability for this cytokine. A distinct subpopulation of CD4(+) effector memory T (TEM) cells that secrete IL-17A, but not IFN-γ, was responsible for early IL-17A production. We found mouse "TEM-17" cells to be enriched within the intestinal epithelium and among lamina propria lymphocytes. Furthermore, interfering with IL-17A receptor signaling in human PBMCs attenuated the expression of numerous inflammatory mediators implicated in the TSS-associated cytokine storm. IL-17A receptor blockade also abrogated the secondary effect of SAg-stimulated PBMCs on human dermal fibroblasts as judged by C/EBP δ expression. Finally, the early IL-17A response to SAgs was pathogenic because in vivo neutralization of IL-17A in humanized mice ameliorated hepatic and intestinal damage and reduced mortality. Together, our findings identify CD4(+) TEM cells as a key effector of TSS and reveal a novel role for IL-17A in TSS immunopathogenesis. Our work thus elucidates a pathogenic, as opposed to protective, role for IL-17A during Gram-positive bacterial infections. Accordingly, the IL-17-IL-17R axis may provide an attractive target for the management of SAg-mediated illnesses.

  18. Effector and Naturally Occurring Regulatory T Cells Display No Abnormalities in Activation Induced Cell Death in NOD Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kaminitz, Ayelet; Yolcu, Esma S.; Askenasy, Enosh M.; Stein, Jerry; Yaniv, Isaac; Shirwan, Haval; Askenasy, Nadir

    2011-01-01

    Background Disturbed peripheral negative regulation might contribute to evolution of autoimmune insulitis in type 1 diabetes. This study evaluates the sensitivity of naïve/effector (Teff) and regulatory T cells (Treg) to activation-induced cell death mediated by Fas cross-linking in NOD and wild-type mice. Principal Findings Both effector (CD25−, FoxP3−) and suppressor (CD25+, FoxP3+) CD4+ T cells are negatively regulated by Fas cross-linking in mixed splenocyte populations of NOD, wild type mice and FoxP3-GFP tranegenes. Proliferation rates and sensitivity to Fas cross-linking are dissociated in Treg cells: fast cycling induced by IL-2 and CD3/CD28 stimulation improve Treg resistance to Fas-ligand (FasL) in both strains. The effector and suppressor CD4+ subsets display balanced sensitivity to negative regulation under baseline conditions, IL-2 and CD3/CD28 stimulation, indicating that stimulation does not perturb immune homeostasis in NOD mice. Effective autocrine apoptosis of diabetogenic cells was evident from delayed onset and reduced incidence of adoptive disease transfer into NOD.SCID by CD4+CD25− T cells decorated with FasL protein. Treg resistant to Fas-mediated apoptosis retain suppressive activity in vitro. The only detectable differential response was reduced Teff proliferation and upregulation of CD25 following CD3-activation in NOD mice. Conclusion These data document negative regulation of effector and suppressor cells by Fas cross-linking and dissociation between sensitivity to apoptosis and proliferation in stimulated Treg. There is no evidence that perturbed AICD in NOD mice initiates or promotes autoimmune insulitis. PMID:21738739

  19. Tumor suppressor genes are larger than apoptosis-effector genes and have more regions of active chromatin: Connection to a stochastic paradigm for sequential gene expression programs.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Marlene; Mauro, James A; Ramsamooj, Michael; Blanck, George

    2015-08-03

    Apoptosis- and proliferation-effector genes are substantially regulated by the same transactivators, with E2F-1 and Oct-1 being notable examples. The larger proliferation-effector genes have more binding sites for the transactivators that regulate both sets of genes, and proliferation-effector genes have more regions of active chromatin, i.e, DNase I hypersensitive and histone 3, lysine-4 trimethylation sites. Thus, the size differences between the 2 classes of genes suggest a transcriptional regulation paradigm whereby the accumulation of transcription factors that regulate both sets of genes, merely as an aspect of stochastic behavior, accumulate first on the larger proliferation-effector gene "traps," and then accumulate on the apoptosis effector genes, thereby effecting sequential activation of the 2 different gene sets. As IRF-1 and p53 levels increase, tumor suppressor proteins are first activated, followed by the activation of apoptosis-effector genes, for example during S-phase pausing for DNA repair. Tumor suppressor genes are larger than apoptosis-effector genes and have more IRF-1 and p53 binding sites, thereby likewise suggesting a paradigm for transcription sequencing based on stochastic interactions of transcription factors with different gene classes. In this report, using the ENCODE database, we determined that tumor suppressor genes have a greater number of open chromatin regions and histone 3 lysine-4 trimethylation sites, consistent with the idea that a larger gene size can facilitate earlier transcriptional activation via the inclusion of more transactivator binding sites.

  20. Protective Immunity Induced with the RTS,S/AS Vaccine Is Associated with IL-2 and TNF-α Producing Effector and Central Memory CD4+ T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Rein, Lisa E.; Moris, Philippe; Janssens, Michel; Ofori-Anyinam, Opokua; Cohen, Joe; Kester, Kent E.; Heppner, D. Gray; Krzych, Urszula

    2011-01-01

    A phase 2a RTS,S/AS malaria vaccine trial, conducted previously at the Walter Reed Army Institute of Research, conferred sterile immunity against a primary challenge with infectious sporozoites in 40% of the 80 subjects enrolled in the study. The frequency of Plasmodium falciparum circumsporozoite protein (CSP)-specific CD4+ T cells was significantly higher in protected subjects as compared to non-protected subjects. Intrigued by these unique vaccine-related correlates of protection, in the present study we asked whether RTS,S also induced effector/effector memory (TE/EM) and/or central memory (TCM) CD4+ T cells and whether one or both of these sub-populations is the primary source of cytokine production. We showed for the first time that PBMC from malaria-non-exposed RTS,S-immunized subjects contain both TE/EM and TCM cells that generate strong IL-2 responses following re-stimulation in vitro with CSP peptides. Moreover, both the frequencies and the total numbers of IL-2-producing CD4+ TE/EM cells and of CD4+ TCM cells from protected subjects were significantly higher than those from non-protected subjects. We also demonstrated for the first time that there is a strong association between the frequency of CSP peptide-reactive CD4+ T cells producing IL-2 and the titers of CSP-specific antibodies in the same individual, suggesting that IL-2 may be acting as a growth factor for follicular Th cells and/or B cells. The frequencies of CSP peptide-reactive, TNF-α-producing CD4+ TE/EM cells and of CD4+ TE/EM cells secreting both IL-2 and TNF-α were also shown to be higher in protected vs. non-protected individuals. We have, therefore, demonstrated that in addition to TNF-α, IL-2 is also a significant contributing factor to RTS,S/AS vaccine induced immunity and that both TE/EM and TCM cells are major producers of IL-2. PMID:21779319

  1. Old Mice Accumulate Activated Effector CD4 T Cells Refractory to Regulatory T Cell-Induced Immunosuppression

    PubMed Central

    Harpaz, Idan; Bhattacharya, Udayan; Elyahu, Yehezqel; Strominger, Itai; Monsonego, Alon

    2017-01-01

    Chronic low-grade inflammation and reduced lymphocyte potency are implicated in the pathogenesis of major illnesses associated with aging. Whether this immune phenotype results from a loss of cell-mediated regulation or intrinsic dysregulated function of effector T cells (Teffs) requires further research. Here, we report that, as compared with young C57BL6 mice, old mice show an increased frequency of CD4+CD62L− Teffs with a dysregulated activated phenotype and markedly increased effector functions. Analysis of the frequency and suppressive function of CD4+FoxP3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) indicates an increase in the frequency of FoxP3+ T cells with aging which, however, occurs within the CD4+CD25− T cells. Furthermore, whereas Tregs from young and old mice similarly suppress Teffs from young mice, both have a compromised suppressive capacity of Teffs from old mice, a phenomenon which is partially recovered in the presence of IL-2-producing CD4+CD62L+ non-Teffs. Finally, we observed that Teff subsets from old mice are enriched with IL-17A-producing T cells and exhibit intrinsically dysregulated expression of genes encoding cell-surface molecules and transcription factors, which play a key role in T-cell activation and regulation. We, thus, demonstrate an age-related impairment in the regulation of effector CD4 T cells, which may underlie the higher risk for destructive inflammation associated with aging. PMID:28382033

  2. Distinct regions of the Phytophthora essential effector Avh238 determine its function in cell death activation and plant immunity suppression.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bo; Wang, Qunqing; Jing, Maofeng; Guo, Baodian; Wu, Jiawei; Wang, Haonan; Wang, Yang; Lin, Long; Wang, Yan; Ye, Wenwu; Dong, Suomeng; Wang, Yuanchao

    2017-04-01

    Phytophthora pathogens secrete effectors to manipulate host innate immunity, thus facilitating infection. Among the RXLR effectors highly induced during Phytophthora sojae infection, Avh238 not only contributes to pathogen virulence but also triggers plant cell death. However, the detailed molecular basis of Avh238 functions remains largely unknown. We mapped the regions responsible for Avh238 functions in pathogen virulence and plant cell death induction using a strategy that combines investigation of natural variation and large-scale mutagenesis assays. The correlation between cellular localization and Avh238 functions was also evaluated. We found that the 79(th) residue (histidine or leucine) of Avh238 determined its cell death-inducing activity, and that the 53 amino acids in its C-terminal region are responsible for promoting Phytophthora infection. Transient expression of Avh238 in Nicotiana benthamiana revealed that nuclear localization is essential for triggering cell death, while Avh238-mediated suppression of INF1-triggered cell death requires cytoplasmic localization. Our results demonstrate that a representative example of an essential Phytophthora RXLR effector can evolve to escape recognition by the host by mutating one nucleotide site, and can also retain plant immunosuppressive activity to enhance pathogen virulence in planta.

  3. Old Mice Accumulate Activated Effector CD4 T Cells Refractory to Regulatory T Cell-Induced Immunosuppression.

    PubMed

    Harpaz, Idan; Bhattacharya, Udayan; Elyahu, Yehezqel; Strominger, Itai; Monsonego, Alon

    2017-01-01

    Chronic low-grade inflammation and reduced lymphocyte potency are implicated in the pathogenesis of major illnesses associated with aging. Whether this immune phenotype results from a loss of cell-mediated regulation or intrinsic dysregulated function of effector T cells (Teffs) requires further research. Here, we report that, as compared with young C57BL6 mice, old mice show an increased frequency of CD4+CD62L- Teffs with a dysregulated activated phenotype and markedly increased effector functions. Analysis of the frequency and suppressive function of CD4+FoxP3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) indicates an increase in the frequency of FoxP3+ T cells with aging which, however, occurs within the CD4+CD25- T cells. Furthermore, whereas Tregs from young and old mice similarly suppress Teffs from young mice, both have a compromised suppressive capacity of Teffs from old mice, a phenomenon which is partially recovered in the presence of IL-2-producing CD4+CD62L+ non-Teffs. Finally, we observed that Teff subsets from old mice are enriched with IL-17A-producing T cells and exhibit intrinsically dysregulated expression of genes encoding cell-surface molecules and transcription factors, which play a key role in T-cell activation and regulation. We, thus, demonstrate an age-related impairment in the regulation of effector CD4 T cells, which may underlie the higher risk for destructive inflammation associated with aging.

  4. Identification of Novel Coxiella burnetii Icm/Dot Effectors and Genetic Analysis of Their Involvement in Modulating a Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Lifshitz, Ziv; Burstein, David; Schwartz, Kierstyn; Shuman, Howard A.; Pupko, Tal

    2014-01-01

    Coxiella burnetii, the causative agent of Q fever, is a human intracellular pathogen that utilizes the Icm/Dot type IVB secretion system to translocate effector proteins into host cells. To identify novel C. burnetii effectors, we applied a machine-learning approach to predict C. burnetii effectors, and examination of 20 such proteins resulted in the identification of 13 novel effectors. To determine whether these effectors, as well as several previously identified effectors, modulate conserved eukaryotic pathways, they were expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The effects on yeast growth were examined under regular growth conditions and in the presence of caffeine, a known modulator of the yeast cell wall integrity (CWI) mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase pathway. In the presence of caffeine, expression of the effectors CBU0885 and CBU1676 caused an enhanced inhibition of yeast growth, and the growth inhibition of CBU0388 was suppressed. Furthermore, analysis of synthetic lethality effects and examination of the activity of the CWI MAP kinase transcription factor Rlm1 indicated that CBU0388 enhances the activation of this MAP kinase pathway in yeast, while CBU0885 and CBU1676 abolish this activation. Additionally, coexpression of CBU1676 and CBU0388 resulted in mutual suppression of their inhibition of yeast growth. These results strongly indicate that these three effectors modulate the CWI MAP kinase pathway in yeast. Moreover, both CBU1676 and CBU0885 were found to contain a conserved haloacid dehalogenase (HAD) domain, which was found to be required for their activity. Collectively, our results demonstrate that MAP kinase pathways are most likely targeted by C. burnetii Icm/Dot effectors. PMID:24958706

  5. Identification of Phakopsora pachyrhizi Candidate Effectors with Virulence Activity in a Distantly Related Pathosystem

    PubMed Central

    Kunjeti, Sridhara G.; Iyer, Geeta; Johnson, Ebony; Li, Eric; Broglie, Karen E.; Rauscher, Gilda; Rairdan, Gregory J.

    2016-01-01

    Phakopsora pachyrhizi is the causal agent of Asian Soybean Rust, a disease that causes enormous economic losses, most markedly in South America. P. pachyrhizi is a biotrophic pathogen that utilizes specialized feeding structures called haustoria to colonize its hosts. In rusts and other filamentous plant pathogens, haustoria have been shown to secrete effector proteins into their hosts to permit successful completion of their life cycle. We have constructed a cDNA library from P. pachyrhizi haustoria using paramagnetic bead-based methodology and have identified 35 P. pachyrhizi candidate effector (CE) genes from this library which are described here. In addition, we quantified the transcript expression pattern of six of these genes and show that two of these CEs are able to greatly increase the susceptibility of Nicotiana benthamiana to Phytophthora infestans. This strongly suggests that these genes play an important role in P. pachyrhizi virulence on its hosts. PMID:27014295

  6. Ex-vivo analysis of CD8+ T cells infiltrating colorectal tumors identifies a major effector-memory subset with low perforin content.

    PubMed

    Ye, Sheng-Wei; Wang, Yu; Valmori, Danila; Ayyoub, Maha; Han, Yan; Xu, Xiao-Lan; Zhao, Ai-Lian; Qu, Li; Gnjatic, Sacha; Ritter, Gerd; Old, Lloyd J; Gu, Jin

    2006-09-01

    Previous studies have indicated that the infiltration of CD8+ T cells in colorectal cancer is an independent predictor of increased survival but clinical observations have suggested that the cytotoxic function of CD8+ T cells infiltrating colorectal cancer may often be limited. In this study, we have assessed the phenotype of colorectal cancer CD8+ tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) isolated ex vivo from tumor tissue, and assessed the perforin content of TIL with respect to their location using immunohistochemistry. We found that CD8+ T cells TILs isolated from colorectal cancer are mainly composed of antigen-experienced cells of effector memory type (TEM, CD45RA-CCR7-, and CD27+/CD28- or CD27-/CD28-), and contain only minor proportions of terminally differentiated CD8+ T cells (TEMRA, CD45RA+CCR7-). The perforin content of these TILs, however, is significantly lower than that of antigen-experienced T cells in PBMCs due to the much lower levels of perforin found in the CD27-CD28- subset in TILs compared with CD8+ T cells of similar phenotype in PBMCs.

  7. Clinically Relevant Reactivation of Polyomavirus BK (BKPyV) in HLA-A02-Positive Renal Transplant Recipients Is Associated with Impaired Effector-Memory Differentiation of BKPyV-Specific CD8+ T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Remmerswaal, Ester B. M.; Heutinck, Kirstin M.; ten Brinke, Anja; Feltkamp, Mariet C. W.; van der Weerd, Neelke C.; van der Pant, Karlijn A. M. I.; Bemelman, Frederike J.; van Lier, René A. W.; ten Berge, Ineke J. M.

    2016-01-01

    Polyomavirus BK (BKPyV) frequently reactivates in immunosuppressed renal transplant recipients (RTRs) and may lead to graft loss due to BKPyV-induced interstitial nephritis (BKVN). Little is known on the differentiation of CD8+ T cells targeting BKPyV in RTRs. Here we investigated whether BKPyV-specific CD8+ T cell differentiation differs in RTRs with varying degrees of BKPyV reactivation and/or BKVN. Using combinatorial encoding with tetramers carrying BKPyV major capsid protein (VP1) and large T antigen protein (LTAG) epitopes, we investigated CD8+ T cell responses to BKPyV in longitudinally obtained PBMC samples from 46 HLA-A02-positive RTRs and 20 healthy adults. We were also able to isolate BKPyV-specific CD8+ T cells from five renal allografts, two of which were affected by BKVN. Before transplantation, BKPyV-specific CD8+ T cells targeting VP1 and LTAG epitopes appeared predominantly as central-memory and CD27+/CD28+ effector-memory (TEM), and naïve-like PD-1-expressing cells, respectively. After viral reactivation, BKPyV-specific CD8+ T cells assumed CD28− TEM and TEMRA states in patients who were able to control BKPyV, whereas differentiation lagged behind in patients with severe viral reactivation or BKVN. Furthermore, VP1-specific CD69+/CD103+ tissue-resident memory (TRM) cells accumulated in BKVN-affected allografts but lacked signs of effector differentiation. In contrast, granzyme B-expressing effector cells were detected in allografts not affected by BKVN. In conclusion, effector-memory differentiation of BKPyV-specific CD8+ T cells in patients with high viral load or BKVN is impaired. Further characterization of the specific mechanisms behind this altered cellular differentiation is necessary to develop therapies that can prevent the emergence of BKVN. PMID:27723787

  8. Does Active Memory Capacity Change with Age?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halford, Graeme S.; And Others

    A series of experiments, which used the primary memory paradigm of Wickens et al. (1981, 1985) with university students, adults, and 8- and 9-year-old children, found an increase in primary memory capacity with age. Primary memory differs from secondary memory in that the latter is susceptible to proactive interference, whereas the former is not.…

  9. Expression of Pseudomonas syringae type III effectors in yeast under stress conditions reveals that HopX1 attenuates activation of the high osmolarity glycerol MAP kinase pathway.

    PubMed

    Salomon, Dor; Bosis, Eran; Dar, Daniel; Nachman, Iftach; Sessa, Guido

    2012-11-01

    The Gram-negative bacterium Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst) is the causal agent of speck disease in tomato. Pst pathogenicity depends on a type III secretion system that delivers effector proteins into host cells, where they promote disease by manipulating processes to the advantage of the pathogen. Previous studies identified seven Pst effectors that inhibit growth when expressed in yeast under normal growth conditions, suggesting that they interfere with cellular processes conserved in yeast and plants. We hypothesized that effectors also target conserved cellular processes that are required for yeast growth only under stress conditions. We therefore examined phenotypes induced by expression of Pst effectors in yeast grown in the presence of various stressors. Out of 29 effectors tested, five (HopX1, HopG1, HopT1-1, HopH1 and AvrPtoB) displayed growth inhibition phenotypes only in combination with stress conditions. Viability assays revealed that the HopX1 effector caused loss of cell viability under prolonged osmotic stress. Using transcription reporters, we found that HopX1 attenuated the activation of the high osmolarity glycerol (HOG) mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway, which is responsible for yeast survival under osmotic stress, while other MAPK pathways were mildly affected by HopX1. Interestingly, HopX1-mediated phenotypes in yeast were dependent on the putative transglutaminase catalytic triad of the effector. This study enlarges the pool of phenotypes available for the functional analysis of Pst type III effectors in yeast, and exemplifies how analysis of phenotypes detected in yeast under stress conditions can lead to the identification of eukaryotic cellular processes affected by bacterial effectors.

  10. Hemispheric Asymmetries in the Activation and Monitoring of Memory Errors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giammattei, Jeannette; Arndt, Jason

    2012-01-01

    Previous research on the lateralization of memory errors suggests that the right hemisphere's tendency to produce more memory errors than the left hemisphere reflects hemispheric differences in semantic activation. However, all prior research that has examined the lateralization of memory errors has used self-paced recognition judgments. Because…

  11. NORE1A is a double barreled Ras senescence effector that activates p53 and Rb.

    PubMed

    Donninger, Howard; Barnoud, Thibaut; Clark, Geoffrey J

    2016-09-01

    Although Ras is a potent oncogene in human tumors it has the paradoxical ability to promote Oncogene Induced Senescence (OIS). This appears to serve as a major barrier to Ras driven transformation in vivo. The signaling pathways used by Ras to promote senescence remain relatively poorly understood, but appear to invoke both the p53 and the Rb master tumor suppressors. Exactly how Ras communicates with p53 and Rb has remained something of a puzzle. NORE1A is a direct Ras effector that is frequently downregulated in human tumors. We have now found that it serves as a powerful Ras senescence effector. Moreover, we have defined signaling mechanisms that allows Ras to control both p53 and Rb post-translational modifications via the NORE1A scaffolding molecule. Indeed, NORE1A can be detected in complex with both p53 and Rb. Thus, by coupling Ras to both tumor suppressors, NORE1A forms a major component of the Ras senescence machinery and serves as the missing link between Ras and p53/Rb.

  12. False memory for context and true memory for context similarly activate the parahippocampal cortex.

    PubMed

    Karanian, Jessica M; Slotnick, Scott D

    2017-02-24

    The role of the parahippocampal cortex is currently a topic of debate. One view posits that the parahippocampal cortex specifically processes spatial layouts and sensory details (i.e., the visual-spatial processing view). In contrast, the other view posits that the parahippocampal cortex more generally processes spatial and non-spatial contexts (i.e., the general contextual processing view). A large number of studies have found that true memories activate the parahippocampal cortex to a greater degree than false memories, which would appear to support the visual-spatial processing view as true memories are typically associated with greater visual-spatial detail than false memories. However, in previous studies, contextual details were also greater for true memories than false memories. Thus, such differential activity in the parahippocampal cortex may have reflected differences in contextual processing, which would challenge the visual-spatial processing view. In the present functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study, we employed a source memory paradigm to investigate the functional role of the parahippocampal cortex during true memory and false memory for contextual information to distinguish between the visual-spatial processing view and the general contextual processing view. During encoding, abstract shapes were presented to the left or right of fixation. During retrieval, old shapes were presented at fixation and participants indicated whether each shape was previously on the "left" or "right" followed by an "unsure", "sure", or "very sure" confidence rating. The conjunction of confident true memories for context and confident false memories for context produced activity in the parahippocampal cortex, which indicates that this region is associated with contextual processing. Furthermore, the direct contrast of true memory and false memory produced activity in the visual cortex but did not produce activity in the parahippocampal cortex. The present

  13. Adenovirus Vector-Induced CD8+ T Effector Memory Cell Differentiation and Recirculation, But Not Proliferation, Are Important for Protective Immunity Against Experimental Trypanosoma cruzi Infection

    PubMed Central

    Vasconcelos, José Ronnie; Dominguez, Mariana R.; Neves, Ramon L.; Ersching, Jonatan; Araújo, Adriano; Santos, Luara I.; Virgilio, Fernando S.; Machado, Alexandre V.; Bruna-Romero, Oscar; Gazzinelli, Ricardo T.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Heterologous prime-boost vaccination using plasmid DNA followed by replication-defective adenovirus vector generates a large number of specific CD8+ T effector memory (TEM) cells that provide long-term immunity against a variety of pathogens. In the present study, we initially characterized the frequency, phenotype, and function of these T cells in vaccinated mice that were subjected to infectious challenge with the human protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi. We observed that the frequency of the specific CD8+ T cells in the spleens of the vaccinated mice increased after challenge. Specific TEM cells differentiated into cells with a KLRG1High CD27Low CD43Low CD183LowT-betHigh EomesLow phenotype and capable to produce simultaneously the antiparasitic mediators IFNγ and TNF. Using the gzmBCreERT2/ROSA26EYFP transgenic mouse line, in which the cells that express Granzyme B after immunization, are indelibly labeled with enhanced yellow fluorescent protein, we confirmed that CD8+ T cells present after challenge were indeed TEM cells that had been induced by vaccination. Subsequently, we observed that the in vivo increase in the frequency of the specific CD8+ T cells was not because of an anamnestic immune response. Most importantly, after challenge, the increase in the frequency of specific cells and the protective immunity they mediate were insensitive to treatment with the cytostatic toxic agent hydroxyurea. We have previously described that the administration of the drug FTY720, which reduces lymphocyte recirculation, severely impairs protective immunity, and our evidence supports the model that when large amounts of antigen-experienced CD8+ TEM cells are present after heterologous prime-boost vaccination, differentiation, and recirculation, rather than proliferation, are key for the resultant protective immunity. PMID:24568548

  14. A high-mobility, low-cost phenotype defines human effector-memory CD8+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Zenhaeusern, Gabriela; Gubser, Patrick; Eisele, Petra; Gasser, Olivier; Steinhuber, Andrea; Trampuz, Andrej; Handschin, Christoph; Luster, Andrew D; Hess, Christoph

    2009-01-01

    T cells move randomly ("random-walk"), a characteristic thought to be integral to their function. Using migration assays and time-lapse microscopy, we found that CD8+ T cells lacking the lymph node homing receptors CCR7 and CD62L migrate more efficiently in transwell assays, and that these same cells are characterized by a high frequency of cells exhibiting random crawling activity under culture conditions mimicking the interstitial/extravascular milieu, but not when examined on endothelial cells. To assess the energy efficiency of cells crawling at a high frequency, we measured mRNA expression of genes key to mitochondrial energy metabolism (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1beta [PGC-1beta], estrogen-related receptor alpha [ERRalpha], cytochrome C, ATP synthase, and the uncoupling proteins [UCPs] UCP-2 and -3), quantified ATP contents, and performed calorimetric analyses. Together these assays indicated a high energy efficiency of the high crawling frequency CD8+ T-cell population, and identified differentially regulated heat production among nonlymphoid versus lymphoid homing CD8+ T cells.

  15. The Influence of Acute Physical Activity on Working Memory.

    PubMed

    Zach, Sima; Shalom, Eyal

    2016-04-01

    The effect of three types of physical activity on two types of working memory were investigated. Participants were 20 adult males who trained twice a week in volleyball two hours per session. Procedures included two pre and post intervention tests of working memory: the Digit span and Visual Memory Span subtests of the Wechsler Memory Scale-Revised. Interventions included tactical volleyball formation, body-weight resistance exercises, 15 minutes of running, and sub-maximal aerobic activity. Volleyball activity improved memory performance to a greater extent than the other two activities. Results indicate that immediately after acute exercise there is an increase in working memory function, more evident after physical activity in which cognitive functioning is inherent.

  16. IL-10 distinguishes a unique population of activated, effector-like CD8(+) T cells in murine acute liver inflammation.

    PubMed

    Rood, Julia E; Canna, Scott W; Weaver, Lehn K; Tobias, John W; Behrens, Edward M

    2017-04-01

    Immune-mediated liver injury is a central feature of hyperinflammatory diseases, such as hemophagocytic syndromes, yet the immunologic mechanisms underlying those processes are incompletely understood. In this study, we used the toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9)-mediated model of a hemophagocytic syndrome known as macrophage activation syndrome (MAS) to dissect the predominant immune cell populations infiltrating the liver during inflammation. We identified CD8(+) T cells that unexpectedly produce interleukin-10 (IL-10) in addition to interferon-γ (IFN-γ) as a major hepatic population induced by TLR9 stimulation. Despite their ability to produce this anti-inflammatory cytokine, IL-10(+) hepatic CD8(+) T cells in TLR9-MAS mice did not resemble CD8(+) T suppressor cells. Instead, the induction of these cells occurred independently of antigen stimulation and was partially dependent on IFN-γ. IL-10(+) hepatic CD8(+) T cells demonstrated an activated phenotype and high turnover rate, consistent with an effector-like identity. Transcriptional analysis of this population confirmed a gene signature of effector CD8(+) T cells yet suggested responsiveness to liver injury-associated growth factors. Together, these findings suggest that IL-10(+) CD8(+) T cells induced by systemic inflammation to infiltrate the liver have initiated an inflammatory, rather than regulatory, program and may thus have a pathogenic role in severe, acute hepatitis.

  17. In Planta Expression Screens of Phytophthora infestans RXLR Effectors Reveal Diverse Phenotypes, Including Activation of the Solanum bulbocastanum Disease Resistance Protein Rpi-blb2[W

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Sang-Keun; Young, Carolyn; Lee, Minkyoung; Oliva, Ricardo; Bozkurt, Tolga O.; Cano, Liliana M.; Win, Joe; Bos, Jorunn I.B.; Liu, Hsin-Yin; van Damme, Mireille; Morgan, William; Choi, Doil; Van der Vossen, Edwin A.G.; Vleeshouwers, Vivianne G.A.A.; Kamoun, Sophien

    2009-01-01

    The Irish potato famine pathogen Phytophthora infestans is predicted to secrete hundreds of effector proteins. To address the challenge of assigning biological functions to computationally predicted effector genes, we combined allele mining with high-throughput in planta expression. We developed a library of 62 infection-ready P. infestans RXLR effector clones, obtained using primer pairs corresponding to 32 genes and assigned activities to several of these genes. This approach revealed that 16 of the 62 examined effectors cause phenotypes when expressed inside plant cells. Besides the well-studied AVR3a effector, two additional effectors, PexRD8 and PexRD3645-1, suppressed the hypersensitive cell death triggered by the elicitin INF1, another secreted protein of P. infestans. One effector, PexRD2, promoted cell death in Nicotiana benthamiana and other solanaceous plants. Finally, two families of effectors induced hypersensitive cell death specifically in the presence of the Solanum bulbocastanum late blight resistance genes Rpi-blb1 and Rpi-blb2, thereby exhibiting the activities expected for Avrblb1 and Avrblb2. The AVRblb2 family was then studied in more detail and found to be highly variable and under diversifying selection in P. infestans. Structure-function experiments indicated that a 34–amino acid region in the C-terminal half of AVRblb2 is sufficient for triggering Rpi-blb2 hypersensitivity and that a single positively selected AVRblb2 residue is critical for recognition by Rpi-blb2. PMID:19794118

  18. False memory for face in short-term memory and neural activity in human amygdala.

    PubMed

    Iidaka, Tetsuya; Harada, Tokiko; Sadato, Norihiro

    2014-12-03

    Human memory is often inaccurate. Similar to words and figures, new faces are often recognized as seen or studied items in long- and short-term memory tests; however, the neural mechanisms underlying this false memory remain elusive. In a previous fMRI study using morphed faces and a standard false memory paradigm, we found that there was a U-shaped response curve of the amygdala to old, new, and lure items. This indicates that the amygdala is more active in response to items that are salient (hit and correct rejection) compared to items that are less salient (false alarm), in terms of memory retrieval. In the present fMRI study, we determined whether the false memory for faces occurs within the short-term memory range (a few seconds), and assessed which neural correlates are involved in veridical and illusory memories. Nineteen healthy participants were scanned by 3T MRI during a short-term memory task using morphed faces. The behavioral results indicated that the occurrence of false memories was within the short-term range. We found that the amygdala displayed a U-shaped response curve to memory items, similar to those observed in our previous study. These results suggest that the amygdala plays a common role in both long- and short-term false memory for faces. We made the following conclusions: First, the amygdala is involved in detecting the saliency of items, in addition to fear, and supports goal-oriented behavior by modulating memory. Second, amygdala activity and response time might be related with a subject's response criterion for similar faces.

  19. Site-specific gene targeting using transcription activator-like effector (TALE)-based nuclease in Brassica oleracea.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zijian; Li, Nianzu; Huang, Guodong; Xu, Junqiang; Pan, Yu; Wang, Zhimin; Tang, Qinglin; Song, Ming; Wang, Xiaojia

    2013-11-01

    Site-specific recognition modules with DNA nuclease have tremendous potential as molecular tools for genome targeting. The type III transcription activator-like effectors (TALEs) contain a DNA binding domain consisting of tandem repeats that can be engineered to bind user-defined specific DNA sequences. We demonstrated that customized TALE-based nucleases (TALENs), constructed using a method called "unit assembly", specifically target the endogenous FRIGIDA gene in Brassica oleracea L. var. capitata L. The results indicate that the TALENs bound to the target site and cleaved double-strand DNA in vitro and in vivo, whereas the effector binding elements have a 23 bp spacer. The T7 endonuclease I assay and sequencing data show that TALENs made double-strand breaks, which were repaired by a non-homologous end-joining pathway within the target sequence. These data show the feasibility of applying customized TALENs to target and modify the genome with deletions in those organisms that are still in lacking gene target methods to provide germplasms in breeding improvement.

  20. Functional Analysis of Plant Defense Suppression and Activation by the Xanthomonas Core Type III Effector XopX.

    PubMed

    Stork, William; Kim, Jung-Gun; Mudgett, Mary Beth

    2015-02-01

    Many phytopathogenic type III secretion effector proteins (T3Es) have been shown to target and suppress plant immune signaling but perturbation of the plant immune system by T3Es can also elicit a plant response. XopX is a "core" Xanthomonas T3E that contributes to growth and symptom development during Xanthomonas euvesicatoria infection of tomato but its functional role is undefined. We tested the effect of XopX on several aspects of plant immune signaling. XopX promoted ethylene production and plant cell death (PCD) during X. euvesicatoria infection of susceptible tomato and in transient expression assays in Nicotiana benthamiana, which is consistent with its requirement for the development of X. euvesicatoria-induced disease symptoms. Additionally, although XopX suppressed flagellin-induced reactive oxygen species, it promoted the accumulation of pattern-triggered immunity (PTI) gene transcripts. Surprisingly, XopX coexpression with other PCD elicitors resulted in delayed PCD, suggesting antagonism between XopX-dependent PCD and other PCD pathways. However, we found no evidence that XopX contributed to the suppression of effector-triggered immunity during X. euvesicatoria-tomato interactions, suggesting that XopX's primary virulence role is to modulate PTI. These results highlight the dual role of a core Xanthomonas T3E in simultaneously suppressing and activating plant defense responses.

  1. The type III effector EspF coordinates membrane trafficking by the spatiotemporal activation of two eukaryotic signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Alto, Neal M.; Weflen, Andrew W.; Rardin, Matthew J.; Yarar, Defne; Lazar, Cheri S.; Tonikian, Raffi; Koller, Antonius; Taylor, Susan S.; Boone, Charles; Sidhu, Sachdev S.; Schmid, Sandra L.; Hecht, Gail A.; Dixon, Jack E.

    2007-01-01

    Bacterial toxins and effector proteins hijack eukaryotic enzymes that are spatially localized and display rapid signaling kinetics. However, the molecular mechanisms by which virulence factors engage highly dynamic substrates in the host cell environment are poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that the enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) type III effector protein EspF nucleates a multiprotein signaling complex composed of eukaryotic sorting nexin 9 (SNX9) and neuronal Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (N-WASP). We demonstrate that a specific and high affinity association between EspF and SNX9 induces membrane remodeling in host cells. These membrane-remodeling events are directly coupled to N-WASP/Arp2/3–mediated actin nucleation. In addition to providing a biochemical mechanism of EspF function, we find that EspF dynamically localizes to membrane-trafficking organelles in a spatiotemporal pattern that correlates with SNX9 and N-WASP activity in living cells. Thus, our findings suggest that the EspF-dependent assembly of SNX9 and N-WASP represents a novel form of signaling mimicry used to promote EPEC pathogenesis and gastrointestinal disease. PMID:17893247

  2. Physical Activity Is Positively Associated with Episodic Memory in Aging

    PubMed Central

    Hayes, Scott M.; Alosco, Michael L.; Hayes, Jasmeet P.; Cadden, Margaret; Peterson, Kristina M.; Allsup, Kelly; Forman, Daniel E.; Sperling, Reisa A.; Verfaellie, Mieke

    2016-01-01

    Aging is associated with performance reductions in executive function and episodic memory, although there is substantial individual variability in cognition among older adults. One factor that may be positively associated with cognition in aging is physical activity. To date, few studies have objectively assessed physical activity in young and older adults, and examined whether physical activity is differentially associated with cognition in aging. Young (n = 29, age 18–31 years) and older adults (n = 31, ages 55–82 years) completed standardized neuropsychological testing to assess executive function and episodic memory capacities. An experimental face-name relational memory task was administered to augment assessment of episodic memory. Physical activity (total step count and step rate) was objectively assessed using an accelerometer, and hierarchical regressions were used to evaluate relationships between cognition and physical activity. Older adults performed more poorly on tasks of executive function and episodic memory. Physical activity was positively associated with a composite measure of visual episodic memory and face-name memory accuracy in older adults. Physical activity associations with cognition were independent of sedentary behavior, which was negatively correlated with memory performance. Physical activity was not associated with cognitive performance in younger adults. Physical activity is positively associated with episodic memory performance in aging. The relationship appears to be strongest for face-name relational memory and visual episodic memory, likely attributable to the fact that these tasks make strong demands on the hippocampus. The results suggest that physical activity relates to cognition in older, but not younger adults. PMID:26581790

  3. Diacylglycerol Kinases in T Cell Tolerance and Effector Function

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shelley S.; Hu, Zhiming; Zhong, Xiao-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Diacylglycerol kinases (DGKs) are a family of enzymes that regulate the relative levels of diacylglycerol (DAG) and phosphatidic acid (PA) in cells by phosphorylating DAG to produce PA. Both DAG and PA are important second messengers cascading T cell receptor (TCR) signal by recruiting multiple effector molecules, such as RasGRP1, PKCθ, and mTOR. Studies have revealed important physiological functions of DGKs in the regulation of receptor signaling and the development and activation of immune cells. In this review, we will focus on recent progresses in our understanding of two DGK isoforms, α and ζ, in CD8 T effector and memory cell differentiation, regulatory T cell development and function, and invariant NKT cell development and effector lineage differentiation. PMID:27891502

  4. Generation of GFP Reporter Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Using AAVS1 Safe Harbor Transcription Activator-Like Effector Nuclease.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yongquan; Rao, Mahendra; Zou, Jizhong

    2014-05-16

    Generation of a fluorescent GFP reporter line in human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) provides enormous potentials in both basic stem cell research and regenerative medicine. A protocol for efficiently generating such an engineered reporter line by gene targeting is highly desired. Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) are a new class of artificial restriction enzymes that have been shown to significantly promote homologous recombination by >1000-fold. The AAVS1 (adeno-associated virus integration site 1) locus is a "safe harbor" and has an open chromatin structure that allows insertion and stable expression of transgene. Here, we describe a step-by-step protocol from determination of TALENs activity, hiPSC culture, and delivery of a donor into AAVS1 targeting site, to validation of targeted integration by PCR and Southern blot analysis using hiPSC line, and a pair of open-source AAVS1 TALENs.

  5. Postsynaptic GABAB receptor activity regulates excitatory neuronal architecture and spatial memory.

    PubMed

    Terunuma, Miho; Revilla-Sanchez, Raquel; Quadros, Isabel M; Deng, Qiudong; Deeb, Tarek Z; Lumb, Michael; Sicinski, Piotr; Haydon, Philip G; Pangalos, Menelas N; Moss, Stephen J

    2014-01-15

    Cognitive dysfunction is a common symptom in many neuropsychiatric disorders and directly correlates with poor patient outcomes. The majority of prolonged inhibitory signaling in the brain is mediated via GABAB receptors (GABABRs), but the molecular function of these receptors in cognition is ill defined. To explore the significance of GABABRs in neuronal activity and cognition, we created mice with enhanced postsynaptic GABABR signaling by mutating the serine 783 in receptor R2 subunit (S783A), which decreased GABABR degradation. Enhanced GABABR activity reduced the expression of immediate-early gene-encoded protein Arc/Arg3.1, effectors that are critical for long-lasting memory. Intriguingly, S783A mice exhibited increased numbers of excitatory synapses and surface AMPA receptors, effects that are consistent with decreased Arc/Arg3.1 expression. These deficits in Arc/Arg3.1 and neuronal morphology lead to a deficit in spatial memory consolidation. Collectively our results suggest a novel and unappreciated role for GABABR activity in determining excitatory neuronal architecture and spatial memory via their ability to regulate Arc/Arg3.1.

  6. Postsynaptic GABAB Receptor Activity Regulates Excitatory Neuronal Architecture and Spatial Memory

    PubMed Central

    Revilla-Sanchez, Raquel; Quadros, Isabel M.; Deng, Qiudong; Deeb, Tarek Z.; Lumb, Michael; Sicinski, Piotr; Haydon, Philip G.; Pangalos, Menelas N.

    2014-01-01

    Cognitive dysfunction is a common symptom in many neuropsychiatric disorders and directly correlates with poor patient outcomes. The majority of prolonged inhibitory signaling in the brain is mediated via GABAB receptors (GABABRs), but the molecular function of these receptors in cognition is ill defined. To explore the significance of GABABRs in neuronal activity and cognition, we created mice with enhanced postsynaptic GABABR signaling by mutating the serine 783 in receptor R2 subunit (S783A), which decreased GABABR degradation. Enhanced GABABR activity reduced the expression of immediate-early gene-encoded protein Arc/Arg3.1, effectors that are critical for long-lasting memory. Intriguingly, S783A mice exhibited increased numbers of excitatory synapses and surface AMPA receptors, effects that are consistent with decreased Arc/Arg3.1 expression. These deficits in Arc/Arg3.1 and neuronal morphology lead to a deficit in spatial memory consolidation. Collectively our results suggest a novel and unappreciated role for GABABR activity in determining excitatory neuronal architecture and spatial memory via their ability to regulate Arc/Arg3.1. PMID:24431439

  7. Subthreshold IKK activation modulates the effector functions of primary mast cells and allows specific targeting of transformed mast cells.

    PubMed

    Drube, Sebastian; Weber, Franziska; Loschinski, Romy; Beyer, Mandy; Rothe, Mandy; Rabenhorst, Anja; Göpfert, Christiane; Meininger, Isabel; Diamanti, Michaela A; Stegner, David; Häfner, Norman; Böttcher, Martin; Reinecke, Kirstin; Herdegen, Thomas; Greten, Florian R; Nieswandt, Bernhard; Hartmann, Karin; Krämer, Oliver H; Kamradt, Thomas

    2015-03-10

    Mast cell differentiation and proliferation depends on IL-3. IL-3 induces the activation of MAP-kinases and STATs and consequently induces proliferation and survival. Dysregulation of IL-3 signaling pathways also contribute to inflammation and tumorigenesis. We show here that IL-3 induces a SFK- and Ca²⁺-dependent activation of the inhibitor of κB kinases 2 (IKK2) which results in mast cell proliferation and survival but does not induce IκBα-degradation and NFκB activation. Therefore we propose the term "subthreshold IKK activation".This subthreshold IKK activation also primes mast cells for enhanced responsiveness to IL-33R signaling. Consequently, co-stimulation with IL-3 and IL-33 increases IKK activation and massively enhances cytokine production induced by IL-33.We further reveal that in neoplastic mast cells expressing constitutively active Ras, subthreshold IKK activation is associated with uncontrolled proliferation. Consequently, pharmacological IKK inhibition reduces tumor growth selectively by inducing apoptosis in vivo.Together, subthreshold IKK activation is crucial to mediate the full IL-33-induced effector functions in primary mast cells and to mediate uncontrolled proliferation of neoplastic mast cells. Thus, IKK2 is a new molecularly defined target structure.

  8. Developmental Differences in Prefrontal Activation during Working Memory Maintenance and Manipulation for Different Memory Loads

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jolles, Dietsje D.; Kleibeuker, Sietske W.; Rombouts, Serge A. R. B.; Crone, Eveline A.

    2011-01-01

    The ability to keep information active in working memory is one of the cornerstones of cognitive development. Prior studies have demonstrated that regions which are important for working memory performance in adults, such as dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (VLPFC), and superior parietal cortex, become…

  9. Neural activity, memory, and dementias: serotonergic markers.

    PubMed

    Meneses, Alfredo

    2017-04-01

    Dysfunctional memory seems to be a key component of diverse dementias and other neuropsychiatric disorders; unfortunately, no effective treatment exists for this, probably because of the absence of neural biomarkers accompanying it. Diverse neurotransmission systems have been implicated in memory, including serotonin or 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT). There are multiple serotonergic pharmacological tools, well-characterized downstream signaling in mammals' species and neural markers providing new insights into memory functions and dysfunctions. Serotonin in mammal species has multiple neural markers, including receptors (5-HT1-7), serotonin transporter, and volume transmission, which are present in brain areas involved in memory. Memory, amnesia, and forgetting modify serotonergic markers; this influence is bidirectional. Evidence shows insights and therapeutic targets and diverse approaches support the translatability of using neural markers and cerebral functions and dysfunctions, including memory formation and amnesia. For instance, 5-HT2A/2B/2C, 5-HT4, and 5-HT6 receptors are involved in tau protein hyperphosphorylation in Alzheimer's disease. In addition, at least, 5-HT1A, 5-HT4, 5-HT6, and 5-HT7 receptors as well as serotonin transporter seem to be useful neural markers and therapeutic targets. Hence, available evidence supports the notion that several mechanisms cooperate to achieve synaptic plasticity or memory, including changes in the number of neurotransmitter receptors and transporters. Considering that memory is a key component of dementias, hence reversing or reducing memory deficits might positively affect them?

  10. Strong and sustained effector function of memory- versus naïve-derived T cells upon T-cell receptor RNA transfer: implications for cellular therapy.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Simone; Klobuch, Sebastian; Besold, Katrin; Plachter, Bodo; Dörrie, Jan; Schaft, Niels; Theobald, Matthias; Herr, Wolfgang

    2012-12-01

    Current protocols used to select CMV-specific T cells for adoptive immunotherapy focus on virus-specific memory T cells from seropositive donors. However, this strategy is not feasible in patients undergoing allogeneic haematopoietic stem-cell transplantation (HSCT) from CMV-seronegative donors. Here, we redirected T cells of CMV-seronegative donors with a human genetically engineered TCR recognizing an HLA-A*0201-binding peptide epitope of CMVpp65. To facilitate clinical translation of this approach, we used a non-viral expression system based on in vitro transcribed RNA and electroporation. Although memory and naïve-derived T-cell subsets were both efficiently transfected by TCR-RNA, memory-derived T cells showed much stronger levels of HLA-A*0201-restricted cytolytic activity to CMV-infected fibroblasts and maintained acquired function for 5-10 days. In addition to redirection of CD8(+) cytotoxic T cells, TCR-RNA transfection was capable of redirecting CD4(+) T cells into potent Ag-specific Th cells that efficiently triggered maturation of DCs. Our data suggest that memory rather than naïve-derived T cells are the preferred subset for transient TCR expression by RNA electroporation, providing more efficient and sustained virus-specific CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cell function. CMV TCR-RNA may represent a suitable therapeutic 'off-the-shelf' reagent to be used in severe CMV infections of HSCT patients when endogenous CMV-specific T-cell immunity is insufficient.

