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Sample records for activated glutaminase pag

  1. STEREOLOGICAL ESTIMATES OF THE BASAL FOREBRAIN CELL POPULATION IN THE RAT, INCLUDING NEURONS CONTAINING CHOLINE ACETYLTRANSFERASE (ChAT), GLUTAMIC ACID DECARBOXYLASE (GAD) OR PHOSPHATE-ACTIVATED GLUTAMINASE (PAG) AND COLOCALIZING VESICULAR GLUTAMATE TRANSPORTERS (VGluTs)

    PubMed Central

    GRITTI, I.; HENNY, P.; GALLONI, F.; MAINVILLE, L.; MARIOTTI, M.; JONES, B. E.

    2006-01-01

    The basal forebrain (BF) plays an important role in modulating cortical activity and influencing attention, learning and memory. These activities are fulfilled importantly yet not entirely by cholinergic neurons. Noncholinergic neurons also contribute and are comprised by GABAergic neurons and other possibly glutamatergic neurons. The aim of the present study was to estimate the total number of cells in the BF of the rat and the proportions of that total represented by cholinergic, GABAergic and glutamatergic neurons. For this purpose, cells were counted using unbiased stereological methods within the medial septum, diagonal band, magnocellular preoptic nucleus, substantia innominata and globus pallidus in sections stained for Nissl substance and/or the neurotransmitter enzymes, choline acetyltransferase (ChAT), glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) or phosphate-activated glutaminase (PAG). In Nissl-stained sections, the total number of neurons in the BF was estimated as ~355,000 and the numbers of ChAT-immuno-positive (+) as ~22,000, GAD+ ~119,000 and PAG+ ~316,000, corresponding to ~5%, ~35% and ~90% of the total. Thus, of the large population of BF neurons, only a small proportion has the capacity to synthesize acetylcholine (ACh), one third to synthesize GABA and the vast majority to synthesize glutamate (Glu). Moreover, through the presence of PAG, a proportion of ACh- and GABA-synthesizing neurons also have the capacity to synthesize Glu. In sections dual fluorescent immunostained for vesicular transporters, VGluT3 and not VGluT2 was present in the cell bodies of most PAG+ and ChAT+ and half the GAD+ cells. Given previous results showing that VGluT2 and not VGluT3 was present in BF axon terminals and not colocalized with VAChT or VGAT, we conclude that the BF cell population influences cortical and subcortical regions through neurons which release ACh, GABA or Glu from their terminals but which in part can also synthesize and release Glu from their soma or

  2. Determination of Phosphate-activated Glutaminase Activity and Its Kinetics in Mouse Tissues using Metabolic Mapping (Quantitative Enzyme Histochemistry)

    PubMed Central

    Botman, Dennis; Tigchelaar, Wikky

    2014-01-01

    Phosphate-activated glutaminase (PAG) converts glutamine to glutamate as part of the glutaminolysis pathway in mitochondria. Two genes, GLS1 and GLS2, which encode for kidney-type PAG and liver-type PAG, respectively, differ in their tissue-specific activities and kinetics. Tissue-specific PAG activity and its kinetics were determined by metabolic mapping using a tetrazolium salt and glutamate dehydrogenase as an auxiliary enzyme in the presence of various glutamine concentrations. In kidney and brain, PAG showed Michaelis-Menten kinetics with a Km of 0.6 mM glutamine and a Vmax of 1.1 µmol/mL/min when using 5 mM glutamine. PAG activity was high in the kidney cortex and inner medulla but low in the outer medulla, papillary tip, glomeruli and the lis of Henle. In brain tissue sections, PAG was active in the grey matter and inactive in myelin-rich regions. Liver PAG showed allosteric regulation with a Km of 11.6 mM glutamine and a Vmax of 0.5 µmol/mL/min when using 20 mM glutamine. The specificity of the method was shown after incubation of brain tissue sections with the PAG inhibitor 6-diazo-5-oxo-L-norleucine. PAG activity was decreased to 22% in the presence of 2 mM 6-diazo-5-oxo-L-norleucine. At low glutamine concentrations, PAG activity was higher in periportal regions, indicating a lower Km for periportal PAG. When compared with liver, kidney and brain, other tissues showed 3-fold to 6-fold less PAG activity. In conclusion, PAG is mainly active in mouse kidney, brain and liver, and shows different kinetics depending on which type of PAG is expressed. PMID:25163927

  3. Summary of PhysPAG Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritz, Steven M.

    2012-01-01

    The Physics of the Cosmos (PCOS) Program Analysis Group (PhysPAG) provides an important interface between the scientific community and NASA in matters related to PCOS objectives. An Executive Committee facilitates the work of several subgroups, including a Technology Science Analysis Group and an Inflation Probe Science Analysis Group. Work is also starting in areas of X-ray, gamma-ray, and gravitational wave astrophysics. The PAG reports to the Astrophysics Subcommittee of the NASA Advisory Council. A summary of PhysPAG activities will be given, along with time for questions and discussion.

  4. Summary of PhysPAG Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nousek, John A.

    2014-01-01

    The Physics of the Cosmos Program Analysis Group (PhysPAG) is responsible for solicitiing and coordinating community input for the development and execution of NASA's Physics of the Cosmos (PCOS) program. In this session I will report on the activity of the PhysPAG, and solicit community involvement in the process of defining PCOS objectives, planning SMD architecture, and prioritizing PCOS activities. I will also report on the activities of the PhysPAG Executive Committee, which include the chairs of the Science Analysis Groups/ Science Interest Groups which fall under the PhysPAG sphere of interest. Time at the end of the presentation willl be reserved for questions and discussion from the community.

  5. Summary of PhysPAG Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritz, Steven M.

    2013-01-01

    The Physics of the Cosmos (PCOS) Program Analysis Group (PhysPAG) provides an important interface between the scientific community and NASA in matters related to PCOS objectives, and also provides opportunities for community discussions. An Executive Committee facilitates the work of several subgroups, including an Inflation Probe Science Analysis Group (IPSAG), an X-ray group (XRSAG) , a gamma-ray,group (GRSAG), a gravitational wave group (GWSAG), and a cosmic-ray group (CRSAG). In addition to identifying opportunities and issues, these groups also help articulate technology needs. Membership in all the SAGs is completely open, with information and newsletter signups available on the PhysPAG pages at the PCOS program website. The PhysPAG reports to the Astrophysics Subcommittee of the NASA Advisory Council. A summary of PhysPAG activities will be given, along with time for questions and discussion.

  6. Phosphate-activated glutaminase activity is enhanced in brain, intestine and kidneys of rats following portacaval anastomosis

    PubMed Central

    Romero-Gómez, Manuel; Jover, María; Díaz-Gómez, Daniel; de Terán, Laura Collantes; Rodrigo, Regina; Camacho, Inés; Echevarría, Miriam; Felipo, Vicente; Bautista, Juan D

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To assess whether portacaval anastomosis (PCA) in rats affects the protein expression and/or activity of glutaminase in kidneys, intestines and in three brain areas of cortex, basal ganglia and cerebellum and to explain the neurological alterations found in hepatic encephalopathy (HE). METHODS: Sixteen male Wistar rats weighing 250-350 g were grouped into sham-operation control (n = 8) or portacaval shunt (n = 8). Twenty-eight days after the procedure, the animals were sacrificed. The duodenum, kidney and brain were removed, homogenised and mitochondria were isolated. Ammonia was measured in brain and blood. Phosphate-activated glutaminase (PAG) activity was determined by measuring ammonia production following incubation for one hour at 37 °C with O-phthalaldehyde (OPA) and specific activity expressed in units per gram of protein (µkat/g of protein). Protein expression was measured by immunoblotting. RESULTS: Duodenal and kidney PAG activities together with protein content were significantly higher in PCA group than in control or sham-operated rats (duodenum PAG activity was 976.95±268.87 µkat/g of protein in PCA rats vs 429.19±126.92 µkat/g of protein in sham-operated rats; kidneys PAG activity was 1259.18 ± 228.79 µkat/g protein in PCA rats vs 669.67± 400.8 µkat/g of protein in controls, P < 0.05; duodenal protein content: 173% in PCA vs sham-operated rats; in kidneys the content of protein was 152% in PCA vs sham-operated rats). PAG activity and protein expression in PCA rats were higher in cortex and basal ganglia than those in sham-operated rats (cortex: 6646.6 ± 1870.4 µkat/g of protein vs 3573.8 ± 2037.4 µkat/g of protein in control rats, P < 0.01; basal ganglia, PAG activity was 3657.3 ± 1469.6 μkat/g of protein in PCA rats vs 2271.2 ± 384 μkat/g of protein in sham operated rats, P < 0.05; In the cerebellum, the PAG activity was 2471.6 ± 701.4 μkat/g of protein vs 1452.9 ± 567.8

  7. In vivo activity of glutaminase in the brain of hyperammonaemic rats measured by 15N nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed Central

    Kanamori, K; Ross, B D

    1995-01-01

    The in vivo activity of phosphate-activated glutaminase (PAG) was measured in the brain of hyperammonaemic rat by 15N n.m.r. Brain glutamine was 15N-enriched by intravenous infusion of 15NH4+ until the concentration of [5-15N]glutamine reached 6.1 mumol/g. Further glutamine synthesis was inhibited by intraperitoneal injection of methionine-DL-sulphoximine, an inhibitor of glutamine synthetase, and the infusate was changed to 14NH4+ during observation of decrease in brain [5-15N]glutamine due to PAG and other glutamine utilization pathways. Progressive decrease in brain [5-15N]glutamine, PAG-catalysed production of 15NH4+ and its subsequent assimilation into glutamate by glutamate dehydrogenase were monitored in vivo by 15N n.m.r. Brain [5-15N]glutamine (15N enrichment of 0.35-0.50) decreased at a rate of 1.2 mumol/h per g of brain. The in vivo PAG activity, determined from the observed rate and the quantity of 15NH4+ produced and subsequently assimilated into glutamate and aspartate, was 0.9-1.3 mumol/h per g. This activity is less than 1.1% of the reported activity in vitro measured in rat brain homogenate at a 10 mM concentration of the activator Pi. Inhibition by ammonia (brain level 1.4 mumol/g) alone does not account for the observed low activity in vivo. The result strongly suggests that, in intact brain, PAG activity is maintained at a low level by a suboptimal in situ concentration of Pi and the strong inhibitory effect of glutamate. The observed PAG activity in vivo is lower than the reported in vivo activity of glutamate decarboxylase which converts glutamate into gamma-aminobutyrate (GABA). The result suggests that PAG-catalysed hydrolysis of glutamine is not the sole provider of glutamate used for GABA synthesis. PMID:7826349

  8. Glutaminase Activity Determines Cytotoxicity of L-Asparaginases on Most Leukemia Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Parmentier, Jean Hugues; Maggi, Maristella; Tarasco, Erika; Scotti, Claudia; Avramis, Vassilios I; Mittelman, Steven D.

    2015-01-01

    L-Asparaginase (ASNase) is a front-line chemotherapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), which acts by deaminating asparagine and glutamine. To evaluate the importance of glutaminase activity, we exploited a recently developed mutant of Helicobacter pylori ASNase (dm HpA), with amino acid substitutions M121C/T169M. The mutant form has the same asparaginase activity as wild-type but lacks glutaminase activity. Wild-type and dm HpA were compared with the clinically used ASNases from E. coli (L-ASP) and Erwinia chrysanthemi (ERWase). Asparaginase activity was similar for all isoforms, while glutaminase activity followed the rank order: ERWase > L-ASP > wild-type HpA > dm HpA. Cytotoxic efficacy of ASNases was tested on 11 human leukemia cell lines and two patient-derived ALL samples. Two cell lines which we had previously shown to be asparagine-dependent were equally sensitive to the asparaginase isoforms. The other nine lines and the two patient-derived samples were more sensitive to isoforms with higher glutaminase activities. ERWase was overall the most effective ASNase on all cell lines tested whereas dm HpA, having the lowest glutaminase activity, was the least effective. These data demonstrate that asparaginase activity alone may not be sufficient for ASNase cytotoxicity, and that glutaminase activity may be required for full anti-leukemic efficacy. PMID:25941002

  9. REPEATED ANABOLIC/ANDROGENIC STEROID EXPOSURE DURING ADOLESCENCE ALTERS PHOSPHATE-ACTIVATED GLUTAMINASE AND GLUTAMATE RECEPTOR 1 SUBUNIT IMMUNOREACTIVITY IN HAMSTER BRAIN: CORRELATION WITH OFFENSIVE AGGRESSION

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Shannon G.; Ricci, Lesley A.; Melloni, Richard H.

    2007-01-01

    Male Syrian hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus) treated with moderately high doses (5.0mg/kg/day) of anabolic/androgenic steroids (AAS) during adolescence (P27–P56) display highly escalated offensive aggression. The current study examined whether adolescent AAS-exposure influenced the immunohistochemical localization of phosphate-activated glutaminase (PAG), the rate-limiting enzyme in the synthesis of glutamate, a fast-acting neurotransmitter implicated in the modulation of aggression in various species and models of aggression, as well as glutamate receptor 1 subunit (GluR1). Hamsters were administered AAS during adolescence, scored for offensive aggression using the resident-intruder paradigm, and then examined for changes in PAG and GluR1 immunoreactivity in areas of the brain implicated in aggression control. When compared with sesame oil-treated control animals, aggressive AAS-treated hamsters displayed a significant increase in the number of PAG- and area density of GluR1- containing neurons in several notable aggression regions, although the differential pattern of expression did not appear to overlap across brain regions. Together, these results suggest that altered glutamate synthesis and GluR1 receptor expression in specific aggression areas may be involved in adolescent AAS-induced offensive aggression. PMID:17418431

  10. The glutaminase activity of l-asparaginase is not required for anticancer activity against ASNS-negative cells

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Wai Kin; Lorenzi, Philip L.; Anishkin, Andriy; Purwaha, Preeti; Rogers, David M.; Sukharev, Sergei; Rempe, Susan B.; Weinstein, John N.

    2014-01-01

    l-Asparaginase (l-ASP) is a key component of therapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Its mechanism of action, however, is still poorly understood, in part because of its dual asparaginase and glutaminase activities. Here, we show that l-ASP’s glutaminase activity is not always required for the enzyme’s anticancer effect. We first used molecular dynamics simulations of the clinically standard Escherichia coli l-ASP to predict what mutated forms could be engineered to retain activity against asparagine but not glutamine. Dynamic mapping of enzyme substrate contacts identified Q59 as a promising mutagenesis target for that purpose. Saturation mutagenesis followed by enzymatic screening identified Q59L as a variant that retains asparaginase activity but shows undetectable glutaminase activity. Unlike wild-type l-ASP, Q59L is inactive against cancer cells that express measurable asparagine synthetase (ASNS). Q59L is potently active, however, against ASNS-negative cells. Those observations indicate that the glutaminase activity of l-ASP is necessary for anticancer activity against ASNS-positive cell types but not ASNS-negative cell types. Because the clinical toxicity of l-ASP is thought to stem from its glutaminase activity, these findings suggest the hypothesis that glutaminase-negative variants of l-ASP would provide larger therapeutic indices than wild-type l-ASP for ASNS-negative cancers. PMID:24659632

  11. Design and Characterization of Erwinia Chrysanthemi l-Asparaginase Variants with Diminished l-Glutaminase Activity.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Hien Anh; Su, Ying; Lavie, Arnon

    2016-08-19

    Current FDA-approved l-asparaginases also possess significant l-glutaminase activity, which correlates with many of the toxic side effects of these drugs. Therefore, l-asparaginases with reduced l-glutaminase activity are predicted to be safer. We exploited our recently described structures of the Erwinia chrysanthemi l-asparaginase (ErA) to inform the design of mutants with diminished ability to hydrolyze l-glutamine. Structural analysis of these variants provides insight into the molecular basis for the increased l-asparagine specificity. A primary role is attributed to the E63Q mutation that acts to hinder the correct positioning of l-glutamine but not l-asparagine. The substitution of Ser-254 with either an asparagine or a glutamine increases the l-asparagine specificity but only when combined with the E63Q mutation. The A31I mutation reduces the substrate Km value; this is a key property to allow the required therapeutic l-asparagine depletion. Significantly, an ultra-low l-glutaminase ErA variant maintained its cell killing ability. By diminishing the l-glutaminase activity of these highly active l-asparaginases, our engineered ErA variants hold promise as l-asparaginases with fewer side effects. PMID:27354283

  12. Structural Basis for the Active Site Inhibition Mechanism of Human Kidney-Type Glutaminase (KGA)

    PubMed Central

    Thangavelu, K.; Chong, Qing Yun; Low, Boon Chuan; Sivaraman, J.

    2014-01-01

    Glutaminase is a metabolic enzyme responsible for glutaminolysis, a process harnessed by cancer cells to feed their accelerated growth and proliferation. Among the glutaminase isoforms, human kidney-type glutaminase (KGA) is often upregulated in cancer and is thus touted as an attractive drug target. Here we report the active site inhibition mechanism of KGA through the crystal structure of the catalytic domain of KGA (cKGA) in complex with 6-diazo-5-oxo-L-norleucine (DON), a substrate analogue of glutamine. DON covalently binds with the active site Ser286 and interacts with residues such as Tyr249, Asn335, Glu381, Asn388, Tyr414, Tyr466 and Val484. The nucleophilic attack of Ser286 sidechain on DON releases the diazo group (N2) from the inhibitor and results in the formation of an enzyme-inhibitor complex. Mutational studies confirmed the key role of these residues in the activity of KGA. This study will be important in the development of KGA active site inhibitors for therapeutic interventions. PMID:24451979

  13. Inhibition of mitochondrial glutaminase activity reverses acquired erlotinib resistance in non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Caifeng; Jin, Jiangbo; Bao, Xujie; Zhan, Wei-Hua; Han, Tian-Yu; Gan, Mingxi; Zhang, Chengfu; Wang, Jianbin

    2016-01-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) erlotinib has been approved based on the clinical benefit in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients over the past decade. Unfortunately, cancer cells become resistant to this agent via various mechanisms, and this limits the improvement in patient outcomes. Thus, it is urgent to develop novel agents to overcome erlotinib resistance. Here, we propose a novel strategy to overcome acquired erlotinib resistance in NSCLC by inhibiting glutaminase activity. Compound 968, an inhibitor of the glutaminase C (GAC), when combined with erlotinib potently inhibited the cell proliferation of erlotinib-resistant NSCLC cells HCC827ER and NCI-H1975. The combination of compound 968 and erlotinib not only decreased GAC and EGFR protein expression but also inhibited GAC activity in HCC827ER cells. The growth of erlotinib-resistant cells was glutamine-dependent as proved by GAC gene knocked down and rescue experiment. More importantly, compound 968 combined with erlotinib down-regulated the glutamine and glycolysis metabolism in erlotinib-resistant cells. Taken together, our study provides a valuable approach to overcome acquired erlotinib resistance by blocking glutamine metabolism and suggests that combination of EGFR-TKI and GAC inhibitor maybe a potential treatment strategy for acquired erlotinib-resistant NSCLC. PMID:26575584

  14. Active Glutaminase C Self-assembles into a Supratetrameric Oligomer That Can Be Disrupted by an Allosteric Inhibitor*

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Amanda Petrina Scotá; Cassago, Alexandre; Gonçalves, Kaliandra de Almeida; Dias, Marília Meira; Adamoski, Douglas; Ascenção, Carolline Fernanda Rodrigues; Honorato, Rodrigo Vargas; de Oliveira, Juliana Ferreira; Ferreira, Igor Monteze; Fornezari, Camila; Bettini, Jefferson; Oliveira, Paulo Sérgio Lopes; Paes Leme, Adriana Franco; Portugal, Rodrigo Villares; Ambrosio, Andre Luis Berteli; Dias, Sandra Martha Gomes

    2013-01-01

    The phosphate-dependent transition between enzymatically inert dimers into catalytically capable tetramers has long been the accepted mechanism for the glutaminase activation. Here, we demonstrate that activated glutaminase C (GAC) self-assembles into a helical, fiber-like double-stranded oligomer and propose a molecular model consisting of seven tetramer copies per turn per strand interacting via the N-terminal domains. The loop 321LRFNKL326 is projected as the major regulating element for self-assembly and enzyme activation. Furthermore, the previously identified in vivo lysine acetylation (Lys311 in humans, Lys316 in mouse) is here proposed as an important down-regulator of superoligomer assembly and protein activation. Bis-2-(5-phenylacetamido-1,3,4-thiadiazol-2-yl)ethyl sulfide, a known glutaminase inhibitor, completely disrupted the higher order oligomer, explaining its allosteric mechanism of inhibition via tetramer stabilization. A direct correlation between the tendency to self-assemble and the activity levels of the three mammalian glutaminase isozymes was established, with GAC being the most active enzyme while forming the longest structures. Lastly, the ectopic expression of a fiber-prone superactive GAC mutant in MDA-MB 231 cancer cells provided considerable proliferative advantages to transformed cells. These findings yield unique implications for the development of GAC-oriented therapeutics targeting tumor metabolism. PMID:23935106

  15. ErbB2 Activation Upregulates Glutaminase 1 Expression Which Promotes Breast Cancer Cell Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Qie, Shuo; Chu, Clarissa; Li, Weihua; Wang, Chenguang; Sang, Nianli

    2015-01-01

    Active glutamine utilization is critical for tumor cell proliferation. Glutaminolysis represents the first and rate-limiting step of glutamine utilization and is catalyzed by glutaminase (GLS). Activation of ErbB2 is one of the major causes of breast cancers, the second most common cause of death for women in many countries. However, it remains unclear whether ErbB2 signaling affects glutaminase expression in breast cancer cells. In this study, we show that MCF10A-NeuT cell line has higher GLS1 expression at both mRNA and protein levels than its parental line MCF10A, and knockdown of ErbB2 decreases GLS1 expression in MCF10A-NeuT cells. We further show that in these cells, ErbB2-mediated upregulation of GLS1 is not correlated to c-Myc expression. Moreover, activation of neither PI3K-Akt nor MAPK pathway is sufficient to upregulate GLS1 expression. Interestingly, inhibition of NF-κB blocks ErbB2-stimulated GLS1 expression, whereas stimulation of NF-κB is sufficient to enhance GLS1 levels in MCF10A cells, suggesting a PI3K-Akt-independent activation of NF-κB upregulates GLS1 in ErbB2-positive breast cancer cells. Finally, knockdown or inhibition of GLS1 significantly decreased the proliferation of breast cancer cells with high GLS1 levels. Taken together, our data indicate that ErbB2 activation promotes GLS1 expression via a PI3K-Akt-independent NF-κB pathway in breast cancer cells, identifying another oncogenic signaling pathway which stimulates GLS1 expression, and thus promoting glutamine utilization in cancer cells. These findings, if validated by in vivo model, may facilitate the identification of novel biochemical targets for cancer prevention and therapy. PMID:24122876

  16. Myc promotes glutaminolysis in human neuroblastoma through direct activation of glutaminase 2

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Daibiao; Ren, Ping; Su, Hexiu; Yue, Ming; Xiu, Ruijuan; Hu, Yufeng; Liu, Hudan; Qing, Guoliang

    2015-01-01

    Deamidation of glutamine to glutamate by glutaminase 1 (GLS1, also called GLS) and GLS2 is an essential step in both glutaminolysis and glutathione (GSH) biosynthesis. However, mechanisms whereby cancer cells regulate glutamine catabolism remains largely unknown. We report here that N-Myc, an essential Myc family member, promotes conversion of glutamine to glutamate in MYCN-amplified neuroblastoma cells by directly activating GLS2, but not GLS1, transcription. Abrogation of GLS2 function profoundly inhibited glutaminolysis, which resulted in feedback inhibition of aerobic glycolysis likely due to thioredoxin-interacting protein (TXNIP) activation, dramatically decreasing cell proliferation and survival in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, elevated GLS2 expression is significantly elevated in MYCN-amplified neuroblastomas in comparison with non-amplified ones, correlating with unfavorable patient survival. In aggregate, these results reveal a novel mechanism deciphering context-dependent regulation of metabolic heterogeneities, uncovering a previously unsuspected link between Myc, GLS2 and tumor metabolism. PMID:26528759

  17. Glutamatergic or GABAergic neuron-specific, long-term expression in neocortical neurons from helper virus-free HSV-1 vectors containing the phosphate-activated glutaminase, vesicular glutamate transporter-1, or glutamic acid decarboxylase promoter

    PubMed Central

    Rasmussen, Morten; Kong, Lingxin; Zhang, Guo-rong; Liu, Meng; Wang, Xiaodan; Szabo, Gabor; Curthoys, Norman P.; Geller, Alfred I.

    2009-01-01

    Many potential uses of direct gene transfer into neurons require restricting expression to one of the two major types of forebrain neurons, glutamatergic or GABAergic neurons. Thus, it is desirable to develop virus vectors that contain either a glutamatergic or GABAergic neuron-specific promoter. The brain/kidney phosphate-activated glutaminase (PAG), the product of the GLS1 gene, produces the majority of the glutamate for release as neurotransmitter, and is a marker for glutamatergic neurons. A PAG promoter was partially characterized using a cultured kidney cell line. The three vesicular glutamate transporters (VGLUTs) are expressed in distinct populations of neurons, and VGLUT1 is the predominant VGLUT in the neocortex, hippocampus, and cerebellar cortex. Glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) produces GABA; the two molecular forms of the enzyme, GAD65 and GAD67, are expressed in distinct, but largely overlapping, groups of neurons, and GAD67 is the predominant form in the neocortex. In transgenic mice, an ∼9 kb fragment of the GAD67 promoter supports expression in most classes of GABAergic neurons. Here, we constructed plasmid (amplicon) Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV-1) vectors that placed the Lac Z gene under the regulation of putative PAG, VGLUT1, or GAD67 promoters. Helper virus-free vector stocks were delivered into postrhinal cortex, and the rats were sacrificed 4 days or 2 months later. The PAG or VGLUT1 promoters supported ∼90 % glutamatergic neuron-specific expression. The GAD67 promoter supported ∼90 % GABAergic neuron-specific expression. Long-term expression was observed using each promoter. Principles for obtaining long-term expression from HSV-1 vectors, based on these and other results, are discussed. Long-term glutamatergic or GABAergic neuron-specific expression may benefit specific experiments on learning or specific gene therapy approaches. Of note, promoter analyses might identify regulatory elements that determine a glutamatergic or GABAergic

  18. T Helper Cell Activation and Expansion Is Sensitive to Glutaminase Inhibition under Both Hypoxic and Normoxic Conditions.

    PubMed

    Sener, Zeynep; Cederkvist, Fritjof H; Volchenkov, Roman; Holen, Halvor L; Skålhegg, Bjørn S

    2016-01-01

    Immune responses often take place where nutrients and O2 availability are limited. This has an impact on T cell metabolism and influences activation and effector functions. T cell proliferation and expansion are associated with increased consumption of glutamine which is needed in a number of metabolic pathways and regulate various physiological processes. The first step in endogenous glutamine metabolism is reversible and is regulated by glutaminase (GLS1 and GLS2) and glutamine synthase (GLUL). There are two isoforms of GLS1, Kidney type glutaminase (KGA) and Glutaminase C (GAC). The aim of this study is to investigate the expression, localization and role of GLS1 and GLUL in naïve and activated human CD4+ T cells stimulated through the CD3 and CD28 receptors under normoxia and hypoxia. In proliferating cells, GAC was upregulated and KGA was downregulated, and both enzymes were located to the mitochondria irrespective of O2 levels. By contrast GLUL is localized to the cytoplasm and was upregulated under hypoxia. Proliferation was dependent on glutamine consumption, as glutamine deprivation and GLS1 inhibition decreased proliferation and expression of CD25 and CD226, regardless of O2 availability. Again irrespective of O2, GLS1 inhibition decreased the proportion of CCR6 and CXCR3 expressing CD4+ T cells as well as cytokine production. We propose that systemic Th cell activation and expansion might be dependent on glutamine but not O2 availability. PMID:27467144

  19. T Helper Cell Activation and Expansion Is Sensitive to Glutaminase Inhibition under Both Hypoxic and Normoxic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Sener, Zeynep; Cederkvist, Fritjof H.; Volchenkov, Roman; Holen, Halvor L.; Skålhegg, Bjørn S.

    2016-01-01

    Immune responses often take place where nutrients and O2 availability are limited. This has an impact on T cell metabolism and influences activation and effector functions. T cell proliferation and expansion are associated with increased consumption of glutamine which is needed in a number of metabolic pathways and regulate various physiological processes. The first step in endogenous glutamine metabolism is reversible and is regulated by glutaminase (GLS1 and GLS2) and glutamine synthase (GLUL). There are two isoforms of GLS1, Kidney type glutaminase (KGA) and Glutaminase C (GAC). The aim of this study is to investigate the expression, localization and role of GLS1 and GLUL in naïve and activated human CD4+ T cells stimulated through the CD3 and CD28 receptors under normoxia and hypoxia. In proliferating cells, GAC was upregulated and KGA was downregulated, and both enzymes were located to the mitochondria irrespective of O2 levels. By contrast GLUL is localized to the cytoplasm and was upregulated under hypoxia. Proliferation was dependent on glutamine consumption, as glutamine deprivation and GLS1 inhibition decreased proliferation and expression of CD25 and CD226, regardless of O2 availability. Again irrespective of O2, GLS1 inhibition decreased the proportion of CCR6 and CXCR3 expressing CD4+ T cells as well as cytokine production. We propose that systemic Th cell activation and expansion might be dependent on glutamine but not O2 availability. PMID:27467144

  20. Changes in the activity levels of glutamine synthetase, glutaminase and glycogen synthetase in rats subjected to hypoxic stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vats, P.; Mukherjee, A. K.; Kumria, M. M. L.; Singh, S. N.; Patil, S. K. B.; Rangnathan, S.; Sridharan, K.

    Exposure to high altitude causes loss of body mass and alterations in metabolic processes, especially carbohydrate and protein metabolism. The present study was conducted to elucidate the role of glutamine synthetase, glutaminase and glycogen synthetase under conditions of chronic intermittent hypoxia. Four groups, each consisting of 12 male albino rats (Wistar strain), were exposed to a simulated altitude of 7620 m in a hypobaric chamber for 6 h per day for 1, 7, 14 and 21 days, respectively. Blood haemoglobin, blood glucose, protein levels in the liver, muscle and plasma, glycogen content, and glutaminase, glutamine synthetase and glycogen synthetase activities in liver and muscle were determined in all groups of exposed and in a group of unexposed animals. Food intake and changes in body mass were also monitored. There was a significant reduction in body mass (28-30%) in hypoxia-exposed groups as compared to controls, with a corresponding decrease in food intake. There was rise in blood haemoglobin and plasma protein in response to acclimatisation. Over a three-fold increase in liver glycogen content was observed following 1 day of hypoxic exposure (4.76+/-0.78 mg.g-1 wet tissue in normal unexposed rats; 15.82+/-2.30 mg.g-1 wet tissue in rats exposed to hypoxia for 1 day). This returned to normal in later stages of exposure. However, there was no change in glycogen synthetase activity except for a decrease in the 21-days hypoxia-exposed group. There was a slight increase in muscle glycogen content in the 1-day exposed group which declined significantly by 56.5, 50.6 and 42% following 7, 14, and 21 days of exposure, respectively. Muscle glycogen synthetase activity was also decreased following 21 days of exposure. There was an increase in glutaminase activity in the liver and muscle in the 7-, 14- and 21-day exposed groups. Glutamine synthetase activity was higher in the liver in 7- and 14-day exposed groups; this returned to normal following 21 days of exposure

  1. Small molecule glutaminase inhibitors block glutamate release from stimulated microglia.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Ajit G; O'Driscoll, Cliona M; Bressler, Joseph; Kaufmann, Walter; Rojas, Camilo J; Slusher, Barbara S

    2014-01-01

    Glutaminase plays a critical role in the generation of glutamate, a key excitatory neurotransmitter in the CNS. Excess glutamate release from activated macrophages and microglia correlates with upregulated glutaminase suggesting a pathogenic role for glutaminase. Both glutaminase siRNA and small molecule inhibitors have been shown to decrease excess glutamate and provide neuroprotection in multiple models of disease, including HIV-associated dementia (HAD), multiple sclerosis and ischemia. Consequently, inhibition of glutaminase could be of interest for treatment of these diseases. Bis-2-(5-phenylacetimido-1,2,4-thiadiazol-2-yl)ethyl sulfide (BPTES) and 6-diazo-5-oxo-l-norleucine (DON), two most commonly used glutaminase inhibitors, are either poorly soluble or non-specific. Recently, several new BPTES analogs with improved physicochemical properties were reported. To evaluate these new inhibitors, we established a cell-based microglial activation assay measuring glutamate release. Microglia-mediated glutamate levels were significantly augmented by tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) and Toll-like receptor (TLR) ligands coincident with increased glutaminase activity. While several potent glutaminase inhibitors abrogated the increase in glutamate, a structurally related analog devoid of glutaminase activity was unable to block the increase. In the absence of glutamine, glutamate levels were significantly attenuated. These data suggest that the in vitro microglia assay may be a useful tool in developing glutaminase inhibitors of therapeutic interest. PMID:24269238

  2. Kinetic characterization of ebselen, chelerythrine and apomorphine as glutaminase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Ajit G; Rojas, Camilo; Tanega, Cordelle; Shen, Min; Simeonov, Anton; Boxer, Matthew B; Auld, Douglas S; Ferraris, Dana V; Tsukamoto, Takashi; Slusher, Barbara S

    2013-08-23

    Glutaminase catalyzes the hydrolysis of glutamine to glutamate and plays a central role in the proliferation of neoplastic cells via glutaminolysis, as well as in the generation of excitotoxic glutamate in central nervous system disorders such as HIV-associated dementia (HAD) and multiple sclerosis. Both glutaminase siRNA and glutaminase inhibition have been shown to be effective in in vitro models of cancer and HAD, suggesting a potential role for small molecule glutaminase inhibitors. However, there are no potent, selective inhibitors of glutaminase currently available. The two prototypical glutaminase inhibitors, BPTES and DON, are either insoluble or non-specific. In a search for more drug-like glutaminase inhibitors, we conducted a screen of 1280 in vivo active drugs (Library of Pharmacologically Active Compounds (LOPAC(1280))) and identified ebselen, chelerythrine and (R)-apomorphine. The newly identified inhibitors exhibited 10 to 1500-fold greater affinities than DON and BPTES and over 100-fold increased efficiency of inhibition. Although non-selective, it is noteworthy that the affinity of ebselen for glutaminase is more potent than any other activity yet described. It is possible that the previously reported biological activity seen with these compounds is due, in part, to glutaminase inhibition. Ebselen, chelerythrine and apomorphine complement the armamentarium of compounds to explore the role of glutaminase in disease. PMID:23850693

  3. Kinetic characterization of ebselen, chelerythrine and apomorphine as glutaminase inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Ajit G.; Rojas, Camilo; Tanega, Cordelle; Shen, Min; Simeonov, Anton; Boxer, Matthew B.; Auld, Douglas S.; Ferraris, Dana V.; Tsukamoto, Takashi; Slusher, Barbara S.

    2013-08-23

    Highlights: •Ebselen, chelerythrine and apomorphine were identified as glutaminase inhibitors. •These had greater affinities and efficiency of inhibition than known prototypes. •Their previously reported biological activity could be due to glutaminase inhibition. -- Abstract: Glutaminase catalyzes the hydrolysis of glutamine to glutamate and plays a central role in the proliferation of neoplastic cells via glutaminolysis, as well as in the generation of excitotoxic glutamate in central nervous system disorders such as HIV-associated dementia (HAD) and multiple sclerosis. Both glutaminase siRNA and glutaminase inhibition have been shown to be effective in in vitro models of cancer and HAD, suggesting a potential role for small molecule glutaminase inhibitors. However, there are no potent, selective inhibitors of glutaminase currently available. The two prototypical glutaminase inhibitors, BPTES and DON, are either insoluble or non-specific. In a search for more drug-like glutaminase inhibitors, we conducted a screen of 1280 in vivo active drugs (Library of Pharmacologically Active Compounds (LOPAC{sup 1280})) and identified ebselen, chelerythrine and (R)-apomorphine. The newly identified inhibitors exhibited 10 to 1500-fold greater affinities than DON and BPTES and over 100-fold increased efficiency of inhibition. Although non-selective, it is noteworthy that the affinity of ebselen for glutaminase is more potent than any other activity yet described. It is possible that the previously reported biological activity seen with these compounds is due, in part, to glutaminase inhibition. Ebselen, chelerythrine and apomorphine complement the armamentarium of compounds to explore the role of glutaminase in disease.

  4. Prolonged ingestion of prehydrolyzed whey protein induces little or no change in digestive enzymes, but decreases glutaminase activity in exercising rats.

    PubMed

    Nery-Diez, Ana Cláudia C; Carvalho, Iara R; Amaya-Farfán, Jaime; Abecia-Soria, Maria Inés; Miyasaka, Célio K; Ferreira, Clécio da S

    2010-08-01

    Because consumption of whey protein hydrolysates is on the increase, the possibility that prolonged ingestion of whey protein hydrolysates affect the digestive system of mammals has prompted us to evaluate the enzymatic activities of pepsin, leucine-aminopeptidase, chymotrypsin, trypsin, and glutaminase in male Wistar rats fed diets containing either a commercial whey isolate or a whey protein hydrolysate with medium degree of hydrolysis and to compare the results with those produced by physical training (sedentary, sedentary-exhausted, trained, and trained-exhausted) in the treadmill for 4 weeks. The enzymatic activities were determined by classical procedures in all groups. No effect due to the form of the whey protein in the diet was seen in the activities of pepsin, trypsin, chymotrypsin, and leucine-aminopeptidase. Training tended to increase the activity of glutaminase, but exhaustion promoted a decrease in the trained animals, and consumption of the hydrolysate decreased it even further. The results are consistent with the conclusion that chronic consumption of a whey protein hydrolysate brings little or no modification of the proteolytic digestive system and that the lowering of glutaminase activity may be associated with an antistress effect, counteracting the effect induced by training in the rat. PMID:20482282

  5. Engineering the substrate specificity of Escherichia coli asparaginase. II. Selective reduction of glutaminase activity by amino acid replacements at position 248.

    PubMed Central

    Derst, C.; Henseling, J.; Röhm, K. H.

    2000-01-01

    The use of Escherichia coli asparaginase II as a drug for the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia is complicated by the significant glutaminase side activity of the enzyme. To develop enzyme forms with reduced glutaminase activity, a number of variants with amino acid replacements in the vicinity of the substrate binding site were constructed and assayed for their kinetic and stability properties. We found that replacements of Asp248 affected glutamine turnover much more strongly than asparagine hydrolysis. In the wild-type enzyme, N248 modulates substrate binding to a neighboring subunit by hydrogen bonding to side chains that directly interact with the substrate. In variant N248A, the loss of transition state stabilization caused by the mutation was 15 kJ mol(-1) for L-glutamine compared to 4 kJ mol(-1) for L-aspartic beta-hydroxamate and 7 kJ mol(-1) for L-asparagine. Smaller differences were seen with other N248 variants. Modeling studies suggested that the selective reduction of glutaminase activity is the result of small conformational changes that affect active-site residues and catalytically relevant water molecules. PMID:11106175

  6. PagP Activation in the Outer Membrane Triggers R3 Core Oligosaccharide Truncation in the Cytoplasm of Escherichia coli O157:H7

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Abigail E.; Kim, Sang-Hyun; Liu, Feng; Jia, Wenyi; Vinogradov, Evgeny; Gyles, Carlton L.; Bishop, Russell E.

    2016-01-01

    The Escherichia coli outer membrane phospholipid:lipid A palmitoyltransferase PagP is normally a latent enzyme, but it can be directly activated in outer membranes by lipid redistribution associated with a breach in the permeability barrier. We now demonstrate that a lipid A myristate deficiency in an E. coli O157:H7 msbB mutant constitutively activates PagP in outer membranes. The lipid A myristate deficiency is associated with hydrophobic antibiotic sensitivity and, unexpectedly, with serum sensitivity, which resulted from O-antigen polysaccharide absence due to a cytoplasmically determined truncation at the first outer core glucose unit of the R3 core oligosaccharide. Mutational inactivation of pagP in the myristate-deficient lipid A background aggravated the hydrophobic antibiotic sensitivity as a result of losing a partially compensatory increase in lipid A palmitoylation while simultaneously restoring serum resistance and O-antigen attachment to intact lipopolysaccharide. Complementation with either wild-type pagP or catalytically inactive pagPSer77Ala alleles restored the R3 core truncation. However, the intact lipopolysaccharide was preserved after complementation with an internal deletion pagPΔ5–14 allele, which mostly eliminates a periplasmic amphipathic α-helical domain but fully supports cell surface lipid A palmitoylation. Our findings indicate that activation of PagP not only triggers lipid A palmitoylation in the outer membrane but also separately truncates the R3 core oligosaccharide in the cytoplasm. We discuss the implication that PagP might function as an apical sensory transducer, which can be activated by a breach in the outer membrane permeability barrier. PMID:18070877

  7. Expression of Gls and Gls2 glutaminase isoforms in astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Cardona, Carolina; Sánchez-Mejías, Elisabeth; Dávila, José C; Martín-Rufián, Mercedes; Campos-Sandoval, José A; Vitorica, Javier; Alonso, Francisco J; Matés, José M; Segura, Juan A; Norenberg, Michael D; Rama Rao, Kakulavarapu V; Jayakumar, Arumugan R; Gutiérrez, Antonia; Márquez, Javier

    2015-03-01

    The expression of glutaminase in glial cells has been a controversial issue and matter of debate for many years. Actually, glutaminase is essentially considered as a neuronal marker in brain. Astrocytes are endowed with efficient and high capacity transport systems to recapture synaptic glutamate which seems to be consistent with the absence of glutaminase in these glial cells. In this work, a comprehensive study was devised to elucidate expression of glutaminase in neuroglia and, more concretely, in astrocytes. Immunocytochemistry in rat and human brain tissues employing isoform-specific antibodies revealed expression of both Gls and Gls2 glutaminase isozymes in glutamatergic and GABAergic neuronal populations as well as in astrocytes. Nevertheless, there was a different subcellular distribution: Gls isoform was always present in mitochondria while Gls2 appeared in two different locations, mitochondria and nucleus. Confocal microscopy and double immunofluorescence labeling in cultured astrocytes confirmed the same pattern previously seen in brain tissue samples. Astrocytic glutaminase expression was also assessed at the mRNA level, real-time quantitative RT-PCR detected transcripts of four glutaminase isozymes but with marked differences on their absolute copy number: the predominance of Gls isoforms over Gls2 transcripts was remarkable (ratio of 144:1). Finally, we proved that astrocytic glutaminase proteins possess enzymatic activity by in situ activity staining: concrete populations of astrocytes were labeled in the cortex, cerebellum and hippocampus of rat brain demonstrating functional catalytic activity. These results are relevant for the stoichiometry of the Glu/Gln cycle at the tripartite synapse and suggest novel functions for these classical metabolic enzymes. PMID:25297978

  8. [Recombinant intracellular Rhodospirillum rubrum L-asparaginase with low L-glutaminase activity and antiproliferative effect].

    PubMed

    Pokrovskaia, M V; Pokrovskiĭ, V S; Aleksandrova, S S; Anisimova, N Iu; Adrianov, R M; Treshchalina, E M; Ponomarev, G V; Sokolov, N N

    2013-01-01

    The recombinant producer of Rhodospirillum rubrum L-asparaginase (RrA) was received and purification procedure of RrA was developed. It was shown that RrA has following biochemical and catalytic characteristics: K(m) for L-asn 0.22 MM, pH optimum 9.2; temperature optimum 54 degrees C; pI = 5.1 +/- 0.3; L-gln activity seems to be low-to-negligible. K562, DU145 and MDA-MB-231 cellular lines displayed significant sensitivity towards the enzyme (IC50 = 1.80; 9.19 and 34.62 ME/ml, respectively. In comparison with L-asparaginases from E. coli II type (EcA) and Erwinia carotovora (EwA) cytotoxicity of RrA seems to be higher than EwA, but lower than EcA. 10-fold i.p. RrA administration (4000 ME/kg per day) in L5178y bearing mice showed T/C = 172%. The received results show that RrA belongs to I type cellular L-asparaginases with low L-gln activity and the high antiproliferative effect. PMID:23789346

  9. G-receptor antagonists increased the activating effect of mastoparan on low Km GTPase of mouse PAG.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Peña, Y; Sánchez-Blázquez, P; Garzón, J

    1995-02-01

    Mastoparan activated in a concentration-dependent manner the low Km GTPase activity in P2 fractions from mouse periaquedultal grey matter (PAG). This peptide at 1-10 mM produced increases of 30-70% over the basal value of 90-120 pmol Pi/mg/min. A series of substances displaying antagonist activity at cellular receptors and not modifying the GTPase function, when used at nanomolar and micromolar concentrations enhanced the effect of mastoparan upon this enzyme. These included antagonists of receptors coupling G proteins: naloxone (non selective opioid antagonist), CTOP (m opioid receptors), ICI 174,864 (d opioid receptors), nor-BNI (k opioid receptors), sulpiride (D2 dopaminergic antagonist), idazoxan (a2 adrenergic antagonist). Bicuculline, antagonist of a receptor not linked to G proteins, GABAA, did not alter the effect of mastoparan on the GTPase. The m opioid agonist, DAMGO, prevented naloxone from increasing the function of the mastoparan-activated enzyme. Thus, mastoparan appears to act on Gi/Go proteins at a site not directly related to the receptor binding domain. PMID:7794687

  10. Hormonal stimulation of mitochondrial glutaminase. Effects of vasopressin, angiotensin II, adrenaline and glucagon.

    PubMed Central

    Corvera, S; García-Sáinz, J A

    1983-01-01

    Adrenaline (through alpha 1-adrenoceptors), vasopressin and angiotensin II stimulate mitochondrial glutaminase activity. This stimulation probably contributes to the ureogenic effect of these hormones. The activity of the enzyme is sensitive to Ca2+ depletion. A role of Ca2+ in hormonal modulation of glutaminase activity is suggested. PMID:6870814

  11. Rat hepatic glutaminase: identification of the full coding sequence and characterization of a functional promoter.

    PubMed Central

    Chung-Bok, M I; Vincent, N; Jhala, U; Watford, M

    1997-01-01

    Glutamine catabolism in mammalian liver is catalysed by a unique isoenzyme of phosphate-activated glutaminase. The full coding and 5' untranslated sequence for rat hepatic glutaminase was isolated by screening lambda ZAP cDNA libraries and a Charon 4a rat genomic library. The sequence produces a mRNA 2225 nt in length, encoding a polypeptide of 535 amino acid residues with a calculated molecular mass of 59.2 kDa. The deduced amino acid sequence of rat liver glutaminase shows 86% similarity to that of rat kidney glutaminase and 65% similarity to a putative glutaminase from Caenorhabditis elegans. A genomic clone to rat liver glutaminase was isolated that contains 3.5 kb of the gene and 7.5 kb of the 5' flanking region. The 1 kb immediately upstream of the hepatic glutaminase gene (from -1022 to +48) showed functional promoter activity in HepG2 hepatoma cells. This promoter region did not respond to treatment with cAMP, but was highly responsive (10-fold stimulation) to the synthetic glucocorticoid dexamethasone. Subsequent 5' deletion analysis indicated that the promoter region between -103 and +48 was sufficient for basal promoter activity. This region does not contain an identifiable TATA element, indicating that transcription of the glutaminase gene is driven by a TATA-less promoter. The region responsive to glucocorticoids was mapped to -252 to -103 relative to the transcription start site. PMID:9164856

  12. Mice lacking brain/kidney phosphate-activated glutaminase (GLS1) have impaired glutamatergic synaptic transmission, altered breathing, disorganized goal-directed behavior and die shortly after birth

    PubMed Central

    Masson, Justine; Darmon, Michèle; Conjard, Agnès; Chuhma, Nao; Ropert, Nicole; Thoby-Brisson, Muriel; Foutz, Arthur S.; Parrot, Sandrine; Miller, Gretchen M.; Jorisch, Renée; Polan, Jonathan; Hamon, Michel; Hen, René; Rayport, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    Neurotransmitter glutamate has been thought to derive mainly from glutamine via the action of glutaminase type 1 (GLS1). To address the importance of this pathway in glutamatergic transmission, we knocked out GLS1 in mice. The insertion of a STOP cassette by homologous recombination produced a null allele that blocked transcription, encoded no immunoreactive protein and abolished GLS1 enzymatic activity. Null mutants were slightly smaller, were deficient in goal-directed behavior, hypoventilated and died in the first post-natal day. No gross or microscopic defects were detected in peripheral organs or in the central nervous system. In cultured neurons from the null mutants, miniature EPSC amplitude and duration were normal; however, the amplitude of evoked EPSCs decayed more rapidly with sustained 10 Hz stimulation, consistent with an observed reduction in depolarization-evoked glutamate release. Because of this activity-dependent impairment in glutamatergic transmission, we surmised that respiratory networks, which require temporal summation of synaptic input, would be particularly affected. We found that the amplitude of inspirations was decreased in vivo, chemosensitivity to CO2 was severely altered, and the frequency of pacemaker activity recorded in the respiratory generator in the Pre-Bötzinger complex, a glutamatergic brainstem network that can be isolated in vitro, was increased. Our results show that while alternate pathways to GLS1 glutamate synthesis support baseline glutamatergic transmission, the GLS1 pathway is essential for maintaining the function of active synapses, and so the mutation is associated with impaired respiratory function, abnormal goal-directed behavior and neonatal demise. PMID:16641247

  13. Down-regulation of glutaminase C in human hepatocarcinoma cell by diphenylarsinic acid, a degradation product of chemical warfare agents.

    PubMed

    Kita, Kayoko; Suzuki, Toshihide; Ochi, Takafumi

    2007-05-01

    In a poisonous incident in Kamisu, Japan, it is understood that diphenylarsinic acid (DPAA) was a critical contaminant of ground water. Most patients showed dysfunction of the central nervous system. To understand the overall mechanism of DPAA toxicity and to gain some insight into the application of a remedy specific for intoxication, the molecular target must be clarified. As an approach, a high throughput analysis of cell proteins in cultured human hepatocarcinoma HpG2 exposed to DPAA was performed by two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE). Four proteins, which were up- and down-regulated by exposure of cultured HepG2 cells to DPAA, were identified. They were chaperonin containing TCP-1 (CCT) beta subunit, aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 (ALDH1), ribosomal protein P0 and glutaminase C (GAC). Of these, GAC was the only protein that was down-regulated by DPAA exposure, and cellular expression levels were reduced by DPAA in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. Decrease in cellular GAC levels was accompanied by decreased activity of the enzyme, phosphate-activated glutaminase (PAG). Decreased expression of GAC by DPAA was also observed in human cervical carcinoma HeLa and neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells. By contrast, no significant changes in GAC protein expression were observed when cells were incubated with arsenite [iAs (III)] and trivalent dimethylarsinous acid [DMA (III)]. In the central nervous system, GAC plays a role in the production of the neurotransmitter glutamic acid. Selective inhibition of GAC expression by DPAA may be a cause of dysfunction of glutamatergic neuronal transmission and the resultant neurological impairments. PMID:17321558

  14. Down-regulation of glutaminase C in human hepatocarcinoma cell by diphenylarsinic acid, a degradation product of chemical warfare agents

    SciTech Connect

    Kita, Kayoko . E-mail: kkayoko@pharm.teikyo-u.ac.jp; Suzuki, Toshihide; Ochi, Takafumi

    2007-05-01

    In a poisonous incident in Kamisu, Japan, it is understood that diphenylarsinic acid (DPAA) was a critical contaminant of ground water. Most patients showed dysfunction of the central nervous system. To understand the overall mechanism of DPAA toxicity and to gain some insight into the application of a remedy specific for intoxication, the molecular target must be clarified. As an approach, a high throughput analysis of cell proteins in cultured human hepatocarcinoma HpG2 exposed to DPAA was performed by two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE). Four proteins, which were up- and down-regulated by exposure of cultured HepG2 cells to DPAA, were identified. They were chaperonin containing TCP-1 (CCT) beta subunit, aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 (ALDH1), ribosomal protein P0 and glutaminase C (GAC). Of these, GAC was the only protein that was down-regulated by DPAA exposure, and cellular expression levels were reduced by DPAA in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. Decrease in cellular GAC levels was accompanied by decreased activity of the enzyme, phosphate-activated glutaminase (PAG). Decreased expression of GAC by DPAA was also observed in human cervical carcinoma HeLa and neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells. By contrast, no significant changes in GAC protein expression were observed when cells were incubated with arsenite [iAs (III)] and trivalent dimethylarsinous acid [DMA (III)]. In the central nervous system, GAC plays a role in the production of the neurotransmitter glutamic acid. Selective inhibition of GAC expression by DPAA may be a cause of dysfunction of glutamatergic neuronal transmission and the resultant neurological impairments.

  15. Functional and Structural Characterization of Four Glutaminases from Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis†

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Greg; Singer, Alex; Proudfoot, Michael; Skarina, Tatiana; Kim, Youngchang; Chang, Changsoo; Dementieva, Irina; Kuznetsova, Ekaterina; Gonzalez, Claudio F.; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Savchenko, Alexei; Yakunin, Alexander F.

    2008-01-01

    Glutaminases belong to the large superfamily of serine-dependent β-lactamases and penicillin-binding proteins, and they catalyze the hydrolytic deamidation of l-glutamine to l-glutamate. In this work, we purified and biochemically characterized four predicted glutaminases from Escherichia coli (YbaS and YneH) and Bacillus subtilis (YlaM and YbgJ). The proteins demonstrated strict specificity to l-glutamine and did not hydrolyze d-glutamine or l-asparagine. In each organism, one glutaminase showed higher affinity to glutamine (E. coli YbaS and B. subtilis YlaM; Km 7.3 and 7.6 mM, respectively) than the second glutaminase (E. coli YneH and B. subtilis YbgJ; Km 27.6 and 30.6 mM, respectively). The crystal structures of the E. coli YbaS and the B. subtilis YbgJ revealed the presence of a classical β-lactamase-like fold and conservation of several key catalytic residues of β-lactamases (Ser74, Lys77, Asn126, Lys268, and Ser269 in YbgJ). Alanine replacement mutagenesis demonstrated that most of the conserved residues located in the putative glutaminase catalytic site are essential for activity. The crystal structure of the YbgJ complex with the glutaminase inhibitor 6-diazo-5-oxo-l-norleucine revealed the presence of a covalent bond between the inhibitor and the hydroxyl oxygen of Ser74, providing evidence that Ser74 is the primary catalytic nucleophile and that the glutaminase reaction proceeds through formation of an enzyme–glutamyl intermediate. Growth experiments with the E. coli glutaminase deletion strains revealed that YneH is involved in the assimilation of l-glutamine as a sole source of carbon and nitrogen and suggested that both glutaminases (YbaS and YneH) also contribute to acid resistance in E. coli. PMID:18459799

  16. Clinical biochemical aspects of glutaminase toxicity in rabbits and Rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed Central

    Hambleton, P.; Benbough, J. E.; Baskerville, A.; Harris-Smith, P. W.

    1980-01-01

    Treatment with a chemically modified glutaminase was lethal to rabbits and Rhesus monkeys at all but the lowest doses. Changes in the serum levels of triglycerides, glucose, creatinine, urea, cholesterol and protein and in the activities of some serum enzymes were the probable result of the development of lesions in liver, kidney and intestine observed at necropsy. Treatment with unmodified glutaminase induced similar changes in rabbits but not in Rhesus monkeys. PMID:6775664

  17. Crystal structure of a major fragment of the salt-tolerant glutaminase from Micrococcus luteus K-3

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshimune, Kazuaki . E-mail: k.yoshimune@aist.go.jp; Shirakihara, Yasuo; Shiratori, Aya; Wakayama, Mamoru; Chantawannakul, Panuwan; Moriguchi, Mitsuaki

    2006-08-11

    Glutaminase of Micrococcus luteus K-3 (intact glutaminase; 48 kDa) is digested to a C-terminally truncated fragment (glutaminase fragment; 42 kDa) that shows higher salt tolerance than that of the intact glutaminase. The crystal structure of the glutaminase fragment was determined at 2.4 A resolution using multiple-wavelength anomalous dispersion (MAD). The glutaminase fragment is composed of N-terminal and C-terminal domains, and a putative catalytic serine-lysine dyad (S64 and K67) is located in a cleft of the N-terminal domain. Mutations of the S64 or K67 residues abolished the enzyme activity. The N-terminal domain has abundant glutamic acid residues on its surface, which may explain its salt-tolerant mechanism. A diffraction analysis of the intact glutaminase crystals (a twinning fraction of 0.43) located the glutaminase fragment in the unit cell but failed to turn up clear densities for the missing C-terminal portion of the molecule.

  18. The oncogenic transcription factor c-Jun regulates glutaminase expression and sensitizes cells to glutaminase-targeted therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lukey, Michael J.; Greene, Kai Su; Erickson, Jon W.; Wilson, Kristin F.; Cerione, Richard A.

    2016-01-01

    Many transformed cells exhibit altered glucose metabolism and increased utilization of glutamine for anabolic and bioenergetic processes. These metabolic adaptations, which accompany tumorigenesis, are driven by oncogenic signals. Here we report that the transcription factor c-Jun, product of the proto-oncogene JUN, is a key regulator of mitochondrial glutaminase (GLS) levels. Activation of c-Jun downstream of oncogenic Rho GTPase signalling leads to elevated GLS gene expression and glutaminase activity. In human breast cancer cells, GLS protein levels and sensitivity to GLS inhibition correlate strongly with c-Jun levels. We show that c-Jun directly binds to the GLS promoter region, and is sufficient to increase gene expression. Furthermore, ectopic overexpression of c-Jun renders breast cancer cells dependent on GLS activity. These findings reveal a role for c-Jun as a driver of cancer cell metabolic reprogramming, and suggest that cancers overexpressing JUN may be especially sensitive to GLS-targeted therapies. PMID:27089238

  19. Physics of the Cosmos Program Analysis Group (PhysPAG) Report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nousek, John A.

    2015-01-01

    The Physics of the Cosmos Program Analysis Group (PhysPAG) serves as a forum for soliciting and coordinating input and analysis from the scientific community in support of the PCOS program objectives. I will outline the activities of the PhysPAG over the past year, since the last meeting during the AAS meeting in National Harbor, and mention the activities of the PhysPAG related Scientific Interest Groups.

  20. Connections from the rat dorsal column nuclei (DCN) to the periaqueductal gray matter (PAG).

    PubMed

    Barbaresi, Paolo; Mensà, Emanuela

    2016-08-01

    Electrical stimulation of the dorsal columns (DCs; spinal cord stimulation; SCS) has been proposed to treat chronic neuropathic pain. SCS may activate a dual mechanism that would affect both the spinal cord and supraspinal levels. Stimulation of DCs or DC nuclei (DCN) in animals where neuropathic pain has been induced causes activation of brainstem centers including the periaqueductal gray (PAG), which is involved in the endogenous pain suppression system. Biotinylated dextran-amine (BDA) was iontophoretically injected into the DCN to analyze the ascending projection directed to the PAG. Separate injections into the gracile nucleus (GrN) and the cuneate nucleus (CunN) showed BDA-positive fibers terminating in different regions of the contralateral PAG. GrN-PAG afferents terminated in the caudal and middle portions of PAG-l, whereas CunN-PAG fibers terminated in the middle and rostral portions of PAG-l. Based on the DCN somatotopic map, the GrN sends information to the PAG from the contralateral hindlimb and the tail and the CunN from the contralateral forelimb, shoulder, neck and ear. This somatotopic organization is consistent with earlier electrophysiological and PAG stimulation studies. These fibers could form part of the DCs-brainstem-spinal cord loop, which may be involved in the inhibitory effects of SCS on neuropathic pain. PMID:26902642

  1. Kinetic properties of Streptomyces canarius L- Glutaminase and its anticancer efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Reda, Fifi M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract L-glutaminase was produced by Streptomyces canarius FR (KC460654) with an apparent molecular mass of 44 kDa. It has 17.9 purification fold with a final specific activity 132.2 U/mg proteins and 28% yield recovery. The purified L-glutaminase showed a maximal activity against L-glutamine when incubated at pH 8.0 at 40 °C for 30 min. It maintained its stability at wide range of pH from 5.0 11.0 and thermal stable up to 60 °C with Tm value 57.5 °C. It has high affinity and catalytic activity for L-glutamine (Km 0.129 mM, Vmax 2.02 U/mg/min), followed by L-asparagine and L-aspartic acid. In vivo, L-glutaminase showed no observed changes in liver; kidney functions; hematological parameters and slight effect on RBCs and level of platelets after 10 days of rabbit's injection. The anticancer activity of L-glutaminase was also tested against five types of human cancer cell lines using MTT assay in vitro. L-glutaminase has a significant efficiency against Hep-G2 cell (IC50, 6.8 μg/mL) and HeLa cells (IC50, 8.3 μg/mL), while the growth of MCF-7 cells was not affected. L-glutaminase has a moderate cytotoxic effect against HCT-116 cell (IC50, 64.7 μg/mL) and RAW 264.7 cell (IC50, 59.3 μg/mL). PMID:26691453

  2. Transmembrane Adaptor Protein PAG/CBP Is Involved in both Positive and Negative Regulation of Mast Cell Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Draberova, Lubica; Bugajev, Viktor; Potuckova, Lucie; Halova, Ivana; Bambouskova, Monika; Polakovicova, Iva; Xavier, Ramnik J.; Seed, Brian

    2014-01-01

    The transmembrane adaptor protein PAG/CBP (here, PAG) is expressed in multiple cell types. Tyrosine-phosphorylated PAG serves as an anchor for C-terminal SRC kinase, an inhibitor of SRC-family kinases. The role of PAG as a negative regulator of immunoreceptor signaling has been examined in several model systems, but no functions in vivo have been determined. Here, we examined the activation of bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs) with PAG knockout and PAG knockdown and the corresponding controls. Our data show that PAG-deficient BMMCs exhibit impaired antigen-induced degranulation, extracellular calcium uptake, tyrosine phosphorylation of several key signaling proteins (including the high-affinity IgE receptor subunits, spleen tyrosine kinase, and phospholipase C), production of several cytokines and chemokines, and chemotaxis. The enzymatic activities of the LYN and FYN kinases were increased in nonactivated cells, suggesting the involvement of a LYN- and/or a FYN-dependent negative regulatory loop. When BMMCs from PAG-knockout mice were activated via the KIT receptor, enhanced degranulation and tyrosine phosphorylation of the receptor were observed. In vivo experiments showed that PAG is a positive regulator of passive systemic anaphylaxis. The combined data indicate that PAG can function as both a positive and a negative regulator of mast cell signaling, depending upon the signaling pathway involved. PMID:25246632

  3. Co-expression of glutaminase K and L isoenzymes in human tumour cells

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    The pattern of expression of glutaminase isoenzymes in tumour cells has been investigated to clarify its role in the malignant transformation and the prospect of its use as a clinically relevant factor. Using leukaemia cells from medullar blood of human patients and several established human cancer cell lines, we have developed a competitive RT (reverse transcriptase)-PCR assay to quantify simultaneously K-type (kidney-type) and L-type (liver-type) glutaminase mRNAs. Co-expression of both transcripts and higher amounts of L-type mRNA were always found in all cancer cell types analysed. However, mature lymphocytes from the medullar blood of a patient suffering aplasia did not express the K-type transcript and showed a 15-fold increase of L-type transcript. Co-expression was also confirmed at the protein level using isoform-specific antibodies; nevertheless, it did not correlate with the relative abundance of glutaminase transcripts and strong K-type protein signals were detected. On the other hand, marked differences were found with regard to glutamate inhibition and phosphate activation of tumour glutaminase activity. Taken together, the protein data suggest that K isoform would account for the majority of glutaminase activity in these human tumour cells. The results confirm that simultaneous expression of both isoenzymes in human cancer cells is a more frequent event than previously thought. Furthermore, the present work and other previous data suggest that K isoform is up-regulated with increased rates of proliferation, whereas prevalence of the L isoform seems to be related with resting or quiescent cell states. PMID:15496140

  4. The potential of halophilic and halotolerant bacteria for the production of antineoplastic enzymes: L-asparaginase and L-glutaminase

    PubMed Central

    Shirazian, Pejman; Asad, Sedigheh; Amoozegar, Mohammad Ali

    2016-01-01

    L-asparaginase and L-glutaminase can be effectively used for the treatment of patients who suffer from accute lymphoblastic leukemia and tumor cells. Microbial sources are the best source for the bulk production of these enzymes. However, their long-term administration may cause immunological responses, so screening for new enzymes with novel properties is required. Halophilic and halotolerant bacteria with novel enzymatic characteristics can be considered as a potential source for production of enzymes with different immunological properties. In this study, L-asparaginase and L-glutaminase production by halophilic bacteria isolated from Urmia salt lake was studied. Out of the 85 isolated halophilic and halotolerant bacterial strains, 16 (19 %) showed L-asparaginase activity and 3 strains (3.5 %) showed L-glutaminase activity. Strains with the highest activities were selected for further studies. Based on 16S rDNA sequence analysis, it was shown that the selected isolates for L-asparaginase and L-glutaminase production belong to the genus Bacillus and Salicola, respectively. Both enzymes were produced extracellularly. The strain with the most L-asparaginase production did not show L-glutaminase production which is medically important. The effects of key parameters including temperature, initial pH of the solution, and concentrations of glucose, asparagine or glutamine, and sodium chloride were evaluated by means of response surface methodology (RSM) to optimize enzymes production. Under the obtained optimal conditions, L-asparaginase and L-glutaminase production was increased up to 1.5 (61.7 unit/mL) and 2.6 fold (46.4 unit/mL), respectively. PMID:27330530

  5. PAGER: constructing PAGs and new PAG–PAG relationships for network biology

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Zongliang; Kshirsagar, Madhura M.; Nguyen, Thanh; Suphavilai, Chayaporn; Neylon, Michael T.; Zhu, Liugen; Ratliff, Timothy; Chen, Jake Y.

