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Sample records for activated flux flow

  1. Thermally activated flux flow in superconducting epitaxial FeSe0.6Te0.4 thin film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, D.; Choi, W. J.; Seo, Y. I.; Seo, Sehun; Lee, Sanghan; Kwon, Yong Seung

    The thermally activated flux flow effect has been studied in epitaxial FeSe0.6Te0.4 thin film grown by a PLD method through the electrical resistivity measurement under various magnetic fields for B//c and B//ab. The results showed that the thermally activated flux flow effect is well described by the nonlinear temperature-dependent activation energy. The evaluated apparent activation energy U0 (B) is one order larger than the reported results and showed the double-linearity in both magnetic field directions. Furthermore, the FeSe0.6Te0.4 thin film shows the anisotropy of 5.6 near Tc and 2D-like superconducting behavior in thermally activated flux flow region. In addition, the vortex glass transition and the temperature dependence of the high critical fields were determined.

  2. High-resolution digital movies of emerging flux and horizontal flows in active regions on the sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Topka, K.; Ferguson, S.; Frank, Z.; Tarbell, T.; Title, A.

    1988-01-01

    High-resolution observations of active regions in many wavelength bands obtained at the Vacuum Tower Telescope of NSO/Sunspot (Sacramento Peak) are presented. The SOUP tunable filter, HRSO 1024 x 1024 CCD camera, and a sunspot tracker for image stabilization were used. Subarrays of 512 x 512 pixels were processed digitally and recorded on videodisk in movie format. The movies with 0.5 to 1 arcsecond resolution of the following simultaneous observations were shown: green continuum, longitudinal magnetogram, Doppler velocity, Fe I 5576 A line center, H alpha wings, and H alpha line center. The best set of movies show a 90 x 90 arcsecond field-of-view of an active region at S29, W11. When viewed at speeds of a few thousand times real-time, the photospheric movies clearly show the active region fields being distorted by a remarkable combination of systematic flows and small eruptions of new flux. Flux emergence is most easily discovered in line center movies: an elongated dark feature appears first, followed soon after by bright points at one or both ends. A brief, strong upflow is seen when the dark feature first appears; downflow in the bright points persists much longer. The magnetic flux appears to increase gradually over this extended period. Some of the flux emergence events were studied in detail, with measurements of horizontal and vertical velocities and magnetic flux versus time within one footpoint of the loop.

  3. Effect of Erbium substitution on temperature and field dependence of thermally activated flux flow resistance in Bi-2212 superconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paladhi, D.; Mandal, P.; Sahoo, R. C.; Giri, S. K.; Nath, T. K.

    2016-12-01

    Thermally activated flux flow (TAFF) regime of Er doped Bi2Sr2Ca1-xErxCu2O8+δ (x=0.0, 0.1, 0.3) polycrystalline systems have been investigated using magneto-transport measurements up to 70 kOe magnetic field. High quality single phase samples have been prepared by standard solid state reaction method. The activation energy or pinning strength (U0) have been calculated using thermally activated flux flow (TAFF) model by linear fitting from the semi-logarithmic curve of ln ρ vs 1/T. It has been observed that activation energy (U0) decreases with Er substitution and U0 follows power law dependence with magnetic field for all three samples. Irreversibility lines (IL) have been drawn from the magneto-transport data for all three samples and it is observed that IL shifts to lower temperature with higher Er concentration. It is confirmed from the above results that pinning strength becomes weaker with Er doping. Finally, the variation of U0 have been shown with temperature by re-plotting -T(ln (ρ/ρ100)) vs T for three samples showing non-linear dependence with temperature.

  4. Superconducting flux flow digital circuits

    DOEpatents

    Hietala, Vincent M.; Martens, Jon S.; Zipperian, Thomas E.

    1995-01-01

    A NOR/inverter logic gate circuit and a flip flop circuit implemented with superconducting flux flow transistors (SFFTs). Both circuits comprise two SFFTs with feedback lines. They have extremely low power dissipation, very high switching speeds, and the ability to interface between Josephson junction superconductor circuits and conventional microelectronics.

  5. Superconducting flux flow digital circuits

    DOEpatents

    Hietala, V.M.; Martens, J.S.; Zipperian, T.E.

    1995-02-14

    A NOR/inverter logic gate circuit and a flip flop circuit implemented with superconducting flux flow transistors (SFFTs) are disclosed. Both circuits comprise two SFFTs with feedback lines. They have extremely low power dissipation, very high switching speeds, and the ability to interface between Josephson junction superconductor circuits and conventional microelectronics. 8 figs.

  6. Horizontal flow fields in and around a small active region. The transition period between flux emergence and decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, M.; Denker, C.; Balthasar, H.; Kuckein, C.; González Manrique, S. J.; Sobotka, M.; Bello González, N.; Hoch, S.; Diercke, A.; Kummerow, P.; Berkefeld, T.; Collados, M.; Feller, A.; Hofmann, A.; Kneer, F.; Lagg, A.; Löhner-Böttcher, J.; Nicklas, H.; Pastor Yabar, A.; Schlichenmaier, R.; Schmidt, D.; Schmidt, W.; Schubert, M.; Sigwarth, M.; Solanki, S. K.; Soltau, D.; Staude, J.; Strassmeier, K. G.; Volkmer, R.; von der Lühe, O.; Waldmann, T.

    2016-11-01

    Context. The solar magnetic field is responsible for all aspects of solar activity. Thus, emergence of magnetic flux at the surface is the first manifestation of the ensuing solar activity. Aims: Combining high-resolution and synoptic observations aims to provide a comprehensive description of flux emergence at photospheric level and of the growth process that eventually leads to a mature active region. Methods: The small active region NOAA 12118 emerged on 2014 July 17 and was observed one day later with the 1.5-m GREGOR solar telescope on 2014 July 18. High-resolution time-series of blue continuum and G-band images acquired in the blue imaging channel (BIC) of the GREGOR Fabry-Pérot Interferometer (GFPI) were complemented by synoptic line-of-sight magnetograms and continuum images obtained with the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). Horizontal proper motions and horizontal plasma velocities were computed with local correlation tracking (LCT) and the differential affine velocity estimator (DAVE), respectively. Morphological image processing was employed to measure the photometric and magnetic area, magnetic flux, and the separation profile of the emerging flux region during its evolution. Results: The computed growth rates for photometric area, magnetic area, and magnetic flux are about twice as high as the respective decay rates. The space-time diagram using HMI magnetograms of five days provides a comprehensive view of growth and decay. It traces a leaf-like structure, which is determined by the initial separation of the two polarities, a rapid expansion phase, a time when the spread stalls, and a period when the region slowly shrinks again. The separation rate of 0.26 km s-1 is highest in the initial stage, and it decreases when the separation comes to a halt. Horizontal plasma velocities computed at four evolutionary stages indicate a changing pattern of inflows. In LCT maps we find persistent flow patterns

  7. Turbulent crossed fluxes in incompressible flows

    PubMed

    Sancho

    2000-02-01

    We show in the framework of the stochastic calculus the existence of turbulent crossed fluxes in incompressible flows. Physically, these fluxes are related to the dependence of the phenomenological coefficients on the temperature and concentration variables.

  8. A formulation of three-dimensional residual mean flow and wave activity flux applicable to both to Rossby waves and gravity waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinoshita, T.; Sato, K.

    2012-12-01

    The Transformed Eulerian-Mean (TEM) equations formulated by Andrews and McIntyre (1976, 1978) has been widely used to examine wave-mean flow interaction in the meridional cross section. Although a lot of efforts have been made to generalize the TEM equations to three dimensions so far, formulae derived by previous studies are applicable to particular waves, mainly Rossby waves on the quasi-geostrophic (QG) equations or inertia-gravity waves on the primitive equations. This study has newly formulated three-dimensional (3D) TEM equations which are applicable to both Rossby waves and gravity waves. The formulae can be used to examine the 3D material transport driven by these waves. Moreover, two kinds of 3D wave activity flux have been derived respectively for describing the wave force to the mean flow and for the wave propagation. The residual mean flow is expressed with the sum of the Eulerian-mean flow and the Stokes drift in the 2D TEM equations. Thus, a formulation is made for the 3D Stokes drift on the primitive equation (PRSD) from its original definition using a small amplitude theory for a slowly-varying mean flow. The PRSD is equivalent to the 3D Stokes drift derived by Kinoshita et al. (2010) for gravity waves for the constant Coriolis parameter and to the 3D QG Stokes drift which is also derived in this study for the small Rossby number limit. The 3D wave activity flux (3D-flux-M), whose divergence corresponds to the wave force, is derived by using PRSD. The 3D residual mean flow associated with synoptic-scale wave disturbances in the upper troposphere in April is investigated by applying the new formulae to ERA-Interim data. It is found that the sum of time-mean unbalanced flow and PRSD is southward in the east end of the storm track although it is northward in the west as is consistent with the 2D residual flow. A case study is also made for dominant gravity waves around the Southern Andes by applying the PRSD and 3D-flux-M to the simulation data of a

  9. Stefan blowing effects on MHD bioconvection flow of a nanofluid in the presence of gyrotactic microorganisms with active and passive nanoparticles flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giri, Shib Sankar; Das, Kalidas; Kundu, Prabir Kumar

    2017-02-01

    The present paper investigates the effect of Stefan blowing on the hydro-magnetic bioconvection of a water-based nanofluid flow containing gyrotactic microorganisms through a permeable surface. Also we studied both actively and passively the controlled flux of nanoparticles and the effect of a surface slip at the wall. We adopt a similarity approach to reduce the leading partial differential equations into ordinary differential equations along with two separate boundary conditions (active and passive) and solve the resulting equations numerically by employing the RK-4 method through the shooting technique to perform the flow analysis. Discussions on the effect of emerging flow parameter on the flow characteristic are made properly through graphs and charts. We observed that the effects of the traditional Lewis number and suction/blowing parameter on temperature distribution and microorganism concentration are converse to each other. A fair result comparison of the present paper with formerly obtained results is given.

  10. Dual Active Surface Heat Flux Gage Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liebert, Curt H.; Kolodziej, Paul

    1995-01-01

    A unique plug-type heat flux gage probe was tested in the NASA Ames Research Center 2x9 turbulent flow duct facility. The probe was fabricated by welding a miniature dual active surface heat flux gage body to the end of a hollow metal cylindrical bolt containing a metal inner tube. Cooling air flows through the inner tube, impinges onto the back of the gage body and then flows out through the annulus formed between the inner tube and the hollow bolt wall. Heat flux was generated in the duct facility with a Huels arc heater. The duct had a rectangular cross section and one wall was fabricated from 2.54 centimeter thick thermal insulation rigid surface material mounted onto an aluminum plate. To measure heat flux, the probe was inserted through the plate and insulating materials with the from of the gage located flush with the hot gas-side insulation surface. Absorbed heat fluxes measured with the probe were compared with absorbed heat fluxes measured with six water-cooled reference calorimeters. These calorimeters were located in a water-cooled metal duct wall which was located across from the probe position. Correspondence of transient and steady heat fluxes measured with the reference calorimeters and heat flux gage probe was generally within a satisfactory plus or minus 10 percent. This good correspondence was achieved even though the much cooler probe caused a large surface temperature disruption of 1000K between the metal gage and the insulation. However, this temperature disruption did not seriously effect the accuracy of the heat flux measurement. A current application for dual active surface heat flux gages is for transient and steady absorbed heat flux, surface temperature and heat transfer coefficient measurements on the surface of an oxidizer turbine inlet deflector operating in a space shuttle test bed engine.

  11. Dual active surface heat flux gage probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liebert, Curt H.; Kolodziej, Paul

    1995-02-01

    A unique plug-type heat flux gage probe was tested in the NASA Ames Research Center 2x9 turbulent flow duct facility. The probe was fabricated by welding a miniature dual active surface heat flux gage body to the end of a hollow metal cylindrical bolt containing a metal inner tube. Cooling air flows through the inner tube, impinges onto the back of the gage body and then flows out through the annulus formed between the inner tube and the hollow bolt wall. Heat flux was generated in the duct facility with a Huels arc heater. The duct had a rectangular cross section and one wall was fabricated from 2.54 centimeter thick thermal insulation rigid surface material mounted onto an aluminum plate. To measure heat flux, the probe was inserted through the plate and insulating materials with the from of the gage located flush with the hot gas-side insulation surface. Absorbed heat fluxes measured with the probe were compared with absorbed heat fluxes measured with six water-cooled reference calorimeters. These calorimeters were located in a water-cooled metal duct wall which was located across from the probe position. Correspondence of transient and steady heat fluxes measured with the reference calorimeters and heat flux gage probe was generally within a satisfactory plus or minus 10 percent. This good correspondence was achieved even though the much cooler probe caused a large surface temperature disruption of 1000K between the metal gage and the insulation. However, this temperature disruption did not seriously effect the accuracy of the heat flux measurement. A current application for dual active surface heat flux gages is for transient and steady absorbed heat flux, surface temperature and heat transfer coefficient measurements on the surface of an oxidizer turbine inlet deflector operating in a space shuttle test bed engine.

  12. Flux flow and flux dynamics in high-Tc superconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, L. H.; Turchinskaya, M.; Swartzendruber, L. J.; Roitburd, A.; Lundy, D.; Ritter, J.; Kaiser, D. L.

    1991-01-01

    Because high temperature superconductors, including BYCO and BSSCO, are type 2 superconductors with relatively low H(sub c 1) values and high H(sub c 2) values, they will be in a critical state for many of their applications. In the critical state, with the applied field between H(sub c 1) and H(sub c 2), flux lines have penetrated the material and can form a flux lattice and can be pinned by structural defects, chemical inhomogeneities, and impurities. A detailed knowledge of how flux penetrates the material and its behavior under the influence of applied fields and current flow, and the effect of material processing on these properties, is required in order to apply, and to improve the properties of these superconductors. When the applied field is changed rapidly, the time dependence of flux change can be divided into three regions, an initial region which occurs very rapidly, a second region in which the magnetization has a 1n(t) behavior, and a saturation region at very long times. A critical field is defined for depinning, H(sub c,p) as that field at which the hysteresis loop changes from irreversible to reversible. As a function of temperature, it is found that H(sub c,p) is well described by a power law with an exponent between 1.5 and 2.5. The behavior of H(sub c,p) for various materials and its relationship to flux flow and flux dynamics are discussed.

  13. Sediment Vertical Flux in Unsteady Sheet Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, T.; Jenkins, J. T.; Liu, P. L.

    2002-12-01

    In models for sediment suspension, two different boundary conditions have been employed at the sediment bed. Either the sediment concentration is given or the vertical flux of sediment is specified. The specification of the latter is usually called the pick-up function. Recently, several developments towards a better understanding of the sediment bed boundary condition have been reported. Nielson et al (Coastal Engineering 2002, 45, p61-68) have indicated a better performance using the sediment vertical flux as the bed boundary condition in comparisons with experimental data. Also, Drake and Calantoni (Journal of Geophysical Research 2001, 106, C9, p19859-19868) have suggested that in the nearshore environment with its various unsteady flow conditions, the appropriate sediment boundary conditions of a large-scale morphology model must consider both the magnitude the free stream velocity and the acceleration of the flow. In this research, a small-scale sheet flow model based on the two-phase theory is implemented to further study these issues. Averaged two-phase continuum equations are presented for concentrated flows of sediment that are driven by strong, fully developed, unsteady turbulent shear flows over a mobile bed. The particle inter-granular stress is modeled using collisional granular flow theory and a two-equation closure for the fluid turbulence is adopted. In the context of the two-phase theory, sediment is transported through the sediment vertical velocity. Using the fully developed sediment phase continuity equation, it can be shown that the vertical velocity of the sediment must vanish when the flow reaches a steady state. In other words, in fully developed conditions, it is the unsteadiness of the flow that induces the vertical motion of the sediment and that changes the sediment concentration profile. Therefore, implementing a boundary condition based on sediment vertical flux is consistent with both the two-phase theory and with the observation

  14. Energy fluxes in turbulent separated flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mollicone, J.-P.; Battista, F.; Gualtieri, P.; Casciola, C. M.

    2016-10-01

    Turbulent separation in channel flow containing a curved wall is studied using a generalised form of Kolmogorov equation. The equation successfully accounts for inhomogeneous effects in both the physical and separation spaces. We investigate the scale-by-scale energy dynamics in turbulent separated flow induced by a curved wall. The scale and spatial fluxes are highly dependent on the shear layer dynamics and the recirculation bubble forming behind the lower curved wall. The intense energy produced in the shear layer is transferred to the recirculation region, sustaining the turbulent velocity fluctuations. The energy dynamics radically changes depending on the physical position inside the domain, resembling planar turbulent channel dynamics downstream.

  15. Critical heat flux in subcooled flow boiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, David Douglas

    The critical heat flux (CHF) phenomenon was investigated for water flow in tubes with particular emphasis on the development of methods for predicting CHF in the subcooled flow boiling regime. The Purdue University Boiling and Two-Phase Flow Laboratory (PU-BTPFL) CHF database for water flow in a uniformly heated tube was compiled from the world literature dating back to 1949 and represents the largest CHF database ever assembled with 32,544 data points from over 100 sources. The superiority of this database was proven via a detailed examination of previous databases. The PU-BTPFL CHF database is an invaluable tool for the development of CHF correlations and mechanistic models that are superior to existing ones developed with smaller, less comprehensive CHF databases. In response to the many inaccurate and inordinately complex correlations, two nondimensional, subcooled CHF correlations were formulated, containing only five adjustable constants and whose unique functional forms were determined without using a statistical analysis but rather using the parametric trends observed in less than 10% of the subcooled CHF data. The correlation based on inlet conditions (diameter, heated length, mass velocity, pressure, inlet quality) was by far the most accurate of all known subcooled CHF correlations, having mean absolute and root-mean-square (RMS) errors of 10.3% and 14.3%, respectively. The outlet (local) conditions correlation was the most accurate correlation based on local CHF conditions (diameter, mass velocity, pressure, outlet quality) and may be used with a nonuniform axial heat flux. Both correlations proved more accurate than a recent CHF look-up table commonly employed in nuclear reactor thermal hydraulic computer codes. An interfacial lift-off, subcooled CHF model was developed from a consideration of the instability of the vapor-liquid interface and the fraction of heat required for liquid-vapor conversion as opposed to that for bulk liquid heating. Severe

  16. Siphon flows in isolated magnetic flux tubes. 3: The equilibrium path of the flux tube arch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, John H.; Montesinis, Benjamin

    1989-09-01

    The arched equilibrium path of a thin magnetic flux tube in a plane-stratified, nonmagnetic atmosphere is calculated for cases in which the flux tube contains a steady siphon flow. The large scale mechanical equilibrium of the flux tube involves a balance among the magnetic buoyancy force, the net magnetic tension force due to the curvature of the flux tube axis, and the inertial (centrifugal) force due to the siphon flow along curved streamlines. The ends of the flux tube are assumed to be pinned down by some other external force. Both isothermal and adiabatic siphon flows are considered for flux tubes in an isothermal external atmosphere. For the isothermal case, in the absence of a siphon flow the equilibrium path reduces to the static arch calculated by Parker (1975, 1979). The presence of a siphon flow causes the flux tube arch to bend more sharply, so that magnetic tension can overcome the additional straightening effect of the inertial force, and reduces the maximum width of the arch. The curvature of the arch increases as the siphon flow speed increases. For a critical siphon flow, with supercritical flow in the downstream leg, the arch is asymmetric, with greater curvature in the downstream leg of the arch. Adiabatic flow have qualitatively similar effects, except that adiabatic cooling reduces the buoyancy of the flux tube and thus leads to significantly wider arches. In some cases the cooling is strong enough to create negative buoyancy along sections of the flux tube, requiring upward curvature of the flux tube path along these sections and sometimes leading to unusual equilibrium paths of periodic, sinusoidal form.

  17. Siphon flows in isolated magnetic flux tubes. 3: The equilibrium path of the flux tube arch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, John H.; Montesinis, Benjamin

    1989-01-01

    The arched equilibrium path of a thin magnetic flux tube in a plane-stratified, nonmagnetic atmosphere is calculated for cases in which the flux tube contains a steady siphon flow. The large scale mechanical equilibrium of the flux tube involves a balance among the magnetic buoyancy force, the net magnetic tension force due to the curvature of the flux tube axis, and the inertial (centrifugal) force due to the siphon flow along curved streamlines. The ends of the flux tube are assumed to be pinned down by some other external force. Both isothermal and adiabatic siphon flows are considered for flux tubes in an isothermal external atmosphere. For the isothermal case, in the absence of a siphon flow the equilibrium path reduces to the static arch calculated by Parker (1975, 1979). The presence of a siphon flow causes the flux tube arch to bend more sharply, so that magnetic tension can overcome the additional straightening effect of the inertial force, and reduces the maximum width of the arch. The curvature of the arch increases as the siphon flow speed increases. For a critical siphon flow, with supercritical flow in the downstream leg, the arch is asymmetric, with greater curvature in the downstream leg of the arch. Adiabatic flow have qualitatively similar effects, except that adiabatic cooling reduces the buoyancy of the flux tube and thus leads to significantly wider arches. In some cases the cooling is strong enough to create negative buoyancy along sections of the flux tube, requiring upward curvature of the flux tube path along these sections and sometimes leading to unusual equilibrium paths of periodic, sinusoidal form.

  18. Fluid flow through seamounts and implications for global mass fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Robert N.; Fisher, Andrew T.; Chapman, David S.

    2004-08-01

    Seamounts contribute to globally significant hydrothermal fluxes, but the dynamics and impacts of fluid flow through these features are poorly understood. Numerical models of coupled heat and fluid flow illustrate how seamounts induce local convection in the oceanic crust. We consider idealized axisymmetric seamounts and calculate mass and heat fluxes by using a coupled heat- and fluid-flow model. By using P. Wessel's global database of ˜15,000 seamounts identified through satellite gravimetry, we estimate that the mass flux associated with seamounts is ˜1014 kg/yr, a number comparable to estimated regional mass fluxes through mid-ocean ridges and flanks. In addition, the seamount-generated advective heat flux may be locally significant well beyond the 65 Ma average age at which advective lithospheric heat loss on ridge flanks ends. These flows may be important for facilitating geochemical exchange between the crust and ocean and may affect subseafloor microbial ecosystems.

  19. Flux-flow resistivity of three high-temperature superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Cha, Y.S.; Evans, D.J.; Hull, J.R.; Seol, S.Y.

    1996-10-01

    Results of experiments on flux-flow resistivity (the relationship of voltage to current) of three high-temperature superconductors are described. The superconductors are a melt-cast BSCCO 2212 rod, a single filament BSCCO powder-in-tube (PIT) tape, and a multifilament PIT tape. The flux-flow resistivity of these superconductors was measured at three temperatures: 77 K (saturated liquid nitrogen), 87 K (saturated liquid argon), and 67 K (subcooled liquid nitrogen). Implications of the present results for practical applications are discussed.

  20. PROTOSTELLAR ACCRETION FLOWS DESTABILIZED BY MAGNETIC FLUX REDISTRIBUTION

    SciTech Connect

    Krasnopolsky, Ruben; Shang, Hsien; Li Zhiyun; Zhao Bo

    2012-09-20

    Magnetic flux redistribution lies at the heart of the problem of star formation in dense cores of molecular clouds that are magnetized to a realistic level. If all of the magnetic flux of a typical core were to be dragged into the central star, the stellar field strength would be orders of magnitude higher than the observed values. This well-known magnetic flux problem can in principle be resolved through non-ideal MHD effects. Two-dimensional (axisymmetric) calculations have shown that ambipolar diffusion, in particular, can transport magnetic flux outward relative to matter, allowing material to enter the central object without dragging the field lines along. We show through simulations that such axisymmetric protostellar accretion flows are unstable in three dimensions to magnetic interchange instability in the azimuthal direction. The instability is driven by the magnetic flux redistributed from the matter that enters the central object. It typically starts to develop during the transition from the prestellar phase of star formation to the protostellar mass accretion phase. In the latter phase, the magnetic flux is transported outward mainly through advection by strongly magnetized low-density regions that expand against the collapsing inflow. The tussle between the gravity-driven infall and magnetically driven expansion leads to a highly filamentary inner accretion flow that is more disordered than previously envisioned. The efficient outward transport of magnetic flux by advection lowers the field strength at small radii, making the magnetic braking less efficient and the formation of rotationally supported disks easier in principle. However, we find no evidence for such disks in any of our rotating collapse simulations. We conclude that the inner protostellar accretion flow is shaped to a large extent by the flux redistribution-driven magnetic interchange instability. How disks form in such an environment is unclear.

  1. Development of an inviscid flux scheme for thermochemical nonequilibrium flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Charles Hugh

    Solutions to the governing equations that model hypersonic aerothermodynamics rely heavily on the mathematical and numerical technology that characterizes Computational Fluid Dynamics. Many areas of significant investigation are relevant to advancing state of the art hypersonic aerothermodynamic engineering and applied research analyses. Due to the relatively high energy achieved by spacecraft during launch, physical models for thermal nonequilibrium and chemical nonequilibrium are necessary to develop adequate numerical reentry simulations. In addition, complex features of the Navier Stokes equations require sophisticated mathematical and numerical techniques in order to develop reasonably accurate simulations in an acceptable amount of time. The objective of this work is to present the development of a new inviscid flux evaluation method. This new method, referred to as the Flux Consistent scheme, is closely related to the Modified Steger-Warming method. The unique characteristics of this new flux scheme involve an original eigenvalue implementation. This original eigenvalue formulation, however, leads to incorrect flux magnitudes which must be corrected in the total flux to provide an accurate representation of the inviscid fluxes. The mathematical technique used to identify flux magnitude errors in the Flux Consistent scheme is also applied to the Modified Steger-Warming flux evaluation method. This assessment leads to the characterization of flux errors in the Modified Steger-Warming scheme which are generated by eigenvalue differences between the left and right cell interface flow states. These Modified Steger-Warming flux errors are shown to vanish for supersonic conditions. Two hypotheses in reference to the Modified Steger-Warming scheme are proposed. The first is that sonic glitch problems occurring in some Steger-Warming simulations are the result of the flux error vanishing at supersonic conditions. The second hypothesis concerning the Steger

  2. Characterization of a hybrid powdered activated carbon-dynamic membrane bioreactor (PAC-DMBR) process with high flux by gravity flow: Operational performance and sludge properties.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yisong; Wang, Xiaochang C; Sun, Qiyuan; Ngo, Huu Hao; Yu, Zhenzhen; Tang, Jialing; Zhang, Qionghua

    2017-01-01

    Three PAC-DMBRs were developed for wastewater treatment under different PAC dosages with biomass concentrations averaged at 2.5, 3.5 and 5.0g/L. The DMBRs could be continuously operated at 40-100L/m(2)h, while higher fluxes were obtained within the PAC-DMBRs with hydraulic retention times varying in 4-10h. A dose of 1g/L PAC brought about obvious improvement in the sludge particle size distribution, settling, flocculating and dewatering properties due to the formation of biological PAC, and the sludge properties were further improved at a higher PAC dose (3g/L). The addition of PAC notably shortened the DM formation time after air backwashing and enhanced pollutant removal. Moreover, under a long solid retention time (approximately 150d), the concentrations of both soluble and bound extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) decreased substantially because of the adsorption and biodegradation effects of the biological PAC. No obvious impact on biomass activity was observed with PAC addition.

  3. Momentum flux in two phase two component low quality flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumeister, K. J.; Graham, R. W.; Henry, R. E.

    1972-01-01

    In two phase flow systems line losses comprise frictional and momentum pressure drops. For design purposes, it would be desirable to estimate the line losses employing a one-dimensional calculation. Two methods for computing one-dimensional momentum flux at a test section discharge station are compared to the experimental value for a range of two-phase flow conditions. The one-dimensional homogeneous model appears to be more accurate generally in predicting the momentum than the variable slip model.

  4. On the relation between coronal heating, flux tube divergence, and the solar wind proton flux and flow speed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandbaek, Onulf; Leer, Egil; Hansteen, Viggo H.

    1994-01-01

    A one-fluid solar wind model is used to investigate some relations between coronal heating, the flux tube divergence near the Sun, and the solar wind proton flux and flow speed. The effects of energy addition to the supersonic region of the flow are also studied. We allow for a mechanical energy flux that heats the corona, and an Alfven wave energy flux that adds energy, mainly to the supersonic flow, both as momentum and as heat. We find that the mechanical energy flux determines the solar wind mass flux, and in order to keep an almost constant proton flux at the orbit of Earth with changing flow geometry, that the mechanical energy flux must vary linearly with the magnetic field in the inner corona. This thermally driven wind generally has a low asymptotic flow speed. When Alfven waves are added to the thermally driven flow, the asymptotic flow speed is increased and is determined by the ratio of the Alfven wave and the mechanical energy fluxes at the coronal base. Flow speeds characteristic of recurrent high-speed solar wind streams can be obtained only when the Alfven wave energy flux, deposited in the supersonic flow, is larger than the mechanical energy flux heating the corona.

  5. Magnetic field generation from shear flow in flux ropes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Intrator, T. P.; Sears, J.; Gao, K.; Klarenbeek, J.; Yoo, C.

    2012-10-01

    In the Reconnection Scaling Experiment (RSX) we have measured out of plane quadrupole magnetic field structure in situations where magnetic reconnection was minimal. This quadrupole out of plane magnetic signature has historically been presumed to be the smoking gun harbinger of reconnection. On the other hand, we showed that when flux ropes bounced instead of merging and reconnecting, this signature could evolve. This can follow from sheared fluid flows in the context of a generalized Ohms Law. We reconstruct a shear flow model from experimental data for flux ropes that have been experimentally well characterized in RSX as screw pinch equilibria, including plasma ion and electron flow, with self consistent profiles for magnetic field, pressure, and current density. The data can account for the quadrupole field structure.

  6. An HTS flux pump operated by directly driving a superconductor into flux flow region in the E- J curve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Jianzhao; Coombs, T. A.

    2016-09-01

    High-T c superconducting (HTS) flux pumps are capable of compensating the persistent current decay in HTS magnets without electrical contact. In this paper, following work on a low-T c superconducting self-switching flux pump, we propose a new HTS flux pump by directly driving a high-T c superconductor into the flux flow region in the E- J curve. The flux pump consists of a transformer which has a superconducting secondary winding shorted by an YBCO-coated conductor bridge. A high alternating current with a much higher positive peak value than the negative peak value is induced in the secondary winding. The current always drives the bridge superconductor into the flux flow region only at around its positive peak value, thus resulting in flux pumping. The proposed flux pump is much simpler than existing HTS flux pumps.

  7. Heat flux measurement in a high enthalpy plasma flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Löhle, Stefan; Battaglia, Jean-Luc; Gardarein, Jean-Laurent; Jullien, Pierre; van Ootegem, Bruno

    2008-11-01

    It is a widely used approach to measure heat flux in harsh environments like high enthalpy plasma flows, fusion plasma and rocket motor combustion chambers based on solving the inverse heat conduction problem in a semi-infinite environment. This approach strongly depends on model parameters and geometrical aspects of the sensor design. In this work the surface heat flux is determined by solving the inverse heat conduction problem using an identified system as a direct model. The identification of the system is performed using calibration measurements with modern laser technique and advanced data handling. The results of the identified thermo-physical system show that a non-integer model appears most adapted to this particular problem. It is concluded that the new method improves the heat flux sensor significantly and furthermore extend its application to very short measurement times.

  8. Flux flow and flux dynamics in high-T(sub c) superconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, L. H.; Turchinskaya, M.; Roytburd, A.; Swartzendruber, L. J.

    1990-01-01

    Because high temperature superconductors, including BYCO and BSCCO, are type 2 superconductors with relatively low H(sub c 1) values and high H(sub c 2) values, they will be in a critical state for many of their applications. In the critical state, with the applied field between H(sub c 1) and H(sub c 2), flux lines have penetrated the material and can form a flux lattice and can be pinned by structural defects, chemical inhomogeneities, and impurities. A detailed knowledge of how flux penetrates the material and its behavior under the influence of applied fields and current flow, and the effect of material processing on these properties, is required in order to apply, and to improve the properties of, these superconductors. When the applied field is changed rapidly, the time dependence of flux change can be divided into three regions, an initial region which occurs very rapidly, a second region in which the magnetization has a 1n(t) behavior, and a saturation region at very long times. A critical field is defined for depinning, H(sub c,p) as that field at which the hysteresis loop changes from irreversible to reversible. As a function of temperature it is found that H(sub c,p) is well described by a power law with an exponent between 1.5 and 2.5. The behavior of H(sub c,p) for various materials and its relationship to flux flow and flux dynamics are discussed.

  9. Implications of Saito's coronal density model on the polar solar wind flow and heavy ion abundances. [mathematical models of proton flux density and solar activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldman, W. C.

    1976-01-01

    A comparison of polar solar wind proton flux upper limits derived using a coronal density model, with Lyman alpha measurements of the length of the neutral H tail of comet Bennet at high latitudes, shows that either extended heating beyond 2 solar radii is necessary some of the time or that the model's polar densities are too low. Whichever possibility is the case, the fact that the solar wind particle flux does not appear to decrease with increasing latitude indicates that the heavy element content of the high latitude wind may be similar to that observed in the ecliptic. It was then shown that solar wind heavy ion observations at high latitudes allow a determination of the electron temperature at heights which bracket the nominal location of the coronal temperature maximum thus providing information concerning the magnitude and extent of mechanical dissipation in the intermediate corona.

  10. Improved Flux Formulations for Unsteady Low Mach Number Flows

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-07-01

    modeling multi-species flows (as, for example, the combusted exhaust plume from an aircraft engine). One effective way for expressing a general...physical-Mach number and the ratio of specific heats : 2 1 1p p p M M ρ γ ρ γ γ ′  ′ − = +     (5) where 2 2 2 2 minmin max( , , ),1p...the CRUNCH CFD ® code, developed at CRAFT Tech [12]-[15]. The candidate flux formulations for unsteady low Mach number flows will be tested out

  11. Azimuthal Stress and Heat Flux In Radiatively Inefficient Accretion Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devlen, Ebru

    2016-07-01

    Radiatively Inefficient Accretion Flows (RIAFs) have low radiative efficiencies and/or low accretion rates. The accreting gas may retain most of its binding energy in the form of heat. This lost energy for hot RIAFs is one of the problems heavily worked on in the literature. RIAF observations on the accretion to super massive black holes (e.g., Sagittarius A* in the center of our Galaxy) have shown that the observational data are not consistent with either advection-dominated accretion flow (ADAF) or Bondi models. For this reason, it is very important to theoretically comprehend the physical properties of RIAFs derived from observations with a new disk/flow model. One of the most probable candidates for definition of mass accretion and the source of excess heat energy in RIAFs is the gyroviscous modified magnetorotational instability (GvMRI). Dispersion relation is derived by using MHD equations containing heat flux term based on viscosity in the energy equation. Numerical solutions of the disk equations are done and the growth rates of the instability are calculated. This additional heat flux plays an important role in dissipation of energy. The rates of the angular momentum and heat flux which are obtained from numerical calculations of the turbulence brought about by the GVMRI are also discussed.

  12. DETECTION OF THE HORIZONTAL DIVERGENT FLOW PRIOR TO THE SOLAR FLUX EMERGENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Toriumi, S.; Yokoyama, T.; Hayashi, K.

    2012-06-01

    It is widely accepted that solar active regions including sunspots are formed by the emerging magnetic flux from the deep convection zone. In previous numerical simulations, we found that the horizontal divergent flow (HDF) occurs before the flux emergence at the photospheric height. This paper reports the HDF detection prior to the flux emergence of NOAA AR 11081, which is located away from the disk center. We use SDO/HMI data to study the temporal changes of the Doppler and magnetic patterns from those of the reference quiet Sun. As a result, the HDF appearance is found to come before the flux emergence by about 100 minutes. Also, the horizontal speed of the HDF during this time gap is estimated to be 0.6-1.5 km s{sup -1}, up to 2.3 km s{sup -1}. The HDF is caused by the plasma escaping horizontally from the rising magnetic flux. And the interval between the HDF and the flux emergence may reflect the latency during which the magnetic flux beneath the solar surface is waiting for the instability onset to the further emergence. Moreover, SMART H{alpha} images show that the chromospheric plages appear about 14 minutes later, located cospatial with the photospheric pores. This indicates that the plages are caused by plasma flowing down along the magnetic fields that connect the pores at their footpoints. One important result of observing the HDF may be the possibility of predicting the sunspot appearances that occur in several hours.

  13. Flux or speed? Examining speckle contrast imaging of vascular flows

    PubMed Central

    Kazmi, S. M. Shams; Faraji, Ehssan; Davis, Mitchell A.; Huang, Yu-Yen; Zhang, Xiaojing J.; Dunn, Andrew K.

    2015-01-01

    Speckle contrast imaging enables rapid mapping of relative blood flow distributions using camera detection of back-scattered laser light. However, speckle derived flow measures deviate from direct measurements of erythrocyte speeds by 47 ± 15% (n = 13 mice) in vessels of various calibers. Alternatively, deviations with estimates of volumetric flux are on average 91 ± 43%. We highlight and attempt to alleviate this discrepancy by accounting for the effects of multiple dynamic scattering with speckle imaging of microfluidic channels of varying sizes and then with red blood cell (RBC) tracking correlated speckle imaging of vascular flows in the cerebral cortex. By revisiting the governing dynamic light scattering models, we test the ability to predict the degree of multiple dynamic scattering across vessels in order to correct for the observed discrepancies between relative RBC speeds and multi-exposure speckle imaging estimates of inverse correlation times. The analysis reveals that traditional speckle contrast imagery of vascular flows is neither a measure of volumetric flux nor particle speed, but rather the product of speed and vessel diameter. The corrected speckle estimates of the relative RBC speeds have an average 10 ± 3% deviation in vivo with those obtained from RBC tracking. PMID:26203384

  14. Critical heat flux of subcooled flow boiling with water for high heat flux application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inasaka, Fujio; Nariai, Hideki

    1993-11-01

    Subcooled flow boiling in water is thought to be advantageous in removing high heat load of more than 10 MW/m2. Characteristics of the critical heat flux (CHF), which determines the upper limit of heat removal, are very important for the design of cooling systems. In this paper, studies on subcooled flow boiling CHF, which have been conducted by the authors, are reported. Experiments were conducted using direct current heating of stainless steel tube. For uniform heating conditions, CHF increment in small diameter tubes (1 - 3 mm inside diameter) and the CHF characteristics in tubes with internal twisted tapes were investigated, and also the existing CHF correlations for ordinary tubes (more than 3 mm inside diameter) were evaluated. For peripherally non-uniform heating conditions using the tube, whose wall thickness was partly reduced, the CHF for swirl flow was higher than the CHF under uniform heating conditions with an increase of the non-uniformity factor.

  15. Effect of Energetic Plasma Flux on Flowing Liquid Lithium Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalathiparambil, Kishor; Jung, Soonwook; Christenson, Michael; Fiflis, Peter; Xu, Wenyu; Szott, Mathew; Ruzic, David

    2014-10-01

    An operational liquid lithium system with steady state flow driven by thermo-electric magneto-hydrodynamic force and capable of constantly refreshing the plasma exposed surface have been demonstrated at U of I. To evaluate the system performance in reactor relevant conditions, specifically to understand the effect of disruptive plasma events on the performance of the liquid metal PFCs, the setup was integrated to a pulsed plasma generator. A coaxial plasma generator drives the plasma towards a theta pinch which preferentially heats the ions, simulating ELM like flux, and the plasma is further guided towards the target chamber which houses the flowing lithium system. The effect of the incident flux is examined using diagnostic tools including triple Langmuir probe, calorimeter, rogowski coils, Ion energy analyzers, and fast frame spectral image acquisition with specific optical filters. The plasma have been well characterized and a density of ~1021 m-3, with electron temperature ~10 - 20 eV is measured, and final plasma velocities of 34 - 74 kms-1 have been observed. Calorimetric measurements using planar molybdenum targets indicate a maximum plasma energy (with 6 kV plasma gun and 20 kV theta pinch) of 0.08 MJm-2 with plasma divergence effects resulting in marginal reduction of 40 +/- 23 J in plasma energy. Further results from the other diagnostic tools, using the flowing lithium targets and the planar targets coated with lithium will be presented. DOE DE-SC0008587.

  16. Improved Flux Formulations for Unsteady Low Mach Number Flows

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-06-01

    flows (as, for example, the combusted exhaust plume from an aircraft engine). One effective way for expressing a general iterative method is through a...pseudo-Mach number to physical-Mach number and the ratio of specific heats : 2 1 1p p p M M (5) where 2 2 2 2 minmin max( , , ),1p i uM M M M (6...performed with the CRUNCH CFD ® code, developed at CRAFT Tech12-15. The candidate flux formulations for unsteady low Mach 8 American Institute of

  17. Sign change of the flux flow hall effect in HTSC

    SciTech Connect

    Feigel`man, M.V.; Geshkenbein, V.B.; Larkin, A.I. ||; Vinokur, V.M.

    1994-05-01

    A novel mechanism for the sign change of the Hall effect in flux flow region is proposed. The difference {delta}n between the electron density at the center of the vortex core and that far outside the vortex causes the additional contribution to the Hall conductivity {delta}{sigma}{sub xy} = {delta}nec/B. This contribution can be bigger than the conventional one inn the dirty case {Delta}(T){tau} < 1. If the electron density inside the core exceeds the electron density outside the core the double sign change may occur as a function of temperature and magnetic field.

  18. Active flows on trees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forrow, Aden; Woodhouse, Francis G.; Dunkel, Jörn

    2016-11-01

    Coherent, large scale dynamics in many nonequilibrium physical, biological, or information transport networks are driven by small-scale local energy input. We introduce and explore a generic model for compressible active flows on tree networks. In contrast to thermally-driven systems, active friction selects discrete states with only a small number of oscillation modes activated at distinct fixed amplitudes. This state selection can interact with graph topology to produce different localized dynamical time scales in separate regions of large networks. Using perturbation theory, we systematically predict the stationary states of noisy networks. Our analytical predictions agree well with a Bayesian state estimation based on a hidden Markov model applied to simulated time series data on binary trees. While the number of stable states per tree scales exponentially with the number of edges, the mean number of activated modes in each state averages 1 / 4 the number of edges. More broadly, these results suggest that the macroscopic response of active networks, from actin-myosin networks in cells to flow networks in Physarum polycephalum, can be dominated by a few select modes.

  19. Generalization of geometrical flux maximizing flow on Riemannian manifolds for improved volumetric blood vessel segmentation.

    PubMed

    Gooya, Ali; Liao, Hongen; Sakuma, Ichiro

    2012-09-01

    Geometric flux maximizing flow (FLUX) is an active contour based method which evolves an initial surface to maximize the flux of a vector field on the surface. For blood vessel segmentation, the vector field is defined as the vectors specified by vascular edge strengths and orientations. Hence, the segmentation performance depends on the quality of the detected edge vector field. In this paper, we propose a new method for level set based segmentation of blood vessels by generalizing the FLUX on a Riemannian manifold (R-FLUX). We consider a 3D scalar image I(x) as a manifold embedded in the 4D space (x, I(x)) and compute the image metric by pullback from the 4D space, whose metric tensor depends on the vessel enhancing diffusion (VED) tensor. This allows us to devise a non-linear filter which both projects and normalizes the original image gradient vectors under the inverse of local VED tensors. The filtered gradient vectors pertaining to the vessels are less sensitive to the local image contrast and more coherent with the local vessel orientation. The method has been applied to both synthetic and real TOF MRA data sets. Comparisons are made with the FLUX and vesselsness response based segmentations, indicating that the R-FLUX outperforms both methods in terms of leakage minimization and thiner vessel delineation.

  20. Momentum Flux Measuring Instrument for Neutral and Charged Particle Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chavers, Greg; Chang-Diaz, Franklin; Schafer, Charles F. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    An instrument to measure the momentum flux (total pressure) of plasma and neutral particle jets onto a surface has been developed. While this instrument was developed for magnetized plasmas, the concept works for non-magnetized plasmas as well. We have measured forces as small as 10(exp -4) Newtons on a surface immersed in the plasma where small forces are due to ionic and neutral particles with kinetic energies on the order of a few eV impacting the surface. This instrument, a force sensor, uses a target plate (surface) that is immersed in the plasma and connected to one end of an alumina rod while the opposite end of the alumina rod is mechanically connected to a titanium beam on which four strain gauges are mounted. The force on the target generates torque causing strain in the beam. The resulting strain measurements can be correlated to a force on the target plate. The alumina rod electrically and thermally isolates the target plate from the strain gauge beam and allows the strain gauges to be located out of the plasma flow while also serving as a moment arm of several inches to increase the strain in the beam at the strain gauge location. These force measurements correspond directly to momentum flux and may be used with known plasma conditions to place boundaries on the kinetic energies of the plasma and neutral particles. The force measurements may also be used to infer thrust produced by a plasma propulsive device. Stainless steel, titanium, molybdenum, and aluminum flat target plates have been used. Momentum flux measurements of H2, D2, He, and Ar plasmas produced in a magnetized plasma device have been performed.

  1. Modified kinetic flux vector splitting schemes for compressible flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yibing; Jiang, Song

    2009-06-01

    We investigate the traditional kinetic flux vector splitting (KFVS) and BGK schemes for the compressible Euler equations. First, based on a careful study of the behavior of the discrete physical variables across the contact discontinuity, we analyze quantitatively the mechanism of inducing spurious oscillations of the velocity and pressure in the vicinity of the contact discontinuity for the first-order KFVS and BGK schemes. Then, with the help of this analysis, we propose a first-order modified KFVS (MKFVS) scheme which is oscillation-free in the vicinity of the contact discontinuity, provided certain consistent conditions are satisfied. Moreover, by using piecewise linear reconstruction and van Leer's limiter, the first-order MKFVS scheme is extended to a second-order one, consequently, a nonoscillatory second-order MKFVS scheme is constructed. Finally, by combing the MKFVS schemes with the γ-model, we successfully extend the MKFVS schemes to multi-flows, and propose therefore a first- and second-order MKFVS schemes for multi-fluid computations, which are nonoscillatory across fluid interfaces. A number of numerical examples presented in this paper validate the theoretic analysis and demonstrate the good performance of the MKFVS schemes in simulation of contact discontinuities for both single- and multi-fluids.

  2. Flow regimes and mechanistic modeling of critical heat flux under subcooled flow boiling conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Corre, Jean-Marie

    Thermal performance of heat flux controlled boiling heat exchangers are usually limited by the Critical Heat Flux (CHF) above which the heat transfer degrades quickly, possibly leading to heater overheating and destruction. In an effort to better understand the phenomena, a literature review of CHF experimental visualizations under subcooled flow boiling conditions was performed and systematically analyzed. Three major types of CHF flow regimes were identified (bubbly, vapor clot and slug flow regime) and a CHF flow regime map was developed, based on a dimensional analysis of the phenomena and available data. It was found that for similar geometric characteristics and pressure, a Weber number (We)/thermodynamic quality (x) map can be used to predict the CHF flow regime. Based on the experimental observations and the review of the available CHF mechanistic models under subcooled flow boiling conditions, hypothetical CHF mechanisms were selected for each CHF flow regime, all based on a concept of wall dry spot overheating, rewetting prevention and subsequent dry spot spreading. It is postulated that a high local wall superheat occurs locally in a dry area of the heated wall, due to a cyclical event inherent to the considered CHF two-phase flow regime, preventing rewetting (Leidenfrost effect). The selected modeling concept has the potential to span the CHF conditions from highly subcooled bubbly flow to early stage of annular flow. A numerical model using a two-dimensional transient thermal analysis of the heater undergoing nucleation was developed to mechanistically predict CHF in the case of a bubbly flow regime. In this type of CHF two-phase flow regime, the high local wall superheat occurs underneath a nucleating bubble at the time of bubble departure. The model simulates the spatial and temporal heater temperature variations during nucleation at the wall, accounting for the stochastic nature of the boiling phenomena. The model has also the potential to evaluate

  3. INVESTIGATION OF HELICITY AND ENERGY FLUX TRANSPORT IN THREE EMERGING SOLAR ACTIVE REGIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Vemareddy, P.

    2015-06-20

    We report the results of an investigation of helicity and energy flux transport from three emerging solar active regions (ARs). Using time sequence vector magnetic field observations obtained from the Helioseismic Magnetic Imager, the velocity field of plasma flows is derived by the differential affine velocity estimator for vector magnetograms. In three cases, the magnetic fluxes evolve to pump net positive, negative, and mixed-sign helicity flux into the corona. The coronal helicity flux is dominantly coming from the shear term that is related to horizontal flux motions, whereas energy flux is dominantly contributed by the emergence term. The shear helicity flux has a phase delay of 5–14 hr with respect to absolute magnetic flux. The nonlinear curve of coronal energy versus relative helicity identifies the configuration of coronal magnetic fields, which is approximated by a fit of linear force-free fields. The nature of coronal helicity related to the particular pattern of evolving magnetic fluxes at the photosphere has implications for the generation mechanism of two kinds of observed activity in the ARs.

  4. Performance of a Cross-Flow Humidifier with a High Flux Water Vapor Transport Membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Ahluwalia, R. K.; Wang, X.; Johnson, W. B.; Berg, F.; Kadylak, D.

    2015-09-30

    Water vapor transport (WVT) flux across a composite membrane that consists of a very thin perfluorosulfonic acid (PFSA) ionomer layer sandwiched between two expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) microporous layers is investigated. Static and dynamic tests are conducted to measure WVT flux for different composite structures; a transport model shows that the underlying individual resistances for water diffusion in the gas phase and microporous and ionomer layers and for interfacial kinetics of water uptake at the ionomer surface are equally important under different conditions. A finite-difference model is formulated to determine water transport in a full-scale (2-m2 active membrane area) planar cross-flow humidifier module assembled using pleats of the optimized composite membrane. In agreement with the experimental data, the modeled WVT flux in the module increases at higher inlet relative humidity (RH) of the wet stream and at lower pressures, but the mass transfer effectiveness is higher at higher pressures. The model indicates that the WVT flux is highest under conditions that maintain the wet stream at close to 100% RH while preventing the dry stream from becoming saturated. The overall water transport is determined by the gradient in RH of the wet and dry streams but is also affected by vapor diffusion in the gas layer and the microporous layer.

  5. Performance of a cross-flow humidifier with a high flux water vapor transport membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahluwalia, R. K.; Wang, X.; Johnson, W. B.; Berg, F.; Kadylak, D.

    2015-09-01

    Water vapor transport (WVT) flux across a composite membrane that consists of a very thin perfluorosulfonic acid (PFSA) ionomer layer sandwiched between two expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) microporous layers is investigated. Static and dynamic tests are conducted to measure WVT flux for different composite structures; a transport model shows that the underlying individual resistances for water diffusion in the gas phase and microporous and ionomer layers and for interfacial kinetics of water uptake at the ionomer surface are equally important under different conditions. A finite-difference model is formulated to determine water transport in a full-scale (2-m2 active membrane area) planar cross-flow humidifier module assembled using pleats of the optimized composite membrane. In agreement with the experimental data, the modeled WVT flux in the module increases at higher inlet relative humidity (RH) of the wet stream and at lower pressures, but the mass transfer effectiveness is higher at higher pressures. The model indicates that the WVT flux is highest under conditions that maintain the wet stream at close to 100% RH while preventing the dry stream from becoming saturated. The overall water transport is determined by the gradient in RH of the wet and dry streams but is also affected by vapor diffusion in the gas layer and the microporous layer.

  6. Consistency between the flow at the top of the core and the frozen-flux approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whaler, K. A.; Holme, R.

    2007-12-01

    The flow just below the core-mantle boundary is constrained by the radial component of the induction equation. In the Alfvén frozen-flux limit, thought to be applicable to the outer core on the decade timescale of interest in geomagnetism, this gives a single equation involving the known radial magnetic field and its secular variation in two unknown flow components, leading to a severe problem of non-uniqueness. Despite this, we have two specific pieces of flow information which can be deduced directly from the frozen-flux induction equation: the component of flow perpendicular to null-flux curves, contours on which the radial magnetic field vanishes, and the amount of horizontal convergence and divergence at local extrema (maxima, minima and saddle points) of the radial magnetic field. To produce global velocity maps, we make additional assumptions about the nature of the flow and invert the radial induction equation for flow coefficients. However, it is not clear a priori that the flows thus generated are consistent with what we know about them along null-flux curves and at local extrema. This paper examines that issue. We look at typical differences between the null-flux curve perpendicular flow component, and convergence and divergence values at extrema, deduced directly from the induction equation and those from the inversions, investigate the effect of forcing the inversions to produce the correct null-flux curve and extremal values, and characterise the uncertainties on the various quantities contributing. Although the differences between the flow values from the induction equation directly and obtained by inversion seem large, and imposing the direct flow information as side constraints during inversion alters the flows significantly, we also show that these differences are within the likely uncertainties. Thus, we conclude that flows obtained through inversion do not contravene the specific flow information obtained directly from the radial induction

  7. NEW VACUUM SOLAR TELESCOPE OBSERVATIONS OF A FLUX ROPE TRACKED BY A FILAMENT ACTIVATION

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Shuhong; Zhang, Jun; Liu, Zhong; Xiang, Yongyuan E-mail: zjun@nao.cas.cn

    2014-04-01

    One main goal of the New Vacuum Solar Telescope (NVST) which is located at the Fuxian Solar Observatory is to image the Sun at high resolution. Based on the high spatial and temporal resolution NVST Hα data and combined with the simultaneous observations from the Solar Dynamics Observatory for the first time, we investigate a flux rope tracked by filament activation. The filament material is initially located at one end of the flux rope and fills in a section of the rope; the filament is then activated by magnetic field cancellation. The activated filament rises and flows along helical threads, tracking the twisted flux rope structure. The length of the flux rope is about 75 Mm, the average width of its individual threads is 1.11 Mm, and the estimated twist is 1π. The flux rope appears as a dark structure in Hα images, a partial dark and partial bright structure in 304 Å, and as a bright structure in 171 Å and 131 Å images. During this process, the overlying coronal loops are quite steady since the filament is confined within the flux rope and does not erupt successfully. It seems that, for the event in this study, the filament is located and confined within the flux rope threads, instead of being suspended in the dips of twisted magnetic flux.

  8. Internal filtration, filtration fraction, and blood flow resistance in high- and low-flux dialyzers.

    PubMed

    Schneditz, Daniel; Zierler, Edda; Vanholder, Raymond; Eloot, Sunny

    2014-01-01

    It was the aim to examine the fluid flow in blood and dialysate compartments of highly permeable hollow fiber dialyzers where internal filtration contributes to solute removal but where excessive filtration bears a risk of cell activation and damage. Flow characteristics of high- (HF) and low-flux (LF) dialyzers were studied in lab-bench experiments using whole bovine blood. Measurements obtained under different operating conditions and under zero net ultrafiltration were compared to theoretical calculations obtained from a mathematical model. Experimental resistances in the blood compartment were within ±2% of those calculated from the model when dialysate was used as a test fluid. With whole blood, the experimental resistances in the blood compartment were only 81.8 ± 2.8% and 83.7 ± 4.3% of those calculated for the LF and HF dialyzer, respectively. Surprisingly, measured blood flow resistance slightly but significantly decreased with increasing flow rate (p < 0.001). Mathematical modeling confirmed this decrease both in LF and HF dialyzers which was accompanied by a concomitant decrease in internal filtration fraction, while overall internal filtration increased. The increase in internal filtration when increasing blood flow is associated with a beneficial reduction in internal filtration fraction. Concerns of increased hemoconcentration when increasing blood flow therefore appear to be unwarranted.

  9. Explosive Flux Compression: 50 Years of Los Alamos Activities

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, C.M.; Thomson, D.B.; Garn, W.B.

    1998-10-18

    Los Alamos flux compression activities are surveyed, mainly through references in view of space limitations. However, two plasma physics programs done with Sandia National Laboratory are discussed in more detail.

  10. Explosive Flux Compression:. 50 Years of LOS Alamos Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fowler, C.; Thomson, D.; Garn, W.

    2004-11-01

    Los Alamos flux compression activities are surveyed, mainly through references in view of space limitations. However, two plasma physics programs done with Sandia National Laboratory are discussed in more detail.

  11. Effects of mass flow rate and droplet velocity on surface heat flux during cryogen spray cooling.

    PubMed

    Karapetian, Emil; Aguilar, Guillermo; Kimel, Sol; Lavernia, Enrique J; Nelson, J Stuart

    2003-01-07

    Cryogen spray cooling (CSC) is used to protect the epidermis during dermatologic laser surgery. To date, the relative influence of the fundamental spray parameters on surface cooling remains incompletely understood. This study explores the effects of mass flow rate and average droplet velocity on the surface heat flux during CSC. It is shown that the effect of mass flow rate on the surface heat flux is much more important compared to that of droplet velocity. However, for fully atomized sprays with small flow rates, droplet velocity can make a substantial difference in the surface heat flux.

  12. Dynamics of Magnetic Flux Tubes in an Advective Flow around a Black Hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deb, Arnab; Chakrabarti, Sandip Kumar; Giri, Kinsuk

    2016-07-01

    Magnetic fields cannibalized by an accretion flow would very soon have a dominant toroidal component. Without changing the topology, we study the movements of these flux tubes inside a geometrically thick advective disk which undergo centrifugal pressure supported shocks. We also consider the effects of the flux tubes on the flow. We use a finite element method (Total Variation Diminishing) for this purpose and specifically focussed whether the flux tubes contribute to changes in outflow properties in terms of its collimation and outflow rates. It is seen that depending upon the cross sectional radius of the flux tubes (which control the drag force), these field lines may move towards the central object or oscillate vertically before eventually escaping out of the funnel wall (pressure zero surface). These interesting results obtained with and without flux tubes point to the role the flux tubes play in collimation of jets and outflows.

  13. Flux Enhancement in Crossflow Membrane Filtration: Fouling and It's Minimization by Flow Reversal

    SciTech Connect

    Shamsuddin Ilias

    2005-08-04

    Fouling problems are perhaps the single most important reason for relatively slow acceptance of ultrafiltration in many areas of chemical and biological processing. To overcome the losses in permeate flux associated with concentration polarization and fouling in cross flow membrane filtration, we investigated the concept of flow reversal as a method to enhance membrane flux in ultrafiltration. Conceptually, flow reversal prevents the formation of stable hydrodynamic and concentration boundary layers at or near the membrane surface. Further more, periodic reversal of the flow direction of the feed stream at the membrane surface results in prevention and mitigation of membrane fouling. Consequently, these advantages are expected to enhance membrane flux significantly. A crossflow membrane filtration unit was designed and built to test the concept of periodic flow reversal for flux enhancement. The essential elements of the system include a crossflow hollow fiber membrane module integrated with a two-way valve to direct the feed flow directions. The two-way valve is controlled by a controller-timer for periodic reversal of flow of feed stream. Another important feature of the system is that with changing feed flow direction, the permeate flow direction is also changed to maintain countercurrent feed and permeate flows for enhanced mass transfer driving force (concentration difference). Three feed solutions (Bovine serum albumin (BSA), apple juice and citrus fruit pectin) were studied in crossflow membrane filtration. These solutes are well-known in membrane filtration for their fouling and concentration polarization potentials. Laboratory-scale tests on a hollow-fiber ultrafiltration membrane module using each of the feed solutes show that under flow reversal conditions, the permeate flux is significantly enhanced when compared with the conventional unidirectional flow. The flux enhancement is dramatic (by an order of magnitude) with increased feed concentration and

  14. The turbulent heat flux in low Mach number flows with large density variations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orourke, Peter J.; Collins, Lance R.

    1988-01-01

    A transport equation has been derived which is the difference between the volume- and mass-averaged velocities and is simply related to the turbulent heat flux phi sup h. Using this equation and an assumption analogous to the drift flux approximation of two-phase flow modeling, an algebraic closure relation for phi sup h that exibits fluxes due to directed transport proportional to -del anti p and due to gradient transport proportional to -del tau has been obtained.

  15. Magnetic Flux Transport and the Long-term Evolution of Solar Active Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ugarte-Urra, Ignacio; Upton, Lisa; Warren, Harry P.; Hathaway, David H.

    2015-12-01

    With multiple vantage points around the Sun, Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO) and Solar Dynamics Observatory imaging observations provide a unique opportunity to view the solar surface continuously. We use He ii 304 Å data from these observatories to isolate and track ten active regions and study their long-term evolution. We find that active regions typically follow a standard pattern of emergence over several days followed by a slower decay that is proportional in time to the peak intensity in the region. Since STEREO does not make direct observations of the magnetic field, we employ a flux-luminosity relationship to infer the total unsigned magnetic flux evolution. To investigate this magnetic flux decay over several rotations we use a surface flux transport model, the Advective Flux Transport model, that simulates convective flows using a time-varying velocity field and find that the model provides realistic predictions when information about the active region's magnetic field strength and distribution at peak flux is available. Finally, we illustrate how 304 Å images can be used as a proxy for magnetic flux measurements when magnetic field data is not accessible.

  16. MAGNETIC FLUX TRANSPORT AND THE LONG-TERM EVOLUTION OF SOLAR ACTIVE REGIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Ugarte-Urra, Ignacio; Upton, Lisa; Warren, Harry P.; Hathaway, David H.

    2015-12-20

    With multiple vantage points around the Sun, Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO) and Solar Dynamics Observatory imaging observations provide a unique opportunity to view the solar surface continuously. We use He ii 304 Å data from these observatories to isolate and track ten active regions and study their long-term evolution. We find that active regions typically follow a standard pattern of emergence over several days followed by a slower decay that is proportional in time to the peak intensity in the region. Since STEREO does not make direct observations of the magnetic field, we employ a flux-luminosity relationship to infer the total unsigned magnetic flux evolution. To investigate this magnetic flux decay over several rotations we use a surface flux transport model, the Advective Flux Transport model, that simulates convective flows using a time-varying velocity field and find that the model provides realistic predictions when information about the active region's magnetic field strength and distribution at peak flux is available. Finally, we illustrate how 304 Å images can be used as a proxy for magnetic flux measurements when magnetic field data is not accessible.

  17. Generalization of data on critical heat fluxes for flow swirled using a tape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krug, A. F.; Kuzma-Kichta, Yu. A.; Komendantov, A. S.

    2010-03-01

    The available data on critical heat fluxes for boiling of subcooled and saturated liquid in tubes with twisted tape inserts are considered. Experimental data obtained by different researchers are generalized, and an equation for calculating critical heat fluxes for both smooth tubes and tubes with flow swirling by means of a tape is proposed.

  18. FLUX ENHANCEMENT IN CROSSFLOW MEMBRANE FILTRATION: FOULING AND IT'S MINIMIZATION BY FLOW REVERSAL

    SciTech Connect

    Shamsuddin Ilias

    2002-03-14

    Fouling problems are perhaps the single most important reason for relatively slow acceptance of ultrafiltration in many areas of chemical and biological processing. To overcome the losses in permeate flux associated with concentration polarization and fouling in cross flow membrane filtration, we investigated the concept of flow reversal as a method to enhance membrane flux in ultrafiltration. Conceptually, flow reversal prevents the formation of stable hydrodynamic and concentration boundary layers at or near the membrane surface. Further more, periodic reversal of the flow direction of the feed stream at the membrane surface results in prevention and mitigation of membrane fouling. Consequently, these advantages are expected to enhance membrane flux significantly. A crossflow membrane filtration unit was designed and built to test the concept of periodic flow reversal for flux enhancement. The essential elements of the system include a crossflow hollow fiber membrane module integrated with a two-way valve to direct the feed flow directions. The two-way valve is controlled by a controller-timer for periodic reversal of flow of feed stream. Another important feature of the system is that with changing feed flow direction, the permeate flow direction is also changed to maintain countercurrent feed and permeate flows for enhanced mass transfer driving force (concentration difference). Bovine serum albumin (BSA) is a well-studied model solute in membrane filtration known for its fouling and concentration polarization capabilities. Laboratory-scale tests on a hollow-fiber ultrafiltration membrane module using BSA solution as feed show that under flow reversal conditions, the permeate flux is significantly enhanced when compared with the conventional unidirectional flow. The flux enhancement is dramatic (by an order of magnitude) with increased feed concentration and operating transmembrane pressure.

  19. FLUX ENHANCEMENT IN CROSSFLOW MEMBRANE FILTRATION: FOULING AND IT'S MINIMIZATION BY FLOW REVERSAL

    SciTech Connect

    Shamsuddin Ilias

    2005-01-25

    Fouling problems are perhaps the single most important reason for relatively slow acceptance of ultrafiltration in many areas of chemical and biological processing. To overcome the losses in permeate flux associated with concentration polarization and fouling in cross flow membrane filtration, we investigated the concept of flow reversal as a method to enhance membrane flux in ultrafiltration. Conceptually, flow reversal prevents the formation of stable hydrodynamic and concentration boundary layers at or near the membrane surface. Further more, periodic reversal of the flow direction of the feed stream at the membrane surface results in prevention and mitigation of membrane fouling. Consequently, these advantages are expected to enhance membrane flux significantly. A crossflow membrane filtration unit was designed and built to test the concept of periodic flow reversal for flux enhancement. The essential elements of the system include a crossflow hollow fiber membrane module integrated with a two-way valve to direct the feed flow directions. The two-way valve is controlled by a controller-timer for periodic reversal of flow of feed stream. Another important feature of the system is that with changing feed flow direction, the permeate flow direction is also changed to maintain countercurrent feed and permeate flows for enhanced mass transfer driving force (concentration difference). In this report, we report our application of Flow Reversal technique in clarification of apple juice containing pectin. The presence of pectin in apple juice makes the clarification process difficult and is believed to cause membrane fouling. Of all compounds found in apple juice, pectin is most often identified as the major hindrance to filtration performance. Based on our ultrafiltration experiments with apple juice, we conclude that under flow reversal conditions, the permeate flux is significantly enhanced when compared with the conventional unidirectional flow. Thus, flow reversal

  20. Transformed eddy-PV flux and positive synoptic eddy feedback onto low-frequency flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Hong-Li; Jin, Fei-Fei; Kug, Jong-Seong; Gao, Li

    2011-06-01

    Interaction between synoptic eddy and low-frequency flow (SELF) has been the subject of many studies. In this study, we further examine the interaction by introducing a transformed eddy-potential-vorticity (TEPV) flux that is obtained from eddy-potential-vorticity flux through a quasi-geostrophic potential-vorticity inversion. The main advantage of using the TEPV flux is that it combines the effects of the eddy-vorticity and heat fluxes into the net acceleration of the low-frequency flow in such a way that the TEPV flux tends to be analogous to the eddy-vorticity fluxes in the barotropic framework. We show that the anomalous TEPV fluxes are preferentially directed to the left-hand side of the low-frequency flow in all vertical levels throughout the troposphere for monthly flow anomalies and for climate modes such as the Arctic Oscillation (AO). Furthermore, this left-hand preference of the TEPV flux direction is a convenient three-dimensional indicator of the positive reinforcement of the low-frequency flow by net eddy-induced acceleration. By projecting the eddy-induced net accelerations onto the low-frequency flow anomalies, we estimate the eddy-induced growth rates for the low frequency flow anomalies. This positive eddy-induced growth rate is larger (smaller) in the lower (upper) troposphere. The stronger positive eddy feedback in the lower troposphere may play an important role in maintaining an equivalent barotropic structure of the low-frequency atmospheric flow by balancing some of the strong damping effect of surface friction.

  1. Transformed Eddy-PV Flux and Positive Synoptic Eddy Feedback onto Low-Frequency Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, H.; Jin, F.; Kug, J.; Gao, L.

    2010-12-01

    Interaction between synoptic eddy and low-frequency flow (SELF) has been the subject of many studies. In this study, we further examine the interaction by introducing a transformed eddy-potential-vorticity (TEPV) flux that is obtained from eddy-potential-vorticity flux through a quasi-geostrophic potential-vorticity inversion. The main advantage of using the TEPV flux is that it combines the effects of the eddy-vorticity and heat fluxes into the net acceleration of the low-frequency flow in such a way that the TEPV flux tends to be analogous to the eddy-vorticity fluxes in the barotropic framework. We show that the anomalous TEPV fluxes are preferentially directed to the left-hand side of the low-frequency flow in all vertical levels throughout the troposphere for monthly flow anomalies and for climate modes such as the Arctic Oscillation (AO). Furthermore, this left-hand preference of the TEPV flux direction is a convenient three-dimensional indicator of the positive reinforcement of the low-frequency flow by net eddy-induced acceleration. By projecting the eddy-induced net accelerations onto the low-frequency flow anomalies, we estimate the eddy-induced growth rates for the low frequency flow anomalies. This positive eddy-induced growth rate is larger (smaller) in the lower (upper) troposphere. The stronger positive eddy feedback in the lower troposphere may play an important role in maintaining an equivalent barotropic structure of the low-frequency atmospheric flow by balancing some of the strong damping effect of surface friction.