  11. Subthreshold IKK activation modulates the effector functions of primary mast cells and allows specific targeting of transformed mast cells

    PubMed Central

    Drube, Sebastian; Beyer, Mandy; Rothe, Mandy; Rabenhorst, Anja; Göpfert, Christiane; Meininger, Isabel; Diamanti, Michaela A.; Stegner, David; Häfner, Norman; Böttcher, Martin; Reinecke, Kirstin; Herdegen, Thomas; Greten, Florian R.; Nieswandt, Bernhard; Hartmann, Karin; Krämer, Oliver H.; Kamradt, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Mast cell differentiation and proliferation depends on IL-3. IL-3 induces the activation of MAP-kinases and STATs and consequently induces proliferation and survival. Dysregulation of IL-3 signaling pathways also contribute to inflammation and tumorigenesis. We show here that IL-3 induces a SFK- and Ca2+-dependent activation of the inhibitor of κB kinases 2 (IKK2) which results in mast cell proliferation and survival but does not induce IκBα-degradation and NFκB activation. Therefore we propose the term “subthreshold IKK activation”. This subthreshold IKK activation also primes mast cells for enhanced responsiveness to IL-33R signaling. Consequently, co-stimulation with IL-3 and IL-33 increases IKK activation and massively enhances cytokine production induced by IL-33. We further reveal that in neoplastic mast cells expressing constitutively active Ras, subthreshold IKK activation is associated with uncontrolled proliferation. Consequently, pharmacological IKK inhibition reduces tumor growth selectively by inducing apoptosis in vivo. Together, subthreshold IKK activation is crucial to mediate the full IL-33-induced effector functions in primary mast cells and to mediate uncontrolled proliferation of neoplastic mast cells. Thus, IKK2 is a new molecularly defined target structure. PMID:25749030

  12. Regulation of NK Cell Activation and Effector Functions by the IL-12 Family of Cytokines: The Case of IL-27.

    PubMed

    Zwirner, Norberto Walter; Ziblat, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are characterized by their ability to detect and induce apoptosis of susceptible target cells and by secretion of immunoregulatory cytokines such as IFN-γ. Activation of these effector functions is triggered upon recognition of tumor and pathogen (mostly virus)-infected cells and because of a bidirectional cross talk that NK cells establish with other cells of myeloid origin such as dendritic cells (DC) and macrophages. A common characteristic of these myeloid cells is their ability to secrete different members of the IL-12 family of cytokines such as IL-12, IL-23, and IL-27 and cytokines such as IL-15 and IL-18. Although the effect of IL-12, IL-15, and IL-18 has been characterized, the effect of IL-23 and IL-27 on NK cells (especially human) remains ill-defined. Particularly, IL-27 is a cytokine with dual functions as it has been described as pro- and as anti-inflammatory in different experimental settings. Recent evidence indicates that this cytokine indeed promotes human NK cell activation, IFN-γ secretion, NKp46-dependent NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity, and antibody (Ab)-dependent NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) against monoclonal Ab-coated tumor cells. Remarkably, IL-27 also primes NK cells for IL-18 responsiveness, enhancing these functional responses. Consequently, IL-27 acts as a pro-inflammatory cytokine that, in concert with other DC-derived cytokines, hierarchically contributes to NK cells activation and effector functions, which likely contributes to foster the adaptive immune response in different physiopathological conditions.

  13. Regulation of NK Cell Activation and Effector Functions by the IL-12 Family of Cytokines: The Case of IL-27

    PubMed Central

    Zwirner, Norberto Walter; Ziblat, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are characterized by their ability to detect and induce apoptosis of susceptible target cells and by secretion of immunoregulatory cytokines such as IFN-γ. Activation of these effector functions is triggered upon recognition of tumor and pathogen (mostly virus)-infected cells and because of a bidirectional cross talk that NK cells establish with other cells of myeloid origin such as dendritic cells (DC) and macrophages. A common characteristic of these myeloid cells is their ability to secrete different members of the IL-12 family of cytokines such as IL-12, IL-23, and IL-27 and cytokines such as IL-15 and IL-18. Although the effect of IL-12, IL-15, and IL-18 has been characterized, the effect of IL-23 and IL-27 on NK cells (especially human) remains ill-defined. Particularly, IL-27 is a cytokine with dual functions as it has been described as pro- and as anti-inflammatory in different experimental settings. Recent evidence indicates that this cytokine indeed promotes human NK cell activation, IFN-γ secretion, NKp46-dependent NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity, and antibody (Ab)-dependent NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) against monoclonal Ab-coated tumor cells. Remarkably, IL-27 also primes NK cells for IL-18 responsiveness, enhancing these functional responses. Consequently, IL-27 acts as a pro-inflammatory cytokine that, in concert with other DC-derived cytokines, hierarchically contributes to NK cells activation and effector functions, which likely contributes to foster the adaptive immune response in different physiopathological conditions. PMID:28154569

  14. Active non-volatile memory post-processing

    DOEpatents

    Kannan, Sudarsun; Milojicic, Dejan S.; Talwar, Vanish

    2017-04-11

    A computing node includes an active Non-Volatile Random Access Memory (NVRAM) component which includes memory and a sub-processor component. The memory is to store data chunks received from a processor core, the data chunks comprising metadata indicating a type of post-processing to be performed on data within the data chunks. The sub-processor component is to perform post-processing of said data chunks based on said metadata.

  15. Role of Hcp, a type 6 secretion system effector, of Aeromonas hydrophila in modulating activation of host immune cells.

    PubMed

    Suarez, Giovanni; Sierra, Johanna C; Kirtley, Michelle L; Chopra, Ashok K

    2010-12-01

    Recently, we reported that the type 6 secretion system (T6SS) of Aeromonas hydrophila SSU plays an important role in bacterial virulence in a mouse model, and immunization of animals with the T6SS effector haemolysin co-regulated protein (Hcp) protected them against lethal infections with wild-type bacteria. Additionally, we showed that the mutant bacteria deleted for the vasH gene within the T6SS gene cluster did not express the hcp gene, while the vasK mutant could express and translocate Hcp, but was unable to secrete it into the extracellular milieu. Both of these A. hydrophila SSU mutants were readily phagocytosed by murine macrophages, pointing to the possible role of the secreted form of Hcp in the evasion of the host innate immunity. By using the ΔvasH mutant of A. hydrophila, our in vitro data showed that the addition of exogenous recombinant Hcp (rHcp) reduced bacterial uptake by macrophages. These results were substantiated by increased bacterial virulence when rHcp was added along with the ΔvasH mutant in a septicaemic mouse model of infection. Analysis of the cytokine profiling in the intraperitoneal lavage as well as activation of host cells after 4 h of infection with the ΔvasH mutant supplemented with rHcp indicated that this T6SS effector inhibited production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and induced immunosuppressive cytokines, such as interleukin-10 and transforming growth factor-β, which could circumvent macrophage activation and maturation. This mechanism of innate immune evasion by Hcp possibly inhibited the recruitment of cellular immune components, which allowed bacterial multiplication and dissemination in animals, thereby leading to their mortality.

  16. T Cell Receptor Activation of NF-κB in Effector T Cells: Visualizing Signaling Events Within and Beyond the Cytoplasmic Domain of the Immunological Synapse.

    PubMed

    Traver, Maria K; Paul, Suman; Schaefer, Brian C

    2017-01-01

    The T cell receptor (TCR) to NF-κB signaling pathway plays a critical role in regulation of proliferation and effector T cell differentiation and function. In naïve T cells, data suggest that most or all key cytoplasmic NF-κB signaling occurs in a TCR-proximal manner at the immunological synapse (IS). However, the subcellular organization of cytoplasmic NF-κB-activating complexes in effector T cells is more complex, involving signaling molecules and regulatory mechanisms beyond those operative in naïve cells. Additionally, in effector T cells, much signaling occurs at cytoplasmic locations distant from the IS. Visualization of these cytoplasmic signaling complexes has provided key insights into the complex and dynamic regulation of NF-κB signal transduction in effector T cells. In this chapter, we provide in-depth protocols for activating and preparing effector T cells for fluorescence imaging, as well as a discussion of the effective application of distinct imaging methodologies, including confocal and super-resolution microscopy and imaging flow cytometry.

  17. Molecular and Cellular Mechanisms for Trapping and Activating Emotional Memories

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Denise J.; Sano, Yoshitake; Lee, Yong-Seok; Zhou, Yu; Bekal, Pallavi; Deisseroth, Karl; Silva, Alcino J.

    2016-01-01

    Recent findings suggest that memory allocation to specific neurons (i.e., neuronal allocation) in the amygdala is not random, but rather the transcription factor cAMP-response element binding protein (CREB) modulates this process, perhaps by regulating the transcription of channels that control neuronal excitability. Here, optogenetic studies in the mouse lateral amygdala (LA) were used to demonstrate that CREB and neuronal excitability regulate which neurons encode an emotional memory. To test the role of CREB in memory allocation, we overexpressed CREB in the lateral amygdala to recruit the encoding of an auditory-fear conditioning (AFC) memory to a subset of neurons. Then, post-training activation of these neurons with Channelrhodopsin-2 was sufficient to trigger recall of the memory for AFC, suggesting that CREB regulates memory allocation. To test the role of neuronal excitability in memory allocation, we used a step function opsin (SFO) to transiently increase neuronal excitability in a subset of LA neurons during AFC. Post-training activation of these neurons with Volvox Channelrhodopsin-1 was able to trigger recall of that memory. Importantly, our studies show that activation of the SFO did not affect AFC by either increasing anxiety or by strengthening the unconditioned stimulus. Our findings strongly support the hypothesis that CREB regulates memory allocation by modulating neuronal excitability. PMID:27579481

  18. Role of Prefrontal Persistent Activity in Working Memory

    PubMed Central

    Riley, Mitchell R.; Constantinidis, Christos

    2016-01-01

    The prefrontal cortex is activated during working memory, as evidenced by fMRI results in human studies and neurophysiological recordings in animal models. Persistent activity during the delay period of working memory tasks, after the offset of stimuli that subjects are required to remember, has traditionally been thought of as the neural correlate of working memory. In the last few years several findings have cast doubt on the role of this activity. By some accounts, activity in other brain areas, such as the primary visual and posterior parietal cortex, is a better predictor of information maintained in visual working memory and working memory performance; dynamic patterns of activity may convey information without requiring persistent activity at all; and prefrontal neurons may be ill-suited to represent non-spatial information about the features and identity of remembered stimuli. Alternative interpretations about the role of the prefrontal cortex have thus been suggested, such as that it provides a top-down control of information represented in other brain areas, rather than maintaining a working memory trace itself. Here we review evidence for and against the role of prefrontal persistent activity, with a focus on visual neurophysiology. We show that persistent activity predicts behavioral parameters precisely in working memory tasks. We illustrate that prefrontal cortex represents features of stimuli other than their spatial location, and that this information is largely absent from early cortical areas during working memory. We examine memory models not dependent on persistent activity, and conclude that each of those models could mediate only a limited range of memory-dependent behaviors. We review activity decoded from brain areas other than the prefrontal cortex during working memory and demonstrate that these areas alone cannot mediate working memory maintenance, particularly in the presence of distractors. We finally discuss the discrepancy between

  19. The Drosophila PRR GNBP3 assembles effector complexes involved in antifungal defenses independently of its Toll pathway activation function

    PubMed Central

    Matskevich, Alexey A.; Quintin, Jessica; Ferrandon, Dominique

    2010-01-01

    Summary The Drosophila Toll signalling pathway controls the systemic antifungal host response. Gram-negative binding protein 3 (GNBP3), a member of the β-Glucan recognition protein (βGRP) family, senses fungal infections and activates this pathway. A second detection system perceives the activity of proteolytic fungal virulence factors and redundantly activates Toll. GNBP3hades mutant flies succumb more rapidly to Candida albicans and to entomopathogenic fungal infections than wild type (WT) flies, despite normal triggering of the Toll pathway via the virulence detection system. These observations suggest that GNBP3 triggers antifungal defenses that are not dependent on activation of the Toll pathway. Here, we show that GNBP3 agglutinates fungal cells. Furthermore, it can activate melanization in a Toll-independent manner. Melanization is likely to be an essential defense against some fungal infections since the entomopathogenic fungus B. bassiana inhibits the activity of the main melanization enzymes, the phenol oxidases. Finally, we show that GNBP3 assembles “attack complexes”, which comprise PO and the serpin NEC. We propose that Drosophila GNBP3 targets fungi immediately at the inception of the infection by bringing effector molecules in direct contact with the invading microorganisms. PMID:20201042

  20. The Drosophila PRR GNBP3 assembles effector complexes involved in antifungal defenses independently of its Toll-pathway activation function.

    PubMed

    Matskevich, Alexey A; Quintin, Jessica; Ferrandon, Dominique

    2010-05-01

    The Drosophila Toll-signaling pathway controls the systemic antifungal host response. Gram-negative binding protein 3 (GNBP3), a member of the beta-glucan recognition protein family senses fungal infections and activates this pathway. A second detection system perceives the activity of proteolytic fungal virulence factors and redundantly activates Toll. GNBP3(hades) mutant flies succumb more rapidly to Candida albicans and to entomopathogenic fungal infections than WT flies, despite normal triggering of the Toll pathway via the virulence detection system. These observations suggest that GNBP3 triggers antifungal defenses that are not dependent on activation of the Toll pathway. Here, we show that GNBP3 agglutinates fungal cells. Furthermore, it can activate melanization in a Toll-independent manner. Melanization is likely to be an essential defense against some fungal infections given that the entomopathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana inhibits the activity of the main melanization enzymes, the phenol oxidases. Finally, we show that GNBP3 assembles "attack complexes", which comprise phenoloxidase and the necrotic serpin. We propose that Drosophila GNBP3 targets fungi immediately at the inception of the infection by bringing effector molecules in direct contact with the invading microorganisms.

  1. Suppressive activity of the chloroform extract of Tripterygium wilfordii Hook f on effector T cell activation during Hymenolepis nana infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Asano, K; Matsuishi, J; Yu, Y; Nemoto, K; Nakazawa, M; Kasahara, T; Hisamitsu, T

    1998-01-01

    The chloroform extract of Tripterygium wilfordii Hook f (TWH extract) administered into mice daily at doses of 80.0 to 200.0 micrograms/kg (but not 40.0 micrograms/kg) caused suppression of protective immunity to Hymenolepis nana when the extract was injected subcutaneously during the induction phase of protective immunity. Daily administration of 200.0 micrograms/kg TWH extract, during the course of larval development from challenge, also suppressed protective immunity. Inhibition of protective immunity was only observed in mice that received TWH extract for 6 days at a daily dose of 200.0 micrograms/kg and were challenged 24 h after the final injection. TWH extract did not inhibit formation of effector cells that mediate delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH) to H. nana egg antigen when the extract was administered subcutaneously at a dose of 200.0 micrograms/kg/day for 5 days before cell preparation. However, TWH extract did inhibit DTH effector cell activation when cells prepared from infected, PBS-injected mice were transferred into 200.0 micrograms/kg TWH extract-treated recipient mice. These results strongly indicate that TWH extract cannot inhibit the generation of effector cells but will suppress their function in vivo.

  2. Actin activates Pseudomonas aeruginosa ExoY nucleotidyl cyclase toxin and ExoY-like effector domains from MARTX toxins

    PubMed Central

    Belyy, Alexander; Raoux-Barbot, Dorothée; Saveanu, Cosmin; Namane, Abdelkader; Ogryzko, Vasily; Worpenberg, Lina; David, Violaine; Henriot, Veronique; Fellous, Souad; Merrifield, Christien; Assayag, Elodie; Ladant, Daniel; Renault, Louis; Mechold, Undine

    2016-01-01

    The nucleotidyl cyclase toxin ExoY is one of the virulence factors injected by the Pseudomonas aeruginosa type III secretion system into host cells. Inside cells, it is activated by an unknown eukaryotic cofactor to synthesize various cyclic nucleotide monophosphates. ExoY-like adenylate cyclases are also found in Multifunctional-Autoprocessing Repeats-in-ToXin (MARTX) toxins produced by various Gram-negative pathogens. Here we demonstrate that filamentous actin (F-actin) is the hitherto unknown cofactor of ExoY. Association with F-actin stimulates ExoY activity more than 10,000 fold in vitro and results in stabilization of actin filaments. ExoY is recruited to actin filaments in transfected cells and alters F-actin turnover. Actin also activates an ExoY-like adenylate cyclase MARTX effector domain from Vibrio nigripulchritudo. Finally, using a yeast genetic screen, we identify actin mutants that no longer activate ExoY. Our results thus reveal a new sub-group within the class II adenylyl cyclase family, namely actin-activated nucleotidyl cyclase (AA-NC) toxins. PMID:27917880

  3. Neural activity reveals perceptual grouping in working memory.

    PubMed

    Rabbitt, Laura R; Roberts, Daniel M; McDonald, Craig G; Peterson, Matthew S

    2017-03-01

    There is extensive evidence that the contralateral delay activity (CDA), a scalp recorded event-related brain potential, provides a reliable index of the number of objects held in visual working memory. Here we present evidence that the CDA not only indexes visual object working memory, but also the number of locations held in spatial working memory. In addition, we demonstrate that the CDA can be predictably modulated by the type of encoding strategy employed. When individual locations were held in working memory, the pattern of CDA modulation mimicked previous findings for visual object working memory. Specifically, CDA amplitude increased monotonically until working memory capacity was reached. However, when participants were instructed to group individual locations to form a constellation, the CDA was prolonged and reached an asymptote at two locations. This result provides neural evidence for the formation of a unitary representation of multiple spatial locations.

  4. Activation of Imaginal Information on True and False Memories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Sau Hou; Pierce, Benton H.

    2009-01-01

    The present study examined the activation of imaginal information on true and false memories. Participants studied a series of concrete objects in pictures or words. The imagery group (n = 96) was instructed to form images and the control group (n = 96) was not instructed to do so. Both groups were then given a standard recognition memory test and…

  5. Effect of memory impairment on training outcomes in ACTIVE

    PubMed Central

    UNVERZAGT, FREDERICK W.; KASTEN, LINDA; JOHNSON, KATHY E.; REBOK, GEORGE W.; MARSISKE, MICHAEL; KOEPKE, KATHY MANN; ELIAS, JEFFREY W.; MORRIS, JOHN N.; WILLIS, SHERRY L.; BALL, KARLENE; REXROTH, DANIEL F.; SMITH, DAVID M.; WOLINSKY, FREDRIC D.; TENNSTEDT, SHARON L.

    2009-01-01

    Cognitive training improves mental abilities in older adults, but the trainability of persons with memory impairment is unclear. We conducted a subgroup analysis of subjects in the Advanced Cognitive Training for Independent and Vital Elderly (ACTIVE) trial to examine this issue. ACTIVE enrolled 2802 non-demented, community-dwelling adults aged 65 years and older and randomly assigned them to one of four groups: Memory training, reasoning training, speed-of-processing training, or no-contact control. For this study, participants were defined as memory-impaired if baseline Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test (AVLT) sum recall score was 1.5 SD or more below predicted AVLT sum recall score from a regression-derived formula using age, education, ethnicity, and vocabulary from all subjects at baseline. Assessments were taken at baseline (BL), post-test, first annual (A1), and second annual (A2) follow-up. One hundred and ninety-three subjects were defined as memory-impaired and 2580 were memory-normal. Training gain as a function memory status (impaired vs. normal) was compared in a mixed effects model. Results indicated that memory-impaired participants failed to benefit from Memory training but did show normal training gains after reasoning and speed training. Memory function appears to mediate response to structured cognitive interventions in older adults. PMID:17942013

  6. The Activated Type 1–Polarized Cd8+ T Cell Population Isolated from an Effector Site Contains Cells with Flexible Cytokine Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Doyle, Anthony G.; Buttigieg, Kathy; Groves, Penny; Johnson, Barbara J.; Kelso, Anne

    1999-01-01

    The capacity of activated T cells to alter their cytokine expression profiles after migration into an effector site has not previously been defined. We addressed this issue by paired daughter analysis of a type 1–polarized CD8+ effector T cell population freshly isolated from lung parenchyma of influenza virus–infected mice. Single T cells were activated to divide in vitro; individual daughter cells were then micromanipulated into secondary cultures with and without added IL-4 to assess their potential to express type 2 cytokine genes. The resultant subclones were analyzed for type 1 and 2 cytokine mRNAs at day 6–7. When the most activated (CD44highCD11ahigh) CD8+ subpopulation from infected lung was compared with naive or resting (CD44lowCD11alow) CD8+ cells from infected lung and from normal lymph nodes (LNs), both clonogenicity and plasticity of the cytokine response were highest in the LN population and lowest in the activated lung population, correlating inversely with effector function. Multipotential cells were nevertheless detected among clonogenic CD44highCD11ahigh lung cells at 30–50% of the frequency in normal LNs. The data indicate that activated CD8+ T cells can retain the ability to proliferate and express new cytokine genes in response to local stimuli after recruitment to an effector site. PMID:10523606

  7. The TORC1 effector kinase Npr1 fine tunes the inherent activity of the Mep2 ammonium transport protein.

    PubMed

    Boeckstaens, Mélanie; Llinares, Elisa; Van Vooren, Pascale; Marini, Anna Maria

    2014-01-01

    The TORC1 complex controls cell growth upon integrating nutritional signals including amino-acid availability. TORC1 notably adapts the plasma membrane protein content by regulating arrestin-mediated endocytosis of amino-acid transporters. Here we demonstrate that TORC1 further fine tunes the inherent activity of the ammonium transport protein, Mep2, a yeast homologue of mammalian Rhesus factors, independently of arrestin-mediated endocytosis. The TORC1 effector kinase Npr1 and the upstream TORC1 regulator Npr2 control Mep2 transport activity by phospho-silencing a carboxy-terminal autoinhibitory domain. Under poor nitrogen supply, Npr1 enables Mep2 S457 phosphorylation and thus ammonium transport activity. Supplementation of the preferred nitrogen source glutamine leads to Mep2 inactivation and instant S457 dephosphorylation via plasma membrane Psr1 and Psr2 redundant phosphatases. This study underscores that TORC1 also adjusts nutrient permeability to regulate cell growth in a fast and flexible response to environmental perturbation, establishing a hierarchy in the transporters to be degraded, inactivated or maintained active at the plasma membrane.

  8. Modeling active memory: Experiment, theory and simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amit, Daniel J.

    2001-06-01

    Neuro-physiological experiments on cognitively performing primates are described to argue that strong evidence exists for localized, non-ergodic (stimulus specific) attractor dynamics in the cortex. The specific phenomena are delay activity distributions-enhanced spike-rate distributions resulting from training, which we associate with working memory. The anatomy of the relevant cortex region and the physiological characteristics of the participating elements (neural cells) are reviewed to provide a substrate for modeling the observed phenomena. Modeling is based on the properties of the integrate-and-fire neural element in presence of an input current of Gaussian distribution. Theory of stochastic processes provides an expression for the spike emission rate as a function of the mean and the variance of the current distribution. Mean-field theory is then based on the assumption that spike emission processes in different neurons in the network are independent, and hence the input current to a neuron is Gaussian. Consequently, the dynamics of the interacting network is reduced to the computation of the mean and the variance of the current received by a cell of a given population in terms of the constitutive parameters of the network and the emission rates of the neurons in the different populations. Within this logic we analyze the stationary states of an unstructured network, corresponding to spontaneous activity, and show that it can be stable only if locally the net input current of a neuron is inhibitory. This is then tested against simulations and it is found that agreement is excellent down to great detail. A confirmation of the independence hypothesis. On top of stable spontaneous activity, keeping all parameters fixed, training is described by (Hebbian) modification of synapses between neurons responsive to a stimulus and other neurons in the module-synapses are potentiated between two excited neurons and depressed between an excited and a quiescent neuron

  9. Effector Mechanisms of Rejection

    PubMed Central

    Moreau, Aurélie; Varey, Emilie; Anegon, Ignacio; Cuturi, Maria-Cristina

    2013-01-01

    Organ transplantation appears today to be the best alternative to replace the loss of vital organs induced by various diseases. Transplants can, however, also be rejected by the recipient. In this review, we provide an overview of the mechanisms and the cells/molecules involved in acute and chronic rejections. T cells and B cells mainly control the antigen-specific rejection and act either as effector, regulatory, or memory cells. On the other hand, nonspecific cells such as endothelial cells, NK cells, macrophages, or polymorphonuclear cells are also crucial actors of transplant rejection. Last, beyond cells, the high contribution of antibodies, chemokines, and complement molecules in graft rejection is discussed in this article. The understanding of the different components involved in graft rejection is essential as some of them are used in the clinic as biomarkers to detect and quantify the level of rejection. PMID:24186491

  10. Understanding children's activity memory: the role of outcomes.

    PubMed

    Ratner, H H; Foley, M A; McCaskill, P

    2001-06-01

    In three experiments the effectiveness of activity outcomes as memory cues was investigated. In the first experiment, 5-year-olds participated in four activities. In two of these activities, action results were maintained during the unfolding of the activity and perceptually preserved in the activity's end product. In the other two activities, action results "disappeared" from view during the activity and were transformed within the end product. Each activity was recalled under one of four cue conditions: verbal, object, action, and reenactment. For half of the children, the end product was also present during retrieval. Memory for the two types of activities varied with cue condition and with the presence of the end product. In a second experiment, children attempted to describe how the end products could be recreated from the materials used in the activities without participating in them. Patterns of performance confirmed that memory and not inference was responsible for the effects observed in the first experiment. In a third experiment, 5- and 7-year-olds participated in activities of the two types. Within each, picture supports were provided to investigate whether the perceptual availability of action results during encoding influences memory. Results are discussed with respect to an activity memory framework and implications for science education.

  11. Active Flutter Suppression Using Cooperative, High Frequency, Dynamic-Resonant Aero-Effectors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-12-13

    Final 06/15/03-09/14/06 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Sa . CONTRACT NUMBER Active Flutter Suppression Using Cooperative, High Frequency, Dynamic Resonant Aero...maneuvering performance. Conventional active vibration control and flutter suppression systems are servo -hydraulic. Conventional servo -hydraulic...technology is burdened by a set of undesirable characteristics that effectively restrict their use to large aircraft. The servo -hydraulic based systems have

  12. Intracellular complement activation sustains T cell homeostasis and mediates effector differentiation.

    PubMed

    Liszewski, M Kathryn; Kolev, Martin; Le Friec, Gaelle; Leung, Marilyn; Bertram, Paula G; Fara, Antonella F; Subias, Marta; Pickering, Matthew C; Drouet, Christian; Meri, Seppo; Arstila, T Petteri; Pekkarinen, Pirkka T; Ma, Margaret; Cope, Andrew; Reinheckel, Thomas; Rodriguez de Cordoba, Santiago; Afzali, Behdad; Atkinson, John P; Kemper, Claudia

    2013-12-12

    Complement is viewed as a critical serum-operative component of innate immunity, with processing of its key component, C3, into activation fragments C3a and C3b confined to the extracellular space. We report here that C3 activation also occurred intracellularly. We found that the T cell-expressed protease cathepsin L (CTSL) processed C3 into biologically active C3a and C3b. Resting T cells contained stores of endosomal and lysosomal C3 and CTSL and substantial amounts of CTSL-generated C3a. While "tonic" intracellular C3a generation was required for homeostatic T cell survival, shuttling of this intracellular C3-activation-system to the cell surface upon T cell stimulation induced autocrine proinflammatory cytokine production. Furthermore, T cells from patients with autoimmune arthritis demonstrated hyperactive intracellular complement activation and interferon-γ production and CTSL inhibition corrected this deregulated phenotype. Importantly, intracellular C3a was observed in all examined cell populations, suggesting that intracellular complement activation might be of broad physiological significance.

  13. Simultaneous gene editing by injection of mRNAs encoding transcription activator-like effector nucleases into mouse zygotes.

    PubMed

    Li, Chunliang; Qi, Rong; Singleterry, Rebecca; Hyle, Judith; Balch, Amanda; Li, Xiuling; Sublett, Jack; Berns, Hartmut; Valentine, Marcus; Valentine, Virginia; Sherr, Charles J

    2014-05-01

    Injection of transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALEN) mRNAs into mouse zygotes transferred into foster mothers efficiently generated founder mice with heritable mutations in targeted genes. Immunofluorescence visualization of phosphorylated histone 2A (γH2AX) combined with fluorescence in situ hybridization revealed that TALEN pairs targeting the Agouti locus induced site-directed DNA breaks in zygotes within 6 h of injection, an activity that continued at reduced efficiency in two-cell embryos. TALEN-Agouti mRNAs injected into zygotes of brown FvB × C57BL/6 hybrid mice generated completely black pups, confirming that mutations were induced prior to, and/or early after, cell division. Founder mice, many of which were mosaic, transmitted altered Agouti alleles to F1 pups to yield an allelic series of mutant strains. Although mutations were targeted to "spacer" sequences flanked by TALEN binding sites, larger deletions that extended beyond the TALEN-binding sequences were also detected and were similarly inherited through the germ line. Zygotic coinjection of TALEN mRNAs directed to the Agouti, miR-205, and the Arf tumor suppressor loci yielded pups containing frequent and heritable mutations of two or three genes. Simultaneous gene editing in zygotes affords an efficient approach for producing mice with compound mutant phenotypes, bypassing constraints of conventional mouse knockout technology in embryonic stem cells.

  14. Design, evaluation, and screening methods for efficient targeted mutagenesis with transcription activator-like effector nucleases in medaka.

    PubMed

    Ansai, Satoshi; Inohaya, Keiji; Yoshiura, Yasutoshi; Schartl, Manfred; Uemura, Norihito; Takahashi, Ryosuke; Kinoshita, Masato

    2014-01-01

    Genome editing using engineered nucleases such as transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) has become a powerful technology for reverse genetics. In this study, we have described efficient detection methods for TALEN-induced mutations at endogenous loci and presented guidelines of TALEN design for efficient targeted mutagenesis in medaka, Oryzias latipes. We performed a heteroduplex mobility assay (HMA) using an automated microchip electrophoresis system, which is a simple and high-throughput method for evaluation of in vivo activity of TALENs and for genotyping mutant fish of F1 or later generations. We found that a specific pattern of mutations is dominant for TALENs harboring several base pairs of homologous sequences in target sequence. Furthermore, we found that a 5' T, upstream of each TALEN-binding sequence, is not essential for genomic DNA cleavage. Our findings provide information that expands the potential of TALENs and other engineered nucleases as tools for targeted genome editing in a wide range of organisms, including medaka.

  15. DNA Methylation Affects the Efficiency of Transcription Activator-Like Effector Nucleases-Mediated Genome Editing in Rice

    PubMed Central

    Kaya, Hidetaka; Numa, Hisataka; Nishizawa-Yokoi, Ayako; Toki, Seiichi; Habu, Yoshiki

    2017-01-01

    Genome editing in plants becomes popular since the advent of sequence-specific nucleases (SSNs) that are simple to set up and efficient in various plant species. Although transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) are one of the most prevalent SSNs and have a potential to provide higher target specificity by their dimeric property, TALENs are sensitive to methylated cytosines that are present not only in transposons but also in active genes in plants. In mammalian cells, the methylation sensitivity of TALENs could be overcome by using a base-recognition module (N∗) that has a higher affinity to methylated cytosine. In contrast to mammals, plants carry DNA methylation at all cytosine contexts (CG, CHG, and CHH, where H represents A, C, or T) with various degrees and effectiveness of N∗ module in genome editing in plants has not been explored. In this study, we designed sets of TALENs with or without N∗ modules and examined their efficiency in genome editing of methylated regions in rice. Although improvement in genome editing efficiency was observed with N∗-TALENs designed to a stably methylated target, another target carrying cytosines with various levels of methylation showed resistance to both normal and N∗-TALENs. The results suggest that variability of cytosine methylation in target regions is an additional factor affecting the genome editing efficiency of TALENs. PMID:28348570

  16. Efficient Gene Editing in Pluripotent Stem Cells by Bacterial Injection of Transcription Activator-Like Effector Nuclease Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Jingyue; Bai, Fang; Jin, Yongxin; Santostefano, Katherine E.; Ha, Un-Hwan; Wu, Donghai

    2015-01-01

    The type III secretion system (T3SS) of Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a powerful tool for direct protein delivery into mammalian cells and has successfully been used to deliver various exogenous proteins into mammalian cells. In the present study, transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN) proteins have been efficiently delivered using the P. aeruginosa T3SS into mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs), human ESCs (hESCs), and human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) for genome editing. This bacterial delivery system offers an alternative method of TALEN delivery that is highly efficient in cleavage of the chromosomal target and presumably safer by avoiding plasmid DNA introduction. We combined the method of bacterial T3SS-mediated TALEN protein injection and transfection of an oligonucleotide template to effectively generate precise genetic modifications in the stem cells. Initially, we efficiently edited a single-base in the gfp gene of a mESC line to silence green fluorescent protein (GFP) production. The resulting GFP-negative mESC was cloned from a single cell and subsequently mutated back to a GFP-positive mESC line. Using the same approach, the gfp gene was also effectively knocked out in hESCs. In addition, a defined single-base edition was effectively introduced into the X-chromosome-linked HPRT1 gene in hiPSCs, generating an in vitro model of Lesch-Nyhan syndrome. T3SS-mediated TALEN protein delivery provides a highly efficient alternative for introducing precise gene editing within pluripotent stem cells for the purpose of disease genotype-phenotype relationship studies and cellular replacement therapies. Significance The present study describes a novel and powerful tool for the delivery of the genome editing enzyme transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN) directly into pluripotent stem cells (PSCs), achieving desired base changes on the genomes of PSCs with high efficiency. This novel approach uses bacteria as a protein delivery

  17. Effects of Stroke on Ipsilesional End-Effector Kinematics in a Multi-Step Activity of Daily Living

    PubMed Central

    Gulde, Philipp; Hughes, Charmayne Mary Lee; Hermsdörfer, Joachim

    2017-01-01

    Background: Stroke frequently impairs activities of daily living (ADL) and deteriorates the function of the contra- as well as the ipsilesional limbs. In order to analyze alterations of higher motor control unaffected by paresis or sensory loss, the kinematics of ipsilesional upper limb movements in patients with stroke has previously been analyzed during prehensile movements and simple tool use actions. By contrast, motion recording of multi-step ADL is rare and patient-control comparisons for movement kinematics are largely lacking. Especially in clinical research, objective quantification of complex externally valid tasks can improve the assessment of neurological impairments. Methods: In this preliminary study we employed three-dimensional motion recording and applied kinematic analysis in a multi-step ADL (tea-making). The trials were examined with respect to errors and sub-action structure, durations, path lengths (PLs), peak velocities, relative activity (RA) and smoothness. In order to check for specific burdens the sub-actions of the task were extracted and compared. To examine the feasibility of the approach, we determined the behavioral and kinematic metrics of the (ipsilesional) unimanual performance of seven chronic stroke patients (64a ± 11a, 3 with right/4 with left brain damage (LBD), 2 with signs of apraxia, variable severity of paresis) and compared the results with data of 14 neurologically healthy age-matched control participants (70a ± 7a). Results: T-tests revealed that while the quantity and structure of sub-actions of the task were similar. The analysis of end-effector kinematics was able to detect clear group differences in the associated parameters. Specifically, trial duration (TD) was increased (Cohen’s d = 1.77); the RA (Cohen’s d = 1.72) and the parameters of peak velocities (Cohen’s d = 1.49/1.97) were decreased in the patient group. Analysis of the task’s sub-actions repeated measures analysis of variance (rmANOVA) revealed

  18. Overlapping parietal activity in memory and perception: evidence for the attention to memory model.

    PubMed

    Cabeza, Roberto; Mazuz, Yonatan S; Stokes, Jared; Kragel, James E; Woldorff, Marty G; Ciaramelli, Elisa; Olson, Ingrid R; Moscovitch, Morris

    2011-11-01

    The specific role of different parietal regions to episodic retrieval is a topic of intense debate. According to the Attention to Memory (AtoM) model, dorsal parietal cortex (DPC) mediates top-down attention processes guided by retrieval goals, whereas ventral parietal cortex (VPC) mediates bottom-up attention processes captured by the retrieval output or the retrieval cue. This model also hypothesizes that the attentional functions of DPC and VPC are similar for memory and perception. To investigate this last hypothesis, we scanned participants with event-related fMRI whereas they performed memory and perception tasks, each comprising an orienting phase (top-down attention) and a detection phase (bottom-up attention). The study yielded two main findings. First, consistent with the AtoM model, orienting-related activity for memory and perception overlapped in DPC, whereas detection-related activity for memory and perception overlapped in VPC. The DPC overlap was greater in the left intraparietal sulcus, and the VPC overlap in the left TPJ. Around overlapping areas, there were differences in the spatial distribution of memory and perception activations, which were consistent with trends reported in the literature. Second, both DPC and VPC showed stronger connectivity with medial-temporal lobe during the memory task and with visual cortex during the perception task. These findings suggest that, during memory tasks, some parietal regions mediate similar attentional control processes to those involved in perception tasks (orienting in DPC vs. detection in VPC), although on different types of information (mnemonic vs. sensory).

  19. Neural correlates of episodic memory: associative memory and confidence drive hippocampus activations.

    PubMed

    Kuchinke, Lars; Fritzemeier, Steffen; Hofmann, Markus J; Jacobs, Arthur M

    2013-10-01

    The present study used a study-test recognition memory task to examine the brain regions engaged in episodic and associative memory processes. Participants evaluated on a six-point rating scale how confident they were on whether or not an item was presented in a previous study phase. Neural activations for high- and low-confidence decisions were examined in old and new items at two levels of between-item-associations. Items had different amounts of associations within the stimulus set, while associations were defined by co-occurrence statistics. The medial frontal gyrus, the posterior cingulate gyrus, the superior temporal gyrus and the right hippocampus revealed U-shaped activation functions with greater activations for high-confidence OLD and NEW decisions. This was independent of the associative memory manipulation, which suggests that not episodic memory, but rather processes related to confidence account for the activation in these brain regions. In contrast, left hippocampus followed a different activation pattern that was modulated by the amount of associations. This provides evidence for the role of the left hippocampus in associative memory.

  20. Single molecule real-time sequencing of Xanthomonas oryzae genomes reveals a dynamic structure and complex TAL (transcription activator-like) effector gene relationships

    PubMed Central

    Booher, Nicholas J.; Carpenter, Sara C. D.; Sebra, Robert P.; Wang, Li; Salzberg, Steven L.; Leach, Jan E.; Bogdanove, Adam J.

    2016-01-01

    Pathogen-injected, direct transcriptional activators of host genes, TAL (transcription activator-like) effectors play determinative roles in plant diseases caused by Xanthomonas spp. A large domain of nearly identical, 33–35 aa repeats in each protein mediates DNA recognition. This modularity makes TAL effectors customizable and thus important also in biotechnology. However, the repeats render TAL effector (tal) genes nearly impossible to assemble using next-generation, short reads. Here, we demonstrate that long-read, single molecule real-time (SMRT) sequencing solves this problem. Taking an ensemble approach to first generate local, tal gene contigs, we correctly assembled de novo the genomes of two strains of the rice pathogen X. oryzae completed previously using the Sanger method and even identified errors in those references. Sequencing two more strains revealed a dynamic genome structure and a striking plasticity in tal gene content. Our results pave the way for population-level studies to inform resistance breeding, improve biotechnology and probe TAL effector evolution. PMID:27148456

  1. AC Electric Field Activated Shape Memory Polymer Composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kang, Jin Ho; Siochi, Emilie J.; Penner, Ronald K.; Turner, Travis L.

    2011-01-01

    Shape memory materials have drawn interest for applications like intelligent medical devices, deployable space structures and morphing structures. Compared to other shape memory materials like shape memory alloys (SMAs) or shape memory ceramics (SMCs), shape memory polymers (SMPs) have high elastic deformation that is amenable to tailored of mechanical properties, have lower density, and are easily processed. However, SMPs have low recovery stress and long response times. A new shape memory thermosetting polymer nanocomposite (LaRC-SMPC) was synthesized with conductive fillers to enhance its thermo-mechanical characteristics. A new composition of shape memory thermosetting polymer nanocomposite (LaRC-SMPC) was synthesized with conductive functionalized graphene sheets (FGS) to enhance its thermo-mechanical characteristics. The elastic modulus of LaRC-SMPC is approximately 2.7 GPa at room temperature and 4.3 MPa above its glass transition temperature. Conductive FGSs-doped LaRC-SMPC exhibited higher conductivity compared to pristine LaRC SMP. Applying an electric field at between 0.1 Hz and 1 kHz induced faster heating to activate the LaRC-SMPC s shape memory effect relative to applying DC electric field or AC electric field at frequencies exceeding1 kHz.

  2. Jet Engine Exhaust Nozzle Flow Effector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Travis L. (Inventor); Cano, Roberto J. (Inventor); Silox, Richard J. (Inventor); Buehrle, Ralph D. (Inventor); Cagle, Christopher M. (Inventor); Cabell, Randolph H. (Inventor); Hilton, George C. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A jet engine exhaust nozzle flow effector is a chevron formed with a radius of curvature with surfaces of the flow effector being defined and opposing one another. At least one shape memory alloy (SMA) member is embedded in the chevron closer to one of the chevron's opposing surfaces and substantially spanning from at least a portion of the chevron's root to the chevron's tip.

  3. Jet Engine Exhaust Nozzle Flow Effector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Travis L. (Inventor); Cano, Roberto J. (Inventor); Silcox, Richard J. (Inventor); Buehrle, Ralph D. (Inventor); Cagle, Christopher M. (Inventor); Cabell, Randolph H. (Inventor); Hilton, George C. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A jet engine exhaust nozzle flow effector is a chevron formed with a radius of curvature with surfaces of the flow effector being defined and opposing one another. At least one shape memory alloy (SMA) member is embedded in the chevron closer to one of the chevron's opposing surfaces and substantially spanning from at least a portion of the chevron's root to the chevron's tip.

  4. GTL001 and bivalent CyaA-based therapeutic vaccine strategies against human papillomavirus and other tumor-associated antigens induce effector and memory T-cell responses that inhibit tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Esquerré, Michaël; Momot, Marie; Goubier, Anne; Gonindard, Christophe; Leung-Theung-Long, Stéphane; Misseri, Yolande; Bissery, Marie-Christine

    2017-03-13

    GTL001 is a bivalent therapeutic vaccine containing human papillomavirus (HPV) 16 and HPV18 E7 proteins inserted in the Bordetella pertussis adenylate cyclase (CyaA) vector intended to prevent cervical cancer in HPV-infected women with normal cervical cytology or mild abnormalities. To be effective, therapeutic cervical cancer vaccines should induce both a T cell-mediated effector response against HPV-infected cells and a robust CD8(+) T-cell memory response to prevent potential later infection. We examined the ability of GTL001 and related bivalent CyaA-based vaccines to induce, in parallel, effector and memory CD8(+) T-cell responses to both vaccine antigens. Intradermal vaccination of C57BL/6 mice with GTL001 adjuvanted with a TLR3 agonist (polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid) or a TLR7 agonist (topical 5% imiquimod cream) induced strong HPV16 E7-specific T-cell responses capable of eradicating HPV16 E7-expressing tumors. Tumor-free mice also had antigen-specific memory T-cell responses that protected them against a subsequent challenge with HPV18 E7-expressing tumor cells. In addition, vaccination with bivalent vaccines containing CyaA-HPV16 E7 and CyaA fused to a tumor-associated antigen (melanoma-specific antigen A3, MAGEA3) or to a non-viral, non-tumor antigen (ovalbumin) eradicated HPV16 E7-expressing tumors and protected against a later challenge with MAGEA3- and ovalbumin-expressing tumor cells, respectively. These results show that CyaA-based bivalent vaccines such as GTL001 can induce both therapeutic and prophylactic anti-tumor T-cell responses. The CyaA platform can be adapted to different antigens and adjuvants, and therefore may be useful for developing other therapeutic vaccines.

  5. Does physical activity influence semantic memory activation in amnestic mild cognitive impairment?

    PubMed

    Smith, J Carson; Nielson, Kristy A; Woodard, John L; Seidenberg, Michael; Verber, Matthew D; Durgerian, Sally; Antuono, Piero; Butts, Alissa M; Hantke, Nathan C; Lancaster, Melissa A; Rao, Stephen M

    2011-07-30

    The effect of physical activity (PA) on functional brain activation for semantic memory in amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI) was examined using event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging during fame discrimination. Significantly greater semantic memory activation occurred in the left caudate of High- versus Low-PA patients, (P=0.03), suggesting PA may enhance memory-related caudate activation in aMCI.

  6. Understanding the Mysterious M2 Macrophage through Activation Markers and Effector Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Rőszer, Tamás

    2015-01-01

    The alternatively activated or M2 macrophages are immune cells with high phenotypic heterogeneity and are governing functions at the interface of immunity, tissue homeostasis, metabolism, and endocrine signaling. Today the M2 macrophages are identified based on the expression pattern of a set of M2 markers. These markers are transmembrane glycoproteins, scavenger receptors, enzymes, growth factors, hormones, cytokines, and cytokine receptors with diverse and often yet unexplored functions. This review discusses whether these M2 markers can be reliably used to identify M2 macrophages and define their functional subdivisions. Also, it provides an update on the novel signals of the tissue environment and the neuroendocrine system which shape the M2 activation. The possible evolutionary roots of the M2 macrophage functions are also discussed. PMID:26089604

  7. RNA-seq pinpoints a Xanthomonas TAL-effector activated resistance gene in a large-crop genome.

    PubMed

    Strauss, Tina; van Poecke, Remco M P; Strauss, Annett; Römer, Patrick; Minsavage, Gerald V; Singh, Sylvia; Wolf, Christina; Strauss, Axel; Kim, Seungill; Lee, Hyun-Ah; Yeom, Seon-In; Parniske, Martin; Stall, Robert E; Jones, Jeffrey B; Choi, Doil; Prins, Marcel; Lahaye, Thomas

    2012-11-20

    Transcription activator-like effector (TALE) proteins of the plant pathogenic bacterial genus Xanthomonas bind to and transcriptionally activate host susceptibility genes, promoting disease. Plant immune systems have taken advantage of this mechanism by evolving TALE binding sites upstream of resistance (R) genes. For example, the pepper Bs3 and rice Xa27 genes are hypersensitive reaction plant R genes that are transcriptionally activated by corresponding TALEs. Both R genes have a hallmark expression pattern in which their transcripts are detectable only in the presence and not the absence of the corresponding TALE. By transcriptome profiling using next-generation sequencing (RNA-seq), we tested whether we could avoid laborious positional cloning for the isolation of TALE-induced R genes. In a proof-of-principle experiment, RNA-seq was used to identify a candidate for Bs4C, an R gene from pepper that mediates recognition of the Xanthomonas TALE protein AvrBs4. We identified one major Bs4C candidate transcript by RNA-seq that was expressed exclusively in the presence of AvrBs4. Complementation studies confirmed that the candidate corresponds to the Bs4C gene and that an AvrBs4 binding site in the Bs4C promoter directs its transcriptional activation. Comparison of Bs4C with a nonfunctional allele that is unable to recognize AvrBs4 revealed a 2-bp polymorphism within the TALE binding site of the Bs4C promoter. Bs4C encodes a structurally unique R protein and Bs4C-like genes that are present in many solanaceous genomes seem to be as tightly regulated as pepper Bs4C. These findings demonstrate that TALE-specific R genes can be cloned from large-genome crops with a highly efficient RNA-seq approach.

  8. Generation of obese rat model by transcription activator-like effector nucleases targeting the leptin receptor gene.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yuting; Lu, Wenqing; Gao, Na; Long, Yi; Shao, Yanjiao; Liu, Meizhen; Chen, Huaqing; Ye, Shixin; Ma, Xueyun; Liu, Mingyao; Li, Dali

    2017-02-01

    The laboratory rat is a valuable mammalian model organism for basic research and drug discovery. Here we demonstrate an efficient methodology by applying transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) technology to generate Leptin receptor (Lepr) knockout rats on the Sprague Dawley (SD) genetic background. Through direct injection of in vitro transcribed mRNA of TALEN pairs into SD rat zygotes, somatic mutations were induced in two of three resulting pups. One of the founders carrying bi-allelic mutation exhibited early onset of obesity and infertility. The other founder carried a chimeric mutation which was efficiently transmitted to the progenies. Through phenotyping of the resulting three lines of rats bearing distinct mutations in the Lepr locus, we found that the strains with a frame-shifted or premature stop codon mutation led to obesity and metabolic disorders. However, no obvious defect was observed in a strain with an in-frame 57 bp deletion in the extracellular domain of Lepr. This suggests the deleted amino acids do not significantly affect Lepr structure and function. This is the first report of generating the Lepr mutant obese rat model in SD strain through a reverse genetic approach. This suggests that TALEN is an efficient and powerful gene editing technology for the generation of disease models.

