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Sample records for activated human pbmcs

  1. M48U1 and Tenofovir combination synergistically inhibits HIV infection in activated PBMCs and human cervicovaginal histocultures

    PubMed Central

    Musumeci, Giuseppina; Bon, Isabella; Lembo, David; Cagno, Valeria; Re, Maria Carla; Signoretto, Caterina; Diani, Erica; Lopalco, Lucia; Pastori, Claudia; Martin, Loïc; Ponchel, Gilles; Gibellini, Davide; Bouchemal, Kawthar

    2017-01-01

    Microbicides are considered a promising strategy for preventing human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) transmission and disease. In this report, we first analyzed the antiviral activity of the miniCD4 M48U1 peptide formulated in hydroxyethylcellulose (HEC) hydrogel in activated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) infected with R5- and X4–tropic HIV-1 strains. The results demonstrate that M48U1 prevented infection by several HIV-1 strains including laboratory strains, and HIV-1 subtype B and C strains isolated from the activated PBMCs of patients. M48U1 also inhibited infection by two HIV-1 transmitted/founder infectious molecular clones (pREJO.c/2864 and pTHRO.c/2626). In addition, M48U1 was administered in association with tenofovir, and these two antiretroviral drugs synergistically inhibited HIV-1 infection. In the next series of experiments, we tested M48U1 alone or in combination with tenofovir in HEC hydrogel with an organ-like structure mimicking human cervicovaginal tissue. We demonstrated a strong antiviral effect in absence of significant tissue toxicity. Together, these results indicate that co-treatment with M48U1 plus tenofovir is an effective antiviral strategy that may be used as a new topical microbicide to prevent HIV-1 transmission. PMID:28145455

  2. Production of citokines by human PBMCs in simulated microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakos, Agnes; Varkonyi, Andrea; Minarovits, Janos; Batkai, Laszlo

    2005-08-01

    Alteration of immune functions have been observed in lymphocytes from astronautes after long-term and short term space flight. To study the influence of microgravity on the cytokine network, human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were investigated for their ability to secrete different cytokines (TNF-α, IL-12, and IFN-γ) in simulated microgravity established by Rotary Cell Culture System (RCCS). We detected a significantly enhanced level of all investigated cytokines in simulated microgravity. They appeared consecutively: TNF-α showed its maximum at 24 hours, IL-12 at 48 hours and IFN-γ at day 6. We suggest that simulated microgravity itself affects the production of different intercellular signal molecules and modulates thereby immune cell function.

  3. Production of biologically active recombinant human soluble CD23 and its effect on PBMCs isolated from hyper-IgE blood.

    PubMed

    Daniels, Brodie B; Askew, Sandra L; van de Venter, Maryna; Oosthuizen, Vaughan

    2005-04-01

    A recombinant form of human soluble CD23 (sCD23), the low affinity receptor for IgE (FcepsilonRII), was produced by PCR cloning the lectin-binding domain sequence into a bacterial expression vector. After renaturation and purification, the sCD23 bound IgE and divalent metal ions, indicating its activity. The recombinant human sCD23 exhibited similar proinflammatory properties as the native protein. Although interleukin-1beta, tumour necrosis factor-alpha, and nuclear factor-kappaB appeared not to be enhanced significantly in unstimulated RPMI 8866 B-lymphoblastoid and U937 promonocytic cell lines with 24 h incubation of recombinant sCD23, they were produced in both healthy and hyper-IgE-derived peripheral blood mononuclear cells, especially tumour necrosis factor-alpha. This study concludes that while recombinant and chimeric sCD23 may be useful in blocking IgE binding to immune cells and decreasing IgE synthesis by B-lymphocytes, the production of proinflammatory cytokines, particularly tumour necrosis factor-alpha will enhance immune responses in cases of asthma, allergy, and hyper-IgE syndrome.

  4. Quercetin modulates toll-like receptor-mediated protein kinase signaling pathways in oxLDL-challenged human PBMCs and regulates TLR-activated atherosclerotic inflammation in hypercholesterolemic rats.

    PubMed

    Bhaskar, Shobha; Helen, A

    2016-12-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are pattern recognition receptors that have a unique and essential function in innate immunity. The effect of quercetin on TLR-mediated downstream signaling mechanism and its effect on TLR-mediated MAP kinase and Akt pathways were studied in oxLDL-stimulated hPBMCs using specific inhibitors. The pretreatment of hPBMCs with specific TLR inhibitor, CLI-095, decreased the NF-κB nuclear translocation and TNF-α release by oxLDL. When the cells treated with inhibitor and quercetin together, the inhibition was more effective. The specific inhibitor for p38 MAPK, SB203580, reduced the phosphorylated p38 level and decreased the NF-κB activation and TNF-α release by oxLDL-challenged hPBMCs. This inhibitor showed enhanced inhibition when treated with quercetin together. The inhibitors for ERK1/2, PD98059, and for JNK, SP606125, also showed inhibitory effect on NF-κB activation and TNF-α release by oxLDL-simulated hPBMCs. Quercetin supplementation enhanced the inhibition of nuclear translocation of NF-κB and the release of cytokines. TLR4 inhibition study confirmed the downstream signaling mechanism mediated by NF-κB which is involved in the oxLDL-induced inflammatory response, and quercetin suppresses the cytokine, TNF-α release by modulating TLR-NF-κB signaling pathway. In addition to NF-κB signaling pathway, inflammation induced by oxLDL was also related to the activation of p38MAPK, ERK1/2 and JNK, and Akt pathways, and the protective effect of quercetin may be also related to the inhibition of activation of these pathways. Quercetin significantly downregulated the elevated mRNA expression of TLRs and cytokine TNF-α in HCD-fed atherosclerotic rats in vivo. As quercetin possesses inhibition on both TLR-NF-κB signaling pathway and TLR-mediated MAPK pathway, it is evident that it can be used as a therapeutic agent to ameliorate atherosclerotic inflammation. Since quercetin is the major flavonoid and forms the backbone of many other

  5. Human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from smokers release higher levels of IL-1-like cytokines after exposure to combustion-generated ultrafine particles.

    PubMed

    De Falco, Gianluigi; Terlizzi, Michela; Sirignano, Mariano; Commodo, Mario; D'Anna, Andrea; Aquino, Rita P; Pinto, Aldo; Sorrentino, Rosalinda

    2017-02-22

    Ultrafine particles (UFP) generated by combustion processes are often associated with adverse health effects. However, little is known about the inflammatory processes generated by UFP that may underlie their toxicological activity. Murine macrophages (J774.1 cells) and human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were used to evaluate the molecular mechanism underlying the pro-inflammatory activity of UFP. The addition of soot particles to J774.1 cells induced a concentration-dependent release of IL-1α, IL-1β and IL-33 This effect was not associated with cell death and, in contrast to literature, was pronounced at very low concentrations (5-100 pg/ml). Similarly, UFP induced the release of IL-1α, IL-18 and IL-33 by PBMCs. However, this effect was solely observed in PBMCs obtained from smokers, as the PBMCs from non-smokers instead released higher levels of IL-10. The release of these cytokines after UFP exposure was caspase-1- and NLRP3 inflammasome-dependent in PBMCs from healthy smokers, whereas IL-1α release was calpain-dependent. These results show that UFP at very low concentrations are able to give rise to an inflammatory process that is responsible for IL-1α, IL-18 and IL-33 release, which is pronounced in PBMCs from smokers, confirming that these individuals are especially susceptible to inflammatory-based airway diseases once exposed to air pollution.

  6. Human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from smokers release higher levels of IL-1-like cytokines after exposure to combustion-generated ultrafine particles

    PubMed Central

    De Falco, Gianluigi; Terlizzi, Michela; Sirignano, Mariano; Commodo, Mario; D’Anna, Andrea; Aquino, Rita P.; Pinto, Aldo; Sorrentino, Rosalinda

    2017-01-01

    Ultrafine particles (UFP) generated by combustion processes are often associated with adverse health effects. However, little is known about the inflammatory processes generated by UFP that may underlie their toxicological activity. Murine macrophages (J774.1 cells) and human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were used to evaluate the molecular mechanism underlying the pro-inflammatory activity of UFP. The addition of soot particles to J774.1 cells induced a concentration-dependent release of IL-1α, IL-1β and IL-33 This effect was not associated with cell death and, in contrast to literature, was pronounced at very low concentrations (5–100 pg/ml). Similarly, UFP induced the release of IL-1α, IL-18 and IL-33 by PBMCs. However, this effect was solely observed in PBMCs obtained from smokers, as the PBMCs from non-smokers instead released higher levels of IL-10. The release of these cytokines after UFP exposure was caspase-1- and NLRP3 inflammasome-dependent in PBMCs from healthy smokers, whereas IL-1α release was calpain-dependent. These results show that UFP at very low concentrations are able to give rise to an inflammatory process that is responsible for IL-1α, IL-18 and IL-33 release, which is pronounced in PBMCs from smokers, confirming that these individuals are especially susceptible to inflammatory-based airway diseases once exposed to air pollution. PMID:28223692

  7. Leptin induces the phagocytosis and protective immune response in Leishmania donovani infected THP-1 cell line and human PBMCs.

    PubMed

    Dayakar, Alti; Chandrasekaran, Sambamurthy; Veronica, Jalaja; Maurya, Radheshyam

    2016-01-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) is an infectious disease responsible for several deaths in malnourished children due to impaired cell-mediated immunity, which is accompanied by low circulating leptin levels. The cytokine function of leptin is implicated for several immune regulation activities such as hematopoiesis, angiogenesis, innate and adaptive immunity. Its deficiency associated with polarization of Th2 response, which coincides with VL pathogenesis. To determine the cytokine role of leptin in case of experimental VL, we tested the leptin associated Th1/Th2 type cytokine profile at mRNA level from Leishmania donovani infected human monocytic leukemia cell line (THP-1) and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). We also tested the effect of leptin on macrophages activation (viz. studying the phosphorylation of signaling moieties), phagocytic activity and intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production during infection. We observed that leptin induced Th1 specific response by upregulation of IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-8 and TNF-α in THP-1 and IFN-γ, IL-12 and IL-2 in PBMCs. We also observed the downregulation of Th2 type cytokine i.e. IL-10 in THP-1 and unaltered expression of cytokines i.e. TGF-β, IL-10 and IL-4 in PBMCs. In addition, leptin stimulates the macrophages by inducing phosphorylation of Erk1/2 and Akt which are usually dephosphorylated in L. donovani infection. In concordance, leptin also induces the macrophage phagocytic activity by enhancing the intracellular ROS generation which helps in phagolysosome formation and oxidative killing of the parasite. In compilation, leptin is able to maintain the defensive environment against L. donovani infection through the classical macrophage activity.

  8. Growth suppression effect of human mesenchymal stem cells from bone marrow, adipose tissue, and Wharton’s jelly of umbilical cord on PBMCs

    PubMed Central

    Ayatollahi, Maryam; Talaei-Khozani, Tahereh; Razmkhah, Mahboobeh

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): Immunosuppressive property of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) has great attraction in regenerative medicine especially when dealing with tissue damage involving immune reactions. The most attractive tissue sources of MSCs used in clinical applications are bone marrow (BM), adipose tissue (AT), and Wharton’s jelly (WJ) of human umbilical cord. The current study has compared immunomodulatory properties of human BM, AT, and WJ-MSCs. Materials and Methods: Three different types of human MSCs were isolated, cultured, and characterized by flow cytometry and differentiation potentials. The MSCs were co-cultured with allogeneic phytohemagglutinin (PHA) activated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). The proliferation of PBMCs was assessed by flow cytometry of carboxyfluorescein succinimidyl ester (CFSE) stained cells and compared to each other and to the growth of PBMCs in the absence of MSCs. Additionally, the growth suppression was indirectly assessed by using the transwell culture system. Results: The proliferation of PBMCs reduced to 6.2, 7 and 15.4- fold in cultures with AT-MSCs, WJ-MSCs, and BM-MSCs, respectively, compared to the PHA-activated cells. When the growth suppression was indirectly assessed by using the transwell culture system, it was revealed that AT-MSCs, WJ-MSCs, and BM-MSCs caused growth reduction in PBMCs to 3, 8, and 8 -fold, respectively, compared to the PHA-activated cells. Conclusion: These data collectively conclude that the immunomodulatory effects of MSCs, which may mostly carry out through direct cell to cell contact, are different between various sources. Accordingly results of this study may contribute to the application of these cells in cell therapy and regenerative medicine. PMID:27081458

  9. Characterization of two anti-dengue human monoclonal antibodies prepared from PBMCs of patients with dengue illness in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Li, Z-Y; Yamashita, A; Kawashita, N; Sasaki, T; Pan, Y; Ono, K-I; Ikuta, K; Li, Y-G

    2016-06-01

    The global spread of the four dengue virus (DENV) serotypes (dengue-1 to -4) has made this virus a major and growing public health concern. Generally, pre-existing neutralizing antibodies derived from primary infection play a significant role in protecting against subsequent infection with the same serotype. By contrast, these pre-existing antibodies are believed to mediate a non-protective response to subsequent heterotypic DENV infections, leading to the onset of dengue illness. In this study, two monoclonal antibodies prepared by using peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from patients with dengue fever were characterized. Epitope mapping revealed that amino acid residues 254-278 in domain II of the viral envelope protein E were the target region of these antibodies. A database search revealed that certain sequences in this epitope region showed high conservation among the four serotypes of DENV. These two human monoclonal antibodies could neutralize DENV-2,-4 more effectively than DENV-1,-3. The amino acid sequences could not explain this difference in neutralizing activity. However, the 3D structure results showed that amino acid 274 could be the critical residue for the difference in neutralization. These results may provide basic information for the development of a dengue vaccine.

  10. The effect of diabetes-associated autoantigens on cell processes in human PBMCs and their relevance to autoimmune diabetes development.

    PubMed

    Vcelakova, Jana; Blatny, Radek; Halbhuber, Zbynek; Kolar, Michal; Neuwirth, Ales; Petruzelkova, Lenka; Ulmannova, Tereza; Kolouskova, Stanislava; Sumnik, Zdenek; Pithova, Pavlina; Krivjanska, Maria; Filipp, Dominik; Stechova, Katerina

    2013-01-01

    Type 1 Diabetes (T1D) is considered to be a T-helper- (Th-) 1 autoimmune disease; however, T1D pathogenesis likely involves many factors, and sufficient tools for autoreactive T cell detection for the study of this disease are currently lacking. In this study, using gene expression microarrays, we analysed the effect of diabetes-associated autoantigens on peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) with the purpose of identifying (pre)diabetes-associated cell processes. Twelve patients with recent onset T1D, 18 first-degree relatives of the TD1 patients (DRL; 9/18 autoantibody positive), and 13 healthy controls (DV) were tested. PBMCs from these individuals were stimulated with a cocktail of diabetes-associated autoantigens (proinsulin, IA-2, and GAD65-derived peptides). After 72 hours, gene expression was evaluated by high-density gene microarray. The greatest number of functional differences was observed between relatives and controls (69 pathways), from which 15% of the pathways belonged to "immune response-related" processes. In the T1D versus controls comparison, more pathways (24%) were classified as "immune response-related." Important pathways that were identified using data from the T1D versus controls comparison were pathways involving antigen presentation by MHCII, the activation of Th17 and Th22 responses, and cytoskeleton rearrangement-related processes. Genes involved in Th17 and TGF-beta cascades may represent novel, promising (pre)diabetes biomarkers.

  11. Dynamic interaction between astrocytes and infiltrating PBMCs in context of neuroAIDS

    PubMed Central

    Richards, Maureen H.; Narasipura, Srinivas D.; Kim, Stephanie; Seaton, Melanie S.; Lutgen, Victoria; Al-Harthi, Lena

    2014-01-01

    HIV-mediated neuropathogenesis is a multifaceted process involving several players, including resident brain cells (neurons, astrocytes, and microglia) and infiltrating cells (peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs)). We evaluated the dynamic interaction between astrocytes and infiltrating PBMCs as it impacts HIV in the CNS. We demonstrate that human primary-derived astrocytes (PDAs) predominantly secrete Wnt 1, 2b, 3, 5b, and 10b. Wnts are small secreted glycoproteins that initiate either β-catenin-dependent or independent signal transduction. The Wnt pathway plays a vital role in the regulation of CNS activities including neurogenesis, neurotransmitter release, synaptic plasticity, and memory consolidation. We show that HIV infection of PDAs altered astrocyte Wnt profile by elevating Wnts 2b and 10b. Astrocyte conditioned media (ACM) inhibited HIV replication in PBMCs by 50%. Removal of Wnts from ACM abrogated its ability to suppress HIV replication in PBMCs. Inversely, PBMCs supernatant activated PDAs, as demonstrated by a 10-fold increase in HLA-DR and a 5- fold increase in IFNγ expression, and enhanced astrocyte susceptibility to HIV by 2-fold, which was mediated by IFNγ in a Stat-3-dependent manner. Collectively, these data demonstrate a dynamic interaction between astrocytes and PBMCs, whereby astrocyte-secreted Wnts exert an anti-HIV effect on infected PBMCs and PBMCs, in turn, secrete IFNγ that enhance astrocyte susceptibility to productive HIV infection and mediate their activation. PMID:25331637

  12. Dynamic interaction between astrocytes and infiltrating PBMCs in context of neuroAIDS.

    PubMed

    Richards, Maureen H; Narasipura, Srinivas D; Kim, Stephanie; Seaton, Melanie S; Lutgen, Victoria; Al-Harthi, Lena

    2015-03-01

    HIV-mediated neuropathogenesis is a multifaceted process involving several players, including resident brain cells (neurons, astrocytes, and microglia) and infiltrating cells [peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs)]. We evaluated the dynamic interaction between astrocytes and infiltrating PBMCs as it impacts HIV in the CNS. We demonstrate that human primary-derived astrocytes (PDAs) predominantly secrete Wnt 1, 2b, 3, 5b, and 10b. Wnts are small secreted glycoproteins that initiate either β-catenin-dependent or independent signal transduction. The Wnt pathway plays a vital role in the regulation of CNS activities including neurogenesis, neurotransmitter release, synaptic plasticity, and memory consolidation. We show that HIV infection of PDAs altered astrocyte Wnt profile by elevating Wnts 2b and 10b. Astrocyte conditioned media (ACM) inhibited HIV replication in PBMCs by 50%. Removal of Wnts from ACM abrogated its ability to suppress HIV replication in PBMCs. Inversely, PBMCs supernatant activated PDAs, as demonstrated by a 10-fold increase in HLA-DR and a 5-fold increase in IFNγ expression, and enhanced astrocyte susceptibility to HIV by 2-fold, which was mediated by IFNγ in a Stat-3-dependent manner. Collectively, these data demonstrate a dynamic interaction between astrocytes and PBMCs, whereby astrocyte-secreted Wnts exert an anti-HIV effect on infected PBMCs and PBMCs, in turn, secrete IFNγ that enhance astrocyte susceptibility to productive HIV infection and mediate their activation.

  13. Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) exposure to human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) abolish T cell responses only in high concentrations and following coincubation for more than two hours.

    PubMed

    Kloverpris, Henrik; Fomsgaard, Anders; Handley, Amanda; Ackland, Jim; Sullivan, Mark; Goulder, Philip

    2010-04-30

    Immunotherapies based on reinfusion of autologous cells incubated ex vivo with peptides reconstituted in toxic solvents, such as DMSO, are now performed on a routine basis. However, the toxic effects of the most common solvent used, DMSO, on T cell responses from human PBMCs, have not previously been evaluated in detail. Here, in preparation for a first-in-man human phase I vaccine trial comprising reinfusion of autologous HIV peptide-pulsed PBMCs, human PBMCs from healthy and HIV-infected donors were exposed in vitro to a range of DMSO concentrations, and for a range of time periods. Polychromatic flow cytometry was used to evaluate the influence of DMSO on functional T cell responses. We report that high concentrations of up to 10% of DMSO for 1 hour do not affect the cell viability, the magnitude or the functional profile of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell responses, regardless of antigen specificity and HLA class I restriction. In contrast, >2% for >2 hours compromises these responses. These data are relevant in the design of immunotherapies based on pulsing a large number of peptides onto antigen presenting cells prior to reinfusion.

  14. Aspergillus Cell Wall Chitin Induces Anti- and Proinflammatory Cytokines in Human PBMCs via the Fc-γ Receptor/Syk/PI3K Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Becker, K. L.; Aimanianda, V.; Wang, X.; Gresnigt, M. S.; Ammerdorffer, A.; Jacobs, C. W.; Gazendam, R. P.; Joosten, L. A. B.; Netea, M. G.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Chitin is an important cell wall component of Aspergillus fumigatus conidia, of which hundreds are inhaled on a daily basis. Previous studies have shown that chitin has both anti- and proinflammatory properties; however the exact mechanisms determining the inflammatory signature of chitin are poorly understood, especially in human immune cells. Human peripheral blood mononuclear cells were isolated from healthy volunteers and stimulated with chitin from Aspergillus fumigatus. Transcription and production of the proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra) were measured from the cell culture supernatant by quantitative PCR (qPCR) or enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), respectively. Chitin induced an anti-inflammatory signature characterized by the production of IL-1Ra in the presence of human serum, which was abrogated in immunoglobulin-depleted serum. Fc-γ-receptor-dependent recognition and phagocytosis of IgG-opsonized chitin was identified as a novel IL-1Ra-inducing mechanism by chitin. IL-1Ra production induced by chitin was dependent on Syk kinase and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) activation. In contrast, costimulation of chitin with the pattern recognition receptor (PRR) ligands lipopolysaccharide, Pam3Cys, or muramyl dipeptide, but not β-glucan, had synergistic effects on the induction of proinflammatory cytokines by human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). In conclusion, chitin can have both pro- and anti-inflammatory properties, depending on the presence of pathogen-associated molecular patterns and immunoglobulins, thus explaining the various inflammatory signatures reported for chitin. PMID:27247234

  15. The effects of calpain inhibition on IkB alpha degradation after activation of PBMCs: identification of the calpain cleavage sites.

    PubMed

    Schaecher, Kurt; Goust, Jean-Michel; Banik, Naren L

    2004-07-01

    Human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were activated using anti-CD3/CD28 (HIT3A/CD28.2) resulting in degradation of IkB alpha, an inhibitor of NFkB, relative to unactivated cells. Degradation of IkB alpha began by 30 min and proceeded for at least 5 h. Calpeptin, a calpain inhibitor, inhibited IkB alpha degradation in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, calpain inhibition increased IkB alpha levels compared to nonactivated controls. Recombinant IkB alpha was incubated with purified porcine m-calpain in the presence of 0.1% Triton X-100, and the degradation products were monitored by SDS-PAGE and sequenced. Most of the degradation products were peptides derived from calpain, but one was derived from IkB alpha cleaved between amino acids 50 and 51 (glutamine and glutamic acid). The liberated fragment included the entire signal response domain (SRD), a region containing key serine and threonine residues necessary for phosphorylation by the IKKinase complex and sites required for ubiquitination. The results suggest that calpain plays an important role in IkB alpha degradation, a crucial event in T cell activation.

  16. Replacing with whole grains and legumes reduces Lp-PLA2 activities in plasma and PBMCs in patients with prediabetes or T2D.

    PubMed

    Kim, Minjoo; Jeung, Se Ri; Jeong, Tae-Sook; Lee, Sang-Hyun; Lee, Jong Ho

    2014-08-01

    To determine dietary effects on circulating lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 (Lp-PLA2) activity and enzyme activity in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), 99 patients with impaired fasting glucose, impaired glucose tolerance, or newly-diagnosed T2D were randomly assigned to either a control group (usual diet with refined rice) or the whole grain and legume group. Substitution of whole grains and legumes for refined rice was associated with the replacement of 7% of energy from carbohydrates with energy from protein (about 4%) and fat. After 12 weeks, the whole grain and legume group showed a significant decrease in fasting glucose, insulin, homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance, hemoglobin A1c, malondialdehyde, plasma Lp-PLA2 activity, and oxidized LDL (ox-LDL), and an increase in LDL particle size. The changes (Δs) in these variables in the whole grain and legume group were significantly different from those in controls after adjustment for the baseline levels. When all subjects were considered, Δ plasma Lp-PLA2 positively correlated with Δ glucose, Δ PBMC Lp-PLA2, Δ ox-LDL, and Δ urinary 8-epi-prostaglandin F2α after being adjusted for confounding factors. The Δ PBMC Lp-PLA2 correlated positively with Δ glucose and Δ ox-LDL, and negatively with Δ LDL particle size and baseline PBMC Lp-PLA2 The substitution of whole grains and legumes for refined rice resulted in a reduction in Lp-PLA2 activities in plasma and PBMCs partly through improved glycemic control, increased consumption of protein relative to carbohydrate, and reduced lipid peroxides.

  17. Antimony Resistant Leishmania donovani but Not Sensitive Ones Drives Greater Frequency of Potent T-Regulatory Cells upon Interaction with Human PBMCs: Role of IL-10 and TGF-β in Early Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, June; Sundar, Shyam; Dujardin, Jean Claude; Roy, Syamal

    2014-01-01

    In India the sand fly, Phlebotomus argentipes, transmitted parasitic disease termed kala-azar is caused by Leishmania donovani (LD) in humans. These immune-evading parasites have increasingly developed resistance to the drug sodium antimony gluconate in endemic regions. Lack of early diagnosis methods for the disease limits the information available regarding the early interactions of this parasite with either human tissues or cell lineages. We reasoned that peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from healthy human beings could help compare some of their immune signatures once they were exposed for up to 8 days, to either pentavalent antimony sensitive (SbS-LD) or resistant (SbR-LD) Leishmania donovani isolates. At day 2, PBMC cultures exposed to SbS-LD and SbR-LD stationary phase promastigotes had four and seven fold higher frequency of IL-10 secreting monocyte-macrophage respectively, compared to cultures unexposed to parasites. Contrasting with the CD4+CD25−CD127− type-1 T-regulatory (Tr1) cell population that displayed similar features whatever the culture conditions, there was a pronounced increase in the IL-10 producing CD4+CD25+CD127low/− inducible T-regulatory cells (iTregs) in the PBMC cultures sampled at day 8 post addition of SbR-LD. Sorted iTregs from different cultures on day 8 were added to anti-CD3/CD28 induced naïve PBMCs to assess their suppressive ability. We observed that iTregs from SbR-LD exposed PBMCs had more pronounced suppressive ability compared to SbS-LD counterpart on a per cell basis and is dependent on both IL-10 and TGF-β, whereas IL-10 being the major factor contributing to the suppressive ability of iTregs sorted from PBMC cultures exposed to SbS–LD. Of note, iTreg population frequency value remained at the basal level after addition of genetically modified SbR-LD lacking unique terminal sugar in surface glycan. Even with limitations of this artificial in vitro model of L. donovani-human PBMC interactions, the present

  18. Antimony resistant Leishmania donovani but not sensitive ones drives greater frequency of potent T-regulatory cells upon interaction with human PBMCs: role of IL-10 and TGF-β in early immune response.

    PubMed

    Guha, Rajan; Das, Shantanabha; Ghosh, June; Sundar, Shyam; Dujardin, Jean Claude; Roy, Syamal

    2014-07-01

    In India the sand fly, Phlebotomus argentipes, transmitted parasitic disease termed kala-azar is caused by Leishmania donovani (LD) in humans. These immune-evading parasites have increasingly developed resistance to the drug sodium antimony gluconate in endemic regions. Lack of early diagnosis methods for the disease limits the information available regarding the early interactions of this parasite with either human tissues or cell lineages. We reasoned that peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from healthy human beings could help compare some of their immune signatures once they were exposed for up to 8 days, to either pentavalent antimony sensitive (Sb(S)-LD) or resistant (Sb(R)-LD) Leishmania donovani isolates. At day 2, PBMC cultures exposed to Sb(S)-LD and Sb(R)-LD stationary phase promastigotes had four and seven fold higher frequency of IL-10 secreting monocyte-macrophage respectively, compared to cultures unexposed to parasites. Contrasting with the CD4(+)CD25-CD127- type-1 T-regulatory (Tr1) cell population that displayed similar features whatever the culture conditions, there was a pronounced increase in the IL-10 producing CD4(+)CD25(+)CD127low/- inducible T-regulatory cells (iTregs) in the PBMC cultures sampled at day 8 post addition of Sb(R)-LD. Sorted iTregs from different cultures on day 8 were added to anti-CD3/CD28 induced naïve PBMCs to assess their suppressive ability. We observed that iTregs from Sb(R)-LD exposed PBMCs had more pronounced suppressive ability compared to Sb(S)-LD counterpart on a per cell basis and is dependent on both IL-10 and TGF-β, whereas IL-10 being the major factor contributing to the suppressive ability of iTregs sorted from PBMC cultures exposed to Sb(S)-LD. Of note, iTreg population frequency value remained at the basal level after addition of genetically modified Sb(R)-LD lacking unique terminal sugar in surface glycan. Even with limitations of this artificial in vitro model of L. donovani-human PBMC

  19. Comparative Multi-Donor Study of IFNγ Secretion and Expression by Human PBMCs Using ELISPOT Side-by-Side with ELISA and Flow Cytometry Assays.

    PubMed

    Hagen, Jodi; Zimmerman, Ryan; Goetz, Christine; Bonnevier, Jody; Houchins, Jeffrey P; Reagan, Kevin; Kalyuzhny, Alexander E

    2015-02-11

    ELISPOT, ELISA and flow cytometry techniques are often used to study the function of immune system cells. It is tempting to speculate that these assays can be used interchangeably, providing similar information about the cytokine secreting activity of cells: the higher the number of cytokine-positive cells measured by flow cytometry, the higher the number of cytokine-secreting cells expected to be detected by ELISPOT and the larger the amount of secreted cytokine expected to be measured by ELISA. We have analyzed the expression level and secretion capacity of IFNγ from peripheral blood mononuclear cells isolated from five healthy donors and stimulated by calcium ionomycin mixed with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate in a non-specific manner in side-by-side testing using ELISPOT, ELISA and flow cytometry assays. In our study, we observed a general correlation in donors' ranking between ELISPOT and flow cytometry; ELISA values did not correlate with either ELISPOT or flow cytometry. However, a detailed donor-to-donor comparison between ELISPOT and flow cytometry revealed significant discrepancies: donors who have similar numbers of IFNγ-positive cells measured by flow cytometry show 2-3-fold differences in the number of spot-forming cells (SFCs) measured by ELISPOT; and donors who have the same number of SFCs measured by ELISPOT show 30% differences in the number of IFNγ-positive cells measured by flow cytometry. Significant discrepancies between donors were also found when comparing ELISA and ELISPOT techniques: donors who secreted the same amount of IFNγ measured by ELISA show six-fold differences in the number of SFCs measured by ELISPOT; and donors who have 5-7-times less secreted IFNγ measured by ELISA show a two-fold increase in the number of SFCs measured by ELISPOT compared to donors who show a more profound secretion of IFNγ measured by ELISA. The results of our study suggest that there can be a lack of correlation between IFNγ values measured by

  20. Imbalance between HAT and HDAC Activities in the PBMCs of Patients with Ankylosing Spondylitis or Rheumatoid Arthritis and Influence of HDAC Inhibitors on TNF Alpha Production

    PubMed Central

    Toussirot, Eric; Abbas, Wasim; Khan, Kashif Aziz; Tissot, Marion; Jeudy, Alicia; Baud, Lucile; Bertolini, Ewa; Wendling, Daniel; Herbein, Georges

    2013-01-01

    Objective Acetylation or deacetylation of histone proteins may modulate cytokine gene transcription such as TNF alpha (TNF). We evaluated the balance between histone deacetytlase (HDAC) and histone acetyltransferase (HAT) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) or ankylosing spondylitis (AS) compared to healthy controls (HC) and determined the influence of HDAC inhibitors (trichostatin A -TSA- or Sirtinol -Sirt-) on these enzymatic activities and on the PBMC production of TNF. Methods 52 patients with RA, 21 with AS and 38 HC were evaluated. HAT and HDAC activities were measured on nuclear extracts from PBMC using colorimetric assays. Enzymatic activities were determined prior to and after ex vivo treatment of PBMC by TSA or Sirt. TNF levels were evaluated in PBMC culture supernatants in the absence or presence of TSA or Sirt. Results HAT and HDAC activities were significantly reduced in AS, while these activities reached similar levels in RA and HC. Ex vivo treatment of PBMC by HDACi tended to decrease HDAC expression in HC, but Sirt significantly reduced HAT in RA. TNF production by PBMC was significantly down-regulated by Sirt in HC and AS patients. Conclusion HAT and HDAC were disturbed in AS while no major changes were found in RA. HDACi may modulate HDAC and HAT PBMC expression, especially Sirt in RA. Sirtinol was able to down regulate TNF production by PBMC in HC and AS. An imbalance between HAT and HDAC activities might provide the rationale for the development of HDACi in the therapeutic approach to inflammatory rheumatic diseases. PMID:24039666

  1. Ellagic Acid, a Dietary Polyphenol, Inhibits Tautomerase Activity of Human Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor and Its Pro-inflammatory Responses in Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Souvik; Siddiqui, Asim A; Mazumder, Somnath; De, Rudranil; Saha, Shubhra J; Banerjee, Chinmoy; Iqbal, Mohd S; Adhikari, Susanta; Alam, Athar; Roy, Siddhartha; Bandyopadhyay, Uday

    2015-05-27

    Ellagic acid (EA), a phenolic lactone, inhibited tautomerase activity of human macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) noncompetitively (Ki = 1.97 ± 0.7 μM). The binding of EA to MIF was determined by following the quenching of tryptophan fluorescence. We synthesized several EA derivatives, and their structure-activity relationship studies indicated that the planar conjugated lactone moiety of EA was essential for MIF inhibition. MIF induces nuclear translocation of NF-κB and chemotaxis of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) to promote inflammation. We were interested in evaluating the effect of EA on nuclear translocation of NF-κB and chemotactic activity in human PBMCs in the presence of MIF. The results showed that EA inhibited MIF-induced NF-κB nuclear translocation in PBMCs, as evident from confocal immunofluorescence microscopic data. EA also inhibited MIF-mediated chemotaxis of PBMCs. Thus, we report MIF-inhibitory activity of EA and inhibition of MIF-mediated proinflammatory responses in PBMCs by EA.

  2. Bone resorptive activity of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells after fusion with polyethylene glycol.

    PubMed

    Manrique, Edwin; Castillo, Luz M; Lazala, Oswaldo; Guerrero, Carlos A; Acosta, Orlando

    2017-03-01

    The bone remodeling process occurs through bone formation by osteoblasts and bone resorption by osteoclasts, a process involving the contribution of endocrine and nervous systems. The mechanisms associated to differentiation and proliferation of osteoclasts and osteoblasts are considered a potential therapeutic target for treating some erosive bone diseases. The aim of the present study is to explore the feasibility of generating active osteoclast-like cells from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) following polyethylene glycol (PEG)-induced fusion. PEG-fused PBMCs showed TRAP(+)-multinucleated cells and bone resorption activity, and were also positive for osteoclast markers such as carbonic anhydrase II, calcitonin receptor, vacuolar ATPase, and cathepsin K, when examined by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, immunochemistry and Western blotting. TRAP expression and bone resorptive activity were higher in whole PEG-fused PBMCs than in separated T lymphocytes, B lymphocytes or monocytes. Both TRAP expression and bone resorptive activity were also higher in osteogenesis imperfecta patients compared to PEG-fused PBMCs from healthy individuals. PEG-induced fusion was more efficient in inducing TRAP and bone resorptive activities than macrophage colony-stimulating factor or dexamethasone treatment. Bone resorptive activity of PEG-fused PMBCs was inhibited by bisphosphonates. Evidence is provided that the use of PEG-based cell fusion is a straightforward and amenable method for studying human osteoclast differentiation and testing new therapeutic strategies.

  3. Increased Calpain Correlates with Th1 Cytokine Profile in PBMCs from MS Patients

    PubMed Central

    Imam, Sarah A.; Guyton, Mary K.; Haque, Azizul; Vandenbark, Arthur; Tyor, William R.; Ray, Swapan K.; Banik, Naren L.

    2007-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a devastating autoimmune demyelinating disease of the CNS. This study investigated whether expression and activity of the calcium-activated protease calpain correlated with Th1/Th2 dysregulation in MS patients during states of relapse and remission. Calpain expression and activity were significantly increased in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from MS patients, compared to controls, with the highest expression and activity noted during relapse. Th1 cytokines were highest and Th2 cytokines were lowest in MS patients during relapse. Treatment with calpain inhibitor, calpeptin, decreased Th1 cytokines in PBMCs from MS patients. Calpain inhibitor also reduced degradation of myelin basic protein (MBP) by inhibiting the calpain secreted from MBP-specific T cells. Taken together, these results suggested calpain involvement in Th1/Th2 dysregulation in MS patients. PMID:17765980

  4. Forsythoside A Inhibits BVDV Replication via TRAF2-Dependent CD28–4-1BB Signaling in Bovine PBMCs

    PubMed Central

    Song, Quan-Jiang; Weng, Xiao-Gang; Cai, Dong-Jie; Zhang, Wang; Wang, Jiu-Feng

    2016-01-01

    Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV), the causative agent of bovine viral diarrhea/mucosal disease (BVD/MD), is an important pathogen of cattle and other wild animals throughout the world. BVDV infection typically leads to an impaired immune response in cattle. In the present study, we investigated the effect of Forsythoside A (FTA) on BVDV infection of bovine peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). We found that Forsythoside A could not only promote proliferation of PBMCs and T cells activation but also inhibit the replication of BVDV as well as apoptosis induced by BVDV. FTA treatment could counteract the BVDV-induced overproduction of IFN-γ to maintain the immune homeostasis in bovine PBMCs. At same time, FTA can enhance the secretion of IL-2. What’s more, BVDV promotes the expression of CD28, 4-1BB and TRAF-2, which can be modulated by FTA. Our data suggest that FTA protects PBMCs from BVDV infection possibly via TRAF2-dependent CD28–4-1BB signaling, which may activate PBMCs in response to BVDV infection. Therefore, this aids in the development of an effective adjuvant for vaccines against BVDV and other specific FTA-based therapies for preventing BVDV infection. PMID:27617959

  5. Down-regulation of miR-181a can reduce heat stress damage in PBMCs of Holstein cows.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kun-Lin; Fu, Yuan-Yuan; Shi, Min-Yan; Li, Hui-Xia

    2016-09-01

    Heat stress can weaken the immune system and even increase livestock's susceptibility to disease. MicroRNA (miR) is short non-coding RNA that functions in post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression and some phenotypes. Our recent study found that miR-181a is highly expressed in the serum of heat-stressed Holstein cows, but the potential function of miR-181a is still not clarified. In this study, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), isolated from Holstein cows' peripheral blood, were used to investigate the effects of miR-181a inhibitor on heat stress damage. Our results showed that significant apoptosis and oxidative damage were induced by heat stress in PBMCs. However, with apoptosis, the levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and content of malondialdehyde (MDA) were reduced, while the content of glutathione (GSH) and the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) were increased even under heat stress conditions after transfecting miR-181a inhibitors to PBMCs. Meanwhile, mRNA expression of bax and caspase-3 was significantly decreased, but mRNA expression of bcl-2 was increased in transfected PBMCs. In conclusion, our results demonstrated that down-regulation of miR-181a can reduce heat stress damage in PBMCs of Holstein cows.

  6. Induced gene expression of the hypusine-containing protein eukaryotic initiation factor 5A in activated human T lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Bevec, D; Klier, H; Holter, W; Tschachler, E; Valent, P; Lottspeich, F; Baumruker, T; Hauber, J

    1994-01-01

    The hypusine-containing protein eukaryotic initiation factor 5A (eIF-5A) is a cellular cofactor critically required for the function of the Rev transactivator protein of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). eIF-5A localizes in the nuclear and cytoplasmic compartments of mammalian cells, suggesting possible activities on the level of regulated mRNA transport and/or protein translation. In this report we show that eIF-5A gene expression is constitutively low but inducible with T-lymphocyte-specific stimuli in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of healthy individuals. In contrast, eIF-5A is constitutively expressed at high levels in human cell lines as well as in various human organs. Comparison of eIF-5A levels in the PBMCs of uninfected and HIV-1-infected donors shows a significant upregulation of eIF-5A gene expression in the PBMCs of HIV-1 patients, compatible with a possible role of eIF-5A in HIV-1 replication during T-cell activation. Images PMID:7971969

  7. Mechanism of anti-inflammatory effect of tricin, a flavonoid isolated from Njavara rice bran in LPS induced hPBMCs and carrageenan induced rats.

    PubMed

    Shalini, V; Jayalekshmi, Ananthasankaran; Helen, A

    2015-08-01

    Njavara is an indigenous medicinal rice variety traditionally used in Ayurvedic system of medicine practiced in Kerala, India. Tricin is a bioflavonoid present in significantly higher levels in rice bran of Njavara. Present study attempted to identify the molecular target of tricin in TLR mediated signaling pathways by using lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (hPBMCs) and carrageenan induced paw edema in rats as experimental models. Tricin acted upstream in the activation of inflammation cascade by interfering with TLR4 activation, preferably by blocking the LPS induced activation of TLR4, MYD88 and TRIF proteins in hPBMCs. Subsequently, tricin significantly blocked the activation of downstream kinases like p38MAPK, JNK1/2 and IRF3. Thus the inhibitory effect of tricin on NF-κB and IRF3 together confirms the specific inhibition of both MYD88 dependent and TRIF dependent pathways. Tricin treatment also inhibited the pro-inflammatory effect of LPS by blocking the TLR4 signaling mediated activation of cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2), which is confirmed by specific inhibition of COX-2. Results demonstrated that in addition to NF-κB, tricin can prevent the activation of STAT proteins by significantly inhibiting the activation of both STAT1 and STAT3 via the down regulation of upstream phosphorylating enzymes like JAK1 and JAK2. The protective anti-inflammatory effect of tricin was also confirmed by in vivo experiments. Thus, this study provides strong evidence that tricin exerts its anti-inflammatory effect via a mechanism involving the TLR4/NF-κB/STAT signaling cascade.

  8. Activation of ERK mitogen-activated protein kinase in human cells by the mycotoxin patulin

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, T.-S.; Yu, F.-Y.; Su, C.-C.; Kan, J.-C.; Chung, C.-P.; Liu, B.-H. . E-mail: bingliu@csmu.edu.tw

    2005-09-01

    Patulin (PAT), a mycotoxin produced by certain species of Penicillium and Aspergillus, is often detectable in moldy fruits and their derivative products. PAT led to a concentration-dependent and time-dependent increase in phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated protein kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) in human embryonic kidney (HEK293) cells, human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), and Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells. Exposure of HEK293 cells to concentrations above 5 {mu}M PAT for 30 min induced ERK1/2 phosphorylation; activation of ERK1/2 was also observed after 24 h incubation with 0.05 {mu}M of PAT. Treatment of human PBMCs for 30 min with 30 {mu}M PAT dramatically increased the phosphorylated ERK1/2 levels. Both MEK1/2 inhibitors, U0126 and PD98059, suppressed ERK1/2 activation in either HEK293 or MDCK cells. In HEK293 cells, U0126-mediated inhibition of PAT-induced ERK1/2 phosphorylation resulted in a significant decrease in levels of DNA damage, expressed as tail moment values, in the single cell gel electrophoresis assay. Conversely, U0126 did not affect cell viability, lactate dehydrogenase release, and the DNA synthesis rate in PAT-treated cultures. Exposure of HEK293 cells for 90 min to 15 {mu}M PAT elevated the levels of early growth response gene-1 (egr-1) mRNA, but not of c-fos, fosB, and junB mRNAs. These results indicate that in human cells, PAT causes a rapid and persistent activation of ERK1/2 and this signaling pathway plays an important role in mediating PAT-induced DNA damage and egr-1 gene expression.

  9. CD4 T cell activation by B cells in human Leishmania (Viannia) infection

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background An effective adaptive immune response requires activation of specific CD4 T cells. The capacity of B cells to activate CD4 T cells in human cutaneous leishmaniasis caused by Leishmania (Viannia) has not been evaluated. Methods CD4 T cell activation by B cells of cutaneous leishmaniasis patients was evaluated by culture of PBMCs or purified B cells and CD4 T cells with Leishmania panamensis antigens. CD4 T cell and B cell activation markers were evaluated by flow cytometry and 13 cytokines were measured in supernatants with a bead-based capture assay. The effect of Leishmania antigens on BCR-mediated endocytosis of ovalbumin was evaluated in the Ramos human B cell line by targeting the antigen with anti-IgM-biotin and anti-biotin-ovalbumin-FITC. Results Culture of PBMCs from cutaneous leishmaniasis patients with Leishmania antigens resulted in upregulation of the activation markers CD25 and CD69 as well as increased frequency of CD25hiCD127- cells among CD4 T cells. Concomitantly, B cells upregulated the costimulatory molecule CD86. These changes were not observed in PBMCs from healthy subjects, indicating participation of Leishmania-specific lymphocytes expanded in vivo. Purified B cells from these patients, when interacting with purified CD4 T cells and Leishmania antigens, were capable of inducing significant increases in CD25 and CD69 expression and CD25hiCD127- frequency in CD4 T cells. These changes were associated with upregulation of CD86 in B cells. Comparison of changes in CD4 T cell activation parameters between PBMC and B cell/CD4 T cell cultures showed no statistically significant differences; further, significant secretion of IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-13 was induced in both types of cultures. Additionally, culture with Leishmania antigens enhanced BCR-mediated endocytosis of ovalbumin in Ramos human B cells. Conclusions The capacity of B cells specific for Leishmania antigens in peripheral blood of cutaneous leishmaniasis patients to

  10. Time-Course Study of the Transcriptome of Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells (PBMCs) from Sheep Infected with Fasciola hepatica

    PubMed Central

    Scheerlinck, Jean-Pierre; Ansell, Brendan R. E.; Hall, Ross S.; Gasser, Robin B.; Jex, Aaron R.

    2016-01-01

    Fasciola hepatica is a parasitic trematode that infects a wide range of mammalian hosts, including livestock and humans, in temperate and tropical regions globally. This trematode causes the disease fascioliasis, which consists of an acute phase (≤ 12 weeks) during which juvenile parasites migrate through the host liver tissues, and a chronic phase (> 12 weeks) following the establishment of adult parasites in the liver bile ducts. Few studies have explored the progression of the host response over the course of Fasciola infection in the same animals. In this study, we characterized transcriptomic changes in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) collected from sheep at three time points over the first eight weeks of infection relative to uninfected controls. In total, 183 and 76 genes were found to be differentially transcribed at two and eight weeks post-infection respectively. Functional and pathway analysis of differentially transcribed genes revealed changes related to T-cell activation that may underpin a Th2-biased immune response against this parasite. This first insight into the dynamics of host responses during the early stages of infection improves the understanding of the pathogenesis of acute fascioliasis, informs vaccine development and presents a set of PBMC markers with diagnostic potential. PMID:27438474

  11. Effects of active bufadienolide compounds on human cancer cells and CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells in mitogen-activated human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Bo; He, Jing; Kisoh, Keishi; Hayashi, Hideki; Tanaka, Sachiko; Si, Nan; Zhao, Hai-Yu; Hirano, Toshihiko; Bian, Baolin; Takagi, Norio

    2016-09-01

    The growth inhibitory effects of bufadienolide compounds were investigated in two intractable cancer cells, a human glioblastoma cell line U-87 and a pancreatic cancer cell line SW1990. Among four bufadienolide compounds, a dose-dependent cytotoxicity was observed in these cancer cells after treatment with gamabufotalin and arenobufagin. The IC50 values of the two compounds were 3-5 times higher in normal peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) than these values for both cancer cell lines. However, similar phenomena were not observed for two other bufadienolide compounds, telocinobufagin and bufalin. These results thus suggest that gamabufotalin and arenobufagin possess selective cytotoxic activity against tumor cells rather than normal cells. Moreover, a clear dose-dependent lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release, a well-known hallmark of necrosis, was observed in both cancer cells treated with gamabufotalin, suggesting that gamabufotalin-mediated cell death is predominantly associated with a necrosis-like phenotype. Of most importance, treatment with as little as 8 ng/ml of gamabufotalin, even an almost non-toxic concentration to PBMCs, efficiently downregulated the percentages of CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ regulator T (Treg) cells in mitogen-activated PBMCs. Given that Treg cells play a critical role in tumor immunotolerance by suppressing antitumor immunity, these results suggest that gamabufotalin may serve as a promising candidate, as an adjuvant therapeutic agent by manipulating Treg cells to enhance the efficacy of conventional anticancer drugs and lessen their side-effects. These findings provide insights into the clinical application of gamabufotalin for cancer patients with glioblastoma/pancreatic cancer based on its cytocidal effect against tumor cells as well as its depletion of Treg cells.

  12. The Nrf2 activator tBHQ inhibits T cell activation of primary human CD4 T cells.

    PubMed

    Turley, Alexandra E; Zagorski, Joseph W; Rockwell, Cheryl E

    2015-02-01

    The transcription factor nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) regulates a battery of antioxidant, detoxification, and cell stress genes. It is activated by oxidative stress and a number of exogenous compounds, one of which is tert-butylhydroquinone (tBHQ), a widely used food preservative. Nrf2 modulates immune responses in numerous rodent models of inflammation, but its effects on human immune cells are not well characterized. The purpose of these studies was to evaluate the effects of the Nrf2 activator tBHQ on early events of T cell activation in primary human cells. Treatment with tBHQ induced mRNA expression of the Nrf2 target genes HMOX-1, GCLC, and NQO1, and also increased NRF2 mRNA expression, albeit to a lesser extent than the other target genes. tBHQ decreased production of the cytokines IL-2 and IFN-γ at both the protein and mRNA levels after stimulation with anti-CD3/anti-CD28 in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells and to an even greater extent in isolated CD4 T cells. Likewise, tBHQ decreased induction of CD25 and CD69 in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and this decrease was even more marked in isolated CD4 T cells. In addition, tBHQ inhibited induction of NFκB DNA binding in anti-CD3/anti-CD28-activated PBMCs. Collectively, these data suggest that tBHQ inhibits activation of primary human CD4 T cells, which correlates with activation of Nrf2 and inhibition of NFκB DNA binding. Although these studies suggest the food additive tBHQ negatively impacts T cell activation, further studies will be needed to fully elucidate the effect of tBHQ on human immune responses.

  13. Human Infrastructure & Human Activity Detection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-07-01

    researchers are developing sensors systems that detect footfalls (or gait ) [1, 2], speech, the spectral response of human skin, etc [3]. Little work has...cone shaped field of view. • Visible imagers can capture color or grayscale video for human gait detection and object recognition. • Infrared...his/her gait produces a unique signature [13]. Indirect means of detecting personnel include the usage of acoustic, seismic, magnetic, passive

  14. Peptide-Derivatized SB105-A10 Dendrimer Inhibits the Infectivity of R5 and X4 HIV-1 Strains in Primary PBMCs and Cervicovaginal Histocultures

    PubMed Central

    Bon, Isabella; Lembo, David; Rusnati, Marco; Clò, Alberto; Morini, Silvia; Miserocchi, Anna; Bugatti, Antonella; Grigolon, Sonia; Musumeci, Giuseppina; Landolfo, Santo; Re, Maria Carla; Gibellini, Davide

    2013-01-01

    Peptide dendrimers are a class of molecules that exhibit a large array of biological effects including antiviral activity. In this report, we analyzed the antiviral activity of the peptide-derivatized SB105-A10 dendrimer, which is a tetra-branched dendrimer synthetized on a lysine core, in activated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) that were challenged with reference and wild-type human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) strains. SB105-A10 inhibited infections by HIV-1 X4 and R5 strains, interfering with the early phases of the viral replication cycle. SB105-A10 targets heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) and, importantly, the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) assay revealed that SB105-A10 strongly binds gp41 and gp120, most likely preventing HIV-1 attachment/entry through multiple mechanisms. Interestingly, the antiviral activity of SB105-A10 was also detectable in an organ-like structure of human cervicovaginal tissue, in which SB105-A10 inhibited the HIV-1ada R5 strain infection without altering the tissue viability. These results demonstrated the strong antiviral activity of SB105-A10 and suggest a potential microbicide use of this dendrimer to prevent the heterosexual transmission of HIV-1. PMID:24116111

  15. Antioxidant enzyme activities of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells exposed to trace elements.

    PubMed

    Kuppusamy, U R; Dharmani, M; Kanthimathi, M S; Indran, M

    2005-07-01

    The trace elements copper, zinc, and selenium are important immune modulators and essential cofactors of the antioxidant enzymes. In the present study, the proliferative effect of human peripheral mononuclear cells (PBMCs) that have been exposed to copper, zinc, and selenium and the corresponding activities of antioxidant enzymes, namely superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and catalase, were determined. Zinc and copper stimulated the PBMC proliferation in a dose-dependent manner within the dose range 25-200 micromol/L. SOD and GPx activities in PBMCs exposed to zinc were inhibited, whereas catalase activity was unaffected. All the three antioxidant enzymes in the cells exposed to copper were inhibited. Selenium exerted more potent inhibition of the cell proliferation while causing stimulation of the antioxidant enzymes at the lowest dose (25 micromol/L) than at the highest dose (200 micromol/L) tested. A significant negative correlation was observed between proliferation and antioxidant enzyme (SOD and GPx) activities in trace-element-exposed PBMC. The present findings substantiate the importance of trace elements as immune modulators and the involvement of enzymatic antioxidant system in the immune cell regulation.

  16. Curcumin inhibits osteoclastogenic potential in PBMCs from rheumatoid arthritis patients via the suppression of MAPK/RANK/c-Fos/NFATc1 signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Wei; Zhao, Ling-Jie; Dong, Xiao-Lei; Zhao, Zhi-Ming; Li, Jing; Zhang, Bei-Bei; Cai, Hui

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the effects of curcumin on the osteoclastogenic potential of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) obtained from patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and to investigate the underlying molecular mechanisms. PBMCs from patients with RA (n=12) and healthy controls (n=10) were cultured to assess osteoclastogenic potential. The number of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase-positive osteoclasts differentiated from PBMCs isolated from patients with RA was significantly increased compared with that of the healthy controls. In addition, the osteoclast number in patients with RA was correlated with the clinical indicators, Sharp score (r=0.810; P=0.001) and lumbar T-score (r=−0.685; P=0.014). Furthermore, the resorption area was increased in the RA group compared with the healthy controls. The mRNA and protein expression levels in PBMC-derived osteoclasts treated with curcumin were measured by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blotting, respectively. Curcumin inhibited the osteoclastogenic potential of PBMCs, potentially by suppressing activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2, p38 and c-Jun N-terminal kinase, and inhibiting receptor activator of nuclear factor κB (RANK), c-Fos and nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFATc1) expression. The results of the present study demonstrated that curcumin may inhibit the osteoclastogenic potential of PBMCs from patients with RA through the suppression of the mitogen-activated protein kinase/RANK/c-Fos/NFATc1 signaling pathways, and that curcumin may be a potential novel therapeutic agent for the treatment of bone deterioration in inflammatory diseases such as RA. PMID:27572279

  17. The Crohn's disease-associated polymorphism in ATG16L1 (rs2241880) reduces SHIP gene expression and activity in human subjects.

    PubMed

    Ngoh, E N; Brugger, H K; Monajemi, M; Menzies, S C; Hirschfeld, A F; Del Bel, K L; Jacobson, K; Lavoie, P M; Turvey, S E; Sly, L M

    2015-10-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) is a polygenic immune-mediated disease characterized by gastrointestinal inflammation. Mice deficient in the hematopoietic-restricted SH2 domain-containing inositolpolyphosphate 5'-phosphatase (SHIP) develop spontaneous CD-like ileal inflammation. Intriguingly, SHIP mRNA is not upregulated in biopsies from patients with ileal CD despite immune cell infiltration, but SHIP's role in human CD remains unknown. We analyzed SHIP mRNA expression and activity in biopsies and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from control and treatment-naive subjects with ileal CD, and demonstrated that SHIP mRNA and activity were lower in hematopoietic cells in ileal biopsies and PBMCs from subjects with CD. In all tissues from our patient cohort and in PBMCs from a second healthy control cohort, subjects homozygous for the autophagy-related 16-like protein (ATG16L1) CD-associated gene variant (rs2241880), had low SHIP mRNA expression and activity. SHIP protein expression increased during autophagy and SHIP upregulation was dependent on ATG16L1 and/or autophagy, as well as the ATG16L1 CD-associated gene variant. Finally, homozygosity for the ATG16L1 risk variant and low SHIP mRNA expression is inversely related to increased (LPS+ATP)-induced IL-1β production by PBMCs in our cohorts and was regulated by increased transcription of ILIB. These data suggest a novel mechanism by which the ATG16L1 CD-associated gene variant may predispose people to develop intestinal inflammation.

  18. Effect of BjcuL, a lectin isolated from Bothrops jararacussu, on human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Pires, Weverson Luciano; de Castro, Onassis Boeri; Kayano, Anderson Makoto; da Silva Setúbal, Sulamita; Pontes, Adriana Silva; Nery, Neriane Monteiro; Paloschi, Mauro Valentino; Dos Santos Pereira, Soraya; Stábeli, Rodrigo Guerino; Fernandes, Carla Freire Celedônio; Soares, Andreimar Martins; Zuliani, Juliana Pavan

    2017-02-08

    BjcuL is a C-type lectin with specificity for the binding of β-d-galactose units isolated from Bothrops jararacussu venom. It triggers cellular infiltration in post capillary venules, increases edema and vascular permeability in murine models, contributes to in vitro neutrophil activation and modulates macrophage functional activation towards an M1 state. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of BjcuL on human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) activation with a focus on PBMCs proliferation and inflammatory mediators release. Results showed that BjcuL is not toxic to PBMCs, that BjcuL inhibits PBMCs proliferation and that it stimulates PBMCs to produce superoxide anion and hydrogen peroxide, primarily via lymphocyte stimulation, but does not stimulate the production of nitric oxide and PGE2. These results demonstrate that BjcuL has an immunomodulatory effect on PBMCs. Further studies are needed to confirm the immunomodulatory effect of BjcuL, to elucidate the molecular mechanisms of action responsible for its effects and to determine its potential application as an immunopharmacological and biotechnological tool.

  19. Comparative study of the effect of chloro-, dichloro-, bromo-, and dibromoacetic acid on necrotic, apoptotic and morphological changes in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (in vitro study).

    PubMed

    Michałowicz, Jaromir; Wróblewski, Wojciech; Mokra, Katarzyna; Maćczak, Aneta; Kwiatkowska, Marta

    2015-10-01

    In this study, the effect of monochloroacetic acid (MCAA), dichloroacetic acid (DCAA), monobromoacetic acid (MBAA) and dibromoacetic acid (DBAA) on human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) was assessed. HAAs studied induced at millimolar concentrations necrotic alterations in PBMCs with the strongest effect noted for MBAA and DBAA. Chloro- and bromoacetic acids also provoked changes in PBMCs morphology because they caused a strong decrease in cell size (particularly DCAA and DBAA) and increase in cell granulation (mainly MBAA and DBAA). All HAAs studied, and DCAA and DBAA in particular (at lower concentrations than those, which caused necrosis) induced apoptotic changes, which was confirmed by analysis of alterations in cell membrane permeability and caspase 8, 9 and 3 activation. Moreover, HAAs examined (mainly dihalogenated acids) strongly increased transmembrane mitochondrial potential and enhanced ROS (mainly hydroxyl radical) formation, which was possibly associated with apoptotic changes provoked by those substances. The results showed that DBAA exhibited the strongest effects on PBMCs.

  20. A New Ex Vivo Method for Effective Expansion and Activation of Human Natural Killer Cells for Anti-Tumor Immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hui; Tang, Ruihua; Li, Jing; Liu, Yaxiong; Ye, Linjie; Shao, Dongyan; Jin, Mingliang; Huang, Qingsheng; Shi, Junling

    2015-12-01

    Preserving the activities of natural killer (NK) cells in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) after ex vivo expansion and activation is critical for NK cell-based therapy. Collected from human PBMCs, the NK cells were expanded and activated. The expressions of surface receptors, cytotoxicity against tumor cells, and antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) of the NK cells before and after expansion and activation were, respectively, compared. After expansion, the ADCC activity of healthy human NK cells was improved by 32 %, and the cytotoxicity against four types of tumor cells was increased by 19, 29, 26, and 28 %, respectively. The positive expression rates for the activating receptors NKG2D, CD94, NKp46, NKp30, and NKp44 of healthy human NK cells expanded ex vivo were increased by 60, 40, 20, 40, and 63 %, respectively, whereas those for the inhibitory receptors CD158b, NKB1, and NKAT showed no significant changes. The addition of an immunologically active peptide, "TKD," during cell expansion further increased NK cytotoxicity by approximately 10 %. The expanded and activated NK cells from cancer patients achieved average purity which was greater than 90 %, and the cytotoxicity against K562 cells was increased by more than 17 %. Compared with resting NK cells, NK cells both from healthy volunteers and cancer patients expanded and activated ex vivo using our method were significantly more active and demonstrated significantly increased anti-tumor activity. This method could be therefore used as a new and effective approach to meet requirements for anti-tumor immunotherapy.

  1. Regulation of Inflammatory Gene Expression in PBMCs by Immunostimulatory Botanicals

    PubMed Central

    Denzler, Karen L.; Waters, Robert; Jacobs, Bertram L.; Rochon, Yvan; Langland, Jeffrey O.

    2010-01-01

    Many hundreds of botanicals are used in complementary and alternative medicine for therapeutic use as antimicrobials and immune stimulators. While there exists many centuries of anecdotal evidence and few clinical studies on the activity and efficacy of these botanicals, limited scientific evidence exists on the ability of these botanicals to modulate the immune and inflammatory responses. Using botanogenomics (or herbogenomics), this study provides novel insight into inflammatory genes which are induced in peripheral blood mononuclear cells following treatment with immunomodulatory botanical extracts. These results may suggest putative genes involved in the physiological responses thought to occur following administration of these botanical extracts. Using extracts from immunostimulatory herbs (Astragalus membranaceus, Sambucus cerulea, Andrographis paniculata) and an immunosuppressive herb (Urtica dioica), the data presented supports previous cytokine studies on these herbs as well as identifying additional genes which may be involved in immune cell activation and migration and various inflammatory responses, including wound healing, angiogenesis, and blood pressure modulation. Additionally, we report the presence of lipopolysaccharide in medicinally prepared extracts of these herbs which is theorized to be a natural and active component of the immunostimulatory herbal extracts. The data presented provides a more extensive picture on how these herbs may be mediating their biological effects on the immune and inflammatory responses. PMID:20838436

  2. Accumulation of defective viral genomes in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of human immunodeficiency virus type 1-infected individuals.

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, G; Xu, X; Chermann, J C; Hirsch, I

    1997-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) genomes present in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of infected persons or in lymphocytes infected in vitro were studied by long-distance PCR (LD-PCR) using primers localized in the HIV-1 long terminal repeats. The full-length 9-kb DNA was the only LD-PCR product obtained in peripheral and cord blood lymphocytes from seronegative donors infected in vitro. However, a high proportion (27% to 66%) of distinct populations of extensively deleted HIV-1 genomes of variable size was detected in PBMCs of 15 of 16 HIV-1-infected persons. Physical mapping of defective genomes showed that the frequency of deletions is proportional to their proximity to the central part of HIV-1 genome, which is consistent with a deletion mechanism involving a single polymerase jump during reverse transcription. Sequencing of deletion junctions revealed the presence of short direct repeats of three or four nucleotides. The number of defective HIV-1 genomes decreased after in vitro activation of PBMCs. Persistence of full-length and deleted genomes in in vitro activated PBMCs correlated with isolation of an infectious virus. Our results represent the first quantitative assessment of intragenomic rearrangements in HIV-1 genomes in PBMCs of infected persons and demonstrate that, in contrast to in vitro infection, defective genomes accumulate in PBMCs of infected persons. PMID:9032358

  3. Haemonchus contortus excretory and secretory proteins (HcESPs) suppress functions of goat PBMCs in vitro.

    PubMed

    Gadahi, Javaid Ali; Yongqian, Bu; Ehsan, Muhammad; Zhang, Zhen Chao; Wang, Shuai; Yan, Ruo Feng; Song, Xiao Kai; Xu, Li Xin; Li, Xiang Rui

    2016-06-14

    Excretory and secretory products (ESPs) of nematode contain various proteins which are capable of inducing the instigation or depression of the host immune response and are involved in the pathogenesis of the worms. In the present study, Haemonchus contortus excretory and secretory products (HcESPs) were collected from the adult worms. Binding of HcESPs to goat peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) was confirmed by immune-fluorescence assay. Effects of the HcESPs on cytokine production, cell proliferation, cell migration and nitric oxide (NO) production of PBMCs were checked by co-incubation of HcESPs with goat PBMCs. The results indicated that the production of IL-4 and IFN-γ were significantly decreased by HcESPs in dose dependent manner. On the contrary, the production of IL-10 and IL-17 were increased. Cell migration was significantly enhanced by HcESPs, whereas, HcESPs treatment significantly suppressed the cell proliferation and NO production. These results indicated that the HcESPs played important suppressive regulatory roles on PBMCs and provided highlights to the understanding of the host-parasite interactions.

  4. PARP is activated in human asthma and its inhibition by olaparib blocks house dust mite-induced disease in mice.

    PubMed

    Ghonim, Mohamed A; Pyakurel, Kusma; Ibba, Salome V; Wang, Jeffrey; Rodriguez, Paulo; Al-Khami, Amir A; Lammi, Matthew R; Kim, Hogyoung; Zea, Arnold H; Davis, Christian; Okpechi, Samuel; Wyczechowska, Dorota; Al-Ghareeb, Kamel; Mansy, Moselhy S; Ochoa, Augusto; Naura, Amarjit S; Boulares, A Hamid

    2015-12-01

    Our laboratory established a role for poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase (PARP) in asthma. To increase the clinical significance of our studies, it is imperative to demonstrate that PARP is actually activated in human asthma, to examine whether a PARP inhibitor approved for human testing such as olaparib blocks already-established chronic asthma traits in response to house dust mite (HDM), a true human allergen, in mice and to examine whether the drug modulates human cluster of differentiation type 4 (CD4(+)) T-cell function. To conduct the study, human lung specimens and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and a HDM-based mouse asthma model were used. Our results show that PARP is activated in PBMCs and lung tissues of asthmatics. PARP inhibition by olaparib or gene knockout blocked established asthma-like traits in mice chronically exposed to HDM including airway eosinophilia and hyper-responsiveness. These effects were linked to a marked reduction in T helper 2 (Th2) cytokine production without a prominent effect on interferon (IFN)-γ or interleukin (IL)-10. PARP inhibition prevented HDM-induced increase in overall cellularity, weight and CD4(+) T-cell population in spleens of treated mice whereas it increased the T-regulatory cell population. In CD3/CD28-stimulated human CD4 (+)T-cells, olaparib treatment reduced Th2 cytokine production potentially by modulating GATA binding protein-3 (gata-3)/IL-4 expression while moderately affecting T-cell proliferation. PARP inhibition inconsistently increased IL-17 in HDM-exposed mice and CD3/CD28-stimulated CD4(+) T cells without a concomitant increase in factors that can be influenced by IL-17. In the present study, we provide evidence for the first time that PARP-1 is activated in human asthma and that its inhibition is effective in blocking established asthma in mice.

  5. Identification of Immunopotentiating Lactic Acid Bacteria that Induce Antibody Production by in vitro Stimulated Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Makiko; Hitaka, Akira; Fujino, Himiko; Matsumoto, Takashi; Hasegawa, Takanori; Morimatsu, Fumiki; Fujiki, Tsukasa; Katakura, Yoshinori

    2012-01-01

    L-leucyl-L-leucine methyl ester (LLME) is known to remove lysosome-rich cells from human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). To evaluate the immunopotentiating ability of lactic acid bacteria (LAB), we adopted the in vitro stimulation protocol of LLME-treated PBMCs as a model assay system and monitored the level of antibody produced by stimulated PBMCs. The results indicated that several LAB strains have immunopotentiating ability against PBMCs, as evidenced by the enhanced antibody production and increased number of antigen-specific B cells. Next, we identified T cells as the direct target cells of the immunopotentiating LAB strain L32, suggesting that L32 induced antibody production by PBMCs through T-cell activation. Finally, we tested the immunopotentiating ability of ligands for Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2), which is known to mediate the LAB signal, and observed that both L32 and one of the TLR2 ligands, LTA-BS, induced antigen-specific antibody production by in vitro stimulated PBMC. This suggests that L32 and LTA-BS can be used as an adjuvant for stimulating immune reaction in PBMCs.

  6. Recombinant Haemonchus contortus 24 kDa excretory/secretory protein (rHcES-24) modulate the immune functions of goat PBMCs in vitro.

    PubMed

    Gadahi, Javaid Ali; Li, Baojie; Ehsan, Muhammad; Wang, Shuai; Zhang, Zhenchao; Wang, Yujian; Hasan, Muhammad Waqqas; Yan, Ruofeng; Song, Xiaokai; Xu, Lixin; Li, Xiangrui

    2016-12-20

    A 24 kDa protein is one of the important components in Haemonchus contortus (barber pole worm) excretory/secretory products (HcESPs), which was shown to have important antigenic function. However, little is known about the immunomodulatory effects of this proteinon host cell. In the present study gene encoding 24kDa excretory/secretory protein (HcES-24) was cloned. The recombinant protein of HcES-24 (rHcES-24) was expressed in a histidine-tagged fusion protein soluble form in Escherichia coli. Binding activity of rHcES-24 to goat PBMCs was confirmed by immunofluorescence assay (IFA) and its immunomudulatory effect on cytokine secretion, cell proliferation, cell migration and nitric oxide production were observed by co-incubation of rHcES-24. IFA results revealed that rHcES-24 could bind to the PBMCs. The interaction of rHcES-24 increased the production of IL4, IL10, IL17 and cell migration in dose dependent manner. However, rHcES-24 treatment significantly suppressed the production of IFNγ, proliferation of the PBMC and Nitric oxide (NO) production. Our findings showed that the rHcES-24 played important regulatory effects on the goat PBMCs.

  7. Dental Calculus Stimulates Interleukin-1β Secretion by Activating NLRP3 Inflammasome in Human and Mouse Phagocytes

    PubMed Central

    Montenegro Raudales, Jorge Luis; Yoshimura, Atsutoshi; SM, Ziauddin; Kaneko, Takashi; Ozaki, Yukio; Ukai, Takashi; Miyazaki, Toshihiro; Latz, Eicke; Hara, Yoshitaka

    2016-01-01

    Dental calculus is a mineralized deposit associated with periodontitis. The bacterial components contained in dental calculus can be recognized by host immune sensors, such as Toll-like receptors (TLRs), and induce transcription of proinflammatory cytokines, such as IL-1β. Studies have shown that cellular uptake of crystalline particles may trigger NLRP3 inflammasome activation, leading to the cleavage of the IL-1β precursor to its mature form. Phagocytosis of dental calculus in the periodontal pocket may therefore lead to the secretion of IL-1β, promoting inflammatory responses in periodontal tissues. However, the capacity of dental calculus to induce IL-1β secretion in human phagocytes has not been explored. To study this, we stimulated human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) with dental calculus collected from periodontitis patients, and measured IL-1β secretion by ELISA. We found that calculus induced IL-1β secretion in both human PMNs and PBMCs. Calculus also induced IL-1β in macrophages from wild-type mice, but not in macrophages from NLRP3- and ASC-deficient mice, indicating the involvement of NLRP3 and ASC. IL-1β induction was inhibited by polymyxin B, suggesting that LPS is one of the components of calculus that induces pro-IL-1β transcription. To analyze the effect of the inorganic structure, we baked calculus at 250°C for 1 h. This baked calculus failed to induce pro-IL-1β transcription. However, it did induce IL-1β secretion in lipid A-primed cells, indicating that the crystalline structure of calculus induces inflammasome activation. Furthermore, hydroxyapatite crystals, a component of dental calculus, induced IL-1β in mouse macrophages, and baked calculus induced IL-1β in lipid A-primed human PMNs and PBMCs. These results indicate that dental calculus stimulates IL-1β secretion via NLRP3 inflammasome in human and mouse phagocytes, and that the crystalline structure has a partial role in

  8. IL-6 down-regulates HLA class II expression and IL-12 production of human dendritic cells to impair activation of antigen-specific CD4(+) T cells.

    PubMed

    Ohno, Yosuke; Kitamura, Hidemitsu; Takahashi, Norihiko; Ohtake, Junya; Kaneumi, Shun; Sumida, Kentaro; Homma, Shigenori; Kawamura, Hideki; Minagawa, Nozomi; Shibasaki, Susumu; Taketomi, Akinobu

    2016-02-01

    Immunosuppression in tumor microenvironments critically affects the success of cancer immunotherapy. Here, we focused on the role of interleukin (IL)-6/signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT3) signaling cascade in immune regulation by human dendritic cells (DCs). IL-6-conditioned monocyte-derived DCs (MoDCs) impaired the presenting ability of cancer-related antigens. Interferon (IFN)-γ production attenuated by CD4(+) T cells co-cultured with IL-6-conditioned MoDCs corresponded with decreased DC IL-12p70 production. Human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DR and CD86 expression was significantly reduced in CD11b(+)CD11c(+) cells obtained from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of healthy donors by IL-6 treatment and was STAT3 dependent. Arginase-1 (ARG1), lysosomal protease, cathepsin L (CTSL), and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX2) were involved in the reduction of surface HLA-DR expression. Gene expressions of ARG1, CTSL, COX2, and IL6 were higher in tumor-infiltrating CD11b(+)CD11c(+) cells compared with PBMCs isolated from colorectal cancer patients. Expression of surface HLA-DR and CD86 on CD11b(+)CD11c(+) cells was down-regulated, and T cell-stimulating ability was attenuated compared with PBMCs, suggesting that an immunosuppressive phenotype might be induced by IL-6, ARG1, CTSL, and COX2 in tumor sites of colorectal cancer patients. There was a relationship between HLA-DR expression levels in tumor tissues and the size of CD4(+) T and CD8(+) T cell compartments. Our findings indicate that IL-6 causes a dysfunction in human DCs that activates cancer antigen-specific Th cells, suggesting that blocking the IL-6/STAT3 signaling pathway might be a promising strategy to improve cancer immunotherapy.

