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Sample records for activated glutaminase pag

  1. STEREOLOGICAL ESTIMATES OF THE BASAL FOREBRAIN CELL POPULATION IN THE RAT, INCLUDING NEURONS CONTAINING CHOLINE ACETYLTRANSFERASE (ChAT), GLUTAMIC ACID DECARBOXYLASE (GAD) OR PHOSPHATE-ACTIVATED GLUTAMINASE (PAG) AND COLOCALIZING VESICULAR GLUTAMATE TRANSPORTERS (VGluTs)

    PubMed Central

    GRITTI, I.; HENNY, P.; GALLONI, F.; MAINVILLE, L.; MARIOTTI, M.; JONES, B. E.

    2006-01-01

    The basal forebrain (BF) plays an important role in modulating cortical activity and influencing attention, learning and memory. These activities are fulfilled importantly yet not entirely by cholinergic neurons. Noncholinergic neurons also contribute and are comprised by GABAergic neurons and other possibly glutamatergic neurons. The aim of the present study was to estimate the total number of cells in the BF of the rat and the proportions of that total represented by cholinergic, GABAergic and glutamatergic neurons. For this purpose, cells were counted using unbiased stereological methods within the medial septum, diagonal band, magnocellular preoptic nucleus, substantia innominata and globus pallidus in sections stained for Nissl substance and/or the neurotransmitter enzymes, choline acetyltransferase (ChAT), glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) or phosphate-activated glutaminase (PAG). In Nissl-stained sections, the total number of neurons in the BF was estimated as ~355,000 and the numbers of ChAT-immuno-positive (+) as ~22,000, GAD+ ~119,000 and PAG+ ~316,000, corresponding to ~5%, ~35% and ~90% of the total. Thus, of the large population of BF neurons, only a small proportion has the capacity to synthesize acetylcholine (ACh), one third to synthesize GABA and the vast majority to synthesize glutamate (Glu). Moreover, through the presence of PAG, a proportion of ACh- and GABA-synthesizing neurons also have the capacity to synthesize Glu. In sections dual fluorescent immunostained for vesicular transporters, VGluT3 and not VGluT2 was present in the cell bodies of most PAG+ and ChAT+ and half the GAD+ cells. Given previous results showing that VGluT2 and not VGluT3 was present in BF axon terminals and not colocalized with VAChT or VGAT, we conclude that the BF cell population influences cortical and subcortical regions through neurons which release ACh, GABA or Glu from their terminals but which in part can also synthesize and release Glu from their soma or

  2. Determination of Phosphate-activated Glutaminase Activity and Its Kinetics in Mouse Tissues using Metabolic Mapping (Quantitative Enzyme Histochemistry)

    PubMed Central

    Botman, Dennis; Tigchelaar, Wikky

    2014-01-01

    Phosphate-activated glutaminase (PAG) converts glutamine to glutamate as part of the glutaminolysis pathway in mitochondria. Two genes, GLS1 and GLS2, which encode for kidney-type PAG and liver-type PAG, respectively, differ in their tissue-specific activities and kinetics. Tissue-specific PAG activity and its kinetics were determined by metabolic mapping using a tetrazolium salt and glutamate dehydrogenase as an auxiliary enzyme in the presence of various glutamine concentrations. In kidney and brain, PAG showed Michaelis-Menten kinetics with a Km of 0.6 mM glutamine and a Vmax of 1.1 µmol/mL/min when using 5 mM glutamine. PAG activity was high in the kidney cortex and inner medulla but low in the outer medulla, papillary tip, glomeruli and the lis of Henle. In brain tissue sections, PAG was active in the grey matter and inactive in myelin-rich regions. Liver PAG showed allosteric regulation with a Km of 11.6 mM glutamine and a Vmax of 0.5 µmol/mL/min when using 20 mM glutamine. The specificity of the method was shown after incubation of brain tissue sections with the PAG inhibitor 6-diazo-5-oxo-L-norleucine. PAG activity was decreased to 22% in the presence of 2 mM 6-diazo-5-oxo-L-norleucine. At low glutamine concentrations, PAG activity was higher in periportal regions, indicating a lower Km for periportal PAG. When compared with liver, kidney and brain, other tissues showed 3-fold to 6-fold less PAG activity. In conclusion, PAG is mainly active in mouse kidney, brain and liver, and shows different kinetics depending on which type of PAG is expressed. PMID:25163927

  3. Summary of PhysPAG Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritz, Steven M.

    2012-01-01

    The Physics of the Cosmos (PCOS) Program Analysis Group (PhysPAG) provides an important interface between the scientific community and NASA in matters related to PCOS objectives. An Executive Committee facilitates the work of several subgroups, including a Technology Science Analysis Group and an Inflation Probe Science Analysis Group. Work is also starting in areas of X-ray, gamma-ray, and gravitational wave astrophysics. The PAG reports to the Astrophysics Subcommittee of the NASA Advisory Council. A summary of PhysPAG activities will be given, along with time for questions and discussion.

  4. Summary of PhysPAG Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nousek, John A.

    2014-01-01

    The Physics of the Cosmos Program Analysis Group (PhysPAG) is responsible for solicitiing and coordinating community input for the development and execution of NASA's Physics of the Cosmos (PCOS) program. In this session I will report on the activity of the PhysPAG, and solicit community involvement in the process of defining PCOS objectives, planning SMD architecture, and prioritizing PCOS activities. I will also report on the activities of the PhysPAG Executive Committee, which include the chairs of the Science Analysis Groups/ Science Interest Groups which fall under the PhysPAG sphere of interest. Time at the end of the presentation willl be reserved for questions and discussion from the community.

  5. Summary of PhysPAG Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritz, Steven M.

    2013-01-01

    The Physics of the Cosmos (PCOS) Program Analysis Group (PhysPAG) provides an important interface between the scientific community and NASA in matters related to PCOS objectives, and also provides opportunities for community discussions. An Executive Committee facilitates the work of several subgroups, including an Inflation Probe Science Analysis Group (IPSAG), an X-ray group (XRSAG) , a gamma-ray,group (GRSAG), a gravitational wave group (GWSAG), and a cosmic-ray group (CRSAG). In addition to identifying opportunities and issues, these groups also help articulate technology needs. Membership in all the SAGs is completely open, with information and newsletter signups available on the PhysPAG pages at the PCOS program website. The PhysPAG reports to the Astrophysics Subcommittee of the NASA Advisory Council. A summary of PhysPAG activities will be given, along with time for questions and discussion.

  6. Regulation of transcription and activity of Rhizobium etli glutaminase A.

    PubMed

    Huerta-Saquero, Alejandro; Calderón-Flores, Arturo; Díaz-Villaseñor, Andrea; Du Pont, Gisela; Durán, Socorro

    2004-08-01

    The present study determines the regulatory mechanisms that operate on Rhizobium etli glutaminase A. glsA gene expression levels were evaluated under several metabolic conditions by fusions of the glsA gene promoter and the transcriptional reporter cassette uidA2-aad. glsA expression was directly correlated to the glutaminase A activity found under the tested growth conditions, reaching its maximum level in the presence of glutamine and during exponential growth phase. Glutamine induces glsA expression. The influence of allosteric metabolites on glutaminase A activity was also determined. The purified enzyme was inhibited by 2-oxoglutarate and pyruvate, whereas oxaloacetate and glyoxylate modulate it positively. Glutaminase A is not inhibited by glutamate and is activated by ammonium. Glutaminase A participates in an ATP-consuming cycle where glutamine is continually degraded and resynthesized by glutamine synthetase (GS). GS and glutaminase A activities appear simultaneously during bacterial growth under different metabolic conditions and their control mechanisms are not reciprocal. Slight overproduction in glutaminase A expression causes a reduction in growth yield and a dramatic decrease in bacterial growth. We propose a model for regulation of glutaminase A, and discuss its contribution to glutamine cycle regulation. PMID:15279892

  7. Metformin Inhibits Glutaminase Activity and Protects against Hepatic Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Ampuero, Javier; Ranchal, Isidora; Nuñez, David; Díaz-Herrero, María del Mar; Maraver, Marta; del Campo, José Antonio; Rojas, Ángela; Camacho, Inés; Figueruela, Blanca; Bautista, Juan D.; Romero-Gómez, Manuel

    2012-01-01

    Aim To investigate the influence of metformin use on liver dysfunction and hepatic encephalopathy in a retrospective cohort of diabetic cirrhotic patients. To analyze the impact of metformin on glutaminase activity and ammonia production in vitro. Methods Eighty-two cirrhotic patients with type 2 diabetes were included. Forty-one patients were classified as insulin sensitizers experienced (metformin) and 41 as controls (cirrhotic patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus without metformin treatment). Baseline analysis included: insulin, glucose, glucagon, leptin, adiponectin, TNFr2, AST, ALT. HOMA-IR was calculated. Baseline HE risk was calculated according to minimal hepatic encephalopathy, oral glutamine challenge and mutations in glutaminase gene. We performed an experimental study in vitro including an enzymatic activity assay where glutaminase inhibition was measured according to different metformin concentrations. In Caco2 cells, glutaminase activity inhibition was evaluated by ammonia production at 24, 48 and 72 hours after metformina treatment. Results Hepatic encephalopathy was diagnosed during follow-up in 23.2% (19/82): 4.9% (2/41) in patients receiving metformin and 41.5% (17/41) in patients without metformin treatment (logRank 9.81; p = 0.002). In multivariate analysis, metformin use [H.R.11.4 (95% CI: 1.2–108.8); p = 0.034], age at diagnosis [H.R.1.12 (95% CI: 1.04–1.2); p = 0.002], female sex [H.R.10.4 (95% CI: 1.5–71.6); p = 0.017] and HE risk [H.R.21.3 (95% CI: 2.8–163.4); p = 0.003] were found independently associated with hepatic encephalopathy. In the enzymatic assay, glutaminase activity inhibition reached 68% with metformin 100 mM. In Caco2 cells, metformin (20 mM) decreased glutaminase activity up to 24% at 72 hours post-treatment (p<0.05). Conclusions Metformin was found independently related to overt hepatic encephalopathy in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and high risk of hepatic encephalopathy. Metformin

  8. Glutamate and GABA-metabolizing enzymes in post-mortem cerebellum in Alzheimer's disease: phosphate-activated glutaminase and glutamic acid decarboxylase.

    PubMed

    Burbaeva, G Sh; Boksha, I S; Tereshkina, E B; Savushkina, O K; Prokhorova, T A; Vorobyeva, E A

    2014-10-01

    Enzymes of glutamate and GABA metabolism in postmortem cerebellum from patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) have not been comprehensively studied. The present work reports results of original comparative study on levels of phosphate-activated glutaminase (PAG) and glutamic acid decarboxylase isoenzymes (GAD65/67) in autopsied cerebellum samples from AD patients and matched controls (13 cases in each group) as well as summarizes published evidence for altered levels of PAG and GAD65/67 in AD brain. Altered (decreased) levels of these enzymes and changes in links between amounts of these enzymes and other glutamate-metabolizing enzymes (such as glutamate dehydrogenase and glutamine synthetase-like protein) in AD cerebella suggest significantly impaired glutamate and GABA metabolism in this brain region, which was previously regarded as not substantially involved in AD pathogenesis.

  9. Purification and characterization of a glutaminase enzyme accounting for the majority of glutaminase activity in Aspergillus sojae under solid-state culture.

    PubMed

    Ito, Kotaro; Hanya, Yoshiki; Koyama, Yasuji

    2013-10-01

    Glutaminase, an enzyme that hydrolyzes L-glutamine to L-glutamate, plays an important role in the production of fermented foods by enhancing the umami taste. In this study, we found ten glutaminase genes in the Aspergillus sojae genome by conducting a BLAST search of the characterized glutaminase sequence. We subsequently constructed glutaminase gene disruptants. The glutaminase activity of the gahB disruptant was decreased by approximately 90 % in A. sojae and Aspergillus oryzae, indicating that this enzyme (GahB) accounted for the majority of the glutaminase activity in Aspergillus species. Subsequently, GahB protein was purified from the AsgahB-overexpressing transformant and characterized. The molecular mass was estimated to be approximately 110 and 259 kDa by SDS-PAGE and gel filtration chromatography, respectively, indicating that the native form of AsGahB was a dimer. The optimal pH was 9.0, and the optimal temperature was 50 °C. Analysis of substrate specificity revealed that AsGahB had peptidoglutaminase-asparaginase activity, similar to AsGahA, but preferred free L-glutamine to free L-asparagine, C-terminal glutaminyl, and asparaginyl residues in peptides.

  10. Glutaminase Activity Determines Cytotoxicity of L-Asparaginases on Most Leukemia Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Parmentier, Jean Hugues; Maggi, Maristella; Tarasco, Erika; Scotti, Claudia; Avramis, Vassilios I; Mittelman, Steven D.

    2015-01-01

    L-Asparaginase (ASNase) is a front-line chemotherapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), which acts by deaminating asparagine and glutamine. To evaluate the importance of glutaminase activity, we exploited a recently developed mutant of Helicobacter pylori ASNase (dm HpA), with amino acid substitutions M121C/T169M. The mutant form has the same asparaginase activity as wild-type but lacks glutaminase activity. Wild-type and dm HpA were compared with the clinically used ASNases from E. coli (L-ASP) and Erwinia chrysanthemi (ERWase). Asparaginase activity was similar for all isoforms, while glutaminase activity followed the rank order: ERWase > L-ASP > wild-type HpA > dm HpA. Cytotoxic efficacy of ASNases was tested on 11 human leukemia cell lines and two patient-derived ALL samples. Two cell lines which we had previously shown to be asparagine-dependent were equally sensitive to the asparaginase isoforms. The other nine lines and the two patient-derived samples were more sensitive to isoforms with higher glutaminase activities. ERWase was overall the most effective ASNase on all cell lines tested whereas dm HpA, having the lowest glutaminase activity, was the least effective. These data demonstrate that asparaginase activity alone may not be sufficient for ASNase cytotoxicity, and that glutaminase activity may be required for full anti-leukemic efficacy. PMID:25941002

  11. The glutaminase activity of l-asparaginase is not required for anticancer activity against ASNS-negative cells

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Wai Kin; Lorenzi, Philip L.; Anishkin, Andriy; Purwaha, Preeti; Rogers, David M.; Sukharev, Sergei; Rempe, Susan B.; Weinstein, John N.

    2014-01-01

    l-Asparaginase (l-ASP) is a key component of therapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Its mechanism of action, however, is still poorly understood, in part because of its dual asparaginase and glutaminase activities. Here, we show that l-ASP’s glutaminase activity is not always required for the enzyme’s anticancer effect. We first used molecular dynamics simulations of the clinically standard Escherichia coli l-ASP to predict what mutated forms could be engineered to retain activity against asparagine but not glutamine. Dynamic mapping of enzyme substrate contacts identified Q59 as a promising mutagenesis target for that purpose. Saturation mutagenesis followed by enzymatic screening identified Q59L as a variant that retains asparaginase activity but shows undetectable glutaminase activity. Unlike wild-type l-ASP, Q59L is inactive against cancer cells that express measurable asparagine synthetase (ASNS). Q59L is potently active, however, against ASNS-negative cells. Those observations indicate that the glutaminase activity of l-ASP is necessary for anticancer activity against ASNS-positive cell types but not ASNS-negative cell types. Because the clinical toxicity of l-ASP is thought to stem from its glutaminase activity, these findings suggest the hypothesis that glutaminase-negative variants of l-ASP would provide larger therapeutic indices than wild-type l-ASP for ASNS-negative cancers. PMID:24659632

  12. Allosteric properties of phosphate-activated glutaminase of human liver mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Snodgrass, P J; Lund, P

    1984-03-22

    The kinetics of human liver phosphate-activated glutaminase were studied in mitochondria isolated from surgical biopsies. The pH profile and activation by phosphate closely resembled rat liver glutaminase and differed clearly from human or rat kidney mitochondrial glutaminases. The activity responses to glutamine or phosphate were allosteric, showing positive cooperativity, as in the rat liver enzyme. Exogenous 1 mM NH4Cl shifted the glutamine concentration at half-maximal velocity, [Gln]0.5, to lower values without changing Vmax or sigmoidicity. Hill plots showed a parallel shift to the left with NH4Cl and the apparent number of binding sites, nH, was 2-3. 25 mM KHCO3 gave the same effects as NH4Cl on [Gln]0.5, Vmax, sigmoidicity and nH. The combination of the two activators was less than additive. Glutamate did not inhibit. We postulate that liver glutaminase is allosteric in its kinetics because it plays a key role in urea synthesis by regulating provision of glutamate for synthesis of N-acetylglutamate, the obligatory co-factor of carbamoylphosphate synthetase. PMID:6704422

  13. Design and Characterization of Erwinia Chrysanthemi l-Asparaginase Variants with Diminished l-Glutaminase Activity.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Hien Anh; Su, Ying; Lavie, Arnon

    2016-08-19

    Current FDA-approved l-asparaginases also possess significant l-glutaminase activity, which correlates with many of the toxic side effects of these drugs. Therefore, l-asparaginases with reduced l-glutaminase activity are predicted to be safer. We exploited our recently described structures of the Erwinia chrysanthemi l-asparaginase (ErA) to inform the design of mutants with diminished ability to hydrolyze l-glutamine. Structural analysis of these variants provides insight into the molecular basis for the increased l-asparagine specificity. A primary role is attributed to the E63Q mutation that acts to hinder the correct positioning of l-glutamine but not l-asparagine. The substitution of Ser-254 with either an asparagine or a glutamine increases the l-asparagine specificity but only when combined with the E63Q mutation. The A31I mutation reduces the substrate Km value; this is a key property to allow the required therapeutic l-asparagine depletion. Significantly, an ultra-low l-glutaminase ErA variant maintained its cell killing ability. By diminishing the l-glutaminase activity of these highly active l-asparaginases, our engineered ErA variants hold promise as l-asparaginases with fewer side effects. PMID:27354283

  14. Effect of lysine to alanine mutations on the phosphate activation and BPTES inhibition of glutaminase.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Charles J; Acheff, Eric; Kennedy, Ryan; Taylor, Lynn; Curthoys, Norman P

    2015-09-01

    The GLS1 gene encodes a mitochondrial glutaminase that is highly expressed in brain, kidney, small intestine and many transformed cells. Recent studies have identified multiple lysine residues in glutaminase that are sites of N-acetylation. Interestingly, these sites are located within either a loop segment that regulates access of glutamine to the active site or the dimer:dimer interface that participates in the phosphate-dependent oligomerization and activation of the enzyme. These two segments also contain the binding sites for bis-2[5-phenylacetamido-1,2,4-thiadiazol-2-yl]ethylsulfide (BPTES), a highly specific and potent uncompetitive inhibitor of this glutaminase. BPTES is also the lead compound for development of novel cancer chemotherapeutic agents. To provide a preliminary assessment of the potential effects of N-acetylation, the corresponding lysine to alanine mutations were constructed in the hGACΔ1 plasmid. The wild type and mutated proteins were purified by Ni(+)-affinity chromatography and their phosphate activation and BPTES inhibition profiles were analyzed. Two of the alanine substitutions in the loop segment (K311A and K328A) and the one in the dimer:dimer interface (K396A) form enzymes that require greater concentrations of phosphate to produce half-maximal activation and exhibit greater sensitivity to BPTES inhibition. By contrast, the K320A mutation results in a glutaminase that exhibits near maximal activity in the absence of phosphate and is not inhibited by BPTES. Thus, lysine N-acetylation may contribute to the acute regulation of glutaminase activity in various tissues and alter the efficacy of BPTES-type inhibitors.

  15. Structural basis for the active site inhibition mechanism of human kidney-type glutaminase (KGA).

    PubMed

    Thangavelu, K; Chong, Qing Yun; Low, Boon Chuan; Sivaraman, J

    2014-01-01

    Glutaminase is a metabolic enzyme responsible for glutaminolysis, a process harnessed by cancer cells to feed their accelerated growth and proliferation. Among the glutaminase isoforms, human kidney-type glutaminase (KGA) is often upregulated in cancer and is thus touted as an attractive drug target. Here we report the active site inhibition mechanism of KGA through the crystal structure of the catalytic domain of KGA (cKGA) in complex with 6-diazo-5-oxo-L-norleucine (DON), a substrate analogue of glutamine. DON covalently binds with the active site Ser286 and interacts with residues such as Tyr249, Asn335, Glu381, Asn388, Tyr414, Tyr466 and Val484. The nucleophilic attack of Ser286 sidechain on DON releases the diazo group (N2) from the inhibitor and results in the formation of an enzyme-inhibitor complex. Mutational studies confirmed the key role of these residues in the activity of KGA. This study will be important in the development of KGA active site inhibitors for therapeutic interventions.

  16. Structural Basis for the Active Site Inhibition Mechanism of Human Kidney-Type Glutaminase (KGA)

    PubMed Central

    Thangavelu, K.; Chong, Qing Yun; Low, Boon Chuan; Sivaraman, J.

    2014-01-01

    Glutaminase is a metabolic enzyme responsible for glutaminolysis, a process harnessed by cancer cells to feed their accelerated growth and proliferation. Among the glutaminase isoforms, human kidney-type glutaminase (KGA) is often upregulated in cancer and is thus touted as an attractive drug target. Here we report the active site inhibition mechanism of KGA through the crystal structure of the catalytic domain of KGA (cKGA) in complex with 6-diazo-5-oxo-L-norleucine (DON), a substrate analogue of glutamine. DON covalently binds with the active site Ser286 and interacts with residues such as Tyr249, Asn335, Glu381, Asn388, Tyr414, Tyr466 and Val484. The nucleophilic attack of Ser286 sidechain on DON releases the diazo group (N2) from the inhibitor and results in the formation of an enzyme-inhibitor complex. Mutational studies confirmed the key role of these residues in the activity of KGA. This study will be important in the development of KGA active site inhibitors for therapeutic interventions. PMID:24451979

  17. Antitumor activity of the glutaminase inhibitor CB-839 in triple-negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Gross, Matt I; Demo, Susan D; Dennison, Jennifer B; Chen, Lijing; Chernov-Rogan, Tania; Goyal, Bindu; Janes, Julie R; Laidig, Guy J; Lewis, Evan R; Li, Jim; Mackinnon, Andrew L; Parlati, Francesco; Rodriguez, Mirna L M; Shwonek, Peter J; Sjogren, Eric B; Stanton, Timothy F; Wang, Taotao; Yang, Jinfu; Zhao, Frances; Bennett, Mark K

    2014-04-01

    Glutamine serves as an important source of energy and building blocks for many tumor cells. The first step in glutamine utilization is its conversion to glutamate by the mitochondrial enzyme glutaminase. CB-839 is a potent, selective, and orally bioavailable inhibitor of both splice variants of glutaminase (KGA and GAC). CB-839 had antiproliferative activity in a triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) cell line, HCC-1806, that was associated with a marked decrease in glutamine consumption, glutamate production, oxygen consumption, and the steady-state levels of glutathione and several tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates. In contrast, no antiproliferative activity was observed in an estrogen receptor-positive cell line, T47D, and only modest effects on glutamine consumption and downstream metabolites were observed. Across a panel of breast cancer cell lines, GAC protein expression and glutaminase activity were elevated in the majority of TNBC cell lines relative to receptor positive cells. Furthermore, the TNBC subtype displayed the greatest sensitivity to CB-839 treatment and this sensitivity was correlated with (i) dependence on extracellular glutamine for growth, (ii) intracellular glutamate and glutamine levels, and (iii) GAC (but not KGA) expression, a potential biomarker for sensitivity. CB-839 displayed significant antitumor activity in two xenograft models: as a single agent in a patient-derived TNBC model and in a basal like HER2(+) cell line model, JIMT-1, both as a single agent and in combination with paclitaxel. Together, these data provide a strong rationale for the clinical investigation of CB-839 as a targeted therapeutic in patients with TNBC and other glutamine-dependent tumors.

  18. Active Glutaminase C Self-assembles into a Supratetrameric Oligomer That Can Be Disrupted by an Allosteric Inhibitor*

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Amanda Petrina Scotá; Cassago, Alexandre; Gonçalves, Kaliandra de Almeida; Dias, Marília Meira; Adamoski, Douglas; Ascenção, Carolline Fernanda Rodrigues; Honorato, Rodrigo Vargas; de Oliveira, Juliana Ferreira; Ferreira, Igor Monteze; Fornezari, Camila; Bettini, Jefferson; Oliveira, Paulo Sérgio Lopes; Paes Leme, Adriana Franco; Portugal, Rodrigo Villares; Ambrosio, Andre Luis Berteli; Dias, Sandra Martha Gomes

    2013-01-01

    The phosphate-dependent transition between enzymatically inert dimers into catalytically capable tetramers has long been the accepted mechanism for the glutaminase activation. Here, we demonstrate that activated glutaminase C (GAC) self-assembles into a helical, fiber-like double-stranded oligomer and propose a molecular model consisting of seven tetramer copies per turn per strand interacting via the N-terminal domains. The loop 321LRFNKL326 is projected as the major regulating element for self-assembly and enzyme activation. Furthermore, the previously identified in vivo lysine acetylation (Lys311 in humans, Lys316 in mouse) is here proposed as an important down-regulator of superoligomer assembly and protein activation. Bis-2-(5-phenylacetamido-1,3,4-thiadiazol-2-yl)ethyl sulfide, a known glutaminase inhibitor, completely disrupted the higher order oligomer, explaining its allosteric mechanism of inhibition via tetramer stabilization. A direct correlation between the tendency to self-assemble and the activity levels of the three mammalian glutaminase isozymes was established, with GAC being the most active enzyme while forming the longest structures. Lastly, the ectopic expression of a fiber-prone superactive GAC mutant in MDA-MB 231 cancer cells provided considerable proliferative advantages to transformed cells. These findings yield unique implications for the development of GAC-oriented therapeutics targeting tumor metabolism. PMID:23935106

  19. Glutamatergic or GABAergic neuron-specific, long-term expression in neocortical neurons from helper virus-free HSV-1 vectors containing the phosphate-activated glutaminase, vesicular glutamate transporter-1, or glutamic acid decarboxylase promoter.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Morten; Kong, Lingxin; Zhang, Guo-rong; Liu, Meng; Wang, Xiaodan; Szabo, Gabor; Curthoys, Norman P; Geller, Alfred I

    2007-05-01

    Many potential uses of direct gene transfer into neurons require restricting expression to one of the two major types of forebrain neurons, glutamatergic or GABAergic neurons. Thus, it is desirable to develop virus vectors that contain either a glutamatergic or GABAergic neuron-specific promoter. The brain/kidney phosphate-activated glutaminase (PAG), the product of the GLS1 gene, produces the majority of the glutamate for release as neurotransmitter, and is a marker for glutamatergic neurons. A PAG promoter was partially characterized using a cultured kidney cell line. The three vesicular glutamate transporters (VGLUTs) are expressed in distinct populations of neurons, and VGLUT1 is the predominant VGLUT in the neocortex, hippocampus, and cerebellar cortex. Glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) produces GABA; the two molecular forms of the enzyme, GAD65 and GAD67, are expressed in distinct, but largely overlapping, groups of neurons, and GAD67 is the predominant form in the neocortex. In transgenic mice, an approximately 9 kb fragment of the GAD67 promoter supports expression in most classes of GABAergic neurons. Here, we constructed plasmid (amplicon) Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV-1) vectors that placed the Lac Z gene under the regulation of putative PAG, VGLUT1, or GAD67 promoters. Helper virus-free vector stocks were delivered into postrhinal cortex, and the rats were sacrificed 4 days or 2 months later. The PAG or VGLUT1 promoters supported approximately 90% glutamatergic neuron-specific expression. The GAD67 promoter supported approximately 90% GABAergic neuron-specific expression. Long-term expression was observed using each promoter. Principles for obtaining long-term expression from HSV-1 vectors, based on these and other results, are discussed. Long-term glutamatergic or GABAergic neuron-specific expression may benefit specific experiments on learning or specific gene therapy approaches. Of note, promoter analyses might identify regulatory elements that determine

  20. Residue-Dependent Thermodynamic Cost and Barrel Plasticity Balances Activity in the PhoPQ-Activated Enzyme PagP of Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Bharat Ramasubramanian; Mahalakshmi, Radhakrishnan

    2015-09-22

    PagP is an eight-stranded transmembrane β-barrel enzyme indispensable for lipid A palmitoylation in Gram-negative bacteria. The severity of infection by pathogens, including Salmonella, Legionella, and Bordetella, and resistance to antimicrobial peptides, relies on lipid A remodeling by PagP, rendering PagP a sought-after drug target. Despite a conserved sequence, more robust palmitoylation of lipid A is observed in Salmonella typhimurium compared to Escherichia coli, a possible consequence of the differential regulation of PagP expression and/or specific activity. Work here identifies molecular signatures that demarcate thermodynamic stability and variances in catalytic efficiency between S. typhimurium (PagP-St) and E. coli (PagP-Ec) transmembrane PagP barrel variants. We demonstrate that Salmonella PagP displays a 2-fold destabilization of the barrel, while achieving 15-20 magnitude higher lipase efficiency, through subtle alterations of lipid-facing residues distal from the active site. We find that catalytic properties of these homologues are retained across different lipid environments such as micelles, vesicles, and natural extracts. By comparing thermodynamic stability with activity of selectively designed mutants, we conclude that activity-stability trade-offs can be influenced by factors secluded from the catalytic region. Our results provide a compelling correlation of the primary protein structure with enzymatic activity, barrel thermodynamic stability, and scaffold plasticity. Our analysis can open avenues for the development of potent pharmaceuticals against salmonellosis.

  1. T Helper Cell Activation and Expansion Is Sensitive to Glutaminase Inhibition under Both Hypoxic and Normoxic Conditions.

    PubMed

    Sener, Zeynep; Cederkvist, Fritjof H; Volchenkov, Roman; Holen, Halvor L; Skålhegg, Bjørn S

    2016-01-01

    Immune responses often take place where nutrients and O2 availability are limited. This has an impact on T cell metabolism and influences activation and effector functions. T cell proliferation and expansion are associated with increased consumption of glutamine which is needed in a number of metabolic pathways and regulate various physiological processes. The first step in endogenous glutamine metabolism is reversible and is regulated by glutaminase (GLS1 and GLS2) and glutamine synthase (GLUL). There are two isoforms of GLS1, Kidney type glutaminase (KGA) and Glutaminase C (GAC). The aim of this study is to investigate the expression, localization and role of GLS1 and GLUL in naïve and activated human CD4+ T cells stimulated through the CD3 and CD28 receptors under normoxia and hypoxia. In proliferating cells, GAC was upregulated and KGA was downregulated, and both enzymes were located to the mitochondria irrespective of O2 levels. By contrast GLUL is localized to the cytoplasm and was upregulated under hypoxia. Proliferation was dependent on glutamine consumption, as glutamine deprivation and GLS1 inhibition decreased proliferation and expression of CD25 and CD226, regardless of O2 availability. Again irrespective of O2, GLS1 inhibition decreased the proportion of CCR6 and CXCR3 expressing CD4+ T cells as well as cytokine production. We propose that systemic Th cell activation and expansion might be dependent on glutamine but not O2 availability. PMID:27467144

  2. T Helper Cell Activation and Expansion Is Sensitive to Glutaminase Inhibition under Both Hypoxic and Normoxic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Sener, Zeynep; Cederkvist, Fritjof H.; Volchenkov, Roman; Holen, Halvor L.; Skålhegg, Bjørn S.

    2016-01-01

    Immune responses often take place where nutrients and O2 availability are limited. This has an impact on T cell metabolism and influences activation and effector functions. T cell proliferation and expansion are associated with increased consumption of glutamine which is needed in a number of metabolic pathways and regulate various physiological processes. The first step in endogenous glutamine metabolism is reversible and is regulated by glutaminase (GLS1 and GLS2) and glutamine synthase (GLUL). There are two isoforms of GLS1, Kidney type glutaminase (KGA) and Glutaminase C (GAC). The aim of this study is to investigate the expression, localization and role of GLS1 and GLUL in naïve and activated human CD4+ T cells stimulated through the CD3 and CD28 receptors under normoxia and hypoxia. In proliferating cells, GAC was upregulated and KGA was downregulated, and both enzymes were located to the mitochondria irrespective of O2 levels. By contrast GLUL is localized to the cytoplasm and was upregulated under hypoxia. Proliferation was dependent on glutamine consumption, as glutamine deprivation and GLS1 inhibition decreased proliferation and expression of CD25 and CD226, regardless of O2 availability. Again irrespective of O2, GLS1 inhibition decreased the proportion of CCR6 and CXCR3 expressing CD4+ T cells as well as cytokine production. We propose that systemic Th cell activation and expansion might be dependent on glutamine but not O2 availability. PMID:27467144

  3. T Helper Cell Activation and Expansion Is Sensitive to Glutaminase Inhibition under Both Hypoxic and Normoxic Conditions.

    PubMed

    Sener, Zeynep; Cederkvist, Fritjof H; Volchenkov, Roman; Holen, Halvor L; Skålhegg, Bjørn S

    2016-01-01

    Immune responses often take place where nutrients and O2 availability are limited. This has an impact on T cell metabolism and influences activation and effector functions. T cell proliferation and expansion are associated with increased consumption of glutamine which is needed in a number of metabolic pathways and regulate various physiological processes. The first step in endogenous glutamine metabolism is reversible and is regulated by glutaminase (GLS1 and GLS2) and glutamine synthase (GLUL). There are two isoforms of GLS1, Kidney type glutaminase (KGA) and Glutaminase C (GAC). The aim of this study is to investigate the expression, localization and role of GLS1 and GLUL in naïve and activated human CD4+ T cells stimulated through the CD3 and CD28 receptors under normoxia and hypoxia. In proliferating cells, GAC was upregulated and KGA was downregulated, and both enzymes were located to the mitochondria irrespective of O2 levels. By contrast GLUL is localized to the cytoplasm and was upregulated under hypoxia. Proliferation was dependent on glutamine consumption, as glutamine deprivation and GLS1 inhibition decreased proliferation and expression of CD25 and CD226, regardless of O2 availability. Again irrespective of O2, GLS1 inhibition decreased the proportion of CCR6 and CXCR3 expressing CD4+ T cells as well as cytokine production. We propose that systemic Th cell activation and expansion might be dependent on glutamine but not O2 availability.

  4. Cortical glutaminase, beta-glucuronidase and glucose utilization in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    McGeer, E G; McGeer, P L; Akiyama, H; Harrop, R

    1989-11-01

    Large pyramidal neurons of rat and human neocortex stain immunohistochemically for phosphate-activated glutaminase (PAG). In a limited number of postmortem brains, we find large reductions in cortical PAG activity in Alzheimer's disease (AD). This finding is consistent with histological evidence that pyramidal neurons are affected in AD. The reductions are greater than those found in the same samples in choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) but the possible deleterious effects of coma and similar premortem factors on human PAG activity have yet to be assessed. The activity of beta-glucuronidase, a lysosomal enzyme which occurs in reactive astrocytes, is elevated in the same samples. Positron emission tomography (PET) studies, using 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG), have demonstrated significant deficiencies in glucose metabolism in the cortex in AD, with the parietal, temporal and some frontal areas being particularly affected. We found in serial scans of 13 AD cases, including one relatively young (44-46 year old) familial case, an exacerbation of the defect over time in most cases. We have found a negative correlation between the regional metabolic rates for glucose (LCMR(s] measured premortem and the beta-glucuronidase activities measured postmortem on a few AD cases that have come to autopsy. The correlations between LCMR(s) and PAG and ChAT activities tend to be positive. The results are consistent with previous suggestions that decreased LCMR(s) in AD reflect local neuronal loss and gliosis.

  5. Changes in the activity levels of glutamine synthetase, glutaminase and glycogen synthetase in rats subjected to hypoxic stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vats, P.; Mukherjee, A. K.; Kumria, M. M. L.; Singh, S. N.; Patil, S. K. B.; Rangnathan, S.; Sridharan, K.

    Exposure to high altitude causes loss of body mass and alterations in metabolic processes, especially carbohydrate and protein metabolism. The present study was conducted to elucidate the role of glutamine synthetase, glutaminase and glycogen synthetase under conditions of chronic intermittent hypoxia. Four groups, each consisting of 12 male albino rats (Wistar strain), were exposed to a simulated altitude of 7620 m in a hypobaric chamber for 6 h per day for 1, 7, 14 and 21 days, respectively. Blood haemoglobin, blood glucose, protein levels in the liver, muscle and plasma, glycogen content, and glutaminase, glutamine synthetase and glycogen synthetase activities in liver and muscle were determined in all groups of exposed and in a group of unexposed animals. Food intake and changes in body mass were also monitored. There was a significant reduction in body mass (28-30%) in hypoxia-exposed groups as compared to controls, with a corresponding decrease in food intake. There was rise in blood haemoglobin and plasma protein in response to acclimatisation. Over a three-fold increase in liver glycogen content was observed following 1 day of hypoxic exposure (4.76+/-0.78 mg.g-1 wet tissue in normal unexposed rats; 15.82+/-2.30 mg.g-1 wet tissue in rats exposed to hypoxia for 1 day). This returned to normal in later stages of exposure. However, there was no change in glycogen synthetase activity except for a decrease in the 21-days hypoxia-exposed group. There was a slight increase in muscle glycogen content in the 1-day exposed group which declined significantly by 56.5, 50.6 and 42% following 7, 14, and 21 days of exposure, respectively. Muscle glycogen synthetase activity was also decreased following 21 days of exposure. There was an increase in glutaminase activity in the liver and muscle in the 7-, 14- and 21-day exposed groups. Glutamine synthetase activity was higher in the liver in 7- and 14-day exposed groups; this returned to normal following 21 days of exposure

  6. Kinetic characterization of ebselen, chelerythrine and apomorphine as glutaminase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Ajit G; Rojas, Camilo; Tanega, Cordelle; Shen, Min; Simeonov, Anton; Boxer, Matthew B; Auld, Douglas S; Ferraris, Dana V; Tsukamoto, Takashi; Slusher, Barbara S

    2013-08-23

    Glutaminase catalyzes the hydrolysis of glutamine to glutamate and plays a central role in the proliferation of neoplastic cells via glutaminolysis, as well as in the generation of excitotoxic glutamate in central nervous system disorders such as HIV-associated dementia (HAD) and multiple sclerosis. Both glutaminase siRNA and glutaminase inhibition have been shown to be effective in in vitro models of cancer and HAD, suggesting a potential role for small molecule glutaminase inhibitors. However, there are no potent, selective inhibitors of glutaminase currently available. The two prototypical glutaminase inhibitors, BPTES and DON, are either insoluble or non-specific. In a search for more drug-like glutaminase inhibitors, we conducted a screen of 1280 in vivo active drugs (Library of Pharmacologically Active Compounds (LOPAC(1280))) and identified ebselen, chelerythrine and (R)-apomorphine. The newly identified inhibitors exhibited 10 to 1500-fold greater affinities than DON and BPTES and over 100-fold increased efficiency of inhibition. Although non-selective, it is noteworthy that the affinity of ebselen for glutaminase is more potent than any other activity yet described. It is possible that the previously reported biological activity seen with these compounds is due, in part, to glutaminase inhibition. Ebselen, chelerythrine and apomorphine complement the armamentarium of compounds to explore the role of glutaminase in disease. PMID:23850693

  7. Small molecule glutaminase inhibitors block glutamate release from stimulated microglia.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Ajit G; O'Driscoll, Cliona M; Bressler, Joseph; Kaufmann, Walter; Rojas, Camilo J; Slusher, Barbara S

    2014-01-01

    Glutaminase plays a critical role in the generation of glutamate, a key excitatory neurotransmitter in the CNS. Excess glutamate release from activated macrophages and microglia correlates with upregulated glutaminase suggesting a pathogenic role for glutaminase. Both glutaminase siRNA and small molecule inhibitors have been shown to decrease excess glutamate and provide neuroprotection in multiple models of disease, including HIV-associated dementia (HAD), multiple sclerosis and ischemia. Consequently, inhibition of glutaminase could be of interest for treatment of these diseases. Bis-2-(5-phenylacetimido-1,2,4-thiadiazol-2-yl)ethyl sulfide (BPTES) and 6-diazo-5-oxo-l-norleucine (DON), two most commonly used glutaminase inhibitors, are either poorly soluble or non-specific. Recently, several new BPTES analogs with improved physicochemical properties were reported. To evaluate these new inhibitors, we established a cell-based microglial activation assay measuring glutamate release. Microglia-mediated glutamate levels were significantly augmented by tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) and Toll-like receptor (TLR) ligands coincident with increased glutaminase activity. While several potent glutaminase inhibitors abrogated the increase in glutamate, a structurally related analog devoid of glutaminase activity was unable to block the increase. In the absence of glutamine, glutamate levels were significantly attenuated. These data suggest that the in vitro microglia assay may be a useful tool in developing glutaminase inhibitors of therapeutic interest. PMID:24269238

  8. Kinetic characterization of ebselen, chelerythrine and apomorphine as glutaminase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Ajit G.; Rojas, Camilo; Tanega, Cordelle; Shen, Min; Simeonov, Anton; Boxer, Matthew B.; Auld, Douglas S.; Ferraris, Dana V.; Tsukamoto, Takashi; Slusher, Barbara S.

    2014-01-01

    Glutaminase catalyzes the hydrolysis of glutamine to glutamate and plays a central role in the proliferation of neoplastic cells via glutaminolysis, as well as in the generation of excitotoxic glutamate in central nervous system disorders such as HIV-associated dementia (HAD) and multiple sclerosis. Both glutaminase siRNA and glutaminase inhibition have been shown to be effective in in vitro models of cancer and HAD, suggesting a potential role for small molecule glutaminase inhibitors. However, there are no potent, selective inhibitors of glutaminase currently available. The two prototypical glutaminase inhibitors, BPTES and DON, are either insoluble or non-specific. In a search for more drug-like glutaminase inhibitors, we conducted a screen of 1280 in vivo active drugs (Library of Pharmacologically Active Compounds (LOPAC1280)) and identified ebselen, chelerythrine and (R)-apomorphine. The newly identified inhibitors exhibited 10 to 1500-fold greater affinities than DON and BPTES and over 100-fold increased efficiency of inhibition. Although non-selective, it is noteworthy that the affinity of ebselen for glutaminase is more potent than any other activity yet described. It is possible that the previously reported biological activity seen with these compounds is due, in part, to glutaminase inhibition. Ebselen, chelerythrine and apomorphine complement the armamentarium of compounds to explore the role of glutaminase in disease. PMID:23850693

  9. L-Asparaginase as potent anti-leukemic agent and its significance of having reduced glutaminase side activity for better treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Ramya, L N; Doble, Mukesh; Rekha, V P B; Pulicherla, K K

    2012-08-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) is one of the leading types of malignant disorder seen in children. Viral infections, genetic factors and exposure to chemical carcinogens are some of the factors responsible for causing ALL. Treatment strategies followed for curing ALL include chemotherapy or radiation therapy, wherein, chemotherapy involves the use of the enzymatic drug L-Asparaginase. The enzyme can be produced from various plants, animals, bacterial and fungal sources but, among them, bacterial sources are widely used for production of this enzyme. The enzyme is non-human in origin having certain bottle necks with L-Asparaginase therapy in the form of side effects such as pancreatitis, thrombosis which are mainly due to glutaminase side activity. Hence, present-day research is mainly focussed on minimizing or completely eliminating the glutaminase activity of the enzyme L-Asparaginase. This review is focussed on the complications associated with glutaminase side activity and use of glutaminase free enzymatic drug L-Asparaginase in treating ALL and the other developments related to the modification of the drug for quality treatment. PMID:22684410

  10. Dissemination of lipid A deacylases (pagL) among gram-negative bacteria: identification of active-site histidine and serine residues.

    PubMed

    Geurtsen, Jeroen; Steeghs, Liana; Hove, Jan Ten; van der Ley, Peter; Tommassen, Jan

    2005-03-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is one of the main constituents of the Gram-negative bacterial outer membrane. It usually consists of a highly variable O-antigen, a less variable core oligosaccharide, and a highly conserved lipid moiety, designated lipid A. Several bacteria are capable of modifying their lipid A architecture in response to external stimuli. The outer membrane-localized lipid A 3-O-deacylase, encoded by the pagL gene of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, removes the fatty acyl chain from the 3 position of lipid A. Although a similar activity was reported in some other Gram-negative bacteria, the corresponding genes could not be identified. Here, we describe the presence of pagL homologs in a variety of Gram-negative bacteria. Although the overall sequence similarity is rather low, a conserved domain could be distinguished in the C-terminal region. The activity of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Bordetella bronchiseptica pagL homologs was confirmed upon expression in Escherichia coli, which resulted in the removal of an R-3-hydroxymyristoyl group from lipid A. Upon deacylation by PagL, E. coli lipid A underwent another modification, which was the result of the activity of the endogenous palmitoyl transferase PagP. Furthermore, we identified a conserved histidine-serine couple as active site residues, suggesting a catalytic mechanism similar to serine hydrolases. The biological function of PagL remains unclear. However, because PagL homologs were found in both pathogenic and nonpathogenic species, PagL-mediated deacylation of lipid A probably does not have a dedicated role in pathogenicity.

  11. Kinetic characterization of ebselen, chelerythrine and apomorphine as glutaminase inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Ajit G.; Rojas, Camilo; Tanega, Cordelle; Shen, Min; Simeonov, Anton; Boxer, Matthew B.; Auld, Douglas S.; Ferraris, Dana V.; Tsukamoto, Takashi; Slusher, Barbara S.

    2013-08-23

    Highlights: •Ebselen, chelerythrine and apomorphine were identified as glutaminase inhibitors. •These had greater affinities and efficiency of inhibition than known prototypes. •Their previously reported biological activity could be due to glutaminase inhibition. -- Abstract: Glutaminase catalyzes the hydrolysis of glutamine to glutamate and plays a central role in the proliferation of neoplastic cells via glutaminolysis, as well as in the generation of excitotoxic glutamate in central nervous system disorders such as HIV-associated dementia (HAD) and multiple sclerosis. Both glutaminase siRNA and glutaminase inhibition have been shown to be effective in in vitro models of cancer and HAD, suggesting a potential role for small molecule glutaminase inhibitors. However, there are no potent, selective inhibitors of glutaminase currently available. The two prototypical glutaminase inhibitors, BPTES and DON, are either insoluble or non-specific. In a search for more drug-like glutaminase inhibitors, we conducted a screen of 1280 in vivo active drugs (Library of Pharmacologically Active Compounds (LOPAC{sup 1280})) and identified ebselen, chelerythrine and (R)-apomorphine. The newly identified inhibitors exhibited 10 to 1500-fold greater affinities than DON and BPTES and over 100-fold increased efficiency of inhibition. Although non-selective, it is noteworthy that the affinity of ebselen for glutaminase is more potent than any other activity yet described. It is possible that the previously reported biological activity seen with these compounds is due, in part, to glutaminase inhibition. Ebselen, chelerythrine and apomorphine complement the armamentarium of compounds to explore the role of glutaminase in disease.

  12. Lid L11 of the glutamine amidotransferase domain of CTP synthase mediates allosteric GTP activation of glutaminase activity.

    PubMed

    Willemoës, Martin; Mølgaard, Anne; Johansson, Eva; Martinussen, Jan

    2005-02-01

    GTP is an allosteric activator of CTP synthase and acts to increase the k(cat) for the glutamine-dependent CTP synthesis reaction. GTP is suggested, in part, to optimally orient the oxy-anion hole for hydrolysis of glutamine that takes place in the glutamine amidotransferase class I (GATase) domain of CTP synthase. In the GATase domain of the recently published structures of the Escherichia coli and Thermus thermophilus CTP synthases a loop region immediately proceeding amino acid residues forming the oxy-anion hole and named lid L11 is shown for the latter enzyme to be flexible and change position depending on the presence or absence of glutamine in the glutamine binding site. Displacement or rearrangement of this loop may provide a means for the suggested role of allosteric activation by GTP to optimize the oxy-anion hole for glutamine hydrolysis. Arg359, Gly360 and Glu362 of the Lactococcus lactis enzyme are highly conserved residues in lid L11 and we have analyzed their possible role in GTP activation. Characterization of the mutant enzymes R359M, R359P, G360A and G360P indicated that both Arg359 and Gly360 are involved in the allosteric response to GTP binding whereas the E362Q enzyme behaved like wild-type enzyme. Apart from the G360A enzyme, the results from kinetic analysis of the enzymes altered at position 359 and 360 showed a 10- to 50-fold decrease in GTP activation of glutamine dependent CTP synthesis and concomitant four- to 10-fold increases in K(A) for GTP. The R359M, R359P and G360P also showed no GTP activation of the uncoupled glutaminase reaction whereas the G360A enzyme was about twofold more active than wild-type enzyme. The elevated K(A) for GTP and reduced GTP activation of CTP synthesis of the mutant enzymes are in agreement with a predicted interaction of bound GTP with lid L11 and indicate that the GTP activation of glutamine dependent CTP synthesis may be explained by structural rearrangements around the oxy-anion hole of the GATase

  13. Steady-state kinetics of the glutaminase reaction of CTP synthase from Lactococcus lactis. The role of the allosteric activator GTP incoupling between glutamine hydrolysis and CTP synthesis.

    PubMed

    Willemoës, Martin; Sigurskjold, Bent W

    2002-10-01

    CTP synthase catalyzes the reaction glutamine + UTP + ATP --> glutamate + CTP + ADP + Pi. The rate of the reaction is greatly enhanced by the allosteric activator GTP. We have studied the glutaminase half-reaction of CTP synthase from Lactococcus lactis and its response to the allosteric activator GTP and nucleotides that bind to the active site. In contrast to what has been found for the Escherichia coli enzyme, GTP activation of the L. lactis enzyme did not result in similar kcat values for the glutaminase activity and glutamine hydrolysis coupled to CTP synthesis. GTP activation of the glutaminase reaction never reached the levels of GTP-activated CTP synthesis, not even when the active site was saturated with UTP and the nonhydrolyzeable ATP-binding analog adenosine 5'-[gamma-thio]triphosphate. Furthermore, under conditions where the rate of glutamine hydrolysis exceeded that of CTP synthesis, GTP would stimulate CTP synthesis. These results indicate that the L. lactis enzyme differs significantly from the E. coli enzyme. For the E. coli enzyme, activation by GTP was found to stimulate glutamine hydrolysis and CTP synthesis to the same extent, suggesting that the major function of GTP binding is to activate the chemical steps of glutamine hydrolysis. An alternative mechanism for the action of GTP on L. lactis CTP synthase is suggested. Here the binding of GTP to the allosteric site promotes coordination of the phosphorylation of UTP and hydrolysis of glutamine for optimal efficiency in CTP synthesis rather than just acting to increase the rate of glutamine hydrolysis itself. PMID:12354108

  14. Phosphoprotein Associated with Glycosphingolipid-Enriched Microdomains (Pag), a Novel Ubiquitously Expressed Transmembrane Adaptor Protein, Binds the Protein Tyrosine Kinase Csk and Is Involved in Regulation of T Cell Activation

    PubMed Central

    Brdic̆ka, Tomás̆; Pavlis̆tová, Dagmar; Leo, Albrecht; Bruyns, Eddy; Kor̆ínek, Vladimír; Angelisová, Pavla; Scherer, Jeanette; Shevchenko, Andrej; Shevchenko, Anna; Hilgert, Ivan; C̆erný, Jan; Drbal, Karel; Kuramitsu, Yasuhiro; Kornacker, Birgit; Hor̆ejs̆í, Václav; Schraven, Burkhart

    2000-01-01

    According to a recently proposed hypothesis, initiation of signal transduction via immunoreceptors depends on interactions of the engaged immunoreceptor with glycosphingolipid-enriched membrane microdomains (GEMs). In this study, we describe a novel GEM-associated transmembrane adaptor protein, termed phosphoprotein associated with GEMs (PAG). PAG comprises a short extracellular domain of 16 amino acids and a 397-amino acid cytoplasmic tail containing ten tyrosine residues that are likely phosphorylated by Src family kinases. In lymphoid cell lines and in resting peripheral blood α/β T cells, PAG is expressed as a constitutively tyrosine-phosphorylated protein and binds the major negative regulator of Src kinases, the tyrosine kinase Csk. After activation of peripheral blood α/β T cells, PAG becomes rapidly dephosphorylated and dissociates from Csk. Expression of PAG in COS cells results in recruitment of endogenous Csk, altered Src kinase activity, and impaired phosphorylation of Src-specific substrates. Moreover, overexpression of PAG in Jurkat cells downregulates T cell receptor–mediated activation of the transcription factor nuclear factor of activated T cells. These findings collectively suggest that in the absence of external stimuli, the PAG–Csk complex transmits negative regulatory signals and thus may help to keep resting T cells in a quiescent state. PMID:10790433

  15. Hormonal stimulation of mitochondrial glutaminase. Effects of vasopressin, angiotensin II, adrenaline and glucagon.

    PubMed Central

    Corvera, S; García-Sáinz, J A

    1983-01-01

    Adrenaline (through alpha 1-adrenoceptors), vasopressin and angiotensin II stimulate mitochondrial glutaminase activity. This stimulation probably contributes to the ureogenic effect of these hormones. The activity of the enzyme is sensitive to Ca2+ depletion. A role of Ca2+ in hormonal modulation of glutaminase activity is suggested. PMID:6870814

  16. Mice lacking brain/kidney phosphate-activated glutaminase have impaired glutamatergic synaptic transmission, altered breathing, disorganized goal-directed behavior and die shortly after birth.

    PubMed

    Masson, Justine; Darmon, Michèle; Conjard, Agnès; Chuhma, Nao; Ropert, Nicole; Thoby-Brisson, Muriel; Foutz, Arthur S; Parrot, Sandrine; Miller, Gretchen M; Jorisch, Renée; Polan, Jonathan; Hamon, Michel; Hen, René; Rayport, Stephen

    2006-04-26

    Neurotransmitter glutamate has been thought to derive mainly from glutamine via the action of glutaminase type 1 (GLS1). To address the importance of this pathway in glutamatergic transmission, we knocked out GLS1 in mice. The insertion of a STOP cassette by homologous recombination produced a null allele that blocked transcription, encoded no immunoreactive protein, and abolished GLS1 enzymatic activity. Null mutants were slightly smaller, were deficient in goal-directed behavior, hypoventilated, and died in the first postnatal day. No gross or microscopic defects were detected in peripheral organs or in the CNS. In cultured neurons from the null mutants, miniature EPSC amplitude and duration were normal; however, the amplitude of evoked EPSCs decayed more rapidly with sustained 10 Hz stimulation, consistent with an observed reduction in depolarization-evoked glutamate release. Because of this activity-dependent impairment in glutamatergic transmission, we surmised that respiratory networks, which require temporal summation of synaptic input, would be particularly affected. We found that the amplitude of inspirations was decreased in vivo, chemosensitivity to CO2 was severely altered, and the frequency of pacemaker activity recorded in the respiratory generator in the pre-Bötzinger complex, a glutamatergic brainstem network that can be isolated in vitro, was increased. Our results show that although alternate pathways to GLS1 glutamate synthesis support baseline glutamatergic transmission, the GLS1 pathway is essential for maintaining the function of active synapses, and thus the mutation is associated with impaired respiratory function, abnormal goal-directed behavior, and neonatal demise.

  17. L-asparaginase and L-glutaminase activities in submerged rice soil amended with municipal solid waste compost and decomposed cow manure.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharyya, P; Chakrabarti, K; Tripathy, S; Chakraborty, A; Kim, K; Kim, S H

    2007-01-01

    The field study was conducted to evaluate the effect of municipal solid waste compost (MSWC) as a soil amendment on L-asparaginase (LA) and L-glutaminase (LG) activities. Experiments were conducted during the wet seasons of 1997, 1998 and 1999 on rice grown under a submerged condition, at the Agriculture Experimental Farm, Calcutta University at Baruipur, West Bengal, India. The treatments consisted of control, no input; MSWC, at 60 Kg N ha(- 1); well-decomposed cow manure (DCM), at 60 Kg N ha(- 1); MSWC (30 Kg N ha(- 1)) + Urea (U) (30 Kg N ha(- 1)); DCM (30 Kg N ha(- 1)) + U (30 Kg N ha(- 1)) and Fertilizer, (at 60:30:30 NPK kg ha(- 1)) through urea, single superphosphate and muriate of potash respectively). LA and LG activities alone and their ratio with organic-C (ratio index value, RIV), straw and grain yield were higher in DCM than MSWC-treated soils, due to higher amount of biogenic organic materials like water-soluble organic carbon, carbohydrate and mineralizable nitrogen in the former. The studied parameters were higher when urea was integrated with DCM or MSWC, compared to their single applications. The heavy metals in MSWC did not detrimentally influence the above-measured activities of soil. In the event of long term MSWC application, changes in soil quality parameters should be monitored regularly, since heavy metals once entering into soil persist over a long period. PMID:17562468

  18. Glutaminase-producing Meyerozyma (Pichia) guilliermondii isolated from Thai soy sauce fermentation.

    PubMed

    Aryuman, Phichayaphorn; Lertsiri, Sittiwat; Visessanguan, Wonnop; Niamsiri, Nuttawee; Bhumiratana, Amaret; Assavanig, Apinya

    2015-01-01

    In this study, 34 yeast isolates were obtained from koji and moromi samples of Thai soy sauce fermentation. However, the most interesting yeast strain was isolated from the enriched 2 month-old (M2) moromi sample and identified as Meyerozyma (Pichia) guilliermondii EM2Y61. This strain is a salt-tolerant yeast that could tolerate up to 20% (w/v) NaCl and produce extracellular and cell-bound glutaminases. Interestingly, its glutaminases were more active in 18% (w/v) NaCl which is a salt concentration in moromi. The extracellular glutaminase's activity was found to be much higher than that of cell-bound glutaminase. The highest specific activity and stability of the extracellular glutaminase were found in 18% (w/v) NaCl at pH4.5 and 37°C. A challenge test by adding partially-purified extracellular glutaminase from M. guilliermondii EM2Y61 into 1 month-old (M1) moromi sample showed an increased conversion of L-glutamine to L-glutamic acid. This is the first report of glutaminase producing M. guilliermondii isolated from the moromi of Thai soy sauce fermentation. The results suggested the potential application of M. guilliermondii EM2Y61 as starter yeast culture to increase l-glutamic acid during soy sauce fermentation.

  19. Mice lacking brain/kidney phosphate-activated glutaminase (GLS1) have impaired glutamatergic synaptic transmission, altered breathing, disorganized goal-directed behavior and die shortly after birth

    PubMed Central

    Masson, Justine; Darmon, Michèle; Conjard, Agnès; Chuhma, Nao; Ropert, Nicole; Thoby-Brisson, Muriel; Foutz, Arthur S.; Parrot, Sandrine; Miller, Gretchen M.; Jorisch, Renée; Polan, Jonathan; Hamon, Michel; Hen, René; Rayport, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    Neurotransmitter glutamate has been thought to derive mainly from glutamine via the action of glutaminase type 1 (GLS1). To address the importance of this pathway in glutamatergic transmission, we knocked out GLS1 in mice. The insertion of a STOP cassette by homologous recombination produced a null allele that blocked transcription, encoded no immunoreactive protein and abolished GLS1 enzymatic activity. Null mutants were slightly smaller, were deficient in goal-directed behavior, hypoventilated and died in the first post-natal day. No gross or microscopic defects were detected in peripheral organs or in the central nervous system. In cultured neurons from the null mutants, miniature EPSC amplitude and duration were normal; however, the amplitude of evoked EPSCs decayed more rapidly with sustained 10 Hz stimulation, consistent with an observed reduction in depolarization-evoked glutamate release. Because of this activity-dependent impairment in glutamatergic transmission, we surmised that respiratory networks, which require temporal summation of synaptic input, would be particularly affected. We found that the amplitude of inspirations was decreased in vivo, chemosensitivity to CO2 was severely altered, and the frequency of pacemaker activity recorded in the respiratory generator in the Pre-Bötzinger complex, a glutamatergic brainstem network that can be isolated in vitro, was increased. Our results show that while alternate pathways to GLS1 glutamate synthesis support baseline glutamatergic transmission, the GLS1 pathway is essential for maintaining the function of active synapses, and so the mutation is associated with impaired respiratory function, abnormal goal-directed behavior and neonatal demise. PMID:16641247

  20. Down-regulation of glutaminase C in human hepatocarcinoma cell by diphenylarsinic acid, a degradation product of chemical warfare agents.

    PubMed

    Kita, Kayoko; Suzuki, Toshihide; Ochi, Takafumi

    2007-05-01

    In a poisonous incident in Kamisu, Japan, it is understood that diphenylarsinic acid (DPAA) was a critical contaminant of ground water. Most patients showed dysfunction of the central nervous system. To understand the overall mechanism of DPAA toxicity and to gain some insight into the application of a remedy specific for intoxication, the molecular target must be clarified. As an approach, a high throughput analysis of cell proteins in cultured human hepatocarcinoma HpG2 exposed to DPAA was performed by two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE). Four proteins, which were up- and down-regulated by exposure of cultured HepG2 cells to DPAA, were identified. They were chaperonin containing TCP-1 (CCT) beta subunit, aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 (ALDH1), ribosomal protein P0 and glutaminase C (GAC). Of these, GAC was the only protein that was down-regulated by DPAA exposure, and cellular expression levels were reduced by DPAA in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. Decrease in cellular GAC levels was accompanied by decreased activity of the enzyme, phosphate-activated glutaminase (PAG). Decreased expression of GAC by DPAA was also observed in human cervical carcinoma HeLa and neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells. By contrast, no significant changes in GAC protein expression were observed when cells were incubated with arsenite [iAs (III)] and trivalent dimethylarsinous acid [DMA (III)]. In the central nervous system, GAC plays a role in the production of the neurotransmitter glutamic acid. Selective inhibition of GAC expression by DPAA may be a cause of dysfunction of glutamatergic neuronal transmission and the resultant neurological impairments. PMID:17321558

  1. Down-regulation of glutaminase C in human hepatocarcinoma cell by diphenylarsinic acid, a degradation product of chemical warfare agents

    SciTech Connect

    Kita, Kayoko . E-mail: kkayoko@pharm.teikyo-u.ac.jp; Suzuki, Toshihide; Ochi, Takafumi

    2007-05-01

    In a poisonous incident in Kamisu, Japan, it is understood that diphenylarsinic acid (DPAA) was a critical contaminant of ground water. Most patients showed dysfunction of the central nervous system. To understand the overall mechanism of DPAA toxicity and to gain some insight into the application of a remedy specific for intoxication, the molecular target must be clarified. As an approach, a high throughput analysis of cell proteins in cultured human hepatocarcinoma HpG2 exposed to DPAA was performed by two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE). Four proteins, which were up- and down-regulated by exposure of cultured HepG2 cells to DPAA, were identified. They were chaperonin containing TCP-1 (CCT) beta subunit, aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 (ALDH1), ribosomal protein P0 and glutaminase C (GAC). Of these, GAC was the only protein that was down-regulated by DPAA exposure, and cellular expression levels were reduced by DPAA in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. Decrease in cellular GAC levels was accompanied by decreased activity of the enzyme, phosphate-activated glutaminase (PAG). Decreased expression of GAC by DPAA was also observed in human cervical carcinoma HeLa and neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells. By contrast, no significant changes in GAC protein expression were observed when cells were incubated with arsenite [iAs (III)] and trivalent dimethylarsinous acid [DMA (III)]. In the central nervous system, GAC plays a role in the production of the neurotransmitter glutamic acid. Selective inhibition of GAC expression by DPAA may be a cause of dysfunction of glutamatergic neuronal transmission and the resultant neurological impairments.

  2. Production and optimization of L-glutaminase enzyme from Hypocrea jecorina pure culture.

    PubMed

    Bülbül, Dilara; Karakuş, Emine

    2013-01-01

    L-Glutaminase (L-glutamine amidohydrolase, EC 3.5.1.2) is the important enzyme that catalyzes the deamination of L-glutamine to L-glutamic acid and ammonium ions. Recently, L-glutaminase has received much attention with respect to its therapeutic and industrial applications. It acts as a potent antileukemic agent and shows flavor-enhancing capacity in the production of fermented foods. Glutaminase activity is widely distributed in plants, animal tissues, and microorganisms, including bacteria, yeasts, and fungi. This study presents microbial production of glutaminase enzyme from Hypocrea jecorina pure culture and determination of optimum conditions and calculation of kinetic parameters of the produced enzyme. The optimum values were determined by using sa Nesslerization reaction for our produced glutaminase enzyme. The optimum pH value was determined as 8.0 and optimum temperature as 50°C for the glutaminase enzyme. The Km and Vmax values, the kinetic parameters, of enzyme produced from Hypocrea jecorina, pure culture were determined as 0.491 mM for Km and 13.86 U/L for Vmax by plotted Lineweaver-Burk graphing, respectively. The glutaminase enzyme from H. jecorina microorganism has very high thermal and storage stability.

  3. Physics of the Cosmos Program Analysis Group (PhysPAG) Report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nousek, John A.

    2015-01-01

    The Physics of the Cosmos Program Analysis Group (PhysPAG) serves as a forum for soliciting and coordinating input and analysis from the scientific community in support of the PCOS program objectives. I will outline the activities of the PhysPAG over the past year, since the last meeting during the AAS meeting in National Harbor, and mention the activities of the PhysPAG related Scientific Interest Groups.

  4. The oncogenic transcription factor c-Jun regulates glutaminase expression and sensitizes cells to glutaminase-targeted therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lukey, Michael J.; Greene, Kai Su; Erickson, Jon W.; Wilson, Kristin F.; Cerione, Richard A.

    2016-01-01

    Many transformed cells exhibit altered glucose metabolism and increased utilization of glutamine for anabolic and bioenergetic processes. These metabolic adaptations, which accompany tumorigenesis, are driven by oncogenic signals. Here we report that the transcription factor c-Jun, product of the proto-oncogene JUN, is a key regulator of mitochondrial glutaminase (GLS) levels. Activation of c-Jun downstream of oncogenic Rho GTPase signalling leads to elevated GLS gene expression and glutaminase activity. In human breast cancer cells, GLS protein levels and sensitivity to GLS inhibition correlate strongly with c-Jun levels. We show that c-Jun directly binds to the GLS promoter region, and is sufficient to increase gene expression. Furthermore, ectopic overexpression of c-Jun renders breast cancer cells dependent on GLS activity. These findings reveal a role for c-Jun as a driver of cancer cell metabolic reprogramming, and suggest that cancers overexpressing JUN may be especially sensitive to GLS-targeted therapies. PMID:27089238

  5. Isolation and identification of actinomycetes for production of novel extracellular glutaminase free L-asparaginase.

    PubMed

    Saxena, Akansha; Upadhyay, Ramraj; Kango, Naveen

    2015-12-01

    Over the recent years glutaminase free L-asparaginase has gained more importance due to better therapeutic properties for treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Actinomycetes are known for L-asparaginase activity. In the current study, 80 actinomycetes were isolated from various soil habitats by serial dilution technique. Presence of L-asparaginase was investigated in a total of 240 actinomycetes by tubed agar method using modified M-9 medium. A total of 165 actinomycetes were found positive for L-asparaginase activity. Among these, 57 actinomycetes producing larger zones of L-asparagine hydrolysis were further screened for their capacity to produce glutaminase-free L-asparaginase. Four L-glutaminase-free actinomycetes were found to be potential L-asparaginase producers. These actinomycetes were identified as Streptomyces cyaneus (SAP 1287, CFS 1560), S. exfoliates (CFS 1557) and S. phaeochromogenes (GS 1573) on the basis of morphological and biochemical identification studies. Maximum L-asparaginase activity (19.2 Uml(-1)) was observed in culture filtrate of S. phaeochromogenes under submerged fermentation. Results indicate that S. phaeochromogenes could be a potential source of glutaminase free L-asparaginase for commercial purpose. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on production of glutaminase free L-asparaginase from S. cyaneus, S. exfoliatus and S. phaeochromogenes. PMID:26742323

  6. Kinetic properties and inhibition of Acinetobacter glutaminase-asparaginase.

    PubMed

    Steckel, J; Roberts, J; Philips, F S; Chou, T C

    1983-03-15

    Kinetic parameters, substrate specificity and exclusivity of ligands at binding sites of L-glutaminase-L-asparaginase purified from Acinetobacter glutaminasificans were studied in order to gain knowledge about the dual activities of this enzyme and its inhibition by structural analogs. Both L-glutamine and L-asparagine, which showed similar Km (4 approximately 7 X 10(-5) M) and Vmax (molecular activity 1.0 min-1) values, were competitive with each other for the substrate binding site. The products, L-glutamic acid and L-aspartic acid, showed competitive inhibition with respect to either L-glutamine or L-asparagine as substrates. Multiple inhibition of the glutaminase activity by L-glutamic acid and L-aspartic acid indicated that these ligands are mutually exclusive at the product-releasing site. The initial rates of both of the enzyme's activities were competitively inhibited by the following inhibitors (in rates of both of the enzyme's activities were competitively inhibited by the following inhibitors (in decreasing order of activity): 6-diazo-5-oxo-L-norleucine (DON), L-methionine sulfoximine, azaserine, and Acivicin. DON and azaserine inhibited both the asparaginase and glutaminase activities in a time-dependent and irreversible manner. The kinetic data suggest an ordered mechanism with glutamine or asparagine as the first substrate and glutamic acid or aspartic acid, respectively, as the last product. These results also suggest that a single mechanism and a single set of binding sites are responsible for catalyzing both of the enzyme's activities. The data also showed that succinylated enzyme, which has a 10-fold increase of plasma half-life in animals and humans and, thus, has benefit as a cancer chemotherapeutic agent, retained its catalytic activity and maintained Km and Vmax values similar to the native enzyme.