  2. FLUX ENHANCEMENT IN CROSSFLOW MEMBRANE FILTRATION: FOULING AND IT'S MINIMIZATION BY FLOW REVERSAL

    SciTech Connect

    Shamsuddin Ilias

    2004-06-14

    Fouling problems are perhaps the single most important reason for relatively slow acceptance of ultrafiltration in many areas of chemical and biological processing. To overcome the losses in permeate flux associated with concentration polarization and fouling in cross flow membrane filtration, we investigated the concept of flow reversal as a method to enhance membrane flux in ultrafiltration. Conceptually, flow reversal prevents the formation of stable hydrodynamic and concentration boundary layers at or near the membrane surface. Further more, periodic reversal of the flow direction of the feed stream at the membrane surface results in prevention and mitigation of membrane fouling. Consequently, these advantages are expected to enhance membrane flux significantly. A crossflow membrane filtration unit was designed and built to test the concept of periodic flow reversal for flux enhancement. The essential elements of the system include a crossflow hollow fiber membrane module integrated with a two-way valve to direct the feed flow directions. The two-way valve is controlled by a controller-timer for periodic reversal of flow of feed stream. Another important feature of the system is that with changing feed flow direction, the permeate flow direction is also changed to maintain countercurrent feed and permeate flows for enhanced mass transfer driving force (concentration difference). In our previous report, we reported our work on UF of BSA. In this report, we report our continuing application of Flow Reversal technique in clarification of apple juice containing pectin. The presence of pectin in apple juice makes the clarification process difficult and is believed to cause membrane fouling. Of all compounds found in apple juice, pectin is most often identified as the major hindrance to filtration performance. Laboratory-scale tests on a hollow-fiber ultrafiltration membrane module using pectin in apple juice as feed show that under flow reversal conditions, the

  3. Constraints on hydrothermal heat flux through the oceanic lithosphere from global heat flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stein, Carol A.; Stein, Seth

    1994-01-01

    A significant discrepancy exists between the heat flow measured at the seafloor and the higher values predicted by thermal models of the cooling lithosphere. This discrepancy is generally interpreted as indicating that the upper oceanic crust is cooled significantly by hydrothermal circulation. The magnitude of this heat flow discrepancy is the primary datum used to estimate the volume of hydrothermal flow, and the variation in the discrepancy with lithospheric age is the primary constraint on how the hydrothermal flux is divided between near-ridge and off-ridge environments. The resulting estimates are important for investigation of both the thermal structure of the lithosphere and the chemistry of the oceans. We reevaluate the magnitude and age variation of the discrepancy using a global heat flow data set substantially larger than in earlier studies, and the GDHI (Global Depth and Heat Flow) model that better predicts the heat flow. We estimate that of the predicted global oceanic heat flux of 32 x 10(exp 12) W, 34% (11 x 10(exp 12) W) occurs by hydrothermal flow. Approximately 30% of the hydrothermal heat flux occurs in crust younger than 1 Ma, so the majority of this flux is off-ridge. These hydrothermal heat flux estimates are upper bounds, because heat flow measurements require sediment at the site and so are made preferentially at topographic lows, where heat flow may be depressed. Because the water temperature for the near-ridge flow exceeds that for the off-ridge flow, the near-ridge water flow will be even a smaller fraction of the total water flow. As a result, in estimating fluxes from geochemical data, use of the high water temperatures appropriate for the ridge axis may significantly overestimate the heat flux for an assumed water flux or underestimate the water flux for an assumed heat flux. Our data also permit improved estimates of the 'sealing' age, defined as the age where the observed heat flow approximately equals that predicted, suggesting

  4. Organization of ice flow by localized regions of elevated geothermal heat flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pittard, M. L.; Galton-Fenzi, B. K.; Roberts, J. L.; Watson, C. S.

    2016-04-01

    The impact of localized regions of elevated geothermal heat flux on ice sheet dynamics is largely unknown. Simulations of ice dynamics are produced using poorly resolved and low-resolution estimates of geothermal heat flux. Observations of crustal heat production within the continental crust underneath the Lambert-Amery glacial system in East Antarctica indicate that high heat flux regions of at least 120 mW m-2 exist. Here we investigate the influence of simulated but plausible, localized regions of elevated geothermal heat flux on ice dynamics using a numerical ice sheet model of the Lambert-Amery glacial system. We find that high heat flux regions have a significant effect across areas of slow-moving ice with the influence extending both upstream and downstream of the geothermal anomaly, while fast-moving ice is relatively unaffected. Our results suggest that localized regions of elevated geothermal heat flux may play an important role in the organization of ice sheet flow.

  5. Groundwater Flow Field Distortion by Monitoring Wells and Passive Flux Meters.

    PubMed

    Verreydt, G; Bronders, J; Van Keer, I; Diels, L; Vanderauwera, P

    2015-01-01

    Due to differences in hydraulic conductivity and effects of well construction geometry, groundwater lateral flow through a monitoring well typically differs from groundwater flow in the surrounding aquifer. These differences must be well understood in order to apply passive measuring techniques, such as passive flux meters (PFMs) used for the measurement of groundwater and contaminant mass fluxes. To understand these differences, lab flow tank experiments were performed to evaluate the influences of the well screen, the surrounding filter pack and the presence of a PFM on the natural groundwater flux through a monitoring well. The results were compared with analytical calculations of flow field distortion based on the potential theory of Drost et al. (1968). Measured well flow field distortion factors were found to be lower than calculated flow field distortion factors, while measured PFM flow field distortion factors were comparable to the calculated ones. However, this latter is not the case for all conditions. The slotted geometry of the well screen seems to make a correct analytical calculation challenging for conditions where flow field deviation occurs, because the potential theory assumes a uniform flow field. Finally, plots of the functional relationships of the distortion of the flow field with the hydraulic conductivities of the filter screen, surrounding filter pack and corresponding radii make it possible to design well construction to optimally function during PFM applications.

  6. Simultaneous estimation of bidirectional particle flow and relative flux using MUSIC-OCT: phantom studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yousefi, Siavash; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2014-11-01

    In an optical coherence tomography (OCT) scan from a living tissue, red blood cells (RBCs) are the major source of backscattering signal from moving particles within microcirculatory system. Measuring the concentration and velocity of RBC particles allows assessment of RBC flux and flow, respectively, to assess tissue perfusion and oxygen/nutrition exchange rates within micro-structures. In this paper, we propose utilizing spectral estimation techniques to simultaneously quantify bi-directional particle flow and relative flux by spectral estimation of the received OCT signal from moving particles within capillary tubes embedded in tissue mimicking phantoms. The proposed method can be directly utilized for in vivo quantification of capillaries and microvessels. Compared to the existing methods in the literature that can either quantify flow direction or power, our proposed method allows simultaneous flow (velocity) direction and relative flux (power) estimation.

  7. SNS Sample Activation Calculator Flux Recommendations and Validation

    SciTech Connect

    McClanahan, Tucker C.; Gallmeier, Franz X.; Iverson, Erik B.; Lu, Wei

    2015-02-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) uses the Sample Activation Calculator (SAC) to calculate the activation of a sample after the sample has been exposed to the neutron beam in one of the SNS beamlines. The SAC webpage takes user inputs (choice of beamline, the mass, composition and area of the sample, irradiation time, decay time, etc.) and calculates the activation for the sample. In recent years, the SAC has been incorporated into the user proposal and sample handling process, and instrument teams and users have noticed discrepancies in the predicted activation of their samples. The Neutronics Analysis Team validated SAC by performing measurements on select beamlines and confirmed the discrepancies seen by the instrument teams and users. The conclusions were that the discrepancies were a result of a combination of faulty neutron flux spectra for the instruments, improper inputs supplied by SAC (1.12), and a mishandling of cross section data in the Sample Activation Program for Easy Use (SAPEU) (1.1.2). This report focuses on the conclusion that the SAPEU (1.1.2) beamline neutron flux spectra have errors and are a significant contributor to the activation discrepancies. The results of the analysis of the SAPEU (1.1.2) flux spectra for all beamlines will be discussed in detail. The recommendations for the implementation of improved neutron flux spectra in SAPEU (1.1.3) are also discussed.

  8. Flow Boiling Critical Heat Flux in Reduced Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mudawar, Issam; Zhang, Hui; Hasan, Mohammad M.

    2004-01-01

    This study provides systematic method for reducing power consumption in reduced gravity systems by adopting minimum velocity required to provide adequate CHF and preclude detrimental effects of reduced gravity . This study proves it is possible to use existing 1 ge flow boiling and CHF correlations and models to design reduced gravity systems provided minimum velocity criteria are met

  9. Coalescence of magnetic flux ropes observed in the tailward high-speed flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yan; Wang, Rongsheng; Lu, Quanming; Du, Aimin; Yao, Zhonghua; Wu, Mingyu

    2016-11-01

    We report a tailward high-speed flow event observed by Cluster during 0203:00UT-0205:30UT on 20 September 2003. Within the flows, a series of three bipolar Bz signatures were observed. The first and third bipolar Bz signatures are identified as magnetic flux ropes, while the middle one is found to result from the collision of the two flux ropes. A vertical thin current layer was embedded in the center of the middle bipolar Bz signature. Combining the plasma, electric field, and wave data around the thin current layer, we conclude that the two magnetic flux ropes were coalescing. The observations indicate that coalescence of magnetic flux ropes can happen in the regions away from reconnection site and can produce energetic electrons and waves. A basic criterion for identifying the coalescence in the magnetotail is proposed also.

  10. Solution of three-dimensional flow problems using a flux-spline method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karki, K.; Mongia, H.; Patankar, S.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reports the application of a flux-spline scheme to three-dimensional fluid flow problems. The performance of this scheme is contrasted with that of the power-law differencing scheme. The numerical results are compared with reference solutions available in the literature. For the problems considered in this study, the flux-spline scheme is significantly more accurate than the power-law scheme.

  11. Anomalous flux flow resistivity in the two-gap superconductor MgB2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibata, A.; Matsumoto, M.; Izawa, K.; Matsuda, Y.; Lee, S.; Tajima, S.

    2003-08-01

    The flux flow resistivity ρf associated with purely viscous motion of vortices in high-quality MgB2 was measured by microwave surface impedance. Flux flow resistivity exhibits unusual field dependence with strong enhancement at low field, which is markedly different to conventional s-wave superconductors. A crossover field which separates two distinct flux flow regimes having different ρf slopes was clearly observed in H‖ab plane. The unusual H dependence indicates that two very differently sized superconducting gaps in MgB2 manifest in the vortex dynamics and almost equally contribute to energy dissipation. The carrier scattering rate in two different bands is also discussed with the present results, compared to heat-capacity and thermal-conductivity results.

  12. Evidence of Twisted Flux-Tube Emergence in Active Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poisson, M.; Mandrini, C. H.; Démoulin, P.; López Fuentes, M.

    2015-03-01

    Elongated magnetic polarities are observed during the emergence phase of bipolar active regions (ARs). These extended features, called magnetic tongues, are interpreted as a consequence of the azimuthal component of the magnetic flux in the toroidal flux-tubes that form ARs. We develop a new systematic and user-independent method to identify AR tongues. Our method is based on determining and analyzing the evolution of the AR main polarity inversion line (PIL). The effect of the tongues is quantified by measuring the acute angle [ τ] between the orientation of the PIL and the direction orthogonal to the AR main bipolar axis. We apply a simple model to simulate the emergence of a bipolar AR. This model lets us interpret the effect of magnetic tongues on parameters that characterize ARs ( e.g. the PIL inclination and the tilt angles, and their evolution). In this idealized kinematic emergence model, τ is a monotonically increasing function of the twist and has the same sign as the magnetic helicity. We systematically apply our procedure to a set of bipolar ARs (41 ARs) that were observed emerging in line-of-sight magnetograms over eight years. For most of the cases studied, the tongues only have a small influence on the AR tilt angle since tongues have a much lower magnetic flux than the more concentrated main polarities. From the observed evolution of τ, corrected for the temporal evolution of the tilt angle and its final value when the AR is fully emerged, we estimate the average number of turns in the subphotospherically emerging flux-rope. These values for the 41 observed ARs are below unity, except for one. This indicates that subphotospheric flux-ropes typically have a low amount of twist, i.e. highly twisted flux-tubes are rare. Our results demonstrate that the evolution of the PIL is a robust indicator of the presence of tongues and constrains the amount of twist in emerging flux-tubes.

  13. Modeling of Fluctuating Mass Flux in Variable Density Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    So, R. M. C.; Mongia, H. C.; Nikjooy, M.

    1983-01-01

    The approach solves for both Reynolds and Favre averaged quantities and calculates the scalar pdf. Turbulent models used to close the governing equations are formulated to account for complex mixing and variable density effects. In addition, turbulent mass diffusivities are not assumed to be in constant proportion to turbulent momentum diffusivities. The governing equations are solved by a combination of finite-difference technique and Monte-Carlo simulation. Some preliminary results on simple variable density shear flows are presented. The differences between these results and those obtained using conventional models are discussed.

  14. Crossing turbulent boundaries: interfacial flux in environmental flows.

    PubMed

    Grant, Stanley B; Marusic, Ivan

    2011-09-01

    Advances in the visualization and prediction of turbulence are shedding new light on mass transfer in the turbulent boundary layer. These discoveries have important implications for many topics in environmental science and engineering, from the transport of earth-warming CO2 across the sea-air interface, to nutrient processing and sediment erosion in rivers, lakes, and the ocean, to pollutant removal in water and wastewater treatment systems. In this article we outline current understanding of turbulent boundary layer flows, with particular focus on coherent turbulence and its impact on mass transport across the sediment-water interface in marine and freshwater systems.

  15. Influence of heat and mass flux conditions in hydromagnetic flow of Jeffrey nanofluid

    SciTech Connect

    Abbasi, F. M.; Shehzad, S. A.; Hayat, T.; Alsaedi, A.; Obid, Mustafa A.

    2015-03-15

    This article explores the hydromagnetic steady flow of Jeffrey fluid in the presence of thermal radiation. The chosen nanofluid model takes into account the Brownian motion and thermophoresis effects. Flow and heat transfer characteristics are determined by a stretching surface with flux conditions. The nonlinear boundary layer flow through partial differential systems is converted into the ordinary differential systems. The resulting reduced systems are computed for the convergent solutions of velocity, temperature and nanoparticle concentration. Graphs of dimensionless temperature and nanoparticle concentration profiles are presented for different values of emerging parameters. Skin-friction coefficient are computed and analyzed in both hydrodynamic and hydromagnetic flow situations.

  16. Numerical simulations of active region scale flux emergence: From spot formation to decay

    SciTech Connect

    Rempel, M.; Cheung, M. C. M.

    2014-04-20

    We present numerical simulations of active region scale flux emergence covering a time span of up to 6 days. Flux emergence is driven by a bottom boundary condition that advects a semi-torus of magnetic field with 1.7 × 10{sup 22} Mx flux into the computational domain. The simulations show that, even in the absence of twist, the magnetic flux is able the rise through the upper 15.5 Mm of the convection zone and emerge into the photosphere to form spots. We find that spot formation is sensitive to the persistence of upflows at the bottom boundary footpoints, i.e., a continuing upflow would prevent spot formation. In addition, the presence of a torus-aligned flow (such flow into the retrograde direction is expected from angular momentum conservation during the rise of flux ropes through the convection zone) leads to a significant asymmetry between the pair of spots, with the spot corresponding to the leading spot on the Sun being more axisymmetric and coherent, but also forming with a delay relative to the following spot. The spot formation phase transitions directly into a decay phase. Subsurface flows fragment the magnetic field and lead to intrusions of almost field free plasma underneath the photosphere. When such intrusions reach photospheric layers, the spot fragments. The timescale for spot decay is comparable to the longest convective timescales present in the simulation domain. We find that the dispersal of flux from a simulated spot in the first two days of the decay phase is consistent with self-similar decay by turbulent diffusion.

  17. Magnetospheric plasma flows associated with boundary waves and flux transfer events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sibeck, D. G.; Smith, M. F.

    1992-01-01

    We describe plasma flow perturbations in the outer magnetosphere during the passage of magnetopause boundary waves and cylindrically shaped flux transfer events (FTEs). Spacecraft which remain within the magnetosphere observe bipolar flows normal to the nominal magnetopause accompanied by flows nearly opposite to the direction of boundary wave and/or FTE motion. Flows are generally discontinuous across FTE and magnetopause boundaries, with reversals in the component of flow tangential to the nominal magnetopause expected during all magnetopause crossings and some entries into FTEs. No bipolar flows normal to the nominal magnetopause occur within FTEs unless they rotate and none occur in the magnetosheath unless the boundary waves propagate relative to the magnetosheath flow. IRM satellite observations on October 28, 1984 may be interpreted either in terms of FTEs or boundary waves.

  18. Up-gradient particle flux in a drift wave-zonal flow system

    SciTech Connect

    Cui, L.; Tynan, G. R.; Thakur, S. C.; Diamond, P. H.; Brandt, C.

    2015-05-15

    We report a net inward, up-gradient turbulent particle flux in a cylindrical plasma when collisional drift waves generate a sufficiently strong sheared azimuthal flow that drives positive (negative) density fluctuations up (down) the background density gradient, resulting in a steepening of the mean density gradient. The results show the existence of a saturation mechanism for drift-turbulence driven sheared flows that can cause up-gradient particle transport and density profile steepening.

  19. Modeling the Subsurface Evolution of Active-Region Flux Tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Y.

    2009-12-01

    I present results from a set of 3-D spherical-shell MHD simulations of the buoyant rise of active region flux tubes in the solar interior that put new constraints on the initial twist of the subsurface tubes in order for them to emerge with tilt angles consistent with the observed Joy's law for the mean tilt of solar active regions. Due to asymmetric stretching of the Ω-shaped tube by the Coriolis force, a field strength asymmetry develops with the leading side having a greater field strength and thus being more cohesive compared to the following side. Furthermore, the magnetic flux in the leading leg shows more coherent values of local twist α ≡ JB / B2, whereas the values in the following leg show large fluctuations and are of mixed signs.

  20. A Comparative Study for Flow of Viscoelastic Fluids with Cattaneo-Christov Heat Flux

    PubMed Central

    Hayat, Tasawar; Muhammad, Taseer; Alsaedi, Ahmed; Mustafa, Meraj

    2016-01-01

    This article examines the impact of Cattaneo-Christov heat flux in flows of viscoelastic fluids. Flow is generated by a linear stretching sheet. Influence of thermal relaxation time in the considered heat flux is seen. Mathematical formulation is presented for the boundary layer approach. Suitable transformations lead to a nonlinear differential system. Convergent series solutions of velocity and temperature are achieved. Impacts of various influential parameters on the velocity and temperature are sketched and discussed. Numerical computations are also performed for the skin friction coefficient and heat transfer rate. Our findings reveal that the temperature profile has an inverse relationship with the thermal relaxation parameter and the Prandtl number. Further the temperature profile and thermal boundary layer thickness are lower for Cattaneo-Christov heat flux model in comparison to the classical Fourier’s law of heat conduction. PMID:27176779

  1. Measurements of turbulent boundary layer flow and surface fluxes over roughness and temperature transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markfort, Corey; Zhang, Wei; Porte-Agel, Fernando

    2016-11-01

    Often natural and engineered surfaces have spatially heterogeneous properties at a variety of scales that affect the structure of the turbulent boundary layer, which is no longer in equilibrium with the local surface. Predicting the spatial distributions of surface momentum and scalar fluxes over heterogeneous surfaces remains a challenge. We present measurements made in a thermally stratified boundary layer wind tunnel to characterize the turbulent flow and surface fluxes for abrupt transitions in surface temperature and roughness. We compare the development of internal boundary layers for momentum and heat, and associated mean surface flux for two cases. The first is a smooth boundary layer with an abrupt change in surface temperature and the second also involves a change from a fully rough to a smooth wall. The effects of roughness change on surface heat flux and implications for prediction are examined. The data will be compared to typical models that utilize Monin-Obukhov similarity theory.

  2. DYNAMIC COUPLING OF CONVECTIVE FLOWS AND MAGNETIC FIELD DURING FLUX EMERGENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Fang Fang; Manchester IV, Ward; Van der Holst, Bart; Abbett, William P.

    2012-01-20

    We simulate the buoyant rise of a magnetic flux rope from the solar convection zone into the corona to better understand the energetic coupling of the solar interior to the corona. The magnetohydrodynamic model addresses the physics of radiative cooling, coronal heating, and ionization, which allow us to produce a more realistic model of the solar atmosphere. The simulation illustrates the process by which magnetic flux emerges at the photosphere and coalesces to form two large concentrations of opposite polarities. We find that the large-scale convective motion in the convection zone is critical to form and maintain sunspots, while the horizontal converging flows in the near-surface layer prevent the concentrated polarities from separating. The footpoints of the sunspots in the convection zone exhibit a coherent rotation motion, resulting in the increasing helicity of the coronal field. Here, the local configuration of the convection causes the convergence of opposite polarities of magnetic flux with a shearing flow along the polarity inversion line. During the rising of the flux rope, the magnetic energy is first injected through the photosphere by the emergence, followed by energy transport by horizontal flows, after which the energy is subducted back to the convection zone by the submerging flows.

  3. Flux-tube geometry and solar wind speed during an activity cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinto, R. F.; Brun, A. S.; Rouillard, A. P.

    2016-07-01

    Context. The solar wind speed at 1 AU shows cyclic variations in latitude and in time which reflect the evolution of the global background magnetic field during the activity cycle. It is commonly accepted that the terminal (asymptotic) wind speed in a given magnetic flux-tube is generally anti-correlated with its total expansion ratio, which motivated the definition of widely used semi-empirical scaling laws relating one to the other. In practice, such scaling laws require ad hoc corrections (especially for the slow wind in the vicinities of streamer/coronal hole boundaries) and empirical fits to in situ spacecraft data. A predictive law based solely on physical principles is still missing. Aims: We test whether the flux-tube expansion is the controlling factor of the wind speed at all phases of the cycle and at all latitudes (close to and far from streamer boundaries) using a very large sample of wind-carrying open magnetic flux-tubes. We furthermore search for additional physical parameters based on the geometry of the coronal magnetic field which have an influence on the terminal wind flow speed. Methods: We use numerical magneto-hydrodynamical simulations of the corona and wind coupled to a dynamo model to determine the properties of the coronal magnetic field and of the wind velocity (as a function of time and latitude) during a whole 11-yr activity cycle. These simulations provide a large statistical ensemble of open flux-tubes which we analyse conjointly in order to identify relations of dependence between the wind speed and geometrical parameters of the flux-tubes which are valid globally (for all latitudes and moments of the cycle). Results: Our study confirms that the terminal (asymptotic) speed of the solar wind depends very strongly on the geometry of the open magnetic flux-tubes through which it flows. The total flux-tube expansion is more clearly anti-correlated with the wind speed for fast rather than for slow wind flows, and effectively controls the

  4. Gas Flux and Density Surrounding a Cylindrical Aperture in the Free Molecular Flow Regime

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soulas, George C.

    2011-01-01

    The equations for rigorously calculating the particle flux and density surrounding a cylindrical aperture in the free molecular flow regime are developed and presented. The fundamental equations for particle flux and density from a reservoir and a diffusely reflecting surface will initially be developed. Assumptions will include a Maxwell-Boltzmann speed distribution, equal particle and wall temperatures, and a linear flux distribution along the cylindrical aperture walls. With this information, the equations for axial flux and density surrounding a cylindrical aperture will be developed. The cylindrical aperture will be divided into multiple volumes and regions to rigorously determine the surrounding axial flux and density, and appropriate limits of integration will be determined. The results of these equations will then be evaluated. The linear wall flux distribution assumption will be assessed. The axial flux and density surrounding a cylindrical aperture with a thickness-to-radius ratio of 1.25 will be presented. Finally, the equations determined in this study will be verified using multiple methods.

  5. A novel heat flux study of a geothermally active lake - Lake Rotomahana, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tivey, Maurice A.; de Ronde, Cornel E. J.; Tontini, Fabio Caratori; Walker, Sharon L.; Fornari, Daniel J.

    2016-03-01

    A new technique for measuring conductive heat flux in a lake was adapted from the marine environment to allow for multiple measurements to be made in areas where bottom sediment cover is sparse, or even absent. This thermal blanket technique, pioneered in the deep ocean for use in volcanic mid-ocean rift environments, was recently used in the geothermally active Lake Rotomahana, New Zealand. Heat flow from the lake floor propagates into the 0.5 m diameter blanket and establishes a thermal gradient across the known blanket thickness and thereby provides an estimate of the conductive heat flux of the underlying terrain. This approach allows conductive heat flux to be measured over a spatially dense set of stations in a relatively short period of time. We used 10 blankets and deployed them for 1 day each to complete 110 stations over an 11-day program in the 6 × 3 km lake. Results show that Lake Rotomahana has a total conductive heat flux of about 47 MW averaging 6 W/m2 over the geothermally active lake. The western half of the lake has two main areas of high heat flux; 1) a high heat flux area averaging 21.3 W/m2 along the western shoreline, which is likely the location of the pre-existing geothermal system that fed the famous Pink Terraces, mostly destroyed during the 1886 eruption 2) a region southwest of Patiti Island with a heat flux averaging 13.1 W/m2 that appears to be related to the explosive rift that formed the lake in the 1886 Tarawera eruption. A small rise in bottom water temperature over the survey period of 0.01 °C/day suggests the total thermal output of the lake is ~ 112-132 MW and when compared to the conductive heat output suggests that 18-42% of the total thermal energy is by conductive heat transfer.

  6. Active Flow Control Activities at NASA Langley

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anders, Scott G.; Sellers, William L., III; Washburn, Anthony E.

    2004-01-01

    NASA Langley continues to aggressively investigate the potential advantages of active flow control over more traditional aerodynamic techniques. This paper provides an update to a previous paper and describes both the progress in the various research areas and the significant changes in the NASA research programs. The goals of the topics presented are focused on advancing the state of knowledge and understanding of controllable fundamental mechanisms in fluids as well as to address engineering challenges. An organizational view of current research activities at NASA Langley in active flow control as supported by several projects is presented. On-center research as well as NASA Langley funded contracts and grants are discussed at a relatively high level. The products of this research are to be demonstrated either in bench-top experiments, wind-tunnel investigations, or in flight as part of the fundamental NASA R&D program and then transferred to more applied research programs within NASA, DOD, and U.S. industry.

  7. Continuous monitoring of fluid flow rate and contemporaneous biogeochemical fluxes in the sub-seafloor; the Mosquito flux meter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Culling, D. P.; Solomon, E. A.; Kastner, M.; Berg, R. D.

    2013-12-01

    Fluid flow through marine sediments and oceanic crust impacts seawater chemistry as well as diagenetic, thermal, seismic, and magmatic processes at plate boundaries, creates ore and gas hydrate deposits at and below seafloor, and establishes and maintains deep microbial ecosystems. However, steady-state fluid flow rates, as well as the temporal and spatial variability of fluid flow and composition are poorly constrained in many marine environments. A new, low-cost instrument deployable by ROV or submersible, named the Mosquito, was recently developed to provide continuous, long-term and campaign style monitoring of fluid flow rate and contemporaneous solute fluxes at multiple depths below the sea floor. The Mosquito consists of a frame that houses several osmotic pumps (Osmo-Samplers [OS]) connected to coils of tubing that terminate with an attachment to long thin titanium (Ti) needles, all of which are mounted to a release plate. The OS's consist of an acrylic housing which contains a brine chamber (BC) and a distilled water chamber (DWC) separated by semi permeable membranes. The osmotic gradient between the chambers drives the flow of distilled water into the BC. The DWC is connected to the Teflon tubing coil and a Ti needle, both of which are also filled with distilled water, thus the OS pulls fluid from the base of the needle through the tubing coil. One central Ti needle is attached to a custom-made tracer injection assembly, filled with a known volume of tracer, which is triggered, injecting a point source in the sediment. On a typical Mosquito, 4 needles are mounted vertically at varying depths with respect to the tracer injection needle, and 4 needles are mounted at equal depth but set at variable horizontal distances away from the tracer injection. Once the Mosquito has been placed on the seafloor, the release plate is manually triggered pushing the Ti needles into the sediment, then the tracer injection assembly is actuated. As the tracer is advected

  8. 3D Laboratory Measurements of Forces, Flows, and Collimation in Arched Flux Tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haw, Magnus; Bellan, Paul

    2016-10-01

    Fully 3D, vector MHD force measurements from an arched, current carrying flux tube (flux rope) are presented. The experiment consists of two arched plasma-filled flux ropes each powered by a capacitor bank. The two loops are partially overlapped, as in a Venn diagram, and collide and reconnect during their evolution. B-field data is taken on the lower plasma arch using a 54 channel B-dot probe. 3D volumetric data is acquired by placing the probe at 2700 locations and taking 5 plasma shots at each location. The resulting data set gives high resolution (2cm, 10ns) volumetric B-field data with high reproducibility (deviation of 3% between shots). Taking the curl of the measured 3D B-field gives current densities (J) in good agreement with measured capacitor bank current. The JxB forces calculated from the data have a strong axial component at the base of the current channel and are shown to scale linearly with axial gradients in current density. Assuming force balance in the flux tube minor radius direction, we infer near-Alfvenic axial flows from the footpoint regions which are consistent with the measured axial forces. Flux tube collimation is observed in conjunction with these axial flows. These dynamic processes are relevant to the stability and dynamics of coronal loops. Supported provided by NSF, AFOSR.

  9. Underwater observations of active lava flows from Kilauea volcano, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tribble, G.W.

    1991-01-01

    Underwater observation of active submarine lava flows from Kilauea volcano, Hawaii, in March-June 1989 revealed both pillow lava and highly channelized lava streams flowing down a steep and unconsolidated lava delta. The channelized streams were 0.7-1.5 m across and moved at rates of 1-3 m/s. The estimated flux of a stream was 0.7 m3/s. Jets of hydrothermal water and gas bubbles were associated with the volcanic activity. The rapidly moving channelized lava streams represent a previously undescribed aspect of submarine volcanism. -Author

  10. A Prototype Flux-Plate Heat-Flow Sensor for Venus Surface Heat-Flow Determinations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, Paul; Reyes, Celso; Smrekar, Suzanne E.

    2005-01-01

    Venus is the most Earth-like planet in the Solar System in terms of size, and the densities of the two planets are almost identical when selfcompression of the two planets is taken into account. Venus is the closest planet to Earth, and the simplest interpretation of their similar densities is that their bulk compositions are almost identical. Models of the thermal evolution of Venus predict interior temperatures very similar to those indicated for the regions of Earth subject to solid-state convection, but even global analyses of the coarse Pioneer Venus elevation data suggest Venus does not lose heat by the same primary heat loss mechanism as Earth, i.e., seafloor spreading. The comparative paucity of impact craters on Venus has been interpreted as evidence for relatively recent resurfacing of the planet associated with widespread volcanic and tectonic activity. The difference in the gross tectonic styles of Venus and Earth, and the origins of some of the enigmatic volcano-tectonic features on Venus, such as the coronae, appear to be intrinsically related to Venus heat loss mechanism(s). An important parameter in understanding Venus geological evolution, therefore, is its present surface heat flow. Before the complications of survival in the hostile Venus surface environment were tackled, a prototype fluxplate heat-flow sensor was built and tested for use under synthetic stable terrestrial surface conditions. The design parameters for this prototype were that it should operate on a conforming (sand) surface, with a small, self-contained power and recording system, capable of operating without servicing for at least several days. The precision and accuracy of the system should be < 5 mW/sq m. Additional information is included in the original extended abstract.

  11. THE RISE OF ACTIVE REGION FLUX TUBES IN THE TURBULENT SOLAR CONVECTIVE ENVELOPE

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, Maria A.; Fan Yuhong; Miesch, Mark S.

    2011-11-01

    We use a thin flux tube model in a rotating spherical shell of turbulent convective flows to study how active region scale flux tubes rise buoyantly from the bottom of the convection zone to near the solar surface. We investigate toroidal flux tubes at the base of the convection zone with field strengths ranging from 15 kG to 100 kG at initial latitudes ranging from 1{sup 0} to 40{sup 0} with a total flux of 10{sup 22} Mx. We find that the dynamic evolution of the flux tube changes from convection dominated to magnetic buoyancy dominated as the initial field strength increases from 15 kG to 100 kG. At 100 kG, the development of {Omega}-shaped rising loops is mainly controlled by the growth of the magnetic buoyancy instability. However, at low field strengths of 15 kG, the development of rising {Omega}-shaped loops is largely controlled by convective flows, and properties of the emerging loops are significantly changed compared to previous results in the absence of convection. With convection, rise times are drastically reduced (from years to a few months), loops are able to emerge at low latitudes, and tilt angles of emerging loops are consistent with Joy's law for initial field strengths of {approx}>40 kG. We also examine other asymmetries that develop between the leading and following legs of the emerging loops. Taking all the results together, we find that mid-range field strengths of {approx}40-50 kG produce emerging loops that best match the observed properties of solar active regions.

  12. What Supergranule Flow Models Tell Us About the Sun's Surface Shear Layer and Magnetic Flux Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hathaway, David

    2011-01-01

    Models of the photospheric flows due to supergranulation are generated using an evolving spectrum of vector spherical harmonics up to spherical harmonic wavenumber l1500. Doppler velocity data generated from these models are compared to direct Doppler observations from SOHO/MDI and SDO/HMI. The models are adjusted to match the observed spatial power spectrum as well as the wavenumber dependence of the cell lifetimes, differential rotation velocities, meridional flow velocities, and relative strength of radial vs. horizontal flows. The equatorial rotation rate as a function of wavelength matches the rotation rate as a function of depth as determined by global helioseismology. This leads to the conclusions that the cellular structures are anchored at depths equal to their widths, that the surface shear layer extends to at least 70 degrees latitude, and that the poleward meridional flow decreases in amplitude and reverses direction at the base of the surface shear layer (approx.35 Mm below the surface). Using the modeled flows to passively transport magnetic flux indicates that the observed differential rotation and meridional flow of the magnetic elements are directly related to the differential rotation and meridional flow of the convective pattern itself. The magnetic elements are transported by the evolving boundaries of the supergranule pattern (where the convective flows converge) and are unaffected by the weaker flows associated with the differential rotation or meridional flow of the photospheric plasma.

  13. Comparisons of Earthward Poynting flux and the kinetic energy flux of up-flowing transversely heated ions from the Polar spacecraft on cusp magnetic field lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, S.; Wygant, J. R.; Cattell, C. A.; Scudder, J. D.; Mozer, F.; Russell, C. T.

    2013-12-01

    This paper presents estimates of the Poynting flux flowing along magnetic field lines in the Earth's cusp region over altitudes from 0.8 Re to 7 Re using measurements during several passes from the Polar spacecraft. The Poynting flux is calculated from measurements of electric fields from the University of California, Berkeley double probe electric field instrument, and from magnetic field measurements from the U.C.L.A. fluxgate magnetometer. The estimates of Poynting flux are of special interest because the high altitude mapping of the cusp magnetic flux tubes may connect to newly reconnected field lines and the low altitude mapping of these field lines is the scene of powerful acceleration processes, most notably transverse heating and outflow of ions. The data show that the Poynting flux is predominantly downward over the frequency range from 1 mHz to 1 Hz . This frequency range includes the Poynting flux due to steady state convection and field-aligned current systems, Alfven waves, and kinetic Alfven waves. Measurement of transversely heated ions over the energy ranges from 10 eV to several keV and their associated ion kinetic energy flux are presented from the University of Iowa Hydra instrument and compared to the values of the downward Poynting flux. Generally the downward Poynting flux exceeds the upward kinetic energy flux of the ions.

  14. Heat flux at the transition from harmonic to chaotic flow in thermal convection

    SciTech Connect

    Castillo, V.M.; Hoover, W.G.

    1998-09-01

    Numerical simulations of the fully compressible Navier-Stokes equations are used to study the transition from simple-periodic {open_quotes}harmonic{close_quotes} thermal convection to chaotic thermal convection as the Rayleigh number Ra is increased. The simulations suggest that a sharp discontinuity in the relationship between the Nusselt number Nu (the ratio of the total heat flux to the Fourier heat flux) and the Rayleigh number is associated with this transition in flow morphology. This drop in the Nusselt number is also seen in the data reported in independent experiments involving the convection of two characteristically different fluids{emdash}liquid mercury [Phys. Rev. E {bold 56}, R1302 (1997)] (a nearly incompressible fluid with Prandtl number Pr=0.024) and gaseous helium [Phys. Rev. A {bold 36}, 5870 (1987)] (a compressible fluid with unit Pr). The harmonic flow generates a dual-maximum (quasiharmonic) temperature histogram, while the chaotic flow generates a single-maximum histogram at the center point in the simulated cell. This is consistent with the temperature distributions reported for the convecting mercury before and after the drop in Nu. Our simulations also suggest a hysteresis in the Nu-Ra curve linking the two distinctly different flow morphologies, heat fluxes, and temperature-fluctuation histograms at the same Rayleigh number. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  15. Fluidic actuators for active flow control on airframe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schueller, M.; Weigel, P.; Lipowski, M.; Meyer, M.; Schlösser, P.; Bauer, M.

    2016-04-01

    One objective of the European Projects AFLoNext and Clean Sky 2 is to apply Active Flow Control (AFC) on the airframe in critical aerodynamic areas such as the engine/wing junction or the outer wing region for being able to locally improve the aerodynamics in certain flight conditions. At the engine/wing junction, AFC is applied to alleviate or even eliminate flow separation at low speeds and high angle of attacks likely to be associated with the integration of underwing- mounted Ultra High Bypass Ratio (UHBR) engines and the necessary slat-cut-outs. At the outer wing region, AFC can be used to allow more aggressive future wing designs with improved performance. A relevant part of the work on AFC concepts for airframe application is the development of suitable actuators. Fluidic Actuated Flow Control (FAFC) has been introduced as a Flow Control Technology that influences the boundary layer by actively blowing air through slots or holes out of the aircraft skin. FAFC actuators can be classified by their Net Mass Flux and accordingly divided into ZNMF (Zero Net Mass Flux) and NZNMF (Non Zero Net-Mass-Flux) actuators. In the frame of both projects, both types of the FAFC actuator concepts are addressed. In this paper, the objectives of AFC on the airframe is presented and the actuators that are used within the project are discussed.

  16. Spectropolarimetric Evidence for a Siphon Flow along an Emerging Magnetic Flux Tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Requerey, Iker S.; Ruiz Cobo, B.; Del Toro Iniesta, J. C.; Orozco Suárez, D.; Blanco Rodríguez, J.; Solanki, S. K.; Barthol, P.; Gandorfer, A.; Gizon, L.; Hirzberger, J.; Riethmüller, T. L.; van Noort, M.; Schmidt, W.; Martínez Pillet, V.; Knölker, M.

    2017-03-01

    We study the dynamics and topology of an emerging magnetic flux concentration using high spatial resolution spectropolarimetric data acquired with the Imaging Magnetograph eXperiment on board the sunrise balloon-borne solar observatory. We obtain the full vector magnetic field and the line of sight (LOS) velocity through inversions of the Fe i line at 525.02 nm with the SPINOR code. The derived vector magnetic field is used to trace magnetic field lines. Two magnetic flux concentrations with different polarities and LOS velocities are found to be connected by a group of arch-shaped magnetic field lines. The positive polarity footpoint is weaker (1100 G) and displays an upflow, while the negative polarity footpoint is stronger (2200 G) and shows a downflow. This configuration is naturally interpreted as a siphon flow along an arched magnetic flux tube.

  17. Intercalibration of a passive wind-vane flux sampler against a continuous-flow denuder for the measurements of atmospheric ammonia concentrations and surface exchange fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, B.; Wyers, G. P.; Nørnberg, P.; Nemitz, E.; Sutton, M. A.

    A passive wind-vane flux sampler is a simple low-cost device used to estimate long-term vertical fluxes of ammonia in the atmospheric surface boundary layer. The passive flux sampler measures the horizontal flux of ammonia. A vertical gradient of the horizontal flux, combined with micro-meteorological measurements of wind speed and temperature, is used to estimated the vertical flux of ammonia using a modified aerodynamic gradient technique. The passive wind-vane flux sampler gradient was calibrated against a gradient measured with fast response (6 min) continuous-flow denuders. The measurements were carried out at a heathland located in an intensive farming area in the centre of the Netherlands. A field campaign took place over 70 day period in the summer of 1996, during which the sampling periods of the passive wind-vane flux sampler varied between 3 and 9 days. The comparison clearly showed that the long-term measurements with the passive wind-vane flux samplers gave accurate average ammonia deposition values for the field campaign as a whole which deviated by only 18% from the reference flux. However, there was no significant correlation between the fluxes from the passive samplers and the reference method for the individual 10 periods which were compared. Possible explanations found for the lacking correlation were (I) a high percentage number of half-hour emission events within each period resulted in a significant large relative deviation between the fluxes, and (II) uncertainties in the reference method might also explain the lacking correlation. The passive wind-vane flux samplers proved to be a stable method for long-term measurements (months to years) due to a close to 100% optimal functioning during the field campaign.

  18. Importance of snowmelt-derived fluxes on the groundwater flow in a high elevation meadow (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowry, C.; Loheide, S. P.; Deems, J. S.; Moore, C. E.; Lundquist, J. D.

    2010-12-01

    In order to manage or restore riparian ecosystems in high elevation environments, under both current and future climatic conditions, we must have an understanding of both stream flow and groundwater dynamics. Seasonal changes in both stream flow and water table fluctuations in these environments are dependent on snowmelt-derived flux entering riparian zones from the larger watershed. Without reliable data, from field observations or numerical modeling, there is little chance of accurately quantifying changes in water table dynamics, surface inundation, soil moisture or stream stage, which are critical to riparian vegetation within these systems. In the work presented here, we show the impact of snowmelt-derived groundwater flux from the surrounding hillslopes on water table dynamics in Tuolumne Meadows, which is located in the Sierra Nevada Mountains of California, USA. Results show the importance of a combination of fluxes at the hillslope boundaries, snowmelt within the meadow and changes in the stream stage on water levels within the meadow. These results also demonstrate the importance of timing of groundwater flux entering the meadow as a result of spring snowmelt, which was observed to vary over 20 days based on the location, aspect, and local geology of the contributing area within the larger watershed. Identifying temporal and spatial variability in flux entering the meadow is necessary in order to simulate changes in water levels within the meadow. Caution must be taken when linking watershed scale models to local meadow scale models as results can vary significantly based on the temporal and spatial scales at which boundary fluxes are lumped. Without a clear hydrologic representation of snowmelt on the surrounding hillslopes, it is difficult to simulate groundwater dynamics within these riparian ecosystems with the accuracy necessary for understanding ecosystem response.

  19. Fluid fluxes from petrological record: links to mineral-fluid thermodynamics and implications for flow patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolejš, D.

    2012-04-01

    Fluid flow through the Earth's lithosphere is an inevitable consequence of fluid production during sediment compaction, prograde metamorphic reactions, and magmatic degassing, in settings ranging from subducting zones, continental crust underplating to shallow magma chambers. In addition, high buoyancy and low viscosity of aqueous fluid in a rock environment make flow universally viable and efficient. Fluids are not preserved in their pathways and much of their evidence including chemical composition is often retrieved from mineral mode, chemical, or isotopic variations. Several important links, advantages and artifacts arising from dimensional consistency and from correlations with mineral-fluid thermodynamics are worthy to revisit. The magnitude of fluid-rock interaction is measured by the fluid-rock ratio (mfl3 mr-3) or a time-integrated fluid flux (mfl3 mr-2). These two measures differ by mr, the characteristic distance of alteration or front propagation, parallel to the flow direction. As a consequence, the fluid-rock ratios depend on spatial relationships between flow direction, temperature- and pressure-gradient orientation, and alteration zone or vein geometry. The reservoir ratios, which are required in mass-balance or phase-equilibrium calculations, can still be unambiguously defined when the above variables are scaled to the flow direction. Gradients in mole amounts of reaction progress or mineral precipitated, n, per unit temperature or pressure are directly related to standard reaction enthalpy and volume, respectively. The effects of pressure are commonly assumed to be negligible. Systematic evaluation of mineral solubilities, however, reveals that (i) dn/dT is nearly identical for a variety of phases and from subduction to collisional geotherms but minerals dissolving into charged species exhibit higher solubilities, therefore, yield greater reaction progress and lower fluid fluxes along low-dT /dzgeotherms; (ii) during lateral (isobaric) flow, dn

  20. Transition region fluxes in A-F Dwarfs: Basal fluxes and dynamo activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walter, Frederick M.; Schrijver, Carolus J.; Boyd, William

    1988-01-01

    The transition region spectra of 87 late A and early F dwarfs and subgiants were analyzed. The emission line fluxes are uniformly strong in the early F stars, and drop off rapidly among the late A stars. The basal flux level in the F stars is consistent with an extrapolation of that observed among the G stars, while the magnetic component displays the same flux-flux relations seen among solar-like stars. Despite the steep decrease in transition region emission flux for B-V less than 0.28, C II emission is detected in alpha Aql (B-V = 0.22). The dropoff in emission is inconsistent with models of the mechanically generated acoustic flux available. It is concluded that, although the nonmagnetic basal heating is an increasingly important source of atmospheric heating among the early F stars, magnetic heating occurs in any star which has a sufficiently thick convective zone to generate acoustic heating.

  1. An improved flux-split algorithm applied to hypersonic flows in chemical equilibrium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, Grant

    1988-01-01

    An explicit, finite-difference, shock-capturing numerical algorithm is presented and applied to hypersonic flows assumed to be in thermochemical equilibrium. Real-gas chemistry is either loosely coupled to the gasdynamics by way of a Gibbs free energy minimization package or fully coupled using species mass conservation equations with finite-rate chemical reactions. A scheme is developed that maintains stability in the explicit, finite-rate formulation while allowing relatively high time steps. The codes use flux vector splitting to difference the inviscid fluxes and employ real-gas corrections to viscosity and thermal conductivity. Numerical results are compared against existing ballistic range and flight data. Flows about complex geometries are also computed.

  2. Nonlinear effects at high flux-flow electric fields.

    PubMed

    Huebener, R P

    2009-06-24

    Ohm's law with the linear relation between resistive voltage and electric current is strictly valid only in the limit of infinitesimally small voltages. On the other hand, at finite electric voltages nonlinearities in the electric resistance can develop due to the energy picked up by the charge carriers in the electric field. This can lead to important effects both in the case of semiconductors and of superconductors, where the energy rise of the charge carriers or the quasiparticles can become relatively large. In this paper we limit our discussion to the flux-flow voltage in the mixed state of a type-II superconductor. At sufficiently low temperatures the energy dependence of the quasiparticle density of states and, hence, of the quasiparticle scattering rate can cause distinct nonlinear effects in the flux-flow resistance. The recent advances in thin-film sample preparation provided new opportunities for observing nonlinear effects of the latter kind.

  3. Supersonic Mass Flux Measurements via Tunable Diode Laser Absorption and Non-Uniform Flow Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Leyen S.; Strand, Christopher L.; Jeffries, Jay B.; Hanson, Ronald K.; Diskin, Glenn S.; Gaffney, Richard L.; Capriotti, Diego P.

    2011-01-01

    Measurements of mass flux are obtained in a vitiated supersonic ground test facility using a sensor based on line-of-sight (LOS) diode laser absorption of water vapor. Mass flux is determined from the product of measured velocity and density. The relative Doppler shift of an absorption transition for beams directed upstream and downstream in the flow is used to measure velocity. Temperature is determined from the ratio of absorption signals of two transitions (lambda(sub 1)=1349 nm and lambda(sub 2)=1341.5 nm) and is coupled with a facility pressure measurement to obtain density. The sensor exploits wavelength-modulation spectroscopy with second-harmonic detection (WMS-2f) for large signal-to-noise ratios and normalization with the 1f signal for rejection of non-absorption related transmission fluctuations. The sensor line-of-sight is translated both vertically and horizontally across the test section for spatially-resolved measurements. Time-resolved measurements of mass flux are used to assess the stability of flow conditions produced by the facility. Measurements of mass flux are within 1.5% of the value obtained using a facility predictive code. The distortion of the WMS lineshape caused by boundary layers along the laser line-of-sight is examined and the subsequent effect on the measured velocity is discussed. A method for correcting measured velocities for flow non-uniformities is introduced and application of this correction brings measured velocities within 4 m/s of the predicted value in a 1630 m/s flow.

  4. Heat flux reduction mechanism induced by a combinational opposing jet and cavity concept in supersonic flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Wei; Jiang, Yan-ping; Yan, Li; Liu, Jun

    2016-04-01

    The thermal protection on the surface of hypersonic vehicles attracts an increasing attention worldwide, especially when the vehicle enters the atmosphere at high speed. In the current study, the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations coupled with the Menter's shear stress transport (SST) model have been employed to investigate the heat flux reduction mechanism induced by the variations of the cavity configuration, the jet pressure ratio and the injectant molecular weight in the combinational opposing jet and cavity concept. The length of the cavity is set to be 6 mm, 8 mm and 10 mm in order to make sure that the cavity configuration is the "open" cavity, and the jet pressure ratio is set to be 0.4, 0.6 and 0.8 in order to make sure that the flow field is steady. The injectant is set to be nitrogen and helium. The obtained results show that the aft angle of the cavity only has a slight impact on the heat flux reduction, and the heat flux peak decreases with the decrease of the length of the cavity. The design of the thermal protection system for the hypersonic blunt body is a multi-objective design exploration problem, and the heat flux distribution depends on the jet pressure ratio, the aft wall of the cavity and the injectant molecular weight. The heat flux peak decreases with the increase of the jet pressure ratio when the aft angle of the cavity is large enough, and this value is 45°.

  5. On the heat flux vector for flowing granular materials--part II: derivation and special cases

    SciTech Connect

    Massoudi, Mehrdad

    2006-09-10

    Heat transfer plays a major role in the processing of many particulate materials. The heat flux vector is commonly modelled by the Fourier's law of heat conduction and for complex materials such as non-linear fluids, porous media, or granular materials, the coefficient of thermal conductivity is generalized by assuming that it would depend on a host of material and kinematical parameters such as temperature, shear rate, porosity or concentration, etc. In Part I, we will give a brief review of the basic equations of thermodynamics and heat transfer to indicate the importance of the modelling of the heat flux vector. We will also discuss the concept of effective thermal conductivity (ETC) in granular and porous media. In Part II, we propose and subsequently derive a properly frame-invariant constitutive relationship for the heat flux vector for a (single phase) flowing granular medium. Standard methods in continuum mechanics such as representation theorems and homogenization techniques are used. It is shown that the heat flux vector in addition to being proportional to the temperature gradient (the Fourier's law), could also depend on the gradient of density (or volume fraction), and D (the symmetric part of the velocity gradient) in an appropriate manner. The emphasis in this paper is on the idea that for complex non-linear materials it is the heat flux vector which should be studied; obtaining or proposing generalized form of the thermal conductivity is not always appropriate or sufficient.

  6. Squeezed flow of a nanofluid with Cattaneo-Christov heat and mass fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muhammad, Noor; Nadeem, Sohail; Mustafa, Tahir

    In this article mathematical model is developed for squeezing flow of viscous fluid with heat and mass fluxes using Cattaneo-Christov theory. Characteristics of flow are explored with thermal and solutal stratification phenomena. Disturbance in the fluid is induced by a linear stretching sheet which is characterized by lower plate. The System of arising partial differential equations are reduced to a system of ordinary differential equations by utilizing suitable transformations. The graphical behavior of various parameters on velocity, temperature, and concentration distributions are analyzed and discussed. It is noted that thermal and solutal relaxation parameters result in the reduction of temperature and concentration distribution respectively.

  7. Unsteady flow of carbon nanotubes with chemical reaction and Cattaneo-Christov heat flux model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayat, Tasawar; Kiran, Asmara; Imtiaz, Maria; Alsaedi, Ahmed

    Present analysis examines boundary layer flow of carbon nanotubes over a curved stretching surface. Instead of classical Fourier law we employed Cattaneo-Christov heat flux theory. The heterogeneous reaction taking place on the wall surface are given by isothermal cubic autocatalytic kinetics. The homogeneous reaction occurring in the ambient fluid are governed by first order kinetics. Appropriate transformations are employed to obtain system of nonlinear ordinary differential equations. Convergent series solution are obtained. Single and multi wall carbon nanotubes are used. Water is taken as a base fluid. Fluid flow, temperature, concentration, skin friction coefficient and Nusselt number are examined and analyzed for different involved parameters.

  8. Application of a flux-split algorithm to chemically relaxing, hypervelocity blunt-body flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balakrishnan, A.

    1987-01-01

    Viscous, nonequilibrium, hypervelocity flow fields over two axisymmetric configurations are numerically simulated using a factored, implicit, flux-split algorithm. The governing gas-dynamic and species-continuity equations for laminar flow are presented. The gas-dynamics/nonequilibrium-chemistry coupling procedure is developed as part of the solution procedure and is described in detail. Numerical solutions are presented for hypervelocity flows over a hemisphere and over an axisymmetric aeroassisted orbital transfer vehicle using three different chemistry models. The gas models considered are those for an ideal gas, for a frozen gas, and for chemically relaxing air consisting of five species. The calculated results are compared with existing numerical solutions in the literature along the stagnation line of the hemisphere. The effects of free-stream Reynolds number on the nonequilibrium flow field are discussed.

  9. Measurements and computations of mass flow and momentum flux through short tubes in rarefied gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lilly, T. C.; Gimelshein, S. F.; Ketsdever, A. D.; Markelov, G. N.

    2006-09-01

    Gas flows through orifices and short tubes have been extensively studied from the 1960s through the 1980s for both fundamental and practical reasons. These flows are a basic and often important element of various modern gas driven instruments. Recent advances in micro- and nanoscale technologies have paved the way for a generation of miniaturized devices in various application areas, from clinical analyses to biochemical detection to aerospace propulsion. The latter is the main area of interest of this study, where rarefied gas flow into a vacuum through short tubes with thickness-to-diameter ratios varying from 0.015 to 1.2 is investigated both experimentally and numerically with kinetic and continuum approaches. Helium and nitrogen gases are used in the range of Reynolds numbers from 0.02 to 770 (based on the tube diameter), corresponding to Knudsen numbers from 40 down to about 0.001. Propulsion properties of relatively thin and thick tubes are examined. Good agreement between experimental and numerical results is observed for mass flow rate and momentum flux, the latter being corrected for the experimental facility background pressure. For thick-to-thin tube ratios of mass flow and momentum flux versus pressure, a minimum is observed at a Knudsen number of about 0.5. A short tube propulsion efficiency is shown to be much higher than that of a thin orifice. The effect of surface specularity on a thicker tube specific impulse was found to be relatively small.

  10. A comparison of sap flow and eddy fluxes of water vapor from a boreal deciduous forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hogg, Edward H.; Black, T. Andrew; den Hartog, Gerry; Neumann, Harold H.; Zimmermann, Reiner; Hurdle, Patrick A.; Blanken, Peter D.; Nesic, Zoran; Yang, Paul C.; Staebler, Ralf M.; McDonald, Kyle C.; Oren, Ram

    1997-12-01

    Water flux to the atmosphere was measured from a mature stand of aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx.) in Saskatchewan, Canada, as part of the Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS). Diurnal and seasonal changes in transpiration were monitored using two sap flow techniques and were compared against the difference between eddy correlation measurements of water vapor flux made above and below the aspen canopy. The three methods showed similar diurnal and seasonal trends in water flux, although sap flow lagged the eddy correlation measurements by about 1 hour diurnally due to changes in water storage within the trees. During the growing season, all methods showed a linear increase in midday transpiration with above-canopy vapor pressure deficit (VPD) up to ˜1 kPa, beyond which transpiration was relatively constant (VPD 1-2.5 kPa). A similar relationship was obtained when total daily transpiration was plotted against mean daytime VPD. The results are consistent with other observations that stomatal conductance of the aspen canopy decreases at high VPD. The complementary benefits of simultaneous monitoring of canopy transpiration by both eddy correlation and sap flow measurements are discussed.

  11. #FluxFlow: Visual Analysis of Anomalous Information Spreading on Social Media.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jian; Cao, Nan; Wen, Zhen; Song, Yale; Lin, Yu-Ru; Collins, Christopher

    2014-12-01

    We present FluxFlow, an interactive visual analysis system for revealing and analyzing anomalous information spreading in social media. Everyday, millions of messages are created, commented, and shared by people on social media websites, such as Twitter and Facebook. This provides valuable data for researchers and practitioners in many application domains, such as marketing, to inform decision-making. Distilling valuable social signals from the huge crowd's messages, however, is challenging, due to the heterogeneous and dynamic crowd behaviors. The challenge is rooted in data analysts' capability of discerning the anomalous information behaviors, such as the spreading of rumors or misinformation, from the rest that are more conventional patterns, such as popular topics and newsworthy events, in a timely fashion. FluxFlow incorporates advanced machine learning algorithms to detect anomalies, and offers a set of novel visualization designs for presenting the detected threads for deeper analysis. We evaluated FluxFlow with real datasets containing the Twitter feeds captured during significant events such as Hurricane Sandy. Through quantitative measurements of the algorithmic performance and qualitative interviews with domain experts, the results show that the back-end anomaly detection model is effective in identifying anomalous retweeting threads, and its front-end interactive visualizations are intuitive and useful for analysts to discover insights in data and comprehend the underlying analytical model.

  12. Thermal detection of flux-flow noise in type-II superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plaçais, B.; Simon, Y.

    1989-02-01

    In this paper we present an original method for the observation of flux-flow noise. A superconducting slab, placed in a normal magnetic field, and immersed in He II, constitutes one of the walls of a rectangular second-sound resonator. As is well known, the voltage observed in the flux-flow regime is noisy, due to irregularities in the vortex motion. Therefore, noise in Joule dissipation is expected to occur, making the slab act as a noisy second-sound transmitter. Second-sound noise is then amplified selectively on the different modes of the resonator, with amplitudes depending, in general, on the spatial distribution and coherence of the fluctuating heat sources on the sample. Thus careful and detailed second-sound analysis should provide valuable information on vortex motion and pinning, that is not necessarily given by the usual voltage noise measurements. Preliminary experiments reported in this paper are merely intended to demonstrate that we are able to detect and identify the thermal flux-flow noise, in spite of its minuteness (~10-15 W2/Hz), while obtaining reliable quantitative results.

  13. A flux monitoring method for easy and accurate flow rate measurement in pressure-driven flows.

    PubMed

    Siria, Alessandro; Biance, Anne-Laure; Ybert, Christophe; Bocquet, Lydéric

    2012-03-07

    We propose a low-cost and versatile method to measure flow rate in microfluidic channels under pressure-driven flows, thereby providing a simple characterization of the hydrodynamic permeability of the system. The technique is inspired by the current monitoring method usually employed to characterize electro-osmotic flows, and makes use of the measurement of the time-dependent electric resistance inside the channel associated with a moving salt front. We have successfully tested the method in a micrometer-size channel, as well as in a complex microfluidic channel with a varying cross-section, demonstrating its ability in detecting internal shape variations.

  14. Radon-222 activity flux measurement using activated charcoal canisters: revisiting the methodology.

    PubMed

    Alharbi, Sami H; Akber, Riaz A

    2014-03-01

    The measurement of radon ((222)Rn) activity flux using activated charcoal canisters was examined to investigate the distribution of the adsorbed (222)Rn in the charcoal bed and the relationship between (222)Rn activity flux and exposure time. The activity flux of (222)Rn from five sources of varying strengths was measured for exposure times of one, two, three, five, seven, 10, and 14 days. The distribution of the adsorbed (222)Rn in the charcoal bed was obtained by dividing the bed into six layers and counting each layer separately after the exposure. (222)Rn activity decreased in the layers that were away from the exposed surface. Nevertheless, the results demonstrated that only a small correction might be required in the actual application of charcoal canisters for activity flux measurement, where calibration standards were often prepared by the uniform mixing of radium ((226)Ra) in the matrix. This was because the diffusion of (222)Rn in the charcoal bed and the detection efficiency as a function of the charcoal depth tended to counterbalance each other. The influence of exposure time on the measured (222)Rn activity flux was observed in two situations of the canister exposure layout: (a) canister sealed to an open bed of the material and (b) canister sealed over a jar containing the material. The measured (222)Rn activity flux decreased as the exposure time increased. The change in the former situation was significant with an exponential decrease as the exposure time increased. In the latter case, lesser reduction was noticed in the observed activity flux with respect to exposure time. This reduction might have been related to certain factors, such as absorption site saturation or the back diffusion of (222)Rn gas occurring at the canister-soil interface.

  15. Transport coefficients and heat fluxes in non-equilibrium high-temperature flows with electronic excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Istomin, V. A.; Kustova, E. V.

    2017-02-01

    The influence of electronic excitation on transport processes in non-equilibrium high-temperature ionized mixture flows is studied. Two five-component mixtures, N 2 / N2 + / N / N + / e - and O 2 / O2 + / O / O + / e - , are considered taking into account the electronic degrees of freedom for atomic species as well as the rotational-vibrational-electronic degrees of freedom for molecular species, both neutral and ionized. Using the modified Chapman-Enskog method, the transport coefficients (thermal conductivity, shear viscosity and bulk viscosity, diffusion and thermal diffusion) are calculated in the temperature range 500-50 000 K. Thermal conductivity and bulk viscosity coefficients are strongly affected by electronic states, especially for neutral atomic species. Shear viscosity, diffusion, and thermal diffusion coefficients are not sensible to electronic excitation if the size of excited states is assumed to be constant. The limits of applicability for the Stokes relation are discussed; at high temperatures, this relation is violated not only for molecular species but also for electronically excited atomic gases. Two test cases of strongly non-equilibrium flows behind plane shock waves corresponding to the spacecraft re-entry (Hermes and Fire II) are simulated numerically. Fluid-dynamic variables and heat fluxes are evaluated in gases with electronic excitation. In inviscid flows without chemical-radiative coupling, the flow-field is weakly affected by electronic states; however, in viscous flows, their influence can be more important, in particular, on the convective heat flux. The contribution of different dissipative processes to the heat transfer is evaluated as well as the effect of reaction rate coefficients. The competition of diffusion and heat conduction processes reduces the overall effect of electronic excitation on the convective heating, especially for the Fire II test case. It is shown that reliable models of chemical reaction rates are of great

  16. Active combustion flow modulation valve

    DOEpatents

    Hensel, John Peter; Black, Nathaniel; Thorton, Jimmy Dean; Vipperman, Jeffrey Stuart; Lambeth, David N; Clark, William W

    2013-09-24

    A flow modulation valve has a slidably translating hollow armature with at least one energizable coil wound around and fixably attached to the hollow armature. The energizable coil or coils are influenced by at least one permanent magnet surrounding the hollow armature and supported by an outer casing. Lorentz forces on the energizable coils which are translated to the hollow armature, increase or decrease the flow area to provide flow throttling action. The extent of hollow armature translation depends on the value of current supplied and the direction of translation depends on the direction of current flow. The compact nature of the flow modulation valve combined with the high forces afforded by the actuator design provide a flow modulation valve which is highly responsive to high-rate input control signals.

  17. Stochastic cycle selection in active flow networks

    PubMed Central

    Woodhouse, Francis G.; Forrow, Aden; Fawcett, Joanna B.; Dunkel, Jörn

    2016-01-01

    Active biological flow networks pervade nature and span a wide range of scales, from arterial blood vessels and bronchial mucus transport in humans to bacterial flow through porous media or plasmodial shuttle streaming in slime molds. Despite their ubiquity, little is known about the self-organization principles that govern flow statistics in such nonequilibrium networks. Here we connect concepts from lattice field theory, graph theory, and transition rate theory to understand how topology controls dynamics in a generic model for actively driven flow on a network. Our combined theoretical and numerical analysis identifies symmetry-based rules that make it possible to classify and predict the selection statistics of complex flow cycles from the network topology. The conceptual framework developed here is applicable to a broad class of biological and nonbiological far-from-equilibrium networks, including actively controlled information flows, and establishes a correspondence between active flow networks and generalized ice-type models. PMID:27382186

  18. Stochastic cycle selection in active flow networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodhouse, Francis; Forrow, Aden; Fawcett, Joanna; Dunkel, Jorn

    2016-11-01

    Active biological flow networks pervade nature and span a wide range of scales, from arterial blood vessels and bronchial mucus transport in humans to bacterial flow through porous media or plasmodial shuttle streaming in slime molds. Despite their ubiquity, little is known about the self-organization principles that govern flow statistics in such non-equilibrium networks. By connecting concepts from lattice field theory, graph theory and transition rate theory, we show how topology controls dynamics in a generic model for actively driven flow on a network. Through theoretical and numerical analysis we identify symmetry-based rules to classify and predict the selection statistics of complex flow cycles from the network topology. Our conceptual framework is applicable to a broad class of biological and non-biological far-from-equilibrium networks, including actively controlled information flows, and establishes a new correspondence between active flow networks and generalized ice-type models.

  19. Horizontal Flows in the Photosphere and Subphotosphere of Two Active Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Yang; Zhao, Junwei; Schuck, P. W.

    2012-01-01

    We compare horizontal flow fields in the photosphere and in the subphotosphere (a layer 0.5 megameters below the photosphere) in two solar active regions: AR11084 and AR11158. AR11084 is a mature, simple active region without significant flaring activity, and AR11158 is a multipolar, complex active region with magnetic flux emerging during the period studied. Flows in the photosphere are derived by applying the Differential Affine Velocity Estimator for Vector Magnetograms (DAVE4VM) on HMI-observed vector magnetic fields, and the subphotospheric flows are inferred by time-distance helioseismology using HMI-observed Dopplergrams. Similar flow patterns are found for both layers for AR11084: inward flows in the sunspot umbra and outward flows surrounding the sunspot. The boundary between the inward and outward flows, which is slightly different in the photosphere and the subphotosphere, is within the sunspot penumbra. The area having inward flows in the subphotosphere is larger than that in the photosphere. For AR11158, flows in these two layers show great similarities in some areas and significant differences in other areas. Both layers exhibit consistent outward flows in the areas surrounding sunspots. On the other hand, most well-documented flux-emergence-related flow features seen in the photosphere do not have counterparts in the subphotosphere. This implies that the horizontal flows caused by flux emergence do not extend deeply into the subsurface.

  20. Modeling flow in nanoporous, membrane reservoirs and interpretation of coupled fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geren, Filiz

    The average pore size in unconventional, tight-oil reservoirs is estimated to be less than 100 nm. At this pore size, Darcy flow is no longer the dominating flow mechanism and a combination of diffusive flows determines the flow characteristics. Concentration driven self-diffusion has been well known and included in the flow and transport models in porous media. However, when the sizes of the pores and pore-throats decrease down to the size of the hydrocarbon molecules, the porous medium acts like a semi-permeable membrane, and the size of the pore openings dictates the direction of transport between adjacent pores. Accordingly, characterization of flow and transport in tight unconventional plays requires understanding of their membrane properties. This Master of Science thesis first highlights the membrane properties of nanoporous, unconventional reservoirs and then discusses how filtration effects can be incorporated into the models of transport in nanoporous media within the coupled flux concept. The effect of filtration on fluid composition and its impact on black-oil fluid properties like bubble point pressure is also demonstrated. To define filtration and filtration pressure in unconventional, tight-oil reservoirs, analogy to chemical osmosis is applied two pore systems connected with a pore throat, which shows membrane properties. Because the pore throat selectivity permits the passage of fluid molecules by their sizes, given a filtration pressure difference between the two pore systems, the concentration difference between the systems is determined by flash calculations. The results are expressed in the form of filtration (membrane) efficiency, which is essential parameter to define coupled fluxes for porous media flow.

  1. Simulation of three-component fluid flows using the multiphase lattice Boltzmann flux solver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Y.; Tang, G. H.; Wang, Y.

    2016-06-01

    In this work, we extend the multiphase lattice Boltzmann flux solver, which was proposed in [1] for simulating incompressible flows of binary fluids based on two-component Cahn-Hilliard model, to three-component fluid flows. In the present method, the multiphase lattice Boltzmann flux solver is applied to solve for the flow field and the three-component Cahn-Hilliard model is used to predict the evolution of the interfaces. The proposed method is first validated through the classical problem of simulation of partial spreading of a liquid lens between the other two components. Numerical results of interface shapes and contact angles agree well with theoretical solutions. After that, to further demonstrate the capability of the present method, several numerical examples of three-component fluid flows are presented, including a bubble rising across a fluid-fluid interface, single droplet falling through a fluid-fluid interface, the collision-coalescence of two droplets, and the non-contact collision of two droplets. It is shown that the present method can successfully handle complex interactions among three components.

  2. Analysis of cell flux in the parallel plate flow chamber: implications for cell capture studies.

    PubMed

    Munn, L L; Melder, R J; Jain, R K

    1994-08-01

    The parallel plate flow chamber provides a controlled environment for determinations of the shear stress at which cells in suspension can bind to endothelial cell monolayers. By decreasing the flow rate of cell-containing media over the monolayer and assessing the number of cells bound at each wall shear stress, the relationship between shear force and binding efficiency can be determined. The rate of binding should depend on the delivery of cells to the surface as well as the intrinsic cell-surface interactions; thus, only if the cell flux to the surface is known can the resulting binding curves be interpreted correctly. We present the development and validation of a mathematical model based on the sedimentation rate and velocity profile in the chamber for the delivery of cells from a flowing suspension to the chamber surface. Our results show that the flux depends on the bulk cell concentration, the distance from the entrance point, and the flow rate of the cell-containing medium. The model was then used in a normalization procedure for experiments in which T cells attach to TNF-alpha-stimulated HUVEC monolayers, showing that a threshold for adhesion occurs at a shear stress of about 3 dyn/cm2.

  3. Multidimensional directional flux weighted upwind scheme for multiphase flow modeling in heterogeneous porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, G.

    2012-12-01

    Multiphase flow modeling is an important numerical tool for a better understanding of transport processes in the fields including, but not limited to, petroleum reservoir engineering, remedy of ground water contamination, and risk evaluation of greenhouse gases such as CO2 injected into deep saline reservoirs. However, accurate numerical modeling for multiphase flow remains many challenges that arise from the inherent tight coupling and strong non-linear nature of the governing equations and the highly heterogeneous media. The existence of counter current flow which is caused by the effect of adverse relative mobility contrast and gravitational and capillary forces will introduce additional numerical instability. Recently multipoint flux approximation (MPFA) has become a subject of extensive research and has been demonstrated with great success in reducing considerable grid orientation effects compared to the conventional single point upstream (SPU) weighting scheme, especially in higher dimensions. However, the present available MPFA schemes are mathematically targeted to certain types of grids in two dimensions, a more general form of MPFA scheme is needed for both 2-D and 3-D problems. In this work a new upstream weighting scheme based on multipoint directional incoming fluxes is proposed which incorporates full permeability tensor to account for the heterogeneity of the porous media. First, the multiphase governing equations are decoupled into an elliptic pressure equation and a hyperbolic or parabolic saturation depends on whether the gravitational and capillary pressures are presented or not. Next, a dual secondary grid (called finite volume grid) is formulated from a primary grid (called finite element grid) to create interaction regions for each grid cell over the entire simulation domain. Such a discretization must ensure the conservation of mass and maintain the continuity of the Darcy velocity across the boundaries between neighboring interaction regions

  4. Structure of a magnetic flux annihilation layer formed by the collision of supersonic, magnetized plasma flows

    SciTech Connect

    Suttle, L. G.; Hare, J. D.; Lebedev, S. V.; Swadling, G. F.; Burdiak, G. C.; Ciardi, A.; Chittenden, J. P.; Loureiro, N. F.; Niasse, N.; Suzuki-Vidal, F.; Wu, J.; Yang, Q.; Clayson, T.; Frank, A.; Robinson, T. S.; Smith, R. A.; Stuart, N.