  9. A Metabolic Biofuel Cell: Conversion of Human Leukocyte Metabolic Activity to Electrical Currents

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    An investigation of the electrochemical activity of human white blood cells (WBC) for biofuel cell (BFC) applications is described. WBCs isolated from whole human blood were suspended in PBS and introduced into the anode compartment of a proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell. The cathode compartment contained a 50 mM potassium ferricyanide solution. Average current densities between 0.9 and 1.6 μA cm-2 and open circuit potentials (Voc) between 83 and 102 mV were obtained, which were both higher than control values. Cyclic voltammetry was used to investigate the electrochemical activity of the activated WBCs in an attempt to elucidate the mechanism of electron transfer between the cells and electrode. Voltammograms were obtained for the WBCs, including peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs - a lymphocyte-monocyte mixture isolated on a Ficoll gradient), a B lymphoblastoid cell line (BLCL), and two leukemia cell lines, namely K562 and Jurkat. An oxidation peak at about 363 mV vs. SCE for the PMA (phorbol ester) activated primary cells, with a notable absence of a reduction peak was observed. Oxidation peaks were not observed for the BLCL, K562 or Jurkat cell lines. HPLC confirmed the release of serotonin (5-HT) from the PMA activated primary cells. It is believed that serotonin, among other biochemical species released by the activated cells, contributes to the observed BFC currents. PMID:21569243

  10. Resveratrol Alters Proliferative Responses and Apoptosis in Human Activated B Lymphocytes In Vitro

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We hypothesized that resveratrol, a polyphenol found in grapes, peanuts, and berries would modulate B lymphocyte proliferation, immunoglobulin synthesis, and apoptosis after activation with T-cell dependent pokeweed mitogen. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were isolated from the blood of ...

  11. Carbon ions and X‑rays induce pro‑inflammatory effects in 3D oral mucosa models with and without PBMCs.

    PubMed

    Tschachojan, Viktoria; Schroer, Henrike; Averbeck, Nicole; Mueller-Klieser, Wolfgang

    2014-11-01

    Oral mucositis is a severe complication of radiotherapy. Hence, it may constitute a serious medical safety risk for astronauts during extended space flights, such as missions to Mars, during which they are exposed to heavy-ion irradiation. For risk assessment of developing radiation-induced mucositis, a three-dimensional (3D) organotypic oral mucosa model was irradiated with 12C heavy ions or X‑rays. The present study focused mainly on early radiation‑induced effects, such as the activation of nuclear factor κB (NFκB) and the expression or release of pro-inflammatory marker molecules. The 3D oral mucosa models with or without peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were irradiated with X‑rays or 12C heavy ions followed by snap freezing. Subsequently, cryosections were derived from the specimens, which were immunostained for analysis of compactness, DNA double strand breaks (DSB) and activation of NFκB. Radiation‑induced release of interleukin 6 (IL6) and interleukin 8 (IL8) was quantified by ELISA. Quantification of the DNA damage in irradiated mucosa models revealed distinctly more DSB after heavy-ion irradiation compared to X‑rays at definite time points, suggesting a higher gene toxicity of heavy ions. NFκB activation was observed after treatment with X‑rays or 12C particles. ELISA analyses showed significantly higher IL6 and IL8 levels after irradiation with X‑rays and 12C particles compared to non-irradiated controls, whereas co‑cultures including PBMCs released 2 to 3-fold higher interleukin concentrations compared to mucosa models without PBMCs. In this study, we demonstrated that several pro-inflammatory markers are induced by X‑rays and heavy-ion irradiation within an oral mucosa model. This suggests that oral mucositis indeed poses a risk for astronauts on extended space flights.

  12. Intrinsic Patterns of Human Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Kun; Ivanov, Plamen Ch.; Chen, Zhi; Hilton, Michael; Stanley, H. Eugene; Shea, Steven

    2003-03-01

    Activity is one of the defining features of life. Control of human activity is complex, being influenced by many factors both extrinsic and intrinsic to the body. The most obvious extrinsic factors that affect activity are the daily schedule of planned events, such as work and recreation, as well as reactions to unforeseen or random events. These extrinsic factors may account for the apparently random fluctuations in human motion observed over short time scales. The most obvious intrinsic factors are the body clocks including the circadian pacemaker that influences our sleep/wake cycle and ultradian oscillators with shorter time scales [2, 3]. These intrinsic rhythms may account for the underlying regularity in average activity level over longer periods of up to 24 h. Here we ask if the known extrinsic and intrinsic factors fully account for all complex features observed in recordings of human activity. To this end, we measure activity over two weeks from forearm motion in subjects undergoing their regular daily routine. Utilizing concepts from statistical physics, we demonstrate that during wakefulness human activity possesses previously unrecognized complex dynamic patterns. These patterns of activity are characterized by robust fractal and nonlinear dynamics including a universal probability distribution and long-range power-law correlations that are stable over a wide range of time scales (from minutes to hours). Surprisingly, we find that these dynamic patterns are unaffected by changes in the average activity level that occur within individual subjects throughout the day and on different days of the week, and between subjects. Moreover, we find that these patterns persist when the same subjects undergo time-isolation laboratory experiments designed to account for the phase of the circadian pacemaker, and control the known extrinsic factors by restricting behaviors and manipulating scheduled events including the sleep/wake cycle. We attribute these newly

  13. Desipramine decreases expression of human and murine indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenases.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Alexandra K; Janda, Tiffany M; Lawson, Marcus A; Rytych, Jennifer L; Smith, Robin A; Ocampo-Solis, Cecilia; McCusker, Robert H

    2017-05-01

    Abundant evidence connects depression symptomology with immune system activation, stress and subsequently elevated levels of kynurenine. Anti-depressants, such as the tricyclic norepinephrine/serotonin reuptake inhibitor desipramine (Desip), were developed under the premise that increasing extracellular neurotransmitter level was the sole mechanism by which they alleviate depressive symptomologies. However, evidence suggests that anti-depressants have additional actions that contribute to their therapeutic potential. The Kynurenine Pathway produces tryptophan metabolites that modulate neurotransmitter activity. This recognition identified another putative pathway for anti-depressant targeting. Considering a recognized role of the Kynurenine Pathway in depression, we investigated the potential for Desip to alter expression of rate-limiting enzymes of this pathway: indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenases (Ido1 and Ido2). Mice were administered lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or synthetic glucocorticoid dexamethasone (Dex) with Desip to determine if Desip alters indoleamine-dioxygenase (DO) expression in vivo following a modeled immune and stress response. This work was followed by treating murine and human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) with interferon-gamma (IFNγ) and Desip. In vivo: Desip blocked LPS-induced Ido1 expression in hippocampi, astrocytes, microglia and PBMCs and Ido2 expression by PBMCs. Ex vivo: Desip decreased IFNγ-induced Ido1 and Ido2 expression in murine PBMCs. This effect was directly translatable to the human system as Desip decreased IDO1 and IDO2 expression by human PBMCs. These data demonstrate for the first time that an anti-depressant alters expression of Ido1 and Ido2, identifying a possible new mechanism behind anti-depressant activity. Furthermore, we propose the assessment of PBMCs for anti-depressant responsiveness using IDO expression as a biomarker.

  14. Carvedilol differentially regulates cytokine production from activated human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shih-Ping; Ho, Ling-Jun; Cheng, Shu-Meng; Hsu, Yu-Lin; Tsao, Tien-Ping; Chang, Deh-Ming; Lai, Jenn-Haung

    2004-05-01

    Chronic inflammation is one of the important mechanisms involved in atherosclerosis formation. The activated monocytes and their secreted cytokines contribute significantly to this inflammatory process. Here we examined the effects of carvedilol, a recently introduced cardio-protective alpha-1- and beta-receptor blocker, on cytokine production from various stimuli-activated human immune effector cells. By ELISA analysis, we showed that carvedilol inhibited interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), but enhanced interleukin (IL)-12 production in phytohemagglutinin (PHA)- and concanavalin A (ConA)-stimulated human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). The production of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) was marginally affected. When purified monocytes were examined, we observed the consistent up-regulation of IL-12 production while both IL-10 and TNF-alpha were unaffected or marginally down-regulated, respectively, by carvedilol. In agreement with the observation in monocytes, the production of IL-12 from activated macrophages was also up-regulated by carvedilol. We concluded that carvedilol might mediate its therapeutic effects through differentially regulating cytokine production from activated mononuclear cells, including at least monocytes and macrophages.

  15. Viral latency in blood and saliva of simian foamy virus-infected humans.

    PubMed

    Rua, Rejane; Betsem, Edouard; Gessain, Antoine

    2013-01-01

    Simian foamy viruses (SFV) are widespread retroviruses among non-human primates (NHP). SFV actively replicate in the oral cavity and can be transmitted to humans through NHP bites, giving rise to a persistent infection. We aimed at studying the natural history of SFV infection in human. We have analyzed viral load and gene expression in 14 hunters from Cameroon previously shown to be infected with a gorilla SFV strain. Viral DNA could be detected by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (q-PCR) targeting the pol-in region, in most samples of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) (7.1 ± 6.0 SFV DNA copies/105 PBMCs) and saliva (2.4 ± 4.3 SFV DNA copies/105 cells) derived from the hunters. However, quantitative real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT)-qPCR revealed the absence of SFV viral gene expression in both PBMCs and saliva, suggesting that SFV was latent in the human samples. Our study demonstrates that a latent infection can occur in humans and persist for years, both in PBMCs and saliva. Such a scenario may contribute to the putative lack of secondary human-to-human transmissions of SFV.

  16. Effect of sublingual immunotherapy on level of cytokines in PBMCs of patients with allergic asthma.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhongxi; Li, Wenjing; Chen, Huan; Zhang, Wei

    2011-06-01

    This study examined the possible mechanism of sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) in the treatment of allergic asthma. Forty asthma patients allergic to dust mite were enrolled. They received SLIT with dermatophagoides farinae (Der. f) drops for one year. Thirty healthy subjects served as controls. The levels of IL-4 and IFN-γ of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were determined in allergic asthma patients before and after the SLIT as well as the healthy subjects. The results showed that the level of IL-4 was substantially increased and that of IFN-γ remarkably decreased in the patients before the SLIT as compared with those in the healthy subjects (P<0.05). After the SLIT, the level of IL-4 was significantly reduced and that of IFN-γ elevated in these allergic asthma patients. It was concluded that sublingual immunotherapy is effective for patients with allergic asthma. And it may work by regulating the balance of Th1/Th2 through changing the expression of IL-4 and IFN-γ in PBMCs.

  17. 50 Hz sinusoidal magnetic fields do not affect human lymphocyte activation and proliferation in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capri, Miriam; Mesirca, Pietro; Remondini, Daniel; Carosella, Simona; Pasi, Sara; Castellani, Gastone; Franceschi, Claudio; Bersani, Ferdinando

    2004-12-01

    In the last 30 years, an increasing public concern about the possible harmful effects of electromagnetic fields generated by power lines and domestic appliances has pushed the scientific community to search for a correct and comprehensive answer to this problem. In this work the effects of exposure to 50 Hz sinusoidal magnetic fields, with a magnetic flux density of 0.05 mT and 2.5 mT (peak values), were studied on human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) collected from healthy young and elderly donors. Cell activation and proliferation were investigated by using flow cytometry techniques and 3H-TdR incorporation assays, respectively. The results obtained indicated that exposure to the fields altered neither DNA synthesis nor the capacity of lymphocytes to enter the activation phase and progress into the cell cycle. Thus, the conclusions are that two important functional phases of human lymphocytes, such as activation and proliferation, are not affected by exposures to 50 Hz magnetic fields similar to those found under power lines.

  18. Proteomic Analysis of the Excretory and Secretory Proteins of Haemonchus contortus (HcESP) Binding to Goat PBMCs In Vivo Revealed Stage-Specific Binding Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Gadahi, Javaid Ali; Wang, Shuai; Bo, Gao; Ehsan, Muhammad; Yan, RuoFeng; Song, XiaoKai; Xu, LiXin; Li, XiangRui

    2016-01-01

    Haemonchus contortus is a parasitic gastrointestinal nematode, and its excretory and secretory products (HcESPs) interact extensively with the host cells. In this study, we report the interaction of proteins from HcESPs at different developmental stages to goat peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) in vivo using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. A total of 407 HcESPs that interacted with goat PBMCs at different time points were identified from a H. contortus protein database using SEQUEST searches. The L4 and L5 stages of H. contortus represented a higher proportion of the identified proteins compared with the early and late adult stages. Both stage-specific interacting proteins and proteins that were common to multiple stages were identified. Forty-seven interacting proteins were shared among all stages. The gene ontology (GO) distributions of the identified goat PBMC-interacting proteins were nearly identical among all developmental stages, with high representation of binding and catalytic activity. Cellular, metabolic and single-organism processes were also annotated as major biological processes, but interestingly, more proteins were annotated as localization processes at the L5 stage than at the L4 and adult stages. Based on the clustering of homologous proteins, we improved the functional annotations of un-annotated proteins identified at different developmental stages. Some unnamed H. contortus ATP-binding cassette proteins, including ADP-ribosylation factor and P-glycoprotein-9, were identified by STRING protein clustering analysis. PMID:27467391

  19. Telomerase activity in human cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Griffith, J.

    2000-10-01

    The overall goal of this collaborative project was to investigate the role in malignant cells of both chromosome telomeres, and telomerase, the enzyme that replicates telomeres. Telomeres are highly conserved nucleoprotein complexes located at the ends of eucaryotic chromosomes. Telomere length in somatic cells is reduced by 40--50 nucleotide pairs with every cell division due to incomplete replication of terminal DNA sequences and the absence of telomerase, the ribonucleoprotein that adds telomere DNA to chromosome ends. Although telomerase is active in cells with extended proliferative capacities, including more than 85% of tumors, work performed under this contract demonstrated that the telomeres of human cancer cells are shorter than those of paired normal cells, and that the length of the telomeres is characteristic of particular types of cancers. The extent of telomere shortening ostensibly is related to the number of cell divisions the tumor has undergone. It is believed that ongoing cell proliferation leads to the accumulation and fixation of new mutations in tumor cell lineages.Therefore, it is not unreasonable to assume that the degree of phenotypic variability is related to the proliferative history of the tumor, and therefore to telomere length, implying a correlation with prognosis. In some human tumors, short telomeres are also correlated with genomic instabilities, including interstitial chromosome translocation, loss of heterozygosity, and aneuoploidy. Moreover, unprotected chromosome ends are highly recombinogenic and telomere shortening in cultured human cells correlates with the formation of dicentric chromosomes, suggesting that critically short telomeres not only identify, but also predispose, cells to genomic instability, again implying a correlation with prognosis. Therefore, telomere length or content could be an important predictor of metastatic potential or responsiveness to various therapeutic modalities.

  20. APL-1, an altered peptide ligand derived from human heat-shock protein 60, selectively induces apoptosis in activated CD4+ CD25+ T cells from peripheral blood of rheumatoid arthritis patients.

    PubMed

    Barberá, Ariana; Lorenzo, Noraylis; Garrido, Greta; Mazola, Yuliet; Falcón, Viviana; Torres, Ana María; Hernández, María Isabel; Hernández, María Victoria; Margry, Bram; de Groot, A Marit; van Roon, Joel; van der Zee, Ruurd; Broere, Femke; van Eden, Willem; Padrón, Gabriel; Domínguez, María del Carmen

    2013-12-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic T-cell mediated autoimmune disease that affects primarily the joints. The induction of immune tolerance through antigen-specific therapies for the blockade of pathogenic CD4+ T cells constitutes a current focus of research. In this focus it is attempted to simultaneously activate multiple regulatory mechanisms, such as: apoptosis and regulatory T cells (Tregs). APL-1 is an altered peptide ligand derived from a novel CD4+ T-cell epitope of human heat-shock protein of 60kDa, an autoantigen involved in the pathogenesis of RA. Previously, we have reported that APL-1 induces CD4+ CD25(high)Foxp3+ Tregs in several systems. Here, we investigated the ability of APL-1 in inducing apoptosis in PBMCs from RA patients, who were classified as active or inactive according to their DAS28 score. APL-1 decreased the viability of PBMCs from active but not from inactive patients. DNA fragmentation assays and typical morphological features clearly demonstrated that APL-1 induced apoptosis in these cells. Activated CD4+ CD25+ T cells but not resting CD4+ CD25- T cells were identified as targets of APL-1. Furthermore, CD4+ T-cell responses to APL-1 were found to be dependent on antigen presentation via the HLA-DR molecule. Thus, APL-1 is a regulatory CD4+ T cell epitope which might modulate inflammatory immune responses in PBMCs from RA patients by inducing CD4+ CD25(high)Foxp3+ Tregs and apoptosis in activated CD4+ T cells. These results support further investigation of this candidate drug for the treatment of RA.

  1. Human Development Program: Level V Activity Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ball, Geraldine

    The curriculum guide presents the activities component of the Human Development Program for grade 5. The Human Development Program (HDP) is an affective curricular approach developed by psychologists to help teachers instill responsibility and self-confidence in children. The activity guide presents topics and directions for 180 sequential Human…

  2. Nivolumab and Urelumab Enhance Antitumor Activity of Human T Lymphocytes Engrafted in Rag2-/-IL2Rγnull Immunodeficient Mice.

    PubMed

    Sanmamed, Miguel F; Rodriguez, Inmaculada; Schalper, Kurt A; Oñate, Carmen; Azpilikueta, Arantza; Rodriguez-Ruiz, Maria E; Morales-Kastresana, Aizea; Labiano, Sara; Pérez-Gracia, Jose L; Martín-Algarra, Salvador; Alfaro, Carlos; Mazzolini, Guillermo; Sarno, Francesca; Hidalgo, Manuel; Korman, Alan J; Jure-Kunkel, Maria; Melero, Ignacio

    2015-09-01

    A current pressing need in cancer immunology is the development of preclinical model systems that are immunocompetent for the study of human tumors. Here, we report the development of a humanized murine model that can be used to analyze the pharmacodynamics and antitumor properties of immunostimulatory monoclonal antibodies (mAb) in settings where the receptors targeted by the mAbs are expressed. Human lymphocytes transferred into immunodeficient mice underwent activation and redistribution to murine organs, where they exhibited cell-surface expression of hCD137 and hPD-1. Systemic lymphocyte infiltrations resulted in a lethal CD4(+) T cell-mediated disease (xenograft-versus-host disease), which was aggravated when murine subjects were administered clinical-grade anti-hCD137 (urelumab) and anti-hPD-1 (nivolumab). In mice engrafted with human colorectal HT-29 carcinoma cells and allogeneic human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), or with a patient-derived gastric carcinoma and PBMCs from the same patient, we found that coadministration of urelumab and nivolumab was sufficient to significantly slow tumor growth. Correlated with this result were increased numbers of activated human T lymphocytes producing IFNγ and decreased numbers of human regulatory T lymphocytes in the tumor xenografts, possibly explaining the efficacy of the therapeutic regimen. Our results offer a proof of concept for the use of humanized mouse models for surrogate efficacy and histology investigations of immune checkpoint drugs and their combinations.

  3. miR-146a in PBMCs modulates Th1 function in patients with acute coronary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Guo, Min; Mao, Xiaobo; Ji, Qingwei; Lang, Mingjian; Li, Songnan; Peng, Yudong; Zhou, Wei; Xiong, Bo; Zeng, Qiutang

    2010-07-01

    The upregulation of Th1 cells has been suggested to have an essential function in the development of atherosclerosis (AS). Recent studies indicate that miR-146a is a microRNA specifically and highly expressed in Th1-driven autoimmune disease. The aim of the study was to investigate the possible mechanisms of the miR-146a in the onset of acute coronary syndrome (ACS). The results showed that the expression of miR-146a in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) was significantly increased in patients with ACS. We showed that overexpression of miR-146a in PBMCs could significantly upregulate the function of Th1 cells. Furthermore, we showed that miR-146a treatment could modulate the Th1 differentiation through posttranscriptional enhancing the T-bet pathway in PBMCs. In addition, this study also provided evidence that miR-146a treatment in vitro could induce the protein expression of TNF-alpha, MCP-1, NF-kappaB p65, which are key pro-inflammatory cytokines and critical transcription factor in AS. In contrast, miR-146a inhibitor could attenuate these phenomena significantly. The results support the concept that miR-146a may be a novel regulatory factor in Th1 differentiation and a new therapeutic target for AS and ACS.

  4. Effect of Blood Component Coatings of Enosseal Implants on Proliferation and Synthetic Activity of Human Osteoblasts and Cytokine Production of Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hulejova, Hana; Bartova, Jirina; Riedel, Tomas; Pesakova, Vlasta

    2016-01-01

    The study monitored in vitro early response of connective tissue cells and immunocompetent cells to enosseal implant materials coated by different blood components (serum, activated plasma, and plasma/platelets) to evaluate human osteoblast proliferation and synthetic activity and inflammatory response presented as a cytokine profile of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) under conditions imitating the situation upon implantation. The cells were cultivated on coated Ti-plasma-sprayed (Ti-PS), Ti-etched (Ti-Etch), Ti-hydroxyapatite (Ti-HA), and ZrO2 surfaces. The plasma/platelets coating supported osteoblast proliferation only on osteoconductive Ti-HA and Ti-Etch whereas activated plasma enhanced proliferation on all surfaces. Differentiation (BAP) and IL-8 production remained unchanged or decreased irrespective of the coating and surface; only the serum and plasma/platelets-coated ZrO2 exhibited higher BAP and IL-8 expression. RANKL production increased on serum and activated plasma coatings. PBMCs produced especially cytokines playing role in inflammatory phase of wound healing, that is, IL-6, GRO-α, GRO, ENA-78, IL-8, GM-CSF, EGF, and MCP-1. Cytokine profiles were comparable for all tested surfaces; only ENA-78, IL-8, GM-CSF, and MCP-1 expression depended on materials and coatings. The activated plasma coating led to uniformed surfaces and represented a favorable treatment especially for bioinert Ti-PS and ZrO2 whereas all coatings had no distinctive effect on bioactive Ti-HA and Ti-Etch. PMID:27651560

  5. Sensing Human Activity: GPS Tracking

    PubMed Central

    van der Spek, Stefan; van Schaick, Jeroen; de Bois, Peter; de Haan, Remco

    2009-01-01

    The enhancement of GPS technology enables the use of GPS devices not only as navigation and orientation tools, but also as instruments used to capture travelled routes: as sensors that measure activity on a city scale or the regional scale. TU Delft developed a process and database architecture for collecting data on pedestrian movement in three European city centres, Norwich, Rouen and Koblenz, and in another experiment for collecting activity data of 13 families in Almere (The Netherlands) for one week. The question posed in this paper is: what is the value of GPS as ‘sensor technology’ measuring activities of people? The conclusion is that GPS offers a widely useable instrument to collect invaluable spatial-temporal data on different scales and in different settings adding new layers of knowledge to urban studies, but the use of GPS-technology and deployment of GPS-devices still offers significant challenges for future research. PMID:22574061

  6. Gc protein-derived macrophage-activating factor (GcMAF) stimulates cAMP formation in human mononuclear cells and inhibits angiogenesis in chick embryo chorionallantoic membrane assay.

    PubMed

    Pacini, Stefania; Morucci, Gabriele; Punzi, Tiziana; Gulisano, Massimo; Ruggiero, Marco

    2011-04-01

    The effects of Gc protein-derived macrophage-activating factor (GcMAF) have been studied in cancer and other conditions where angiogenesis is deregulated. In this study, we demonstrate for the first time that the mitogenic response of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) to GcMAF was associated with 3'-5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) formation. The effect was dose dependent, and maximal stimulation was achieved using 0.1 ng/ml. Heparin inhibited the stimulatory effect of GcMAF on PBMCs. In addition, we demonstrate that GcMAF (1 ng/ml) inhibited prostaglandin E(1)- and human breast cancer cell-stimulated angiogenesis in chick embryo chorionallantoic membrane (CAM) assay. Finally, we tested different GcMAF preparations on CAM, and the assay proved to be a reliable, reproducible and inexpensive method to determine the relative potencies of different preparations and their stability; we observed that storage at room temperature for 15 days decreased GcMAF potency by about 50%. These data could prove useful for upcoming clinical trials on GcMAF.

  7. Human body contour data based activity recognition.

    PubMed

    Myagmarbayar, Nergui; Yuki, Yoshida; Imamoglu, Nevrez; Gonzalez, Jose; Otake, Mihoko; Yu, Wenwei

    2013-01-01

    This research work is aimed to develop autonomous bio-monitoring mobile robots, which are capable of tracking and measuring patients' motions, recognizing the patients' behavior based on observation data, and providing calling for medical personnel in emergency situations in home environment. The robots to be developed will bring about cost-effective, safe and easier at-home rehabilitation to most motor-function impaired patients (MIPs). In our previous research, a full framework was established towards this research goal. In this research, we aimed at improving the human activity recognition by using contour data of the tracked human subject extracted from the depth images as the signal source, instead of the lower limb joint angle data used in the previous research, which are more likely to be affected by the motion of the robot and human subjects. Several geometric parameters, such as, the ratio of height to weight of the tracked human subject, and distance (pixels) between centroid points of upper and lower parts of human body, were calculated from the contour data, and used as the features for the activity recognition. A Hidden Markov Model (HMM) is employed to classify different human activities from the features. Experimental results showed that the human activity recognition could be achieved with a high correct rate.

  8. Human filarial Wolbachia lipopeptide directly activates human neutrophils in vitro.

    PubMed

    Tamarozzi, F; Wright, H L; Johnston, K L; Edwards, S W; Turner, J D; Taylor, M J

    2014-10-01

    The host inflammatory response to the Onchocerca volvulus endosymbiont, Wolbachia, is a major contributing factor in the development of chronic pathology in humans (onchocerciasis/river blindness). Recently, the toll-like pattern recognition receptor motif of the major inflammatory ligands of filarial Wolbachia, membrane-associated diacylated lipoproteins, was functionally defined in murine models of pathology, including mediation of neutrophil recruitment to the cornea. However, the extent to which human neutrophils can be activated in response to this Wolbachia pattern recognition motif is not known. Therefore, the responses of purified peripheral blood human neutrophils to a synthetic N-terminal diacylated lipopeptide (WoLP) of filarial Wolbachia peptidoglycan-associated lipoprotein (PAL) were characterized. WoLP exposure led to a dose-dependent activation of healthy, human neutrophils that included gross morphological alterations and modulation of surface expressed integrins involved in tethering, rolling and extravasation. WoLP exposure induced chemotaxis but not chemokinesis of neutrophils, and secretion of the major neutrophil chemokine, interleukin 8. WoLP also induced and primed the respiratory burst, and enhanced neutrophil survival by delay of apoptosis. These results indicate that the major inflammatory motif of filarial Wolbachia lipoproteins directly activates human neutrophils in vitro and promotes a molecular pathway by which human neutrophils are recruited to sites of Onchocerca parasitism.

  9. Activation of human lymphocytes by supernatants from human thymic epithelium.

    PubMed

    Goust, J M; Vesole, D H; Fudenberg, H H

    1979-11-01

    Supernatants from human thymic epithelial cells (TS) were found to have a mitogenic effect on cultured human peripheral blood mononuclear cells and to potentiate their responses to lectins. This was not observed with culture supernatants from the human cell lines AV-3 and HeLa or from the murine cell line L-929. The maximum potentiating effects were observed with pokeweed mitogen (PWM) and phytohaemagglutinin (PHA), whereas the response to concanavalin A (Con A) was only slightly enhanced. TS also potentiated the mixed lymphocyte culture (MLC) response of normal T cells and thymocytes cultured with mitomycin C-treated B lymphoid cell lines. The mitogenic effect of TS was time-dependent and paralleled the appearance of lymphoid colonies in semi-solid agar. Chromatographical separation of concentrated serum-free TS on Sephadex G-100 yielded an active fraction of molecular weight 15,000--25,000 which had all the activities of unseparated TS.

  10. Activation of human lymphocytes by supernatants from human thymic epithelium.

    PubMed Central

    Goust, J M; Vesole, D H; Fudenberg, H H

    1979-01-01

    Supernatants from human thymic epithelial cells (TS) were found to have a mitogenic effect on cultured human peripheral blood mononuclear cells and to potentiate their responses to lectins. This was not observed with culture supernatants from the human cell lines AV-3 and HeLa or from the murine cell line L-929. The maximum potentiating effects were observed with pokeweed mitogen (PWM) and phytohaemagglutinin (PHA), whereas the response to concanavalin A (Con A) was only slightly enhanced. TS also potentiated the mixed lymphocyte culture (MLC) response of normal T cells and thymocytes cultured with mitomycin C-treated B lymphoid cell lines. The mitogenic effect of TS was time-dependent and paralleled the appearance of lymphoid colonies in semi-solid agar. Chromatographical separation of concentrated serum-free TS on Sephadex G-100 yielded an active fraction of molecular weight 15,000--25,000 which had all the activities of unseparated TS. PMID:160851

  11. Physical environment virtualization for human activities recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poshtkar, Azin; Elangovan, Vinayak; Shirkhodaie, Amir; Chan, Alex; Hu, Shuowen

    2015-05-01

    Human activity recognition research relies heavily on extensive datasets to verify and validate performance of activity recognition algorithms. However, obtaining real datasets are expensive and highly time consuming. A physics-based virtual simulation can accelerate the development of context based human activity recognition algorithms and techniques by generating relevant training and testing videos simulating diverse operational scenarios. In this paper, we discuss in detail the requisite capabilities of a virtual environment to aid as a test bed for evaluating and enhancing activity recognition algorithms. To demonstrate the numerous advantages of virtual environment development, a newly developed virtual environment simulation modeling (VESM) environment is presented here to generate calibrated multisource imagery datasets suitable for development and testing of recognition algorithms for context-based human activities. The VESM environment serves as a versatile test bed to generate a vast amount of realistic data for training and testing of sensor processing algorithms. To demonstrate the effectiveness of VESM environment, we present various simulated scenarios and processed results to infer proper semantic annotations from the high fidelity imagery data for human-vehicle activity recognition under different operational contexts.

  12. Understanding human dynamics in microblog posting activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Zhihong; Zhang, Yubao; Wang, Hui; Li, Pei

    2013-02-01

    Human activity patterns are an important issue in behavior dynamics research. Empirical evidence indicates that human activity patterns can be characterized by a heavy-tailed inter-event time distribution. However, most researchers give an understanding by only modeling the power-law feature of the inter-event time distribution, and those overlooked non-power-law features are likely to be nontrivial. In this work, we propose a behavior dynamics model, called the finite memory model, in which humans adaptively change their activity rates based on a finite memory of recent activities, which is driven by inherent individual interest. Theoretical analysis shows a finite memory model can properly explain various heavy-tailed inter-event time distributions, including a regular power law and some non-power-law deviations. To validate the model, we carry out an empirical study based on microblogging activity from thousands of microbloggers in the Celebrity Hall of the Sina microblog. The results show further that the model is reasonably effective. We conclude that finite memory is an effective dynamics element to describe the heavy-tailed human activity pattern.

  13. Deep Human Parsing with Active Template Regression.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xiaodan; Liu, Si; Shen, Xiaohui; Yang, Jianchao; Liu, Luoqi; Dong, Jian; Lin, Liang; Yan, Shuicheng

    2015-12-01

    In this work, the human parsing task, namely decomposing a human image into semantic fashion/body regions, is formulated as an active template regression (ATR) problem, where the normalized mask of each fashion/body item is expressed as the linear combination of the learned mask templates, and then morphed to a more precise mask with the active shape parameters, including position, scale and visibility of each semantic region. The mask template coefficients and the active shape parameters together can generate the human parsing results, and are thus called the structure outputs for human parsing. The deep Convolutional Neural Network (CNN) is utilized to build the end-to-end relation between the input human image and the structure outputs for human parsing. More specifically, the structure outputs are predicted by two separate networks. The first CNN network is with max-pooling, and designed to predict the template coefficients for each label mask, while the second CNN network is without max-pooling to preserve sensitivity to label mask position and accurately predict the active shape parameters. For a new image, the structure outputs of the two networks are fused to generate the probability of each label for each pixel, and super-pixel smoothing is finally used to refine the human parsing result. Comprehensive evaluations on a large dataset well demonstrate the significant superiority of the ATR framework over other state-of-the-arts for human parsing. In particular, the F1-score reaches 64.38 percent by our ATR framework, significantly higher than 44.76 percent based on the state-of-the-art algorithm [28].

  14. Human telomerase: biogenesis, trafficking, recruitment, and activation.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Jens C; Cech, Thomas R

    2015-06-01

    Telomerase is the ribonucleoprotein enzyme that catalyzes the extension of telomeric DNA in eukaryotes. Recent work has begun to reveal key aspects of the assembly of the human telomerase complex, its intracellular trafficking involving Cajal bodies, and its recruitment to telomeres. Once telomerase has been recruited to the telomere, it appears to undergo a separate activation step, which may include an increase in its repeat addition processivity. This review covers human telomerase biogenesis, trafficking, and activation, comparing key aspects with the analogous events in other species.

  15. Human telomerase: biogenesis, trafficking, recruitment, and activation

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Jens C.

    2015-01-01

    Telomerase is the ribonucleoprotein enzyme that catalyzes the extension of telomeric DNA in eukaryotes. Recent work has begun to reveal key aspects of the assembly of the human telomerase complex, its intracellular trafficking involving Cajal bodies, and its recruitment to telomeres. Once telomerase has been recruited to the telomere, it appears to undergo a separate activation step, which may include an increase in its repeat addition processivity. This review covers human telomerase biogenesis, trafficking, and activation, comparing key aspects with the analogous events in other species. PMID:26063571

  16. Scaling behavior of online human activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Zhi-Dan; Cai, Shi-Min; Huang, Junming; Fu, Yan; Zhou, Tao

    2012-11-01

    The rapid development of the Internet technology enables humans to explore the web and record the traces of online activities. From the analysis of these large-scale data sets (i.e., traces), we can get insights about the dynamic behavior of human activity. In this letter, the scaling behavior and complexity of human activity in the e-commerce, such as music, books, and movies rating, are comprehensively investigated by using the detrended fluctuation analysis technique and the multiscale entropy method. Firstly, the interevent time series of rating behaviors of these three types of media show similar scaling properties with exponents ranging from 0.53 to 0.58, which implies that the collective behaviors of rating media follow a process embodying self-similarity and long-range correlation. Meanwhile, by dividing the users into three groups based on their activities (i.e., rating per unit time), we find that the scaling exponents of the interevent time series in the three groups are different. Hence, these results suggest that a stronger long-range correlations exist in these collective behaviors. Furthermore, their information complexities vary in the three groups. To explain the differences of the collective behaviors restricted to the three groups, we study the dynamic behavior of human activity at the individual level, and find that the dynamic behaviors of a few users have extremely small scaling exponents associated with long-range anticorrelations. By comparing the interevent time distributions of four representative users, we can find that the bimodal distributions may bring forth the extraordinary scaling behaviors. These results of the analysis of the online human activity in the e-commerce may not only provide insight into its dynamic behaviors but may also be applied to acquire potential economic interest.

  17. Phenyl valerate esterase activity of human butyrylcholinesterase.

    PubMed

    Mangas, Iris; Vilanova, Eugenio; Estévez, Jorge

    2017-03-15

    Phenyl valerate is used for detecting and measuring neuropathy target esterase (NTE) and has been used for discriminating esterases as potential target in hen model of organophosphorus delayed neuropathy. In previous studies we observed that phenyl valerate esterase (PVase) activity of an enzymatic fraction in chicken brain might be due to a butyrylcholinesterase protein (BuChE), and it was suggested that this enzymatic fraction could be related to the potentiation/promotion phenomenon of the organophosphate-induced delayed neuropathy (OPIDN). In this work, PVase activity of purified human butyrylcholinesterase (hBuChE) is demonstrated and confirms the novel observation that a relationship of BuChE with PVase activities is also relevant for humans, as is, therefore the potential role in toxicity for humans. The KM and catalytic constant (kcat) were estimated as 0.52/0.72 µM and 45,900/49,200 min(-1) respectively. Furthermore, this work studies the inhibition by preincubation of PVase and cholinesterase activities of hBuChE with irreversible inhibitors (mipafox, iso-OMPA or PMSF), showing that these inhibitors interact similarly in both activities with similar second-order inhibition constants. Acethylthiocholine and phenyl valerate partly inhibit PVase and cholinesterase activities, respectively. All these observations suggest that both activities occur in the same active center. The interaction with a reversible inhibitor (ethopropazine) showed that the cholinesterase activity was more sensitive than the PVase activity, showing that the sensitivity for this reversible inhibitor is affected by the nature of the substrate. The present work definitively establishes the capacity of BuChE to hydrolyze the carboxylester phenyl valerate using a purified enzyme (hBuChE). Therefore, BuChE should be considered in the research of organophosphorus targets of toxicity related with PVase proteins.

  18. Active tectonics and human survival strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Geoffrey; Bailey, Geoffrey; Sturdy, Derek

    1994-10-01

    Tectonic movements continuously remould the surface of Earth in response to plate motion. Yet such deformation is rarely taken into account when assessing landscape change and its impact on human land use, except perhaps as an occasional hazard to human life or a temporary disruption in the longer term patterns of human history. However, active tectonics also create and sustain landscapes that can be beneficial to human survival, forming a complex topography of potentially fertile sedimentary basins enclosed by mountain barriers that can facilitate the control and explotation of food resources, especially animal prey. We discuss the tectonic history of northwest Greece and show how the Paleolithic sites of the region are located to take advantage of tectonically created features at both a local and a regional scale. We suggest that the association of significant concentrations of early Paleolithic sites with tectonically acitve regions is not coincidental and that on the longer time spans of human biological evolution, active tectonics has been an important selective agent contributing to the development of the human species as an intelligent predator.

  19. Effects of the Commercial Flame Retardant Mixture DE-71 on Cytokine Production by Human Immune Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mynster Kronborg, Thit; Frohnert Hansen, Juliana; Nielsen, Claus Henrik; Ramhøj, Louise; Frederiksen, Marie; Vorkamp, Katrin; Feldt-Rasmussen, Ulla

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Although production of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) is now banned, release from existing products will continue for many years. The PBDEs are assumed to be neurotoxic and toxic to endocrine organs at low concentrations. Their effect on the immune system has not been investigated thoroughly. We aimed to investigate the influence of DE-71 on cytokine production by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) stimulated with Escherichia Coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or phytohaemagglutinin-L (PHA-L). Material and Methods PBMCs isolated from healthy donors were pre-incubated with DE-71 at various concentrations and subsequently incubated with the monocyte stimulator LPS, or the T-cell activator PHA-L. Interferon (IFN)-γ, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, IL-17A, and IL-17F were quantified in the supernatants by Luminex kits. Results At non-cytotoxic concentrations (0.01–10 μg/mL), DE-71 significantly enhanced secretion of IL-1β, IL-6, CXCL8, IL-10, and TNF-α (p<0.001–0.019; n = 6) from LPS-stimulated PBMCs. IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-17A, and IL-17F (p = <0.001–0.043; n = 6) secretion were enhanced from PHA-L-stimulated PBMCs as well. Secretion of IL-1β, IL-2, IL-10, IL-8 and IL-6 was not significantly affected by DE-71. Conclusions We demonstrate an enhancing effect of DE-71 on cytokine production by normal human PBMCs stimulated with LPS or PHA-L ex vivo. PMID:27128973

  20. Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cell Function and Dendritic Cell Differentiation Are Affected by Bisphenol-A Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Ariemma, Fabiana; Cimmino, Ilaria; Bruzzese, Dario; Scerbo, Roberta; Picascia, Stefania; D’Esposito, Vittoria; Beguinot, Francesco; Formisano, Pietro

    2016-01-01

    Environmental pollutants, including endocrine disruptor chemicals (EDCs), interfere on human health, leading to hormonal, immune and metabolic perturbations. Bisphenol-A (BPA), a main component of polycarbonate plastics, has been receiving increased attention due to its worldwide distribution with a large exposure. In humans, BPA, for its estrogenic activity, may have a role in autoimmunity, inflammatory and allergic diseases. To this aim, we assessed the effect of low BPA doses on functionality of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), and on in vitro differentiation of dendritic cells from monocytes (mDCs). Fresh peripheral blood samples were obtained from 12 healthy adult volunteers. PBMCs were left unstimulated or were activated with the mitogen phytohemagglutinin (PHA) or the anti-CD3 and anti-CD28 antibodies and incubated in presence or absence of BPA at 0.1 and 1nM concentrations. The immune-modulatory effect of BPA was assessed by evaluating the cell proliferation and the levels of interferon-γ (IFN-γ), interleukin-4 (IL-4), interleukin-10 (IL-10) and interleukin-13 (IL-13) secreted by PBMCs. mDCs were differentiated with IL-4 and GC-CSF with or without BPA and the expression of differentiation/maturation markers (CD11c, CD1a, CD86, HLA-DR) was evaluated by flow cytometry; furthermore, a panel of 27 different cytokines, growth factors and chemokines were assayed in the mDC culture supernatants. PBMCs proliferation significantly increased upon BPA exposure compared to BPA untreated cells. In addition, a significant decrease in IL-10 secretion was observed in PBMCs incubated with BPA, either in unstimulated or mitogen-stimulated cells, and at both 0.1 and 1nM BPA concentrations. Similarly, IL-13 was reduced, mainly in cells activated by antiCD3/CD28. By contrast, no significant changes in IFN-γ and IL-4 production were found in any condition assayed. Finally, BPA at 1nM increased the density of dendritic cells expressing CD1a and concomitantly

  1. On universality in human correspondence activity.

    PubMed

    Malmgren, R Dean; Stouffer, Daniel B; Campanharo, Andriana S L O; Amaral, Luís A Nunes

    2009-09-25

    The identification and modeling of patterns of human activity have important ramifications for applications ranging from predicting disease spread to optimizing resource allocation. Because of its relevance and availability, written correspondence provides a powerful proxy for studying human activity. One school of thought is that human correspondence is driven by responses to received correspondence, a view that requires a distinct response mechanism to explain e-mail and letter correspondence observations. We demonstrate that, like e-mail correspondence, the letter correspondence patterns of 16 writers, performers, politicians, and scientists are well described by the circadian cycle, task repetition, and changing communication needs. We confirm the universality of these mechanisms by rescaling letter and e-mail correspondence statistics to reveal their underlying similarity.

  2. MEASURING CHOLINESTERASE ACTIVITY IN HUMAN SALIVA

    EPA Science Inventory

    To assess the potential for using saliva in pesticide biomonitoring, the consistency of cholinesterase activity in human saliva collected over time was examined. In this pilot study, saliva was collected from 20 healthy adults once per week for 5 consecutive weeks using 2 differe...

  3. The Human Activity of Evaluation Theorizing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alkin, Marvin C.; Ellett, Frederick, Jr.

    Theorizing about evaluation should be conceptualized as a human activity governed by certain strategies and principles. The theories advanced by various evaluators have changed over the years, thus illustrating ten principles of evaluation. The starting point for theory development or modification is self-reflection and review of one's own…

  4. MEASURING CHOLINESTERASE ACTIVITY IN HUMAN SALIVA.

    EPA Science Inventory

    To assess the potential for using saliva in pesticide biomonitoring, the consistency of cholinesterase activity in human saliva collected over time was examined. In this pilot study, saliva was collected from 20 healthy adults once per week for 5 consecutive weeks using 2 differe...

  5. Food & Fitness. Directory. Human Nutrition Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Agriculture, Washington, DC.

    Activities of the following regulatory and food service agencies of the Department of Agriculture are described: (1) Agricultural Research Service; (2) Cooperative State Research Service; (3) Economic Research Service; (4) Human Nutrition Information Service; (5) Office of Grants and Program Systems; (6) Office of International Cooperation and…

  6. Scaling laws of human interaction activity.

    PubMed

    Rybski, Diego; Buldyrev, Sergey V; Havlin, Shlomo; Liljeros, Fredrik; Makse, Hernán A

    2009-08-04

    Even though people in our contemporary technological society are depending on communication, our understanding of the underlying laws of human communicational behavior continues to be poorly understood. Here we investigate the communication patterns in 2 social Internet communities in search of statistical laws in human interaction activity. This research reveals that human communication networks dynamically follow scaling laws that may also explain the observed trends in economic growth. Specifically, we identify a generalized version of Gibrat's law of social activity expressed as a scaling law between the fluctuations in the number of messages sent by members and their level of activity. Gibrat's law has been essential in understanding economic growth patterns, yet without an underlying general principle for its origin. We attribute this scaling law to long-term correlation patterns in human activity, which surprisingly span from days to the entire period of the available data of more than 1 year. Further, we provide a mathematical framework that relates the generalized version of Gibrat's law to the long-term correlated dynamics, which suggests that the same underlying mechanism could be the source of Gibrat's law in economics, ranging from large firms, research and development expenditures, gross domestic product of countries, to city population growth. These findings are also of importance for designing communication networks and for the understanding of the dynamics of social systems in which communication plays a role, such as economic markets and political systems.

  7. Dibutyltin-induced alterations of interleukin 1beta secretion from human immune cells.

    PubMed

    Brown, Shyretha; Tehrani, Shahin; Whalen, Margaret M

    2017-02-01

    Dibutyltin (DBT) is used to stabilize polyvinyl chloride plastics (including pipes that distribute drinking water) and as a de-worming agent in poultry. DBT is found in human blood, and DBT exposures alter the secretion of tumor necrosis factor alpha and interferon gamma from lymphocytes. Interleukin (IL)-1β is a proinflammatory cytokine that regulates cellular growth, tissue restoration and immune response regulation. IL-1β plays a role in increasing invasiveness of certain tumors. This study reveals that exposures to DBT (24 h, 48 h and 6 days) modify the secretion of IL-1β from increasingly reconstituted preparations of human immune cells (highly enriched human natural killer cells, monocyte-depleted [MD] peripheral blood mononuclear cells [PBMCs], PBMCs, granulocytes and a preparation combining both PBMCs and granulocytes). DBT altered IL-1β secretion from all cell preparations. Higher concentrations of DBT (5 and 2.5 μm) decreased the secretion of IL-1β, while lower concentrations of DBT (0.1 and 0.05 μm) increased the secretion of IL-1β. Selected signaling pathways were examined in MD-PBMCs to determine if they play a role in DBT-induced elevations of IL-1β secretion. Pathways examined were IL-1β converting enzyme (caspase 1), mitogen-activated protein kinases and nuclear factor kappa B. Caspase 1 and mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways appear to be utilized by DBT in increasing IL-1β secretion. These results indicate that DBT alters IL-1β secretion from human immune cells in an ex. vivo system utilizing several IL-1β regulating signaling pathways. Thus, DBT may have the potential to alter IL-1β secretion in an in vivo system. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Transcriptome analysis of the human T lymphocyte cell line Jurkat and human peripheral blood mononuclear cells exposed to deoxynivalenol (DON): New mechanistic insights

    SciTech Connect

    Katika, Madhumohan R.; Hendriksen, Peter J.M.; Shao, Jia; Loveren, Henk van; Peijnenburg, Ad

    2012-10-01

    Deoxynivalenol (DON) or vomitoxin is a commonly encountered type-B trichothecene mycotoxin, produced by Fusarium species predominantly found in cereals and grains. DON is known to exert toxic effects on the gastrointestinal, reproductive and neuroendocrine systems, and particularly on the immune system. Depending on dose and exposure time, it can either stimulate or suppress immune function. The main objective of this study was to obtain a deeper insight into DON-induced effects on lymphoid cells. For this, we exposed the human T-lymphocyte cell line Jurkat and human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) to various concentrations of DON for various times and examined gene expression changes by DNA microarray analysis. Jurkat cells were exposed to 0.25 and 0.5 μM DON for 3, 6 and 24 h. Biological interpretation of the microarray data indicated that DON affects various processes in these cells: It upregulates genes involved in ribosome structure and function, RNA/protein synthesis and processing, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, calcium-mediated signaling, mitochondrial function, oxidative stress, the NFAT and NF-κB/TNF-α pathways, T cell activation and apoptosis. The effects of DON on the expression of genes involved in ER stress, NFAT activation and apoptosis were confirmed by qRT-PCR. Other biochemical experiments confirmed that DON activates calcium-dependent proteins such as calcineurin and M-calpain that are known to be involved in T cell activation and apoptosis. Induction of T cell activation was also confirmed by demonstrating that DON activates NFATC1 and induces its translocation from the cytoplasm to the nucleus. For the gene expression profiling of PBMCs, cells were exposed to 2 and 4 μM DON for 6 and 24 h. Comparison of the Jurkat microarray data with those obtained with PBMCs showed that most of the processes affected by DON in the Jurkat cell line were also affected in the PBMCs. -- Highlights: ► The human T cell line Jurkat and human

  9. Prostaglandin E2 inhibits NLRP3 inflammasome activation through EP4 receptor and intracellular cAMP in human macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yueqin; Martinez-Anton, Asuncion; Qi, Hai-Yan; Logun, Carolea; Alsaaty, Sara; Park, Yong Hwan; Kastner, Daniel L.; Chae, Jae Jin; Shelhamer, James H.

    2015-01-01

    Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) is a potent lipid mediator involved in maintaining homeostasis but also promotion of acute inflammation or immune suppression in chronic inflammation and cancer. NLRP3 inflammasome plays an important role in host defense. Uncontrolled activation of NLRP3 inflammasome, due to mutations in the NLRP3 gene causes cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes (CAPS). Here, we showed that NLRP3 inflammasome activation is inhibited by PGE2 in human primary monocyte-derived macrophages. This effect was mediated through prostaglandin E receptor 4 (EP4) and an increase in intracellular cAMP, independently of protein kinase A (PKA) or exchange protein directly activated by cAMP (Epac). A specific agonist of EP4 mimicked, while its antagonist or EP4 knockdown reversed PGE2-mediated NLRP3 inhibition. PGE2 caused an increase in intracellular cAMP. Blockade of adenylate cyclase by its inhibitor reversed PGE2-mediated NLRP3 inhibition. Increase of intracellular cAMP by an activator of adenylate cyclase or an analog of cAMP, or a blockade of cAMP degradation by phosphodiesterase inhibitor decreased NLRP3 activation. PKA or Epac agonists did not mimic and their antagonists did not reverse PGE2-mediated NLRP3 inhibition. In addition, constitutive IL-1β secretion from LPS-primed PBMCs of CAPS patients was substantially reduced by high doses of PGE2. Moreover, blocking cytosolic phospholipase A2α by its inhibitor or siRNA or inhibiting cyclooxygenase 2, resulting in inhibition of endogenous PGE2 production, caused an increase in NLRP3 inflammasome activation. Our results suggest that PGE2 might play a role in maintaining homeostasis during the resolution phase of inflammation and might serve as an autocrine and paracrine regulator. PMID:25917098

  10. Effects of aircraft noise on human activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnoult, M. D.; Gilfillan, L. G.

    1983-01-01

    The effects of aircrft noise on human activities was investigated by developing a battery of tasks (1) representative of a range of human activities and (2) sensitive to the disruptive effects of noise. The noise used were recordings of jet aircraft and helicopter sounds at three lvels of loudness--60, 70, and 80 dB(A). Experiment 1 investigated 12 different cognitive tasks, along with two intelligibility tasks included to validate that the noises were being effective. Interference with intelligibility was essentially the same as found in the research literature, but only inconsistent effects were found on either accuracy or latency of performance on the cognitive tasks. When the tasks were grouped into four categories (Intelligibility, Matching, Verbal, and Arithmetic), reliable differences in rated annoyingness of the noises were related to the task category and to the type of noise (jet or helicopter).

  11. Glycolate kinase activity in human red cells.

    PubMed

    Fujii, S; Beutler, E

    1985-02-01

    Human red cells manifest glycolate kinase activity. This activity copurifies with pyruvate kinase and is decreased in the red cells of subjects with hereditary pyruvate kinase deficiency. Glycolate kinase activity was detected in the presence of FDP or glucose-1,6-P2. In the presence of 1 mmol/L FDP, the Km for adenosine triphosphate (ATP) was 0.28 mmol/L and a half maximum velocity for glycolate was obtained at 40 mmol/L. The pH optimum of the reaction was over 10.5 With 10 mumol/L FDP, 500 mumol/L glucose-1,6-P2, 2 mmol/L ATP, 5 mmol/L MgCl2, and 50 mmol/L glycolate at pH 7.5, glycolate kinase activity was calculated to be approximately 0.0013 U/mL RBC. In view of this low activity even in the presence of massive amounts of glycolate, the glycolate kinase reaction cannot account for the maintenance of the reported phosphoglycolate level in human red cells.

  12. Activation of human factor IX (Christmas factor).

    PubMed Central

    Di Scipio, R G; Kurachi, K; Davie, E W

    1978-01-01

    Human Factor IX (Christmas factor) is a single-chain plasma glycoprotein (mol wt 57,000) that participates in the middle phase of the intrinsic pathway of blood coagulation. It is present in plasma as a zymogen and is converted to a serine protease, Factor IXabeta, by Factor XIa (activated plasma thromboplastin antecedent) in the presence of calcium ions. In the activation reaction, two internal peptide bonds are hydrolyzed in Factor IX. These cleavages occur at a specific arginyl-alanine peptide bond and a specific arginyl-valine peptide bond. This results in the release of an activation peptide (mol wt approximately equal to 11,000) from the internal region of the precursor molecule and the generation of Factor IXabeta (mol wt approximately equal to 46,000). Factor IXabeta is composed of a light chain (mol wt approximately equal to 18,000) and a heavy chain (mol wt approximately equal to 28,000), and these chains are held together by a disulfide bond(s). The light chain originates from the amino terminal portion of the precursor molecule and has an amino terminal sequence of Tyr-Asn-Ser-Gly-Lys. The heavy chain originates from the carboxyl terminal region of the precursor molecule and contains an amino terminal sequence of Val-Val-Gly-Gly-Glu. The heavy chain of Factor IXabeta also contains the active site sequence of Phe-Cys-Ala-Gly-Phe-His-Glu-Gly-Arg-Asp-Ser-Cys-Gln-Gly-Asp-SER-Gly-Gly-Pro. The active site serine residue is shown in capital letters. Factor IX is also converted to Factor IXaalpha by a protease from Russell's viper venom. This activation reaction, however, occurs in a single step and involves only the cleavage of the internal arginyl-valine peptide bond. Human Factor IXabeta was inhibited by human antithrombin III by the formation of a one-to-one complex of enzyme and inhibitor. In this reaction, the inhibitor was tightly bound to the heavy chain of the enzyme. These data indicate that the mechanism of activation of human Factor IX and its

  13. HLA-G promotes myeloid-derived suppressor cell accumulation and suppressive activity during human pregnancy through engagement of the receptor ILT4.

    PubMed

    Köstlin, Natascha; Ostermeir, Anna-Lena; Spring, Bärbel; Schwarz, Julian; Marmé, Alexander; Walter, Christina B; Poets, Christian F; Gille, Christian

    2017-02-01

    Establishing and maintaining maternal-fetal tolerance is essential for a successful pregnancy; failure of immunological adaptation to pregnancy leads to severe complications such as abortion or preterm delivery. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) are innate immune cells that suppress T-cell responses, expand during pregnancy and thus may play a role in tolerance induction. Human leucocyte antigen G (HLA-G) is a major histocompatibility complex (MHC) I molecule with immune-modulatory properties, which is expressed during pregnancy. Here, we investigated the impact of HLA-G on MDSCs accumulation and activation in pregnant women. We demonstrate that granulocytic MDSCs (GR-MDSCs) express receptors for HLA-G, namely immunoglobulin-like transcript (ILT) 2 and 4, and that ILT4-expression by GR-MDSCs is regulated during pregnancy. Stimulation with soluble HLA-G (sHLA-G) increased suppressive activity of GR-MDSCs, induced MDSCs from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and led to phosphorylation of the signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) and induction of indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) in myeloid cells. Effects of sHLA-G on MDSC accumulation were mediated through ILT4. These results suggest an interaction between MDSCs and HLA-G in humans as a potential mechanism for maintaining maternal-fetal tolerance. Modulating MDSC function during pregnancy via HLA-G might provide new opportunities for a therapeutic manipulation of immunological pregnancy complications.

  14. Physical Human Activity Recognition Using Wearable Sensors.

    PubMed

    Attal, Ferhat; Mohammed, Samer; Dedabrishvili, Mariam; Chamroukhi, Faicel; Oukhellou, Latifa; Amirat, Yacine

    2015-12-11

    This paper presents a review of different classification techniques used to recognize human activities from wearable inertial sensor data. Three inertial sensor units were used in this study and were worn by healthy subjects at key points of upper/lower body limbs (chest, right thigh and left ankle). Three main steps describe the activity recognition process: sensors' placement, data pre-processing and data classification. Four supervised classification techniques namely, k-Nearest Neighbor (k-NN), Support Vector Machines (SVM), Gaussian Mixture Models (GMM), and Random Forest (RF) as well as three unsupervised classification techniques namely, k-Means, Gaussian mixture models (GMM) and Hidden Markov Model (HMM), are compared in terms of correct classification rate, F-measure, recall, precision, and specificity. Raw data and extracted features are used separately as inputs of each classifier. The feature selection is performed using a wrapper approach based on the RF algorithm. Based on our experiments, the results obtained show that the k-NN classifier provides the best performance compared to other supervised classification algorithms, whereas the HMM classifier is the one that gives the best results among unsupervised classification algorithms. This comparison highlights which approach gives better performance in both supervised and unsupervised contexts. It should be noted that the obtained results are limited to the context of this study, which concerns the classification of the main daily living human activities using three wearable accelerometers placed at the chest, right shank and left ankle of the subject.

  15. Physical Human Activity Recognition Using Wearable Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Attal, Ferhat; Mohammed, Samer; Dedabrishvili, Mariam; Chamroukhi, Faicel; Oukhellou, Latifa; Amirat, Yacine

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a review of different classification techniques used to recognize human activities from wearable inertial sensor data. Three inertial sensor units were used in this study and were worn by healthy subjects at key points of upper/lower body limbs (chest, right thigh and left ankle). Three main steps describe the activity recognition process: sensors’ placement, data pre-processing and data classification. Four supervised classification techniques namely, k-Nearest Neighbor (k-NN), Support Vector Machines (SVM), Gaussian Mixture Models (GMM), and Random Forest (RF) as well as three unsupervised classification techniques namely, k-Means, Gaussian mixture models (GMM) and Hidden Markov Model (HMM), are compared in terms of correct classification rate, F-measure, recall, precision, and specificity. Raw data and extracted features are used separately as inputs of each classifier. The feature selection is performed using a wrapper approach based on the RF algorithm. Based on our experiments, the results obtained show that the k-NN classifier provides the best performance compared to other supervised classification algorithms, whereas the HMM classifier is the one that gives the best results among unsupervised classification algorithms. This comparison highlights which approach gives better performance in both supervised and unsupervised contexts. It should be noted that the obtained results are limited to the context of this study, which concerns the classification of the main daily living human activities using three wearable accelerometers placed at the chest, right shank and left ankle of the subject. PMID:26690450

  16. CFTR targeting during activation of human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Ng, Hang Pong; Valentine, Vincent G; Wang, Guoshun

    2016-12-01

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), a cAMP-activated chloride channel, plays critical roles in phagocytic host defense. However, how activated neutrophils regulate CFTR channel distribution subcellularly is not well defined. To investigate, we tested multiple Abs against different CFTR domains, to examine CFTR expression in human peripheral blood neutrophils by flow cytometry. The data confirmed that resting neutrophils had pronounced CFTR expression. Activation of neutrophils with soluble or particulate agonists did not significantly increase CFTR expression level, but induced CFTR redistribution to cell surface. Such CFTR mobilization correlated with cell-surface recruitment of formyl-peptide receptor during secretory vesicle exocytosis. Intriguingly, neutrophils from patients with ΔF508-CF, despite expression of the mutant CFTR, showed little cell-surface mobilization upon stimulation. Although normal neutrophils effectively targeted CFTR to their phagosomes, ΔF508-CF neutrophils had impairment in that process, resulting in deficient hypochlorous acid production. Taken together, activated neutrophils regulate CFTR distribution by targeting this chloride channel to the subcellular sites of activation, and ΔF508-CF neutrophils fail to achieve such targeting, thus undermining their host defense function.

  17. Anti-inflammatory Effects of Ganoderma Lucidum Triterpenoid in Human Crohn’s Disease Associated with Down-Regulation of NF-κB Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Changda; Dunkin, David; Lai, Joanne; Song, Ying; Ceballos, Clare; Benkov, Keith; Li, Xiu-Min

    2015-01-01

    Background Crohn’s disease (CD) is a chronic inflammatory disease of the gastrointestinal tract. Current medications have potentially serious side effects. Hence there is increasing interest in alternative therapies. We previously demonstrated the anti-inflammatory effects of FAHF-2 in-vitro on PBMCs and mucosa from CD subjects. Here we investigated the anti-inflammatory effects of a bioactive compound isolated from Ganoderma lucidum (G. lucidum), a key herbal constituent of FAHF-2, in CD in vitro. Methods Triterpene ganoderic acid C1 (GAC1) was isolated from G. lucidum. Stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophages were treated with GAC1. Human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and colonic biopsies were obtained from children with CD and cultured with or without GAC1. TNF-α and other pro-inflammatory cytokine levels were measured in the culture supernatant. NF-κB signaling was investigated in PBMCs and colonic mucosa treated with GAC1 by In-Cell Western and western blot analysis. Results GAC1 decreased TNF-α production by macrophages and PBMCs from CD subjects. GAC1 significantly decreased TNF-α, IFN-γ, and IL-17A production by inflamed colonic biopsies from CD subjects. These effects were due to down-regulation of the NF-κB signaling pathway. Conclusions GAC1 inhibited production of TNF-α and other pro-inflammatory cytokines by PBMCs and inflamed CD colonic mucosa due to blockage of NF-κB activation. GAC1 is a key beneficial constituent in G. lucidum and the FAHF-2 formula in suppressing the inflammatory cytokines found in CD and warrants clinical investigation for the treatment of CD. PMID:25993687

  18. Spreading dynamics following bursty human activity patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Byungjoon; Goh, K.-I.; Vazquez, Alexei

    2011-03-01

    We study the susceptible-infected model with power-law waiting time distributions P(τ)~τ-α, as a model of spreading dynamics under heterogeneous human activity patterns. We found that the average number of new infections n(t) at time t decays as a power law in the long-time limit, n(t)~t-β, leading to extremely slow prevalence decay. We also found that the exponent in the spreading dynamics β is related to that in the waiting time distribution α in a way depending on the interactions between agents but insensitive to the network topology. These observations are well supported by both the theoretical predictions and the long prevalence decay time in real social spreading phenomena. Our results unify individual activity patterns with macroscopic collective dynamics at the network level.

  19. Pseudo-esterase Activity of Human Albumin

    PubMed Central

    Lockridge, Oksana; Xue, Weihua; Gaydess, Andrea; Grigoryan, Hasmik; Ding, Shi-Jian; Schopfer, Lawrence M.; Hinrichs, Steven H.; Masson, Patrick

    2008-01-01

    Human albumin is thought to hydrolyze esters because multiple equivalents of product are formed for each equivalent of albumin. Esterase activity with p-nitrophenyl acetate has been attributed to turnover at tyrosine 411. However, p-nitrophenyl acetate creates multiple, stable, acetylated adducts, a property contrary to turnover. Our goal was to identify residues that become acetylated by p-nitrophenyl acetate and determine the relationship between stable adduct formation and turnover. Fatty acid-free human albumin was treated with 0.5 mm p-nitrophenyl acetate for 5 min to 2 weeks, or with 10 mm p-nitrophenyl acetate for 48 h to 2 weeks. Aliquots were digested with pepsin, trypsin, or GluC and analyzed by mass spectrometry to identify labeled residues. Only Tyr-411 was acetylated within the first 5 min of reaction with 0.5 mm p-nitrophenyl acetate. After 0.5–6 h there was partial acetylation of 16–17 residues including Asp-1, Lys-4, Lys-12, Tyr-411, Lys-413, and Lys-414. Treatment with 10 mm p-nitrophenyl acetate resulted in acetylation of 59 lysines, 10 serines, 8 threonines, 4 tyrosines, and Asp-1. When Tyr-411 was blocked with diisopropylfluorophosphate or chlorpyrifos oxon, albumin had normal esterase activity with β-naphthyl acetate as visualized on a nondenaturing gel. However, after 82 residues had been acetylated, esterase activity was almost completely inhibited. The half-life for deacetylation of Tyr-411 at pH 8.0, 22 °C was 61 ± 4 h. Acetylated lysines formed adducts that were even more stable. In conclusion, the pseudo-esterase activity of albumin is the result of irreversible acetylation of 82 residues and is not the result of turnover. PMID:18577514

  20. The transcriptional activity of human Chromosome 22

    PubMed Central

    Rinn, John L.; Euskirchen, Ghia; Bertone, Paul; Martone, Rebecca; Luscombe, Nicholas M.; Hartman, Stephen; Harrison, Paul M.; Nelson, F. Kenneth; Miller, Perry; Gerstein, Mark; Weissman, Sherman; Snyder, Michael

    2003-01-01

    A DNA microarray representing nearly all of the unique sequences of human Chromosome 22 was constructed and used to measure global-transcriptional activity in placental poly(A)+ RNA. We found that many of the known, related and predicted genes are expressed. More importantly, our study reveals twice as many transcribed bases as have been reported previously. Many of the newly discovered expressed fragments were verified by RNA blot analysis and a novel technique called differential hybridization mapping (DHM). Interestingly, a significant fraction of these novel fragments are expressed antisense to previously annotated introns. The coding potential of these novel expressed regions is supported by their sequence conservation in the mouse genome. This study has greatly increased our understanding of the biological information encoded on a human chromosome. To facilitate the dissemination of these results to the scientific community, we have developed a comprehensive Web resource to present the findings of this study and other features of human Chromosome 22 at http://array.mbb.yale.edu/chr22. PMID:12600945

  1. Combustible and non-combustible tobacco product preparations differentially regulate human peripheral blood mononuclear cell functions.

    PubMed

    Arimilli, Subhashini; Damratoski, Brad E; Prasad, G L

    2013-09-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells and T cells play essential roles in innate and adaptive immune responses in protecting against microbial infections and in tumor surveillance. Although evidence suggests that smoking causes immunosuppression, there is limited information whether the use of smokeless tobacco (ST) products affects immune responses. In this study, we assessed the effects of two preparations of cigarette smoke, ST extract and nicotine on T cell and NK cell responses using Toll-like receptor-ligand stimulated human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). The tobacco product preparations (TPPs) tested included whole smoke conditioned media (WS-CM), total particulate matter (TPM) and a ST product preparation in complete artificial saliva (ST/CAS). The PBMCs were stimulated with polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid (poly I:C) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS). A marked reduction of the expression of intracellular IFN-γ and TNF-α was evident in NK cells and T cells treated with WS-CM and TPM. Consistently, attenuation of ligand-induced secretion of cytokines (IL-1β, IL-10, IL-12 and TNF-α) from PBMCs treated with WS-CM and TPM were observed. While the treatment with TPPs did not alter the expression of the maturation marker CD69, WS-CM and TPM inhibited the cytolytic activity of human PBMCs. Suppression of perforin by WS-CM was also detected. Although interference from the vehicle confounded the interpretation of effects of ST/CAS, some effects were evident only at high concentrations. Nicotine treatment minimally impacted expression of cytokines and cytolytic activity. Data presented herein suggests that the function of NK cells and T cells is influenced by exposure to TPPs (based on equi-nicotine units) in the following order: WS-CM>TPM>ST/CAS. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis put forward by others that chronic smoking leads to immunosuppression, an effect that may contribute to increased microbial infections and cancer incidence among smokers.

  2. Telomerase activity in human pleural mesothelioma

    PubMed Central

    Dhaene, K.; Hubner, R.; Kumar-Singh, S.; Weyn, B.; Van Marck, E.

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Gradual telomere erosion eventually limits the replicative life span of somatic cells and is regarded as an ultimate tumour suppressor mechanism, eliminating cells that have accumulated genetic alterations. Telomerase, which has been found in over 85% of human cancers, elongates telomeres and may be required for tumorigenesis by the process of immortalisation. Malignant mesothelioma is an incurable malignancy with a poor prognosis. The disease becomes symptomatic decades after exposure to carcinogenic asbestos fibres, suggesting the long term survival of pre-malignant cell clones. This study investigated the presence of telomerase in pleural malignant mesothelioma, which may be the target for future anti-telomerase drugs.
METHODS—Telomerase activity was semi-quantitatively measured in extracts from 22 primary pleural mesotheliomas, two benign solitary fibrous tumours of the pleura, four mesothelioma cell lines, and six short term mesothelial cell cultures from normal pleura using a non-isotopic dilution assay of the telomeric repeat amplification protocol.
RESULTS—Twenty of the 22 primary mesotheliomas (91%) and all tumour derived mesothelioma cell lines were telomerase positive. Different levels of enzyme activity were observed in the tumours of different histological subtypes. Telomerase activity could not be detected in the six normal mesothelial cell cultures or in the two mesotheliomas. Both benign solitary fibrous tumours showed strong telomerase activity.
CONCLUSIONS—Telomerase activity is found in a high proportion of mesotheliomas and anti-telomerase drugs might therefore be useful clinically. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that telomerase activity may be a feature of carcinogenesis in mesotheliomas and possibly in many other cancers.

 PMID:10193387

  3. Expression of selected proteins of the extrinsic and intrinsic pathways of apoptosis in human leukocytes exposed to N-nitrosodimethylamine.

    PubMed

    Iwaniuk, A; Jabłońska, E; Jabłoński, J; Ratajczak-Wrona, W; Garley, M

    2015-06-01

    N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) is a xenobiotic widespread in human environment capable of regulating the lifespan of immune cells. In this study, we examined the roles of the tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL)/death receptor 5 (DR5) complex and the Fas molecule in the induction of the extrinsic apoptosis pathway in human neutrophils (polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs)) and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) exposed to NDMA. Also we assessed these proteins ability to trigger the intrinsic apoptosis pathway in those cells. For this purpose, we examined the expression of Fas-associated protein with death domain, truncated Bid (tBid) proteins, and apoptogenic factors such as apoptosis-inducing factor, Smac/Diablo, Omi/HtrA2, and caspase-3 as an indication of accomplished apoptosis phenomenon. PMNs and PBMCs were isolated from whole blood by density gradient centrifugation using Polymorphrep. Apoptotic cells were assessed with flow cytometry using a ready-made kit. The expression of proapoptotic molecules was investigated by Western blot analysis of PMNs and PBMCs treated with NDMA and/or rhTRAIL. The obtained results confirm the proapoptotic effects of NDMA on the examined human leukocytes and indicate an active participation of the TRAIL/DR5 complex and Fas protein in the process of apoptosis. Moreover, the research revealed distinct mechanisms of intrinsic apoptosis pathway activation between PMNs and PBMCs exposed to NDMA, as confirmed by the different levels of tBid, Smac/Diablo, Omi/HtrA2, and caspase-3 expression in those cells.

  4. HIV-1 Nef Impairs Key Functional Activities in Human Macrophages through CD36 Downregulation

    PubMed Central

    Olivetta, Eleonora; Tirelli, Valentina; Chiozzini, Chiara; Scazzocchio, Beatrice; Romano, Ignazio; Arenaccio, Claudia; Sanchez, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    Monocytes and macrophages utilize the class A and B scavenger receptors to recognize and perform phagocytosis of invading microbes before a pathogen-specific immune response is generated. HIV-1 Nef protein affects the innate immune system impairing oxidative burst response and phagocytic capacity of macrophages. Our data show that exogenous recombinant myristoylated Nef protein induces a marked CD36 downregulation in monocytes from Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells, in Monocyte-Derived Macrophages (MDMs) differentiated by cytokines and in MDMs contained in a mixed culture obtained expanding PBMCs under Human Erythroid Massive Amplification condition. Under the latter culture condition we identify three main populations after 6 days of expansion: lymphocytes (37.8±14.7%), erythroblasts (46.7±6.1%) and MDMs (15.7±7.5%). The Nef addition to the cell culture significantly downregulates CD36 expression in MDMs, but not in erythroid cells. Furthermore, CD36 inhibition is highly specific since it does not modify the expression levels of other MDM markers such as CD14, CD11c, CD86, CD68, CD206, Toll-like Receptor 2 and Toll-like Receptor 4. Similar results were obtained in MDMs infected with VSV-G pseudotyped HIV-1-expressing Nef. The reduced CD36 membrane expression is associated with decrease of correspondent CD36 mRNA transcript. Furthermore, Nef-induced CD36 downregulation is linked to both impaired scavenger activity with reduced capability to take up oxidized lipoproteins and to significant decreased phagocytosis of fluorescent beads and GFP-expressing Salmonella tiphymurium. In addition we observed that Nef induces TNF-α release in MDMs. Although these data suggest a possible involvement of TNF-α in mediating Nef activity, our results exclude a possible relationship between Nef-induced TNF-α release and Nef-mediated CD36 downregulation. The present work shows that HIV-1 Nef protein may have a role in the strategies elaborated by HIV-1 to alter pathogen

  5. Antiretroviral resistance among HIV type 1-infected women first exposed to antiretrovirals during pregnancy: plasma versus PBMCs.

    PubMed

    Soto-Ramirez, Luis E; Rodriguez-Diaz, Roberto; Durán, Adriana S; Losso, Marcelo H; Salomón, Horacio; Gómez-Carrillo, Manuel; Pampuro, Sandra; Harris, D Robert; Duarte, Geraldo; De Souza, Ricardo S; Read, Jennifer S

    2008-06-01

    Resistance-associated mutations (RAMs) in plasma samples from HIV-1-infected women who received antiretroviral (ARV) prophylaxis during pregnancy was assessed and correlated with the detection of RAMs in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PMBCs). The study population was composed of HIV-1-infected women enrolled in a prospective cohort study in Latin America and the Caribbean (NISDI Perinatal Study) as of March 1, 2005, who were diagnosed with HIV-1 infection during the current pregnancy, who received ARVs during pregnancy for prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV-1, and who were followed through at least the 6-12 week postpartum visit. Plasma samples collected at enrollment during pregnancy and at 6-12 weeks postpartum were assayed for RAMs. Plasma results were compared to previously described PBMC results from the same study population. Of 819 enrolled subjects, 197 met the eligibility criteria. Nucleic acid amplification was accomplished in 123 plasma samples at enrollment or 6-12 weeks postpartum, and RAMs were detected in 22 (17.9%; 95%CI: 11.7-25.9%). Previous analyses had demonstrated detection of RAMs in PBMCs in 19 (16.1%). There was high concordance between RAMs detected in plasma and PBMC samples, with only eight discordant pairs. The prevalence of RAMs among these pregnant, HIV-1-infected women is high (15%). Rates of detection of RAMs in plasma and PBMC samples were similar.