  7. Transmembrane Adaptor Protein PAG/CBP Is Involved in both Positive and Negative Regulation of Mast Cell Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Draberova, Lubica; Bugajev, Viktor; Potuckova, Lucie; Halova, Ivana; Bambouskova, Monika; Polakovicova, Iva; Xavier, Ramnik J.; Seed, Brian

    2014-01-01

    The transmembrane adaptor protein PAG/CBP (here, PAG) is expressed in multiple cell types. Tyrosine-phosphorylated PAG serves as an anchor for C-terminal SRC kinase, an inhibitor of SRC-family kinases. The role of PAG as a negative regulator of immunoreceptor signaling has been examined in several model systems, but no functions in vivo have been determined. Here, we examined the activation of bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs) with PAG knockout and PAG knockdown and the corresponding controls. Our data show that PAG-deficient BMMCs exhibit impaired antigen-induced degranulation, extracellular calcium uptake, tyrosine phosphorylation of several key signaling proteins (including the high-affinity IgE receptor subunits, spleen tyrosine kinase, and phospholipase C), production of several cytokines and chemokines, and chemotaxis. The enzymatic activities of the LYN and FYN kinases were increased in nonactivated cells, suggesting the involvement of a LYN- and/or a FYN-dependent negative regulatory loop. When BMMCs from PAG-knockout mice were activated via the KIT receptor, enhanced degranulation and tyrosine phosphorylation of the receptor were observed. In vivo experiments showed that PAG is a positive regulator of passive systemic anaphylaxis. The combined data indicate that PAG can function as both a positive and a negative regulator of mast cell signaling, depending upon the signaling pathway involved. PMID:25246632

  8. Kinetic properties of Streptomyces canarius L- Glutaminase and its anticancer efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Reda, Fifi M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract L-glutaminase was produced by Streptomyces canarius FR (KC460654) with an apparent molecular mass of 44 kDa. It has 17.9 purification fold with a final specific activity 132.2 U/mg proteins and 28% yield recovery. The purified L-glutaminase showed a maximal activity against L-glutamine when incubated at pH 8.0 at 40 °C for 30 min. It maintained its stability at wide range of pH from 5.0 11.0 and thermal stable up to 60 °C with Tm value 57.5 °C. It has high affinity and catalytic activity for L-glutamine (Km 0.129 mM, Vmax 2.02 U/mg/min), followed by L-asparagine and L-aspartic acid. In vivo, L-glutaminase showed no observed changes in liver; kidney functions; hematological parameters and slight effect on RBCs and level of platelets after 10 days of rabbit's injection. The anticancer activity of L-glutaminase was also tested against five types of human cancer cell lines using MTT assay in vitro. L-glutaminase has a significant efficiency against Hep-G2 cell (IC50, 6.8 μg/mL) and HeLa cells (IC50, 8.3 μg/mL), while the growth of MCF-7 cells was not affected. L-glutaminase has a moderate cytotoxic effect against HCT-116 cell (IC50, 64.7 μg/mL) and RAW 264.7 cell (IC50, 59.3 μg/mL). PMID:26691453

  9. Theanine, gamma-glutamylethylamide, is metabolized by renal phosphate-independent glutaminase.

    PubMed

    Tsuge, Haruhito; Sano, Sachi; Hayakawa, Takashi; Kakuda, Takami; Unno, Tomonori

    2003-03-17

    The distribution of theanine-degrading activity in Wistar rats was examined and this activity was detected only in the kidney. Judging from polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, theanine-degrading enzyme from rat kidney was purified almost to homogeneity. Theanine-degrading activity was co-purified with glutaminase activity, and the relative activity for theanine was about 85% of that for L-glutamine throughout purification. Substrate specificity of purified enzyme preparation coincided well with the data of phosphate-independent glutaminase [EC 3.5.1.2], which had been previously reported. It was very curious that gamma-glutamyl methyl and ethyl esters were more effectively hydrolyzed than theanine and L-glutamine, in view of relative activity and K(m) value. It was suggested that gamma-glutamyl moiety in theanine molecule was transferred to form gamma-glutamylglycylglycine with relative ease in the presence of glycylglycine. On the other hand, purified phosphate-dependent glutaminase did not show theanine-degrading activity at all. Thus, it was concluded that theanine was hydrolyzed by phosphate-independent glutaminase in kidney and suggested that, as for the metabolic fate of theanine, its glutamyl moiety might be transferred by means of gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase reaction to other peptides in vivo.

  10. Transmembrane adaptor protein PAG1 is a novel tumor suppressor in neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Saurabh; Ghosh, Rajib; Chen, Zaowen; Lakoma, Anna; Gunaratne, Preethi H.; Kim, Eugene S.; Shohet, Jason M.

    2016-01-01

    (NB) is the most common extracranial pediatric solid tumor with high mortality rates. The tyrosine kinase c-Src has been known to play an important role in differentiation of NB cells, but the mechanism of c-Src regulation has not been defined. Here, we characterize PAG1 (Cbp, Csk binding protein), a central inhibitor of c-Src and other Src family kinases, as a novel tumor suppressor in NB. Clinical cohort analysis demonstrate that low expression of PAG1 is a significant prognostic factor for high stage disease, increased relapse, and worse overall survival for children with NB. PAG1 knockdown in NB cells promotes proliferation and anchorage-independent colony formation with increased activation of AKT and ERK downstream of c-Src, while PAG1 overexpression significantly rescues these effects. In vivo, PAG1 overexpression significantly inhibits NB tumorigenicity in an orthotopic xenograft model. Our results establish PAG1 as a potent tumor suppressor in NB by inhibiting c-Src and downstream effector pathways. Thus, reactivation of PAG1 and inhibition of c-Src kinase activity represents an important novel therapeutic approach for high-risk NB. PMID:26993602

  11. Correlations of regional postmortem enzyme activities with premortem local glucose metabolic rates in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    McGeer, E G; McGeer, P L; Harrop, R; Akiyama, H; Kamo, H

    1990-12-01

    Correlations were sought between local cerebral metabolic rates (LCMRs) for glucose in various regions of the cortex, determined in premortem PET scans, with the regional activities of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT), acetylcholinesterase (AChE), beta-glucuronidase (Gluc, a probable index of reactive gliosis), and phosphate-activated glutaminase (PAG, a possible indice of the large pyramidal neurons) measured on postmortem tissue. Significant negative correlations between LCMRs and Gluc activities were found in 6 PET-scanned cases of Alzheimer disease (AD), and positive correlations of LCMRs with PAG were found in 5. By contrast, a positive correlation with ChAT and AChE was found in only 1. The results are consistent with the metabolic deficits in AD being primarily a reflection of local neuronal loss and gliosis. Similar data on two cases of Huntington's disease showed no significant correlations, while 1 patient with Parkinson dementia showed a significant (negative) correlation only with Gluc.

  12. PAGER: constructing PAGs and new PAG–PAG relationships for network biology

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Zongliang; Kshirsagar, Madhura M.; Nguyen, Thanh; Suphavilai, Chayaporn; Neylon, Michael T.; Zhu, Liugen; Ratliff, Timothy; Chen, Jake Y.

    2015-01-01

    In this article, we described a new database framework to perform integrative “gene-set, network, and pathway analysis” (GNPA). In this framework, we integrated heterogeneous data on pathways, annotated list, and gene-sets (PAGs) into a PAG electronic repository (PAGER). PAGs in the PAGER database are organized into P-type, A-type and G-type PAGs with a three-letter-code standard naming convention. The PAGER database currently compiles 44 313 genes from 5 species including human, 38 663 PAGs, 324 830 gene–gene relationships and two types of 3 174 323 PAG–PAG regulatory relationships—co-membership based and regulatory relationship based. To help users assess each PAG’s biological relevance, we developed a cohesion measure called Cohesion Coefficient (CoCo), which is capable of disambiguating between biologically significant PAGs and random PAGs with an area-under-curve performance of 0.98. PAGER database was set up to help users to search and retrieve PAGs from its online web interface. PAGER enable advanced users to build PAG–PAG regulatory networks that provide complementary biological insights not found in gene set analysis or individual gene network analysis. We provide a case study using cancer functional genomics data sets to demonstrate how integrative GNPA help improve network biology data coverage and therefore biological interpretability. The PAGER database can be accessible openly at http://discovery.informatics.iupui.edu/PAGER/. Contact: jakechen@iupui.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:26072489

  13. The potential of halophilic and halotolerant bacteria for the production of antineoplastic enzymes: L-asparaginase and L-glutaminase

    PubMed Central

    Shirazian, Pejman; Asad, Sedigheh; Amoozegar, Mohammad Ali

    2016-01-01

    L-asparaginase and L-glutaminase can be effectively used for the treatment of patients who suffer from accute lymphoblastic leukemia and tumor cells. Microbial sources are the best source for the bulk production of these enzymes. However, their long-term administration may cause immunological responses, so screening for new enzymes with novel properties is required. Halophilic and halotolerant bacteria with novel enzymatic characteristics can be considered as a potential source for production of enzymes with different immunological properties. In this study, L-asparaginase and L-glutaminase production by halophilic bacteria isolated from Urmia salt lake was studied. Out of the 85 isolated halophilic and halotolerant bacterial strains, 16 (19 %) showed L-asparaginase activity and 3 strains (3.5 %) showed L-glutaminase activity. Strains with the highest activities were selected for further studies. Based on 16S rDNA sequence analysis, it was shown that the selected isolates for L-asparaginase and L-glutaminase production belong to the genus Bacillus and Salicola, respectively. Both enzymes were produced extracellularly. The strain with the most L-asparaginase production did not show L-glutaminase production which is medically important. The effects of key parameters including temperature, initial pH of the solution, and concentrations of glucose, asparagine or glutamine, and sodium chloride were evaluated by means of response surface methodology (RSM) to optimize enzymes production. Under the obtained optimal conditions, L-asparaginase and L-glutaminase production was increased up to 1.5 (61.7 unit/mL) and 2.6 fold (46.4 unit/mL), respectively. PMID:27330530

  14. The potential of halophilic and halotolerant bacteria for the production of antineoplastic enzymes: L-asparaginase and L-glutaminase.

    PubMed

    Shirazian, Pejman; Asad, Sedigheh; Amoozegar, Mohammad Ali

    2016-01-01

    L-asparaginase and L-glutaminase can be effectively used for the treatment of patients who suffer from accute lymphoblastic leukemia and tumor cells. Microbial sources are the best source for the bulk production of these enzymes. However, their long-term administration may cause immunological responses, so screening for new enzymes with novel properties is required. Halophilic and halotolerant bacteria with novel enzymatic characteristics can be considered as a potential source for production of enzymes with different immunological properties. In this study, L-asparaginase and L-glutaminase production by halophilic bacteria isolated from Urmia salt lake was studied. Out of the 85 isolated halophilic and halotolerant bacterial strains, 16 (19 %) showed L-asparaginase activity and 3 strains (3.5 %) showed L-glutaminase activity. Strains with the highest activities were selected for further studies. Based on 16S rDNA sequence analysis, it was shown that the selected isolates for L-asparaginase and L-glutaminase production belong to the genus Bacillus and Salicola, respectively. Both enzymes were produced extracellularly. The strain with the most L-asparaginase production did not show L-glutaminase production which is medically important. The effects of key parameters including temperature, initial pH of the solution, and concentrations of glucose, asparagine or glutamine, and sodium chloride were evaluated by means of response surface methodology (RSM) to optimize enzymes production. Under the obtained optimal conditions, L-asparaginase and L-glutaminase production was increased up to 1.5 (61.7 unit/mL) and 2.6 fold (46.4 unit/mL), respectively. PMID:27330530

  15. Glutaminase regulation in cancer cells: a druggable chain of events

    PubMed Central

    Katt, William P.; Cerione, Richard A.

    2014-01-01

    Metabolism is the process by which cells convert relatively simple extracellular nutrients into energy and building blocks necessary for their growth and survival. In cancer cells, metabolism is dramatically altered compared with normal cells. These alterations are known as the Warburg effect. One consequence of these changes is cellular addiction to glutamine. Because of this, in recent years the enzyme glutaminase has become a key target for small molecule therapeutic intervention. Like many oncotargets, however, glutaminase has a number of upstream partners that might offer additional druggable targets. This review summarizes the work from the current decade surrounding glutaminase and its regulation, and suggests strategies for therapeutic intervention in relevant cases. PMID:24140288

  16. Revisiting the Timing of Action of the PAG Adaptor Using Quantitative Proteomics Analysis of Primary T Cells.

    PubMed

    Reginald, Kavita; Chaoui, Karima; Roncagalli, Romain; Beau, Mathilde; Goncalves Menoita, Marisa; Monsarrat, Bernard; Burlet-Schiltz, Odile; Malissen, Marie; Gonzalez de Peredo, Anne; Malissen, Bernard

    2015-12-01

    The protein tyrosine kinase LCK plays a key role in TCR signaling, and its activity is dynamically controlled by the tyrosine kinase C-terminal Src kinase (CSK) and the tyrosine phosphatase CD45. CSK is brought in contiguity to LCK via binding to a transmembrane adaptor known as phosphoprotein associated with glycosphingolipid-enriched microdomains (PAG). The lack of a blatant phenotype in PAG-deficient mice has impeded our understanding of the mechanisms through which PAG exerts its negative-regulatory role in TCR signaling. We used quantitative mass spectrometry and both thymocytes and CD4(+) T cells from mice in which a tag for affinity purification was knocked in the gene coding for PAG to determine the composition and dynamics of the multiprotein complexes that are found around PAG over 5 min of activation. Most of the high-confidence interactions that we observed were previously unknown. Using phosphoproteomic analysis, PAG showed low levels of tyrosine phosphorylation in resting primary mouse CD4(+) T cells; the levels of tyrosine phosphorylation increased and reached a maximum 2 min after stimulation. Analysis of the dynamics of association of the protein tyrosine phosphatase PTPN22 and lipid phosphatase SHIP-1 with PAG following T cell activation suggests that both cooperate with CSK to terminate T cell activation. Our findings provide a model of the role for PAG in mouse primary CD4(+) T cells that is consistent with recent phosphoproteomic studies of the Jurkat T cell line but difficult to reconcile with former biochemical studies indicating that PAG is constitutively phosphorylated in resting T cells and rapidly dephosphorylated once the TCR is engaged. PMID:26512138

  17. A temperature and salt-tolerant L-glutaminase from gangotri region of uttarakhand himalaya: enzyme purification and characterization.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Lokendra; Singh, Balvinder; Adhikari, Dilip Kumar; Mukherjee, Joydeep; Ghosh, Debashish

    2012-04-01

    Purification and characterization of halotolerant, thermostable alkaline L-glutaminase from a Bacillus sp. LKG-01 (MTCC 10401), isolated from Gangotri region of Uttarakhand Himalaya, is being reported in this paper. Enzyme has been purified 49-fold from cell-free extract with 25% recovery (specific activity 584.2 U/mg protein) by (NH₄)₂SO₄ precipitation followed by anion exchange chromatography and gel filtration. Enzyme has a molecular weight of 66 kDa. L-Glutaminase is most active at pH 11.0 and stable in the pH range 8.0-11.0. Temperature optimum is 70 °C and is completely stable after 3 h pre-incubation at 50 °C. Enzyme reflects more enhanced activity with 1-20% (w/v) NaCl, which is further reduced to 80% when NaCl concentration was increased up to 25%. L-Glutaminase is almost active with K⁺, Zn²⁺, and Ni²⁺ ions and K(m) and V(max) values of 240 μM and 277.77 ± 1.1 U/mg proteins, respectively. Higher specific activity, purification fold, better halo-tolerance, and thermostability would make this enzyme more attractive for food fermentation with respect to other soil microbe derived L-glutaminase reported so far. PMID:22367638

  18. Non-ionic PAG behavior under high energy exposure sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawson, Richard A.; Noga, David E.; Tolbert, Laren M.; Henderson, Clifford L.

    2009-03-01

    A series of non-ionic PAGs were synthesized and their acid generation efficiency measured under deep ultraviolet and electron beam exposures. The acid generation efficiency was determined with an on-wafer method that uses spectroscopic ellipsometry to measure the absorbance of an acid sensitive dye (Coumarin 6). Under DUV exposures, common ionic onium salt PAGs showed excellent photoacid generation efficiency, superior to most non-ionic PAGS tested in this work. In contrast, under 100 keV high energy e-beam exposures, almost all of the non-ionic PAGs showed significantly better acid generation performance than the ionic onium salt PAGs tested. In particular, one non-ionic PAG showed almost an order of magnitude improvement in the Dill C acid generation rate constant as compared to a triarylsulfonium PAG. The high energy acid generation efficiency was found to correlate well with the electron affinity of the PAGs, suggesting that improvements in PAG design can be predicted. Non-ionic PAGs merit further investigation as a means for producing higher sensitivity resists under high energy exposure sources.

  19. Long-Range Modulation of PAG1 Expression by 8q21 Allergy Risk Variants.

    PubMed

    Vicente, Cristina T; Edwards, Stacey L; Hillman, Kristine M; Kaufmann, Susanne; Mitchell, Hayley; Bain, Lisa; Glubb, Dylan M; Lee, Jason S; French, Juliet D; Ferreira, Manuel A R

    2015-08-01

    The gene(s) whose expression is regulated by allergy risk variants is unknown for many loci identified through genome-wide association studies. Addressing this knowledge gap might point to new therapeutic targets for allergic disease. The aim of this study was to identify the target gene(s) and the functional variant(s) underlying the association between rs7009110 on chromosome 8q21 and allergies. Eight genes are located within 1 Mb of rs7009110. Multivariate association analysis of publicly available exon expression levels from lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) identified a significant association between rs7009110 and the expression of a single gene, PAG1 (p = 0.0017), 732 kb away. Analysis of histone modifications and DNase I hypersensitive sites in LCLs identified four putative regulatory elements (PREs) in the region. Chromosome conformation capture confirmed that two PREs interacted with the PAG1 promoter, one in allele-specific fashion. To determine whether these PREs were functional, LCLs were transfected with PAG1 promoter-driven luciferase reporter constructs. PRE3 acted as a transcriptional enhancer for PAG1 exclusively when it carried the rs2370615:C allergy predisposing allele, a variant in complete linkage disequilibrium with rs7009110. As such, rs2370615, which overlaps RelA transcription factor (TF) binding in LCLs and was found to disrupt Foxo3a binding to PRE3, represents the putative functional variant in this locus. Our studies suggest that the risk-associated allele of rs2370615 predisposes to allergic disease by increasing PAG1 expression, which might promote B cell activation and have a pro-inflammatory effect. Inhibition of PAG1 expression or function might have therapeutic potential for allergic diseases.

  20. p63 regulates glutaminase 2 expression

    PubMed Central

    Giacobbe, Arianna; Bongiorno-Borbone, Lucilla; Bernassola, Francesca; Terrinoni, Alessandro; Markert, Elke Katrin; Levine, Arnold J.; Feng, Zhaohui; Agostini, Massimilano; Zolla, Lello; Agrò, Alessandro Finazzi; Notterman, Daniel A.; Melino, Gerry; Peschiaroli, Angelo

    2013-01-01

    The transcription factor p63 is critical for many biological processes, including development and maintenance of epidermal tissues and tumorigenesis. Here, we report that the TAp63 isoforms regulate cell metabolism through the induction of the mitochondrial glutaminase 2 (GLS2) gene both in primary cells and tumor cell lines. By ChIP analysis and luciferase assay, we confirmed that TAp63 binds directly to the p53/p63 consensus DNA binding sequence within the GLS2 promoter region. Given the critical role of p63 in epidermal differentiation, we have investigated the regulation of GLS2 expression during this process. GLS2 and TAp63 expression increases during the in vitro differentiation of primary human keratinocytes, and depletion of GLS2 inhibits skin differentiation both at molecular and cellular levels. We found that GLS2 and TAp63 expression are concomitantly induced in cancer cells exposed to oxidative stresses. siRNA-mediated depletion of GLS2 sensitizes cells to ROS-induced apoptosis, suggesting that the TAp63/GLS2 axis can be functionally important as a cellular antioxidant pathway in the absence of p53. Accordingly, we found that GLS2 is upregulated in colon adenocarcinoma. Altogether, our findings demonstrate that GLS2 is a bona fide TAp63 target gene, and that the TAp63-dependent regulation of GLS2 is important for both physiological and pathological processes. PMID:23574722

  1. Distinct Structural Elements Govern the Folding, Stability, and Catalysis in the Outer Membrane Enzyme PagP.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Bharat Ramasubramanian; Mahalakshmi, Radhakrishnan

    2016-09-01

    The outer membrane enzyme PagP is indispensable for lipid A palmitoylation in Gram-negative bacteria and has been implicated in resistance to host immune defenses. PagP possesses an unusual structure for an integral membrane protein, with a highly dynamic barrel domain that is tilted with respect to the membrane normal. In addition, it contains an N-terminal amphipathic helix. Recent functional and structural studies have shown that these molecular factors are critical for PagP to carry out its function in the challenging environment of the bacterial outer membrane. However, the precise contributions of the N-helix to folding and stability and residues that can influence catalytic rates remain to be addressed. Here, we identify a sequence-dependent stabilizing role for the N-terminal helix of PagP in the measured thermodynamic stability of the barrel. Using chimeric barrel sequences, we show that the Escherichia coli PagP N-terminal helix confers 2-fold greater stability to the Salmonella typhimurium barrel. Further, we find that the W78F substitution in S. typhimurium causes a nearly 20-fold increase in the specific activity in vitro for the phospholipase reaction, compared to that of E. coli PagP. Here, phenylalanine serves as a key regulator of catalysis, possibly by increasing the reaction rate. Through coevolution analysis, we detect an interaction network between seemingly unrelated segments of this membrane protein. Exchanging the structural and functional features between homologous PagP enzymes from E. coli and S. typhimurium has provided us with an understanding of the molecular factors governing PagP stability and function. PMID:27525547

  2. Distinct Structural Elements Govern the Folding, Stability, and Catalysis in the Outer Membrane Enzyme PagP.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Bharat Ramasubramanian; Mahalakshmi, Radhakrishnan

    2016-09-01

    The outer membrane enzyme PagP is indispensable for lipid A palmitoylation in Gram-negative bacteria and has been implicated in resistance to host immune defenses. PagP possesses an unusual structure for an integral membrane protein, with a highly dynamic barrel domain that is tilted with respect to the membrane normal. In addition, it contains an N-terminal amphipathic helix. Recent functional and structural studies have shown that these molecular factors are critical for PagP to carry out its function in the challenging environment of the bacterial outer membrane. However, the precise contributions of the N-helix to folding and stability and residues that can influence catalytic rates remain to be addressed. Here, we identify a sequence-dependent stabilizing role for the N-terminal helix of PagP in the measured thermodynamic stability of the barrel. Using chimeric barrel sequences, we show that the Escherichia coli PagP N-terminal helix confers 2-fold greater stability to the Salmonella typhimurium barrel. Further, we find that the W78F substitution in S. typhimurium causes a nearly 20-fold increase in the specific activity in vitro for the phospholipase reaction, compared to that of E. coli PagP. Here, phenylalanine serves as a key regulator of catalysis, possibly by increasing the reaction rate. Through coevolution analysis, we detect an interaction network between seemingly unrelated segments of this membrane protein. Exchanging the structural and functional features between homologous PagP enzymes from E. coli and S. typhimurium has provided us with an understanding of the molecular factors governing PagP stability and function.

  3. Film quantum yields of EUV& ultra-high PAG photoresists

    SciTech Connect

    Hassanein, Elsayed; Higgins, Craig; Naulleau, Patrick; Matyi, Richard; Gallatin, Greg; Denbeaux, Gregory; Antohe, Alin; Thackery, Jim; Spear, Kathleen; Szmanda, Charles; Anderson, Christopher N.; Niakoula, Dimitra; Malloy, Matthew; Khurshid, Anwar; Montgomery, Cecilia; Piscani, Emil C.; Rudack, Andrew; Byers, Jeff; Ma, Andy; Dean, Kim; Brainard, Robert

    2008-01-10

    Base titration methods are used to determine C-parameters for three industrial EUV photoresist platforms (EUV-2D, MET-2D, XP5496) and twenty academic EUV photoresist platforms. X-ray reflectometry is used to measure the density of these resists, and leads to the determination of absorbance and film quantum yields (FQY). Ultrahigh levels ofPAG show divergent mechanisms for production of photo acids beyond PAG concentrations of 0.35 moles/liter. The FQY of sulfonium PAGs level off, whereas resists prepared with iodonium PAG show FQY s that increase beyond PAG concentrations of 0.35 moles/liter, reaching record highs of 8-13 acids generatedlEUV photons absorbed.

  4. Glutaminases in brain: Multiple isoforms for many purposes.

    PubMed

    Campos-Sandoval, José A; Martín-Rufián, Mercedes; Cardona, Carolina; Lobo, Carolina; Peñalver, Ana; Márquez, Javier

    2015-09-01

    Glutaminase is expressed in most mammalian tissues and cancer cells, but recent studies are now revealing a considerably degree of complexity in its pattern of expression and functional regulation. Novel transcript variants of the mammalian glutaminase Gls2 gene have been recently found and characterized in brain. Co-expression of different isoforms in the same cell type would allow cells to fine-tune their Gln/Glu levels under a wide range of metabolic states. Moreover, the discovery of protein interacting partners and novel subcellular localizations, for example nucleocytoplasmic in neurons and astrocytes, strongly suggest non-neurotransmission roles for Gls2 isoforms associated with transcriptional regulation and cellular differentiation. Of note, Gls isoforms have been considered as an important trophic factor for neuronal differentiation and postnatal development of brain regions. On the other hand, glutaminases are taking center stage in tumor biology as new therapeutic targets to inhibit metabolic reprogramming of cancer cells. Interestingly, glutaminase isoenzymes play seemingly opposing roles in cancer cell growth and proliferation; this issue will be also succinctly discussed with special emphasis on brain tumors.

  5. Aryl sulfonates as neutral photoacid generators (PAGs) for EUV lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulc, Robert; Blackwell, James M.; Younkin, Todd R.; Putna, E. Steve; Esswein, Katherine; DiPasquale, Antonio G.; Callahan, Ryan; Tsubaki, Hideaki; Tsuchihashi, Tooru

    2009-03-01

    EUV lithography (EUVL) is a leading candidate for printing sub-32 nm hp patterns. In order for EUVL to be commercially viable at these dimensions, a continuous evolution of the photoresist material set is required to simultaneously meet the aggressive specifications for resolution, resist sensitivity, LWR, and outgassing rate. Alternative PAG designs, especially if tailored for EUVL, may aid in the formation of a material set that helps achieve these aggressive targets. We describe the preparation, characterization, and lithographic evaluation of aryl sulfonates as non-ionic or neutral photoacid generators (PAGs) for EUVL. Full lithographic characterization is reported for our first generation resist formulation using compound H, MAP-1H-2.5. It is benchmarked against MAP-1P-5.0, which contains the well-known sulfonium PAG, triphenylsulfonium triflate (compound P). Z-factor analysis indicates nZ32 = 81.4 and 16.8 respectively, indicating that our first generation aryl sulfonate formulations require about 4.8x improvement to match the results achieved with a model onium PAG. Improving the acid generation efficiency and use of the generated byproducts is key to the continued optimization of this class of PAGs. To that end, we believe EI-MS fragmentation patterns and molecular simulations can be used to understand and optimize the nature and efficiency of electron-induced PAG fragmentation.

  6. Studying electron-PAG interactions using electron-induced fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narasimhan, Amrit; Grzeskowiak, Steven; Ostrander, Jonathan; Schad, Jonathon; Rebeyev, Eliran; Neisser, Mark; Ocola, Leonidas E.; Denbeaux, Gregory; Brainard, Robert L.

    2016-03-01

    In extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography, 92 eV photons are used to expose photoresists. Typical EUV resists are organic-based and chemically amplified using photoacid generators (PAGs). Upon exposure, PAGs produce acids which catalyze reactions that result in changes in solubility. In EUV lithography, photo- and secondary electrons (energies of 10- 80 eV) play a large role in PAG acid-production. Several mechanisms for electron-PAG interactions (e.g. electron trapping, and hole-initiated chemistry) have been proposed. The aim of this study is to explore another mechanism - internal excitation - in which a bound PAG electron can be excited by receiving energy from another energetic electron, causing a reaction that produces acid. This paper explores the mechanism of internal excitation through the analogous process of electron-induced fluorescence, in which an electron loses energy by transferring that energy to a molecule and that molecule emits a photon rather than decomposing. We will show and quantify electron-induced fluorescence of several fluorophores in polymer films to mimic resist materials, and use this information to refine our proposed mechanism. Relationships between the molecular structure of fluorophores and fluorescent quantum yield may aid in the development of novel PAGs for EUV lithography.

  7. Aβ Induces Excitotoxicity Mediated by APC/C-Cdh1 Depletion That Can Be Prevented by Glutaminase Inhibition Promoting Neuronal Survival

    PubMed Central

    Fuchsberger, T.; Martínez-Bellver, S.; Giraldo, E.; Teruel-Martí, V.; Lloret, A.; Viña, J.

    2016-01-01

    The E3 ubiquitin ligase anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C) is activated by the fizzy-related protein homolog/CDC20-like protein 1 (cdh1) in post-mitotic neurons. Growing evidence suggests that dysregulation of APC/C-Cdh1 is involved in neurodegenerative diseases. Here we show in neurons that oligomers of amyloid beta (Aβ), a peptide related to Alzheimer’s disease, cause proteasome-dependent degradation of cdh1. This leads to a subsequent increase in glutaminase (a degradation target of APC/C-Cdh1), which causes an elevation of glutamate levels and further intraneuronal Ca2+ dysregulation, resulting in neuronal apoptosis. Glutaminase inhibition prevents glutamate excitotoxicity and apoptosis in Aβ treated neurons. Furthermore, glutamate also decreases cdh1 and leads to accumulation of glutaminase, suggesting that there may be a positive feedback loop of cdh1 inactivation. We confirmed the main findings in vivo using microinjection of either Aβ or glutamate in the CA1 region of the rat hippocampus. We show here for the first time in vivo that both Aβ and glutamate cause nuclear exclusion of cdh1 and an increase in glutaminase. These results show that maintaining normal APC/C-Cdh1 activity may be a useful target in Alzheimer’s disease treatment. PMID:27514492

  8. Aβ Induces Excitotoxicity Mediated by APC/C-Cdh1 Depletion That Can Be Prevented by Glutaminase Inhibition Promoting Neuronal Survival.

    PubMed

    Fuchsberger, T; Martínez-Bellver, S; Giraldo, E; Teruel-Martí, V; Lloret, A; Viña, J

    2016-08-12

    The E3 ubiquitin ligase anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C) is activated by the fizzy-related protein homolog/CDC20-like protein 1 (cdh1) in post-mitotic neurons. Growing evidence suggests that dysregulation of APC/C-Cdh1 is involved in neurodegenerative diseases. Here we show in neurons that oligomers of amyloid beta (Aβ), a peptide related to Alzheimer's disease, cause proteasome-dependent degradation of cdh1. This leads to a subsequent increase in glutaminase (a degradation target of APC/C-Cdh1), which causes an elevation of glutamate levels and further intraneuronal Ca(2+) dysregulation, resulting in neuronal apoptosis. Glutaminase inhibition prevents glutamate excitotoxicity and apoptosis in Aβ treated neurons. Furthermore, glutamate also decreases cdh1 and leads to accumulation of glutaminase, suggesting that there may be a positive feedback loop of cdh1 inactivation. We confirmed the main findings in vivo using microinjection of either Aβ or glutamate in the CA1 region of the rat hippocampus. We show here for the first time in vivo that both Aβ and glutamate cause nuclear exclusion of cdh1 and an increase in glutaminase. These results show that maintaining normal APC/C-Cdh1 activity may be a useful target in Alzheimer's disease treatment.

  9. Synaptic Underpinnings of Altered Hippocampal Function in Glutaminase Deficient Mice During Maturation

    PubMed Central

    Gaisler-Salomon, Inna; Wang, Yvonne; Chuhma, Nao; Zhang, Hong; Golumbic, Yaela N.; Mihali, Andra; Arancio, Ottavio; Sibille, Etienne; Rayport, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    Glutaminase-deficient mice (GLS1 hets), with reduced glutamate recycling, have a focal reduction in hippocampal activity, mainly in CA1, and manifest behavioral and neurochemical phenotypes suggestive of schizophrenia resilience. To address the basis for the hippocampal hypoactivity, we examined synaptic plastic mechanisms and glutamate receptor expression. While baseline synaptic strength was unaffected in Schaffer collateral inputs to CA1, we found that long-term potentiation was attenuated. In wild-type mice, GLS1 gene expression was highest in the hippocampus and cortex, where it was reduced by about 50% in GLS1 hets. In other brain regions with lower wild-type GLS1 gene expression there were no genotypic reductions. In adult GLS1 hets, NMDA receptor NR1 subunit gene expression was reduced, but not AMPA receptor GluR1 subunit gene expression. In contrast, juvenile GLS1 hets showed no reductions in NR1 gene expression. In concert with this, adult GLS1 hets showed a deficit in hippocampal-dependent contextual fear conditioning while juvenile GLS1 hets did not. These alterations in glutamatergic synaptic function may partly explain the hippocampal hypoactivity seen in the GLS1 hets. The maturity-onset reduction in NR1 gene expression and in contextual learning supports the premise that glutaminase inhibition in adulthood should prove therapeutic in schizophrenia. PMID:22431402

  10. A novel uPAg-KPI fusion protein inhibits the growth and invasion of human ovarian cancer cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    ZHAO, LI-PING; XU, TIAN-MIN; KAN, MU-JIE; XIAO, YE-CHEN; CUI, MAN-HUA

    2016-01-01

    Urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) acts by breaking down the basement membrane and is involved in cell proliferation, migration and invasion. These actions are mediated by binding to the uPA receptor (uPAR) via its growth factor domain (GFD). The present study evaluated the effects of uPAg-KPI, a fusion protein of uPA-GFD and a kunitz protease inhibitor (KPI) domain that is present in the amyloid β-protein precursor. Using SKOV-3 cells, an ovarian cancer cell line, we examined cell viability, migration, invasion and also protein expression. Furthermore, we examined wound healing, and migration and invasion using a Transwell assay. Our data showed that uPAg-KPI treatment reduced the viability of ovarian cancer SKOV-3 cells in both a concentration and time-dependent manner by arresting tumor cells at G1/G0 phase of the cell cycle. The IC50 of uPAg-KPI was 0.5 µg/µl after 48 h treatment. At this concentration, uPAg-KPI also inhibited tumor cell colony formation, wound closure, as well as cell migration and invasion capacity. At the protein level, western blot analysis demonstrated that uPAg-KPI exerted no significant effect on the expression of total extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/ERK2 and AKT, whereas it suppressed levels of phosphorylated ERK1/ERK2 and AKT. Thus, we suggest that this novel uPAg-KPI fusion protein reduced cell viability, colony formation, wound healing and the invasive ability of human ovarian cancer SKOV-3 cells in vitro by regulating ERK and AKT signaling. Further studies using other cell lines will confirm these findings. PMID:27035617

  11. In Silico Analysis of Glutaminase from Different Species of Escherichia and Bacillus

    PubMed Central

    Irajie, Cambyz; Mohkam, Milad; Nezafat, Navid; Hosseinzadeh, Saeed; Aminlari, Mahmood; Ghasemi, Younes

    2016-01-01

    Background: Glutaminase (EC 3.5.1.2) catalyzes the hydrolytic degradation of L-glutamine to L-glutamic acid and has been introduced for cancer therapy in recent years. The present study was an in silico analysis of glutaminase to further elucidate its structure and physicochemical properties. Methods: Forty glutaminase protein sequences from different species of Escherichia and Bacillus obtained from the UniProt Protein Database were characterized for homology search, physiochemical properties, phylogenetic tree construction, motif, superfamily search, and multiple sequence alignment. Results: The sequence level homology was obtained among different groups of glutaminase enzymes, which belonged to superfamily serine-dependent β-lactamases and penicillin-binding proteins. The phylogenetic tree constructed indicated 2 main clusters for the glutaminases. The distribution of common β-lactamase motifs was also observed; however, various non-common motifs were also observed. Conclusion: Our results showed that the existence of a conserved motif with a signature amino-acid sequence of β-lactamases could be considered for the genetic engineering of glutaminases in view of their potential application in cancer therapy. Nonetheless, further research is needed to improve the stability of glutaminases and decrease their immunogenicity in both medical and food industrial applications. PMID:27582590

  12. Bordetella parapertussis PagP Mediates the Addition of Two Palmitates to the Lipopolysaccharide Lipid A

    PubMed Central

    Hittle, L. E.; Jones, J. W.; Hajjar, A. M.

    2014-01-01

    Bordetella bronchiseptica PagP (PagPBB) is a lipid A palmitoyl transferase that is required for resistance to antibody-dependent complement-mediated killing in a murine model of infection. B. parapertussis contains a putative pagP homolog (encoding B. parapertussis PagP [PagPBPa]), but its role in the biosynthesis of lipid A, the membrane anchor of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), has not been investigated. Mass spectrometry analysis revealed that wild-type B. parapertussis lipid A consists of a heterogeneous mixture of lipid A structures, with penta- and hexa-acylated structures containing one and two palmitates, respectively. Through mutational analysis, we demonstrate that PagPBPa is required for the modification of lipid A with palmitate. While PagPBB transfers a single palmitate to the lipid A C-3′ position, PagPBPa transfers palmitates to the lipid A C-2 and C-3′ positions. The addition of two palmitate acyl chains is unique to B. parapertussis. Mutation of pagPBPa resulted in a mutant strain with increased sensitivity to antimicrobial peptide killing and decreased endotoxicity, as evidenced by reduced proinflammatory responses via Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) to the hypoacylated LPS. Therefore, PagP-mediated modification of lipid A regulates outer membrane function and may be a means to modify interactions between the bacterium and its human host during infection. PMID:25422302

  13. Bordetella parapertussis PagP mediates the addition of two palmitates to the lipopolysaccharide lipid A.

    PubMed

    Hittle, L E; Jones, J W; Hajjar, A M; Ernst, R K; Preston, A

    2015-02-01

    Bordetella bronchiseptica PagP (PagPBB) is a lipid A palmitoyl transferase that is required for resistance to antibody-dependent complement-mediated killing in a murine model of infection. B. parapertussis contains a putative pagP homolog (encoding B. parapertussis PagP [PagPBPa]), but its role in the biosynthesis of lipid A, the membrane anchor of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), has not been investigated. Mass spectrometry analysis revealed that wild-type B. parapertussis lipid A consists of a heterogeneous mixture of lipid A structures, with penta- and hexa-acylated structures containing one and two palmitates, respectively. Through mutational analysis, we demonstrate that PagPBPa is required for the modification of lipid A with palmitate. While PagPBB transfers a single palmitate to the lipid A C-3' position, PagPBPa transfers palmitates to the lipid A C-2 and C-3' positions. The addition of two palmitate acyl chains is unique to B. parapertussis. Mutation of pagPBPa resulted in a mutant strain with increased sensitivity to antimicrobial peptide killing and decreased endotoxicity, as evidenced by reduced proinflammatory responses via Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) to the hypoacylated LPS. Therefore, PagP-mediated modification of lipid A regulates outer membrane function and may be a means to modify interactions between the bacterium and its human host during infection. PMID:25422302

  14. Pregnancy associated glycoproteins (PAG) in postpartum cows, ewes, goats and their offspring.

    PubMed

    Haugejorden, G; Waage, S; Dahl, E; Karlberg, K; Beckers, J F; Ropstad, E

    2006-11-01

    Determination of plasma concentrations of pregnancy associated glycoproteins (PAG) has been used for early pregnancy diagnosis in cows. However, this is complicated by the presence of PAG in plasma for an extended period postpartum. The main objective of the present study was to investigate the postpartum elimination rates of pregnancy associated glycoproteins (PAG) in sheep, goats and cows in order to gain background information applicable to the use of PAG for pregnancy diagnosis in domestic ruminants. A second objective was to investigate whether PAG are transferred to the foetus and newborn, by measuring plasma PAG concentrations in calves, lambs and goat kids before and after colostrum feeding. PAG in the blood at parturition were eliminated by a first order process in the cows and ewes, while a two-step log-linear decline occurred in the goats. Estimated postpartum half-life of plasma PAG in the cows and ewes was 9 and 4.5 days, respectively. In the goats, half-lives were 3.6 and 7.5 days in the initial fast and terminal slow phase. Basal levels were reached 80-90 days postpartum in cows. Plasma PAG concentration can be used for pregnancy diagnosis from day 28 after AI, provided that the time interval from calving to AI is >60 days. Using a heterologous antibody RIA, we found 4 ng/mL to be the appropriate cut-off. Due to the presence of PAG residues from the previous gestation, the interval from AI to pregnancy diagnosis should increase by approximately 0.5 days beyond 28 days for each day of AI closer to calving than 60. Measurements in newborn ruminants suggested that PAG enter the foetal blood in utero and that colostral PAG are transferred to the newborn. Following the peak plasma concentration observed 1 day after birth in most of the animals, PAG were rapidly eliminated in a log-linear fashion.

  15. Analysis of replication region of the cryptic plasmid pAG20 from Acetobacter aceti 3620.

    PubMed

    Kretová, Miroslava; Szemes, Tomás; Laco, Juraj; Gronesová, Paulína; Grones, Jozef

    2005-03-01

    The DNA sequence of small cryptic plasmid pAG20 in Acetobacter aceti was determined at 3064 bp with 51.6% GC pairs. The plasmid encoded a 186 amino acid protein which is important for plasmid replication in Gram-negative bacteria except Escherichia coli. Two 21 bp large direct repeat sequence 1 and two 13 bp direct repeat sequence 2 were determined in the regulation region upstream from gene encoded Rep protein. Vector pAG24 with kanamycin gene and two deletion derivatives pAG25 and pAG26 without rep gene from plasmid pAG20 were constructed. Plasmid pAG24 was replicated in a broad host range like E. coli, Acetobacter pasteurianus, A. aceti, Comanomonas spp., Serratia marcescens, and Shigella spp.

  16. PAGs, DRLs, AALs and Other Alphabet Soup MQOs for Laboratory Analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, C T

    2009-10-15

    During an incident of national significance involving radioactive materials protective action guides (PAGs) are established to protect workers and the public from harmful exposure levels of radioactive materials. The PAGs are stated in terms of dose and must be converted to measurable quantities in various media (DRLs). This workshop will present the current PAGs, methods for converting the PAGs to DRLs, and using the Data Quality Objectives process in the Multi-agency Radiological Laboratory Analytical Protocols Manual (MARLAP), derive measurement quality objectives (MQOs) for the laboratories. Examples from the Empire 09 exercise will be used in this presentation.

  17. Glutaminase 1 inhibition reduces thymidine synthesis in NSCLC.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae-Seon; Kang, Joon H; Lee, Seon-Hyeong; Lee, Chang-Hun; Son, Jaekyoung; Kim, Soo-Youl

    2016-08-26

    We found that non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is remarkably sensitive to the regulation of glutamine supply by testing the metabolic dependency of 11 cancer cell lines against regulation of glycolysis, autophagy, fatty acid synthesis, and glutamine supply. Glutamine is known as a key supplement of cancer cell growth that is converted to α-ketoglutarate for anabolic biogenesis via glutamate by glutaminase 1 (GLS1). GLS1 inhibition using 10 μM of bis-2-(5-phenylacetamido-1,3,4-thiadiazol-2-yl)ethyl sulfide (BPTES) showed about 50% cell growth arrest by SRB assay. By testing the synergistic effects of conventional therapeutics, BPTES combined with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), an irreversible inhibitor of thymidylate synthase, significant effects were observed on cell growth arrest in NSCLC. We found that GLS1 inhibition using BPTES reduced metabolic intermediates including thymidine and carbamoyl phosphate. Reduction of thymidine and carbamoyl-phosphate synthesis by BPTES treatment exacerbated pyrimidine supply by combination with 5-FU, which induced cell death synergistically in NSCLC. PMID:27338638

  18. Genomic organization and transcriptional analysis of the human l-glutaminase gene.

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Gómez, Cristina; Matés, José M; Gómez-Fabre, Pedro M; del Castillo-Olivares, Antonio; Alonso, Francisco J; Márquez, Javier

    2003-01-01

    In mammals, glutaminase (GA) is expressed in most tissues, but the regulation of organ-specific expression is largely unknown. Therefore, as an essential step towards studying the regulation of GA expression, the human liver-type GA (hLGA) gene has been characterized. LGA genomic sequences were isolated using the genome walking technique. Analysis and comparison of these sequences with two LGA cDNA clones and the Human Genome Project database, allowed the determination of the genomic organization of the LGA gene. The gene has 18 exons and is approx. 18 kb long. All exon/intron junction sequences conform to the GT/AG rule. Progressive deletion analysis of LGA promoter-luciferase constructs indicated that the core promoter is located between nt -141 and +410, with several potential regulatory elements: CAAT, GC, TATA-like, Ras-responsive element binding protein and specificity protein 1 (Sp1) sites. The minimal promoter was mapped within +107 and +410, where only an Sp1 binding site is present. Mutation experiments suggested that two CAAT recognition elements near the transcription-initiation site (-138 and -87), play a crucial role for optimal promoter activity. Electrophoretic mobility-shift assays confirmed the importance of CAAT- and TATA-like boxes to enhance basal transcription, and demonstrated that HNF-1 motif is a significant distal element for transcriptional regulation of the hLGA gene. PMID:12444921

  19. Photosensitivity and line-edge roughness of novel polymer-bound PAG photoresists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Cheng-Tsung; Wang, Mingxing; Jarnagin, Nathan D.; Gonsalves, Kenneth E.; Roberts, Jeanette M.; Yueh, Wang; Henderson, Clifford L.

    2007-03-01

    Substantially improved photoresist material designs, which can provide higher photosensitivity and precise critical dimension and edge roughness control, will be required to enable the application of next generation lithography technology to the production of future sub-65 nm node IC device generations. The development and characterization of novel material platforms that solve the aforementioned basic problems with chemically amplified resists (CARs) is essential and is already one of the major subjects of modern lithography research. In that regard, we have pursued development of a variety of 193 nm and EUV CARs that contain photoacid generator (PAG) units covalently bonded directly to the resin polymer backbone. However, the detailed structure-property relationships that result from this direct attachment of the PAG functional group to the polymer have previously not yet been rigorously characterized. In this work, the lithographic properties of a polymer-bound PAG CAR (GBLMA-co-EAMA-co-F4-MBS.TPS) and its blended-PAG analog resist (GBLMA-co-EAMA blend F4-IBBS.TPS) were studied and compared. The direct incorporation of PAG functionality into the resist polymer, where the resulting photoacid remains bound to the polymer, showed improved photosensitivity, resolution, and lower LER as compared with the analogous blended-PAG resist. The improved resolution and LER were expected due to the restricted photoacid diffusion and uniform PAG distribution provided by direct incorporation of the PAG into the polymer backbone to make a single-component resist material. The ability to load higher levels of PAG into the resist provided by this PAG incorporation into the polymer, as compared to the low PAG concentrations attainable by traditional blending approaches, overcomes the sensitivity loss that should result from reduction in photoacid diffusivity and concomitant smaller acid-catalytic chain lengths. In fact, the polymer-bound PAG resist achieves a faster photospeed than

  20. β-Arrestin-2 knockout prevents development of cellular μ-opioid receptor tolerance but does not affect opioid-withdrawal-related adaptations in single PAG neurons

    PubMed Central

    Connor, M; Bagley, E E; Chieng, B C; Christie, M J

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Tolerance to the behavioural effects of morphine is blunted in β-arrestin-2 knockout mice, but opioid withdrawal is largely unaffected. The cellular mechanisms of tolerance have been studied in some neurons from β-arrestin-2 knockouts, but tolerance and withdrawal mechanisms have not been examined at the cellular level in periaqueductal grey (PAG) neurons, which are crucial for central tolerance and withdrawal phenomena. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH μ-Opioid receptor (MOPr) inhibition of voltage-gated calcium channel currents (ICa) was examined by patch-clamp recordings from acutely dissociated PAG neurons from wild-type and β-arrestin-2 knockout mice treated chronically with morphine (CMT) or vehicle. Opioid withdrawal-induced activation of GABA transporter type 1 (GAT-1) currents was determined using perforated patch recordings from PAG neurons in brain slices. KEY RESULTS MOPr inhibition of ICa in PAG neurons was unaffected by β-arrestin-2 deletion. CMT impaired coupling of MOPrs to ICa in PAG neurons from wild-type mice, but this cellular tolerance was not observed in neurons from CMT β-arrestin-2 knockouts. However, β-arrestin-2 knockouts displayed similar opioid-withdrawal-induced activation of GAT-1 currents as wild-type PAG neurons. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS In β-arrestin-2 knockout mice, the central neurons involved in the anti-nociceptive actions of opioids also fail to develop cellular tolerance to opioids following chronic morphine. The results also provide the first cellular physiological evidence that opioid withdrawal is not disrupted by β-arrestin-2 deletion. However, the unaffected basal sensitivity to opioids in PAG neurons provides further evidence that changes in basal MOPr sensitivity cannot account for the enhanced acute nociceptive response to morphine reported in β-arrestin-2 knockouts. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed section on Opioids: New Pathways to Functional Selectivity. To view the other

  1. Role of pagL and lpxO in Bordetella bronchiseptica lipid A biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    MacArthur, I; Jones, J W; Goodlett, D R; Ernst, R K; Preston, A

    2011-09-01

    PagL and LpxO are enzymes that modify lipid A. PagL is a 3-O deacylase that removes the primary acyl chain from the 3 position, and LpxO is an oxygenase that 2-hydroxylates specific acyl chains in the lipid A. pagL and lpxO homologues have been identified in the genome of Bordetella bronchiseptica, but in the current structure for B. bronchiseptica lipid A the 3 position is acylated and 2-OH acylation is not reported. We have investigated the role of B. bronchiseptica pagL and lpxO in lipid A biosynthesis. We report a different structure for wild-type (WT) B. bronchiseptica lipid A, including the presence of 2-OH-myristate, the presence of which is dependent on lpxO. We also demonstrate that the 3 position is not acylated in the major WT lipid A structures but that mutation of pagL results in the presence of 3-OH-decanoic acid at this position, suggesting that lipid A containing this acylation is synthesized but that PagL removes most of it from the mature lipid A. These data refine the structure of B. bronchiseptica lipid A and demonstrate that pagL and lpxO are involved in its biosynthesis.

  2. Ail and PagC-related proteins in the entomopathogenic bacteria of Photorhabdus genus.

    PubMed

    Mouammine, Annabelle; Lanois, Anne; Pagès, Sylvie; Lafay, Bénédicte; Molle, Virginie; Canova, Marc; Girard, Pierre-Alain; Duvic, Bernard; Givaudan, Alain; Gaudriault, Sophie

    2014-01-01

    Among pathogenic Enterobacteriaceae, the proteins of the Ail/OmpX/PagC family form a steadily growing family of outer membrane proteins with diverse biological properties, potentially involved in virulence such as human serum resistance, adhesion and entry into eukaryotic culture cells. We studied the proteins Ail/OmpX/PagC in the bacterial Photorhabdus genus. The Photorhabdus bacteria form symbiotic complexes with nematodes of Heterorhabditis species, associations which are pathogenic to insect larvae. Our phylogenetic analysis indicated that in Photorhabdus asymbiotica and Photorhabdus luminescens only Ail and PagC proteins are encoded. The genomic analysis revealed that the Photorhabdus ail and pagC genes were present in a unique copy, except two ail paralogs from P. luminescens. These genes, referred to as ail1Pl and ail2Pl, probably resulted from a recent tandem duplication. Surprisingly, only ail1Pl expression was directly controlled by PhoPQ and low external Mg2+ conditions. In P. luminescens, the magnesium-sensing two-component regulatory system PhoPQ regulates the outer membrane barrier and is required for pathogenicity against insects. In order to characterize Ail functions in Photorhabdus, we showed that only ail2Pl and pagCPl had the ability, when expressed into Escherichia coli, to confer resistance to complement in human serum. However no effect in resistance to antimicrobial peptides was found. Thus, the role of Ail and PagC proteins in Photorhabdus life cycle is discussed. PMID:25333642

  3. Ail and PagC-Related Proteins in the Entomopathogenic Bacteria of Photorhabdus Genus

    PubMed Central

    Mouammine, Annabelle; Lanois, Anne; Pagès, Sylvie; Lafay, Bénédicte; Molle, Virginie; Canova, Marc; Girard, Pierre-Alain; Duvic, Bernard; Givaudan, Alain; Gaudriault, Sophie

    2014-01-01

    Among pathogenic Enterobacteriaceae, the proteins of the Ail/OmpX/PagC family form a steadily growing family of outer membrane proteins with diverse biological properties, potentially involved in virulence such as human serum resistance, adhesion and entry into eukaryotic culture cells. We studied the proteins Ail/OmpX/PagC in the bacterial Photorhabdus genus. The Photorhabdus bacteria form symbiotic complexes with nematodes of Heterorhabditis species, associations which are pathogenic to insect larvae. Our phylogenetic analysis indicated that in Photorhabdus asymbiotica and Photorhabdus luminescens only Ail and PagC proteins are encoded. The genomic analysis revealed that the Photorhabdus ail and pagC genes were present in a unique copy, except two ail paralogs from P. luminescens. These genes, referred to as ail1Pl and ail2Pl, probably resulted from a recent tandem duplication. Surprisingly, only ail1Pl expression was directly controlled by PhoPQ and low external Mg2+ conditions. In P. luminescens, the magnesium-sensing two-component regulatory system PhoPQ regulates the outer membrane barrier and is required for pathogenicity against insects. In order to characterize Ail functions in Photorhabdus, we showed that only ail2Pl and pagCPl had the ability, when expressed into Escherichia coli, to confer resistance to complement in human serum. However no effect in resistance to antimicrobial peptides was found. Thus, the role of Ail and PagC proteins in Photorhabdus life cycle is discussed. PMID:25333642

  4. A novel glutamine biosensor based on zinc oxide nanorod and glutaminase enzyme from Hypocria jecorina.

    PubMed

    Albayrak, Dilruba; Karakuş, Emine

    2016-01-01

    A novel biosensor for determination of L-glutamine in pharmaceutical glutamine powder was developed via immobilizing our produced glutaminase enzyme from Hypocria jecorina onto our prepared zinc oxide (ZnO) nanorod and chitosan. ZnO nanorods were prepared as surface-dependent and surface-independent and both were used. The biosensor is specific for L-glutamine and the peculiar analytical properties (linearity range, reproducibility, and accuracy) of it were experimentally determined. The optimum operating conditions of the biosensor such as buffer concentration, buffer pH, and medium temperature effect on the response of biosensor were studied. Km and Vmax values for the our-producing glutaminase enzyme from Hypocria jecorina immobilized on the biosensor were also determined as 0.29 mM and 208.33 mV/min., respectively, from Lineweaver-Burk plot. The biosensor was then used for the determination of glutamine contained in pharmaceutical formulations.

  5. Treatment of bleached wool with trans-glutaminases to enhance tensile strength, whiteness, and alkali resistance.

    PubMed

    Montazer, Majid; Lessan, Fatemeh; Pajootan, Elmira; Dadashian, Fatemeh

    2011-09-01

    Trans-glutaminases is known as a cross-linking enzyme for proteins. Wool is a proteinous fiber conventionally is treated through several processes to obtain the desirable characteristics. Bleaching is also one of the most important processes usually carried out by using an oxidizing agent in a conventional method. The tensile strength of wool yarns was reduced as a consequence of oxidative bleaching. Here, with the help of microbial trans-glutaminases (m-TGases), a novel bleaching process was disclosed in a way to obtain a bleached wool yarn with no significant reduction in the tensile strength. The results confirmed that the bleached wool yarns with H(2)O(2) could be modified by m-TGases post-treatment. The m-TGases treatment on the bleached wool yarns improved the tensile strength and whiteness along with the higher alkali resistance. PMID:21638062

  6. Unexpected functional implication of a stable succinimide in the structural stability of Methanocaldococcus jannaschii glutaminase

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sanjeev; Prakash, Sunita; Gupta, Kallol; Dongre, Aparna; Balaram, Padmanabhan; Balaram, Hemalatha

    2016-01-01

    Protein ageing is often mediated by the formation of succinimide intermediates. These short-lived intermediates derive from asparaginyl deamidation and aspartyl dehydration and are rapidly converted into β-aspartyl or D-aspartyl residues. Here we report the presence of a highly stable succinimide intermediate in the glutaminase subunit of GMP synthetase from the hyperthermophile Methanocaldoccocus jannaschii. By comparing the biophysical properties of the wild-type protein and of several mutants, we show that the presence of succinimide increases the structural stability of the glutaminase subunit. The protein bearing this modification in fact remains folded at 100 °C and in 8 M guanidinium chloride. Mutation of the residue following the reactive asparagine provides insight into the factors that contribute to the hydrolytic stability of the succinimide. Our findings suggest that sequences that stabilize succinimides from hydrolysis may be evolutionarily selected to confer extreme thermal stability. PMID:27677693

  7. Development of Modified Pag (Polyalkylene Glycol) High VI High Fuel Efficient Lubricant for LDV Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Gangopadhyay, Arup; McWatt, D. G.; Zdrodowski, R. J.; Liu, Zak; Elie, Larry; Simko, S. J.; Erdemir, Ali; Ramirez, Giovanni; Cuthbert, J.; Hock, E. D.

    2015-09-30

    Engine oils play a critical role in friction reduction. Improvements in engine oil technology steadily improved fuel economy as the industry moved through ILSAC GF-1 to GF-5 specifications. These improvements were influenced by changes in base oil chemistry, development of new friction modifiers and their treat levels, and the total additive package consisting of various other components. However, the improvements are incremental and further fuel consumption reduction opportunities are becoming more challenging. Polyalkylene glycol (PAG) based engine oils are being explored as a step forward for significant fuel consumption reduction. Although PAG fluids are used in many industrial applications, its application as an engine oil has been explored in a limited way. The objective of this project is to deep dive in exploring the applicability of PAG technology in engine oil, understanding the benefits, and limitations, elucidating the mechanism(s) for friction benefits, if any, and finally recommending how to address any limitations. The project was designed in four steps, starting with selection of lubricant technology, followed by friction and wear evaluations in laboratory bench tests which are relatively simple and inexpensive and also served as a screener for further evaluation. Selected formulations were chosen for more complex engine component level tests i.e., motored valvetrain friction and wear, piston ring friction using a motored single cylinder, and motored engine tests. A couple of formulations were further selected based on component level tests for engine dyno tests i.e., Sequence VID (ASTM D6709) for fuel economy, Sequence IVA (ASTM D6891) for valvetrain wear, and Sequence VG (ASTM D6593) for sludge and varnish protection. These are some of the industry standard tests required for qualifying engine oils. Out of these tests, a single PAG oil was selected for chassis roll dynamometer tests for fuel economy and emission measurements using FTP (Federal

  8. Anxiolytic-like effects of DOI microinjections into the hippocampus (but not the amygdala nor the PAG) in the mice four plates test.

    PubMed

    Masse, Fabienne; Petit-Demouliere, Benoit; Dubois, Isabelle; Hascoët, Martine; Bourin, Michel

    2008-04-01

    Anxiolytic-like effects of DOI, a 5-HT(2A/2C) agonist have been observed in the four plates test (FPT) after intra-peritoneal administrations. In the present study, DOI (1 microg, 2 microg or 5 microg per mice) was directly injected to three brain structures, the hippocampus, the amygdala and the periaqueductal gray matter (PAG). Tests were carried out immediately after injections. In amygdala and PAG, DOI exerted an anxiogenic-like effect. In the hippocampus, a strong anxiolytic-like effect was found only when injecting 5 microg DOI/mice in the FPT, with a size effect comparable to the anxiolytic-like effect of diazepam 1mg/kg injected intra-peritoneally. DOI or vehicle injections did not affect locomotor activity. These results help us to understand mechanisms of action of DOI in animal models of anxiety, probably through an interaction with other neurotransmitter system, which may take place in the hippocampus.

  9. Inscribing the perimeter of the PagP hydrocarbon ruler by site-specific chemical alkylation.

    PubMed

    Khan, M Adil; Moktar, Joel; Mott, Patrick J; Vu, Mary; McKie, Aaron H; Pinter, Thomas; Hof, Fraser; Bishop, Russell E

    2010-10-26

    The Escherichia coli outer membrane phospholipid:lipid A palmitoyltransferase PagP selects palmitate chains using its β-barrel-interior hydrocarbon ruler and interrogates phospholipid donors by gating them laterally through an aperture known as the crenel. Lipid A palmitoylation provides antimicrobial peptide resistance and modulates inflammation signaled through the host TLR4/MD2 pathway. Gly88 substitutions can raise the PagP hydrocarbon ruler floor to correspondingly shorten the selected acyl chain. To explore the limits of hydrocarbon ruler acyl chain selectivity, we have modified the single Gly88Cys sulfhydryl group with linear alkyl units and identified C10 as the shortest acyl chain to be efficiently utilized. Gly88Cys-S-ethyl, S-n-propyl, and S-n-butyl PagP were all highly specific for C12, C11, and C10 acyl chains, respectively, and longer aliphatic or aminoalkyl substitutions could not extend acyl chain selectivity any further. The donor chain length limit of C10 coincides with the phosphatidylcholine transition from displaying bilayer to micellar properties in water, but the detergent inhibitor lauryldimethylamine N-oxide also gradually became ineffective in a micellar assay as the selected acyl chains were shortened to C10. The Gly88Cys-S-ethyl and norleucine substitutions exhibited superior C12 acyl chain specificity compared to that of Gly88Met PagP, thus revealing detection by the hydrocarbon ruler of the Met side chain tolerance for terminal methyl group gauche conformers. Although norleucine substitution was benign, selenomethionine substitution at Met72 was highly destabilizing to PagP. Within the hydrophobic and van der Waals-contacted environment of the PagP hydrocarbon ruler, side chain flexibility, combined with localized thioether-aromatic dispersion attraction, likely influences the specificity of acyl chain selection.

  10. Purification and Characterization of Glutaminase Free Asparaginase from Enterobacter cloacae: In-Vitro Evaluation of Cytotoxic Potential against Human Myeloid Leukemia HL-60 Cells.

    PubMed

    Husain, Islam; Sharma, Anjana; Kumar, Suresh; Malik, Fayaz

    2016-01-01

    Asparaginase is an important antileukemic agent extensively used worldwide but the intrinsic glutaminase activity of this enzymatic drug is responsible for serious life threatening side effects. Hence, glutaminase free asparaginase is much needed for upgradation of therapeutic index of asparaginase therapy. In the present study, glutaminase free asparaginase produced from Enterobacter cloacae was purified to apparent homogeneity. The purified enzyme was found to be homodimer of approximately 106 kDa with monomeric size of approximately 52 kDa and pI 4.5. Purified enzyme showed optimum activity between pH 7-8 and temperature 35-40°C, which is close to the internal environment of human body. Monovalent cations such as Na+ and K+ enhanced asparaginase activity whereas divalent and trivalent cations, Ca2+, Mg2+, Zn2+, Mn2+, and Fe3+ inhibited the enzyme activity. Kinetic parameters Km, Vmax and Kcat of purified enzyme were found to be 1.58×10-3 M, 2.22 IU μg-1 and 5.3 × 104 S-1, respectively. Purified enzyme showed prolonged in vitro serum (T1/2 = ~ 39 h) and trypsin (T1/2 = ~ 32 min) half life, which is therapeutically remarkable feature. The cytotoxic activity of enzyme was examined against a panel of human cancer cell lines, HL-60, MOLT-4, MDA-MB-231 and T47D, and highest cytotoxicity observed against HL-60 cells (IC50 ~ 3.1 IU ml-1), which was comparable to commercial asparaginase. Cell and nuclear morphological studies of HL-60 cells showed that on treatment with purified asparaginase symptoms of apoptosis were increased in dose dependent manner. Cell cycle progression analysis indicates that enzyme induces apoptosis by cell cycle arrest in G0/G1 phase. Mitochondrial membrane potential loss showed that enzyme also triggers the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis. Furthermore, the enzyme was found to be nontoxic for human noncancerous cells FR-2 and nonhemolytic for human erythrocytes. PMID:26891220

  11. Purification and Characterization of Glutaminase Free Asparaginase from Enterobacter cloacae: In-Vitro Evaluation of Cytotoxic Potential against Human Myeloid Leukemia HL-60 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Husain, Islam; Sharma, Anjana; Kumar, Suresh; Malik, Fayaz

    2016-01-01

    Asparaginase is an important antileukemic agent extensively used worldwide but the intrinsic glutaminase activity of this enzymatic drug is responsible for serious life threatening side effects. Hence, glutaminase free asparaginase is much needed for upgradation of therapeutic index of asparaginase therapy. In the present study, glutaminase free asparaginase produced from Enterobacter cloacae was purified to apparent homogeneity. The purified enzyme was found to be homodimer of approximately 106 kDa with monomeric size of approximately 52 kDa and pI 4.5. Purified enzyme showed optimum activity between pH 7–8 and temperature 35–40°C, which is close to the internal environment of human body. Monovalent cations such as Na+ and K+ enhanced asparaginase activity whereas divalent and trivalent cations, Ca2+, Mg2+, Zn2+, Mn2+, and Fe3+ inhibited the enzyme activity. Kinetic parameters Km, Vmax and Kcat of purified enzyme were found to be 1.58×10−3 M, 2.22 IU μg-1 and 5.3 × 104 S-1, respectively. Purified enzyme showed prolonged in vitro serum (T1/2 = ~ 39 h) and trypsin (T1/2 = ~ 32 min) half life, which is therapeutically remarkable feature. The cytotoxic activity of enzyme was examined against a panel of human cancer cell lines, HL-60, MOLT-4, MDA-MB-231 and T47D, and highest cytotoxicity observed against HL-60 cells (IC50 ~ 3.1 IU ml-1), which was comparable to commercial asparaginase. Cell and nuclear morphological studies of HL-60 cells showed that on treatment with purified asparaginase symptoms of apoptosis were increased in dose dependent manner. Cell cycle progression analysis indicates that enzyme induces apoptosis by cell cycle arrest in G0/G1 phase. Mitochondrial membrane potential loss showed that enzyme also triggers the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis. Furthermore, the enzyme was found to be nontoxic for human noncancerous cells FR-2 and nonhemolytic for human erythrocytes. PMID:26891220

  12. Synthetic lethality of combined glutaminase and Hsp90 inhibition in mTORC1-driven tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Csibi, Alfredo; Yang, Sun; Hoffman, Gregory R; Li, Chenggang; Zhang, Erik; Yu, Jane J; Blenis, John

    2015-01-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) integrates multiple signals from growth factors, nutrients, and cellular energy status to control a wide range of metabolic processes, including mRNA biogenesis; protein, nucleotide, and lipid synthesis; and autophagy. Deregulation of the mTORC1 pathway is found in cancer as well as genetic disorders such as tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) and sporadic lymphangioleiomyomatosis. Recent studies have shown that the mTORC1 inhibitor rapamycin and its analogs generally suppress proliferation rather than induce apoptosis. Therefore, it is critical to use alternative strategies to induce death of cells with activated mTORC1. In this study, a small-molecule screen has revealed that the combination of glutaminase (GLS) and heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) inhibitors selectively triggers death of TSC2-deficient cells. At a mechanistic level, high mTORC1-driven translation rates in TSC1/2-deficient cells, unlike wild-type cells, sensitizes these cells to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Thus, Hsp90 inhibition drives accumulation of unfolded protein and ER stress. When combining proteotoxic stress with oxidative stress by depletion of the intracellular antioxidant glutathione by GLS inhibition, acute cell death is observed in cells with activated mTORC1 signaling. This study suggests that this combination strategy may have the potential to be developed into a therapeutic use for the treatment of mTORC1-driven tumors. PMID:25524627

  13. Pregnancy-associated glycoprotein (PAG) concentration in plasma and milk samples for early pregnancy diagnosis in Lacaune dairy sheep.