    2015-01-01

    In this article, we described a new database framework to perform integrative “gene-set, network, and pathway analysis” (GNPA). In this framework, we integrated heterogeneous data on pathways, annotated list, and gene-sets (PAGs) into a PAG electronic repository (PAGER). PAGs in the PAGER database are organized into P-type, A-type and G-type PAGs with a three-letter-code standard naming convention. The PAGER database currently compiles 44 313 genes from 5 species including human, 38 663 PAGs, 324 830 gene–gene relationships and two types of 3 174 323 PAG–PAG regulatory relationships—co-membership based and regulatory relationship based. To help users assess each PAG’s biological relevance, we developed a cohesion measure called Cohesion Coefficient (CoCo), which is capable of disambiguating between biologically significant PAGs and random PAGs with an area-under-curve performance of 0.98. PAGER database was set up to help users to search and retrieve PAGs from its online web interface. PAGER enable advanced users to build PAG–PAG regulatory networks that provide complementary biological insights not found in gene set analysis or individual gene network analysis. We provide a case study using cancer functional genomics data sets to demonstrate how integrative GNPA help improve network biology data coverage and therefore biological interpretability. The PAGER database can be accessible openly at http://discovery.informatics.iupui.edu/PAGER/. Contact: jakechen@iupui.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:26072489

  6. Genetic Pharmacotherapy as an Early CNS Drug Development Strategy: Testing Glutaminase Inhibition for Schizophrenia Treatment in Adult Mice

    PubMed Central

    Mingote, Susana; Masson, Justine; Gellman, Celia; Thomsen, Gretchen M.; Lin, Chyuan-Sheng; Merker, Robert J.; Gaisler-Salomon, Inna; Wang, Yvonne; Ernst, Rachel; Hen, René; Rayport, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Genetic pharmacotherapy is an early drug development strategy for the identification of novel CNS targets in mouse models prior to the development of specific ligands. Here for the first time, we have implemented this strategy to address the potential therapeutic value of a glutamate-based pharmacotherapy for schizophrenia involving inhibition of the glutamate recycling enzyme phosphate-activated glutaminase. Mice constitutively heterozygous for GLS1, the gene encoding glutaminase, manifest a schizophrenia resilience phenotype, a key dimension of which is an attenuated locomotor response to propsychotic amphetamine challenge. If resilience is due to glutaminase deficiency in adulthood, then glutaminase inhibitors should have therapeutic potential. However, this has been difficult to test given the dearth of neuroactive glutaminase inhibitors. So, we used genetic pharmacotherapy to ask whether adult induction of GLS1 heterozygosity would attenuate amphetamine responsiveness. We generated conditional floxGLS1 mice and crossed them with global CAGERT2cre∕+ mice to produce GLS1 iHET mice, susceptible to tamoxifen induction of GLS1 heterozygosity. One month after tamoxifen treatment of adult GLS1 iHET mice, we found a 50% reduction in GLS1 allelic abundance and glutaminase mRNA levels in the brain. While GLS1 iHET mice showed some recombination prior to tamoxifen, there was no impact on mRNA levels. We then asked whether induction of GLS heterozygosity would attenuate the locomotor response to propsychotic amphetamine challenge. Before tamoxifen, control and GLS1 iHET mice did not differ in their response to amphetamine. One month after tamoxifen treatment, amphetamine-induced hyperlocomotion was blocked in GLS1 iHET mice. The block was largely maintained after 5 months. Thus, a genetically induced glutaminase reduction—mimicking pharmacological inhibition—strongly attenuated the response to a propsychotic challenge, suggesting that glutaminase may be a novel

  7. Panic disorder: is the PAG involved?

    PubMed

    Del-Ben, Cristina Marta; Graeff, Frederico Guilherme

    2009-01-01

    Data from studies with humans have suggested that abnormalities of midbrain structures, including the periaqueductal gray matter (PAG), could be involved in the neurobiology of panic disorder (PD). The electrical stimulation of the PAG in neurosurgical patients induces panic-like symptoms and the effect of drugs that are effective in the treatment of PD in the simulation of public speaking model of anxiety is in agreement with data from animal models of PD. Structural neuroimaging studies have shown increases in gray matter volume of midbrain and pons of PD patients. There is also evidence of lower serotonin transporter and receptor binding, and increases of metabolism in the midbrain of PD patients. Nevertheless, these midbrain abnormalities can not be considered as specific findings, since neuroimaging data indicate that PD patients have abnormalities in other brain structures that process fear and anxiety. PMID:19283082

  8. p63 regulates glutaminase 2 expression

    PubMed Central

    Giacobbe, Arianna; Bongiorno-Borbone, Lucilla; Bernassola, Francesca; Terrinoni, Alessandro; Markert, Elke Katrin; Levine, Arnold J.; Feng, Zhaohui; Agostini, Massimilano; Zolla, Lello; Agrò, Alessandro Finazzi; Notterman, Daniel A.; Melino, Gerry; Peschiaroli, Angelo

    2013-01-01

    The transcription factor p63 is critical for many biological processes, including development and maintenance of epidermal tissues and tumorigenesis. Here, we report that the TAp63 isoforms regulate cell metabolism through the induction of the mitochondrial glutaminase 2 (GLS2) gene both in primary cells and tumor cell lines. By ChIP analysis and luciferase assay, we confirmed that TAp63 binds directly to the p53/p63 consensus DNA binding sequence within the GLS2 promoter region. Given the critical role of p63 in epidermal differentiation, we have investigated the regulation of GLS2 expression during this process. GLS2 and TAp63 expression increases during the in vitro differentiation of primary human keratinocytes, and depletion of GLS2 inhibits skin differentiation both at molecular and cellular levels. We found that GLS2 and TAp63 expression are concomitantly induced in cancer cells exposed to oxidative stresses. siRNA-mediated depletion of GLS2 sensitizes cells to ROS-induced apoptosis, suggesting that the TAp63/GLS2 axis can be functionally important as a cellular antioxidant pathway in the absence of p53. Accordingly, we found that GLS2 is upregulated in colon adenocarcinoma. Altogether, our findings demonstrate that GLS2 is a bona fide TAp63 target gene, and that the TAp63-dependent regulation of GLS2 is important for both physiological and pathological processes. PMID:23574722

  9. Non-ionic PAG behavior under high energy exposure sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawson, Richard A.; Noga, David E.; Tolbert, Laren M.; Henderson, Clifford L.

    2009-03-01

    A series of non-ionic PAGs were synthesized and their acid generation efficiency measured under deep ultraviolet and electron beam exposures. The acid generation efficiency was determined with an on-wafer method that uses spectroscopic ellipsometry to measure the absorbance of an acid sensitive dye (Coumarin 6). Under DUV exposures, common ionic onium salt PAGs showed excellent photoacid generation efficiency, superior to most non-ionic PAGS tested in this work. In contrast, under 100 keV high energy e-beam exposures, almost all of the non-ionic PAGs showed significantly better acid generation performance than the ionic onium salt PAGs tested. In particular, one non-ionic PAG showed almost an order of magnitude improvement in the Dill C acid generation rate constant as compared to a triarylsulfonium PAG. The high energy acid generation efficiency was found to correlate well with the electron affinity of the PAGs, suggesting that improvements in PAG design can be predicted. Non-ionic PAGs merit further investigation as a means for producing higher sensitivity resists under high energy exposure sources.

  10. Production of glutaminase (E.C.3.2.1.5) from Zygosaccharomyces rouxii: statistical optimization using response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Padma; Singhal, Rekha S

    2008-07-01

    A face centered central composite design was employed to investigate the interactive effects of four variables, viz. concentrations of sucrose, yeast extract, sodium chloride, and glutamine, identified earlier by one-factor-at-a-time approach, on glutaminase production by Zygosaccharomyces rouxii. A significant influence of yeast extract on glutaminase production was noted. Response surface methodology (RSM) showed that a medium containing (g/l) sucrose, 17.8; yeast extract, 48.0; glutamine, 5.0 and sodium chloride, 55.6 to be optimum for the production of glutaminase. This medium was projected to produce, theoretically, an enzyme activity of 149.98 U/l and a specific activity of 0.488 U/mg protein. The applied methodology was validated using this optimized media and enzyme activity 155.89+/-1.68 U/l and specific activity of 0.468+/-0.088 U/mg protein was obtained. Further, this optimization strategy combined with an increase in inoculum enhanced the enzyme activity and specific activity by 2.94 and 3.58 fold, respectively, as compared to the unoptimized media. PMID:17951056

  11. 78 FR 42071 - Updates to Protective Action Guides Manual: Protective Action Guides (PAGs) and Planning Guidance...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-15

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY Updates to Protective Action Guides Manual: Protective Action Guides (PAGs) and Planning Guidance... the public comment period for the proposed guidance ``PAG Manual: Protective Action Guides (PAGs)...

  12. Film quantum yields of EUV& ultra-high PAG photoresists

    SciTech Connect

    Hassanein, Elsayed; Higgins, Craig; Naulleau, Patrick; Matyi, Richard; Gallatin, Greg; Denbeaux, Gregory; Antohe, Alin; Thackery, Jim; Spear, Kathleen; Szmanda, Charles; Anderson, Christopher N.; Niakoula, Dimitra; Malloy, Matthew; Khurshid, Anwar; Montgomery, Cecilia; Piscani, Emil C.; Rudack, Andrew; Byers, Jeff; Ma, Andy; Dean, Kim; Brainard, Robert

    2008-01-10

    Base titration methods are used to determine C-parameters for three industrial EUV photoresist platforms (EUV-2D, MET-2D, XP5496) and twenty academic EUV photoresist platforms. X-ray reflectometry is used to measure the density of these resists, and leads to the determination of absorbance and film quantum yields (FQY). Ultrahigh levels ofPAG show divergent mechanisms for production of photo acids beyond PAG concentrations of 0.35 moles/liter. The FQY of sulfonium PAGs level off, whereas resists prepared with iodonium PAG show FQY s that increase beyond PAG concentrations of 0.35 moles/liter, reaching record highs of 8-13 acids generatedlEUV photons absorbed.

  13. Crystal Structures of Protein Glutaminase and Its Pro Forms Converted into Enzyme-Substrate Complex*

    PubMed Central

    Hashizume, Ryota; Maki, Yukiko; Mizutani, Kimihiko; Takahashi, Nobuyuki; Matsubara, Hiroyuki; Sugita, Akiko; Sato, Kimihiko; Yamaguchi, Shotaro; Mikami, Bunzo

    2011-01-01

    Protein glutaminase, which converts a protein glutamine residue to a glutamate residue, is expected to be useful as a new food-processing enzyme. The crystal structures of the mature and pro forms of the enzyme were refined at 1.15 and 1.73 Å resolution, respectively. The overall structure of the mature enzyme has a weak homology to the core domain of human transglutaminase-2. The catalytic triad (Cys-His-Asp) common to transglutaminases and cysteine proteases is located in the bottom of the active site pocket. The structure of the recombinant pro form shows that a short loop between S2 and S3 in the proregion covers and interacts with the active site of the mature region, mimicking the protein substrate of the enzyme. Ala-47 is located just above the pocket of the active site. Two mutant structures (A47Q-1 and A47Q-2) refined at 1.5 Å resolution were found to correspond to the enzyme-substrate complex and an S-acyl intermediate. Based on these structures, the catalytic mechanism of protein glutaminase is proposed. PMID:21926168

  14. Sensitivity of cultured pancreatic carcinoma cells to Acinetobacter glutaminase-asparaginase.

    PubMed

    Wu, M C; Arimura, G K; Holcenberg, J S; Yunis, A A

    1982-09-01

    Cultured human pancreatic carcinoma cells (MIA PaCa-2) have been shown previously to be very sensitive to E. coli L-asparaginase (EC II). The present studies have demonstrated that another enzyme, Acinetobacter glutaminase-asparaginase (AGA) is much more effective in inhibiting cell growth. At the concentration of 0.0025 U/ml of AGA activity the enzyme totally inhibited cell growth, whereas the EC II with the same concentration did not show any effect. The inhibition of cell growth correlated well with inhibition of protein and glycoprotein synthesis. The addition of L-glutamine at the concentration of 1 mM completely reversed the inhibition of protein synthesis. Similarly, the addition of L-glutamine at the concentration of 3 mM daily on 3 successive days after adding AGA resulted in significant reversal of growth inhibition. The results of this study indicate that the action of AGA on MIA PaCa-2 is, to a great extent, exerted through its L-glutaminase activity. PMID:7173949

  15. Aβ Induces Excitotoxicity Mediated by APC/C-Cdh1 Depletion That Can Be Prevented by Glutaminase Inhibition Promoting Neuronal Survival

    PubMed Central

    Fuchsberger, T.; Martínez-Bellver, S.; Giraldo, E.; Teruel-Martí, V.; Lloret, A.; Viña, J.

    2016-01-01

    The E3 ubiquitin ligase anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C) is activated by the fizzy-related protein homolog/CDC20-like protein 1 (cdh1) in post-mitotic neurons. Growing evidence suggests that dysregulation of APC/C-Cdh1 is involved in neurodegenerative diseases. Here we show in neurons that oligomers of amyloid beta (Aβ), a peptide related to Alzheimer’s disease, cause proteasome-dependent degradation of cdh1. This leads to a subsequent increase in glutaminase (a degradation target of APC/C-Cdh1), which causes an elevation of glutamate levels and further intraneuronal Ca2+ dysregulation, resulting in neuronal apoptosis. Glutaminase inhibition prevents glutamate excitotoxicity and apoptosis in Aβ treated neurons. Furthermore, glutamate also decreases cdh1 and leads to accumulation of glutaminase, suggesting that there may be a positive feedback loop of cdh1 inactivation. We confirmed the main findings in vivo using microinjection of either Aβ or glutamate in the CA1 region of the rat hippocampus. We show here for the first time in vivo that both Aβ and glutamate cause nuclear exclusion of cdh1 and an increase in glutaminase. These results show that maintaining normal APC/C-Cdh1 activity may be a useful target in Alzheimer’s disease treatment. PMID:27514492

  16. The integral membrane enzyme PagP alternates between two dynamically distinct states.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Peter M; Bishop, Russell E; Kay, Lewis E

    2004-06-29

    PhoPQ-activated gene P (PagP) is an integral membrane enzyme that transfers the sn-1 palmitate chain from phospholipid to lipopolysaccharide in Gram-negative bacteria. A recent x-ray crystallographic study established that the sn-1 palmitate binds within a long cavity at the center of the PagP beta barrel. The high mobility required to permit substrate entry into the central core of the barrel contrasts with the need to assemble a well defined structure in the peripheral loops, where many key catalytic residues are located. To gain insight into how dynamics relate to the function of PagP, the enzyme was reconstituted into CYFOS-7, a detergent that supports enzymatic activity. Under these conditions, PagP exists in equilibrium between two states, relaxed (R) and tense (T). The kinetics and thermodynamics of the interchange have been investigated by (1)H-(15)N NMR spectroscopy, with Delta H = -10.7 kcal/mol and Delta S = -37.5 cal/mol.K for the R--> T transition. A comparison of chemical shifts between the two states indicates that major structural changes occur in the large extracellular L1 loop and adjacent regions of the beta barrel. In addition to the R,T interconversion, other conformational exchange processes are observed in the R state, showing it to be quite flexible. Thus a picture emerges in which substrate entry is facilitated by the mobility of the R state, whereas the relatively rigid T state adopts a radically different conformation in a region of the protein known to be essential for catalysis. The ability to switch between dynamically distinct states may be a key feature of the catalytic cycle of PagP. PMID:15210985

  17. Synaptic underpinnings of altered hippocampal function in glutaminase-deficient mice during maturation.

    PubMed

    Gaisler-Salomon, Inna; Wang, Yvonne; Chuhma, Nao; Zhang, Hong; Golumbic, Yaela N; Mihali, Andra; Arancio, Ottavio; Sibille, Etienne; Rayport, Stephen

    2012-05-01

    Glutaminase-deficient mice (GLS1 hets), with reduced glutamate recycling, have a focal reduction in hippocampal activity, mainly in CA1, and manifest behavioral and neurochemical phenotypes suggestive of schizophrenia resilience. To address the basis for the hippocampal hypoactivity, we examined synaptic plastic mechanisms and glutamate receptor expression. Although baseline synaptic strength was unaffected in Schaffer collateral inputs to CA1, we found that long-term potentiation was attenuated. In wild-type (WT) mice, GLS1 gene expression was highest in the hippocampus and cortex, where it was reduced by about 50% in GLS1 hets. In other brain regions with lower WT GLS1 gene expression, there were no genotypic reductions. In adult GLS1 hets, NMDA receptor NR1 subunit gene expression was reduced, but not AMPA receptor GluR1 subunit gene expression. In contrast, juvenile GLS1 hets showed no reductions in NR1 gene expression. In concert with this, adult GLS1 hets showed a deficit in hippocampal-dependent contextual fear conditioning, whereas juvenile GLS1 hets did not. These alterations in glutamatergic synaptic function may partly explain the hippocampal hypoactivity seen in the GLS1 hets. The maturity-onset reduction in NR1 gene expression and in contextual learning supports the premise that glutaminase inhibition in adulthood should prove therapeutic in schizophrenia. PMID:22431402

  18. MiR169 and its target PagHAP2-6 regulated by ABA are involved in poplar cambium dormancy.

    PubMed

    Ding, Qi; Zeng, Jun; He, Xin-Qiang

    2016-07-01

    Dormancy is an effective strategy for perennial plants in temperate zones to survive the winter stress. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have been well known as important regulators for various biological processes. In this study, we checked the expression of miR169 members in the cambium zone during dormancy and active growth in poplar and found that they had distinct expression patterns. We identified and characterized a dormancy-specific target gene of miR169, PagHAP2-6. 5' RACE assays confirmed the direct cleavage of PagHAP2-6 mRNA by miR169. The yeast functional complementation analysis showed that PagHAP2-6 was a homolog of Heme Activator Protein2 (HAP2)/Nuclear factor Y-A (NF-YA) transcription factor in poplar. qRT-PCR analysis indicated that PagHAP2-6 was highly expressed in the dormant stage, which was converse to the expression pattern of pag-miR169a, n, and r. In addition, the transcription of PagHAP2-6 was induced by exogenous abscisic acid (ABA), and both over-expression of PagHAP2-6 in Arabidopsis and transient co-expression assays in Nicotiana benthamiana indicated that PagHAP2-6 could increase the resistance to exogenous ABA. Taken together, the results suggested that miR169 and its target PagHAP2-6 regulated by ABA were involved in poplar cambium dormancy, which provided new insights into the regulatory mechanisms of tree dormancy-active growth transition. PMID:27111502

  19. Aryl sulfonates as neutral photoacid generators (PAGs) for EUV lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulc, Robert; Blackwell, James M.; Younkin, Todd R.; Putna, E. Steve; Esswein, Katherine; DiPasquale, Antonio G.; Callahan, Ryan; Tsubaki, Hideaki; Tsuchihashi, Tooru

    2009-03-01

    EUV lithography (EUVL) is a leading candidate for printing sub-32 nm hp patterns. In order for EUVL to be commercially viable at these dimensions, a continuous evolution of the photoresist material set is required to simultaneously meet the aggressive specifications for resolution, resist sensitivity, LWR, and outgassing rate. Alternative PAG designs, especially if tailored for EUVL, may aid in the formation of a material set that helps achieve these aggressive targets. We describe the preparation, characterization, and lithographic evaluation of aryl sulfonates as non-ionic or neutral photoacid generators (PAGs) for EUVL. Full lithographic characterization is reported for our first generation resist formulation using compound H, MAP-1H-2.5. It is benchmarked against MAP-1P-5.0, which contains the well-known sulfonium PAG, triphenylsulfonium triflate (compound P). Z-factor analysis indicates nZ32 = 81.4 and 16.8 respectively, indicating that our first generation aryl sulfonate formulations require about 4.8x improvement to match the results achieved with a model onium PAG. Improving the acid generation efficiency and use of the generated byproducts is key to the continued optimization of this class of PAGs. To that end, we believe EI-MS fragmentation patterns and molecular simulations can be used to understand and optimize the nature and efficiency of electron-induced PAG fragmentation.

  20. Antioxidant proteins TSA and PAG interact synergistically with Presenilin to modulate Notch signaling in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Wangler, Michael F; Reiter, Lawrence T; Zimm, Georgianna; Trimble-Morgan, Jennifer; Wu, Jane; Bier, Ethan

    2011-07-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathogenesis is characterized by senile plaques in the brain and evidence of oxidative damage. Oxidative stress may precede plaque formation in AD; however, the link between oxidative damage and plaque formation remains unknown. Presenilins are transmembrane proteins in which mutations lead to accelerated plaque formation and early-onset familial Alzheimer's disease. Presenilins physically interact with two antioxidant enzymes thiol-specific antioxidant (TSA) and proliferation-associated gene (PAG) of the peroxiredoxin family. The functional consequences of these interactions are unclear. In the current study we expressed a presenilin transgene in Drosophila wing and sensory organ precursors of the fly. This caused phenotypes typical of Notch signaling loss-of-function mutations. We found that while expression of TSA or PAG alone produced no phenotype, co-expression of TSA and PAG with presenilin led to an enhanced Notch loss-of-function phenotype. This phenotype was more severe and more penetrant than that caused by the expression of Psn alone. In order to determine whether these phenotypes were indeed affecting Notch signaling, this experiment was performed in a genetic background carrying an activated Notch (Abruptex) allele. The phenotypes were almost completely rescued by this activated Notch allele. These results link peroxiredoxins with the in vivo function of Presenilin, which ultimately connects two key pathogenetic mechanisms in AD, namely, antioxidant activity and plaque formation, and raises the possibility of a role for peroxiredoxin family members in Alzheimer's pathogenesis. PMID:21822800

  1. Mammalian Glutaminase Gls2 Gene Encodes Two Functional Alternative Transcripts by a Surrogate Promoter Usage Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Campos-Sandoval, José A.; Manzanares, Elisa; Lobo, Carolina; Segura, J. A.; Alonso, Francisco J.; Matés, José M.; Márquez, Javier

    2012-01-01

    Background Glutaminase is expressed in most mammalian tissues and cancer cells, but the regulation of its expression is poorly understood. An essential step to accomplish this goal is the characterization of its species- and cell-specific isoenzyme pattern of expression. Our aim was to identify and characterize transcript variants of the mammalian glutaminase Gls2 gene. Methodology/Principal Findings We demonstrate for the first time simultaneous expression of two transcript variants from the Gls2 gene in human, rat and mouse. A combination of RT-PCR, primer-extension analysis, bioinformatics, real-time PCR, in vitro transcription and translation and immunoblot analysis was applied to investigate GLS2 transcripts in mammalian tissues. Short (LGA) and long (GAB) transcript forms were isolated in brain and liver tissue of human, rat and mouse. The short LGA transcript arises by a combination of two mechanisms of transcriptional modulation: alternative transcription initiation and alternative promoter. The LGA variant contains both the transcription start site (TSS) and the alternative promoter in the first intron of the Gls2 gene. The full human LGA transcript has two in-frame ATGs in the first exon, which are missing in orthologous rat and mouse transcripts. In vitro transcription and translation of human LGA yielded two polypeptides of the predicted size, but only the canonical full-length protein displayed catalytic activity. Relative abundance of GAB and LGA transcripts showed marked variations depending on species and tissues analyzed. Conclusions/Significance This is the first report demonstrating expression of alternative transcripts of the mammalian Gls2 gene. Transcriptional mechanisms giving rise to GLS2 variants and isolation of novel GLS2 transcripts in human, rat and mouse are presented. Results were also confirmed at the protein level, where catalytic activity was demonstrated for the human LGA protein. Relative abundance of GAB and LGA transcripts was

  2. A novel uPAg-KPI fusion protein inhibits the growth and invasion of human ovarian cancer cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    ZHAO, LI-PING; XU, TIAN-MIN; KAN, MU-JIE; XIAO, YE-CHEN; CUI, MAN-HUA

    2016-01-01

    Urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) acts by breaking down the basement membrane and is involved in cell proliferation, migration and invasion. These actions are mediated by binding to the uPA receptor (uPAR) via its growth factor domain (GFD). The present study evaluated the effects of uPAg-KPI, a fusion protein of uPA-GFD and a kunitz protease inhibitor (KPI) domain that is present in the amyloid β-protein precursor. Using SKOV-3 cells, an ovarian cancer cell line, we examined cell viability, migration, invasion and also protein expression. Furthermore, we examined wound healing, and migration and invasion using a Transwell assay. Our data showed that uPAg-KPI treatment reduced the viability of ovarian cancer SKOV-3 cells in both a concentration and time-dependent manner by arresting tumor cells at G1/G0 phase of the cell cycle. The IC50 of uPAg-KPI was 0.5 µg/µl after 48 h treatment. At this concentration, uPAg-KPI also inhibited tumor cell colony formation, wound closure, as well as cell migration and invasion capacity. At the protein level, western blot analysis demonstrated that uPAg-KPI exerted no significant effect on the expression of total extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/ERK2 and AKT, whereas it suppressed levels of phosphorylated ERK1/ERK2 and AKT. Thus, we suggest that this novel uPAg-KPI fusion protein reduced cell viability, colony formation, wound healing and the invasive ability of human ovarian cancer SKOV-3 cells in vitro by regulating ERK and AKT signaling. Further studies using other cell lines will confirm these findings. PMID:27035617

  3. A novel uPAg-KPI fusion protein inhibits the growth and invasion of human ovarian cancer cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Li-Ping; Xu, Tian-Min; Kan, Mu-Jie; Xiao, Ye-Chen; Cui, Man-Hua

    2016-05-01

    Urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) acts by breaking down the basement membrane and is involved in cell proliferation, migration and invasion. These actions are mediated by binding to the uPA receptor (uPAR) via its growth factor domain (GFD). The present study evaluated the effects of uPAg-KPI, a fusion protein of uPA-GFD and a kunitz protease inhibitor (KPI) domain that is present in the amyloid β-protein precursor. Using SKOV-3 cells, an ovarian cancer cell line, we examined cell viability, migration, invasion and also protein expression. Furthermore, we examined wound healing, and migration and invasion using a Transwell assay. Our data showed that uPAg-KPI treatment reduced the viability of ovarian cancer SKOV-3 cells in both a concentration and time-dependent manner by arresting tumor cells at G1/G0 phase of the cell cycle. The IC50 of uPAg-KPI was 0.5 µg/µl after 48 h treatment. At this concentration, uPAg-KPI also inhibited tumor cell colony formation, wound closure, as well as cell migration and invasion capacity. At the protein level, western blot analysis demonstrated that uPAg-KPI exerted no significant effect on the expression of total extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/ERK2 and AKT, whereas it suppressed levels of phosphorylated ERK1/ERK2 and AKT. Thus, we suggest that this novel uPAg-KPI fusion protein reduced cell viability, colony formation, wound healing and the invasive ability of human ovarian cancer SKOV-3 cells in vitro by regulating ERK and AKT signaling. Further studies using other cell lines will confirm these findings. PMID:27035617

  4. In Silico Analysis of Glutaminase from Different Species of Escherichia and Bacillus

    PubMed Central

    Irajie, Cambyz; Mohkam, Milad; Nezafat, Navid; Hosseinzadeh, Saeed; Aminlari, Mahmood; Ghasemi, Younes

    2016-01-01

    Background: Glutaminase (EC 3.5.1.2) catalyzes the hydrolytic degradation of L-glutamine to L-glutamic acid and has been introduced for cancer therapy in recent years. The present study was an in silico analysis of glutaminase to further elucidate its structure and physicochemical properties. Methods: Forty glutaminase protein sequences from different species of Escherichia and Bacillus obtained from the UniProt Protein Database were characterized for homology search, physiochemical properties, phylogenetic tree construction, motif, superfamily search, and multiple sequence alignment. Results: The sequence level homology was obtained among different groups of glutaminase enzymes, which belonged to superfamily serine-dependent β-lactamases and penicillin-binding proteins. The phylogenetic tree constructed indicated 2 main clusters for the glutaminases. The distribution of common β-lactamase motifs was also observed; however, various non-common motifs were also observed. Conclusion: Our results showed that the existence of a conserved motif with a signature amino-acid sequence of β-lactamases could be considered for the genetic engineering of glutaminases in view of their potential application in cancer therapy. Nonetheless, further research is needed to improve the stability of glutaminases and decrease their immunogenicity in both medical and food industrial applications. PMID:27582590

  5. Design, synthesis, and characterization of fluorine-free PAGs for 193-nm lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Sen; Glodde, Martin; Varanasi, Pushkara R.

    2010-04-01

    Photoacid generators (PAGs) are a key component in chemically amplified resists used in photolithography. Perfluorooctanesulfonates (PFOS) and other perfluoroalkylsulfonates (PFAS) have been well adopted as PAGs in 193 nm photoresist. Recently, concerns have been raised about their environmental impact due to their chemical persistency, bioaccumulation and toxicity. It is a general interest to find environmentally benign PAGs that are free of fluorine atoms. Here we describe the design, synthesis and characterization of a series of novel fluorine-free onium salts as PAGs for 193 nm photoresists. These PAGs demonstrated desirable physical and lithography properties when compared with PFAS-based PAGs for both dry and immersion exposures.

  6. Corner rounding in EUV photoresist: tuning through molecular weight, PAG size, and development time

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Christopher; Daggett, Joe; Naulleau, Patrick

    2009-12-31

    In this paper, the corner rounding bias of a commercially available extreme ultraviolet photoresist is monitored as molecular weight, photoacid generator (PAG) size, and development time are varied. These experiments show that PAG size influences corner biasing while molecular weight and development time do not. Large PAGs are shown to exhibit less corner biasing, and in some cases, lower corner rounding, than small PAGs. In addition, heavier resist polymers are shown to exhibit less corner rounding than lighter ones.

  7. Glutaminase 2 is a novel negative regulator of small GTPase Rac1 and mediates p53 function in suppressing metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Cen; Liu, Juan; Zhao, Yuhan; Yue, Xuetian; Zhu, Yu; Wang, Xiaolong; Wu, Hao; Blanco, Felix; Li, Shaohua; Bhanot, Gyan; Haffty, Bruce G; Hu, Wenwei; Feng, Zhaohui

    2016-01-01

    Glutaminase (GLS) isoenzymes GLS1 and GLS2 are key enzymes for glutamine metabolism. Interestingly, GLS1 and GLS2 display contrasting functions in tumorigenesis with elusive mechanism; GLS1 promotes tumorigenesis, whereas GLS2 exhibits a tumor-suppressive function. In this study, we found that GLS2 but not GLS1 binds to small GTPase Rac1 and inhibits its interaction with Rac1 activators guanine-nucleotide exchange factors, which in turn inhibits Rac1 to suppress cancer metastasis. This function of GLS2 is independent of GLS2 glutaminase activity. Furthermore, decreased GLS2 expression is associated with enhanced metastasis in human cancer. As a p53 target, GLS2 mediates p53’s function in metastasis suppression through inhibiting Rac1. In summary, our results reveal that GLS2 is a novel negative regulator of Rac1, and uncover a novel function and mechanism whereby GLS2 suppresses metastasis. Our results also elucidate a novel mechanism that contributes to the contrasting functions of GLS1 and GLS2 in tumorigenesis. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10727.001 PMID:26751560

  8. Role of IL-1 beta and 5-HT2 receptors in midbrain periaqueductal gray (PAG) in potentiating defensive rage behavior in cat.

    PubMed

    Bhatt, Suresh; Bhatt, Rekha; Zalcman, Steven S; Siegel, Allan

    2008-02-01

    Feline defensive rage, a form of aggressive behavior that occurs in response to a threat can be elicited by electrical stimulation of the medial hypothalamus or midbrain periaqueductal gray (PAG). Our laboratory has recently begun a systematic examination of the role of cytokines in the regulation of rage and aggressive behavior. It was shown that the cytokine, interleukin-2 (IL-2), differentially modulates defensive rage when microinjected into the medial hypothalamus and PAG by acting through separate neurotransmitter systems. The present study sought to determine whether a similar relationship exists with respect to interleukin 1-beta (IL-1 beta), whose receptor activation in the medial hypothalamus potentiates defensive rage. Thus, the present study identified the effects of administration of IL-1 beta into the PAG upon defensive rage elicited from the medial hypothalamus. Microinjections of IL-1 beta into the dorsal PAG significantly facilitated defensive rage behavior elicited from the medial hypothalamus in a dose and time dependent manner. In addition, the facilitative effects of IL-1 beta were blocked by pre-treatment with anti-IL-1 beta receptor antibody, while IL-1 beta administration into the PAG had no effect upon predatory attack elicited from the lateral hypothalamus. The findings further demonstrated that IL-1 beta's effects were mediated through 5-HT(2) receptors since pretreatment with a 5-HT(2C) receptors antagonist blocked the facilitating effects of IL-1 beta. An extensive pattern of labeling of IL-1 beta and 5-HT(2C) receptors in the dorsal PAG supported these findings. The present study demonstrates that IL-beta in the dorsal PAG, similar to the medial hypothalamus, potentiates defensive rage behavior and is mediated through a 5-HT(2C) receptor mechanism. PMID:17890051

  9. Bordetella parapertussis PagP Mediates the Addition of Two Palmitates to the Lipopolysaccharide Lipid A

    PubMed Central

    Hittle, L. E.; Jones, J. W.; Hajjar, A. M.

    2014-01-01

    Bordetella bronchiseptica PagP (PagPBB) is a lipid A palmitoyl transferase that is required for resistance to antibody-dependent complement-mediated killing in a murine model of infection. B. parapertussis contains a putative pagP homolog (encoding B. parapertussis PagP [PagPBPa]), but its role in the biosynthesis of lipid A, the membrane anchor of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), has not been investigated. Mass spectrometry analysis revealed that wild-type B. parapertussis lipid A consists of a heterogeneous mixture of lipid A structures, with penta- and hexa-acylated structures containing one and two palmitates, respectively. Through mutational analysis, we demonstrate that PagPBPa is required for the modification of lipid A with palmitate. While PagPBB transfers a single palmitate to the lipid A C-3′ position, PagPBPa transfers palmitates to the lipid A C-2 and C-3′ positions. The addition of two palmitate acyl chains is unique to B. parapertussis. Mutation of pagPBPa resulted in a mutant strain with increased sensitivity to antimicrobial peptide killing and decreased endotoxicity, as evidenced by reduced proinflammatory responses via Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) to the hypoacylated LPS. Therefore, PagP-mediated modification of lipid A regulates outer membrane function and may be a means to modify interactions between the bacterium and its human host during infection. PMID:25422302

  10. Western analyses of pregnancy-associated glycoprotein family (PAG) in placental extracts of various mammals.

    PubMed

    Bella, A; Sousa, N M; Dehimi, M L; Watts, J; Beckers, J F

    2007-10-15

    The present study was conducted in order to analyze the immunoreactivity of placental extracts of several animal species and humans against the following three groups of PAG antisera: anti-boPAG-I (R#497), -boPAG-II (R#435), and -caPAG (R#706). Placental proteins were obtained after extraction at neutral pH, followed by ammonium sulfate (A.S.) precipitation, dialysis, and lyophilization. The immunoreactivity of different placental extracts was revealed by the use of monodimensional SDS-PAGE, followed by blotting on nitrocellulose membrane and the identification of immunoreactive proteins after incubation with PAG antisera (Western blot technique). A strong immunoreactivity of proteins from synepitheliochorial placenta (cattle, sheep, goat, bison, buffalo, and deer) was demonstrated in both 20-50% and 50-80% A.S. fractions using the three antisera. Proteins from species with epitheliochorial placenta presented variable profiles of detected PAG-like proteins: in the sow, many immunoreactive forms were revealed by antisera boPAG-I and boPAG-II, whereas in the dromedary, only two forms were revealed by anti-boPAG-II. Concerning other species, our protocols showed for the first time a cross-reaction between PAG antisera with proteins extracted from dog, alpaca, dromedary, sea lion, and human placenta. PMID:17850858

  11. Glutaminase 1 inhibition reduces thymidine synthesis in NSCLC.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae-Seon; Kang, Joon H; Lee, Seon-Hyeong; Lee, Chang-Hun; Son, Jaekyoung; Kim, Soo-Youl

    2016-08-26

    We found that non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is remarkably sensitive to the regulation of glutamine supply by testing the metabolic dependency of 11 cancer cell lines against regulation of glycolysis, autophagy, fatty acid synthesis, and glutamine supply. Glutamine is known as a key supplement of cancer cell growth that is converted to α-ketoglutarate for anabolic biogenesis via glutamate by glutaminase 1 (GLS1). GLS1 inhibition using 10 μM of bis-2-(5-phenylacetamido-1,3,4-thiadiazol-2-yl)ethyl sulfide (BPTES) showed about 50% cell growth arrest by SRB assay. By testing the synergistic effects of conventional therapeutics, BPTES combined with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), an irreversible inhibitor of thymidylate synthase, significant effects were observed on cell growth arrest in NSCLC. We found that GLS1 inhibition using BPTES reduced metabolic intermediates including thymidine and carbamoyl phosphate. Reduction of thymidine and carbamoyl-phosphate synthesis by BPTES treatment exacerbated pyrimidine supply by combination with 5-FU, which induced cell death synergistically in NSCLC. PMID:27338638

  12. Purification and characterization of glutaminase free asparaginase from Pseudomonas otitidis: Induce apoptosis in human leukemia MOLT-4 cells.

    PubMed

    Husain, Islam; Sharma, Anjana; Kumar, Suresh; Malik, Fayaz

    2016-02-01

    Asparaginase is an important antineoplastic drug extensively used for the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia, but the intrinsic glutaminase activity of this enzymatic drug is responsible for several life threatening side effects. This study describes the purification and characterization of glutaminase free asparaginase from Pseudomonas otitidis. The purified enzyme exhibited molecular mass of approximately 205±3 kDa on native-PAGE and ̴34±1 kDa on SDS-PAGE, revealing that the enzyme is homohexamer. The isoelectric point of enzyme was 5.5, calculated by 2D-PAGE. Optimum activity of asparaginase was achieved at 40 °C and pH 7.5, which is close to the internal environment of the human body. Monovalent cations (Na(+) and K(+)) and reducing agents (2-mercaptoethanol and glutathione) has enhanced asparaginase activity. Whereas, divalent (Ca(2+), Mg(2+), Zn(2+) and Mn(2+)), trivalent (Fe(3+)) cations and thiol group blocking agent (iodoacetamide) inhibited the enzyme activity significantly. In vitro serum and trypsin half life of asparaginase is almost 2 and 1.5 fold respectively, which is higher than commercial asparaginase. MTT assay results showed that the anticancer activity of purified asparaginase was comparable or higher than commercial E. coli asparaginase. Microscopic studies and cell cycle analysis suggested that purified enzyme induced apoptotic cell death in dose-dependent manner. Loss of mitochondrial membrane potential suggests that enzyme induces cell death via activation of intrinsic apoptotic pathway. Purified asparaginase was found to be nontoxic for human noncancerous FR-2 cells and human blood lymphocytes, which is a remarkable therapeutic feature. PMID:26597158

  13. Genomic organization and transcriptional analysis of the human l-glutaminase gene.

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Gómez, Cristina; Matés, José M; Gómez-Fabre, Pedro M; del Castillo-Olivares, Antonio; Alonso, Francisco J; Márquez, Javier

    2003-01-01

    In mammals, glutaminase (GA) is expressed in most tissues, but the regulation of organ-specific expression is largely unknown. Therefore, as an essential step towards studying the regulation of GA expression, the human liver-type GA (hLGA) gene has been characterized. LGA genomic sequences were isolated using the genome walking technique. Analysis and comparison of these sequences with two LGA cDNA clones and the Human Genome Project database, allowed the determination of the genomic organization of the LGA gene. The gene has 18 exons and is approx. 18 kb long. All exon/intron junction sequences conform to the GT/AG rule. Progressive deletion analysis of LGA promoter-luciferase constructs indicated that the core promoter is located between nt -141 and +410, with several potential regulatory elements: CAAT, GC, TATA-like, Ras-responsive element binding protein and specificity protein 1 (Sp1) sites. The minimal promoter was mapped within +107 and +410, where only an Sp1 binding site is present. Mutation experiments suggested that two CAAT recognition elements near the transcription-initiation site (-138 and -87), play a crucial role for optimal promoter activity. Electrophoretic mobility-shift assays confirmed the importance of CAAT- and TATA-like boxes to enhance basal transcription, and demonstrated that HNF-1 motif is a significant distal element for transcriptional regulation of the hLGA gene. PMID:12444921

  14. PAGs, DRLs, AALs and Other Alphabet Soup MQOs for Laboratory Analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, C T

    2009-10-15

    During an incident of national significance involving radioactive materials protective action guides (PAGs) are established to protect workers and the public from harmful exposure levels of radioactive materials. The PAGs are stated in terms of dose and must be converted to measurable quantities in various media (DRLs). This workshop will present the current PAGs, methods for converting the PAGs to DRLs, and using the Data Quality Objectives process in the Multi-agency Radiological Laboratory Analytical Protocols Manual (MARLAP), derive measurement quality objectives (MQOs) for the laboratories. Examples from the Empire 09 exercise will be used in this presentation.

  15. Perflourosulfonyl imides and methides: investigating the lithographic potential of novel superacid PAGs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, DongKwan; Ma, Xiaoming; Lamanna, William M.; Pawlowski, Georg

    2002-07-01

    The lithographic performance of a new class of onium type photo acid generators (PAGs) developed by 3M Company has been evaluated using standard hybrid/acetal and ESCAP type DUV (248 nm) photoresist formulations. The new PAGs produce perfluoroalkyl sulfonylimides or sulfonylmethides with superacidic properties matching or exceeding the acid strength of commonly known perfluoroalkyl sulfonic acids, such as trifluoromethane sulfonic acid. The direct comparison of near commercial photoresist formulations containing onium perfluoroalkyl sulfonates with identical materials using equimolar amounts of the new PAGs revealed that the new 3M PAGs give rise to almost identical lithographic properties, such as resolution, DOF, and exposure latitude. In addition, secondary properties such as photoresist stability, delay stability, or line edge roughness are almost equivalent, and thus the new PAGs are considered as suitable candidates used for the manufacturing of high volume production photoresists.

  16. Treatment of bleached wool with trans-glutaminases to enhance tensile strength, whiteness, and alkali resistance.

    PubMed

    Montazer, Majid; Lessan, Fatemeh; Pajootan, Elmira; Dadashian, Fatemeh

    2011-09-01

    Trans-glutaminases is known as a cross-linking enzyme for proteins. Wool is a proteinous fiber conventionally is treated through several processes to obtain the desirable characteristics. Bleaching is also one of the most important processes usually carried out by using an oxidizing agent in a conventional method. The tensile strength of wool yarns was reduced as a consequence of oxidative bleaching. Here, with the help of microbial trans-glutaminases (m-TGases), a novel bleaching process was disclosed in a way to obtain a bleached wool yarn with no significant reduction in the tensile strength. The results confirmed that the bleached wool yarns with H(2)O(2) could be modified by m-TGases post-treatment. The m-TGases treatment on the bleached wool yarns improved the tensile strength and whiteness along with the higher alkali resistance. PMID:21638062

  17. Identification of multiple pregnancy-associated glycoproteins (PAGs) purified from the European bison (Eb; Bison bonasus L.) placentas.

    PubMed

    Kiewisz, J; Melo de Sousa, N; Beckers, J F; Panasiewicz, G; Gizejewski, Z; Szafranska, B

    2009-06-01

    This paper describes the first identified chorionic PAGs in the European bison (Eb), named EbPAGs, predominantly expressed during early and mid-pregnancy (45-120 day post-coitum; dpc). Many EbPAGs were extracted from various cotyledonary tissues, precipitated, chromatographed (DEAE and VVA: Vicia villosa agglutinin), electrophoresed (1D- and 2D-PAGE), analysed by heterologous (cross-species) Western blotting and then micro-sequenced by Edman degradation. Finally, twelve selected VVA-purified isoforms (Ip 3.7-7.4) were entirely characterised. Nine identified NH(2)-terminal micro-sequences were found to be PAGs. On 45 dpc, three identified forms were named: EbPAG(67AkDa) (RGSNLTHPLRNIGDLFYVGN), EbPAG(55BkDa) (RGSNLTHPL) and EbPAG(50CkDa) (SQISLRGSNLTI). On 60 dpc, the next three forms were named: EbPAG(71DkDa) (RGSNLTIHPLRNIIDLFYVG), EbPAG(55EkDa) (RGSNLTHPLRNI) and EbPAG(50FkDa) (SQISLRGS). On 120 dpc, three other forms were named: EbPAG(71GkDa) (RGSNLTHPLRNIRDLFYVG), EbPAG(60HkDa) (RGSNLTTHPLRNIKDLVVYM) and EbPAG(50IkDa) (SGSNLTTV). These EbPAG ((A-I)) sequences are unique, as they are not identical to any other PAGs purified previously in related species of the Bovidae family. However, the EbPAGs (A-I forms) have some sequence resemblance to internal sequences of various full-length polypeptide PAG precursors (in silico translated from cloned cDNAs) identified in domestic cattle. Three other novel native isoforms (J1, J2 and K): EbUPG(45kDa) J1 (SKDNYKNYIPLIVPFAT), EbUPG(45kDa) J2 (SKDNQKNYIPLIVPFAT) and EbUPG(76kDa) K (SPEFTV), were temporarily named 'unknown placental glycoproteins' (UPGs), due to their efficient VVA-purification (specific for glycoproteins only) and a lack of considerable consensus to previously sequenced placental glycoproteins in the Bovidae family. This is the first study identifying NH(2)-terminals of multiple/diverse EbPAGs and some EbUPGs purified from the synepitheliochorial cotyledonary placenta of the endangered Bison bonasus (Red List

  18. A Newly Identified Glutaminase-Free ʟ-Asparaginase (ʟ-ASPG86) from the Marine Bacterium Mesoflavibacter zeaxanthinifaciens.

    PubMed

    Lee, Su-Jin; Lee, Youngdeuk; Park, Gun-Hoo; Umasuthan, Navaneethaiyer; Heo, Soo-Jin; De Zoysa, Mahanama; Jung, Won-Kyo; Lee, Dae-Won; Kim, Hanjun; Kang, Do-Hyung; Oh, Chulhong

    2016-06-28

    ʟ-Asparaginase (E.C. 3.5.1.1) is an enzyme involved in asparagine hydrolysis and has the potential to effect leukemic cells and various other cancer cells. We identified the Lasparaginase gene (ʟ-ASPG86) in the genus Mesoflavibacter, which consists of a 1,035 bp open reading frame encoding 344 amino acids. Following phylogenetic analysis, the deduced amino acid sequence of ʟ-ASPG86 (ʟ-ASPG86) was grouped as a type I asparaginase with respective homologs in Escherichia coli and Yersinia pseudotuberculosis. The ʟ-ASPG86 gene was cloned into the pET-16b vector to express the respective protein in E. coli BL21 (DE3) cells. Recombinant ʟ-asparaginase (r-ʟ-ASPG86) showed optimum conditions at 37-40oC, pH 9. Moreover, r-ʟ-ASPG86 did not exhibit glutaminase activity. In the metal ions test, its enzymatic activity was highly improved upon addition of 5 mM manganese (3.97-fold) and magnesium (3.35-fold) compared with the untreated control. The specific activity of r-LASPG86 was 687.1 units/mg under optimum conditions (37°C, pH 9, and 5 mM MnSO4). PMID:26975773

  19. Purification and Characterization of Glutaminase Free Asparaginase from Enterobacter cloacae: In-Vitro Evaluation of Cytotoxic Potential against Human Myeloid Leukemia HL-60 Cells.

    PubMed

    Husain, Islam; Sharma, Anjana; Kumar, Suresh; Malik, Fayaz

    2016-01-01

    Asparaginase is an important antileukemic agent extensively used worldwide but the intrinsic glutaminase activity of this enzymatic drug is responsible for serious life threatening side effects. Hence, glutaminase free asparaginase is much needed for upgradation of therapeutic index of asparaginase therapy. In the present study, glutaminase free asparaginase produced from Enterobacter cloacae was purified to apparent homogeneity. The purified enzyme was found to be homodimer of approximately 106 kDa with monomeric size of approximately 52 kDa and pI 4.5. Purified enzyme showed optimum activity between pH 7-8 and temperature 35-40°C, which is close to the internal environment of human body. Monovalent cations such as Na+ and K+ enhanced asparaginase activity whereas divalent and trivalent cations, Ca2+, Mg2+, Zn2+, Mn2+, and Fe3+ inhibited the enzyme activity. Kinetic parameters Km, Vmax and Kcat of purified enzyme were found to be 1.58×10-3 M, 2.22 IU μg-1 and 5.3 × 104 S-1, respectively. Purified enzyme showed prolonged in vitro serum (T1/2 = ~ 39 h) and trypsin (T1/2 = ~ 32 min) half life, which is therapeutically remarkable feature. The cytotoxic activity of enzyme was examined against a panel of human cancer cell lines, HL-60, MOLT-4, MDA-MB-231 and T47D, and highest cytotoxicity observed against HL-60 cells (IC50 ~ 3.1 IU ml-1), which was comparable to commercial asparaginase. Cell and nuclear morphological studies of HL-60 cells showed that on treatment with purified asparaginase symptoms of apoptosis were increased in dose dependent manner. Cell cycle progression analysis indicates that enzyme induces apoptosis by cell cycle arrest in G0/G1 phase. Mitochondrial membrane potential loss showed that enzyme also triggers the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis. Furthermore, the enzyme was found to be nontoxic for human noncancerous cells FR-2 and nonhemolytic for human erythrocytes. PMID:26891220

  20. Purification and Characterization of Glutaminase Free Asparaginase from Enterobacter cloacae: In-Vitro Evaluation of Cytotoxic Potential against Human Myeloid Leukemia HL-60 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Husain, Islam; Sharma, Anjana; Kumar, Suresh; Malik, Fayaz

    2016-01-01

    Asparaginase is an important antileukemic agent extensively used worldwide but the intrinsic glutaminase activity of this enzymatic drug is responsible for serious life threatening side effects. Hence, glutaminase free asparaginase is much needed for upgradation of therapeutic index of asparaginase therapy. In the present study, glutaminase free asparaginase produced from Enterobacter cloacae was purified to apparent homogeneity. The purified enzyme was found to be homodimer of approximately 106 kDa with monomeric size of approximately 52 kDa and pI 4.5. Purified enzyme showed optimum activity between pH 7–8 and temperature 35–40°C, which is close to the internal environment of human body. Monovalent cations such as Na+ and K+ enhanced asparaginase activity whereas divalent and trivalent cations, Ca2+, Mg2+, Zn2+, Mn2+, and Fe3+ inhibited the enzyme activity. Kinetic parameters Km, Vmax and Kcat of purified enzyme were found to be 1.58×10−3 M, 2.22 IU μg-1 and 5.3 × 104 S-1, respectively. Purified enzyme showed prolonged in vitro serum (T1/2 = ~ 39 h) and trypsin (T1/2 = ~ 32 min) half life, which is therapeutically remarkable feature. The cytotoxic activity of enzyme was examined against a panel of human cancer cell lines, HL-60, MOLT-4, MDA-MB-231 and T47D, and highest cytotoxicity observed against HL-60 cells (IC50 ~ 3.1 IU ml-1), which was comparable to commercial asparaginase. Cell and nuclear morphological studies of HL-60 cells showed that on treatment with purified asparaginase symptoms of apoptosis were increased in dose dependent manner. Cell cycle progression analysis indicates that enzyme induces apoptosis by cell cycle arrest in G0/G1 phase. Mitochondrial membrane potential loss showed that enzyme also triggers the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis. Furthermore, the enzyme was found to be nontoxic for human noncancerous cells FR-2 and nonhemolytic for human erythrocytes. PMID:26891220

  1. Glutamine metabolism in uricotelic species: variation in skeletal muscle glutamine synthetase, glutaminase, glutamine levels and rates of protein synthesis.

    PubMed

    Watford, Malcolm; Wu, Guoyao

    2005-04-01

    High intracellular glutamine levels have been implicated in promoting net protein synthesis and accretion in mammalian skeletal muscle. Little is known regarding glutamine metabolism in uricotelic species but chicken breast muscle exhibits high rates of protein accretion and would be predicted to maintain high glutamine levels. However, chicken breast muscle expresses high glutaminase activity and here we report that chicken breast muscle also expresses low glutamine synthetase activity (0.07+/-0.01 U/g) when compared to leg muscle (0.50+/-0.04 U/g). Free glutamine levels were 1.38+/-0.09 and 9.69+/-0.12 nmol/mg wet weight in breast and leg muscles of fed chickens, respectively. Glutamine levels were also lower in dove breast muscle (4.82+/-0.35 nmol/mg wet weight) when compared to leg muscle (16.2+/-1.0 nmol/mg wet weight) and much lower (1.80+/-0.46 nmol/mg wet weight) in lizard leg muscle. In fed chickens, rates of fractional protein synthesis were higher in leg than in breast muscle, and starvation (48 h) resulted in a decrease in both glutamine content and rate of protein synthesis in leg muscle. Thus, although tissue-specific glutamine metabolism in uricotelic species differs markedly from that in ureotelic animals, differences in rates of skeletal muscle protein synthesis are associated with corresponding differences in intramuscular glutamine content. PMID:15763516

  2. Synthetic lethality of combined glutaminase and Hsp90 inhibition in mTORC1-driven tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jing; Csibi, Alfredo; Yang, Sun; Hoffman, Gregory R.; Li, Chenggang; Zhang, Erik; Yu, Jane J.; Blenis, John

    2015-01-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) integrates multiple signals from growth factors, nutrients, and cellular energy status to control a wide range of metabolic processes, including mRNA biogenesis; protein, nucleotide, and lipid synthesis; and autophagy. Deregulation of the mTORC1 pathway is found in cancer as well as genetic disorders such as tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) and sporadic lymphangioleiomyomatosis. Recent studies have shown that the mTORC1 inhibitor rapamycin and its analogs generally suppress proliferation rather than induce apoptosis. Therefore, it is critical to use alternative strategies to induce death of cells with activated mTORC1. In this study, a small-molecule screen has revealed that the combination of glutaminase (GLS) and heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) inhibitors selectively triggers death of TSC2-deficient cells. At a mechanistic level, high mTORC1-driven translation rates in TSC1/2-deficient cells, unlike wild-type cells, sensitizes these cells to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Thus, Hsp90 inhibition drives accumulation of unfolded protein and ER stress. When combining proteotoxic stress with oxidative stress by depletion of the intracellular antioxidant glutathione by GLS inhibition, acute cell death is observed in cells with activated mTORC1 signaling. This study suggests that this combination strategy may have the potential to be developed into a therapeutic use for the treatment of mTORC1-driven tumors. PMID:25524627

  3. Incorporation of 15N-labeled ammonia into glutamine amide groups by protein-glutaminase and analysis of the reactivity for α-lactalbumin.

    PubMed

    Miwa, Noriko; Shimba, Nobuhisa; Nakamura, Mina; Yokoyama, Keiichi; Nio, Noriki; Suzuki, Eiichiro; Sonomoto, Kenji

    2011-12-28

    Protein-glutaminase (PG) is an enzyme that catalyzes the deamidation of protein-bound glutamine residues. We found that an enzyme labeling technique (ELT), which is a stable isotope labeling method based on transglutaminase (TGase) reaction, is applicable for PG. PG catalyzed incorporation of (15)N-labeled ammonium ions into reactive glutamine amide groups in α-lactalbumin similarly to TGase and deamidated the most reactive glutamine amide group once labeled with (15)N. Furthermore, we investigated the effect of ammonium ions on the PG activity by peptide mapping, and more reactive glutamine residues were detected than were detected by the ELT in the presence of ammonium ions. This is probably because ammonium ions are competitive inhibitors, causing decreased reactivity for glutamine residues. We propose the reaction scheme of PG in the presence of the (15)N-labeled ammonium ions and show that the ELT method with PG is useful for evaluating the activity of PG. PMID:22060122

  4. Development of Modified Pag (Polyalkylene Glycol) High VI High Fuel Efficient Lubricant for LDV Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Gangopadhyay, Arup; McWatt, D. G.; Zdrodowski, R. J.; Liu, Zak; Elie, Larry; Simko, S. J.; Erdemir, Ali; Ramirez, Giovanni; Cuthbert, J.; Hock, E. D.

    2015-09-30

    Engine oils play a critical role in friction reduction. Improvements in engine oil technology steadily improved fuel economy as the industry moved through ILSAC GF-1 to GF-5 specifications. These improvements were influenced by changes in base oil chemistry, development of new friction modifiers and their treat levels, and the total additive package consisting of various other components. However, the improvements are incremental and further fuel consumption reduction opportunities are becoming more challenging. Polyalkylene glycol (PAG) based engine oils are being explored as a step forward for significant fuel consumption reduction. Although PAG fluids are used in many industrial applications, its application as an engine oil has been explored in a limited way. The objective of this project is to deep dive in exploring the applicability of PAG technology in engine oil, understanding the benefits, and limitations, elucidating the mechanism(s) for friction benefits, if any, and finally recommending how to address any limitations. The project was designed in four steps, starting with selection of lubricant technology, followed by friction and wear evaluations in laboratory bench tests which are relatively simple and inexpensive and also served as a screener for further evaluation. Selected formulations were chosen for more complex engine component level tests i.e., motored valvetrain friction and wear, piston ring friction using a motored single cylinder, and motored engine tests. A couple of formulations were further selected based on component level tests for engine dyno tests i.e., Sequence VID (ASTM D6709) for fuel economy, Sequence IVA (ASTM D6891) for valvetrain wear, and Sequence VG (ASTM D6593) for sludge and varnish protection. These are some of the industry standard tests required for qualifying engine oils. Out of these tests, a single PAG oil was selected for chassis roll dynamometer tests for fuel economy and emission measurements using FTP (Federal

  5. Cross sections of EUV PAGs: influence of concentration, electron energy, and structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grzeskowiak, Steven; Narasimhan, Amrit; Wisehart, Liam; Schad, Jonathon; Neisser, Mark; Ocola, Leonidas E.; Brainard, Robert L.; Denbeaux, Greg

    2016-03-01

    Optimizing the photochemistry of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) photoresists should provide faster, more efficient resists which would lead to greater throughput in manufacturing. The fundamental reaction mechanisms in EUV resists are believed to be due to interactions with energetic electrons liberated by ionization. Identifying the likelihood (or cross section) of how these photoelectrons interact with resist components is critical to optimizing the performance of EUV resists. Chemically amplified resists utilize photoacid generators (PAGs) to improve sensitivity; measuring the cross section of electron induced decomposition of different PAGs will provide insight into developing new resist materials. To study the interactions of photoelectrons generated by EUV absorption, photoresists were exposed to electron beams at energies between 80 and 250 eV. The reactions between PAG molecules and electrons were measured using a mass spectrometer to monitor the levels of small molecules produced by PAG decomposition that outgassed from the film. Comparing the cross sections of a variety of PAG molecules can provide insight into the relationship between chemical structure and reactivity to the electrons in their environments. This research is a part of a larger SEMATECH research program to understand the fundamentals of resist exposures to help in the development of new, better performing EUV resists.

  6. Sequential Optimization Methods for Augmentation of Marine Enzymes Production in Solid-State Fermentation: l-Glutaminase Production a Case Study.

    PubMed

    Sathish, T; Uppuluri, K B; Veera Bramha Chari, P; Kezia, D

    2016-01-01

    There is an increased l-glutaminase market worldwide due to its relevant industrial applications. Salt tolerance l-glutaminases play a vital role in the increase of flavor of different types of foods like soya sauce and tofu. This chapter is presenting the economically viable l-glutaminases production in solid-state fermentation (SSF) by Aspergillus flavus MTCC 9972 as a case study. The enzyme production was improved following a three step optimization process. Initially mixture design (MD) (augmented simplex lattice design) was employed to optimize the solid substrate mixture. Such solid substrate mixture consisted of 59:41 of wheat bran and Bengal gram husk has given higher amounts of l-glutaminase. Glucose and l-glutamine were screened as a finest additional carbon and nitrogen sources for l-glutaminase production with help of Plackett-Burman Design (PBD). l-Glutamine also acting as a nitrogen source as well as inducer for secretion of l-glutaminase from A. flavus MTCC 9972. In the final step of optimization various environmental and nutritive parameters such as pH, temperature, moisture content, inoculum concentration, glucose, and l-glutamine levels were optimized through the use of hybrid feed forward neural networks (FFNNs) and genetic algorithm (GA). Through sequential optimization methods MD-PBD-FFNN-GA, the l-glutaminase production in SSF could be improved by 2.7-fold (453-1690U/g). PMID:27452167

  7. Inscribing the Perimeter of the PagP Hydrocarbon Ruler by Site-Specific Chemical Alkylation†

    PubMed Central

    Khan, M. Adil; Moktar, Joel; Mott, Patrick J.; Vu, Mary; McKie, Aaron H.; Pinter, Thomas; Hof, Fraser; Bishop, Russell E.

    2016-01-01

    The Escherichia coli outer membrane phospholipid:lipid A palmitoyltransferase PagP selects palmitate chains using its β-barrel-interior hydrocarbon ruler and interrogates phospholipid donors by gating them laterally through an aperture known as the crenel. Lipid A palmitoylation provides antimicrobial peptide resistance and modulates inflammation signaled through the host TLR4/MD2 pathway. Gly88 substitutions can raise the PagP hydrocarbon ruler floor to correspondingly shorten the selected acyl chain. To explore the limits of hydrocarbon ruler acyl chain selectivity, we have modified the single Gly88Cys sulfhydryl group with linear alkyl units and identified C10 as the shortest acyl chain to be efficiently utilized. Gly88Cys-S-ethyl, S-n-propyl, and S-n-butyl PagP were all highly specific for C12, C11, and C10 acyl chains, respectively, and longer aliphatic or aminoalkyl substitutions could not extend acyl chain selectivity any further. The donor chain length limit of C10 coincides with the phosphatidylcholine transition from displaying bilayer to micellar properties in water, but the detergent inhibitor lauryldimethylamine N-oxide also gradually became ineffective in a micellar assay as the selected acyl chains were shortened to C10. The Gly88Cys-S-ethyl and norleucine substitutions exhibited superior C12 acyl chain specificity compared to that of Gly88Met PagP, thus revealing detection by the hydrocarbon ruler of the Met side chain tolerance for terminal methyl group gauche conformers. Although norleucine substitution was benign, selenomethionine substitution at Met72 was highly destabilizing to PagP. Within the hydrophobic and van der Waals-contacted environment of the PagP hydrocarbon ruler, side chain flexibility, combined with localized thioetheraromatic dispersion attraction, likely influences the specificity of acyl chain selection. PMID:20853818

  8. CFIm25 regulates glutaminase alternative terminal exon definition to modulate miR-23 function.

    PubMed

    Masamha, Chioniso P; Xia, Zheng; Peart, Natoya; Collum, Scott; Li, Wei; Wagner, Eric J; Shyu, Ann-Bin

    2016-06-01

    Alternative polyadenylation (APA) and alternative splicing (AS) provide mRNAs with the means to avoid microRNA repression through selective shortening or differential usage of 3'UTRs. The two glutaminase (GLS) mRNA isoforms, termed KGA and GAC, contain distinct 3'UTRs with the KGA isoform subject to repression by miR-23. We show that depletion of the APA regulator CFIm25 causes a strong shift to the usage of a proximal poly(A) site within the KGA 3'UTR and also alters splicing to favor exclusion of the GAC 3'UTR. Surprisingly, we observe that while miR-23 is capable of down-regulating the shortened KGA 3'UTR, it has only minor impact on the full-length KGA 3'UTR, demonstrating that additional potent negative regulation of GLS expression exists beyond this single microRNA targeting site. Finally, we show that the apoptosis induced upon down-regulation of the GAC isoform can be alleviated through concurrent reduction in CFIm25 expression, revealing the sensitivity of glutaminase expression to the levels of RNA processing factors. These results exemplify the complex interplay between RNA processing and microRNA repression in controlling glutamine metabolism in cancer cells. PMID:27095025

  9. Pregnancy-associated glycoprotein (PAG) concentration in plasma and milk samples for early pregnancy diagnosis in Lacaune dairy sheep.

    PubMed

    El Amiri, B; Sousa, N M; Alvarez Oxiley, A; Hadarbach, D; Beckers, J F

    2015-04-01

    In the present study, four RIA systems (RIA-1 to -4) based on two antisera raised against ovine pregnancy-associated glycoproteins (ovPAGs), combined with an ovine or a bovine PAG tracer were used to measure PAG concentrations in plasma and milk samples of dairy ewes. Blood and milk samples were collected on different days of gestation: 0, 18, 20, 22, 25, 28, 32, 42, and 49. From day 20 onward, the PAG in plasma could be detected in all pregnant ewes using the four RIA systems. By using milk, except for RIA-1, the other systems showed a sensitivity of 100% from day 28 of gestation onward. In plasma, PAG concentrations were higher in multiple than in single pregnancies, while no clear relationship was observed in milk. In conclusion, milk is a good alternative to plasma for early pregnancy diagnosis in sheep from day 28 to day 42. PMID:25613086

  10. Elastohydrodynamics of oil-soluble PAGs, high-oleic sunflower oil and their blends

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recent reports indicate that the oxidative stability of vegetable oils can be improved for lubrication purposes by mixing them with oil-soluble polyalkyl glycols (OS-PAG). This inspired a study of other lubrication-related properties of their blends. The viscosity, density, and elastohydrodynamic fi...

  11. Study of acid diffusion behaves form PAG by using top coat method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekiguchi, Atsushi; Matsumoto, Yoko

    2014-03-01

    Our past research on measurements of simulation parameters for ArF resists focused on establishing methods for measuring the following parameters:[1]-[4] • Development parameters[1] • PEB parameters[2] • Dill's ABC parameters[3] • Quencher parameter[4] We entered these parameters into a lithography simulator and performed ArF resist simulations.We then explored ways to optimize the ArF resist material and process. This paper reports on our study of methods for measuring the diffusion length of acid generated from PAG during exposures. In our experiment, we applied a PAG-containing top coat (TC) material (second layer) to a PAG-free ArF resist (first layer), then performed the exposure and PEB processes. The acid generated in the TC during the exposure diffused into the ArF resist in the lower layer (first layer) when PEB was performed. The process of developing this sample removed the TC in the second layer and the parts of the first layer into which the acid had diffused.We obtained the acid diffusion length based on the quantity of film removed by the development. We calculated the acid diffusion coefficient after varying the exposure value and repeating the measurement. For this report, we also performed measurements to determine how differences in PAG anion size, amount of quencher additive, and PEB temperature affected the acid diffusion coefficient.We entered the measurements obtained into the PROLITH simulator and explored the effects of acid diffusion on pattern profile.

  12. Quantum efficiency of PAG decomposition in different polymer matrices at advanced lithographic wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedynyshyn, Theodore H.; Sinta, Roger F.; Mowers, William A.; Cabral, Alberto

    2003-06-01

    The Dill ABC parameters for optical resists are typically determined by measuring the change in the intensity of transmitted light at the wavelength of interest as a function of incident energy. The effectiveness of the experiment rests with the fact that the resist optical properties change with exposure and that the optical properties are directly related to the concentration of PAG compound. These conditions are not typically satisfied in CA resists and thus C is unobtainable by this method. FT-IR spectroscopy can directly measure changes in the photoactive species by isolating and measuring absorbance peaks unique to the photoactive species. We employed the ProABC software, specially modified to allow FT-IR absorbance input, to extract ABS parameters through a best fit of the lithography model to experimental data. The quantum efficiency of PAG decomposition at 157-, 193-, and 248-nm was determined for four diazomethane type PAGs in four different polymer matrices. It was found that both the Dill C parameter and the quantum efficiency for all PAGs increased as wavelength decreased, but that the magnitude of the increase was strongly dependent on the polymer matrix.

  13. 78 FR 22257 - Updates to Protective Action Guides Manual: Protective Action Guides (PAGs) and Planning Guidance...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-15

    ... emergency levels of nuclear radiation * * *.'' (Executive Order No. 12656, sec.1601(2)). EPA's role in PAGs... Blocking Agent in Radiation Emergencies, FDA (66 FR 64046, Dec. 11, 2001). Provide basic planning guidance... Radiological Dispersal Device (RDD) and Improvised Nuclear Device (IND) Incidents, DHS/FEMA (73 FR 45029, Aug...