  9. A One-Step System for Convenient and Flexible Assembly of Transcription Activator-Like Effector Nucleases (TALENs).

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jinlong; Sun, Wenye; Liang, Jing; Jiang, Jing; Wu, Zhao

    2016-09-01

    Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) are powerful tools for targeted genome editing in diverse cell types and organisms. However, the highly identical TALE repeat sequences make it challenging to assemble TALEs using conventional cloning approaches, and multiple repeats in one plasmid are easily catalyzed for homologous recombination in bacteria. Although the methods for TALE assembly are constantly improving, these methods are not convenient because of laborious assembly steps or large module libraries, limiting their broad utility. To overcome the barrier of multiple assembly steps, we report a one-step system for the convenient and flexible assembly of a 180 TALE module library. This study is the first demonstration to ligate 9 mono-/dimer modules and one circular TALEN backbone vector in a one step process, generating 9.5 to 18.5 repeat sequences with an overall assembly rate higher than 50%. This system makes TALEN assembly much simpler than the conventional cloning of two DNA fragments because this strategy combines digestion and ligation into one step using circular vectors and different modules to avoid gel extraction. Therefore, this system provides a convenient tool for the application of TALEN-mediated genome editing in scientific studies and clinical trials.

  10. Inactivation of Phaeodactylum tricornutum urease gene using transcription activator-like effector nuclease-based targeted mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Weyman, Philip D; Beeri, Karen; Lefebvre, Stephane C; Rivera, Josefa; McCarthy, James K; Heuberger, Adam L; Peers, Graham; Allen, Andrew E; Dupont, Christopher L

    2015-05-01

    Diatoms are unicellular photosynthetic algae with promise for green production of fuels and other chemicals. Recent genome-editing techniques have greatly improved the potential of many eukaryotic genetic systems, including diatoms, to enable knowledge-based studies and bioengineering. Using a new technique, transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs), the gene encoding the urease enzyme in the model diatom, Phaeodactylum tricornutum, was targeted for interruption. The knockout cassette was identified within the urease gene by PCR and Southern blot analyses of genomic DNA. The lack of urease protein was confirmed by Western blot analyses in mutant cell lines that were unable to grow on urea as the sole nitrogen source. Untargeted metabolomic analysis revealed a build-up of urea, arginine and ornithine in the urease knockout lines. All three intermediate metabolites are upstream of the urease reaction within the urea cycle, suggesting a disruption of the cycle despite urea production. Numerous high carbon metabolites were enriched in the mutant, implying a breakdown of cellular C and N repartitioning. The presented method improves the molecular toolkit for diatoms and clarifies the role of urease in the urea cycle.

  11. Transcription activator-like effector nucleases mediated metabolic engineering for enhanced fatty acids production in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Aouida, Mustapha; Li, Lixin; Mahjoub, Ali; Alshareef, Sahar; Ali, Zahir; Piatek, Agnieszka; Mahfouz, Magdy M

    2015-10-01

    Targeted engineering of microbial genomes holds much promise for diverse biotechnological applications. Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/Cas9 systems are capable of efficiently editing microbial genomes, including that of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Here, we demonstrate the use of TALENs to edit the genome of S. cerevisiae with the aim of inducing the overproduction of fatty acids. Heterodimeric TALENs were designed to simultaneously edit the FAA1 and FAA4 genes encoding acyl-CoA synthetases in S. cerevisiae. Functional yeast double knockouts generated using these TALENs over-produce large amounts of free fatty acids into the cell. This study demonstrates the use of TALENs for targeted engineering of yeast and demonstrates that this technology can be used to stimulate the enhanced production of free fatty acids, which are potential substrates for biofuel production. This proof-of-principle study extends the utility of TALENs as excellent genome editing tools and highlights their potential use for metabolic engineering of yeast and other organisms, such as microalgae and plants, for biofuel production.

  12. Targeted mutagenesis of multiple and paralogous genes in Xenopus laevis using two pairs of transcription activator-like effector nucleases.

    PubMed

    Sakane, Yuto; Sakuma, Tetsushi; Kashiwagi, Keiko; Kashiwagi, Akihiko; Yamamoto, Takashi; Suzuki, Ken-Ichi T

    2014-01-01

    Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) have been extensively used in genome editing in various organisms. In some cases, however, it is difficult to efficiently disrupt both paralogous genes using a single pair of TALENs in Xenopus laevis because of its polyploidy. Here, we report targeted mutagenesis of multiple and paralogous genes using two pairs of TALENs in X. laevis. First, we show simultaneous targeted mutagenesis of three genes, tyrosinase paralogues (tyra and tyrb) and enhanced green fluorescent protein (egfp) by injection of two TALENs pairs in transgenic embryos carrying egfp. Consistent with the high frequency of both severe phenotypic traits, albinism and loss of GFP fluorescence, frameshift mutation rates of tyr paralogues and egfp reached 40-80%. Next, we show early introduction of TALEN-mediated mutagenesis of these target loci during embryogenesis. Finally, we also demonstrate that two different pairs of TALENs can simultaneously introduce mutations to both paralogues encoding histone chaperone with high efficiency. Our results suggest that targeted mutagenesis of multiple genes using TALENs can be applied to analyze the functions of paralogous genes with redundancy in X. laevis.

  13. Efficient genome engineering by targeted homologous recombination in mouse embryos using transcription activator-like effector nucleases.

    PubMed

    Sommer, Daniel; Peters, Annika; Wirtz, Tristan; Mai, Maren; Ackermann, Justus; Thabet, Yasser; Schmidt, Jürgen; Weighardt, Heike; Wunderlich, F Thomas; Degen, Joachim; Schultze, Joachim L; Beyer, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Generation of mouse models by introducing transgenes using homologous recombination is critical for understanding fundamental biology and pathology of human diseases. Here we investigate whether artificial transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs)-powerful tools that induce DNA double-strand breaks at specific genomic locations-can be combined with a targeting vector to induce homologous recombination for the introduction of a transgene in embryonic stem cells and fertilized murine oocytes. We describe the generation of a conditional mouse model using TALENs, which introduce double-strand breaks at the genomic locus of the special AT-rich sequence-binding protein-1 in combination with a large 14.4 kb targeting template vector. We report successful germline transmission of this allele and demonstrate its recombination in primary cells in the presence of Cre-recombinase. These results suggest that TALEN-assisted induction of DNA double-strand breaks can facilitate homologous recombination of complex targeting constructs directly in oocytes.

  14. An efficient antiviral strategy for targeting hepatitis B virus genome using transcription activator-like effector nucleases.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jieliang; Zhang, Wen; Lin, Junyu; Wang, Fan; Wu, Min; Chen, Cuncun; Zheng, Ye; Peng, Xiuhua; Li, Jianhua; Yuan, Zhenghong

    2014-02-01

    The hepatitis B virus (HBV) is a DNA virus that can cause chronic hepatitis B (CHB) in humans. Current therapies for CHB infection are limited in efficacy and do not target the pre-existing viral genomic DNA, which are present in the nucleus as a covalently closed circular DNA (cccDNA) form. The transcription activator-like (TAL) effector nucleases (TALENs) are newly developed enzymes that can cleave sequence-specific DNA targets. Here, TALENs targeting the conserved regions of the viral genomic DNA among different HBV genotypes were constructed. The expression of TALENs in Huh7 cells transfected with monomeric linear full-length HBV DNA significantly reduced the viral production of HBeAg, HBsAg, HBcAg, and pgRNA, resulted in a decreased cccDNA level and misrepaired cccDNAs without apparent cytotoxic effects. The anti-HBV effect of TALENs was further demonstrated in a hydrodynamic injection-based mouse model. In addition, an enhanced antiviral effect with combinations of TALENs and interferon-α (IFN-α) treatment was observed and expression of TALENs restored HBV suppressed IFN-stimulated response element-directed transcription. Taken together, these data indicate that TALENs can specifically target and successfully inactivate the HBV genome and are potently synergistic with IFN-α, thus providing a potential therapeutic strategy for treating CHB infection.

  15. Inactivation of hepatitis B virus replication in cultured cells and in vivo with engineered transcription activator-like effector nucleases.

    PubMed

    Bloom, Kristie; Ely, Abdullah; Mussolino, Claudio; Cathomen, Toni; Arbuthnot, Patrick

    2013-10-01

    Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection remains an important global health problem. Stability of the episomal covalently closed circular HBV DNA (cccDNA) is largely responsible for the modest curative efficacy of available therapy. Since licensed anti-HBV drugs have a post-transcriptional mechanism of action, disabling cccDNA is potentially of therapeutic benefit. To develop this approach, we engineered mutagenic transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) that target four HBV-specific sites within the viral genome. TALENs with cognate sequences in the S or C open-reading frames (ORFs) efficiently disrupted sequences at the intended sites and suppressed markers of viral replication. Following triple transfection of cultured HepG2.2.15 cells under mildly hypothermic conditions, the S TALEN caused targeted mutation in ~35% of cccDNA molecules. Markers of viral replication were also inhibited in vivo in a murine hydrodynamic injection model of HBV replication. HBV target sites within S and C ORFs of the injected HBV DNA were mutated without evidence of toxicity. These findings are the first to demonstrate a targeted nuclease-mediated disruption of HBV cccDNA. Efficacy in vivo also indicates that these engineered nucleases have potential for use in treatment of chronic HBV infection.

  16. AMP-activated protein kinase fortifies epithelial tight junctions during energetic stress via its effector GIV/Girdin

    PubMed Central

    Aznar, Nicolas; Patel, Arjun; Rohena, Cristina C; Dunkel, Ying; Joosen, Linda P; Taupin, Vanessa; Kufareva, Irina; Farquhar, Marilyn G; Ghosh, Pradipta

    2016-01-01

    Loss of epithelial polarity impacts organ development and function; it is also oncogenic. AMPK, a key sensor of metabolic stress stabilizes cell-cell junctions and maintains epithelial polarity; its activation by Metformin protects the epithelial barrier against stress and suppresses tumorigenesis. How AMPK protects the epithelium remains unknown. Here, we identify GIV/Girdin as a novel effector of AMPK, whose phosphorylation at a single site is both necessary and sufficient for strengthening mammalian epithelial tight junctions and preserving cell polarity and barrier function in the face of energetic stress. Expression of an oncogenic mutant of GIV (cataloged in TCGA) that cannot be phosphorylated by AMPK increased anchorage-independent growth of tumor cells and helped these cells to evade the tumor-suppressive action of Metformin. This work defines a fundamental homeostatic mechanism by which the AMPK-GIV axis reinforces cell junctions against stress-induced collapse and also provides mechanistic insight into the tumor-suppressive action of Metformin. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.20795.001 PMID:27813479

  17. Signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 (STAT5) paralog dose governs T cell effector and regulatory functions

    PubMed Central

    Villarino, Alejandro; Laurence, Arian; Robinson, Gertraud W; Bonelli, Michael; Dema, Barbara; Afzali, Behdad; Shih, Han-Yu; Sun, Hong-Wei; Brooks, Stephen R; Hennighausen, Lothar; Kanno, Yuka; O'Shea, John J

    2016-01-01

    The transcription factor STAT5 is fundamental to the mammalian immune system. However, the relationship between its two paralogs, STAT5A and STAT5B, and the extent to which they are functionally distinct, remain uncertain. Using mouse models of paralog deficiency, we demonstrate that they are not equivalent for CD4+ 'helper' T cells, the principal orchestrators of adaptive immunity. Instead, we find that STAT5B is dominant for both effector and regulatory (Treg) responses and, therefore, uniquely necessary for immunological tolerance. Comparative analysis of genomic distribution and transcriptomic output confirm that STAT5B has fargreater impact but, surprisingly, the data point towards asymmetric expression (i.e. paralog dose), rather than distinct functional properties, as the key distinguishing feature. Thus, we propose a quantitative model of STAT5 paralog activity whereby relative abundance imposes functional specificity (or dominance) in the face of widespread structural homology. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.08384.001 PMID:26999798

  18. Allele-Specific Reduction of the Mutant Huntingtin Allele Using Transcription Activator-Like Effectors in Human Huntington's Disease Fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Fink, Kyle D; Deng, Peter; Gutierrez, Josh; Anderson, Joseph S; Torrest, Audrey; Komarla, Anvita; Kalomoiris, Stefanos; Cary, Whitney; Anderson, Johnathon D; Gruenloh, William; Duffy, Alexandra; Tempkin, Teresa; Annett, Geralyn; Wheelock, Vicki; Segal, David J; Nolta, Jan A

    2016-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder caused by an abnormal expansion of CAG repeats. Although pathogenesis has been attributed to this polyglutamine expansion, the underlying mechanisms through which the huntingtin protein functions have yet to be elucidated. It has been suggested that postnatal reduction of mutant huntingtin through protein interference or conditional gene knockout could prove to be an effective therapy for patients suffering from HD. For allele-specific targeting, transcription activator-like effectors (TALE) were designed to target single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in the mutant allele and packaged into a vector backbone containing KRAB to promote transcriptional repression of the disease-associated allele. Additional TALEs were packaged into a vector backbone containing heterodimeric FokI and were designed to be used as nucleases (TALEN) to cause a CAG-collapse in the mutant allele. Human HD fibroblasts were treated with each TALE-SNP or TALEN. Allele-expression was measured using a SNP-genotyping assay and mutant protein aggregation was quantified with Western blots for anti-ubiquitin. The TALE-SNP and TALEN significantly reduced mutant allele expression (p < 0.05) when compared to control transfections while not affecting expression of the nondisease allele. This study demonstrates the potential of allele-specific gene modification using TALE proteins, and provides a foundation for targeted treatment for individuals suffering from Huntington's or other genetically linked diseases.

  19. FusX: A Rapid One-Step Transcription Activator-Like Effector Assembly System for Genome Science.

    PubMed

    Ma, Alvin C; McNulty, Melissa S; Poshusta, Tanya L; Campbell, Jarryd M; Martínez-Gálvez, Gabriel; Argue, David P; Lee, Han B; Urban, Mark D; Bullard, Cassandra E; Blackburn, Patrick R; Man, Toni K; Clark, Karl J; Ekker, Stephen C

    2016-06-01

    Transcription activator-like effectors (TALEs) are extremely effective, single-molecule DNA-targeting molecular cursors used for locus-specific genome science applications, including high-precision molecular medicine and other genome engineering applications. TALEs are used in genome engineering for locus-specific DNA editing and imaging, as artificial transcriptional activators and repressors, and for targeted epigenetic modification. TALEs as nucleases (TALENs) are effective editing tools and offer high binding specificity and fewer sequence constraints toward the targeted genome than other custom nuclease systems. One bottleneck of broader TALE use is reagent accessibility. For example, one commonly deployed method uses a multitube, 5-day assembly protocol. Here we describe FusX, a streamlined Golden Gate TALE assembly system that (1) is backward compatible with popular TALE backbones, (2) is functionalized as a single-tube 3-day TALE assembly process, (3) requires only commonly used basic molecular biology reagents, and (4) is cost-effective. More than 100 TALEN pairs have been successfully assembled using FusX, and 27 pairs were quantitatively tested in zebrafish, with each showing high somatic and germline activity. Furthermore, this assembly system is flexible and is compatible with standard molecular biology laboratory tools, but can be scaled with automated laboratory support. To demonstrate, we use a highly accessible and commercially available liquid-handling robot to rapidly and accurately assemble TALEs using the FusX TALE toolkit. Together, the FusX system accelerates TALE-based genomic science applications from basic science screening work for functional genomics testing and molecular medicine applications.

  20. FusX: A Rapid One-Step Transcription Activator-Like Effector Assembly System for Genome Science

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Alvin C.; McNulty, Melissa S.; Poshusta, Tanya L.; Campbell, Jarryd M.; Martínez-Gálvez, Gabriel; Argue, David P.; Lee, Han B.; Urban, Mark D.; Bullard, Cassandra E.; Blackburn, Patrick R.; Man, Toni K.; Clark, Karl J.; Ekker, Stephen C.

    2016-01-01

    Transcription activator-like effectors (TALEs) are extremely effective, single-molecule DNA-targeting molecular cursors used for locus-specific genome science applications, including high-precision molecular medicine and other genome engineering applications. TALEs are used in genome engineering for locus-specific DNA editing and imaging, as artificial transcriptional activators and repressors, and for targeted epigenetic modification. TALEs as nucleases (TALENs) are effective editing tools and offer high binding specificity and fewer sequence constraints toward the targeted genome than other custom nuclease systems. One bottleneck of broader TALE use is reagent accessibility. For example, one commonly deployed method uses a multitube, 5-day assembly protocol. Here we describe FusX, a streamlined Golden Gate TALE assembly system that (1) is backward compatible with popular TALE backbones, (2) is functionalized as a single-tube 3-day TALE assembly process, (3) requires only commonly used basic molecular biology reagents, and (4) is cost-effective. More than 100 TALEN pairs have been successfully assembled using FusX, and 27 pairs were quantitatively tested in zebrafish, with each showing high somatic and germline activity. Furthermore, this assembly system is flexible and is compatible with standard molecular biology laboratory tools, but can be scaled with automated laboratory support. To demonstrate, we use a highly accessible and commercially available liquid-handling robot to rapidly and accurately assemble TALEs using the FusX TALE toolkit. Together, the FusX system accelerates TALE-based genomic science applications from basic science screening work for functional genomics testing and molecular medicine applications. PMID:26854857

  1. Gene targeting in rats using transcription activator-like effector nucleases.

    PubMed

    Ménoret, Séverine; Tesson, Laurent; Rémy, Séverine; Usal, Claire; Thépenier, Virginie; Thinard, Reynald; Ouisse, Laure-Hélène; De Cian, Anne; Giovannangeli, Carine; Concordet, Jean-Paul; Anegon, Ignacio

    2014-08-15

    The rat is a model of choice to understanding gene function and modeling human diseases. Since recent years, successful engineering technologies using gene-specific nucleases have been developed to gene edit the genome of different species, including the rat. This development has become important for the creation of new rat animals models of human diseases, analyze the role of genes and express recombinant proteins. Transcription activator-like (TALE) nucleases are designed nucleases consist of a DNA binding domain fused to a nuclease domain capable of cleaving the targeted DNA. We describe a detailed protocol for generating knockout rats via microinjection of TALE nucleases into fertilized eggs. This technology is an efficient, cost- and time-effective method for creating new rat models.

  2. The role of REM sleep theta activity in emotional memory.

    PubMed

    Hutchison, Isabel C; Rathore, Shailendra

    2015-01-01

    While non-REM (NREM) sleep has been strongly implicated in the reactivation and consolidation of memory traces, the role of rapid-eye movement (REM) sleep remains unclear. A growing body of research on humans and animals provide behavioral evidence for a role of REM sleep in the strengthening and modulation of emotional memories. Theta activity-which describes low frequency oscillations in the local field potential within the hippocampus, amygdala and neocortex-is a prominent feature of both wake and REM sleep in humans and rodents. Theta coherence between the hippocampus and amygdala drives large-scale pontine-geniculo-occipital (PGO) waves, the density of which predicts increases in plasticity-related gene expression. This could potentially facilitate the processing of emotional memory traces within the hippocampus during REM sleep. Further, the timing of hippocampal activity in relation to theta phase is vital in determining subsequent potentiation of neuronal activity. This could allow the emotionally modulated strengthening of novel and gradual weakening of consolidated hippocampal memory traces during REM sleep. Hippocampal theta activity is also correlated with REM sleep levels of achetylcholine - which is thought to reduce hippocampal inputs in the neocortex. The additional low levels of noradrenaline during REM sleep, which facilitate feedback within the neocortex, could allow the integration of novel memory traces previously consolidated during NREM sleep. We therefore propose that REM sleep mediates the prioritized processing of emotional memories within the hippocampus, the integration of previously consolidated memory traces within the neocortex, as well as the disengagement of consolidated neocortical memory traces from the hippocampus.

  3. Tumor necrosis factor: a potent effector molecule for tumor cell killing by activated macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Urban, J L; Shepard, H M; Rothstein, J L; Sugarman, B J; Schreiber, H

    1986-01-01

    Activated macrophages (aM phi) destroy more effectively cancer cells than normal cells. The mechanism by which macrophages destroy cancer cells is not known. We report here that tumor cells susceptible to aM phi were killed by recombinant (r) tumor necrosis factor type alpha (TNF-alpha), whereas variant tumor cells resistant to aM phi after selection in vitro or in vivo were resistant to killing by rTNF-alpha. The converse selection for rTNF-alpha-resistant variants resulted in cells that were also resistant to killing by aM phi. The sensitivity of macrophage-resistant variants was not changed to other tumoricidal cells or soluble mediators, except that the macrophage-resistant variants were also resistant to the effects of another cytotoxic protein, B-cell lymphotoxin, which is structurally related to rTNF-alpha. Similar results were obtained regardless of whether short-term or long-term cytotoxic effects of aM phi were measured. Finally, it was shown that killing of tumor cells by murine aM phi was completely inhibited with a polyclonal antibody that neutralizes the effects of murine TNF-alpha. These results suggest a major role for TNF-alpha in tumor cell destruction by aM phi in vitro and in vivo. PMID:3487788

  4. A survey of commercially available manipulators, end-effectors, and delivery systems for reactor decommissioning activities

    SciTech Connect

    Henley, D.R.; Litka, T.J.

    1996-05-01

    Numerous nuclear facilities owned by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) are under consideration for decommissioning. Currently, there are no standardized, automated, remote systems designed to dismantle and thereby reduce the size of activated reactor components and vessels so that they can be packaged and shipped to disposal sites. Existing dismantling systems usually consist of customized, facility-specific tooling that has been developed to dismantle a specific reactor system. Such systems have a number of drawbacks. Generally, current systems cannot be disassembled, moved, and reused. Developing and deploying the tooling for current systems is expensive and time-consuming. In addition, the amount of manual work is significant because long-handled tools must be used; as a result, personnel are exposed to excessive radiation. A standardized, automated, remote system is therefore needed to deliver the tooling necessary to dismantle nuclear facilities at different locations. Because this system would be reusable, it would produce less waste. The system would also save money because of its universal design, and it would be more reliable than current systems.

  5. Antitumor efficacy of radiation plus immunotherapy depends upon dendritic cell activation of effector CDS+ T cells

    PubMed Central

    Dovedi, Simon J.; Lipowska-Bhalla, Grazyna; Beers, Stephen A.; Cheadle, Eleanor J.; Mu, Lijun; Glennie, Martin J.

    2017-01-01

    Tumor cells dying after cytotoxic therapy are a potential source of antigen for T-cell priming. Antigen-presenting cells (APCs) can cross-present MHC I–restricted peptides after the uptake of dying cells. Depending on the nature of the surrounding environmental signals, APCs then orchestrate a spectrum of responses ranging from immune activation to inhibition. Previously, we had demonstrated that combining radiation with either agonistic monoclonal antibody (mAb) to CD40 or a systemically administered TLR7 agonist could enhance CD8 T-cell–dependent protection against syngeneic murine lymphoma models. However, it remains unknown how individual APC populations impact on this antitumor immune response. Using APC depletion models, we now show that dendritic cells (DCs), but not macrophages or B cells, were responsible for the generation of long-term immunological protection following combination therapy with radiotherapy and either agonistic CD40 mAb or systemic TLR7 agonist therapy. Novel immunotherapeutic approaches that augment antigen uptake and presentation by DCs may further enhance the generation of therapeutic antitumor immune responses, leading to improved outcomes after radiotherapy. PMID:27241845

  6. APOE ε4 genotype predicts memory for everyday activities.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Heather R; Sargent, Jesse Q; Flores, Shaney; Nowotny, Petra; Goate, Alison; Zacks, Jeffrey M

    2015-01-01

    The apolipoprotein E (ApOE) ε4 allele is associated with neuropathological buildup of amyloid in the brain, and with lower performance on some laboratory measures of memory in some populations. In two studies, we tested whether ApOE genotype affects memory for everyday activities. In Study 1, participants aged 20-79 years old (n = 188) watched movies of actors engaged in daily activities and completed memory tests for the activities in the movies. In Study 2, cognitively healthy and demented older adults (n = 97) watched and remembered similar movies, and also underwent structural MRI scanning. All participants provided saliva samples for genetic analysis. In both samples we found that, in older adults, ApOE ε4 carriers demonstrated worse everyday memory performance than did ε4 noncarriers. In Study 2, ApOE ε4 carriers had smaller medial temporal lobes (MTL) volumes, and MTL volume mediated the relationship between ApOE genotype and everyday memory performance. These everyday memory tasks measure genetically determined cognitive decline that can occur prior to a clinical diagnosis of dementia. Further, these tasks are easily administered and may be a useful clinical tool in identifying ε4 carriers who may be at risk for MTL atrophy and further cognitive decline that is a common characteristic of the earliest stages of Alzheimer's disease.

  7. APOE ε4 Genotype Predicts Memory for Everyday Activities

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Heather R.; Sargent, Jesse Q.; Flores, Shaney; Nowotny, Petra; Goate, Alison; Zacks, Jeffrey M.

    2015-01-01

    The apolipoprotein E (ApoE) ε4 allele is associated with neuropathological buildup of amyloid in the brain, and with lower performance on some laboratory measures of memory in some populations. In two studies, we tested whether ApoE genotype affects memory for everyday activities. In Study 1, participants aged 20-79 years old (n = 188) watched movies of actors engaged in daily activities and completed memory tests for the activities in the movies. In Study 2, cognitively healthy and demented older adults (n = 97) watched and remembered similar movies, and also underwent structural MRI scanning. All participants provided saliva samples for genetic analysis. In both samples we found that, in older adults, ApoE ε4 carriers demonstrated worse everyday memory performance than did ε4 non-carriers. In Study 2, ApoE ε4 carriers had smaller MTL volumes, and MTL volume mediated the relationship between ApoE genotype and everyday memory performance. These everyday memory tasks measure genetically-determined cognitive decline that can occur prior to a clinical diagnosis of dementia. Further, these tasks are easily administered and may be a useful clinical tool in identifying ε4 carriers who may be at risk for MTL atrophy and further cognitive decline that is a common characteristic of the earliest stages of Alzheimer's disease. PMID:25754878

  8. Activation of a Covalent Enzyme-Substrate Bond by Noncovalent Interaction with an Effector

    PubMed Central

    Malhotra, O. P.; Bernhard, Sidney A.

    1973-01-01

    The absorption spectrum of an activesite specific chromophoric acyl enzyme, sturgeon β-(2-furyl)-acryloyl-glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, is reported. This acyl enzyme undergoes all of the catalyzed reactions characteristic of the intermediate of the physiological acyl enzyme, 3-phospho-D-glyceroyl-glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenease. The rates of reactions of both these acyl enzymes depend strongly on the extent of interaction of the acyl enzyme with the oxidized coenzyme, NAD+, even where the “redox” properties of the coenzyme are not required. Likewise, the spectral properties of chromophoric acyl enzyme are affected by the extent of bound NAD. Under the pseudophysiological conditions reported herein, there is a stoichiometric limitation of two furylacryloyl-acyl groups per enzyme molecule containing four covalently-equivalent subunits. The binding of NAD both to the apoenzyme and to the diacyl enzyme is heterogeneous: at low extents of NAD occupancy, NAD binding is stronger. The binding to acyl enzyme can be quantitatively described by an enzyme model involving a tetramer with 2-fold symmetry, and consequently containing equal numbers of two classes of sites. NAD binding to difurylacryloyl-enzyme occurs virtually discretely, first to the two unmodified (tight-binding) sites, followed by looser binding to the two acyl-sites. NAD occupancy at these latter sites transforms the chromophoric acyl spectrum from that characteristic of a model furylacryloyl-thiol ester in H2O to a highly perturbed furylacryloyl spectrum characteristic of monomeric native “active-thiol” furylacryloyl-enzymes. Likewise the acyl reactivity towards arsenolysis depends on the extent of NAD bound to the loose sites. Elimination of the tight binding of NAD to the difurylacryloyl enzyme tetramer by alkylation of the remaining two free SH groups with iodoacetate has no apparent influence on the NAD-dependent furylacryloyl-spectral perturbation at the “two equivalent

  9. The RhoA effector mDia is induced during T cell activation and regulates actin polymerization and cell migration in T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Vicente-Manzanares, Miguel; Rey, Mercedes; Pérez-Martínez, Manuel; Yáñez-Mó, María; Sancho, David; Cabrero, José Román; Barreiro, Olga; de la Fuente, Hortensia; Itoh, Kazuyuki; Sánchez-Madrid, Francisco

    2003-07-15

    Regulation of actin polymerization is critical for many different functions of T lymphocytes, including cell migration. Here we show that the RhoA effector mDia is induced in vitro in activated PBL and is highly expressed in vivo in diseased tissue-infiltrating activated lymphocytes. mDia localizes at the leading edge of polarized T lymphoblasts in an area immediately posterior to the leading lamella, in which its effector protein profilin is also concentrated. Overexpression of an activated mutant of mDia results in an inhibition of both spontaneous and chemokine-directed T cell motility. mDia does not regulate the shape of the cell, which involves another RhoA effector, p160 Rho-coiled coil kinase, and is not involved in integrin-mediated cell adhesion. However, mDia activation blocked CD3- and PMA-mediated cell spreading. mDia activation increased polymerized actin levels, which resulted in the blockade of chemokine-induced actin polymerization by depletion of monomeric actin. Moreover, mDia was shown to regulate the function of the small GTPase Rac1 through the control of actin availability. Together, our data demonstrate that RhoA is involved in the control of the filamentous actin/monomeric actin balance through mDia, and that this balance is critical for T cell responses.

  10. Nonthermal activation of transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 channels in abdominal viscera tonically inhibits autonomic cold-defense effectors.

    PubMed

    Steiner, Alexandre A; Turek, Victoria F; Almeida, Maria C; Burmeister, Jeffrey J; Oliveira, Daniela L; Roberts, Jennifer L; Bannon, Anthony W; Norman, Mark H; Louis, Jean-Claude; Treanor, James J S; Gavva, Narender R; Romanovsky, Andrej A

    2007-07-11

    An involvement of the transient receptor potential vanilloid (TRPV) 1 channel in the regulation of body temperature (T(b)) has not been established decisively. To provide decisive evidence for such an involvement and determine its mechanisms were the aims of the present study. We synthesized a new TRPV1 antagonist, AMG0347 [(E)-N-(7-hydroxy-5,6,7,8-tetrahydronaphthalen-1-yl)-3-(2-(piperidin-1-yl)-6-(trifluoromethyl)pyridin-3-yl)acrylamide], and characterized it in vitro. We then found that this drug is the most potent TRPV1 antagonist known to increase T(b) of rats and mice and showed (by using knock-out mice) that the entire hyperthermic effect of AMG0347 is TRPV1 dependent. AMG0347-induced hyperthermia was brought about by one or both of the two major autonomic cold-defense effector mechanisms (tail-skin vasoconstriction and/or thermogenesis), but it did not involve warmth-seeking behavior. The magnitude of the hyperthermic response depended on neither T(b) nor tail-skin temperature at the time of AMG0347 administration, thus indicating that AMG0347-induced hyperthermia results from blockade of tonic TRPV1 activation by nonthermal factors. AMG0347 was no more effective in causing hyperthermia when administered into the brain (intracerebroventricularly) or spinal cord (intrathecally) than when given systemically (intravenously), which indicates a peripheral site of action. We then established that localized intra-abdominal desensitization of TRPV1 channels with intraperitoneal resiniferatoxin blocks the T(b) response to systemic AMG0347; the extent of desensitization was determined by using a comprehensive battery of functional tests. We conclude that tonic activation of TRPV1 channels in the abdominal viscera by yet unidentified nonthermal factors inhibits skin vasoconstriction and thermogenesis, thus having a suppressive effect on T(b).

  11. Memory

    MedlinePlus

    ... it has to decide what is worth remembering. Memory is the process of storing and then remembering this information. There are different types of memory. Short-term memory stores information for a few ...

  12. The role of REM sleep theta activity in emotional memory

    PubMed Central

    Hutchison, Isabel C.; Rathore, Shailendra

    2015-01-01

    While non-REM (NREM) sleep has been strongly implicated in the reactivation and consolidation of memory traces, the role of rapid-eye movement (REM) sleep remains unclear. A growing body of research on humans and animals provide behavioral evidence for a role of REM sleep in the strengthening and modulation of emotional memories. Theta activity—which describes low frequency oscillations in the local field potential within the hippocampus, amygdala and neocortex—is a prominent feature of both wake and REM sleep in humans and rodents. Theta coherence between the hippocampus and amygdala drives large-scale pontine-geniculo-occipital (PGO) waves, the density of which predicts increases in plasticity-related gene expression. This could potentially facilitate the processing of emotional memory traces within the hippocampus during REM sleep. Further, the timing of hippocampal activity in relation to theta phase is vital in determining subsequent potentiation of neuronal activity. This could allow the emotionally modulated strengthening of novel and gradual weakening of consolidated hippocampal memory traces during REM sleep. Hippocampal theta activity is also correlated with REM sleep levels of achetylcholine - which is thought to reduce hippocampal inputs in the neocortex. The additional low levels of noradrenaline during REM sleep, which facilitate feedback within the neocortex, could allow the integration of novel memory traces previously consolidated during NREM sleep. We therefore propose that REM sleep mediates the prioritized processing of emotional memories within the hippocampus, the integration of previously consolidated memory traces within the neocortex, as well as the disengagement of consolidated neocortical memory traces from the hippocampus. PMID:26483709

  13. Activating human genes with zinc finger proteins, transcription activator-like effectors and CRISPR/Cas9 for gene therapy and regenerative medicine.

    PubMed

    Gersbach, Charles A; Perez-Pinera, Pablo

    2014-08-01

    New technologies have recently been developed to control the expression of human genes in their native genomic context by engineering synthetic transcription factors that can be targeted to any DNA sequence. The ability to precisely regulate any gene as it occurs naturally in the genome provides a means to address a variety of diseases and disorders. This approach also circumvents some of the traditional challenges of gene therapy. In this editorial, we review the technologies that have enabled targeted human gene activation, including the engineering of transcription factors based on zinc finger proteins, transcription activator-like effectors and the CRISPR/Cas9 system. Additionally, we highlight examples in which these methods have been developed for therapeutic applications and discuss challenges and opportunities.

  14. Rapid Functional Decline of Activated and Memory Graft-vs-Host-Reactive T Cells Encountering Host Antigens in the Absence of Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hao Wei; Andreola, Giovanna; Carlson, Alicia; Shao, Steven; Lin, Charles; Zhao, Guiling; Sykes, Megan

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation in the priming host environment has critical effects on the graft-vs-host (GVH) responses mediated by naïve donor T cells. However, it is unclear how a quiescent or inflammatory environment impacts the activity of GVH-reactive primed T and memory cells. We show here that GVH-reactive primed donor T cells generated in irradiated recipients had diminished ability compared to naïve T cells to increase donor chimerism when transferred to quiescent mixed allogeneic chimeras. GVH-reactive primed T cells showed marked loss of cytotoxic function and activation and delayed but not decreased proliferation or accumulation in lymphoid tissues when transferred to quiescent mixed chimeras compared to freshly irradiated secondary recipients. Primed CD4 and CD8 T cells provided mutual help to sustain these functions in both subsets. CD8 help for CD4 cells was largely IFN-γ-dependent. Toll-like receptor (TLR) stimulation following transfer of GVH-reactive primed T cells to mixed chimeras restored their cytotoxic effector function and permitted the generation of more effective T cell memory in association with reduced PD-1 expression on CD4 memory cells. Our data indicate that an inflammatory host environment is required for the maintenance of GVH-reactive primed T cell functions and the generation of memory T cells that can rapidly acquire effector functions. These findings have important implications for GVHD and T cell-mediated immunotherapies. PMID:26085679

  15. Rapid Functional Decline of Activated and Memory Graft-versus-Host-Reactive T Cells Encountering Host Antigens in the Absence of Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Li, Hao Wei; Andreola, Giovanna; Carlson, Alicia L; Shao, Steven; Lin, Charles P; Zhao, Guiling; Sykes, Megan

    2015-08-01

    Inflammation in the priming host environment has critical effects on the graft-versus-host (GVH) responses mediated by naive donor T cells. However, it is unclear how a quiescent or inflammatory environment impacts the activity of GVH-reactive primed T and memory cells. We show in this article that GVH-reactive primed donor T cells generated in irradiated recipients had diminished ability compared with naive T cells to increase donor chimerism when transferred to quiescent mixed allogeneic chimeras. GVH-reactive primed T cells showed marked loss of cytotoxic function and activation, and delayed but not decreased proliferation or accumulation in lymphoid tissues when transferred to quiescent mixed chimeras compared with freshly irradiated secondary recipients. Primed CD4 and CD8 T cells provided mutual help to sustain these functions in both subsets. CD8 help for CD4 cells was largely IFN-γ dependent. TLR stimulation after transfer of GVH-reactive primed T cells to mixed chimeras restored their cytotoxic effector function and permitted the generation of more effective T cell memory in association with reduced PD-1 expression on CD4 memory cells. Our data indicate that an inflammatory host environment is required for the maintenance of GVH-reactive primed T cell functions and the generation of memory T cells that can rapidly acquire effector functions. These findings have important implications for graft-versus-host disease and T cell-mediated immunotherapies.

  16. Quantitative variation in effector activity of ToxA isoforms from Stagonospora nodorum and Pyrenophora tritici-repentis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    ToxA is a proteinaceous necrotrophic effector produced by Stagonospora nodorum and Pyrenophora tritici-repentis. In this study, all eight mature isoforms of the ToxA protein were purified and compared. Circular dichroism spectra indicated that all isoforms were structurally intact and had indistingu...

  17. Memory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKean, Kevin

    1983-01-01

    Discusses current research (including that involving amnesiacs and snails) into the nature of the memory process, differentiating between and providing examples of "fact" memory and "skill" memory. Suggests that three brain parts (thalamus, fornix, mammilary body) are involved in the memory process. (JN)

  18. Communication: Memory effects and active Brownian diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Pulak K.; Li, Yunyun; Marchegiani, Giampiero; Marchesoni, Fabio

    2015-12-01

    A self-propelled artificial microswimmer is often modeled as a ballistic Brownian particle moving with constant speed aligned along one of its axis, but changing direction due to random collisions with the environment. Similarly to thermal noise, its angular randomization is described as a memoryless stochastic process. Here, we speculate that finite-time correlations in the orientational dynamics can affect the swimmer's diffusivity. To this purpose, we propose and solve two alternative models. In the first one, we simply assume that the environmental fluctuations governing the swimmer's propulsion are exponentially correlated in time, whereas in the second one, we account for possible damped fluctuations of the propulsion velocity around the swimmer's axis. The corresponding swimmer's diffusion constants are predicted to get, respectively, enhanced or suppressed upon increasing the model memory time. Possible consequences of this effect on the interpretation of the experimental data are discussed.

  19. Communication: Memory effects and active Brownian diffusion.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Pulak K; Li, Yunyun; Marchegiani, Giampiero; Marchesoni, Fabio

    2015-12-07

    A self-propelled artificial microswimmer is often modeled as a ballistic Brownian particle moving with constant speed aligned along one of its axis, but changing direction due to random collisions with the environment. Similarly to thermal noise, its angular randomization is described as a memoryless stochastic process. Here, we speculate that finite-time correlations in the orientational dynamics can affect the swimmer's diffusivity. To this purpose, we propose and solve two alternative models. In the first one, we simply assume that the environmental fluctuations governing the swimmer's propulsion are exponentially correlated in time, whereas in the second one, we account for possible damped fluctuations of the propulsion velocity around the swimmer's axis. The corresponding swimmer's diffusion constants are predicted to get, respectively, enhanced or suppressed upon increasing the model memory time. Possible consequences of this effect on the interpretation of the experimental data are discussed.

  20. Communication: Memory effects and active Brownian diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Pulak K.; Li, Yunyun; Marchegiani, Giampiero; Marchesoni, Fabio

    2015-12-07

    A self-propelled artificial microswimmer is often modeled as a ballistic Brownian particle moving with constant speed aligned along one of its axis, but changing direction due to random collisions with the environment. Similarly to thermal noise, its angular randomization is described as a memoryless stochastic process. Here, we speculate that finite-time correlations in the orientational dynamics can affect the swimmer’s diffusivity. To this purpose, we propose and solve two alternative models. In the first one, we simply assume that the environmental fluctuations governing the swimmer’s propulsion are exponentially correlated in time, whereas in the second one, we account for possible damped fluctuations of the propulsion velocity around the swimmer’s axis. The corresponding swimmer’s diffusion constants are predicted to get, respectively, enhanced or suppressed upon increasing the model memory time. Possible consequences of this effect on the interpretation of the experimental data are discussed.

  1. Dissociable Memory- and Response-Related Activity in Parietal Cortex During Auditory Spatial Working Memory

    PubMed Central

    Alain, Claude; Shen, Dawei; Yu, He; Grady, Cheryl

    2010-01-01

    Attending and responding to sound location generates increased activity in parietal cortex which may index auditory spatial working memory and/or goal-directed action. Here, we used an n-back task (Experiment 1) and an adaptation paradigm (Experiment 2) to distinguish memory-related activity from that associated with goal-directed action. In Experiment 1, participants indicated, in separate blocks of trials, whether the incoming stimulus was presented at the same location as in the previous trial (1-back) or two trials ago (2-back). Prior to a block of trials, participants were told to use their left or right index finger. Accuracy and reaction times were worse for the 2-back than for the 1-back condition. The analysis of functional magnetic resonance imaging data revealed greater sustained task-related activity in the inferior parietal lobule (IPL) and superior frontal sulcus during 2-back than 1-back after accounting for response-related activity elicited by the targets. Target detection and response execution were also associated with enhanced activity in the IPL bilaterally, though the activation was anterior to that associated with sustained task-related activity. In Experiment 2, we used an event-related design in which participants listened (no response required) to trials that comprised four sounds presented either at the same location or at four different locations. We found larger IPL activation for changes in sound location than for sounds presented at the same location. The IPL activation overlapped with that observed during the auditory spatial working memory task. Together, these results provide converging evidence supporting the role of parietal cortex in auditory spatial working memory which can be dissociated from response selection and execution. PMID:21833258

  2. Autonomic activity during sleep predicts memory consolidation in humans

    PubMed Central

    Whitehurst, Lauren N.; McDevitt, Elizabeth A.; Duggan, Katherine A.; Mednick, Sara C.

    2016-01-01

    Throughout history, psychologists and philosophers have proposed that good sleep benefits memory, yet current studies focusing on the relationship between traditionally reported sleep features (e.g., minutes in sleep stages) and changes in memory performance show contradictory findings. This discrepancy suggests that there are events occurring during sleep that have not yet been considered. The autonomic nervous system (ANS) shows strong variation across sleep stages. Also, increases in ANS activity during waking, as measured by heart rate variability (HRV), have been correlated with memory improvement. However, the role of ANS in sleep-dependent memory consolidation has never been examined. Here, we examined whether changes in cardiac ANS activity (HRV) during a daytime nap were related to performance on two memory conditions (Primed and Repeated) and a nonmemory control condition on the Remote Associates Test. In line with prior studies, we found sleep-dependent improvement in the Primed condition compared with the Quiet Wake control condition. Using regression analyses, we compared the proportion of variance in performance associated with traditionally reported sleep features (model 1) vs. sleep features and HRV during sleep (model 2). For both the Primed and Repeated conditions, model 2 (sleep + HRV) predicted performance significantly better (73% and 58% of variance explained, respectively) compared with model 1 (sleep only, 46% and 26% of variance explained, respectively). These findings present the first evidence, to our knowledge, that ANS activity may be one potential mechanism driving sleep-dependent plasticity. PMID:27298366

  3. Physical activity and memory functions: an interventional study.

    PubMed

    Ruscheweyh, R; Willemer, C; Krüger, K; Duning, T; Warnecke, T; Sommer, J; Völker, K; Ho, H V; Mooren, F; Knecht, S; Flöel, A

    2011-07-01

    Previous studies have suggested beneficial effects of physical activity on cognition. Here, we asked in an interventional approach if physical activity performed at different intensity levels would differentially affect episodic memory function. Additionally, we tried to identify mechanisms mediating these changes. Sixty-two healthy elderly individuals were assessed for level of physical activity, aerobic fitness, episodic memory score, neurotrophin and catecholamine levels, and received a magnetic resonance image of the brain at baseline and after a six months intervention of medium or low-intensity physical activity or control. Increase in total physical activity was positively associated with increase in memory score over the entire cohort, without significant differences between intensity groups. It was also positively associated with increases in local gray matter volume in prefrontal and cingulate cortex, and BDNF levels (trend). In conclusion, we showed that physical activity conveys the beneficial effects on memory function independently of its intensity, possibly mediated by local gray matter volume and neurotrophic factors. Our findings may carry significant implications for prevention of cognitive decline in the elderly.

  4. Prefrontal activity and impaired memory encoding strategies in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Guimond, Synthia; Hawco, Colin; Lepage, Martin

    2017-03-08

    Schizophrenia patients have significant memory difficulties that have far-reaching implications in their daily life. These impairments are partly attributed to an inability to self-initiate effective memory encoding strategies, but its core neurobiological correlates remain unknown. The current study addresses this critical gap in our knowledge of episodic memory impairments in schizophrenia. Schizophrenia patients (n = 35) and healthy controls (n = 23) underwent a Semantic Encoding Memory Task (SEMT) during an fMRI scan. Brain activity was examined for conditions where participants were a) prompted to use semantic encoding strategies, or b) not prompted but required to self-initiate such strategies. When prompted to use semantic encoding strategies, schizophrenia patients exhibited similar recognition performance and brain activity as healthy controls. However, when required to self-initiate these strategies, patients had significant reduced recognition performance and brain activity in the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, as well as in the left temporal gyrus, left superior parietal lobule, and cerebellum. When patients were divided based on performance on the SEMT, the subgroup with more severe deficits in self-initiation also showed greater reduction in left dorsolateral prefrontal activity. These results suggest that impaired self-initiation of elaborative encoding strategies is a driving feature of memory deficits in schizophrenia. We also identified the neural correlates of impaired self-initiation of semantic encoding strategies, in which a failure to activate the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex plays a key role. These findings provide important new targets in the development of novel treatments aiming to improve memory and ultimately patients' outcome.

  5. The Nature of Individual Differences in Working Memory Capacity: Active Maintenance in Primary Memory and Controlled Search from Secondary Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Unsworth, Nash; Engle, Randall W.