  6. Antiretroviral Resistance among HIV Type 1-Infected Women First Exposed to Antiretrovirals during Pregnancy: Plasma versus PBMCs

    PubMed Central

    Soto-Ramirez, Luis E.; Rodriguez-Diaz, Roberto; Durán, Adriana S.; Losso, Marcelo H.; Salomón, Horacio; Gómez-Carrillo, Manuel; Pampuro, Sandra; Harris, D. Robert; Duarte, Geraldo; De Souza, Ricardo S.

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Resistance-associated mutations (RAMs) in plasma samples from HIV-1-infected women who received antiretroviral (ARV) prophylaxis during pregnancy was assessed and correlated with the detection of RAMs in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PMBCs). The study population was composed of HIV-1-infected women enrolled in a prospective cohort study in Latin America and the Caribbean (NISDI Perinatal Study) as of March 1, 2005, who were diagnosed with HIV-1 infection during the current pregnancy, who received ARVs during pregnancy for prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV-1, and who were followed through at least the 6–12 week postpartum visit. Plasma samples collected at enrollment during pregnancy and at 6–12 weeks postpartum were assayed for RAMs. Plasma results were compared to previously described PBMC results from the same study population. Of 819 enrolled subjects, 197 met the eligibility criteria. Nucleic acid amplification was accomplished in 123 plasma samples at enrollment or 6–12 weeks postpartum, and RAMs were detected in 22 (17.9%; 95%CI: 11.7–25.9%). Previous analyses had demonstrated detection of RAMs in PBMCs in 19 (16.1%). There was high concordance between RAMs detected in plasma and PBMC samples, with only eight discordant pairs. The prevalence of RAMs among these pregnant, HIV-1-infected women is high (>15%). Rates of detection of RAMs in plasma and PBMC samples were similar. PMID:18507526

  7. Activation of human peroxisome-activated receptor-gamma ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Obesity in children has become an epidemic and recent research suggests a possible contribution from exposure to environmental chemicals. Several chemicals, such as phthalates, brominated flame retardants, and perfluorinated chemicals, are common in house dust on floors where children play and are suspected obesogens. Obesogens can act via a mechanism that involves activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPARy). A previous study found that dust collected from children’s homes binds to PPARy. Here, we investigated the ability of house dust to activate PPARy in a transiently transfected cell assay. Dust samples were collected in 2012 from carpeted and hardwood floors in children’s homes using thimbles fitted into a vacuum cleaner hose (“TEO” samples), or from homes in an adult cohort NIEHS study. Dust was extracted with 50:50 hexane:acetone, sonicated, centrifuged, and the organic layer collected. This was repeated 2X. The extracts were filtered to remove particulates, dried with purified nitrogen, and reconstituted in DMS0 at 200 ug/ul. COS-1 cells were transfected for 24 hrs with a human PPARy vector containing a luciferase reporter, and exposed for 24 hrs to negative controls water or DMSO (0.1%), positive controls Troglitazone (3 uM in water) or Rosiglitazone (100 nM in DMSO), or dust extracts serially diluted in DMEM at 50, 100, and 200 ug/ml in 0.1% DMSO. Cells were lysed and luciferase activity was measured. Data were log-tra

  8. Human-in-the-loop active electrosense.

    PubMed

    Fang, Sandra; Peshkin, Michael; MacIver, Malcolm A

    2016-12-20

    Active electrosense is a non-visual, short range sensing system used by weakly electric fish, enabling such fish to locate and identify objects in total darkness. Here we report initial findings from the use of active electrosense for object localization during underwater teleoperation with a virtual reality (VR) head-mounted display (HMD). The advantage of electrolocating with a VR system is that it naturally allows for aspects of the task that are difficult for a person to perform to be allocated to the computer. However, interpreting weak and incomplete patterns in the incoming data is something that people are typically far better at than computers. To achieve human-computer synergy, we integrated an active electrosense underwater robot with the Oculus Rift HMD. The virtual environment contains a visualization of the electric images of the objects surrounding the robot as well as various virtual fixtures that guide users to regions of higher information value. Initial user testing shows that these fixtures significantly reduce the time taken to localize an object, but may not increase the accuracy of the position estimate. Our results highlight the advantages of translating the unintuitive physics of electrolocation to an intuitive visual representation for accomplishing tasks in environments where imaging systems fail, such as in dark or turbid water.

  9. Autoimmune disease-associated variants of extracellular endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidase 1 induce altered innate immune responses by human immune cells

    PubMed Central

    Aldhamen, Yasser A.; Pepelyayeva, Yuliya; Rastall, David P.W.; Seregin, Sergey S.; Zervoudi, Efthalia; Koumantou, Despoina; Aylsworth, Charles F.; Quiroga, Dionisia; Godbehere, Sarah; Georgiadis, Dimitris; Stratikos, Efstratios; Amalfitano, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    ERAP1 gene polymorphisms have been linked to several autoimmune diseases; however, the molecular mechanisms underlying these associations are not well understood. Recently, we have demonstrated that ERAP1 regulates key aspects of the innate immune response. Moreover, previous studies show ERAP1 to be ER-localized and secreted during inflammation. Herein, we investigate the possible roles that ERAP1 polymorphic variants may have in modulating innate immune responses of human PBMCs using two experimental methods: extracellular exposure of hPBMCs to ERAP1 variants and adenovirus-based ERAP1 expression. We found that exposure of hPBMCs to ERAP1 variant proteins as well as ERAP1 overexpression by Ad vectors increased inflammatory cytokine and chemokine production, and enhanced immune cell activation. Investigating the molecular mechanisms behind these responses revealed that ERAP1 is able to activate innate immunity via multiple pathways, including the NLRP3 inflammasome. Importantly, these responses varied if autoimmune-disease-associated variants of ERAP1 were examined in the assay systems. Unexpectedly, blocking ERAP1 cellular internalization augmented IL-1β production. To our knowledge, this is the first report identifying ERAP1 as being involved in modulating innate responses of human immune cells, a finding that may explain why ERAP1 has been genetically associated with several autoimmune diseases. PMID:25591727

  10. A human in vitro model system for investigating genome-wide host responses to SARS coronavirus infection

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Lisa FP; Hibberd, Martin L; Ooi, Eng-Eong; Tang, Kin-Fai; Neo, Soek-Ying; Tan, Jenny; Krishna Murthy, Karuturi R; Vega, Vinsensius B; Chia, Jer-Ming; Liu, Edison T; Ren, Ee-Chee

    2004-01-01

    Background The molecular basis of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) coronavirus (CoV) induced pathology is still largely unclear. Many SARS patients suffer respiratory distress brought on by interstitial infiltration and frequently show peripheral blood lymphopenia and occasional leucopenia. One possible cause of this could be interstitial inflammation, following a localized host response. In this study, we therefore examine the immune response of SARS-CoV in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) over the first 24 hours. Methods PBMCs from normal healthy donors were inoculated in vitro with SARS-CoV and the viral replication kinetics was studied by real-time quantitative assays. SARS-CoV specific gene expression changes were examined by high-density oligonucleotide array analysis. Results We observed that SARS-CoV was capable of infecting and replicating in PBMCs and the kinetics of viral replication was variable among the donors. SARS-CoV antibody binding assays indicated that SARS specific antibodies inhibited SARS-CoV viral replication. Array data showed monocyte-macrophage cell activation, coagulation pathway upregulation and cytokine production together with lung trafficking chemokines such as IL8 and IL17, possibly activated through the TLR9 signaling pathway; that mimicked clinical features of the disease. Conclusions The identification of human blood mononuclear cells as a direct target of SARS-CoV in the model system described here provides a new insight into disease pathology and a tool for investigating the host response and mechanisms of pathogenesis. PMID:15357874

  11. [Topographic characteristics of the human electrodermal activity].

    PubMed

    Lazarev, A O

    2014-01-01

    The investigation with participation of 6 test-subjects provided the first evidence that two dermal areas far apart from each other may possess identical spontaneous electrodermal activity (EDA) (r = 0.98) and, on the contrary, adjacent dermal areas may differ in EDA (p = 0.001). Asymmetry in EDA distribution across the human body was demonstrated. Most often the left part of the body was negatively charged relative to the right part. This held true also to the upper body in 59.2% cases and the lower body in 87.3% cases. In the vast majority of cases (98.6-100%) the upper body was charged negatively relative to the lower body.

  12. Structural snapshots of actively translating human ribosomes.

    PubMed

    Behrmann, Elmar; Loerke, Justus; Budkevich, Tatyana V; Yamamoto, Kaori; Schmidt, Andrea; Penczek, Pawel A; Vos, Matthijn R; Bürger, Jörg; Mielke, Thorsten; Scheerer, Patrick; Spahn, Christian M T

    2015-05-07

    Macromolecular machines, such as the ribosome, undergo large-scale conformational changes during their functional cycles. Although their mode of action is often compared to that of mechanical machines, a crucial difference is that, at the molecular dimension, thermodynamic effects dominate functional cycles, with proteins fluctuating stochastically between functional states defined by energetic minima on an energy landscape. Here, we have used cryo-electron microscopy to image ex-vivo-derived human polysomes as a source of actively translating ribosomes. Multiparticle refinement and 3D variability analysis allowed us to visualize a variety of native translation intermediates. Significantly populated states include not only elongation cycle intermediates in pre- and post-translocational states, but also eEF1A-containing decoding and termination/recycling complexes. Focusing on the post-translocational state, we extended this assessment to the single-residue level, uncovering striking details of ribosome-ligand interactions and identifying both static and functionally important dynamic elements.

  13. High concentration of branched-chain amino acids promotes oxidative stress, inflammation and migration of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells via mTORC1 activation.

    PubMed

    Zhenyukh, Olha; Civantos, Esther; Ruiz-Ortega, Marta; Sánchez, Maria Soledad; Vázquez, Clotilde; Peiró, Concepción; Egido, Jesús; Mas, Sebastián

    2017-03-01

    Leucine, isoleucine and valine are essential aminoacids termed branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) due to its aliphatic side-chain. In several pathological and physiological conditions increased BCAA plasma concentrations have been described. Elevated BCAA levels predict insulin resistance development. Moreover, BCAA levels higher than 2mmol/L are neurotoxic by inducing microglial activation in maple syrup urine disease. However, there are no studies about the direct effects of BCAA in circulating cells. We have explored whether BCAA could promote oxidative stress and pro-inflammatory status in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) obtained from healthy donors. In cultured PBMCs, 10mmol/L BCAA increased the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) via both NADPH oxidase and the mitochondria, and activated Akt-mTOR signalling. By using several inhibitors and activators of these molecular pathways we have described that mTOR activation by BCAA is linked to ROS production and mitochondrial dysfunction. BCAA stimulated the activation of the redox-sensitive transcription factor NF-κB, which resulted in the release of pro-inflammatory molecules, such as interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-α, intracellular adhesion molecule-1 or CD40L, and the migration of PBMCs. In conclusion, elevated BCAA blood levels can promote the activation of circulating PBMCs, by a mechanism that involving ROS production and NF-κB pathway activation. These data suggest that high concentrations of BCAA could exert deleterious effects on circulating blood cells and therefore contribute to the pro-inflammatory and oxidative status observed in several pathophysiological conditions.

  14. Salient sounds activate human visual cortex automatically

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, John J.; Störmer, Viola S.; Martinez, Antigona; Feng, Wenfeng; Hillyard, Steven A.

    2013-01-01

    Sudden changes in the acoustic environment enhance perceptual processing of subsequent visual stimuli that appear in close spatial proximity. Little is known, however, about the neural mechanisms by which salient sounds affect visual processing. In particular, it is unclear whether such sounds automatically activate visual cortex. To shed light on this issue, the present study examined event-related brain potentials (ERPs) that were triggered either by peripheral sounds that preceded task-relevant visual targets (Experiment 1) or were presented during purely auditory tasks (Experiments 2, 3, and 4). In all experiments the sounds elicited a contralateral ERP over the occipital scalp that was localized to neural generators in extrastriate visual cortex of the ventral occipital lobe. The amplitude of this cross-modal ERP was predictive of perceptual judgments about the contrast of co-localized visual targets. These findings demonstrate that sudden, intrusive sounds reflexively activate human visual cortex in a spatially specific manner, even during purely auditory tasks when the sounds are not relevant to the ongoing task. PMID:23699530

  15. Recognition of human activities with wearable sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Weihua; Guo, Yongcai; Gao, Chao; Li, Xinke

    2012-12-01

    A novel approach for recognizing human activities with wearable sensors is investigated in this article. The key techniques of this approach include the generalized discriminant analysis (GDA) and the relevance vector machines (RVM). The feature vectors extracted from the measured signal are processed by GDA, with its dimension remarkably reduced from 350 to 12 while fully maintaining the most discriminative information. The reduced feature vectors are then classified by the RVM technique according to an extended multiclass model, which shows good convergence characteristic. Experimental results on the Wearable Action Recognition Dataset demonstrate that our approach achieves an encouraging recognition rate of 99.2%, true positive rate of 99.18% and false positive rate of 0.07%. Although in most cases, the support vector machines model has more than 70 support vectors, the number of relevance vectors related to different activities is always not more than 4, which implies a great simplicity in the classifier structure. Our approach is expected to have potential in real-time applications or solving problems with large-scale datasets, due to its perfect recognition performance, strong ability in feature reduction, and simple classifier structure.

  16. Focus-of-attention for human activity recognition from UAVs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burghouts, G. J.; van Eekeren, A. W. M.; Dijk, J.

    2014-10-01

    This paper presents a system to extract metadata about human activities from full-motion video recorded from a UAV. The pipeline consists of these components: tracking, motion features, representation of the tracks in terms of their motion features, and classification of each track as one of the human activities of interest. We consider these activities: walk, run, throw, dig, wave. Our contribution is that we show how a robust system can be constructed for human activity recognition from UAVs, and that focus-of-attention is needed. We find that tracking and human detection are essential for robust human activity recognition from UAVs. Without tracking, the human activity recognition deteriorates. The combination of tracking and human detection is needed to focus the attention on the relevant tracks. The best performing system includes tracking, human detection and a per-track analysis of the five human activities. This system achieves an average accuracy of 93%. A graphical user interface is proposed to aid the operator or analyst during the task of retrieving the relevant parts of video that contain particular human activities. Our demo is available on YouTube.

  17. Reshaping Human Antibodies: Grafting an Antilysozyme Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verhoeyen, Martine; Milstein, Cesar; Winter, Greg

    1988-03-01

    The production of therapeutic human monoclonal antibodies by hybridoma technology has proved difficult, and this has prompted the ``humanizing'' of mouse monoclonal antibodies by recombinant DNA techniques. It was shown previously that the binding site for a small hapten could be grafted from the heavy-chain variable domain of a mouse antibody to that of a human myeloma protein by transplanting the hypervariable loops. It is now shown that a large binding site for a protein antigen (lysozyme) can also be transplanted from mouse to human heavy chain. The success of such constructions may be facilitated by an induced-fit mechanism.

  18. Tumoricidal activity of human monocytes activated in vitro by free and liposome-encapsulated human lymphokines.

    PubMed Central

    Kleinerman, E S; Schroit, A J; Fogler, W E; Fidler, I J

    1983-01-01

    Human peripheral blood mononuclear cells from normal donors obtained by separation on a Percoll gradient were incubated with free or liposome-entrapped lymphokines produced from concanavalin A-stimulated lymphocytes and then were tested for cytotoxic activity against tumor cells. The treated monocytes lysed tumorigenic melanoma and glioblastoma target cells, but had no effect on three types of nontumorigenic target cells. The activation of monocytes to become tumoricidal was caused by macrophage-activating factor (MAF) and not by contamination with endotoxins, concanavalin A, or interferon. The endocytosis of liposomes containing MAF, but not of those containing control supernatants, led to the activation of cytotoxic properties in the monocytes. Activation by liposome-encapsulated MAF was very efficient and required less than 1/800th of the amount of free MAF necessary to achieve the same levels of cytotoxicity. Thus, the encapsulation of mitogen-induced MAF in liposomes could provide an effective approach for the activation of blood monocytes in situ. Images FIGURE 2 PMID:6348087

  19. Interferon-alpha regulates the dynamic balance between human activated regulatory and effector T cells: implications for antiviral and autoimmune responses.

    PubMed

    Golding, Amit; Rosen, Antony; Petri, Michelle; Akhter, Ehtisham; Andrade, Felipe

    2010-09-01

    An adequate effector response against pathogens and its subsequent inactivation after pathogen clearance are critical for the maintenance of immune homeostasis. This process involves an initial phase of T-cell effector (Teff) activation followed by the expansion of regulatory T cells (Tregs), a unique cell population that limits Teff functions. However, significant questions remain unanswered about the mechanisms that regulate the balance between these cell populations. Using an in vitro system to mimic T-cell activation in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), we analysed the patterns of Treg and Teff activation, with special attention to the role of type I interferon (IFN-I). Interestingly, we found that IFN-alpha, either exogenously added or endogenously induced, suppressed the generation of CD4(+) FoxP3(HI )IFN-gamma(Neg) activated Tregs (aTregs) while simultaneously promoting propagation of CD4(+) FoxP3(Low/Neg )IFN-gamma(Pos) activated Teffs (aTeffs). We also showed that IFN-alpha-mediated inhibition of interleukin (IL)-2 production may play an essential role in IFN-alpha-induced suppression of aTregs. In order to test our findings in a disease state with chronically elevated IFN-alpha, we investigated systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Plasma from patients with SLE was found to contain IFN-I activity that suppressed aTreg generation. Furthermore, anti-CD3 activated SLE PBMCs exhibited preferential expansion of aTeffs with a very limited increase in aTreg numbers. Together, these observations support a model whereby a transient production of IFN-alpha (such as is seen in an early antiviral response) may promote CD4 effector functions by delaying aTreg generation, but a chronic elevation of IFN-alpha may tip the aTeff:aTreg balance towards aTeffs and autoimmunity.

  20. A novel and simple method for generation of human dendritic cells from unfractionated peripheral blood mononuclear cells within 2 days: its application for induction of HIV-1-reactive CD4(+) T cells in the hu-PBL SCID mice.

    PubMed

    Kodama, Akira; Tanaka, Reiko; Saito, Mineki; Ansari, Aftab A; Tanaka, Yuetsu

    2013-01-01

    Because dendritic cells (DCs) play a critical role in the regulation of adaptive immune responses, they have been ideal candidates for cell-based immunotherapy of cancers and infections in humans. Generally, monocyte-derived DCs (MDDCs) were generated from purified monocytes by multiple steps of time-consuming physical manipulations for an extended period cultivation. In this study, we developed a novel, simple and rapid method for the generation of type-1 helper T cell (Th1)-stimulating human DCs directly from bulk peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). PBMCs were cultivated in the presence of 20 ng/ml of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, 20 ng/ml of interleukin-4 (IL-4) and 1,000 U/ml of interferon-β for 24 h followed by 24 h maturation with a cytokine cocktail containing 10 ng/ml of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), 10 ng/ml of IL-1β and 1 μg/ml of prostaglandin E2. The phenotype and biological activity of these new DCs for induction of allogeneic T cell proliferation and cytokine production were comparable to those of the MDDCs. Importantly, these new DCs pulsed with inactivated HIV-1 could generated HIV-1-reactive CD4(+) T cell responses in humanized mice reconstituted with autologous PBMCs from HIV-1-negative donors. This simple and quick method for generation of functional DCs will be useful for future studies on DC-mediated immunotherapies.

  1. THE NATIONAL EXPOSURE RESEARCH LABORATORY'S CONSOLIDATED HUMAN ACTIVITY DATABASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA's National Exposure Research Laboratory (NERL) has combined data from 12 U.S. studies related to human activities into one comprehensive data system that can be accessed via the Internet. The data system is called the Consolidated Human Activity Database (CHAD), and it is ...

  2. THE NATIONAL EXPOSURE RESEARCH LABORATORY'S COMPREHENSIVE HUMAN ACTIVITY DATABASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA's National Exposure Research Laboratory (NERL) has combined data from nine U.S. studies related to human activities into one comprehensive data system that can be accessed via the world-wide web. The data system is called CHAD-Consolidated Human Activity Database-and it is ...

  3. Human multimedia display interface based on human activity recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Yiting; Lee, Eung-Joo

    2011-06-01

    In this paper, we will propose a Human Multimedia Display Interface. The interface uses the tracking of human hand movements to control the IP-TV. This paper presents an improved CAMSHIFT algorithm to control an IP-TV system. The CAMSHIFT algorithm (Continuously Adaptive MeanShift) is a method of using color information[1]. It can do tracking with a specific color of the target. In some typical environmental constraints, it can obtain good tracking performance. However, as the question of noise, large area similar to the color interference and so on, only by CAM-SHIFT algorithm it is not competent. Against these issues we propose an improved CAMSHIFT algorithm[2].

  4. Activities of Human Gene Nomenclature Committee

    SciTech Connect

    2002-07-16

    The objective of this project, shared between NIH and DOE, has been and remains to enable the medical genetics communities to use common names for genes that are discovered by different gene hunting groups, in different species. This effort provides consistent gene nomenclature and approved gene symbols to the community at large. This contributes to a uniform and consistent understanding of genomes, particularly the human as well as functional genomics based on comparisons between homologous genes in related species (human and mice).

  5. A quasi-quantitative dual multiplexed immunoblot method to simultaneously analyze ATM and H2AX Phosphorylation in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Bakkenist, Christopher J; Czambel, R Kenneth; Hershberger, Pamela A; Tawbi, Hussein; Beumer, Jan H; Schmitz, John C

    2015-01-01

    Pharmacologic inhibition of DNA repair may increase the efficacy of many cytotoxic cancer agents. Inhibitors of DNA repair enzymes including APE1, ATM, ATR, DNA-PK and PARP have been developed and the PARP inhibitor olaparib is the first-in-class approved in Europe and the USA for the treatment of advanced BRCA-mutated ovarian cancer. Sensitive pharmacodynamic (PD) biomarkers are needed to further evaluate the efficacy of inhibitors of DNA repair enzymes in clinical trials. ATM is a protein kinase that mediates cell-cycle checkpoint activation and DNA double-strand break repair. ATM kinase activation at DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) is associated with intermolecular autophosphorylation on serine-1981. Exquisite sensitivity and high stoichiometry as well as facile extraction suggest that ATM serine-1981 phosphorylation may be a highly dynamic PD biomarker for both ATM kinase inhibitors and radiation- and chemotherapy-induced DSBs. Here we report the pre-clinical analytical validation and fit-for-purpose biomarker method validation of a quasi-quantitative dual multiplexed immunoblot method to simultaneously analyze ATM and H2AX phosphorylation in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). We explore the dynamics of these phosphorylations in PBMCs exposed to chemotherapeutic agents and DNA repair inhibitors in vitro, and show that ATM serine-1981 phosphorylation is increased in PBMCs in sarcoma patients treated with DNA damaging chemotherapy.

  6. Human Activity Recognition in AAL Environments Using Random Projections

    PubMed Central

    Damaševičius, Robertas; Vasiljevas, Mindaugas; Šalkevičius, Justas; Woźniak, Marcin

    2016-01-01

    Automatic human activity recognition systems aim to capture the state of the user and its environment by exploiting heterogeneous sensors attached to the subject's body and permit continuous monitoring of numerous physiological signals reflecting the state of human actions. Successful identification of human activities can be immensely useful in healthcare applications for Ambient Assisted Living (AAL), for automatic and intelligent activity monitoring systems developed for elderly and disabled people. In this paper, we propose the method for activity recognition and subject identification based on random projections from high-dimensional feature space to low-dimensional projection space, where the classes are separated using the Jaccard distance between probability density functions of projected data. Two HAR domain tasks are considered: activity identification and subject identification. The experimental results using the proposed method with Human Activity Dataset (HAD) data are presented. PMID:27413392

  7. Human Activity Recognition in AAL Environments Using Random Projections.

    PubMed

    Damaševičius, Robertas; Vasiljevas, Mindaugas; Šalkevičius, Justas; Woźniak, Marcin

    2016-01-01

    Automatic human activity recognition systems aim to capture the state of the user and its environment by exploiting heterogeneous sensors attached to the subject's body and permit continuous monitoring of numerous physiological signals reflecting the state of human actions. Successful identification of human activities can be immensely useful in healthcare applications for Ambient Assisted Living (AAL), for automatic and intelligent activity monitoring systems developed for elderly and disabled people. In this paper, we propose the method for activity recognition and subject identification based on random projections from high-dimensional feature space to low-dimensional projection space, where the classes are separated using the Jaccard distance between probability density functions of projected data. Two HAR domain tasks are considered: activity identification and subject identification. The experimental results using the proposed method with Human Activity Dataset (HAD) data are presented.

  8. Aryl hydrocarbon mono-oxygenase activity in human lymphocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Griffin, G.D.; Schuresko, D.D.

    1981-06-01

    Aryl hydrocarbon mono-oxygenase (AHM), an enzyme of key importance in metabolism of xenobiotic chemicals such as polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PNA), is present in human lymphocytes. Studies investing the relation of activity of AHM in human lymphocytes to parameters such as disease state, PNA exposure, in vitro mitogen stimulation, etc. have been summarized in this report. Some studies have demonstrated increased AHM activity in lymphocytes from cigarette smokers (compared to nonsmokers), and in lung cancer patients when compared to appropriate control groups. These observations are confused by extreme variability in human lymphocyte AHM activities, such variability arising from factors such as genetic variation in AHM activity, variation in in vitro culture conditions which affect AHM activity, and the problematical relationship of common AHM assays to actual PNA metabolism taking place in lymphocytes. If some of the foregoing problems can be adequately addressed, lymphocyte AHM activity could hold the promise of being a useful biomarker system for human PNA exposure.

  9. Activation of the interleukin-34 inflammatory pathway in response to influenza A virus infection.

    PubMed

    Yu, Guozheng; Bing, Yuntao; Zhu, Siying; Li, Wei; Xia, Lin; Li, Yong; Liu, Zhisu

    2015-02-01

    Interleukin 34 (IL-34) is a newly recognized cytokine that functions similarly to macrophage colony-stimulating factor. This study investigated the mechanism by which IL-34 is produced in response to exogenous pathogen infections in humans. The results showed that the IL-34 levels were higher in the serum and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from 155 influenza A virus (IAV)-infected patients than in those from 145 healthy individuals. The expression level of IL-34 in IAV-infected PBMCs was blocked by IL-22-specific siRNA. This result indicated that IL-34 was induced by IL-22 in the inflammatory cascade. The mRNA and protein expression levels of IL-22 activated by IAV infection were significantly inhibited by IL-34 overexpression but induced by IL-34-specific siRNA. Thus, a feedback system most likely exists between IL-34 and IL-22. The IL-22 expression in T helper type 17 (Th17) cells of PBMCs was higher than IL-34 expression in Th17 cells of PBMCs, and there was IL-34 expression in IL-22+ Th17 cells. This result showed that the production of IL-22 and IL-34 is both from the same and different subset of cells, which indicated that the regulatory mechanism of IL-22/IL-34 is through the autocrine or paracrine systems. In conclusion, IL-34 is induced by IL-22 in the inflammatory cascade in response to IAV infection. Therefore, IL-34 is a promising target for the screening of anti-inflammatory medicines.

  10. Biofidelic Human Activity Modeling and Simulation with Large Variability

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-11-25

    capture data to replicate a human activity in 3D space. Since technologies for simultaneously capturing human motion and dynamic shapes are not yet ready...for practical use, a motion capture system can be used to capture markers on the body during motion and a 3D body scanner can be used to capture the...animation-capable model that can replicate a human activity in 3D space with the true shape and true motion of a human. Using this approach, a model

  11. Antiproliferative activity of xanthones isolated from Artocarpus obtusus.

    PubMed

    Hashim, Najihah Mohd; Rahmani, Mawardi; Ee, Gwendoline Cheng Lian; Sukari, Mohd Aspollah; Yahayu, Maizatulakmal; Oktima, Winda; Ali, Abd Manaf; Go, Rusea

    2012-01-01

    An investigation of the chemical constituents in Artocarpus obtusus species led to the isolation of three new xanthones, pyranocycloartobiloxanthone A (1), dihydroartoindonesianin C (2), and pyranocycloartobiloxanthone B (3). The compounds were subjected to antiproliferative assay against human promyelocytic leukemia (HL60), human chronic myeloid leukemia (K562), and human estrogen receptor (ER+) positive breast cancer (MCF7) cell lines. Pyranocycloartobiloxanthone A (1) consistently showed strong cytotoxic activity against the three cell lines compared to the other two with IC(50) values of 0.5, 2.0 and 5.0 μg/mL, respectively. Compound (1) was also observed to exert antiproliferative activity and apoptotic promoter towards HL60 and MCF7 cell lines at respective IC(50) values. The compound (1) was not toxic towards normal cell lines human nontumorigenic breast cell line (MCF10A) and human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) with IC(50) values of more than 30 μg/mL.

  12. Active Metabolites of Isoxazolylpenicillins in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Thijssen, H. H. W.; Mattie, H.

    1976-01-01

    Metabolites of the isoxazolylpenicillins that still possessed antibacterial activity were shown to be present in urine and serum. In healthy subjects, the amounts excreted in urine were low; 10 to 23% of the excreted penicillin activities represented the metabolites. The highest amount of metabolite in urine was found for oxacillin, and the lowest was found for flucloxacillin. No extreme differences in the amounts of metabolite excreted were observed when the compounds were administered orally or intravenously. In one healthy subject metabolite levels were estimated for cloxacillin in serum. Very low levels were found, i.e., about 9% of the activity. In subjects with highly impaired renal function, the metabolite may represent up to 50% of the total level of penicillin in serum. The antibacterial activities of the different metabolites were of the same order of magnitude as those of the respective parent compounds. Also, the activity against benzylpenicillin-resistant staphylococci was retained. It is not likely that the formation of the active metabolites should influence therapeutic results. PMID:825029

  13. Thyroid peroxidase activity in human nodular goiters.

    PubMed

    Moura, E G; Rosenthal, D; Carvalho-Guimarães, D P

    1989-01-01

    1. Thyroid peroxidase (TPO, iodide-oxidation) activity was evaluated in nodular and paranodular tissue samples from 27 patients with nodular goiter (19 "cold" and 8 "hot" nodules), and compared to 11 diffuse toxic goiter and 9 normal thyroid tissue samples. 2. In terms of U/g digitonin solubilized protein, TPO activity was increased in hot nodules (P less than 0.05), although not as much as in diffuse toxic goiters (P less than 0.01). 3. The mean TPO activity of tissues paranodular to a cold nodule was not different from that of normal thyroids. 4. Both the highest and the lowest TPO activities were found in cold nodules, but their mean value did not differ from those of their paranodular tissues or normal thyroids. 5. Inter-tissue variability was significantly increased (P less than 0.01) in cold nodules and in tissues paranodular to a hot nodule. 6. These data show that heterogeneity both within and among tissues contributes to the wide range of TPO activity detected in nodular goiters.

  14. Hemagglutinin activity of human plasma fibronectin.

    PubMed

    Vuento, M

    1979-09-01

    Purified human plasma fibronectin at concentrations of about 30 microgram/ml was found to agglutinate trypsin-treated erythrocytes from certain species. The hemagglutination reaction was inhibited by specific antibodies to fibronectin, by relatively low concentrations of polyamines and by higher concentrations of basic amino acids and nonacetylated amino sugars. The divalent cations Ca2+ and Mg2+ and the chelating agent ethylenediaminetetraacetate did not affect the reaction. None of the neutral amino acids, neutral sugars or polyanions tested was inhibitory. The results imply that plasma fibronectin is capable of interacting with cell surfaces and support the idea of a similarity between cellular and plasma fibronectins.

  15. Sexual activity and sleep in humans.

    PubMed

    Brissette, S; Montplaisir, J; Godbout, R; Lavoisier, P

    1985-07-01

    Polysomnographic recordings were obtained in 10 subjects (5 men and 5 women) for three conditions: following masturbation with orgasm, following masturbation without orgasm, and after reading neutral material. The analysis of several sleep parameters did not reveal any effect of masturbation on sleep. These results suggest that physiological changes that occur during masturbation, with or without orgasm, have no major effect on sleep organization. Other factors associated with sexual activity and potentially responsible for sleepiness after orgasm are discussed, and further strategies to study the interrelationship of sexual activity and sleep are proposed.

  16. ANALYSIS OF DISCRIMINATING FACTORS IN HUMAN ACTIVITIES THAT AFFECT EXPOSURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Accurately modeling exposure to particulate matter (PM) and other pollutants ultimately involves the utilization of human location-activity databases to assist in understanding the potential variability of microenvironmental exposures. This paper critically considers and stati...

  17. Human blood platelets lack nitric oxide synthase activity.

    PubMed

    Böhmer, Anke; Gambaryan, Stepan; Tsikas, Dimitrios

    2015-01-01

    Reports on expression and functionality of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activity in human blood platelets and erythrocytes are contradictory. We used a specific gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) method to detect NOS activity in human platelets. The method measures simultaneously [(15)N]nitrite and [(15)N]nitrate formed from oxidized (15)N-labeled nitric oxide ((15)NO) upon its NOS-catalyzed formation from the substrate l-[guanidino-(15)N2]-arginine. Using this GC-MS assay, we did not detect functional NOS in non-stimulated platelets and in intact platelets activated by various agonists (adenosine diphosphate, collagen, thrombin, or von Willebrand factor) or lysed platelets. l-[guanidino-nitro]-Arginine-inhibitable NOS activity was measured after addition of recombinant human endothelial NOS to lysed platelets. Previous and recent studies from our group challenge expression and functionality of NOS in human platelets and erythrocytes.

  18. Kinetics of cytokine expression in bovine PBMCs and whole blood after in vitro stimulation with foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) antigen.

    PubMed

    Dar, Pervaiz A; Hajam, Irshad A; Suryanarayana, Velavurthy S; Kishore, Subodh; Kondabattula, Ganesh

    2015-03-01

    The interest in analysing antigen-specific cytokine responses has substantially increased in recent years, in part due to their use in assessing vaccine efficacy. In the present study, the kinetics of IL-2, IL-4 and IFN-γ expression was determined in bovine PBMCs by real-time PCR and in whole blood by cytokine-release assay after in vitro stimulation with recall foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) antigen. The results showed that the cytokine mRNA of IL-2 and IFN-γ in PBMCs were induced early (peak induction at 6 h), whereas the IL-4 mRNA showed delayed induction (peaked at 24 h). In contrast, the kinetics of cytokine proteins in whole blood was different and required the accumulation of the proteins before being optimally detected. The peak accumulation of cytokine protein in whole blood was recorded at 72 h for IL-2 and IL-4, and 96 h for IFN-γ. The findings of this study are of importance when selecting an optimal time points for measuring antigen-specific cytokine expression in cattle.

  19. Proteomic analysis of Fasciola hepatica excretory and secretory products (FhESPs) involved in interacting with host PBMCs and cytokines by shotgun LC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qing; Huang, Si-Yang; Yue, Dong-Mei; Wang, Jin-Lei; Wang, Yujian; Li, Xiangrui; Zhu, Xing-Quan

    2017-02-01

    Fasciola hepatica is a helminth parasite with a worldwide distribution, which can cause chronic liver disease, fasciolosis, leading to economic losses in the livestock and public health in many countries. Control is mostly reliant on the use of drugs, and as a result, drug resistance has now emerged. The identification of F. hepatica genes involved in interaction between the parasite and host immune system is utmost important to elucidate the evasion mechanisms of the parasite and develop more effective strategies against fasciolosis. In this study, we aimed to identify molecules in F. hepatica excretory and secretory products (FhESPs) interacting with the host peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), Th1-like cytokines (IL2 and IFN-γ), and Th17-like cytokines (IL17) by Co-IP combined with tandem mass spectrometry. The results showed that 14, 16, and 9 proteins in FhESPs could bind with IL2, IL17, and IFN-γ, respectively, which indicated that adult F. hepatica may evade the host immune responses through directly interplaying with cytokines. In addition, nine proteins in FhESPs could adhere to PBMCs. Our findings provided potential targets as immuno-regulators, and will be helpful to elucidate the molecular basis of host-parasite interactions and search for new potential proteins as vaccine and drug target candidates.

  20. Paeoniflorin suppresses inflammatory response in imiquimod-induced psoriasis-like mice and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from psoriasis patients.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tao; Fu, Li-Xin; Zhang, Li-Wen; Yin, Bin; Zhou, Pei-Mei; Cao, Na; Lu, Yong-Hong

    2016-08-01

    Psoriasis is one of the most common immune-mediated chronic inflammatory skin disorders, characterized by hyperproliferation of keratinocytes, dilation and growth of dermal capillary vasculature, and cellular infiltration of T cells, dendritic cells (DCs), and neutrophils. Paeoniflorin (PF), the principal component of total glucosides of paeony (TGP), displays anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties in several animal models. In this study, we investigated the anti-inflammatory effects and mechanisms of PF in imiquimod (IMQ)-induced psoriasis-like mouse model. The effects of PF on inflammatory cytokine expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from patients with psoriasis vulgaris were also observed. Our results indicated that PF effectively attenuated the clinical and histopathologic changes in IMQ-induced psoriasis-like mouse model. Furthermore, PF reduced the infiltration of T cells, CD11c(+)DCs, and neutrophils in lesional skin. In addition, PF also significantly decreased the mRNA expression of inflammatory cytokines, such as IL-17, INF-γ, IL-6, and TNF-α, in IMQ-induced psoriasis-like mouse model and PBMCs from patients with psoriasis vulgaris. Hence, our data suggest that PF can inhibit leukocyte infiltration and decrease the expression of inflammatory cytokines such as IL-17, INF-γ, IL-6, and TNF-α. PF might be a candidate drug for the treatment of psoriasis.

  1. Human activities change marine ecosystems by altering predation risk.

    PubMed

    Madin, Elizabeth M P; Dill, Lawrence M; Ridlon, April D; Heithaus, Michael R; Warner, Robert R

    2016-01-01

    In ocean ecosystems, many of the changes in predation risk - both increases and decreases - are human-induced. These changes are occurring at scales ranging from global to local and across variable temporal scales. Indirect, risk-based effects of human activity are known to be important in structuring some terrestrial ecosystems, but these impacts have largely been neglected in oceans. Here, we synthesize existing literature and data to explore multiple lines of evidence that collectively suggest diverse human activities are changing marine ecosystems, including carbon storage capacity, in myriad ways by altering predation risk. We provide novel, compelling evidence that at least one key human activity, overfishing, can lead to distinct, cascading risk effects in natural ecosystems whose magnitude exceeds that of presumed lethal effects and may account for previously unexplained findings. We further discuss the conservation implications of human-caused indirect risk effects. Finally, we provide a predictive framework for when human alterations of risk in oceans should lead to cascading effects and outline a prospectus for future research. Given the speed and extent with which human activities are altering marine risk landscapes, it is crucial that conservation and management policy considers the indirect effects of these activities in order to increase the likelihood of success and avoid unfortunate surprises.

  2. Tumour Necrosis Factor-alpha (TNF-α) and its soluble receptor type 1 (sTNFR I) in human active and healed leishmaniases.

    PubMed

    Nateghi Rostami, M; Seyyedan Jasbi, E; Khamesipour, A; Mohammadi, A M

    2016-04-01

    The role of tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) is not fully understood in human leishmaniasis. We analysed the alterations in the levels of TNF-α, soluble TNF receptor type 1 (sTNFR I), IL-17 and IL-22 productions in active and healed leishmaniases. Blood samples were collected from volunteers with active cutaneous leishmaniasis (ACL), the same subjects after lesion healing (healed CL = HCL), volunteers with active visceral leishmaniasis (AVL), healed VL (HVL) and healthy controls. Levels of cytokines were titrated on Leishmania Ag-stimulated PBMC culture. The mean level of TNF-α production from stimulated cells was significantly higher in ACL than controls (P < 0·001) and significantly reduced after treatment in HCL volunteers (P < 0·05). The mean level of sTNFR I production was significantly higher in ACL than controls (P < 0·001) and significantly reduced after treatment in HCL volunteers (P < 0·05). The mean level of IL-22 production in AVL was significantly higher than controls (P < 0·05) and was significantly lower in HVL compared with AVL (P < 0·001) and controls (P < 0·05). The levels of TNF-α (P = 0·0025) and sTNFR I (P < 0·01) productions from PBMCs showed significant decreasing trend after treatment in each CL volunteer. Reduction in TNF-α is associated with clinical response to treatment and healing of CL lesions due to L. major.

  3. Dietary Methanol Regulates Human Gene Activity

    PubMed Central

    Komarova, Tatiana V.; Sheshukova, Ekaterina V.; Kosorukov, Vyacheslav S.; Kiryanov, Gleb I.; Dorokhov, Yuri L.

    2014-01-01

    Methanol (MeOH) is considered to be a poison in humans because of the alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH)-mediated conversion of MeOH to formaldehyde (FA), which is toxic. Our recent genome-wide analysis of the mouse brain demonstrated that an increase in endogenous MeOH after ADH inhibition led to a significant increase in the plasma MeOH concentration and a modification of mRNA synthesis. These findings suggest endogenous MeOH involvement in homeostasis regulation by controlling mRNA levels. Here, we demonstrate directly that study volunteers displayed increasing concentrations of MeOH and FA in their blood plasma when consuming citrus pectin, ethanol and red wine. A microarray analysis of white blood cells (WBC) from volunteers after pectin intake showed various responses for 30 significantly differentially regulated mRNAs, most of which were somehow involved in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). There was also a decreased synthesis of hemoglobin mRNA, HBA and HBB, the presence of which in WBC RNA was not a result of red blood cells contamination because erythrocyte-specific marker genes were not significantly expressed. A qRT-PCR analysis of volunteer WBCs after pectin and red wine intake confirmed the complicated relationship between the plasma MeOH content and the mRNA accumulation of both genes that were previously identified, namely, GAPDH and SNX27, and genes revealed in this study, including MME, SORL1, DDIT4, HBA and HBB. We hypothesized that human plasma MeOH has an impact on the WBC mRNA levels of genes involved in cell signaling. PMID:25033451

  4. Telomerase Activity in Human Ovarian Carcinoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Counter, Christopher M.; Hirte, Hal W.; Bacchetti, Silvia; Harley, Calvin B.

    1994-04-01

    Telomeres fulfill the dual function of protecting eukaryotic chromosomes from illegitimate recombination and degradation and may aid in chromosome attachment to the nuclear membrane. We have previously shown that telomerase, the enzyme which synthesizes telomeric DNA, is not detected in normal somatic cells and that telomeres shorten with replicative age. In cells immortalized in vitro, activation of telomerase apparently stabilizes telomere length, preventing a critical destabilization of chromosomes, and cell proliferation continues even when telomeres are short. In vivo, telomeres of most tumors are shorter than telomeres of control tissues, suggesting an analogous role for the enzyme. To assess the relevance of telomerase and telomere stability in the development and progression of tumors, we have measured enzyme activity and telomere length in metastatic cells of epithelial ovarian carcinoma. We report that extremely short telomeres are maintained in these cells and that tumor cells, but not isogenic nonmalignant cells, express telomerase. Our findings suggest that progression of malignancy is ultimately dependent upon activation of telomerase and that telomerase inhibitors may be effective antitumor drugs.

  5. Tricin, flavonoid from Njavara reduces inflammatory responses in hPBMCs by modulating the p38MAPK and PI3K/Akt pathways and prevents inflammation associated endothelial dysfunction in HUVECs.

    PubMed

    Shalini, V; Pushpan, Chithra K; G, Sindhu; A, Jayalekshmy; A, Helen

    2016-02-01

    Previous studies revealed the potent anti-inflammatory activity of tricin, the active component of Njavara rice bran. Here, we report the involvement of specific signaling pathways in the protective effect of tricin against LPS induced inflammation in hPBMCs and the role of tricin in modulating endothelial dysfunction in LPS induced HUVECs. Pretreatment with tricin (15μM) significantly inhibited the release of TNF-α and was comparable to the specific pathway blockers like ERK inhibitor (PD98059), JNK inhibitor (SP600125) and p38 inhibitor (SB203580), whereas an increased release of TNF-α was observed in PI3K/Akt inhibitor (LY294002) treated cells. Tricin alone and combination treatment of tricin and SB203580 showed more significant inhibition of activation of COX-2 and TNF-α than that of SB203580 alone treated group. Combination treatment of tricin and LY294002 showed increased activation of COX-2 and TNF-α, proved that PI3K activation is essential for the anti-inflammatory effect of tricin. Studies conducted on HUVECs revealed the protective effect of tricin against endothelial dysfunction associated with LPS induced inflammation by inhibiting the activation of proinflammatory mediators like TNF-α, IFN-γ, MCP 1 by modulating NF-κB and MAPK signaling pathways. ELISA and flow cytometric analysis again confirmed the protection of tricin against endothelial damage, especially from the decreased activation of cell adhesion molecules like ICAM-1, VCAM-1 and E-Selectin upon tricin treatment. This work establishes the mechanism behind the potent anti-inflammatory activity of the flavonoid tricin.

  6. Human suspicious activity recognition in thermal infrared video

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossen, Jakir; Jacobs, Eddie; Chowdhury, Fahmida K.

    2014-10-01

    Detecting suspicious behaviors is important for surveillance and monitoring systems. In this paper, we investigate suspicious activity detection in thermal infrared imagery, where human motion can be easily detected from the background regardless of the lighting conditions and colors of the human clothing and surfaces. We use locally adaptive regression kernels (LARK) as patch descriptors, which capture the underlying local structure of the data exceedingly well, even in the presence of significant distortions. Patch descriptors are generated for each query patch and for each database patch. A statistical approach is used to match the query activity with the database to make the decision of suspicious activity. Human activity videos in different condition such as, walking, running, carrying a gun, crawling, and carrying backpack in different terrains were acquired using thermal infrared camera. These videos are used for training and performance evaluation of the algorithm. Experimental results show that the proposed approach achieves good performance in suspicious activity recognition.

  7. [Biochemical characteristics of iodperoxidase activity of human saliva].

    PubMed

    Belevich, V K; Senchuk, V V

    2011-01-01

    Peroxidase-catalyzed oxidation of iodide in human saliva leads to the formation of a brown product with lambda max 287 nm and 353 nm (I3-) identified by the method of UV-spectrophotometry. I3- directly reacts with starch producing the characteristic blue complex. Salivary iodide peroxidase activity was found to be from 1.2 to 2.3 times higher then the activity of salivary peroxidases with natural substrates (SCN- and Cl-). Optimum for the iodide peroxidase activity in human saliva was found to be near pH 5.8. Salivary iodide peroxidase activity progressively lowers with the rise of pH value of the reaction mixture until total loss at the pH>7.4 was observed. Iodide peroxidase activity in human saliva at pH>7.4 is masked due to decomposition of I3- with the increase of pH along with the inhibition of peroxidases and I3- reduction by low molecular weight dialyzable salivary components possibly by Cl- and NCS-. Salivary iodide peroxidase activity was completely inhibited by peroxidase inhibitors (NaN3, 2-mercaptoethanol, thiourea), while addition of the peroxidase alternative substrates (ascorbate, quercetin, thiocyanate) resulted in partial inhibition of iodide peroxidase activity. The results of the study confirm the idea, that high activity of human saliva peroxidase with iodide as a substrate may play a crucial role in the bioavailability and metabolism of biologically active iodide.

  8. Integrin activation controls metastasis in human breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Felding-Habermann, Brunhilde; O'Toole, Timothy E.; Smith, Jeffrey W.; Fransvea, Emilia; Ruggeri, Zaverio M.; Ginsberg, Mark H.; Hughes, Paul E.; Pampori, Nisar; Shattil, Sanford J.; Saven, Alan; Mueller, Barbara M.

    2001-01-01

    Metastasis is the primary cause of death in human breast cancer. Metastasis to bone, lungs, liver, and brain involves dissemination of breast cancer cells via the bloodstream and requires adhesion within the vasculature. Blood cell adhesion within the vasculature depends on integrins, a family of transmembrane adhesion receptors, and is regulated by integrin activation. Here we show that integrin αvβ3 supports breast cancer cell attachment under blood flow conditions in an activation-dependent manner. Integrin αvβ3 was found in two distinct functional states in human breast cancer cells. The activated, but not the nonactivated, state supported tumor cell arrest during blood flow through interaction with platelets. Importantly, activated αvβ3 was expressed by freshly isolated metastatic human breast cancer cells and variants of the MDA-MB 435 human breast cancer cell line, derived from mammary fat pad tumors or distant metastases in severe combined immunodeficient mice. Expression of constitutively activated mutant αvβ3D723R, but not αvβ3WT, in MDA-MB 435 cells strongly promoted metastasis in the mouse model. Thus breast cancer cells can exhibit a platelet-interactive and metastatic phenotype that is controlled by the activation of integrin αvβ3. Consequently, alterations within tumors that lead to the aberrant control of integrin activation are expected to adversely affect the course of human breast cancer. PMID:11172040

  9. Integrin activation controls metastasis in human breast cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felding-Habermann, Brunhilde; O'Toole, Timothy E.; Smith, Jeffrey W.; Fransvea, Emilia; Ruggeri, Zaverio M.; Ginsberg, Mark H.; Hughes, Paul E.; Pampori, Nisar; Shattil, Sanford J.; Saven, Alan; Mueller, Barbara M.

    2001-02-01

    Metastasis is the primary cause of death in human breast cancer. Metastasis to bone, lungs, liver, and brain involves dissemination of breast cancer cells via the bloodstream and requires adhesion within the vasculature. Blood cell adhesion within the vasculature depends on integrins, a family of transmembrane adhesion receptors, and is regulated by integrin activation. Here we show that integrin v3 supports breast cancer cell attachment under blood flow conditions in an activation-dependent manner. Integrin v3 was found in two distinct functional states in human breast cancer cells. The activated, but not the nonactivated, state supported tumor cell arrest during blood flow through interaction with platelets. Importantly, activated αvβ3 was expressed by freshly isolated metastatic human breast cancer cells and variants of the MDA-MB 435 human breast cancer cell line, derived from mammary fat pad tumors or distant metastases in severe combined immunodeficient mice. Expression of constitutively activated mutant αvβ3D723R, but not αvβ3WT, in MDA-MB 435 cells strongly promoted metastasis in the mouse model. Thus breast cancer cells can exhibit a platelet-interactive and metastatic phenotype that is controlled by the activation of integrin αvβ3. Consequently, alterations within tumors that lead to the aberrant control of integrin activation are expected to adversely affect the course of human breast cancer.

  10. MAIT cells are activated during human viral infections.

    PubMed

    van Wilgenburg, Bonnie; Scherwitzl, Iris; Hutchinson, Edward C; Leng, Tianqi; Kurioka, Ayako; Kulicke, Corinna; de Lara, Catherine; Cole, Suzanne; Vasanawathana, Sirijitt; Limpitikul, Wannee; Malasit, Prida; Young, Duncan; Denney, Laura; Moore, Michael D; Fabris, Paolo; Giordani, Maria Teresa; Oo, Ye Htun; Laidlaw, Stephen M; Dustin, Lynn B; Ho, Ling-Pei; Thompson, Fiona M; Ramamurthy, Narayan; Mongkolsapaya, Juthathip; Willberg, Christian B; Screaton, Gavin R; Klenerman, Paul

    2016-06-23

    Mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells are abundant in humans and recognize bacterial ligands. Here, we demonstrate that MAIT cells are also activated during human viral infections in vivo. MAIT cells activation was observed during infection with dengue virus, hepatitis C virus and influenza virus. This activation-driving cytokine release and Granzyme B upregulation-is TCR-independent but dependent on IL-18 in synergy with IL-12, IL-15 and/or interferon-α/β. IL-18 levels and MAIT cell activation correlate with disease severity in acute dengue infection. Furthermore, HCV treatment with interferon-α leads to specific MAIT cell activation in vivo in parallel with an enhanced therapeutic response. Moreover, TCR-independent activation of MAIT cells leads to a reduction of HCV replication in vitro mediated by IFN-γ. Together these data demonstrate MAIT cells are activated following viral infections, and suggest a potential role in both host defence and immunopathology.

  11. Mu-opioid induction of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, RANTES, and IFN-gamma-inducible protein-10 expression in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Wetzel, M A; Steele, A D; Eisenstein, T K; Adler, M W; Henderson, E E; Rogers, T J

    2000-12-01

    Strong evidence for the direct modulation of the immune system by opioids is well documented. Mu-opioids have been shown to alter the release of cytokines important for both host defense and the inflammatory response. Proinflammatory chemokines monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), RANTES, and IFN-gamma-inducible protein-10 (IP-10) play crucial roles in cell-mediated immune responses, proinflammatory reactions, and viral infections. In this report, we show that [D-Ala(2),N:-Me-Phe(4),Gly-ol(5)]enkephalin (DAMGO), a mu-opioid-selective agonist, augments the expression in human PBMCs of MCP-1, RANTES, and IP-10 at both the mRNA and protein levels. Because of the proposed relationship between opioid abuse and HIV-1 infection, we also examined the impact of DAMGO on chemokine expression in HIV-infected cells. Our results show that DAMGO administration induces a significant increase in RANTES and IP-10 expression, while MCP-1 protein levels remain unaffected in PBMCs infected with the HIV-1 strain. In contrast, we show a dichotomous effect of DAMGO treatment on IP-10 protein levels expressed by T- and M-tropic HIV-infected PBMCs. The differential modulation of chemokine expression in T- and M-tropic HIV-1-infected PBMCs by opioids supports a detrimental role for opioids during HIV-1 infection. Modulation of chemokine expression may enhance trafficking of potential noninfected target cells to the site of active infection, thus directly contributing to HIV-1 replication and disease progression to AIDS.

  12. Tax and Semaphorin 4D Released from Lymphocytes Infected with Human Lymphotropic Virus Type 1 and Their Effect on Neurite Growth.

    PubMed

    Quintremil, Sebastián; Alberti, Carolina; Rivera, Matías; Medina, Fernando; Puente, Javier; Cartier, Luis; Ramírez, Eugenio; Tanaka, Yuetsu; Valenzuela, M Antonieta

    2016-01-01

    Human lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is a retrovirus causing HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP), a neurodegenerative central nervous system (CNS) axonopathy. This virus mainly infects CD4(+) T lymphocytes without evidence of neuronal infection. Viral Tax, secreted from infected lymphocytes infiltrated in the CNS, is proposed to alter intracellular pathways related to axonal cytoskeleton dynamics, producing neurological damage. Previous reports showed a higher proteolytic release of soluble Semaphorin 4D (sSEMA-4D) from CD4(+) T cells infected with HTLV-1. Soluble SEMA-4D binds to its receptor Plexin-B1, activating axonal growth collapse pathways in the CNS. In the current study, an increase was found in both SEMA-4D in CD4(+) T cells and sSEMA-4D released to the culture medium of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from HAM/TSP patients compared to asymptomatic carriers and healthy donors. After a 16-h culture, infected PBMCs showed significantly higher levels of CRMP-2 phosphorylated at Ser(522). The effect was blocked either with anti-Tax or anti-SEMA-4D antibodies. The interaction of Tax and sSEMA-4D was found in secreted medium of PBMCs in patients, which might be associated with a leading role of Tax with the SEMA-4D-Plexin-B1 signaling pathway. In infected PBMCs, the migratory response after transwell assay showed that sSEMA-4D responding cells were CD4(+)Tax(+) T cells with a high CRMP-2 pSer(522) content. In the present study, the participation of Tax-sSEMA-4D in the reduction in neurite growth in PC12 cells produced by MT2 (HTLV-1-infected cell line) culture medium was observed. These results lead to the participation of plexins in the reported effects of infected lymphocytes on neuronal cells.

  13. Echocardiographic image of an active human heart

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Echocardiographic images provide quick, safe images of the heart as it beats. While a state-of-the art echocardiograph unit is part of the Human Research Facility on International Space Station, quick transmission of images and data to Earth is a challenge. NASA is developing techniques to improve the echocardiography available to diagnose sick astronauts as well as study the long-term effects of space travel on their health. Echocardiography uses ultrasound, generated in a sensor head placed against the patient's chest, to produce images of the structure of the heart walls and valves. However, ultrasonic imaging creates an enormous volume of data, up to 220 million bits per second. This can challenge ISS communications as well as Earth-based providers. Compressing data for rapid transmission back to Earth can degrade the quality of the images. Researchers at the Cleveland Clinic Foundation are working with NASA to develop compression techniques that meet imaging standards now used on the Internet and by the medical community, and that ensure that physicians receive quality diagnostic images.

  14. Energy monitoring system based on human activity in the workplace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mustafa, Nur Hanim; Husain, Mohd Nor; Aziz, Mohamad Zoinol Abidin Abdul; Othman, Mohd Azlishah; Malek, Fareq

    2015-05-01

    Human behaviors always related to day routine activities in a smart house directly give the significant factor to manage energy usage in human life. An Addition that, the factor will contribute to the best efficiency of the system. This paper will focus on the monitoring efficiency based on duration time in office hours around 8am until 5pm which depend on human behavior at working place. Besides that, the correlation coefficient method is used to show the relation between energy consumption and energy saving based on the total hours of time energy spent. In future, the percentages of energy monitoring system usage will be increase to manage energy saving based on human behaviors. This scenario will help to see the human activity in the workplace in order to get the energy saving and support world green environment.

  15. Humpback Dolphin (Genus Sousa) Behavioural Responses to Human Activities.

    PubMed

    Piwetz, Sarah; Lundquist, David; Würsig, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    Humpback dolphins (genus Sousa) use shallow, near-shore waters throughout their range. This coastal distribution makes them vulnerable to recreational and commercial disturbances, especially near heavily populated and industrialized areas. Most research focusing on Sousa and human activities has emphasized direct impacts and threats, involving injury and death, with relatively little focus on indirect effects on dolphins, such as changes in behaviour that may lead to deleterious effects. Understanding behaviour is important in resolving human-wildlife conflict and is an important component of conservation. This chapter gives an overview of animal behavioural responses to human activity with examples from diverse taxa; reviews the scientific literature on behavioural responses of humpback dolphins to human activity throughout their range, including marine vessel traffic, dolphin tourism, cetacean-fishery interactions, noise pollution, and habitat alteration; and highlights information and data gaps for future humpback dolphin research to better inform behaviour-based management decisions that contribute to conservation efforts.

  16. Regulatory T cell levels and cytokine production in active non-infectious uveitis: in-vitro effects of pharmacological treatment

    PubMed Central

    Molins, B; Mesquida, M; Lee, R W J; Llorenç, V; Pelegrín, L; Adán, A

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to quantify the proportion of regulatory T cells (Treg) and cytokine expression by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) in patients with active non-infectious uveitis, and to evaluate the effect of in-vitro treatment with infliximab, dexamethasone and cyclosporin A on Treg levels and cytokine production in PBMCs from uveitis patients and healthy subjects. We included a group of 21 patients with active non-infectious uveitis and 18 age-matched healthy subjects. The proportion of forkhead box protein 3 (FoxP3)+ Treg cells and intracellular tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α expression in CD4+ T cells was determined by flow cytometry. PBMCs were also either rested or activated with anti-CD3/anti-CD28 and cultured in the presence or absence of dexamethasone, cyclosporin A and infliximab. Supernatants of cultured PBMCs were collected and TNF-α, interleukin (IL)-10, IL-17 and interferon (IFN)-γ levels were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). No significant differences were observed in nTreg levels between uveitis patients and healthy subjects. However, PBMCs from uveitis patients produced significantly higher amounts of TNF-α and lower amounts of IL-10. Dexamethasone treatment in vitro significantly reduced FoxP3+ Treg levels in PBMCs from both healthy subjects and uveitis patients, and all tested drugs significantly reduced TNF-α production in PBMCs. Dexamethasone and cyclosporin A significantly reduced IL-17 and IFN-γ production in PBMCs and dexamethasone up-regulated IL-10 production in activated PBMCs from healthy subjects. Our results suggest that PBMCs from patients with uveitis express more TNF-α and less IL-10 than healthy subjects, and this is independent of FoxP3+ Treg levels. Treatment with infliximab, dexamethasone and cyclosporin A in vitro modulates cytokine production, but does not increase the proportion of FoxP3+ Treg cells. PMID:25354724

  17. Regulatory T cell levels and cytokine production in active non-infectious uveitis: in-vitro effects of pharmacological treatment.

    PubMed

    Molins, B; Mesquida, M; Lee, R W J; Llorenç, V; Pelegrín, L; Adán, A

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to quantify the proportion of regulatory T cells (Treg ) and cytokine expression by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) in patients with active non-infectious uveitis, and to evaluate the effect of in-vitro treatment with infliximab, dexamethasone and cyclosporin A on Treg levels and cytokine production in PBMCs from uveitis patients and healthy subjects. We included a group of 21 patients with active non-infectious uveitis and 18 age-matched healthy subjects. The proportion of forkhead box protein 3 (FoxP3)(+) Treg cells and intracellular tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α expression in CD4(+) T cells was determined by flow cytometry. PBMCs were also either rested or activated with anti-CD3/anti-CD28 and cultured in the presence or absence of dexamethasone, cyclosporin A and infliximab. Supernatants of cultured PBMCs were collected and TNF-α, interleukin (IL)-10, IL-17 and interferon (IFN)-γ levels were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). No significant differences were observed in nTreg levels between uveitis patients and healthy subjects. However, PBMCs from uveitis patients produced significantly higher amounts of TNF-α and lower amounts of IL-10. Dexamethasone treatment in vitro significantly reduced FoxP3(+) Treg levels in PBMCs from both healthy subjects and uveitis patients, and all tested drugs significantly reduced TNF-α production in PBMCs. Dexamethasone and cyclosporin A significantly reduced IL-17 and IFN-γ production in PBMCs and dexamethasone up-regulated IL-10 production in activated PBMCs from healthy subjects. Our results suggest that PBMCs from patients with uveitis express more TNF-α and less IL-10 than healthy subjects, and this is independent of FoxP3(+) Treg levels. Treatment with infliximab, dexamethasone and cyclosporin A in vitro modulates cytokine production, but does not increase the proportion of FoxP3(+) Treg cells.

  18. Concepts of Connectivity and Human Epileptic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Lemieux, Louis; Daunizeau, Jean; Walker, Matthew C.

    2011-01-01

    This review attempts to place the concept of connectivity from increasingly sophisticated neuroimaging data analysis methodologies within the field of epilepsy research. We introduce the more principled connectivity terminology developed recently in neuroimaging and review some of the key concepts related to the characterization of propagation of epileptic activity using what may be called traditional correlation-based studies based on EEG. We then show how essentially similar methodologies, and more recently models addressing causality, have been used to characterize whole-brain and regional networks using functional MRI data. Following a discussion of our current understanding of the neuronal system aspects of the onset and propagation of epileptic discharges and seizures, we discuss the most advanced and ambitious framework to attempt to fully characterize epileptic networks based on neuroimaging data. PMID:21472027

  19. Human Activity and Pollution in Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graf, H.-F.; Shirsat, S. V.; Podzun, R.

    2009-04-01

    A regional climate chemistry model is used to determine the level of pollution of the Antarctic continent due to anthropogenic and natural emission of sulphur species. Based on an emission inventory for the year 2004/2005 including emissions from energy use and ground traffic at and between Antarctic research stations, flight activity, tourist and scientific ship operations, and emissions from the Mt. Erebus volcano, atmospheric concentration and deposition rates of sulphur species and black carbon were simulated at 0.5 degree resolution for the whole Antarctic continent. The biggest anthropogenic source of pollution is ship operations. These concentrate near the Antarctic Peninsula and close to the big scientific stations at Queen Maud Land and in the Ross sea area. The prevailing winds guarantee that most of the anthropogenic emissions from sources near the coast will be blown to lower latitudes and do not affect the continent. While atmospheric concentrations over vast areas remain extremely low, in some places locally concentrations and deposition rates are reached that may be detectable by in-situ measurements and give rise to concern. Especially at the Peninsula atmospheric concentrations and surface deposition of sulphur and soot are dominated by ship emissions. The largest part of shipping activity in this region is from tourist ships, a strongly increasing business. The by far biggest source of sulphur species in Antarctica is the Mt. Erebus volcano. It is also the only source that remains equally strong in polar winter. However, due to its high altitude and the long life time of SO2, especially in winter resulting in long range transport and dilution, Erebus emissions contribute relatively little to deposition of sulphur in the most anthropogenic polluted areas while they dominate the sulphur deposition in central Antarctica.

  20. Human Islets Exhibit Electrical Activity on Microelectrode Arrays (MEA).

    PubMed

    Schönecker, S; Kraushaar, U; Guenther, E; Gerst, F; Ullrich, S; Häring, H-U; Königsrainer, A; Barthlen, W; Drews, G; Krippeit-Drews, P

    2015-05-01

    This study demonstrates for the first time that the microelectrode array (MEA) technique allows analysis of electrical activity of islets isolated from human biopsies. We have shown before that this method, i.e., measuring beta cell electrical activity with extracellular electrodes, is a powerful tool to assess glucose responsiveness of isolated murine islets. In the present study, human islets were shown to exhibit glucose-dependent oscillatory electrical activity. The glucose responsiveness could be furthermore demonstrated by an increase of insulin secretion in response to glucose. Electrical activity was increased by tolbutamide and inhibited by diazoxide. In human islets bursts of electrical activity were markedly blunted by the Na(+) channel inhibitor tetrodotoxin which does not affect electrical activity in mouse islets. Thus, the MEA technique emerges as a powerful tool to decipher online the unique features of human islets.Additionally, this technique will enable research with human islets even if only a few islets are available and it will allow a fast and easy test of metabolic integrity of islets destined for transplantation.

  1. Brain Activation During Singing: "Clef de Sol Activation" Is the "Concert" of the Human Brain.

    PubMed

    Mavridis, Ioannis N; Pyrgelis, Efstratios-Stylianos

    2016-03-01

    Humans are the most complex singers in nature, and the human voice is thought by many to be the most beautiful musical instrument. Aside from spoken language, singing represents a second mode of acoustic communication in humans. The purpose of this review article is to explore the functional anatomy of the "singing" brain. Methodologically, the existing literature regarding activation of the human brain during singing was carefully reviewed, with emphasis on the anatomic localization of such activation. Relevant human studies are mainly neuroimaging studies, namely functional magnetic resonance imaging and positron emission tomography studies. Singing necessitates activation of several cortical, subcortical, cerebellar, and brainstem areas, served and coordinated by multiple neural networks. Functionally vital cortical areas of the frontal, parietal, and temporal lobes bilaterally participate in the brain's activation process during singing, confirming the latter's role in human communication. Perisylvian cortical activity of the right hemisphere seems to be the most crucial component of this activation. This also explains why aphasic patients due to left hemispheric lesions are able to sing but not speak the same words. The term clef de sol activation is proposed for this crucial perisylvian cortical activation due to the clef de sol shape of the topographical distribution of these cortical areas around the sylvian fissure. Further research is needed to explore the connectivity and sequence of how the human brain activates to sing.

  2. Telomerase activity in human brain tumors: astrocytoma and meningioma.

    PubMed

    Kheirollahi, Majid; Mehrazin, Masoud; Kamalian, Naser; Mohammadi-asl, Javad; Mehdipour, Parvin

    2013-05-01

    Somatic cells do not have telomerase activity but immortalized cell lines and more than 85 % of the cancer cells show telomerase activation to prevent the telomere from progressive shortening. The activation of this enzyme has been found in a variety of human tumors and tumor-derived cell lines, but only few studies on telomerase activity in human brain tumors have been reported. Here, we evaluated telomerase activity in different grades of human astrocytoma and meningioma brain tumors. In this study, assay for telomerase activity performed on 50 eligible cases consisted of 26 meningioma, 24 astrocytoma according to the standard protocols. In the brain tissues, telomerase activity was positive in 39 (65 %) of 50 patients. One sample t test showed that the telomerase activity in meningioma and astrocytoma tumors was significantly positive entirely (P < 0.001). Also, grade I of meningioma and low grades of astrocytoma (grades I and II) significantly showed telomerase activity. According to our results, we suggest that activation of telomerase is an event that starts mostly at low grades of brain including meningioma and astrocytoma tumors.

  3. How does fluoroaluminate activate human platelets?

    PubMed

    Rendu, F; Lebret, M; Tenza, D; Levy-Toledano, S

    1990-01-15

    Platelet activation induced by NaF or fluoroaluminate (AlF4-) was studied. The latter has been described to substitute for the gamma-phosphate group of the GTP molecule. With 10 mM-NaF, a concentration unable to induce any measurable Ca2+ mobilization (as measured with Indo 1), addition of AlCl3 potentiated platelet aggregation, thromboxane synthesis, diacylglycerol formation and p43 phosphorylation, without any increase in intracellular Ca2+. Neither phosphoinositide hydrolysis nor phosphatidic acid formation could be detected. AlF4- induced the release through a granule centralization within a microtubule bundle, although no myosin light-chain phosphorylation could be detected. Addition of flurbiprofen (10 microM) resulted in only partial inhibition of diacylglycerol formation, with no effect on the release reaction or on p43 phosphorylation. The present results suggest that AlF4- does not stimulate a G-protein governing the phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C. The AlF4(-)-induced diacylglycerol formation is discussed. Moreover, these results bring evidence that there is no correlation between granule centralization and myosin light-chain phosphorylation.

  4. How does fluoroaluminate activate human platelets?

    PubMed Central

    Rendu, F; Lebret, M; Tenza, D; Levy-Toledano, S

    1990-01-01

    Platelet activation induced by NaF or fluoroaluminate (AlF4-) was studied. The latter has been described to substitute for the gamma-phosphate group of the GTP molecule. With 10 mM-NaF, a concentration unable to induce any measurable Ca2+ mobilization (as measured with Indo 1), addition of AlCl3 potentiated platelet aggregation, thromboxane synthesis, diacylglycerol formation and p43 phosphorylation, without any increase in intracellular Ca2+. Neither phosphoinositide hydrolysis nor phosphatidic acid formation could be detected. AlF4- induced the release through a granule centralization within a microtubule bundle, although no myosin light-chain phosphorylation could be detected. Addition of flurbiprofen (10 microM) resulted in only partial inhibition of diacylglycerol formation, with no effect on the release reaction or on p43 phosphorylation. The present results suggest that AlF4- does not stimulate a G-protein governing the phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C. The AlF4(-)-induced diacylglycerol formation is discussed. Moreover, these results bring evidence that there is no correlation between granule centralization and myosin light-chain phosphorylation. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. PMID:2302176

  5. Understanding human activity patterns based on space-time-semantics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Wei; Li, Songnian

    2016-11-01

    Understanding human activity patterns plays a key role in various applications in an urban environment, such as transportation planning and traffic forecasting, urban planning, public health and safety, and emergency response. Most existing studies in modeling human activity patterns mainly focus on spatiotemporal dimensions, which lacks consideration of underlying semantic context. In fact, what people do and discuss at some places, inferring what is happening at the places, cannot be simple neglected because it is the root of human mobility patterns. We believe that the geo-tagged semantic context, representing what individuals do and discuss at a place and a specific time, drives a formation of specific human activity pattern. In this paper, we aim to model human activity patterns not only based on space and time but also with consideration of associated semantics, and attempt to prove a hypothesis that similar mobility patterns may have different motivations. We develop a spatiotemporal-semantic model to quantitatively express human activity patterns based on topic models, leading to an analysis of space, time and semantics. A case study is conducted using Twitter data in Toronto based on our model. Through computing the similarities between users in terms of spatiotemporal pattern, semantic pattern and spatiotemporal-semantic pattern, we find that only a small number of users (2.72%) have very similar activity patterns, while the majority (87.14%) show different activity patterns (i.e., similar spatiotemporal patterns and different semantic patterns, similar semantic patterns and different spatiotemporal patterns, or different in both). The population of users that has very similar activity patterns is decreased by 56.41% after incorporating semantic information in the corresponding spatiotemporal patterns, which can quantitatively prove the hypothesis.