    2016-05-31

    We present experiments characterizing the detailed structure of a current layer, generated by the collision of two counter-streaming, supersonic and magnetized aluminum plasma flows. The anti parallel magnetic fields advected by the flows are found to be mutually annihilated inside the layer, giving rise to a bifurcated current structure—two narrow current sheets running along the outside surfaces of the layer. Measurements with Thomson scattering show a fast outflow of plasma along the layer and a high ion temperature (Ti~¯ZTe, with average ionization ¯Z=7). Lastly, analysis of the spatially resolved plasma parameters indicates that the advection and subsequent annihilation of the in-flowing magnetic flux determines the structure of the layer, while the ion heating could be due to the development of kinetic, current-driven instabilities.

  5. Structure of a magnetic flux annihilation layer formed by the collision of supersonic, magnetized plasma flows

    DOE PAGES

    Suttle, L. G.; Hare, J. D.; Lebedev, S. V.; ...

    2016-05-31

    We present experiments characterizing the detailed structure of a current layer, generated by the collision of two counter-streaming, supersonic and magnetized aluminum plasma flows. The anti parallel magnetic fields advected by the flows are found to be mutually annihilated inside the layer, giving rise to a bifurcated current structure—two narrow current sheets running along the outside surfaces of the layer. Measurements with Thomson scattering show a fast outflow of plasma along the layer and a high ion temperature (Ti~¯ZTe, with average ionization ¯Z=7). Lastly, analysis of the spatially resolved plasma parameters indicates that the advection and subsequent annihilation of themore » in-flowing magnetic flux determines the structure of the layer, while the ion heating could be due to the development of kinetic, current-driven instabilities.« less

  6. Neoclassical ion heat flux and poloidal flow in a tokamak pedestal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kagan, Grigory; Catto, Peter J.

    2010-05-01

    In the core of a tokamak, turbulent transport normally dominates over neoclassical. The situation could be different in a high confinement (or H) mode pedestal, where the former may be suppressed by a strongly sheared equilibrium electric field. On the other hand, this very field makes conventional neoclassical results inapplicable in the pedestal by significantly modifying ion drift orbits. We present the first calculation of the banana regime neoclassical ion heat flux and poloidal flow in the pedestal accounting for the strong E × B drift inherent to this tokamak region. Interestingly, we find that due to the electric field the pedestal poloidal ion flow can change its direction as compared with its core counterpart. This result elucidates the discrepancy between the conventional banana regime predictions and recent experimental measurements of the impurity flow performed at Alcator C-Mod.

  7. Increasing Binding Efficiency via Reporter Shape and Flux in a Viral Nanoparticle Lateral-Flow Assay.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jinsu; Vu, Binh; Kourentzi, Katerina; Willson, Richard C; Conrad, Jacinta C

    2017-02-15

    To identify factors controlling the performance of reporter particles in a sensitive lateral-flow assay (LFA), we investigated the effect of the flux and shape of filamentous bacteriophage (phage) on the performance of phage LFAs. Phage of three different lengths and diameters were modified with biotin and AlexaFluor 555 as binding and read-out elements, respectively. The binding efficiencies of the functionalized phage were tested in a fibrous glass LFA membrane modified with avidin. The total binding rate, quantified using real-time particle counting and particle image velocimetry, decreased monotonically with the average bulk flux of phage through the membrane. At the pore scale, more phage bound in regions with faster local flow, confirming that both average and local flux increased binding. The number of bound phage increased with the aspect ratio of the phage and scaled with the phage surface area, consistent with a binding interaction controlled by the number of recognition elements on the surface. Together, these results indicate that increasing the likelihood that recognition elements on the surface of phage encounter the fibers enhances the assay binding efficiency and suggests one origin for the improved performance of nonspherical phage reporters.

  8. Flux Transport Solar Dynamos with Shallow Meridional Flow and Turbulent Pumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandi, Dibyendu; Hazra, Soumitra

    2016-07-01

    The large-scale solar magnetic cycle is sustained by a dynamo mechanism in which the induction of the toroidal component of the magnetic field by differential rotation and the regeneration of the poloidal component are crucial processes. In the Sun, the Babcock-Leighton mechanism, i.e., the (near-surface) redistribution of the flux of tilted bipolar sunspot pairs is thought to be the main source of the solar poloidal field. The poloidal field so generated must be transported to the solar interior where the toroidal field is generated and stored - presumably near the base of the solar convection zone. Traditionally, flux transport dynamo models have relied on a deep meridional circulation to achieve this transport. However, recent observations claim that the meridional circulation could be much shallower that previously thought. We explore the question whether flux transport dynamos can function with a shallow meridional flow and present an alternative paradigm for flux transport dynamics in solar-stellar interiors sustained by turbulent pumping.

  9. Flux-Flow Oscillator (FFO) Made with the Fluxon Cloning Circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farhan-Hassan, H.; Gulevich, D. R.; Dmitriev, P. N.; Koshelets, V. P.; Kusmartsev, F. V.

    In present paper we have developed a new device, Flux-Flow Oscillator (FFO) where flux cloning phenomena have been demonstrated. Such FFO made with the use of flux cloning circuit can in principle operate even without magnetic field, that is in a very different manner than conventional FFO [1] developed nowadays for practical applications [2, 3]. We have designed such a novel device and build it up with the use of the long Josephson T-shaped junction of a linear overlap geometry made up with Nb-AlO x -Nb technology. We have theoretically described the properties of such a device and the dynamics of vortices there. These theoretical studies have been performed in the framework of a sine-Gordon model, which includes surface losses. Finally we have tested the device experimentally and demonstrated that the flux cloning can lead to a strong coherent terahertz radiation. There the shape of the spectral lines and the current-voltage characteristics have been also measured.

  10. A flux splitting method for the Baer-Nunziato equations of compressible two-phase flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokareva, S. A.; Toro, E. F.

    2016-10-01

    Here we extend the Toro-Vázquez flux vector splitting approach (TV), originally proposed for the ideal 1D Euler equations in [1], to the Baer-Nunziato equations of compressible two-phase flow. Following the TV approach we identify corresponding advection and pressure operators. We perform a rigorous analysis of the associated non-conservative pressure system and derive its complete characteristic structure. The choice of the advection numerical flux is obvious. For the pressure system, several schemes are presented. The complete schemes are then implemented in the setting of finite volume and path-conservative methods and are systematically assessed in terms of accuracy and efficiency, through a carefully selected suite of test problems. The presented schemes constitute a building block for the construction of high-order numerical methods for solving the Baer-Nunziato equations. Here, as an illustrative example of such possibility, we present the construction of a second-order scheme.

  11. Simulation of flux expulsion and associated dynamics in a two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandaru, Vinodh; Pracht, Julian; Boeck, Thomas; Schumacher, Jörg

    2015-08-01

    We consider a plane channel flow of an electrically conducting fluid which is driven by a mean pressure gradient in the presence of an applied magnetic field that is streamwise periodic with zero mean. Magnetic flux expulsion and the associated bifurcation in such a configuration are explored using direct numerical simulations (DNS). The structure of the flow and magnetic fields in the Hartmann regime (where the dominant balance is through Lorentz forces) and the Poiseuille regime (where viscous effects play a significant role) are studied, and detailed comparisons to the existing one-dimensional model of Kamkar and Moffatt (J Fluid Mech 90:107-122, 1982) are drawn to evaluate the validity of the model. Comparisons show good agreement of the model with DNS in the Hartmann regime, but significant differences arising in the Poiseuille regime when nonlinear effects become important. The effects of various parameters like the magnetic Reynolds number, imposed field wavenumber etc. on the bifurcation of the flow are studied. Magnetic field line reconnections occurring during the dynamic runaway reveal a specific two-step pattern that leads to the gradual expulsion of flux in the core region.

  12. Triggering an Eruptive Flare by Emerging Flux in a Solar Active-Region Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louis, Rohan E.; Kliem, Bernhard; Ravindra, B.; Chintzoglou, Georgios

    2015-12-01

    A flare and fast coronal mass ejection originated between solar active regions NOAA 11514 and 11515 on 2012 July 1 (SOL2012-07-01) in response to flux emergence in front of the leading sunspot of the trailing region 11515. Analyzing the evolution of the photospheric magnetic flux and the coronal structure, we find that the flux emergence triggered the eruption by interaction with overlying flux in a non-standard way. The new flux neither had the opposite orientation nor a location near the polarity inversion line, which are favorable for strong reconnection with the arcade flux under which it emerged. Moreover, its flux content remained significantly smaller than that of the arcade ({≈} 40 %). However, a loop system rooted in the trailing active region ran in part under the arcade between the active regions, passing over the site of flux emergence. The reconnection with the emerging flux, leading to a series of jet emissions into the loop system, caused a strong but confined rise of the loop system. This lifted the arcade between the two active regions, weakening its downward tension force and thus destabilizing the considerably sheared flux under the arcade. The complex event was also associated with supporting precursor activity in an enhanced network near the active regions, acting on the large-scale overlying flux, and with two simultaneous confined flares within the active regions.

  13. EMERGENCE OF HELICAL FLUX AND THE FORMATION OF AN ACTIVE REGION FILAMENT CHANNEL

    SciTech Connect

    Lites, B. W.; Kubo, M.; Berger, T.; Frank, Z.; Shine, R.; Tarbell, T.; Title, A.; Okamoto, T. J.; Otsuji, K.

    2010-07-20

    We present comprehensive observations of the formation and evolution of a filament channel within NOAA Active Region (AR) 10978 from Hinode/Solar Optical Telescope and TRACE. We employ sequences of Hinode spectro-polarimeter maps of the AR, accompanying Hinode Narrowband Filter Instrument magnetograms in the Na I D1 line, Hinode Broadband Filter Instrument filtergrams in the Ca II H line and G-band, Hinode X-ray telescope X-ray images, and TRACE Fe IX 171 A image sequences. The development of the channel resembles qualitatively that presented by Okamoto et al. in that many indicators point to the emergence of a pre-existing sub-surface magnetic flux rope. The consolidation of the filament channel into a coherent structure takes place rapidly during the course of a few hours, and the filament form then gradually shrinks in width over the following two days. Particular to this filament channel is the observation of a segment along its length of horizontal, weak (500 G) flux that, unlike the rest of the filament channel, is not immediately flanked by strong vertical plage fields of opposite polarity on each side of the filament. Because this isolated horizontal field is observed in photospheric lines, we infer that it is unlikely that the channel formed as a result of reconnection in the corona, but the low values of inferred magnetic fill fraction along the entire length of the filament channel suggest that the bulk of the field resides somewhat above the low photosphere. Correlation tracking of granulation in the G band presents no evidence for either systematic flows toward the channel or systematic shear flows along it. The absence of these flows, along with other indications of these data from multiple sources, reinforces (but does not conclusively demonstrate) the picture of an emerging flux rope as the origin of this AR filament channel.

  14. Tissue factor activity under flow.

    PubMed

    Diamond, Scott L

    2010-04-01

    Coagulation processes under flow conditions are fundamentally different when compared to whole blood clotting in a tube. Due to red blood cell migration toward the center of the vessel, platelet concentrations are elevated several-fold in the plasma layer near the wall or thrombus. Evaluation of platelet function, coagulation proteases, and pharmacological agents can utilize closed systems of constant volume that lack flow (eg. intracellular calcium measurement, automated calibrated thrombography) or include flow (eg. aggregometry or cone-and-plate viscometry). However, these laboratory approaches fail to recreate the fact that intravascular thrombosis is an open system where blood is continually flowing over a thrombotic site. In open systems, the rapid accumulation of platelets at a surface leads to platelet concentrations greatly exceeding those found in whole blood and the delivery/removal of species by convection may impact the efficacy of pharmacological agents. During a clotting event under flow, platelets can accumulate via adhesion receptors to concentrations that are 10 to 50-fold higher than that of platelet-rich plasma. Using controlled in vitro perfusions of whole blood, it is possible to determine the critical level of surface tissue factor needed to trigger full scale coagulation on collagen. Such in vitro perfusion systems also allow a determination of the potency of anti-platelet agents as a function of wall shear rate.

  15. Steel slag carbonation in a flow-through reactor system: the role of fluid-flux.

    PubMed

    Berryman, Eleanor J; Williams-Jones, Anthony E; Migdisov, Artashes A

    2015-01-01

    Steel production is currently the largest industrial source of atmospheric CO2. As annual steel production continues to grow, the need for effective methods of reducing its carbon footprint increases correspondingly. The carbonation of the calcium-bearing phases in steel slag generated during basic oxygen furnace (BOF) steel production, in particular its major constituent, larnite {Ca2SiO4}, which is a structural analogue of olivine {(MgFe)2SiO4}, the main mineral subjected to natural carbonation in peridotites, offers the potential to offset some of these emissions. However, the controls on the nature and efficiency of steel slag carbonation are yet to be completely understood. Experiments were conducted exposing steel slag grains to a CO2-H2O mixture in both batch and flow-through reactors to investigate the impact of temperature, fluid flux, and reaction gradient on the dissolution and carbonation of steel slag. The results of these experiments show that dissolution and carbonation of BOF steel slag are more efficient in a flow-through reactor than in the batch reactors used in most previous studies. Moreover, they show that fluid flux needs to be optimized in addition to grain size, pressure, and temperature, in order to maximize the efficiency of carbonation. Based on these results, a two-stage reactor consisting of a high and a low fluid-flux chamber is proposed for CO2 sequestration by steel slag carbonation, allowing dissolution of the slag and precipitation of calcium carbonate to occur within a single flow-through system.

  16. High active nitrogen flux growth of GaN by plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    McSkimming, Brian M. Speck, James S.; Chaix, Catherine

    2015-09-15

    In the present study, the authors report on a modified Riber radio frequency (RF) nitrogen plasma source that provides active nitrogen fluxes more than 30 times higher than those commonly used for plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy (PAMBE) growth of gallium nitride (GaN) and thus a significantly higher growth rate than has been previously reported. GaN films were grown using N{sub 2} gas flow rates between 5 and 25 sccm while varying the plasma source's RF forward power from 200 to 600 W. The highest growth rate, and therefore the highest active nitrogen flux, achieved was ∼7.6 μm/h. For optimized growth conditions, the surfaces displayed a clear step-terrace structure with an average RMS roughness (3 × 3 μm) on the order of 1 nm. Secondary ion mass spectroscopy impurity analysis demonstrates oxygen and hydrogen incorporation of 1 × 10{sup 16} and ∼5 × 10{sup 17}, respectively. In addition, the authors have achieved PAMBE growth of GaN at a substrate temperature more than 150 °C greater than our standard Ga rich GaN growth regime and ∼100 °C greater than any previously reported PAMBE growth of GaN. This growth temperature corresponds to GaN decomposition in vacuum of more than 20 nm/min; a regime previously unattainable with conventional nitrogen plasma sources. Arrhenius analysis of the decomposition rate shows that samples with a flux ratio below stoichiometry have an activation energy greater than decomposition of GaN in vacuum while samples grown at or above stoichiometry have decreased activation energy. The activation energy of decomposition for GaN in vacuum was previously determined to be ∼3.1 eV. For a Ga/N flux ratio of ∼1.5, this activation energy was found to be ∼2.8 eV, while for a Ga/N flux ratio of ∼0.5, it was found to be ∼7.9 eV.

  17. Study of Critical Heat Flux Mechanism in Flow Boiling Using Bubble Crowding Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinoshita, Hidetaka; Nariai, Hideki; Inasaka, Fujio

    Critical heat flux (CHF) of Subcooled Flow Boiling with water in a tube was investigated from the viewpoint of mechanistic models. The Weisman-Pei bubble crowding model was selected to predict CHF in a short tube and in a tube with an internal twisted tape under nonuniform heating conditions, Based on the results of bubble behavior observation and preliminary analysis. The original Weisman-Pei model was modified in order to explain the physical phenomena of CHF. The modified model predicted well CHF in a smooth tube including the very short tube and the tube with an internal twisted tape under uniform and nonuniform heating conditions.

  18. Flow between two stretchable rotating disks with Cattaneo-Christov heat flux model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayat, Tasawar; Qayyum, Sumaira; Imtiaz, Maria; Alsaedi, Ahmed

    An analysis is performed to investigate flow between two stretchable rotating disks. Thermal equation is constructed by Cattaneo-Christov heat flux theory. Porous medium is also taken into account. The nonlinear partial differential equations are first converted to ordinary differential equations and then computed for the convergent series solutions. Discussion about impact of dimensionless parameters on velocities, temperature and skin friction coefficient is given. It is observed that the radial velocity at upper disk enhances for larger values of ratio of corresponding stretching rate to angular velocity. Velocity in y-direction decays with an increase in rotational parameter. Magnitude of temperature profile decays for larger Prandtl number and thermal relaxation parameter.

  19. Stagnation point flow towards nonlinear stretching surface with Cattaneo-Christov heat flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayat, T.; Zubair, M.; Ayub, M.; Waqas, M.; Alsaedi, A.

    2016-10-01

    Here the influence of the non-Fourier heat flux in a two-dimensional (2D) stagnation point flow of Eyring-Powell liquid towards a nonlinear stretched surface is reported. The stretching surface is of variable thickness. Thermal conductivity of fluid is taken temperature-dependent. Ordinary differential systems are obtained through the implementation of meaningful transformations. The reduced non-dimensional expressions are solved for the convergent series solutions. Convergence interval is obtained for the computed solutions. Graphical results are displayed and analyzed in detail for the velocity, temperature and skin friction coefficient. The obtained results reveal that the temperature gradient enhances when the thermal relaxation parameter is increased.

  20. Three-dimensional flow of Powell-Eyring nanofluid with heat and mass flux boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tasawar, Hayat; Ikram, Ullah; Taseer, Muhammad; Ahmed, Alsaedi; Sabir, Ali Shehzad

    2016-07-01

    This article investigates the three-dimensional flow of Powell-Eyring nanofluid with thermophoresis and Brownian motion effects. The energy equation is considered in the presence of thermal radiation. The heat and mass flux conditions are taken into account. Mathematical formulation is carried out through the boundary layer approach. The governing partial differential equations are transformed into the nonlinear ordinary differential equations through suitable variables. The resulting nonlinear ordinary differential equations have been solved for the series solutions. Effects of emerging physical parameters on the temperature and nanoparticles concentration are plotted and discussed. Numerical values of local Nusselt and Sherwood numbers are computed and examined.

  1. Enthalpy Distributions of Arc Jet Flow Based on Measured Laser Induced Fluorescence, Heat Flux and Stagnation Pressure Distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suess, Leonard E.; Milhoan, James D.; Oelke, Lance; Godfrey, Dennis; Larin, Maksim Y.; Scott, Carl D.; Grinstead, Jay H.; DelPapa, Steven

    2011-01-01

    The centerline total enthalpy of arc jet flow is determined using laser induced fluorescence of oxygen and nitrogen atoms. Each component of the energy, kinetic, thermal, and chemical can be determined from LIF measurements. Additionally, enthalpy distributions are inferred from heat flux and pressure probe distribution measurements using an engineering formula. Average enthalpies are determined by integration over the radius of the jet flow, assuming constant mass flux and a mass flux distribution estimated from computational fluid dynamics calculations at similar arc jet conditions. The trends show favorable agreement, but there is an uncertainty that relates to the multiple individual measurements and assumptions inherent in LIF measurements.

  2. The dynamic evolution of active-region-scale magnetic flux tubes in the turbulent solar convective envelope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Maria Ann

    2014-12-01

    The Sun exhibits cyclic properties of its large-scale magnetic field on the order of sigma22 years, with a ˜11 year frequency of sunspot occurrence. These sunspots, or active regions, are the centers of magnetically driven phenomena such as flares and coronal mass ejections. Volatile solar magnetic events directed toward the Earth pose a threat to human activities and our increasingly technological society. As such, the origin and nature of solar magnetic flux emergence is a topic of global concern. Sunspots are observable manifestations of solar magnetic fields, thus providing a photospheric link to the deep-seated dynamo mechanism. However, the manner by which bundles of magnetic field, or flux tubes, traverse the convection zone to eventual emergence at the solar surface is not well understood. To provide a connection between dynamo-generated magnetic fields and sunspots, I have performed simulations of magnetic flux emergence through the bulk of a turbulent, solar convective envelope by employing a thin flux tube model subject to interaction with flows taken from a hydrodynamic convection simulation computed through the Anelastic Spherical Harmonic (ASH) code. The convective velocity field interacts with the flux tube through the drag force it experiences as it traverses through the convecting medium. Through performing these simulations, much insight has been gained about the influence of turbulent solar-like convection on the flux emergence process and resulting active region properties. I find that the dynamic evolution of flux tubes change from convection dominated to magnetic buoyancy dominated as the initial field strength of the flux tubes increases from 15 kG to 100 kG. Additionally, active-region-scale flux tubes of 40 kG and greater exhibit properties similar to those of active regions on the Sun, such as: tilt angles, rotation rates, and morphological asymmetries. The joint effect of the Coriolis force and helical motions present in convective

  3. Hydromagnetic flow of third grade nanofluid with viscous dissipation and flux conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Hussain, T.; Shehzad, S. A.; Hayat, T.; Alsaedi, A.

    2015-08-15

    This article investigates the magnetohydrodynamic flow of third grade nanofluid with thermophoresis and Brownian motion effects. Energy equation is considered in the presence of thermal radiation and viscous dissipation. Rosseland’s approximation is employed for thermal radiation. The heat and concentration flux conditions are taken into account. The governing nonlinear mathematical expressions of velocity, temperature and concentration are converted into dimensionless expressions via transformations. Series solutions of the dimensionless velocity, temperature and concentration are developed. Convergence of the constructed solutions is checked out both graphically and numerically. Effects of interesting physical parameters on the temperature and concentration are plotted and discussed in detail. Numerical values of skin-friction coefficient are computed for the hydrodynamic and hydromagnetic flow cases.

  4. Structure of a Magnetic Flux Annihilation Layer Formed by the Collision of Supersonic, Magnetized Plasma Flows.

    PubMed

    Suttle, L G; Hare, J D; Lebedev, S V; Swadling, G F; Burdiak, G C; Ciardi, A; Chittenden, J P; Loureiro, N F; Niasse, N; Suzuki-Vidal, F; Wu, J; Yang, Q; Clayson, T; Frank, A; Robinson, T S; Smith, R A; Stuart, N

    2016-06-03

    We present experiments characterizing the detailed structure of a current layer, generated by the collision of two counterstreaming, supersonic and magnetized aluminum plasma flows. The antiparallel magnetic fields advected by the flows are found to be mutually annihilated inside the layer, giving rise to a bifurcated current structure-two narrow current sheets running along the outside surfaces of the layer. Measurements with Thomson scattering show a fast outflow of plasma along the layer and a high ion temperature (T_{i}∼Z[over ¯]T_{e}, with average ionization Z[over ¯]=7). Analysis of the spatially resolved plasma parameters indicates that the advection and subsequent annihilation of the inflowing magnetic flux determines the structure of the layer, while the ion heating could be due to the development of kinetic, current-driven instabilities.

  5. Hydromagnetic flow of third grade nanofluid with viscous dissipation and flux conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, T.; Shehzad, S. A.; Hayat, T.; Alsaedi, A.

    2015-08-01

    This article investigates the magnetohydrodynamic flow of third grade nanofluid with thermophoresis and Brownian motion effects. Energy equation is considered in the presence of thermal radiation and viscous dissipation. Rosseland's approximation is employed for thermal radiation. The heat and concentration flux conditions are taken into account. The governing nonlinear mathematical expressions of velocity, temperature and concentration are converted into dimensionless expressions via transformations. Series solutions of the dimensionless velocity, temperature and concentration are developed. Convergence of the constructed solutions is checked out both graphically and numerically. Effects of interesting physical parameters on the temperature and concentration are plotted and discussed in detail. Numerical values of skin-friction coefficient are computed for the hydrodynamic and hydromagnetic flow cases.

  6. Flow-Boiling Critical Heat Flux Experiments Performed in Reduced Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasan, Mohammad M.; Mudawar, Issam

    2005-01-01

    Poor understanding of flow boiling in microgravity has recently emerged as a key obstacle to the development of many types of power generation and advanced life support systems intended for space exploration. The critical heat flux (CHF) is perhaps the most important thermal design parameter for boiling systems involving both heatflux-controlled devices and intense heat removal. Exceeding the CHF limit can lead to permanent damage, including physical burnout of the heat-dissipating device. The importance of the CHF limit creates an urgent need to develop predictive design tools to ensure both the safe and reliable operation of a two-phase thermal management system under the reduced-gravity (like that on the Moon and Mars) and microgravity environments of space. At present, very limited information is available on flow-boiling heat transfer and the CHF under these conditions.

  7. Interhemispheric Differences in High-Latitude Flows and Poynting Flux Observed by Swarm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knudsen, D. J.; Patrick, M.; Burchill, J. K.; Archer, W. E.

    2015-12-01

    The three Swarm satellites were launched into nearly-polar, circular orbits in November 2013. Following an initial, pearls-on-a-string configuration, the constellation was brought to its current arrangement with two satellites flying side by side side at an altitude of 460 km, with the third orbiting at 510 km. These orbits are ideal for studying interhemsispheric differences in the topside ionosphere. Each satellite carries two Thermal Ion Imagers to measure ion flows and temperatures, two Langmuir Probes to measure electron densities and temperatures, and vector and scalar magnetometers. This talk will provide an overview of interhemispheric differences seen by Swarm as manifested in several quantities including intense flow channels detected near the poleward boundary, ionospheric upflow, and quasi-static Poynting flux.

  8. Use of flow-normalization to evaluate nutrient concentration and flux changes in Lake Champlain tributaries, 1990-2009

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Medalie, Laura; Hirsch, Robert M.; Archfield, Stacey A.

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey evaluated 20 years of total phosphorus (P) and total nitrogen (N) concentration data for 18 Lake Champlain tributaries using a new statistical method based on weighted regressions to estimate daily concentration and flux histories based on discharge, season, and trend as explanatory variables. The use of all the streamflow discharge values for a given date in the record, in a process called "flow-normalization," removed the year-to-year variation due to streamflow and generated a smooth time series from which trends were calculated. This approach to data analysis can be of great value to evaluations of the success of restoration efforts because it filters out the large random fluctuations in the flux that are due to the temporal variability in streamflow. Results for the full 20 years of record showed a mixture of upward and downward trends for concentrations and yields of P and N. When the record was broken into two 10-year periods, for many tributaries, the more recent period showed a reversal in N from upward to downward trends and a similar reversal or reduction in magnitude of upward trends for P. Some measures of P and N concentrations and yields appear to be related to intensity of agricultural activities, point-source loads of P, or population density. Total flow-normalized P flux aggregated from the monitored tributaries showed a decrease of 30 metric tons per year from 1991 to 2009, which is about 15% of the targeted reduction established by the operational management plan for the Lake Champlain Basin.

  9. Flux through trehalose synthase flows from trehalose to the alpha anomer of maltose in mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    Miah, Farzana; Koliwer-Brandl, Hendrik; Rejzek, Martin; Field, Robert A; Kalscheuer, Rainer; Bornemann, Stephen

    2013-04-18

    Trehalose synthase (TreS) was thought to catalyze flux from maltose to trehalose, a precursor of essential trehalose mycolates in mycobacterial cell walls. However, we now show, using a genetic approach, that TreS is not required for trehalose biosynthesis in Mycobacterium smegmatis, whereas two alternative trehalose-biosynthetic pathways (OtsAB and TreYZ) are crucial. Consistent with this direction of flux, trehalose levels in Mycobacterium tuberculosis decreased when TreS was overexpressed. In addition, TreS was shown to interconvert the α anomer of maltose and trehalose using (1)H and (19)F-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopies using its normal substrates and deoxyfluoromaltose analogs, with the nonenzymatic mutarotation of α/β-maltose being slow. Therefore, flux through TreS in mycobacteria flows from trehalose to α-maltose, which is the appropriate anomer for maltose kinase of the GlgE α-glucan pathway, which in turn contributes to intracellular and/or capsular polysaccharide biosynthesis.

  10. Updates on AmeriFlux Network Data Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, B.; Boden, T.; Krassovski, M.; Jackson, B.

    2011-12-01

    The Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory serves as the central data repository for the AmeriFlux network. The currently available datasets include hourly or half-hourly meteorological and flux observations, biological measurement records, and synthesis data products. In this presentation, we provide an update on this network database including the recent release of gap-filled meteorological records and progress in generating value-added high level products for the flux measurements. We will also discuss our plans in developing and producing other high-level products, such as uncertainty estimates for flux measurement and derivation of phenology from the available measurements at flux sites.

  11. CFD Modeling for Active Flow Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, Pieter G.

    2001-01-01

    This presentation describes current work under UEET Active Flow Control CFD Research Tool Development. The goal of this work is to develop computational tools for inlet active flow control design. This year s objectives were to perform CFD simulations of fully gridded vane vortex generators, micro-vortex genera- tors, and synthetic jets, and to compare flowfield results with wind tunnel tests of simple geometries with flow control devices. Comparisons are shown for a single micro-vortex generator on a flat plate, and for flow over an expansion ramp with sidewall effects. Vortex core location, pressure gradient and oil flow patterns are compared between experiment and computation. This work lays the groundwork for evaluating simplified modeling of arrays of devices, and provides the opportunity to test simple flow control device/sensor/ control loop interaction.

  12. Flux flow and vortex tunneling in two-dimensional arrays of small Josephson junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C.D.; Delsing, P.; Haviland, D.B.; Harada, Y.; Claeson, T.

    1996-10-01

    We have measured the temperature dependence and magnetic field dependence of the zero-bias resistance ({ital R}{sub 0}) as well as the current-voltage ({ital I}-{ital V}) characteristics for several two-dimensional arrays of small aluminum Josephson junctions. {ital R}{sub 0}({ital T}) decreases with decreasing temperature, which can be described in terms of two types of vortex motion: flux, flow, and vortex tunneling. At temperatures higher than the Kosterlitz-Thouless transition temperature ({ital T}{gt}{ital T}{sub {ital c}}) or at a bias current greater than the current corresponding to the onset of the nonlinear {ital I}-{ital V} characteristics ({ital I}{gt}{ital I}{sub {ital d}}), the effective damping resistance which characterizes flux-flow motion is found to be approximately equal to the junction normal-state resistance {ital R}{sub {ital N}}. At low temperatures and at small bias current, {ital R}{sub 0} is temperature independent and remains finite down to our minimum attainable temperature. This finite resistance is found to be dependent on the array size as well as the junction parameters. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  13. Control of Pitching Airfoil Aerodynamics by Vorticity Flux Modification using Active Bleed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kearney, John; Glezer, Ari

    2014-11-01

    Distributed active bleed driven by pressure differences across a pitching airfoil is used to regulate the vorticity flux over the airfoil's surface and thereby to control aerodynamic loads in wind tunnel experiments. The range of pitch angles is varied beyond the static stall margin of the 2-D VR-7 airfoil at reduced pitching rates up to k = 0.42. Bleed is regulated dynamically using piezoelectric louvers between the model's pressure side near the trailing edge and the suction surface near the leading edge. The time-dependent evolution of vorticity concentrations over the airfoil and in the wake during the pitch cycle is investigated using high-speed PIV and the aerodynamic forces and moments are measured using integrated load cells. The timing of the dynamic stall vorticity flux into the near wake and its effect on the flow field are analyzed in the presence and absence of bleed using proper orthogonal decomposition (POD). It is shown that bleed actuation alters the production, accumulation, and advection of vorticity concentrations near the surface with significant effects on the evolution, and, in particular, the timing of dynamic stall vortices. These changes are manifested by alteration of the lift hysteresis and improvement of pitch stability during the cycle, while maintaining cycle-averaged lift to within 5% of the base flow level with significant implications for improvement of the stability of flexible wings and rotor blades. This work is supported by the Rotorcraft Center (VLRCOE) at Georgia Tech.

  14. KELVIN-HELMHOLTZ INSTABILITY IN CORONAL MAGNETIC FLUX TUBES DUE TO AZIMUTHAL SHEAR FLOWS

    SciTech Connect

    Soler, R.; Terradas, J.; Oliver, R.; Ballester, J. L.; Goossens, M.

    2010-04-01

    Transverse oscillations of coronal loops are often observed and have been theoretically interpreted as kink magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) modes. Numerical simulations by Terradas et al. suggest that shear flows generated at the loop boundary during kink oscillations could give rise to a Kelvin-Helmholtz instability (KHI). Here, we investigate the linear stage of the KHI in a cylindrical magnetic flux tube in the presence of azimuthal shear motions. We consider the basic, linearized MHD equations in the beta = 0 approximation and apply them to a straight and homogeneous cylindrical flux tube model embedded in a coronal environment. Azimuthal shear flows with a sharp jump of the velocity at the cylinder boundary are included in the model. We obtain an analytical expression for the dispersion relation of the unstable MHD modes supported by the configuration, and compute analytical approximations of the critical velocity shear and the KHI growth rate in the thin tube limit. A parametric study of the KHI growth rates is performed by numerically solving the full dispersion relation. We find that fluting-like modes can develop a KHI in timescales comparable to the period of kink oscillations of the flux tube. The KHI growth rates increase with the value of the azimuthal wavenumber and decrease with the longitudinal wavenumber. However, the presence of a small azimuthal component of the magnetic field can suppress the KHI. Azimuthal motions related to kink oscillations of untwisted coronal loops may trigger a KHI, but this phenomenon has not been observed to date. We propose that the azimuthal component of the magnetic field is responsible for suppressing the KHI in a stable coronal loop. The required twist is small enough to prevent the development of the pinch instability.

  15. The role of coherent flow structures in the sensible heat fluxes of an Alaskan boreal forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starkenburg, Derek; Fochesatto, Gilberto J.; Prakash, Anupma; Cristóbal, Jordi; Gens, Rudiger; Kane, Douglas L.

    2013-08-01

    Accelerations in the flow over forests generate coherent structures which locally enhance updrafts and downdrafts, forcing rapid exchanges of energy and matter. Here, observations of the turbulent flow are made in a highly heterogeneous black spruce boreal forest in Fairbanks, Alaska at ~2.6 h (12 m) and ~0.6 h (3 m), where h is the mean canopy height of 4.7 m. Wavelet analysis is used to detect coherent structures. The sonic temperature and wind data cover 864 half-hour periods spanning winter, spring, and summer. When mean global statistics of structures are analyzed at the two levels independently, results are similar to other studies. Specifically, an average of eight structures occurs per period, their mean duration is 85 s, and their mean heat flux contribution is 48%. However, this analysis suggests that 31% of the structures detected at 2.6 h, and 13% at 0.6 h, may be influenced by wave-like flow organization. Remarkably, less than 25% of the structures detected occur synchronously in the subcanopy and above canopy levels, which speaks robustly to the lack of flow interaction within only nine vertical meters of the forest.

  16. Boron Accelerates Cultured Osteoblastic Cell Activity through Calcium Flux.

    PubMed

    Capati, Mark Luigi Fabian; Nakazono, Ayako; Igawa, Kazunari; Ookubo, Kensuke; Yamamoto, Yuya; Yanagiguchi, Kajirou; Kubo, Shisei; Yamada, Shizuka; Hayashi, Yoshihiko

    2016-12-01

    A low concentration of boron (B) accelerates the proliferation and differentiation of mammalian osteoblasts. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of 0.1 mM of B on the membrane function of osteoblastic cells in vitro. Genes involved in cell activity were investigated using gene expression microarray analyses. The Ca(2+) influx and efflux were evaluated to demonstrate the activation of L-type Ca(2+) channel for the Ca(2+) influx, and that of Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase for the Ca(2+) efflux. A real-time PCR analysis revealed that the messenger RNA (mRNA) expression of four mineralization-related genes was clearly increased after 3 days of culture with a B-supplemented culture medium. Using microarray analyses, five genes involved in cell proliferation and differentiation were upregulated compared to the control group. Regarding the Ca(2+) influx, in the nifedipine-pretreated group, the relative fluorescence intensity for 1 min after adding B solution did not increase compared with that for 1 min before addition. In the control group, the relative fluorescence intensity was significantly increased compared with the experimental group (P < 0.05). Regarding the Ca(2+) efflux, in the experimental group cultured in 0.1 mM of B-supplemented medium, the relative fluorescence intensity for 10 min after ouabain treatment revealed a significantly lower slope value compared with the control group (P < 0.01). This is the first study to demonstrate the acceleration of Ca(2+) flux by B supplementation in osteoblastic cells. Cell membrane stability is related to the mechanism by which a very low concentration of B promotes the proliferation and differentiation of mammalian osteoblastic cells in vitro.

  17. A DOUBLE-RING ALGORITHM FOR MODELING SOLAR ACTIVE REGIONS: UNIFYING KINEMATIC DYNAMO MODELS AND SURFACE FLUX-TRANSPORT SIMULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Munoz-Jaramillo, Andres; Martens, Petrus C. H.; Nandy, Dibyendu; Yeates, Anthony R. E-mail: dnandi@iiserkol.ac.i E-mail: anthony@maths.dundee.ac.u

    2010-09-01

    The emergence of tilted bipolar active regions (ARs) and the dispersal of their flux, mediated via processes such as diffusion, differential rotation, and meridional circulation, is believed to be responsible for the reversal of the Sun's polar field. This process (commonly known as the Babcock-Leighton mechanism) is usually modeled as a near-surface, spatially distributed {alpha}-effect in kinematic mean-field dynamo models. However, this formulation leads to a relationship between polar field strength and meridional flow speed which is opposite to that suggested by physical insight and predicted by surface flux-transport simulations. With this in mind, we present an improved double-ring algorithm for modeling the Babcock-Leighton mechanism based on AR eruption, within the framework of an axisymmetric dynamo model. Using surface flux-transport simulations, we first show that an axisymmetric formulation-which is usually invoked in kinematic dynamo models-can reasonably approximate the surface flux dynamics. Finally, we demonstrate that our treatment of the Babcock-Leighton mechanism through double-ring eruption leads to an inverse relationship between polar field strength and meridional flow speed as expected, reconciling the discrepancy between surface flux-transport simulations and kinematic dynamo models.

  18. AmeriFlux Network Data Activities: updates, progress and plans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, B.; Boden, T.; Krassovski, M.; Song, X.

    2013-12-01

    The Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory serves as the long-term data repository for the AmeriFlux network. Datasets currently available include hourly or half-hourly meteorological and flux observations, biological measurement records, and synthesis data products. In this presentation, we provide an update of this network database including a comprehensive review and evaluation of the biological data from about 70 sites, development of a new product for flux uncertainty estimates, and re-formatting of Level-2 standard files. In 2013, we also provided data support to two synthesis studies --- 2012 drought synthesis and FACE synthesis. Issues related to data quality and solutions in compiling datasets for these synthesis studies will be discussed. We will also present our work plans in developing and producing other high-level products, such as derivation of phenology from the available measurements at flux sites.

  19. A New Facility for Measurements of Three-Dimensional, Local Subcooled Flow Boiling Heat Flux and Related Critical Heat Flux for PFCs

    SciTech Connect

    Boyd, Ronald D. Sr.; Cofie, Penrose; Li Qingyuan; Ekhlassi, Ali A

    2002-01-15

    In the development of plasma-facing components for fusion reactors and high-heat-flux heat sinks (or components) for electronic applications, the components are usually subjected to a peripherally nonuniform heat flux. Even if the applied heat flux is uniform in the axial direction (which is unlikely), both intuition and recent investigations have clearly shown that both the local heat flux and the eventual critical heat flux (CHF) in this three-dimensional (3-D) case will differ significantly from similar quantities found in the voluminous body of data for uniformly heated flow channels. Although this latter case has been used in the past as an estimate for the former case, more study has become necessary to examine the 3-D temperature and heat flux distributions and related CHF. Work thus far has shown that the nonuniform peripheral heat flux condition enhances CHF in some cases.To avoid the excess costs associated with using electron or ion beams to produce the nonuniform heat flux, a new facility was developed that will allow 3-D conjugate heat transfer measurements and two-dimensional, local subcooled flow boiling heat flux and related CHF measurements.The configurations under study for this work consist of (a) a nonuniformly heated cylinder-like test section with a circular coolant channel bored through the center and (b) a monoblock that is a square cross-section parallelepiped with a circular drilled flow channel along the channel centerline. The theoretical or ideal cylinder-like test section would be a circular cylinder with half (-90 to 90 deg) of its outside boundary subjected to a uniform heat flux and the remaining half insulated. For the monoblock, a uniform heat flux is applied to one of the outside surfaces, and the remaining surfaces are insulated. The outside diameter of the cylinder-like test section is 30.0 mm, and its length is 200.0 mm. The monoblock square is 30.0 mm long. The inside diameter of the flow channel for both types of test

  20. An upwind, kinetic flux-vector splitting method for flows in chemical and thermal non-equilibrium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eppard, W. M.; Grossman, B.

    1993-01-01

    We have developed new upwind kinetic difference schemes for flows with non-equilibrium thermodynamics and chemistry. These schemes are derived from the Boltzmann equation with the resulting Euler schemes developed as moments of the discretized Boltzmann scheme with a locally Maxwellian velocity distribution. Splitting the velocity distribution at the Boltzmann level is seen to result in a flux-split Euler scheme and is called Kinetic Flux Vector Splitting (KFVS). Extensions to flows with finite-rate chemistry and vibrational relaxation is accomplished utilizing nonequilibrium kinetic theory. Computational examples are presented comparing KFVS with the schemes of Van Leer and Roe for a quasi-one-dimensional flow through a supersonic diffuser, inviscid flow through two-dimensional inlet, and viscous flow over a cone at zero angle-of-attack. Calculations are also shown for the transonic flow over a bump in a channel and the transonic flow over an NACA 0012 airfoil. The results show that even though the KFVS scheme is a Riemann solver at the kinetic level, its behavior at the Euler level is more similar to the existing flux-vector splitting algorithms than to the flux-difference splitting scheme of Roe.

  1. Variability of the Lyman alpha flux with solar activity

    SciTech Connect

    Lean, J.L.; Skumanich, A.

    1983-07-01

    A three-component model of the solar chromosphere, developed from ground based observations of the Ca II K chromospheric emission, is used to calculate the variability of the Lyman alpha flux between 1969 and 1980. The Lyman alpha flux at solar minimum is required in the model and is taken as 2.32 x 10/sup 11/ photons/cm/sup 2//s. This value occurred during 1975 as well as in 1976 near the commencement of solar cycle 21. The model predicts that the Lyman alpha flux increases to as much as 5 x 10/sup 11/ photons/cm/sup 2//s at the maximum of the solar cycle. The ratio of the average fluxes for December 1979 (cycle maximum) and July 1976 (cycle minimum) is 1.9. During solar maximum the 27-day solar rotation is shown to cause the Lyman alpha flux to vary by as much as 40% or as little as 5%. The model also shows that the Lyman alpha flux varies over intermediate time periods of 2 to 3 years, as well as over the 11-year sunspot cycle. We conclude that, unlike the sunspot number and the 10.7-cm radio flux, the Lyman alpha flux had a variability that was approximately the same during each of the past three cycles. Lyman alpha fluxes calculated by the model are consistent with measurements of the Lyman alpha flux made by 11 of a total of 14 rocket experiments conducted during the period 1969--1980. The model explains satisfactorily the absolute magnitude, long-term trends, and the cycle variability seen in the Lyman alpha irradiances by the OSO 5 satellite experiment. The 27-day variability observed by the AE-E satellite experiment is well reproduced. However, the magntidue of the AE-E 1 Lyman alpha irradiances are higher than the model calculations by between 40% and 80%. We suggest that the assumed calibration of the AE-E irradiances is in error.

  2. An Isolated Circular Synthetic Jet in Cross-Flow at Low Momentum-Flux Ratio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milanovic, Ivana M.; Zaman, Khairul B. M. Q.; Rumsey, Christopher L.

    2005-01-01

    A joint experimental and computational investigation was carried out for a round synthetic jet issuing normal to a turbulent boundary layer at a momentum-flux ratio of one. Distributions of velocity and turbulence intensity were measured by hot-wire anemometry. Numerical results were obtained using unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (URANS) computations. Time and phase-averaged flow properties were compared on the cross sectional plane at x/D = 0.53, 5 and 10 as well as on the axial plane of symmetry. Overall, the numerical results agreed well with the experimental data. CFD predicted a somewhat larger velocity deficit in regions of low-momentum fluid pulled up from the boundary layer. Phase- averaged velocity contours at the plane of symmetry indicated good match between experiments and CFD regarding the size and the position of the periodic flow structure. However, some differences occurred in details such as the shape and inclination of the low-speed flow structure.

  3. Flux Surface Variation of Impurity Density and Flows in the Pedestal Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Churchill, Michael; Lipschultz, Bruce; Theiler, Christian; Alcator C-Mod Team

    2013-10-01

    Measured impurity density and flows in the pedestal region of Alcator C-Mod can deviate significantly on a flux surface from current model predictions. Comparing localized measurements at the low-field side (LFS) midplane and the high-field side (HFS) midplane, boron (B5 +) impurity density asymmetries larger than 10x are observed in H-mode plasmas, with larger densities at the HFS. The LFS density pedestal varies in position and width with varying plasma conditions, while the HFS impurity density profile remains rather fixed. Impurity density asymmetries are not observed in plasmas with small gradients, i.e L-mode, suggesting the drive for the asymmetry may be the strong gradients in the H-mode pedestal region. However, impurity density asymmetries are also absent in I-mode plasmas, despite the presence of a strong radial gradient in temperature (with no main ion density pedestal). This indicates an interplay between the gradient scale lengths of the main ion density and temperature in the drive of the impurity density asymmetry. Impurity flows in the pedestal show the opposite behavior; flows measured in H-mode plasmas are close to the expected in-out variation, while in I-mode they deviate significantly. Supported by USDoE award DE-FC02-99ER54512.

  4. Neoclassical ion heat flux and poloidal flow in a tokamak pedestal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kagan, Grigory; Catto, Peter J.

    2009-11-01

    In the core of a tokamak, neoclassical transport normally dominates over classical while itself being dominated by turbulent transport. The situation may be different in a high confinement (or H) mode pedestal, where the latter is effectively suppressed by a strongly sheared equilibrium electric field. On the other hand, this very field makes conventional neoclassical results inapplicable in the pedestal by significantly modifying ion drift orbits. We present the first calculation of the banana regime neoclassical ion heat flux and poloidal flow in the pedestal accounting for the strong ExB drift inherent to this tokamak region. Interestingly, the fact that ion heat conductivity depends on the local values of the electric field and its shear allows us to hypothesize about possible shapes of the global electric field and density profiles in the pedestal. We also find that due to the electric field the pedestal poloidal ion flow is likely to change its direction as compared to its core counterpart. This result elucidates the discrepancy between the conventional banana regime predictions and recent experimental measurements of the impurity flow performed at Alcator C-Mod.

  5. Flow and heat transfer of ferrofluids over a flat plate with uniform heat flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, W. A.; Khan, Z. H.; Haq, R. U.

    2015-04-01

    The present work is dedicated to analyze the flow and heat transport of ferrofluids along a flat plate subjected to uniform heat flux and slip velocity. A magnetic field is applied in the transverse direction to the plate. Moreover, three different kinds of magnetic nanoparticles (Fe3O4, CoFe2O4, Mn-ZnFe2O4 are incorporated within the base fluid. We have considered two different kinds of base fluids (kerosene and water) having poor thermal conductivity as compared to solid magnetic nanoparticles. Self-similar solutions are obtained and are compared with the available data for special cases. A simulation is performed for each ferrofluid mixture by considering the dominant effects of slip and uniform heat flux. It is found that the present results are in an excellent agreement with the existing literature. The variation of skin friction and heat transfer is also performed at the surface of the plate and then the better heat transfer and of each mixture is analyzed. Kerosene-based magnetite Fe3O4 provides the higher heat transfer rate at the wall as compared to the kerosene-based cobalt ferrite and Mn-Zn ferrite. It is also concluded that the primary effect of the magnetic field is to accelerate the dimensionless velocity and to reduce the dimensionless surface temperature as compared to the hydrodynamic case, thereby increasing the skin friction and the heat transfer rate of ferrofluids.

  6. Effect of optimal estimation of flux difference information on the lattice traffic flow model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Shu-hong; Li, Chun-gui; Tang, Xin-lai; Tian, Chuan

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, a new lattice model is proposed by considering the optimal estimation of flux difference information. The effect of this new consideration upon the stability of traffic flow is examined through linear stability analysis. Furthermore, a modified Korteweg-de Vries (mKdV) equation near the critical point is constructed and solved by means of nonlinear analysis method, and thus the propagation behavior of traffic jam can be described by the kink-antikink soliton solution of the mKdV equation. Numerical simulation is carried out under periodical condition with results in good agreement with theoretical analysis, therefore, it is verified that the new consideration can enhance the stability of traffic systems and suppress the emergence of traffic jams effectively.

  7. Modeling tangent hyperbolic nanoliquid flow with heat and mass flux conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayat, T.; Ullah, I.; Alsaedi, A.; Ahmad, B.

    2017-03-01

    This attempt predicts the hydromagnetic flow of a tangent hyperbolic nanofluid originated by a non-linear impermeable stretching surface. The considered nanofluid model takes into account the Brownian diffusion and thermophoresis characteristics. An incompressible liquid is electrically conducted in the presence of a non-uniformly applied magnetic field. Heat and mass transfer phenomena posses flux conditions. Mathematical formulation is developed by utilizing the boundary layer approach. A system of ordinary differential equations is obtained by employing adequate variables. Convergence for obtained series solutions is checked and explicitly verified through tables and plots. Effects of numerous pertinent variables on velocity, temperature and concentration fields are addressed. Computations for surface drag coefficient, heat transfer rate and mass transfer rate are presented and inspected for the influence of involved variables. Temperature is found to enhance for a higher magnetic variable. Present and previous outcomes in limiting sense are also compared.

  8. Effects of prescribed heat flux and transpiration on MHD axisymmetric flow impinging on stretching cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mabood, Fazle; Lorenzini, Giulio; Pochai, Nopparat; Ibrahim, Sheikh Muhammad

    2016-11-01

    A numerical treatment for axisymmetric flow and heat transfer due to a stretching cylinder under the influence of a uniform magnetic field and prescribed surface heat flux is presented. Numerical results are obtained for dimensionless velocity, temperature, skin friction coefficient and Nusselt number for several values of the suction/injection, magnetic and curvature parameters as well as the Prandtl number. The present study reveals that the controlling parameters have strong effects on the physical quantities of interest. It is seen that the magnetic field enhances the dimensionless temperature inside the thermal boundary layer, whereas it reduces the dimensionless velocity inside the hydrodynamic boundary layer. Heat transfer rate reduces, while the skin friction coefficient increases with magnetic field.

  9. Experimental investigation on drag and heat flux reduction in supersonic/hypersonic flows: A survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhen-guo; Sun, Xi-wan; Huang, Wei; Li, Shi-bin; Yan, Li

    2016-12-01

    The drag and heat reduction problem of hypersonic vehicles has always attracted the attention worldwide, and the experimental test approach is the basis of theoretical analysis and numerical simulation. In the current study, research progress of experimental investigations on drag and heat reduction are summarized by several kinds of mechanism, namely the forward-facing cavity, the opposing jet, the aerospike, the energy deposition and their combinational configurations, and the combinational configurations include the combinational opposing jet and forward-facing cavity concept and the combinational opposing jet and aerospike concept. The geometric models and flow conditions are emphasized, especially for the basic principle for the drag and heat flux reduction of each device. The measurement results of aerodynamic and aerothermodynamic are compared and analyzed as well, which can be a reference for assessing the accuracy of numerical results.

  10. Decrease in T Cell Activation and Calcium Flux during Clinorotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sams, Clarence; Holtzclaw, J. David

    2006-01-01

    We investigated the effect of altered gravitational environments on T cell activation. We isolated human, naive T cells (CD3+CD14-CD19-CD16-CD56-CD25-CD69-CD45RA-) following IRB approved protocols. These purified T cells were then incubated with 6 mm polystyrene beads coated with OKT3 (Ortho Biotech, Raritan, NJ) and antiCD28 (Becton Dickinson (BD), San Jose, CA) at 37 C for 24 hours. Antibodies were at a 1:1 ratio and the bead-to-cell ratio was 2:1. Four incubation conditions existed: 1) static or "1g"; 2) centrifugation at 10 relative centrifugal force (RCF) or "10g"; 3) clinorotation at 25 RPM (functional weightlessness or "0g"); and 4) clinorotation at 80 RPM ("1g" plus net shear force approx.30 dynes/sq cm). Following incubation, T cells were stained for CD25 expression (BD) and intracellular calcium (ratio of Fluo4 to Fura Red, Molecular Probes, Eugene, OR) and analyzed by flow cytometry (Coulter EPICS XL, Miami, FL). Results: Static or "1g" T cells had the highest level of CD25 expression and intracellular calcium. T cells centrifuged at 10 RCF ("10g") had lower CD25 expression and calcium levels compared to the static control. However, cells centrifuged at 10 RCF had higher CD25 expression and calcium levels than those exposed to 24 RPM clinorotation ("0g"). T cells exposed to 24 RPM clinorotation had lower CD25 expression, but the approximately the same calcium levels than T cells exposed to 80 RPM clinorotation. These data suggest that stress-activated calcium channel exist in T cells and may play a role during T cell activation.

  11. On Cattaneo-Christov heat flux model for Carreau fluid flow over a slendering sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashim; Khan, Masood

    The underlying intentions of this article are to investigate the impact of non-Fourier heat flux model on the stagnation-point flow of non-Newtonian Carreau fluid. In this study, the innovative Cattaneo-Christov constitutive model is introduced to study the characteristics of thermal relaxation time. The flow is impelled by a slendering surface which is of the variable thickness. In the model, the physical mechanism responsible for homogeneous-heterogeneous reactions are further taken into account. Also, the diffusion coefficients of the reactant and auto catalyst are considered to be equal. The governing non-linear partial differential equations consisting of the momentum, energy and concentration equations are reduced to the coupled ordinary differential equations by means of local similarity transformations. The transformed ODEs are tackled numerically by employing an effective shooting algorithm along with the Runge-Kutta Fehlberg scheme. The physical characteristics of the fluid velocity, temperature and concentration profiles are illuminated with the variation of numerous governing factors and are presented graphically. For instance, our result indicates that the temperature and thermal boundary layer thickness are lower in case of Cattaneo-Christov heat flux model when compared to classical Fourier's heat model. Meanwhile, the rate of heat transfer is significantly improved by a high wall thickness parameter and an opposite influence is found due to the thermal relaxation parameter. We further noticed that a higher value of homogeneous and heterogeneous reaction parameter corresponds to a deceleration in the concentration field and it shows an inverse relation for the Schmidt number. A correlation with accessible results for specific cases is found with fabulous consent.

  12. Activation parameters of flow through battery separators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blokhra, R. L.

    1983-01-01

    Studies of the hydrodynamic flow of water and 45 percent potassium hydroxide (KOH) solution through a microporous and an ion exchange separator are described. The permeability values are interpreted in terms of a pseudoactivation process. The enthalpy of activation deltaH* and the entropy of activation deltaS* were estimated from Eyring's rate equation.

  13. Numerical model for swirl flow cooling in high-heat-flux particle beam targets and the design of a swirl-flow-based plasma limiter

    SciTech Connect

    Milora, S.L.; Combs, S.K.; Foster, C.A.

    1984-11-01

    An unsteady, two-dimensional heat conduction code has been used to study the performance of swirl-flow-based neutral particle beam targets. The model includes the effects of two-phase heat transfer and asymmetric heating of tubular elements. The calorimeter installed in the Medium Energy Test Facility, which has been subjected to 30-s neutral beam pulses with incident heat flux intensities of greater than or equal to 5 kW/cm/sup 2/, has been modeled. The numerical results indicate that local heat fluxes in excess of 7 kW/cm/sup 2/ occur at the water-cooled surface on the side exposed to the beam. This exceeds critical heat flux limits for uniformly heated tubes wih straight flow by approximately a factor of 5. The design of a plasma limiter based on swirl flow heat transfer is presented.

  14. Transitioning Active Flow Control to Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joslin, Ronald D.; Horta, Lucas G.; Chen, Fang-Jenq

    1999-01-01

    Active Flow Control Programs at NASA, the U.S. Air Force, and DARPA have been initiated with the goals of obtaining revolutionary advances in aerodynamic performance and maneuvering compared to conventional approaches. These programs envision the use of actuators, sensors, and controllers on applications such as aircraft wings/tails, engine nacelles, internal ducts, nozzles, projectiles, weapons bays, and hydrodynamic vehicles. Anticipated benefits of flow control include reduced weight, part count, and operating cost and reduced fuel burn (and emissions), noise and enhanced safety if the sensors serve a dual role of flow control and health monitoring. To get from the bench-top or laboratory test to adaptive distributed control systems on realistic applications, reliable validated design tools are needed in addition to sub- and large-scale wind-tunnel and flight experiments. This paper will focus on the development of tools for active flow control applications.

  15. High mountain water fluxes, a trans-Himalayan base-flow perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andermann, C.; Stieglitz, T. C.; Hovius, N.; Sharma, R.; Labasque, T.

    2013-12-01

    Large scale hydrological processes in mountain areas underlain by bedrock are not well constrained. Groundwater is commonly considered to be of little importance in the mountain water balance, with direct runoff, snow and ice melt thought to be the principal hydrological buffer. We present new insights into hydrological fluxes between major reservoirs and their associated time scales in a trans-Himalayan catchment. The study area is the Kali Gandaki catchment, rising in the dry Tibetan interior, carving through the high Himalayas and draining the full width of the foothills to the Ganges foreland. The catchment has a well-defined monsoon climate, with pronounced annual wet and dry seasons and a clear separation of windward and lee regions. From December to end of March rainfall is minimal. This offers an opportunity to resolve the spatial contribution of hydrological fluxes, other than direct runoff to river discharge, using geochemical tracers. In February 2013 we have sampled the river over its full 350 km length at ~10 km intervals, all main tributaries and several springs in each lithological unit. We have measured major element abundances, CFC's and noble gases for age determination, trace elements and stable isotopes. We also measured 222Rn in situ, as a tracer for groundwater contribution. These measurements are placed in a context of topographic analyses and continuous discharge and precipitation measurements. We have observed large variations of chemical fluxes over several orders of magnitude, showing a systematic downstream dilution trend for most major elements. High initial concentrations derive from evaporite deposits in the uppermost part of the catchment, constituting a large scale, natural salt tracer experiment. The well-defined decline of solute concentrations along the main river, paired with constraints on the composition of lateral water inputs downstream allows the calculation of the spatial distribution of additional hydrological fluxes, by

  16. Active Flow Control Stator With Coanda Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guendogdu; Vorreiter; Seume

    2010-01-01

    Active Flow Control increases the permissible aerodynamic loading. Curved surface near the trailing edge ("Coanda surface"): a) increases turning -> higher pressure ratio. b) controls boundary layer separation -> increased surge margin. Objective: Reduce the number of vanes or compressor stages. Constraints: 1. In a real compressor, the vane must still function entirely without blowing. 2. Maintain the flow exit angle of the reference stator despite the resulting increase in stator loading.

  17. Slow Magnetosonic Waves and Fast Flows in Active Region Loops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ofman, L.; Wang, T. J.; Davila, J. M.

    2012-01-01

    Recent extreme ultraviolet spectroscopic observations indicate that slow magnetosonic waves are present in active region (AR) loops. Some of the spectral data were also interpreted as evidence of fast (approx 100-300 km/s) quasiperiodic flows. We have performed three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (3D MHD) modeling of a bipolar AR that contains impulsively generated waves and flows in coronal loops. The model AR is initiated with a dipole magnetic field and gravitationally stratified density, with an upflow-driven steadily or periodically in localized regions at the footpoints of magnetic loops. The resulting flows along the magnetic field lines of the AR produce higher density loops compared to the surrounding plasma by injection of material into the flux tubes and the establishment of siphon flow.We find that the impulsive onset of flows with subsonic speeds result in the excitation of damped slow magnetosonic waves that propagate along the loops and coupled nonlinearly driven fast-mode waves. The phase speed of the slow magnetosonic waves is close to the coronal sound speed. When the amplitude of the driving pulses is increased we find that slow shock-like wave trains are produced. When the upflows are driven periodically, undamped oscillations are produced with periods determined by the periodicity of the upflows. Based on the results of the 3D MHD model we suggest that the observed slow magnetosonic waves and persistent upflows may be produced by the same impulsive events at the bases of ARs.

  18. An Assessment of the Impact of Transient Eddies on the Zonal Flow during a Blocking Episode Using Localized Eliassen-Palm Flux Diagnostics.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trenberth, Kevin E.

    1986-10-01

    The Eliassen-Palm (E-P) flux, applied to zonal men flows, is an indicator of both the flux of eddy activity and the eddy forcing of the zonal mean flow. For time mean flows, a localized E-P flux is derived and used diagnostically to assess the impact of transient eddies on a major blocking episode that occurred over the South Pacific during the Southern Hemisphere winter of 1979. In contrast to previous studies that have focused on the mean quasi-geostrophic potential vorticity equation, the focus here is on the mean momentum equations. Eddy transports and the associated induced meridional circulation and other internal adjustments necessary to maintain the thermal wind balance, are gathered together allowing the residual circulation and the effects of the eddies to be determined. The time-mean equations of motion are thus transformed to consist of mean terms, the residual circulation and the divergence of a localized E-P flux vector. The latter is a measure of the eddy forcing of the mean flow, and the east-west component is shown to be related to the flux of wave activity. For the zonal mean case it is identical to the E-P flux. The local E-P flux is closely related to, but differs from, the E-vector of Hoskins et al. and Plumb's radiative wave activity flux, but has several advantages over both.For the blocking episode, defined as 20 July-31 August 1979, transient eddies were steered around the location of the blocking anticyclones following the two branches of the split westerly jet. However, the transient eddies in each branch differed in character, both from each other and from those in the main Southern Hemisphere storm track that extends across the southern Indian Ocean near 50°S. In the latter, the high frequency synoptic-scale baroclinic eddies are barotropically damped. The eddies have similar character to the south of the block but consist mainly of zonal wavenumbers 3 and 4 with periods shorter than a week. In contrast, the transient eddies in the

  19. Investigation of Body Force Effects on Flow Boiling Critical Heat Flux

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Hui; Mudawar, Issam; Hasan, Mohammad M.

    2002-01-01

    The bubble coalescence and interfacial instabilities that are important to modeling critical heat flux (CHF) in reduced-gravity systems can be sensitive to even minute body forces. Understanding these complex phenomena is vital to the design and safe implementation of two-phase thermal management loops proposed for space and planetary-based thermal systems. While reduced gravity conditions cannot be accurately simulated in 1g ground-based experiments, such experiments can help isolate the effects of the various forces (body force, surface tension force and inertia) which influence flow boiling CHF. In this project, the effects of the component of body force perpendicular to a heated wall were examined by conducting 1g flow boiling experiments at different orientations. FC-72 liquid was boiled along one wall of a transparent rectangular flow channel that permitted photographic study of the vapor-liquid interface at conditions approaching CHF. High-speed video imaging was employed to capture dominant CHF mechanisms. Six different CHF regimes were identified: Wavy Vapor Layer, Pool Boiling, Stratification, Vapor Counterflow, Vapor Stagnation, and Separated Concurrent Vapor Flow. CHF showed great sensitivity to orientation for flow velocities below 0.2 m/s, where very small CHF values where measured, especially with downflow and downward-facing heated wall orientations. High flow velocities dampened the effects of orientation considerably. Figure I shows representative images for the different CHF regimes. The Wavy Vapor Layer regime was dominant for all high velocities and most orientations, while all other regimes were encountered at low velocities, in the downflow and/or downward-facing heated wall orientations. The Interfacial Lift-off model was modified to predict the effects of orientation on CHF for the dominant Wavy Vapor Layer regime. The photographic study captured a fairly continuous wavy vapor layer travelling along the heated wall while permitting liquid

  20. Convective thermal fluxes in unsteady non-homogeneous flows generating complex three dimensional vorticity patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tellez Alvarez, Jackson David; Redondo, Jose Manuel; Sanchez, Jesu Mary

    2016-04-01

    The improvements in experimental methods and high resolution image analysis are nowadays able to detect subtle changes in the structure of the turbulence over a wide range of temporal and spatial scales [1], we compare the scaling shown by different mixing fronts driven by buoyancy that form convective driven mixing. We use PIV and density front tracking in several experimental configurations akin to geophysical overturning [2, 3]. We parametrize the role of unstable stratification by means of the Rayleigh and Atwood numbers and compare the scaling and the multifractal structure functions of the different markers used to visualize the non-homogeneous. Both reactive and passive scalar tracers are used to investigate the mixing structure and the intermittency of the flow. Different initial conditions are compared and the mixing efficiency of the overall turbulent process is evaluated [4 - 6]. Diffusion is measured in the transition from a homogeneous linearly stratified fluid to a cellular or layered structure by means of Thermoelectric generated heating and cooling [2, 4]. Patterns arise by setting up a convective flow generated by a buoyant heat flux either in the base or in a side wall of the convective enclosure [1, 6]. The experiments described here investigate high Prandtl number mixing using brine or sugar solutions and fresh water in order to form a density interface and low Prandtl number mixing with only temperature gradients [7]. The set of dimensionless parameters define conditions of numeric and small scale laboratory modeling of environmental flows. Fields of velocity, density and their gradients were computed and visualized [8, 9]. When convective heating and cooling takes place the combination of internal waves and buoyant turbulence is much more complicated if the Rayleigh and Reynolds numbers are high in order to study entrainment and mixing. The experiments described here investigate high Prandtl number mixing using salt or sugar solutions and

  1. Imposing land-surface fluxes at an immersed boundary for improved simulations of atmospheric flow over complex terrain

    SciTech Connect

    Lundquist, K A; Chow, F K; Lundquist, J K; Mirocha, J D

    2008-06-05

    Boundary layer flows are greatly complicated by the presence of complex terrain which redirects mean flow and alters the structure of turbulence. Surface fluxes of heat and moisture provide additional forcing which induce secondary flows, or can dominate flow dynamics in cases with weak mean flows. Mesoscale models are increasingly being used for numerical simulations of boundary layer flows over complex terrain. These models typically use a terrain-following coordinate transformation, but these introduce numerical errors over steep terrain. An alternative is to use an immersed boundary method which alleviates errors associated with the coordinate transformation by allowing the terrain to be represented as a surface which arbitrarily passes through a Cartesian grid. This paper describes coupling atmospheric physics models to an immersed boundary method implemented in the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model in previous work [Lundquist et al., 2007]. When the immersed boundary method is used, boundary conditions must be imposed on the immersed surface for velocity and scalar surface fluxes. Previous algorithms, such as those used by Tseng and Ferziger [2003] and Balaras [2004], impose no-slip boundary conditions on the velocity field at the immersed surface by adding a body force to the Navier-Stokes equations. Flux boundary conditions for the advection-diffusion equation have not been adequately addressed. A new algorithm is developed here which allows scalar surface fluxes to be imposed on the flow solution at an immersed boundary. With this extension of the immersed boundary method, land-surface models can be coupled to the immersed boundary to provide realistic surface forcing. Validation is provided in the context of idealized valley simulations with both specified and parameterized surface fluxes using the WRF code. Applicability to real terrain is illustrated with a fully coupled two-dimensional simulation of the Owens Valley in California.

  2. A laser-induced heat flux technique for convective heat transfer measurements in high speed flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porro, A. R.; Keith, T. G., Jr.; Hingst, W. R.

    1991-01-01

    A technique is developed to measure the local convective heat transfer coefficient on a model surface in a supersonic flow field. The technique uses a laser to apply a discrete local heat flux at the model test surface, and an infrared camera system determines the local temperature distribution due to the heating. From this temperature distribution and an analysis of the heating process, a local convective heat transfer coefficient is determined. The technique was used to measure the local surface convective heat transfer coefficient distribution on a flat plate at nominal Mach numbers of 2.5, 3.0, 3.5, and 4.0. The flat plate boundary layer initially was laminar and became transitional in the measurement region. The experimentally determined convective heat transfer coefficients were generally higher than the theoretical predictions for flat plate laminar boundary layers. However, the results indicate that this nonintrusive optical measurement technique has the potential to measure surface convective heat transfer coefficients in high speed flow fields.

  3. Flow and Heat Flux Behavior of Micro-bubble Jet Flows Observed in Thin, Twisted-Wire, Subcooled Boiling in Microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munro, Troy R.; Ban, Heng

    2015-02-01

    Thin wire, subcooled boiling experiments were performed onboard an aircraft flying a parabolic trajectory to provide microgravity conditions for improved observation of jet flow phenomena and their behavior in the absence of buoyant forces. A new type of nucleation jet flow was observed in microgravity. This new micro-bubble jet flow is seen at medium to high heat fluxes and is characterized by a region of the wire that forms multiple jet columns which contain micro-bubbles. These columns flow together and penetrate tens of millimeters into the bulk fluid. Bubble behavior on the wire was observed to progress from a dominance of larger isolated bubbles on the wire to a dominance of micro-bubble jet flows on the wire as heat flux was increased. There was also a transient transition from a few large isolated bubbles to micro-bubble jet flow dominance for a set heat flux. A cross correlation calculation provided velocities of micro-bubbles in the flow, which were in the range of 4-14 mm/s. These velocities were used with convection correlations to show that fluid flows induced by jet flows are a significant contributor to the subcooled boiling heat transfer in microgravity, but are not the primary contributor. Additionally, a relative bubble area analysis approximates the direct contribution of these jet flows to the overall heat dissipation. These micro-bubble jet flows, which are only observed on thin wires (not flat surfaces), and the convection currents they induce, have the potential to allow for sustained fluid motion to occur in microgravity.

  4. Sapflow+: a four-needle heat-pulse sap flow sensor enabling nonempirical sap flux density and water content measurements.

    PubMed

    Vandegehuchte, Maurits W; Steppe, Kathy

    2012-10-01

    • To our knowledge, to date, no nonempirical method exists to measure reverse, low or high sap flux density. Moreover, existing sap flow methods require destructive wood core measurements to determine sapwood water content, necessary to convert heat velocity to sap flux density, not only damaging the tree, but also neglecting seasonal variability in sapwood water content. • Here, we present a nonempirical heat-pulse-based method and coupled sensor which measure temperature changes around a linear heater in both axial and tangential directions after application of a heat pulse. By fitting the correct heat conduction-convection equation to the measured temperature profiles, the heat velocity and water content of the sapwood can be determined. • An identifiability analysis and validation tests on artificial and real stem segments of European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) confirm the applicability of the method, leading to accurate determinations of heat velocity, water content and hence sap flux density. • The proposed method enables sap flux density measurements to be made across the entire natural occurring sap flux density range of woody plants. Moreover, the water content during low flows can be determined accurately, enabling a correct conversion from heat velocity to sap flux density without destructive core measurements.

