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Sample records for activated human peripheral

  1. Activation of the peripheral endocannabinoid system in human obesity.

    PubMed

    Engeli, Stefan; Böhnke, Jana; Feldpausch, Mareike; Gorzelniak, Kerstin; Janke, Jürgen; Bátkai, Sándor; Pacher, Pál; Harvey-White, Judy; Luft, Friedrich C; Sharma, Arya M; Jordan, Jens

    2005-10-01

    Obesity is the main risk factor for the development of type 2 diabetes. Activation of the central endocannabinoid system increases food intake and promotes weight gain. Blockade of the cannabinoid type 1 (CB-1) receptor reduces body weight in animals by central and peripheral actions; the role of the peripheral endocannabinoid system in human obesity is now being extensively investigated. We measured circulating endocannabinoid concentrations and studied the expression of CB-1 and the main degrading enzyme, fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), in adipose tissue of lean (n = 20) and obese (n = 20) women and after a 5% weight loss in a second group of women (n = 17). Circulating levels of anandamide and 1/2-arachidonoylglycerol were increased by 35 and 52% in obese compared with lean women (P < 0.05). Adipose tissue mRNA levels were reduced by -34% for CB-1 and -59% for FAAH in obese subjects (P < 0.05). A strong negative correlation was found between FAAH expression in adipose tissue and circulating endocannabinoids. Circulating endocannabinoids and CB-1 or FAAH expression were not affected by 5% weight loss. The expression of CB-1 and FAAH was increased in mature human adipocytes compared with in preadipocytes and was found in several human tissues. Our findings support the presence of a peripheral endocannabinoid system that is upregulated in human obesity.

  2. Peripheral inflammatory disease associated with centrally activated IL-1 system in humans and mice.

    PubMed

    Lampa, Jon; Westman, Marie; Kadetoff, Diana; Agréus, Anna Nordenstedt; Le Maître, Erwan; Gillis-Haegerstrand, Caroline; Andersson, Magnus; Khademi, Mohsen; Corr, Maripat; Christianson, Christina A; Delaney, Ada; Yaksh, Tony L; Kosek, Eva; Svensson, Camilla I

    2012-07-31

    During peripheral immune activation caused by an infection or an inflammatory condition, the innate immune response signals to the brain and causes an up-regulation of central nervous system (CNS) cytokine production. Central actions of proinflammatory cytokines, in particular IL-1β, are pivotal for the induction of fever and fatigue. In the present study, the influence of peripheral chronic joint inflammatory disease in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) on CNS inflammation was investigated. Intrathecal interleukin (IL)-1β concentrations were markedly elevated in RA patients compared with controls or with patients with multiple sclerosis. Conversely, the anti-inflammatory IL-1 receptor antagonist and IL-4 were decreased in RA cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Tumor necrosis factor and IL-6 levels in the CSF did not differ between patients and controls. Concerning IL-1β, CSF concentrations in RA patients were higher than in serum, indicating local production in the CNS, and there was a positive correlation between CSF IL-1β and fatigue assessments. Next, spinal inflammation in experimental arthritis was investigated. A marked increase of IL-1β, IL-18, and tumor necrosis factor, but not IL-6 mRNA production, in the spinal cord was observed, coinciding with increased arthritis scores in the KBxN serum transfer model. These data provide evidence that peripheral inflammation such as arthritis is associated with an immunological activation in the CNS in both humans and mice, suggesting a possible therapeutic target for centrally affecting conditions as fatigue in chronic inflammatory diseases, for which to date there are no specific treatments.

  3. Carvedilol differentially regulates cytokine production from activated human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shih-Ping; Ho, Ling-Jun; Cheng, Shu-Meng; Hsu, Yu-Lin; Tsao, Tien-Ping; Chang, Deh-Ming; Lai, Jenn-Haung

    2004-05-01

    Chronic inflammation is one of the important mechanisms involved in atherosclerosis formation. The activated monocytes and their secreted cytokines contribute significantly to this inflammatory process. Here we examined the effects of carvedilol, a recently introduced cardio-protective alpha-1- and beta-receptor blocker, on cytokine production from various stimuli-activated human immune effector cells. By ELISA analysis, we showed that carvedilol inhibited interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), but enhanced interleukin (IL)-12 production in phytohemagglutinin (PHA)- and concanavalin A (ConA)-stimulated human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). The production of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) was marginally affected. When purified monocytes were examined, we observed the consistent up-regulation of IL-12 production while both IL-10 and TNF-alpha were unaffected or marginally down-regulated, respectively, by carvedilol. In agreement with the observation in monocytes, the production of IL-12 from activated macrophages was also up-regulated by carvedilol. We concluded that carvedilol might mediate its therapeutic effects through differentially regulating cytokine production from activated mononuclear cells, including at least monocytes and macrophages.

  4. Bone resorptive activity of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells after fusion with polyethylene glycol.

    PubMed

    Manrique, Edwin; Castillo, Luz M; Lazala, Oswaldo; Guerrero, Carlos A; Acosta, Orlando

    2017-03-01

    The bone remodeling process occurs through bone formation by osteoblasts and bone resorption by osteoclasts, a process involving the contribution of endocrine and nervous systems. The mechanisms associated to differentiation and proliferation of osteoclasts and osteoblasts are considered a potential therapeutic target for treating some erosive bone diseases. The aim of the present study is to explore the feasibility of generating active osteoclast-like cells from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) following polyethylene glycol (PEG)-induced fusion. PEG-fused PBMCs showed TRAP(+)-multinucleated cells and bone resorption activity, and were also positive for osteoclast markers such as carbonic anhydrase II, calcitonin receptor, vacuolar ATPase, and cathepsin K, when examined by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, immunochemistry and Western blotting. TRAP expression and bone resorptive activity were higher in whole PEG-fused PBMCs than in separated T lymphocytes, B lymphocytes or monocytes. Both TRAP expression and bone resorptive activity were also higher in osteogenesis imperfecta patients compared to PEG-fused PBMCs from healthy individuals. PEG-induced fusion was more efficient in inducing TRAP and bone resorptive activities than macrophage colony-stimulating factor or dexamethasone treatment. Bone resorptive activity of PEG-fused PMBCs was inhibited by bisphosphonates. Evidence is provided that the use of PEG-based cell fusion is a straightforward and amenable method for studying human osteoclast differentiation and testing new therapeutic strategies.

  5. IL-4 induces neutrophilic maturation of HL-60 cells and activation of human peripheral blood neutrophils.

    PubMed Central

    Bober, L A; Waters, T A; Pugliese-Sivo, C C; Sullivan, L M; Narula, S K; Grace, M J

    1995-01-01

    IL-4 is a T-helper cell derived cytokine that has effects on myelomonocytic cell maturation and activation. We have studied the effect of IL-4 on neutrophilic maturation using the cell line HL-60 and found that it has a profound effect on the maturation and activation of the cell line. The treatment of HL-60 cells with recombinant hu IL-4 (0.15 to 15.0 ng/ml) induced a shift in the percentage of HL-60 cells staining positive for chloroacetate esterase enzyme activity (indicating commitment to the neutrophilic lineage). IL-4 increased surface expression of the neutrophil-lineage antigen WEM G11, the complement receptors CR3 (CD11b) and CR1 (CD35), but not for the monocyte differentiation antigen CD14. IL-4 treated HL-60 cells demonstrated enhanced Fc- and complement-mediated phagocytic capacity and increased hexose-monophosphate shunt activity. In addition, IL-4 was capable of sustaining the neutrophil maturation of HL-60 cells that had been pre-treated for 24 h with DMSO. To investigate the effect of IL-4 on the mature neutrophil, we studied freshly isolated and rested human peripheral blood neutrophils. In the absence of other stimuli, neutrophils were induced by IL-4 to have significantly elevated phagocytic responses. The response was specific since treatment with anti-human IL-4 abolished phagocytic stimulation. Finally, IL-4 treatment also stimulated resting neutrophils to migrate toward zymosan-activated serum (ZAS) and human IL-5. The results demonstrate that IL-4 is a potent maturation factor for myelocytes to become neutrophils and that IL-4 can stimulate resting mature neutrophils. PMID:7529148

  6. Antioxidant enzyme activities of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells exposed to trace elements.

    PubMed

    Kuppusamy, U R; Dharmani, M; Kanthimathi, M S; Indran, M

    2005-07-01

    The trace elements copper, zinc, and selenium are important immune modulators and essential cofactors of the antioxidant enzymes. In the present study, the proliferative effect of human peripheral mononuclear cells (PBMCs) that have been exposed to copper, zinc, and selenium and the corresponding activities of antioxidant enzymes, namely superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and catalase, were determined. Zinc and copper stimulated the PBMC proliferation in a dose-dependent manner within the dose range 25-200 micromol/L. SOD and GPx activities in PBMCs exposed to zinc were inhibited, whereas catalase activity was unaffected. All the three antioxidant enzymes in the cells exposed to copper were inhibited. Selenium exerted more potent inhibition of the cell proliferation while causing stimulation of the antioxidant enzymes at the lowest dose (25 micromol/L) than at the highest dose (200 micromol/L) tested. A significant negative correlation was observed between proliferation and antioxidant enzyme (SOD and GPx) activities in trace-element-exposed PBMC. The present findings substantiate the importance of trace elements as immune modulators and the involvement of enzymatic antioxidant system in the immune cell regulation.

  7. Activation of axonal Kv7 channels in human peripheral nerve by flupirtine but not placebo - therapeutic potential for peripheral neuropathies: results of a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Flupirtine is an analgesic with muscle-relaxing properties that activates Kv7 potassium channels. Kv7 channels are expressed along myelinated and unmyelinated peripheral axons where their activation is expected to reduce axonal excitability and potentially contribute to flupirtine’s clinical profile. Trial design To investigate the electrical excitability of peripheral myelinated axons following orally administered flupirtine, in-vitro experiments on isolated peripheral nerve segments were combined with a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, phase I clinical trial (RCT). Methods Threshold tracking was used to assess the electrical excitability of myelinated axons in isolated segments of human sural nerve in vitro and motoneurones to abductor pollicis brevis (APB) in situ in healthy subjects. In addition, the effect of flupirtine on ectopic action potential generation in myelinated axons was examined using ischemia of the lower arm. Results Flupirtine (3-30 μM) shortened the relative refractory period and increased post-conditioned superexcitability in human myelinated axons in vitro. Similarly, in healthy subjects the relative refractory period of motoneurones to APB was reduced 2 hours after oral flupirtine but not following placebo. Whether this effect was due to a direct action of flupirtine on peripheral axons or temperature could not be resolved. Flupirtine (200 mg p.o.) also reduced ectopic axonal activity induced by 10 minutes of lower arm ischemia. In particular, high frequency (ca. 200 Hz) components of EMG were reduced in the post-ischemic period. Finally, visual analogue scale ratings of sensations perceived during the post-ischemic period were reduced following flupirtine (200 mg p.o.). Conclusions Clinical doses of flupirtine reduce the excitability of peripheral myelinated axons. Trial registration ClinicalTrials registration is NCT01450865. PMID:23394517

  8. Effect of sulfur mustard exposure on protease activity in human peripheral blood lymphocytes. (Reannouncement with new availability information)

    SciTech Connect

    Cowan, F.M.; Broomfield, C.A.; Smith, W.J.

    1991-12-31

    Sulfur mustard is a chemical warfare blistering agent for which neither the mechanism of action nor an antidote is known. Papirmeister et al. (1985) have postulated a biochemical hypothesis for mustard-induced cutaneous injury involving a sequelae of DNA alkylation, metabolic disruption and activation of protease. Human peripheral blood lymphocytes in cell cultures were employed as an in vitro model for alkylating agent toxicity. A chromogenic peptide substrate assay was used for detection of protease in lymphocytes treated with sulfur mustard or chloroethyl sulfide. Exposure of human peripheral blood lymphocytes from normal donors to these alkylating agents resulted in an increase in cell associated protease activity. This increase in protease activity may contribute to the pathology or act as an indicator to predict methods of therapeutic intervention for sulfur mustard toxicity.

  9. Expression of transferrin receptors on mitogen-stimulated human peripheral blood lymphocytes: relation to cellular activation and related metabolic events.

    PubMed Central

    Galbraith, R M; Galbraith, G M

    1981-01-01

    Mitogen-activated normal human peripheral blood lymphocytes bind transferrin to specific membrane receptors. In this study, lymphocytes stimulated with phytohaemagglutinin for 0-66 hr were examined to determine the relation of this phenomenon to cellular activation and related metabolic events. Transferrin receptors were first detected at 20-24 hr. This event was consistently preceded by RNA and protein turnover which commenced during the first 6 hr of culture, whereas initiation of DNA synthesis was detected concurrently with the appearance of receptors or slightly later (24-30 hr). Exposure of cells to inhibitors of RNA and protein synthesis early during culture (at 0 or 24 hr) prevented the expression of transferrin receptors, but also caused generalized metabolic failure, and abrogated cellular activation. In contrast, later addition of these agents at 48 hr did not interfere significantly with the process of activation, but did suppress the terminal increase in receptor-bearing cells observed during the final 18 hr in control cultures lacking inhibitor. After deliberate thermal stripping of receptors from activated cells, the reappearance of membrance binding sites which normally occurred within 30 min, was also blocked by cycloheximide, puromycin and actinomycin D. However, similar inhibition of DNA which was induced by hydroxyurea had much less effect upon both the initial appearance of receptors and their reappearance after ligand-induced depletion. These results demonstrate that the appearance of transferrin receptors upon human lymphocytes is dependent upon cellular activation and requires synthesis of protein and RNA. PMID:6172372

  10. In vitro effects of 'designer' amphetamines on human peripheral blood mononuclear leukocytes proliferation and on natural killer cell activity.

    PubMed

    Gagnon, L; Lacroix, F; Chan, J; Buttar, H S

    1992-12-01

    Human peripheral blood mononuclear leukocytes (PBML) proliferation was measured in the presence or absence of amphetamines. Proliferation in response to T-cell mitogen PHA was suppressed from 22 to 34% by d- and dl-amphetamine, respectively, contrarily to 1-form which did not affect proliferation of PHA-stimulated PBML. The 'designer' amphetamines appeared to be more potent inhibitors of PBML proliferation induced by both PHA and PWM stimulation than those of the racemic and isomeric forms of amphetamine. A wide variation was seen in the suppressive actions of the 'designer' amphetamines, and the mean percentages of suppression varied from 12 to 45% compared with the control values. 4-Propoxy-amphetamine (4-PA) was found to be the most active among the 'designer' drugs. In vitro effects of d-, 1- and dl-amphetamine were also studied on natural killer (NK) cell activity. A marked increase in the NK cell activity was observed only in the presence of very low concentrations (10(-12) to 10(-10) M) of dl-amphetamine, however, the activity of the NK cell remained within the control limits in the presence of d- or 1-forms. The findings suggest that the abuse of amphetamines, especially the 'designer' drugs, may adversely affect the activity of immunoregulatory cells and might lead to a compromised immune system in amphetamine abusers.

  11. PSP activates monocytes in resting human peripheral blood mononuclear cells: immunomodulatory implications for cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Sekhon, Bhagwant Kaur; Sze, Daniel Man-Yuen; Chan, Wing Keung; Fan, Kei; Li, George Qian; Moore, Douglas Edwin; Roubin, Rebecca Heidi

    2013-06-15

    Polysaccharopeptide (PSP), from Coriolus versicolor, has been used as an adjuvant to chemotherapy, and has demonstrated anti-tumor and immunomodulating effects. However its mechanism remains unknown. To elucidate how PSP affects immune populations, we compared PSP treatments both with and without prior incubation in phytohaemagglutinin (PHA) - a process commonly used in immune population experimentation. We first standardised a capillary electrophoresis fingerprinting technique for PSP identification and characterisation. We then established the proliferative capability of PSP on various immune populations in peripheral blood mononuclear cells, using flow cytometry, without prior PHA treatment. It was found that PSP significantly increased the number of monocytes (CD14(+)/CD16(-)) compared to controls without PHA. This increase in monocytes was confirmed using another antibody panel of CD14 and MHCII. In contrast, proliferations of T-cells, NK, and B-cells were not significantly changed by PSP. Thus, stimulating monocyte/macrophage function with PSP could be an effective therapeutic intervention in targeting tumors.

  12. Thymic hormonal activity on human peripheral blood lymphocytes, in vitro. I. Reciprocal effect on T and B rosette formation.

    PubMed Central

    Shoham, J; Cohen, M; Chandali, Y; Avni, A

    1980-01-01

    One hour incubation with the thymic extract TP-1 induced reciprocal effect on B and T rosette formation in lymphocytes of human peripheral blood. The percentage of mouse erythrocyte rosette-forming cells among lymphocytes of chronic lymphatic leukaemia was decreased by TP-1 from 54.5% to 27.1% (P < 0.001). No such effect was observed in healthy adult or cord blood lymphocytes. On the other hand, the percentage of sheep erythrocyte rosette forming cells increased significantly after TP-1 treatment, but only under conditions of active rosette formation and not in the total rosette assay. This increase was highly significant in three conditions with relative deficiency of cell-mediated immunity: newborns (17.1 to 28.3%), cancer patients (24.5 to 31.7%) and patients with lepromatous leprosy (19.8 to 31.8%). Only a small increase was noticed in healthy adults. A similarly prepared spleen extract was not active in either B or T rosette assays. PMID:6969219

  13. Effects of active bufadienolide compounds on human cancer cells and CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells in mitogen-activated human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Bo; He, Jing; Kisoh, Keishi; Hayashi, Hideki; Tanaka, Sachiko; Si, Nan; Zhao, Hai-Yu; Hirano, Toshihiko; Bian, Baolin; Takagi, Norio

    2016-09-01

    The growth inhibitory effects of bufadienolide compounds were investigated in two intractable cancer cells, a human glioblastoma cell line U-87 and a pancreatic cancer cell line SW1990. Among four bufadienolide compounds, a dose-dependent cytotoxicity was observed in these cancer cells after treatment with gamabufotalin and arenobufagin. The IC50 values of the two compounds were 3-5 times higher in normal peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) than these values for both cancer cell lines. However, similar phenomena were not observed for two other bufadienolide compounds, telocinobufagin and bufalin. These results thus suggest that gamabufotalin and arenobufagin possess selective cytotoxic activity against tumor cells rather than normal cells. Moreover, a clear dose-dependent lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release, a well-known hallmark of necrosis, was observed in both cancer cells treated with gamabufotalin, suggesting that gamabufotalin-mediated cell death is predominantly associated with a necrosis-like phenotype. Of most importance, treatment with as little as 8 ng/ml of gamabufotalin, even an almost non-toxic concentration to PBMCs, efficiently downregulated the percentages of CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ regulator T (Treg) cells in mitogen-activated PBMCs. Given that Treg cells play a critical role in tumor immunotolerance by suppressing antitumor immunity, these results suggest that gamabufotalin may serve as a promising candidate, as an adjuvant therapeutic agent by manipulating Treg cells to enhance the efficacy of conventional anticancer drugs and lessen their side-effects. These findings provide insights into the clinical application of gamabufotalin for cancer patients with glioblastoma/pancreatic cancer based on its cytocidal effect against tumor cells as well as its depletion of Treg cells.

  14. Ellagic Acid, a Dietary Polyphenol, Inhibits Tautomerase Activity of Human Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor and Its Pro-inflammatory Responses in Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Souvik; Siddiqui, Asim A; Mazumder, Somnath; De, Rudranil; Saha, Shubhra J; Banerjee, Chinmoy; Iqbal, Mohd S; Adhikari, Susanta; Alam, Athar; Roy, Siddhartha; Bandyopadhyay, Uday

    2015-05-27

    Ellagic acid (EA), a phenolic lactone, inhibited tautomerase activity of human macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) noncompetitively (Ki = 1.97 ± 0.7 μM). The binding of EA to MIF was determined by following the quenching of tryptophan fluorescence. We synthesized several EA derivatives, and their structure-activity relationship studies indicated that the planar conjugated lactone moiety of EA was essential for MIF inhibition. MIF induces nuclear translocation of NF-κB and chemotaxis of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) to promote inflammation. We were interested in evaluating the effect of EA on nuclear translocation of NF-κB and chemotactic activity in human PBMCs in the presence of MIF. The results showed that EA inhibited MIF-induced NF-κB nuclear translocation in PBMCs, as evident from confocal immunofluorescence microscopic data. EA also inhibited MIF-mediated chemotaxis of PBMCs. Thus, we report MIF-inhibitory activity of EA and inhibition of MIF-mediated proinflammatory responses in PBMCs by EA.

  15. Immunomodulatory properties of human serum immunoglobulin A: anti-inflammatory and pro-inflammatory activities in human monocytes and peripheral blood mononuclear cells

    PubMed Central

    Olas, K; Butterweck, H; Teschner, W; Schwarz, H P; Reipert, B M

    2005-01-01

    Our study investigated the immunomodulatory activities of human plasma-derived serum immunoglobulin (Ig)A. Previous findings seem contradictory indicating either pro- or anti-inflammatory activities. We used serum IgA purified from large plasma pools and studied the modulation of the release of cytokines and chemokines from resting and lipopolysaccharide (LPS, endotoxin)-stimulated human adherent monocytes and human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). Our results indicate that IgA down-modulates the release of the pro-inflammatory chemokines monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP) 1, macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP) 1α and MIP1β from LPS-stimulated PBMC and the release of MCP1, MIP1α and MIP1β from LPS-stimulated monocytes. Furthermore, we confirmed previous reports that plasma-derived serum IgA down-modulates the release of the pro-inflammatory cytokines, interleukin (IL)-6 and tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α, from LPS-stimulated monocytes and PBMC, and up-regulates the release of IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1RA) from resting and LPS-stimulated monocytes and resting PBMC. This IgA-mediated up-regulation of IL-1RA is independent of the simultaneous up-regulation of IL-1β release, as shown by blocking the biological activity of IL-1β with a neutralizing antibody. On the other hand, we also found an IgA-induced pro-inflammatory activity, namely IgA-mediated up-regutation of the release of pro-inflammatory IL-1β as well as down-regulation of the anti-inflammatory cytokines IL-10 and IL-12p40 from LPS-stimulated monocytes and PBMC and a down-regulation of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β from resting and LPS-stimulated PBMC. We conclude that human serum IgA has both an anti-inflammatory and a pro-inflammatory capacity and this dual capacity might contribute to the feedback mechanisms maintaining a balance between pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory activities. PMID:15932509

  16. Human skin: an independent peripheral endocrine organ.

    PubMed

    Zouboulis, C C

    2000-01-01

    The historical picture of the endocrine system as a set of discrete hormone-producing organs has been substituted by organs regarded as organized communities in which the cells emit, receive and coordinate molecular signals from established endocrine organs, other distant sources, their neighbors, and themselves. In this wide sense, the human skin and its tissues are targets as well as producers of hormones. Although the role of hormones in the development of human skin and its capacity to produce and release hormones are well established, little attention has been drawn to the ability of human skin to fulfil the requirements of a classic endocrine organ. Indeed, human skin cells produce insulin-like growth factors and -binding proteins, propiomelanocortin derivatives, catecholamines, steroid hormones and vitamin D from cholesterol, retinoids from diet carotenoids, and eicosanoids from fatty acids. Hormones exert their biological effects on the skin through interaction with high-affinity receptors, such as receptors for peptide hormones, neurotransmitters, steroid hormones and thyroid hormones. In addition, the human skin is able to metabolize hormones and to activate and inactivate them. These steps are overtaken in most cases by different skin cell populations in a coordinated way indicating the endocrine autonomy of the skin. Characteristic examples are the metabolic pathways of the corticotropin-releasing hormone/propiomelanocortin axis, steroidogenesis, vitamin D, and retinoids. Hormones exhibit a wide range of biological activities on the skin, with major effects caused by growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor-1, neuropeptides, sex steroids, glucocorticoids, retinoids, vitamin D, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor ligands, and eicosanoids. At last, human skin produces hormones which are released in the circulation and are important for functions of the entire organism, such as sex hormones, especially in aged individuals, and insulin-like growth

  17. Polyclonal activation of human peripheral blood B lymphocytes by formaldehyde-fixed Salmonella paratyphi B. I. Immunoglobulin production without DNA synthesis

    PubMed Central

    1981-01-01

    A "new" polyclonal activator of human peripheral blood B cells, formaldehyde-fixed Salmonella paratyphi B, is described. This bacterium does not stimulate cell proliferation as measured by incorporation of tritiated thymidine but does stimulate a subpopulation of B cells to secrete large amounts of IgM, IgG, and IgA in 7-day cell cultures. The immunoglobulins (Ig) produced by cells responding to S. paratyphi B are not specific antibodies against the bacterial antigens. In comparison with other B cell activators (pokeweed mitogen, Staphylococcus aureus Cowan I, and lipopolysaccharide), S. paratyphi B stimulation produced greater amounts of IgM but less IgG than pokeweed mitogen (PWM) or S. aureus Cowan I; lipopolysaccharide failed to stimulate significant Ig production on day 7 in most cases. In addition, the response to S. paratyphi apparently did not require T cell collaboration. These results suggest that the B cell subpopulation(s) responding to S. paratyphi B may be more differentiated B cells than those responding to either PWM or S. aureus Cowan I. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells from five patients with common variable immunodeficiency without evidence of abnormal suppressor T cells or monocytes failed to respond to S. paratyphi B, whereas cells from two of the same patients responded well to S. aureus Cowan I and partially to PWM. Thus, S. paratyphi B appears to be superior to other B cell activators for studies of B cell function in normal and abnormal states. PMID:6972434

  18. Suppression by Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol of the primary immunoglobulin M response by human peripheral blood B cells is associated with impaired STAT3 activation.

    PubMed

    Ngaotepprutaram, Thitirat; Kaplan, Barbara L F; Carney, Stephen; Crawford, Robert; Kaminski, Norbert E

    2013-08-09

    This study was undertaken to gain insights into the mechanism for Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ(9)-THC)-mediated suppression of primary immunoglobulin M (IgM) responses in humans. An in vitro activation model, which employs cell surface-expressed CD40 ligand (CD40L) and recombinant cytokines (interleukin (IL)-2, -6, and -10), was used to differentiate human peripheral blood (HPB) naïve B cells into IgM secreting cells. Pretreatment with Δ(9)-THC significantly decreased the number of IgM secreting cells as determined by ELISPOT. The attenuation of IgM secretion by Δ(9)-THC involved, at least in part, the impairment of plasma cell differentiation as evidenced by suppression of immunoglobulin joining chain (IgJ) mRNA expression. The analysis at each of two different stages critically involved in plasma cell differentiation indicates that Δ(9)-THC impaired both the primary activation stage and proliferation of B cells. Interestingly, Δ(9)-THC selectively suppressed the surface expression of CD80, but not other measured B-cell activation markers (CD69, CD86, and ICAM1). Furthermore, pretreatment with Δ(9)-THC was accompanied by a robust decrease of STAT3 phosphorylation, whereas the phosphorylation of the p65 NFκB subunit was not affected. Collectively, these data provide new insights into the mechanisms for impaired B cell function by Δ(9)-THC.

  19. Human beta-mannosidase deficiency associated with peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Levade, T; Graber, D; Flurin, V; Delisle, M B; Pieraggi, M T; Testut, M F; Carrière, J P; Salvayre, R

    1994-01-01

    Human beta-mannosidosis is an inherited lysosomal storage disorder described in only seven families. We present a further case in a black African 14-year-old boy with severely deficient beta-mannosidase activity, bilateral thenar and hypothenar amyotrophy, electrophysiologically demonstrable demyelinating peripheral neuropathy, and cytoplasmic vacuolation of skin fibroblasts and lymphoid cells. The clinical and biochemical features of our patient are compared to those of previously reported patients.

  20. Activation of peripheral blood neutrophils and lymphocytes by human procathepsin D and insulin-like growth factor II.

    PubMed

    Vĕtvicka, V; Fusek, M

    1994-07-01

    Cathepsin D, a lysosomal aspartic proteinase, is well known to be overexpressed and secreted in the form of its zymogen by many types of human breast cancer tissues. In the cell lines derived from these tissues, cathepsin D functions as an autocrine mitogen, and it was suggested that its secretion might pose some physiological functions. Recently we have identified the presence of procathepsin D in human breast milk and similar findings were reported for bovine milk which imply also some physiological function. Thus, we have tested the influence of procathepsin D and insulin-like growth factor II on the expression of CD11a, CD11b, FcRI, CD62L, and HLA-DR surface determinants on neutrophils and lymphocytes. We have used procathepsin D purified from the secretions of breast cancer cell line ZR-75-1 and commercially available IGF II. Our results showed that both studied factors significantly influence the expression of tested surface molecules.