    2007-01-01

    Studies examining individual differences in working memory capacity have suggested that individuals with low working memory capacities demonstrate impaired performance on a variety of attention and memory tasks compared with individuals with high working memory capacities. This working memory limitation can be conceived of as arising from 2…

  6. Marker for type VI secretion system effectors

    PubMed Central

    Salomon, Dor; Kinch, Lisa N.; Trudgian, David C.; Guo, Xiaofeng; Klimko, John A.; Grishin, Nick V.; Mirzaei, Hamid; Orth, Kim

    2014-01-01

    Bacteria use diverse mechanisms to kill, manipulate, and compete with other cells. The recently discovered type VI secretion system (T6SS) is widespread in bacterial pathogens and used to deliver virulence effector proteins into target cells. Using comparative proteomics, we identified two previously unidentified T6SS effectors that contained a conserved motif. Bioinformatic analyses revealed that this N-terminal motif, named MIX (marker for type six effectors), is found in numerous polymorphic bacterial proteins that are primarily located in the T6SS genome neighborhood. We demonstrate that several MIX-containing proteins are T6SS effectors and that they are not required for T6SS activity. Thus, we propose that MIX-containing proteins are T6SS effectors. Our findings allow for the identification of numerous uncharacterized T6SS effectors that will undoubtedly lead to the discovery of new biological mechanisms. PMID:24927539

  7. Rhythmic Working Memory Activation in the Human Hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Leszczyński, Marcin; Fell, Juergen; Axmacher, Nikolai

    2015-11-10

    Working memory (WM) maintenance is assumed to rely on a single sustained process throughout the entire maintenance period. This assumption, although fundamental, has never been tested. We used intracranial electroencephalography (EEG) recordings from the human hippocampus in two independent experiments to investigate the neural dynamics underlying WM maintenance. We observed periodic fluctuations between two different oscillatory regimes: Periods of "memory activation" were reflected by load-dependent alpha power reductions and lower levels of cross-frequency coupling (CFC). They occurred interleaved with periods characterized by load-independent high levels of alpha power and CFC. During memory activation periods, a relevant CFC parameter (load-dependent changes of the peak modulated frequency) correlated with individual WM capacity. Fluctuations between these two periods predicted successful performance and were locked to the phase of endogenous delta oscillations. These results show that hippocampal maintenance is a dynamic rather than constant process and depends critically on a hierarchy of oscillations.

  8. Teaching an old dog new tricks: Suppressing activation of specific mitogen-activated kinases as a potential virulence function of the bacterial AvrRpt2 effector protein

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT AvrRpt2 is one of the first Pseudomonas syringae effector proteins demonstrated to be delivered into host cells. It suppresses plant immunity by modulating auxin signaling and cleavage of the membrane-localized defense regulator RIN4. We recently uncovered a novel potential virulence function of AvrRpt2, where it specifically blocked activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases, MPK4 and MPK11, but not of MPK3 and MPK6. Putative AvrRpt2 homologs from different phytopathogens and plant-associated bacteria showed distinct activities with respect to MPK4/11 activation suppression and RIN4 cleavage. Apart from differences in sequence similarity, 3 of the analyzed homologs were apparently “truncated.” To examine the role of the AvrRpt2 N-terminus, we modeled the structures of these AvrRpt2 homologs and performed deletion and domain swap experiments. Our results strengthen the finding that RIN4 cleavage is irrelevant for the ability to suppress defense-related MPK4/11 activation and indicate that full protease activity or cleavage specificity is affected by the N-terminus. PMID:27830985

  9. Hippocampal activity mediates the relationship between circadian activity rhythms and memory in older adults.

    PubMed

    Sherman, Stephanie M; Mumford, Jeanette A; Schnyer, David M

    2015-08-01

    Older adults experience parallel changes in sleep, circadian rhythms, and episodic memory. These processes appear to be linked such that disruptions in sleep contribute to deficits in memory. Although more variability in circadian patterns is a common feature of aging and predicts pathology, little is known about how alterations in circadian activity rhythms within older adults influence new episodic learning. Following 10 days of recording sleep-wake patterns using actigraphy, healthy older adults underwent fMRI while performing an associative memory task. The results revealed better associative memory was related to more consistent circadian activity rhythms, independent of total sleep time, sleep efficiency, and level of physical activity. Moreover, hippocampal activity during successful memory retrieval events was positively correlated with associative memory accuracy and circadian activity rhythm (CAR) consistency. We demonstrated that the link between consistent rhythms and associative memory performance was mediated by hippocampal activity. These findings provide novel insight into how the circadian rhythm of sleep-wake cycles are associated with memory in older adults and encourage further examination of circadian activity rhythms as a biomarker of cognitive functioning.

  10. Generation of effector cells that localize to mucosal tissues and form resident memory CD8 T cells is controlled by mTOR

    PubMed Central

    Sowell, Ryan T.; Rogozinska, Magdalena; Nelson, Christine E.; Vezys, Vaiva; Marzo, Amanda L.

    2014-01-01

    Mucosal tissues are subject to frequent pathogen exposure and major sites for transmission of infectious disease. CD8 T cells play a critical role in controlling mucosa-acquired infections though their migration into mucosal tissues is tightly regulated. The mechanisms and signals that control the formation of tissue-resident memory CD8 T cells are poorly understood however, one key regulator of memory CD8 T cell differentiation, mTOR kinase, can be inhibited by rapamycin. We report that despite enhancing the formation of memory CD8 T cells in secondary lymphoid tissues, rapamycin inhibits the formation of resident memory CD8 T cells in the intestinal and vaginal mucosa. The ability of rapamycin to block formation of functional resident CD8 T cells in mucosal tissues protected mice from a model of CD8 T cell mediated lethal intestinal autoimmunity. These findings demonstrate an opposing role for mTOR in the formation of resident versus non-resident CD8 T cell immunity. PMID:25070853

  11. Interferon-alpha regulates the dynamic balance between human activated regulatory and effector T cells: implications for antiviral and autoimmune responses.

    PubMed

    Golding, Amit; Rosen, Antony; Petri, Michelle; Akhter, Ehtisham; Andrade, Felipe

    2010-09-01

    An adequate effector response against pathogens and its subsequent inactivation after pathogen clearance are critical for the maintenance of immune homeostasis. This process involves an initial phase of T-cell effector (Teff) activation followed by the expansion of regulatory T cells (Tregs), a unique cell population that limits Teff functions. However, significant questions remain unanswered about the mechanisms that regulate the balance between these cell populations. Using an in vitro system to mimic T-cell activation in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), we analysed the patterns of Treg and Teff activation, with special attention to the role of type I interferon (IFN-I). Interestingly, we found that IFN-alpha, either exogenously added or endogenously induced, suppressed the generation of CD4(+) FoxP3(HI )IFN-gamma(Neg) activated Tregs (aTregs) while simultaneously promoting propagation of CD4(+) FoxP3(Low/Neg )IFN-gamma(Pos) activated Teffs (aTeffs). We also showed that IFN-alpha-mediated inhibition of interleukin (IL)-2 production may play an essential role in IFN-alpha-induced suppression of aTregs. In order to test our findings in a disease state with chronically elevated IFN-alpha, we investigated systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Plasma from patients with SLE was found to contain IFN-I activity that suppressed aTreg generation. Furthermore, anti-CD3 activated SLE PBMCs exhibited preferential expansion of aTeffs with a very limited increase in aTreg numbers. Together, these observations support a model whereby a transient production of IFN-alpha (such as is seen in an early antiviral response) may promote CD4 effector functions by delaying aTreg generation, but a chronic elevation of IFN-alpha may tip the aTeff:aTreg balance towards aTeffs and autoimmunity.

  12. Working Memory Training: Improving Intelligence--Changing Brain Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jausovec, Norbert; Jausovec, Ksenija

    2012-01-01

    The main objectives of the study were: to investigate whether training on working memory (WM) could improve fluid intelligence, and to investigate the effects WM training had on neuroelectric (electroencephalography--EEG) and hemodynamic (near-infrared spectroscopy--NIRS) patterns of brain activity. In a parallel group experimental design,…

  13. Genetic diversity of transcriptional activator-like effector genes in Chinese isolates of Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzicola.

    PubMed

    Ji, Zhi-Yuan; Zakria, Muhammad; Zou, Li-Fang; Xiong, Li; Li, Zheng; Ji, Guang-Hai; Chen, Gong-You

    2014-07-01

    Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzicola causes bacterial leaf streak (BLS), a devastating disease of rice in Asia countries. X. oryzae pv. oryzicola utilizes repertoires of transcriptional activator-like effectors (TALEs) to manipulate host resistance or susceptibility; thus, TALEs can determine the outcome of BLS. In this report, we studied genetic diversity in putative tale genes of 65 X. oryzae pv. oryzicola strains that originated from nine provinces of southern China. Genomic DNAs from the 65 strains were digested with BamHI and hybridized with an internal fragment of avrXa3, a tale gene originating from the related pathogen, X. oryzae pv. oryzae, which causes bacterial leaf blight (BLB). Southern blot analysis indicated that the strains contained a variable number (9 to 22) of avrXa3-hybridizing fragments (e.g., putative tale genes). Based on the number and size of hybridizing bands, strains were classified into 14 genotypes (designated 1 to 14), and genotypes 3 and 10 represented 29.23 and 24.64% of the total, respectively. A high molecular weight BamHI fragment (HMWB; ≈6.0 kb) was present in 12 of the 14 genotypes, and sequence analysis of the HMWB revealed the presence of a C-terminally truncated tale, an insertion element related to IS1403, and genes encoding phosphoglycerate mutase and endonuclease V. Primers were developed from the 6.0-kb HMWB fragment and showed potential in genotyping X. oryzae pv. oryzicola strains by polymerase chain reaction. Virulence of X. oryzae pv. oryzicola strains was assessed on 23 rice cultivars containing different resistance genes for BLB. The X. oryzae pv. oryzicola strains could be grouped into 14 pathotypes (I to XIV), and the grouping of strains was almost identical to the categories determined by genotypic analysis. In general, strains containing higher numbers of putative tale genes were more virulent on rice than strains containing fewer tales. The results also indicate that there are no gene-for-gene relationships

  14. Thermally activated retainer means utilizing shape memory alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grimaldi, Margaret E. (Inventor); Hartz, Leslie S. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A retainer member suitable for retaining a gap filler placed in gaps between adjacent tile members is presented. One edge of the retainer member may be attached to the gap filler and another edge may be provided with a plurality of tab members which in an intermediate position do not interfere with placement or removal of the gap filler between tile members. The retainer member may be fabricated from a shape memory alloy which when heated to a specified memory temperature will thermally activate the tab members to predetermined memory positions engaging the tile members to retain the gap filler in the gap. This invention has particular application to the thermal tiles on space vehicles such as the Space Shuttle Orbiter.

  15. Interaction of the GTP-binding and GTPase-activating domains of ARD1 involves the effector region of the ADP-ribosylation factor domain.

    PubMed

    Vitale, N; Moss, J; Vaughan, M

    1997-02-14

    ADP-ribosylation factors (ARFs) are a family of approximately 20-kDa guanine nucleotide-binding proteins and members of the Ras superfamily, originally identified and purified by their ability to enhance the ADP-ribosyltransferase activity of cholera toxin and more recently recognized as critical participants in vesicular trafficking pathways and phospholipase D activation. ARD1 is a 64-kDa protein with an 18-kDa carboxyl-terminal ARF domain (p3) and a 46-kDa amino-terminal extension (p5) that is widely expressed in mammalian tissues. Using recombinant proteins, we showed that p5, the amino-terminal domain of ARD1, stimulates the GTPase activity of p3, the ARF domain, and appears to be the GTPase-activating protein (GAP) component of this bifunctional protein, whereas in other members of the Ras superfamily a separate GAP molecule interacts with the effector region of the GTP-binding protein. p5 stimulated the GTPase activity of p3 but not of ARF1, which differs from p3 in several amino acids in the effector domain. After substitution of 7 amino acids from p3 in the appropriate position in ARF1, the chimeric protein ARF1(39-45p3) bound to p5, which increased its GTPase activity. Specifically, after Gly40 and Thr45 in the putative effector domain of ARF1 were replaced with the equivalent Asp and Pro, respectively, from p3, functional interaction of the chimeric ARF1 with p5 was increased. Thus, Asp25 and Pro30 of the ARF domain (p3) of ARD1 are involved in its functional and physical interaction with the GTPase-activating (p5) domain of ARD1. After deletion of the amino-terminal 15 amino acids from ARF1(39-45p3), its interaction with p5 was essentially equivalent to that of p3, suggesting that the amino terminus of ARF1(39-45p3) may interfere with binding to p5. These results are consistent with the conclusion that the GAP domain of ARD1 interacts with the effector region of the ARF domain and thereby stimulates GTP hydrolysis.

  16. Structural Insights into a Unique Legionella pneumophila Effector LidA Recognizing Both GDP and GTP Bound Rab1 in Their Active State

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Defen; Li, Bingqing; Zhu, Deyu; Chen, Yuzhen; Zhang, Hao; Xu, Sujuan; Chai, Jijie; Gu, Lichuan

    2012-01-01

    The intracellular pathogen Legionella pneumophila hijacks the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-derived vesicles to create an organelle designated Legionella-containing vacuole (LCV) required for bacterial replication. Maturation of the LCV involved acquisition of Rab1, which is mediated by the bacterial effector protein SidM/DrrA. SidM/DrrA is a bifunctional enzyme having the activity of both Rab1-specific GDP dissociation inhibitor (GDI) displacement factor (GDF) and guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF). LidA, another Rab1-interacting bacterial effector protein, was reported to promote SidM/DrrA-mediated recruitment of Rab1 to the LCV as well. Here we report the crystal structures of LidA complexes with GDP- and GTP-bound Rab1 respectively. Structural comparison revealed that GDP-Rab1 bound by LidA exhibits an active and nearly identical conformation with that of GTP-Rab1, suggesting that LidA can disrupt the switch function of Rab1 and render it persistently active. As with GTP, LidA maintains GDP-Rab1 in the active conformation through interaction with its two conserved switch regions. Consistent with the structural observations, biochemical assays showed that LidA binds to GDP- and GTP-Rab1 equally well with an affinity approximately 7.5 nM. We propose that the tight interaction with Rab1 allows LidA to facilitate SidM/DrrA-catalyzed release of Rab1 from GDIs. Taken together, our results support a unique mechanism by which a bacterial effector protein regulates Rab1 recycling. PMID:22416225

  17. Direct ex vivo analysis of human CD4(+) memory T cell activation requirements at the single clonotype level.

    PubMed

    Bitmansour, Arlene D; Douek, Daniel C; Maino, Vernon C; Picker, Louis J

    2002-08-01

    CD4(+) memory T cells continuously integrate signals transmitted through the TCR and costimulatory molecules, only responding when the intensity of such signals exceeds an intrinsic activation threshold. Recent data suggest that these activation thresholds can be regulated independently of TCR specificity, and that threshold tuning may constitute a major mechanism for controlling T cell effector activity. In this work we take advantage of the profound clonotypic hierarchies of the large human CD4(+) T cell response to CMV to study activation thresholds of fresh (unexpanded) memory T cells at the clonotypic level. We identified dominant responses to CMV matrix determinants mediated by single TCRB sequences within particular TCR-Vbeta families. The specific response characteristics of these single, Ag-specific, TCRB-defined clonotypes could be unequivocally determined in fresh PBMC preparations by cytokine flow cytometry with gating on the appropriate Vbeta family. These analyses revealed 1) optimal peptides capable of eliciting specific responses by themselves at doses as low as 2 pg/ml, with each log increase in dose eliciting ever-increasing frequencies of responding cells over a 4- to 5-log range; 2) significant augmentation of response frequencies at all submaximal peptide doses by CD28- and CD49d-mediated costimulation; 3) differential dose response and costimulatory characteristics for IFN-gamma and IL-2 responses; and 4) no association of activation requirements with the CD27-defined CD4(+) T cell memory differentiation pathway. Taken together these data confirm that triggering heterogeneity exists within individual CD4(+) memory T cell clonotypes in vivo and demonstrate that such single clonotypes can manifest qualitatively different functional responses depending on epitope dose and relative levels of costimulation.

  18. In vitro activation and differentiation of naïve CD4+ and CD8+ T cells into HCV core- and NS3-specific armed effector cells: a new role for CD4+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Krishnadas, Deepa K; Li, Wen; Kumar, Rakesh; Tyrrell, Lorne J; Agrawal, Babita

    2009-01-01

    Viral clearance in hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection has been correlated with strong, multi-specific and sustained T cell responses. The number of functionally active effector T cells determines the outcome of infection. Only a small number of antigen-specific naïve T cells are originally present. Upon infection, they undergo activation, clonal expansion and differentiation to become effector cells. In this study, we determined the ability of dendritic cells (DCs) to prime T cells in vitro to become effector cells upon stimulation with various TLR ligands or IFNalpha. T cell priming and activation was determined by proliferation and production of effector molecules, IFN-gamma and Granzyme B (GrB). HCV Core-specific T cells showed significant increase in proliferation, and the number of HCV Core-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cells producing IFN-gamma and GrB was higher than control or NS3-specific T cells. These in vitro-primed CD4+ and CD8+ T cells exhibit the phenotype of just-activated and/or armed effector lymphocytes confirming the transition of naïve T cells to effector cells. This is the first study demonstrating the activation of GrB+CD4+ T cells against antigen(s) derived from HCV. Our study suggests a novel role of CD4+ T cells in immunity against HCV.

  19. Cross-dressed dendritic cells drive memory CD8+ T-cell activation after viral infection.

    PubMed

    Wakim, Linda M; Bevan, Michael J

    2011-03-31

    After an infection, cytotoxic T lymphocyte precursors proliferate and become effector cells by recognizing foreign peptides in the groove of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules expressed by antigen-presenting cells (APCs). Professional APCs specialized for T-cell activation acquire viral antigen either by becoming infected themselves (direct presentation) or by phagocytosis of infected cells, followed by transfer of antigen to the cytosol, processing and MHC class I loading in a process referred to as cross-presentation. An alternative way, referred to as 'cross-dressing', by which an uninfected APC could present antigen was postulated to be by the transfer of preformed peptide-MHC complexes from the surface of an infected cell to the APC without the need of further processing. Here we show that this mechanism exists and boosts the antiviral response of mouse memory CD8(+) T cells. A number of publications have demonstrated sharing of peptide-loaded MHC molecules in vitro. Our in vitro experiments demonstrate that cross-dressing APCs do not acquire peptide-MHC complexes in the form of exosomes released by donor cells. Rather, the APCs and donor cells have to contact each other for the transfer to occur. After a viral infection, we could isolate cross-dressed APCs able to present viral antigen in vitro. Furthermore, using the diphtheria toxin system to selectively eliminate APCs that could only acquire viral peptide-MHC complexes by cross-dressing, we show that such presentation can promote the expansion of resting memory T cells. Notably, naive T cells were excluded from taking part in the response. Cross-dressing is a mechanism of antigen presentation used by dendritic cells that may have a significant role in activating previously primed CD8(+) T cells.

  20. Adaptive memory: stereotype activation is not enough.

    PubMed

    Otgaar, Henry; Smeets, Tom; Merckelbach, Harald; Jelicic, Marko; Verschuere, Bruno; Galliot, Anne-Marie; van Riel, Laura

    2011-08-01

    Studies have shown that survival processing leads to superior memorability. The aim of the present study was to examine whether this survival recall advantage might result from stereotype activation. To test this hypothesis, we conducted a pilot study and two experiments in which participants were primed with stereotypes (Experiment 1, professor and elderly person; Experiment 2, survival-stereotype). In Experiment 1, 120 undergraduates were randomly assigned to a survival, professor stereotype, elderly person stereotype, or moving scenario and rated words for their relevance to the imagined scenario. In Experiment 2, 75 undergraduates were given a survival, survival-stereotype (based on our pilot study), or moving scenario. Both experiments showed that survival processing leads to a greater recall advantage over the stereotype groups and control group. These data indicate that the mere activation of stereotypes cannot explain the survival recall advantage.

  1. Local delivery of CpG-B and GM-CSF induces concerted activation of effector and regulatory T cells in the human melanoma sentinel lymph node.

    PubMed

    van den Hout, Mari F C M; Sluijter, Berbel J R; Santegoets, Saskia J A M; van Leeuwen, Paul A M; van den Tol, M Petrousjka; van den Eertwegh, Alfons J M; Scheper, Rik J; de Gruijl, Tanja D

    2016-04-01

    Impaired immune effector functions in the melanoma sentinel lymph node (SLN) may allow for early metastatic events. In an effort to determine the optimal way to strengthen immune defenses, 28 clinical stage I-II melanoma patients were randomized in a 3-arm Phase II study to receive, prior to excision and sampling of the SLN, i.d. injections of saline or low-dose CpG-B (CpG), alone or combined with GM-CSF (GM), around the melanoma excision site. We previously described the combined administration of these DC-targeting agents to result in activation and recruitment of potentially cross-presenting BDCA3(+) DCs to the SLN. In this report we describe the effects on effector and regulatory T and NK cell subsets. Local low-dose CpG administration resulted in lower CD4/CD8 ratios, Th1 skewing, increased frequencies of melanoma-specific CD8(+) T cells and possible recruitment of effector NK cells, irrespective of GM co-administration. These immune-potentiating effects were counterbalanced by increased IL-10 production by T cells and significantly higher levels of FoxP3 and CTLA4 in regulatory T cells (Tregs) with correspondingly higher suppressive activity in the SLN. Notably, CpG ± GM-administered patients showed significantly lower numbers of SLN metastases (saline: 4/9, CpG + GM: 1/9, CpG: 0/10, p = 0.04). These findings indicate that i.d. delivery of low-dose CpG ± GM potentially arms the SLN of early-stage melanoma patients against metastatic spread, but that antitumor efficacy may be further boosted by counteracting the collateral activation of Tregs.

  2. Effector proteins of rust fungi

    PubMed Central

    Petre, Benjamin; Joly, David L.; Duplessis, Sébastien

    2014-01-01

    Rust fungi include many species that are devastating crop pathogens. To develop resistant plants, a better understanding of rust virulence factors, or effector proteins, is needed. Thus far, only six rust effector proteins have been described: AvrP123, AvrP4, AvrL567, AvrM, RTP1, and PGTAUSPE-10-1. Although some are well established model proteins used to investigate mechanisms of immune receptor activation (avirulence activities) or entry into plant cells, how they work inside host tissues to promote fungal growth remains unknown. The genome sequences of four rust fungi (two Melampsoraceae and two Pucciniaceae) have been analyzed so far. Genome-wide analyses of these species, as well as transcriptomics performed on a broader range of rust fungi, revealed hundreds of small secreted proteins considered as rust candidate secreted effector proteins (CSEPs). The rust community now needs high-throughput approaches (effectoromics) to accelerate effector discovery/characterization and to better understand how they function in planta. However, this task is challenging due to the non-amenability of rust pathosystems (obligate biotrophs infecting crop plants) to traditional molecular genetic approaches mainly due to difficulties in culturing these species in vitro. The use of heterologous approaches should be promoted in the future. PMID:25191335

  3. Efficient help for autoreactive B-cell activation requires CD4+ T-cell recognition of an agonist peptide at the effector stage.

    PubMed

    Hondowicz, Brian D; Batheja, Amrita O; Metzgar, Michele H; Pagán, Antonio J; Perng, Olivia A; Willms, Simone; Caton, Andrew J; Erikson, Jan

    2009-09-01

    T-cell recognition of peptide/MHC complexes is flexible and can lead to differential activation, but how interactions with agonist (full activation) or partial agonist (suboptimal activation) peptides can shape immune responses in vivo is not well characterized. We investigated the effect of stimulation by agonist or partial agonist ligands during initial CD4(+) T-cell priming, and subsequent T-B-cell cognate interactions, on antibody production by anti-chromatin B cells. We found that autoantibody production required TCR recognition of an agonist peptide at the effector stage of B-cell activation. However, interaction with a weak agonist ligand at this effector stage failed to promote efficient autoantibody production, even if the CD4(+) T cells were fully primed by an agonist peptide. These studies suggest that the reactivity of the TCR for a target self-peptide during CD4(+) T-B-cell interaction can be a critical determinant in restraining anti-chromatin autoantibody production.

  4. Addition of transcription activator-like effector binding sites to a pathogen strain-specific rice bacterial blight resistance gene makes it effective against additional strains and against bacterial leaf streak.

    PubMed

    Hummel, Aaron W; Doyle, Erin L; Bogdanove, Adam J

    2012-09-01

    Xanthomonas transcription activator-like (TAL) effectors promote disease in plants by binding to and activating host susceptibility genes. Plants counter with TAL effector-activated executor resistance genes, which cause host cell death and block disease progression. We asked whether the functional specificity of an executor gene could be broadened by adding different TAL effector binding elements (EBEs) to it. We added six EBEs to the rice Xa27 gene, which confers resistance to strains of the bacterial blight pathogen Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo) that deliver the TAL effector AvrXa27. The EBEs correspond to three other effectors from Xoo strain PXO99(A) and three from strain BLS256 of the bacterial leaf streak pathogen Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzicola (Xoc). Stable integration into rice produced healthy lines exhibiting gene activation by each TAL effector, and resistance to PXO99(A) , a PXO99(A) derivative lacking AvrXa27, and BLS256, as well as two other Xoo and 10 Xoc strains virulent toward wildtype Xa27 plants. Transcripts initiated primarily at a common site. Sequences in the EBEs were found to occur nonrandomly in rice promoters, suggesting an overlap with endogenous regulatory sequences. Thus, executor gene specificity can be broadened by adding EBEs, but caution is warranted because of the possible coincident introduction of endogenous regulatory elements.

  5. Gene targeting technologies in rats: zinc finger nucleases, transcription activator-like effector nucleases, and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats.

    PubMed

    Mashimo, Tomoji

    2014-01-01

    The laboratory rat has been widely used as an animal model in biomedical science for more than 150 years. Applying zinc-finger nucleases or transcription activator-like effector nucleases to rat embryos via microinjection is an efficient genome editing tool for generating targeted knockout rats. Recently, clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated endonucleases have been used as an effective tool for precise and multiplex genome editing in mice and rats. In this review, the advantages and disadvantages of these site-specific nuclease technologies for genetic analysis and manipulation in rats are discussed.

  6. Translocated effectors of Yersinia

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Hiroyuki; Young, Glenn M.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Currently, all known translocated effectors of Yersinia are delivered into host cells by type III secretion systems (T3SSs). Pathogenic Yersinia maintain the plasmid-encoded Ysc T3SS for the specific delivery of the well-studied Yop effectors. New horizons for effector biology have opened with the discovery of the Ysps of Y. enterocolitica Biovar 1B, which are translocated into host cells by the chromosome-endoded Ysa T3SS. The reported arsenal of effectors is likely to expand since genomic analysis has revealed gene-clusters in some Yersinia that code for other T3SSs. These efforts also revealed possible type VI secretion (T6S) systems, which may indicate translocation of effectors occurs by multiple mechanisms. PMID:19185531

  7. Medial Temporal Lobe Activity Predicts Successful Relational Memory Binding

    PubMed Central

    Hannula, Deborah E.; Ranganath, Charan

    2009-01-01

    Previous neuropsychological findings have implicated medial temporal lobe (MTL) structures in retaining object-location relations over the course of short delays, but MTL effects have not always been reported in neuroimaging investigations with similar short-term memory requirements. Here, we used event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging to test the hypothesis that the hippocampus and related MTL structures support accurate retention of relational memory representations, even across short delays. On every trial, four objects were presented, each in one of nine possible locations of a three-dimensional grid. Participants were to mentally rotate the grid and then maintain the rotated representation in anticipation of a test stimulus: a rendering of the grid, rotated 90° from the original viewpoint. The test stimulus was either a “match” display, in which object-location relations were intact, or a “mismatch” display, in which one object occupied a new, previously unfilled location (mismatch position), or two objects had swapped locations (mismatch swap). Encoding phase activation in anterior and posterior regions of the left hippocampus, and in bilateral perirhinal cortex, predicted subsequent accuracy on the short-term memory decision, as did bilateral posterior hippocampal activity after the test stimulus. Notably, activation in these posterior hippocampal regions was also sensitive to the degree to which object-location bindings were preserved in the test stimulus; activation was greatest for match displays, followed by mismatch-position displays, and finally mismatch-swap displays. These results indicate that the hippocampus and related MTL structures contribute to successful encoding and retrieval of relational information in visual short-term memory. PMID:18171929

  8. Heterologous Plasmid DNA Prime-Recombinant Human Adenovirus 5 Boost Vaccination Generates a Stable Pool of Protective Long-Lived CD8+ T Effector Memory Cells Specific for a Human Parasite, Trypanosoma cruzi▿†

    PubMed Central

    Rigato, Paula Ordonhez; de Alencar, Bruna C.; de Vasconcelos, José Ronnie C.; Dominguez, Mariana R.; Araújo, Adriano F.; Machado, Alexandre V.; Gazzinelli, Ricardo T.; Bruna-Romero, Oscar; Rodrigues, Mauricio M.

    2011-01-01

    Recently, we described a heterologous prime-boost strategy using plasmid DNA followed by replication-defective human recombinant adenovirus type 5 as a powerful strategy to elicit long-lived CD8+ T-cell-mediated protective immunity against experimental systemic infection of mice with a human intracellular protozoan parasite, Trypanosoma cruzi. In the present study, we further characterized the protective long-lived CD8+ T cells. We compared several functional and phenotypic aspects of specific CD8+ T cells present 14 or 98 days after the last immunizing dose and found the following: (i) the numbers of specific cells were similar, as determined by multimer staining or by determining the number of gamma interferon (IFN-γ)-secreting cells by enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT) assay; (ii) these cells were equally cytotoxic in vivo; (iii) following in vitro stimulation, a slight decline in the frequency of multifunctional cells (CD107a+ IFN-γ+ or CD107a+ IFN-γ+ tumor necrosis factor alpha positive [TNF-α+]) was paralleled by a significant increase of CD107a singly positive cells after 98 days; (iv) the expression of several surface markers was identical, except for the reexpression of CD127 after 98 days; (v) the use of genetically deficient mice revealed a role for interleukin-12 (IL-12)/IL-23, but not IFN-γ, in the maintenance of these memory cells; and (vi) subsequent immunizations with an unrelated virus or a plasmid vaccine or the depletion of CD4+ T cells did not significantly erode the number or function of these CD8+ T cells during the 15-week period. From these results, we concluded that heterologous plasmid DNA prime-adenovirus boost vaccination generated a stable pool of functional protective long-lived CD8+ T cells with an effector memory phenotype. PMID:21357719

  9. Memory Systems Do Not Divide on Consciousness: Reinterpreting Memory in Terms of Activation and Binding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reder, Lynne M.; Park, Heekyeong; Kieffaber, Paul D.

    2009-01-01

    There is a popular hypothesis that performance on implicit and explicit memory tasks reflects 2 distinct memory systems. Explicit memory is said to store those experiences that can be consciously recollected, and implicit memory is said to store experiences and affect subsequent behavior but to be unavailable to conscious awareness. Although this…

  10. Shigella Effector OspB Activates mTORC1 in a Manner That Depends on IQGAP1 and Promotes Cell Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Eshleman, Heather D.; Fu, Yang; Bloom, Alexander; Li, Zhigang; Sacks, David B.; Goldberg, Marcia B.

    2015-01-01

    The intracellular bacterial pathogen Shigella infects and spreads through the human intestinal epithelium. Effector proteins delivered by Shigella into cells promote infection by modulating diverse host functions. We demonstrate that the effector protein OspB interacts directly with the scaffolding protein IQGAP1, and that the absence of either OspB or IQGAP1 during infection leads to larger areas of S. flexneri spread through cell monolayers. We show that the effect on the area of bacterial spread is due to OspB triggering increased cell proliferation at the periphery of infected foci, thereby replacing some of the cells that die within infected foci and restricting the area of bacterial spread. We demonstrate that OspB enhancement of cell proliferation results from activation of mTORC1, a master regulator of cell growth, and is blocked by the mTORC1-specific inhibitor rapamycin. OspB activation of mTORC1, and its effects on cell proliferation and bacterial spread, depends on IQGAP1. Our results identify OspB as a regulator of mTORC1 and mTORC1-dependent cell proliferation early during S. flexneri infection and establish a role for IQGAP1 in mTORC1 signaling. They also raise the possibility that IQGAP1 serves as a scaffold for the assembly of an OspB-mTORC1 signaling complex. PMID:26473364

  11. The Type IV Secretion System Effector Protein CirA Stimulates the GTPase Activity of RhoA and Is Required for Virulence in a Mouse Model of Coxiella burnetii Infection

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Mary M.; Faris, Robert; van Schaik, Erin J.; McLachlan, Juanita Thrasher; Wright, William U.; Tellez, Andres; Roman, Victor A.; Rowin, Kristina; Case, Elizabeth Di Russo; Luo, Zhao-Qing

    2016-01-01

    Coxiella burnetii, the etiological agent of Q fever in humans, is an intracellular pathogen that replicates in an acidified parasitophorous vacuole derived from host lysosomes. Generation of this replicative compartment requires effectors delivered into the host cell by the Dot/Icm type IVb secretion system. Several effectors crucial for C. burnetii intracellular replication have been identified, but the host pathways coopted by these essential effectors are poorly defined, and very little is known about how spacious vacuoles are formed and maintained. Here we demonstrate that the essential type IVb effector, CirA, stimulates GTPase activity of RhoA. Overexpression of CirA in mammalian cells results in cell rounding and stress fiber disruption, a phenotype that is rescued by overexpression of wild-type or constitutively active RhoA. Unlike other effector proteins that subvert Rho GTPases to modulate uptake, CirA is the first effector identified that is dispensable for uptake and instead recruits Rho GTPase to promote biogenesis of the bacterial vacuole. Collectively our results highlight the importance of CirA in coopting host Rho GTPases for establishment of Coxiella burnetii infection and virulence in mammalian cell culture and mouse models of infection. PMID:27324482

  12. The Type IV Secretion System Effector Protein CirA Stimulates the GTPase Activity of RhoA and Is Required for Virulence in a Mouse Model of Coxiella burnetii Infection.

    PubMed

    Weber, Mary M; Faris, Robert; van Schaik, Erin J; McLachlan, Juanita Thrasher; Wright, William U; Tellez, Andres; Roman, Victor A; Rowin, Kristina; Case, Elizabeth Di Russo; Luo, Zhao-Qing; Samuel, James E

    2016-09-01

    Coxiella burnetii, the etiological agent of Q fever in humans, is an intracellular pathogen that replicates in an acidified parasitophorous vacuole derived from host lysosomes. Generation of this replicative compartment requires effectors delivered into the host cell by the Dot/Icm type IVb secretion system. Several effectors crucial for C. burnetii intracellular replication have been identified, but the host pathways coopted by these essential effectors are poorly defined, and very little is known about how spacious vacuoles are formed and maintained. Here we demonstrate that the essential type IVb effector, CirA, stimulates GTPase activity of RhoA. Overexpression of CirA in mammalian cells results in cell rounding and stress fiber disruption, a phenotype that is rescued by overexpression of wild-type or constitutively active RhoA. Unlike other effector proteins that subvert Rho GTPases to modulate uptake, CirA is the first effector identified that is dispensable for uptake and instead recruits Rho GTPase to promote biogenesis of the bacterial vacuole. Collectively our results highlight the importance of CirA in coopting host Rho GTPases for establishment of Coxiella burnetii infection and virulence in mammalian cell culture and mouse models of infection.

  13. Dissociation of Active Working Memory and Passive Recognition in Rhesus Monkeys

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Basile, Benjamin M.; Hampton, Robert R.

    2013-01-01

    Active cognitive control of working memory is central in most human memory models, but behavioral evidence for such control in nonhuman primates is absent and neurophysiological evidence, while suggestive, is indirect. We present behavioral evidence that monkey memory for familiar images is under active cognitive control. Concurrent cognitive…

  14. Dissecting gamma frequency activity during human memory processing.

    PubMed

    Kucewicz, Michal T; Berry, Brent M; Kremen, Vaclav; Brinkmann, Benjamin H; Sperling, Michael R; Jobst, Barbara C; Gross, Robert E; Lega, Bradley; Sheth, Sameer A; Stein, Joel M; Das, Sandthitsu R; Gorniak, Richard; Stead, S Matthew; Rizzuto, Daniel S; Kahana, Michael J; Worrell, Gregory A

    2017-03-13

    Gamma frequency activity (30-150 Hz) is induced in cognitive tasks and is thought to reflect underlying neural processes. Gamma frequency activity can be recorded directly from the human brain using intracranial electrodes implanted in patients undergoing treatment for drug-resistant epilepsy. Previous studies have independently explored narrowband oscillations in the local field potential and broadband power increases. It is not clear, however, which processes contribute to human brain gamma frequency activity, or their dynamics and roles during memory processing. Here a large dataset of intracranial recordings obtained during encoding of words from 101 patients was used to detect, characterize and compare induced gamma frequency activity events. Individual bursts of gamma frequency activity were isolated in the time-frequency domain to determine their spectral features, including peak frequency, amplitude, frequency span, and duration. We found two distinct types of gamma frequency activity events that showed either narrowband or broadband frequency spans revealing characteristic spectral properties. Narrowband events, the predominant type, were induced by word presentations following an initial induction of broadband events, which were temporally separated and selectively correlated with evoked response potentials, suggesting that they reflect different neural activities and play different roles during memory encoding. The two gamma frequency activity types were differentially modulated during encoding of subsequently recalled and forgotten words. In conclusion, we found evidence for two distinct activity types induced in the gamma frequency range during cognitive processing. Separating these two gamma frequency activity components contributes to the current understanding of electrophysiological biomarkers, and may prove useful for emerging neurotechnologies targeting, mapping and modulating distinct neurophysiological processes in normal and epileptogenic brain.

  15. Advanced Aerodynamic Control Effectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Richard M.; Bauer, Steven X. S.

    1999-01-01

    A 1990 research program that focused on the development of advanced aerodynamic control effectors (AACE) for military aircraft has been reviewed and summarized. Data are presented for advanced planform, flow control, and surface contouring technologies. The data show significant increases in lift, reductions in drag, and increased control power, compared to typical aerodynamic designs. The results presented also highlighted the importance of planform selection in the design of a control effector suite. Planform data showed that dramatic increases in lift (greater than 25%) can be achieved with multiple wings and a sawtooth forebody. Passive porosity and micro drag generator control effector data showed control power levels exceeding that available from typical effectors (moving surfaces). Application of an advanced planform to a tailless concept showed benefits of similar magnitude as those observed in the generic studies.

  16. End-effector microprocessor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doggett, William R.

    1992-01-01

    The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include: automated structures assembly facility current control hierarchy; automated structures assembly facility purposed control hierarchy; end-effector software state transition diagram; block diagram for ideal install composite; and conclusions.

  17. Frontal theta activity during working memory in test anxiety.

    PubMed

    Shi, Zhan; Gao, Xin; Zhou, Renlai

    2015-03-04

    Previous studies have shown that working memory (WM) processes are related to frontal-midline theta (FM-theta) activity (4-8 Hz) and test anxiety impairs WM performance. However, the effect of test anxiety on FM-theta activity during WM has not been investigated as yet. To examine this question, 37 undergraduates were asked to complete a modified reading span task involving neutral working memory capacity (WMC) and emotional WMC while their electroencephalography was measured. The results showed that relative to neutral WMC performance (the ability to remember the letter lists in the context of valence-neutral sentences), emotional WMC performance (the ability to remember the letter lists in the context of test-related sentences) was poorer for highly test anxious participants compared with lowly test anxious participants. Relative to FM-theta activity during remembering the letter lists in the valence-neutral context, FM-theta activity was weaker during remembering the letter lists in the test-related context for highly test anxious participants compared with lowly test anxious participants. These findings indicate that FM-theta is an index not only for successful WM manipulation but also for efficient prefrontal cortex functioning during WM.

  18. Assessing working memory capacity through time-constrained elementary activities.

    PubMed

    Lucidi, Annalisa; Loaiza, Vanessa; Camos, Valérie; Barrouillet, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    Working memory (WM) capacity measured through complex span tasks is among the best predictors of fluid intelligence (Gf). These tasks usually involve maintaining memoranda while performing complex cognitive activities that require a rather high level of education (e.g., reading comprehension, arithmetic), restricting their range of applicability. Because individual differences in such complex activities are nothing more than the concatenation of small differences in their elementary constituents, complex span tasks involving elementary processes should be as good of predictors of Gf as traditional tasks. The present study showed that two latent variables issued from either traditional or new span tasks involving time-constrained elementary activities were similarly correlated with Gf. Moreover, a model with a single unitary WM factor had a similar fit as a model with two distinct WM factors. Thus, time-constrained elementary activities can be integrated in WM tasks, permitting the assessment of WM in a wider range of populations.

  19. The Salmonella Effector SpvD Is a Cysteine Hydrolase with a Serovar-specific Polymorphism Influencing Catalytic Activity, Suppression of Immune Responses, and Bacterial Virulence*

    PubMed Central

    Grabe, Grzegorz J.; Zhang, Yue; Przydacz, Michal; Rolhion, Nathalie; Yang, Yi; Pruneda, Jonathan N.; Komander, David; Holden, David W.; Hare, Stephen A.

    2016-01-01

    Many bacterial pathogens secrete virulence (effector) proteins that interfere with immune signaling in their host. SpvD is a Salmonella enterica effector protein that we previously demonstrated to negatively regulate the NF-κB signaling pathway and promote virulence of S. enterica serovar Typhimurium in mice. To shed light on the mechanistic basis for these observations, we determined the crystal structure of SpvD and show that it adopts a papain-like fold with a characteristic cysteine-histidine-aspartate catalytic triad comprising Cys-73, His-162, and Asp-182. SpvD possessed an in vitro deconjugative activity on aminoluciferin-linked peptide and protein substrates in vitro. A C73A mutation abolished SpvD activity, demonstrating that an intact catalytic triad is required for its function. Taken together, these results strongly suggest that SpvD is a cysteine protease. The amino acid sequence of SpvD is highly conserved across different S. enterica serovars, but residue 161, located close to the catalytic triad, is variable, with serovar Typhimurium SpvD having an arginine and serovar Enteritidis a glycine at this position. This variation affected hydrolytic activity of the enzyme on artificial substrates and can be explained by substrate accessibility to the active site. Interestingly, the SpvDG161 variant more potently inhibited NF-κB-mediated immune responses in cells in vitro and increased virulence of serovar Typhimurium in mice. In summary, our results explain the biochemical basis for the effect of virulence protein SpvD and demonstrate that a single amino acid polymorphism can affect the overall virulence of a bacterial pathogen in its host. PMID:27789710

  20. Human intracranial high-frequency activity during memory processing: neural oscillations or stochastic volatility?

    PubMed

    Burke, John F; Ramayya, Ashwin G; Kahana, Michael J

    2015-04-01

    Intracranial high-frequency activity (HFA), which refers to fast fluctuations in electrophysiological recordings, increases during memory processing. Two views have emerged to explain this effect: (1) HFA reflects a synchronous signal, related to underlying gamma oscillations, that plays a mechanistic role in human memory and (2) HFA reflects an asynchronous signal that is a non-specific marker of brain activation. We review recent data supporting each of these views and conclude that HFA during memory processing is more consistent with an asynchronous signal. Memory-related HFA is therefore best conceptualized as a biomarker of neural activation that can functionally map memory with high spatial and temporal precision.

  1. Persistently active neurons in human medial frontal and medial temporal lobe support working memory.

    PubMed

    Kamiński, Jan; Sullivan, Shannon; Chung, Jeffrey M; Ross, Ian B; Mamelak, Adam N; Rutishauser, Ueli

    2017-04-01

    Persistent neural activity is a putative mechanism for the maintenance of working memories. Persistent activity relies on the activity of a distributed network of areas, but the differential contribution of each area remains unclear. We recorded single neurons in the human medial frontal cortex and medial temporal lobe while subjects held up to three items in memory. We found persistently active neurons in both areas. Persistent activity of hippocampal and amygdala neurons was stimulus-specific, formed stable attractors and was predictive of memory content. Medial frontal cortex persistent activity, on the other hand, was modulated by memory load and task set but was not stimulus-specific. Trial-by-trial variability in persistent activity in both areas was related to memory strength, because it predicted the speed and accuracy by which stimuli were remembered. This work reveals, in humans, direct evidence for a distributed network of persistently active neurons supporting working memory maintenance.

  2. Memory Systems Do Not Divide on Consciousness: Reinterpreting Memory in Terms of Activation and Binding

    PubMed Central

    Reder, Lynne M.; Park, Heekyeong; Kieffaber, Paul D.

    2009-01-01

    There is a popular hypothesis that performance on implicit and explicit memory tasks reflects 2 distinct memory systems. Explicit memory is said to store those experiences that can be consciously recollected, and implicit memory is said to store experiences and affect subsequent behavior but to be unavailable to conscious awareness. Although this division based on awareness is a useful taxonomy for memory tasks, the authors review the evidence that the unconscious character of implicit memory does not necessitate that it be treated as a separate system of human memory. They also argue that some implicit and explicit memory tasks share the same memory representations and that the important distinction is whether the task (implicit or explicit) requires the formation of a new association. The authors review and critique dissociations from the behavioral, amnesia, and neuroimaging literatures that have been advanced in support of separate explicit and implicit memory systems by highlighting contradictory evidence and by illustrating how the data can be accounted for using a simple computational memory model that assumes the same memory representation for those disparate tasks. PMID:19210052

  3. The Role of Memory Activation in Creating False Memories of Encoding Context

    PubMed Central

    Arndt, Jason

    2010-01-01

    Three experiments examined false memory for encoding context by presenting DRM themes (Deese, 1959; Roediger & McDermott, 1995) in usual-looking fonts and testing related, but unstudied, lure items in a font that was shown during encoding. In two of the experiments, testing lure items in the font used to study their associated themes increased false recognition relative to testing lure items in a font that was used to study a different lure's theme. Further, studying a larger number of associates exacerbated the influence of testing lure items in a font used to study their associated themes. Finally, testing lures in a font that was encoded many times, but was not used to present the lures' studied associates, increased lure errors more than testing lures in a font that was encoded relatively fewer times. These results favor the explanation of false recognition offered by global-matching models of recognition memory over the explanations of activation-monitoring theory and fuzzy-trace theory. PMID:20053045

  4. Laser-activated shape memory polymer intravascular thrombectomy device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Small, Ward, IV; Wilson, Thomas S.; Benett, William J.; Loge, Jeffrey M.; Maitland, Duncan J.

    2005-10-01

    A blood clot (thrombus) that becomes lodged in the arterial network supplying the brain can cause an ischemic stroke, depriving the brain of oxygen and often resulting in permanent disability. As an alternative to conventional clot-dissolving drug treatment, we are developing an intravascular laser-activated therapeutic device using shape memory polymer (SMP) to mechanically retrieve the thrombus and restore blood flow to the brain. Thermal imaging and computer simulation were used to characterize the optical and photothermal behavior of the SMP microactuator. Deployment of the SMP device in an in vitro thrombotic vascular occlusion model demonstrated the clinical treatment concept.

  5. Identification of a genetic cluster influencing memory performance and hippocampal activity in humans.

    PubMed

    de Quervain, Dominique J-F; Papassotiropoulos, Andreas

    2006-03-14

    Experimental work in animals has shown that memory formation depends on a cascade of molecular events. Here we show that variability of human memory performance is related to variability in genes encoding proteins of this signaling cascade, including the NMDA and metabotrobic glutamate receptors, adenylyl cyclase, CAMKII, PKA, and PKC. The individual profile of genetic variability in these signaling molecules correlated significantly with episodic memory performance (P < 0.00001). Moreover, functional MRI during memory formation revealed that this genetic profile correlated with activations in memory-related brain regions, including the hippocampus and parahippocampal gyrus. The present study indicates that genetic variability in the human homologues of memory-related signaling molecules contributes to interindividual differences in human memory performance and memory-related brain activations.

  6. The Association between Physical Activity During the Day and Long-Term Memory Stability

    PubMed Central

    Pontifex, Matthew B.; Gwizdala, Kathryn L.; Parks, Andrew C.; Pfeiffer, Karin A.; Fenn, Kimberly M.