  5. On Cattaneo-Christov heat flux in the flow of variable thermal conductivity Eyring-Powell fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayat, Tasawar; Khan, Muhammad Ijaz; Waqas, Muhammad; Alsaedi, Ahmed

    Here Cattaneo-Christov heat flux model is employed for heat transfer in the stagnation point flow due to stretching cylinder. This consideration modifies the Fourier's law of heat conduction through thermal relaxation time. Temperature-dependent thermal conductivity is adopted. Constitutive equations for Eyring-Powell liquid are considered in the boundary layer flow analysis. Convergent solutions to the nonlinear formulation are derived and analyzed using homotopic procedure. Skin friction coefficient is tabulated and examined for various embedded parameters.

  6. Columbia University flow instability experimental program: Volume 7. Single tube tests, critical heat flux test program

    SciTech Connect

    Dougherty, T.; Maciuca, C.; McAssey, E.V. Jr.; Reddy, D.G.; Yang, B.W.

    1992-09-01

    This report deals with critical heat flux (CHF) measurements in vertical down flow of water at low pressures in a round Inconel tube, 96 inches long and 0.62 inch inside diameter. A total of 28 CHF points were obtained. These data were found to correlate linearly with the single variable q, defined as the heat flux required to raise the enthalpy from the inlet value to the saturation value. These results were compared to the published results of Swedish investigators for vertical upflow of water at low pressures in round tubes of similar diameters and various lengths. The parameter q depends on the inlet enthalpy and is a nonlocal variable, thus this correlation is nonlocal unless the coefficients depend upon tube length in a particular prescribed manner. For the low pressure Swedish data, the coefficients are practically independent of length and hence the correlation is nonlocal. In the present investigation only one length was employed, so it is not possible to determine whether the correlation for these data is local or nonlocal, although there is reason to believe that it is local. The same correlation was applied to a large data base (thousands of CHF points) compiled from the published data of a number of groups and found to apply, with reasonable accuracy over a wide range of conditions, yielding sometimes local and sometimes nonlocal correlations. The basic philosophy of data analysis here was not to generate a single correlation which would reproduce all data, but to search for correlations which apply adequately over some range and which might have some mechanistic significance. The tentative conclusion is that at least two mechanisms appear operative, leading to two types of correlations, one local, the other nonlocal.

  7. Dynamics of Thrombin Generation and Flux from Clots during Whole Human Blood Flow over Collagen/Tissue Factor Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Shu; Lu, Yichen; Sinno, Talid; Diamond, Scott L

    2016-10-28

    Coagulation kinetics are well established for purified blood proteases or human plasma clotting isotropically. However, less is known about thrombin generation kinetics and transport within blood clots formed under hemodynamic flow. Using microfluidic perfusion (wall shear rate, 200 s(-1)) of corn trypsin inhibitor-treated whole blood over a 250-μm long patch of type I fibrillar collagen/lipidated tissue factor (TF; ∼1 TF molecule/μm(2)), we measured thrombin released from clots using thrombin-antithrombin immunoassay. The majority (>85%) of generated thrombin was captured by intrathrombus fibrin as thrombin-antithrombin was largely undetectable in the effluent unless Gly-Pro-Arg-Pro (GPRP) was added to block fibrin polymerization. With GPRP present, the flux of thrombin increased to ∼0.5 × 10(-12) nmol/μm(2)-s over the first 500 s of perfusion and then further increased by ∼2-3-fold over the next 300 s. The increased thrombin flux after 500 s was blocked by anti-FXIa antibody (O1A6), consistent with thrombin-feedback activation of FXI. Over the first 500 s, ∼92,000 molecules of thrombin were generated per surface TF molecule for the 250-μm-long coating. A single layer of platelets (obtained with αIIbβ3 antagonism preventing continued platelet deposition) was largely sufficient for thrombin production. Also, the overall thrombin-generating potential of a 1000-μm-long coating became less efficient on a per μm(2) basis, likely due to distal boundary layer depletion of platelets. Overall, thrombin is robustly generated within clots by the extrinsic pathway followed by late-stage FXIa contributions, with fibrin localizing thrombin via its antithrombin-I activity as a potentially self-limiting hemostatic mechanism.

  8. The development of flux-split algorithms for flows with non-equilibrium thermodynamics and chemical reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grossman, B.; Cinella, P.

    1988-01-01

    A finite-volume method for the numerical computation of flows with nonequilibrium thermodynamics and chemistry is presented. A thermodynamic model is described which simplifies the coupling between the chemistry and thermodynamics and also results in the retention of the homogeneity property of the Euler equations (including all the species continuity and vibrational energy conservation equations). Flux-splitting procedures are developed for the fully coupled equations involving fluid dynamics, chemical production and thermodynamic relaxation processes. New forms of flux-vector split and flux-difference split algorithms are embodied in a fully coupled, implicit, large-block structure, including all the species conservation and energy production equations. Several numerical examples are presented, including high-temperature shock tube and nozzle flows. The methodology is compared to other existing techniques, including spectral and central-differenced procedures, and favorable comparisons are shown regarding accuracy, shock-capturing and convergence rates.

  9. Flow cytometric allergy diagnosis: basophil activation techniques.

    PubMed

    Bridts, Chris H; Sabato, Vito; Mertens, Christel; Hagendorens, Margo M; De Clerck, Luc S; Ebo, Didier G

    2014-01-01

    The basis of flow cytometric allergy diagnosis is quantification of changes in expression of basophilic surface membrane markers (Ebo et al., Clin Exp Allergy 34: 332-339, 2004). Upon encountering specific allergens recognized by surface receptor FcεRI-bound IgE, basophils not only secrete and generate quantifiable bioactive mediators but also up-regulate the expression of different markers (e.g., CD63, CD203c) which can be detected by multicolor flow cytometry using specific monoclonal antibodies (Ebo et al., Cytometry B Clin Cytom 74: 201-210, 2008). Here, we describe two flow cytometry-based protocols which allow detection of surface marker activation (Method 1) and changes in intragranular histamine (Method 2), both reflecting different facets of basophil activation.

  10. Analytical and numerical study on cooling flow field designs performance of PEM fuel cell with variable heat flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afshari, Ebrahim; Ziaei-Rad, Masoud; Jahantigh, Nabi

    2016-06-01

    In PEM fuel cells, during electrochemical generation of electricity more than half of the chemical energy of hydrogen is converted to heat. This heat of reactions, if not exhausted properly, would impair the performance and durability of the cell. In general, large scale PEM fuel cells are cooled by liquid water that circulates through coolant flow channels formed in bipolar plates or in dedicated cooling plates. In this paper, a numerical method has been presented to study cooling and temperature distribution of a polymer membrane fuel cell stack. The heat flux on the cooling plate is variable. A three-dimensional model of fluid flow and heat transfer in cooling plates with 15 cm × 15 cm square area is considered and the performances of four different coolant flow field designs, parallel field and serpentine fields are compared in terms of maximum surface temperature, temperature uniformity and pressure drop characteristics. By comparing the results in two cases, the constant and variable heat flux, it is observed that applying constant heat flux instead of variable heat flux which is actually occurring in the fuel cells is not an accurate assumption. The numerical results indicated that the straight flow field model has temperature uniformity index and almost the same temperature difference with the serpentine models, while its pressure drop is less than all of the serpentine models. Another important advantage of this model is the much easier design and building than the spiral models.

  11. Active dynamics of tissue shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popović, Marko; Nandi, Amitabha; Merkel, Matthias; Etournay, Raphaël; Eaton, Suzanne; Jülicher, Frank; Salbreux, Guillaume

    2017-03-01

    We present a hydrodynamic theory to describe shear flows in developing epithelial tissues. We introduce hydrodynamic fields corresponding to state properties of constituent cells as well as a contribution to overall tissue shear flow due to rearrangements in cell network topology. We then construct a generic linear constitutive equation for the shear rate due to topological rearrangements and we investigate a novel rheological behaviour resulting from memory effects in the tissue. We identify two distinct active cellular processes: generation of active stress in the tissue, and actively driven topological rearrangements. We find that these two active processes can produce distinct cellular and tissue shape changes, depending on boundary conditions applied on the tissue. Our findings have consequences for the understanding of tissue morphogenesis during development.

  12. Enzymatically active high-flux selectively gas-permeable membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Ying-Bing; Cecchi, Joseph L.; Rempe, Susan; FU, Yaqin; Brinker, C. Jeffrey

    2016-01-26

    An ultra-thin, catalyzed liquid transport medium-based membrane structure fabricated with a porous supporting substrate may be used for separating an object species such as a carbon dioxide object species. Carbon dioxide flux through this membrane structures may be several orders of magnitude higher than traditional polymer membranes with a high selectivity to carbon dioxide. Other gases such as molecular oxygen, molecular hydrogen, and other species including non-gaseous species, for example ionic materials, may be separated using variations to the membrane discussed.

  13. Helium in deep circulating groundwater in the Great Hungarian Plain: Flow dynamics and crustal and mantle helium fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stute, M.; Sonntag, C.; Deák, J.; Schlosser, P.

    1992-05-01

    Observed helium concentrations in deep circulating groundwater of the sedimentary basin of the Great Hungarian Plain (GHP), Hungary, cover a range of three orders of magnitude (≈4 ·10 -8 to 4 · 10 -5 ccSTP g-1). 3He /4He ratios and noble gas concentrations are used to separate helium components originating from the atmosphere, tritium decay, crustal production, and mantle degassing. The characteristic distribution of measured helium concentrations and isotope ratios can be reproduced qualitatively by a simple two-dimensional advection/diffusion model. Other simple models isolating parts of the regional flow domain (recharge, discharge, and horizontal flow) are discussed and applied to derive quantitative information on helium fluxes due to degassing of the Earth's crust /mantle and on the dynamics of groundwater flow. The estimated helium flux of 0.7-4.5 · 10 9 atoms 4He m -2 s -1 is lower than values derived from other deep groundwater circulation systems, probably because the relatively young upper few thousand meters of the sedimentary basin (Tertiary to Quaternary age) shield the flux from the deeper crust. The high mantle helium flux of up to 4.2 · 10 8 atoms 4He m -2 s -1 is probably related to the Miocene volcanism or to continuing intrusion accompanying extension. By fitting calculated helium depth profiles to measured data in the discharge area, vertical flow velocities of the order of 1.5 mm y -1 are estimated. Assuming that a flux of 0.7-4.5 · 10 9 atoms 4He m -2 s -1 is representative for the entire basin, the turnover time of the regional groundwater flow system is estimated to be about 10 6 y.

  14. Modeling hydrodynamic flows in plasma fluxes when depositing metal layer on the surface of catalyst converters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chinakhov, D. A.; Sarychev, V. D.; Granovsky, A. Yu; Solodsky, S. A.; Nevsky, S. A.; Konovalov, S. V.

    2017-01-01

    Air pollution with harmful substances resulting from combustion of liquid hydrocarbons and emitted into atmosphere became one of the global environmental problems in the late 20th century. The systems of neutralization capable to reduce toxicity of exhaust gases several times are very important for making environmentally safer combustion products discharged into the atmosphere. As revealed in the literature review, one of the most promising purification procedures is neutralization of burnt gases by catalyst converter systems. The principal working element in the converter is a catalytic layer of metals deposited on ceramics, with thickness 20-60 micron and a well-developed micro-relief. The paper presents a thoroughly substantiated new procedure of deposing a nano-scale surface layer of metal-catalyst particles, furthering the utilization of catalysts on a new level. The paper provides description of mathematical models and computational researches into plasma fluxes under high-frequency impulse input delivered to electrode material, explorations of developing Kelvin-Helmholtz, Marangoni and magnetic hydrodynamic instabilities on the surface of liquid electrode metal droplet in the nano-scale range of wavelengths to obtain a flow of nano-meter particles of cathode material. The authors have outlined a physical and mathematical model of magnetic and hydrodynamic instability for the case of melt flowing on the boundary with the molten metal with the purpose to predict the interphase shape and mutual effect of formed plasma jet and liquid metal droplet on the electrode in the nano-scale range of wavelengths at high-frequency impact on the boundary “electrode-liquid layer”.

  15. Length and time for development of laminar flow in tubes following a step increase of volume flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhury, Rafeed A.; Herrmann, Marcus; Frakes, David H.; Adrian, Ronald J.

    2015-01-01

    Laminar flows starting up from rest in round tubes are relevant to numerous industrial and biomedical applications. The two most common types are flows driven by an abruptly imposed constant pressure gradient or by an abruptly imposed constant volume flux. Analytical solutions are available for transient, fully developed flows, wherein streamwise development over the entrance length is absent (Szymanski in J de Mathématiques Pures et Appliquées 11:67-107, 1932; Andersson and Tiseth in Chem Eng Commun 112(1):121-133, 1992, respectively). They represent the transient responses of flows in tubes that are very long compared with the entrance length, a condition that is seldom satisfied in biomedical tube networks. This study establishes the entrance (development) length and development time of starting laminar flow in a round tube of finite length driven by a piston pump that produces a step change from zero flow to a constant volume flux for Reynolds numbers between 500 and 3,000. The flows are examined experimentally, using stereographic particle image velocimetry and computationally using computational fluid dynamics, and are then compared with the known analytical solutions for fully developed flow conditions in infinitely long tubes. Results show that step function volume flux start-up flows reach steady state and fully developed flow five times more quickly than those driven by a step function pressure gradient, a 500 % change when compared with existing estimates. Based on these results, we present new, simple guidelines for achieving experimental flows that are fully developed in space and time in realistic (finite) tube geometries. To a first approximation, the time to achieve steady spatially developing flow is nearly equal to the time needed to achieve steady, fully developed flow. Conversely, the entrance length needed to achieve fully developed transient flow is approximately equal to the length needed to achieve fully developed steady flow. Beyond this

  16. A HELIOSEISMIC SURVEY OF NEAR-SURFACE FLOWS AROUND ACTIVE REGIONS AND THEIR ASSOCIATION WITH FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Braun, D. C.

    2016-03-10

    We use helioseismic holography to study the association of shallow flows with solar flare activity in about 250 large sunspot groups observed between 2010 and 2014 with the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager on the Solar Dynamics Observatory. Four basic flow parameters: horizontal speed, horizontal component of divergence, vertical component of vorticity, and a vertical kinetic helicity proxy, are mapped for each active region (AR) during its passage across the solar disk. Flow indices are derived representing the mean and standard deviation of these parameters over magnetic masks and compared with contemporary measures of flare X-ray flux. A correlation exists for several of the flow indices, especially those based on the speed and the standard deviation of all flow parameters. However, their correlation with X-ray flux is similar to that observed with the mean unsigned magnetic flux density over the same masks. The temporal variation of the flow indices are studied, and a superposed epoch analysis with respect to the occurrence to 70 M and X-class flares is made. While flows evolve with the passage of the ARs across the disk, no discernible precursors or other temporal changes specifically associated with flares are detected.

  17. A laser-induced heat flux technique for convective heat transfer measurements in high speed flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porro, A. R.; Keith, T. G., Jr.; Hingst, W. R.

    1991-01-01

    A technique is developed to measure the local convective heat transfer coefficient on a model surface in a supersonic flow field. The technique uses a laser to apply a discrete local heat flux at the model test surface, and an infrared camera system determines the local temperature distribution due to the heating. From this temperature distribution and an analysis of the heating process, a local convective heat transfer coefficient is determined. The technique was used to measure the local surface convective heat transfer coefficient distribution on a flat plate at nominal Mach numbers of 2.5, 3.0, 3.5, and 4.0. The flat plate boundary layer initially was laminar and became transitional in the measurement region. The experimentally determined convective heat transfer coefficients were generally higher than the theoretical predictions for flat plate laminar boundary layers. However, the results indicate that this nonintrusive optical measurement technique has the potential to measure surface convective heat transfer coefficients in high-speed flowfields.

  18. Hypersonic Engine Leading Edge Experiments in a High Heat Flux, Supersonic Flow Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gladden, Herbert J.; Melis, Matthew E.

    1994-01-01

    A major concern in advancing the state-of-the-art technologies for hypersonic vehicles is the development of an aeropropulsion system capable of withstanding the sustained high thermal loads expected during hypersonic flight. Three aerothermal load related concerns are the boundary layer transition from laminar to turbulent flow, articulating panel seals in high temperature environments, and strut (or cowl) leading edges with shock-on-shock interactions. A multidisciplinary approach is required to address these technical concerns. A hydrogen/oxygen rocket engine heat source has been developed at the NASA Lewis Research Center as one element in a series of facilities at national laboratories designed to experimentally evaluate the heat transfer and structural response of the strut (or cowl) leading edge. A recent experimental program conducted in this facility is discussed and related to cooling technology capability. The specific objective of the experiment discussed is to evaluate the erosion and oxidation characteristics of a coating on a cowl leading edge (or strut leading edge) in a supersonic, high heat flux environment. Heat transfer analyses of a similar leading edge concept cooled with gaseous hydrogen is included to demonstrate the complexity of the problem resulting from plastic deformation of the structures. Macro-photographic data from a coated leading edge model show progressive degradation over several thermal cycles at aerothermal conditions representative of high Mach number flight.

  19. DSMC simulation of rarefied gas flows under cooling conditions using a new iterative wall heat flux specifying technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhlaghi, H.; Roohi, E.; Myong, R. S.

    2012-11-01

    Micro/nano geometries with specified wall heat flux are widely encountered in electronic cooling and micro-/nano-fluidic sensors. We introduce a new technique to impose the desired (positive/negative) wall heat flux boundary condition in the DSMC simulations. This technique is based on an iterative progress on the wall temperature magnitude. It is found that the proposed iterative technique has a good numerical performance and could implement both positive and negative values of wall heat flux rates accurately. Using present technique, rarefied gas flow through micro-/nanochannels under specified wall heat flux conditions is simulated and unique behaviors are observed in case of channels with cooling walls. For example, contrary to the heating process, it is observed that cooling of micro/nanochannel walls would result in small variations in the density field. Upstream thermal creep effects in the cooling process decrease the velocity slip despite of the Knudsen number increase along the channel. Similarly, cooling process decreases the curvature of the pressure distribution below the linear incompressible distribution. Our results indicate that flow cooling increases the mass flow rate through the channel, and vice versa.

  20. Mechanistic model for the prediction of water-subcooled-flow-boiling critical heat flux at high liquid velocity and subcooling

    SciTech Connect

    Celata, G.P.; Cumo, M.; Mariani, A.; Zummo, G.

    1996-07-01

    A new model is presented for the prediction of the critical heat flux (CHF) of subcooled flow boiling based on a liquid-sublayer dryout mechanism, i.e., the dryout of a thin, liquid layer beneath an intermittent vapor blanket due to the coalescence of small bubbles. The model focuses on the analysis of the CHF in subcooled flow boiling under conditions of very high mass flux and liquid subcooling, typical of fusion reactor thermal-hydraulic design, and is characterized by the absence of empirical constants always present in earlier models. Peripheral nonuniform heating and/or twisted-tape inserts are accounted for in the model, which was originally developed for uniform heating and straight flow. The simultaneous occurrence of the two events is also well predicted by the model. Although initially formulated for operating conditions typical of the thermal-hydraulic design of fusion reactor high-heat-flux components, the model is proven to be able to satisfactorily predict the CHF under more general conditions, provided local thermodynamic conditions of the bulk flow at the CHF are sufficiently far from the saturated state. 60 refs., 11 figs.

  1. Superfluid Density and Flux-Flow Resistivity Measurements of Multiple-Band Superconductor β-PdBi2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okada, Tatsunori; Imai, Yoshinori; Maeda, Atsutaka

    β -PdBi2 (Tcmax = 5 . 4 K) is a newcomer of the multiple-band superconductors, revealed by the specific heat and the upper critical field measurements, and the angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. In addition, authors of ref. observed the spin-polarized band dispersion and proposed that β-PdBi2 is a candidate of topological superconductor. However, there is less information on superconducting properties so far. In order to clarify the superconducting gap function, we measured the temperature (T) and magnetic field (B) dependence of microwave complex conductivity of β-PdBi2 single crystals. We found that the superfluid density exhibits the thermally activated T dependence, manifesting the absence of nodes in the superconducting gaps. We also found that the flux-flow resistivity increased with B with downward-convex shape. Based on some theories, we considered that such a behavior originated from the backflow of supercurrents around vortices reflecting rather small Ginzburg-Landau parameter (κ ~= 5). This work was supported by the JSPS KAKENHI (Grant Numbers 15K17697 and 26-9315), and the JSPS Research Fellowship for Young Scientists.

  2. Observation of fluctuation-driven particle flux reduction by low-frequency zonal flow in a linear magnetized plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, R.; Xie, J. L. Yu, C. X.; Liu, A. D.; Lan, T.; Li, H.; Liu, W. D.; Zhang, S. B.; Kong, D. F.; Hu, G. H.

    2015-01-15

    Low-frequency zonal flow (ZF) has been observed in a linear magnetic plasma device, exhibiting significant intermittency. Using the conditional analysis method, a time-averaged fluctuation-induced particle flux was observed to consistently decrease as ZF increased in amplitude. A dominant fraction of the flux, which is driven by drift-wave harmonics, is reversely modulated by ZF in the time domain. Spectra of the flux, together with each of the related turbulence properties, are estimated subject to two conditions, i.e., when potential fluctuation series represents a strong ZF intermittency or a very weak ZF component. Comparison of frequency-domain results demonstrates that ZF reduces the cross-field particle transport primarily by suppressing the density fluctuation as well as decorrelating density and potential fluctuations.

  3. Lattice Boltzmann simulation of flows in bifurcate channel at rotating inflow boundary conditions and resulted different outflow fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Qing-Dong

    2011-08-01

    The Lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) is used to simulate the flow field in a bifurcate channel which is a simplified model of the draft tube of hydraulic turbine machine. According to the simulation results, some qualitative conclusions can be deduced. The reason of uneven flux in different branches of draft tube is given. Not only the vortex rope itself, but also the attenuation of the rotation strength is important in bringing on the uneven flux. The later leads to adverse pressure gradient, and changes the velocity profile. If the outlet contains more than one exit, the one that contains the vortex rope will lose flux because of this adverse pressure gradient. Several possible methods can be used to minimize the adverse pressure gradient domain in order to improve the efficiency of turbine machine.

  4. Quantification of Natural Gradient Flow Using Active Fiber Optic DTS in Sealed Boreholes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coleman, T. I.; Parker, B. L.; Munn, J. D.; Chalari, A.; Mondanos, M.

    2014-12-01

    Temperature has been used for many years to characterize flow in fractured rock systems. Fiber-optic distributed temperature sensing (DTS) was adopted by the oil/gas industry over two decades ago for monitoring processes in deep fractured rock environments. Improvements in DTS system resolutions, methodology advancements, and improved data processing techniques have caused recent popularity for shallow fractured rock hydrogeologic applications. A powerful advance in DTS methodology is the use of response data collected during active cable heating. When applied to borehole applications active heating creates a thermal disequilibrium in the aquifer system that enhances the detection of groundwater flow. Active DTS has been applied to open borehole environments; however, characterization methods based on open borehole measurements are limited in that only the effects of unnatural flow (i.e. vertical cross-connection and redistribution of flow creating local, induced flows) can be observed. To characterize natural gradient flow processes borehole effects need to be minimized.The literature shows borehole sealing using flexible impervious fabric liners creates a static water column in the well that eliminates the negative effects of cross-connection. Measurements in this sealed environment have been shown by others to be representative of natural gradient flow conditions, rather than the conditions created by the borehole short circuiting units or fractures with varying hydraulic head. A new method for flow system characterization using active DTS in sealed boreholes has been developed with excellent prospects for quantitation of natural gradient groundwater fluxes and related hydraulic properties. This project demonstrates the utility of using an analytical solution for calculating apparent thermal conductivities and natural gradient groundwater fluxes at depth-discrete intervals observed continuously along a borehole using active DTS. Groundwater flux data can then be

  5. Enhancement of critical heat flux in subcooled flow boiling of water by use of a volatile additive

    SciTech Connect

    Pabisz, R.A. Jr.; Bergles, A.E.

    1996-12-31

    The present investigation considers the effect of a 1-pentanol additive in water on the critical heat flux (CHF) and pressure drop in forced subcooled boiling. A small quantity of 1-pentanol was added to distilled water with the objective of getting an approximate 2% by weight mixture, which had been found to give superior performance in previous studies of pool and flow boiling. Experiments were performed using stainless steel tubes with internal diameters of 4.4 and 6.1 mm. Tests were conducted with mass fluxes of 4,400 kg/m{sup 2}s, exit pressures of 9 bar, length-to-diameter ratios of 25, and exit subcoolings from 65 to 90 C. Test sections were heated directly by DC power, and critical heat flux data were inferred from test-section burnout. The alcohol concentration was periodically checked by draining off a sample and performing a Proton Nuclear Magnetic Resonance scan on the mixture. At high subcoolings, the mixture exhibited an increase in the critical heat flux over that of pure water. However at low subcoolings there is a decrease in the critical heat flux. The increases in critical heat flux noted with the 1-pentanol mixture in this experiment were not as large as would be expected from saturated pool boiling results published by Van Stralen (1959). Pressure drop data for both the mixture and the pure water also were recorded. The 1-pentanol mixture, in general, exhibited larger pressure drops for the same conditions. Subcooled flow boiling has a wide array of commercial cooling applications, including blades in gas turbines, high power laser optics, plasma-facing components in fusion reactors, supercomputers, etc.

  6. Surface and subsurface flows and fluxes in a Florida salt marsh: Measurements, mass balances and process modeling (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meile, C. D.; Esch, M.; Gray, E. R.; Cable, J. E.

    2013-12-01

    Coastal wetlands play an important role in the exchange of carbon and nutrients between terrestrial and marine environments, with estimates exceeding 10% of the global ocean C inputs being attributed to wetlands. Constraining such contributions is challenging, as fluxes are bound to vary substantially over a range of timescales, including tidal inundation and seasons. An important factor determining export fluxes are subsurface processes, because fluid passing through the marsh subsurface becomes enriched in inorganic and organic carbon as well as nutrients released during decomposition of organic matter. Thus, even a modest flux of pore water to tidal creeks can lead to a significant loading of carbon and nutrients to the coastal ocean. Here, we present our efforts to quantify the role of groundwater in a microtidal saltmarsh located in the Big Bend region of the Florida Gulf Coast. We established a regional water balance, and from a survey of flow and dissolved organic carbon in tidal creeks between Econfina and Aucilla Rivers provide an estimate of DOC export, indicating that DOC significantly contributes to marsh carbon export. To constrain the role of subsurface processes, we also quantify seepage fluxes of pore water from tidal creek banks, using a combination of field experiments and modeling. Field work involved deploying devices designed to capture pore water seeping from creek banks at multiple heights of the bank. Results show that seepage varies dynamically with the tide, and indicate substantial spatial variability. Additionally, numerical flow modeling was used to assess the experimental design and the impact of the positioning of the seepage collector at the creek bank. Simulation results show significant variation in seepage with vertical position in the creek bank. This information on flow magnitude and dynamics was then combined with concentration measurements in creek and pore waters to scale up from individual observations to provide estimates

  7. Motion-correlated flow distortion and wave-induced biases in air-sea flux measurements from ships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prytherch, J.; Yelland, M. J.; Brooks, I. M.; Tupman, D. J.; Pascal, R. W.; Moat, B. I.; Norris, S. J.

    2015-09-01

    Direct measurements of the turbulent air-sea fluxes of momentum, heat, moisture and gases are often made using sensors mounted on ships. Ship-based turbulent wind measurements are corrected for platform motion using well established techniques, but biases at scales associated with wave and platform motion are often still apparent in the flux measurements. It has been uncertain whether this signal is due to time-varying distortion of the air flow over the platform or to wind-wave interactions impacting the turbulence. Methods for removing such motion-scale biases from scalar measurements have previously been published but their application to momentum flux measurements remains controversial. Here we show that the measured motion-scale bias has a dependence on the horizontal ship velocity and that a correction for it reduces the dependence of the measured momentum flux on the orientation of the ship to the wind. We conclude that the bias is due to experimental error and that time-varying motion-dependent flow distortion is the likely source.

  8. Motion-correlated flow distortion and wave-induced biases in air-sea flux measurements from ships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prytherch, J.; Yelland, M. J.; Brooks, I. M.; Tupman, D. J.; Pascal, R. W.; Moat, B. I.; Norris, S. J.

    2015-06-01

    Direct measurements of the turbulent air-sea fluxes of momentum, heat, moisture and gases. are often made using sensors mounted on ships. Ship-based turbulent wind measurements are corrected for platform motion using well established techniques, but biases at scales associated with wave and platform motion are often still apparent in the flux measurements. It has been uncertain whether this signal is due to time-varying distortion of the air flow over the platform, or to wind-wave interactions impacting the turbulence. Methods for removing such motion-scale biases from scalar measurements have previously been published but their application to momentum flux measurements remains controversial. Here we show that the measured motion-scale bias has a dependence on the horizontal ship velocity, and that a correction for it reduces the dependence of the measured momentum flux on the orientation of the ship to the wind. We conclude that the bias is due to experimental error, and that time-varying motion-dependent flow distortion is the likely source.

  9. Cattaneo-Christov Heat Flux Model for MHD Three-Dimensional Flow of Maxwell Fluid over a Stretching Sheet.

    PubMed

    Rubab, Khansa; Mustafa, M

    2016-01-01

    This letter investigates the MHD three-dimensional flow of upper-convected Maxwell (UCM) fluid over a bi-directional stretching surface by considering the Cattaneo-Christov heat flux model. This model has tendency to capture the characteristics of thermal relaxation time. The governing partial differential equations even after employing the boundary layer approximations are non linear. Accurate analytic solutions for velocity and temperature distributions are computed through well-known homotopy analysis method (HAM). It is noticed that velocity decreases and temperature rises when stronger magnetic field strength is accounted. Penetration depth of temperature is a decreasing function of thermal relaxation time. The analysis for classical Fourier heat conduction law can be obtained as a special case of the present work. To our knowledge, the Cattaneo-Christov heat flux model law for three-dimensional viscoelastic flow problem is just introduced here.

  10. On doubly stratified chemically reactive flow of Powell-Eyring liquid subject to non-Fourier heat flux theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayat, T.; Zubair, M.; Waqas, M.; Alsaedi, A.; Ayub, M.

    This investigation addresses the chemical reaction and double stratification effects in the flow induced by a nonlinear stretching surface with variable thickness. Flow formulation is developed using rheological expressions of Eyring-Powell liquid. Salient features of heat transfer are examined by considering non-Fourier heat flux model. Formulation is arranged for variable thermal conductivity. Flux model under consideration is the generalized form of Fourier's classical expression with thermal relaxation time. Ordinary differential systems are obtained through implementation of appropriate transformations. Convergent series solutions are constructed. Non-dimensional velocity, temperature, concentration, skin friction and Sherwood number are displayed and discussed. It is anticipated that thermal and concentration stratified parameters decay the temperature and concentration respectively.

  11. Cattaneo-Christov Heat Flux Model for MHD Three-Dimensional Flow of Maxwell Fluid over a Stretching Sheet

    PubMed Central

    Rubab, Khansa; Mustafa, M.

    2016-01-01

    This letter investigates the MHD three-dimensional flow of upper-convected Maxwell (UCM) fluid over a bi-directional stretching surface by considering the Cattaneo-Christov heat flux model. This model has tendency to capture the characteristics of thermal relaxation time. The governing partial differential equations even after employing the boundary layer approximations are non linear. Accurate analytic solutions for velocity and temperature distributions are computed through well-known homotopy analysis method (HAM). It is noticed that velocity decreases and temperature rises when stronger magnetic field strength is accounted. Penetration depth of temperature is a decreasing function of thermal relaxation time. The analysis for classical Fourier heat conduction law can be obtained as a special case of the present work. To our knowledge, the Cattaneo-Christov heat flux model law for three-dimensional viscoelastic flow problem is just introduced here. PMID:27093542

  12. Characterization of Beta-leptinotarsin-h and the Effects of Calcium Flux Antagonists on its Activity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    observation eliminated non-selective cation channels such as nicotinic, glutamatergic, purinergic P2X, and serotoni- nergic 5 - HT3 ligand-operated Ca 2C...Characterization of b-leptinotarsin-h and the effects of calcium flux antagonists on its activity Richard D. Croslanda,*, Richard W. Fitchb,1, Harry...presynaptic nerve terminals. We tested antagonists of Ca2C flux for their effects on b-leptinotarsin-h-stimulated Ca2C uptake in rat brain synaptosomes

  13. Cerebral blood flow response to functional activation

    PubMed Central

    Paulson, Olaf B; Hasselbalch, Steen G; Rostrup, Egill; Knudsen, Gitte Moos; Pelligrino, Dale

    2010-01-01

    Cerebral blood flow (CBF) and cerebral metabolic rate are normally coupled, that is an increase in metabolic demand will lead to an increase in flow. However, during functional activation, CBF and glucose metabolism remain coupled as they increase in proportion, whereas oxygen metabolism only increases to a minor degree—the so-called uncoupling of CBF and oxidative metabolism. Several studies have dealt with these issues, and theories have been forwarded regarding the underlying mechanisms. Some reports have speculated about the existence of a potentially deficient oxygen supply to the tissue most distant from the capillaries, whereas other studies point to a shift toward a higher degree of non-oxidative glucose consumption during activation. In this review, we argue that the key mechanism responsible for the regional CBF (rCBF) increase during functional activation is a tight coupling between rCBF and glucose metabolism. We assert that uncoupling of rCBF and oxidative metabolism is a consequence of a less pronounced increase in oxygen consumption. On the basis of earlier studies, we take into consideration the functional recruitment of capillaries and attempt to accommodate the cerebral tissue's increased demand for glucose supply during neural activation with recent evidence supporting a key function for astrocytes in rCBF regulation. PMID:19738630

  14. Complex Spontaneous Flows and Concentration Banding in Active Polar Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giomi, Luca; Marchetti, M. Cristina; Liverpool, Tanniemola B.

    2008-11-01

    We study the dynamical properties of active polar liquid crystalline films. Like active nematic films, active polar films undergo a dynamical transition to spontaneously flowing steady states. Spontaneous flow in polar fluids is, however, always accompanied by strong concentration inhomogeneities or “banding” not seen in nematics. In addition, a spectacular property unique to polar active films is their ability to generate spontaneously oscillating and banded flows even at low activity. The oscillatory flows become increasingly complicated for strong polarity.

  15. Flux rope proxies and fan-spine structures in active region NOAA 11897

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Y. J.; Li, T.; Zhang, J.

    2016-08-01

    Context. Flux ropes are composed of twisted magnetic fields and are closely connected with coronal mass ejections. The fan-spine magnetic topology is another type of complex magnetic fields. It has been reported by several authors, and is believed to be associated with null-point-type magnetic reconnection. Aims: We try to determine the number of flux rope proxies and reveal fan-spine structures in the complex active region (AR) NOAA 11897. Methods: Employing the high-resolution observations from the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) and the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS), we statistically investigated flux rope proxies in NOAA AR 11897 from 14 November 2013 to 19 November 2013 and display two fan-spine structures in this AR. Results: For the first time, we detect flux rope proxies of NOAA 11897 for a total of 30 times in four different locations during this AR's transference from solar east to west on the disk. Moreover, we notice that these flux rope proxies were tracked by active or eruptive material of filaments 12 times, while for the remaining 18 times they appeared as brightenings in the corona. These flux rope proxies were either tracked in both lower and higher temperature wavelengths or only detected in hot channels. None of these flux rope proxies was observed to erupt; they faded away gradually. In addition to these flux rope proxies, we detect for the first time a secondary fan-spine structure. It was covered by dome-shaped magnetic fields that belong to a larger fan-spine topology. Conclusions: These new observations imply that many flux ropes can exist in an AR and that the complexity of AR magnetic configurations is far beyond our imagination. Movies 1-8 are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  16. Flux-split algorithms for the multi-dimensional Euler equations with real gases. [in hypersonic flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grossman, B.; Walters, R. W.

    1989-01-01

    Upwind algorithms are developed for the numerical solution of the multidimensional Euler equations for real gases. Flux-splitting methods are derived which account for a general equation of state. Approximations to the state equation based on physical arguments result in simplified algorithms which may be implemented into existing perfect-gas codes. Applications of the method to several high-Mach-number high-temperature flows are presented for two and three space dimensions.

  17. Hydromagnetic Steady Flow of Maxwell Fluid over a Bidirectional Stretching Surface with Prescribed Surface Temperature and Prescribed Surface Heat Flux

    PubMed Central

    Shehzad, Sabir Ali; Alsaedi, Ahmad; Hayat, Tasawar

    2013-01-01

    This paper investigates the steady hydromagnetic three-dimensional boundary layer flow of Maxwell fluid over a bidirectional stretching surface. Both cases of prescribed surface temperature (PST) and prescribed surface heat flux (PHF) are considered. Computations are made for the velocities and temperatures. Results are plotted and analyzed for PST and PHF cases. Convergence analysis is presented for the velocities and temperatures. Comparison of PST and PHF cases is given and examined. PMID:23874523

  18. Flux balance analysis reveals acetate metabolism modulates cyclic electron flow and alternative glycolytic pathways in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Chapman, Stephen P; Paget, Caroline M; Johnson, Giles N; Schwartz, Jean-Marc

    2015-01-01

    Cells of the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii cultured in the presence of acetate perform mixotrophic growth, involving both photosynthesis and organic carbon assimilation. Under such conditions, cells exhibit a reduced capacity for photosynthesis but a higher growth rate, compared to phototrophic cultures. Better understanding of the down regulation of photosynthesis would enable more efficient conversion of carbon into valuable products like biofuels. In this study, Flux Balance Analysis (FBA) and Flux Variability Analysis (FVA) have been used with a genome scale model of C. reinhardtii to examine changes in intracellular flux distribution in order to explain their changing physiology. Additionally, a reaction essentiality analysis was performed to identify which reaction subsets are essential for a given growth condition. Our results suggest that exogenous acetate feeds into a modified tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, which bypasses the CO2 evolution steps, explaining increases in biomass, consistent with experimental data. In addition, reactions of the oxidative pentose phosphate and glycolysis pathways, inactive under phototrophic conditions, show substantial flux under mixotrophic conditions. Importantly, acetate addition leads to an increased flux through cyclic electron flow (CEF), but results in a repression of CO2 fixation via Rubisco, explaining the down regulation of photosynthesis. However, although CEF enhances growth on acetate, it is not essential-impairment of CEF results in alternative metabolic pathways being increased. We have demonstrated how the reactions of photosynthesis interconnect with carbon metabolism on a global scale, and how systems approaches play a viable tool in understanding complex relationships at the scale of the organism.

  19. Flux balance analysis reveals acetate metabolism modulates cyclic electron flow and alternative glycolytic pathways in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, Stephen P.; Paget, Caroline M.; Johnson, Giles N.; Schwartz, Jean-Marc

    2015-01-01

    Cells of the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii cultured in the presence of acetate perform mixotrophic growth, involving both photosynthesis and organic carbon assimilation. Under such conditions, cells exhibit a reduced capacity for photosynthesis but a higher growth rate, compared to phototrophic cultures. Better understanding of the down regulation of photosynthesis would enable more efficient conversion of carbon into valuable products like biofuels. In this study, Flux Balance Analysis (FBA) and Flux Variability Analysis (FVA) have been used with a genome scale model of C. reinhardtii to examine changes in intracellular flux distribution in order to explain their changing physiology. Additionally, a reaction essentiality analysis was performed to identify which reaction subsets are essential for a given growth condition. Our results suggest that exogenous acetate feeds into a modified tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, which bypasses the CO2 evolution steps, explaining increases in biomass, consistent with experimental data. In addition, reactions of the oxidative pentose phosphate and glycolysis pathways, inactive under phototrophic conditions, show substantial flux under mixotrophic conditions. Importantly, acetate addition leads to an increased flux through cyclic electron flow (CEF), but results in a repression of CO2 fixation via Rubisco, explaining the down regulation of photosynthesis. However, although CEF enhances growth on acetate, it is not essential—impairment of CEF results in alternative metabolic pathways being increased. We have demonstrated how the reactions of photosynthesis interconnect with carbon metabolism on a global scale, and how systems approaches play a viable tool in understanding complex relationships at the scale of the organism. PMID:26175742

  20. On the heat flux vector for flowing granular materials--Part I: effective thermal conductivity and background

    SciTech Connect

    Massoudi, Mehrdad

    2006-09-10

    Heat transfer plays a major role in the processing of many particulate materials. The heat flux vector is commonly modelled by the Fourier’s law of heat conduction and for complex materials such as nonlinear fluids, porous media, or granular materials, the coeffcient of thermal conductivity is generalized by assuming that it would depend on a host of material and kinematical parameters such as temperature, shear rate, porosity or concentration, etc. In Part I, we will give a brief review of the basic equations of thermodynamics and heat transfer to indicate the importance of the modelling of the heat flux vector. We will also discuss the concept of effective thermal conductivity (ETC) in granular and porous media. In Part II, we propose and subsequently derive a properly frame-invariant constitutive relationship for the heat flux vector for a (single phase) flowing granular medium. Standard methods in continuum mechanics such as representation theorems and homogenization techniques are used. It is shown that the heat flux vector in addition to being proportional to the temperature gradient (the Fourier’s law), could also depend on the gradient of density (or volume fraction), and D (the symmetric part of the velocity gradient) in an appropriate manner. The emphasis in this paper is on the idea that for complex non-linear materials it is the heat flux vector which should be studied; obtaining or proposing generalized form of the thermal conductivity is not always appropriate or suffcient.

  1. Drift flux model as approximation of two fluid model for two phase dispersed and slug flow in tube

    SciTech Connect

    Nigmatulin, R.I.

    1995-09-01

    The analysis of one-dimensional schematizing for non-steady two-phase dispersed and slug flow in tube is presented. Quasi-static approximation, when inertia forces because of the accelerations of the phases may be neglected, is considered. Gas-liquid bubbly and slug vertical upward flows are analyzed. Non-trivial theoretical equations for slip velocity for these flows are derived. Juxtaposition of the derived equations for slip velocity with the famous Zuber-Findlay correlation as cross correlation coefficients is criticized. The generalization of non-steady drift flux Wallis theory taking into account influence of wall friction on the bubbly or slug flows for kinematical waves is considered.

  2. Colony Rheology: Active Arthropods Generate Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniels, Karen; Mann, Michael; Charbonneau, Patrick

    2015-03-01

    Hydrodynamic-like flows are observed in biological systems as varied as bacteria, insects, birds, fish, and mammals. Both the phenomenology (e.g. front instabilities, milling motions) and the interaction types (hydrodynamic, direct contact, psychological, excluded-volume) strongly vary between systems, but a question common to all of them is to understand the role of particle-scale fluctuations in controlling large-scale rheological behaviors. We will address these questions through experiments on a new system, Tyrolichus casei (cheese mites), which live in dense, self-mixing colonies composed of a mixture of living mites and inert flour/detritus. In experiments performed in a Hele-Shaw geometry, we observe that the rheology of a colony is strongly dependent on the relative concentration of active and inactive particles. In addition to spreading flows, we also observe that the system can generate convective circulation and auto-compaction.

  3. Time-resolved X-ray PIV technique for diagnosing opaque biofluid flow with insufficient X-ray fluxes.

    PubMed

    Jung, Sung Yong; Park, Han Wook; Kim, Bo Heum; Lee, Sang Joon

    2013-05-01

    X-ray imaging is used to visualize the biofluid flow phenomena in a nondestructive manner. A technique currently used for quantitative visualization is X-ray particle image velocimetry (PIV). Although this technique provides a high spatial resolution (less than 10 µm), significant hemodynamic parameters are difficult to obtain under actual physiological conditions because of the limited temporal resolution of the technique, which in turn is due to the relatively long exposure time (~10 ms) involved in X-ray imaging. This study combines an image intensifier with a high-speed camera to reduce exposure time, thereby improving temporal resolution. The image intensifier amplifies light flux by emitting secondary electrons in the micro-channel plate. The increased incident light flux greatly reduces the exposure time (below 200 µs). The proposed X-ray PIV system was applied to high-speed blood flows in a tube, and the velocity field information was successfully obtained. The time-resolved X-ray PIV system can be employed to investigate blood flows at beamlines with insufficient X-ray fluxes under specific physiological conditions. This method facilitates understanding of the basic hemodynamic characteristics and pathological mechanism of cardiovascular diseases.

  4. Modeling and experiments for wall heat flux partitioning during subcooled flow boiling of water at low pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, Nilanjana

    Void fraction during subcooled flow boiling depends on the amount of vapor generated at the wall and condensation in the bulk. Partitioning of heat flux at the wall is required to determine the fraction of the energy that is utilized for vapor production. The wall heat flux models currently available in the literature were developed for high-pressure applications and have too much empiricism built into them. As such their deficiencies become pronounced when applied to low pressures (1--5 bar), which are of interest in passively cooled advanced reactors (e.g., AP 600). In this work a mechanistic model for nucleate boiling heat flux as a function of wall superheat has been developed. The premise of the proposed model is that the entire energy from the wall is first transferred to the superheated liquid layer adjacent to the wall, either by transient conduction or forced convection. A fraction of this energy is then utilized for vapor generation. Contribution of each of the heat transfer mechanism---forced convection, transient conduction, and vapor generation, has been quantified in terms of nucleation site densities, bubble departure and lift off diameters, bubble release frequency, flow parameters like velocity, inlet subcooling, wall superheat, and fluid and surface properties, including system pressures. In this work, the vapor generation component at the wall is computed independently and not as factors of other wall heat flux components as has been done in most past studies. To support the model development, subcooled flow boiling experiments were conducted at pressures of 1.03 to 3.2 bar for a wide range of mass fluxes (124 kg/m2s to 926 kg/m2s ), heat fluxes (2.5 W/cm2 to 113 W/cm2) and for contact angles varying from 30° to 90°. These experiments were conducted using a vertical Copper plate and a Zircalloy-4 nine-rod bundle. Experimental data were also utilized for developing empirical correlations for nucleation site density, bubble departure and lift off

  5. ACTIVE: a program to calculate and plot reaction rates from ANISN calculated fluxes

    SciTech Connect

    Judd, J.L.

    1981-12-01

    The ACTIVE code calculates spatial heating rates, tritium production rates, neutron reaction rates, and energy spectra from particle fluxes calculated by ANISN. ACTIVE has a variety of input options including the capability to plot all calculated spatial distributions. The code was primarily designed for use with fusion first wall/blanket systems, but could be applied to any one-dimensional problem.

  6. Identities in flux: cognitive network activation in times of change.

    PubMed

    Menon, Tanya; Smith, Edward Bishop

    2014-05-01

    Using a dynamic cognitive model, we experimentally test two competing hypotheses that link identity and cognitive network activation during times of change. On one hand, affirming people's sense of power might give them confidence to think beyond the densest subsections of their social networks. Alternatively, if such power affirmations conflict with people's more stable status characteristics, this could create tension, deterring people from considering their networks' diversity. We test these competing hypotheses experimentally by priming people at varying levels of status with power (high/low) and asking them to report their social networks. We show that confirming identity-not affirming power-cognitively prepares people to broaden their social networks when the world is changing around them. The emotional signature of having a confirmed identity is feeling comfortable and in control, which mediates network activation. We suggest that stable, confirmed identities are the foundation from which people can exhibit greater network responsiveness.

  7. Improved thrust calculations of active magnetic bearings considering fringing flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Seok-Myeong; Kim, Kwan-Ho; Ko, Kyoung-Jin; Choi, Ji-Hwan; Sung, So-Young; Lee, Yong-Bok

    2012-04-01

    A methodology for deriving fringing permeance in axisymmetric devices such as active thrust magnetic bearings (ATMBs) is presented. The methodology is used to develop an improved equivalent magnetic circuit (EMC) for ATMBs, which considers the fringing effect. This EMC was used to characterize the force between the housing and mover and the dependence of thrust and inductance on the air gap and input current, respectively. These characteristics were validated by comparison with those obtained by the finite element method and in experiments.

  8. Two-phase flow characteristic of inverted bubbly, slug and annular flow in post-critical heat flux region

    SciTech Connect

    Ishii, M.; Denten, J.P.

    1988-01-01

    Inverted annular flow can be visualized as a liquid jet-like core surrounded by a vapor annulus. While many analytical and experimental studies of heat transfer in this regime have been performed, there is very little understanding of the basic hydrodynamics of the post-CHF flow field. However, a recent experimental study was done that was able to successfully investigate the effects of various steady-state inlet flow parameters on the post-CHF hydrodynamics of the film boiling of a single phase liquid jet. This study was carried out by means of a visual photographic analysis of an idealized single phase core inverted annular flow initial geometry (single phase liquid jet core surrounded by a coaxial annulus of gas). In order to extend this study, a subsequent flow visualization of an idealized two-phase core inverted annular flow geometry (two-phase central jet core, surrounded by a coaxial annulus of gas) was carried out. The objective of this second experimental study was to investigate the effect of steady-state inlet, pre-CHF two-phase jet core parameters on the hydrodynamics of the post-CHF flow field. In actual film boiling situations, two-phase flows with net positive qualities at the CHF point are encountered. Thus, the focus of the present experimental study was on the inverted bubbly, slug, and annular flow fields in the post dryout film boiling region. Observed post dryout hydrodynamic behavior is reported. A correlation for the axial extent of the transition flow pattern between inverted annular and dispersed droplet flow (the agitated regime) is developed. It is shown to depend strongly on inlet jet core parameters and jet void fraction at the dryout point. 45 refs., 9 figs., 4 tabs.

  9. Shuttle program. Solar activity prediction of sunspot numbers, predicted solar radio flux

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, G. G.; Newman, S. R.

    1980-01-01

    A solar activity prediction technique for monthly mean sunspot numbers over a period of approximately ten years from February 1979 to January 1989 is presented. This includes the predicted maximum epoch of solar cycle 21, approximately January 1980, and the predicted minimum epoch of solar cycle 22, approximately March 1987. Additionally, the solar radio flux 10.7 centimeter smooth values are included for the same time frame using a smooth 13 month empirical relationship. The incentive for predicting solar activity values is the requirement of solar flux data as input to upper atmosphere density models utilized in mission planning satellite orbital lifetime studies.

  10. Base flow and stormwater net fluxes of carbon and trace metals to the Mediterranean sea by an urbanized small river.

    PubMed

    Nicolau, R; Lucas, Y; Merdy, P; Raynaud, M

    2012-12-15

    Base flow and storm flow events from a small, urbanized Mediterranean river located in the South of France were studied to evaluate net fluxes from the continent to the coastal sea water. Considered variables were: pH, conductivity, redox potential, temperature, dissolved O(2), SPM (Suspended Particulate Matter), Cl(-), NO(3)(-), SO(4)(2-), Na(+), K(+), Mg(2+), Ca(2+), DOC (Dissolved Organic Carbon), Cu, Zn, Cd and Pb in the dissolved fraction and POC (Particulate Organic Carbon), Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Cd and Pb in the particulate fraction. If rainfall intensity and antecedent rainfall history were sufficient to explain many observed variations, the patterns of particles and solutes transport greatly varied from one storm event to another. SPM, POC, particulate Cu, Zn, Cd and Pb had similar behavior characterized by an immediate increase at the beginning of the storm flow and the highest values at the first high discharge peak. Among dissolved species, Cl(-), SO(4)(2-), Na(+), Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) had a behavior very similar one to the other. They exhibited high concentrations and enrichment factors at the beginning of the storm flow, due to fast leaching of highly labile species. Their concentrations decreased during posterior discharge peaks but positive enrichment factors indicated permanent sources for these ions. DOC, K(+) and NO(3)(-) had different behaviors which indicated sources positively correlated with rainfall intensity. A 3D-fluorescence study showed that the humified organic matter contribution to DOC increased during storm flow. Relationships between DOC and dissolved Cu and Pb indicated differences in organic-matter binding properties between dry and humid periods. Storm flow were responsible for more than 90% of the annual output to the sea of SPM, POC and particulate Cu, Zn, Cd and Pb and more than 70% for dissolved Pb, Cd, NO(3)(-) and DOC. For the other dissolved species, outputs were balanced between base flow and storm flow. Contrary to what

  11. Development of high flux thermal neutron generator for neutron activation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vainionpaa, Jaakko H.; Chen, Allan X.; Piestrup, Melvin A.; Gary, Charles K.; Jones, Glenn; Pantell, Richard H.

    2015-05-01

    The new model DD110MB neutron generator from Adelphi Technology produces thermal (<0.5 eV) neutron flux that is normally achieved in a nuclear reactor or larger accelerator based systems. Thermal neutron fluxes of 3-5 · 107 n/cm2/s are measured. This flux is achieved using four ion beams arranged concentrically around a target chamber containing a compact moderator with a central sample cylinder. Fast neutron yield of ∼2 · 1010 n/s is created at the titanium surface of the target chamber. The thickness and material of the moderator is selected to maximize the thermal neutron flux at the center. The 2.5 MeV neutrons are quickly thermalized to energies below 0.5 eV and concentrated at the sample cylinder. The maximum flux of thermal neutrons at the target is achieved when approximately half of the neutrons at the sample area are thermalized. In this paper we present simulation results used to characterize performance of the neutron generator. The neutron flux can be used for neutron activation analysis (NAA) prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) for determining the concentrations of elements in many materials. Another envisioned use of the generator is production of radioactive isotopes. DD110MB is small enough for modest-sized laboratories and universities. Compared to nuclear reactors the DD110MB produces comparable thermal flux but provides reduced administrative and safety requirements and it can be run in pulsed mode, which is beneficial in many neutron activation techniques.

  12. Experimental study of thermocapillary flows in a thin liquid layer with heat fluxes imposed on the free surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lai, Chun-Liang; Greenberg, Paul S.; Chai, An-Ti

    1988-01-01

    To study thermocapillary flows in a two-dimensional thin liquid layer with heat fluxes imposed on the free surface experimentally, a long tray configuration was employed to simulate the infinite layer. The surface temperature distribution due to thermocapillary convective for different flow regimes was measured and compared with theoretical predictions. A short tray configuration was also employed to study the end wall effects (insulating or conducting). The results show that for a strong convection flow with an insulating wall as the boundary the surface temperature distribution became quite uniform. Consequently, the thermocapillary driving force was greatly reduced. On the other hand, a strong fluid motion always existed adjacent to the conducting wall because of the large surface temperature gradient near the wall.

  13. Hydrodynamic and thermal slip flow boundary layers over a flat plate with constant heat flux boundary condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aziz, Abdul

    2010-03-01

    In this paper the boundary layer flow over a flat plat with slip flow and constant heat flux surface condition is studied. Because the plate surface temperature varies along the x direction, the momentum and energy equations are coupled due to the presence of the temperature gradient along the plate surface. This coupling, which is due to the presence of the thermal jump term in Maxwell slip condition, renders the momentum and energy equations non-similar. As a preliminary study, this paper ignores this coupling due to thermal jump condition so that the self-similar nature of the equations is preserved. Even this fundamental problem for the case of a constant heat flux boundary condition has remained unexplored in the literature. It was therefore chosen for study in this paper. For the hydrodynamic boundary layer, velocity and shear stress distributions are presented for a range of values of the parameter characterizing the slip flow. This slip parameter is a function of the local Reynolds number, the local Knudsen number, and the tangential momentum accommodation coefficient representing the fraction of the molecules reflected diffusively at the surface. As the slip parameter increases, the slip velocity increases and the wall shear stress decreases. These results confirm the conclusions reached in other recent studies. The energy equation is solved to determine the temperature distribution in the thermal boundary layer for a range of values for both the slip parameter as well as the fluid Prandtl number. The increase in Prandtl number and/or the slip parameter reduces the dimensionless surface temperature. The actual surface temperature at any location of x is a function of the local Knudsen number, the local Reynolds number, the momentum accommodation coefficient, Prandtl number, other flow properties, and the applied heat flux.

  14. Control of glycolytic flux in Zymomonas mobilis by glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Snoep, J.L. |; Arfman, N.; Yomano, L.P.; Ingram, L.O.; Westerhoff, H.V.; Conway, T.

    1996-07-20

    Alycolytic genes in Zymomonas mobilis are highly expressed and constitute half of the cytoplasmic protein. The first four genes (glf, zwf, edd, glk) in this pathway form an operon encoding a glucose permease, glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6-P dehydrogenase), 6-phosphogluconate dehydratase, and glucokinase, respectively. Each gene was overexpressed from a tac promoter to investigate the control of glycolysis during the early stages of batch fermentation when flux (qCO{sub 2}) is highest. Almost half of flux control appears to reside with G6-P dehydrogenase (C{sub G6-P dehydrogenase}{sup J} = 0.4). Although Z. mobilis exhibits one of the highest rates of glycolysis known, recombinants with elevated G6-P dehydrogenase had a 10% to 13% higher glycolytic flux than the native organism. A small increase in flux was also observed for recombinants expressing glf. Results obtained did not allow a critical evaluation of glucokinase and this enzyme may also represent an important control point. 6-Phosphogluconate dehydratase appears to be saturating at native levels. With constructs containing the full operon, growth rate and flux were both reduced, complicating interpretations. However, results obtained were also consistent with G6-P dehydrogenase as a primary site of control. Flux was 17% higher in operon constructs which exhibited a 17% increase in G6-P dehydrogenase specific activity, relative to the average of other operon constructs which contain a frameshift mutation in zwf.

  15. Separated Vs. homogeneous two-phase flow in violent strombolian activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pioli, L.; Cashman, K.; Wallace, P.

    2007-12-01

    The term "violent Strombolian" was first used to describe mafic eruptions that formed ash-charged columns up to 6 km high, and dispersed material up to a few hundred km from the source (Walker, 1971). These eruptions are often discontinuous and strongly pulsatory and are typically associated with simultaneous effusive activity: they form composite deposits constituted by a cinder cone, tephra blanket, and lava flows spreading from lateral vents. This eruptive regime is typical of water-rich mafic magmas and is characterized by average mass flows (103-105 kg/s) intermediate between Hawaiian and subplinian regimes. Within this interval, there is a direct correlation between explosivity, as defined by tephra production, and magma flux. When magma flow exceeds 105 kg/s, gas segregation is no longer possible and eruptive activity takes the form of sustained columns (subplinian to plinian activity). At eruption rates below 103 kg/s passive degassing processes dominate, causing lava effusion and/or mild explosive activity (Strombolian to Hawaiian). We suggest that very shallow gas segregation processes play a fundamental role in violent strombolian dynamics, affecting both explosive and effusive activity. Simultaneous eruption of tephra from the cone and lava flows from lateral vents requires both a gas-rich mixture ascending the central conduit and gas-poor lava flowing in the lateral system. Uneven distribution of liquid and gas phases is possible only when gas and magma are characterized by different momentum, i.e. the flow is separated. At a first approximation, the phase distribution is controlled by the two-phase flow regime (bubbly, slug, churn or annular), both gas and liquid fluxes, and the ratio between conduit and dike diameters. To quantify this process, we analyze in detail the dynamics of a particularly long-lived and well-known eruption of the last century- the Paricutin eruption (1943-1952) of central Mexico. Specific two-phase flow models are then used to

  16. Comparison of Heat Flux Gages for High Enthalpy Flows - NASA Ames and IRS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loehle, Stefan; Nawaz, Anuscheh; Herdrich, Georg; Fasoulas, Stefanos; Martinez, Edward; Raiche, George

    2016-01-01

    This article is a companion to a paper on heat flux measurements as initiated under a Space Act Agreement in 2011. The current focus of this collaboration between the Institute of Space Systems (IRS) of the University of Stuttgart and NASA Ames Research Center is the comparison and refinement of diagnostic measurements. A first experimental campaign to test different heat flux gages in the NASA Interaction Heating Facility (IHF) and the Plasmawindkanaele (PWK) at IRS was established. This paper focuses on the results of the measurements conducted at IRS. The tested gages included a at face and hemispherical probe head, a 4" hemispherical slug calorimeter, a null-point calorimeter from Ames and a null-point calorimeter developed for this purpose at IRS. The Ames null-point calorimeter was unfortunately defective upon arrival. The measured heat fluxes agree fairly well with each other. The reason for discrepancies can be attributed to signal-to-noise levels and the probe geometry.

  17. Flow-activated ion channels in vascular endothelium.

    PubMed

    Gautam, Mamta; Gojova, Andrea; Barakat, Abdul I

    2006-01-01

    The ability of vascular endothelial cells (ECs) to respond to fluid mechanical forces associated with blood flow is essential for flow-mediated vasoregulation and arterial wall remodeling. Abnormalities in endothelial responses to flow also play a role in the development of atherosclerosis. Although our understanding of the endothelial signaling pathways stimulated by flow has greatly increased over the past two decades, the mechanisms by which ECs sense flow remain largely unknown. Activation of flow-sensitive ion channels is among the fastest known endothelial responses to flow; therefore, these ion channels have been proposed as candidate flow sensors. This review focuses on: 1) describing the various types of flow-sensitive ion channels that have been reported in ECs, 2) discussing the implications of activation of these ion channels for endothelial function, and 3) proposing candidate mechanisms for activation of flow-sensitive ion channels.

  18. Analytical study of Cattaneo-Christov heat flux model for a boundary layer flow of Oldroyd-B fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    F, M. Abbasi; M, Mustafa; S, A. Shehzad; M, S. Alhuthali; T, Hayat

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the Cattaneo-Christov heat flux model for a two-dimensional laminar boundary layer flow of an incompressible Oldroyd-B fluid over a linearly stretching sheet. Mathematical formulation of the boundary layer problems is given. The nonlinear partial differential equations are converted into the ordinary differential equations using similarity transformations. The dimensionless velocity and temperature profiles are obtained through optimal homotopy analysis method (OHAM). The influences of the physical parameters on the velocity and the temperature are pointed out. The results show that the temperature and the thermal boundary layer thickness are smaller in the Cattaneo-Christov heat flux model than those in the Fourier’s law of heat conduction. Project supported by the Deanship of Scientific Research (DSR) King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia (Grant No. 32-130-36-HiCi).

  19. Active Flow Control Strategies Using Surface Pressure Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, Vikas; Alvi, Farrukh S.

    2010-01-01

    Evaluate the efficacy of Microjets Can we eliminate/minimize flow separation? Is the flow unsteadiness reduced? Guidelines for an active control Search for an appropriate sensor. Examine for means to develop a flow model for identifying the state of flow over the surface Guidelines toward future development of a Simple and Robust control methodology

  20. Critical heat flux in locally heated liquid film moving under the action of gas flow in a mini-channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tkachenko, E. M.; Zaitsev, D. V.; Orlik, E. V.; Kabov, O. A.

    2016-10-01

    Thin and ultra thin liquid films driven by a forced gas/vapor flow (stratified or annular flows), i.e. shear-driven liquid films in a narrow channel, is one of the promising candidate for the thermal management of advanced semiconductor devices with high local heat release. In experiments performed in this paper with locally heated shear-driven liquid films of water the effect of various conditions, such as flow rates of liquid and gas and channel height, on critical heat flux (CHF) was investigated. In experiments the record value of CHF as high as 540 W/cm2 has been achieved. The heat spreading into the substrate and the heat loses into the atmosphere in total don't exceed 30% at heat fluxes higher than 200 W/cm2. Comparison of shear-driven liquid films and gravity-driven liquid films showed that CHF in shear-driven films up to 10 times higher than in gravity-driven liquid films. Thus, prospect of using shear- driven films of water in modern cooling systems of semiconductor devices was confirmed.

  1. High Flux Microchannel Receiver Development with Adap-tive Flow Control

    SciTech Connect

    Drost, Kevin

    2015-08-15

    This project is focused on the demonstration of a microchannel-based solar receiver (MSR). The MSR concept consists of using a modular arrangement of arrayed microchannels to heat a working fluid in a concentrating solar receiver, allowing a much higher solar flux on the receiver and consequently a significant reduction in thermal losses, size, and cost.

  2. Minimum activation martensitic alloys for surface disposal after exposure to neutron flux

    DOEpatents

    Lechtenberg, Thomas

    1985-01-01

    Steel alloys for long-term exposure to neutron flux have a martensitic microstructure and contain chromium, carbon, tungsten, vanadium and preferably titanium. Activation of the steel is held to within acceptable limits for eventual surface disposal by stringently controlling the impurity levels of Ni, Mo, Cu, N, Co, Nb, Al and Mn.

  3. Gamma-ray-spectroscopy following high-flux 14-MeV neutron activation

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, R.E.

    1981-10-12

    The Rotating Target Neutron Source (RTNS-I), a high-intensity source of 14-MeV neutrons at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), has been used for applications in activation analysis, inertial-confinement-fusion diagnostic development, and fission decay-heat studies. The fast-neutron flux from the RTNS-I is at least 50 times the maximum fluxes available from typical neutron generators, making these applications possible. Facilities and procedures necessary for gamma-ray spectroscopy of samples irradiated at the RTNS-I were developed.

  4. DEVELOPMENT OF LOW-DIFFUSION FLUX-SPLITTING METHODS FOR DENSE GAS-SOLID FLOWS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The development of a class of low-diffusion upwinding methods for computing dense gas-solid flows is presented in this work. An artificial compressibility/low-Mach preconditioning strategy is developed for a hyperbolic two-phase flow equation system consisting of separate solids ...

  5. Optimization of Magneto-Rheological Damper for Maximizing Magnetic Flux Density in the Fluid Flow Gap Through FEA and GA Approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishna, Hemanth; Kumar, Hemantha; Gangadharan, Kalluvalappil

    2016-06-01

    A magneto rheological (MR) fluid damper offers cost effective solution for semiactive vibration control in an automobile suspension. The performance of MR damper is significantly depends on the electromagnetic circuit incorporated into it. The force developed by MR fluid damper is highly influenced by the magnetic flux density induced in the fluid flow gap. In the present work, optimization of electromagnetic circuit of an MR damper is discussed in order to maximize the magnetic flux density. The optimization procedure was proposed by genetic algorithm and design of experiments techniques. The result shows that the fluid flow gap size less than 1.12 mm cause significant increase of magnetic flux density.

  6. Numerical simulation of multi-dimensional two-phase flow based on flux vector splitting

    SciTech Connect

    Staedtke, H.; Franchello, G.; Worth, B.

    1995-09-01

    This paper describes a new approach to the numerical simulation of transient, multidimensional two-phase flow. The development is based on a fully hyperbolic two-fluid model of two-phase flow using separated conservation equations for the two phases. Features of the new model include the existence of real eigenvalues, and a complete set of independent eigenvectors which can be expressed algebraically in terms of the major dependent flow parameters. This facilitates the application of numerical techniques specifically developed for high speed single-phase gas flows which combine signal propagation along characteristic lines with the conservation property with respect to mass, momentum and energy. Advantages of the new model for the numerical simulation of one- and two- dimensional two-phase flow are discussed.

  7. Niacin alleviates TRAIL-mediated colon cancer cell death via autophagy flux activation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung-Wook; Lee, Ju-Hee; Moon, Ji-Hong; Nazim, Uddin M.D.; Lee, You-Jin; Seol, Jae-Won; Hur, Jin; Eo, Seong-Kug; Lee, John-Hwa; Park, Sang-Youel

    2016-01-01

    Niacin, also known as vitamin B3 or nicotinamide is a water-soluble vitamin that is present in black beans and rice among other foods. Niacin is well known as an inhibitor of metastasis in human breast carcinoma cells but the effect of niacin treatment on TRAIL-mediated apoptosis is unknown. Here, we show that niacin plays an important role in the regulation of autophagic flux and protects tumor cells against TRAIL-mediated apoptosis. Our results indicated that niacin activated autophagic flux in human colon cancer cells and the autophagic flux activation protected tumor cells from TRAIL-induced dysfunction of mitochondrial membrane potential and tumor cell death. We also demonstrated that ATG5 siRNA and autophagy inhibitor blocked the niacin-mediated inhibition of TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Taken together, our study is the first report demonstrating that niacin inhibits TRAIL-induced apoptosis through activation of autophagic flux in human colon cancer cells. And our results also suggest that autophagy inhibitors including genetic and pharmacological tools may be a successful therapeutics during anticancer therapy using TRAIL. PMID:26517672

  8. Heat flux and plasma flow in the far scrape-off layer of the inboard poloidal field null configuration in QUEST

    SciTech Connect

    Onchi, T.; Zushi, H.; Hanada, K.; Idei, H.; Hasegawa, M.; Nakamura, K.; Fujisawa, A.; Nagashima, Y.; Matsuoka, K.; Kuzmin, A.; Kawasaki, S.; Nakashima, H.; Higashijima, A.; Watanabe, O.; Mishra, K.; Mahira, Y.; Tashima, S.; Banerjee, S.; Nagaoka, K.

    2015-08-15

    Heat flux and plasma flow in the scrape-off layer (SOL) are examined for the inboard poloidal field null (IPN) configuration of the spherical tokamak QUEST. In the plasma current (I{sub p}) ramp-up phase, high heat flux (>1 MW/m{sup 2}) and supersonic flow (Mach number M > 1) are found to be present simultaneously in the far-SOL. The heat flux is generated by energetic electrons excursed from the last closed flux surface. Supersonic flows in the poloidal and toroidal directions are correlated with each other. In the quasi-steady state, sawtooth-like oscillation of I{sub p} at 20 Hz is observed. Heat flux and subsonic plasma flow in the far-SOL are modified corresponding to the I{sub p}-oscillation. The heat flow caused by motion of energetic electrons and the bulk-particle transport to the far-SOL is enhanced during the low-I{sub p} phase. Modification of plasma flow in the far SOL occurs earlier than the I{sub p} crash. The M–I{sub p} curve has a limit-cycle characteristic with sawtooth-like oscillation. Such a core–SOL relationship indicates that the far-SOL flow plays an important role in sustaining the oscillation of I{sub p} in the IPN configuration.