  14. Feeding the Preschool Child: Documents Issued by PAG Ad Hoc Working Group Meetings (1969-1975).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Nations Industrial Development Organization, Vienna (Austria).

    This document contains six papers prepared between 1969 and 1975 by the Protein-Calorie Advisory Group (PAG) of the United Nations on topics related to the feeding of preschool children in underdeveloped countries. Among the topics covered: (1) nutrition in utero; (2) nutritional aspects of breastfeeding; (3) infant mortality rates as indicators…

  15. A Thiolate Anion Buried within the Hydrocarbon Ruler Perturbs PagP Lipid Acyl Chain Selection†

    PubMed Central

    Khan, M. Adil; Moktar, Joel; Mott, Patrick J.; Bishop, Russell E.

    2016-01-01

    The Escherichia coli outer membrane phospholipid:lipid A palmitoyltransferase PagP exhibits remarkable selectivity because its binding pocket for lipid acyl chains excludes those differing in length from palmitate by a solitary methylene unit. This narrow detergent-binding hydrophobic pocket buried within the eight-strand antiparallel β-barrel is known as the hydrocarbon ruler. Gly88 lines the acyl chain binding pocket floor, and its substitution can raise the floor to correspondingly shorten the selected acyl chain. An aromatic exciton interaction between Tyr26 and Trp66 provides an intrinsic spectroscopic probe located immediately adjacent to Gly88. The Gly88Cys PagP enzyme was engineered to function as a dedicated myristoyltransferase, but the mutant enzyme instead selected both myristoyl and pentadecanoyl groups, was devoid of the exciton, and displayed a 21 °C reduction in thermal stability. We now demonstrate that the structural perturbation results from a buried thiolate anion attributed to suppression of the Cys sulfhydryl group pKa from 9.4 in aqueous solvent to 7.5 in the hydrocarbon ruler microenvironment. The Cys thiol is sandwiched at the interface between a nonpolar and a polar β-barrel interior milieu, suggesting that local electrostatics near the otherwise hydrophobic hydrocarbon ruler pocket serve to perturb the thiol pKa. Neutralization of the Cys thiolate anion by protonation restores wild-type exciton and thermal stability signatures to Gly88Cys PagP, which then functions as a dedicated myristoyltransferase at pH 7. Gly88Cys PagP assembled in bacterial membranes recapitulates lipid A myristoylation in vivo. Hydrocarbon ruler–exciton coupling in PagP thus reveals a thiol–thiolate ionization mechanism for modulating lipid acyl chain selection. PMID:20175558

  16. Identification of brain-specific angiogenesis inhibitor 2 as an interaction partner of glutaminase interacting protein

    SciTech Connect

    Zencir, Sevil; Ovee, Mohiuddin; Dobson, Melanie J.; Banerjee, Monimoy; Topcu, Zeki; Mohanty, Smita

    2011-08-12

    Highlights: {yields} Brain-specific angiogenesis inhibitor 2 (BAI2) is a new partner protein for GIP. {yields} BAI2 interaction with GIP was revealed by yeast two-hybrid assay. {yields} Binding of BAI2 to GIP was characterized by NMR, CD and fluorescence. {yields} BAI2 and GIP binding was mediated through the C-terminus of BAI2. -- Abstract: The vast majority of physiological processes in living cells are mediated by protein-protein interactions often specified by particular protein sequence motifs. PDZ domains, composed of 80-100 amino acid residues, are an important class of interaction motif. Among the PDZ-containing proteins, glutaminase interacting protein (GIP), also known as Tax Interacting Protein TIP-1, is unique in being composed almost exclusively of a single PDZ domain. GIP has important roles in cellular signaling, protein scaffolding and modulation of tumor growth and interacts with a number of physiological partner proteins, including Glutaminase L, {beta}-Catenin, FAS, HTLV-1 Tax, HPV16 E6, Rhotekin and Kir 2.3. To identify the network of proteins that interact with GIP, a human fetal brain cDNA library was screened using a yeast two-hybrid assay with GIP as bait. We identified brain-specific angiogenesis inhibitor 2 (BAI2), a member of the adhesion-G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), as a new partner of GIP. BAI2 is expressed primarily in neurons, further expanding GIP cellular functions. The interaction between GIP and the carboxy-terminus of BAI2 was characterized using fluorescence, circular dichroism (CD) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy assays. These biophysical analyses support the interaction identified in the yeast two-hybrid assay. This is the first study reporting BAI2 as an interaction partner of GIP.

  17. Cloning, sequence analysis, and expression of ansB from Pseudomonas fluorescens, encoding periplasmic glutaminase/asparaginase.

    PubMed

    Hüser, A; Klöppner, U; Röhm, K H

    1999-09-15

    A gene (ansB) encoding a class II glutaminase/asparaginase has been cloned from Pseudomonas fluorescens and characterized by DNA sequencing, promoter analysis and heterologous expression in Escherichia coli. We show that ansB is monocistronic and depends on the alternate sigma factor sigma 54 for expression. A second open reading frame located downstream of ansB is highly homologous to a number of bacterial genes that encode secreted endonucleases of unknown function. PMID:10499283

  18. Influence of base and PAG on deprotection blur in EUV photoresists and some thoughts on shot noise

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Juanita; Anderson, Christopher; Naulleau, Patrick; Niakoula, Demitra; Hassanein, Elsayed; Brainard, Robert; Gallatin, Gregg; Dean, Kim

    2008-06-01

    A contact-hole deprotection blur metric has been used to monitor the deprotection blur of an experimental open platform resist (EH27) as the weight percent of base and photo acid generator (PAG) were varied. Patterning ability in 1:1 line-space patterns is shown to improve at smaller pitches as base/PAG are increased however no significant change in deprotection blur was observed. Isolated (or intrinsic) line-edge-roughness (LER) is shown to improve with increased base loading while remaining fixed through PAG loading. A discussion of improved patterning performance as related to shot noise and deprotection blur concludes with a speculation that the spatial distribution of PAG molecules has been playing some role, perhaps a dominant one, in determining the uniformity of photo generated acids in the resists that have been studied.

  19. Analysis of the generating action of the acid from PAG using acid sensitive dyes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekiguchi, Atsushi; Matsumoto, Yoko; Konishi, Hiroko; Moriyasu, Kengo; Morimoto, Yukihiro

    2011-04-01

    The use of acid sensitive dyes to determine the quantity of acid generated from PAG and in the analysis of acid-generating reaction is currently being studied. The method would allow an easy understanding of the PAG acid-generating reaction simply by adding an acid sensitive dye to the resist. In the conventional method, a resist containing a chromogenic substance is applied to a quartz substrate, which is then exposed. Following the exposure, the absorbance of chromogenic component near 530 nm is measured and evaluated with a spectroscope. The rate constant for acid generation (Dill's C parameter) during the exposure is determined based on the relationship between transmittance at 530 nm and the exposure dose. However, the chromogenic substance used in this method degrades over time (fading reaction) after the exposure, resulting in variations in transmittance measurements due to the effects of time between the completion of the exposure and the measurement of transmittance. We devised a prototype instrument capable of in situ measurements of absorbance at 530 nm while irradiating a 193-nm light beam. Using this instrument, we obtained rate constants for acid generation (Dill's C parameter) and examined the differing results obtained with ArF resist polymers of differing PAG concentrations and structures as well as dependence on the quantity of the chromogenic substance.

  20. Glutaminase Increases in Rat Dorsal Root Ganglion Neurons after Unilateral Adjuvant-Induced Hind Paw Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, E. Matthew; Zhang, Zijia; Schechter, Ruben; Miller, Kenneth E.

    2016-01-01

    Glutamate is a neurotransmitter used at both the peripheral and central terminals of nociceptive primary sensory neurons, yet little is known concerning regulation of glutamate metabolism during peripheral inflammation. Glutaminase (GLS) is an enzyme of the glutamate-glutamine cycle that converts glutamine into glutamate for neurotransmission and is implicated in producing elevated levels of glutamate in central and peripheral terminals. A potential mechanism for increased levels of glutamate is an elevation in GLS expression. We assessed GLS expression after unilateral hind paw inflammation by measuring GLS immunoreactivity (ir) with quantitative image analysis of L4 dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons after one, two, four, and eight days of adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA) compared to saline injected controls. No significant elevation in GLS-ir occurred in the DRG ipsilateral to the inflamed hind paw after one or two days of AIA. After four days AIA, GLS-ir was elevated significantly in all sizes of DRG neurons. After eight days AIA, GLS-ir remained elevated in small (<400 µm2), presumably nociceptive neurons. Western blot analysis of the L4 DRG at day four AIA confirmed the elevated GLS-ir. The present study indicates that GLS expression is increased in the chronic stage of inflammation and may be a target for chronic pain therapy. PMID:26771651

  1. A High-Throughput Fluorimetric Assay for 2-Hydroxyglutarate Identifies Zaprinast as a Glutaminase Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Elhammali, Adnan; Ippolito, Joseph E.; Collins, Lynne; Crowley, Jan; Marasa, Jayne; Piwnica-Worms, David

    2014-01-01

    Recently identified IDH mutations lead to the production of 2-hydroxyglutarate (2HG), an onco-metabolite aberrantly elevated in selected cancers. We developed a facile and inexpensive fluorimetric microplate assay for quantitation of 2HG and performed an unbiased small molecule screen in live cells to identify compounds capable of perturbing 2HG production. Zaprinast, a PDE5 inhibitor, was identified as an efficacious modulator of 2HG production and confirmed to lower 2HG levels in vivo. The mechanism of action was not due to cGMP stabilization, but rather, profiling of metabolites upstream of mutant IDH1 pointed to targeted inhibition of the enzyme glutaminase (GLS). Zaprinast treatment reversed histone hypermethylation and soft agar growth of IDH1 mutant cells, and treatment of glutamine-addicted pancreatic cancer cells reduced growth and sensitized cells to oxidative damage. Thus, Zaprinast is efficacious against glutamine metabolism and further establishes the therapeutic linkages between GLS and 2HG-mediated oncogenesis. PMID:24740997

  2. Dlx-2 and glutaminase upregulate epithelial-mesenchymal transition and glycolytic switch

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Su Yeon; Jeon, Hyun Min; Ju, Min Kyung; Jeong, Eui Kyong; Kim, Cho Hee; Park, Hye Gyeong; Han, Song Iy; Kang, Ho Sung

    2016-01-01

    Most cancer cells depend on enhanced glucose and glutamine (Gln) metabolism for growth and survival. Oncogenic metabolism provides biosynthetic precursors for nucleotides, lipids, and amino acids; however, its specific roles in tumor progression are largely unknown. We previously showed that distal-less homeobox-2 (Dlx-2), a homeodomain transcription factor involved in embryonic and tumor development, induces glycolytic switch and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) by inducing Snail expression. Here we show that Dlx-2 also induces the expression of the crucial Gln metabolism enzyme glutaminase (GLS1), which converts Gln to glutamate. TGF-β and Wnt induced GLS1 expression in a Dlx-2-dependent manner. GLS1 shRNA (shGLS1) suppressed in vivo tumor metastasis and growth. Inhibition of Gln metabolism by shGLS1, Gln deprivation, and Gln metabolism inhibitors (DON, 968 and BPTES) prevented Dlx-2-, TGF-β-, Wnt-, and Snail-induced EMT and glycolytic switch. Finally, shDlx-2 and Gln metabolism inhibition decreased Snail mRNA levels through p53-dependent upregulation of Snail-targeting microRNAs. These results demonstrate that the Dlx-2/GLS1/Gln metabolism axis is an important regulator of TGF-β/Wnt-induced, Snail-dependent EMT, metastasis, and glycolytic switch. PMID:26771232

  3. Simultaneously targeting tissue transglutaminase and kidney type glutaminase sensitizes cancer cells to acid toxicity and offers new opportunities for therapeutic intervention.

    PubMed

    Katt, William P; Antonyak, Marc A; Cerione, Richard A

    2015-01-01

    Most cancer cells undergo characteristic metabolic changes that are commonly referred to as the Warburg effect, with one of the hallmarks being a dramatic increase in the rate of lactic acid fermentation. This leads to the production of protons, which in turn acidifies the microenvironment surrounding tumors. Cancer cells have acquired resistance to acid toxicity, allowing them to survive and grow under these detrimental conditions. Kidney type glutaminase (GLS1), which is responsible for the conversion of glutamine to glutamate, produces ammonia as part of its catalytic activities and has been shown to modulate cellular acidity. In this study, we show that tissue, or type 2, transglutaminase (TG2), a γ-glutamyl transferase that is highly expressed in metastatic cancers and produces ammonia as a byproduct of its catalytic activity, is up-regulated by decreases in cellular pH and helps protect cells from acid-induced cell death. Since both TG2 and GLS1 can similarly function to protect cancer cells, we then proceeded to demonstrate that treatment of a variety of cancer cell types with inhibitors of each of these proteins results in synthetic lethality. The combination doses of the inhibitors induce cell death, while individual treatment with each compound shows little or no ability to kill cells. These results suggest that combination drug treatments that simultaneously target TG2 and GLS1 might provide an effective strategy for killing cancer cells. PMID:25426679

  4. Involvement of the pagR gene of pXO2 in anthrax pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Xudong; Zhang, Enmin; Zhang, Huijuan; Wei, Jianchun; Li, Wei; Zhu, Jin; Wang, Bingxiang; Dong, Shulin

    2016-01-01

    Anthrax is a disease caused by Bacillus anthracis. Specifically, the anthrax toxins and capsules encoded by the pXO1 and pXO2 plasmids, respectively, are the major virulence factors. We previously reported that the pXO1 plasmid was retained in the attenuated strain of B. anthracis vaccine strains even after subculturing at high temperatures. In the present study, we reinvestigate the attenuation mechanism of Pasteur II. Sequencing of pXO1 and pXO2 from Pasteur II strain revealed mutations in these plasmids as compared to the reference sequences. Two deletions on these plasmids, one each on pXO1 and pXO2, were confirmed to be unique to the Pasteur II strain as compared to the wild-type strains. Gene replacement with homologous recombination revealed that the mutation in the promoter region of the pagR gene on pXO2, but not the mutation on pXO1, contributes to lethal levels of toxin production. This result was further confirmed by RT-PCR, western blot, and animal toxicity assays. Taken together, our results signify that the attenuation of the Pasteur II vaccine strain is caused by a mutation in the pagR gene on its pXO2 plasmid. Moreover, these data suggest that pXO2 plasmid encoded proteins are involved in the virulence of B. anthracis. PMID:27363681

  5. Numerical Simulation and Observational Analysis of the Bora of Pag's Ribs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trošić, Tanja; Trošić, Živko

    2010-02-01

    The severe bora case that lasted from 13 to 15 November 2004 has been selected for the analysis of the bora of Pag’s ribs, which occurs in the northern part of the eastern Adriatic coast over the Pag island area (Croatia). According to the measurements from automatic stations, the MM5 numerical model is successful in the 10-min mean wind speed prediction at 10-m height. The vertical analysis of the wind speed and potential temperature also gave satisfactory results. At the commencement of the bora the modelled wind had a magnitude of 20ms-1 at 10-m height in the Pag island area, which sharply attenuated in the cross direction and to the open sea. In this way the model has proved successful in predicting the characteristics of the bora of Pag’s ribs. Potential vorticity (PV) at 600m has lower values within PV banners than during the developed bora. The consequence is a strong jet emanating from the nearest gap. The vertical cross-sections through the centre of the gap point out a permanent hydraulic-like flow. At the time of the bora of Pag’s ribs the highest modelled turbulent kinetic energy is found in the jump-like region above the inversion and within the boundary layer along the lower boundary, ranging from 6-8m2 s-2. It is concluded that the dissipation in the hydraulic jumps and the wave breaking regions are the reasons for PV generation.

  6. Involvement of the pagR gene of pXO2 in anthrax pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xudong; Zhang, Enmin; Zhang, Huijuan; Wei, Jianchun; Li, Wei; Zhu, Jin; Wang, Bingxiang; Dong, Shulin

    2016-01-01

    Anthrax is a disease caused by Bacillus anthracis. Specifically, the anthrax toxins and capsules encoded by the pXO1 and pXO2 plasmids, respectively, are the major virulence factors. We previously reported that the pXO1 plasmid was retained in the attenuated strain of B. anthracis vaccine strains even after subculturing at high temperatures. In the present study, we reinvestigate the attenuation mechanism of Pasteur II. Sequencing of pXO1 and pXO2 from Pasteur II strain revealed mutations in these plasmids as compared to the reference sequences. Two deletions on these plasmids, one each on pXO1 and pXO2, were confirmed to be unique to the Pasteur II strain as compared to the wild-type strains. Gene replacement with homologous recombination revealed that the mutation in the promoter region of the pagR gene on pXO2, but not the mutation on pXO1, contributes to lethal levels of toxin production. This result was further confirmed by RT-PCR, western blot, and animal toxicity assays. Taken together, our results signify that the attenuation of the Pasteur II vaccine strain is caused by a mutation in the pagR gene on its pXO2 plasmid. Moreover, these data suggest that pXO2 plasmid encoded proteins are involved in the virulence of B. anthracis. PMID:27363681

  7. Evaluation of the radiation-sensitizer/protector and/or antioxidant efficiencies using Fricke and PAG dosimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meesat, Ridthee; Jay-Gerin, Jean-Paul; Khalil, Abdelouahed; Lepage, Martin

    2009-05-01

    In this study, our aim is to assess the potential of Fricke and polyacrylamide gel (PAG) dosimeters to quantitatively evaluate the efficiency of potential radiation sensitizers/protectors and antioxidants. These compounds are of importance in radiotherapy as well as in disease prevention and promotion of health. The basic principle of the Fricke dosimeter is the radiation-induced oxidation of Fe2+ to Fe3+ in an aerated aqueous 0.4 M H2SO4. The production of ferric ions is most sensitive to the radical species produced in the radiolysis of water. Using this method, we observed that cystamine (one of the best of the known radioprotectors) can prevent oxydation of Fe2+ from reactive radiolysis species. However, one obvious disadvantage of the Fricke dosimeter is that it operates under highly acidic conditions (pH 0.46), which may degrade biological compounds. In contrast, the pH of the polyacrylamide gel (PAG) dosimeter is almost neutral, such that degradation of compounds is less probable. A change in R2-dose sensitivity was observed in the presence of radiosensitizers/radioprotectors and antioxidants. The protective effect of Trolox (a well-known antioxidant) and thiourea (a radioprotector) was readily observed using the PAG dosimeter. Incorporation of iodinated radiation sensitizers such as NaI and an iodine contrast agent led to a quantifiable sensitizer enhancement ratio. These studies suggest that the Fricke and the PAG dosimeters have the potential to evaluate the efficiency of radiation sensitizers/protectors and antioxidants.

  8. PagP Crystallized from SDS/Cosolvent Reveals the Route for Phospholipid Access to the Hydrocarbon Ruler

    SciTech Connect

    Cuesta-Seijo, Jose Antonio; Neale, Chris; Khan, M. Adil; Moktar, Joel; Tran, Christopher D.; Bishop, Russell E.; Pomès, Régis; Privé, Gilbert G.

    2012-02-06

    Enzymatic reactions involving bilayer lipids occur in an environment with strict physical and topological constraints. The integral membrane enzyme PagP transfers a palmitoyl group from a phospholipid to lipid A in order to assist Escherichia coli in evading host immune defenses during infection. PagP measures the palmitoyl group with an internal hydrocarbon ruler that is formed in the interior of the eight-stranded antiparallel {beta} barrel. The access and egress of the palmitoyl group is thought to take a lateral route from the bilayer phase to the barrel interior. Molecular dynamics, mutagenesis, and a 1.4 {angstrom} crystal structure of PagP in an SDS/2-methyl-2,4-pentanediol (MPD) cosolvent system reveal that phospholipid access occurs at the crenel present between strands F and G of PagP. In this way, the phospholipid head group can remain exposed to the cell exterior while the lipid acyl chain remains in a predominantly hydrophobic environment as it translocates to the protein interior.

  9. PagP Crystallized from SDS/Cosolvent Reveals the Route for Phospholipid Access to the Hydrocarbon Ruler

    PubMed Central

    Cuesta-Seijo, Jose Antonio; Neale, Chris; Khan, M. Adil; Moktar, Joel; Tran, Christopher D.; Bishop, Russell E.; Pomès, Régis; Privé, Gilbert G.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Enzymatic reactions involving bilayer lipids occur in an environment with strict physical and topological constraints. The integral membrane enzyme PagP transfers a palmitoyl group from a phospholipid to lipid A in order to assist Escherichia coli in evading host immune defenses during infection. PagP measures the palmitoyl group with an internal hydrocarbon ruler that is formed in the interior of the eight-stranded antiparallel β barrel. The access and egress of the palmitoyl group is thought to take a lateral route from the bilayer phase to the barrel interior. Molecular dynamics, mutagenesis, and a 1.4 Å crystal structure of PagP in an SDS/2-methyl-2, 4-pentanediol (MPD) cosolvent system reveal that phospholipid access occurs at the crenel present between strands F and G of PagP. In this way, the phospholipid head group can remain exposed to the cell exterior while the lipid acyl chain remains in a predominantly hydrophobic environment as it translocates to the protein interior. PMID:20826347

  10. H3PAgI: generation by laser-ablation and characterization by rotational spectroscopy and ab initio calculations.

    PubMed

    Stephens, Susanna L; Tew, David P; Walker, Nicholas R; Legon, Anthony C

    2016-07-28

    The new compound H3PAgI has been synthesized in the gas phase by means of the reaction of laser-ablated silver metal with a pulse of gas consisting of a dilute mixture of ICF3 and PH3 in argon. Ground-state rotational spectra were detected and assigned for the two isotopologues H3P(107)AgI and H3P(109)AgI in their natural abundance by means of a chirped-pulse, Fourier-transform, microwave spectrometer. Both isotopologues exhibit rotational spectra of the symmetric-top type, analysis of which led to accurate values of the rotational constant B0, the quartic centrifugal distortion constants DJ and DJK, and the iodine nuclear quadrupole coupling constant χaa(I) = eQqaa. Ab initio calculations at the explicitly-correlated level of theory CCSD(T)(F12*)/aug-cc-pVDZ confirmed that the atoms PAg-I lie on the C3 axis in that order. The experimental rotational constants were interpreted to give the bond lengths r0(PAg) = 2.3488(20) Å and r0(Ag-I) = 2.5483(1) Å, in good agreement with the equilibrium lengths of 2.3387 Å and 2.5537 Å, respectively, obtained in the ab initio calculations. Measures of the strength of the interaction of PH3 and AgI (the dissociation energy De for the process H3PAgI = H3P + AgI and the intermolecular stretching force constant FPAg) are presented and are interpreted to show that the order of binding strength is H3PHI < H3PICl < H3PAgI for these metal-bonded molecules and their halogen-bonded and hydrogen-bonded analogues. PMID:27354204

  11. MobiPag: Integrated Mobile Payment, Ticketing and Couponing Solution Based on NFC †

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Helena; José, Rui; Coelho, André; Melro, Ana; Ferreira, Marta Campos; Cunha, João Falcão e; Monteiro, Miguel Pimenta; Ribeiro, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Mobile payments still remain essentially an emerging technology, seeking to fill the gap between the envisioned potential and widespread usage. In this paper, we present an integrated mobile service solution based on the near field communication (NFC) protocol that was developed under a research project called MobiPag. The most distinctive characteristic of Mobipag is its open architectural model that allows multiple partners to become part of the payment value-chain and create solutions that complement payments in many unexpected ways. We describe the Mobipag architecture and how it has been used to support a mobile payment trial. We identify a set of design lessons resulting from usage experiences associated with real-world payment situations with NFC-enabled mobile phones. Based on results from this trial, we identify a number of challenges and guidelines that may help to shape future versions of NFC-based payment systems. In particular, we highlight key challenges for the initial phases of payment deployments, where it is essential to focus on scenarios that can be identified as more feasible for early adoption. We also have identified a fundamental trade-off between the flexibility supported by the Mobipag solution and the respective implications for the payment process, particularly on the users' mental model. PMID:25061838

  12. Reappraisal of the palaeomagnetism of the Miocene intramontane Pag and Drniš-Sinj basins, External Dinarides (Croatia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Márton, Emő; Pavelić, Davor; Vranjković, Alan; Ćosović, Vlasta

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents palaeomagnetic results from the Miocene offshore Pag and the twin onshore (Drniš-Sinj) basins. Earlier magnetostratigraphic results were published from both basins, which documented that the lake sediments were good targets for palaeomagnetism. From the Pag basin, we sampled the oldest and youngest segments of the 1200 m long Crnika section and obtained statistically different palaeomagnetic directions from the two parts. During a repeated visit to the section it was revealed that modern gravity-driven creeping can account for this, i.e. the results from the Pag basin should be rejected from regional tectonic interpretation. The overall-mean palaeomagnetic direction for the Drniš-Sinj basin has excellent statistical parameters, its high quality is further supported by positive regional fold/tilt and reversal tests, based on seven geographically distributed localities. The results suggests 13-20° CCW rotation with respect to Africa and 21-27° with respect to stable Europe, during the last 15 million years. As the External Dinarides are the loci of a complicated network of Miocene and even younger tectonic zones, we cannot export the observed rotation for the whole unit, but consider our results as one step in obtaining robust kinematic constraints for the post-Oligocene tectonic history of the External Dinarides.

  13. Development of the Updated Environmental Protection Agency Manual of Protective Action Guides (PAGS) and Protective Actions for Nuclear Incidents

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, L.M.

    2008-07-01

    As a student intern with the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Headquarters, the author was trained in the National Response Plan (NRP) and assisted in the editing of the new (unpublished) EPA Protective Action Guides (PAGs) [1] which has been revised in light of the perceived post 9/11 potential for 'Dirty Bomb' and 'Improvised Nuclear Device' attacks on civilian areas. Technical aspects and the public policy aspects of developing the new guides are discussed. Early Phase initial responses discussed include: Notification of state and/or local authorities, immediate evacuation/sheltering prior to release information or measurements, monitoring of releases and exposure rate measurements, estimation of dose consequences, implementation of protective actions in other areas. The new PAG clarifies the use of 1992 PAGs [2] for incidents other than nuclear power plant accidents, lowers projected thyroid dose for potassium iodine (KI), provides drinking water guidance, includes guidance for long-term site restoration, and updates dosimetry from ICRP 26 to ICRP 60. (authors)

  14. Influence of base and PAG on deprotection blur in EUV photoresists and some thoughts on shot noise

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Christopher N.; Naulleau, Patrick P.; Niakoula, Dimitra; Hassanein, Elsayed; Brainard, Robert; Gallatin, Gregg; Dean, Kim

    2008-06-01

    A contact-hole deprotection blur metric has been used to monitor the deprotection blur of an experimental open platform resist (EH27) as the weight percent of base and photo acid generator (PAG) were varied. A 6x increase in base weight percent is shown to reduce the size of successfully patterned 1:1 line-space features from 52 nm to 39 nm without changing deprotection blur. Corresponding isolated line-edge-roughness is reduced from 6.9 nm to 4.1 nm. A 2x increase in PAG weight percent is shown to improve 1:1 line-space patterning from 47 nm to 40 nm without changing deprotection blur or isolated LER. A discussion of improved patterning performance as related to shot noise and deprotection blur concludes with a speculation that the spatial distribution of PAG molecules has been playing some role, perhaps a dominant one, in determining the uniformity of photo generated acids in the resists that have been studied.

  15. Indoleamine 2,3‑dioxygenase downregulates T‑cell receptor complex ζ‑chain and c‑Myc, and reduces proliferation, lactate dehydrogenase levels and mitochondrial glutaminase in human T‑cells.

    PubMed

    Eleftheriadis, Theodoros; Pissas, Georgios; Antoniadi, Georgia; Tsogka, Konstantina; Sounidaki, Maria; Liakopoulos, Vassilios; Stefanidis, Ioannis

    2016-01-01

    Indoleamine 2,3‑dioxygenase (IDO), through L‑tryptophan depletion, activates general control non‑derepressible (GCN) 2 kinase and suppresses T‑cell proliferation, in addition to suppressing aerobic glycolysis and glutaminolysis, which are required for these rapidly proliferating cells. A number of, however not all of these alterations, are partially mediated through IDO‑induced p53 upregulation. In two‑way mixed lymphocyte reactions (MLRs), IDO reduced cellular proliferation. In MLR‑derived T‑cells, IDO induced the expression levels of p53 and p21, however concurrently reduced the levels of ζ‑chain, c‑Myc, lactate dehydrogenase A (LDH‑A) and glutaminase (GLS)2. However, p53 had no effect on the expression of the above proteins. These results were recapitulated in T‑cells activated with anti‑CD2, anti‑CD3 and anti‑CD28 by direct activation of the GCN2 kinase with tryptophanol. In conclusion, IDO, through GCN2 kinase activation, downregulates the levels of TCR‑complex ζ‑chain and c‑Myc, resulting in the suppression of T‑cell proliferation and a reduction in the levels of LDH‑A and GLS2, which are key enzymes involved in aerobic glycolysis and glutaminolysis, respectively. PMID:26647830

  16. Mesenchymal Phenotype Predisposes Lung Cancer Cells to Impaired Proliferation and Redox Stress in Response to Glutaminase Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Ulanet, Danielle B.; Couto, Kiley; Jha, Abhishek; Choe, Sung; Wang, Amanda; Woo, Hin-Koon; Steadman, Mya; DeLaBarre, Byron; Gross, Stefan; Driggers, Edward; Dorsch, Marion; Hurov, Jonathan B.

    2014-01-01

    Recent work has highlighted glutaminase (GLS) as a key player in cancer cell metabolism, providing glutamine-derived carbon and nitrogen to pathways that support proliferation. There is significant interest in targeting GLS for cancer therapy, although the gene is not known to be mutated or amplified in tumors. As a result, identification of tractable markers that predict GLS dependence is needed for translation of GLS inhibitors to the clinic. Herein we validate a small molecule inhibitor of GLS and show that non-small cell lung cancer cells marked by low E-cadherin and high vimentin expression, hallmarks of a mesenchymal phenotype, are particularly sensitive to inhibition of the enzyme. Furthermore, lung cancer cells induced to undergo epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) acquire sensitivity to the GLS inhibitor. Metabolic studies suggest that the mesenchymal cells have a reduced capacity for oxidative phosphorylation and increased susceptibility to oxidative stress, rendering them unable to cope with the perturbations induced by GLS inhibition. These findings elucidate selective metabolic dependencies of mesenchymal lung cancer cells and suggest novel pathways as potential targets in this aggressive cancer type. PMID:25502225

  17. Post-Roman sea-level changes on Pag Island (Adriatic Sea): Dating Croatia's "enigmatic" coastal notch?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marriner, Nick; Morhange, Christophe; Faivre, Sanja; Flaux, Clément; Vacchi, Matteo; Miko, Slobodan; Dumas, Vincent; Boetto, Giulia; Radic Rossi, Irena

    2014-09-01

    The presence of a regional-wide notch (45 to 115 cm below present biological mean sea level [BMSL]) along the Adriatic coast of Croatia, at a string of sites between Zadar and Rijeka, provides evidence for a rapid but poorly constrained subsidence event(s) after Roman times. For more than a century, this geomorphological tidal level indicator has attracted rich scientific debate but many unresolved questions remain. In this paper, we present new results from Caska Bay (Pag Island) looking at notch morphology and Holocene salt-marsh stratigraphy to constrain the chronology of this crustal deformation on Pag Island. The typical salt-marsh stratigraphy comprises low to high salt-marsh muds interjected by an unconformable marine layer (which lies between - 50 and - 100 cm BMSL) consistent with an abrupt transgression. The palaeoecological record shows an abrupt shift in assemblages across the salt-marsh mud-sand sediment contact translating abrupt coastal changes. Geochronological data constrain this event to around 1000 to 1200 cal. AD. The altitude of the layer is coeval with the submerged notch attested on limestone cliffs around the bay. The U-shape of the notch profile, coupled with the sharp palaecological contacts and submerged Roman pier, implies that sea-level rise was episodic and not gradual as suggested by regional numerical models. Together, our findings shed new light on the chronology of the "enigmatic" Croatian notch on the island of Pag, and highlight the need to couple geomorphological studies of rocky coasts with high-resolution sediment records.

  18. Amygdalar neuronal activity mediates the cardiovascular responses evoked from the dorsolateral periaqueductal gray in conscious rats.

    PubMed

    de Abreu, A R; Abreu, A R; Santos, L T; de Souza, A A; da Silva, L G; Chianca, D A; de Menezes, R C

    2015-01-22

    There is ample evidence that both lateral/dorsolateral periaqueductal gray (l/dlPAG) and basolateral amygdala (BLA) are essential for the regulation of the autonomic responses evoked during innate reactions to threatening stimuli. However, it is not well established to what extent the BLA regulates the upstream functional connection from the l/dlPAG. Here we evaluated the role of the BLA and its glutamatergic receptors in the cardiovascular responses induced by l/dlPAG stimulation in rats. We examined the influence of acute inhibition of the BLA, unilaterally, by injecting muscimol on the cardiovascular responses evoked by the injection of N-methyl D-aspartate (NMDA) into the l/dlPAG. We also evaluated the role of BLA ionotropic glutamate receptors in these responses by injecting antagonists of NMDA and AMPA/kainate receptor subtypes into the BLA. Our results show that the microinjection of NMDA in the BLA increased the mean arterial pressure (MAP) and heart rate (HR). Injection of NMDA into the l/dlPAG caused similar increases in these variables, which was prevented by the prior injection of muscimol, a GABAA agonist, into the BLA. Moreover, injection of glutamatergic antagonists (2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoate (AP5) and 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (CNQX)) into the BLA reduced the increase in MAP and HR induced by l/dlPAG activation. Finally, the inhibition of the central amygdala neurons failed to reduce the cardiovascular changes induced by l/dlPAG activation. These results indicate that physiological responses elicited by l/dlPAG activation require the neuronal activity in the BLA. This ascending excitatory pathway from the l/dlPAG to the BLA might ensure the expression of the autonomic component of the defense reaction. PMID:25451289

  19. Circulating concentrations of pregnancy associated glycoproteins (PAGs) are associated with embryo/fetal survival but not ovulatory follicle size in suckled beef cows

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    GnRH-induced ovulation of small dominant follicles resulted in increased late embryonic/fetal mortality around the time of embryo-uterine attachment. Pregnancy associated glycoproteins (PAGs) are secreted by binucleated trophoblast cells into the maternal circulation and have been used to monitor t...

  20. Circulating bovine pregnancy associated glycoproteins (bPAGs) are associated with late embryonic/fetal survival but not ovulatory follicle size in suckled beef cows

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    GnRH-induced ovulation of small dominant follicles resulted in increased late embryonic/fetal mortality. The objective of this study was to examine the relationship between ovulatory follicle size, embryo/fetal survival, and circulating concentrations of bPAGs (detects presence of an embryo/fetus a...

  1. A gelatin-free model system for the study of the basic radiation-induced polymerization in PAG dosimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babic, S.; Park, Y. S.; Schreiner, L. J.

    2004-01-01

    In this presentation we show results of investigations on gelatin-free dosimeters containing equal amounts of acrylamide and N,N'-methylene-bisacrylamide (named Aqueous Polyacrylamide, APA, dosimeters). The dosimeters were prepared with three different total monomer concentrations (2, 6, and 8% by weight). Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spin-spin and spin-lattice proton relaxation measurements at 20 MHz, and gravimetric analyses performed on all three dosimeters, show a continuous degree of polymerization over the range of dose 0.5 - 25 Gy. The developed NMR model explains the relationship observed between the relaxation data and the amount of cross-linked polymer formed at each dose. This model may be extended with gelatin relaxation data to provide a fundamental understanding of radiation-induced polymerization in the conventional PAG dosimeters.

  2. Central circuits mediating patterned autonomic activity during active vs. passive emotional coping.

    PubMed

    Bandler, R; Keay, K A; Floyd, N; Price, J

    2000-09-01

    Animals, including humans, react with distinct emotional coping strategies to different sets of environmental demands. These strategies include the capacity to affect appropriate responses to "escapable" or "inescapable" stressors. Active emotional coping strategies--fight or flight--are particularly adaptive if the stress is escapable. On the other hand, passive emotional coping strategies-quiescence, immobility, decreased responsiveness to the environment-are useful when the stress is inescapable. Passive strategies contribute also to facilitating recovery and healing once the stressful event is over. Active vs. passive emotional coping strategies are characterised further by distinct patterns of autonomic change. Active strategies are associated with sympathoexcitation (hypertension, tachycardia), whereas passive strategies are associated with sympathoinhibitory patterns (hypotension, bradycardia). Distinct neural substrates mediating active vs. passive emotional coping have been identified within the longitudinal neuronal columns of the midbrain periaqueductal gray region (PAG). The PAG offers then a potentially useful point of entry for delineating neural circuits mediating the different forms of emotional coping and their associated patterns of autonomic activity. As one example, recent studies of the connections of orbital and medial prefrontal cortical (PFC) fields with specific PAG longitudinal neuronal columns are reviewed. Findings of discrete orbital and medial PFC projections to different PAG columns, and related PFC and PAG columnar connections with specific subregions of the hypothalamus, suggest that distinct but parallel circuits mediate the behavioural strategies and patterns of autonomic activity characteristic of emotional "engagement with" or "disengagement from" the external environment. PMID:11033213

  3. Preliminary evaluation of optical CT scanning versus MRI for nPAG gel dosimetry: The Ghent experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandecasteele, Jan; DeDeene, Yves

    2009-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate fast laser-scanning optical CT versus MRI for an nPAG gel dosimeter in terms of accuracy and precision. Three small cylindrical volumetric gel phantoms were fabricated and irradiated with photon beams. The gel dosimeters were scanned with an MR scanner and an in house developed laser scanning optical CT scanner. A comparison between MRI and optical CT scanning was performed based on the reconstructed images. Preliminary results show a fair correspondence in the MRI acquired and optical CT acquired dose maps. Still, ringing artifacts contaminate the reconstructed optical CT images. These may be related to sub-pixel misalignments between the blank projection and the acquired transmission projection of the gel phantom. Another artifact may be caused by refraction near the edges of the field. Further optimisation of our optical CT scanner is required to obtain the same accuracy as with MRI. To make a comparison between the two imaging modalities in terms of precision, the intrinsic dose precision on readout (IPD) was calculated which is independent of spatial resolution and acquisition time. It is shown that optical CT has a better intrinsic dose precision.

  4. Analysis of acid-generating action of PAG in an EUV resist using acid-sensitive dyes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekiguchi, Atsushi; Matsumoto, Yoko; Biafore, John J.

    2013-03-01

    Researchers are currently examining various methods for determining the quantity of acid generated by a photoacid generator (PAG) and for analyzing acid-generating reactions using acid-sensitive dyes that react with acid and generate a color. Adding an acid-sensitive dye to the resist gives a clear grasp of the acid-generating action. The process involves applying a resist containing an acid-sensitive dye to a quartz substrate; exposing the substrate; and measuring and evaluating the absorbance of a chromogenic substance near 530 nm using a spectroscope. The method determines the rate constant for acid generation (Dill C parameter) during exposure based on the relationship between transmissivity at 530 nm and exposure dose. Using this method, we obtained and compared rate constants for acid generation (C parameters) as part of our study of dependence on the quantity of quencher in the EUV resist. Our results indicate a new model that accounts for the quencher concentration parameter would be useful in analyzing dependence on the quantity of quencher. This paper presents these findings, together with the results of studies of profile simulations using the quencher concentration parameter obtained in the experiments.

  5. Glutamatergic vestibular neurons express Fos after vestibular stimulation and project to the NTS and the PBN in rats.

    PubMed

    Cai, Yi-Ling; Ma, Wen-Ling; Li, Min; Guo, Jun-Sheng; Li, Yi-Qian; Wang, Li-Gang; Wang, Wei-Zhong

    2007-05-01

    In this study, retrograde tracing method combined with phosphate-activated glutaminase (PAG) and Fos immunofluorescence histochemistry was used to identify glutamatergic vestibular nucleus (VN) neurons receiving vestibular inputs and projecting to the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) and the parabrachial nucleus (PBN). Conscious animals were subjected to 120 min Ferris-wheel like rotation stimulation. Neuronal activation was assessed by Fos expression in the nucleus of VN neurons. After Fluoro-gold (FG) injection into the caudal NTS, approximately 48% FG-labeled VN neurons were immunoreactive for PAG, and about 14% PAG/FG double-labeled neurons co-existed with Fos. Following FG injection into the PBN, approximately 56% FG-labeled VN neurons were double-labeled with PAG, and about 12% of the PAG/FG double-labeled neurons also expressed Fos. Careful examination of the typology and distribution pattern of these PAG-immunoreactive neurons indicated that the vast majority of these neurons were glutamatergic rather than GABAergic. These results suggest that PAG-immunoreactive VN neurons might constitute excitatory glutamatergic VN-NTS and VN-PBN transmission pathways and these pathways might be involved in vestibulo-autonomic reflexes during vestibular stimulation. PMID:17412503

  6. Opportunities for public health to increase physical activity among youths.

    PubMed

    Piercy, Katrina L; Dorn, Joan M; Fulton, Janet E; Janz, Kathleen F; Lee, Sarah M; McKinnon, Robin A; Pate, Russell R; Pfeiffer, Karin A; Young, Deborah Rohm; Troiano, Richard P; Lavizzo-Mourey, Risa

    2015-03-01

    Despite the well-known benefits of youths engaging in 60 or more minutes of daily physical activity, physical inactivity remains a significant public health concern. The 2008 Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans (PAG) provides recommendations on the amount of physical activity needed for overall health; the PAG Midcourse Report (2013) describes effective strategies to help youths meet these recommendations. Public health professionals can be dynamic change agents where youths live, learn, and play by changing environments and policies to empower youths to develop regular physical activity habits to maintain throughout life. We have summarized key findings from the PAG Midcourse Report and outlined actions that public health professionals can take to ensure that all youths regularly engage in health-enhancing physical activity. PMID:25602864

  7. Optimization of Culture Conditions for Production of the Anti-Leukemic Glutaminase Free L-Asparaginase by Newly Isolated Streptomyces olivaceus NEAE-119 Using Response Surface Methodology.

    PubMed

    El-Naggar, Noura El-Ahmady; Moawad, Hassan; El-Shweihy, Nancy M; El-Ewasy, Sara M

    2015-01-01

    Among the antitumor drugs, bacterial enzyme L-asparaginase has been employed as the most effective chemotherapeutic agent in pediatric oncotherapy especially for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Glutaminase free L-asparaginase producing actinomycetes were isolated from soil samples collected from Egypt. Among them, a potential culture, strain NEAE-119, was selected and identified on the basis of morphological, cultural, physiological, and biochemical properties together with 16S rRNA sequence as Streptomyces olivaceus NEAE-119 and sequencing product (1509 bp) was deposited in the GenBank database under accession number KJ200342. The optimization of different process parameters for L-asparaginase production by Streptomyces olivaceus NEAE-119 using Plackett-Burman experimental design and response surface methodology was carried out. Fifteen variables (temperature, pH, incubation time, inoculum size, inoculum age, agitation speed, dextrose, starch, L-asparagine, KNO3, yeast extract, K2HPO4, MgSO4·7H2O, NaCl, and FeSO4·7H2O) were screened using Plackett-Burman experimental design. The most positive significant independent variables affecting enzyme production (temperature, inoculum age, and agitation speed) were further optimized by the face-centered central composite design-response surface methodology. PMID:26180806

  8. Optimization of Culture Conditions for Production of the Anti-Leukemic Glutaminase Free L-Asparaginase by Newly Isolated Streptomyces olivaceus NEAE-119 Using Response Surface Methodology

    PubMed Central

    El-Naggar, Noura El-Ahmady; Moawad, Hassan; El-Shweihy, Nancy M.; El-Ewasy, Sara M.

    2015-01-01

    Among the antitumor drugs, bacterial enzyme L-asparaginase has been employed as the most effective chemotherapeutic agent in pediatric oncotherapy especially for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Glutaminase free L-asparaginase producing actinomycetes were isolated from soil samples collected from Egypt. Among them, a potential culture, strain NEAE-119, was selected and identified on the basis of morphological, cultural, physiological, and biochemical properties together with 16S rRNA sequence as Streptomyces olivaceus NEAE-119 and sequencing product (1509 bp) was deposited in the GenBank database under accession number KJ200342. The optimization of different process parameters for L-asparaginase production by Streptomyces olivaceus NEAE-119 using Plackett-Burman experimental design and response surface methodology was carried out. Fifteen variables (temperature, pH, incubation time, inoculum size, inoculum age, agitation speed, dextrose, starch, L-asparagine, KNO3, yeast extract, K2HPO4, MgSO4·7H2O, NaCl, and FeSO4·7H2O) were screened using Plackett-Burman experimental design. The most positive significant independent variables affecting enzyme production (temperature, inoculum age, and agitation speed) were further optimized by the face-centered central composite design-response surface methodology. PMID:26180806

  9. Production of glutaminase(E.C. 3.2.1.5) from Zygosaccharomyces rouxii in solid-state fermentation and modeling the growth of Z. rouxii therein.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Padma; Singhal, Rekha S

    2010-04-01

    Glutaminase production in Zygosacchromyces rouxii by solid-state fermentation (SSF) is detailed. Substrates screening showed best results with oatmeal (OM) and wheatbran (WB). Further, a 1:1 combination of OM: WB gave 0.614units/gds with artificial sea water (ASW) as moistening agent. Evaluation of additional carbon, nitrogen, aminoacids and minerals supplementation was done. A central composite design was employed to investigate effects of four variables, viz. moisture content, glucose, corn steep liquor and glutamine on production. A 4-fold increase in enzyme production was obtained. Studies were undertaken to analyze the time course model the microbial growth and nutrient utilization during SSF. Logistic equation (R2=0.8973), describing the growth model of Z.rouxii was obtained, with maximum values of micronm and Xm at 0.326h-1 and 7.35% of dry matter weight loss, respectively. A good-fit model to describe utilization of total carbohydrate (R2=0.9906) nitrogen concentration (R2=0.9869) with time was obtained. The model was used successfully to predict enzyme production (R2=0.7950). PMID:20467247

  10. [Preventive effect of polaprezinc suspension dispersed in sodium alginate solution (P-AG) for stomatitis induced by Docetaxel/Cisplatin/Fluorouracil (DCF) chemotherapy in patients with head and neck cancer].

    PubMed

    Sugisaki, Takahito; Kawakami, Kazuyoshi; Nemoto, Maki; Kawata, Keiji; Ishibashi, Michiko; Fujiki, Yukako; Mishima, Yuko; Yokoyama, Masahiro; Takahashi, Shunji; Hatake, Kiyohiko; Hama, Toshihiro

    2011-05-01

    We measured the effectiveness of the prophylactic administration of a polaprezinc suspension dispersed in sodium alginate solution (P-AG) by dividing it into two courses in the same patients, and measured the stomatitis induced by Docetaxel/Cisplatin/Fluorouracil (DCF) chemotherapy. We then evaluated the results. We defined the therapeutic course as the course where P-AG was given therapeutically for stomatitis induced after DCF chemotherapy. We defined the prophylactic course as when P-AG was prophylactically given before any incidences of stomatitis after the therapeutic course. We compared the incidences of stomatitis in the prophylactic courses with those of the therapeutic courses. The incidences of stomatitis that were higher than Grade 1 were 17 out of 17 patients (100%) in the therapeutic course. On the other hand, they were 15 out of 17 patients (88. 2%) in the prophylactic course. Compared with the mean of the Grade of Stomatitis by the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3. 0 (CTCAE v. 3. 0), the maximal Grade of stomatitis significantly decreased in the prophylactic courses compared to those of the therapeutic courses(p<0. 05). Therefore, these results suggested that we were able to decrease the severity of stomatitis by using P-AG prophylactically, as opposed to using P-AG therapeutically. PMID:21566437

  11. Effects of a metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 7 negative allosteric modulator in the periaqueductal grey on pain responses and rostral ventromedial medulla cell activity in rat

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The metabotropic glutamate receptor 7 (mGluR7) negative allosteric modulator, 6-(4-methoxyphenyl)-5-methyl-3-pyridin-4-ylisoxazolo[4,5-c]pyridin-4(5H)-one (MMPIP), was locally microinjected into the ventrolateral periaqueductal gray (VL PAG) and the effect on pain responses in formalin and spare nerve injury (SNI) -induced neuropathic pain models was monitored in the rat. The activity of rostral ventromedial medulla (RVM) “pronociceptive” ON and “antinociceptive” OFF cells was also evaluated. Intra–VL PAG MMPIP blocked the first and second phase of nocifensive behaviour in the formalin pain model. MMPIP increased the tail flick latency and simultaneously increased the activity of the OFF cells while inhibiting that of ON cells in rats with SNI of the sciatic nerve. MMPIP failed to modify nociceptive responses and associated RVM ON and OFF cell activity in sham rats. An increase in mGluR7 gene, protein and staining, the latter being associated with vesicular glutamate transporter-positive profiles, has been found in the VL PAG in SNI rats. Blockade of mGluR7 within the VL PAG has an antinociceptive effect in formalin and neuropathic pain models. VL PAG mGluR7 blockade offers a target for dis-inhibiting the VL PAG-RVM pathway and silencing pain in inflammatory and neuropathic pain models. PMID:24004843

  12. Halophilic Bacteria of Lunsu Produce an Array of Industrially Important Enzymes with Salt Tolerant Activity.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Sonika; Sharma, Parul; Dev, Kamal; Sourirajan, Anuradha

    2016-01-01

    The halophilic bacterial isolates SS1, SS2, SS3, SS5, and SS8 were characterized for production of industrially important enzymes like amylase, protease, lipase, and glutaminase. Halophilic bacterial isolates SS1 and SS3 exhibited salt dependent extracellular amylase and protease activities. Both the halophilic isolates SS1 and SS3 exhibited maximum amylase and protease activities in the presence of 1.5 and 1.0 M NaCl, respectively, with the optimum pH 8 and temperature 40°C. SS2 showed maximum extracellular protease and lipase activities in the presence of 0.75 M NaCl, at optimum pH of 7, and temperature 37°C. The glutaminase activity of SS3 increased with increase in concentration of NaCl up to 2.5 M. The optimum pH and temperature for L-glutaminase activity of SS3 was 8 and 40°C, respectively. The combined hydrolytic activities of these halophilic bacterial isolates can be used for bioconversion of organic materials to useful products. PMID:26885394

  13. Halophilic Bacteria of Lunsu Produce an Array of Industrially Important Enzymes with Salt Tolerant Activity

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Sonika; Sharma, Parul; Dev, Kamal; Sourirajan, Anuradha

    2016-01-01

    The halophilic bacterial isolates SS1, SS2, SS3, SS5, and SS8 were characterized for production of industrially important enzymes like amylase, protease, lipase, and glutaminase. Halophilic bacterial isolates SS1 and SS3 exhibited salt dependent extracellular amylase and protease activities. Both the halophilic isolates SS1 and SS3 exhibited maximum amylase and protease activities in the presence of 1.5 and 1.0 M NaCl, respectively, with the optimum pH 8 and temperature 40°C. SS2 showed maximum extracellular protease and lipase activities in the presence of 0.75 M NaCl, at optimum pH of 7, and temperature 37°C. The glutaminase activity of SS3 increased with increase in concentration of NaCl up to 2.5 M. The optimum pH and temperature for L-glutaminase activity of SS3 was 8 and 40°C, respectively. The combined hydrolytic activities of these halophilic bacterial isolates can be used for bioconversion of organic materials to useful products. PMID:26885394

  14. Combining a PagP fusion protein system with nickel ion-catalyzed cleavage to produce intrinsically disordered proteins in E. coli.

    PubMed

    Zahran, Somaya; Pan, Jonathan S; Liu, Philip B; Hwang, Peter M

    2015-12-01

    Many proteins contain intrinsically disordered regions that are highly solvent-exposed and susceptible to post-translational modifications. Studying these protein segments is critical to understanding their physiologic regulation, but proteolytic degradation can make them difficult to express and purify. We have designed a new protein expression vector that fuses the target protein to the N-terminus of the integral membrane protein, PagP. The two proteins are connected by a short linker containing the sequence SRHW, previously shown to be optimal for nickel ion-catalyzed cleavage. The methodology is demonstrated for an intrinsically disordered segment of cardiac troponin I. cTnI[135-209]-SRHW-PagP-His6 fusion protein was overexpressed in Escherichia coli, accumulating in insoluble inclusion bodies. The protein was solubilized, purified using nickel affinity chromatography, and then cleaved with 0.5mM NiSO4 at pH 9.0 and 45 °C, all in 6M guanidine-HCl. Nickel ion-catalyzed peptide bond hydrolysis is an effective chemical cleavage technique under denaturing conditions that preclude the use of proteases. Moreover, nickel-catalyzed cleavage is more specific than the most commonly used agent, cyanogen bromide, which cleaves C-terminal to methionine residues. We were able to produce 15 mg of purified cTnI[135-209] from 1L of M9 minimal media using this protocol. The methodology is more generally applicable to the production of intrinsically disordered protein segments. PMID:26297994

  15. Differential activation of the μ-opioid receptor by oxycodone and morphine in pain-related brain regions in a bone cancer pain model

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Atsushi; Hasegawa, Minoru; Minami, Kazuhisa; Kanbara, Tomoe; Tomii, Takako; Nishiyori, Atsushi; Narita, Minoru; Suzuki, Tsutomu; Kato, Akira

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose Bone cancer pain is chronic and often difficult to control with opioids. However, recent studies have shown that several opioids have distinct analgesic profiles in chronic pain. Experimental Approach To clarify the mechanisms underlying these distinct analgesic profiles, functional changes in the μ-opioid receptor were examined using a mouse femur bone cancer (FBC) model. Key Results In the FBC model, the Bmax of [3H]-DAMGO binding was reduced by 15–45% in the periaqueductal grey matter (PAG), region ventral to the PAG (vPAG), mediodorsal thalamus (mTH), ventral thalamus and spinal cord. Oxycodone (10−8–10−5 M) and morphine (10−8–10−5 M) activated [35S]-GTPγS binding, but the activation was significantly attenuated in the PAG, vPAG, mTH and spinal cord in the FBC model. Interestingly, the attenuation of oxycodone-induced [35S]-GTPγS binding was quite limited (9–26%) in comparison with that of morphine (46–65%) in the PAG, vPAG and mTH, but not in the spinal cord. Furthermore, i.c.v. oxycodone at doses of 0.02–1.0 μg per mouse clearly inhibited pain-related behaviours, such as guarding, limb-use abnormalities and allodynia-like behaviour in the FBC model mice, while i.c.v. morphine (0.05–2.0 μg per mouse) had only partial or little analgesic effect on limb-use abnormalities and allodynia-like behaviour. Conclusion and Implications These results show that μ-opioid receptor functions are attenuated in several pain-related regions in bone cancer in an agonist-dependent manner, and suggest that modification of the μ-opioid receptor is responsible for the distinct analgesic effect of oxycodone and morphine. PMID:22889192

  16. Gene Expression of Glutamate Metabolizing Enzymes in the Hippocampal Formation in Human Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Eid, Tore; Lee, Tih-Shih W; Wang, Yue; Peréz, Edgar; Drummond, Jana; Lauritzen, Fredrik; Bergersen, Linda H; Woodruff, James H Meador; Spencer, Dennis D; de Lanerolle, Nihal C; McCullumsmith, Robert E

    2012-01-01

    Summary PURPOSE Increased interictal concentrations of extracellular hippocampal glutamate have been implicated in the pathophysiology of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) in humans. Recent studies suggest that perturbations of the glutamate metabolizing enzymes glutamine synthetase (GS) and phosphate activated glutaminase (PAG) may underlie the glutamate excess in TLE. However, the molecular mechanism of the enzyme perturbations remains unclear. A better understanding of the regulatory mechanisms of GS and PAG could facilitate the discovery of novel therapeutics for TLE. METHODS We used in situ hybridization on histological sections to assess the distribution and quantity of mRNA for GS and PAG in subfields of hippocampal formations from: (a) patients with TLE and concomitant hippocampal sclerosis, (b) patients with TLE and no hippocampal sclerosis, and (c) non-epilepsy autopsy subjects. KEY FINDINGS GS mRNA was increased by approximately 50% in the CA3 in TLE patients without hippocampal sclerosis vs. in TLE patients with sclerosis and in non-epilepsy subjects. PAG mRNA was increased by more than 100% in the subiculum in both TLE patient categories vs. in non-epilepsy subjects. PAG mRNA was also increased in the CA1, CA2, CA3 and dentate hilus in TLE without hippocampal sclerosis vs. in TLE with sclerosis. Finally, PAG mRNA was increased in the dentate gyrus in TLE with sclerosis vs. in non-epilepsy subjects, and also increased in the hilus in TLE without sclerosis vs. in TLE with sclerosis. SIGNIFICANCE These findings demonstrate complex changes in the expression of mRNAs for GS and PAG in the hippocampal formation in TLE, and raise the possibility that both transcriptional and post-transcriptional mechanisms may underlie the regulation of GS and PAG proteins in the epileptic brain. PMID:23384343

  17. Prevalence and trends in physical activity among older adults in the United States: A comparison across three national surveys.

    PubMed

    Keadle, Sarah Kozey; McKinnon, Robin; Graubard, Barry I; Troiano, Richard P

    2016-08-01

    This paper examined how many older adults (65+years) are meeting physical activity (PA) Guidelines (PAG; 150min/week of moderate-to-vigorous PA) using data from three leading national surveys (NHANES, BRFSS and NHIS). The proportion of individuals meeting aerobic PAG was determined for the most recent cycle available for each survey (NHANES 2011-12, NHIS and BRFSS 2013). We also assessed whether PAG adherence has changed over time. Predicted margins from multinomial logistic regression were computed after adjusting for age, race/ethnicity and gender and sample weights. The proportion of older adults meeting PAG was 27.3% for NHANES, 35.8% for NHIS and 44.3% for BRFSS. Across all surveys, men reported higher levels of activity than women, Non-Hispanic whites reported higher levels than Non-Hispanic blacks and Hispanics, activity declined with age and was lower in those with functional limitations, all P<0.05. The proportion of older adults meeting PAG in the NHIS survey, the only survey where PA questions remained the same over time, increased from 25.7% in 1998 to 35.8% in 2013 (P<0.01). Point-estimates for activity levels are different between surveys but they consistently identify sub-groups who are less active. Although older adults are reporting more activity over time, adherence to aerobic and strength training PAG remains low in this population and there is a need for effective interventions to prevent age-related declines in PA and address health disparities among older adults. PMID:27196146

  18. The intracellular B30.2 domain of Butyrophilin 3A1 binds phosphoantigens to mediate activation of human Vγ9Vδ2 T cells

    PubMed Central

    Sandstrom, Andrew; Peigné, Cassie-Marie; Léger, Alexandra; Crooks, James E.; Konczak, Fabienne; Gesnel, Marie-Claude; Breathnach, Richard; Bonneville, Marc; Scotet, Emmanuel; Adams, Erin J.

    2014-01-01

    Summary In humans, Vγ9Vδ2 T cells detect tumor cells and microbial infections including Mycobacterium tuberculosis through recognition of small pyrophosphate containing organic molecules known as phosphoantigens (pAgs). Key to pAg-mediated activation of Vγ9Vδ2 T cells is the butyrophilin 3A1 (BTN3A1) protein that contains an intracellular B30.2 domain critical to pAg reactivity. Here, we have demonstrated through structural, biophysical and functional approaches that the intracellular B30.2 domain of BTN3A1 directly binds pAg through a positively-charged surface pocket. Charge-reversal of pocket residues abrogates binding and Vγ9Vδ2 T cell activation. We have also identified a gain-of-function mutation within this pocket that when introduced into B30.2 domain of the non-stimulatory BTN3A3 isoform, transfers pAg binding ability and Vγ9Vδ2 T cell activation. These studies demonstrate that internal sensing of changes in pAg metabolite concentrations by BTN3A1 molecules is a critical step in Vγ9Vδ2 T cell detection of infection and tumorigenesis. PMID:24703779

  19. The intracellular B30.2 domain of butyrophilin 3A1 binds phosphoantigens to mediate activation of human Vγ9Vδ2 T cells.

    PubMed

    Sandstrom, Andrew; Peigné, Cassie-Marie; Léger, Alexandra; Crooks, James E; Konczak, Fabienne; Gesnel, Marie-Claude; Breathnach, Richard; Bonneville, Marc; Scotet, Emmanuel; Adams, Erin J

    2014-04-17

    In humans, Vγ9Vδ2 T cells detect tumor cells and microbial infections, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis, through recognition of small pyrophosphate containing organic molecules known as phosphoantigens (pAgs). Key to pAg-mediated activation of Vγ9Vδ2 T cells is the butyrophilin 3A1 (BTN3A1) protein that contains an intracellular B30.2 domain critical to pAg reactivity. Here, we have demonstrated through structural, biophysical, and functional approaches that the intracellular B30.2 domain of BTN3A1 directly binds pAg through a positively charged surface pocket. Charge reversal of pocket residues abrogates binding and Vγ9Vδ2 T cell activation. We have also identified a gain-of-function mutation within this pocket that, when introduced into the B30.2 domain of the nonstimulatory BTN3A3 isoform, transfers pAg binding ability and Vγ9Vδ2 T cell activation. These studies demonstrate that internal sensing of changes in pAg metabolite concentrations by BTN3A1 molecules is a critical step in Vγ9Vδ2 T cell detection of infection and tumorigenesis. PMID:24703779

  20. PKC-Dependent Signaling Pathways within PAG and Thalamus Contribute to the Nitric Oxide-Induced Nociceptive Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Ghelardini, Carla

    2013-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is an important molecule involved in nociceptive processing in the central nervous system. The release of NO within the spinal cord has long been implicated in the mechanisms underlying exaggerated pain sensitivity, and administration of NO donors can induce hyperalgesia. To elucidate the supraspinal mechanism responsible for NO-induced nociceptive hypersensitivity, we investigated the modulation of protein kinase C (PKC) and downstream effectors following treatment with the NO donors nitroglycerin and sodium nitroprusside. Both compounds induced a prolonged cold allodynia and heat hyperalgesia, increased levels of c-Fos and IL-1β, and activated NF-κB within periaqueductal grey matter and thalamus. Simultaneously, an increased expression and phosphorylation of PKC γ and ε were detected. To clarify the cellular mechanism involved in the NO-induced hypernociception, we examined the expression of transcription factors that act as PKC downstream effectors. A dramatic hyperphosphorylation of CREB and STAT1 was observed. The i.c.v. administration of the PKC blocker calphostin C prevented the NO-induced hypernociception, the hyperphosphorylation of CREB and STAT1, and partially reduced NF-κB activation. Conversely, the increase of IL-1β was unmodified by calphostin C. These results suggest the relevance of cerebral PKC-mediated CREB and STAT1 activation in the NO donor-induced nociceptive behavior. PMID:27335876

  1. Non-exercise Estimation of V02max Using a Dichotomy of Meeting or Not Meeting DHHS Physical Activity Recommendations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wier, Larry T.; Jackson, Allen W.; Jackson, Andrew S.

    2009-01-01

    The physical activity guidelines (PAG) established by the US Dept. of Health and Human Services in 2008 is consistent with a rating of >/= 6 on the 11-point NASA Physical Activity Status Scale (PASS). Wier, et. al. developed non-exercise models for estimating VO2(sub max) from a combination of PASS, age, gender and either waist girth (WG) (R = 0.810, SEE= 4.799 ml/kg/min), %Fat (R = 0. 817, SEE = 4.716 ml/kg/min) or BMI (R = 0.802, SEE = 4.900 ml . kg-1. min -1 ). PURPOSE: to develop non-exercise models to estimate VO2max from age, gender, body composition (WG, %Fat, BMI) and PASS dichotomized at meets or does not meet the PAG (PAG-PASS), and to compare the accuracy of the PAG-PASS models with the models using the 11-point PASS. METHODS: 2417 men and 384 women were measured for VO2max by indirect calorimetry (RER >1.1); age (yr), gender by M = 1, W = 0; WG at the umbilicus; %fat by skin-folds, BMI by weight (kg) divided by height squared (m 2 ) , and PAGPASS by PASS < 6 = 0 and =/> 6 = 1. RESULTS: Three models were developed by multiple regression to estimate VO2(sub max) from age, gender, PAG-PASS and either WG (R = 0.790, SEE=5.019 ml/kg/min), %FAT (R= 0.080, SEE = 4.915 ml/kg/min) or BMI (R = 0.777, SEE = 5.162ml/kg/min). Cross-validation by the PRESS technique confirmed these statistics. Simple correlations between measured VO2(sub max) and estimates from the PAG-PASS models with WG, %Fat and BMI were 0.790, 0.800 and 0.777, minimally different from the correlations obtained with the PASS models (0.810, 0.810, and 0.802). PAG-PASS and PASS model constant errors were also similar: < 1 ml/kg/min for subsamples of age, gender, PASS and for VO2(sub max) between 30 and 50 ml/kg/min (70% of the sample) but > 1 ml/kg/min for VO2(sub max) <30 and >50 ml/kg/min. CONCLUSIONS: Non-exercise models using the combined effects of age, gender, body composition and the dichotomized PAG-PASS provide estimates of VO2(sub max) that are accurate for most adults, and the accuracy of

  2. Activation of orexin 1 receptors in the periaqueductal gray of male rats leads to antinociception via retrograde endocannabinoid (2-arachidonoylglycerol)-induced disinhibition

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Yu-Cheng; Lee, Hsin-Jung; Tung, Li-Wei; Liao, Yan-Yu; Fu, Szu-Ying; Teng, Shu-Fang; Liao, Hsin-Tzu; Mackie, Ken; Chiou, Lih-Chu

    2011-01-01

    Orexin A and B are hypothalamic peptides known to modulate arousal, feeding and reward via OX1 and OX2 receptors. Orexins are also antinociceptive in the brain but their mechanism(s) of action remain unclear. Here, we investigated the antinociceptive mechanism of orexin A in the rat ventrolateral periaqueductal gray (vlPAG), a midbrain region crucial for initiating descending pain inhibition. In vlPAG slices, orexin A (30-300 nM) depressed GABAergic evoked inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs). This effect was blocked by an OX1 (SB 334867), but not OX2 (Compound 29), antagonist. Orexin A increased the paired-pulse ratio of paired IPSCs, and decreased the frequency, but not amplitude, of miniature IPSCs. Orexin A-induced IPSC depression was mimicked by WIN 55,212-2, a cannabinoid 1 (CB1) receptor agonist. AM 251, a CB1 antagonist, reversed depressant effects by both agonists. Orexin A-induced IPSC depression was prevented by U73122 and tetrahydrolipstatin, inhibitors of phospholipase C (PLC) and diacylglycerol lipase (DAGL), respectively, and enhanced by URB602, which inhibits enzymatic degradation of 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG). Moderate DAGLα, but not DAGLβ, immunoreactivity was observed in the vlPAG. Orexin A produced an overall excitatory effect on evoked postsynaptic potentials and hence increased vlPAG neuronal activity. Intra-vlPAG microinjection of orexin A reduced hot-plate nociceptive responses in rats in a manner blocked by SB 334867 and AM 251. Therefore, orexin A may produce antinociception by activating postsynaptic OX1 receptors, stimulating synthesis of 2-AG, an endocannabinoid, through a Gq-protein-mediated PLC-DAGLα enzymatic cascade culminating in retrograde inhibition of GABA release (disinhibition) in the vlPAG. PMID:21994376

  3. Spectral-luminosity evolution of active galactic nuclei and the cosmic X- and gamma ray background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leiter, Darryl; Boldt, Elihu

    1992-01-01

    Coherent electromagnetic dynamo acceleration processes, which act on charge particles within the context of black hole accretion disk scenarios, are generally regarded as the underlying central power source for active galactic nuclei (AGN). If the precursor active galaxies (PAG) for such AGN are formed at high redshift and contain initial seed black holes with mass approximately equal to 10(exp 4) solar masses, then the Eddington limited X-ray radiation emitted during their lifetime will undergo the phenomenon of 'spectral-luminosity evolution'. When accretion disks are first formed at the onset of galaxy formation the accretion rate occurs at very high values of luminosity/size compactness parameter L/R greater than 10(exp 30) erg/cm-sec. In the absence of extended structure, such high values of L/R generate dynamic constraints which suppress coherent, black hole/accretion disk dynamo particle acceleration processes. This inhibits nonthermal radiation processes and causes the spectrum of X-radiation emitted by PAG to be predominantly thermal. A superposition of PAG sources at z is greater than or equal to 6 can account for the residual cosmic X-ray background (CXB) obtained from the total CXB after subtraction of foreground AGN sources associated with present epoch Seyfert galaxies. The manner in which the PAG undergo spectral-luminosity evolution into Seyfert galaxies is investigated.