  6. TLR-9 Contributes to the Antiviral Innate Immune Sensing of Rodent Parvoviruses MVMp and H-1PV by Normal Human Immune Cells

    PubMed Central

    Raykov, Zahari; Grekova, Svitlana P.; Hörlein, Rita; Leuchs, Barbara; Giese, Thomas; Giese, Nathalia A.; Rommelaere, Jean; Zawatzky, Rainer; Daeffler, Laurent

    2013-01-01

    The oncotropism of Minute Virus of Mice (MVMp) is partially related to the stimulation of an antiviral response mediated by type-I interferons (IFNs) in normal but not in transformed mouse cells. The present work was undertaken to assess whether the oncotropism displayed against human cells by MVMp and its rat homolog H-1PV also depends on antiviral mechanisms and to identify the pattern recognition receptor (PRR) involved. Despite their low proliferation rate which represents a drawback for parvovirus multiplication, we used human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (hPBMCs) as normal model specifically because all known PRRs are functional in this mixed cell population and moreover because some of its subsets are among the main IFN producers upon infections in mammals. Human transformed models consisted in lines and tumor cells more or less permissive to both parvoviruses. Our results show that irrespective of their permissiveness, transformed cells do not produce IFNs nor develop an antiviral response upon parvovirus infection. However, MVMp- or H-1PV-infected hPBMCs trigger such defense mechanisms despite an absence of parvovirus replication and protein expression, pointing to the viral genome as the activating element. Substantial reduction of an inhibitory oligodeoxynucleotide (iODN) of the latter IFN production identified TLR-9 as a potential PRR for parvoviruses in hPBMCs. However, neither the iODN treatment nor an antibody-induced neutralization of the IFN-triggered effects restored parvovirus multiplication in these cells as expected by their weak proliferation in culture. Finally, given that a TLR-9 activation could also not be observed in parvovirus-infected human lines reported to be endowed with a functional TLR-9 pathway (Namalwa, Raji, and HEK293-TLR9+/+), our data suggest that transformed human cells do not sense MVMp or H-1PV either because of an absence of PRR expression or an intrinsic, or virus-driven defect in the endosomal sensing of the

  7. Activation of GPR119 Stimulates Human β-Cell Replication and Neogenesis in Humanized Mice with Functional Human Islets

    PubMed Central

    Ansarullah; Free, Colette; Christopherson, Jenica; Chen, Quanhai; Gao, Jie; Liu, Chengyang; Naji, Ali; Rabinovitch, Alex; Guo, Zhiguang

    2016-01-01

    Using humanized mice with functional human islets, we investigated whether activating GPR119 by PSN632408, a small molecular agonist, can stimulate human β-cell regeneration in vivo. Human islets were transplanted under the left kidney capsule of immunodeficient mice with streptozotocin- (STZ-) induced diabetes. The recipient mice were treated with PSN632408 or vehicle and BrdU daily. Human islet graft function in the mice was evaluated by nonfasting glucose levels, oral glucose tolerance, and removal of the grafts. Immunostaining for insulin, glucagon, and BrdU or Ki67 was performed in islet grafts to evaluate α- and β-cell replication. Insulin and CK19 immunostaining was performed to evaluate β-cell neogenesis. Four weeks after human islet transplantation, 71% of PSN632408-treated mice achieved normoglycaemia compared with 24% of vehicle-treated mice. Also, oral glucose tolerance was significantly improved in the PSN632408-treated mice. PSN632408 treatment significantly increased both human α- and β-cell areas in islet grafts and stimulated α- and β-cell replication. In addition, β-cell neogenesis was induced from pancreatic duct cells in the islet grafts. Our results demonstrated that activation of GPR119 increases β-cell mass by stimulating human β-cell replication and neogenesis. Therefore, GPR119 activators may qualify as therapeutic agents to increase human β-cell mass in patients with diabetes. PMID:27413754

  8. A Multiscale Survival Process for Modeling Human Activity Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tianyang; Cui, Peng; Song, Chaoming; Zhu, Wenwu; Yang, Shiqiang

    2016-01-01

    Human activity plays a central role in understanding large-scale social dynamics. It is well documented that individual activity pattern follows bursty dynamics characterized by heavy-tailed interevent time distributions. Here we study a large-scale online chatting dataset consisting of 5,549,570 users, finding that individual activity pattern varies with timescales whereas existing models only approximate empirical observations within a limited timescale. We propose a novel approach that models the intensity rate of an individual triggering an activity. We demonstrate that the model precisely captures corresponding human dynamics across multiple timescales over five orders of magnitudes. Our model also allows extracting the population heterogeneity of activity patterns, characterized by a set of individual-specific ingredients. Integrating our approach with social interactions leads to a wide range of implications. PMID:27023682

  9. Detection of cardiac activity changes from human speech

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tovarek, Jaromir; Partila, Pavol; Voznak, Miroslav; Mikulec, Martin; Mehic, Miralem

    2015-05-01

    Impact of changes in blood pressure and pulse from human speech is disclosed in this article. The symptoms of increased physical activity are pulse, systolic and diastolic pressure. There are many methods of measuring and indicating these parameters. The measurements must be carried out using devices which are not used in everyday life. In most cases, the measurement of blood pressure and pulse following health problems or other adverse feelings. Nowadays, research teams are trying to design and implement modern methods in ordinary human activities. The main objective of the proposal is to reduce the delay between detecting the adverse pressure and to the mentioned warning signs and feelings. Common and frequent activity of man is speaking, while it is known that the function of the vocal tract can be affected by the change in heart activity. Therefore, it can be a useful parameter for detecting physiological changes. A method for detecting human physiological changes by speech processing and artificial neural network classification is described in this article. The pulse and blood pressure changes was induced by physical exercises in this experiment. The set of measured subjects was formed by ten healthy volunteers of both sexes. None of the subjects was a professional athlete. The process of the experiment was divided into phases before, during and after physical training. Pulse, systolic, diastolic pressure was measured and voice activity was recorded after each of them. The results of this experiment describe a method for detecting increased cardiac activity from human speech using artificial neural network.

  10. Telomerase Activity is Downregulated Early During Human Brain Development

    PubMed Central

    Ishaq, Abbas; Hanson, Peter S.; Morris, Christopher M.; Saretzki, Gabriele

    2016-01-01

    Changes in hTERT splice variant expression have been proposed to facilitate the decrease of telomerase activity during fetal development in various human tissues. Here, we analyzed the expression of telomerase RNA (hTR), wild type and α-spliced hTERT in developing human fetal brain (post conception weeks, pcw, 6–19) and in young and old cortices using qPCR and correlated it to telomerase activity measured by TRAP assay. Decrease of telomerase activity occurred early during brain development and correlated strongest to decreased hTR expression. The expression of α-spliced hTERT increased between pcw 10 and 19, while that of wild type hTERT remained unchanged. Lack of expression differences between young and old cortices suggests that most changes seem to occur early during human brain development. Using in vitro differentiation of neural precursor stem cells (NPSCs) derived at pcw 6 we found a decrease in telomerase activity but no major expression changes in telomerase associated genes. Thus, they do not seem to model the mechanisms for the decrease in telomerase activity in fetal brains. Our results suggest that decreased hTR levels, as well as transient increase in α-spliced hTERT, might both contribute to downregulation of telomerase activity during early human brain development between 6 and 17 pcw. PMID:27322326

  11. Human DJ-1-specific Transcriptional Activation of Tyrosine Hydroxylase Gene*

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Shizuma; Taira, Takahiro; Takahashi-Niki, Kazuko; Niki, Takeshi; Ariga, Hiroyoshi; Iguchi-Ariga, Sanae M. M.

    2010-01-01

    Loss-of-function mutation in the DJ-1 gene causes a subset of familial Parkinson disease. The mechanism underlying DJ-1-related selective vulnerability in the dopaminergic pathway is, however, not known. DJ-1 has multiple functions, including transcriptional regulation, and one of transcriptional target genes for DJ-1 is the tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) gene, the product of which is a key enzyme for dopamine biosynthesis. It has been reported that DJ-1 is a neuroprotective transcriptional co-activator that sequesters a transcriptional co-repressor polypyrimidine tract-binding protein-associated splicing factor (PSF) from the TH gene promoter. In this study, we found that knockdown of human DJ-1 by small interference RNA in human dopaminergic cell lines attenuated TH gene expression and 4-dihydroxy-l-phenylalanine production but that knockdown or knock-out of mouse DJ-1 in mouse cell lines or in mice did not affect such expression and TH activity. In reporter assays using the human TH gene promoter linked to the luciferase gene, stimulation of TH promoter activity was observed in human cells, but not mouse cells, that had been transfected with DJ-1. Although human DJ-1 and mouse DJ-1 were associated either with human or with mouse PSF, TH promoter activity inhibited by PSF was restored by human DJ-1 but not by mouse DJ-1. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays revealed that the complex of PSF with DJ-1 bound to the human but not the mouse TH gene promoter. These results suggest a novel species-specific transcriptional regulation of the TH promoter by DJ-1 and one of the mechanisms for no reduction of TH in DJ-1-knock-out mice. PMID:20938049

  12. Human DJ-1-specific transcriptional activation of tyrosine hydroxylase gene.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Shizuma; Taira, Takahiro; Takahashi-Niki, Kazuko; Niki, Takeshi; Ariga, Hiroyoshi; Iguchi-Ariga, Sanae M M

    2010-12-17

    Loss-of-function mutation in the DJ-1 gene causes a subset of familial Parkinson disease. The mechanism underlying DJ-1-related selective vulnerability in the dopaminergic pathway is, however, not known. DJ-1 has multiple functions, including transcriptional regulation, and one of transcriptional target genes for DJ-1 is the tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) gene, the product of which is a key enzyme for dopamine biosynthesis. It has been reported that DJ-1 is a neuroprotective transcriptional co-activator that sequesters a transcriptional co-repressor polypyrimidine tract-binding protein-associated splicing factor (PSF) from the TH gene promoter. In this study, we found that knockdown of human DJ-1 by small interference RNA in human dopaminergic cell lines attenuated TH gene expression and 4-dihydroxy-L-phenylalanine production but that knockdown or knock-out of mouse DJ-1 in mouse cell lines or in mice did not affect such expression and TH activity. In reporter assays using the human TH gene promoter linked to the luciferase gene, stimulation of TH promoter activity was observed in human cells, but not mouse cells, that had been transfected with DJ-1. Although human DJ-1 and mouse DJ-1 were associated either with human or with mouse PSF, TH promoter activity inhibited by PSF was restored by human DJ-1 but not by mouse DJ-1. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays revealed that the complex of PSF with DJ-1 bound to the human but not the mouse TH gene promoter. These results suggest a novel species-specific transcriptional regulation of the TH promoter by DJ-1 and one of the mechanisms for no reduction of TH in DJ-1-knock-out mice.

  13. Perceiving emotions in human-human and human-animal interactions: Hemodynamic prefrontal activity (fNIRS) and empathic concern.

    PubMed

    Vanutelli, Maria Elide; Balconi, Michela

    2015-09-25

    In the last years social neuroscience research attempted to identify the neural networks underlying the human ability to perceive others' emotions, a core process in establishing meaningful social bonds. A large amount of papers arose and identified common and specific empathy-based networks with respect to stimulus type and task. Despite the great majority of studies focused on human-human contexts, we do not establish relations with only other humans, but also with non-human animals. The aim of the present work was to explore the brain mechanisms involved in empathic concern for people who interacts with both peers and other species. Participants have been assessed by functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) while viewing pictures depicting humans interacting with both other men and women (human-human condition: HH), or with dogs and cats (human-animal: HA). Results showed that aggressive HH interactions elicited greater prefrontal activity (PFC) than HA ones while, when considering HA interactions, friendly ones were related to higher cortical activity. Finally, oxy (O2Hb) and deoxyhemoglobin (HHb) increasing related to the processing of aggressive interactions positively correlated with different empathic measures, within more specific brain regions. Results were elucidated with respect to available evidence on emotion perception, empathic neural mechanisms and their functional meaning for human-animal contexts.

  14. Human Receptor Activation by Aroclor 1260, a Polychlorinated Biphenyl Mixture

    PubMed Central

    Wahlang, Banrida; Falkner, K. Cameron; Clair, Heather B.; Al-Eryani, Laila; Prough, Russell A.; States, J. Christopher; Coslo, Denise M.; Omiecinski, Curtis J.; Cave, Matthew C.

    2014-01-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are persistent environmental toxicants, present in 100% of U.S. adults and dose-dependently associated with obesity and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). PCBs are predicted to interact with receptors previously implicated in xenobiotic/energy metabolism and NAFLD. These receptors include the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), pregnane xenobiotic receptor (PXR), constitutive androstane receptor (CAR), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs), liver-X-receptor (LXRα), and farnesoid-X-receptor (FXR). This study evaluates Aroclor 1260, a PCB mixture with congener composition mimicking that of human adipose tissue, and selected congeners, as potential ligands for these receptors utilizing human hepatoma-derived (HepG2) and primate-derived (COS-1) cell lines, and primary human hepatocytes. Aroclor 1260 (20 μg/ml) activated AhR, and PCB 126, a minor component, was a potent inducer. Aroclor 1260 activated PXR in a simple concentration-dependent manner at concentrations ≥10 μg/ml. Among the congeners tested, PCBs 138, 149, 151, 174, 183, 187, and 196 activated PXR. Aroclor 1260 activated CAR2 and CAR3 variants at lower concentrations and antagonize CAR2 activation by the CAR agonist, CITCO, at higher concentrations (≥20 μg/ml). Additionally, Aroclor 1260 induced CYP2B6 in primary hepatocytes. At subtoxic doses, Aroclor 1260 did not activate LXR or FXR and had no effect on LXR- or FXR-dependent induction by the agonists T0901317 or GW4064, respectively. Aroclor 1260 (20 μg/ml) suppressed PPARα activation by the agonist nafenopin, although none of the congeners tested demonstrated significant inhibition. The results suggest that Aroclor 1260 is a human AhR, PXR and CAR3 agonist, a mixed agonist/antagonist for CAR2, and an antagonist for human PPARα. PMID:24812009

  15. Parasite zoonoses and wildlife: One Health, spillover and human activity.

    PubMed

    Thompson, R C Andrew

    2013-11-01

    This review examines parasite zoonoses and wildlife in the context of the One Health triad that encompasses humans, domestic animals, wildlife and the changing ecosystems in which they live. Human (anthropogenic) activities influence the flow of all parasite infections within the One Health triad and the nature and impact of resulting spillover events are examined. Examples of spillover from wildlife to humans and/or domestic animals, and vice versa, are discussed, as well as emerging issues, particularly the need for parasite surveillance of wildlife populations. Emphasis is given to Trypanosoma cruzi and related species in Australian wildlife, Trichinella, Echinococcus, Giardia, Baylisascaris, Toxoplasma and Leishmania.

  16. Bacterial expression of human kynurenine 3-monooxygenase: solubility, activity, purification.

    PubMed

    Wilson, K; Mole, D J; Binnie, M; Homer, N Z M; Zheng, X; Yard, B A; Iredale, J P; Auer, M; Webster, S P

    2014-03-01

    Kynurenine 3-monooxygenase (KMO) is an enzyme central to the kynurenine pathway of tryptophan metabolism. KMO has been implicated as a therapeutic target in several disease states, including Huntington's disease. Recombinant human KMO protein production is challenging due to the presence of transmembrane domains, which localise KMO to the outer mitochondrial membrane and render KMO insoluble in many in vitro expression systems. Efficient bacterial expression of human KMO would accelerate drug development of KMO inhibitors but until now this has not been achieved. Here we report the first successful bacterial (Escherichia coli) expression of active FLAG™-tagged human KMO enzyme expressed in the soluble fraction and progress towards its purification.

  17. CRISPR RNA-guided activation of endogenous human genes.

    PubMed

    Maeder, Morgan L; Linder, Samantha J; Cascio, Vincent M; Fu, Yanfang; Ho, Quan H; Joung, J Keith

    2013-10-01

    Short guide RNAs (gRNAs) can direct catalytically inactive CRISPR-associated 9 nuclease (dCas9) to repress endogenous genes in bacteria and human cells. Here we show that single or multiple gRNAs can direct dCas9 fused to a VP64 transcriptional activation domain to increase expression of endogenous human genes. This proof-of-principle work shows that clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)-Cas systems can target heterologous effector domains to endogenous sites in human cells.

  18. Recombinant HCMV UL128 expression and functional identification of PBMC-attracting activity in vitro.

    PubMed

    Gao, Huihui; Hui-Hui, Gao; Tao, Ran; Ran, Tao; Zheng, Qi; Qi, Zheng; Xu, Jun; Jun, Xu; Shang, Shiqiang; Shi-Qiang, Shang

    2013-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) has evolved several immune evasion strategies. One strategy is controlling the movement of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) by encoding homologues of chemokines. Our aim was to determine whether HCMV open reading frame (ORF) UL128 could encode a protein that attracts PBMCs like a β-chemokine. The recombinant UL128 protein was synthesized by construction of a stably transfected CHO-UL128 cell line, and a chemotaxis assay showed that UL128 was able to attract PBMCs with a potency equal to that of MIP-1α in vitro. We hypothesize that UL128 protein may act as a β-chemokine homologue in viral pathogenesis.

  19. Cercarial glycocalyx of Schistosoma mansoni activates human complement.

    PubMed Central

    Samuelson, J C; Caulfield, J P

    1986-01-01

    Human complement activation by cercariae and schistosomula of the human parasite Schistosoma mansoni was studied in vitro. Cercariae are composed of tails which are shed after infection of the host and bodies which transform into the larvae or schistosomula after infection. After incubation in fresh normal human serum (NHS), cercarial tails bound more anti-C3 antibodies than did cercarial bodies (CB), and the tails were rapidly lysed, while the attached CB remained intact. Complement activation by cercariae was dependent on the alternative pathway but was independent of antibody, as shown by C3 deposition by hypogammaglobulinemic human sera. By transmission microscopy, the fibrillar glycocalyx on both CB and tails was stained by NHS but not by heat-inactivated serum (HI-NHS). The glycocalyx was labeled with periodate and tritiated borohydride, and parasites were incubated in NHS and HI-NHS. After solubilization, the labeled glycocalyx on organisms incubated in NHS but not HI-NHS bound anti-C3 antibodies. Of the CB incubated with eserine sulfate to prevent transformation, 78% +/- 10% were dead after culture for 24 h in NHS. In contrast, 21% +/- 12% of the CB were dead after culture in HI-NHS. Schistosomula incubated in NHS bound 37% of the amount of anti-C3 antibodies bound by cercariae but were not killed by NHS. In conclusion, the cercarial glycocalyx activated human complement, and schistosomula were less susceptible to killing than cercariae because they had less glycocalyx and activated less complement. Images PMID:3940995

  20. Dipeptides Increase Functional Activity of Human Skin Fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Malinin, V V; Durnova, A O; Polyakova, V O; Kvetnoi, I M

    2015-05-01

    We analyzed the effect of dipeptide Glu-Trp and isovaleroyl-Glu-Trp in concentrations of 0.2, 2 and 20 μg/ml and Actovegin preparation on functional activity of human skin fibroblasts. Dipeptides, especially Glu-Trp, produce a stimulating effect on human skin fibroblasts and their effect is equivalent to that of Actovegin. Dipeptides stimulate cell renewal processes by activating synthesis of Ki-67 and reducing expression of caspase-9 and enhance antioxidant function of the cells by stimulating the expression of Hsp-90 and inducible NO-synthase. These findings suggest that dipeptides are promising candidates for preparations stimulating reparative processes.

  1. Production of Enzymatically Active Human Acetylcholinesterase in E. Coli

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-10-01

    AD-A282 703 lE1l1lm11I AD( CONTRACT NO: DAMD17-90-C-0107 TITLE: PRODUCTION OF ENZYMATICALLY ACTIVE HUMAN ACETYLCHOLINESTERASE IN E . COLI PRINCIPAL...FUNDING NUMBERS Production of Enzymatically Active Human Contract No. Acetylcholinesterase in E . coli DAMD17-90-C-0107 6. AUTHOR(S) M. Gorecki, Ph.D. and M...S493pMFL-52Ser - Run #1 37 Table 8: Summary of reconstitution and purification of rhAChE derived from E . coli S493pMFL-52Ser - Run #2 38 Table 9

  2. The impacts of local human activities on the Antarctic environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tin, T.; Fleming, Z. L.; Hughes, K. A.; Ainley, D. G.; Convey, P.; Moreno, C. A.; Pfeiffer, S.; Scott, J.; Snape, I.

    2009-04-01

    An overview of a recently published review of the scientific literature from the past decade on the impacts of human activities on the Antarctic environment is presented. An assessment of the cumulative effects of scientists and accompanying base construction, tourists and fishery activities in Antarctica is timely given a decade since the Protocol on Environmental Protection to the Antarctic Treaty came into force in 1998 and the increasing attention given to and human presence in Antarctica during this 2007-2009 IPY. A range of impacts has been identified at a variety of spatial and temporal scales. Chemical contamination and sewage disposal on the continent have been found to be long-lived, with contemporary sewage management practices at many coastal stations insufficient to prevent local contamination. Human activities, particularly construction and transport, have affected Antarctic flora and fauna and a small number of non-indigenous plant and animal species has become established on some of the Antarctic Peninsula and sub Antarctic islands. There is little indication of recovery of overexploited fish stocks, and ramifications of fishing activity on bycatch species and the ecosystem could also be far-reaching. The Antarctic Treaty System and its instruments, in particular the Convention for the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources (CCAMLR) and the Environmental Protocol, provide a framework within which management of human activities take place. In order to ensure comprehensive protection of the Antarctic environment, including its intrinsic, wilderness and scientific values in the face of the continuing expansion of human activities in Antarctica, a more effective implementation of a wide range of measures is essential. These include effective environmental impact assessments, long-term monitoring, mitigation measures for non-indigenous species, ecosystem-based management of living resources, and increased regulation of National Antarctic

  3. Pupil diameter covaries with BOLD activity in human locus coeruleus.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Peter R; O'Connell, Redmond G; O'Sullivan, Michael; Robertson, Ian H; Balsters, Joshua H

    2014-08-01

    The locus coeruleus-noradrenergic (LC-NA) neuromodulatory system has been implicated in a broad array of cognitive processes, yet scope for investigating this system's function in humans is currently limited by an absence of reliable non-invasive measures of LC activity. Although pupil diameter has been employed as a proxy measure of LC activity in numerous studies, empirical evidence for a relationship between the two is lacking. In the present study, we sought to rigorously probe the relationship between pupil diameter and BOLD activity localized to the human LC. Simultaneous pupillometry and fMRI revealed a relationship between continuous pupil diameter and BOLD activity in a dorsal pontine cluster overlapping with the LC, as localized via neuromelanin-sensitive structural imaging and an LC atlas. This relationship was present both at rest and during performance of a two-stimulus oddball task, with and without spatial smoothing of the fMRI data, and survived retrospective image correction for physiological noise. Furthermore, the spatial extent of this pupil/LC relationship guided a volume-of-interest analysis in which we provide the first demonstration in humans of a fundamental characteristic of animal LC activity: phasic modulation by oddball stimulus relevance. Taken together, these findings highlight the potential for utilizing pupil diameter to achieve a more comprehensive understanding of the role of the LC-NA system in human cognition.

  4. Chicken cathelicidin-2-derived peptides with enhanced immunomodulatory and antibacterial activities against biological warfare agents.

    PubMed

    Molhoek, E Margo; van Dijk, Albert; Veldhuizen, Edwin J A; Dijk-Knijnenburg, Helma; Mars-Groenendijk, Roos H; Boele, Linda C L; Kaman-van Zanten, Wendy E; Haagsman, Henk P; Bikker, Floris J

    2010-09-01

    Host defence peptides (HDPs) are considered to be excellent candidates for the development of novel therapeutic agents. Recently, it was demonstrated that the peptide C1-15, an N-terminal segment of chicken HDP cathelicidin-2, exhibits potent antibacterial activity while lacking cytotoxicity towards eukaryotic cells. In the present study, we report that C1-15 is active against bacteria such as Bacillus anthracis and Yersinia pestis that may potentially be used by bioterrorists. Substitution of single and multiple phenylalanine (Phe) residues to tryptophan (Trp) in C1-15 resulted in variants with improved antibacterial activity against B. anthracis and Y. pestis as well as decreased salt sensitivity. In addition, these peptides exhibited enhanced neutralisation of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced release of pro-inflammatory cytokines in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). The antibacterial and LPS-neutralising activities of these C1-15-derived peptides are exerted at concentrations far below the concentrations that are toxic to human PBMCs. Taken together, we show that Phe-->Trp substitutions in C1-15 variants enhances the antibacterial and LPS-neutralising activities against pathogenic bacteria, including those that may potentially be used as biological warfare agents.

  5. Human activity recognition based on Evolving Fuzzy Systems.

    PubMed

    Iglesias, Jose Antonio; Angelov, Plamen; Ledezma, Agapito; Sanchis, Araceli

    2010-10-01

    Environments equipped with intelligent sensors can be of much help if they can recognize the actions or activities of their users. If this activity recognition is done automatically, it can be very useful for different tasks such as future action prediction, remote health monitoring, or interventions. Although there are several approaches for recognizing activities, most of them do not consider the changes in how a human performs a specific activity. We present an automated approach to recognize daily activities from the sensor readings of an intelligent home environment. However, as the way to perform an activity is usually not fixed but it changes and evolves, we propose an activity recognition method based on Evolving Fuzzy Systems.

  6. [Chromatographic separation of activated proteases from human plasma].

    PubMed

    Lehmann, B; Taucher, M; Kühne, H; Scheuch, D W

    1988-01-01

    After separation of aceton and dextran sulfate activated human plasma by column chromatography on DEAE-cellulose three esterolytically and amidolytically active fractions, respectively, were obtained, which were assigned to the following species: plasma kallikrein (PK), PK.alpha-macroglobulin.HMW-Kininogen. Their percentage in the whole activity is variable. The proportion of free PK is low (0.11). For characterization of the products we studied inhibition by different polyvalent inhibitors. The Michaelis constant (Km) with p-toluene-sulfonyl-L-arginine methyl ester (TAME) were determined. For simulation of in vivo conditions dextran sulfate activated plasma was inactivated at 37 degrees C. The residual activity and the spontaneous activity in plasma from patients with shock are produced by different active protease inhibitor complexes.

  7. Implications of Special Regions to Conducting Human Activities on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rummel, J. D.; Barlow, N. G.; Beaty, D. W.; Jones, M. A.; Hipkin, V.

    2014-12-01

    A MEPAG Science Analysis Group (SAG) has undertaken an analysis of Special Regions (SR) on Mars—regions where indigenous martian life could exist or where Earth microbes, if introduced, could survive and reproduce. The SR-SAG has considered the impact of SR on future human activities on the martian surface. Human exploration requires access to in-situ resources, some of which may be found in SR. Water and oxygen for ISRU are found in the atmosphere, surface/near-surface ice, hydrated minerals, and perchlorates. Water ice is most abundant at latitudes poleward of ~60 degrees, but polar darkness, cold temperatures, and CO2 degassing present hazards to human operations in these regions. Accessible water is more limited toward the equator, though temperature and solar energy conditions become more favorable. The possible presence of liquid water in Recurring Slope Lineae and active gullies leads to their treatment as SR. Fuel for surface operations and propellants for crew ascent could be manufactured from the martian atmosphere and surface materials, but dust in the atmosphere may clog ISRU equipment and perchlorate is toxic to humans. Power may be produced from solar or nuclear energy. Reliance on solar energy limits operations to the equatorial zone where easily accessible ice resources are limited. Nuclear power allows surface operations at a range of latitudes, but waste heat could convert some non-SR into SR. Radiation shielding is necessary for long-term human operations on Mars and could be obtained by deposition of regolith or by water storage in tanks or as ice around habitats, or the use of underground habitats. SR-SAG recognizes that it will be impossible for all human-associated processes and operations to be conducted within entirely closed systems. Protocols need to be established so (1) human missions to Mars will not contaminate SR nor be contaminated by materials from them, and (2) human activities on Mars will avoid converting areas into SR.

  8. Human ECG signal parameters estimation during controlled physical activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maciejewski, Marcin; Surtel, Wojciech; Dzida, Grzegorz

    2015-09-01

    ECG signal parameters are commonly used indicators of human health condition. In most cases the patient should remain stationary during the examination to decrease the influence of muscle artifacts. During physical activity, the noise level increases significantly. The ECG signals were acquired during controlled physical activity on a stationary bicycle and during rest. Afterwards, the signals were processed using a method based on Pan-Tompkins algorithms to estimate their parameters and to test the method.

  9. [Phosphonate esterase activity in human serum (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Labadie, M; Laplaud, P M; Lachatre, G; Breton, J C

    1980-02-01

    A simple methodology for the spectrophotometric assay of phosphonate esterase activity in human serum samples is described, featuring incubation at 30 degrees C in a medium containing p-nitrophenol and phenyl-phosphonic acid ester. Reproducibility of the method as well a mean values in normal patients vs age and sex are reported. Serum activity appears to be increased almost exclusively during pregnancy or administration of estrogenic drugs (as oral contraceptives or in prostate neoplasms).

  10. Bronchorelaxation of the human bronchi by CFTR activators.

    PubMed

    Norez, Caroline; Jayle, Christophe; Becq, Frédéric; Vandebrouck, Clarisse

    2014-02-01

    The airway functions are profoundly affected in many diseases including asthma, COPD and cystic fibrosis (CF). CF the most common lethal autosomal recessive genetic disease is caused by mutations of the CFTR (Cystic Fibrosis transmembrane Conductance Regulator) gene, which normally encodes a multifunctional and integral membrane cAMP regulated and ATP gated Cl(-) channel expressed in airway epithelial cells. Using human lung tissues obtained from patients undergoing surgery for lung cancer, we demonstrated that CFTR participates in bronchorelaxation. Using human bronchial smooth muscle cells (HBSMC), we applied iodide influx assay to analyze the CFTR-dependent ionic transport and immunofluorescence technique to localize CFTR proteins. Moreover, the relaxation was studied in isolated human bronchial segments after pre-contraction with carbachol to determine the implication of CFTR in bronchodilation. We found in HBSMC that the pharmacology and regulation of CFTR is similar to that of its epithelial counterpart both for activation (using forskolin/genistein or a benzo[c]quinolizinium derivative) and for inhibition (CFTR(inh)-172 and GPinh5a). With human bronchial rings, we observed that whatever the compound used including salbutamol, the activation of muscular CFTR leads to a bronchodilation after constriction with carbachol. Altogether, these observations revealed that CFTR in the human airways is expressed in bronchial smooth muscle cells and can be pharmacologically manipulated leading to the hypothesis that this ionic channel could contribute to bronchodilation in human.

  11. Recombinant Human Peptidoglycan Recognition Proteins Reveal Antichlamydial Activity.

    PubMed

    Bobrovsky, Pavel; Manuvera, Valentin; Polina, Nadezhda; Podgorny, Oleg; Prusakov, Kirill; Govorun, Vadim; Lazarev, Vassili

    2016-07-01

    Peptidoglycan recognition proteins (PGLYRPs) are innate immune components that recognize the peptidoglycan and lipopolysaccharides of bacteria and exhibit antibacterial activity. Recently, the obligate intracellular parasite Chlamydia trachomatis was shown to have peptidoglycan. However, the antichlamydial activity of PGLYRPs has not yet been demonstrated. The aim of our study was to test whether PGLYRPs exhibit antibacterial activity against C. trachomatis Thus, we cloned the regions containing the human Pglyrp1, Pglyrp2, Pglyrp3, and Pglyrp4 genes for subsequent expression in human cell lines. We obtained stable HeLa cell lines that secrete recombinant human PGLYRPs into culture medium. We also generated purified recombinant PGLYRP1, -2, and -4 and confirmed their activities against Gram-positive (Bacillus subtilis) and Gram-negative (Escherichia coli) bacteria. Furthermore, we examined the activities of recombinant PGLYRPs against C. trachomatis and determined their MICs. We also observed a decrease in the infectious ability of chlamydial elementary bodies in the next generation after a single exposure to PGLYRPs. Finally, we demonstrated that PGLYRPs attach to C. trachomatis elementary bodies and activate the expression of the chlamydial two-component stress response system. Thus, PGLYRPs inhibit the development of chlamydial infection.

  12. Recombinant Human Peptidoglycan Recognition Proteins Reveal Antichlamydial Activity

    PubMed Central

    Manuvera, Valentin; Polina, Nadezhda; Podgorny, Oleg; Prusakov, Kirill; Govorun, Vadim; Lazarev, Vassili

    2016-01-01

    Peptidoglycan recognition proteins (PGLYRPs) are innate immune components that recognize the peptidoglycan and lipopolysaccharides of bacteria and exhibit antibacterial activity. Recently, the obligate intracellular parasite Chlamydia trachomatis was shown to have peptidoglycan. However, the antichlamydial activity of PGLYRPs has not yet been demonstrated. The aim of our study was to test whether PGLYRPs exhibit antibacterial activity against C. trachomatis. Thus, we cloned the regions containing the human Pglyrp1, Pglyrp2, Pglyrp3, and Pglyrp4 genes for subsequent expression in human cell lines. We obtained stable HeLa cell lines that secrete recombinant human PGLYRPs into culture medium. We also generated purified recombinant PGLYRP1, -2, and -4 and confirmed their activities against Gram-positive (Bacillus subtilis) and Gram-negative (Escherichia coli) bacteria. Furthermore, we examined the activities of recombinant PGLYRPs against C. trachomatis and determined their MICs. We also observed a decrease in the infectious ability of chlamydial elementary bodies in the next generation after a single exposure to PGLYRPs. Finally, we demonstrated that PGLYRPs attach to C. trachomatis elementary bodies and activate the expression of the chlamydial two-component stress response system. Thus, PGLYRPs inhibit the development of chlamydial infection. PMID:27160295

  13. Beta2-Adrenoceptor Stimulation Suppresses TLR9-Dependent IFNA1 Secretion in Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells

    PubMed Central

    Weisheit, Christina; Knüfermann, Pascal; Baumgarten, Georg; Hoeft, Andreas; Poth, Jens M.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction IFNA1 (interferon alpha) is a key cytokine regulating the activity of numerous immune cells. Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) as natural interferon-producing cells play critical roles as sensors of pathogens and link innate to adaptive immunity. CpG motifs within DNA sequences activating toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9) are the main stimuli eliciting IFNA1 secretion from pDCs. Adrenergic substances are capable of differentially modulating the response from various immune cells. Hence, the aim of this study was to examine how adrenoceptor stimulation influences TLR9-induced IFNA1 secretion from human pDCs. Methods PBMCs generated from human whole blood and pDCs enriched from buffy coats were stimulated with LPS and CpG-ODN 2336 in the presence or absence of epinephrine and different adrenoceptor antagonists. Secretion of TNF and IFNA1 was measured by ELISA. Flow cytometry was used to determine efficacy of pDC enrichment and adrenoceptor expression of PBMC subsets. The influence of modified IFNA1 secretion on NK cell activity was evaluated using a colorimetric tumor cell lysis assay. Results TLR9-induced IFNA1 secretion as well as TLR4-induced TNF secretion from PBMCs was dose-dependently attenuated by coincubation with epinephrine. Combination with different specific adrenoceptor antagonists revealed that this effect was mediated by the adrenoceptor β2 (ADRB2). Since flow cytometric analysis could exclude the presence of ADRB2 on pDCs, highly enriched pDCs lacked any visible impact of adrenoceptor stimulation on TLR9-induced IFNA1 release. Combination of pDCs with PBMCs restored the effect, even when they were separated by a permeable membrane. Suppression of TLR9-mediated IFNA1 secretion from PBMCs by adrenoceptor stimulation reduced the lytic activity of NK cells on K562 tumor cells. Conclusion We provide insights into the underlying mechanisms of the interrelation between immune responses and pharmacological agents widely used in clinical practice

  14. Human brain activity with functional NIR optical imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Qingming

    2001-08-01

    In this paper we reviewed the applications of functional near infrared optical imager in human brain activity. Optical imaging results of brain activity, including memory for new association, emotional thinking, mental arithmetic, pattern recognition ' where's Waldo?, occipital cortex in visual stimulation, and motor cortex in finger tapping, are demonstrated. It is shown that the NIR optical method opens up new fields of study of the human population, in adults under conditions of simulated or real stress that may have important effects upon functional performance. It makes practical and affordable for large populations the complex technology of measuring brain function. It is portable and low cost. In cognitive tasks subjects could report orally. The temporal resolution could be millisecond or less in theory. NIR method will have good prospects in exploring human brain secret.

  15. PIXE and neutron activation methods in human hair material analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bǎdicǎ, T.; Ciortea, C.; Cojocaru, V.; Ivaşcu, M.; Petrovici, A.; Popa, A.; Popescu, I.; Sǎlǎgean, M.; Spiridon, S.

    1984-04-01

    In order to compare some of the nuclear methods in human hair material analysis, proton induced X-ray excitation and variant techniques of neutron activation analysis have been used. The elemental concentrations are compared with the IAEA-Vienna certified values. The efficiency and reliability of the methods used are briefly discussed.

  16. T helper cell activation and human retroviral pathogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Copeland, K F; Heeney, J L

    1996-01-01

    T helper (Th) cells are of central importance in regulating many critical immune effector mechanisms. The profile of cytokines produced by Th cells correlates with the type of effector cells induced during the immune response to foreign antigen. Th1 cells induce the cell-mediated immune response, while Th2 cells drive antibody production. Th cells are the preferential targets of human retroviruses. Infections with human T-cell leukemia virus (HTLV) or human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) result in the expansion of Th cells by the action of HTLV (adult T-cell leukemia) or the progressive loss of T cells by the action of HIV (AIDS). Both retrovirus infections impart a high-level activation state in the host immune cells as well as systemically. However, diverging responses to this activation state have contrasting effects on the Th-cell population. In HIV infection, Th-cell loss has been attributed to several mechanisms, including a selective elimination of cells by apoptosis. The induction of apoptosis in HIV infection is complex, with many different pathways able to induce cell death. In contrast, infection of Th cells with HTLV-1 affords the cell a protective advantage against apoptosis. This advantage may allow the cell to escape immune surveillance, providing the opportunity for the development of Th-cell cancer. In this review, we will discuss the impact of Th-cell activation and general immune activation on human retrovirus expression with a focus upon Th-cell function and the progression to disease. PMID:8987361

  17. Spatial Effects of Sound on Visual Activity in Human Newborns.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mendelson, Morton J.; Haith, Marshall M.

    This study investigated the possibility of a functional relation between the auditory and visual systems in the human newborn beyond reflexive organization. Visual activity was monitored in 16 newborns through the use of infrared corneal reflection video tape recording. Infants were observed in total darkness and while monocularly viewing a…

  18. Linguistic Human Rights Discourse in Deaf Community Activism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, Joseph J.

    2015-01-01

    The past three decades of activism for linguistic human rights (Skutnabb-Kangas 2000) have witnessed examples of language planning by various national and supranational actors in national and international spaces, with an exchange of ideas and strategies employed by national, regional, and worldwide organizations. In many countries a key goal of…

  19. [Human cloning in the activities of the European Union].

    PubMed

    Mik, C

    2001-01-01

    The European Union has been concerned with human cloning since the late 80. It resulted from inclusion of biotechnology into the sphere of European integration. The attitude of the European Union in the domain of human cloning was shaped, in principle in the second part of the 90. As the Community law stands at present, the European Union is not able to regulate all aspects of the cloning of human beings. It has no general power to decide in that sphere, especially, as far as bioethic aspects are concerned. The cloning of human beings in the European Union is understood as a process aiming at producing new human being, genetically identical with another live or dead human being. Thus the notion of human cloning is reduced to reproductive cloning. Three instruments are at the disposal of the European Union in the domain of human cloning. The first is prohibition of reproductive cloning as a general principle of Community law. However, that principle is not the result of judicial activity of the European Court of Justice (as general principles normally are), but the logical consequence of views formally expressed by the European Parliament, the Council of the Europe as well as the Commission. The principle was finally included in the Charter of fundamental rights of the European Union. The second instrument is an imperative prohibition of patent granting to biotechnological inventions on human reproductive cloning. Last, but not least, the Union applies a prohibition of financing scientific research connected with human cloning from the budget of the European Communities within the V Framework Programme in the field of research and technological development.

  20. DNA helicase activity in purified human RECQL4 protein.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Takahiro; Kohno, Toshiyuki; Ishimi, Yukio

    2009-09-01

    Human RECQL4 protein was expressed in insect cells using a baculovirus protein expression system and it was purified to near homogeneity. The protein sedimented at a position between catalase (230 kDa) and ferritin (440 kDa) in glycerol gradient centrifugation, suggesting that it forms homo-multimers. Activity to displace annealed 17-mer oligonucleotide in the presence of ATP was co-sedimented with hRECQL4 protein. In ion-exchange chromatography, both DNA helicase activity and single-stranded DNA-dependent ATPase activity were co-eluted with hRECQL4 protein. The requirements of ATP and Mg for the helicase activity were different from those for the ATPase activity. The data suggest that the helicase migrates on single-stranded DNA in a 3'-5' direction. These results suggest that the hRECQL4 protein exhibits DNA helicase activity.

  1. Antioxidant activity of olive polyphenols in humans: a review.

    PubMed

    Raederstorff, Daniel

    2009-05-01

    In vitro and animal studies show that polyphenols from olives have potent antioxidant activities; 50 % of the phenolic compounds contained in olives and virgin olive oil are hydroxytyrosol and derivatives thereof. Hydroxytyrosol is the major olive polyphenol consumed and well absorbed in humans. It is considered to have the highest antioxidant potency compared to the other olive polyphenols. Review of the human intervention studies showed that olive polyphenols decreased the levels of oxidized-LDL in plasma and positively affected several biomarkers of oxidative damage. The antioxidant effects of olive polyphenols on low-density lipoprotein (LDL) oxidation are observed after a dietary intake of about 10 mg per day. The overall evidence from in vitro assays, and animal and human studies support the antioxidant effect of olive polyphenols. However, further larger human studies are needed to clarify the effect of olive polyphenols on markers of oxidative stress, particularly DNA damage and plasma isoprostane levels.

  2. Red wine activates plasma membrane redox system in human erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Tedesco, Idolo; Moccia, Stefania; Volpe, Silvestro; Alfieri, Giovanna; Strollo, Daniela; Bilotto, Stefania; Spagnuolo, Carmela; Di Renzo, Massimo; Aquino, Rita P; Russo, Gian Luigi

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, we report that polyphenols present in red wine obtained by a controlled microvinification process are able to protect human erythrocytes from oxidative stress and to activate Plasma Membrane Redox System (PMRS). Human plasma obtained from healthy subjects was incubated in the presence of whole red wine at a concentration corresponding to 9.13-73 μg/ml gallic acid equivalents to verify the capacity to protect against hypochlorous acid (HOCl)-induced plasma oxidation and to minimize chloramine formation. Red wine reduced hemolysis and chloramine formation induced by HOCl of 40 and 35%, respectively. PMRS present on human erythrocytes transfers electrons from intracellular molecules to extracellular electron acceptors. We demonstrated that whole red wine activated PMRS activity in human erythrocytes isolated from donors in a dose-dependent manner with a maximum at about 70-100 μg/ml gallic acid equivalents. We also showed that red wine increased glutathione (GSH) levels and erythrocytic antioxidant capacity, measured by 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) quenching assay. Furthermore, we reported that GSH played a crucial role in regulating PMRS activity in erythrocytes. In fact, the effect of iodoacetamide, an alkylating agent that induces depletion of intracellular GSH, was completely counteracted by red wine. Bioactive compounds present in red wine, such as gallic acid, resveratrol, catechin, and quercetin were unable to activate PMRS when tested at the concentrations normally present in aged red wines. On the contrary, the increase of PMRS activity was associated with the anthocyanin fraction, suggesting the capacity of this class of compounds to positively modulate PMRS enzymatic activity.

  3. Human Monoclonal Antibodies against Clostridium difficile Toxins A and B Inhibit Inflammatory and Histologic Responses to the Toxins in Human Colon and Peripheral Blood Monocytes

    PubMed Central

    Koon, Hon Wai; Shih, David Q.; Hing, Tressia C.; Yoo, Jun Hwan; Ho, Samantha; Chen, Xinhua; Kelly, Ciarán P.; Targan, Stephan R.

    2013-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is a common and debilitating nosocomial infection with high morbidity and mortality. C. difficile mediates diarrhea and colitis by releasing two toxins, toxin A and toxin B. Since both toxins stimulate proinflammatory signaling pathways in human colonocytes and both are involved in the pathophysiology of CDI, neutralization of toxin A and B activities may represent an important therapeutic approach against CDI. Recent studies indicated that human monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against toxins A and B reduce their cytotoxic and secretory activities and prevent CDI in hamsters. Moreover, anti-toxin A and anti-toxin B MAbs together with antibiotics also effectively reduced recurrent CDI in humans. However, whether these MAbs neutralize toxin A- and toxin B-associated immune responses in human colonic mucosa or human peripheral blood monocyte cells (PBMCs) has never been examined. We used fresh human colonic biopsy specimens and peripheral blood monocytes to evaluate the effects of these antibodies against toxin A- and B-associated cytokine release, proinflammatory signaling, and histologic damage. Incubation of anti-toxin A (MK3415) or anti-toxin B (MK6072) MAbs with human PBMCs significantly inhibited toxin A- and toxin B-mediated tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) expression. MK3415 and MK6072 also diminished toxin A- and toxin B-mediated NF-κB p65 phosphorylation in human monocytes, respectively, and significantly reduced toxin A- and B-induced TNF-α and IL-1β expression as well as histologic damage in human colonic explants. Our results underline the effectiveness of MK3415 and MK6072 in blocking C. difficile toxin A- and toxin B-mediated inflammatory responses and histologic damage. PMID:23629713

  4. Human Neutrophil-Mediated Nonoxidative Antifungal Activity against Cryptococcus neoformans

    PubMed Central

    Mambula, Salamatu S.; Simons, Elizabeth R.; Hastey, Ryan; Selsted, Michael E.; Levitz, Stuart M.

    2000-01-01

    It has long been appreciated that polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) kill Cryptococcus neoformans, at least in part via generation of fungicidal oxidants. The aim of this study was to examine the contribution of nonoxidative mechanisms to the inhibition and killing of C. neoformans. Treatment of human PMN with inhibitors and scavengers of respiratory burst oxidants only partially reversed anticryptococcal activity, suggesting that both oxidative and nonoxidative mechanisms were operative. To define the mediators of nonoxidative anticryptococcal activity, PMN were fractionated into cytoplasmic, primary (azurophil) granule, and secondary (specific) granule fractions. Incubation of C. neoformans with these fractions for 18 h resulted in percents inhibition of growth of 67.4 ± 3.4, 84.6 ± 4.4, and 29.2 ± 10.5 (mean ± standard error, n = 3), respectively. Anticryptococcal activity of the cytoplasmic fraction was abrogated by zinc and depletion of calprotectin. Antifungal activity of the primary granules was significantly reduced by pronase treatment, boiling, high ionic strength, and magnesium but not calcium. Fractionation of the primary granules by reverse phase high-pressure liquid chromatography on a C4 column over an acetonitrile gradient revealed multiple peaks with anticryptococcal activity. Of these, peaks 1 and 6 had substantial fungistatic and fungicidal activity. Peak 1 was identified by acid-urea polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) and mass spectroscopy as human neutrophil proteins (defensins) 1 to 3. Analysis of peak 6 by sodium dodecyl sulfate-PAGE revealed multiple bands. Thus, human PMN have nonoxidative anticryptococcal activity residing principally in their cytoplasmic and primary granule fractions. Calprotectin mediates the cytoplasmic activity, whereas multiple proteins, including defensins, are responsible for activity of the primary granules. PMID:11035733

  5. Haplotype-environment interactions that regulate the human glutathione S-transferase P1 promoter.

    PubMed

    Cauchi, Stephane; Han, Weiguo; Kumar, Shalini V; Spivack, Simon D

    2006-06-15

    Phase II detoxification of carcinogens is reported to mediate some of the anticarcinogenesis effects of candidate chemopreventive agents. We explored the interaction between sequence variation in the GSTP1 gene promoter and candidate chemopreventive exposure in regulating human GSTP1 expression. Polymorphisms along 1.8 kb of the GSTP1 promoter were identified in leukocytes [peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC)] from 40 Caucasian subjects. Ten promoter polymorphisms (9 previously unreported) displayed strong linkage disequilibrium, yielding identification of three frequently observed haplotypes [HAP1 (43%), HAP2 (36%), and HAP3 (8%)]. Each haplotype was cloned into luciferase reporter constructs and transfected into normal human bronchial epithelial cells. Basal HAP3 reporter activity was significantly elevated (1.8-fold) but decreased to the same levels as HAP2 and HAP1 with increasing concentrations of sulforaphane, benzyl isothiocyanate (BITC), and epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG). To confirm native HAP3 functionality, we quantitated mRNA expression in uncultured PBMCs and in laser microdissected normal lung epithelial cells (MNLEC) from the same patients. Basal mRNA expression was higher in HAP3 individuals [1.8-fold (PBMC) and 4-fold (MNLEC) for HAP3 heterozygotes and 2.3-fold (PBMC), and 15-fold (MNLEC) for the HAP3 homozygote] than in the other genotypes. PBMC GSTP1 mRNA expression correlated to MNLEC expression (R2 = 0.77). After culture and in vitro exposure to sulforaphane, BITC, or EGCG, the elevated GSTP1 mRNA expression of PBMCs from HAP3 individuals decreased to common expression levels. Elevated HAP3 function was confirmed at the protein level in PBMCs (5-fold higher for HAP3 heterozygotes and 7.6-fold for the HAP3 homozygote). These data suggest a potentially protective GSTP1 promoter haplotype and unpredicted inhibitory chemopreventive agent-haplotype interactions.

  6. Cleavage and activation of human factor IX by serine proteases

    SciTech Connect

    Enfield, D.L.; Thompson, A.R.

    1984-10-01

    Human factor IX circulates as a single-chain glycoprotein. Upon activation in vitro, it is cleaved into disulfide-linked light and heavy chains and an activation peptide. After reduction of activated /sup 125/I-factor IX, the heavy and light chains are readily identified by gel electrophoresis. A direct, immunoradiometric assay for factor IXa was developed to assess activation of factor IX for proteases that cleaved it. The assay utilized radiolabeled antithrombin III with heparin to identify the active site and antibodies to distinguish factor IX. After cleavage of factor IX by factor XIa, factor VIIa-tissue thromboplastin complex, or the factor X-activating enzyme from Russell's viper venom, antithrombin III bound readily to factor IXa. Cleavage of /sup 125/I-factor IX by trypsin, chymotrypsin, and granulocyte elastase in the presence of calcium yielded major polypeptide fragments of the sizes of the factor XIa-generated light and heavy chains. When the immunoradiometric assay was used to assess trypsin-cleaved factor IX, the product bound antithrombin III, but not maximally. After digesting with insolubilized trypsin, clotting activity confirmed activation. In evaluating activation of factor IX, physical evidence of activation cleavages does not necessarily correlate with generation of an active site.

  7. Transcriptional Activation Domains of Human Heat Shock Factor 1 Recruit Human SWI/SNF

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, E. Kelly; Weirich, Christine S.; Guyon, Jeffrey R.; Sif, Saïd; Kingston, Robert E.

    2001-01-01

    Chromatin remodeling complexes such as SWI/SNF use the energy of ATP hydrolysis to remodel nucleosomal DNA and increase transcription of nucleosomal templates. Human heat shock factor one (hHSF1) is a tightly regulated activator that stimulates transcriptional initiation and elongation using different portions of its activation domains. Here we demonstrate that hHSF1 associates with BRG1, the ATPase subunit of human SWI/SNF (hSWI/SNF) at endogenous protein concentrations. We also show that hHSF1 activation domains recruit hSWI/SNF to a chromatin template in a purified system. Mutation of hHSF1 residues responsible for activation of transcriptional elongation has the most severe effect on recruitment of SWI/SNF and association of hHSF1 with BRG1, suggesting that recruitment of chromatin remodeling activity might play a role in stimulation of elongation. PMID:11486022

  8. MERTK as negative regulator of human T cell activation

    PubMed Central

    Cabezón, Raquel; Carrera-Silva, E. Antonio; Flórez-Grau, Georgina; Errasti, Andrea E.; Calderón-Gómez, Elisabeth; Lozano, Juan José; España, Carolina; Ricart, Elena; Panés, Julián; Rothlin, Carla Vanina; Benítez-Ribas, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis whether MERTK, which is up-regulated in human DCs treated with immunosuppressive agents, is directly involved in modulating T cell activation. MERTK is a member of the TAM family and contributes to regulating innate immune response to ACs by inhibiting DC activation in animal models. However, whether MERTK interacts directly with T cells has not been addressed. Here, we show that MERTK is highly expressed on dex-induced human tol-DCs and participates in their tolerogenic effect. Neutralization of MERTK in allogenic MLR, as well as autologous DC–T cell cultures, leads to increased T cell proliferation and IFN-γ production. Additionally, we identify a previously unrecognized noncell-autonomous regulatory function of MERTK expressed on DCs. Mer-Fc protein, used to mimic MERTK on DCs, suppresses naïve and antigen-specific memory T cell activation. This mechanism is mediated by the neutralization of the MERTK ligand PROS1. We find that MERTK and PROS1 are expressed in human T cells upon TCR activation and drive an autocrine proproliferative mechanism. Collectively, these results suggest that MERTK on DCs controls T cell activation and expansion through the competition for PROS1 interaction with MERTK in the T cells. In conclusion, this report identified MERTK as a potent suppressor of T cell response. PMID:25624460

  9. Activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{alpha} enhances fatty acid oxidation in human adipocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Joo-Young; Hashizaki, Hikari; Goto, Tsuyoshi; Sakamoto, Tomoya; Takahashi, Nobuyuki; Kawada, Teruo

    2011-04-22

    Highlights: {yields} PPAR{alpha} activation increased mRNA expression levels of adipocyte differentiation marker genes and GPDH activity in human adipocytes. {yields} PPAR{alpha} activation also increased insulin-dependent glucose uptake in human adipocytes. {yields} PPAR{alpha} activation did not affect lipid accumulation in human adipocytes. {yields} PPAR{alpha} activation increased fatty acid oxidation through induction of fatty acid oxidation-related genes in human adipocytes. -- Abstract: Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{alpha} (PPAR{alpha}) is a key regulator for maintaining whole-body energy balance. However, the physiological functions of PPAR{alpha} in adipocytes have been unclarified. We examined the functions of PPAR{alpha} using human multipotent adipose tissue-derived stem cells as a human adipocyte model. Activation of PPAR{alpha} by GW7647, a potent PPAR{alpha} agonist, increased the mRNA expression levels of adipocyte differentiation marker genes such as PPAR{gamma}, adipocyte-specific fatty acid-binding protein, and lipoprotein lipase and increased both GPDH activity and insulin-dependent glucose uptake level. The findings indicate that PPAR{alpha} activation stimulates adipocyte differentiation. However, lipid accumulation was not changed, which is usually observed when PPAR{gamma} is activated. On the other hand, PPAR{alpha} activation by GW7647 treatment induced the mRNA expression of fatty acid oxidation-related genes such as CPT-1B and AOX in a PPAR{alpha}-dependent manner. Moreover, PPAR{alpha} activation increased the production of CO{sub 2} and acid soluble metabolites, which are products of fatty acid oxidation, and increased oxygen consumption rate in human adipocytes. The data indicate that activation of PPAR{alpha} stimulates both adipocyte differentiation and fatty acid oxidation in human adipocytes, suggesting that PPAR{alpha} agonists could improve insulin resistance without lipid accumulation in adipocytes. The expected

  10. Human Activity Modeling: Toward A Pragmatic Integration of Activity Theory and Usage-Centered Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Constantine, Larry L.

    Human activity modeling is a systematic approach to organizing and representing the contextual aspects of tool use that is both well-grounded in an accepted theoretical framework and embedded within a proven design method. Activity theory provides the vocabulary and conceptual framework for understanding the human use of tools and other artifacts. Usage-centered design provides the methodological scaffolding for applying activity theory in practice. In this chapter, activity theory and usage-centered design are outlined and the connections between the two are highlighted. Simple extensions to the models of usage-centered design are introduced that together succinctly model the salient and most essential features of the activities within which tool use is embedded. Although not intended as a tutorial, examples of Activity Maps, Activity Profiles, and Participation Maps are provided.

  11. Human Temporal Cortical Single Neuron Activity during Language: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Ojemann, George A.

    2013-01-01

    Findings from recordings of human temporal cortical single neuron activity during several measures of language, including object naming and word reading are reviewed and related to changes in activity in the same neurons during recent verbal memory and verbal associative learning measures, in studies conducted during awake neurosurgery for the treatment of epilepsy. The proportion of neurons changing activity with language tasks was similar in either hemisphere. Dominant hemisphere activity was characterized by relative inhibition, some of which occurred during overt speech, possibly to block perception of one’s own voice. However, the majority seems to represent a dynamic network becoming active with verbal memory encoding and especially verbal learning, but inhibited during performance of overlearned language tasks. Individual neurons are involved in different networks for different aspects of language, including naming or reading and naming in different languages. The majority of the changes in activity were tonic sustained shifts in firing. Patterned phasic activity for specific language items was very infrequently recorded. Human single neuron recordings provide a unique perspective on the biologic substrate for language, for these findings are in contrast to many of the findings from other techniques for investigating this. PMID:24961418

  12. Seasonal variations in physical activity and implications for human health.

    PubMed

    Shephard, Roy J; Aoyagi, Yukitoshi

    2009-10-01

    This review explores the implications of seasonal changes in physical activity for fitness and human health. Photosensitivity and nutrient shortages mediate animal hibernation via the hypothalamus and changes in leptin and ghrelin concentrations. Opportunities for hunting and crop cultivation determine seasonal activity in under-developed human societies, but in developed societies temperature and rainfall are dominant influences, usually over-riding innate rhythms. Both questionnaire data and objective measurements show that many groups from children to the elderly increase their physical activity from winter to spring or summer. Measurements of maximal oxygen intake and muscle strength commonly show parallel seasonal changes. However, potential effects upon body mass and body fat may be counteracted by changes of food intake; subsistence agriculturists sometimes maintain or increase physical activity at the expense of a decrease in body mass. In developed societies, body fat commonly increases during the winter, with parallel changes in blood lipids, blood pressure and blood coagulability; moreover, these changes are not always fully reversed the following summer. Most developed societies show increased all-cause and cardiac mortalities in the winter. Health consequences of seasonal variations in physical activity including an increased vulnerability to cardiac catastrophe and a year-by-year increase in total body fat seem most likely if the average level of physical activity for the year is low. Public health recommendations should underline the importance of maintaining physical activity during adverse environmental conditions by adapting clothing, modifying behaviour and exploiting any available air-conditioned indoor facilities.

  13. Tax posttranslational modifications and interaction with calreticulin in MT-2 cells and human peripheral blood mononuclear cells of human T cell lymphotropic virus type-I-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis patients.

    PubMed

    Medina, Fernando; Quintremil, Sebastian; Alberti, Carolina; Barriga, Andres; Cartier, Luis; Puente, Javier; Ramírez, Eugenio; Ferreira, Arturo; Tanaka, Yuetsu; Valenzuela, Maria Antonieta

    2014-04-01

    The human retrovirus human T cell lymphotropic virus type-I (HTLV-1) is the etiologic agent of HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP). Axonal degeneration in HAM/TSP patients occurs without neuron infection, with the secreted viral Tax protein proposed to be involved. We previously found that Tax secreted into the culture medium of MT-2 cells (HTLV-1-infected cell line) produced neurite retraction in neuroblastoma cells differentiated to neuronal type. To assess the relevance of Tax posttranslational modifications on this effect, we addressed the question of whether Tax secreted by MT-2 cells and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of HTLV-1-infected subjects is modified. The interaction of Tax with calreticulin (CRT) that modulates intracellular Tax localization and secretion has been described. We studied Tax localization and modifications in MT-2 cells and its interaction with CRT. Intracellular Tax in MT-2 cells was assessed by flow cytometry, corresponding mainly to a 71-kDa protein followed by western blot. This protein reported as a chimera with gp21 viral protein-confirmed by mass spectrometry-showed no ubiquitination or SUMOylation. The Tax-CRT interaction was determined by confocal microscopy and coimmunoprecipitation. Extracellular Tax from HAM/TSP PBMCs is ubiquitinated according to western blot, and its interaction with CRT was shown by coimmunoprecipitation. A positive correlation between Tax and CRT secretion was observed in HAM/TSP PBMCs and asymptomatic carriers. For both proteins inhibitors and activators of secretion showed secretion through the endoplasmic reticulum-Golgi complex. Tax, present in PBMC culture medium, produced neurite retraction in differentiated neuroblastoma cells. These results suggest that Tax, whether ubiquitinated or not, is active for neurite retraction.

  14. Tax Posttranslational Modifications and Interaction with Calreticulin in MT-2 Cells and Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells of Human T Cell Lymphotropic Virus Type-I-Associated Myelopathy/Tropical Spastic Paraparesis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Medina, Fernando; Quintremil, Sebastian; Alberti, Carolina; Barriga, Andres; Cartier, Luis; Puente, Javier; Ramírez, Eugenio; Ferreira, Arturo; Tanaka, Yuetsu

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The human retrovirus human T cell lymphotropic virus type-I (HTLV-1) is the etiologic agent of HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP). Axonal degeneration in HAM/TSP patients occurs without neuron infection, with the secreted viral Tax protein proposed to be involved. We previously found that Tax secreted into the culture medium of MT-2 cells (HTLV-1-infected cell line) produced neurite retraction in neuroblastoma cells differentiated to neuronal type. To assess the relevance of Tax posttranslational modifications on this effect, we addressed the question of whether Tax secreted by MT-2 cells and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of HTLV-1-infected subjects is modified. The interaction of Tax with calreticulin (CRT) that modulates intracellular Tax localization and secretion has been described. We studied Tax localization and modifications in MT-2 cells and its interaction with CRT. Intracellular Tax in MT-2 cells was assessed by flow cytometry, corresponding mainly to a 71-kDa protein followed by western blot. This protein reported as a chimera with gp21 viral protein—confirmed by mass spectrometry—showed no ubiquitination or SUMOylation. The Tax–CRT interaction was determined by confocal microscopy and coimmunoprecipitation. Extracellular Tax from HAM/TSP PBMCs is ubiquitinated according to western blot, and its interaction with CRT was shown by coimmunoprecipitation. A positive correlation between Tax and CRT secretion was observed in HAM/TSP PBMCs and asymptomatic carriers. For both proteins inhibitors and activators of secretion showed secretion through the endoplasmic reticulum–Golgi complex. Tax, present in PBMC culture medium, produced neurite retraction in differentiated neuroblastoma cells. These results suggest that Tax, whether ubiquitinated or not, is active for neurite retraction. PMID:24321043

  15. Impact of human activities on the ecology of nontuberculous mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    Falkinham, Joseph O

    2010-06-01

    Nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are environmental opportunistic pathogens of humans and animals. They are found in a wide variety of habitats to which humans are exposed, including drinking water distribution systems and household water and plumbing. In that regard, they are distinct from their obligate pathogenic relatives, the members of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex. Owing to the presence of NTM in the human environment, human activities have had direct impacts on their ecology and thereby their epidemiology. NTM are oligotrophic, able to grow at low organic matter concentrations and over a wide range of temperatures, and even at low oxygen concentrations. Thus, NTM are normal inhabitants of natural waters and drinking waters. Discovery of the presence of NTM-polluted soils is not surprising in light of the ability of NTM to degrade a variety of hydrocarbon pollutants. A major human activity selecting for the growth and predominance of mycobacteria in habitats is disinfection. In comparison to other bacteria, NTM are disinfectant, heavy metal and antibiotic resistant. Therefore, the use of any antimicrobial agent selects for mycobacteria. Use of disinfectant in drinking water treatment selects for mycobacteria that can grow and come to proliferate in drinking water distribution systems in the absence of disinfectant-sensitive competing microorganisms. NTM selection may also occur as a consequence of antibiotics in drinking water sources.

  16. Natural OX40L expressed on human T cell leukemia virus type-I-immortalized T cell lines interferes with infection of activated peripheral blood mononuclear cells by CCR5-utilizing human immunodeficiency virus

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background OX40 ligand (OX40L) co-stimulates and differentiates T cells via ligation of OX40 that is transiently induced on T cells upon activation, resulting in prolonged T cell survival and enhanced cytokine production by T cells. This view has led to the targeting of OX40 as a strategy to boost antigen specific T cells in the context of vaccination. In addition, the ligation of OX40 has also been shown to inhibit infection by CCR5-utilizing (R5) but not CXCR4-utilizing (X4) human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) via enhancement of production of CCR5-binding β-chemokines. It was reasoned that human T cell leukemia virus type-I (HTLV-1) immortalized T cell lines that express high levels of OX40L could serve as an unique source of physiologically functional OX40L. The fact that HTLV-1+ T cell lines simultaneously also express high levels of OX40 suggested a potential limitation. Results Results of our studies showed that HTLV-1+ T cell lines bound exogenous OX40 but not OX40L, indicating that HTLV-1+ T cell lines express an active form of OX40L but an inactive form of OX40. Anti-OX40 non-blocking monoclonal antibody (mAb), but not blocking mAb, stained HTLV-1+ T cell lines, suggesting that the OX40 might be saturated with endogenous OX40L. Functionality of the OX40L was confirmed by the fact that a paraformaldehyde (PFA)-fixed HTLV-1+ T cell lines inhibited the infection of autologous activated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) with R5 HIV-1 which was reversed by either anti-OX40L blocking mAb or a mixture of neutralizing mAbs against CCR5-binding β-chemokines. Conclusions Altogether, these results demonstrated that autologous T cell lines immortalized by HTLV-1 can be utilized as a conventional source of physiologically functional OX40L. PMID:24238037

  17. Human airway epithelia express catalytically active NEU3 sialidase.

    PubMed

    Lillehoj, Erik P; Hyun, Sang Won; Feng, Chiguang; Zhang, Lei; Liu, Anguo; Guang, Wei; Nguyen, Chinh; Sun, Wenji; Luzina, Irina G; Webb, Tonya J; Atamas, Sergei P; Passaniti, Antonino; Twaddell, William S; Puché, Adam C; Wang, Lai-Xi; Cross, Alan S; Goldblum, Simeon E

    2014-05-01

    Sialic acids on glycoconjugates play a pivotal role in many biological processes. In the airways, sialylated glycoproteins and glycolipids are strategically positioned on the plasma membranes of epithelia to regulate receptor-ligand, cell-cell, and host-pathogen interactions at the molecular level. We now demonstrate, for the first time, sialidase activity for ganglioside substrates in human airway epithelia. Of the four known mammalian sialidases, NEU3 has a substrate preference for gangliosides and is expressed at mRNA and protein levels at comparable abundance in epithelia derived from human trachea, bronchi, small airways, and alveoli. In small airway and alveolar epithelia, NEU3 protein was immunolocalized to the plasma membrane, cytosolic, and nuclear subcellular fractions. Small interfering RNA-induced silencing of NEU3 expression diminished sialidase activity for a ganglioside substrate by >70%. NEU3 immunostaining of intact human lung tissue could be localized to the superficial epithelia, including the ciliated brush border, as well as to nuclei. However, NEU3 was reduced in subepithelial tissues. These results indicate that human airway epithelia express catalytically active NEU3 sialidase.

  18. Low-relief landscape modeling with human activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Q.; Kumar, P.; Anders, A. M.

    2015-12-01

    Intensively managed landscapes (IMLs) in the Midwestern United States have been shaped by repeated glacial events over geologic time scales followed by rapid human modifications for agriculture and artificial drainage that were overlaid on extremely low gradient stream networks. These landscapes are heavily modified by agriculture, artificial drainage, deforestation, urbanization, and wetland destruction. Channel head extension and periodic dredging for channel straightening not only strongly affected hydrologic and geomorphologic response, but also fundamentally alter the energy consumption in the whole river basin. However, it is unclear how the landscape consumes and responds to the extra energy from human activities. Therefore, we evaluate the present-day dynamics of river network from the perspective of of geomorphic equilibrium, hydrological response, and the rate of energy dissipation. Then, we simulate the landscape evolution to discover the tendency of the system. We find that channel head extension and straightening increases the rate of energy dissipation and pushes the river network further away from equilibrium condition. From our numerical model simulation, extending and maintaining the ditches in the river network can cause large ridge migration, river network redistribution, and enlargement of the drainage basin area. Our research demonstrates how the river basin responds to human activities in glaciated landscape, and how it is likely to behave with artificial modifications on the topography in the future. We attribute the legacy to drainage basin reorganization and theorized that humans can have a lasting impact on the landscape even after active management has ceased.

  19. Muscular activity and its relationship to biomechanics and human performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ariel, Gideon

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this manuscript is to address the issue of muscular activity, human motion, fitness, and exercise. Human activity is reviewed from the historical perspective as well as from the basics of muscular contraction, nervous system controls, mechanics, and biomechanical considerations. In addition, attention has been given to some of the principles involved in developing muscular adaptations through strength development. Brief descriptions and findings from a few studies are included. These experiments were conducted in order to investigate muscular adaptation to various exercise regimens. Different theories of strength development were studied and correlated to daily human movements. All measurement tools used represent state of the art exercise equipment and movement analysis. The information presented here is only a small attempt to understand the effects of exercise and conditioning on Earth with the objective of leading to greater knowledge concerning human responses during spaceflight. What makes life from nonliving objects is movement which is generated and controlled by biochemical substances. In mammals. the controlled activators are skeletal muscles and this muscular action is an integral process composed of mechanical, chemical, and neurological processes resulting in voluntary and involuntary motions. The scope of this discussion is limited to voluntary motion.

  20. Lysyl oxidase activity in human normal skins and postburn scars.

    PubMed

    Hayakawa, T; Hino, N; Fuyamada, H; Nagatsu, T; Aoyama, H

    1976-09-06

    Lysyl oxidase activity of human normal skins derived from the frontal thighs of 33 subjects showed large variations and the mean value was 11 455 +/- 7 172 (S.D.) cpm/g of wet weight tissue. The age of lesion affected the lysyl oxidase activity in postburn scars. Granulation tissues showed a fairly low activity; however, the activity increased sharply within 2--3 months, and reached a significantly higher value than that of normal skin. The high level of activity continued for up to 2--3 years, then gradually decreased to normal range after 5 years or so. Lysyl oxidase activity was detected only after 4 M urea treatment of tissues. Benzylamine oxidase activity also showed large variations in both normal skins and postburn scars, with mean values of: 0.128 +/- 0.077 (S.D.) and 0.145 +/- 0.090 (S.D.) mmol/g of wet weight/h, respectively. No correlation was observed between lysyl oxidase and benzylamine oxidase activities. The granulation tissues showed significantly high values of benzylamine oxidase activity in contrast to the low values of lysyl oxidase activity.

  1. How consumer physical activity monitors could transform human physiology research.

    PubMed

    Wright, Stephen P; Hall Brown, Tyish S; Collier, Scott R; Sandberg, Kathryn

    2017-03-01

    A sedentary lifestyle and lack of physical activity are well-established risk factors for chronic disease and adverse health outcomes. Thus, there is enormous interest in measuring physical activity in biomedical research. Many consumer physical activity monitors, including Basis Health Tracker, BodyMedia Fit, DirectLife, Fitbit Flex, Fitbit One, Fitbit Zip, Garmin Vivofit, Jawbone UP, MisFit Shine, Nike FuelBand, Polar Loop, Withings Pulse O2, and others have accuracies similar to that of research-grade physical activity monitors for measuring steps. This review focuses on the unprecedented opportunities that consumer physical activity monitors offer for human physiology and pathophysiology research because of their ability to measure activity continuously under real-life conditions and because they are already widely used by consumers. We examine current and potential uses of consumer physical activity monitors as a measuring or monitoring device, or as an intervention in strategies to change behavior and predict health outcomes. The accuracy, reliability, reproducibility, and validity of consumer physical activity monitors are reviewed, as are limitations and challenges associated with using these devices in research. Other topics covered include how smartphone apps and platforms, such as the Apple ResearchKit, can be used in conjunction with consumer physical activity monitors for research. Lastly, the future of consumer physical activity monitors and related technology is considered: pattern recognition, integration of sleep monitors, and other biosensors in combination with new forms of information processing.

  2. Hepatitis C virus infection inhibits a Src-kinase regulatory phosphatase and reduces T cell activation in vivo.

    PubMed

    Bhattarai, Nirjal; McLinden, James H; Xiang, Jinhua; Mathahs, M Meleah; Schmidt, Warren N; Kaufman, Thomas M; Stapleton, Jack T

    2017-02-24

    Among human RNA viruses, hepatitis C virus (HCV) is unusual in that it causes persistent infection in the majority of infected people. To establish persistence, HCV evades host innate and adaptive immune responses by multiple mechanisms. Recent studies identified virus genome-derived small RNAs (vsRNAs) in HCV-infected cells; however, their biological significance during human HCV infection is unknown. One such vsRNA arising from the hepatitis C virus (HCV) E2 coding region impairs T cell receptor (TCR) signaling by reducing expression of a Src-kinase regulatory phosphatase (PTPRE) in vitro. Since TCR signaling is a critical first step in T cell activation, differentiation, and effector function, its inhibition may contribute towards HCV persistence in vivo. The effect of HCV infection on PTPRE expression in vivo has not been examined. Here, we found that PTPRE levels were significantly reduced in liver tissue and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) obtained from HCV-infected humans compared to uninfected controls. Loss of PTPRE expression impaired antigen-specific TCR signaling, and curative HCV therapy restored PTPRE expression in PBMCs; restoring antigen-specific TCR signaling defects. The extent of PTPRE expression correlated with the amount of sequence complementarity between the HCV E2 vsRNA and the PTPRE 3' UTR target sites. Transfection of a hepatocyte cell line with full-length HCV RNA or with synthetic HCV vsRNA duplexes inhibited PTPRE expression, recapitulating the in vivo observation. Together, these data demonstrate that HCV infection reduces PTPRE expression in the liver and PBMCs of infected humans, and suggest that the HCV E2 vsRNA is a novel viral factor that may contribute towards viral persistence.

  3. Hepatitis C virus infection inhibits a Src-kinase regulatory phosphatase and reduces T cell activation in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Bhattarai, Nirjal; McLinden, James H.; Xiang, Jinhua; Mathahs, M. Meleah; Schmidt, Warren N.; Kaufman, Thomas M.