    PubMed

    El Amiri, B; Sousa, N M; Alvarez Oxiley, A; Hadarbach, D; Beckers, J F

    2015-04-01

    In the present study, four RIA systems (RIA-1 to -4) based on two antisera raised against ovine pregnancy-associated glycoproteins (ovPAGs), combined with an ovine or a bovine PAG tracer were used to measure PAG concentrations in plasma and milk samples of dairy ewes. Blood and milk samples were collected on different days of gestation: 0, 18, 20, 22, 25, 28, 32, 42, and 49. From day 20 onward, the PAG in plasma could be detected in all pregnant ewes using the four RIA systems. By using milk, except for RIA-1, the other systems showed a sensitivity of 100% from day 28 of gestation onward. In plasma, PAG concentrations were higher in multiple than in single pregnancies, while no clear relationship was observed in milk. In conclusion, milk is a good alternative to plasma for early pregnancy diagnosis in sheep from day 28 to day 42.

  14. Quantum efficiency of PAG decomposition in different polymer matrices at advanced lithographic wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedynyshyn, Theodore H.; Sinta, Roger F.; Mowers, William A.; Cabral, Alberto

    2003-06-01

    The Dill ABC parameters for optical resists are typically determined by measuring the change in the intensity of transmitted light at the wavelength of interest as a function of incident energy. The effectiveness of the experiment rests with the fact that the resist optical properties change with exposure and that the optical properties are directly related to the concentration of PAG compound. These conditions are not typically satisfied in CA resists and thus C is unobtainable by this method. FT-IR spectroscopy can directly measure changes in the photoactive species by isolating and measuring absorbance peaks unique to the photoactive species. We employed the ProABC software, specially modified to allow FT-IR absorbance input, to extract ABS parameters through a best fit of the lithography model to experimental data. The quantum efficiency of PAG decomposition at 157-, 193-, and 248-nm was determined for four diazomethane type PAGs in four different polymer matrices. It was found that both the Dill C parameter and the quantum efficiency for all PAGs increased as wavelength decreased, but that the magnitude of the increase was strongly dependent on the polymer matrix.

  15. Study of acid diffusion behaves form PAG by using top coat method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekiguchi, Atsushi; Matsumoto, Yoko

    2014-03-01

    Our past research on measurements of simulation parameters for ArF resists focused on establishing methods for measuring the following parameters:[1]-[4] • Development parameters[1] • PEB parameters[2] • Dill's ABC parameters[3] • Quencher parameter[4] We entered these parameters into a lithography simulator and performed ArF resist simulations.We then explored ways to optimize the ArF resist material and process. This paper reports on our study of methods for measuring the diffusion length of acid generated from PAG during exposures. In our experiment, we applied a PAG-containing top coat (TC) material (second layer) to a PAG-free ArF resist (first layer), then performed the exposure and PEB processes. The acid generated in the TC during the exposure diffused into the ArF resist in the lower layer (first layer) when PEB was performed. The process of developing this sample removed the TC in the second layer and the parts of the first layer into which the acid had diffused.We obtained the acid diffusion length based on the quantity of film removed by the development. We calculated the acid diffusion coefficient after varying the exposure value and repeating the measurement. For this report, we also performed measurements to determine how differences in PAG anion size, amount of quencher additive, and PEB temperature affected the acid diffusion coefficient.We entered the measurements obtained into the PROLITH simulator and explored the effects of acid diffusion on pattern profile.

  16. Elastohydrodynamics of oil-soluble PAGs, high-oleic sunflower oil and their blends

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recent reports indicate that the oxidative stability of vegetable oils can be improved for lubrication purposes by mixing them with oil-soluble polyalkyl glycols (OS-PAG). This inspired a study of other lubrication-related properties of their blends. The viscosity, density, and elastohydrodynamic fi...

  17. Feeding the Preschool Child: Documents Issued by PAG Ad Hoc Working Group Meetings (1969-1975).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Nations Industrial Development Organization, Vienna (Austria).

    This document contains six papers prepared between 1969 and 1975 by the Protein-Calorie Advisory Group (PAG) of the United Nations on topics related to the feeding of preschool children in underdeveloped countries. Among the topics covered: (1) nutrition in utero; (2) nutritional aspects of breastfeeding; (3) infant mortality rates as indicators…

  18. Out-of-band insensitive polymer-bound PAG for EUV resist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwashita, Jun; Hirayama, Taku; Matsuzawa, Kensuke; Utsumi, Yoshiyuki; Ohmori, Katsumi

    2012-03-01

    Out of band (OoB) radiation has been regarded as one of the key issues on Extreme Ultra Violet Lithography (EUVL). OoB light especially in the deep ultraviolet (DUV) region have a negative impact on image contrast and resist profile, since general photo acid generator (PAG) used in chemically amplified EUV resist are also sensitive for DUV. It is reported that a Spectral Purify Filter (SPF) would eliminate OoB radiation. However it expense a large reduction in EUV power and hence throughput, so it is reported that HVM EUV exposure tool would not employ SPF. Therefore, both EUV sensitive and DUV insensitive are required property to overcome OoB radiation issue by resist material itself. Consideration of PAG cation structure was proceeded to control absorption for DUV. Based on the concept, OoB insensitivity was investigated both on blend resist platform and Polymer Bound PAG (PBP) platform. OoB insensitive concept was confirmed with UV spectrum and sensitivity for KrF and ArF. The OoB insensitive PAG cation worked well on PBP, while dark loss are seen on blend resist platform due to lack of inhibition effect. Lithographic performance would be exhibited using Alpha Demo Tool (ADT) and NXE3100. Outgassing property on witness sample (WS) and Residual Gas Analysis (RGA ) will be also discussed.

  19. Characterization of the analogues to human pregnancy-associated alpha 2-glycoprotein (alpha 2PAG, PZP) isolated in the mouse and rat.

    PubMed

    Hau, J; Porstmann, T

    1984-10-01

    Immunological cross-reaction and antigenic identity between pregnancy-associated alpha 2-glycoprotein (alpha 2PAG) and alpha 2PAG analogues in the mouse and the rat are demonstrated. The proteins have been characterized independently in 2 different laboratories and the physicochemical and biological properties of the rat and the mouse alpha 2PAG analogues and human alpha 2PAG are compared and discussed.

  20. A thiolate anion buried within the hydrocarbon ruler perturbs PagP lipid acyl chain selection.

    PubMed

    Khan, M Adil; Moktar, Joel; Mott, Patrick J; Bishop, Russell E

    2010-03-23

    The Escherichia coli outer membrane phospholipid:lipid A palmitoyltransferase PagP exhibits remarkable selectivity because its binding pocket for lipid acyl chains excludes those differing in length from palmitate by a solitary methylene unit. This narrow detergent-binding hydrophobic pocket buried within the eight-strand antiparallel beta-barrel is known as the hydrocarbon ruler. Gly88 lines the acyl chain binding pocket floor, and its substitution can raise the floor to correspondingly shorten the selected acyl chain. An aromatic exciton interaction between Tyr26 and Trp66 provides an intrinsic spectroscopic probe located immediately adjacent to Gly88. The Gly88Cys PagP enzyme was engineered to function as a dedicated myristoyltransferase, but the mutant enzyme instead selected both myristoyl and pentadecanoyl groups, was devoid of the exciton, and displayed a 21 degrees C reduction in thermal stability. We now demonstrate that the structural perturbation results from a buried thiolate anion attributed to suppression of the Cys sulfhydryl group pK(a) from 9.4 in aqueous solvent to 7.5 in the hydrocarbon ruler microenvironment. The Cys thiol is sandwiched at the interface between a nonpolar and a polar beta-barrel interior milieu, suggesting that local electrostatics near the otherwise hydrophobic hydrocarbon ruler pocket serve to perturb the thiol pK(a). Neutralization of the Cys thiolate anion by protonation restores wild-type exciton and thermal stability signatures to Gly88Cys PagP, which then functions as a dedicated myristoyltransferase at pH 7. Gly88Cys PagP assembled in bacterial membranes recapitulates lipid A myristoylation in vivo. Hydrocarbon ruler-exciton coupling in PagP thus reveals a thiol-thiolate ionization mechanism for modulating lipid acyl chain selection.

  1. Sequential Optimization Methods for Augmentation of Marine Enzymes Production in Solid-State Fermentation: l-Glutaminase Production a Case Study.

    PubMed

    Sathish, T; Uppuluri, K B; Veera Bramha Chari, P; Kezia, D

    2016-01-01

    There is an increased l-glutaminase market worldwide due to its relevant industrial applications. Salt tolerance l-glutaminases play a vital role in the increase of flavor of different types of foods like soya sauce and tofu. This chapter is presenting the economically viable l-glutaminases production in solid-state fermentation (SSF) by Aspergillus flavus MTCC 9972 as a case study. The enzyme production was improved following a three step optimization process. Initially mixture design (MD) (augmented simplex lattice design) was employed to optimize the solid substrate mixture. Such solid substrate mixture consisted of 59:41 of wheat bran and Bengal gram husk has given higher amounts of l-glutaminase. Glucose and l-glutamine were screened as a finest additional carbon and nitrogen sources for l-glutaminase production with help of Plackett-Burman Design (PBD). l-Glutamine also acting as a nitrogen source as well as inducer for secretion of l-glutaminase from A. flavus MTCC 9972. In the final step of optimization various environmental and nutritive parameters such as pH, temperature, moisture content, inoculum concentration, glucose, and l-glutamine levels were optimized through the use of hybrid feed forward neural networks (FFNNs) and genetic algorithm (GA). Through sequential optimization methods MD-PBD-FFNN-GA, the l-glutaminase production in SSF could be improved by 2.7-fold (453-1690U/g). PMID:27452167

  2. Analysis of the generating action of the acid from PAG using acid sensitive dyes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekiguchi, Atsushi; Matsumoto, Yoko; Konishi, Hiroko; Moriyasu, Kengo; Morimoto, Yukihiro

    2011-04-01

    The use of acid sensitive dyes to determine the quantity of acid generated from PAG and in the analysis of acid-generating reaction is currently being studied. The method would allow an easy understanding of the PAG acid-generating reaction simply by adding an acid sensitive dye to the resist. In the conventional method, a resist containing a chromogenic substance is applied to a quartz substrate, which is then exposed. Following the exposure, the absorbance of chromogenic component near 530 nm is measured and evaluated with a spectroscope. The rate constant for acid generation (Dill's C parameter) during the exposure is determined based on the relationship between transmittance at 530 nm and the exposure dose. However, the chromogenic substance used in this method degrades over time (fading reaction) after the exposure, resulting in variations in transmittance measurements due to the effects of time between the completion of the exposure and the measurement of transmittance. We devised a prototype instrument capable of in situ measurements of absorbance at 530 nm while irradiating a 193-nm light beam. Using this instrument, we obtained rate constants for acid generation (Dill's C parameter) and examined the differing results obtained with ArF resist polymers of differing PAG concentrations and structures as well as dependence on the quantity of the chromogenic substance.

  3. Diphenylarsinic acid promotes degradation of glutaminase C by mitochondrial Lon protease.

    PubMed

    Kita, Kayoko; Suzuki, Toshihide; Ochi, Takafumi

    2012-05-25

    Glutaminase C (GAC), a splicing variant of the kidney-type glutaminase (KGA) gene, is a vital mitochondrial enzyme protein that catalyzes glutamine to glutamate. Earlier studies have shown that GAC proteins in the human hepatocarcinoma cell line, HepG2, were down-regulated by diphenylarsinic acid (DPAA), but the mechanism by which DPAA induced GAC protein down-regulation remained poorly understood. Here, we showed that DPAA promoted GAC protein degradation without affecting GAC transcription and translation. Moreover, DPAA-induced GAC proteolysis was mediated by mitochondrial Lon protease. DPAA insolubilized 0.5% Triton X-100-soluble GAC protein and promoted the accumulation of insoluble GAC in Lon protease knockdown cells. DPAA destroyed the native tetrameric GAC conformation and promoted an increase in the unassembled form of GAC when DPAA was incubated with cell extracts. Decreases in the tetrameric form of GAC were observed in cells exposed to DPAA, and decreases occurred prior to a decrease in total GAC protein levels. In addition, decreases in the tetrameric form of GAC were observed independently with Lon protease. Mitochondrial heat shock protein 70 is known to be an indispensable protein that can bind to misfolded proteins, thereby supporting degradation of proteins sensitive to Lon protease. When cells were incubated with DPAA, GAC proteins that can bind with mtHsp70 increased. Interestingly, the association of mtHsp70 with GAC protein increased when the tetrameric form of GAC was reduced. These results suggest that degradation of native tetrameric GAC by DPAA may be a trigger in GAC protein degradation by Lon protease.

  4. Identification of brain-specific angiogenesis inhibitor 2 as an interaction partner of glutaminase interacting protein

    SciTech Connect

    Zencir, Sevil; Ovee, Mohiuddin; Dobson, Melanie J.; Banerjee, Monimoy; Topcu, Zeki; Mohanty, Smita

    2011-08-12

    Highlights: {yields} Brain-specific angiogenesis inhibitor 2 (BAI2) is a new partner protein for GIP. {yields} BAI2 interaction with GIP was revealed by yeast two-hybrid assay. {yields} Binding of BAI2 to GIP was characterized by NMR, CD and fluorescence. {yields} BAI2 and GIP binding was mediated through the C-terminus of BAI2. -- Abstract: The vast majority of physiological processes in living cells are mediated by protein-protein interactions often specified by particular protein sequence motifs. PDZ domains, composed of 80-100 amino acid residues, are an important class of interaction motif. Among the PDZ-containing proteins, glutaminase interacting protein (GIP), also known as Tax Interacting Protein TIP-1, is unique in being composed almost exclusively of a single PDZ domain. GIP has important roles in cellular signaling, protein scaffolding and modulation of tumor growth and interacts with a number of physiological partner proteins, including Glutaminase L, {beta}-Catenin, FAS, HTLV-1 Tax, HPV16 E6, Rhotekin and Kir 2.3. To identify the network of proteins that interact with GIP, a human fetal brain cDNA library was screened using a yeast two-hybrid assay with GIP as bait. We identified brain-specific angiogenesis inhibitor 2 (BAI2), a member of the adhesion-G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), as a new partner of GIP. BAI2 is expressed primarily in neurons, further expanding GIP cellular functions. The interaction between GIP and the carboxy-terminus of BAI2 was characterized using fluorescence, circular dichroism (CD) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy assays. These biophysical analyses support the interaction identified in the yeast two-hybrid assay. This is the first study reporting BAI2 as an interaction partner of GIP.

  5. The Rep20 replication initiator from the pAG20 plasmid of Acetobacter aceti.

    PubMed

    Babič, Martin; Rešková, Zuzana; Bugala, Juraj; Cimová, Viera; Grones, Peter; Grones, Jozef

    2014-01-01

    In the previously isolated pAG20 plasmid from the Acetobacter aceti CCM3610 strain, the Rep20 protein was characterized as a main replication initiator. The pAG20 plasmid origin was localized in the vicinity of the rep20 gene and contained two 21-nucleotide-long iteron sequences, two 13-nucleotide-long direct repeats, and a DnaA-binding site. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay and nonradioactive fragment analysis confirmed that the Rep20 protein interacted with two direct repeats (5'-TCCAAATTTGGAT'-3') and their requirement during plasmid replication was verified by mutagenesis. Although the association could not be validated of the DnaA protein of from the host cells of Escherichia coli with the plasmid-encoded replication initiator that usually occurs during replication initiation, Rep20 was able to form dimeric structures by which it could bind the sequence of the rep20 gene and autoregulate its own expression. Targeted mutagenesis of the Rep20 protein revealed the importance of the third α-helix and ⁶³Lys, specifically during DNA binding. The second, closely adjacent β-sheet also took part in this process in which ⁵²Asn played a significant role.

  6. Involvement of the pagR gene of pXO2 in anthrax pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xudong; Zhang, Enmin; Zhang, Huijuan; Wei, Jianchun; Li, Wei; Zhu, Jin; Wang, Bingxiang; Dong, Shulin

    2016-01-01

    Anthrax is a disease caused by Bacillus anthracis. Specifically, the anthrax toxins and capsules encoded by the pXO1 and pXO2 plasmids, respectively, are the major virulence factors. We previously reported that the pXO1 plasmid was retained in the attenuated strain of B. anthracis vaccine strains even after subculturing at high temperatures. In the present study, we reinvestigate the attenuation mechanism of Pasteur II. Sequencing of pXO1 and pXO2 from Pasteur II strain revealed mutations in these plasmids as compared to the reference sequences. Two deletions on these plasmids, one each on pXO1 and pXO2, were confirmed to be unique to the Pasteur II strain as compared to the wild-type strains. Gene replacement with homologous recombination revealed that the mutation in the promoter region of the pagR gene on pXO2, but not the mutation on pXO1, contributes to lethal levels of toxin production. This result was further confirmed by RT-PCR, western blot, and animal toxicity assays. Taken together, our results signify that the attenuation of the Pasteur II vaccine strain is caused by a mutation in the pagR gene on its pXO2 plasmid. Moreover, these data suggest that pXO2 plasmid encoded proteins are involved in the virulence of B. anthracis. PMID:27363681

  7. Involvement of the pagR gene of pXO2 in anthrax pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Xudong; Zhang, Enmin; Zhang, Huijuan; Wei, Jianchun; Li, Wei; Zhu, Jin; Wang, Bingxiang; Dong, Shulin

    2016-01-01

    Anthrax is a disease caused by Bacillus anthracis. Specifically, the anthrax toxins and capsules encoded by the pXO1 and pXO2 plasmids, respectively, are the major virulence factors. We previously reported that the pXO1 plasmid was retained in the attenuated strain of B. anthracis vaccine strains even after subculturing at high temperatures. In the present study, we reinvestigate the attenuation mechanism of Pasteur II. Sequencing of pXO1 and pXO2 from Pasteur II strain revealed mutations in these plasmids as compared to the reference sequences. Two deletions on these plasmids, one each on pXO1 and pXO2, were confirmed to be unique to the Pasteur II strain as compared to the wild-type strains. Gene replacement with homologous recombination revealed that the mutation in the promoter region of the pagR gene on pXO2, but not the mutation on pXO1, contributes to lethal levels of toxin production. This result was further confirmed by RT-PCR, western blot, and animal toxicity assays. Taken together, our results signify that the attenuation of the Pasteur II vaccine strain is caused by a mutation in the pagR gene on its pXO2 plasmid. Moreover, these data suggest that pXO2 plasmid encoded proteins are involved in the virulence of B. anthracis. PMID:27363681

  8. Silencing of glutaminase 1 resensitizes Taxol-resistant breast cancer cells to Taxol.

    PubMed

    Fu, Aiqin; Yu, Ze; Song, Yaobo; Zhang, Enning

    2015-06-01

    Taxol is a front‑line chemotherapeutic agent for the treatment of patients with multiple types of tumor. However, resistance to Taxol remains one of the principal causes of cancer‑associated mortality. Glutamine, which is metabolized via a glutaminase (GLS)‑dependent process, termed glutaminolysis, is important in cell growth and metabolism. The present study reported a novel mechanism underlying Taxol resistance in breast cancer cells. By investigating the glutamine metabolism of breast cancer cells in response to treatment with Taxol in vitro, it was observed that Taxol induced the uptake of glutamine and the expression of GLS1. Notably, Taxol‑resistant cancer cells exhibited upregulation in the metabolism of glutamine and expression of GLS1. In addition, overexpression of GLS1 rendered cancer cells resistant to Taxol, indicating that GLS1 may be the therapeutic target for overcoming Taxol resistance in clinical therapeutics. The results also demonstrated that knock‑down of GLS1 using small interfering RNA, resensitized the Taxol‑resistant breast cancer cells to Taxol.

  9. Glutaminase Increases in Rat Dorsal Root Ganglion Neurons after Unilateral Adjuvant-Induced Hind Paw Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, E. Matthew; Zhang, Zijia; Schechter, Ruben; Miller, Kenneth E.

    2016-01-01

    Glutamate is a neurotransmitter used at both the peripheral and central terminals of nociceptive primary sensory neurons, yet little is known concerning regulation of glutamate metabolism during peripheral inflammation. Glutaminase (GLS) is an enzyme of the glutamate-glutamine cycle that converts glutamine into glutamate for neurotransmission and is implicated in producing elevated levels of glutamate in central and peripheral terminals. A potential mechanism for increased levels of glutamate is an elevation in GLS expression. We assessed GLS expression after unilateral hind paw inflammation by measuring GLS immunoreactivity (ir) with quantitative image analysis of L4 dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons after one, two, four, and eight days of adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA) compared to saline injected controls. No significant elevation in GLS-ir occurred in the DRG ipsilateral to the inflamed hind paw after one or two days of AIA. After four days AIA, GLS-ir was elevated significantly in all sizes of DRG neurons. After eight days AIA, GLS-ir remained elevated in small (<400 µm2), presumably nociceptive neurons. Western blot analysis of the L4 DRG at day four AIA confirmed the elevated GLS-ir. The present study indicates that GLS expression is increased in the chronic stage of inflammation and may be a target for chronic pain therapy. PMID:26771651

  10. The distribution of invA, pagC and spvC genes among Salmonella isolates from animals.

    PubMed

    Nolan, L K; Giddings, C W; Brown, J

    1995-01-01

    New molecular diagnostic techniques often rely on hybridization or amplification of specific DNA regions to detect pathogenic bacteria. The choice of genes to be used as probes or as the targets of amplification techniques is critical to the success of these procedures. The genes so used might best be those associated with virulent isolates and having a wide distribution among such isolates. In this study three genes, invA, pagC and spvC, thought to be associated with the virulence of salmonellae, were labelled and used to probe the total DNA from 103 Salmonella isolates from animals in an attempt to determine whether these genes might be useful in diagnostic procedures. pagC was detected in 99% of the Salmonella tested, and invA was detected in 94.2% of the isolates. Both pagC and invA were detected with a significantly higher frequency than spvC in isolates from chickens and swine, but no significant difference in detection of these three genes occurred when bovine isolates were examined. Failure to detect any of these genes occurred in only one isolate. Isolates from apparently healthy or from clinically ill chickens and swine could not be distinguished by detecting these three genes. The genes were not detected in the non-Salmonella strains tested. These results suggest that, of these three genes, pagC may be the best choice for use as a probe or polymerase chain reaction target in future detection protocols.

  11. PagP Crystallized from SDS/Cosolvent Reveals the Route for Phospholipid Access to the Hydrocarbon Ruler

    SciTech Connect

    Cuesta-Seijo, Jose Antonio; Neale, Chris; Khan, M. Adil; Moktar, Joel; Tran, Christopher D.; Bishop, Russell E.; Pomès, Régis; Privé, Gilbert G.

    2012-02-06

    Enzymatic reactions involving bilayer lipids occur in an environment with strict physical and topological constraints. The integral membrane enzyme PagP transfers a palmitoyl group from a phospholipid to lipid A in order to assist Escherichia coli in evading host immune defenses during infection. PagP measures the palmitoyl group with an internal hydrocarbon ruler that is formed in the interior of the eight-stranded antiparallel {beta} barrel. The access and egress of the palmitoyl group is thought to take a lateral route from the bilayer phase to the barrel interior. Molecular dynamics, mutagenesis, and a 1.4 {angstrom} crystal structure of PagP in an SDS/2-methyl-2,4-pentanediol (MPD) cosolvent system reveal that phospholipid access occurs at the crenel present between strands F and G of PagP. In this way, the phospholipid head group can remain exposed to the cell exterior while the lipid acyl chain remains in a predominantly hydrophobic environment as it translocates to the protein interior.

  12. Evaluation of the radiation-sensitizer/protector and/or antioxidant efficiencies using Fricke and PAG dosimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meesat, Ridthee; Jay-Gerin, Jean-Paul; Khalil, Abdelouahed; Lepage, Martin

    2009-05-01

    In this study, our aim is to assess the potential of Fricke and polyacrylamide gel (PAG) dosimeters to quantitatively evaluate the efficiency of potential radiation sensitizers/protectors and antioxidants. These compounds are of importance in radiotherapy as well as in disease prevention and promotion of health. The basic principle of the Fricke dosimeter is the radiation-induced oxidation of Fe2+ to Fe3+ in an aerated aqueous 0.4 M H2SO4. The production of ferric ions is most sensitive to the radical species produced in the radiolysis of water. Using this method, we observed that cystamine (one of the best of the known radioprotectors) can prevent oxydation of Fe2+ from reactive radiolysis species. However, one obvious disadvantage of the Fricke dosimeter is that it operates under highly acidic conditions (pH 0.46), which may degrade biological compounds. In contrast, the pH of the polyacrylamide gel (PAG) dosimeter is almost neutral, such that degradation of compounds is less probable. A change in R2-dose sensitivity was observed in the presence of radiosensitizers/radioprotectors and antioxidants. The protective effect of Trolox (a well-known antioxidant) and thiourea (a radioprotector) was readily observed using the PAG dosimeter. Incorporation of iodinated radiation sensitizers such as NaI and an iodine contrast agent led to a quantifiable sensitizer enhancement ratio. These studies suggest that the Fricke and the PAG dosimeters have the potential to evaluate the efficiency of radiation sensitizers/protectors and antioxidants.

  13. PagP Crystallized from SDS/Cosolvent Reveals the Route for Phospholipid Access to the Hydrocarbon Ruler

    PubMed Central

    Cuesta-Seijo, Jose Antonio; Neale, Chris; Khan, M. Adil; Moktar, Joel; Tran, Christopher D.; Bishop, Russell E.; Pomès, Régis; Privé, Gilbert G.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Enzymatic reactions involving bilayer lipids occur in an environment with strict physical and topological constraints. The integral membrane enzyme PagP transfers a palmitoyl group from a phospholipid to lipid A in order to assist Escherichia coli in evading host immune defenses during infection. PagP measures the palmitoyl group with an internal hydrocarbon ruler that is formed in the interior of the eight-stranded antiparallel β barrel. The access and egress of the palmitoyl group is thought to take a lateral route from the bilayer phase to the barrel interior. Molecular dynamics, mutagenesis, and a 1.4 Å crystal structure of PagP in an SDS/2-methyl-2, 4-pentanediol (MPD) cosolvent system reveal that phospholipid access occurs at the crenel present between strands F and G of PagP. In this way, the phospholipid head group can remain exposed to the cell exterior while the lipid acyl chain remains in a predominantly hydrophobic environment as it translocates to the protein interior. PMID:20826347

  14. Macrophages treated with particulate matter PM2.5 induce selective neurotoxicity through glutaminase-mediated glutamate generation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fang; Huang, Yunlong; Zhang, Fang; Chen, Qiang; Wu, Beiqing; Rui, Wei; Zheng, Jialin C; Ding, Wenjun

    2015-07-01

    Exposure to atmospheric particulate matter PM2.5 (aerodynamic diameter ≤ 2.5 μm) has been epidemiologically associated with respiratory illnesses. However, recent data have suggested that PM2.5 is able to infiltrate into circulation and elicit a systemic inflammatory response. Potential adverse effects of air pollutants to the central nervous system (CNS) have raised concerns, but whether PM2.5 causes neurotoxicity remains unclear. In this study, we have demonstrated that PM2.5 impairs the tight junction of endothelial cells and increases permeability and monocyte transmigration across endothelial monolayer in vitro, indicating that PM2.5 is able to disrupt blood-brain barrier integrity and gain access to the CNS. Exposure of primary neuronal cultures to PM2.5 resulted in decrease in cell viability and loss of neuronal antigens. Furthermore, supernatants collected from PM2.5 -treated macrophages and microglia were also neurotoxic. These macrophages and microglia significantly increased extracellular levels of glutamate following PM2.5 exposure, which were negatively correlated with neuronal viability. Pre-treatment with NMDA receptor antagonist MK801 alleviated neuron loss, suggesting that PM2.5 neurotoxicity is mediated by glutamate. To determine the potential source of excess glutamate production, we investigated glutaminase, the main enzyme for glutamate generation. Glutaminase was reduced in PM2.5 -treated macrophages and increased in extracellular vesicles, suggesting that PM2.5 induces glutaminase release through extracellular vesicles. In conclusion, these findings indicate PM2.5 as a potential neurotoxic factor, crucial to understanding the effects of air pollution on the CNS.

  15. H3PAgI: generation by laser-ablation and characterization by rotational spectroscopy and ab initio calculations.

    PubMed

    Stephens, Susanna L; Tew, David P; Walker, Nicholas R; Legon, Anthony C

    2016-07-28

    The new compound H3PAgI has been synthesized in the gas phase by means of the reaction of laser-ablated silver metal with a pulse of gas consisting of a dilute mixture of ICF3 and PH3 in argon. Ground-state rotational spectra were detected and assigned for the two isotopologues H3P(107)AgI and H3P(109)AgI in their natural abundance by means of a chirped-pulse, Fourier-transform, microwave spectrometer. Both isotopologues exhibit rotational spectra of the symmetric-top type, analysis of which led to accurate values of the rotational constant B0, the quartic centrifugal distortion constants DJ and DJK, and the iodine nuclear quadrupole coupling constant χaa(I) = eQqaa. Ab initio calculations at the explicitly-correlated level of theory CCSD(T)(F12*)/aug-cc-pVDZ confirmed that the atoms PAg-I lie on the C3 axis in that order. The experimental rotational constants were interpreted to give the bond lengths r0(PAg) = 2.3488(20) Å and r0(Ag-I) = 2.5483(1) Å, in good agreement with the equilibrium lengths of 2.3387 Å and 2.5537 Å, respectively, obtained in the ab initio calculations. Measures of the strength of the interaction of PH3 and AgI (the dissociation energy De for the process H3PAgI = H3P + AgI and the intermolecular stretching force constant FPAg) are presented and are interpreted to show that the order of binding strength is H3PHI < H3PICl < H3PAgI for these metal-bonded molecules and their halogen-bonded and hydrogen-bonded analogues. PMID:27354204

  16. Structural basis for the allosteric inhibitory mechanism of human kidney-type glutaminase (KGA) and its regulation by Raf-Mek-Erk signaling in cancer cell metabolism.

    PubMed

    Thangavelu, K; Pan, Catherine Qiurong; Karlberg, Tobias; Balaji, Ganapathy; Uttamchandani, Mahesh; Suresh, Valiyaveettil; Schüler, Herwig; Low, Boon Chuan; Sivaraman, J

    2012-05-15

    Besides thriving on altered glucose metabolism, cancer cells undergo glutaminolysis to meet their energy demands. As the first enzyme in catalyzing glutaminolysis, human kidney-type glutaminase isoform (KGA) is becoming an attractive target for small molecules such as BPTES [bis-2-(5 phenylacetamido-1, 2, 4-thiadiazol-2-yl) ethyl sulfide], although the regulatory mechanism of KGA remains unknown. On the basis of crystal structures, we reveal that BPTES binds to an allosteric pocket at the dimer interface of KGA, triggering a dramatic conformational change of the key loop (Glu312-Pro329) near the catalytic site and rendering it inactive. The binding mode of BPTES on the hydrophobic pocket explains its specificity to KGA. Interestingly, KGA activity in cells is stimulated by EGF, and KGA associates with all three kinase components of the Raf-1/Mek2/Erk signaling module. However, the enhanced activity is abrogated by kinase-dead, dominant negative mutants of Raf-1 (Raf-1-K375M) and Mek2 (Mek2-K101A), protein phosphatase PP2A, and Mek-inhibitor U0126, indicative of phosphorylation-dependent regulation. Furthermore, treating cells that coexpressed Mek2-K101A and KGA with suboptimal level of BPTES leads to synergistic inhibition on cell proliferation. Consequently, mutating the crucial hydrophobic residues at this key loop abrogates KGA activity and cell proliferation, despite the binding of constitutive active Mek2-S222/226D. These studies therefore offer insights into (i) allosteric inhibition of KGA by BPTES, revealing the dynamic nature of KGA's active and inhibitory sites, and (ii) cross-talk and regulation of KGA activities by EGF-mediated Raf-Mek-Erk signaling. These findings will help in the design of better inhibitors and strategies for the treatment of cancers addicted with glutamine metabolism.

  17. Structural basis for the allosteric inhibitory mechanism of human kidney-type glutaminase (KGA) and its regulation by Raf-Mek-Erk signaling in cancer cell metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Thangavelu, K.; Pan, Catherine Qiurong; Karlberg, Tobias; Balaji, Ganapathy; Uttamchandani, Mahesh; Suresh, Valiyaveettil; Schüler, Herwig; Low, Boon Chuan; Sivaraman, J.

    2012-01-01

    Besides thriving on altered glucose metabolism, cancer cells undergo glutaminolysis to meet their energy demands. As the first enzyme in catalyzing glutaminolysis, human kidney-type glutaminase isoform (KGA) is becoming an attractive target for small molecules such as BPTES [bis-2-(5 phenylacetamido-1, 2, 4-thiadiazol-2-yl) ethyl sulfide], although the regulatory mechanism of KGA remains unknown. On the basis of crystal structures, we reveal that BPTES binds to an allosteric pocket at the dimer interface of KGA, triggering a dramatic conformational change of the key loop (Glu312-Pro329) near the catalytic site and rendering it inactive. The binding mode of BPTES on the hydrophobic pocket explains its specificity to KGA. Interestingly, KGA activity in cells is stimulated by EGF, and KGA associates with all three kinase components of the Raf-1/Mek2/Erk signaling module. However, the enhanced activity is abrogated by kinase-dead, dominant negative mutants of Raf-1 (Raf-1-K375M) and Mek2 (Mek2-K101A), protein phosphatase PP2A, and Mek-inhibitor U0126, indicative of phosphorylation-dependent regulation. Furthermore, treating cells that coexpressed Mek2-K101A and KGA with suboptimal level of BPTES leads to synergistic inhibition on cell proliferation. Consequently, mutating the crucial hydrophobic residues at this key loop abrogates KGA activity and cell proliferation, despite the binding of constitutive active Mek2-S222/226D. These studies therefore offer insights into (i) allosteric inhibition of KGA by BPTES, revealing the dynamic nature of KGA's active and inhibitory sites, and (ii) cross-talk and regulation of KGA activities by EGF-mediated Raf-Mek-Erk signaling. These findings will help in the design of better inhibitors and strategies for the treatment of cancers addicted with glutamine metabolism. PMID:22538822

  18. MobiPag: Integrated Mobile Payment, Ticketing and Couponing Solution Based on NFC †

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Helena; José, Rui; Coelho, André; Melro, Ana; Ferreira, Marta Campos; Cunha, João Falcão e; Monteiro, Miguel Pimenta; Ribeiro, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Mobile payments still remain essentially an emerging technology, seeking to fill the gap between the envisioned potential and widespread usage. In this paper, we present an integrated mobile service solution based on the near field communication (NFC) protocol that was developed under a research project called MobiPag. The most distinctive characteristic of Mobipag is its open architectural model that allows multiple partners to become part of the payment value-chain and create solutions that complement payments in many unexpected ways. We describe the Mobipag architecture and how it has been used to support a mobile payment trial. We identify a set of design lessons resulting from usage experiences associated with real-world payment situations with NFC-enabled mobile phones. Based on results from this trial, we identify a number of challenges and guidelines that may help to shape future versions of NFC-based payment systems. In particular, we highlight key challenges for the initial phases of payment deployments, where it is essential to focus on scenarios that can be identified as more feasible for early adoption. We also have identified a fundamental trade-off between the flexibility supported by the Mobipag solution and the respective implications for the payment process, particularly on the users' mental model. PMID:25061838

  19. MobiPag: integrated mobile payment, ticketing and couponing solution based on NFC.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Helena; José, Rui; Coelho, André; Melro, Ana; Ferreira, Marta Campos; Falcão e Cunha, João; Monteiro, Miguel Pimenta; Ribeiro, Carlos

    2014-07-24

    Mobile payments still remain essentially an emerging technology, seeking to fill the gap between the envisioned potential and widespread usage. In this paper, we present an integrated mobile service solution based on the near field communication (NFC) protocol that was developed under a research project called MobiPag. The most distinctive characteristic of Mobipag is its open architectural model that allows multiple partners to become part of the payment value-chain and create solutions that complement payments in many unexpected ways. We describe the Mobipag architecture and how it has been used to support a mobile payment trial. We identify a set of design lessons resulting from usage experiences associated with real-world payment situations with NFC-enabled mobile phones. Based on results from this trial, we identify a number of challenges and guidelines that may help to shape future versions of NFC-based payment systems. In particular, we highlight key challenges for the initial phases of payment deployments, where it is essential to focus on scenarios that can be identified as more feasible for early adoption. We also have identified a fundamental trade-off between the flexibility supported by the Mobipag solution and the respective implications for the payment process, particularly on the users' mental model.

  20. Influence of base and PAG on deprotection blur in EUV photoresists and some thoughts on shot noise

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Christopher N.; Naulleau, Patrick P.; Niakoula, Dimitra; Hassanein, Elsayed; Brainard, Robert; Gallatin, Gregg; Dean, Kim

    2008-06-01

    A contact-hole deprotection blur metric has been used to monitor the deprotection blur of an experimental open platform resist (EH27) as the weight percent of base and photo acid generator (PAG) were varied. A 6x increase in base weight percent is shown to reduce the size of successfully patterned 1:1 line-space features from 52 nm to 39 nm without changing deprotection blur. Corresponding isolated line-edge-roughness is reduced from 6.9 nm to 4.1 nm. A 2x increase in PAG weight percent is shown to improve 1:1 line-space patterning from 47 nm to 40 nm without changing deprotection blur or isolated LER. A discussion of improved patterning performance as related to shot noise and deprotection blur concludes with a speculation that the spatial distribution of PAG molecules has been playing some role, perhaps a dominant one, in determining the uniformity of photo generated acids in the resists that have been studied.

  1. Reappraisal of the palaeomagnetism of the Miocene intramontane Pag and Drniš-Sinj basins, External Dinarides (Croatia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Márton, Emő; Pavelić, Davor; Vranjković, Alan; Ćosović, Vlasta

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents palaeomagnetic results from the Miocene offshore Pag and the twin onshore (Drniš-Sinj) basins. Earlier magnetostratigraphic results were published from both basins, which documented that the lake sediments were good targets for palaeomagnetism. From the Pag basin, we sampled the oldest and youngest segments of the 1200 m long Crnika section and obtained statistically different palaeomagnetic directions from the two parts. During a repeated visit to the section it was revealed that modern gravity-driven creeping can account for this, i.e. the results from the Pag basin should be rejected from regional tectonic interpretation. The overall-mean palaeomagnetic direction for the Drniš-Sinj basin has excellent statistical parameters, its high quality is further supported by positive regional fold/tilt and reversal tests, based on seven geographically distributed localities. The results suggests 13-20° CCW rotation with respect to Africa and 21-27° with respect to stable Europe, during the last 15 million years. As the External Dinarides are the loci of a complicated network of Miocene and even younger tectonic zones, we cannot export the observed rotation for the whole unit, but consider our results as one step in obtaining robust kinematic constraints for the post-Oligocene tectonic history of the External Dinarides.

  2. Circulating concentrations of pregnancy associated glycoproteins (PAGs) are associated with embryo/fetal survival but not ovulatory follicle size in suckled beef cows

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    GnRH-induced ovulation of small dominant follicles resulted in increased late embryonic/fetal mortality around the time of embryo-uterine attachment. Pregnancy associated glycoproteins (PAGs) are secreted by binucleated trophoblast cells into the maternal circulation and have been used to monitor t...

  3. Circulating bovine pregnancy associated glycoproteins (bPAGs) are associated with late embryonic/fetal survival but not ovulatory follicle size in suckled beef cows

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    GnRH-induced ovulation of small dominant follicles resulted in increased late embryonic/fetal mortality. The objective of this study was to examine the relationship between ovulatory follicle size, embryo/fetal survival, and circulating concentrations of bPAGs (detects presence of an embryo/fetus a...

  4. Amygdalar neuronal activity mediates the cardiovascular responses evoked from the dorsolateral periaqueductal gray in conscious rats.

    PubMed

    de Abreu, A R; Abreu, A R; Santos, L T; de Souza, A A; da Silva, L G; Chianca, D A; de Menezes, R C

    2015-01-22

    There is ample evidence that both lateral/dorsolateral periaqueductal gray (l/dlPAG) and basolateral amygdala (BLA) are essential for the regulation of the autonomic responses evoked during innate reactions to threatening stimuli. However, it is not well established to what extent the BLA regulates the upstream functional connection from the l/dlPAG. Here we evaluated the role of the BLA and its glutamatergic receptors in the cardiovascular responses induced by l/dlPAG stimulation in rats. We examined the influence of acute inhibition of the BLA, unilaterally, by injecting muscimol on the cardiovascular responses evoked by the injection of N-methyl D-aspartate (NMDA) into the l/dlPAG. We also evaluated the role of BLA ionotropic glutamate receptors in these responses by injecting antagonists of NMDA and AMPA/kainate receptor subtypes into the BLA. Our results show that the microinjection of NMDA in the BLA increased the mean arterial pressure (MAP) and heart rate (HR). Injection of NMDA into the l/dlPAG caused similar increases in these variables, which was prevented by the prior injection of muscimol, a GABAA agonist, into the BLA. Moreover, injection of glutamatergic antagonists (2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoate (AP5) and 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (CNQX)) into the BLA reduced the increase in MAP and HR induced by l/dlPAG activation. Finally, the inhibition of the central amygdala neurons failed to reduce the cardiovascular changes induced by l/dlPAG activation. These results indicate that physiological responses elicited by l/dlPAG activation require the neuronal activity in the BLA. This ascending excitatory pathway from the l/dlPAG to the BLA might ensure the expression of the autonomic component of the defense reaction. PMID:25451289

  5. Analysis of acid-generating action of PAG in an EUV resist using acid-sensitive dyes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekiguchi, Atsushi; Matsumoto, Yoko; Biafore, John J.

    2013-03-01

    Researchers are currently examining various methods for determining the quantity of acid generated by a photoacid generator (PAG) and for analyzing acid-generating reactions using acid-sensitive dyes that react with acid and generate a color. Adding an acid-sensitive dye to the resist gives a clear grasp of the acid-generating action. The process involves applying a resist containing an acid-sensitive dye to a quartz substrate; exposing the substrate; and measuring and evaluating the absorbance of a chromogenic substance near 530 nm using a spectroscope. The method determines the rate constant for acid generation (Dill C parameter) during exposure based on the relationship between transmissivity at 530 nm and exposure dose. Using this method, we obtained and compared rate constants for acid generation (C parameters) as part of our study of dependence on the quantity of quencher in the EUV resist. Our results indicate a new model that accounts for the quencher concentration parameter would be useful in analyzing dependence on the quantity of quencher. This paper presents these findings, together with the results of studies of profile simulations using the quencher concentration parameter obtained in the experiments.

  6. [In memoriam Fidel Pagés Miravé (1886-1923) on the 75th anniversary of the publication of "Anesthesia metamérica"].

    PubMed

    Herrera, A; de las Mulas, M

    1996-02-01

    Fidel Pagés was born in Huesca on the 26th of January 1886. He completed his secondary studies in the same city, later receiving his degree in medicine and surgery from University of Zaragoza (1908) with high honors. The same year he joined the army medical corp, to be sent to serve in Melilla in 1909 with a rank of second medical officer. After being promoted in 1911 to first medical officer, he served in Tarragona, Toledo, Madrid (where received his doctoral degree), Ciudad Real, and once again in Madrid. In 1913 Pagés married and was destined to Mahón, only to return to work at the War Ministry in Madrid in 1915, after a brief sojourn in Alicante. The same year he placed first in competition for a staff position at Madrid's Hospital Provincial. In 1917, during World War I, he inspected POW camps in Austria and Hungary, while also serving in the military hospital in Vienna. In 1919 he became the founding editor of Revista Española de Cirugía, which published "Anestesia metamérica" in 1921, simultaneous to its publication in Revista de Sanidad Militar. In 1920 on he was assigned to Madrid's Hospital Militar de Urgencia, but was also briefly sent to Melilla in 1921 as a consequence of the military "Disaster at Annual". In 1922 he was promoted to the rank of Medical Commandant. On the 21st of September 1923, Pagés died in a traffic accident while returning to Madrid from San Sebastián. His work was soon forgotten, as can be seen from the credit long given to the Italian surgeon Dogliotti for the discovery of epidural anesthesia. Only with passing time, and through the effort of Argentinian and Spanish physicians, has the world come to recognize Pagés as the original author of this technique.

  7. Identification of Legionella pneumophila rcp, a pagP-Like Gene That Confers Resistance to Cationic Antimicrobial Peptides and Promotes Intracellular Infection

    PubMed Central

    Robey, Marianne; O'Connell, William; Cianciotto, Nicholas P.

    2001-01-01

    In the course of characterizing a locus involved in heme utilization, we identified a Legionella pneumophila gene predicted to encode a protein with homology to the product of the Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium pagP gene. In Salmonella, pagP increases resistance to the bactericidal effects of cationic antimicrobial peptides (CAMPs). Mutants with insertions in the L. pneumophila pagP-like gene were generated and showed decreased resistance to different structural classes of CAMPs compared to the wild type; hence, this gene was designated rcp for resistance to cationic antimicrobial peptides. Furthermore, Legionella CAMP resistance was induced by growth in low-magnesium medium. To determine whether rcp had any role in intracellular survival, mutants were tested in the two most relevant host cells for Legionnaires' disease, i.e., amoebae and macrophages. These mutants exhibited a 1,000-fold-decreased recovery during a Hartmannella vermiformis coculture. Complementation of the infectivity defect could be achieved by introduction of a plasmid containing the intact rcp gene. Mutations in rcp consistently reduced both the numbers of bacteria recovered during intracellular infection and their cytopathic capacity for U937 macrophages. The rcp mutant was also more defective for lung colonization of A/J mice. Growth of rcp mutants in buffered yeast extract broth was identical to that of the wild type, indicating that the observed differences in numbers of bacteria recovered from host cells were not due to a generalized growth defect. However, in low-Mg2+ medium, the rcp mutant was impaired in stationary-phase survival. This is the first demonstration of a pagP-like gene, involved in resistance to CAMPs, being required for intracellular infection and virulence. PMID:11401964

  8. Effect of enzymatic deamidation of soy protein by protein-glutaminase on the flavor-binding properties of the protein under aqueous conditions.

    PubMed

    Suppavorasatit, Inthawoot; Cadwallader, Keith R

    2012-08-15

    The effect of the enzymatic deamidation by protein-glutaminase (PG) on flavor-binding properties of soy protein isolate (SPI) under aqueous conditions was evaluated by a modified equilibrium dialysis (ultrafiltration) technique. Binding parameters, such as number of binding sites (n) and binding constants (K), were derived from Klotz plots. The partial deamidation of SPI by PG (43.7% degree of deamidation) decreased overall flavor-binding affinity (nK) at 25 °C for both vanillin and maltol by approximately 9- and 4-fold, respectively. The thermodynamic parameters of binding indicated that the flavor-protein interactions were spontaneous (negative ΔG°) and that the driving force of the interactions shifted from entropy to enthalpy driven as a result of deamidation. Deamidation of soy protein caused a change in the mechanism of binding from hydrophobic interactions or covalent bonding (Schiff base formation) to weaker van der Waals forces or hydrogen bonding. PMID:22831747

  9. Malleability of the folding mechanism of the outer membrane protein PagP: parallel pathways and the effect of membrane elasticity.

    PubMed

    Huysmans, Gerard H M; Radford, Sheena E; Baldwin, Stephen A; Brockwell, David J

    2012-02-24

    Understanding the interactions between membrane proteins and the lipid bilayer is key to increasing our ability to predict and tailor the folding mechanism, structure and stability of membrane proteins. Here, we have investigated the effects of changing the membrane composition and the relative concentrations of protein and lipid on the folding mechanism of the bacterial outer membrane protein PagP. The folding pathway, monitored by tryptophan fluorescence, was found to be characterized by a burst phase, representing PagP adsorption to the liposome surface, followed by a time course that reflects the folding and insertion of the protein into the membrane. In 1,2-dilauroyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (diC(12:0)PC) liposomes, the post-adsorption time course fits well to a single exponential at high lipid-to-protein ratios (LPRs), but at low LPRs, a second exponential phase with a slower folding rate constant is observed. Interrupted refolding assays demonstrated that the two exponential phases reflect the presence of parallel folding pathways. Partitioning between these pathways was found to be modulated by the elastic properties of the membrane. Folding into mixed 1,2-dilauroyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine:diC(12:0)PC liposomes resulted in a decrease in PagP adsorption to the liposomes and a switch to the slower folding pathway. By contrast, inclusion of 1,2-dilauroyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoserine into diC(12:0)PC liposomes resulted in a decrease in the folding rate of the fast pathway. The results highlight the effect of lipid composition in tailoring the folding mechanism of a membrane protein, revealing that membrane proteins have access to multiple, competing folding routes to a unique native structure.

  10. Identification of neural cells activated by mating stimulus in the periaqueductal gray in female rats

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Shunji; Kawata, Mitsuhiro

    2014-01-01

    Induction of lordosis as typical female sexual behavior in rodents is dependent on a mount stimulus from males and blood levels of estrogen. Periaqueductal gray (PAG) efferent neurons have been suggested to be important for lordosis behavior; however, the neurochemical basis remains to be understood. In this study, we neuroanatomically examined (1) whether PAG neurons activated by mating stimulus project to the medullary reticular formation (MRF), which is also a required area for lordosis; and (2) whether these neurons are glutamatergic. Mating stimulus significantly increased the number of cFos-immunoreactive (ir) neurons in the PAG, particularly in its lateral region. Half of cFos-ir neurons in the lateral PAG were positive for a retrograde tracer (FluoroGold; FG) injected into the MRF. cFos-ir neurons also colocalized with mRNA of vesicular glutamate transporter 2 (vGLUT2), a molecular marker for glutamatergic neurons. Using retrograde tracing and in situ hybridization in conjunction with fluorescent microscopy, we also found FG and vGLUT2 mRNA double-positive neurons in the lateral PAG. These results suggest that glutamatergic neurons in the lateral PAG project to the MRF and are involved in lordosis behavior in female rats. PMID:25565950

  11. Opportunities for public health to increase physical activity among youths.

    PubMed

    Piercy, Katrina L; Dorn, Joan M; Fulton, Janet E; Janz, Kathleen F; Lee, Sarah M; McKinnon, Robin A; Pate, Russell R; Pfeiffer, Karin A; Young, Deborah Rohm; Troiano, Richard P; Lavizzo-Mourey, Risa

    2015-03-01

    Despite the well-known benefits of youths engaging in 60 or more minutes of daily physical activity, physical inactivity remains a significant public health concern. The 2008 Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans (PAG) provides recommendations on the amount of physical activity needed for overall health; the PAG Midcourse Report (2013) describes effective strategies to help youths meet these recommendations. Public health professionals can be dynamic change agents where youths live, learn, and play by changing environments and policies to empower youths to develop regular physical activity habits to maintain throughout life. We have summarized key findings from the PAG Midcourse Report and outlined actions that public health professionals can take to ensure that all youths regularly engage in health-enhancing physical activity. PMID:25602864

  12. Effects of a metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 7 negative allosteric modulator in the periaqueductal grey on pain responses and rostral ventromedial medulla cell activity in rat.

    PubMed

    Palazzo, Enza; Marabese, Ida; Luongo, Livio; Boccella, Serena; Bellini, Giulia; Giordano, Maria Elvira; Rossi, Francesca; Scafuro, Mariantonietta; Novellis, Vito de; Maione, Sabatino

    2013-09-03

    The metabotropic glutamate receptor 7 (mGluR7) negative allosteric modulator, 6-(4-methoxyphenyl)-5-methyl-3-pyridin-4-ylisoxazolo[4,5-c]pyridin-4(5H)-one (MMPIP), was locally microinjected into the ventrolateral periaqueductal gray (VL PAG) and the effect on pain responses in formalin and spare nerve injury (SNI) -induced neuropathic pain models was monitored in the rat. The activity of rostral ventromedial medulla (RVM) "pronociceptive" ON and "antinociceptive" OFF cells was also evaluated. Intra-VL PAG MMPIP blocked the first and second phase of nocifensive behaviour in the formalin pain model. MMPIP increased the tail flick latency and simultaneously increased the activity of the OFF cells while inhibiting that of ON cells in rats with SNI of the sciatic nerve. MMPIP failed to modify nociceptive responses and associated RVM ON and OFF cell activity in sham rats. An increase in mGluR7 gene, protein and staining, the latter being associated with vesicular glutamate transporter-positive profiles, has been found in the VL PAG in SNI rats. Blockade of mGluR7 within the VL PAG has an antinociceptive effect in formalin and neuropathic pain models. VL PAG mGluR7 blockade offers a target for dis-inhibiting the VL PAG-RVM pathway and silencing pain in inflammatory and neuropathic pain models.

  13. Optimization of Culture Conditions for Production of the Anti-Leukemic Glutaminase Free L-Asparaginase by Newly Isolated Streptomyces olivaceus NEAE-119 Using Response Surface Methodology.

    PubMed

    El-Naggar, Noura El-Ahmady; Moawad, Hassan; El-Shweihy, Nancy M; El-Ewasy, Sara M

    2015-01-01

    Among the antitumor drugs, bacterial enzyme L-asparaginase has been employed as the most effective chemotherapeutic agent in pediatric oncotherapy especially for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Glutaminase free L-asparaginase producing actinomycetes were isolated from soil samples collected from Egypt. Among them, a potential culture, strain NEAE-119, was selected and identified on the basis of morphological, cultural, physiological, and biochemical properties together with 16S rRNA sequence as Streptomyces olivaceus NEAE-119 and sequencing product (1509 bp) was deposited in the GenBank database under accession number KJ200342. The optimization of different process parameters for L-asparaginase production by Streptomyces olivaceus NEAE-119 using Plackett-Burman experimental design and response surface methodology was carried out. Fifteen variables (temperature, pH, incubation time, inoculum size, inoculum age, agitation speed, dextrose, starch, L-asparagine, KNO3, yeast extract, K2HPO4, MgSO4·7H2O, NaCl, and FeSO4·7H2O) were screened using Plackett-Burman experimental design. The most positive significant independent variables affecting enzyme production (temperature, inoculum age, and agitation speed) were further optimized by the face-centered central composite design-response surface methodology. PMID:26180806

  14. Optimization of Culture Conditions for Production of the Anti-Leukemic Glutaminase Free L-Asparaginase by Newly Isolated Streptomyces olivaceus NEAE-119 Using Response Surface Methodology

    PubMed Central

    El-Naggar, Noura El-Ahmady; Moawad, Hassan; El-Shweihy, Nancy M.; El-Ewasy, Sara M.

    2015-01-01

    Among the antitumor drugs, bacterial enzyme L-asparaginase has been employed as the most effective chemotherapeutic agent in pediatric oncotherapy especially for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Glutaminase free L-asparaginase producing actinomycetes were isolated from soil samples collected from Egypt. Among them, a potential culture, strain NEAE-119, was selected and identified on the basis of morphological, cultural, physiological, and biochemical properties together with 16S rRNA sequence as Streptomyces olivaceus NEAE-119 and sequencing product (1509 bp) was deposited in the GenBank database under accession number KJ200342. The optimization of different process parameters for L-asparaginase production by Streptomyces olivaceus NEAE-119 using Plackett-Burman experimental design and response surface methodology was carried out. Fifteen variables (temperature, pH, incubation time, inoculum size, inoculum age, agitation speed, dextrose, starch, L-asparagine, KNO3, yeast extract, K2HPO4, MgSO4·7H2O, NaCl, and FeSO4·7H2O) were screened using Plackett-Burman experimental design. The most positive significant independent variables affecting enzyme production (temperature, inoculum age, and agitation speed) were further optimized by the face-centered central composite design-response surface methodology. PMID:26180806

  15. Combining a PagP fusion protein system with nickel ion-catalyzed cleavage to produce intrinsically disordered proteins in E. coli.

    PubMed

    Zahran, Somaya; Pan, Jonathan S; Liu, Philip B; Hwang, Peter M

    2015-12-01

    Many proteins contain intrinsically disordered regions that are highly solvent-exposed and susceptible to post-translational modifications. Studying these protein segments is critical to understanding their physiologic regulation, but proteolytic degradation can make them difficult to express and purify. We have designed a new protein expression vector that fuses the target protein to the N-terminus of the integral membrane protein, PagP. The two proteins are connected by a short linker containing the sequence SRHW, previously shown to be optimal for nickel ion-catalyzed cleavage. The methodology is demonstrated for an intrinsically disordered segment of cardiac troponin I. cTnI[135-209]-SRHW-PagP-His6 fusion protein was overexpressed in Escherichia coli, accumulating in insoluble inclusion bodies. The protein was solubilized, purified using nickel affinity chromatography, and then cleaved with 0.5mM NiSO4 at pH 9.0 and 45 °C, all in 6M guanidine-HCl. Nickel ion-catalyzed peptide bond hydrolysis is an effective chemical cleavage technique under denaturing conditions that preclude the use of proteases. Moreover, nickel-catalyzed cleavage is more specific than the most commonly used agent, cyanogen bromide, which cleaves C-terminal to methionine residues. We were able to produce 15 mg of purified cTnI[135-209] from 1L of M9 minimal media using this protocol. The methodology is more generally applicable to the production of intrinsically disordered protein segments.

  16. Fixative composition alters distributions of immunoreactivity for glutaminase and two markers of nociceptive neurons, Nav1.8 and TRPV1, in the rat dorsal root ganglion.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, E Matthew; Schechter, Ruben; Miller, Kenneth E

    2010-04-01

    Most, if not all, dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons use the neurotransmitter glutamate. There are, however, conflicting reports of the percentages of DRG neurons that express glutaminase (GLS), the enzyme that synthesizes glutamate, ranging from 30% to 100% of DRG neurons. Defining DRG neuron populations by the expression of proteins like GLS, which indicates function, is routinely accomplished with immunolabeling techniques. Proper characterization of DRG neuron populations relies on accurate detection of such antigens. It is known intuitively that fixation can alter immunoreactivity (IR). In this study, we compared the effects of five formaldehyde concentrations between 0.25% and 4.0% (w/v) and five picric acid concentrations between 0.0% and 0.8% (w/v) on the IR of GLS, the voltage-gated sodium channel 1.8 (Na(v)1.8), and the capsaicin receptor TRPV1. We also compared the effects of five incubation time lengths from 2 to 192 hr, in primary antiserum on IR. Lowering formaldehyde concentration elevated IR for all three antigens, while raising picric acid concentration increased Na(v)1.8 and TRPV1 IR. Increasing IR improved detection sensitivity, which led to higher percentages of labeled DRG neurons. By selecting fixation conditions that optimized IR, we found that all DRG neurons express GLS, 69% of neurons express Na(v)1.8, and 77% of neurons express TRPV1, indicating that some previous studies may have underestimated the percentages of DRG neurons expressing these proteins. This manuscript contains online supplemental material at http://www.jhc.org. Please visit this article online to view these materials. PMID:20026672

  17. Halophilic Bacteria of Lunsu Produce an Array of Industrially Important Enzymes with Salt Tolerant Activity

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Sonika; Sharma, Parul; Dev, Kamal; Sourirajan, Anuradha

    2016-01-01

    The halophilic bacterial isolates SS1, SS2, SS3, SS5, and SS8 were characterized for production of industrially important enzymes like amylase, protease, lipase, and glutaminase. Halophilic bacterial isolates SS1 and SS3 exhibited salt dependent extracellular amylase and protease activities. Both the halophilic isolates SS1 and SS3 exhibited maximum amylase and protease activities in the presence of 1.5 and 1.0 M NaCl, respectively, with the optimum pH 8 and temperature 40°C. SS2 showed maximum extracellular protease and lipase activities in the presence of 0.75 M NaCl, at optimum pH of 7, and temperature 37°C. The glutaminase activity of SS3 increased with increase in concentration of NaCl up to 2.5 M. The optimum pH and temperature for L-glutaminase activity of SS3 was 8 and 40°C, respectively. The combined hydrolytic activities of these halophilic bacterial isolates can be used for bioconversion of organic materials to useful products. PMID:26885394

  18. Immunological evaluation of OMV(PagL)+Bap(1-487aa) and AbOmpA(8-346aa)+Bap(1-487aa) as vaccine candidates against Acinetobacter baumannii sepsis infection.

    PubMed

    Badmasti, Farzad; Ajdary, Soheila; Bouzari, Saeid; Fooladi, Abbas Ali Imani; Shahcheraghi, Fereshteh; Siadat, Seyed Davar

    2015-10-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is an important nosocomial pathogen that causes a high morbidity and mortality rate in infected patients with sepsis form. The surface exposed virulence proteins and serum resistance factors helping to dissemination of this bacterium to bloodstream are the most promising vaccine candidates against this microorganism. In this project we immunologically evaluated OMV(PagL)+Bap(1-487aa) and AbOmpA (8-346aa)+Bap(1-487aa) as combination forms as well as Bap(1-487aa), AbOmpA(8-346aa) and OMV(PagL) singly, with addition of alum adjuvant as vaccine candidates. The titers of total IgG, IgG1 and IgG2c as well as concentration of IL-4 and IFN-γ and survival rates were measured in a C57BL/6 murine model with disseminated sepsis. The ratio of IgG1/IgG2c and profile of IL-4/IFN-γ in OMV (PagL)+Bap (1-487aa) formulation shows the humoral and cellular immune responses have been induced robustly and have created a full protection against A. baumannii ATCC 19606 and MDR AB-44 strains. We found that the two combination vaccine candidates were protective and induced both Th1 and Th2 responses.

  19. Prevalence and trends in physical activity among older adults in the United States: A comparison across three national surveys.

    PubMed

    Keadle, Sarah Kozey; McKinnon, Robin; Graubard, Barry I; Troiano, Richard P

    2016-08-01

    This paper examined how many older adults (65+years) are meeting physical activity (PA) Guidelines (PAG; 150min/week of moderate-to-vigorous PA) using data from three leading national surveys (NHANES, BRFSS and NHIS). The proportion of individuals meeting aerobic PAG was determined for the most recent cycle available for each survey (NHANES 2011-12, NHIS and BRFSS 2013). We also assessed whether PAG adherence has changed over time. Predicted margins from multinomial logistic regression were computed after adjusting for age, race/ethnicity and gender and sample weights. The proportion of older adults meeting PAG was 27.3% for NHANES, 35.8% for NHIS and 44.3% for BRFSS. Across all surveys, men reported higher levels of activity than women, Non-Hispanic whites reported higher levels than Non-Hispanic blacks and Hispanics, activity declined with age and was lower in those with functional limitations, all P<0.05. The proportion of older adults meeting PAG in the NHIS survey, the only survey where PA questions remained the same over time, increased from 25.7% in 1998 to 35.8% in 2013 (P<0.01). Point-estimates for activity levels are different between surveys but they consistently identify sub-groups who are less active. Although older adults are reporting more activity over time, adherence to aerobic and strength training PAG remains low in this population and there is a need for effective interventions to prevent age-related declines in PA and address health disparities among older adults. PMID:27196146

  20. GABA transporter currents activated by protein kinase A excite midbrain neurons during opioid withdrawal.

    PubMed

    Bagley, Elena E; Gerke, Michelle B; Vaughan, Christopher W; Hack, Stephen P; Christie, MacDonald J

    2005-02-01

    Adaptations in neurons of the midbrain periaqueductal gray (PAG) induced by chronic morphine treatment mediate expression of many signs of opioid withdrawal. The abnormally elevated action potential rate of opioid-sensitive PAG neurons is a likely cellular mechanism for withdrawal expression. We report here that opioid withdrawal in vitro induced an opioid-sensitive cation current that was mediated by the GABA transporter-1 (GAT-1) and required activation of protein kinase A (PKA) for its expression. Inhibition of GAT-1 or PKA also prevented withdrawal-induced hyperexcitation of PAG neurons. Our findings indicate that GAT-1 currents can directly increase the action potential rates of neurons and that GAT-1 may be a target for therapy to alleviate opioid-withdrawal symptoms.

  1. Attenuation of microglial and neuronal activation in the brain by ICV minocycline following myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Dworak, Melissa; Stebbing, Martin; Kompa, Andrew R; Rana, Indrajeetsinh; Krum, Henry; Badoer, Emilio

    2014-10-01

    Following myocardial infarction, microglia, the immune cells in the central nervous system, become activated in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) suggesting inflammation in this nucleus. Little is known about other brain nuclei. In the present study, we investigated whether the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM), the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS) and the periaqueductal grey (PAG), regions known to have important cardiovascular regulatory functions, also show increased microglial activation and whether this coincides with increased neuronal activity. We also investigated whether minocycline inhibited microglial activation and whether this also affected neuronal activity and cardiac function. Compared to controls there was a significant increase in the proportion of activated microglia and neuronal activation in the PVN, RVLM, NTS and PAG, 12weeks following myocardial infarction (P<0.001). Intracebroventricular infusion of minocycline (beginning one week prior to infarction) significantly attenuated the increase in microglial activation by at least 50% in the PVN, RVLM, PAG and NTS, and neuronal activation was significantly reduced by 50% in the PVN and virtually abolished in the PAG, RVLM and NTS. Cardiac function (percent fractional shortening) was significantly reduced by 55% following myocardial infarction but this was not ameliorated by minocycline treatment. The results suggest that following myocardial infarction, inflammation occurs in brain nuclei that play key roles in cardiovascular regulation and that attenuation of this inflammation may not be sufficient to ameliorate cardiac function.