  4. SOCIAL DEFEAT, A PARADIGM OF DEPRESSION IN RATS THAT ELICITS 22-kHz VOCALIZATIONS, PREFERENTIALLY ACTIVATES THE CHOLINERGIC SIGNALING PATHWAY IN THE PERIAQUEDUCTAL GRAY

    PubMed Central

    Kroes, Roger A.; Burgdorf, Jeffrey; Otto, Nigel J.; Panksepp, Jaak; Moskal, Joseph R.

    2007-01-01

    Gene expression profiles in the periaqueductal gray (PAG) of adult Long-Evans rats as a function of a stressful social defeat in inter-male fighting encounters were examined. This social subordination model mimics prototypical behavioral changes that parallel aspects of clinical depression, has been postulated to simulate early changes in the onset of depression in the losers, and has been successfully utilized for the evaluation of antidepressant activity. 22-kHz ultrasonic vocalizations (USVs) have been shown to reflect negative emotional states akin to anxiety and depression. Social defeat is the most robust and reliable method of eliciting these calls. The PAG has been shown to be a key brain region for the generation of 22-kHz ultrasonic vocalizations, and 22-kHz USVs have been shown to be controlled by the mesolimbic cholinergic system. In this present study we examined gene expression changes in the PAG of social subordinate rats compared to dominant rats (that do not exhibit 22-kHz USVs). We found that social defeat significantly altered the genes associated with cholinergic synaptic transmission in the PAG. The most robust of these were the increased expression of the β2 subunit of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (CHRNB2) and the T-subunit of acetylcholinesterase (ACHE) in the subordinate animals. These changes were corroborated by qRT-PCR and found to be exclusive to the PAG compared to seven other brain regions examined. These data suggest that cholinergic transmission in the PAG is involved in the generation of 22-kHz USVs and provide potential therapeutic targets for the treatment of affective disorders. PMID:17452055

  5. Response of hydrolytic enzyme activities and nitrogen mineralization to fertilizer and organic matter application in subtropical paddy soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kader, Mohammed Abdul; Yeasmin, Sabina; Akter, Masuda; Sleutel, Steven

    2016-04-01

    Driving controllers of nitrogen (N) mineralization in paddy soils, especially under anaerobic soil conditions, remain elusive. The influence of exogenous organic matter (OM) and fertilizer application on the activities of five relevant enzymes (β-glucosaminidase, β-glucosidase, L-glutaminase, urease and arylamidase) was measured in two long-term field experiments. One 18-years field experiment was established on a weathered terrace soil with a rice-wheat crop rotation at the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Agricultural University (BSMRAU) having five OM treatments combined with two mineral N fertilizer levels. Another 30-years experiment was established on a young floodplain soil with rice-rice crop rotation at the Bangladesh Agricultural University (BAU) having eight mineral fertilizer treatments combined with organic manure. At BSMRAU, N fertilizer and OM amendments significantly increased all enzyme activities, suggesting them to be primarily determined by substrate availability. At BAU, non-responsiveness of β-glucosidase activity suggested little effect of the studied fertilizer and OM amendments on general soil microbial activity. Notwithstanding probably equal microbial demand for N, β-glucosaminidase and L-glutaminase activities differed significantly among the treatments (P>0.05) and followed strikingly opposite trends and correlations with soil organic N mineralization. So enzymatic pathways to acquire N differed by treatment at BAU, indicating differences in soil N quality and bio-availability. L-glutaminase activity was significantly positively correlated to the aerobic and anaerobic N mineralization rates at both field experiments. Combined with negative correlations between β-glucosaminidase activity and N mineralization rates, it appears that terminal amino acid NH2 hydrolysis was a rate-limiting step for soil N mineralization at BAU. Future investigations with joint quantification of polyphenol accumulation and binding of N, alongside an

  6. Anti-wear additive content in fully synthetic PAO and PAG base oils and its effect on electrostatic and tribological phenomena in a rotating shaft-oil-lip seal system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gajewski, Juliusz B.; Głogowski, Marek J.

    2013-03-01

    The paper presents the results of experiments on electrostatic and tribological aspects of different anti-wear additive's contents when an additive is blended with different fully synthetic (poly-α-olefin) and PAG (polyalkylene glycol) base oils in a rotating shaft-oil and oil-lip seal interfacial system. The experimental results are the relationships of electric potential induced in a lip seal's stiffening ring to angular velocity of a rotating metal shaft and to temperature of the oils tested. The braking torque of a shaft is measured with a torquemeter sensor connected directly with a microprocessor-based system for controlling the rotational speed and for measuring the shaft's braking torque and oil temperature. The beneficial and promising results are obtained for PAG when an external DC electric field is applied to the system and the braking torque is then reduced for a certain combination of the base oil and additive's contents. On the basis of the former and present research results an analysis is made to permit one to show how the type of the oils and additives tested can affect both interfaces: rotating shaft-oil and oil-lip of the lip seal and especially the braking torque.

  7. Blockade of presynaptic 4-aminopyridine-sensitive potassium channels increases initial neurotransmitter release probability, reinstates synaptic transmission altered by GABAB receptor activation in rat midbrain periaqueductal gray.

    PubMed

    Li, Guangying; Liu, Zhi-Liang; Zhang, Wei-Ning; Yang, Kun

    2016-01-01

    The activation of γ-aminobutyric acid receptor subtype B (GABAB) receptors in the midbrain ventrolateral periaqueductal gray (vlPAG) induces both postsynaptic and presynaptic inhibition. Whereas the postsynaptic inhibition is mediated by G protein-coupled inwardly rectifying K channels, the presynaptic inhibition of neurotransmitter release is primarily mediated by voltage-gated calcium channels. Using whole-cell recordings from acute rat PAG slices, we report here that the bath application of 4-aminopyridine, a voltage-gated K channel blocker, increases the initial GABA and glutamate release probability (P) and reinstates P depressed by presynaptic GABAB receptor activation at inhibitory and excitatory synapses, respectively. However, Ba, which blocks G protein-coupled inwardly rectifying K channels, does not produce similar effects. Our data suggest that the blockade of presynaptic 4-aminopyridine-sensitive K channels in vlPAG facilitates neurotransmitter release and reinstates synaptic transmission that has been altered by presynaptic GABAB receptor activation. Because vlPAG is involved in the descending pain control system, the present results may have potential therapeutic applications. PMID:26575285

  8. Targeting glutaminolysis has antileukemic activity in acute myeloid leukemia and synergizes with BCL-2 inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Jacque, Nathalie; Ronchetti, Anne Marie; Larrue, Clément; Meunier, Godelieve; Birsen, Rudy; Willems, Lise; Saland, Estelle; Decroocq, Justine; Maciel, Thiago Trovati; Lambert, Mireille; Poulain, Laury; Hospital, Marie Anne; Sujobert, Pierre; Joseph, Laure; Chapuis, Nicolas; Lacombe, Catherine; Moura, Ivan Cruz; Demo, Susan; Sarry, Jean Emmanuel; Recher, Christian; Mayeux, Patrick; Tamburini, Jérôme

    2015-01-01

    Cancer cells require glutamine to adapt to increased biosynthetic activity. The limiting step in intracellular glutamine catabolism involves its conversion to glutamate by glutaminase (GA). Different GA isoforms are encoded by the genes GLS1 and GLS2 in humans. Herein, we show that glutamine levels control mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells. Glutaminase C (GAC) is the GA isoform that is most abundantly expressed in AML. Both knockdown of GLS1 expression and pharmacologic GLS1 inhibition by the drug CB-839 can reduce OXPHOS, leading to leukemic cell proliferation arrest and apoptosis without causing cytotoxic activity against normal human CD34+ progenitors. Strikingly, GLS1 knockdown dramatically inhibited AML development in NSG mice. The antileukemic activity of CB-839 was abrogated by both the expression of a hyperactive GACK320A allele and the addition of the tricarboxyclic acid cycle product α-ketoglutarate, indicating the critical function of GLS1 in AML cell survival. Finally, glutaminolysis inhibition activated mitochondrial apoptosis and synergistically sensitized leukemic cells to priming with the BCL-2 inhibitor ABT-199. These findings show that targeting glutamine addiction via GLS1 inhibition offers a potential novel therapeutic strategy for AML. PMID:26186940

  9. Rat exposure in mice with neuropathic pain induces fear and antinociception that is not reversed by 5-HT2C receptor activation in the dorsal periaqueductal gray.

    PubMed

    Furuya-da-Cunha, Elke Mayumi; Souza, Rimenez Rodrigues de; Canto-de-Souza, Azair

    2016-07-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that serotonin 5-HT2C receptors in the dorsal periaqueductal gray (dPAG) mediate both anxiety and antinociception in mice submitted to the elevated plus maze. The present study examined the effects of intra-dPAG infusion of the serotonin 5-HT2C receptor agonist (MK-212) in the defensive reactions and antinociception in mice with neurophatic pain confronted by a predator. Neuropathic pain was induced by chronic constriction injury (CCI) of the sciatic nerve, and predator confrontation was performed using the rat exposure test (RET). Our results demonstrated that both sham-operated and CCI mice exhibited intense defensive reactions when confronted by rats. However, rat-exposed CCI mice showed reduced pain reactivity in comparison to CCI mice exposed to a toy rat. Intra-dPAG infusion of MK-212 prior to predator exposure did not significantly alter defensive or antinociceptive responses. To our knowledge, our results represent the first evidence of RET-induced antinociception in mice. Moreover, the results of the present study suggest that 5-HT2C receptor activation in the dPAG is not critically involved in the control of predator-evoked fearful or antinociceptive responses. PMID:27059332

  10. Hypoxia regulates glutamate metabolism and membrane transport in rat PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, S; Millhorn, D E

    2001-03-01

    We investigated the effect of hypoxia on glutamate metabolism and uptake in rat pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells. Various key enzymes relevant to glutamate production, metabolism and transport were coordinately regulated by hypoxia. PC12 cells express two glutamate-metabolizing enzymes, glutamine synthetase (GS) and glutamate decarboxylase (GAD), as well as the glutamate-producing enzyme, phosphate-activated glutaminase (PAG). Exposure to hypoxia (1% O(2)) for 6 h or longer increased expression of GS mRNA and protein and enhanced GS enzymatic activity. In contrast, hypoxia caused a significant decrease in expression of PAG mRNA and protein, and also decreased PAG activity. In addition, hypoxia led to an increase in GAD65 and GAD67 protein levels and GAD enzymatic activity. PC12 cells express three Na(+)-dependent glutamate transporters; EAAC1, GLT-1 and GLAST. Hypoxia increased EAAC1 and GLT-1 protein levels, but had no effect on GLAST. Chronic hypoxia significantly enhanced the Na(+)-dependent component of glutamate transport. Furthermore, chronic hypoxia decreased cellular content of glutamate, but increased that of glutamine. Taken together, the hypoxia-induced changes in enzymes related to glutamate metabolism and transport are consistent with a decrease in the extracellular concentration of glutamate. This may have a role in protecting PC12 cells from the cytotoxic effects of glutamate during chronic hypoxia. PMID:11259512

  11. Inhibition of Microglia Activation as a Phenotypic Assay in Early Drug Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Figuera-Losada, Mariana; Rojas, Camilo; Slusher, Barbara S.

    2014-01-01

    Complex biological processes such as inflammation, cell death, migration, proliferation, and the release of biologically active molecules can be used as outcomes in phenotypic assays during early stages of drug discovery. Although target-based approaches have been widely used over the past decades, a disproportionate number of first-in-class drugs have been identified using phenotypic screening. This review details phenotypic assays based on inhibition of microglial activation and their utility in primary and secondary screening, target validation, and pathway elucidation. The role of microglia, both in normal as well as in pathological conditions such as chronic neurodegenerative diseases, is reviewed. Methodologies to assess microglia activation in vitro are discussed in detail, and classes of therapeutic drugs known to decrease the proinflammatory and cytotoxic responses of activated microglia are appraised, including inhibitors of glutaminase, cystine/glutamate antiporter, nuclear factor κB, and mitogen-activated protein kinases. PMID:23945875

  12. Spinal dorsal horn neuronal responses to myelinated versus unmyelinated heat nociceptors and their modulation by activation of the periaqueductal grey in the rat.

    PubMed

    McMullan, Simon; Lumb, Bridget M

    2006-10-15

    The aim of this study was to further understand the central processing of inputs arising from unmyelinated and myelinated nociceptors by (i) determining the response characteristics of Class 2 dorsal horn neurones to preferential activation of C- and A-fibre heat nociceptors, and (ii) investigating the control exerted by the dorsolateral/lateral region of the midbrain periaqueductal grey (DL/L-PAG) on C- and A-fibre-evoked responses of these neurones. The use of different rates of skin heating to preferentially activate unmyelinated (C-fibre; 2.5 degrees C s(-1)) versus myelinated (A-fibre; 7.5 degrees C s(-1)) heat nociceptors revealed that, in response to C-nociceptor activation, Class 2 neurones encode well only over the first 5 degrees C above threshold, and that at higher temperatures responses decline. In contrast, responses to A-nociceptor activation are linear and encode skin temperature over more than 10 degrees C, and almost certainly into the tissue-damaging range. PAG stimulation raised thresholds and decreased significantly the magnitude of responses to A- and C-nociceptor activation. However, differences were revealed in the effects of descending control on the relationships between skin temperature and neuronal firing rate; the linear relationship that occurred over the first 5 degrees C of slow rates of skin heating was no longer evident, whereas that to fast rates of skin heating was maintained over the entire range, albeit shifted to the right. These data indicate that the sensori-discriminative information conveyed in A-fibre nociceptors is maintained and that the information from C-nociceptors is lost in the presence of descending control from the DL/L-PAG. The data are discussed in relation to the role of the DL/L-PAG in mediating active coping strategies. PMID:16916903

  13. Capsaicin-evoked brain activation and central sensitization in anaesthetised rats: a functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    Moylan Governo, Ricardo Jose; Morris, Peter Gordon; Prior, Malcolm John William; Marsden, Charles Alexander; Chapman, Victoria

    2006-12-15

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) of blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) haemodynamic responses was used to study the effects of the noxious substance capsaicin on whole brain activation in isofluorane anaesthetised rats. Rats (n=8) received intradermal injection of capsaicin (30 microg/5 microl), or topical cream (0.1%) capsaicin and BOLD responses were acquired for up to 120 min. Effects of capsaicin versus placebo cream treatment on the BOLD response to a 15 g mechanical stimulus applied adjacent to the site of cream application were also studied. Both injection and cream application of capsaicin activated brain areas involved in pain processing, including the thalamus and periaqueductal grey (PAG) (p<0.05, corrected for multiple comparisons). Capsaicin also produced increases in BOLD signal intensity in other regions that contribute to pain processing, such as the parabrachial nucleus and superior colliculus. Mechanical stimulation in capsaicin-treated rats, but not placebo-treated rats, induced a significant decrease in BOLD signal intensity in the PAG (p<0.001). These data demonstrate that the noxious substance capsaicin produces brain activation in the midbrain regions and reveals the importance of the PAG in central sensitization. PMID:16843597

  14. Quality Assurance Program Plan for the radiological survey activities program --- Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project

    SciTech Connect

    Knott, R.R.; Little, C.A.

    1991-08-01

    The Pollutant Assessments Group (PAG) at the Grand Junction Office (GJO), Colorado, of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is responsible for surveying designated sites in the vicinity of 24 inactive mill sites involved in the Department of Energy's (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project (UMTRAP). The purpose of these surveys is to provide a recommendation to DOE whether to include or exclude these sites from UMTRAP based on whether the on-site residual radioactive material (if any) originated from the former mill sites, and radiation levels on-site are in excess of appropriate Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) criteria. This report describes the Quality Assurance Plan (QAP) for the PAG in conducting all activities related to UMTRAP. All quality assurance provisions given by the DOE, DOE/UMTRA and ORNL organizations are integrated into this plan. Specifically, this report identifies the policies and procedures followed in accomplishing the PAG/UMTRA QA program, identifies those organizational units involved in the implementation of these procedures, and outlines the respective responsibilities of those groups. 11 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. Construction of Escherichia coli Mutant with Decreased Endotoxic Activity by Modifying Lipid A Structure.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qiong; Li, Yanyan; Zhao, Xinxin; Yang, Xue; Liu, Qing; Kong, Qingke

    2015-06-01

    Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) and its derivatives are widely used for the production of recombinant proteins, but these purified proteins are always contaminated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). LPS is recognized by the toll-like receptor 4 and myeloid differentiation factor 2 complex of mammalian immune cells and leads to release of pro-inflammatory cytokines. It is a vital step to remove LPS from the proteins before use for therapeutic purpose. In this study, we constructed BL21 (DE3) ∆msbB28 ∆pagP38 mutant, which produces a penta-acylated LPS with reduced endotoxicity. The plasmids harboring pagL and/or lpxE were then introduced into this mutant to further modify the LPS. The new strain (S004) carrying plasmid pQK004 (pagL and lpxE) produced mono-phosphoryated tetra-acylated lipid A, which induces markedly less production of tumor necrosis factor-α in the RAW264.7 and IL-12 in the THP1, but still retains ability to produce recombinant proteins. This study provides a strategy to decrease endotoxic activity of recombinant proteins purified from E. coli BL21 backgrounds and a feasible approach to modify lipid A structure for alternative purposes such as mono-phosphoryl lipid A (MPL) as vaccine adjuvants. PMID:26023843

  16. Construction of Escherichia coli Mutant with Decreased Endotoxic Activity by Modifying Lipid A Structure

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qiong; Li, Yanyan; Zhao, Xinxin; Yang, Xue; Liu, Qing; Kong, Qingke

    2015-01-01

    Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) and its derivatives are widely used for the production of recombinant proteins, but these purified proteins are always contaminated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). LPS is recognized by the toll-like receptor 4 and myeloid differentiation factor 2 complex of mammalian immune cells and leads to release of pro-inflammatory cytokines. It is a vital step to remove LPS from the proteins before use for therapeutic purpose. In this study, we constructed BL21 (DE3) ∆msbB28 ∆pagP38 mutant, which produces a penta-acylated LPS with reduced endotoxicity. The plasmids harboring pagL and/or lpxE were then introduced into this mutant to further modify the LPS. The new strain (S004) carrying plasmid pQK004 (pagL and lpxE) produced mono-phosphoryated tetra-acylated lipid A, which induces markedly less production of tumor necrosis factor-α in the RAW264.7 and IL-12 in the THP1, but still retains ability to produce recombinant proteins. This study provides a strategy to decrease endotoxic activity of recombinant proteins purified from E. coli BL21 backgrounds and a feasible approach to modify lipid A structure for alternative purposes such as mono-phosphoryl lipid A (MPL) as vaccine adjuvants. PMID:26023843

  17. Photo-activated ionic gelation of alginate hydrogel: real-time rheological monitoring of the two-step crosslinking mechanism.

    PubMed

    Higham, Alina K; Bonino, Christopher A; Raghavan, Srinivasa R; Khan, Saad A

    2014-07-21

    We examine the gelation of alginate undergoing ionic crosslinking upon ultraviolet (UV) irradiation using in situ dynamic rheology. Hydrogels are formed by combining alginate with calcium carbonate (CaCO3) particles and a photoacid generator (PAG). The PAG is photolyzed upon UV irradiation, resulting in the release of free calcium ions for ionic crosslinking. The viscous and elastic moduli during gelation are monitored as a function of the UV irradiation intensity, exposure time, alginate concentration, and the ratio between alginate and calcium carbonate. Gel time decreases as irradiation intensity increases because a larger concentration of PAG is photolyzed. Interestingly, dark curing, the continuing growth of microstructure in the absence of UV light, is observed. In some instances, the sample transitions from a solution to a gel during the dark curing phase. Additionally, when exposed to constant UV irradiation after the dark curing phase, samples reach the same plateau modulus as samples exposed to constant UV without dark curing, implying that dark curing does not affect the gelation mechanism. We believe the presence of dark curing is the result of the acidic environment persisting within the sample, allowing CaCO3 to dissociate, thereby releasing free Ca(2+) ions capable of binding with the available appropriate ionic blocks of the polymer chains. The growth of microstructure is then detected if the activation barrier has been crossed to release sufficient calcium ions. In this regard, we calculate a value of 30 J that represents the activation energy required to initiate gelation. PMID:24894636

  18. Ligand-biased activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 leads to differences in opioid induced antinociception and tolerance.

    PubMed

    Bobeck, Erin N; Ingram, Susan L; Hermes, Sam M; Aicher, Sue A; Morgan, Michael M

    2016-02-01

    Opioids produce antinociception by activation of G protein signaling linked to the mu-opioid receptor (MOPr). However, opioid binding to the MOPr also activates β-arrestin signaling. Opioids such as DAMGO and fentanyl differ in their relative efficacy for activation of these signaling cascades, but the behavioral consequences of this differential signaling are not known. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the behavioral significance of G protein and internalization dependent signaling within ventrolateral periaqueductal gray (vlPAG). Antinociception induced by microinjecting DAMGO into the vlPAG was attenuated by blocking Gαi/o protein signaling with administration of pertussis toxin (PTX), preventing internalization with administration of dynamin dominant-negative inhibitory peptide (dyn-DN) or direct inhibition of ERK1/2 with administration of the MEK inhibitor, U0126. In contrast, the antinociceptive effect of microinjecting fentanyl into the vlPAG was not altered by administration of PTX or U0126, and was enhanced by administration of dyn-DN. Microinjection of DAMGO, but not fentanyl, into the vlPAG induced phosphorylation of ERK1/2, which was blocked by inhibiting receptor internalization with administration of dyn-DN, but not by inhibition of Gαi/o proteins. ERK1/2 inhibition also prevented the development and expression of tolerance to repeated DAMGO microinjections, but had no effect on fentanyl tolerance. These data reveal that ERK1/2 activation following MOPr internalization contributes to the antinociceptive effect of some (e.g., DAMGO), but not all opioids (e.g., fentanyl) despite the known similarities for these agonists to induce β-arrestin recruitment and internalization. PMID:26497105

  19. A new role for α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex: regulating metabolism through post-translational modification of other enzymes.

    PubMed

    McKenna, Mary C; Rae, Caroline D

    2015-07-01

    This Editorial highlights a study by Gibson et al. published in this issue of JNeurochem, in which the authors reveal a novel role for the α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex (KGDHC) in post-translational modification of proteins. KGDHC may catalyze post-translational modification of itself as well as several other proteins by succinylation of lysine residues. The authors' report of an enzyme responsible for succinylation of key mitochondrial enzymes represents a major step toward our understanding of the complex functional metabolome. TCA, tricarboxylic acid; KG, α-ketoglutarate; KGDHC, α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex; FUM, fumarase; MDH, malate dehydrogenase; ME, malic enzyme; GDH, glutamate dehydrogenase; AAT, aspartate aminotransferase; GS, glutamine synthetase; PAG, phosphate-activated glutaminase; SIRT3, silent information regulator 3; SIRT5, silent information regulator 5. PMID:26052752

  20. Distinct ensembles of medial prefrontal cortex neurons are activated by threatening stimuli that elicit excitation vs. inhibition of movement.

    PubMed

    Halladay, Lindsay R; Blair, Hugh T

    2015-08-01

    Neural circuits controlling defensive behavior were investigated by recording single units in medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and dorsolateral periaqueductal gray (dlPAG) while rats expressed conditioned fear responses to an auditory conditioned stimulus (CS; 20-s train of white noise pips) previously paired with an aversive unconditioned stimulus (US; 2-s train of periorbital shocks). The CS elicited conditioned movement inhibition (CMI; characterized by decreased movement speed and freezing) when rats had not recently encountered the US, whereas the CS elicited conditioned movement excitation (CME; characterized by increased movement speed and flight behavior) after recent US encounters. Many mPFC neurons were "strategy-selective" cells that changed their firing rates only when the CS elicited CME (15/71) or CMI (13/71) responses, whereas few mPFC cells (4/71) responded nonselectively to the CS during either response. By contrast, many dlPAG neurons (20/74) responded nonselectively to the CS, but most (40/74) were excited by the CS selectively during CME trials (and none during CMI trials). CME-selective neurons in dlPAG responded phasically after CS pips that elicited CME responses, whereas CME-selective neurons in mPFC showed tonically elevated activity before and after pips that evoked CME responses. These findings suggest that, at the time when the CS occurs, tonic firing rates of CME- and CMI-selective mPFC neurons may bias the rat's choice of whether to express CME vs. CMI responses, perhaps via projections to downstream structures (such as amygdala and PAG) that influence how sensory stimuli are mapped onto motor circuits that drive the expression of competing behaviors. PMID:25972588

  1. Distinct ensembles of medial prefrontal cortex neurons are activated by threatening stimuli that elicit excitation vs. inhibition of movement

    PubMed Central

    Blair, Hugh T.

    2015-01-01

    Neural circuits controlling defensive behavior were investigated by recording single units in medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and dorsolateral periaqueductal gray (dlPAG) while rats expressed conditioned fear responses to an auditory conditioned stimulus (CS; 20-s train of white noise pips) previously paired with an aversive unconditioned stimulus (US; 2-s train of periorbital shocks). The CS elicited conditioned movement inhibition (CMI; characterized by decreased movement speed and freezing) when rats had not recently encountered the US, whereas the CS elicited conditioned movement excitation (CME; characterized by increased movement speed and flight behavior) after recent US encounters. Many mPFC neurons were “strategy-selective” cells that changed their firing rates only when the CS elicited CME (15/71) or CMI (13/71) responses, whereas few mPFC cells (4/71) responded nonselectively to the CS during either response. By contrast, many dlPAG neurons (20/74) responded nonselectively to the CS, but most (40/74) were excited by the CS selectively during CME trials (and none during CMI trials). CME-selective neurons in dlPAG responded phasically after CS pips that elicited CME responses, whereas CME-selective neurons in mPFC showed tonically elevated activity before and after pips that evoked CME responses. These findings suggest that, at the time when the CS occurs, tonic firing rates of CME- and CMI-selective mPFC neurons may bias the rat's choice of whether to express CME vs. CMI responses, perhaps via projections to downstream structures (such as amygdala and PAG) that influence how sensory stimuli are mapped onto motor circuits that drive the expression of competing behaviors. PMID:25972588

  2. Regulation of active site coupling in glutamine-dependent NAD[superscript +] synthetase

    SciTech Connect

    LaRonde-LeBlanc, Nicole; Resto, Melissa; Gerratana, Barbara

    2009-05-21

    NAD{sup +} is an essential metabolite both as a cofactor in energy metabolism and redox homeostasis and as a regulator of cellular processes. In contrast to humans, Mycobacterium tuberculosis NAD{sup +} biosynthesis is absolutely dependent on the activity of a multifunctional glutamine-dependent NAD{sup +} synthetase, which catalyzes the ATP-dependent formation of NAD{sup +} at the synthetase domain using ammonia derived from L-glutamine in the glutaminase domain. Here we report the kinetics and structural characterization of M. tuberculosis NAD{sup +} synthetase. The kinetics data strongly suggest tightly coupled regulation of the catalytic activities. The structure, the first of a glutamine-dependent NAD{sup +} synthetase, reveals a homooctameric subunit organization suggesting a tight dependence of catalysis on the quaternary structure, a 40-{angstrom} intersubunit ammonia tunnel and structural elements that may be involved in the transfer of information between catalytic sites.

  3. Behavioral meaningful opioidergic stimulation activates kappa receptor gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Teodorov, E.; Ferrari, M.F.R.; Fior-Chadi, D.R.; Camarini, R.; Felício, L.F.

    2012-01-01

    The periaqueductal gray (PAG) has been reported to be a location for opioid regulation of pain and a potential site for behavioral selection in females. Opioid-mediated behavioral and physiological responses differ according to the activity of opioid receptor subtypes. The present study investigated the effects of the peripheral injection of the kappa-opioid receptor agonist U69593 into the dorsal subcutaneous region of animals on maternal behavior and on Oprk1 gene activity in the PAG of female rats. Female Wistar rats weighing 200-250 g at the beginning of the study were randomly divided into 2 groups for maternal behavior and gene expression experiments. On day 5, pups were removed at 7:00 am and placed in another home cage that was distant from their mother. Thirty minutes after removing the pups, the dams were treated with U69593 (0.15 mg/kg, sc) or 0.9% saline (up to 1 mL/kg) and after 30 min were evaluated in the maternal behavior test. Latencies in seconds for pup retrieval, grouping, crouching, and full maternal behavior were scored. The results showed that U69593 administration inhibited maternal behavior (P < 0.05) because a lower percentage of U69593 group dams showed retrieval of first pup, retrieving all pups, grouping, crouching and displaying full maternal behavior compared to the saline group. Opioid gene expression was evaluated using real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). A single injection of U69593 increased Oprk1 PAG expression in both virgin (P < 0.05) and lactating female rats (P < 0.01), with no significant effect on Oprm1 or Oprd1 gene activity. Thus, the expression of kappa-opioid receptors in the PAG may be modulated by single opioid receptor stimulation and behavioral meaningful opioidergic transmission in the adult female might occur simultaneously to specific changes in gene expression of kappa-opioid receptor subtype. This is yet another alert for the complex role of the opioid system in female

  4. Remote-controlled drug release from graphene oxide-capped mesoporous silica to cancer cells by photoinduced pH-jump activation.

    PubMed

    He, Dinggeng; He, Xiaoxiao; Wang, Kemin; Zou, Zhen; Yang, Xue; Li, Xuecai

    2014-06-24

    Remote light control of drug release enhances our ability to address the complexity of biological systems because of its remarkable spatial/temporal resolution. Here, a new class of remote-controlled release system by incorporating photoacid generator (PAG) into graphene oxide-capped mesoporous silica was designed for delivering drug payloads to cancer cells via photoinduced pH-jump activation. PAG was immobilized on pore wall of the boronic acid-grafted mesoporous silica via strong physical adsorption, and then the nanoparticle was capped with graphene oxide sheet by an acid-labile boroester bond, leading to the formation of nanogated ensemble (MSP-BA-GO). Illuminating with a UV light, PAG generated a pH jump, which induced cleavage of the boroester linkers and thus resulted in the uncapping of pore gates. Moreover, folic acid-modified, doxorubicin (DOX)-loaded MSP-BA-GO (DOX@MSP-BA-GOF) showed selective cell internalization via receptor-mediated endocytosis and subsequent released DOX by the remote illumination. We envisioned that this remote-controlled drug delivery system could find potential applications for cancer therapy. PMID:24924411

  5. Negative emotions facilitate isometric force through activation of prefrontal cortex and periaqueductal gray.

    PubMed

    Blakemore, Rebekah L; Rieger, Sebastian W; Vuilleumier, Patrik

    2016-01-01

    Emotions are considered to modulate action readiness. Previous studies have demonstrated increased force production following exposure to emotionally arousing visual stimuli; however the neural mechanisms underlying how precise force output is controlled within varying emotional contexts remain poorly understood. To identify the neural correlates of emotion-modulated motor behaviour, twenty-two participants produced a submaximal isometric precision-grip contraction while viewing pleasant, unpleasant, neutral or blank images (without visual feedback of force output). Force magnitude was continuously recorded together with change in brain activity using functional magnetic resonance imaging. Viewing unpleasant images resulted in reduced force decay during force maintenance as compared with pleasant, neutral and blank images. Subjective valence and arousal ratings significantly predicted force production during maintenance. Neuroimaging revealed that negative valence and its interaction with force output correlated with increased activity in right inferior frontal gyrus (rIFG), while arousal was associated with amygdala and periaqueductal gray (PAG) activation. Force maintenance alone was correlated with cerebellar activity. These data demonstrate a valence-driven modulation of force output, mediated by a cortico-subcortical network involving rIFG and PAG. These findings are consistent with engagement of motor pathways associated with aversive motivation, eliciting defensive behaviour and action preparedness in response to negative emotional signals. PMID:26400014

  6. Anti-thrombotic activity and chemical characterization of steroidal saponins from Dioscorea zingiberensis C.H. Wright.

    PubMed

    Li, Hua; Huang, Wen; Wen, Yanqing; Gong, Guohua; Zhao, Qingbing; Yu, Gang

    2010-12-01

    Steroidal saponins have long attracted scientific attention, due to their structural diversity and significant biological activities. Total steroidal saponins (TSS) extracted from the rhizomes of Dioscorea zingiberensis C.H. Wright (DZW) constitute an effective treatment for cardiovascular disease. However, the active constituents contained in DZW rhizomes and their pharmacological properties are not fully understood. The aim of this work is to determine and quantify the active constituents in DZW rhizomes using fingerprint technique, and evaluate its anti-thrombotic activity using inferior vena cava ligation thrombosis rat model and pulmonary thrombosis mice model after being gavaged with TSS for 1 or 2weeks. In the study, a chemical fingerprint method was firstly established and validated to quantify and standardize TSS from DZW rhizomes including parvifloside, protodeltonin, protodioscin, protogracillin, zingiberensis saponin, deltonin, dioscin and trillin. TSS extracted from DZW rhizomes were showed to have the inhibitions on platelet aggregation (PAG) and thrombosis, and prolong activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), thrombin time (TT), and prothrombin time (PT) in a dose-dependent manner in rats. TSS also prolonged the bleeding time and clotting time in a dose-dependent manner in mice. The results indicate that TSS could inhibit thrombosis by both improving the anticoagulation activity and inhibiting PAG action, suggesting that TSS from DZW rhizomes have the potential to reduce the risk of cardiovascular diseases by anti-thrombotic action. PMID:20659537

  7. Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase depletes tryptophan, activates general control non-derepressible 2 kinase and down-regulates key enzymes involved in fatty acid synthesis in primary human CD4+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Eleftheriadis, Theodoros; Pissas, Georgios; Antoniadi, Georgia; Liakopoulos, Vassilios; Stefanidis, Ioannis

    2015-10-01

    Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) is expressed in antigen-presenting cells and exerts immunosuppressive effects on CD4(+) T cells. One mechanism is through the inhibition of aerobic glycolysis. Another prerequisite for T-cell proliferation and differentiation into effector cells is increased fatty acid (FA) synthesis. The effect of IDO on enzymes involved in FA synthesis was evaluated in primary human cells both in mixed lymphocyte reactions in the presence or not of the IDO inhibitor 1-dl-methyl-tryptophan, and in stimulated CD4(+) T cells in the presence or not of the general control non-derepressible 2 (GCN2) kinase activator tryptophanol (TRP). IDO or TRP inhibited cell proliferation. By assessing the level of GCN2 kinase or mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 substrates along with a kynurenine free system we showed that IDO exerts its effect mainly through activation of GCN2 kinase. IDO or TRP down-regulated ATP-citrate lyase and acetyl coenzyme A carboxylase 1, key enzymes involved in FA synthesis. Also, IDO or TRP altered the expression of enzymes that control the availability of carbon atoms for FA synthesis, such as lactate dehydrogenase-A, pyruvate dehydrogenase, glutaminase 1 and glutaminase 2, in a way that inhibits FA synthesis. In conclusion, IDO through GCN2 kinase activation inhibits CD4(+) T-cell proliferation and down-regulates key enzymes that directly or indirectly promote FA synthesis, a prerequisite for CD4(+) T-cell proliferation and differentiation into effector cell lineages. PMID:26147366

  8. Analgesic Neural Circuits Are Activated by Electroacupuncture at Two Sets of Acupoints

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Man-Li; Qiu, Zheng-Ying

    2016-01-01

    To investigate analgesic neural circuits activated by electroacupuncture (EA) at different sets of acupoints in the brain, goats were stimulated by EA at set of Baihui-Santai acupoints or set of Housanli acupoints for 30 min. The pain threshold was measured using the potassium iontophoresis method. The levels of c-Fos were determined with Streptavidin-Biotin Complex immunohistochemistry. The results showed pain threshold induced by EA at set of Baihui-Santai acupoints was 44.74% ± 4.56% higher than that by EA at set of Housanli acupoints (32.64% ± 5.04%). Compared with blank control, EA at two sets of acupoints increased c-Fos expression in the medial septal nucleus (MSN), the arcuate nucleus (ARC), the nucleus amygdala basalis (AB), the lateral habenula nucleus (HL), the ventrolateral periaqueductal grey (vlPAG), the locus coeruleus (LC), the nucleus raphe magnus (NRM), the pituitary gland, and spinal cord dorsal horn (SDH). Compared with EA at set of Housanli points, EA at set of Baihui-Santai points induced increased c-Fos expression in AB but decrease in MSN, the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus, HL, and SDH. It suggests that ARC-PAG-NRM/LC-SDH and the hypothalamus-pituitary may be the common activated neural pathways taking part in EA-induced analgesia at the two sets of acupoints. PMID:27429635

  9. [NADPH-diaphorase activity and Fos expression in brainstem nuclei involved in cardiovascular regulation following intracarotid injection of capsaicin].

    PubMed

    Xue, B J; Zhang, X X; Ding, Y F; Shi, G M; He, R R

    2001-02-01

    The present study was undertaken to define whether intracarotid injection of capsaicin induces Fos expression associated with the activation of NOS-containing neurons in brainstem nuclei by combining the immunocytochemical method for Fos with NADPH-d histochemical technique for NOS. The results obtained are as follows: (1) Intracarotid injection of capsaicin caused a significant increase of Fos-like immunoreactive neurons in area postrema (AP), nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS), paragigantocellularis lateralis (PGL) and locus coeruleus (LC), without influence upon the neurons of raphe nuclei (RN) and periaqueductal gray (PAG). (2) NO-containing neurons in PGL and NTS and the double-labeled neurons in PGL were also increased significantly following intracarotid injection of capsaicin. Small numbers of NO-containing neurons were found in LC, but there was no change in the number of NO-containing neurons in RN and PAG. No NADPH-d histochemical activity could be found in AP. (3) The above responses to capsaicin were significantly inhibited by pretreatment with either a capsaicin receptor antagonist ruthenium red or a NMDA receptor antagonist MK-801. The above results indicate that intracarotid injection of capsaicin may activate the neurons in brainstem nuclei involved in cardiovascular regulation, and that NO only plays an indirect role in the modulation of the responses of brainstem nuclei to capsaicin. These effects of capsaicin are mediated by capsaicin receptors with involvement of glutamate. PMID:11354801

  10. Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clearing: Nature and Learning in the Pacific Northwest, 1984

    1984-01-01

    Presents three activities: (1) investigating succession in a schoolground; (2) investigating oak galls; and (3) making sun prints (photographs made without camera or darkroom). Each activity includes a list of materials needed and procedures used. (JN)

  11. Hemolymph coagulation and phenoloxidase activity in Uca tangeri induced by Escherichia coli endotoxin.

    PubMed

    Salawu, Musa O; Oloyede, Hussein O B; Oladiji, Temidayo A; Yakubu, Musa T; Amuzat, Aliyu O

    2016-05-01

    Uca tangeri is a marine fiddler crab found commonly in the West African coast and is often exposed to Gram-negative pathogens upon injury. The aim of this study was to document the patterns of endotoxin-induced protein coagulation and phenoloxidase (PO) activity in hemolymph fractions of Uca tangeri. Hemolymph from live crabs was obtained by carapace puncture, pooled. and then separated into plasma, hemocyte Lysate (HL), hemocyte lysate supernatant (HLS) and hemocyte lysate debris (HLD). The effect of Escherichia coli (O1111:B4) endotoxin and calcium ion (Ca(2+)) on protein coagulation in the presence/absence of endotoxin and the endotoxin dose-dependence of coagulation and PO activity were each studied in the plasma, HL, HLS and HLD. The results showed Ca(2+) was required to induce coagulation, and was endotoxin concentration-dependent in the plasma. PO activity was highest in the HLS but PO specific activity was highest in HLD. PO activity remained relatively constant with increased LPS concentration in the range studied 0-10 EU/ml. From the data we conclude that endotoxin-induced protein coagulation occurs in the plasma alone and might be mediated by trans-glutaminases, while PO activity is localized inside hemocytes and cell membranes in Uca tangeri. PMID:26524621

  12. Activation of the opioidergic descending pain control system underlies placebo analgesia.

    PubMed

    Eippert, Falk; Bingel, Ulrike; Schoell, Eszter D; Yacubian, Juliana; Klinger, Regine; Lorenz, Jürgen; Büchel, Christian

    2009-08-27

    Placebo analgesia involves the endogenous opioid system, as administration of the opioid antagonist naloxone decreases placebo analgesia. To investigate the opioidergic mechanisms that underlie placebo analgesia, we combined naloxone administration with functional magnetic resonance imaging. Naloxone reduced both behavioral and neural placebo effects as well as placebo-induced responses in pain-modulatory cortical structures, such as the rostral anterior cingulate cortex (rACC). In a brainstem-specific analysis, we observed a similar naloxone modulation of placebo-induced responses in key structures of the descending pain control system, including the hypothalamus, the periaqueductal gray (PAG), and the rostral ventromedial medulla (RVM). Most importantly, naloxone abolished placebo-induced coupling between rACC and PAG, which predicted both neural and behavioral placebo effects as well as activation of the RVM. These findings show that opioidergic signaling in pain-modulating areas and the projections to downstream effectors of the descending pain control system are crucially important for placebo analgesia. PMID:19709634

  13. Study of the Glutaminase Inhibitor CB-839 in Solid Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-18

    Solid Tumors; Triple-Negative Breast Cancer; Non Small Cell Lung Cancer; Renal Cell Carcinoma; Mesothelioma; Fumarate Hydratase (FH)-Deficient Tumors; Succinate Dehydrogenase (SDH)-Deficient Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors (GIST); Succinate Dehydrogenase (SDH)-Deficient Non-gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors; Tumors Harboring Isocitrate Dehydrogenase-1 (IDH1) and IDH2 Mutations; Tumors Harboring Amplifications in the cMyc Gene

  14. Effect of direct eye contact in PTSD related to interpersonal trauma: an fMRI study of activation of an innate alarm system

    PubMed Central

    Steuwe, Carolin; Daniels, Judith K.; Frewen, Paul A.; Densmore, Maria; Pannasch, Sebastian; Beblo, Thomas; Reiss, Jeffrey; Lanius, Ruth A.

    2014-01-01

    In healthy individuals, direct eye contact initially leads to activation of a fast subcortical pathway, which then modulates a cortical route eliciting social cognitive processes. The aim of this study was to gain insight into the neurobiological effects of direct eye-to-eye contact using a virtual reality paradigm in individuals with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) related to prolonged childhood abuse. We examined 16 healthy comparison subjects and 16 patients with a primary diagnosis of PTSD using a virtual reality functional magnetic resonance imaging paradigm involving direct vs averted gaze (happy, sad, neutral) as developed by Schrammel et al. in 2009. Irrespective of the displayed emotion, controls exhibited an increased blood oxygenation level-dependent response during direct vs averted gaze within the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex, left temporoparietal junction and right temporal pole. Under the same conditions, individuals with PTSD showed increased activation within the superior colliculus (SC)/periaqueductal gray (PAG) and locus coeruleus. Our findings suggest that healthy controls react to the exposure of direct gaze with an activation of a cortical route that enhances evaluative ‘top–down’ processes underlying social interactions. In individuals with PTSD, however, direct gaze leads to sustained activation of a subcortical route of eye-contact processing, an innate alarm system involving the SC and the underlying circuits of the PAG. PMID:22977200

  15. Effect of direct eye contact in PTSD related to interpersonal trauma: an fMRI study of activation of an innate alarm system.

    PubMed

    Steuwe, Carolin; Daniels, Judith K; Frewen, Paul A; Densmore, Maria; Pannasch, Sebastian; Beblo, Thomas; Reiss, Jeffrey; Lanius, Ruth A

    2014-01-01

    In healthy individuals, direct eye contact initially leads to activation of a fast subcortical pathway, which then modulates a cortical route eliciting social cognitive processes. The aim of this study was to gain insight into the neurobiological effects of direct eye-to-eye contact using a virtual reality paradigm in individuals with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) related to prolonged childhood abuse. We examined 16 healthy comparison subjects and 16 patients with a primary diagnosis of PTSD using a virtual reality functional magnetic resonance imaging paradigm involving direct vs averted gaze (happy, sad, neutral) as developed by Schrammel et al. in 2009. Irrespective of the displayed emotion, controls exhibited an increased blood oxygenation level-dependent response during direct vs averted gaze within the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex, left temporoparietal junction and right temporal pole. Under the same conditions, individuals with PTSD showed increased activation within the superior colliculus (SC)/periaqueductal gray (PAG) and locus coeruleus. Our findings suggest that healthy controls react to the exposure of direct gaze with an activation of a cortical route that enhances evaluative 'top-down' processes underlying social interactions. In individuals with PTSD, however, direct gaze leads to sustained activation of a subcortical route of eye-contact processing, an innate alarm system involving the SC and the underlying circuits of the PAG. PMID:22977200

  16. Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moody, Mally

    1992-01-01

    A series of four activities are presented to enhance students' abilities to appreciate and use trigonometry as a tool in problem solving. Activities cover problems applying the law of sines, the law of cosines, and matching equivalent trigonometric expressions. A teacher's guide, worksheets, and answers are provided. (MDH)

  17. Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kincaid, Charlene; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Presents an activity in which students collect and organize data from a real-world simulation of the scientific concept of half life. Students collect data using a marble sifter, analyze the data using a graphing calculator, and determine an appropriate mathematical model. Includes reproducible worksheets. (MDH)

  18. Expert and Naive Raters Using the PAG: Does it Matter?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cornelius, Edwin T.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Questions the observed correlation between job experts and naive raters using the Position Analysis Questionnaire (PAQ); and conducts a replication of the Smith and Hakel study (1979) with college students (N=39). Concluded that PAQ ratings from job experts and college students are not equivalent and therefore are not interchangeable. (LLL)

  19. TMT predator odor activated neural circuit in C57BL/6J mice indicates TMT-stress as a suitable model for uncontrollable intense stress.

    PubMed

    Janitzky, K; D'Hanis, W; Kröber, A; Schwegler, H

    2015-03-01

    Intense stressful events can result in chronic disorders such as posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). In vulnerable individuals, a single aversive experience can be sufficient to cause long-lasting behavioral changes. Candidate brain regions implicated in stress-related psychopathology are the amygdala, the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST), and the hypothalamic pituitary adrenal (HPA) axis. In rodents exposure to 2,5-dihydro-2,4,5-trimethylthiazoline (TMT), an ethologically relevant stressor, has been shown to induce intense stress and innate anxiety responses. To study dispositions for the development of maladaptive stress responses, mice models are required. Therefore C57BL/6J mice were exposed to TMT and Fos expression was studied in key brain regions implicated in stress responses and anxiety-like behavior. Our results show TMT-induced activation of a distinct neural circuit involving the BNST, the lateral septum (LS), the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN), the periaqueductal gray (PAG) and the locus coeruleus (LC). Anatomical interconnection of the BNST with all these regions could point to an important modulatory role of this nucleus. Since, the BNST gets direct input from the olfactory bulbs and projects to the PVN and PAG and is therefore well positioned to modulate behavioral and endocrine stress responses to TMT. Hence, we suggest that TMT exposure is suitable to investigate uncontrollable stress responses in mice which exhibit similarities to maladaptive stress responses underlying PTSD in humans. PMID:25532494

  20. Time-variant fMRI activity in the brainstem and higher structures in response to acupuncture.

    PubMed

    Napadow, Vitaly; Dhond, Rupali; Park, Kyungmo; Kim, Jieun; Makris, Nikos; Kwong, Kenneth K; Harris, Richard E; Purdon, Patrick L; Kettner, Norman; Hui, Kathleen K S

    2009-08-01

    Acupuncture modulation of activity in the human brainstem is not well known. This structure is plagued by physiological artifact in neuroimaging experiments. In addition, most studies have used short (<15 min) block designs, which miss delayed responses following longer duration stimulation. We used brainstem-focused cardiac-gated fMRI and evaluated time-variant brain response to longer duration (>30 min) stimulation with verum (VA, electro-stimulation at acupoint ST-36) or sham point (SPA, non-acupoint electro-stimulation) acupuncture. Our results provide evidence that acupuncture modulates brainstem nuclei important to endogenous monoaminergic and opioidergic systems. Specifically, VA modulated activity in the substantia nigra (SN), nucleus raphe magnus, locus ceruleus, nucleus cuneiformis, and periaqueductal gray (PAG). Activation in the ventrolateral PAG was greater for VA compared to SPA. Linearly decreasing time-variant activation, suggesting classical habituation, was found in response to both VA and SPA in sensorimotor (SII, posterior insula, premotor cortex) brain regions. However, VA also produced linearly time-variant activity in limbic regions (amygdala, hippocampus, and SN), which was bimodal and not likely habituation--consisting of activation in early blocks, and deactivation by the end of the run. Thus, acupuncture induces different brain response early, compared to 20-30 min after stimulation. We attribute the fMRI differences between VA and SPA to more varied and stronger psychophysical response induced by VA. Our study demonstrates that acupuncture modulation of brainstem structures can be studied non-invasively in humans, allowing for comparison to animal studies. Our protocol also demonstrates a fMRI approach to study habituation and other time-variant phenomena over longer time durations. PMID:19345268

  1. Corynebacterium glutamicum ggtB encodes a functional γ-glutamyl transpeptidase with γ-glutamyl dipeptide synthetic and hydrolytic activity.

    PubMed

    Walter, Frederik; Grenz, Sebastian; Ortseifen, Vera; Persicke, Marcus; Kalinowski, Jörn

    2016-08-20

    In this work the role of γ-glutamyl transpeptidase in the metabolism of γ-glutamyl dipeptides produced by Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC 13032 was studied. The enzyme is encoded by the gene ggtB (cg1090) and synthesized as a 657 amino acids long preprotein. Gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase activity was found to be associated with intact cells of C. glutamicum and was abolished upon deletion of ggtB. Bioinformatic analysis indicated that the enzyme is a lipoprotein and is attached to the outer side of the cytoplasmic membrane. Biochemical parameters of recombinant GgtB were determined using the chromogenic substrate γ-glutamyl-p-nitroanilide. Highest activity of the enzyme was measured in sodium bicarbonate buffer at pH 9.6 and 45°C. The KM value was 123μM. GgtB catalyzed the concentration-dependent synthesis and hydrolysis of γ-glutamyl dipeptides and showed strong glutaminase activity. The intracellular concentrations of five γ-glutamyl dipeptides (γ-Glu-Glu, γ-Glu-Gln, γ-Glu-Val, γ-Glu-Leu, γ-Glu-Met) were determined by HPLC-MS and ranged from 0.15 to 0.4mg/g CDW after exponential growth in minimal media. Although deletion and overexpression of ggtB had significant effects on intracellular dipeptide concentrations, it was neither essential for biosynthesis nor catabolism of these dipeptides in vivo. PMID:26528625

  2. Building up analgesia in humans via the endogenous μ-opioid system by combining placebo and active tDCS: a preliminary report.

    PubMed

    DosSantos, Marcos F; Martikainen, Ilkka K; Nascimento, Thiago D; Love, Tiffany M; DeBoer, Misty D; Schambra, Heidi M; Bikson, Marom; Zubieta, Jon-Kar; DaSilva, Alexandre F

    2014-01-01

    Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS) is a method of non-invasive brain stimulation that has been frequently used in experimental and clinical pain studies. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying tDCS-mediated pain control, and most important its placebo component, are not completely established. In this pilot study, we investigated in vivo the involvement of the endogenous μ-opioid system in the global tDCS-analgesia experience. Nine healthy volunteers went through positron emission tomography (PET) scans with [11C]carfentanil, a selective μ-opioid receptor (MOR) radiotracer, to measure the central MOR activity during tDCS in vivo (non-displaceable binding potential, BPND)--one of the main analgesic mechanisms in the brain. Placebo and real anodal primary motor cortex (M1/2mA) tDCS were delivered sequentially for 20 minutes each during the PET scan. The initial placebo tDCS phase induced a decrease in MOR BPND in the periaqueductal gray matter (PAG), precuneus, and thalamus, indicating activation of endogenous μ-opioid neurotransmission, even before the active tDCS. The subsequent real tDCS also induced MOR activation in the PAG and precuneus, which were positively correlated to the changes observed with placebo tDCS. Nonetheless, real tDCS had an additional MOR activation in the left prefrontal cortex. Although significant changes in the MOR BPND occurred with both placebo and real tDCS, significant analgesic effects, measured by improvements in the heat and cold pain thresholds, were only observed after real tDCS, not the placebo tDCS. This study gives preliminary evidence that the analgesic effects reported with M1-tDCS, can be in part related to the recruitment of the same endogenous MOR mechanisms induced by placebo, and that such effects can be purposely optimized by real tDCS. PMID:25029273

  3. Cinaciguat, a novel activator of soluble guanylate cyclase, protects against ischemia/reperfusion injury: role of hydrogen sulfide

    PubMed Central

    Salloum, Fadi N.; Das, Anindita; Samidurai, Arun; Hoke, Nicholas N.; Chau, Vinh Q.; Ockaili, Ramzi A.; Stasch, Johannes-Peter

    2012-01-01

    Cinaciguat (BAY 58–2667) is a novel nitric oxide (NO)-independent activator of soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC), which induces cGMP-generation and vasodilation in diseased vessels. We tested the hypothesis that cinaciguat might trigger protection against ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) in the heart and adult cardiomyocytes through cGMP/protein kinase G (PKG)-dependent generation of hydrogen sulfide (H2S). Adult New Zealand White rabbits were pretreated with 1 or 10 μg/kg cinaciguat (iv) or 10% DMSO (vehicle) 15 min before I/R or with 10 μg/kg cinaciguat (iv) at reperfusion. Additionally, adult male ICR mice were treated with either cinaciguat (10 μg/kg ip) or vehicle 30 min before I/R or at the onset of reperfusion (10 μg/kg iv). The PKG inhibitor KT5283 (KT; 1 mg/kg ip) or dl-propargylglycine (PAG; 50 mg/kg ip) the inhibitor of the H2S-producing enzyme cystathionine-γ-lyase (CSE) were given 10 and 30 min before cinaciguat. Cardiac function and infarct size were assessed by echocardiography and tetrazolium staining, respectively. Primary adult mouse cardiomyocytes were isolated and treated with cinaciguat before simulated ischemia/reoxygenation. Cinaciguat caused 63 and 41% reduction of infarct size when given before I/R and at reperfusion in rabbits, respectively. In mice, cinaciguat pretreatment caused a more robust 80% reduction in infarct size vs. 63% reduction when given at reperfusion and preserved cardiac function following I/R, which were blocked by KT and PAG. Cinaciguat also caused an increase in myocardial PKG activity and CSE expression. In cardiomyocytes, cinaciguat (50 nM) reduced necrosis and apoptosis and increased H2S levels, which was abrogated by KT. Cinaciguat is a novel molecule to induce H2S generation and a powerful protection against I/R injury in heart. PMID:22268103

  4. Overview of NASA Astrophysics Program Analysis Groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders, Wilton T.; Sambruna, Rita M.; Perez, Mario R.; Hudgins, Douglas M.

    2015-01-01

    NASA Astrophysics Program Analysis Groups (PAGs) are responsible for facilitating and coordinating community input into the development and execution of NASAs three astrophysics science themes: Cosmic Origins (COPAG), Exoplanet Exploration (ExoPAG), and Physics of the Cosmos (PhysPAG). The PAGs provide a community-based, interdisciplinary forum for analyses that support and inform planning and prioritization of activities within the Astrophysics Division programs. Operations and structure of the PAGs are described in their Terms of Reference (TOR), which can be found on the three science theme Program Office web pages. The Astrophysics PAGs report their input and findings to NASA through the Astrophysics Subcommittee of the NASA Advisory Council, of which all the PAG Chairs are members. In this presentation, we will provide an overview of the ongoing activities of NASAs Astrophysics PAGs in the context of the opportunities and challenges currently facing the Astrophysics Division. NASA Headquarters representatives for the COPAG, ExoPAG, and PhysPAG will all be present and available to answer questions about the programmatic role of the Astrophysics PAGs.

  5. Overview of NASA Astrophysics Program Analysis Groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Michael R.; Hudgins, D. M.; Sambruna, R. M.

    2014-01-01

    NASA Astrophysics Program Analysis Groups (PAGs) are responsible for facilitating and coordinating community input into the developmentand execution of NASAs three astrophysics science themes: Cosmic Origins (COPAG), Exoplanet Exploration (ExoPAG), and Physics of the Cosmos (PhysPAG). The PAGs provide a community-based, interdisciplinary forum for analyses that support and inform planning and prioritization of activities within the Astrophysics Division programs. Operations and structure of the PAGs are described in the Terms of Reference (TOR) which can be found on the three science theme Program Office web pages. The Astrophysics PAGs report their input and findings to NASA through the Astrophysics Subcommittee of the NASA Advisory Council, of which all the PAG Chairs are members. In this presentation, we will provide an overview of the ongoing activities of NASAs Astrophysics PAGs in the context of the opportunities and challenges currently facing the Astrophysics Division. NASA Headquarters representatives for the COPAG, ExoPAG, and PhysPAG will all be present and available to answer questions about the programmatic role of the Astrophysics PAGs.

  6. Heat stability of protective antigen of Leptospira interrogans serovar lai.

    PubMed Central

    Masuzawa, T; Nakamura, R; Shimizu, T; Yanagihara, Y

    1990-01-01

    Protective antigen (PAg; glycolipid antigen; molecular size, 23 to 30 kilodaltons), the serogroup-specific antigen partially purified from leptospiral cells, is one of the most important protective antigens. The heat stability of PAg was compared with that of whole-cell (WC) antigen by using sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, immunoblotting, protective activity, opsonin-inducing activity, agglutinating antibody-inducing activity, and an inhibition test in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. A band of 23 to 30 kilodaltons of PAg, which was seen in untreated PAg and WC, shifted to a position with a molecular size of ca. 20 kilodaltons after heat treatment of PAg at 80 degrees C for 30 min and WC at 100 degrees C for 30 min. In the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay inhibition test with monoclonal antibody LW2 and a sonicated antigen of WC, the inhibition rate of PAg and WC to sonicated WC was reduced by heat treatment at 80 degrees C for 30 min and at 100 degrees C for 30 min, respectively. Agglutinating antibody-inducing activities and opsonin-inducing activities of PAg and WC in mice were reduced by heat treatment under the same conditions; these activities were assayed by a microscopic agglutination test and by chemical luminescence response in serum from immunized mice, respectively. Protective activity of heated PAg and heated WC in cyclophosphamide-pretreated mice agreed with the results of immunogenicity in mice. These results indicate that the Leptospira PAg is one of the important protective antigens and is altered by heat treatment at 80 degrees C. Furthermore, the immunogenicity and antigenicity of the PAg present in WC are more stable than that of the extracted PAg, and the coexistence of other cellular components with PAg might protect and stabilize PAg from the heat treatment. Images PMID:2332463

  7. Identification of discrete functional subregions of the human periaqueductal gray

    PubMed Central

    Satpute, Ajay B.; Wager, Tor D.; Cohen-Adad, Julien; Bianciardi, Marta; Choi, Ji-Kyung; Buhle, Jason T.; Wald, Lawrence L.; Barrett, Lisa Feldman

    2013-01-01

    The midbrain periaqueductal gray (PAG) region is organized into distinct subregions that coordinate survival-related responses during threat and stress [Bandler R, Keay KA, Floyd N, Price J (2000) Brain Res 53 (1):95–104]. To examine PAG function in humans, researchers have relied primarily on functional MRI (fMRI), but technological and methodological limitations have prevented researchers from localizing responses to different PAG subregions. We used high-field strength (7-T) fMRI techniques to image the PAG at high resolution (0.75 mm isotropic), which was critical for dissociating the PAG from the greater signal variability in the aqueduct. Activation while participants were exposed to emotionally aversive images segregated into subregions of the PAG along both dorsal/ventral and rostral/caudal axes. In the rostral PAG, activity was localized to lateral and dorsomedial subregions. In caudal PAG, activity was localized to the ventrolateral region. This shifting pattern of activity from dorsal to ventral PAG along the rostrocaudal axis mirrors structural and functional neurobiological observations in nonhuman animals. Activity in lateral and ventrolateral subregions also grouped with distinct emotional experiences (e.g., anger and sadness) in a factor analysis, suggesting that each subregion participates in distinct functional circuitry. This study establishes the use of high-field strength fMRI as a promising technique for revealing the functional architecture of the PAG. The techniques developed here also may be extended to investigate the functional roles of other brainstem nuclei. PMID:24082116

  8. Maternal inflammation leads to impaired glutamate homeostasis and up-regulation of glutamate carboxypeptidase II in activated microglia in the fetal/newborn rabbit brain.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhi; Bassam, Bassam; Thomas, Ajit G; Williams, Monica; Liu, Jinhuan; Nance, Elizabeth; Rojas, Camilo; Slusher, Barbara S; Kannan, Sujatha

    2016-10-01

    Astrocyte dysfunction and excessive activation of glutamatergic systems have been implicated in a number of neurologic disorders, including periventricular leukomalacia (PVL) and cerebral palsy (CP). However, the role of chorioamnionitis on glutamate homeostasis in the fetal and neonatal brains is not clearly understood. We have previously shown that intrauterine endotoxin administration results in intense microglial 'activation' and increased pro-inflammatory cytokines in the periventricular region (PVR) of the neonatal rabbit brain. In this study, we assessed the effect of maternal inflammation on key components of the glutamate pathway and its relationship to astrocyte and microglial activation in the fetal and neonatal New Zealand white rabbit brain. We found that intrauterine endotoxin exposure at gestational day 28 (G28) induced acute and prolonged glutamate elevation in the PVR of fetal (G29, 1day post-injury) and postnatal day 1 (PND1, 3days post-injury) brains along with prominent morphological changes in the astrocytes (soma hypertrophy and retracted processes) in the white matter tracts. There was a significant increase in glutaminase and N-Methyl-d-Aspartate receptor (NMDAR) NR2 subunit expression along with decreased glial L-glutamate transporter 1 (GLT-1) in the PVR at G29, that would promote acute dysregulation of glutamate homeostasis. This was accompanied with significantly decreased TGF-β1 at PND1 in CP kits indicating ongoing neuroinflammation. We also show for the first time that glutamate carboxypeptidase II (GCPII) was significantly increased in the activated microglia at the periventricular white matter area in both G29 and PND1 CP kits. This was confirmed by in vitro studies demonstrating that LPS activated primary microglia markedly upregulate GCPII enzymatic activity. These results suggest that maternal intrauterine endotoxin exposure results in early onset and long-lasting dysregulation of glutamate homeostasis, which may be mediated by

  9. Associations between pregnancy-associated glycoproteins and pregnancy outcomes, milk yield, parity, and clinical diseases in high-producing dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Mercadante, P M; Ribeiro, E S; Risco, C; Ealy, A D

    2016-04-01

    Pregnancy-associated glycoproteins (PAG) are produced by the ruminant placenta and secreted into the maternal circulation throughout pregnancy. The extent to which circulating PAG concentrations predict pregnancy outcomes was examined herein. Also, associations between circulating PAG concentrations and various production parameters and clinical diseases were evaluated. Lactating primiparous and multiparous Holstein cows (n=345) were bred via timed artificial insemination using a standard Ovsynch protocol. Pregnancy was diagnosed by transrectal ultrasonography at d 32, 46, and 74 of gestation. Blood was harvested at d 32 to determine plasma concentrations of PAG and progesterone. Cows pregnant at d 32 that subsequently lost their pregnancy at d 46 and 74 had reduced PAG concentrations. Both artificial insemination service number and parity were associated with plasma PAG concentrations. Concentration of PAG in plasma was greater for cows pregnant from their second or later breeding than those pregnant from the first breeding postpartum, and was increased for primiparous compared with multiparous. In addition, cows with greater milk yield had increased plasma PAG concentrations. No association was detected between body condition score and plasma PAG concentrations. Cows that experienced clinical metritis, metabolic problems, or left displacement abomasum in the early postpartum period preceding breeding had greater plasma PAG concentrations than cows not experiencing these clinical diseases. Also, cows with multiple clinical diseases had increased odds of pregnancy loss when compared with cows not experiencing clinical diseases. Odds ratio testing detected a tendency in the relationship between reduced milk yield and increased pregnancy loss. Collectively, these associations illustrate one feature of the early developing placenta that may predict pregnancy outcomes in dairy cattle. It is unclear if plasma PAG are actively involved with mediating pregnancy outcomes

  10. Sexual Experience Modulates Neuronal Activity in Male Japanese Quail

    PubMed Central

    Can, Adem; Domjan, Michael; Delville, Yvon

    2008-01-01

    After an initial increase, repeated exposure to a particular stimulus or familiarity with an event results in lower immediate early gene expression levels in relevant brain structures. We predicted that similar effects would occur in Japanese quail after repeated sexual experience within brain areas involved in sexual behavior, namely, the medial preoptic nucleus (POM), the bed nucleus of stria terminalis (BST), and the nucleus taeniae of the amygdala (TnA), an avian homolog of medial amygdala. High experience subjects copulated with a female once on each of 16 consecutive days, whereas low experience subjects were allowed to copulate either once or twice. Control subjects were never exposed to a female. High experience subjects were faster to initiate sexual interaction, performed more cloacal contacts, and completed each cloacal contact faster than low experience subjects. Low experience subjects showed an increase in egr-1 (ZENK) expression, an immediate early gene product used as marker of neural activation in birds, in the areas of interest. In contrast, in high experience animals, egr-1 expression in the POM, BST and the periaqueductal gray (PAG) was not different than the level of expression in unmated controls. These results show that experience modulates the level of immediate early gene expression in the case of sexual behavior. Our results also indicate that immediate early gene expression in specific brain areas is not necessarily related to behavioral output, but depends on the behavioral history of the subjects. PMID:17826778

  11. Roles of the periaqueductal gray in descending facilitatory and inhibitory controls of intramuscular hypertonic saline induced muscle nociception.