  1. Effect of Blood Component Coatings of Enosseal Implants on Proliferation and Synthetic Activity of Human Osteoblasts and Cytokine Production of Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hulejova, Hana; Bartova, Jirina; Riedel, Tomas; Pesakova, Vlasta

    2016-01-01

    The study monitored in vitro early response of connective tissue cells and immunocompetent cells to enosseal implant materials coated by different blood components (serum, activated plasma, and plasma/platelets) to evaluate human osteoblast proliferation and synthetic activity and inflammatory response presented as a cytokine profile of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) under conditions imitating the situation upon implantation. The cells were cultivated on coated Ti-plasma-sprayed (Ti-PS), Ti-etched (Ti-Etch), Ti-hydroxyapatite (Ti-HA), and ZrO2 surfaces. The plasma/platelets coating supported osteoblast proliferation only on osteoconductive Ti-HA and Ti-Etch whereas activated plasma enhanced proliferation on all surfaces. Differentiation (BAP) and IL-8 production remained unchanged or decreased irrespective of the coating and surface; only the serum and plasma/platelets-coated ZrO2 exhibited higher BAP and IL-8 expression. RANKL production increased on serum and activated plasma coatings. PBMCs produced especially cytokines playing role in inflammatory phase of wound healing, that is, IL-6, GRO-α, GRO, ENA-78, IL-8, GM-CSF, EGF, and MCP-1. Cytokine profiles were comparable for all tested surfaces; only ENA-78, IL-8, GM-CSF, and MCP-1 expression depended on materials and coatings. The activated plasma coating led to uniformed surfaces and represented a favorable treatment especially for bioinert Ti-PS and ZrO2 whereas all coatings had no distinctive effect on bioactive Ti-HA and Ti-Etch. PMID:27651560

  2. Purification of basophils from peripheral human blood.

    PubMed

    Falcone, Franco H; Gibbs, Bernhard F

    2014-01-01

    The purification of basophils from peripheral blood has represented a formidable challenge for researchers since they were discovered by Paul Ehrlich in 1879. From the first published attempts in the late 1960s, it took half a century to develop robust protocols able to provide sufficient numbers of pure, functionally unimpaired basophils. The existing protocols for basophil purification exploit those properties of basophils which distinguish them from other cell types such as their localization in blood, density, and the presence or absence of surface markers. Purification techniques have been used in various combinations and variations to achieve a common goal in mind: to obtain a pure population of human basophils in sufficient numbers for downstream studies. The arduous way leading up to the modern protocols is summarized in this historical retrospective. A fast protocol for purification of basophils to near homogeneity is also described.

  3. Mobilization of Copper ions by Flavonoids in Human Peripheral Lymphocytes Leads to Oxidative DNA Breakage: A Structure Activity Study.

    PubMed

    Arif, Hussain; Rehmani, Nida; Farhan, Mohd; Ahmad, Aamir; Hadi, Sheikh Mumtaz

    2015-11-09

    Epidemiological studies have linked dietary consumption of plant polyphenols with lower incidence of various cancers. In particular, flavonoids (present in onion, tomato and other plant sources) induce apoptosis and cytotoxicity in cancer cells. These can therefore be used as lead compounds for the synthesis of novel anticancer drugs with greater bioavailability. In the present study, we examined the chemical basis of cytotoxicity of flavonoids by studying the structure-activity relationship of myricetin (MN), fisetin (FN), quercetin (QN), kaempferol (KL) and galangin (GN). Using single cell alkaline gel electrophoresis (comet assay), we established the relative efficiency of cellular DNA breakage as MN > FN > QN > KL > GN. Also, we determined that the cellular DNA breakage was the result of mobilization of chromatin-bound copper ions and the generation of reactive oxygen species. The relative DNA binding affinity order was further confirmed using molecular docking and thermodynamic studies through the interaction of flavonoids with calf thymus DNA. Our results suggest that novel anti-cancer molecules should have ortho-dihydroxy groups in B-ring and hydroxyl groups at positions 3 and 5 in the A-ring system. Additional hydroxyl groups at other positions further enhance the cellular cytotoxicity of the flavonoids.

  4. Mobilization of Copper ions by Flavonoids in Human Peripheral Lymphocytes Leads to Oxidative DNA Breakage: A Structure Activity Study

    PubMed Central

    Arif, Hussain; Rehmani, Nida; Farhan, Mohd; Ahmad, Aamir; Hadi, Sheikh Mumtaz

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have linked dietary consumption of plant polyphenols with lower incidence of various cancers. In particular, flavonoids (present in onion, tomato and other plant sources) induce apoptosis and cytotoxicity in cancer cells. These can therefore be used as lead compounds for the synthesis of novel anticancer drugs with greater bioavailability. In the present study, we examined the chemical basis of cytotoxicity of flavonoids by studying the structure–activity relationship of myricetin (MN), fisetin (FN), quercetin (QN), kaempferol (KL) and galangin (GN). Using single cell alkaline gel electrophoresis (comet assay), we established the relative efficiency of cellular DNA breakage as MN > FN > QN > KL > GN. Also, we determined that the cellular DNA breakage was the result of mobilization of chromatin-bound copper ions and the generation of reactive oxygen species. The relative DNA binding affinity order was further confirmed using molecular docking and thermodynamic studies through the interaction of flavonoids with calf thymus DNA. Our results suggest that novel anti-cancer molecules should have ortho-dihydroxy groups in B-ring and hydroxyl groups at positions 3 and 5 in the A-ring system. Additional hydroxyl groups at other positions further enhance the cellular cytotoxicity of the flavonoids. PMID:26569217

  5. [Enterobacterial antigen in human peripheral blood lymphocytes].

    PubMed

    Faure-Fontenla, M A; García-Tamayo, F

    1989-11-01

    The following study has as prior history the research reports which have shown the existence of an antigenic tissue deposit in gram-negative enterobacteria. The antigens of the enterobacteria have also been found in the lymphocytic membranes and cytoplasm. Since intestinal lymphoid tissue cells can recirculate by means of the thoracic duct to the peripheral venous system, it was proposed that the circulating lymphocytes in healthy people could also contain small amounts of a common enterobacterial antigen. The study was carried out in 15 human venous blood samples, of which the lymphocytic population was separated to later be used in the preparation of 15 alcohol soluble extracts. This material was used for inhibiting the immuno-hemolysis assay in three occasions in order to show the presence of antigens shared by different enterobacterias, using as reference a fraction separated from the LPS of Escherichia coli 08. The results showed that the human lymphocytes also had antigenic determinants common to gram-negative bacteria.

  6. Use of a human plaque-forming cell assay to study peripheral blood bursa-equivalent cell activation and excessive suppressor cell activity in humoral immunodeficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Herrod, H G; Buckley, R H

    1979-01-01

    A plaque assay that detects human mononuclear blood cells producing immunoglobulin (Ig)M antibody to sheep erythrocytes was investigated for its usefulness in studying B-cell activation and regulation in 24 patients with humoral immunodeficiency. Cells from 3 of 15 patients with common variable agammaglobulinemia produced some plaques (range 40--160/10(6) cells; normal range 80--1240/10(6)), but those from the other 12, from all 7 with x-linked agammaglobulinemia and from the 2 with x-linked immunodeficiency with hyper-IgM failed to produce any detectable plaques. In co-cultures of patient and normal cells a very good correlation was seen between results of the plaque assay and an IgM biosynthesis assay in detecting excessive suppressor cell activity. Cells from 7 of 15 common variable agammaglobulinemics, from 3 of 7 x-linked agammaglobulinemics, and from both patients with hyper-IgM caused significant suppression of IgM biosynthesis and(or) plaque formation by normal cells. The observations in the last two groups and discordance for excess suppressor activity in identical twins with common variable agammaglobulinemia suggest that the activity develops secondarily to whatever their primary defects may be. Culturing non-T cells from common variable agammaglobulinemics exhibiting excessive suppressor cell activity with normal T cells resulted in plaque formation in four of five patients so studied; in all five the suppressor activity was found in the T-cell population. The availability of a plaque assay for the study of blood cells from immunodeficient patients provides a new probe to examine the cellular nature of such defects. PMID:376549

  7. Augmentation by interleukin-18 of MHC-nonrestricted killer activity of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells in response to interleukin-12.

    PubMed

    Singh, S M; Yanagawa, H; Hanibuchi, M; Miki, T; Okamura, H; Sone, S

    2000-01-01

    Interleukin (IL)-18 is a novel cytokine with pleiotropic functions. In the present study, we examined the induction of the killer activity of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (MNC) against lung cancer cell lines upon treatment with IL-18 in combination with IL-12. Cytotoxic activity was measured by standard (51)Cr release assay. IL-18 (100 ng/ml) was found to significantly augment IL-12-induced killer activity in a MHC-nonrestricted manner against allogeneic NK-resistant Daudi cells and lung cancer cell lines: SBC-3, RERF-LC-AI and A549. IL-18 could augment IL-12-induced killer activity both at the optimal as well as suboptimal doses of the latter. However, IL-18 was found to have little effect on the killer activity of MNC induced by optimal or suboptimal dose of IL-2 or IL-15. Treatment of MNC with IL-18 in combination with IL-12 for a period of more than 4 days was observed to optimally induce the killer activity. As for induction of IFN-gamma production by MNC, IL-18 augmented that induced by IL-2 and IL-15, as well as that induced by IL-12. These results show the potential of IL-18 in combination with IL-12 for clinical application in treatment of cancer.

  8. Renalase regulates peripheral and central dopaminergic activities.

    PubMed

    Quelhas-Santos, Janete; Serrão, Maria Paula; Soares-Silva, Isabel; Fernandes-Cerqueira, Cátia; Simões-Silva, Liliana; Pinho, Maria João; Remião, Fernando; Sampaio-Maia, Benedita; Desir, Gary V; Pestana, Manuel

    2015-01-15

    Renalase is a recently identified FAD/NADH-dependent amine oxidase mainly expressed in kidney that is secreted into blood and urine where it was suggested to metabolize catecholamines. The present study evaluated central and peripheral dopaminergic activities in the renalase knockout (KO) mouse model and examined the changes induced by recombinant renalase (RR) administration on plasma and urine catecholamine levels. Compared with wild-type (WT) mice, KO mice presented increased plasma levels of epinephrine (Epi), norepinephrine (NE), and dopamine (DA) that were accompanied by increases in the urinary excretion of Epi, NE, DA. In addition, the KO mice presented an increase in urinary DA-to-l-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (l-DOPA) ratios without changes in renal tubular aromatic-l-amino acid decarboxylase (AADC) activity. By contrast, the in vivo administration of RR (1.5 mg/kg sc) to KO mice was accompanied by significant decreases in plasma levels of Epi, DA, and l-DOPA as well as in urinary excretion of Epi, DA, and DA-to-l-DOPA ratios notwithstanding the accompanied increase in renal AADC activity. In addition, the increase in renal DA output observed in renalase KO mice was accompanied by an increase in the expression of the L-type amino acid transporter like (LAT) 1 that is reversed by the administration of RR in these animals. These results suggest that the overexpression of LAT1 in the renal cortex of the renalase KO mice might contribute to the enhanced l-DOPA availability/uptake and consequently to the activation of the renal dopaminergic system in the presence of renalase deficiency.

  9. Renalase regulates peripheral and central dopaminergic activities

    PubMed Central

    Serrão, Maria Paula; Soares-Silva, Isabel; Fernandes-Cerqueira, Cátia; Simões-Silva, Liliana; Pinho, Maria João; Remião, Fernando; Sampaio-Maia, Benedita; Desir, Gary V.; Pestana, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Renalase is a recently identified FAD/NADH-dependent amine oxidase mainly expressed in kidney that is secreted into blood and urine where it was suggested to metabolize catecholamines. The present study evaluated central and peripheral dopaminergic activities in the renalase knockout (KO) mouse model and examined the changes induced by recombinant renalase (RR) administration on plasma and urine catecholamine levels. Compared with wild-type (WT) mice, KO mice presented increased plasma levels of epinephrine (Epi), norepinephrine (NE), and dopamine (DA) that were accompanied by increases in the urinary excretion of Epi, NE, DA. In addition, the KO mice presented an increase in urinary DA-to-l-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (l-DOPA) ratios without changes in renal tubular aromatic-l-amino acid decarboxylase (AADC) activity. By contrast, the in vivo administration of RR (1.5 mg/kg sc) to KO mice was accompanied by significant decreases in plasma levels of Epi, DA, and l-DOPA as well as in urinary excretion of Epi, DA, and DA-to-l-DOPA ratios notwithstanding the accompanied increase in renal AADC activity. In addition, the increase in renal DA output observed in renalase KO mice was accompanied by an increase in the expression of the L-type amino acid transporter like (LAT) 1 that is reversed by the administration of RR in these animals. These results suggest that the overexpression of LAT1 in the renal cortex of the renalase KO mice might contribute to the enhanced l-DOPA availability/uptake and consequently to the activation of the renal dopaminergic system in the presence of renalase deficiency. PMID:25411385

  10. High concentration of branched-chain amino acids promotes oxidative stress, inflammation and migration of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells via mTORC1 activation.

    PubMed

    Zhenyukh, Olha; Civantos, Esther; Ruiz-Ortega, Marta; Sánchez, Maria Soledad; Vázquez, Clotilde; Peiró, Concepción; Egido, Jesús; Mas, Sebastián

    2017-03-01

    Leucine, isoleucine and valine are essential aminoacids termed branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) due to its aliphatic side-chain. In several pathological and physiological conditions increased BCAA plasma concentrations have been described. Elevated BCAA levels predict insulin resistance development. Moreover, BCAA levels higher than 2mmol/L are neurotoxic by inducing microglial activation in maple syrup urine disease. However, there are no studies about the direct effects of BCAA in circulating cells. We have explored whether BCAA could promote oxidative stress and pro-inflammatory status in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) obtained from healthy donors. In cultured PBMCs, 10mmol/L BCAA increased the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) via both NADPH oxidase and the mitochondria, and activated Akt-mTOR signalling. By using several inhibitors and activators of these molecular pathways we have described that mTOR activation by BCAA is linked to ROS production and mitochondrial dysfunction. BCAA stimulated the activation of the redox-sensitive transcription factor NF-κB, which resulted in the release of pro-inflammatory molecules, such as interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-α, intracellular adhesion molecule-1 or CD40L, and the migration of PBMCs. In conclusion, elevated BCAA blood levels can promote the activation of circulating PBMCs, by a mechanism that involving ROS production and NF-κB pathway activation. These data suggest that high concentrations of BCAA could exert deleterious effects on circulating blood cells and therefore contribute to the pro-inflammatory and oxidative status observed in several pathophysiological conditions.

  11. Combined use of an immunotoxin and cyclosporine to prevent both activated and quiescent peripheral blood T cells from producing type 1 human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed Central

    Bell, K D; Ramilo, O; Vitetta, E S

    1993-01-01

    Two different populations of infected T cells are present in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals: activated cells that produce virions and quiescent cells that harbor the viral genome but are unable to produce virus unless they are activated. Using an in vitro model of acute HIV infection, we have evaluated the effect of depleting activated T cells with an immunotoxin and subsequently inhibiting activation of quiescent T cells with an immunosuppressive agent. CD25 (Tac, p55), the alpha chain of the interleukin 2 receptor, is expressed on activated, but not quiescent, T cells. An anti-CD25-ricin A chain immunotoxin eliminated activated, CD25+ HIV-infected cells and, thereby, inhibited viral production by these cells. Subsequent addition of cyclosporine to the residual CD25- cells prevented their activation and thereby suppressed their ability to produce virus and to propagate the infection to uninfected T cells. Images PMID:8434001

  12. Peripheral sounds rapidly activate visual cortex: evidence from electrocorticography.

    PubMed

    Brang, David; Towle, Vernon L; Suzuki, Satoru; Hillyard, Steven A; Di Tusa, Senneca; Dai, Zhongtian; Tao, James; Wu, Shasha; Grabowecky, Marcia

    2015-11-01

    Neurophysiological studies with animals suggest that sounds modulate activity in primary visual cortex in the presence of concurrent visual stimulation. Noninvasive neuroimaging studies in humans have similarly shown that sounds modulate activity in visual areas even in the absence of visual stimuli or visual task demands. However, the spatial and temporal limitations of these noninvasive methods prevent the determination of how rapidly sounds activate early visual cortex and what information about the sounds is relayed there. Using spatially and temporally precise measures of local synaptic activity acquired from depth electrodes in humans, we demonstrate that peripherally presented sounds evoke activity in the anterior portion of the contralateral, but not ipsilateral, calcarine sulcus within 28 ms of sound onset. These results suggest that auditory stimuli rapidly evoke spatially specific activity in visual cortex even in the absence of concurrent visual stimulation or visual task demands. This rapid auditory-evoked activation of primary visual cortex is likely to be mediated by subcortical pathways or direct cortical projections from auditory to visual areas.

  13. Natural OX40L expressed on human T cell leukemia virus type-I-immortalized T cell lines interferes with infection of activated peripheral blood mononuclear cells by CCR5-utilizing human immunodeficiency virus

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background OX40 ligand (OX40L) co-stimulates and differentiates T cells via ligation of OX40 that is transiently induced on T cells upon activation, resulting in prolonged T cell survival and enhanced cytokine production by T cells. This view has led to the targeting of OX40 as a strategy to boost antigen specific T cells in the context of vaccination. In addition, the ligation of OX40 has also been shown to inhibit infection by CCR5-utilizing (R5) but not CXCR4-utilizing (X4) human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) via enhancement of production of CCR5-binding β-chemokines. It was reasoned that human T cell leukemia virus type-I (HTLV-1) immortalized T cell lines that express high levels of OX40L could serve as an unique source of physiologically functional OX40L. The fact that HTLV-1+ T cell lines simultaneously also express high levels of OX40 suggested a potential limitation. Results Results of our studies showed that HTLV-1+ T cell lines bound exogenous OX40 but not OX40L, indicating that HTLV-1+ T cell lines express an active form of OX40L but an inactive form of OX40. Anti-OX40 non-blocking monoclonal antibody (mAb), but not blocking mAb, stained HTLV-1+ T cell lines, suggesting that the OX40 might be saturated with endogenous OX40L. Functionality of the OX40L was confirmed by the fact that a paraformaldehyde (PFA)-fixed HTLV-1+ T cell lines inhibited the infection of autologous activated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) with R5 HIV-1 which was reversed by either anti-OX40L blocking mAb or a mixture of neutralizing mAbs against CCR5-binding β-chemokines. Conclusions Altogether, these results demonstrated that autologous T cell lines immortalized by HTLV-1 can be utilized as a conventional source of physiologically functional OX40L. PMID:24238037

  14. Prokineticins in central and peripheral control of human reproduction.

    PubMed

    Traboulsi, Wael; Brouillet, Sophie; Sergent, Frederic; Boufettal, Houssine; Samouh, Naima; Aboussaouira, Touria; Hoffmann, Pascale; Feige, Jean Jacques; Benharouga, Mohamed; Alfaidy, Nadia

    2015-11-01

    Prokineticin 1 (PROK1) and (PROK2), are two closely related proteins that were identified as the mammalian homologs of their two amphibian homologs, mamba intestinal toxin (MIT-1) and Bv8. PROKs activate two G-protein linked receptors (prokineticin receptor 1 and 2, PROKR1 and PROKR2). Both PROK1 and PROK2 have been found to regulate a stunning array of biological functions. In particular, PROKs stimulate gastrointestinal motility, thus accounting for their family name "prokineticins". PROK1 acts as a potent angiogenic mitogen, thus earning its other name, endocrine gland-derived vascular endothelial factor. In contrast, PROK2 signaling pathway has been shown to be a critical regulator of olfactory bulb morphogenesis and sexual maturation. During the last decade, strong evidences established the key roles of prokineticins in the control of human central and peripheral reproductive processes. PROKs act as main regulators of the physiological functions of the ovary, uterus, placenta, and testis, with marked dysfunctions in various pathological conditions such as recurrent pregnancy loss, and preeclampsia. PROKs have also been associated to the tumor development of some of these organs. In the central system, prokineticins control the migration of GnRH neurons, a key process that controls reproductive functions. Importantly, mutations in PROK2 and PROKR2 are associated to the development of Kallmann syndrome, with direct consequences on the reproductive system. This review describes the finely tuned actions of prokineticins in the control of the central and peripheral reproductive processes. Also, it discusses future research directions for the use of these cytokines as diagnostic markers for several reproductive diseases.

  15. Mouse forward genetics in the study of the peripheral nervous system and human peripheral neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Douglas, Darlene S.; Popko, Brian

    2009-01-01

    Forward genetics, the phenotype-driven approach to investigating gene identity and function, has a long history in mouse genetics. Random mutations in the mouse transcend bias about gene function and provide avenues towards unique discoveries. The study of the peripheral nervous system is no exception; from historical strains such as the trembler mouse, which led to the identification of PMP22 as a human disease gene causing multiple forms of peripheral neuropathy, to the more recent identification of the claw paw and sprawling mutations, forward genetics has long been a tool for probing the physiology, pathogenesis, and genetics of the PNS. Even as spontaneous and mutagenized mice continue to enable the identification of novel genes, provide allelic series for detailed functional studies, and generate models useful for clinical research, new methods, such as the piggyBac transposon, are being developed to further harness the power of forward genetics. PMID:18481175

  16. Photoacoustic tomography of small-animal and human peripheral joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xueding; Chamberland, David L.; Fowlkes, J. Brian; Carson, Paul L.; Jamadar, David A.

    2008-02-01

    As an emerging imaging technology that combines the merits of both light and ultrasound, photoacoustic tomography (PAT) holds promise for screening and diagnosis of inflammatory joint diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis. In this study, the feasibility of PAT in imaging small-animal joints and human peripheral joints in a noninvasive manner was explored. Ex vivo rat tail and fresh cadaveric human finger joints were imaged. Based on the intrinsic optical contrast, intra- and extra-articular tissue structures in the joints were visualized successfully. Using light in the near-infrared region, the imaging depth of PAT is sufficient for cross-sectional imaging of a human peripheral joint as a whole organ. PAT, as a novel imaging modality with unique advantages, may contribute significantly to the early diagnosis of inflammatory joint disorders and accurate monitoring of disease progression and response to therapy.

  17. Identification of functional antigenic segments of toxic shock syndrome toxin 1 by differential immunoreactivity and by differential mitogenic responses of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells, using active toxin fragments.

    PubMed Central

    Edwin, C; Kass, E H

    1989-01-01

    When toxic shock syndrome toxin 1 was subjected to papain hydrolysis, two serologically active fragments of 16.3 kilodaltons (16K fragment) and 12.4 kilodaltons (12K fragment) were generated, whereas a third fragment of 9.7 kilodaltons (10K fragment) was inactive. The biologic activities of the fragments were evaluated in vitro by determining their ability to promote nonspecific proliferation of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. The 12K fragment was significantly (P less than or equal to 0.013) more stimulatory than the 16K fragment. When human peripheral blood mononuclear cells were preincubated for a period of 24 h with various concentrations of the 16K fragment, followed by incubation with a constant amount (2 x 10(-2) ng/ml) of whole toxin, the level of DNA synthesis induced by the holotoxin was reduced by approximately 60% when compared with that of controls exposed to whole toxin alone. The 12K fragment did not demonstrate a similar blocking effect. Immunoblots of the toxic shock syndrome toxin 1 digest, which were exposed to monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) developed against native toxin, depicted the presence of two different antigenic regions (epitopes). One MAb, 8-5-7, which has been shown previously to inhibit the biologic activity of the holotoxin in vitro and in vivo, reacted primarily with the 12K fragment. A second MAb, 10-6-1, that did not neutralize interleukin-1 production reacted primarily with the 16K fragment. On the basis of the differential mitogenic responses and the identification of heterologous epitopes, it was concluded that the functional region of the holotoxin can be partitioned into at least two functional segments encompassed between amino acid residues 53 and 87 and between amino acid residues 88 and 194 on the polypeptide chain. Images PMID:2731989

  18. Evaluation of 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) adduct levels and DNA strand breaks in human peripheral blood lymphocytes exposed in vitro to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons with or without animal metabolic activation.

    PubMed

    Isabel, Rodríguez-Romero María; Sandra, Gómez-Arroyo; Rafael, Villalobos-Pietrini; Carmen, Martínez-Valenzuela; Josefina, Cortés-Eslava; del Carmen, Calderón-Ezquerro María; Rocío, García-Martínez; Francisco, Arenas-Huertero; Elena, Calderón-Segura María

    2012-04-01

    The polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) dibenzo(a,h)anthracene, benzo(ghi)perylene, benzo(b)fluoranthene and benzo(a)pyrene have been identified in urban air from Mexico City and some of them are classified as human carcinogens. In the present study, human peripheral blood lymphocytes were exposed in vitro to different concentrations of PAHs with (+S9) or without (-S9) metabolic activation. The genotoxic and cytotoxic effects of each PAH were examined with an alkaline comet assay and trypan blue dye exclusion, and oxidative DNA damage was determined via the detection of 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OhdG) adduct levels by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The DNA damage was evaluated with two genotoxicity parameters: the frequency of comets and the comet tail length. Concentrations of 20, 40, 80, 160 and 320 µM DB(a,h)A-S9; 20, 40, 80, 160 and 240 µM B(ghi)P-S9; 20, 30, 40, 60 and 80 µM B(b)F-S9; and 80 µM B(a)P-S9 for 24 h induced a small but significant increase in the means of comet frequency, in the tail length and in the 8-oHDg levels in relation to the control (0.5% DMSO-S9). However, all PAHs+S9 produced a more significant increase in DNA strand breaks and the level of 8-OHdG compared with the control (0.5% DMSO+S9), with a concentration-effect relationship. The viability of lymphocytes exposed to all PAHs-S9 and PAHs+S9 was not modified compared with the control. The results of this study demonstrate that the comet and ELISA are rapid, suitable and sensitive methods to detect in vitro PAH-induced DNA damage in human peripheral lymphocytes.

  19. Are Human Peripheral Nerves Sensitive to X-Ray Imaging?

    PubMed Central

    Scopel, Jonas Francisco; de Souza Queiroz, Luciano; O’Dowd, Francis Pierce; Júnior, Marcondes Cavalcante França; Nucci, Anamarli; Hönnicke, Marcelo Gonçalves

    2015-01-01

    Diagnostic imaging techniques play an important role in assessing the exact location, cause, and extent of a nerve lesion, thus allowing clinicians to diagnose and manage more effectively a variety of pathological conditions, such as entrapment syndromes, traumatic injuries, and space-occupying lesions. Ultrasound and nuclear magnetic resonance imaging are becoming useful methods for this purpose, but they still lack spatial resolution. In this regard, recent phase contrast x-ray imaging experiments of peripheral nerve allowed the visualization of each nerve fiber surrounded by its myelin sheath as clearly as optical microscopy. In the present study, we attempted to produce high-resolution x-ray phase contrast images of a human sciatic nerve by using synchrotron radiation propagation-based imaging. The images showed high contrast and high spatial resolution, allowing clear identification of each fascicle structure and surrounding connective tissue. The outstanding result is the detection of such structures by phase contrast x-ray tomography of a thick human sciatic nerve section. This may further enable the identification of diverse pathological patterns, such as Wallerian degeneration, hypertrophic neuropathy, inflammatory infiltration, leprosy neuropathy and amyloid deposits. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first successful phase contrast x-ray imaging experiment of a human peripheral nerve sample. Our long-term goal is to develop peripheral nerve imaging methods that could supersede biopsy procedures. PMID:25757086

  20. Different Mode of Afferents Determines the Frequency Range of High Frequency Activities in the Human Brain: Direct Electrocorticographic Comparison between Peripheral Nerve and Direct Cortical Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Katsuya; Matsumoto, Riki; Matsuhashi, Masao; Usami, Kiyohide; Shimotake, Akihiro; Kunieda, Takeharu; Kikuchi, Takayuki; Mikuni, Nobuhiro; Miyamoto, Susumu; Fukuyama, Hidenao; Takahashi, Ryosuke; Ikeda, Akio

    2015-01-01

    Physiological high frequency activities (HFA) are related to various brain functions. Factors, however, regulating its frequency have not been well elucidated in humans. To validate the hypothesis that different propagation modes (thalamo-cortical vs. cortico-coritcal projections), or different terminal layers (layer IV vs. layer II/III) affect its frequency, we, in the primary somatosensory cortex (SI), compared HFAs induced by median nerve stimulation with those induced by electrical stimulation of the cortex connecting to SI. We employed 6 patients who underwent chronic subdural electrode implantation for presurgical evaluation. We evaluated the HFA power values in reference to the baseline overriding N20 (earliest cortical response) and N80 (late response) of somatosensory evoked potentials (HFASEP(N20) and HFASEP(N80)) and compared those overriding N1 and N2 (first and second responses) of cortico-cortical evoked potentials (HFACCEP(N1) and HFACCEP(N2)). HFASEP(N20) showed the power peak in the frequency above 200 Hz, while HFACCEP(N1) had its power peak in the frequency below 200 Hz. Different propagation modes and/or different terminal layers seemed to determine HFA frequency. Since HFACCEP(N1) and HFA induced during various brain functions share a similar broadband profile of the power spectrum, cortico-coritcal horizontal propagation seems to represent common mode of neural transmission for processing these functions. PMID:26087042

  1. Different Mode of Afferents Determines the Frequency Range of High Frequency Activities in the Human Brain: Direct Electrocorticographic Comparison between Peripheral Nerve and Direct Cortical Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Katsuya; Matsumoto, Riki; Matsuhashi, Masao; Usami, Kiyohide; Shimotake, Akihiro; Kunieda, Takeharu; Kikuchi, Takayuki; Mikuni, Nobuhiro; Miyamoto, Susumu; Fukuyama, Hidenao; Takahashi, Ryosuke; Ikeda, Akio

    2015-01-01

    Physiological high frequency activities (HFA) are related to various brain functions. Factors, however, regulating its frequency have not been well elucidated in humans. To validate the hypothesis that different propagation modes (thalamo-cortical vs. cortico-coritcal projections), or different terminal layers (layer IV vs. layer II/III) affect its frequency, we, in the primary somatosensory cortex (SI), compared HFAs induced by median nerve stimulation with those induced by electrical stimulation of the cortex connecting to SI. We employed 6 patients who underwent chronic subdural electrode implantation for presurgical evaluation. We evaluated the HFA power values in reference to the baseline overriding N20 (earliest cortical response) and N80 (late response) of somatosensory evoked potentials (HFA(SEP(N20)) and HFA(SEP(N80))) and compared those overriding N1 and N2 (first and second responses) of cortico-cortical evoked potentials (HFA(CCEP(N1)) and HFA(CCEP(N2))). HFA(SEP(N20)) showed the power peak in the frequency above 200 Hz, while HFA(CCEP(N1)) had its power peak in the frequency below 200 Hz. Different propagation modes and/or different terminal layers seemed to determine HFA frequency. Since HFA(CCEP(N1)) and HFA induced during various brain functions share a similar broadband profile of the power spectrum, cortico-coritcal horizontal propagation seems to represent common mode of neural transmission for processing these functions.