    2017-01-01

    Among human RNA viruses, hepatitis C virus (HCV) is unusual in that it causes persistent infection in the majority of infected people. To establish persistence, HCV evades host innate and adaptive immune responses by multiple mechanisms. Recent studies identified virus genome-derived small RNAs (vsRNAs) in HCV-infected cells; however, their biological significance during human HCV infection is unknown. One such vsRNA arising from the hepatitis C virus (HCV) E2 coding region impairs T cell receptor (TCR) signaling by reducing expression of a Src-kinase regulatory phosphatase (PTPRE) in vitro. Since TCR signaling is a critical first step in T cell activation, differentiation, and effector function, its inhibition may contribute towards HCV persistence in vivo. The effect of HCV infection on PTPRE expression in vivo has not been examined. Here, we found that PTPRE levels were significantly reduced in liver tissue and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) obtained from HCV-infected humans compared to uninfected controls. Loss of PTPRE expression impaired antigen-specific TCR signaling, and curative HCV therapy restored PTPRE expression in PBMCs; restoring antigen-specific TCR signaling defects. The extent of PTPRE expression correlated with the amount of sequence complementarity between the HCV E2 vsRNA and the PTPRE 3’ UTR target sites. Transfection of a hepatocyte cell line with full-length HCV RNA or with synthetic HCV vsRNA duplexes inhibited PTPRE expression, recapitulating the in vivo observation. Together, these data demonstrate that HCV infection reduces PTPRE expression in the liver and PBMCs of infected humans, and suggest that the HCV E2 vsRNA is a novel viral factor that may contribute towards viral persistence. PMID:28235043

  4. Current concepts of active vasodilation in human skin

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Brett J.; Hollowed, Casey G.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT In humans, an increase in internal core temperature elicits large increases in skin blood flow and sweating. The increase in skin blood flow serves to transfer heat via convection from the body core to the skin surface while sweating results in evaporative cooling of the skin. Cutaneous vasodilation and sudomotor activity are controlled by a sympathetic cholinergic active vasodilator system that is hypothesized to operate through a co-transmission mechanism. To date, mechanisms of cutaneous active vasodilation remain equivocal despite many years of research by several productive laboratory groups. The purpose of this review is to highlight recent advancements in the field of cutaneous active vasodilation framed in the context of some of the historical findings that laid the groundwork for our current understanding of cutaneous active vasodilation. PMID:28349094

  5. Preliminary Work Domain Analysis for Human Extravehicular Activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGuire, Kerry; Miller, Matthew; Feigh, Karen

    2015-01-01

    A work domain analysis (WDA) of human extravehicular activity (EVA) is presented in this study. A formative methodology such as Cognitive Work Analysis (CWA) offers a new perspective to the knowledge gained from the past 50 years of living and working in space for the development of future EVA support systems. EVA is a vital component of human spaceflight and provides a case study example of applying a work domain analysis (WDA) to a complex sociotechnical system. The WDA presented here illustrates how the physical characteristics of the environment, hardware, and life support systems of the domain guide the potential avenues and functional needs of future EVA decision support system development.

  6. Dissecting gamma frequency activity during human memory processing.

    PubMed

    Kucewicz, Michal T; Berry, Brent M; Kremen, Vaclav; Brinkmann, Benjamin H; Sperling, Michael R; Jobst, Barbara C; Gross, Robert E; Lega, Bradley; Sheth, Sameer A; Stein, Joel M; Das, Sandthitsu R; Gorniak, Richard; Stead, S Matthew; Rizzuto, Daniel S; Kahana, Michael J; Worrell, Gregory A

    2017-03-13

    Gamma frequency activity (30-150 Hz) is induced in cognitive tasks and is thought to reflect underlying neural processes. Gamma frequency activity can be recorded directly from the human brain using intracranial electrodes implanted in patients undergoing treatment for drug-resistant epilepsy. Previous studies have independently explored narrowband oscillations in the local field potential and broadband power increases. It is not clear, however, which processes contribute to human brain gamma frequency activity, or their dynamics and roles during memory processing. Here a large dataset of intracranial recordings obtained during encoding of words from 101 patients was used to detect, characterize and compare induced gamma frequency activity events. Individual bursts of gamma frequency activity were isolated in the time-frequency domain to determine their spectral features, including peak frequency, amplitude, frequency span, and duration. We found two distinct types of gamma frequency activity events that showed either narrowband or broadband frequency spans revealing characteristic spectral properties. Narrowband events, the predominant type, were induced by word presentations following an initial induction of broadband events, which were temporally separated and selectively correlated with evoked response potentials, suggesting that they reflect different neural activities and play different roles during memory encoding. The two gamma frequency activity types were differentially modulated during encoding of subsequently recalled and forgotten words. In conclusion, we found evidence for two distinct activity types induced in the gamma frequency range during cognitive processing. Separating these two gamma frequency activity components contributes to the current understanding of electrophysiological biomarkers, and may prove useful for emerging neurotechnologies targeting, mapping and modulating distinct neurophysiological processes in normal and epileptogenic brain.

  7. Influence of Fragrances on Human Psychophysiological Activity: With Special Reference to Human Electroencephalographic Response

    PubMed Central

    Sowndhararajan, Kandhasamy; Kim, Songmun

    2016-01-01

    The influence of fragrances such as perfumes and room fresheners on the psychophysiological activities of humans has been known for a long time, and its significance is gradually increasing in the medicinal and cosmetic industries. A fragrance consists of volatile chemicals with a molecular weight of less than 300 Da that humans perceive through the olfactory system. In humans, about 300 active olfactory receptor genes are devoted to detecting thousands of different fragrance molecules through a large family of olfactory receptors of a diverse protein sequence. The sense of smell plays an important role in the physiological effects of mood, stress, and working capacity. Electrophysiological studies have revealed that various fragrances affected spontaneous brain activities and cognitive functions, which are measured by an electroencephalograph (EEG). The EEG is a good temporal measure of responses in the central nervous system and it provides information about the physiological state of the brain both in health and disease. The EEG power spectrum is classified into different frequency bands such as delta (0.5–4 Hz), theta (4–8 Hz), alpha (8–13 Hz), beta (13–30 Hz) and gamma (30–50 Hz), and each band is correlated with different features of brain states. A quantitative EEG uses computer software to provide the topographic mapping of the brain activity in frontal, temporal, parietal and occipital brain regions. It is well known that decreases of alpha and beta activities and increases of delta and theta activities are associated with brain pathology and general cognitive decline. In the last few decades, many scientific studies were conducted to investigate the effect of inhalation of aroma on human brain functions. The studies have suggested a significant role for olfactory stimulation in the alteration of cognition, mood, and social behavior. This review aims to evaluate the available literature regarding the influence of fragrances on the

  8. Crystal Structure of an Active Form of Human MMP-1

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, Shalini; Visse, Robert; Nagase, Hideaki; Acharya, K. Ravi

    2006-01-01

    The extracellular matrix is a dynamic environment that constantly undergoes remodelling and degradation during vital physiological processes such as angiogenesis, wound healing, and development. Unbalanced extracellular matrix breakdown is associated with many diseases such as arthritis, cancer and fibrosis. Interstitial collagen is degraded by matrix metalloproteinases with collagenolytic activity by MMP-1, MMP-8 and MMP-13, collectively known as the collagenases. Matrix metalloproteinase 1 (MMP-1) plays a pivotal role in degradation of interstitial collagen types I, II, and III. Here, we report the crystal structure of the active form of human MMP-1 at 2.67 Å resolution. This is the first MMP-1 structure that is free of inhibitor and a water molecule essential for peptide hydrolysis is observed coordinated with the active site zinc. Comparing this structure with the human proMMP-1 shows significant structural differences, mainly in the relative orientation of the hemopexin domain, between the pro form and active form of the human enzyme. PMID:16890240

  9. Endomorphins fully activate a cloned human mu opioid receptor.

    PubMed

    Gong, J; Strong, J A; Zhang, S; Yue, X; DeHaven, R N; Daubert, J D; Cassel, J A; Yu, G; Mansson, E; Yu, L

    1998-11-13

    Endomorphins were recently identified as endogenous ligands with high selectivity for mu opioid receptors. We have characterized the ability of endomorphins to bind to and functionally activate the cloned human mu opioid receptor. Both endomorphin-1 and endomorphin-2 exhibited binding selectivity for the mu opioid receptor over the delta and kappa opioid receptors. Both agonists inhibited forskolin-stimulated increase of cAMP in a dose-dependent fashion. When the mu opioid receptor was coexpressed in Xenopus oocytes with G protein-activated K+ channels, application of either endomorphin activated an inward K+ current. This activation was dose-dependent and blocked by naloxone. Both endomorphins acted as full agonists with efficacy similar to that of [D-Ala2,N-Me-Phe4,Gly-ol5]enkephalin (DAMGO). These data indicate that endomorphins act as full agonists at the human mu opioid receptor, capable of stimulating the receptor to inhibit the cAMP/adenylyl cyclase pathway and activate G-protein-activated inwardly rectifying potassium (GIRK) channels.

  10. Vampire bat salivary plasminogen activator is quiescent in human plasma in the absence of fibrin unlike human tissue plasminogen activator.

    PubMed

    Gardell, S J; Hare, T R; Bergum, P W; Cuca, G C; O'Neill-Palladino, L; Zavodny, S M

    1990-12-15

    The vampire bat salivary plasminogen activator (Bat-PA) is a potent PA that exhibits remarkable selectivity toward fibrin-bound plasminogen (Gardell et al, J Biol Chem 256: 3568, 1989). Herein, we describe the activity of recombinant DNA-derived Bat-PA (rBat-PA) in a human plasma milieu. rBat-PA and recombinant human single-chain tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA) are similarly efficacious at lysing plasma clots. In stark contrast to rt-PA, the addition of 250 nmol/L rBat-PA to plasma in the absence of a clot failed to deplete plasminogen, alpha 2-antiplasmin and fibrinogen. The lytic activities exhibited by finger-domain minus Bat-PA (F- rBat-PA) and finger and epidermal growth factor-like domains minus Bat-PA (FG- rBat-PA) were less than rBat-PA, especially at low concentrations of PA; nevertheless, these truncated forms also possessed a strict requirement for a fibrin cofactor. The loss of PA activity following the addition of rBat-PA to plasma was slower than that observed when either rt-PA or two-chain rt-PA was added. The efficacy, fibrin selectivity, and decreased susceptibility to inactivation exhibited by rBat-PA in vitro in a human plasma milieu suggests that rBat-PA may be superior to rt-PA for the treatment of thrombotic complications.

  11. Human prostatic cancer cells, PC3, elaborate mitogenic activity which selectively stimulates human bone cells

    SciTech Connect

    Perkel, V.S.; Mohan, S.; Herring, S.J.; Baylink, D.J.; Linkhart, T.A. )

    1990-11-01

    Prostatic cancer typically produces osteoblastic metastases which are not attended by marrow fibrosis. In the present study we sought to test the hypothesis that prostatic cancer cells produce factor(s) which act selectively on human osteoblasts. Such a paracrine mechanism would explain the observed increase in osteoblasts, unaccompanied by an increase in marrow fibroblasts. To test this hypothesis we investigated the mitogenic activity released by the human prostatic tumor cell line, PC3. PC3 cells have been reported previously to produce mitogenic activity for cells that was relatively specific for rat osteoblasts compared to rat fibroblasts. However, the effects of this activity on human cells has not been examined previously. PC3-conditioned medium (CM) (5-50 micrograms CM protein/ml) stimulated human osteoblast proliferation by 200-950% yet did not stimulate human fibroblast proliferation ((3H)thymidine incorporation). PC3 CM also increased cell numbers in human osteoblast but not fibroblast cell cultures. To determine whether the osteoblast-specific mitogenic activity could be attributed to known bone growth factors, specific assays for these growth factors were performed. PC3 CM contained 10 pg insulin-like growth factor (IGF) I, less than 2 pg IGF II, 54 pg basic fibroblast growth factor, and 16 pg transforming growth factor beta/microgram CM protein. None of these growth factors alone or in combination could account for the observed osteoblast-specific PC3 cell-derived mitogenic activity. Furthermore, when 5 micrograms/ml PC3 CM was tested in combination with maximally effective concentrations of either basic fibroblast growth factor, IGF I, IGF II, or transforming growth factor beta, it produced an additive effect suggesting that PC3 CM stimulates osteoblast proliferation by a mechanism independent of these bone mitogens.

  12. A phased strategy to differentiate human CD14+monocytes into classically and alternatively activated macrophages and dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Zarif, Jelani C; Hernandez, James R; Verdone, James E; Campbell, Scott P; Drake, Charles G; Pienta, Kenneth J

    2016-01-01

    There are currently several in vitro strategies to differentiate human CD14(+) monocytes isolated from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) into the M1 or M2 macrophage cell types. Each cell type is then verified using flow cytometric analysis of cell-surface markers. Human CD14(+) monocytes have the potential to differentiate into M1 and M2 macrophages, both of which demonstrate varying degrees of cell-surface antigen overlap. Using multiple surface markers with current macrophage polarization protocols, our data reveal several limitations of currently used methods, such as highly ambiguous cell types that possess cell-surface marker overlap and functional similarities. Utilizing interleukin-6 (IL-6) and two phases of cytokine exposure, we have developed a protocol to differentiate human monocytes into M1, M2, or dendritic cells (DCs) with greater efficiency and fidelity relative to macrophages and DCs that are produced by commonly used methods. This is achieved via alterations in cytokine composition, dosing, and incubation times, as well as improvements in verification methodology. Our method reliably reproduces human in vitro monocyte-derived DCs and macrophage models that will aid in better defining and understanding innate and adaptive immunity, as well as pathologic states.

  13. Human podoplanin-positive monocytes and platelets enhance lymphangiogenesis through the activation of the podoplanin/CLEC-2 axis.

    PubMed

    Hur, Jin; Jang, Jae Hee; Oh, Il-Young; Choi, Jae-Il; Yun, Ji-Yeon; Kim, Joonoh; Choi, Young-Eun; Ko, Seung-Bum; Kang, Jin-A; Kang, Jeehoon; Lee, Sang Eun; Lee, Hwan; Park, Young-Bae; Kim, Hyo-Soo

    2014-08-01

    Emerging studies suggested that murine podoplanin-positive monocytes (PPMs) are involved in lymphangiogenesis. The goal of this study was to demonstrate the therapeutic lymphangiogenesis of human PPMs by the interaction with platelets. Aggregation culture of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) resulted in cellular aggregates termed hematospheres. During 5-day culture, PPMs expanded exponentially and expressed several lymphatic endothelial cell-specific markers including vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR)-3 and well-established lymphangiogenic transcription factors. Next, we investigated the potential interaction of PPMs with platelets that had C-type lectin-like receptor-2 (CLEC-2), a receptor of podoplanin. In vitro coculture of PPMs and platelets stimulated PPMs to strongly express lymphatic endothelial markers and upregulate lymphangiogenic cytokines. Recombinant human CLEC-2 also stimulated PPMs through Akt and Erk signaling. Likewise, platelets in coculture with PPMs augmented secretion of a lymphangiogenic cytokine, interleukin (IL)-1-β, via podoplanin/CLEC-2 axis. The supernatant obtained from coculture was able to enhance the migration, viability, and proliferation of lymphatic endothelial cell. Local injection of hematospheres with platelets significantly increased lymphatic neovascularization and facilitated wound healing in the full-thickness skin wounds of nude mice. Cotreatment with PPMs and platelets augments lymphangiogenesis through podoplanin/CLEC-2 axis, which thus would be a promising novel strategy of cell therapy to treat human lymphatic vessel disease.

  14. Activities of human RRP6 and structure of the human RRP6 catalytic domain

    SciTech Connect

    Januszyk, Kurt; Liu, Quansheng; Lima, Christopher D.

    2011-08-29

    The eukaryotic RNA exosome is a highly conserved multi-subunit complex that catalyzes degradation and processing of coding and noncoding RNA. A noncatalytic nine-subunit exosome core interacts with Rrp44 and Rrp6, two subunits that possess processive and distributive 3'-to-5' exoribonuclease activity, respectively. While both Rrp6 and Rrp44 are responsible for RNA processing in budding yeast, Rrp6 may play a more prominent role in processing, as it has been demonstrated to be inhibited by stable RNA secondary structure in vitro and because the null allele in budding yeast leads to the buildup of specific structured RNA substrates. Human RRP6, otherwise known as PM/SCL-100 or EXOSC10, shares sequence similarity to budding yeast Rrp6 and is proposed to catalyze 3'-to-5' exoribonuclease activity on a variety of nuclear transcripts including ribosomal RNA subunits, RNA that has been poly-adenylated by TRAMP, as well as other nuclear RNA transcripts destined for processing and/or destruction. To characterize human RRP6, we expressed the full-length enzyme as well as truncation mutants that retain catalytic activity, compared their activities to analogous constructs for Saccharomyces cerevisiae Rrp6, and determined the X-ray structure of a human construct containing the exoribonuclease and HRDC domains that retains catalytic activity. Structural data show that the human active site is more exposed when compared to the yeast structure, and biochemical data suggest that this feature may play a role in the ability of human RRP6 to productively engage and degrade structured RNA substrates more effectively than the analogous budding yeast enzyme.

  15. Assessing the impact of human activities on British Columbia's estuaries.

    PubMed

    Robb, Carolyn K

    2014-01-01

    The world's marine and coastal ecosystems are under threat and single-sector management efforts have failed to address those threats. Scientific consensus suggests that management should evolve to focus on ecosystems and their human, ecological, and physical components. Estuaries are recognized globally as one of the world's most productive and most threatened ecosystems and many estuarine areas in British Columbia (BC) have been lost or degraded. To help prioritize activities and areas for regional management efforts, spatial information on human activities that adversely affect BC's estuaries was compiled. Using statistical analyses, estuaries were assigned to groups facing related threats that could benefit from similar management. The results show that estuaries in the most populated marine ecosections have the highest biological importance but also the highest impacts and the lowest levels of protection. This research is timely, as it will inform ongoing marine planning, land acquisition, and stewardship efforts in BC.

  16. Optimal Recognition Method of Human Activities Using Artificial Neural Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oniga, Stefan; József, Sütő

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this research is an exhaustive analysis of the various factors that may influence the recognition rate of the human activity using wearable sensors data. We made a total of 1674 simulations on a publically released human activity database by a group of researcher from the University of California at Berkeley. In a previous research, we analyzed the influence of the number of sensors and their placement. In the present research we have examined the influence of the number of sensor nodes, the type of sensor node, preprocessing algorithms, type of classifier and its parameters. The final purpose is to find the optimal setup for best recognition rates with lowest hardware and software costs.

  17. A near atomic structure of the active human apoptosome.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Tat Cheung; Hong, Chuan; Akey, Ildikó V; Yuan, Shujun; Akey, Christopher W

    2016-10-04

    In response to cell death signals, an active apoptosome is assembled from Apaf-1 and procaspase-9 (pc-9). Here we report a near atomic structure of the active human apoptosome determined by cryo-electron microscopy. The resulting model gives insights into cytochrome c binding, nucleotide exchange and conformational changes that drive assembly. During activation an acentric disk is formed on the central hub of the apoptosome. This disk contains four Apaf-1/pc-9 CARD pairs arranged in a shallow spiral with the fourth pc-9 CARD at lower occupancy. On average, Apaf-1 CARDs recruit 3 to 5 pc-9 molecules to the apoptosome and one catalytic domain may be parked on the hub, when an odd number of zymogens are bound. This suggests a stoichiometry of one or at most, two pc-9 dimers per active apoptosome. Thus, our structure provides a molecular framework to understand the role of the apoptosome in programmed cell death and disease.

  18. Legal regime of human activities in outer space law

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golda, Carlo

    1994-01-01

    Current developments in space activities increasingly involve the presence of humans on board spacecraft and, in the near future, on the Moon, on Mars, on board Space Stations, etc. With respect to these challenges, the political and legal issues connected to the status of astronauts are largely unclear and require a new doctrinal attention. In the same way, many legal and political questions remain open in the structure of future space crews: the need for international standards in the definition and training of astronauts, etc.; but, first of all, an international uniform legal definition of astronauts. Moreover, the legal structure for human life and operations in outer space can be a new and relevant paradigm for the definition of similar rules in all the situations and environments in which humans are involved in extreme frontiers. The present article starts from an overview on the existing legal and political definitions of 'astronauts', moving to the search of a more useful definition. This is followed by an analysis of the concrete problems created by human space activities, and the legal and political responses to them (the need for a code of conduct; the structure of the crew and the existing rules in the US and ex-USSR; the new legal theories on the argument; the definition and structure of a code of conduct; the next legal problems in fields such as privacy law, communications law, business law, criminal law, etc.).

  19. Human epidermal plasminogen activator. Characterization, localization, and modulation.

    PubMed

    Morioka, S; Jensen, P J; Lazarus, G S

    1985-12-01

    Using biochemical and immunocytochemical approaches, we have investigated the plasminogen activator (PA) of primary human epidermal cell cultures. A rabbit antibody raised against human urinary PA (urokinase) inhibited greater than or equal to 96% of the PA activity in the keratinocyte cultures. Immunoblot and double immunodiffusion analyses of keratinocyte PA with anti-urokinase antibody confirmed that epidermal PA was of the urokinase type. Immunocytochemical investigation of human keratinocyte cultures with anti-urokinase antibody revealed two characteristic staining patterns for PA. First, cells at the advancing edge of subconfluent colonies were cytoplasmically stained in a granular pattern. Similar staining was observed at the migrating edges of confluent epidermal cell cultures that had been wounded by cutting with a blade. This induction of PA staining was independent of cell division. Secondly, differentiated epidermal cells located on the surface of colonies were stained either at the plasma membrane or homogeneously throughout the cell. The highly differentiated, spontaneously shed cells were usually very heavily stained by anti-urokinase antibody. These immunocytochemical experiments suggest that PA expression is highly regulated in human epidermal cells. Specifically, PA expression appears to be related to cellular differentiation and to cell movement in expanding or wounded keratinocyte colonies.

  20. Human psychophysiological activity monitoring methods using fiber optic sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zyczkowski, M.; Uzieblo-Zyczkowska, B.

    2010-10-01

    The paper presents the concept of fiber optic sensor system for human psycho-physical activity detection. A fiber optic sensor that utilizes optical phase interferometry or intensity in modalmetric to monitor a patient's vital signs such as respiration cardiac activity, blood pressure and body's physical movements. The sensor, which is non-invasive, comprises an optical fiber interferometer that includes an optical fiber proximately situated to the patient so that time varying acusto-mechanical signals from the patient are coupled into the optical fiber. The system can be implemented in embodiments ranging form a low cost in-home to a high end product for in hospital use.

  1. Interactions between cardiac, respiratory, and brain activity in humans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musizza, Bojan; Stefanovska, Aneta

    2005-05-01

    The electrical activity of the heart (ECG), respiratory function and electric activity of the brain (EEG) were simultaneously recorded in conscious, healthy humans. Instantaneous frequencies of the heart beat, respiration and α-waves were then determined from 30-minutes recordings. The instantaneous cardiac frequency was defined as the inverse value of the time interval between two consecutive R-peaks. The instantaneous respiratory frequency was obtained from recordings of the excursions of thorax by application of the Hilbert transform. To obtain the instantaneous frequency of α-waves, the EEG signal recorded from the forehead was first analysed using the wavelet transform. Then the frequency band corresponding to α-waves was extracted and the Hilbert transform applied. Synchronization analysis was performed and the direction of coupling was ascertained, using pairs of instantaneous frequencies in each case. It is shown that the systems are weakly bidirectionally coupled. It was confirmed that, in conscious healthy humans, respiration drives cardiac activity. We also demonstrate from these analyses that α-activity drives both respiration and cardiac activity.

  2. Vanadium promotes hydroxyl radical formation by activated human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Fickl, Heidi; Theron, Annette J; Grimmer, Heidi; Oommen, Joyce; Ramafi, Grace J; Steel, Helen C; Visser, Susanna S; Anderson, Ronald

    2006-01-01

    This study was undertaken to investigate the effects of vanadium in the +2, +3, +4, and +5 valence states on superoxide generation, myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, and hydroxyl radical formation by activated human neutrophils in vitro, using lucigenin-enhanced chemiluminescence (LECL), autoiodination, and electron spin resonance with 5,5-dimethyl-l-pyrroline N-oxide as the spin trap, respectively. At concentrations of up to 25 microM, vanadium, in the four different valence states used, did not affect the LECL responses of neutrophils activated with either the chemoattractant, N-formyl-l-methionyl-l-leucyl-l-phenylalanine (1 microM), or the phorbol ester, phorbol 12-myristate 12-acetate (25 ng/ml). However, exposure to vanadium in the +2, +3, and +4, but not the +5, valence states was accompanied by significant augmentation of hydroxyl radical formation by activated neutrophils and attenuation of MPO-mediated iodination. With respect to hydroxyl radical formation, similar effects were observed using cell-free systems containing either hydrogen peroxide (100 microM) or xanthine/xanthine oxidase together with vanadium (+2, +3, +4), while the activity of purified MPO was inhibited by the metal in these valence states. These results demonstrate that vanadium in the +2, +3, and +4 valence states interacts prooxidatively with human neutrophils, competing effectively with MPO for hydrogen peroxide to promote formation of the highly toxic hydroxyl radical.

  3. Glucocorticoid receptor activation and inactivation in cultured human lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, R H; Leach, K L; La Forest, A C; O'Toole, T E; Wagner, R; Pratt, W B

    1981-01-10

    Although glucocorticoids are not cytolytic for and do not inhibit the growth of the IM-9 line of cultured human lymphoblasts, these cells have a high steroid-binding capacity. We have used IM-9 cells in order to examine whether unoccupied glucocorticoid receptors are inactivated and activated in intact cells. when IM-9 cells are incubated in glucose-free medium in a nitrogen atmosphere, both their ability to bind triamcinolone acetonide and their ATP levels decline and, when glucose and oxygen are reintroduced, ATP levels and receptor activity return. The specific glucocorticoid-binding activity of cytosol prepared from cells exposed to various degrees of energy limitation is directly correlated with the ATP content. Receptor activation in intact cells is rapid and independent of protein synthesis. Cytosol prepared from inactivated cells cannot be activated by addition of ATP. The inactivation of glucocorticoid receptors that occurs when cytosol from normal IM-9 cells is incubated at 25 degrees C is inhibited by molybdate, vanadate, fluoride, ATP, and several other nucleotides. The experiments with intact human lymphoblasts suggest that assays of specific glucocorticoid-binding capacity do not necessarily reflect the cellular content of receptor protein.

  4. Valsalva maneuver: Insights into baroreflex modulation of human sympathetic activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Michael L.; Eckberg, Dwain L.; Fritsch, Janice M.; Beightol, Larry A.; Ellenbogen, Kenneth A.

    1991-01-01

    Valsalva's maneuver, voluntary forced expiration against a closed glottis, is a well-characterized research tool, used to assess the integrity of human autonomic cardiovascular control. Valsalva straining provokes a stereotyped succession of alternating positive and negative arterial pressure and heart rate changes mediated in part by arterial baroreceptors. Arterial pressure changes result primarily from fluctuating levels of venous return to the heart and changes of sympathetic nerve activity. Muscle sympathetic activity was measured directly in nine volunteers to explore quantitatively the relation between arterial pressure and human sympathetic outflow during pressure transients provoked by controlled graded Valsalva maneuvers. Our results underscore several properties of sympathetic regulation during Valsalva straining. First, muscle sympathetic nerve activity changes as a mirror image of changes in arterial pressure. Second, the magnitude of sympathetic augmentation during Valsalva straining predicts phase 4 arterial pressure elevations. Third, post-Valsalva sympathetic inhibition persists beyond the return of arterial and right atrial pressures to baseline levels which reflects an alteration of the normal relation between arterial pressure and muscle sympathetic activity. Therefore, Valsalva straining may have some utility for investigating changes of reflex control of sympathetic activity after space flight; however, measurement of beat-to-beat arterial pressure is essential for this use. The utility of this technique in microgravity can not be determined from these data. Further investigations are necessary to determine whether these relations are affected by the expansion of intrathoracic blood volume associated with microgravity.

  5. Decrease of fibrinolytic activity in human endothelial cells by arsenite.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Shinn-Jong; Lin, Tsun-Mei; Wu, Hua-Lin; Han, Huai-Song; Shi, Guey-Yueh

    2002-01-01

    Blackfoot disease (BFD) is an endemic peripheral vascular occlusive disease that occurred in the southwest coast of Taiwan. It is believed that arsenic in the drinking water from artesian wells plays an important role in the development of the disease. We have previously shown that BFD patients had significant lower tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) antigen level and higher plasminogen activator inhibitor, Type 1 (PAI-1) antigen level than normal controls. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of arsenite on the fibrinolytic and anticoagulant activities of cultured macrovascular and microvascular endothelial cells. Incubation of human microvascular endothelial cells (HMEC-1), but not human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), with arsenite caused a decrease of t-PA mRNA level, a rise of both PAI-1 mRNA level and PAI activity. Arsenite could also inhibit the thrombomodulin (TM) mRNA expression and reduce the TM antigen level in HMEC-1. In conclusion, arsenite had a greater effect on HMEC-1 as compared to HUVECs in lowering the fibrinolytic activity and may be responsible for the reduced capacity of fibrinolysis associated with BFD.

  6. Early development of synchrony in cortical activations in the human

    PubMed Central

    Koolen, N.; Dereymaeker, A.; Räsänen, O.; Jansen, K.; Vervisch, J.; Matic, V.; Naulaers, G.; De Vos, M.; Van Huffel, S.; Vanhatalo, S.

    2016-01-01

    Early intermittent cortical activity is thought to play a crucial role in the growth of neuronal network development, and large scale brain networks are known to provide the basis for higher brain functions. Yet, the early development of the large scale synchrony in cortical activations is unknown. Here, we tested the hypothesis that the early intermittent cortical activations seen in the human scalp EEG show a clear developmental course during the last trimester of pregnancy, the period of intensive growth of cortico-cortical connections. We recorded scalp EEG from altogether 22 premature infants at post-menstrual age between 30 and 44 weeks, and the early cortical synchrony was quantified using recently introduced activation synchrony index (ASI). The developmental correlations of ASI were computed for individual EEG signals as well as anatomically and mathematically defined spatial subgroups. We report two main findings. First, we observed a robust and statistically significant increase in ASI in all cortical areas. Second, there were significant spatial gradients in the synchrony in fronto-occipital and left-to-right directions. These findings provide evidence that early cortical activity is increasingly synchronized across the neocortex. The ASI-based metrics introduced in our work allow direct translational comparison to in vivo animal models, as well as hold promise for implementation as a functional developmental biomarker in future research on human neonates. PMID:26876605

  7. Genetic Analysis of Daily Activity in Humans and Mice

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    of the technical developments that have made such genetic dissections a productive force in the mouse , have, when combined with innovations in...and Mice AFOSR grant F49620-97-1-0321 Joseph S. Takahashi Dept. of Neurobiology & Physiology Northwestern University 2153 North Campus Dr. Evanston...Activity in Humans and Mice Unclassified 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Takahashi, Joseph S. ; 5f. WORK

  8. Spontaneous neural activity during human slow wave sleep.

    PubMed

    Dang-Vu, Thien Thanh; Schabus, Manuel; Desseilles, Martin; Albouy, Geneviève; Boly, Mélanie; Darsaud, Annabelle; Gais, Steffen; Rauchs, Géraldine; Sterpenich, Virginie; Vandewalle, Gilles; Carrier, Julie; Moonen, Gustave; Balteau, Evelyne; Degueldre, Christian; Luxen, André; Phillips, Christophe; Maquet, Pierre

    2008-09-30

    Slow wave sleep (SWS) is associated with spontaneous brain oscillations that are thought to participate in sleep homeostasis and to support the processing of information related to the experiences of the previous awake period. At the cellular level, during SWS, a slow oscillation (<1 Hz) synchronizes firing patterns in large neuronal populations and is reflected on electroencephalography (EEG) recordings as large-amplitude, low-frequency waves. By using simultaneous EEG and event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we characterized the transient changes in brain activity consistently associated with slow waves (>140 microV) and delta waves (75-140 microV) during SWS in 14 non-sleep-deprived normal human volunteers. Significant increases in activity were associated with these waves in several cortical areas, including the inferior frontal, medial prefrontal, precuneus, and posterior cingulate areas. Compared with baseline activity, slow waves are associated with significant activity in the parahippocampal gyrus, cerebellum, and brainstem, whereas delta waves are related to frontal responses. No decrease in activity was observed. This study demonstrates that SWS is not a state of brain quiescence, but rather is an active state during which brain activity is consistently synchronized to the slow oscillation in specific cerebral regions. The partial overlap between the response pattern related to SWS waves and the waking default mode network is consistent with the fascinating hypothesis that brain responses synchronized by the slow oscillation restore microwake-like activity patterns that facilitate neuronal interactions.

  9. Asbestos exposure increases human bronchial epithelial cell fibrinolytic activity.

    PubMed

    Gross, T J; Cobb, S M; Gruenert, D C; Peterson, M W

    1993-03-01

    Chronic exposure to asbestos fibers results in fibrotic lung disease. The distal pulmonary epithelium is an early target of asbestos-mediated injury. Local plasmin activity may be important in modulating endoluminal inflammatory responses in the lung. We studied the effects of asbestos exposure on cell-mediated plasma clot lysis as a marker of pericellular plasminogen activation. Exposing human bronchial epithelial (HBE) cells to 100 micrograms/ml of asbestos fibers for 24 h resulted in increased plasma clot lysis. Fibrinolytic activity was augmented in a dose-dependent fashion, was not due to secreted protease, and occurred only when there was direct contact between the plasma clot and the epithelial monolayer. Further analysis showed that asbestos exposure increased HBE cell-associated urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) activity in a time-dependent manner. The increased cell-associated PA activity could be removed by acid washing. The increase in PA activity following asbestos exposure required new protein synthesis because it was abrogated by treatment with either cycloheximide or actinomycin D. Therefore, asbestos exposure increases epithelial-mediated fibrinolysis by augmenting expression of uPA activity at the cell surface by mechanisms that require new RNA and protein synthesis. These observations suggest a novel mechanism whereby exposure of the distal epithelium to inhaled particulates may result in a chronic inflammatory response that culminates in the development of fibrotic lung disease.

  10. Potent cough suppression by physiologically active substance in human plasma.

    PubMed

    Akaike, Norio; Ito, Yushi; Ogawa, Sachie K; Maeda, Megumi; Wakita, Masahito; Takahama, Kazuo; Noguchi, Tetsuro; Kamei, Shintaro; Hamamoto, Takayoshi; Umehashi, Misako; Maeda, Hiroaki

    2014-01-01

    Human plasma contains wide variety of bioactive proteins that have proved essential in therapeutic discovery. However many human plasma proteins remain orphans with unknown biological functions. Evidences suggest that some plasma components target the respiratory system. In the present study we adapted heparin affinity chromatography to fractionate human plasma for functional bioassay. Fractions from pooled human plasma yielded particular plasma fractions with strong cough suppressing effects. Purification yielded a fraction that was finally identified as an activated blood coagulation factor fXIa using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization/time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI/TOF-MS). The fraction almost completely suppressed coughs induced by either chemical or mechanical stimulation applied to larynx or bifurcation of guinea-pig trachea. Cough suppressing effect of the fraction and commercially available fXIa were one million times stronger than codeine and codeine only partially suppressed the mechanically triggered coughing in animal model. Recent reviews highlighted prominent shortcomings of current available antitussives, including narcotic opioids such as codeine and their unpleasant or intolerable side effects. Therefore, safer and more effective cough suppressants would be welcome, and present findings indicate that fXIa in human plasma as a very promising, new therapeutic candidate for effective antitussive action.

  11. Familial Mediterranean fever mutations lift the obligatory requirement for microtubules in Pyrin inflammasome activation

    PubMed Central

    Van Gorp, Hanne; Saavedra, Pedro H. V.; de Vasconcelos, Nathalia M.; Van Opdenbosch, Nina; Vande Walle, Lieselotte; Matusiak, Magdalena; Prencipe, Giusi; Insalaco, Antonella; Van Hauwermeiren, Filip; Demon, Dieter; Bogaert, Delfien J.; Dullaers, Melissa; De Baere, Elfride; Hochepied, Tino; Dehoorne, Joke; Vermaelen, Karim Y.; Haerynck, Filomeen; De Benedetti, Fabrizio; Lamkanfi, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is the most common monogenic autoinflammatory disease worldwide. It is caused by mutations in the inflammasome adaptor Pyrin, but how FMF mutations alter signaling in FMF patients is unknown. Herein, we establish Clostridium difficile and its enterotoxin A (TcdA) as Pyrin-activating agents and show that wild-type and FMF Pyrin are differentially controlled by microtubules. Diverse microtubule assembly inhibitors prevented Pyrin-mediated caspase-1 activation and secretion of IL-1β and IL-18 from mouse macrophages and human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Remarkably, Pyrin inflammasome activation persisted upon microtubule disassembly in PBMCs of FMF patients but not in cells of patients afflicted with other autoinflammatory diseases. We further demonstrate that microtubules control Pyrin activation downstream of Pyrin dephosphorylation and that FMF mutations enable microtubule-independent assembly of apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a caspase recruitment domain (ASC) micrometer-sized perinuclear structures (specks). The discovery that Pyrin mutations remove the obligatory requirement for microtubules in inflammasome activation provides a conceptual framework for understanding FMF and enables immunological screening of FMF mutations. PMID:27911804

  12. Validation of Reference Genes for Quantitative Real-Time PCR in Bovine PBMCs Transformed and Non-transformed by Theileria annulata

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hongxi; Liu, Junlong; Li, Youquan; Yang, Congshan; Zhao, Shuaiyang; Liu, Juan; Liu, Aihong; Liu, Guangyuan; Yin, Hong; Guan, Guiquan; Luo, Jianxun

    2016-01-01

    Theileria annulata is a tick-borne intracellular protozoan parasite that causes tropical theileriosis, a fatal bovine lymphoproliferative disease. The parasite predominantly invades bovine B lymphocytes and macrophages and induces host cell transformation by a mechanism that is not fully comprehended. Analysis of signaling pathways by quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) could be a highly efficient means to understand this transformation mechanism. However, accurate analysis of qPCR data relies on selection of appropriate reference genes for normalization, yet few papers on T. annulata contain evidence of reference gene validation. We therefore used the geNorm and NormFinder programs to evaluate the stability of 5 candidate reference genes; 18S rRNA, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), ACTB (β-actin), PRKG1 (protein kinase cGMP-dependent, type I) and TATA box binding protein (TBP). The results showed that 18S rRNA was the reference gene most stably expressed in bovine PBMCs transformed and non-transformed with T. annulata, followed by GAPDH and TBP. While 18S rRNA and GAPDH were the best combination, these 2 genes were chosen as references to study signaling pathways involved in the transformation mechanism of T. annulata. PMID:26951977

  13. Human kallikrein 6 activity is regulated via an autoproteolytic mechanism of activation/inactivation.

    PubMed

    Bayés, Alex; Tsetsenis, Theodoros; Ventura, Salvador; Vendrell, Josep; Aviles, Francesc X; Sotiropoulou, Georgia

    2004-06-01

    Human kallikrein 6 (protease M/zyme/neurosin) is a serine protease that has been suggested to be a serum biomarker for ovarian cancer and may also be involved in pathologies of the CNS. The precursor form of human kallikrein 6 (pro-hK6) was overexpressed in Pichia pastoris and found to be autoprocessed to an active but unstable mature enzyme that subsequently yielded the inactive, self-cleavage product, hK6 (D81-K244). Site-directed mutagenesis was used to investigate the basis for the intrinsic catalytic activity and the activation mechanism of pro-hK6. A single substitution R80 --> Q stabilized the activity of the mature enzyme, while substitution of the active site serine (S197 --> A) resulted in complete loss of hK6 proteolytic activity and facilitated protein production. Our data suggest that the enzymatic activity of hK6 is regulated by an autoactivation/autoinactivation mechanism. Mature hK6 displayed a trypsin-like activity against synthetic substrates and human plasminogen was identified as a putative physiological substrate for hK6, as specific cleavage at the plasminogen internal bond S460-V461 resulted in the generation of angiostatin, an endogenous inhibitor of angiogenesis and metastatic growth.

  14. Influence of vestibular activation on respiration in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monahan, Kevin D.; Sharpe, Melissa K.; Drury, Daniel; Ertl, Andrew C.; Ray, Chester A.

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of the semicircular canals and otolith organs on respiration in humans. On the basis of animal studies, we hypothesized that vestibular activation would elicit a vestibulorespiratory reflex. To test this hypothesis, respiratory measures, arterial blood pressure, and heart rate were measured during engagement of semicircular canals and/or otolith organs. Dynamic upright pitch and roll (15 cycles/min), which activate the otolith organs and semicircular canals, increased respiratory rate (Delta2 +/- 1 and Delta3 +/- 1 breaths/min, respectively; P < 0.05). Dynamic yaw and lateral pitch (15 cycles/min), which activate the semicircular canals, increased respiration similarly (Delta3 +/- 1 and Delta2 +/- 1, respectively; P < 0.05). Dynamic chair rotation (15 cycles/min), which mimics dynamic yaw but eliminates neck muscle afferent, increased respiration (Delta3 +/- 1; P < 0.05) comparable to dynamic yaw (15 cycles/min). Increases in respiratory rate were graded as greater responses occurred during upright (Delta5 +/- 2 breaths/min) and lateral pitch (Delta4 +/- 1) and roll (Delta5 +/- 1) performed at 30 cycles/min. Increases in breathing frequency resulted in increases in minute ventilation during most interventions. Static head-down rotation, which activates otolith organs, did not alter respiratory rate (Delta1 +/- 1 breaths/min). Collectively, these data indicate that semicircular canals, but not otolith organs or neck muscle afferents, mediate increased ventilation in humans and support the concept that vestibular activation alters respiration in humans.

  15. Anticancer activities of bovine and human lactoferricin-derived peptides.

    PubMed

    Arias, Mauricio; Hilchie, Ashley L; Haney, Evan F; Bolscher, Jan G M; Hyndman, M Eric; Hancock, Robert E W; Vogel, Hans J

    2017-02-01

    Lactoferrin (LF) is a mammalian host defense glycoprotein with diverse biological activities. Peptides derived from the cationic region of LF possess cytotoxic activity against cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. Bovine lactoferricin (LFcinB), a peptide derived from bovine LF (bLF), exhibits broad-spectrum anticancer activity, while a similar peptide derived from human LF (hLF) is not as active. In this work, several peptides derived from the N-terminal regions of bLF and hLF were studied for their anticancer activities against leukemia and breast-cancer cells, as well as normal peripheral blood mononuclear cells. The cyclized LFcinB-CLICK peptide, which possesses a stable triazole linkage, showed improved anticancer activity, while short peptides hLF11 and bLF10 were not cytotoxic to cancer cells. Interestingly, hLF11 can act as a cell-penetrating peptide; when combined with the antimicrobial core sequence of LFcinB (RRWQWR) through either a Pro or Gly-Gly linker, toxicity to Jurkat cells increased. Together, our work extends the library of LF-derived peptides tested for anticancer activity, and identified new chimeric peptides with high cytotoxicity towards cancerous cells. Additionally, these results support the notion that short cell-penetrating peptides and antimicrobial peptides can be combined to create new adducts with increased potency.

  16. Human brain activity with near-infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Qingming; Chance, Britton

    1999-09-01

    Human brain activity was studied with a real time functional Near-InfraRed Imager (fNIRI). The imager has 16 measurement channels and covers 4 cm by 9 cm detection area. Brain activities in occipital, motor and prefrontal area were studied with the fNIRI. In prefrontal stimulation, language cognition, analogies, forming memory for new associations, emotional thinking, and mental arithmetic were carried out. Experimental results measured with fNIRI are demonstrated in this paper. It was shown that fNIRI technique is able to reveal the occipital activity during visual stimulation, and co-register well with results of fMRI in the motor cortex activity during finger tapping. In the studies of the effects of left prefrontal lobe on forming memory for new associations, it is shown that left prefrontal lobe activated more under deep conditions than that under shallow encoding, especially the dorsal part. In the studies of emotional thinking, it was shown that the responses were different between positive- negative emotional thinking and negative-positive emotional thinking. In mental arithmetic studies, higher activation was found in the first task than in the second, regardless of the difficulty, and higher activation was measured in subtraction of 17 than in subtraction of 3.

  17. Activated protooncogenes in human lung tumors from smokers.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, S H; Anna, C K; Brown, K C; Wiest, J S; Beattie, E J; Pero, R W; Iglehart, J D; Anderson, M W

    1991-02-15

    Fourteen primary human lung tumor DNAs from smokers were analyzed for transforming activity by two DNA transfection assays. Activated protooncogenes were detected in 3 of 11 tumor DNAs by the NIH 3T3 focus assay, whereas activated protooncogenes were detected in 11 of 13 tumor DNAs by the NIH 3T3 cotransfection-nude mouse tumorigenicity assay. K- or NRAS genes activated by point mutation at codons 12 or 61 were detected in a large cell carcinoma, a squamous cell carcinoma, and 5 adenocarcinomas. An HRAS oncogene activated by a different mechanism was detected in an epidermoid carcinoma. One adenocarcinoma was found to contain an activated RAF gene. Two unidentified transforming genes were detected in a squamous cell carcinoma DNA and two adenocarcinoma DNAs. Eight of 10 lung adenocarcinomas that had formed metastases at the time of surgery were found to contain RAS oncogenes. No significant increase in metastasis was observed in the lung adenocarcinomas that contained one or more 6-kilobase EcoRI alleles of the LMYC gene. Overall, 12 of 14 (86%) of the lung tumor DNAs from smokers were found to contain activated protooncogenes. RAS oncogenes appear to play a role in the development of metastases in lung adenocarcinomas.

  18. Activity of Protease-Activated Receptors in Primary Cultured Human Myenteric Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Kugler, Eva M.; Mazzuoli, Gemma; Demir, Ihsan E.; Ceyhan, Güralp O.; Zeller, Florian; Schemann, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Activity of the four known protease-activated receptors (PARs) has been well studied in rodent enteric nervous system and results in animal models established an important role for neuronal PAR2. We recently demonstrated that, unlike in rodents, PAR1 is the dominant neuronal protease receptor in the human submucous plexus. With this study we investigated whether this also applies to the human myenteric plexus. We used voltage sensitive dye recordings to detect action potential discharge in primary cultures of human myenteric neurons in response to PAR activating peptides (APs). Application of the PAR1-AP (TFLLR) or PAR4-AP (GYPGQV) evoked spike discharge in 79 or 23% of myenteric neurons, respectively. The PAR1-AP response was mimicked by the endogenous PAR1 activator thrombin and blocked by the PAR1 antagonists SCH79797. Human myenteric neurons did not respond to PAR2-AP. This was not due to culture conditions because all three PAR-APs evoked action potentials in cultured guinea pig myenteric neurons. Consecutive application of PAR-APs revealed coexpression (relative to the population responding to PAR-APs) of PAR1/PAR2 in 51%, PAR1/PAR4 in 43%, and of PAR2/PAR4 in 29% of guinea pig myenteric neurons. Our study provided further evidence for the prominent role of neuronal PAR1 in the human enteric nervous system. PMID:22988431

  19. Human endothelial dihydrofolate reductase low activity limits vascular tetrahydrobiopterin recycling.

    PubMed

    Whitsett, Jennifer; Rangel Filho, Artur; Sethumadhavan, Savitha; Celinska, Joanna; Widlansky, Michael; Vasquez-Vivar, Jeannette

    2013-10-01

    Tetrahydrobiopterin (BH₄) is required for NO synthesis and inhibition of superoxide release from endothelial NO synthase. Clinical trials using BH₄ to treat endothelial dysfunction have produced mixed results. Poor outcomes may be explained by the rapid systemic and cellular oxidation of BH₄. One of the oxidation products of BH₄, 7,8-dihydrobiopterin (7,8-BH₂), is recycled back to BH₄ by dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR). This enzyme is ubiquitously distributed and shows a wide range of activity depending on species-specific factors and cell type. Information about the kinetics and efficiency of BH4 recycling in human endothelial cells receiving BH₄ treatment is lacking. To characterize this reaction, we applied a novel multielectrode coulometric HPLC method that enabled the direct quantification of 7,8-BH₂ and BH₄, which is not possible with fluorescence-based methodologies. We found that basal untreated BH₄ and 7,8-BH₂ concentrations in human endothelial cells (ECs) are lower than in bovine and murine endothelioma cells. Treatment of human ECs with BH₄ transiently increased intracellular BH₄ while accumulating the more stable 7,8-BH₂. This was different from bovine or murine ECs, which resulted in preferential BH₄ increase. Using BH₄ diastereomers, 6S-BH₄ and 6R-BH₄, the narrow contribution of enzymatic DHFR recycling to total intracellular BH₄ was demonstrated. Reduction of 7,8-BH₂ to BH₄ occurs at very slow rates in cells and needs supraphysiological levels of 7,8-BH₂, indicating this reaction is kinetically limited. Activity assays verified that human DHFR has very low affinity for 7,8-BH₂ (DHF7,8-BH₂) and folic acid inhibits 7,8-BH₂ recycling. We conclude that low activity of endothelial DHFR is an important factor limiting the benefits of BH4 therapies, which may be further aggravated by folate supplements.

  20. Role of human prostasomes in the activation of spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Arienti, G; Carlini, E; Saccardi, C; Palmerini, C A

    2004-01-01

    Prostasomes are small vesicles of prostatic origin contained in human semen. Their composition is peculiar under many aspects. Cholesterol is abundant and many proteins are endowed with enzymatic or other activities. The function of prostasomes has been amply debated and several hypotheses have been put forward. The liquefaction of semen, spermatozoa motility, antibacterial activity and immunological functions have been related to prostasomes. Under certain aspects, prostasomes resemble synaptosomes. The fusion of prostasomes to spermatozoa enriches spermatozoa with cholesterol and causes bursts of cytoplasmic sperm calcium. The interaction of spermatozoa and prostasomes should be limited to vagina since prostasomes are immobile and do not follow spermatozoa in the superior female genital tract. Calcium bursts would increase spermatozoa motility, where cholesterol would decapacitate spermatozoa, so preventing untimely activation. Since spermatozoa receive many different molecules from prostasomes, additional effects are also possible. Prostasomes makes spermatozoa more apt to be activated by progesterone in the proximity of the ovum. Therefore, the fusion between spermatozoa and prostasomes would influence spermatozoa behaviour under many aspects and might be relevant for fecundation. The richness of molecular species in prostasomes is amazing and these small vesicles are expected to lead to many more discoveries in the field of human reproduction.

  1. Extracellular stimulation with human "noisy" electromyographic patterns facilitates myotube activity.

    PubMed

    Sciancalepore, M; Coslovich, T; Lorenzon, P; Ziraldo, G; Taccola, G

    2015-10-01

    Electrical stimulation (ES) of skeletal muscle partially mimics the benefits of physical activity. However, the stimulation protocols applied clinically to date, often cause unpleasant symptoms and muscle fatigue. Here, we compared the efficiency of a "noisy" stimulus waveform derived from human electromyographic (EMG) muscle patterns, with stereotyped 45 and 1 Hz electrical stimulations applied to mouse myotubes in vitro. Human gastrocnemius medialis electromyograms recorded from volunteers during real locomotor activity were used as a template for a noisy stimulation, called EMGstim. The stimulus-induced electrical activity, intracellular Ca(2+) dynamics and mechanical twitches in the myotubes were assessed using whole-cell perforated patch-clamp, Ca(2+) imaging and optical visualization techniques. EMGstim was more efficient in inducing myotube cell firing, [Ca(2+)]i changes and contractions compared with more conventional electrical stimulation. Its stimulation strength was also much lower than the minimum required to induce contractions via stereotyped stimulation protocols. We conclude that muscle cells in vitro can be more efficiently depolarized using the "noisy" stochastic stimulation pattern, EMGstim, a finding that suggests a way to favor a higher level of electrical activity in a larger number of cells.

  2. Cinobufagin Modulates Human Innate Immune Responses and Triggers Antibacterial Activity

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Shanshan; Spelmink, Laura; Codemo, Mario; Subramanian, Karthik; Pütsep, Katrin

    2016-01-01

    The traditional Chinese medicine Chan-Su is widely used for treatment of cancer and cardiovascular diseases, but also as a remedy for infections such as furunculosis, tonsillitis and acute pharyngitis. The clinical use of Chan-Su suggests that it has anti-infective effects, however, the mechanism of action is incompletely understood. In particular, the effect on the human immune system is poorly defined. Here, we describe previously unrecognized immunomodulatory activities of cinobufagin (CBG), a major bioactive component of Chan-Su. Using human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs), we show that LPS-induced maturation and production of a number of cytokines was potently inhibited by CBG, which also had a pro-apoptotic effect, associated with activation of caspase-3. Interestingly, CBG triggered caspase-1 activation and significantly enhanced IL-1β production in LPS-stimulated cells. Finally, we demonstrate that CBG upregulates gene expression of the antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) hBD-2 and hBD-3 in DCs, and induces secretion of HNP1-3 and hCAP-18/LL-37 from neutrophils, potentiating neutrophil antibacterial activity. Taken together, our data indicate that CBG modulates the inflammatory phenotype of DCs in response to LPS, and triggers an antibacterial innate immune response, thus proposing possible mechanisms for the clinical effects of Chan-Su in anti-infective therapy. PMID:27529866

  3. Robust Indoor Human Activity Recognition Using Wireless Signals

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yi; Jiang, Xinli; Cao, Rongyu; Wang, Xiyang

    2015-01-01

    Wireless signals–based activity detection and recognition technology may be complementary to the existing vision-based methods, especially under the circumstance of occlusions, viewpoint change, complex background, lighting condition change, and so on. This paper explores the properties of the channel state information (CSI) of Wi-Fi signals, and presents a robust indoor daily human activity recognition framework with only one pair of transmission points (TP) and access points (AP). First of all, some indoor human actions are selected as primitive actions forming a training set. Then, an online filtering method is designed to make actions’ CSI curves smooth and allow them to contain enough pattern information. Each primitive action pattern can be segmented from the outliers of its multi-input multi-output (MIMO) signals by a proposed segmentation method. Lastly, in online activities recognition, by selecting proper features and Support Vector Machine (SVM) based multi-classification, activities constituted by primitive actions can be recognized insensitive to the locations, orientations, and speeds. PMID:26184231

  4. The role of AMP-activated protein kinase in quercetin-induced apoptosis of HL-60 cells.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Jie; Niu, Guomin; Yin, Songmei; Xie, Shuangfeng; Li, Yiqing; Nie, Danian; Ma, Liping; Wang, Xiuju; Wu, Yudan

    2014-05-01

    Our previous studies have shown that quercetin inhibits Cox-2 and Bcl-2 expressions, and induces human leukemia HL-60 cell apoptosis. In order to investigate the role of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) on quercetin-induced apoptosis of HL-60 cells, we used flow cytometry to detect cell apoptosis. The expressions of LKB1, phosphorylated AMPK (p-AMPK), and Cox-2 protein were detected in HL-60 cells and normal peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) by western blot. The expressions of LKB1, p-AMPK, and Cox-2 were detected in HL-60 cells after culture with quercetin. The expressions of p-AMPK were detected in HL-60 cells after culture with AMPK inhibitor Compound C. Then, the expressions of LKB1, p-AMPK, and Cox-2 were detected in HL-60 cells after culture with quercetin alone or quercetin + Compound C. It was found that there was no significant difference in LKB1 between PBMCs and HL-60. p-AMPK in PBMCs was higher than that in HL-60, while Cox-2 was lower. After culture of HL-60 with quercetin, p-AMPK was increased, Cox-2 was decreased, but LKB1 remained unchanged. After culture of HL-60 with Compound C, p-AMPK was decreased. There was no significant difference in LKB1 between the quercetin-alone and the quercetin + Compound C groups. p-AMPK decreased more significantly, while Cox-2 increased more significantly in the quercetin + Compound C groups than those in the quercetin-alone groups. Taken together, these findings suggested that quercetin activates AMPK expression in HL-60 cells independent of LKB1 activation, inhibits Cox-2 expression by activating AMPK, and further regulates the Bcl-2-dependent pathways of apoptosis to exert its anti-leukemia effect.

  5. Listening to humans walking together activates the social brain circuitry.

    PubMed

    Saarela, Miiamaaria V; Hari, Riitta

    2008-01-01

    Human footsteps carry a vast amount of social information, which is often unconsciously noted. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging, we analyzed brain networks activated by footstep sounds of one or two persons walking. Listening to two persons walking together activated brain areas previously associated with affective states and social interaction, such as the subcallosal gyrus bilaterally, the right temporal pole, and the right amygdala. These areas seem to be involved in the analysis of persons' identity and complex social stimuli on the basis of auditory cues. Single footsteps activated only the biological motion area in the posterior STS region. Thus, hearing two persons walking together involved a more widespread brain network than did hearing footsteps from a single person.

  6. Dengue virus NS1 protein activates cells via Toll-like receptor 4 and disrupts endothelial cell monolayer integrity.

    PubMed

    Modhiran, Naphak; Watterson, Daniel; Muller, David A; Panetta, Adele K; Sester, David P; Liu, Lidong; Hume, David A; Stacey, Katryn J; Young, Paul R

    2015-09-09

    Complications arising from dengue virus infection include potentially fatal vascular leak, and severe disease has been linked with excessive immune cell activation. An understanding of the triggers of this activation is critical for the development of appropriately targeted disease control strategies. We show here that the secreted form of the dengue virus nonstructural protein 1 (NS1) is a pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP). Highly purified NS1 devoid of bacterial endotoxin activity directly activated mouse macrophages and human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) via Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), leading to the induction and release of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines. In an in vitro model of vascular leak, treatment with NS1 alone resulted in the disruption of endothelial cell monolayer integrity. Both NS1-mediated activation of PBMCs and NS1-induced vascular leak in vitro were inhibited by a TLR4 antagonist and by anti-TLR4 antibody treatment. The importance of TLR4 activation in vivo was confirmed by the reduction in capillary leak by a TLR4 antagonist in a mouse model of dengue virus infection. These results pinpoint NS1 as a viral toxin counterpart of the bacterial endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Similar to the role of LPS in septic shock, NS1 might contribute to vascular leak in dengue patients, which highlights TLR4 antagonists as a possible therapeutic option.

  7. Structural divergence of GPI-80 in activated human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Nitto, Takeaki; Takeda, Yuji; Yoshitake, Hiroshi; Sendo, Fujiro; Araki, Yoshihiko

    2007-07-27

    GPI-80 is a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored protein that is mainly expressed in human neutrophils. Previous studies using 3H9, a monoclonal antibody (mAb) against GPI-80, suggested that GPI-80 regulates leukocyte adherence and migration through Mac-1. GPI-80, which is anchored at the plasma membrane in resting neutrophils, moves into the pseudopodia and is released from activated human neutrophils. Here, we demonstrate that neutrophil activation affects GPI-80 dynamics using a new anti-GPI-80 mAb, designated 4D4, which is directed against the form of GPI-80 found on resting human neutrophils. Similar to 3H9, 4D4 influences Mac-1-dependent neutrophil adhesion. Treatment of purified GPI-80 with periodic acid and trypsin indicated that 3H9 and 4D4 recognize peptide and carbohydrate moieties, respectively. Stimulation with fMLP decreased the binding of 4D4 to GPI-80 on the neutrophil surface but increased the overall expression of GPI-80, as visualized by the 3H9 signal. Confocal laser microscopy revealed the 4D4 signal mainly on cell bodies and at a low level on pseudopodia during migration toward increasing concentrations of fMLP, whereas the 3H9 signal was observed in both areas. In addition, soluble GPI-80 released from activated neutrophils did not bind 4D4. These results suggest that there are two populations of GPI-80 that differ in the ability to bind 4D4. The 4D4-recognized form may regulate Mac-1-dependent neutrophil adhesion, and may subsequently be converted to a 4D4-unrecognized form during neutrophil activation.

  8. The Impact of Glyphosate, Its Metabolites and Impurities on Viability, ATP Level and Morphological changes in Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kwiatkowska, Marta; Jarosiewicz, Paweł; Michałowicz, Jaromir; Koter-Michalak, Maria; Huras, Bogumiła; Bukowska, Bożena

    2016-01-01

    The toxicity of herbicides to animals and human is an issue of worldwide concern. The present study has been undertaken to assess toxic effect of widely used pesticide—glyphosate, its metabolites: aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA) and methylphosphonic acid and its impurities: N-(phosphonomethyl)iminodiacetic acid (PMIDA), N-methylglyphosate, hydroxymethylphosphonic acid and bis-(phosphonomethyl)amine on human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). We have evaluated the effect of those compounds on viability, ATP level, size (FSC-A parameter) and granulation (SSC-A parameter) of the cells studied. Human peripheral blood mononuclear cells were exposed to different concentrations of glyphosate, its metabolites and impurities (0.01–10 mM) for 4 and 24 h. It was found that investigated compounds caused statistically significant decrease in viability and ATP level of PBMCs. The strongest changes in cell viability and ATP level were observed after 24 h incubation of PBMCs with bis-(phosphonomethyl)amine, and particularly PMIDA. Moreover, all studied compounds changed cell granularity, while PMIDA and bis-(phosphonomethyl)amine altered PBMCs size. It may be concluded that bis-(phosphonomethyl)amine, and PMIDA caused a slightly stronger damage to PBMCs than did glyphosate. Changes in the parameters studied in PBMCs were observed only at high concentrations of the compounds examined, which clearly shows that they may occur in this cell type only as a result of acute poisoning of human organism with these substances. PMID:27280764

  9. Human activity and damaging landslides and floods on Madeira Island

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baioni, D.

    2011-11-01

    Over the last few decades, the island of Madeira has become an important offshore tourism and business center, with rapid economic and demographic development that has caused changes to the landscape due to human activity. In Madeira's recent history, there has been an increase over time in the frequency of occurrence of damaging landslide and flood events. As a result, the costs of restoration work due to damage caused by landslide and flood events have become a larger and larger component of Madeira's annual budget. Landslides and floods in Madeira deserve particular attention because they represent the most serious hazard to human life, to property, and to the natural environment and its important heritage value. The work reported on in this paper involved the analysis of historical data regarding damaging landslide and flood events on Madeira (in particular from 1941 to 1991) together with data on geological characteristics, topographic features, and climate, and from field observations. This analysis showed that the main factor triggering the occurrence of damaging landslide and flood events is rainfall, but that the increase in the number of damaging events recorded on Madeira Island, especially in recent times, seems to be related mostly to human activity, specifically to economic development and population growth, rather than to natural factors.

  10. Multi-Dimensional Dynamics of Human Electromagnetic Brain Activity

    PubMed Central

    Kida, Tetsuo; Tanaka, Emi; Kakigi, Ryusuke

    2016-01-01

    Magnetoencephalography (MEG) and electroencephalography (EEG) are invaluable neuroscientific tools for unveiling human neural dynamics in three dimensions (space, time, and frequency), which are associated with a wide variety of perceptions, cognition, and actions. MEG/EEG also provides different categories of neuronal indices including activity magnitude, connectivity, and network properties along the three dimensions. In the last 20 years, interest has increased in inter-regional connectivity and complex network properties assessed by various sophisticated scientific analyses. We herein review the definition, computation, short history, and pros and cons of connectivity and complex network (graph-theory) analyses applied to MEG/EEG signals. We briefly describe recent developments in source reconstruction algorithms essential for source-space connectivity and network analyses. Furthermore, we discuss a relatively novel approach used in MEG/EEG studies to examine the complex dynamics represented by human brain activity. The correct and effective use of these neuronal metrics provides a new insight into the multi-dimensional dynamics of the neural representations of various functions in the complex human brain. PMID:26834608

  11. Natural image classification driven by human brain activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Dai; Peng, Hanyang; Wang, Jinqiao; Tang, Ming; Xue, Rong; Zuo, Zhentao

    2016-03-01

    Natural image classification has been a hot topic in computer vision and pattern recognition research field. Since the performance of an image classification system can be improved by feature selection, many image feature selection methods have been developed. However, the existing supervised feature selection methods are typically driven by the class label information that are identical for different samples from the same class, ignoring with-in class image variability and therefore degrading the feature selection performance. In this study, we propose a novel feature selection method, driven by human brain activity signals collected using fMRI technique when human subjects were viewing natural images of different categories. The fMRI signals associated with subjects viewing different images encode the human perception of natural images, and therefore may capture image variability within- and cross- categories. We then select image features with the guidance of fMRI signals from brain regions with active response to image viewing. Particularly, bag of words features based on GIST descriptor are extracted from natural images for classification, and a sparse regression base feature selection method is adapted to select image features that can best predict fMRI signals. Finally, a classification model is built on the select image features to classify images without fMRI signals. The validation experiments for classifying images from 4 categories of two subjects have demonstrated that our method could achieve much better classification performance than the classifiers built on image feature selected by traditional feature selection methods.

  12. Multi-Dimensional Dynamics of Human Electromagnetic Brain Activity.

    PubMed

    Kida, Tetsuo; Tanaka, Emi; Kakigi, Ryusuke

    2015-01-01

    Magnetoencephalography (MEG) and electroencephalography (EEG) are invaluable neuroscientific tools for unveiling human neural dynamics in three dimensions (space, time, and frequency), which are associated with a wide variety of perceptions, cognition, and actions. MEG/EEG also provides different categories of neuronal indices including activity magnitude, connectivity, and network properties along the three dimensions. In the last 20 years, interest has increased in inter-regional connectivity and complex network properties assessed by various sophisticated scientific analyses. We herein review the definition, computation, short history, and pros and cons of connectivity and complex network (graph-theory) analyses applied to MEG/EEG signals. We briefly describe recent developments in source reconstruction algorithms essential for source-space connectivity and network analyses. Furthermore, we discuss a relatively novel approach used in MEG/EEG studies to examine the complex dynamics represented by human brain activity. The correct and effective use of these neuronal metrics provides a new insight into the multi-dimensional dynamics of the neural representations of various functions in the complex human brain.

  13. Three-dimensional electrical impedance tomography of human brain activity.

    PubMed

    Tidswell, T; Gibson, A; Bayford, R H; Holder, D S

    2001-02-01

    Regional cerebral blood flow and blood volume changes that occur during human brain activity will change the local impedance of that cortical area, as blood has a lower impedance than that of brain. Theoretically, such impedance changes could be measured from scalp electrodes and reconstructed into images of the internal impedance of the head. Electrical Impedance Tomography (EIT) is a newly developed technique by which impedance measurements from the surface of an object are reconstructed into impedance images. It is fast, portable, inexpensive, and noninvasive, but has a relatively low spatial resolution. EIT images were recorded with scalp electrodes and an EIT system, specially optimized for recording brain function, in 39 adult human subjects during visual, somatosensory, or motor activity. Reproducible impedance changes of about 0.5% occurred in 51/52 recordings, which lasted from 6 s after the stimulus onset to 41 s after stimulus cessation. When these changes were reconstructed into impedance images, using a novel 3-D reconstruction algorithm, 19 data sets demonstrated significant impedance changes in the appropriate cortical region. This demonstrates, for the first time, that significant impedance changes, which could form the basis for a novel neuroimaging technology, may be recorded in human subjects with scalp electrodes. The final images contained spatial noise and strategies to reduce this in future work are presented.

  14. ras activation in human tumors and in animal model systems.

    PubMed Central

    Corominas, M; Sloan, S R; Leon, J; Kamino, H; Newcomb, E W; Pellicer, A

    1991-01-01

    Environmental agents such as radiation and chemicals are known to cause genetic damage. Alterations in a limited set of cellular genes called proto-oncogenes lead to unregulated proliferation and differentiation. We have studied the role of the ras gene family in carcinogenesis using two different animal models. In one case, thymic lymphomas were induced in mice by either gamma or neutron radiation, and in the other, keratoacanthomas were induced in rabbit skin with dimethylbezanthracene. Human keratoacanthomas similar to the ones induced in rabbits were also analyzed. We found that different types of radiation such as gamma rays and neutrons, induced different point mutations in ras genes. A novel K-ras mutation in codon 146 has been found in thymic lymphomas induced by neutrons. Keratoacanthomas induced in rabbit skin by dimethylbenzanthracene show a high frequency of H-ras-activated genes carrying a mutation in codon 61. The same is observed in human keratoacanthomas, although mutations are in both the 12th and the 61st codons of the H-ras gene. H-ras activation is less frequent in human squamous cell carcinomas than in keratoacanthomas, suggesting that ras genes could play a role in vivo in differentiation as well as in proliferation. Images FIGURE 1. FIGURE 2. FIGURE 3. FIGURE 4. PMID:1773791

  15. Coordinated activities of human dicer domains in regulatory RNA processing.

    PubMed

    Ma, Enbo; Zhou, Kaihong; Kidwell, Mary Anne; Doudna, Jennifer A

    2012-09-28

    The conserved ribonuclease Dicer generates microRNAs and short-interfering RNAs that guide gene silencing in eukaryotes. The specific contributions of human Dicer's structural domains to RNA product length and substrate preference are incompletely understood, due in part to the difficulties of Dicer purification. Here, we show that active forms of human Dicer can be assembled from recombinant polypeptides expressed in bacteria. Using this system, we find that three distinct modes of RNA recognition give rise to Dicer's fidelity and product length specificity. The first involves anchoring one end of a double-stranded RNA helix within the PAZ domain, which can assemble in trans with Dicer's catalytic domains to reconstitute an accurate but non-substrate-selective dicing activity. The second entails nonspecific RNA binding by the double-stranded RNA binding domain, an interaction that is essential for substrate recruitment in the absence of the PAZ domain. The third mode of recognition involves hairpin RNA loop recognition by the helicase domain, which ensures efficient processing of specific substrates. These results reveal distinct interactions of each Dicer domain with different RNA structural features and provide a facile system for investigating the molecular mechanisms of human microRNA biogenesis.

  16. TT virus (TTV) loads associated with different peripheral blood cell types and evidence for TTV replication in activated mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Maggi, F; Fornai, C; Zaccaro, L; Morrica, A; Vatteroni, M L; Isola, P; Marchi, S; Ricchiuti, A; Pistello, M; Bendinelli, M

    2001-06-01

    TT virus (TTV) loads associated with the peripheral blood cells of seven patients known to carry the virus in plasma were investigated by real-time PCR. Whereas red cells/platelets were uniformly negative, six and four patients yielded positive peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and polymorphonuclear leukocytes, respectively, but viral titres were generally low. Fractionation of PBMCs into monocyte- and B, T4, and T8 lymphocyte-enriched subpopulations showed no pattern in the viral loads that might suggest the preferential association of TTV to one or more specific cell types. TTV-negative PBMCs absorbed measurable amounts of virus when incubated with infected plasma at 4 degrees C. Furthermore, cultures of TTV-negative phytohaemagglutinin-stimulated PBMCs exposed in vitro to virus-positive plasma and faecal extracts released considerable levels of infectious TTV into the supernatant fluid and the same was true for TTV-positive stimulated PBMCs. These results indicate that, whereas freshly harvested resting PBMCs seem to produce little, if any TTV, stimulated PBMCs actively replicate the virus.

  17. Inhibition of human natural killer cell functional activity by human aspartyl β-hydroxylase.

    PubMed

    Huyan, Ting; Li, Qi; Ye, Lin-Jie; Yang, Hui; Xue, Xiao-Ping; Zhang, Ming-Jie; Huang, Qing-Sheng; Yin, Da-Chuan; Shang, Peng

    2014-12-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are a key component of the innate immune system and play pivotal roles as inflammatory regulators and in tumor surveillance. Human aspartyl β-hydroxylase (HAAH) is a plasma membrane and endoplasmic reticulum protein with hydroxylation activity, which is over-expressed in many malignant neoplasms and can be detected from the sera of tumor patients. HAAH is involved in regulating tumor cell infiltration and metastasis. Escaping from immune surveillance may help tumor cell infiltration and metastasis. However, the effects of HAAH on tumor immune surveillance have not yet been investigated carefully. The present study investigated the potential use of HAAH as an immune regulator of human NK cells. We assessed the effects of recombinant HAAH (r-HAAH) on primary human NK cell morphology, viability, cytotoxicity, apoptosis, receptors expression and cytokine/cytolytic proteins production. Our results demonstrated that r-HAAH negatively affects NK cell activity in a time and dose-dependent manner. It noticeably reduces the viability of the NK cells by increasing apoptosis and necrosis via caspase signaling pathways. Moreover, r-HAAH reduces the NK cell cytotoxicity by inhibiting surface expression of NKG2D, NKp44 and IFN-γ secretion. These findings suggest that one of the ways by which HAAH actively promotes tumor formation and proliferation is by inhibiting NK cell-surveillance activity.

  18. Mechanism of human natural killer cell activation by Haemophilus ducreyi.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Janowicz, Diane M; Fortney, Kate R; Katz, Barry P; Spinola, Stanley M

    2009-08-15

    The role of natural killer (NK) cells in the host response to Haemophilus ducreyi infection is unclear. In pustules obtained from infected human volunteers, there was an enrichment of CD56bright NK cells bearing the activation markers CD69 and HLA-DR, compared with peripheral blood. To study the mechanism by which H. ducreyi activated NK cells, we used peripheral blood mononuclear cells from uninfected volunteers. H. ducreyi activated NK cells only in the presence of antigen-presenting cells. H. ducreyi-infected monocytes and monocyte-derived macrophages activated NK cells in a contact- and interleukin-18 (IL-18)-dependent manner, whereas monocyte-derived dendritic cells induced NK activation through soluble IL-12. More lesional NK cells than peripheral blood NK cells produced IFN-gamma in response to IL-12 and IL-18. We conclude that NK cells are recruited to experimental lesions and likely are activated by infected macrophages and dendritic cells. IFN-gamma produced by lesional NK cells may facilitate phagocytosis of H. ducreyi.

  19. Identification of Human Gustatory Cortex by Activation Likelihood Estimation

    PubMed Central

    Veldhuizen, Maria G.; Albrecht, Jessica; Zelano, Christina; Boesveldt, Sanne; Breslin, Paul; Lundström, Johan N.

    2010-01-01

    Over the last two decades, neuroimaging methods have identified a variety of taste-responsive brain regions. Their precise location, however, remains in dispute. For example, taste stimulation activates areas throughout the insula and overlying operculum, but identification of subregions has been inconsistent. Furthermore, literature reviews and summaries of gustatory brain activations tend to reiterate rather than resolve this ambiguity. Here we used a new meta-analytic method [activation likelihood estimation (ALE)] to obtain a probability map of the location of gustatory brain activation across fourteen studies. The map of activation likelihood values can also serve as a source of independent coordinates for future region-of-interest analyses. We observed significant cortical activation probabilities in: bilateral anterior insula and overlying frontal operculum, bilateral mid dorsal insula and overlying Rolandic operculum, and bilateral posterior insula/parietal operculum/postcentral gyrus, left lateral orbitofrontal cortex (OFC), right medial OFC, pregenual anterior cingulate cortex (prACC) and right mediodorsal thalamus. This analysis confirms the involvement of multiple cortical areas within insula and overlying operculum in gustatory processing and provides a functional “taste map” which can be used as an inclusive mask in the data analyses of future studies. In light of this new analysis, we discuss human central processing of gustatory stimuli and identify topics where increased research effort is warranted. PMID:21305668

  20. [Human social activity under conditions of relative social isolation].