    2016-01-01

    Despite positive associations between chronic physical activity and memory; we have little understanding of how best to incorporate physical activity during the day to facilitate the consolidation of information into memory, nor even how time spent physically active during the day relates to memory processes. The purpose of this investigation was to examine the relation between physical activity during the day and long-term memory. Ninety-two young adults learned a list of paired-associate items and were tested on the items after a 12-hour interval during which heart rate was recorded continuously. Although the percentage of time spent active during the day was unrelated to memory, two critical physical activity periods were identified as relating to the maintenance of long-term memory. Engaging in physical activity during the period 1 to 2-hours following the encoding of information was observed to be detrimental to the maintenance of information in long-term memory. In contrast, physical activity during the period 1-hour prior to memory retrieval was associated with superior memory performance, likely due to enhanced retrieval processing. These findings provide initial evidence to suggest that long-term memory may be enhanced by more carefully attending to the relative timing of physical activity incorporated during the day. PMID:27909312

  7. Effects of cryopreservation on effector cells for antibody dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) and natural killer (NK) cell activity in (51)Cr-release and CD107a assays.

    PubMed

    Mata, Mariana M; Mahmood, Fareeha; Sowell, Ryan T; Baum, Linda L

    2014-04-01

    Freshly isolated PBMC are broadly used as effector cells in functional assays that evaluate antibody-dependent cell mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) and NK activity; however, they introduce natural-individual donor-to-donor variability. Cryopreserved PBMC provide a more consistent source of effectors than fresh cells in cytotoxicity assays. Our objective was to determine the effects of cryopreservation of effector PBMC on cell frequency, and on the magnitude and specificity of ADCC and NK activity. Fresh, frozen/overnight rested and frozen/not rested PBMC were used as effector cells in (51)Cr-release and CD107a degranulation assays. Frozen/overnight rested PBMC had higher ADCC and NK activity in both assays when compared to fresh PBMC; however, when using frozen/not rested PBMC, ADCC and NK activities were significantly lower than fresh PBMC. Background CD107a degranulation in the absence of target cell stimulation was greater in PBMC that were frozen/not rested when compared to fresh PBMC or PBMC that were frozen overnight and rested. The percentages of CD16(+)CD56(dim) NK cells and CD14(+) monocytes were lower in PBMC that were frozen and rested overnight than in fresh PBMC. CD16 expression on CD56(dim) NK cells was similar for all PBMC treatments. PBMC that were frozen and rested overnight were comparable to fresh PBMC effectors. PBMC that were frozen and used immediately when evaluating ADCC or NK activity using either a (51)Cr-release assay or a CD107a degranulation assay had the lowest activity. Clinical studies of antibodies that mediate ADCC would benefit from using effector cells that have been frozen, thawed and rested overnight prior to assay.

  8. Simultaneous activation of viral antigen-specific memory CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells using mRNA-electroporated CD40-activated autologous B-cells.

    PubMed

    Van den Bosch, Glenn A; Van Gulck, Ellen; Ponsaerts, Peter; Nijs, Griet; Lenjou, Marc; Apers, Ludwig; Kint, Ilse; Heyndrickx, Leo; Vanham, Guido; Van Bockstaele, Dirk R; Berneman, Zwi N; Van Tendeloo, Viggo F I

    2006-01-01

    Recently, it has become obvious that not only CD8 T-cells, but also CD4 T-helper cells are required for the induction of an effective, long-lasting cellular immune response. In view of the clinical importance of cytomegalovirus (CMV) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, we developed 2 strategies to simultaneously reactivate viral antigen-specific memory CD4 and CD8 T-cells of CMV-seropositive and HIV-seropositive subjects using mRNA-electroporated autologous CD40-activated B cells. In the setting of HIV, we provide evidence that CD40-activated B cells can be cultured from HAART-naive HIV-1 seropositive patients. These cells not only express and secrete the HIV p24 antigen after electroporation with codon-optimized HIV-1 gag mRNA, but can also be used to in vitro reactivate Gag antigen-specific interferon-gamma-producing CD4 and CD8 autologous T-cells. For the CMV-specific approach, we applied mRNA coding for the pp65 protein coupled to the lysosomal-associated membrane protein-1 to transfect CD40-activated B cells to induce CMV antigen-specific CD4 and CD8 T-cells. More detailed analysis of the activated interferon-gamma-producing CMV pp65 tetramer positive CD8 T-cells revealed an effector memory phenotype with the capacity to produce interleukin-2. Our findings clearly show that the concomitant activation of both CD4 and CD8 (memory) T-cells using mRNA-electroporated CD40-B cells is feasible in CMV and HIV-1-seropositive persons, which indicates the potential value of this approach for application in cellular immunotherapy of infectious diseases.

  9. Signal-regulator interactions. Genetic analysis of the effector binding site of xylS, the benzoate-activated positive regulator of Pseudomonas TOL plasmid meta-cleavage pathway operon.

    PubMed

    Ramos, J L; Michan, C; Rojo, F; Dwyer, D; Timmis, K

    1990-01-20

    This study reports a genetic analysis of the interactions between a positive regulator of gene expression and its effector molecules. Transcription of the TOL plasmid meta-cleavage pathway operon is specifically stimulated by the XylS protein positive regulator either through activation of this regulator by benzoate effectors or through its hyperproduction. One xylS mutant that exhibits constitutive expression of the operon promoter has been characterized, together with six mutants encoding altered XylS proteins that recognize as effectors benzoate analogues that are non-effectors for the XylS wild-type protein. The changes in two mutant regulators are located at the N-terminal end of the protein, within a putative beta-pleated domain. These mutant proteins exhibit a markedly increased affinity for normal benzoate effectors, with K's values fivefold to 60-fold lower than those of the wild-type XylS protein. They are additionally activated by new effectors having certain substituents at position 2, 3 and 4 of the aromatic ring. Two other mutant proteins recognize new effectors having substituents at position 4 and 5 of the aromatic ring, and contain mutations at their C-terminal end within a putative alpha-helix-rich domain. Three other mutations, one of which leads to constitutive expression from Pm, each result in an amino acid change in the central region of the regulator. These findings suggest but do not prove that the effector binding pocket of the XylS protein may be composed of two or more non-contiguous segments of its primary structure. The XylS protein exhibits homology with the AraC protein of Escherichia coli, a protein that stimulates transcription from ara promoters when it is activated by arabinose or benzoate. Mutations influencing effector activation of the XylS protein characterized in this study are all located in regions exhibiting a high degree of homology with the corresponding aligned sequence of AraC protein.

  10. Transcription activator-like effector nucleases efficiently disrupt the target gene in Iberian ribbed newts (Pleurodeles waltl), an experimental model animal for regeneration.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Toshinori; Sakamoto, Kousuke; Sakuma, Tetsushi; Yokotani, Naoki; Inoue, Takeshi; Kawaguchi, Eri; Agata, Kiyokazu; Yamamoto, Takashi; Takeuchi, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    Regeneration of a lost tissue in an animal is an important issue. Although regenerative studies have a history of research spanning more than a century, the gene functions underlying regulation of the regeneration are mostly unclear. Analysis of knockout animals is a very powerful tool with which to elucidate gene function. Recently, transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) have been developed as an effective technique for genome editing. This technique enables gene targeting in amphibians such as newts that were previously impossible. Here we show that newts microinjected with TALEN mRNAs designed for targeting the tyrosinase gene in single-cell stage embryos revealed an albino phenotype. Sequence analysis revealed that the tyrosinase genes were effectively disrupted in these albino newts. Moreover, precise genome alteration was achieved using TALENs and single strand oligodeoxyribonucleotides. Our results suggest that TALENs are powerful tools for genome editing for regenerative research in newts.

  11. TRANSCRIPTION ACTIVATOR-LIKE EFFECTOR NUCLEASE-Mediated Generation and Metabolic Analysis of Camalexin-Deficient cyp71a12 cyp71a13 Double Knockout Lines.

    PubMed

    Müller, Teresa M; Böttcher, Christoph; Morbitzer, Robert; Götz, Cornelia C; Lehmann, Johannes; Lahaye, Thomas; Glawischnig, Erich

    2015-07-01

    In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), a number of defense-related metabolites are synthesized via indole-3-acetonitrile (IAN), including camalexin and indole-3-carboxylic acid (ICOOH) derivatives. Cytochrome P450 71A13 (CYP71A13) is a key enzyme for camalexin biosynthesis and catalyzes the conversion of indole-3-acetaldoxime (IAOx) to IAN. The CYP71A13 gene is located in tandem with its close homolog CYP71A12, also encoding an IAOx dehydratase. However, for CYP71A12, indole-3-carbaldehyde and cyanide were identified as major reaction products. To clarify CYP71A12 function in vivo and to better understand IAN metabolism, we generated two cyp71a12 cyp71a13 double knockout mutant lines. CYP71A12-specific transcription activator-like effector nucleases were introduced into the cyp71a13 background, and very efficient somatic mutagenesis was achieved. We observed stable transmission of the cyp71a12 mutation to the following generations, which is a major challenge for targeted mutagenesis in Arabidopsis. In contrast to cyp71a13 plants, in which camalexin accumulation is partially reduced, double mutants synthesized only traces of camalexin, demonstrating that CYP71A12 contributes to camalexin biosynthesis in leaf tissue. A major role of CYP71A12 was identified for the inducible biosynthesis of ICOOH. Specifically, the ICOOH methyl ester was reduced to 12% of the wild-type level in AgNO3-challenged cyp71a12 leaves. In contrast, indole-3-carbaldehyde derivatives apparently are synthesized via alternative pathways, such as the degradation of indole glucosinolates. Based on these results, we present a model for this surprisingly complex metabolic network with multiple IAN sources and channeling of IAOx-derived IAN into camalexin biosynthesis. In conclusion, transcription activator-like effector nuclease-mediated mutation is a powerful tool for functional analysis of tandem genes in secondary metabolism.

  12. The NO-cGMP-PKG Signaling Pathway Regulates Synaptic Plasticity and Fear Memory Consolidation in the Lateral Amygdala via Activation of ERK/MAP Kinase

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ota, Kristie T.; Pierre, Vicki J.; Ploski, Jonathan E.; Queen, Kaila; Schafe, Glenn E.

    2008-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that nitric oxide (NO) signaling plays a crucial role in memory consolidation of Pavlovian fear conditioning and in synaptic plasticity in the lateral amygdala (LA). In the present experiments, we examined the role of the cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG), a downstream effector of NO, in fear memory consolidation and…

  13. Mycobacterium tuberculosis PstS1 amplifies IFN-γ and induces IL-17/IL-22 responses by unrelated memory CD4+ T cells via dendritic cell activation.

    PubMed

    Palma, Carla; Schiavoni, Giovanna; Abalsamo, Laura; Mattei, Fabrizio; Piccaro, Giovanni; Sanchez, Massimo; Fernandez, Carmen; Singh, Mahavir; Gabriele, Lucia

    2013-09-01

    The immunological mechanisms that modulate protection during Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infection or vaccination are not fully understood. Secretion of IFN-γ and, to a lesser extent, of IL-17 by CD4(+) T cells plays a major role both in protection and immunopathology. Few Mtb Ags interacting with DCs affect priming, activation, and regulation of Ag-unrelated CD4(+) T-cell responses. Here we demonstrate that PstS1, a 38 kDa-lipoprotein of Mtb, promotes Ag-independent activation of memory T lymphocytes specific for Ag85B or Ag85A, two immunodominant protective Ags of Mtb. PstS1 expands CD4(+) and CD8(+) memory T cells, amplifies secretion of IFN-γ and IL-22 and induces IL-17 production by effector memory cells in an Ag-unrelated manner in vitro and in vivo. These effects were mediated through the stimulation of DCs, particularly of the CD8α(-) subtype, which respond to PstS1 by undergoing phenotypic maturation and by secreting IL-6, IL-1β and, to a lower extent, IL-23. IL-6 secretion by PstS1-stimulated DCs was required for IFN-γ, and to a lesser extent for IL-22 responses by Ag85B-specific memory T cells. These results may open new perspectives for immunotherapeutic strategies to control Th1/Th17 immune responses in Mtb infections and in vaccinations against tuberculosis.

  14. Memories.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brand, Judith, Ed.

    1998-01-01

    This theme issue of the journal "Exploring" covers the topic of "memories" and describes an exhibition at San Francisco's Exploratorium that ran from May 22, 1998 through January 1999 and that contained over 40 hands-on exhibits, demonstrations, artworks, images, sounds, smells, and tastes that demonstrated and depicted the biological,…

  15. Legionella Metaeffector Exploits Host Proteasome to Temporally Regulate Cognate Effector

    PubMed Central

    Kubori, Tomoko; Shinzawa, Naoaki; Kanuka, Hirotaka; Nagai, Hiroki

    2010-01-01

    Pathogen-associated secretion systems translocate numerous effector proteins into eukaryotic host cells to coordinate cellular processes important for infection. Spatiotemporal regulation is therefore important for modulating distinct activities of effectors at different stages of infection. Here we provide the first evidence of “metaeffector,” a designation for an effector protein that regulates the function of another effector within the host cell. Legionella LubX protein functions as an E3 ubiquitin ligase that hijacks the host proteasome to specifically target the bacterial effector protein SidH for degradation. Delayed delivery of LubX to the host cytoplasm leads to the shutdown of SidH within the host cells at later stages of infection. This demonstrates a sophisticated level of coevolution between eukaryotic cells and L. pneumophila involving an effector that functions as a key regulator to temporally coordinate the function of a cognate effector protein. PMID:21151961

  16. Task-dependent activations of human auditory cortex during spatial discrimination and spatial memory tasks.

    PubMed

    Rinne, Teemu; Koistinen, Sonja; Talja, Suvi; Wikman, Patrik; Salonen, Oili

    2012-02-15

    In the present study, we applied high-resolution functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) of the human auditory cortex (AC) and adjacent areas to compare activations during spatial discrimination and spatial n-back memory tasks that were varied parametrically in difficulty. We found that activations in the anterior superior temporal gyrus (STG) were stronger during spatial discrimination than during spatial memory, while spatial memory was associated with stronger activations in the inferior parietal lobule (IPL). We also found that wide AC areas were strongly deactivated during the spatial memory tasks. The present AC activation patterns associated with spatial discrimination and spatial memory tasks were highly similar to those obtained in our previous study comparing AC activations during pitch discrimination and pitch memory (Rinne et al., 2009). Together our previous and present results indicate that discrimination and memory tasks activate anterior and posterior AC areas differently and that this anterior-posterior division is present both when these tasks are performed on spatially invariant (pitch discrimination vs. memory) or spatially varying (spatial discrimination vs. memory) sounds. These results also further strengthen the view that activations of human AC cannot be explained only by stimulus-level parameters (e.g., spatial vs. nonspatial stimuli) but that the activations observed with fMRI are strongly dependent on the characteristics of the behavioral task. Thus, our results suggest that in order to understand the functional structure of AC a more systematic investigation of task-related factors affecting AC activations is needed.

  17. Repression of Androgen Receptor Activity by HEYL, a Third Member of the Hairy/Enhancer-of-split-related Family of Notch Effectors*

    PubMed Central

    Lavery, Derek N.; Villaronga, M. Angeles; Walker, Marjorie M.; Patel, Anup; Belandia, Borja; Bevan, Charlotte L.

    2011-01-01

    The Hairy/Enhancer-of-split-related with YRPW-like motif (HEY) family of proteins are transcriptional repressors and downstream effectors of Notch signaling. We previously reported that HEY1 and HEY2 selectively repress androgen receptor (AR) signaling in mammalian cell lines and have shown that in human tissue HEY1 is excluded from the nuclei in prostate cancer but not benign prostatic hyperplasia. We have now characterized a third member of this family, HEYL, which is a more potent repressor of AR activity. HEYL interacted with and repressed AR activation function-1 domain and competitively inhibited SRC1e activation of AR transcriptional activity. Using a cell line inducibly expressing exogenous HEYL, we showed that HEYL represses endogenous AR-regulated genes and reduces androgen-dependent prostate cancer cell growth. Using a trans-repression assay, we identified both trichostatin-sensitive and -insensitive domains within HEYL; however, analysis of endogenous AR target genes suggested that HEYL represses AR activity through histone deacetylase I/II-independent mechanisms. Immunohistochemical analyses of tissue indicated that, in a fashion similar to that previously reported for HEY1, HEYL is excluded from the nuclei in prostate cancer but not adjacent benign tissue. This suggests that nuclear exclusion of HEY proteins may be an important step in the progression of prostate cancer. PMID:21454491

  18. Developmental Activation of the AHR Increases Effector CD4+ T Cells and Exacerbates Symptoms in Autoimmune Disease-Prone Gnaq+/− Mice

    PubMed Central

    Boule, Lisbeth A.; Burke, Catherine G.; Fenton, Bruce M.; Thevenet-Morrison, Kelly; Jusko, Todd A.; Lawrence, B. Paige

    2015-01-01

    Perinatal environmental exposures are potentially important contributors to the increase in autoimmune diseases. Yet, the mechanisms by which these exposures increase self-reactive immune responses later in life are poorly understood. Autoimmune diseases require CD4+ T cells for initiation, progression, and/or clinical symptoms; thus, developmental exposures that cause durable changes in CD4+ T cells may play a role. Early life activation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) causes persistent changes in the response of CD4+ T cells to infection later in life but whether CD4+ T cells are affected by developmental exposure in the context of an autoimmune disease is unknown. Gnaq+/− mice develop symptoms of autoimmune disease similar to those measured clinically, and therefore can be used to evaluate gene-environment interactions during development on disease progression. Herein, we examined the effect of AHR activation in utero and via lactation, or solely via lactation, on disease onset and severity in adult Gnaq+/− offspring. Developmental activation of the AHR-accelerated disease in Gnaq+/− mice, and this correlates with increases in effector CD4+ T-cell populations. Increased symptom onset and cellular changes due to early life AHR activation were more evident in female Gnaq+/− mice compared with males. These observations suggest that developmental AHR activation by pollutants, and other exogenous ligands, may increase the likelihood that genetically predisposed individuals will develop clinical symptoms of autoimmune disease later in life. PMID:26363170

  19. Developmental Activation of the AHR Increases Effector CD4+ T Cells and Exacerbates Symptoms in Autoimmune Disease-Prone Gnaq+/- Mice.

    PubMed

    Boule, Lisbeth A; Burke, Catherine G; Fenton, Bruce M; Thevenet-Morrison, Kelly; Jusko, Todd A; Lawrence, B Paige

    2015-12-01

    Perinatal environmental exposures are potentially important contributors to the increase in autoimmune diseases. Yet, the mechanisms by which these exposures increase self-reactive immune responses later in life are poorly understood. Autoimmune diseases require CD4(+) T cells for initiation, progression, and/or clinical symptoms; thus, developmental exposures that cause durable changes in CD4(+) T cells may play a role. Early life activation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) causes persistent changes in the response of CD4(+) T cells to infection later in life but whether CD4(+) T cells are affected by developmental exposure in the context of an autoimmune disease is unknown. Gnaq(+/-) mice develop symptoms of autoimmune disease similar to those measured clinically, and therefore can be used to evaluate gene-environment interactions during development on disease progression. Herein, we examined the effect of AHR activation in utero and via lactation, or solely via lactation, on disease onset and severity in adult Gnaq(+/-) offspring. Developmental activation of the AHR-accelerated disease in Gnaq(+/-) mice, and this correlates with increases in effector CD4(+) T-cell populations. Increased symptom onset and cellular changes due to early life AHR activation were more evident in female Gnaq(+/-) mice compared with males. These observations suggest that developmental AHR activation by pollutants, and other exogenous ligands, may increase the likelihood that genetically predisposed individuals will develop clinical symptoms of autoimmune disease later in life.

  20. Despite large-scale T cell activation, only a minor subset of T cells responding in vitro to Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans differentiate into effector T cells.

    PubMed

    Zadeh, H H; Tanavoli, S; Haines, D D; Kreutzer, D L

    2000-06-01

    Recent studies in our laboratory have demonstrated that Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans has a potent T cell stimulatory effect, activating more than half of all T cells. However, since the fate of these activated T cells was not known, the present study sought to determine whether all of these T cells differentiate into effector cells. To that end, the intracellular expression of T cell cytokines (IL-2, IFN-gamma, IL-4 and IL-10) in response to A. actinomycetemcomitans was determined by flow cytometry. Results demonstrated a time-dependent increase in the expression of the cytokines, most reaching peak levels at 24-48 h. At 48 h, the proportion of T cells expressing each of the cytokines were as follows: IL-2 (1.7%+/-0.3), IFN-gamma (1.8%+/-0.5), IL-4 (1.0%+/-0.2) and IL-10 (1.5%+/-0.5). These data indicated that only 2-5% of all T cells stimulated with A. actinomycetemcomitans expressed any T cell cytokines. The finding of large-scale T cell activation in the absence of cytokine expression suggests that the activation of T cells in response to A. actinomycetemcomitans is incomplete. To investigate this phenomenon, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were cultured with A. actinomycetemcomitans for 24 h followed by sorting of the activated (CD69+) cells by immunomagnetic separation and restimulation with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) and ionomycin. Results demonstrated that nearly 90% of the T cells were unresponsive to further restimulation. A possible explanation for this unresponsiveness is the induction of clonal anergy among the responding T cells. To determine possible preferential effects of the stimulation on specific cytokines, the expression of each cytokine among T cells responding to A. actinomycetemcomitans was compared to the maximum levels achieved by PMA + ionomycin stimulation. Results showed that number of IL-2+ and IFN-gamma+ T cells observed in response to A. actinomycetemcomitans were between 2% and 7% of those seen in

  1. Systematic Analysis of Bacterial Effector-Postsynaptic Density 95/Disc Large/Zonula Occludens-1 (PDZ) Domain Interactions Demonstrates Shigella OspE Protein Promotes Protein Kinase C Activation via PDLIM Proteins*

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Chae-ryun; Allen, John E.; Russo, Brian; Lee, Soo Young; Heindl, Jason E.; Baxt, Leigh A.; Herrera, Bobby Brooke; Kahoud, Emily; MacBeath, Gavin; Goldberg, Marcia B.

    2014-01-01

    Diseases caused by many Gram-negative bacterial pathogens depend on the activities of bacterial effector proteins that are delivered into eukaryotic cells via specialized secretion systems. Effector protein function largely depends on specific subcellular targeting and specific interactions with cellular ligands. PDZ domains are common domains that serve to provide specificity in protein-protein interactions in eukaryotic systems. We show that putative PDZ-binding motifs are significantly enriched among effector proteins delivered into mammalian cells by certain bacterial pathogens. We use PDZ domain microarrays to identify candidate interaction partners of the Shigella flexneri effector proteins OspE1 and OspE2, which contain putative PDZ-binding motifs. We demonstrate in vitro and in cells that OspE proteins interact with PDLIM7, a member of the PDLIM family of proteins, which contain a PDZ domain and one or more LIM domains, protein interaction domains that participate in a wide variety of functions, including activation of isoforms of protein kinase C (PKC). We demonstrate that activation of PKC during S. flexneri infection is attenuated in the absence of PDLIM7 or OspE proteins and that the OspE PDZ-binding motif is required for wild-type levels of PKC activation. These results are consistent with a model in which binding of OspE to PDLIM7 during infection regulates the activity of PKC isoforms that bind to the PDLIM7 LIM domain. PMID:25124035

  2. The last half-repeat of transcription activator-like effector (TALE) is dispensable and thereby TALE-based technology can be simplified.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Chong-Ke; Wang, Chun-Lian; Zhang, Xiao-Ping; Wang, Fu-Jun; Qin, Teng-Fei; Zhao, Kai-Jun

    2014-09-01

    To activate the expression of host genes that contribute to pathogen growth, pathogenic Xanthomonas bacteria inject their transcription activator-like effectors (TALEs) into plant cells and the TALEs bind to target gene promoters by the central repeat region consisting of near-perfect 34-amino-acid repeats (34-aa repeats). Based on the recognition codes between the 34-aa repeats and the targeted nucleotides, TALE-based technologies, such as designer TALEs (dTALEs) and TALE nucleases (TALENs), have been developed. Amazingly, every natural TALE invariantly has a truncated last half-repeat (LHR) at the end of the 34-aa repeats. Consequently, all the reported dTALEs and TALENs also harbour their LHRs. Here, we show that the LHRs in dTALEs are dispensable for the function of gene activation by both transient expression assays in Nicotiana benthamiana and gene-specific targeting in the rice genome, indicating that TALEs might originate from a single progenitor. In the light of this finding, we demonstrate that dTALEs can be constructed through two simple steps. Moreover, the activation strengths of dTALEs lacking the LHR are comparable with those of dTALEs harbouring the LHR. Our results provide new insights into the origin of natural TALEs, and will facilitate the simplification of the design and assembly of TALE-based tools, such as dTALEs and TALENs, in the near future.

  3. Knockout of the adp gene related with colonization in Bacillus nematocida B16 using customized transcription activator-like effectors nucleases

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Qiuhong; Zheng, Haoying; Zhang, Lin; Qin, Fujun; Facemire, Loryn; Zhang, Guo; Cao, Feng; Zhang, Ke-qin; Huang, Xiaowei; Yang, Jianwei; He, Lei; Liu, Chanjuan

    2015-01-01

    Bacillus nematocida B16 is able to dominate in the intestines of the worm Caenorhabditis elegans in ‘Trojan horse’ pathogenic mechanism. The adp is one candidate gene which potentially play a vital role in the colonization from our previous random mutagenesis screening results. To analyse the functional role of this gene, we constructed the adp knockout mutant through customized transcription activator-like effectors nucleases (TALEN), which has been successfully used in yeasts, nematodes, zebrafish and human pluripotent cells. Here, we first time report this knockout method in bacteria on this paper. Bioassay experiments demonstrated that the adp knockout mutant of B16 showed considerably lower colonization activity, reduced numbers of intestines and less than 80% nematocidal activity compared with the wild-type strain when infected for 48 h. However, no obvious change on proteolytic activity was observed in the mutant. Conversely, the complementation of adp gene restored most of the above deficient phenotypes. These results indicated that the adp gene was involved in surface adhesion and played a comparatively important role in colonizing host nematodes. Moreover, TALENs successfully disrupt target genes in bacteria. PMID:25912819

  4. Granzyme B production distinguishes recently activated CD8+ memory cells from resting memory cells

    PubMed Central

    Nowacki, Tobias M.; Kuerten, Stefanie; Zhang, Wenji; Shive, Carey L.; Kreher, Christian R.; Boehm, Bernhard O.; Lehmann, Paul V.; Tary-Lehmann, Magdalena

    2007-01-01

    For immune diagnostic purposes it would be critical to be able to distinguish between ongoing immune processes, such as active infections, and long-term immune memory, for example imprinted by infections that have been cleared a long time ago or by vaccinations. We tested the hypothesis that the secretion of Granzyme B, as detected in ex vivo ELISPOT assays, permits this distinction. We studied EBV-, flu- and CMV-specific CD8+ cells in healthy individuals, Vaccinia virus-reactive CD8+ cells in the course of vaccination, and HIV-specific CD8+ cells in HIV-infected individuals. Antigen-specific ex vivo GzB production was detected only transiently after Vaccinia immunization, and in HIV-infected individuals. Our data suggest that ex vivo ELISPOT measurements of granzyme B permit the identification of actively ongoing CD8+ cell responses – a notion that is pertinent to the immune diagnostic of infections, transplantation, allergies, autoimmune diseases, tumors, and vaccine development. PMID:17825804

  5. The Sensory Nature of Episodic Memory: Sensory Priming Effects Due to Memory Trace Activation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brunel, Lionel; Labeye, Elodie; Lesourd, Mathieu; Versace, Remy

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to provide evidence that memory and perceptual processing are underpinned by the same mechanisms. Specifically, the authors conducted 3 experiments that emphasized the sensory aspect of memory traces. They examined their predictions with a short-term priming paradigm based on 2 distinct phases: a learning phase consisting…

  6. Goal- and retrieval-dependent activity in the striatum during memory recognition.

    PubMed

    Clos, Mareike; Schwarze, Ulrike; Gluth, Sebastian; Bunzeck, Nico; Sommer, Tobias

    2015-06-01

    The striatum has been associated with successful memory retrieval but the precise functional link still remains unclear. One hypothesis is that striatal activity reflects an active evaluation process of the retrieval outcome dependent on the current behavioral goals rather than being a consequence of memory reactivation. We have recently shown that the striatum also correlates with confidence in memory recognition, which could reflect high subjective value ascribed to high certainty decisions. To examine whether striatal activity during memory recognition reflects subjective value indeed, we conducted an fMRI study using a recognition memory paradigm in which the participants rated not only the recognition confidence but also indicated the pleasantness associated with the previous memory retrieval. The results demonstrated a high positive correlation between confidence and pleasantness both on the behavioral and brain activation level particularly in the striatum. As almost all of variance in the striatal confidence signal could be explained by experienced pleasantness, this part of the striatal memory recognition response probably corresponds to greater subjective value of high confidence responses. While perceived oldness was also strongly correlated with striatal activity, this activation pattern was clearly distinct from that associated with confidence and pleasantness and thus could not be explained by higher subjective value to detect "old" items. Together, these results show that at least two independent processes contribute to striatal activation in recognition memory: a more flexible evaluation response dependent on context and goals captured by memory confidence and a potentially retrieval-related response captured by perceived oldness.

  7. Pneumatic inflatable end effector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, K. H.; Johnston, J. D. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    The invention relates to an end effector device for robot or teleoperated type space vehicle which includes an inflatable balloon member carried on the end of tubular member which has a hollow center or conduit through which a suitable pressurized fluid is supplied. The device may be inserted into a variety of shaped openings or truss-type structures for handling in space.

  8. Transcription activator-like effector-mediated regulation of gene expression based on the inducible packaging and delivery via designed extracellular vesicles.

    PubMed

    Lainšček, Duško; Lebar, Tina; Jerala, Roman

    2017-02-26

    Transcription activator-like effector (TALE) proteins present a powerful tool for genome editing and engineering, enabling introduction of site-specific mutations, gene knockouts or regulation of the transcription levels of selected genes. TALE nucleases or TALE-based transcription regulators are introduced into mammalian cells mainly via delivery of the coding genes. Here we report an extracellular vesicle-mediated delivery of TALE transcription regulators and their ability to upregulate the reporter gene in target cells. Designed transcriptional activator TALE-VP16 fused to the appropriate dimerization domain was enriched as a cargo protein within extracellular vesicles produced by mammalian HEK293 cells stimulated by Ca-ionophore and using blue light- or rapamycin-inducible dimerization systems. Blue light illumination or rapamycin increased the amount of the TALE-VP16 activator in extracellular vesicles and their addition to the target cells resulted in an increased expression of the reporter gene upon addition of extracellular vesicles to the target cells. This technology therefore represents an efficient delivery for the TALE-based transcriptional regulators.

  9. Leishmania donovani-specific 25- and 28-kDa urinary proteins activate macrophage effector functions, lymphocyte proliferation and Th1 cytokines production.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Vinod; Gour, Jalaj K; Singh, Nisha; Bajpai, Surabhi; Singh, Rakesh K

    2013-04-01

    Growing incidence of drug resistance against leishmaniasis in endemic areas and limited drug options necessitates the need for a vaccine. Notwithstanding significant leishmanial research in the past decades, a vaccine candidate is far from reality. In this study, we report the potential of two urinary leishmanial proteins to induce macrophage effector functions, inflammatory cytokines production and human lymphocytes proliferation. A total four proteins of molecular mass 25, 28, 54 and 60 kDa were identified in human urine samples. The 25 and 28 kDa proteins significantly induced NADPH oxidase (p<0.001), superoxide dismutase (p<0.001) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (p<0.001) activities in stimulated RAW264.7 macrophages. The release of nitric oxide, tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin (IL)-12 was also significantly (p<0.001) higher in 25 and 28 kDa activated macrophages as compared with cells activated with other two proteins. These two proteins also induced significant (p<0.001) proliferation and release of IFN-γ and IL-12 in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

  10. Plasmodium vivax infection induces expansion of activated naïve/memory T cells and differentiation into a central memory profile.

    PubMed

    Silva, Ana Luiza Teixeira; Lacerda, Marcus Vinícius; Fujiwara, Ricardo Toshio; Bueno, Lilian Lacerda; Braga, Erika Martins

    2013-11-01

    Immunity to malaria is widely believed to wane in the absence of reinfection, but direct evidence for the presence or absence of durable immunological memory to malaria is limited. Here, we characterized the profile of circulating naïve and memory (including central and effector) CD4⁺ T cells responses of individuals naturally infected by Plasmodium vivax. In the current study, we demonstrated that acute P. vivax infection induces a significant increase in the absolute number of both naïve and memory cells, which were responsible for the production of anti-inflammatory (IL-10) and pro-inflammatory (IFN-γ) cytokines. Finally, we described the profile of memory cell subtypes (T(CM)-CD45RO(high)CCR7⁺ and T(EM)-CD45RO(high)CCR7⁻), as well as the pattern of cell migration based on CD62L selectin expression, demonstrating that P. vivax-infected donors presented with a predominantly central memory cell profile. Our results indicate that the expansion of both naïve and memory T cells, responsible for the production of both pro-inflammatory and regulatory cytokines, which might also contribute to the modulation of immune responses during P. vivax infection.

  11. Neohesperidin dihydrochalcone: presentation of a small molecule activator of mammalian alpha-amylase as an allosteric effector.

    PubMed

    Kashani-Amin, Elaheh; Larijani, Bagher; Ebrahim-Habibi, Azadeh

    2013-03-18

    Flavonoids and their precursor trans-chalcone have been reported as inhibitors of mammalian alpha-amylase. With regard to this background, neohesperidin dihydrochalcone (NHDC) effect was investigated toward porcine pancreatic alpha-amylase (PPA), and found to be an activator of the enzyme. The maximal activation (up to threefold) was found to occur at 4.8mM of NHDC, which could be considered to have a high activation profile, with regard to the alpha and beta parameters (alpha<1activator of the enzyme and based on the results obtained from modeling tools, it is suggested to interact with PPA at a hydrophilic site located at the N-terminal, far from the active site of the enzyme.

  12. Structure and Function of a Fungal Adhesin that Binds Heparin and Mimics Thrombospondin-1 by Blocking T Cell Activation and Effector Function

    PubMed Central

    Brandhorst, T. Tristan; Roy, René; Wüthrich, Marcel; Nanjappa, Som; Filutowicz, Hanna; Galles, Kevin; Tonelli, Marco; McCaslin, Darrell R.; Satyshur, Kenneth; Klein, Bruce

    2013-01-01

    Blastomyces adhesin-1 (BAD-1) is a 120-kD surface protein on B. dermatitidis yeast. We show here that BAD-1 contains 41 tandem repeats and that deleting even half of them impairs fungal pathogenicity. According to NMR, the repeats form tightly folded 17-amino acid loops constrained by a disulfide bond linking conserved cysteines. Each loop contains a highly conserved WxxWxxW motif found in thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1) type 1 heparin-binding repeats. BAD-1 binds heparin specifically and saturably, and is competitively inhibited by soluble heparin, but not related glycosaminoglycans. According to SPR analysis, the affinity of BAD-1 for heparin is 33 nM±14 nM. Putative heparin-binding motifs are found both at the N-terminus and within each tandem repeat loop. Like TSP-1, BAD-1 blocks activation of T cells in a manner requiring the heparan sulfate-modified surface molecule CD47, and impairs effector functions. The tandem repeats of BAD-1 thus confer pathogenicity, harbor motifs that bind heparin, and suppress T-cell activation via a CD47-dependent mechanism, mimicking mammalian TSP-1. PMID:23853587

  13. Autoantibody production in lpr/lpr gld/gld mice reflects accumulation of CD4+ effector cells that are resistant to regulatory T cell activity.

    PubMed

    Hondowicz, Brian D; Fields, Michele L; Nish, Simone A; Larkin, Joseph; Caton, Andrew J; Erikson, Jan

    2008-09-01

    In Fas/FasL-deficient mice anti-chromatin Ab production is T cell dependent and is not apparent until after 10 weeks of age. Early control of anti-chromatin antibodies may be due to the counterbalancing influence of Treg cells. Here we show that Treg cells block lpr/lpr gld/gld Th cells from providing help to anti-chromatin B cells in an in vivo transfer system. Interestingly, the percentage and absolute numbers of Foxp3+ Treg cells is elevated in BALB/c-lpr/lpr gld/gld mice and increases with age compared to BALB/c mice. The majority of Foxp3 expression is found in the B220- CD4+ T cell population, and Foxp3-expressing cells are localized in the splenic PALS (periarteriolar lymphocyte sheath). Strikingly, although the lack of functional Fas/FasL does not affect the ability of Treg cells to block Th cell proliferation, Treg cells can block the IFN-gamma differentiation of Th cells from BALB/c or young BALB-lpr/lpr gld/gld mice but not of pre-existing Th1 cells from older BALB/c-lpr/lpr gld/gld mice. Thus, we suggest autoantibody production is not caused by the lack of Treg cells but by a defect in activation-induced cell death that leads to the accumulation of T effector cells that are resistant to regulatory T cell activity.

  14. The Invertebrate Lysozyme Effector ILYS-3 Is Systemically Activated in Response to Danger Signals and Confers Antimicrobial Protection in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Gravato-Nobre, Maria João; Vaz, Filipa; Filipe, Sergio; Chalmers, Ronald; Hodgkin, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about the relative contributions and importance of antibacterial effectors in the nematode C. elegans, despite extensive work on the innate immune responses in this organism. We report an investigation of the expression, function and regulation of the six ilys (invertebrate-type lysozyme) genes of C. elegans. These genes exhibited a surprising variety of tissue-specific expression patterns and responses to starvation or bacterial infection. The most strongly expressed, ilys-3, was investigated in detail. ILYS-3 protein was expressed constitutively in the pharynx and coelomocytes, and dynamically in the intestine. Analysis of mutants showed that ILYS-3 was required for pharyngeal grinding (disruption of bacterial cells) during normal growth and consequently it contributes to longevity, as well as being protective against bacterial pathogens. Both starvation and challenge with Gram-positive pathogens resulted in ERK-MAPK-dependent up-regulation of ilys-3 in the intestine. The intestinal induction by pathogens, but not starvation, was found to be dependent on MPK-1 activity in the pharynx rather than in the intestine, demonstrating unexpected communication between these two tissues. The coelomocyte expression appeared to contribute little to normal growth or immunity. Recombinant ILYS-3 protein was found to exhibit appropriate lytic activity against Gram-positive cell wall material. PMID:27525822

  15. Binding of SycH chaperone to YscM1 and YscM2 activates effector yop expression in Yersinia enterocolitica.

    PubMed

    Cambronne, Eric D; Sorg, Joseph A; Schneewind, Olaf

    2004-02-01

    Yersinia enterocolitica transports YscM1 and YscM2 via the type III pathway, a mechanism that is required for the establishment of bacterial infections. Prior to host cell contact, YscM1 and YscM2 exert posttranscriptional regulation to inhibit expression of effector yop genes, which encode virulence factors that travel the type III pathway into the cytoplasm of macrophages. Relief from repression has been predicted to occur via the type III secretion of YscM1 and YscM2 into the extracellular medium, resulting in the depletion of regulatory molecules from the bacterial cytoplasm. Using digitonin fractionation and fluorescence microscopy of FlAsH-labeled polypeptides in Yersinia-infected cells, we have localized YscM1 and YscM2 within the host cell cytoplasm. Type III injection of YscM1 and YscM2 required the SycH chaperone. Expression of C-terminal fusions of YscM1 and YscM2 to the neomycin phosphotransferase reporter revealed sequences required for regulatory activity and for secretion in the absence of SycH. Coexpression of SycH and glutathione S-transferase (GST)-YscM1 or GST-YscM2, hybrid GST variants that cannot be transported by the type III apparatus, also relieved repression of Yop synthesis. GST-SycH bound to YscM1 and YscM2 and activated effector yop expression without initiation of the bound regulatory molecules into the type III pathway. Further, regulation of yop expression by YscM1, YscM2, and SycH is shown to act independently of factors that regulate secretion, and gel filtration chromotography revealed populations of YscM1 and YscM2 that are not bound to SycH under conditions where Yop synthesis is repressed. Taken together, these results suggest that YscM1- and YscM2-mediated repression may be relieved through binding to the cytoplasmic chaperone SycH prior to their type III injection into host cells.

  16. Binding of SycH Chaperone to YscM1 and YscM2 Activates Effector yop Expression in Yersinia enterocolitica

    PubMed Central

    Cambronne, Eric D.; Sorg, Joseph A.; Schneewind, Olaf

    2004-01-01

    Yersinia enterocolitica transports YscM1 and YscM2 via the type III pathway, a mechanism that is required for the establishment of bacterial infections. Prior to host cell contact, YscM1 and YscM2 exert posttranscriptional regulation to inhibit expression of effector yop genes, which encode virulence factors that travel the type III pathway into the cytoplasm of macrophages. Relief from repression has been predicted to occur via the type III secretion of YscM1 and YscM2 into the extracellular medium, resulting in the depletion of regulatory molecules from the bacterial cytoplasm. Using digitonin fractionation and fluorescence microscopy of FlAsH-labeled polypeptides in Yersinia-infected cells, we have localized YscM1 and YscM2 within the host cell cytoplasm. Type III injection of YscM1 and YscM2 required the SycH chaperone. Expression of C-terminal fusions of YscM1 and YscM2 to the neomycin phosphotransferase reporter revealed sequences required for regulatory activity and for secretion in the absence of SycH. Coexpression of SycH and glutathione S-transferase (GST)-YscM1 or GST-YscM2, hybrid GST variants that cannot be transported by the type III apparatus, also relieved repression of Yop synthesis. GST-SycH bound to YscM1 and YscM2 and activated effector yop expression without initiation of the bound regulatory molecules into the type III pathway. Further, regulation of yop expression by YscM1, YscM2, and SycH is shown to act independently of factors that regulate secretion, and gel filtration chromotography revealed populations of YscM1 and YscM2 that are not bound to SycH under conditions where Yop synthesis is repressed. Taken together, these results suggest that YscM1- and YscM2-mediated repression may be relieved through binding to the cytoplasmic chaperone SycH prior to their type III injection into host cells. PMID:14729710

  17. Innate-like effector differentiation of human invariant NKT cells driven by IL-7.

    PubMed

    de Lalla, Claudia; Festuccia, Nicola; Albrecht, Inka; Chang, Hyun-Dong; Andolfi, Grazia; Benninghoff, Ulrike; Bombelli, Ferdinando; Borsellino, Giovanna; Aiuti, Alessandro; Radbruch, Andreas; Dellabona, Paolo; Casorati, Giulia

    2008-04-01

    Conventional MHC-restricted T lymphocytes leave thymus with a naive phenotype and require Ag-dependent stimulation coupled to proliferation to acquire effector functions. Invariant (i)NKT cells are a subset of T lymphocytes considered innate because they display an effector memory phenotype independent of TCR stimulation by foreign Ags. We investigated the effector differentiation program followed by human iNKT cells by studying cells from a relevant set of fetal thymi and umbilical cord blood samples. We find that human fetal iNKT cells have already started a differentiation program that activates the epigenetic and transcriptional control of ifng and il4 genes, leading at birth to cells that express these cytokines upon TCR signaling but independently of proliferation in vitro. Both ex vivo and in vitro analysis of fetal and neonatal iNKT cells delineate an effector differentiation program linked to cell division in vivo, and they identify IL-7 as one of the crucial signals driving this program in the apparent absence of Ag stimulation. Consistent with these data, human fetal and neonatal iNKT cells are hyperresponsive in vitro to IL-7 in comparison to conventional T cells, owing to an increased expression and signaling function of the IL-7 receptor alpha-chain. The innate nature of human iNKT cells could thus derive from lineage-specific developmental cues that selectively make these cells efficient IL-7 responders following thymic selection.

  18. Tripartite motif-containing protein 30 modulates TCR-activated proliferation and effector functions in CD4+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Choi, Un Yung; Hur, Ji Yeon; Lee, Myeong Sup; Zhang, Quanri; Choi, Won Young; Kim, Lark Kyun; Lee, Wook-Bin; Oh, Goo Taeg; Kim, Young-Joon

    2014-01-01

    To avoid excessive activation, immune signals are tightly controlled by diverse inhibitory proteins. TRIM30, a tripartite motif (TRIM)-containing protein is one of such inhibitors known to function in macrophages. To define the roles of TRIM30, we generated Trim30 knockout (Trim30-/-) mice. Trim30 deletion caused no major developmental defects in any organs, nor showed any discernable defect in the activation of macrophages. But, Trim30-/- mice showed increased CD4/CD8 ratio when aged and Trim30-/- CD4+ T cells exhibited an abnormal response upon TCR activation, in particular in the absence of a costimulatory signal. Adoptive transfer of wild-type and Trim30-/- CD4+ T cells together into lymphopenic hosts confirmed higher proliferation of the Trim30-/- CD4+ T cells in vivo. Despite the enhanced proliferation, Trim30-/- T cells showed decreased levels of NF-κB activation and IL-2 production compared to wild-type cells. These results indicate a distinct requirement for TRIM30 in modulation of NF-κB activation and cell proliferation induced by TCR stimulation.

  19. Midlife memory ability accounts for brain activity differences in healthy aging.

    PubMed

    Pudas, Sara; Persson, Jonas; Nilsson, Lars-Göran; Nyberg, Lars

    2014-11-01

    Cross-sectional neuroimaging studies suggest that hippocampal and prefrontal cortex functions underlie individual differences in memory ability in older individuals, but it is unclear how individual differences in cognitive ability in youth contribute to cognitive and neuroimaging measures in older age. Here, we investigated the relative influences of midlife memory ability and age-related memory change on memory-related BOLD-signal variability at one time point, using a sample from a longitudinal population-based aging study (N = 203, aged 55-80 years). Hierarchical regression analyses showed that midlife memory ability, assessed 15-20 years earlier, explained at least as much variance as memory change in clusters in the left inferior prefrontal cortex and the bilateral hippocampus, during memory encoding. Furthermore, memory change estimates demonstrated higher sensitivity than current memory levels in identifying distinct frontal regions where activity was selectively related to age-related memory change, as opposed to midlife memory. These findings highlight challenges in interpreting individual differences in neurocognitive measures as age-related changes in the absence of longitudinal data and also demonstrate the improved sensitivity of longitudinal measures.

  20. Deficiency of MALT1 paracaspase activity results in unbalanced regulatory and effector T and B cell responses leading to multiorgan inflammation.

    PubMed

    Bornancin, Frédéric; Renner, Florian; Touil, Ratiba; Sic, Heiko; Kolb, Yeter; Touil-Allaoui, Ismahane; Rush, James S; Smith, Paul A; Bigaud, Marc; Junker-Walker, Ursula; Burkhart, Christoph; Dawson, Janet; Niwa, Satoru; Katopodis, Andreas; Nuesslein-Hildesheim, Barbara; Weckbecker, Gisbert; Zenke, Gerhard; Kinzel, Bernd; Traggiai, Elisabetta; Brenner, Dirk; Brüstle, Anne; St Paul, Michael; Zamurovic, Natasa; McCoy, Kathy D; Rolink, Antonius; Régnier, Catherine H; Mak, Tak W; Ohashi, Pamela S; Patel, Dhavalkumar D; Calzascia, Thomas

    2015-04-15

    The paracaspase MALT1 plays an important role in immune receptor-driven signaling pathways leading to NF-κB activation. MALT1 promotes signaling by acting as a scaffold, recruiting downstream signaling proteins, as well as by proteolytic cleavage of multiple substrates. However, the relative contributions of these two different activities to T and B cell function are not well understood. To investigate how MALT1 proteolytic activity contributes to overall immune cell regulation, we generated MALT1 protease-deficient mice (Malt1(PD/PD)) and compared their phenotype with that of MALT1 knockout animals (Malt1(-/-)). Malt1(PD/PD) mice displayed defects in multiple cell types including marginal zone B cells, B1 B cells, IL-10-producing B cells, regulatory T cells, and mature T and B cells. In general, immune defects were more pronounced in Malt1(-/-) animals. Both mouse lines showed abrogated B cell responses upon immunization with T-dependent and T-independent Ags. In vitro, inactivation of MALT1 protease activity caused reduced stimulation-induced T cell proliferation, impaired IL-2 and TNF-α production, as well as defective Th17 differentiation. Consequently, Malt1(PD/PD) mice were protected in a Th17-dependent experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis model. Surprisingly, Malt1(PD/PD) animals developed a multiorgan inflammatory pathology, characterized by Th1 and Th2/0 responses and enhanced IgG1 and IgE levels, which was delayed by wild-type regulatory T cell reconstitution. We therefore propose that the pathology characterizing Malt1(PD/PD) animals arises from an immune imbalance featuring pathogenic Th1- and Th2/0-skewed effector responses and reduced immunosuppressive compartments. These data uncover a previously unappreciated key function of MALT1 protease activity in immune homeostasis and underline its relevance in human health and disease.