  2. Effects of intra-PAG infusion of ovine CRF on defensive behaviors in Swiss-Webster mice.

    PubMed

    Carvalho-Netto, Eduardo F; Litvin, Yoav; Nunes-de-Souza, Ricardo L; Blanchard, D Caroline; Blanchard, Robert J

    2007-01-25

    The midbrain dorsal periaqueductal gray (DPAG) is part of the brain defensive system involved in active defense reactions to threatening stimuli. Corticotrophin releasing factor (CRF) is a peptidergic neurotransmitter that has been strongly implicated in the control of both behavioral and endocrine responses to threat and stress. We investigated the effect of the nonspecific CRF receptor agonist, ovine CRF (oCRF), injected into the DPAG of mice, in two predator-stress situations, the mouse defense test battery (MDTB), and the rat exposure test (RET). In the MDTB, oCRF weakly modified defensive behaviors in mice confronted by the predator (rat); e.g. it increased avoidance distance when the rat was approached and escape attempts (jump escapes) in forced contact. In the RET, drug infusion enhanced duration in the chamber while reduced tunnel and surface time, and reduced contact with the screen which divides the subject and the predator. oCRF also reduced both frequency and duration of risk assessment (stretch attend posture: SAP) in the tunnel and tended to increase freezing. These findings suggest that patterns of defensiveness in response to low intensity threat (RET) are more sensitive to intra-DPAG oCRF than those triggered by high intensity threats (MDTB). Our data indicate that CRF systems may be functionally involved in unconditioned defenses to a predator, consonant with a role for DPAG CRF systems in the regulation of emotionality.

  3. Activation of type 5 metabotropic glutamate receptors and diacylglycerol lipase-α initiates 2-arachidonoylglycerol formation and endocannabinoid-mediated analgesia.

    PubMed

    Gregg, Laura C; Jung, Kwang-Mook; Spradley, Jessica M; Nyilas, Rita; Suplita, Richard L; Zimmer, Andreas; Watanabe, Masahiko; Mackie, Ken; Katona, István; Piomelli, Daniele; Hohmann, Andrea G

    2012-07-11

    Acute stress reduces pain sensitivity by engaging an endocannabinoid signaling circuit in the midbrain. The neural mechanisms governing this process and molecular identity of the endocannabinoid substance(s) involved are unknown. We combined behavior, pharmacology, immunohistochemistry, RNA interference, quantitative RT-PCR, enzyme assays, and lipidomic analyses of endocannabinoid content to uncover the role of the endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoyl-sn-glycerol (2-AG) in controlling pain sensitivity in vivo. Here, we show that footshock stress produces antinociception in rats by activating type 5 metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGlu(5)) in the dorsolateral periaqueductal gray (dlPAG) and mobilizing 2-AG. Stimulation of mGlu(5) in the dlPAG with DHPG [(S)-3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine] triggered 2-AG formation and enhanced stress-dependent antinociception through a mechanism dependent upon both postsynaptic diacylglycerol lipase (DGL) activity, which releases 2-AG, and presynaptic CB(1) cannabinoid receptors. Pharmacological blockade of DGL activity in the dlPAG with RHC80267 [1,6-bis(cyclohexyloximinocarbonylamino)hexane] and (-)-tetrahydrolipstatin (THL), which inhibit activity of DGL-α and DGL-β isoforms, suppressed stress-induced antinociception. Inhibition of DGL activity in the dlPAG with THL selectively decreased accumulation of 2-AG without altering levels of anandamide. The putative 2-AG-synthesizing enzyme DGL-α colocalized with mGlu(5) at postsynaptic sites of the dlPAG, whereas CB(1) was confined to presynaptic terminals, consistent with a role for 2-AG as a retrograde signaling messenger. Finally, virally mediated silencing of DGL-α, but not DGL-β, transcription in the dlPAG mimicked effects of DGL inhibition in suppressing both endocannabinoid-mediated stress antinociception and 2-AG formation. The results indicate that activation of the postsynaptic mGlu(5)-DGL-α cascade triggers retrograde 2-AG signaling in vivo. This pathway is required for

  4. Fear-induced suppression of nociceptive behaviour and activation of Akt signalling in the rat periaqueductal grey: role of fatty acid amide hydrolase.

    PubMed

    Butler, Ryan K; Ford, Gemma K; Hogan, Michelle; Roche, Michelle; Doyle, Karen M; Kelly, John P; Kendall, David A; Chapman, Victoria; Finn, David P

    2012-01-01

    The endocannabinoid system regulates nociception and aversion and mediates fear-conditioned analgesia (FCA). We investigated the effects of the fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) inhibitor URB597, which inhibits the catabolism of the endocannabinoid anandamide and related N-acylethanolamines, on expression of FCA and fear and pain related behaviour per se in rats. We also examined associated alterations in the expression of the signal transduction molecule phospho-Akt in the periaqueductal grey (PAG) by immunoblotting. FCA was modelled by assessing formalin-evoked nociceptive behaviour in an arena previously paired with footshock. URB597 (0.3 mg/kg, i.p.) enhanced FCA and increased fear-related behaviour in formalin-treated rats. Conditioned fear per se in non-formalin-treated rats was associated with increased expression of phospho-Akt in the PAG. URB597 reduced the expression of fear-related behaviour in the early part of the trial, an effect that was accompanied by attenuation of the fear-induced increase in phospho-Akt expression in the PAG. Intra-plantar injection of formalin also reduced the fear-induced increase in phospho-Akt expression. These data provide evidence for a role of FAAH in FCA, fear responding in the presence or absence of nociceptive tone, and fear-evoked increases in PAG phospho-Akt expression. In addition, the results suggest that fear-evoked activation of Akt signalling in the PAG is abolished in the presence of nociceptive tone.

  5. Knowledge of and preferred sources of assistance for physical activity in a sample of urban Indigenous Australians

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, Alison L; Hunt, Julian; Jenkins, David

    2008-01-01

    Background To examine urban Indigenous Australians' knowledge of the current Physical Activity Guidelines (PAG) and identify their preferred sources of assistance or advice regarding physical activity. Method Self-completed questionnaire data were collected from 194 participants; the questionnaires sought information on standard demographics including an assessment of their perceived physical activity level relative to peers. Outcome measures were agreement with five statements from the current PAG and indicators of preferred sources of assistance or advice regarding physical activity. Results Most participants demonstrated excellent knowledge of the current PAG, with 92% to 88% of participants agreeing with the statements. Significantly more older participants (> 44 years) identified that 'blocks of 10 minutes of activity are OK' compared to younger participants (aged 18–44 years: 60%; X2 = 6.23; p = .04). Significantly more higher educated participants agreed (96%) that 'brisk walking for half an hour most days was good for health' compared to the less educated participants (85%; X2 = 8.08; p = .02). The most preferred source of physical activity advice identified by men was the GP/health professional (62% vs. 53%; men and women respectively, NS), while for women it was a group to be active with (60% vs. 42%; women and men respectively; X2 = 6.09; p = .01). Conclusion Urban Indigenous Australians have similar levels of knowledge regarding the PAG to non-Indigenous Australians. However, the option of accumulating 10-minute activity bouts needs to be better communicated to younger Indigenous people. Most participants expressed a preference for advice about physical activity to be delivered via health professionals, and groups to be active with. Indigenous and age-specific resources that promote the unique aspects of the current PAG (e.g., that vigorous exercise is not essential for health and blocks of 10 minutes of activity are OK) should be developed and

  6. Non-exercise Estimation of V02max Using a Dichotomy of Meeting or Not Meeting DHHS Physical Activity Recommendations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wier, Larry T.; Jackson, Allen W.; Jackson, Andrew S.

    2009-01-01

    The physical activity guidelines (PAG) established by the US Dept. of Health and Human Services in 2008 is consistent with a rating of >/= 6 on the 11-point NASA Physical Activity Status Scale (PASS). Wier, et. al. developed non-exercise models for estimating VO2(sub max) from a combination of PASS, age, gender and either waist girth (WG) (R = 0.810, SEE= 4.799 ml/kg/min), %Fat (R = 0. 817, SEE = 4.716 ml/kg/min) or BMI (R = 0.802, SEE = 4.900 ml . kg-1. min -1 ). PURPOSE: to develop non-exercise models to estimate VO2max from age, gender, body composition (WG, %Fat, BMI) and PASS dichotomized at meets or does not meet the PAG (PAG-PASS), and to compare the accuracy of the PAG-PASS models with the models using the 11-point PASS. METHODS: 2417 men and 384 women were measured for VO2max by indirect calorimetry (RER >1.1); age (yr), gender by M = 1, W = 0; WG at the umbilicus; %fat by skin-folds, BMI by weight (kg) divided by height squared (m 2 ) , and PAGPASS by PASS < 6 = 0 and =/> 6 = 1. RESULTS: Three models were developed by multiple regression to estimate VO2(sub max) from age, gender, PAG-PASS and either WG (R = 0.790, SEE=5.019 ml/kg/min), %FAT (R= 0.080, SEE = 4.915 ml/kg/min) or BMI (R = 0.777, SEE = 5.162ml/kg/min). Cross-validation by the PRESS technique confirmed these statistics. Simple correlations between measured VO2(sub max) and estimates from the PAG-PASS models with WG, %Fat and BMI were 0.790, 0.800 and 0.777, minimally different from the correlations obtained with the PASS models (0.810, 0.810, and 0.802). PAG-PASS and PASS model constant errors were also similar: < 1 ml/kg/min for subsamples of age, gender, PASS and for VO2(sub max) between 30 and 50 ml/kg/min (70% of the sample) but > 1 ml/kg/min for VO2(sub max) <30 and >50 ml/kg/min. CONCLUSIONS: Non-exercise models using the combined effects of age, gender, body composition and the dichotomized PAG-PASS provide estimates of VO2(sub max) that are accurate for most adults, and the accuracy of

  7. Response of hydrolytic enzyme activities and nitrogen mineralization to fertilizer and organic matter application in subtropical paddy soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kader, Mohammed Abdul; Yeasmin, Sabina; Akter, Masuda; Sleutel, Steven

    2016-04-01

    Driving controllers of nitrogen (N) mineralization in paddy soils, especially under anaerobic soil conditions, remain elusive. The influence of exogenous organic matter (OM) and fertilizer application on the activities of five relevant enzymes (β-glucosaminidase, β-glucosidase, L-glutaminase, urease and arylamidase) was measured in two long-term field experiments. One 18-years field experiment was established on a weathered terrace soil with a rice-wheat crop rotation at the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Agricultural University (BSMRAU) having five OM treatments combined with two mineral N fertilizer levels. Another 30-years experiment was established on a young floodplain soil with rice-rice crop rotation at the Bangladesh Agricultural University (BAU) having eight mineral fertilizer treatments combined with organic manure. At BSMRAU, N fertilizer and OM amendments significantly increased all enzyme activities, suggesting them to be primarily determined by substrate availability. At BAU, non-responsiveness of β-glucosidase activity suggested little effect of the studied fertilizer and OM amendments on general soil microbial activity. Notwithstanding probably equal microbial demand for N, β-glucosaminidase and L-glutaminase activities differed significantly among the treatments (P>0.05) and followed strikingly opposite trends and correlations with soil organic N mineralization. So enzymatic pathways to acquire N differed by treatment at BAU, indicating differences in soil N quality and bio-availability. L-glutaminase activity was significantly positively correlated to the aerobic and anaerobic N mineralization rates at both field experiments. Combined with negative correlations between β-glucosaminidase activity and N mineralization rates, it appears that terminal amino acid NH2 hydrolysis was a rate-limiting step for soil N mineralization at BAU. Future investigations with joint quantification of polyphenol accumulation and binding of N, alongside an

  8. Inhibition of the oxidative stress-induced miR-23a protects the human retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells from apoptosis through the upregulation of glutaminase and glutamine uptake.

    PubMed

    Li, Dan-Dan; Zhong, Bin-Wu; Zhang, Hai-Xia; Zhou, Hong-Yan; Luo, Jie; Liu, Yang; Xu, Gui-Chun; Luan, Chun-Sheng; Fang, Jun

    2016-10-01

    The degeneration of retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells in the sub retinal pigment epithelial space and choroid is an initial pathological characteristic for the age-related macular degeneration which is the leading cause of severe vision loss in old people. Moreover, oxidative stress is implicated as a major inducer of RPE cell death. Here, we assessed the correlation between the H2O2-induced RPE cell death and glutamine metabolism. We found under low glutamine supply (20 %), the ARPE-19 cells were more susceptive to H2O2-induced apoptosis. Moreover, the glutamine uptake and the glutaminase (GLS) were suppressed by H2O2 treatments. Moreover, we observed miR-23a was upregulated by H2O2 treatments and overexpression of miR-23a significantly sensitized ARPE-19 cells to H2O2. Importantly, Western blotting and luciferase assay demonstrated GLS1 is a direct target of miR-23a in RPE cells. Inhibition of the H2O2-induced miR-23a by antagomiR protected the RPE cells from the oxidative stress-induced cell death. In addition, recovery of GLS1 expression in miR-23a overexpressed RPE cells rescued the H2O2-induced cell death. This study illustrated a mechanism for the protection of the oxidative-induced RPE cell death through the recovery of glutamine metabolism by inhibition of miR-23a, contributing to the discovery of novel targets and the developments of therapeutic strategies for the prevention of RPE cells from oxidative stress.

  9. Inhibition of the oxidative stress-induced miR-23a protects the human retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells from apoptosis through the upregulation of glutaminase and glutamine uptake.

    PubMed

    Li, Dan-Dan; Zhong, Bin-Wu; Zhang, Hai-Xia; Zhou, Hong-Yan; Luo, Jie; Liu, Yang; Xu, Gui-Chun; Luan, Chun-Sheng; Fang, Jun

    2016-10-01

    The degeneration of retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells in the sub retinal pigment epithelial space and choroid is an initial pathological characteristic for the age-related macular degeneration which is the leading cause of severe vision loss in old people. Moreover, oxidative stress is implicated as a major inducer of RPE cell death. Here, we assessed the correlation between the H2O2-induced RPE cell death and glutamine metabolism. We found under low glutamine supply (20 %), the ARPE-19 cells were more susceptive to H2O2-induced apoptosis. Moreover, the glutamine uptake and the glutaminase (GLS) were suppressed by H2O2 treatments. Moreover, we observed miR-23a was upregulated by H2O2 treatments and overexpression of miR-23a significantly sensitized ARPE-19 cells to H2O2. Importantly, Western blotting and luciferase assay demonstrated GLS1 is a direct target of miR-23a in RPE cells. Inhibition of the H2O2-induced miR-23a by antagomiR protected the RPE cells from the oxidative stress-induced cell death. In addition, recovery of GLS1 expression in miR-23a overexpressed RPE cells rescued the H2O2-induced cell death. This study illustrated a mechanism for the protection of the oxidative-induced RPE cell death through the recovery of glutamine metabolism by inhibition of miR-23a, contributing to the discovery of novel targets and the developments of therapeutic strategies for the prevention of RPE cells from oxidative stress. PMID:27411920

  10. Rat exposure in mice with neuropathic pain induces fear and antinociception that is not reversed by 5-HT2C receptor activation in the dorsal periaqueductal gray.

    PubMed

    Furuya-da-Cunha, Elke Mayumi; Souza, Rimenez Rodrigues de; Canto-de-Souza, Azair

    2016-07-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that serotonin 5-HT2C receptors in the dorsal periaqueductal gray (dPAG) mediate both anxiety and antinociception in mice submitted to the elevated plus maze. The present study examined the effects of intra-dPAG infusion of the serotonin 5-HT2C receptor agonist (MK-212) in the defensive reactions and antinociception in mice with neurophatic pain confronted by a predator. Neuropathic pain was induced by chronic constriction injury (CCI) of the sciatic nerve, and predator confrontation was performed using the rat exposure test (RET). Our results demonstrated that both sham-operated and CCI mice exhibited intense defensive reactions when confronted by rats. However, rat-exposed CCI mice showed reduced pain reactivity in comparison to CCI mice exposed to a toy rat. Intra-dPAG infusion of MK-212 prior to predator exposure did not significantly alter defensive or antinociceptive responses. To our knowledge, our results represent the first evidence of RET-induced antinociception in mice. Moreover, the results of the present study suggest that 5-HT2C receptor activation in the dPAG is not critically involved in the control of predator-evoked fearful or antinociceptive responses. PMID:27059332

  11. Light-activated ionic gelation of common biopolymers.

    PubMed

    Javvaji, Vishal; Baradwaj, Aditya G; Payne, Gregory F; Raghavan, Srinivasa R

    2011-10-18

    Biopolymers such as alginate and pectin are well known for their ability to undergo gelation upon addition of multivalent cations such as calcium (Ca(2+)). Here, we report a simple way to activate such ionic gelation by UV irradiation. Our approach involves combining an insoluble salt of the cation (e.g., calcium carbonate, CaCO(3)) with an aqueous solution of the polymer (e.g., alginate) along with a third component, a photoacid generator (PAG). Upon UV irradiation, the PAG dissociates to release H(+) ions, which react with the CaCO(3) to generate free Ca(2+). In turn, the Ca(2+) ions cross-link the alginate chains into a physical network, thereby resulting in a hydrogel. Dynamic rheological experiments confirm the elastic character of the alginate gel, and the gel modulus is shown to be tunable via the irradiation time as well as the PAG and alginate concentrations. The above approach is easily extended to other biopolymers such as pectin. Using this approach, a photoresponse can be imparted to conventional biopolymers without the need for any chemical modification of the molecules. Photoresponsive alginate gels may be useful in creating biomaterials or tissue mimics. As a step toward potential applications, we demonstrate the ability to photopattern a thin film of alginate gel onto a glass substrate under mild conditions. PMID:21800827

  12. Light-activated ionic gelation of common biopolymers.

    PubMed

    Javvaji, Vishal; Baradwaj, Aditya G; Payne, Gregory F; Raghavan, Srinivasa R

    2011-10-18

    Biopolymers such as alginate and pectin are well known for their ability to undergo gelation upon addition of multivalent cations such as calcium (Ca(2+)). Here, we report a simple way to activate such ionic gelation by UV irradiation. Our approach involves combining an insoluble salt of the cation (e.g., calcium carbonate, CaCO(3)) with an aqueous solution of the polymer (e.g., alginate) along with a third component, a photoacid generator (PAG). Upon UV irradiation, the PAG dissociates to release H(+) ions, which react with the CaCO(3) to generate free Ca(2+). In turn, the Ca(2+) ions cross-link the alginate chains into a physical network, thereby resulting in a hydrogel. Dynamic rheological experiments confirm the elastic character of the alginate gel, and the gel modulus is shown to be tunable via the irradiation time as well as the PAG and alginate concentrations. The above approach is easily extended to other biopolymers such as pectin. Using this approach, a photoresponse can be imparted to conventional biopolymers without the need for any chemical modification of the molecules. Photoresponsive alginate gels may be useful in creating biomaterials or tissue mimics. As a step toward potential applications, we demonstrate the ability to photopattern a thin film of alginate gel onto a glass substrate under mild conditions.

  13. Hypoxia regulates glutamate metabolism and membrane transport in rat PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, S; Millhorn, D E

    2001-03-01

    We investigated the effect of hypoxia on glutamate metabolism and uptake in rat pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells. Various key enzymes relevant to glutamate production, metabolism and transport were coordinately regulated by hypoxia. PC12 cells express two glutamate-metabolizing enzymes, glutamine synthetase (GS) and glutamate decarboxylase (GAD), as well as the glutamate-producing enzyme, phosphate-activated glutaminase (PAG). Exposure to hypoxia (1% O(2)) for 6 h or longer increased expression of GS mRNA and protein and enhanced GS enzymatic activity. In contrast, hypoxia caused a significant decrease in expression of PAG mRNA and protein, and also decreased PAG activity. In addition, hypoxia led to an increase in GAD65 and GAD67 protein levels and GAD enzymatic activity. PC12 cells express three Na(+)-dependent glutamate transporters; EAAC1, GLT-1 and GLAST. Hypoxia increased EAAC1 and GLT-1 protein levels, but had no effect on GLAST. Chronic hypoxia significantly enhanced the Na(+)-dependent component of glutamate transport. Furthermore, chronic hypoxia decreased cellular content of glutamate, but increased that of glutamine. Taken together, the hypoxia-induced changes in enzymes related to glutamate metabolism and transport are consistent with a decrease in the extracellular concentration of glutamate. This may have a role in protecting PC12 cells from the cytotoxic effects of glutamate during chronic hypoxia. PMID:11259512

  14. Activation of P2X7 receptors in the midbrain periaqueductal gray of rats facilitates morphine tolerance.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Zhi; Li, You-Yan; Sun, Meng-Jie

    2015-08-01

    Opiates such as morphine exhibit analgesic effect in various pain models, but repeated and chronic morphine administration may develop resistance to antinociception. The purinergic signaling system is involved in the mechanisms of pain modulation and morphine tolerance. This study aimed to determine whether the P2X7 receptor in the ventrolateral midbrain periaqueductal gray (vlPAG) is involved in morphine tolerance. Development of tolerance to the antinociceptive effect of morphine was induced in normal adult male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats through subcutaneous injection of morphine (10mg/kg). The analgesic effect of morphine (5mg/kg, i.p.) was assessed by measuring mechanical withdrawal thresholds (MWTs) in rats with an electronic von Frey anesthesiometer. The expression levels and distribution of the P2X7 receptor in the vlPAG was evaluated through Western blot analysis and immunohistochemistry. The acute effects of intra-vlPAG injection of the selective P2X7 receptor agonist Bz-ATP, the selective P2X7 receptor antagonist A-740003, or antisense oligodeoxynucleotide (AS ODN) targeting the P2X7 receptor on morphine-treated rats were also observed. Results demonstrated that repeated morphine administration decreased the mechanical pain thresholds. By contrast, the expression of the P2X7 receptor protein was up-regulated in the vlPAG in morphine tolerant rats. The percent changes in MWT were markedly but only transiently attenuated by intra-vlPAG injection of Bz-ATP (9nmol/0.3μL) but elevated by A-740003 at doses of 10 and 100nmol/0.3μL. AS ODN (15nmol/0.3μL) against the P2X7 receptor reduced the development of chronic morphine tolerance in rats. These results suggest that the development of antinociceptive tolerance to morphine is partially mediated by activating the vlPAG P2X7 receptors. The present data also suggest that the P2X7 receptors may be a therapeutic target for improving the analgesic effect of morphine in treatments of pain when morphine tolerance

  15. Capsaicin-evoked brain activation and central sensitization in anaesthetised rats: a functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    Moylan Governo, Ricardo Jose; Morris, Peter Gordon; Prior, Malcolm John William; Marsden, Charles Alexander; Chapman, Victoria

    2006-12-15

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) of blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) haemodynamic responses was used to study the effects of the noxious substance capsaicin on whole brain activation in isofluorane anaesthetised rats. Rats (n=8) received intradermal injection of capsaicin (30 microg/5 microl), or topical cream (0.1%) capsaicin and BOLD responses were acquired for up to 120 min. Effects of capsaicin versus placebo cream treatment on the BOLD response to a 15 g mechanical stimulus applied adjacent to the site of cream application were also studied. Both injection and cream application of capsaicin activated brain areas involved in pain processing, including the thalamus and periaqueductal grey (PAG) (p<0.05, corrected for multiple comparisons). Capsaicin also produced increases in BOLD signal intensity in other regions that contribute to pain processing, such as the parabrachial nucleus and superior colliculus. Mechanical stimulation in capsaicin-treated rats, but not placebo-treated rats, induced a significant decrease in BOLD signal intensity in the PAG (p<0.001). These data demonstrate that the noxious substance capsaicin produces brain activation in the midbrain regions and reveals the importance of the PAG in central sensitization. PMID:16843597

  16. Inhibition of Microglia Activation as a Phenotypic Assay in Early Drug Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Figuera-Losada, Mariana; Rojas, Camilo; Slusher, Barbara S.

    2014-01-01

    Complex biological processes such as inflammation, cell death, migration, proliferation, and the release of biologically active molecules can be used as outcomes in phenotypic assays during early stages of drug discovery. Although target-based approaches have been widely used over the past decades, a disproportionate number of first-in-class drugs have been identified using phenotypic screening. This review details phenotypic assays based on inhibition of microglial activation and their utility in primary and secondary screening, target validation, and pathway elucidation. The role of microglia, both in normal as well as in pathological conditions such as chronic neurodegenerative diseases, is reviewed. Methodologies to assess microglia activation in vitro are discussed in detail, and classes of therapeutic drugs known to decrease the proinflammatory and cytotoxic responses of activated microglia are appraised, including inhibitors of glutaminase, cystine/glutamate antiporter, nuclear factor κB, and mitogen-activated protein kinases. PMID:23945875

  17. β-cypermethrin-induced acute neurotoxicity in the cerebral cortex of mice.

    PubMed

    Cao, DeQing; Chen, Nan; Zhu, ChunXiao; Zhao, Yue; Liu, Li; Yang, Jun; An, Li

    2015-01-01

    A Type II pyrethroid pesticide β-cypermethrin is widely used in agriculture and domestic applications for pest control. However, the effect of β-cypermethrin on the glutamate neurotransmitter has not been well-documented. In the current study, mice were treated with 20, 40, or 80 mg/kg β-cypermethrin by a single oral gavage, with corn oil as a vehicle control. Four hours after treatment, we investigated glutamate levels and glutamate-metabolizing enzyme (phosphate-activated glutaminase, PAG; glutamine synthetase, GS) activities in the cerebral cortex of mice, using a HPLC system with ultraviolet detectors and a colorimetric assay. Glutamate uptake levels in the synaptosomes of cerebral cortex and mRNA expression levels of PAG, GS, and glutamate transporter-1 (GLT-1) in the cerebral cortex were detected by a radioactive labeling method and qRT-PCR, respectively. Toxic symptoms were observed in mice treated with 40 or 80 mg/kg β-cypermethrin. Compared with the control, significant decreases in glutamate level and GS activity, and an obvious increase in synaptosomal glutamate uptake, were found in the cerebral cortex of mice treated with 80 mg/kg β-cypermethrin. No significant changes were found among groups in PAG activity or PAG, GS, and GLT-1 mRNA expression levels. These results suggest that β-cypermethrin treatment may reduce the glutamate level in the mouse cerebral cortex, which is associated with decreased GS activity and increased synaptosomal glutamate uptake. Our findings provide a partial explanation for the neurotoxic effects of synthetic β-cypermethrin insecticides.

  18. Photo-activated ionic gelation of alginate hydrogel: real-time rheological monitoring of the two-step crosslinking mechanism.

    PubMed

    Higham, Alina K; Bonino, Christopher A; Raghavan, Srinivasa R; Khan, Saad A

    2014-07-21

    We examine the gelation of alginate undergoing ionic crosslinking upon ultraviolet (UV) irradiation using in situ dynamic rheology. Hydrogels are formed by combining alginate with calcium carbonate (CaCO3) particles and a photoacid generator (PAG). The PAG is photolyzed upon UV irradiation, resulting in the release of free calcium ions for ionic crosslinking. The viscous and elastic moduli during gelation are monitored as a function of the UV irradiation intensity, exposure time, alginate concentration, and the ratio between alginate and calcium carbonate. Gel time decreases as irradiation intensity increases because a larger concentration of PAG is photolyzed. Interestingly, dark curing, the continuing growth of microstructure in the absence of UV light, is observed. In some instances, the sample transitions from a solution to a gel during the dark curing phase. Additionally, when exposed to constant UV irradiation after the dark curing phase, samples reach the same plateau modulus as samples exposed to constant UV without dark curing, implying that dark curing does not affect the gelation mechanism. We believe the presence of dark curing is the result of the acidic environment persisting within the sample, allowing CaCO3 to dissociate, thereby releasing free Ca(2+) ions capable of binding with the available appropriate ionic blocks of the polymer chains. The growth of microstructure is then detected if the activation barrier has been crossed to release sufficient calcium ions. In this regard, we calculate a value of 30 J that represents the activation energy required to initiate gelation.

  19. Photo-activated ionic gelation of alginate hydrogel: real-time rheological monitoring of the two-step crosslinking mechanism.

    PubMed

    Higham, Alina K; Bonino, Christopher A; Raghavan, Srinivasa R; Khan, Saad A

    2014-07-21

    We examine the gelation of alginate undergoing ionic crosslinking upon ultraviolet (UV) irradiation using in situ dynamic rheology. Hydrogels are formed by combining alginate with calcium carbonate (CaCO3) particles and a photoacid generator (PAG). The PAG is photolyzed upon UV irradiation, resulting in the release of free calcium ions for ionic crosslinking. The viscous and elastic moduli during gelation are monitored as a function of the UV irradiation intensity, exposure time, alginate concentration, and the ratio between alginate and calcium carbonate. Gel time decreases as irradiation intensity increases because a larger concentration of PAG is photolyzed. Interestingly, dark curing, the continuing growth of microstructure in the absence of UV light, is observed. In some instances, the sample transitions from a solution to a gel during the dark curing phase. Additionally, when exposed to constant UV irradiation after the dark curing phase, samples reach the same plateau modulus as samples exposed to constant UV without dark curing, implying that dark curing does not affect the gelation mechanism. We believe the presence of dark curing is the result of the acidic environment persisting within the sample, allowing CaCO3 to dissociate, thereby releasing free Ca(2+) ions capable of binding with the available appropriate ionic blocks of the polymer chains. The growth of microstructure is then detected if the activation barrier has been crossed to release sufficient calcium ions. In this regard, we calculate a value of 30 J that represents the activation energy required to initiate gelation. PMID:24894636

  20. A new role for α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex: regulating metabolism through post-translational modification of other enzymes.

    PubMed

    McKenna, Mary C; Rae, Caroline D

    2015-07-01

    This Editorial highlights a study by Gibson et al. published in this issue of JNeurochem, in which the authors reveal a novel role for the α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex (KGDHC) in post-translational modification of proteins. KGDHC may catalyze post-translational modification of itself as well as several other proteins by succinylation of lysine residues. The authors' report of an enzyme responsible for succinylation of key mitochondrial enzymes represents a major step toward our understanding of the complex functional metabolome. TCA, tricarboxylic acid; KG, α-ketoglutarate; KGDHC, α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex; FUM, fumarase; MDH, malate dehydrogenase; ME, malic enzyme; GDH, glutamate dehydrogenase; AAT, aspartate aminotransferase; GS, glutamine synthetase; PAG, phosphate-activated glutaminase; SIRT3, silent information regulator 3; SIRT5, silent information regulator 5. PMID:26052752

  1. Regulation of active site coupling in glutamine-dependent NAD[superscript +] synthetase

    SciTech Connect

    LaRonde-LeBlanc, Nicole; Resto, Melissa; Gerratana, Barbara

    2009-05-21

    NAD{sup +} is an essential metabolite both as a cofactor in energy metabolism and redox homeostasis and as a regulator of cellular processes. In contrast to humans, Mycobacterium tuberculosis NAD{sup +} biosynthesis is absolutely dependent on the activity of a multifunctional glutamine-dependent NAD{sup +} synthetase, which catalyzes the ATP-dependent formation of NAD{sup +} at the synthetase domain using ammonia derived from L-glutamine in the glutaminase domain. Here we report the kinetics and structural characterization of M. tuberculosis NAD{sup +} synthetase. The kinetics data strongly suggest tightly coupled regulation of the catalytic activities. The structure, the first of a glutamine-dependent NAD{sup +} synthetase, reveals a homooctameric subunit organization suggesting a tight dependence of catalysis on the quaternary structure, a 40-{angstrom} intersubunit ammonia tunnel and structural elements that may be involved in the transfer of information between catalytic sites.

  2. Antinociception induced by motor cortex stimulation: somatotopy of behavioral response and profile of neuronal activation.

    PubMed

    França, Nubia R M; Toniolo, Elaine F; Franciosi, Adriano C; Alves, Adilson S; de Andrade, Daniel C; Fonoff, Erich T; Britto, Luiz R; Dale, Camila S

    2013-08-01

    Motor cortex stimulation (MCS) is used as a therapy for patients with refractory neuropathic pain. Experimental evidence suggests that the motor cortex (MC) is involved in the modulation of normal nociceptive response, but the underlying mechanisms have not been clarified yet. In previous studies, we demonstrated that MCS increases the nociceptive threshold of naive conscious rats by inhibiting thalamic sensory neurons and disinhibiting the neurons in periaqueductal gray (PAG), with the involvement of the opioid system. The aim of this study was to investigate the possible somatotopy of the motor cortex on MCS-induced antinociception and the pattern of neuronal activation evaluated by Fos and Egr-1 immunolabel in an attempt to better understand the relation between MC and analgesia. Rats received epidural electrode implants placed over the MC, in three distinct areas (forelimb, hindlimb or tail), according to a functional mapping established in previous studies. Nociceptive threshold was evaluated under 15-min electrical stimulating sessions. MCS induced selective antinociception in the limb related to the stimulated cortex, with no changes in other evaluated areas. MCS decreased Fos immunoreactivity (Fos-IR) in the superficial layers of the dorsal horn of the spinal cord for all evaluated groups and increased Fos-IR in the PAG, although no changes were observed in the PAG for the tail group. Egr-1 results were similar to those obtained for Fos. Data shown herein demonstrate that MCS elicits a substantial and selective antinociceptive effect, which is mediated, at least in part, by the activation of descendent inhibitory pain pathway.

  3. Dependence of in vivo glutamine synthetase activity on ammonia concentration in rat brain studied by 1H - 15N heteronuclear multiple-quantum coherence-transfer NMR.

    PubMed Central

    Kanamori, K; Ross, B D; Kuo, E L

    1995-01-01

    The dependence of the in vivo rate of glutamine synthesis on the substrate ammonia concentration was studied in rat brain by 1H-15N heteronuclear multiple-quantum coherence-transfer NMR in combination with biochemical techniques. In vivo rates were measured at various steady-state blood and brain ammonia concentrations within the ranges 0.4-0.55 mumol/g and 0.86-0.98 mumol/g respectively, after low-rate intravenous 15NH4+ infusion (isotope chase). The rate of glutamine synthesis at steady state was determined from the change in brain [5-15N]glutamine levels during isotope chase, observed selectively through the amide proton by NMR, and 15N enrichments of brain glutamine and of blood and brain ammonia measured byN gas chromatography-MS. The in vivo rate (v) was 3.3-4.5 mumol/h per g of brain at blood ammonia concentrations (s) of 0.40-0.55 mumol/g. A linear increase of 1/v with 1/s permitted estimation of the in vivo glutamine synthetase (GS) activity at a physiological blood ammonia concentration to be 0.4-2.1 mumol/h per g. The observed ammonia-dependence strongly suggests that, under physiological conditions, in vivo GS activity is kinetically limited by sub-optimal in situ concentrations of ammonia as well as glutamate and ATP. Comparison of the observed in vivo GS activity with the reported in vivo rates of glutaminase and of gamma-aminobutyrate (GABA) synthesis suggests that, under mildly hyperammonaemic conditions, glutamine is synthesized at a sufficiently high rate to serve as a precursor of GABA, but glutaminase-catalysed hydrolysis of glutamine is too slow to be the sole provider of glutamate used for GABA synthesis. PMID:7487913

  4. Analgesic Neural Circuits Are Activated by Electroacupuncture at Two Sets of Acupoints

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Man-Li; Qiu, Zheng-Ying

    2016-01-01

    To investigate analgesic neural circuits activated by electroacupuncture (EA) at different sets of acupoints in the brain, goats were stimulated by EA at set of Baihui-Santai acupoints or set of Housanli acupoints for 30 min. The pain threshold was measured using the potassium iontophoresis method. The levels of c-Fos were determined with Streptavidin-Biotin Complex immunohistochemistry. The results showed pain threshold induced by EA at set of Baihui-Santai acupoints was 44.74% ± 4.56% higher than that by EA at set of Housanli acupoints (32.64% ± 5.04%). Compared with blank control, EA at two sets of acupoints increased c-Fos expression in the medial septal nucleus (MSN), the arcuate nucleus (ARC), the nucleus amygdala basalis (AB), the lateral habenula nucleus (HL), the ventrolateral periaqueductal grey (vlPAG), the locus coeruleus (LC), the nucleus raphe magnus (NRM), the pituitary gland, and spinal cord dorsal horn (SDH). Compared with EA at set of Housanli points, EA at set of Baihui-Santai points induced increased c-Fos expression in AB but decrease in MSN, the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus, HL, and SDH. It suggests that ARC-PAG-NRM/LC-SDH and the hypothalamus-pituitary may be the common activated neural pathways taking part in EA-induced analgesia at the two sets of acupoints. PMID:27429635

  5. Effect of direct eye contact in PTSD related to interpersonal trauma: an fMRI study of activation of an innate alarm system

    PubMed Central

    Steuwe, Carolin; Daniels, Judith K.; Frewen, Paul A.; Densmore, Maria; Pannasch, Sebastian; Beblo, Thomas; Reiss, Jeffrey; Lanius, Ruth A.

    2014-01-01

    In healthy individuals, direct eye contact initially leads to activation of a fast subcortical pathway, which then modulates a cortical route eliciting social cognitive processes. The aim of this study was to gain insight into the neurobiological effects of direct eye-to-eye contact using a virtual reality paradigm in individuals with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) related to prolonged childhood abuse. We examined 16 healthy comparison subjects and 16 patients with a primary diagnosis of PTSD using a virtual reality functional magnetic resonance imaging paradigm involving direct vs averted gaze (happy, sad, neutral) as developed by Schrammel et al. in 2009. Irrespective of the displayed emotion, controls exhibited an increased blood oxygenation level-dependent response during direct vs averted gaze within the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex, left temporoparietal junction and right temporal pole. Under the same conditions, individuals with PTSD showed increased activation within the superior colliculus (SC)/periaqueductal gray (PAG) and locus coeruleus. Our findings suggest that healthy controls react to the exposure of direct gaze with an activation of a cortical route that enhances evaluative ‘top–down’ processes underlying social interactions. In individuals with PTSD, however, direct gaze leads to sustained activation of a subcortical route of eye-contact processing, an innate alarm system involving the SC and the underlying circuits of the PAG. PMID:22977200

  6. Acquisition of Pavlovian fear conditioning using β-adrenoceptor activation of the dorsal premammillary nucleus as an unconditioned stimulus to mimic live predator-threat exposure.

    PubMed

    Pavesi, Eloisa; Canteras, Newton S; Carobrez, Antônio P

    2011-04-01

    In the present work, we sought to mimic the internal state changes in response to a predator threat by pharmacologically stimulating the brain circuit involved in mediating predator fear responses, and explored whether this stimulation would be a valuable unconditioned stimulus (US) in an olfactory fear conditioning paradigm (OFC). The dorsal premammillary nucleus (PMd) is a key brain structure in the neural processing of anti-predatory defensive behavior and has also been shown to mediate the acquisition and expression of anti-predatory contextual conditioning fear responses. Rats were conditioned by pairing the US, which was an intra-PMd microinjection of isoproterenol (ISO; β-adrenoceptor agonist), with amyl acetate odor-the conditioned stimulus (CS). ISO (10 and 40 nmol) induced the acquisition of the OFC and the second-order association by activation of β-1 receptors in the PMd. Furthermore, similar to what had been found for contextual conditioning to a predator threat, atenolol (β-1 receptor antagonist) in the PMd also impaired the acquisition and expression of OFC promoted by ISO. Considering the strong glutamatergic projections from the PMd to the dorsal periaqueductal gray (dPAG), we tested how the glutamatergic blockade of the dPAG would interfere with the OFC induced by ISO. Accordingly, microinjections of NMDA receptor antagonist (AP5, 6 nmol) into the dPAG were able to block both the acquisition, and partially, the expression of the OFC. In conclusion, we have found that PMd β-1 adrenergic stimulation is a good model to mimic predatory threat-induced internal state changes, and works as a US able to mobilize the same systems involved in the acquisition and expression of predator-related contextual conditioning.

  7. Study of the Glutaminase Inhibitor CB-839 in Solid Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-18

    Solid Tumors; Triple-Negative Breast Cancer; Non Small Cell Lung Cancer; Renal Cell Carcinoma; Mesothelioma; Fumarate Hydratase (FH)-Deficient Tumors; Succinate Dehydrogenase (SDH)-Deficient Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors (GIST); Succinate Dehydrogenase (SDH)-Deficient Non-gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors; Tumors Harboring Isocitrate Dehydrogenase-1 (IDH1) and IDH2 Mutations; Tumors Harboring Amplifications in the cMyc Gene

  8. Orexin-A and Endocannabinoid Activation of the Descending Antinociceptive Pathway Underlies Altered Pain Perception in Leptin Signaling Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Cristino, Luigia; Luongo, Livio; Imperatore, Roberta; Boccella, Serena; Becker, Thorsten; Morello, Giovanna; Piscitelli, Fabiana; Busetto, Giuseppe; Maione, Sabatino; Di Marzo, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    Pain perception can become altered in individuals with eating disorders and obesity for reasons that have not been fully elucidated. We show that leptin deficiency in ob/ob mice, or leptin insensitivity in the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus in mice with high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity, are accompanied by elevated orexin-A (OX-A) levels and orexin receptor-1 (OX1-R)-dependent elevation of the levels of the endocannabinoid, 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG), in the ventrolateral periaqueductal gray (vlPAG). In ob/ob mice, these alterations result in the following: (i) increased excitability of OX1-R-expressing vlPAG output neurons and subsequent increased OFF and decreased ON cell activity in the rostral ventromedial medulla, as assessed by patch clamp and in vivo electrophysiology; and (ii) analgesia, in both healthy and neuropathic mice. In HFD mice, instead, analgesia is only unmasked following leptin receptor antagonism. We propose that OX-A/endocannabinoid cross talk in the descending antinociceptive pathway might partly underlie increased pain thresholds in conditions associated with impaired leptin signaling.

  9. Expert and Naive Raters Using the PAG: Does it Matter?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cornelius, Edwin T.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Questions the observed correlation between job experts and naive raters using the Position Analysis Questionnaire (PAQ); and conducts a replication of the Smith and Hakel study (1979) with college students (N=39). Concluded that PAQ ratings from job experts and college students are not equivalent and therefore are not interchangeable. (LLL)

  10. Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kincaid, Charlene; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Presents an activity in which students collect and organize data from a real-world simulation of the scientific concept of half life. Students collect data using a marble sifter, analyze the data using a graphing calculator, and determine an appropriate mathematical model. Includes reproducible worksheets. (MDH)

  11. Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathematics Teacher, 1982

    1982-01-01

    The material presented is designed to help students explore geometric patterns involving Fibonnaci numbers and the golden ratio, and to aid in review of basic geometry skills. Worksheet masters intended for duplication are provided. Suggestions are made of possible classroom extensions to the initial activities. (MP)

  12. Regionally selective activation of ERK and JNK in morphine paradoxical hyperalgesia: a step toward improving opioid pain therapy.

    PubMed

    Sanna, Maria Domenica; Ghelardini, Carla; Galeotti, Nicoletta

    2014-11-01

    In addition to analgesia, opioid agonists may increase pain sensitivity under different conditions varying dose and administration pattern. While opioid hyperalgesia induced by tolerance and withdrawal is largely studied, little is known on the mechanisms underlying ultra-low dose morphine hyperalgesia. This pronociceptive response appears to play an opposing role in morphine analgesia and might have clinical relevance. Ultra-low dose morphine elicited thermal hyperalgesia through activation of μ opioid receptors. To elucidate the intracellular mechanism of morphine nociceptive behaviour, we investigated the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), crucial pathways in pain hypersensitivity. The catalytic activity of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), p38, c-Jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK), upstream modulators and transcription factors was investigated in the mouse periaqueductal grey matter (PAG), thalamus and prefrontal cortex by western blotting. Ultra-low dose morphine intensively increased pERK1 contents in the PAG and cortex and, to a lesser extent, increased cortical ERK2 and JNK phosphorylation. No involvement of p38 was detected. Morphine exposure also increased phosphorylation of cortical c-Jun whereas levels of phosphorylated cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) remained unmodified. Blockade of protein kinase C (PKC) prevented increases in phosphorylation showing a PKC-dependent mechanism of activation. Pharmacological inhibitors of PKC, ERK, and JNK activity prevented morphine hyperalgesia. No modulation of MAPK and transcription factors' activity was detected in the thalamus. These results support the concept that selective activation of ERK and JNK on descending pathways plays an important role in ultra-low dose morphine hyperalgesia. The modulation of these signalling processes might improve pain management with opiate analgesics.

  13. Meningococcal Outer Membrane Vesicle Composition-Dependent Activation of the Innate Immune Response.

    PubMed

    Zariri, Afshin; Beskers, Joep; van de Waterbeemd, Bas; Hamstra, Hendrik Jan; Bindels, Tim H E; van Riet, Elly; van Putten, Jos P M; van der Ley, Peter

    2016-10-01

    Meningococcal outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) have been extensively investigated and successfully implemented as vaccines. They contain pathogen-associated molecular patterns, including lipopolysaccharide (LPS), capable of triggering innate immunity. However, Neisseria meningitidis contains an extremely potent hexa-acylated LPS, leading to adverse effects when its OMVs are applied as vaccines. To create safe OMV vaccines, detergent treatment is generally used to reduce the LPS content. While effective, this method also leads to loss of protective antigens such as lipoproteins. Alternatively, genetic modification of LPS can reduce its toxicity. In the present study, we have compared the effects of standard OMV isolation methods using detergent or EDTA with those of genetic modifications of LPS to yield a penta-acylated lipid A (lpxL1 and pagL) on the in vitro induction of innate immune responses. The use of detergent decreased both Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and TLR2 activation by OMVs, while the LPS modifications reduced only TLR4 activation. Mutational removal of PorB or lipoprotein factor H binding protein (fHbp), two proteins known to trigger TLR2 signaling, had no effect, indicating that multiple TLR2 ligands are removed by detergent treatment. Detergent-treated OMVs and lpxL1 OMVs showed similar reductions of cytokine profiles in the human monocytic cell line MM6 and human dendritic cells (DCs). OMVs with the alternative penta-acylated LPS structure obtained after PagL-mediated deacylation showed reduced induction of proinflammatory cytokines interleukin-6 (IL-6) and IL-1β but not of IP-10, a typical TRIF-dependent chemokine. Taken together, these data show that lipid A modification can be used to obtain OMVs with reduced activation of innate immunity, similar to what is found after detergent treatment. PMID:27481244

  14. Building up analgesia in humans via the endogenous μ-opioid system by combining placebo and active tDCS: a preliminary report.

    PubMed

    DosSantos, Marcos F; Martikainen, Ilkka K; Nascimento, Thiago D; Love, Tiffany M; DeBoer, Misty D; Schambra, Heidi M; Bikson, Marom; Zubieta, Jon-Kar; DaSilva, Alexandre F

    2014-01-01

    Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS) is a method of non-invasive brain stimulation that has been frequently used in experimental and clinical pain studies. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying tDCS-mediated pain control, and most important its placebo component, are not completely established. In this pilot study, we investigated in vivo the involvement of the endogenous μ-opioid system in the global tDCS-analgesia experience. Nine healthy volunteers went through positron emission tomography (PET) scans with [11C]carfentanil, a selective μ-opioid receptor (MOR) radiotracer, to measure the central MOR activity during tDCS in vivo (non-displaceable binding potential, BPND)--one of the main analgesic mechanisms in the brain. Placebo and real anodal primary motor cortex (M1/2mA) tDCS were delivered sequentially for 20 minutes each during the PET scan. The initial placebo tDCS phase induced a decrease in MOR BPND in the periaqueductal gray matter (PAG), precuneus, and thalamus, indicating activation of endogenous μ-opioid neurotransmission, even before the active tDCS. The subsequent real tDCS also induced MOR activation in the PAG and precuneus, which were positively correlated to the changes observed with placebo tDCS. Nonetheless, real tDCS had an additional MOR activation in the left prefrontal cortex. Although significant changes in the MOR BPND occurred with both placebo and real tDCS, significant analgesic effects, measured by improvements in the heat and cold pain thresholds, were only observed after real tDCS, not the placebo tDCS. This study gives preliminary evidence that the analgesic effects reported with M1-tDCS, can be in part related to the recruitment of the same endogenous MOR mechanisms induced by placebo, and that such effects can be purposely optimized by real tDCS. PMID:25029273

  15. Antidepressant treatment reduces Fos-like immunoreactivity induced by swim stress in different columns of the periaqueductal gray matter.

    PubMed

    Lino-de-Oliveira, Cilene; de Oliveira, Rúbia M W; Pádua Carobrez, Antonio; de Lima, Thereza C M; del Bel, Elaine Aparecida; Guimarães, Francisco Silveira

    2006-10-16

    Antidepressant treatment attenuates behavioral changes induced by uncontrollable stress. The periaqueductal gray matter (PAG) is proposed to be a brain site involved in the behavioral responses to uncontrollable stress and antidepressant effects. The main goal of the present study was to investigate the effect of antidepressant treatment on the pattern of neural activation of the PAG along its mediolateral and rostrocaudal subregions after a forced swim stress episode. Male Wistar rats were sub-acutely treated with desipramine (a selective noradrenaline re-uptake blocker, three injections of 10 mg/kg in 24 h) or clomipramine (a non-selective serotonin and noradrenaline re-uptake blocker, three injections of 10 mg/kg in 24 h) and submitted to the forced swimming test (FST). Two hours after the test their brain were removed for Fos immunohistochemistry. Fos-like immunoreactivity (FLI) in rostral, intermediate and caudal portions of dorsomedial (dmPAG), dorsolateral (dlPAG), lateral (lPAG) and ventrolateral (vlPAG) PAG were quantified by a computerized system. The FST session increased FLI in most parts of the PAG. Previous treatment with desipramine or clomipramine reduced FLI in all columns of the PAG. FLI in the PAG correlated positively with to the immobility time and negatively with to climbing behavior scored during the test. These results indicate that neurons in the PAG are activated by uncontrollable stress. Moreover, inhibitory action of antidepressants on this activity may be associated with the anti-immobility effects of these drugs in the FST.

  16. Dorsal periaqueductal gray-amygdala pathway conveys both innate and learned fear responses in rats

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun Joo; Horovitz, Omer; Pellman, Blake A.; Tan, Lancy Mimi; Li, Qiuling; Richter-Levin, Gal; Kim, Jeansok J.

    2013-01-01

    The periaqueductal gray (PAG) and amygdala are known to be important for defensive responses, and many contemporary fear-conditioning models present the PAG as downstream of the amygdala, directing the appropriate behavior (i.e., freezing or fleeing). However, empirical studies of this circuitry are inconsistent and warrant further examination. Hence, the present study investigated the functional relationship between the PAG and amygdala in two different settings, fear conditioning and naturalistic foraging, in rats. In fear conditioning, electrical stimulation of the dorsal PAG (dPAG) produced unconditional responses (URs) composed of brief activity bursts followed by freezing and 22-kHz ultrasonic vocalization. In contrast, stimulation of ventral PAG and the basolateral amygdalar complex (BLA) evoked freezing and/or ultrasonic vocalization. Whereas dPAG stimulation served as an effective unconditional stimulus for fear conditioning to tone and context conditional stimuli, neither ventral PAG nor BLA stimulation supported fear conditioning. The conditioning effect of dPAG, however, was abolished by inactivation of the BLA. In a foraging task, dPAG and BLA stimulation evoked only fleeing toward the nest. Amygdalar lesion/inactivation blocked the UR of dPAG stimulation, but dPAG lesions did not block the UR of BLA stimulation. Furthermore, in vivo recordings demonstrated that electrical priming of the dPAG can modulate plasticity of subiculum–BLA synapses, providing additional evidence that the amygdala is downstream of the dPAG. These results suggest that the dPAG conveys unconditional stimulus information to the BLA, which directs both innate and learned fear responses, and that brain stimulation-evoked behaviors are modulated by context. PMID:23959880

  17. Overview of NASA Astrophysics Program Analysis Groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Michael R.; Hudgins, D. M.; Sambruna, R. M.

    2014-01-01

    NASA Astrophysics Program Analysis Groups (PAGs) are responsible for facilitating and coordinating community input into the developmentand execution of NASAs three astrophysics science themes: Cosmic Origins (COPAG), Exoplanet Exploration (ExoPAG), and Physics of the Cosmos (PhysPAG). The PAGs provide a community-based, interdisciplinary forum for analyses that support and inform planning and prioritization of activities within the Astrophysics Division programs. Operations and structure of the PAGs are described in the Terms of Reference (TOR) which can be found on the three science theme Program Office web pages. The Astrophysics PAGs report their input and findings to NASA through the Astrophysics Subcommittee of the NASA Advisory Council, of which all the PAG Chairs are members. In this presentation, we will provide an overview of the ongoing activities of NASAs Astrophysics PAGs in the context of the opportunities and challenges currently facing the Astrophysics Division. NASA Headquarters representatives for the COPAG, ExoPAG, and PhysPAG will all be present and available to answer questions about the programmatic role of the Astrophysics PAGs.

  18. Overview of NASA Astrophysics Program Analysis Groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders, Wilton T.; Sambruna, Rita M.; Perez, Mario R.; Hudgins, Douglas M.

    2015-01-01

    NASA Astrophysics Program Analysis Groups (PAGs) are responsible for facilitating and coordinating community input into the development and execution of NASAs three astrophysics science themes: Cosmic Origins (COPAG), Exoplanet Exploration (ExoPAG), and Physics of the Cosmos (PhysPAG). The PAGs provide a community-based, interdisciplinary forum for analyses that support and inform planning and prioritization of activities within the Astrophysics Division programs. Operations and structure of the PAGs are described in their Terms of Reference (TOR), which can be found on the three science theme Program Office web pages. The Astrophysics PAGs report their input and findings to NASA through the Astrophysics Subcommittee of the NASA Advisory Council, of which all the PAG Chairs are members. In this presentation, we will provide an overview of the ongoing activities of NASAs Astrophysics PAGs in the context of the opportunities and challenges currently facing the Astrophysics Division. NASA Headquarters representatives for the COPAG, ExoPAG, and PhysPAG will all be present and available to answer questions about the programmatic role of the Astrophysics PAGs.

  19. Quantitative metabolome analysis profiles activation of glutaminolysis in glioma with IDH1 mutation.

    PubMed

    Ohka, Fumiharu; Ito, Maki; Ranjit, Melissa; Senga, Takeshi; Motomura, Ayako; Motomura, Kazuya; Saito, Kaori; Kato, Keiko; Kato, Yukinari; Wakabayashi, Toshihiko; Soga, Tomoyoshi; Natsume, Atsushi

    2014-06-01

    Isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1), which localizes to the cytosol and peroxisomes, catalyzes the oxidative decarboxylation of isocitrate to α-ketoglutarate (α-KG) and in parallel converts NADP(+) to NADPH. IDH1 mutations are frequently detected in grades 2-4 gliomas and in acute myeloid leukemias (AML). Mutations of IDH1 have been identified at codon 132, with arginine being replaced with histidine in most cases. Mutant IDH1 gains novel enzyme activity converting α-KG to D-2-hydroxyglutarate (2-HG) which acts as a competitive inhibitor of α-KG. As a result, the activity of α-KG-dependent enzyme is reduced. Based on these findings, 2-HG has been proposed to be an oncometabolite. In this study, we established HEK293 and U87 cells that stably expressed IDH1-WT and IDH1-R132H and investigated the effect of glutaminase inhibition on cell proliferation with 6-diazo-5-oxo-L-norleucine (DON). We found that cell proliferation was suppressed in IDH1-R132H cells. The addition of α-KG restored cell proliferation. The metabolic features of 33 gliomas with wild type IDH1 (IDH1-WT) and with IDH1-R132H mutation were examined by global metabolome analysis using capillary electrophoresis time-of-flight mass spectrometry (CE-TOFMS). We showed that the 2-HG levels were highly elevated in gliomas with IDH1-R132H mutation. Intriguingly, in gliomas with IDH1-R132H, glutamine and glutamate levels were significantly reduced which implies replenishment of α-KG by glutaminolysis. Based on these results, we concluded that glutaminolysis is activated in gliomas with IDH1-R132H mutation and that development of novel therapeutic approaches targeting activated glutaminolysis is warranted.

  20. Heat stability of protective antigen of Leptospira interrogans serovar lai.

    PubMed Central

    Masuzawa, T; Nakamura, R; Shimizu, T; Yanagihara, Y

    1990-01-01

    Protective antigen (PAg; glycolipid antigen; molecular size, 23 to 30 kilodaltons), the serogroup-specific antigen partially purified from leptospiral cells, is one of the most important protective antigens. The heat stability of PAg was compared with that of whole-cell (WC) antigen by using sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, immunoblotting, protective activity, opsonin-inducing activity, agglutinating antibody-inducing activity, and an inhibition test in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. A band of 23 to 30 kilodaltons of PAg, which was seen in untreated PAg and WC, shifted to a position with a molecular size of ca. 20 kilodaltons after heat treatment of PAg at 80 degrees C for 30 min and WC at 100 degrees C for 30 min. In the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay inhibition test with monoclonal antibody LW2 and a sonicated antigen of WC, the inhibition rate of PAg and WC to sonicated WC was reduced by heat treatment at 80 degrees C for 30 min and at 100 degrees C for 30 min, respectively. Agglutinating antibody-inducing activities and opsonin-inducing activities of PAg and WC in mice were reduced by heat treatment under the same conditions; these activities were assayed by a microscopic agglutination test and by chemical luminescence response in serum from immunized mice, respectively. Protective activity of heated PAg and heated WC in cyclophosphamide-pretreated mice agreed with the results of immunogenicity in mice. These results indicate that the Leptospira PAg is one of the important protective antigens and is altered by heat treatment at 80 degrees C. Furthermore, the immunogenicity and antigenicity of the PAg present in WC are more stable than that of the extracted PAg, and the coexistence of other cellular components with PAg might protect and stabilize PAg from the heat treatment. Images PMID:2332463

  1. Dorsolateral and ventral regions of the periaqueductal gray matter are involved in distinct types of fear.

    PubMed

    Vianna, D M; Landeira-Fernandez, J; Brandão, M L

    2001-12-01

    Stepwise increases in the electrical stimulation of the dorsolateral periaqueductal gray (dlPAG) produces alertness, then freezing and finally escape. This paper examines whether this freezing is (i) caused by Pavlovian fear conditioning to the contextual cues present during stimulation and (ii) the result of the stimulation of neurons located inside the dlPAG or elsewhere. To this end, freezing behavior was assessed in rats exposed either to the same or a different environment (context shift test) following the application of either footshocks or stimulation of the dlPAG at the freezing threshold. Rats submitted to footshocks presented freezing to the context 24h later whereas rats submitted to the dlPAG stimulation showed freezing only immediately after the stimulation, regardless of the context. In the second experiment, aversive states generated by activation of the dlPAG were assessed either by measuring the thresholds for freezing and escape responses or the duration of these responses following microinjections of semicarbazide inside the dlPAG. The duration of freezing behavior was also measured in rats submitted to a contextual fear-conditioning paradigm using footshocks as unconditioned stimulus. Lesions of the ventral periaqueductal gray (vPAG) disrupted conditioned freezing to contextual cues associated to footshocks but vPAG lesions did not change the threshold of either freezing or escape responses elicited by electrical stimulation of the dlPAG. Lesions of the vPAG did not change the amount of freezing or escape responses produced by microinjections of semicarbazide into the dlPAG. These results indicate that stimulation of dlPAG neurons produce freezing behavior independent of any contextual fear conditioning and add to previously reported evidence showing that the vPAG is a critical structure for the expression of conditioned fear. In contrast, the neural substrate of unconditioned dlPAG stimulation-induced freezing is likely to elaborate

  2. Maternal inflammation leads to impaired glutamate homeostasis and up-regulation of glutamate carboxypeptidase II in activated microglia in the fetal/newborn rabbit brain.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhi; Bassam, Bassam; Thomas, Ajit G; Williams, Monica; Liu, Jinhuan; Nance, Elizabeth; Rojas, Camilo; Slusher, Barbara S; Kannan, Sujatha

    2016-10-01

    Astrocyte dysfunction and excessive activation of glutamatergic systems have been implicated in a number of neurologic disorders, including periventricular leukomalacia (PVL) and cerebral palsy (CP). However, the role of chorioamnionitis on glutamate homeostasis in the fetal and neonatal brains is not clearly understood. We have previously shown that intrauterine endotoxin administration results in intense microglial 'activation' and increased pro-inflammatory cytokines in the periventricular region (PVR) of the neonatal rabbit brain. In this study, we assessed the effect of maternal inflammation on key components of the glutamate pathway and its relationship to astrocyte and microglial activation in the fetal and neonatal New Zealand white rabbit brain. We found that intrauterine endotoxin exposure at gestational day 28 (G28) induced acute and prolonged glutamate elevation in the PVR of fetal (G29, 1day post-injury) and postnatal day 1 (PND1, 3days post-injury) brains along with prominent morphological changes in the astrocytes (soma hypertrophy and retracted processes) in the white matter tracts. There was a significant increase in glutaminase and N-Methyl-d-Aspartate receptor (NMDAR) NR2 subunit expression along with decreased glial L-glutamate transporter 1 (GLT-1) in the PVR at G29, that would promote acute dysregulation of glutamate homeostasis. This was accompanied with significantly decreased TGF-β1 at PND1 in CP kits indicating ongoing neuroinflammation. We also show for the first time that glutamate carboxypeptidase II (GCPII) was significantly increased in the activated microglia at the periventricular white matter area in both G29 and PND1 CP kits. This was confirmed by in vitro studies demonstrating that LPS activated primary microglia markedly upregulate GCPII enzymatic activity. These results suggest that maternal intrauterine endotoxin exposure results in early onset and long-lasting dysregulation of glutamate homeostasis, which may be mediated by

  3. Liposomes for targeting hepatocellular carcinoma: use of conjugated arabinogalactan as targeting ligand.

    PubMed

    Shah, Sanket M; Goel, Peeyush N; Jain, Ankitkumar S; Pathak, Pankaj O; Padhye, Sameer G; Govindarajan, Srinath; Ghosh, Sandipto S; Chaudhari, Pradip R; Gude, Rajiv P; Gopal, Vijaya; Nagarsenker, Mangal S

    2014-12-30

    Present study investigates the potential of chemically modified (Shah et al., 2013) palmitoylated arabinogalactan (PAG) in guiding liposomal delivery system and targeting asialoglycoprotein receptors (ASGPR) which are expressed in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). PAG was incorporated in liposomes during preparation and doxorubicin hydrochloride was actively loaded in preformed liposomes with and without PAG. The liposomal systems with or without PAG were evaluated for in vitro release, in vitro cytotoxicity, in vitro cell uptake on ASGPR(+) cells, in vivo pharmacokinetic study, in vivo biodistribution study, and in vivo efficacy study in immunocompromised mice. The particle size for all the liposomal systems was below 200 nm with a negative zeta potential. Doxorubicin loaded PAG liposomes released significantly higher amount of doxorubicin at pH 5.5 as compared to pH 7.4, providing advantage for targeted tumor therapy. Doxorubicin in PAG liposomes showed superior cytotoxicity on ASGPR(+) HepG2 cells as compared to ASGPR(-), MCF7, A549, and HT29 cells. Superior uptake of doxorubicin loaded PAG liposomes as compared to doxorubicin loaded conventional liposomes was evident in confocal microscopy studies. Higher AUC in pharmacokinetic study and higher deposition in liver was observed for PAG liposomes compared to conventional liposomes. Significantly higher tumor suppression was noted in immunocompromised mice for mice treated with PAG liposomes as compared to the conventional liposomes. Targeting ability and superior activity of PAG liposomes is established pre-clinically suggesting potential of targeted delivery system for improved treatment of HCC.

  4. Structural basis for morpheein-type allosteric regulation of Escherichia coli glucosamine-6-phosphate synthase: equilibrium between inactive hexamer and active dimer.

    PubMed

    Mouilleron, Stéphane; Badet-Denisot, Marie-Ange; Pecqueur, Ludovic; Madiona, Karine; Assrir, Nadine; Badet, Bernard; Golinelli-Pimpaneau, Béatrice

    2012-10-01

    The amino-terminal cysteine of glucosamine-6-phosphate synthase (GlmS) acts as a nucleophile to release and transfer ammonia from glutamine to fructose 6-phosphate through a channel. The crystal structure of the C1A mutant of Escherichia coli GlmS, solved at 2.5 Å resolution, is organized as a hexamer, where the glutaminase domains adopt an inactive conformation. Although the wild-type enzyme is active as a dimer, size exclusion chromatography, dynamic and quasi-elastic light scattering, native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and ultracentrifugation data show that the dimer is in equilibrium with a hexameric state, in vitro and in cellulo. The previously determined structures of the wild-type enzyme, alone or in complex with glucosamine 6-phosphate, are also consistent with a hexameric assembly that is catalytically inactive because the ammonia channel is not formed. The shift of the equilibrium toward the hexameric form in the presence of cyclic glucosamine 6-phosphate, together with the decrease of the specific activity with increasing enzyme concentration, strongly supports product inhibition through hexamer stabilization. Altogether, our data allow us to propose a morpheein model, in which the active dimer can rearrange into a transiently stable form, which has the propensity to form an inactive hexamer. This would account for a physiologically relevant allosteric regulation of E. coli GlmS. Finally, in addition to cyclic glucose 6-phosphate bound at the active site, the hexameric organization of E. coli GlmS enables the binding of another linear sugar molecule. Targeting this sugar-binding site to stabilize the inactive hexameric state is therefore suggested for the development of specific antibacterial inhibitors.

  5. Mitochondrial thiol modification by a targeted electrophile inhibits metabolism in breast adenocarcinoma cells by inhibiting enzyme activity and protein levels.

    PubMed

    Smith, M Ryan; Vayalil, Praveen K; Zhou, Fen; Benavides, Gloria A; Beggs, Reena R; Golzarian, Hafez; Nijampatnam, Bhavitavya; Oliver, Patsy G; Smith, Robin A J; Murphy, Michael P; Velu, Sadanandan E; Landar, Aimee

    2016-08-01

    Many cancer cells follow an aberrant metabolic program to maintain energy for rapid cell proliferation. Metabolic reprogramming often involves the upregulation of glutaminolysis to generate reducing equivalents for the electron transport chain and amino acids for protein synthesis. Critical enzymes involved in metabolism possess a reactive thiolate group, which can be modified by certain oxidants. In the current study, we show that modification of mitochondrial protein thiols by a model compound, iodobutyl triphenylphosphonium (IBTP), decreased mitochondrial metabolism and ATP in MDA-MB 231 (MB231) breast adenocarcinoma cells up to 6 days after an initial 24h treatment. Mitochondrial thiol modification also depressed oxygen consumption rates (OCR) in a dose-dependent manner to a greater extent than a non-thiol modifying analog, suggesting that thiol reactivity is an important factor in the inhibition of cancer cell metabolism. In non-tumorigenic MCF-10A cells, IBTP also decreased OCR; however the extracellular acidification rate was significantly increased at all but the highest concentration (10µM) of IBTP indicating that thiol modification can have significantly different effects on bioenergetics in tumorigenic versus non-tumorigenic cells. ATP and other adenonucleotide levels were also decreased by thiol modification up to 6 days post-treatment, indicating a decreased overall energetic state in MB231 cells. Cellular proliferation of MB231 cells was also inhibited up to 6 days post-treatment with little change to cell viability. Targeted metabolomic analyses revealed that thiol modification caused depletion of both Krebs cycle and glutaminolysis intermediates. Further experiments revealed that the activity of the Krebs cycle enzyme, aconitase, was attenuated in response to thiol modification. Additionally, the inhibition of glutaminolysis corresponded to decreased glutaminase C (GAC) protein levels, although other protein levels were unaffected. This study

  6. Mitochondrial thiol modification by a targeted electrophile inhibits metabolism in breast adenocarcinoma cells by inhibiting enzyme activity and protein levels.