    PubMed

    Prokhvatilov, A Iu

    1992-01-01

    The differences in using a "social isolation" concept in the psychological literature are presented. The term of "relative social isolation" is clarified. A relationship between human adaptation to the relative social isolation environments and the development of his social qualities and social activities is presented. The "social context", dictating motivation attitudes of a man to the isolation situation, emotional experiences, self-appraisal of activity is of crucial importance for evaluating the real environments of relative social isolations. Social activity of a personality is studied as the relations of a man with the conditions of his activity. The results of studying the dynamics of the psychic state of a man during individual and group isolation are compared. It is concluded that social activity of man and his functional state are interrelated. The particular manifestations and direction of the changes in the social activity of the subject depend on the duration of isolation and are determined first of all by social significance and meaningful and balanced work for a person as well as by the amount and frequency of direct and mediated social contacts under specific conditions of relative social isolation.

  1. Glycosylated human oxyhaemoglobin activates nuclear factor-κB and activator protein-1 in cultured human aortic smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Peiró, Concepción; Matesanz, Nuria; Nevado, Julián; Lafuente, Nuria; Cercas, Elena; Azcutia, Verónica; Vallejo, Susana; Rodríguez-Mañas, Leocadio; Sánchez-Ferrer, Carlos F

    2003-01-01

    Diabetic vessels undergo structural changes that are linked to a high incidence of cardiovascular diseases. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) mediate cell signalling in the vasculature, where they can promote cell growth and activate redox-regulated transcription factors, like activator protein-1 (AP-1) or nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), which are involved in remodelling and inflammation processes. Amadori adducts, formed through nonenzymatic glycosylation, can contribute to ROS formation in diabetes. In this study, we analysed whether Amadori-modified human oxyhaemoglobin, glycosylated at either normal (N-Hb) or elevated (E-Hb) levels, can induce cell growth and activate AP-1 and NF-κB in cultured human aortic smooth muscle cells (HASMC). E-Hb (1 nM–1 μM), but not N-Hb, promoted a concentration-dependent increase in cell size from nanomolar concentrations, although it failed to stimulate HASMC proliferation. At 10 nM, E-Hb stimulated both AP-1 and NF-κB activity, as assessed by transient transfection, electromobility shift assays or immunofluorescence staining. The effects of E-Hb resembled those of the proinflammatory cytokine tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α). E-Hb enhanced intracellular superoxide anions content and its effects on HASMC were abolished by different ROS scavengers. In conclusion, E-Hb stimulates growth and activates AP-1 and NF-κB in human vascular smooth muscle by redox-sensitive pathways, thus suggesting a possible direct role for Amadori adducts in diabetic vasculopathy. PMID:14504138

  2. Acetaminophen Induces Human Neuroblastoma Cell Death through NFKB Activation

    PubMed Central

    Posadas, Inmaculada; Santos, Pablo; Ceña, Valentín

    2012-01-01

    Neuroblastoma resistance to apoptosis may contribute to the aggressive behavior of this tumor. Therefore, it would be relevant to activate endogenous cellular death mechanisms as a way to improve neuroblastoma therapy. We used the neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cell line as a model to study the mechanisms involved in acetaminophen (AAP)-mediated toxicity by measuring CYP2E1 enzymatic activity, NFkB p65 subunit activation and translocation to the nucleus, Bax accumulation into the mitochondria, cytochrome c release and caspase activation. AAP activates the intrinsic death pathway in the SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cell line. AAP metabolism is partially responsible for this activation, because blockade of the cytochrome CYP2E1 significantly reduced but did not totally prevent, AAP-induced SH-SY5Y cell death. AAP also induced NFkB p65 activation by phosphorylation and its translocation to the nucleus, where NFkB p65 increased IL-1β production. This increase contributed to neuroblastoma cell death through a mechanism involving Bax accumulation into the mitochondria, cytochrome c release and caspase3 activation. Blockade of NFkB translocation to the nucleus by the peptide SN50 prevented AAP-mediated cell death and IL-1β production. Moreover, overexpression of the antiapoptotic protein Bcl-xL did not decrease AAP-mediated IL-1β production, but prevented both AAP and IL-1β-mediated cell death. We also confirmed the AAP toxic actions on SK-N-MC neuroepithelioma and U87MG glioblastoma cell lines. The results presented here suggest that AAP activates the intrinsic death pathway in neuroblastoma cells through a mechanism involving NFkB and IL-1β. PMID:23166834

  3. Activation of the peripheral endocannabinoid system in human obesity.

    PubMed

    Engeli, Stefan; Böhnke, Jana; Feldpausch, Mareike; Gorzelniak, Kerstin; Janke, Jürgen; Bátkai, Sándor; Pacher, Pál; Harvey-White, Judy; Luft, Friedrich C; Sharma, Arya M; Jordan, Jens

    2005-10-01

    Obesity is the main risk factor for the development of type 2 diabetes. Activation of the central endocannabinoid system increases food intake and promotes weight gain. Blockade of the cannabinoid type 1 (CB-1) receptor reduces body weight in animals by central and peripheral actions; the role of the peripheral endocannabinoid system in human obesity is now being extensively investigated. We measured circulating endocannabinoid concentrations and studied the expression of CB-1 and the main degrading enzyme, fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), in adipose tissue of lean (n = 20) and obese (n = 20) women and after a 5% weight loss in a second group of women (n = 17). Circulating levels of anandamide and 1/2-arachidonoylglycerol were increased by 35 and 52% in obese compared with lean women (P < 0.05). Adipose tissue mRNA levels were reduced by -34% for CB-1 and -59% for FAAH in obese subjects (P < 0.05). A strong negative correlation was found between FAAH expression in adipose tissue and circulating endocannabinoids. Circulating endocannabinoids and CB-1 or FAAH expression were not affected by 5% weight loss. The expression of CB-1 and FAAH was increased in mature human adipocytes compared with in preadipocytes and was found in several human tissues. Our findings support the presence of a peripheral endocannabinoid system that is upregulated in human obesity.

  4. Theoretical considerations for mapping activation in human cardiac fibrillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rappel, Wouter-Jan; Narayan, Sanjiv M.

    2013-06-01

    Defining mechanisms for cardiac fibrillation is challenging because, in contrast to other arrhythmias, fibrillation exhibits complex non-repeatability in spatiotemporal activation but paradoxically exhibits conserved spatial gradients in rate, dominant frequency, and electrical propagation. Unlike animal models, in which fibrillation can be mapped at high spatial and temporal resolution using optical dyes or arrays of contact electrodes, mapping of cardiac fibrillation in patients is constrained practically to lower resolutions or smaller fields-of-view. In many animal models, atrial fibrillation is maintained by localized electrical rotors and focal sources. However, until recently, few studies had revealed localized sources in human fibrillation, so that the impact of mapping constraints on the ability to identify rotors or focal sources in humans was not described. Here, we determine the minimum spatial and temporal resolutions theoretically required to detect rigidly rotating spiral waves and focal sources, then extend these requirements for spiral waves in computer simulations. Finally, we apply our results to clinical data acquired during human atrial fibrillation using a novel technique termed focal impulse and rotor mapping (FIRM). Our results provide theoretical justification and clinical demonstration that FIRM meets the spatio-temporal resolution requirements to reliably identify rotors and focal sources for human atrial fibrillation.

  5. In vitro activity, postantibiotic effect and human monocyte activity of grepafloxacin against Legionella species.

    PubMed

    Dubois, Jacques; St-Pierre, Claude

    1999-04-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the in vitro antimicrobial activity, postantibiotic effect (PAE) and human monocyte activity of grepafloxacin compared with sparfloxacin, ciprofloxacin, clarithromycin, erythromycin and rifampicin against 181 strains of Legionella pneumophila, nine strains of L. micdadei, 10 strains of L. dumoffii, seven strains of L. longbeachae and seven other Legionella strains. METHODS: MICs were determined by standard agar dilution using buffered yeast extract (BYE) agar. PAE and human monocyte activity were determined by standard culture techniques. RESULTS: Grepafloxacin, sparfloxacin and rifampicin were the most active agents against L. pneumophila (MIC90 active than erythromycin against L. dumoffii and L. longbeachae and more active than both erythromycin and clarithromycin against L. micdadei and isolates of other Legionella spp. The PAE of grepafloxacin against erythromycin-susceptible L. pneumophila (2.62 h) was higher than that of sparfloxacin (0.88 h), erythromycin (0.93 hours) and clarithromycin (0.72 h). Against erythromycin-resistant L. pneumophila, the PAE of grepafloxacin (4.18 h) was higher than those of all the other antibiotics tested. Grepafloxacin, sparfloxacin, ciprofloxacin and clarithromycin inhibited the growth of all L. pneumophila strains and other erythromycin-resistant Legionella spp. in human monocytes. However, only grepafloxacin and ciprofloxacin prevented regrowth or killed L. pneumophila after removal of extracellular antibiotic. CONCLUSIONS: Grepafloxacin showed effective antibacterial activity against the Legionella spp. tested, and has a PAE and activity within human monocytes that suggest it may be useful in the treatment of lower respiratory tract infections caused by Legionella spp.

  6. Antiproliferative activities of Garcinia bracteata extract and its active ingredient, isobractatin, against human tumor cell lines.

    PubMed

    Shen, Tao; Li, Wei; Wang, Yan-Yan; Zhong, Qing-Qing; Wang, Shu-Qi; Wang, Xiao-Ning; Ren, Dong-Mei; Lou, Hong-Xiang

    2014-03-01

    In our cell based screening of antitumor ingredients from plants, the EtOH extract of Garcinia bracteata displayed antiproliferative effect against human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells, human breast cancer MCF-7 cells, and human prostate cancer PC3 cells. Phytochemical investigation of this active extract produced nine ingredients, and their structures were established by analysis of MS and NMR spectra. Antiproliferative evaluation of isolated ingredients on A549, MCF-7 and PC3 cells indicated that a xanthone named isobractatin (1) exhibited potent antiproliferative activity against the above three human cancer cell lines with IC50 values ranging from 2.90 to 4.15 μM. Treatment of PC3 cells with 1 led to an enhancement of the cell apoptosis, and arrested cell cycle in the G0/G1 phase. The G0/G1 phase cycle-related proteins analysis showed that the expressions of cyclins D1 and E were reduced by 1, whereas the protein level of cyclin dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitor P21 was induced. Additionally, 1 enhanced PC3 cell apoptosis by activations of Bax, caspases 3 and 9, and by inhibition of Bcl-2. Our combined data illustrated that isobractatin (1) was the antiproliferative ingredient of G. bracteata against three human cancer cell lines, which exerted its antiproliferatrive effect via cell cycle arrest and induction of apoptosis.

  7. Information Flow Model of Human Extravehicular Activity Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Matthew J.; McGuire, Kerry M.; Feigh, Karen M.

    2014-01-01

    Future human spaceflight missions will face the complex challenge of performing human extravehicular activity (EVA) beyond the low Earth orbit (LEO) environment. Astronauts will become increasingly isolated from Earth-based mission support and thus will rely heavily on their own decision-making capabilities and onboard tools to accomplish proposed EVA mission objectives. To better address time delay communication issues, EVA characters, e.g. flight controllers, astronauts, etc., and their respective work practices and roles need to be better characterized and understood. This paper presents the results of a study examining the EVA work domain and the personnel that operate within it. The goal is to characterize current and historical roles of ground support, intravehicular (IV) crew and EV crew, their communication patterns and information needs. This work provides a description of EVA operations and identifies issues to be used as a basis for future investigation.

  8. Human factors in remote control engineering development activities

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, M.M.; Hamel, W.R.; Draper, J.V.

    1983-01-01

    Human factors engineering, which is an integral part of the advanced remote control development activities at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, is described. First, work at the Remote Systems Development Facility (RSDF) has shown that operators can perform a wide variety of tasks, some of which were not specifically designed for remote systems, with a dextrous electronic force-reflecting servomanipulator and good television remote viewing capabilities. Second, the data collected during mock-up remote maintenance experiments at the RSDF have been analyzed to provide guidelines for the design of human interfaces with an integrated advanced remote maintenance system currently under development. Guidelines have been provided for task allocation between operators, remote viewing systems, and operator controls. 6 references, 5 figures, 2 tables.

  9. Chemosensory Cues to Conspecific Emotional Stress Activate Amygdala in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Mujica-Parodi, Lilianne R.; Strey, Helmut H.; Frederick, Blaise; Savoy, Robert; Cox, David; Botanov, Yevgeny; Tolkunov, Denis; Rubin, Denis; Weber, Jochen

    2009-01-01

    Alarm substances are airborne chemical signals, released by an individual into the environment, which communicate emotional stress between conspecifics. Here we tested whether humans, like other mammals, are able to detect emotional stress in others by chemosensory cues. Sweat samples collected from individuals undergoing an acute emotional stressor, with exercise as a control, were pooled and presented to a separate group of participants (blind to condition) during four experiments. In an fMRI experiment and its replication, we showed that scanned participants showed amygdala activation in response to samples obtained from donors undergoing an emotional, but not physical, stressor. An odor-discrimination experiment suggested the effect was primarily due to emotional, and not odor, differences between the two stimuli. A fourth experiment investigated behavioral effects, demonstrating that stress samples sharpened emotion-perception of ambiguous facial stimuli. Together, our findings suggest human chemosensory signaling of emotional stress, with neurobiological and behavioral effects. PMID:19641623

  10. Effective use of frozen donor peripheral blood mononuclear cells for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 isolation from vertically infected pediatric patients.

    PubMed Central

    Paul, M O; Tetali, S; Pahwa, S

    1994-01-01

    In this study, we examined variables related to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) isolation utilizing samples from 51 HIV-infected (153 plasma and 122 peripheral blood mononuclear cell [PBMC] samples) and 57 uninfected (182 plasma and 163 PBMC samples) infants. Our chief observation was that cryopreservation of donor PBMCs does not significantly alter their sensitivity or specificity for isolation of HIV from patient PBMCs or plasma. PMID:8051275

  11. Effective use of frozen donor peripheral blood mononuclear cells for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 isolation from vertically infected pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Paul, M O; Tetali, S; Pahwa, S

    1994-05-01

    In this study, we examined variables related to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) isolation utilizing samples from 51 HIV-infected (153 plasma and 122 peripheral blood mononuclear cell [PBMC] samples) and 57 uninfected (182 plasma and 163 PBMC samples) infants. Our chief observation was that cryopreservation of donor PBMCs does not significantly alter their sensitivity or specificity for isolation of HIV from patient PBMCs or plasma.

  12. Super Normal Vector for Human Activity Recognition with Depth Cameras.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaodong; Tian, YingLi

    2017-05-01

    The advent of cost-effectiveness and easy-operation depth cameras has facilitated a variety of visual recognition tasks including human activity recognition. This paper presents a novel framework for recognizing human activities from video sequences captured by depth cameras. We extend the surface normal to polynormal by assembling local neighboring hypersurface normals from a depth sequence to jointly characterize local motion and shape information. We then propose a general scheme of super normal vector (SNV) to aggregate the low-level polynormals into a discriminative representation, which can be viewed as a simplified version of the Fisher kernel representation. In order to globally capture the spatial layout and temporal order, an adaptive spatio-temporal pyramid is introduced to subdivide a depth video into a set of space-time cells. In the extensive experiments, the proposed approach achieves superior performance to the state-of-the-art methods on the four public benchmark datasets, i.e., MSRAction3D, MSRDailyActivity3D, MSRGesture3D, and MSRActionPairs3D.

  13. Evaluation of Hemagglutination Activity of Chitosan Nanoparticles Using Human Erythrocytes

    PubMed Central

    de Lima, Jefferson Muniz; Sarmento, Ronaldo Rodrigues; de Souza, Joelma Rodrigues; Brayner, Fábio André; Feitosa, Ana Paula Sampaio; Padilha, Rafael; Alves, Luiz Carlos; Porto, Isaque Jerônimo; Batista, Roberta Ferreti Bonan Dantas; de Oliveira, Juliano Elvis; de Medeiros, Eliton Souto; Bonan, Paulo Rogério Ferreti; Castellano, Lúcio Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Chitosan is a polysaccharide composed of randomly distributed chains of β-(1-4) D-glucosamine and N-acetyl-D-glucosamine. This compound is obtained by partial or total deacetylation of chitin in acidic solution. The chitosan-based hemostatic agents have been gaining much attention in the management of bleeding. The aim of this study was to evaluate in vitro hemagglutination activity of chitosan nanoparticles using human erythrocytes. The preparation of nanoparticles was achieved by ionotropic gelification technique followed by neutralization with NaOH 1 mol/L−1. The hemagglutination activity was performed on a solution of 2% erythrocytes (pH 7.4 on PBS) collected from five healthy volunteers. The hemolysis determination was made by spectrophotometric analysis. Chitosan nanoparticle solutions without NaOH addition changed the reddish colour of the wells into brown, suggesting an oxidative reaction of hemoglobin and possible cell lysis. All neutralized solutions of chitosan nanoparticles presented positive haemagglutination, without any change in reaction color. Chitosan nanoparticles presented hemolytic activity ranging from 186.20 to 223.12%, while neutralized solutions ranged from 2.56 to 72.54%, comparing to distilled water. Results highlight the need for development of new routes of synthesis of chitosan nanoparticles within human physiologic pH. PMID:25759815

  14. Disturbances of electrodynamic activity affect abortion in human

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jandová, A.; Nedbalová, M.; Kobilková, J.; Čoček, A.; Dohnalová, A.; Cifra, M.; Pokorný, J.

    2011-12-01

    Biochemical research of biological systems is highly developed, and it has disclosed a spectrum of chemical reactions, genetic processes, and the pathological development of various diseases. The fundamental hypothesis of physical processes in biological systems, in particular of coherent electrically polar vibrations and electromagnetic activity, was formulated by H. Fröhlich he assumed connection of cancer process with degradation of coherent electromagnetic activity. But the questions of cellular structures capable of the coherent electrical polar oscillation, mechanisms of energy supply, and the specific role of the endogenous electromagnetic fields in transport, organisation, interactions, and information transfer remained open. The nature of physical disturbances caused by some diseases (including the recurrent abortion in humans and the cancer) was unknown. We have studied the reasons of recurrent abortions in humans by means of the cell mediated immunity (using immunologic active RNA prepared from blood of inbred laboratory mice strain C3H/H2K, infected with the lactate dehydrogenase elevating virus-LD V) and the cytogenetic examination from karyotype pictures. The recurrent abortion group contained women with dg. spontaneous abortion (n = 24) and the control group was composed of 30 healthy pregnant women. Our hypothesis was related to quality of endometrium in relation to nidation of the blastocyst. The energetic insufficiency (ATP) inhibits normal development of fetus and placenta. We hope that these ideas might have impact on further research, which could provide background for effective interdisciplinary cooperation of malignant and non-malignant diseases.

  15. Evaluation of hemagglutination activity of chitosan nanoparticles using human erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    de Lima, Jefferson Muniz; Sarmento, Ronaldo Rodrigues; de Souza, Joelma Rodrigues; Brayner, Fábio André; Feitosa, Ana Paula Sampaio; Padilha, Rafael; Alves, Luiz Carlos; Porto, Isaque Jerônimo; Batista, Roberta Ferreti Bonan Dantas; de Oliveira, Juliano Elvis; de Medeiros, Eliton Souto; Bonan, Paulo Rogério Ferreti; Castellano, Lúcio Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Chitosan is a polysaccharide composed of randomly distributed chains of β-(1-4) D-glucosamine and N-acetyl-D-glucosamine. This compound is obtained by partial or total deacetylation of chitin in acidic solution. The chitosan-based hemostatic agents have been gaining much attention in the management of bleeding. The aim of this study was to evaluate in vitro hemagglutination activity of chitosan nanoparticles using human erythrocytes. The preparation of nanoparticles was achieved by ionotropic gelification technique followed by neutralization with NaOH 1 mol/L(-1). The hemagglutination activity was performed on a solution of 2% erythrocytes (pH 7.4 on PBS) collected from five healthy volunteers. The hemolysis determination was made by spectrophotometric analysis. Chitosan nanoparticle solutions without NaOH addition changed the reddish colour of the wells into brown, suggesting an oxidative reaction of hemoglobin and possible cell lysis. All neutralized solutions of chitosan nanoparticles presented positive haemagglutination, without any change in reaction color. Chitosan nanoparticles presented hemolytic activity ranging from 186.20 to 223.12%, while neutralized solutions ranged from 2.56 to 72.54%, comparing to distilled water. Results highlight the need for development of new routes of synthesis of chitosan nanoparticles within human physiologic pH.

  16. p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase activation by ultraviolet A radiation in human dermal fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Le Panse, Rozen; Dubertret, Louis; Coulomb, Bernard

    2003-08-01

    UVA radiation penetrates deeply into the skin reaching both the epidermis and the dermis. We thus investigated the effects of naturally occurring doses of UVA radiation on mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activities in human dermal fibroblasts. We demonstrated that UVA selectively activates p38 MAPK with no effect on extracellular-regulated kinases (ERK1-ERK2) or JNK-SAPK (cJun NH2-terminal kinase-stress-activated protein kinase) activities. We then investigated the signaling pathway used by UVA to activate p38 MAPK. L-Histidine and sodium azide had an inhibitory effect on UVA activation of p38 MAPK, pointing to a role of singlet oxygen in transduction of the UVA effect. Afterward, using prolonged cell treatments with growth factors to desensitize their signaling pathways or suramin to block growth factor receptors, we demonstrated that UVA signaling pathways shared elements with growth factor signaling pathways. In addition, using emetine (a translation inhibitor altering ribosome functioning) we detected the involvement of ribotoxic stress in p38 MAPK activation by UVA. Our observations suggest that p38 activation by UVA in dermal fibroblasts involves singlet oxygen-dependent activation of ligand-receptor signaling pathways or ribotoxic stress mechanism (or both). Despite the activation of these two distinct signaling mechanisms, the selective activation of p38 MAPK suggests a critical role of this kinase in the effects of UVA radiation.

  17. Aptamer-conjugated live human immune cell based biosensors for the accurate detection of C-reactive protein

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Jangsun; Seo, Youngmin; Jo, Yeonho; Son, Jaewoo; Choi, Jonghoon

    2016-01-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP) is a pentameric protein that is present in the bloodstream during inflammatory events, e.g., liver failure, leukemia, and/or bacterial infection. The level of CRP indicates the progress and prognosis of certain diseases; it is therefore necessary to measure CRP levels in the blood accurately. The normal concentration of CRP is reported to be 1–3 mg/L. Inflammatory events increase the level of CRP by up to 500 times; accordingly, CRP is a biomarker of acute inflammatory disease. In this study, we demonstrated the preparation of DNA aptamer-conjugated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (Apt-PBMCs) that specifically capture human CRP. Live PBMCs functionalized with aptamers could detect different levels of human CRP by producing immune complexes with reporter antibody. The binding behavior of Apt-PBMCs toward highly concentrated CRP sites was also investigated. The immune responses of Apt-PBMCs were evaluated by measuring TNF-alpha secretion after stimulating the PBMCs with lipopolysaccharides. In summary, engineered Apt-PBMCs have potential applications as live cell based biosensors and for in vitro tracing of CRP secretion sites. PMID:27708384

  18. Aptamer-conjugated live human immune cell based biosensors for the accurate detection of C-reactive protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Jangsun; Seo, Youngmin; Jo, Yeonho; Son, Jaewoo; Choi, Jonghoon

    2016-10-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP) is a pentameric protein that is present in the bloodstream during inflammatory events, e.g., liver failure, leukemia, and/or bacterial infection. The level of CRP indicates the progress and prognosis of certain diseases; it is therefore necessary to measure CRP levels in the blood accurately. The normal concentration of CRP is reported to be 1–3 mg/L. Inflammatory events increase the level of CRP by up to 500 times; accordingly, CRP is a biomarker of acute inflammatory disease. In this study, we demonstrated the preparation of DNA aptamer-conjugated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (Apt-PBMCs) that specifically capture human CRP. Live PBMCs functionalized with aptamers could detect different levels of human CRP by producing immune complexes with reporter antibody. The binding behavior of Apt-PBMCs toward highly concentrated CRP sites was also investigated. The immune responses of Apt-PBMCs were evaluated by measuring TNF-alpha secretion after stimulating the PBMCs with lipopolysaccharides. In summary, engineered Apt-PBMCs have potential applications as live cell based biosensors and for in vitro tracing of CRP secretion sites.

  19. Rickettsia australis Activates Inflammasome in Human and Murine Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Smalley, Claire; Bechelli, Jeremy; Rockx-Brouwer, Dedeke; Saito, Tais; Azar, Sasha R.; Ismail, Nahed; Walker, David H.; Fang, Rong

    2016-01-01

    Rickettsiae actively escape from vacuoles and replicate free in the cytoplasm of host cells, where inflammasomes survey the invading pathogens. In the present study, we investigated the interactions of Rickettsia australis with the inflammasome in both mouse and human macrophages. R. australis induced a significant level of IL-1β secretion by human macrophages, which was significantly reduced upon treatment with an inhibitor of caspase-1 compared to untreated controls, suggesting caspase-1-dependent inflammasome activation. Rickettsia induced significant secretion of IL-1β and IL-18 in vitro by infected mouse bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMMs) as early as 8–12 h post infection (p.i.) in a dose-dependent manner. Secretion of these cytokines was accompanied by cleavage of caspase-1 and was completely abrogated in BMMs deficient in caspase-1/caspase-11 or apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a caspase activation and recruitment domain (ASC), suggesting that R. australis activate the ASC-dependent inflammasome. Interestingly, in response to the same quantity of rickettsiae, NLRP3-/- BMMs significantly reduced the secretion level of IL-1β compared to wild type (WT) controls, suggesting that NLRP3 inflammasome contributes to cytosolic recognition of R. australis in vitro. Rickettsial load in spleen, but not liver and lung, of R. australis-infected NLRP3-/- mice was significantly greater compared to WT mice. These data suggest that NLRP3 inflammasome plays a role in host control of bacteria in vivo in a tissue-specific manner. Taken together, our data, for the first time, illustrate the activation of ASC-dependent inflammasome by R. australis in macrophages in which NLRP3 is involved. PMID:27362650

  20. Demonstration of adenosine deaminase activity in human fibroblast lysosomes.

    PubMed Central

    Lindley, E R; Pisoni, R L

    1993-01-01

    Human fibroblast lysosomes, purified on Percoll density gradients, contain an adenosine deaminase (ADA) activity that accounts for approximately 10% of the total ADA activity in GM0010A human fibroblasts. In assays of lysosomal ADA, the conversion of [3H]adenosine into [3H]inosine was proportional to incubation time and the amount of lysosomal material added to reaction mixtures. Maximal activity was observed between pH 7 and 8, and lysosomal ADA displayed a Km of 37 microM for adenosine at 25 degrees C and pH 5.5. Lysosomal ADA was completely inhibited by 2.5 mM Cu2+ or Hg2+ salts, but not by other bivalent cations (Ba2+, Cd2+, Ca2+, Fe2+, Mg2+, Mn2+ and Zn2+). Coformycin (2.5 mM), deoxycoformycin (0.02 mM), 2'-deoxyadenosine (2.5 mM), 6-methylaminopurine riboside (2.5 mM), 2'-3'-isopropylidene-adenosine (2.5 mM) and erythro-9-(2-hydroxy-3-nonyl)adenine (0.2 mM) inhibited lysosomal ADA by > 97%. In contrast, 2.5 mM S-adenosyl-L-homocysteine and cytosine were poor inhibitors. Nearly all lysosomal ADA activity is eluted as a high-molecular-mass protein (> 200 kDa) just after the void volume on a Sephacryl S-200 column, and is very heat-stable, retaining 70% of its activity after incubation at 65 degrees C for 80 min. We speculate that compartmentalization of ADA within lysosomes would allow deamination of adenosine to occur without competition by adenosine kinase, which could assist in maintaining cellular energy requirements under conditions of nutritional deprivation. PMID:8452534

  1. Activated platelets signal chemokine synthesis by human monocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Weyrich, A S; Elstad, M R; McEver, R P; McIntyre, T M; Moore, K L; Morrissey, J H; Prescott, S M; Zimmerman, G A

    1996-01-01

    Human blood monocytes adhere rapidly and for prolonged periods to activated platelets that display P-selectin, an adhesion protein that recognizes a specific ligand on leukocytes, P-selectin glycoprotein-1. We previously demonstrated that P-selectin regulates expression and secretion of cytokines by stimulated monocytes when it is presented in a purified, immobilized form or by transfected cells. Here we show that thrombin-activated platelets induce the expression and secretion of monocyte chemotactic protein-1 and IL-8 by monocytes. Enhanced monokine synthesis requires engagement of P-selectin glycoprotein-1 on the leukocyte by P-selectin on the platelet. Secretion of the chemokines is not, however, directly signaled by P-selectin; instead, tethering of the monocytes by P-selectin is required for their activation by RANTES (regulated upon activation normal T cell expressed presumed secreted), a platelet chemokine not previously known to induce immediate-early gene products in monocytes. Adhesion of monocytes to activated platelets results in nuclear translocation of p65 (RelA), a component of the NF-kappaB family of transcription factors that binds kappaB sequences in the regulatory regions of monocyte chemotactic protein-1, IL-8, and other immediate-early genes. However, expression of tissue factor, a coagulation protein that also has a kappaB sequence in the 5' regulatory region of its gene, is not induced in monocytes adherent to activated platelets. Thus, contact of monocytes with activated platelets differentially affects the expression of monocyte products. These experiments suggest that activated platelets regulate chemokine secretion by monocytes in inflammatory lesions in vivo and provide a model for the study of gene regulation in cell-cell interactions. PMID:8617886

  2. Human ZCCHC12 activates AP-1 and CREB signaling as a transcriptional co-activator.

    PubMed

    Li, Hong; Liu, Qian; Hu, Xiang; Feng, Du; Xiang, Shuanglin; He, Zhicheng; Hu, Xingwang; Zhou, Jianlin; Ding, Xiaofeng; Zhou, Chang; Zhang, Jian

    2009-07-01

    Mouse zinc finger CCHC domain containing 12 gene (ZCCHC12) has been identified as a transcriptional co-activator of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling, and human ZCCHC12 was reported to be related to non-syndromic X-linked mental retardation (NS-XLMR). However, the details of how human ZCCHC12 involve in the NS-XLMR still remain unclear. In this study, we identified a novel nuclear localization signal (NLS) in the middle of human ZCCHC12 protein which is responsible for the nuclear localization. Multiple-tissue northern blot analysis indicated that ZCCHC12 is highly expressed in human brain. Furthermore, in situ hybridization showed that ZCCHC12 is specifically expressed in neuroepithelium of forebrain, midbrain, and diencephalon regions of mouse E10.5 embryos. Luciferase reporter assays demonstrated that ZCCHC12 enhanced the transcriptional activities of activator protein 1 (AP-1) and cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) as a coactivator. In conclusion, we identified a new NLS in ZCCHC12 and figured out that ZCCHC12 functions as a transcriptional co-activator of AP-1 and CREB.

  3. Can Melatonin Act as an Antioxidant in Hydrogen Peroxide-Induced Oxidative Stress Model in Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells?

    PubMed Central

    Emamgholipour, Solaleh; Hossein-Nezhad, Arash; Ansari, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. We aimed to investigate the possible effects of melatonin on gene expressions and activities of MnSOD and catalase under conditions of oxidative stress induced by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Materials and Methods. PBMCs were isolated from healthy subjects and treated as follows: (1) control (only with 0.1% DMSO for 12 h); (2) melatonin (1 mM) for 12 h; (3) H2O2 (250 μM) for 2 h; (4) H2O2 (250 μM) for 2 h following 10 h pretreatment with melatonin (1 mM). The gene expression was evaluated by real-time PCR. MnSOD and catalase activities in PBMCs were determined by colorimetric assays. Results. Pretreatment of PBMCs with melatonin significantly augmented expression and activity of MnSOD which were diminished by H2O2. Melatonin treatment of PBMCs caused a significant upregulation of catalase by almost 2-fold in comparison with untreated cells. However, activity and expression of catalase increased by 1.5-fold in PBMCs under H2O2-induced oxidative stress compared with untreated cell. Moreover, pretreatment of PBMCs with melatonin resulted in a significant 1.8-fold increase in catalase expression compared to PBMCs treated only with H2O2. Conclusion. It seems that melatonin could prevent from undesirable impacts of H2O2-induced oxidative stress on MnSOD downregulation. Moreover, melatonin could promote inductive effect of H2O2 on catalase mRNA expression. PMID:26881079

  4. Localization of visually evoked cortical activity in humans.

    PubMed

    Srebro, R

    1985-03-01

    The locations of cortical activity evoked by visual stimuli presented at different positions in the visual field are deduced from the scalp topography of visually evoked potentials in humans. To accomplish this, the Laplacian evoked potential is measured using a multi-electrode array. It is shown that the Laplacian response has the following useful attributes for this purpose. It is reference-free. Its spatial resolution is approximately 2 cm referred to the surface of the cortex. Its spatial sensitivity characteristic is that of a spatial band-pass filter. It is relatively insensitive to source--sink configurations that are oriented tangentially to the surface of the scalp. Only modest assumptions about the source--sink configuration are required to obtain a unique inversion of the scalp topography. Stimuli consisting of checkerboard-filled octant or annular octant segments are presented as appearance-disappearance pulses at sixteen different positions in the visual field in randomized order. The locations of evoked cortical activity in the occipital, parietal and temporal lobes are represented on a Mercator projection map for each octant or octant segment stimulated. Lower hemifield stimuli activate cortex which lies mainly on the convexity of the occipital lobe contralateral to the side of stimulus presentation in the visual field. The more peripheral the stimulus is in the visual field, the more rostral is the location of the active cortex. The rostral-to-caudal location of the evoked activity varies from subject to subject by as much as 3 cm on the surface of the occipital cortex. Furthermore, in any single subject there is a substantial amount of hemispheric asymmetry. Upper hemifield stimuli activate cortex that lies on the extreme caudal pole of the occipital lobe. This activity is relatively weak, and in some subjects it is almost unmeasurable. It is suggested that the representation of the upper hemifield in the cortex lies mostly on the inferior and

  5. Nattokinase-promoted tissue plasminogen activator release from human cells.

    PubMed

    Yatagai, Chieko; Maruyama, Masugi; Kawahara, Tomoko; Sumi, Hiroyuki

    2008-01-01

    When heated to a temperature of 70 degrees C or higher, the strong fibrinolytic activity of nattokinase in a solution was deactivated. Similar results were observed in the case of using Suc-Ala-Ala-Pro-Phe-pNA and H-D-Val-Leu-Lys-pNA, which are synthetic substrates of nattokinase. In the current study, tests were conducted on the indirect fibrinolytic effects of the substances containing nattokinase that had been deactivated through heating at 121 degrees C for 15 min. Bacillus subtilis natto culture solutions made from three types of bacteria strain were heat-treated and deactivated, and it was found that these culture solutions had the ability to generate tissue plasminogen activators (tPA) from vascular endothelial cells and HeLa cells at certain concentration levels. For example, it was found that the addition of heat-treated culture solution of the Naruse strain (undiluted solution) raises the tPA activity of HeLa cells to about 20 times that of the control. Under the same conditions, tPA activity was raised to a level about 5 times higher for human vascular endothelial cells (HUVEC), and to a level about 24 times higher for nattokinase sold on the market. No change in cell count was observed for HeLa cells and HUVEC in the culture solution at these concentrations, and the level of activity was found to vary with concentration.

  6. Design of phosphorylated dendritic architectures to promote human monocyte activation.

    PubMed

    Poupot, Mary; Griffe, Laurent; Marchand, Patrice; Maraval, Alexandrine; Rolland, Olivier; Martinet, Ludovic; L'Faqihi-Olive, Fatima-Ezzahra; Turrin, Cédric-Olivier; Caminade, Anne-Marie; Fournié, Jean-Jacques; Majoral, Jean-Pierre; Poupot, Rémy

    2006-11-01

    As first defensive line, monocytes are a pivotal cell population of innate immunity. Monocyte activation can be relevant to a range of immune conditions and responses. Here we present new insights into the activation of monocytes by a series of phosphonic acid-terminated, phosphorus-containing dendrimers. Various dendritic or subdendritic structures were synthesized and tested, revealing the basic structural requirements for monocyte activation. We showed that multivalent character and phosphonic acid capping of dendrimers are crucial for monocyte targeting and activation. Confocal videomicroscopy showed that a fluorescein-tagged dendrimer binds to isolated monocytes and gets internalized within a few seconds. We also found that dendrimers follow the phagolysosomial route during internalization by monocytes. Finally, we performed fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) experiments between a specifically designed fluorescent dendrimer and phycoerythrin-coupled antibodies. We showed that the typical innate Toll-like receptor (TLR)-2 is clearly involved, but not alone, in the sensing of dendrimers by monocytes. In conclusion, phosphorus-containing dendrimers appear as precisely tunable nanobiotools able to target and activate human innate immunity and thus prove to be good candidates to develop new drugs for immunotherapies.

  7. Reduced amygdala activity during aversive conditioning in human narcolepsy.

    PubMed

    Ponz, Aurélie; Khatami, Ramin; Poryazova, Rositsa; Werth, Esther; Boesiger, Peter; Schwartz, Sophie; Bassetti, Claudio L

    2010-03-01

    Narcolepsy with cataplexy is a sleep-wake disorder caused by a loss of hypothalamic hypocretins. Here we assessed the time course of amygdala activation during aversive conditioning in unmedicated patients with narcolepsy. Unlike healthy matched control subjects, narcolepsy patients had no enhancement of amygdala response to conditioned stimuli and no increase in functional coupling between the amygdala and medial prefrontal cortex. These findings suggest that human narcolepsy is accompanied by abnormal emotional learning, and that, in line with animal data, the hypocretin system and the amygdala are involved in this process.

  8. Activation of reward circuitry in human opiate addicts.

    PubMed

    Sell, L A; Morris, J; Bearn, J; Frackowiak, R S; Friston, K J; Dolan, R J

    1999-03-01

    The neurobiological mechanisms of opiate addictive behaviour in humans are unknown. A proposed model of addiction implicates ascending brainstem neuromodulatory systems, particularly dopamine. Using functional neuroimaging, we assessed the neural response to heroin and heroin-related cues in established opiate addicts. We show that the effect of both heroin and heroin-related visual cues are maximally expressed in the sites of origin of ascending midbrain neuromodulatory systems. These context-specific midbrain activations predict responses to salient visual cues in cortical and subcortical regions implicated in reward-related behaviour. These findings implicate common neurobiological processes underlying drug and drug-cue-related effects.

  9. Glucuronidation of active tamoxifen metabolites by the human UDP glucuronosyltransferases.

    PubMed

    Sun, Dongxiao; Sharma, Arun K; Dellinger, Ryan W; Blevins-Primeau, Andrea S; Balliet, Renee M; Chen, Gang; Boyiri, Telih; Amin, Shantu; Lazarus, Philip

    2007-11-01

    Tamoxifen (TAM) is an antiestrogen that has been widely used in the treatment and prevention of breast cancer in women. One of the major mechanisms of metabolism and elimination of TAM and its major active metabolites 4-hydroxytamoxifen (4-OH-TAM) and 4-OH-N-desmethyl-TAM (endoxifen; 4-hydroxy-N-desmethyl-tamoxifen) is via glucuronidation. Although limited studies have been performed characterizing the glucuronidation of 4-OH-TAM, no studies have been performed on endoxifen. In the present study, characterization of the glucuronidating activities of human UDP glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs) against isomers of 4-OH-TAM and endoxifen was performed. Using homogenates of individual UGT-overexpressing cell lines, UGTs 2B7 approximately 1A8 > UGT1A10 exhibited the highest overall O-glucuronidating activity against trans-4-OH-TAM as determined by Vmax/K(M), with the hepatic enzyme UGT2B7 exhibiting the highest binding affinity and lowest K(M) (3.7 microM). As determined by Vmax/K(M), UGT1A10 exhibited the highest overall O-glucuronidating activity against cis-4-OH-TAM, 10-fold higher than the next-most active UGTs 1A1 and 2B7, but with UGT1A7 exhibiting the lowest K(M). Although both N- and O-glucuronidation occurred for 4-OH-TAM in human liver microsomes, only O-glucuronidating activity was observed for endoxifen; no endoxifen-N-glucuronidation was observed for any UGT tested. UGTs 1A10 approximately 1A8 > UGT2B7 exhibited the highest overall glucuronidating activities as determined by Vmax/K(M) for trans-endoxifen, with the extrahepatic enzyme UGT1A10 exhibiting the highest binding affinity and lowest K(M) (39.9 microM). Similar to that observed for cis-4-OH-TAM, UGT1A10 also exhibited the highest activity for cis-endoxifen. These data suggest that several UGTs, including UGTs 1A10, 2B7, and 1A8 play an important role in the metabolism of 4-OH-TAM and endoxifen.

  10. 2000 years of human activity in Tuchola Pinewoods (northern Poland)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obremska, Milena; Ott, Florian; Słowiński, Michał; Lutyńska, Monika; Błaszkiewicz, Mirosław; Brauer, Achim

    2014-05-01

    During the last two millennia human activity and their settlements together with varying climate conditions strongly influenced landscape scale changes. Especially within palaeoecological records these environmental responses are well expressed. However, a robust age control is needed for the evaluation and interpretation of biotic proxies.We present a record from the annually laminated (varved) sediments of Lake Czechowskie, located in northern Poland. The investigated record covers the past 2000 years and demonstrates the continuous vegetation history and human activity in the Northern part of the Tuchola Pinewoods. The chronology was established by varve counting and confirmed by AMS 14C dating, 137Cs activity measurement and a tephra layer (Askja 1875). We used high-resolution biotic (pollen, green algae and diatom analysis) sedimentological (varve and sublayer thickness variations) and geochemical (µ-XRF data) proxies to reconstruct the environmental changes within a time of increasing human activity and fluctuating climatic conditions. Based on different spatial sampling and measuring increments the temporal resolution varies between subseasonal (µ-XRF), annual (varves) up to five-varveresolution (biotic proxies) making it possible to trace even short lasting local and regional changes. Our results display visible human pressure in this area between 50- 350 yr. AD (Roman Period) exerted by tribes related to the Wielbark Culture. The development of persisting settlements and agriculture took place at expense of surrounding hornbeam forests. An intensification of lake productivity (expressed as an increase of varve thickness) started after 250 AD. If this lake ecosystem response relates to an intensified agriculture (and a possible transport of nutrients from neighboring rural lands) or to a climate shift will be further discussed. The rapid decline of human indicators about 350 years AD at the transition to the migration period might be related to cooler

  11. Depression of cortical activity in humans by mild hypercapnia.

    PubMed

    Thesen, Thomas; Leontiev, Oleg; Song, Tao; Dehghani, Nima; Hagler, Donald J; Huang, Mingxiong; Buxton, Richard; Halgren, Eric

    2012-03-01

    The effects of neural activity on cerebral hemodynamics underlie human brain imaging with functional magnetic resonance imaging and positron emission tomography. However, the threshold and characteristics of the converse effects, wherein the cerebral hemodynamic and metabolic milieu influence neural activity, remain unclear. We tested whether mild hypercapnia (5% CO2 ) decreases the magnetoencephalogram response to auditory pattern recognition and visual semantic tasks. Hypercapnia induced statistically significant decreases in event-related fields without affecting behavioral performance. Decreases were observed in early sensory components in both auditory and visual modalities as well as later cognitive components related to memory and language. Effects were distributed across cortical regions. Decreases were comparable in evoked versus spontaneous spectral power. Hypercapnia is commonly used with hemodynamic models to calibrate the blood oxygenation level-dependent response. Modifying model assumptions to incorporate the current findings produce a modest but measurable decrease in the estimated cerebral metabolic rate for oxygen change with activation. Because under normal conditions, low cerebral pH would arise when bloodflow is unable to keep pace with neuronal activity, the cortical depression observed here may reflect a homeostatic mechanism by which neuronal activity is adjusted to a level that can be sustained by available bloodflow. Animal studies suggest that these effects may be mediated by pH-modulating presynaptic adenosine receptors. Although the data is not clear, comparable changes in cortical pH to those induced here may occur during sleep apnea, sleep, and exercise. If so, these results suggest that such activities may in turn have generalized depressive effects on cortical activity.

  12. Depression of Cortical Activity in Humans by Mild Hypercapnia

    PubMed Central

    Thesen, Thomas; Leontiev, Oleg; Song, Tao; Dehghani, Nima; Hagler, Donald J; Huang, Mingxiong; Buxton, Richard; Halgren, Eric

    2013-01-01

    The effects of neural activity on cerebral hemodynamics underlie human brain imaging with functional magnetic resonance imaging and positron emission tomography. However, the threshold and characteristics of the converse effects, wherein the cerebral hemodynamic and metabolic milieu influence neural activity, remain unclear. We tested whether mild hypercapnia (5% CO2) decreases the magnetoencephalogram response to auditory pattern recognition and visual semantic tasks. Hypercapnia induced statistically significant decreases in event-related fields without affecting behavioral performance. Decreases were observed in early sensory components in both auditory and visual modalities as well as later cognitive components related to memory and language. Effects were distributed across cortical regions. Decreases were comparable in evoked versus spontaneous spectral power. Hypercapnia is commonly used with hemodynamic models to calibrate the blood oxygenation level-dependent response. Modifying model assumptions to incorporate the current findings produce a modest but measurable decrease in the estimated cerebral metabolic rate for oxygen change with activation. Because under normal conditions, low cerebral pH would arise when bloodflow is unable to keep pace with neuronal activity, the cortical depression observed here may reflect a homeostatic mechanism by which neuronal activity is adjusted to a level that can be sustained by available bloodflow. Animal studies suggest that these effects may be mediated by pH-modulating presynaptic adenosine receptors. Although the data is not clear, comparable changes in cortical pH to those induced here may occur during sleep apnea, sleep, and exercise. If so, these results suggest that such activities may in turn have generalized depressive effects on cortical activity. PMID:21500313

  13. Rhythmic Working Memory Activation in the Human Hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Leszczyński, Marcin; Fell, Juergen; Axmacher, Nikolai

    2015-11-10

    Working memory (WM) maintenance is assumed to rely on a single sustained process throughout the entire maintenance period. This assumption, although fundamental, has never been tested. We used intracranial electroencephalography (EEG) recordings from the human hippocampus in two independent experiments to investigate the neural dynamics underlying WM maintenance. We observed periodic fluctuations between two different oscillatory regimes: Periods of "memory activation" were reflected by load-dependent alpha power reductions and lower levels of cross-frequency coupling (CFC). They occurred interleaved with periods characterized by load-independent high levels of alpha power and CFC. During memory activation periods, a relevant CFC parameter (load-dependent changes of the peak modulated frequency) correlated with individual WM capacity. Fluctuations between these two periods predicted successful performance and were locked to the phase of endogenous delta oscillations. These results show that hippocampal maintenance is a dynamic rather than constant process and depends critically on a hierarchy of oscillations.

  14. Swell activated chloride channel function in human neutrophils

    SciTech Connect

    Salmon, Michael D.; Ahluwalia, Jatinder

    2009-04-17

    Non-excitable cells such as neutrophil granulocytes are the archetypal inflammatory immune cell involved in critical functions of the innate immune system. The electron current generated (I{sub e}) by the neutrophil NADPH oxidase is electrogenic and rapidly depolarises the membrane potential. For continuous function of the NADPH oxidase, I{sub e} has to be balanced to preserve electroneutrality, if not; sufficient depolarisation would prevent electrons from leaving the cell and neutrophil function would be abrogated. Subsequently, the depolarisation generated by the neutrophil NADPH oxidase I{sub e} must be counteracted by ion transport. The finding that depolarisation required counter-ions to compensate electron transport was followed by the observation that chloride channels activated by swell can counteract the NADPH oxidase membrane depolarisation. In this mini review, we discuss the research findings that revealed the essential role of swell activated chloride channels in human neutrophil function.

  15. Combining Users' Activity Survey and Simulators to Evaluate Human Activity Recognition Systems

    PubMed Central

    Azkune, Gorka; Almeida, Aitor; López-de-Ipiña, Diego; Chen, Liming

    2015-01-01

    Evaluating human activity recognition systems usually implies following expensive and time-consuming methodologies, where experiments with humans are run with the consequent ethical and legal issues. We propose a novel evaluation methodology to overcome the enumerated problems, which is based on surveys for users and a synthetic dataset generator tool. Surveys allow capturing how different users perform activities of daily living, while the synthetic dataset generator is used to create properly labelled activity datasets modelled with the information extracted from surveys. Important aspects, such as sensor noise, varying time lapses and user erratic behaviour, can also be simulated using the tool. The proposed methodology is shown to have very important advantages that allow researchers to carry out their work more efficiently. To evaluate the approach, a synthetic dataset generated following the proposed methodology is compared to a real dataset computing the similarity between sensor occurrence frequencies. It is concluded that the similarity between both datasets is more than significant. PMID:25856329

  16. Combining users' activity survey and simulators to evaluate human activity recognition systems.

    PubMed

    Azkune, Gorka; Almeida, Aitor; López-de-Ipiña, Diego; Chen, Liming

    2015-04-08

    Evaluating human activity recognition systems usually implies following expensive and time-consuming methodologies, where experiments with humans are run with the consequent ethical and legal issues. We propose a novel evaluation methodology to overcome the enumerated problems, which is based on surveys for users and a synthetic dataset generator tool. Surveys allow capturing how different users perform activities of daily living, while the synthetic dataset generator is used to create properly labelled activity datasets modelled with the information extracted from surveys. Important aspects, such as sensor noise, varying time lapses and user erratic behaviour, can also be simulated using the tool. The proposed methodology is shown to have very important advantages that allow researchers to carry out their work more efficiently. To evaluate the approach, a synthetic dataset generated following the proposed methodology is compared to a real dataset computing the similarity between sensor occurrence frequencies. It is concluded that the similarity between both datasets is more than significant.

  17. 48 CFR 3452.224-72 - Research activities involving human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... involving human subjects. 3452.224-72 Section 3452.224-72 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT... Text of Provisions and Clauses 3452.224-72 Research activities involving human subjects. As prescribed... human subjects covered under 34 CFR part 97: Research Activities Involving Human Subjects (MAR 2011)...

  18. 48 CFR 3452.224-72 - Research activities involving human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... involving human subjects. 3452.224-72 Section 3452.224-72 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT... Text of Provisions and Clauses 3452.224-72 Research activities involving human subjects. As prescribed... human subjects covered under 34 CFR part 97: Research Activities Involving Human Subjects (MAR 2011)...

  19. 48 CFR 3452.224-72 - Research activities involving human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... involving human subjects. 3452.224-72 Section 3452.224-72 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT... Text of Provisions and Clauses 3452.224-72 Research activities involving human subjects. As prescribed... human subjects covered under 34 CFR part 97: Research Activities Involving Human Subjects (MAR 2011)...

  20. Modelling large scale human activity in San Francisco

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez, Marta

    2010-03-01

    Diverse group of people with a wide variety of schedules, activities and travel needs compose our cities nowadays. This represents a big challenge for modeling travel behaviors in urban environments; those models are of crucial interest for a wide variety of applications such as traffic forecasting, spreading of viruses, or measuring human exposure to air pollutants. The traditional means to obtain knowledge about travel behavior is limited to surveys on travel journeys. The obtained information is based in questionnaires that are usually costly to implement and with intrinsic limitations to cover large number of individuals and some problems of reliability. Using mobile phone data, we explore the basic characteristics of a model of human travel: The distribution of agents is proportional to the population density of a given region, and each agent has a characteristic trajectory size contain information on frequency of visits to different locations. Additionally we use a complementary data set given by smart subway fare cards offering us information about the exact time of each passenger getting in or getting out of the subway station and the coordinates of it. This allows us to uncover the temporal aspects of the mobility. Since we have the actual time and place of individual's origin and destination we can understand the temporal patterns in each visited location with further details. Integrating two described data set we provide a dynamical model of human travels that incorporates different aspects observed empirically.

  1. Dynamic Stimuli And Active Processing In Human Visual Perception

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haber, Ralph N.

    1990-03-01

    Theories of visual perception traditionally have considered a static retinal image to be the starting point for processing; and has considered processing both to be passive and a literal translation of that frozen, two dimensional, pictorial image. This paper considers five problem areas in the analysis of human visually guided locomotion, in which the traditional approach is contrasted to newer ones that utilize dynamic definitions of stimulation, and an active perceiver: (1) differentiation between object motion and self motion, and among the various kinds of self motion (e.g., eyes only, head only, whole body, and their combinations); (2) the sources and contents of visual information that guide movement; (3) the acquisition and performance of perceptual motor skills; (4) the nature of spatial representations, percepts, and the perceived layout of space; and (5) and why the retinal image is a poor starting point for perceptual processing. These newer approaches argue that stimuli must be considered as dynamic: humans process the systematic changes in patterned light when objects move and when they themselves move. Furthermore, the processing of visual stimuli must be active and interactive, so that perceivers can construct panoramic and stable percepts from an interaction of stimulus information and expectancies of what is contained in the visual environment. These developments all suggest a very different approach to the computational analyses of object location and identification, and of the visual guidance of locomotion.

  2. Uptake and intracellular activity of fluconazole in human polymorphonuclear leukocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Pascual, A; García, I; Conejo, C; Perea, E J

    1993-01-01

    The penetration of fluconazole into human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) and tissue culture epithelial cells (McCoy) was evaluated. At different extracellular concentrations (0.5 to 10 mg/liter), fluconazole reached cell-associated concentrations greater than the extracellular ones in either human PMNs (intracellular concentration to extracellular concentration ratio, > or = 2.2) or McCoy cells (intracellular concentration to extracellular concentration ratio, > or = 1.3). The uptake of fluconazole by PMNs was rapid and reversible but was not energy dependent. The intracellular penetration of fluconazole was not affected by environmental pH or temperature. Ingestion of opsonized zymosan and opsonized Candida albicans did not significantly increase the amount of PMN-associated fluconazole. At therapeutic extracellular concentrations, the intracellular activity of fluconazole against C. albicans in PMNs was significantly lower than that of amphotericin B. It was concluded that fluconazole reaches high intracellular concentrations within PMNs but shows moderate activity against intracellular C. albicans in vitro. PMID:8452347

  3. Recognition of Human Activities Using Continuous Autoencoders with Wearable Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lukun

    2016-01-01

    This paper provides an approach for recognizing human activities with wearable sensors. The continuous autoencoder (CAE) as a novel stochastic neural network model is proposed which improves the ability of model continuous data. CAE adds Gaussian random units into the improved sigmoid activation function to extract the features of nonlinear data. In order to shorten the training time, we propose a new fast stochastic gradient descent (FSGD) algorithm to update the gradients of CAE. The reconstruction of a swiss-roll dataset experiment demonstrates that the CAE can fit continuous data better than the basic autoencoder, and the training time can be reduced by an FSGD algorithm. In the experiment of human activities’ recognition, time and frequency domain feature extract (TFFE) method is raised to extract features from the original sensors’ data. Then, the principal component analysis (PCA) method is applied to feature reduction. It can be noticed that the dimension of each data segment is reduced from 5625 to 42. The feature vectors extracted from original signals are used for the input of deep belief network (DBN), which is composed of multiple CAEs. The training results show that the correct differentiation rate of 99.3% has been achieved. Some contrast experiments like different sensors combinations, sensor units at different positions, and training time with different epochs are designed to validate our approach. PMID:26861319

  4. Tirasemtiv amplifies skeletal muscle response to nerve activation in humans

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Richard; Saikali, Khalil G; Chou, Willis; Russell, Alan J; Chen, Michael M; Vijayakumar, Vipin; Stoltz, Randall R; Baudry, Stephane; Enoka, Roger M; Morgans, David J; Wolff, Andrew A; Malik, Fady I

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: In this study we tested the hypothesis that tirasemtiv, a selective fast skeletal muscle troponin activator that sensitizes the sarcomere to calcium, could amplify the response of muscle to neuromuscular input in humans. Methods: Healthy men received tirasemtiv and placebo in a randomized, double-blind, 4-period, crossover design. The deep fibular nerve was stimulated transcutaneously to activate the tibialis anterior muscle and produce dorsiflexion of the foot. The force–frequency relationship of tibialis anterior dorsiflexion was assessed after dosing. Results: Tirasemtiv increased force produced by the tibialis anterior in a dose-, concentration-, and frequency-dependent manner with the largest increases [up to 24.5% (SE 3.1), P < 0.0001] produced at subtetanic nerve stimulation frequencies (10 Hz). Conclusions: The data confirm that tirasemtiv amplifies the response of skeletal muscle to nerve input in humans. This outcome provides support for further studies of tirasemtiv as a potential therapy in conditions marked by diminished neuromuscular input. Muscle Nerve 50: 925–931, 2014 PMID:24634285

  5. Ultrastructural Localization of Peroxidase Activity in Human Platelets and Megakaryocytes

    PubMed Central

    Breton-Gorius, Janine; Guichard, Josette

    1972-01-01

    Normal human platelets and megakaryocytes were examined for peroxidase activity by the diaminobenzidine (DAB) cytochemical technic. When the fixation and the incubation were adequate, a strong reaction was present in the dense tubular system of platelets suspended in plasma or spread on carbon. The black reaction product was ascribed to enzyme activity, since the reaction was completely eliminated when H2O2 or DAB were omitted, or when H2O2 was in excess. In addition, the reaction was inhibited by aminotriazole, cyanide and azide. In the human megakaryocytes, the reaction was localized in the endoplasmic reticulum including the perinuclear envelope. The Golgi complex and the clear vacuolar system were negative for the reaction. After platelet release, the reaction was always seen in the perinuclear space. The nature and function of the enzyme, as well as its possible relationships with catalase, are discussed. ImagesFig 3Fig 4Fig 5Fig 6Fig 7Fig 8Fig 9Fig 10Fig 11Fig 1Fig 2Fig 12Fig 13Fig 14Fig 15Fig 16 PMID:5009974

  6. Anticancer activity of glucomoringin isothiocyanate in human malignant astrocytoma cells.

    PubMed

    Rajan, Thangavelu Soundara; De Nicola, Gina Rosalinda; Iori, Renato; Rollin, Patrick; Bramanti, Placido; Mazzon, Emanuela

    2016-04-01

    Isothiocyanates (ITCs) released from their glucosinolate precursors have been shown to inhibit tumorigenesis and they have received significant attention as potential chemotherapeutic agents against cancer. Astrocytoma grade IV is the most frequent and most malignant primary brain tumor in adults without any curative treatment. New therapeutic drugs are therefore urgently required. In the present study, we investigated the in vitro antitumor activity of the glycosylated isothiocyanate moringin [4-(α-l-rhamnopyranosyloxy)benzyl isothiocyanate] produced from quantitative myrosinase-induced hydrolysis of glucomoringin (GMG) under neutral pH value. We have evaluated the potency of moringin on apoptosis induction and cell death in human astrocytoma grade IV CCF-STTG1 cells. Moringin showed to be effective in inducing apoptosis through p53 and Bax activation and Bcl-2 inhibition. In addition, oxidative stress related Nrf2 transcription factor and its upstream regulator CK2 alpha expressions were modulated at higher doses, which indicated the involvement of oxidative stress-mediated apoptosis induced by moringin. Moreover, significant reduction in 5S rRNA was noticed with moringin treatment. Our in vitro results demonstrated the antitumor efficacy of moringin derived from myrosinase-hydrolysis of GMG in human malignant astrocytoma cells.

  7. Human transcriptional coactivator PC4 stimulates DNA end joining and activates DSB repair activity.

    PubMed

    Batta, Kiran; Yokokawa, Masatoshi; Takeyasu, Kunio; Kundu, Tapas K

    2009-01-23

    Human transcriptional coactivator PC4 is a highly abundant nuclear protein that is involved in diverse cellular processes ranging from transcription to chromatin organization. Earlier, we have shown that PC4, a positive activator of p53, overexpresses upon genotoxic insult in a p53-dependent manner. In the present study, we show that PC4 stimulates ligase-mediated DNA end joining irrespective of the source of DNA ligase. Pull-down assays reveal that PC4 helps in the association of DNA ends through its C-terminal domain. In vitro nonhomologous end-joining assays with cell-free extracts show that PC4 enhances the joining of noncomplementary DNA ends. Interestingly, we found that PC4 activates double-strand break (DSB) repair activity through stimulation of DSB rejoining in vivo. Together, these findings demonstrate PC4 as an activator of nonhomologous end joining and DSB repair activity.

  8. Increased proteasome activity determines human embryonic stem cell identity

    PubMed Central

    Vilchez, David; Boyer, Leah; Morantte, Ianessa; Lutz, Margaret; Merkwirth, Carsten; Joyce, Derek; Spencer, Brian; Page, Lesley; Masliah, Eliezer; Berggren, W. Travis; Gage, Fred H.; Dillin, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Embryonic stem cells are able to replicate continuously in the absence of senescence and, therefore, are immortal in culture1,2. While genome stability is central for survival of stem cells; proteome stability may play an equally important role in stem cell identity and function. Additionally, with the asymmetric divisions invoked by stem cells, the passage of damaged proteins to daughter cells could potentially destroy the resulting lineage of cells. We hypothesized that stem cells have an increased proteostasis ability compared to their differentiated counterparts and asked whether proteasome activity differed among human embryonic stem cells (hESCs). Notably, hESC populations exhibit a high proteasome activity that is correlated with increased levels of the 19S proteasome subunit PSMD11/RPN-63–5 and a corresponding increased assembly of the 26S/30S proteasome. Ectopic expression of PSMD11 is sufficient to increase proteasome assembly and activity. Proteasome inhibition affects pluripotency of hESCs inducing differentiation towards specific cell lineages. FOXO4, an insulin/IGF-1 responsive transcription factor associated with long lifespan in invertebrates6,7, regulates proteasome activity by modulating the expression of PSMD11 in hESCs. Our results establish a novel regulation of proteostasis in hESCs that links longevity and stress resistance in invertebrates with hESC function and identity. PMID:22972301

  9. Conformation and activity of recombinant human fibroblast interferon-beta.

    PubMed

    Boublik, M; Moschera, J A; Wei, C; Kung, H F

    1990-04-01

    Conformation of highly purified recombinant human fibroblast interferon-beta (rHuIFN-beta) was correlated with its biological activity. The extent of ordered secondary structure was determined by circular dichroic (CD) spectroscopy in various buffer conditions to establish conditions of protein stability and its potential for helix formation. The highest "helicity" (about 50 +/- 5% of alpha-helices) and the highest antiviral activities (4-10 x 10(7) units/mg) were found in 50% ethylene glycol, 1 M NaCl and 0.05 M Na3PO4, pH 7.2 (Buffer I); 80 mM citric acid, 20 mM Na2HPO4, pH 2.9 (Buffer II); and 25 mM NH4OAc, 125 mM NaCl, pH 5.1 (Buffer III). Both helicity and antiviral activity of the IFN-beta decrease in parallel with denaturation by urea, heat, and/or by repeated cycles of freezing and thawing. Low pH (pH 2.9 Buffer II) exhibits a distinct stabilizing effect on the structure and antiviral activity of IFN-beta against heat denaturation.

  10. A near atomic structure of the active human apoptosome

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Tat Cheung; Hong, Chuan; Akey, Ildikó V; Yuan, Shujun; Akey, Christopher W

    2016-01-01

    In response to cell death signals, an active apoptosome is assembled from Apaf-1 and procaspase-9 (pc-9). Here we report a near atomic structure of the active human apoptosome determined by cryo-electron microscopy. The resulting model gives insights into cytochrome c binding, nucleotide exchange and conformational changes that drive assembly. During activation an acentric disk is formed on the central hub of the apoptosome. This disk contains four Apaf-1/pc-9 CARD pairs arranged in a shallow spiral with the fourth pc-9 CARD at lower occupancy. On average, Apaf-1 CARDs recruit 3 to 5 pc-9 molecules to the apoptosome and one catalytic domain may be parked on the hub, when an odd number of zymogens are bound. This suggests a stoichiometry of one or at most, two pc-9 dimers per active apoptosome. Thus, our structure provides a molecular framework to understand the role of the apoptosome in programmed cell death and disease. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.17755.001 PMID:27697150

  11. CP-690,550, a therapeutic agent, inhibits cytokine-mediated Jak3 activation and proliferation of T cells from patients with ATL and HAM/TSP.

    PubMed

    Ju, Wei; Zhang, Meili; Jiang, Jian-kang; Thomas, Craig J; Oh, Unsong; Bryant, Bonita R; Chen, Jing; Sato, Noriko; Tagaya, Yutaka; Morris, John C; Janik, John E; Jacobson, Steven; Waldmann, Thomas A

    2011-02-10

    The retrovirus, human T-cell-lymphotrophic virus-1 (HTLV-I) is the etiologic agent of adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) and the neurological disorder HTLV-I-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP). The HTLV-I-encoded protein tax constitutively activates interleukin-2 (IL-2), IL-9, and IL-15 autocrine/paracrine systems that in turn activate the Jak3 (Janus kinase 3)/STAT5 (signal transducers and activators of transcription 5) pathway, suggesting a therapeutic strategy that involves targeting Jak3. We evaluated the action of the Jak3 inhibitor CP-690,550 on cytokine dependent ex vivo proliferation that is characteristic of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from select patients with smoldering or chronic subtypes of ATL, or from those with HAM/TSP whose PBMCs are associated with autocrine/paracrine pathways that involve the production of IL-2, IL-9, IL-15, and their receptors. CP-690,550 at 50 nM inhibited the 6-day ex vivo spontaneous proliferation of PBMCs from ATL and HAM/TSP patients by 67.1% and 86.4%, respectively. Furthermore, CP-690,550 inhibited STAT5 phosphorylation in isolated ATL T cells ex vivo. Finally, in an in vivo test of biological activity, CP-690,550 treatment of mice with a CD8 T-cell IL-15-transgenic leukemia that manifests an autocrine IL-15/IL-15Rα pathway prolonged the survival duration of these tumor-bearing mice. These studies support further evaluation of the Jak3 inhibitor CP-690,550 in the treatment of select patients with HTLV-I-associated ATL and HAM/TSP.

  12. Characterization of aldehyde oxidase enzyme activity in cryopreserved human hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Hutzler, J Matthew; Yang, Young-Sun; Albaugh, Daniel; Fullenwider, Cody L; Schmenk, Jennifer; Fisher, Michael B

    2012-02-01

    Substrates of aldehyde oxidase (AO), for which human clinical pharmacokinetics are reported, were selected and evaluated in pooled mixed-gender cryopreserved human hepatocytes in an effort to quantitatively characterize AO activity. Estimated hepatic clearance (Cl(h)) for BIBX1382, carbazeran, O⁶-benzylguanine, zaleplon, and XK-469 using cryopreserved hepatocytes was 18, 17, 12, <4.3, and <4.3 ml · min⁻¹ · kg⁻¹, respectively. The observed metabolic clearance in cryopreserved hepatocytes was confirmed to be a result of AO-mediated metabolism via two approaches. Metabolite identification after incubations in the presence of H₂¹⁸O confirmed that the predominant oxidative metabolite was generated by AO, as expected isotope patterns in mass spectra were observed after analysis by high-resolution mass spectrometry. Second, clearance values were efficiently attenuated upon coincubation with hydralazine, an inhibitor of AO. The low exposure after oral doses of BIBX1382 and carbazeran (∼5% F) would have been fairly well predicted using simple hepatic extraction (f(h)) values derived from cryopreserved hepatocytes. In addition, the estimated hepatic clearance value for O⁶-benzylguanine was within ∼80% of the observed total clearance in humans after intravenous administration (15 ml · min⁻¹ · kg⁻¹), indicating a reasonable level of quantitative activity from this in vitro system. However, a 3.5-fold underprediction of total clearance was observed for zaleplon, despite the 5-oxo metabolite being clearly observed. These data taken together suggest that the use of cryopreserved hepatocytes may be a practical approach for assessing AO-mediated metabolism in discovery and potentially useful for predicting hepatic clearance of AO substrates.

  13. Dual allosteric activation mechanisms in monomeric human glucokinase.

    PubMed

    Whittington, A Carl; Larion, Mioara; Bowler, Joseph M; Ramsey, Kristen M; Brüschweiler, Rafael; Miller, Brian G

    2015-09-15

    Cooperativity in human glucokinase (GCK), the body's primary glucose sensor and a major determinant of glucose homeostatic diseases, is fundamentally different from textbook models of allostery because GCK is monomeric and contains only one glucose-binding site. Prior work has demonstrated that millisecond timescale order-disorder transitions within the enzyme's small domain govern cooperativity. Here, using limited proteolysis, we map the site of disorder in unliganded GCK to a 30-residue active-site loop that closes upon glucose binding. Positional randomization of the loop, coupled with genetic selection in a glucokinase-deficient bacterium, uncovers a hyperactive GCK variant with substantially reduced cooperativity. Biochemical and structural analysis of this loop variant and GCK variants associated with hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia reveal two distinct mechanisms of enzyme activation. In α-type activation, glucose affinity is increased, the proteolytic susceptibility of the active site loop is suppressed and the (1)H-(13)C heteronuclear multiple quantum coherence (HMQC) spectrum of (13)C-Ile-labeled enzyme resembles the glucose-bound state. In β-type activation, glucose affinity is largely unchanged, proteolytic susceptibility of the loop is enhanced, and the (1)H-(13)C HMQC spectrum reveals no perturbation in ensemble structure. Leveraging both activation mechanisms, we engineer a fully noncooperative GCK variant, whose functional properties are indistinguishable from other hexokinase isozymes, and which displays a 100-fold increase in catalytic efficiency over wild-type GCK. This work elucidates specific structural features responsible for generating allostery in a monomeric enzyme and suggests a general strategy for engineering cooperativity into proteins that lack the structural framework typical of traditional allosteric systems.

  14. Human Health Relevance of Pharmaceutically Active Compounds in Drinking Water.

    PubMed

    Khan, Usman; Nicell, Jim

    2015-05-01

    In Canada, as many as 20 pharmaceutically active compounds (PhACs) have been detected in samples of treated drinking water. The presence of these PhACs in drinking water raises important questions as to the human health risk posed by their potential appearance in drinking water supplies and the extent to which they indicate that other PhACs are present but have not been detected using current analytical methods. Therefore, the goal of the current investigation was to conduct a screening-level assessment of the human health risks posed by the aquatic release of an evaluation set of 335 selected PhACs. Predicted and measured concentrations were used to estimate the exposure of Canadians to each PhAC in the evaluation set. Risk evaluations based on measurements could only be performed for 17 PhACs and, of these, all were found to pose a negligible risk to human health when considered individually. The same approach to risk evaluation, but based on predicted rather than measured environmental concentrations, suggested that 322 PhACs of the evaluation set, when considered individually, are expected to pose a negligible risk to human health due to their potential presence in drinking waters. However, the following 14 PhACs should be prioritized for further study: triiodothyronine, thyroxine, ramipril and its metabolite ramiprilat, candesartan, lisinopril, atorvastatin, lorazepam, fentanyl, atenolol, metformin, enalaprilat, morphine, and irbesartan. Finally, the currently available monitoring data for PhACs in Canadian surface and drinking waters was found to be lacking, irrespective of whether their suitability was assessed based on risk posed, predicted exposure concentrations, or potency.

  15. ANALYSIS OF HUMAN ACTIVITY DATA FOR USE IN MODELING ENVIRONMENTAL EXPOSURES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Human activity data are a critical part of exposure models being developed by the US EPA's National Exposure Research Laboratory (NERL). An analysis of human activity data within NERL's Consolidated Human Activity Database (CHAD) was performed in two areas relevant to exposure ...

  16. 48 CFR 3452.224-71 - Notice about research activities involving human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... activities involving human subjects. 3452.224-71 Section 3452.224-71 Federal Acquisition Regulations System... Text of Provisions and Clauses 3452.224-71 Notice about research activities involving human subjects... contract will include, or is likely to include, research activities involving human subjects covered...

  17. Investigation of gene expression pattern of 5HTR2a and MAO-A in PBMCs of individuals who had been exposed to air pollution in highly polluted area.

    PubMed

    Sheikhha, Hajar; Emadi, Somayeh; Jorbozedar, Saman; Deilami, Gholamreza D; Ahangari, Ghasem

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to air pollutants can lead to lung inflammatory responses such as allergic asthma. Serotonin elevation is shown to be present in peripheral blood of symptomatic asthmatic patients. In this study, two genes, 5HTR2a and MAO-A playing important roles in serotonin function, were analyzed in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of individuals who had been exposed to air pollution and allergic asthmatic patients as well. Thus, cDNA was synthesized from PBMCs' mRNA of the subjects and then gene expression was measured by real-time PCR. 5HTR2A gene expression in PBMCs of both exposed individuals and allergic asthmatic patients was significantly increased compared with control group, whereas MAO-A gene expression showed no significant changes in neither groups. These results indicate that there may be association between increased 5HTR2a gene expression and exposure to air pollution as well as asthma incidence. Some relevant patents are also outlined in this article.

  18. Activation of autophagy in human skeletal muscle is dependent on exercise intensity and AMPK activation.

    PubMed

    Schwalm, Céline; Jamart, Cécile; Benoit, Nicolas; Naslain, Damien; Prémont, Christophe; Prévet, Jérémy; Van Thienen, Ruud; Deldicque, Louise; Francaux, Marc

    2015-08-01

    In humans, nutrient deprivation and extreme endurance exercise both activate autophagy. We hypothesized that cumulating fasting and cycling exercise would potentiate activation of autophagy in skeletal muscle. Well-trained athletes were divided into control (n = 8), low-intensity (LI, n = 8), and high-intensity (HI, n = 7) exercise groups and submitted to fed and fasting sessions. Muscle biopsy samples were obtained from the vastus lateralis before, at the end, and 1 h after a 2 h LI or HI bout of exercise. Phosphorylation of ULK1(Ser317) was higher after exercise (P < 0.001). In both the fed and the fasted states, LC3bII protein level and LC3bII/I were decreased after LI and HI (P < 0.05), while p62/SQSTM1 was decreased only 1 h after HI (P < 0.05), indicating an increased autophagic flux after HI. The autophagic transcriptional program was also activated, as evidenced by the increased level of LC3b, p62/SQSTM1, GabarapL1, and Cathepsin L mRNAs observed after HI but not after LI. The increased autophagic flux after HI exercise could be due to increased AMP-activated protein kinase α (AMPKα) activity, as both AMPKα(Thr172) and ACC(Ser79) had a higher phosphorylation state after HI (P < 0.001). In summary, the most effective strategy to activate autophagy in human skeletal muscle seems to rely on exercise intensity more than diet.