  2. Characterization of muscarinic cholinergic receptor subtypes in human peripheral lung

    SciTech Connect

    Bloom, J.W.; Halonen, M.; Yamamura, H.I.

    1988-02-01

    The authors have characterized the muscarinic cholinergic receptor subtypes in human peripheral lung membranes using the selective muscarinic antagonist (/sup 3/H)pirenzepine ((/sup 3/H)PZ) and the classical muscarinic antagonist (/sup 3/H)(-)-quinuclidinyl benzilate. High-affinity binding with pharmacologic specificity was demonstrated for both radioligands. The high affinity Kd for (/sup 3/H)PZ binding determined from saturation isotherms was 5.6 nM, and the Kd for (/sup 3/H)(-)-quinuclidinyl benzilate binding was 14.3 pM. Approximately 62% of the total muscarinic binding sites in human peripheral lung bind (/sup 3/H)PZ with high affinity. There was no significant effect of the guanine nucleotide, guanyl-5'-yl imidodiphosphate, on the inhibition of (/sup 3/H)(-)-quinyclidinyl benzilate binding by the muscarinic agonist carbachol in peripheral lung membranes. If the muscarinic receptor with high affinity for PZ has an important role in bronchoconstriction, its characterization could result in the development of more selective bronchodilators.

  3. The induction of human peripheral blood lymphoid colonies by conditioned media from human tumour cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Vesole, D H; Moore, G E

    1980-01-01

    Conditioned medium (CM) from 29 human tumour cell lines and 3 malignant pleural fluids were tested for their ability to stimulate lymphoid colony formation in semi-solid agar; 9 of 14 malignant melanomas, 3 of 6 colonic carcinomas, 2 of 5 ovarian carcinomas, 3 of 4 breast carcinomas and 1 of 3 pleural fluids from breast cancer patients contained colony-stimulating activity (CSA) for human peripheral blood lymphoid cells (PBL) in semi-solid agar. Conditioned media also stimulated PBL proliferation in liquid medium; these effects were dose dependent. With the exception of one pleural fluid, extensive dialysis of CM did not significantly increase colony formation; CM from two tumour cell lines demonstrated a significant decrease in the induction of colony formation after dialysis. PMID:6970165

  4. Induction of apoptosis in human mitogen-activated peripheral blood T-lymphocytes by the ether phospholipid ET-18-OCH3: Involvement of the Fas receptor/ligand system

    PubMed Central

    Cabaner, Christelle; Gajate, Consuelo; Macho, Antonio; Muñoz, Eduardo; Modolell, Manuel; Mollinedo, Faustino

    1999-01-01

    Activated T-cells constitute a target for treatment of autoimmune diseases. We have found that the antitumour ether phospholipid 1-O-octadecyl-2-O-methyl-rac-glycero-3-phosphocholine (ET-18-OCH3; edelfosine) induced dose- and time-dependent apoptosis in human mitogen-activated peripheral blood T-lymphocytes, but not in resting T-cells. T-lymphocytes were stimulated with phytohemagglutinin and interleukin-2 or with concanavalin A. Apoptosis was assessed by DNA fragmentation through cell cycle and TUNEL analyses, as well as through visualization of internucleosomal DNA fragmentation in agarose gels.The ET-18-OCH3-mediated apoptotic response in activated T-lymphocytes was less intense than in human leukaemic T cell lines, such as Jurkat cells and Peer cells; namely about 25% apoptosis in activated T-cells versus about 46–61% apoptosis in T leukaemic cells after 24 h treatment with 10 μM ET-18-OCH3.The ET-18-OCH3 thioether analogue BM 41.440 (ilmofosine) showed a similar apoptotic capacity to that found with ET-18-OCH3 in activated T-cells, whereas the phospholipid analogue hexadecylphosphocholine (miltefosine) failed to promote this response.The uptake of [3H]-ET-18-OCH3 was much larger in activated T-cells than in resting lymphocytes.Using a cytofluorimetric approach we have found that ET-18-OCH3 induced disruption of the mitochondrial transmembrane potential and production of reactive oxygen species in activated T-cells, but not in resting lymphocytes.ET-18-OCH3 induced an increase in Fas (APO-1/CD95) ligand mRNA expression in activated T-cells, and incubation with a blocking anti-Fas (APO-1/CD95) antibody partially inhibited the ET-18-OCH3-induced apoptosis of activated T-lymphocytes.These results demonstrate that mitogen-activated T-cells, unlike resting lymphocytes, are able to take up significant amounts of ET-18-OCH3, and are susceptible to undergo apoptosis by the ether lipid via, in part, the Fas (APO-1/CD95) receptor/ligand system. This ET-18-OCH3

  5. Inhibitory activity of the white wine compounds, tyrosol and caffeic acid, on lipopolysaccharide-induced tumor necrosis factor-alpha release in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Giovannini, L; Migliori, M; Filippi, C; Origlia, N; Panichi, V; Falchi, M; Bertelli, A A E; Bertelli, A

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess whether tyrosol and caffeic acid are able to inhibit lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha release. TNF is one of the most important cytokines involved in inflammatory reactions. The results show that both tyrosol and caffeic acid are able to inhibit LPS-induced TNF-alpha release from human monocytes, even at low doses. Their mechanisms of action are discussed and we conclude that high doses of the two compounds are not required to achieve effective inhibition of inflammatory reactions due to TNF-alpha release.

  6. Synthesis of multivalent glycoconjugates containing the immunoactive LELTE peptide: effect of glycosylation on cellular activation and natural killing by human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Renaudet, Olivier; Krenek, Karel; Bossu, Isabelle; Dumy, Pascal; Kádek, Alan; Adámek, David; Vanek, Ondrej; Kavan, Daniel; Gazák, Radek; Sulc, Miroslav; Bezouska, Karel; Kren, Vladimír

    2010-05-19

    Pentapeptide diacidic sequence LELTE, derived from the mycobacterial heat shock protein hsp65, has been recently identified as a "danger" signal of the immune system effective via specific binding to the universal leukocyte triggering receptor CD69. This sequence is not active per se, only after its presentation within the multivalent environment of its parent protein, or after artificial dimerization using a standard bifunctional reagents. Here we describe an entirely new way of presenting of this peptide based on its attachment to a cyclopeptide RAFT scaffold (K-K-K-P-G)(2) through the epsilon-amino group of lysine residues, alone or in combination with the carbohydrate epitope alphaGalNAc. The ability of such RAFT scaffolds to precipitate the target CD69 receptor or to activate CD69-positive cells is enhanced in compounds 2 and 4 possessing combined peptide/carbohydrate expression. Compounds 2 and 4 are highly efficient activators of natural killer lymphocytes, but they are completely inactive from the point of view of activation-induced apoptosis of lymphocytes by the target cells. These unique properties make the combined peptide/carbohydrate RAFTs highly suitable for future evaluation in animal tumor therapies in vivo and predict them to be readily available and efficient immunoactivators.

  7. Functional activation of lymphocyte CD44 in peripheral blood is a marker of autoimmune disease activity.

    PubMed Central

    Estess, P; DeGrendele, H C; Pascual, V; Siegelman, M H

    1998-01-01

    Interactions between complementary receptors on leukocytes and endothelial cells play a central role in regulating extravasation from the blood and thereby affect both normal and pathologic inflammatory responses. CD44 on lymphocytes that has been "activated" to bind its principal ligand hyaluronate (HA) on endothelium can mediate the primary adhesion (rolling) of lymphocytes to vascular endothelial cells under conditions of physiologic shear stress, and this interaction is used for activated T cell extravasation into an inflamed site in vivo in mice (DeGrendele, H.C., P. Estess, L.J. Picker, and M.H. Siegelman. 1996. J. Exp. Med. 183:1119-1130. DeGrendele, H.D., P. Estess, and M.H. Siegelman. 1997. Science. 278:672-675. DeGrendele, H.C., P. Estess, and M.H. Siegelman. 1997. J. Immunol. 159: 2549-2553). Here, we have investigated the role of lymphocyte-borne-activated CD44 in the human and show that CD44-dependent primary adhesion is induced in human peripheral blood T cells through T cell receptor triggering. In addition, lymphocytes capable of CD44/HA-dependent rolling interactions can be found resident within inflamed tonsils. In analysis of peripheral bloods of patients from a pediatric rheumatology clinic, examining systemic lupus erythematosus, and a group of chronic arthropathies, expression of CD44-dependent primary adhesion strongly correlates with concurrent symptomatic disease, with 85% of samples from clinically active patients showing elevated levels of rolling activity (compared with only 4% of inactive patients). These rolling interactions are predominantly mediated by T cells. The results suggest that circulating T lymphocytes bearing activated CD44 are elevated under conditions of chronic inflammation and that these may represent a pathogenically important subpopulation of activated circulating cells that may provide a reliable marker for autoimmune or chronic inflammatory disease activity. PMID:9739051

  8. Anticarcinogenic and antimutagenic activity of Alstonia scholaris on the albino mice bone marrow cells and peripheral human lymphocyte culture against methyl methane sulfonate induced genotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Md. Sultan; Ahmad, Sheeba; Ali, Afsar; Afzal, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Background: The use of medicinal plants in modern medicine for the prevention and treatment of cancer is an important aspect. For this reason, it is important to identify antitumor promoting agents present in medicinal plants commonly used by the human population. Materials and Methods: We used in vivo and in vitro methods using chromosomal aberrations (CAs), sister chromatid exchange (SCE) and replication index (RI) as markers, exposed by methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) as well as alcoholic extract of Alstonia scholaris in five increasing concentrations (200, 250, 300, 350 and 400 mg/kg body weight for in vivo and 150, 200, 250 and 300 μg/ml of culture) and of three different durations of 24, 48 and 72 h in the presence as well absence of S9 mix. Results: Extracts of Alstonia reduces the total aberrant cells ranges from 10.0% to 41.84% and frequencies of aberration in the aberrant cells ranges from 220 to 124 against 290 aberrations causes due to MMS in vivo. Similarly in the in vitro, it reduces CAs (39.62%, 32.83%, and 38.48%) and (45.31%, 44.46%, and 38.34%) at 24, 48, and 72 h of exposure respectively; in the absence as well as presence of liver S9 fraction. It also reduces SCE from 7.70 to 4.20 per cell and enhances RI from 1.45 to 1.64. Conclusion: Extracts of Alstonia significantly reduces the number of aberrant cells and frequency of aberration per cell at each concentration and duration of exposure in vivo; and CAs and SCE in vitro and enhances RI. PMID:27308264

  9. Selective recovery of fascicular activity in peripheral nerves.

    PubMed

    Wodlinger, B; Durand, D M

    2011-10-01

    The peripheral nerves of an amputee's residual limb still carry the information required to provide the robust, natural control signals needed to command a dexterous prosthetic limb. However, these signals are mixed in the volume conductor of the body and extracting them is an unmet challenge. A beamforming algorithm was used to leverage the spatial separation of the fascicular sources, recovering mixed pseudo-spontaneous signals with normalized mean squared error of 0.14 ± 0.10 (n = 12) in an animal model. The method was also applied to a human femoral nerve model using computer simulations and recovered all five fascicular-group signals simultaneously with R(2) = 0.7 ± 0.2 at a signal-to-noise ratio of 0 dB. This technique accurately separated peripheral neural signals, potentially providing the voluntary, natural and robust command signals needed for advanced prosthetic limbs.

  10. Receptor expression and responsiveness of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells to a human cytomegalovirus encoded CC chemokine.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Qi; Xu, Jun; Gao, Huihui; Tao, Ran; Li, Wei; Shang, Shiqiang; Gu, Weizhong

    2015-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus is a ubiquitous pathogen that infects the majority of the world's population. After long period of time co-evolving with human being, this pathogen has developed several strategies to evade host immune surveillance. One of the major trick is encoding homologous to those of the host organism or stealing host cellular genes that have significant functions in immune system. To date, we have found several viral immune analogous which include G protein coupled receptor, class I major histocompatibility complex and chemokine. Chemokine is a small group of molecules which is defined by the presence of four cysteines in highly conserved region. The four kinds of chemokines (C, CC, CXC, and CX3C) are classified based on the arrangement of 1 or 2 N-terminal cysteine residues. UL128 protein is one of the analogous that encoded by human cytomegalovirus that has similar amino acid sequences to the human CC chemokine. It has been proved to be one of the essential particles that involved in human cytomegalovirus entry into epithelial/endothelial cells as well as macrophages. It is also the target of potent neutralizing antibodies in human cytomegalovirus-seropositive individuals. We had demonstrated the chemotactic trait of UL128 protein in our previous study. Recombinant UL128 in vitro has the ability to attract monocytes to the infection region and enhances peripheral blood mononuclear cell proliferation by activating the MAPK/ERK signaling pathway. However, the way that this viral encoded chemokine interacting with peripheral blood mononuclear cells and the detailed mechanism that involving the virus entry into host cells keeps unknown. Here we performed in vitro investigation into the effects of UL128 protein on peripheral blood mononuclear cell's activation and receptor binding, which may help us further understand the immunomodulatory function of UL128 protein as well as human cytomegalovirus diffusion mechanism.

  11. Activation of peripheral KCNQ channels relieves gout pain

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Yueming; Xu, Haiyan; Zhan, Li; Zhou, Xindi; Chen, Xueqin; Gao, Zhaobing

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Intense inflammatory pain caused by urate crystals in joints and other tissues is a major symptom of gout. Among therapy drugs that lower urate, benzbromarone (BBR), an inhibitor of urate transporters, is widely used because it is well tolerated and highly effective. We demonstrate that BBR is also an activator of voltage-gated KCNQ potassium channels. In cultured recombinant cells, BBR exhibited significant potentiation effects on KCNQ channels comparable to previously reported classical activators. In native dorsal root ganglion neurons, BBR effectively overcame the suppression of KCNQ currents, and the resultant neuronal hyperexcitability caused by inflammatory mediators, such as bradykinin (BK). Benzbromarone consistently attenuates BK-, formalin-, or monosodium urate–induced inflammatory pain in rat and mouse models. Notably, the analgesic effects of BBR are largely mediated through peripheral and not through central KCNQ channels, an observation supported both by pharmacokinetic studies and in vivo experiments. Moreover, multiple residues in the superficial part of the voltage sensing domain of KCNQ channels were identified critical for the potentiation activity of BBR by a molecular determinant investigation. Our data indicate that activation of peripheral KCNQ channels mediates the pain relief effects of BBR, potentially providing a new strategy for the development of more effective therapies for gout. PMID:25735002

  12. Motor Neuron Activation in Peripheral Nerves Using Infrared Neural Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, EJ; Tyler, DJ

    2014-01-01

    Objective Localized activation of peripheral axons may improve selectivity of peripheral nerve interfaces. Infrared neural stimulation (INS) employs localized delivery to activate neural tissue. This study investigated INS to determine whether localized delivery limited functionality in larger mammalian nerves. Approach The rabbit sciatic nerve was stimulated extraneurally with 1875 nm-wavelength infrared light, electrical stimulation, or a combination of both. Infrared-sensitive regions (ISR) of the nerve surface and electromyogram (EMG) recruitment of the Medial Gastrocnemius, Lateral Gastrocnemius, Soleus, and Tibialis Anterior were the primary output measures. Stimulation applied included infrared-only, electrical-only, and combined infrared and electrical. Main results 81% of nerves tested were sensitive to INS, with 1.7± 0.5 ISR detected per nerve. INS was selective to a single muscle within 81% of identified ISR. Activation energy threshold did not change significantly with stimulus power, but motor activation decreased significantly when radiant power was decreased. Maximum INS levels typically recruited up to 2–9% of any muscle. Combined infrared and electrical stimulation differed significantly from electrical recruitment in 7% of cases. Significance The observed selectivity of INS indicates it may be useful in augmenting rehabilitation, but significant challenges remain in increasing sensitivity and response magnitude to improve the functionality of INS. PMID:24310923

  13. Motor neuron activation in peripheral nerves using infrared neural stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, E. J.; Tyler, D. J.

    2014-02-01

    Objective. Localized activation of peripheral axons may improve selectivity of peripheral nerve interfaces. Infrared neural stimulation (INS) employs localized delivery to activate neural tissue. This study investigated INS to determine whether localized delivery limited functionality in larger mammalian nerves. Approach. The rabbit sciatic nerve was stimulated extraneurally with 1875 nm wavelength infrared light, electrical stimulation, or a combination of both. Infrared-sensitive regions (ISR) of the nerve surface and electromyogram (EMG) recruitment of the Medial Gastrocnemius, Lateral Gastrocnemius, Soleus, and Tibialis Anterior were the primary output measures. Stimulation applied included infrared-only, electrical-only, and combined infrared and electrical. Main results. 81% of nerves tested were sensitive to INS, with 1.7 ± 0.5 ISR detected per nerve. INS was selective to a single muscle within 81% of identified ISR. Activation energy threshold did not change significantly with stimulus power, but motor activation decreased significantly when radiant power was decreased. Maximum INS levels typically recruited up to 2-9% of any muscle. Combined infrared and electrical stimulation differed significantly from electrical recruitment in 7% of cases. Significance. The observed selectivity of INS indicates that it may be useful in augmenting rehabilitation, but significant challenges remain in increasing sensitivity and response magnitude to improve the functionality of INS.

  14. Arginase activity in peripheral blood of patients with intestinal schistosomiasis, Wonji, Central Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Getaneh, A; Tamrat, A; Tadesse, K

    2015-07-01

    Morbidity and mortality caused by schistosomiasis usually results from immunopathology. But the underlying mechanisms are not yet clearly understood. Th2-type immune response is thought to be dominant during chronic schistosomiasis, and upregulation of arginase-I is one component of this milieu. A cohort study was conducted to assess arginase activity in peripheral blood of humans with intestinal schistosomiasis in Wonji-Shoa Sugar Estate, Central Ethiopia. Laboratory-confirmed 30 Schistosoma mansoni-infected patients and 18 apparently healthy controls were recruited. Faecal egg count was carried out by Kato-Katz technique. Plasma and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were isolated from whole blood. Activity of arginase in plasma and PBMC lysates was measured, and results were compared with that of controls. Twenty-one of 30 patients had light infection, whereas moderate and heavy intensity infections were observed in eight and only one patient(s), respectively. A significant increase in both PBMC (patients: 59.96 + 82.99, controls: 25.44 + 24.6 mU/mg protein, P < 0.0001) and plasma (patients: 1.61 + 2.19, controls: 0.31 + 0.73 mU/mL plasma, P < 0.0001) arginase activity was observed during human S. mansoni infection. Arginase activity increases in peripheral blood of patients with intestinal schistosomiasis.

  15. Interaction of Choriocarcinoma Cells and Human Peripheral Blood Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    August, Charles S.; Cox, Sheila T.; Naughton, Michael A.

    1979-01-01

    Cultured choriocarcinoma (Be Wo) cells exist that share many of the morphologic and bio-synthetic properties of normal human trophoblasts. In an attempt to develop a model for the immunologic relationship between a sensitized mother and fetus, we mixed Be Wo cells with mitogen-activated cytotoxic lymphocytes in vitro. Be Wo cells were resistant to the cytolytic effects of the activated lymphocytes despite 24-h exposure and intimate cell-to-cell contact as determined by microscopy. Control target cells, a line of human hepatoma cells, were readily destroyed. Cytotoxicity was measured by determining residual radioactivity of [3H]thymidine-labeled target cells after exposure to activated lymphocytes. Employing the quantitative assay, we confirmed the morphologic results and showed that Be Wo and a number of other choriocarcinoma cell lines were resistant to the cytotoxic effects of lymphocytes activated by phytohemagglutinin, pokeweed mitogen, and allogeneic cells in mixed lymphocyte cultures. Moreover, Be Wo cells were resistant to injury over a wide range of killer to target cell ratios. Significant killing of the Be Wo cells occurred only after prolonged exposure (48 and 72 h) to the activated lymphocytes. We suggest that one mechanism that may assist the fetus (or a choriocarcinoma) in its immunologic survival is the intrinsic resistance of trophoblast cells to lymphocyte-mediated cytotoxicity. Images PMID:570981

  16. In vitro study of interactions between silicon-containing nanoparticles and human peripheral blood leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Andreeva, E R; Rudimov, E G; Gornostaeva, A N; Beklemyshev, V I; Makhonin, I I; Maugeri, U O G; Buravkova, L B

    2013-07-01

    The effects of silicon dioxide-based nanoparticles on the viability and proliferative activity of human peripheral blood cultured lymphocytes were studied. All nanoparticles in a concentration of 100 μg/ml produced a significant cytotoxic effect, its intensity depending on particles' structure: SiO2 nanoparticles were least toxic, while Ce3(+)-intercaled montmorillonite nanoparticles were most toxic. The cells died mainly by apoptosis and postapoptotic necrosis. Incubation with nanoparticles in a concentration of 100 μg/ml for 72 h caused death of all phytohemagglutinin-activated lymphocytes, while in concentrations of 1 and 10 μg/ml the nanoparticles had no effect of proliferative activity of cells. The results suggest that the effects of nanoparticles on cells are determined by the nanoparticle concentration and size, as well as by their structure.

  17. Bacillus anthracis’ lethal toxin induces broad transcriptional responses in human peripheral monocytes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Anthrax lethal toxin (LT), produced by the Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus anthracis, is a highly effective zinc dependent metalloprotease that cleaves the N-terminus of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinases (MAPKK or MEKs) and is known to play a role in impairing the host immune system during an inhalation anthrax infection. Here, we present the transcriptional responses of LT treated human monocytes in order to further elucidate the mechanisms of LT inhibition on the host immune system. Results Western Blot analysis demonstrated cleavage of endogenous MEK1 and MEK3 when human monocytes were treated with 500 ng/mL LT for four hours, proving their susceptibility to anthrax lethal toxin. Furthermore, staining with annexin V and propidium iodide revealed that LT treatment did not induce human peripheral monocyte apoptosis or necrosis. Using Affymetrix Human Genome U133 Plus 2.0 Arrays, we identified over 820 probe sets differentially regulated after LT treatment at the p <0.001 significance level, interrupting the normal transduction of over 60 known pathways. As expected, the MAPKK signaling pathway was most drastically affected by LT, but numerous genes outside the well-recognized pathways were also influenced by LT including the IL-18 signaling pathway, Toll-like receptor pathway and the IFN alpha signaling pathway. Multiple genes involved in actin regulation, signal transduction, transcriptional regulation and cytokine signaling were identified after treatment with anthrax LT. Conclusion We conclude LT directly targets human peripheral monocytes and causes multiple aberrant gene responses that would be expected to be associated with defects in human monocyte’s normal signaling transduction pathways and function. This study provides further insights into the mechanisms associated with the host immune system collapse during an anthrax infection, and suggests that anthrax LT may have additional downstream targets outside the well-known MAPK

  18. Identification of interleukin-2 in human peripheral blood eosinophils.

    PubMed Central

    Levi-Schaffer, F; Barkans, J; Newman, T M; Ying, S; Wakelin, M; Hohenstein, R; Barak, V; Lacy, P; Kay, A B; Moqbel, R

    1996-01-01

    Interleukin-2 (IL-2) is an essential growth factor for T cells. Previous studies have shown that human peripheral eosinophils respond to IL-2 in chemotaxis and express the IL-2 receptor (CD25). In addition, eosinophils have been shown to transcribe messenger RNA for IL-2. The aim of the present study was to determine whether eosinophils translate mRNA for IL-2 and to determine the site of intracellular localization. By immunocytochemistry, an average of 9% of cells showed cytoplasmic staining for IL-2 in freshly isolated unstimulated blood eosinophils obtained from asthmatic subjects who were not receiving oral corticosteroid treatment (n = 5). Freshly isolated, disrupted, highly purified eosinophils (> 99%, by CD16- immunomagnetic selection) contained an average of 6 pg/10(6) cells of IL-2 measured by a specific enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) (n = 7). Purified eosinophil incubated with serum-coated Sephadex beads showed an increase in the amount of intracellularly-retained IL-2 (26.2 +/- 7.2 pg/10(6) cells) with some evidence for release of this cytokine but only in three out of six eosinophil preparations (range 1.3-5.8 pg/10(6) cells). The intracellular localization of IL-2 was determined by fractionation of the cells on a linear (0-45%) Nycodenz gradient in sucrose buffer followed by detection of IL-2 in the fractions using an IL-2-specific ELISA and dot blotting. The majority of the IL-2 detected co-eluted with known eosinophil granule markers (i.e. major basic protein (MBP), eosinophil cationic protein (ECP), eosinophil peroxidase (EPO) and beta-hexosaminidase) but small quantities were also detected in the cytosolic (lactate dehydrogenase-(LDH) associated) and membrane (CD9+) fractions. Immunogold labelling of intact eosinophils using an anti-IL-2 monoclonal antibody confirmed IL-2 immunoreactivity in association with the eosinophil crystalline granule cores. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that eosinophils synthesize, release and

  19. Sensorimotor Peripheral Nerve Function and Physical Activity in Older Men

    PubMed Central

    Lange-Maia, Brittney S.; Cauley, Jane A.; Newman, Anne B.; Boudreau, Robert M.; Jakicic, John M.; Glynn, Nancy W.; Zivkovic, Sasa; Dam, Tien; Caserotti, Paolo; Cawthon, Peggy M.; Orwoll, Eric S.; Strotmeyer, Elsa S.

    2017-01-01

    We determined whether sensorimotor peripheral nerve (PN) function was associated with physical activity (PA) in older men. The Osteoporotic Fractures in Men Study Pittsburgh, PA, site (n=328, age 78.8±4.7 years), conducted PN testing, including: peroneal motor and sural sensory nerve conduction (latencies, amplitudes: CMAP and SNAP for motor and sensory amplitude, respectively), 1.4g/10g monofilament (dorsum of the great toe), and neuropathy symptoms. ANOVA and multivariate linear regression modeled PN associations with PA (Physical Activity Scale for the Elderly (PASE) and SenseWear Armband). After multivariable adjustment, better motor latency was associated with higher PASE scores (160.5±4.8 vs 135.6±6.7, p<0.01). Those without vs. with neuropathy symptoms had higher PASE scores (157.6±5.3 vs 132.9±7.1, p<0.01). Better vs. worse SNAP was associated with slightly more daily vigorous activity (9.5±0.8 vs. 7.3±0.7, p=0.05). Other PN measures were not associated with PA. Certain PN measures were associated with lower PA, suggesting a potential pathway for disability. PMID:26964668

  20. Accumulation of peripheral autoreactive B cells in the absence of functional human regulatory T cells

    PubMed Central

    Kinnunen, Tuure; Chamberlain, Nicolas; Morbach, Henner; Choi, Jinyoung; Kim, Sangtaek; Craft, Joseph; Mayer, Lloyd; Cancrini, Caterina; Passerini, Laura; Bacchetta, Rosa; Ochs, Hans D.; Torgerson, Troy R.