  1. Hippocampal Activation of Rac1 Regulates the Forgetting of Object Recognition Memory.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yunlong; Du, Shuwen; Lv, Li; Lei, Bo; Shi, Wei; Tang, Yikai; Wang, Lianzhang; Zhong, Yi

    2016-09-12

    Forgetting is a universal feature for most types of memories. The best-defined and extensively characterized behaviors that depict forgetting are natural memory decay and interference-based forgetting [1, 2]. Molecular mechanisms underlying the active forgetting remain to be determined for memories in vertebrates. Recent progress has begun to unravel such mechanisms underlying the active forgetting [3-11] that is induced through the behavior-dependent activation of intracellular signaling pathways. In Drosophila, training-induced activation of the small G protein Rac1 mediates natural memory decay and interference-based forgetting of aversive conditioning memory [3]. In mice, the activation of photoactivable-Rac1 in recently potentiated spines in a motor learning task erases the motor memory [12]. These lines of evidence prompted us to investigate a role for Rac1 in time-based natural memory decay and interference-based forgetting in mice. The inhibition of Rac1 activity in hippocampal neurons through targeted expression of a dominant-negative Rac1 form extended object recognition memory from less than 72 hr to over 72 hr, whereas Rac1 activation accelerated memory decay within 24 hr. Interference-induced forgetting of this memory was correlated with Rac1 activation and was completely blocked by inhibition of Rac1 activity. Electrophysiological recordings of long-term potentiation provided independent evidence that further supported a role for Rac1 activation in forgetting. Thus, Rac1-dependent forgetting is evolutionarily conserved from invertebrates to vertebrates.

  2. Robotic end effector

    DOEpatents

    Minichan, R.L.

    1993-10-05

    An end effector is described for use in probing a surface with a robotic arm. The end effector has a first portion that carries a gimbal with a probe, the gimbal holding the probe normal to the surface, and a second portion with a set of three shafts within a housing for urging the gimbal and probe against the surface. The second portion contains a potentiometer connected by another shaft to the first portion to measure the position of the first portion with respect to the second so that the second portion can be moved to place and maintain the shafts at the midpoint of their travel. Then, as irregularities in the surface are encountered, the first portion can respond by moving closer to or farther from the second portion. 7 figures.

  3. Robotic end effector

    DOEpatents

    Minichan, Richard L.

    1993-01-01

    An end effector for use in probing a surface with a robotic arm. The end effector has a first portion that carries a gimbal with a probe, the gimbal holding the probe normal to the surface, and a second portion with a set of three shafts within a housing for urging the gimbal and probe against the surface. The second portion contains a potentiometer connected by another shaft to the first portion to measure the position of the first portion with respect to the second so that the second portion can be moved to place and maintain the shafts at the midpoint of their travel. Then, as irregularities in the surface are encountered, the first portion can respond by moving closer to or farther from the second portion.

  4. Robotic end effector

    SciTech Connect

    Minichan, R.L.

    1991-12-31

    This invention is comprised of an end effector for use in probing a surface with a robotic arm. The end effector has a first portion that carries a gamble with a probe, the gamble holding the probe normal to the surface, and a second portion with a set of three shafts within a housing for urging the gamble and probe against the surface. The second portion contains a potentiometer connected by another shaft to the first portion to measure the position of the first portion with respect to the second so that the second portion can be moved to place and maintain the shafts at the midpoint of their travel. Then, as irregularities in the surface are encountered, the first portion can respond by moving closer to or farther from the second portion.

  5. Inhibition of interferon gene activation by death-effector domain-containing proteins from the molluscum contagiosum virus.

    PubMed

    Randall, Crystal M H; Biswas, Sunetra; Selen, Catherine V; Shisler, Joanna L

    2014-01-14

    Apoptosis, NF-κB activation, and IRF3 activation are a triad of intrinsic immune responses that play crucial roles in the pathogenesis of infectious diseases, cancer, and autoimmunity. FLIPs are a family of viral and cellular proteins initially found to inhibit apoptosis and more recently to either up- or down-regulate NF-κB. As such, a broad role for FLIPs in disease regulation is postulated, but exactly how a FLIP performs such multifunctional roles remains to be established. Here we examine FLIPs (MC159 and MC160) encoded by the molluscum contagiosum virus, a dermatotropic poxvirus causing skin infections common in children and immunocompromised individuals, to better understand their roles in viral pathogenesis. While studying their molecular mechanisms responsible for NF-κB inhibition, we discovered that each protein inhibited IRF3-controlled luciferase activity, identifying a unique function for FLIPs. MC159 and MC160 each inhibited TBK1 phosphorylation, confirming this unique function. Surprisingly, MC159 coimmunoprecipitated with TBK1 and IKKε but MC160 did not, suggesting that these homologs use distinct molecular mechanisms to inhibit IRF3 activation. Equally surprising was the finding that the FLIP regions necessary for TBK1 inhibition were distinct from those MC159 or MC160 regions previously defined to inhibit NF-κB or apoptosis. These data reveal previously unappreciated complexities of FLIPs, and that subtle differences within the conserved regions of FLIPs possess distinct molecular and structural fingerprints that define crucial differences in biological activities. A future comparison of mechanistic differences between viral FLIP proteins can provide new means of precisely manipulating distinct aspects of intrinsic immune responses.

  6. Working Memory-Related Neural Activity Predicts Future Smoking Relapse

    PubMed Central

    Loughead, James; Wileyto, E Paul; Ruparel, Kosha; Falcone, Mary; Hopson, Ryan; Gur, Ruben; Lerman, Caryn

    2015-01-01

    Brief abstinence from smoking impairs cognition, particularly executive function, and this has a role in relapse to smoking. This study examined whether working memory-related brain activity predicts subsequent smoking relapse above and beyond standard clinical and behavioral measures. Eighty treatment-seeking smokers completed two functional magnetic resonance imaging sessions (smoking satiety vs 24 h abstinence challenge) during performance of a visual N-back task. Brief counseling and a short-term quit attempt followed. Relapse during the first 7 days was biochemically confirmed by the presence of the nicotine metabolite cotinine. Mean percent blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) signal change was extracted from a priori regions of interest: bilateral dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), medial frontal/cingulate gyrus, posterior cingulate cortex (PCC), and ventromedial prefrontal cortex. Signal from these brain regions and additional clinical measures were used to model outcome status, which was then validated with resampling techniques. Relapse to smoking was predicted by increased withdrawal symptoms, decreased left DLPFC and increased PCC BOLD percent signal change (abstinence vs smoking satiety). Receiver operating characteristic analysis demonstrated 81% area under the curve using these predictors, a significant improvement over the model with clinical variables only. The combination of abstinence-induced decreases in left DLPFC activation and reduced suppression of PCC may be a prognostic marker for poor outcome, specifically early smoking relapse. PMID:25469682

  7. Complementary Role of Frontoparietal Activity and Cortical Pattern Similarity in Successful Episodic Memory Encoding

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Gui; Dong, Qi; Chen, Chuansheng; Lu, Zhong-Lin; Mumford, Jeanette A.; Poldrack, Russell A.

    2013-01-01

    One central goal in cognitive neuroscience of learning and memory is to characterize the neural processes that lead to long-lasting episodic memory. In addition to the stronger frontoparietal activity, greater category- or item-specific cortical representation during encoding, as measured by pattern similarity (PS), is also associated with better subsequent episodic memory. Nevertheless, it is unknown whether frontoparietal activity and cortical PS reflect distinct mechanisms. To address this issue, we reanalyzed previous data (Xue G, Dong Q, Chen C, Lu ZL, Mumford JA, Poldrack RA. 2010. Greater neural pattern similarity across repetitions is associated with better memory. Science. 330:97, Experiment 3) using a novel approach based on combined activation-based and information-based analyses. The results showed that across items, stronger frontoparietal activity was associated with greater PS in distributed brain regions, including those where the PS was predictive of better subsequent memory. Nevertheless, the item-specific PS was still associated with later episodic memory after controlling the effect of frontoparietal activity. Our results suggest that one possible mechanism of frontoparietal activity on episodic memory encoding is via enhancing PS, resulting in more unique and consistent input to the medial temporal lobe. In addition, they suggest that PS might index additional processes, such as pattern reinstatement as a result of study-phase retrieval, that contribute to episodic memory encoding. PMID:22645250

  8. Hippocampal noradrenergic activation is necessary for object recognition memory consolidation and can promote BDNF increase and memory persistence.

    PubMed

    Mello-Carpes, Pâmela B; da Silva de Vargas, Liane; Gayer, Mateus Cristofari; Roehrs, Rafael; Izquierdo, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    Previously we showed that activation of the Nucleus of the Solitary Tract (NTS)-Nucleus Paragigantocellularis (PGi)-Locus coeruleus (LC) pathway, which theoretically culminates with norepinephrine (NE) release in dorsal hippocampus (CA1 region) and basolateral amygdala (BLA) is necessary for the consolidation of object recognition (OR) memory. Here we show that, while the microinjection of the beta-noradrenergic receptor blocker timolol into CA1 impairs OR memory consolidation, the microinjection of norepinephrine (NE) promotes the persistence of this type of memory. Further, we show that OR consolidation is attended by an increase of norepinephrine (NE) levels and of the expression of brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in hippocampus, which are impaired by inactivation of the NTS-PGi-LC pathway by the infusion of muscimol into the NTS.

  9. Structure and activity of the Cas3 HD nuclease MJ0384, an effector enzyme of the CRISPR interference

    SciTech Connect

    Beloglazova, Natalia; Petit, Pierre; Flick, Robert; Brown, Greg; Savchenko, Alexei; Yakunin, Alexander F.

    2012-03-15

    Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs) and Cas proteins represent an adaptive microbial immunity system against viruses and plasmids. Cas3 proteins have been proposed to play a key role in the CRISPR mechanism through the direct cleavage of invasive DNA. Here, we show that the Cas3 HD domain protein MJ0384 from Methanocaldococcus jannaschii cleaves endonucleolytically and exonucleolytically (3'-5') single-stranded DNAs and RNAs, as well as 3'-flaps, splayed arms, and R-loops. The degradation of branched DNA substrates by MJ0384 is stimulated by the Cas3 helicase MJ0383 and ATP. The crystal structure of MJ0384 revealed the active site with two bound metal cations and together with site-directed mutagenesis suggested a catalytic mechanism. Our studies suggest that the Cas3 HD nucleases working together with the Cas3 helicases can completely degrade invasive DNAs through the combination of endo- and exonuclease activities.

  10. Major histocompatibility complex-unrestricted cytolytic activity of human T cells: analysis of precursor frequency and effector phenotype

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, S.S.; Thiele, D.L.; Lipsky, P.E.

    1987-12-01

    The frequency and phenotype of human T cells that mediate major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-unrestricted cytolysis were analyzed. T cell clones were generated by culturing adherent cell-depleted peripheral blood mononuclear cells at a density of 0.3 cell/well with phytohemagglutinin, recombinant interleukin 2 (rIL-2), and irradiated autologous peripheral blood mononuclear cells and/or Epstein-Barr virus-transformed lymphoblastoid cell lines. All of the 198 clones generated by this method were T cells (CD2/sup +/, CD3/sup +/, CD4/sup +/ or CD2/sup +/, CD3/sup +/, CD8/sup +/) that possessed potent lytic activity against K562, an erythroleukemia line sensitive to lysis by human natural killer cells, and Cur, a renal carcinoma cell line resistant to human natural killer activity. Cytolysis, measured by /sup 51/Cr release, was MHC-unrestricted, since the clones were able to lyse MHC class I or class II negative targets, as well as MHC class I and class II negative targets. Although the clones produced tissue necrosis factor/lymphotoxin-like molecules, lysis of Cur of K562 was not mediated by a soluble factor secreted by the clones. These data indicate that the capacity for MHC-unrestricted tumoricidal activity and expression of NKH1 and CD11b, but not CD 16, are properties common to all or nearly all human peripheral blood-derived T cell clones regardless of CD4 or CD8 phenotype.

  11. Baseline activity predicts working memory load of preceding task condition.

    PubMed

    Pyka, Martin; Hahn, Tim; Heider, Dominik; Krug, Axel; Sommer, Jens; Kircher, Tilo; Jansen, Andreas

    2013-11-01

    The conceptual notion of the so-called resting state of the brain has been recently challenged by studies indicating a continuing effect of cognitive processes on subsequent rest. In particular, activity in posterior parietal and medial prefrontal areas has been found to be modulated by preceding experimental conditions. In this study, we investigated which brain areas show working memory dependent patterns in subsequent baseline periods and how specific they are for the preceding experimental condition. During functional magnetic resonance imaging, 94 subjects performed a letter-version of the n-back task with the conditions 0-back and 2-back followed by a low-level baseline in which subjects had to passively observe the letters appearing. In a univariate analysis, 2-back served as control condition while 0-back, baseline after 0-back and baseline after 2-back were modeled as regressors to test for activity changes between both baseline conditions. Additionally, we tested, using Gaussian process classifiers, the recognition of task condition from functional images acquired during baseline. Besides the expected activity changes in the precuneus and medial prefrontal cortex, we found differential activity in the thalamus, putamen, and postcentral gyrus that were affected by the preceding task. The multivariate analysis revealed that images of the subsequent baseline block contain task related patterns that yield a recognition rate of 70%. The results suggest that the influence of a cognitive task on subsequent baseline is strong and specific for some areas but not restricted to areas of the so-called default mode network.

  12. Deconvoluting post-transplant immunity: cell subset-specific mapping reveals pathways for activation and expansion of memory T, monocytes and B cells.

    PubMed

    Grigoryev, Yevgeniy A; Kurian, Sunil M; Avnur, Zafi; Borie, Dominic; Deng, Jun; Campbell, Daniel; Sung, Joanna; Nikolcheva, Tania; Quinn, Anthony; Schulman, Howard; Peng, Stanford L; Schaffer, Randolph; Fisher, Jonathan; Mondala, Tony; Head, Steven; Flechner, Stuart M; Kantor, Aaron B; Marsh, Christopher; Salomon, Daniel R

    2010-10-14

    A major challenge for the field of transplantation is the lack of understanding of genomic and molecular drivers of early post-transplant immunity. The early immune response creates a complex milieu that determines the course of ensuing immune events and the ultimate outcome of the transplant. The objective of the current study was to mechanistically deconvolute the early immune response by purifying and profiling the constituent cell subsets of the peripheral blood. We employed genome-wide profiling of whole blood and purified CD4, CD8, B cells and monocytes in tandem with high-throughput laser-scanning cytometry in 10 kidney transplants sampled serially pre-transplant, 1, 2, 4, 8 and 12 weeks. Cytometry confirmed early cell subset depletion by antibody induction and immunosuppression. Multiple markers revealed the activation and proliferative expansion of CD45RO(+)CD62L(-) effector memory CD4/CD8 T cells as well as progressive activation of monocytes and B cells. Next, we mechanistically deconvoluted early post-transplant immunity by serial monitoring of whole blood using DNA microarrays. Parallel analysis of cell subset-specific gene expression revealed a unique spectrum of time-dependent changes and functional pathways. Gene expression profiling results were validated with 157 different probesets matching all 65 antigens detected by cytometry. Thus, serial blood cell monitoring reflects the profound changes in blood cell composition and immune activation early post-transplant. Each cell subset reveals distinct pathways and functional programs. These changes illuminate a complex, early phase of immunity and inflammation that includes activation and proliferative expansion of the memory effector and regulatory cells that may determine the phenotype and outcome of the kidney transplant.

  13. Production of α1,3-galactosyltransferase targeted pigs using transcription activator-like effector nuclease-mediated genome editing technology.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jung-Taek; Kwon, Dae-Kee; Park, A-Rum; Lee, Eun-Jin; Yun, Yun-Jin; Ji, Dal-Young; Lee, Kiho; Park, Kwang-Wook

    2016-03-01

    Recent developments in genome editing technology using meganucleases demonstrate an efficient method of producing gene edited pigs. In this study, we examined the effectiveness of the transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN) system in generating specific mutations on the pig genome. Specific TALEN was designed to induce a double-strand break on exon 9 of the porcine α1,3-galactosyltransferase (GGTA1) gene as it is the main cause of hyperacute rejection after xenotransplantation. Human decay-accelerating factor (hDAF) gene, which can produce a complement inhibitor to protect cells from complement attack after xenotransplantation, was also integrated into the genome simultaneously. Plasmids coding for the TALEN pair and hDAF gene were transfected into porcine cells by electroporation to disrupt the porcine GGTA1 gene and express hDAF. The transfected cells were then sorted using a biotin-labeled IB4 lectin attached to magnetic beads to obtain GGTA1 deficient cells. As a result, we established GGTA1 knockout (KO) cell lines with biallelic modification (35.0%) and GGTA1 KO cell lines expressing hDAF (13.0%). When these cells were used for somatic cell nuclear transfer, we successfully obtained live GGTA1 KO pigs expressing hDAF. Our results demonstrate that TALEN-mediated genome editing is efficient and can be successfully used to generate gene edited pigs.

  14. De novo-engineered transcription activator-like effector (TALE) hybrid nuclease with novel DNA binding specificity creates double-strand breaks.

    PubMed

    Mahfouz, Magdy M; Li, Lixin; Shamimuzzaman, Md; Wibowo, Anjar; Fang, Xiaoyun; Zhu, Jian-Kang

    2011-02-08

    Site-specific and rare cutting nucleases are valuable tools for genome engineering. The generation of double-strand DNA breaks (DSBs) promotes homologous recombination in eukaryotes and can facilitate gene targeting, additions, deletions, and inactivation. Zinc finger nucleases have been used to generate DSBs and subsequently, for genome editing but with low efficiency and reproducibility. The transcription activator-like family of type III effectors (TALEs) contains a central domain of tandem repeats that could be engineered to bind specific DNA targets. Here, we report the generation of a Hax3-based hybrid TALE nuclease with a user-selected DNA binding specificity. We show that the engineered TALE nuclease can bind to its target sequence in vitro and that the homodimeric TALE nuclease can cleave double-stranded DNA in vitro if the DNA binding sites have the proper spacing and orientation. Transient expression assays in tobacco leaves suggest that the hybrid nuclease creates DSB in its target sequence, which is subsequently repaired by nonhomologous end-joining repair. Taken together, our data show the feasibility of engineering TALE-based hybrid nucleases capable of generating site-specific DSBs and the great potential for site-specific genome modification in plants and eukaryotes in general.

  15. Knockout of a transgene by transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) in the sawfly, Athalia rosae (Hymenoptera) and the ladybird beetle, Harmonia axyridis (Coleoptera).

    PubMed

    Hatakeyama, M; Yatomi, J; Sumitani, M; Takasu, Y; Sekiné, K; Niimi, T; Sezutsu, H

    2016-02-01

    Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) are efficient tools for targeted genome editing and have been utilized in a number of insects. Here, we demonstrate the gene disruption (knockout) caused by TALENs targeting a transgene, 3xP3-driven enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP), that is integrated in the genome of two species, the sawfly Athalia rosae (Hymenoptera) and the ladybird beetle Harmonia axyridis (Coleoptera). Messenger RNAs of TALENs targeting the sequences adjacent to the chromophore region were microinjected into the eggs/embryos of each species. In At. rosae, when microinjection was performed at the posterior end of eggs, 15% of G(0) individuals showed a somatic mosaic phenotype for eye EGFP fluorescence. Three-quarters of the somatic mosaics produced EGFP-negative G(1) progeny. When eggs were injected at the anterior end, 63% of the G(0) individuals showed somatic mosaicism, and 17% of them produced EGFP-negative G(1) progeny. In H. axyridis, 25% of posterior-injected and 8% of anterior-injected G(0) individuals produced EGFP-negative G(1) progeny. In both species, the EGFP-negative progeny retained the EGFP gene, and various deletions were detected in the target sequences, indicating that gene disruption was successfully induced. Finally, for both species, 18-21% of G(0) founders produced gene knockout progeny sufficient for establishing knockout strains.

  16. The broad bacterial blight resistance of rice line CBB23 is triggered by a novel transcription activator-like (TAL) effector of Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chun-Lian; Qin, Teng-Fei; Yu, Hong-Man; Zhang, Xiao-Ping; Che, Jin-Ying; Gao, Ying; Zheng, Chong-Ke; Yang, Bing; Zhao, Kai-Jun

    2014-05-01

    Bacterial blight (BB), caused by Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo), is not only a disease devastating rice production worldwide, but also an ideal model system for the study of the interaction between plants and their bacterial pathogens. The rice near-isogenic line (NIL) CBB23, derived from a cross between a wild rice Oryza rufipogon accession (RBB16) and a susceptible indica rice variety (Jingang 30), is highly resistant to all field Xoo strains tested so far. Although the BB resistance of CBB23 has been widely used in rice breeding programmes, the mechanism of its extremely broad-spectrum resistance remains unknown. Here, we report the molecular cloning of an avirulence gene, designated as avrXa23, from Xoo strain PXO99(A) . We validate that AvrXa23, a novel transcription activator-like effector, specifically triggers the broad-spectrum BB resistance in CBB23. The prevalence of avrXa23 in all 38 Xoo strains surveyed may explain the broad-spectrum feature of BB resistance in CBB23. The results will significantly facilitate the molecular cloning of the corresponding resistance (R) gene in the host, and provide new insights into our understanding of the molecular mechanism for broad-spectrum disease resistance in plants.

  17. Messenger RNA encoding constitutively active Toll-like receptor 4 enhances effector functions of human T cells

    PubMed Central

    Pato, A; Eisenberg, G; Machlenkin, A; Margalit, A; Cafri, G; Frankenburg, S; Merims, S; Peretz, T; Lotem, M; Gross, G

    2015-01-01

    Adoptive T cell therapy of cancer employs a large number of ex-vivo-propagated T cells which recognize their targets either by virtue of their endogenous T cell receptor (TCR) or via genetic reprogramming. However, both cell-extrinsic and intrinsic mechanisms often diminish the in-vivo potency of these therapeutic T cells, limiting their clinical efficacy and broader use. Direct activation of human T cells by Toll-like receptor (TLR) ligands induces T cell survival and proliferation, boosts the production of proinflammatory cytokines and augments resistance to regulatory T cell (Treg) suppression. Removal of the TLR ligand-binding region results in constitutive signalling triggered by the remaining cytosolic Toll/interleukin-1 receptor (TIR) domain. The use of such TIR domains therefore offers an ideal means for equipping anti-tumour T cells with the arsenal of functional attributes required for improving current clinical protocols. Here we show that constitutively active (ca)TLR-4 can be expressed efficiently in human T cells using mRNA electroporation. The mere expression of caTLR-4 mRNA in polyclonal CD8 and CD4 T cells induced the production of interferon (IFN)-γ, triggered the surface expression of CD25, CD69 and 4-1BB and up-regulated a panel of cytokines and chemokines. In tumour-infiltrating lymphocytes prepared from melanoma patients, caTLR-4 induced robust IFN-γ secretion in all samples tested. Furthermore, caTLR-4 enhanced the anti-melanoma cytolytic activity of tumour-infiltrating lymphocytes and augmented the secretion of IFN-γ, tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α and granulocyte–macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) for at least 4 days post-transfection. Our results demonstrate that caTLR-4 is capable of exerting multiple T cell-enhancing effects and can potentially be used as a genetic adjuvant in adoptive cell therapy. PMID:26212048

  18. Modification of Bacterial Effector Proteins Inside Eukaryotic Host Cells

    PubMed Central

    Popa, Crina M.; Tabuchi, Mitsuaki; Valls, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Pathogenic bacteria manipulate their hosts by delivering a number of virulence proteins -called effectors- directly into the plant or animal cells. Recent findings have shown that such effectors can suffer covalent modifications inside the eukaryotic cells. Here, we summarize the recent reports where effector modifications by the eukaryotic machinery have been described. We restrict our focus on proteins secreted by the type III or type IV systems, excluding other bacterial toxins. We describe the known examples of effectors whose enzymatic activity is triggered by interaction with plant and animal cell factors, including GTPases, E2-Ubiquitin conjugates, cyclophilin and thioredoxins. We focus on the structural interactions with these factors and their influence on effector function. We also review the described examples of host-mediated post-translational effector modifications which are required for proper subcellular location and function. These host-specific covalent modifications include phosphorylation, ubiquitination, SUMOylation, and lipidations such as prenylation, fatty acylation and phospholipid binding. PMID:27489796

  19. Lateral posterior parietal activity during reality monitoring discriminations of memories of high and low perceptual vividness.

    PubMed

    King, Danielle R; Schubert, Misty L; Miller, Michael B

    2015-09-01

    Regions of the lateral posterior parietal cortex (PPC) tend to be more active during recognition of previously studied items compared to correct rejection of unstudied items. Previously, we demonstrated that this effect is source-specific. While items that were encoded through visual perception elicited robust successful retrieval activity in the lateral PPC during a subsequent source memory test, items that were visually imagined did not elicit this effect. Memories of perceived events typically contain more perceptually-based contextual details than memories of imagined events. Therefore, source-based differences in lateral parietal activity might be due to a difference in the perceptual vividness of memories of perceived and imagined events. The goal of the present study was to test this hypothesis. Participants perceived and imagined items in both high and low perceptual vividness conditions. Experiment 1 demonstrated that memories for items encoded in the high vividness conditions contained significantly greater visual detail than memories encoded in the low vividness conditions. In Experiment 2, participants were scanned while they made source memory judgments about items that were previously perceived and imagined in high and low vividness conditions. Consistent with previous findings, the left lateral PPC was more active during retrieval of perceived compared to imagined events. However, lateral PPC activity did not vary according to vividness, suggesting that source effects in this region cannot be explained by a difference in the perceptual vividness of memories encoded through perception versus imagination.

  20. Age Differences in Brain Activity Related to Unsuccessful Declarative Memory Retrieval

    PubMed Central

    Grady, Cheryl L.; St-Laurent, Marie; Burianová, Hana

    2016-01-01

    Although memory recall is known to be reduced with normal aging, little is known about the patterns of brain activity that accompany these recall failures. By assessing faulty memory, we can identify the brain regions engaged during retrieval attempts in the absence of successful memory and determine the impact of aging on this functional activity. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging to examine age differences in brain activity associated with memory failure in three memory retrieval tasks: autobiographical (AM), episodic (EM) and semantic (SM). Compared to successful memory retrieval, both age groups showed more activity when they failed to recall a memory in regions consistent with the salience network (SLN), a brain network also associated with non-memory errors. Both groups also showed strong functional coupling among SLN regions during incorrect trials and in intrinsic patterns of functional connectivity. In comparison to young adults, older adults demonstrated (1) less activity within the SLN during unsuccessful AM trials; (2) weaker intrinsic functional connectivity between SLN nodes and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex; and (3) less differentiation of SLN functional connectivity during incorrect trials across memory conditions. These results suggest that the SLN is engaged during recall failures, as it is for non-memory errors, which may be because errors in general have particular salience for adapting behavior. In older adults, the dedifferentiation of functional connectivity within the SLN across memory conditions and the reduction of functional coupling between it and prefrontal cortex may indicate poorer internetwork communication and less flexible use of cognitive control processes, either while retrieval is attempted or when monitoring takes place after retrieval has failed. PMID:25541365

  1. Generation of Foxo3-targeted Mice by Injection of mRNAs Encoding Transcription Activator-like Effector Nucleases (TALENs) into Zygotes.

    PubMed

    Zhu, P; Liu, Q; Liu, S; Su, X; Feng, W; Lei, X; Liu, J; Cui, K; Huang, B; Shi, D

    2015-06-01

    In this study, for exploring the mechanism of forkhead box O3(Foxo3) participating in regulation of the activation of primordial oocytes, Foxo3-targeted mice were generated by injection of mRNAs encoding transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) into mouse zygotes. The TALEN sites were designed with high conservative homologous region among pig, bovine, buffalo and mouse by commercial bio-companies. The TALENs mutagenic non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) repair activity were determined to be 31.3% in human embryonic kidney 293T (HEK-293T) cells by dual luciferase reporter assay system. Then, we firstly injected TALEN-mRNAs into the cytoplasm of mouse zygotes by micromanipulation, and four of 48 mouse blastocysts were identified as mutation by sequencing. Subsequently, by the method of TALEN-mRNAs injected into the zygotes with pronucleus micromanipulation technique, we obtained seven Foxo3 mutants of 20 FVB/NJ backgrounds mice which were Foxo3-independent alleles with frameshift and deletion mutations. It was very interesting that all seven were heterozygous mutants (Foxo3(-/+) ), and the gene mutagenesis rates of the mice reached 35%. The five Foxo3 mutant females were all infertile in the following 6 months after birth. The histological examination results showed that there were rare primordial follicles and primary follicles in the ovary of Foxo3 mutant compared to that of wide-type female mice. Moreover, one of two mutant males was subfertile and another was fertile normally. Those results suggested that the mutant of Foxo3 severely affected the fertile ability of female and perhaps male in some degree; furthermore, an even more efficient TALENs-based gene mutation method has been established to be poised to revolutionize the study of mouse and other species genetics.

  2. Nck adaptors, besides promoting N-WASP mediated actin-nucleation activity at pedestals, influence the cellular levels of enteropathogenic Escherichia coli Tir effector

    PubMed Central

    Nieto-Pelegrin, Elvira; Kenny, Brendan; Martinez-Quiles, Narcisa

    2014-01-01

    Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) binding to human intestinal cells triggers the formation of disease-associated actin rich structures called pedestals. The latter process requires the delivery, via a Type 3 secretion system, of the translocated Intimin receptor (Tir) protein into the host plasma membrane where binding of a host kinase-modified form to the bacterial surface protein Intimin triggers pedestal formation. Tir-Intimin interaction recruits the Nck adaptor to a Tir tyrosine phosphorylated residue where it activates neural Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (N-WASP); initiating the major pathway to actin polymerization mediated by the actin-related protein (Arp) 2/3 complex. Previous studies with Nck-deficient mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) identified a key role for Nck in pedestal formation, presumed to reflect a lack of N-WASP activation. Here, we show the defect relates to reduced amounts of Tir within Nck-deficient cells. Indeed, Tir delivery and, thus, pedestal formation defects were much greater for MEFs than HeLa (human epithelial) cells. Crucially, the levels of two other effectors (EspB/EspF) within Nck-deficient MEFs were not reduced unlike that of Map (Mitochondrial associated protein) which, like Tir, requires CesT chaperone function for efficient delivery. Interestingly, drugs blocking various host protein degradation pathways failed to increase Tir cellular levels unlike an inhibitor of deacetylase activity (Trichostatin A; TSA). Treatments with TSA resulted in significant recovery of Tir levels, potentiation of actin polymerization and improvement in bacterial attachment to cells. Our findings have important implications for the current model of Tir-mediated actin polymerization and opens new lines of research in this area. PMID:25482634

  3. Memory retrieval by activating engram cells in mouse models of early Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Dheeraj S.; Arons, Autumn; Mitchell, Teryn I.; Pignatelli, Michele; Ryan, Tomás J.; Tonegawa, Susumu

    2016-01-01

    Summary Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by progressive memory decline and subsequent loss of broader cognitive functions1. Memory decline in early stages of Alzheimer’s is mostly limited to episodic memory, for which the hippocampus (HPC) plays a crucial role2. However, it has been uncertain whether the observed amnesia in early stages of Alzheimer’s is due to disrupted encoding and consolidation of episodic information, or an impairment in the retrieval of stored memory information. Here we show that in transgenic mouse models of early Alzheimer’s, direct optogenetic activation of hippocampal memory engram cells results in memory retrieval despite the fact that these mice are amnesic in long-term memory tests when natural recall cues are utilized, revealing a retrieval, rather than a storage impairment. Prior to amyloid plaque deposition, the amnesia in these mice is age-dependent3–5, which correlates with a progressive reduction of spine density of hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG) engram cells. We show that optogenetic induction of long-term potentiation (LTP) at perforant path (PP) synapses of DG engram cells restores both spine density and long-term memory. We also demonstrate that an ablation of DG engram cells containing restored spine density prevents the rescue of long-term memory. Thus, selective rescue of spine density in engram cells may lead to an effective strategy for treating memory loss in early stages of Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:26982728

  4. SHADE: A Shape-Memory-Activated Device Promoting Ankle Dorsiflexion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pittaccio, S.; Viscuso, S.; Rossini, M.; Magoni, L.; Pirovano, S.; Villa, E.; Besseghini, S.; Molteni, F.

    2009-08-01

    Acute post-stroke rehabilitation protocols include passive mobilization as a means to prevent contractures. A device (SHADE) that provides repetitive passive motion to a flaccid ankle by using shape memory alloy actuators could be of great help in providing this treatment. A suitable actuator was designed as a cartridge of approximately 150 × 20 × 15 mm, containing 2.5 m of 0.25 mm diameter NiTi wire. This actuator was activated by Joule’s effect employing a 7 s current input at 0.7 A, which provided 10 N through 76 mm displacement. Cooling and reset by natural convection took 30 s. A prototype of SHADE was assembled with two thermoplastic shells hinged together at the ankle and strapped on the shin and foot. Two actuators were fixed on the upper shell while an inextensible thread connected each NiTi wire to the foot shell. The passive ankle motion (passive range of motion, PROM) generated by SHADE was evaluated optoelectronically on three flaccid patients (58 ± 5 years old); acceptability was assessed by a questionnaire presented to further three flaccid patients (44 ± 11.5 years old) who used SHADE for 5 days, 30 min a day. SHADE was well accepted by all patients, produced good PROM, and caused no pain. The results prove that suitable limb mobilization can be produced by SMA actuators.

  5. The Eyes Have It: Hippocampal Activity Predicts Expression of Memory in Eye Movements

    PubMed Central

    Hannula, Deborah E.; Ranganath, Charan

    2009-01-01

    Although there is widespread agreement that the hippocampus is critical for explicit episodic memory retrieval, it is controversial whether this region can also support indirect expressions of relational memory when explicit retrieval fails. Here, using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) with concurrent indirect, eye-movement-based memory measures, we obtained evidence that hippocampal activity predicted expressions of relational memory in subsequent patterns of viewing, even when explicit, conscious retrieval failed. Additionally, activity in the lateral prefrontal cortex, and functional connectivity between the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex was greater for correct than for incorrect trials. Together, these results suggest that hippocampal activity can support the expression of relational memory even when explicit retrieval fails, and that recruitment of a broader cortical network may be required to support explicit associative recognition. PMID:19755103

  6. The eyes have it: hippocampal activity predicts expression of memory in eye movements.

    PubMed

    Hannula, Deborah E; Ranganath, Charan

    2009-09-10

    Although there is widespread agreement that the hippocampus is critical for explicit episodic memory retrieval, it is controversial whether this region can also support indirect expressions of relational memory when explicit retrieval fails. Here, using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) with concurrent indirect, eye-movement-based memory measures, we obtained evidence that hippocampal activity predicted expressions of relational memory in subsequent patterns of viewing, even when explicit, conscious retrieval failed. Additionally, activity in the lateral prefrontal cortex and functional connectivity between the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex were greater for correct than for incorrect trials. Together, these results suggest that hippocampal activity can support the expression of relational memory even when explicit retrieval fails and that recruitment of a broader cortical network may be required to support explicit associative recognition.

  7. Memory monitoring performance and PFC activity are associated with 5-HTTLPR genotype in older adults

    PubMed Central

    Pacheco, Jennifer; Beevers, Christopher G.; McGeary, John E.; Schnyer, David M.

    2012-01-01

    Older adults show extensive variability in cognitive performance, including episodic memory. A portion of this variability could potentially be explained by genetic factors. Recent literature shows that the neurotransmitter serotonin plays an important role in memory processes, as enhancements of brain serotonin have led to memory improvement. Here, we have begun to explore genetic contributions to the performance and underlying brain activity associated with source memory monitoring. Using a source recognition memory task during fMRI scanning, this study offers evidence that older adults who carry a short allele (S-car) of the serotonin transporter linked polymorphic region (5-HTTLPR) in the SLC6A4 gene show specific deficits in source memory monitoring relative to older adults who are homozygous for the long allele (LL). These deficits are accompanied by less neural activity in regions of prefrontal cortex that have been shown to support accurate memory monitoring. Moreover, while the older adult LL group’s behavioral performance does not differ from younger adults, their brain activation reveals evidence of compensatory activation that likely supports their higher performance level. These results provide preliminary evidence that the long-allele homozygous profile is cognitively beneficial to older adults, particularly for memory functioning. PMID:22705442

  8. The Effects of an Afterschool Physical Activity Program on Working Memory in Preadolescent Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kamijo, Keita; Pontifex, Matthew B.; O'Leary, Kevin C.; Scudder, Mark R.; Wu, Chien-Ting; Castelli, Darla M.; Hillman, Charles H.

    2011-01-01

    The present study examined the effects of a 9-month randomized control physical activity intervention aimed at improving cardiorespiratory fitness on changes in working memory performance in preadolescent children relative to a waitlist control group. Participants performed a modified Sternberg task, which manipulated working memory demands based…

  9. Does an Activity-Based Learning Strategy Improve Preschool Children's Memory for Narrative Passages?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biazak, Janna E.; Marley, Scott C.; Levin, Joel R.

    2010-01-01

    Contemporary embodiment theory's indexical hypothesis predicts that engaging in text-relevant activity while listening to a story will: (1) enhance memory for enacted story content; and, (2) result in relatively greater memory enhancement for enacted atypical events than for typical ones ([Glenberg and Robertson, 1999] and [Glenberg and Robertson,…

  10. Mapping Neuronal Activation and the Influence of Adrenergic Signaling during Contextual Memory Retrieval

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Wei-Ping; Guzowski, John F.; Thomas, Steven A.

    2005-01-01

    We recently described a critical role for adrenergic signaling in the hippocampus during contextual and spatial memory retrieval. To determine which neurons are activated by contextual memory retrieval and its sequelae in the presence and absence of adrenergic signaling, transcriptional imaging for the immediate-early gene "Arc" was used in…

  11. Activation of Midbrain Structures by Associative Novelty and the Formation of Explicit Memory in Humans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schott, Bjorn H.; Sellner, Daniela B.; Lauer, Corinna-J.; Habib, Reza; Frey, Julietta U.; Guderian, Sebastian; Heinze, Hans-Jochen; Duzel, Emrah

    2004-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests a close functional relationship between memory formation in the hippocampus and dopaminergic neuromodulation originating in the ventral tegmental area and medial substantia nigra of the midbrain. Here we report midbrain activation in two functional MRI studies of visual memory in healthy young adults. In the first study,…

  12. Memory retrieval requires ongoing protein synthesis and NMDA receptor activity-mediated AMPA receptor trafficking.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Joëlle; Gamache, Karine; Schneider, Rilla; Nader, Karim

    2015-02-11

    Whereas consolidation and reconsolidation are considered dynamic processes requiring protein synthesis, memory retrieval has long been considered a passive readout of previously established plasticity. However, previous findings suggest that memory retrieval may be more dynamic than previously thought. This study therefore aimed at investigating the molecular mechanisms underlying memory retrieval in the rat. Infusion of protein synthesis inhibitors (rapamycin or anisomycin) in the amygdala 10 min before memory retrieval transiently impaired auditory fear memory expression, suggesting ongoing protein synthesis is required to enable memory retrieval. We then investigated the role of protein synthesis in NMDA receptor activity-mediated AMPA receptor trafficking. Coinfusion of an NMDA receptor antagonist (ifenprodil) or infusion of an AMPA receptor endocytosis inhibitor (GluA23Y) before rapamycin prevented this memory impairment. Furthermore, rapamycin transiently decreased GluA1 levels at the postsynaptic density (PSD), but did not affect extrasynaptic sites. This effect at the PSD was prevented by an infusion of GluA23Y before rapamycin. Together, these data show that ongoing protein synthesis is required before memory retrieval is engaged, and suggest that this protein synthesis may be involved in the NMDAR activity-mediated trafficking of AMPA receptors that takes place during memory retrieval.

  13. TAL effectors and the executor R genes

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Junli; Yin, Zhongchao; White, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Transcription activator-like (TAL) effectors are bacterial type III secretion proteins that function as transcription factors in plants during Xanthomonas/plant interactions, conditioning either host susceptibility and/or host resistance. Three types of TAL effector associated resistance (R) genes have been characterized—recessive, dominant non-transcriptional, and dominant TAL effector-dependent transcriptional based resistance. Here, we discuss the last type of R genes, whose functions are dependent on direct TAL effector binding to discrete effector binding elements in the promoters. Only five of the so-called executor R genes have been cloned, and commonalities are not clear. We have placed the protein products in two groups for conceptual purposes. Group 1 consists solely of the protein from pepper, BS3, which is predicted to have catalytic function on the basis of homology to a large conserved protein family. Group 2 consists of BS4C-R, XA27, XA10, and XA23, all of which are relatively short proteins from pepper or rice with multiple potential transmembrane domains. Group 2 members have low sequence similarity to proteins of unknown function in closely related species. Firm predictions await further experimentation on these interesting new members to the R gene repertoire, which have potential broad application in new strategies for disease resistance. PMID:26347759

  14. High activity of N-alpha-benzyloxycarbonyl-L-lysine thiobenzyl ester serine esterase and cytolytic perforin in cloned cell lines is not demonstrable in in-vivo-induced cytotoxic effector cells.

    PubMed Central

    Dennert, G; Anderson, C G; Prochazka, G

    1987-01-01

    Recent observations have suggested striking similarities between complement-mediated and cell-mediated lysis. Both pathways share the terminal insertion of channels into target membranes, and unique esterases have been postulated to participate in the activation of cytolytic effector molecules. Since killer-specific esterases and channel-forming proteins can be demonstrated in in vitro cell lines, it is important to ascertain that the described esterase and channel-forming proteins are also present in killer cells from in vivo sources. Results presented here show that killer-cell-specific N alpha-benzyloxycarbonyl-L-lysine thiobenzyl ester serine esterase is induced in vitro concomitant with the sensitization of cytotoxic effector cells. In contrast, in-vivo-primed cytotoxic T cells or natural killer (NK) cells fail to express high levels of this enzyme. Assay of different cytotoxic effector cells reveals the presence of N alpha-benzyloxycarbonyl-L-lysine thiobenzyl ester serine esterase in clones with T killer and NK activity, but enzyme levels do not correlate with cytolytic activity nor does inhibition of esterase activity interfere with granule-mediated cell lysis. A similar result is seen with granule-mediated cytolytic activity. Cloned NK and T killer cell lines possess granules that are able to lyse erythrocyte targets. However, T killer cells sensitized in mixed lymphocyte culture or in vivo have no detectable cytotoxic granules. Cytotoxic granules are also not detected in NK cells isolated from animals. PMID:2955414

  15. Silymarin inhibits ultraviolet radiation-induced immune suppression through DNA repair-dependent activation of dendritic cells and stimulation of effector T cells

    PubMed Central

    Vaid, Mudit; Prasad, Ram; Singh, Tripti; Elmets, Craig A.; Xu, Hui; Katiyar, Santosh K.

    2013-01-01

    Silymarin inhibits UVB-induced immunosuppression in mouse skin. To identify the molecular mechanisms underlying this effect, we used an adoptive transfer approach in which dendritic cells (DCs) from the draining lymph nodes of donor mice that had been UVB-exposed and sensitized to 2,4,-dinitrofluorobenzene (DNFB) were transferred into naïve recipient mice. The contact hypersensitivity (CHS) response of the recipient mice to DNFB was then measured. When DCs were obtained from UVB-exposed donor mice that were not treated with silymarin, the CHS response was suppressed confirming the role of DCs in the UVB-induced immunosuppression. Silymarin treatment of UVB-exposed donor mice relieved this suppression of the CHS response in the recipients. Silymarin treatment was associated with rapid repair of UVB-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) in DCs and silymarin treatment did not prevent UV-induced immunosuppression in XPA-deficient mice which are unable to repair UV-induced DNA damage. The CHS response in mice receiving DCs from silymarin-treated UV-exposed donor mice also was associated with enhanced secretion of Th1-type cytokines and stimulation of T cells. Adoptive transfer of T cells revealed that transfer of either CD8+ or CD4+ cells from silymarin-treated, UVB-exposed donors resulted in enhancement of the CHS response. Cell culture study showed enhanced secretion of IL-2 and IFNγ by CD8+ T cells, and reduced secretion of Th2 cytokines by CD4+ cells, obtained from silymarin-treated UVB-exposed mice. These data suggest that DNA repair-dependent functional activation of DCs, a reduction in CD4+ regulatory T-cell activity, and stimulation of CD8+ effector T cells contribute to silymarin-mediated inhibition of UVB-induced immunosuppression. PMID:23395695

  16. Insights into the TOR-S6K signaling pathway in maize (Zea mays L.). pathway activation by effector-receptor interaction.

    PubMed

    Garrocho-Villegas, Verónica; Aguilar C, Raúl; Sánchez de Jiménez, Estela

    2013-12-23

    The primordial TOR pathway, known to control growth and cell proliferation, has still not been fully described for plants. Nevertheless, in maize, an insulin-like growth factor (ZmIGF) peptide has been reported to stimulate this pathway. This research provides further insight into the TOR pathway in maize, using a biochemical approach in cultures of fast-growing (FG) and slow-growing (SG) calli, as a model system. Our results revealed that addition of either ZmIGF or insulin to SG calli stimulated DNA synthesis and increased the growth rate through cell proliferation and increased the rate of ribosomal protein (RP) synthesis by the selective mobilization of RP mRNAs into polysomes. Furthermore, analysis of the phosphorylation status of the main TOR and S6K kinases from the TOR pathway revealed stimulation by ZmIGF or insulin, whereas rapamycin inhibited its activation. Remarkably, a putative maize insulin-like receptor was recognized by a human insulin receptor antibody, as demonstrated by immunoprecipitation from membrane protein extracts of maize callus. Furthermore, competition experiments between ZmIGF and insulin for the receptor site on maize protoplasts suggested structural recognition of the putative receptor by either effector. These data were confirmed by confocal immunolocalization within the cell membrane of callus cells. Taken together, these data indicate that cell growth and cell proliferation in maize depend on the activation of the TOR-S6K pathway through the interaction of an insulin-like growth factor and its receptor. This evidence suggests that higher plants as well as metazoans have conserved this biochemical pathway to regulate their growth, supporting the conclusion that it is a highly evolved conserved pathway.

  17. Distinct Splice Variants of Dynamin-related Protein 1 Differentially Utilize Mitochondrial Fission Factor as an Effector of Cooperative GTPase Activity.