  19. Isolation of biologically-active exosomes from human plasma.

    PubMed

    Muller, Laurent; Hong, Chang-Sook; Stolz, Donna B; Watkins, Simon C; Whiteside, Theresa L

    2014-09-01

    Effects of exosomes present in human plasma on immune cells have not been examined in detail. Immunological studies with plasma-derived exosomes require their isolation by procedures involving ultracentrifugation. These procedures were largely developed using supernatants of cultured cells. To test biologic activities of plasma-derived exosomes, methods are necessary that ensure adequate recovery of exosome fractions free of contaminating larger vesicles, cell fragments and protein/nucleic acid aggregates. Here, an optimized method for exosome isolation from human plasma/serum specimens of normal controls (NC) or cancer patients and its advantages and pitfalls are described. To remove undesirable plasma-contaminating components, ultrafiltration of differentially-centrifuged plasma/serum followed by size-exclusion chromatography prior to ultracentrifugation facilitated the removal of contaminants. Plasma or serum was equally acceptable as a source of exosomes based on the recovered protein levels (in μg protein/mL plasma) and TEM image quality. Centrifugation on sucrose density gradients led to large exosome losses. Fresh plasma was the best source of morphologically-intact exosomes, while the use of frozen/thawed plasma decreased exosome purity but not their biologic activity. Treatments of frozen plasma with DNAse, RNAse or hyaluronidase did not improve exosome purity and are not recommended. Cancer patients' plasma consistently yielded more isolated exosomes than did NCs' plasma. Cancer patients' exosomes also mediated higher immune suppression as evidenced by decreased CD69 expression on responder CD4+ T effector cells. Thus, the described procedure yields biologically-active, morphologically-intact exosomes that have reasonably good purity without large protein losses and can be used for immunological, biomarker and other studies.

  20. Substrate rigidity regulates human T cell activation and proliferation.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Roddy S; Hao, Xueli; Shen, Keyue; Bashour, Keenan; Akimova, Tatiana; Hancock, Wayne W; Kam, Lance C; Milone, Michael C

    2012-08-01

    Adoptive immunotherapy using cultured T cells holds promise for the treatment of cancer and infectious disease. Ligands immobilized on surfaces fabricated from hard materials such as polystyrene plastic are commonly employed for T cell culture. The mechanical properties of a culture surface can influence the adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation of stem cells and fibroblasts. We therefore explored the impact of culture substrate stiffness on the ex vivo activation and expansion of human T cells. We describe a simple system for the stimulation of the TCR/CD3 complex and the CD28 receptor using substrates with variable rigidity manufactured from poly(dimethylsiloxane), a biocompatible silicone elastomer. We show that softer (Young's Modulus [E] < 100 kPa) substrates stimulate an average 4-fold greater IL-2 production and ex vivo proliferation of human CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells compared with stiffer substrates (E > 2 MPa). Mixed peripheral blood T cells cultured on the stiffer substrates also demonstrate a trend (nonsignificant) toward a greater proportion of CD62L(neg), effector-differentiated CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells. Naive CD4(+) T cells expanded on softer substrates yield an average 3-fold greater proportion of IFN-γ-producing Th1-like cells. These results reveal that the rigidity of the substrate used to immobilize T cell stimulatory ligands is an important and previously unrecognized parameter influencing T cell activation, proliferation, and Th differentiation. Substrate rigidity should therefore be a consideration in the development of T cell culture systems as well as when interpreting results of T cell activation based upon solid-phase immobilization of TCR/CD3 and CD28 ligands.

  1. Substrate rigidity regulates human T cell activation and proliferation1

    PubMed Central

    O’Connor, Roddy S.; Hao, Xueli; Shen, Keyue; Bashour, Keenan; Akimova, Tatiana; Hancock, Wayne W.; Kam, Lance; Milone, Michael C.

    2012-01-01

    Adoptive immunotherapy using cultured T cells holds promise for the treatment of cancer and infectious disease. Ligands immobilized on surfaces fabricated from hard materials such as polystyrene plastic are commonly employed for T cell culture. The mechanical properties of a culture surface can influence the adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation of stem cells and fibroblasts. We therefore explored the impact of culture substrate stiffness on the ex vivo activation and expansion of human T cells. We describe a simple system for the stimulation of the TCR/CD3 complex and the CD28 receptor using substrates with variable rigidity manufactured from poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS), a biocompatible silicone elastomer. We show that softer (Young’s Modulus [E] < 100 kPa) substrates stimulate an average 4-fold greater IL-2 production and ex vivo proliferation of human CD4+ and CD8+ T cells compared with stiffer substrates (E >2 MPa). Mixed peripheral blood T cells cultured on the stiffer substrates also demonstrate a trend (non-significant) towards a greater proportion of CD62Lneg, effector-differentiated CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. Naïve CD4+ T cells expanded on softer substrates yield an average 3-fold greater proportion of IFN-γ producing TH1-like cells. These results reveal that the rigidity of the substrate used to immobilize T cell stimulatory ligands is an important and previously unrecognized parameter influencing T cell activation, proliferation and TH differentiation. Substrate rigidity should therefore be a consideration in the development of T cell culture systems as well as when interpreting results of T cell activation based upon solid-phase immobilization of TCR/CD3 and CD28 ligands. PMID:22732590

  2. Saliva microbiomes distinguish caries-active from healthy human populations

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Fang; Zeng, Xiaowei; Ning, Kang; Liu, Kuan-Liang; Lo, Chien-Chi; Wang, Wei; Chen, Jie; Wang, Dongmei; Huang, Ranran; Chang, Xingzhi; Chain, Patrick S; Xie, Gary; Ling, Junqi; Xu, Jian

    2012-01-01

    The etiology of dental caries remains elusive because of our limited understanding of the complex oral microbiomes. The current methodologies have been limited by insufficient depth and breadth of microbial sampling, paucity of data for diseased hosts particularly at the population level, inconsistency of sampled sites and the inability to distinguish the underlying microbial factors. By cross-validating 16S rRNA gene amplicon-based and whole-genome-based deep-sequencing technologies, we report the most in-depth, comprehensive and collaborated view to date of the adult saliva microbiomes in pilot populations of 19 caries-active and 26 healthy human hosts. We found that: first, saliva microbiomes in human population were featured by a vast phylogenetic diversity yet a minimal organismal core; second, caries microbiomes were significantly more variable in community structure whereas the healthy ones were relatively conserved; third, abundance changes of certain taxa such as overabundance of Prevotella Genus distinguished caries microbiota from healthy ones, and furthermore, caries-active and normal individuals carried different arrays of Prevotella species; and finally, no ‘caries-specific' operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were detected, yet 147 OTUs were ‘caries associated', that is, differentially distributed yet present in both healthy and caries-active populations. These findings underscored the necessity of species- and strain-level resolution for caries prognosis, and were consistent with the ecological hypothesis where the shifts in community structure, instead of the presence or absence of particular groups of microbes, underlie the cariogenesis. PMID:21716312

  3. Human Brain Activity Related to the Tactile Perception of Stickiness.

    PubMed

    Yeon, Jiwon; Kim, Junsuk; Ryu, Jaekyun; Park, Jang-Yeon; Chung, Soon-Cheol; Kim, Sung-Phil

    2017-01-01

    While the perception of stickiness serves as one of the fundamental dimensions for tactile sensation, little has been elucidated about the stickiness sensation and its neural correlates. The present study investigated how the human brain responds to perceived tactile sticky stimuli using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). To evoke tactile perception of stickiness with multiple intensities, we generated silicone stimuli with varying catalyst ratios. Also, an acrylic sham stimulus was prepared to present a condition with no sticky sensation. From the two psychophysics experiments-the methods of constant stimuli and the magnitude estimation-we could classify the silicone stimuli into two groups according to whether a sticky perception was evoked: the Supra-threshold group that evoked sticky perception and the Infra-threshold group that did not. In the Supra-threshold vs. Sham contrast analysis of the fMRI data using the general linear model (GLM), the contralateral primary somatosensory area (S1) and ipsilateral dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) showed significant activations in subjects, whereas no significant result was found in the Infra-threshold vs. Sham contrast. This result indicates that the perception of stickiness not only activates the somatosensory cortex, but also possibly induces higher cognitive processes. Also, the Supra- vs. Infra-threshold contrast analysis revealed significant activations in several subcortical regions, including the pallidum, putamen, caudate and thalamus, as well as in another region spanning the insula and temporal cortices. These brain regions, previously known to be related to tactile discrimination, may subserve the discrimination of different intensities of tactile stickiness. The present study unveils the human neural correlates of the tactile perception of stickiness and may contribute to broadening the understanding of neural mechanisms associated with tactile perception.

  4. Global Profiling of Carbohydrate Active Enzymes in Human Gut Microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Mande, Sharmila S.

    2015-01-01

    Motivation Carbohydrate Active enzyme (CAZyme) families, encoded by human gut microflora, play a crucial role in breakdown of complex dietary carbohydrates into components that can be absorbed by our intestinal epithelium. Since nutritional wellbeing of an individual is dependent on the nutrient harvesting capability of the gut microbiome, it is important to understand how CAZyme repertoire in the gut is influenced by factors like age, geography and food habits. Results This study reports a comprehensive in-silico analysis of CAZyme profiles in the gut microbiomes of 448 individuals belonging to different geographies, using similarity searches of the corresponding gut metagenomic contigs against the carbohydrate active enzymes database. The study identifies a core group of 89 CAZyme families that are present across 85% of the gut microbiomes. The study detects several geography/age-specific trends in gut CAZyme repertoires of the individuals. Notably, a group of CAZymes having a positive correlation with BMI has been identified. Further this group of BMI-associated CAZymes is observed to be specifically abundant in the Firmicutes phyla. One of the major findings from this study is identification of three distinct groups of individuals, referred to as 'CAZotypes', having similar CAZyme profiles. Distinct taxonomic drivers for these CAZotypes as well as the probable dietary basis for such trends have also been elucidated. The results of this study provide a global view of CAZyme profiles across individuals of various geographies and age-groups. These results re-iterate the need of a more precise understanding of the role of carbohydrate active enzymes in human nutrition. PMID:26544883

  5. Human Brain Activity Related to the Tactile Perception of Stickiness

    PubMed Central

    Yeon, Jiwon; Kim, Junsuk; Ryu, Jaekyun; Park, Jang-Yeon; Chung, Soon-Cheol; Kim, Sung-Phil

    2017-01-01

    While the perception of stickiness serves as one of the fundamental dimensions for tactile sensation, little has been elucidated about the stickiness sensation and its neural correlates. The present study investigated how the human brain responds to perceived tactile sticky stimuli using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). To evoke tactile perception of stickiness with multiple intensities, we generated silicone stimuli with varying catalyst ratios. Also, an acrylic sham stimulus was prepared to present a condition with no sticky sensation. From the two psychophysics experiments–the methods of constant stimuli and the magnitude estimation—we could classify the silicone stimuli into two groups according to whether a sticky perception was evoked: the Supra-threshold group that evoked sticky perception and the Infra-threshold group that did not. In the Supra-threshold vs. Sham contrast analysis of the fMRI data using the general linear model (GLM), the contralateral primary somatosensory area (S1) and ipsilateral dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) showed significant activations in subjects, whereas no significant result was found in the Infra-threshold vs. Sham contrast. This result indicates that the perception of stickiness not only activates the somatosensory cortex, but also possibly induces higher cognitive processes. Also, the Supra- vs. Infra-threshold contrast analysis revealed significant activations in several subcortical regions, including the pallidum, putamen, caudate and thalamus, as well as in another region spanning the insula and temporal cortices. These brain regions, previously known to be related to tactile discrimination, may subserve the discrimination of different intensities of tactile stickiness. The present study unveils the human neural correlates of the tactile perception of stickiness and may contribute to broadening the understanding of neural mechanisms associated with tactile perception. PMID:28163677

  6. Shedding of tumor necrosis factor receptors by activated human neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    The capacity of human neutrophils (PMN) to bind tumor necrosis factor (TNF) was rapidly lost when the cells were incubated in suspension with agents that can stimulate their migratory and secretory responses. Both physiological (poly)peptides (FMLP, C5a, CSF-GM) and pharmacologic agonists (PMN, calcium ionophore A23187) induced the loss of TNF receptors (TNF-R) from the cell surface. Half-maximal loss in TNF-R ensued after only approximately 2 min with 10(-7) M FMLP at 37 degrees C, and required only 10(-9) M FMLP during a 30-min exposure. However, there were no such changes even with prolonged exposure of PMN to FMLP at 4 degrees or 16 degrees C. Scatchard analysis revealed loss of TNF- binding sites without change in their affinity (Kd approximately 0.4 nM) as measured at incompletely modulating concentrations of FMLP, C5a, PMA, or A23187. The binding of anti-TNF-R mAbs to PMN decreased in parallel, providing independent evidence for the loss of TNF-R from the cell surface. At the same time, soluble TNF-R appeared in the medium of stimulated PMN. This inference was based on the PMN- and FMLP-dependent generation of a nonsedimentable activity that could inhibit the binding of TNF to fresh human PMN or to mouse macrophages, and the ability of mAbs specific for human TNF-R to abolish inhibition by PMN-conditioned medium of binding of TNF to mouse macrophages. Soluble TNF-R activity was associated with a protein of Mr approximately 28,000 by ligand blot analysis of cell-free supernatants of FMLP-treated PMN. Thus, some portion of the FMLP-induced loss of TNF-R from human PMN is due to shedding of TNF-R. Shedding was unaffected by inhibitors of serine and thiol proteases and could not be induced with phosphatidylinositol- specific phospholipase C. Loss of TNF-R from PMN first stimulated by other agents may decrease their responsiveness to TNF. TNF-R shed by PMN may be one source of the TNF-binding proteins found in body fluids, and may blunt the actions of the

  7. Crystal Structure of Human Plasma Platelet-Activating Factor Acetylhydrolase

    SciTech Connect

    Samanta, U.; Bahnson, B

    2008-01-01

    Human plasma platelet-activating factor (PAF) acetylhydrolase functions by reducing PAF levels as a general anti-inflammatory scavenger and is linked to anaphylactic shock, asthma, and allergic reactions. The enzyme has also been implicated in hydrolytic activities of other pro-inflammatory agents, such as sn-2 oxidatively fragmented phospholipids. This plasma enzyme is tightly bound to low and high density lipoprotein particles and is also referred to as lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A{sub 2}. The crystal structure of this enzyme has been solved from x-ray diffraction data collected to a resolution of 1.5{angstrom}. It has a classic lipase {alpha}/{beta}-hydrolase fold, and it contains a catalytic triad of Ser{sup 273}, His{sup 351}, and Asp{sup 296}. Two clusters of hydrophobic residues define the probable interface-binding region, and a prediction is given of how the enzyme is bound to lipoproteins. Additionally, an acidic patch of 10 carboxylate residues and a neighboring basic patch of three residues are suggested to play a role in high density lipoprotein/low density lipoprotein partitioning. A crystal structure is also presented of PAF acetylhydrolase reacted with the organophosphate compound paraoxon via its active site Ser{sup 273}. The resulting diethyl phosphoryl complex was used to model the tetrahedral intermediate of the substrate PAF to the active site. The model of interface binding begins to explain the known specificity of lipoprotein-bound substrates and how the active site can be both close to the hydrophobic-hydrophilic interface and at the same time be accessible to the aqueous phase.

  8. Rewiring cellular metabolism via the AKT/mTOR pathway contributes to host defence against Mycobacterium tuberculosis in human and murine cells

    PubMed Central

    Lachmandas, Ekta; Beigier‐Bompadre, Macarena; Cheng, Shih‐Chin; Kumar, Vinod; van Laarhoven, Arjan; Wang, Xinhui; Ammerdorffer, Anne; Boutens, Lily; de Jong, Dirk; Kanneganti, Thirumala‐Devi; Gresnigt, Mark S.; Ottenhoff, Tom H.M.; Joosten, Leo A.B.; Stienstra, Rinke; Wijmenga, Cisca; Kaufmann, Stefan H.E.; van Crevel, Reinout

    2016-01-01

    Cells in homeostasis metabolize glucose mainly through the tricarboxylic acid cycle and oxidative phosphorylation, while activated cells switch their basal metabolism to aerobic glycolysis. In this study, we examined whether metabolic reprogramming toward aerobic glycolysis is important for the host response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). Through transcriptional and metabolite analysis we show that Mtb induces a switch in host cellular metabolism toward aerobic glycolysis in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). The metabolic switch is TLR2 dependent but NOD2 independent, and is mediated in part through activation of the AKT‐mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin) pathway. We show that pharmacological inhibition of the AKT/mTOR pathway inhibits cellular responses to Mtb both in vitro in human PBMCs, and in vivo in a model of murine tuberculosis. Our findings reveal a novel regulatory layer of host responses to Mtb that will aid understanding of host susceptibility to Mtb, and which may be exploited for host‐directed therapy. PMID:27624090

  9. Voltage-activated proton current in eosinophils from human blood.

    PubMed Central

    Gordienko, D V; Tare, M; Parveen, S; Fenech, C J; Robinson, C; Bolton, T B

    1996-01-01

    1. The resting membrane potential of freshly purified normodense human eosinophils bathed in and dialysed with quasi-physiological solutions was -63 +/- 2 mV (n = 100). 2. In voltage-clamp mode with quasi-physiological internal and external solutions, voltage steps from the holding potential of -60 mV to levels positive to +20 mV resulted in development of a quasi-instantaneous outward current and a slowly developing outward current. The instantaneous current was absent when the cells were bathed in and dialysed with K(+)-free solution. 3. The slow outward current persisted following simultaneous replacement of K+, Na+ and most of the Cl- with largely impermeant ions (tetraethylammonium, N-methyl-D-glucamine and methanesulphonate) and was augmented when the cell was dialysed with a solution of increased buffering capacity for protons. The observed reversal potential of the current closely followed the hydrogen equilibrium potential over a wide range of internal-external pH combinations, indicating that the conductance underlying the slow outward current was highly selective for H+ ions. 4. Acidification of the pipette solution (increasing [H+]i) augmented the outward H+ current and shifted its activation range negatively, whilst acidification of the external solution had the opposite effect. The voltage dependence of the current is modulated by the transmembrane pH gradient so the only outward current could be activated. However, when the outward current was activated by a voltage step, rapid acidification of external solution produced an inward H+ current which rapidly deactivated. 5. The proton current was reversibly inhibited in a voltage-dependent manner by extracellular application of Zn2+. The apparent dissociation constants were 8 nM (at +40 mV), 36 nM (at +70 mV) and 200 nM (at +100 mV). 6. The proton current was augmented by exposure to 10 microM arachidonic acid. This augmentation consisted of a shift of the voltage dependence of activation to more

  10. A proline-rich polypeptide complex (PRP) isolated from ovine colostrum. Modulation of H2O2 and cytokine induction in human leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Zabłocka, Agnieszka; Janusz, Maria; Macała, Józefa; Lisowski, Józef

    2007-07-01

    A proline-rich polypeptide complex (PRP) has immunoregulatory properties and also shows beneficial effects in Alzheimer's disease (AD). It is known that the unregulated activation of microglial cells in AD may result in chronic inflammatory response. There is a link between the activation of immune cells on the periphery and in the central nervous system (CNS). Therefore, we studied the effect of the PRP on human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) stimulated by LPS with PHA (LP) or PMA as proinflammatory activators. PRP and its nonapeptide fragment (NP) inhibited by 40-60% production of H(2)O(2) induced by PMA. The peptides also inhibited activity of superoxide dismutase. Both peptide preparations showed differential effects on the secretion of cytokines. NP induced TNF-alpha only while PRP induced IL-6, IL-10 and TNF-alpha. On the other hand, the release of TNF-alpha and IL-10 induced by LP in PBMCs was inhibited by PRP while NP inhibited the release of IFN-gamma and IL-10. The results obtained showed that PRP may affect not only adaptive immunity but also innate immunity and thus may regulate secretions of mediators of inflammation. The regulatory effect of the PRP on the innate immunity may shed some light on understanding the beneficial effects of this polypeptide complex in AD patients.

  11. Active site amino acid sequence of human factor D.

    PubMed

    Davis, A E

    1980-08-01

    Factor D was isolated from human plasma by chromatography on CM-Sephadex C50, Sephadex G-75, and hydroxylapatite. Digestion of reduced, S-carboxymethylated factor D with cyanogen bromide resulted in three peptides which were isolated by chromatography on Sephadex G-75 (superfine) equilibrated in 20% formic acid. NH2-Terminal sequences were determined by automated Edman degradation with a Beckman 890C sequencer using a 0.1 M Quadrol program. The smallest peptide (CNBr III) consisted of the NH2-terminal 14 amino acids. The other two peptides had molecular weights of 17,000 (CNBr I) and 7000 (CNBr II). Overlap of the NH2-terminal sequence of factor D with the NH2-terminal sequence of CNBr I established the order of the peptides. The NH2-terminal 53 residues of factor D are somewhat more homologous with the group-specific protease of rat intestine than with other serine proteases. The NH2-terminal sequence of CNBr II revealed the active site serine of factor D. The typical serine protease active site sequence (Gly-Asp-Ser-Gly-Gly-Pro was found at residues 12-17. The region surrounding the active site serine does not appear to be more highly homologous with any one of the other serine proteases. The structural data obtained point out the similarities between factor D and the other proteases. However, complete definition of the degree of relationship between factor D and other proteases will require determination of the remainder of the primary structure.

  12. Activation of human mitochondrial pantothenate kinase 2 by palmitoylcarnitine.

    PubMed

    Leonardi, Roberta; Rock, Charles O; Jackowski, Suzanne; Zhang, Yong-Mei

    2007-01-30

    The human isoform 2 of pantothenate kinase (PanK2) is localized to the mitochondria, and mutations in this protein are associated with a progressive neurodegenerative disorder. PanK2 inhibition by acetyl-CoA is so stringent (IC50 < 1 microM) that it is unclear how the enzyme functions in the presence of intracellular CoA concentrations. Palmitoylcarnitine was discovered to be a potent activator of PanK2 that functions to competitively antagonize acetyl-CoA inhibition. Acetyl-CoA was a competitive inhibitor of purified PanK2 with respect to ATP. The interaction between PanK2 and acetyl-CoA was stable enough that a significant proportion of the purified protein was isolated as the PanK2.acetyl-CoA complex. The long-chain acylcarnitine activation of PanK2 explains how PanK2 functions in vivo, by providing a positive regulatory mechanism to counteract the negative regulation of PanK2 activity by acetyl-CoA. Our results suggest that PanK2 is located in the mitochondria to sense the levels of palmitoylcarnitine and up-regulate CoA biosynthesis in response to an increased mitochondrial demand for the cofactor to support beta-oxidation.

  13. Interactions between occlusion and human brain function activities.

    PubMed

    Ohkubo, C; Morokuma, M; Yoneyama, Y; Matsuda, R; Lee, J S

    2013-02-01

    There are few review articles in the area of human research that focus on the interactions between occlusion and brain function. This systematic review discusses the effect of occlusion on the health of the entire body with a focus on brain function. Available relevant articles in English from 1999 to 2011 were assessed in an online database and as hard copies in libraries. The selected 19 articles were classified into the following five categories: chewing and tongue movements, clenching and grinding, occlusal splints and occlusal interference, prosthetic rehabilitation, and pain and stimulation. The relationships between the brain activity observed in the motor and sensory cortices and movements of the oral and maxillofacial area, such as those produced by gum chewing, tapping and clenching, were investigated. It was found that the sensorimotor cortex was also affected by the placement of the occlusal interference devices, splints and implant prostheses. Brain activity may change depending on the strength of the movements in the oral and maxillofacial area. Therefore, mastication and other movements stimulate the activity in the cerebral cortex and may be helpful in preventing degradation of a brain function. However, these findings must be verified by evidence gathered from more subjects.

  14. Epac Activation Regulates Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells Migration and Adhesion.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jiao-Le; Deng, Ruixia; Chung, Sookja K; Chan, Godfrey Chi-Fung

    2016-04-01

    How to enhance the homing of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) to the target tissues remains a clinical challenge nowadays. To overcome this barrier, the mechanism responsible for the hMSCs migration and engraftment has to be defined. Currently, the exact mechanism involved in migration and adhesion of hMSCs remains unknown. Exchange protein directly activated by cAMP (Epac), a novel protein discovered in cAMP signaling pathway, may have a potential role in regulating cells adhesion and migration by triggering the downstream Rap family signaling cascades. However, the exact role of Epac in cells homing is elusive. Our study evaluated the role of Epac in the homing of hMSCs. We confirmed that hMSCs expressed functional Epac and its activation enhanced the migration and adhesion of hMSCs significantly. The Epac activation was further found to be contributed directly to the chemotactic responses induced by stromal cell derived factor-1 (SDF-1) which is a known chemokine in regulating hMSCs homing. These findings suggested Epac is connected to the SDF-1 signaling cascades. In conclusion, our study revealed that Epac plays a role in hMSCs homing by promoting adhesion and migration. Appropriate manipulation of Epac may enhance the homing of hMSCs and facilitate their future clinical applications.

  15. Long-range scaling behaviours of human colonic pressure activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Rongguo; Yan, Guozheng; Zhang, Wenqiang; Wang, Long

    2008-11-01

    The long-range scaling behaviours of human colonic pressure activities under normal physiological conditions are studied by using the method of detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA). The DFA is an effective period representation with a single quantitative scaling exponent α to accurately quantify long-range correlations naturally presented in a complex non-stationary time series. The method shows that the colonic activities of the healthy subjects exhibit long-range power-law correlations; however such correlations either will be destroyed if we randomly shuffle the original data or will cease to be of a power-law form if we chop some high-amplitude spikes off. These facts indicate that the colonic tissue or enteric nervous system (ENS) with a good functional motility has a good memory to its past behaviours and generates well-organized colonic spikes; however such good memory becomes too long to be remembered for the colonic activity of the slow transit constipation (STC) patient and colonic dysmotility occurs.

  16. Determination of phosphodiesterase I activity in human blood serum.

    PubMed

    Hynie, I; Meuffels, M; Poznanski, W J

    1975-09-01

    Phosphodiesterase I (EC 3.1.4.1) activity was detected in normal human blood serum. The enzyme is stable at laboratory temperature for three days, but is inactivated at pH less than 7. The pH for optimum activity increases with the substrate concentration (under the conditions used, from pH 9.0 to 10.2) and, conversely, the Km increases with pH and buffer concentration. The enzyme is inhibited by ethylenediaminetetraacetate but not by phosphate (0.1 mol/liter). We developed a simple quantitative method for its determination, based on hydrolysis of the p-nitrophenyl ester of thymidine 5'-monophosphate and subsequent measurement of the liberated p-nitrophenol at 400 nm in NaOH (0.1 mol/liter). Normal values (mean +/- 2 SD) were determined to be 33 +/- 6.4 U/liter. Preliminary studies indicate that phosphodiesterase I activity is greater than normal in serum of patients with necrotic changes in the liver or kidney or in cases of breast cancer, but not in that of patients with myocardial infarction, bone cancer, lung cancer, or chronic liver cirrhosis.

  17. Allergen extracts directly mobilize and activate human eosinophils.

    PubMed

    Svensson, Lena; Rudin, Anna; Wennerås, Christine

    2004-06-01

    Allergic diseases are characterized by the presence of eosinophils, which are recruited to the affected tissues by chemoattractants produced by T cells, mast cells and epithelium. Our objective was to evaluate if allergens can directly activate human eosinophils. The capacity of purified allergen extracts to elicit eosinophil chemotaxis, respiratory burst, degranulation and up-regulation of the adhesion molecule complement receptor 3 (CR3) was determined in eosinophils isolated from healthy blood donors. Eosinophils stimulated with an extract from house dust mite (HDM) released the granule protein major basic protein (MBP) and up-regulated the surface expression of CR3. Cat allergen extracts also induced the up-regulation of CR3, but not the release of MBP; instead cat, as well as birch and grass allergens, elicited the release of eosinophil peroxidase (EPO). In addition, grass pollen extract caused the secretion of MBP. None of the allergens stimulated eosinophilic cationic protein release, nor production of free oxygen radicals. Both HDM and birch extracts were chemotactic for eosinophils. These findings establish that common aeroallergens can directly activate eosinophils in vitro. We propose that eosinophil activation in vivo is not exclusively mediated by cytokines and chemokines of the allergic inflammatory reaction, but could partly be the result of direct interaction between allergens and eosinophils.

  18. Exosomes: novel effectors of human platelet lysate activity.

    PubMed

    Torreggiani, E; Perut, F; Roncuzzi, L; Zini, N; Baglìo, S R; Baldini, N

    2014-09-22

    Despite the popularity of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) and platelet lysate (PL) in orthopaedic practice, the mechanism of action and the effectiveness of these therapeutic tools are still controversial. So far, the activity of PRP and PL has been associated with different growth factors (GF) released during platelet degranulation. This study, for the first time, identifies exosomes, nanosized vesicles released in the extracellular compartment by a number of elements, including platelets, as one of the effectors of PL activity. Exosomes were isolated from human PL by differential ultracentrifugation, and analysed by electron microscopy and Western blotting. Bone marrow stromal cells (MSC) treated with three different exosome concentrations (0.6 μg, 5 μg and 50 μg) showed a significant, dose-dependent increase in cell proliferation and migration compared to the control. In addition, osteogenic differentiation assays demonstrated that exosome concentration differently affected the ability of MSC to deposit mineralised matrix. Finally, the analysis of exosome protein content revealed a higher amount of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF-BB) and transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1) as compared to PL. In regards to RNA content, an enrichment of small RNAs in exosomes as compared to donor platelets has been found. These results suggest that exosomes consistently contribute to PL activity and could represent an advantageous nanodelivery system for cell-free regeneration therapies.

  19. Flavonoid inhibition of aromatase enzyme activity in human preadipocytes.

    PubMed

    Campbell, D R; Kurzer, M S

    1993-09-01

    Eleven flavonoid compounds were compared with aminoglutethimide (AG), a pharmaceutical aromatase inhibitor, for their abilities to inhibit aromatase enzyme activity in a human preadipocyte cell culture system. Flavonoids exerting no effect on aromatase activity were catechin, daidzein, equol, genistein, beta-naphthoflavone (BNF), quercetin and rutin. The synthetic flavonoid, alpha-naphthoflavone (ANF), was the most potent aromatase inhibitor, with an I50 value of 0.5 microM. Three naturally-occurring flavonoids, chrysin, flavone, and genistein 4'-methyl ether (Biochanin A) showed I50 values of 4.6, 68, and 113 microM, respectively, while AG showed an I50 value of 7.4 microM. Kinetic analyses showed that both AG and the flavonoids acted as competitive inhibitors of aromatase. The Ki values, indicating the effectiveness of inhibition, were 0.2, 2.4, 2.4, 22, and 49 microM, for ANF, AG, chrysin, flavone, and Biochanin A, respectively. Chrysin, the most potent of the naturally-occurring flavonoids, was similar in potency and effectiveness to AG, a pharmaceutical aromatase inhibitor used clinically in cases of estrogen-dependent carcinoma. These data suggest that flavonoid inhibition of peripheral aromatase activity may contribute to the observed cancer-preventive hormonal effects of plant-based diets.

  20. Endothelial human dihydrofolate reductase low activity limits vascular tetrahydrobiopterin recycling

    PubMed Central

    Whitsett, Jennifer; Filho, Artur Rangel; Sethumadhavan, Savitha; Celinska, Joanna; Widlansky, Michael; Vásquez-Vivar, Jeannette

    2013-01-01

    Tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) is required for NO synthesis and inhibition of superoxide release from eNOS. Clinical trials using BH4 to treat endothelial dysfunction have produced mixed results. Poor outcomes may be explained by the rapid systemic and cellular oxidation of BH4. One of the oxidation products of BH4, 7,8-dihydrobiopterin (7,8-BH2), is recycled back to BH4 by dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR). This enzyme is ubiquitously distributed and shows a wide range of activity depending on species-specific factors and cell type. Information about the kinetics and efficiency of BH4 recycling in human endothelial cells receiving BH4 treatment is lacking. To characterize this reaction, we applied a novel multi-electrode coulometric HPLC method that enabled the direct quantification of 7,8-BH2 and BH4 which is not possible with fluorescent-based methodologies. We found that basal untreated BH4 and 7,8-BH2 concentrations in human ECs is lower than bovine and murine endothelioma cells. Treatment of human ECs with BH4 transiently increased intracellular BH4 while accumulating the more stable 7,8-BH2. This was different from bovine or murine ECs that resulted in preferential BH4 increase. Using BH4 diastereomers, 6S-BH4 and 6R-BH4, the narrow contribution of enzymatic DHFR recycling to total intracellular BH4 was demonstrated. Reduction of 7,8-BH2 to BH4 occurs at very slow rates in cells and needs supra-physiological levels of 7,8-BH2, indicating this reaction is kinetically limited. Activity assays verified that hDHFR has very low affinity for 7,8-BH2 (DHF7,8-BH2) and folic acid inhibits 7,8-BH2 recycling. We conclude that low activity of endothelial DHFR is an important factor limiting the benefits of BH4 therapies which may be further aggravated by folate supplements. PMID:23707606

  1. Ionizing Radiation Activates AMP-Activated Kinase (AMPK): A Target for Radiosensitization of Human Cancer Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sanli, Toran; Rashid, Ayesha; Liu Caiqiong

    2010-09-01

    Purpose: Adenosine monophosphate (AMP)-activated kinase (AMPK) is a molecular energy sensor regulated by the tumor suppressor LKB1. Starvation and growth factors activate AMPK through the DNA damage sensor ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM). We explored the regulation of AMPK by ionizing radiation (IR) and its role as a target for radiosensitization of human cancer cells. Methods and Materials: Lung, prostate, and breast cancer cells were treated with IR (2-8 Gy) after incubation with either ATM or AMPK inhibitors or the AMPK activator metformin. Then, cells were subjected to either lysis and immunoblotting, immunofluorescence microscopy, clonogenic survival assays, or cell cycle analysis. Results: IR induced a robust phosphorylation and activation of AMPK in all tumor cells, independent of LKB1. IR activated AMPK first in the nucleus, and this extended later into cytoplasm. The ATM inhibitor KU-55933 blocked IR activation of AMPK. AMPK inhibition with Compound C or anti-AMPK {alpha} subunit small interfering RNA (siRNA) blocked IR induction of the cell cycle regulators p53 and p21{sup waf/cip} as well as the IR-induced G2/M arrest. Compound C caused resistance to IR, increasing the surviving fraction after 2 Gy, but the anti-diabetic drug metformin enhanced IR activation of AMPK and lowered the surviving fraction after 2 Gy further. Conclusions: We provide evidence that IR activates AMPK in human cancer cells in an LKB1-independent manner, leading to induction of p21{sup waf/cip} and regulation of the cell cycle and survival. AMPK appears to (1) participate in an ATM-AMPK-p21{sup waf/cip} pathway, (2) be involved in regulation of the IR-induced G2/M checkpoint, and (3) may be targeted by metformin to enhance IR responses.

  2. Human sperm acrosome reaction-initiating activity associated with the human cumulus oophorus and mural granulosa cells.

    PubMed

    Siiteri, J E; Dandekar, P; Meizel, S

    1988-04-01

    This report describes the detection and partial characterization of preovulatory human cumulus oophorus and mural granulosa cell-associated activity capable of initiating the human sperm acrosome reaction (AR) in vitro. Fragments of preovulatory human cumulus (cells plus extracellular matrix) were washed 3 times, incubated for 24 hr and the spent media and washes assayed for their ability to initiate the human sperm acrosome reaction (AR) in vitro. AR activity was present in the first two washes but not the third wash; however, AR activity was recovered in the spent medium after 3 X-washed fragments were incubated for 24 hr under conditions which maintained the viability of the cumulus cells. The spent media of preovulatory human mural granulosa cells contained AR-initiating activity after 1-3, 3-6, and 6-9 days of culture. The properties of the AR activity present in spent media of human cumulus fragments included resistance to loss of activity during treatment with pronase; resistance to loss of activity during treatment with chondroitinase ABC or bacterial hyaluronidase; heat stability after overnight incubation; lack of extraction by chloroform-methanol; an apparent molecular weight (MW) of 50,000, as determined by Sephadex G-75 column chromatography; conversion to a lower apparent MW activity by incubation with pronase. These properties are also characteristic of a fraction derived by Sephadex G-75 chromatography of preovulatory human follicular fluid which also has been shown to stimulate the human sperm acrosome reaction in vitro. The AR activity from spent media of human mural granulosa cells is also found in a 50,000 MW Sephadex G-75 fraction. We propose that the sources of the 50,000 MW human follicular fluid AR activity are the cumulus oophorus and the mural granulosa cells.

  3. Superoxide anion production by human neutrophils activated by Trichomonas vaginalis.

    PubMed

    Song, Hyun-Ouk; Ryu, Jae-Sook

    2013-08-01

    Neutrophils are the predominant inflammatory cells found in vaginal discharges of patients infected with Trichomonas vaginalis. In this study, we examined superoxide anion (O2 (.-)) production by neutrophils activated by T. vaginalis. Human neutrophils produced superoxide anions when stimulated with either a lysate of T. vaginalis, its membrane component (MC), or excretory-secretory product (ESP). To assess the role of trichomonad protease in production of superoxide anions by neutrophils, T. vaginalis lysate, ESP, and MC were each pretreated with a protease inhibitor cocktail before incubation with neutrophils. Superoxide anion production was significantly decreased by this treatment. Trichomonad growth was inhibited by preincubation with supernatants of neutrophils incubated for 3 hr with T. vaginalis lysate. Furthermore, myeloperoxidase (MPO) production by neutrophils was stimulated by live trichomonads. These results indicate that the production of superoxide anions and MPO by neutrophils stimulated with T. vaginalis may be a part of defense mechanisms of neutrophils in trichomoniasis.

  4. NASA Aerosciences Activities to Support Human Space Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LeBeau, Gerald J.

    2011-01-01

    The Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center (JSC) has been a critical element of the United State's human space flight program for over 50 years. It is the home to NASA s Mission Control Center, the astronaut corps, and many major programs and projects including the Space Shuttle Program, International Space Station Program, and the Orion Project. As part of JSC's Engineering Directorate, the Applied Aeroscience and Computational Fluid Dynamics Branch is charted to provide aerosciences support to all human spacecraft designs and missions for all phases of flight, including ascent, exo-atmospheric, and entry. The presentation will review past and current aeroscience applications and how NASA works to apply a balanced philosophy that leverages ground testing, computational modeling and simulation, and flight testing, to develop and validate related products. The speaker will address associated aspects of aerodynamics, aerothermodynamics, rarefied gas dynamics, and decelerator systems, involving both spacecraft vehicle design and analysis, and operational mission support. From these examples some of NASA leading aerosciences challenges will be identified. These challenges will be used to provide foundational motivation for the development of specific advanced modeling and simulation capabilities, and will also be used to highlight how development activities are increasing becoming more aligned with flight projects. NASA s efforts to apply principles of innovation and inclusion towards improving its ability to support the myriad of vehicle design and operational challenges will also be briefly reviewed.

  5. Antitumor activity of dobutamine on human osteosarcoma cells

    PubMed Central

    YIN, JUN; DONG, QIRONG; ZHENG, MINQIAN; XU, XIAOZU; ZOU, GUOYOU; MA, GUOLIN; LI, KEFENG

    2016-01-01

    Dobutamine has been widely used for the treatment of heart failure and cardiogenic shock since the 1970s. Osteosarcoma is the most commonly observed malignant bone tumor in children. Currently, there are no effective drugs for the treatment of osteosarcoma. In the present study, the potential anticancer activity of dobutamine on human osteosarcoma cells was examined. Human osteosarcoma MG-63 cells were treated with dobutamine at various concentrations and for various incubation times. The inhibition of cell growth by dobutamine was determined by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay. Flow cytometry was utilized to evaluate the effect of dobutamine on cell apoptosis and the cell cycle. Furthermore, the expression levels of caspase-3 and caspase-9 were assessed by western blot analysis. The influence of dobutamine on cancer cell migration and invasion was additionally evaluated using wound-healing assay and the Boyden Chamber migration method. Dobutamine significantly inhibited the growth of MG-63 cells at a concentration of 10 µM or higher when incubated for 12 h or longer (P=0.023). Dobutamine augmented cell apoptosis and arrested the cell cycle in the G2/M phase. Western blot analysis revealed that dobutamine induces expression of caspase-3 and caspase-9. In addition, the invasiveness and migration of MG-63 cells was inhibited by dobutamine in a concentration-dependent manner. The results of the present study may lead to novel applications for dobutamine in the treatment of osteosarcoma. PMID:27284371

  6. A human factors evaluation of Extravehicular Activity gloves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Hara, John M.; Briganti, Michael; Cleland, John; Winfield, Dan

    1989-01-01

    One of the major problems faced in Extravehicular Activity (EVA) glove development has been the absence of concise and reliable methods to measure the effects of EVA gloves on human-hand capabilities. NASA has sponsored a program to develop a standardized set of tests designed to assess EVA-gloved hand capabilities in six performance domains: Range of Motion, Strength, Tactile Perception, Dexterity, Fatigue, and Comfort. Based upon an assessment of general human-hand functioning and EVA task requirements, several tests within each performance domain were developed to provide a comprehensive evaluation. All tests were designed to be conducted in a glove box with the bare hand, an EVA glove without pressure, an EVA glove at operation pressure. Thus, the differential effect on performance of the glove with and without pressure was tested. Bare hand performance was used to 'calibrate' the effects. Ten subjects participated in the test setup as a repeated-measures experimental design. The paper will report the results of the test program.

  7. NASA Human Spaceflight Architecture Team Lunar Destination Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connolly, J. F.; Mueller, R. P.; Whitley, R. J.

    2012-01-01

    NASA's Human Spaceflight Architecture Team (HAT) Lunar Destination Team has been developing a number of "Design Reference Missions" (DRM) to inform exploration architecture development, transportation approaches, and destination elements and operations. There are four destinations being considered in the HAT studies: Cis-Lunar, Lunar, Near Earth Asteroids and Mars. The lunar destination includes all activities that occur on the moon itself, but not low lunar orbit operations or Earth Moon LaGrange points which are the responsibility of the HAT Cis-Lunar Team. This paper will review the various surface DRMs developed as representative scenarios that could occur in a human lunar return. The approaches have been divided into two broad categories: a seven day short stay mission with global capabilities and a longer extended duration stay of 28 days which is limited to the lunar poles as a landing zone. The surface elements, trade studies, traverses, concept of operations and other relevant issues and methodologies will be presented and discussed in the context and framework of the HAT ground rules and assumptions which are constrained by NASA's available transportation systems. An international collaborative effort based on the 2011 Global Exploration Roadmap (GER) will also be examined and evaluated.

  8. Cortical activity predicts good variation in human motor output.

    PubMed

    Babikian, Sarine; Kanso, Eva; Kutch, Jason J

    2017-02-04

    Human movement patterns have been shown to be particularly variable if many combinations of activity in different muscles all achieve the same task goal (i.e., are goal-equivalent). The nervous system appears to automatically vary its output among goal-equivalent combinations of muscle activity to minimize muscle fatigue or distribute tissue loading, but the neural mechanism of this "good" variation is unknown. Here we use a bimanual finger task, electroencephalography (EEG), and machine learning to determine if cortical signals can predict goal-equivalent variation in finger force output. 18 healthy participants applied left and right index finger forces to repeatedly perform a task that involved matching a total (sum of right and left) finger force. As in previous studies, we observed significantly more variability in goal-equivalent muscle activity across task repetitions compared to variability in muscle activity that would not achieve the goal: participants achieved the task in some repetitions with more right finger force and less left finger force (right > left) and in other repetitions with less right finger force and more left finger force (left > right). We found that EEG signals from the 500 milliseconds (ms) prior to each task repetition could make a significant prediction of which repetitions would have right > left and which would have left > right. We also found that cortical maps of sites contributing to the prediction contain both motor and pre-motor representation in the appropriate hemisphere. Thus, goal-equivalent variation in motor output may be implemented at a cortical level.

  9. Human lipopolysaccharide-binding protein potentiates bactericidal activity of human bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein.

    PubMed Central

    Horwitz, A H; Williams, R E; Nowakowski, G

    1995-01-01

    Human bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein (BPI) from neutrophils and a recombinant amino-terminal fragment, rBPI23, bind to and are cytotoxic for gram-negative bacteria both in vitro and ex vivo in plasma or whole blood. To function in vivo as an extracellular bactericidal agent, rBPI23 must act in the presence of the lipopolysaccharide-binding protein (LBP), which also binds to but has no reported cytotoxicity for gram-negative bacteria. LBP, which is present at 5 to 10 micrograms/ml in healthy humans and at much higher levels in septic patients, mediates proinflammatory host responses to gram-negative infection. On the basis of these previous observations, we have examined the effect of recombinant LBP (rLBP) on the bactericidal activity of rBPI23 against Escherichia coli J5 in vitro. Physiological concentrations of rLBP (5 to 20 micrograms/ml) had little or no bactericidal activity but reduced by up to approximately 10,000-fold the concentration of BPI required for bactericidal or related activities in assays which measure (i) cell viability as CFUs on solid media or growth in broth culture and (ii) protein synthesis following treatment with BPI. LBP also potentiated BPI-mediated permeabilization of the E. coli outer membrane to actinomycin D by about 100-fold but had no permeabilizing activity of its own. Under optimal conditions for potentiation, fewer than 100 BPI molecules were required to kill a single E. coli J5 bacterium. PMID:7822017

  10. Activation of the human, intermediate-conductance, Ca2+-activated K+ channel by methylxanthines.

    PubMed

    Schrøder, R L; Jensen, B S; Strøbaek, D; Olesen, S P; Christophersen, P

    2000-10-01

    This study demonstrated that the methylxanthines, theophylline, IBMX and caffeine, activate the human, intermediate-conductance, Ca2+-activated K+ channel (hIK) stably expressed in HEK-293 cells. Whole-cell voltage-clamp experiments showed that the hIK current increased reversibly and voltage independently after the addition of methylxanthines. In current-clamp experiments, theophylline dose-dependently hyperpolarised the cell membrane from a resting potential of -18 mV to -56 mV. The methylxanthines did not affect large-conductance (BK) or small-conductance (SK2), Ca2+-activated K+ channels, demonstrating that the effects were not secondary to a rise in intracellular Ca2+. However, the activation of hIK by theophylline required an intracellular [Ca2+] above 30 nM. The hIK current was insensitive to 8-bromoadenosine cyclic 3',5'-monophosphate (8-bromo-cAMP), forskolin, 8-bromoguanosine cyclic 3',5'-monophosphate (8-bromo-cGMP) and sodium nitroprusside. Moreover, in the presence of inhibitors of protein kinase A (PKA) or protein kinase G (PKG) theophylline still activated the current. Finally, mutation of the putative PKA/PKG consensus phosphorylation site (Ser334) had no effect on the theophylline-induced activation of hIK. Since the observed activation is independent of changes in PKA/PKG-phosphorylation and of fluctuations in intracellular Ca2+, we suggest that the methylxanthines interact directly with the hIK protein.

  11. Human-human hybridoma autoantibodies with both anti-DNA and rheumatoid factor activities.

    PubMed

    Rauch, J; Tannenbaum, H; Straaton, K; Massicotte, H; Wild, J

    1986-01-01

    Human hybridomas have been produced by fusing peripheral blood lymphocytes from patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) with the GM 4672 human cell line. 262 hybridoma clones from the fusions of four RA and five SLE patients were screened for binding to denatured DNA (dDNA), native DNA, and the Fc fragment of human IgG (HIgG). Of the 17 hybridoma antibodies (nine RA, eight SLE) selected for strong binding to denatured DNA, Fc, or both, five reacted with dDNA only, one with Fc only, and eight with both dDNA and Fc. Hybridoma supernatants exhibiting dual reactivity were absorbed over HIgG and bovine serum albumin (BSA)-Sepharose immunoabsorbent columns. The reactivities to both DNA and HIgG were completely removed by the HIgG column but unaffected by passage over the BSA column, and both DNA binding and rheumatoid factor activities were recovered in the acid eluates from the Sepharose-IgG column. The binding of dual reactive hybridoma autoantibodies to the Fc fragment of HIgG was specifically competed by dDNA and HIgG, providing additional evidence that one antibody may be capable of reacting both as a rheumatoid factor and as an anti-DNA antibody.

  12. Diurnal Human Activity and Introduced Species Affect Occurrence of Carnivores in a Human-Dominated Landscape.

    PubMed

    Moreira-Arce, Dario; Vergara, Pablo M; Boutin, Stan

    2015-01-01

    Diurnal human activity and domestic dogs in agro-forestry mosaics should theoretically modify the diurnal habitat use patterns of native carnivores, with these effects being scale-dependent. We combined intensive camera trapping data with Bayesian occurrence probability models to evaluate both diurnal and nocturnal patterns of space use by carnivores in a mosaic of land-use types in southern Chile. A total of eight carnivores species were recorded, including human-introduced dogs. During the day the most frequently detected species were the culpeo fox and the cougar. Conversely, during the night, the kodkod and chilla fox were the most detected species. The best supported models showed that native carnivores responded differently to landscape attributes and dogs depending on both the time of day as well as the spatial scale of landscape attributes. The positive effect of native forest cover at 250 m and 500 m radius buffers was stronger during the night for the Darwin's fox and cougar. Road density at 250 m scale negatively affected the diurnal occurrence of Darwin´s fox, whereas at 500 m scale roads had a stronger negative effect on the diurnal occurrence of Darwin´s foxes and cougars. A positive effect of road density on dog occurrence was evidenced during both night and day. Patch size had a positive effect on cougar occurrence during night whereas it affected negatively the occurrence of culpeo foxes and skunks during day. Dog occurrence had a negative effect on Darwin's fox occurrence during day-time and night-time, whereas its negative effect on the occurrence of cougar was evidenced only during day-time. Carnivore occurrences were not influenced by the proximity to a conservation area. Our results provided support for the hypothesis that diurnal changes to carnivore occurrence were associated with human and dog activity. Landscape planning in our study area should be focused in reducing both the levels of diurnal human activity in native forest remnants

  13. Diurnal Human Activity and Introduced Species Affect Occurrence of Carnivores in a Human-Dominated Landscape

    PubMed Central

    Moreira-Arce, Dario; Vergara, Pablo M.; Boutin, Stan

    2015-01-01

    Diurnal human activity and domestic dogs in agro-forestry mosaics should theoretically modify the diurnal habitat use patterns of native carnivores, with these effects being scale-dependent. We combined intensive camera trapping data with Bayesian occurrence probability models to evaluate both diurnal and nocturnal patterns of space use by carnivores in a mosaic of land-use types in southern Chile. A total of eight carnivores species were recorded, including human-introduced dogs. During the day the most frequently detected species were the culpeo fox and the cougar. Conversely, during the night, the kodkod and chilla fox were the most detected species. The best supported models showed that native carnivores responded differently to landscape attributes and dogs depending on both the time of day as well as the spatial scale of landscape attributes. The positive effect of native forest cover at 250m and 500 m radius buffers was stronger during the night for the Darwin's fox and cougar. Road density at 250m scale negatively affected the diurnal occurrence of Darwin´s fox, whereas at 500m scale roads had a stronger negative effect on the diurnal occurrence of Darwin´s foxes and cougars. A positive effect of road density on dog occurrence was evidenced during both night and day. Patch size had a positive effect on cougar occurrence during night whereas it affected negatively the occurrence of culpeo foxes and skunks during day. Dog occurrence had a negative effect on Darwin's fox occurrence during day-time and night-time, whereas its negative effect on the occurrence of cougar was evidenced only during day-time. Carnivore occurrences were not influenced by the proximity to a conservation area. Our results provided support for the hypothesis that diurnal changes to carnivore occurrence were associated with human and dog activity. Landscape planning in our study area should be focused in reducing both the levels of diurnal human activity in native forest remnants and

  14. Inferring Human Activity in Mobile Devices by Computing Multiple Contexts.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ruizhi; Chu, Tianxing; Liu, Keqiang; Liu, Jingbin; Chen, Yuwei

    2015-08-28

    This paper introduces a framework for inferring human activities in mobile devices by computing spatial contexts, temporal contexts, spatiotemporal contexts, and user contexts. A spatial context is a significant location that is defined as a geofence, which can be a node associated with a circle, or a polygon; a temporal context contains time-related information that can be e.g., a local time tag, a time difference between geographical locations, or a timespan; a spatiotemporal context is defined as a dwelling length at a particular spatial context; and a user context includes user-related information that can be the user's mobility contexts, environmental contexts, psychological contexts or social contexts. Using the measurements of the built-in sensors and radio signals in mobile devices, we can snapshot a contextual tuple for every second including aforementioned contexts. Giving a contextual tuple, the framework evaluates the posteriori probability of each candidate activity in real-time using a Naïve Bayes classifier. A large dataset containing 710,436 contextual tuples has been recorded for one week from an experiment carried out at Texas A&M University Corpus Christi with three participants. The test results demonstrate that the multi-context solution significantly outperforms the spatial-context-only solution. A classification accuracy of 61.7% is achieved for the spatial-context-only solution, while 88.8% is achieved for the multi-context solution.

  15. A human phospholipid phosphatase activated by a transmembrane control module.

    PubMed

    Halaszovich, Christian R; Leitner, Michael G; Mavrantoni, Angeliki; Le, Audrey; Frezza, Ludivine; Feuer, Anja; Schreiber, Daniela N; Villalba-Galea, Carlos A; Oliver, Dominik

    2012-11-01

    In voltage-sensitive phosphatases (VSPs), a transmembrane voltage sensor domain (VSD) controls an intracellular phosphoinositide phosphatase domain, thereby enabling immediate initiation of intracellular signals by membrane depolarization. The existence of such a mechanism in mammals has remained elusive, despite the presence of VSP-homologous proteins in mammalian cells, in particular in sperm precursor cells. Here we demonstrate activation of a human VSP (hVSP1/TPIP) by an intramolecular switch. By engineering a chimeric hVSP1 with enhanced plasma membrane targeting containing the VSD of a prototypic invertebrate VSP, we show that hVSP1 is a phosphoinositide-5-phosphatase whose predominant substrate is PI(4,5)P(2). In the chimera, enzymatic activity is controlled by membrane potential via hVSP1's endogenous phosphoinositide binding motif. These findings suggest that the endogenous VSD of hVSP1 is a control module that initiates signaling through the phosphatase domain and indicate a role for VSP-mediated phosphoinositide signaling in mammals.

  16. Active and passive transport of drugs in the human placenta.

    PubMed

    Włoch, Stanisław; Pałasz, Artur; Kamiński, Marcin

    2009-10-01

    The human placenta, characterized by the processes of passive transport and facilitated diffusion, contains numerous active transport proteins, usually located in the microvilli of the syncytiotrophoblast or in the endothelium of the capillaries of the villi. These proteins use either the energy from ATP hydrolysis or other mechanisms resulting, among others, from the formation of the maternofetal ion gradient, which facilitates the transfer of various endogenous substances or xenobiotics across the body membranes. The proteins either trigger the efflux of these substances from the fetal tissues via the placenta into the maternal bloodstream, or conversely they accumulate them in the fetal tissues. Both the placenta and the fetus are equipped with independent systems of enzymes of 1st and 2nd phase of substrate metabolism, such as CYP450, glucuronyltransferase or sulphatase. An active therapy with a wide range of drugs, often at high toxicity levels, either shortly before or during pregnancy, has naturally posed a question concerning the degree of impermeability of the placental barrier and how effectively it can be crossed, including any possible negative embryotoxic or teratogenic consequences. Such hazards seem to be quite real, as many drugs are substrates for ABC transporters. Also the placenta itself, including its structure, is subject to vast transformations during pregnancy which may be observed as the thinning of the barrier separating the maternal blood from the fetal one, from 20-30 microm in the first trimester of gestation down to 2-4 microm in the third trimester of gestation.

  17. Inferring Human Activity in Mobile Devices by Computing Multiple Contexts

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ruizhi; Chu, Tianxing; Liu, Keqiang; Liu, Jingbin; Chen, Yuwei

    2015-01-01

    This paper introduces a framework for inferring human activities in mobile devices by computing spatial contexts, temporal contexts, spatiotemporal contexts, and user contexts. A spatial context is a significant location that is defined as a geofence, which can be a node associated with a circle, or a polygon; a temporal context contains time-related information that can be e.g., a local time tag, a time difference between geographical locations, or a timespan; a spatiotemporal context is defined as a dwelling length at a particular spatial context; and a user context includes user-related information that can be the user’s mobility contexts, environmental contexts, psychological contexts or social contexts. Using the measurements of the built-in sensors and radio signals in mobile devices, we can snapshot a contextual tuple for every second including aforementioned contexts. Giving a contextual tuple, the framework evaluates the posteriori probability of each candidate activity in real-time using a Naïve Bayes classifier. A large dataset containing 710,436 contextual tuples has been recorded for one week from an experiment carried out at Texas A&M University Corpus Christi with three participants. The test results demonstrate that the multi-context solution significantly outperforms the spatial-context-only solution. A classification accuracy of 61.7% is achieved for the spatial-context-only solution, while 88.8% is achieved for the multi-context solution. PMID:26343665

  18. Perception's shadow: long-distance synchronization of human brain activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, Eugenio; George, Nathalie; Lachaux, Jean-Philippe; Martinerie, Jacques; Renault, Bernard; Varela, Francisco J.

    1999-02-01

    Transient periods of synchronization of oscillating neuronal discharges in the frequency range 30-80Hz (gamma oscillations) have been proposed to act as an integrative mechanism that may bring a widely distributed set of neurons together into a coherent ensemble that underlies a cognitive act. Results of several experiments in animals provide support for this idea (see, for example, refs 4,5,6,7,8,9,10). In humans, gamma oscillations have been described both on the scalp (measured by electroencephalography and magnetoencephalography) and in intracortical recordings, but no direct participation of synchrony in a cognitive task has been demonstrated so far. Here we record electrical brain activity from subjects who are viewing ambiguous visual stimuli (perceived either as faces or as meaningless shapes). We show for the first time, to our knowledge, that only face perception induces a long-distance pattern of synchronization, corresponding to the moment of perception itself and to the ensuing motor response. A period of strong desynchronization marks the transition between the moment of perception and the motor response. We suggest that this desynchronization reflects a process of active uncoupling of the underlying neural ensembles that is necessary to proceed from one cognitive state to another.

  19. Transgenic chickens expressing human urokinase-type plasminogen activator.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sung Ho; Gupta, Mukesh Kumar; Ho, Young Tae; Kim, Teoan; Lee, Hoon Taek

    2013-09-01

    Urokinase-type plasminogen activator is a serine protease that is clinically used in humans for the treatment of thrombolytic disorders and vascular diseases such as acute ischemic stroke and acute peripheral arterial occlusion. This study explored the feasibility of using chickens as a bioreactor for producing human urokinase-type plasminogen activator (huPA). Recombinant huPA gene, under the control of a ubiquitous Rous sarcoma virus promoter, was injected into the subgerminal cavity of freshly laid chicken eggs at stage X using the replication-defective Moloney murine leukemia virus (MoMLV)-based retrovirus vectors encapsidated with VSV-G (vesicular stomatitis virus G) glycoprotein. A total of 38 chicks, out of 573 virus-injected eggs, hatched and contained the huPA gene in their various body parts. The mRNA transcript of the huPA gene was present in various organs, including blood and egg, and was germ-line transmitted to the next generation. The level of active huPA protein was 16-fold higher in the blood of the transgenic chicken than in the nontransgenic chicken (P < 0.05). The expression of huPA protein in eggs increased from 7.82 IU/egg in the G0 generation to 17.02 IU/egg in the G1 generation. However, huPA-expressing embryos had reduced survival and hatchability at d 18 and 21 of incubation, respectively, and the blood clotting time was significantly higher in transgenic chickens than their nontransgenic counterparts (P < 0.05). Furthermore, adult transgenic rooster showed reduced (P < 0.05) fertility, as revealed by reduced volume of semen ejaculate, sperm concentration, and sperm viability. Taken together, our data suggest that huPA transgenic chickens could be successfully produced by the retroviral vector system. Transgenic chickens, expressing the huPA under the control of a ubiquitous promoter, may not only be used as a bioreactor for pharming of the huPA drug but also be useful for studying huPA-induced bleeding and other disorders.

  20. Can human activities alter the drowning fate of barrier islands?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenzo-Trueba, J.; Ashton, A. D.; Jin, D.; Hoagland, P.; Kite-Powell, H.

    2012-12-01

    Low-lying coastal barriers face an uncertain future over the coming century and beyond as sea levels rise, with many projections suggesting end-of-century rates of sea-level rise as high or higher than 1 cm/yr. Geologically, such rates of sea-level rise have been experienced several thousand years ago and we can use our understanding of geological processes and sedimentary evidence to help unravel the dynamics of natural barriers experiencing sea-level rise. Along many modern coastal barriers, however, anthropic change, such as beach nourishment, dune construction, and emplacement of hard structures, plays a dominant role in coastline dynamics. A fundamental question to be addressed is whether human activities intended to preserve infrastructure and beach recreation may make wholesale collapse, or 'drowning,' of barrier systems more likely. Here we present a numerical modeling tool that couples natural processes and the human responses to these changes (and the subsequent of human responses on natural processes). Recent theoretical model development suggests that barriers are intrinsically morphodynamic features, responding to sea-level rise in complex ways through the interactions of marine processes and barrier overwash. Undeveloped coastal barriers would therefore respond to an accelerated sea-level rise in complex, less predictable manners than suggested by existing long-term models. We have developed a model that examines non-equilibrium cross-shore evolution of barrier systems at decadal to centennial temporal scales, focusing on the interactions between processes of shoreface evolution and overwash deposition. Model responses demonstrate two means of barrier collapse during sea-level rise: 'height drowning', which occurs when overwash fluxes are insufficient to maintain the landward migration rate required to keep in pace with sea-level rise, and 'width drowning', which occurs when the shoreface response is insufficient to maintain the barrier geometry

  1. Enhancing human spermine synthase activity by engineered mutations.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhe; Zheng, Yueli; Petukh, Margo; Pegg, Anthony; Ikeguchi, Yoshihiko; Alexov, Emil

    2013-01-01

    Spermine synthase (SMS) is an enzyme which function is to convert spermidine into spermine. It was shown that gene defects resulting in amino acid changes of the wild type SMS cause Snyder-Robinson syndrome, which is a mild-to-moderate mental disability associated with osteoporosis, facial asymmetry, thin habitus, hypotonia, and a nonspecific movement disorder. These disease-causing missense mutations were demonstrated, both in silico and in vitro, to affect the wild type function of SMS by either destabilizing the SMS dimer/monomer or directly affecting the hydrogen bond network of the active site of SMS. In contrast to these studies, here we report an artificial engineering of a more efficient SMS variant by transferring sequence information from another organism. It is confirmed experimentally that the variant, bearing four amino acid substitutions, is catalytically more active than the wild type. The increased functionality is attributed to enhanced monomer stability, lowering the pKa of proton donor catalytic residue, optimized spatial distribution of the electrostatic potential around the SMS with respect to substrates, and increase of the frequency of mechanical vibration of the clefts presumed to be the gates toward the active sites. The study demonstrates that wild type SMS is not particularly evolutionarily optimized with respect to the reaction spermidine → spermine. Having in mind that currently there are no variations (non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphism, nsSNP) detected in healthy individuals, it can be speculated that the human SMS function is precisely tuned toward its wild type and any deviation is unwanted and disease-causing.

  2. Different phenolic compounds activate distinct human bitter taste receptors.

    PubMed

    Soares, Susana; Kohl, Susann; Thalmann, Sophie; Mateus, Nuno; Meyerhof, Wolfgang; De Freitas, Victor

    2013-02-20

    Bitterness is a major sensory attribute of several common foods and beverages rich in polyphenol compounds. These compounds are reported as very important for health as chemopreventive compounds, but they are also known to taste bitter. In this work, the activation of the human bitter taste receptors, TAS2Rs, by six polyphenol compounds was analyzed. The compounds chosen are present in a wide range of plant-derived foods and beverages, namely, red wine, beer, tea, and chocolate. Pentagalloylglucose (PGG) is a hydrolyzable tannin, (-)-epicatechin is a precursor of condensed tannins, procyanidin dimer B3 and trimer C2 belong to the condensed tannins, and malvidin-3-glucoside and cyanidin-3-glucoside are anthocyanins. The results show that the different compounds activate different combinations of the ~25 TAS2Rs. (-)-Epicatechin activated three receptors, TAS2R4, TAS2R5, and TAS2R39, whereas only two receptors, TAS2R5 and TAS2R39, responded to PGG. In contrast, malvidin-3-glucoside and procyanidin trimer stimulated only one receptor, TAS2R7 and TAS2R5, respectively. Notably, tannins are the first natural agonists found for TAS2R5 that display high potency only toward this receptor. The catechol and/or galloyl groups appear to be important structural determinants that mediate the interaction of these polyphenolic compounds with TAS2R5. Overall, the EC(50) values obtained for the different compounds vary 100-fold, with the lowest values for PGG and malvidin-3-glucoside compounds, suggesting that they could be significant polyphenols responsible for the bitterness of fruits, vegetables, and derived products even if they are present in very low concentrations.

  3. Fibrin activates GPVI in human and mouse platelets

    PubMed Central

    Alshehri, Osama M.; Montague, Samantha; Watson, Stephanie K.; Frampton, Jon; Bender, Markus; Watson, Steve P.

    2015-01-01

    The glycoprotein VI (GPVI)-Fc receptor γ (FcRγ) chain is the major platelet signaling receptor for collagen. Paradoxically, in a FeCl3 injury model, occlusion, but not initiation of thrombus formation, is delayed in GPVI-deficient and GPVI-depleted mice. In this study, we demonstrate that GPVI is a receptor for fibrin and speculate that this contributes to development of an occlusive thrombus. We observed a marked increase in tyrosine phosphorylation, including the FcRγ chain and Syk, in human and mouse platelets induced by thrombin in the presence of fibrinogen and the αIIbβ3 blocker eptifibatide. This was not seen in platelets stimulated by a protease activated receptor (PAR)-4 peptide, which is unable to generate fibrin from fibrinogen. The pattern of tyrosine phosphorylation was similar to that induced by activation of GPVI. Consistent with this, thrombin did not induce tyrosine phosphorylation of Syk and the FcRγ chain in GPVI-deficient mouse platelets. Mouse platelets underwent full spreading on fibrin but not fibrinogen, which was blocked in the presence of a Src kinase inhibitor or in the absence of GPVI. Spreading on fibrin was associated with phosphatidylserine exposure (procoagulant activity), and this too was blocked in GPVI-deficient platelets. The ectodomain of GPVI was shown to bind to immobilized monomeric and polymerized fibrin. A marked increase in embolization was seen following FeCl3 injury in GPVI-deficient mice, likely contributing to the delay in occlusion in this model. These results demonstrate that GPVI is a receptor for fibrin and provide evidence that this interaction contributes to thrombus growth and stability. PMID:26282541

  4. Fibrin activates GPVI in human and mouse platelets.

    PubMed

    Alshehri, Osama M; Hughes, Craig E; Montague, Samantha; Watson, Stephanie K; Frampton, Jon; Bender, Markus; Watson, Steve P

    2015-09-24

    The glycoprotein VI (GPVI)-Fc receptor γ (FcRγ) chain is the major platelet signaling receptor for collagen. Paradoxically, in a FeCl3 injury model, occlusion, but not initiation of thrombus formation, is delayed in GPVI-deficient and GPVI-depleted mice. In this study, we demonstrate that GPVI is a receptor for fibrin and speculate that this contributes to development of an occlusive thrombus. We observed a marked increase in tyrosine phosphorylation, including the FcRγ chain and Syk, in human and mouse platelets induced by thrombin in the presence of fibrinogen and the αIIbβ3 blocker eptifibatide. This was not seen in platelets stimulated by a protease activated receptor (PAR)-4 peptide, which is unable to generate fibrin from fibrinogen. The pattern of tyrosine phosphorylation was similar to that induced by activation of GPVI. Consistent with this, thrombin did not induce tyrosine phosphorylation of Syk and the FcRγ chain in GPVI-deficient mouse platelets. Mouse platelets underwent full spreading on fibrin but not fibrinogen, which was blocked in the presence of a Src kinase inhibitor or in the absence of GPVI. Spreading on fibrin was associated with phosphatidylserine exposure (procoagulant activity), and this too was blocked in GPVI-deficient platelets. The ectodomain of GPVI was shown to bind to immobilized monomeric and polymerized fibrin. A marked increase in embolization was seen following FeCl3 injury in GPVI-deficient mice, likely contributing to the delay in occlusion in this model. These results demonstrate that GPVI is a receptor for fibrin and provide evidence that this interaction contributes to thrombus growth and stability.

  5. The Need for a Harmonized Repository for Next-Generation Human Activity Data

    EPA Science Inventory

    Multi-tiered human time-activity-location data can inform many efforts to describe human exposures to air pollutants and other chemicals on a range of temporal and spatial scales. In the last decade, EPA's Consolidated Human Activity Database (CHAD) has served as a harmonized rep...

  6. 48 CFR 3452.224-71 - Notice about research activities involving human subjects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... about the regulations for the protection of human subjects and related policies and guidelines... activities involving human subjects. 3452.224-71 Section 3452.224-71 Federal Acquisition Regulations System... Text of Provisions and Clauses 3452.224-71 Notice about research activities involving human...

  7. 21 CFR 201.316 - Drugs with thyroid hormone activity for human use; required warning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Drugs with thyroid hormone activity for human use... AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL LABELING Specific Labeling Requirements for Specific Drug Products § 201.316 Drugs with thyroid hormone activity for human use; required warning. (a)...

  8. 21 CFR 201.316 - Drugs with thyroid hormone activity for human use; required warning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Drugs with thyroid hormone activity for human use... AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL LABELING Specific Labeling Requirements for Specific Drug Products § 201.316 Drugs with thyroid hormone activity for human use; required warning. (a)...

  9. Oxidatively fragmented phosphatidylcholines activate human neutrophils through the receptor for platelet-activating factor.

    PubMed

    Smiley, P L; Stremler, K E; Prescott, S M; Zimmerman, G A; McIntyre, T M

    1991-06-15

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF, 1-O-alkyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine) activates neutrophils (polymorphonuclear leukocytes, PMN) through a receptor that specifically recognizes short sn-2 residues. We oxidized synthetic [2-arachidonoyl]phosphatidylcholine to fragment and shorten the sn-2 residue, and then examined the phospholipid products for the ability to stimulate PMN. 1-Palmitoyl-2-arachidonoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine was fragmented by ozonolysis to 1-palmitoyl-2-(5-oxovaleroyl)-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine. This phospholipid activated human neutrophils at submicromolar concentrations, and is effects were inhibited by specific PAF receptor antagonists WEB2086, L659,989, and CV3988. 1-Palmitoyl-2-arachidonoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine next was fragmented by an uncontrolled free radical-catalyzed reaction: it was treated with soybean lipoxygenase to form its sn-2 15-hydroperoxy derivative (which did not activate neutrophils) and then allowed to oxidize under air. The secondary oxidation resulted in the formation of numerous fragmented phospholipids (Stremler, K. E., Stafforini, D. M., Prescott, S. M., and McIntyre, T. M. (1991) J. Biol. Chem. 266, 11095-11103), some of which activated PMN. Hydrolysis of sn-2 residues with phospholipase A2 destroyed biologic activity, as did hydrolysis with PAF acetylhydrolase. PAF acetylhydrolase is specific for short or intermediate length sn-2 residues and does not hydrolyze the starting material (Stremler, K. E., Stafforini, D. M., Prescott, S. M., and McIntyre, T. M. (1991) J. Biol. Chem. 266, 11095-11103). Neutrophil activation was completely blocked by L659,989, a specific PAF receptor antagonist. We conclude that diacylphosphatidylcholines containing an sn-2 polyunsaturated fatty acyl residue can be oxidatively fragmented to species with sn-2 residues short enough to activate the PAF receptor of neutrophils. This suggests a new mechanism for the appearance of biologically active phospholipids, and shows

  10. Cordycepin inhibits lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α production via activating amp-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian-Li; Xu, Ying; Shen, Jie

    2014-07-08

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α is elevated during the acute phase of Kawasaki disease (KD), which damages vascular endothelial cells to cause systemic vasculitis. In the current study, we investigated the potential role of cordycepin on TNFα expression in both lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated macrophages and ex vivo cultured peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of KD patients. We found that cordycepin significantly suppressed LPS-induced TNFα expression and production in mouse macrophages (RAW 264.7 cells and bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs)). Meanwhile, cordycepin alleviated TNFα production in KD patients' PBMCs. PBMCs from healthy controls had a much lower level of basal TNF-α content than that of KD patients. LPS-induced TNF-α production in healthy controls' PBMCs was also inhibited by cordycepin. For the mechanism study, we discovered that cordycepin activated AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling in both KD patients' PBMCs and LPS-stimulated macrophages, which mediated cordycepin-induced inhibition against TNFα production. AMPK inhibition by its inhibitor (compound C) or by siRNA depletion alleviated cordycepin's effect on TNFα production. Further, we found that cordycepin inhibited reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) activation in LPS-stimulate RAW 264.7 cells or healthy controls' PBMCs. PBMCs of KD patients showed higher basal level of ROS and NF-κB activation, which was also inhibited by cordycepin co-treatment. In conclusion, our data showed that cordycepin inhibited TNFα production, which was associated with AMPK activation as well as ROS and NF-κB inhibition. The results of this study should have significant translational relevance in managing this devastating disease.

  11. LRE2, an active human L1 element, has low level transcriptional activity and extremely low reverse transcriptase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, S.E.; Dombroski, B.A.; Sassaman, D.M.