  9. The relationship between absolute vorticity flux along the main flow and convection heat transfer in a tube inserting a twisted tape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Zhi-Min; Sun, Dong-Liang; Wang, Liang-Bi

    2009-09-01

    As passive enhancement devices, twisted tape insert has been used for almost a century, the most dominant heat transfer enhancement mechanism of circular tube fitted with twisted tape is the secondary flow generated by the tape. There is a parameter to specify the intensity of secondary flow, but this parameter cannot be applied to more general cases. Here cross-averaged absolute vorticity flux in the main flow direction is used to specify the intensity of secondary flow produced by twisted tape inserted in a tube. The relationship between the intensity of secondary flow and the intensity of laminar convective heat transfer is studied using a numerical method. The results reveal that the cross-averaged absolute vorticity flux in the main flow direction can reflect the intensity of secondary flow and a significant relationship between this cross-averaged absolute vorticity flux and Nusselt number exists for studied cases. The presented results validate that the cross-averaged absolute vorticity flux in the main flow direction is a general specifying of the intensity of secondary flow and can be used in other cases.

  10. High Resolution Simulations of Tearing and Flux-Rope Formation in Active Region Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyper, P. F.; DeVore, C. R.; Karpen, J. T.

    2015-12-01

    Observations of coronal jets increasingly suggest that local fragmentation and the generation of small-scale structure plays an important role in the dynamics of these events. In the magnetically closed corona, jets most often occur near active regions and are associated with an embedded-bipole topology consisting of a 3D magnetic null point atop a domed fan separatrix surface at the base of a coronal loop. Impulsive reconnection in the vicinity of the null point between the magnetic fluxes inside and outside the dome launches the jet along the loop. Wyper & Pontin 2014 showed that the 3D current layers that facilitate such reconnection are explosively unstable to tearing, generating complex flux-rope structures. Utilizing the adaptive mesh capabilities of the Adaptively Refined Magnetohydrodynamics Solver, we investigate the generation of such fine-scale structure in high-resolution simulations of active-region jets. We observe the formation of multiple flux-rope structures forming across the fan separatrix surface and discuss the photospheric signatures of these flux ropes and the associated local topology change. We also introduce a new way of identifying such flux ropes in the magnetic field, based on structures observed in the magnetic squashing factor calculated on the photosphere. By tracking the position and number of new null points produced by the fragmentation, we also show that the formation of flux ropes can occur away from the main null region on the flanks of the separatrix dome and that the jet curtain has a highly complex magnetic structure. This work was funded through an appointment to the NASA Postdoctoral Program and by NASA's Living With a Star TR&T program.

  11. Ultradiscrete optimal velocity model: a cellular-automaton model for traffic flow and linear instability of high-flux traffic.

    PubMed

    Kanai, Masahiro; Isojima, Shin; Nishinari, Katsuhiro; Tokihiro, Tetsuji

    2009-05-01

    In this paper, we propose the ultradiscrete optimal velocity model, a cellular-automaton model for traffic flow, by applying the ultradiscrete method for the optimal velocity model. The optimal velocity model, defined by a differential equation, is one of the most important models; in particular, it successfully reproduces the instability of high-flux traffic. It is often pointed out that there is a close relation between the optimal velocity model and the modified Korteweg-de Vries (mkdV) equation, a soliton equation. Meanwhile, the ultradiscrete method enables one to reduce soliton equations to cellular automata which inherit the solitonic nature, such as an infinite number of conservation laws, and soliton solutions. We find that the theory of soliton equations is available for generic differential equations and the simulation results reveal that the model obtained reproduces both absolutely unstable and convectively unstable flows as well as the optimal velocity model.

  12. The motion of magnetic flux tube at the dayside magnetopause under the influence of solar wind flow

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Z.X.; Hu, Y.D.; Li, F. ); Pu, Z.Y. )

    1990-05-01

    The authors propose that flux transfer events (FTEs) at the dayside magnetopause are formed by fluid vortices in the flow field. According to the view of vortex-induced reconnection a FTE tube is a magnetic fluid vortex tube (MF vortex tube). The motion of a FTE tube can be represented by that of a MF vortex in the formation region located in the dayside magnetopause region. This study deals with the internal and external influences governing the motion of MF vortex tubes. The equations of motion of a vortex tube are established and solved. It is found that a FTE tube moves frm low latitude to high latitude with a certain speed. However, the motional path is not a straight line but oscillates about the northward direction for the northern hemisphere. The motional velocity, amplitude and period of the oscillation depend on the flow field and magnetic field in the magnetosheath and magnetosphere as well as the size of the FTE tube.

  13. Purification ability and carbon dioxide flux from surface flow constructed wetlands treating sewage treatment plant effluent.

    PubMed

    Wu, Haiming; Lin, Li; Zhang, Jian; Guo, Wenshan; Liang, Shuang; Liu, Hai

    2016-11-01

    In this study, a two-year experiment was carried out to investigate variation of carbon dioxide (CO2) flux from free water surface constructed wetlands (FWS CW) systems treating sewage treatment plant effluent, and treatment performance was also evaluated. The better 74.6-76.6% COD, 92.7-94.4% NH4(+)-N, 60.1-84.7% TN and 49.3-70.7% TP removal efficiencies were achieved in planted CW systems compared with unplanted systems. The planted CW was a net CO2 sink, while the unplanted CW was a net CO2 source in the entire study period. An obvious annual and seasonal variability of CO2 fluxes from different wetland systems was also presented with the average CO2 flux ranging from -592.83mgm(-2)h(-1) to 553.91mgm(-2)h(-1) during 2012-2013. In addition, the net exchange of CO2 between CW systems and the atmosphere was significantly affected by air temperature, and the presence of plants also had the significant effect on total CO2 emissions.

  14. The study of variations of low energy cosmic helium's flux (up to 6 MeV) due to solar activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shayan, M.; Davoudifar, P.; Bagheri, Z.

    2017-04-01

    In General, the flux of low energy cosmic rays varies with time due to solar activities. The cosmic particle fluxes were studied using data of satellites near the Earth. In this work, first we studied the variations of particle fluxes from 1 Jan to 31 Dec 2000 and 35 events were selected. Then we proposed a relation for cosmic particle flux as a function of time and rigidity in the time of approaching ejecta to the Earth. The coefficients of the relation were calculated using experimental data of particle fluxes from ACE satellite. Finally, we compare time variations of these coefficients for different events.

  15. Convective heat flow in space cryogenics plugs - Critical and moderate He II heat flux densities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuan, S. W. K.; Frederking, T. H. K.

    1990-01-01

    Plug flow rates of entropy, heat and normal fluid in phase separators and in zero net mass flow systems are, to some extent, quite similar. A simplified analysis of critical conditions is presented in agreement with data trends. A critical temperature gradient arises on the basis of the He II two-fluid model at the stability limit constraining the thermohydrodynamics of the system. Thus, the question of critical thermodynamic fluctuations associated with nucleation versus the possibility of critical gradients in externally imposed parameters is answered in favor of the latter route toward turbulence. Furthermore, a similarity equation is presented which incorporates size dependent rates for moderate heat flow densities observed in experiments.

  16. Correlative Aspects of the Solar Electron Neutrino Flux and Solar Activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Robert M.

    2000-01-01

    Between 1970 and 1994, the Homestake Solar Neutrino Detector obtained 108 observations of the solar electron neutrino flux (less than 0.814 MeV). The "best fit" values derived from these observations suggest an average daily production rate of about 0.485 Ar-37 atom per day, a rate equivalent to about 2.6 SNU (solar neutrino units) or about a factor of 3 below the expected rate from the standard solar model. In order to explain, at least, a portion of this discrepancy, some researchers have speculated that the flux of solar neutrinos is variable, possibly being correlated with various markers of the solar cycle (e.g., sunspot number, the Ap index, etc.). In this paper, using the larger "standard data set," the issue of correlative behavior between solar electron neutrino flux and solar activity is re-examined. The results presented here clearly indicate that no statistically significant association exists between any of the usual markers of solar activity and the solar electron neutrino flux.

  17. Evaluation of CETP activity in vivo under non-steady-state conditions: influence of anacetrapib on HDL-TG flux[S

    PubMed Central

    McLaren, David G.; Previs, Stephen F.; Phair, Robert D.; Stout, Steven J.; Xie, Dan; Chen, Ying; Salituro, Gino M.; Xu, Suoyu S.; Castro-Perez, Jose M.; Opiteck, Gregory J.; Akinsanya, Karen O.; Cleary, Michele A.; Dansky, Hayes M.; Johns, Douglas G.; Roddy, Thomas P.

    2016-01-01

    Studies in lipoprotein kinetics almost exclusively rely on steady-state approaches to modeling. Herein, we have used a non-steady-state experimental design to examine the role of cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) in mediating HDL-TG flux in vivo in rhesus macaques, and therefore, we developed an alternative strategy to model the data. Two isotopomers ([2H11] and [13C18]) of oleic acid were administered (orally and intravenously, respectively) to serve as precursors for labeling TGs in apoB-containing lipoproteins. The flux of a specific TG (52:2) from these donor lipoproteins to HDL was used as the measure of CETP activity; calculations are also presented to estimate total HDL-TG flux. Based on our data, we estimate that the peak total postprandial TG flux to HDL via CETP is ∼13 mg·h−1·kg−1 and show that this transfer was inhibited by 97% following anacetrapib treatment. Collectively, these data demonstrate that HDL TG flux can be used as a measure of CETP activity in vivo. The fact that the donor lipoproteins can be labeled in situ using well-established stable isotope tracer techniques suggests ways to measure this activity for native lipoproteins in free-living subjects under any physiological conditions. PMID:26658238

  18. An improved multiphase lattice Boltzmann flux solver for three-dimensional flows with large density ratio and high Reynolds number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.; Shu, C.; Yang, L. M.

    2015-12-01

    An improved multiphase lattice Boltzmann flux solver (MLBFS) is proposed in this work for effective simulation of three-dimensional (3D) multiphase flows with large density ratio and high Reynolds number. As a finite volume scheme, the MLBFS originally proposed in [27] applies the finite volume method to solve for macroscopic flow variables directly. The fluxes are reconstructed locally at each cell interface by using the standard LBM solutions. Due to the modeling error of the standard LBM, the reconstructed fluxes deviate from those in the Navier-Stokes equations; and to compensate this error, a complex tensor is introduced in the original MLBFS. However, the computation of the tensor introduces additional complexity and usually needs a relatively thicker interface thickness to maintain numerical stability, which makes the solver be complex and inefficient in the 3D case. To remove this drawback, in this work, a theoretical analysis to the formulations obtained from the Chapman-Enskog expansion is conducted. It is shown that the modeling error can be effectively removed by modifying the computation of the equilibrium density distribution function. With this improvement, the proposed 3D MLBFS not only avoids the calculation of the compensation tensor but also is able to maintain numerical stability with very thin interface thickness. Several benchmark cases, including the challenging droplet impacting on a dry surface, head-on collisions of binary droplets and droplet splashing on a thin film with density ratio 1000 and Reynolds number up to 3000, are studied to validate the proposed solver. The obtained results agree well with the published data.

  19. Relationship between the photospheric Poynting flux and the active region luminosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazachenko, Maria D.; Canfield, Richard C.; Fisher, George H.; Hudson, Hugh S.; Welsch, Brian

    2014-06-01

    How does energy radiated by active regions compare with magnetic energy that propagates lower across the photosphere? This is a fundamental question for energy storage and release in active regions, yet it is presently poorly understood. In this work we quantify and compare both energy terms using SDO observations of the active region (AR) 11520. To quantify the magnetic energy crossing the photosphere, or the Poynting flux, we need to know both the magnetic field vector B and electric field vector E as well. Our current electric field inversion technique, PDFI, combines the Poloidal-Toroidal-Decomposition method with information from Doppler measurements, Fourier local correlation tracking (FLCT) results, and the ideal MHD constraint, to determine the electric field from vector magnetic field and Doppler data. We apply the PDFI method to a sequence of Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI/SDO) vector magnetogram data, to find the electric-field and hence the Poynting-flux evolution in AR 11520. We find that most of the magnetic energy in this AR is injected in the range of $10^7$ to $10^8$ $ergs/{cm^2 s}$, with the largest fluxes reaching $10^{10}$ $ergs/{cm^2 s}$. Integrating over the active region this yields a total energy of order $10^{28}$ ergs/s. To quantify the active region luminosity, we use EUV Variability Experiment (EVE) and Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) spectrally resolved observations. We find the active region luminosity of order $10^{28}$ ergs/s. We compare derived magnetic and radiated energy fluxes on different temporal and spatial scales and estimate their uncertainties. We also discuss the roles that potential/non-potential and emerging/shearing terms play in the total magnetic energy budget.

  20. Experimental study of laminar flow forced-convection heat transfer in air flowing through offset plates heated by radiation heat flux

    SciTech Connect

    Ali, A.H.H.; Kishinami, Koki; Hanaoka, Yutaka; Suzuki, Jun

    1998-04-01

    An experimental study of the steady state laminar flow forced-convection heat transfer of air flowing through offset plates located between two parallel plates and heated by radiation heat flux was carried out. The ranges of parameters tested were incident radiation heat fluxes of 500, 700, and 1,000 W/m{sup 2}. With Re ranging from 650 to 2,560, the inlet air bulk temperatures changed from 18.2 to 70 C and the tilting angle of the unit with the horizontal ranged from 0 to 90{degree} respectively. The results show that the rate of the increase in the local Nusselt number was observed to be proportional with Re up to 1,900, while it became less sensitive over Re range of 1,900--2,500. Also, in this range of Re, with the inlet air temperature of 20 C, the angle of inclination of the unit has no effect on the local Nusselt number. Increasing the incident radiation heat flux in the case of higher values of Re leads to a slight decrease in the value of the local Nusselt number. The effect of the inlet air bulk temperature on the forced-convection heat transfer coefficient shows, in the case of the horizontal position, an increase in the inlet air bulk temperature leads to slight decreases in the value of the average Nusselt number, while it leads to significant decreases in the value of the average Nusselt number as the tilting angle increases up to the vertical position. This effect is clearer in the case of Re = 650 rather than Re = 2,550. This work has application to solar collectors.

  1. Evolution of Large-scale Solar Magnetic Fields in a Flux-Transport Model Including a Multi-cell Meridional Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, E.; Dikpati, M.

    2003-12-01

    Advances in helioseismology over the past decade have enabled us to detect subsurface meridional flows in the Sun. Some recent helioseismological analysis (Giles 1999, Haber et al. 2002) has indicated a submerged, reverse flow cell occurring at high latitudes of the Sun's northern hemisphere between 1998 and 2001. Meridional circulation plays an important role in the operation of a class of large-scale solar dynamo, the so-called "flux-transport" dynamo. In such dynamo models, the poleward drift of the large-scale solar magnetic fields and the polar reversal process are explained by the advective-diffusive transport of magnetic flux by a meridional circulation with a poleward surface flow component. Any temporal and spatial variations in the meridional flow pattern are expected to greatly influence the evolution of large-scale magnetic fields in a flux-transport dynamo. The aim of this paper is to explore the implications of a steady, multi-cell flow on the advection of weak, large-scale, magnetic flux. We present a simple, two-cell flux transport model operating in an r-theta cross-section of the northern hemisphere. Azimuthal symmetry is assumed. Performing numerical flux-transport simulations with a reverse flow cell at various latitudes, we demonstrate the effect of this cell on the evolutionary pattern of the large-scale diffuse fields. We also show how a flux concentration may occur at the latitude where the radial flows of the two cells are sinking downward. This work is supported by NASA grants W-19752, W-10107, and W-10175. The National Center for Atmospheric Research is sponsored by the National Science Foundation.

  2. Flux-corrected transport techniques for transient calculations of strongly shocked flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boris, J. P.

    1976-01-01

    New flux-corrected transport algorithms are described for solving generalized continuity equations. These techniques were developed by requiring that the finite difference formulas used ensure positivity for an initially positive convected quantity. Thus FCT is particularly valuable for fluid-like problems with strong gradients or shocks. Repeated application of the same subroutine to mass, momentum, and energy conservation equations gives a simple solution of the coupled time-dependent equations of ideal compressible fluid dynamics without introducing an artificial viscosity. FCT algorithms span Eulerian, sliding-rezone, and Lagrangian finite difference grids in several coordinate systems. The latest FCT techniques are fully vectorized for parallel/pipeline processing.

  3. Application of Crunch-Flow Routines to Constrain Present and Past Carbon Fluxes at Gas-Hydrate Bearing Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Torres, Marta

    2014-01-31

    In November 2012, Oregon State University initiated the project entitled: Application of Crunch-Flow routines to constrain present and past carbon fluxes at gas-hydrate bearing sites. Within this project we developed Crunch-Flow based modeling modules that include important biogeochemical processes that need to be considered in gas hydrate environments. Our modules were applied to quantify carbon cycling in present and past systems, using data collected during several DOE-supported drilling expeditions, which include the Cascadia margin in US, Ulleung Basin in South Korea, and several sites drilled offshore India on the Bay of Bengal and Andaman Sea. Specifically, we completed modeling efforts that: 1) Reproduce the compositional and isotopic profiles observed at the eight drilled sites in the Ulleung Basin that constrain and contrast the carbon cycling pathways at chimney (high methane flux) and non-chimney sites (low methane, advective systems); 2) Simulate the Ba record in the sediments to quantify the past dynamics of methane flux in the southern Hydrate Ridge, Cascadia margin; and 3) Provide quantitative estimates of the thickness of individual mass transport deposits (MTDs), time elapsed after the MTD event, rate of sulfate reduction in the MTD, and time required to reach a new steady state at several sites drilled in the Krishna-Godavari (K-G) Basin off India. In addition we developed a hybrid model scheme by coupling a home-made MATLAB code with CrunchFlow to address the methane transport and chloride enrichment at the Ulleung Basins chimney sites, and contributed the modeling component to a study focusing on pore-scale controls on gas hydrate distribution in sediments from the Andaman Sea. These efforts resulted in two manuscripts currently under review, and contributed the modeling component of another pare, also under review. Lessons learned from these efforts are the basis of a mini-workshop to be held at Oregon State University (Feb 2014) to instruct

  4. EVOLUTION OF SPINNING AND BRAIDING HELICITY FLUXES IN SOLAR ACTIVE REGION NOAA 10930

    SciTech Connect

    Ravindra, B.; Yoshimura, Keiji; Dasso, Sergio E-mail: yosimura@solar.physics.montana.edu

    2011-12-10

    The line-of-sight magnetograms from Solar Optical Telescope Narrowband Filter Imager observations of NOAA Active Region 10930 have been used to study the evolution of spinning and braiding helicities over a period of five days starting from 2006 December 9. The north (N) polarity sunspot was the follower and the south (S) polarity sunspot was the leader. The N-polarity sunspot in the active region was rotating in the counterclockwise direction. The rate of rotation was small during the first two days of observations and it increased up to 8 Degree-Sign hr{sup -1} on the third day of the observations. On the fourth and fifth days it remained at 4 Degree-Sign hr{sup -1} with small undulations in its magnitude. The sunspot rotated about 260 Degree-Sign in the last three days. The S-polarity sunspot did not complete more than 20 Degree-Sign in five days. However, it changed its direction of rotation five times over a period of five days and injected both the positive and negative type of spin helicity fluxes into the corona. Through the five days, both the positive and negative sunspot regions injected equal amounts of spin helicity. The total injected helicity is predominantly negative in sign. However, the sign of the spin and braiding helicity fluxes computed over all the regions were reversed from negative to positive five times during the five-day period of observations. The reversal in spinning helicity flux was found before the onset of the X3.4-class flare, too. Though, the rotating sunspot has been observed in this active region, the braiding helicity has contributed more to the total accumulated helicity than the spinning helicity. The accumulated helicity is in excess of -7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 43} Mx{sup 2} over a period of five days. Before the X3.4-class flare that occurred on 2006 December 13, the rotation speed and spin helicity flux increased in the S-polarity sunspot. Before the flare, the total injected helicity was larger than -6

  5. Preferential water and solute fluxes in a model macropored porous medium as a function of flow rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    batany, stephane; Peyneau, Pierre-Emmanuel; Lassabatere, Laurent; Bechet, Beatrice; Faure, Pamela; Dangla, Patrick

    2016-04-01

    solutes and water fractionation between mobile and immobile zones. Besides, the column was imaged in an MRI device to track solute transfer within the model system. The experimental results clearly show that solute transfer depends on flow rate. At high flow rates, preferential flow is established, and solute BTCs are mono-modal curves. The amount of water visited in the system is roughly the same as the volume of water in the macropore. Apparently, solute and water flowed mostly through the macropore. For lower flow rates, BTCs present two peaks revealing bimodal transfer, with a fraction of the transport now occurring in the matrix. The analysis of these BTCs with the moment method and the dual permeability model allowed the quantification of the amount of water visited in the matrix and water exchange between the macropore and the matrix. These data and modeling results are compared with MRI observations and lattice-Boltzmann simulations. This study provides relevant data regarding the understanding of the effect of a macropore on water infiltration and solute fluxes in soils.

  6. Research on the filtering characteristic of single phase series hybrid active power filter based on fundamental magnetic flux compensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Jun; Chen, Qiaofu; Zhang, Yuqi

    2012-12-01

    In this article, the PWM inverter works as a controlled fundamental current source in the single phase series hybrid active power filter (APF) based on fundamental magnetic flux compensation (FMFC). The series transformer can exhibit the self-impedance of primary winding to harmonic current, which forces harmonic current to flow into passive power filter. With the influence of harmonic current, the voltage of primary winding of transformer is a harmonic voltage, which makes the inverter output currents have a certain harmonic component, and it degrades the filtering characteristics. On the basis of PWM inverter, the mathematical model of series hybrid APF is established, and the filtering characteristics of single phase APF are analysed in detail. Three methods are gained to improve filtering characteristics: reasonably designing the inverter output filter inductance, increasing series transformer ratio and adopting voltage feed-forward control. Experimental results show that the proposed APF has greater validity.

  7. Pinning, flow and plastic deformation of flux vortices in high T(sub c) superconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roytburd, A.

    1990-01-01

    In high temperature superconductor (HTSC) materials the vortices are highly mobile and flexible. This is reflected in different models of melt of a vortex lattice. Another aspect of the problem is stressed: an easy nucleation and high mobility of dislocations in the vortex lattice. Some models of plastic deformation of vortex lattice are considered as a result of its interaction with a real crystal structure. Depinning is interpreted as yield of plastic flow is vortex medium. Effect of macroscopic defects in crystal structures (pores, inclusions, grain and domain boundaries) is being considered in detail. Available experimental facts on magnetization and a critical current in HTSC and conventional superconductors are discussed from the points of view of depinning to vortices vs. plastic flow of vortices vs. plastic flow of vortices medium.

  8. Coupling of albumin flux to volume flow in skin and muscles of anesthetized rats

    SciTech Connect

    Renkin, E.M.; Gustafson-Sgro, M.; Sibley, L.

    1988-09-01

    Bovine serum albumin (BSA) labeled with /sup 131/I or /sup 125/I was injected intravenously in pentobarbital sodium-anesthetized rats, and tracer clearances into leg skin and muscles were measured over 30, 60, and 120 min. BSA labeled with the alternate tracer was used as vascular volume reference. Two minutes before injection of the tracer, a ligature was tied around one femoral vein to occlude outflow partially and raise capillary pressure in that leg. The unoccluded leg served as control. Skin and muscles of the occluded leg had variably and substantially higher water contents (delta W) than paired control tissues and slightly but consistently increased albumin clearances (CA). The delta CA/delta W, equivalent to the albumin concentration of capillary filtrate relative to plasma determined by linear regression, were as follows: leg skin 0.004 (95% confidence limits -0.001 to +0.009), muscle biceps femoris 0.005 (0.001-0.010), muscle gastrocnemius 0.011 (0.004-0.019), muscle tibialis anterior 0.016 (0.012-0.021). All these values are significantly less than 0.10, which corresponds to a reflection coefficient for serum albumin (sigma A) of 0.90. Convective coupling of albumin flux to volume flux in skin and muscles of intact, anesthetized rats is low, with sigma AS in the range 0.98 to greater than 0.99.

  9. Finite-volume method with lattice Boltzmann flux scheme for incompressible porous media flow at the representative-elementary-volume scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yang; Li, Decai; Shu, Shi; Niu, Xiaodong

    2016-02-01

    Based on the Darcy-Brinkman-Forchheimer equation, a finite-volume computational model with lattice Boltzmann flux scheme is proposed for incompressible porous media flow in this paper. The fluxes across the cell interface are calculated by reconstructing the local solution of the generalized lattice Boltzmann equation for porous media flow. The time-scaled midpoint integration rule is adopted to discretize the governing equation, which makes the time step become limited by the Courant-Friedricks-Lewy condition. The force term which evaluates the effect of the porous medium is added to the discretized governing equation directly. The numerical simulations of the steady Poiseuille flow, the unsteady Womersley flow, the circular Couette flow, and the lid-driven flow are carried out to verify the present computational model. The obtained results show good agreement with the analytical, finite-difference, and/or previously published solutions.

  10. Resonant behaviour of MHD waves on magnetic flux tubes. III - Effect of equilibrium flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goossens, Marcel; Hollweg, Joseph V.; Sakurai, Takashi

    1992-01-01

    The Hollweg et al. (1990) analysis of MHD surface waves in a stationary equilibrium is extended. The conservation laws and jump conditions at Alfven and slow resonance points obtained by Sakurai et al. (1990) are generalized to include an equilibrium flow, and the assumption that the Eulerian perturbation of total pressure is constant is recovered as the special case of the conservation law for an equilibrium with straight magnetic field lines and flow along the magnetic field lines. It is shown that the conclusions formulated by Hollweg et al. are still valid for the straight cylindrical case. The effect of curvature is examined.

  11. Analysis of the Flux Growth Rate in Emerging Active Regions on the Sun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramenko, V. I.; Kutsenko, A. S.; Tikhonova, O. I.; Yurchyshyn, V. B.

    2017-04-01

    We studied the emergence process of 42 active regions (ARs) by analyzing the time derivative, R(t), of the total unsigned flux. Line-of-sight magnetograms acquired by the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) were used. A continuous piecewise linear fitting to the R(t)-profile was applied to detect an interval, Δ t2, of nearly constant R(t) covering one or several local maxima. The magnitude of R(t) averaged over Δ t2 was accepted as an estimate of the maximum value of the flux growth rate, R_{MAX}, which varies in a range of (0.5 - 5)×10^{20} Mx hour^{-1} for ARs with a maximum total unsigned flux of (0.5 - 3)× 10^{22} Mx. The normalized flux growth rate, RN, was defined under the assumption that the saturated total unsigned flux, F_{MAX}, equals unity. Out of 42 ARs in our initial list, 36 events were successfully fitted, and they form two subsets (with a small overlap of eight events): the ARs with a short (<13 hours) interval Δ t2 and a high (>0.024 hour^{-1}) normalized flux emergence rate, RN, form the "rapid" emergence event subset. The second subset consists of "gradual" emergence events, and it is characterized by a long (>13 hours) interval Δ t2 and a low RN (<0.024 hour^{-1}). In diagrams of R_{MAX} plotted versus F_{MAX}, the events from different subsets do not overlap, and each subset displays an individual power law. The power-law index derived from the entire ensemble of 36 events is 0.69 ± 0.10. The rapid emergence is consistent with a two-step emergence process of a single twisted flux tube. The gradual emergence is possibly related to a consecutive rising of several flux tubes emerging at nearly the same location in the photosphere.

  12. Effects of activating fluxes on the weld penetration and corrosion resistant property of laser welded joint of ferritic stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yonghui; Hu, Shengsun; Shen, Junqi

    2015-10-01

    This study was based on the ferritic stainless steel SUS430. Under the parallel welding conditions, the critical penetration power values (CPPV) of 3mm steel plates with different surface-coating activating fluxes were tested. Results showed that, after coating with activating fluxes, such as ZrO2, CaCO3, CaF2 and CaO, the CPPV could reduce 100~250 W, which indicating the increases of the weld penetrations (WP). Nevertheless, the variation range of WP with or without activating fluxes was less than 16.7%. Compared with single-component ones, a multi-component activating flux composed of 50% ZrO2, 12.09% CaCO3, 10.43% CaO, and 27.49% MgO was testified to be much more efficient, the WP of which was about 2.3-fold of that without any activating fluxes. Furthermore, a FeCl3 spot corrosion experiment was carried out with samples cut from weld zone to test the effects of different activating fluxes on the corrosion resistant (CR) property of the laser welded joints. It was found that all kinds of activating fluxes could improve the CR of the welded joints. And, it was interesting to find that the effect of the mixed activating fluxes was inferior to those single-component ones. Among all the activating fluxes, the single-component of CaCO3 seemed to be the best in resisting corrosion. By means of Energy Dispersive Spectrometer (EDS) testing, it was found that the use of activating fluxes could effectively restrain the loss of Cr element of weld zone in the process of laser welding, thus greatly improving the CR of welded joints.

  13. Galactic cosmic ray flux in the mid of 1700 from 44Ti activity of Agen meteorite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taricco, Carla; Sinha, Neeharika; Bhandari, Narendra; Colombetti, Paolo; Mancuso, Salvatore; Rubinetti, Sara; Barghini, Dario

    2016-04-01

    Cosmogenic isotopes produced by galactic cosmic rays (GCR) in meteorites offer the opportunity to reveal the heliospheric magnetic field modulation in the interplanetary space between heliocentric distances of 1 and 3 AU. We present the gamma-activity measurement of Agen meteorite, a H5 chondrite that fell on September 5, 1814 in Aquitaine, France. Its 44Ti activity reflects GCR flux integrated since the mid of 1700 to the time of fall and confirms the decreasing trend of GCR flux that we previously suggested on the basis of measurements of other meteorites which fell in the last 250 years as well as the centennial modulation of GCR due to the Gleissberg solar cycle This result was obtained thanks to the high-efficiency and selective configuration of the gamma-ray spectrometer (HPGe+NaI) operating at the underground Laboratory of Monte dei Cappuccini (OATo, INAF) in Torino, Italy.

  14. Influence of Photospheric Magnetic Conditions on the Catastrophic Behaviors of Flux Ropes in Solar Active Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Quanhao; Wang, Yuming; Hu, Youqiu; Liu, Rui; Liu, Jiajia

    2017-02-01

    Since only the magnetic conditions at the photosphere can be routinely observed in current observations, it is of great significance to determine the influences of photospheric magnetic conditions on solar eruptive activities. Previous studies about catastrophe indicated that the magnetic system consisting of a flux rope in a partially open bipolar field is subject to catastrophe, but not if the bipolar field is completely closed under the same specified photospheric conditions. In order to investigate the influence of the photospheric magnetic conditions on the catastrophic behavior of this system, we expand upon the 2.5-dimensional ideal magnetohydrodynamic model in Cartesian coordinates to simulate the evolution of the equilibrium states of the system under different photospheric flux distributions. Our simulation results reveal that a catastrophe occurs only when the photospheric flux is not concentrated too much toward the polarity inversion line and the source regions of the bipolar field are not too weak; otherwise no catastrophe occurs. As a result, under certain photospheric conditions, a catastrophe could take place in a completely closed configuration, whereas it ceases to exist in a partially open configuration. This indicates that whether the background field is completely closed or partially open is not the only necessary condition for the existence of catastrophe, and that the photospheric conditions also play a crucial role in the catastrophic behavior of the flux rope system.

  15. HDAC6 activity is not required for basal autophagic flux in metastatic prostate cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Gregory W; Wickramasekara, Samanthi; Fang, Yufeng; Maier, Claudia S; Williams, David E; Dashwood, Roderick H; Perez, Viviana I

    2015-01-01

    Histone deacetylase 6 is a multifunctional lysine deacetylase that is recently emerging as a central facilitator of response to stress and may play an important role in cancer cell proliferation. The histone deacetylase 6-inhibitor tubacin has been shown to slow the growth of metastatic prostate cancer cells and sensitize cancer cells to chemotherapeutic agents. However, the proteins histone deacetylase 6 interacts with, and thus its role in cancer cells, remains poorly characterized. Histone deacetylase 6 deacetylase activity has recently been shown to be required for efficient basal autophagic flux. Autophagy is often dysregulated in cancer cells and may confer stress resistance and allow for cell maintenance and a high proliferation rate. Tubacin may therefore slow cancer cell proliferation by decreasing autophagic flux. We characterized the histone deacetylase 6-interacting proteins in LNCaP metastatic prostate cancer cells and found that histone deacetylase 6 interacts with proteins involved in several cellular processes, including autophagy. Based on our interaction screen, we assessed the impact of the histone deacetylase 6-inhibitor tubacin on autophagic flux in two metastatic prostate cancer cell lines and found that tubacin does not influence autophagic flux. Histone deacetylase 6 therefore influences cell proliferation through an autophagy-independent mechanism. PMID:26643866

  16. ESTIMATING FLOW AND FLUX OF GROUND-WATER DISCHARGE USING WATER TEMPERATURE AND VELOCITY. (R827961)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The nature of ground water discharge to a stream has important implications for nearby ground water flow, especially with respect to contaminant transport and well-head protection. Measurements of ground water discharge were accomplished in this study using (1) differences bet...

  17. FLUX-CORRECTED TRANSPORT TECHNIQUE FOR OPEN CHANNEL FLOW. (R825200)

    EPA Science Inventory

    In modeling flow in open channels, the traditional finite difference/finite volume schemes become inefficient and warrant special numerical treatment in the presence of shocks and discontinuities. The numerical oscillations that arise by making use of a second- and higher-order s...

  18. Columbia University Flow Instability Experimental Program, Volume 10: Critical Heat Flux Test Program data tables

    SciTech Connect

    Coutts, D.A.

    1993-09-01

    This report is one of a series of reports which document the flow instability testing conducted by Columbia University during 1989 through 1992. This report volume provides a hardcopy version of the twenty-six electronic media data files: CO515(A-D).DAT, CO525(A-G). DAT, CO530(A-K).DAT, CO718(A-E).DAT.

  19. Fluid flow, methane fluxes, carbonate precipitation and biogeochemical turnover in gas hydrate-bearing sediments at Hydrate Ridge, Cascadia Margin: numerical modeling and mass balances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luff, Roger; Wallmann, Klaus

    2003-09-01

    A numerical model was applied to investigate and to quantify biogeochemical processes and methane turnover in gas hydrate-bearing surface sediments from a cold vent site situated at Hydrate Ridge, an accretionary structure located in the Cascadia Margin subduction zone. Steady state simulations were carried out to obtain a comprehensive overview on the activity in these sediments which are covered with bacterial mats and are affected by strong fluid flow from below. The model results underline the dominance of advective fluid flow that forces a large inflow of methane from below (869 μmol cm -2 a -1) inducing high oxidation rates in the surface layers. Anaerobic methane oxidation is the major process, proceeding at a depth-integrated rate of 870 μmol cm -2 a -1. A significant fraction (14%) of bicarbonate produced by anaerobic methane oxidation is removed from the fluids by precipitation of authigenic aragonite and calcite. The total rate of carbonate precipitation (120 μmol cm -2 a -1) allows for the build-up of a massive carbonate layer with a thickness of 1 m over a period of 20,000 years. Aragonite is the major carbonate mineral formed by anaerobic methane oxidation if the flow velocity of methane-charge fluids is high enough (≥10 cm a -1) to maintain super-saturation with respect to this highly soluble carbonate phase. It precipitates much faster within the studied surface sediments than previously observed in abiotic laboratory experiments, suggesting microbial catalysis. The investigated station is characterized by high carbon and oxygen turnover rates (≈1000 μmol cm -2 a -1) that are well beyond the rates observed at other continental slope sites not affected by fluid venting. This underlines the strong impact of fluid venting on the benthic system, even though the flow velocity of 10 cm a -1 derived by the model is relative low compared to fluid flow rates found at other cold vent sites. Non-steady state simulations using measured fluid flow

  20. Glucose-induced activation of rubidium transport and water flux in sunflower root systems.

    PubMed

    Quintero, J M; Molina, R; Fournier, J M; Benlloch, M; Ramos, J

    2001-01-01

    Excised 20-d-old sunflower roots (Helianthus annuus L. cv. Sun-Gro 393) were used to study the effect of different sugars on rubidium and water fluxes. The roots sensed and absorbed glucose from the external medium inducing the activation of rubidium accumulated in the root (Rb(+) root), the flux of exuded rubidium (J(Rb)) and, to a lesser degree, the exudation rate (J(v)). These effects were also triggered by fructose, but not by 6-deoxyglucose (6-dG), a glucose analogue which is not a substrate for hexokinase (HXK). The effect of 2-deoxyglucose (2-dG), an analogue that is phosphorylated but not further metabolized, was complex, suggesting an inhibitory effect on solute transport to the xylem. The amounts of glucose required to activate rubidium and water fluxes were similar to those previously reported to regulate different processes in other plants (0.5--10 mM). When sorbitol was used instead of glucose, neither rubidium uptake (Rb(+) root plus J(Rb)) nor J(v) was activated. It is proposed that glucose present in the root plays an important signalling role in the regulation of Rb(+) (K(+)) and water transport in plant roots.

  1. Measurement of surface mercury fluxes at active industrial gold mines in Nevada (USA).

    PubMed

    Eckley, C S; Gustin, M; Marsik, F; Miller, M B

    2011-01-01

    Mercury (Hg) may be naturally associated with the rock units hosting precious and base metal deposits. Active gold mines are known to have point source releases of Hg associated with ore processing facilities. The nonpoint source release of Hg to the air from the large area (hundreds to thousands of hectares) of disturbed and processed material at industrial open pit gold mines has not been quantified. This paper describes the field data collected as part of a project focused on estimating nonpoint source emissions of Hg from two active mines in Nevada, USA. In situ Hg flux data were collected on diel and seasonal time steps using a dynamic flux chamber from representative mine surfaces. Hg fluxes ranged from <1500 ng m(-2) day(-1) for waste rock piles (0.6-3.5 μg g(-1)) to 684,000 ng m(-2) day(-1) for tailings (2.8-58 μg g(-1)). Releases were positively correlated with material Hg concentrations, surface grain size, and moisture content. Highest Hg releases occurred from materials under active cyanide leaching and from tailings impoundments containing processed high-grade ore. Data collected indicate that as mine sites are reclaimed and material disturbance ceases, emissions will decline. Additionally local cycling of atmospheric Hg (deposition and re-emission) was found to occur.

  2. Reducing phosphorus flux from organic soils in surface flow treatment wetlands.

    PubMed

    Lindstrom, Susan M; White, John R

    2011-10-01

    Treatment wetlands have a finite period of effective nutrient removal after which treatment efficiency declines. This is due to the accumulation of organic matter which decreases the capacity and hydraulic retention time of the wetland. We investigated four potential solutions to improve the soluble reactive P (SRP) removal of a municipal wastewater treatment wetland soil including; dry down, surface additions of alum or calcium carbonate and physical removal of the accreted organic soil under both aerobic and anaerobic water column conditions. The flux of SRP from the soil to the water column under aerobic conditions was higher for the continuously flooded controls (1.1±0.4 mg P m(-2) d(-1)), dry down (1.5±0.9 mg P m(-2) d(-1)) and CaCO3 (0.8±0.7 mg P m(-2) d(-1)) treatments while the soil removal and alum treatments were significantly lower at 0.02±0.10 and -0.07±0.02 mg P m(-2) d(-1), respectively. These results demonstrate that the two most effective management strategies at sequestering SRP were organic soil removal and alum additions. There are difficulties and costs associated with removal and disposal of soils from a treatment wetland. Therefore our findings suggest that alum addition may be the most cost effective and efficient means of increasing the sequestering of P in aging treatment wetlands experiencing reduced P removal rates. However, more research is needed to determine the longer term effects of alum buildup in the organic soil on the wetland biota, in particular, on the macrophytes and invertebrates. Since alum effectiveness is time limited, a longer term solution to P flux may favor the organic soil removal.

  3. HADES RV Programme with HARPS-N at TNG . III. Flux-flux and activity-rotation relationships of early-M dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maldonado, J.; Scandariato, G.; Stelzer, B.; Biazzo, K.; Lanza, A. F.; Maggio, A.; Micela, G.; González-Álvarez, E.; Affer, L.; Claudi, R. U.; Cosentino, R.; Damasso, M.; Desidera, S.; González Hernández, J. I.; Gratton, R.; Leto, G.; Messina, S.; Molinari, E.; Pagano, I.; Perger, M.; Piotto, G.; Rebolo, R.; Ribas, I.; Sozzetti, A.; Suárez Mascareño, A.; Zanmar Sanchez, R.

    2017-01-01

    Context. Understanding stellar activity in M dwarfs is crucial for the physics of stellar atmospheres and for ongoing radial velocity exoplanet programmes. Despite the increasing interest in M dwarfs, our knowledge of the chromospheres of these stars is far from being complete. Aims: We test whether the relations between activity, rotation, and stellar parameters and flux-flux relationships previously investigated for main-sequence FGK stars and for pre-main-sequence M stars also hold for early-M dwarfs on the main-sequence. Although several attempts have been made so far, here we analyse a large sample of stars undergoing relatively low activity. Methods: We analyse in a homogeneous and coherent way a well-defined sample of 71 late-K/early-M dwarfs that are currently being observed in the framework of the HArps-N red Dwarf Exoplanet Survey (HADES). Rotational velocities are derived using the cross-correlation technique, while emission flux excesses in the Ca ii H & K and Balmer lines from Hα up to Hɛ are obtained by using the spectral subtraction technique. The relationships between the emission excesses and the stellar parameters (projected rotational velocity, effective temperature, kinematics, and age) are studied. Relations between pairs of fluxes of different chromospheric lines (flux-flux relationships) are also studied and compared with the literature results for other samples of stars. Results: We find that the strength of the chromospheric emission in the Ca ii H & K and Balmer lines is roughly constant for stars in the M0-M3 spectral range. Although our sample is likely to be biased towards inactive stars, our data suggest that a moderate but significant correlation between activity and rotation might be present, as well as a hint of kinematically selected young stars showing higher levels of emission in the calcium line and in most of the Balmer lines. We find our sample of M dwarfs to be complementary in terms of chromospheric and X-ray fluxes with

  4. Flow and magnetic field properties in the trailing sunspots of active region NOAA 12396

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, M.; Denker, C.; Böhm, F.; Balthasar, H.; Fischer, C. E.; Kuckein, C.; Bello González, N.; Berkefeld, T.; Collados, M.; Diercke, A.; Feller, A.; González Manrique, S. J.; Hofmann, A.; Lagg, A.; Nicklas, H.; Orozco Suárez, D.; Pator Yabar, A.; Rezaei, R.; Schlichenmaier, R.; Schmidt, D.; Schmidt, W.; Sigwarth, M.; Sobotka, M.; Solanki, S. K.; Soltau, D.; Staude, J.; Strassmeier, K. G.; Volkmer, R.; von der Lühe, O.; Waldmann, T.

    2016-11-01

    Improved measurements of the photospheric and chromospheric three-dimensional magnetic and flow fields are crucial for a precise determination of the origin and evolution of active regions. We present an illustrative sample of multi-instrument data acquired during a two-week coordinated observing campaign in August 2015 involving, among others, the GREGOR solar telescope (imaging and near-infrared spectroscopy) and the space missions Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) and Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS). The observations focused on the trailing part of active region NOAA 12396 with complex polarity inversion lines and strong intrusions of opposite polarity flux. The GREGOR Infrared Spectrograph (GRIS) provided Stokes IQUV spectral profiles in the photospheric Si I λ1082.7 nm line, the chromospheric He I λ1083.0 nm triplet, and the photospheric Ca I λ1083.9 nm line. Carefully calibrated GRIS scans of the active region provided maps of Doppler velocity and magnetic field at different atmospheric heights. We compare quick-look maps with those obtained with the ``Stokes Inversions based on Response functions'' (SIR) code, which furnishes deeper insight into the magnetic properties of the region. We find supporting evidence that newly emerging flux and intruding opposite polarity flux are hampering the formation of penumbrae, i.e., a penumbra fully surrounding a sunspot is only expected after cessation of flux emergence in proximity to the sunspots.

  5. Critical heat-flux characteristics of R-113 boiling two-phase flow in twisted-tape-inserted tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Sangryoul; Inoue, Akira; Takahashi, Minoru

    1996-07-01

    This paper presents experimental data on the critical heat flux (CHF) in twisted-tape-inserted tubes over a wide quality range of {minus}0.25 to 0.8. The influences of quality, twist ratio, mass velocity, and clearance between the twisted tape and tube inner wall on CHF were investigated. In the subcooled region, it was observed, using an infrared thermoviewer, that CHF was initiated locally at the wall near the twisted tape. Consequently, twisted tape insertion with small tape-well clearance decreased CHF to below the value of the empty tubes at a low flow rate. This decrease was found to be avoidable by adjusting the clearance. In the net quality region, CHF of the twisted-tape-inserted tubes increased with increasing flow rate contrary to the case of the empty tubes. However, CHF in the net quality region was also decreased by insertion of twisted tapes with high twist ratio (loosely twisted tapes) at a very low flow rate.

  6. YANA – a software tool for analyzing flux modes, gene-expression and enzyme activities

    PubMed Central

    Schwarz, Roland; Musch, Patrick; von Kamp, Axel; Engels, Bernd; Schirmer, Heiner; Schuster, Stefan; Dandekar, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    Background A number of algorithms for steady state analysis of metabolic networks have been developed over the years. Of these, Elementary Mode Analysis (EMA) has proven especially useful. Despite its low user-friendliness, METATOOL as a reliable high-performance implementation of the algorithm has been the instrument of choice up to now. As reported here, the analysis of metabolic networks has been improved by an editor and analyzer of metabolic flux modes. Analysis routines for expression levels and the most central, well connected metabolites and their metabolic connections are of particular interest. Results YANA features a platform-independent, dedicated toolbox for metabolic networks with a graphical user interface to calculate (integrating METATOOL), edit (including support for the SBML format), visualize, centralize, and compare elementary flux modes. Further, YANA calculates expected flux distributions for a given Elementary Mode (EM) activity pattern and vice versa. Moreover, a dissection algorithm, a centralization algorithm, and an average diameter routine can be used to simplify and analyze complex networks. Proteomics or gene expression data give a rough indication of some individual enzyme activities, whereas the complete flux distribution in the network is often not known. As such data are noisy, YANA features a fast evolutionary algorithm (EA) for the prediction of EM activities with minimum error, including alerts for inconsistent experimental data. We offer the possibility to include further known constraints (e.g. growth constraints) in the EA calculation process. The redox metabolism around glutathione reductase serves as an illustration example. All software and documentation are available for download at . Conclusion A graphical toolbox and an editor for METATOOL as well as a series of additional routines for metabolic network analyses constitute a new user-friendly software for such efforts. PMID:15929789

  7. Advanced digital methods for blood flow flux analysis using µPIV approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurochkin, Maxim A.; Timoshina, Polina A.; Fedosov, Ivan V.; Tuchin, Valery V.

    2015-03-01

    A digital optical system focused on work with laboratory animals for intravital capillaroscopy has been developed. It implements the particle image velocimetry (PIV) based approach for measurements of red blood cells velocity in laboratory rat stomach capillaries. We propose a method of involuntary displacement compensation of the capillary network images. Image stabilization algorithm is based on correlation of feature tracking. The efficiency of designed image stabilization algorithm was experimentally demonstrated. The results of capillary blood flow analysis are demonstrated.

  8. Identifying Components of Groundwater Flow, Flux, and Storage in Tuolumne Meadows, Yosemite, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vialpando, M., III; Lowry, C.; Visser, A.; Moran, J. E.; Esser, B. K.

    2015-12-01

    High elevation meadows in the Sierra Nevada of California, USA represent mixing zones between surface water and groundwater. Quantifying the exchange between stream water and groundwater, and the residence time of water stored in meadow sediments will allow examination of the possible buffer effect that groundwater has on meadows and streams. This in turn has implications for the resilience of the ecosystem as well as the downstream communities that are dependent upon runoff for water supply. Stream flow was measured and water samples were collected along a 5 km reach of the Tuolumne River and adjacent wells during both spring runoff and baseflow. Water samples were analyzed for concentrations of dissolved noble gases and anions, sulfur-35, tritium and radon to study surface water-groundwater interactions and residence times. Although lower than average because of the ongoing drought in California, discharge in early July 2015 was about 35 times that measured during the previous fall. During baseflow, a small component of fracture flow (2%) is identified using dissolved helium. Radon, anions and stream discharge identify reaches of groundwater discharge. Anions show a steady increase in the groundwater component over the western portion of the meadow during baseflow, and over 50% of stream water is exchanged with meadow groundwater, without a net gain or loss of stream flow. Sulfur-35 and tritium results indicated that groundwater contributing to stream flow has recharged within the previous two years. With the current drought, estimated as the most severe in 1200 years, accurate estimations of water availability are becoming increasingly important to water resource managers.

  9. ENTRAINED-FLOW ADSORPTION OF MERCURY USING ACTIVATED CARBON

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bench-scale experiments were conducted in a flow reactor to simulate entrained-flow capture of elemental mercury (Hg) by activated carbon. Adsorption of Hg by several commercial activated carbons was examined at different carbon-to-mercury (C:Hg) ratios (by weight) (600:1 - 29000...

  10. An Active, Collaborative Approach to Learning Skills in Flow Cytometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuller, Kathryn; Linden, Matthew D.; Lee-Pullen, Tracey; Fragall, Clayton; Erber, Wendy N.; Röhrig, Kimberley J.

    2016-01-01

    Advances in science education research have the potential to improve the way students learn to perform scientific interpretations and understand science concepts. We developed active, collaborative activities to teach skills in manipulating flow cytometry data using FlowJo software. Undergraduate students were given compensated clinical flow…

  11. Numerical Study of Cattaneo-Christov Heat Flux Model for Viscoelastic Flow Due to an Exponentially Stretching Surface

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad Khan, Junaid; Mustafa, M.; Hayat, T.; Alsaedi, A.

    2015-01-01

    This work deals with the flow and heat transfer in upper-convected Maxwell fluid above an exponentially stretching surface. Cattaneo-Christov heat flux model is employed for the formulation of the energy equation. This model can predict the effects of thermal relaxation time on the boundary layer. Similarity approach is utilized to normalize the governing boundary layer equations. Local similarity solutions are achieved by shooting approach together with fourth-fifth-order Runge-Kutta integration technique and Newton’s method. Our computations reveal that fluid temperature has inverse relationship with the thermal relaxation time. Further the fluid velocity is a decreasing function of the fluid relaxation time. A comparison of Fourier’s law and the Cattaneo-Christov’s law is also presented. Present attempt even in the case of Newtonian fluid is not yet available in the literature. PMID:26325426

  12. Flow-orthogonal bead oscillation in a microfluidic chip with a magnetic anisotropic flux-guide array.

    PubMed

    van Pelt, Stijn; Derks, Roy; Matteucci, Marco; Hansen, Mikkel Fougt; Dietzel, Andreas

    2011-04-01

    A new concept for the manipulation of superparamagnetic beads inside a microfluidic chip is presented in this paper. The concept allows for bead actuation orthogonal to the flow direction inside a microchannel. Basic manipulation functionalities were studied by means of finite element simulations and results were oval-shaped steady state oscillations with bead velocities up to 500 μm/s. The width of the trajectory could be controlled by prescribing external field rotation. Successful verification experiments were performed on a prototype chip fabricated with excimer laser ablation in polycarbonate and electroforming of nickel flux-guides. Bead velocities up to 450 μm/s were measured in a 75 μm wide channel. By prescribing the currents in the external quadrupole magnet, the shape of the bead trajectory could be controlled.

  13. Numerical Study of Cattaneo-Christov Heat Flux Model for Viscoelastic Flow Due to an Exponentially Stretching Surface.

    PubMed

    Ahmad Khan, Junaid; Mustafa, M; Hayat, T; Alsaedi, A

    2015-01-01

    This work deals with the flow and heat transfer in upper-convected Maxwell fluid above an exponentially stretching surface. Cattaneo-Christov heat flux model is employed for the formulation of the energy equation. This model can predict the effects of thermal relaxation time on the boundary layer. Similarity approach is utilized to normalize the governing boundary layer equations. Local similarity solutions are achieved by shooting approach together with fourth-fifth-order Runge-Kutta integration technique and Newton's method. Our computations reveal that fluid temperature has inverse relationship with the thermal relaxation time. Further the fluid velocity is a decreasing function of the fluid relaxation time. A comparison of Fourier's law and the Cattaneo-Christov's law is also presented. Present attempt even in the case of Newtonian fluid is not yet available in the literature.

  14. Numerical implementation, verification and validation of two-phase flow four-equation drift flux model with Jacobian-free Newton–Krylov method

    SciTech Connect

    Zou, Ling; Zhao, Haihua; Zhang, Hongbin

    2016-08-24

    This study presents a numerical investigation on using the Jacobian-free Newton–Krylov (JFNK) method to solve the two-phase flow four-equation drift flux model with realistic constitutive correlations (‘closure models’). The drift flux model is based on Isshi and his collaborators’ work. Additional constitutive correlations for vertical channel flow, such as two-phase flow pressure drop, flow regime map, wall boiling and interfacial heat transfer models, were taken from the RELAP5-3D Code Manual and included to complete the model. The staggered grid finite volume method and fully implicit backward Euler method was used for the spatial discretization and time integration schemes, respectively. The Jacobian-free Newton–Krylov method shows no difficulty in solving the two-phase flow drift flux model with a discrete flow regime map. In addition to the Jacobian-free approach, the preconditioning matrix is obtained by using the default finite differencing method provided in the PETSc package, and consequently the labor-intensive implementation of complex analytical Jacobian matrix is avoided. Extensive and successful numerical verification and validation have been performed to prove the correct implementation of the models and methods. Code-to-code comparison with RELAP5-3D has further demonstrated the successful implementation of the drift flux model.

  15. Numerical implementation, verification and validation of two-phase flow four-equation drift flux model with Jacobian-free Newton–Krylov method

    DOE PAGES

    Zou, Ling; Zhao, Haihua; Zhang, Hongbin

    2016-08-24

    This study presents a numerical investigation on using the Jacobian-free Newton–Krylov (JFNK) method to solve the two-phase flow four-equation drift flux model with realistic constitutive correlations (‘closure models’). The drift flux model is based on Isshi and his collaborators’ work. Additional constitutive correlations for vertical channel flow, such as two-phase flow pressure drop, flow regime map, wall boiling and interfacial heat transfer models, were taken from the RELAP5-3D Code Manual and included to complete the model. The staggered grid finite volume method and fully implicit backward Euler method was used for the spatial discretization and time integration schemes, respectively. Themore » Jacobian-free Newton–Krylov method shows no difficulty in solving the two-phase flow drift flux model with a discrete flow regime map. In addition to the Jacobian-free approach, the preconditioning matrix is obtained by using the default finite differencing method provided in the PETSc package, and consequently the labor-intensive implementation of complex analytical Jacobian matrix is avoided. Extensive and successful numerical verification and validation have been performed to prove the correct implementation of the models and methods. Code-to-code comparison with RELAP5-3D has further demonstrated the successful implementation of the drift flux model.« less

  16. Numerical model for swirl cooling in high-heat-flux particle beam targets and the design of a swirl-flow-based plasma limiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milora, S. L.; Combs, S. K.; Foster, C. A.

    1984-11-01

    An unsteady, two-dimensional heat conduction code was used to study the performance of swirl-flow-based neutral particle beam targets. The model includes the effects of two-phase heat transfer and asymmetric heating of tubular elements. The calorimeter subjected to 30-s neutral beam pulses with incident heat flux intensities of greater than or equal to 5 kW/cu cm, is modeled. The numerical results indicate that local heat fluxes in excess of 7 kW/sq cm occur at the water cooled surface on the side exposed to the beam. This exceeds critical heat flux limits for uniformly heated tubes with straight flow by approximately a factor of 5. The design of a plasma limiter based on swirl flow heat transfer is presented.

  17. Study on critical heat flux enhancement in flow boiling of SiC nano-fluids under low pressure and low flow conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S. W.; Park, S. D.; Kang, S.; Kim, S. M.; Seo, H.; Lee, D. W.; Bang, I. C.

    2012-07-01

    Critical heat flux (CHF) is the thermal limit of a phenomenon in which a phase change occurs during heating (such as bubbles forming on a metal surface used to heat water), which suddenly decreases the heat transfer efficiency, thus causing localized overheating of the heating surface. The enhancement of CHF can increase the safety margins and allow operation at higher heat fluxes; thus, it can increase the economy. A very interesting characteristics of nano-fluids is their ability to significantly enhance the CHF. nano-fluids are nano-technology-based colloidal dispersions engineered through stable suspending of nanoparticles. All experiments were performed in round tubes with an inner diameter of 0.01041 m and a length of 0.5 m under low pressure and low flow (LPLF) conditions at a fixed inlet temperature using water, 0.01 vol. % Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/water and SiC/water nano-fluids. It was found that the CHF of the nano-fluids was enhanced and the CHF of the SiC/water nano-fluid was more enhanced than that of the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/water nano-fluid. (authors)

  18. Average energetic ion flux variations associated with geomagnetic activity from EPIC/STICS on Geotail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christon, S. P.; Gloeckler, G.; Eastman, T. E.; McEntire, R. W.; Roelef, E. C.; Lui, A. T. Y.; Williams, D. J.; Frank, L. A.; Paterson, W. R.; Kokubun, S.; Matsumoto, H.; Kojima, H.; Mukai, T.; Saito, Y.; Yamamoto, T.

    1996-01-01

    The magnetotail ion flux measurements from the Geotail spacecraft are analyzed both with and without the application of selection criteria that identify the plasma regime in which an observation is obtained. The different results are compared with each other. The initial results on the changes of energetic ion flux and composition correlated to average substorm activity in different magnetotail plasma regimes are discussed. The energetic ions are measured using the energetic particles and ion composition (EPIC) experiment and the suprathermal ion composition spectrometer (STICS). The plasma, wave and field instruments of the Geotail satellite were used to identify the principle magnetotail plasma regimes of plasma sheet, lobe, and magnetospheric boundary layer, as well as the magnetosheath and solar wind. Energetic O and H ions were observed in all the plasma regimes.

  19. Structural integrated sensor and actuator systems for active flow control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behr, Christian; Schwerter, Martin; Leester-Schädel, Monika; Wierach, Peter; Dietzel, Andreas; Sinapius, Michael

    2016-04-01

    An adaptive flow separation control system is designed and implemented as an essential part of a novel high-lift device for future aircraft. The system consists of MEMS pressure sensors to determine the flow conditions and adaptive lips to regulate the mass flow and the velocity of a wall near stream over the internally blown Coanda flap. By the oscillating lip the mass flow in the blowing slot changes dynamically, consequently the momentum exchange of the boundary layer over a high lift flap required mass flow can be reduced. These new compact and highly integrated systems provide a real-time monitoring and manipulation of the flow conditions. In this context the integration of pressure sensors into flow sensing airfoils of composite material is investigated. Mechanical and electrical properties of the integrated sensors are investigated under mechanical loads during tensile tests. The sensors contain a reference pressure chamber isolated to the ambient by a deformable membrane with integrated piezoresistors connected as a Wheatstone bridge, which outputs voltage signals depending on the ambient pressure. The composite material in which the sensors are embedded consists of 22 individual layers of unidirectional glass fiber reinforced plastic (GFRP) prepreg. The results of the experiments are used for adapting the design of the sensors and the layout of the laminate to ensure an optimized flux of force in highly loaded structures primarily for future aeronautical applications. It can be shown that the pressure sensor withstands the embedding process into fiber composites with full functional capability and predictable behavior under stress.

  20. Quasi-biennial modulation of solar neutrino flux: connections with solar activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vecchio, A.; Laurenza, M.; D'alessi, L.; Carbone, V.; Storini, M.

    2011-12-01

    A quasi-biennial periodicity has been recently found (Vecchio et al., 2010) in the solar neutrino flux, as detected at the Homestake experiment, as well as in the flux of solar energetic protons, by means of the Empirical Modes Decomposition technique. Moreover, both fluxes have been found to be significantly correlated at the quasi-biennial timescale, thus supporting the hypothesis of a connection between solar neutrinos and solar activity. The origin of this connection is investigated, by modeling how the standard Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein (MSW) effect (the process for which the well-known neutrino flavor oscillations are modified in passing through the material) could be influenced by matter fluctuations. As proposed by Burgess et al., 2004, by introducing a background magnetic field in the helioseismic model, density fluctuations can be excited in the radiative zone by the resonance between helioseismic g-modes and Alfvén waves. In particular, with reasonable values of the background magnetic field (10-100 kG), the distance between resonant layers could be of the same order of neutrino oscillation length. We study the effect over this distance of a background magnetic field which is variable with a ~2 yr period, in agreement with typical variations of solar activity. Our findings suggest that the quasi-biennial modulation of the neutrino flux is theoretically possible as a consequence of the magnetic field variations in the solar interior. A. Vecchio, M. Laurenza, V. Carbone, M. Storini, The Astrophysical Journal Letters, 709, L1-L5 (2010). C. Burgess, N. S. Dzhalilov, T. I. Rashba, V., B.Semikoz, J. W. F. Valle, Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc., 348, 609-624 (2004).

  1. Active shear flow control for improved combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutmark, E.; Parr, T. P.; Hanson-Parr, D. M.; Schadow, K. C.

    1990-01-01

    The acoustical and fluid dynamic facets of an excited premixed flame were studied experimentally to evaluate possibilities for development of a stabilizing closed-loop control system. The flame was analyzed as a nonlinear system which includes different subcomponents: acoustics, fluid dynamics, and chemical reaction. Identification of the acoustical and fluid dynamics subsystems is done by analyzing the transfer function, which was obtained by driving the system with both white-noise and a frequency-sweeping sine-wave. The features obtained by this analysis are compared to results of flow visualization and hot-wire flow-field and spectral measurements. The acoustical subsystem is determined by the resonant acoustic modes of the settling chamber. These modes are subsequently filtered and amplified by the flow shear layer, whose instability characteristics are dominated by the preferred mode frequency.

  2. Comparison of urea clearance in low-efficiency low-flux vs. high-efficiency high-flux dialyzer membrane with reduced blood and dialysate flow: an in vitro analysis.

    PubMed

    Munshi, Raj; Ahmad, Suhail

    2014-01-01

    Rapid removal of small molecules during hemodialysis places an acutely ill patient with kidney failure at an increased risk of hemodynamic instability and for dialysis disequilibrium syndrome. The use of high-flux, high-efficiency (HEF) dialyzers may increase this risk despite reductions in blood and dialysate flow. We performed in vitro experiments to compare urea clearance at low dialysate flow and various blood flows using a low-efficiency low-flux (LEF) and a HEF membrane. Compared to LEF, there was a significant increase in the clearance of urea at all blood flows with the HEF (all P values < 0.005). HEF dialyzer (F180NR) had higher urea clearance at a blood flow of 150 mL/min than LEF dialyzer (F5) at blood flow of 300 mL/min (144.1 ± 0.99 vs. 130.1 ± 0.001 mL/min for F180 vs. F5, respectively, P < 0.002). Our data suggest that use of HEF dialyzer are not as safe as LEF in high-risk acute dialysis patients since these are associated with more rapid removal of urea despite reduction in blood and dialysate flow as compared to LEF.

  3. Dynamic-Active Flow Control - Phase I

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-10-18

    Section, 4: Plenum Chamber, 5: Rear Observation Window, 6: Return Pipework , 7: Filtration Isolation Valve, 8: AC Motor and Centrifugal Pump, 10: Return... Pipework (pressure side), 11: Filtration Circuit. A large settling chamber existed upstream of the test section. The pump flow was introduced

  4. Active Flow Control with Thermoacoustic Actuators

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-31

    dielectric barrier discharge ( DBD ) plasma actuators [4], or combustion powered actuators [5]. Compared to passive flow control techniques, such as vortex...space nor adding significant weight, which is similar to how DBD plasma actuators can be installed. 3 The sound generation mechanism, known as

  5. Active Boundary Layer Trip for Supersonic Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schloegel, F.; Panigua, G.; Tirtey, S.

    2009-01-01

    The last decade has been full of excitement and success for the hypersonic community thanks to various Scramjet ground tests and launches. These studies have shown promising potentials but the viability to perform commercial flights at Mach 8 is still to be demonstrated. An ideal Scramjet is one which is capable of self- starting over a wide range of angles of attack and Mach number. The Scramjet designer has to ensure that the boundary layer over the inlet ramp is fully turbulent where shocks impact, hence reducing the risks of chocked flow conditions. Most studies have issued the efficiency of roughness trip to trigger the boundary layer transition. At hypersonic speed, heat transfer and drag dramatically increase resulting in skin friction averaging at 40% of the overall drag. This study investigates the possibility of triggering transition using perpendicular air jets on a flat plate place in a hypersonic cross-flow. Experiments were conducted in the von Karman Institute hypersonic blow down wind tunnel H3. This facility is mounted with a Mach 6 contoured nozzles and provides flows with Reynolds number in the range of 10x106/m to 30x106/m. The model consist of a flat plate manufactured with a built -in settling chamber, equipped with a pressure tap and a thermocouple to monitor the jet conditions. A first flat plate was manufactured with a black-coated Plexiglas top, for surface heat transfer measurement using an infrared camera. On the second model, a Upilex sheet equipped with 32 thin film gages was glued, time dependent heat transfer measurements up to 60kHz. The jet injection conditions have been varied and a Mach number of 5.5 kept constant. The flow topology was investigated using fast schlieren techniques and oil flow, in order to gain a better understanding.

  6. Local wall heat flux/temperature meter for convective flow and method of utilizing same

    DOEpatents

    Boyd, Ronald D.; Ekhlassi, Ali; Cofie, Penrose

    2004-11-30

    According to one embodiment of the invention, a method includes providing a conduit having a fluid flowing therethrough, disposing a plurality of temperature measurement devices inside a wall of the conduit, positioning at least some of the temperature measurement devices proximate an inside surface of the wall of the conduit, positioning at least some of the temperature measurement devices at different radial positions at the same circumferential location within the wall, measuring a plurality of temperatures of the wall with respective ones of the temperature measurement devices to obtain a three-dimensional temperature topology of the wall, determining the temperature dependent thermal conductivity of the conduit, and determining a multi-dimensional thermal characteristic of the inside surface of the wall of the conduit based on extrapolation of the three-dimensional temperature topology and the temperature dependent thermal conductivities.

  7. Local wall heat flux/temperature meter for convective flow and method of utilizing same

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, Ronald D. (Inventor); Ekhlassi, Ali (Inventor); Cofie, Penrose (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    According to one embodiment of the invention, a method includes providing a conduit having a fluid flowing therethrough, disposing a plurality of temperature measurement devices inside a wall of the conduit, positioning at least some of the temperature measurement devices proximate an inside surface of the wall of the conduit, positioning at least some of the temperature measurement devices at different radial positions at the same circumferential location within the wall, measuring a plurality of temperatures of the wall with respective ones of the temperature measurement devices to obtain a three-dimensional temperature topology of the wall, determining the temperature dependent thermal conductivity of the conduit, and determining a multi-dimensional thermal characteristic of the inside surface of the wall of the conduit based on extrapolation of the three-dimensional temperature topology and the temperature dependent thermal conductivities.

  8. Comparisons of xylem sap flow and water vapour flux at the stand level and derivation of canopy conductance for Scots pine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granier, A.; Biron, P.; Köstner, B.; Gay, L. W.; Najjar, G.

    1996-03-01

    Simultaneous measurements of xylem sap flow and water vapour flux over a Scots pine ( Pinus sylvestris) forest (Hartheim, Germany), were carried out during the Hartheim Experiment (HartX), an intensive observation campaign of the international programme REKLIP. Sap flow was measured every 30 min using both radial constant heating (Granier, 1985) and two types of Cermak sap flowmeters installed on 24 trees selected to cover a wide range of the diameter classes of the stand (min 8 cm; max 17.5 cm). Available energy was high during the observation period (5.5 to 6.9 mm.day-1), and daily cumulated sap flow on a ground area basis varied between 2.0 and 2.7 mm day-1 depending on climate conditions. Maximum hourly values of sap flow reached 0.33 mm h-1, i.e., 230 W m-2. Comparisons of sap flow with water vapour flux as measured with two OPEC (One Propeller Eddy Correlation, University of Arizona) systems showed a time lag between the two methods, sap flow lagging about 90 min behind vapour flux. After taking into account this time lag in the sap flow data set, a good agreement was found between both methods: sap flow = 0.745* vapour flux, r 2 = 0.86. The difference between the two estimates was due to understory transpiration. Canopy conductance ( g c ) was calculated from sap flow measurements using the reverse form of Penman-Monteith equation and climatic data measured 4 m above the canopy. Variations of g c were well correlated ( r 2 = 0.85) with global radiation ( R) and vapour pressure deficit ( vpd). The quantitative expression for g c = f ( R, vpd) was very similar to that previously found with maritime pine ( Pinus pinaster) in the forest of Les Landes, South Western France.