    2013-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) play an essential role in preventing autoimmunity. Mutations in the forkhead box protein 3 (FOXP3) gene, which encodes a transcription factor critical for Treg function, result in a severe autoimmune disorder and the production of various autoantibodies in mice and in IPEX (immune dysregulation, polyendocrinopathy, enteropathy, X-linked) patients. However, it is unknown whether Tregs normally suppress autoreactive B cells. To investigate a role for Tregs in maintaining human B-cell tolerance, we tested the reactivity of recombinant antibodies isolated from single B cells isolated from IPEX patients. Characteristics and reactivity of antibodies expressed by new emigrant/transitional B cells from IPEX patients were similar to those from healthy donors, demonstrating that defective Treg function does not impact central B-cell tolerance. In contrast, mature naive B cells from IPEX patients often expressed autoreactive antibodies, suggesting an important role for Tregs in maintaining peripheral B-cell tolerance. T cells displayed an activated phenotype in IPEX patients, including their Treg-like cells, and showed up-regulation of CD40L, PD-1, and inducibl T-cell costimulator (ICOS), which may favor the accumulation of autoreactive mature naive B cells in these patients. Hence, our data demonstrate an essential role for Tregs in the establishment and the maintenance of peripheral B-cell tolerance in humans. PMID:23223361

  1. Genotoxic evaluation of Halfenprox using the human peripheral lymphocyte micronucleus assay and the Ames test.

    PubMed

    Akyıl, Dilek; Eren, Yasin; Konuk, Muhsin; Dere, Hatice; Serteser, Ahmet

    2017-04-01

    The genotoxicity and mutagenicity of Halfenprox, a synthetic pyrethroid insecticide and acaricide, was assessed using two standard genotoxicity assays of the Salmonella typhimurium mutagenicity assay (Ames test) and in vitro micronucleus (MN) assay in human peripheral lymphocytes. In the Ames test, Salmonella strains TA98 and TA100 were treated with or without S9 fraction. The doses of Halfenprox were 6.25, 12.5, 25, 50, and 100 μg/plate and test materials were dissolved in DMSO. The concentrations of Halfenprox did not show mutagenic activity on both strains with and without S9 fraction. The MN assay was used to investigate the genotoxic effects of Halfenprox in human peripheral lymphocytes treated with 250, 500, 750, and 1000 μg/ml concentrations of Halfenprox for 24 and 48 h, and at 1000 μg/ml the concentration was significantly increased and the MN formation was compared with the negative control for both treatment periods. In addition, a significant decrease of the nuclear devision index (NDI) values at the higher concentrations of Halfenprox and at both treatment periods was observed.

  2. [2'-5' olygoadenylate synthetase activity in peripheral facial paralysis].

    PubMed

    Nakazato, H; Ikeda, M

    1995-03-01

    Interferons are produced in response to viral infection and play an important part in defense by their antiviral effects. An interferon-induced enzyme, 2'-5' oligoadenylate synthetase (2-5AS) also takes an important part of the system of defense against viral infections, and its activity elevates in nonspecific viral infections. This study was designed to evaluate the usefulness of examining serum 2-5AS activity and peripheral blood WBC 2-5AS (WBC 2-5AS) as diagnostic aids of viral infections that cause facial paralysis. Samples were obtained from 83 patients with Bell's palsy, 20 with Ramsay Hunt syndrome, 74 healthy individuals, and a total of 177 subjects. In 177, we measured serum 2-5AS level in 123 subjects, WBC 2-5AS level in 57, and both in 25. Serum 2-5AS levels in Bell's palsy (60 cases) ranged from 20 to 146 pmol/dl (average: 38.5). The range in Ramsay Hunt syndrome (13) was 20-333 (average: 59.0), and in healthy controls (50), it was 20-128 (average: 41.4). WBC 2-5AS level ranged from 20 to 5900 pmol/dl (average: 733.2) in Bell's palsy (23 cases), from 20-4540 (average: 1371.4) in Ramsay Hunt syndrome (7), and from 20-903 (average: 294.5) in healthy individuals (24). There were no statistically significant differences in serum 2-5AS activities. Otherwise, there was significant difference (p < 0.01) between healthy individuals and Patients with Ramsay Hunt syndrome in WBC 2-5AS activity. In Bell's palsy, 3 cases (13.0%) with markedly high WBC 2-5AS levels existed.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. [239Pu and chromosomal aberrations in human peripheral blood lymphocytes].

    PubMed

    Okladnikova, N D; Osovets, S V; Kudriavtseva, T I

    2009-01-01

    The genome status in somatic cells was assessed using the chromosomal aberration (CA) test in peripheral blood lymphocytes from 194 plutonium workers exposed to occupational radiation mainly from low-transportable compounds of airborne 230Pu. Pu body burden at the time of cytogenetic study varied from values close to the method sensitivity to values multiply exceeding the permissible level. Standard (routine) methods of peripheral blood lymphocytes cultivation were applied. Chromatid- and chromosomal-type structural changes were estimated. Aberrations were estimated per 100 examined metaphase cells. The quantitative relationship between the CA frequency and Pu body burden and the absorbed dose to the lung was found. Mathematical processing of results was carried out based on the phenomenological model. The results were shown as theoretical and experimental curves. The threshold of the CA yield was 0.43 +/- 0.03 kBq (Pu body burden) and 6.12 +/- 1.20 cGy (absorbed dose to the lung).

  4. The Immunomodulatory Effects of Nidus Vespae on Human Peripheral Blood Immune Cells In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Ming; Ling, Yang; Qi, Qiufeng; Zhang, Yaping; Bao, Yanqing; Liu, Yongping

    2015-01-01

    Nidus Vespae has been used in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) to treat various cancers, but the underlying mechanisms were not yet clarified. This study was to investigate the effect of Nidus Vespae decoction (NVD) on tumor cell viability and immunoregulating functions of human peripheral blood immune cells. The effects on tumor cell viability, peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) proliferation activity, and the tumor cell phagocytosis of monocytes were evaluated by cell counting kit-8. Tumor-killing activity of cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) was analyzed by 51Cr releasing assay. IgG production of B cells and cytokine (TNF-α and IL-6) secretion of monocytes were determined by ELISA method. Data showed that NVD has no significant inhibiting effects on gastric cancer cells growth. Nevertheless, it could obviously promote PBMC proliferation in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. After treatment with NVD, the CTL cytotoxicity against SGC-7901 was significantly greater than control. The TNF-α and IL-6 secretion of monocytes and the IgG production of B cells also increased remarkably. Furthermore, NVD could significantly promote the phagocytosis of monocytes on tumor cells. These results suggest that NVD appears to have an immunoenhancing effect on immune cells, indicating that Nidus Vespae is worth exploring for immunomodulatory effects in tumor treatment. PMID:26339270

  5. Successful in vitro antigen-dependent activation of 24-hour-old peripheral blood lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Owen, J A; Muirhead, K; Jensen, C; Jonak, Z L

    1996-03-28

    We describe a simple, rapid and reproducible in vitro culture system in which human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs), donated 24 h prior to initiation of culture can be stimulated to produce antigen-specific antibodies. Peripheral blood lymphocytes purified by Ficoll-Hypaque centrifugation were passed over a G10 Sephadex column and then activated in vitro in the presence of 0.003% staphylococcus Cowan A, 2.8 x 10(-6) M indomethacin and appropriate concentrations of tetanus toxoid antigen. After the first 24 h in culture, a five-fold concentrated supernatant from an allogeneic mixed lymphocyte culture was added. The cell surface phenotypes of the PBLs were analyzed by flow cytometry at the initiation and termination of culture, in order to provide a comprehensive characterization of the cellular composition of a successful in vitro stimulation system. Our results clearly show that the majority of peripheral blood B cells can be induced to an activated stage (blast transformation) and interleukin 2 (IL-2) receptor expression, following very simple manipulations of the lymphoid population. Tetanus toxoid-specific antibody production can be readily generated in this cell population. In contrast, T cells were not activated to express IL-2 receptors and reach blast transformation, and did not show appreciable proliferation. Our system provides a population of B cells producing antibodies of desired specificity which could be utilized for the generation of human hybridomas or could serve as a donor population for antibody engineering via the combinatorial library approach. Careful light scattering and cell surface phenotypic analyses of the cells entering, proliferating and differentiating in these cultures enabled several novel observations to be made.

  6. Molybdate modulates mitogen and cyclosporin responses of human peripheral blood lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Michelis, Fotios V; Delitheos, Andreas; Tiligada, Ekaterini

    2011-07-01

    The trace element molybdenum (Mo) is an essential component of key physiological systems in animals, plants and microorganisms. The molybdate oxoanion MoO(4)(2-) has been demonstrated to cause diverse yet poorly understood biochemical and pharmacological effects, such as non-specific inhibition of phosphatases and stabilization of steroid receptors. This study aimed to investigate the effects of molybdate on the activation of human peripheral blood lymphocytes (hPBLs) ex vivo and its potential interaction with the widely used immunosuppressant drug cyclosporin A (CsA). Lymphocyte activation was evaluated by performing multiple experiments determining blastogenesis in cultured peripheral blood lymphocytes obtained from 5 healthy volunteers, following stimulation induced by phytohemagglutinin (PHA), in the absence or presence of 0.05-10 mM sodium molybdate or/and 2.5-30 μg/mL CsA. Blastogenesis was assessed by a morphometric assay based on the relative proportions of unactivated lymphocytes, activated lymphoblasts and cells with aberrant morphology after PHA-induced activation. Molybdate concentrations up to 1 mM showed no effect on lymphocyte blastogenesis, while higher concentrations exerted immunosuppressive actions on cultured hPBLs. Co-administration of 0.1 mM sodium molybdate with CsA, at doses up to 20 μg/mL, induced no alteration in the response of cultured hPBLs to CsA. However, molybdate potentiated the immunosuppressive action of higher CsA concentrations, implying a likely dose-related synergistic interaction of the two agents in PHA-stimulated blood lymphocytes. These observations are indicative of the possible biological importance of molybdate oxoanions in the modulation of hPBL activation that may have pharmacological consequences during the therapeutic application of immunomodulatory drugs.

  7. Putative Epimutagens in Maternal Peripheral and Cord Blood Samples Identified Using Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Arai, Yoshikazu; Hayakawa, Koji; Arai, Daisuke; Ito, Rie; Iwasaki, Yusuke; Saito, Koichi; Akutsu, Kazuhiko; Takatori, Satoshi; Ishii, Rie; Hayashi, Rumiko; Izumi, Shun-Ichiro; Sugino, Norihiro; Kondo, Fumio; Horie, Masakazu; Nakazawa, Hiroyuki; Makino, Tsunehisa; Hirosawa, Mitsuko; Shiota, Kunio; Ohgane, Jun

    2015-01-01

    The regulation of transcription and genome stability by epigenetic systems are crucial for the proper development of mammalian embryos. Chemicals that disturb epigenetic systems are termed epimutagens. We previously performed chemical screening that focused on heterochromatin formation and DNA methylation status in mouse embryonic stem cells and identified five epimutagens: diethyl phosphate (DEP), mercury (Hg), cotinine, selenium (Se), and octachlorodipropyl ether (S-421). Here, we used human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) to confirm the effects of 20 chemicals, including the five epimutagens, detected at low concentrations in maternal peripheral and cord blood samples. Of note, these individual chemicals did not exhibit epimutagenic activity in hiPSCs. However, because the fetal environment contains various chemicals, we evaluated the effects of combined exposure to chemicals (DEP, Hg, cotinine, Se, and S-421) on hiPSCs. The combined exposure caused a decrease in the number of heterochromatin signals and aberrant DNA methylation status at multiple gene loci in hiPSCs. The combined exposure also affected embryoid body formation and neural differentiation from hiPSCs. Therefore, DEP, Hg, cotinine, Se, and S-421 were defined as an “epimutagen combination” that is effective at low concentrations as detected in maternal peripheral and cord blood. PMID:26339649

  8. Specific high-affinity binding sites for a synthetic gliadin heptapeptide of human peripheral blood lymphocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Payan, D.G.; Horvath, K.; Graf, L.

    1987-03-23

    The synthetic peptide containing residues 43-49 of ..cap alpha..-gliadin, the major protein component of gluten, has previously been shown to inhibit the production of lymphokine activities by mononuclear leukocytes. The authors demonstrate using radiolabeled ..cap alpha..-gliadin(43-49) that human peripheral blood lymphocytes express approximately 20,000-25,000 surface receptors for this peptide, with a dissociation constant (K/sub D/) of 20 nM. In addition, binding is inhibited by naloxone and an enkephalin analog, thus confirming the functional correlate which demonstrates inhibition by these agents of ..cap alpha..-gliadin(43-49) functional effects. Furthermore, B-lymphocytes bind specifically a greater amount of (/sup 125/I)..cap alpha..-gliadin(43-49) than T-lymphocytes. The lymphocyte ..cap alpha..-gliadin(43-49) receptor may play an important role in mediating the immunological response to ..cap alpha..-gliadin. 16 references, 4 figures.

  9. Corticotropin releasing hormone- and adreno-corticotropin-like immunoreactivity in human placenta, peripheral and uterine vein plasma.

    PubMed

    Schulte, H M; Healy, D L

    1987-01-01

    The presence of corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH)-like immunoreactivity (IR) in human placenta and maternal peripheral blood has been reported by many investigators. However, its physiological role has not yet been defined. We investigated plasma and placental tissue from women at different times of pregnancy and performed peripheral and uterine vein sampling during caesarean section before and after removal of the placenta. Beside IR-CRH, IR-GRF and -GnRH as well as -ACTH and cortisol were measured. The highest content of CRH was found in placental extracts from end term (40 weeks) pregnancies and lower levels at an earlier stage (10 weeks). Plasma CRH from peripheral blood could be detected in some samples and was higher as pregnancy advanced. Thirty minutes after removal of the placenta CRH levels dropped in peripheral plasma and could not be detected in uterine vein samples. IR-ACTH plasma levels were within the range of normals, cortisol was elevated. Gel- and HPLC-chromatographie revealed that placental extracts coeluted with synthetic human CRH. The material from endterm placenta showed full bioactivity in the rat pituitary bio-assay. IR-GRF could only be detected in 10 weeks placental tissue and no IR-GnRH was measured. We conclude that CRH from the placenta is biologically active, however, cannot stimulate the maternal pituitary-adrenal-axis.

  10. CD1d-restricted peripheral T cell lymphoma in mice and humans

    PubMed Central

    Bachy, Emmanuel; Urb, Mirjam; Chandra, Shilpi; Robinot, Rémy; Bricard, Gabriel; de Bernard, Simon; Traverse-Glehen, Alexandra; Gazzo, Sophie; Blond, Olivier; Khurana, Archana; Baseggio, Lucile; Heavican, Tayla; Ffrench, Martine; Crispatzu, Giuliano; Mondière, Paul; Schrader, Alexandra; Taillardet, Morgan; Thaunat, Olivier; Martin, Nadine; Dalle, Stéphane; Le Garff-Tavernier, Magali; Salles, Gilles; Lachuer, Joel; Hermine, Olivier; Asnafi, Vahid; Roussel, Mikael; Lamy, Thierry; Herling, Marco; Iqbal, Javeed; Buffat, Laurent; Marche, Patrice N.; Gaulard, Philippe; Kronenberg, Mitchell; Defrance, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral T cell lymphomas (PTCLs) are a heterogeneous entity of neoplasms with poor prognosis, lack of effective therapies, and a largely unknown pathophysiology. Identifying the mechanism of lymphomagenesis and cell-of-origin from which PTCLs arise is crucial for the development of efficient treatment strategies. In addition to the well-described thymic lymphomas, we found that p53-deficient mice also developed mature PTCLs that did not originate from conventional T cells but from CD1d-restricted NKT cells. PTCLs showed phenotypic features of activated NKT cells, such as PD-1 up-regulation and loss of NK1.1 expression. Injections of heat-killed Streptococcus pneumonia, known to express glycolipid antigens activating NKT cells, increased the incidence of these PTCLs, whereas Escherichia coli injection did not. Gene expression profile analyses indicated a significant down-regulation of genes in the TCR signaling pathway in PTCL, a common feature of chronically activated T cells. Targeting TCR signaling pathway in lymphoma cells, either with cyclosporine A or anti-CD1d blocking antibody, prolonged mice survival. Importantly, we identified human CD1d-restricted lymphoma cells within Vδ1 TCR-expressing PTCL. These results define a new subtype of PTCL and pave the way for the development of blocking anti-CD1d antibody for therapeutic purposes in humans. PMID:27069116

  11. Central as well as Peripheral Attentional Bottlenecks in Dual-Task Performance Activate Lateral Prefrontal Cortices

    PubMed Central

    Szameitat, André J.; Vanloo, Azonya; Müller, Hermann J.

    2016-01-01

    Human information processing suffers from severe limitations in parallel processing. In particular, when required to respond to two stimuli in rapid succession, processing bottlenecks may appear at central and peripheral stages of task processing. Importantly, it has been suggested that executive functions are needed to resolve the interference arising at such bottlenecks. The aims of the present study were to test whether central attentional limitations (i.e., bottleneck at the decisional response selection stage) as well as peripheral limitations (i.e., bottleneck at response initiation) both demand executive functions located in the lateral prefrontal cortex. For this, we re-analyzed two previous studies, in which a total of 33 participants performed a dual-task according to the paradigm of the psychological refractory period (PRP) during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). In one study (N = 17), the PRP task consisted of two two-choice response tasks known to suffer from a central bottleneck (CB group). In the other study (N = 16), the PRP task consisted of two simple-response tasks known to suffer from a peripheral bottleneck (PB group). Both groups showed considerable dual-task costs in form of slowing of the second response in the dual-task (PRP effect). Imaging results are based on the subtraction of both single-tasks from the dual-task within each group. In the CB group, the bilateral middle frontal gyri and inferior frontal gyri were activated. Higher activation in these areas was associated with lower dual-task costs. In the PB group, the right middle frontal and inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) were activated. Here, higher activation was associated with higher dual-task costs. In conclusion we suggest that central and peripheral bottlenecks both demand executive functions located in lateral prefrontal cortices (LPFC). Differences between the CB and PB groups with respect to the exact prefrontal areas activated and the correlational patterns

  12. Stem Cell-Derived Immature Human Dorsal Root Ganglia Neurons to Identify Peripheral Neurotoxicants

    PubMed Central

    Klima, Stefanie; Karreman, Christiaan; Grinberg, Marianna; Meisig, Johannes; Henry, Margit; Rotshteyn, Tamara; Rahnenführer, Jörg; Blüthgen, Nils; Sachinidis, Agapios; Waldmann, Tanja; Leist, Marcel

    2016-01-01

    Safety sciences and the identification of chemical hazards have been seen as one of the most immediate practical applications of human pluripotent stem cell technology. Protocols for the generation of many desirable human cell types have been developed, but optimization of neuronal models for toxicological use has been astonishingly slow, and the wide, clinically important field of peripheral neurotoxicity is still largely unexplored. A two-step protocol to generate large lots of identical peripheral human neuronal precursors was characterized and adapted to the measurement of peripheral neurotoxicity. High content imaging allowed an unbiased assessment of cell morphology and viability. The computational quantification of neurite growth as a functional parameter highly sensitive to disturbances by toxicants was used as an endpoint reflecting specific neurotoxicity. The differentiation of cells toward dorsal root ganglia neurons was tracked in relation to a large background data set based on gene expression microarrays. On this basis, a peripheral neurotoxicity (PeriTox) test was developed as a first toxicological assay that harnesses the potential of human pluripotent stem cells to generate cell types/tissues that are not otherwise available for the prediction of human systemic organ toxicity. Testing of more than 30 chemicals showed that human neurotoxicants and neurite growth enhancers were correctly identified. Various classes of chemotherapeutic agents causing human peripheral neuropathies were identified, and they were missed when tested on human central neurons. The PeriTox test we established shows the potential of human stem cells for clinically relevant safety testing of drugs in use and of new emerging candidates. Significance The generation of human cells from pluripotent stem cells has aroused great hopes in biomedical research and safety sciences. Neurotoxicity testing is a particularly important application for stem cell-derived somatic cells, as

  13. Cerium Dioxide Nanoparticles Induce Apoptosis and Autophagy in Human Peripheral Blood Monocytes

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Salik; Al-Nsour, Faris; Rice, Annette B.; Marshburn, Jamie; Yingling, Brenda; Ji, Zhaoxia; Zink, Jeffrey I.; Walker, Nigel J.; Garantziotis, Stavros

    2015-01-01

    Cerium dioxide nanoparticles (CeO2 NPs) have diversified industrial uses and novel therapeutic applications are actively being pursued. There is lack of mechanistic data concerning the effects of CeO2 NPs on primary human cells. We aimed at characterizing the cytotoxic effects of CeO2 NPs in human peripheral blood monocytes. CeO2 NPs and their suspensions were thoroughly characterized, including using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), dynamic light scattering (DLS), and zeta potential analysis. Blood from healthy human volunteers was drawn through phlebotomy and CD14+ cells were isolated. Cells were exposed to CeO2 NPs (0.5–10 μg/mL) for 20 or 40 hours and mechanisms of cell injury were studied. TEM revealed that CeO2 NPs are internalized by monocytes and are found either in vesicles or free in the cytoplasm. CeO2 NP exposure leads to decrease in cell viability and treated cells exhibit characteristic hallmarks of apoptosis (activation of Bax, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, DNA fragmentation). CeO2 NP toxicity is caused by mitochondrial damage leading to apoptosis inducing factor (AIF) release, but not due to caspase activation or reactive oxygen species production. Moreover, CeO2 NP exposure leads to autophagy, which is further increased after pharmacological inhibition of tumour suppressor protein p53. Inhibition of autophagy partially reverses cell death by CeO2 NPs. It is concluded that CeO2 NPs are toxic to primary human monocytes at relatively low doses. PMID:22717232

  14. Altered Distribution of Peripheral Blood Memory B Cells in Humans Chronically Infected with Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Fernández, Esteban R.; Olivera, Gabriela C.; Quebrada Palacio, Luz P.; González, Mariela N.; Hernandez-Vasquez, Yolanda; Sirena, Natalia María; Morán, María L.; Ledesma Patiño, Oscar S.; Postan, Miriam

    2014-01-01

    Numerous abnormalities of the peripheral blood T cell compartment have been reported in human chronic Trypanosoma cruzi infection and related to prolonged antigenic stimulation by persisting parasites. Herein, we measured circulating lymphocytes of various phenotypes based on the differential expression of CD19, CD4, CD27, CD10, IgD, IgM, IgG and CD138 in a total of 48 T. cruzi-infected individuals and 24 healthy controls. Infected individuals had decreased frequencies of CD19+CD27+ cells, which positively correlated with the frequencies of CD4+CD27+ cells. The contraction of CD19+CD27+ cells was comprised of IgG+IgD-, IgM+IgD- and isotype switched IgM-IgD- memory B cells, CD19+CD10+CD27+ B cell precursors and terminally differentiated CD19+CD27+CD138+ plasma cells. Conversely, infected individuals had increased proportions of CD19+IgG+CD27-IgD- memory and CD19+IgM+CD27-IgD+ transitional/naïve B cells. These observations prompted us to assess soluble CD27, a molecule generated by the cleavage of membrane-bound CD27 and used to monitor systemic immune activation. Elevated levels of serum soluble CD27 were observed in infected individuals with Chagas cardiomyopathy, indicating its potentiality as an immunological marker for disease progression in endemic areas. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that chronic T. cruzi infection alters the distribution of various peripheral blood B cell subsets, probably related to the CD4+ T cell deregulation process provoked by the parasite in humans. PMID:25111833

  15. Protective effect of quercetin against oxidative stress caused by dimethoate in human peripheral blood lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of quercetin in alleviating the cytotoxic effects of Dimethoate in human peripheral blood lymphocytes. Methods Lymphocytes were divided into too groups. The first group, lymphocytes were incubated for 4 h at 37°C with different concentrations (0, 40, 60 and 100 mM) of Dimethoate. The second group was preincubated with quercetin for 30 min and followed by Dim incubation for 4 h at 37°C. Results Following in vitro incubation, Dimethoate caused a significant increase in malondialdehyde levels, a significant decrease in thiol levels, as well as a significant increase in superoxide dismutase, and catalase activities in lymphocytes at different concentrations. Quercetin pretreated lymphocytes showed a significant protection against the cytotoxic effects inducted by Dimethoate on the studied parameters. Conclusion In conclusion, antioxidant quercetin could protect against Dimethoate-induced oxidative stress by decreasing lipid peroxidation, protein oxidation and increasing superoxide dismutase and catalase activities in human lymphocytes. PMID:21861917

  16. Visualization of peripheral vasodilative indices in human skin by use of red, green, blue images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishidate, Izumi; Tanaka, Noriyuki; Kawase, Tatsuya; Maeda, Takaaki; Yuasa, Tomonori; Aizu, Yoshihisa; Yuasa, Tetsuya; Niizeki, Kyuichi

    2013-06-01

    We propose a method to visualize the arterial inflow, the vascular resistance, and the venous capacitance in the skin tissue from red, green, blue (RGB) digital color images. The arterial inflow and the venous capacitance in the skin tissue are visualized based on an increase in the rate of change in the total blood concentration and the change of the total blood concentration during upper limb occlusion at a pressure of 50 mmHg. The resultant arterial inflow with the measured mean arterial pressure also provides an image of the vascular resistance in human skin. The arterial inflow, the vascular resistance, and the venous capacitance acquired by the method are well correlated with those obtained from the conventional strain-gauge plethysmograph. The correlation coefficients R between the estimated values by the method and the measurements by the SPG are calculated to be 0.83 (P<0.001) for the arterial inflow, 0.77 (P<0.01) for the vascular resistance, and 0.77 (P<0.01) for the venous capacitance. The arterial inflow and the venous capacitance in the skin tissue are significantly higher in active subjects compared with the sedentary subjects, whereas the vascular resistance was significantly lower in the active subjects compared with the sedentary subjects. The results of the present study indicate the possibility of using the proposed method for evaluating the peripheral vascular functions in human skin.

  17. Developmental study of tripeptidyl peptidase I activity in the mouse central nervous system and peripheral organs.

    PubMed

    Dimitrova, Mashenka; Deleva, Denislava; Pavlova, Velichka; Ivanov, Ivaylo

    2011-11-01

    Tripeptidyl peptidase I (TPPI) - a lysosomal serine protease - is encoded by the CLN2 gene, mutations that cause late-infantile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (LINCL) connected with profound neuronal loss, severe clinical symptoms and early death at puberty. Developmental studies of TPPI activity levels and distribution have been done in the human and rat central nervous systems (CNS) and visceral organs. Similar studies have not been performed in mouse. In this paper, we follow up on the developmental changes in the enzyme activity and localization pattern in the CNS and visceral organs of mouse over the main periods of life - embryonic, neonate, suckling, infantile, juvenile, adult and aged - using biochemical assays and enzyme histochemistry. In the studied peripheral organs (liver, kidney, spleen, pancreas and lung) TPPI is present at birth but further its pattern is not consistent in different organs over different life periods. TPPI activity starts to be expressed in the brain at the 10th embryonic day but in most neuronal types it appears at the early infantile period, increases during infancy, reaches high activity levels in the juvenile period and is highest in adult and aged animals. Thus, in mice TPPI activity becomes crucial for the neuronal functions later in development (juvenile period) than in humans and does not decrease with aging. These results are essential as a basis for comparison between normal and pathological TPPI patterns in mice. They can be valuable in view of the use of animal models for studying LINCL and other neurodegenerative disorders.

  18. Evaluation of peripheral blood basophil activation by means of surface plasmon resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Yanase, Yuhki; Hiragun, Takaaki; Yanase, Tetsuji; Kawaguchi, Tomoko; Ishii, Kaori; Hide, Michihiro

    2012-02-15

    Basophil activation in response to antigen may represent specificities of type I allergy of individuals and their reactions in the body. We previously demonstrated that surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensor could detect the activation of human basophils in response to antigens. In this study, we further developed a technique based on SPR imaging (SPRI) system to detect reactions of individual basophils isolated from human blood, and investigated the potential of this sensor as a tool for diagnosis of type I allergy. To detect the change of refractive index (RI) in individual basophils, human basophils were isolated by negative selection with antibodies conjugated with magnetic beads, fixed on a gold film with anti-basophil antibody and stimulated with various antigens under the measurement of SPRI. The sensor could detect the reactions of individual basophils in response to specific antigens as well as non-specific activators. Moreover, the sensor well allocated two spots of basophils on a sensor chip and detected individual reactions to antigen. Thus, the technique developed in this study can visualize the effect of various stimuli or inhibitors on basophils as change of intracellular RI distribution at the single cell level. In combination with a device to rapidly isolate basophils from peripheral blood, this technique may be a useful tool as a high throughput screening system in clinical diagnosis for type I allergy.

  19. Association of interleukin-15-induced peripheral immune activation with hepatic stellate cell activation in persons coinfected with hepatitis C virus and HIV.