    1994-09-01

    Previously, we found a 2 kb insertion containing a rearranged L1 element plus a unique sequence component (USC) within exon 48 of the dystrophin gene of a patient with muscular dystrophy. We used the USC to clone the precursor of this insertion, the second known {open_quotes}active{close_quotes} human L1 element. The locus LRE2 (L1 Retrotransposable Element 2) has an allele derived from the patient which matches the insertion sequence exactly. LRE2 has a perfect 13-15 bp target site duplication, 2 open reading frames (ORFs), and an unusual 21 bp truncation of the 5{prime} end in a region known to be important for L1 transcription. The truncated LRE2 promoter has about 20% of the transcriptional activity of a previously studied L1 promoter after transfection into NTera2D1 cells of a construct in which the L1 promoter drives the expression of a lacZ gene. In addition, the reverse transcriptase (RT) encoded by LRE2 is active in an in vivo pseudogene assay in yeast and an in vitro assay. However, in both assays the RT of LRE2 is 1-5% as active as that of LRE1. These data demonstrate that multiple {open_quotes}active{close_quotes} L1 elements exist in the human genome, and that active elements can have highly variable rates of transcription and reverse transcriptase activity. That the RT of LRE2 has extremely low activity suggests the possibility that retrotransposition of an L1 element may in some cases involve an RT encoded by another L1 element.

  12. Differences in Neural Activation for Object-Directed Grasping in Chimpanzees and Humans

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Lauren E.; Gutman, David A.; Votaw, John R.; Schuster, David M.; Preuss, Todd M.; Orban, Guy A.; Stout, Dietrich; Parr, Lisa A.

    2013-01-01

    The human faculty for object-mediated action, including tool use and imitation, exceeds that of even our closest primate relatives and is a key foundation of human cognitive and cultural uniqueness. In humans and macaques, observing object-directed grasping actions activates a network of frontal, parietal, and occipitotemporal brain regions, but differences in human and macaque activation suggest that this system has been a focus of selection in the primate lineage. To study the evolution of this system, we performed functional neuroimaging in humans' closest living relatives, chimpanzees. We compare activations during performance of an object-directed manual grasping action, observation of the same action, and observation of a mimed version of the action that consisted of only movements without results. Performance and observation of the same action activated a distributed frontoparietal network similar to that reported in macaques and humans. Like humans and unlike macaques, these regions were also activated by observing movements without results. However, in a direct chimpanzee/human comparison, we also identified unique aspects of human neural responses to observed grasping. Chimpanzee activation showed a prefrontal bias, including significantly more activity in ventrolateral prefrontal cortex, whereas human activation was more evenly distributed across more posterior regions, including significantly more activation in ventral premotor cortex, inferior parietal cortex, and inferotemporal cortex. This indicates a more “bottom-up” representation of observed action in the human brain and suggests that the evolution of tool use, social learning, and cumulative culture may have involved modifications of frontoparietal interactions. PMID:23986247

  13. A Novel Wearable Sensor-Based Human Activity Recognition Approach Using Artificial Hydrocarbon Networks.

    PubMed

    Ponce, Hiram; Martínez-Villaseñor, María de Lourdes; Miralles-Pechuán, Luis

    2016-07-05

    Human activity recognition has gained more interest in several research communities given that understanding user activities and behavior helps to deliver proactive and personalized services. There are many examples of health systems improved by human activity recognition. Nevertheless, the human activity recognition classification process is not an easy task. Different types of noise in wearable sensors data frequently hamper the human activity recognition classification process. In order to develop a successful activity recognition system, it is necessary to use stable and robust machine learning techniques capable of dealing with noisy data. In this paper, we presented the artificial hydrocarbon networks (AHN) technique to the human activity recognition community. Our artificial hydrocarbon networks novel approach is suitable for physical activity recognition, noise tolerance of corrupted data sensors and robust in terms of different issues on data sensors. We proved that the AHN classifier is very competitive for physical activity recognition and is very robust in comparison with other well-known machine learning methods.

  14. Deferoxamine Suppresses Collagen Cleavage and Protease, Cytokine, and COL10A1 Expression and Upregulates AMPK and Krebs Cycle Genes in Human Osteoarthritic Cartilage.

    PubMed

    Tchetina, Elena V; Markova, Galina A; Poole, A Robin; Zukor, David J; Antoniou, John; Makarov, Sergey A; Kuzin, Aleksandr N

    2016-01-01

    This study reports the effects of the iron chelator deferoxamine (DFO) on collagen cleavage, inflammation, and chondrocyte hypertrophy in relation to energy metabolism-related gene expression in osteoarthritic (OA) articular cartilage. Full-depth explants of human OA knee articular cartilage from arthroplasty were cultured with exogenous DFO (1-50 μM). Type II collagen cleavage and phospho-adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (pAMPK) concentrations were measured using ELISAs. Gene expression studies employed real-time PCR and included AMPK analyses in PBMCs. In OA explants collagen cleavage was frequently downregulated by 10-50 μM DFO. PCR analysis of 7 OA patient cartilages revealed that 10 μM DFO suppressed expression of MMP-1, MMP-13, IL-1β, and TNFα and a marker of chondrocyte hypertrophy, COL10A1. No changes were observed in the expression of glycolysis-related genes. In contrast, expressions of genes associated with the mitochondrial Krebs cycle (TCA), AMPK, HIF1α, and COL2A1 were upregulated. AMPK gene expression was reduced in OA cartilage and increased in PBMCs from the same patients compared to healthy controls. Our studies demonstrate that DFO is capable of suppressing excessive collagenase-mediated type II collagen cleavage in OA cartilage and reversing phenotypic changes. The concomitant upregulation of proanabolic TCA-related gene expressions points to a potential for availability of energy generating substrates required for matrix repair by end-stage OA chondrocytes. This might normally be prevented by high whole-body energy requirements indicated by elevated AMPK expression in PBMCs of OA patients.

  15. Lipidomic evidence that lowering the typical dietary palmitate to oleate ratio in humans decreases the leukocyte production of proinflammatory cytokines and muscle expression of redox-sensitive genes.

    PubMed

    Kien, C Lawrence; Bunn, Janice Y; Fukagawa, Naomi K; Anathy, Vikas; Matthews, Dwight E; Crain, Karen I; Ebenstein, David B; Tarleton, Emily K; Pratley, Richard E; Poynter, Matthew E

    2015-12-01

    We recently reported that lowering the high, habitual palmitic acid (PA) intake in ovulating women improved insulin sensitivity and both inflammatory and oxidative stress. In vitro studies indicate that PA can activate both cell membrane toll-like receptor-4 and the intracellular nucleotide oligomerization domain-like receptor protein (NLRP3). To gain further insight into the relevance to human metabolic disease of dietary PA, we studied healthy, lean and obese adults enrolled in a randomized, crossover trial comparing 3-week, high-PA (HPA) and low-PA/high-oleic-acid (HOA) diets. After each diet, both hepatic and peripheral insulin sensitivities were measured, and we assessed cytokine concentrations in plasma and in supernatants derived from lipopolysaccharide-stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) as well as proinflammatory gene expression in skeletal muscle. Insulin sensitivity was unaffected by diet. Plasma concentration of tumor necrosis factor-α was higher during the HPA diet. Lowering the habitually high PA intake by feeding the HOA diet resulted in lower secretion of interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-18, IL-10, and tumor necrosis factor-α by PBMCs, as well as lower relative mRNA expression of cJun and NLRP3 in muscle. Principal components analysis of 156 total variables coupled to analysis of covariance indicated that the mechanistic pathway for the differential dietary effects on PBMCs involved changes in the PA/OA ratio of tissue lipids. Our results indicate that lowering the dietary and tissue lipid PA/OA ratio resulted in lower leukocyte production of proinflammatory cytokines and muscle expression of redox-sensitive genes, but the relevance to diabetes risk is uncertain.

  16. Deferoxamine Suppresses Collagen Cleavage and Protease, Cytokine, and COL10A1 Expression and Upregulates AMPK and Krebs Cycle Genes in Human Osteoarthritic Cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Markova, Galina A.; Poole, A. Robin; Zukor, David J.; Antoniou, John; Makarov, Sergey A.; Kuzin, Aleksandr N.

    2016-01-01

    This study reports the effects of the iron chelator deferoxamine (DFO) on collagen cleavage, inflammation, and chondrocyte hypertrophy in relation to energy metabolism-related gene expression in osteoarthritic (OA) articular cartilage. Full-depth explants of human OA knee articular cartilage from arthroplasty were cultured with exogenous DFO (1–50 μM). Type II collagen cleavage and phospho-adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (pAMPK) concentrations were measured using ELISAs. Gene expression studies employed real-time PCR and included AMPK analyses in PBMCs. In OA explants collagen cleavage was frequently downregulated by 10–50 μM DFO. PCR analysis of 7 OA patient cartilages revealed that 10 μM DFO suppressed expression of MMP-1, MMP-13, IL-1β, and TNFα and a marker of chondrocyte hypertrophy, COL10A1. No changes were observed in the expression of glycolysis-related genes. In contrast, expressions of genes associated with the mitochondrial Krebs cycle (TCA), AMPK, HIF1α, and COL2A1 were upregulated. AMPK gene expression was reduced in OA cartilage and increased in PBMCs from the same patients compared to healthy controls. Our studies demonstrate that DFO is capable of suppressing excessive collagenase-mediated type II collagen cleavage in OA cartilage and reversing phenotypic changes. The concomitant upregulation of proanabolic TCA-related gene expressions points to a potential for availability of energy generating substrates required for matrix repair by end-stage OA chondrocytes. This might normally be prevented by high whole-body energy requirements indicated by elevated AMPK expression in PBMCs of OA patients. PMID:28042296

  17. Modeling of human factor Va inactivation by activated protein C

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Because understanding of the inventory, connectivity and dynamics of the components characterizing the process of coagulation is relatively mature, it has become an attractive target for physiochemical modeling. Such models can potentially improve the design of therapeutics. The prothrombinase complex (composed of the protease factor (F)Xa and its cofactor FVa) plays a central role in this network as the main producer of thrombin, which catalyses both the activation of platelets and the conversion of fibrinogen to fibrin, the main substances of a clot. A key negative feedback loop that prevents clot propagation beyond the site of injury is the thrombin-dependent generation of activated protein C (APC), an enzyme that inactivates FVa, thus neutralizing the prothrombinase complex. APC inactivation of FVa is complex, involving the production of partially active intermediates and “protection” of FVa from APC by both FXa and prothrombin. An empirically validated mathematical model of this process would be useful in advancing the predictive capacity of comprehensive models of coagulation. Results A model of human APC inactivation of prothrombinase was constructed in a stepwise fashion by analyzing time courses of FVa inactivation in empirical reaction systems with increasing number of interacting components and generating corresponding model constructs of each reaction system. Reaction mechanisms, rate constants and equilibrium constants informing these model constructs were initially derived from various research groups reporting on APC inactivation of FVa in isolation, or in the presence of FXa or prothrombin. Model predictions were assessed against empirical data measuring the appearance and disappearance of multiple FVa degradation intermediates as well as prothrombinase activity changes, with plasma proteins derived from multiple preparations. Our work integrates previously published findings and through the cooperative analysis of in vitro

  18. Integrating ecology and social science using two examples of wandering wildlife and human activity

    EPA Science Inventory

    Many researchers have studied impacts of human activity on wildlife or human attitudes toward wildlife, but not both simultaneously. Understanding these interactions is critical to better understand the intricacies of real world conservation issues. The goal of my presentation ...

  19. Impacts of Human Activity on the Microbial Communities of Devon Island, Canadian High Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bywaters, K. B.; Burton, A. S.; Wallace, S. L.; Glass, B. J.

    2016-09-01

    The impacts of human activities on microbial communities in arctic environments are poorly understood. This project compares the distribution of microbes at the HMP Mars analog site prior to and after human settlement.

  20. Transcription Factors Regulating Inflammatory Cytokine Production Are Differentially Expressed in Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells of Behçet Disease Depending on Disease Activity

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Min-Yeong; Yun, Su Jin; Lee, Mi Jin; Kim, Kyongmin

    2017-01-01

    Background Behçet disease (BD) is a relapsing inflammatory disease with increased production of inflammatory cytokines in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs); however, the underlying molecular mechanisms are not well known. Objective To analyze whether the differential expression of transcription factors is involved in the increased tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interleukin (IL)-6 production by PBMCs of BD patients compared to healthy controls (HCs). Methods Expression of transcription factors was examined by real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and western blotting. Cytokine production by CD11b+ cells transfected with siRNAs against transcription factors was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results In the absence of lipopolysaccharide stimulation, the transcript level of CCAAT-enhancer-binding proteins (C/EBP) β was increased in PBMCs from patients with active BD compared to that in PBMCs from patients with stable BD. The C/EBPδ transcript level was higher in PBMCs from patients with active BD than in those from HCs. The activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3) transcript level was increased in PBMCs from patients with stable BD compared to that in PBMCs from HCs. siRNAs targeting C/EBPβ and C/EBPδ significantly reduced the production of IL-6 and TNF-α in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated CD11b+ cells from patients with BD as well as from HCs. Conclusion We found differential expression of C/EBPβ, C/EBPδ, and ATF3 in PBMCs from patients with BD depending on disease activity, indicating the involvement of these molecules in BD pathogenesis.

  1. Myelostimulatory activity of recombinant human interleukin-2 in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Talmadge, J.E.; Schneider, M.; Keller, J.; Ruscetti, F.; Longo, D.; Pennington, R.; Bowersox, O.; Tribble, H.

    1989-05-01

    In a series of studies designed to extend our understanding of interleukin-2 (IL-2) and to study the effect of biologic response modifiers on bone marrow, we observed that administering recombinant human (rH) IL-2 to normal mice resulted in an increase in the frequency of colony-forming units-culture (CFU-C) in bone marrow. In addition, rH IL-2 was able to accelerate host recovery from cyclophosphamide (CTX)- or radiation-induced bone marrow depression and peripheral blood leukopenia. Not only can rH IL-2 accelerate, in a dose-dependent manner, the return of bone marrow, peripheral blood cellularity, and CFU-C frequency to normal levels following cytoreduction by CTX or irradiation, but it also significantly increases CFU-C frequency to greater than normal levels. Furthermore, rH IL-2 can significantly prolong survival of animals receiving a lethal dose of irradiation or CTX. Thus, multiple mechanisms are responsible for the synergistic therapeutic activity associated with rH IL-2 and CTX. rH IL-2 does not act only as an immunomodulatory agent in the presence or absence of suppressor T cells, but also accelerates host recovery from cytoreductive agents, resulting in decreased leukopenia and perhaps resistances to secondary infection. Thus, rH IL-2 plus chemotherapy may increase therapeutic activity against neoplastic disease, not only by adding immune stimulation to the direct antitumor effect of the drug but also by allowing delivery of higher, more effective doses of chemotherapy.

  2. Chloride transport in functionally active phagosomes isolated from Human neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Aiken, Martha L.; Painter, Richard G.; Zhou, Yun; Wang, Guoshun

    2012-01-01

    Chloride anion is critical for hypochlorous acid (HOCl) production and microbial killing in neutrophil phagosomes. However, the molecular mechanism by which this anion is transported to the organelle is poorly understood. In this report, membrane-enclosed and functionally active phagosomes were isolated from human neutrophils by using opsonized paramagnetic latex microspheres and a rapid magnetic separation method. The phagosomes recovered were highly enriched for specific protein markers associated with this organelle such as lysosomal-associated membrane protein-1, myeloperoxidase (MPO), lactoferrin, and NADPH oxidase. When FITC–dextran was included in the phagocytosis medium, the majority of the isolated phagosomes retained the fluorescent label after isolation, indicative of intact membrane structure. Flow cytometric measurement of acridine orange, a fluorescent pH indicator, in the purified phagosomes demonstrated that the organelle in its isolated state was capable of transporting protons to the phagosomal lumen via the vacuolar-type ATPase proton pump (V-ATPase). When NADPH was supplied, the isolated phagosomes constitutively oxidized dihydrorhodamine 123, indicating their ability to produce hydrogen peroxide. The preparations also showed a robust production of HOCl within the phagosomal lumen when assayed with the HOCl-specific fluorescent probe R19-S by flow cytometry. MPO-mediated iodination of the proteins covalently conjugated to the phagocytosed beads was quantitatively measured. Phagosomal uptake of iodide and protein iodination were significantly blocked by chloride channel inhibitors, including CFTRinh-172 and NPPB. Further experiments determined that the V-ATPase-driving proton flux into the isolated phagosomes required chloride cotransport, and the cAMP-activated CFTR chloride channel was a major contributor to the chloride transport. Taken together, the data suggest that the phagosomal preparation described herein retains ion transport

  3. Haemophilus ducreyi partially activates human myeloid dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Banks, Keith E; Humphreys, Tricia L; Li, Wei; Katz, Barry P; Wilkes, David S; Spinola, Stanley M

    2007-12-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) orchestrate innate and adaptive immune responses to bacteria. How Haemophilus ducreyi, which causes genital ulcers and regional lymphadenitis, interacts with DC is unknown. H. ducreyi evades uptake by polymorphonuclear leukocyte and macrophage-like cell lines by secreting LspA1 and LspA2. Many H. ducreyi strains express cytolethal distending toxin (CDT), and recombinant CDT causes apoptosis of DC in vitro. Here, we examined interactions between DC and H. ducreyi 35000HP, which produces LspA1, LspA2, and CDT. In human volunteers infected with 35000HP, the ratio of myeloid DC to plasmacytoid DC was 2.8:1 in lesions, compared to a ratio of 1:1 in peripheral blood. Using myeloid DC derived from monocytes as surrogates for lesional DC, we found that DC infected with 35000HP remained as viable as uninfected DC for up to 48 h. Gentamicin protection and confocal microscopy assays demonstrated that DC ingested and killed 35000HP, but killing was incomplete at 48 h. The expression of LspA1 and LspA2 did not inhibit the uptake of H. ducreyi, despite inactivating Src kinases. Infection of DC with live 35000HP caused less cell surface marker activation than infection with heat-killed 35000HP and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and inhibited maturation by LPS. However, infection of DC with live bacteria caused the secretion of significantly higher levels of interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor alpha than infection with heat-killed bacteria and LPS. The survival of H. ducreyi in DC may provide a mechanism by which the organism traffics to lymph nodes. Partial activation of DC may abrogate the establishment of a full Th1 response and an environment that promotes phagocytosis.

  4. Activation of necroptosis in human and experimental cholestasis

    PubMed Central

    Afonso, Marta B; Rodrigues, Pedro M; Simão, André L; Ofengeim, Dimitry; Carvalho, Tânia; Amaral, Joana D; Gaspar, Maria M; Cortez-Pinto, Helena; Castro, Rui E; Yuan, Junying; Rodrigues, Cecília M P

    2016-01-01

    Cholestasis encompasses liver injury and inflammation. Necroptosis, a necrotic cell death pathway regulated by receptor-interacting protein (RIP) 3, may mediate cell death and inflammation in the liver. We aimed to investigate the role of necroptosis in mediating deleterious processes associated with cholestatic liver disease. Hallmarks of necroptosis were evaluated in liver biopsies of primary biliary cholangitis (PBC) patients and in wild-type and RIP3-deficient (RIP3−/−) mice subjected to common bile duct ligation (BDL). The functional link between RIP3, heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and antioxidant response was investigated in vivo after BDL and in vitro. We demonstrate increased RIP3 expression and mixed lineage kinase domain-like protein (MLKL) phosphorylation in liver samples of human PBC patients, coincident with thioflavin T labeling, suggesting activation of necroptosis. BDL resulted in evident hallmarks of necroptosis, concomitant with progressive bile duct hyperplasia, multifocal necrosis, fibrosis and inflammation. MLKL phosphorylation was increased and insoluble aggregates of RIP3, MLKL and RIP1 formed in BLD liver tissue samples. Furthermore, RIP3 deficiency blocked BDL-induced necroinflammation at 3 and 14 days post-BDL. Serum hepatic enzymes, fibrogenic liver gene expression and oxidative stress decreased in RIP3−/− mice at 3 days after BDL. However, at 14 days, cholestasis aggravated and fibrosis was not halted. RIP3 deficiency further associated with increased hepatic expression of HO-1 and accumulation of iron in BDL mice. The functional link between HO-1 activity and bile acid toxicity was established in RIP3-deficient primary hepatocytes. Necroptosis is triggered in PBC patients and mediates hepatic necroinflammation in BDL-induced acute cholestasis. Targeting necroptosis may represent a therapeutic strategy for acute cholestasis, although complementary approaches may be required to control progression of chronic cholestatic liver disease

  5. UV-inactivated HSV-1 potently activates NK cell killing of leukemic cells.

    PubMed

    Samudio, Ismael; Rezvani, Katayoun; Shaim, Hila; Hofs, Elyse; Ngom, Mor; Bu, Luke; Liu, Guoyu; Lee, Jason T C; Imren, Suzan; Lam, Vivian; Poon, Grace F T; Ghaedi, Maryam; Takei, Fumio; Humphries, Keith; Jia, William; Krystal, Gerald

    2016-05-26

    Herein we demonstrate that oncolytic herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1) potently activates human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) to lyse leukemic cell lines and primary acute myeloid leukemia samples, but not healthy allogeneic lymphocytes. Intriguingly, we found that UV light-inactivated HSV-1 (UV-HSV-1) is equally effective in promoting PBMC cytolysis of leukemic cells and is 1000- to 10 000-fold more potent at stimulating innate antileukemic responses than UV-inactivated cytomegalovirus, vesicular stomatitis virus, reovirus, or adenovirus. Mechanistically, UV-HSV-1 stimulates PBMC cytolysis of leukemic cells, partly via Toll-like receptor-2/protein kinase C/nuclear factor-κB signaling, and potently stimulates expression of CD69, degranulation, migration, and cytokine production in natural killer (NK) cells, suggesting that surface components of UV-HSV-1 directly activate NK cells. Importantly, UV-HSV-1 synergizes with interleukin-15 (IL-15) and IL-2 in inducing activation and cytolytic activity of NK cells. Additionally, UV-HSV-1 stimulates glycolysis and fatty acid oxidation-dependent oxygen consumption in NK cells, but only glycolysis is required for their enhanced antileukemic activity. Last, we demonstrate that T cell-depleted human PBMCs exposed to UV-HSV-1 provide a survival benefit in a murine xenograft model of human acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Taken together, our results support the preclinical development of UV-HSV-1 as an adjuvant, alone or in combination with IL-15, for allogeneic donor mononuclear cell infusions to treat AML.

  6. UV-inactivated HSV-1 potently activates NK cell killing of leukemic cells

    PubMed Central

    Samudio, Ismael; Rezvani, Katayoun; Shaim, Hila; Hofs, Elyse; Ngom, Mor; Bu, Luke; Liu, Guoyu; Lee, Jason T. C.; Imren, Suzan; Lam, Vivian; Poon, Grace F. T.; Ghaedi, Maryam; Takei, Fumio; Humphries, Keith; Jia, William

    2016-01-01

    Herein we demonstrate that oncolytic herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1) potently activates human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) to lyse leukemic cell lines and primary acute myeloid leukemia samples, but not healthy allogeneic lymphocytes. Intriguingly, we found that UV light–inactivated HSV-1 (UV-HSV-1) is equally effective in promoting PBMC cytolysis of leukemic cells and is 1000- to 10 000-fold more potent at stimulating innate antileukemic responses than UV-inactivated cytomegalovirus, vesicular stomatitis virus, reovirus, or adenovirus. Mechanistically, UV-HSV-1 stimulates PBMC cytolysis of leukemic cells, partly via Toll-like receptor-2/protein kinase C/nuclear factor-κB signaling, and potently stimulates expression of CD69, degranulation, migration, and cytokine production in natural killer (NK) cells, suggesting that surface components of UV-HSV-1 directly activate NK cells. Importantly, UV-HSV-1 synergizes with interleukin-15 (IL-15) and IL-2 in inducing activation and cytolytic activity of NK cells. Additionally, UV-HSV-1 stimulates glycolysis and fatty acid oxidation–dependent oxygen consumption in NK cells, but only glycolysis is required for their enhanced antileukemic activity. Last, we demonstrate that T cell–depleted human PBMCs exposed to UV-HSV-1 provide a survival benefit in a murine xenograft model of human acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Taken together, our results support the preclinical development of UV-HSV-1 as an adjuvant, alone or in combination with IL-15, for allogeneic donor mononuclear cell infusions to treat AML. PMID:26941401

  7. In vitro transdifferentiation of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells to photoreceptor-like cells.

    PubMed

    Komuta, Yukari; Ishii, Toshiyuki; Kaneda, Makoto; Ueda, Yasuji; Miyamoto, Kiyoko; Toyoda, Masashi; Umezawa, Akihiro; Seko, Yuko

    2016-06-15

    Direct reprogramming is a promising, simple and low-cost approach to generate target cells from somatic cells without using induced pluripotent stem cells. Recently, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) have attracted considerable attention as a somatic cell source for reprogramming. As a cell source, PBMCs have an advantage over dermal fibroblasts with respect to the ease of collecting tissues. Based on our studies involving generation of photosensitive photoreceptor cells from human iris cells and human dermal fibroblasts by transduction of photoreceptor-related transcription factors via retrovirus vectors, we transduced these transcription factors into PBMCs via Sendai virus vectors. We found that retinal disease-related genes were efficiently detected in CRX-transduced cells, most of which are crucial to photoreceptor functions. In functional studies, a light-induced inward current was detected in some CRX-transduced cells. Moreover, by modification of the culture conditions including additional transduction of RAX1 and NEUROD1, we found a greater variety of retinal disease-related genes than that observed in CRX-transduced PBMCs. These data suggest that CRX acts as a master control gene for reprogramming PBMCs into photoreceptor-like cells and that our induced photoreceptor-like cells might contribute to individualized drug screening and disease modeling of inherited retinal degeneration.

  8. Nuclear actin activates human transcription factor genes including the OCT4 gene.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Shota; Yamamoto, Koji; Tokunaga, Makio; Sakata-Sogawa, Kumiko; Harata, Masahiko

    2015-01-01

    RNA microarray analyses revealed that nuclear actin activated many human transcription factor genes including OCT4, which is required for gene reprogramming. Oct4 is known to be activated by nuclear actin in Xenopus oocytes. Our findings imply that this process of OCT4 activation is conserved in vertebrates and among cell types and could be used for gene reprogramming of human cells.

  9. The effect of N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) on Bax and Mcl-1 expression in human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Jablonski, Jakub; Jablonska, Ewa; Leonik, Agnieszka

    2011-12-01

    In the present study we examined a role of pro-apoptotic Bax and anti-apoptotic Mcl-1 proteins, participating in the regulation of intrinsic apoptosis pathway in human neutrophils (PMNs) exposed to N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA), the environmental xenobiotic. For the purpose comparison, the same studies were conducted in autologous peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). The production of cytochrome c by PMNs was also determined. A deficit of anti-apoptotic Mcl-1 and overexpression of the pro-apoptotic protein Bax suggest that the apoptosis process in human neutrophils exposed to NDMA is dependent on changes in the expression of these proteins. PMNs were more sensitive to NDMA than PBMCs.

  10. Dopamine Receptor Activation Increases HIV Entry into Primary Human Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Gaskill, Peter J.; Yano, Hideaki H.; Kalpana, Ganjam V.; Javitch, Jonathan A.; Berman, Joan W.

    2014-01-01

    Macrophages are the primary cell type infected with HIV in the central nervous system, and infection of these cells is a major component in the development of neuropathogenesis and HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders. Within the brains of drug abusers, macrophages are exposed to increased levels of dopamine, a neurotransmitter that mediates the addictive and reinforcing effects of drugs of abuse such as cocaine and methamphetamine. In this study we examined the effects of dopamine on HIV entry into primary human macrophages. Exposure to dopamine during infection increased the entry of R5 tropic HIV into macrophages, irrespective of the concentration of the viral inoculum. The entry pathway affected was CCR5 dependent, as antagonizing CCR5 with the small molecule inhibitor TAK779 completely blocked entry. The effect was dose-dependent and had a steep threshold, only occurring above 108 M dopamine. The dopamine-mediated increase in entry required dopamine receptor activation, as it was abrogated by the pan-dopamine receptor antagonist flupenthixol, and could be mediated through both subtypes of dopamine receptors. These findings indicate that the effects of dopamine on macrophages may have a significant impact on HIV pathogenesis. They also suggest that drug-induced increases in CNS dopamine may be a common mechanism by which drugs of abuse with distinct modes of action exacerbate neuroinflammation and contribute to HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders in infected drug abusers. PMID:25268786

  11. Error-related electrocorticographic activity in humans during continuous movements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milekovic, Tomislav; Ball, Tonio; Schulze-Bonhage, Andreas; Aertsen, Ad; Mehring, Carsten

    2012-04-01

    Brain-machine interface (BMI) devices make errors in decoding. Detecting these errors online from neuronal activity can improve BMI performance by modifying the decoding algorithm and by correcting the errors made. Here, we study the neuronal correlates of two different types of errors which can both be employed in BMI: (i) the execution error, due to inaccurate decoding of the subjects’ movement intention; (ii) the outcome error, due to not achieving the goal of the movement. We demonstrate that, in electrocorticographic (ECoG) recordings from the surface of the human brain, strong error-related neural responses (ERNRs) for both types of errors can be observed. ERNRs were present in the low and high frequency components of the ECoG signals, with both signal components carrying partially independent information. Moreover, the observed ERNRs can be used to discriminate between error types, with high accuracy (≥83%) obtained already from single electrode signals. We found ERNRs in multiple cortical areas, including motor and somatosensory cortex. As the motor cortex is the primary target area for recording control signals for a BMI, an adaptive motor BMI utilizing these error signals may not require additional electrode implants in other brain areas.

  12. Sympathetic nerve activity and simulated diving in healthy humans.

    PubMed

    Shamsuzzaman, Abu; Ackerman, Michael J; Kuniyoshi, Fatima Sert; Accurso, Valentina; Davison, Diane; Amin, Raouf S; Somers, Virend K

    2014-04-01

    The goal of our study was to develop a simple and practical method for simulating diving in humans using facial cold exposure and apnea stimuli to measure neural and circulatory responses during the stimulated diving reflex. We hypothesized that responses to simultaneous facial cold exposure and apnea (simulated diving) would be synergistic, exceeding the sum of responses to individual stimuli. We studied 56 volunteers (24 female and 32 male), average age of 39 years. All subjects were healthy, free of cardiovascular and other diseases, and on no medications. Although muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA), blood pressure, and vascular resistance increased markedly during both early and late phases of simulated diving, significant reductions in heart rate were observed only during the late phase. Total MSNA during simulated diving was greater than combined MSNA responses to the individual stimuli. We found that simulated diving is a powerful stimulus to sympathetic nerve traffic with significant bradycardia evident in the late phase of diving and eliciting synergistic sympathetic and parasympathetic responses. Our data provide insight into autonomic triggers that could help explain catastrophic cardiovascular events that may occur during asphyxia or swimming, such as in patients with obstructive sleep apnea or congenital long QT syndrome.

  13. Human papillomavirus infections in nonsexually active perinatally HIV infected children.

    PubMed

    Moscicki, Anna-Barbara; Puga, Ana; Farhat, Sepideh; Ma, Yifei

    2014-02-01

    Although human papillomavirus (HPV) infections are common in HIV-infected adults, little is known about children. Our objective was to examine the prevalence of and risks for HPV of the oral mucosal and external genital areas in nonsexually active (NSA) perinatally (P) HIV+ children and compare with HIV-exposed but uninfected (HEU) children. A convenience sample attending a pediatric clinic were enrolled. Samples for HPV were obtained from the oral and anogenital areas and tested for one of 37 HPV types. The mean age of the 48 PHIV+ children was 14.3±3.9 years vs. 6.2±4.8 for the 52 HEU (p<0.001). Of the 23 PHIV+ girls, 30.4% had anogenital and 17% had oral HPV, and of the 27 HEU girls, 2 (7.4%) anogenital and 0 had oral HPV. Of the boys, 4/23 (17.4%) and 1/25 (4%) PHIV+ had anogenital and oral HPV, respectively, and 3/24 (12.5%) and 1/25 (4%) HEU had anogenital and oral HPV, respectively. Rates of HPV did not differ by age among the PHIV+, whereas older HEU were more likely to have HPV than younger HEU (p=0.07). This large age gap precluded statistical comparison by HIV status. The presence of HPV in NSA PHIV+ children may have implications regarding HPV vaccination efficacy.

  14. Effect of morphine on sympathetic nerve activity in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Jason R.; Sauder, Charity L.; Ray, Chester A.

    2002-01-01

    There are conflicting reports for the role of endogenous opioids on sympathetic and cardiovascular responses to exercise in humans. A number of studies have utilized naloxone (an opioid-receptor antagonist) to investigate the effect of opioids during exercise. In the present study, we examined the effect of morphine (an opioid-receptor agonist) on sympathetic and cardiovascular responses at rest and during isometric handgrip (IHG). Eleven subjects performed 2 min of IHG (30% maximum) followed by 2 min of postexercise muscle ischemia (PEMI) before and after systemic infusion of morphine (0.075 mg/kg loading dose + 1 mg/h maintenance) or placebo (saline) in double-blinded experiments on separate days. Morphine increased resting muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA; 17 +/- 2 to 22 +/- 2 bursts/min; P < 0.01) and increased mean arterial pressure (MAP; 87 +/- 2 to 91 +/- 2 mmHg; P < 0.02), but it decreased heart rate (HR; 61 +/- 4 to 59 +/- 3; P < 0.01). However, IHG elicited similar increases for MSNA, MAP, and HR between the control and morphine trial (drug x exercise interaction = not significant). Moreover, responses to PEMI were not different. Placebo had no effect on resting, IHG, and PEMI responses. We conclude that morphine modulates cardiovascular and sympathetic responses at rest but not during isometric exercise.

  15. Global changes in biogeochemical cycles in response to human activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Berrien, III; Melillo, Jerry

    1994-01-01

    The main objective of our research was to characterize biogeochemical cycles at continental and global scales in both terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. This characterization applied to both natural ecosystems and those disturbed by human activity. The primary elements of interest were carbon and nitrogen and the analysis sought to quantify standing stocks and dynamic cycling processes. The translocation of major nutrients from the terrestrial landscape to the atmosphere (via trace gases) and to fluvial systems (via leaching, erosional losses, and point source pollution) were of particular importance to this study. Our aim was to develop the first generation of Earth System Models. Our research was organized around the construction and testing of component biogeochemical models which treated terrestrial ecosystem processes, aquatic nutrient transport through drainage basins, and trace gas exchanges at the continental and global scale. A suite of three complementary models were defined within this construct. The models were organized to operate at a 1/2 degree latitude by longitude level of spatial resolution and to execute at a monthly time step. This discretization afforded us the opportunity to understand the dynamics of the biosphere down to subregional scales, while simultaneously placing these dynamics into a global context.

  16. Human Research Program Human Health Countermeasures Element Extravehicular Activity (EVA) Risk Standing Review Panel (SRP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norfleet, William; Harris, Bernard

    2009-01-01

    The Extravehicular Activity (EVA) Risk Standing Review Panel (SRP) was favorably impressed by the operational risk management approach taken by the Human Research Program (HRP) Integrated Research Plan (IRP) to address the stated life sciences issues. The life sciences community at the Johnson Space Center (JSC) seems to be focused on operational risk management. This approach is more likely to provide risk managers with the information they need at the time they need it. Concerning the information provided to the SRP by the EVA Physiology, Systems, and Performance Project (EPSP), it is obvious that a great deal of productive activity is under way. Evaluation of this information was hampered by the fact that it often was not organized in a fashion that reflects the "Gaps and Tasks" approach of the overall Human Health Countermeasures (HHC) effort, and that a substantial proportion of the briefing concerned subjects that, while interesting, are not part of the HHC Element (e.g., the pressurized rover presentation). Additionally, no information was provided on several of the tasks or how they related to work underway or already accomplished. This situation left the SRP having to guess at the efforts and relationship to other elements, and made it hard to easily map the EVA Project efforts currently underway, and the data collected thus far, to the gaps and tasks in the IRP. It seems that integration of the EPSP project into the HHC Element could be improved. Along these lines, we were concerned that our SRP was split off from the other participating SRPs at an early stage in the overall agenda for the meeting. In reality, the concerns of EPSP and other projects share much common ground. For example, the commonality of the concerns of the EVA and exercise physiology groups is obvious, both in terms of what reduced exercise capacity can do to EVA capability, and how the exercise performed during an EVA could contribute to an overall exercise countermeasure prescription.

  17. Structure-activity relationships of polybiguanides with activity against human immunodeficiency virus type 1

    PubMed Central

    Passic, Shendra R.; Ferguson, Mary Lee; Catalone, Bradley J.; Kish-Catalone, Tina; Kholodovych, Vladyslav; Zhu, Wei; Welsh, William; Rando, Robert; Howett, Mary K.; Wigdahl, Brian; Labib, Mohamed; Krebs, Fred C.

    2013-01-01

    Previous investigations showing that polydisperse biguanide (PDBG) molecules have activity against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) also suggested a relationship between PDBG biologic activity and the lengths of hydrocarbon linkers surrounding the positively charged biguanide unit. To better define structure-activity relationships, PDBG molecules with select linker lengths were evaluated for cytotoxicity, anti-HIV-1 activity, and in vivo toxicity. Results of the in vitro experiments demonstrated that increases in linker length (and, therefore, increases in compound lipophilicity) were generally associated with increases in cytotoxicity and antiviral activity against HIV-1. However, a relationship between linker length asymmetry and in vitro therapeutic index (TI) suggested structural specificity in the mechanism of action against HIV-1. Polyethylene hexamethylene biguanide (PEHMB; biguanide units spaced between alternating ethylene and hexamethylene linkers) was found to have the highest in vitro TI (CC50/IC50) among the compounds examined. Recent improvements in PEHMB synthesis and purification have yielded preparations of PEHMB with in vitro TI values of 266 and 7000 against HIV-1 strains BaL and IIIB, respectively. The minimal toxicity of PEHMB relative to polyhexamethylene biguanide (PHMB; biguanide units alternating with hexamethylene linkers) in a murine model of cervicovaginal microbicide toxicity was consistent with considerable differences in cytotoxicity between PEHMB and PHMB observed during in vitro experiments. These structure-activity investigations increase our understanding of PDBG molecules as agents with activity against HIV-1 and provide the foundation for further preclinical studies of PEHMB and other biguanide-based compounds as antiviral and microbicidal agents. PMID:21106331

  18. Human platelet heparanase: purification, characterization and catalytic activity.

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, C; Parish, C R

    1998-01-01

    Heparan sulphate (HS) is an important component of the extracellular matrix (ECM) and the vasculature basal lamina (BL) which functions as a barrier to the extravasation of metastatic and inflammatory cells. Platelet-tumour cell aggregation at the capillary endothelium results in activation and degranulation of platelets. Cleavage of HS by endoglycosidase or heparanase activity produced in relatively large amounts by the platelets and the invading cells may assist in the disassembly of the ECM and BL, and thereby facilitate cell migration. Using a recently published rapid, quantitative assay for heparanase activity towards HS [Freeman, C. and Parish, C.R. (1997), Biochem. J., 325, 229-237], human platelet heparanase has now been purified 1700-fold to homogeneity in 19% yield by a five column procedure, which consists of concanavalin A-Sepharose, Zn2+-chelating-Sepharose, Blue A-agarose, octyl-agarose and gel filtration chromatography. The enzyme, which was shown to be an endoglucuronidase that degrades both heparin and HS, has a native molecular mass of 50 kDa when analysed by gel filtration chromatography and by SDS/PAGE. Platelet heparanase degraded porcine mucosal HS in a stepwise fashion from a number average molecular mass of 18.5 to 13, to 8 and finally to 4.5 kDa fragments as determined by gel filtration analysis. Bovine lung heparin was degraded from 8.9 to 4.8 kDa while porcine mucosal heparin was degraded from 8.1 kDa to 3.8 and finally to 2.9 kDa fragments. Studies of the enzyme's substrate specificity using modified heparin analogues showed that substrate cleavage required the presence of carboxyl groups, but O- and N-sulphation were not essential. Inhibition studies demonstrated an absolute requirement for the presence of O-sulphate groups. Platelet heparanase was inhibited by heparin analogues which also inhibited tumour heparanase, suggesting that sulphated polysaccharides which inhibit tumour metastasis may act to prevent both tumour cell and

  19. Activation of Human Monocytes by Live Borrelia burgdorferi Generates TLR2-Dependent and -Independent Responses Which Include Induction of IFN-β

    PubMed Central

    Salazar, Juan C.; Duhnam-Ems, Star; La Vake, Carson; Cruz, Adriana R.; Moore, Meagan W.; Caimano, Melissa J.; Velez-Climent, Leonor; Shupe, Jonathan; Krueger, Winfried; Radolf, Justin D.

    2009-01-01

    It is widely believed that innate immune responses to Borrelia burgdorferi (Bb) are primarily triggered by the spirochete's outer membrane lipoproteins signaling through cell surface TLR1/2. We recently challenged this notion by demonstrating that phagocytosis of live Bb by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) elicited greater production of proinflammatory cytokines than did equivalent bacterial lysates. Using whole genome microarrays, we show herein that, compared to lysates, live spirochetes elicited a more intense and much broader transcriptional response involving genes associated with diverse cellular processes; among these were IFN-β and a number of interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs), which are not known to result from TLR2 signaling. Using isolated monocytes, we demonstrated that cell activation signals elicited by live Bb result from cell surface interactions and uptake and degradation of organisms within phagosomes. As with PBCMs, live Bb induced markedly greater transcription and secretion of TNF-α, IL-6, IL-10 and IL-1β in monocytes than did lysates. Secreted IL-18, which, like IL-1β, also requires cleavage by activated caspase-1, was generated only in response to live Bb. Pro-inflammatory cytokine production by TLR2-deficient murine macrophages was only moderately diminished in response to live Bb but was drastically impaired against lysates; TLR2 deficiency had no significant effect on uptake and degradation of spirochetes. As with PBMCs, live Bb was a much more potent inducer of IFN-β and ISGs in isolated monocytes than were lysates or a synthetic TLR2 agonist. Collectively, our results indicate that the enhanced innate immune responses of monocytes following phagocytosis of live Bb have both TLR2-dependent and -independent components and that the latter induce transcription of type I IFNs and ISGs. PMID:19461888

  20. The Consolidated Human Activity Database — Master Version (CHAD-Master) Technical Memorandum

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This technical memorandum contains information about the Consolidated Human Activity Database -- Master version, including CHAD contents, inventory of variables: Questionnaire files and Event files, CHAD codes, and references.

  1. Exploring techniques for vision based human activity recognition: methods, systems, and evaluation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xin; Tang, Jinshan; Zhang, Xiaolong; Liu, Xiaoming; Zhang, Hong; Qiu, Yimin

    2013-01-25

    With the wide applications of vision based intelligent systems, image and video analysis technologies have attracted the attention of researchers in the computer vision field. In image and video analysis, human activity recognition is an important research direction. By interpreting and understanding human activity, we can recognize and predict the occurrence of crimes and help the police or other agencies react immediately. In the past, a large number of papers have been published on human activity recognition in video and image sequences. In this paper, we provide a comprehensive survey of the recent development of the techniques, including methods, systems, and quantitative evaluation towards the performance of human activity recognition.

  2. Surfactant protein D induces immune quiescence and apoptosis of mitogen-activated peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Pandit, Hrishikesh; Thakur, Gargi; Koippallil Gopalakrishnan, Aghila Rani; Dodagatta-Marri, Eswari; Patil, Anushree; Kishore, Uday; Madan, Taruna

    2016-02-01

    Surfactant protein D (SP-D) is an integral molecule of the innate immunity secreted by epithelial cells lining the mucosal surfaces. The C-type lectin domain of SP-D performs pattern recognition functions while it binds to putative receptors on immune cells to modify cellular functions. Activation of immune cells and increased serum SP-D is observed in a range of patho-physiological conditions including infections. We speculated if SP-D can modulate systemic immune response via direct interaction with activated PBMCs. In this study, we examined interaction of a recombinant fragment of human SP-D (rhSP-D) on PHA-activated PBMCs. We report a significant downregulation of activation receptors such as TLR2, TLR4, CD11c and CD69 upon rhSP-D treatment. rhSP-D inhibited production of Th1 (TNF-α and IFN-γ) and Th17 (IL-17A) cytokines along with IL-6. Interestingly, levels of IL-2, Th2 (IL-4) and regulatory (IL-10 and TGF-β) cytokines remained unaltered. Analysis of co-stimulatory CD28 and co-inhibitory CTLA4 receptors along with their ligands CD80 and CD86 revealed a selective up-regulation of CTLA4 in the lymphocyte subset. rhSP-D induced apoptosis in the activated but not in non-activated lymphocytes. Blockade of CTLA4 inhibited rhSP-D mediated apoptosis of activated lymphocytes, confirming involvement of CTLA4. We conclude that SP-D restores immune homeostasis. It regulates expression of immunomodulatory receptors and cytokines, which is followed by induction of apoptosis in activated lymphocytes. These findings suggest a critical role of SP-D in immune surveillance against activated immune cells.

  3. Recombinant Human Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 Promotes Cementogenic Differentiation of Human Periodontal Ligament Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Jin, Hexiu; Choung, Han-Wool; Lim, Ki-Taek; Jin, Bin; Jin, Chengbiao; Chung, Jong-Hoon; Choung, Pill-Hoon

    2015-12-01

    The periodontium, consisting of gingiva, periodontal ligament (PDL), cementum, and alveolar bone, is necessary for the maintenance of tooth function. Specifically, the regenerative abilities of cementum with inserted PDL are important for the prevention of tooth loss. Periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs), which are located in the connective tissue PDL between the cementum and alveolar bone, are an attractive candidate for hard tissue formation. We investigated the effects of recombinant human plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (rhPAI-1) on cementogenic differentiation of human PDLSCs (hPDLSCs) in vitro and in vivo. Untreated and rhPAI-1-treated hPDLSCs mixed with hydroxyapatite/tricalcium phosphate (HA/TCP) and dentin matrix were transplanted subcutaneously into the dorsal surface of immunocompromised mice to assess their capacity for hard tissue formation at 8 and 10 weeks posttransplantation. rhPAI-1 accelerated mineral nodule formation and increased the mRNA expression of cementoblast-associated markers in hPDLSCs. We also observed that rhPAI-1 upregulated the levels of osterix (OSX) and cementum protein 1 (CEMP1) through Smad2/3 and p38 pathways, whereas specific inhibitors of Smad3 and p38 inhibited the enhancement of mineralization of hPDLSCs by rhPAI-1. Furthermore, transplantation of hPDLSCs with rhPAI-1 showed a great ability to promote cementogenic differentiation. Notably, rhPAI-1 induced hPDLSCs to regenerate cementum-like tissue with PDL fibers inserted into newly formed cementum-like tissue. These results suggest that rhPAI-1 may play a key role in cementogenic differentiation of hPDLSCs. rhPAI-1 with hPDLSCs may be a good candidate for future clinical applications in periodontal tissue regeneration and possibly in tooth root bioengineering.

  4. Recombinant Human Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 Promotes Cementogenic Differentiation of Human Periodontal Ligament Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Hexiu; Choung, Han-Wool; Lim, Ki-Taek; Jin, Bin; Jin, Chengbiao; Chung, Jong-Hoon

    2015-01-01

    The periodontium, consisting of gingiva, periodontal ligament (PDL), cementum, and alveolar bone, is necessary for the maintenance of tooth function. Specifically, the regenerative abilities of cementum with inserted PDL are important for the prevention of tooth loss. Periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs), which are located in the connective tissue PDL between the cementum and alveolar bone, are an attractive candidate for hard tissue formation. We investigated the effects of recombinant human plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (rhPAI-1) on cementogenic differentiation of human PDLSCs (hPDLSCs) in vitro and in vivo. Untreated and rhPAI-1-treated hPDLSCs mixed with hydroxyapatite/tricalcium phosphate (HA/TCP) and dentin matrix were transplanted subcutaneously into the dorsal surface of immunocompromised mice to assess their capacity for hard tissue formation at 8 and 10 weeks posttransplantation. rhPAI-1 accelerated mineral nodule formation and increased the mRNA expression of cementoblast-associated markers in hPDLSCs. We also observed that rhPAI-1 upregulated the levels of osterix (OSX) and cementum protein 1 (CEMP1) through Smad2/3 and p38 pathways, whereas specific inhibitors of Smad3 and p38 inhibited the enhancement of mineralization of hPDLSCs by rhPAI-1. Furthermore, transplantation of hPDLSCs with rhPAI-1 showed a great ability to promote cementogenic differentiation. Notably, rhPAI-1 induced hPDLSCs to regenerate cementum-like tissue with PDL fibers inserted into newly formed cementum-like tissue. These results suggest that rhPAI-1 may play a key role in cementogenic differentiation of hPDLSCs. rhPAI-1 with hPDLSCs may be a good candidate for future clinical applications in periodontal tissue regeneration and possibly in tooth root bioengineering. PMID:25808697

  5. IFNL3 genotype is associated with differential induction of IFNL3 in primary human hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Kurbanov, Fuat; Kim, Yonghak; Latanich, Rachel; Chaudhari, Pooja; El-Diwany, Ramy; Knabel, Matt; Kandathil, Abraham J; Cameron, Andrew; Cox, Andrea; Jang, Yoon-Young; Thomas, David L; Balagopal, Ashwin

    2016-01-01

    Background Lambda interferons (IFNLs) have potent antiviral activity against HCV, and polymorphisms within the IFNL gene cluster near the IFNL3 gene strongly predict spontaneous- and treatment-related HCV infection outcomes. The mechanism(s) linking IFNL polymorphisms and HCV control is currently elusive. Methods IFNL induction was studied in primary human hepatocytes (PHH) from 18 human donors, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from 18 human donors, multiple cell lines and induced pluripotent stem cell-derived hepatocyte-like cells (iPSC-hepatocytes) from 7 human donors. After stimulation with intracellular RNA and infectious HCV, quantitative PCR (qPCR) primers and probes were designed to distinguish and quantify closely related IFNL messenger (m)RNAs from IFNL1, IFNL2 and IFNL3. Results PHH demonstrated the most potent induction of IFNLs, although had lower pre-stimulation levels compared to PBMCs, monocytes and cell lines. PHH stimulation with cytoplasmic poly I:C induced >1,000-fold expression of IFNL1, IFNL2 and IFNL3. PHH from donors who were homozygous for the favourable IFNL3 allele (IFNL3-CC) had higher IFNL3 induction compared to PHH from IFNL3-TT donors (P=0.03). Baseline IFNL mRNA expression and induction was also tested in iPSC-hepatocytes: iPSC-hepatocytes had significantly higher baseline expression of IFNLs compared to PHH (P<0.0001), and IFNL3 induction was marginally different in iPSC-hepatocytes by IFNL genotype (P=0.07). Conclusions Hepatocytes express IFNLs when stimulated by a synthetic viral RNA that signals the cell through the cytoplasm. IFNL induction may be greater in persons with the favourable IFNL3 allele. These data provide insight into the strong linkage between IFNL3 genetics and control of HCV infection. PMID:26109548

  6. Effects of butyltins on mitogen-activated-protein kinase kinase kinase and Ras activity in human natural killer cells.

    PubMed

    Celada, Lindsay J; Whalen, Margaret M

    2014-09-01

    Butyltins (BTs) contaminate the environment and are found in human blood. BTs, tributyltin (TBT) and dibutyltin (DBT) diminish the cytotoxic function and levels of key proteins of human natural killer (NK) cells. NK cells are an initial immune defense against tumors, virally infected cells and antibody-coated cells and thus critical to human health. The signaling pathways that regulate NK cell functions include mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs). Studies have shown that exposure to BTs leads to activation of specific MAPKs and MAPK kinases (MAP2Ks) in human NK cells. MAP2K kinases (MAP3Ks) are upstream activators of MAP2Ks, which then activate MAPKs. The current study examined if BT-induced activation of MAP3Ks was responsible for MAP2K and thus, MAPK activation. This study examines the effects of TBT and DBT on the total levels of two MAP3Ks, c-Raf and ASK1, as well as activating and inhibitory phosphorylation sites on these MAP3Ks. In addition, the immediate upstream activator of c-Raf, Ras, was examined for BT-induced alterations. Our results show significant activation of the MAP3K, c-Raf, in human NK cells within 10 min of TBT exposure and the MAP3K, ASK1, after 1 h exposures to TBT. In addition, our results suggest that both TBT and DBT affect the regulation of c-Raf.

  7. Consolidated Human Activity Database (CHAD) for use in human exposure and health studies and predictive models

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA scientists have compiled detailed data on human behavior from 22 separate exposure and time-use studies into CHAD. The database includes more than 54,000 individual study days of detailed human behavior.

  8. Loss and Gain of Human Acidic Mammalian Chitinase Activity by Nonsynonymous SNPs

    PubMed Central

    Okawa, Kazuaki; Ohno, Misa; Kashimura, Akinori; Kimura, Masahiro; Kobayashi, Yuki; Sakaguchi, Masayoshi; Sugahara, Yasusato; Kamaya, Minori; Kino, Yoshihiro; Bauer, Peter O.; Oyama, Fumitaka

    2016-01-01

    Acidic mammalian chitinase (AMCase) is implicated in asthma, allergic inflammation, and food processing. Little is known about genetic and evolutional regulation of chitinolytic activity of AMCase. Here, we relate human AMCase polymorphisms to the mouse AMCase, and show that the highly active variants encoded by nonsynonymous single-nucleotide polymorphisms (nsSNPs) are consistent with the mouse AMCase sequence. The chitinolytic activity of the recombinant human AMCase was significantly lower than that of the mouse counterpart. By creating mouse-human chimeric AMCase protein we found that the presence of the N-terminal region of human AMCase containing conserved active site residues reduced the enzymatic activity of the molecule. We were able to significantly increase the activity of human AMCase by amino acid substitutions encoded by nsSNPs (N45, D47, and R61) with those conserved in the mouse homologue (D45, N47, and M61). For abolition of the mouse AMCase activity, introduction of M61R mutation was sufficient. M61 is conserved in most of primates other than human and orangutan as well as in other mammals. Orangutan has I61 substitution, which also markedly reduced the activity of the mouse AMCase, indicating that the M61 is a crucial residue for the chitinolytic activity. Altogether, our data suggest that human AMCase has lost its chitinolytic activity by integration of nsSNPs during evolution and that the enzyme can be reactivated by introducing amino acids conserved in the mouse counterpart. PMID:27702777

  9. Increased sialidase activity in serum of cancer patients: Identification of sialidase and inhibitor activities in human serum.

    PubMed

    Hata, Keiko; Tochigi, Tatsuo; Sato, Ikuro; Kawamura, Sadafumi; Shiozaki, Kazuhiro; Wada, Tadashi; Takahashi, Kohta; Moriya, Setsuko; Yamaguchi, Kazunori; Hosono, Masahiro; Miyagi, Taeko

    2015-04-01

    Aberrant sialylation in glycoproteins and glycolipids is a characteristic feature of malignancy. Human sialidases, which catalyze the removal of sialic acid residues from glycoconjugates, have been implicated in cancer progression. They have been detected in a wide variety of human cells and tissues, but few studies have focused on their existence in human serum. Among the four types identified to date, we previously demonstrated that plasma membrane-associated ganglioside sialidase (NEU3) is markedly upregulated in various human cancers, including examples in the colon and prostate. Here, using a sensitive assay method, we found a significant increase of sialidase activity in the serum of patients with prostate cancer compared with that in healthy subjects having low activity, if any. Activity was apparent with gangliosides as substrates, but only to a very limited extent with 4-methylumbelliferyl sialic acid, a good synthetic substrate for sialidases other than human NEU3. The serum sialidase was also almost entirely immunoprecipitated with anti-NEU3 antibody, but not with antibodies for other sialidases. Interestingly, sera additionally contained inhibitory activity against the sialidase and also against recombinant human NEU3. The sialidase and inhibitor activities could be separated by exosome isolation and by hydrophobic column chromatography. The serum sialidase was assessed by a sandwich ELISA method using two anti-NEU3 antibodies. The results provide strong evidence that the serum sialidase is, in fact, NEU3, and this subtype may, therefore, be a potential utility for novel diagnosis of human cancers.

  10. Report: EPA Prepared to Implement Strategic Human Capital Management Activities But Challenges Remain

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Report #2004-P-00024, September 20, 2004. EPA’s headquarters and regional offices are prepared to implement strategic human capital management activities, but an alignment of office-level activities to the Agency’s Strategy for Human Capital is lacking.

  11. Energy monitoring based on human activity in the workplace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mustafa, N. H.; Husain, M. N.; Abd Aziz, M. Z. A.; Othman, M. A.; Malek, F.

    2014-04-01

    Human behavior is the most important factor in order to manage energy usage. Nowadays, smart house technology offers a better quality of life by introducing automated appliance control and assistive services. However, human behaviors will contribute to the efficiency of the system. This paper will focus on monitoring efficiency based on duration time in office hours around 8am until 5pm which depend on human behavior atb the workplace. Then, the correlation coefficient method is used to show the relation between energy consumption and energy saving based on the total hours of time energy spent. In future, the percentages of energy monitoring system usage will be increase to manage energy in efficient ways based on human behaviours. This scenario will lead to the positive impact in order to achieve the energy saving in the building and support the green environment.

  12. Global Night-Time Lights for Observing Human Activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hipskind, Stephen R.; Elvidge, Chris; Gurney, K.; Imhoff, Mark; Bounoua, Lahouari; Sheffner, Edwin; Nemani, Ramakrishna R.; Pettit, Donald R.; Fischer, Marc

    2011-01-01

    We present a concept for a small satellite mission to make systematic, global observations of night-time lights with spatial resolution suitable for discerning the extent, type and density of human settlements. The observations will also allow better understanding of fine scale fossil fuel CO2 emission distribution. The NASA Earth Science Decadal Survey recommends more focus on direct observations of human influence on the Earth system. The most dramatic and compelling observations of human presence on the Earth are the night light observations taken by the Defence Meteorological System Program (DMSP) Operational Linescan System (OLS). Beyond delineating the footprint of human presence, night light data, when assembled and evaluated with complementary data sets, can determine the fine scale spatial distribution of global fossil fuel CO2 emissions. Understanding fossil fuel carbon emissions is critical to understanding the entire carbon cycle, and especially the carbon exchange between terrestrial and oceanic systems.

  13. Transcriptional activation of JC virus by human T-lymphotropic virus type I Tax protein in human neuronal cell lines.

    PubMed

    Okada, Y; Sawa, H; Tanaka, S; Takada, A; Suzuki, S; Hasegawa, H; Umemura, T; Fujisawa, J; Tanaka, Y; Hall, W W; Nagashima, K

    2000-06-02

    Polyomavirus JC (JCV) causes the human demyelinating disease, progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML). The recent demonstration of cases of PML in association with human T-lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I) infection prompted us to examine whether the HTLV-I-encoded regulatory protein Tax activates JCV transcription. By employing a dual luciferase assay, we initially found that the expression of Tax activated the transcriptional potential of both early and late promoters of JCV in human neuronal but not in non-neuronal cells. We subsequently analyzed the mechanism of Tax-induced activation of the JCV promoter in neuronal cells with the following results: 1) the JCV promoter that lacks the NF-kappaB-binding motif could not be activated by Tax; 2) the overexpression of IkappaBalpha abolished Tax-induced transcriptional activation of the JCV promoter; 3) a Tax mutant (M22) lacking the potential for activation via the NF-kappaB pathway did not activate the JCV promoter. Furthermore, Tax enhances the gene expression of JCV T antigen and VP1. We examined mechanisms of the cell-specific activation of the JCV promoter by Tax. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay demonstrated the presence of Tax-bound protein(s) that were specifically present in non-neuronal cells. This study is the first demonstration of the activation of JCV promoter by HTLV-I Tax in an NF-kappaB-dependent manner.

  14. Sialic acid content in human saliva and anti-influenza activity against human and avian influenza viruses.

    PubMed

    Limsuwat, Nattavatchara; Suptawiwat, Ornpreya; Boonarkart, Chompunuch; Puthavathana, Pilaipan; Wiriyarat, Witthawat; Auewarakul, Prasert

    2016-03-01

    It was shown previously that human saliva has higher antiviral activity against human influenza viruses than against H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses, and that the major anti-influenza activity was associated with sialic-acid-containing molecules. To further characterize the differential susceptibility to saliva among influenza viruses, seasonal influenza A and B virus, pandemic H1N1 virus, and 15 subtypes of avian influenza virus were tested for their susceptibility to human and chicken saliva. Human saliva showed higher hemagglutination inhibition (HI) and neutralization (NT) titers against seasonal influenza A virus and the pandemic H1N1 viruses than against influenza B virus and most avian influenza viruses, except for H9N2 and H12N9 avian influenza viruses, which showed high HI and NT titers. To understand the nature of sialic-acid-containing anti-influenza factors in human saliva, α2,3- and α2,6-linked sialic acid was measured in human saliva samples using a lectin binding and dot blot assay. α2,6-linked sialic acid was found to be more abundant than α2,3-linked sialic acid, and a seasonal H1N1 influenza virus bound more efficiently to human saliva than an H5N1 virus in a dot blot analysis. These data indicated that human saliva contains the sialic acid type corresponding to the binding preference of seasonal influenza viruses.

  15. Erosion of the Mekong delta: the role of human activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anthony, E.; Dussouillez, P.; Goichot, M.; Brunier, G.; Dolique, F.; Nguyen, V.; Loisel, H.; Mangin, A.; Vantrepotte, V.

    2013-12-01

    River deltas are threatened by dams, dykes, flow channelling, and aggregate extraction. These activities outweigh climate change and sea-level rise in causing delta vulnerability1, and will aggravate the impacts to be expected from these effects2. We show here from analysis of: (1) delta channel morphology and sediment budgets, and (2) satellite imagery, that the Mekong delta, considered as the world's third largest, and hitherto strongly prograding, is now in a phase of large-scale erosion. We discuss the mechanistic links involved in erosion and the way these are related to human activities. High-resolution (2.5 m) SPOT 5 images for the years 2003, 2007, 2011/12 covering 405 km of the delta shoreline show an overall retreat rate of over 8 m a year. 75% of the analysed shoreline, i.e., the muddy western sector, is now retreating at rates exceeding 50 m a year in places. The sandy river-mouth sector maintains a semblance of stability, but with strong variations. We attribute erosion to a cascade of morphosedimentary changes linked to sediment mining from the deltaic channels and upstream dam interception. We estimated from Meris satellite imagery an annual 5% decrease in surface suspended concentrations exiting at the mouths of the Mekong over the period 2003-2011 that may reflect increased trapping of mud behind dams in China. We also infer modification of river-mouth and coastal mud storage patterns resulting from a loss of ca. 200 million m3 of delta channel sediments between 1998 and 2008 from aggregate extraction. Dykes have been shown to result in increased channel flow velocities during the high-discharge monsoon season, favouring further channel deepening3. Stronger river-mouth outflow velocities during this season may be leading to export of a greater proportion of mud far offshore of the coastal longshore transport corridor that ensured mud supply to, and past progradation of, the muddy western coast. In contrast, greater seawater penetration in the

  16. Characterization of in vitro antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity activity of therapeutic antibodies - impact of effector cells.

    PubMed

    Chung, Shan; Lin, Yuwen L; Reed, Chae; Ng, Carl; Cheng, Zhijie Jey; Malavasi, Fabio; Yang, Jihong; Quarmby, Valerie; Song, An

    2014-05-01

    Antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) is an important mechanism of action implicated in the clinical efficacy of several therapeutic antibodies. In vitro ADCC assays employing effector cells capable of inducing lysis of target cells bound by antibodies are routinely performed to support the research and development of therapeutic antibodies. ADCC assays are commonly performed using peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), natural killer (NK) cells or engineered cell lines as effector cells. In this study we evaluated the impact of different effector cell types including primary PBMCs, primary NK cells, engineered NK cell lines, and an engineered reporter cell line, on the in vitro ADCC activity of two glycoforms of a humanized IgG1 antibody. The results of this study show the differential effects on both the efficacy and potency of the antibodies by different effector cells and the finding that both the allotype and the expression level of CD16a affect the potency of effector cells in ADCC assays. Our results also show that engineered NK or reporter cell lines provide reduced variability compared to primary effector cells for in vitro ADCC assays.

  17. Recognition of human activity characteristics based on state transitions modeling technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elangovan, Vinayak; Shirkhodaie, Amir

    2012-06-01

    Human Activity Discovery & Recognition (HADR) is a complex, diverse and challenging task but yet an active area of ongoing research in the Department of Defense. By detecting, tracking, and characterizing cohesive Human interactional activity patterns, potential threats can be identified which can significantly improve situation awareness, particularly, in Persistent Surveillance Systems (PSS). Understanding the nature of such dynamic activities, inevitably involves interpretation of a collection of spatiotemporally correlated activities with respect to a known context. In this paper, we present a State Transition model for recognizing the characteristics of human activities with a link to a prior contextbased ontology. Modeling the state transitions between successive evidential events determines the activities' temperament. The proposed state transition model poses six categories of state transitions including: Human state transitions of Object handling, Visibility, Entity-entity relation, Human Postures, Human Kinematics and Distance to Target. The proposed state transition model generates semantic annotations describing the human interactional activities via a technique called Casual Event State Inference (CESI). The proposed approach uses a low cost kinect depth camera for indoor and normal optical camera for outdoor monitoring activities. Experimental results are presented here to demonstrate the effectiveness and efficiency of the proposed technique.

  18. Activated CD11b+ CD15+ Granulocytes Increase in the Blood of Patients with Uveal Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    McKenna, Kyle C.; Beatty, Kelly M.; Bilonick, Richard A.; Schoenfield, Lynn; Lathrop, Kira L.; Singh, Arun D.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To determine whether activated CD11b+ CD15+ granulocytes increase in the blood of patients with uveal melanoma. Methods Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were isolated by density gradient centrifugation from the blood of patients with primary choroidal/ciliochoroidal uveal melanomas (six women, four men; age range, 46–91 years) and healthy control donors (14 women, 10 men; age range, 50 – 81 years). The expression of CD15 and CD68 on CD11b+ myeloid cells within PBMCs and primary uveal melanomas was evaluated by flow cytometry. CD3ζ chain expression by CD3ε+ T cells in PBMCs and within primary uveal melanomas was measured as an indirect indication of T-cell function. Results The percentage of CD11b+ cells in PBMCs of patients with uveal melanoma increased 1.8-fold in comparison to healthy donors and comprised three subsets: CD68 negative CD15+ granulocytes, which increased 4.1-fold; CD68− CD15− cells, which increased threefold; and CD68+ CD15low cells, which were unchanged. A significant (2.7-fold) reduction in CD3ζ chain expression on CD3ε+ T cells, a marker of T-cell dysfunction, was observed in PBMCs of patients with uveal melanoma in comparison with healthy control subjects and correlated significantly with the percentage of CD11b+ cells in PBMCs. CD3ζ chain expression on T cells within primary tumors was equivalent to CD3ζ expression in PBMCs of the same patient in four of five patients analyzed. Conclusions Activated CD11b+ CD15+ granulocytes expand in the blood of patients with uveal melanoma and may contribute to immune evasion by ocular tumors by inhibiting T-cell function via decreasing CD3ζ chain expression. PMID:19369244

  19. Activation of the human neutrophil respiratory burst with zymosan-activated serum.

    PubMed

    Smith, R J; Iden, S S; Bowman, B J

    1984-06-15

    Zymosan-activated serum ( ZAS ) stimulated a time- and concentration-dependent generation of superoxide anion (O-2) by human neutrophils. O-2 production was rapid with maximum generation occurring 2 minutes after cell exposure to ZAS . O-2 generation is markedly reduced if cells are not preincubated with cytochalasin B prior to contact with ZAS . The amount of O-2 produced by ZAS stimulated neutrophils was enhanced in the presence of extra-cellular calcium. However, the intracellular calcium antagonist, 8-(N,N-diethylamino)-octyl-(3,4,5-trimethoxy) benzoate hydrochloride (TMB-8), caused a dose-related inhibition of ZAS -elicited O-2 production. Neutrophils pretreated with ZAS were desensitized to the subsequent exposure to this stimulus. The fact that pretreatment of neutrophils with ZAS did not diminish the capacity of these cells to generate O-2 in response to 1-O-hexadecyl/octadecyl-2-O-acetyl-sn-glyceryl-3-phosphorylcholine (AGEPC),N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (FMLP) or 5(5),12(R)-dihydroxy-6,14-cis-8,10-trans-eicosatetraenoic acid (LTB4), demonstrates the stimulus specific nature of ZAS -induced desensitization. Thus, ZAS , which contains the complement-derived neutrophil activator, C5a, a naturally occurring phlogistic mediator, represents a relevant probe for investigating neutrophil function.

  20. The earliest record of human activity in northern Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parfitt, Simon A.; Barendregt, René W.; Breda, Marzia; Candy, Ian; Collins, Matthew J.; Coope, G. Russell; Durbidge, Paul; Field, Mike H.; Lee, Jonathan R.; Lister, Adrian M.; Mutch, Robert; Penkman, Kirsty E. H.; Preece, Richard C.; Rose, James; Stringer, Christopher B.; Symmons, Robert; Whittaker, John E.; Wymer, John J.; Stuart, Anthony J.

    2005-12-01

    The colonization of Eurasia by early humans is a key event after their spread out of Africa, but the nature, timing and ecological context of the earliest human occupation of northwest Europe is uncertain and has been the subject of intense debate. The southern Caucasus was occupied about 1.8 million years (Myr) ago, whereas human remains from Atapuerca-TD6, Spain (more than 780kyr ago) and Ceprano, Italy (about 800kyr ago) show that early Homo had dispersed to the Mediterranean hinterland before the Brunhes-Matuyama magnetic polarity reversal (780kyr ago). Until now, the earliest uncontested artefacts from northern Europe were much younger, suggesting that humans were unable to colonize northern latitudes until about 500kyr ago. Here we report flint artefacts from the Cromer Forest-bed Formation at Pakefield (52°N), Suffolk, UK, from an interglacial sequence yielding a diverse range of plant and animal fossils. Event and lithostratigraphy, palaeomagnetism, amino acid geochronology and biostratigraphy indicate that the artefacts date to the early part of the Brunhes Chron (about 700kyr ago) and thus represent the earliest unequivocal evidence for human presence north of the Alps.

  1. Effects of human subsistence activities on forest birds in northern Kenya.

    PubMed

    Borghesio, Luca

    2008-04-01

    Indigenous tribes and conservation biologists may have common goals and may be able to collaborate on the maintenance of biodiversity, but few researchers have evaluated the impacts and potential benefits of human subsistence activities. I studied the effects of subsistence activities (primarily wood collection) of nomadic pastoralists in 3 Afromontane forests of northern Kenya. In surveys of 404, 25-m-radius plots, I recorded vegetation structure and composition of the forest bird community. Plots with higher levels of human activity had significantly different vegetation structure, with more-open canopies, more grass, and fewer tree stems. Nectarivores (abundance +231%) and aerial insectivores (+66%) were more abundant in plots with more-intense wood collecting than in plots with less human activity, whereas abundance of forest specialists (-28%) decreased in plots with more-intense human activity. Abundance of 58% of the bird species either increased or decreased significantly in plots with more-intense human activity. Generally, the number of individuals of forest specialists decreased (6 of 7 species showed significant responses) and the number of individuals of edge and nonforest species increased with increasing human activity. Canonical correspondence analysis showed that an intensification of human activities would favor nectarivores, aerial insectivores, granivores, and omnivores and would negatively affect large-sized, ground-foraging species and arboreal frugivores. Subsistence human activities favored the invasion of forest by edge species at the expense of forest specialists; thus, further intensification of forest exploitation by local peoples is not recommended. At the same time, however, subsistence activities in northern Kenya forests appeared to increase the structural diversity of the vegetation and provided suitable habitat for part (but not all) of the forest avifauna, which suggests that subsistence human activities may have a role in the

  2. Serological, biological, and molecular characterization of New Zealand white rabbits infected by intraperitoneal inoculation with cell-free human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed Central

    Reina, S; Markham, P; Gard, E; Rayed, F; Reitz, M; Gallo, R C; Varnier, O E

    1993-01-01

    The availability of a small laboratory animal model suitable for the evaluation of methods for prevention and treatment of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection would be a valuable resource for AIDS research. Here we describe the infection of a strain of domestic rabbits by intraperitoneal inoculation with cell-free human immunodeficiency virus type 1. Evidence of infection includes the presence of an immune response that has persisted for almost 3 years and the detection of an reisolation of infectious virus from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and other tissues during the first 2 years. Typical viral proteins, DNA and RNA patterns, were observed in rabbit PBMCs and in cells infected by cocultivation with rabbit PBMCs. While a number of possible pathological changes were evaluated in infected rabbits, the presence of changes in lymph node structure similar to those reported in infected humans merits further investigation. Images PMID:7688823

  3. Biologically Active Chorionic Gonadotropin: Synthesis by the Human Fetus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGregor, W. G.; Kuhn, R. W.; Jaffe, R. B.

    1983-04-01

    The kidney, and to a slight extent the liver, of human fetuses were found to synthesize and secrete the α subunit common to glycoprotein hormones. Fetal lung and muscle did not synthesize this protein. Since fetal kidney and liver were previously found to synthesize β chorionic gonadotropin, their ability to synthesize bioactive chorionic gonadotropin was also determined. The newly synthesized hormone bound to mouse Leydig cells and elicited a biological response: namely, the synthesis of testosterone. These results suggest that the human fetus may participate in metabolic homeostasis during its development.

  4. Action of T-activin on activity of human natural killer cells in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Cheknev, S.B.; Saidov, M.Z.; Koval'chuk, L.V.; Pavlyuk, A.S.; Arion, V.Ya.

    1986-09-01

    This paper describes a study of the action of T-activin on activity of human natural killer cells (NKC) in vitro. The K-562 chronic human myeloid leukemia cells, cultured in vitro, used as targets were labeled with /sup 3/H-uridine. The experimental results indicate that T-activin can depress NKC activity but under certain conditions, it can also stimulate NKC. T-activin possesses immunoregulatory properties relative to NKC activity in vitro.

  5. The genome of Bifidobacterium pseudocatenulatum IPLA 36007, a human intestinal strain with isoflavone-activation activity

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Bifidobacterium species, including Bifidobacterium pseudocatenulatum, are among the dominant microbial populations of the human gastrointestinal tract. They are also major components of many commercial probiotic products. Resident and transient bifidobacteria are thought to have several beneficial health effects. However, our knowledge o