    PubMed

    Lei, Jing; Sun, Tao; Lumb, Bridget M; You, Hao-Jun

    2014-07-01

    Despite the importance of the periaqueductal gray (PAG) in the modulation of nociception and pain, many aspects of the roles of the different columns of the PAG in descending controls: facilitation and inhibition, are not understood. Employing a tonic muscle pain model established by i.m. injection of 5.8% saline into the gastrocnemius muscle, we now report the results of investigations designed to explore any differences in Fos expression in the different functional columns of the PAG in male Sprague-Dawley rats. In a second series of experiments, effects of the PAG on descending control of spinally-organized nociception were assessed by measuring hind paw withdrawal reflexes to noxious mechanical and heat stimulation before and after electrolytic lesion of specific columns of the PAG. Our results show that Fos expression within different columns of the PAG increases significantly and differentially following i.m. injection of 5.8% saline. The mean number of Fos positive neurons in the dorsolateral (dl), lateral (l), dorsomedial (dm) PAG elicited by i.m. injection of 5.8% saline reached a peak at 4h with a gradual decrease over time, whereas the maximum number of Fos-positive neurons in the ventrolateral (vl) PAG was observed 8h after i.m. injection. Contralateral lesion of the dl PAG significantly depressed ipsilateral secondary mechanical hyperalgesia in intramuscularly induced (5.8% saline) nociception (P<0.05), whereas heat hypoalgesia was not affected (P>0.05). By contrast, contralateral lesion of the vl PAG completely blocked the occurrence of ipsilateral heat hypoalgesia (P<0.05), while bilateral mechanical hyperalgesia was unaffected (P>0.05). In conclusion, functions of specific columns of the PAG in the control of spinal nociceptive activities are not homogeneous. It is suggested that, in this muscle pain model, the dl PAG and vl PAG participate in descending facilitation and inhibition of nociception, respectively. PMID:24792920

  12. RAPID HETEROLOGOUS DESENSITIZATION OF ANTINOCICEPTIVE ACTIVITY BETWEEN MU OR DELTA OPIOID RECEPTORS AND CHEMOKINE RECEPTORS IN RATS

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiaohong; Geller, Ellen B.; Rogers, Thomas J.; Adler, Martin W.

    2007-01-01

    Previous studies have shown pretreatment with chemokines CCL5/RANTES (100 ng) or CXCL12/SDF-1alpha (100 ng) injected into the periaqueductal grey (PAG) region of the brain, 30 minutes (min) before the mu opioid agonist DAMGO (400 ng), blocked the antinociception induced by DAMGO in the in vivo cold water tail-flick (CWT) antinociceptive test in rats. In the present experiments, we tested whether the action of other agonists at mu and delta opioid receptors is blocked when CCL5/RANTES or CXCL12/SDF-1alpha is administered into the PAG 30 min before, or co-administered with, opioid agonists in the CWT assay. The results showed that (1) CXCL12/SDF-1alpha (100 ng, PAG) or CCL5/RANTES (100 ng, PAG), given 30 min before the opioid agonist morphine, or selective delta opioid receptor agonist DPDPE, blocked the antinociceptive effect of these drugs; (2) CXCL12/SDF-1alpha (100 ng, PAG) or CCL5/RANTES (100 ng, PAG), injected at the same time as DAMGO or DPDPE, significantly reduced the antinociceptive effect induced by these drugs. These results demonstrate that the heterologous desensitization is rapid between the mu or delta opioid receptors and either CCL5/RANTES receptor CCR5 or CXCL12/SDF-1alpha receptor CXCR4 in vivo, but the effect is greater if the chemokine is administered before the opioid. PMID:17049756

  13. Mitochondrial thiol modification by a targeted electrophile inhibits metabolism in breast adenocarcinoma cells by inhibiting enzyme activity and protein levels

    PubMed Central

    Smith, M. Ryan; Vayalil, Praveen K.; Zhou, Fen; Benavides, Gloria A.; Beggs, Reena R.; Golzarian, Hafez; Nijampatnam, Bhavitavya; Oliver, Patsy G.; Smith, Robin A.J.; Murphy, Michael P.; Velu, Sadanandan E.; Landar, Aimee

    2016-01-01

    Many cancer cells follow an aberrant metabolic program to maintain energy for rapid cell proliferation. Metabolic reprogramming often involves the upregulation of glutaminolysis to generate reducing equivalents for the electron transport chain and amino acids for protein synthesis. Critical enzymes involved in metabolism possess a reactive thiolate group, which can be modified by certain oxidants. In the current study, we show that modification of mitochondrial protein thiols by a model compound, iodobutyl triphenylphosphonium (IBTP), decreased mitochondrial metabolism and ATP in MDA-MB 231 (MB231) breast adenocarcinoma cells up to 6 days after an initial 24 h treatment. Mitochondrial thiol modification also depressed oxygen consumption rates (OCR) in a dose-dependent manner to a greater extent than a non-thiol modifying analog, suggesting that thiol reactivity is an important factor in the inhibition of cancer cell metabolism. In non-tumorigenic MCF-10A cells, IBTP also decreased OCR; however the extracellular acidification rate was significantly increased at all but the highest concentration (10 µM) of IBTP indicating that thiol modification can have significantly different effects on bioenergetics in tumorigenic versus non-tumorigenic cells. ATP and other adenonucleotide levels were also decreased by thiol modification up to 6 days post-treatment, indicating a decreased overall energetic state in MB231 cells. Cellular proliferation of MB231 cells was also inhibited up to 6 days post-treatment with little change to cell viability. Targeted metabolomic analyses revealed that thiol modification caused depletion of both Krebs cycle and glutaminolysis intermediates. Further experiments revealed that the activity of the Krebs cycle enzyme, aconitase, was attenuated in response to thiol modification. Additionally, the inhibition of glutaminolysis corresponded to decreased glutaminase C (GAC) protein levels, although other protein levels were unaffected. This study

  14. Mitochondrial thiol modification by a targeted electrophile inhibits metabolism in breast adenocarcinoma cells by inhibiting enzyme activity and protein levels.

    PubMed

    Smith, M Ryan; Vayalil, Praveen K; Zhou, Fen; Benavides, Gloria A; Beggs, Reena R; Golzarian, Hafez; Nijampatnam, Bhavitavya; Oliver, Patsy G; Smith, Robin A J; Murphy, Michael P; Velu, Sadanandan E; Landar, Aimee

    2016-08-01

    Many cancer cells follow an aberrant metabolic program to maintain energy for rapid cell proliferation. Metabolic reprogramming often involves the upregulation of glutaminolysis to generate reducing equivalents for the electron transport chain and amino acids for protein synthesis. Critical enzymes involved in metabolism possess a reactive thiolate group, which can be modified by certain oxidants. In the current study, we show that modification of mitochondrial protein thiols by a model compound, iodobutyl triphenylphosphonium (IBTP), decreased mitochondrial metabolism and ATP in MDA-MB 231 (MB231) breast adenocarcinoma cells up to 6 days after an initial 24h treatment. Mitochondrial thiol modification also depressed oxygen consumption rates (OCR) in a dose-dependent manner to a greater extent than a non-thiol modifying analog, suggesting that thiol reactivity is an important factor in the inhibition of cancer cell metabolism. In non-tumorigenic MCF-10A cells, IBTP also decreased OCR; however the extracellular acidification rate was significantly increased at all but the highest concentration (10µM) of IBTP indicating that thiol modification can have significantly different effects on bioenergetics in tumorigenic versus non-tumorigenic cells. ATP and other adenonucleotide levels were also decreased by thiol modification up to 6 days post-treatment, indicating a decreased overall energetic state in MB231 cells. Cellular proliferation of MB231 cells was also inhibited up to 6 days post-treatment with little change to cell viability. Targeted metabolomic analyses revealed that thiol modification caused depletion of both Krebs cycle and glutaminolysis intermediates. Further experiments revealed that the activity of the Krebs cycle enzyme, aconitase, was attenuated in response to thiol modification. Additionally, the inhibition of glutaminolysis corresponded to decreased glutaminase C (GAC) protein levels, although other protein levels were unaffected. This study

  15. Conditioned respiratory threat in the subdivisions of the human periaqueductal gray

    PubMed Central

    Faull, Olivia K; Jenkinson, Mark; Ezra, Martyn; Pattinson, Kyle TS

    2016-01-01

    The sensation of breathlessness is the most threatening symptom of respiratory disease. The different subdivisions of the midbrain periaqueductal gray (PAG) are intricately (and differentially) involved in integrating behavioural responses to threat in animals, while the PAG has previously only been considered as a single entity in human research. Here we investigate how these individual PAG columns are differently involved with respiratory threat. Eighteen healthy subjects were conditioned to associate shapes with certain or uncertain impending respiratory load, and scanned the following day during anticipation and application of inspiratory loading using 7 T functional MRI. We showed activity in the ventrolateral PAG (vlPAG) during anticipation of resistive loading, with activity in the lateral PAG (lPAG) during resistive loading, revealing spatially and temporally distinct functions within this structure. We propose that lPAG is involved with sensorimotor responses to breathlessness, while the vlPAG operates within the threat perception network for impending breathlessness. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12047.001 PMID:26920223

  16. In vivo and in vitro liver cancer metabolism observed with hyperpolarized [5-13C]glutamine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabella, C.; Karlsson, M.; Canapè, C.; Catanzaro, G.; Colombo Serra, S.; Miragoli, L.; Poggi, L.; Uggeri, F.; Venturi, L.; Jensen, P. R.; Lerche, M. H.; Tedoldi, F.

    2013-07-01

    Glutamine metabolism is, with its many links to oncogene expression, considered a crucial step in cancer metabolism and it is thereby a key target for alteration in cancer development. In particular, strong correlations have been reported between oncogene expression and expression and activity of the enzyme glutaminase. This mitochondrial enzyme, which is responsible for the deamidation of glutamine to form glutamate, is overexpressed in many tumour tissues. In animal models, glutaminase expression is correlated with tumour growth rate and it is readily possible to limit tumour growth by suppression of glutaminase activity. In principle, hyperpolarized 13C MR spectroscopy can provide insight to glutamine metabolism and should hence be a valuable tool to study changes in glutaminase activity as tumours progress. However, no such successful in vivo studies have been reported, even though several good biological models have been tested. This may, at least partly, be due to problems in preparing glutamine for hyperpolarization. This paper reports a new and improved preparation of hyperpolarized [5-13C]glutamine, which provides a highly sensitive 13C MR marker. With this preparation of hyperpolarized [5-13C]glutamine, glutaminase activity in vivo in a rat liver tumour was investigated. Moreover, this marker was also used to measure response to drug treatment in vitro in cancer cells. These examples of [5-13C]glutamine used in tumour models warrant the new preparation to allow metabolic studies with this conditionally essential amino acid.

  17. Patterns of Brain Activation and Meal Reduction Induced by Abdominal Surgery in Mice and Modulation by Rikkunshito

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lixin; Mogami, Sachiko; Yakabi, Seiichi; Karasawa, Hiroshi; Yamada, Chihiro; Yakabi, Koji; Hattori, Tomohisa; Taché, Yvette

    2015-01-01

    Abdominal surgery inhibits food intake and induces c-Fos expression in the hypothalamic and medullary nuclei in rats. Rikkunshito (RKT), a Kampo medicine improves anorexia. We assessed the alterations in meal microstructure and c-Fos expression in brain nuclei induced by abdominal surgery and the modulation by RKT in mice. RKT or vehicle was gavaged daily for 1 week. On day 8 mice had no access to food for 6–7 h and were treated twice with RKT or vehicle. Abdominal surgery (laparotomy-cecum palpation) was performed 1–2 h before the dark phase. The food intake and meal structures were monitored using an automated monitoring system for mice. Brain sections were processed for c-Fos immunoreactivity (ir) 2-h after abdominal surgery. Abdominal surgery significantly reduced bouts, meal frequency, size and duration, and time spent on meals, and increased inter-meal interval and satiety ratio resulting in 92–86% suppression of food intake at 2–24 h post-surgery compared with control group (no surgery). RKT significantly increased bouts, meal duration and the cumulative 12-h food intake by 11%. Abdominal surgery increased c-Fos in the prelimbic, cingulate and insular cortexes, and autonomic nuclei, such as the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, central amygdala, hypothalamic supraoptic (SON), paraventricular and arcuate nuclei, Edinger-Westphal nucleus (E-W), lateral periaqueduct gray (PAG), lateral parabrachial nucleus, locus coeruleus, ventrolateral medulla and nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS). RKT induced a small increase in c-Fos-ir neurons in the SON and E-W of control mice, and in mice with surgery there was an increase in the lateral PAG and a decrease in the NTS. These findings indicate that abdominal surgery inhibits food intake by increasing both satiation (meal duration) and satiety (meal interval) and activates brain circuits involved in pain, feeding behavior and stress that may underlie the alterations of meal pattern and food intake inhibition. RKT

  18. Patterns of Brain Activation and Meal Reduction Induced by Abdominal Surgery in Mice and Modulation by Rikkunshito.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lixin; Mogami, Sachiko; Yakabi, Seiichi; Karasawa, Hiroshi; Yamada, Chihiro; Yakabi, Koji; Hattori, Tomohisa; Taché, Yvette

    2015-01-01

    Abdominal surgery inhibits food intake and induces c-Fos expression in the hypothalamic and medullary nuclei in rats. Rikkunshito (RKT), a Kampo medicine improves anorexia. We assessed the alterations in meal microstructure and c-Fos expression in brain nuclei induced by abdominal surgery and the modulation by RKT in mice. RKT or vehicle was gavaged daily for 1 week. On day 8 mice had no access to food for 6-7 h and were treated twice with RKT or vehicle. Abdominal surgery (laparotomy-cecum palpation) was performed 1-2 h before the dark phase. The food intake and meal structures were monitored using an automated monitoring system for mice. Brain sections were processed for c-Fos immunoreactivity (ir) 2-h after abdominal surgery. Abdominal surgery significantly reduced bouts, meal frequency, size and duration, and time spent on meals, and increased inter-meal interval and satiety ratio resulting in 92-86% suppression of food intake at 2-24 h post-surgery compared with control group (no surgery). RKT significantly increased bouts, meal duration and the cumulative 12-h food intake by 11%. Abdominal surgery increased c-Fos in the prelimbic, cingulate and insular cortexes, and autonomic nuclei, such as the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, central amygdala, hypothalamic supraoptic (SON), paraventricular and arcuate nuclei, Edinger-Westphal nucleus (E-W), lateral periaqueduct gray (PAG), lateral parabrachial nucleus, locus coeruleus, ventrolateral medulla and nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS). RKT induced a small increase in c-Fos-ir neurons in the SON and E-W of control mice, and in mice with surgery there was an increase in the lateral PAG and a decrease in the NTS. These findings indicate that abdominal surgery inhibits food intake by increasing both satiation (meal duration) and satiety (meal interval) and activates brain circuits involved in pain, feeding behavior and stress that may underlie the alterations of meal pattern and food intake inhibition. RKT improves

  19. The poplar basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor BEE3 – Like gene affects biomass production by enhancing proliferation of xylem cells in poplar

    SciTech Connect

    Noh, Seol Ah Choi, Young-Im Cho, Jin-Seong Lee, Hyoshin

    2015-06-19

    Brassinosteroids (BRs) play important roles in many aspects of plant growth and development, including regulation of vascular cambium activities and cell elongation. BR-induced BEE3 (brassinosteroid enhanced expression 3) is required for a proper BR response. Here, we identified a poplar (Populus alba × Populus glandulosa) BEE3-like gene, PagBEE3L, encoding a putative basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH)-type transcription factor. Expression of PagBEE3L was induced by brassinolide (BL). Transcripts of PagBEE3L were mainly detected in stems, with the internode having a low level of transcription and the node having a relatively higher level. The function of the PagBEE3L gene was investigated through phenotypic analyses with PagBEE3L-overexpressing (ox) transgenic lines. This work particularly focused on a potential role of PagBEE3L in stem growth and development of polar. The PagBEE3L-ox poplar showed thicker and longer stems than wild-type plants. The xylem cells from the stems of PagBEE3L-ox plants revealed remarkably enhanced proliferation, resulting in an earlier thickening growth than wild-type plants. Therefore, this work suggests that xylem development of poplar is accelerated in PagBEE3L-ox plants and PagBEE3L plays a role in stem growth by increasing the proliferation of xylem cells to promote the initial thickening growth of poplar stems. - Highlights: • We identify the BEE3-like gene form hybrid poplar (Populus alba × Populus glandulosa). • We examine effects of overexpression of PagBEE3L on growth in poplar. • We found that 35S:BEE3L transgenic plants showed more rapid growth than wild-type plants. • BEE3L protein plays an important role in the development of plant stem.

  20. Local retention of antibodies in vivo with an injectable film embedded with a fluorogen-activating protein.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wen; Saunders, Matthew J; Bagia, Christina; Freeman, Eric C; Fan, Yong; Gawalt, Ellen S; Waggoner, Alan S; Meng, Wilson S

    2016-05-28

    Herein we report an injectable film by which antibodies can be localized in vivo. The system builds upon a bifunctional polypeptide consisting of a fluorogen-activating protein (FAP) and a β-fibrillizing peptide (βFP). The FAP domain generates fluorescence that reflects IgG binding sites conferred by Protein A/G (pAG) conjugated with the fluorogen malachite green (MG). A film is generated by mixing these proteins with molar excess of EAK16-II, a βFP that forms β-sheet fibrils at high salt concentrations. The IgG-binding, fluorogenic film can be injected in vivo through conventional needled syringes. Confocal microscopic images and dose-response titration experiments showed that loading of IgG into the film was mediated by pAG(MG) bound to the FAP. Release of IgG in vitro was significantly delayed by the bioaffinity mechanism; 26% of the IgG were released from films embedded with pAG(MG) after five days, compared to close to 90% in films without pAG(MG). Computational simulations indicated that the release rate of IgG is governed by positive cooperativity due to pAG(MG). When injected into the subcutaneous space of mouse footpads, film-embedded IgG were retained locally, with distribution through the lymphatics impeded. The ability to track IgG binding sites and distribution simultaneously will aid the optimization of local antibody delivery systems. PMID:27038493

  1. Endometriosis Is Associated With a Shift in MU Opioid and NMDA Receptor Expression in the Brain Periaqueductal Gray.

    PubMed

    Torres-Reverón, Annelyn; Palermo, Karylane; Hernández-López, Anixa; Hernández, Siomara; Cruz, Myrella L; Thompson, Kenira J; Flores, Idhaliz; Appleyard, Caroline B

    2016-09-01

    Studies have examined how endometriosis interacts with the nervous system, but little attention has been paid to opioidergic systems, which are relevant to pain signaling. We used the autotransplantation rat model of endometriosis and allowed to progress for 60 days. The brain was collected and examined for changes in endogenous opioid peptides, mu opioid receptors (MORs), and the N-methyl-d-aspartate subunit receptor (NR1) in the periaqueductal gray (PAG), since both of these receptors can regulate PAG activity. No changes in endogenous opioid peptides in met- and leu-enkephalin or β-endorphin levels were observed within the PAG. However, MOR immunoreactivity was significantly decreased in the ventral PAG in the endometriosis group. Endometriosis reduced by 20% the number of neuronal profiles expressing MOR and reduced by 40% the NR1 profiles. Our results suggest that endometriosis is associated with subtle variations in opioidergic and glutamatergic activity within the PAG, which may have implications for pain processing. PMID:27089914

  2. Optimization of a fast optical CT scanner for nPAG gel dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandecasteele, Jan; DeDeene, Yves

    2009-05-01

    A fast laser scanning optical CT scanner was constructed and optimized at the Ghent university. The first images acquired were contaminated with several imaging artifacts. The origins of the artifacts were investigated. Performance characteristics of different components were measured such as the laser spot size, light attenuation by the lenses and the dynamic range of the photo-detector. The need for a differential measurement using a second photo-detector was investigated. Post processing strategies to compensate for hardware related errors were developed. Drift of the laser and of the detector was negligible. Incorrectly refractive index matching was dealt with by developing an automated matching process. When scratches on the water bath and phantom container are present, these pose a post processing challenge to eliminate the resulting artifacts from the reconstructed images Secondary laser spots due to multiple reflections need to be further investigated. The time delay in the control of the galvanometer and detector was dealt with using black strips that serve as markers of the projection position. Still some residual ringing artifacts are present. Several small volumetric test phantoms were constructed to obtain an overall picture of the accuracy.

  3. Sex Differences in the Anatomical and Functional Organization of the Periaqueductal Gray – Rostral Ventromedial Medullary Pathway in the Rat: A Potential Circuit Mediating the Sexually Dimorphic Actions of Morphine

    PubMed Central

    Loyd, Dayna R.; Murphy, Anne Z.

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that morphine, administered systemically or directly into the PAG, produces a significantly greater degree of antinociception in males in comparison to females. As the midbrain periaqueductal gray (PAG) and its descending projections to the rostral ventromedial medulla (RVM) constitute an essential neural circuit for opioid-based analgesia, the present studies were conducted to determine if sex differences in the anatomical organization of the PAG-RVM pathway, and its activation during persistent inflammatory pain, could account for sex-based differences in opioid analgesia. In the rat, retrograde tracing was combined with Fos immunocytochemistry to investigate sexual dimorphism in the organization of the PAG-RVM circuit and its activation by persistent inflammatory pain induced by intraplantar injection of complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA). The ability of morphine to suppress the activation of the PAG-RVM circuit was also examined. Sexually dimorphic retrograde labeling was observed within the dorsomedial and lateral/ventrolateral PAG at all rostrocaudal levels, with females having significantly more PAG-RVM output neurons in comparison to males. While no sex differences were noted in the activation of the PAG-RVM circuit by persistent inflammatory pain, significantly more double labeled cells were found in males in comparison to females. Systemic administration of morphine significantly suppressed CFA-induced Fos in the PAG in males only. The results of these studies demonstrate that both the anatomical organization, and functional activation, of the PAG-RVM circuit is sexually dimorphic, and may provide the anatomical substrate for sex-based differences in morphine analgesia. PMID:16615128

  4. Motor organization of positive and negative emotional vocalization in the cat midbrain periaqueductal gray.

    PubMed

    Subramanian, Hari H; Arun, Mridula; Silburn, Peter A; Holstege, Gert

    2016-06-01

    Neurochemical microstimulation in different parts of the midbrain periaqueductal gray (PAG) in the cat generates four different types of vocalization, mews, howls, cries, and hisses. Mews signify positive vocal expression, whereas howls, hisses, and cries signify negative vocal communications. Mews were generated in the lateral column of the intermediate PAG and howls and hisses in the ventrolateral column of the intermediate PAG. Cries were generated in two regions, the lateral column of the rostral PAG and the ventrolateral column of the caudal PAG. To define the specific motor patterns belonging to mews, howls, and cries, the following muscles were recorded during these vocalizations: larynx (cricothyroid, thyroarytenoid, and posterior cricoarytenoid), tongue (genioglossus), jaw (digastric), and respiration (diaphragm, internal intercostal, external abdominal oblique, and internal abdominal oblique) muscles. Furthermore, the frequency, intensity, activation cascades, and turns and amplitude analyses of the electromyograms (EMGs) during these vocalizations were analyzed. The results show that each type of vocalization consists of a specific, circumscribed motor coordination. The nucleus retroambiguus (NRA) in the caudal medulla serves as the final premotor interneuronal output system for vocalization. NRA neurochemical microstimulation also generated vocalizations (guttural sounds). Analysis of the EMGs demonstrated that these vocalizations consist of only small parts of the emotional voalizations generated by neurochemical stimulation in the PAG. These results demonstrate that motor organization of positive and negative emotional vocal expressions are segregated in the PAG and that the PAG uses the NRA as a tool to gain access to the motoneurons generating vocalization. PMID:26235936

  5. Structural Modeling and Analysis of Pregnancy-Associated Glycoprotein-1 of Buffalo (Bubalus bubalis)

    PubMed Central

    Andonissamy, Jerome; Singh, S. K.; Agarwal, S. K.

    2012-01-01

    The present study was conducted to design and analyze the structural model of buffalo pregnancy-associated glycoprotein-1 (PAG-1) using bioinformatics. Structural modeling of the deduced buffalo PAG-1 protein was done using PHYRE, CONSURF servers and its structure was subsequently constructed using MODELLER 9.9 and PyMOL softwares Buffalo PAG-1 structural conformity was analyzed using PROSA, WHATIF, and 3D-PSSM servers. Designed buffalo PAG-1 protein structure on BLAST analysis retrieved protein structures belonging to aspartic proteinase family. Moreover in silico analysis revealed buffalo PAG-1 protein retained bilobed structure with pepstatin-binding clefts near the active sites by docking studies with pepstatin A using PatchDock server. Structural studies revealed that the amino and carboxy terminal containing aspartic residues are highly conserved and buried within the protein structure. Structural conformity studies showed that more than 90% of the residues lie inside favored and allowed regions. It was also deduced that buffalo PAG-1 possesses low and high energy zones with a very low threshold for proteolysis ascertaining the stableness of the buffalo PAG-1 protein structure. This study depicts the structural conformity and stability of buffalo PAG-1 protein.

  6. Differential changes of metabolic brain activity and interregional functional coupling in prefronto-limbic pathways during different stress conditions: functional imaging in freely behaving rodent pups

    PubMed Central

    Bock, Jörg; Riedel, Anett; Braun, Katharina

    2012-01-01

    The trumpet-tailed rat or degu (Octodon degus) is an established model to investigate the consequences of early stress on the development of emotional brain circuits and behavior. The aim of this study was to identify brain circuits, that respond to different stress conditions and to test if acute stress alters functional coupling of brain activity among prefrontal and limbic regions. Using functional imaging (2-Fluoro-deoxyglucose method) in 8-day-old male degu pups the following stress conditions were compared: (A) pups together with parents and siblings (control), (B) separation of the litter from the parents, (C) individual separation from parents and siblings, and (D) individual separation and presentation of maternal calls. Condition (B) significantly downregulated brain activity in the prefrontal cortex, hippocampus, nucleus accumbens (NAcc), and sensory areas compared to controls. Activity decrease was even more pronounced during condition (C), where, in contrast to all other regions, activity in the PAG was increased. Interestingly, brain activity in stress-associated brain regions such as the amygdala and habenula was not affected. In condition (D) maternal vocalizations “reactivated” brain activity in the cingulate and precentral medial cortex, NAcc, and striatum and in sensory areas. In contrast, reduced activity was measured in the prelimbic and infralimbic cortex (IL) and in the hippocampus and amygdala. Correlation analysis revealed complex, region- and situation-specific changes of interregional functional coupling among prefrontal and limbic brain regions during stress exposure. We show here for the first time that early life stress results in a widespread reduction of brain activity in the infant brain and changes interregional functional coupling. Moreover, maternal vocalizations can partly buffer stress-induced decrease in brain activity in some regions and evoked very different functional coupling patterns compared to the three other

  7. Stress induces analgesia via orexin 1 receptor-initiated endocannabinoid/CB1 signaling in the mouse periaqueductal gray.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hsin-Jung; Chang, Lu-Yang; Ho, Yu-Cheng; Teng, Shu-Fang; Hwang, Ling-Ling; Mackie, Ken; Chiou, Lih-Chu

    2016-06-01

    The orexin system consists of orexin A/hypocretin 1 and orexin B/hypocretin 2, and OX1 and OX2 receptors. Our previous electrophysiological study showed that orexin A in the rat ventrolateral periaqueductal gray (vlPAG) induced antinociception via an OX1 receptor-initiated and endocannabinoid-mediated disinhibition mechanism. Here, we further characterized antinociceptive effects of orexins in the mouse vlPAG and investigated whether this mechanism in the vlPAG can contribute to stress-induced analgesia (SIA) in mice. Intra-vlPAG (i.pag.) microinjection of orexin A in the mouse vlPAG increased the hot-plate latency. This effect was mimicked by i.pag. injection of WIN 55,212-2, a CB1 agonist, and antagonized by i.pag. injection of the antagonist of OX1 (SB 334867) or CB1 (AM 251), but not OX2 (TCS-OX2-29) or opioid (naloxone), receptors. [Ala(11), D-Leu(15)]-orexin B (i.pag.), an OX2 selective agonist, also induced antinociception in a manner blocked by i.pag. injection of TCS-OX2-29, but not SB 334867 or AM 251. Mice receiving restraint stress for 30 min showed significantly longer hot-plate latency, more c-Fos-expressing orexin neurons in the lateral hypothalamus and higher orexin levels in the vlPAG than unrestrained mice. Restraint SIA in mice was prevented by i.pag. or intraperitoneal injection of SB 334867 or AM 251, but not TCS-OX2-29 or naloxone. These results suggest that during stress, hypothalamic orexin neurons are activated, releasing orexins into the vlPAG to induce analgesia, possibly via the OX1 receptor-initiated, endocannabinoid-mediated disinhibition mechanism previously reported. Although activating either OX1 or OX2 receptors in the vlPAG can lead to antinociception, only OX1 receptor-initiated antinociception is endocannabinoid-dependent. PMID:26907809

  8. Common brain activations for painful and non-painful aversive stimuli

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Identification of potentially harmful stimuli is necessary for the well-being and self-preservation of all organisms. However, the neural substrates involved in the processing of aversive stimuli are not well understood. For instance, painful and non-painful aversive stimuli are largely thought to activate different neural networks. However, it is presently unclear whether there is a common aversion-related network of brain regions responsible for the basic processing of aversive stimuli. To help clarify this issue, this report used a cross-species translational approach in humans (i.e. meta-analysis) and rodents (i.e. systematic review of functional neuroanatomy). Results Animal and human data combined to show a core aversion-related network, consisting of similar cortical (i.e. MCC, PCC, AI, DMPFC, RTG, SMA, VLOFC; see results section or abbreviation section for full names) and subcortical (i.e. Amyg, BNST, DS, Hab, Hipp/Parahipp, Hyp, NAc, NTS, PAG, PBN, raphe, septal nuclei, Thal, LC, midbrain) regions. In addition, a number of regions appeared to be more involved in pain-related (e.g. sensory cortex) or non-pain-related (e.g. amygdala) aversive processing. Conclusions This investigation suggests that aversive processing, at the most basic level, relies on similar neural substrates, and that differential responses may be due, in part, to the recruitment of additional structures as well as the spatio-temporal dynamic activity of the network. This network perspective may provide a clearer understanding of why components of this circuit appear dysfunctional in some psychiatric and pain-related disorders. PMID:22676259

  9. Dorsolateral and ventral regions of the periaqueductal gray matter are involved in distinct types of fear.

    PubMed

    Vianna, D M; Landeira-Fernandez, J; Brandão, M L

    2001-12-01

    Stepwise increases in the electrical stimulation of the dorsolateral periaqueductal gray (dlPAG) produces alertness, then freezing and finally escape. This paper examines whether this freezing is (i) caused by Pavlovian fear conditioning to the contextual cues present during stimulation and (ii) the result of the stimulation of neurons located inside the dlPAG or elsewhere. To this end, freezing behavior was assessed in rats exposed either to the same or a different environment (context shift test) following the application of either footshocks or stimulation of the dlPAG at the freezing threshold. Rats submitted to footshocks presented freezing to the context 24h later whereas rats submitted to the dlPAG stimulation showed freezing only immediately after the stimulation, regardless of the context. In the second experiment, aversive states generated by activation of the dlPAG were assessed either by measuring the thresholds for freezing and escape responses or the duration of these responses following microinjections of semicarbazide inside the dlPAG. The duration of freezing behavior was also measured in rats submitted to a contextual fear-conditioning paradigm using footshocks as unconditioned stimulus. Lesions of the ventral periaqueductal gray (vPAG) disrupted conditioned freezing to contextual cues associated to footshocks but vPAG lesions did not change the threshold of either freezing or escape responses elicited by electrical stimulation of the dlPAG. Lesions of the vPAG did not change the amount of freezing or escape responses produced by microinjections of semicarbazide into the dlPAG. These results indicate that stimulation of dlPAG neurons produce freezing behavior independent of any contextual fear conditioning and add to previously reported evidence showing that the vPAG is a critical structure for the expression of conditioned fear. In contrast, the neural substrate of unconditioned dlPAG stimulation-induced freezing is likely to elaborate

  10. NAAG peptidase inhibition in the periaqueductal gray and rostral ventromedial medulla reduces flinching in the formalin model of inflammation

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) have been identified as significant analgesic targets. Systemic treatments with inhibitors of the enzymes that inactivate the peptide transmitter N-acetylaspartylglutamate (NAAG), an mGluR3 agonist, have an analgesia-like effect in rat models of inflammatory and neuropathic pain. The goal of this study was to begin defining locations within the central pain pathway at which NAAG activation of its receptor mediates this effect. Results NAAG immunoreactivity was found in neurons in two brain regions that mediate nociceptive processing, the periaqueductal gray (PAG) and the rostral ventromedial medulla (RVM). Microinjection of the NAAG peptidase inhibitor ZJ43 into the PAG contralateral, but not ipsilateral, to the formalin injected footpad reduced the rapid and slow phases of the nociceptive response in a dose-dependent manner. ZJ43 injected into the RVM also reduced the rapid and slow phase of the response. The group II mGluR antagonist LY341495 blocked these effects of ZJ43 on the PAG and RVM. NAAG peptidase inhibition in the PAG and RVM did not affect the thermal withdrawal response in the hot plate test. Footpad inflammation also induced a significant increase in glutamate release in the PAG. Systemic injection of ZJ43 increased NAAG levels in the PAG and RVM and blocked the inflammation-induced increase in glutamate release in the PAG. Conclusion These data demonstrate a behavioral and neurochemical role for NAAG in the PAG and RVM in regulating the spinal motor response to inflammation and that NAAG peptidase inhibition has potential as an approach to treating inflammatory pain via either the ascending (PAG) and/or the descending pain pathways (PAG and RVM) that warrants further study. PMID:22971334

  11. Neural substrates underlying fear-evoked freezing: the periaqueductal grey–cerebellar link

    PubMed Central

    Koutsikou, Stella; Crook, Jonathan J; Earl, Emma V; Leith, J Lianne; Watson, Thomas C; Lumb, Bridget M; Apps, Richard

    2014-01-01

    The central neural pathways involved in fear-evoked behaviour are highly conserved across mammalian species, and there is a consensus that understanding them is a fundamental step towards developing effective treatments for emotional disorders in man. The ventrolateral periaqueductal grey (vlPAG) has a well-established role in fear-evoked freezing behaviour. The neural pathways underlying autonomic and sensory consequences of vlPAG activation in fearful situations are well understood, but much less is known about the pathways that link vlPAG activity to distinct fear-evoked motor patterns essential for survival. In adult rats, we have identified a pathway linking the vlPAG to cerebellar cortex, which terminates as climbing fibres in lateral vermal lobule VIII (pyramis). Lesion of pyramis input–output pathways disrupted innate and fear-conditioned freezing behaviour. The disruption in freezing behaviour was strongly correlated to the reduction in the vlPAG-induced facilitation of α-motoneurone excitability observed after lesions of the pyramis. The increased excitability of α-motoneurones during vlPAG activation may therefore drive the increase in muscle tone that underlies expression of freezing behaviour. By identifying the cerebellar pyramis as a critical component of the neural network subserving emotionally related freezing behaviour, the present study identifies novel neural pathways that link the PAG to fear-evoked motor responses. PMID:24639484

  12. Mutations in subunit interface and B-cell epitopes improve antileukemic activities of Escherichia coli asparaginase-II: evaluation of immunogenicity in mice.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Ranjit Kumar; Verma, Shikha; Pati, Rashmirekha; Sengupta, Mitali; Khatua, Biswajit; Jena, Rabindra Kumar; Sethy, Sudha; Kar, Santosh K; Mandal, Chitra; Roehm, Klaus H; Sonawane, Avinash

    2014-02-01

    L-Asparaginase-II from Escherichia coli (EcA) is a central component in the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). However, the therapeutic efficacy of EcA is limited due to immunogenicity and a short half-life in the patient. Here, we performed rational mutagenesis to obtain EcA variants with a potential to improve ALL treatment. Several variants, especially W66Y and Y176F, killed the ALL cells more efficiently than did wild-type EcA (WT-EcA), although nonleukemic peripheral blood monocytes were not affected. Several assays, including Western blotting, annexin-V/propidium iodide binding, comet, and micronuclei assays, showed that the reduction in viability of leukemic cells is due to the increase in caspase-3, cytochrome c release, poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase activation, down-regulation of anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-XL, an arrest of the cell cycle at the G0/G1 phase, and eventually apoptosis. Both W66Y and Y176F induced significantly more apoptosis in lymphocytes derived from ALL patients. In addition, Y176F and Y176S exhibited greatly decreased glutaminase activity, whereas K288S/Y176F, a variant mutated in one of the immunodominant epitopes, showed reduced antigenicity. Further in vivo immunogenicity studies in mice showed that K288S/Y176F was 10-fold less immunogenic as compared with WT-EcA. Moreover, sera obtained from WT-EcA immunized mice and ALL patients who were given asparaginase therapy for several weeks recognized the K288S/Y176F mutant significantly less than the WT-EcA. Further mechanistic studies revealed that W66Y, Y176F, and K288S/Y176F rapidly depleted asparagine and also down-regulated the transcription of asparagine synthetase as compared with WT-EcA. These highly desirable attributes of these variants could significantly advance asparaginase therapy of leukemia in the future. PMID:24297177

  13. Active-R filter

    DOEpatents

    Soderstrand, Michael A.

    1976-01-01

    An operational amplifier-type active filter in which the only capacitor in the circuit is the compensating capacitance of the operational amplifiers, the various feedback and coupling elements being essentially solely resistive.

  14. Processed Aloe vera Gel Ameliorates Cyclophosphamide-Induced Immunotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Im, Sun-A; Kim, Ki-Hyang; Kim, Hee-Suk; Lee, Ki-Hwa; Shin, Eunju; Do, Seon-Gil; Jo, Tae Hyung; Park, Young In; Lee, Chong-Kil

    2014-01-01

    The effects of processed Aloe vera gel (PAG) on cyclophosphamide (CP)-induced immunotoxicity were examined in mice. Intraperitoneal injection of CP significantly reduced the total number of lymphocytes and erythrocytes in the blood. Oral administration of PAG quickly restored CP-induced lymphopenia and erythropenia in a dose-dependent manner. The reversal of CP-induced hematotoxicity by PAG was mediated by the functional preservation of Peyer’s patch cells. Peyer’s patch cells isolated from CP-treated mice, which were administered PAG, produced higher levels of T helper 1 cytokines and colony-stimulating factors (CSF) in response to concanavalin A stimulation as compared with those isolated from CP-treated control mice. PAG-derived polysaccharides directly activated Peyer’s patch cells isolated from normal mice to produce cytokines including interleukin (IL)-6, IL-12, interferon-γ, granulocyte-CSF, and granulocyte-macrophage-CSF. The cytokines produced by polysaccharide-stimulated Peyer’s patch cells had potent proliferation-inducing activity on mouse bone marrow cells. In addition, oral administration of PAG restored IgA secretion in the intestine after CP treatment. These results indicated that PAG could be an effective immunomodulator and that it could prevent CP-induced immunotoxic side effects. PMID:25347273

  15. Transfer of palmitate from phospholipids to lipid A in outer membranes of Gram-negative bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Bishop, Russell E.; Gibbons, Henry S.; Guina, Tina; Trent, M.Stephen; Miller, Samuel I.; Raetz, Christian R.H.

    2000-01-01

    Regulated covalent modifications of lipid A are implicated in virulence of pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria. The Salmonella typhimurium PhoP/PhoQ-activated gene pagP is required both for biosynthesis of hepta-acylated lipid A species containing palmitate and for resistance to cationic anti-microbial peptides. Palmitoylated lipid A can also function as an endotoxin antagonist. We now show that pagP and its Escherichia coli homolog (crcA) encode an unusual enzyme of lipid A biosynthesis localized in the outer membrane. PagP transfers a palmitate residue from the sn-1 position of a phospholipid to the N-linked hydroxymyristate on the proximal unit of lipid A (or its precursors). PagP bearing a C-terminal His6-tag accumulated in outer membranes during overproduction, was purified with full activity and was shown by cross-linking to behave as a homodimer. PagP is the first example of an outer membrane enzyme involved in lipid A biosynthesis. Additional pagP homologs are encoded in the genomes of Yersinia and Bordetella species. PagP may provide an adaptive response toward both Mg2+ limitation and host innate immune defenses. PMID:11013210

  16. Microinjection of muscimol into the periaqueductal gray suppresses cardiovascular and neuroendocrine response to air jet stress in conscious rats

    PubMed Central

    de Menezes, Rodrigo C. A.; Zaretsky, Dmitry V.; Sarkar, Sumit; Fontes, Marco A. P.; DiMicco, Joseph A.

    2008-01-01

    Microinjection of the neuronal inhibitor muscimol into the dorsomedial hypothalamus (DMH) suppresses increases in heart rate (HR), mean arterial pressure (MAP), and circulating levels of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) evoked in air jet stress in conscious rats. Similar injection of muscimol into the caudal region of the lateral/dorsolateral periaqueductal gray (l/dlPAG) reduces autonomic responses evoked from the DMH, leading to the suggestion that neurons in the l/dlPAG may represent a descending relay for DMH-induced increases in HR and MAP. Here, we examined the role of neuronal activity in the caudal l/dlPAG on the increases in MAP, HR, and plasma ACTH seen in air jet stress in rats. Microinjection of muscimol into the caudal l/dlPAG reduced stress-induced increases in HR and MAP, while identical injections into sites just dorsal or into the rostral l/dlPAG had no effect. Microinjection of a combination of the glutamate receptor antagonists 2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoate (AP5) and 2,3-dihydroxy-6-nitro-7-sulfamoyl-benzo[f]quinoxaline-2,3-dione (NBQX) into the caudal l/dlPAG decreased stress-induced increases in HR alone only at the end of the 20-min stress period but significantly accelerated return to baseline. Surprisingly, microinjection of muscimol into the caudal l/dlPAG also reduced the stress-induced increase in plasma ACTH by 51%. Compared with unstressed control rats, rats exposed to air jet stress exhibited ∼3 times the number of Fos-positive neurons in the l/dlPAG. These findings suggest that neurons in the l/dlPAG are activated in air jet stress and that this activity contributes to increases in HR, MAP, and plasma ACTH. PMID:18650321

  17. An enzyme-encapsulated microreactor for efficient theanine synthesis.

    PubMed

    Matsuura, Shun-ichi; Yokoyama, Takuji; Ishii, Ryo; Itoh, Tetsuji; Tomon, Emiko; Hamakawa, Satoshi; Tsunoda, Tatsuo; Mizukami, Fujio; Nanbu, Hironobu; Hanaoka, Taka-aki

    2012-07-18

    A flow-type microreactor containing glutaminase-mesoporous silica composites with 10.6 nm pore diameter (TMPS10.6) was developed for the continuous synthesis of theanine, a unique amino acid. High enzymatic activity was exhibited by the local control of the reaction temperature. PMID:22674037

  18. Involvement of non-NMDA glutamate receptors of the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus in the cardiovascular response to the microinjection of noradrenaline into the dorsal periaqueductal gray area of rats.

    PubMed

    Pelosi, Gislaine Garcia; Busnardo, Cristiane; Tavares, Rodrigo Fiacadori; Corrêa, Fernando Morgan Aguiar

    2015-03-30

    The dorsal periaqueductal gray area (dPAG) is involved in cardiovascular modulation. In a previous study, we showed that noradrenaline (NA) microinjected into the dPAG caused a vasopressin-mediated pressor response, involving a relay in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN). In the present study, we evaluated the involvement of ionotropic glutamate receptors within the PVN in the cardiovascular response to NA microinjection into the dPAG of unanesthetized rats. Microinjection of the selective NMDA glutamate receptor antagonist LY235959 (2nmol/100nL) unilaterally into the PVN did not affect the cardiovascular response evoked by microinjection of NA (15nmol/50nL) into the dPAG. On the other hand, unilateral PVN pretreatment with the non-NMDA glutamate receptor antagonist NBQX (2nmol/100nL) significantly reduced the pressor and cardiac response caused by microinjection of NA into the dPAG. In addition, bilateral PVN pretreatment with NBQX (2nmol/100nL) blocked the cardiovascular response to NA injected into the dPAG. In conclusion, the present results suggest that bilateral PVN activation of non-NMDA glutamate receptors mediates the vasopressin-related cardiovascular response to the microinjection of NA into the dPAG. PMID:25617821

  19. Additive chemistry and distributions in NTD photoresist thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thackeray, James; Hong, Chang-Young; Clark, Michael B.

    2016-03-01

    The lithographic performance of photoresists is a function of the vertical distribution of formulation components, such as photoacid generator (PAG) molecules, in photoresist thin films and how these components undergo chemical modification and migrate within the film during the lithography processing steps. This paper will discuss how GCIB-SIMS depth profiles were used to monitor the PAG and quencher base distributions before and after exposure and post-exposure bake processing steps for different PAG/photoresist formulations. The authors show that the use of surface active quencher in an NTD photoresist leads to better resist profiles, superior DOF and better OPC performance.

  20. Stimulation of the dorsal periaqueductal gray enhances spontaneous recovery of a conditioned taste aversion

    PubMed Central

    Mickley, G. Andrew; Ketchesin, Kyle D.; Ramos, Linnet; Luchsinger, Joseph R.; Rogers, Morgan M.; Wiles, Nathanael R.; Hoxha, Nita

    2012-01-01

    Due to its relevance to clinical practice, extinction of learned fears has been a major focus of recent research. However, less is known about the means by which conditioned fears re-emerge (i.e., spontaneously recover) as time passes or contexts change following extinction. The periaqueductal gray represents the final common pathway mediating defensive reactions to fear and we have reported previously that the dorsolateral PAG (dlPAG) exhibits a small but reliable increase in neural activity (as measured by c-fos protein immunoreactivity) when spontaneous recovery (SR) of a conditioned taste aversion (CTA) is reduced. Here we extend these correlational studies to determine if inducing dlPAG c-fos expression through electrical brain stimulation could cause a reduction in SR of a CTA. Male Sprague-Dawley rats acquired a strong aversion to saccharin (conditioned stimulus; CS) and then underwent CTA extinction through multiple non-reinforced exposures to the CS. Following a 30-day latency period after asymptotic extinction was achieved; rats either received stimulation of the dorsal PAG (dPAG) or stimulation of closely adjacent structures. Sixty minutes following the stimulation, rats were again presented with the saccharin solution as we tested for SR of the CTA. The brain stimulation evoked c-fos expression around the tip of the electrodes. However, stimulation of the dPAG failed to reduce SR of the previously extinguished CTA. In fact, dPAG stimulation caused rats to significantly suppress their saccharin drinking (relative to controls) – indicating an enhanced SR. These data refute a cause-and-effect relationship between enhanced dPAG c-fos expression and a reduction in SR. However, they highlight a role for the dPAG in modulating SR of extinguished CTAs. PMID:23183042

  1. Stimulation of the dorsal periaqueductal gray enhances spontaneous recovery of a conditioned taste aversion.

    PubMed

    Mickley, G Andrew; Ketchesin, Kyle D; Ramos, Linnet; Luchsinger, Joseph R; Rogers, Morgan M; Wiles, Nathanael R; Hoxha, Nita

    2013-02-01

    Due to its relevance to clinical practice, extinction of learned fears has been a major focus of recent research. However, less is known about the means by which conditioned fears re-emerge (i.e., spontaneously recover) as time passes or contexts change following extinction. The periaqueductal gray represents the final common pathway mediating defensive reactions to fear and we have reported previously that the dorsolateral PAG (dlPAG) exhibits a small but reliable increase in neural activity (as measured by c-fos protein immunoreactivity) when spontaneous recovery (SR) of a conditioned taste aversion (CTA) is reduced. Here we extend these correlational studies to determine if inducing dlPAG c-fos expression through electrical brain stimulation could cause a reduction in SR of a CTA. Male Sprague-Dawley rats acquired a strong aversion to saccharin (conditioned stimulus; CS) and then underwent CTA extinction through multiple non-reinforced exposures to the CS. Following a 30-day latency period after asymptotic extinction was achieved; rats either received stimulation of the dorsal PAG (dPAG) or stimulation of closely adjacent structures. Sixty minutes following the stimulation, rats were again presented with the saccharin solution as we tested for SR of the CTA. The brain stimulation evoked c-fos expression around the tip of the electrodes. However, stimulation of the dPAG failed to reduce SR of the previously extinguished CTA. In fact, dPAG stimulation caused rats to significantly suppress their saccharin drinking (relative to controls) - indicating an enhanced SR. These data refute a cause-and-effect relationship between enhanced dPAG c-fos expression and a reduction in SR. However, they highlight a role for the dPAG in modulating SR of extinguished CTAs. PMID:23183042

  2. Flagella-independent surface motility in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sun-Yang; Pontes, Mauricio H.; Groisman, Eduardo A.

    2015-01-01

    Flagella are multiprotein complexes necessary for swimming and swarming motility. In Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, flagella-mediated motility is repressed by the PhoP/PhoQ regulatory system. We now report that Salmonella can move on 0.3% agarose media in a flagella-independent manner when experiencing the PhoP/PhoQ-inducing signal low Mg2+. This motility requires the PhoP-activated mgtA, mgtC, and pagM genes, which specify a Mg2+ transporter, an inhibitor of Salmonella’s own F1Fo ATPase, and a small protein of unknown function, respectively. The MgtA and MgtC proteins are necessary for pagM expression because pagM mRNA levels were lower in mgtA and mgtC mutants than in wild-type Salmonella, and also because pagM expression from a heterologous promoter rescued motility in mgtA and mgtC mutants. PagM promotes group motility by a surface protein(s), as a pagM-expressing strain conferred motility upon a pagM null mutant, and proteinase K treatment eliminated motility. The pagM gene is rarely found outside subspecies I of S. enterica and often present in nonfunctional allelic forms in organisms lacking the identified motility. Deletion of the pagM gene reduced bacterial replication on 0.3% agarose low Mg2+ media but not in low Mg2+ liquid media. Our findings define a form of motility that allows Salmonella to scavenge nutrients and to escape toxic compounds in low Mg2+ semisolid environments. PMID:25624475

  3. Flagella-independent surface motility in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Park, Sun-Yang; Pontes, Mauricio H; Groisman, Eduardo A

    2015-02-10

    Flagella are multiprotein complexes necessary for swimming and swarming motility. In Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, flagella-mediated motility is repressed by the PhoP/PhoQ regulatory system. We now report that Salmonella can move on 0.3% agarose media in a flagella-independent manner when experiencing the PhoP/PhoQ-inducing signal low Mg(2+). This motility requires the PhoP-activated mgtA, mgtC, and pagM genes, which specify a Mg(2+) transporter, an inhibitor of Salmonella's own F1Fo ATPase, and a small protein of unknown function, respectively. The MgtA and MgtC proteins are necessary for pagM expression because pagM mRNA levels were lower in mgtA and mgtC mutants than in wild-type Salmonella, and also because pagM expression from a heterologous promoter rescued motility in mgtA and mgtC mutants. PagM promotes group motility by a surface protein(s), as a pagM-expressing strain conferred motility upon a pagM null mutant, and proteinase K treatment eliminated motility. The pagM gene is rarely found outside subspecies I of S. enterica and often present in nonfunctional allelic forms in organisms lacking the identified motility. Deletion of the pagM gene reduced bacterial replication on 0.3% agarose low Mg(2+) media but not in low Mg(2+) liquid media. Our findings define a form of motility that allows Salmonella to scavenge nutrients and to escape toxic compounds in low Mg(2+) semisolid environments. PMID:25624475

  4. Physical activity

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001941.htm Physical activity To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Physical activity -- which includes an active lifestyle and routine exercise -- ...

  5. Activation detector

    DOEpatents

    Bell, Zane William [Oak Ridge, TN; Boatner, Lynn Allen [Oak Ridge, TN

    2009-12-08

    A method of detecting an activator, the method including impinging with an activator a receptor material lacking a photoluminescent material and generating a by-product of a radioactive decay due to the activator impinging the reeptor material. The method further including, generating light from the by-product via the Cherenkov effect and identifying a characteristic of the activator based on the light.

  6. Immunological characteristics of the glycolipid antigen of Leptospira interrogans serovar lai.

    PubMed Central

    Masuzawa, T; Nakamura, R; Shimizu, T; Iwamoto, Y; Morita, T; Yanagihara, Y

    1989-01-01

    The protective antigen (PAg), a glycolipid substance, was extracted from Leptospira interrogans serovar lai strain 017 with a chloroform-methanol-water (1:2:0.8 [vol/vol/vol]) solution and partially purified by silica gel column chromatography. The PAg was not detected by Coomassie brilliant blue staining in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis but was observed as a smearlike band, which corresponded to a 24- to 30-kilodalton standard protein, by silver staining. The outer envelope (OE) fraction showed the same band, suggesting that the PAg was one of the chemical components of the OE. The immunogenicity and protective activity of the PAg were compared with those of the OE. The PAg as well as the OE and whole cells was able to induce agglutinating antibody against L. interrogans. Furthermore, the immune sera exhibited opsonic activity against L. interrogans, as observed by measurement of chemical luminescence derived from reactive oxygen. The PAg exhibited protective activity in hamsters challenged with lethal doses of L. interrogans. Therefore, the antigen may be useful as a component vaccine against leptospiral infection. Images PMID:2744857

  7. Impairment of adenylyl cyclase-mediated glutamatergic synaptic plasticity in the periaqueductal grey in a rat model of neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Yu-Cheng; Cheng, Jen-Kun; Chiou, Lih-Chu

    2015-01-01

    Key points Long-lasting neuropathic pain has been attributed to elevated neuronal plasticity changes in spinal, peripheral and cortical levels. Here, we found that reduced neuronal plasticity in the ventrolateral periaqueductal grey (vlPAG), a midbrain region important for initiating descending pain inhibition, may also contribute to neuropathic pain. Forskolin- and isoproterenol (isoprenaline)-elicited EPSC potentiation was impaired in the vlPAG of a rat model of neuropathic pain induced by spinal nerve injury. Down-regulation of adenylyl cyclase–cAMP– PKA signalling, due to impaired adenylyl cyclase, but not phosphodiesterase, in glutamatergic terminals may contribute to the hypofunction of excitatory synaptic plasticity in the vlPAG of neuropathic rats and the subsequent descending pain inhibition, ultimately leading to long-lasting neuropathic pain. Our results suggest that drugs that activate adenylyl cyclase in the vlPAG have the potential for relieving neuropathic pain. Abstract Neuropathic pain has been attributed to nerve injury-induced elevation of peripheral neuronal discharges and spinal excitatory synaptic plasticity while little is known about the contribution of neuroplasticity changes in the brainstem. Here, we examined synaptic plasticity changes in the ventrolateral (vl) periaqueductal grey (PAG), a crucial midbrain region for initiating descending pain inhibition, in spinal nerve ligation (SNL)-induced neuropathic rats. In vlPAG slices of sham-operated rats, forskolin, an adenylyl cyclase (AC) activator, produced long-lasting enhancement of EPSCs. This is a presynaptic effect since forskolin decreased the paired-pulse ratio and failure rate of EPSCs, and increased the frequency, but not the amplitude, of miniature EPSCs. Forskolin-induced EPSC potentiation was mimicked by a β-adrenergic agonist (isoproterenol (isoprenaline)), and prevented by an AC inhibitor (SQ 22536) and a cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) inhibitor (H89), but not by a

  8. Active turbulence in active nematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thampi, S. P.; Yeomans, J. M.

    2016-07-01

    Dense, active systems show active turbulence, a state characterised by flow fields that are chaotic, with continually changing velocity jets and swirls. Here we review our current understanding of active turbulence. The development is primarily based on the theory and simulations of active liquid crystals, but with accompanying summaries of related literature.

  9. Physical activity

    MedlinePlus

    ... time they spend watching TV and using a computer and other electronic devices. All of these activities ... U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans: Recommendation ... Page last updated: ...

  10. Activity Scale.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerpelman, Larry C.; Weiner, Michael J.

    This twenty-four item scale assesses students' actual and desired political-social activism in terms of physical participation, communication activities, and information-gathering activities. About ten minutes are required to complete the instrument. The scale is divided into two subscales. The first twelve items (ACT-A) question respondents on…

  11. Membrane-associated signaling in human B-lymphoma lines

    SciTech Connect

    Tauzin, Sebastien; Ding, Heidrun; Burdevet, Dimitri; Borisch, Bettina; Hoessli, Daniel C.

    2011-01-15

    In B-non-Hodgkin lymphomas, Lyn and Cbp/PAG constitute the core of an oncogenic signalosome that captures the Phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase, the Spleen tyrosine kinase and the Signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 to generate pro-survival and proliferative signals. Lymphoma lines corresponding to follicular, mantle-cell and Burkitt-derived lymphomas display type-specific signalosome organizations that differentially activate PI3K, Syk and STAT3. In the follicular lymphoma line, PI3K, Syk and STAT3 were optimally activated upon association with the Lyn-Cbp/PAG signalosome, while in the Burkitt lymphoma-derived line, the association with Cbp/PAG and activation of PI3K were interfered with by the latent membrane proteins encoded by the Epstein-Barr virus. In the Jeko-1 mantle-cell line, a weak association of Syk with the Lyn-Cbp/PAG signalosome resulted in poor activation of Syk, but in those cells, as in the follicular and Burkitt-derived lines, efficient apoptosis induction by the Syk inhibitor R406 indicated that Syk is nonetheless an important prosurvival element and therefore a valuable therapeutic target. In all configurations described herein is the Lyn-Cbp/PAG signalosome independent of external signals and provides efficient means of activation for its associated lipid and protein kinases. In follicular and Burkitt-derived lines, Syk appears to be activated following binding to Cbp/PAG and no longer requires B-cell receptor-associated activation motifs for activation. Assessment of the different modalities of Lyn-Cbp/PAG signalosome organization could help in selecting the appropriate combination of kinase inhibitors to eliminate a particular type of lymphoma cells.

  12. Evidence of a suffocation alarm system within the periaqueductal gray matter of the rat.

    PubMed

    Schimitel, F G; de Almeida, G M; Pitol, D N; Armini, R S; Tufik, S; Schenberg, L C

    2012-01-01

    Dyspnea, hunger for air, and urge to flee are the cardinal symptoms of panic attacks. Patients also show baseline respiratory abnormalities and a higher rate of comorbid and antecedent respiratory diseases. Panic attacks are also precipitated by infusion of sodium lactate and inhalation of 5% CO₂ in predisposed patients but not in healthy volunteers or patients without panic disorder. Accordingly, Klein [Klein (1993) Arch Gen Psychiatry 50:306-317] suggested that clinical panic is the misfiring of an as-yet-unidentified suffocation alarm system. In rats, selective anoxia of chemoreceptor cells by potassium cyanide (KCN) and electrical and chemical stimulations of periaqueductal gray matter (PAG) produce defensive behaviors, which resemble panic attacks. Thus, here we examined the effects of single or combined administrations of CO₂ (8% and 13%) and KCN (10-80 μg, i.v.) on spontaneous and PAG-evoked behaviors of rats either intact or bearing electrolytic lesions of PAG. Exposure to CO₂ alone reduced grooming while increased exophthalmus, suggesting an arousal response to non-visual cues of environment. Unexpectedly, however, CO₂ attenuated PAG-evoked immobility, trotting, and galloping while facilitated defecation and micturition. Conversely, KCN produced all defensive behaviors of the rat and facilitated PAG-evoked trotting, galloping, and defecation. There were also facilitatory trends in PAG-evoked exophthalmus, immobility, and jumping. Moreover, whereas the KCN-evoked defensive behaviors were attenuated or even suppressed by discrete lesions of PAG, they were markedly facilitated by CO₂. Authors suggest that the PAG harbors an anoxia-sensitive suffocation alarm system which activation precipitates panic attacks and potentiates the subject responses to hypercapnia. PMID:22062132

  13. CRF type 1 receptors in the dorsal periaqueductal gray modulate anxiety-induced defensive behaviors.

    PubMed

    Litvin, Yoav; Pentkowski, Nathan S; Blanchard, D Caroline; Blanchard, Robert J

    2007-08-01

    The dorsal periaqueductal gray (dPAG) is involved in defensive coping reactions to threatening stimuli. Corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) is substantially implicated as a direct modulator of physiological, endocrine and behavioral responses to a stressor. Previous findings demonstrate a direct role of the central CRF system in dPAG-mediated defensive reactions toward a threatening stimulus. These include anxiogenic behaviors in the elevated plus maze (EPM) in rats and defensive reactions in both the mouse defense test battery (MDTB) and rat exposure test (RET) paradigms in mice. Furthermore, CRF was shown to directly and dose-dependently excite PAG neurons in vitro. The aim of the present series of experiments was to directly evaluate the role of the CRF1 receptor (CRF1) in dPAG-induced defensive behaviors in the MDTB and the RET paradigms. For this purpose, cortagine, a novel CRF1-selective agonist, was directly infused into the dPAG. In the RET the high dose of cortagine (100 ng) significantly affected spatial avoidance measures and robustly increased burying behavior, an established avoidance activity, while having no effects on behaviors in the MDTB. Collectively, these results implicate CRF1 in the dPAG as a mediator of temporally and spatially dependent avoidance in response to controllable and constant stimuli. PMID:17540371

  14. Active ratchets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelani, L.; Costanzo, A.; Di Leonardo, R.

    2011-12-01

    We analyze self-propelling organisms, or active particles, in a periodic asymmetric potential. Unlike standard ratchet effect for Brownian particles requiring external forcing, in the case of active particles asymmetric potential alone produces a net drift speed (active ratchet effect). By using theoretical models and numerical simulations we demonstrate the emergence of the rectification process in the presence of an asymmetric piecewise periodic potential. The broken spatial symmetry (external potential) and time symmetry (active particles) are sufficient ingredients to sustain unidirectional transport. Our findings open the way to new mechanisms to move in directional manner motile organisms by using external periodic static fields.

  15. RAM: A Conserved Signaling Network That Regulates Ace2p Transcriptional Activity and Polarized MorphogenesisD⃞

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Bryce; Kurischko, Cornelia; Horecka, Joe; Mody, Manali; Nair, Pradeep; Pratt, Lana; Zougman, Alexandre; McBroom, Linda D.B.; Hughes, Timothy R.; Boone, Charlie; Luca, Francis C.

    2003-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, polarized morphogenesis is critical for bud site selection, bud development, and cell separation. The latter is mediated by Ace2p transcription factor, which controls the daughter cell-specific expression of cell separation genes. Recently, a set of proteins that include Cbk1p kinase, its binding partner Mob2p, Tao3p (Pag1p), and Hym1p were shown to regulate both Ace2p activity and cellular morphogenesis. These proteins seem to form a signaling network, which we designate RAM for regulation of Ace2p activity and cellular morphogenesis. To find additional RAM components, we conducted genetic screens for bilateral mating and cell separation mutants and identified alleles of the PAK-related kinase Kic1p in addition to Cbk1p, Mob2p, Tao3p, and Hym1p. Deletion of each RAM gene resulted in a loss of Ace2p function and caused cell polarity defects that were distinct from formin or polarisome mutants. Two-hybrid and coimmunoprecipitation experiments reveal a complex network of interactions among the RAM proteins, including Cbk1p–Cbk1p, Cbk1p–Kic1p, Kic1p–Tao3p, and Kic1p–Hym1p interactions, in addition to the previously documented Cbk1p–Mob2p and Cbk1p–Tao3p interactions. We also identified a novel leucine-rich repeat-containing protein Sog2p that interacts with Hym1p and Kic1p. Cells lacking Sog2p exhibited the characteristic cell separation and cell morphology defects associated with perturbation in RAM signaling. Each RAM protein localized to cortical sites of growth during both budding and mating pheromone response. Hym1p was Kic1p- and Sog2p-dependent and Sog2p and Kic1p were interdependent for localization, indicating a close functional relationship between these proteins. Only Mob2p and Cbk1p were detectable in the daughter cell nucleus at the end of mitosis. The nuclear localization and kinase activity of the Mob2p–Cbk1p complex were dependent on all other RAM proteins, suggesting that Mob2p–Cbk1p functions late in the

  16. Faculty Activism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Academe, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Blending scholarship and activism, whether domestic or international, takes some real work. Two scholar-activists reflect on why and how activism can be more than academic labor in this feature of the "Academe" journal. This feature includes the following brief reflections on political work, both local and global that demonstrates how on campus…

  17. Indoor Activities

    MedlinePlus

    ... so you can do some lifting while you watch TV. Walk around the house when you talk on the phone. Make an extra trip up and down the stairs when you do the laundry. Download the Tip Sheet Indoor Activities (PDF, 739.53 KB) You Might Also Like Sun Safety Have Fun. Be Active with Your Dog! ...

  18. Catalyst activator

    DOEpatents

    McAdon, Mark H.; Nickias, Peter N.; Marks, Tobin J.; Schwartz, David J.

    2001-01-01

    A catalyst activator particularly adapted for use in the activation of metal complexes of metals of Group 3-10 for polymerization of ethylenically unsaturated polymerizable monomers, especially olefins, comprising two Group 13 metal or metalloid atoms and a ligand structure including at least one bridging group connecting ligands on the two Group 13 metal or metalloid atoms.

  19. Outdoor Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minneapolis Independent School District 275, Minn.

    Twenty-four activities suitable for outdoor use by elementary school children are outlined. Activities designed to make children aware of their environment include soil painting, burr collecting, insect and pond water collecting, studies of insect galls and field mice, succession studies, and a model of natural selection using dyed toothpicks. A…

  20. Astronomy Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenstone, Sid

    This document consists of activities and references for teaching astronomy. The activities (which include objectives, list of materials needed, and procedures) focus on: observing the Big Dipper and locating the North Star; examining the Big Dipper's stars; making and using an astrolabe; examining retograde motion of Mars; measuring the Sun's…

  1. Activated Charcoal

    MedlinePlus

    ... ACTIVATED CHARCOAL are as follows:Trapping chemicals to stop some types of poisoning when used as a ... Charbon Végétal, Charbon Végétal Activé, Charcoal, Gas Black, Lamp Black, Medicinal Charcoal, Noir de Gaz, Noir de ...

  2. Periaqueductal Grey EP3 Receptors Facilitate Spinal Nociception in Arthritic Secondary Hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Drake, R.A.R.; Leith, J.L.; Almahasneh, F.; Martindale, J.; Wilson, A.W.; Lumb, B.