    PubMed

    Allison, Robert D; Katsounas, Antonios; Koziol, Deloris E; Kleiner, David E; Alter, Harvey J; Lempicki, Richard A; Wood, Brad; Yang, Jun; Fullmer, Brandie; Cortez, Karoll J; Polis, Michael A; Kottilil, Shyam

    2009-08-15

    Hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) mediate hepatitis C virus (HCV)-related liver fibrosis, and increased HSC activation in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/HCV coinfection may be associated with accelerated fibrosis. We examined the level of HSC activation in HIV/HCV-coinfected and HCV-monoinfected subjects and its relationship to the level of activation and gene expression of peripheral immune cells in coinfected subjects. HSC activation levels positively correlated with peripheral CD4+ and CD8+ T cell immune activation and were associated with enhanced interleukin-15 (IL-15) gene expression, suggesting a pathogenic role for IL-15-driven immunomediated hepatic fibrosis. Future strategies that reduce immune activation and HSC activation may delay progression of liver fibrosis.

  20. Evaluation of genetic damage in human peripheral lymphocytes exposed to mineral trioxide aggregate and Portland cements.

    PubMed

    Braz, M G; Camargo, E A; Salvadori, D M F; Marques, M E A; Ribeiro, D A

    2006-03-01

    summary Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) and Portland cement are being used in dentistry as root-end-filling material for periapical surgery and for the sealing of communications between the root canal system and the surrounding tissues. However, genotoxicity tests for complete risk assessment of these compounds have not been conducted up to now. In the present study, the genotoxic effects of MTA and Portland cements were evaluated in peripheral lymphocytes from 10 volunteers by the alkaline single cell gel (comet) assay. The results pointed out that the single cell gel (comet) assay failed to detect the presence of DNA damage after a treatment of peripheral lymphocytes by MTA and Portland cements for concentrations up to 1000 mug mL(-1). In summary, our results indicate that exposure to MTA or Portland cements may not be a factor that increases the level of DNA lesions in human peripheral lymphocytes as detected by single cell gel (comet) assay.

  1. Reactive oxygen species formation and apoptosis in human peripheral blood mononuclear cell induced by 900 MHz mobile phone radiation.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yao-Sheng; Huang, Bao-Tian; Huang, Yao-Xiong

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate that reactive oxygen species (ROS) plays an important role in the process of apoptosis in human peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) which is induced by the radiation of 900 MHz radiofrequency electromagnetic field (RFEMF) at a specific absorption rate (SAR) of ~0.4 W/kg when the exposure lasts longer than two hours. The apoptosis is induced through the mitochondrial pathway and mediated by activating ROS and caspase-3, and decreasing the mitochondrial potential. The activation of ROS is triggered by the conformation disturbance of lipids, protein, and DNA induced by the exposure of GSM RFEMF. Although human PBMC was found to have a self-protection mechanism of releasing carotenoid in response to oxidative stress to lessen the further increase of ROS, the imbalance between the antioxidant defenses and ROS formation still results in an increase of cell death with the exposure time and can cause about 37% human PBMC death in eight hours.

  2. APL-1, an altered peptide ligand derived from human heat-shock protein 60, selectively induces apoptosis in activated CD4+ CD25+ T cells from peripheral blood of rheumatoid arthritis patients.

    PubMed

    Barberá, Ariana; Lorenzo, Noraylis; Garrido, Greta; Mazola, Yuliet; Falcón, Viviana; Torres, Ana María; Hernández, María Isabel; Hernández, María Victoria; Margry, Bram; de Groot, A Marit; van Roon, Joel; van der Zee, Ruurd; Broere, Femke; van Eden, Willem; Padrón, Gabriel; Domínguez, María del Carmen

    2013-12-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic T-cell mediated autoimmune disease that affects primarily the joints. The induction of immune tolerance through antigen-specific therapies for the blockade of pathogenic CD4+ T cells constitutes a current focus of research. In this focus it is attempted to simultaneously activate multiple regulatory mechanisms, such as: apoptosis and regulatory T cells (Tregs). APL-1 is an altered peptide ligand derived from a novel CD4+ T-cell epitope of human heat-shock protein of 60kDa, an autoantigen involved in the pathogenesis of RA. Previously, we have reported that APL-1 induces CD4+ CD25(high)Foxp3+ Tregs in several systems. Here, we investigated the ability of APL-1 in inducing apoptosis in PBMCs from RA patients, who were classified as active or inactive according to their DAS28 score. APL-1 decreased the viability of PBMCs from active but not from inactive patients. DNA fragmentation assays and typical morphological features clearly demonstrated that APL-1 induced apoptosis in these cells. Activated CD4+ CD25+ T cells but not resting CD4+ CD25- T cells were identified as targets of APL-1. Furthermore, CD4+ T-cell responses to APL-1 were found to be dependent on antigen presentation via the HLA-DR molecule. Thus, APL-1 is a regulatory CD4+ T cell epitope which might modulate inflammatory immune responses in PBMCs from RA patients by inducing CD4+ CD25(high)Foxp3+ Tregs and apoptosis in activated CD4+ T cells. These results support further investigation of this candidate drug for the treatment of RA.

  3. [Cytogenetic analysis of the effects of selected 2d generation cytostatics (iproplatin and oxoplatin) on human peripheral lymphocytes in vitro].

    PubMed

    Srb, V; Vancurová, R; Kubzová, E

    1989-01-01

    Cytostatic effect of Iproplatinum (CHIP, cis-dichlorotrans-dihydroxy-bis-isopropylaminoplatinic complex) and Oxoplatinum (oxo-Pt, cis-diamin-dichloro-trans-dihydroxyplatinic complex) is studied as influencing genetic structures of in vitro human peripheral lymphocytes. Both mentioned substances are classed as prospective cytostatics with satisfactory effect on various tumors, and both undergo now preclinical tests in our country. They are supposed to cause less undesired side effects in comparison with previous preparation of this range--cisplatinum (cis-DDP; Platidiam). The genotoxicity of both substances is examined using the short-term test (72 hrs.), which means a cultivation of raw human peripheral blood modified according to Macek (1965). To set the testing scheme, five concentrations of substances (0, 5, 12, 60 and 120 mumol.l-1) were selected as well as three time intervals of action of a substance (3, 6 and 24 hrs.) prior the expiration of cultivation time, i.e. before the mitotic cycle stop in c-metaphase. Concentrations were determined estimating cisplatinum's dosage to patients. The concentration value 120 mumol.l-1 responds in theory to a single therapeutic dose administration of Platidiam. However, in praxis this concentration is never achieved in organism (resp. protein-binding effect). In accordance with mice LD50 values, both the Iproplatinum and Oxoplatinum showed experimentally 10 times less toxicity than cis-DDP. Cytogenetic changes were evaluated by microscopy in peripheral lymphocytes (predominantly the occurrence of chromosome abnormalities in metaphase), and mitotic activity was as well identified.

  4. Activity of histidine in peripheral blood erythrocytes of pregnant women during exacerbation of cytomegalovirus infection.

    PubMed

    Lutsenko, M T; Andrievskaya, I A

    2014-10-01

    We studied the effect of active cytomegalovirus infection on histidine content in peripheral blood erythrocytes of pregnant women at gestation weeks 20-22 and its involvement into hemoglobin oxygenation. Using the histochemical technique developed by us, we studied the distribution of products of specific reaction for histidine in peripheral blood erythrocytes of pregnant women. The percentage of histidine-positive erythrocytes and their area were evaluated. The relationship between the distribution of the products of the reaction for histidine in peripheral blood erythrocytes of pregnant women and the titer of anti-cytomegalovirus IgG was revealed. The histidine content in peripheral blood erythrocytes of pregnant women with active cytomegalovirus infection was reduced, which impaired heme binding to globin and decreased the formation of oxyhemoglobin.

  5. Genotoxicity test of self-renovated ceramics in primary human peripheral lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Hua, Nan; Zhu, Huifang; Zhuang, Jing; Chen, Liping

    2014-12-01

    Zirconia-based ceramics is widely used in dentistry. Different compositions of ceramics have different features. Our self-renovated ceramics become more machinable without scarifying its dental restoration properties after adjusting ratio of lanthanum phosphate (LaPO4)/yttrium oxide (Y2O3). In order to evaluate its safety, here, we tested its genotoxicity in primary human peripheral lymphocytes. The human lymphocytes cultured on three groups of different ratios of LaPO4/Y2O3 diphase ceramics for 6 days showed little effect of growth inhibition and similar effect of growth trend to the negative control. Furthermore, single-cell gel electrophoresis (comet assay) indicated that there was no significant difference of the value of tail moment between the tested ceramics and negative control, the IPS Empress II (P > 0.05). Our findings implicate that our self-renovated ceramics do not induce DNA damages in human peripheral lymphocytes and support their future clinic application.

  6. Plasma Dopamine-Beta-Hydroxylase as an Index of Peripheral Noradrenergic Activity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-08-17

    ABSTRACT Tit le of Dissertation: Plasma Dopamine-Beta- Hydroxylase as an Index of Peripheral Noradrenergic Act iv i ty John P. A f f ron t i...Pharmacology Dopamine-Beta- Hydroxylase (DBH) (E .C . I .14.17.1) is the biosynthetic enzyme for norepinephrine and is released with the neurotransmitter dur...lu id DBH as an index of central non- adrenergic act ivi ty is addressed. PLASMA DOPAMINE-BETA- HYDROXYLASE ACTIVITY AS AN INDEX OF PERIPHERAL

  7. Activation of human lymphocytes by supernatants from human thymic epithelium.

    PubMed

    Goust, J M; Vesole, D H; Fudenberg, H H

    1979-11-01

    Supernatants from human thymic epithelial cells (TS) were found to have a mitogenic effect on cultured human peripheral blood mononuclear cells and to potentiate their responses to lectins. This was not observed with culture supernatants from the human cell lines AV-3 and HeLa or from the murine cell line L-929. The maximum potentiating effects were observed with pokeweed mitogen (PWM) and phytohaemagglutinin (PHA), whereas the response to concanavalin A (Con A) was only slightly enhanced. TS also potentiated the mixed lymphocyte culture (MLC) response of normal T cells and thymocytes cultured with mitomycin C-treated B lymphoid cell lines. The mitogenic effect of TS was time-dependent and paralleled the appearance of lymphoid colonies in semi-solid agar. Chromatographical separation of concentrated serum-free TS on Sephadex G-100 yielded an active fraction of molecular weight 15,000--25,000 which had all the activities of unseparated TS.

  8. Activation of human lymphocytes by supernatants from human thymic epithelium.

    PubMed Central

    Goust, J M; Vesole, D H; Fudenberg, H H

    1979-01-01

    Supernatants from human thymic epithelial cells (TS) were found to have a mitogenic effect on cultured human peripheral blood mononuclear cells and to potentiate their responses to lectins. This was not observed with culture supernatants from the human cell lines AV-3 and HeLa or from the murine cell line L-929. The maximum potentiating effects were observed with pokeweed mitogen (PWM) and phytohaemagglutinin (PHA), whereas the response to concanavalin A (Con A) was only slightly enhanced. TS also potentiated the mixed lymphocyte culture (MLC) response of normal T cells and thymocytes cultured with mitomycin C-treated B lymphoid cell lines. The mitogenic effect of TS was time-dependent and paralleled the appearance of lymphoid colonies in semi-solid agar. Chromatographical separation of concentrated serum-free TS on Sephadex G-100 yielded an active fraction of molecular weight 15,000--25,000 which had all the activities of unseparated TS. PMID:160851

  9. Upregulation of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) replication by CD4 cross-linking in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of HIV-infected adults.

    PubMed Central

    Than, S; Oyaizu, N; Tetali, S; Romano, J; Kaplan, M; Pahwa, S

    1997-01-01

    This study was conducted with peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 67 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected adults. It supports the hypothesis that cross-linking of CD4 molecules by HIV gp120 can result in HIV upregulation and spread of infection. Underlying mechanisms include activation of latent infection by factors in addition to, or other than, tumor necrosis factor alpha. PMID:9223523

  10. Upregulation of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) replication by CD4 cross-linking in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of HIV-infected adults.

    PubMed

    Than, S; Oyaizu, N; Tetali, S; Romano, J; Kaplan, M; Pahwa, S

    1997-08-01

    This study was conducted with peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 67 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected adults. It supports the hypothesis that cross-linking of CD4 molecules by HIV gp120 can result in HIV upregulation and spread of infection. Underlying mechanisms include activation of latent infection by factors in addition to, or other than, tumor necrosis factor alpha.

  11. Chronic inorganic arsenic exposure in vitro induces a cancer cell phenotype in human peripheral lung epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Person, Rachel J.; Olive Ngalame, Ntube N.; Makia, Ngome L.; Bell, Matthew W.; Waalkes, Michael P.; Tokar, Erik J.

    2015-07-01

    Inorganic arsenic is a human lung carcinogen. We studied the ability of chronic inorganic arsenic (2 μM; as sodium arsenite) exposure to induce a cancer phenotype in the immortalized, non-tumorigenic human lung peripheral epithelial cell line, HPL-1D. After 38 weeks of continuous arsenic exposure, secreted matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP2) activity increased to over 200% of control, levels linked to arsenic-induced cancer phenotypes in other cell lines. The invasive capacity of these chronic arsenic-treated lung epithelial (CATLE) cells increased to 320% of control and colony formation increased to 280% of control. CATLE cells showed enhanced proliferation in serum-free media indicative of autonomous growth. Compared to control cells, CATLE cells showed reduced protein expression of the tumor suppressor gene PTEN (decreased to 26% of control) and the putative tumor suppressor gene SLC38A3 (14% of control). Morphological evidence of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) occurred in CATLE cells together with appropriate changes in expression of the EMT markers vimentin (VIM; increased to 300% of control) and e-cadherin (CDH1; decreased to 16% of control). EMT is common in carcinogenic transformation of epithelial cells. CATLE cells showed increased KRAS (291%), ERK1/2 (274%), phosphorylated ERK (p-ERK; 152%), and phosphorylated AKT1 (p-AKT1; 170%) protein expression. Increased transcript expression of metallothioneins, MT1A and MT2A and the stress response genes HMOX1 (690%) and HIF1A (247%) occurred in CATLE cells possibly in adaptation to chronic arsenic exposure. Thus, arsenic induced multiple cancer cell characteristics in human peripheral lung epithelial cells. This model may be useful to assess mechanisms of arsenic-induced lung cancer. - Highlights: • Chronic arsenic exposure transforms a human peripheral lung epithelia cell line. • Cells acquire characteristics in common with human lung adenocarcinoma cells. • These transformed cells provide a

  12. Myokymia and neuromyotonia in veterinary medicine: a comparison with peripheral nerve hyperexcitability syndrome in humans.

    PubMed

    Vanhaesebrouck, An E; Bhatti, Sofie F M; Franklin, Robin J M; Van Ham, Luc

    2013-08-01

    Involuntary muscle hyperactivity can result from muscle or peripheral nerve hyperexcitability or central nervous system dysfunction. In humans, diseases causing hyperexcitability of peripheral nerves are grouped together under the term 'peripheral nerve hyperexcitability' (PNH). Hyperexcitability of the peripheral motor nerve can result into five different phenotypic main variants, i.e. fasciculations, myokymia, neuromyotonia, cramps and tetany, each with their own clinical and electromyographic characteristics. This review focuses on the most commonly described expressions of PNH in veterinary medicine, i.e. myokymia and neuromyotonia, in particular in young Jack Russell terriers. Data from 58 veterinary cases with generalized myokymia and neuromyotonia were analyzed, including unpublished treatment and follow-up data on eight Jack Russell terriers from a previous study and seven additional Jack Russell terriers. A dysfunction of the potassium channel or its associated proteins has been found in many human syndromes characterized by PNH, in particular in generalized myokymia and neuromyotonia, and is suspected to occur in veterinary medicine. Potential pathomechanisms of potassium channel dysfunction leading to signs of PNH are broad and include genetic mutations, antibody-mediated attack or ion channel maldistribution due to axonal degeneration or demyelination. A more accurate classification of the different PNH syndromes will facilitate a more rapid diagnosis and guide further research into natural occurring PNH in animals.

  13. Allelic Exclusion and Peripheral Reconstitution by TCR Transgenic T Cells Arising From Transduced Human Hematopoietic Stem/Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Giannoni, Francesca; Hardee, Cinnamon L; Wherley, Jennifer; Gschweng, Eric; Senadheera, Shantha; Kaufman, Michael L; Chan, Rebecca; Bahner, Ingrid; Gersuk, Vivian; Wang, Xiaoyan; Gjertson, David; Baltimore, David; Witte, Owen N; Economou, James S; Ribas, Antoni; Kohn, Donald B

    2013-01-01

    Transduction and transplantation of human hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPC) with the genes for a T-cell receptor (TCR) that recognizes a tumor-associated antigen may lead to sustained long-term production of T cells expressing the TCR and confer specific antitumor activity. We evaluated this using a lentiviral vector (CCLc-MND-F5) carrying cDNA for a human TCR specific for an HLA-A*0201-restricted peptide of Melanoma Antigen Recognized by T cells (MART-1). CD34+ HSPC were transduced with the F5 TCR lentiviral vector or mock transduced and transplanted into neonatal NSG mice or NSG mice transgenic for human HLA-A*0201 (NSG-A2). Human CD8+ and CD4+ T cells expressing the human F5 TCR were present in the thymus, spleen, and peripheral blood after 4–5 months. Expression of human HLA-A*0201 in NSG-A2 recipient mice led to significantly increased numbers of human CD8+ and CD4+ T cells expressing the F5 TCR, compared with control NSG recipients. Transduction of the human CD34+ HSPC by the F5 TCR transgene caused a high degree of allelic exclusion, potently suppressing rearrangement of endogenous human TCR-β genes during thymopoiesis. In summary, we demonstrated the feasibility of engineering human HSPC to express a tumor-specific TCR to serve as a long-term source of tumor-targeted mature T cells for immunotherapy of melanoma. PMID:23380815

  14. Human Infrastructure & Human Activity Detection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-07-01

    researchers are developing sensors systems that detect footfalls (or gait ) [1, 2], speech, the spectral response of human skin, etc [3]. Little work has...cone shaped field of view. • Visible imagers can capture color or grayscale video for human gait detection and object recognition. • Infrared...his/her gait produces a unique signature [13]. Indirect means of detecting personnel include the usage of acoustic, seismic, magnetic, passive

  15. Ectopic lymphokine gene expression in human peripheral blood lymphocytes in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Chambers, C.A.; Kang, Joonsoo; Hozumi, Nobumichi Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, Ontario )

    1992-02-01

    An animal model to study the effects of ectopic expression of cytokines involved in cell growth and differentiation has been established. Retrovirus vectors containing the human interleukin 6 cDNA were used to produce high titer virus-producing lines. Human peripheral blood lymphocytes (hPBLs) were successfully infected with the retrovirus and engrafted into severe combined immunodeficient mice. The majority of the animals were engrafted with hPBLs, as determined by the presence of human glucose phosphate isomerase. Furthermore, six of seven mice engrafted with hPBLs infected with high titer virus and detectable hPBLs present in the spleen expressed the retroviral human interleukin 6 gene. Importantly, human interleukin 6 protein was expressed at physiologically significant levels in these mice. These results demonstrate that models for human disease and immunotherapy involving retrovirus-mediated gene transfer into human cells can be developed in mice.

  16. Proteoglycans regulate the chemotaxis of dendritic cells derived from human peripheral blood monocytes.

    PubMed

    Yoshino, Hironori; Takahashi, Kenji; Monzen, Satoru; Kashiwakura, Ikuo

    2010-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are a type of antigen-presenting cell which play an essential role in the immune system. The transition from immature DC (iDCs) to mature DCs (mDCs) requires appropriate maturation stimuli, such as pro-inflammatory cytokines or pathogen-derived components. Proteoglycans (PGs), which are composed of core proteins and the glycosaminoglycans that bind to them, are one of the main components of the extracellular matrix around pathogens such as bacteria. This study investigated the effects of PG extracted from the nasal septum cartilage of whale (W-PG) on the maturation of DCs derived from human peripheral blood monocytes. iDCs were prepared from human monocytes using granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and interleukin-4 (IL-4). The iDCs were stimulated by W-PG alone. In another type of experiment, the iDCs were stimulated by MIX (tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), IL-1beta, IL-6 and prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2))) or a combination of MIX plus W-PG. The stimulation of W-PG alone did not induce the phenotypic maturation from iDCs. However, W-PG promoted the up-regulation of chemokine receptor CCR7-surface expression and the chemotactic responsiveness to CCR7 ligand macrophage inflammatory protein-3beta on MIX-stimulated mDCs although W-PG did not influence matrix metalloproteinase-9 activity which is an important factor in DC migration through the extracellular matrix. The findings that W-PG can selectively regulate the chemotactic activity of DCs in vitro under inflammatory conditions therefore indicate that the interaction of PGs with immune cells including DCs plays an important role in the immune response under the milieu of innate immunity.

  17. Combustible and non-combustible tobacco product preparations differentially regulate human peripheral blood mononuclear cell functions.

    PubMed

    Arimilli, Subhashini; Damratoski, Brad E; Prasad, G L

    2013-09-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells and T cells play essential roles in innate and adaptive immune responses in protecting against microbial infections and in tumor surveillance. Although evidence suggests that smoking causes immunosuppression, there is limited information whether the use of smokeless tobacco (ST) products affects immune responses. In this study, we assessed the effects of two preparations of cigarette smoke, ST extract and nicotine on T cell and NK cell responses using Toll-like receptor-ligand stimulated human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). The tobacco product preparations (TPPs) tested included whole smoke conditioned media (WS-CM), total particulate matter (TPM) and a ST product preparation in complete artificial saliva (ST/CAS). The PBMCs were stimulated with polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid (poly I:C) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS). A marked reduction of the expression of intracellular IFN-γ and TNF-α was evident in NK cells and T cells treated with WS-CM and TPM. Consistently, attenuation of ligand-induced secretion of cytokines (IL-1β, IL-10, IL-12 and TNF-α) from PBMCs treated with WS-CM and TPM were observed. While the treatment with TPPs did not alter the expression of the maturation marker CD69, WS-CM and TPM inhibited the cytolytic activity of human PBMCs. Suppression of perforin by WS-CM was also detected. Although interference from the vehicle confounded the interpretation of effects of ST/CAS, some effects were evident only at high concentrations. Nicotine treatment minimally impacted expression of cytokines and cytolytic activity. Data presented herein suggests that the function of NK cells and T cells is influenced by exposure to TPPs (based on equi-nicotine units) in the following order: WS-CM>TPM>ST/CAS. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis put forward by others that chronic smoking leads to immunosuppression, an effect that may contribute to increased microbial infections and cancer incidence among smokers.

  18. Dissecting Interferon-Induced Transcriptional Programs in Human Peripheral Blood Cells

    PubMed Central

    Waddell, Simon J.; Popper, Stephen J.; Rubins, Kathleen H.; Griffiths, Michael J.; Brown, Patrick O.; Levin, Michael; Relman, David A.

    2010-01-01

    Interferons are key modulators of the immune system, and are central to the control of many diseases. The response of immune cells to stimuli in complex populations is the product of direct and indirect effects, and of homotypic and heterotypic cell interactions. Dissecting the global transcriptional profiles of immune cell populations may provide insights into this regulatory interplay. The host transcriptional response may also be useful in discriminating between disease states, and in understanding pathophysiology. The transcriptional programs of cell populations in health therefore provide a paradigm for deconvoluting disease-associated gene expression profiles. We used human cDNA microarrays to (1) compare the gene expression programs in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) elicited by 6 major mediators of the immune response: interferons α, β, ω and γ, IL12 and TNFα; and (2) characterize the transcriptional responses of purified immune cell populations (CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, B cells, NK cells and monocytes) to IFNγ stimulation. We defined a highly stereotyped response to type I interferons, while responses to IFNγ and IL12 were largely restricted to a subset of type I interferon-inducible genes. TNFα stimulation resulted in a distinct pattern of gene expression. Cell type-specific transcriptional programs were identified, highlighting the pronounced response of monocytes to IFNγ, and emergent properties associated with IFN-mediated activation of mixed cell populations. This information provides a detailed view of cellular activation by immune mediators, and contributes an interpretive framework for the definition of host immune responses in a variety of disease settings. PMID:20339534

  19. Analysis of cytotoxic effects of silver nanoclusters on human peripheral blood mononuclear cells 'in vitro'.

    PubMed

    Orta-García, Sandra Teresa; Plascencia-Villa, Germán; Ochoa-Martínez, Angeles Catalina; Ruiz-Vera, Tania; Pérez-Vázquez, Francisco Javier; Velázquez-Salazar, J Jesús; Yacamán, Miguel José; Navarro-Contreras, Hugo Ricardo; Pérez-Maldonado, Iván N

    2015-10-01

    The antimicrobial properties of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have made these particles one of the most used nanomaterials in consumer products. Therefore, an understanding of the interactions (unwanted toxicity) between nanoparticles and human cells is of significant interest. The aim of this study was to assess the in vitro cytotoxicity effects of silver nanoclusters (AgNC, < 2 nm diameter) on peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). Using flow cytometry and comet assay methods, we demonstrate that exposure of PBMC to AgNC induced intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, DNA damage and apoptosis at 3, 6 and 12 h, with a dose-dependent response (0.1, 1, 3, 5 and 30 µg ml(-1)). Advanced electron microscopy imaging of complete and ultrathin-sections of PBMC confirmed the cytotoxic effects and cell damage caused by AgNC. The present study showed that AgNC produced without coating agents induced significant cytotoxic effects on PBMC owing to their high aspect ratio and active surface area, even at much lower concentrations (<1 µg ml(-1)) than those applied in previous studies, resembling what would occur under real exposure conditions to nanosilver-functionalized consumer products.

  20. Catabolism of exogenously supplied thymidine to thymine and dihydrothymine by platelets in human peripheral blood

    SciTech Connect

    Pero, R.W.; Johnson, D.; Olsson, A.

    1984-11-01

    The interference of platelets with the estimation of unscheduled DNA synthesis in human peripheral mononuclear leukocytes following genotoxic exposure was studied. A 96% reduction in the unscheduled DNA synthesis value was achieved by incubating (/sup 3/H)thymidine with platelet-rich plasma for 5 hr at 37 degrees. Using radioactive thymine-containing compounds, together with quantitative analyses based on thin-layer and ion-exchange chromatographies, we have shown that thymidine was converted to thymine which, in turn, was converted to dihydrothymine in platelet-rich plasma. The enzymes responsible were separated from platelet lysates by gel filtration and were identified as thymidine phosphorylase and dihydrothymine dehydrogenase. The phosphorylase reversibly catalyzed the formation of thymine from thymidine and converted bromodeoxyuridine to bromouracil. The dehydrogenase reversibly catalyzed the interconversion of thymine and dihydrothymine in a reaction dependent on NADP(H), and it was inhibited by diazouracil and by thymine. Nearly all the thymidine-catabolizing activity found in whole blood samples supplied exogenously with thymidine was accounted for by the platelets. Since most genetic toxicological tests that use blood samples do not involve removing platelets from the blood cell cultures, then it is concluded that precautions should be taken in the future to determine the influence of platelets on these test systems. This is particularly true for methods dependent on thymidine pulses such as unscheduled DNA synthesis, or those dependent on bromodeoxyuridine, such as sister chromatid exchanges, since this nucleoside is also a substrate for thymidine phosphorylase.