  9. An influence of long-lasting and gradual magnetic flux transport on fate of magnetotail fast plasma flows: An energetic particle injection substorm event study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowada, Motoharu; Fu, Suiyan; Parks, George K.; Pulkkinen, Tuija I.; Pu, Zuyin

    2014-10-01

    Based on multi-satellite and ground observations, we investigated an influence of long-lasting and gradual enhancements of magnetic flux transport rate on the magnetotail fast flow duration. On March 10th, 2009, THEMIS-B, which was located in the central plasma sheet of middle distant magnetotail (XGSM ~-25.8 RE), observed the fast flows with the velocity exceeding 300 km/s, lasting over 3 h for intense southward Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF) period. During long-lasting fast flows, AL index variations were very extensive and their recovery was much slow. Pi 2 waves were observed at the ground observatories around the THEMIS's footpoints and at low-/mid-latitudes. The aspect for these AL variations suggests Steady Magnetospheric Convection (SMC), but clear substorm signatures were also observed. Further magnetic dipolarization was detected by THEMIS-A at XGSM ~-8.2 RE and its nearby THEMIS-E. Only THEMIS-A observed the associated energetic electron flux enhancements. Therefore, the fast flows occurred during substorm with energetic particle injections at “imitative” SMC, which would be driven by prolonged intense southward IMF. The cumulative transport rates of magnetic and Poynting fluxes consecutively and gradually enhanced. On the other hand, THEMIS-C detected much shorter fast flows with the duration of 37 min at XGSM ~-18.1 RE and weak/gradual substorm-associated dipolarization. However, the cumulative magnetic flux transport rate was enhanced only during the fast flow interval and was saturated after the fast flows. From different magnetic transport rate profiles at THEMIS-B and THEMIS-C, the realms of dipolar-configured field lines expanded to near THEMIS-C's position responsible for long-lasting fast flow-associated consecutive and gradual magnetic flux pileup. Because the resultant “high-speed flow braking” region was retreated into a few RE tailward direction, long-lasting fast flows were almost stemmed. These results suggest that the

  10. Effect of blood flow rate on internal filtration in a high-flux dialyzer with polysulfone membrane.

    PubMed

    Sakiyama, Ryoichi; Ishimori, Isamu; Akiba, Takashi; Mineshima, Michio

    2012-09-01

    Internal filtration/backfiltration (IF/BF) of a dialyzer depends on several parameters. This study evaluated the effect of the blood flow rate (Q (B)) on the internal filtration flow rate (Q (IF)) measured using Doppler ultrasonography for a high-flux dialyzer with a polysulfone membrane, APS-15E. In an in vitro study, bovine blood was circulated through the dialyzer, at a Q (B) of 100-350 mL/min. The clearances (CL) of creatinine, β(2)-microglobulin, and α(1)-microglobulin were then investigated. Q (IF) increased with the Q (B) value. A good correlation was obtained between Q (IF) and the pressure difference between the pressures at the inlet of the blood compartment and the pressure at the outlet of the dialysate compartment. The creatinine CL values strongly depended on Q (B) because molecular diffusion was dominant. The β(2)-microglobulin CL also depended on Q (B), because its removal rate seemed to be affected by both diffusive and convective transport caused by the IF/BF. An extremely low CL value was obtained for α(1)-microglobulin because of its low diffusivity and membrane fouling induced by proteins plugging the membrane. In conclusion, the IF/BF in the dialyzer strongly depends on Q (B). Furthermore, the dependence of the solute clearance on Q (B) decreased with increasing molecular size of the solute because of the decrease in diffusivity through the membrane.

  11. Self-organized criticality in a two-dimensional cellular automaton model of a magnetic flux tube with background flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dănilă, B.; Harko, T.; Mocanu, G.

    2015-11-01

    We investigate the transition to self-organized criticality in a two-dimensional model of a flux tube with a background flow. The magnetic induction equation, represented by a partial differential equation with a stochastic source term, is discretized and implemented on a two-dimensional cellular automaton. The energy released by the automaton during one relaxation event is the magnetic energy. As a result of the simulations, we obtain the time evolution of the energy release, of the system control parameter, of the event lifetime distribution and of the event size distribution, respectively, and we establish that a self-organized critical state is indeed reached by the system. Moreover, energetic initial impulses in the magnetohydrodynamic flow can lead to one-dimensional signatures in the magnetic two-dimensional system, once the self-organized critical regime is established. The applications of the model for the study of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) is briefly considered, and it is shown that some astrophysical parameters of the bursts, like the light curves, the maximum released energy and the number of peaks in the light curve can be reproduced and explained, at least on a qualitative level, by working in a framework in which the systems settles in a self-organized critical state via magnetic reconnection processes in the magnetized GRB fireball.

  12. X-ray flux variability of active galactic nuclei observed using NuSTAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rani, Priyanka; Stalin, C. S.; Rakshit, Suvendu

    2017-04-01

    We present results of a systematic study of flux variability on hourly time-scales in a large sample of active galactic nuclei (AGN) in the 3-79 keV band using data from Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array. Our sample consists of four BL Lac objects (BL Lacs), three flat spectrum radio quasars (FSRQs) 24 Seyfert 1, 42 Seyfert 2 and eight narrow line Seyfert 1 (NLSy1) galaxies. We find that in the 3-79 keV band, about 65 per cent of the sources in our sample show significant variations on hourly time-scales. Using the Mann-Whitney U-test and the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test, we find no difference in the variability behaviour between Seyfert 1 and 2 galaxies. The blazar sources (FSRQs and BL Lacs) in our sample are more variable than Seyfert galaxies that include Seyfert 1 and Seyfert 2 in the soft (3-10 keV), hard (10-79 keV) and total (3-79 keV) bands. NLSy1 galaxies show the highest duty cycle of variability (87 per cent), followed by BL Lacs (82 per cent), Seyfert galaxies (56 per cent) and FSRQs (23 per cent). We obtained flux doubling/halving time in the hard X-ray band less than 10 min in 11 sources. The flux variations between the hard and soft bands in all the sources in our sample are consistent with zero lag.

  13. INCLINATION-DEPENDENT ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS FLUX PROFILES FROM STRONG LENSING OF THE KERR SPACETIME

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Bin; Dai, Xinyu; Baron, E.

    2013-01-10

    Recent quasar microlensing observations have constrained the X-ray emission sizes of quasars to be about 10 gravitational radii, one order of magnitude smaller than the optical emission sizes. Using a new ray-tracing code for the Kerr spacetime, we find that the observed X-ray flux is strongly influenced by the gravity field of the central black hole, even for observers at moderate inclination angles. We calculate inclination-dependent flux profiles of active galactic nuclei in the optical and X-ray bands by combining the Kerr lensing and projection effects for future reference. We further study the dependence of the X-ray-to-optical flux ratio on the inclination angle caused by differential lensing distortion of the X-ray and optical emission, assuming several corona geometries. The strong lensing X-ray-to-optical magnification ratio can change by a factor of {approx}10 for normal quasars in some cases, and a further factor of {approx}10 for broad absorption line (BAL) quasars and obscured quasars. Comparing our results with the observed distributions in normal and BAL quasars, we find that the inclination angle dependence of the magnification ratios can significantly change the X-ray-to-optical flux ratio distributions. In particular, the mean value of the spectrum slope parameter {alpha}{sub ox}, 0.3838log F {sub 2keV}/F {sub 2500A}, can differ by {approx}0.1-0.2 between normal and BAL quasars, depending on corona geometries, suggesting larger intrinsic absorptions in BAL quasars.

  14. Active Control of Jet Engine Inlet Flows

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-03-31

    circumferential distortion pattern acts as an unsteady forcing function, inducing blade vibration that can result in structural fatigue and failure 3. This...after moderate vibrations of the duct model were observed under standard test conditions, a more rigid mounting system was adopted. Upstream of the...The design process started with determining the proper placement of the actuators. Using results from surface pressure tests and flow visualization

  15. Statistical analysis of the horizontal divergent flow in emerging solar active regions

    SciTech Connect

    Toriumi, Shin; Hayashi, Keiji; Yokoyama, Takaaki

    2014-10-10

    Solar active regions (ARs) are thought to be formed by magnetic fields from the convection zone. Our flux emergence simulations revealed that a strong horizontal divergent flow (HDF) of unmagnetized plasma appears at the photosphere before the flux begins to emerge. In our earlier study, we analyzed HMI data for a single AR and confirmed presence of this precursor plasma flow in the actual Sun. In this paper, as an extension of our earlier study, we conducted a statistical analysis of the HDFs to further investigate their characteristics and better determine the properties. From SDO/HMI data, we picked up 23 flux emergence events over a period of 14 months, the total flux of which ranges from 10{sup 20} to 10{sup 22} Mx. Out of 23 selected events, 6 clear HDFs were detected by the method we developed in our earlier study, and 7 HDFs detected by visual inspection were added to this statistic analysis. We found that the duration of the HDF is on average 61 minutes and the maximum HDF speed is on average 3.1 km s{sup –1}. We also estimated the rising speed of the subsurface magnetic flux to be 0.6-1.4 km s{sup –1}. These values are highly consistent with our previous one-event analysis as well as our simulation results. The observation results lead us to the conclusion that the HDF is a rather common feature in the earliest phase of AR emergence. Moreover, our HDF analysis has the capability of determining the subsurface properties of emerging fields that cannot be directly measured.

  16. Near-Horizontal, Two-Phase Flow Patterns of Nitrogen and Hydrogen at Low Mass Heat and Flux (on CD-ROM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanDresar, N. T.; Siegwarth, J. D.

    2001-01-01

    One reason for NASA's interest in cryogenic two-phase flow with low mass and heat flux is the need to design spacecraft heat exchangers used for vaporizing cryogenic propellants. The CD-ROM provides digitized movies of particular flow patterns observed in experimental work. The movies have been provided in (QuickTime9Trademark) format, encoded at 320w x 240h pixels, 15 fps, using the Sorenson(Trademark) Video Codec for compression. Experiments were conducted to obtain data on the two-phase (liquid and vapor) flow behavior of cryogenic nitrogen and hydrogen under low mass and heat flux conditions. Tests were performed in normal gravity with a 1.5 degree up flow configuration. View ports in the apparatus permitted visual observation of the two-phase flow patterns. Computer codes to predict flow patterns were developed from theoretical/empirical models reported in the literature. Predictions from the computer codes were compared with experimental flow pattern observations. Results are presented employing the traditional two-dimensional flow pattern map format using the liquid and gas superficial velocities as coordinates. In general, the agreement between the experimental results and the analytical predictive methods is reasonably good. Small regions of the flow pattern maps are identified where the models are deficient as a result of neglecting phase change phenomena. Certain regions of the maps were beyond the range of the experiments and could not be completely validated. Areas that could benefit from further work include modeling of the transition from separated flow, collection of additional data in the bubble and annular flow regimes, and collection of experimental data at other inclination angles, tube diameters and high heat flux.

  17. Flow Tagging Velocimetry Using Caged Dye Photo-Activated Fluorophores

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-01-01

    Meas. Sci. Technol. 11 (2000) 1251–1258. Printed in the UK PII: S0957-0233(00)10968-3 Flow tagging velocimetry using caged dye photo-activated...followed by laser induced electronic fluo- rescence, has been applied both to low speed turbulent air jets (Noullez et al 1997) and to supersonic flow...measurements in electrohydrodynamic flows with mean velocities of order 2–4 µm s−1. There are, however, some significant disadvantages associated with

  18. Sap flow measurements combining sap-flux density radial profiles with punctual sap-flux density measurements in oak trees (Quercus ilex and Quercus pyrenaica) - water-use implications in a water-limited savanna-

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyes, J. Leonardo; Lubczynski1, Maciek W.

    2010-05-01

    Sap flow measurement is a key aspect for understanding how plants use water and their impacts on the ecosystems. A variety of sensors have been developed to measure sap flow, each one with its unique characteristics. When the aim of a research is to have accurate tree water use calculations, with high temporal and spatial resolution (i.e. scaled), a sensor with high accuracy, high measurement efficiency, low signal-to-noise ratio and low price is ideal, but such has not been developed yet. Granier's thermal dissipation probes (TDP) have been widely used in many studies and various environmental conditions because of its simplicity, reliability, efficiency and low cost. However, it has two major flaws when is used in semi-arid environments and broad-stem tree species: it is often affected by high natural thermal gradients (NTG), which distorts the measurements, and it cannot measure the radial variability of sap-flux density in trees with sapwood thicker than two centimeters. The new, multi point heat field deformation sensor (HFD) is theoretically not affected by NTG, and it can measure the radial variability of the sap flow at different depths. However, its high cost is a serious limitation when simultaneous measurements are required in several trees (e.g. catchment-scale studies). The underlying challenge is to develop a monitoring schema in which HFD and TDP are combined to satisfy the needs of measurement efficiency and accuracy in water accounting. To assess the level of agreement between TDP and HFD methods in quantifying sap flow rates and temporal patterns on Quercus ilex (Q.i ) and Quercus pyrenaica trees (Q.p.), three measurement schemas: standard TDP, TDP-NTG-corrected and HFD were compared in dry season at the semi-arid Sardon area, near Salamanca in Spain in the period from June to September 2009. To correct TDP measurements with regard to radial sap flow variability, a radial sap flux density correction factor was applied and tested by adjusting TDP

  19. Impacts of membrane flux enhancers on activated sludge respiration and nutrient removal in MBRs.

    PubMed

    Iversen, Vera; Koseoglu, Hasan; Yigit, Nevzat O; Drews, Anja; Kitis, Mehmet; Lesjean, Boris; Kraume, Matthias

    2009-02-01

    This paper presents the findings of experimental investigations regarding the influence of 13 different flux enhancing chemicals (FeCl3, polyaluminium chloride, 2 chitosans, 5 synthetic polymers, 2 starches and 2 activated carbons) on respirometric characteristics and nitrification/denitrification performance of membrane bioreactor (MBR) mixed liquor. Flux enhancing chemicals are a promising method to reduce the detrimental effects of fouling phenomena via the modification of mixed liquor characteristics. However, potentially inhibiting effects of these chemicals on mixed liquor biological activity triggered the biokinetic studies (in jar tests) conducted in this work. The tested polyaluminium chloride (PACl) strongly impacted on nitrification (-16%) and denitrification rate (-43%). The biodegradable nature of chitosan was striking in endogenous and exogenous tests. Considering the relatively high costs of this chemical, an application for wastewater treatment does thus not seem to be advisable. Also, addition of one of the tested activated carbons strongly impacted on the oxygen uptake rate (-28%), nitrification (-90%) and denitrification rate (-43%), due to a decrease of pH. Results show that the changes in kLa values were mostly not significant, however, a decrease of 13% in oxygen transfer was found for sludge treated with PACl.

  20. On the area expansion of magnetic flux tubes in solar active regions

    SciTech Connect

    Dudík, Jaroslav; Dzifčáková, Elena; Cirtain, Jonathan W. E-mail: elena@asu.cas.cz

    2014-11-20

    We calculated the three-dimensional (3D) distribution of the area expansion factors in a potential magnetic field, extrapolated from the high-resolution Hinode/SOT magnetogram of the quiescent active region NOAA 11482. Retaining only closed loops within the computational box, we show that the distribution of area expansion factors show significant structure. Loop-like structures characterized by locally lower values of the expansion factor are embedded in a smooth background. These loop-like flux tubes have squashed cross-sections and expand with height. The distribution of the expansion factors show an overall increase with height, allowing an active region core characterized by low values of the expansion factor to be distinguished. The area expansion factors obtained from extrapolation of the Solar Optical Telescope magnetogram are compared to those obtained from an approximation of the observed magnetogram by a series of 134 submerged charges. This approximation retains the general flux distribution in the observed magnetogram, but removes the small-scale structure in both the approximated magnetogram and the 3D distribution of the area expansion factors. We argue that the structuring of the expansion factor can be a significant ingredient in producing the observed structuring of the solar corona. However, due to the potential approximation used, these results may not be applicable to loops exhibiting twist or to active regions producing significant flares.

  1. An active, collaborative approach to learning skills in flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Fuller, Kathryn; Linden, Matthew D; Lee-Pullen, Tracey; Fragall, Clayton; Erber, Wendy N; Röhrig, Kimberley J

    2016-06-01

    Advances in science education research have the potential to improve the way students learn to perform scientific interpretations and understand science concepts. We developed active, collaborative activities to teach skills in manipulating flow cytometry data using FlowJo software. Undergraduate students were given compensated clinical flow cytometry listmode output (FCS) files and asked to design a gating strategy to diagnose patients with different hematological malignancies on the basis of their immunophenotype. A separate cohort of research trainees was given uncompensated data files on which they performed their own compensation, calculated the antibody staining index, designed a sequential gating strategy, and quantified rare immune cell subsets. Student engagement, confidence, and perceptions of flow cytometry were assessed using a survey. Competency against the learning outcomes was assessed by asking students to undertake tasks that required understanding of flow cytometry dot plot data and gating sequences. The active, collaborative approach allowed students to achieve learning outcomes not previously possible with traditional teaching formats, for example, having students design their own gating strategy, without forgoing essential outcomes such as the interpretation of dot plots. In undergraduate students, favorable perceptions of flow cytometry as a field and as a potential career choice were correlated with student confidence but not the ability to perform flow cytometry data analysis. We demonstrate that this new pedagogical approach to teaching flow cytometry is beneficial for student understanding and interpretation of complex concepts. It should be considered as a useful new method for incorporating complex data analysis tasks such as flow cytometry into curricula.

  2. ELEMENTAL MERCURY CAPTURE BY ACTIVATED CARBON IN A FLOW REACTOR

    EPA Science Inventory


    The paper gives results of bench-scale experiments in a flow reactor to simulate the entrained-flow capture of elemental mercury (Hgo) using solid sorbents. Adsorption of Hgo by a lignite-based activated carbon (Calgon FGD) was examined at different carbon/mercury (C/Hg) rat...

  3. Tidally oscillating bisulfide fluxes and fluid flow rates observed with in situ chemical sensors at a warm spring in Monterey Bay, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plant, Josh N.; Johnson, Kenneth S.; Fitzwater, Steve E.; Sakamoto, Carole M.; Coletti, Luke J.; Jannasch, Hans W.

    2010-12-01

    An In Situ Ultraviolet Spectrophotometer (ISUS) was coupled to a benthic chamber to characterize the bisulfide flux emanating from a warm spring at the Extrovert Cliff locality within Monterey Bay, California. The chamber was periodically flushed with bottom seawater to reset chemical concentrations, which enabled deployments over multiple days. Data from several deployments, each lasting at least 10 days, were used to calculate flow rates, fluid concentrations, and fluxes over time. The bisulfide concentration of the fluid entering the chamber varied from 75 to 4500 μmol l -1. Positive temperature anomalies up to 3.5° were associated with these elevated concentrations. Linear flow rates ranged from 2 to >17 m day -1, while the bisulfide fluxes varied from 0.2 to 80 mol m -2 day -1. The bisulfide originated at depth and was not produced in the surface sediments via an anaerobic oxidation of methane coupled to sulfate reduction. Tides modulated the flow as well as the composition of the fluid entering the chamber. It appeared that a deep sourced fluid, which supplied the bisulfide, was mixed with a second, ambient seawater-like fluid before entering the flux chamber. At low tides, flow rates were at their highest and the contribution of the deep sourced fluid to the fluid entering the chamber was at a maximum.

  4. Flow of active suspensions and biased swimming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafai, Salima; Peyla, Philippe; Garcia, Xabel; Kitenbergs, Guntars; Garcia, Michaël; LIPhy Team

    2012-11-01

    It is a challenge to understand the hydrodynamics associated with individual or collective motion of microswimmers through their fluid-mediated interactions in order for instance to manipulate the cells efficiently for some applications purposes. The motion of these micro-organisms can be often affected by the presence of gradients leading to a biased random walk (chemotaxis in the presence of chemicals, gyrotaxis in a gravity field, phototaxis under light exposure). In this study, we present our experimental results concerning the coupling of a Poiseuille flow with the biased random walk of Chlamydomonas Reinhardtii, a green unicellular micro-alga. This is done by illuminating the microswimmer suspension while flowing in a microchannel device. We show that one can obtain a spontaneous and reversible migration and separation of the microalgae suspension from the rest of the suspending medium under illumination and then dynamically control the concentration of the suspension with light. We present a simple model that accounts for the observed phenomenon. We thank the ANR MOSICOB and MICMACSWIM.

  5. Active flow control of subsonic flow in an adverse pressure gradient using synthetic jets and passive micro flow control devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denn, Michael E.

    Several recent studies have shown the advantages of active and/or passive flow control devices for boundary layer flow modification. Many current and future proposed air vehicles have very short or offset diffusers in order to save vehicle weight and create more optimal vehicle/engine integration. Such short coupled diffusers generally result in boundary layer separation and loss of pressure recovery which reduces engine performance and in some cases may cause engine stall. Deployment of flow control devices can alleviate this problem to a large extent; however, almost all active flow control devices have some energy penalty associated with their inclusion. One potential low penalty approach for enhancing the diffuser performance is to combine the passive flow control elements such as micro-ramps with active flow control devices such as synthetic jets to achieve higher control authority. The goal of this dissertation is twofold. The first objective is to assess the ability of CFD with URANS turbulence models to accurately capture the effects of the synthetic jets and micro-ramps on boundary layer flow. This is accomplished by performing numerical simulations replicating several experimental test cases conducted at Georgia Institute of Technology under the NASA funded Inlet Flow Control and Prediction Technologies Program, and comparing the simulation results with experimental data. The second objective is to run an expanded CFD matrix of numerical simulations by varying various geometric and other flow control parameters of micro-ramps and synthetic jets to determine how passive and active control devices interact with each other in increasing and/or decreasing the control authority and determine their influence on modification of boundary layer flow. The boundary layer shape factor is used as a figure of merit for determining the boundary layer flow quality/modification and its tendency towards separation. It is found by a large number of numerical experiments and

  6. Time Series Measurements of Diffuse Hydrothermal Flow at the ASHES Vent Field Reveal Tidally Modulated Heat and Volume Flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mittelstaedt, E. L.; Fornari, D. J.; Crone, T. J.

    2015-12-01

    Existing time-series measurements of temperature and velocity of diffuse hydrothermal fluids exhibit variability over a range of periods from seconds to days. Frequency analysis of these measurements reveals differences between studies and field locations including nearly white spectra, as well as spectra with peaks at tidal and inertial periods. Based upon these results, previous authors have suggested several processes that may control diffuse flow rates, including tidally induced currents and 'tidal pumping', and have also suggested that there are no systematic controls. To further investigate the processes that control variability in diffuse flow, we use data from a new, deep-sea camera and temperature measurement system, the Diffuse Effluent Measurement System (DEMS), deployed during the July, 2014 cruise of the R/V Atlantis. The DEMS was deployed with DSV Alvin above a fracture network at the Phoenix vent within the ASHES vent field (Axial Seamount, 1541 mbsl). The system collected 20 seconds of imagery at 20 Hz and 24 seconds of temperature measurements at 1 Hz each hour over the period between July 22 and August 2nd. Velocities of the upwelling fluids were calculated using Diffuse Fluid Velocimetry (DFV; Mittelstaedt et al., 2010). DFV is a cross correlation technique that tracks moving index of refraction anomalies (i.e., hot parcels of fluid) through time. Over the ~12 day deployment, median flow rates ranged from 0.5 cm/s to 6 cm/s and mean fluid temperature anomalies from 0°C up to ~6.5°C, yielding an average heat flux density of 0.23 MW/m2. Spectral analysis of both the measured temperatures and calculated velocities yield a peak in normalized power at the semi-diurnal lunar period (M2, 12.4hrs), but no other spectral peaks above the 95% confidence level. Here, we present these results and discuss their implications for the tidal current and tidal pressure models of diffuse flow variability at the ASHES vent field.

  7. Neutrophil adhesion and activation under flow

    PubMed Central

    Zarbock, Alexander; Ley, Klaus

    2009-01-01

    Neutrophil recruitment into inflamed tissue in response to injury or infection is tightly regulated. Reduced neutrophil recruitment can result in a reduced ability to fight invading microorganisms. During inflammation, neutrophils roll along the endothelial wall of postcapillary venules and integrate inflammatory signals. Neutrophil activation by selectins and chemokines regulates integrin adhesiveness. Binding of activated integrins to their counter-receptors on endothelial cells induces neutrophil arrest and firm adhesion. Adherent neutrophils can be further activated to undergo cytoskeletal rearrangement, crawling, transmigration, superoxide production and respiratory burst. Signaling through G-protein coupled receptors, selectin ligands, Fc receptors and outside-in signaling of integrins are all involved in neutrophil activation, but their interplay in the multistep process of recruitment are only beginning to emerge. This review provides an overview of signaling in rolling and adherent neutrophils. PMID:19037827

  8. Midtail plasma flows and the relationship to near-Earth substorm activity: A case study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lopez, R. E.; Goodrich, C. C.; Reeves, G. D.; Belian, R. D.; Taktakishvili, A.

    1994-01-01

    Recent simulations of magnetotail reconnection have pointed to a link between plasma flows, dipolarization, and the substorm current wedge. In particular, Hesse and Birn (1991) have proposed that earthward jetting of plasma from the reconnection region transports flux into the near-Earth region. At the inner edge of the plasma sheet this flux piles up, producing a dipolarization of the magnetic field. The vorticity produced by the east-west deflection of the flow at the inner edge of the plasma sheet gives rise to field-aligned currents that have region 1 polarity. Thus in this scenario the earthward flow from the reconnection region produces the dipolarization ad the current wedge in a self-consistent fashion. In this study we examine observations made on April 8, 1985 by the Active Magnetospheric Particle Tracer Explorers (AMPTE)/Ion Release Module (IRM), the geosynchronous satellites 1979-053, 1983-019, and 1984-037, and Syowa station, as well as AE. This event is unique because IRM was located near the neutral sheet in the midnight sector for am extended period of time. Ground data show that there was ongoing activity in the IRM local time sector for several hours, beginning at 1800 UT and reaching a crescendo at 2300 UT. This activity was also accompanied by energetic particle variations, including injections, at geosynchronous orbit in the nighttime sector. Significantly, there were no fast flows at the neutral sheet until the great intensification of activity at 2300 UT. At that time, IRM recorded fast eartheard flow simultaneous with a dipolatization of the magetic field. We conclude that while the aforementioned scenario for the creation of the current wedge encounters serious problems explaining the earlier activity, the observations at 2300 UT are consistent with the scenario of Hesse and Birn (1191). On that basis it is argued that the physics of substorms is not exclusively rooted in the development of a global tearing mode. Processes at the inner edge

  9. Rhinovirus-induced calcium flux triggers NLRP3 and NLRC5 activation in bronchial cells.

    PubMed

    Triantafilou, Kathy; Kar, Satwik; van Kuppeveld, Frank J M; Triantafilou, Martha

    2013-12-01

    Human rhinoviruses have been linked with underlying lung disorders, such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, in children and adults. However, the mechanism of virus-induced airway inflammation is poorly understood. In this study, using virus deletion mutants and silencing for nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptors (NLRs), we show that the rhinovirus ion channel protein 2B triggers NLRP3 and NLRC5 inflammasome activation and IL-1β secretion in bronchial cells. 2B protein targets the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi and induces Ca(2+) reduction in these organelles, thereby disturbing the intracellular calcium homeostasis. NLRP3 and NLRC5 act in a cooperative manner during the inflammasome assembly by sensing intracellular Ca(2+) fluxes and trigger IL-1β secretion. These results reveal for the first time that human rhinovirus infection in primary bronchial cells triggers inflammasome activation.

  10. Regulation of glomerulotubular balance: flow-activated proximal tubule function.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tong; Weinbaum, Sheldon; Weinstein, Alan M

    2017-03-07

    The purpose of this review is to summarize our knowledge and understanding of the physiological importance and the mechanisms underlying flow-activated proximal tubule transport. Since the earliest micropuncture studies of mammalian proximal tubule, it has been recognized that tubular flow is an important regulator of sodium, potassium, and acid-base transport in the kidney. Increased fluid flow stimulates Na(+) and HCO3(-) absorption in the proximal tubule via stimulation of Na/H-exchanger isoform 3 (NHE3) and H(+)-ATPase. In the proximal tubule, brush border microvilli are the major flow sensors, which experience changes in hydrodynamic drag and bending moment as luminal flow velocity changes and which transmit the force of altered flow to cytoskeletal structures within the cell. The signal to NHE3 depends upon the integrity of the actin cytoskeleton; the signal to the H(+)-ATPase depends upon microtubules. We have demonstrated that alterations in fluid drag impact tubule function by modulating ion transporter availability within the brush border membrane of the proximal tubule. Beyond that, there is evidence that transporter activity within the peritubular membrane is also modulated by luminal flow. Secondary messengers that regulate the flow-mediated tubule function have also been delineated. Dopamine blunts the responsiveness of proximal tubule transporters to changes in luminal flow velocity, while a DA1 antagonist increases flow sensitivity of solute reabsorption. IP3 receptor-mediated intracellular Ca(2+) signaling is critical to transduction of microvillus drag. In this review, we summarize our findings of the regulatory mechanism of flow-mediated Na(+) and HCO3(-) transport in the proximal tubule and review available information about flow sensing and regulatory mechanism of glomerulotubular balance.

  11. High-Lift System for a Supercritical Airfoil: Simplified by Active Flow Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melton, LaTunia Pack; Schaeffler, Norman W.; Lin, John C.

    2007-01-01

    Active flow control wind tunnel experiments were conducted in the NASA Langley Low-Turbulence Pressure Tunnel using a two-dimensional supercritical high-lift airfoil with a 15% chord hinged leading-edge flap and a 25% chord hinged trailing-edge flap. This paper focuses on the application of zero-net-mass-flux periodic excitation near the airfoil trailing edge flap shoulder at a Mach number of 0.1 and chord Reynolds numbers of 1.2 x 10(exp 6) to 9 x 10(exp 6) with leading- and trailing-edge flap deflections of 25 deg. and 30 deg., respectively. The purpose of the investigation was to increase the zero-net-mass-flux options for controlling trailing edge flap separation by using a larger model than used on the low Reynolds number version of this model and to investigate the effect of flow control at higher Reynolds numbers. Static and dynamic surface pressures and wake pressures were acquired to determine the effects of flow control on airfoil performance. Active flow control was applied both upstream of the trailing edge flap and immediately downstream of the trailing edge flap shoulder and the effects of Reynolds number, excitation frequency and amplitude are presented. The excitations around the trailing edge flap are then combined to control trailing edge flap separation. The combination of two closely spaced actuators around the trailing-edge flap knee was shown to increase the lift produced by an individual actuator. The phase sensitivity between two closely spaced actuators seen at low Reynolds number is confirmed at higher Reynolds numbers. The momentum input required to completely control flow separation on the configuration was larger than that available from the actuators used.

  12. Vapor Pressure Deficit, Soil Moisture, and Stream Flow Relationships to Land-Atmosphere Fluxes of Water and Carbon.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, S. R.; Emanuel, R. E.; McGlynn, B. L.

    2014-12-01

    Climatic change is exerting considerable influence on the hydrologic and biogeochemical cycles of snow- dominated montane forest ecosystems. Growing season drought stress is a common occurrence after snowmelt-derived soil water content (WC) and stream flow (Q) have declined, leading to an increase in atmospheric water demands (i.e. vapor pressure deficit, VPD). Here, we analyzed a 6-year record (2006-2011) of H2O and CO2 fluxes from the Tenderfoot Creek Experimental Forest, a montane forest in the northern Rocky Mountains to examine (1) how growing season evapotranspiration (ET), net ecosystem production of carbon (NEP), and water use efficiency (WUENEP/ET) respond to changing WC and VPD, (2) how annual NEP is influenced by annual precipitation and growing season length (GSL), and (3) the relationship of stream flow (Q), a catchment-wide indicator of water availability, to NEP and WUENEP/ET. Growing season NEP exhibited a linear relationship with WC and a log-linear relationship with Q, indicative of persistent water limitations when streamflow and soil moisture reach their annual minima late in the growing season. Nevertheless, years with long GSLs had relatively higher NEP, with a small net carbon sink maintained even at low levels of WC and Q, suggesting that trees are able to obtain water from deeper portions of the soil profile (>30 cm) during droughts. However, the warmer, drier climate projected for this region could bring this system closer to a critical threshold of GSL, WC, and VPD, introducing vegetation water stress that could alter the current relationship between GSL and annual NEP.

  13. How Phosphorylation and ATPase Activity Regulate Anion Flux though the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR).

    PubMed

    Zwick, Matthias; Esposito, Cinzia; Hellstern, Manuel; Seelig, Anna

    2016-07-08

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR, ABCC7), mutations of which cause cystic fibrosis, belongs to the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter family and works as a channel for small anions, such as chloride and bicarbonate. Anion channel activity is known to depend on phosphorylation by cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA) and CFTR-ATPase activity. Whereas anion channel activity has been extensively investigated, phosphorylation and CFTR-ATPase activity are still poorly understood. Here, we show that the two processes can be measured in a label-free and non-invasive manner in real time in live cells, stably transfected with CFTR. This study reveals three key findings. (i) The major contribution (≥90%) to the total CFTR-related ATP hydrolysis rate is due to phosphorylation by PKA and the minor contribution (≤10%) to CFTR-ATPase activity. (ii) The mutant CFTR-E1371S that is still conductive, but defective in ATP hydrolysis, is not phosphorylated, suggesting that phosphorylation requires a functional nucleotide binding domain and occurs in the post-hydrolysis transition state. (iii) CFTR-ATPase activity is inversely related to CFTR anion flux. The present data are consistent with a model in which CFTR is in a closed conformation with two ATPs bound. The open conformation is induced by ATP hydrolysis and corresponds to the post-hydrolysis transition state that is stabilized by phosphorylation and binding of chloride channel potentiators.

  14. Distribution of the Effect of Solar Proton Flux And Geomagnetic Activity on the Stratospheric Ozone Profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velinov, P. I. Y.; Tassev, Y.; Yanev, T.; Tomova, D.

    Two-way MANOVA was used to examine the impact of two factors: 1) the proton flux intensity and 2) the geomagnetic activity on the dependant variable "ozone mixing ratio" which characterizes the stratospheric ozone profiles. The examination was carried out with fixed levels of two other factors: a) the heights at which the "ozone mixing ratio" was recorded, i,e, 35 km, 30.2 km, 24.5 km, 18.4 km, 15.6 km and b) the energetic intervals within which the proton flux was measured, i.e. =0,6-4,2 MeV; 4,2-8,7 MeV; 8,7-14,5 MeV; 15-44 MeV; 39-82 MeV; 84-200 MeV; 110-500 MeV. The analysis was performed for all combinations of levels of the factors a) and b) for which data was available. It was aimed at revealing which of the factors 1) and 2) were dominating with different combinations of the factors a) and b) with fixed levels. For this purpose a post hoc analysis was performed as well. The main results are as follows: factors 1) and 2) exert statistically significant impact on the dependant variable at all of the heights examined, but not for all of energetic intervals; increase of the ozone mixing ratio was observed as a main effect of the proton flux intensity at heights 24.5 km, 18.4 km, 15.6 km, but the analysis of the simultaneous acting of factors 1) and 2) revealed a decrease of the dependant variable at these heights; these effects possibly indicate the existence of two different mechanisms of impact on the ozone mixing ratio; the afore- discussed effects decrease with the height and therefore their graphical image was named "Christmas tree".

  15. Measuring Spatial Variability of Vapor Flux to Characterize Vadose-zone VOC Sources: Flow-cell Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Mainhagu, Jon; Morrison, C.; Truex, Michael J.; Oostrom, Martinus; Brusseau, Mark

    2014-08-05

    A method termed vapor-phase tomography has recently been proposed to characterize the distribution of volatile organic contaminant mass in vadose-zone source areas, and to measure associated three-dimensional distributions of local contaminant mass discharge. The method is based on measuring the spatial variability of vapor flux, and thus inherent to its effectiveness is the premise that the magnitudes and temporal variability of vapor concentrations measured at different monitoring points within the interrogated area will be a function of the geospatial positions of the points relative to the source location. A series of flow-cell experiments was conducted to evaluate this premise. A well-defined source zone was created by injection and extraction of a non-reactive gas (SF6). Spatial and temporal concentration distributions obtained from the tests were compared to simulations produced with a mathematical model describing advective and diffusive transport. Tests were conducted to characterize both areal and vertical components of the application. Decreases in concentration over time were observed for monitoring points located on the opposite side of the source zone from the local–extraction point, whereas increases were observed for monitoring points located between the local–extraction point and the source zone. We found that the results illustrate that comparison of temporal concentration profiles obtained at various monitoring points gives a general indication of the source location with respect to the extraction and monitoring points.

  16. MHD boundary layer slip flow and heat transfer of ferrofluid along a stretching cylinder with prescribed heat flux.

    PubMed

    Qasim, Muhammad; Khan, Zafar Hayat; Khan, Waqar Ahmad; Ali Shah, Inayat

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) flow of ferrofluid along a stretching cylinder. The velocity slip and prescribed surface heat flux boundary conditions are employed on the cylinder surface. Water as conventional base fluid containing nanoparticles of magnetite (Fe3O4) is used. Comparison between magnetic (Fe3O4) and non-magnetic (Al2O3) nanoparticles is also made. The governing non-linear partial differential equations are reduced to non-linear ordinary differential equations and then solved numerically using shooting method. Present results are compared with the available data in the limiting cases. The present results are found to be in an excellent agreement. It is observed that with an increase in the magnetic field strength, the percent difference in the heat transfer rate of magnetic nanoparticles with Al2O3 decreases. Surface shear stress and the heat transfer rate at the surface increase as the curvature parameter increases, i.e curvature helps to enhance the heat transfer.

  17. Measuring Spatial Variability of Vapor Flux to Characterize Vadose-zone VOC Sources: Flow-cell Experiments

    DOE PAGES

    Mainhagu, Jon; Morrison, C.; Truex, Michael J.; ...

    2014-08-05

    A method termed vapor-phase tomography has recently been proposed to characterize the distribution of volatile organic contaminant mass in vadose-zone source areas, and to measure associated three-dimensional distributions of local contaminant mass discharge. The method is based on measuring the spatial variability of vapor flux, and thus inherent to its effectiveness is the premise that the magnitudes and temporal variability of vapor concentrations measured at different monitoring points within the interrogated area will be a function of the geospatial positions of the points relative to the source location. A series of flow-cell experiments was conducted to evaluate this premise. Amore » well-defined source zone was created by injection and extraction of a non-reactive gas (SF6). Spatial and temporal concentration distributions obtained from the tests were compared to simulations produced with a mathematical model describing advective and diffusive transport. Tests were conducted to characterize both areal and vertical components of the application. Decreases in concentration over time were observed for monitoring points located on the opposite side of the source zone from the local–extraction point, whereas increases were observed for monitoring points located between the local–extraction point and the source zone. We found that the results illustrate that comparison of temporal concentration profiles obtained at various monitoring points gives a general indication of the source location with respect to the extraction and monitoring points.« less

  18. Flux Tensor Constrained Geodesic Active Contours with Sensor Fusion for Persistent Object Tracking.

    PubMed

    Bunyak, Filiz; Palaniappan, Kannappan; Nath, Sumit Kumar; Seetharaman, Gunasekaran

    2007-08-01

    This paper makes new contributions in motion detection, object segmentation and trajectory estimation to create a successful object tracking system. A new efficient motion detection algorithm referred to as the flux tensor is used to detect moving objects in infrared video without requiring background modeling or contour extraction. The flux tensor-based motion detector when applied to infrared video is more accurate than thresholding "hot-spots", and is insensitive to shadows as well as illumination changes in the visible channel. In real world monitoring tasks fusing scene information from multiple sensors and sources is a useful core mechanism to deal with complex scenes, lighting conditions and environmental variables. The object segmentation algorithm uses level set-based geodesic active contour evolution that incorporates the fusion of visible color and infrared edge informations in a novel manner. Touching or overlapping objects are further refined during the segmentation process using an appropriate shape-based model. Multiple object tracking using correspondence graphs is extended to handle groups of objects and occlusion events by Kalman filter-based cluster trajectory analysis and watershed segmentation. The proposed object tracking algorithm was successfully tested on several difficult outdoor multispectral videos from stationary sensors and is not confounded by shadows or illumination variations.

  19. δ-SUNSPOT FORMATION IN SIMULATION OF ACTIVE-REGION-SCALE FLUX EMERGENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Fang; Fan, Yuhong

    2015-06-10

    δ-sunspots, with highly complex magnetic structures, are very productive in energetic eruptive events, such as X-class flares and homologous eruptions. We here study the formation of such complex magnetic structures by numerical simulations of magnetic flux emergence from the convection zone into the corona in an active-region-scale domain. In our simulation, two pairs of bipolar sunspots form on the surface, originating from two buoyant segments of a single subsurface twisted flux rope, following the approach of Toriumi et al. Expansion and rotation of the emerging fields in the two bipoles drive the two opposite polarities into each other with apparent rotating motion, producing a compact δ-sunspot with a sharp polarity inversion line. The formation of the δ-sunspot in such a realistic-scale domain produces emerging patterns similar to those formed in observations, e.g., the inverted polarity against Hale's law, the curvilinear motion of the spot, and strong transverse field with highly sheared magnetic and velocity fields at the polarity inversion line (PIL). Strong current builds up at the PIL, giving rise to reconnection, which produces a complex coronal magnetic connectivity with non-potential fields in the δ-spot overlaid by more relaxed fields connecting the two polarities at the two ends.

  20. δ-Sunspot Formation in Simulation of Active-region-scale Flux Emergence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Fang; Fan, Yuhong

    2015-06-01

    δ-sunspots, with highly complex magnetic structures, are very productive in energetic eruptive events, such as X-class flares and homologous eruptions. We here study the formation of such complex magnetic structures by numerical simulations of magnetic flux emergence from the convection zone into the corona in an active-region-scale domain. In our simulation, two pairs of bipolar sunspots form on the surface, originating from two buoyant segments of a single subsurface twisted flux rope, following the approach of Toriumi et al. Expansion and rotation of the emerging fields in the two bipoles drive the two opposite polarities into each other with apparent rotating motion, producing a compact δ-sunspot with a sharp polarity inversion line. The formation of the δ-sunspot in such a realistic-scale domain produces emerging patterns similar to those formed in observations, e.g., the inverted polarity against Hale's law, the curvilinear motion of the spot, and strong transverse field with highly sheared magnetic and velocity fields at the polarity inversion line (PIL). Strong current builds up at the PIL, giving rise to reconnection, which produces a complex coronal magnetic connectivity with non-potential fields in the δ-spot overlaid by more relaxed fields connecting the two polarities at the two ends.

  1. Formation of δ-Sunspot in Simulations of Active-Region-Scale Flux Emergence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Fang; Fan, Yuhong

    2015-04-01

    δ-sunspots, with highly complex magnetic structures, are very productive in energetic eruptive events, such as X-class flares and homologous eruptions. We here study the formation of such complex magnetic structures by numerical simulations of magnetic flux emergence from the convection zone into the corona in an active-region-scale domain. In our simulation, two pairs of bipolar sunspots form on the surface, originating from two buoyant segments of a single subsurface twisted flux rope. Expansion and rotation of the emerging fields in the two bipoles drive the two opposite polarities into each other with apparent rotating motion, producing a compact δ-sunspot with a sharp polarity inversion line. The formation of the δ-sunspot in such a realistic-scale domain produces emerging pattherns similar to those formed in observations, e.g. the inverted polarity against Hale’s law, the curvilinear motion of the spot, strong transverse field with highly sheared magnetic and velocity fields at the PIL. Strong current builds up at the PIL, giving rise to reconnection, which produces a complex coronal magnetic connectivity with non-potential fields in the -spot overlaid by more relaxed fields connecting the two polarities at the two ends.

  2. Energy spectrum of interplanetary magnetic flux ropes and its connection with solar activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, D. J.; Feng, H. Q.; Chao, J. K.

    2008-03-01

    Context: Recent observations of the solar wind show that interplanetary magnetic flux ropes (IMFRs) have a continuous scale-distribution from small-scale flux ropes to large-scale magnetic clouds. Aims: In this work, we investigate the energy spectrum of IMFRs and its possible connection with solar activity. Methods: In consideration of the detectable probability of an IMFR to be proportional to its diameter, the actual energy spectrum of IMFRs can be obtained from the observed spectrum based on spacecraft observations in the solar wind. Results: It is found that IMFRs have a negative power-law spectrum with an index α = 1.36±0.03, which is similar to that of solar flares, and is probably representative of interplanetary energy spectrum of coronal mass ejections (CMEs), that is, the energy spectrum of interplanetary CMEs (ICMEs). This indicates that the energy distribution of CMEs has a similar negative power-law spectrum. In particular, there are numerous small-scale CMEs in the solar corona, and their interplanetary consequences may be directly detected in situ by spacecraft in the solar wind as small-scale IMFRs, although they are too weak to appear clearly in current coronagraph observations. Conclusions: The presence of small-scale CMEs, especially the energy spectrum of CMEs is potentially important for understanding both the solar magneto-atmosphere and CMEs.

  3. Flux Tensor Constrained Geodesic Active Contours with Sensor Fusion for Persistent Object Tracking

    PubMed Central

    Bunyak, Filiz; Palaniappan, Kannappan; Nath, Sumit Kumar; Seetharaman, Gunasekaran

    2007-01-01

    This paper makes new contributions in motion detection, object segmentation and trajectory estimation to create a successful object tracking system. A new efficient motion detection algorithm referred to as the flux tensor is used to detect moving objects in infrared video without requiring background modeling or contour extraction. The flux tensor-based motion detector when applied to infrared video is more accurate than thresholding ”hot-spots”, and is insensitive to shadows as well as illumination changes in the visible channel. In real world monitoring tasks fusing scene information from multiple sensors and sources is a useful core mechanism to deal with complex scenes, lighting conditions and environmental variables. The object segmentation algorithm uses level set-based geodesic active contour evolution that incorporates the fusion of visible color and infrared edge informations in a novel manner. Touching or overlapping objects are further refined during the segmentation process using an appropriate shape-based model. Multiple object tracking using correspondence graphs is extended to handle groups of objects and occlusion events by Kalman filter-based cluster trajectory analysis and watershed segmentation. The proposed object tracking algorithm was successfully tested on several difficult outdoor multispectral videos from stationary sensors and is not confounded by shadows or illumination variations. PMID:19096530

  4. Trend of photospheric helicity flux in active regions generating halo CMEs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smyrli, Aimilia; Zuccarello, Francesco; Zuccarello, Francesca; Romano, Paolo; Guglielmino, Salvatore Luigi; Spadaro, Daniele; Hood, Alan; Mackay, Duncan

    Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) are very energetic events initiated in the solar atmosphere, re-sulting in the expulsion of magnetized plasma clouds that propagate into interplanetary space. It has been proposed that CMEs can play an important role in shedding magnetic helicity, avoiding its endless accumulation in the corona. We therefore investigated the behavior of magnetic helicity accumulation in sites where the initiation of CMEs occurred, in order to de-termine whether and how changes in magnetic helicity accumulation are temporally correlated with CME occurrence. After identifying the active regions (AR) where the CMEs were ini-tiated by means of a double cross-check based on the flaring-eruptive activity and the use of SOHO/EIT difference images, we used MDI magnetograms to calculate magnetic flux evolu-tion, magnetic helicity injection rate and magnetic helicity injection in 10 active regions that gave rise to 12 halo CMEs observed during the period February 2000 -June 2003. No unique behavior in magnetic helicity injection accompanying halo CME occurrence is found. In fact, in some cases there is an abrupt change in helicity injection timely correlated with the CME event, while in some others no significant variation is recorded. However, our analysis show that the most significant changes in magnetic flux and magnetic helicity injection are associated with impulsive CMEs rather than gradual CMEs. Moreover, the most significant changes in mag-netic helicity are observed when X-class flares or eruptive filaments occur, while the occurrence of flares of class C or M seems not to affect significantly the magnetic helicity accumulation.

  5. Interplanetary proton flux and solar wind conditions for different solar activities interacting with spacecraft and astronauts in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nejat, Cyrus

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this research is to determine the interplanetary proton flux and solar wind conditions by using data from several satellites such as Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE), Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES) in particular GOES 9, GOES 11, GOES 12, GOES 13, and Solar Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) to determine proton flux in different solar wind conditions. The data from above satellites were used to determine space weather conditions in which the goals are to evaluate proton fluxes for four periods of solar cycle activity: a solar cycle 23/24 minimum (2008), close to a solar cycle 22/23 minimum (1997), with intermediate activity (2011) and for about maximum activity for the cycle 23 (2003), to compare data of two period of solar cycle in 2003 and 2008 (Max vs. Min), to compare data of two period of solar cycle in 1997 and 2008 (Min vs. Min), to compare soft X-ray flux from SOHO with proton 1-10 MeV flux from GOES 9 for strong flare in 1997. To conclude the above evaluations are being used to determine the interaction between the space weather conditions and the following consequences of these conditions important for astronautics and everyday human activity: 1- Satellite and Spacecraft charging, 2-Dangerous conditions for onboard electronics and astronauts during strong solar flare events, and 3- Total Electron Content (TEC), Global Positioning System (GPS), and radio communication problems related to solar activity.

  6. Formation of a double-decker magnetic flux rope in the sigmoidal solar active region 11520

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, X.; Ding, M. D.; Zhang, J.; Guo, Y.; Sun, X. D.; Wang, Y. M.; Kliem, B.; Deng, Y. Y.

    2014-07-10

    In this paper, we address the formation of a magnetic flux rope (MFR) that erupted on 2012 July 12 and caused a strong geomagnetic storm event on July 15. Through analyzing the long-term evolution of the associated active region observed by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly and the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory, it is found that the twisted field of an MFR, indicated by a continuous S-shaped sigmoid, is built up from two groups of sheared arcades near the main polarity inversion line a half day before the eruption. The temperature within the twisted field and sheared arcades is higher than that of the ambient volume, suggesting that magnetic reconnection most likely works there. The driver behind the reconnection is attributed to shearing and converging motions at magnetic footpoints with velocities in the range of 0.1-0.6 km s{sup –1}. The rotation of the preceding sunspot also contributes to the MFR buildup. Extrapolated three-dimensional non-linear force-free field structures further reveal the locations of the reconnection to be in a bald-patch region and in a hyperbolic flux tube. About 2 hr before the eruption, indications of a second MFR in the form of an S-shaped hot channel are seen. It lies above the original MFR that continuously exists and includes a filament. The whole structure thus makes up a stable double-decker MFR system for hours prior to the eruption. Eventually, after entering the domain of instability, the high-lying MFR impulsively erupts to generate a fast coronal mass ejection and X-class flare; while the low-lying MFR remains behind and continuously maintains the sigmoidicity of the active region.

  7. Formation of a Double-decker Magnetic Flux Rope in the Sigmoidal Solar Active Region 11520

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, X.; Ding, M. D.; Zhang, J.; Sun, X. D.; Guo, Y.; Wang, Y. M.; Kliem, B.; Deng, Y. Y.

    2014-07-01

    In this paper, we address the formation of a magnetic flux rope (MFR) that erupted on 2012 July 12 and caused a strong geomagnetic storm event on July 15. Through analyzing the long-term evolution of the associated active region observed by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly and the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory, it is found that the twisted field of an MFR, indicated by a continuous S-shaped sigmoid, is built up from two groups of sheared arcades near the main polarity inversion line a half day before the eruption. The temperature within the twisted field and sheared arcades is higher than that of the ambient volume, suggesting that magnetic reconnection most likely works there. The driver behind the reconnection is attributed to shearing and converging motions at magnetic footpoints with velocities in the range of 0.1-0.6 km s-1. The rotation of the preceding sunspot also contributes to the MFR buildup. Extrapolated three-dimensional non-linear force-free field structures further reveal the locations of the reconnection to be in a bald-patch region and in a hyperbolic flux tube. About 2 hr before the eruption, indications of a second MFR in the form of an S-shaped hot channel are seen. It lies above the original MFR that continuously exists and includes a filament. The whole structure thus makes up a stable double-decker MFR system for hours prior to the eruption. Eventually, after entering the domain of instability, the high-lying MFR impulsively erupts to generate a fast coronal mass ejection and X-class flare; while the low-lying MFR remains behind and continuously maintains the sigmoidicity of the active region.

  8. Observations of photospheric magnetic fields and shear flows in flaring active regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tarbell, T.; Ferguson, S.; Frank, Z.; Title, A.; Topka, K.

    1988-01-01

    Horizontal flows in the photosphere and subsurface convection zone move the footpoints of coronal magnetic field lines. Magnetic energy to power flares can be stored in the corona if the flows drive the fields far from the potential configuration. Videodisk movies were shown with 0.5 to 1 arcsecond resolution of the following simultaneous observations: green continuum, longitudinal magnetogram, Fe I 5576 A line center (mid-photosphere), H alpha wings, and H alpha line center. The movies show a 90 x 90 arcsecond field of view of an active region at S29, W11. When viewed at speeds of a few thousand times real-time, the photospheric movies clearly show the active region fields being distorted by a remarkable combination of systematic flows and small eruptions of new flux. Magnetic bipoles are emerging over a large area, and the polarities are systematically flowing apart. The horizontal flows were mapped in detail from the continuum movies, and these may be used to predict the future evolution of the region. The horizontal flows are not discernable in H alpha. The H alpha movies strongly suggest reconnection processes in the fibrils joining opposite polarities. When viewed in combination with the magnetic movies, the cause for this evolution is apparent: opposite polarity fields collide and partially cancel, and the fibrils reconnect above the surface. This type of reconnection, driven by subphotospheric flows, complicates the chromospheric and coronal fields, causing visible braiding and twisting of the fibrils. Some of the transient emission events in the fibrils and adjacent plage may also be related.

  9. Mass flux into the Nanga Parbat-Haramosh massif: Orogen-parallel transport, lower crustal flow, or both?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whipp, D. M.; Beaumont, C.; Braun, J.

    2011-12-01

    Relative to most of the Himalaya, the Nanga Parbat-Haramosh massif requires an additional mass flux into its base to balance extreme rates of surface denudation (>10 mm/a) over the last ~2-3 Ma. One proposed source is middle to lower crustal flow into the massif (e.g., Zeitler et al., 2001), which while likely inactive elsewhere along strike, may be sustainable by very rapid surface denudation, a high geothermal gradient, and thermal weakening of rocks beneath the syntaxes. An alternative source is orogen-parallel (OP) transport due to oblique convergence and strain partitioning along the Himalayan arc (e.g., Seeber and Pêcher, 1998). Several observations including (1) predominantly orogen-normal slip on the frontal thrusts deduced from seismic events, (2) OP extension accommodated on orogen-normal structures, and (3) distributed and segmented strike-slip faulting trending parallel to the arc are consistent with strain partitioning and OP mass transport. A key question is can this mechanism supply sufficient mass to the Nanga Parbat syntaxis, or is local channel flow required? We explore mass transport into the western Himalayan syntaxis region using lithospheric-scale 3D mechanical and coupled thermo-mechanical models of an arcuate orogen. The crust is either frictional plastic or power-law viscous, with a constant low viscosity lower crust present in some experiments. Applied velocity boundary conditions are transmitted to the base of the crust by a strong frictional plastic mantle lithosphere, and mantle detachment/subduction drives formation of a bivergent, arcuate orogen. To assess the magnitude of mass transport from strain partitioning, we first explore purely mechanical experiments featuring a 5-km-high Tibet-like plateau above a weak lower crust and with a frictional plastic decollement that dips at 10° beneath the incipient orogen, similar to the Himalayan basal detachment. Preliminary results show gravitational feedback from the plateau drives

  10. Experimental comparison of two hot-wire techniques for resolution of turbulent mass flux and local stagnation temperature in supersonic flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, D. A.; Ng, W. F.; Walker, M. D.

    1988-01-01

    The performance of two constant-temperature normal hot-wire techniques in a supersonic flow is examined. The first technique uses a single-wire and rapid scanning of multiple overheat ratios. Time averages of the signals at all overheats are used to separate the mean and rms mass flux, stagnation temperature and their cross-correlation. The second technique uses a dual-wire probe with each wire operating at different overheat ratios, giving instantaneous mass flux and stagnation temperature. Preliminary results indicate that the separation distance (0.18 mm) between the two hot wires in the dual-wire probe does not introduce significant error. However, the rms mass flux inferred from the dual-wire technique is a factor of two higher than that from the single-wire technique.

  11. Investigating Possible Links between Incoming Cosmic Ray Fluxes and Lightning Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chronis, Themis

    2010-05-01

    During the past two decades, particular scientific attention has been drawn to the potential cosmic ray-atmospheric coupling. Galactic cosmic rays reaching the upper troposphere are suggested as the key modulators of the global electric circuit with further implications on cloud microphysical processes. Unfortunately, the scarcity of the associated observations renders the evaluation of the theoritized mechanisms rather difficult. This contribution proposes a different approach by introducing observations provided by the National Lightning Detection Network for the period 1990-2005. The study area encompasses the greater part of continental U.S. and the surrounding waters. The results highlight a statistically significant positive trend between monthly lightning activity and galactic cosmic ray fluxes during the winter season. During the summer season the trend becomes statistically non-significant. In addition, the featured analysis introduces a technique to assess the potential impact of Forbush Events on daily lightning activity. Results illustrate that lightning activity may be responsive (minimized) 4-5 days following a Forbush Event.

  12. Fast incorporation of optical flow into active polygons.

    PubMed

    Unal, Gozde; Krim, Hamid; Yezzi, Anthony

    2005-06-01

    In this paper, we first reconsider, in a different light, the addition of a prediction step to active contour-based visual tracking using an optical flow and clarify the local computation of the latter along the boundaries of continuous active contours with appropriate regularizers. We subsequently detail our contribution of computing an optical flow-based prediction step directly from the parameters of an active polygon, and of exploiting it in object tracking. This is in contrast to an explicitly separate computation of the optical flow and its ad hoc application. It also provides an inherent regularization effect resulting from integrating measurements along polygon edges. As a result, we completely avoid the need of adding ad hoc regularizing terms to the optical flow computations, and the inevitably arbitrary associated weighting parameters. This direct integration of optical flow into the active polygon framework distinguishes this technique from most previous contour-based approaches, where regularization terms are theoretically, as well as practically, essential. The greater robustness and speed due to a reduced number of parameters of this technique are additional and appealing features.

  13. Laminar flow downregulates Notch activity to promote lymphatic sprouting.

    PubMed

    Choi, Dongwon; Park, Eunkyung; Jung, Eunson; Seong, Young Jin; Yoo, Jaehyuk; Lee, Esak; Hong, Mingu; Lee, Sunju; Ishida, Hiroaki; Burford, James; Peti-Peterdi, Janos; Adams, Ralf H; Srikanth, Sonal; Gwack, Yousang; Chen, Christopher S; Vogel, Hans J; Koh, Chester J; Wong, Alex K; Hong, Young-Kwon

    2017-04-03

    The major function of the lymphatic system is to drain interstitial fluid from tissue. Functional drainage causes increased fluid flow that triggers lymphatic expansion, which is conceptually similar to hypoxia-triggered angiogenesis. Here, we have identified a mechanotransduction pathway that translates laminar flow-induced shear stress to activation of lymphatic sprouting. While low-rate laminar flow commonly induces the classic shear stress responses in blood endothelial cells and lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs), only LECs display reduced Notch activity and increased sprouting capacity. In response to flow, the plasma membrane calcium channel ORAI1 mediates calcium influx in LECs and activates calmodulin to facilitate a physical interaction between Krüppel-like factor 2 (KLF2), the major regulator of shear responses, and PROX1, the master regulator of lymphatic development. The PROX1/KLF2 complex upregulates the expression of DTX1 and DTX3L. DTX1 and DTX3L, functioning as a heterodimeric Notch E3 ligase, concertedly downregulate NOTCH1 activity and enhance lymphatic sprouting. Notably, overexpression of the calcium reporter GCaMP3 unexpectedly inhibited lymphatic sprouting, presumably by disturbing calcium signaling. Endothelial-specific knockouts of Orai1 and Klf2 also markedly impaired lymphatic sprouting. Moreover, Dtx3l loss of function led to defective lymphatic sprouting, while Dtx3l gain of function rescued impaired sprouting in Orai1 KO embryos. Together, the data reveal a molecular mechanism underlying laminar flow-induced lymphatic sprouting.

  14. Flux-flow and vortex-glass phase in iron pnictide {{BaFe}}_{2-x}{{Ni}}_{x}{{As}}_{2} single crystals with {T}_{c}\\,\\sim \\,20 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salem-Sugui, S., Jr.; Alvarenga, A. D.; Luo, H.-Q.; Zhang, R.; Gong, D.-L.

    2017-01-01

    We analysed the flux-flow region of isofield magnetoresistivity data obtained on three crystals of {{BaFe}}2-x Ni x As2 with T c ˜ 20 K for three different geometries relative to the angle formed between the applied magnetic field and the c-axis of the crystals. The field dependent activation energy, U 0, was obtained from the thermal assisted flux-flow (TAFF) and modified vortex-glass models, which were compared with the values of U 0 obtained from flux-creep available in the literature. We observed that the U 0 obtained from the TAFF model show deviations among the different crystals, while the correspondent glass lines obtained from the vortex-glass model are virtually coincident. It is shown that the data is well explained by the modified vortex-glass model, allowing extract of values of T g, the glass transition temperature, and {T}* , a temperature which scales with the mean field critical temperature {T}{{c}}(H). The resulting glass lines obey the anisotropic Ginzburg-Landau theory and are well fitted by a theory developed in the literature by considering the effect of disorder.

  15. Climate Variability over India and Bangladesh from the Perturbed UK Met Office Hadley Model: Impacts on Flow and Nutrient Fluxes in the Ganges Delta System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitehead, P. G.; Caesar, J.; Crossman, J.; Barbour, E.; Ledesma, J.; Futter, M. N.

    2015-12-01

    A semi-distributed flow and water quality model (INCA- Integrated Catchments Model) has been set up for the whole of the Ganges- Brahmaputra- Meghna (GBM) River system in India and Bangladesh. These massive rivers transport large fluxes of water and nutrients into the Bay of Bengal via the GBM Delta system in Bangladesh. Future climate change will impact these fluxes with changing rainfall, temperature, evapotranspiration and soil moisture deficits being altered in the catchment systems. In this study the INCA model has been used to assess potential impacts of climate change using the UK Met Office Hadley Centre GCM model linked to a regionally coupled model of South East Asia, covering India and Bangladesh. The Hadley Centre model has been pururbed by varying the parameters in the model to generate 17 realisations of future climates. Some of these reflect expected change but others capture the more extreme potential behaviour of future climate conditions. The 17 realisations have been used to drive the INCA Flow and Nitrogen model inorder to generate downstream times series of hydrology and nitrate- nitrogen. The variability of the climates on these fluxes are investigated and and their likley impact on the Bay of Begal Delta considered. Results indicate a slight shift in the monsoon season with increased wet season flows and increased temperatures which alter nutrient fluxes. Societal Importance to Stakeholders The GBM Delta supports one of the most densely populated regions of people living in poverty, who rely on ecosystem services provided by the Delta for survival. These ecosystem services are dependent upon fluxes of water and nutrients. Freshwater for urban, agriculture, and aquaculture requirements are essential to livelihoods. Nutrient loads stimulate estuarine ecosystems, supporting fishing stocks, which contribute significantly the economy of Bangladesh. Thus the societal importance of upstream climate driven change change in Bangladesh are very

  16. Governing equations of transient soil water flow and soil water flux in multi-dimensional fractional anisotropic media and fractional time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavvas, M. Levent; Ercan, Ali; Polsinelli, James

    2017-03-01

    In this study dimensionally consistent governing equations of continuity and motion for transient soil water flow and soil water flux in fractional time and in fractional multiple space dimensions in anisotropic media are developed. Due to the anisotropy in the hydraulic conductivities of natural soils, the soil medium within which the soil water flow occurs is essentially anisotropic. Accordingly, in this study the fractional dimensions in two horizontal and one vertical directions are considered to be different, resulting in multi-fractional multi-dimensional soil space within which the flow takes place. Toward the development of the fractional governing equations, first a dimensionally consistent continuity equation for soil water flow in multi-dimensional fractional soil space and fractional time is developed. It is shown that the fractional soil water flow continuity equation approaches the conventional integer form of the continuity equation as the fractional derivative powers approach integer values. For the motion equation of soil water flow, or the equation of water flux within the soil matrix in multi-dimensional fractional soil space and fractional time, a dimensionally consistent equation is also developed. Again, it is shown that this fractional water flux equation approaches the conventional Darcy equation as the fractional derivative powers approach integer values. From the combination of the fractional continuity and motion equations, the governing equation of transient soil water flow in multi-dimensional fractional soil space and fractional time is obtained. It is shown that this equation approaches the conventional Richards equation as the fractional derivative powers approach integer values. Then by the introduction of the Brooks-Corey constitutive relationships for soil water into the fractional transient soil water flow equation, an explicit form of the equation is obtained in multi-dimensional fractional soil space and fractional time. The

  17. An enzyme-entrapped agarose gel for visualization of ischemia-induced L-glutamate fluxes in hippocampal slices in a flow system.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Kazuhisa; Shoji, Atushi; Sugawara, Masao

    2015-01-01

    An agarose gel slip containing L-glutamate oxidase (GluOx), horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and a dye DA-64 is proposed as a tool for visualizing ischemia-induced L-glutamate release in hippocampal slices in a flow system. The agarose slip with a detection limit of 6.0 ± 0.8 μmol L(-1) for L-glutamate enabled us to visualize L-glutamate fluxes in a flow system. The leak of a dye from the agarose gel was negligible and a diffusion blur due to spreading of Bindshedler's Green (BG) within the gel was suppressed. Monitoring the time-dependent change of ischemia-induced L-glutamate fluxes at neuronal regions CA1, DG and CA3 of hippocampal slices is demonstrated.

  18. INVESTIGATING TWO SUCCESSIVE FLUX ROPE ERUPTIONS IN A SOLAR ACTIVE REGION

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, X.; Zhang, J.; Ding, M. D.; Guo, Y.; Olmedo, O.; Sun, X. D.; Liu, Y.

    2013-06-01

    We investigate two successive flux rope (FR1 and FR2) eruptions resulting in two coronal mass ejections (CMEs) on 2012 January 23. Both flux ropes (FRs) appeared as an EUV channel structure in the images of high temperature passbands of the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly prior to the CME eruption. Through fitting their height evolution with a function consisting of linear and exponential components, we determine the onset time of the FR impulsive acceleration with high temporal accuracy for the first time. Using this onset time, we divide the evolution of the FRs in the low corona into two phases: a slow rise phase and an impulsive acceleration phase. In the slow rise phase of FR1, the appearance of sporadic EUV and UV brightening and the strong shearing along the polarity inverse line indicates that the quasi-separatrix-layer reconnection likely initiates the slow rise. On the other hand, for FR2, we mainly contribute its slow rise to the FR1 eruption, which partially opened the overlying field and thus decreased the magnetic restriction. At the onset of the impulsive acceleration phase, FR1 (FR2) reaches the critical height of 84.4 ± 11.2 Mm (86.2 ± 13.0 Mm) where the decline of the overlying field with height is fast enough to trigger the torus instability. After a very short interval (∼2 minutes), the flare emission began to enhance. These results reveal the compound activity involving multiple magnetic FRs and further suggest that the ideal torus instability probably plays the essential role of initiating the impulsive acceleration of CMEs.

  19. Study of coolant activation and dose rates with flow rate and power perturbations in pool-type research reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Mirza, N.M.; Mirza, S.M.; Ahmad, N. )

    1991-12-01

    This paper reports on a computer code using the multigroup diffusion theory based LEOPARD and ODMUG programs that has been developed to calculate the activity in the coolant leaving the core of a pool-type research reactor. Using this code, the dose rates at various locations along the coolant path with varying coolant flow rate and reactor power perturbations are determined. A flow rate decrease from 1000 to 145 m{sup 3}/h is considered. The results indicate that a flow rate decrease leads to an increase in the coolant outlet temperature, which affects the neutron group constants and hence the group fluxes. The activity in the coolant leaving the core increases with flow rate decrease. However, at the inlet of the holdup tank, the total dose rate first increases, then passes through a maximum at {approximately} 500 m{sup 3}/h, and finally decreases with flow rate decrease. The activity at the outlet of the holdup tank is mainly due to {sup 24}Na and {sup 56}Mn, and it increases by {approximately} 2% when the flow rate decreases from 1000 to 145 m{sup 3}/h. In an accidental power rise at constant flow rate, the activity in the coolant increases, and the dose rates at all the points along the coolant path show a slight nonlinear rise as the reactor power density increases.

  20. Fossil fuel burning in Taylor Valley, southern Victoria Land, Antarctica: Estimating the role of scientific activities on carbon and nitrogen reservoirs and fluxes

    SciTech Connect

    Lyons, W.B.; Nezat, C.A.; Welch, K.A.; Kottmeier, S.T.; Doran, P.T.

    2000-05-01

    Particulate organic and elemental carbon and nitrogen as well as NO{sub x} fluxes from scientific activities have been computed for Taylor Valley, Antarctica ({approximately}78{degree} S). These authropogenic fluxes have been compared to both the natural fluxes and landscape reservoirs as determined from Long-Term Ecological Research (LTER) investigations in the valley. The anthropogenic, nongaseous carbon fluxes are minor compared to the natural fluxes, while the anthropogenic NO{sub x} flux may be potentially important over decadal time scales.

  1. Active Control of Jets in Cross-Flow for Film Cooling Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nikitopoulos, Dimitris E.

    2003-01-01

    Jets in cross-flow have applications in film cooling of gas turbine vanes, blades and combustor liners. Their cooling effectiveness depends on the extent to which the cool jet-fluid adheres to the cooled component surface. Lift-off of the cooling jet flow or other mechanisms promoting mixing, cause loss of cooling effectiveness as they allow the hot "free-stream" fluid to come in contact with the component surface. The premise of this project is that cooling effectiveness can be improved by actively controlling (e.9. forcing, pulsing) the jet flow. Active control can be applied to prevent/delay lift-off and suppress mixing. Furthermore, an actively controlled film-cooling system coupled with appropriate sensory input (e.g. temperature or heat flux) can adapt to spatial and temporal variations of the hot-gas path. Thus, it is conceivable that the efficiency of film-cooling systems can be improved, resulting in coolant fluid economy. It is envisioned that Micro Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) will play a role in the realization of such systems. As a first step, a feasibility study will be conducted to evaluate the concept, identify actuation and sensory elements and develop a control strategy. Part of this study will be the design of a proof-of-concept experiment and collection of necessary data.

  2. What the towers don't see at night: nocturnal sap flow in trees and shrubs at two AmeriFlux sites in California.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Joshua B; Baldocchi, Dennis D; Misson, Laurent; Dawson, Todd E; Goldstein, Allen H

    2007-04-01

    At the leaf scale, it is a long-held assumption that stomata close at night in the absence of light, causing transpiration to decrease to zero. Energy balance models and evapotranspiration equations often rely on net radiation as an upper bound, and some models reduce evapotranspiration to zero at night when there is no solar radiation. Emerging research is showing, however, that transpiration can occur throughout the night in a variety of vegetation types and biomes. At the ecosystem scale, eddy covariance measurements have provided extensive data on latent heat flux for a multitude of ecosystem types globally. Nighttime eddy covariance measurements, however, are generally unreliable because of low turbulence. If significant nighttime water loss occurs, eddy flux towers may be missing key information on latent heat flux. We installed and measured rates of sap flow by the heat ratio method (Burgess et al. 2001) at two AmeriFlux (part of FLUXNET) sites in California. The heat ratio method allows measurement and quantification of low rates of sap flow, including negative rates (i.e., hydraulic lift). We measured sap flow in five Pinus ponderosa Dougl. ex Laws. trees and three Arctostaphylos manzanita Parry and two Ceanothus cordulatus A. Kellog shrubs in the Sierra Nevada Mountains, and in five Quercus douglasii Hook and Arn. trees at an oak savanna in the Central Valley of California. Nocturnal sap flow was observed in all species, and significant nighttime water loss was observed in both species of trees. Vapor pressure deficit and air temperature were both well correlated with nighttime transpiration; the influence of wind speed on nighttime transpiration was insignificant at both sites. We distinguished between storage-tissue refilling and water loss based on data from Year 2005, and calculated the percentage by which nighttime transpiration was underestimated by eddy covariance measurements at both sites.