    PubMed

    Smith, M Ryan; Vayalil, Praveen K; Zhou, Fen; Benavides, Gloria A; Beggs, Reena R; Golzarian, Hafez; Nijampatnam, Bhavitavya; Oliver, Patsy G; Smith, Robin A J; Murphy, Michael P; Velu, Sadanandan E; Landar, Aimee

    2016-08-01

    Many cancer cells follow an aberrant metabolic program to maintain energy for rapid cell proliferation. Metabolic reprogramming often involves the upregulation of glutaminolysis to generate reducing equivalents for the electron transport chain and amino acids for protein synthesis. Critical enzymes involved in metabolism possess a reactive thiolate group, which can be modified by certain oxidants. In the current study, we show that modification of mitochondrial protein thiols by a model compound, iodobutyl triphenylphosphonium (IBTP), decreased mitochondrial metabolism and ATP in MDA-MB 231 (MB231) breast adenocarcinoma cells up to 6 days after an initial 24h treatment. Mitochondrial thiol modification also depressed oxygen consumption rates (OCR) in a dose-dependent manner to a greater extent than a non-thiol modifying analog, suggesting that thiol reactivity is an important factor in the inhibition of cancer cell metabolism. In non-tumorigenic MCF-10A cells, IBTP also decreased OCR; however the extracellular acidification rate was significantly increased at all but the highest concentration (10µM) of IBTP indicating that thiol modification can have significantly different effects on bioenergetics in tumorigenic versus non-tumorigenic cells. ATP and other adenonucleotide levels were also decreased by thiol modification up to 6 days post-treatment, indicating a decreased overall energetic state in MB231 cells. Cellular proliferation of MB231 cells was also inhibited up to 6 days post-treatment with little change to cell viability. Targeted metabolomic analyses revealed that thiol modification caused depletion of both Krebs cycle and glutaminolysis intermediates. Further experiments revealed that the activity of the Krebs cycle enzyme, aconitase, was attenuated in response to thiol modification. Additionally, the inhibition of glutaminolysis corresponded to decreased glutaminase C (GAC) protein levels, although other protein levels were unaffected. This study

  7. Mitochondrial thiol modification by a targeted electrophile inhibits metabolism in breast adenocarcinoma cells by inhibiting enzyme activity and protein levels

    PubMed Central

    Smith, M. Ryan; Vayalil, Praveen K.; Zhou, Fen; Benavides, Gloria A.; Beggs, Reena R.; Golzarian, Hafez; Nijampatnam, Bhavitavya; Oliver, Patsy G.; Smith, Robin A.J.; Murphy, Michael P.; Velu, Sadanandan E.; Landar, Aimee

    2016-01-01

    Many cancer cells follow an aberrant metabolic program to maintain energy for rapid cell proliferation. Metabolic reprogramming often involves the upregulation of glutaminolysis to generate reducing equivalents for the electron transport chain and amino acids for protein synthesis. Critical enzymes involved in metabolism possess a reactive thiolate group, which can be modified by certain oxidants. In the current study, we show that modification of mitochondrial protein thiols by a model compound, iodobutyl triphenylphosphonium (IBTP), decreased mitochondrial metabolism and ATP in MDA-MB 231 (MB231) breast adenocarcinoma cells up to 6 days after an initial 24 h treatment. Mitochondrial thiol modification also depressed oxygen consumption rates (OCR) in a dose-dependent manner to a greater extent than a non-thiol modifying analog, suggesting that thiol reactivity is an important factor in the inhibition of cancer cell metabolism. In non-tumorigenic MCF-10A cells, IBTP also decreased OCR; however the extracellular acidification rate was significantly increased at all but the highest concentration (10 µM) of IBTP indicating that thiol modification can have significantly different effects on bioenergetics in tumorigenic versus non-tumorigenic cells. ATP and other adenonucleotide levels were also decreased by thiol modification up to 6 days post-treatment, indicating a decreased overall energetic state in MB231 cells. Cellular proliferation of MB231 cells was also inhibited up to 6 days post-treatment with little change to cell viability. Targeted metabolomic analyses revealed that thiol modification caused depletion of both Krebs cycle and glutaminolysis intermediates. Further experiments revealed that the activity of the Krebs cycle enzyme, aconitase, was attenuated in response to thiol modification. Additionally, the inhibition of glutaminolysis corresponded to decreased glutaminase C (GAC) protein levels, although other protein levels were unaffected. This study

  8. Conditioned respiratory threat in the subdivisions of the human periaqueductal gray

    PubMed Central

    Faull, Olivia K; Jenkinson, Mark; Ezra, Martyn; Pattinson, Kyle TS

    2016-01-01

    The sensation of breathlessness is the most threatening symptom of respiratory disease. The different subdivisions of the midbrain periaqueductal gray (PAG) are intricately (and differentially) involved in integrating behavioural responses to threat in animals, while the PAG has previously only been considered as a single entity in human research. Here we investigate how these individual PAG columns are differently involved with respiratory threat. Eighteen healthy subjects were conditioned to associate shapes with certain or uncertain impending respiratory load, and scanned the following day during anticipation and application of inspiratory loading using 7 T functional MRI. We showed activity in the ventrolateral PAG (vlPAG) during anticipation of resistive loading, with activity in the lateral PAG (lPAG) during resistive loading, revealing spatially and temporally distinct functions within this structure. We propose that lPAG is involved with sensorimotor responses to breathlessness, while the vlPAG operates within the threat perception network for impending breathlessness. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12047.001 PMID:26920223

  9. Spectral evolution of active galactic nuclei Penrose Compton scattering processes and gamma ray emission from Seyfert galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leiter, Darryl; Boldt, Elihu

    1990-01-01

    In black hole spectral evolution models for active galactic nuclei (AGN), present epoch Seyfert galaxies evolve from an earlier precursor active galaxy (PAG) stage at redshift z is approximately 7 where they acted as the thermal sources responsible for the residual cosmic x ray background (RCXB). The Seyfert galaxies which emerge in this context emit Penrose Compton Scattering (PCS) gamma ray transients on the order of hours with a kinematic cutoff in the spectrum less than or equal to 3 MeV. The EGRET (Energetic Gamma-Ray Experimental Telescope/ OSSE (Oriented Scintillation Spectrometer Experiment/ COMPTEL (Compton Telescope)/ BATSE (Burst and Transient Source Experiment) instruments on the Gamma Ray Observatory (GRO) are appropriate instruments to carry out further tests of this model by studying: PCS gamma ray transient emission from individual galaxies and, the possibility that present epoch PCS gamma ray emitting Seyfert galaxies contribute observable temporal variability to the excess diffuse gamma ray background component less than or equal to 3 MeV.

  10. Patterns of Brain Activation and Meal Reduction Induced by Abdominal Surgery in Mice and Modulation by Rikkunshito.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lixin; Mogami, Sachiko; Yakabi, Seiichi; Karasawa, Hiroshi; Yamada, Chihiro; Yakabi, Koji; Hattori, Tomohisa; Taché, Yvette

    2015-01-01

    Abdominal surgery inhibits food intake and induces c-Fos expression in the hypothalamic and medullary nuclei in rats. Rikkunshito (RKT), a Kampo medicine improves anorexia. We assessed the alterations in meal microstructure and c-Fos expression in brain nuclei induced by abdominal surgery and the modulation by RKT in mice. RKT or vehicle was gavaged daily for 1 week. On day 8 mice had no access to food for 6-7 h and were treated twice with RKT or vehicle. Abdominal surgery (laparotomy-cecum palpation) was performed 1-2 h before the dark phase. The food intake and meal structures were monitored using an automated monitoring system for mice. Brain sections were processed for c-Fos immunoreactivity (ir) 2-h after abdominal surgery. Abdominal surgery significantly reduced bouts, meal frequency, size and duration, and time spent on meals, and increased inter-meal interval and satiety ratio resulting in 92-86% suppression of food intake at 2-24 h post-surgery compared with control group (no surgery). RKT significantly increased bouts, meal duration and the cumulative 12-h food intake by 11%. Abdominal surgery increased c-Fos in the prelimbic, cingulate and insular cortexes, and autonomic nuclei, such as the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, central amygdala, hypothalamic supraoptic (SON), paraventricular and arcuate nuclei, Edinger-Westphal nucleus (E-W), lateral periaqueduct gray (PAG), lateral parabrachial nucleus, locus coeruleus, ventrolateral medulla and nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS). RKT induced a small increase in c-Fos-ir neurons in the SON and E-W of control mice, and in mice with surgery there was an increase in the lateral PAG and a decrease in the NTS. These findings indicate that abdominal surgery inhibits food intake by increasing both satiation (meal duration) and satiety (meal interval) and activates brain circuits involved in pain, feeding behavior and stress that may underlie the alterations of meal pattern and food intake inhibition. RKT improves

  11. Patterns of Brain Activation and Meal Reduction Induced by Abdominal Surgery in Mice and Modulation by Rikkunshito

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lixin; Mogami, Sachiko; Yakabi, Seiichi; Karasawa, Hiroshi; Yamada, Chihiro; Yakabi, Koji; Hattori, Tomohisa; Taché, Yvette

    2015-01-01

    Abdominal surgery inhibits food intake and induces c-Fos expression in the hypothalamic and medullary nuclei in rats. Rikkunshito (RKT), a Kampo medicine improves anorexia. We assessed the alterations in meal microstructure and c-Fos expression in brain nuclei induced by abdominal surgery and the modulation by RKT in mice. RKT or vehicle was gavaged daily for 1 week. On day 8 mice had no access to food for 6–7 h and were treated twice with RKT or vehicle. Abdominal surgery (laparotomy-cecum palpation) was performed 1–2 h before the dark phase. The food intake and meal structures were monitored using an automated monitoring system for mice. Brain sections were processed for c-Fos immunoreactivity (ir) 2-h after abdominal surgery. Abdominal surgery significantly reduced bouts, meal frequency, size and duration, and time spent on meals, and increased inter-meal interval and satiety ratio resulting in 92–86% suppression of food intake at 2–24 h post-surgery compared with control group (no surgery). RKT significantly increased bouts, meal duration and the cumulative 12-h food intake by 11%. Abdominal surgery increased c-Fos in the prelimbic, cingulate and insular cortexes, and autonomic nuclei, such as the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, central amygdala, hypothalamic supraoptic (SON), paraventricular and arcuate nuclei, Edinger-Westphal nucleus (E-W), lateral periaqueduct gray (PAG), lateral parabrachial nucleus, locus coeruleus, ventrolateral medulla and nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS). RKT induced a small increase in c-Fos-ir neurons in the SON and E-W of control mice, and in mice with surgery there was an increase in the lateral PAG and a decrease in the NTS. These findings indicate that abdominal surgery inhibits food intake by increasing both satiation (meal duration) and satiety (meal interval) and activates brain circuits involved in pain, feeding behavior and stress that may underlie the alterations of meal pattern and food intake inhibition. RKT

  12. 78 FR 42071 - Updates to Protective Action Guides Manual: Protective Action Guides (PAGs) and Planning Guidance...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-15

    ...-HQ- OAR-2007-0268, by one of the following methods: www.regulations.gov : Follow the on-line... should avoid the use of special characters, any form of encryption, and be free of any defects or...

  13. 78 FR 22257 - Updates to Protective Action Guides Manual: Protective Action Guides (PAGs) and Planning Guidance...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-15

    ... Radiological Dispersal Device (RDD) and Improvised Nuclear Device (IND) Incidents, DHS/FEMA (73 FR 45029, Aug 1... Human Food and Animal Feeds: Recommendations for State and Local Agencies, FDA (63 FR 43402, Aug 13... Blocking Agent in Radiation Emergencies, FDA (66 FR 64046, Dec. 11, 2001). Provide basic planning...

  14. Optimization of a fast optical CT scanner for nPAG gel dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandecasteele, Jan; DeDeene, Yves

    2009-05-01

    A fast laser scanning optical CT scanner was constructed and optimized at the Ghent university. The first images acquired were contaminated with several imaging artifacts. The origins of the artifacts were investigated. Performance characteristics of different components were measured such as the laser spot size, light attenuation by the lenses and the dynamic range of the photo-detector. The need for a differential measurement using a second photo-detector was investigated. Post processing strategies to compensate for hardware related errors were developed. Drift of the laser and of the detector was negligible. Incorrectly refractive index matching was dealt with by developing an automated matching process. When scratches on the water bath and phantom container are present, these pose a post processing challenge to eliminate the resulting artifacts from the reconstructed images Secondary laser spots due to multiple reflections need to be further investigated. The time delay in the control of the galvanometer and detector was dealt with using black strips that serve as markers of the projection position. Still some residual ringing artifacts are present. Several small volumetric test phantoms were constructed to obtain an overall picture of the accuracy.

  15. In vivo and in vitro liver cancer metabolism observed with hyperpolarized [5-13C]glutamine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabella, C.; Karlsson, M.; Canapè, C.; Catanzaro, G.; Colombo Serra, S.; Miragoli, L.; Poggi, L.; Uggeri, F.; Venturi, L.; Jensen, P. R.; Lerche, M. H.; Tedoldi, F.

    2013-07-01

    Glutamine metabolism is, with its many links to oncogene expression, considered a crucial step in cancer metabolism and it is thereby a key target for alteration in cancer development. In particular, strong correlations have been reported between oncogene expression and expression and activity of the enzyme glutaminase. This mitochondrial enzyme, which is responsible for the deamidation of glutamine to form glutamate, is overexpressed in many tumour tissues. In animal models, glutaminase expression is correlated with tumour growth rate and it is readily possible to limit tumour growth by suppression of glutaminase activity. In principle, hyperpolarized 13C MR spectroscopy can provide insight to glutamine metabolism and should hence be a valuable tool to study changes in glutaminase activity as tumours progress. However, no such successful in vivo studies have been reported, even though several good biological models have been tested. This may, at least partly, be due to problems in preparing glutamine for hyperpolarization. This paper reports a new and improved preparation of hyperpolarized [5-13C]glutamine, which provides a highly sensitive 13C MR marker. With this preparation of hyperpolarized [5-13C]glutamine, glutaminase activity in vivo in a rat liver tumour was investigated. Moreover, this marker was also used to measure response to drug treatment in vitro in cancer cells. These examples of [5-13C]glutamine used in tumour models warrant the new preparation to allow metabolic studies with this conditionally essential amino acid.

  16. Role played by periaqueductal gray neurons in parasympathetically mediated fear bradycardia in conscious rats.

    PubMed

    Koba, Satoshi; Inoue, Ryo; Watanabe, Tatsuo

    2016-06-01

    Freezing, a characteristic pattern of defensive behavior elicited by fear, is associated with a decrease in the heart rate. Central mechanisms underlying fear bradycardia are poorly understood. The periaqueductal gray (PAG) in the midbrain is known to contribute to autonomic cardiovascular adjustments associated with various emotional behaviors observed during active or passive defense reactions. The purpose of this study was to elucidate the role played by PAG neurons in eliciting fear bradycardia. White noise sound (WNS) exposure at 90 dB induced freezing behavior and elicited bradycardia in conscious rats. The WNS exposure-elicited bradycardia was mediated parasympathetically because intravenous administration of atropine abolished the bradycardia (P < 0.05). Moreover, WNS exposure-elicited bradycardia was mediated by neuronal activation of the lateral/ventrolateral PAG (l/vlPAG) because bilateral microinjection of muscimol, a GABAA agonist, into the l/vlPAG significantly suppressed the bradycardia. It is noted that muscimol microinjected bilaterally into the dorsolateral PAG had no effect on WNS exposure-elicited bradycardia. Furthermore, retrograde neuronal tracing experiments combined with immunohistochemistry demonstrated that a number of l/vlPAG neurons that send direct projections to the nucleus ambiguus (NA) in the medulla, a major origin of parasympathetic preganglionic neurons to the heart, were activated by WNS exposure. Based on these findings, we propose that the l/vlPAG-NA monosynaptic pathway transmits fear-driven central signals, which elicit bradycardia through parasympathetic outflow.

  17. Opioid receptors in the midbrain periaqueductal gray regulate extinction of pavlovian fear conditioning.

    PubMed

    McNally, Gavan P; Pigg, Michael; Weidemann, Gabrielle

    2004-08-01

    Four experiments studied the role of opioid receptors in the midbrain periaqueductal gray matter (PAG), an important structure eliciting conditioned fear responses, in the extinction of Pavlovian fear. Rats received pairings of an auditory conditioned stimulus (CS) with a foot shock unconditioned stimulus (US). The freezing conditioned response (CR) elicited by the CS was then extinguished via nonreinforced presentations of the CS. Microinjection of the opioid receptor antagonist naloxone into the ventrolateral PAG (vlPAG) before nonrein-forced CS presentations impaired development of extinction, but such microinjections at the end of extinction did not reinstate an already extinguished freezing CR. This role for opioid receptors in fear extinction was specific to the vlPAG because infusions of naloxone into the dorsal PAG did not impair fear extinction. Finally, the impairment of fear extinction produced by vlPAG infusions of naloxone was dose-dependent. These results show for the first time that the midbrain PAG contributes to fear extinction and specifically identify a role for vlPAG opioid receptors in the acquisition but not the expression of such extinction. Taken together with our previous findings, we suggest that, during fear conditioning, activation of vlPAG opioid receptors contributes to detection of the discrepancy between the actual and expected outcome of the conditioning trial. vlPAG opioid receptors regulate the learning that accrues to the CS and other stimuli present on a trial because they instantiate an associative error correction process influencing US information reaching the site of CS-US convergence in the amygdala. During nonreinforcement, this vlPAG opioid receptor contribution signals extinction.

  18. The poplar basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor BEE3 – Like gene affects biomass production by enhancing proliferation of xylem cells in poplar

    SciTech Connect

    Noh, Seol Ah Choi, Young-Im Cho, Jin-Seong Lee, Hyoshin

    2015-06-19

    Brassinosteroids (BRs) play important roles in many aspects of plant growth and development, including regulation of vascular cambium activities and cell elongation. BR-induced BEE3 (brassinosteroid enhanced expression 3) is required for a proper BR response. Here, we identified a poplar (Populus alba × Populus glandulosa) BEE3-like gene, PagBEE3L, encoding a putative basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH)-type transcription factor. Expression of PagBEE3L was induced by brassinolide (BL). Transcripts of PagBEE3L were mainly detected in stems, with the internode having a low level of transcription and the node having a relatively higher level. The function of the PagBEE3L gene was investigated through phenotypic analyses with PagBEE3L-overexpressing (ox) transgenic lines. This work particularly focused on a potential role of PagBEE3L in stem growth and development of polar. The PagBEE3L-ox poplar showed thicker and longer stems than wild-type plants. The xylem cells from the stems of PagBEE3L-ox plants revealed remarkably enhanced proliferation, resulting in an earlier thickening growth than wild-type plants. Therefore, this work suggests that xylem development of poplar is accelerated in PagBEE3L-ox plants and PagBEE3L plays a role in stem growth by increasing the proliferation of xylem cells to promote the initial thickening growth of poplar stems. - Highlights: • We identify the BEE3-like gene form hybrid poplar (Populus alba × Populus glandulosa). • We examine effects of overexpression of PagBEE3L on growth in poplar. • We found that 35S:BEE3L transgenic plants showed more rapid growth than wild-type plants. • BEE3L protein plays an important role in the development of plant stem.

  19. Differential effects of NK1 receptors in the midbrain periaqueductal gray upon defensive rage and predatory attack in the cat.

    PubMed

    Gregg, Thomas R; Siegel, Allan

    2003-12-19

    This study utilized anatomical and behavioral-pharmacological methods to determine the role of NK(1)-Substance P receptors in the midbrain periaqueductal gray (PAG) in defensive rage behavior in cats. For behavioral pharmacological experiments, monopolar stimulating electrodes were implanted in the medial hypothalamus for elicitation of defensive rage behavior and cannula-electrodes were implanted in the PAG for microinjections of receptor compounds. Microinjections of the NMDA antagonist, AP-7 (2 nmol), into the dorsal PAG blocked defensive rage elicited by medial hypothalamic stimulation, thus establishing the PAG as a synaptic region that receives hypothalamic inputs linked to defensive rage behavior. Microinjections of the NK(1) agonist, GR73632, into the same injection sites facilitated defensive rage in a dose-dependent manner, and also induced spontaneous hissing in five cats. The effects of GR73632 were reduced by pretreatment of the PAG with the NK(1) antagonist, GR82334 (16 nmol), microinjected into the same sites. Microinjections of GR73632 (8 nmol) into the PAG also suppressed predatory attack elicited by stimulation of the lateral hypothalamus. Immunohistochemical methods utilized to detect Substance P and Fos immunoreactivity revealed that neurons in the PAG activated after defensive rage-inducing medial hypothalamic stimulation lie in the same region as Substance-P-immunoreactive processes. Fos immunoreactivity was highest in the dorsomedial aspect of the rostral PAG after medial hypothalamic stimulation. Cats that were unstimulated or that exhibited predatory attack after lateral hypothalamic stimulation had low c-fos expression levels in the PAG. Substance P immunoreactivity was high throughout the dorsal PAG. The results indicate that NK(1) receptors in the PAG potentiate defensive rage and suppress predatory aggression in the cat. PMID:14642448

  20. Local retention of antibodies in vivo with an injectable film embedded with a fluorogen-activating protein.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wen; Saunders, Matthew J; Bagia, Christina; Freeman, Eric C; Fan, Yong; Gawalt, Ellen S; Waggoner, Alan S; Meng, Wilson S

    2016-05-28

    Herein we report an injectable film by which antibodies can be localized in vivo. The system builds upon a bifunctional polypeptide consisting of a fluorogen-activating protein (FAP) and a β-fibrillizing peptide (βFP). The FAP domain generates fluorescence that reflects IgG binding sites conferred by Protein A/G (pAG) conjugated with the fluorogen malachite green (MG). A film is generated by mixing these proteins with molar excess of EAK16-II, a βFP that forms β-sheet fibrils at high salt concentrations. The IgG-binding, fluorogenic film can be injected in vivo through conventional needled syringes. Confocal microscopic images and dose-response titration experiments showed that loading of IgG into the film was mediated by pAG(MG) bound to the FAP. Release of IgG in vitro was significantly delayed by the bioaffinity mechanism; 26% of the IgG were released from films embedded with pAG(MG) after five days, compared to close to 90% in films without pAG(MG). Computational simulations indicated that the release rate of IgG is governed by positive cooperativity due to pAG(MG). When injected into the subcutaneous space of mouse footpads, film-embedded IgG were retained locally, with distribution through the lymphatics impeded. The ability to track IgG binding sites and distribution simultaneously will aid the optimization of local antibody delivery systems.

  1. Local retention of antibodies in vivo with an injectable film embedded with a fluorogen-activating protein.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wen; Saunders, Matthew J; Bagia, Christina; Freeman, Eric C; Fan, Yong; Gawalt, Ellen S; Waggoner, Alan S; Meng, Wilson S

    2016-05-28

    Herein we report an injectable film by which antibodies can be localized in vivo. The system builds upon a bifunctional polypeptide consisting of a fluorogen-activating protein (FAP) and a β-fibrillizing peptide (βFP). The FAP domain generates fluorescence that reflects IgG binding sites conferred by Protein A/G (pAG) conjugated with the fluorogen malachite green (MG). A film is generated by mixing these proteins with molar excess of EAK16-II, a βFP that forms β-sheet fibrils at high salt concentrations. The IgG-binding, fluorogenic film can be injected in vivo through conventional needled syringes. Confocal microscopic images and dose-response titration experiments showed that loading of IgG into the film was mediated by pAG(MG) bound to the FAP. Release of IgG in vitro was significantly delayed by the bioaffinity mechanism; 26% of the IgG were released from films embedded with pAG(MG) after five days, compared to close to 90% in films without pAG(MG). Computational simulations indicated that the release rate of IgG is governed by positive cooperativity due to pAG(MG). When injected into the subcutaneous space of mouse footpads, film-embedded IgG were retained locally, with distribution through the lymphatics impeded. The ability to track IgG binding sites and distribution simultaneously will aid the optimization of local antibody delivery systems. PMID:27038493

  2. Common representation of pain and negative emotion in the midbrain periaqueductal gray.

    PubMed

    Buhle, Jason T; Kober, Hedy; Ochsner, Kevin N; Mende-Siedlecki, Peter; Weber, Jochen; Hughes, Brent L; Kross, Ethan; Atlas, Lauren Y; McRae, Kateri; Wager, Tor D

    2013-08-01

    Human neuroimaging offers a powerful way to connect animal and human research on emotion, with profound implications for psychological science. However, the gulf between animal and human studies remains a formidable obstacle: human studies typically focus on the cortex and a few subcortical regions such as the amygdala, whereas deeper structures such as the brainstem periaqueductal gray (PAG) play a key role in animal models. Here, we directly assessed the role of PAG in human affect by interleaving in a single fMRI session two conditions known to elicit strong emotional responses--physical pain and negative image viewing. Negative affect and PAG activity increased in both conditions. We next examined eight independent data sets, half featuring pain stimulation and half negative image viewing. In sum, these data sets comprised 198 additional participants. We found increased activity in PAG in all eight studies. Taken together, these findings suggest PAG is a key component of human affective responses.

  3. Distribution of CB1 Cannabinoid Receptors and Their Relationship with Mu-Opioid Receptors in the Rat Periaqueductal Gray

    PubMed Central

    Wilson-Poe, A.R.; Morgan, M.M.; Aicher, S.A.; Hegarty, D.M.

    2012-01-01

    The periaqueductal gray (PAG) is part of a descending pain modulatory system that, when activated, produces widespread and profound antinociception. Microinjection of either opioids or cannabinoids into the PAG elicits antinociception. Moreover, microinjection of the cannabinoid 1 (CB1) receptor agonist HU-210 into the PAG enhances the antinociceptive effect of subsequent morphine injections, indicating a direct relationship between these two systems. The objective of this study was to characterize the distribution of CB1 receptors in the dorsolateral and ventrolateral PAG in relationship to mu-opioid peptide (MOP) receptors. Immunocytochemical analysis revealed extensive and diffuse CB1 receptor labeling in the PAG, 60% of which was found in somatodendritic profiles. CB1 and MOP receptor immunolabeling were co-localized in 32% of fluorescent Nissl-stained cells that were analyzed. Eight percent (8%) of PAG neurons that were MOP receptor-immunoreactive received CB1 receptor-immunoreactive appositions. Ultrastructural analysis confirmed the presence CB1 receptor-immunoreactive somata, dendrites and axon terminals in the PAG. These results indicate that behavioral interactions between cannabinoids and opioids may be the result of cellular adaptations within PAG neurons co-expressing CB1 and MOP receptors. PMID:22521830

  4. Differential changes of metabolic brain activity and interregional functional coupling in prefronto-limbic pathways during different stress conditions: functional imaging in freely behaving rodent pups.

    PubMed

    Bock, Jörg; Riedel, Anett; Braun, Katharina

    2012-01-01

    The trumpet-tailed rat or degu (Octodon degus) is an established model to investigate the consequences of early stress on the development of emotional brain circuits and behavior. The aim of this study was to identify brain circuits, that respond to different stress conditions and to test if acute stress alters functional coupling of brain activity among prefrontal and limbic regions. Using functional imaging (2-Fluoro-deoxyglucose method) in 8-day-old male degu pups the following stress conditions were compared: (A) pups together with parents and siblings (control), (B) separation of the litter from the parents, (C) individual separation from parents and siblings, and (D) individual separation and presentation of maternal calls. Condition (B) significantly downregulated brain activity in the prefrontal cortex, hippocampus, nucleus accumbens (NAcc), and sensory areas compared to controls. Activity decrease was even more pronounced during condition (C), where, in contrast to all other regions, activity in the PAG was increased. Interestingly, brain activity in stress-associated brain regions such as the amygdala and habenula was not affected. In condition (D) maternal vocalizations "reactivated" brain activity in the cingulate and precentral medial cortex, NAcc, and striatum and in sensory areas. In contrast, reduced activity was measured in the prelimbic and infralimbic cortex (IL) and in the hippocampus and amygdala. Correlation analysis revealed complex, region- and situation-specific changes of interregional functional coupling among prefrontal and limbic brain regions during stress exposure. We show here for the first time that early life stress results in a widespread reduction of brain activity in the infant brain and changes interregional functional coupling. Moreover, maternal vocalizations can partly buffer stress-induced decrease in brain activity in some regions and evoked very different functional coupling patterns compared to the three other conditions.

  5. Dorsolateral and ventral regions of the periaqueductal gray matter are involved in distinct types of fear.

    PubMed

    Vianna, D M; Landeira-Fernandez, J; Brandão, M L

    2001-12-01

    Stepwise increases in the electrical stimulation of the dorsolateral periaqueductal gray (dlPAG) produces alertness, then freezing and finally escape. This paper examines whether this freezing is (i) caused by Pavlovian fear conditioning to the contextual cues present during stimulation and (ii) the result of the stimulation of neurons located inside the dlPAG or elsewhere. To this end, freezing behavior was assessed in rats exposed either to the same or a different environment (context shift test) following the application of either footshocks or stimulation of the dlPAG at the freezing threshold. Rats submitted to footshocks presented freezing to the context 24h later whereas rats submitted to the dlPAG stimulation showed freezing only immediately after the stimulation, regardless of the context. In the second experiment, aversive states generated by activation of the dlPAG were assessed either by measuring the thresholds for freezing and escape responses or the duration of these responses following microinjections of semicarbazide inside the dlPAG. The duration of freezing behavior was also measured in rats submitted to a contextual fear-conditioning paradigm using footshocks as unconditioned stimulus. Lesions of the ventral periaqueductal gray (vPAG) disrupted conditioned freezing to contextual cues associated to footshocks but vPAG lesions did not change the threshold of either freezing or escape responses elicited by electrical stimulation of the dlPAG. Lesions of the vPAG did not change the amount of freezing or escape responses produced by microinjections of semicarbazide into the dlPAG. These results indicate that stimulation of dlPAG neurons produce freezing behavior independent of any contextual fear conditioning and add to previously reported evidence showing that the vPAG is a critical structure for the expression of conditioned fear. In contrast, the neural substrate of unconditioned dlPAG stimulation-induced freezing is likely to elaborate

  6. The poplar basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor BEE3 - Like gene affects biomass production by enhancing proliferation of xylem cells in poplar.

    PubMed

    Noh, Seol Ah; Choi, Young-Im; Cho, Jin-Seong; Lee, Hyoshin

    2015-06-19

    Brassinosteroids (BRs) play important roles in many aspects of plant growth and development, including regulation of vascular cambium activities and cell elongation. BR-induced BEE3 (brassinosteroid enhanced expression 3) is required for a proper BR response. Here, we identified a poplar (Populus alba × Populus glandulosa) BEE3-like gene, PagBEE3L, encoding a putative basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH)-type transcription factor. Expression of PagBEE3L was induced by brassinolide (BL). Transcripts of PagBEE3L were mainly detected in stems, with the internode having a low level of transcription and the node having a relatively higher level. The function of the PagBEE3L gene was investigated through phenotypic analyses with PagBEE3L-overexpressing (ox) transgenic lines. This work particularly focused on a potential role of PagBEE3L in stem growth and development of polar. The PagBEE3L-ox poplar showed thicker and longer stems than wild-type plants. The xylem cells from the stems of PagBEE3L-ox plants revealed remarkably enhanced proliferation, resulting in an earlier thickening growth than wild-type plants. Therefore, this work suggests that xylem development of poplar is accelerated in PagBEE3L-ox plants and PagBEE3L plays a role in stem growth by increasing the proliferation of xylem cells to promote the initial thickening growth of poplar stems.

  7. The protective effects of endogenous hydrogen sulfide modulator, S-propargyl-cysteine, on high glucose-induced apoptosis in cardiomyocytes: A novel mechanism mediated by the activation of Nrf2.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hebei; Mao, Yicheng; Tan, Bo; Luo, Shanshan; Zhu, Yizhun

    2015-08-15

    S-propargyl-cysteine (SPRC) is a novel synthetic molecule exerting antioxidant effects via elevating generation of endogenous H2S. Our study aimed to elucidate possible antioxidant mechanisms of SPRC in hyperglycemia-induced oxidative stress. H9C2 cells were treated with SPRC or NaHS at the indicated concentration before being treated with high glucose for 48h. Follow-up experiments were based on detailed description given in Section 2. SD rats were injected with Streptozocin (STZ) to induce diabetes as previously reported. Diabetic rats were administrated with SPRC, NaHS or solution respectively for one week before the rats were killed for follow-up experiments. Our work found that SPRC remarkably attenuated high glucose induced generation of reactive oxygen species and apoptosis in H9C2 cells. SPRC increased stability and nuclear translocation of Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), up-regulated expression of antioxidant enzyme superoxide dismutase (SOD) and interfered with the interaction between Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1 (KEAP1) and Nrf2. SPRC activated Nrf2 via Cystathionase-γ-lyase (CSE) and Akt pathway. CSE inhibitor PAG and Akt inhibitor LY294002 could reverse the protective effects of SPRC. Knockdown of Nrf2 by shRNA also blocked SPRC up-regulated expression of CSE. Similar results of protein expression and hypoglycemic activity of SPRC were observed in STZ induced diabetic rats.

  8. Neural substrates underlying fear-evoked freezing: the periaqueductal grey-cerebellar link.

    PubMed

    Koutsikou, Stella; Crook, Jonathan J; Earl, Emma V; Leith, J Lianne; Watson, Thomas C; Lumb, Bridget M; Apps, Richard

    2014-05-15

    The central neural pathways involved in fear-evoked behaviour are highly conserved across mammalian species, and there is a consensus that understanding them is a fundamental step towards developing effective treatments for emotional disorders in man. The ventrolateral periaqueductal grey (vlPAG) has a well-established role in fear-evoked freezing behaviour. The neural pathways underlying autonomic and sensory consequences of vlPAG activation in fearful situations are well understood, but much less is known about the pathways that link vlPAG activity to distinct fear-evoked motor patterns essential for survival. In adult rats, we have identified a pathway linking the vlPAG to cerebellar cortex, which terminates as climbing fibres in lateral vermal lobule VIII (pyramis). Lesion of pyramis input-output pathways disrupted innate and fear-conditioned freezing behaviour. The disruption in freezing behaviour was strongly correlated to the reduction in the vlPAG-induced facilitation of α-motoneurone excitability observed after lesions of the pyramis. The increased excitability of α-motoneurones during vlPAG activation may therefore drive the increase in muscle tone that underlies expression of freezing behaviour. By identifying the cerebellar pyramis as a critical component of the neural network subserving emotionally related freezing behaviour, the present study identifies novel neural pathways that link the PAG to fear-evoked motor responses. PMID:24639484

  9. Inhibition of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium lipopolysaccharide deacylation by aminoarabinose membrane modification.

    PubMed

    Kawasaki, Kiyoshi; Ernst, Robert K; Miller, Samuel I

    2005-04-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium remodels the lipid A component of lipopolysaccharide, a major component of the outer membrane, to survive within animals. The activation of the sensor kinase PhoQ in host environments increases the synthesis of enzymes that deacylate, palmitoylate, hydroxylate, and attach aminoarabinose to lipid A, also known as endotoxin. These modifications promote bacterial resistance to antimicrobial peptides and reduce the host recognition of lipid A by Toll-like receptor 4. The Salmonella lipid A 3-O-deacylase, PagL, is an outer membrane protein whose expression is regulated by PhoQ. In S. enterica serovar Typhimurium strains that had the ability to add aminoarabinose to lipid A, 3-O-deacylated lipid A species were not detected, despite the PhoQ induction of PagL protein expression. In contrast, strains defective for the aminoarabinose modification of lipid A demonstrated in vivo PagL activity, indicating that this membrane modification inhibited PagL's enzymatic activity. Since not all lipid A molecules are modified with aminoarabinose upon PhoQ activation, these results cannot be ascribed to the substrate specificity of PagL. PagL-dependent deacylation was detected in sonically disrupted membranes and membranes treated with the nonionic detergent n-octyl-beta-d-glucopyranoside, suggesting that perturbation of the intact outer membrane releases PagL from posttranslational inhibition by aminoarabinose-containing membranes. Taken together, these results suggest that PagL enzymatic deacylation is posttranslationally inhibited by membrane environments, which either sequester PagL from its substrate or alter its conformation.

  10. Active-R filter

    DOEpatents

    Soderstrand, Michael A.

    1976-01-01

    An operational amplifier-type active filter in which the only capacitor in the circuit is the compensating capacitance of the operational amplifiers, the various feedback and coupling elements being essentially solely resistive.

  11. Additive chemistry and distributions in NTD photoresist thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thackeray, James; Hong, Chang-Young; Clark, Michael B.

    2016-03-01

    The lithographic performance of photoresists is a function of the vertical distribution of formulation components, such as photoacid generator (PAG) molecules, in photoresist thin films and how these components undergo chemical modification and migrate within the film during the lithography processing steps. This paper will discuss how GCIB-SIMS depth profiles were used to monitor the PAG and quencher base distributions before and after exposure and post-exposure bake processing steps for different PAG/photoresist formulations. The authors show that the use of surface active quencher in an NTD photoresist leads to better resist profiles, superior DOF and better OPC performance.

  12. Flagella-independent surface motility in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Park, Sun-Yang; Pontes, Mauricio H; Groisman, Eduardo A

    2015-02-10

    Flagella are multiprotein complexes necessary for swimming and swarming motility. In Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, flagella-mediated motility is repressed by the PhoP/PhoQ regulatory system. We now report that Salmonella can move on 0.3% agarose media in a flagella-independent manner when experiencing the PhoP/PhoQ-inducing signal low Mg(2+). This motility requires the PhoP-activated mgtA, mgtC, and pagM genes, which specify a Mg(2+) transporter, an inhibitor of Salmonella's own F1Fo ATPase, and a small protein of unknown function, respectively. The MgtA and MgtC proteins are necessary for pagM expression because pagM mRNA levels were lower in mgtA and mgtC mutants than in wild-type Salmonella, and also because pagM expression from a heterologous promoter rescued motility in mgtA and mgtC mutants. PagM promotes group motility by a surface protein(s), as a pagM-expressing strain conferred motility upon a pagM null mutant, and proteinase K treatment eliminated motility. The pagM gene is rarely found outside subspecies I of S. enterica and often present in nonfunctional allelic forms in organisms lacking the identified motility. Deletion of the pagM gene reduced bacterial replication on 0.3% agarose low Mg(2+) media but not in low Mg(2+) liquid media. Our findings define a form of motility that allows Salmonella to scavenge nutrients and to escape toxic compounds in low Mg(2+) semisolid environments. PMID:25624475

  13. Stimulation of the dorsal periaqueductal gray enhances spontaneous recovery of a conditioned taste aversion

    PubMed Central

    Mickley, G. Andrew; Ketchesin, Kyle D.; Ramos, Linnet; Luchsinger, Joseph R.; Rogers, Morgan M.; Wiles, Nathanael R.; Hoxha, Nita

    2012-01-01

    Due to its relevance to clinical practice, extinction of learned fears has been a major focus of recent research. However, less is known about the means by which conditioned fears re-emerge (i.e., spontaneously recover) as time passes or contexts change following extinction. The periaqueductal gray represents the final common pathway mediating defensive reactions to fear and we have reported previously that the dorsolateral PAG (dlPAG) exhibits a small but reliable increase in neural activity (as measured by c-fos protein immunoreactivity) when spontaneous recovery (SR) of a conditioned taste aversion (CTA) is reduced. Here we extend these correlational studies to determine if inducing dlPAG c-fos expression through electrical brain stimulation could cause a reduction in SR of a CTA. Male Sprague-Dawley rats acquired a strong aversion to saccharin (conditioned stimulus; CS) and then underwent CTA extinction through multiple non-reinforced exposures to the CS. Following a 30-day latency period after asymptotic extinction was achieved; rats either received stimulation of the dorsal PAG (dPAG) or stimulation of closely adjacent structures. Sixty minutes following the stimulation, rats were again presented with the saccharin solution as we tested for SR of the CTA. The brain stimulation evoked c-fos expression around the tip of the electrodes. However, stimulation of the dPAG failed to reduce SR of the previously extinguished CTA. In fact, dPAG stimulation caused rats to significantly suppress their saccharin drinking (relative to controls) – indicating an enhanced SR. These data refute a cause-and-effect relationship between enhanced dPAG c-fos expression and a reduction in SR. However, they highlight a role for the dPAG in modulating SR of extinguished CTAs. PMID:23183042

  14. Identification of phenylpropanoids in fig (Ficus carica L.) leaves.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Toru; Okiura, Aya; Saito, Keita; Kohno, Masahiro

    2014-10-15

    In this study, the phenylpropanoid composition and antioxidant activity of identified components in fig (Ficus carica L.) leaves were examined. Known polyphenols rutin, isoschaftoside, isoquercetin, and chlorogenic acid were identified. Furthermore, caffeoylmalic acid (CMA) was the most abundant polyphenol and was identified for the first time. CMA exhibited antioxidant activity similar to that of vitamin C or catechin. Psoralen and bergapten were identified as known furanocoumarins, with psoralen being the most abundant. Moreover, psoralic acid glucoside (PAG) was identified for the first time. As a precursor of psoralen, PAG content was equivalent to the psoralen content in moles. Notably, the content of these compounds varied between the five fig varieties, and the furanocoumarin and PAG contents varied more than that of the polyphenols. Further investigations concerning the influence of CMA and PAG on human health are necessary to elucidate functionalities of fig leaves.

  15. Immunological characteristics of the glycolipid antigen of Leptospira interrogans serovar lai.

    PubMed Central

    Masuzawa, T; Nakamura, R; Shimizu, T; Iwamoto, Y; Morita, T; Yanagihara, Y

    1989-01-01

    The protective antigen (PAg), a glycolipid substance, was extracted from Leptospira interrogans serovar lai strain 017 with a chloroform-methanol-water (1:2:0.8 [vol/vol/vol]) solution and partially purified by silica gel column chromatography. The PAg was not detected by Coomassie brilliant blue staining in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis but was observed as a smearlike band, which corresponded to a 24- to 30-kilodalton standard protein, by silver staining. The outer envelope (OE) fraction showed the same band, suggesting that the PAg was one of the chemical components of the OE. The immunogenicity and protective activity of the PAg were compared with those of the OE. The PAg as well as the OE and whole cells was able to induce agglutinating antibody against L. interrogans. Furthermore, the immune sera exhibited opsonic activity against L. interrogans, as observed by measurement of chemical luminescence derived from reactive oxygen. The PAg exhibited protective activity in hamsters challenged with lethal doses of L. interrogans. Therefore, the antigen may be useful as a component vaccine against leptospiral infection. Images PMID:2744857

  16. Cortical spreading depression decreases Fos expression in rat periaqueductal gray matter.

    PubMed

    Borysovych Bogdanov, Volodymyr; Bogdanova, Olena Viktorivna; Lombard, Arnaud; Chauvel, Virginie; Multon, Sylvie; Kot, Larysa Ivanivna; Makarchuk, Mykola Yukhymovych; Schoenen, Jean

    2015-01-12

    The migraine headache involves activation and central sensitization of the trigeminovascular pain pathway. The migraine aura is likely due to cortical spreading depression (CSD), a propagating wave of brief neuronal depolarization followed by prolonged inhibition. The precise link between CSD and headache remains controversial. Our objectives were to study the effect of CSD on neuronal activation in the periaqueductal grey matter (PAG), an area known to control pain and autonomic functions, and to be involved in migraine pathogenesis. Fos-immunoreactive nuclei were counted in rostral PAG and Edinger-Westphal nuclei (PAG-EWn bregma -6.5 mm), and caudal PAG (bregma -8 mm) of 17 adult male Sprague-Dawley rats after KCl-induced CSD under chloral hydrate anesthesia. Being part of a pharmacological study, six animals had received, for the preceding 4 weeks daily, intraperitoneal injections of lamotrigine (15 mg/kg), six others had been treated with saline, while five sham-operated animals served as controls. We found that the number of Fos-immunoreactive nuclei in the PAG decreased after CSD provocation. There was no difference between lamotrigine- and saline-treated animals. The number of CSDs correlated negatively with Fos-immunoreactive counts. CSD-linked inhibition of neuronal activity in the PAG might play a role in central sensitization during migraine attacks and contribute to a better understanding of the link between the aura and the headache.

  17. Impairment of adenylyl cyclase-mediated glutamatergic synaptic plasticity in the periaqueductal grey in a rat model of neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Yu-Cheng; Cheng, Jen-Kun; Chiou, Lih-Chu

    2015-01-01

    Key points Long-lasting neuropathic pain has been attributed to elevated neuronal plasticity changes in spinal, peripheral and cortical levels. Here, we found that reduced neuronal plasticity in the ventrolateral periaqueductal grey (vlPAG), a midbrain region important for initiating descending pain inhibition, may also contribute to neuropathic pain. Forskolin- and isoproterenol (isoprenaline)-elicited EPSC potentiation was impaired in the vlPAG of a rat model of neuropathic pain induced by spinal nerve injury. Down-regulation of adenylyl cyclase–cAMP– PKA signalling, due to impaired adenylyl cyclase, but not phosphodiesterase, in glutamatergic terminals may contribute to the hypofunction of excitatory synaptic plasticity in the vlPAG of neuropathic rats and the subsequent descending pain inhibition, ultimately leading to long-lasting neuropathic pain. Our results suggest that drugs that activate adenylyl cyclase in the vlPAG have the potential for relieving neuropathic pain. Abstract Neuropathic pain has been attributed to nerve injury-induced elevation of peripheral neuronal discharges and spinal excitatory synaptic plasticity while little is known about the contribution of neuroplasticity changes in the brainstem. Here, we examined synaptic plasticity changes in the ventrolateral (vl) periaqueductal grey (PAG), a crucial midbrain region for initiating descending pain inhibition, in spinal nerve ligation (SNL)-induced neuropathic rats. In vlPAG slices of sham-operated rats, forskolin, an adenylyl cyclase (AC) activator, produced long-lasting enhancement of EPSCs. This is a presynaptic effect since forskolin decreased the paired-pulse ratio and failure rate of EPSCs, and increased the frequency, but not the amplitude, of miniature EPSCs. Forskolin-induced EPSC potentiation was mimicked by a β-adrenergic agonist (isoproterenol (isoprenaline)), and prevented by an AC inhibitor (SQ 22536) and a cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) inhibitor (H89), but not by a

  18. Active turbulence in active nematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thampi, S. P.; Yeomans, J. M.

    2016-07-01

    Dense, active systems show active turbulence, a state characterised by flow fields that are chaotic, with continually changing velocity jets and swirls. Here we review our current understanding of active turbulence. The development is primarily based on the theory and simulations of active liquid crystals, but with accompanying summaries of related literature.

  19. Membrane-associated signaling in human B-lymphoma lines

    SciTech Connect

    Tauzin, Sebastien; Ding, Heidrun; Burdevet, Dimitri; Borisch, Bettina; Hoessli, Daniel C.

    2011-01-15

    In B-non-Hodgkin lymphomas, Lyn and Cbp/PAG constitute the core of an oncogenic signalosome that captures the Phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase, the Spleen tyrosine kinase and the Signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 to generate pro-survival and proliferative signals. Lymphoma lines corresponding to follicular, mantle-cell and Burkitt-derived lymphomas display type-specific signalosome organizations that differentially activate PI3K, Syk and STAT3. In the follicular lymphoma line, PI3K, Syk and STAT3 were optimally activated upon association with the Lyn-Cbp/PAG signalosome, while in the Burkitt lymphoma-derived line, the association with Cbp/PAG and activation of PI3K were interfered with by the latent membrane proteins encoded by the Epstein-Barr virus. In the Jeko-1 mantle-cell line, a weak association of Syk with the Lyn-Cbp/PAG signalosome resulted in poor activation of Syk, but in those cells, as in the follicular and Burkitt-derived lines, efficient apoptosis induction by the Syk inhibitor R406 indicated that Syk is nonetheless an important prosurvival element and therefore a valuable therapeutic target. In all configurations described herein is the Lyn-Cbp/PAG signalosome independent of external signals and provides efficient means of activation for its associated lipid and protein kinases. In follicular and Burkitt-derived lines, Syk appears to be activated following binding to Cbp/PAG and no longer requires B-cell receptor-associated activation motifs for activation. Assessment of the different modalities of Lyn-Cbp/PAG signalosome organization could help in selecting the appropriate combination of kinase inhibitors to eliminate a particular type of lymphoma cells.

  20. Activity Scale.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerpelman, Larry C.; Weiner, Michael J.

    This twenty-four item scale assesses students' actual and desired political-social activism in terms of physical participation, communication activities, and information-gathering activities. About ten minutes are required to complete the instrument. The scale is divided into two subscales. The first twelve items (ACT-A) question respondents on…

  1. Proteasome Activators

    PubMed Central

    Stadtmueller, Beth M.; Hill, Christopher P.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Proteasomes degrade a multitude of protein substrates in the cytosol and nucleus, and thereby are essential for many aspects of cellular function. Because the proteolytic sites are sequestered in a closed barrel-shaped structure, activators are required to facilitate substrate access. Structural and biochemical studies of two activator families, 11S and Blm10, have provided insights to proteasome activation mechanisms, although the biological functions of these factors remain obscure. Recent advances have improved our understanding of the third activator family, including the 19S activator, which targets polyubiquitylated proteins for degradation. PMID:21211719

  2. Active ratchets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelani, L.; Costanzo, A.; Di Leonardo, R.

    2011-12-01

    We analyze self-propelling organisms, or active particles, in a periodic asymmetric potential. Unlike standard ratchet effect for Brownian particles requiring external forcing, in the case of active particles asymmetric potential alone produces a net drift speed (active ratchet effect). By using theoretical models and numerical simulations we demonstrate the emergence of the rectification process in the presence of an asymmetric piecewise periodic potential. The broken spatial symmetry (external potential) and time symmetry (active particles) are sufficient ingredients to sustain unidirectional transport. Our findings open the way to new mechanisms to move in directional manner motile organisms by using external periodic static fields.

  3. Periaqueductal Grey EP3 Receptors Facilitate Spinal Nociception in Arthritic Secondary Hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Drake, R.A.R.; Leith, J.L.; Almahasneh, F.; Martindale, J.; Wilson, A.W.; Lumb, B.

    2016-01-01

    Descending controls on spinal nociceptive processing play a pivotal role in shaping the pain experience after tissue injury. Secondary hypersensitivity develops within undamaged tissue adjacent and distant to damaged sites. Spinal neuronal pools innervating regions of secondary hypersensitivity are dominated by descending facilitation that amplifies spinal inputs from unsensitized peripheral nociceptors. Cyclooxygenase–prostaglandin (PG) E2 signaling within the ventrolateral periaqueductal gray (vlPAG) is pronociceptive in naive and acutely inflamed animals, but its contributions in more prolonged inflammation and, importantly, secondary hypersensitivity remain unknown. In naive rats, PG EP3 receptor (EP3R) antagonism in vlPAG modulated noxious withdrawal reflex (EMG) thresholds to preferential C-nociceptor, but not A-nociceptor, activation and raised thermal withdrawal thresholds in awake animals. In rats with inflammatory arthritis, secondary mechanical and thermal hypersensitivity of the hindpaw developed and was associated with spinal sensitization to A-nociceptor inputs alone. In arthritic rats, blockade of vlPAG EP3R raised EMG thresholds to C-nociceptor activation in the area of secondary hypersensitivity to a degree equivalent to that evoked by the same manipulation in naive rats. Importantly, vlPAG EP3R blockade also affected responses to A-nociceptor activation, but only in arthritic animals. We conclude that vlPAG EP3R activity exerts an equivalent facilitation on the spinal processing of C-nociceptor inputs in naive and arthritic animals, but gains in effects on spinal A-nociceptor processing from a region of secondary hypersensitivity. Therefore, the spinal sensitization to A-nociceptor inputs associated with secondary hypersensitivity is likely to be at least partly dependent on descending prostanergic facilitation from the vlPAG. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT After tissue damage, sensitivity to painful stimulation develops in undamaged areas (secondary

  4. Activation of 5-HT(2C) receptors in the dorsal periaqueductal gray increases antinociception in mice exposed to the elevated plus-maze.

    PubMed

    Baptista, Daniela; Nunes-de-Souza, Ricardo Luiz; Canto-de-Souza, Azair

    2012-11-01

    Several findings have pointed to the role of the dorsal periaqueductal gray (dPAG) serotonin 5-HT(1A) and 5-HT(2A-C) receptor subtypes in the modulation of defensive behavior in animals exposed to the elevated plus-maze (EPM). Besides displaying anxiety-like behavior, rodents also exhibit antinociception in the EPM. This study investigated the effects of intra-dPAG injections of 5-HT(1A) and 5-HT(2B/2C) receptor ligands on EPM-induced antinociception in mice. Male Swiss mice received 0.1 μl intra-dPAG injections of vehicle, 5.6 and 10 nmol of 8-OHDPAT, a 5-HT(1A) receptor agonist (Experiment 1), or 0.01, 0.03 and 0.1 nmol of mCPP, a 5-HT(2B/2C) receptor agonist (Experiment 2). Five minutes later, each mouse received an intraperitoneal injection of 0.6% acetic acid (0.1 ml/10 g body weight; nociceptive stimulus) and was individually confined in the open (OA) or enclosed (EA) arms of the EPM for 5 min, during which the number of abdominal writhes induced by the acetic acid was recorded. While intra-dPAG injection of 8-OHDPAT did not change open-arm antinociception (OAA), mCPP (0.01 nmol) enhanced it. Combined injections of ketanserin (10 nmol/0.1 μl), a 5-HT(2A/2C) receptor antagonist, and 0.01 nmol of mCPP (Experiment 3), selectively and completely blocked the OAA enhancement induced by mCPP. Although intra-dPAG injection of mCPP (0.01 nmol) also produced antinociception in EA-confined mice (Experiment 2), this effect was not confirmed in Experiment 3. Moreover, no other compound changed the nociceptive response in EA-confined animals. These results suggest that the 5-HT(2C) receptors located within the PAG play a role in this type of environmentally induced pain inhibition in mice.

  5. Mu Opioid Receptor Modulation of Dopamine Neurons in the Periaqueductal Gray/Dorsal Raphe: A Role in Regulation of Pain.

    PubMed

    Li, Chia; Sugam, Jonathan A; Lowery-Gionta, Emily G; McElligott, Zoe A; McCall, Nora M; Lopez, Alberto J; McKlveen, Jessica M; Pleil, Kristen E; Kash, Thomas L

    2016-07-01

    The periaqueductal gray (PAG) is a brain region involved in nociception modulation, and an important relay center for the descending nociceptive pathway through the rostral ventral lateral medulla. Given the dense expression of mu opioid receptors and the role of dopamine in pain, the recently characterized dopamine neurons in the ventral PAG (vPAG)/dorsal raphe (DR) region are a potentially critical site for the antinociceptive actions of opioids. The objectives of this study were to (1) evaluate synaptic modulation of the vPAG/DR dopamine neurons by mu opioid receptors and to (2) dissect the anatomy and neurochemistry of these neurons, in order to assess the downstream loci and functions of their activation. Using a mouse line that expresses eGFP under control of the tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) promoter, we found that mu opioid receptor activation led to a decrease in inhibitory inputs onto the vPAG/DR dopamine neurons. Furthermore, combining immunohistochemistry, optogenetics, electrophysiology, and fast-scan cyclic voltammetry in a TH-cre mouse line, we demonstrated that these neurons also express the vesicular glutamate type 2 transporter and co-release dopamine and glutamate in a major downstream projection structure-the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis. Finally, activation of TH-positive neurons in the vPAG/DR using Gq designer receptors exclusively activated by designer drugs displayed a supraspinal, but not spinal, antinociceptive effect. These results indicate that vPAG/DR dopamine neurons likely play a key role in opiate antinociception, potentially via the activation of downstream structures through dopamine and glutamate release.

  6. Astronomy Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenstone, Sid

    This document consists of activities and references for teaching astronomy. The activities (which include objectives, list of materials needed, and procedures) focus on: observing the Big Dipper and locating the North Star; examining the Big Dipper's stars; making and using an astrolabe; examining retograde motion of Mars; measuring the Sun's…

  7. Faculty Activism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Academe, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Blending scholarship and activism, whether domestic or international, takes some real work. Two scholar-activists reflect on why and how activism can be more than academic labor in this feature of the "Academe" journal. This feature includes the following brief reflections on political work, both local and global that demonstrates how on campus…

  8. Catalyst activator

    DOEpatents

    McAdon, Mark H.; Nickias, Peter N.; Marks, Tobin J.; Schwartz, David J.

    2001-01-01

    A catalyst activator particularly adapted for use in the activation of metal complexes of metals of Group 3-10 for polymerization of ethylenically unsaturated polymerizable monomers, especially olefins, comprising two Group 13 metal or metalloid atoms and a ligand structure including at least one bridging group connecting ligands on the two Group 13 metal or metalloid atoms.

  9. Outdoor Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minneapolis Independent School District 275, Minn.

    Twenty-four activities suitable for outdoor use by elementary school children are outlined. Activities designed to make children aware of their environment include soil painting, burr collecting, insect and pond water collecting, studies of insect galls and field mice, succession studies, and a model of natural selection using dyed toothpicks. A…

  10. Periaqueductal gray μ and κ opioid receptors determine behavioral selection from maternal to predatory behavior in lactating rats.

    PubMed

    Klein, Marianne Orlandini; Cruz, Aline de Mello; Machado, Franciele Corrêa; Picolo, Gisele; Canteras, Newton Sabino; Felicio, Luciano Freitas

    2014-11-01

    Every mother must optimize her time between caring for her young and her subsistence. The rostro lateral portion of the periaqueductal grey (rlPAG) is a critical site that modulates the switch between maternal and predatory behavior. Opioids play multiple roles in both maternal behavior and this switching process. The present study used a pharmacological approach to evaluate the functional role of rlPAG μ and κ opioid receptors in behavioral selection. Rat dams were implanted with a guide cannula in the rlPAG and divided into three experiments in which we tested the role of opioid agonists (Experiment 1), the influence of μ and κ opioid receptor blockade in the presence of morphine (Experiment 2), and the influence of μ and κ opioid receptor blockade (Experiment 3). After behavioral test, in Experiment 4, we evaluated rlPAG μ and κ receptor activation in all Experiments 1-3. The results showed that massive opioidergic activation induced by morphine in the rlPAG inhibited maternal behavior without interfering with predatory hunting. No behavioral changes and no receptor activation were promoted by the specific agonist alone. However, κ receptor blockade increased hunting behavior and increased the level of μ receptor activation in the rlPAG. Thus, endogenous opioidergic tone might be modulated by a functional interaction between opioid receptor subtypes. Such a compensatory receptor interaction appears to be relevant for behavioral selection among motivated behaviors. These findings indicate a role for multiple opioid receptor interactions in the modulation of behavioral selection between maternal and predatory behaviors in the PAG.

  11. Activation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Alfassi, Z.B. . Dept. of Nuclear Engineering)

    1990-01-01

    This volume contains 16 chapters on the application of activation analysis in the fields of life sciences, biological materials, coal and its effluents, environmental samples, archaeology, material science, and forensics. Each chapter is processed separately for the data base.

  12. Integrin activation

    PubMed Central

    Ginsberg, Mark H.

    2014-01-01

    Integrin-mediated cell adhesion is important for development, immune responses, hemostasis and wound healing. Integrins also function as signal transducing receptors that can control intracellular pathways that regulate cell survival, proliferation, and cell fate. Conversely, cells can modulate the affinity of integrins for their ligands a process operationally defined as integrin activation. Analysis of activation of integrins has now provided a detailed molecular understanding of this unique form of “inside-out” signal transduction and revealed new paradigms of how transmembrane domains (TMD) can transmit long range allosteric changes in transmembrane proteins. Here, we will review how talin and mediates integrin activation and how the integrin TMD can transmit these inside out signals. [BMB Reports 2014; 47(12): 655-659] PMID:25388208

  13. Active Cytokinins

    PubMed Central

    Mornet, René; Theiler, Jane B.; Leonard, Nelson J.; Schmitz, Ruth Y.; Moore, F. Hardy; Skoog, Folke

    1979-01-01

    Four series of azidopurines have been synthesized and tested for cytokinin activity in the tobacco callus bioassay: 2- and 8-azido-N6-benzyladenines, -N6-(Δ2-isopentenyl)adenines, and -zeatins, and N6-(2- and 4-azidobenzyl)adenines. The compounds having 2-azido substitution on the adenine ring are as active as the corresponding parent compounds, while those with 8-azido substitution are about 10 or more times as active. The 8-azidozeatin, which is the most active cytokinin observed, exhibited higher than minimal detectable activity at 1.2 × 10−5 micromolar, the lowest concentration tested. The shape of the growth curve indicates that even a concentration as low as 5 × 10−6 micromolar would probably be effective. By comparison, the lowest active concentration ever reported for zeatin has been 5 × 10−5 micromolar, representing a sensitivity rarely attained. All of the azido compounds have been submitted to photolysis in aqueous ethanol, and the photoproducts have been detected and identified by low and high resolution mass spectrometry. They are rationalized as products of abstraction and insertion reactions of the intermediate nitrenes. The potential of the major released products as cytokinins was also assessed by bioassay. 2-Azido-N6-(Δ2-isopentenyl)adenine competed with [14C]kinetin for the cytokinin-binding protein isolated from wheat germ. When the azido compound was photolysed in the presence of this protein, its attachment effectively blocked the binding of [14C]kinetin. PMID:16661017

  14. Excitatory Amino Acid Receptors Mediate Asymmetry and Lateralization in the Descending Cardiovascular Pathways from the Dorsomedial Hypothalamus

    PubMed Central

    Xavier, Carlos Henrique; Ianzer, Danielle; Lima, Augusto Martins; Marins, Fernanda Ribeiro; Pedrino, Gustavo Rodrigues; Vaz, Gisele; Menezes, Gustavo Batista; Nalivaiko, Eugene; Fontes, Marco Antônio Peliky

    2014-01-01

    The dorsomedial hypothalamus (DMH) and lateral/dorsolateral periaqueductal gray (PAG) are anatomically and functionally connected. Both the DMH and PAG depend on glutamatergic inputs for activation. We recently reported that removal of GABA-ergic tone in the unilateral DMH produces: asymmetry, that is, a right- (R-) sided predominance in cardiac chronotropism, and lateralization, that is, a greater increase in ipsilateral renal sympathetic activity (RSNA). In the current study, we investigated whether excitatory amino acid (EAA) receptors in the DMH–PAG pathway contribute to the functional interhemispheric difference. In urethane (1.2 to 1.4 g/kg, i.p.) anesthetized rats, we observed that: (i) nanoinjections of N-methyl D-aspartate (NMDA 100 pmol/100 nl) into the unilateral DMH produced the same right-sided predominance in the control of cardiac chronotropy, (ii) nanoinjections of NMDA into the ipsilateral DMH or PAG evoked lateralized RSNA responses, and (iii) blockade of EAA receptors in the unilateral DMH attenuated the cardiovascular responses evoked by injection of NMDA into either the R- or left- (L-) PAG. In awake rats, nanoinjection of kynurenic acid (1 nmol/100 nL) into the L-DMH or R- or L-PAG attenuated the tachycardia evoked by air stress. However, the magnitude of stress-evoked tachycardia was smallest when the EAA receptors of the R-DMH were blocked. We conclude that EAA receptors contribute to the right-sided predominance in cardiac chronotropism. This interhemispheric difference that involves EAA receptors was observed in the DMH but not in the PAG. PMID:25397884

  15. Active microwaves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, D.; Vidal-Madjar, D.

    1994-01-01

    Research on the use of active microwaves in remote sensing, presented during plenary and poster sessions, is summarized. The main highlights are: calibration techniques are well understood; innovative modeling approaches have been developed which increase active microwave applications (segmentation prior to model inversion, use of ERS-1 scatterometer, simulations); polarization angle and frequency diversity improves characterization of ice sheets, vegetation, and determination of soil moisture (X band sensor study); SAR (Synthetic Aperture Radar) interferometry potential is emerging; use of multiple sensors/extended spectral signatures is important (increase emphasis).

  16. Activity report

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, S W

    2008-08-11

    This report is aimed to show the author's activities to support the LDRD. The title is 'Investigation of the Double-C Behavior in the Pu-Ga Time-Temperature-Transformation Diagram' The sections are: (1) Sample Holder Test; (2) Calculation of x-ray diffraction patterns; (3) Literature search and preparing publications; (4) Tasks Required for APS Experiments; and (5) Communications.

  17. Classroom Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stuart, Frances R.

    This pamphlet suggests activities that may be used in the elementary school classroom. Chapter I lists various short plays that children can easily perform which encourage their imagination. Chapter II details a few quiet classroom games such as "I Saw,""Corral the Wild Horse,""Who Has Gone from the Room," and "Six-Man-Football Checkers." A number…

  18. Learning Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tipton, Tom, Ed.

    1983-01-01

    Presents a flow chart for naming inorganic compounds. Although it is not necessary for students to memorize rules, preliminary skills needed before using the chart are outlined. Also presents an activity in which the mass of an imaginary atom is determined using lead shot, Petri dishes, and a platform balance. (JN)

  19. Leaf Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mingie, Walter

    Leaf activities can provide a means of using basic concepts of outdoor education to learn in elementary level subject areas. Equipment needed includes leaves, a clipboard with paper, and a pencil. A bag of leaves may be brought into the classroom if weather conditions or time do not permit going outdoors. Each student should pick a leaf, examine…

  20. Get Active

    MedlinePlus

    ... Lifting small weights – you can even use bottled water or cans of food as weights Watch these videos for muscle strengthening exercises to do at home or at the gym. If you do muscle-strengthening activities with weights, check out the do’s and don’ ...

  1. Activated Sludge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saunders, F. Michael

    1978-01-01

    Presents the 1978 literature review of wastewater treatment. This review covers: (1) activated sludge process; (2) process control; (3) oxygen uptake and transfer; (4) phosphorus removal; (5) nitrification; (6) industrial wastewater; and (7) aerobic digestion. A list of 136 references is also presented. (HM)

  2. Integrity of the dorsolateral periaqueductal grey is essential for the fight-or-flight response, but not the respiratory component of a defense reaction.

    PubMed

    Bondarenko, E; Guimarães, D D; Braga, V A; Nalivaiko, E

    2016-06-01

    Periaqueductal grey is believed to be one of the key structures of the central respiratory stress network. Previous studies established that stimulation of the periaqueductal grey, especially its dorsolateral division (dlPAG), evokes tachypnea as well as increases in other autonomic parameters and motor activity. We investigated the effects of blockade of the dlPAG with GABAA agonist muscimol on respiration during stress and presentation of brief alerting stimuli in conscious unrestrained rats. We found that integrity of the dlPAG is not essential for stress-induced increase in basal/resting respiratory rate or for generation of respiratory responses to brief alerting stimuli. However, blockade of the dlPAG reduced the amount of motor activity and concomitant high-frequency respiratory activity during restraint and the first 5min of novelty stress. We conclude that the integrity of the dlPAG is not essential for generation of respiratory component of the defense reaction, but it mediates expression of the fight-or-flight response including its respiratory component.

  3. Pollutant Assessments Group Procedures Manual: Volume 1, Administrative and support procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-03-01

    This manual describes procedures currently in use by the Pollutant Assessments Group. The manual is divided into two volumes: Volume 1 includes administrative and support procedures, and Volume 2 includes technical procedures. These procedures are revised in an ongoing process to incorporate new developments in hazardous waste assessment technology and changes in administrative policy. Format inconsistencies will be corrected in subsequent revisions of individual procedures. The purpose of the Pollutant Assessments Groups Procedures Manual is to provide a standardized set of procedures documenting in an auditable manner the activities performed by the Pollutant Assessments Group (PAG) of the Health and Safety Research Division (HASRD) of the Environmental Measurements and Applications Section (EMAS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The Procedures Manual ensures that the organizational, administrative, and technical activities of PAG conform properly to protocol outlined by funding organizations. This manual also ensures that the techniques and procedures used by PAG and other contractor personnel meet the requirements of applicable governmental, scientific, and industrial standards. The Procedures Manual is sufficiently comprehensive for use by PAG and contractor personnel in the planning, performance, and reporting of project activities and measurements. The Procedures Manual provides procedures for conducting field measurements and includes program planning, equipment operation, and quality assurance elements. Successive revisions of this manual will be archived in the PAG Document Control Department to facilitate tracking of the development of specific procedures.