  1. Antigenotoxic Effect of Trametes spp. Extracts against DNA Damage on Human Peripheral White Blood Cells

    PubMed Central

    Knežević, Aleksandar; Živković, Lada; Stajić, Mirjana; Vukojević, Jelena; Milovanović, Ivan; Spremo-Potparević, Biljana

    2015-01-01

    Trametes species have been used for thousands of years in traditional and conventional medicine for the treatment of various types of diseases. The goal was to evaluate possible antigenotoxic effects of mycelium and basidiocarp extracts of selected Trametes species and to assess dependence on their antioxidant potential. Trametes versicolor, T. hirsuta, and T. gibbosa were the species studied. Antigenotoxic potentials of extracts were assessed on human peripheral white blood cells with basidiocarp and mycelium extracts of the species. The alkaline comet test was used for detection of DNA strand breaks and alkali-labile sites, as well as the extent of DNA migration. DPPH assay was used to estimate antioxidative properties of extracts. Fruiting body extracts of T. versicolor and T. gibbosa as well as T. hirsuta extracts, except that at 20.0 mg/mL, were not genotoxic agents. T. versicolor extract had at 5.0 mg/mL the greatest antigenotoxic effect in both pre- and posttreatment of leukocytes. The mycelium extracts of the three species had no genotoxic activity and significant antigenotoxic effect against H2O2-induced DNA damage, both in pre- and posttreatment. The results suggest that extracts of these three species could be considered as strong antigenotoxic agents able to stimulate genoprotective response of cells. PMID:26258163

  2. Induction of endometriosis alters the peripheral and endometrial regulatory T cell population in the non-human primate

    PubMed Central

    Braundmeier, A.; Jackson, K.; Hastings, J.; Koehler, J.; Nowak, R.; Fazleabas, A.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND Endometriosis is a gynecological condition that is characterized by extreme abdominal pain and also decreased fertility. Regulatory T cells (Tregs) have immunosuppressive activity critical for embryonic implantation and likewise the acceptance of tissue engraftment. Utilizing the induced non-human primate (Papio anubis) model of endometriosis, we hypothesize that endometriosis decreases the peripheral and endomet rial Treg profile, whereas ectopic lesions have increased Treg localization. METHODS Peripheral blood and endometrium were obtained throughout the menstrual cycle prior to and after induction of disease. Animals were randomly assigned to control (n = 7) or diseased (n = 16) treatment groups. Endometriosis was induced by i.p. injection of autologous menstrual tissue for 2 consecutive months during menses. Peripheral blood and endometrial tissue were collected at d9-11PO at 1, 3, 6, 9, 12 and 15 months post-induction of disease for fluorescence-activated cell sorting, quantitative RT–PCR and immunohistochemistry. Ectopic lesions were excised at 1 and 6 months post-inoculation and also harvested at necropsy (15 months) and processed for RNA of IHC. Identification of Tregs through analysis of FOXP3 expression was conducted utlilizing several methodologies. Differences were determined by non-parametric statistical analysis between all treatment groups and time points. RESULTS In control animals, the proportion of peripheral natural Tregs (nTregs) was reduced (P < 0.05) during the mid- and late secretory stages of the menstrual cycle compared with menses. The induction of disease decreased peripheral Treg expression at early time points (P < 0.05) and this remained low throughout the time course, compared with the pre-inoculatory level of an individual. FOXP3 gene expression and Treg populations were also decreased in the eutopic endometrium (P < 0.05) compared with control animals, whereas these parameters were increased in ectopic lesions (P < 0

  3. TRPA1 receptor localisation in the human peripheral nervous system and functional studies in cultured human and rat sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Anand, U; Otto, W R; Facer, P; Zebda, N; Selmer, I; Gunthorpe, M J; Chessell, I P; Sinisi, M; Birch, R; Anand, P

    2008-06-20

    TRPA1 is a receptor expressed by sensory neurons, that is activated by low temperature (<17 degrees C) and plant derivatives such as cinnamaldehyde and isoeugenol, to elicit sensations including pain. Using immunohistochemistry, we have, for the first time, localised TRPA1 in human DRG neurons, spinal cord motoneurones and nerve roots, peripheral nerves, intestinal myenteric plexus neurones, and skin basal keratinocytes. TRPA1 co-localised with a subset of hDRG neurons positive for TRPV1, the heat and capsaicin receptor. The number of small/medium TRPA1 positive neurons (< or =50 microm) was increased after hDRG avulsion injury [percentage of cells, median (range): controls 16.5 (7-23); injured 46 (34-55); P<0.005], but the number of large TRPA1 neurons was unchanged [control 19.5 (13-31); injured 21 (11-35)]. Similar TRPA1 changes were observed in cultured hDRG neurons, after exposure to a combination of key neurotrophic factors NGF, GDNF and NT-3 (NTFs) in vitro. We used calcium imaging to examine responses of HEK cells transfected with hTRPA1 cDNA, and of human and rat DRG neurons cultured with or without added NTFs, to cinnamaldehyde (CA) and isoeugenol (IE). Exposure to NTFs in vitro sensitized cultured human sensory neuronal responses to CA; repeated CA exposure produced desensitisation. In rDRG neurons, low (225 microM) CA preincubation enhanced capsaicin responses, while high (450 microM and 2mM) CA caused inhibition which was partially reversed in the presence of 8 bromo cAMP, indicating receptor dephosphorylation. While TRPA1 localisation is more widespread than TRPV1, it represents a promising novel drug target for the treatment of chronic pain and hypersensitivity.

  4. The effects of calpain inhibition upon IL-2 and CD25 expression in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Schaecher, K E; Goust, J M; Banik, N L

    2001-10-01

    Calcium is an important contributor to T cell activation; it is also the major factor in the activation of the calcium-activated neutral proteinase, calpain. For this reason, we wanted to investigate if calpain has a role in T cell activation and what aspects of this activation calpain affects. As measured by semi-quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), calpain inhibition decreased interleukin-2 (IL-2) and CD25 mRNA expression in a dose-dependent manner, at early time points following the initial activation, and over extended periods of time in activated human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Using an enzyme-linked immuno-sorbent assay (ELISA) specific for human IL-2, we found that calpain inhibition decreased IL-2 secretion in a dose-dependent manner, shortly after activation, and continuously over time. Inhibiting calpain caused a dose-dependent inhibition of CD25 cell surface expression and also inhibited expression shortly after activation and for at least 48 h. This study showed that calpain has an integral role in the synthesis of the two important T cell activation factors, IL-2 and CD25.

  5. Human Monoclonal Antibodies against Clostridium difficile Toxins A and B Inhibit Inflammatory and Histologic Responses to the Toxins in Human Colon and Peripheral Blood Monocytes

    PubMed Central

    Koon, Hon Wai; Shih, David Q.; Hing, Tressia C.; Yoo, Jun Hwan; Ho, Samantha; Chen, Xinhua; Kelly, Ciarán P.; Targan, Stephan R.

    2013-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is a common and debilitating nosocomial infection with high morbidity and mortality. C. difficile mediates diarrhea and colitis by releasing two toxins, toxin A and toxin B. Since both toxins stimulate proinflammatory signaling pathways in human colonocytes and both are involved in the pathophysiology of CDI, neutralization of toxin A and B activities may represent an important therapeutic approach against CDI. Recent studies indicated that human monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against toxins A and B reduce their cytotoxic and secretory activities and prevent CDI in hamsters. Moreover, anti-toxin A and anti-toxin B MAbs together with antibiotics also effectively reduced recurrent CDI in humans. However, whether these MAbs neutralize toxin A- and toxin B-associated immune responses in human colonic mucosa or human peripheral blood monocyte cells (PBMCs) has never been examined. We used fresh human colonic biopsy specimens and peripheral blood monocytes to evaluate the effects of these antibodies against toxin A- and B-associated cytokine release, proinflammatory signaling, and histologic damage. Incubation of anti-toxin A (MK3415) or anti-toxin B (MK6072) MAbs with human PBMCs significantly inhibited toxin A- and toxin B-mediated tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) expression. MK3415 and MK6072 also diminished toxin A- and toxin B-mediated NF-κB p65 phosphorylation in human monocytes, respectively, and significantly reduced toxin A- and B-induced TNF-α and IL-1β expression as well as histologic damage in human colonic explants. Our results underline the effectiveness of MK3415 and MK6072 in blocking C. difficile toxin A- and toxin B-mediated inflammatory responses and histologic damage. PMID:23629713

  6. Microcystin-LR induced DNA damage in human peripheral blood lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Zegura, B; Gajski, G; Straser, A; Garaj-Vrhovac, V; Filipič, M

    2011-12-24

    Human exposure to microcystins, which are produced by freshwater cyanobacterial species, is of growing concern due to increasing appearance of cyanobacterial blooms as a consequence of global warming and increasing water eutrophication. Although microcystins are considered to be liver-specific, there is evidence that they may also affect other tissues. These substances have been shown to induce DNA damage in vitro and in vivo, but the mechanisms of their genotoxic activity remain unclear. In human peripheral blood lymphocytes (HPBLs) exposure to non-cytotoxic concentrations (0, 0.1, 1 and 10μg/ml) of microcystin-LR (MCLR) induced a dose- and time-dependent increase in DNA damage, as measured with the comet assay. Digestion of DNA from MCLR-treated HPBLs with purified formamidopyrimidine-DNA glycosylase (Fpg) displayed a greater number of DNA strand-breaks than non-digested DNA, confirming the evidence that MCLR induces oxidative DNA damage. With the cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay no statistically significant induction of micronuclei, nucleoplasmic bridges and nuclear buds was observed after a 24-h exposure to MCLR. At the molecular level, no changes in the expression of selected genes involved in the cellular response to DNA damage and oxidative stress were observed after a 4-h exposure to MCLR (1μg/ml). After 24h, DNA damage-responsive genes (p53, mdm2, gadd45a, cdkn1a), a gene involved in apoptosis (bax) and oxidative stress-responsive genes (cat, gpx1, sod1, gsr, gclc) were up-regulated. These results provide strong support that MCLR is an indirectly genotoxic agent, acting via induction of oxidative stress, and that lymphocytes are also the target of microcystin-induced toxicity.

  7. Human filarial Wolbachia lipopeptide directly activates human neutrophils in vitro.

    PubMed

    Tamarozzi, F; Wright, H L; Johnston, K L; Edwards, S W; Turner, J D; Taylor, M J

    2014-10-01

    The host inflammatory response to the Onchocerca volvulus endosymbiont, Wolbachia, is a major contributing factor in the development of chronic pathology in humans (onchocerciasis/river blindness). Recently, the toll-like pattern recognition receptor motif of the major inflammatory ligands of filarial Wolbachia, membrane-associated diacylated lipoproteins, was functionally defined in murine models of pathology, including mediation of neutrophil recruitment to the cornea. However, the extent to which human neutrophils can be activated in response to this Wolbachia pattern recognition motif is not known. Therefore, the responses of purified peripheral blood human neutrophils to a synthetic N-terminal diacylated lipopeptide (WoLP) of filarial Wolbachia peptidoglycan-associated lipoprotein (PAL) were characterized. WoLP exposure led to a dose-dependent activation of healthy, human neutrophils that included gross morphological alterations and modulation of surface expressed integrins involved in tethering, rolling and extravasation. WoLP exposure induced chemotaxis but not chemokinesis of neutrophils, and secretion of the major neutrophil chemokine, interleukin 8. WoLP also induced and primed the respiratory burst, and enhanced neutrophil survival by delay of apoptosis. These results indicate that the major inflammatory motif of filarial Wolbachia lipoproteins directly activates human neutrophils in vitro and promotes a molecular pathway by which human neutrophils are recruited to sites of Onchocerca parasitism.

  8. Human psychophysics and rodent spinal neurones exhibit peripheral and central mechanisms of inflammatory pain in the UVB and UVB heat rekindling models

    PubMed Central

    O’Neill, Jessica; Sikandar, Shafaq; McMahon, Stephen B; Dickenson, Anthony H

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The predictive value of laboratory models for human pain processing is crucial for improving translational research. The discrepancy between peripheral and central mechanisms of pain is an important consideration for drug targets, and here we describe two models of inflammatory pain that involve ultraviolet B (UVB) irradiation, which can employ peripheral and central sensitisation to produce mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia in rats and humans. We use electrophysiology in rats to measure the mechanically- and thermally-evoked activity of rat spinal neurones and quantitative sensory testing to assess human psychophysical responses to mechanical and thermal stimulation in a model of UVB irradiation and in a model of UVB irradiation with heat rekindling. Our results demonstrate peripheral sensitisation in both species driven by UVB irradiation, with a clear mechanical and thermal hypersensitivity of rat dorsal horn neurones and enhanced perceptual responses of human subjects to both mechanical and thermal stimulation. Additional heat rekindling produces markers of central sensitisation in both species, including enhanced receptive field sizes. Importantly, we also showed a correlation in the evoked activity of rat spinal neurones to human thermal pain thresholds. The parallel results in rats and humans validate the translational use of both models and the potential for such models for preclinical assessment of prospective analgesics in inflammatory pain states. Key points Translational research is key to bridging the gaps between preclinical findings and the patients, and a translational model of inflammatory pain will ideally induce both peripheral and central sensitisation, more effectively mimicking clinical pathophysiology in some chronic inflammatory conditions. We conducted a parallel investigation of two models of inflammatory pain, using ultraviolet B (UVB) irradiation alone and UVB irradiation with heat rekindling. We used rodent electrophysiology

  9. Human psychophysics and rodent spinal neurones exhibit peripheral and central mechanisms of inflammatory pain in the UVB and UVB heat rekindling models.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, Jessica; Sikandar, Shafaq; McMahon, Stephen B; Dickenson, Anthony H

    2015-09-01

    Translational research is key to bridging the gaps between preclinical findings and the patients, and a translational model of inflammatory pain will ideally induce both peripheral and central sensitisation, more effectively mimicking clinical pathophysiology in some chronic inflammatory conditions. We conducted a parallel investigation of two models of inflammatory pain, using ultraviolet B (UVB) irradiation alone and UVB irradiation with heat rekindling. We used rodent electrophysiology and human quantitative sensory testing to characterise nociceptive processing in the peripheral and central nervous systems in both models. In both species, UVB irradiation produces peripheral sensitisation measured as augmented evoked activity of rat dorsal horn neurones and increased perceptual responses of human subjects to mechanical and thermal stimuli. In both species, UVB with heat rekindling produces central sensitisation. UVB irradiation alone and UVB with heat rekindling are translational models of inflammation that produce peripheral and central sensitisation, respectively. The predictive value of laboratory models for human pain processing is crucial for improving translational research. The discrepancy between peripheral and central mechanisms of pain is an important consideration for drug targets, and here we describe two models of inflammatory pain that involve ultraviolet B (UVB) irradiation, which can employ peripheral and central sensitisation to produce mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia in rats and humans. We use electrophysiology in rats to measure the mechanically- and thermally-evoked activity of rat spinal neurones and quantitative sensory testing to assess human psychophysical responses to mechanical and thermal stimulation in a model of UVB irradiation and in a model of UVB irradiation with heat rekindling. Our results demonstrate peripheral sensitisation in both species driven by UVB irradiation, with a clear mechanical and thermal hypersensitivity of

  10. Lipopolysaccharide Stimulates Butyric Acid-Induced Apoptosis in Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kurita-Ochiai, Tomoko; Fukushima, Kazuo; Ochiai, Kuniyasu

    1999-01-01

    We previously reported that butyric acid, an extracellular metabolite from periodontopathic bacteria, induced apoptosis in murine thymocytes, splenic T cells, and human Jurkat T cells. In this study, we examined the ability of butyric acid to induce apoptosis in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and the effect of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) on this apoptosis. Butyric acid significantly inhibited the anti-CD3 monoclonal antibody- and concanavalin A-induced proliferative responses in a dose-dependent fashion. This inhibition of PBMC growth by butyric acid depended on apoptosis in vitro. It was characterized by internucleosomal DNA digestion and revealed by gel electrophoresis followed by a colorimetric DNA fragmentation assay to occur in a concentration-dependent fashion. Butyric acid-induced PBMC apoptosis was accompanied by caspase-3 protease activity but not by caspase-1 protease activity. LPS potentiated butyric acid-induced PBMC apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. Flow-cytometric analysis revealed that LPS increased the proportion of sub-G1 cells and the number of late-stage apoptotic cells induced by butyric acid. Annexin V binding experiments with fractionated subpopulations of PBMC in flow cytometory revealed that LPS accelerated the butyric acid-induced CD3+-T-cell apoptosis followed by similar levels of both CD4+- and CD8+-T-cell apoptosis. The addition of LPS to PBMC cultures did not cause DNA fragmentation, suggesting that LPS was unable to induce PBMC apoptosis directly. These data suggest that LPS, in combination with butyric acid, potentiates CD3+ PBMC T-cell apoptosis and plays a role in the apoptotic depletion of CD4+ and CD8+ cells. PMID:9864191

  11. LDL and HDL transfer rates across peripheral microvascular endothelium agree with those predicted for passive ultrafiltration in humans.

    PubMed

    Michel, C Charles; Nanjee, M Nazeem; Olszewski, Waldemar L; Miller, Norman E

    2015-01-01

    The mechanisms by which LDLs and HDLs cross the vascular endothelium from plasma into interstitial fluid are not understood, and have never been studied in humans in vivo. We determined whether the plasma-to-lymph clearance rates of LDL and HDL conform with those predicted by passive ultrafiltration through intercellular pores, or if it is necessary to invoke an active process such as receptor-mediated transcytosis. Plasma and afferent peripheral lymph were collected under steady-state conditions from 30 healthy men, and assayed for seven globular proteins of molecular radii 2.89-8.95 nm, complement C3, and apo AI, apo AII, and apo B. Plasma-to-lymph clearance rates of the seven proteins fitted the relation expected for molecules of their size when transported through two populations of pores of radius 4.95 and 20.1 nm. The same model parameters were then found to accurately predict the clearance rates of both HDL and LDL. The apparent clearance of complement C3, previously shown to be secreted by cultured endothelium, exceeded that predicted by the model. We conclude that the transport of HDL and LDL from plasma into interstitial fluid across the peripheral vascular endothelium in healthy humans can be explained by ultrafiltration without invoking an additional active process such as transcytosis.

  12. LDL and HDL transfer rates across peripheral microvascular endothelium agree with those predicted for passive ultrafiltration in humans

    PubMed Central

    Michel, C. Charles; Nanjee, M. Nazeem; Olszewski, Waldemar L.; Miller, Norman E.

    2015-01-01

    The mechanisms by which LDLs and HDLs cross the vascular endothelium from plasma into interstitial fluid are not understood, and have never been studied in humans in vivo. We determined whether the plasma-to-lymph clearance rates of LDL and HDL conform with those predicted by passive ultrafiltration through intercellular pores, or if it is necessary to invoke an active process such as receptor-mediated transcytosis. Plasma and afferent peripheral lymph were collected under steady-state conditions from 30 healthy men, and assayed for seven globular proteins of molecular radii 2.89–8.95 nm, complement C3, and apo AI, apo AII, and apo B. Plasma-to-lymph clearance rates of the seven proteins fitted the relation expected for molecules of their size when transported through two populations of pores of radius 4.95 and 20.1 nm. The same model parameters were then found to accurately predict the clearance rates of both HDL and LDL. The apparent clearance of complement C3, previously shown to be secreted by cultured endothelium, exceeded that predicted by the model. We conclude that the transport of HDL and LDL from plasma into interstitial fluid across the peripheral vascular endothelium in healthy humans can be explained by ultrafiltration without invoking an additional active process such as transcytosis. PMID:25398615

  13. Microneurography as a tool in clinical neurophysiology to investigate peripheral neural traffic in humans.

    PubMed

    Mano, Tadaaki; Iwase, Satoshi; Toma, Shinobu

    2006-11-01

    Microneurography is a method using metal microelectrodes to investigate directly identified neural traffic in myelinated as well as unmyelinated efferent and afferent nerves leading to and coming from muscle and skin in human peripheral nerves in situ. The present paper reviews how this technique has been used in clinical neurophysiology to elucidate the neural mechanisms of autonomic regulation, motor control and sensory functions in humans under physiological and pathological conditions. Microneurography is particularly important to investigate efferent and afferent neural traffic in unmyelinated C fibers. The recording of efferent discharges in postganglionic sympathetic C efferent fibers innervating muscle and skin (muscle sympathetic nerve activity; MSNA and skin sympathetic nerve activity; SSNA) provides direct information about neural control of autonomic effector organs including blood vessels and sweat glands. Sympathetic microneurography has become a potent tool to reveal neural functions and dysfunctions concerning blood pressure control and thermoregulation. This recording has been used not only in wake conditions but also in sleep to investigate changes in sympathetic neural traffic during sleep and sleep-related events such as sleep apnea. The same recording was also successfully carried out by astronauts during spaceflight. Recordings of afferent discharges from muscle mechanoreceptors have been used to understand the mechanisms of motor control. Muscle spindle afferent information is particularly important for the control of fine precise movements. It may also play important roles to predict behavior outcomes during learning of a motor task. Recordings of discharges in myelinated afferent fibers from skin mechanoreceptors have provided not only objective information about mechanoreceptive cutaneous sensation but also the roles of these signals in fine motor control. Unmyelinated mechanoreceptive afferent discharges from hairy skin seem to be

  14. Peripheral and central effects of repeated social defeat stress: monocyte trafficking, microglial activation, and anxiety.

    PubMed

    Reader, B F; Jarrett, B L; McKim, D B; Wohleb, E S; Godbout, J P; Sheridan, J F

    2015-03-19

    The development and exacerbation of depression and anxiety are associated with exposure to repeated psychosocial stress. Stress is known to affect the bidirectional communication between the nervous and immune systems leading to elevated levels of stress mediators including glucocorticoids (GCs) and catecholamines and increased trafficking of proinflammatory immune cells. Animal models, like the repeated social defeat (RSD) paradigm, were developed to explore this connection between stress and affective disorders. RSD induces activation of the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis activation, increases bone marrow production and egress of primed, GC-insensitive monocytes, and stimulates the trafficking of these cells to tissues including the spleen, lung, and brain. Recently, the observation that these monocytes have the ability to traffic to the brain perivascular spaces and parenchyma have provided mechanisms by which these peripheral cells may contribute to the prolonged anxiety-like behavior associated with RSD. The data that have been amassed from the RSD paradigm and others recapitulate many of the behavioral and immunological phenotypes associated with human anxiety disorders and may serve to elucidate potential avenues of treatment for these disorders. Here, we will discuss novel and key data that will present an overview of the neuroendocrine, immunological and behavioral responses to social stressors.

  15. Peripheral and Central Effects of Repeated Social Defeat Stress: Monocyte Trafficking, Microglial Activation, and Anxiety

    PubMed Central

    Reader, Brenda F.; Jarrett, Brant L.; McKim, Daniel B.; Wohleb, Eric S.; Godbout, Jonathan P.; Sheridan, John F.

    2015-01-01

    The development and exacerbation of depression and anxiety are associated with exposure to repeated psychosocial stress. Stress is known to affect the bidirectional communication between the nervous and immune systems leading to elevated levels of stress mediators including glucocorticoids (GCs) and catecholamines and increased trafficking of proinflammatory immune cells. Animal models, like the repeated social defeat (RSD) paradigm, were developed to explore this connection between stress and affective disorders. RSD induces activation of the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) and hypothalamic-pituitary (HPA) axis activation, increases bone marrow production and egress of primed, GC-insensitive monocytes, and stimulates the trafficking of these cells to tissues including the spleen, lung, and brain. Recently, the observation that these monocytes have the ability to traffic to the brain perivascular spaces and parenchyma have provided mechanisms by which these peripheral cells may contribute to the prolonged anxiety-like behavior associated with RSD. The data that have been amassed from the RSD paradigm and others recapitulate many of the behavioral and immunological phenotypes associated with human anxiety disorders and may serve to elucidate potential avenues of treatment for these disorders. Here, we will discuss novel and key data that will present an overview of the neuroendocrine, immunological and behavioral responses to social stressors. PMID:25596319

  16. The human BDNF gene: peripheral gene expression and protein levels as biomarkers for psychiatric disorders

    PubMed Central

    Cattaneo, A; Cattane, N; Begni, V; Pariante, C M; Riva, M A

    2016-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) regulates the survival and growth of neurons, and influences synaptic efficiency and plasticity. The human BDNF gene consists of 11 exons, and distinct BDNF transcripts are produced through the use of alternative promoters and splicing events. The majority of the BDNF transcripts can be detected not only in the brain but also in the blood cells, although no study has yet investigated the differential expression of BDNF transcripts at the peripheral level. This review provides a description of the human BDNF gene structure as well as a summary of clinical and preclinical evidence supporting the role of BDNF in the pathogenesis of psychiatric disorders. We will discuss several mechanisms as possibly underlying BDNF modulation, including epigenetic mechanisms. We will also discuss the potential use of peripheral BDNF as a biomarker for psychiatric disorders, focusing on the factors that can influence BDNF gene expression and protein levels. Within this context, we have also characterized, for we believe the first time, the expression of BDNF transcripts in the blood, with the aim to provide novel insights into the molecular mechanisms and signaling that may regulate peripheral BDNF gene expression levels. PMID:27874848

  17. (+)-Cannabidiol analogues which bind cannabinoid receptors but exert peripheral activity only.

    PubMed

    Fride, Ester; Feigin, Cfir; Ponde, Datta E; Breuer, Aviva; Hanus, Lumír; Arshavsky, Nina; Mechoulam, Raphael

    2004-12-15

    Delta9-Tetrahydrocannabinol (Delta9-THC) and (-)-cannabidiol are major constituents of the Cannabis sativa plant with different pharmacological profiles: (-)-Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol, but not (-)-cannabidiol, activates cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptors and induces psychoactive and peripheral effects. We have tested a series of (+)-cannabidiol derivatives, namely, (+)-cannabidiol-DMH (DMH-1,1-dimethylheptyl-), (+)-7-OH-cannabidiol-DMH, (+)-7-OH- cannabidiol, (+)-7-COOH- cannabidiol and (+)-7-COOH-cannabidiol-DMH, for central and peripheral (intestinal, antiinflammatory and peripheral pain) effects in mice. Although all (+)-cannabidiols bind to cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptors, only (+)-7-OH-cannabidiol-DMH was centrally active, while all (+)-cannabidiol analogues completely arrested defecation. The effects of (+)-cannabidiol-DMH and (+)-7-OH-cannabidiol-DMH were partially antagonized by the cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonist N-(piperidiny-1-yl)-5-(4-chlorophenyl)-1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-4-methyl-1H-pyrazole-3-carboxamide (SR141716), but not by the cannabinoid CB2 receptor antagonist N-[-(1S)-endo-1,3,3-trimethil bicyclo [2.2.1] heptan-2-yl-5-(4-chloro-3-methylphenyl)-1-(4-methylbenzyl)-pyrazole-3-carboxamide (SR144528), and had no effect on CB1(-/-) receptor knockout mice. (+)-Cannabidiol-DMH inhibited the peripheral pain response and arachidonic-acid-induced inflammation of the ear. We conclude that centrally inactive (+)-cannabidiol analogues should be further developed as antidiarrheal, antiinflammatory and analgesic drugs for gastrointestinal and other peripheral conditions.