  3. Experimental results and a self-consistent model of evaporation and high heat flux extraction by evaporating flow in a micro-grooved blade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monazami, Reza; Saadat, Mehdi; Zhu, Jianzhong; Haj-Hariri, Hossein

    2015-11-01

    The problem of evaporation from a vertical micro-grooved blade heated from above is investigated. The required superheat to handle the incoming flux is calculated using the results of the study by Monazami and Haj-Hariri (2012). The relation between the applied heat flux, dry-out length and the maximum equilibrium temperature for several geometries and working fluids are studied. Furthermore, a computational study of the evaporating meniscus is conducted to evaluate the evaporation rates and dissipated heat flux at the liquid-vapor interface. The computational study accounts for the flow and heat transfer in both liquid and vapor phases. The results of this study indicate that the micro-grooved structure can dissipate heat fluxes as high as 10MW/m2 for superheats as low as 5 degrees Kelvin. Experiments are conducted to verify the computational and analytical results. The findings of this work are applicable to the design of thermal management systems for high heat flux applications. Partially supported by the MAXNET Energy Partnership (Max Planck Institute and UVA).

  4. An experimental study of heat transfer in the thermal entrance region for polymer solutions in turbulent pipe flows under constant wall heat flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghajar, Afshin J.; Toh, Ken H.

    1988-01-01

    Experimental results for the effects of polymer concentration, polymer type, solution flow rate, and pipe diameter on the thermal entrance length and heat transfer reduction are presented. The experiments were conducted for Separan AP-273 and Separan AP-30 solutions with concentrations ranging from 10 to 500 ppm flowing turbulently in the test sections of 1.11 cm and 1.88 cm I.D. under constant wall heat flux. An empirical correlation for the minimum heat transfer asymptote was established which predicts the present experimental data with a maximum deviation of 8 percent.

  5. Parallel determination of enzyme activities and in vivo fluxes in Brassica napus embryos grown on organic or inorganic nitrogen source.

    PubMed

    Junker, Björn H; Lonien, Joachim; Heady, Lindsey E; Rogers, Alistair; Schwender, Jörg

    2007-01-01

    After the completion of the genomic sequencing of model organisms, numerous post-genomic studies, integrating transcriptome and metabolome data, are aimed at developing a more complete understanding of cell physiology. Here, we measure in vivo metabolic fluxes by steady state labeling, and in parallel, the activity of enzymes in central metabolism in cultured developing embryos of Brassica napus. Embryos were grown on either the amino acids glutamine and alanine as an organic nitrogen source, or on ammonium nitrate as an inorganic nitrogen source. The type of nitrogen made available to developing embryos caused substantial differences in fluxes associated with the tricarboxylic acid cycle, including flux reversion. The changes observed in enzyme activity were not consistent with our estimates of metabolic flux. Furthermore, most extractable enzyme activities are in large surplus relative to the requirements for the observed in vivo fluxes. The results demonstrate that in this model system the metabolic response of central metabolism to changes in environmental conditions can be achieved largely without regulatory reprogramming of the enzyme machinery.

  6. Active Flow Effectors for Noise and Separation Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Travis L.

    2011-01-01

    New flow effector technology for separation control and enhanced mixing is based upon shape memory alloy hybrid composite (SMAHC) technology. The technology allows for variable shape control of aircraft structures through actively deformable surfaces. The flow effectors are made by embedding shape memory alloy actuator material in a composite structure. When thermally actuated, the flow effector def1ects into or out of the flow in a prescribed manner to enhance mixing or induce separation for a variety of applications, including aeroacoustic noise reduction, drag reduction, and f1ight control. The active flow effectors were developed for noise reduction as an alternative to fixed-configuration effectors, such as static chevrons, that cannot be optimized for airframe installation effects or variable operating conditions and cannot be retracted for off-design or fail-safe conditions. Benefits include: Increased vehicle control, overall efficiency, and reduced noise throughout all f1ight regimes, Reduced flow noise, Reduced drag, Simplicity of design and fabrication, Simplicity of control through direct current stimulation, autonomous re sponse to environmental heating, fast re sponse, and a high degree of geometric stability. The concept involves embedding prestrained SMA actuators on one side of the chevron neutral axis in order to generate a thermal moment and def1ect the structure out of plane when heated. The force developed in the host structure during def1ection and the aerodynamic load is used for returning the structure to the retracted position. The chevron design is highly scalable and versatile, and easily affords active and/or autonomous (environmental) control. The technology offers wide-ranging market applications, including aerospace, automotive, and any application that requires flow separation or noise control.

  7. Active Flow Control on a Boundary-Layer-Ingesting Inlet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorton, Susan Althoff; Owens, Lewis R.; Jenkins, Luther N.; Allan, Brian G.; Schuster, Ernest P.

    2004-01-01

    Boundary layer ingestion (BLI) is explored as means to improve overall system performance for Blended Wing Body configuration. The benefits of BLI for vehicle system performance benefit are assessed with a process derived from first principles suitable for highly-integrated propulsion systems. This performance evaluation process provides framework within which to assess the benefits of an integrated BLI inlet and lays the groundwork for higher-fidelity systems studies. The results of the system study show that BLI provides a significant improvement in vehicle performance if the inlet distortion can be controlled, thus encouraging the pursuit of active flow control (AFC) as a BLI enabling technology. The effectiveness of active flow control in reducing engine inlet distortion was assessed using a 6% scale model of a 30% BLI offset, diffusing inlet. The experiment was conducted in the NASA Langley Basic Aerodynamics Research Tunnel with a model inlet designed specifically for this type of testing. High mass flow pulsing actuators provided the active flow control. Measurements were made of the onset boundary layer, the duct surface static pressures, and the mass flow through the duct and the actuators. The distortion was determined by 120 total pressure measurements located at the aerodynamic interface plane. The test matrix was limited to a maximum freestream Mach number of 0.15 with scaled mass flows through the inlet for that condition. The data show that the pulsed actuation can reduce distortion from 29% to 4.6% as measured by the circumferential distortion descriptor DC60 using less than 1% of inlet mass flow. Closed loop control of the actuation was also demonstrated using a sidewall surface static pressure as the response sensor.

  8. INITIATION AND ERUPTION PROCESS OF MAGNETIC FLUX ROPE FROM SOLAR ACTIVE REGION NOAA 11719 TO EARTH-DIRECTED CME

    SciTech Connect

    Vemareddy, P.; Zhang, J.

    2014-12-20

    An eruption event launched from the solar active region (AR) NOAA 11719 is investigated based on coronal EUV observations and photospheric magnetic field measurements obtained from the Solar Dynamic Observatory. The AR consists of a filament channel originating from a major sunspot and its south section is associated with an inverse-S sigmoidal system as observed in Atmospheric Imaging Assembly passbands. We regard the sigmoid as the main body of the flux rope (FR). There also exists a twisted flux bundle crossing over this FR. This overlying flux bundle transforms in shape similar to kink-rise evolution, which corresponds with the rise motion of the FR. The emission measure and temperature along the FR exhibits an increasing trend with its rising motion, indicating reconnection in the thinning current sheet underneath the FR. Net magnetic flux of the AR, evaluated at north and south polarities, showed decreasing behavior whereas the net current in these fluxes exhibits an increasing trend. Because the negative (positive) flux has a dominant positive (negative) current, the chirality of AR flux system is likely negative (left handed) in order to be consistent with the chirality of inverse S-sigmoidal FR. This analysis of magnetic fields of the source AR suggests that the cancelling fluxes are prime factors of the monotonous twisting of the FR system, reaching to a critical state to trigger kink instability and rise motion. This rise motion may have led to the onset of the torus instability, resulting in an Earth-directed coronal mass ejection, and the progressive reconnection in the thinning current sheet beneath the rising FR led to the M6.5 flare.

  9. Plasma membrane calcium flux, protein kinase C activation and smooth muscle contraction.

    PubMed

    Forder, J; Scriabine, A; Rasmussen, H

    1985-11-01

    Isolated perfused rabbit ear arteries contract when treated with 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA), an activator of the calcium-activated, phospholipid-dependent protein kinase or C-kinase. Under conditions where the calcium concentration in the perfusate is 1.5 mM and the potassium concentration is 4.8 mM, there is a latent period of 70 +/- 19 min (mean +/- S.E.M., n = 10) between TPA addition and the onset of the contractile response. Once initiated, the contractile response is progressive and sustained. When perfusion conditions are altered in such a way as to modify calcium flux across the plasma membrane (i.e., raising the extracellular calcium concentration to 2.5 mM Ca++, raising the extracellular potassium concentration to 10 mM, and/or preincubating the tissues in media containing 100 nM Bay K 8644, a potent calcium channel agonist), the latency period between TPA addition and initiation of the contractile response is significantly reduced (2.5 mM Ca++, 37 +/- 7 min; 10 mM K+ and 2.5 mM Ca++, 11 +/- 3 min; 100 nM Bay K 8644 and 1.5 mM Ca++, 20 +/- 7 min; 100 nM Bay K 8644 and 2.5 mM Ca2+, 8.5 +/- 1.7 min; 10 mM K+ and 100 nM Bay K 8644, 11 +/- 5 min). Likewise, the combination of 2.5 mM calcium, 100 nM Bay K 8644, and 3.3 microM ouabain results in a contractile response 4.5 +/- 2.0 min after TPA addition (means +/- S.E.M., n = 4). Control tissues (absence of TPA addition) run simultaneously show no contractile responses to the various Ca++ flux regulators even after 90 min of incubation.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  10. Inferring 222Rn soil fluxes from ambient 222Rn activity and eddy covariance measurements of CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Laan, Sander; Manohar, Swagath; Vermeulen, Alex; Bosveld, Fred; Meijer, Harro; Manning, Andrew; van der Molen, Michiel; van der Laan-Luijkx, Ingrid

    2016-11-01

    We present a new methodology, which we call Single Pair of Observations Technique with Eddy Covariance (SPOT-EC), to estimate regional-scale surface fluxes of 222Rn from tower-based observations of 222Rn activity concentration, CO2 mole fractions and direct CO2 flux measurements from eddy covariance. For specific events, the regional (222Rn) surface flux is calculated from short-term changes in ambient (222Rn) activity concentration scaled by the ratio of the mean CO2 surface flux for the specific event to the change in its observed mole fraction. The resulting 222Rn surface emissions are integrated in time (between the moment of observation and the last prior background levels) and space (i.e. over the footprint of the observations). The measurement uncertainty obtained is about ±15 % for diurnal events and about ±10 % for longer-term (e.g. seasonal or annual) means. The method does not provide continuous observations, but reliable daily averages can be obtained. We applied our method to in situ observations from two sites in the Netherlands: Cabauw station (CBW) and Lutjewad station (LUT). For LUT, which is an intensive agricultural site, we estimated a mean 222Rn surface flux of (0.29 ± 0.02) atoms cm-2 s-1 with values > 0.5 atoms cm-2 s-1 to the south and south-east. For CBW we estimated a mean 222Rn surface flux of (0.63 ± 0.04) atoms cm-2 s-1. The highest values were observed to the south-west, where the soil type is mainly river clay. For both stations good agreement was found between our results and those from measurements with soil chambers and two recently published 222Rn soil flux maps for Europe. At both sites, large spatial and temporal variability of 222Rn surface fluxes were observed which would be impractical to measure with a soil chamber. SPOT-EC, therefore, offers an important new tool for estimating regional-scale 222Rn surface fluxes. Practical applications furthermore include calibration of process-based 222Rn soil flux models, validation

  11. Zooplankton diel vertical migration and contribution to deep active carbon flux in the NW Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isla, Alejandro; Scharek, Renate; Latasa, Mikel

    2015-03-01

    The diel vertical migration (DVM) of zooplankton contributes to the biological pump transporting material from surface to deep waters. We examined the DVM of the zooplankton community in different size fractions (53-200 μm, 200-500 μm, 500-1000 μm, 1000-2000 μm and > 2000 μm) during three cruises carried out in the open NW Mediterranean Sea. We assessed their metabolic rates from empirical published relationships and estimated the active fluxes of dissolved carbon to the mesopelagic zone driven by migrant zooplankton. Within the predominantly oligotrophic Mediterranean Sea, the NW region is one of the most productive ones, with a seasonal cycle characterized by a prominent spring bloom. The study area was visited at three different phases of the seasonal cycle: during the spring bloom, the post-bloom, and strongly stratified oligotrophic conditions. We found seasonal differences in DVM, less evident during the bloom. Changes in DVM intensity were related to the composition of the zooplanktonic assemblage, which also varied between cruises. Euphausiids appeared as the most active migrants in all seasons, and their life cycle conditioned the observed pattern. Immature stages, which are unable to perform large diel vertical movements, dominated during the bloom, in contrast to the higher relative importance of migrating adults in the other two sampling periods. The amount of dissolved carbon exported was determined by the migrant zooplankton biomass, being highest during the post-bloom (2.2 mmol C respired m- 2 d- 1, and up to 3.1 mmol C exported m- 2 d- 1 when DOC release estimations are added). The active transport by diel migrants represented a substantial contribution to total carbon export to deep waters, especially under stratified oligotrophic conditions, revealing the importance of zooplankton in the biological pump operating in the study area.

  12. Flow cytometric study of in vitro neutrophil activation by biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Gorbet, M B; Yeo, E L; Sefton, M V

    1999-03-05

    Neutrophil activation for adherent and nonadherent cells, as measured by flow cytometry, was not strongly dependent on material surface chemistry. We had hypothesized that material-induced neutrophil activation was an important parameter associated with material failure. All materials tested [cellophane, an acrylonitrile copolymer (AN69), Pellethane, nylon, polyethylene terephthalate, low density polyethylene, and polydimethylsiloxane] activated isolated human neutrophils, which were resuspended in plasma or serum, to similar extents based on L-selectin shedding, CD11b upregulation, and stimulation of the oxidative burst after 30-min exposure. Inhibition of complement activation by sCR1 unexpectedly had little effect if any on nonadherent neutrophils. However, neutrophil adhesion, but not the level of activation of the adherent cells, was strongly dependent on complement activation. Pretreatment with albumin did not inhibit adhesion or reduce neutrophil activation, but plasma pretreatment resulted in increased activation for nonadherent and adherent cells. More adhesion and a higher level of activation of adherent cells was observed following pretreatment with fibrinogen, a ligand of CD11b. Taken together these results suggest that upon contact with a material, neutrophil activation may occur though mechanisms that are not mediated by complement. For example, the presence of plasma proteins such as fibrinogen at the interface may trigger activation and the release of other activating agents. Although the material differences are small, the extent of activation may be significant and warrant further study of the mechanism and consequences of that activation.

  13. Enhanced fuel efficiency on tractor-trailers using synthetic jet-based active flow control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amitay, Michael; Menicovich, David; Gallardo, Daniele

    2016-04-01

    The application of piezo-electrically-driven synthetic-jet-based active flow control to reduce drag on tractor-trailers was explored experimentally in wind tunnel testing as well as full-scale road tests. Aerodynamic drag accounts for more than 50% of the usable energy at highway speeds, a problem that applies primarily to trailer trucks. Therefore, a reduction in aerodynamic drag results in large saving of fuel and reduction in CO2 emissions. The active flow control technique that is being used relies on a modular system comprised of distributed, small, highly efficient actuators. These actuators, called synthetic jets, are jets that are synthesized at the edge of an orifice by a periodic motion of a piezoelectric diaphragm(s) mounted on one (or more) walls of a sealed cavity. The synthetic jet is zero net mass flux (ZNMF), but it allows momentum transfer to flow. It is typically driven near diaphragm and/or cavity resonance, and therefore, small electric input [O(10W)] is required. Another advantage of this actuator is that no plumbing is required. The system doesn't require changes to the body of the truck, can be easily reconfigured to various types of vehicles, and consumes small amounts of electrical power from the existing electrical system of the truck. Preliminary wind tunnel results showed up to 18% reduction in fuel consumption, whereas road tests also showed very promising results.

  14. Mixing interfaces, fluxes, residence times and redox conditions of the hyporheic zones induced by dune-like bedforms and ambient groundwater flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marzadri, Alessandra; Tonina, Daniele; Bellin, Alberto; Valli, Alberto

    2016-02-01

    Recent studies highlighted the importance of the interface between streams and their surrounding sediment, known as the hyporheic zone, where stream waters flow through the alluvium. These pore water fluxes stem from the interaction among streambed morphology, stream hydraulics and surrounding groundwater flow. We analytically model the hyporheic hydraulics induced by a spatially uniform ambient groundwater flow made of a horizontal, underflow, and a vertical, basal, component, which mimics gaining and losing stream conditions. The proposed analytical solution allows to investigate the control of simple hydromorphological quantities on the extent, residence time and redox conditions of the hyporheic zone, and the thickness of the mixing interface between hyporheic and groundwater cells. Our analysis shows that the location of the mixing zone shallows or deepens in the sediment as a function of bedform geometry, surface hydraulic and groundwater flow. The point of stagnation, where hyporheic flow velocities vanish and where the separation surface passes through, is shallower than or coincides with the deepest point of the hyporheic zone only due to underflow. An increase of the ambient flow causes a reduction of the hyporheic zone volume similarly in both losing and gaining conditions. The hyporheic residence time is lognormally distributed under neutral, losing and gaining conditions, with the residence time moments depending on the same set of parameters describing dune morphology and stream flow.

  15. Low-Speed Active Flow Control Laboratory Developed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Culley, Dennis E.; Bright, Michelle M.

    2005-01-01

    The future of aviation propulsion systems is increasingly focused on the application of control technologies to significantly enhance the performance of a new generation of air vehicles. Active flow control refers to a set of technologies that manipulate the flow of air and combustion gases deep within the confines of an engine to dynamically alter its performance during flight. By employing active flow control, designers can create engines that are significantly lighter, are more fuel efficient, and produce lower emissions. In addition, the operating range of an engine can be extended, yielding safer transportation systems. The realization of these future propulsion systems requires the collaborative development of many base technologies to achieve intelligent, embedded control at the engine locations where it will be most effective. NASA Glenn Research Center s Controls and Dynamics Technology Branch has developed a state-of-the-art low-speed Active Flow Control Laboratory in which emerging technologies can be integrated and explored in a flexible, low-cost environment. The facility allows the most promising developments to be prescreened and optimized before being tested on higher fidelity platforms, thereby reducing the cost of experimentation and improving research effectiveness.

  16. Microgravity experiments on boiling and applications: research activity of advanced high heat flux cooling technology for electronic devices in Japan.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Koichi; Kawamura, Hiroshi

    2004-11-01

    Research and development on advanced high heat flux cooling technology for electronic devices has been carried out as the Project of Fundamental Technology Development for Energy Conservation, promoted by the New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization of Japan (NEDO). Based on the microgravity experiments on boiling heat transfer, the following useful results have obtained for the cooling of electronic devices. In subcooled flow boiling in a small channel, heat flux increases considerably more than the ordinary critical heat flux with microbubble emission in transition boiling, and dry out of the heating surface is disturbed. Successful enhancement of heat transfer is achieved by a capillary effect from grooved surface dual subchannels on the liquid supply. The critical heat flux increases 30-40 percent more than for ordinary subchannels. A self-wetting mechanism has been proposed, following investigation of bubble behavior in pool boiling of binary mixtures under microgravity. Ideas and a new concept have been proposed for the design of future cooling system in power electronics.

  17. Photospheric Magnetic Flux Transport - Supergranules Rule

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hathaway, David H.; Rightmire-Upton, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    Observations of the transport of magnetic flux in the Sun's photosphere show that active region magnetic flux is carried far from its origin by a combination of flows. These flows have previously been identified and modeled as separate axisymmetric processes: differential rotation, meridional flow, and supergranule diffusion. Experiments with a surface convective flow model reveal that the true nature of this transport is advection by the non-axisymmetric cellular flows themselves - supergranules. Magnetic elements are transported to the boundaries of the cells and then follow the evolving boundaries. The convective flows in supergranules have peak velocities near 500 m/s. These flows completely overpower the superimposed 20 m/s meridional flow and 100 m/s differential rotation. The magnetic elements remain pinned at the supergranule boundaries. Experiments with and without the superimposed axisymmetric photospheric flows show that the axisymmetric transport of magnetic flux is controlled by the advection of the cellular pattern by underlying flows representative of deeper layers. The magnetic elements follow the differential rotation and meridional flow associated with the convection cells themselves -- supergranules rule!

  18. STUDY OF THE POYNTING FLUX IN ACTIVE REGION 10930 USING DATA-DRIVEN MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC SIMULATION

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Y. L.; Wang, H. N.; He, H.; Zhu, X. S.

    2011-08-10

    Powerful solar flares are closely related to the evolution of magnetic field configuration on the photosphere. We choose the Poynting flux as a parameter in the study of magnetic field changes. We use time-dependent multidimensional MHD simulations around a flare occurrence to generate the results, with the temporal variation of the bottom boundary conditions being deduced from the projected normal characteristic method. By this method, the photospheric magnetogram could be incorporated self-consistently as the bottom condition of data-driven simulations. The model is first applied to a simulation datum produced by an emerging magnetic flux rope as a test case. Then, the model is used to study NOAA AR 10930, which has an X3.4 flare, the data of which has been obtained by the Hinode/Solar Optical Telescope on 2006 December 13. We compute the magnitude of Poynting flux (S{sub total}), radial Poynting flux (S{sub z} ), a proxy for ideal radial Poynting flux (S{sub proxy}), Poynting flux due to plasma surface motion (S{sub sur}), and Poynting flux due to plasma emergence (S{sub emg}) and analyze their extensive properties in four selected areas: the whole sunspot, the positive sunspot, the negative sunspot, and the strong-field polarity inversion line (SPIL) area. It is found that (1) the S{sub total}, S{sub z} , and S{sub proxy} parameters show similar behaviors in the whole sunspot area and in the negative sunspot area. The evolutions of these three parameters in the positive area and the SPIL area are more volatile because of the effect of sunspot rotation and flux emergence. (2) The evolution of S{sub sur} is largely influenced by the process of sunspot rotation, especially in the positive sunspot. The evolution of S{sub emg} is greatly affected by flux emergence, especially in the SPIL area.

  19. AMPK activation protects cells from oxidative stress-induced senescence via autophagic flux restoration and intracellular NAD(+) elevation.

    PubMed

    Han, Xiaojuan; Tai, Haoran; Wang, Xiaobo; Wang, Zhe; Zhou, Jiao; Wei, Xiawei; Ding, Yi; Gong, Hui; Mo, Chunfen; Zhang, Jie; Qin, Jianqiong; Ma, Yuanji; Huang, Ning; Xiang, Rong; Xiao, Hengyi

    2016-06-01

    AMPK activation is beneficial for cellular homeostasis and senescence prevention. However, the molecular events involved in AMPK activation are not well defined. In this study, we addressed the mechanism underlying the protective effect of AMPK on oxidative stress-induced senescence. The results showed that AMPK was inactivated in senescent cells. However, pharmacological activation of AMPK by metformin and berberine significantly prevented the development of senescence and, accordingly, inhibition of AMPK by Compound C was accelerated. Importantly, AMPK activation prevented hydrogen peroxide-induced impairment of the autophagic flux in senescent cells, evidenced by the decreased p62 degradation, GFP-RFP-LC3 cancellation, and activity of lysosomal hydrolases. We also found that AMPK activation restored the NAD(+) levels in the senescent cells via a mechanism involving mostly the salvage pathway for NAD(+) synthesis. In addition, the mechanistic relationship of autophagic flux and NAD(+) synthesis and the involvement of mTOR and Sirt1 activities were assessed. In summary, our results suggest that AMPK prevents oxidative stress-induced senescence by improving autophagic flux and NAD(+) homeostasis. This study provides a new insight for exploring the mechanisms of aging, autophagy and NAD(+) homeostasis, and it is also valuable in the development of innovative strategies to combat aging.

  20. Eruption of the magnetic flux rope in a fast decayed active region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Shangbin

    2012-07-01

    An isolated and fast decayed active region was observed when passing through solar disk. There is only one CME related with it that give us a good opportunity to investigate the whole process of the CME. Filament in this active region rises up rapidly and then hesitates and disintegrates into flare loops. The rising filament from EIT images separates into two parts just before eruption. It is interesting that this filament rises up with positive kink which is opposite to the negative helicity according to the inverse S-shaped X-ray sigmoid and accumulated magnetic helicity. A new filament reforms several hours later after CME and the axis of this new one rotates clockwise about 22° comparing with that of the former one. We also observed a bright transient J-shaped X-ray sigmoid immediately appears after filament eruption. It quickly develops into a soft X-ray cusp and rises up firstly then drops down. We propose that field lines underneath bald-patch sparatrix surface (BPSS) where for the formation of a magnetic tangential discontinuity are locally rooted to the photosphere near the bald-patch (BP) inversion line. Field lines above the surface are detached from the photosphere to form this CME and partially open the field which make the filament loses equilibrium to rise quickly and then be drawn back by the tension force of magnetic field after eruption to form a new filament. Two magnetic cancelation regions have been observed clearly just before filament eruption that reflect the existence of BPs. On the other hand, the values of total magnetic helicity to the corona taken by emergence and differential rotation normalized by the square total magnetic flux implies the possibility of upper bound on the total magnetic helicity that a force-free field can contain.

  1. Plume's buoyancy and heat fluxes from the deep mantle estimated by an instantaneous mantle flow simulation based on the S40RTS global seismic tomography model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Masaki

    2012-11-01

    It is still an open question as to how much heat is transported from the deep mantle to the upper mantle by mantle upwelling plumes, which would impose a strong constraint on models of the thermal evolution of the earth. Here I perform numerical computations of instantaneous mantle flow based on a recent highly resolved global seismic tomography model (S40RTS), apply new simple fluid dynamics theories to the plume's radius and velocity, considering a Poiseuille flow assumption and a power-law relationship between the boundary layer thickness and Rayleigh number, and estimate the plume's buoyancy and heat fluxes from the deep lower mantle under varying plume viscosity. The results show that for some major mantle upwelling plumes with localized strong ascent velocity under the South Pacific and Africa, the buoyancy fluxes of each plume beneath the ringwoodite to perovskite + magnesiowüstite ("660-km") phase decomposition boundary are comparable to those inferred from observed hotspot swell volumes on the earth, i.e., on the order of 1 Mg s-1, when the plume viscosity is 1019-1020 Pa s. This result, together with previous numerical simulations of mantle convection and the gentle Clausius-Clapeyron slope for the 660-km phase decomposition derived from recent high-pressure measurements under dehydrated/hydrated conditions in the mantle transition zone, implies that mantle upwelling plumes in the lower mantle penetrate the 660-km phase decomposition boundary without significant loss in thermal buoyancy because of the weak thermal barrier at the 660-km boundary. The total plume heat flux under the South Pacific is estimated to be about 1 TW beneath the 660-km boundary, which is significantly smaller than the core-mantle boundary heat flux. Previously published scaling laws for the plume's radius and velocity based on a plume spacing theory, which explains well plume dynamics in three-dimensional time-dependent mantle convection, suggest that these plume fluxes depend

  2. Links between methane flux and transcriptional activities of methanogens and methane oxidizers in a blanket peat bog.

    PubMed

    Freitag, Thomas E; Toet, Sylvia; Ineson, Phil; Prosser, James I

    2010-07-01

    The relationship between biogeochemical process rates and microbial functional activity was investigated by analysis of the transcriptional dynamics of the key functional genes for methanogenesis (methyl coenzyme M reductase; mcrA) and methane oxidation (particulate methane monooxygenase; pmoA) and in situ methane flux at two peat soil field sites with contrasting net methane-emitting and -oxidizing characteristics. qPCR was used to quantify the abundances of mcrA and pmoA genes and transcripts at two soil depths. Total methanogen and methanotroph transcriptional dynamics, calculated from mcrA and pmoA gene : transcript abundance ratios, were similar at both sites and depths. However, a linear relationship was demonstrated between surface mcrA and pmoA transcript dynamics and surface flux rates at the methane-emitting and methane-oxidizing sites, respectively. Results indicate that methanotroph activity was at least partially substrate-limited at the methane-emitting site and by other factors at the methane-oxidizing site. Soil depth also contributed to the control of surface methane fluxes, but to a lesser extent. Small differences in the soil water content may have contributed to differences in methanogen and methanotroph activities. This study therefore provides a first insight into the regulation of in situ, field-level surface CH(4) flux at the molecular level by an accurate reflection of gene : transcript abundance ratios for the key genes in methane generation and consumption.

  3. Active Flow Control on Laminar flow over a Backward facing step

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mushyam, Aditya; Bergada, Josep M.

    2015-09-01

    In the present study, two dimensional flow over a backward-facing step in laminar flow regime with application of active flow control (AFC) technique is analysed. The aim of the present work is to gauge the effectiveness of implementing AFC to reduce drag and study its effects on flow characteristics. In order to analyse the influence of AFC on the boundary layer and the downstream vortex shedding, two different kinds of AFC techniques have been used in this study namely zero net mass flow actuators and fluidic actuators. A parametric non dimensional analysis has been carried out by varying the frequency from 0.025 to 0.1 and jet amplitude from 0.05 and 1. Four different positions of the groove were simulated; groove was respectively located at 0.024a, 0.047a, 0.072a and 0.097a, measured upstream from the right side upper edge. Three different non dimensional groove widths 0.023a, 0.048a and 0.073a were also evaluated, where a is the step height. The idea behind this study was to determine an optimal configuration to reduce the drag on the step and to suppress the vortex dissipation in the wake of the step. It was observed that when using an AFC frequency ± 10% of the vortex shedding one, was causing the maximum drag reduction. When comparing the effects of zero net mass flow actuators with the fluidic actuators, it was observed that zero net mass flow actuators were more effective.

  4. Inferred flows of electric currents in solar active regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ding, Y. J.; Hong, Q. F.; Hagyard, M. J.; Deloach, A. C.

    1985-01-01

    Techniques to identify sources of major current systems in active regions and their channels of flow are explored. Measured photospheric vector magnetic fields together with high resolution white light and H-alpha photographs provide the data base to derive the current systems in the photosphere and chromosphere of a solar active region. Simple mathematical constructions of active region fields and currents are used to interpret these data under the assumptions that the fields in the lower atmosphere (below 200 km) may not be force free but those in the chromosphere and higher are. The results obtained for the complex active region AR 2372 are: (1) Spots exhibiting significant spiral structure in the penumbral filaments were the source of vertical currents at the photospheric surface; (2) Magnetic neutral lines where the transverse magnetic field was strongly sheared were channels along which a strong current system flowed; (3) The inferred current systems produced a neutral sheet and oppositely-flowing currents in the area of the magnetic delta configuration that was the site of flaring.

  5. Temperature-gated thermal rectifier for active heat flow control.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jia; Hippalgaonkar, Kedar; Shen, Sheng; Wang, Kevin; Abate, Yohannes; Lee, Sangwook; Wu, Junqiao; Yin, Xiaobo; Majumdar, Arun; Zhang, Xiang

    2014-08-13

    Active heat flow control is essential for broad applications of heating, cooling, and energy conversion. Like electronic devices developed for the control of electric power, it is very desirable to develop advanced all-thermal solid-state devices that actively control heat flow without consuming other forms of energy. Here we demonstrate temperature-gated thermal rectification using vanadium dioxide beams in which the environmental temperature actively modulates asymmetric heat flow. In this three terminal device, there are two switchable states, which can be regulated by global heating. In the "Rectifier" state, we observe up to 28% thermal rectification. In the "Resistor" state, the thermal rectification is significantly suppressed (<1%). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of solid-state active-thermal devices with a large rectification in the Rectifier state. This temperature-gated rectifier can have substantial implications ranging from autonomous thermal management of heating and cooling systems to efficient thermal energy conversion and storage.

  6. Formation of sunspots and active regions through the emergence of magnetic flux generated in a solar convective dynamo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Feng; Rempel, Matthias D.; Fan, Yuhong

    2016-05-01

    We present a realistic numerical model of sunspot and active region formation through the emergence of flux tubes generated in a solar convective dynamo. The magnetic and velocity fields in a horizontal layer near the top boundary of the solar convective dynamo simulation are used as a time-dependent bottom boundary to drive the near surface layer radiation MHD simulations of magneto-convection and flux emergence with the MURaM code. The latter code simulates the emergence of the flux tubes through the upper most layer of the convection zone to the photosphere.The emerging flux tubes interact with the convection and break into small scale magnetic elements that further rise to the photosphere. At the photosphere, several bipolar pairs of sunspots are formed through the coalescence of the small scale magnetic elements. The sunspot pairs in the simulation successfully reproduce the fundamental observed properties of solar active regions, including the more coherent leading spots with a stronger field strength, and the correct tilts of the bipolar pairs. These asymmetries come most probably from the intrinsic asymmetries in the emerging fields imposed at the bottom boundary, where the horizontal fields are already tilted and the leading sides of the emerging flux tubes are usually up against the downdraft lanes of the giant cells. It is also found that penumbrae with numerous filamentary structures form in regions of strong horizontal magnetic fields that naturally comes from the ongoing flux emergence. In contrast to previous models, the penumbrae and umbrae are divided by very sharp boarders, which is highly consistent with observations.

  7. DIVERGENT HORIZONTAL SUB-SURFACE FLOWS WITHIN ACTIVE REGION 11158

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, Kiran; Tripathy, S. C.; Hill, F. E-mail: stripathy@nso.edu

    2015-07-20

    We measure the horizontal subsurface flow in a fast emerging active region (AR; NOAA 11158) using the ring-diagram technique and the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager high spatial resolution Dopplergrams. This AR had a complex magnetic structure and displayed significant changes in morphology during its disk passage. Over a period of six days from 2011 February 11 to 16, the temporal variation in the magnitude of the total velocity is found to follow the trend of magnetic field strength. We further analyze regions of individual magnetic polarity within AR 11158 and find that the horizontal velocity components in these sub-regions have significant variation with time and depth. The leading and trailing polarity regions move faster than the mixed-polarity region. Furthermore, both zonal and meridional components have opposite signs for trailing and leading polarity regions at all depths showing divergent flows within the AR. We also find a sharp decrease in the magnitude of total horizontal velocity in deeper layers around major flares. It is suggested that the re-organization of magnetic fields during flares, combined with the sunspot rotation, decreases the magnitude of horizontal flows or that the flow kinetic energy has been converted into the energy released by flares. After the decline in flare activity and sunspot rotation, the flows tend to follow the pattern of magnetic activity. We also observe less variation in the velocity components near the surface but these tend to increase with depth, further demonstrating that the deeper layers are more affected by the topology of ARs.

  8. Active Flow Control: Instrumentation Automation and Experimental Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gimbert, N. Wes

    1995-01-01

    In investigating the potential of a new actuator for use in an active flow control system, several objectives had to be accomplished, the largest of which was the experimental setup. The work was conducted at the NASA Langley 20x28 Shear Flow Control Tunnel. The actuator named Thunder, is a high deflection piezo device recently developed at Langley Research Center. This research involved setting up the instrumentation, the lighting, the smoke, and the recording devices. The instrumentation was automated by means of a Power Macintosh running LabVIEW, a graphical instrumentation package developed by National Instruments. Routines were written to allow the tunnel conditions to be determined at a given instant at the push of a button. This included determination of tunnel pressures, speed, density, temperature, and viscosity. Other aspects of the experimental equipment included the set up of a CCD video camera with a video frame grabber, monitor, and VCR to capture the motion. A strobe light was used to highlight the smoke that was used to visualize the flow. Additional effort was put into creating a scale drawing of another tunnel on site and a limited literature search in the area of active flow control.

  9. Design of an actively cooled plate calorimeter for the investigation of pool fire heat fluxes

    SciTech Connect

    Koski, J. A.; Keltner, N. R.; Nicolette, V. F.; Wix, S. D.

    1992-01-01

    For final qualification of shipping containers for transport of hazardous materials, thermal testing in accordance with regulations such as 10CFR71 must be completed. Such tests typically consist of 30 minute exposures with the container fully engulfed in flames from a large, open pool of JP4 jet engine fuel. Despite careful engineering analyses of the container, testing often reveals design problems that must be solved by modification and expensive retesting of the container. One source of this problem is the wide variation in surface heat flux to the container that occurs in pool fires. Average heat fluxes of 50 to 60 kW/m{sup 2} are typical and close the values implied by the radiation model in 10CFR71, but peak fluxes up to 150 kW/m{sup 2} are routinely observed in fires. Heat fluxes in pool fires have been shown to be a function of surface temperature of the container, height above the pool, surface orientation, wind, and other variables. If local variations in the surface heat flux to the container could be better predicted, design analyses would become more accurate, and fewer problems will be uncovered during testing. The objective of the calorimeter design described in this paper is to measure accurately pool fire heat fluxes under controlled conditions, and to provide data for calibration of improved analytical models of local flame-surface interactions.

  10. Gravity wave activity in the thermosphere inferred from GOCE data, and its dependence on solar flux conditions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Raphael F.; Bruinsma, Sean; Doornbos, Eelco; Massarweh, Lotfi

    2016-04-01

    This study is focused on the effect of solar flux conditions on the dynamics of Gravity Waves (GW) in thermosphere. Air density and cross-wind in situ estimates from the Gravity Field and Steady-State Ocean Circulation Explorer (GOCE) accelerometers are analyzed for the whole mission duration. The analysis was performed in the Fourier spectral domain averaging spectral results over periods of 2 months close to solstices. First the Amplitude Spectral Density (ASD) and the Magnitude Squared Coherence (MSC) of physical parameters are linked to local gravity waves. Then, a new GW marker (called Cf3) was introduced here to constrain GWs activity under Low, Medium and High solar flux conditions, showing a clear solar dumping effect on GW activity. Most of GW signal has been found in a spectral range above 8 mHz in GOCE data, meaning a maximum horizontal wavelength around 1000 km. The level GW activity at GOCE altitude is strongly decreasing with increasing solar flux. Furthermore, a shift in the dominant frequency with solar flux conditions has been noted, leading to a larger horizontal wavelengths (from 200 to 500 km) during high solar flux conditions. The influence of correlated error sources, between air density and cross-winds, is discussed. Consistency of the spectral domain results has been verified in time-domain with a global mapping of high frequency perturbations along GOCE orbit. This analysis shows a clear dependence with geomagnetic latitude with strong perturbations at magnetic poles, and an extension to lower latitudes favoured by low solar activity conditions. Various possible causes of this spatial trend are discussed.

  11. Direct evidence for a three-dimensional magnetic flux rope flanked by two active magnetic reconnection X lines at Earth's magnetopause.

    PubMed

    Øieroset, M; Phan, T D; Eastwood, J P; Fujimoto, M; Daughton, W; Shay, M A; Angelopoulos, V; Mozer, F S; McFadden, J P; Larson, D E; Glassmeier, K-H

    2011-10-14

    We report the direct detection by three THEMIS spacecraft of a magnetic flux rope flanked by two active X lines producing colliding plasma jets near the center of the flux rope. The observed density depletion and open magnetic field topology inside the flux rope reveal important three-dimensional effects. There was also evidence for nonthermal electron energization within the flux rope core where the fluxes of 1-4 keV superthermal electrons were higher than those in the converging reconnection jets. The observed ion and electron energizations differ from current theoretical predictions.

  12. Impact of seabird activity on nitrous oxide and methane fluxes from High Arctic tundra in Svalbard, Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Renbin; Chen, Qingqing; Ding, Wei; Xu, Hua

    2012-12-01

    In this study, tundra N2O and CH4 fluxes were measured from one seabird sanctuary (SBT) and two non-seabird colonies (NST-I and NST-II) in Ny-Ålesund (79°55'N, 11°56'E), Svalbard during the summers of 2008 and 2009. N2O and CH4 fluxes from SBT showed large temporal and spatial variations depending on the intensity of seabird activity. High seabird activity sites showed large N2O and CH4 emissions while low N2O and CH4 emissions, even CH4 uptake occurred at medium and low seabird activity sites. Overall the mean fluxes were 18.3 ± 3.6 μg N2O m-2 h-1 and 53.5 ± 20.3 μg CH4 m-2 h-1 from tundra SBT whereas tundra NST-I and NST-II represented a relatively weak N2O source (8.3 ± 13.2 μg N2O m-2 h-1) and strong CH4 sink (-82.8 ± 22.3 μg CH4 m-2 h-1). Seabird activity was the strongest control of N2O and CH4 fluxes compared with soil temperature and moisture, and high N2O and CH4 emissions were created by soil physical and chemical processes (the sufficient supply of nutrients NH4+-N, NO3--N, total nitrogen, total phosphorus and total carbon from seabird guano, seabird tramp and appropriate water content) related to the seabird activity. Our work suggests that tundra ecosystems impacted by seabird activity are the potential "hotspots" for N2O and CH4 emissions although these sources have been largely neglected at present. Furthermore the combination of seabird activity and warming climate will likely further enhance N2O and CH4 emissions from the High Arctic tundra.

  13. Physical mechanisms of longitudinal vortexes formation, appearance of zones with high heat fluxes and early transition in hypersonic flow over delta wing with blunted leading edges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandrov, S. V.; Vaganov, A. V.; Shalaev, V. I.

    2016-10-01

    Processes of vortex structures formation and they interactions with the boundary layer in the hypersonic flow over delta wing with blunted leading edges are analyzed on the base of experimental investigations and numerical solutions of Navier-Stokes equations. Physical mechanisms of longitudinal vortexes formation, appearance of abnormal zones with high heat fluxes and early laminar turbulent transition are studied. These phenomena were observed in many high-speed wind tunnel experiments; however they were understood only using the detailed analysis of numerical modeling results with the high resolution. Presented results allowed explaining experimental phenomena. ANSYS CFX code (the DAFE MIPT license) on the grid with 50 million nodes was used for the numerical modeling. The numerical method was verified by comparison calculated heat flux distributions on the wing surface with experimental data.

  14. Giant Volume Change of Active Gels under Continuous Flow

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-04-21

    communication17 of BZ droplets and chemical self-organiza- tion,18 the properties and potential of self-oscillating gels in a microfluidic system have yet to be...active gels driven by the Belousov−Zhabotinsky reaction. These results demon- strate that microfluidics offers a useful and facile experimental...soft materials and microfluidic systems. ■ INTRODUCTION This paper reports the use of a continuous reactant flow in a microfluidic system to achieve

  15. Determination of the velocity, density, maximum flux, and enthalpy profiles for a very high temperature arc jet nozzle flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopp, Robert William

    1989-06-01

    Hypervelocity flows for velocities is excess of 1.4 km/sec (Mach 5) require very high stagnation temperature to avoid liquefaction. The arc heater wind tunnel was designed to provide such flows. The electric-arc driven wind tunnel can develop stagnation temperatures up to 13,000 K which will produce hypervelocity flows up to 7 km/sec (earth orbital speed). The nature of the flow, however, is such that the high temperature source flow may cause severe gradients at the nozzle exit. In order to perform aerothermodynamic tests the characterization of the flow in the test section is required. This paper experimentally determines the stream profiles for an arcjet wind tunnel conical nozzle directly from calorimetry and pitot probe surveys.

  16. Active Flow Control at Low Reynolds Numbers on a NACA 0015 Airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melton, LaTunia Pack; Hannon, Judith; Yao, Chung-Sheng; Harris, Jerome

    2008-01-01

    Results from a low Reynolds number wind tunnel experiment on a NACA 0015 airfoil with a 30% chord trailing edge flap tested at deflection angles of 0, 20, and 40 are presented and discussed. Zero net mass flux periodic excitation was applied at the ap shoulder to control flow separation for flap deflections larger than 0. The primary objective of the experiment was to compare force and moment data obtained from integrating surface pressures to data obtained from a 5-component strain-gage balance in preparation for additional three-dimensional testing of the model. To achieve this objective, active flow control is applied at an angle of attack of 6 where published results indicate that oscillatory momentum coefficients exceeding 1% are required to delay separation. Periodic excitation with an oscillatory momentum coefficient of 1.5% and a reduced frequency of 0.71 caused a significant delay of separation on the airfoil with a flap deflection of 20. Higher momentum coefficients at the same reduced frequency were required to achieve a similar level of flow attachment on the airfoil with a flap deflection of 40. There was a favorable comparison between the balance and integrated pressure force and moment results.

  17. River solute fluxes reflecting active hydrothermal chemical weathering of the Yellowstone Plateau Volcanic Field, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hurwitz, S.; Evans, William C.; Lowenstern, J. B.

    2010-01-01

    In the past few decades numerous studies have quantified the load of dissolved solids in large rivers to determine chemical weathering rates in orogenic belts and volcanic areas, mainly motivated by the notion that over timescales greater than ~100kyr, silicate hydrolysis may be the dominant sink for atmospheric CO2, thus creating a feedback between climate and weathering. Here, we report the results of a detailed study during water year 2007 (October 1, 2006 to September 30, 2007) in the major rivers of the Yellowstone Plateau Volcanic Field (YPVF) which hosts Earth's largest "restless" caldera and over 10,000 thermal features. The chemical compositions of rivers that drain thermal areas in the YPVF differ significantly from the compositions of rivers that drain non-thermal areas. There are large seasonal variations in river chemistry and solute flux, which increases with increasing water discharge. The river chemistry and discharge data collected periodically over an entire year allow us to constrain the annual solute fluxes and to distinguish between low-temperature weathering and hydrothermal flux components. The TDS flux from Yellowstone Caldera in water year 2007 was 93t/km2/year. Extensive magma degassing and hydrothermal interaction with rocks accounts for at least 82% of this TDS flux, 83% of the cation flux and 72% of the HCO3- flux. The low-temperature chemical weathering rate (17t/km2/year), calculated on the assumption that all the Cl- is of thermal origin, could include a component from low-temperature hydrolysis reactions induced by CO2 ascending from depth rather than by atmospheric CO2. Although this uncertainty remains, the calculated low-temperature weathering rate of the young rhyolitic rocks in the Yellowstone Caldera is comparable to the world average of large watersheds that drain also more soluble carbonates and evaporates but is slightly lower than calculated rates in other, less-silicic volcanic regions. Long-term average fluxes at

  18. Material Flows in an Active Nematic Liquid Crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decamp, Stephen; Redner, Gabriel; Baskaran, Aparna; Hagan, Michael; Dogic, Zvonimir

    Active matter systems are composed of energy consuming constituent components which drive far-from-equilibrium dynamics. As such, active materials exhibit energetic states which would be unfavorable in passive, equilibrium materials. We study one such material; an active nematic liquid crystal which exists in a dynamical steady state where +/-1/2 defects are continuously generated and annihilated at a constant rate. The active nematic is composed of micron-sized microtubule filaments which are highly concentrated into a quasi-2D film that resides on an oil-water interface. Kinesin motor proteins drive inter-filament sliding which results in net extensile motion of the microtubule film. Notably, we find a mesophase in which motile +1/2 defects, acquire system-spanning orientational order. Currently, we are tracking material flows generated by the active stresses in the system to measure length scales at which energy is dissipated, and to measure the relation between internally generated flows and bend in the nematic field.

  19. Similarity solution for the flow behind a shock wave in a non-ideal gas with heat conduction and radiation heat-flux in magnetogasdynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nath, G.; Vishwakarma, J. P.

    2014-05-01

    The propagation of a spherical (or cylindrical) shock wave in a non-ideal gas with heat conduction and radiation heat-flux, in the presence of a spacially decreasing azimuthal magnetic field, driven out by a moving piston is investigated. The heat conduction is expressed in terms of Fourier's law and the radiation is considered to be of the diffusion type for an optically thick grey gas model. The thermal conductivity K and the absorption coefficient αR are assumed to vary with temperature and density. The gas is assumed to have infinite electrical conductivity and to obey a simplified van der Waals equation of state. The shock wave moves with variable velocity and the total energy of the wave is non-constant. Similarity solutions are obtained for the flow-field behind the shock and the effects of variation of the heat transfer parameters, the parameter of the non-idealness of the gas, both, decreases the compressibility of the gas and hence there is a decrease in the shock strength. Further, it is investigated that with an increase in the parameters of radiative and conductive heat transfer the tendency of formation of maxima in the distributions of heat flux, density and isothermal speed of sound decreases. The pressure and density vanish at the inner surface (piston) and hence a vacuum is form at the center of symmetry. The shock waves in conducting non-ideal gas with conductive and radiative heat fluxes can be important for description of shocks in supernova explosions, in the study of central part of star burst galaxies, nuclear explosion, chemical detonation, rupture of a pressurized vessels, in the analysis of data from exploding wire experiments, and cylindrically symmetric hypersonic flow problems associated with meteors or reentry vehicles, etc. The findings of the present works provided a clear picture of whether and how the non-idealness parameter, conductive and radiative heat transfer parameters and the magnetic field affect the flow behind the shock

  20. Impact of biochar application to a Mediterranean wheat crop on soil microbial activity and greenhouse gas fluxes.

    PubMed

    Castaldi, S; Riondino, M; Baronti, S; Esposito, F R; Marzaioli, R; Rutigliano, F A; Vaccari, F P; Miglietta, F

    2011-11-01

    Biochar has been recently proposed as a management strategy to improve crop productivity and global warming mitigation. However, the effect of such approach on soil greenhouse gas fluxes is highly uncertain and few data from field experiments are available. In a field trial, cultivated with wheat, biochar was added to the soil (3 or 6 kg m(-2)) in two growing seasons (2008/2009 and 2009/2010) so to monitor the effect of treatments on microbial parameters 3 months and 14 months after char addition. N(2)O, CH(4) and CO(2) fluxes were measured in the field during the first year after char addition. Biochar incorporation into the soil increased soil pH (from 5.2 to 6.7) and the rates of net N mineralization, soil microbial respiration and denitrification activity in the first 3 months, but after 14 months treated and control plots did not differ significantly. No changes in total microbial biomass and net nitrification rate were observed. In char treated plots, soil N(2)O fluxes were from 26% to 79% lower than N(2)O fluxes in control plots, excluding four sampling dates after the last fertilization with urea, when N(2)O emissions were higher in char treated plots. However, due to the high spatial variability, the observed differences were rarely significant. No significant differences of CH(4) fluxes and field soil respiration were observed among different treatments, with just few exceptions. Overall the char treatments showed a minimal impact on microbial parameters and GHG fluxes over the first 14 months after biochar incorporation.

  1. Carbon-dioxide flow measurement in geodynamically active area of West Bohemia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlcek, Josef; Fischer, Tomas; Heinicke, Jens

    2016-04-01

    Geodynamically active area of West Bohemia is interesting not only due to its earthquake swarms occurrence but also due to degassing flux of magmatic origin occurring in natural moffettes and mineral springs. While monitoring of earthquakes is done by a standard local seismic network, monitoring of amount of CO2 is at its initial stage. Despite lack of data, the 2014 earthquake swarm showed also very interesting increase in CO2 flow. This correlation with seismicity motivated us to develop robust and reliable methods of CO2 flow measurement, which would be sufficient to create denser monitoring network. Standard usage of gas-flowmeter for the purpose of gas flow measurement is dependent on the weather and device conditions, which makes the measurement instable in time and unreliable. Although gas-flowmeter is also accompanied with measurement of the gas pressure in the well to check flow rate value, reliability of this method is still low. This problematic behavior of the flow measurement was the reason to test new methods to measure CO2 amount - the first is based on measuring the density water with bubbles in the well by differential pressure gauge. The second one utilizes electric conductivity measurement to determine the density of bubbles in the water-gas mixture. Advantage of these methods is that their probes are directly in the well or moffette, where the concentration is measured. This approach is free of the influence of moving parts and assures the independence of measurements of environmental conditions. In this paper we show examples of obtained data series from selected sites and compare the trend of the curves, the mutual relations of the measured quantities and the influence of environmental conditions.

  2. Mathematical modelling of unsteady MHD natural convection flow past a vertical plate with variable surface temperature and mass flux in the presence of radiation and chemical reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raju, S. Suresh Kumar; Narahari, Marneni; Pendyala, Rajashekhar

    2016-11-01

    In the present study, a numerical analysis is made for unsteady magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) natural convective boundary-layer flow past an impulsively started semi-infinite vertical plate with variable surface temperature and mass flux in the presence of thermal radiation and chemical reaction. The Crank-Nicolson implicit finite difference technique is implemented to solve the system of governing equations. Numerical results are obtained for different values of system parameters and analyzed through graphs. The velocity profiles of the present study have been compared with the available results for the limiting case and a good agreement is found between the results.

  3. Determination of areal sedimentation rates in rivers by using plate sediment trap measurements and flow velocity-settling flux relationship.

    PubMed

    Kozerski, Hans-Peter

    2002-07-01

    Not much is known about sedimentation of organic particles in rivers. Plate sediment traps deployed in fast flowing River Spree and in a slowly flowing side arm yielded trapping rates between 0.7 and 52gDW m(-2) d(-1). A linear regression between flow velocity and trapping rates was used to extrapolate from point measurements to areal average trapping rates, which were 11 gDW m(-2) d(-1) in the side arm and 1.4 gDW m(-2) d(-1) in the free flowing river section. These rates are typical for the River Spree, but different from other rivers. The plate trap measurements provide the basic variables for the sedimentation rate sed = C x W*s(1-V/V(crit,sed)), i.e. concentration of particles (C), sinking velocity (Ws) flow velocity (V), and a threshold velocity (V(crit,sed)).

  4. Overview of Active Flow Control at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pack, L. G.; Joslin, R. D.

    1998-01-01

    The paper summarizes Active Flow Control projects currently underway at the NASA Langley Research Center. Technology development is being pursued within a multidisciplinary, cooperative approach, involving the classical disciplines of fluid mechanics, structural mechanics, material science, acoustics, and stability and control theory. Complementing the companion papers in this session, the present paper will focus on projects that have the goal of extending the state-of-the-art in the measurement, prediction, and control of unsteady, nonlinear aerodynamics. Toward this goal, innovative actuators, micro and macro sensors, and control strategies are considered for high payoff flow control applications. The target payoffs are outlined within each section below. Validation of the approaches range from bench-top experiments to wind-tunnel experiments to flight tests. Obtaining correlations for future actuator and sensor designs are implicit in the discussion. The products of the demonstration projects and design tool development from the fundamental NASA R&D level technology will then be transferred to the Applied Research components within NASA, DOD, and US Industry. Keywords: active flow control, separation control, MEMS, review

  5. Mass transfer effects on the unsteady mhd radiative- convective flow of a micropolar fluid past a vertical porous plate with variable heat and mass fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, M. Gnaneswara

    2013-03-01

    The problem of unsteady two-dimensional laminar flow of a viscous incompressible micropolar fluid past a vertical porous plate in the presence of a transverse magnetic field and thermal radiation with variable heat and mass fluxes is considered. The free stream velocity is subjected to exponentially increasing or decreasing small perturbations. A uniform magnetic field acts perpendicularly to a porous surface where a micropolar fluid is absorbed with a suction velocity varying with time. The Rosseland approximation is used to describe radiative heat transfer in the limit of optically thick fluids. The effects of the flow parameters and thermophysical properties on the velocity and temperature fields across the boundary layer are investigated. The effects of various parameters on the velocity, microrotation velocity, temperature, and concentration profiles are given graphically, and the values of the skin friction and couple stress coefficients are presented.

  6. Joule heating effects on unsteady natural convection flow near a moving semi-infinite vertical plate with variable heat flux and mass transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narahari, Marneni; Raju, S. Suresh Kumar; Nagarani, P.

    2016-11-01

    The unsteady MHD free convective boundary-layer flow along an impulsively started semi-infinite vertical plate with variable heat flux and mass transfer have been investigated numerically. The effects of chemical reaction, thermal radiation and Joule heating are incorporated in the governing equations. Crank-Nicolson finite-difference method is used to solve the governing coupled non-linear partial differential equations. The influence of thermal radiation, chemical reaction and Joule heating on flow characteristics are presented graphically and discussed in detailed. To validate the present numerical results, a comparison study has been performed with the previously published results and found that the results are in excellent agreement. It is found that the local Nusselt and Sherwood numbers decreases with the intensification of magnetic field and the local Sherwood number slightly decreases with the increase of radiation parameter.

  7. A study of the Merritt Island, Florida sea breeze flow regimes and their effect on surface heat and moisture fluxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubes, M. T.; Cooper, H. J.; Smith, E. A.

    1993-01-01

    Data collected during the Convective and Precipitation/Electrification Experiment were analyzed as part of an investigation of the sea breeze in the vicinity of Merritt Island, Florida. Analysis of near-surface divergence fields shows that the classical 24-hour oscillation in divergence over the island due to the direct sea breeze circulation is frequently disrupted and exhibits two distinct modes: the classical sea breeze pattern and deviations from that pattern. A comparison of clear day surface energy fluxes with fluxes on other days indicates that changes in magnitudes were dominated by the presence or absence of clouds. Non-classical sea breeze days tended to lose more available energy in the morning than classical sea breeze days due to earlier development of small cumulus over the island. A composite storm of surface winds, surface energy fluxes, rainfall, and satellite visible data was constructed. A spectral transmittance over the visible wavelengths for the cloud cover resulting from the composite storm was calculated. It is shown that pre-storm transmittances of 0.8 fall to values near 0.1 as the downdraft moves directly over the site. It is also found that under post-composite storm conditions of continuous clear sky days, 3.5 days are required to evaporate back into the atmosphere the latent heat energy lost to the surface by rainfall.

  8. Wave- and tidally-driven flow and sediment flux across a fringing coral reef: Southern Molokai, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Storlazzi, C.D.; Ogston, A.S.; Bothner, Michael H.; Field, M.E.; Presto, M.K.

    2004-01-01

    The fringing coral reef off the south coast of Molokai, Hawaii is currently being studied as part of a US Geological Survey (USGS) multi-disciplinary project that focuses on geologic and oceanographic processes that affect coral reef systems. For this investigation, four instrument packages were deployed across the fringing coral reef during the summer of 2001 to understand the processes governing fine-grained terrestrial sediment suspension on the shallow reef flat (h=1m) and its advection across the reef crest and onto the deeper fore reef. The time-series measurements suggest the following conceptual model of water and fine-grained sediment transport across the reef: Relatively cool, clear water flows up onto the reef flat during flooding tides. At high tide, more deep-water wave energy is able to propagate onto the reef flat and larger Trade wind-driven waves can develop on the reef flat, thereby increasing sediment suspension. Trade wind-driven surface currents and wave breaking at the reef crest cause setup of water on the reef flat, further increasing the water depth and enhancing the development of depth-limited waves and sediment suspension. As the tide ebbs, the water and associated suspended sediment on the reef flat drains off the reef flat and is advected offshore and to the west by Trade wind- and tidally- driven currents. Observations on the fore reef show relatively high turbidity throughout the water column during the ebb tide. It therefore appears that high suspended sediment concentrations on the deeper fore reef, where active coral growth is at a maximum, are dynamically linked to processes on the muddy, shallow reef flat.

  9. Fitting Transporter Activities to Cellular Drug Concentrations and Fluxes: Why the Bumblebee Can Fly

    PubMed Central

    Mendes, Pedro; Oliver, Stephen G.; Kell, Douglas B.

    2015-01-01

    A recent paper in this journal argued that reported expression levels, kcat and Km for drug transporters could be used to estimate the likelihood that drug fluxes through Caco-2 cells could be accounted for solely by protein transporters. It was in fact concluded that if five such transporters contributed ‘randomly’ they could account for the flux of the most permeable drug tested (verapamil) 35% of the time. However, the values of permeability cited for verapamil were unusually high; this and other drugs have much lower permeabilities. Even for the claimed permeabilities, we found that a single ‘random’ transporter could account for the flux 42% of the time, and that two transporters can achieve 10 · 10−6 cm·s−1 90% of the time. Parameter optimisation methods show that even a single transporter can account for Caco-2 drug uptake of the most permeable drug. Overall, the proposal that ‘phospholipid bilayer diffusion (of drugs) is negligible’ is not disproved by the calculations of ‘likely’ transporter-based fluxes. PMID:26538313

  10. Exceptional suppression of flux-flow resistivity in FeSe0.4Te0.6 by back-flow from excess Fe atoms and Se /Te substitutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okada, Tatsunori; Nabeshima, Fuyuki; Takahashi, Hideyuki; Imai, Yoshinori; Maeda, Atsutaka

    2015-02-01

    We measured the microwave surface impedance of FeSe0.4Te0.6 single crystals with and without external magnetic fields. The superfluid density exhibited a quadratic temperature dependence, indicating a strong pair-breaking effect. The flux-flow resistivity behaved as ρf(B ≪Bc 2) /ρn=α B /Bc 2 . The observed α value of ≈0.66 was considerably smaller than that of other Fe-based materials (α ≥1 ) and was attributed to a back-flow of superfluids remarkable in disordered superconductors. This is an observation of the back-flow phenomenon caused by an origin other than the vortex pinning in multiple-band systems.

  11. Activity flow over resting-state networks shapes cognitive task activations

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Michael W.; Ito, Takuya; Bassett, Danielle S.; Schultz, Douglas H.

    2016-01-01

    Resting-state functional connectivity (FC) has helped reveal the intrinsic network organization of the human brain, yet its relevance to cognitive task activations has been unclear. Uncertainty remains despite evidence that resting-state FC patterns are highly similar to cognitive task activation patterns. Identifying the distributed processes that shape localized cognitive task activations may help reveal why resting-state FC is so strongly related to cognitive task activations. We found that estimating task-evoked activity flow (the spread of activation amplitudes) over resting-state FC networks allows prediction of cognitive task activations in a large-scale neural network model. Applying this insight to empirical functional MRI data, we found that cognitive task activations can be predicted in held-out brain regions (and held-out individuals) via estimated activity flow over resting-state FC networks. This suggests that task-evoked activity flow over intrinsic networks is a large-scale mechanism explaining the relevance of resting-state FC to cognitive task activations. PMID:27723746

  12. Activation of autophagy flux by metformin downregulates cellular FLICE–like inhibitory protein and enhances TRAIL- induced apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Nazim, Uddin MD; Moon, Ji-Hong; Lee, Ju-Hee; Lee, You-Jin; Seol, Jae-Won; Eo, Seong-Kug; Lee, John-Hwa; Park, Sang-Youel

    2016-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) is a member of the TNF superfamily. TRAIL is regarded as one of the most promising anticancer agents, because it can destruct cancer cells without showing any toxicity to normal cells. Metformin is an anti-diabetic drug with anticancer activity by inhibiting tumor cell proliferation. In this study, we demonstrated that metformin could induce TRAIL-mediated apoptotic cell death in TRAIL-resistant human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells. Pretreatment of metformindownregulation of c-FLIP and markedly enhanced TRAIL-induced tumor cell death by dose-dependent manner. Treatment with metformin resulted in slight increase in the accumulation of microtubule-associated protein light chain LC3-II and significantly decreased the p62 protein levels by dose-dependent manner indicated that metformin induced autophagy flux activation in the lung cancer cells. Inhibition of autophagy flux using a specific inhibitor and genetically modified ATG5 siRNA blocked the metformin-mediated enhancing effect of TRAIL. These data demonstrated that downregulation of c-FLIP by metformin enhanced TRAIL-induced tumor cell death via activating autophagy flux in TRAIL-resistant lung cancer cells and also suggest that metformin may be a successful combination therapeutic strategy with TRAIL in TRAIL-resistant cancer cells including lung adenocarcinoma cells. PMID:26992204

  13. Active and passive Na+ fluxes across the basolateral membrane of rabbit urinary bladder.

    PubMed

    Eaton, D C; Frace, A M; Silverthorn, S U

    1982-01-01

    The apical membrane of rabbit urinary bladder can be functionally removed by application of nystatin at high concentration if the mucosal surface of the tissue is bathed in a saline which mimics intracellular ion concentrations. Under these conditions, the tissue is as far as the movement of univalent ions no more than a sheet of basolateral membrane with some tight junctional membrane in parallel. In this manner the Na+ concentration at the inner surface of the basolateral membrane can be varied by altering the concentration in the mucosal bulk solution. When this was done both mucosal-to-serosal 22Na flux and net change in basolateral current were measured. The flux and the current could be further divided into the components of each that were either blocked by ouabain or insensitive to ouabain. Ouabain-insensitive mucosal-to-serosal Na+ flux was a linear function of mucosal Na+ concentration. Ouabain-sensitive Na+ flux and ouabain-sensitive, Na+-induced current both display a saturating relationship which cannot be accounted for by the presence of unstirred layers. If the interaction of Na+ with the basolateral transport process is assumed to involve the interaction of some number of Na+ ions, n, with a maximal flux, MMAX, then the data can be fit by assuming 3.2 equivalent sites for interaction and a value for MMAX of 287.8 pM cm-2 sec-1 with an intracellular Na concentration of 2.0 mM Na+ at half-maximal saturation. By comparing these values with the ouabain-sensitive, Na+-induced current, we calculate a Na+ to K+ coupling ratio of 1.40 +/- 0.07 for the transport process.

  14. Water flow and nutrient flux from five estuarine rivers along the southwest coast of Everglades National Park, Florida, 1997-2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Levesque, V.A.

    2004-01-01

    Discharge and nutrient fluxes for five tidally affected streams were monitored and evaluated as a part of the U.S. Geological Survey Place-Based Studies Initiative and the U.S. Department of the Interior Critical Ecosystem Studies Initiative. Locations on Lostmans Creek, and Broad, Harney, Shark, and North Rivers were selected using the criterion that a large amount of the water that flows through Shark River Slough must pass these sites. Discharge and nutrient-concentration data collection started at the Broad, Harney, and Shark River stations in January 1997 and ended in early 2001. Discharge and nutrient-concentration data collection started at the Lostmans Creek and North River stations in April 1999 and ended in early 2001. Each station was equipped with a vertically oriented acoustic-velocity sensor, water-level pressure transducer, bottom water-temperature thermistor, and specific conductance four-electrode sensor. Data collected using a vessel-mounted acoustic discharge measurement system were used to calibrate regression models of the mean river velocities and the in-situ index velocities. Information from these stations, in conjunction with data from other ongoing studies, will help to determine environmental effects on the southwest coast estuaries as changes in water management of the Everglades National Park continue. Discharges from the Lostmans Creek, and Broad, Harney, Shark, and North River stations are influenced by semidiurnal tides, meteorological events, and surface- and ground-water inflow. Each of the five rivers is usually well mixed, having no greater than 500 microSiemens per centimeter at 25? Celsius difference in specific conductance from top to bottom during flood and ebb tides. Instantaneous flood discharges (water moving upstream) are typically of greater magnitude and shorter duration than instantaneous ebb discharges (water moving downstream). Instantaneous discharge data were filtered using a low-pass filter to remove predominant

  15. Snapshot of Active Flow Control Research at NASA Langley

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Washburn, A. E.; Gorton, S. Althoff; Anders, S. G.

    2002-01-01

    NASA Langley is aggressively investigating the potential advantages of active flow control as opposed to more traditional aerodynamic techniques. Many of these techniques will be blended with advanced materials and structures to further enhance payoff. Therefore a multi-disciplinary approach to technology development is being attempted that includes researchers from the more historical disciplines of fluid mechanics. acoustics, material science, structural mechanics, and control theory. The overall goals of the topics presented are focused on advancing the state of knowledge and understanding of controllable fundamental mechanisms in fluids rather than on specific engineering problems. An organizational view of current research activities at NASA Langley in active flow control as supported by several programs such as the Morphing Project under Breakthrough Vehicle Technologies Program (BVT). the Ultra-Efficient Engine Technology Program (UEET), and the 21st Century Aircraft Technology Program (TCAT) is presented. On-center research as well as NASA Langley funded contracts and grants are discussed at a relatively high level. The products of this research, as part of the fundamental NASA R and D (research and development) program. will be demonstrated as either bench-top experiments, wind-tunnel investigations, or in flight tests. Later they will be transferred to more applied research programs within NASA, DOD (Department of Defense), and U.S. industry.

  16. The muscle activity of trout exposed to unsteady flow.

    PubMed

    Klein, Adrian; Bleckmann, Horst

    2017-02-23

    In running water trout seek out special regions for station holding. Trout exposed to flow fluctuations caused by a cylinder hold station immediately upstream of the cylinder (bow wake region), adjacent to the cylinder (entraining region) or downstream of the cylinder (Kármán gait). In addition it was shown that the activity of the axial red swimming muscles is reduced during Kármán gaiting. Up to now only the two-dimensional (horizontal) extensions of the above regions have been examined. We determined both, the horizontal and vertical extension of the Kármán gait, entraining and bow wake region by continuously recording the position (spatial resolution 1 cm(3)) of trout for 3 h. In addition we continuously recorded the trunk muscle activity. The Kármán gate region had the smallest vertical extension (13 cm, water level 28-29 cm, length of the submerged cylinder 27 cm), followed by the entraining (21 cm) and bow wake region (25 cm). A fourth so far unknown region used for station holding was immediately below a stationary surface wave which, at flow velocities ≥36 cm s(- 1), developed slightly downstream of the cylinder. While in any of the above regions the activity of the axial swimming muscles was significantly reduced.

  17. Flow and Heat Transfer of Powell-Eyring Fluid due to an Exponential Stretching Sheet with Heat Flux and Variable Thermal Conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Megahed, Ahmed M.

    2015-03-01

    An analysis was carried out to describe the problem of flow and heat transfer of Powell-Eyring fluid in boundary layers on an exponentially stretching continuous permeable surface with an exponential temperature distribution in the presence of heat flux and variable thermal conductivity. The governing partial differential equations describing the problem were transformed into a set of coupled non-linear ordinary differential equations and then solved with a numerical technique using appropriate boundary conditions for various physical parameters. The numerical solution for the governing non-linear boundary value problem is based on applying the shooting method over the entire range of physical parameters. The effects of various parameters like the thermal conductivity parameter, suction parameter, dimensionless Powell-Eyring parameters and the Prandtl number on the flow and temperature profiles as well as on the local skin-friction coefficient and the local Nusselt number are presented and discussed. In this work, special attention was given to investigate the effect of the thermal conductivity parameter on the velocity and temperature fields above the sheet in the presence of heat flux. The numerical results were also validated with results from a previously published work on various special cases of the problem, and good agreements were seen.