  4. Lipopolysaccharide Engineering in Neisseria meningitidis

    PubMed Central

    Pupo, Elder; Hamstra, Hendrik-Jan; Meiring, Hugo; van der Ley, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Engineering the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) biosynthetic pathway offers the potential to obtain modified derivatives with optimized adjuvant properties. Neisseria meningitidis strain H44/76 was modified by expression of the pagL gene encoding lipid A 3-O-deacylase from Bordetella bronchiseptica and by inactivation of the lgtB gene encoding the terminal oligosaccharide galactosyltransferase. Mass spectrometry analysis of purified mutant LPS was used for detailed compositional analysis of all present molecular species. This determined that the modified LPS was mainly pentaacylated, demonstrating high efficiency of conversion from the hexaacyl to the 3-O-deacylated form by heterologous lipid A 3-O-deacylase (PagL) expression. MS analyses also provided evidence for expression of only one major oligosaccharide glycoform, which lacked the terminal galactose residue as expected from inactivation of the lgtB gene. The immunomodulatory properties of PagL-deacylated LPS were compared with another pentaacyl form obtained from an lpxL1− mutant, which lacks the 2′ secondary acyl chain. Although both LPS mutants displayed impaired capacity to induce production of the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-6 in the monocytic cell line Mono Mac 6, induction of the Toll-interleukin-1 receptor domain-containing adaptor-inducing interferon-β-dependent chemokine interferon-γ-induced protein 10 was largely retained only for the lgtB−/pagL+ mutant. Removal of remaining hexaacyl species exclusively present in lgtB−/pagL+ LPS demonstrated that these minor species potentiate but do not determine the activity of this LPS. These results are the first to indicate a qualitatively different response of human innate cells to pentaacyl lpxL1− and pagL+ LPS and show the importance of detailed structure-function analysis when working with modified lipid A structures. The pagL+ LPS has significant potential as immune modulator in humans. PMID:24492609

  5. Forging stronger partnerships between academic health centers and patient-driven organizations.

    PubMed

    Gallin, Elaine K; Bond, Enriqueta; Califf, Robert M; Crowley, William F; Davis, Pamela; Galbraith, Richard; Reece, E Albert

    2013-09-01

    In this article, the authors review the unique role that patient-driven organizations, such as patient advocacy groups and voluntary health organizations (PAG/VHOs), play in translational and clinical research. The importance of fostering collaborations between these organizations and U.S. academic health centers (AHCs) is also discussed. Although both the PAG/VHO community and AHCs are heterogeneous, and although not all organizations are well governed or provide independent, well-researched views, there are many outstanding, well-managed, independent PAG/VHOs in the United States whose missions overlap with those of AHCs. The characteristics of effective PAG/VHOs that would serve as excellent partners for AHCs are discussed, and examples are provided regarding their many contributions, which have included advancing research on rare diseases, recruiting patients for clinical trials, and establishing patient registries and biospecimen banks. The authors present feedback obtained from informal discussions with PAG/VHO staff, as well as a survey of a small sample of organizations, that has identified bureaucratic processes, negotiating intellectual property rights, and institutional review board (IRB) delays as the most problematic areas of interactions with AHCs. Actions are suggested for building effective partnerships between the two sectors and the activities that AHCs should undertake to facilitate their interactions with PAG/VHOs including streamlining contract review and IRB processes and finding ways to better align the incentives motivating academic clinical and translational investigators with the goals of PAG/VHOs. This article is one product of the Clinical Research Forum's Partnering with Patient Advocacy Groups Initiative. PMID:23887007

  6. Forging stronger partnerships between academic health centers and patient-driven organizations.

    PubMed

    Gallin, Elaine K; Bond, Enriqueta; Califf, Robert M; Crowley, William F; Davis, Pamela; Galbraith, Richard; Reece, E Albert

    2013-09-01

    In this article, the authors review the unique role that patient-driven organizations, such as patient advocacy groups and voluntary health organizations (PAG/VHOs), play in translational and clinical research. The importance of fostering collaborations between these organizations and U.S. academic health centers (AHCs) is also discussed. Although both the PAG/VHO community and AHCs are heterogeneous, and although not all organizations are well governed or provide independent, well-researched views, there are many outstanding, well-managed, independent PAG/VHOs in the United States whose missions overlap with those of AHCs. The characteristics of effective PAG/VHOs that would serve as excellent partners for AHCs are discussed, and examples are provided regarding their many contributions, which have included advancing research on rare diseases, recruiting patients for clinical trials, and establishing patient registries and biospecimen banks. The authors present feedback obtained from informal discussions with PAG/VHO staff, as well as a survey of a small sample of organizations, that has identified bureaucratic processes, negotiating intellectual property rights, and institutional review board (IRB) delays as the most problematic areas of interactions with AHCs. Actions are suggested for building effective partnerships between the two sectors and the activities that AHCs should undertake to facilitate their interactions with PAG/VHOs including streamlining contract review and IRB processes and finding ways to better align the incentives motivating academic clinical and translational investigators with the goals of PAG/VHOs. This article is one product of the Clinical Research Forum's Partnering with Patient Advocacy Groups Initiative.

  7. Glucokinase activators.

    PubMed

    Filipski, Kevin J; Futatsugi, Kentaro; Pfefferkorn, Jeffrey A; Stevens, Benjamin D

    2012-07-01

    In this review we highlight recently disclosed progress in the field of small-molecule activators of the human glucokinase enzyme. Several of the reported chemotypes possess structural features that diverge from known leads; some of these modifications appear to be specifically designed to modulate tissue selectivity or discrete parameters of enzyme function (e.g., S0.5 v Vmax). This review will inform the reader of the extent of continued effort being directed toward discovery of a first-in-class drug for Type II diabetes mellitus that functions through this target. Patents were selected from those published in December 2009 up to November 2011; foreign filings were translated where possible to understand the claims and biological techniques utilized to characterize the reported glucokinase activators. Overall, there appears to be a recent trend leading to reduced patent filings for small-molecule glucokinase activators. There are many possible explanations for this trend; however, it is likely that the field has reached maturity and that the downturn of new disclosures represents the transition of many of these programs to the clinic.

  8. Physical and enzymological interaction of Bacillus subtilis proteins required for de novo pyridoxal 5'-phosphate biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Belitsky, Boris R

    2004-02-01

    Bacillus subtilis synthesizes pyridoxal 5'-phosphate, the active form of vitamin B(6), by a poorly characterized pathway involving the yaaD and yaaE genes. The pdxS (yaaD) mutant was confirmed to be a strict B(6) auxotroph, but the pdxT (yaaE) mutant turned out to be a conditional auxotroph depending on the availability of ammonium in the growth medium. The PdxS and PdxT proteins copurified during affinity chromatography and apparently form a complex that has glutaminase activity. PdxS and PdxT appear to encode the synthase and glutaminase subunits, respectively, of a glutamine amidotransferase of as-yet-unknown specificity essential for B(6) biosynthesis.

  9. Engineering of Helicobacter pylori L-Asparaginase: Characterization of Two Functionally Distinct Groups of Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Maggi, Maristella; Chiarelli, Laurent R.; Valentini, Giovanna; Scotti, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial L-asparaginases have been used as anti-cancer drugs for over 4 decades though presenting, along with their therapeutic efficacy, several side effects due to their bacterial origin and, seemingly, to their secondary glutaminase activity. Helicobacter pylori type II L-asparaginase possesses interesting features, among which a reduced catalytic efficiency for L-GLN, compared to the drugs presently used in therapy. In the present study, we describe some enzyme variants with catalytic and in vitro cytotoxic activities different from the wild type enzyme. Particularly, replacements on catalytic threonines (T16D and T95E) deplete the enzyme of both its catalytic activities, once more underlining the essential role of such residues. One serendipitous mutant, M121C/T169M, had a preserved efficiency vs L-asparagine but was completely unable to carry out L-glutamine hydrolysis. Interestingly, this variant did not exert any cytotoxic effect on HL-60 cells. The M121C and T169M single mutants had reduced catalytic activities (nearly 2.5- to 4-fold vs wild type enzyme, respectively). Mutant Q63E, endowed with a similar catalytic efficiency versus asparagine and halved glutaminase efficiency with respect to the wild type enzyme, was able to exert a cytotoxic effect comparable to, or higher than, the one of the wild type enzyme when similar asparaginase units were used. These findings may be relevant to determine the role of glutaminase activity of L-asparaginase in the anti-proliferative effect of the drug and to shed light on how to engineer the best asparaginase/glutaminase combination for an ever improved, patients-tailored therapy. PMID:25664771

  10. Active packaging with antifungal activities.

    PubMed

    Nguyen Van Long, N; Joly, Catherine; Dantigny, Philippe

    2016-03-01

    There have been many reviews concerned with antimicrobial food packaging, and with the use of antifungal compounds, but none provided an exhaustive picture of the applications of active packaging to control fungal spoilage. Very recently, many studies have been done in these fields, therefore it is timely to review this topic. This article examines the effects of essential oils, preservatives, natural products, chemical fungicides, nanoparticles coated to different films, and chitosan in vitro on the growth of moulds, but also in vivo on the mould free shelf-life of bread, cheese, and fresh fruits and vegetables. A short section is also dedicated to yeasts. All the applications are described from a microbiological point of view, and these were sorted depending on the name of the species. Methods and results obtained are discussed. Essential oils and preservatives were ranked by increased efficacy on mould growth. For all the tested molecules, Penicillium species were shown more sensitive than Aspergillus species. However, comparison between the results was difficult because it appeared that the efficiency of active packaging depended greatly on the environmental factors of food such as water activity, pH, temperature, NaCl concentration, the nature, the size, and the mode of application of the films, in addition to the fact that the amount of released antifungal compounds was not constant with time.

  11. Active packaging with antifungal activities.

    PubMed

    Nguyen Van Long, N; Joly, Catherine; Dantigny, Philippe

    2016-03-01

    There have been many reviews concerned with antimicrobial food packaging, and with the use of antifungal compounds, but none provided an exhaustive picture of the applications of active packaging to control fungal spoilage. Very recently, many studies have been done in these fields, therefore it is timely to review this topic. This article examines the effects of essential oils, preservatives, natural products, chemical fungicides, nanoparticles coated to different films, and chitosan in vitro on the growth of moulds, but also in vivo on the mould free shelf-life of bread, cheese, and fresh fruits and vegetables. A short section is also dedicated to yeasts. All the applications are described from a microbiological point of view, and these were sorted depending on the name of the species. Methods and results obtained are discussed. Essential oils and preservatives were ranked by increased efficacy on mould growth. For all the tested molecules, Penicillium species were shown more sensitive than Aspergillus species. However, comparison between the results was difficult because it appeared that the efficiency of active packaging depended greatly on the environmental factors of food such as water activity, pH, temperature, NaCl concentration, the nature, the size, and the mode of application of the films, in addition to the fact that the amount of released antifungal compounds was not constant with time. PMID:26803804

  12. Amino acid metabolism in tumour-bearing mice.

    PubMed Central

    Rivera, S; Azcón-Bieto, J; López-Soriano, F J; Miralpeix, M; Argilés, J M

    1988-01-01

    Mice bearing the Lewis lung carcinoma showed a high tumour glutaminase activity and significantly higher concentrations of most amino acids than in both the liver and the skeletal muscle of the host. Tumour tissue slices showed a marked preference for glutamine, especially for oxidation of its skeleton to CO2. It is proposed that the metabolism of this particular carcinoma is focused on amino acid degradation, glutamine being its preferred substrate. PMID:3342022

  13. Active tectonics

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    This study is part of a series of Studies in Geophysics that have been undertaken for the Geophysics Research Forum by the Geophysics Study Committee. One purpose of each study is to provide assessments from the scientific community to aid policymakers in decisions on societal problems that involve geophysics. An important part of such assessments is an evaluation of the adequacy of current geophysical knowledge and the appropriateness of current research programs as a source of information required for those decisions. The study addresses our current scientific understanding of active tectonics --- particularly the patterns and rates of ongoing tectonic processes. Many of these processes cannot be described reasonably using the limited instrumental or historical records; however, most can be described adequately for practical purposes using the geologic record of the past 500,000 years. A program of fundamental research focusing especially on Quaternary tectonic geology and geomorphology, paleoseismology, neotectonics, and geodesy is recommended to better understand ongoing, active tectonic processes. This volume contains 16 papers. Individual papers are indexed separately on the Energy Database.

  14. Glutamine facilitates chemotherapy while reducing toxicity.

    PubMed

    Klimberg, V S; Nwokedi, E; Hutchins, L F; Pappas, A A; Lang, N P; Broadwater, J R; Read, R C; Westbrook, K C

    1992-01-01

    Dose intensification of chemotherapy is thought to increase survival. With recent advances in hemopoietic cell modulators such as granulocyte colony stimulating factor, the limiting toxicity of intensifying chemotherapeutic regimens has become the severity of the associated enterocolitis. In animal models, glutamine protects the host from methotrexate-induced enterocolitis. This study evaluates the effects of a glutamine-supplemented diet on the tumoricidal effectiveness of methotrexate. Sarcoma-bearing Fisher 344 rats (n = 30) were pair-fed an isocaloric elemental diet containing 1% glutamine or an isonitrogenous amount of glycine beginning on day 25 of the study. Rats from each group received two intraperitoneal injections of methotrexate (5 mg/kg) or saline on days 26 and 33 of the study. On day 40, rats were killed, tumor volume and weight were recorded, and tumor glutaminase activity and tumor morphometrics were measured. Blood was taken for arterial glutamine content, complete blood count, and blood culture. The gut was processed for glutaminase activity and synthesis phase of the deoxyribonucleic acid. In rats receiving methotrexate, the tumor volume loss was nearly doubled when glutamine was added to the diet. Significant differences in tumor glutaminase activity and morphometrics were not detected. The toxicity to the host was ameliorated. Significantly increased synthesis phase of deoxyribonucleic acid of the whole jejunum, decreased bacteremia, "sepsis," and mortality were demonstrated. Glutamine supplementation enhances the tumoricidal effectiveness of methotrexate while reducing its morbidity and mortality in this sarcoma rat model.

  15. Line width roughness reduction by rational design of photoacid generator for sub-millisecond laser post-exposure bake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Jing; Thompson, Michael O.; Ober, Christopher K.

    2014-03-01

    Sub-millisecond laser post-exposure bake (PEB) is an alternative technology to address the excessive acid diffusion for chemically amplified photoresist systems. By rationally designing the resist, laser post-exposure bake is able to improve the resolution and reduce the line width roughness (LWR) compared to patterns exposed under the same conditions but using conventional hotplate PEB. It was found that only the resist with high deprotection activation energy and low diffusion activation energy showed improved performance using laser PEB. Accordingly, a PAG was designed to have low acid diffusivity by binding the counter ions to a molecular glass core while keeping photophysical properties and processing conditions similar to a conventional PAG. By reducing the diffusivity of the counter ions, the PAG was able to further reduce LWR by 60% using laser PEB.

  16. Pharmacological evidence for the mediation of the panicolytic effect of fluoxetine by dorsal periaqueductal gray matter μ-opioid receptors.

    PubMed

    Roncon, Camila Marroni; Almada, Rafael Carvalho; Maraschin, Jhonatan Christian; Audi, Elisabeth Aparecida; Zangrossi, Hélio; Graeff, Frederico Guilherme; Coimbra, Norberto Cysne

    2015-12-01

    Previously reported results have shown that the inhibitory effect of fluoxetine on escape behavior, interpreted as a panicolytic-like effect, is blocked by pretreatment with either the opioid receptor antagonist naloxone or the 5-HT1A receptor (5-HT1A-R) antagonist WAY100635 via injection into the dorsal periaqueductal gray matter (dPAG). Additionally, reported evidence indicates that the μ-opioid receptor (MOR) interacts with the 5-HT1A-R in the dPAG. In the present work, pretreatment of the dPAG with the selective MOR blocker CTOP antagonized the anti-escape effect of chronic fluoxetine (10 mg/kg, i.p., daily, for 21 days), as measured in the elevated T-maze (ETM) test, indicating mediation of this effect by the MOR. In addition, the combined administration of sub-effective doses of the selective MOR agonist DAMGO (intra-dPAG) and sub-effective doses of chronic as well as subchronic (7 days) fluoxetine increased avoidance and escape latencies, suggesting that the activation of MORs may facilitate and accelerate the effects of fluoxetine. The current observation that MORs located in the dPAG mediate the anti-escape effect of fluoxetine may open new perspectives for the development of more efficient and fast-acting panic-alleviating drugs.

  17. DAVIC activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujiwara, Hiroshi

    1995-12-01

    DAVIC (Digital Audio Visual Council) is the defacto standardization organization established in Mar. 1994, based on international consensus for digital audio visual services. After completion of MPEG2 standardization, the broadcasting industry, the communication industry, the computer industry, and consumer electronics industry have started development of concrete services and products. Especially the interactive digital audio visual services, such as Video On Demand (VOD) or Near Video On Demand (NVOD), have become hot topics all over the world. Such interactive digital audio visual services are combined technologies of multi-media coding, digital transmission and computer networking. Therefore more than 150 organizations from all industry sectors have participated in DAVIC and are contributing from their own industrial contexts. DAVIC's basic policy is to use the available technologies specified by the other standards bodies as much as possible. So DAVIC's standardization activities have close relationship with ISO IEC/JTC1/SC29, ITU-T SG 9, ATM-Forum, IETF, IMA, DVB, etc. DAVIC is trying to specify Applications, Reference Models, Security, Usage Information Control, and the interfaces and protocols among the Content Provider, the Server, the core network, the access network, and the Set Top Unit. DAVIC's first goal is to specify DAVIC1.0 based on CFP1 (Call for Proposal) and CFP2 by Dec. 1995, and the next direction is under preparation for further progress based on CFP3 and CFP4.

  18. Cholecystokinin B receptors in the periaqueductal gray potentiate defensive rage behavior elicited from the medial hypothalamus of the cat.

    PubMed

    Luo, B; Cheu, J W; Siegel, A

    1998-06-15

    Defensive rage behavior is mediated over a descending pathway from the medial hypothalamus to the dorsolateral midbrain periaqueductal gray (PAG) where further integration of this response takes place. The present study sought to determine the roles of CCK-A and CCK-B receptor activation in the PAG in modulating defensive rage behavior. The 'hissing' component of the defensive rage response was used throughout the experiment as the measure of defensive rage behavior. The basic design of the experiment involved placement of monopolar electrodes into the medial hypothalamus from which defensive rage could be elicited and cannula electrodes into the dorsal PAG for purposes of identifying defensive rage sites in this region and for microinjections of CCK compounds into these sites at a later time. Microinjections of the selective CCK-B receptor antagonist, LY288513 (1.05, 4.2, 17.0 nmol/0.25 microliter), into the PAG suppressed the hissing response in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Microinjections of the CCK-B agonist, pentagastrin, (0.5 and 1.0 nmol/0.25 microliter) facilitated the occurrence of defensive rage behavior. Moreover, administration of LY288513 (17 nmol/0.25 microliter) 55 min prior to pentagastrin (1.0 nmol/0.25 microliter) delivery blocked the facilitatory effects of pentagastrin. Administration of the CCK-A antagonist, PD140548 (34 nmol/0.25 microliter), into the PAG failed to alter response latencies for defensive rage behavior. In contrast, microinjections of the CCK-B antagonist, LY288513 (4.2, 17.0 nmol/0.25 microliter), facilitated the occurrence of predatory attack behavior elicited from the lateral hypothalamus. This finding demonstrates the specificity of the effects of CCK-B receptor blockade upon hissing. A combination of immunocytochemical and retrograde tracing procedures using microinjections of Fluoro-Gold (8%, 6 microliters) into the PAG were employed to identify the possible loci of CCK neurons that project to the PAG. The data

  19. Active knee joint flexibility and sports activity.

    PubMed

    Hahn, T; Foldspang, A; Vestergaard, E; Ingemann-Hansen, T

    1999-04-01

    The aim of the study was to estimate active knee flexion and active knee extension in athletes and to investigate the potential association of each to different types of sports activity. Active knee extension and active knee flexion was measured in 339 athletes. Active knee extension was significantly higher in women than in men and significantly positively associated with weekly hours of swimming and weekly hours of competitive gymnastics. Active knee flexion was significantly positively associated with participation in basketball, and significantly negatively associated with age and weekly hours of soccer, European team handball and swimming. The results point to sport-specific adaptation of active knee flexion and active knee extension.

  20. IASS Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hojaev, Alisher S.; Ibragimova, Elvira M.

    2015-08-01

    It’s well known, astronomy in Uzbekistan has ancient roots and traditions (e.g., Mirzo Ulugh Beg, Abū al-Rayhān al-Bīrūnī, Abū ‘Abdallāh al-Khwārizmī) and astronomical heritage carefully preserved. Nowadays uzbek astronomers play a key role in scientific research but also in OAD and Decadal Plan activity in the Central Asia region. International Aerospace School (IASS) is an amazing and wonderful event held annually about 30 years. IASS is unique project in the region, and at the beginning we spent the Summer and Winter Schools. At present in the summer camp we gather about 50 teenage and undergraduate students over the country and abroad (France, Malaysia, Turkey, Azerbaijan, Pakistan, Russia, etc.). They are selected on the basis of tests of astronomy and space issues. During two weeks of IASS camp the invited scientists, cosmonauts and astronauts as well as other specialists give lectures and engage in practical exercises with IASS students in astronomy, including daily observations of the Sun and night sky observations with meniscus telescope, space research and exploration, aerospace modelling, preparation and presentation of original projects. This is important that IASS gives not theoretical grounds only but also practically train the students and the hands-on training is the major aims of IASS. Lectures and practice in the field of astronomy carried out with the direct involvement and generous assistance of Uranoscope Association (Paris, France). The current 26-th IASS is planned to held in July 2015.

  1. Utilization and synthesis of glutamine in the lens

    SciTech Connect

    Jernigan, H.M. Jr.; Geller, A.M.

    1987-05-01

    Previous studies with rat and calf lenses have shown that the primary source of lenticular glutamate for a wide variety of pathways is glutamine, which is more readily transported from the surrounding fluids than glutamate. In contrast, recent studies showed that monkey lenses utilize glutamate more rapidly than glutamine, although glutamine appears to enter monkey lenses more rapidly than glutamine. Further studies were initiated to elucidate the balance between transport, deamidation, and synthesis of glutamine in the lens. Glutamine synthesis in intact rat lenses was barely detectable; however, homogenates of adult rat lenses converted measurable amounts of (/sup 3/H)-glutamate to glutamine. The identity of the product was confirmed using glutaminase. Glutamine deamidation in intact rhesus monkey lenses incubated in TC-199 medium containing 2 mM glutamine was only 0.19 ..mu..mol g/sup -1/ hr/sup -1/, compared with 1.96 ..mu..mol g/sup -1/ hr/sup -1/ for rat lenses under identical conditions. However, under optimal assay conditions, glutaminase activity in monkey lens homogenates was similar to that of rat lens homogenates. Thus, the rate of synthesis and deamidation of glutamine by intact lenses is apparently limited factors other than total lenticular glutamine synthetase and glutaminase activity.

  2. Activation Energy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gadeken, Owen

    2002-01-01

    Teaming is so common in today's project management environment that most of us assume it comes naturally. We further assume that when presented with meaningful and challenging work, project teams will naturally engage in productive activity to complete their tasks. This assumption is expressed in the simple (but false) equation: Team + Work = Teamwork. Although this equation appears simple and straightforward, it is far from true for most project organizations whose reality is a complex web of institutional norms based on individual achievement and rewards. This is illustrated by the very first successful team experience from my early Air Force career. As a young lieutenant, I was sent to Squadron Officer School, which was the first in the series of Air Force professional military education courses I was required to complete during my career. We were immediately formed into teams of twelve officers. Much of the course featured competition between these teams. As the most junior member of my team, I quickly observed the tremendous pressure to show individual leadership capability. At one point early in the course, almost everyone in our group was vying to become the team leader. This conflict was so intense that it caused us to fail miserably in our first outdoor team building exercise. We spent so much time fighting over leadership that we were unable to complete any of the events on the outdoor obstacle course. This complete lack of success was so disheartening to me that I gave our team little hope for future success. What followed was a very intense period of bickering, conflict, and even shouting matches as our dysfunctional team tried to cope with our early failures and find some way to succeed. British physician and researcher Wilfred Bion (Experiences in Groups, 1961) discovered that there are powerful psychological forces inherent in all groups that divert from accomplishing their primary tasks. To overcome these restraining forces and use the potential

  3. Optimality in the zonation of ammonia detoxification in rodent liver.

    PubMed

    Bartl, Martin; Pfaff, Michael; Ghallab, Ahmed; Driesch, Dominik; Henkel, Sebastian G; Hengstler, Jan G; Schuster, Stefan; Kaleta, Christoph; Gebhardt, Rolf; Zellmer, Sebastian; Li, Pu

    2015-11-01

    The rodent liver eliminates toxic ammonia. In mammals, three enzymes (or enzyme systems) are involved in this process: glutaminase, glutamine synthetase and the urea cycle enzymes, represented by carbamoyl phosphate synthetase. The distribution of these enzymes for optimal ammonia detoxification was determined by numerical optimization. This in silico approach predicted that the enzymes have to be zonated in order to achieve maximal removal of toxic ammonia and minimal changes in glutamine concentration. Using 13 compartments, representing hepatocytes, the following predictions were generated: glutamine synthetase is active only within a narrow pericentral zone. Glutaminase and carbamoyl phosphate synthetase are located in the periportal zone in a non-homogeneous distribution. This correlates well with the paradoxical observation that in a first step glutamine-bound ammonia is released (by glutaminase) although one of the functions of the liver is detoxification by ammonia fixation. The in silico approach correctly predicted the in vivo enzyme distributions also for non-physiological conditions (e.g. starvation) and during regeneration after tetrachloromethane (CCl4) intoxication. Metabolite concentrations of glutamine, ammonia and urea in each compartment, representing individual hepatocytes, were predicted. Finally, a sensitivity analysis showed a striking robustness of the results. These bioinformatics predictions were validated experimentally by immunohistochemistry and are supported by the literature. In summary, optimization approaches like the one applied can provide valuable explanations and high-quality predictions for in vivo enzyme and metabolite distributions in tissues and can reveal unknown metabolic functions.

  4. Evaluating the ParticipACTION "Think Again" Campaign

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gainforth, Heather L.; Jarvis, Jocelyn W.; Berry, Tanya R.; Chulak-Bozzer, Tala; Deshpande, Sameer; Faulkner, Guy; Rhodes, Ryan E.; Spence, John C.; Tremblay, Mark S.; Latimer-Cheung, Amy E.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: ParticipACTION's 2011 "Think Again" campaign aimed to draw parents', and specifically mothers', attention to the amount of physical activity (PA) their children do relative to the national guidelines (physical activity guidelines [PAG]). Purpose: To evaluate ParticipACTION's "Think Again" campaign in the context…

  5. Human brain stem structures respond differentially to noxious heat.

    PubMed

    Ritter, Alexander; Franz, Marcel; Dietrich, Caroline; Miltner, Wolfgang H R; Weiss, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Concerning the physiological correlates of pain, the brain stem is considered to be one core region that is activated by noxious input. In animal studies, different slopes of skin heating (SSH) with noxious heat led to activation in different columns of the midbrain periaqueductal gray (PAG). The present study aimed at finding a method for differentiating structures in PAG and other brain stem structures, which are associated with different qualities of pain in humans according to the structures that were associated with different behavioral significances to noxious thermal stimulation in animals. Brain activity was studied by functional MRI in healthy subjects in response to steep and shallow SSH with noxious heat. We found differential activation to different SSH in the PAG and the rostral ventromedial medulla (RVM). In a second experiment, we demonstrate that the different SSH were associated with different pain qualities. Our experiments provide evidence that brainstem structures, i.e., the PAG and the RVM, become differentially activated by different SSH. Therefore, different SSH can be utilized when brain stem structures are investigated and when it is aimed to activate these structures differentially. Moreover, percepts of first pain were elicited by shallow SSH whereas percepts of second pain were elicited by steep SSH. The stronger activation of these brain stem structures to SSH, eliciting percepts of second vs. first pain, might be of relevance for activating different coping strategies in response to the noxious input with the two types of SSH.

  6. The Periaqueductal Gray Orchestrates Sensory and Motor Circuits at Multiple Levels of the Neuraxis

    PubMed Central

    Koutsikou, Stella; Watson, Thomas C.; Crook, Jonathan J.; Leith, J. Lianne; Lawrenson, Charlotte L.; Lumb, Bridget M.

    2015-01-01

    The periaqueductal gray (PAG) coordinates behaviors essential to survival, including striking changes in movement and posture (e.g., escape behaviors in response to noxious stimuli vs freezing in response to fear-evoking stimuli). However, the neural circuits underlying the expression of these behaviors remain poorly understood. We demonstrate in vivo in rats that activation of the ventrolateral PAG (vlPAG) affects motor systems at multiple levels of the neuraxis through the following: (1) differential control of spinal neurons that forward sensory information to the cerebellum via spino-olivo-cerebellar pathways (nociceptive signals are reduced while proprioceptive signals are enhanced); (2) alterations in cerebellar nuclear output as revealed by changes in expression of Fos-like immunoreactivity; and (3) regulation of spinal reflex circuits, as shown by an increase in α-motoneuron excitability. The capacity to coordinate sensory and motor functions is demonstrated in awake, behaving rats, in which natural activation of the vlPAG in fear-conditioned animals reduced transmission in spino-olivo-cerebellar pathways during periods of freezing that were associated with increased muscle tone and thus motor outflow. The increase in spinal motor reflex excitability and reduction in transmission of ascending sensory signals via spino-olivo-cerebellar pathways occurred simultaneously. We suggest that the interactions revealed in the present study between the vlPAG and sensorimotor circuits could form the neural substrate for survival behaviors associated with vlPAG activation. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Neural circuits that coordinate survival behaviors remain poorly understood. We demonstrate in rats that the periaqueductal gray (PAG) affects motor systems at the following multiple levels of the neuraxis: (1) through altering transmission in spino-olivary pathways that forward sensory signals to the cerebellum, reducing and enhancing transmission of nociceptive and

  7. Physical Activity (Exercise)

    MedlinePlus

    ... fitness. Your fitness routine should include aerobic and strength-training activities, and may also include stretching activities. Aerobic ... Examples include walking, jogging, bicycling, swimming, and tennis. Strength-training activities These activities increase the strength and endurance ...

  8. c-Fos expression in neurons projecting from the preoptic and lateral hypothalamic areas to the ventrolateral periaqueductal gray in relation to sleep states

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Kung-Chiao; Gvilia, Irma; Kumar, Sunil; Uschakov, Aaron; McGinty, Dennis; Alam, M. Noor; Szymusiak, Ronald

    2011-01-01

    The ventrolateral division of the periaqueductal gray (vlPAG) and the adjacent deep mesencephalic reticular nucleus have been implicated in the control of sleep. The preoptic hypothalamus, which contains populations of sleep-active neurons, is an important source of afferents to the vlPAG. The perifornical lateral hypothalamus (LH) contains populations of wake-active neurons and also projects strongly to the vlPAG. We examined nonREM and REM sleep-dependent expression of c-Fos protein in preoptic-vlPAG and LH-vlPAG projection neurons identified by retrograde labeling with Fluoro-gold (FG). Separate groups of rats (n=5) were subjected to 3 hours total sleep deprivation (TSD) followed by 1 hour recovery sleep (RS), or to 3 hours of selective REM sleep deprivation (RSD) followed by RS. A third group of rats (n=5) was subjected to TSD without opportunity for RS (awake group). In the median preoptic nucleus (MnPN), the percentage of FG+ neurons that were also Fos+ was higher in TSD-RS animals compared to both RSD-RS rats and awake rats. There were significant correlations between time spent in deep nonREM sleep during the 1-hour prior to sacrifice across groups and the percentage of double-labeled cells in MnPN and ventrolateral preoptic area (VLPO). There were no significant correlations between percentage of double labeled neurons and time spent in REM sleep for any of the preoptic nuclei examined. In the LH, percentage of double-labeled neurons was highest in awake rats, intermediate in TSD-RS rats and lowest in the RSD-RS group. These results suggest that neurons projecting from MnPN and VLPO to the vlPAG are activated during nonREM sleep and support the hypothesis that preoptic neurons provide inhibitory input to vlPAG during sleep. Suppression of excitatory input to the vlPAG from the LH during sleep may have a permissive effect on REM sleep generation. PMID:21601616

  9. c-Fos expression in neurons projecting from the preoptic and lateral hypothalamic areas to the ventrolateral periaqueductal gray in relation to sleep states.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, K-C; Gvilia, I; Kumar, S; Uschakov, A; McGinty, D; Alam, M N; Szymusiak, R

    2011-08-11

    The ventrolateral division of the periaqueductal gray (vlPAG) and the adjacent deep mesencephalic reticular nucleus have been implicated in the control of sleep. The preoptic hypothalamus, which contains populations of sleep-active neurons, is an important source of afferents to the vlPAG. The perifornical lateral hypothalamus (LH) contains populations of wake-active neurons and also projects strongly to the vlPAG. We examined nonREM and REM sleep-dependent expression of c-Fos protein in preoptic-vlPAG and LH-vlPAG projection neurons identified by retrograde labeling with Fluorogold (FG). Separate groups of rats (n=5) were subjected to 3 h total sleep deprivation (TSD) followed by 1 h recovery sleep (RS), or to 3 h of selective REM sleep deprivation (RSD) followed by RS. A third group of rats (n=5) was subjected to TSD without opportunity for RS (awake group). In the median preoptic nucleus (MnPN), the percentage of FG+ neurons that were also Fos+ was higher in TSD-RS animals compared to both RSD-RS rats and awake rats. There were significant correlations between time spent in deep nonREM sleep during the 1 h prior to sacrifice across groups and the percentage of double-labeled cells in MnPN and ventrolateral preoptic area (VLPO). There were no significant correlations between percentage of double-labeled neurons and time spent in REM sleep for any of the preoptic nuclei examined. In the LH, percentage of double-labeled neurons was highest in awake rats, intermediate in TSD-RS rats and lowest in the RSD-RS group. These results suggest that neurons projecting from MnPN and VLPO to the vlPAG are activated during nonREM sleep and support the hypothesis that preoptic neurons provide inhibitory input to vlPAG during sleep. Suppression of excitatory input to the vlPAG from the LH during sleep may have a permissive effect on REM sleep generation.

  10. The Pseudomonas aeruginosa Lipid A Deacylase: Selection for Expression and Loss within the Cystic Fibrosis Airway

    PubMed Central

    Ernst, Robert K.; Adams, Kristin N.; Moskowitz, Samuel M.; Kraig, Gretchen M.; Kawasaki, Kiyoshi; Stead, Christopher M.; Trent, M. Stephen; Miller, Samuel I.

    2006-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is the major surface component of gram-negative bacteria, and a component of LPS, lipid A, is recognized by the innate immune system through the Toll-like receptor 4/MD-2 complex. Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an environmental gram-negative bacterium that opportunistically infects the respiratory tracts of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF), can synthesize various structures of lipid A. Lipid A from P. aeruginosa strains isolated from infants with CF has a specific structure that includes the removal of the 3 position 3-OH C10 fatty acid. Here we demonstrate increased expression of the P. aeruginosa lipid A 3-O-deacylase (PagL) in isolates from CF infants compared to that in environmental isolates. PagL activity was increased in environmental isolates by growth in medium limited for magnesium and decreased by growth at low temperature in laboratory-adapted strains of P. aeruginosa. P. aeruginosa PagL was shown to be an outer membrane protein by isopycnic density gradient centrifugation. Heterologous expression of P. aeruginosa pagL in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and Escherichia coli resulted in removal of the 3-OH C14 fatty acid from lipid A, indicating that P. aeruginosa PagL recognizes either 3-OH C10 or 3-OH C14. Finally, deacylated lipid A species were not observed in some clinical P. aeruginosa isolates from patients with severe pulmonary disease, suggesting that loss of PagL function can occur during long-term adaptation to the CF airway. PMID:16352835

  11. The calcium-stimulated lipid A 3-O deacylase from Rhizobium etli is not essential for plant nodulation.

    PubMed

    Sohlenkamp, Christian; Raetz, Christian R H; Ingram, Brian O

    2013-07-01

    The lipid A component of lipopolysaccharide from the nitrogen-fixing plant endosymbiont, Rhizobium etli, is structurally very different from that found in most enteric bacteria. The lipid A from free-living R. etli is structurally heterogeneous and exists as a mixture of species which are either pentaacylated or tetraacylated. In contrast, the lipid A from R. etli bacteroids is reported to consist exclusively of tetraacylated lipid A species. The tetraacylated lipid A species in both cases lack a beta-hydroxymyristoyl chain at the 3-position of lipid A. Here, we show that the lipid A modification enzyme responsible for 3-O deacylation in R. etli is a homolog of the PagL protein originally described in Salmonella enterica sv. typhimurium. In contrast to the PagL proteins described from other species, R. etli PagL displays a calcium dependency. To determine the importance of the lipid A modification catalyzed by PagL, we isolated and characterized a R. etli mutant deficient in the pagL gene. Mass spectrometric analysis confirmed that the mutant strain was exclusively tetraacylated and radiochemical analysis revealed that 3-O deacylase activity was absent in membranes prepared from the mutant. The R. etli mutant was not impaired in its ability to form nitrogen-fixing nodules on Phaseolus vulgaris but it displayed slower nodulation kinetics relative to the wild-type strain. The lipid A modification catalyzed by R. etli PagL, therefore, is not required for nodulation but may play other roles such as protecting bacterial endosymbionts from plant immune responses during infection. PMID:24046865

  12. The calcium-stimulated lipid A 3-O deacylase from Rhizobium etli is not essential for plant nodulation.

    PubMed

    Sohlenkamp, Christian; Raetz, Christian R H; Ingram, Brian O

    2012-07-01

    The lipid A component of lipopolysaccharide from the nitrogen-fixing plant endosymbiont, Rhizobium etli, is structurally very different from that found in most enteric bacteria. The lipid A from free-living R. etli is structurally heterogeneous and exists as a mixture of species which are either pentaacylated or tetraacylated. In contrast, the lipid A from R. etli bacteroids is reported to consist exclusively of tetraacylated lipid A species. The tetraacylated lipid A species in both cases lack a β-hydroxymyristoyl chain at the 3-position of lipid A. Here, we show that the lipid A modification enzyme responsible for 3-O deacylation in R. etli is a homolog of the PagL protein originally described in Salmonella enterica sv. typhimurium. In contrast to the PagL proteins described from other species, R. etli PagL displays a calcium dependency. To determine the importance of the lipid A modification catalyzed by PagL, we isolated and characterized a R. etli mutant deficient in the pagL gene. Mass spectrometric analysis confirmed that the mutant strain was exclusively tetraacylated and radiochemical analysis revealed that 3-O deacylase activity was absent in membranes prepared from the mutant. The R. etli mutant was not impaired in its ability to form nitrogen-fixing nodules on Phaseolus vulgaris but it displayed slower nodulation kinetics relative to the wild-type strain. The lipid A modification catalyzed by R. etli PagL, therefore, is not required for nodulation but may play other roles such as protecting bacterial endosymbionts from plant immune responses during infection. PMID:23583844

  13. [Adapting physical activities for an active retirement].

    PubMed

    Renaudie, François

    2016-01-01

    The benefits of doing adapted physical exercise for elderly people have been proven. For more than thirty years, the French Federation for an Active Retirement has been striving to help people age well by proposing multiple activities to remain in good health after the age of 50. Doctors, activity leaders and federal instructors are attentive to each individual's capacities. PMID:27449307

  14. Learning as Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jonassen, David H.

    2002-01-01

    Integrates contemporary theories of learning into a theory of learning as activity. Explains ecological psychology, changes in understanding of learning, activity systems and activity theory (including the integration of consciousness and activity), and activity structure; and discusses learning as a cognitive and social process. (LRW)

  15. Physical Activity Assessment

    Cancer.gov

    Current evidence convincingly indicates that physical activity reduces the risk of colon and breast cancer. Physical activity may also reduce risk of prostate cancer. Scientists are also evaluating potential relationships between physical activity and other cancers.

  16. Facts about Physical Activity

    MedlinePlus

    ... Physical Activity Overweight & Obesity Healthy Weight Breastfeeding Micronutrient Malnutrition State and Local Programs Facts about Physical Activity ... Physical Activity Overweight & Obesity Healthy Weight Breastfeeding Micronutrient Malnutrition State and Local Programs File Formats Help: How ...

  17. Enzyme activities in activated sludge flocs.

    PubMed

    Yu, Guang-Hui; He, Pin-Jing; Shao, Li-Ming; Lee, Duu-Jong

    2007-12-01

    This study quantified the activities of enzymes in extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) and in pellets. Seven commonly adopted extraction schemes were utilized to extract from aerobic flocs the contained EPS, which were further categorized into loosely bound (LB) and tightly bound (TB) fractions. Ultrasonication effectively extracted the EPS from sludge flocs. Enzyme assay tests showed that the protease activity was localized mainly on the pellets, alpha-amylase and alpha-glucosidase activities were largely bound with LB-EPS, and few protease, alpha-amylase, or alpha-glucosidase activities were associated with the TB-EPS fraction. There exists no correlation between the biochemical compositions of EPS and the distribution of enzyme activities in the sludge matrix. The 44-65% of alpha-amylase and 59-100% of alpha-glucosidase activities noted with the LB-EPS indicate heterogeneous hydrolysis patterns in the sludge flocs with proteins and carbohydrates.

  18. Components of the cannabinoid system in the dorsal periaqueductal gray are related to resting heart rate.

    PubMed

    Dean, Caron; Hillard, Cecilia J; Seagard, Jeanne L; Hopp, Francis A; Hogan, Quinn H

    2016-08-01

    The present study was undertaken to examine whether variations in endocannabinoid signaling in the dorsal periaqueductal gray (dPAG) are associated with baseline autonomic nerve activity, heart rate, and blood pressure. Blood pressure was recorded telemetrically in rats, and heart rate and power spectral analysis of heart rate variability were determined. Natural variations from animal to animal provided a range of baseline values for analysis. Transcript levels of endocannabinoid signaling components in the dPAG were analyzed, and endocannabinoid content and catabolic enzyme activity were measured. Higher baseline heart rate was associated with increased anandamide content and with decreased activity of the anandamide-hydrolyzing enzyme, fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), and it was negatively correlated with transcript levels of both FAAH and monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL), a catabolic enzyme for 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG). Autonomic tone and heart rate, but not blood pressure, were correlated to levels of FAAH mRNA. In accordance with these data, exogenous anandamide in the dPAG of anesthetized rats increased heart rate. These data indicate that in the dPAG, anandamide, a FAAH-regulated lipid, contributes to regulation of baseline heart rate through influences on autonomic outflow.

  19. Regulation of extinction-related plasticity by opioid receptors in the ventrolateral periaqueductal gray matter.

    PubMed

    Parsons, Ryan G; Gafford, Georgette M; Helmstetter, Fred J

    2010-01-01

    Recent work has led to a better understanding of the neural mechanisms underlying the extinction of Pavlovian fear conditioning. Long-term synaptic changes in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) are critical for extinction learning, but very little is currently known about how the mPFC and other brain areas interact during extinction. The current study examined the effect of drugs that impair the extinction of fear conditioning on the activation of the extracellular-related kinase/mitogen-activated protein kinase (ERK/MAPK) in brain regions that likely participate in the consolidation of extinction learning. Inhibitors of opioid and N-methyl-d-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptors were applied to the ventrolateral periaqueductal gray matter (vlPAG) and amygdala shortly before extinction training. Results from these experiments show that blocking opioid receptors in the vlPAG prevented the formation of extinction memory, whereas NMDA receptor blockade had no effect. Conversely, blocking NMDA receptors in the amygdala disrupted the formation of fear extinction memory, but opioid receptor blockade in the same brain area did not. Subsequent experiments tested the effect of these drug treatments on the activation of the ERK/MAPK signaling pathway in various brain regions following extinction training. Only opioid receptor blockade in the vlPAG disrupted ERK phosphorylation in the mPFC and amygdala. These data support the idea that opiodergic signaling derived from the vlPAG affects plasticity across the brain circuit responsible for the formation of extinction memory.

  20. Components of the cannabinoid system in the dorsal periaqueductal gray are related to resting heart rate

    PubMed Central

    Dean, Caron; Hillard, Cecilia J.; Seagard, Jeanne L.; Hopp, Francis A.; Hogan, Quinn H.

    2016-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to examine whether variations in endocannabinoid signaling in the dorsal periaqueductal gray (dPAG) are associated with baseline autonomic nerve activity, heart rate, and blood pressure. Blood pressure was recorded telemetrically in rats, and heart rate and power spectral analysis of heart rate variability were determined. Natural variations from animal to animal provided a range of baseline values for analysis. Transcript levels of endocannabinoid signaling components in the dPAG were analyzed, and endocannabinoid content and catabolic enzyme activity were measured. Higher baseline heart rate was associated with increased anandamide content and with decreased activity of the anandamide-hydrolyzing enzyme and fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), and it was negatively correlated with transcript levels of both FAAH and monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL), a catabolic enzyme for 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG). Autonomic tone and heart rate, but not blood pressure, were correlated to levels of FAAH mRNA. In accordance with these data, exogenous anandamide in the dPAG of anesthetized rats increased heart rate. These data indicate that in the dPAG, anandamide, a FAAH-regulated lipid, contributes to regulation of baseline heart rate through influences on autonomic outflow. PMID:27280429

  1. Ready for action: a role for the human midbrain in responding to infant vocalizations.

    PubMed

    Parsons, Christine E; Young, Katherine S; Joensson, Morten; Brattico, Elvira; Hyam, Jonathan A; Stein, Alan; Green, Alexander L; Aziz, Tipu Z; Kringelbach, Morten L

    2014-07-01

    Infant vocalizations are among the most biologically salient sounds in the environment and can draw the listener to the infant rapidly in both times of distress and joy. A region of the midbrain, the periaqueductal gray (PAG), has long been implicated in the control of urgent, survival-related behaviours. To test for PAG involvement in the processing of infant vocalizations, we recorded local field potentials from macroelectrodes implanted in this region in four adults who had undergone deep brain stimulation. We found a significant difference occurring as early as 49 ms after hearing a sound in activity recorded from the PAG in response to infant vocalizations compared with constructed control sounds and adult and animal affective vocalizations. This difference was not present in recordings from thalamic electrodes implanted in three of the patients. Time frequency analyses revealed distinct patterns of activity in the PAG for infant vocalisations, constructed control sounds and adult and animal vocalisations. These results suggest that human infant vocalizations can be discriminated from other emotional or acoustically similar sounds early in the auditory pathway. We propose that this specific, rapid activity in response to infant vocalizations may reflect the initiation of a state of heightened alertness necessary to instigate protective caregiving.

  2. Active commuting to school

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Declines in physical activity levels have coincided with increasing rates of obesity in children. This is problematic because physical activity has been shown to attenuate weight gain in children. Active commuting to school is one way of increasing children's physical activity. However, given the hi...

  3. Home Activities for Fours.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferguson-Florissant School District, Ferguson, MO.

    These home learning activity guides have been developed for parents to use with their 4-year-old children. Most of the activities require only household items that are often thrown away and can be recycled for learning activities. Some require no materials at all. The guides frequently begin with a discussion of home activities; progress through…

  4. [Positive Activities Campaign.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (DHHS/PHS), Rockville, MD. Center for Substance Abuse Prevention.

    This packet contains four pamphlets that are part of a campaign to encourage adults to provide and promote positive activities for youth and to serve as role models for young people. "Positive Activities: A Campaign for Youth" includes information on what positive activities are, how to get involved in helping to provide positive activities for…

  5. Increasing Youth Physical Activity with Activity Calendars

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eckler, Seth

    2016-01-01

    Physical educators often struggle with ways to get their students to be active beyond the school day. One strategy to accomplish this is the use of physical activity calendars (PACs). The purpose of this article is to support the use of PACs and give practical advice for creating effective PACs.

  6. Photoresist film analysis to investigate LWR generation mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Shinichi; Mochida, Kenji; Kimura, Tooru; Nakanishi, Kana; Kawasaki, Naohiko; Man, Naoki

    2013-03-01

    In order to understand the mechanism of line width roughness (LWR) generation and to find control knobs for improving photoresist design, we established PAG activity analysis methods by utilizing Time-of-Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). TOF-SIMS depth profiling using Gas Cluster Ion Beam (GCIB) allowed the ability to clearly identify photoresist ingredient distribution in the photoresist films from the surface to the bottom of the resist films. TEM provided distribution information of photoresist ingredients in nanometer scale. As a result, PAG function and polymer reaction mechanism can be monitored by these methods. The TOFSIMS outputs during coating, exposure, and post-exposure bake (PEB) steps provide indications of distribution change of PAGs, quenching reaction derivatives, and remaining protecting group, which correspond to acid generation distribution, acid diffusion, and diffusion of deprotection reaction in photoresist film respectively during each consecutive lithographic patterning step. The difference in activity of PAGs can also be observed. These novel analytical methods can provide remarkably helpful information about identifying proper control knobs for lithographic performance of photoresist and for next generation lithography (NGL), especially extreme ultra violet lithography (EUVL) materials, where exposure tool time is very limited.

  7. Role of steroid hormones and morphine treatment in the modulation of opioid receptor gene expression in brain structures in the female rat.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Wesley Soares; Pereira, Lucas Assis; Cezar, Luana Carvalho; Camarini, Rosana; Felicio, Luciano Freitas; Bernardi, Maria Martha; Teodorov, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    This study determined the effects of acute treatment with morphine on the expression of the Oprm1, Oprk1, and Oprd1 genes (which encode μ, κ, and δ receptors, respectively) in the striatum, hypothalamus, and periaqueductal gray (PAG) in ovariectomized female rats treated with estrogen. Ovariectomized female rats were divided into five equal groups. Two groups received estrogen (50 µg/kg, 54 h before testing) and saline (ES group) or 3.5 mg/kg morphine (EM group) 2 h before euthanasia. The SS group received saline solution 54 and 2 h before the experiments. The SM group received saline 54 h and 3.5 mg/kg morphine 2 h before the experiments. The W group remained undisturbed. The genes expression were evaluated. Oprm1 and Oprk1 expression were activated, respectively, in the hypothalamus and PAG and in the striatum and PAG by morphine only in estrogen-treated animals. Oprd1 expression in the hypothalamus and PAG was activated by morphine in both estrogen-treated and -nontreated animals. The Oprm1 and Oprk1 gene response to morphine might depend on estrogen, whereas the Oprd1 gene response to morphine might not depend on estrogen, supporting the hypothesis of a functional role for ovarian hormones in opioid receptor-mediated functional adaptations in the female brain.

  8. The Lysophosphatidylinositol Receptor GPR55 Modulates Pain Perception in the Periaqueductal Gray

    PubMed Central

    Deliu, Elena; Sperow, Margaret; Console-Bram, Linda; Carter, Rhonda L.; Tilley, Douglas G.; Kalamarides, Daniel J.; Kirby, Lynn G.; Brailoiu, G. Cristina; Brailoiu, Eugen; Benamar, Khalid

    2015-01-01

    Emerging evidence indicates the involvement of GPR55 and its proposed endogenous ligand, lysophosphatidylinositol (LPI), in nociception, yet their role in central pain processing has not been explored. Using Ca2+ imaging, we show here that LPI elicits concentration-dependent and GPR55-mediated increases in intracellular Ca2+ levels in dissociated rat periaqueductal gray (PAG) neurons, which express GPR55 mRNA. This effect is mediated by Ca2+ release from the endoplasmic reticulum via inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors and by Ca2+ entry via P/Q-type of voltage-gated Ca2+ channels. Moreover, LPI depolarizes PAG neurons and upon intra-PAG microinjection, reduces nociceptive threshold in the hot-plate test. Both these effects are dependent on GPR55 activation, because they are abolished by pretreatment with ML-193 [N-(4-(N-(3,4-dimethylisoxazol-5-yl)sulfamoyl)-phenyl)-6,8-dimethyl-2-(pyridin-2-yl)quinoline-4-carboxamide], a selective GPR55 antagonist. Thus, we provide the first pharmacological evidence that GPR55 activation at central levels is pronociceptive, suggesting that interfering with GPR55 signaling in the PAG may promote analgesia. PMID:25972448

  9. Glutamyl-gamma-boronate inhibitors of bacterial Glu-tRNA(Gln) amidotransferase.

    PubMed

    Decicco, C P; Nelson, D J; Luo, Y; Shen, L; Horiuchi, K Y; Amsler, K M; Foster, L A; Spitz, S M; Merrill, J J; Sizemore, C F; Rogers, K C; Copeland, R A; Harpel, M R

    2001-09-17

    Analogues of glutamyl-gamma-boronate (1) were synthesized as mechanism-based inhibitors of bacterial Glu-tRNA(Gln) amidotransferase (Glu-AdT) and were designed to engage a putative catalytic serine nucleophile required for the glutaminase activity of the enzyme. Although 1 provides potent enzyme inhibition, structure-activity studies revealed a narrow range of tolerated chemical changes that maintained activity. Nonetheless, growth inhibition of organisms that require Glu-AdT by the most potent enzyme inhibitors appears to validate mechanism-based inhibitor design of Glu-AdT as an approach to antimicrobial development.

  10. Glutamyl-gamma-boronate inhibitors of bacterial Glu-tRNA(Gln) amidotransferase.

    PubMed

    Decicco, C P; Nelson, D J; Luo, Y; Shen, L; Horiuchi, K Y; Amsler, K M; Foster, L A; Spitz, S M; Merrill, J J; Sizemore, C F; Rogers, K C; Copeland, R A; Harpel, M R

    2001-09-17

    Analogues of glutamyl-gamma-boronate (1) were synthesized as mechanism-based inhibitors of bacterial Glu-tRNA(Gln) amidotransferase (Glu-AdT) and were designed to engage a putative catalytic serine nucleophile required for the glutaminase activity of the enzyme. Although 1 provides potent enzyme inhibition, structure-activity studies revealed a narrow range of tolerated chemical changes that maintained activity. Nonetheless, growth inhibition of organisms that require Glu-AdT by the most potent enzyme inhibitors appears to validate mechanism-based inhibitor design of Glu-AdT as an approach to antimicrobial development. PMID:11549469

  11. Virucidal activity of an activated sludge supernatant.

    PubMed

    Rehn, Y; Schwartzbrod, L

    1993-09-01

    The virucidal activity of the activated sludge aqueous phase was studied from the time of initial inoculation with a poliovirus type 1 suspension and for durations of three and nine days. The mixtures were incubated in presence of a nutritive medium at 26 degrees C and samples were drawn at regular intervals of time for viral titration. The activated sludge supernatant (ASS) caused an important decrease of the titer of the poliovirus type 1 suspension especially after nine days of incubation. There was an average reduction of the viral titer of 79% after three days and 97% after nine days. When incubating the ASS with a nutritive medium before inoculating it, the viral decrease was much greater than when incubating without nutritive medium. When sterilizing the ASS before incubation and then inoculating it, no significant virucidal activity was observed (0% to 6%). Furthermore, when the ASS was subjected to a sterilization by filtration after incubation and was then inoculated, there existed a lower but not negligible viral inactivation (53% to 64%). The virucidal activity potentiality of the ASS is therefore due to microorganisms acting both directly as a support for viral particles adsorption and indirectly via the synthesis of substances with virucidal activity. When freezing and thawing the incubated ASS, and then sterilizing it by filtration before inoculation, the viral decrease reached 87% to 94%. This proves that the virucidal substances are only partly excreted by the microorganisms.

  12. Active magnetic regenerator

    DOEpatents

    Barclay, John A.; Steyert, William A.

    1982-01-01

    The disclosure is directed to an active magnetic regenerator apparatus and method. Brayton, Stirling, Ericsson, and Carnot cycles and the like may be utilized in an active magnetic regenerator to provide efficient refrigeration over relatively large temperature ranges.

  13. Preschoolers’ Physical Activity Behaviours

    PubMed Central

    Irwin, Jennifer D.; He, Meizi; Bouck, L. Michelle Sangster; Tucker, Patricia; Pollett, Graham L.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To understand parents’ perspectives of their preschoolers’ physical activity behaviours. Methods A maximum variation sample of 71 parents explored their preschoolers’ physical activity behaviours through 10 semi-structured focus group discussions. Results Parents perceived Canada’s Physical Activity Guidelines for Children as inadequate; that their preschoolers get and need more than 30–90 minutes of activity daily; and that physical activity habits must be established during the preschool years. Nine barriers against and facilitators toward adequate physical activity were proposed: child’s age, weather, daycare, siblings, finances, time, society and safety, parents’ impact, and child’s activity preferences. Discussion The need for education and interventions that address current barriers are essential for establishing physical activity as a lifestyle behaviour during early childhood and, consequently, helping to prevent both childhood and adulthood obesity. PMID:16625802

  14. Balance Food and Activity

    MedlinePlus

    ... For Health Professionals Tools and Resources Promotional Materials Programming Materials Weight Management Nutrition Physical Activity Reduce Screen ... Training For Health Professionals Tools & Resources Promotional ... Programming Materials Weight Management Nutrition Physical Activity Reduce Screen ...

  15. Population Education. Awareness Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brouse, Deborah E.

    1990-01-01

    Described are awareness activities that deal with human population growth, resources, and the environment. Activities include simulations, mathematical exercises, and discussions of the topic. Specific examples of what individuals can do to help are listed. (KR)

  16. Major operations and activities

    SciTech Connect

    Black, D.G.

    1995-06-01

    This section of the 1994 Hanford Site Environmental Report summarizes the major operations and activities on the site. These operations and activities include site management, waste management, environmental restoration and corrective actions, and research and technology development.

  17. Active Fire Mapping Program

    MedlinePlus

    ... Incidents (Home) New Large Incidents Fire Detection Maps MODIS Satellite Imagery VIIRS Satellite Imagery Fire Detection GIS ... Data Web Services Latest Detected Fire Activity Other MODIS Products Frequently Asked Questions About Active Fire Maps ...

  18. Family Activities for Fitness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grosse, Susan J.

    2009-01-01

    This article discusses how families can increase family togetherness and improve physical fitness. The author provides easy ways to implement family friendly activities for improving and maintaining physical health. These activities include: walking, backyard games, and fitness challenges.

  19. Green Schools Activity Booklet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sacramento Tree Foundation, CA.

    This collection of interdisciplinary hands-on activities covers a variety of topics related to trees and conservation. Twenty-four activities integrate the subjects of social studies, fine arts, science, language arts, math, geography, and music. Although activity instructions are not consistent they usually contain details on objectives and…

  20. Activity Sheets. Draft Copy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duke Power Company, Educational Services Dept., Charlotte, NC.

    This document consists of energy vocabulary activities, three games, worksheets, laboratory activities/exercises, and an introductory classroom exercise designed to introduce energy concepts to students. Vocabulary activities focus on coal and energy consumption. The three games (with instructions) focus on various aspects of energy and energy…

  1. Bonus Activity Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Learning, 1992

    1992-01-01

    Provides on-task activities to fill in unexpected extra moments in elementary classes. The activities require little preparation and take 5-15 minutes to complete. There are activities for math, language arts, social science, science, critical thinking, and computer. An outer space board game is also included. (SM)

  2. Climate Change: An Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Garry

    1995-01-01

    Presents a segment of the Geoscience Education booklet, Climate Change, that contains information and activities that enable students to gain a better appreciation of the possible effects human activity has on the Earth's climate. Describes the Terrace Temperatures activity that leads students through an investigation using foraminifera data to…

  3. Active Learning Crosses Generations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodard, Diane K.

    2002-01-01

    Describes the benefits of intergenerational programs, highlighting a child care program that offers age-appropriate and mutually beneficial activities for children and elders within a nearby retirement community. The program has adopted High/Scope's active learning approach to planning and implementing activities that involve both generations. The…

  4. Activity Theory and Ontology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peim, Nick

    2009-01-01

    This paper seeks to re-examine Yrio Engestrom's activity theory as a technology of knowledge designed to enable positive transformations of specific practices. The paper focuses on a key paper where Engestrom defines the nature and present state of activity theory. Beginning with a brief account of the relations between activity theory and…

  5. Highlights of 1981 activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The highlights of NASA's 1981 activities are presented, including the results of the two flights of the space shuttle Columbia and the Voyager 2 encounter with Saturn. Accomplishments in the areas of space transportation operations; space science; aeronautical, energy, and space research and development; as well as space tracking, international activities, and 1981 launch activities are discussed.

  6. Measurement of Physical Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dishman, Rod K.; Washburn, Richard A.; Schoeller, Dale A.

    2001-01-01

    Valid assessment of physical activity must be unobtrusive, practical to administer, and specific about physical activity type, frequency, duration, and intensity. Assessment methods can be categorized according to whether they provide direct or indirect (e.g., self-report) observation of physical activity, body motion, physiological response…

  7. FL Activities & Festivals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages, Hastings-on-Hudson, NY.

    A collection of student, class, and school foreign language activities suggests a variety of projects and describes three specific school efforts. The suggested activities include: (1) individual student efforts such as writing to pen-pals; (2) group activities such as a foreign language auction or sing-along; (3) group projects for the school…

  8. Technology Learning Activities I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Technology Education Association, Reston, VA.

    This guide contains 30 technology learning activities. Activities may contain all or some of the following: an introduction, objectives, materials and equipment, challenges, limitations, notes and investigations, resources and references used, and evaluation ideas. Activity titles are: (1) Occupations in Construction Technology; (2) Designing a…

  9. Woodsy Owl Activity Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forest Service (USDA), Washington, DC.

    This guide offers teachers and after-school group leaders 12 fun and engaging activities. Activities feature lessons on trees, water, wind, the earth, food, and waste. The activities are designed to help children aged 5-8 become more aware of the natural environment and fundamental conservation principles. Titles of children's books are embedded…

  10. Interactive effects of glutamine and gamma-aminobutyric acid on growth performance and skeletal muscle amino acid metabolism of 22-42-day-old broilers exposed to hot environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Hong; Bai, Xi; Shah, Assar Ali; Dai, Sifa; Wang, Like; Hua, Jinling; Che, Chuanyan; He, Shaojun; Wen, Aiyou; Jiang, Jinpeng

    2016-06-01

    The present experiment was conducted to investigate the interactive effects between dietary glutamine (Gln, 0 and 5 g/kg) and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA, 0 and 100 mg/kg) on growth performance and amino acid (AA) metabolism of broilers under hot environment. A total of 360 22-day-old Arbor Acres male chickens were randomly assigned to five treatment groups under thermoneutral chamber (PC, 23 °C) and cyclic heat stress (HS, 30-34 °C cycling) conditions. Compared with the PC group, cyclic HS decreased ( P < 0.05) daily weight gain (DWG), daily feed consumption (DFC), the concentrations of Gln, glutamate (Glu), and GABA, and the activities of glutaminase and glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) in breast muscle at 28, 35, and 42 days, while it increased ( P < 0.05) the activities of glutamine synthetase (GS) and gamma-aminobutyric acid transaminase (GABA-T) at 28, 35, and 42 days. Dietary Gln and GABA improved ( P < 0.05) DWG and DFC of broilers under cyclic HS during 28-42 days. In breast muscle, the Gln supplementation increased ( P < 0.05) the concentrations of Gln (28, 35, and 42 days), Glu (28, 35, and 42 days), and GABA (42 days) and the activities of glutaminase (28, 35, and 42 days) and GAD (28, 35, and 42 days) but decreased ( P < 0.05) GS activities at 28, 35, and 42 days and GABA-T activities at 28 days. The addition of GABA increased ( P < 0.05) the concentrations of Gln and Glu and activities of glutaminase and GAD, while it decreased ( P < 0.05) GABA-T activities at 28, 35, and 42 days. Significant interactions ( P < 0.05) between Gln and GABA were found on breast skeletal muscle Gln concentrations, glutaminase activities, GS activities at 28 and 35 days, and DWG, GABA concentrations, and GABA-T activities at 28, 35, and 42 days in broilers under cyclic HS. In conclusion, the present results indicated that the interactions of exogenous Gln and GABA could offer a potential nutritional strategy to prevent HS-related depression in skeletal muscle Gln and

  11. Tea enhances insulin activity.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Richard A; Polansky, Marilyn M

    2002-11-20

    The most widely known health benefits of tea relate to the polyphenols as the principal active ingredients in protection against oxidative damage and in antibacterial, antiviral, anticarcinogenic, and antimutagenic activities, but polyphenols in tea may also increase insulin activity. The objective of this study was to determine the insulin-enhancing properties of tea and its components. Tea, as normally consumed, was shown to increase insulin activity >15-fold in vitro in an epididymal fat cell assay. Black, green, and oolong teas but not herbal teas, which are not teas in the traditional sense because they do not contain leaves of Camellia senensis, were all shown to increase insulin activity. High-performance liquid chromatography fractionation of tea extracts utilizing a Waters SymmetryPrep C18 column showed that the majority of the insulin-potentiating activity for green and oolong teas was due to epigallocatechin gallate. For black tea, the activity was present in several regions of the chromatogram corresponding to, in addition to epigallocatechin gallate, tannins, theaflavins, and other undefined compounds. Several known compounds found in tea were shown to enhance insulin with the greatest activity due to epigallocatechin gallate followed by epicatechin gallate, tannins, and theaflavins. Caffeine, catechin, and epicatechin displayed insignificant insulin-enhancing activities. Addition of lemon to the tea did not affect the insulin-potentiating activity. Addition of 5 g of 2% milk per cup decreased the insulin-potentiating activity one-third, and addition of 50 g of milk per cup decreased the insulin-potentiating activity approximately 90%. Nondairy creamers and soy milk also decreased the insulin-enhancing activity. These data demonstrate that tea contains in vitro insulin-enhancing activity and the predominant active ingredient is epigallocatechin gallate. PMID:12428980

  12. Vestibular activation of sympathetic nerve activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, C. A.; Carter, J. R.

    2003-01-01

    AIM: The vestibulosympathetic reflex refers to sympathetic nerve activation by the vestibular system. Animal studies indicate that the vestibular system assists in blood pressure regulation during orthostasis. Although human studies clearly demonstrate activation of muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) during engagement of the otolith organs, the role of the vestibulosympathetic reflex in maintaining blood pressure during orthostasis is not well-established. Examination of the vestibulosympathetic reflex with other cardiovascular reflexes indicates that it is a powerful and independent reflex. Ageing, which is associated with an increased risk for orthostatic hypotension, attenuates the vestibulosympathetic reflex. The attenuated reflex is associated with a reduction in arterial pressure. CONCLUSION: These findings suggest that the vestibulosympathetic reflex assists in blood pressure regulation in humans, but future studies examining this reflex in other orthostatically intolerant populations are necessary to address this hypothesis.