    2016-01-01

    Descending controls on spinal nociceptive processing play a pivotal role in shaping the pain experience after tissue injury. Secondary hypersensitivity develops within undamaged tissue adjacent and distant to damaged sites. Spinal neuronal pools innervating regions of secondary hypersensitivity are dominated by descending facilitation that amplifies spinal inputs from unsensitized peripheral nociceptors. Cyclooxygenase–prostaglandin (PG) E2 signaling within the ventrolateral periaqueductal gray (vlPAG) is pronociceptive in naive and acutely inflamed animals, but its contributions in more prolonged inflammation and, importantly, secondary hypersensitivity remain unknown. In naive rats, PG EP3 receptor (EP3R) antagonism in vlPAG modulated noxious withdrawal reflex (EMG) thresholds to preferential C-nociceptor, but not A-nociceptor, activation and raised thermal withdrawal thresholds in awake animals. In rats with inflammatory arthritis, secondary mechanical and thermal hypersensitivity of the hindpaw developed and was associated with spinal sensitization to A-nociceptor inputs alone. In arthritic rats, blockade of vlPAG EP3R raised EMG thresholds to C-nociceptor activation in the area of secondary hypersensitivity to a degree equivalent to that evoked by the same manipulation in naive rats. Importantly, vlPAG EP3R blockade also affected responses to A-nociceptor activation, but only in arthritic animals. We conclude that vlPAG EP3R activity exerts an equivalent facilitation on the spinal processing of C-nociceptor inputs in naive and arthritic animals, but gains in effects on spinal A-nociceptor processing from a region of secondary hypersensitivity. Therefore, the spinal sensitization to A-nociceptor inputs associated with secondary hypersensitivity is likely to be at least partly dependent on descending prostanergic facilitation from the vlPAG. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT After tissue damage, sensitivity to painful stimulation develops in undamaged areas (secondary

  3. Mu Opioid Receptor Modulation of Dopamine Neurons in the Periaqueductal Gray/Dorsal Raphe: A Role in Regulation of Pain.

    PubMed

    Li, Chia; Sugam, Jonathan A; Lowery-Gionta, Emily G; McElligott, Zoe A; McCall, Nora M; Lopez, Alberto J; McKlveen, Jessica M; Pleil, Kristen E; Kash, Thomas L

    2016-07-01

    The periaqueductal gray (PAG) is a brain region involved in nociception modulation, and an important relay center for the descending nociceptive pathway through the rostral ventral lateral medulla. Given the dense expression of mu opioid receptors and the role of dopamine in pain, the recently characterized dopamine neurons in the ventral PAG (vPAG)/dorsal raphe (DR) region are a potentially critical site for the antinociceptive actions of opioids. The objectives of this study were to (1) evaluate synaptic modulation of the vPAG/DR dopamine neurons by mu opioid receptors and to (2) dissect the anatomy and neurochemistry of these neurons, in order to assess the downstream loci and functions of their activation. Using a mouse line that expresses eGFP under control of the tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) promoter, we found that mu opioid receptor activation led to a decrease in inhibitory inputs onto the vPAG/DR dopamine neurons. Furthermore, combining immunohistochemistry, optogenetics, electrophysiology, and fast-scan cyclic voltammetry in a TH-cre mouse line, we demonstrated that these neurons also express the vesicular glutamate type 2 transporter and co-release dopamine and glutamate in a major downstream projection structure-the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis. Finally, activation of TH-positive neurons in the vPAG/DR using Gq designer receptors exclusively activated by designer drugs displayed a supraspinal, but not spinal, antinociceptive effect. These results indicate that vPAG/DR dopamine neurons likely play a key role in opiate antinociception, potentially via the activation of downstream structures through dopamine and glutamate release. PMID:26792442

  4. Activated Charcoal

    MedlinePlus

    ... is used to treat poisonings, reduce intestinal gas (flatulence), lower cholesterol levels, prevent hangover, and treat bile ... lower cholesterol levels in the blood. Decreasing gas (flatulence). Some studies show that activated charcoal is effective ...

  5. Activation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Alfassi, Z.B. . Dept. of Nuclear Engineering)

    1990-01-01

    This volume contains 16 chapters on the application of activation analysis in the fields of life sciences, biological materials, coal and its effluents, environmental samples, archaeology, material science, and forensics. Each chapter is processed separately for the data base.

  6. Get Active

    MedlinePlus

    ... section Health Conditions 4 of 10 sections Take Action! Take Action: How Active Are You? First, think about your ... section Learn More 5 of 10 sections Take Action: Get Started I’m just getting started. Start ...

  7. Periaqueductal gray μ and κ opioid receptors determine behavioral selection from maternal to predatory behavior in lactating rats.

    PubMed

    Klein, Marianne Orlandini; Cruz, Aline de Mello; Machado, Franciele Corrêa; Picolo, Gisele; Canteras, Newton Sabino; Felicio, Luciano Freitas

    2014-11-01

    Every mother must optimize her time between caring for her young and her subsistence. The rostro lateral portion of the periaqueductal grey (rlPAG) is a critical site that modulates the switch between maternal and predatory behavior. Opioids play multiple roles in both maternal behavior and this switching process. The present study used a pharmacological approach to evaluate the functional role of rlPAG μ and κ opioid receptors in behavioral selection. Rat dams were implanted with a guide cannula in the rlPAG and divided into three experiments in which we tested the role of opioid agonists (Experiment 1), the influence of μ and κ opioid receptor blockade in the presence of morphine (Experiment 2), and the influence of μ and κ opioid receptor blockade (Experiment 3). After behavioral test, in Experiment 4, we evaluated rlPAG μ and κ receptor activation in all Experiments 1-3. The results showed that massive opioidergic activation induced by morphine in the rlPAG inhibited maternal behavior without interfering with predatory hunting. No behavioral changes and no receptor activation were promoted by the specific agonist alone. However, κ receptor blockade increased hunting behavior and increased the level of μ receptor activation in the rlPAG. Thus, endogenous opioidergic tone might be modulated by a functional interaction between opioid receptor subtypes. Such a compensatory receptor interaction appears to be relevant for behavioral selection among motivated behaviors. These findings indicate a role for multiple opioid receptor interactions in the modulation of behavioral selection between maternal and predatory behaviors in the PAG. PMID:25116253

  8. Integrin activation

    PubMed Central

    Ginsberg, Mark H.

    2014-01-01

    Integrin-mediated cell adhesion is important for development, immune responses, hemostasis and wound healing. Integrins also function as signal transducing receptors that can control intracellular pathways that regulate cell survival, proliferation, and cell fate. Conversely, cells can modulate the affinity of integrins for their ligands a process operationally defined as integrin activation. Analysis of activation of integrins has now provided a detailed molecular understanding of this unique form of “inside-out” signal transduction and revealed new paradigms of how transmembrane domains (TMD) can transmit long range allosteric changes in transmembrane proteins. Here, we will review how talin and mediates integrin activation and how the integrin TMD can transmit these inside out signals. [BMB Reports 2014; 47(12): 655-659] PMID:25388208

  9. Active Cytokinins

    PubMed Central

    Mornet, René; Theiler, Jane B.; Leonard, Nelson J.; Schmitz, Ruth Y.; Moore, F. Hardy; Skoog, Folke

    1979-01-01

    Four series of azidopurines have been synthesized and tested for cytokinin activity in the tobacco callus bioassay: 2- and 8-azido-N6-benzyladenines, -N6-(Δ2-isopentenyl)adenines, and -zeatins, and N6-(2- and 4-azidobenzyl)adenines. The compounds having 2-azido substitution on the adenine ring are as active as the corresponding parent compounds, while those with 8-azido substitution are about 10 or more times as active. The 8-azidozeatin, which is the most active cytokinin observed, exhibited higher than minimal detectable activity at 1.2 × 10−5 micromolar, the lowest concentration tested. The shape of the growth curve indicates that even a concentration as low as 5 × 10−6 micromolar would probably be effective. By comparison, the lowest active concentration ever reported for zeatin has been 5 × 10−5 micromolar, representing a sensitivity rarely attained. All of the azido compounds have been submitted to photolysis in aqueous ethanol, and the photoproducts have been detected and identified by low and high resolution mass spectrometry. They are rationalized as products of abstraction and insertion reactions of the intermediate nitrenes. The potential of the major released products as cytokinins was also assessed by bioassay. 2-Azido-N6-(Δ2-isopentenyl)adenine competed with [14C]kinetin for the cytokinin-binding protein isolated from wheat germ. When the azido compound was photolysed in the presence of this protein, its attachment effectively blocked the binding of [14C]kinetin. PMID:16661017

  10. Get Active

    MedlinePlus

    ... Lifting small weights – you can even use bottled water or cans of food as weights Watch these videos for muscle strengthening exercises to do at home or at the gym. If you do muscle-strengthening activities with weights, check out the do’s and don’ ...

  11. Learning Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tipton, Tom, Ed.

    1983-01-01

    Presents a flow chart for naming inorganic compounds. Although it is not necessary for students to memorize rules, preliminary skills needed before using the chart are outlined. Also presents an activity in which the mass of an imaginary atom is determined using lead shot, Petri dishes, and a platform balance. (JN)

  12. Activated Sludge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saunders, F. Michael

    1978-01-01

    Presents the 1978 literature review of wastewater treatment. This review covers: (1) activated sludge process; (2) process control; (3) oxygen uptake and transfer; (4) phosphorus removal; (5) nitrification; (6) industrial wastewater; and (7) aerobic digestion. A list of 136 references is also presented. (HM)

  13. Activity report

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, S W

    2008-08-11

    This report is aimed to show the author's activities to support the LDRD. The title is 'Investigation of the Double-C Behavior in the Pu-Ga Time-Temperature-Transformation Diagram' The sections are: (1) Sample Holder Test; (2) Calculation of x-ray diffraction patterns; (3) Literature search and preparing publications; (4) Tasks Required for APS Experiments; and (5) Communications.

  14. Additive effects of glucagon and non-metabolizable analogue of leucine on glutamine catabolism in rat hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Zaleski, J.; Erecinska, M.

    1986-05-01

    ..beta..-2-Aminobicyclo-(2.2.1)-heptane-2-carboxylic acid (BCH), at 10 mM, a known activator of glutamate dehydrogenase, doubled the rate of urea synthesis in hepatocytes from fed rats incubated with 10 mM glutamine (gln) and 2 mM ornithine. The stimulation of urea formation was accompanied by 1.4-fold activation of /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ release from (U-/sup 14/C)gln and 2.5-fold decline in intracellular gln content. There was no significant change in glutamate level while 2-oxoglutarate and malate increased by 1.3- and 2.4-fold, respectively. In hepatocytes from fasted rats BCH was similarly effective in stimulation of urea and /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ formation and it also doubled the rate of glucose synthesis. Effects of BCH on hepatocytes from fasted rats were associated with about 2-fold elevation of glutamate, aspartate and alanine levels. The effects of BCH and glucagon (a putative glutaminase activator) on urea, /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ and glucose formation were additive. The results suggest that BCH-induced activation of gln catabolism in hepatocytes is caused primarily by stimulation of glutaminase rather than glutamate dehydrogenase. It seems that the mechanisms of activation of glutaminase by BCH and glucagon are different.

  15. Excitatory Amino Acid Receptors Mediate Asymmetry and Lateralization in the Descending Cardiovascular Pathways from the Dorsomedial Hypothalamus

    PubMed Central

    Xavier, Carlos Henrique; Ianzer, Danielle; Lima, Augusto Martins; Marins, Fernanda Ribeiro; Pedrino, Gustavo Rodrigues; Vaz, Gisele; Menezes, Gustavo Batista; Nalivaiko, Eugene; Fontes, Marco Antônio Peliky

    2014-01-01

    The dorsomedial hypothalamus (DMH) and lateral/dorsolateral periaqueductal gray (PAG) are anatomically and functionally connected. Both the DMH and PAG depend on glutamatergic inputs for activation. We recently reported that removal of GABA-ergic tone in the unilateral DMH produces: asymmetry, that is, a right- (R-) sided predominance in cardiac chronotropism, and lateralization, that is, a greater increase in ipsilateral renal sympathetic activity (RSNA). In the current study, we investigated whether excitatory amino acid (EAA) receptors in the DMH–PAG pathway contribute to the functional interhemispheric difference. In urethane (1.2 to 1.4 g/kg, i.p.) anesthetized rats, we observed that: (i) nanoinjections of N-methyl D-aspartate (NMDA 100 pmol/100 nl) into the unilateral DMH produced the same right-sided predominance in the control of cardiac chronotropy, (ii) nanoinjections of NMDA into the ipsilateral DMH or PAG evoked lateralized RSNA responses, and (iii) blockade of EAA receptors in the unilateral DMH attenuated the cardiovascular responses evoked by injection of NMDA into either the R- or left- (L-) PAG. In awake rats, nanoinjection of kynurenic acid (1 nmol/100 nL) into the L-DMH or R- or L-PAG attenuated the tachycardia evoked by air stress. However, the magnitude of stress-evoked tachycardia was smallest when the EAA receptors of the R-DMH were blocked. We conclude that EAA receptors contribute to the right-sided predominance in cardiac chronotropism. This interhemispheric difference that involves EAA receptors was observed in the DMH but not in the PAG. PMID:25397884

  16. Engineering of Helicobacter pylori L-Asparaginase: Characterization of Two Functionally Distinct Groups of Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Maggi, Maristella; Chiarelli, Laurent R.; Valentini, Giovanna; Scotti, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial L-asparaginases have been used as anti-cancer drugs for over 4 decades though presenting, along with their therapeutic efficacy, several side effects due to their bacterial origin and, seemingly, to their secondary glutaminase activity. Helicobacter pylori type II L-asparaginase possesses interesting features, among which a reduced catalytic efficiency for L-GLN, compared to the drugs presently used in therapy. In the present study, we describe some enzyme variants with catalytic and in vitro cytotoxic activities different from the wild type enzyme. Particularly, replacements on catalytic threonines (T16D and T95E) deplete the enzyme of both its catalytic activities, once more underlining the essential role of such residues. One serendipitous mutant, M121C/T169M, had a preserved efficiency vs L-asparagine but was completely unable to carry out L-glutamine hydrolysis. Interestingly, this variant did not exert any cytotoxic effect on HL-60 cells. The M121C and T169M single mutants had reduced catalytic activities (nearly 2.5- to 4-fold vs wild type enzyme, respectively). Mutant Q63E, endowed with a similar catalytic efficiency versus asparagine and halved glutaminase efficiency with respect to the wild type enzyme, was able to exert a cytotoxic effect comparable to, or higher than, the one of the wild type enzyme when similar asparaginase units were used. These findings may be relevant to determine the role of glutaminase activity of L-asparaginase in the anti-proliferative effect of the drug and to shed light on how to engineer the best asparaginase/glutaminase combination for an ever improved, patients-tailored therapy. PMID:25664771

  17. Laboratory Activities

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Christopher F.; Serne, R. Jeffrey

    2008-01-17

    This chapter summarizes the laboratory activities performed by PNNL’s Vadose Zone Characterization Project in support of the Tank Farm Vadose Zone Program, led by CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. The results of these studies are contained in numerous reports (Lindenmeier et al. 2002; Serne et al. 2002a, 2002b, 2002c, 2002d, 2002e; Lindenmeier et al. 2003; Serne et al. 2004a, 2004b; Brown et al. 2005, 2006a, 2007; Serne et al. 2007) and have generated much of the data reported in Chapter 22 (Geochemistry-Contaminant Movement), Appendix G (Geochemistry-Contaminant Movement), and Cantrell et al. (2007, SST WMA Geochemistry Data Package – in preparation). Sediment samples and characterization results from PNNL’s Vadose Zone Characterization Project are also shared with other science and technology (S&T) research projects, such as those summarized in Chapter 12 (Associated Science Activities).

  18. Hepatoprotective Activity.

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    The liver performs a vital role in metabolism, secretion, storage, and detoxification of endogenous and exogenous substances. Oxidative stress and free radicals enhance the severity of hepatic damage, which can be overcome by the antioxidant mechanism. Plant extracts can be the best source of such antioxidants and mediate hepatoprotective activity. In this chapter, high-dose paracetamol-induced hepatotoxicity in rat model is discussed with explanations of biochemical and histopathological studies. PMID:26939279

  19. Pollutant Assessments Group Procedures Manual: Volume 1, Administrative and support procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-03-01

    This manual describes procedures currently in use by the Pollutant Assessments Group. The manual is divided into two volumes: Volume 1 includes administrative and support procedures, and Volume 2 includes technical procedures. These procedures are revised in an ongoing process to incorporate new developments in hazardous waste assessment technology and changes in administrative policy. Format inconsistencies will be corrected in subsequent revisions of individual procedures. The purpose of the Pollutant Assessments Groups Procedures Manual is to provide a standardized set of procedures documenting in an auditable manner the activities performed by the Pollutant Assessments Group (PAG) of the Health and Safety Research Division (HASRD) of the Environmental Measurements and Applications Section (EMAS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The Procedures Manual ensures that the organizational, administrative, and technical activities of PAG conform properly to protocol outlined by funding organizations. This manual also ensures that the techniques and procedures used by PAG and other contractor personnel meet the requirements of applicable governmental, scientific, and industrial standards. The Procedures Manual is sufficiently comprehensive for use by PAG and contractor personnel in the planning, performance, and reporting of project activities and measurements. The Procedures Manual provides procedures for conducting field measurements and includes program planning, equipment operation, and quality assurance elements. Successive revisions of this manual will be archived in the PAG Document Control Department to facilitate tracking of the development of specific procedures.

  20. Forging stronger partnerships between academic health centers and patient-driven organizations.

    PubMed

    Gallin, Elaine K; Bond, Enriqueta; Califf, Robert M; Crowley, William F; Davis, Pamela; Galbraith, Richard; Reece, E Albert

    2013-09-01

    In this article, the authors review the unique role that patient-driven organizations, such as patient advocacy groups and voluntary health organizations (PAG/VHOs), play in translational and clinical research. The importance of fostering collaborations between these organizations and U.S. academic health centers (AHCs) is also discussed. Although both the PAG/VHO community and AHCs are heterogeneous, and although not all organizations are well governed or provide independent, well-researched views, there are many outstanding, well-managed, independent PAG/VHOs in the United States whose missions overlap with those of AHCs. The characteristics of effective PAG/VHOs that would serve as excellent partners for AHCs are discussed, and examples are provided regarding their many contributions, which have included advancing research on rare diseases, recruiting patients for clinical trials, and establishing patient registries and biospecimen banks. The authors present feedback obtained from informal discussions with PAG/VHO staff, as well as a survey of a small sample of organizations, that has identified bureaucratic processes, negotiating intellectual property rights, and institutional review board (IRB) delays as the most problematic areas of interactions with AHCs. Actions are suggested for building effective partnerships between the two sectors and the activities that AHCs should undertake to facilitate their interactions with PAG/VHOs including streamlining contract review and IRB processes and finding ways to better align the incentives motivating academic clinical and translational investigators with the goals of PAG/VHOs. This article is one product of the Clinical Research Forum's Partnering with Patient Advocacy Groups Initiative. PMID:23887007

  1. Lipopolysaccharide Engineering in Neisseria meningitidis

    PubMed Central

    Pupo, Elder; Hamstra, Hendrik-Jan; Meiring, Hugo; van der Ley, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Engineering the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) biosynthetic pathway offers the potential to obtain modified derivatives with optimized adjuvant properties. Neisseria meningitidis strain H44/76 was modified by expression of the pagL gene encoding lipid A 3-O-deacylase from Bordetella bronchiseptica and by inactivation of the lgtB gene encoding the terminal oligosaccharide galactosyltransferase. Mass spectrometry analysis of purified mutant LPS was used for detailed compositional analysis of all present molecular species. This determined that the modified LPS was mainly pentaacylated, demonstrating high efficiency of conversion from the hexaacyl to the 3-O-deacylated form by heterologous lipid A 3-O-deacylase (PagL) expression. MS analyses also provided evidence for expression of only one major oligosaccharide glycoform, which lacked the terminal galactose residue as expected from inactivation of the lgtB gene. The immunomodulatory properties of PagL-deacylated LPS were compared with another pentaacyl form obtained from an lpxL1− mutant, which lacks the 2′ secondary acyl chain. Although both LPS mutants displayed impaired capacity to induce production of the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-6 in the monocytic cell line Mono Mac 6, induction of the Toll-interleukin-1 receptor domain-containing adaptor-inducing interferon-β-dependent chemokine interferon-γ-induced protein 10 was largely retained only for the lgtB−/pagL+ mutant. Removal of remaining hexaacyl species exclusively present in lgtB−/pagL+ LPS demonstrated that these minor species potentiate but do not determine the activity of this LPS. These results are the first to indicate a qualitatively different response of human innate cells to pentaacyl lpxL1− and pagL+ LPS and show the importance of detailed structure-function analysis when working with modified lipid A structures. The pagL+ LPS has significant potential as immune modulator in humans. PMID:24492609

  2. Immunocytochemical localization of calretinin-containing neurons in the rat periaqueductal gray and colocalization with enzymes producing nitric oxide: a double, double-labeling study.

    PubMed

    Barbaresi, Paolp; Quaranta, Alexia; Amoroso, Salvatore; Mensà, Emanuela; Fabri, Mara

    2012-04-01

    The pattern of distribution and colocalization of the calcium-binding protein calretinin (Cal) and of enzymes producing nitric oxide (NO) was examined in the rat periaqueductal gray matter (PAG) using two different experimental approaches, by combining Cal immunocytochemistry with NADPH-diaphorase (NADPH-d) histochemistry and with NOS immunocytochemistry, respectively. Cal-immunopositive neurons were found throughout the rostrocaudal extension of both dorsolateral (PAG-dl) and ventrolateral PAG (PAG-vl). Double-labeled neurons were found only in PAG-dl. The first experimental approach indicated that 33-41% of the NADPH-d-positive (Nadph+) cells were immunoreactive for Cal, whereas NADPH-d activity appeared in 19-26% of the Cal-immunopositive (Cal(IP) ) neurons. Two-color immunofluorescence revealed that ∼39-43% of NOS-immunoreactive (NOS(IR) ) neurons were double-labeled with Cal and ∼23% of Cal(IP) neurons expressed NOS immunoreactivity. Measurement in semithin sections of the size of the three neuronal populations found in PAG-dl, showed that Cal(IP) neurons had a cross-sectional area of 94.7 μm², whereas Nadph+ neurons and double-labeled neurons were slightly smaller, having a cross-sectional area of 90.5 and 91.4 μm², respectively. On electron microscopy, Cal(IP) axon terminals formed either symmetric or asymmetric synapses; although the latter synapses were more numerous, both types contacted preferentially Cal(IP) dendrites. These experiments suggest that PAG-dl is characterized by a high degree of heterogeneity. PMID:22121011

  3. Analgesic Activity.

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    Analgesics are agents which selectively relieve pain by acting in the CNS and peripheral pain mediators without changing consciousness. Analgesics may be narcotic or non-narcotic. The study of pain in animals raises ethical, philosophical, and technical problems. Both peripheral and central pain models are included to make the test more evident for the analgesic property of the plant. This chapter highlights methods such as hot plate and formalin and acetic acid-induced pain models to check the analgesic activity of medicinal plants. PMID:26939272

  4. Active Sonar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, Edmund J.

    An active sonar system is one in which pulses of acoustic energy are launched into the water for the purpose of producing echoes. By examining the echoes of transmitted pulses, it affords the capability of both detecting the presence of and estimating the range, and in certain cases, the bearing, of an underwater target. In its most common arrangement, the transmitter (or projector) and the receiver are colocated. This is known as the monostatic configuration and is depicted in Figure 1. When this is not so, it is known as a bistatic or multistatic configuration.

  5. Active packaging with antifungal activities.

    PubMed

    Nguyen Van Long, N; Joly, Catherine; Dantigny, Philippe

    2016-03-01

    There have been many reviews concerned with antimicrobial food packaging, and with the use of antifungal compounds, but none provided an exhaustive picture of the applications of active packaging to control fungal spoilage. Very recently, many studies have been done in these fields, therefore it is timely to review this topic. This article examines the effects of essential oils, preservatives, natural products, chemical fungicides, nanoparticles coated to different films, and chitosan in vitro on the growth of moulds, but also in vivo on the mould free shelf-life of bread, cheese, and fresh fruits and vegetables. A short section is also dedicated to yeasts. All the applications are described from a microbiological point of view, and these were sorted depending on the name of the species. Methods and results obtained are discussed. Essential oils and preservatives were ranked by increased efficacy on mould growth. For all the tested molecules, Penicillium species were shown more sensitive than Aspergillus species. However, comparison between the results was difficult because it appeared that the efficiency of active packaging depended greatly on the environmental factors of food such as water activity, pH, temperature, NaCl concentration, the nature, the size, and the mode of application of the films, in addition to the fact that the amount of released antifungal compounds was not constant with time. PMID:26803804

  6. Glutamine facilitates chemotherapy while reducing toxicity.

    PubMed

    Klimberg, V S; Nwokedi, E; Hutchins, L F; Pappas, A A; Lang, N P; Broadwater, J R; Read, R C; Westbrook, K C

    1992-01-01

    Dose intensification of chemotherapy is thought to increase survival. With recent advances in hemopoietic cell modulators such as granulocyte colony stimulating factor, the limiting toxicity of intensifying chemotherapeutic regimens has become the severity of the associated enterocolitis. In animal models, glutamine protects the host from methotrexate-induced enterocolitis. This study evaluates the effects of a glutamine-supplemented diet on the tumoricidal effectiveness of methotrexate. Sarcoma-bearing Fisher 344 rats (n = 30) were pair-fed an isocaloric elemental diet containing 1% glutamine or an isonitrogenous amount of glycine beginning on day 25 of the study. Rats from each group received two intraperitoneal injections of methotrexate (5 mg/kg) or saline on days 26 and 33 of the study. On day 40, rats were killed, tumor volume and weight were recorded, and tumor glutaminase activity and tumor morphometrics were measured. Blood was taken for arterial glutamine content, complete blood count, and blood culture. The gut was processed for glutaminase activity and synthesis phase of the deoxyribonucleic acid. In rats receiving methotrexate, the tumor volume loss was nearly doubled when glutamine was added to the diet. Significant differences in tumor glutaminase activity and morphometrics were not detected. The toxicity to the host was ameliorated. Significantly increased synthesis phase of deoxyribonucleic acid of the whole jejunum, decreased bacteremia, "sepsis," and mortality were demonstrated. Glutamine supplementation enhances the tumoricidal effectiveness of methotrexate while reducing its morbidity and mortality in this sarcoma rat model. PMID:1287230

  7. Active tectonics

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    This study is part of a series of Studies in Geophysics that have been undertaken for the Geophysics Research Forum by the Geophysics Study Committee. One purpose of each study is to provide assessments from the scientific community to aid policymakers in decisions on societal problems that involve geophysics. An important part of such assessments is an evaluation of the adequacy of current geophysical knowledge and the appropriateness of current research programs as a source of information required for those decisions. The study addresses our current scientific understanding of active tectonics --- particularly the patterns and rates of ongoing tectonic processes. Many of these processes cannot be described reasonably using the limited instrumental or historical records; however, most can be described adequately for practical purposes using the geologic record of the past 500,000 years. A program of fundamental research focusing especially on Quaternary tectonic geology and geomorphology, paleoseismology, neotectonics, and geodesy is recommended to better understand ongoing, active tectonic processes. This volume contains 16 papers. Individual papers are indexed separately on the Energy Database.

  8. Utilization and synthesis of glutamine in the lens

    SciTech Connect

    Jernigan, H.M. Jr.; Geller, A.M.

    1987-05-01

    Previous studies with rat and calf lenses have shown that the primary source of lenticular glutamate for a wide variety of pathways is glutamine, which is more readily transported from the surrounding fluids than glutamate. In contrast, recent studies showed that monkey lenses utilize glutamate more rapidly than glutamine, although glutamine appears to enter monkey lenses more rapidly than glutamine. Further studies were initiated to elucidate the balance between transport, deamidation, and synthesis of glutamine in the lens. Glutamine synthesis in intact rat lenses was barely detectable; however, homogenates of adult rat lenses converted measurable amounts of (/sup 3/H)-glutamate to glutamine. The identity of the product was confirmed using glutaminase. Glutamine deamidation in intact rhesus monkey lenses incubated in TC-199 medium containing 2 mM glutamine was only 0.19 ..mu..mol g/sup -1/ hr/sup -1/, compared with 1.96 ..mu..mol g/sup -1/ hr/sup -1/ for rat lenses under identical conditions. However, under optimal assay conditions, glutaminase activity in monkey lens homogenates was similar to that of rat lens homogenates. Thus, the rate of synthesis and deamidation of glutamine by intact lenses is apparently limited factors other than total lenticular glutamine synthetase and glutaminase activity.

  9. DAVIC activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujiwara, Hiroshi

    1995-12-01

    DAVIC (Digital Audio Visual Council) is the defacto standardization organization established in Mar. 1994, based on international consensus for digital audio visual services. After completion of MPEG2 standardization, the broadcasting industry, the communication industry, the computer industry, and consumer electronics industry have started development of concrete services and products. Especially the interactive digital audio visual services, such as Video On Demand (VOD) or Near Video On Demand (NVOD), have become hot topics all over the world. Such interactive digital audio visual services are combined technologies of multi-media coding, digital transmission and computer networking. Therefore more than 150 organizations from all industry sectors have participated in DAVIC and are contributing from their own industrial contexts. DAVIC's basic policy is to use the available technologies specified by the other standards bodies as much as possible. So DAVIC's standardization activities have close relationship with ISO IEC/JTC1/SC29, ITU-T SG 9, ATM-Forum, IETF, IMA, DVB, etc. DAVIC is trying to specify Applications, Reference Models, Security, Usage Information Control, and the interfaces and protocols among the Content Provider, the Server, the core network, the access network, and the Set Top Unit. DAVIC's first goal is to specify DAVIC1.0 based on CFP1 (Call for Proposal) and CFP2 by Dec. 1995, and the next direction is under preparation for further progress based on CFP3 and CFP4.

  10. Activities update

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Gerald A.

    1994-07-01

    The present report is an update on activities for the second year of funding. Research leading to a detailed characterization of antiproton annihilation in nuclei has resulted in a published analysis of fast deuteron production from carbon and uranium targets. This follows previously reported work and publications by our group on gamma-ray, neutral and charged pion, proton, and neutron production. The deuteron measurements are important to our SHIVA Star antiproton- catalyzed microfission experiment at the Phillips Laboratory, Kirtland AFB, in that they help constrain theoretical models of light nuclei production and subsequent energy deposition in the target. Work continues at SHIVA Star on working fluid formation and target compression for the microfission experiment. Excellent progress has been made, both theoretically and experimentally, on these important aspects of the experiment. The Penn State group, working in collaboration with Los Alamos National Laboratory physicists, trapped and held up to 721,000 antiprotons per beam injection pulse from the LEAR accelerator during July, 1993. This was a crucial step to the ultimate goal of transferring large numbers of antiprotons to the Phillips Laboratory for the antiproton-catalyzed microfission experiment.

  11. Active Segmentation

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Ajay; Aloimonos, Yiannis

    2009-01-01

    The human visual system observes and understands a scene/image by making a series of fixations. Every fixation point lies inside a particular region of arbitrary shape and size in the scene which can either be an object or just a part of it. We define as a basic segmentation problem the task of segmenting that region containing the fixation point. Segmenting the region containing the fixation is equivalent to finding the enclosing contour- a connected set of boundary edge fragments in the edge map of the scene - around the fixation. This enclosing contour should be a depth boundary. We present here a novel algorithm that finds this bounding contour and achieves the segmentation of one object, given the fixation. The proposed segmentation framework combines monocular cues (color/intensity/texture) with stereo and/or motion, in a cue independent manner. The semantic robots of the immediate future will be able to use this algorithm to automatically find objects in any environment. The capability of automatically segmenting objects in their visual field can bring the visual processing to the next level. Our approach is different from current approaches. While existing work attempts to segment the whole scene at once into many areas, we segment only one image region, specifically the one containing the fixation point. Experiments with real imagery collected by our active robot and from the known databases 1 demonstrate the promise of the approach. PMID:20686671

  12. IASS Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hojaev, Alisher S.; Ibragimova, Elvira M.

    2015-08-01

    It’s well known, astronomy in Uzbekistan has ancient roots and traditions (e.g., Mirzo Ulugh Beg, Abū al-Rayhān al-Bīrūnī, Abū ‘Abdallāh al-Khwārizmī) and astronomical heritage carefully preserved. Nowadays uzbek astronomers play a key role in scientific research but also in OAD and Decadal Plan activity in the Central Asia region. International Aerospace School (IASS) is an amazing and wonderful event held annually about 30 years. IASS is unique project in the region, and at the beginning we spent the Summer and Winter Schools. At present in the summer camp we gather about 50 teenage and undergraduate students over the country and abroad (France, Malaysia, Turkey, Azerbaijan, Pakistan, Russia, etc.). They are selected on the basis of tests of astronomy and space issues. During two weeks of IASS camp the invited scientists, cosmonauts and astronauts as well as other specialists give lectures and engage in practical exercises with IASS students in astronomy, including daily observations of the Sun and night sky observations with meniscus telescope, space research and exploration, aerospace modelling, preparation and presentation of original projects. This is important that IASS gives not theoretical grounds only but also practically train the students and the hands-on training is the major aims of IASS. Lectures and practice in the field of astronomy carried out with the direct involvement and generous assistance of Uranoscope Association (Paris, France). The current 26-th IASS is planned to held in July 2015.

  13. Pharmacological evidence for the mediation of the panicolytic effect of fluoxetine by dorsal periaqueductal gray matter μ-opioid receptors.

    PubMed

    Roncon, Camila Marroni; Almada, Rafael Carvalho; Maraschin, Jhonatan Christian; Audi, Elisabeth Aparecida; Zangrossi, Hélio; Graeff, Frederico Guilherme; Coimbra, Norberto Cysne

    2015-12-01

    Previously reported results have shown that the inhibitory effect of fluoxetine on escape behavior, interpreted as a panicolytic-like effect, is blocked by pretreatment with either the opioid receptor antagonist naloxone or the 5-HT1A receptor (5-HT1A-R) antagonist WAY100635 via injection into the dorsal periaqueductal gray matter (dPAG). Additionally, reported evidence indicates that the μ-opioid receptor (MOR) interacts with the 5-HT1A-R in the dPAG. In the present work, pretreatment of the dPAG with the selective MOR blocker CTOP antagonized the anti-escape effect of chronic fluoxetine (10 mg/kg, i.p., daily, for 21 days), as measured in the elevated T-maze (ETM) test, indicating mediation of this effect by the MOR. In addition, the combined administration of sub-effective doses of the selective MOR agonist DAMGO (intra-dPAG) and sub-effective doses of chronic as well as subchronic (7 days) fluoxetine increased avoidance and escape latencies, suggesting that the activation of MORs may facilitate and accelerate the effects of fluoxetine. The current observation that MORs located in the dPAG mediate the anti-escape effect of fluoxetine may open new perspectives for the development of more efficient and fast-acting panic-alleviating drugs. PMID:26320545

  14. Activation Energy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gadeken, Owen

    2002-01-01

    Teaming is so common in today's project management environment that most of us assume it comes naturally. We further assume that when presented with meaningful and challenging work, project teams will naturally engage in productive activity to complete their tasks. This assumption is expressed in the simple (but false) equation: Team + Work = Teamwork. Although this equation appears simple and straightforward, it is far from true for most project organizations whose reality is a complex web of institutional norms based on individual achievement and rewards. This is illustrated by the very first successful team experience from my early Air Force career. As a young lieutenant, I was sent to Squadron Officer School, which was the first in the series of Air Force professional military education courses I was required to complete during my career. We were immediately formed into teams of twelve officers. Much of the course featured competition between these teams. As the most junior member of my team, I quickly observed the tremendous pressure to show individual leadership capability. At one point early in the course, almost everyone in our group was vying to become the team leader. This conflict was so intense that it caused us to fail miserably in our first outdoor team building exercise. We spent so much time fighting over leadership that we were unable to complete any of the events on the outdoor obstacle course. This complete lack of success was so disheartening to me that I gave our team little hope for future success. What followed was a very intense period of bickering, conflict, and even shouting matches as our dysfunctional team tried to cope with our early failures and find some way to succeed. British physician and researcher Wilfred Bion (Experiences in Groups, 1961) discovered that there are powerful psychological forces inherent in all groups that divert from accomplishing their primary tasks. To overcome these restraining forces and use the potential

  15. Optimality in the zonation of ammonia detoxification in rodent liver.

    PubMed

    Bartl, Martin; Pfaff, Michael; Ghallab, Ahmed; Driesch, Dominik; Henkel, Sebastian G; Hengstler, Jan G; Schuster, Stefan; Kaleta, Christoph; Gebhardt, Rolf; Zellmer, Sebastian; Li, Pu

    2015-11-01

    The rodent liver eliminates toxic ammonia. In mammals, three enzymes (or enzyme systems) are involved in this process: glutaminase, glutamine synthetase and the urea cycle enzymes, represented by carbamoyl phosphate synthetase. The distribution of these enzymes for optimal ammonia detoxification was determined by numerical optimization. This in silico approach predicted that the enzymes have to be zonated in order to achieve maximal removal of toxic ammonia and minimal changes in glutamine concentration. Using 13 compartments, representing hepatocytes, the following predictions were generated: glutamine synthetase is active only within a narrow pericentral zone. Glutaminase and carbamoyl phosphate synthetase are located in the periportal zone in a non-homogeneous distribution. This correlates well with the paradoxical observation that in a first step glutamine-bound ammonia is released (by glutaminase) although one of the functions of the liver is detoxification by ammonia fixation. The in silico approach correctly predicted the in vivo enzyme distributions also for non-physiological conditions (e.g. starvation) and during regeneration after tetrachloromethane (CCl4) intoxication. Metabolite concentrations of glutamine, ammonia and urea in each compartment, representing individual hepatocytes, were predicted. Finally, a sensitivity analysis showed a striking robustness of the results. These bioinformatics predictions were validated experimentally by immunohistochemistry and are supported by the literature. In summary, optimization approaches like the one applied can provide valuable explanations and high-quality predictions for in vivo enzyme and metabolite distributions in tissues and can reveal unknown metabolic functions. PMID:26438405

  16. Pregnancy - associated glycoproteins as a new diagnostic tool in cattle reproduction.

    PubMed

    Gajewski, Z; Pertajitis, M; Sousa, N; Beckers, J; Pawliński, B; Janett, F

    2009-12-01

    Pregnancy-associated glycoproteins (PAGs) are powerful pregnancy markers in domestic cattle. These proteins are expressed in mono- and binucleate trophoblast cells from the first days of gestation until calving. Different molecules were identified as being expressed at various stages of pregnancy. However, up to date, their functions and activities during pregnancy were not yet established. Specific RIA tests were developed (classic and alternative RIA) and used to measure the concentration of these glycoproteins in blood during gestation and the postpartum period in cattle. In maternal blood, PAGs rise to detectable levels from days 24 to 28 after fertilization. A recent study indicated that PAGs can also be detected in milk samples. However, concentrations in milk are much lower when compared to those of plasma. PMID:19946848

  17. Physical Activity (Exercise)

    MedlinePlus

    ... fitness. Your fitness routine should include aerobic and strength-training activities, and may also include stretching activities. Aerobic ... Examples include walking, jogging, bicycling, swimming, and tennis. Strength-training activities These activities increase the strength and endurance ...

  18. Evaluating the ParticipACTION "Think Again" Campaign

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gainforth, Heather L.; Jarvis, Jocelyn W.; Berry, Tanya R.; Chulak-Bozzer, Tala; Deshpande, Sameer; Faulkner, Guy; Rhodes, Ryan E.; Spence, John C.; Tremblay, Mark S.; Latimer-Cheung, Amy E.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: ParticipACTION's 2011 "Think Again" campaign aimed to draw parents', and specifically mothers', attention to the amount of physical activity (PA) their children do relative to the national guidelines (physical activity guidelines [PAG]). Purpose: To evaluate ParticipACTION's "Think Again" campaign in the context…

  19. The Periaqueductal Gray Orchestrates Sensory and Motor Circuits at Multiple Levels of the Neuraxis

    PubMed Central

    Koutsikou, Stella; Watson, Thomas C.; Crook, Jonathan J.; Leith, J. Lianne; Lawrenson, Charlotte L.; Lumb, Bridget M.

    2015-01-01

    The periaqueductal gray (PAG) coordinates behaviors essential to survival, including striking changes in movement and posture (e.g., escape behaviors in response to noxious stimuli vs freezing in response to fear-evoking stimuli). However, the neural circuits underlying the expression of these behaviors remain poorly understood. We demonstrate in vivo in rats that activation of the ventrolateral PAG (vlPAG) affects motor systems at multiple levels of the neuraxis through the following: (1) differential control of spinal neurons that forward sensory information to the cerebellum via spino-olivo-cerebellar pathways (nociceptive signals are reduced while proprioceptive signals are enhanced); (2) alterations in cerebellar nuclear output as revealed by changes in expression of Fos-like immunoreactivity; and (3) regulation of spinal reflex circuits, as shown by an increase in α-motoneuron excitability. The capacity to coordinate sensory and motor functions is demonstrated in awake, behaving rats, in which natural activation of the vlPAG in fear-conditioned animals reduced transmission in spino-olivo-cerebellar pathways during periods of freezing that were associated with increased muscle tone and thus motor outflow. The increase in spinal motor reflex excitability and reduction in transmission of ascending sensory signals via spino-olivo-cerebellar pathways occurred simultaneously. We suggest that the interactions revealed in the present study between the vlPAG and sensorimotor circuits could form the neural substrate for survival behaviors associated with vlPAG activation. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Neural circuits that coordinate survival behaviors remain poorly understood. We demonstrate in rats that the periaqueductal gray (PAG) affects motor systems at the following multiple levels of the neuraxis: (1) through altering transmission in spino-olivary pathways that forward sensory signals to the cerebellum, reducing and enhancing transmission of nociceptive and

  20. [Adapting physical activities for an active retirement].

    PubMed

    Renaudie, François

    2016-01-01

    The benefits of doing adapted physical exercise for elderly people have been proven. For more than thirty years, the French Federation for an Active Retirement has been striving to help people age well by proposing multiple activities to remain in good health after the age of 50. Doctors, activity leaders and federal instructors are attentive to each individual's capacities. PMID:27449307

  1. The Pseudomonas aeruginosa Lipid A Deacylase: Selection for Expression and Loss within the Cystic Fibrosis Airway

    PubMed Central

    Ernst, Robert K.; Adams, Kristin N.; Moskowitz, Samuel M.; Kraig, Gretchen M.; Kawasaki, Kiyoshi; Stead, Christopher M.; Trent, M. Stephen; Miller, Samuel I.

    2006-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is the major surface component of gram-negative bacteria, and a component of LPS, lipid A, is recognized by the innate immune system through the Toll-like receptor 4/MD-2 complex. Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an environmental gram-negative bacterium that opportunistically infects the respiratory tracts of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF), can synthesize various structures of lipid A. Lipid A from P. aeruginosa strains isolated from infants with CF has a specific structure that includes the removal of the 3 position 3-OH C10 fatty acid. Here we demonstrate increased expression of the P. aeruginosa lipid A 3-O-deacylase (PagL) in isolates from CF infants compared to that in environmental isolates. PagL activity was increased in environmental isolates by growth in medium limited for magnesium and decreased by growth at low temperature in laboratory-adapted strains of P. aeruginosa. P. aeruginosa PagL was shown to be an outer membrane protein by isopycnic density gradient centrifugation. Heterologous expression of P. aeruginosa pagL in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and Escherichia coli resulted in removal of the 3-OH C14 fatty acid from lipid A, indicating that P. aeruginosa PagL recognizes either 3-OH C10 or 3-OH C14. Finally, deacylated lipid A species were not observed in some clinical P. aeruginosa isolates from patients with severe pulmonary disease, suggesting that loss of PagL function can occur during long-term adaptation to the CF airway. PMID:16352835

  2. Periaqueductal grey cyclooxygenase-dependent facilitation of C-nociceptive drive and encoding in dorsal horn neurons in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Leith, J Lianne; Wilson, Alex W; You, Hao-Jun; Lumb, Bridget M; Donaldson, Lucy F

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The experience of pain is strongly affected by descending control systems originating in the brainstem ventrolateral periaqueductal grey (VL-PAG), which control the spinal processing of nociceptive information. A- and C-fibre nociceptors detect noxious stimulation, and have distinct and independent contributions to both the perception of pain quality (fast and slow pain, respectively) and the development of chronic pain. Evidence suggests a separation in the central processing of information arising from A- vs. C-nociceptors; for example, inhibition of the cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1)–prostaglandin system within the VL-PAG alters spinal nociceptive reflexes evoked by C-nociceptor input in vivo via descending pathways, leaving A-nociceptor-evoked reflexes largely unaffected. As the spinal neuronal mechanisms underlying these different responses remain unknown, we determined the effect of inhibition of VL-PAG COX-1 on dorsal horn wide dynamic-range neurons evoked by C- vs. A-nociceptor activation. Inhibition of VL-PAG COX-1 in anaesthetised rats increased firing thresholds of lamina IV–V wide dynamic-range dorsal horn neurons in response to both A- and C-nociceptor stimulation. Importantly, wide dynamic-range dorsal horn neurons continued to faithfully encode A-nociceptive information, even after VL-PAG COX-1 inhibition, whereas the encoding of C-nociceptor information by wide dynamic-range spinal neurons was significantly disrupted. Dorsal horn neurons with stronger C-nociceptor input were affected by COX-1 inhibition to a greater extent than those with weak C-fibre input. These data show that the gain and contrast of C-nociceptive information processed in individual wide dynamic-range dorsal horn neurons is modulated by prostanergic descending control mechanisms in the VL-PAG. PMID:25239460

  3. Learning as Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jonassen, David H.

    2002-01-01

    Integrates contemporary theories of learning into a theory of learning as activity. Explains ecological psychology, changes in understanding of learning, activity systems and activity theory (including the integration of consciousness and activity), and activity structure; and discusses learning as a cognitive and social process. (LRW)

  4. Coagulant Activity of Leukocytes. TISSUE FACTOR ACTIVITY

    PubMed Central

    Niemetz, J.

    1972-01-01

    Peritoneal leukocytes harvested from rabbits which have received two spaced doses of endotoxin have significantly greater (10-fold) coagulant activity than leukocytes from control rabbits. The coagulant activity accelerates the clotting of normal plasma and activates factor X in the presence of factor VII and calcium and is therefore regarded as tissue factor. A total of 40-80 mg tissue factor activity was obtained from the peritoneal cavity of single endotoxin-treated rabbits. In leukocyte subcellular fractions, separated by centrifugation, the specific tissue factor activity sedimented mainly at 14,500 g and above. The procoagulant activity was destroyed after heating for 10 min at 65°C but was preserved at lower temperatures. Polymyxin B, when given with the first dose of endotoxin, reduced both the number of peritoneal leukocytes and their tissue factor activity by two-thirds. When given immediately before the second dose of endotoxin, polymyxin B had no inhibitory effect. PMID:4333021

  5. Longitudinal neuronal organization of defensive reactions in the midbrain periaqueductal gray region of the rat.

    PubMed

    Depaulis, A; Keay, K A; Bandler, R

    1992-01-01

    In a previous study we investigated the intraspecific defensive reactions evoked by excitation of neurons in the intermediate third of the midbrain periaqueductal gray matter (PAG) of the rat. Experiments revealed that activation of neurons in this region of the PAG mediated: (i) backward defensive behavior, characterized by upright postures and backward movements, and (ii) reactive immobility ("freezing"), in which the rat remained immobile, but reacted with backward defensive behavior to investigative, non-aggressive contact initiated by the partner. In the present study, we aimed to extend our understanding of PAG mediation of defensive behavior by observing: (i) in a non-aggressive social interaction test, the behavioral effects of microinjections of low doses of kainic acid (40 pmol in 200 nl) made in the caudal third of the PAG; and (ii) the behavioral and cardiovascular effects of microinjections of D,L-homocysteic acid (5-10 nmol in 50-100 nl) made in the PAG of the unanesthetized decerebrate rat. Kainic acid injections into the area lateral to the midbrain aqueduct in the caudal third of the PAG evoked: (i) forward avoidance behavior, characterized by forward locomotion and occasional hop/jumps; (ii) reactive immobility ("freezing"), in which the rat remained immobile, but reacted with forward avoidance behavior to investigative, non-aggressive contact initiated by the partner; and (iii) 22-28 kHz ultrasonic vocalizations. These injections also evoked a dramatic increase in defensive responsiveness to tactile stimuli on the half of the body contralateral, but not ipsilateral, to the site of injection. Electroencephalographic measurements indicated that none of these effects were secondary to seizure activity. In the decerebrate rat, D,L-homocysteic acid injections in the caudal third of the PAG evoked forward running movements along with increased blood pressure and heart rate, the strongest effects being evoked from the region lateral to the midbrain

  6. Facts about Physical Activity

    MedlinePlus

    ... Physical Activity Overweight & Obesity Healthy Weight Breastfeeding Micronutrient Malnutrition State and Local Programs Facts about Physical Activity ... Physical Activity Overweight & Obesity Healthy Weight Breastfeeding Micronutrient Malnutrition State and Local Programs File Formats Help: How ...

  7. Physical Activity Assessment

    Cancer.gov

    Current evidence convincingly indicates that physical activity reduces the risk of colon and breast cancer. Physical activity may also reduce risk of prostate cancer. Scientists are also evaluating potential relationships between physical activity and other cancers.

  8. Panax Notoginseng Saponins Ameliorates Coxsackievirus B3-Induced Myocarditis by Activating the Cystathionine-γ-Lyase/Hydrogen Sulfide Pathway.

    PubMed

    Pan, Lulu; Zhang, Yuanhai; Lu, Jiacheng; Geng, Zhimin; Jia, Lianhong; Rong, Xing; Wang, Zhenquan; Zhao, Qifeng; Wu, Rongzhou; Chu, Maoping; Zhang, Chunxiang

    2015-12-01

    This study is to determine the therapeutic effects of Panax notoginseng saponins (PNSs) on coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3)-induced myocarditis, and whether cystathionine-γ-lyase (CSE)/hydrogen sulfide (H2S) pathway is involved. Mouse model of myocarditis was induced by CVB3 infection, and the mice were subjected to vehicle (saline) or drug treatments (sodium bisulfide (NaHS), propargylglycine (PAG), or PNSs). The results showed that there were inflammatory cell infiltrations, interstitial edemas, and elevated inflammatory cytokines, in CVB3-induced myocarditis. PAG administration increased, whereas NaHS treatment decreased the severity of the myocarditis. PNS treatment dramatically alleviated these myocardial injuries and decreased the viral messenger RNA (mRNA) expression by the enhanced expression of CSE/H2S pathway. Moreover, the therapeutic effects of PNSs on myocarditis were stronger than those of NaHS. Finally, the effect of PNSs on CSE/H2S pathway and cardiac cell protection were verified in cultured cardiac cells. PNSs may be a promising medication for viral myocarditis therapy. PMID:26525047

  9. Toll-Like Receptor Activation by Generalized Modules for Membrane Antigens from Lipid A Mutants of Salmonella enterica Serovars Typhimurium and Enteritidis

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Omar; Caboni, Mariaelena; Negrea, Aurel; Necchi, Francesca; Alfini, Renzo; Micoli, Francesca; Saul, Allan; MacLennan, Calman A.

    2016-01-01

    Invasive nontyphoidal Salmonella (iNTS) disease is a neglected disease with high mortality in children and HIV-positive individuals in sub-Saharan Africa, caused primarily by Africa-specific strains of Salmonella enterica serovars Typhimurium and Enteritidis. A vaccine using GMMA (generalized modules for membrane antigens) from S. Typhimurium and S. Enteritidis containing lipid A modifications to reduce potential in vivo reactogenicity is under development. GMMA with penta-acylated lipid A showed the greatest reduction in the level of cytokine release from human peripheral blood monocytes from that for GMMA with wild-type lipid A. Deletion of the lipid A modification genes msbB and pagP was required to achieve pure penta-acylation. Interestingly, ΔmsbB ΔpagP GMMA from S. Enteritidis had a slightly higher stimulatory potential than those from S. Typhimurium, a finding consistent with the higher lipopolysaccharide (LPS) content and Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) stimulatory potential of the former. Also, TLR5 ligand flagellin was found in Salmonella GMMA. No relevant contribution to the stimulatory potential of GMMA was detected even when the flagellin protein FliC from S. Typhimurium was added at a concentration as high as 10% of total protein, suggesting that flagellin impurities are not a major factor for GMMA-mediated immune stimulation. Overall, the stimulatory potential of S. Typhimurium and S. Enteritidis ΔmsbB ΔpagP GMMA was close to that of Shigella sonnei GMMA, which are currently in phase I clinical trials. PMID:26865597

  10. Anxiogenic effects of activation of NK-1 receptors of the dorsal periaqueductal gray as assessed by the elevated plus-maze, ultrasound vocalizations and tail-flick tests.

    PubMed

    Bassi, Gabriel S; Nobre, Manoel J; de Araújo, João E; Brandão, Marcus L

    2007-12-01

    Ultrasound vocalizations (USVs) known as 22kHz are usual components of the defensive responses of rats exposed to threatening conditions. The amount of emission of 22kHz USVs depends on the intensity of the aversive stimuli. While moderate fear causes an anxiolytic-sensitive enhancement of the defensive responses, high fear tended to reduce the defensive performance of the animals to aversive stimuli. The dorsal periaqueductal gray (dPAG) is an important vocal center and a crucial structure for the expression of defensive responses. Substance P (SP) is involved in the modulation of the defensive response at this midbrain level, but the type of neurokinin receptors involved in this action is not completely understood. In this study we examined whether local injections of the selective NK-1 agonist SAR-MET-SP (10-100 pmol/0.2microL) into the dPAG (i) cause anxiogenic effects in the elevated plus-maze (EPM) (Exp. I), (ii) influence the novelty-induced 22kHz USVs recorded within the frequency range of 20-26kHz (Exp. II) and (iii) change the nociceptive reactivity to heat applied to the rat's tail (Exp III). The data obtained showed that SAR-MET-SP elicited significant "anxiety-like" behaviors, as revealed by the decrease in the number of entries into and time spent onto the open arms of the EPM. These anxiogenic effects were accompanied with antinociception and disruption of the novelty-induced increase in the number and duration of 22kHz USVs. These findings are in agreement with the notion that NK-1 receptors of the dPAG may be an important neurochemical target for new selective drugs aimed at the control of pathological anxiety states. PMID:17981325

  11. Active commuting to school

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Declines in physical activity levels have coincided with increasing rates of obesity in children. This is problematic because physical activity has been shown to attenuate weight gain in children. Active commuting to school is one way of increasing children's physical activity. However, given the hi...

  12. Civil Law: 12 Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dresbach, Debra

    These learning activities on civil law are intended to supplement the secondary level Scholastic materials "Living Law." Case studies, simulations, and role-play activities are included. Information provided for each activity includes a brief overview, background information, teacher instructions and a description of each activity. Activities…

  13. Increasing Youth Physical Activity with Activity Calendars

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eckler, Seth

    2016-01-01

    Physical educators often struggle with ways to get their students to be active beyond the school day. One strategy to accomplish this is the use of physical activity calendars (PACs). The purpose of this article is to support the use of PACs and give practical advice for creating effective PACs.

  14. Persistent active longitudes in sunspot activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berdyugina, S.; Usoskin, I.

    It has been recently shown that spot activity of cool stars including solar analogues, is grouped in two clearly distinguished active longitudes which are persistent within at least one starspot cycle. Solar data including positional information of individual sunspots / groups extends back for about 130 years covering 12 solar cycles. Here we present the results of our research of longitudinal distribution of sunspot activity using an analysis similar to that applied to the stars. First, we synthesized, from the actual sunspot data, the sun's light curve as if it was defined only by spots. Then solar images were calculated from this light curve, giving a natural smoothing of the spot pattern. For each Carrington rotation, longitudinal position of these smoothed spot regions was calculated. The analysis reveals the following main features: - Sunspot activity is grouped in two active longitudes (with the differential rotation taken into account) 180o apart from each other which are persistent through the entire studied period of 12 cycles, similarly to stars. - The longitude migration is determined by changing the mean latitude of sunspot activity (the Maunder butterfly) and differential rotation. - The two longitudes periodically alternate the dominant activity with about 3.7 year period implying for the existence of the Sflip-flopT phenomenon known in - starspot activity.

  15. Ready for action: a role for the human midbrain in responding to infant vocalizations.

    PubMed

    Parsons, Christine E; Young, Katherine S; Joensson, Morten; Brattico, Elvira; Hyam, Jonathan A; Stein, Alan; Green, Alexander L; Aziz, Tipu Z; Kringelbach, Morten L

    2014-07-01

    Infant vocalizations are among the most biologically salient sounds in the environment and can draw the listener to the infant rapidly in both times of distress and joy. A region of the midbrain, the periaqueductal gray (PAG), has long been implicated in the control of urgent, survival-related behaviours. To test for PAG involvement in the processing of infant vocalizations, we recorded local field potentials from macroelectrodes implanted in this region in four adults who had undergone deep brain stimulation. We found a significant difference occurring as early as 49 ms after hearing a sound in activity recorded from the PAG in response to infant vocalizations compared with constructed control sounds and adult and animal affective vocalizations. This difference was not present in recordings from thalamic electrodes implanted in three of the patients. Time frequency analyses revealed distinct patterns of activity in the PAG for infant vocalisations, constructed control sounds and adult and animal vocalisations. These results suggest that human infant vocalizations can be discriminated from other emotional or acoustically similar sounds early in the auditory pathway. We propose that this specific, rapid activity in response to infant vocalizations may reflect the initiation of a state of heightened alertness necessary to instigate protective caregiving. PMID:23720574

  16. Components of the cannabinoid system in the dorsal periaqueductal gray are related to resting heart rate

    PubMed Central

    Dean, Caron; Hillard, Cecilia J.; Seagard, Jeanne L.; Hopp, Francis A.; Hogan, Quinn H.

    2016-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to examine whether variations in endocannabinoid signaling in the dorsal periaqueductal gray (dPAG) are associated with baseline autonomic nerve activity, heart rate, and blood pressure. Blood pressure was recorded telemetrically in rats, and heart rate and power spectral analysis of heart rate variability were determined. Natural variations from animal to animal provided a range of baseline values for analysis. Transcript levels of endocannabinoid signaling components in the dPAG were analyzed, and endocannabinoid content and catabolic enzyme activity were measured. Higher baseline heart rate was associated with increased anandamide content and with decreased activity of the anandamide-hydrolyzing enzyme and fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), and it was negatively correlated with transcript levels of both FAAH and monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL), a catabolic enzyme for 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG). Autonomic tone and heart rate, but not blood pressure, were correlated to levels of FAAH mRNA. In accordance with these data, exogenous anandamide in the dPAG of anesthetized rats increased heart rate. These data indicate that in the dPAG, anandamide, a FAAH-regulated lipid, contributes to regulation of baseline heart rate through influences on autonomic outflow. PMID:27280429

  17. Interactive effects of glutamine and gamma-aminobutyric acid on growth performance and skeletal muscle amino acid metabolism of 22-42-day-old broilers exposed to hot environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Hong; Bai, Xi; Shah, Assar Ali; Dai, Sifa; Wang, Like; Hua, Jinling; Che, Chuanyan; He, Shaojun; Wen, Aiyou; Jiang, Jinpeng

    2015-10-01

    The present experiment was conducted to investigate the interactive effects between dietary glutamine (Gln, 0 and 5 g/kg) and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA, 0 and 100 mg/kg) on growth performance and amino acid (AA) metabolism of broilers under hot environment. A total of 360 22-day-old Arbor Acres male chickens were randomly assigned to five treatment groups under thermoneutral chamber (PC, 23 °C) and cyclic heat stress (HS, 30-34 °C cycling) conditions. Compared with the PC group, cyclic HS decreased (P < 0.05) daily weight gain (DWG), daily feed consumption (DFC), the concentrations of Gln, glutamate (Glu), and GABA, and the activities of glutaminase and glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) in breast muscle at 28, 35, and 42 days, while it increased (P < 0.05) the activities of glutamine synthetase (GS) and gamma-aminobutyric acid transaminase (GABA-T) at 28, 35, and 42 days. Dietary Gln and GABA improved (P < 0.05) DWG and DFC of broilers under cyclic HS during 28-42 days. In breast muscle, the Gln supplementation increased (P < 0.05) the concentrations of Gln (28, 35, and 42 days), Glu (28, 35, and 42 days), and GABA (42 days) and the activities of glutaminase (28, 35, and 42 days) and GAD (28, 35, and 42 days) but decreased (P < 0.05) GS activities at 28, 35, and 42 days and GABA-T activities at 28 days. The addition of GABA increased (P < 0.05) the concentrations of Gln and Glu and activities of glutaminase and GAD, while it decreased (P < 0.05) GABA-T activities at 28, 35, and 42 days. Significant interactions (P < 0.05) between Gln and GABA were found on breast skeletal muscle Gln concentrations, glutaminase activities, GS activities at 28 and 35 days, and DWG, GABA concentrations, and GABA-T activities at 28, 35, and 42 days in broilers under cyclic HS. In conclusion, the present results indicated that the interactions of exogenous Gln and GABA could offer a potential nutritional strategy to prevent HS-related depression in skeletal muscle Gln and GABA

  18. Interactive effects of glutamine and gamma-aminobutyric acid on growth performance and skeletal muscle amino acid metabolism of 22-42-day-old broilers exposed to hot environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Hong; Bai, Xi; Shah, Assar Ali; Dai, Sifa; Wang, Like; Hua, Jinling; Che, Chuanyan; He, Shaojun; Wen, Aiyou; Jiang, Jinpeng

    2016-06-01

    The present experiment was conducted to investigate the interactive effects between dietary glutamine (Gln, 0 and 5 g/kg) and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA, 0 and 100 mg/kg) on growth performance and amino acid (AA) metabolism of broilers under hot environment. A total of 360 22-day-old Arbor Acres male chickens were randomly assigned to five treatment groups under thermoneutral chamber (PC, 23 °C) and cyclic heat stress (HS, 30-34 °C cycling) conditions. Compared with the PC group, cyclic HS decreased ( P < 0.05) daily weight gain (DWG), daily feed consumption (DFC), the concentrations of Gln, glutamate (Glu), and GABA, and the activities of glutaminase and glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) in breast muscle at 28, 35, and 42 days, while it increased ( P < 0.05) the activities of glutamine synthetase (GS) and gamma-aminobutyric acid transaminase (GABA-T) at 28, 35, and 42 days. Dietary Gln and GABA improved ( P < 0.05) DWG and DFC of broilers under cyclic HS during 28-42 days. In breast muscle, the Gln supplementation increased ( P < 0.05) the concentrations of Gln (28, 35, and 42 days), Glu (28, 35, and 42 days), and GABA (42 days) and the activities of glutaminase (28, 35, and 42 days) and GAD (28, 35, and 42 days) but decreased ( P < 0.05) GS activities at 28, 35, and 42 days and GABA-T activities at 28 days. The addition of GABA increased ( P < 0.05) the concentrations of Gln and Glu and activities of glutaminase and GAD, while it decreased ( P < 0.05) GABA-T activities at 28, 35, and 42 days. Significant interactions ( P < 0.05) between Gln and GABA were found on breast skeletal muscle Gln concentrations, glutaminase activities, GS activities at 28 and 35 days, and DWG, GABA concentrations, and GABA-T activities at 28, 35, and 42 days in broilers under cyclic HS. In conclusion, the present results indicated that the interactions of exogenous Gln and GABA could offer a potential nutritional strategy to prevent HS-related depression in skeletal muscle Gln and

  19. Interactive effects of glutamine and gamma-aminobutyric acid on growth performance and skeletal muscle amino acid metabolism of 22-42-day-old broilers exposed to hot environment.

    PubMed

    Hu, Hong; Bai, Xi; Shah, Assar Ali; Dai, Sifa; Wang, Like; Hua, Jinling; Che, Chuanyan; He, Shaojun; Wen, Aiyou; Jiang, Jinpeng

    2016-06-01

    The present experiment was conducted to investigate the interactive effects between dietary glutamine (Gln, 0 and 5 g/kg) and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA, 0 and 100 mg/kg) on growth performance and amino acid (AA) metabolism of broilers under hot environment. A total of 360 22-day-old Arbor Acres male chickens were randomly assigned to five treatment groups under thermoneutral chamber (PC, 23 °C) and cyclic heat stress (HS, 30-34 °C cycling) conditions. Compared with the PC group, cyclic HS decreased (P < 0.05) daily weight gain (DWG), daily feed consumption (DFC), the concentrations of Gln, glutamate (Glu), and GABA, and the activities of glutaminase and glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) in breast muscle at 28, 35, and 42 days, while it increased (P < 0.05) the activities of glutamine synthetase (GS) and gamma-aminobutyric acid transaminase (GABA-T) at 28, 35, and 42 days. Dietary Gln and GABA improved (P < 0.05) DWG and DFC of broilers under cyclic HS during 28-42 days. In breast muscle, the Gln supplementation increased (P < 0.05) the concentrations of Gln (28, 35, and 42 days), Glu (28, 35, and 42 days), and GABA (42 days) and the activities of glutaminase (28, 35, and 42 days) and GAD (28, 35, and 42 days) but decreased (P < 0.05) GS activities at 28, 35, and 42 days and GABA-T activities at 28 days. The addition of GABA increased (P < 0.05) the concentrations of Gln and Glu and activities of glutaminase and GAD, while it decreased (P < 0.05) GABA-T activities at 28, 35, and 42 days. Significant interactions (P < 0.05) between Gln and GABA were found on breast skeletal muscle Gln concentrations, glutaminase activities, GS activities at 28 and 35 days, and DWG, GABA concentrations, and GABA-T activities at 28, 35, and 42 days in broilers under cyclic HS. In conclusion, the present results indicated that the interactions of exogenous Gln and GABA could offer a potential nutritional strategy to prevent HS

  20. Antifeedant activity of quassinoids.

    PubMed

    Leskinen, V; Polonsky, J; Bhatnagar, S

    1984-10-01

    The antifeedant activity of 13 quassinoids of different structural types has been studied against the Mexican bean beetle (Epilachna varivestis Mulsant) 4th instar larvae and the southern armyworm (Spodoptera eridania Crawer) 5th instar larvae. All quassinoids tested displayed significant activity against the Mexican bean beetle and, thus, do not reveal a simple structure-activity relationship. Five quassinoids were active against the southern armyworm. Interestingly, four of these-bruceantin (I), glaucarubinone (VI), isobruceine A (VIII), and simalikalactone D (XI)-possess the required structural features for antineoplastic activity. The noncytotoxic quassin (X) is an exception; it is active against both pests. PMID:24318349

  1. CATALASE ACTIVITY IN LEPTOSPIRA

    PubMed Central

    Rao, P. J.; Larson, A. D.; Cox, C. D.

    1964-01-01

    Rao, P. J. (University of Illinois, Urbana), A. D. Larson, and C. D. Cox. Catalase activity in Leptospira. J. Bacteriol. 88:1045–1048. 1964.—A number of serotypes of Leptospira were found to possess catalase activity, although considerable variation in activity existed among various serotypes. Catalase activity of L. pomona was reduced by inhibitors commonly employed for arresting catalase activity in other biological systems. Catalase activity was increased three to five times by growing cultures under conditions of oxygen availability; however, aeration had no beneficial effect on total viable cell crop. The relationship of oxygen to metabolism and future studies on virulence of the leptospirae is discussed. PMID:14219017

  2. Active Fire Mapping Program

    MedlinePlus

    ... Incidents (Home) New Large Incidents Fire Detection Maps MODIS Satellite Imagery VIIRS Satellite Imagery Fire Detection GIS ... Data Web Services Latest Detected Fire Activity Other MODIS Products Frequently Asked Questions About Active Fire Maps ...