  18. High flux MWCNTs-interlinked GO hybrid membranes survived in cross-flow filtration for the treatment of strontium-containing wastewater.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lin; Lu, Ying; Liu, Ying-Ling; Li, Ming; Zhao, Hai-Yang; Hou, Li-An

    2016-12-15

    Graphene oxide (GO)-based membranes provide an encouraging opportunity to support high separation efficiency for wastewater treatment. However, due to the relatively weak interaction between GO nanosheets, it is difficult for bare GO-based membranes to survive in cross-flow filtration. In addition, the permeation flux of the bare GO membrane is not high sufficiently due to its narrow interlayer spacing. In this study, GO membranes interlinked with multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) via covalent bonds were fabricated on modified polyacrylonitrile (PAN) supports by vacuum filtration. Due to the strong bonds between GO, MWCNTs and the PAN membrane, the membranes could be used for the treatment of simulated nuclear wastewater containing strontium via a cross-flow process. The result showed a high flux of 210.7L/(m(2)h) at 0.4MPa, which was approximately 4 times higher than that of commercial nanofiltration membranes. The improved water permeation was attributed to the nanochannels created by the interlinked MWCNTs in the GO layers. In addition, the hybrid membrane exhibited a high rejection of 93.4% for EDTA-chelated Sr(2+) in an alkaline solution, and could also be used to separate Na(+)/Sr(2+) mixtures. These results indicate that the MWCNTs-interlinked GO membrane has promising prospects for application in radioactive waste treatment.

  19. Tritium and 36Cl as constraints on fast fracture flow and percolation flux in the unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain.

    PubMed

    Guerin, M

    2001-10-01

    An analysis of tritium and 36Cl data collected at Yucca Mountain, Nevada suggests that fracture flow may occur at high velocities through the thick unsaturated zone. The mechanisms and extent of this "fast flow" in fractures at Yucca Mountain are investigated with data analysis, mixing models and several one-dimensional modeling scenarios. The model results and data analysis provide evidence substantiating the weeps model [Gauthier, J.H., Wilson, M.L., Lauffer, F.C., 1992. Proceedings of the Third Annual International High-level Radioactive Waste Management Conference, vol. 1, Las Vegas, NV. American Nuclear Society, La Grange Park, IL, pp. 891-989] and suggest that fast flow in fractures with minimal fracture-matrix interaction may comprise a substantial proportion of the total infiltration through Yucca Mountain. Mixing calculations suggest that bomb-pulse tritium measurements, in general, represent the tail end of travel times for thermonuclear-test-era (bomb-pulse) infiltration. The data analysis shows that bomb-pulse tritium and 36Cl measurements are correlated with discrete features such as horizontal fractures and areas where lateral flow may occur. The results presented here imply that fast flow in fractures may be ubiquitous at Yucca Mountain, occurring when transient infiltration (storms) generates flow in the connected fracture network.

  20. Endocannabinoids Control Platelet Activation and Limit Aggregate Formation under Flow

    PubMed Central

    De Angelis, Valentina; Koekman, Arnold C.; Weeterings, Cees; Roest, Mark; de Groot, Philip G.; Herczenik, Eszter; Maas, Coen

    2014-01-01

    Background The endocannabinoid system has previously been implicated in the regulation of neurons and inflammatory cells. Additionally, it has been reported that endocannabinoid receptors are present on circulating platelets, but there has been conflicting evidence on their contribution to platelet function. Objectives Our aim was to examine the role of endocannabinoids in platelet function in vitro and in vivo. Methods and Results We studied the effects of the well-characterized endogenous endocannabinoid anandamide on platelet aggregation in suspension, α-granule release, calcium mobilization, Syk phosphorylation, as well as platelet spreading and aggregate formation under flow. Anandamide inhibits platelet aggregation and α-granule release by collagen, collagen-derived peptide CRP-XL, ADP, arachidonic acid and thromboxane A2 analogue U46619. However, activation via thrombin receptor PAR-1 stays largely unaffected. Calcium mobilization is significantly impaired when platelets are stimulated with collagen or CRP-XL, but remains normal in the presence of the other agonists. In line with this finding, we found that anandamide prevents collagen-induced Syk phosphorylation. Furthermore, anandamide-treated platelets exhibit reduced spreading on immobilized fibrinogen, have a decreased capacity for binding fibrinogen in solution and show perturbed platelet aggregate formation under flow over collagen. Finally, we investigated the influence of Cannabis sativa consumption by human volunteers on platelet activation. Similar to our in vitro findings with anandamide, ex vivo collagen-induced platelet aggregation and aggregate formation on immobilized collagen under flow were impaired in whole blood of donors that had consumed Cannabis sativa. Conclusions Endocannabinoid receptor agonists reduce platelet activation and aggregate formation both in vitro and ex vivo after Cannabis sativa consumption. Further elucidation of this novel regulatory mechanism for platelet function

  1. Mixed convection flow over a horizontal circular cylinder with constant heat flux embedded in a porous medium filled by a nanofluid: Buongiorno-Darcy model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tham, Leony; Nazar, Roslinda; Pop, Ioan

    2016-09-01

    The steady laminar mixed convection boundary layer flow from a horizontal circular cylinder in a nanofluid embedded in a porous medium, which is maintained at a constant surface heat flux, has been studied by using the Buongiorno-Darcy nanofluid model for both cases of a heated and cooled cylinder. The resulting system of nonlinear partial differential equations is solved numerically using an implicit finite-difference scheme known as the Keller box method. The solutions for the flow and heat transfer characteristics are evaluated numerically and studied for various values of the governing parameters, namely the Lewis number, Brownian number, mixed convection parameter, buoyancy ratio parameter and thermophoresis parameter. It is also found that the boundary layer separation occurs at the opposing fluid flow, that is when the mixed convection parameter is negative. It is also observed that increasing the mixed convection parameter delays the boundary layer separation and the separation can be completely suppressed for sufficiently large values of the mixed convection parameter. The Brownian and buoyancy ratio parameters appear to affect the fluid flow and heat transfer profiles.

  2. Calculations of three-dimensional flows using the isenthalpic Euler equations with implicit flux-vector splitting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cannizzaro, Frank E.; Von Lavante, E.; Melson, N. Duane

    1988-01-01

    A numerical method for solving the isenthalpic form of the Euler equations is developed. The method is based on the concept of flux vector splitting in its implicit form applied to a cell centered finite volume scheme. Approximate factorization is implemented in solving the implicit part of the governing equations. Time marching to a steady state solution requires short computational times due to the relative efficiency of the basic method. Computational times are further reduced by the implementation of multigrid. Results for several basic cases are shown.

  3. Determination of aluminum and phosphorus in biological materials by reactor activation analysis using germanium as integral flux monitor and comparator.

    PubMed

    Furnari, J C; Cohen, I M

    1994-01-01

    A method for determination of aluminum and phosphorus in biological materials, based on activation in a nuclear reactor and measurement of 28Al, produced by the 27Al(n, gamma)28Al and 31P(n, alpha)28Al reactions, is described. Irradiations in the undisturbed and epicadmium spectra provide a two-equation system in order to determine the contributions of aluminum and phosphorus to the total activities. Germanium is used as an integral flux monitor and comparator, through the reactions: 74Ge(n, gamma)75Ge, 76Ge(n, gamma)77Ge, and 72Ge(n,p)72Ga.

  4. Measurement of the total active 8B solar neutrino flux at the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory with enhanced neutral current sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, S N; Anthony, A E; Beier, E W; Bellerive, A; Biller, S D; Boger, J; Boulay, M G; Bowler, M G; Bowles, T J; Brice, S J; Bullard, T V; Chan, Y D; Chen, M; Chen, X; Cleveland, B T; Cox, G A; Dai, X; Dalnoki-Veress, F; Doe, P J; Dosanjh, R S; Doucas, G; Dragowsky, M R; Duba, C A; Duncan, F A; Dunford, M; Dunmore, J A; Earle, E D; Elliott, S R; Evans, H C; Ewan, G T; Farine, J; Fergani, H; Fleurot, F; Formaggio, J A; Fowler, M M; Frame, K; Fulsom, B G; Gagnon, N; Graham, K; Grant, D R; Hahn, R L; Hall, J C; Hallin, A L; Hallman, E D; Hamer, A S; Handler, W B; Hargrove, C K; Harvey, P J; Hazama, R; Heeger, K M; Heintzelman, W J; Heise, J; Helmer, R L; Hemingway, R J; Hime, A; Howe, M A; Jagam, P; Jelley, N A; Klein, J R; Kos, M S; Krumins, A V; Kutter, T; Kyba, C C M; Labranche, H; Lange, R; Law, J; Lawson, I T; Lesko, K T; Leslie, J R; Levine, I; Luoma, S; MacLellan, R; Majerus, S; Mak, H B; Maneira, J; Marino, A D; McCauley, N; McDonald, A B; McGee, S; McGregor, G; Mifflin, C; Miknaitis, K K S; Miller, G G; Moffat, B A; Nally, C W; Nickel, B G; Noble, A J; Norman, E B; Oblath, N S; Okada, C E; Ollerhead, R W; Orrell, J L; Oser, S M; Ouellet, C; Peeters, S J M; Poon, A W P; Robertson, B C; Robertson, R G H; Rollin, E; Rosendahl, S S E; Rusu, V L; Schwendener, M H; Simard, O; Simpson, J J; Sims, C J; Sinclair, D; Skensved, P; Smith, M W E; Starinsky, N; Stokstad, R G; Stonehill, L C; Tafirout, R; Takeuchi, Y; Tesić, G; Thomson, M; Thorman, M; Van Berg, R; Van de Water, R G; Virtue, C J; Wall, B L; Waller, D; Waltham, C E; Tseung, H Wan Chan; Wark, D L; West, N; Wilhelmy, J B; Wilkerson, J F; Wilson, J R; Wouters, J M; Yeh, M; Zuber, K

    2004-05-07

    The Sudbury Neutrino Observatory has precisely determined the total active (nu(x)) 8B solar neutrino flux without assumptions about the energy dependence of the nu(e) survival probability. The measurements were made with dissolved NaCl in heavy water to enhance the sensitivity and signature for neutral-current interactions. The flux is found to be 5.21 +/- 0.27(stat)+/-0.38(syst) x 10(6) cm(-2) s(-1), in agreement with previous measurements and standard solar models. A global analysis of these and other solar and reactor neutrino results yields Deltam(2)=7.1(+1.2)(-0.6) x 10(-5) eV(2) and theta=32.5(+2.4)(-2.3) degrees. Maximal mixing is rejected at the equivalent of 5.4 standard deviations.

  5. Sensitive Detection of Proteopathic Seeding Activity with FRET Flow Cytometry.

    PubMed

    Furman, Jennifer L; Holmes, Brandon B; Diamond, Marc I

    2015-12-08

    Increasing evidence supports transcellular propagation of toxic protein aggregates, or proteopathic seeds, as a mechanism for the initiation and progression of pathology in several neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease and the related tauopathies. The potentially critical role of tau seeds in disease progression strongly supports the need for a sensitive assay that readily detects seeding activity in biological samples. By combining the specificity of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET), the sensitivity of flow cytometry, and the stability of a monoclonal cell line, an ultra-sensitive seeding assay has been engineered and is compatible with seed detection from recombinant or biological samples, including human and mouse brain homogenates. The assay employs monoclonal HEK 293T cells that stably express the aggregation-prone repeat domain (RD) of tau harboring the disease-associated P301S mutation fused to either CFP or YFP, which produce a FRET signal upon protein aggregation. The uptake of proteopathic tau seeds (but not other proteins) into the biosensor cells stimulates aggregation of RD-CFP and RD-YFP, and flow cytometry sensitively and quantitatively monitors this aggregation-induced FRET. The assay detects femtomolar concentrations (monomer equivalent) of recombinant tau seeds, has a dynamic range spanning three orders of magnitude, and is compatible with brain homogenates from tauopathy transgenic mice and human tauopathy subjects. With slight modifications, the assay can also detect seeding activity of other proteopathic seeds, such as α-synuclein, and is also compatible with primary neuronal cultures. The ease, sensitivity, and broad applicability of FRET flow cytometry makes it useful to study a wide range of protein aggregation disorders.

  6. Flow cytometric analysis of crayfish haemocytes activated by lipopolysaccharides

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cardenas, W.; Dankert, J.R.; Jenkins, J.A.

    2004-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharides (LPS) from Gram-negative bacteria are strong stimulators of white river crayfish, Procambarus zonangulus, haemocytes in vitro. Following haemocyte treatment with LPS and with LPS from rough mutant R5 (LPS Rc) from Salmonella minnesota, flow cytometric analysis revealed a conspicuous and reproducible decrease in cell size as compared to control haemocytes. These LPS molecules also caused a reduction in haemocyte viability as assessed by flow cytometry with the fluorescent dyes calcein-AM and ethidium homodimer. The onset of cell size reduction was gradual and occurred prior to cell death. Haemocytes treated with LPS from S. minnesota without the Lipid A moiety (detoxified LPS) decreased in size without a reduction of viability. The action of LPS on crayfish haemocytes appeared to be related to the activation of the prophenoloxidase system because phenoloxidase (PO)-specific activity in the supernatants from control and detoxified LPS-treated cells was significantly lower than that from LPS and LPS-Rc treated cells (P < 0.05). Furthermore, addition of trypsin inhibitor to the LPS treatments caused noticeable delays in cell size and viability changes. These patterns of cellular activation by LPS formulations indicated that crayfish haemocytes react differently to the polysaccharide and lipid A moieties of LPS, where lipid A is cytotoxic and the polysaccharide portion is stimulatory. These effects concur with the general pattern of mammalian cell activation by LPS, thereby indicting commone innate immune recognition mechanisms to bacterial antigens between cells from mammals and invertebrates. These definitive molecular approaches used to verify and identify mechanisms of invertbrate haemocyte responses to LPS could be applied with other glycoconjugates, soluble mediators, or xenobiotic compounds.

  7. Pressure drop, heat transfer, critical heat flux, and flow stability of two-phase flow boiling of water and ethylene glycol/water mixtures - final report for project "Efficent cooling in engines with nucleate boiling."

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, W.; France, D. M.; Routbort, J. L.

    2011-01-19

    Because of its order-of-magnitude higher heat transfer rates, there is interest in using controllable two-phase nucleate boiling instead of conventional single-phase forced convection in vehicular cooling systems to remove ever increasing heat loads and to eliminate potential hot spots in engines. However, the fundamental understanding of flow boiling mechanisms of a 50/50 ethylene glycol/water mixture under engineering application conditions is still limited. In addition, it is impractical to precisely maintain the volume concentration ratio of the ethylene glycol/water mixture coolant at 50/50. Therefore, any investigation into engine coolant characteristics should include a range of volume concentration ratios around the nominal 50/50 mark. In this study, the forced convective boiling heat transfer of distilled water and ethylene glycol/water mixtures with volume concentration ratios of 40/60, 50/50, and 60/40 in a 2.98-mm-inner-diameter circular tube has been investigated in both the horizontal flow and the vertical flow. The two-phase pressure drop, the forced convective boiling heat transfer coefficient, and the critical heat flux of the test fluids were determined experimentally over a range of the mass flux, the vapor mass quality, and the inlet subcooling through a new boiling data reduction procedure that allowed the analytical calculation of the fluid boiling temperatures along the experimental test section by applying the ideal mixture assumption and the equilibrium assumption along with Raoult's law. Based on the experimental data, predictive methods for the two-phase pressure drop, the forced convective boiling heat transfer coefficient, and the critical heat flux under engine application conditions were developed. The results summarized in this final project report provide the necessary information for designing and implementing nucleate-boiling vehicular cooling systems.

  8. Retrieval of lava and SO2 fluxes during long-lived effusive eruptions using MSG-SEVIRI: the case of Bárdarbunga 2014 activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gouhier, Mathieu; Gauthier, Pierre-Jean; Haddadi, Baptiste; Moune, Séverine; Sigmarsson, Olgeir

    2015-04-01

    During effusive events, such as that of the 2014 Holuhraun eruption in the Bárdarbunga Volcanic System, Iceland, the lava and SO2 fluxes can be very large and possibly last for several months. However, the magma effusion rate as well as the gas flux may vary. The monitoring of any changes is essential as it informs on the dynamics of the eruption, and possibly reflects modifications of deeper mechanisms at the origin of the eruption. Geostationary satellite sensors turns out to be particularly relevant to record rapid changes of surface activity by the continuous acquisition of infrared data at time resolution of up to one image every five minutes. However, the long time-series generated cannot easily be analyzed and interpreted using conventional techniques, and require automated processing. Here we present a new method, hereafter called the "gradient method", which can be applied for the quantification of both lava volume and gas mass fluxes during long-lived effusive eruptions using infrared geostationary satellite data. The retrieval scheme comprises the following steps: firstly, the instantaneous lava volume and SO2 cloud mass must be calculated from each image. Then, we apply the "gradient method" to retrieve the lava and gas fluxes, leading to estimates of the true lava volume and gas mass. For the lava, the 3.9µm and 12µm wavebands are used to detect thermal anomalies and calculate related lava areas from the dual "pixel integrated temperature" method. Then, assuming the lava flow thickness, it gives an instantaneous lava volume. The SO2 column abundance is retrieved from the 8.7µm waveband using a linear regression derived from a least square fit procedure between satellite sensor measurements and simulated radiances. It leads to an instantaneous SO2 cloud mass. These calculations are made at each time step, generating time series of these two parameters. The actual lava volume and SO2 mass cannot be estimated through the integration of the total time

  9. Flux Transport and the Sun's Global Magnetic Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hathaway, David H.

    2010-01-01

    The Sun s global magnetic field is produced and evolved through the emergence of magnetic flux in active regions and its transport across the solar surface by the axisymmetric differential rotation and meridional flow and the non-axisymmetric convective flows of granulation, supergranulation, and giant cell convection. Maps of the global magnetic field serve as the inner boundary condition for space weather. The photospheric magnetic field and its evolution determine the coronal and solar wind structures through which CMEs must propagate and in which solar energetic particles are accelerated and propagate. Producing magnetic maps which best represent the actual field configuration at any instant requires knowing the magnetic field over the observed hemisphere as well as knowing the flows that transport flux. From our Earth-based vantage point we only observe the front-side hemisphere and each pole is observable for only six months of the year at best. Models for the surface magnetic flux transport can be used to provide updates to the magnetic field configuration in those unseen regions. In this presentation I will describe successes and failures of surface flux transport and present new observations on the structure, the solar cycle variability, and the evolution of the flows involved in magnetic flux transport. I find that supergranules play the dominant role due to their strong flow velocities and long lifetimes. Flux is transported by differential rotation and meridional flow only to the extent that the supergranules participate in those two flows.

  10. Numerical Simulation of Atmospheric Boundary Layer Flow Over Battlefield-scale Complex Terrain: Surface Fluxes From Resolved and Subgrid Scales

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-06

    be associated with field campaign data from a tower equipped with sonic anemometers )[47]. We used large-eddy simulation (LES) to model flow over...provides datasets that might more readily be retrieved from a micrometeorological tower equipped with sonic anemometers (while retaining the spatial

  11. Near-Horizontal, Two-Phase Flow Patterns of Nitrogen and Hydrogen at Low Mass Heat and Flux Supplement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanDresar, Neil T.; Siegwarth, James D.

    2001-01-01

    This CD is a companion to NASA/TP-2001-210380. It contains digitized movies of particular flow patterns observed in experimental work. The movies have been provided in QuickTime format, encoded at 320w x 240h pixels, 15 fps, using the Sorenson Video Codec for compression.

  12. Use of Temperature and Surface Gas Flux as Novel Measures of Microbial Activity at a Crude Oil Spill Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekins, B. A.; Warren, E.; Sihota, N. J.; Hostettler, F. D.

    2012-12-01

    Degradation of crude oil in the subsurface has been studied for over 30 years at a spill site located near Bemidji, Minnesota, USA. The well-characterized site is being used to experiment with the use of surface gas flux and temperature measurements as novel methods for quantifying microbial activity. In the largest subsurface oil body, a 2-m-thick smear zone spans the water table 6-8 m below the surface. Methane produced from degradation of the oil diffuses upward and mixes with oxygen from the surface supporting aerobic methanotrophy at 2-4 m depth. The methane oxidation produces CO2 and heat at rates which are hypothetically proportional to other measures of subsurface microbial activity. To test this hypothesis, vertical profiles of temperature and microbial populations, surface CO2 flux, and oil degradation state were measured at three sites in the oil body and one background site. Temperature increases in the oil zone near the water table were 1-4°C above the background site. The site with the highest temperature increase at the water table also had the highest concentrations of gene copy numbers for methanogens (mcrA) and methanotrophs (pmoA) along with the most degraded oil. Surface CO2 flux over the oil sites averaged more than twice that at the background site but was not consistently highest over the site with the highest activity by other measures. One possible explanation for this discrepancy is variation in the effective diffusion coefficient of the vadose zone between the methanotrophic zone and the surface. At the level of the methanotrophic zone, temperatures were elevated 2-6°C over the background values but again the site with greatest average annual temperature increase was not at the most active site. This may be due to enhanced recharge at the most active site, which lies at the center of a local topographic depression where focused recharge occurs. Overall, the temperature and flux data showed significant increases at the oil sites compared

  13. The Contribution of Englacial Latent Heat Transfer to Seaward Ice Flux from Regions of Convergent and Divergent Ice Flow in Western Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poinar, K.; Joughin, I. R.

    2014-12-01

    Glacial meltwater can refreeze within firn and crevasses, warming the ice through latent heat transfer. The consequent softening of the ice has been identified as a potential destabilization mechanism for the Greenland Ice Sheet, which would flow more quickly seaward with lower viscosity. We calculate the effect of meltwater refreezing within firn and englacial features on ice temperature and viscosity in two contrasting areas of western Greenland: Jakobshavn Isbrae, a convergent, fast-flowing outlet glacier, and the Pakitsoq area (Swiss Camp) directly to its north, a "dead zone" experiencing slow, divergent flow because of its location between two outlet glaciers. We explore how much refreezing affects the seaward velocity of ice in each location by comparing our modeled temperature profiles to borehole data. Pakitsoq ice shows significant englacial latent heat transfer, or cryo-hydrologic warming, while the ice in Jakobshavn has warmed largely due to percolation within the firn. We find that the Pakitsoq region is rather unique in western Greenland because of the long residence time of the ice in the ablation zone (800 years) there; ice flowing through Jakobshavn, by contrast, spends only 20 years in the ablation zone, not enough time for deep, diffusive englacial warming to occur. Examination of the velocity field of the ice sheet indicates that 70% of the ice flux through western Greenland spends insufficient time (200 years or less) in the ablation zone to produce significant englacial warming. Thus, the effects of englacial latent heat transfer may be fairly limited to regions of divergent flow such as Pakitsoq. Ice loss in these regions, which tend to be land-terminating, is dominated by surface melt rather than seaward ice motion, further suggesting that englacial heat transfer may have a lesser effect on the stability of the ice sheet than previously supposed.

  14. Low-energy electron flux and its reaction to active experimentation of Spacelab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilhelm, K.

    1981-01-01

    An instrument capable of observing the natural electron flux in the energy range from 0.1 to 12.0 kiloelectron volts is discussed for use in an experiment intended as a forerunner of a method that will utilize artificially accelerated electrons as tracer particles for electron fields parallel to the magnetic field. Effects that are of importance either as means of detecting the echo beam or as causes of beam perturbations (e.g., spacecraft charging effects and electron background) are to be studied. The use of electron accelerators as a tool to probe magnetospheric processes rather than to modify them is planned.

  15. Self-similar flow of a rotating dusty gas behind the shock wave with increasing energy, conduction and radiation heat flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nath, G.

    2012-01-01

    A self-similar solution is obtained for one dimensional adiabatic flow behind a cylindrical shock wave propagating in a rotating dusty gas in presence of heat conduction and radiation heat flux with increasing energy. The dusty gas is assumed to be a mixture of non-ideal (or perfect) gas and small solid particles, in which solid particles are continuously distributed. It is assumed that the equilibrium flow-condition is maintained and variable energy input is continuously supplied by the piston (or inner expanding surface). The heat conduction is expressed in terms of Fourier's law and the radiation is considered to be of the diffusion type for an optically thick grey gas model. The thermal conductivity K and the absorption coefficient αR are assumed to vary with temperature only. In order to obtain the similarity solutions the initial density of the ambient medium is assumed to be constant and the angular velocity of the ambient medium is assumed to be decreasing as the distance from the axis increases. The effects of the variation of the heat transfer parameters and non-idealness of the gas in the mixture are investigated. The effects of an increase in (i) the mass concentration of solid particles in the mixture and (ii) the ratio of the density of solid particles to the initial density of the gas on the flow variables are also investigated.

  16. Neutron flux measurement using activated radioactive isotopes at the Baksan underground scintillation telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochkarov, M. M.; Alikhanov, I. A.; Boliev, M. M.; Dzaparova, I. M.; Novoseltseva, R. V.; Novoseltsev, Yu. F.; Petkov, V. B.; Volchenko, V. I.; Volchenko, G. V.; Yanin, A. F.

    2016-11-01

    Preliminary results of a neutron background measurement at the Baksan underground scintillation telescope (BUST) are presented. The external planes of the BUST are fully covered with standard scintillation detectors shielding the internal planes and suppressing thus background events due to cosmogenic and local radioactivity. The shielded internal planes were used as target for the neutron flux registration. The experimental method is based on the delayed coincidences between signals from any of the BUST counters. It is assumed that the first signal is due to inelastic interaction of a neutron with the organic scintillator, while the second signal comes from the decay of an unstable radioactive isotope formed when the fast neutron interacts with the 12C nuclei. Using the Monte-Carlo method (GEANT4) we also simulated propagation of neutrons through a layer of scintillator. The experimentally found muon induced neutron flux is j =1.3 -0.3 +0.7 ×10-10cm-2s-1 for neutron energies E ≥ 22MeV, which is in a qualitative agreement with similar measurements of other underground laboratories as well as with predictions of the GEANT4.

  17. Mapping fluxes of radicals from the combination of electrochemical activation and optical microscopy.

    PubMed

    Munteanu, Sorin; Roger, Jean Paul; Fedala, Yasmina; Amiot, Fabien; Combellas, Catherine; Tessier, Gilles; Kanoufi, Frédéric

    2013-01-01

    The coating of gold (Au) electrode surfaces with nitrophenyl (NP) layers is studied by combination of electrochemical actuation and optical detection. The electrochemical actuation of the reduction of the nitrobenzenediazonium (NBD) precursor is used to generate NP radicals and therefore initiate the electrografting. The electrografting process is followed in situ and in real time by light reflectivity microscopy imaging, allowing for spatio-temporal imaging with sub-micrometer lateral resolution and sub-nanometer thickness sensitivity of the local growth of a transparent organic coating onto a reflecting Au electrode. The interest of the electrochemical actuation resides in its ability to finely control the grafting rate of the NP layer through the electrode potential. Coupling the electrochemical actuation with microscopic imaging of the electrode surface allows quantitative estimates of the local grafting rates and subsequently a real time and in situ mapping of the reacting fluxes of NP radicals on the surface. Over the 2 orders of magnitude range of grafting rates (from 0.04 to 4 nm s(-1)), it is demonstrated that the edge of Au electrodes are grafted -1.3 times more quickly than their centre, illustrating the manifestation of edge-effects on flux distribution at an electrode. A model is proposed to explain the observed edge-effect, it relies on the short lifetime of the intermediate NP radical species.

  18. Validation of the MCNP computational model for neutron flux distribution with the neutron activation analysis measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiyapun, K.; Chimtin, M.; Munsorn, S.; Somchit, S.

    2015-05-01

    The objective of this work is to demonstrate the method for validating the predication of the calculation methods for neutron flux distribution in the irradiation tubes of TRIGA research reactor (TRR-1/M1) using the MCNP computer code model. The reaction rate using in the experiment includes 27Al(n, α)24Na and 197Au(n, γ)198Au reactions. Aluminium (99.9 wt%) and gold (0.1 wt%) foils and the gold foils covered with cadmium were irradiated in 9 locations in the core referred to as CT, C8, C12, F3, F12, F22, F29, G5, and G33. The experimental results were compared to the calculations performed using MCNP which consisted of the detailed geometrical model of the reactor core. The results from the experimental and calculated normalized reaction rates in the reactor core are in good agreement for both reactions showing that the material and geometrical properties of the reactor core are modelled very well. The results indicated that the difference between the experimental measurements and the calculation of the reactor core using the MCNP geometrical model was below 10%. In conclusion the MCNP computational model which was used to calculate the neutron flux and reaction rate distribution in the reactor core can be used for others reactor core parameters including neutron spectra calculation, dose rate calculation, power peaking factors calculation and optimization of research reactor utilization in the future with the confidence in the accuracy and reliability of the calculation.

  19. Two-phase flow in a chemically active porous medium

    SciTech Connect

    Darmon, Alexandre Dauchot, Olivier; Benzaquen, Michael; Salez, Thomas

    2014-12-28

    We study the problem of the transformation of a given reactant species into an immiscible product species, as they flow through a chemically active porous medium. We derive the equation governing the evolution of the volume fraction of the species, in a one-dimensional macroscopic description, identify the relevant dimensionless numbers, and provide simple models for capillary pressure and relative permeabilities, which are quantities of crucial importance when tackling multiphase flows in porous media. We set the domain of validity of our models and discuss the importance of viscous coupling terms in the extended Darcy’s law. We investigate numerically the steady regime and demonstrate that the spatial transformation rate of the species along the reactor is non-monotonous, as testified by the existence of an inflection point in the volume fraction profiles. We obtain the scaling of the location of this inflection point with the dimensionless lengths of the problem. Eventually, we provide key elements for optimization of the reactor.

  20. Active flow control for a NACA-0012 Profile: Part II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oualli, H.; Makadem, M.; Ouchene, H.; Ferfouri, A.; Bouabdallah, A.; Gad-El-Hak, M.

    2016-11-01

    Active flow control is applied to a NACA-0012 profile. The experiments are conducted in a wind tunnel. Using a high-resolution visible-light camera and tomography, flow visualizations are carried out. LES finite-volume 3D code is used to complement the physical experiments. The symmetric wing is clipped into two parts, and those parts extend and retract along the chord according to the same sinusoidal law we optimized last year for the same profile but clipped at an angle of 60 deg, instead of the original 90 deg. The Reynolds number range is extended to 500,000, thus covering the flying regimes of micro-UAVs, UAVs, as well as small aircraft. When the nascent cavity is open and the attack angle is 30 deg, the drag coefficient is increased by 1,300%, as compared to the uncontrolled case. However, when the cavity is covered and Re <=105 , a relatively small frequency, f <= 30 Hz, is required for the drag coefficient to drop to negative values. At the maximum Reynolds number, thrust is generated but only at much higher frequencies, 12 <= f <= 16 kHz.

  1. Metabolic flux control at the pyruvate node in an anaerobic Escherichia coli strain with an active pyruvate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qingzhao; Ou, Mark S; Kim, Y; Ingram, L O; Shanmugam, K T

    2010-04-01

    During anaerobic growth of Escherichia coli, pyruvate formate-lyase (PFL) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) channel pyruvate toward a mixture of fermentation products. We have introduced a third branch at the pyruvate node in a mutant of E. coli with a mutation in pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH*) that renders the enzyme less sensitive to inhibition by NADH. The key starting enzymes of the three branches at the pyruvate node in such a mutant, PDH*, PFL, and LDH, have different metabolic potentials and kinetic properties. In such a mutant (strain QZ2), pyruvate flux through LDH was about 30%, with the remainder of the flux occurring through PFL, indicating that LDH is a preferred route of pyruvate conversion over PDH*. In a pfl mutant (strain YK167) with both PDH* and LDH activities, flux through PDH* was about 33% of the total, confirming the ability of LDH to outcompete the PDH pathway for pyruvate in vivo. Only in the absence of LDH (strain QZ3) was pyruvate carbon equally distributed between the PDH* and PFL pathways. A pfl mutant with LDH and PDH* activities, as well as a pfl ldh double mutant with PDH* activity, had a surprisingly low cell yield per mole of ATP (Y(ATP)) (about 7.0 g of cells per mol of ATP) compared to 10.9 g of cells per mol of ATP for the wild type. The lower Y(ATP) suggests the operation of a futile energy cycle in the absence of PFL in this strain. An understanding of the controls at the pyruvate node during anaerobic growth is expected to provide unique insights into rational metabolic engineering of E. coli and related bacteria for the production of various biobased products at high rates and yields.

  2. Strongly Accelerated Margination of Active Particles in Blood Flow

    PubMed Central

    Gekle, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic nanoparticles and other stiff objects injected into a blood vessel filled with red blood cells are known to marginate toward the vessel walls. By means of hydrodynamic lattice-Boltzmann simulations, we show that active particles can strongly accelerate their margination by moving against the flow direction: particles located initially in the channel center migrate much faster to their final position near the wall than in the nonactive case. We explain our findings by an enhanced rate of collisions between the stiff particles and the deformable red blood cells. Our results imply that a significantly faster margination can be achieved either technically by the application of an external magnetic field (if the particles are magnetic) or biologically by self-propulsion (if the particles are, e.g., swimming bacteria). PMID:26789773

  3. Quantitative assessment of Mycoplasma hemadsorption activity by flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    García-Morales, Luis; González-González, Luis; Costa, Manuela; Querol, Enrique; Piñol, Jaume

    2014-01-01

    A number of adherent mycoplasmas have developed highly complex polar structures that are involved in diverse aspects of the biology of these microorganisms and play a key role as virulence factors by promoting adhesion to host cells in the first stages of infection. Attachment activity of mycoplasma cells has been traditionally investigated by determining their hemadsorption ability to red blood cells and it is a distinctive trait widely examined when characterizing the different mycoplasma species. Despite the fact that protocols to qualitatively determine the hemadsorption or hemagglutination of mycoplasmas are straightforward, current methods when investigating hemadsorption at the quantitative level are expensive and poorly reproducible. By using flow cytometry, we have developed a procedure to quantify rapidly and accurately the hemadsorption activity of mycoplasmas in the presence of SYBR Green I, a vital fluorochrome that stains nucleic acids, allowing to resolve erythrocyte and mycoplasma cells by their different size and fluorescence. This method is very reproducible and permits the kinetic analysis of the obtained data and a precise hemadsorption quantification based on standard binding parameters such as the dissociation constant K d. The procedure we developed could be easily implemented in a standardized assay to test the hemadsorption activity of the growing number of clinical isolates and mutant strains of different mycoplasma species, providing valuable data about the virulence of these microorganisms.

  4. Similarity Solutions for the Flow Behind an Exponential Shock in a Rotating Nonideal Gas with Heat Conduction and Radiation Heat Fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, K. K.; Nath, B.

    2014-07-01

    A self-similar solution for the propagation of a shock wave driven by a cylindrical piston moving according to exponential temporal law in a nonideal rotating gas with heat conduction and radiation heat fluxes is investigated. The density and angular velocity of the ambient medium are assumed to be constant. Heat conduction is expressed in terms of the Fourier law, and radiation is considered to be of diffusion type for an optically thick gray gas model. The thermal conductivity and absorption coefficient are assumed to vary with temperature and density. Similarity solutions are obtained, and the effects of variations in the heat transfer parameters and gas nonidealness on the flow variables in the region behind the shock are investigated.

  5. [Effects of brackish water irrigation on soil enzyme activity, soil CO2 flux and organic matter decomposition].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qian-qian; Wang, Fei; Liu, Tao; Chu, Gui-xin

    2015-09-01

    Brackish water irrigation utilization is an important way to alleviate water resource shortage in arid region. A field-plot experiment was set up to study the impact of the salinity level (0.31, 3.0 or 5.0 g · L(-1) NaCl) of irrigated water on activities of soil catalase, invertase, β-glucosidase, cellulase and polyphenoloxidase in drip irrigation condition, and the responses of soil CO2 flux and organic matter decomposition were also determined by soil carbon dioxide flux instrument (LI-8100) and nylon net bag method. The results showed that in contrast with fresh water irrigation treatment (CK), the activities of invertase, β-glucosidase and cellulase in the brackish water (3.0 g · L(-1)) irrigation treatment declined by 31.7%-32.4%, 29.7%-31.6%, 20.8%-24.3%, respectively, while soil polyphenoloxidase activity was obviously enhanced with increasing the salinity level of irrigated water. Compared to CK, polyphenoloxidase activity increased by 2.4% and 20.5%, respectively, in the brackish water and saline water irrigation treatments. Both soil microbial biomass carbon and microbial quotient decreased with increasing the salinity level, whereas, microbial metabolic quotient showed an increasing tendency with increasing the salinity level. Soil CO2 fluxes in the different treatments were in the order of CK (0.31 g · L(-1)) > brackish water irrigation (3.0 g · L(-1)) ≥ saline water irrigation (5.0 g · L(-1)). Moreover, CO2 flux from plastic film mulched soil was always much higher than that from no plastic film mulched soil, regardless the salinity of irrigated water. Compared with CK, soil CO2 fluxes in the saline water and brackish water treatments decreased by 29.8% and 28.2% respectively in the boll opening period. The decomposition of either cotton straw or alfalfa straw in the different treatments was in the sequence of CK (0.31 g · L(-1)) > brackish water irrigation (3.0 g · L(-1)) > saline water treatment (5.0 g · L(-1)). The organic matter

  6. Asymptotic domination of cold relativistic MHD winds by kinetic energy flux

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Begelman, Mitchell C.; Li, Zhi-Yun

    1994-01-01

    We study the conditions which lead to the conversion of most Poynting flux into kinetic energy flux in cold, relativistic hydromagnetic winds. It is shown that plasma acceleration along a precisely radial flow is extremely inefficient due to the near cancellation of the toroidal magnetic pressure and tension forces. However, if the flux tubes in a flow diverge even slightly faster than radially, the fast magnetosonic point moves inward from infinity to a few times the light cylinder radius. Once the flow becomes supermagnetosonic, further divergence of the flux tubes beyond the fast point can accelerate the flow via the 'magnetic nozzle' effect, thereby further converting Poynting flux to kinetic energy flux. We show that the Grad-Shafranov equation admits a generic family of kinetic energy-dominated asymptotic wind solutions with finite total magnetic flux. The Poynting flux in these solutions vanishes logarithmically with distance. The way in which the flux surfaces are nested within the flow depends only on the ratio of angular velocity to poliodal 4-velocity as a function of magnetic flux. Radial variations in flow structure can be expressed in terms of a pressure boundary condition on the outermost flux surface, provided that no external toriodal field surrounds the flow. For a special case, we show explicitly how the flux surfaces merge gradually to their asymptotes. For flows confined by an external medium of pressure decreasing to zero at infinity we show that, depending on how fast the ambient pressure declines, the final flow state could be either a collimated jet or a wind that fills the entire space. We discuss the astrophysical implications of our results for jets from active galactic nuclei and for free pulsar winds such as that believed to power the Crab Nebula.

  7. Inhibition of the active lymph pump by flow in rat mesenteric lymphatics and thoracic duct

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gashev, Anatoliy A.; Davis, Michael J.; Zawieja, David C.; Delp, M. D. (Principal Investigator)

    2002-01-01

    There are only a few reports of the influence of imposed flow on an active lymph pump under conditions of controlled intraluminal pressure. Thus, the mechanisms are not clearly defined. Rat mesenteric lymphatics and thoracic ducts were isolated, cannulated and pressurized. Input and output pressures were adjusted to impose various flows. Lymphatic systolic and diastolic diameters were measured and used to determine contraction frequency and pump flow indices. Imposed flow inhibited the active lymph pump in both mesenteric lymphatics and in the thoracic duct. The active pump of the thoracic duct appeared more sensitive to flow than did the active pump of the mesenteric lymphatics. Imposed flow reduced the frequency and amplitude of the contractions and accordingly the active pump flow. Flow-induced inhibition of the active lymph pump followed two temporal patterns. The first pattern was a rapidly developing inhibition of contraction frequency. Upon imposition of flow, the contraction frequency immediately fell and then partially recovered over time during continued flow. This effect was dependent on the magnitude of imposed flow, but did not depend on the direction of flow. The effect also depended upon the rate of change in the direction of flow. The second pattern was a slowly developing reduction of the amplitude of the lymphatic contractions, which increased over time during continued flow. The inhibition of contraction amplitude was dependent on the direction of the imposed flow, but independent of the magnitude of flow. Nitric oxide was partly but not completely responsible for the influence of flow on the mesenteric lymph pump. Exposure to NO mimicked the effects of flow, and inhibition of the NO synthase by N (G)-monomethyl-L-arginine attenuated but did not completely abolish the effects of flow.

  8. Influence of wave and current flow on sediment-carrying capacity and sediment flux at the water-sediment interface.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jun; Li, Ruijie; Yu, Yonghai; Suo, Anning

    2014-01-01

    In nearshore waters, spatial and temporal scales of waves, tidal currents, and circulation patterns vary greatly. It is, therefore, difficult to combine these factors' effects when trying to predict sediment transport processes. This paper proposes the concept of significant wave velocity, which combines the effects of waves, tides, and ocean currents using the horizontal kinetic energy superposition principle. Through a comparison of the relationship between shear stress at the water-sediment interface and sediment-carrying capacity, assuming equilibrium sediment flux, a new formula for sediment-carrying capacity, which incorporates the concept of significant wave velocities, is derived. Sediment-carrying capacity is a function of the critical velocity, which increases with water depth and decreases with increasing relative roughness of the sea bed. Finally, data from field observation stations and simulations are used to test the proposed formula. The results show that the new formula is in good agreement with both field and simulation data. This new formula for sediment-carrying capacity can be used to simulate nearshore sediment transport.

  9. Data-driven magnetohydrodynamic modelling of a flux-emerging active region leading to solar eruption

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Chaowei; Wu, S. T.; Feng, Xuesheng; Hu, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Solar eruptions are well-recognized as major drivers of space weather but what causes them remains an open question. Here we show how an eruption is initiated in a non-potential magnetic flux-emerging region using magnetohydrodynamic modelling driven directly by solar magnetograms. Our model simulates the coronal magnetic field following a long-duration quasi-static evolution to its fast eruption. The field morphology resembles a set of extreme ultraviolet images for the whole process. Study of the magnetic field suggests that in this event, the key transition from the pre-eruptive to eruptive state is due to the establishment of a positive feedback between the upward expansion of internal stressed magnetic arcades of new emergence and an external magnetic reconnection which triggers the eruption. Such a nearly realistic simulation of a solar eruption from origin to onset can provide important insight into its cause, and also has the potential for improving space weather modelling. PMID:27181846

  10. Increasing dust fluxes on the northeastern Tibetan Plateau linked with the Little Ice Age and recent human activity since the 1950s

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Dejun; Jin, Zhangdong; Zhang, Fei; Song, Lei; Yang, Jinsong

    2016-12-01

    Arid and semi-arid areas in inner Asia contribute lots of mineral dust in the northern hemisphere, but dust flux evolution in the past is poorly constrained. Based on particle sizes and elemental compositions of a sediment core from Lake Qinghai on the northeastern Tibetan Plateau, dust fluxes during ∼1518-2011 A.D. were reconstructed based on 18-100 μm fractions of the lake sediment. The dust fluxes during the past ∼500 years ranged between 100 and 300 g/m2/yr, averaging 202 g/m2/yr, experiencing four stages: Stage 1 (∼1518-1590s), the flux was averaged 165 g/m2/yr, much lower than that in the Stage 2 (1590s-1730s, 254 g/m2/yr); similarly, an average flux of 169 g/m2/yr in the Stage 3 (1730s-1950s) was followed by an increased flux of 259 g/m2/yr in the Stage 4 (1950s-2011). During the first three stages the fluxes were dominated by natural dust activities in arid inner Asia, having a positive relation with wind intensity but a poor correlation with effective moisture (or precipitation) and temperature. The high dust flux in Stage 2 was due to relatively strong wind during the maximum Little Ice Age, whereas the remarkably high flux in 1950s-2011 was resulted from recent increasing human activities in northwestern China. The dust record not only documents past dust fluxes on the northeastern Tibetan Plateau but also reflects evolutions and mechanisms of dust activity/emission in inner Asia during the past ∼500 years.

  11. Controls on gross fluxes of nitrous oxide and methane from an active agricultural ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, W. H.; Silver, W. L.

    2013-12-01

    Agricultural soils can be a significant source of greenhouse gas emissions. Most research on the dynamics of these gases measure net fluxes across the soil-atmosphere interface. This approach limits our ability to determine driving variables because production and consumption processes occur simultaneously, and may be controlled by different factors. We used the trace gas stable isotope pool dilution technique to simultaneously measure field rates of gross production and consumption of N2O and CH4 during the growing season in a corn field located in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, California. We also measured net nitrogen (N) mineralization and nitrification rates, soil temperature, soil moisture, and soil carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions to explore their role as drivers of greenhouse gas fluxes. Across five sampling dates spanning from seeding to senescence, net N2O fluxes ranged from 0 - 4.5 mg N m-2 d-1 and averaged 1.6 × 0.2 mg N m-2 d-1 (n = 112). Gross N2O production ranged from 0.09 - 6.6 mg N m-2 d-1 and gross N2O reduction rates ranged from 0.00 - 0.95 mg N m-2 d-1. The N2O yield averaged 0.68 × 0.02 (n = 40). At peak growth (days after seeding 59 and 94), 89 % of the variability in gross N2O production rates was predicted by the combination of soil moisture, soil temperature, net N mineralization, and CO2 emissions (n = 15, p < 0.001); and 91 % of the variability in gross N2O reduction rates was predicted by net N mineralization and net nitrification together (n = 15, p < 0.001). When the corn was not at peak growth (days after seeding 11, 24, and 171), gross N2O production was most strongly correlated with soil temperature (R2 = 0.20, n = 24, p = 0.03), and gross N2O reduction rates were best predicted by CO2 emissions (R2 = 0.80, n =24, p < 0.001). Net CH4 fluxes ranged from -1.3 to 0.44 mg C m-2 d-1 but fluxes were not detectable for 94 out of 112 measurements. Overall net CH4 fluxes averaged -0.03 × 0.02 mg C m-2 d-1. Using the trace gas pool

  12. Superfine powdered activated carbon (S-PAC) coatings on microfiltration membranes: Effects of milling time on contaminant removal and flux.

    PubMed

    Amaral, Pauline; Partlan, Erin; Li, Mengfei; Lapolli, Flavio; Mefford, O Thompson; Karanfil, Tanju; Ladner, David A

    2016-09-01

    In microfiltration processes for drinking water treatment, one method of removing trace contaminants is to add powdered activated carbon (PAC). Recently, a version of PAC called superfine PAC (S-PAC) has been under development. S-PAC has a smaller particle size and thus faster adsorption kinetics than conventionally sized PAC. Membrane coating performance of various S-PAC samples was evaluated by measuring adsorption of atrazine, a model micropollutant. S-PACs were created in-house from PACs of three different materials: coal, wood, and coconut shell. Milling time was varied to produce S-PACs pulverized with different amounts of energy. These had different particles sizes, but other properties (e.g. oxygen content), also differed. In pure water the coal based S-PACs showed superior atrazine adsorption; all milled carbons had over 90% removal while the PAC had only 45% removal. With addition of calcium and/or NOM, removal rates decreased, but milled carbons still removed more atrazine than PAC. Oxygen content and specific external surface area (both of which increased with longer milling times) were the most significant predictors of atrazine removal. S-PAC coatings resulted in loss of filtration flux compared to an uncoated membrane and smaller particles caused more flux decline than larger particles; however, the data suggest that NOM fouling is still more of a concern than S-PAC fouling. The addition of calcium improved the flux, especially for the longer-milled carbons. Overall the data show that when milling S-PAC with different levels of energy there is a tradeoff: smaller particles adsorb contaminants better, but cause greater flux decline. Fortunately, an acceptable balance may be possible; for example, in these experiments the coal-based S-PAC after 30 min of milling achieved a fairly high atrazine removal (overall 80%) with a fairly low flux reduction (under 30%) even in the presence of NOM. This suggests that relatively short duration (low energy

  13. Numerical Modeling of Flow through Phloem Considering Active Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jin; Sze, Tsun-Kay Jackie; Dutta, Prashanta

    2013-11-01

    Transport through phloem is of significant interest in engineering applications including self-powered microfluidic pumps. We present a phloem model, combining protein level mechanics with cellular level fluid transport. Fluid flow and sucrose transport through a petiole sieve tube are simulated using the Nernst-Planck, Navier-Stokes, and continuity equations. Governing equations are solved using the finite volume method with dynamically calculated boundary conditions. Sieve tube cell structure consisting of sieve plates is included in a two dimensional model by computational cell blocking. Sucrose transport is incorporated as a boundary condition through a six-state model, bringing in active loading mechanisms with consideration of physical plant properties. The effects of reaction rates and leaf sucrose concentration are investigated to understand the transport mechanism in petiole sieve tubes. Numerical results show that increasing forward reactions of the proton sucrose transporter significantly promotes the pumping ability. A lower leaf sieve sucrose concentration results in a lower wall inflow velocity, but yields a higher inflow of water due to the active loading mechanism. The overall effect is higher outflow velocity for lower leaf sieve sucrose concentration because the increase in inflow velocity outweighs wall velocity. This new phloem model provides new insights on mechanisms potentially useful for fluidic pumping in self-powered microfluidic pumps. This work is supported in part by the National Science Fundation grant CBET-1250107.

  14. Activity-dependent branching ratios in stocks, solar x-ray flux, and the Bak-Tang-Wiesenfeld sandpile model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Elliot; Shreim, Amer; Paczuski, Maya

    2010-01-01

    We define an activity-dependent branching ratio that allows comparison of different time series Xt . The branching ratio bx is defined as bx=E[ξx/x] . The random variable ξx is the value of the next signal given that the previous one is equal to x , so ξx={Xt+1∣Xt=x} . If bx>1 , the process is on average supercritical when the signal is equal to x , while if bx<1 , it is subcritical. For stock prices we find bx=1 within statistical uncertainty, for all x , consistent with an “efficient market hypothesis.” For stock volumes, solar x-ray flux intensities, and the Bak-Tang-Wiesenfeld (BTW) sandpile model, bx is supercritical for small values of activity and subcritical for the largest ones, indicating a tendency to return to a typical value. For stock volumes this tendency has an approximate power-law behavior. For solar x-ray flux and the BTW model, there is a broad regime of activity where bx≃1 , which we interpret as an indicator of critical behavior. This is true despite different underlying probability distributions for Xt and for ξx . For the BTW model the distribution of ξx is Gaussian, for x sufficiently larger than 1, and its variance grows linearly with x . Hence, the activity in the BTW model obeys a central limit theorem when sampling over past histories. The broad region of activity where bx is close to one disappears once bulk dissipation is introduced in the BTW model—supporting our hypothesis that it is an indicator of criticality.

  15. Activity-dependent branching ratios in stocks, solar x-ray flux, and the Bak-Tang-Wiesenfeld sandpile model.

    PubMed

    Martin, Elliot; Shreim, Amer; Paczuski, Maya

    2010-01-01

    We define an activity-dependent branching ratio that allows comparison of different time series X(t). The branching ratio b(x) is defined as b(x)=E[xi(x)/x]. The random variable xi(x) is the value of the next signal given that the previous one is equal to x, so xi(x)=[X(t+1) | X(t)=x]. If b(x)>1, the process is on average supercritical when the signal is equal to x, while if b(x)<1, it is subcritical. For stock prices we find b(x)=1 within statistical uncertainty, for all x, consistent with an "efficient market hypothesis." For stock volumes, solar x-ray flux intensities, and the Bak-Tang-Wiesenfeld (BTW) sandpile model, b(x) is supercritical for small values of activity and subcritical for the largest ones, indicating a tendency to return to a typical value. For stock volumes this tendency has an approximate power-law behavior. For solar x-ray flux and the BTW model, there is a broad regime of activity where b(x) approximately equal 1, which we interpret as an indicator of critical behavior. This is true despite different underlying probability distributions for X(t) and for xi(x). For the BTW model the distribution of xi(x) is Gaussian, for x sufficiently larger than 1, and its variance grows linearly with x. Hence, the activity in the BTW model obeys a central limit theorem when sampling over past histories. The broad region of activity where b(x) is close to one disappears once bulk dissipation is introduced in the BTW model-supporting our hypothesis that it is an indicator of criticality.

  16. Experimental Analysis of Heat Flux to a Blunt Body in Hypersonic Flow with Upstream Laser Energy Deposition — Preliminary Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvador, I. I.; Minucci, M. A. S.; Toro, P. G. P.; Oliveira, A. C.; Channes, J. B.; Myrabo, L. N.; Nagamatsu, H. T.

    2006-05-01

    Due to high heat transfer rates in hypersonic flight and its consequent necessity of prohibitively massive thermal protection system, new methods of flow control are required to enable flight in such regimes. Here arises the Direct Energy Air Spike concept, where electromagnetic energy (laser/microwaves) is focalized upstream of the model causing the breakdown of the air and the generation of a Laser Supported Detonation wave which diverts the incoming stream parabolically. In this preliminary work, the heat transfer rates to the surface of a blunt body, downstream the laser induced shock wave, were qualitatively measured and compared with the results without the DEAS. These measurements were conducted with the use of fast response coaxial thermocouples and piezoelectric pressure transducers installed on the surface of the model in the 0.30m IEAv's T2 Hypersonic Shock Tunnel. The laser energy was supplied by a CO2 TEA Laser.

  17. Dynamic modeling of the Ganga river system: impacts of future climate and socio-economic change on flows and nitrogen fluxes in India and Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Whitehead, P G; Sarkar, S; Jin, L; Futter, M N; Caesar, J; Barbour, E; Butterfield, D; Sinha, R; Nicholls, R; Hutton, C; Leckie, H D

    2015-06-01

    This study investigates the potential impacts of future climate and socio-economic change on the flow and nitrogen fluxes of the Ganga river system. This is the first basin scale water quality study for the Ganga considering climate change at 25 km resolution together with socio-economic scenarios. The revised dynamic, process-based INCA model was used to simulate hydrology and water quality within the complex multi-branched river basins. All climate realizations utilized in the study predict increases in temperature and rainfall by the 2050s with significant increase by the 2090s. These changes generate associated increases in monsoon flows and increased availability of water for groundwater recharge and irrigation, but also more frequent flooding. Decreased concentrations of nitrate and ammonia are expected due to increased dilution. Different future socio-economic scenarios were found to have a significant impact on water quality at the downstream end of the Ganga. A less sustainable future resulted in a deterioration of water quality due to the pressures from higher population growth, land use change, increased sewage treatment discharges, enhanced atmospheric nitrogen deposition, and water abstraction. However, water quality was found to improve under a more sustainable strategy as envisaged in the Ganga clean-up plan.

  18. Different nano-particles volume fraction and Hartmann number effects on flow and heat transfer of water-silver nanofluid under the variable heat flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forghani-Tehrani, Pezhman; Karimipour, Arash; Afrand, Masoud; Mousavi, Sayedali

    2017-01-01

    Nanofluid flow and heat transfer composed of water-silver nanoparticles is investigated numerically inside a microchannel. Finite volume approach (FVM) is applied and the effects of gravity are ignored. The whole length of Microchannel is considered in three sections as l1=l3=0.151 and l2=0.71. The linear variable heat flux affects the microchannel wall in the length of l2 while a magnetic field with strength of B0 is considered over the whole domain of it. The influences of different values of Hartmann number (Ha=0, 10, 20), volume fraction of the nanoparticles (ɸ=0, 0.02, 0.04) and Reynolds number (Re=10, 50, 200) on the hydrodynamic and thermal properties of flow are reported. The investigation of slip velocity variations under the effects of a magnetic field are presented for the first time (to the best knowledge of author) while the non-dimensional slip coefficient are selected as B=0.01, 0.05, 0.1 at different states.

  19. Developing the laminar MHD forced convection flow of water/FMWNT carbon nanotubes in a microchannel imposed the uniform heat flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karimipour, Arash; Taghipour, Abdolmajid; Malvandi, Amir

    2016-12-01

    This paper aims to investigate magnetic field and slip effects on developing laminar forced convection of nanofluids in the microchannels. A novel mixture of water and FMWNT carbon nanotubes is used as the working fluid. To do this, fluid flow and heat transfer through a microchannel is simulated by a computer code in FORTRAN language. The mixture of FMWNT carbon nanotubes suspended in water is considered as the nanofluid. Slip velocity is supposed as the hydrodynamic boundary condition while the microchannel's lower wall is insulated and the top wall is under the effect of a constant heat flux. Moreover, the flow field is subjected to a magnetic field with a constant strength. The results are presented as the velocity, temperature and Nusselt number profiles. It is observed that nanofluid composed of water and carbon nanotubes (FMWNT) can work well to increase the heat transfer rate along the microchannel walls. Furthermore, it is indicated that imposing the magnetic field is very effective at the thermally developing region. In contrast, the magnetic field effect at fully developed region is insignificant, especially at low values of Reynolds number.

  20. Numerical solutions for magnetohydrodynamic flow of nanofluid over a bidirectional non-linear stretching surface with prescribed surface heat flux boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahanthesh, B.; Gireesha, B. J.; Gorla, R. S. Reddy; Abbasi, F. M.; Shehzad, S. A.

    2016-11-01

    Numerical solutions of three-dimensional flow over a non-linear stretching surface are developed in this article. An electrically conducting flow of viscous nanoliquid is considered. Heat transfer phenomenon is accounted under thermal radiation, Joule heating and viscous dissipation effects. We considered the variable heat flux condition at the surface of sheet. The governing mathematical equations are reduced to nonlinear ordinary differential systems through suitable dimensionless variables. A well-known shooting technique is implemented to obtain the results of dimensionless velocities and temperature. The obtained results are plotted for multiple values of pertinent parameters to discuss the salient features of these parameters on fluid velocity and temperature. The expressions of skin-friction coefficient and Nusselt number are computed and analyzed comprehensively through numerical values. A comparison of present results with the previous results in absence of nanoparticle volume fraction, mixed convection and magnetic field is computed and an excellent agreement noticed. We also computed the results for both linear and non-linear stretching sheet cases.

  1. The Variation of Solar Fe 14 and Fe 10 Flux over 1.5 Solar Activity Cycles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Altrock, Richard C.

    1990-01-01

    A new source of data on the solar output, namely limb flux from the one- and two-million degree corona is presented. This parameter is derived from data obtained at the National Solar Observatory at Sacramento Peak with the 40 cm coronagraph of the John W. Evans Solar Facility and the Emission Line Coronal Photometer. The limb flux is defined to be the latitude-averaged intensity in millionths of the brightness of disk center from an annulus of width 1.1 minutes centered at a height of 0.15 solar constant above the limb of emission from lines at 6374A (Fe X) or 5303A (Fe XIV). Fe XIV data have been obtained since 1973 and Fe X since 1984. Examination of the Fe XIV data shows that there is ambiguity in the definition of the last two solar activity minima, which can affect the determination of cycle rise times and lengths. There is an indication that a constant minimum or basal corona may exist at solar minimum. Cycle 22 has had a much faster onset than Cycle 21 and has now overtaken Cycle 21. The rise characteristics of the two cycles were very similar up until Jul. to Aug. 1989, at which time a long-term maximum occurred in Fe X and Fe XIV, which could possibly be the solar maximum. Another maximum is developing at the current time. Cycle 21 was characterized in Fe XIV by at least 4 major thrusts or bursts of activity, each lasting on the order of a year and all having similar maximum limb fluxes which indicates that coronal energy output is sustained over periods in which the sunspot number declines significantly. Dramatic increases in the limb fluxes occur from minimum to maximum, ranging from factors of 14 to 21 in the two lines. Two different techniques to predict the epoch of solar maximum have been applied to the Fe XIV data, resulting in estimates of April 1989 (plus or minus 1 mo) and May 1990 (plus or minus 2 mos).

  2. Direct and indirect effects of ammonia, ammonium and nitrate on phosphatase activity and carbon fluxes from decomposing litter in peatland.

    PubMed

    Johnson, David; Moore, Lucy; Green, Samuel; Leith, Ian D; Sheppard, Lucy J

    2010-10-01

    Here we investigate the response of soils and litter to 5 years of experimental additions of ammonium (NH4), nitrate (NO3), and ammonia (NH3) to an ombrotrophic peatland. We test the importance of direct (via soil) and indirect (via litter) effects on phosphatase activity and efflux of CO2. We also determined how species representing different functional types responded to the nitrogen treatments. Our results demonstrate that additions of NO3, NH4 and NH3 all stimulated phosphatase activity but the effects were dependent on species of litter and mechanism (direct or indirect). Deposition of NH3 had no effect on efflux of CO2 from Calluna vulgaris litter, despite it showing signs of stress in the field, whereas both NO3 and NH4 reduced CO2 fluxes. Our results show that the collective impacts on peatlands of the three principal forms of nitrogen in atmospheric deposition are a result of differential effects and mechanisms on individual components.

  3. Active and passive Ca2+ fluxes across cell membranes of the guinea-pig taenia coli.

    PubMed

    Casteels, R; Van Breemen, C

    1975-09-09

    The exchange of Ca between the extracellular fluid and the cellular compartment has been investigated in smooth muscle cells of taenia coli. It was found that during the initial phase of metabolic depletion by DNP + IAA, the net inwards flux of Ca amounts to 0.02 pmol cm(-2)-sec(-1). This increase might be proportional to the physiological calcium leak. The study of the relation between the inwardly directed Na gradient and the cellular Ca content has revealed that this Na gradient exerts no effect during prolonged exposure to K-free solution and a very limited effect during exposure to Na-deficient solutions. The cellular 45Ca release induced by metabolic inhibition is not affected by substituting Li or choline for Na. The supplementary calcium which enters the cells during exposure to a solution at low temperature is extruded on returning to a solution at 35 degrees C, even if the Na gradient is reversed. This finding and the effects of metabolic inhibition indicate that Ca extrusion in smooth muscle cells is a process which depends on metabolism and which is not affected by the inwardly directed Na gradient.

  4. Manufacturing and thermomechanical testing of actively cooled all beryllium high heat flux test pieces

    SciTech Connect

    Vasiliev, N.N.; Sokolov, Yu.A.; Shatalov, G.E.

    1995-09-01

    One of the problems affiliated to ITER high heat flux elements development is a problem of interface of beryllium protection with heat sink routinely made of copper alloys. To get rid of this problem all beryllium elements could be used as heat receivers in places of enhanced thermal loads. In accordance with this objectives four beryllium test pieces of two types have been manufactured in {open_quotes}Institute of Beryllium{close_quotes} for succeeding thermomechanical testing. Two of them were manufactured in accordance with JET team design; they are round {open_quotes}hypervapotron type{close_quotes} test pieces. Another two ones are rectangular test sections with a twisted tape installed inside of the circular channel. Preliminary stress-strain analysis have been performed for both type of the test pieces. Hypervapotrons have been shipped to JET where they were tested on JET test bed. Thermomechanical testing of pieces of the type of {open_quotes}swirl tape inside of tube{close_quotes} have been performed on Kurchatov Institute test bed. Chosen beryllium grade properties, some details of manufacturing, results of preliminary stress-strain analysis and thermomechanical testing of the test pieces {open_quotes}swirl tape inside of tube{close_quotes} type are given in this report.

  5. Activity of metazoa governs biofilm structure formation and enhances permeate flux during Gravity-Driven Membrane (GDM) filtration.

    PubMed

    Derlon, Nicolas; Koch, Nicolas; Eugster, Bettina; Posch, Thomas; Pernthaler, Jakob; Pronk, Wouter; Morgenroth, Eberhard

    2013-04-15

    The impact of different feed waters in terms of eukaryotic populations and organic carbon content on the biofilm structure formation and permeate flux during Gravity-Driven Membrane (GDM) filtration was investigated in this study. GDM filtration was performed at ultra-low pressure (65 mbar) in dead-end mode without control of the biofilm formation. Different feed waters were tested (River water, pre-treated river water, lake water, and tap water) and varied with regard to their organic substrate content and their predator community. River water was manipulated either by chemically inhibiting all eukaryotes or by filtering out macrozoobenthos (metazoan organisms). The structure of the biofilm was characterized at the meso- and micro-scale using Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) and Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy (CLSM), respectively. Based on Total Organic Carbon (TOC) measurements, the river waters provided the highest potential for bacterial growth whereas tap water had the lowest. An increasing content in soluble and particulate organic substrate resulted in increasing biofilm accumulation on membrane surface. However, enhanced biofilm accumulation did not result in lower flux values and permeate flux was mainly influenced by the structure of the biofilm. Metazoan organisms (in particular nematodes and oligochaetes) built-up protective habitats, which resulted in the formation of open and spatially heterogeneous biofilms composed of biomass patches. In the absence of predation by metazoan organisms, a flat and compact biofilm developed. It is concluded that the activity of metazoan organisms in natural river water and its impact on biofilm structure balances the detrimental effect of a high biofilm accumulation, thus allowing for a broader application of GDM filtration. Finally, our results suggest that for surface waters with high particulate organic carbon (POC) content, the use of worms is suitable to enhance POC removal before ultrafiltration units.

  6. Observation-based modelling of permafrost carbon fluxes with accounting for deep carbon deposits and thermokarst activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider von Deimling, Thomas; Grosse, Guido; Strauss, Jens; Schirrmeister, Lutz; Morgenstern, Anne; Schaphoff, Sibyll; Meinshausen, Malte; Boike, Julia

    2015-04-01

    With rising global temperatures and consequent permafrost degradation a part of old carbon stored in high latitude soils will become available for microbial decay and eventual release to the atmosphere. To estimate the strength and timing of future carbon dioxide and methane fluxes from newly thawed permafrost carbon, we have developed a simplified, two-dimensional multi-pool model. As large amounts of soil organic matter are stored in depths below three meters, we have also simulated carbon release from deep deposits in Yedoma regions. For this purpose we have modelled abrupt thaw under thermokarst lakes which can unlock large amounts of soil carbon buried deep in the ground. The computational efficiency of our 2-D model allowed us to run large, multi-centennial ensembles of differing scenarios of future warming to express uncertainty inherent to simulations of the permafrost-carbon feedback. Our model simulations, which are constrained by multiple lines of recent observations, suggest cumulated CO2 fluxes from newly thawed permafrost until the year 2100 of 20-58 Pg-C under moderate warming (RCP2.6), and of 42-141Pg-C under strong warming (RCP8.5). Under intense thermokarst activity, our simulated methane fluxes proved substantial and caused up to 40 % of total permafrost-affected radiative forcing in the 21st century. By quantifying CH4 contributions from different pools and depth levels, we discuss the role of thermokarst dynamics in affecting future Arctic carbon release. The additional global warming through the release from newly thawed permafrost carbon proved only slightly dependent on the pathway of anthropogenic emission in our simulations and reached about 0.1°C by end of the century. The long-term, permafrost-affected global warming increased further in the 22nd and 23rd century, reaching a maximum of about 0.4°C in the year 2300.

  7. Mach number impact on heat flux and pressure distributions of a hypersonic flow over combined gap/step geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leite, Paulo H. M.; Santos, Wilson F. N.

    2014-12-01

    A computational analysis of a hypersonic flow over a combined gap/step configuration at zero degree angle of attack, in chemical equilibrium and thermal non-equilibrium is presented in this work. Effects on pressure and heating loads due to changes on the freestream Mach number and on the step frontal-face height have been investigated by employing the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method. The work focuses the attention of designers of hypersonic configurations on the fundamental parameter of surface discontinuity, which can have an important impact on even initial design. The analysis showed that heating and pressure loads increased with increasing not only the step height but also with the freestream Mach number. In addition, peak values for both loads took place at the vicinity of the step convex corner, a similar behavior observed for a forward-facing step configuration. It was also found that these loads for the gap/step configuration are slightly smaller than those for a forward-facing step.

  8. Fluid flow and heat convection studies for actively cooled airframes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, A. F.

    This report details progress made on the jet impingement - liquid crystal - digital imaging experiment. With the design phase complete, the experiment is currently in the construction phase. In order to reach this phase two design related issues were resolved. The first issue was to determine NASP leading edge active cooling design parameters. Meetings were arranged with personnel at SAIC International, Torrance, CA in order to obtain recent publications that characterized expected leading edge heat fluxes as well as other details of NASP operating conditions. The information in these publications was used to estimate minimum and maximum jet Reynolds numbers needed to accomplish the required leading edge cooling, and to determine the parameters of the experiment. The details of this analysis are shown in Appendix A. One of the concerns for the NASP design is that of thermal stress due to large surface temperature gradients. Using a series of circular jets to cool the leading edge will cause a non-uniform temperature distribution and potentially large thermal stresses. Therefore it was decided to explore the feasibility of using a slot jet to cool the leading edge. The literature contains many investigations into circular jet heat transfer but few investigations of slot jet heat transfer. The first experiments will be done on circular jets impinging on a fiat plate and results compared to previously published data to establish the accuracy of the method. Subsequent experiments will be slot jets impinging on full scale models of the NASP leading edge. Table 1 shows the range of parameters to be explored. Next a preliminary design of the experiment was done. Previous papers which used a similar experimental technique were studied and elements of those experiments adapted to the jet impingement study. Trade-off studies were conducted to determine which design was the least expensive, easy to construct, and easy to use. Once the final design was settled, vendors were

  9. Fluid flow and heat convection studies for actively cooled airframes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mills, A. F.

    1993-01-01

    This report details progress made on the jet impingement - liquid crystal - digital imaging experiment. With the design phase complete, the experiment is currently in the construction phase. In order to reach this phase two design related issues were resolved. The first issue was to determine NASP leading edge active cooling design parameters. Meetings were arranged with personnel at SAIC International, Torrance, CA in order to obtain recent publications that characterized expected leading edge heat fluxes as well as other details of NASP operating conditions. The information in these publications was used to estimate minimum and maximum jet Reynolds numbers needed to accomplish the required leading edge cooling, and to determine the parameters of the experiment. The details of this analysis are shown in Appendix A. One of the concerns for the NASP design is that of thermal stress due to large surface temperature gradients. Using a series of circular jets to cool the leading edge will cause a non-uniform temperature distribution and potentially large thermal stresses. Therefore it was decided to explore the feasibility of using a slot jet to cool the leading edge. The literature contains many investigations into circular jet heat transfer but few investigations of slot jet heat transfer. The first experiments will be done on ci