  18. Fasting levels of monoketonic bile acids in human peripheral and portal circulation.

    PubMed

    Björkhem, I; Angelin, B; Einarsson, K; Ewerth, S

    1982-09-01

    It has been suggested that large amounts of ketonic bile acids may be present in portal venous blood. We have therefore determined the approximate concentration of 3-oxo-, 7-oxo-, and 12-oxo-bile acids (monoketonic bile acids) in human peripheral and portal circulation. These compounds were converted into the corresponding 3alpha-, 7alpha-, and 12alpha-hydroxy bile acids by treatment with sodium borodeuteride, thus increasing the molecular weight of each bile acid formed by one mass unit. The ratio between deuterated and nondeuterated bile acid was determined by combined gas-liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry with use of selected ion monitoring. From the ratio obtained and from the concentration of unlabeled bile acid, determined by isotope dilution-mass spectrometry, the approximate concentration of the different ketonic bile acids could be calculated. This method underestimates 3-oxygenated bile acids by 4-8%, 7-oxygenated bile acids by 2-3%, and 12-oxygenated bile acids by about 25%. The approximate concentration of monoketonic 3,7-oxygenated bile acids was found to be 0.08 +/- 0.02 and 0.37 +/- 0.25 micro mol/l in the peripheral venous serum and the portal venous serum, respectively. The approximate concentration of monoketonic 3,12-oxygenated bile acids was found to be 0.07 +/- 0.02 and 0.32 +/- 0.12 micro mol/l in the peripheral venous serum and the portal venous serum, respectively. The approximate concentration of monoketonic 3,7,12-oxygenated bile acids was found to be 0.03 +/- 0.01 and 0.14 +/- 0.05 micro mol/l in the peripheral venous serum and in the portal venous serum, respectively. The total concentration of the ketonic bile acids constituted only 9 +/- 1% and 8 +/- 3% of the nonoxidized bile acids in the peripheral venous serum and in the portal venous serum, respectively. Thus it seems less likely that the portal inflow of ketonic bile acids is of significant physiological importance under normal conditions.-Björkhem, I., B. Angelin, K

  19. Inhibition of the activation of Hageman factor (factor XII) by peripheral blood cells.

    PubMed Central

    Ratnoff, O D; Emanuelson, M M; Ziats, N P

    1987-01-01

    Suspensions of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), monocytes, T or B lymphocytes, platelets or granulocytes, and cell-depleted supernatant fluids of these suspensions inhibited activation of Hageman factor (HF, Factor XII) by ellagic acid, a property not shared by erythrocytes. PBMC also inhibited HF activation by glass or sulfatides. Contaminating platelets may have contributed to inhibition by PBMC. Elaboration of agents inhibiting HF activation required metabolically active cells. The inhibitor(s) in PBMC supernates were not identified with known agents, but had properties of a nonenzymatic protein. PBMC supernates did not contain fibrinogen, nor alter the thrombin, prothrombin, or partial thromboplastin times of normal plasma, amidolysis by activated plasma thromboplastin antecedent (Factor XIa) or activated Stuart factor (Factor Xa) or esterolysis by C1 (C1 esterase); they inhibited plasmin minimally. These experiments suggest that peripheral blood cells may impede intravascular coagulation. Whether this property helps maintain the fluidity of blood is unclear. PMID:3498741

  20. Distinct BOLD Activation Profiles Following Central and Peripheral Oxytocin Administration in Awake Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ferris, Craig F.; Yee, Jason R.; Kenkel, William M.; Dumais, Kelly Marie; Moore, Kelsey; Veenema, Alexa H.; Kulkarni, Praveen; Perkybile, Allison M.; Carter, C. Sue

    2015-01-01

    A growing body of literature has suggested that intranasal oxytocin (OT) or other systemic routes of administration can alter prosocial behavior, presumably by directly activating OT sensitive neural circuits in the brain. Yet there is no clear evidence that OT given peripherally can cross the blood–brain barrier at levels sufficient to engage the OT receptor. To address this issue we examined changes in blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) signal intensity in response to peripheral OT injections (0.1, 0.5, or 2.5 mg/kg) during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in awake rats imaged at 7.0 T. These data were compared to OT (1 μg/5 μl) given directly to the brain via the lateral cerebroventricle. Using a 3D annotated MRI atlas of the rat brain segmented into 171 brain areas and computational analysis, we reconstructed the distributed integrated neural circuits identified with BOLD fMRI following central and peripheral OT. Both routes of administration caused significant changes in BOLD signal within the first 10 min of administration. As expected, central OT activated a majority of brain areas known to express a high density of OT receptors, e.g., lateral septum, subiculum, shell of the accumbens, bed nucleus of the stria terminalis. This profile of activation was not matched by peripheral OT. The change in BOLD signal to peripheral OT did not show any discernible dose–response. Interestingly, peripheral OT affected all subdivisions of the olfactory bulb, in addition to the cerebellum and several brainstem areas relevant to the autonomic nervous system, including the solitary tract nucleus. The results from this imaging study do not support a direct central action of peripheral OT on the brain. Instead, the patterns of brain activity suggest that peripheral OT may interact at the level of the olfactory bulb and through sensory afferents from the autonomic nervous system to influence brain activity. PMID:26441574

  1. Human neurocysticercosis: in vivo expansion of peripheral regulatory T cells and their recruitment in the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Adalid-Peralta, Laura; Fleury, Agnes; García-Ibarra, Teresa M; Hernández, Marisela; Parkhouse, Michael; Crispín, José Carlos; Voltaire-Proaño, Jefferson; Cárdenas, Graciela; Fragoso, Gladis; Sciutto, Edda

    2012-02-01

    Human neurocysticercosis (NC) is caused by Taenia solium larvae lodged in the central nervous system. Most cases occur with no, or mild, neurological symptoms. However, in some patients, neuroinflammation is exacerbated, leading to severe forms of the disease. Considering the critical role of regulatory T cells (Tregs) in balancing inflammation in chronic diseases, their participation in restraining the inflammatory response in NC was explored in the present study. The frequency of Tregs and their relationship with the level of the proliferative response, the level of activated lymphocytes, and the cytokines expressed were determined in severe NC patients compared with those from healthy donors. Significantly increased peripheral Tregs (CD4(+)CD25(high) and CD4(+)CD25(high)FoxP3(+), CD4(+)CD25(high)CTLA4(+), and CD4(+)CD25(high) IL10(+)) and a significant decrease in activated (CD38(+) and CD69(+)) T cells were observed in 19 NC patients versus 10 healthy subjects. Significantly increased Tregs in NC are accompanied by a depressed specific, and non-specific, lymphocyte proliferative response, and they negatively correlate with activated CD4(+)CD69(+) lymphocytes. Treg frequencies were also determined in cerebral spinal fluid for 8 of the 19 NC patients. A positive significant correlation between peripheral and local Tregs was observed. Here, we report for the first time data that support the possible contribution of local and systemic Tregs in limiting neuroinflammation in NC.

  2. Transferrin Binding to Peripheral Blood Lymphocytes Activated by Phytohemagglutinin Involves a Specific Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Galbraith, Robert M.; Werner, Phillip; Arnaud, Philippe; Galbraith, Gillian M. P.

    1980-01-01

    Immunohistological studies have indicated that membrane sites binding transferrin are present upon activated human peripheral blood lymphocytes. In this study, we have investigated transferrin uptake in human lymphocytes exposed to phytohemagglutinin (PHA), by quantitative radiobinding and immunofluorescence in parallel. In stimulated lymphocytes, binding was maximal after a 30-min incubation, being greatest at 37°C, and greater at 22°C than at 4°C. Although some shedding and endocytosis of transferrin occurred at 22° and 37°C, these factors, and resulting synthesis of new sites, did not affect measurement of binding which was found to be saturable, reversible, and specific for transferrin (Ka 0.5-2.5 × 108 M−1). Binding was greater after a 48-h exposure to PHA than after 24 h, and was maximal at 66 h. Sequential Scatchard analysis revealed no significant elevation in affinity of interaction. However, although the total number of receptors increased, the proportion of cells in which binding of ligand was detected immunohistologically increased in parallel, and after appropriate correction, the cellular density of receptors remained relatively constant throughout (60,000-80,000 sites/cell). Increments in binding during the culture period were thus due predominantly to expansion of a population of cells bearing receptors. Similar differences in binding were apparent upon comparison of cells cultured in different doses of PHA, and in unstimulated cells binding was negligible. Transferrin receptors appear, therefore, to be readily detectable only upon lymphocytes that have been activated. Images PMID:6253523

  3. Effect of leptin on activation and cytokine synthesis in peripheral blood lymphocytes of malnourished infected children

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez, L; Graniel, J; Ortiz, R

    2007-01-01

    Malnutrition compromises immune function, resulting in reduced resistance to infection. Recent animal and human studies have suggested that leptin is capable of modulating the immune response and that its levels, which are regulated by nutritional status, fall rapidly during starvation. Leptin deficiency is associated with impaired cell-mediated immunity, an increased incidence of infectious disease and an associated increase in mortality. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of leptin on activation and cytokine production in peripheral blood T cells from malnourished children. The data obtained in the present study demonstrate that leptin produced an increase in the percentage of CD4+ and CD8+ cells producing interleukin (IL)-2 and interferon (IFN)-γ in 24-h cultures. Moreover, leptin decreased the percentage of CD4+ and CD8+ cells producing IL-4 and IL-10, and enhanced activation of circulating T cells when co-stimulated by phorbol 12-myristate 13 acetate (PMA)–ionomycin. Leptin enhanced the expression of activation markers CD69 and CD25 in both CD4+ and CD8+ cells after 5 h of stimulation. In conclusion, the results obtained show that leptin modulates CD4+ and CD8+ cell activation towards a T helper 1 (Th1) phenotype by stimulating the synthesis of IL-2 and IFN-γ. In contrast, leptin decreases IL-4 and IL-10 production. Moreover, leptin enhanced the expression of CD69 and CD25 on CD4+ and CD8+ cells after stimulation with PMA–ionomycin. PMID:17355247

  4. Sleep Deprivation Impairs the Human Central and Peripheral Nervous System Discrimination of Social Threat.

    PubMed

    Goldstein-Piekarski, Andrea N; Greer, Stephanie M; Saletin, Jared M; Walker, Matthew P

    2015-07-15

    Facial expressions represent one of the most salient cues in our environment. They communicate the affective state and intent of an individual and, if interpreted correctly, adaptively influence the behavior of others in return. Processing of such affective stimuli is known to require reciprocal signaling between central viscerosensory brain regions and peripheral-autonomic body systems, culminating in accurate emotion discrimination. Despite emerging links between sleep and affective regulation, the impact of sleep loss on the discrimination of complex social emotions within and between the CNS and PNS remains unknown. Here, we demonstrate in humans that sleep deprivation impairs both viscerosensory brain (anterior insula, anterior cingulate cortex, amygdala) and autonomic-cardiac discrimination of threatening from affiliative facial cues. Moreover, sleep deprivation significantly degrades the normally reciprocal associations between these central and peripheral emotion-signaling systems, most prominent at the level of cardiac-amygdala coupling. In addition, REM sleep physiology across the sleep-rested night significantly predicts the next-day success of emotional discrimination within this viscerosensory network across individuals, suggesting a role for REM sleep in affective brain recalibration. Together, these findings establish that sleep deprivation compromises the faithful signaling of, and the "embodied" reciprocity between, viscerosensory brain and peripheral autonomic body processing of complex social signals. Such impairments hold ecological relevance in professional contexts in which the need for accurate interpretation of social cues is paramount yet insufficient sleep is pervasive.

  5. Sleep Deprivation Impairs the Human Central and Peripheral Nervous System Discrimination of Social Threat

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein-Piekarski, Andrea N.; Greer, Stephanie M.; Saletin, Jared M.

    2015-01-01

    Facial expressions represent one of the most salient cues in our environment. They communicate the affective state and intent of an individual and, if interpreted correctly, adaptively influence the behavior of others in return. Processing of such affective stimuli is known to require reciprocal signaling between central viscerosensory brain regions and peripheral-autonomic body systems, culminating in accurate emotion discrimination. Despite emerging links between sleep and affective regulation, the impact of sleep loss on the discrimination of complex social emotions within and between the CNS and PNS remains unknown. Here, we demonstrate in humans that sleep deprivation impairs both viscerosensory brain (anterior insula, anterior cingulate cortex, amygdala) and autonomic-cardiac discrimination of threatening from affiliative facial cues. Moreover, sleep deprivation significantly degrades the normally reciprocal associations between these central and peripheral emotion-signaling systems, most prominent at the level of cardiac-amygdala coupling. In addition, REM sleep physiology across the sleep-rested night significantly predicts the next-day success of emotional discrimination within this viscerosensory network across individuals, suggesting a role for REM sleep in affective brain recalibration. Together, these findings establish that sleep deprivation compromises the faithful signaling of, and the “embodied” reciprocity between, viscerosensory brain and peripheral autonomic body processing of complex social signals. Such impairments hold ecological relevance in professional contexts in which the need for accurate interpretation of social cues is paramount yet insufficient sleep is pervasive. PMID:26180190

  6. Interferon-α curbs production of interleukin-22 by human peripheral blood mononuclear cells exposed to live Borrelia burgdorferi.

    PubMed

    Berner, Anika; Bachmann, Malte; Pfeilschifter, Josef; Kraiczy, Peter; Mühl, Heiko

    2015-10-01

    Cytokine networks initiated by means of innate immunity are regarded as a major determinant of host defence in response to acute infection by bacteria including Borrelia burgdorferi. Herein, we demonstrate that interferon (IFN)-α, either endogenously produced after exposure of cells to toll-like receptor-9-activating CpG oligonucleotides or provided as recombinant cytokine, weakens activation of the anti-bacterial interleukin (IL)-1/IL-22 axis in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells exposed to viable B. burgdorferi. As IFN-α has been related to pathological dissemination of the spirochaete, data suggest an immunoregulatory role of type I IFN in this context that is able to significantly modify cytokine profiles thereby possibly determining early course of B. burgdorferi infection.

  7. Potentiation of acid-sensing ion channel activity by peripheral group I metabotropic glutamate receptor signaling.

    PubMed

    Gan, Xiong; Wu, Jing; Ren, Cuixia; Qiu, Chun-Yu; Li, Yan-Kun; Hu, Wang-Ping

    2016-05-01

    Glutamate activates peripheral group I metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) and contributes to inflammatory pain. However, it is still not clear the mechanisms are involved in group I mGluR-mediated peripheral sensitization. Herein, we report that group I mGluRs signaling sensitizes acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons and contributes to acidosis-evoked pain. DHPG, a selective group I mGluR agonist, can potentiate the functional activity of ASICs, which mediated the proton-induced events. DHPG concentration-dependently increased proton-gated currents in DRG neurons. It shifted the proton concentration-response curve upwards, with a 47.3±7.0% increase of the maximal current response to proton. Group I mGluRs, especially mGluR5, mediated the potentiation of DHPG via an intracellular cascade. DHPG potentiation of proton-gated currents disappeared after inhibition of intracellular Gq/11 proteins, PLCβ, PKC or PICK1 signaling. Moreover, DHPG enhanced proton-evoked membrane excitability of rat DRG neurons and increased the amplitude of the depolarization and the number of spikes induced by acid stimuli. Finally, peripherally administration of DHPG dose-dependently exacerbated nociceptive responses to intraplantar injection of acetic acid in rats. Potentiation of ASIC activity by group I mGluR signaling in rat DRG neurons revealed a novel peripheral mechanism underlying group I mGluRs involvement in hyperalgesia.

  8. Peripheral Sensitization Increases Opioid Receptor Expression and Activation by Crotalphine in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Zambelli, Vanessa Olzon; Fernandes, Ana Carolina de Oliveira; Gutierrez, Vanessa Pacciari; Ferreira, Julio Cesar Batista; Parada, Carlos Amilcar; Mochly-Rosen, Daria; Cury, Yara

    2014-01-01

    Inflammation enhances the peripheral analgesic efficacy of opioid drugs, but the mechanisms involved in this phenomenon have not been fully elucidated. Crotalphine (CRP), a peptide that was first isolated from South American rattlesnake C.d. terrificus venom, induces a potent and long-lasting anti-nociceptive effect that is mediated by the activation of peripheral opioid receptors. Because the high efficacy of CRP is only observed in the presence of inflammation, we aimed to elucidate the mechanisms involved in the CRP anti-nociceptive effect induced by inflammation. Using real-time RT-PCR, western blot analysis and ELISA assays, we demonstrate that the intraplantar injection of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) increases the mRNA and protein levels of the µ- and κ-opioid receptors in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) and paw tissue of rats within 3 h of the injection. Using conformation state-sensitive antibodies that recognize activated opioid receptors, we show that PGE2, alone does not increase the activation of these opioid receptors but that in the presence of PGE2, the activation of specific opioid receptors by CRP and selective µ- and κ-opioid receptor agonists (positive controls) increases. Furthermore, PGE2 down-regulated the expression and activation of the δ-opioid receptor. CRP increased the level of activated mitogen-activated protein kinases in cultured DRG neurons, and this increase was dependent on the activation of protein kinase Cζ. This CRP effect was much more prominent when the cells were pretreated with PGE2. These results indicate that the expression and activation of peripheral opioid receptors by opioid-like drugs can be up- or down-regulated in the presence of an acute injury and that acute tissue injury enhances the efficacy of peripheral opioids. PMID:24594607

  9. Genotoxicity evaluation of drinking water sources in human peripheral blood lymphocytes using the comet assay.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yulin; Chen, Haigang; Li, Zhaoli; Sun, Liwei; Qu, Mengmeng; Li, Mei; Kong, Zhiming

    2008-01-01

    The potential harm of organic pollutants in drinking water to human health is widely focused on in the world; more and more pollutants with genotoxic substances are released into the aquatic environment. Water source samples were collected from 7 different localities of Nanjing City. The potential genotoxicity of organic extracts from drinking water sources were investigated by means of the comet assay in human peripheral lymphocytes. The results showed that all the organic extracts from all the water source samples could induce DNA damages of human peripheral blood lymphocytes at different levels. A significant difference (P < 0.01) was observed when compared with the solvent control. The DNA damage increased with the increase of the dosage of the original water source. Significant differences of DNA damage were observed in different drinking water sources, as shown by the multiple comparisons analysis at the dosage of 100x; the degree of DNA damage treated by Hushu waterworks (at town level) was the most serious, the arbitrary units (AU) was 141.62 +/- 6.96, however, that of Shangyuanmen waterworks (at city level) was only 109.64 +/- 2.97. The analysis also revealed that the genotoxicity of town's water sources was higher than that of the city. The results demonstrated that the comet assay can be successfully applied to the genotoxicity monitoring programs of drinking water sources.

  10. The effect of stress on core and peripheral body temperature in humans.

    PubMed

    Vinkers, Christiaan H; Penning, Renske; Hellhammer, Juliane; Verster, Joris C; Klaessens, John H G M; Olivier, Berend; Kalkman, Cor J

    2013-09-01

    Even though there are indications that stress influences body temperature in humans, no study has systematically investigated the effects of stress on core and peripheral body temperature. The present study therefore aimed to investigate the effects of acute psychosocial stress on body temperature using different readout measurements. In two independent studies, male and female participants were exposed to a standardized laboratory stress task (the Trier Social Stress Test, TSST) or a non-stressful control task. Core temperature (intestinal and temporal artery) and peripheral temperature (facial and body skin temperature) were measured. Compared to the control condition, stress exposure decreased intestinal temperature but did not affect temporal artery temperature. Stress exposure resulted in changes in skin temperature that followed a gradient-like pattern, with decreases at distal skin locations such as the fingertip and finger base and unchanged skin temperature at proximal regions such as the infra-clavicular area. Stress-induced effects on facial temperature displayed a sex-specific pattern, with decreased nasal skin temperature in females and increased cheek temperature in males. In conclusion, the amplitude and direction of stress-induced temperature changes depend on the site of temperature measurement in humans. This precludes a direct translation of the preclinical stress-induced hyperthermia paradigm, in which core temperature uniformly rises in response to stress to the human situation. Nevertheless, the effects of stress result in consistent temperature changes. Therefore, the present study supports the inclusion of body temperature as a physiological readout parameter of stress in future studies.

  11. Expression of extracellular calcium (Ca2+o)-sensing receptor in human peripheral blood monocytes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamaguchi, T.; Olozak, I.; Chattopadhyay, N.; Butters, R. R.; Kifor, O.; Scadden, D. T.; Brown, E. M.; O'Malley, B. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    The calcium-sensing receptor (CaR) is a G protein-coupled receptor playing key roles in extracellular calcium ion (Ca2+o) homeostasis in parathyroid gland and kidney. Macrophage-like mononuclear cells appear at sites of osteoclastic bone resorption during bone turnover and may play a role in the "reversal" phase of skeletal remodeling that follows osteoclastic resorption and precedes osteoblastic bone formation. Bone resorption produces substantial local increases in Ca2+o that could provide a signal for such mononuclear cells present locally within the bone marrow microenvironment. Indeed, previous studies by other investigators have shown that raising Ca2+o either in vivo or in vitro stimulated the release of interleukin-6 (IL-6) from human peripheral blood monocytes, suggesting that these cells express a Ca2+o-sensing mechanism. In these earlier studies, however, the use of reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) failed to detect transcripts for the CaR previously cloned from parathyroid and kidney in peripheral blood monocytes. Since we recently found that non-specific esterase-positive, putative monocytes isolated from murine bone marrow express the CaR, we reevaluated the expression of this receptor in human peripheral blood monocytes. Immunocytochemistry, flow cytometry, and Western blot analysis, performed using a polyclonal antiserum specific for the CaR, detected CaR protein in human monocytes. In addition, the use of RT-PCR with CaR-specific primers, followed by nucleotide sequencing of the amplified products, identified CaR transcripts in the cells. Therefore, taken together, our data show that human peripheral blood monocytes possess both CaR protein and mRNA very similar if not identical to those expressed in parathyroid and kidney that could mediate the previously described, direct effects of Ca2+o on these cells. Furthermore, since mononuclear cells isolated from bone marrow also express the CaR, the latter might play some role in

  12. The effects of lipid A on gamma-irradiated human peripheral blood lymphocytes in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubničková, M.; Kuzmina, E. A.; Chausov, V. N.; Ravnachka, I.; Boreyko, A. V.; Krasavin, E. A.

    2016-03-01

    The modulatory effects of lipid A (diphosphoryl lipid A (DLA) and monophosphoryl lipid A (MLA)) on apoptosis induction and DNA structure damage (single and double-strand breaks (SSBs and DSBs, respectively)) in peripheral human blood lymphocytes are studied for 60Co gamma-irradiation. It is shown that in the presence of these agents the amount of apoptotic cells increases compared with the irradiated control samples. The effect is most strongly pronounced for DLA. In its presence, a significant increase is observed in the number of radiation-induced DNA SSBs and DSBs. Possible mechanisms are discussed of the modifying influence of the used agents on radiation-induced cell reactions

  13. Photoacoustic and ultrasound dual-modality imaging of human peripheral joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Guan; Rajian, Justin R.; Girish, Gandikota; Kaplan, Mariana J.; Fowlkes, J. Brian; Carson, Paul L.; Wang, Xueding

    2013-01-01

    A photoacoustic (PA) and ultrasound (US) dual modality system, for imaging human peripheral joints, is introduced. The system utilizes a commercial US unit for both US control imaging and PA signal acquisition. Preliminary in vivo evaluation of the system, on normal volunteers, revealed that this system can recover both the structural and functional information of intra- and extra-articular tissues. Confirmed by the control US images, the system, on the PA mode, can differentiate tendon from surrounding soft tissue based on the endogenous optical contrast. Presenting both morphological and pathological information in joint, this system holds promise for diagnosis and characterization of inflammatory joint diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis.

  14. Changes of human plasma dopamine-beta-hydroxylase activity after intravenous administration of theophylline.

    PubMed

    Aunis, D; Mandel, P; Miras-Portugal, M T; Coquillat, G; Rohmer, F; Warter, J M

    1975-03-01

    The intravenous administration of theophylline to ten healthy human subjects produced either an increase of circulating plasma dopamine-beta-hydroxylase or no change. The rise of plasma enzyme activity may reflect the increased peripheral catecholamine release induced by theophylline.

  15. Accumulation of defective viral genomes in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of human immunodeficiency virus type 1-infected individuals.

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, G; Xu, X; Chermann, J C; Hirsch, I

    1997-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) genomes present in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of infected persons or in lymphocytes infected in vitro were studied by long-distance PCR (LD-PCR) using primers localized in the HIV-1 long terminal repeats. The full-length 9-kb DNA was the only LD-PCR product obtained in peripheral and cord blood lymphocytes from seronegative donors infected in vitro. However, a high proportion (27% to 66%) of distinct populations of extensively deleted HIV-1 genomes of variable size was detected in PBMCs of 15 of 16 HIV-1-infected persons. Physical mapping of defective genomes showed that the frequency of deletions is proportional to their proximity to the central part of HIV-1 genome, which is consistent with a deletion mechanism involving a single polymerase jump during reverse transcription. Sequencing of deletion junctions revealed the presence of short direct repeats of three or four nucleotides. The number of defective HIV-1 genomes decreased after in vitro activation of PBMCs. Persistence of full-length and deleted genomes in in vitro activated PBMCs correlated with isolation of an infectious virus. Our results represent the first quantitative assessment of intragenomic rearrangements in HIV-1 genomes in PBMCs of infected persons and demonstrate that, in contrast to in vitro infection, defective genomes accumulate in PBMCs of infected persons. PMID:9032358

  16. Expression of the Kynurenine Pathway in Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells: Implications for Inflammatory and Neurodegenerative Disease.

    PubMed

    Jones, Simon P; Franco, Nunzio F; Varney, Bianca; Sundaram, Gayathri; Brown, David A; de Bie, Josien; Lim, Chai K; Guillemin, Gilles J; Brew, Bruce J

    2015-01-01

    The kynurenine pathway is a fundamental mechanism of immunosuppression and peripheral tolerance. It is increasingly recognized as playing a major role in the pathogenesis of a wide variety of inflammatory, neurodegenerative and malignant disorders. However, the temporal dynamics of kynurenine pathway activation and metabolite production in human immune cells is currently unknown. Here we report the novel use of flow cytometry, combined with ultra high-performance liquid chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, to sensitively quantify the intracellular expression of three key kynurenine pathway enzymes and the main kynurenine pathway metabolites in a time-course study. This is the first study to show that up-regulation of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO-1), kynurenine 3-monoxygenase (KMO) and quinolinate phosphoribosyltransferase (QPRT) is lacking in lymphocytes treated with interferon gamma. In contrast, peripheral monocytes showed a significant elevation of kynurenine pathway enzymes and metabolites when treated with interferon gamma. Expression of IDO-1, KMO and QPRT correlated significantly with activation of the kynurenine pathway (kynurenine:tryptophan ratio), quinolinic acid concentration and production of the monocyte derived, pro-inflammatory immune response marker: neopterin. Our results also describe an original and sensitive methodological approach to quantify kynurenine pathway enzyme expression in cells. This has revealed further insights into the potential role of these enzymes in disease processes.

  17. Expression of the Kynurenine Pathway in Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells: Implications for Inflammatory and Neurodegenerative Disease

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Simon P.; Franco, Nunzio F.; Varney, Bianca; Sundaram, Gayathri; Brown, David A.; de Bie, Josien; Lim, Chai K.; Guillemin, Gilles J.; Brew, Bruce J.

    2015-01-01

    The kynurenine pathway is a fundamental mechanism of immunosuppression and peripheral tolerance. It is increasingly recognized as playing a major role in the pathogenesis of a wide variety of inflammatory, neurodegenerative and malignant disorders. However, the temporal dynamics of kynurenine pathway activation and metabolite production in human immune cells is currently unknown. Here we report the novel use of flow cytometry, combined with ultra high-performance liquid chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, to sensitively quantify the intracellular expression of three key kynurenine pathway enzymes and the main kynurenine pathway metabolites in a time-course study. This is the first study to show that up-regulation of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO-1), kynurenine 3-monoxygenase (KMO) and quinolinate phosphoribosyltransferase (QPRT) is lacking in lymphocytes treated with interferon gamma. In contrast, peripheral monocytes showed a significant elevation of kynurenine pathway enzymes and metabolites when treated with interferon gamma. Expression of IDO-1, KMO and QPRT correlated significantly with activation of the kynurenine pathway (kynurenine:tryptophan ratio), quinolinic acid concentration and production of the monocyte derived, pro-inflammatory immune response marker: neopterin. Our results also describe an original and sensitive methodological approach to quantify kynurenine pathway enzyme expression in cells. This has revealed further insights into the potential role of these enzymes in disease processes. PMID:26114426

  18. Linking Activation of Microglia and Peripheral Monocytic Cells to the Pathophysiology of Psychiatric Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Yuta; Yu, Zhiqian; Sakai, Mai; Tomita, Hiroaki

    2016-01-01

    A wide variety of studies have identified microglial activation in psychiatric disorders, such as schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and major depressive disorder. Relatively fewer, but robust, studies have detected activation of peripheral monocytic cells in psychiatric disorders. Considering the origin of microglia, as well as neuropsychoimmune interactions in the context of the pathophysiology of psychiatric disorders, it is reasonable to speculate that microglia interact with peripheral monocytic cells in relevance with the pathogenesis of psychiatric disorders; however, these interactions have drawn little attention. In this review, we summarize findings relevant to activation of microglia and monocytic cells in psychiatric disorders, discuss the potential association between these cell types and disease pathogenesis, and propose perspectives for future research on these processes. PMID:27375431

  19. Novel Immunohistochemical Techniques Using Discrete Signal Amplification Systems for Human Cutaneous Peripheral Nerve Fiber Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ningshan; Gibbons, Christopher H.; Freeman, Roy

    2011-01-01

    Confocal imaging uses immunohistochemical binding of specific antibodies to visualize tissues, but technical obstacles limit more widespread use of this technique in the imaging of peripheral nerve tissue. These obstacles include same-species antibody cross-reactivity and weak fluorescent signals of individual and co-localized antigens. The aims of this study were to develop new immunohistochemical techniques for imaging of peripheral nerve fibers. Three-millimeter punch skin biopsies of healthy individuals were fixed, frozen, and cut into 50-µm sections. Tissues were stained with a variety of antibody combinations with two signal amplification systems, streptavidin-biotin-fluorochrome (sABC) and tyramide-horseradish peroxidase-fluorochrome (TSA), used simultaneously to augment immunohistochemical signals. The combination of the TSA and sABC amplification systems provided the first successful co-localization of sympathetic adrenergic and sympathetic cholinergic nerve fibers in cutaneous human sweat glands and vasomotor and pilomotor systems. Primary antibodies from the same species were amplified individually without cross-reactivity or elevated background interference. The confocal fluorescent signal-to-noise ratio increased, and image clarity improved. These modifications to signal amplification systems have the potential for widespread use in the study of human neural tissues. PMID:21411809

  20. Immunohistochemical methods for semiquantitative analysis of collagen content in human peripheral nerve

    PubMed Central

    LOWRY, A.; WILCOX, D.; MASSON, E. A.; WILLIAMS, P. E.