  13. In vitro and in vivo assessment of piroxicam incorporated Aloe vera transgel

    PubMed Central

    Velam, Vinesha; Yalavarthi, Prasanna Raju; Sundaresan, CR; Vandana, KR; Dudala, Thushara Bindu; Kodavatikanti, Haritha; Vadlamudi, Harini Chowdary

    2013-01-01

    Background: The aim of the study was to develop piroxicam-Aloe vera gel (PAG) formulation and make a pharmacodynamic evaluation of the formulation. Materials and Methods: The gel was prepared by using carbopol 934 as gelling agent and methyl paraben as a preservative in an Aloe vera gel base. The formulated gel was also evaluated for physicochemical parameters like pH, viscosity, drug content, and in vitro diffusion assessment. Pharmacodynamic activity of the formulation was evaluated in Wistar albino rats. The formulated gel was compared with that of similar marketed gel (commercial piroxicam gel (CPG)) against the same parameters. Results: From in vitro studies, an effective drug release from PAG was observed to be 68.17% when compared with that of the CPG (62.71%) at 180 min indicating better drug release from the gel formulated in this study. Percentage inhibition of edema was greater for the preparation of PAG (29.57 mean percent inhibition after 60 min) compared to marketed gel which exhibited 18.3% after 60 min. Conclusion: It was concluded from the results that the Aloe vera gel acts as an effective gel base to prepare piroxicam gel with high drug loading capacity and improved anti-inflammatory effect. From the statistical analysis the formulation of PAG showed better release than the CPG at p < 0.05 level of significance. PMID:24350041

  14. Neuroimaging of the Periaqueductal Gray: State of the Field

    PubMed Central

    Linnman, Clas; Moulton, Eric A.; Barmettler, Gabi; Becerra, Lino; Borsook, David

    2011-01-01

    This review and meta-analysis aims at summarizing and integrating the human neuroimaging studies that report periaqueductal gray (PAG) involvement; 250 original manuscripts on human neuroimaging of the PAG were identified. A narrative review and meta-analysis using activation likelihood estimates is included. Behaviors covered include pain and pain modulation, anxiety, bladder and bowel function and autonomic regulation. Methods include structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging, functional connectivity measures, diffusion weighted imaging and positron emission tomography. Human neuroimaging studies in healthy and clinical populations largely confirm the animal literature indicating that the PAG is involved in homeostatic regulation of salient functions such as pain, anxiety and autonomic function. Methodological concerns in the current literature, including resolution constraints, imaging artifacts and imprecise neuroanatomical labeling are discussed, and future directions are proposed. A general conclusion is that PAG neuroimaging is a field with enormous potential to translate animal data onto human behaviors, but with some growing pains that can and need to be addressed in order to add to our understanding of the neurobiology of this key region. PMID:22197740

  15. Regulation of the intersubunit ammonia tunnel in Mycobacterium tuberculosis glutamine-dependent NAD[superscript +] synthetase

    SciTech Connect

    Chuenchor, Watchalee; Doukov, Tzanko I.; Resto, Melissa; Chang, Andrew; Gerratana, Barbara

    2012-08-31

    Glutamine-dependent NAD{sup +} synthetase is an essential enzyme and a validated drug target in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (mtuNadE). It catalyses the ATP-dependent formation of NAD{sup +} from NaAD{sup +} (nicotinic acid-adenine dinucleotide) at the synthetase active site and glutamine hydrolysis at the glutaminase active site. An ammonia tunnel 40 {angstrom} (1 {angstrom} = 0.1 nm) long allows transfer of ammonia from one active site to the other. The enzyme displays stringent kinetic synergism; however, its regulatory mechanism is unclear. In the present paper, we report the structures of the inactive glutaminase C176A variant in an apo form and in three synthetase-ligand complexes with substrates (NaAD{sup +}/ATP), substrate analogue {l_brace}NaAD{sup +}/AMP-CPP (adenosine 5'-[{alpha},{beta}-methylene]triphosphate){r_brace} and intermediate analogues (NaAD{sup +}/AMP/PPi), as well as the structure of wild-type mtuNadE in a product complex (NAD{sup +}/AMP/PPi/glutamate). This series of structures provides snapshots of the ammonia tunnel during the catalytic cycle supported also by kinetics and mutagenesis studies. Three major constriction sites are observed in the tunnel: (i) at the entrance near the glutaminase active site; (ii) in the middle of the tunnel; and (iii) at the end near the synthetase active site. Variation in the number and radius of the tunnel constrictions is apparent in the crystal structures and is related to ligand binding at the synthetase domain. These results provide new insight into the regulation of ammonia transport in the intermolecular tunnel of mtuNadE.

  16. Lamotrigine reverses masseter overactivity caused by stress maybe via Glu suppression.

    PubMed

    Song, Fang; Li, Qiang; Wan, Zhong-Yuan; Zhao, Ya-Juan; Huang, Fei; Yang, Qi; Zhao, Wen-Feng; Zhang, Min; Chen, Yong-Jin

    2014-10-01

    Experimental and non-experimental stress significantly increase masseter muscle tone, which has been linked to the symptoms and pathogenesis of several stomatognathic system diseases. Until now, the mechanism underlying this phenomenon has remained unclear. The current study was performed to determine the mechanism of the stress-induced increase in masseter muscle tone and to investigate the effect of lamotrigine on this change. Animals challenged by repeated restraint stress received either saline as a vehicle or lamotrigine in doses of 20, 30 or 40 mg/kg body weight, whereas control animals received saline without stress treatment. Masseter muscle tone was assessed using electromyography. The activity of glutamate-related metabolic enzymes (glutaminase and glutamine synthetase) in the trigeminal motor nucleus was also investigated. Our results showed an interesting phenomenon: masseter muscle activity increased concurrently with the upregulation of the glutamate concentration after stress treatment. The activities of glutaminase and glutamine synthetase in the trigeminal motor nucleus were also upregulated and downregulated, respectively, when the rats were challenged by prolonged stress. The animals treated with lamotrigine at moderate and high doses had significantly decreased masseter muscle tone compared with stressed animals treated with vehicle. These results suggested that increased glutaminase activity and decreased glutamine synthetase activity increased glutamate production and decreased glutamate decomposition, causing an increase in glutamate levels in the trigeminal motor nucleus and eventually increasing masseter muscle tone. The administration of lamotrigine at doses of 30 or 40 mg/kg body weight effectively mitigated the adverse effects of stress on masseter muscle tone via inhibition of glutamate release.

  17. Lamotrigine reverses masseter overactivity caused by stress maybe via Glu suppression.

    PubMed

    Song, Fang; Li, Qiang; Wan, Zhong-Yuan; Zhao, Ya-Juan; Huang, Fei; Yang, Qi; Zhao, Wen-Feng; Zhang, Min; Chen, Yong-Jin

    2014-10-01

    Experimental and non-experimental stress significantly increase masseter muscle tone, which has been linked to the symptoms and pathogenesis of several stomatognathic system diseases. Until now, the mechanism underlying this phenomenon has remained unclear. The current study was performed to determine the mechanism of the stress-induced increase in masseter muscle tone and to investigate the effect of lamotrigine on this change. Animals challenged by repeated restraint stress received either saline as a vehicle or lamotrigine in doses of 20, 30 or 40 mg/kg body weight, whereas control animals received saline without stress treatment. Masseter muscle tone was assessed using electromyography. The activity of glutamate-related metabolic enzymes (glutaminase and glutamine synthetase) in the trigeminal motor nucleus was also investigated. Our results showed an interesting phenomenon: masseter muscle activity increased concurrently with the upregulation of the glutamate concentration after stress treatment. The activities of glutaminase and glutamine synthetase in the trigeminal motor nucleus were also upregulated and downregulated, respectively, when the rats were challenged by prolonged stress. The animals treated with lamotrigine at moderate and high doses had significantly decreased masseter muscle tone compared with stressed animals treated with vehicle. These results suggested that increased glutaminase activity and decreased glutamine synthetase activity increased glutamate production and decreased glutamate decomposition, causing an increase in glutamate levels in the trigeminal motor nucleus and eventually increasing masseter muscle tone. The administration of lamotrigine at doses of 30 or 40 mg/kg body weight effectively mitigated the adverse effects of stress on masseter muscle tone via inhibition of glutamate release. PMID:24955497

  18. Crystal structures capture three states in the catalytic cycle of a pyridoxal phosphate (PLP) synthase.

    PubMed

    Smith, Amber Marie; Brown, William Clay; Harms, Etti; Smith, Janet L

    2015-02-27

    PLP synthase (PLPS) is a remarkable single-enzyme biosynthetic pathway that produces pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP) from glutamine, ribose 5-phosphate, and glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate. The intact enzyme includes 12 synthase and 12 glutaminase subunits. PLP synthesis occurs in the synthase active site by a complicated mechanism involving at least two covalent intermediates at a catalytic lysine. The first intermediate forms with ribose 5-phosphate. The glutaminase subunit is a glutamine amidotransferase that hydrolyzes glutamine and channels ammonia to the synthase active site. Ammonia attack on the first covalent intermediate forms the second intermediate. Glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate reacts with the second intermediate to form PLP. To investigate the mechanism of the synthase subunit, crystal structures were obtained for three intermediate states of the Geobacillus stearothermophilus intact PLPS or its synthase subunit. The structures capture the synthase active site at three distinct steps in its complicated catalytic cycle, provide insights into the elusive mechanism, and illustrate the coordinated motions within the synthase subunit that separate the catalytic states. In the intact PLPS with a Michaelis-like intermediate in the glutaminase active site, the first covalent intermediate of the synthase is fully sequestered within the enzyme by the ordering of a generally disordered 20-residue C-terminal tail. Following addition of ammonia, the synthase active site opens and admits the Lys-149 side chain, which participates in formation of the second intermediate and PLP. Roles are identified for conserved Asp-24 in the formation of the first intermediate and for conserved Arg-147 in the conversion of the first to the second intermediate. PMID:25568319

  19. Physical Activity and Albuminuria

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Emily S.; Fisher, Naomi D.; Forman, John P.; Curhan, Gary C.

    2010-01-01

    Higher urinary albumin excretion predicts future cardiovascular disease, hypertension, and chronic kidney disease. Physical activity improves endothelial function so activity may reduce albuminuria. Among diabetics, physical activity decreases albuminuria. In nondiabetics, prior studies have shown no association. The authors explored the cross-sectional association between physical activity and albuminuria in 3,587 nondiabetic women in 2 US cohorts, the Nurses’ Health Study I in 2000 and the Nurses’ Health Study II in 1997. Physical activity was expressed as metabolic equivalents per week. The outcome was the top albumin/creatinine ratio (ACR) decile. Multivariate logistic regression was used. Secondary analyses explored the ACR association with strenuous activity and walking. The mean age was 58.6 years. Compared with women in the lowest physical activity quintile, those in the highest quintile had a multivariate-adjusted odds ratio for the top ACR decile of 0.65 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.46, 0.93). The multivariate-adjusted odds ratio for the top ACR decile for those with greater than 210 minutes per week of strenuous activity compared with no strenuous activity was 0.61 (95% CI: 0.37, 0.99), and for those in the highest quintile of walking compared with the lowest quintile, it was 0.69 (95% CI: 0.47, 1.02). Greater physical activity is associated with a lower ACR in nondiabetic women. PMID:20133515

  20. Activated carbon from biomass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manocha, S.; Manocha, L. M.; Joshi, Parth; Patel, Bhavesh; Dangi, Gaurav; Verma, Narendra

    2013-06-01

    Activated carbon are unique and versatile adsorbents having extended surface area, micro porous structure, universal adsorption effect, high adsorption capacity and high degree of surface reactivity. Activated carbons are synthesized from variety of materials. Most commonly used on a commercial scale are cellulosic based precursors such as peat, coal, lignite wood and coconut shell. Variation occurs in precursors in terms of structure and carbon content. Coir having very low bulk density and porous structure is found to be one of the valuable raw materials for the production of highly porous activated carbon and other important factor is its high carbon content. Exploration of good low cost and non conventional adsorbent may contribute to the sustainability of the environment and offer promising benefits for the commercial purpose in future. Carbonization of biomass was carried out in a horizontal muffle furnace. Both carbonization and activation were performed in inert nitrogen atmosphere in one step to enhance the surface area and to develop interconnecting porosity. The types of biomass as well as the activation conditions determine the properties and the yield of activated carbon. Activated carbon produced from biomass is cost effective as it is easily available as a waste biomass. Activated carbon produced by combination of chemical and physical activation has higher surface area of 2442 m2/gm compared to that produced by physical activation (1365 m2/gm).

  1. Physiologic activities of the contact activation system.

    PubMed

    Schmaier, Alvin H

    2014-05-01

    The plasma contact activation (CAS) and kallikrein/kinin (KKS) systems consist of 4 proteins: factor XII, prekallikrein, high molecular weight kininogen, and the bradykinin B2 receptor. Murine genetic deletion of factor XII (F12(-/-)), prekallikrein (Klkb1(-/-)), high molecular weight kininogen (Kgn1(-/-)) and the bradykinin B2 receptor (Bdkrb2(-/-)) yield animals protected from thrombosis. With possible exception of F12(-/-) and Kgn1(-/-) mice, the mechanism(s) for thrombosis protection is not reduced contact activation. Bdkrb2(-/-) mice are best characterized and they are protected from thrombosis through over expression of components of the renin angiotensin system (RAS) leading to elevated prostacyclin with vascular and platelet inhibition. Alternatively, prolylcarboxypeptidase, a PK activator and degrader of angiotensin II, when deficient in the mouse leads to a prothrombotic state. Its mechanism for increased thrombosis also is mediated in part by components of the RAS. These observations suggest that thrombosis in mice of the CAS and KKS are mediated in part through the RAS and independent of reduced contact activation. PMID:24759141

  2. Marine Biology Activities. Ocean Related Curriculum Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pauls, John

    The ocean affects all of our lives. Therefore, awareness of and information about the interconnections between humans and oceans are prerequisites to making sound decisions for the future. Project ORCA (Ocean Related Curriculum Activities) has developed interdisciplinary curriculum materials designed to meet the needs of students and teachers…

  3. Galanin microinjection into the dorsal periaqueductal gray matter produces paradigm-dependent anxiolytic effects.

    PubMed

    Soares, F R C; Silote, G P; Almeida-Santos, A F; Aguiar, D C; Schenberg, L C; Beijamini, V

    2016-03-01

    Galanin is a peptide that is present in the central nervous system in mammals, including rodents and humans. The actions of galanin are mediated by three types of metabotropic receptors: GAL1, GAL2, and GAL3. GAL1 and GAL3 increase K(+) efflux, and GAL2 increases intracellular Ca(2+) levels. The distribution of galanin and its receptors suggests its involvement in fear and/or anxiety. The periaqueductal gray matter (PAG) is a key mediator of defensive behaviors that is both targeted by galaninergic projections and supplied with GAL1 receptors and, less markedly, GAL2 receptors. We examined the effects of galanin microinjections in the dorsal PAG (dPAG) on the performance of rats in different models of anxiety. Male Wistar rats (n=7-12) were implanted with guide cannulae in the dPAG. They received microinjections of either galanin (0.3, 1.0, and 3.0 nmol) or vehicle and were tested in the Vogel conflict test (VCT), elevated plus maze (EPM), and elevated T-maze (ETM). Rats that were tested in the ETM were further evaluated for exploratory activity in the open field test (OFT). Galanin microinjections had no effects on anxiety-like behavior in the EPM or VCT or exploratory activity in the EPM or OFT. In the ETM, however, microinjections of 3 nmol galanin impaired learned anxiety (i.e., avoidance of the open arms) without changing unconditioned fear (i.e., escape from the open arms). The present data suggest that galanin transmission in the dPAG inhibits the acquisition of anxiety-like responses in the ETM. PMID:26751815

  4. Effects of dorsal periaqueductal gray CRF1- and CRF2-receptor stimulation in animal models of panic.

    PubMed

    Sergio, Thatiane de Oliveira; Spiacci, Ailton; Zangrossi, Hélio

    2014-11-01

    An increasing amount of evidence suggests that dysregulation of corticotrophin-releasing factor (CRF) signaling may contribute to the etiology of anxiety disorders such as post-traumatic stress disorder and panic. The dorsal periaqueductal gray matter (dPAG) in the midbrain has been considered a key region involved in the physiopathology of anxiety and panic. Administration of CRF in this structure enhances the expression of anxiety-related defensive behaviors in different animal models. Controversial results have been obtained regarding the involvement of CRF1 and CRF2 receptors in the regulation of panic-related responses. We report here that CRF (0.0625-1 μg) in the dPAG facilitates escape expression in two animal models that associate this behavior with panic, the elevated T-maze and the electrical stimulation of the dPAG. This effect, equally observed after CRF injection in the dorsomedial and dorsolateral columns of the PAG, is due to the activation of CRF1 receptors as revealed by its blockade by the CRF1 receptor antagonist antalarmin. In the elevated T-maze, CRF also facilitates inhibitory avoidance acquisition, suggesting an anxiogenic effect. Local administration of urocortin 2 (0.01-0.1 μg), a preferential CRF2 receptor agonist, failed to change escape expression, but impaired avoidance learning, indicating an anxiolytic effect. The results indicate that CRF1 receptors in the dPAG play a pervasive role in the regulation of defensive responses associated with both generalized anxiety and panic. Recruitment of CRF2 receptors only impacts upon the former type of behaviors, leading to an effect opposed to that caused by CRF1 receptor activation.

  5. Lightning Activities and Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jann-Yenq

    2016-04-01

    The lightning activity is one of the key parameters to understand the atmospheric electric fields and/or currents near the Earth's surface as well as the lithosphere-atmosphere coupling during the earthquake preparation period. In this study, to see whether or not lightning activities are related to earthquakes, we statistically examine lightning activities 30 days before and after 78 land and 230 sea M>5.0 earthquakes in Taiwan during the 12-year period of 1993-2004. Lightning activities versus the location, depth, and magnitude of earthquakes are investigated. Results show that lightning activities tend to appear around the forthcoming epicenter and are significantly enhanced a few, especially 17-19, days before the M>6.0 shallow (depth D< 20 km) land earthquakes. Moreover, the size of the area around the epicenter with the statistical significance of lightning activity enhancement is proportional to the earthquake magnitude.

  6. Thermally Activated Driver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinard, William H.; Murray, Robert C.; Walsh, Robert F.

    1987-01-01

    Space-qualified, precise, large-force, thermally activated driver (TAD) developed for use in space on astro-physics experiment to measure abundance of rare actinide-group elements in cosmic rays. Actinide cosmic rays detected using thermally activated driver as heart of event-thermometer (ET) system. Thermal expansion and contraction of silicone oil activates driver. Potential applications in fluid-control systems where precise valve controls are needed.

  7. Activated recombinant adenovirus proteinases

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, C.W.; Mangel, W.F.

    1999-08-10

    This application describes methods and expression constructs for producing activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases. Purified activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases and methods of purification are described. Activated adenovirus proteinases and methods for obtaining activated adenovirus proteinases are further included. Isolated peptide cofactors of adenovirus proteinase activity, methods of purifying and identifying peptide cofactors are also described. Antibodies immunoreactive with adenovirus proteinases, immunospecific antibodies, and methods for preparing them are also described. Other related methods and materials are also described. 29 figs.

  8. Activated recombinant adenovirus proteinases

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Carl W.; Mangel, Walter F.

    1999-08-10

    This application describes methods and expression constructs for producing activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases. Purified activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases and methods of purification are described. Activated adenovirus proteinases and methods for obtaining activated adenovirus proteinases are further included. Isolated peptide cofactors of adenovirus proteinase activity, methods of purifying and identifying said peptide cofactors are also described. Antibodies immunoreactive with adenovirus proteinases, immunospecific antibodies, and methods for preparing them are also described. Other related methods and materials are also described.

  9. Active unilateral condylar hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Luz, J G; de Rezende, J R; de Araújo, V C; Chilvarquer, I

    1994-01-01

    Two cases of active unilateral condylar hyperplasia which were treated with condylectomy alone are presented. The first case was an adult form and the other a juvenile form. Both were classified as active by using 99Tc bone scintigraphy. Clinical and radiographic features of both cases conformed to the hemimandibular hypertrophy type. Satisfactory facial symmetry and dental occlusion were achieved. Histopathological data confirmed the activity of the articular cartilage layers. PMID:8181091

  10. Activity in distant comets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luu, Jane X.

    1992-01-01

    Activity in distant comets remains a mystery in the sense that we still have no complete theory to explain the various types of activity exhibited by different comets at large distances. This paper explores the factors that should play a role in determining activity in a distant comet, especially in the cases of comet P/Tempel 2, comet Schwassmann-Wachmann 1, and 2060 Chiron.

  11. Crew activities in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bluford, G. S., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    One of the mission requirements of the Space Shuttle is to serve as a working platform for experiments in space. Many of these experiments will be performed by crewmembers (mission specialists and payload specialists) in a general purpose laboratory called Spacelab. All nonexperiment-related activities or housekeeping activities will be done in the Orbiter, while most of the mission-related activities (experiments) will be done in Spacelab. In order for experimenters to design their experiments to best utilize the capabilities of the Orbiter, the Spacelab, and the crew, the working environment in the Orbiter and in Spacelab is described. In addition, the housekeeping activities required of the crew are summarized.

  12. Physical Activity and Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... of scientists, ranging from experts in basic biological science to those with expertise in community behavioral interventions to increase physical activity. This combination of scientists and expertise will ...

  13. NASA metrication activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vlannes, P. N.

    1978-01-01

    NASA's organization and policy for metrification, history from 1964, NASA participation in Federal agency activities, interaction with nongovernmental metrication organizations, and the proposed metrication assessment study are reviewed.

  14. Active Flow Control Activities at NASA Langley

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anders, Scott G.; Sellers, William L., III; Washburn, Anthony E.

    2004-01-01

    NASA Langley continues to aggressively investigate the potential advantages of active flow control over more traditional aerodynamic techniques. This paper provides an update to a previous paper and describes both the progress in the various research areas and the significant changes in the NASA research programs. The goals of the topics presented are focused on advancing the state of knowledge and understanding of controllable fundamental mechanisms in fluids as well as to address engineering challenges. An organizational view of current research activities at NASA Langley in active flow control as supported by several projects is presented. On-center research as well as NASA Langley funded contracts and grants are discussed at a relatively high level. The products of this research are to be demonstrated either in bench-top experiments, wind-tunnel investigations, or in flight as part of the fundamental NASA R&D program and then transferred to more applied research programs within NASA, DOD, and U.S. industry.

  15. Serotonin 5-HT1A and 5-HT2/1C receptors in the midbrain periaqueductal gray differentially modulate defensive rage behavior elicited from the medial hypothalamus of the cat.

    PubMed

    Shaikh, M B; De Lanerolle, N C; Siegel, A

    1997-08-15

    evidence that activation of 5-HT1A and 5-HT2/1C receptors within the midbrain PAG differentially modulate the expression of defensive rage behavior elicited from the medial hypothalamus of the cat. PMID:9313892

  16. Activity Book: Ocean Ecology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Learning, 1992

    1992-01-01

    Presents a collection of activities to help elementary students study ocean ecology. The activities have students investigate ocean inhabitants, analyze animal adaptations, examine how temperature and saltiness affect ocean creatures, and learn about safeguarding the sea. Student pages offer reproducible learning sheets. (SM)

  17. [Field Learning Activities].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nolde Forest Environmental Education Center, Reading, PA.

    Seventy field activities, pertinent to outdoor, environmental studies, are described in this compilation. Designed for elementary and junior high school students, the activities cover many discipline areas--science, social studies, language arts, health, history, mathematics, and art--and many are multidisciplinary in use. Topics range from soil…

  18. Rainy Day Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Child Care, 1997

    1997-01-01

    Experienced caregivers plan ahead for rainy days. This article describes specific rainy day activities for young children, such as books and crafts to learn about rain (rain in a jar, making a rainbow), simple cooking activities (taffy pull, cinnamon candy tea), and games (mummy wrap, hunt the thimble, rain lotto). (EV)

  19. Activities of the ILO.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Labour Education, 1984

    1984-01-01

    Seven articles on International Labour Organization (ILO) activities cover study groups at ILO headquarters, a Philippine rural workers seminar, women's participation in Central American union activities, worksite courses in India, and seminars and symposia in Cape Verde, Mauritius, and Sierra Leone. (SK)

  20. Active Students in Webinars

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolås, Line; Nordseth, Hugo; Yri, Jørgen Sørlie

    2015-01-01

    To ensure student activity in webinars we have defined 10 learning tasks focusing on production and communication e.g. collaborative writing, discussion and polling, and investigated how the technology supports the learning activities. The three project partners in the VisPed-project use different video-conferencing systems, and we analyzed how it…

  1. The Activity of Trypsin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russo, Salvatore F.; Holzman, Tom

    1977-01-01

    Describes an experiment that illustrates the following points concerning the experimental determination of trypsin activity: (1) there is a difference in basing enzyme concentration on weight, absorbance, or active sites; and (2) the method of expressing enzyme concentration determines the value of specific, molecular, and catalytic center…

  2. Emotionally Intense Science Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Donna; Ritchie, Stephen; Sandhu, Maryam; Henderson, Senka

    2015-01-01

    Science activities that evoke positive emotional responses make a difference to students' emotional experience of science. In this study, we explored 8th Grade students' discrete emotions expressed during science activities in a unit on Energy. Multiple data sources including classroom videos, interviews and emotion diaries completed at the end of…

  3. Games and Word Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Northwest Regional Educational Lab., Portland, OR.

    Games and word activities give children another way to integrate their learning and reinforce their literacy skills. They provide different and enjoyable contexts in which children can apply what they are learning. This booklet offers activities which provide a sampling of "fun" ways for tutors to support and supplement their tutees' classroom…

  4. Active Healthy Summer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elliott, Eloise

    2005-01-01

    Summer break is almost here for most elementary teachers and students. Warmer weather and additional free time to make choices create more opportunities to be physically active, whether home alone or out with friends and family. This article describes ways by which physical education specialists can encourage students' physical activity by…

  5. Coordinating Shared Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clement, Bradley

    2004-01-01

    Shared Activity Coordination (ShAC) is a computer program for planning and scheduling the activities of an autonomous team of interacting spacecraft and exploratory robots. ShAC could also be adapted to such terrestrial uses as helping multiple factory managers work toward competing goals while sharing such common resources as floor space, raw materials, and transports. ShAC iteratively invokes the Continuous Activity Scheduling Planning Execution and Replanning (CASPER) program to replan and propagate changes to other planning programs in an effort to resolve conflicts. A domain-expert specifies which activities and parameters thereof are shared and reports the expected conditions and effects of these activities on the environment. By specifying these conditions and effects differently for each planning program, the domain-expert subprogram defines roles that each spacecraft plays in a coordinated activity. The domain-expert subprogram also specifies which planning program has scheduling control over each shared activity. ShAC enables sharing of information, consensus over the scheduling of collaborative activities, and distributed conflict resolution. As the other planning programs incorporate new goals and alter their schedules in the changing environment, ShAC continually coordinates to respond to unexpected events.

  6. Reflections on Activity Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bakhurst, David

    2009-01-01

    It is sometimes suggested that activity theory represents the most important legacy of Soviet philosophy and psychology. But what exactly "is" activity theory? The canonical account in the West is given by Engestrom, who identifies three stages in the theory's development: from Vygotsky's insights, through Leontiev's articulation of the…

  7. Obesity, Physical Activity - Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilliam, Thomas B.

    Childhood obesity starts at a very early age, and preventive measures taken early enough may retard the development of fat cells. It appears that physical activity plays an important role in reducing obesity. The activity program must start early, in preschool days. It is felt that screening children for obesity when they first enter school and…

  8. Science World Activities Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wisconsin Academy of Sciences, Arts and Letters, Madison.

    This document consists of three sections. Section I contains 19 activities developed by master teachers for the Science World '84 summer science program. These activities focus on studies involving airplane controls, trash bag kites, computers, meteorology, compass orienteering, soils, aquatic ecosystems, bogs, and others. Objectives, materials…

  9. Peak Longevity Physical Activity

    Cancer.gov

    People who engage in three to five times the recommended minimum level of leisure-time physical activity derive the greatest benefit in terms of mortality reduction when compared with people who do not engage in leisure-time physical activity.

  10. ZOOMsci Activity Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wade, Meredith

    This activity guide is based on the Public Broadcasting System's (PBS) program "ZOOM." It is designed for educators with activities that are categorized into three themes: (1) Things That Go, which includes "Air" which explores air pressure, "Rubber Bands" which discovers the potential energy of rubber bands, "Baking Soda and Vinegar" which…

  11. Active galactic nuclei

    PubMed Central

    Fabian, Andrew C.

    1999-01-01

    Active galactic nuclei are the most powerful, long-lived objects in the Universe. Recent data confirm the theoretical idea that the power source is accretion into a massive black hole. The common occurrence of obscuration and outflows probably means that the contribution of active galactic nuclei to the power density of the Universe has been generally underestimated. PMID:10220363

  12. Activation of fly ash

    DOEpatents

    Corbin, D.R.; Velenyi, L.J.; Pepera, M.A.; Dolhyj, S.R.

    1986-08-19

    Fly ash is activated by heating a screened magnetic fraction of the ash in a steam atmosphere and then reducing, oxidizing and again reducing the hydrothermally treated fraction. The activated fly ash can be used as a carbon monoxide disproportionating catalyst useful in the production of hydrogen and methane.

  13. Laboratory Activities in Israel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mamlok-Naaman, Rachel; Barnea, Nitza

    2012-01-01

    Laboratory activities have long had a distinctive and central role in the science curriculum, and science educators have suggested that many benefits accrue from engaging students in science laboratory activities. Many research studies have been conducted to investigate the educational effectiveness of laboratory work in science education in…

  14. Curriculum Activities on Aging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmall, Vicki L.; Benge, Nancy

    This paper contains learning activities on aging for use with elementary, high school, and university students in health, family relationships, social studies, and art courses. The activities are intended to help youth develop a more realistic understanding of the aging process and to become aware of both the problems and benefits associated with…

  15. Nutrition Activities Resource Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York City Board of Education, Brooklyn, NY. Div. of Special Education.

    The resource guide suggests activities to help special education students make appropriate choices about their nutritional habits. It is explained that the activities can be infused into other curriculum areas. The guide consists of five themes and includes performance objectives for each: foods eaten at school (planning a school lunch, keeping a…

  16. Activation of fly ash

    DOEpatents

    Corbin, David R.; Velenyi, Louis J.; Pepera, Marc A.; Dolhyj, Serge R.

    1986-01-01

    Fly ash is activated by heating a screened magnetic fraction of the ash in a steam atmosphere and then reducing, oxidizing and again reducing the hydrothermally treated fraction. The activated fly ash can be used as a carbon monoxide disproportionating catalyst useful in the production of hydrogen and methane.

  17. Learning Activities for Toddlers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Child Care, 1996

    1996-01-01

    Suggests activities to help toddlers develop skills in the four important areas of self-help, creativity, world mastery, and coordination. Activities include hand washing, button practice, painting, movement and music, bubble making, creation of a nature mural, and a shoe print trail. (TJQ)

  18. Active and Healthy Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ball, Stephen; Kovarik, Jessica; Leidy, Heather

    2015-01-01

    The Active and Healthy School Program (AHS) can be used to alter the culture and environment of a school to help children make healthier choices. The purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of AHS to increase physical activity while decreasing total screen time, increase healthy food choices, and improve knowledge about physical…

  19. Calculator-Active Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crow, Tracy, Ed.; Harris, Julia, Ed.

    1997-01-01

    This journal contains brief descriptions of calculator-active materials that were found using Resource Finder, the searchable online catalog of curriculum resources from the Eisenhower National Clearinghouse (ENC). It features both the calculators themselves and the activity books that are used with them. Among the calculators included are those…

  20. Activating Event Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hare, Mary; Jones, Michael; Thomson, Caroline; Kelly, Sarah; McRae, Ken

    2009-01-01

    An increasing number of results in sentence and discourse processing demonstrate that comprehension relies on rich pragmatic knowledge about real-world events, and that incoming words incrementally activate such knowledge. If so, then even outside of any larger context, nouns should activate knowledge of the generalized events that they denote or…

  1. Bonus Activity Book. Peacemakers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitman, Betsy Blizard

    1992-01-01

    Activity book helps elementary students learn about peace and see themselves as peacemakers and peacekeepers. Students are introduced to literary and historical figures who have worked for peace and won the Nobel Peace Prize. Activities teach students that peace means more than calm situations or absence of war. (SM)

  2. Vegetable Soup Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shepard, Mary; Shepard, Ray

    Vegetable Soup is a new children's television series whose purpose is to counter the negative and destructive effects of racial isolation. This manual gives detailed instructions for discussion of activities that are presented during the television series such as: crafts, games, recipes, language activities, and children's questions. A list of…

  3. Student Activities. Managing Liability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Barbara; And Others

    This monograph suggests ways that college or university administrations can undertake a systematic and careful review of the risks posed by students' activities. Its purpose is to provide guidance in integrating the risk management process into a school's existing approaches to managing student organizations and activities. It is noted that no…

  4. Untangling occupation and activity.

    PubMed

    Pierce, D

    2001-01-01

    Activity and occupation are two core concepts of occupational therapy that are in need of differentiation. Occupation is defined here as a person's personally constructed, one-time experience within a unique context. Activity is defined as a more general, culturally shared idea about a category of action. The ways in which subjectivity and context are handled within the concepts of occupation and activity are keys to disentangling them. The proposed untangling of the two concepts into distinct definitions is congruent with their historical origins as well as with current definitional trends. Once occupation and activity are recognized as two separate and equally valuable concepts, they offer a rich set of theoretical relations for exploration. The clarity that will result from differentiating occupation and activity will enhance disciplinary discourse and research as well as enhance the intervention efficacy, moral surety, and political strength of the profession.

  5. Active element pattern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pozar, D. M.

    1994-08-01

    This review article will discuss the use of the active element pattern for prediction of the scan performance of large phased array antennas. The introduction and application of the concept of the active element pattern goes back at least 30 years (1) -(6) , but the subject is generally not covered in modern antenna engineering textbooks or handbooks, and many contemporary workers are unfamiliar with this simple but powerful idea. In addition, early references on this subject do not provide a rigorous discussion or derivation of the active element pattern, relying instead on a more qualitative interpretation. The purpose of this communication is to make the technique of active element patterns more accessible to antenna engineers, and to provide a new derivation of the basic active element pattern relations in terms of scattering parameters.

  6. Acute stress affects the global DNA methylation profile in rat brain: modulation by physical exercise.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Gelson M; Toffoli, Leandro V; Manfredo, Marcelo H; Francis-Oliveira, José; Silva, Andrey S; Raquel, Hiviny A; Martins-Pinge, Marli C; Moreira, Estefânia G; Fernandes, Karen B; Pelosi, Gislaine G; Gomes, Marcus V

    2015-02-15

    The vulnerability of epigenetic marks of brain cells to environmental stimuli and its implication for health have been recently debated. Thus, we used the rat model of acute restraint stress (ARS) to evaluate the impact of stress on the global DNA methylation and on the expression of the Dnmt1 and Bdnf genes of hippocampus, cortex, hypothalamus and periaqueductal gray (PAG). Furthermore, we verified the potential of physical exercise to modulate epigenetic responses evoked by ARS. Sedentary male Wistar rats were submitted to ARS at the 75th postnatal day (PND), whereas animals from a physically active group were previously submitted to swimming sessions (35-74th PND) and to ARS at the 75th PND. Global DNA methylation profile was quantified using an ELISA-based method and the quantitative expression of the Dnmt1 and Bdnf genes was evaluated by real-time PCR. ARS induced a decrease in global DNA methylation in hippocampus, cortex and PAG of sedentary animals and an increased expression of Bdnf in PAG. No change in DNA methylation was associated with ARS in the exercised animals, although it was associated with abnormal expression of Dnmt1 and Bdnf in cortex, hypothalamus and PAG. Our data reveal that ARS evokes adaptive changes in global DNA methylation of rat brain that are independent of the expression of the Dnmt1 gene but might be linked to abnormal expression of the Bdnf gene in the PAG. Furthermore, our evidence indicates that physical exercise has the potential to modulate changes in DNA methylation and gene expression consequent to ARS.

  7. Inhibition of hydrogen sulfide restores normal breathing stability and improves autonomic control during experimental heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Del Rio, Rodrigo; Marcus, Noah J.

    2013-01-01

    Cardiovascular autonomic imbalance and breathing instability are major contributors to the progression of heart failure (CHF). Potentiation of the carotid body (CB) chemoreflex has been shown to contribute to these effects. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) recently has been proposed to mediate CB hypoxic chemoreception. We hypothesized that H2S synthesis inhibition should decrease CB chemoreflex activation and improve breathing stability and autonomic function in CHF rats. Using the irreversible inhibitor of cystathione γ-lyase dl-propargylglycine (PAG), we tested the effects of H2S inhibition on resting breathing patterns, the hypoxic and hypercapnic ventilatory responses, and the hypoxic sensitivity of CB chemoreceptor afferents in rats with CHF. In addition, heart rate variability (HRV) and systolic blood pressure variability (SBPV) were calculated as an index of autonomic function. CHF rats, compared with sham rats, exhibited increased breath interval variability and number of apneas, enhanced CB afferent discharge and ventilatory responses to hypoxia, decreased HRV, and increased low-frequency SBPV. Remarkably, PAG treatment reduced the apnea index by 90%, reduced breath interval variability by 40–60%, and reversed the enhanced hypoxic CB afferent and chemoreflex responses observed in CHF rats. Furthermore, PAG treatment partially reversed the alterations in HRV and SBPV in CHF rats. Our results show that PAG treatment restores breathing stability and cardiac autonomic function and reduces the enhanced ventilatory and CB chemosensory responses to hypoxia in CHF rats. These results support the idea that PAG treatment could potentially represent a novel pathway to control sympathetic outflow and breathing instability in CHF. PMID:23449938

  8. Discovery of Salmonella virulence factors translocated via outer membrane vesicles to murine macrophages.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Hyunjin; Ansong, Charles; Adkins, Joshua N; Heffron, Fred

    2011-06-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, an intracellular pathogen and leading cause of food-borne illness, encodes a plethora of virulence effectors. Salmonella virulence factors are translocated into host cells and manipulate host cellular activities, providing a more hospitable environment for bacterial proliferation. In this study, we report a new set of virulence factors that is translocated into the host cytoplasm via bacterial outer membrane vesicles (OMV). PagK (or PagK1), PagJ, and STM2585A (or PagK2) are small proteins composed of ∼70 amino acids and have high sequence homology to each other (>85% identity). Salmonella lacking all three homologues was attenuated for virulence in a mouse infection model, suggesting at least partial functional redundancy among the homologues. While each homologue was translocated into the macrophage cytoplasm, their translocation was independent of all three Salmonella gene-encoded type III secretion systems (T3SSs)-Salmonella pathogenicity island 1 (SPI-1) T3SS, SPI-2 T3SS, and the flagellar system. Selected methods, including direct microscopy, demonstrated that the PagK-homologous proteins were secreted through OMV, which were enriched with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and outer membrane proteins. Vesicles produced by intracellular bacteria also contained lysosome-associated membrane protein 1 (LAMP1), suggesting the possibility of OMV convergence with host cellular components during intracellular trafficking. This study identified novel Salmonella virulence factors secreted via OMV and demonstrated that OMV can function as a vehicle to transfer virulence determinants to the cytoplasm of the infected host cell.

  9. Active optical zoom system

    DOEpatents

    Wick, David V.

    2005-12-20

    An active optical zoom system changes the magnification (or effective focal length) of an optical imaging system by utilizing two or more active optics in a conventional optical system. The system can create relatively large changes in system magnification with very small changes in the focal lengths of individual active elements by leveraging the optical power of the conventional optical elements (e.g., passive lenses and mirrors) surrounding the active optics. The active optics serve primarily as variable focal-length lenses or mirrors, although adding other aberrations enables increased utility. The active optics can either be LC SLMs, used in a transmissive optical zoom system, or DMs, used in a reflective optical zoom system. By appropriately designing the optical system, the variable focal-length lenses or mirrors can provide the flexibility necessary to change the overall system focal length (i.e., effective focal length), and therefore magnification, that is normally accomplished with mechanical motion in conventional zoom lenses. The active optics can provide additional flexibility by allowing magnification to occur anywhere within the FOV of the system, not just on-axis as in a conventional system.

  10. Emotionally Intense Science Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Donna; Ritchie, Stephen; Sandhu, Maryam; Henderson, Senka

    2015-08-01

    Science activities that evoke positive emotional responses make a difference to students' emotional experience of science. In this study, we explored 8th Grade students' discrete emotions expressed during science activities in a unit on Energy. Multiple data sources including classroom videos, interviews and emotion diaries completed at the end of each lesson were analysed to identify individual student's emotions. Results from two representative students are presented as case studies. Using a theoretical perspective drawn from theories of emotions founded in sociology, two assertions emerged. First, during the demonstration activity, students experienced the emotions of wonder and surprise; second, during a laboratory activity, students experienced the intense positive emotions of happiness/joy. Characteristics of these activities that contributed to students' positive experiences are highlighted. The study found that choosing activities that evoked strong positive emotional experiences, focused students' attention on the phenomenon they were learning, and the activities were recalled positively. Furthermore, such positive experiences may contribute to students' interest and engagement in science and longer term memorability. Finally, implications for science teachers and pre-service teacher education are suggested.

  11. Active touch sensing

    PubMed Central

    Prescott, Tony J.; Diamond, Mathew E.; Wing, Alan M.

    2011-01-01

    Active sensing systems are purposive and information-seeking sensory systems. Active sensing usually entails sensor movement, but more fundamentally, it involves control of the sensor apparatus, in whatever manner best suits the task, so as to maximize information gain. In animals, active sensing is perhaps most evident in the modality of touch. In this theme issue, we look at active touch across a broad range of species from insects, terrestrial and marine mammals, through to humans. In addition to analysing natural touch, we also consider how engineering is beginning to exploit physical analogues of these biological systems so as to endow robots with rich tactile sensing capabilities. The different contributions show not only the varieties of active touch—antennae, whiskers and fingertips—but also their commonalities. They explore how active touch sensing has evolved in different animal lineages, how it serves to provide rapid and reliable cues for controlling ongoing behaviour, and even how it can disintegrate when our brains begin to fail. They demonstrate that research on active touch offers a means both to understand this essential and primary sensory modality, and to investigate how animals, including man, combine movement with sensing so as to make sense of, and act effectively in, the world. PMID:21969680

  12. Biological activity of purpurogallin.

    PubMed

    Inamori, Y; Muro, C; Sajima, E; Katagiri, M; Okamoto, Y; Tanaka, H; Sakagami, Y; Tsujibo, H

    1997-05-01

    Purpurogallin showed antibacterial activity toward gram-positive bacteria. Strong activity against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus [minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) against methicillin of 1600 micrograms/ml] was found, with MIC of 11.0 micrograms/ml. Purpurogallin inhibited the growth of all tested plants and decreased the chlorophyll content in the cotyledons of Brassica campestris subsp. rapa. It showed potent inhibitory activity against prolyl endopeptidase (the 50% inhibitory concentration was 1.6 x 10(-5) M), unlike its analogues, hinokitiol and tropolone.

  13. Algorithm-development activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carder, Kendall L.

    1994-01-01

    The task of algorithm-development activities at USF continues. The algorithm for determining chlorophyll alpha concentration, (Chl alpha) and gelbstoff absorption coefficient for SeaWiFS and MODIS-N radiance data is our current priority.

  14. Microglial Activation & Chronic Neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Lull, Melinda E.; Block, Michelle L.

    2010-01-01

    Microglia, the resident innate immune cells in the brain, have long been implicated in the pathology of neurodegenerative diseases. Accumulating evidence points to activated microglia as a chronic source of multiple neurotoxic factors, including TNFα, NO, IL1-β, and reactive oxygen species (ROS), driving progressive neuron damage. Microglia can become chronically activated by either a single stimulus (ex. LPS or neuron damage) or multiple stimuli exposures to result in cumulative neuronal loss over time. While the mechanisms driving these phenomena are just beginning to be understood, reactive microgliosis (the microglial response to neuron damage) and ROS have been implicated as key mechanisms of chronic and neurotoxic microglial activation, particularly in the case of Parkinson’s Disease. Here, we review the mechanisms of neurotoxicity associated with chronic microglial activation and discuss the role of neuronal death and microglial ROS driving the chronic and toxic microglial phenotype. PMID:20880500

  15. Active noise reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, J.

    1984-01-01

    Active Noise Reduction (ANR) techniques, singly and in combination with passive hearing protectors, offer the potential for increased sound protection, enhanced voice communications and improved wearability features for personnel exposed to unacceptable noise conditions. An enhanced closed loop active noise reduction system was miniaturized and incorporated into a standard Air Force flight helmet (HGU-26/P). This report describes the theory of design and operation, prototype configuration and operation, and electroacoustic performance and specifications for the ANR system. This system is theoretically capable of producing in excess of 30 decibels of active noise reduction. Electroacoustic measurements on a flat plate coupler demonstrated approximately 20 decibels of active noise reduction with the prototype unit. A performance evaluation of the integrated ANR unit will be conducted under laboratory and field conditions by government personnel to determine the feasibility of the system for use in military applications.

  16. Activities in Teaching Weather

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tonn, Martin

    1977-01-01

    Presented is a unit composed of activities for teaching weather. Topics include cloud types and formation, simple weather instruments, and the weather station. Illustrations include a weather chart and instruments. A bibliography is given. (MA)

  17. Island Watershed Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benson, Rod

    2003-01-01

    Describes a 90-minute "Island Watershed" activity to help earth science students understand the concept of the water cycle. Introduces a surface waters unit appropriate for students in grades 7-10. Includes watershed project guidelines. (Author/KHR)

  18. Authentic Listening Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, Don; Roberts, Jon

    1981-01-01

    Discusses use of authentic listening experiences in second language classroom so that students will become involved in listening process demanded in authentic listening situations. Gives examples of sample classroom activities. (BK)

  19. French space activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanc, R.

    1982-01-01

    The four main points of research and development of space programs by France are explained. The National Center of Space Studies is discussed, listing the missions of the Center and describing the activities of the staff.

  20. Creating Art Appreciation Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heidt, Ann H.

    1986-01-01

    The experiences of college students enrolled as majors in elementary education in designing art appreciation activities for use in elementary classrooms are described. The college students had no art background. (RM)

  1. Active terahertz metamaterials

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Hou-tong

    2009-01-01

    We demonstrate planar terahertz metamaterial devices enabling actively controllable transmission amplitude, phase, or frequency at room temperature via carrier depletion or photoexcitation in the semiconductor substrate or in semiconductor materials incorporated into the metamaterial structure.

  2. Planning activities in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Kai-Hsiung

    1987-01-01

    Three aspects of planning activities in space are presented. These include generating plans efficiently, coordinating actions among multiple agents, and recovering from plan execution errors. Each aspect is discussed separately.

  3. A Big Gulp Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Bruce

    1997-01-01

    Explains how to implement an activity in which students measure the volume of their oral cavities. Enables students to develop skills in estimation, measurement, connections, statistics, applying concepts and procedures, and communication. (DDR)

  4. PRESSURE ACTIVATED SEALANT TECHNOLOGY

    SciTech Connect

    Michael A. Romano

    2004-04-01

    The objective of this project is to develop new, efficient, cost effective methods of internally sealing natural gas pipeline leaks through the application of differential pressure activated sealants. In researching the current state of the art for gas pipeline sealing technologies we concluded that if the project was successful, it appeared that pressure activated sealant technology would provide a cost effective alternative to existing pipeline repair technology. From our analysis of current field data for a 13 year period from 1985 to 1997 we were able to identify 205 leaks that were candidates for pressure activated sealant technology, affirming that pressure activated sealant technology is a viable option to traditional external leak repairs. The data collected included types of defects, areas of defects, pipe sizes and materials, incident and operating pressures, ability of pipeline to be pigged and corrosion states. This data, and subsequent analysis, was utilized as a basis for constructing applicable sealant test modeling.

  5. Intercreativity: Mapping Online Activism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meikle, Graham

    How do activists use the Internet? This article maps a wide range of activist practice and research by applying and developing Tim Berners-Lee's concept of ‘intercreativity' (1999). It identifies four dimensions of Net activism: intercreative texts, tactics, strategies and networks. It develops these through examples of manifestations of Net activism around one cluster of issues: support campaigns for refugees and asylum seekers.

  6. RMS active damping augmentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, Michael G.; Scott, Michael A.; Demeo, Martha E.

    1992-01-01

    The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include: RMS active damping augmentation; potential space station assembly benefits to CSI; LaRC/JSC bridge program; control law design process; draper RMS simulator; MIMO acceleration control laws improve damping; potential load reduction benefit; DRS modified to model distributed accelerations; accelerometer location; Space Shuttle aft cockpit simulator; simulated shuttle video displays; SES test goals and objectives; and SES modifications to support RMS active damping augmentation.

  7. Information Activities in Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanada, Takeyoshi

    The last few years have seen an explosive growth in database and computer networking activities in Australia. At present there are six major information networks in Australia, which carry more than 400 locally produced databases and many others from overseas. AUSINET databases are exemplified. MIDAS (Multi-mode International Data Aquisition System) provides lower cost access to overseas databases than before. The paper also gives brief outline of various bodies which relate to information and library policy in Australia and regional cooperative activities.

  8. RAVEN Quality Assurance Activities

    SciTech Connect

    Cogliati, Joshua Joseph

    2015-09-01

    This report discusses the quality assurance activities needed to raise the Quality Level of Risk Analysis in a Virtual Environment (RAVEN) from Quality Level 3 to Quality Level 2. This report also describes the general RAVEN quality assurance activities. For improving the quality, reviews of code changes have been instituted, more parts of testing have been automated, and improved packaging has been created. For upgrading the quality level, requirements have been created and the workflow has been improved.

  9. Low activation ferritic alloys

    DOEpatents

    Gelles, David S.; Ghoniem, Nasr M.; Powell, Roger W.

    1986-01-01

    Low activation ferritic alloys, specifically bainitic and martensitic stainless steels, are described for use in the production of structural components for nuclear fusion reactors. They are designed specifically to achieve low activation characteristics suitable for efficient waste disposal. The alloys essentially exclude molybdenum, nickel, nitrogen and niobium. Strength is achieved by substituting vanadium, tungsten, and/or tantalum in place of the usual molybdenum content in such alloys.

  10. Low activation ferritic alloys

    DOEpatents

    Gelles, D.S.; Ghoniem, N.M.; Powell, R.W.

    1985-02-07

    Low activation ferritic alloys, specifically bainitic and martensitic stainless steels, are described for use in the production of structural components for nuclear fusion reactors. They are designed specifically to achieve low activation characteristics suitable for efficient waste disposal. The alloys essentially exclude molybdenum, nickel, nitrogen and niobium. Strength is achieved by substituting vanadium, tungsten, and/or tantalum in place of the usual molybdenum content in such alloys.

  11. Tinnitus activities treatment.

    PubMed

    Tyler, Richard S; Gogel, Stephanie A; Gehringer, Anne K

    2007-01-01

    Tinnitus Activities Treatment includes counseling of the whole person, and considers individual differences and needs. We consider four areas: thoughts and emotions, hearing and communication, sleep, and concentration. We typically use Partial Masking Sound Therapy, with a noise or music set to the lowest level that provides relief. A picture-based approach facilitates engagement of the patient, and provides thorough and structured counseling. We engage the patient by including homework and activities to demonstrate understanding and facilitate progress. PMID:17956807

  12. Phytase activity in lichens.

    PubMed

    Higgins, Niall F; Crittenden, Peter D

    2015-10-01

    Phytase activity was investigated in 13 lichen species using a novel assay method. The work tested the hypothesis that phytase is a component of the suite of surface-bound lichen enzymes that hydrolyse simple organic forms of phosphorus (P) and nitrogen (N) deposited onto the thallus surface. Hydrolysis of inositol hexaphosphate (InsP6 , the substrate for phytase) and appearance of lower-order inositol phosphates (InsP5 -InsP1 ), the hydrolysis products, were measured by ion chromatography. Phytase activity in Evernia prunastri was compared among locations with contrasting rates of N deposition. Phytase activity was readily measurable in epiphytic lichens (e.g. 11.3 μmol InsP6 hydrolysed g(-1)  h(-1) in Bryoria fuscescens) but low in two terricolous species tested (Cladonia portentosa and Peltigera membranacea). Phytase and phosphomonoesterase activities were positively correlated amongst species. In E. prunastri both enzyme activities were promoted by N enrichment and phytase activity was readily released into thallus washings. InsP6 was not detected in tree canopy throughfall but was present in pollen leachate. Capacity to hydrolyse InsP6 appears widespread amongst lichens potentially promoting P capture from atmospheric deposits and plant leachates, and P cycling in forest canopies. The enzyme assay used here might find wider application in studies on plant root-fungal-soil systems.

  13. Physical activity and obesity.

    PubMed

    Tremblay, A

    1999-04-01

    The regular practice of physical activity promotes metabolic adaptations that facilitate the regulation of energy and fat balance. These effects are important for a better control of body weight in the obese individual and should enable him or her to involve adipose tissue to a lesser extent in this regulation. Physical activity favours a negative energy and fat balance, particularly if activities are prolonged and vigorous. The achievement of a negative energy and fat balance with physical activity also strongly depends on the nutritional context in which it is performed. In the long term, an active lifestyle and low-fat food habits are expected to induce a substantial body weight loss in the obese. This weight loss is progressively attenuated over time, presumably because of the decreased impact of a reduced adipose tissue mass on the regulation of energy and fat balance. For the obese individual complying with an activity programme and healthy food habits, a body weight loss of 10% is a realistic goal before the occurrence of resistance to further loss of body fat.

  14. ABB: active bandwidth broker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Kason; Law, Eddie

    2001-07-01

    In this paper, we shall discuss a novel design on the policy-based management for the Internet. This design deploys the concept of active networking. As opposed to the traditional network design, active network empowers network node with the ability to manipulate data and program code in packets, and configure the network properties according to the needs of different applications. The policy-based management can control network routers in order to realize end-to-end Quality of Service (QoS), such as differentiated and integrated services, across the Internet. For the moment, the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) has defined the framework of the policy-based management. It employs a simple client/server model that uses Common Open Policy Service (COPS) protocol to facilitate policy management and control. Our design of Active Bandwidth Broker (ABB) belongs to an active application. Our goals are to distribute centralized workload of the policy-based management over multiple active nodes in the active networks, introduce mobility of the bandwidth brokers, and allows load sharing to the policy-based management. This results a network-wide intelligent, highly available, and consistent QoS control that allows performance protection for voice, video and Internet business application while reducing costs for growing networks.

  15. Antimutagenic activity of spearmint.

    PubMed

    Yu, Tian-Wei; Xu, Meirong; Dashwood, Roderick H

    2004-01-01

    The antimutagenic activity of spearmint (Mentha spicata), a popular food flavoring agent, was studied in the Salmonella assay. Spearmint leaves were brewed in hot water for 5 min at concentrations up to 5% (w/v), and the water extracts were tested against the direct-acting mutagens 4-nitro-1,2-phenylenediamine (NPD) and 2-hydroxyamino-3-methyl-3H-imidazo[4,5-f]quinoline (N-OH-IQ) using Salmonella typhimurium strain TA98. Nontoxic concentrations of spearmint extract inhibited the mutagenic activity of N-OH-IQ in a concentration-dependent fashion, but had no effect against NPD. These experiments by design focused on the water extract consumed commonly as an herbal tea, but chloroform and methanol extracts of spearmint also possessed antimutagenic activity against N-OH-IQ. Water extract of spearmint inhibited the mutagenic activity of the parent compound, 2-amino-3-methyl-3H-imidazo[4,5-f]quinoline (IQ), in the presence of rat liver S9; however, the concentration for 50% inhibition (IC50) against IQ was approximately 10-fold higher than in assays with N-OH-IQ minus S9. At concentrations similar to those used in the Salmonella assays, spearmint extract inhibited two of the major enzymes that play a role in the metabolic activation of IQ, namely, cytochromes P4501A1 and 1A2, based on ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase and methoxyresorufin O-demethylase assays in vitro. In vivo, rats were given spearmint water extract (2%; w/v) as the sole source of drinking fluid before, during, and after 2-week treatment with IQ; colonic aberrant crypt foci were inhibited significantly at 8 weeks (P < 0.05, compared with rats given IQ alone). Collectively, these findings suggest that spearmint tea protects against IQ and possibly other heterocyclic amines through inhibition of carcinogen activation and via direct effects on the activated metabolite(s).

  16. Neural responses of rats in the forced swimming test: [F-18]FDG micro PET study.

    PubMed

    Jang, Dong-Pyo; Lee, So-Hee; Lee, Sang-Yoon; Park, Chan-Woong; Cho, Zang-Hee; Kim, Young-Bo

    2009-10-12

    The forced swimming test (FST) is a widely used tool in the assessment of behavioral despair and prediction of response to antidepressants. However, the neural mechanisms underlying behavioral changes between pretest and test sessions of the FST remain unclear. In this study, we investigated changes in rat brain activity during the FST using [F-18]Fluorodeoxyglucose micro PET. In both pretest and test sessions, the activity of the cerebellum and striatum increased, whereas significant deactivation was observed in the hippocampus, inferior colliculus, orbital cortex, and insula. The periaqueductal gray (PAG) region activated markedly in the pretest session, but did not activate in the test session. There was a significant increase in immobility and a decrease in climbing during the behavioral analysis test session. These results suggest that the PAG region may play an important role in the modulation of FST coping strategies subsequent to failure of the escape response during the pretest session.

  17. Walkability and Physical Activity

    PubMed Central

    Reis, Rodrigo Siqueira; Hino, Adriano Akira Ferreira; Rech, Cassiano Ricardo; Kerr, Jacqueline; Hallal, Pedro Curi

    2013-01-01

    Background Evidence from developing countries is limited on how income level for a given neighborhood is related to physical activity among its residents. Purpose The goal of the study was to examine the association between walkability and physical activity outcomes, and the effect of income on the relationship between walkability and physical activity in adults. Methods The Spaces for Physical Activity in Adults Study (ESPACOS Project) took place in Curitiba, Brazil. Data were collected in 2010 in 32 census tracts selected to vary in income and walkability, as measured by GIS. Participants were 697 individuals aged 18–65 years (52.0% were women) randomly sampled from the selected neighborhoods. The International Physical Activity Questionnaire was used to measure physical activity. All analyses were conducted in 2012. Results The proportion of those who walked for transportation for ≥150 minutes/week was 21.1% in low-walkability areas, and ranged from 33.5% to 35.0% in high-walkability areas. A total of 12.6% of residents were found to walk for leisure for ≥150 minutes/week; this result did not vary across quadrants of walkability and income level. The prevalence of leisure-time moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) was 7.1–10.5 percentage points higher in high-compared to low-walkability areas. After adjusting for all individual confounders, walkability showed an independent association with walking for transport (OR=2.10, 95% CI=1.31, 3.37, p=0.002) and leisure-time MVPA (OR=1.57; 95% CI=1.06, 2.32; p=0.024). Neighborhood income level was independently associated with leisure-time MVPA (OR=1.70; 95% CI=1.06, 2.74, p=0.029). No association was found between walkability and walking for leisure. No interaction was found between walkability and neighborhood income level. Conclusions This study, among adults living in Curitiba, Brazil, confirms findings from studies of high-income countries showing that walkability is positively associated with

  18. Mechanochemically Active Soft Robots.

    PubMed

    Gossweiler, Gregory R; Brown, Cameron L; Hewage, Gihan B; Sapiro-Gheiler, Eitan; Trautman, William J; Welshofer, Garrett W; Craig, Stephen L

    2015-10-14

    The functions of soft robotics are intimately tied to their form-channels and voids defined by an elastomeric superstructure that reversibly stores and releases mechanical energy to change shape, grip objects, and achieve complex motions. Here, we demonstrate that covalent polymer mechanochemistry provides a viable mechanism to convert the same mechanical potential energy used for actuation in soft robots into a mechanochromic, covalent chemical response. A bis-alkene functionalized spiropyran (SP) mechanophore is cured into a molded poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) soft robot walker and gripper. The stresses and strains necessary for SP activation are compatible with soft robot function. The color change associated with actuation suggests opportunities for not only new color changing or camouflaging strategies, but also the possibility for simultaneous activation of latent chemistry (e.g., release of small molecules, change in mechanical properties, activation of catalysts, etc.) in soft robots. In addition, mechanochromic stress mapping in a functional robotic device might provide a useful design and optimization tool, revealing spatial and temporal force evolution within the robot in a way that might be coupled to autonomous feedback loops that allow the robot to regulate its own activity. The demonstration motivates the simultaneous development of new combinations of mechanophores, materials, and soft, active devices for enhanced functionality.

  19. Photon-activation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Fairchild, R.G.; Bond, V.P.

    1982-01-01

    Photon Activation Therapy (PAT) is a technique in which radiation dose to tumor is enhanced via introduction of stable /sup 127/I in the form of iodinated deoxyuridine (IdUrd). Stimulation of cytotoxic effects from IdUrd is accomplished by activation with external (or implanted) radiation sources. Thus, accumulations of this nucleoside in actively competing cellpools do not preclude therapy in so far as such tissues can be excluded from the radiation field. Calculations show that 5% replacement of thymidine (Tyd) in tumor DNA should enhance the biological effectiveness of a given photon radiotherapy dose by a factor of approx. 3. Proportionally higher gains would result from higher replacements of Tyd and IdUrd. In addition, biological response is enhanced by chemical sensitization with IdUrd. The data indicate that damage from photon activation as well as chemical sensitization does not repair. Thus, at low dose rates, a further increase in therapeutic gain should accrue as normal tissues are allowed to repair and regenerate. A samarium-145 source has been developed for PAT, with activating x-ray energies of from 38 to 45 keV. Favorable clinical results can be expected through the use of IdUrd and protracted irradiations with low energy x-rays. In particular, PAT may provide unique advantages at selected sites such as brain, or head and neck tumors. (ERB)

  20. Mechanochemically Active Soft Robots.

    PubMed

    Gossweiler, Gregory R; Brown, Cameron L; Hewage, Gihan B; Sapiro-Gheiler, Eitan; Trautman, William J; Welshofer, Garrett W; Craig, Stephen L

    2015-10-14

    The functions of soft robotics are intimately tied to their form-channels and voids defined by an elastomeric superstructure that reversibly stores and releases mechanical energy to change shape, grip objects, and achieve complex motions. Here, we demonstrate that covalent polymer mechanochemistry provides a viable mechanism to convert the same mechanical potential energy used for actuation in soft robots into a mechanochromic, covalent chemical response. A bis-alkene functionalized spiropyran (SP) mechanophore is cured into a molded poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) soft robot walker and gripper. The stresses and strains necessary for SP activation are compatible with soft robot function. The color change associated with actuation suggests opportunities for not only new color changing or camouflaging strategies, but also the possibility for simultaneous activation of latent chemistry (e.g., release of small molecules, change in mechanical properties, activation of catalysts, etc.) in soft robots. In addition, mechanochromic stress mapping in a functional robotic device might provide a useful design and optimization tool, revealing spatial and temporal force evolution within the robot in a way that might be coupled to autonomous feedback loops that allow the robot to regulate its own activity. The demonstration motivates the simultaneous development of new combinations of mechanophores, materials, and soft, active devices for enhanced functionality. PMID:26390078

  1. Sex Differences in GABAA Signaling in the Periaqueductal Gray Induced by Persistent Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Tonsfeldt, Karen J.; Suchland, Katherine L.; Beeson, Kathleen A.; Lowe, Janet D.; Li, Ming-hua

    2016-01-01

    The ventrolateral periaqueductal gray (vlPAG) is a key structure in the descending pain modulatory circuit. Activation of the circuit occurs via disinhibition of GABAergic inputs onto vlPAG output neurons. In these studies, we tested the hypothesis that GABAergic inhibition is increased during persistent inflammation, dampening activation of the descending circuit from the vlPAG. Our results indicate that persistent inflammation induced by Complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) modulates GABA signaling differently in male and female rats. CFA treatment results in increased presynaptic GABA release but decreased high-affinity tonic GABAA currents in female vlPAG neurons. These effects are not observed in males. The tonic currents in the vlPAG are dependent on GABA transporter activity and are modulated by agonists that activate GABAA receptors containing the δ subunit. The GABAA δ agonist THIP (gaboxadol) induced similar amplitude currents in naive and CFA-treated rats. In addition, a positive allosteric modulator of the GABAA δ subunit, DS2 (4-chloro-N-[2-(2-thienyl)imidazo[1,2-a]pyridin-3-yl]benzamide), increased tonic currents. These results indicate that GABAA δ receptors remain on the cell surface but are less active in CFA-treated female rats. In vivo behavior studies showed that morphine induced greater antinociception in CFA-treated females that was reversed with microinjections of DS2 directly into the vlPAG. DS2 did not affect morphine antinociception in naive or CFA-treated male rats. Together, these data indicate that sex-specific adaptations in GABAA receptor signaling modulate opioid analgesia in persistent inflammation. Antagonists of GABAA δ receptors may be a viable strategy for reducing pain associated with persistent inflammation, particularly in females. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT These studies demonstrate that GABA signaling is modulated in the ventrolateral periaqueductal gray by persistent inflammation differently in female and male rats. Our

  2. Prenucleosomes and Active Chromatin

    PubMed Central

    Khuong, Mai T.; Fei, Jia; Ishii, Haruhiko; Kadonaga, James T.

    2016-01-01

    Chromatin consists of nucleosomes as well as nonnucleosomal histone-containing particles. Here we describe the prenucleosome, which is a stable conformational isomer of the nucleosome that associates with ~80 bp DNA. Prenucleosomes are formed rapidly upon the deposition of histones onto DNA and can be converted into canonical nucleosomes by an ATP-driven chromatin assembly factor such as ACF. Different lines of evidence reveal that there are prenucleosome-sized DNA-containing particles with histones in the upstream region of active promoters. Moreover, p300 acetylates histone H3K56 in prenucleosomes but not in nucleosomes, and H3K56 acetylation is found at active promoters and enhancers. These findings therefore suggest that there may be prenucleosomes or prenucleosome-like particles in the upstream region of active promoters. More generally, we postulate that prenucleosomes or prenucleosome-like particles are present at dynamic chromatin, whereas canonical nucleosomes are at static chromatin. PMID:26767995

  3. [Physical activity and obesity].

    PubMed

    Winkler, S; Hebestreit, A; Ahrens, W

    2012-01-01

    One reason for the high prevalence of overweight and obesity might be the differences in lifestyle compared to earlier decades, called the "obesogenic environment." With this, the decline in physical activity (PA) in favor of a sedentary lifestyle is assumed to play an important role. Physical activity or inactivity has a major impact on the development of overweight and obesity as well as on certain metabolic disorders. This review summarizes current scientific knowledge regarding the association between PA and overweight/obesity. The term "physical activity" is defined and different methods of its assessment are introduced. In addition, certain methods for the evaluation/operationalization of collected PA data are described. Finally, some epidemiological studies dealing with the associations between PA and overweight/obesity in children/adolescents as well as in adults are presented.

  4. Shared Activity Coordination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clement, Bradley J.; Barrett, Anthony C.

    2003-01-01

    Interacting agents that interleave planning and execution must reach consensus on their commitments to each other. In domains where agents have varying degrees of interaction and different constraints on communication and computation, agents will require different coordination protocols in order to efficiently reach consensus in real time. We briefly describe a largely unexplored class of real-time, distributed planning problems (inspired by interacting spacecraft missions), new challenges they pose, and a general approach to solving the problems. These problems involve self-interested agents that have infrequent communication but collaborate on joint activities. We describe a Shared Activity Coordination (SHAC) framework that provides a decentralized algorithm for negotiating the scheduling of shared activities in a dynamic environment, a soft, real-time approach to reaching consensus during execution with limited communication, and a foundation for customizing protocols for negotiating planner interactions. We apply SHAC to a realistic simulation of interacting Mars missions and illustrate the simplicity of protocol development.

  5. Stochastic optical active rheology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyungsuk; Shin, Yongdae; Kim, Sun Taek; Reinherz, Ellis L.; Lang, Matthew J.

    2012-07-01

    We demonstrate a stochastic based method for performing active rheology using optical tweezers. By monitoring the displacement of an embedded particle in response to stochastic optical forces, a rapid estimate of the frequency dependent shear moduli of a sample is achieved in the range of 10-1-103 Hz. We utilize the method to probe linear viscoelastic properties of hydrogels at varied cross-linker concentrations. Combined with fluorescence imaging, our method demonstrates non-linear changes of bond strength between T cell receptors and an antigenic peptide due to force-induced cell activation.

  6. SCOR announces new activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urban, Edward R., Jr.

    Roger Revelle had many good ideas during his long and productive career. One of them came to fruition in 1957 in the form of the Scientific Committee on Oceanic Research (SCOR), which the International Council for Science created as its first interdisciplinary body, to promote international activities in oceanography. Revelle served as SCOR's first president from 1957 to 1960. SCOR offers opportunities for scientists from different countries to cooperate in planning and executing international programs in ocean sciences. Over its 44 years in existence, SCOR has sponsored 120 working groups and has actively participated in many of the major international oceanographic projects. Thirty-six nations presently participate as SCOR members.