    PubMed

    Macdonald, Patrick J; Francy, Christopher A; Stepanyants, Natalia; Lehman, Lance; Baglio, Anthony; Mears, Jason A; Qi, Xin; Ramachandran, Rajesh

    2016-01-01

    Multiple isoforms of the mitochondrial fission GTPase dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1) arise from the alternative splicing of its single gene-encoded pre-mRNA transcript. Among these, the longer Drp1 isoforms, expressed selectively in neurons, bear unique polypeptide sequences within their GTPase and variable domains, known as the A-insert and the B-insert, respectively. Their functions remain unresolved. A comparison of the various biochemical and biophysical properties of the neuronally expressed isoforms with that of the ubiquitously expressed, and shortest, Drp1 isoform (Drp1-short) has revealed the effect of these inserts on Drp1 function. Utilizing various biochemical, biophysical, and cellular approaches, we find that the A- and B-inserts distinctly alter the oligomerization propensity of Drp1 in solution as well as the preferred curvature of helical Drp1 self-assembly on membranes. Consequently, these sequences also suppress Drp1 cooperative GTPase activity. Mitochondrial fission factor (Mff), a tail-anchored membrane protein of the mitochondrial outer membrane that recruits Drp1 to sites of ensuing fission, differentially stimulates the disparate Drp1 isoforms and alleviates the autoinhibitory effect imposed by these sequences on Drp1 function. Moreover, the differential stimulatory effects of Mff on Drp1 isoforms are dependent on the mitochondrial lipid, cardiolipin (CL). Although Mff stimulation of the intrinsically cooperative Drp1-short isoform is relatively modest, CL-independent, and even counter-productive at high CL concentrations, Mff stimulation of the much less cooperative longest Drp1 isoform (Drp1-long) is robust and occurs synergistically with increasing CL content. Thus, membrane-anchored Mff differentially regulates various Drp1 isoforms by functioning as an allosteric effector of cooperative GTPase activity.

  18. Potent in vitro and in vivo activity of an Fc-engineered humanized anti-HM1.24 antibody against multiple myeloma via augmented effector function.

    PubMed

    Tai, Yu-Tzu; Horton, Holly M; Kong, Sun-Young; Pong, Erik; Chen, Hsing; Cemerski, Saso; Bernett, Matthew J; Nguyen, Duc-Hanh T; Karki, Sher; Chu, Seung Y; Lazar, Greg A; Munshi, Nikhil C; Desjarlais, John R; Anderson, Kenneth C; Muchhal, Umesh S

    2012-03-01

    HM1.24, an immunologic target for multiple myeloma (MM) cells, has not been effectively targeted with therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). In this study, we investigated in vitro and in vivo anti-MM activities of XmAb5592, a humanized anti-HM1.24 mAb with Fc-domain engineered to significantly enhance FcγR binding and associated immune effector functions. XmAb5592 increased antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) several fold relative to the anti-HM1.24 IgG1 analog against both MM cell lines and primary patient myeloma cells. XmAb5592 also augmented antibody dependent cellular phagocytosis (ADCP) by macrophages. Natural killer (NK) cells became more activated by XmAb5592 than the IgG1 analog, evidenced by increased cell surface expression of granzyme B-dependent CD107a and MM cell lysis, even in the presence of bone marrow stromal cells. XmAb5592 potently inhibited tumor growth in mice bearing human MM xenografts via FcγR-dependent mechanisms, and was significantly more effective than the IgG1 analog. Lenalidomide synergistically enhanced in vitro ADCC against MM cells and in vivo tumor inhibition induced by XmAb5592. A single dose of 20 mg/kg XmAb5592 effectively depleted both blood and bone marrow plasma cells in cynomolgus monkeys. These results support clinical development of XmAb5592, both as a monotherapy and in combination with lenalidomide, to improve patient outcome of MM.

  19. The Role of Memory Activation in Creating False Memories of Encoding Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arndt, Jason

    2010-01-01

    Using 3 experiments, I examined false memory for encoding context by presenting Deese-Roediger-McDermott themes (Deese, 1959; Roediger & McDermott, 1995) in usual-looking fonts and by testing related, but unstudied, lure items in a font that was shown during encoding. In 2 of the experiments, testing lure items in the font used to study their…

  20. Overlapping Parietal Activity in Memory and Perception: Evidence for the Attention to Memory Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cabeza, Roberto; Mazuz, Yonatan S.; Stokes, Jared; Kragel, James E.; Woldorff, Marty G.; Ciaramelli, Elisa; Olson, Ingrid R.; Moscovitch, Morris

    2011-01-01

    The specific role of different parietal regions to episodic retrieval is a topic of intense debate. According to the Attention to Memory (AtoM) model, dorsal parietal cortex (DPC) mediates top-down attention processes guided by retrieval goals, whereas ventral parietal cortex (VPC) mediates bottom-up attention processes captured by the retrieval…

  1. Memory-Based Decision-Making with Heuristics: Evidence for a Controlled Activation of Memory Representations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khader, Patrick H.; Pachur, Thorsten; Meier, Stefanie; Bien, Siegfried; Jost, Kerstin; Rosler, Frank

    2011-01-01

    Many of our daily decisions are memory based, that is, the attribute information about the decision alternatives has to be recalled. Behavioral studies suggest that for such decisions we often use simple strategies (heuristics) that rely on controlled and limited information search. It is assumed that these heuristics simplify decision-making by…

  2. Tc1 and Tc2 effector cell therapy elicit long-term tumor immunity by contrasting mechanisms that result in complementary endogenous type 1 antitumor responses.

    PubMed

    Dobrzanski, Mark J; Reome, Joyce B; Hollenbaugh, Joseph A; Dutton, Richard W

    2004-02-01

    Cytolytic CD8(+) effector cells fall into two subpopulations based on cytokine secretion. Type 1 CD8(+) T cells (Tc1) secrete IFN-gamma, whereas type 2 CD8(+) T cells (Tc2) secrete IL-4 and IL-5. Both effector cell subpopulations display predominantly perforin-dependent cytolysis in vitro. Using an OVA-transfected B16 lung metastases model, we show that adoptively transferred OVA-specific Tc1 and Tc2 cells induce considerable suppression, but not cure, of pulmonary metastases. However, long-term tumor immunity prolonged survival times indefinitely and was evident by resistance to lethal tumor rechallenge. At early stages after therapy, protection by Tc2 and Tc1 effector cells were dependent in part on effector cell-derived IL-4, IL-5, and IFN-gamma, respectively. Whereas effector cell-derived perforin was not necessary. Over time the numbers of both donor cells diminished to low, yet still detectable, levels. Concomitantly, Tc1 and Tc2 effector cell therapies potentiated endogenous recipient-derived antitumor responses by inducing 1) local T cell-derived chemokines associated with type 1-like immune responses; 2) elevated levels of recipient-derived OVA tetramer-positive CD8 memory T cells that were CD44(high), CD122(+), and Ly6C(high) that predominantly produced IFN-gamma and TNF-alpha; and 3) heightened numbers of activated recipient-derived Th1 and Tc1 T cell subpopulations expressing CD25(+), CD69(+), and CD95(+) cell surface activation markers. Moreover, both Tc2 and Tc1 effector cell therapies were dependent in part on recipient-derived IFN-gamma and TNF-alpha for long-term survival and protection. Collectively, Tc1 and Tc2 effector cell immunotherapy mediate long-term tumor immunity by different mechanisms that subsequently potentiate endogenous recipient-derived type 1 antitumor responses.

  3. Fear extinction memory consolidation requires potentiation of pontine-wave activity during REM sleep.

    PubMed

    Datta, Subimal; O'Malley, Matthew W

    2013-03-06

    Sleep plays an important role in memory consolidation within multiple memory systems including contextual fear extinction memory, but little is known about the mechanisms that underlie this process. Here, we show that fear extinction training in rats, which extinguished conditioned fear, increased both slow-wave sleep and rapid-eye movement (REM) sleep. Surprisingly, 24 h later, during memory testing, only 57% of the fear-extinguished animals retained fear extinction memory. We found that these animals exhibited an increase in phasic pontine-wave (P-wave) activity during post-training REM sleep, which was absent in the 43% of animals that failed to retain fear extinction memory. The results of this study provide evidence that brainstem activation, specifically potentiation of phasic P-wave activity, during post-training REM sleep is critical for consolidation of fear extinction memory. The results of this study also suggest that, contrary to the popular hypothesis of sleep and memory, increased sleep after training alone does not guarantee consolidation and/or retention of fear extinction memory. Rather, the potentiation of specific sleep-dependent physiological events may be a more accurate predictor for successful consolidation of fear extinction memory. Identification of this unique mechanism will significantly improve our present understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanisms that underlie the sleep-dependent regulation of emotional memory. Additionally, this discovery may also initiate development of a new, more targeted treatment method for clinical disorders of fear and anxiety in humans that is more efficacious than existing methods such as exposure therapy that incorporate only fear extinction.

  4. Fear Extinction Memory Consolidation Requires Potentiation of Pontine-Wave Activity during REM Sleep

    PubMed Central

    Datta, Subimal; O'Malley, Matthew W .

    2013-01-01

    Sleep plays an important role in memory consolidation within multiple memory systems including contextual fear extinction memory, but little is known about the mechanisms that underlie this process. Here, we show that fear extinction training in rats, which extinguished conditioned fear, increased both slow-wave sleep and rapid-eye movement (REM) sleep. Surprisingly, 24 h later, during memory testing, only 57% of the fear-extinguished animals retained fear extinction memory. We found that these animals exhibited an increase in phasic pontine-wave (P-wave) activity during post-training REM sleep, which was absent in the 43% of animals that failed to retain fear extinction memory. The results of this study provide evidence that brainstem activation, specifically potentiation of phasic P-wave activity, during post-training REM sleep is critical for consolidation of fear extinction memory. The results of this study also suggest that, contrary to the popular hypothesis of sleep and memory, increased sleep after training alone does not guarantee consolidation and/or retention of fear extinction memory. Rather, the potentiation of specific sleep-dependent physiological events may be a more accurate predictor for successful consolidation of fear extinction memory. Identification of this unique mechanism will significantly improve our present understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanisms that underlie the sleep-dependent regulation of emotional memory. Additionally, this discovery may also initiate development of a new, more targeted treatment method for clinical disorders of fear and anxiety in humans that is more efficacious than existing methods such as exposure therapy that incorporate only fear extinction. PMID:23467372

  5. Physical activity and working memory in healthy older adults: an ERP study.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yu-Kai; Huang, Chung-Ju; Chen, Kuan-Fu; Hung, Tsung-Min

    2013-11-01

    This study examined the effects of physical activity on working memory in older adults using both behavioral and neuroelectric measures. Older adults were assigned to either a higher or lower physical activity group, and event-related potentials were recorded during assessments of a modified Sternberg task. The results indicated that older adults in the higher physical activity group exhibited shorter response times, independent of the working memory load. Enhanced P3 and N1 amplitudes and a decreased P3 latency were observed in the higher physical activity group. These findings suggested that physical activity facilitates working memory by allocating more attentional resources and increasing the efficiency of evaluating the stimulus during the retrieval phase as well as engaging more attentional resources for the early discriminative processes during the encoding phase of a working memory task.

  6. Memory re-differentiation and reduced lymphocyte activation in chronic HCV-infected patients receiving direct-acting antivirals.

    PubMed

    Burchill, M A; Golden-Mason, L; Wind-Rotolo, M; Rosen, H R

    2015-12-01

    Recently, the treatment of HCV has advanced significantly due to the introduction of direct-acting antivirals (DAAs). Studies using interferon (IFN)-containing regimens failed to consistently show restoration of immunologic responses. Therefore, IFN-free DAA formulations provide a unique opportunity to dissect the immunologic effect of HCV cure. This study investigates the restoration of the immune compartment as a consequence of rapid viral clearance in patients successfully treated with DAAs and in the absence of IFN and ribavirin. Here, we evaluate the immunologic changes that occurred following DAA-mediated HCV cure. Peripheral blood from nineteen previously treatment-naïve patients with chronic HCV genotype 1a/1b who received an IFN and ribavirin-free regimen of daclatasvir, asunaprevir and BMS-791325 was evaluated. Immune reconstitution occurs in patients in whom HCV was successfully eradicated via DAA therapy. Restoration of the CD4(+) T-cell compartment in the peripheral blood and a re-differentiation of the T lymphocyte memory compartment resulted in a more effector memory cell population and a reduction in expression in the co-inhibitory molecule TIGIT in bulk T lymphocytes. Furthermore, we observed a partial reversal of the exhausted phenotype in HCV-specific CD8(+) T cells and a dampening of the activation state in peripheral NK cells. Collectively, our data provide the groundwork for dissecting the effect of DAA therapy on the immune system and identifying novel mechanisms by which chronic HCV infection exerts immunosuppressive effects on T cells through the recently described co-inhibitory molecule TIGIT.

  7. CaMKII regulates proteasome phosphorylation and activity and promotes memory destabilization following retrieval.

    PubMed

    Jarome, Timothy J; Ferrara, Nicole C; Kwapis, Janine L; Helmstetter, Fred J

    2016-02-01

    Numerous studies have suggested that memories "destabilize" and require de novo protein synthesis in order to reconsolidate following retrieval, but very little is known about how this destabilization process is regulated. Recently, ubiquitin-proteasome mediated protein degradation has been identified as a critical regulator of memory trace destabilization following retrieval, though the specific mechanisms controlling retrieval-induced changes in ubiquitin-proteasome activity remain equivocal. Here, we found that proteasome activity is increased in the amygdala in a CaMKII-dependent manner following the retrieval of a contextual fear memory. We show that in vitro inhibition of CaMKII reversed retrieval-induced increases in proteasome activity. Additionally, in vivo pharmacological blockade of CaMKII abolished increases in proteolytic activity and activity related regulatory phosphorylation in the amygdala following retrieval, suggesting that CaMKII was "upstream" of protein degradation during the memory reconsolidation process. Consistent with this, while inhibiting CaMKII in the amygdala did not impair memory following retrieval, it completely attenuated the memory impairments that resulted from post-retrieval protein synthesis blockade. Collectively, these results suggest that CaMKII controls the initiation of the memory reconsolidation process through regulation of the proteasome.

  8. Comparison of neural activity that leads to true memories, false memories, and forgetting: An fMRI study of the misinformation effect.

    PubMed

    Baym, Carol L; Gonsalves, Brian D

    2010-09-01

    False memories can occur when people are exposed to misinformation about a past event. Of interest here are the neural mechanisms of this type of memory failure. In the present study, participants viewed photographic vignettes of common activities during an original event phase (OEP), while we monitored their brain activity using fMRI. Later, in a misinformation phase, participants viewed sentences describing the studied photographs, some of which contained information conflicting with that depicted in the photographs. One day later, participants returned for a surprise item memory recognition test for the content of the photographs. Results showed reliable creation of false memories, in that participants reported information that had been presented in the verbal misinformation but not in the photographs. Several regions were more active during the OEP for later accurate memory than for forgetting, but they were also more active for later false memories, indicating that false memories in this paradigm are not simply caused by failure to encode the original event. There was greater activation in the ventral visual stream for subsequent true memories than for subsequent false memories, however, suggesting that differences in encoding may contribute to later susceptibility to misinformation.

  9. PKC-epsilon activation is required for recognition memory in the rat.

    PubMed

    Zisopoulou, Styliani; Asimaki, Olga; Leondaritis, George; Vasilaki, Anna; Sakellaridis, Nikos; Pitsikas, Nikolaos; Mangoura, Dimitra

    2013-09-15

    Activation of PKCɛ, an abundant and developmentally regulated PKC isoform in the brain, has been implicated in memory throughout life and across species. Yet, direct evidence for a mechanistic role for PKCɛ in memory is still lacking. Hence, we sought to evaluate this in rats, using short-term treatments with two PKCɛ-selective peptides, the inhibitory ɛV1-2 and the activating ψɛRACK, and the novel object recognition task (NORT). Our results show that the PKCɛ-selective activator ψɛRACK, did not have a significant effect on recognition memory. In the short time frames used, however, inhibition of PKCɛ activation with the peptide inhibitor ɛV1-2 significantly impaired recognition memory. Moreover, when we addressed at the molecular level the immediate proximal signalling events of PKCɛ activation in acutely dissected rat hippocampi, we found that ψɛRACK increased in a time-dependent manner phosphorylation of MARCKS and activation of Src, Raf, and finally ERK1/2, whereas ɛV1-2 inhibited all basal activity of this pathway. Taken together, these findings present the first direct evidence that PKCɛ activation is an essential molecular component of recognition memory and point toward the use of systemically administered PKCɛ-regulating peptides as memory study tools and putative therapeutic agents.

  10. Stable enhanced green fluorescent protein expression after differentiation and transplantation of reporter human induced pluripotent stem cells generated by AAVS1 transcription activator-like effector nucleases.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yongquan; Liu, Chengyu; Cerbini, Trevor; San, Hong; Lin, Yongshun; Chen, Guokai; Rao, Mahendra S; Zou, Jizhong

    2014-07-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem (hiPS) cell lines with tissue-specific or ubiquitous reporter genes are extremely useful for optimizing in vitro differentiation conditions as well as for monitoring transplanted cells in vivo. The adeno-associated virus integration site 1 (AAVS1) locus has been used as a "safe harbor" locus for inserting transgenes because of its open chromatin structure, which permits transgene expression without insertional mutagenesis. However, it is not clear whether targeted transgene expression at the AAVS1 locus is always protected from silencing when driven by various promoters, especially after differentiation and transplantation from hiPS cells. In this paper, we describe a pair of transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) that enable more efficient genome editing than the commercially available zinc finger nuclease at the AAVS1 site. Using these TALENs for targeted gene addition, we find that the cytomegalovirus-immediate early enhancer/chicken β-actin/rabbit β-globin (CAG) promoter is better than cytomegalovirus 7 and elongation factor 1α short promoters in driving strong expression of the transgene. The two independent AAVS1, CAG, and enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) hiPS cell reporter lines that we have developed do not show silencing of EGFP either in undifferentiated hiPS cells or in randomly and lineage-specifically differentiated cells or in teratomas. Transplanting cardiomyocytes from an engineered AAVS1-CAG-EGFP hiPS cell line in a myocardial infarcted mouse model showed persistent expression of the transgene for at least 7 weeks in vivo. Our results show that high-efficiency targeting can be obtained with open-source TALENs and that careful optimization of the reporter and transgene constructs results in stable and persistent expression in vitro and in vivo.

  11. Targeting of the Plzf Gene in the Rat by Transcription Activator-Like Effector Nuclease Results in Caudal Regression Syndrome in Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats.

    PubMed

    Liška, František; Peterková, Renata; Peterka, Miroslav; Landa, Vladimír; Zídek, Václav; Mlejnek, Petr; Šilhavý, Jan; Šimáková, Miroslava; Křen, Vladimír; Starker, Colby G; Voytas, Daniel F; Izsvák, Zsuzsanna; Pravenec, Michal

    2016-01-01

    Recently, it has been found that spontaneous mutation Lx (polydactyly-luxate syndrome) in the rat is determined by deletion of a conserved intronic sequence of the Plzf (Promyelocytic leukemia zinc finger protein) gene. In addition, Plzf is a prominent candidate gene for quantitative trait loci (QTLs) associated with cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis in the spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR). In the current study, we tested the effects of Plzf gene targeting in the SHR using TALENs (transcription activator-like effector nucleases). SHR ova were microinjected with constructs pTAL438/439 coding for a sequence-specific endonuclease that binds to target sequence in the first coding exon of the Plzf gene. Out of 43 animals born after microinjection, we detected a single male founder. Sequence analysis revealed a deletion of G that resulted in frame shift mutation starting in codon 31 and causing a premature stop codon at position of amino acid 58. The Plzftm1Ipcv allele is semi-lethal since approximately 95% of newborn homozygous animals died perinatally. All homozygous animals exhibited manifestations of a caudal regression syndrome including tail anomalies and serious size reduction and deformities of long bones, and oligo- or polydactyly on the hindlimbs. The heterozygous animals only exhibited the tail anomalies. Impaired development of the urinary tract was also revealed: one homozygous and one heterozygous rat exhibited a vesico-ureteric reflux with enormous dilatation of ureters and renal pelvis. In the homozygote, this was combined with a hypoplastic kidney. These results provide evidence for the important role of Plzf gene during development of the caudal part of a body-column vertebrae, hindlimbs and urinary system in the rat.

  12. Targeting of the Plzf Gene in the Rat by Transcription Activator-Like Effector Nuclease Results in Caudal Regression Syndrome in Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats

    PubMed Central

    Liška, František; Peterková, Renata; Peterka, Miroslav; Landa, Vladimír; Zídek, Václav; Mlejnek, Petr; Šilhavý, Jan; Šimáková, Miroslava; Křen, Vladimír; Starker, Colby G.; Voytas, Daniel F.; Izsvák, Zsuzsanna; Pravenec, Michal

    2016-01-01

    Recently, it has been found that spontaneous mutation Lx (polydactyly-luxate syndrome) in the rat is determined by deletion of a conserved intronic sequence of the Plzf (Promyelocytic leukemia zinc finger protein) gene. In addition, Plzf is a prominent candidate gene for quantitative trait loci (QTLs) associated with cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis in the spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR). In the current study, we tested the effects of Plzf gene targeting in the SHR using TALENs (transcription activator-like effector nucleases). SHR ova were microinjected with constructs pTAL438/439 coding for a sequence-specific endonuclease that binds to target sequence in the first coding exon of the Plzf gene. Out of 43 animals born after microinjection, we detected a single male founder. Sequence analysis revealed a deletion of G that resulted in frame shift mutation starting in codon 31 and causing a premature stop codon at position of amino acid 58. The Plzftm1Ipcv allele is semi-lethal since approximately 95% of newborn homozygous animals died perinatally. All homozygous animals exhibited manifestations of a caudal regression syndrome including tail anomalies and serious size reduction and deformities of long bones, and oligo- or polydactyly on the hindlimbs. The heterozygous animals only exhibited the tail anomalies. Impaired development of the urinary tract was also revealed: one homozygous and one heterozygous rat exhibited a vesico-ureteric reflux with enormous dilatation of ureters and renal pelvis. In the homozygote, this was combined with a hypoplastic kidney. These results provide evidence for the important role of Plzf gene during development of the caudal part of a body—column vertebrae, hindlimbs and urinary system in the rat. PMID:27727328

  13. Natural effector T lymphocytes in normal mice.

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, P; Larsson, E L; Forni, L; Bandeira, A; Coutinho, A

    1985-01-01

    The "natural" T-cell activity in normal unimmunized mice was studied. By double-parameter fluorescence-activated cell sorter analysis, it was found that 5-10% of all splenic Lyt-2+ and L3T4+ lymphocytes are large, of which more than half are in mitotic cycle. In contrast with small resting cells of the same phenotype, activated (large) T cells isolated from normal mice are functional effector cells: L3T4+ large cells induce normal B lymphocytes into proliferation and antibody secretion, while large Lyt-2+ cells efficiently suppress B-lymphocyte responses. No effector cell cytolytic activity could be detected among naturally activated T cells. The significance of these findings for the internal activity in the normal immune system is discussed. PMID:2933744

  14. Two-axis angular effector

    DOEpatents

    Vaughn, Mark R.; Robinett, III, Rush D.; Phelan, John R.; Van Zuiden, Don M.

    1997-01-21

    A new class of coplanar two-axis angular effectors. These effectors combine a two-axis rotational joint analogous to a Cardan joint with linear actuators in a manner to produce a wider range of rotational motion about both axes defined by the joint. This new class of effectors also allows design of robotic manipulators having very high strength and efficiency. These effectors are particularly suited for remote operation in unknown surroundings, because of their extraordinary versatility. An immediate application is to the problems which arise in nuclear waste remediation.

  15. Allocentric spatial memory activation of the hippocampal formation measured with fMRI.

    PubMed

    Parslow, David M; Rose, David; Brooks, Barbara; Fleminger, Simon; Gray, Jeffrey A; Giampietro, Vincent; Brammer, Michael J; Williams, Steven; Gasston, David; Andrew, Christopher; Vythelingum, Goparlen N; Loannou, Glafkos; Simmons, Andrew; Morris, Robin G

    2004-07-01

    Hippocampal activation was investigated, comparing allocentric and egocentric spatial memory. Healthy participants were immersed in a virtual reality circular arena, with pattern-rendered walls. In a viewpoint-independent task, they moved toward a pole, which was then removed. They were relocated to another position and had to move to the prior location of the pole. For viewpoint-dependent memory, the participants were not moved to a new starting point, but the patterns were rotated to prevent them from indicating the final position. Hippocampal and parahippocampal activation were found in the viewpoint-independent memory encoding phase. Viewpoint-dependent memory did not result in such activation. These results suggest differential activation of the hippocampal formation during allocentric encoding, in partial support of the spatial mapping hypothesis as applied to humans.

  16. Lithium activates brain phospholipase A2 and improves memory in rats: implications for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Mury, Fábio B; da Silva, Weber C; Barbosa, Nádia R; Mendes, Camila T; Bonini, Juliana S; Sarkis, Jorge Eduardo Souza; Cammarota, Martin; Izquierdo, Ivan; Gattaz, Wagner F; Dias-Neto, Emmanuel

    2016-10-01

    Phospholipase A2 (Pla2) is required for memory retrieval, and its inhibition in the hippocampus has been reported to impair memory acquisition in rats. Moreover, cognitive decline and memory deficits showed to be reduced in animal models after lithium treatment, prompting us to evaluate possible links between Pla2, lithium and memory. Here, we evaluated the possible modulation of Pla2 activity by a long-term treatment of rats with low doses of lithium and its impact in memory. Wistar rats were trained for the inhibitory avoidance task, treated with lithium for 100 days and tested for perdurability of long-term memory. Hippocampal samples were used for quantifying the expression of 19 brain-expressed Pla2 genes and for evaluating the enzymatic activity of Pla2 using group-specific radio-enzymatic assays. Our data pointed to a significant perdurability of long-term memory, which correlated with increased transcriptional and enzymatic activities of certain members of the Pla2 family (iPla2 and sPla2) after the chronic lithium treatment. Our data suggest new possible targets of lithium, add more information on its pharmacological activity and reinforce the possible use of low doses of lithium for the treatment of neurodegenerative conditions such as the Alzheimer's disease.

  17. Long-Term Heavy Ketamine Use is Associated with Spatial Memory Impairment and Altered Hippocampal Activation

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Celia J. A.; Dodds, Chris M.; Furby, Hannah; Pepper, Fiona; Fam, Johnson; Freeman, Tom P.; Hughes, Emer; Doeller, Christian; King, John; Howes, Oliver; Stone, James M.

    2014-01-01

    Ketamine, a non-competitive N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor antagonist, is rising in popularity as a drug of abuse. Preliminary evidence suggests that chronic, heavy ketamine use may have profound effects on spatial memory but the mechanism of these deficits is as yet unclear. This study aimed to examine the neural mechanism by which heavy ketamine use impairs spatial memory processing. In a sample of 11 frequent ketamine users and 15 poly-drug controls, matched for IQ, age, years in education. We used fMRI utilizing an ROI approach to examine the neural activity of three regions known to support successful navigation; the hippocampus, parahippocampal gyrus, and the caudate nucleus during a virtual reality task of spatial memory. Frequent ketamine users displayed spatial memory deficits, accompanied by and related to, reduced activation in both the right hippocampus and left parahippocampal gyrus during navigation from memory, and in the left caudate during memory updating, compared to controls. Ketamine users also exhibited schizotypal and dissociative symptoms that were related to hippocampal activation. Impairments in spatial memory observed in ketamine users are related to changes in medial temporal lobe activation. Disrupted medial temporal lobe function may be a consequence of chronic ketamine abuse and may relate to schizophrenia-like symptomatology observed in ketamine users. PMID:25538631

  18. Stimulus-dependent EEG activity reflects internal updating of tactile working memory in humans.

    PubMed

    Spitzer, Bernhard; Blankenburg, Felix

    2011-05-17

    Despite recent advances in uncovering the neural signature of tactile working memory processing in animals and humans, the representation of internally modified somatosensory working memory content has not been studied so far. Here, recording EEG in human participants (n = 25) performing a modified delayed match-to-sample task allowed us to disambiguate internally driven memory processing from encoding-related delay activity. After presentation of two distinct vibrotactile frequencies to different index fingers, a visual cue indicated which of the two previous stimuli had to be maintained in working memory throughout a retention interval for subsequent frequency discrimination against a probe stimulus. During cued stimulus maintenance, α activity (8-13 Hz) over early somatosensory cortices was lateralized according to the cued tactile stimulus, even though the location of the stimuli was task irrelevant. The task-relevant memory content, in contrast, was found to be represented in right prefrontal cortex. The key finding was that the visually presented instructions triggered systematic modulations of prefrontal β-band activity (20-25 Hz), which selectively reflected the to-be-maintained frequency of the cued tactile vibration. The results expand previous evidence for parametric representations of vibrotactile frequency in the prefrontal cortex and corroborate a central role of dynamic β-band synchronization during active processing of an analog stimulus quantity in human working memory. In particular, our findings suggest that such processing supports not only sustained maintenance but also purposeful modification and updating of the task-relevant working memory contents.

  19. Autobiographical Memory Retrieval and Hippocampal Activation as a Function of Repetition and the Passage of Time

    PubMed Central

    Nadel, Lynn; Campbell, Jenna; Ryan, Lee

    2007-01-01

    Multiple trace theory (MTT) predicts that hippocampal memory traces expand and strengthen as a function of repeated memory retrievals. We tested this hypothesis utilizing fMRI, comparing the effect of memory retrieval versus the mere passage of time on hippocampal activation. While undergoing fMRI scanning, participants retrieved remote autobiographical memories that had been previously retrieved either one month earlier, two days earlier, or multiple times during the preceding month. Behavioral analyses revealed that the number and consistency of memory details retrieved increased with multiple retrievals but not with the passage of time. While all three retrieval conditions activated a similar set of brain regions normally associated with autobiographical memory retrieval including medial temporal lobe structures, hippocampal activation did not change as a function of either multiple retrievals or the passage of time. However, activation in other brain regions, including the precuneus, lateral prefrontal cortex, parietal cortex, lateral temporal lobe, and perirhinal cortex increased after multiple retrievals, but was not influenced by the passage of time. These results have important implications for existing theories of long-term memory consolidation. PMID:18274617

  20. Quantitative assessment of the functional plasticity of memory CD8(+) T cells.

    PubMed

    Baz, Adriana; Groves, Penny; Buttigieg, Kathy; Apte, Simon H; Kienzle, Norbert; Kelso, Anne

    2016-04-01

    While the functional plasticity of memory CD4(+) T cells has been studied extensively, less is known about this property in memory CD8(+) T cells. Here, we report the direct measurement of plasticity by paired daughter analysis of effector and memory OT-I CD8(+) T cells primed in vivo with ovalbumin. Naïve, effector, and memory OT-I cells were isolated and activated in single-cell culture; then, after the first division, their daughter cells were transferred to new cultures with and without IL-4; expression of IFN-γ and IL-4 mRNAs was measured 5 days later in the resultant subclones. Approximately 40% of clonogenic memory CD8(+) T cells were bipotential in this assay, giving rise to an IL-4(-) subclone in the absence of IL-4 and an IL-4(+) subclone in the presence of IL-4. The frequency of bipotential cells was lower among memory cells than naïve cells but markedly higher than among 8-day effectors. Separation based on high or low expression of CD62L, CD122, CD127, or Ly6C did not identify a phenotypic marker of the bipotential cells. Functional plasticity in memory CD8(+) T-cell populations can therefore reflect modulation at the level of a single memory cell and its progeny.

  1. Active Control of Flexible Space Structures Using the Nitinol Shape Memory Actuators

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-10-01

    number) FIELD !GROUP SUBGROUP I Active Control, Nitinol Actuators, Space Structures 9. ABSTRACT (Continue on reverse if necessary and identify by block...number) Summarizes research progress in the feasibility demonstration of active vibration control using Nitinol shape memory actuators. Tests on...FLEXIBLE SPACE STRUCTURES USING NITINOL SHAPE MEMORY ACTUATORS FINAL REPORT FOR PHASE I SDIO CONTRACT #F49620-87-C-0035 0 BY DR. AMR M. BAZ KARIM R

  2. Biomedical Applications of Thermally Activated Shape Memory Polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Small IV, W; Singhal, P; Wilson, T S; Maitland, D J

    2009-04-10

    Shape memory polymers (SMPs) are smart materials that can remember a primary shape and can return to this primary shape from a deformed secondary shape when given an appropriate stimulus. This property allows them to be delivered in a compact form via minimally invasive surgeries in humans, and deployed to achieve complex final shapes. Here we review the various biomedical applications of SMPs and the challenges they face with respect to actuation and biocompatibility. While shape memory behavior has been demonstrated with heat, light and chemical environment, here we focus our discussion on thermally stimulated SMPs.

  3. Biomedical applications of thermally activated shape memory polymers†

    PubMed Central

    Small, Ward; Singhal, Pooja; Wilson, Thomas S.

    2011-01-01

    Shape memory polymers (SMPs) are smart materials that can remember a primary shape and can return to this primary shape from a deformed secondary shape when given an appropriate stimulus. This property allows them to be delivered in a compact form via minimally invasive surgeries in humans, and deployed to achieve complex final shapes. Here we review the various biomedical applications of SMPs and the challenges they face with respect to actuation and biocompatibility. While shape memory behavior has been demonstrated with heat, light and chemical environment, here we focus our discussion on thermally stimulated SMPs. PMID:21258605

  4. Neural activity in the hippocampus predicts individual visual short-term memory capacity.

    PubMed

    von Allmen, David Yoh; Wurmitzer, Karoline; Martin, Ernst; Klaver, Peter

    2013-07-01

    Although the hippocampus had been traditionally thought to be exclusively involved in long-term memory, recent studies raised controversial explanations why hippocampal activity emerged during short-term memory tasks. For example, it has been argued that long-term memory processes might contribute to performance within a short-term memory paradigm when memory capacity has been exceeded. It is still unclear, though, whether neural activity in the hippocampus predicts visual short-term memory (VSTM) performance. To investigate this question, we measured BOLD activity in 21 healthy adults (age range 19-27 yr, nine males) while they performed a match-to-sample task requiring processing of object-location associations (delay period  =  900 ms; set size conditions 1, 2, 4, and 6). Based on individual memory capacity (estimated by Cowan's K-formula), two performance groups were formed (high and low performers). Within whole brain analyses, we found a robust main effect of "set size" in the posterior parietal cortex (PPC). In line with a "set size × group" interaction in the hippocampus, a subsequent Finite Impulse Response (FIR) analysis revealed divergent hippocampal activation patterns between performance groups: Low performers (mean capacity  =  3.63) elicited increased neural activity at set size two, followed by a drop in activity at set sizes four and six, whereas high performers (mean capacity  =  5.19) showed an incremental activity increase with larger set size (maximal activation at set size six). Our data demonstrated that performance-related neural activity in the hippocampus emerged below capacity limit. In conclusion, we suggest that hippocampal activity reflected successful processing of object-location associations in VSTM. Neural activity in the PPC might have been involved in attentional updating.

  5. The role of OX40 (CD134) in T-cell memory generation.

    PubMed

    Weinberg, Andrew D

    2010-01-01

    Memory T-cell generation is limited by activation-induced cell death during the effector T-cell stage. Cell surface proteins are known to transmit signals that either accentuate or limit T-cell death after activation. This chapter will focus on the TNF-receptor family member OX40, which is expressed on effector T cells and when engaged greatly enhances survival of T cells leading to increased memory T-cell generation. Targeting OX40 in vivo can alter the fate ofT-cell survival. Enhancing OX40 signaling during Ag priming through agonists increases memory T-cell development, while blocking OX40 signaling decreases the memory T-cell pool. These two opposing outcomes provide therapeutic tools for blocking inflammation in autoimmune conditions and enhancing immunity in hosts harboring cancer or chronic pathogens. OX40 agonists and antagonists are in the first stages of human clinical trials and their therapeutic potential will soon be realized.

  6. Induction of an Olfactory Memory by the Activation of a Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaba, Hideto; Hayashi, Yasunori; Higuchi, Takashi; Nakanishi, Shigetada

    1994-07-01

    Female mice form an olfactory memory of male pheromones at mating; exposure to the pheromones of a strange male after that mating will block pregnancy. The formation of this memory is mediated by the accessory olfactory system, in which an increase in norepinephrine after mating reduces inhibitory transmission of γ-aminobutyric acid from the granule cells to the mitral cells. This study shows that the activation of mGluR2, a metabotropic glutamate receptor that suppresses the γ-aminobutyric acid inhibition of the mitral cells, permits the formation of a specific olfactory memory without the occurrence of mating by infusion of mGluR2 agonists into the female's accessory olfactory bulb. This memory faithfully reflects the memory formed at mating.

  7. Proposal for loadable and erasable optical memory unit based on dual active microring optical integrators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Yunhong; Zhang, Xiaobei; Zhang, Xinliang; Huang, Dexiu

    2008-11-01

    A novel approach for loadable and erasable optical memory unit based on dual microring optical integrators is proposed and studied. The optical integrator, which can generate an optical step function for data storing, is synthesized using active media for loss compensation and a tunable phase shifter for data reading at any time. The input data into the memory is return-to-zero (RZ) signal, and the output data read from the memory is also RZ format with a narrower pulse width. An optical digital register based on the proposed optical memory unit is also investigated and simulated, which shows the potential for large scale data storage and serial-to-parallel data conversion. A great number of such memory units can be densely integrated on a photonic circuit for future large scale data storage and buffer.

  8. Age-related Differences in Brain Activity during True and False Memory Retrieval

    PubMed Central

    Dennis, Nancy A.; Kim, Hongkeun; Cabeza, Roberto

    2010-01-01

    Compared to young adults, older adults show not only a reduction in true memories but also an increase in false memories. We investigated the neural bases of these age effects using functional magnetic resonance imaging and a false memory task that resembles the Deese–Roediger–McDermott (DRM) paradigm. Young and older participants were scanned during a word recognition task that included studied words and new words that were strongly associated with studied words (critical lures). During correct recognition of studied words (true memory), older adults showed weaker activity than young adults in the hippocampus but stronger activity than young adults in the retrosplenial cortex. The hippocampal reduction is consistent with age-related deficits in recollection, whereas the retrosplenial increase suggests compensatory recruitment of alternative recollection-related regions. During incorrect recognition of critical lures (false memory), older adults displayed stronger activity than young adults in the left lateral temporal cortex, a region involved in semantic processing and semantic gist. Taken together, the results suggest that older adults’ deficits in true memories reflect a decline in recollection processes mediated by the hippocampus, whereas their increased tendency to have false memories reflects their reliance on semantic gist mediated by the lateral temporal cortex. PMID:18303982

  9. Obesity and insulin resistance are associated with reduced activity in core memory regions of the brain.

    PubMed

    Cheke, Lucy G; Bonnici, Heidi M; Clayton, Nicola S; Simons, Jon S

    2017-02-01

    Increasing research in animals and humans suggests that obesity may be associated with learning and memory deficits, and in particular with reductions in episodic memory. Rodent models have implicated the hippocampus in obesity-related memory impairments, but the neural mechanisms underlying episodic memory deficits in obese humans remain undetermined. In the present study, lean and obese human participants were scanned using fMRI while completing a What-Where-When episodic memory test (the "Treasure-Hunt Task") that assessed the ability to remember integrated item, spatial, and temporal details of previously encoded complex events. In lean participants, the Treasure-Hunt task elicited significant activity in regions of the brain known to be important for recollecting episodic memories, such as the hippocampus, angular gyrus, and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. Both obesity and insulin resistance were associated with significantly reduced functional activity throughout the core recollection network. These findings indicate that obesity is associated with reduced functional activity in core brain areas supporting episodic memory and that insulin resistance may be a key player in this association.

  10. NGF promotes long-term memory formation by activating poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase-1.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shao-Hui; Liao, Xiao-Mei; Liu, Dan; Hu, Juan; Yin, Yang-Yang; Wang, Jian-Zhi; Zhu, Ling-Qiang

    2012-11-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) is a critical secreted protein that plays an important role in development, survival, and function of the mammalian nervous system. Previously reports suggest that endogenous NGF is essential for the hippocampal plasticity/memory and NGF deprivation induces the impairment of hippocampus-related memory and synaptic plasticity. However, whether exogenous supplement of NGF could promote the hippocampus-dependent synaptic plasticity/memory and the possible underlying mechanisms are not clear. In this study we found that NGF administration facilitates the hippocampus-dependent long-term memory and synaptic plasticity by increasing the activity of PARP-1, a polymerase mediating the PolyADP-ribosylation and important for the memory formation. Co-application of 3-Aminobenzamide (3-AB), a specific inhibitor of PARP-1, distinctly blocked the boosting effect of NGF on memory and synaptic plasticity, and the activation of downstream PKA-CREB signal pathway. Our data provide the first evidence that NGF supplement facilitates synaptic plasticity and the memory ability through PARP-1-mediated protein polyADP-ribosylation and activation of PKA-CREB pathway.

  11. Neural Activity during Encoding Predicts False Memories Created by Misinformation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Okado, Yoko; Stark, Craig E. L.

    2005-01-01

    False memories are often demonstrated using the misinformation paradigm, in which a person's recollection of a witnessed event is altered after exposure to misinformation about the event. The neural basis of this phenomenon, however, remains unknown. The authors used fMRI to investigate encoding processes during the viewing of an event and…

  12. Activity in Prelimbic Cortex Subserves Fear Memory Reconsolidation over Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stern, Cristina A. J.; Gazarini, Lucas; Vanvossen, Ana C.; Hames, Mayara S.; Bertoglio, Leandro J.

    2014-01-01

    The prelimbic cortex has been implicated in the consolidation of previously learned fear. Herein, we report that temporarily inactivating this medial prefrontal cortex subregion with the GABA [subscript A] agonist muscimol (4.0 nmol in 0.2 µL per hemisphere) was able to equally disrupt 1-, 7-, and 21-d-old contextual fear memories after their…

  13. Activations of human auditory cortex to phonemic and nonphonemic vowels during discrimination and memory tasks.

    PubMed

    Harinen, Kirsi; Rinne, Teemu

    2013-08-15

    We used fMRI to investigate activations within human auditory cortex (AC) to vowels during vowel discrimination, vowel (categorical n-back) memory, and visual tasks. Based on our previous studies, we hypothesized that the vowel discrimination task would be associated with increased activations in the anterior superior temporal gyrus (STG), while the vowel memory task would enhance activations in the posterior STG and inferior parietal lobule (IPL). In particular, we tested the hypothesis that activations in the IPL during vowel memory tasks are associated with categorical processing. Namely, activations due to categorical processing should be higher during tasks performed on nonphonemic (hard to categorize) than on phonemic (easy to categorize) vowels. As expected, we found distinct activation patterns during vowel discrimination and vowel memory tasks. Further, these task-dependent activations were different during tasks performed on phonemic or nonphonemic vowels. However, activations in the IPL associated with the vowel memory task were not stronger during nonphonemic than phonemic vowel blocks. Together these results demonstrate that activations in human AC to vowels depend on both the requirements of the behavioral task and the phonemic status of the vowels.

  14. Regulatory T cell memory

    PubMed Central

    Rosenblum, Michael D.; Way, Sing Sing; Abbas, Abul K.

    2016-01-01

    Memory for antigen is a defining feature of adaptive immunity. Antigen-specific lymphocyte populations show an increase in number and function after antigen encounter and more rapidly re-expand upon subsequent antigen exposure. Studies of immune memory have primarily focused on effector B cells and T cells with microbial specificity, using prime challenge models of infection. However, recent work has also identified persistently expanded populations of antigen-specific regulatory T cells that protect against aberrant immune responses. In this Review, we consider the parallels between memory effector T cells and memory regulatory T cells, along with the functional implications of regulatory memory in autoimmunity, antimicrobial host defence and maternal fetal tolerance. In addition, we discuss emerging evidence for regulatory T cell memory in humans and key unanswered questions in this rapidly evolving field. PMID:26688349

  15. Emotion regulation modulates anticipatory brain activity that predicts emotional memory encoding in women.

    PubMed

    Galli, Giulia; Griffiths, Victoria A; Otten, Leun J

    2014-03-01

    It has been shown that the effectiveness with which unpleasant events are encoded into memory is related to brain activity set in train before the events. Here, we assessed whether encoding-related activity before an aversive event can be modulated by emotion regulation. Electrical brain activity was recorded from the scalps of healthy women while they performed an incidental encoding task on randomly intermixed unpleasant and neutral visual scenes. A cue presented 1.5 s before each picture indicated the upcoming valence. In half of the blocks of trials, the instructions emphasized to let emotions arise in a natural way. In the other half, participants were asked to decrease their emotional response by adopting the perspective of a detached observer. Memory for the scenes was probed 1 day later with a recognition memory test. Brain activity before unpleasant scenes predicted later memory of the scenes, but only when participants felt their emotions and did not detach from them. The findings indicate that emotion regulation can eliminate the influence of anticipatory brain activity on memory encoding. This may be relevant for the understanding and treatment of psychiatric diseases with a memory component.

  16. Electrocorticography reveals the temporal dynamics of posterior parietal cortical activity during recognition memory decisions

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Alex; Hutchinson, J. Benjamin; Uncapher, Melina R.; Chen, Janice; LaRocque, Karen F.; Foster, Brett L.; Rangarajan, Vinitha; Parvizi, Josef; Wagner, Anthony D.

    2015-01-01

    Theories of the neurobiology of episodic memory predominantly focus on the contributions of medial temporal lobe structures, based on extensive lesion, electrophysiological, and imaging evidence. Against this backdrop, functional neuroimaging data have unexpectedly implicated left posterior parietal cortex (PPC) in episodic retrieval, revealing distinct activation patterns in PPC subregions as humans make memory-related decisions. To date, theorizing about the functional contributions of PPC has been hampered by the absence of information about the temporal dynamics of PPC activity as retrieval unfolds. Here, we leveraged electrocorticography to examine the temporal profile of high gamma power (HGP) in dorsal PPC subregions as participants made old/new recognition memory decisions. A double dissociation in memory-related HGP was observed, with activity in left intraparietal sulcus (IPS) and left superior parietal lobule (SPL) differing in time and sign for recognized old items (Hits) and correctly rejected novel items (CRs). Specifically, HGP in left IPS increased for Hits 300–700 ms poststimulus onset, and decayed to baseline ∼200 ms preresponse. By contrast, HGP in left SPL increased for CRs early after stimulus onset (200−300 ms) and late in the memory decision (from 700 ms to response). These memory-related effects were unique to left PPC, as they were not observed in right PPC. Finally, memory-related HGP in left IPS and SPL was sufficiently reliable to enable brain-based decoding of the participant’s memory state at the single-trial level, using multivariate pattern classification. Collectively, these data provide insights into left PPC temporal dynamics as humans make recognition memory decisions. PMID:26283375

  17. Activation of amygdaloid PKC pathway is necessary for conditioned cues-provoked cocaine memory performance.

    PubMed

    Lai, Yu-Ting; Fan, Hsin-Yi; Cherng, Chianfang G; Chiang, Chih-Yuan; Kao, Gour-Shenq; Yu, Lung

    2008-07-01

    Drug-associated cues are critical in reinstating the drug taking behavior even during prolonged abstinence and thus are thought to be a key factor to induce drug craving and to cause relapse. Amygdaloid complex has been known for its physiological function in mediating emotional experience storage and emotional cues-regulated memory retrieval. This study was undertaken to examine the role of basolateral nuclei of amygdala and the intracellular signaling molecule in drug cues-elicited cocaine memory retrieval. Systemic anisomycin treatment prior to the retrieval test abolished the cues-provoked cocaine conditioned place preference (CPP) memory. Likewise, a similar blockade of cues-provoked cocaine CPP performance was achieved by infusion of anisomycin and cycloheximide into the basolateral nuclei of amygdala before the test. Intra-amygdaloid infusion of H89, a protein kinase A inhibitor, or U0126, a MEK inhibitor, did not affect retrieval of the cues-elicited cocaine CPP memory. In contrast, intra-amygdaloid infusion of NPC 15437, a PKC inhibitor, abolished the cues-elicited cocaine CPP expression, while left the memory per se intact. Intra-amygdaloid infusion of NPC 15437 did not seem to affect locomotor activity or exert observable aversive effect. Taken together, our results suggest that activation of PKC signaling pathway and probably downstream de novo protein synthesis in the basolateral nuclei of amygdala is required for the cues-elicited cocaine memory performance. However, temporary inhibition of this signaling pathway does not seem to affect cocaine CPP memory per se.