  3. Preschoolers’ Physical Activity Behaviours

    PubMed Central

    Irwin, Jennifer D.; He, Meizi; Bouck, L. Michelle Sangster; Tucker, Patricia; Pollett, Graham L.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To understand parents’ perspectives of their preschoolers’ physical activity behaviours. Methods A maximum variation sample of 71 parents explored their preschoolers’ physical activity behaviours through 10 semi-structured focus group discussions. Results Parents perceived Canada’s Physical Activity Guidelines for Children as inadequate; that their preschoolers get and need more than 30–90 minutes of activity daily; and that physical activity habits must be established during the preschool years. Nine barriers against and facilitators toward adequate physical activity were proposed: child’s age, weather, daycare, siblings, finances, time, society and safety, parents’ impact, and child’s activity preferences. Discussion The need for education and interventions that address current barriers are essential for establishing physical activity as a lifestyle behaviour during early childhood and, consequently, helping to prevent both childhood and adulthood obesity. PMID:16625802

  4. Balance Food and Activity

    MedlinePlus

    ... For Health Professionals Tools and Resources Promotional Materials Programming Materials Weight Management Nutrition Physical Activity Reduce Screen ... Training For Health Professionals Tools & Resources Promotional ... Programming Materials Weight Management Nutrition Physical Activity Reduce Screen ...

  5. Active magnetic regenerator

    DOEpatents

    Barclay, John A.; Steyert, William A.

    1982-01-01

    The disclosure is directed to an active magnetic regenerator apparatus and method. Brayton, Stirling, Ericsson, and Carnot cycles and the like may be utilized in an active magnetic regenerator to provide efficient refrigeration over relatively large temperature ranges.

  6. Exercise and Physical Activity

    MedlinePlus

    Alzheimer ’s Caregiving Tips Exercise and Physical Activity Being active and getting exercise helps people with Alzheimer’s disease feel better. Exercise helps keep their muscles, joints, and heart in ...

  7. Antimicrobial activity of isopteropodine.

    PubMed

    García, Rubén; Cayunao, Cesia; Bocic, Ronny; Backhouse, Nadine; Delporte, Carle; Zaldivar, Mercedes; Erazo, Silvia

    2005-01-01

    Bioassay-directed fractionation for the determination of antimicrobial activity of Uncaria tomentosa, has led to the isolation of isopteropodine (0.3%), a known Uncaria pentacyclic oxindol alkaloid that exhibited antibacterial activity against Gram positive bacteria. PMID:16042336

  8. Population Education. Awareness Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brouse, Deborah E.

    1990-01-01

    Described are awareness activities that deal with human population growth, resources, and the environment. Activities include simulations, mathematical exercises, and discussions of the topic. Specific examples of what individuals can do to help are listed. (KR)

  9. Major operations and activities

    SciTech Connect

    Black, D.G.

    1995-06-01

    This section of the 1994 Hanford Site Environmental Report summarizes the major operations and activities on the site. These operations and activities include site management, waste management, environmental restoration and corrective actions, and research and technology development.

  10. Family Activities for Fitness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grosse, Susan J.

    2009-01-01

    This article discusses how families can increase family togetherness and improve physical fitness. The author provides easy ways to implement family friendly activities for improving and maintaining physical health. These activities include: walking, backyard games, and fitness challenges.

  11. Active at Any Size

    MedlinePlus

    ... beginners. Daily life activities Lifestyle activities, such as gardening or washing the car, are great ways to ... bags. Doing chores like lawn mowing, raking leaves, gardening, and housework also count. What questions should I ...

  12. WASTE ACTIVATED SLUDGE PROCESSING

    EPA Science Inventory

    A study was made at pilot scale of a variety of processes for dewatering and stabilization of waste activated sludge from a pure oxygen activated sludge system. Processes evaluated included gravity thickening, dissolved air flotation thickening, basket centrifugation, scroll cent...

  13. The Lysophosphatidylinositol Receptor GPR55 Modulates Pain Perception in the Periaqueductal Gray.

    PubMed

    Deliu, Elena; Sperow, Margaret; Console-Bram, Linda; Carter, Rhonda L; Tilley, Douglas G; Kalamarides, Daniel J; Kirby, Lynn G; Brailoiu, G Cristina; Brailoiu, Eugen; Benamar, Khalid; Abood, Mary E

    2015-08-01

    Emerging evidence indicates the involvement of GPR55 and its proposed endogenous ligand, lysophosphatidylinositol (LPI), in nociception, yet their role in central pain processing has not been explored. Using Ca(2+) imaging, we show here that LPI elicits concentration-dependent and GPR55-mediated increases in intracellular Ca(2+) levels in dissociated rat periaqueductal gray (PAG) neurons, which express GPR55 mRNA. This effect is mediated by Ca(2+) release from the endoplasmic reticulum via inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors and by Ca(2+) entry via P/Q-type of voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels. Moreover, LPI depolarizes PAG neurons and upon intra-PAG microinjection, reduces nociceptive threshold in the hot-plate test. Both these effects are dependent on GPR55 activation, because they are abolished by pretreatment with ML-193 [N-(4-(N-(3,4-dimethylisoxazol-5-yl)sulfamoyl)-phenyl)-6,8-dimethyl-2-(pyridin-2-yl)quinoline-4-carboxamide], a selective GPR55 antagonist. Thus, we provide the first pharmacological evidence that GPR55 activation at central levels is pronociceptive, suggesting that interfering with GPR55 signaling in the PAG may promote analgesia. PMID:25972448

  14. The organization of defensive behavior elicited by optogenetic excitation of rat lateral or ventrolateral periaqueductal gray.

    PubMed

    Assareh, Neda; Sarrami, Mahsa; Carrive, Pascal; McNally, Gavan P

    2016-08-01

    Rodents display characteristic defense responses to predators that are influenced by predatory imminence. The midbrain periaqueductal gray (PAG) serves an important role controlling these responses. The most influential model states that variations in defensive topography are due to distinct PAG regions: ventrolateral PAG (VLPAG) controls postencounter defense, such as freezing and immobility, whereas lateral PAG (LPAG) controls circa-strike defense, such as escape and flight. Here we used channel rhodopsin (ChR2) stimulation to probe the structure of defensive behavior controlled by LPAG and VLPAG. Suprathreshold LPAG stimulation evoked circa-strike defense that was replaced by freezing at stimulation offset. Suprathreshold VLPAG stimulation evoked postencounter-freezing and immobility-but never circa-strike defense. More interestingly, the topography of defensive behavior evoked from LPAG scaled with variations in 465 nm light power. As light power increased, LPAG animals expressed the full defensive syntax of freezing then activity then flight characteristic of increasing predatory imminence. In contrast, the frequency, not topography, of defensive behavior evoked from VLPAG scaled with variations in light power. These findings suggest that LPAG and VLPAG can control variations in defense with increasing predatory imminence in 2 ways. First, consistent with past models, topographical variation can be assembled from different defensive responses controlled by the LPAG (circa-strike) and VLPAG (postencounter). Second, topographical variation can be assembled from variations in LPAG activity itself. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27243807

  15. The Lysophosphatidylinositol Receptor GPR55 Modulates Pain Perception in the Periaqueductal Gray

    PubMed Central

    Deliu, Elena; Sperow, Margaret; Console-Bram, Linda; Carter, Rhonda L.; Tilley, Douglas G.; Kalamarides, Daniel J.; Kirby, Lynn G.; Brailoiu, G. Cristina; Brailoiu, Eugen; Benamar, Khalid

    2015-01-01

    Emerging evidence indicates the involvement of GPR55 and its proposed endogenous ligand, lysophosphatidylinositol (LPI), in nociception, yet their role in central pain processing has not been explored. Using Ca2+ imaging, we show here that LPI elicits concentration-dependent and GPR55-mediated increases in intracellular Ca2+ levels in dissociated rat periaqueductal gray (PAG) neurons, which express GPR55 mRNA. This effect is mediated by Ca2+ release from the endoplasmic reticulum via inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors and by Ca2+ entry via P/Q-type of voltage-gated Ca2+ channels. Moreover, LPI depolarizes PAG neurons and upon intra-PAG microinjection, reduces nociceptive threshold in the hot-plate test. Both these effects are dependent on GPR55 activation, because they are abolished by pretreatment with ML-193 [N-(4-(N-(3,4-dimethylisoxazol-5-yl)sulfamoyl)-phenyl)-6,8-dimethyl-2-(pyridin-2-yl)quinoline-4-carboxamide], a selective GPR55 antagonist. Thus, we provide the first pharmacological evidence that GPR55 activation at central levels is pronociceptive, suggesting that interfering with GPR55 signaling in the PAG may promote analgesia. PMID:25972448

  16. Regulation of the intersubunit ammonia tunnel in Mycobacterium tuberculosis glutamine-dependent NAD[superscript +] synthetase

    SciTech Connect

    Chuenchor, Watchalee; Doukov, Tzanko I.; Resto, Melissa; Chang, Andrew; Gerratana, Barbara

    2012-08-31

    Glutamine-dependent NAD{sup +} synthetase is an essential enzyme and a validated drug target in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (mtuNadE). It catalyses the ATP-dependent formation of NAD{sup +} from NaAD{sup +} (nicotinic acid-adenine dinucleotide) at the synthetase active site and glutamine hydrolysis at the glutaminase active site. An ammonia tunnel 40 {angstrom} (1 {angstrom} = 0.1 nm) long allows transfer of ammonia from one active site to the other. The enzyme displays stringent kinetic synergism; however, its regulatory mechanism is unclear. In the present paper, we report the structures of the inactive glutaminase C176A variant in an apo form and in three synthetase-ligand complexes with substrates (NaAD{sup +}/ATP), substrate analogue {l_brace}NaAD{sup +}/AMP-CPP (adenosine 5'-[{alpha},{beta}-methylene]triphosphate){r_brace} and intermediate analogues (NaAD{sup +}/AMP/PPi), as well as the structure of wild-type mtuNadE in a product complex (NAD{sup +}/AMP/PPi/glutamate). This series of structures provides snapshots of the ammonia tunnel during the catalytic cycle supported also by kinetics and mutagenesis studies. Three major constriction sites are observed in the tunnel: (i) at the entrance near the glutaminase active site; (ii) in the middle of the tunnel; and (iii) at the end near the synthetase active site. Variation in the number and radius of the tunnel constrictions is apparent in the crystal structures and is related to ligand binding at the synthetase domain. These results provide new insight into the regulation of ammonia transport in the intermolecular tunnel of mtuNadE.

  17. Crystal Structures Capture Three States in the Catalytic Cycle of a Pyridoxal Phosphate (PLP) Synthase*♦

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Amber Marie; Brown, William Clay; Harms, Etti; Smith, Janet L.

    2015-01-01

    PLP synthase (PLPS) is a remarkable single-enzyme biosynthetic pathway that produces pyridoxal 5′-phosphate (PLP) from glutamine, ribose 5-phosphate, and glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate. The intact enzyme includes 12 synthase and 12 glutaminase subunits. PLP synthesis occurs in the synthase active site by a complicated mechanism involving at least two covalent intermediates at a catalytic lysine. The first intermediate forms with ribose 5-phosphate. The glutaminase subunit is a glutamine amidotransferase that hydrolyzes glutamine and channels ammonia to the synthase active site. Ammonia attack on the first covalent intermediate forms the second intermediate. Glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate reacts with the second intermediate to form PLP. To investigate the mechanism of the synthase subunit, crystal structures were obtained for three intermediate states of the Geobacillus stearothermophilus intact PLPS or its synthase subunit. The structures capture the synthase active site at three distinct steps in its complicated catalytic cycle, provide insights into the elusive mechanism, and illustrate the coordinated motions within the synthase subunit that separate the catalytic states. In the intact PLPS with a Michaelis-like intermediate in the glutaminase active site, the first covalent intermediate of the synthase is fully sequestered within the enzyme by the ordering of a generally disordered 20-residue C-terminal tail. Following addition of ammonia, the synthase active site opens and admits the Lys-149 side chain, which participates in formation of the second intermediate and PLP. Roles are identified for conserved Asp-24 in the formation of the first intermediate and for conserved Arg-147 in the conversion of the first to the second intermediate. PMID:25568319

  18. Crystal structures capture three states in the catalytic cycle of a pyridoxal phosphate (PLP) synthase.

    PubMed

    Smith, Amber Marie; Brown, William Clay; Harms, Etti; Smith, Janet L

    2015-02-27

    PLP synthase (PLPS) is a remarkable single-enzyme biosynthetic pathway that produces pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP) from glutamine, ribose 5-phosphate, and glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate. The intact enzyme includes 12 synthase and 12 glutaminase subunits. PLP synthesis occurs in the synthase active site by a complicated mechanism involving at least two covalent intermediates at a catalytic lysine. The first intermediate forms with ribose 5-phosphate. The glutaminase subunit is a glutamine amidotransferase that hydrolyzes glutamine and channels ammonia to the synthase active site. Ammonia attack on the first covalent intermediate forms the second intermediate. Glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate reacts with the second intermediate to form PLP. To investigate the mechanism of the synthase subunit, crystal structures were obtained for three intermediate states of the Geobacillus stearothermophilus intact PLPS or its synthase subunit. The structures capture the synthase active site at three distinct steps in its complicated catalytic cycle, provide insights into the elusive mechanism, and illustrate the coordinated motions within the synthase subunit that separate the catalytic states. In the intact PLPS with a Michaelis-like intermediate in the glutaminase active site, the first covalent intermediate of the synthase is fully sequestered within the enzyme by the ordering of a generally disordered 20-residue C-terminal tail. Following addition of ammonia, the synthase active site opens and admits the Lys-149 side chain, which participates in formation of the second intermediate and PLP. Roles are identified for conserved Asp-24 in the formation of the first intermediate and for conserved Arg-147 in the conversion of the first to the second intermediate. PMID:25568319

  19. Green Schools Activity Booklet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sacramento Tree Foundation, CA.

    This collection of interdisciplinary hands-on activities covers a variety of topics related to trees and conservation. Twenty-four activities integrate the subjects of social studies, fine arts, science, language arts, math, geography, and music. Although activity instructions are not consistent they usually contain details on objectives and…

  20. Technology Systems. Laboratory Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brame, Ray; And Others

    This guide contains 43 modules of laboratory activities for technology education courses. Each module includes an instructor's resource sheet and the student laboratory activity. Instructor's resource sheets include some or all of the following elements: module number, course title, activity topic, estimated time, essential elements, objectives,…

  1. Climate Change: An Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Garry

    1995-01-01

    Presents a segment of the Geoscience Education booklet, Climate Change, that contains information and activities that enable students to gain a better appreciation of the possible effects human activity has on the Earth's climate. Describes the Terrace Temperatures activity that leads students through an investigation using foraminifera data to…

  2. Bonus Activity Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Learning, 1992

    1992-01-01

    Provides on-task activities to fill in unexpected extra moments in elementary classes. The activities require little preparation and take 5-15 minutes to complete. There are activities for math, language arts, social science, science, critical thinking, and computer. An outer space board game is also included. (SM)

  3. Activity Sheets. Draft Copy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duke Power Company, Educational Services Dept., Charlotte, NC.

    This document consists of energy vocabulary activities, three games, worksheets, laboratory activities/exercises, and an introductory classroom exercise designed to introduce energy concepts to students. Vocabulary activities focus on coal and energy consumption. The three games (with instructions) focus on various aspects of energy and energy…

  4. Hepatitis and activity

    PubMed Central

    Krikler, Dennis M.

    1971-01-01

    The effects of physical activity during an attack of infectious hepatitis are discussed. There is no evidence that activity during convalescence produces any ill-effects. On the other hand, strenuous physical activity in the acute stage may be dangerous, possibly because hepatic blood-flow is reduced. PMID:5560143

  5. Measurement of Physical Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dishman, Rod K.; Washburn, Richard A.; Schoeller, Dale A.

    2001-01-01

    Valid assessment of physical activity must be unobtrusive, practical to administer, and specific about physical activity type, frequency, duration, and intensity. Assessment methods can be categorized according to whether they provide direct or indirect (e.g., self-report) observation of physical activity, body motion, physiological response…

  6. Activity Theory and Ontology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peim, Nick

    2009-01-01

    This paper seeks to re-examine Yrio Engestrom's activity theory as a technology of knowledge designed to enable positive transformations of specific practices. The paper focuses on a key paper where Engestrom defines the nature and present state of activity theory. Beginning with a brief account of the relations between activity theory and…

  7. Technology Learning Activities I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Technology Education Association, Reston, VA.

    This guide contains 30 technology learning activities. Activities may contain all or some of the following: an introduction, objectives, materials and equipment, challenges, limitations, notes and investigations, resources and references used, and evaluation ideas. Activity titles are: (1) Occupations in Construction Technology; (2) Designing a…

  8. Woodsy Owl Activity Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forest Service (USDA), Washington, DC.

    This guide offers teachers and after-school group leaders 12 fun and engaging activities. Activities feature lessons on trees, water, wind, the earth, food, and waste. The activities are designed to help children aged 5-8 become more aware of the natural environment and fundamental conservation principles. Titles of children's books are embedded…

  9. FLES Games and Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Irujo, Suzanne, Ed.

    A number of activities for teaching foreign language in the elementary school (FLES) are presented. The activities were developed by participants in a FLES teacher training workshop, Project INTERACT, in the Boston area. The first section contains games, thematic units, and other activities specifically related to French language instruction,…

  10. FL Activities & Festivals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages, Hastings-on-Hudson, NY.

    A collection of student, class, and school foreign language activities suggests a variety of projects and describes three specific school efforts. The suggested activities include: (1) individual student efforts such as writing to pen-pals; (2) group activities such as a foreign language auction or sing-along; (3) group projects for the school…

  11. Highlights of 1981 activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The highlights of NASA's 1981 activities are presented, including the results of the two flights of the space shuttle Columbia and the Voyager 2 encounter with Saturn. Accomplishments in the areas of space transportation operations; space science; aeronautical, energy, and space research and development; as well as space tracking, international activities, and 1981 launch activities are discussed.

  12. Anticancer activity of ferrocenylthiosemicarbazones.

    PubMed

    Sandra, Cortez-Maya; Elena, Klimova; Marcos, Flores-Alamo; Elena, Martínez-Klimova; Arturo, Ramírez-Ramírez; Teresa, Ramírez Apan; Marcos, Martínez-García

    2014-03-01

    Aliphatic and aromatic ferrocenylthiosemicarbazones were synthesized. The characterization of the new ferrocenylthiosemicarbazones was done by IR, (1)H-NMR and (13)C-NMR spectroscopy, elemental analysis and X-ray diffraction studies. The biological activity of the obtained compounds was assessed in terms of anticancer activity. Their activity against U251 (human glyoblastoma), PC-3 (human prostatic adenocarcinoma), K562 (human chronic myelogenous leukemia), HCT-15 (human colorectal adenocarcinoma), MCF-7 (human mammary adenocarcinoma) and SKLU-1 (human lung adenocarcinoma) cell lines was studied and compared with cisplatin. All tested compounds showed good activity and the aryl-chloro substituted ferrocenylthiosemicarbazones showed the best anticancer activity. PMID:24144199

  13. Transcriptional activators in yeast

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    Eukaryotic transcription activation domains (ADs) are not well defined on the proteome scale. We systematicallly tested ∼6000 yeast proteins for transcriptional activity using a yeast one-hybrid system and identified 451 transcriptional activators. We then determined their transcription activation strength using fusions to the Gal4 DNA-binding domain and a His3 reporter gene which contained a promoter with a Gal4-binding site. Among the 132 strongest activators 32 are known transcription factors while another 35 have no known function. Although zinc fingers, helix–loop–helix domains and several other domains are highly overrepresented among the activators, only few contain characterized ADs. We also found some striking correlations: the stronger the activation activity, the more acidic, glutamine-rich, proline-rich or asparagine-rich the activators were. About 29% of the activators have been found previously to specifically interact with the transcription machinery, while 10% are known to be components of transcription regulatory complexes. Based on their transcriptional activity, localization and interaction patterns, at least six previously uncharacterized proteins are suggested to be bona fide transcriptional regulators (namely YFL049W, YJR070C, YDR520C, YGL066W/Sgf73, YKR064W and YCR082W/Ahc2). PMID:16464826

  14. Vestibular activation of sympathetic nerve activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, C. A.; Carter, J. R.

    2003-01-01

    AIM: The vestibulosympathetic reflex refers to sympathetic nerve activation by the vestibular system. Animal studies indicate that the vestibular system assists in blood pressure regulation during orthostasis. Although human studies clearly demonstrate activation of muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) during engagement of the otolith organs, the role of the vestibulosympathetic reflex in maintaining blood pressure during orthostasis is not well-established. Examination of the vestibulosympathetic reflex with other cardiovascular reflexes indicates that it is a powerful and independent reflex. Ageing, which is associated with an increased risk for orthostatic hypotension, attenuates the vestibulosympathetic reflex. The attenuated reflex is associated with a reduction in arterial pressure. CONCLUSION: These findings suggest that the vestibulosympathetic reflex assists in blood pressure regulation in humans, but future studies examining this reflex in other orthostatically intolerant populations are necessary to address this hypothesis.

  15. Two different motor systems are needed to generate human speech.

    PubMed

    Holstege, Gert; Subramanian, Hari H

    2016-06-01

    Vocalizations such as mews and cries in cats or crying and laughter in humans are examples of expression of emotions. These vocalizations are generated by the emotional motor system, in which the mesencephalic periaqueductal gray (PAG) plays a central role, as demonstrated by the fact that lesions in the PAG lead to complete mutism in cats, monkeys, as well as in humans. The PAG receives strong projections from higher limbic regions and from the anterior cingulate, insula, and orbitofrontal cortical areas. In turn, the PAG has strong access to the caudal medullary nucleus retroambiguus (NRA). The NRA is the only cell group that has direct access to the motoneurons involved in vocalization, i.e., the motoneuronal cell groups innervating soft palate, pharynx, and larynx as well as diaphragm, intercostal, abdominal, and pelvic floor muscles. Together they determine the intraabdominal, intrathoracic, and subglottic pressure, control of which is necessary for generating vocalization. Only humans can speak, because, via the lateral component of the volitional or somatic motor system, they are able to modulate vocalization into words and sentences. For this modulation they use their motor cortex, which, via its corticobulbar fibers, has direct access to the motoneurons innervating the muscles of face, mouth, tongue, larynx, and pharynx. In conclusion, humans generate speech by activating two motor systems. They generate vocalization by activating the prefrontal-PAG-NRA-motoneuronal pathway, and, at the same time, they modulate this vocalization into words and sentences by activating the corticobulbar fibers to the face, mouth, tongue, larynx, and pharynx motoneurons. PMID:26355872

  16. Activated carbon from biomass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manocha, S.; Manocha, L. M.; Joshi, Parth; Patel, Bhavesh; Dangi, Gaurav; Verma, Narendra

    2013-06-01

    Activated carbon are unique and versatile adsorbents having extended surface area, micro porous structure, universal adsorption effect, high adsorption capacity and high degree of surface reactivity. Activated carbons are synthesized from variety of materials. Most commonly used on a commercial scale are cellulosic based precursors such as peat, coal, lignite wood and coconut shell. Variation occurs in precursors in terms of structure and carbon content. Coir having very low bulk density and porous structure is found to be one of the valuable raw materials for the production of highly porous activated carbon and other important factor is its high carbon content. Exploration of good low cost and non conventional adsorbent may contribute to the sustainability of the environment and offer promising benefits for the commercial purpose in future. Carbonization of biomass was carried out in a horizontal muffle furnace. Both carbonization and activation were performed in inert nitrogen atmosphere in one step to enhance the surface area and to develop interconnecting porosity. The types of biomass as well as the activation conditions determine the properties and the yield of activated carbon. Activated carbon produced from biomass is cost effective as it is easily available as a waste biomass. Activated carbon produced by combination of chemical and physical activation has higher surface area of 2442 m2/gm compared to that produced by physical activation (1365 m2/gm).

  17. Marine Biology Activities. Ocean Related Curriculum Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pauls, John

    The ocean affects all of our lives. Therefore, awareness of and information about the interconnections between humans and oceans are prerequisites to making sound decisions for the future. Project ORCA (Ocean Related Curriculum Activities) has developed interdisciplinary curriculum materials designed to meet the needs of students and teachers…

  18. Possible involvement of histamine, dopamine, and noradrenalin in the periaqueductal gray in electroacupuncture pain relief.

    PubMed

    Murotani, Tomotaka; Ishizuka, Tomoko; Nakazawa, Hiroyuki; Wang, Xiaoming; Mori, Kazu; Sasaki, Kazuro; Ishida, Torao; Yamatodani, Atsushi

    2010-01-01

    Acupuncture and electroacupuncture are used in pain relief; however, the mechanism underlying the analgesic effect of acupuncture is unclear. Several lines of evidence propose that the periaqueductal gray (PAG), which is one of the regions that contributes to the endogenous pain inhibitory system, is involved in the analgesic effect of acupuncture, and the region receives several neural projections such as histamine and noradrenalin and contains the dopamine cell bodies. The current study examined the effects of electroacupuncture at Zusanli (ST36) and Shangjuxu (ST37) acupoints, which are used for clinical pain control, on the release of neurotransmitters in the PAG in rats. Histamine and dopamine release was increased after pain stimulus, while the changes were completely abolished by electroacupuncture. Pain stimulus had no effect on noradrenalin release, but electroacupuncture increased its release. These findings indicate that acupuncture at Zusanli and Shangjuxu exerts an antinociceptive effect via the activation of neurons in the PAG and that the histaminergic, dopaminergic, and noradrenalinergic systems in the PAG are related to electroacupuncture-induced pain relief. PMID:19819232

  19. Neuroimaging of the Periaqueductal Gray: State of the Field

    PubMed Central

    Linnman, Clas; Moulton, Eric A.; Barmettler, Gabi; Becerra, Lino; Borsook, David

    2011-01-01

    This review and meta-analysis aims at summarizing and integrating the human neuroimaging studies that report periaqueductal gray (PAG) involvement; 250 original manuscripts on human neuroimaging of the PAG were identified. A narrative review and meta-analysis using activation likelihood estimates is included. Behaviors covered include pain and pain modulation, anxiety, bladder and bowel function and autonomic regulation. Methods include structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging, functional connectivity measures, diffusion weighted imaging and positron emission tomography. Human neuroimaging studies in healthy and clinical populations largely confirm the animal literature indicating that the PAG is involved in homeostatic regulation of salient functions such as pain, anxiety and autonomic function. Methodological concerns in the current literature, including resolution constraints, imaging artifacts and imprecise neuroanatomical labeling are discussed, and future directions are proposed. A general conclusion is that PAG neuroimaging is a field with enormous potential to translate animal data onto human behaviors, but with some growing pains that can and need to be addressed in order to add to our understanding of the neurobiology of this key region. PMID:22197740

  20. Neuroimaging of the periaqueductal gray: state of the field.

    PubMed

    Linnman, Clas; Moulton, Eric A; Barmettler, Gabi; Becerra, Lino; Borsook, David

    2012-03-01

    This review and meta-analysis aims at summarizing and integrating the human neuroimaging studies that report periaqueductal gray (PAG) involvement; 250 original manuscripts on human neuroimaging of the PAG were identified. A narrative review and meta-analysis using activation likelihood estimates is included. Behaviors covered include pain and pain modulation, anxiety, bladder and bowel function and autonomic regulation. Methods include structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging, functional connectivity measures, diffusion weighted imaging and positron emission tomography. Human neuroimaging studies in healthy and clinical populations largely confirm the animal literature indicating that the PAG is involved in homeostatic regulation of salient functions such as pain, anxiety and autonomic function. Methodological concerns in the current literature, including resolution constraints, imaging artifacts and imprecise neuroanatomical labeling are discussed, and future directions are proposed. A general conclusion is that PAG neuroimaging is a field with enormous potential to translate animal data onto human behaviors, but with some growing pains that can and need to be addressed in order to add to our understanding of the neurobiology of this key region. PMID:22197740

  1. Patterns in Active Nematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeomans, Julia M.

    Active systems, from bacterial suspensions to cellular monolayers, are continuously driven out of equilibrium by local injection of energy from their constituent elements and exhibit turbulent-like, chaotic patterns. We describe how active systems can be stabilised by tuning a physical feature of the system, friction. We demonstrate how the crossover between wet active systems, whose behaviour is dominated by hydrodynamics, and dry active matter where any flow is screened, can be achieved by using friction as a control parameter and demonstrate vortex ordering at the wet-dry crossover. We show that the self organisation of vortices into lattices is accompanied by the spatial ordering of topological defects leading to active crystal-like structures. The emergence of vortex lattices which leads to the positional ordering of topological defects may be a useful step towards the design and control of active materials.

  2. Thermally Activated Driver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinard, William H.; Murray, Robert C.; Walsh, Robert F.

    1987-01-01

    Space-qualified, precise, large-force, thermally activated driver (TAD) developed for use in space on astro-physics experiment to measure abundance of rare actinide-group elements in cosmic rays. Actinide cosmic rays detected using thermally activated driver as heart of event-thermometer (ET) system. Thermal expansion and contraction of silicone oil activates driver. Potential applications in fluid-control systems where precise valve controls are needed.

  3. Activity in distant comets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luu, Jane X.

    1992-01-01

    Activity in distant comets remains a mystery in the sense that we still have no complete theory to explain the various types of activity exhibited by different comets at large distances. This paper explores the factors that should play a role in determining activity in a distant comet, especially in the cases of comet P/Tempel 2, comet Schwassmann-Wachmann 1, and 2060 Chiron.

  4. Activated recombinant adenovirus proteinases

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, C.W.; Mangel, W.F.

    1999-08-10

    This application describes methods and expression constructs for producing activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases. Purified activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases and methods of purification are described. Activated adenovirus proteinases and methods for obtaining activated adenovirus proteinases are further included. Isolated peptide cofactors of adenovirus proteinase activity, methods of purifying and identifying peptide cofactors are also described. Antibodies immunoreactive with adenovirus proteinases, immunospecific antibodies, and methods for preparing them are also described. Other related methods and materials are also described. 29 figs.

  5. Activated recombinant adenovirus proteinases

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Carl W.; Mangel, Walter F.

    1999-08-10

    This application describes methods and expression constructs for producing activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases. Purified activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases and methods of purification are described. Activated adenovirus proteinases and methods for obtaining activated adenovirus proteinases are further included. Isolated peptide cofactors of adenovirus proteinase activity, methods of purifying and identifying said peptide cofactors are also described. Antibodies immunoreactive with adenovirus proteinases, immunospecific antibodies, and methods for preparing them are also described. Other related methods and materials are also described.

  6. Physical Activity and Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... of scientists, ranging from experts in basic biological science to those with expertise in community behavioral interventions to increase physical activity. This combination of scientists and expertise will ...

  7. NASA metrication activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vlannes, P. N.

    1978-01-01

    NASA's organization and policy for metrification, history from 1964, NASA participation in Federal agency activities, interaction with nongovernmental metrication organizations, and the proposed metrication assessment study are reviewed.

  8. Active material based active sealing technology: Part 1. Active seal requirements vs. active material actuator properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henry, Christopher P.; Carter, William; Herrera, Guillermo A.; McKnight, Geoffrey P.; Browne, Alan L.; Johnson, Nancy L.; Bazzi, Imad F.

    2010-04-01

    Current seals used for vehicle closures/swing panels are essentially flexible, frequently hollow structures whose designs are constrained by numerous requirements, many of them competing, including door closing effort (both air bind and seal compression), sound isolation, prevention of water leaks, and accommodation of variations in vehicle build. This paper documents the first portion of a collaborative research study/exploration of the feasibility of and approaches for using active materials with shape and stiffness changing attributes to produce active seal technologies, seals with improved performance. An important design advantage of an active material approach compared to previous active seal technologies is the distribution of active material regions throughout the seal length, which would enable continued active function even with localized failure. Included as a major focus of this study was the assessment of polymeric active materials because of their potential ease of integration into the current seal manufacturing process. In Part 1 of this study, which is documented in this paper, potential materials were evaluated in terms of their cost, activation mechanisms, and mechanical and actuation properties. Based on these properties, simple designs were proposed and utilized to help determine which materials are best suited for active seals. Shape memory alloys (SMA) and electroactive polymers (EAP) were judged to be the most promising.

  9. Galanin microinjection into the dorsal periaqueductal gray matter produces paradigm-dependent anxiolytic effects.

    PubMed

    Soares, F R C; Silote, G P; Almeida-Santos, A F; Aguiar, D C; Schenberg, L C; Beijamini, V

    2016-03-01

    Galanin is a peptide that is present in the central nervous system in mammals, including rodents and humans. The actions of galanin are mediated by three types of metabotropic receptors: GAL1, GAL2, and GAL3. GAL1 and GAL3 increase K(+) efflux, and GAL2 increases intracellular Ca(2+) levels. The distribution of galanin and its receptors suggests its involvement in fear and/or anxiety. The periaqueductal gray matter (PAG) is a key mediator of defensive behaviors that is both targeted by galaninergic projections and supplied with GAL1 receptors and, less markedly, GAL2 receptors. We examined the effects of galanin microinjections in the dorsal PAG (dPAG) on the performance of rats in different models of anxiety. Male Wistar rats (n=7-12) were implanted with guide cannulae in the dPAG. They received microinjections of either galanin (0.3, 1.0, and 3.0 nmol) or vehicle and were tested in the Vogel conflict test (VCT), elevated plus maze (EPM), and elevated T-maze (ETM). Rats that were tested in the ETM were further evaluated for exploratory activity in the open field test (OFT). Galanin microinjections had no effects on anxiety-like behavior in the EPM or VCT or exploratory activity in the EPM or OFT. In the ETM, however, microinjections of 3 nmol galanin impaired learned anxiety (i.e., avoidance of the open arms) without changing unconditioned fear (i.e., escape from the open arms). The present data suggest that galanin transmission in the dPAG inhibits the acquisition of anxiety-like responses in the ETM. PMID:26751815

  10. Active Flow Control Activities at NASA Langley

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anders, Scott G.; Sellers, William L., III; Washburn, Anthony E.

    2004-01-01

    NASA Langley continues to aggressively investigate the potential advantages of active flow control over more traditional aerodynamic techniques. This paper provides an update to a previous paper and describes both the progress in the various research areas and the significant changes in the NASA research programs. The goals of the topics presented are focused on advancing the state of knowledge and understanding of controllable fundamental mechanisms in fluids as well as to address engineering challenges. An organizational view of current research activities at NASA Langley in active flow control as supported by several projects is presented. On-center research as well as NASA Langley funded contracts and grants are discussed at a relatively high level. The products of this research are to be demonstrated either in bench-top experiments, wind-tunnel investigations, or in flight as part of the fundamental NASA R&D program and then transferred to more applied research programs within NASA, DOD, and U.S. industry.

  11. Activating Event Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hare, Mary; Jones, Michael; Thomson, Caroline; Kelly, Sarah; McRae, Ken

    2009-01-01

    An increasing number of results in sentence and discourse processing demonstrate that comprehension relies on rich pragmatic knowledge about real-world events, and that incoming words incrementally activate such knowledge. If so, then even outside of any larger context, nouns should activate knowledge of the generalized events that they denote or…

  12. Endonuclease activity in lipocalins.

    PubMed Central

    Yusifov, T N; Abduragimov, A R; Gasymov, O K; Glasgow, B J

    2000-01-01

    Several lipocalins contain conserved amino acid sequences similar to the phosphodiester bond cleavage domain of sugar non-specific magnesium-dependent nucleases of the Serratia marcescens type. His-89 and Glu-127 of the S. marcescens endonuclease are believed to have a role in the active catalytic site by the attack of a water molecule at the phosphorus atom of the bridging phosphate. Tear lipocalin contains both amino acids in analogous regions, and is active as a nuclease. Two forms of beta-lactoglobulin contain only Glu-134 (analogous to Glu-127 of the Serratia nuclease) yet retain nuclease activity equal to or greater than that of tear lipocalin. However, retinol-binding protein lacks both of these motifs and shows no detectable activity. DNA-nicking activity is decreased by 80% in the mutant of tear lipocalin that replaces Glu-128 but is unchanged by mutations of His-84. The endonuclease activity of tear lipocalin is dependent on the bivalent cations Mg(2+) or Mn(2+) but is decreased at high concentrations of NaCl. These findings indicate that some lipocalins have non-specific endonuclease activity similar in characteristics to the Mg(2+)-dependent nucleases and related to the conserved sequence LEDFXR (where 'X' denotes 'any other residue'), in which the glutamic residue seems to be important for activity. PMID:10769187

  13. Endonuclease activity in lipocalins.

    PubMed

    Yusifov, T N; Abduragimov, A R; Gasymov, O K; Glasgow, B J

    2000-05-01

    Several lipocalins contain conserved amino acid sequences similar to the phosphodiester bond cleavage domain of sugar non-specific magnesium-dependent nucleases of the Serratia marcescens type. His-89 and Glu-127 of the S. marcescens endonuclease are believed to have a role in the active catalytic site by the attack of a water molecule at the phosphorus atom of the bridging phosphate. Tear lipocalin contains both amino acids in analogous regions, and is active as a nuclease. Two forms of beta-lactoglobulin contain only Glu-134 (analogous to Glu-127 of the Serratia nuclease) yet retain nuclease activity equal to or greater than that of tear lipocalin. However, retinol-binding protein lacks both of these motifs and shows no detectable activity. DNA-nicking activity is decreased by 80% in the mutant of tear lipocalin that replaces Glu-128 but is unchanged by mutations of His-84. The endonuclease activity of tear lipocalin is dependent on the bivalent cations Mg(2+) or Mn(2+) but is decreased at high concentrations of NaCl. These findings indicate that some lipocalins have non-specific endonuclease activity similar in characteristics to the Mg(2+)-dependent nucleases and related to the conserved sequence LEDFXR (where 'X' denotes 'any other residue'), in which the glutamic residue seems to be important for activity. PMID:10769187

  14. Activity Book: Ocean Ecology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Learning, 1992

    1992-01-01

    Presents a collection of activities to help elementary students study ocean ecology. The activities have students investigate ocean inhabitants, analyze animal adaptations, examine how temperature and saltiness affect ocean creatures, and learn about safeguarding the sea. Student pages offer reproducible learning sheets. (SM)

  15. Activity Book. Celebrating Diversity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Angell, Pat; And Others

    1993-01-01

    This activity book presents elementary level multicultural books designed to foster self-esteem, understanding, and critical reading skills. It includes a resource list and general discussion boosters for analyzing characters and setting, class activities related to the books, and a student page on character study. (SM)

  16. Active Students in Webinars

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolås, Line; Nordseth, Hugo; Yri, Jørgen Sørlie

    2015-01-01

    To ensure student activity in webinars we have defined 10 learning tasks focusing on production and communication e.g. collaborative writing, discussion and polling, and investigated how the technology supports the learning activities. The three project partners in the VisPed-project use different video-conferencing systems, and we analyzed how it…

  17. PM ACTIVITY PATTERN RESEARCH

    EPA Science Inventory

    Human activity/uptake rate data are necessary to estimate potential human exposure and intake dose to environmental pollutants and to refine human exposure models. Personal exposure monitoring studies have demonstrated the critical role that activities play in explaining and pre...

  18. Activation of fly ash

    DOEpatents

    Corbin, David R.; Velenyi, Louis J.; Pepera, Marc A.; Dolhyj, Serge R.

    1986-01-01

    Fly ash is activated by heating a screened magnetic fraction of the ash in a steam atmosphere and then reducing, oxidizing and again reducing the hydrothermally treated fraction. The activated fly ash can be used as a carbon monoxide disproportionating catalyst useful in the production of hydrogen and methane.

  19. Laboratory Activities in Israel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mamlok-Naaman, Rachel; Barnea, Nitza

    2012-01-01

    Laboratory activities have long had a distinctive and central role in the science curriculum, and science educators have suggested that many benefits accrue from engaging students in science laboratory activities. Many research studies have been conducted to investigate the educational effectiveness of laboratory work in science education in…

  20. Active Healthy Summer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elliott, Eloise

    2005-01-01

    Summer break is almost here for most elementary teachers and students. Warmer weather and additional free time to make choices create more opportunities to be physically active, whether home alone or out with friends and family. This article describes ways by which physical education specialists can encourage students' physical activity by…

  1. Ecological Structure Activity Relationships

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ecological Structure Activity Relationships, v1.00a, February 2009
    ECOSAR (Ecological Structure Activity Relationships) is a personal computer software program that is used to estimate the toxicity of chemicals used in industry and discharged into water. The program predicts...

  2. The Activity of Trypsin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russo, Salvatore F.; Holzman, Tom

    1977-01-01

    Describes an experiment that illustrates the following points concerning the experimental determination of trypsin activity: (1) there is a difference in basing enzyme concentration on weight, absorbance, or active sites; and (2) the method of expressing enzyme concentration determines the value of specific, molecular, and catalytic center…

  3. Obesity, Physical Activity - Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilliam, Thomas B.

    Childhood obesity starts at a very early age, and preventive measures taken early enough may retard the development of fat cells. It appears that physical activity plays an important role in reducing obesity. The activity program must start early, in preschool days. It is felt that screening children for obesity when they first enter school and…

  4. Warm-Up Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mingguang, Yang

    1999-01-01

    Discusses how warm-up activities can help to make the English-as-a-foreign-language classroom a lively and interesting place. Warm-up activities are games carried out at the beginning of each class to motivate students to make good use of class time. (Author/VWL)

  5. Directory of Development Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Control Data Corp., Minneapolis, Minn.

    Assembled in a loose leaf notebook, this collection of independent on-the-job activities is designed to facilitate employee development and intended to help improve an organization's performance appraisal system. The on-the-job development activities described derive from job descriptions, performance appraisal forms, and discussions with job…

  6. Active and Healthy Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ball, Stephen; Kovarik, Jessica; Leidy, Heather

    2015-01-01

    The Active and Healthy School Program (AHS) can be used to alter the culture and environment of a school to help children make healthier choices. The purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of AHS to increase physical activity while decreasing total screen time, increase healthy food choices, and improve knowledge about physical…

  7. Chemical Activities. Teacher Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borgford, Christie L.; Summerlin, Lee R.

    This sourcebook for chemical activities is designed to be used as a student laboratory book for both junior and senior high school students. The student's role as a knowledgeable consumer and informed citizen is stressed. Each activity includes a list of needed materials, procedures, reactions, questions, and notes for the teacher which include…

  8. Rainy Day Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Child Care, 1997

    1997-01-01

    Experienced caregivers plan ahead for rainy days. This article describes specific rainy day activities for young children, such as books and crafts to learn about rain (rain in a jar, making a rainbow), simple cooking activities (taffy pull, cinnamon candy tea), and games (mummy wrap, hunt the thimble, rain lotto). (EV)

  9. Reflections on Activity Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bakhurst, David

    2009-01-01

    It is sometimes suggested that activity theory represents the most important legacy of Soviet philosophy and psychology. But what exactly "is" activity theory? The canonical account in the West is given by Engestrom, who identifies three stages in the theory's development: from Vygotsky's insights, through Leontiev's articulation of the…

  10. Emotionally Intense Science Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Donna; Ritchie, Stephen; Sandhu, Maryam; Henderson, Senka

    2015-01-01

    Science activities that evoke positive emotional responses make a difference to students' emotional experience of science. In this study, we explored 8th Grade students' discrete emotions expressed during science activities in a unit on Energy. Multiple data sources including classroom videos, interviews and emotion diaries completed at the end of…

  11. Activities: More Calculator Capers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmalz, Rosemary

    1983-01-01

    Provided is an activity designed to give grades 7-12 students opportunities to discover numerical patterns and to derive general conclusions from observing data. The activity focuses attention on patterns in products such as 33x34, 333x334, and 3333x3334. Three worksheets and answers are included. (JN)

  12. Vegetable Soup Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shepard, Mary; Shepard, Ray

    Vegetable Soup is a new children's television series whose purpose is to counter the negative and destructive effects of racial isolation. This manual gives detailed instructions for discussion of activities that are presented during the television series such as: crafts, games, recipes, language activities, and children's questions. A list of…

  13. ZOOMsci Activity Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wade, Meredith

    This activity guide is based on the Public Broadcasting System's (PBS) program "ZOOM." It is designed for educators with activities that are categorized into three themes: (1) Things That Go, which includes "Air" which explores air pressure, "Rubber Bands" which discovers the potential energy of rubber bands, "Baking Soda and Vinegar" which…

  14. Science World Activities Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wisconsin Academy of Sciences, Arts and Letters, Madison.

    This document consists of three sections. Section I contains 19 activities developed by master teachers for the Science World '84 summer science program. These activities focus on studies involving airplane controls, trash bag kites, computers, meteorology, compass orienteering, soils, aquatic ecosystems, bogs, and others. Objectives, materials…

  15. HUMAN EXPOSURE ACTIVITY PATTERNS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Human activity/uptake rate data are necessary to estimate potential human exposure and intake dose to environmental pollutants and to refine human exposure models. Personal exposure monitoring studies have demonstrated the critical role that activities play in explaining and pre...

  16. Coordinating Shared Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clement, Bradley

    2004-01-01

    Shared Activity Coordination (ShAC) is a computer program for planning and scheduling the activities of an autonomous team of interacting spacecraft and exploratory robots. ShAC could also be adapted to such terrestrial uses as helping multiple factory managers work toward competing goals while sharing such common resources as floor space, raw materials, and transports. ShAC iteratively invokes the Continuous Activity Scheduling Planning Execution and Replanning (CASPER) program to replan and propagate changes to other planning programs in an effort to resolve conflicts. A domain-expert specifies which activities and parameters thereof are shared and reports the expected conditions and effects of these activities on the environment. By specifying these conditions and effects differently for each planning program, the domain-expert subprogram defines roles that each spacecraft plays in a coordinated activity. The domain-expert subprogram also specifies which planning program has scheduling control over each shared activity. ShAC enables sharing of information, consensus over the scheduling of collaborative activities, and distributed conflict resolution. As the other planning programs incorporate new goals and alter their schedules in the changing environment, ShAC continually coordinates to respond to unexpected events.

  17. Elementary Environmental Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larson, Robert J.

    This guide presents suggestions for field trips, out-of-doors activities, material for centers, and individualized activities in the teaching of elementary school science and particularly environmental education at the elementary level. The guide includes a section on preparation and procedures for conducting field trips, including sample…

  18. Ten Minute Writing Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markus, Sharyn

    Designed with junior high school students in mind, the activities in this booklet are offered as ways to stimulate interest in writing using as little as ten minutes of class time. The activities are arranged in six sections: (1) developing observation skills and paying attention to details; (2) word play, descriptive words, and word collections…

  19. Activation of fly ash

    DOEpatents

    Corbin, D.R.; Velenyi, L.J.; Pepera, M.A.; Dolhyj, S.R.

    1986-08-19

    Fly ash is activated by heating a screened magnetic fraction of the ash in a steam atmosphere and then reducing, oxidizing and again reducing the hydrothermally treated fraction. The activated fly ash can be used as a carbon monoxide disproportionating catalyst useful in the production of hydrogen and methane.

  20. Peak Longevity Physical Activity

    Cancer.gov

    People who engage in three to five times the recommended minimum level of leisure-time physical activity derive the greatest benefit in terms of mortality reduction when compared with people who do not engage in leisure-time physical activity.

  1. Student Activities. Managing Liability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Barbara; And Others

    This monograph suggests ways that college or university administrations can undertake a systematic and careful review of the risks posed by students' activities. Its purpose is to provide guidance in integrating the risk management process into a school's existing approaches to managing student organizations and activities. It is noted that no…

  2. Curriculum Activities on Aging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmall, Vicki L.; Benge, Nancy

    This paper contains learning activities on aging for use with elementary, high school, and university students in health, family relationships, social studies, and art courses. The activities are intended to help youth develop a more realistic understanding of the aging process and to become aware of both the problems and benefits associated with…

  3. Aging and Semantic Activation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howard, Darlene V.

    Three studies tested the theory that long term memory consists of a semantically organized network of concept nodes interconnected by leveled associations or relations, and that when a stimulus is processed, the corresponding concept node is assumed to be temporarily activated and this activation spreads to nearby semantically related nodes. In…

  4. [Field Learning Activities].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nolde Forest Environmental Education Center, Reading, PA.

    Seventy field activities, pertinent to outdoor, environmental studies, are described in this compilation. Designed for elementary and junior high school students, the activities cover many discipline areas--science, social studies, language arts, health, history, mathematics, and art--and many are multidisciplinary in use. Topics range from soil…

  5. Active galactic nuclei

    PubMed Central

    Fabian, Andrew C.

    1999-01-01

    Active galactic nuclei are the most powerful, long-lived objects in the Universe. Recent data confirm the theoretical idea that the power source is accretion into a massive black hole. The common occurrence of obscuration and outflows probably means that the contribution of active galactic nuclei to the power density of the Universe has been generally underestimated. PMID:10220363

  6. Activity in F stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolff, Sidney C.; Boesgaard, Ann Merchant; Simon, Theodore

    1986-01-01

    Measurements of He I 5876 A and IUE measurements of chromospheric and transition region lines in a large sample of F-type stars are presented. The data show that activity is detectable in nearly all early F-type stars and differs in several of its characteristics from that typically seen in cooler stars with slow rotation and fully developed convective zones. The onset of activity occurs near B-V = 0.28, which corresponds approximately to spectral type F0 and T(eff) = 7300 K. There is no correlation between the level of activity and the abundances of lithium and beryllium in F stars hotter than T(eff) = 6600 K. All but one of the stars in the 6600-7300 K temperature interval are active. The levels of activity in these stars are independent of Rossby number.

  7. The Ephrin-A1/EPHA2 Signaling Axis Regulates Glutamine Metabolism in HER2-Positive Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Youngblood, Victoria M; Kim, Laura C; Edwards, Deanna N; Hwang, Yoonha; Santapuram, Pranav R; Stirdivant, Steven M; Lu, Pengcheng; Ye, Fei; Brantley-Sieders, Dana M; Chen, Jin

    2016-04-01

    Dysregulation of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTK) contributes to cellular transformation and cancer progression by disrupting key metabolic signaling pathways. The EPHA2 RTK is overexpressed in aggressive forms of breast cancer, including the HER2(+) subtype, and correlates with poor prognosis. However, the role of EPHA2 in tumor metabolism remains unexplored. In this study, we used in vivo and in vitro models of HER2-overexpressing breast cancer to investigate the mechanisms by which EPHA2 ligand-independent signaling promotes tumorigenesis in the absence of its prototypic ligand, ephrin-A1. We demonstrate that ephrin-A1 loss leads to upregulated glutamine metabolism and lipid accumulation that enhanced tumor growth. Global metabolic profiling of ephrin-A1-null, HER2-overexpressing mammary tumors revealed a significant increase in glutaminolysis, a critical metabolic pathway that generates intermediates for lipogenesis. Pharmacologic inhibition of glutaminase activity reduced tumor growth in both ephrin-A1-depleted and EPHA2-overexpressing tumor allografts in vivo Mechanistically, we show that the enhanced proliferation and glutaminolysis in the absence of ephrin-A1 were attributed to increased RhoA-dependent glutaminase activity. EPHA2 depletion or pharmacologic inhibition of Rho, glutaminase, or fatty acid synthase abrogated the increased lipid content and proliferative effects of ephrin-A1 knockdown. Together, these findings highlight a novel, unsuspected connection between the EPHA2/ephrin-A1 signaling axis and tumor metabolism, and suggest potential new therapeutic targets in cancer subtypes exhibiting glutamine dependency. Cancer Res; 76(7); 1825-36. ©2016 AACR. PMID:26833123

  8. µ- and κ-Opioid receptor activation in the dorsal periaqueductal grey matter differentially modulates panic-like behaviours induced by electrical and chemical stimulation of the inferior colliculus.

    PubMed

    Twardowschy, André; Coimbra, Norberto Cysne

    2015-02-01

    It has been shown that electrical stimulation of the mesencephalic tectum (MT) provokes defensive responses in both humans and rodents. During an emotional aversive state, some convergent studies have also demonstrated the existence of a complex interaction between endogenous opioid peptide- and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-containing connections during fear-induced responses. It has been proposed that opioid neurons exert an influence on GABAergic interneurons, which, in turn, exert inhibitory tonic control on the mesencephalic excitatory pathways. Thus, opioid peptides can disinhibit neurons that are tonically inhibited by GABA, therefore, modulating the expression of defensive behavioural reactions. In the present work, we used both electric stimulation and microinjections of the GABAA receptor antagonist bicuculline in the inferior colliculus (IC) of Wistar rats in combination with microinjections of µ- and κ-opioid receptor selective agonists into the dorsal columns of periaqueductal grey matter (dPAG) to evaluate the effects on panic-like behaviours elicited by IC electrical and chemical stimulation. The present results showed that neurochemical lesions of the dPAG caused a significant impairment in the organisation of defensive responses by IC neurons, reducing the duration [t(14)=3.0; p<0.01] of defensive immobility and the duration [t(14)=2.8; p<0.05] and frequency [t(14)=2.5; p<0.05] of escape. Paradoxically, treating the dPAG with the µ-opioid receptor agonist met-enkephalin caused a significant reduction of panic-like behaviours induced by both electrical and chemical stimulation of the IC, increasing the escape behaviour threshold [F(2,23)=13.5; p<0.001] and decreasing the frequency [F(3,36)=11.7; p<0.001] and duration [F(3,36)=11.6; p<0.001] of escape and the duration of defensive immobility [F(3,36)=16.1; p<0.05]. In contrast, treating the dPAG with the κ-opioid receptor agonist salvinorin-A increased the frequency [F(3,36)=12.4; p<0.01] and

  9. Determinants of Physical Activity in Active and Low-Active, Sixth Grade African-American Youth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trost, Stewart G.; Pate, Russell R.; Ward, Dianne S.; Saunders, Ruth; Riner, William

    1999-01-01

    Compared determinants of physical activity in active and low-active African-American sixth graders, surveying students and making objective assessments of physical activity over seven days. Results indicated that physical activity self-efficacy, beliefs about physical activity outcomes, involvement in community-based physical activity, perception…

  10. Active optical zoom system

    DOEpatents

    Wick, David V.

    2005-12-20

    An active optical zoom system changes the magnification (or effective focal length) of an optical imaging system by utilizing two or more active optics in a conventional optical system. The system can create relatively large changes in system magnification with very small changes in the focal lengths of individual active elements by leveraging the optical power of the conventional optical elements (e.g., passive lenses and mirrors) surrounding the active optics. The active optics serve primarily as variable focal-length lenses or mirrors, although adding other aberrations enables increased utility. The active optics can either be LC SLMs, used in a transmissive optical zoom system, or DMs, used in a reflective optical zoom system. By appropriately designing the optical system, the variable focal-length lenses or mirrors can provide the flexibility necessary to change the overall system focal length (i.e., effective focal length), and therefore magnification, that is normally accomplished with mechanical motion in conventional zoom lenses. The active optics can provide additional flexibility by allowing magnification to occur anywhere within the FOV of the system, not just on-axis as in a conventional system.

  11. Physical activity and cancer.

    PubMed

    Shephard, R J

    1990-12-01

    Evidence that physical activity may protect against various forms of cancer is examined in relation to occupational demands, leisure activities and participation in sport while at university. The variety of forms of neoplasm and equally varied physical activity histories militate against finding any simple relationship between the risk of malignancy and the individual's physical activity history. Nevertheless, five of seven major occupational studies suggest that a physically active occupation offers some protection against colon cancer, and an application of Bradford Hill's criteria generally supports the causal nature of the relationship between physical inactivity and an increased risk of intestinal neoplasia. However, existing reports are by no means conclusive; there thus remains a need for well-designed epidemiological studies of this issue. Data from one laboratory also suggest that in women a history of active leisure is associated with a reduced prevalence of breast and reproductive system cancers. Physical activity potentially encourages a healthy lifestyle, and it could have more direct effects on certain forms of carcinogenesis (for instance, by a speeding of gastro-intestinal transit, or a moderation of sex hormone levels). However, there are also potential negative effects from some types of exercise, particularly an excessive exposure to ultra-violet light in certain water sports. Since moderate exercise elevates mood and helps to conserve lean tissue, it may finally be a helpful component of treatment after a neoplasm has been diagnosed. PMID:2286478

  12. Active touch sensing

    PubMed Central

    Prescott, Tony J.; Diamond, Mathew E.; Wing, Alan M.

    2011-01-01

    Active sensing systems are purposive and information-seeking sensory systems. Active sensing usually entails sensor movement, but more fundamentally, it involves control of the sensor apparatus, in whatever manner best suits the task, so as to maximize information gain. In animals, active sensing is perhaps most evident in the modality of touch. In this theme issue, we look at active touch across a broad range of species from insects, terrestrial and marine mammals, through to humans. In addition to analysing natural touch, we also consider how engineering is beginning to exploit physical analogues of these biological systems so as to endow robots with rich tactile sensing capabilities. The different contributions show not only the varieties of active touch—antennae, whiskers and fingertips—but also their commonalities. They explore how active touch sensing has evolved in different animal lineages, how it serves to provide rapid and reliable cues for controlling ongoing behaviour, and even how it can disintegrate when our brains begin to fail. They demonstrate that research on active touch offers a means both to understand this essential and primary sensory modality, and to investigate how animals, including man, combine movement with sensing so as to make sense of, and act effectively in, the world. PMID:21969680

  13. Measuring Physical Activity Environments

    PubMed Central

    Sallis, James F.

    2010-01-01

    Physical activity is usually done in specific types of places, referred to as physical activity environments. These often include parks, trails, fitness centers, schools, and streets. In recent years, scientific interest has increased notably in measuring physical activity environments. The present paper provides an historical overview of the contributions of the health, planning, and leisure studies fields to the development of contemporary measures. The emphasis is on attributes of the built environment that can be affected by policies to contribute to the promotion of physical activity. Researchers from health fields assessed a wide variety of built environment variables expected to be related to recreational physical activity. Settings of interest were schools, workplaces, and recreation facilities, and most early measures used direct observation methods with demonstrated inter-observer reliability. Investigators from the city planning field evaluated aspects of community design expected to be related to people’s ability to walk from homes to destinations. GIS was used to assess walkability defined by the 3Ds of residential density, land-use diversity, and pedestrian-oriented designs. Evaluating measures for reliability or validity was rarely done in the planning-related fields. Researchers in the leisure studies and recreation fields studied mainly people’s use of leisure time rather than physical characteristics of parks and other recreation facilities. Although few measures of physical activity environments were developed, measures of aesthetic qualities are available. Each of these fields made unique contributions to the contemporary methods used to assess physical activity environments. PMID:19285214

  14. Emotionally Intense Science Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Donna; Ritchie, Stephen; Sandhu, Maryam; Henderson, Senka

    2015-08-01

    Science activities that evoke positive emotional responses make a difference to students' emotional experience of science. In this study, we explored 8th Grade students' discrete emotions expressed during science activities in a unit on Energy. Multiple data sources including classroom videos, interviews and emotion diaries completed at the end of each lesson were analysed to identify individual student's emotions. Results from two representative students are presented as case studies. Using a theoretical perspective drawn from theories of emotions founded in sociology, two assertions emerged. First, during the demonstration activity, students experienced the emotions of wonder and surprise; second, during a laboratory activity, students experienced the intense positive emotions of happiness/joy. Characteristics of these activities that contributed to students' positive experiences are highlighted. The study found that choosing activities that evoked strong positive emotional experiences, focused students' attention on the phenomenon they were learning, and the activities were recalled positively. Furthermore, such positive experiences may contribute to students' interest and engagement in science and longer term memorability. Finally, implications for science teachers and pre-service teacher education are suggested.

  15. THE ACTIVE CENTAURS

    SciTech Connect

    Jewitt, David

    2009-05-15

    The Centaurs are recent escapees from the Kuiper Belt that are destined either to meet fiery oblivion in the hot inner regions of the solar system or to be ejected to the interstellar medium by gravitational scattering from the giant planets. Dynamically evolved Centaurs, when captured by Jupiter and close enough to the Sun for near-surface water ice to sublimate, are conventionally labeled as 'short-period' (specifically, Jupiter-family) comets. Remarkably, some Centaurs show comet-like activity even when far beyond the orbit of Jupiter, suggesting mass loss driven by a process other than the sublimation of water ice. We observed a sample of 23 Centaurs and found nine to be active, with mass-loss rates measured from several kg s{sup -1} to several tonnes s{sup -1}. Considered as a group, we find that the 'active Centaurs' in our sample have perihelia smaller than the inactive Centaurs (median 5.9 AU versus 8.7 AU), and smaller than the median perihelion distance computed for all known Centaurs (12.4 AU). This suggests that their activity is thermally driven. We consider several possibilities for the origin of the mass loss from the active Centaurs. Most are too cold for activity at the observed levels to originate via the sublimation of crystalline water ice. Solid carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide have the opposite problem: they are so volatile that they should drive activity in Centaurs at much larger distances than observed. We consider the possibility that activity in the Centaurs is triggered by the conversion of amorphous ice into the crystalline form accompanied by the release of trapped gases, including carbon monoxide. By imposing the condition that crystallization should occur when the crystallization time is shorter than the orbital period we find a qualitative match to the perihelion distribution of the active Centaurs and conclude that the data are consistent with the hypothesis that the Centaurs contain amorphous ice.

  16. Structural Insight into Substrate Selectivity of Erwinia chrysanthemil-Asparaginase

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    l-Asparaginases of bacterial origin are a mainstay of acute lymphoblastic leukemia treatment. The mechanism of action of these enzyme drugs is associated with their capacity to deplete the amino acid l-asparagine from the blood. However, clinical use of bacterial l-asparaginases is complicated by their dual l-asparaginase and l-glutaminase activities. The latter, even though representing only ∼10% of the overall activity, is partially responsible for the observed toxic side effects. Hence, l-asparaginases devoid of l-glutaminase activity hold potential as safer drugs. Understanding the key determinants of l-asparaginase substrate specificity is a prerequisite step toward the development of enzyme variants with reduced toxicity. Here we present crystal structures of the Erwinia chrysanthemil-asparaginase in complex with l-aspartic acid and with l-glutamic acid. These structures reveal two enzyme conformations—open and closed—corresponding to the inactive and active states, respectively. The binding of ligands induces the positioning of the catalytic Thr15 into its active conformation, which in turn allows for the ordering and closure of the flexible N-terminal loop. Notably, l-aspartic acid is more efficient than l-glutamic acid in inducing the active positioning of Thr15. Structural elements explaining the preference of the enzyme for l-asparagine over l-glutamine are discussed with guidance to the future development of more specific l-asparaginases. PMID:26855287

  17. Physics of solar activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sturrock, Peter A.

    1993-01-01

    The aim of the research activity was to increase our understanding of solar activity through data analysis, theoretical analysis, and computer modeling. Because the research subjects were diverse and many researchers were supported by this grant, a select few key areas of research are described in detail. Areas of research include: (1) energy storage and force-free magnetic field; (2) energy release and particle acceleration; (3) radiation by nonthermal electrons; (4) coronal loops; (5) flare classification; (6) longitude distributions of flares; (7) periodicities detected in the solar activity; (8) coronal heating and related problems; and (9) plasma processes.

  18. D-cycloserine injected into the dorsolateral periaqueductal gray induces anxiolytic-like effects in rats.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Felipe V; Kakihata, Alessandra M; Semedo, Ana Carolina G; Hott, Sara C; Uliana, Daniela L; Guimarães, Francisco S; Resstel, Leonardo B M

    2014-09-01

    D-cycloserine (DCS) is a partial agonist of the glycine site coupled to the NMDA receptor (NMDAR). As a consequence, depending on the doses used it can function as an agonist or antagonist at this site. In rodents, anxiolytic-like effects have been observed after the systemic administration of high doses of DCS. The brain sites of these effects have not been investigated. Direct brain injection of glycine site antagonists or agonists into the dorsolateral periaqueductal gray (dlPAG), a brain structure involved in the modulation of defensive-related behaviors, produces anxiolytic- or anxiogenic-like effects, respectively. The present study investigated if the dlPAG could be a brain site of the anxiolytic effects observed after DCS systemic administration. Male Wistar rats received intra-dlPAG injections of DCS (25, 50, 100 or 200 nmol) and were exposed to the elevated plus-maze (EPM) or to the light-dark box. DCS, at the dose of 200 nmol, increased open arm exploration and the time spent in the light compartment, respectively. Based on this result we tested the effects of intra-dlPAG DCS (200 nmol) administration in animals submitted to the Vogel conflict tests. Anxiolytic-like effect was also observed in this test indicated by the increase of punished responses. The drug did not change locomotor activity, discarding potential confounding factors. These results indicated that administration of DCS, a partial agonist of the NMDAR-associated glycine site, into the dlPAG induces anxiolytic-like effects in different models, pointing to a possible site of action of this compound. PMID:24931794

  19. Inhibition of hydrogen sulfide restores normal breathing stability and improves autonomic control during experimental heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Del Rio, Rodrigo; Marcus, Noah J.

    2013-01-01

    Cardiovascular autonomic imbalance and breathing instability are major contributors to the progression of heart failure (CHF). Potentiation of the carotid body (CB) chemoreflex has been shown to contribute to these effects. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) recently has been proposed to mediate CB hypoxic chemoreception. We hypothesized that H2S synthesis inhibition should decrease CB chemoreflex activation and improve breathing stability and autonomic function in CHF rats. Using the irreversible inhibitor of cystathione γ-lyase dl-propargylglycine (PAG), we tested the effects of H2S inhibition on resting breathing patterns, the hypoxic and hypercapnic ventilatory responses, and the hypoxic sensitivity of CB chemoreceptor afferents in rats with CHF. In addition, heart rate variability (HRV) and systolic blood pressure variability (SBPV) were calculated as an index of autonomic function. CHF rats, compared with sham rats, exhibited increased breath interval variability and number of apneas, enhanced CB afferent discharge and ventilatory responses to hypoxia, decreased HRV, and increased low-frequency SBPV. Remarkably, PAG treatment reduced the apnea index by 90%, reduced breath interval variability by 40–60%, and reversed the enhanced hypoxic CB afferent and chemoreflex responses observed in CHF rats. Furthermore, PAG treatment partially reversed the alterations in HRV and SBPV in CHF rats. Our results show that PAG treatment restores breathing stability and cardiac autonomic function and reduces the enhanced ventilatory and CB chemosensory responses to hypoxia in CHF rats. These results support the idea that PAG treatment could potentially represent a novel pathway to control sympathetic outflow and breathing instability in CHF. PMID:23449938

  20. Extravehicular activity technology discipline

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webbon, Bruce W.

    1990-01-01

    Viewgraphs on extravehicular activity technology discipline for Space Station Freedom are presented. Topics covered include: extravehicular mobility unit; airlock and EMU support equipment; tools, mobility aids, and workstations; and telerobotic work aids interfaces.

  1. Microglial Activation & Chronic Neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Lull, Melinda E.; Block, Michelle L.