  7. Active cleaning technique device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shannon, R. L.; Gillette, R. B.

    1973-01-01

    The objective of this program was to develop a laboratory demonstration model of an active cleaning technique (ACT) device. The principle of this device is based primarily on the technique for removing contaminants from optical surfaces. This active cleaning technique involves exposing contaminated surfaces to a plasma containing atomic oxygen or combinations of other reactive gases. The ACT device laboratory demonstration model incorporates, in addition to plasma cleaning, the means to operate the device as an ion source for sputtering experiments. The overall ACT device includes a plasma generation tube, an ion accelerator, a gas supply system, a RF power supply and a high voltage dc power supply.

  8. Cosmogenic activation of materials

    SciTech Connect

    Amare, J.; Beltran, B.; Carmona, J.M.; Cebrian, S.; Garcia, E.; Irastorza, I.G.; Gomez, H.; Luzon, G.; Martinez, M.; Morales, J.; Ortiz de Solorzano, A.; Pobes, C.; Puimedon, J.; Rodriguez, A.; Ruz, J.; Sarsa, M. L.; Torres, L.; Villar, J.A.; Capelli, S.; Capozzi, F.

    2005-09-08

    The problem of cosmogenic activation produced at sea level in materials typically used in underground experiments looking for rare events is being studied. Several nuclear data libraries have been screened looking for relevant isotope production cross-sections and different codes which can be applied to activation studies have been reviewed. The excitation functions for some problems of interest like production of 60Co and 68Ge in germanium and production of 60Co in tellurium have been obtained taking into account both measurements and calculations and a preliminary estimate of the corresponding rates of production at sea level has been performed.

  9. Optical activity and evolution.

    PubMed

    Khasanov, M M; Gladyshev, G P

    1980-09-01

    It is noted that the chemical reactions occurring in rarefied cosmic clouds (molecular concentration less than or approximately to 10(2) cm-3) differ from similar laboratory reactions by the much greater effect on the outcome of external force fields. In this light it is hypothesized that the synthesis of optically active substances may occur in the outer space under the conjoint stereospecific effect of a magnetic and other molecule-orienting field. It is further conjectured that the optically active substances of the Solar System had been produced in the course of its formation out of the primal rarefield cloud.

  10. Activated carbon material

    DOEpatents

    Evans, A. Gary

    1978-01-01

    Activated carbon particles for use as iodine trapping material are impregnated with a mixture of selected iodine and potassium compounds to improve the iodine retention properties of the carbon. The I/K ratio is maintained at less than about 1 and the pH is maintained at above about 8.0. The iodine retention of activated carbon previously treated with or coimpregnated with triethylenediamine can also be improved by this technique. Suitable flame retardants can be added to raise the ignition temperature of the carbon to acceptable standards.

  11. Inflammasomes and Their Activation

    PubMed Central

    Khare, Sonal; Luc, Nancy; Dorfleutner, Andrea; Stehlik, Christian

    2011-01-01

    The innate immune system relies on the recognition of pathogens by pattern recognition receptors as a first line of defense and to initiate the adaptive immune response. Substantial progress has been made in defining the role of Nod (nucleotide-binding oligimerization domain)-like receptors and AIM2 (absent in melanoma 2) as pattern recognition receptors that activate inflammasomes in macrophages. Inflammasomes are protein platforms essential for the activation of inflammatory caspases and subsequent maturation of their pro-inflammatory cytokine substrates and induction of pyroptosis. This paper summarizes recent developments regarding the function of Nod-like receptors in immunity and disease. PMID:21083527

  12. Space construction activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The Center for Space Construction at the University of Colorado at Boulder was established in 1988 as a University Space Engineering Research Center. The mission of the Center is to conduct interdisciplinary engineering research which is critical to the construction of future space structures and systems and to educate students who will have the vision and technical skills to successfully lead future space construction activities. The research activities are currently organized around two central projects: Orbital Construction and Lunar Construction. Summaries of the research projects are included.

  13. Active seismic experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kovach, R. L.; Watkins, J. S.; Talwani, P.

    1972-01-01

    The Apollo 16 active seismic experiment (ASE) was designed to generate and monitor seismic waves for the study of the lunar near-surface structure. Several seismic energy sources are used: an astronaut-activated thumper device, a mortar package that contains rocket-launched grenades, and the impulse produced by the lunar module ascent. Analysis of some seismic signals recorded by the ASE has provided data concerning the near-surface structure at the Descartes landing site. Two compressional seismic velocities have so far been recognized in the seismic data. The deployment of the ASE is described, and the significant results obtained are discussed.

  14. [Adolescents' physical activity].

    PubMed

    Pagaeva, E K; Misho, P -A; Zhanin, A; Chanturishvili, T P; Pagaeva, K I

    2006-01-01

    The paper defines the parameters reflecting the physical activity of adolescents and their correlation with health and a risk of behavioral disorders, bad habits, and cravings. A total of 9499 Georgian adolescents aged 14-18 years, the senior (9th-llth-form) pupils, selected through two-step cluster sampling were surveyed. The pupils anonymously filled in special questionnaires. This yielded the parameters reflecting the intensity of physical activity of the adolescents and the latter's going in for sports. The parameters were shown to have a beneficial effect on health, including mental health, and on the magnitude of unhealthy behavior.

  15. EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities

    SciTech Connect

    2011-11-21

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Vehicle Technologies Program manages several transportation regulatory activities established by the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPAct), as amended by the Energy Conservation Reauthorization Act of 1998, EPAct 2005, and the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA).

  16. Active-bridge oscillator

    DOEpatents

    Wessendorf, Kurt O.

    2001-01-01

    An active bridge oscillator is formed from a differential amplifier where positive feedback is a function of the impedance of one of the gain elements and a relatively low value common emitter resistance. This use of the nonlinear transistor parameter h stabilizes the output and eliminates the need for ALC circuits common to other bridge oscillators.

  17. Antifungal activity of diethyldithiocarbamate.

    PubMed

    Allerberger, F; Reisinger, E C; Söldner, B; Dierich, M P

    1989-10-01

    Sodium diethyldithiocarbamate (DTC) was evaluated for its ability to combat four different species of fungi in vitro. Using a microtiter-broth-dilution method we were able to demonstrate an antifungal activity against Candida albicans, Cryptococcus neoformans, Aspergillus fumigatus and Mucor mucedo in doses achievable by intravenous administration in man.

  18. Activities of the ILO.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Labour Education, 1986

    1986-01-01

    Discusses the Workers' Education Branch of the ILO (International Labour Organisation), which has been developing workers' education activities in Africa, Asia, and Latin America for the purpose of assisting rural workers' organizations in identifying and developing plans to overcome their own major organizational and financial problems. (CT)

  19. Activities of the ILO.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Enevoldsen, Niels; And Others

    1981-01-01

    A series of articles reviews educational activities of the International Labour Organisation (ILO), including international seminars on workers' education, a study of women workers, trade union training courses at the ILO Turin Centre, and the importance of information dissemination to trade unions. (SK)

  20. Valuing Families. Activity Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glashagel, Jerry; Glashagel, Char

    Developed as a resource for family life education, this activity guide can be used to lead experiential learning situations for intergenerational groups by a counselor, in a course, in a family organization like the YMCA, or in the home. The goals of this guide are to increase the self-esteem of each person and to strengthen the family as a human…

  1. Classroom Speaking Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shuying, Yang

    1999-01-01

    Because most language teaching in China is focused on national tests, language is treated as a knowledge subject and development of communicative abilities is often ignored. This article describes activities that one English-as-a-Foreign-Language teacher used to teach oral English to university students in China. (Author/VWL)

  2. Ocean Drilling Simulation Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Telese, James A.; Jordan, Kathy

    The Ocean Drilling Project brings together scientists and governments from 20 countries to explore the earth's structure and history as it is revealed beneath the oceans' basins. Scientific expeditions examine rock and sediment cores obtained from the ocean floor to learn about the earth's basic processes. The series of activities in this…

  3. Physical Education Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russo, Letty P.

    1978-01-01

    Described are three physical activity games designed to help young children develop a sense of mastery over their bodies: (which will in turn improve their self concepts): a poem to be acted out, Simon Says, and a story play to be acted out. (DLS)

  4. Sexual activity and aging.

    PubMed

    Ni Lochlainn, Mary; Kenny, Rose Anne

    2013-08-01

    Sexuality is an important component of emotional and physical intimacy that men and women experience throughout their lives. Research suggesting that a high proportion of men and women remain sexually active well into later life refutes the prevailing myth that aging and sexual dysfunction are inexorably linked. Age-related physiological changes do not render a meaningful sexual relationship impossible or even necessarily difficult. Many of these physiological changes are modifiable. There are various therapeutic options available to patients to achieve maximum sexual capacity in old age. This article reviews the prevalence of sexual activity among older adults, the problems these adults encounter with sexual activity, and the role of the health care professional in addressing these problems. The physiological sex-related changes that occur as part of the normal aging process in men and women are reviewed, as well as the effect of age-related physical and psychological illness on sexual function. The attitudes and perceptions of the media and general public toward sexual activity and aging are summarized. An understanding of the sexual changes that accompany the aging process may help general practitioners and other doctors to give practical and useful advice on sexuality as well as refute the misconception that aging equates to celibacy. A thorough awareness of this aspect of older people's quality of life can raise meaningful expectations for aging patients. PMID:23540950

  5. Discovering Columbus: Classroom Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moulden, Rick

    1992-01-01

    Presents learning activities concerning Christopher Columbus and his voyages. Includes lessons requiring students to (1) write a pledge of allegiance to the world; (2) examine the Americas before Columbus; (3) prepare a newscast on Columbus' arrival in the Americas; (4) imagine being a Native American encountering Columbus; and (5) explore what…

  6. Nutrition. Learning Activity Package.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Carolyn

    This learning activity package on nutrition is one of a series of 12 titles developed for use in health occupations education programs. Materials in the package include objectives, a list of materials needed, a list of definitions, information sheets, reviews (self evaluations) of portions of the content, and answers to reviews. These topics are…

  7. Highlights of 1978 activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    General highlights of NASA's activities for 1978 are presented. The highlights are categorized into topics such as space science, space transportation systems, space and terrestrial applications, environment, technology utilization, aeronautics, space research and technology, energy programs, and international. A list of the 1978 launches including: (1) launch date; (2) payload designation; (3) launch vehicle; (4) launch site and (5) mission remarks is also presented.

  8. Arsenic activation neutron detector

    DOEpatents

    Jacobs, E.L.

    1980-01-28

    A detector of bursts of neutrons from a deuterium-deuteron reaction includes a quantity of arsenic adjacent a gamma detector such as a scintillator and photomultiplier tube. The arsenic is activated by the 2.5-MeV neutrons to release gamma radiation which is detected to give a quantitative representation of detected neutrons.

  9. Arsenic activation neutron detector

    DOEpatents

    Jacobs, Eddy L.

    1981-01-01

    A detector of bursts of neutrons from a deuterium-deuteron reaction includes a quantity of arsenic adjacent a gamma detector such as a scintillator and photomultiplier tube. The arsenic is activated by the 2.5 Mev neutrons to release gamma radiation which is detected to give a quantitative representation of detected neutrons.

  10. Activating silent argonautes.

    PubMed

    Kidwell, Mary Anne; Doudna, Jennifer A

    2013-07-01

    Multiple Argonaute proteins are implicated in gene silencing by RNA interference (RNAi), but only one is known to be an endonuclease that can cleave target mRNAs. Chimeric Argonaute proteins now reveal an unexpected mechanism by which mutations distal to the catalytic center can unmask intrinsic catalytic activity, results hinting at structurally mediated regulation. PMID:23984440

  11. Highlights of 1976 activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitzpatrick, M.

    1976-01-01

    Highlights of NASA's 1976 activities are summarized. Sixteen successful launches were made. Two landings of Viking spacecraft on Mars and rollout of the space shuttle orbiter are reviewed. Applications of aerospace science to education, health care, and community services are also discussed.

  12. Educating for Political Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chitty, Clyde

    2010-01-01

    The term "political activity" can be interpreted in a myriad of different ways, but in this paper, it is taken to mean involvement in a variety of campaigns around issues affecting the way we live and the sort of society we want to live in. At a time when support for the main political parties has never been weaker, it is essential that teachers…

  13. Geology: The Active Earth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braus, Judy, Ed.

    1987-01-01

    Ranger Rick's NatureScope is a creative education series dedicated to inspiring in children an understanding and appreciation of the natural world while developing the skills they will need to make responsible decisions about the environment. The topic of this issue is "Geology: The Active Earth." Contents are organized into the following…

  14. Environmental Chemistry Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackland, Thomas; And Others

    The authors of this curriculum supplement believe in a laboratory approach to chemistry and express the feeling that environmental chemistry provides the students an opportunity to apply theoretical chemistry to important practical problems. There are eighteen activities presented, each accompanied with behavioral objectives, one or more suggested…

  15. Regional Activities Division. Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Federation of Library Associations, The Hague (Netherlands).

    Papers on library network activities in Canada, the Third World, Japan, Malaysia, Brazil, and Sweden which were presented at the 1982 International Federation of Library Associations (IFLA) conference include: (1) "Canada: A Voluntary and Flexible Network," a review by Guy Sylvestre of the political, social, and economic structures affecting…

  16. Classification of Physical Activity

    PubMed Central

    Turksoy, Kamuran; Paulino, Thiago Marques Luz; Zaharieva, Dessi P.; Yavelberg, Loren; Jamnik, Veronica; Riddell, Michael C.; Cinar, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Physical activity has a wide range of effects on glucose concentrations in type 1 diabetes (T1D) depending on the type (ie, aerobic, anaerobic, mixed) and duration of activity performed. This variability in glucose responses to physical activity makes the development of artificial pancreas (AP) systems challenging. Automatic detection of exercise type and intensity, and its classification as aerobic or anaerobic would provide valuable information to AP control algorithms. This can be achieved by using a multivariable AP approach where biometric variables are measured and reported to the AP at high frequency. We developed a classification system that identifies, in real time, the exercise intensity and its reliance on aerobic or anaerobic metabolism and tested this approach using clinical data collected from 5 persons with T1D and 3 individuals without T1D in a controlled laboratory setting using a variety of common types of physical activity. The classifier had an average sensitivity of 98.7% for physiological data collected over a range of exercise modalities and intensities in these subjects. The classifier will be added as a new module to the integrated multivariable adaptive AP system to enable the detection of aerobic and anaerobic exercise for enhancing the accuracy of insulin infusion strategies during and after exercise. PMID:26443291

  17. Physical Activities for Preschool.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adkins, Dorothy C.; And Others

    The underlying premise of the University of Hawaii Physical Activities for Preschool curriculum is that important contributions to a positive self-concept are made by motor independence and a realistic body image. Program objectives include: (1) the development of strength, endurance, and flexibility in skills that involve the muscles,…

  18. Shark Tagging Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Current: The Journal of Marine Education, 1998

    1998-01-01

    In this group activity, children learn about the purpose of tagging and how scientists tag a shark. Using a cut-out of a shark, students identify, measure, record data, read coordinates, and tag a shark. Includes introductory information about the purpose of tagging and the procedure, a data sheet showing original tagging data from Tampa Bay, and…

  19. Communication Systems. Laboratory Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutherland, Barbara, Ed.

    This communication systems guide provides teachers with learning activities for secondary students. Introductory materials include an instructional planning outline and worksheet, an outline of essential elements, a list of objectives, a course description, and a content outline. The guide contains 32 modules on the following topics: story…

  20. Activity: Computer Talk.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clearing: Nature and Learning in the Pacific Northwest, 1985

    1985-01-01

    Presents an activity in which students create a computer program capable of recording and projecting paper use at school. Includes instructional strategies and background information such as requirements for pounds of paper/tree, energy needs, water consumption, and paper value at the recycling center. A sample program is included. (DH)

  1. Grooming. Learning Activity Package.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stark, Pamela

    This learning activity package on grooming for health workers is one of a series of 12 titles developed for use in health occupations education programs. Materials in the package include objectives, a list of materials needed, information sheets, reviews (self evaluations) of portions of the content, and answers to reviews. These topics are…

  2. Dissemination Activities Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barclay, Hanna; Batatia, Hudj; Bauters, Merja; Ben Ami, Zvi; Drachman, Raul; Flouris, Giorgos; Jadin, Tanja; Jalonen, Satu; Karlgren, Klas; Karpati, Andrea; Kotzinos, Dimitris; Lakkala, Minna; Lallimo, Jiri; Moen, Anne; Nygard, Kathrine; Paavola, Sami; Padiglia, Sheila; Scapolla, Marina; Sins, Patrick; Vasileva, Tania

    2008-01-01

    In the first 24 months of the project, KP-Lab members were highly dedicated to dissemination and were engaged in various dissemination activities that contributed to the prime objective of the KP-Lab dissemination efforts which is "to make the project widely known to a variety of prospective users and, at a later stage, to promote the…

  3. Engineers and Active Responsibility.

    PubMed

    Pesch, Udo

    2015-08-01

    Knowing that technologies are inherently value-laden and systemically interwoven with society, the question is how individual engineers can take up the challenge of accepting the responsibility for their work? This paper will argue that engineers have no institutional structure at the level of society that allows them to recognize, reflect upon, and actively integrate the value-laden character of their designs. Instead, engineers have to tap on the different institutional realms of market, science, and state, making their work a 'hybrid' activity combining elements from the different institutional realms. To deal with this institutional hybridity, engineers develop routines and heuristics in their professional network, which do not allow societal values to be expressed in a satisfactory manner. To allow forms of 'active' responsibility, there have to be so-called 'accountability forums' that guide moral reflections of individual actors. The paper will subsequently look at the methodologies of value-sensitive design (VSD) and constructive technology assessment (CTA) and explore whether and how these methodologies allow engineers to integrate societal values into the design technological artifacts and systems. As VSD and CTA are methodologies that look at the process of technological design, whereas the focus of this paper is on the designer, they can only be used indirectly, namely as frameworks which help to identify the contours of a framework for active responsibility of engineers.

  4. TI-73 Calculator Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips-Bey, Carol K.

    2004-01-01

    This article describes TI-73 calculator activities appropriate for middle school students. It was found that the use of the calculator allowed for higher-level thinking and a richer exploration of mathematical ideas by students. [Included with this article are "Dice Roll Worksheet" and "Transforming Tree Worksheet".] (Contains 9 figures.)

  5. 85 Engaging Movement Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weikart, Phyllis S.; Carlton, Elizabeth B.

    This book presents activities to keep K-6 students moving in a variety of ways as they learn. The movement experiences are planned around key curriculum concepts in movement and music as well as in academic curriculum areas. The experiences develop students' basic timing, language abilities, vocabulary, concentration, planning skills, and…

  6. Bonus Activity Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Learning, 1993

    1993-01-01

    Elementary level activity book presents suggestions for teaching students about endangered and threatened species worldwide. Students learn about what is causing the rapid extinction rate and what needs to be done. They also discover the value of rainforests and why conservationists are fighting to save them. (SM)

  7. Production Systems. Laboratory Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallaway, Ann, Ed.

    This production systems guide provides teachers with learning activities for secondary students. Introductory materials include an instructional planning outline and worksheet, an outline of essential elements, domains and objectives, a course description, and a content outline. The guide contains 30 modules on the following topics: production…

  8. Earthfest. Activity Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weilbacher, Mike

    1991-01-01

    An activity book to help elementary teachers and students explore the environment offers information and questions about spaceships; an ecology primer and poster with questions; information on animal adaptation with poster and questions; ecological and dramatic arts projects; a script for performance; and suggestions to make Earth Day celebrations…

  9. Antimalarial activity of cedronin.

    PubMed

    Moretti, C; Deharo, E; Sauvain, M; Jardel, C; David, P T; Gasquet, M

    1994-06-01

    Cedronin was isolated from Simaba cedron Planchon (Simaroubaceae), a species popularly believed in South America to have antimalarial properties. It was examined for in vitro and in vivo antimalarial activities and for cytotoxicity against KB cells. Experimental results showed that cedronin was active against chloroquine-sensitive and resistant strain, with an IC50 of 0.25 micrograms/ml (0.65 mumol/ml). It was also found to be active in vivo against Plasmodium vinkei with an IC50 of 1.8 mg/kg (4.7 nM/kg) in the classic 4-day test. Cedronin belongs to the small group of quassinoids with a C19 basic skeleton and shows a rather low cytotoxicity against KB cells (IC50 = 4 micrograms/ml, 10.4 microM) as compared with C20 biologically active quassinoids; however its toxic/therapeutic ratio (10/1.8) remains lower than chloroquine (10/0.5).

  10. Active rejector filter

    SciTech Connect

    Kuchinskii, A.G.; Pirogov, S.G.; Savchenko, V.M.; Yakushev, A.K.

    1985-01-01

    This paper describes an active rejector filter for suppressing noise signals in the frequency range 50-100 Hz and for extracting a vlf information signal. The filter has the following characteristics: a high input impedance, a resonant frequency of 75 Hz, a Q of 1.25, and an attenuation factor of 53 dB at resonant frequency.

  11. [Problem Solving Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wisconsin Univ. - Stout, Menomonie. Center for Vocational, Technical and Adult Education.

    The teacher directed problem solving activities package contains 17 units: Future Community Design, Let's Build an Elevator, Let's Construct a Catapult, Let's Design a Recreational Game, Let's Make a Hand Fishing Reel, Let's Make a Wall Hanging, Let's Make a Yo-Yo, Marooned in the Past, Metrication, Mousetrap Vehicles, The Multi System…

  12. Commission 10: Solar Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Driel-Gesztelyi, Lidia; Schrijver, Carolus J.; Klimchuk, James A.; Charbonneau, Paul; Fletcher, Lyndsay; Hasan, S. Sirajul; Hudson, Hugh S.; Kusano, Kanya; Mandrini, Cristina H.; Peter, Hardi; Vršnak, Bojan; Yan, Yihua

    2012-04-01

    Commission 10 of the International Astronomical Union has more than 650 members who study a wide range of activity phenomena produced by our nearest star, the Sun. Solar activity is intrinsically related to solar magnetic fields and encompasses events from the smallest energy releases (nano- or even picoflares) to the largest eruptions in the Solar System, coronal mass ejections (CMEs), which propagate into the Heliosphere reaching the Earth and beyond. Solar activity is manifested in the appearance of sunspot groups or active regions, which are the principal sources of activity phenomena from the emergence of their magnetic flux through their dispersion and decay. The period 2008-2009 saw an unanticipated extended solar cycle minimum and unprecedentedly weak polar-cap and heliospheric field. Associated with that was the 2009 historical maximum in galactic cosmic rays flux since measurements begun in the middle of the 20th Century. Since then Cycle 24 has re-started solar activity producing some spectacular eruptions observed with a fleet of spacecraft and ground-based facilities. In the last triennium major advances in our knowledge and understanding of solar activity were due to continuing success of space missions as SOHO, Hinode, RHESSI and the twin STEREO spacecraft, further enriched by the breathtaking images of the solar atmosphere produced by the Solar Dynamic Observatory (SDO) launched on 11 February 2010 in the framework of NASA's Living with a Star program. In August 2012, at the time of the IAU General Assembly in Beijing when the mandate of this Commission ends, we will be in the unique position to have for the first time a full 3-D view of the Sun and solar activity phenomena provided by the twin STEREO missions about 120 degrees behind and ahead of Earth and other spacecraft around the Earth and ground-based observatories. These new observational insights are continuously posing new questions, inspiring and advancing theoretical analysis and

  13. Interdisciplinary Astronomy Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nerantzis, Nikolaos; Mitrouda, Aikaterini; Reizopoulou, Ioanna; Sidiropoulou, Eirini; Hatzidimitriou, Antonios

    2016-04-01

    On November 9th, 2015, three didactical hours were dedicated to Interdisciplinary Astronomy Activities (http://wp.me/p6Hte2-1I). Our students and their teachers formed three groups and in rotation, were engaged with the following activities: (a) viewing unique images of the Cosmos in the mobile planetarium STARLAB (http://www.planitario.gr/tholos-starlab-classic-standard.html), (b) watching the following videos: Journey to the end of the universe (https://youtu.be/Ufl_Nwbl8xs), Rosetta update (https://youtu.be/nQ9ivd7wv30), The Solar System (https://youtu.be/d66dsagrTa0), Ambition the film (https://youtu.be/H08tGjXNHO4) in the school's library. Students and teachers were informed about our solar system, the Rosetta mission, the universe, etc. and (c) tactile activities such as Meet our home and Meet our neighbors (http://astroedu.iau.org, http://nuclio.org/astroneighbours/resources) and the creation of planets' 3D models (Geology-Geography A' Class Student's book, pg.15). With the activities above we had the pleasure to join the Cosmic Light Edu Kit / International Year of Light 2015 program. After our Interdisciplinary Astronomy Activities, we did a "small" research: our students had to fill an evaluation about their educational gains and the results can be found here http://wp.me/p6Hte2-2q. Moreover, we discussed about Big Ideas of Science (http://wp.me/p3oRiZ-dm) and through the "big" impact of the Rosetta mission & the infinity of our universe, we print posters with relevant topics and place them to the classrooms. We thank Rosa Doran (Nuclio - President of the Executive Council) for her continuous assistance and support on innovative science teaching proposals. She is an inspiration.

  14. Asteroseismic stellar activity relations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonanno, A.; Corsaro, E.; Karoff, C.

    2014-11-01

    Context. In asteroseismology an important diagnostic of the evolutionary status of a star is the small frequency separation which is sensitive to the gradient of the mean molecular weight in the stellar interior. It is thus interesting to discuss the classical age-activity relations in terms of this quantity. Moreover, as the photospheric magnetic field tends to suppress the amplitudes of acoustic oscillations, it is important to quantify the importance of this effect by considering various activity indicators. Aims: We propose a new class of age-activity relations that connects the Mt. Wilson S index and the average scatter in the light curve with the small frequency separation and the amplitude of the p-mode oscillations. Methods: We used a Bayesian inference to compute the posterior probability of various empirical laws for a sample of 19 solar-like active stars observed by the Kepler telescope. Results: We demonstrate the presence of a clear correlation between the Mt. Wilson S index and the relative age of the stars as indicated by the small frequency separation, as well as an anti-correlation between the S index and the oscillation amplitudes. We argue that the average activity level of the stars shows a stronger correlation with the small frequency separation than with the absolute age that is often considered in the literature. Conclusions: The phenomenological laws discovered in this paper have the potential to become new important diagnostics to link stellar evolution theory with the dynamics of global magnetic fields. In particular we argue that the relation between the Mt. Wilson S index and the oscillation amplitudes is in good agreement with the findings of direct numerical simulations of magneto-convection.

  15. The immunomodulation of inducible hydrogen sulfide in Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhibin; Wang, Lingling; Zhang, Tao; Zhou, Zhi; Jiang, Qiufen; Yi, Qilin; Yang, Chuanyan; Qiu, Limei; Song, Linsheng

    2014-10-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is an important gasotransmitter, which plays indispensable roles in cardiovascular, nervous and immune systems of vertebrates. However, the information about the immunomodulation of H2S in invertebrates is still very limited. In the present study, the temporal expression profile of cystathionine γ lyase in oyster Crassostrea gigas (CgCSE) was investigated after the oysters were stimulated by lipopolysaccharide. The expression levels of CgCSE mRNA transcripts in hemocytes increased significantly at 12h (1.31-fold of the PBS group, P<0.05) after LPS stimulation. The immunomodulation of inducible H2S in oyster was examined by monitoring the alterations of both cellular and humoral immune parameters in response to the stimulations of LPS, LPS+Na2S and LPS+propargylglycine (PAG). The total hemocyte counts (THC) and hemolymph PO activity increased significantly after LPS stimulation, and the increase could be further enhanced by adding PAG, while inhibited by appending Na2S. The phagocytosis activity of hemocytes was also increased firstly after LPS treatment, and the increase was enhanced by adding Na2S but inhibited after appending PAG. The anti-bacterial activity in hemolymph increased at 3h post LPS treatment, and then decreased after adding PAG. The total SOD activity of hemolymph was also elevated at 6h post LPS treatment, and the elevated activity was depressed by adding Na2S. These results collectively indicated that H2S might play crucial roles in the immune response of oyster via modulating the turnover and phagocytosis of hemocytes, and regulating the anti-bacterial activity and proPO activation in the hemolymph.

  16. Purification and Characterization of Asparaginase from Phaseolus vulgaris Seeds

    PubMed Central

    Mohamed, Saleh A.; Elshal, Mohamed F.; Kumosani, Taha A.; Aldahlawi, Alia M.

    2015-01-01

    L-asparaginase from bacteria has been used in treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia. The aim of this study was to purify and characterize L-asparaginase from Phaseolus vulgaris seeds instead of microbial sources. L-asparaginase was purified to apparent homogeneity. The enzyme has molecular mass of 79 kDa. The purified asparaginase had very low activity toward a number of asparagine and glutamine analogues. L-asparaginase was free from glutaminase activity. Kinetic parameters, Km and Vmax of purified enzyme, were found to be 6.72 mM and 0.16 μM, respectively. The enzyme had optimum pH at 8.0. The enzyme showed high stability at alkaline pH (pH 7.5–9.0) when incubated for up to 24 h. L-asparaginase had the same temperature optimum and thermal stability at 37°C. K+ was able to greatly enhance the activity of asparaginase by 150% compared with other metals tested. In conclusion, L-asparaginase showed no glutaminase activity and good stability over a wide range of physiological conditions, and thus it could be used as a potential candidate for treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia. PMID:26413120

  17. Influence of native plasmids to fitness of Pantoea vagans strain C9-1

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pantoea vagans strain C9-1 is a biological control agent for fire blight caused by Erwinia amylovora. We cured C9-1 of two of its three plasmids: pPag2, pPag3, and both pPag2 and pPag3, tested phenotypes of the derivatives, and evaluated blossom colonization in the field. pPag2 (166 kb) encodes for ...

  18. Is Enhanced Physical Activity Possible Using Active Videogames?

    PubMed

    Baranowski, Tom; Baranowski, Janice; O'Connor, Teresia; Lu, Amy Shirong; Thompson, Debbe

    2012-06-01

    Our research indicated that 10-12-year-old children receiving two active Wii(™) (Nintendo(®); Nintendo of America, Inc., Redmond, WA) console videogames were no more physically active than children receiving two inactive videogames. Research is needed on how active videogames may increase physical activity.

  19. 101 Environmental Education Activities. Booklet 6--Social Studies Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitney, Helen, Comp.

    Based on the environment and directed at elementary and intermediate level students, 5 field trips are a significant part of the 12 social studies activities in the sixth booklet by the Upper Mississippi River ECO-Center outlining environmental and outdoor education activities. Most of the activities include objectives, activity description,…

  20. Is Enhanced Physical Activity Possible Using Active Videogames?

    PubMed Central

    Baranowski, Janice; O'Connor, Teresia; Lu, Amy Shirong; Thompson, Debbe

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Our research indicated that 10–12-year-old children receiving two active Wii™ (Nintendo®; Nintendo of America, Inc., Redmond, WA) console videogames were no more physically active than children receiving two inactive videogames. Research is needed on how active videogames may increase physical activity. PMID:24416640

  1. Integration of Active Video Games in Extracurricular Activity at Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Jung Eun; Huang, Charles; Pope, Zachary; Gao, Zan

    2015-01-01

    Active video games require players to be physically active. Dance Dance Revolution (DDR) is an interactive dancing game that requires fast-foot movement coordinated with energetic music and visuals. The Wii and Xbox Kinect games have also become good active video games for the promotion of physical activity participation. These games are much more…

  2. Myofilament length dependent activation

    SciTech Connect

    de Tombe, Pieter P.; Mateja, Ryan D.; Tachampa, Kittipong; Mou, Younss Ait; Farman, Gerrie P.; Irving, Thomas C.

    2010-05-25

    The Frank-Starling law of the heart describes the interrelationship between end-diastolic volume and cardiac ejection volume, a regulatory system that operates on a beat-to-beat basis. The main cellular mechanism that underlies this phenomenon is an increase in the responsiveness of cardiac myofilaments to activating Ca{sup 2+} ions at a longer sarcomere length, commonly referred to as myofilament length-dependent activation. This review focuses on what molecular mechanisms may underlie myofilament length dependency. Specifically, the roles of inter-filament spacing, thick and thin filament based regulation, as well as sarcomeric regulatory proteins are discussed. Although the 'Frank-Starling law of the heart' constitutes a fundamental cardiac property that has been appreciated for well over a century, it is still not known in muscle how the contractile apparatus transduces the information concerning sarcomere length to modulate ventricular pressure development.

  3. Sulfur activation in Hiroshima

    SciTech Connect

    Kerr, G.D.; Pace, J.V. III

    1987-01-01

    In 1979, we attempted to establish the validity of source terms for the Hiroshima and Nagasaki bombs using experimental data on sulfur activation. Close agreement was observed between measured and calculated values for test firings of Nagasaki-type bombs. The calculated values were based on source terms developed by W.E. Preeg at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). A discrepancy was found, however, when we compared calculated values for the two bombs because a 1956 report by R.R. Wilson stated that sulfur acitvation by fast neutrons in Hiroshima was approximately three times greater than in Nagasaki. Our calculations based on Preeg's source-term data predicted about equal sulfur activation in the two cities.

  4. LANSCE Activity Report

    SciTech Connect

    Amy Robinson; Audrey Archuleta; Barbara Maes; Dan Strottman; Earl Hoffman; Garth Tietjen; Gene Farnum; Geoff Greene; Joyce Roberts; Ken Johnson; Paul Lewis; Roger Pynn; Stan Schriber; Steve Sterbenz; Steve Wender; Sue Harper

    1999-02-01

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center Activity Report describes scientific and technological progress and achievements in LANSCE Division during the period of 1995 to 1998. This report includes a message from the Division Director, an overview of LANSCE, sponsor overviews, research highlights, advanced projects and facility upgrades achievements, experimental and user program accomplishments, news and events, and a list of publications. The research highlights cover the areas of condensed-matter science and engineering, accelerator science, nuclear science, and radiography. This report also contains a compact disk that includes an overview, the Activity Report itself, LANSCE operations progress reports for 1996 and 1997, experiment reports from LANSCE users, as well as a search capability.

  5. Active microchannel heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Tonkovich, Anna Lee Y [Pasco, WA; Roberts, Gary L [West Richland, WA; Call, Charles J [Pasco, WA; Wegeng, Robert S [Richland, WA; Wang, Yong [Richland, WA

    2001-01-01

    The present invention is an active microchannel heat exchanger with an active heat source and with microchannel architecture. The microchannel heat exchanger has (a) an exothermic reaction chamber; (b) an exhaust chamber; and (c) a heat exchanger chamber in thermal contact with the exhaust chamber, wherein (d) heat from the exothermic reaction chamber is convected by an exothermic reaction exhaust through the exhaust chamber and by conduction through a containment wall to the working fluid in the heat exchanger chamber thereby raising a temperature of the working fluid. The invention is particularly useful as a liquid fuel vaporizer and/or a steam generator for fuel cell power systems, and as a heat source for sustaining endothermic chemical reactions and initiating exothermic reactions.

  6. Active region seismology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogdan, Tom; Braun, D. C.

    1995-01-01

    Active region seismology is concerned with the determination and interpretation of the interaction of the solar acoustic oscillations with near-surface target structures, such as magnetic flux concentration, sunspots, and plage. Recent observations made with a high spatial resolution and a long temporal duration enabled measurements of the scattering matrix for sunspots and solar active regions to be carried out as a function of the mode properties. Based on this information, the amount of p-mode absorption, partial-wave phase shift, and mode mixing introduced by the sunspot, could be determined. In addition, the possibility of detecting the presence of completely submerged magnetic fields was raised, and new procedures for performing acoustic holography of the solar interior are being developed. The accumulating evidence points to the mode conversion of p-modes to various magneto-atmospheric waves within the magnetic flux concentration as being the unifying physical mechanism responsible for these diverse phenomena.

  7. Finsler Active Contours

    PubMed Central

    Melonakos, John; Pichon, Eric; Angenent, Sigurd; Tannenbaum, Allen

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we propose an image segmentation technique based on augmenting the conformal (or geodesic) active contour framework with directional information. In the isotropic case, the euclidean metric is locally multiplied by a scalar conformal factor based on image information such that the weighted length of curves lying on points of interest (typically edges) is small. The conformal factor that is chosen depends only upon position and is in this sense isotropic. Although directional information has been studied previously for other segmentation frameworks, here, we show that if one desires to add directionality in the conformal active contour framework, then one gets a well-defined minimization problem in the case that the factor defines a Finsler metric. Optimal curves may be obtained using the calculus of variations or dynamic programming-based schemes. Finally, we demonstrate the technique by extracting roads from aerial imagery, blood vessels from medical angiograms, and neural tracts from diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imagery. PMID:18195436

  8. Active gel physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prost, J.; Jülicher, F.; Joanny, J.-F.

    2015-02-01

    The mechanical behaviour of cells is largely controlled by a structure that is fundamentally out of thermodynamic equilibrium: a network of crosslinked filaments subjected to the action of energy-transducing molecular motors. The study of this kind of active system was absent from conventional physics and there was a need for both new theories and new experiments. The field that has emerged in recent years to fill this gap is underpinned by a theory that takes into account the transduction of chemical energy on the molecular scale. This formalism has advanced our understanding of living systems, but it has also had an impact on research in physics per se. Here, we describe this developing field, its relevance to biology, the novelty it conveys to other areas of physics and some of the challenges in store for the future of active gel physics.

  9. Endocrine activation in tachycardias.

    PubMed

    Lukac, P; Lukacova, S; Vigas, M; Hatala, R

    2001-01-01

    This article reviews the complex character of neuroendocrine response to paroxysmal tachycardia. While the endocrine influences in arrhythmogenesis are well perceived by the cardiologists, less attention has been paid to influence of tachycardia on neuroendocrine activation. However, this may significantly alter the clinical course of tachycardias and its responses to pharmacotherapeutic interventions. Main characteristics of hormones with direct relationship to cardiovascular system (ANP, AVP, catecholamines, angiotensin and others) are listed with description of regulation of their secretion and main biological effects, especially with regard to regulation of circulation. Changes in hemodynamics during tachycardia with accompanying changes in ANP, AVP renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, sympatho-neural and sympatho-adrenal activation are reviewed. Further research and understanding require more complex approach and concentration on interrelationship of different regulatory hormones in tachycardia. (Fig. 2, Ref. 96.) PMID:11763674

  10. Apheresis activity in Venezuela.

    PubMed

    Saltiel, Christiane

    2005-07-01

    Interest for apheresis activity has been growing in Venezuela. In 1976 there were only a few devices; in 2003, 80 apheresis machines performed 27,675 donor apheresis procedures and 547 therapeutic procedures countrywide. We report the activity at the Metropolitan Blood Bank (the largest one of the country) in the period 1999-2003: 597 therapeutic procedures were performed in 171 patients, during 212 crisis episodes. The average age was 38 +/- 16 years, 65% male and 35% female. Most of the therapeutic procedures were therapeutic plasma exchange for hematology diseases (mainly thrombotic thrombocitopenic purpura and hemophilia inhibitors), including 184 therapeutic procedures with the Autopheresis-C (Baxter Healthcare Corp., Deerfield, IL). Most common adverse effects (3.9%) were hypotension and allergic reactions to the plasma.

  11. Environmental health program activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergtholdt, C. P.

    1969-01-01

    Activities reported include studies on toxic air contaminants, excessive noise, poor lighting, food sanitation, water pollution, and exposure to nonionizing radiation as health hazards. Formulations for a radiological health manual provide guidance to personnel in the procurement and safe handling of radiation producing equipment and Apollo mission planning. A literature search and development of a water analysis laboratory are outlined to obtain information regarding microbiological problems involving potable water, waste management, and personal hygiene.

  12. Ongoing Space Nuclear Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houts, Michael G.

    2007-01-01

    Most ongoing US activities related to space nuclear power and propulsion are sponsored by NASA. NASA-spons0red space nuclear work is currently focused on evaluating potential fission surface power (FSP) systems and on radioisotope power systems (RPS). In addition, significant efforts related to nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) systems have been completed and will provide a starting point for potential future NTP work.

  13. European Neutron Activation System.

    2013-01-11

    Version 03 EASY-2010 (European Activation System) consists of a wide range of codes, data and documentation all aimed at satisfying the objective of calculating the response of materials irradiated in a neutron flux. The main difference from the previous version is the upper energy limit, which has increased from 20 to 60 MeV. It is designed to investigate both fusion devices and accelerator based materials test facilities that will act as intense sources of high-energymore » neutrons causing significant activation of the surrounding materials. The very general nature of the calculational method and the data libraries means that it is applicable (with some reservations) to all situations (e.g. fission reactors or neutron sources) where materials are exposed to neutrons below 60 MeV. EASY can be divided into two parts: data and code development tools and user tools and data. The former are required to develop the latter, but EASY users only need to be able to use the inventory code FISPACT and be aware of the contents of the EAF library (the data source). The complete EASY package contains the FISPACT-2007 inventory code, the EAF-2003, EAF-2005, EAF-2007 and EAF-2010 libraries, and the EASY User Interface for the Window version. The activation package EASY-2010 is the result of significant development to extend the upper energy range from 20 to 60 MeV so that it is capable of being used for IFMIF calculations. The EAF-2010 library contains 66,256 reactions, almost five times more than in EAF-2003 (12,617). Deuteron-induced and proton-induced cross section libraries are also included, and can be used with EASY to enable calculations of the activation due to deuterons and proton [2].« less

  14. Proposed SOLCOST maintenance activities

    SciTech Connect

    1980-01-01

    This document provides a short description of work that has been accomplished to date and work in progress. A discussion of the program status as it is currently configured follows and finally proposed work by Solar Environmental Engineering Company (SEEC) in its most recently signed contract with the Department of Energy (DOE) is given. Early statements are designed to give the reader a good background so that the suggested SOLCOST maintenance activities will be more easily understood.

  15. Semiconductor active plasmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendach, Stefan; Nötzel, Richard

    2013-12-01

    Plasmonics is a research area in nanophotonics attracting increasing interest due to the potential applications in sensing and detecting, sub-wavelength confinement of light, integrated circuits, and many others. In particular, when plasmonic structures such as metal nanostructures or highly doped semiconductor particles are combined with active semiconductor materials and nanostructures, novel exciting physics and applications arise. This special section on semiconductor active plasmonics covers several of the most important and complementary directions in the field. First is the modification of the optical properties of a semiconductor nanostructure due to the close proximity of a metallic film or nanostructure. These arise from the formation hybrid plasmon/exciton states and may lead to enhanced spontaneous emission rates, directional far field emission patterns, strong coupling phenomena, and many more. Second is the realization of sub-wavelength scale nanolasers by coupling a semiconductor gain medium with a plasmonic metallic cavity. Particular emphasis is given on the major technical challenges in the fabrication of these nanolasers, such as device patterning, surface passivation, and metal deposition. While the above topics address mainly active structures and devices operating in the visible or near-infrared wavelength region, in the third, the enhanced THz extinction by periodic arrays of semiconductor particles is discussed. This is based on the build-up of surface plasmon resonances in the doped semiconductor particles which can be resonantly coupled and widely tuned by the carrier density in the semiconductor. We believe these highly diverse aspects give insight into the wide variety of new physics and applications that semiconductor active plasmonics is offering. Finally, we would like to thank the IOP editorial staff, in particular Alice Malhador, for their support, and we would also like to thank the contributors for their efforts and participation

  16. Prebiotic activation processes.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lohrmann, R.; Orgel, L. E.

    1973-01-01

    Questions regarding the combination of amino acids and ribonucleotides to polypeptides and polynucleotides are investigated. Each of the reactions considered occurs in the solid state in plausible prebiotic conditions. Together they provide the basis for a unified scheme of amino acid and nucleotide activation. Urea, imidazole and Mg(++) are essential catalytic components of the reaction mixtures. However, these compounds could probably be replaced by other organic molecules.

  17. Active quantum plasmonics

    PubMed Central

    Marinica, Dana Codruta; Zapata, Mario; Nordlander, Peter; Kazansky, Andrey K.; M. Echenique, Pedro; Aizpurua, Javier; Borisov, Andrei G.

    2015-01-01

    The ability of localized surface plasmons to squeeze light and engineer nanoscale electromagnetic fields through electron-photon coupling at dimensions below the wavelength has turned plasmonics into a driving tool in a variety of technological applications, targeting novel and more efficient optoelectronic processes. In this context, the development of active control of plasmon excitations is a major fundamental and practical challenge. We propose a mechanism for fast and active control of the optical response of metallic nanostructures based on exploiting quantum effects in subnanometric plasmonic gaps. By applying an external dc bias across a narrow gap, a substantial change in the tunneling conductance across the junction can be induced at optical frequencies, which modifies the plasmonic resonances of the system in a reversible manner. We demonstrate the feasibility of the concept using time-dependent density functional theory calculations. Thus, along with two-dimensional structures, metal nanoparticle plasmonics can benefit from the reversibility, fast response time, and versatility of an active control strategy based on applied bias. The proposed electrical manipulation of light using quantum plasmonics establishes a new platform for many practical applications in optoelectronics. PMID:26824066

  18. THE ACTIVE ASTEROIDS

    SciTech Connect

    Jewitt, David

    2012-03-15

    Some asteroids eject dust, unexpectedly producing transient, comet-like comae and tails. First ascribed to the sublimation of near-surface water ice, mass-losing asteroids (also called 'main-belt comets') can in fact be driven by a surprising diversity of mechanisms. In this paper, we consider 11 dynamical asteroids losing mass, in nine of which the ejected material is spatially resolved. We address mechanisms for producing mass loss including rotational instability, impact ejection, electrostatic repulsion, radiation pressure sweeping, dehydration stresses, and thermal fracture, in addition to the sublimation of ice. In two objects (133P and 238P) the repetitive nature of the observed activity leaves ice sublimation as the only reasonable explanation, while in a third ((596) Scheila), a recent impact is the cause. Another impact may account for activity in P/2010 A2, but this tiny object can also be explained as having shed mass after reaching rotational instability. Mass loss from (3200) Phaethon is probably due to cracking or dehydration at extreme ({approx}1000 K) perihelion temperatures, perhaps aided by radiation pressure sweeping. For the other bodies, the mass-loss mechanisms remain unidentified, pending the acquisition of more and better data. While the active asteroid sample size remains small, the evidence for an astonishing diversity of mass-loss processes in these bodies is clear.

  19. Determining activated carbon performance

    SciTech Connect

    Naylor, W.F.; Rester, D.O.

    1995-07-01

    This article discusses the key elements involved in evaluating a system`s performance. Empty bed contact time (EBCT) is a term used to describe the length of time a liquid stream being treated is in contact with a granular activated carbon bed. The EBCT is the time required for a fluid to pass through the volume equivalent of the media bed, without the media being present. In a bed of granular activated carbon, the void volume or space between particles is usually about 45 percent. Therefore, the EBCT is about twice the true or actual time of contact between the fluid being treated and the GAC particles. The EBCT plays an important role in determining the effectiveness and longevity of granular activated carbon (GAC) used to treat liquids in a fixed-bed adsorber. Factors that influence and are influenced by EBCT, and their relationship to GAC performance in a treatment scheme include: adsorption, mass transfer zone, impurity concentration, adsorption affinity, flow rate and system design considerations.

  20. Active quantum plasmonics.

    PubMed

    Marinica, Dana Codruta; Zapata, Mario; Nordlander, Peter; Kazansky, Andrey K; M Echenique, Pedro; Aizpurua, Javier; Borisov, Andrei G

    2015-12-01

    The ability of localized surface plasmons to squeeze light and engineer nanoscale electromagnetic fields through electron-photon coupling at dimensions below the wavelength has turned plasmonics into a driving tool in a variety of technological applications, targeting novel and more efficient optoelectronic processes. In this context, the development of active control of plasmon excitations is a major fundamental and practical challenge. We propose a mechanism for fast and active control of the optical response of metallic nanostructures based on exploiting quantum effects in subnanometric plasmonic gaps. By applying an external dc bias across a narrow gap, a substantial change in the tunneling conductance across the junction can be induced at optical frequencies, which modifies the plasmonic resonances of the system in a reversible manner. We demonstrate the feasibility of the concept using time-dependent density functional theory calculations. Thus, along with two-dimensional structures, metal nanoparticle plasmonics can benefit from the reversibility, fast response time, and versatility of an active control strategy based on applied bias. The proposed electrical manipulation of light using quantum plasmonics establishes a new platform for many practical applications in optoelectronics.

  1. Cooperative nonproliferation activities

    SciTech Connect

    Ystesund, K.; Furaus, J.; Lucero, R.

    1997-08-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) under DOE sponsorship is engaged in nuclear nonproliferation activities with the Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation (PNC) of Japan. From 1995 to the present SNL and PNC have been participating in a cooperative project to implement and assess the use of remote monitoring to achieve nuclear nonproliferation objectives. Implementation of remote monitoring at the PNC Joyo facility took place during 1996 and continues to date. An International Fellowship began in the Fall of 1995 and has complemented the nonproliferation study. Plans are underway to extend the Fellowship and to upgrade the existing Remote Monitoring System to include another area at the Joyo facility. SNL and PNC are currently exploring the possibility of exchanging experts with the objective of promoting regional confidence building in Northeast Asia, possibly using some of the same remote monitoring technologies. This paper will provide an overview of these activities and report on the status of cooperative nonproliferation activities being conducted by PNC and SNL.

  2. Active quantum plasmonics.

    PubMed

    Marinica, Dana Codruta; Zapata, Mario; Nordlander, Peter; Kazansky, Andrey K; M Echenique, Pedro; Aizpurua, Javier; Borisov, Andrei G

    2015-12-01

    The ability of localized surface plasmons to squeeze light and engineer nanoscale electromagnetic fields through electron-photon coupling at dimensions below the wavelength has turned plasmonics into a driving tool in a variety of technological applications, targeting novel and more efficient optoelectronic processes. In this context, the development of active control of plasmon excitations is a major fundamental and practical challenge. We propose a mechanism for fast and active control of the optical response of metallic nanostructures based on exploiting quantum effects in subnanometric plasmonic gaps. By applying an external dc bias across a narrow gap, a substantial change in the tunneling conductance across the junction can be induced at optical frequencies, which modifies the plasmonic resonances of the system in a reversible manner. We demonstrate the feasibility of the concept using time-dependent density functional theory calculations. Thus, along with two-dimensional structures, metal nanoparticle plasmonics can benefit from the reversibility, fast response time, and versatility of an active control strategy based on applied bias. The proposed electrical manipulation of light using quantum plasmonics establishes a new platform for many practical applications in optoelectronics. PMID:26824066

  3. Sesterterpenoids with Anticancer Activity

    PubMed Central

    Evidente, Antonio; Kornienko, Alexander; Lefranc, Florence; Cimmino, Alessio; Dasari, Ramesh; Evidente, Marco; Mathieu, Véronique; Kiss, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Terpenes have received a great deal of attention in the scientific literature due to complex, synthetically challenging structures and diverse biological activities associated with this class of natural products. Based on the number of C5 isoprene units they are generated from, terpenes are classified as hemi- (C5), mono- (C10), sesqui- (C15), di- (C20), sester- (C25), tri (C30), and tetraterpenes (C40). Among these, sesterterpenes and their derivatives known as sesterterpenoids, are ubiquitous secondary metabolites in fungi, marine organisms, and plants. Their structural diversity encompasses carbotricyclic ophiobolanes, polycyclic anthracenones, polycyclic furan-2-ones, polycyclic hydroquinones, among many other carbon skeletons. Furthermore, many of them possess promising biological activities including cytotoxicity and the associated potential as anticancer agents. This review discusses the natural sources that produce sesterterpenoids, provides sesterterpenoid names and their chemical structures, biological properties with the focus on anticancer activities and literature references associated with these metabolites. A critical summary of the potential of various sesterterpenoids as anticancer agents concludes the review. PMID:26295461

  4. Multilayer Active Shell Mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steeves, John

    This thesis presents a novel active mirror technology based on carbon fiber composites and replication manufacturing processes. Multiple additional layers are implemented into the structure in order to provide the reflective layer, actuation capabilities and electrode routing. The mirror is thin, lightweight, and has large actuation capabilities. These features, along with the associated manufacturing processes, represent a significant change in design compared to traditional optics. Structural redundancy in the form of added material or support structures is replaced by thin, unsupported lightweight substrates with large actuation capabilities. Several studies motivated by the desire to improve as-manufactured figure quality are performed. Firstly, imperfections in thin CFRP laminates and their effect on post-cure shape errors are studied. Numerical models are developed and compared to experimental measurements on flat laminates. Techniques to mitigate figure errors for thicker laminates are also identified. A method of properly integrating the reflective facesheet onto the front surface of the CFRP substrate is also presented. Finally, the effect of bonding multiple initially flat active plates to the backside of a curved CFRP substrate is studied. Figure deformations along with local surface defects are predicted and characterized experimentally. By understanding the mechanics behind these processes, significant improvements to the overall figure quality have been made. Studies related to the actuation response of the mirror are also performed. The active properties of two materials are characterized and compared. Optimal active layer thicknesses for thin surface-parallel schemes are determined. Finite element simulations are used to make predictions on shape correction capabilities, demonstrating high correctabiliity and stroke over low-order modes. The effect of actuator saturation is studied and shown to significantly degrade shape correction performance. The

  5. Optogenetics Based Rat-Robot Control: Optical Stimulation Encodes "Stop" and "Escape" Commands.

    PubMed

    Chen, SiCong; Zhou, Hong; Guo, SongChao; Zhang, JiaCheng; Qu, Yi; Feng, ZhouYan; Xu, KeDi; Zheng, XiaoXiang

    2015-08-01

    Electric brain stimulation is frequently used in bio-robot control. However, one possible limitation of electric stimulation is the resultant wide range of influences that may lead to unexpected side-effects. Although there has been prior research done towards optogenetics based brain activation, there has not been much development regarding the comparisons between electric and optical methods of brain activation. In this study, we first encode "Stop" and "Escape" commands by optical stimulation in the dorsal periaqueductal grey (dPAG). The rats behavioral comparisons are then noted down under these two methods. The dPAG neural activity recorded during optical stimulation suggests rate and temporal coding mechanisms in behavioral control. The behavioral comparisons show that rats exhibit anxiety under the "Stop" command conveyed through both optical and electric methods. However, rats are able to recover more quickly from freezing only under optical "Stop" command. Under "Escape" commands, also conveyed through optical means, the rat would move with lessened urgency but the results are more stable. Moreover, c-Fos study shows the optical stimulation activates restricted range in midbrain: the optical stimulation affected only dPAG and its downstreams but electric stimulation activates both the upstream and downstream circuits, in which the glutamatergic neurons are largely occupied and play important role in "Stop" and "Escape" behavior controls. We conclude that optical stimulation is more suited for encoding "Stop" and "Escape" commands for rat-robot control.

  6. Glutaminolysis Was Induced by TGF-β1 through PP2Ac Regulated Raf-MEK-ERK Signaling in Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Guo, YanYan; Deng, YuanJun; Li, XiaoQing; Ning, Yong; Lin, XuePing; Guo, ShuiMing; Chen, MeiXue; Han, Min

    2016-01-01

    Vascular endothelial cells can survive under hypoxic and inflammatory conditions by alterations of the cellular energy metabolism. In addition to high rates of glycolysis, glutaminolysis is another important way of providing the required energy to support cellular sprouting in such situations. However, the exact mechanism in which endothelial cells upregulate glutaminolysis remains unclear. Here we demonstrated that protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A)-mediated Raf-MEK-ERK signaling was involved in glutaminolysis in endothelial cells. Using models of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) treated with transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1), we observed a dramatic induction in cellular glutamate levels accompanied by Raf-MEK-ERK activation. By addition of U0126, the specific inhibitor of MEK1/2, the expression of kidney-type glutaminase (KGA, a critical glutaminase in glutaminolysis) was significantly decreased. Moreover, inhibition of PP2A by okadaic acid (OA), a specific inhibitor of PP2A phosphatase activity or by depletion of its catalytic subunit (PP2Ac), led to a significant inactivation of Raf-MEK-ERK signaling and reduced glutaminolysis in endothelial cells. Taken together, these results indicated that PP2A-dependent Raf-MEK-ERK activation was involved in glutaminolysis and inhibition of PP2A signals was sufficient to block Raf-MEK-ERK pathway and reduced glutamine metabolism in endothelial cells. PMID:27612201

  7. Glutaminolysis Was Induced by TGF-β1 through PP2Ac Regulated Raf-MEK-ERK Signaling in Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, XiaoQing; Ning, Yong; Lin, XuePing; Guo, ShuiMing; Chen, MeiXue; Han, Min

    2016-01-01

    Vascular endothelial cells can survive under hypoxic and inflammatory conditions by alterations of the cellular energy metabolism. In addition to high rates of glycolysis, glutaminolysis is another important way of providing the required energy to support cellular sprouting in such situations. However, the exact mechanism in which endothelial cells upregulate glutaminolysis remains unclear. Here we demonstrated that protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A)-mediated Raf-MEK-ERK signaling was involved in glutaminolysis in endothelial cells. Using models of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) treated with transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1), we observed a dramatic induction in cellular glutamate levels accompanied by Raf-MEK-ERK activation. By addition of U0126, the specific inhibitor of MEK1/2, the expression of kidney-type glutaminase (KGA, a critical glutaminase in glutaminolysis) was significantly decreased. Moreover, inhibition of PP2A by okadaic acid (OA), a specific inhibitor of PP2A phosphatase activity or by depletion of its catalytic subunit (PP2Ac), led to a significant inactivation of Raf-MEK-ERK signaling and reduced glutaminolysis in endothelial cells. Taken together, these results indicated that PP2A-dependent Raf-MEK-ERK activation was involved in glutaminolysis and inhibition of PP2A signals was sufficient to block Raf-MEK-ERK pathway and reduced glutamine metabolism in endothelial cells. PMID:27612201

  8. Molecular expression of l-asparaginase gene from Nocardiopsis alba NIOT-VKMA08 in Escherichia coli: A prospective recombinant enzyme for leukaemia chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Meena, Balakrishnan; Anburajan, Lawrance; Vinithkumar, Nambali Valsalan; Shridhar, Divya; Raghavan, Rangamaran Vijaya; Dharani, Gopal; Kirubagaran, Ramalingam

    2016-09-30

    l-Asparaginase is an antineoplastic agent that selectively reduces the level of l-asparagine in blood and diminishes the proliferation of cancerous cells. Studies were carried out on the cloning and heterologous expression of l-asparaginase biosynthesis gene (ansA) from Nocardiopsis alba NIOT-VKMA08 to achieve the stable inducible system that overproduces the glutaminase-free recombinant l-asparaginase. Overexpression of recombinant l-asparaginase was achieved with an optimized final concentration of 1.5mM of isopropyl-β-d-thiogalactoside (IPTG) and the enzyme was expressed as a soluble protein. The recombinant enzyme was purified using nickel-nitrilotriacetic acid (Ni-NTA) chromatography and the purified enzyme disclosed an elevated level of asparaginase activity (158.1IU/mL). Optimum pH and temperature of the purified l-asparaginase for the hydrolysis of l-asparagine were 8.0 and 37°C and it was very specific for its natural substrate, l-asparagine. Detailed studies were carried out on the kinetics of enzyme reaction, catalytic activity, temperature and ionic strength and the thermostability of the l-asparaginase enzyme. The functional characterisation of the recombinant l-asparaginase was studied through Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), in silico sequence analysis and protein structural modelling. Glutaminase activity was not detected in the recombinant l-asparaginase, which could reduce the probable side effects during leukaemia therapy.

  9. Changing Conceptions of Activation Energy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pacey, Philip D.

    1981-01-01

    Provides background material which relates to the concept of activation energy, fundamental in the study of chemical kinetics. Compares the related concepts of the Arrhenius activation energy, the activation energy at absolute zero, the enthalpy of activation, and the threshold energy. (CS)

  10. Science Activities in Energy: Conservation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oak Ridge Associated Universities, TN.

    Presented is a science activities in energy package which includes 14 activities relating to energy conservation. Activities are simple, concrete experiments for fourth, fifth and sixth grades, which illustrate principles and problems relating to energy. Each activity is outlined on a simple card which is introduced by a question. A teacher's…

  11. Metric Activities, Grades K-6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Draper, Bob, Comp.

    This pamphlet presents worksheets for use in fifteen activities or groups of activities designed for teaching the metric system to children in grades K through 6. The approach taken in several of the activities is one of conversion between metric and English units. The majority of the activities concern length, area, volume, and capacity. A…

  12. [Fernbank Science Center Environmental Activities].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shelton, Lewis

    This document is a compilation of environmental activities related directly to the environment in Georgia. A description of the physiographic characteristics of Georgia is presented upon which the activities that follow are based. These activities include soil, stream and forest investigations; meteorology activities; and plant and animal studies.…

  13. Epsiodic Activity in Radio Galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Saikia, D.J.; Konar, C.; Jamrozy, M.; Machalski, J.; Gupta, Neeraj; Stawarz, L.; Mack, K.-H.; Siemiginowska, A.; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.

    2007-10-15

    One of the interesting issues in our understanding of active galactic nuclei is the duration of their active phase and whether such activity is episodic. In this paper we summarize our recent results on episodic activity in radio galaxies obtained with the GMRT and the VLA.

  14. Activated human platelets induce factor XIIa-mediated contact activation.

    PubMed

    Bäck, Jennie; Sanchez, Javier; Elgue, Graciela; Ekdahl, Kristina Nilsson; Nilsson, Bo

    2010-01-01

    Earlier studies have shown that isolated platelets in buffer systems can promote activation of FXII or amplify contact activation, in the presence of a negatively charge substance or material. Still proof is lacking that FXII is activated by platelets in a more physiological environment. In this study we investigate if activated platelets can induce FXII-mediated contact activation and whether this activation affects clot formation in human blood. Human platelets were activated with a thrombin receptor-activating peptide, SFLLRN-amide, in platelet-rich plasma or in whole blood. FXIIa and FXIa in complex with preferentially antithrombin (AT) and to some extent C1-inhibitor (C1INH) were generated in response to TRAP stimulation. This contact activation was independent of surface-mediated contact activation, tissue factor pathway or thrombin. In clotting whole blood FXIIa-AT and FXIa-AT complexes were specifically formed, demonstrating that AT is a potent inhibitor of FXIIa and FXIa generated by platelet activation. Contact activation proteins were analyzed by flow cytometry and FXII, FXI, high-molecular weight kininogen, and prekallikrein were detected on activated platelets. Using chromogenic assays, enzymatic activity of platelet-associated FXIIa, FXIa, and kallikrein were demonstrated. Inhibition of FXIIa in non-anticoagulated blood also prolonged the clotting time. We conclude that platelet activation triggers FXII-mediated contact activation on the surface and in the vicinity of activated platelets. This leads specifically to generation of FXIIa-AT and FXIa-AT complexes, and contributes to clot formation. Activated platelets may thereby constitute an intravascular locus for contact activation, which may explain the recently reported importance of FXII in thrombus formation. PMID:19878657

  15. Photoactivated and patternable charge transport materials and their use in organic light-emitting devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jie; Lewis, Larry N.; Duggal, Anil R.

    2007-06-01

    Organic light-emitting devices (OLEDs) usually employ at least one organic semiconductor layer that acts as a hole-injection material. The prototypical example is a conjugated polymer such as poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) heavily p doped with polystyrene sulfonic acid. Here, the authors describe a chemical doping strategy for hole injection material formulation that enables spatial patterning of the material conductivity through optical activation. The strategy utilizes an organic photoacid generator (PAG) dispersed in a polymeric organic semiconductor host. Upon UV irradiation, the PAG decomposes and generates a strong protonic acid that subsequently p dopes the host. The authors demonstrate an OLED made with such a light-activated hole-injection material and show that arbitrary emission patterning can be accomplished. This approach may provide a simple, low cost path toward specialty lighting and signage applications for OLED technology.

  16. The active asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jewitt, D.

    2014-07-01

    Active asteroids simultaneously possess the orbits of main-belt asteroids and the physical appearances of comets; they show transient dust comae and solar-radiation pressure-swept tails. Apart from the shear surprise at finding such strange objects in the asteroid belt, the active asteroids are scientifically interesting for several reasons. Although we are limited to scarcely more than a dozen examples, the active asteroids already reveal the distinct action of different physical processes, each previously unobserved and carrying big-picture importance for understanding the solar system. 1. IMPACT. An unambiguous asteroid-asteroid impact was observed in 2010, when a 30-m scale body struck 100-km diameter (596) Scheila. Direct observations of impacts hold scientific importance both by sampling this natural process at full scale (compared with laboratory impacts conducted at tiny scales) and because impact statistics will allow us to assess the erosion rate in the asteroid belt and the contribution of asteroid dust to the interplanetary medium. 2. CRITICAL ROTATION. Several objects have been observed in which the best explanation seems to lie with spin-up to critical periods, presumably (but not certainly) caused by YORP. Examples of both likely mass-shedding (P/2010 A2, P/2013 P5) and full break-up (P/2013 R3, shown below) exist. It has been suggested that, at sub-kilometer sizes, spin-up disruption rates may surpass impact disruption rates. Future observations will show whether or not this is true, and may ultimately lead to an improved understanding of the physics of break-up. 3. THERMAL DISINTEGRATION. Geminid parent (3200) Phaethon shows on-going mass-loss at perihelion, driven by the 1000-K surface temperatures found there. The mechanisms appear to be some combination of thermal fracture and desiccation stress. 4. SUBLIMATION. Two objects have shown repeated activity that appears to be correlated with position in the orbit. The best example is 133P, which has

  17. Advances in Activity Cliff Research.

    PubMed

    Dimova, Dilyana; Bajorath, Jürgen

    2016-05-01

    Activity cliffs, i.e. similar compounds with large potency differences, are of interest from a chemical and informatics viewpoint; as a source of structure-activity relationship information, for compound optimization, and activity prediction. Herein, recent highlights of activity cliff research are discussed including studies that have further extended our understanding of activity cliffs, yielded unprecedented insights, or paved the way for practical applications.

  18. Advances in Activity Cliff Research.

    PubMed

    Dimova, Dilyana; Bajorath, Jürgen

    2016-05-01

    Activity cliffs, i.e. similar compounds with large potency differences, are of interest from a chemical and informatics viewpoint; as a source of structure-activity relationship information, for compound optimization, and activity prediction. Herein, recent highlights of activity cliff research are discussed including studies that have further extended our understanding of activity cliffs, yielded unprecedented insights, or paved the way for practical applications. PMID:27492084

  19. Metadata Activities in Biology

    SciTech Connect

    Inigo, Gil San; HUTCHISON, VIVIAN; Frame, Mike; Palanisamy, Giri

    2010-01-01

    The National Biological Information Infrastructure program has advanced the biological sciences ability to standardize, share, integrate and synthesize data by making the metadata program a core of its activities. Through strategic partnerships, a series of crosswalks for the main biological metadata specifications have enabled data providers and international clearinghouses to aggregate and disseminate tens of thousands of metadata sets describing petabytes of data records. New efforts at the National Biological Information Infrastructure are focusing on better metadata creation and curation tools, semantic mediation for data discovery and other curious initiatives.

  20. ASTP RBCC Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Karl W.; McArthur, Craig; Leopard, Larry (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    This presentation reviews the activities of the Advanced Space Transportation Program (ASTP) in the development of Rocket-Based Combined Cycle (RBCC)technology. The document consist of the presentation slides for a talk scheduled to be given to the World Aviation Congress and Exhibit of SAE. Included in the review is discussion of recent accomplishments in the area of Advanced Reusable technologies (ART), which includes work in flowpath testing, and system studies of the various vehicle/engine combinations including RBCC, Turbine Based Combined Cycle (TBCC) and Pulsed Detonation Engine (PDE). Pictures of the proposed RBCC Flowpaths are included. The next steps in the development process are reviewed.