  18. Induction of memory cytotoxic T cells to influenza A virus and subsequent viral clearance is not modulated by PB1-F2-dependent inflammasome activation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Patricia (Hoi Yee); Bird, Nicola; MacKenzie-Kludas, Charley; Mansell, Ashley; Kedzierska, Katherine; Brown, Lorena; McAuley, Julie

    2016-01-01

    Expression of the viral virulence protein PB1-F2 during infection has been linked to NLRP3 inflammasome complex activation in macrophages and induction of early inflammatory events enhancing immunopathology during influenza disease. We sought to determine whether PB1-F2-specific NLRP3 inflammasome activation influenced the magnitude and/or robustness of the CD8+ T-cell responses specific for conserved viral antigens and subsequent virus elimination. Using murine heterosubtypic viral infection models, we showed that mice infected with virus unable to produce PB1-F2 protein showed no deficit in the overall magnitude and functional memory responses of CD8+ T cells established during the effector phase compared with those infected with wild-type PB1-F2-expressing virus and were equally capable of mounting robust recall responses. These data indicate that while expression of PB1-F2 protein can induce inflammatory events, the capacity to generate memory CD8+ T cells specific for immunodominant viral epitopes remains uncompromised. PMID:26667784

  19. Activities, self-referent memory beliefs, and cognitive performance: evidence for direct and mediated relations.

    PubMed

    Jopp, Daniela; Hertzog, Christopher

    2007-12-01

    In this study, the authors investigated the role of activities and self-referent memory beliefs for cognitive performance in a life-span sample. A factor analysis identified 8 activity factors, including Developmental Activities, Experiential Activities, Social Activities, Physical Activities, Technology Use, Watching Television, Games, and Crafts. A second-order general activity factor was significantly related to a general factor of cognitive function as defined by ability tests. Structural regression models suggested that prediction of cognition by activity level was partially mediated by memory beliefs, controlling for age, education, health, and depressive affect. Models adding paths from general and specific activities to aspects of crystallized intelligence suggested additional unique predictive effects for some activities. In alternative models, nonsignificant effects of beliefs on activities were detected when cognition predicted both variables, consistent with the hypothesis that beliefs derive from monitoring cognition and have no influence on activity patterns.

  20. Decreased activity with increased background network efficiency in amnestic MCI during a visuospatial working memory task.

    PubMed

    Lou, Wutao; Shi, Lin; Wang, Defeng; Tam, Cindy W C; Chu, Winnie C W; Mok, Vincent C T; Cheng, Sheung-Tak; Lam, Linda C W

    2015-09-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated the working memory impairment in patients with amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI). However, the neurophysiological basis of the working memory deficit in aMCI is poorly understood. The aim of this study was to explore the abnormal activity during encoding and recognition procedures, as well as the reorganization of the background network maintaining the working memory state in aMCI. Using event-related fMRI during a visuospatial working memory task with three recognition difficulty levels, the task-related activations and network efficiency of the background network in 17 aMCI patients and 19 matched controls were investigated. Compared with cognitively healthy controls, patients with aMCI showed significantly decreased activity in the frontal and visual cortices during the encoding phase, while during the recognition phase, decreased activity was detected in the frontal, parietal, and visual regions. In addition, increased local efficiency was also observed in the background network of patients with aMCI. The results suggest patients with aMCI showed impaired encoding and recognition functions during the visuospatial working memory task, and may pay more effort to maintain the cognitive state. This study extends our understanding of the impaired working memory function in aMCI and provides a new perspective to investigate the compensatory mechanism in aMCI.

  1. Electrospun nanofiber membranes for electrically activated shape memory nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Fenghua; Zhang, Zhichun; Liu, Yanju; Leng, Jinsong

    2014-06-01

    A novel shape memory nanocomposite system, consisting of a thermoplastic Nafion polymer and ultrathin electrospun polyacrylonitrile (PAN)-based carbonization nanofiber membranes, is successfully synthesized. PAN-based carbonization nanofiber networks that offer responses to deformations are considered to be an excellent actuation source. Significant improvement in the electrical conductivity of carbon nanofiber membranes is found by adjusting the applied voltage power in the electrospinning PAN process varying from 7.85 to 12.30 S cm-1. The porous structure of the carbon nanofiber membranes provides a large specific surface area and interfacial contact area when combined with the polymer matrix. Shape memory Nafion nanocomposites filled with interpenetrating non-woven electrospun PAN carbonization membranes can be actuated by applying 14 V electrical voltage within 5 s. The results, as demonstrated through morphology, electrical and thermal measurements and a shape recovery test, suggest a valuable route to producing soft nanocomposites.

  2. Structural maturation and brain activity predict future working memory capacity during childhood development.

    PubMed

    Ullman, Henrik; Almeida, Rita; Klingberg, Torkel

    2014-01-29

    Human working memory capacity develops during childhood and is a strong predictor of future academic performance, in particular, achievements in mathematics and reading. Predicting working memory development is important for the early identification of children at risk for poor cognitive and academic development. Here we show that structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging data explain variance in children's working memory capacity 2 years later, which was unique variance in addition to that predicted using cognitive tests. While current working memory capacity correlated with frontoparietal cortical activity, the future capacity could be inferred from structure and activity in basal ganglia and thalamus. This gives a novel insight into the neural mechanisms of childhood development and supports the idea that neuroimaging can have a unique role in predicting children's cognitive development.

  3. Peripheral tissue homing receptors enable T cell entry into lymph nodes and affect the anatomical distribution of memory cells

    PubMed Central

    Brinkman, C. Colin; Rouhani, Sherin J.; Srinivasan, Nithya; Engelhard, Victor H.

    2013-01-01

    Peripheral tissue homing receptors enable T cells to access inflamed non-lymphoid tissues. Here we show that two such molecules, E-selectin ligand and α4β1 integrin, enable activated and memory T cells to enter lymph nodes as well. This affects the quantitative and qualitative distribution of these cells among regional lymph node beds. CD8 memory T cells in lymph nodes that express these molecules were mostly CD62Llo, and would normally be classified as effector memory cells. However, similar to central memory cells, they expanded upon antigen re-encounter. This led to differences in the magnitude of the recall response that depended on the route of immunization. These novel cells share properties of both central and effector memory cells, and reside in lymph nodes based on previously undescribed mechanisms of entry. PMID:23926324

  4. The memory function of noradrenergic activity in non-REM sleep.

    PubMed

    Gais, Steffen; Rasch, Björn; Dahmen, Johannes C; Sara, Susan; Born, Jan

    2011-09-01

    There is a long-standing assumption that low noradrenergic activity during sleep reflects mainly the low arousal during this brain state. Nevertheless, recent research has demonstrated that the locus coeruleus, which is the main source of cortical noradrenaline, displays discrete periods of intense firing during non-REM sleep, without any signs of awakening. This transient locus coeruleus activation during sleep seems to occur in response to preceding learning-related episodes. In the present study, we manipulate noradrenergic activity during sleep in humans with either the α2-autoreceptor agonist clonidine or the noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor reboxetine. We show that reducing noradrenergic activity during sleep, but not during wakefulness, impairs subsequent memory performance in an odor recognition task. Increasing noradrenergic availability during sleep, in contrast, enhances memory retention. We conclude that noradrenergic activity during non-REM sleep interacts with other sleep-related mechanisms to functionally contribute to off-line memory consolidation.

  5. Contralateral Cortical Organisation of Information in Visual Short-Term Memory: Evidence from Lateralized Brain Activity during Retrieval

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fortier-Gauthier, Ulysse; Moffat, Nicolas; Dell'Acqua, Robert; McDonald, John J.; Jolicoeur, Pierre

    2012-01-01

    We studied brain activity during retention and retrieval phases of two visual short-term memory (VSTM) experiments. Experiment 1 used a balanced memory array, with one color stimulus in each hemifield, followed by a retention interval and a central probe, at the fixation point that designated the target stimulus in memory about which to make a…

  6. SNARC Effect in Different Effectors.

    PubMed

    Hesse, Philipp N; Fiehler, Katja; Bremmer, Frank

    2016-01-01

    The SNARC (spatial numerical association of response codes) effect, indicating that subjects react faster to the left for small numbers and to the right for large numbers, is used as evidence for the idea that humans use space to organize number representations. Previous studies compared the SNARC effect across sensory modalities within participants and concluded modality independence. So far, it is unknown what sensory-to-motor mappings are involved in generating the SNARC effect and whether these mappings are identical for different effectors within subjects. Hence, we tested whether the SNARC effect is effector specific. Participants performed an auditory parity judgment task and responded with three different effectors: finger (button release), eyes (saccades), and arm (pointing). The SNARC effect occurred in each effector but varied in strength across the effectors. Across subjects, we found a significant correlation of SNARC strength for finger and arm responses suggesting the use of a shared sensory-to-motor mapping. SNARC strength did not correlate, however, between finger and eyes or arm and eyes. An additional statistical analysis based on conditional probabilities provided further evidence for SNARC-effector specificity. Taken together, our results suggest that the sensory-to-motor mapping is not as tight as it would be expected if the SNARC effect was effector independent.

  7. Activating Autophagy in Hippocampal Cells Alleviates the Morphine-Induced Memory Impairment.

    PubMed

    Pan, Jingrui; He, Lei; Li, Xiangpen; Li, Mei; Zhang, Xiaoni; Venesky, Jacob; Li, Yi; Peng, Ying

    2017-04-01

    Morphine abuse in treating severe and chronic pain has become a worldwide problem. But, chronic morphine exposure can cause memory impairment with its mechanisms not fully elucidated by past research sstudies which all focused on the harmful effects of morphine. Autophagy is an important pathway for cells to maintain survival. Here we showed that repeated morphine injection into C57BL/6 mice at a dose of 15 mg/kg per day for 7 days activated autophagic flux mainly in the hippocampi, especially in neurons of hippocampal CA1 region and microglia, with spatial memory impairment confirmed by Morris water maze test. Autophagy inhibition by 3-methyladenine obviously aggravates this morphine-induced memory impairment, accompanied with increased cell deaths in stratum pyramidale of hippocampal CA1, CA3, and DG regions and the activation of microglia to induce inflammation in hippocampus, such as upregulated expression of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, and iNOS, as well as NF-κB' s activation, while morphine alone promoted microglial immunosuppression in hippocampus with autophagy activation which was also confirmed in primary microglia. Taken together, our data indicates that autophagy activating in hippocampal cells can alleviate the memory impairment caused by morphine, by decreasing neuronal deaths in hippocampus and suppressing inflammation in hippocampal microglia, implying that modulating the activation of autophagy might be a promising method to prevent or treat the memory impairment caused by morphine.

  8. Effect of Evolvulus alsinoides Linn. on learning behavior and memory enhancement activity in rodents.

    PubMed

    Nahata, Alok; Patil, U K; Dixit, V K

    2010-04-01

    In the Ayurvedic system of medicine, the whole herb of 'Shankhpushpi' has been employed clinically for centuries for its memory potentiating, anxiolytic and tranquilizing properties. The present study was undertaken to investigate the effects of Evolvulus alsinoides (EA), considered as Shankhpushpi on learning and memory in rodents. Nootropic activity using Cook and Weidley's pole climbing apparatus, passive avoidance paradigms and active avoidance tests were used to test learning and memory. The ethanol extract of EA and its ethyl acetate and aqueous fractions were evaluated for their memory enhancing properties. Two doses (100 and 200 mg/kg p.o.) of the ethanol extract and ethyl acetate and aqueous fractions were administered in separate groups of animals. Both doses of all the extracts of EA significantly improved learning and memory in rats. Furthermore, these doses significantly reversed the amnesia induced by scopolamine (0.3 mg/kg i.p.). Nootropic activity was compared using piracetam as the standard. EA also exhibited potent memory enhancing effects in the step-down and shuttle-box avoidance paradigms.

  9. Nap and melatonin-induced changes in hippocampal activation and their role in verbal memory consolidation.

    PubMed

    Gorfine, Tali; Yeshurun, Yaara; Zisapel, Nava

    2007-11-01

    Overnight sleep contributes to memory consolidation; even a short nap improves memory performance. Such improvement has been linked to hippocampal activity during sleep. Melatonin has been shown to affect the human hippocampus and to induce 'sleep like' changes in brain activation. We therefore conducted and compared two functional magnetic resonance imaging studies: the first study assessed the effect of a 2-hr mid-day nap versus an equal amount of wakefulness on a verbal memory task (unrelated word pair association); the second assessed the effect of melatonin versus placebo (both conditions without nap) on a similar task. We report that following a nap relative to wakefulness, successful retrieval-related activation in the parahippocampus is decreased. A smaller decrease is seen in wakefulness with melatonin but not placebo. In parallel, an improvement in verbal memory recall was found after a nap compared with wakefulness but not with melatonin during wakefulness compared with placebo. Our findings demonstrate effects of melatonin that resemble those of sleep on verbal memory processing in the hippocampus thus suggesting that melatonin, like sleep, can initiate offline plastic changes underlying memory consolidation; they also suggest that concomitant rest without interferences is necessary for enhanced performance.

  10. Signals for the execution of Th2 effector function.

    PubMed

    Fowell, Deborah J

    2009-04-01

    Appropriate control of infection depends on the generation of lymphocytes armed with a particular array of cytokine and chemokine effector molecules. The differentiation of naïve T cells into functionally distinct effector subsets is regulated by signals from the T cell receptor (TCR) and cytokine receptors. Using gene knock-out approaches, the initiation of discrete effector programs appears differentially sensitive to the loss of individual TCR signaling components; likely due to differences in the transcription factors needed to activate individual cytokine genes. Less well understood however, are the signal requirements for the execution of effector function. With a focus on Th2 cells and the kinase ITK, we review recent observations that point to differences between the signals needed for the initiation and implementation of cytokine programs in CD4+ T cells. Indeed, Th2 effector cells signal differently from both their naïve counterparts and from Th1 effectors suggesting they may transduce activation signals differently or may be selectively receptive to different activation signals. Potential regulation points for effector function lie at the level of transcription and translation of cytokine genes. We also discuss how provision of these execution signals may be spatially segregated in vivo occurring at tissue sites of inflammation and subject to modulation by the pathogen itself.

  11. Memory-strengthening activity of Glycyrrhiza glabra in exteroceptive and interoceptive behavioral models.

    PubMed

    Parle, Milind; Dhingra, Dinesh; Kulkarni, S K

    2004-01-01

    In the traditional system of medicine, the roots and rhizomes of Glycyrrhiza glabra have been employed clinically for centuries for their anti-inflammatory, anti-ulcer, expectorant, antimicrobial, and anxiolytic activities. The present study was undertaken to investigate the effects of G. glabra, popularly known as liquorice (Mulathi), on learning and memory. The elevated plus-maze and passive avoidance paradigm were employed to evaluate learning and memory parameters. Three doses (75, 150, and 300 mg/kg p.o.) of aqueous extract of G. glabra were administered for 7 successive days in separate groups of mice. The dose of 150 mg/kg of the aqueous extract of liquorice significantly improved learning and memory of mice. Furthermore, this dose reversed the amnesia induced by diazepam (1 mg/kg i.p.), scopolamine (0.4 mg/kg i.p.), and ethanol (1 g/kg i.p.). Anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties of liquorice may be contributing favorably to the memory enhancement effect. Since scopolamine-induced amnesia was reversed by liquorice, it is possible that the beneficial effect on learning and memory may be because of facilitation of cholinergic transmission in brain. However, further studies are necessitated to identify the exact mechanism of action. In the present investigation, G. glabra has shown promise as a memory enhancer in both exteroceptive and interoceptive behavioral models of memory.

  12. Stimulation over primary motor cortex during action observation impairs effector recognition.

    PubMed

    Naish, Katherine R; Barnes, Brittany; Obhi, Sukhvinder S

    2016-04-01

    Recent work suggests that motor cortical processing during action observation plays a role in later recognition of the object involved in the action. Here, we investigated whether recognition of the effector making an action is also impaired when transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) - thought to interfere with normal cortical activity - is applied over the primary motor cortex (M1) during action observation. In two experiments, single-pulse TMS was delivered over the hand area of M1 while participants watched short clips of hand actions. Participants were then asked whether an image (experiment 1) or a video (experiment 2) of a hand presented later in the trial was the same or different to the hand in the preceding video. In Experiment 1, we found that participants' ability to recognise static images of hands was significantly impaired when TMS was delivered over M1 during action observation, compared to when no TMS was delivered, or when stimulation was applied over the vertex. Conversely, stimulation over M1 did not affect recognition of dot configurations, or recognition of hands that were previously presented as static images (rather than action movie clips) with no object. In Experiment 2, we found that effector recognition was impaired when stimulation was applied part way through (300ms) and at the end (500ms) of the action observation period, indicating that 200ms of action-viewing following stimulation was not long enough to form a new representation that could be used for later recognition. The findings of both experiments suggest that interfering with cortical motor activity during action observation impairs subsequent recognition of the effector involved in the action, which complements previous findings of motor system involvement in object memory. This work provides some of the first evidence that motor processing during action observation is involved in forming representations of the effector that are useful beyond the action observation period.

  13. Opening the Ralstonia solanacearum type III effector tool box: insights into host cell subversion mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Deslandes, Laurent; Genin, Stephane

    2014-08-01

    Effectors delivered to host cells by the Type III secretion system are essential to Ralstonia solanacearum pathogenicity, as in several other plant pathogenic bacteria. The establishment of exhaustive effector repertoires in multiple R. solanacearum strains drew a first picture of the evolutionary dynamics of the pathogen effector suites. Effector repertoires are diversified, with a core of 20-30 effectors present in most of the strains and the obtention of mutants lacking one or more effector genes revealed the functional overlap among this effector network. Recent functional studies have provided insights into the ability of single effectors to manipulate the host proteasome, elicit cell death, trigger the expression of plant genes, and/or display biochemical activities on plant protein targets.

  14. DNA methyltransferase activity is required for memory-related neural plasticity in the lateral amygdala.

    PubMed

    Maddox, Stephanie A; Watts, Casey S; Schafe, Glenn E

    2014-01-01

    We have previously shown that auditory Pavlovian fear conditioning is associated with an increase in DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) expression in the lateral amygdala (LA) and that intra-LA infusion or bath application of an inhibitor of DNMT activity impairs the consolidation of an auditory fear memory and long-term potentiation (LTP) at thalamic and cortical inputs to the LA, in vitro. In the present study, we use awake behaving neurophysiological techniques to examine the role of DNMT activity in memory-related neurophysiological changes accompanying fear memory consolidation and reconsolidation in the LA, in vivo. We show that auditory fear conditioning results in a training-related enhancement in the amplitude of short-latency auditory-evoked field potentials (AEFPs) in the LA. Intra-LA infusion of a DNMT inhibitor impairs both fear memory consolidation and, in parallel, the consolidation of training-related neural plasticity in the LA; that is, short-term memory (STM) and short-term training-related increases in AEFP amplitude in the LA are intact, while long-term memory (LTM) and long-term retention of training-related increases in AEFP amplitudes are impaired. In separate experiments, we show that intra-LA infusion of a DNMT inhibitor following retrieval of an auditory fear memory has no effect on post-retrieval STM or short-term retention of training-related changes in AEFP amplitude in the LA, but significantly impairs both post-retrieval LTM and long-term retention of AEFP amplitude changes in the LA. These findings are the first to demonstrate the necessity of DNMT activity in the consolidation and reconsolidation of memory-associated neural plasticity, in vivo.

  15. Decreases in Theta and Increases in High Frequency Activity Underlie Associative Memory Encoding

    PubMed Central

    Greenberg, Jeffrey A.; Burke, John F.; Haque, Rafi; Kahana, Michael J.; Zaghloul, Kareem A.

    2015-01-01

    Episodic memory encoding refers to the cognitive process by which items and their associated contexts are stored in memory. To investigate changes directly attributed to the formation of explicit associations, we examined oscillatory power captured through intracranial electroencephalography (iEEG) as 27 neurosurgical patients receiving subdural and depth electrodes for seizure monitoring participated in a paired associates memory task. We examined low (3–8 Hz) and high (45–95 Hz) frequency activity, and found that the successful formation of new associations was accompanied by broad decreases in low frequency activity and a posterior to anterior progression of increases in high frequency activity in the left hemisphere. These data suggest that the observed patterns of activity may reflect the neural mechanisms underlying the formation of novel item-item associations. PMID:25862266

  16. Stronger activation and deactivation in archery experts for differential cognitive strategy in visuospatial working memory processing.

    PubMed

    Seo, Jeehye; Kim, Yang-Tae; Song, Hui-Jin; Lee, Hui Joong; Lee, Jongmin; Jung, Tae-Du; Lee, Gunyoung; Kwon, Eunjin; Kim, Jin Gu; Chang, Yongmin

    2012-04-01

    It is well known that elite athletes have higher performance in perception, planning, and execution in sports activities relative to novices. It remains controversial, however, whether any differences in basic cognitive functions between experts and novices exist. Furthermore, few studies have directly used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to investigate neural activation and deactivation differences between experts and novices while performing visuospatial working memory (WM) tasks. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to examine possible differences in neural activation and deactivation associated with working memory components in processing visuospatial information between archery experts and novices. To this end, we employed a judgment of line orientation (JLO) task, which has a strong WM component. With regard to brain activation, archery experts displayed higher activation in cortical areas associated with visuospatial attention and working memory, including the middle frontal cortex, supplemental motor area, and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex than that of the novices during the performance of the JLO task. With regard to brain deactivation, archery experts exhibited stronger task-related deactivation in cortical areas, such as the paracentral cortex/precuneus and the anterior and posterior cingulate cortex related to the default network, than that of the novices. These results suggest that the archery experts have a strategy that demands greater use of neural correlates associated with visuospatial working memory and attention in addition to greater use of DMN in visuospatial working memory task not directly tied to their domain of expertise.

  17. Non-volatile memory devices with redox-active diruthenium molecular compound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pookpanratana, S.; Zhu, H.; Bittle, E. G.; Natoli, S. N.; Ren, T.; Richter, C. A.; Li, Q.; Hacker, C. A.

    2016-03-01

    Reduction-oxidation (redox) active molecules hold potential for memory devices due to their many unique properties. We report the use of a novel diruthenium-based redox molecule incorporated into a non-volatile Flash-based memory device architecture. The memory capacitor device structure consists of a Pd/Al2O3/molecule/SiO2/Si structure. The bulky ruthenium redox molecule is attached to the surface by using a ‘click’ reaction and the monolayer structure is characterized by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy to verify the Ru attachment and molecular density. The ‘click’ reaction is particularly advantageous for memory applications because of (1) ease of chemical design and synthesis, and (2) provides an additional spatial barrier between the oxide/silicon to the diruthenium molecule. Ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy data identified the energy of the electronic levels of the surface before and after surface modification. The molecular memory devices display an unsaturated charge storage window attributed to the intrinsic properties of the redox-active molecule. Our findings demonstrate the strengths and challenges with integrating molecular layers within solid-state devices, which will influence the future design of molecular memory devices.

  18. The effect of transcranial Direct Current Stimulation on gamma activity and working memory in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Hoy, Kate E; Bailey, Neil W; Arnold, Sara L; Fitzgerald, Paul B

    2015-08-15

    Working memory impairments in schizophrenia have been strongly associated with abnormalities in gamma oscillations within the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLFPC). We recently published the first ever study showing that anodal transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS) to the left DLPFC was able to significantly improve working memory performance in schizophrenia. In the current paper we present a secondary analysis from this study, specifically looking at the effect of tDCS on gamma activity and its relationship to working memory. In a repeated measures design we assessed the impact of anodal tDCS (1mA, 2mA, sham) on gamma activity in the left DLPFC at three time-points post-stimulation (0min, 20min, 40min). EEG data was available for 16 participants in the 2mA condition, 13 in the 1mA condition and 12 in the sham condition. Following 2mA stimulation we found a significant increase in gamma event-related synchronisation in the left DLPFC, this was in the context of a significantly improved working memory performance. There was also a significant decrease in gamma event-related synchronisation, with no changes in working memory, following sham stimulation. The current study provides preliminary evidence that tDCS may enhance working memory in schizophrenia by restoring normal gamma oscillatory function.

  19. Activity of human hippocampal and amygdala neurons during retrieval of declarative memories.

    PubMed

    Rutishauser, Ueli; Schuman, Erin M; Mamelak, Adam N

    2008-01-08

    Episodic memories allow us to remember not only that we have seen an item before but also where and when we have seen it (context). Sometimes, we can confidently report that we have seen something (familiarity) but cannot recollect where or when it was seen. Thus, the two components of episodic recall, familiarity and recollection, can be behaviorally dissociated. It is not clear, however, whether these two components of memory are represented separately by distinct brain structures or different populations of neurons in a single anatomical structure. Here, we report that the spiking activity of single neurons in the human hippocampus and amygdala [the medial temporal lobe (MTL)] contain information about both components of memory. We analyzed a class of neurons that changed its firing rate to the second presentation of a previously novel stimulus. We found that the neuronal activity evoked by the presentation of a familiar stimulus (during retrieval) distinguishes stimuli that will be successfully recollected from stimuli that will not be recollected. Importantly, the ability to predict whether a stimulus is familiar is not influenced by whether the stimulus will later be recollected. We thus conclude that human MTL neurons contain information about both components of memory. These data support a continuous strength of memory model of MTL function: the stronger the neuronal response, the better the memory.

  20. Non-volatile Memory Devices with Redox-active Diruthenium Molecular Compound

    PubMed Central

    Pookpanratana, S.; Zhu, H.; Bittle, E. G.; Natoli, S. N.; Ren, T.; Richter, C. A; Li, Q.; Hacker, C. A.

    2016-01-01

    Reduction-oxidation (redox) active molecules hold potential for memory devices due to their many unique properties. We report the use of a novel diruthenium-based redox molecule incorporated into a non-volatile Flash-based memory device architecture. The memory capacitor device structure consists of a Pd/Al2O3/molecule/SiO2/Si structure. The bulky ruthenium redox molecule is attached to the surface by using a “click” reaction and the monolayer structure is characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy to verify the Ru attachment and molecular density. The “click” reaction is particularly advantageous for memory applications because of (1) ease of chemical design and synthesis, and (2) provides an additional spatial barrier between the oxide/silicon to the diruthenium molecule. Ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy data identified the energy of the electronic levels of the surface before and after surface modification. The molecular memory devices display an unsaturated charge storage window attributed to the intrinsic properties of the redox-active molecule. Our findings demonstrate the strengths and challenges with integrating molecular layers within solid-state devices, which will influence the future design of molecular memory devices. PMID:26871549

  1. Oxysterols and Their Cellular Effectors

    PubMed Central

    Olkkonen, Vesa M.; Béaslas, Olivier; Nissilä, Eija

    2012-01-01

    Oxysterols are oxidized 27-carbon cholesterol derivatives or by-products of cholesterol biosynthesis, with a spectrum of biologic activities. Several oxysterols have cytotoxic and pro-apoptotic activities, the ability to interfere with the lateral domain organization, and packing of membrane lipids. These properties may account for their suggested roles in the pathology of diseases such as atherosclerosis, age-onset macular degeneration and Alzheimer’s disease. Oxysterols also have the capacity to induce inflammatory responses and play roles in cell differentiation processes. The functions of oxysterols as intermediates in the synthesis of bile acids and steroid hormones, and as readily transportable forms of sterol, are well established. Furthermore, their actions as endogenous regulators of gene expression in lipid metabolism via liver X receptors and the Insig (insulin-induced gene) proteins have been investigated in detail. The cytoplasmic oxysterol-binding protein (OSBP) homologues form a group of oxysterol/cholesterol sensors that has recently attracted a lot of attention. However, their mode of action is, as yet, poorly understood. Retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptors (ROR) α and γ, and Epstein-Barr virus induced gene 2 (EBI2) have been identified as novel oxysterol receptors, revealing new physiologic oxysterol effector mechanisms in development, metabolism, and immunity, and evoking enhanced interest in these compounds in the field of biomedicine. PMID:24970128

  2. Memory retrieval of inhibitory avoidance requires histamine H1 receptor activation in the hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Fabbri, Roberta; Furini, Cristiane Regina Guerino; Passani, Maria Beatrice; Provensi, Gustavo; Baldi, Elisabetta; Bucherelli, Corrado; Izquierdo, Ivan; de Carvalho Myskiw, Jociane; Blandina, Patrizio

    2016-01-01

    Retrieval represents a dynamic process that may require neuromodulatory signaling. Here, we report that the integrity of the brain histaminergic system is necessary for retrieval of inhibitory avoidance (IA) memory, because rats depleted of histamine through lateral ventricle injections of α-fluoromethylhistidine (a-FMHis), a suicide inhibitor of histidine decarboxylase, displayed impaired IA memory when tested 2 d after training. a-FMHis was administered 24 h after training, when IA memory trace was already formed. Infusion of histamine in hippocampal CA1 of brain histamine-depleted rats (hence, amnesic) 10 min before the retention test restored IA memory but was ineffective when given in the basolateral amygdala (BLA) or the ventral medial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC). Intra-CA1 injections of selective H1 and H2 receptor agonists showed that histamine exerted its effect by activating the H1 receptor. Noteworthy, the H1 receptor antagonist pyrilamine disrupted IA memory retrieval in rats, thus strongly supporting an active involvement of endogenous histamine; 90 min after the retention test, c-Fos–positive neurons were significantly fewer in the CA1s of a-FMHis–treated rats that displayed amnesia compared with in the control group. We also found reduced levels of phosphorylated cAMP-responsive element binding protein (pCREB) in the CA1s of a-FMHis–treated animals compared with in controls. Increases in pCREB levels are associated with retrieval of associated memories. Targeting the histaminergic system may modify the retrieval of emotional memory; hence, histaminergic ligands might reduce dysfunctional aversive memories and improve the efficacy of exposure psychotherapies. PMID:27118833

  3. Memory retrieval of inhibitory avoidance requires histamine H1 receptor activation in the hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Fabbri, Roberta; Furini, Cristiane Regina Guerino; Passani, Maria Beatrice; Provensi, Gustavo; Baldi, Elisabetta; Bucherelli, Corrado; Izquierdo, Ivan; de Carvalho Myskiw, Jociane; Blandina, Patrizio

    2016-05-10

    Retrieval represents a dynamic process that may require neuromodulatory signaling. Here, we report that the integrity of the brain histaminergic system is necessary for retrieval of inhibitory avoidance (IA) memory, because rats depleted of histamine through lateral ventricle injections of α-fluoromethylhistidine (a-FMHis), a suicide inhibitor of histidine decarboxylase, displayed impaired IA memory when tested 2 d after training. a-FMHis was administered 24 h after training, when IA memory trace was already formed. Infusion of histamine in hippocampal CA1 of brain histamine-depleted rats (hence, amnesic) 10 min before the retention test restored IA memory but was ineffective when given in the basolateral amygdala (BLA) or the ventral medial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC). Intra-CA1 injections of selective H1 and H2 receptor agonists showed that histamine exerted its effect by activating the H1 receptor. Noteworthy, the H1 receptor antagonist pyrilamine disrupted IA memory retrieval in rats, thus strongly supporting an active involvement of endogenous histamine; 90 min after the retention test, c-Fos-positive neurons were significantly fewer in the CA1s of a-FMHis-treated rats that displayed amnesia compared with in the control group. We also found reduced levels of phosphorylated cAMP-responsive element binding protein (pCREB) in the CA1s of a-FMHis-treated animals compared with in controls. Increases in pCREB levels are associated with retrieval of associated memories. Targeting the histaminergic system may modify the retrieval of emotional memory; hence, histaminergic ligands might reduce dysfunctional aversive memories and improve the efficacy of exposure psychotherapies.

  4. Patterns of Brain-Electrical Activity during Declarative Memory Performance in 10-Month-Old Infants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morasch, Katherine C.; Bell, Martha Ann

    2009-01-01

    This study of infant declarative memory concurrently examined brain-electrical activity and deferred imitation performance in 10-month-old infants. Continuous electroencephalogram (EEG) measures were collected throughout the activity-matched baseline, encoding (modeling) and retrieval (delayed test) phases of a within-subjects deferred imitation…

  5. Effect of cypermethrin on memory, movement activity and coordination in mice after transient incomplete cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Nieradko-Iwanicka, Barbara; Borzecki, Andrzej

    2008-01-01

    Cypermethrin is a synthetic pyrethroid widely used as an insecticide. The aim of the present study was to investigate the possible effect of 0.1 LD50 of cypermethrin on memory, movement activity and co-ordination in mice exposed to transient incomplete cerebral ischemia. Transient occlusion of both carotid arteries (BCCA) in adult female mice was performed under ketamine + xylazine anesthesia. Intraperitoneal LD50 for cypermethrin was calculated to be 169.9 mg/kg. Memory retention was evaluated in a step-through passive avoidance task (PA), working spatial memory in a Y-maze, spontaneous movement activity in an automated device fitted with two photocells and a counter in two subsequent 30-min periods, and movement co-ordination on a rod spinning at the rate of 10 rotations/min. Neither memory nor movement co-ordination were significantly affected by transient incomplete cerebral ischemia or cypermethrin. BCCA itself did not impair movement activity in the examined mice. Cypermethrin decreased exploratory motor activity in the mice, and the effect was exacerbated by BCCA. These results show that transient incomplete cerebral ischemia combined with exposure to subtoxic doses of cypermethrin do not impair memory, but do affect behavior, producing transient reduction of spontaneous horizontal movement in mice.

  6. Fencing direct memory access data transfers in a parallel active messaging interface of a parallel computer

    DOEpatents

    Blocksome, Michael A.; Mamidala, Amith R.

    2013-09-03

    Fencing direct memory access (`DMA`) data transfers in a parallel active messaging interface (`PAMI`) of a parallel computer, the PAMI including data communications endpoints, each endpoint including specifications of a client, a context, and a task, the endpoints coupled for data communications through the PAMI and through DMA controllers operatively coupled to segments of shared random access memory through which the DMA controllers deliver data communications deterministically, including initiating execution through the PAMI of an ordered sequence of active DMA instructions for DMA data transfers between two endpoints, effecting deterministic DMA data transfers through a DMA controller and a segment of shared memory; and executing through the PAMI, with no FENCE accounting for DMA data transfers, an active FENCE instruction, the FENCE instruction completing execution only after completion of all DMA instructions initiated prior to execution of the FENCE instruction for DMA data transfers between the two endpoints.

  7. Fencing direct memory access data transfers in a parallel active messaging interface of a parallel computer

    DOEpatents

    Blocksome, Michael A; Mamidala, Amith R

    2014-02-11

    Fencing direct memory access (`DMA`) data transfers in a parallel active messaging interface (`PAMI`) of a parallel computer, the PAMI including data communications endpoints, each endpoint including specifications of a client, a context, and a task, the endpoints coupled for data communications through the PAMI and through DMA controllers operatively coupled to segments of shared random access memory through which the DMA controllers deliver data communications deterministically, including initiating execution through the PAMI of an ordered sequence of active DMA instructions for DMA data transfers between two endpoints, effecting deterministic DMA data transfers through a DMA controller and a segment of shared memory; and executing through the PAMI, with no FENCE accounting for DMA data transfers, an active FENCE instruction, the FENCE instruction completing execution only after completion of all DMA instructions initiated prior to execution of the FENCE instruction for DMA data transfers between the two endpoints.

  8. Dissociated sequential activity and stimulus encoding in the dorsomedial striatum during spatial working memory

    PubMed Central

    Akhlaghpour, Hessameddin; Wiskerke, Joost; Choi, Jung Yoon; Taliaferro, Joshua P; Au, Jennifer; Witten, Ilana B

    2016-01-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest that the striatum has an important role in spatial working memory. The neural dynamics in the striatum have been described in tasks with short delay periods (1–4 s), but remain largely uncharacterized for tasks with longer delay periods. We collected and analyzed single unit recordings from the dorsomedial striatum of rats performing a spatial working memory task with delays up to 10 s. We found that neurons were activated sequentially, with the sequences spanning the entire delay period. Surprisingly, this sequential activity was dissociated from stimulus encoding activity, which was present in the same neurons, but preferentially appeared towards the onset of the delay period. These observations contrast with descriptions of sequential dynamics during similar tasks in other brains areas, and clarify the contribution of the striatum to spatial working memory. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.19507.001 PMID:27636864

  9. Pregnancy persistently affects memory T cell populations.

    PubMed

    Kieffer, Tom E C; Faas, Marijke M; Scherjon, Sicco A; Prins, Jelmer R

    2017-02-01

    Pregnancy is an immune challenge to the maternal immune system. The effects of pregnancy on maternal immunity and particularly on memory T cells during and after pregnancy are not fully known. This observational study aims to show the short term and the long term effects of pregnancy on the constitution, size and activation status of peripheral human memory T-lymphocyte populations. Effector memory (EM) and central memory (CM) T-lymphocytes were analyzed using flow cytometry of peripheral blood from 14 nulligravid, 12 primigravid and 15 parous women that were on average 18 months postpartum. The short term effects were shown by the significantly higher CD4+ EM cell and activated CD4+ memory cell proportions in primigravid women compared to nulligravid women. The persistent effects found in this study were the significantly higher proportions of CD4+ EM, CD4+ CM and activated memory T cells in parous women compared to nulligravid women. In contrast to CD4+ cells, activation status of CD8+ memory cells did not differ between the groups. This study shows that pregnancy persistently affects the pre-pregnancy CD4+ memory cell pool in human peripheral blood. During pregnancy, CD4+ T-lymphocytes might differentiate into EM cells followed by persistent higher proportions of CD4+ CM and EM cells postpartum. The persistent effects of pregnancy on memory T cells found in this study support the hypothesis that memory T cells are generated during pregnancy and that these cells could be involved in the lower complication risks in multiparous pregnancies in humans.

  10. Mitogen-activated protein kinase activity is involved in effector functions triggered by the CD94/NKG2-C NK receptor specific for HLA-E.

    PubMed

    Carretero, M; Llano, M; Navarro, F; Bellón, T; López-Botet, M

    2000-10-01

    The CD94/NKG2C heterodimer constitutes an activating receptor involved in NK cell-mediated recognition of the class lb molecule HLA-E. It transduces the triggering signal through an ITAM-bearing molecule, DAP12/KARAP, coupled non-covalently to the receptor. Here we show that specific engagement of the receptor complex expressed on the surface of an NK clone induced the phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). By the use of the MEK inhibitor PD098059 we demonstrate that the MAPK pathway participates in the CD94-dependent TNF-alpha production and cytotoxicity. Moreover, we transferred the activating function by transfection of the heterologous RBL cell line with CD94/NKG2-C/DAP12. In this system, cross-linking of the receptor induced calcium mobilization, serotonin release and phosphorylation of MAPK.

  11. Persistent neural activity during the maintenance of spatial position in working memory.

    PubMed

    Srimal, Riju; Curtis, Clayton E

    2008-01-01

    The mechanism for the short-term maintenance of information involves persistent neural activity during the retention interval, which forms a bridge between the cued memoranda and its later contingent response. Here, we used event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging to identify cortical areas with activity that persists throughout working memory delays with the goal of testing if such activity represents visuospatial attention or prospective saccade goals. We did so by comparing two spatial working memory tasks. During a memory-guided saccade (MGS) task, a location was maintained during a delay after which a saccade was generated to the remembered location. During a spatial item recognition (SIR) task identical to MGS until after the delay, a button press indicated whether a newly cued location matched the remembered location. Activity in frontal and parietal areas persisted above baseline and was greater in the hemisphere contralateral to the cued visual field. However, delay-period activity did not differ between the tasks. Notably, in the putative frontal eye field (FEF), delay period activity did not differ despite that the precise metrics of the memory-guided saccade were known during the MGS delay and saccades were never made in SIR. Persistent FEF activity may therefore represent a prioritized attentional map of space, rather than the metrics for saccades.

  12. Role of slow oscillatory activity and slow wave sleep in consolidation of episodic-like memory in rats.

    PubMed

    Oyanedel, Carlos N; Binder, Sonja; Kelemen, Eduard; Petersen, Kimberley; Born, Jan; Inostroza, Marion

    2014-12-15

    Our previous experiments showed that sleep in rats enhances consolidation of hippocampus dependent episodic-like memory, i.e. the ability to remember an event bound into specific spatio-temporal context. Here we tested the hypothesis that this enhancing effect of sleep is linked to the occurrence of slow oscillatory and spindle activity during slow wave sleep (SWS). Rats were tested on an episodic-like memory task and on three additional tasks covering separately the where (object place recognition), when (temporal memory), and what (novel object recognition) components of episodic memory. In each task, the sample phase (encoding) was followed by an 80-min retention interval that covered either a period of regular morning sleep or sleep deprivation. Memory during retrieval was tested using preferential exploration of novelty vs. familiarity. Consistent with previous findings, the rats which had slept during the retention interval showed significantly stronger episodic-like memory and spatial memory, and a trend of improved temporal memory (although not significant). Object recognition memory was similarly retained across sleep and sleep deprivation retention intervals. Recall of episodic-like memory was associated with increased slow oscillatory activity (0.85-2.0Hz) during SWS in the retention interval. Spatial memory was associated with increased proportions of SWS. Against our hypothesis, a relationship between spindle activity and episodic-like memory performance was not detected, but spindle activity was associated with object recognition memory. The results provide support for the role of SWS and slow oscillatory activity in consolidating hippocampus-dependent memory, the role of spindles in this process needs to be further examined.

  13. Gaming is related to enhanced working memory performance and task-related cortical activity.

    PubMed

    Moisala, M; Salmela, V; Hietajärvi, L; Carlson, S; Vuontela, V; Lonka, K; Hakkarainen, K; Salmela-Aro, K; Alho, K

    2017-01-15

    Gaming experience has been suggested to lead to performance enhancements in a wide variety of working memory tasks. Previous studies have, however, mostly focused on adult expert gamers and have not included measurements of both behavioral performance and brain activity. In the current study, 167 adolescents and young adults (aged 13-24 years) with different amounts of gaming experience performed an n-back working memory task with vowels, with the sensory modality of the vowel stream switching between audition and vision at random intervals. We studied the relationship between self-reported daily gaming activity, working memory (n-back) task performance and related brain activity measured using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). The results revealed that the extent of daily gaming activity was related to enhancements in both performance accuracy and speed during the most demanding (2-back) level of the working memory task. This improved working memory performance was accompanied by enhanced recruitment of a fronto-parietal cortical network, especially the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. In contrast, during the less demanding (1-back) level of the task, gaming was associated with decreased activity in the same cortical regions. Our results suggest that a greater degree of daily gaming experience is associated with better working memory functioning and task difficulty-dependent modulation in fronto-parietal brain activity already in adolescence and even when non-expert gamers are studied. The direction of causality within this association cannot be inferred with certainty due to the correlational nature of the current study.

  14. Target selection biases from recent experience transfer across effectors.

    PubMed

    Moher, Jeff; Song, Joo-Hyun

    2016-02-01

    Target selection is often biased by an observer's recent experiences. However, not much is known about whether these selection biases influence behavior across different effectors. For example, does looking at a red object make it easier to subsequently reach towards another red object? In the current study, we asked observers to find the uniquely colored target object on each trial. Randomly intermixed pre-trial cues indicated the mode of action: either an eye movement or a visually guided reach movement to the target. In Experiment 1, we found that priming of popout, reflected in faster responses following repetition of the target color on consecutive trials, occurred regardless of whether the effector was repeated from the previous trial or not. In Experiment 2, we examined whether an inhibitory selection bias away from a feature could transfer across effectors. While priming of popout reflects both enhancement of the repeated target features and suppression of the repeated distractor features, the distractor previewing effect isolates a purely inhibitory component of target selection in which a previewed color is presented in a homogenous display and subsequently inhibited. Much like priming of popout, intertrial suppression biases in the distractor previewing effect transferred across effectors. Together, these results suggest that biases for target selection driven by recent trial history transfer across effectors. This indicates that representations in memory that bias attention towards or away from specific features are largely independent from their associated actions.

  15. Understanding low reliability of memories for neutral information encoded under stress: alterations in memory-related activation in the hippocampus and midbrain.

    PubMed

    Qin, Shaozheng; Hermans, Erno J; van Marle, Hein J F; Fernández, Guillén

    2012-03-21

    Exposure to an acute stressor can lead to unreliable remembrance of intrinsically neutral information, as exemplified by low reliability of eyewitness memories, which stands in contrast with enhanced memory for the stressful incident itself. Stress-sensitive neuromodulators (e.g., catecholamines) are believed to cause this low reliability by altering neurocognitive processes underlying memory formation. Using event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging, we investigated neural activity during memory formation in 44 young, healthy human participants while incidentally encoding emotionally neutral, complex scenes embedded in either a stressful or neutral context. We recorded event-related pupil dilation responses as an indirect index of phasic noradrenergic activity. Autonomic, endocrine, and psychological measures were acquired to validate stress manipulation. Acute stress during encoding led to a more liberal response bias (more hits and false alarms) when testing memory for the scenes 24 h later. The strength of this bias correlated negatively with pupil dilation responses and positively with stress-induced heart rate increases at encoding. Acute stress, moreover, reduced subsequent memory effects (SMEs; items later remembered vs forgotten) in hippocampus and midbrain, and in pupil dilation responses. The diminished SMEs indicate reduced selectivity and specificity in mnemonic processing during memory formation. This is in line with a model in which stress-induced catecholaminergic hyperactivation alters phasic neuromodulatory signaling in memory-related circuits, resulting in generalized (gist-based) processing at the cost of specificity. Thus, one may speculate that loss of specificity may yield less discrete memory representations at time of encoding, thereby causing a more liberal response bias when probing these memories.

  16. Action selection in multi-effector decision making

    PubMed Central

    Madlon-Kay, Seth; Pesaran, Bijan; Daw, Nathaniel D.

    2012-01-01

    Decision making and reinforcement learning over movements suffer from the curse of dimensionality: the space of possible movements is too vast to search or even represent in its entirety. When actions involve only a single effector, this problem can be ameliorated by considering that effector separately; accordingly, the brain’s sensorimotor systems can subdivide choice by representing values and actions separately for each effector. However, for many actions, such as playing the piano, the value of an action by an effector (e.g., a hand) depends inseparably on the actions of other effectors. By definition, the values of such coordinated multi-effector actions cannot be represented by effector-specific action values, such as those that have been most extensively investigated in parietal and premotor regions. For such actions, one possible solution is to choose according to more abstract valuations over different goods or options, which can then be mapped onto the necessary motor actions. Such an approach separates the learning and decision problem, which will often be lower-dimensional than the space of possible movements, from the multi-effector movement planning problem. The ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) is thought to contain goods-based value signals, so we hypothesized that this region might preferentially drive multi-effector action selection. To examine how the brain solves this problem, we used fMRI to compare patterns of BOLD activity in humans during reward learning tasks in which options were selected through either unimanual or bimanual actions, and in which the response requirements in the latter condition inseparably coupled valuation across both hands. We found value signals in the bilateral medial motor cortex and vmPFC, and consistent with previous studies, the medial motor value signals contained contra-lateral biases indicating effector-specificity, while the vmPFC value signals did not exhibit detectable effector specificity. Although

  17. Auditory short-term memory activation during score reading.