    2010-01-01

    Microglia, the resident innate immune cells in the brain, have long been implicated in the pathology of neurodegenerative diseases. Accumulating evidence points to activated microglia as a chronic source of multiple neurotoxic factors, including TNFα, NO, IL1-β, and reactive oxygen species (ROS), driving progressive neuron damage. Microglia can become chronically activated by either a single stimulus (ex. LPS or neuron damage) or multiple stimuli exposures to result in cumulative neuronal loss over time. While the mechanisms driving these phenomena are just beginning to be understood, reactive microgliosis (the microglial response to neuron damage) and ROS have been implicated as key mechanisms of chronic and neurotoxic microglial activation, particularly in the case of Parkinson’s Disease. Here, we review the mechanisms of neurotoxicity associated with chronic microglial activation and discuss the role of neuronal death and microglial ROS driving the chronic and toxic microglial phenotype. PMID:20880500

  2. Activities: Pick's Rule

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirsch, Christian R.

    1974-01-01

    A series of activities are presented on worksheets marked off with lattice points (like a geoboard). Students are led to discover and apply Pick's Theorem for finding the area of a polygon whose vertices are lattice points. (JP)

  3. Finding Activities You Enjoy

    MedlinePlus

    ... choose physical activities that match your interests! Love music? Take dancing lessons. Sign up for an aerobics ... a Safe Environment Feel Down? Get Up—Emotional Benefits of Exercise STAY INFORMED Follow us on Twitter ...

  4. Exercise and activity - children

    MedlinePlus

    ... other organized sports (such as soccer, swimming, and dancing) Younger children cannot stick with the same activity ... in a water sprinkler, or splashing in puddles. Dance to music. Skate, ice-skate, skate-board, or ...

  5. French space activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanc, R.

    1982-01-01

    The four main points of research and development of space programs by France are explained. The National Center of Space Studies is discussed, listing the missions of the Center and describing the activities of the staff.

  6. Island Watershed Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benson, Rod

    2003-01-01

    Describes a 90-minute "Island Watershed" activity to help earth science students understand the concept of the water cycle. Introduces a surface waters unit appropriate for students in grades 7-10. Includes watershed project guidelines. (Author/KHR)

  7. Algorithm-development activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carder, Kendall L.

    1994-01-01

    The task of algorithm-development activities at USF continues. The algorithm for determining chlorophyll alpha concentration, (Chl alpha) and gelbstoff absorption coefficient for SeaWiFS and MODIS-N radiance data is our current priority.

  8. A Big Gulp Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Bruce

    1997-01-01

    Explains how to implement an activity in which students measure the volume of their oral cavities. Enables students to develop skills in estimation, measurement, connections, statistics, applying concepts and procedures, and communication. (DDR)

  9. Active terahertz metamaterials

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Hou-tong

    2009-01-01

    We demonstrate planar terahertz metamaterial devices enabling actively controllable transmission amplitude, phase, or frequency at room temperature via carrier depletion or photoexcitation in the semiconductor substrate or in semiconductor materials incorporated into the metamaterial structure.

  10. PRESSURE ACTIVATED SEALANT TECHNOLOGY

    SciTech Connect

    Michael A. Romano

    2004-04-01

    The objective of this project is to develop new, efficient, cost effective methods of internally sealing natural gas pipeline leaks through the application of differential pressure activated sealants. In researching the current state of the art for gas pipeline sealing technologies we concluded that if the project was successful, it appeared that pressure activated sealant technology would provide a cost effective alternative to existing pipeline repair technology. From our analysis of current field data for a 13 year period from 1985 to 1997 we were able to identify 205 leaks that were candidates for pressure activated sealant technology, affirming that pressure activated sealant technology is a viable option to traditional external leak repairs. The data collected included types of defects, areas of defects, pipe sizes and materials, incident and operating pressures, ability of pipeline to be pigged and corrosion states. This data, and subsequent analysis, was utilized as a basis for constructing applicable sealant test modeling.

  11. Intercreativity: Mapping Online Activism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meikle, Graham

    How do activists use the Internet? This article maps a wide range of activist practice and research by applying and developing Tim Berners-Lee's concept of ‘intercreativity' (1999). It identifies four dimensions of Net activism: intercreative texts, tactics, strategies and networks. It develops these through examples of manifestations of Net activism around one cluster of issues: support campaigns for refugees and asylum seekers.

  12. Tinnitus activities treatment.

    PubMed

    Tyler, Richard S; Gogel, Stephanie A; Gehringer, Anne K

    2007-01-01

    Tinnitus Activities Treatment includes counseling of the whole person, and considers individual differences and needs. We consider four areas: thoughts and emotions, hearing and communication, sleep, and concentration. We typically use Partial Masking Sound Therapy, with a noise or music set to the lowest level that provides relief. A picture-based approach facilitates engagement of the patient, and provides thorough and structured counseling. We engage the patient by including homework and activities to demonstrate understanding and facilitate progress. PMID:17956807

  13. Low activation ferritic alloys

    DOEpatents

    Gelles, David S.; Ghoniem, Nasr M.; Powell, Roger W.

    1986-01-01

    Low activation ferritic alloys, specifically bainitic and martensitic stainless steels, are described for use in the production of structural components for nuclear fusion reactors. They are designed specifically to achieve low activation characteristics suitable for efficient waste disposal. The alloys essentially exclude molybdenum, nickel, nitrogen and niobium. Strength is achieved by substituting vanadium, tungsten, and/or tantalum in place of the usual molybdenum content in such alloys.

  14. RMS active damping augmentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, Michael G.; Scott, Michael A.; Demeo, Martha E.

    1992-01-01

    The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include: RMS active damping augmentation; potential space station assembly benefits to CSI; LaRC/JSC bridge program; control law design process; draper RMS simulator; MIMO acceleration control laws improve damping; potential load reduction benefit; DRS modified to model distributed accelerations; accelerometer location; Space Shuttle aft cockpit simulator; simulated shuttle video displays; SES test goals and objectives; and SES modifications to support RMS active damping augmentation.

  15. RAVEN Quality Assurance Activities

    SciTech Connect

    Cogliati, Joshua Joseph

    2015-09-01

    This report discusses the quality assurance activities needed to raise the Quality Level of Risk Analysis in a Virtual Environment (RAVEN) from Quality Level 3 to Quality Level 2. This report also describes the general RAVEN quality assurance activities. For improving the quality, reviews of code changes have been instituted, more parts of testing have been automated, and improved packaging has been created. For upgrading the quality level, requirements have been created and the workflow has been improved.

  16. Low activation ferritic alloys

    DOEpatents

    Gelles, D.S.; Ghoniem, N.M.; Powell, R.W.

    1985-02-07

    Low activation ferritic alloys, specifically bainitic and martensitic stainless steels, are described for use in the production of structural components for nuclear fusion reactors. They are designed specifically to achieve low activation characteristics suitable for efficient waste disposal. The alloys essentially exclude molybdenum, nickel, nitrogen and niobium. Strength is achieved by substituting vanadium, tungsten, and/or tantalum in place of the usual molybdenum content in such alloys.

  17. Rheology of Active Gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Daniel

    2015-03-01

    Active networks drive a diverse range of critical processes ranging from motility to division in living cells, yet a full picture of their rheological capabilities in non-cellular contexts is still emerging, e.g., How does the rheological response of a network capable of remodeling under internally-generated stresses differ from that of a passive biopolymer network? In order to address this and other basic questions, we have engineered an active gel composed of microtubules, bidirectional kinesin motors, and molecular depletant that self-organizes into a highly dynamic network of active bundles. The network continually remodels itself under ATP-tunable cycles of extension, buckling, fracturing, and self-healing. Using confocal rheometry we have simultaneously characterized the network's linear and non-linear rheological responses to shear deformation along with its dynamic morphology. We find several surprising and unique material properties for these active gels; most notably, rheological cloaking, the ability of the active gel to drive large-scale fluid mixing over several orders of flow magnitude while maintaining an invariant, solid-like rheological profile and spontaneous flow under confinement, the ability to exert micro-Newton forces to drive persistent directed motion of the rheometer tool. Taken together, these results and others to be discussed highlight the rich stress-structure-dynamics relationships in this class of biologically-derived active gels.

  18. ABB: active bandwidth broker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Kason; Law, Eddie

    2001-07-01

    In this paper, we shall discuss a novel design on the policy-based management for the Internet. This design deploys the concept of active networking. As opposed to the traditional network design, active network empowers network node with the ability to manipulate data and program code in packets, and configure the network properties according to the needs of different applications. The policy-based management can control network routers in order to realize end-to-end Quality of Service (QoS), such as differentiated and integrated services, across the Internet. For the moment, the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) has defined the framework of the policy-based management. It employs a simple client/server model that uses Common Open Policy Service (COPS) protocol to facilitate policy management and control. Our design of Active Bandwidth Broker (ABB) belongs to an active application. Our goals are to distribute centralized workload of the policy-based management over multiple active nodes in the active networks, introduce mobility of the bandwidth brokers, and allows load sharing to the policy-based management. This results a network-wide intelligent, highly available, and consistent QoS control that allows performance protection for voice, video and Internet business application while reducing costs for growing networks.

  19. Phytase activity in lichens.

    PubMed

    Higgins, Niall F; Crittenden, Peter D

    2015-10-01

    Phytase activity was investigated in 13 lichen species using a novel assay method. The work tested the hypothesis that phytase is a component of the suite of surface-bound lichen enzymes that hydrolyse simple organic forms of phosphorus (P) and nitrogen (N) deposited onto the thallus surface. Hydrolysis of inositol hexaphosphate (InsP6 , the substrate for phytase) and appearance of lower-order inositol phosphates (InsP5 -InsP1 ), the hydrolysis products, were measured by ion chromatography. Phytase activity in Evernia prunastri was compared among locations with contrasting rates of N deposition. Phytase activity was readily measurable in epiphytic lichens (e.g. 11.3 μmol InsP6 hydrolysed g(-1)  h(-1) in Bryoria fuscescens) but low in two terricolous species tested (Cladonia portentosa and Peltigera membranacea). Phytase and phosphomonoesterase activities were positively correlated amongst species. In E. prunastri both enzyme activities were promoted by N enrichment and phytase activity was readily released into thallus washings. InsP6 was not detected in tree canopy throughfall but was present in pollen leachate. Capacity to hydrolyse InsP6 appears widespread amongst lichens potentially promoting P capture from atmospheric deposits and plant leachates, and P cycling in forest canopies. The enzyme assay used here might find wider application in studies on plant root-fungal-soil systems. PMID:25963718

  20. Both GLS silencing and GLS2 overexpression synergize with oxidative stress against proliferation of glioma cells

    PubMed Central

    Martín-Rufián, Mercedes; Nascimento-Gomes, Renata; Higuero, Ana; Crisma, Amanda R.; Campos-Sandoval, José A.; Gómez-García, María C.; Cardona, Carolina; Cheng, Tzuling; Lobo, Carolina; Segura, Juan A.; Alonso, Francisco J.; Szeliga, Monika; Albrecht, Jan; Curi, Rui; Márquez, Javier; Colquhoun, Alison; DeBerardinis, Ralph J.

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial glutaminase (GA) plays an essential role in cancer cell metabolism, contributing to biosynthesis, bioenergetics and redox balance. Humans contain several GA isozymes encoded by the GLS and GLS2 genes, but the specific roles of each in cancer metabolism are still unclear. In this study, glioma SFxL and LN229 cells with silenced isoenzyme glutaminase KGA (encoded by GLS) showed lower survival ratios and a reduced GSH-dependent antioxidant capacity. These GLS-silenced cells also demonstrated induction of apoptosis indicated by enhanced annexin V binding capacity and caspase 3 activity. GLS silencing was associated with decreased mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) (JC-1 dye test), indicating that apoptosis was mediated by mitochondrial dysfunction. Similar observations were made in T98 glioma cells overexpressing glutaminase isoenzyme GAB, encoded by GLS2, though some characteristics (GSH/GSSG ratio) were different in the differently treated cell lines. Thus, control of GA isoenzyme expression may prove to be a key tool to alter both metabolic and oxidative stress in cancer therapy. Interestingly, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation by treatment with oxidizing agents: arsenic trioxide or hydrogen peroxide, synergizes with either KGA silencing or GAB overexpression to suppress malignant properties of glioma cells, including the reduction of cellular motility. Of note, negative modulation of GLS isoforms or GAB overexpression evoked lower c-myc and bcl-2 expression, as well as higher pro-apoptotic bid expression. Combination of modulation of GA expression and treatment with oxidizing agents may become a therapeutic strategy for intractable cancers and provides a multi-angle evaluation system for anti-glioma pre-clinical investigations. PMID:24276018

  1. Youth Physical Activity Resources Use and Activity Measured by Accelerometry

    PubMed Central

    Maslow, Andréa L.; Colabianchi, Natalie

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To examine whether utilization of physical activity resources (eg, parks) was associated with daily physical activity measured by accelerometry. Methods 111 adolescents completed a travel diary with concurrent accelerometry. The main exposure was self-reported utilization of a physical activity resource (none/1+ resources). The main outcomes were total minutes spent in daily 1) moderate-vigorous physical activity and 2) vigorous physical activity. Results Utilizing a physical activity resource was significantly associated with total minutes in moderate-vigorous physical activity. African-Americans and males had significantly greater moderate-vigorous physical activity. Conclusions Results from this study support the development and use of physical activity resources. PMID:21204684

  2. Abrogation of fibroblast activation protein enzymatic activity attenuates tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jonathan D; Valianou, Matthildi; Canutescu, Adrian A; Jaffe, Eileen K; Lee, Hyung-Ok; Wang, Hao; Lai, Jack H; Bachovchin, William W; Weiner, Louis M

    2005-03-01

    Tumor-associated fibroblasts are functionally and phenotypically distinct from normal fibroblasts that are not in the tumor microenvironment. Fibroblast activation protein is a 95 kDa cell surface glycoprotein expressed by tumor stromal fibroblasts, and has been shown to have dipeptidyl peptidase and collagenase activity. Site-directed mutagenesis at the catalytic site of fibroblast activation protein, Ser624 --> Ala624, resulted in an approximately 100,000-fold loss of fibroblast activation protein dipeptidyl peptidase (DPP) activity. HEK293 cells transfected with wild-type fibroblast activation protein, enzymatic mutant (S624A) fibroblast activation protein, or vector alone, were inoculated subcutaneously into immunodeficient mouse to assess the contribution of fibroblast activation protein enzymatic activity to tumor growth. Overexpression of wild-type fibroblast activation protein showed growth potentiation and enhanced tumorigenicity compared with both fibroblast activation protein S624A and vector-transfected HEK293 xenografts. HEK293 cells transfected with fibroblast activation protein S624A showed tumor growth rates and tumorigenicity potential similar only to vector-transfected HEK293. In vivo assessment of fibroblast activation protein DPP activity of these tumors showed enhanced enzymatic activity of wild-type fibroblast activation protein, with only baseline levels of fibroblast activation protein DPP activity in either fibroblast activation protein S624A or vector-only xenografts. These results indicate that the enzymatic activity of fibroblast activation protein is necessary for fibroblast activation protein-driven tumor growth in the HEK293 xenograft model system. This establishes the proof-of-principle that the enzymatic activity of fibroblast activation protein plays an important role in the promotion of tumor growth, and provides an attractive target for therapeutics designed to alter fibroblast activation protein-induced tumor growth by targeting

  3. Photon-activation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Fairchild, R.G.; Bond, V.P.

    1982-01-01

    Photon Activation Therapy (PAT) is a technique in which radiation dose to tumor is enhanced via introduction of stable /sup 127/I in the form of iodinated deoxyuridine (IdUrd). Stimulation of cytotoxic effects from IdUrd is accomplished by activation with external (or implanted) radiation sources. Thus, accumulations of this nucleoside in actively competing cellpools do not preclude therapy in so far as such tissues can be excluded from the radiation field. Calculations show that 5% replacement of thymidine (Tyd) in tumor DNA should enhance the biological effectiveness of a given photon radiotherapy dose by a factor of approx. 3. Proportionally higher gains would result from higher replacements of Tyd and IdUrd. In addition, biological response is enhanced by chemical sensitization with IdUrd. The data indicate that damage from photon activation as well as chemical sensitization does not repair. Thus, at low dose rates, a further increase in therapeutic gain should accrue as normal tissues are allowed to repair and regenerate. A samarium-145 source has been developed for PAT, with activating x-ray energies of from 38 to 45 keV. Favorable clinical results can be expected through the use of IdUrd and protracted irradiations with low energy x-rays. In particular, PAT may provide unique advantages at selected sites such as brain, or head and neck tumors. (ERB)

  4. [Inflammasome: activation mechanisms].

    PubMed

    Suárez, Raibel; Buelvas, Neudo

    2015-03-01

    Inflammation is a rapid biologic response of the immune system in vascular tissues, directed to eliminate stimuli capable of causing damage and begin the process of repair. The macromolecular complexes known as "inflammasomes" are formed by a receptor, either NOD (NLR) or ALR, the receptor absent in melanoma 2 (AIM2). In addition, the inflammasome is formed by the speck-like protein associated to apoptosis (ASC) and procaspase-1, that may be activated by variations in the ionic and intracellular and extracellular ATP concentrations; and the loss of stabilization of the fagolisosomme by internalization of insoluble crystals and redox mechanisms. As a result, there is activation of the molecular platform and the processing of inflammatory prointerleukins to their active forms. There are two modalities of activation of the inflammasome: canonical and non-canonical, both capable of generating effector responses. Recent data associate NLRP 3, IL-1β and IL-18 in the pathogenesis of a variety of diseases, including atherosclerosis, type II diabetes, hyperhomocysteinemia, gout, malaria and hypertension. The inflammasome cascade is emerging as a new chemotherapeutic target in these diseases. In this review we shall discuss the mechanisms of activation and regulation of the inflammasome that stimulate, modulate and resolve inflammation. PMID:25920188

  5. Mechanochemically Active Soft Robots.

    PubMed

    Gossweiler, Gregory R; Brown, Cameron L; Hewage, Gihan B; Sapiro-Gheiler, Eitan; Trautman, William J; Welshofer, Garrett W; Craig, Stephen L

    2015-10-14

    The functions of soft robotics are intimately tied to their form-channels and voids defined by an elastomeric superstructure that reversibly stores and releases mechanical energy to change shape, grip objects, and achieve complex motions. Here, we demonstrate that covalent polymer mechanochemistry provides a viable mechanism to convert the same mechanical potential energy used for actuation in soft robots into a mechanochromic, covalent chemical response. A bis-alkene functionalized spiropyran (SP) mechanophore is cured into a molded poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) soft robot walker and gripper. The stresses and strains necessary for SP activation are compatible with soft robot function. The color change associated with actuation suggests opportunities for not only new color changing or camouflaging strategies, but also the possibility for simultaneous activation of latent chemistry (e.g., release of small molecules, change in mechanical properties, activation of catalysts, etc.) in soft robots. In addition, mechanochromic stress mapping in a functional robotic device might provide a useful design and optimization tool, revealing spatial and temporal force evolution within the robot in a way that might be coupled to autonomous feedback loops that allow the robot to regulate its own activity. The demonstration motivates the simultaneous development of new combinations of mechanophores, materials, and soft, active devices for enhanced functionality. PMID:26390078

  6. Inhibiting glutamine uptake represents an attractive new strategy for treating acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Willems, Lise; Jacque, Nathalie; Jacquel, Arnaud; Neveux, Nathalie; Trovati Maciel, Thiago; Lambert, Mireille; Schmitt, Alain; Poulain, Laury; Green, Alexa S.; Uzunov, Madalina; Kosmider, Olivier; Radford-Weiss, Isabelle; Moura, Ivan Cruz; Auberger, Patrick; Ifrah, Norbert; Bardet, Valérie; Chapuis, Nicolas; Lacombe, Catherine; Mayeux, Patrick; Tamburini, Jérôme

    2013-01-01

    Cancer cells require nutrients and energy to adapt to increased biosynthetic activity, and protein synthesis inhibition downstream of mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) has shown promise as a possible therapy for acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Glutamine contributes to leucine import into cells, which controls the amino acid/Rag/mTORC1 signaling pathway. We show in our current study that glutamine removal inhibits mTORC1 and induces apoptosis in AML cells. The knockdown of the SLC1A5 high-affinity transporter for glutamine induces apoptosis and inhibits tumor formation in a mouse AML xenotransplantation model. l-asparaginase (l-ase) is an anticancer agent also harboring glutaminase activity. We show that l-ases from both Escherichia coli and Erwinia chrysanthemi profoundly inhibit mTORC1 and protein synthesis and that this inhibition correlates with their glutaminase activity levels and produces a strong apoptotic response in primary AML cells. We further show that l-ases upregulate glutamine synthase (GS) expression in leukemic cells and that a GS knockdown enhances l-ase–induced apoptosis in some AML cells. Finally, we observe a strong autophagic process upon l-ase treatment. These results suggest that l-ase anticancer activity and glutamine uptake inhibition are promising new therapeutic strategies for AML. PMID:24014241

  7. Purification and Characterization of Asparaginase from Phaseolus vulgaris Seeds

    PubMed Central

    Mohamed, Saleh A.; Elshal, Mohamed F.; Kumosani, Taha A.; Aldahlawi, Alia M.

    2015-01-01

    L-asparaginase from bacteria has been used in treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia. The aim of this study was to purify and characterize L-asparaginase from Phaseolus vulgaris seeds instead of microbial sources. L-asparaginase was purified to apparent homogeneity. The enzyme has molecular mass of 79 kDa. The purified asparaginase had very low activity toward a number of asparagine and glutamine analogues. L-asparaginase was free from glutaminase activity. Kinetic parameters, Km and Vmax of purified enzyme, were found to be 6.72 mM and 0.16 μM, respectively. The enzyme had optimum pH at 8.0. The enzyme showed high stability at alkaline pH (pH 7.5–9.0) when incubated for up to 24 h. L-asparaginase had the same temperature optimum and thermal stability at 37°C. K+ was able to greatly enhance the activity of asparaginase by 150% compared with other metals tested. In conclusion, L-asparaginase showed no glutaminase activity and good stability over a wide range of physiological conditions, and thus it could be used as a potential candidate for treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia. PMID:26413120

  8. Active imaging at DARPA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricklin, J. C.; Tomlinson, P. G.

    2005-08-01

    Active systems, because they provide their own illumination, are capable of operating 24 hours a day and are not dependent upon the angle of the sun. Unlike passive systems, they can provide three-dimensional imaging. DARPA is currently developing systems, technologies, and signal processing to pioneer new or improve existing capabilities that employ active imaging capabilities. These involve both radar and ladar, ranging from a few MHz for foliage penetration to near-visible IR to achieve ultra-high resolution at long range. These capabilities would improve Battlefield Awareness (BA) and provide persistent Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance (ISR) to perform target detection, recognition, and identification. This paper discusses two different approaches to active optical imaging. One is a coherent approach that uses synthetic aperture techniques with infrared laser radar, and another approach uses only the intensity of the speckle pattern in the aperture plane. Both are capable of producing ultra-high resolution at long range.

  9. Prenucleosomes and Active Chromatin

    PubMed Central

    Khuong, Mai T.; Fei, Jia; Ishii, Haruhiko; Kadonaga, James T.

    2016-01-01

    Chromatin consists of nucleosomes as well as nonnucleosomal histone-containing particles. Here we describe the prenucleosome, which is a stable conformational isomer of the nucleosome that associates with ~80 bp DNA. Prenucleosomes are formed rapidly upon the deposition of histones onto DNA and can be converted into canonical nucleosomes by an ATP-driven chromatin assembly factor such as ACF. Different lines of evidence reveal that there are prenucleosome-sized DNA-containing particles with histones in the upstream region of active promoters. Moreover, p300 acetylates histone H3K56 in prenucleosomes but not in nucleosomes, and H3K56 acetylation is found at active promoters and enhancers. These findings therefore suggest that there may be prenucleosomes or prenucleosome-like particles in the upstream region of active promoters. More generally, we postulate that prenucleosomes or prenucleosome-like particles are present at dynamic chromatin, whereas canonical nucleosomes are at static chromatin. PMID:26767995

  10. Flare Activity on Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oskanian, V. S.

    A review of the existing flare data analyses indicates that most probably the flare phenomenon should be considered as one of the manifestation forms of solar-type chromospheric activity on stars and therefore has to be investigated in common with other phenomena specifying this activity. In order to estimate the reliability of such an approach different types of observational data are discussed. It could be shown that most of the phenomena specifying the solar chromospheric activity (BY Dra syndrome, indicating the spottedness of the stellar surface, long-term cyclic variations of emission line intensities, variable local magnetic fields, flares, coronal phenomena, etc.) are observable on a constantly growing number of stars of almost all spectral types and luminosity classes. This fact indicates that the proposed approach could be the right way to solve the problem of the flare phenomenon.

  11. Activity Cycles in Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hathaway, David H.

    2009-01-01

    Starspots and stellar activity can be detected in other stars using high precision photometric and spectrometric measurements. These observations have provided some surprises (starspots at the poles - sunspots are rarely seen poleward of 40 degrees) but more importantly they reveal behaviors that constrain our models of solar-stellar magnetic dynamos. The observations reveal variations in cycle characteristics that depend upon the stellar structure, convection zone dynamics, and rotation rate. In general, the more rapidly rotating stars are more active. However, for stars like the Sun, some are found to be inactive while nearly identical stars are found to be very active indicating that periods like the Sun's Maunder Minimum (an inactive period from 1645 to 1715) are characteristic of Sun-like stars.

  12. Active oxide nanophotonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dicken, Matthew J.

    Materials that can be manipulated electrically or mechanically to induce a change in their intrinsic properties are highly relevant when suitably integrated with current technologies. These "active" materials, such as oxide-based ferroelectrics or materials with easily accessible changes of phase, find extensive use as mechanical resonators, solid-state memories, and optical modulators. Barium titanate, a tetragonal ferroelectric at room temperature, is a prime example of a material both mechanically and optically active. This thesis deals primarily with the deposition of active, oxide-based materials and their integration into device structures where either the mechanical or optical properties are exploited. The technologically interesting paradigms within which these active oxide materials have been investigated are microelectromechanical systems, plasmonics, and metamaterials. Microelectromechanical systems are devices that have been micromachined and rely on an applied voltage to induce a mechanical response. Mechanically active materials, such as piezoelectrics or ferroelectrics, can increase the response of these devices. Plasmonics deals with electromagnetic waves resonantly coupled into free electron oscillations at a metal-dielectric interface or metal nanoparticle. Coupling to these resonant modes allows surface plasmon polaritons to propagate along the metal with a nonlinear dispersion. Metamaterials are ordered, subwavelength, metal inclusions in a dielectric, which respond collectively to electromagnetic radiation. This response can yield a material permittivity or permeability not found in nature. The optical properties of metamaterials lead to effects such as negative index response and super lensing, and can be used to design optical cloaking structures. Here, devices utilizing these effects are investigated with an eye toward tuning or switching their resonant response using optically active oxide thin films. This manuscript follows the evolution

  13. Space construction activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The Center for Space Construction at the University of Colorado at Boulder was established in 1988 as a University Space Engineering Research Center. The mission of the Center is to conduct interdisciplinary engineering research which is critical to the construction of future space structures and systems and to educate students who will have the vision and technical skills to successfully lead future space construction activities. The research activities are currently organized around two central projects: Orbital Construction and Lunar Construction. Summaries of the research projects are included.

  14. MCO Monitoring activity description

    SciTech Connect

    SEXTON, R.A.

    1998-11-09

    Spent Nuclear Fuel remaining from Hanford's N-Reactor operations in the 1970s has been stored under water in the K-Reactor Basins. This fuel will be repackaged, dried and stored in a new facility in the 200E Area. The safety basis for this process of retrieval, drying, and interim storage of the spent fuel has been established. The monitoring of MCOS in dry storage is a currently identified issue in the SNF Project. This plan outlines the key elements of the proposed monitoring activity. Other fuel stored in the K-Reactor Basins, including SPR fuel, will have other monitoring considerations and is not addressed by this activity description.

  15. Inflammasomes and Their Activation

    PubMed Central

    Khare, Sonal; Luc, Nancy; Dorfleutner, Andrea; Stehlik, Christian

    2011-01-01

    The innate immune system relies on the recognition of pathogens by pattern recognition receptors as a first line of defense and to initiate the adaptive immune response. Substantial progress has been made in defining the role of Nod (nucleotide-binding oligimerization domain)-like receptors and AIM2 (absent in melanoma 2) as pattern recognition receptors that activate inflammasomes in macrophages. Inflammasomes are protein platforms essential for the activation of inflammatory caspases and subsequent maturation of their pro-inflammatory cytokine substrates and induction of pyroptosis. This paper summarizes recent developments regarding the function of Nod-like receptors in immunity and disease. PMID:21083527

  16. Active cleaning technique device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shannon, R. L.; Gillette, R. B.

    1973-01-01

    The objective of this program was to develop a laboratory demonstration model of an active cleaning technique (ACT) device. The principle of this device is based primarily on the technique for removing contaminants from optical surfaces. This active cleaning technique involves exposing contaminated surfaces to a plasma containing atomic oxygen or combinations of other reactive gases. The ACT device laboratory demonstration model incorporates, in addition to plasma cleaning, the means to operate the device as an ion source for sputtering experiments. The overall ACT device includes a plasma generation tube, an ion accelerator, a gas supply system, a RF power supply and a high voltage dc power supply.

  17. Activated carbon material

    DOEpatents

    Evans, A. Gary

    1978-01-01

    Activated carbon particles for use as iodine trapping material are impregnated with a mixture of selected iodine and potassium compounds to improve the iodine retention properties of the carbon. The I/K ratio is maintained at less than about 1 and the pH is maintained at above about 8.0. The iodine retention of activated carbon previously treated with or coimpregnated with triethylenediamine can also be improved by this technique. Suitable flame retardants can be added to raise the ignition temperature of the carbon to acceptable standards.

  18. Cryogenic activities at ESTEC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jewell, C. I.

    1989-05-01

    Although the main present cryogenic activity in ESTEC revolves around the preparation of ISO for launch in 1993, many other activities such as Meteosat second generation, FIRST, GRASP, QUASAT, and X-ray detection using bolometers all require some form of cooling to 80 K or less. ESTEC, in an effort to overcome the major constraint of lifetime when using the solution of cryogens is currently involved in the study and development of two mechanical coolers for work in the temperature ranges of 80 and 4 K are based on a Stirling cycle. This paper gives an overview of ESTEC cryogenic interests with an emphasis on the above mechanical coolers.

  19. Solar cell activation system

    SciTech Connect

    Apelian, L.

    1983-07-05

    A system for activating solar cells involves the use of phosphorescent paint, the light from which is amplified by a thin magnifying lens and used to activate solar cells. In a typical system, a member painted with phosphorescent paint is mounted adjacent a thin magnifying lens which focuses the light on a predetermined array of sensitive cells such as selenium, cadmium or silicon, mounted on a plastic board. A one-sided mirror is mounted adjacent the cells to reflect the light back onto said cells for purposes of further intensification. The cells may be coupled to rechargeable batteries or used to directly power a small radio or watch.

  20. Active seismic experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kovach, R. L.; Watkins, J. S.; Talwani, P.

    1972-01-01

    The Apollo 16 active seismic experiment (ASE) was designed to generate and monitor seismic waves for the study of the lunar near-surface structure. Several seismic energy sources are used: an astronaut-activated thumper device, a mortar package that contains rocket-launched grenades, and the impulse produced by the lunar module ascent. Analysis of some seismic signals recorded by the ASE has provided data concerning the near-surface structure at the Descartes landing site. Two compressional seismic velocities have so far been recognized in the seismic data. The deployment of the ASE is described, and the significant results obtained are discussed.

  1. Physical Activities for Preschool.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adkins, Dorothy C.; And Others

    The underlying premise of the University of Hawaii Physical Activities for Preschool curriculum is that important contributions to a positive self-concept are made by motor independence and a realistic body image. Program objectives include: (1) the development of strength, endurance, and flexibility in skills that involve the muscles,…

  2. The Puzzle Design Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Marc E.

    1983-01-01

    A sampling of puzzles and games produced by students at North Rockland High School (New York) are presented as an example of a way student-designed activities can be used to cover a specific unit within the health education curriculum. Produced by 9th and 10th graders, the unit on alcohol consists of puzzles and word games using related vocabulary…

  3. [Problem Solving Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wisconsin Univ. - Stout, Menomonie. Center for Vocational, Technical and Adult Education.

    The teacher directed problem solving activities package contains 17 units: Future Community Design, Let's Build an Elevator, Let's Construct a Catapult, Let's Design a Recreational Game, Let's Make a Hand Fishing Reel, Let's Make a Wall Hanging, Let's Make a Yo-Yo, Marooned in the Past, Metrication, Mousetrap Vehicles, The Multi System…

  4. Production Systems. Laboratory Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallaway, Ann, Ed.

    This production systems guide provides teachers with learning activities for secondary students. Introductory materials include an instructional planning outline and worksheet, an outline of essential elements, domains and objectives, a course description, and a content outline. The guide contains 30 modules on the following topics: production…

  5. Elastolytic activity among staphylococci.

    PubMed Central

    Janda, J M

    1986-01-01

    A total of 161 isolates of the genus Staphylococcus were evaluated for the ability to produce elastase. Elastase activity was detected only in S. epidermidis strains (sensu stricto), being absent in S. aureus isolates and other coagulase-negative staphylococci tested. The elastase elaborated by S. epidermidis isolates appeared to be an inducible enzyme whose synthesis was medium dependent. PMID:3640774

  6. Activities: Preparing for Pythagoras.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laing, Robert A.

    1989-01-01

    Three worksheets are provided to help secondary students explore relationships among the areas of a variety of similar figures constructed on the sides of right triangles. The activity is extended to include the relationship among the lengths of the sides of the right triangle. Included are several student worksheets. (DC)

  7. Active-bridge oscillator

    DOEpatents

    Wessendorf, Kurt O.

    2001-01-01

    An active bridge oscillator is formed from a differential amplifier where positive feedback is a function of the impedance of one of the gain elements and a relatively low value common emitter resistance. This use of the nonlinear transistor parameter h stabilizes the output and eliminates the need for ALC circuits common to other bridge oscillators.

  8. Regional Activities Division. Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Federation of Library Associations, The Hague (Netherlands).

    Papers on library network activities in Canada, the Third World, Japan, Malaysia, Brazil, and Sweden which were presented at the 1982 International Federation of Library Associations (IFLA) conference include: (1) "Canada: A Voluntary and Flexible Network," a review by Guy Sylvestre of the political, social, and economic structures affecting…

  9. Facilitating Active Learner Participation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenberg, Steven; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Project Participate has developed and implemented a model for making decisions about interventions that enhance the ability of a preschool child with severe motor disabilities to actively participate in educational programs. The effectiveness of the process in increasing child participation in play, communication, social interaction, and mobility…

  10. EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities

    SciTech Connect

    2011-11-21

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Vehicle Technologies Program manages several transportation regulatory activities established by the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPAct), as amended by the Energy Conservation Reauthorization Act of 1998, EPAct 2005, and the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA).

  11. Evaluating Guidance Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanborn, Marshall P.

    This report discusses one of the consistent problems in school counseling and guidance-that of furnishing concrete evidence concerning the effects of counseling and guidance activities on the development of children. The following causal factors are discussed: (1) the difficulty of pinning down abstractly stated goals in an operational manner at…

  12. Activity: Computer Talk.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clearing: Nature and Learning in the Pacific Northwest, 1985

    1985-01-01

    Presents an activity in which students create a computer program capable of recording and projecting paper use at school. Includes instructional strategies and background information such as requirements for pounds of paper/tree, energy needs, water consumption, and paper value at the recycling center. A sample program is included. (DH)

  13. Educating for Political Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chitty, Clyde

    2010-01-01

    The term "political activity" can be interpreted in a myriad of different ways, but in this paper, it is taken to mean involvement in a variety of campaigns around issues affecting the way we live and the sort of society we want to live in. At a time when support for the main political parties has never been weaker, it is essential that teachers…

  14. Conflict Activity Cards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levy, Margo; Otero, George

    These action oriented activity cards dealing with conflict situations are for use with secondary students. The cards are intended to supplement any course dealing with conflict, including U.S. history, sociology, English, literature, economics, area studies, or political science. The cards are organized by color into certain broad categories which…

  15. Arsenic activation neutron detector

    DOEpatents

    Jacobs, Eddy L.

    1981-01-01

    A detector of bursts of neutrons from a deuterium-deuteron reaction includes a quantity of arsenic adjacent a gamma detector such as a scintillator and photomultiplier tube. The arsenic is activated by the 2.5 Mev neutrons to release gamma radiation which is detected to give a quantitative representation of detected neutrons.

  16. Arsenic activation neutron detector

    DOEpatents

    Jacobs, E.L.

    1980-01-28

    A detector of bursts of neutrons from a deuterium-deuteron reaction includes a quantity of arsenic adjacent a gamma detector such as a scintillator and photomultiplier tube. The arsenic is activated by the 2.5-MeV neutrons to release gamma radiation which is detected to give a quantitative representation of detected neutrons.

  17. Primary Guidance Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hauck, Ruth, Comp.

    Designed for the primary grades, the guidance activities in this document cover thirty-three topical areas: capabilities, changes, cooperation, criticism, differences, family, feelings, free time, friends, following directions, handicaps, honesty, improving environment, kindness, patience, paying attention, problem solving, rejection,…

  18. Dissemination Activities Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barclay, Hanna; Batatia, Hudj; Bauters, Merja; Ben Ami, Zvi; Drachman, Raul; Flouris, Giorgos; Jadin, Tanja; Jalonen, Satu; Karlgren, Klas; Karpati, Andrea; Kotzinos, Dimitris; Lakkala, Minna; Lallimo, Jiri; Moen, Anne; Nygard, Kathrine; Paavola, Sami; Padiglia, Sheila; Scapolla, Marina; Sins, Patrick; Vasileva, Tania

    2008-01-01

    In the first 24 months of the project, KP-Lab members were highly dedicated to dissemination and were engaged in various dissemination activities that contributed to the prime objective of the KP-Lab dissemination efforts which is "to make the project widely known to a variety of prospective users and, at a later stage, to promote the…

  19. Rubisco Activase Activity Assays

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) activase functions as a mechano-chemical motor protein using the energy from ATP hydrolysis to contort the structure of its target protein, Rubisco. This action modulates the activation state of Rubisco by removing tightly-bound inhibitory s...

  20. Active Learning Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zayapragassarazan, Z.; Kumar, Santosh

    2012-01-01

    Present generation students are primarily active learners with varied learning experiences and lecture courses may not suit all their learning needs. Effective learning involves providing students with a sense of progress and control over their own learning. This requires creating a situation where learners have a chance to try out or test their…

  1. Geology: The Active Earth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braus, Judy, Ed.

    1987-01-01

    Ranger Rick's NatureScope is a creative education series dedicated to inspiring in children an understanding and appreciation of the natural world while developing the skills they will need to make responsible decisions about the environment. The topic of this issue is "Geology: The Active Earth." Contents are organized into the following…

  2. Ocean Drilling Simulation Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Telese, James A.; Jordan, Kathy

    The Ocean Drilling Project brings together scientists and governments from 20 countries to explore the earth's structure and history as it is revealed beneath the oceans' basins. Scientific expeditions examine rock and sediment cores obtained from the ocean floor to learn about the earth's basic processes. The series of activities in this…

  3. E-Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brewster, Joy

    2001-01-01

    Presents five technology-based activities to teach elementary students about the human body, including: creating a heartbeat graph; charting the benefits of exercise; playing a "sense"ational card game; reading online stories from three children living with various conditions or illnesses; and examining diagrams of the human body that have been…

  4. Highlights of 1976 activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitzpatrick, M.

    1976-01-01

    Highlights of NASA's 1976 activities are summarized. Sixteen successful launches were made. Two landings of Viking spacecraft on Mars and rollout of the space shuttle orbiter are reviewed. Applications of aerospace science to education, health care, and community services are also discussed.

  5. Bonus Activity Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Learning, 1993

    1993-01-01

    Elementary level activity book presents suggestions for teaching students about endangered and threatened species worldwide. Students learn about what is causing the rapid extinction rate and what needs to be done. They also discover the value of rainforests and why conservationists are fighting to save them. (SM)

  6. Communication Systems. Laboratory Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutherland, Barbara, Ed.

    This communication systems guide provides teachers with learning activities for secondary students. Introductory materials include an instructional planning outline and worksheet, an outline of essential elements, a list of objectives, a course description, and a content outline. The guide contains 32 modules on the following topics: story…

  7. Open Space Learning Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knapp, Clifford E.

    1976-01-01

    Describes a science activity in which students are given an opportunity to consider the values of open space. The program includes direct involvement as communicators of feelings and facts, leading students to a position of making wise decisions for land use in the future. (EB)

  8. Earthfest. Activity Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weilbacher, Mike

    1991-01-01

    An activity book to help elementary teachers and students explore the environment offers information and questions about spaceships; an ecology primer and poster with questions; information on animal adaptation with poster and questions; ecological and dramatic arts projects; a script for performance; and suggestions to make Earth Day celebrations…

  9. Forecasting geomagnetic activity indices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schofield, J.; Wing, S.; Johnson, J. R.

    2007-12-01

    Magnetically active times, e.g., Kp > 5, are notoriously difficult to predict, precisely the times when such predictions are crucial to the space weather users. Taking advantage of the routinely available solar wind measurements at Langrangian point (L1) and nowcast Kps, Kp and Dst forecast models based on neural networks were developed with the focus on improving the forecast for active times. To satisfy different needs and operational constraints, three models were developed: (1) a model that inputs nowcast Kp and solar wind parameters and predicts Kp 1 hr ahead; (2) a model with the same input as model 1 and predicts Kp 4 hr ahead; and (3) a model that inputs only solar wind parameters and predicts Kp 1 hr ahead (the exact prediction lead time depends on the solar wind speed and the location of the solar wind monitor.) Extensive evaluations of these models and other major operational Kp forecast models show that, while the new models can predict Kps more accurately for all activities, the most dramatic improvements occur for moderate and active times. Similar Dst models were developed. Information dynamics analysis of Kp, suggests that geospace is more dominated by internal dynamics near solar minimum than near solar maximum, when it is more directly driven by external inputs, namely solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF).

  10. Holidays & Festivals: Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Debbie

    There are many times throughout the year when change is celebrated. This elementary level, interdisciplinary resource gives background information and activities related to cross-cultural celebrations of change. Topics covered include: (1) "Charting Changes"; (2) "Special People"; (3) "Celebrating Light"; (4) "Planting and Harvesting"; and (5)…

  11. Environmental Chemistry Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackland, Thomas; And Others

    The authors of this curriculum supplement believe in a laboratory approach to chemistry and express the feeling that environmental chemistry provides the students an opportunity to apply theoretical chemistry to important practical problems. There are eighteen activities presented, each accompanied with behavioral objectives, one or more suggested…

  12. Energy assessment: physical activity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Physical activity is an important component of total energy expenditure, contributing to energy intake needs; it also provides certain health benefits. This review chapter provides state-of-the-art information to researchers and clinicians who are interested in developing research studies or interv...

  13. TI-73 Calculator Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips-Bey, Carol K.

    2004-01-01

    This article describes TI-73 calculator activities appropriate for middle school students. It was found that the use of the calculator allowed for higher-level thinking and a richer exploration of mathematical ideas by students. [Included with this article are "Dice Roll Worksheet" and "Transforming Tree Worksheet".] (Contains 9 figures.)

  14. Creative Activity and Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cunningham, Flora E.

    1979-01-01

    This article compares three theories of the creative process taken from aesthetic philosophy: aesthetic enjoyment (D. W. Gotshalk), aesthetic experience (John Dewey), and aesthetic knowledge (Susanne Langer). Each shows different versions of the learning that accrues from creative activity. From this, curriculum planning and teaching suggestions…

  15. Shark Tagging Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Current: The Journal of Marine Education, 1998

    1998-01-01

    In this group activity, children learn about the purpose of tagging and how scientists tag a shark. Using a cut-out of a shark, students identify, measure, record data, read coordinates, and tag a shark. Includes introductory information about the purpose of tagging and the procedure, a data sheet showing original tagging data from Tampa Bay, and…

  16. Active rejector filter

    SciTech Connect

    Kuchinskii, A.G.; Pirogov, S.G.; Savchenko, V.M.; Yakushev, A.K.

    1985-01-01

    This paper describes an active rejector filter for suppressing noise signals in the frequency range 50-100 Hz and for extracting a vlf information signal. The filter has the following characteristics: a high input impedance, a resonant frequency of 75 Hz, a Q of 1.25, and an attenuation factor of 53 dB at resonant frequency.

  17. 85 Engaging Movement Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weikart, Phyllis S.; Carlton, Elizabeth B.

    This book presents activities to keep K-6 students moving in a variety of ways as they learn. The movement experiences are planned around key curriculum concepts in movement and music as well as in academic curriculum areas. The experiences develop students' basic timing, language abilities, vocabulary, concentration, planning skills, and…

  18. Highlights of 1978 activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    General highlights of NASA's activities for 1978 are presented. The highlights are categorized into topics such as space science, space transportation systems, space and terrestrial applications, environment, technology utilization, aeronautics, space research and technology, energy programs, and international. A list of the 1978 launches including: (1) launch date; (2) payload designation; (3) launch vehicle; (4) launch site and (5) mission remarks is also presented.

  19. Commission 10: Solar Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Driel-Gesztelyi, Lidia; Schrijver, Carolus J.; Klimchuk, James A.; Charbonneau, Paul; Fletcher, Lyndsay; Hasan, S. Sirajul; Hudson, Hugh S.; Kusano, Kanya; Mandrini, Cristina H.; Peter, Hardi; Vršnak, Bojan; Yan, Yihua

    2012-04-01

    Commission 10 of the International Astronomical Union has more than 650 members who study a wide range of activity phenomena produced by our nearest star, the Sun. Solar activity is intrinsically related to solar magnetic fields and encompasses events from the smallest energy releases (nano- or even picoflares) to the largest eruptions in the Solar System, coronal mass ejections (CMEs), which propagate into the Heliosphere reaching the Earth and beyond. Solar activity is manifested in the appearance of sunspot groups or active regions, which are the principal sources of activity phenomena from the emergence of their magnetic flux through their dispersion and decay. The period 2008-2009 saw an unanticipated extended solar cycle minimum and unprecedentedly weak polar-cap and heliospheric field. Associated with that was the 2009 historical maximum in galactic cosmic rays flux since measurements begun in the middle of the 20th Century. Since then Cycle 24 has re-started solar activity producing some spectacular eruptions observed with a fleet of spacecraft and ground-based facilities. In the last triennium major advances in our knowledge and understanding of solar activity were due to continuing success of space missions as SOHO, Hinode, RHESSI and the twin STEREO spacecraft, further enriched by the breathtaking images of the solar atmosphere produced by the Solar Dynamic Observatory (SDO) launched on 11 February 2010 in the framework of NASA's Living with a Star program. In August 2012, at the time of the IAU General Assembly in Beijing when the mandate of this Commission ends, we will be in the unique position to have for the first time a full 3-D view of the Sun and solar activity phenomena provided by the twin STEREO missions about 120 degrees behind and ahead of Earth and other spacecraft around the Earth and ground-based observatories. These new observational insights are continuously posing new questions, inspiring and advancing theoretical analysis and

  20. Asteroseismic stellar activity relations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonanno, A.; Corsaro, E.; Karoff, C.

    2014-11-01

    Context. In asteroseismology an important diagnostic of the evolutionary status of a star is the small frequency separation which is sensitive to the gradient of the mean molecular weight in the stellar interior. It is thus interesting to discuss the classical age-activity relations in terms of this quantity. Moreover, as the photospheric magnetic field tends to suppress the amplitudes of acoustic oscillations, it is important to quantify the importance of this effect by considering various activity indicators. Aims: We propose a new class of age-activity relations that connects the Mt. Wilson S index and the average scatter in the light curve with the small frequency separation and the amplitude of the p-mode oscillations. Methods: We used a Bayesian inference to compute the posterior probability of various empirical laws for a sample of 19 solar-like active stars observed by the Kepler telescope. Results: We demonstrate the presence of a clear correlation between the Mt. Wilson S index and the relative age of the stars as indicated by the small frequency separation, as well as an anti-correlation between the S index and the oscillation amplitudes. We argue that the average activity level of the stars shows a stronger correlation with the small frequency separation than with the absolute age that is often considered in the literature. Conclusions: The phenomenological laws discovered in this paper have the potential to become new important diagnostics to link stellar evolution theory with the dynamics of global magnetic fields. In particular we argue that the relation between the Mt. Wilson S index and the oscillation amplitudes is in good agreement with the findings of direct numerical simulations of magneto-convection.

  1. Interdisciplinary Astronomy Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nerantzis, Nikolaos; Mitrouda, Aikaterini; Reizopoulou, Ioanna; Sidiropoulou, Eirini; Hatzidimitriou, Antonios

    2016-04-01

    On November 9th, 2015, three didactical hours were dedicated to Interdisciplinary Astronomy Activities (http://wp.me/p6Hte2-1I). Our students and their teachers formed three groups and in rotation, were engaged with the following activities: (a) viewing unique images of the Cosmos in the mobile planetarium STARLAB (http://www.planitario.gr/tholos-starlab-classic-standard.html), (b) watching the following videos: Journey to the end of the universe (https://youtu.be/Ufl_Nwbl8xs), Rosetta update (https://youtu.be/nQ9ivd7wv30), The Solar System (https://youtu.be/d66dsagrTa0), Ambition the film (https://youtu.be/H08tGjXNHO4) in the school's library. Students and teachers were informed about our solar system, the Rosetta mission, the universe, etc. and (c) tactile activities such as Meet our home and Meet our neighbors (http://astroedu.iau.org, http://nuclio.org/astroneighbours/resources) and the creation of planets' 3D models (Geology-Geography A' Class Student's book, pg.15). With the activities above we had the pleasure to join the Cosmic Light Edu Kit / International Year of Light 2015 program. After our Interdisciplinary Astronomy Activities, we did a "small" research: our students had to fill an evaluation about their educational gains and the results can be found here http://wp.me/p6Hte2-2q. Moreover, we discussed about Big Ideas of Science (http://wp.me/p3oRiZ-dm) and through the "big" impact of the Rosetta mission & the infinity of our universe, we print posters with relevant topics and place them to the classrooms. We thank Rosa Doran (Nuclio - President of the Executive Council) for her continuous assistance and support on innovative science teaching proposals. She is an inspiration.

  2. [Primary prevention: physical activity].

    PubMed

    Schuler, G

    2004-01-01

    Traditional risk factors such as smoking, hypertension and being overweight have received considerable attention in recent years, whereas physical activity as a preventive strategy does not enjoy the same public attention. In recent years the level of physical activity has decreased dramatically in children and adolescents in favor of time spent on the internet and in front of the TV. If this trend is allowed to develop along the same direction, a sharp increase in cardiovascular disease can be anticipated. The protective action of physical activity on the cardiovascular system has been well documented in large numbers of patients, and the basic physiological mechanisms have been elucidated. Metabolic changes comprise loss of weight, reduction in triglyceride and LDL levels, as well as an increase in HDL. Insulin sensitivity is enhanced in all tissues postponing the manifestation of diabetes mellitus. Shear forces created by physical activity induce ecNOS within the endothelial lining of the arteries. This enzyme is responsible for controlling vasomotion through the elaboration of NO which causes vasodilation in the smooth muscle within the vessel wall. Utilization of preformed collateral vessels has been postulated repeatedly; so far, however, it only could be documented in animals, not in humans. Nearly all studies concerned with primary prevention have shown a significant negative correlation between energy expenditure during exercise and cardiovascular mortality, even light and moderate exercise will result in a lower incidence. In order to eliminate a sedentary life style in children and adolescents, adequate programs should be initiated in all schools; they should aim for 60 min of physical activity on a daily basis. PMID:15021990

  3. Molecular expression of l-asparaginase gene from Nocardiopsis alba NIOT-VKMA08 in Escherichia coli: A prospective recombinant enzyme for leukaemia chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Meena, Balakrishnan; Anburajan, Lawrance; Vinithkumar, Nambali Valsalan; Shridhar, Divya; Raghavan, Rangamaran Vijaya; Dharani, Gopal; Kirubagaran, Ramalingam

    2016-09-30

    l-Asparaginase is an antineoplastic agent that selectively reduces the level of l-asparagine in blood and diminishes the proliferation of cancerous cells. Studies were carried out on the cloning and heterologous expression of l-asparaginase biosynthesis gene (ansA) from Nocardiopsis alba NIOT-VKMA08 to achieve the stable inducible system that overproduces the glutaminase-free recombinant l-asparaginase. Overexpression of recombinant l-asparaginase was achieved with an optimized final concentration of 1.5mM of isopropyl-β-d-thiogalactoside (IPTG) and the enzyme was expressed as a soluble protein. The recombinant enzyme was purified using nickel-nitrilotriacetic acid (Ni-NTA) chromatography and the purified enzyme disclosed an elevated level of asparaginase activity (158.1IU/mL). Optimum pH and temperature of the purified l-asparaginase for the hydrolysis of l-asparagine were 8.0 and 37°C and it was very specific for its natural substrate, l-asparagine. Detailed studies were carried out on the kinetics of enzyme reaction, catalytic activity, temperature and ionic strength and the thermostability of the l-asparaginase enzyme. The functional characterisation of the recombinant l-asparaginase was studied through Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), in silico sequence analysis and protein structural modelling. Glutaminase activity was not detected in the recombinant l-asparaginase, which could reduce the probable side effects during leukaemia therapy. PMID:27155523

  4. Glutaminolysis Was Induced by TGF-β1 through PP2Ac Regulated Raf-MEK-ERK Signaling in Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Guo, YanYan; Deng, YuanJun; Li, XiaoQing; Ning, Yong; Lin, XuePing; Guo, ShuiMing; Chen, MeiXue; Han, Min

    2016-01-01

    Vascular endothelial cells can survive under hypoxic and inflammatory conditions by alterations of the cellular energy metabolism. In addition to high rates of glycolysis, glutaminolysis is another important way of providing the required energy to support cellular sprouting in such situations. However, the exact mechanism in which endothelial cells upregulate glutaminolysis remains unclear. Here we demonstrated that protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A)-mediated Raf-MEK-ERK signaling was involved in glutaminolysis in endothelial cells. Using models of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) treated with transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1), we observed a dramatic induction in cellular glutamate levels accompanied by Raf-MEK-ERK activation. By addition of U0126, the specific inhibitor of MEK1/2, the expression of kidney-type glutaminase (KGA, a critical glutaminase in glutaminolysis) was significantly decreased. Moreover, inhibition of PP2A by okadaic acid (OA), a specific inhibitor of PP2A phosphatase activity or by depletion of its catalytic subunit (PP2Ac), led to a significant inactivation of Raf-MEK-ERK signaling and reduced glutaminolysis in endothelial cells. Taken together, these results indicated that PP2A-dependent Raf-MEK-ERK activation was involved in glutaminolysis and inhibition of PP2A signals was sufficient to block Raf-MEK-ERK pathway and reduced glutamine metabolism in endothelial cells. PMID:27612201

  5. Novel polymeric sulfonium photoacid generator and its application for chemically amplified photoresists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Juan; Qiao, Yu; Wang, Liyuan

    2014-03-01

    Chemically amplified resists (CARs) which involved the photoacid generator (PAG) have been widely used because of the high sensitivity. The inherent incompatibility between the polymer matrix and small molecular PAGs leads to problems including PAG phase separation, non-uniform initial PAG and photoacid distribution, as well as acid migration during the post-exposure baking (PEB) processes. The polymeric PAGs based resist systems which incorporated the PAG units into the main chain showed improved lithographic performance, such as faster photospeed and higher stability, lower outgassing, and lower LER than corresponding blend resists. In this paper, a novel type of polymeric PAGs based on poly (4-hydroxylstyrene) (PHS) was discussed. Chemically amplified photorssists were formed by the polymeric PAG and other film forming material containing acid labile groups. The polymeric PAGs showed advantage over the common small molecular PAG and patterns with 180 nm resolution was obtained in the 248-nm lithography.

  6. Critical Thinking: Inert Information, Activated Ignorance, and Activated Knowledge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paul, Richard; Elder, Linda

    2001-01-01

    Suggests that there are three ways of taking in information: internalizing inert information, forming activated ignorance, or achieving activated knowledge. Explains that only activated knowledge leads the learner, by implication, to more knowledge, and that seeking the logic of things can lead to discovery of activated knowledge. (NB)

  7. Is Enhanced Physical Activity Possible Using Active Videogames?

    PubMed Central

    Baranowski, Janice; O'Connor, Teresia; Lu, Amy Shirong; Thompson, Debbe

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Our research indicated that 10–12-year-old children receiving two active Wii™ (Nintendo®; Nintendo of America, Inc., Redmond, WA) console videogames were no more physically active than children receiving two inactive videogames. Research is needed on how active videogames may increase physical activity. PMID:24416640

  8. 101 Environmental Education Activities. Booklet 6--Social Studies Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitney, Helen, Comp.

    Based on the environment and directed at elementary and intermediate level students, 5 field trips are a significant part of the 12 social studies activities in the sixth booklet by the Upper Mississippi River ECO-Center outlining environmental and outdoor education activities. Most of the activities include objectives, activity description,…

  9. Integration of Active Video Games in Extracurricular Activity at Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Jung Eun; Huang, Charles; Pope, Zachary; Gao, Zan

    2015-01-01

    Active video games require players to be physically active. Dance Dance Revolution (DDR) is an interactive dancing game that requires fast-foot movement coordinated with energetic music and visuals. The Wii and Xbox Kinect games have also become good active video games for the promotion of physical activity participation. These games are much more…

  10. Pulmonary Myeloperoxidase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Ozment, Tammy Regena

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophils are considered one of the first responders of the innate immune response. Their primary activities are to migrate to sites of infection by chemotaxis and trans-migration across the endothelium (Gaines et al., 2005). Once at the site of infection, they phagocytize microbes and kill them. Critical to the neutrophil's ability to kill microbes are the multiple degradative enzymes contained within granules. The activity of these enzymes is non-specific, and therefore, neutrophils also contribute to tissue damage at the site of infection (Gaines and Berliner, 2005). Measurement of neutrophil infiltration into tissues is one way to gauge the severity of infection, inflammation, and tissue damage (Ayala et al., 2002). Myeloperoxidase is found in the primary granules of neutrophils and is an effective measure of neutrophil infiltration into tissues (Gaines and Berliner, 2005).

  11. Optimism in Active Learning

    PubMed Central

    Collet, Timothé; Pietquin, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    Active learning is the problem of interactively constructing the training set used in classification in order to reduce its size. It would ideally successively add the instance-label pair that decreases the classification error most. However, the effect of the addition of a pair is not known in advance. It can still be estimated with the pairs already in the training set. The online minimization of the classification error involves a tradeoff between exploration and exploitation. This is a common problem in machine learning for which multiarmed bandit, using the approach of Optimism int the Face of Uncertainty, has proven very efficient these last years. This paper introduces three algorithms for the active learning problem in classification using Optimism in the Face of Uncertainty. Experiments lead on built-in problems and real world datasets demonstrate that they compare positively to state-of-the-art methods. PMID:26681934

  12. Apheresis activity in Venezuela.

    PubMed

    Saltiel, Christiane

    2005-07-01

    Interest for apheresis activity has been growing in Venezuela. In 1976 there were only a few devices; in 2003, 80 apheresis machines performed 27,675 donor apheresis procedures and 547 therapeutic procedures countrywide. We report the activity at the Metropolitan Blood Bank (the largest one of the country) in the period 1999-2003: 597 therapeutic procedures were performed in 171 patients, during 212 crisis episodes. The average age was 38 +/- 16 years, 65% male and 35% female. Most of the therapeutic procedures were therapeutic plasma exchange for hematology diseases (mainly thrombotic thrombocitopenic purpura and hemophilia inhibitors), including 184 therapeutic procedures with the Autopheresis-C (Baxter Healthcare Corp., Deerfield, IL). Most common adverse effects (3.9%) were hypotension and allergic reactions to the plasma. PMID:15880361

  13. Active region seismology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogdan, Tom; Braun, D. C.

    1995-01-01

    Active region seismology is concerned with the determination and interpretation of the interaction of the solar acoustic oscillations with near-surface target structures, such as magnetic flux concentration, sunspots, and plage. Recent observations made with a high spatial resolution and a long temporal duration enabled measurements of the scattering matrix for sunspots and solar active regions to be carried out as a function of the mode properties. Based on this information, the amount of p-mode absorption, partial-wave phase shift, and mode mixing introduced by the sunspot, could be determined. In addition, the possibility of detecting the presence of completely submerged magnetic fields was raised, and new procedures for performing acoustic holography of the solar interior are being developed. The accumulating evidence points to the mode conversion of p-modes to various magneto-atmospheric waves within the magnetic flux concentration as being the unifying physical mechanism responsible for these diverse phenomena.

  14. LANSCE Activity Report

    SciTech Connect

    Amy Robinson; Audrey Archuleta; Barbara Maes; Dan Strottman; Earl Hoffman; Garth Tietjen; Gene Farnum; Geoff Greene; Joyce Roberts; Ken Johnson; Paul Lewis; Roger Pynn; Stan Schriber; Steve Sterbenz; Steve Wender; Sue Harper

    1999-02-01

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center Activity Report describes scientific and technological progress and achievements in LANSCE Division during the period of 1995 to 1998. This report includes a message from the Division Director, an overview of LANSCE, sponsor overviews, research highlights, advanced projects and facility upgrades achievements, experimental and user program accomplishments, news and events, and a list of publications. The research highlights cover the areas of condensed-matter science and engineering, accelerator science, nuclear science, and radiography. This report also contains a compact disk that includes an overview, the Activity Report itself, LANSCE operations progress reports for 1996 and 1997, experiment reports from LANSCE users, as well as a search capability.

  15. Active microchannel heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Tonkovich, Anna Lee Y [Pasco, WA; Roberts, Gary L [West Richland, WA; Call, Charles J [Pasco, WA; Wegeng, Robert S [Richland, WA; Wang, Yong [Richland, WA

    2001-01-01

    The present invention is an active microchannel heat exchanger with an active heat source and with microchannel architecture. The microchannel heat exchanger has (a) an exothermic reaction chamber; (b) an exhaust chamber; and (c) a heat exchanger chamber in thermal contact with the exhaust chamber, wherein (d) heat from the exothermic reaction chamber is convected by an exothermic reaction exhaust through the exhaust chamber and by conduction through a containment wall to the working fluid in the heat exchanger chamber thereby raising a temperature of the working fluid. The invention is particularly useful as a liquid fuel vaporizer and/or a steam generator for fuel cell power systems, and as a heat source for sustaining endothermic chemical reactions and initiating exothermic reactions.

  16. Active nanoplasmonic metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hess, O.; Pendry, J. B.; Maier, S. A.; Oulton, R. F.; Hamm, J. M.; Tsakmakidis, K. L.

    2012-07-01

    Optical metamaterials and nanoplasmonics bridge the gap between conventional optics and the nanoworld. Exciting and technologically important capabilities range from subwavelength focusing and stopped light to invisibility cloaking, with applications across science and engineering from biophotonics to nanocircuitry. A problem that has hampered practical implementations have been dissipative metal losses, but the efficient use of optical gain has been shown to compensate these and to allow for loss-free operation, amplification and nanoscopic lasing. Here, we review recent and ongoing progress in the realm of active, gain-enhanced nanoplasmonic metamaterials. On introducing and expounding the underlying theoretical concepts of the complex interaction between plasmons and gain media, we examine the experimental efforts in areas such as nanoplasmonic and metamaterial lasers. We underscore important current trends that may lead to improved active imaging, ultrafast nonlinearities on the nanoscale or cavity-free lasing in the stopped-light regime.

  17. Modeling flexible active nematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varga, Michael; Selinger, Robin

    We study active nematic phases of self-propelled flexible chains in two dimensions using computer simulation, to investigate effects of chain flexibility. In a ``dry'' phase of self-propelled flexible chains, we find that increasing chain stiffness enhances orientational order and correlation length, narrows the distribution of turning angles, increases persistence length, and increases the magnitude of giant density fluctuations. We further adapt the simulation model to describe behavior of microtubules driven by kinesin molecular motors in two different environments: on a rigid substrate with kinesin immobilized on the surface; and on a lipid membrane where kinesin is bonded to lipid head groups and can diffuse. Results are compared to experiments by L. Hirst and J. Xu. Lastly, we consider active nematics of flexible particles enclosed in soft, deformable encapsulation in two dimensions, and demonstrate novel mechanisms of pattern formation that are fundamentally different from those observed in bulk. Supported by NSF-DMR 1409658.

  18. Active Biological Materials

    PubMed Central

    Fletcher, Daniel A.; Geissler, Phillip L.

    2011-01-01

    Cells make use of dynamic internal structures to control shape and create movement. By consuming energy to assemble into highly organized systems of interacting parts, these structures can generate force and resist compression, as well as adaptively change in response to their environment. Recent progress in reconstituting cytoskeletal structures in vitro has provided an opportunity to characterize the mechanics and dynamics of filament networks formed from purified proteins. Results indicate that a complex interplay between length scales and timescales underlies the mechanical responses of these systems and that energy consumption, as manifested in molecular motor activity and cytoskeletal filament growth, can drive transitions between distinct material states. This review discusses the basic characteristics of these active biological materials that set them apart from conventional materials and that create a rich array of unique behaviors. PMID:18999991

  19. Endocrine activation in tachycardias.

    PubMed

    Lukac, P; Lukacova, S; Vigas, M; Hatala, R

    2001-01-01

    This article reviews the complex character of neuroendocrine response to paroxysmal tachycardia. While the endocrine influences in arrhythmogenesis are well perceived by the cardiologists, less attention has been paid to influence of tachycardia on neuroendocrine activation. However, this may significantly alter the clinical course of tachycardias and its responses to pharmacotherapeutic interventions. Main characteristics of hormones with direct relationship to cardiovascular system (ANP, AVP, catecholamines, angiotensin and others) are listed with description of regulation of their secretion and main biological effects, especially with regard to regulation of circulation. Changes in hemodynamics during tachycardia with accompanying changes in ANP, AVP renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, sympatho-neural and sympatho-adrenal activation are reviewed. Further research and understanding require more complex approach and concentration on interrelationship of different regulatory hormones in tachycardia. (Fig. 2, Ref. 96.) PMID:11763674

  20. Mount Erebus activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An international team of scientists reports that unusually high seismic activity joggled Mount Erebus last fall. However, the Antarctic volcano showed no external signs of an eruption.When scientists from the United States, Japan, and New Zealand returned to the world's southernmost active volcano last November for their annual field expedition, they found that seismic stations recorded 650 small tremors on October 8; prior to that, the number of quakes had averaged between 20 and 80 per day. The October 8 maximum was followed by 140 on October 9 and 120 on October 10. Philip R. Kyle, assistant professor of geochemistry at the New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology in Socorro and leader of the team studying Mount Erebus, noted that some of the strongest earthquakes recorded during the team's 3 years of observations occurred on October 8; these registered less than 2 on the Richter scale.