    1997-01-01

    Methods are described for the semiquantitative analysis of the connective tissue components of human peripheral nerve using light microscopy. General histological preservation was assessed using haematoxylin and eosin staining and the distribution of collagen type IV was investigated using immunohistochemistry. Several techniques were investigated to establish the one giving optimum structural preservation, immunobinding and greatest contrast for image analysis. Frozen sections were unsuitable for this tissue and paraffin wax sections were therefore used. Alcohol fixation was rejected due to poor preservation of the endoneurium, although immunobinding was excellent. Ice-cold formalin fixation for 24 h was found to be adequate for structural preservation and antibody binding, provided that a protease step was introduced. Trypsin was found to be superior to pepsin for exposing collagen type IV epitopes. Of the detection systems investigated indirect immunofluorescence was not suitable due to considerable autofluorescence of the nerve. The avidin-biotin method provided the greatest contrast, and was therefore the detection method of choice for image analysis. The optimum techniques for image analysis were then used on control human sural nerve to ascertain the best comparative method for collagen type IV in the perineurium. A method of semiquantitative analysis is described which takes into account the fact that there is a close linear relationship between collagen content per unit of perineurium and perineurial perimeter as fascicle size increases in peripheral nerve. This means that data from 2 different sample groups can easily be compared, provided that a range of fascicle sizes is analysed in each case. PMID:9418993

  1. A novel splice variant of human gene NPL, mainly expressed in human liver, kidney and peripheral blood leukocyte.

    PubMed

    Wu, Maoqing; Gu, Shaohua; Xu, Jian; Zou, Xianqiong; Zheng, Huarui; Jin, Zhe; Xie, Yi; Ji, Chaoneng; Mao, Yumin

    2005-04-01

    From the human fetal brain cDNA library constructed by our lab, a novel variant cDNA of a human gene was successfully cloned and identified. Because the gene has been named N-acetylneuraminate pyruvate lyase (NPL), accordingly we term our splice variant NPL_v2. The cDNA of NPL_v2 has a full-length open reading frame (ORF) from the nucleotide position 320 to 1225 that encodes a protein comprising 301 amino acids. SMART analysis showed that our hypothetical protein has one dihydrodipicolinate synthase (DHDPS) domain. Phosphorylation analysis of the deduced protein show that there are five phosphorylation sites including three "serine" and two "threonine" at the region that are not found in other splice variant. RT-PCR experiment revealed that our splice variant of the gene is mainly expressed in human placenta, liver, kidney, pancreas, spleen, thymus, ovary, small intestine and peripheral blood leukocyte.

  2. Problems with measuring peripheral oxytocin: can the data on oxytocin and human behavior be trusted?

    PubMed

    McCullough, Michael E; Churchland, Patricia Smith; Mendez, Armando J

    2013-09-01

    Research on the neurobiological and behavioral effects of oxytocin (OT), as well as on its possible therapeutic applications, has intensified in the past decade. Accurate determination of peripheral OT levels is essential to reach meaningful conclusions and to motivate, support and inform clinical interventions. Different, but concordant, methods for measuring plasma OT have been developed over the past four decades, but since 2004 several commercially available methods have been favored in research with humans. Evaluation of these methods reveals that they lack reliability when used on unextracted samples of human fluids, and that they tag molecules in addition to OT, yielding estimates that are wildly discrepant with an extensive body of earlier findings that were obtained using methods that are well validated, but more laborious. An accurate, specific, and readily available method for measuring OT that can be adopted as the standard in the field is urgently needed for advances in our understanding of OT's roles in cognition and behavior.

  3. Differential expression of the granzymes A, K and M and perforin in human peripheral blood lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Bade, Britta; Boettcher, Heidrun Elise; Lohrmann, Jens; Hink-Schauer, Clara; Bratke, Kai; Jenne, Dieter E; Virchow, J Christian; Luttmann, Werner

    2005-11-01

    Granzymes (Gzm) are a group of serine proteases which are stored in the granules of cytotoxic lymphocytes. In humans, five granzymes have been characterized to date at the molecular level. While GzmA and GzmB have been extensively studied, little is known about GzmH, GzmK and GzmM. In this study, we describe the generation of mAbs against human GzmK and GzmM by genetic immunization. The obtained anti-GzmK and anti-GzmM mAbs are not cross-reactive with GzmA, GzmB, GzmM and GzmA, GzmB, GzmK, respectively, and show a granular staining pattern in human lymphocytes. Flow cytometric analysis of peripheral blood lymphocytes revealed that GzmA, GzmM and perforin show a similar distribution. They are expressed in almost all CD16+CD56+ NK cells, CD3+CD56+ NKT cells and gammadelta T cells as well as in 20-30% of all CD3+CD8+ TC cells. Surprisingly, GzmK was not detected in the highly cytotoxic CD16+CD56+ NK cells but was preferentially expressed in lymphocytes of the T cell lineage, staining 20% of CD3+CD8+ TC cells, 50% of CD3+CD56+ NKT cells and 40% of gammadelta T cells, as well as 60% of the small sub-population of CD56bright+ NK cells. Our data suggest that human granzymes are differentially expressed in distinct sub-populations of peripheral blood lymphocytes.

  4. Modulation of Mitogen-Induced Proliferation of Autologous Peripheral Blood Lymphocytes by Human Alveolar Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Yeager, Henry; Sweeney, Jan A.; Herscowitz, Herbert B.; Barsoum, Ibrahim S.; Kagan, Elliott

    1982-01-01

    Experiments were carried out to determine the effect of cocultivation of T-cell-enriched human peripheral blood lymphocytes with autologous alveolar macrophages on mitogen-induced proliferation as determined by [3H]thymidine uptake. Cells obtained by fiberoptic bronchoscopy and saline bronchial lavage from 14 normal volunteers were enriched for macrophages by adherence in plastic dishes for 1 h in RPMI 1640 medium supplemented with 10% fetal calf serum. Nonadherent mononuclear cells were prepared from heparinized venous blood after Ficoll-Hypaque sedimentation by passage over nylon wool columns. T-cell-enriched populations were incubated with and without alveolar macrophages, either in the presence or absence of phytohemagglutinin. In these experiments, the number of lymphocytes was held constant (105 per well), while the number of alveolar macrophages was varied (0.1 × 105 to 4.0 × 105 per well). Alveolar macrophages generally tended to stimulate phytohemagglutinin-induced lymphoproliferation at lymphocyte/macrophage ratios of 10:1 but consistently and significantly suppressed proliferation at ratios which approach those usually observed in recovered human bronchial lavage fluid, namely, 1:4. The suppressive effect of alveolar macrophages was observed as early as 48 h after culture initiation, while the magnitude of suppression increased with time. Suppression did not appear to be due to alteration in lymphocyte viability, nor was it sensitive to indomethacin. These results indicate that human alveolar macrophages can modulate the in vitro proliferative response of autologous peripheral blood lymphocytes. This observation may have relevance to interactions between alveolar macrophages and bronchial lymphocytes in the human lung in vivo. PMID:6982862

  5. BMP7 retards peripheral myelination by activating p38 MAPK in Schwann cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaoyu; Zhao, Yahong; Peng, Su; Zhang, Shuqiang; Wang, Meihong; Chen, Yeyue; Zhang, Shan; Yang, Yumin; Sun, Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Schwann cell (SC) myelination is pivotal for the proper physiological functioning of the nervous system, but the underlying molecular mechanism remains less well understood. Here, we showed that the expression of bone morphogenetic protein 7 (BMP7) inversely correlates with myelin gene expression during peripheral myelination, which suggests that BMP7 is likely a negative regulator for myelin gene expression. Our experiments further showed that the application of BMP7 attenuates the cAMP induced myelin gene expression in SCs. Downstream pathway analysis suggested that both p38 MAPK and SMAD are activated by exogenous BMP7 in SCs. The pharmacological intervention and gene silence studies revealed that p38 MAPK, not SMAD, is responsible for BMP7-mediated suppression of myelin gene expression. In addition, c-Jun, a potential negative regulator for peripheral myelination, was up-regulated by BMP7. In vivo experiments showed that BMP7 treatment greatly impaired peripheral myelination in newborn rats. Together, our results established that BMP7 is a negative regulator for peripheral myelin gene expression and that p38 MAPK/c-Jun axis might be the main downstream target of BMP7 in this process. PMID:27491681

  6. Activities and functions of peripheral neurons in the enteric nervous system of Aplysia and Lymnaea.

    PubMed

    Kurokawa, M; Ito, S; Okamoto, T

    2008-01-01

    In order to explore the functions of the peripheral neurons in the enteric nervous system (ENS) of the gastropods, Aplysia and Lymnaea, we investigated the correlation between peripheral neuronal activities and movements of the digestive tract. In Aplysia, movements of the gizzard were distinguished into two types of contraction: a large constriction of the whole gizzard following bursting activities of the neurons on the gizzard and EJP-like potentials in the musculature; and a small contraction of a restricted part of the gizzard following a slow muscle potential. When TTX was applied to isolated gizzard preparation, the bursting activities were blocked and the EJP-like potentials and the subsequent constriction disappeared, whereas the slow potentials in the musculature and partial contractions appeared to be unaffected. Therefore, it was suggested that the peripheral neurons on the gizzard were motor neurons for constriction, while the partial contraction was thought to be myogenic. In Lymnaea, we recorded periodic bursting activities in the enteric nervous system that were followed by EJP-like potentials and gastrointestinal movements. The results show that, in both species, there may exist motor neurons in the ENS that are responsible for neurogenic movements of the digestive tract.

  7. Threat-related amygdala activity is associated with peripheral CRP concentrations in men but not women.

    PubMed

    Swartz, Johnna R; Prather, Aric A; Hariri, Ahmad R

    2017-04-01

    Increased levels of peripheral inflammatory markers, including C-Reactive Protein (CRP), are associated with increased risk for depression, anxiety, and suicidality. The brain mechanisms that may underlie the association between peripheral inflammation and internalizing problems remain to be determined. The present study examines associations between peripheral CRP concentrations and threat-related amygdala activity, a neural biomarker of depression and anxiety risk, in a sample of 172 young adult undergraduate students. Participants underwent functional MRI scanning while performing an emotional face matching task to obtain a measure of threat-related amygdala activity to angry and fearful faces; CRP concentrations were assayed from dried blood spots. Results indicated a significant interaction between CRP and sex: in men, but not women, higher CRP was associated with higher threat-related amygdala activity. These results add to the literature finding associations between systemic levels of inflammation and brain function and suggest that threat-related amygdala activity may serve as a potential pathway through which heightened chronic inflammation may increase risk for mood and anxiety problems.

  8. Glutamate and capsaicin effects on trigeminal nociception I: Activation and peripheral sensitization of deep craniofacial nociceptive afferents.

    PubMed

    Lam, David K; Sessle, Barry J; Hu, James W

    2009-01-28

    We have examined the effect of the peripheral application of glutamate and capsaicin to deep craniofacial tissues in influencing the activation and peripheral sensitization of deep craniofacial nociceptive afferents. The activity of single trigeminal nociceptive afferents with receptive fields in deep craniofacial tissues were recorded extracellularly in 55 halothane-anesthetized rats. The mechanical activation threshold (MAT) of each afferent was assessed before and after injection of 0.5 M glutamate (or vehicle) and 1% capsaicin (or vehicle) into the receptive field. A total of 68 afferents that could be activated by blunt noxious mechanical stimulation of the deep craniofacial tissues (23 masseter, 5 temporalis, 40 temporomandibular joint) were studied. When injected alone, glutamate and capsaicin activated and induced peripheral sensitization reflected as MAT reduction in many afferents. Following glutamate injection, capsaicin-evoked activity was greater than that evoked by capsaicin alone, whereas following capsaicin injection, glutamate-evoked responses were similar to glutamate alone. These findings indicate that peripheral application of glutamate or capsaicin may activate or induce peripheral sensitization in a subpopulation of trigeminal nociceptive afferents innervating deep craniofacial tissues, as reflected in changes in MAT and other afferent response properties. The data further suggest that peripheral glutamate and capsaicin receptor mechanisms may interact to modulate the activation and peripheral sensitization in some deep craniofacial nociceptive afferents.

  9. Effect of Hypohydration on Peripheral and Corticospinal Excitability and Voluntary Activation

    PubMed Central

    Bowtell, Joanna L.; Avenell, Gareth; Hunter, Steven P.; Mileva, Katya N.

    2013-01-01

    We investigated whether altered peripheral and/or corticospinal excitatory output and voluntary activation are implicated in hypohydration-induced reductions in muscle isometric and isokinetic (90°.s−1) strength. Nine male athletes completed two trials (hypohydrated, euhydrated) comprising 90 min cycling at 40°C, with body weight losses replaced in euhydrated trial. Peripheral nerve and transcranial magnetic stimulations were applied during voluntary contractions pre- and 40 min post-exercise to quantify voluntary activation and peripheral (M-wave) and corticospinal (motor evoked potential) evoked responses in m. vastus medialis. Both maximum isometric (−15.3±3.1 vs −5.4±3.5%) and isokinetic eccentric (−24.8±4.6 vs −7.3±7.2%) torque decreased to a greater extent in hypohydrated than euhydrated trials (p<0.05). Half relaxation time of the twitch evoked by peripheral nerve stimulation during maximal contractions increased after exercise in the hypohydrated (21.8±9.3%) but stayed constant in the euhydrated (1.6±10.7%; p = 0.017) condition. M-wave amplitude during maximum voluntary contraction increased after exercise in the heat in hypohydrated (10.7±18.0%) but decreased in euhydrated condition (−17.4±16.9%; p = 0.067). Neither peripheral nor cortical voluntary activation were significantly different between conditions. Motor evoked potential amplitude increased similarly in both conditions (hypohydrated: 25.7±28.5%; euhydrated: 52.9±33.5%) and was accompanied by lengthening of the cortical silent period in euhydrated but not hypohydrated condition (p = 0.019). Different neural strategies seem to be adopted to regulate neural drive in the two conditions, with increases in inhibitory input of either intracortical or corticospinal origin during the euhydrated trial. Such changes were absent in the hypohydrated condition, yet voluntary activation was similar to the euhydrated condition, perhaps due to smaller increases in excitatory

  10. Nanostructure and force spectroscopy analysis of human peripheral blood CD4+ T cells using atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Hu, Mingqian; Wang, Jiongkun; Cai, Jiye; Wu, Yangzhe; Wang, Xiaoping

    2008-09-12

    To date, nanoscale imaging of the morphological changes and adhesion force of CD4(+) T cells during in vitro activation remains largely unreported. In this study, we used atomic force microscopy (AFM) to study the morphological changes and specific binding forces in resting and activated human peripheral blood CD4(+) T cells. The AFM images revealed that the volume of activated CD4(+) T cells increased and the ultrastructure of these cells also became complex. Using a functionalized AFM tip, the strength of the specific binding force of the CD4 antigen-antibody interaction was found to be approximately three times that of the unspecific force. The adhesion forces were not randomly distributed over the surface of a single activated CD4(+) T cell, indicated that the CD4 molecules concentrated into nanodomains. The magnitude of the adhesion force of the CD4 antigen-antibody interaction did not change markedly with the activation time. Multiple bonds involved in the CD4 antigen-antibody interaction were measured at different activation times. These results suggest that the adhesion force involved in the CD4 antigen-antibody interaction is highly selective and of high affinity.

  11. Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cell Function and Dendritic Cell Differentiation Are Affected by Bisphenol-A Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Ariemma, Fabiana; Cimmino, Ilaria; Bruzzese, Dario; Scerbo, Roberta; Picascia, Stefania; D’Esposito, Vittoria; Beguinot, Francesco; Formisano, Pietro

    2016-01-01

    Environmental pollutants, including endocrine disruptor chemicals (EDCs), interfere on human health, leading to hormonal, immune and metabolic perturbations. Bisphenol-A (BPA), a main component of polycarbonate plastics, has been receiving increased attention due to its worldwide distribution with a large exposure. In humans, BPA, for its estrogenic activity, may have a role in autoimmunity, inflammatory and allergic diseases. To this aim, we assessed the effect of low BPA doses on functionality of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), and on in vitro differentiation of dendritic cells from monocytes (mDCs). Fresh peripheral blood samples were obtained from 12 healthy adult volunteers. PBMCs were left unstimulated or were activated with the mitogen phytohemagglutinin (PHA) or the anti-CD3 and anti-CD28 antibodies and incubated in presence or absence of BPA at 0.1 and 1nM concentrations. The immune-modulatory effect of BPA was assessed by evaluating the cell proliferation and the levels of interferon-γ (IFN-γ), interleukin-4 (IL-4), interleukin-10 (IL-10) and interleukin-13 (IL-13) secreted by PBMCs. mDCs were differentiated with IL-4 and GC-CSF with or without BPA and the expression of differentiation/maturation markers (CD11c, CD1a, CD86, HLA-DR) was evaluated by flow cytometry; furthermore, a panel of 27 different cytokines, growth factors and chemokines were assayed in the mDC culture supernatants. PBMCs proliferation significantly increased upon BPA exposure compared to BPA untreated cells. In addition, a significant decrease in IL-10 secretion was observed in PBMCs incubated with BPA, either in unstimulated or mitogen-stimulated cells, and at both 0.1 and 1nM BPA concentrations. Similarly, IL-13 was reduced, mainly in cells activated by antiCD3/CD28. By contrast, no significant changes in IFN-γ and IL-4 production were found in any condition assayed. Finally, BPA at 1nM increased the density of dendritic cells expressing CD1a and concomitantly

  12. A novel thyroid stimulating hormone beta-subunit isoform in human pituitary, peripheral blood leukocytes, and thyroid.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, Jeremy S; Klein, John R

    2009-07-01

    Thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) is produced by the anterior pituitary and is used to regulate thyroid hormone output, which in turn controls metabolic activity. Currently, the pituitary is believed to be the only source of TSH used by the thyroid. Recent studies in mice from our laboratory have identified a TSHbeta isoform that is expressed in the pituitary, in peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL), and in the thyroid. To determine whether a human TSHbeta splice variant exists that is analogous to the mouse TSHbeta splice variant, and whether the pattern of expression of the splice variant is similar to that observed in mice, PCR amplification of RNAs from pituitary, thyroid, PBL, and bone marrow was done by reverse-transcriptase PCR and quantitative realtime PCR. Human pituitary expressed a TSHbeta isoform that is analogous to the mouse TSHbeta splice variant, consisting of a 27 nucleotide portion of intron 2 and all of exon 3, coding for 71.2% of the native human TSHbeta polypeptide. Of particular interest, the TSHbeta splice variant was expressed at significantly higher levels than the native form or TSHbeta in PBL and the thyroid. The TSHalpha gene also was expressed in the pituitary, thyroid, and PBL, but not the BM, suggesting that the TSHbeta polypeptide in the thyroid and PBL may exist as a dimer with TSHalpha. These findings identify an unknown splice variant of human TSHbeta. They also have implications for immune-endocrine interactions in the thyroid and for understanding autoimmune thyroid disease from a new perspective.

  13. Comparison of two radiolabeled quinuclidinyl benzilate ligands for the characterization of the human peripheral lung muscarinic receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Joad, J.P.; Casale, T.B.

    1987-09-28

    Quinuclidinyl benzilate, a muscarinic antagonist, has previously been used in its tritiated form ((/sup 3/H)-QNB) to study the lung muscarinic receptor. The authors investigated whether a newer iodinated form of QNB ((/sup 125/I)-QNB) of higher specific activity would be an appropriate ligand to study the human peripheral lung muscarinic receptor. Both the tritiated and iodinated ligands bound specifically to human lung at 23/sup 0/C. At 37/sup 0/C the specific binding of (/sup 3/H)-QNB increased slightly, but no specific binding of (/sup 125/I)-QNB was found. The data from multiple equilibrium binding experiments covering a wide range of radiolabeled QNB concentrations were combined and analyzed using the computer modeling program, LIGAND. The tritiated QNB identified a single affinity human lung binding site with a Kd of 46 +/- 9 pM. The iodinated QNB identified a single higher affinity human lung binding site of much smaller quantity. Competition studies comparing the binding of unlabeled QNB relative to labeled QNB indicated that unlabeled QNB had the same Kd as that measured for (/sup 3/H)-QNB, but a 5 log greater Kd than that measured for (/sup 125/I)-QNB. Other muscarinic receptor agonists and antagonists competed with (/sup 3/H)QNB, but not (/sup 125/I)-QNB for binding to muscarinic receptors with the expected magnitude and rank order of potency. 17 references, 2 figures, 2 tables.

  14. Magnetic targeting of human peripheral blood CD133+ cells for skeletal muscle regeneration.

    PubMed

    Ohkawa, Shingo; Kamei, Naosuke; Kamei, Goki; Shi, Ming; Adachi, Nobuo; Deie, Masataka; Ochi, Mitsuo

    2013-08-01

    Skeletal muscle injuries often leave lasting functional damage or pain. Muscle injuries are routinely treated conservatively, but the most effective treatment to promote the repair of injured muscles has not yet been established. Our previous report demonstrated that human peripheral blood-derived CD133(+) cell transplantation to rat skeletal muscle injury models inhibited fibrosis and enhanced myogenesis after injury. However, the acquisition of a sufficient number of cells remains the limitation for clinical application, as the CD133(+) population is rare in human blood. In this study, we applied a magnetic cell targeting system to accumulate transplanted cells in the muscle injury site and to enhance the regenerative effects of CD133(+) cell transplantation, focusing on the fact that CD133(+) cells are labeled with a magnetic bead for isolation. For the magnetic cell targeting, the magnet field generator was set up to adjust the peak of the magnetic gradient to the injury site of the tibialis anterior muscle, and 1×10(4) human peripheral blood CD133(+) cells were locally injected into the injury site. This cell number is 10% of that used in the previous study. In another group, the same number of CD133(+) cells was injected without magnetic force. The CD133(+) cells transplanted with the magnetic force were more accumulated in the muscle injury site compared with the CD133(+) cells transplanted without the magnetic force. In addition, the transplantation of CD133(+) cells under the magnetic control inhibited fibrous scar formation and promoted angiogenesis and myogenesis, and also upregulated the mRNA expression of myogenic transcription factors, including Pax7, MyoD1 and Myogenin. However, the transplantation of CD133(+) cells without the magnetic force failed to demonstrate these effects. Thus, our magnetic cell targeting system enables transplantation of a limited number of CD133(+) cells to promote the repair of skeletal muscle injury.

  15. Cytogenetic Low-Dose Hyperradiosensitivity Is Observed in Human Peripheral Blood Lymphocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Seth, Isheeta; Joiner, Michael C.; Tucker, James D.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The shape of the ionizing radiation response curve at very low doses has been the subject of considerable debate. Linear-no-threshold (LNT) models are widely used to estimate risks associated with low-dose exposures. However, the low-dose hyperradiosensitivity (HRS) phenomenon, in which cells are especially sensitive at low doses but then show increased radioresistance at higher doses, provides evidence of nonlinearity in the low-dose region. HRS is more prominent in the G2 phase of the cell cycle than in the G0/G1 or S phases. Here we provide the first cytogenetic mechanistic evidence of low-dose HRS in human peripheral blood lymphocytes using structural chromosomal aberrations. Methods and Materials: Human peripheral blood lymphocytes from 2 normal healthy female donors were acutely exposed to cobalt 60 γ rays in either G0 or G2 using closely spaced doses ranging from 0 to 1.5 Gy. Structural chromosomal aberrations were enumerated, and the slopes of the regression lines at low doses (0-0.4 Gy) were compared with doses of 0.5 Gy and above. Results: HRS was clearly evident in both donors for cells irradiated in G2. No HRS was observed in cells irradiated in G0. The radiation effect per unit dose was 2.5- to 3.5-fold higher for doses ≤0.4 Gy than for doses >0.5 Gy. Conclusions: These data provide the first cytogenetic evidence for the existence of HRS in human cells irradiated in G2 and suggest that LNT models may not always be optimal for making radiation risk assessments at low doses.

  16. Characteristics of nucleoplasmic bridges induced by 60Co γ-rays in human peripheral blood lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hua; Lu, Xue; Li, Shuang; Chen, De-Qing; Liu, Qing-Jie

    2013-12-16

    Few studies have shown that the yields of ionising-radiation-induced nucleoplasmic bridges (NPBs) in human cells are dose dependent. However, a dose-response curve between the NPB frequency and the absorbed dose of ionising radiation has not yet been established. This study aimed to investigate NPB frequencies in human peripheral blood lymphocytes induced by cobalt-60 ((60)Co) γ-rays and to establish a dose-response curve. Human peripheral blood samples were collected from three healthy males, and some of these samples were irradiated with 0-6 Gy (60)Co γ-rays. A cytokinesis-block micronucleus cytome assay was then carried out to analyse NPBs and micronuclei (MN) in binucleated cells. The remaining blood samples were irradiated with 0, 2 and 5 Gy of γ-rays, and unstable chromosome aberrations (dicentric chromosome, ring chromosome and acentric chromosome fragment) were analysed. The correlation between NPBs and dicentric plus ring chromosome (dic+r) induced by the same γ-ray dose was also analysed. Results showed that the NPB yields among the three subjects at each dose level were not significantly different. NPBs in binucleated cells at all γ-ray doses conformed to Poisson distribution. The dose-response curve of the γ-ray-induced NPB frequencies followed the linear-quadratic model y = (1.39×10(-3))x (2) + (4.94×10(-3))x. A positive correlation was observed between the frequencies of NPB and dic+r, as well as between the frequencies of MN and acentric fragments. Therefore, NPB is an important biomarker of early chromosome damage event induced by ionising radiation.

  17. Regulation of Exacerbated Immune Responses in Human Peripheral Blood Cells by Hydrolysed Egg White Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Lozano-Ojalvo, Daniel; Molina, Elena; López-Fandiño, Rosina

    2016-01-01

    The anti-allergic potential of egg white protein hydrolysates (from ovalbumin, lysozyme and ovomucoid) was evaluated as their ability to hinder cytokine and IgE production by Th2-skewed human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), as well as the release of pro-inflammatory factors and generation of reactive oxygen species from Th1-stimulated peripheral blood leukocytes (PBLs). The binding to IgE of egg allergic patients was determined and the peptides present in the hydrolysates were identified. The hydrolysates with alcalase down-regulated the production of Th2-biased cytokines and the secretion of IgE to the culture media of Th2-skewed PBMCs, and they significantly neutralized oxidative stress in PBLs. The hydrolysates of ovalbumin and ovomucoid with pepsin helped to re-establish the Th1/Th2 balance in Th2-biased PBMCs, while they also inhibited the release of pro-inflammatory mediators and reduced oxidative stress in PBLs treated with inflammatory stimuli. The hydrolysates with alcalase, in addition to equilibrating Th2 differentiation, exhibited a low IgE-binding. Therefore, they would elicit mild allergic reactions while retaining T cell-stimulating abilities, which might correlate with an anti-allergic benefit. PMID:27007699

  18. Characterization of peripheral blood human immunodeficiency virus isolates from Hispanic women with cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Nieves, Dianedis M Toro; Plaud, Marinés; Wojna, Valerie; Skolasky, Richard; Meléndez, Loyda M

    2007-08-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) tropism plays an important role in HIV-associated dementia. In this study, aimed at determining if the tropism and coreceptor usage of circulating viruses correlates with cognitive function, the authors isolated and characterized HIV from the peripheral blood of 21 Hispanic women using antiretroviral therapy. Macrophage tropism was determined by inoculation of HIV isolates onto monocyte-derived macrophages and lymphocyte cultures. To define coreceptor usage, the HIV isolates were inoculated onto the U87.CD4 glioma cell lines with specific CCR5 and CXCR4 coreceptors. HIV isolates from cognitively impaired patients showed higher levels of replication in mitogen-stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells than did isolates from patients with normal cognition (P < .05). The viral growth of HIV primary isolates in macrophages and lymphocytes did not differ between patients with and those without cognitive impairment. However, isolates from the cognitively impaired women preferentially used the X4 coreceptor (P < .05). These phenotypic studies suggest that cognitively impaired HIV-infected women receiving treatment may have a more highly replicating and more pathogenic X4 virus in the circulation that could contribute to their neuropathogenesis.

  19. Enhanced activation of B cells in a granulocyte colony-stimulating factor-mobilized peripheral blood stem cell graft.

    PubMed

    Tayebi, H; Lapierre, V; Saas, P; Lienard, A; Sutton, L; Milpied, N; Attal, M; Cahn, J Y; Kuentz, M; Blaise, D; Hervé, P; Tiberghien, P; Robinet, E

    2001-09-01

    In a randomized study that compared human leucocyte antigen-identical allogeneic granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF)-mobilized peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC) versus bone marrow (BM) transplantation, the expression of activation markers, CD23, CD25 and CD45RO by B cells, was compared in blood before and after G-CSF mobilization and in PBSC versus BM grafts. The fractions of CD23+ and CD25+ B cells were higher in PBSC than in BM grafts. Moreover, we observed a G-CSF-induced increase in B-cell fractions in blood as well as in PBSC grafts when compared with BM grafts. Such an enhanced B-cell activation could contribute to the accelerated kinetics of immuno-haematological reconstitution, the occurrence of acute haemolysis in the ABO minor incompatibility setting, as well as the increased incidence of chronic graft-versus-host disease observed after PBSC transplantation.

  20. Stimulation through CD50 preferentially induces apoptosis of TCR1+ human peripheral blood lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    López-Briones, S; Portales-Pérez, D P; Baranda, L; de la Fuente, H; Rosenstein, Y; González-Amaro, R

    1998-01-01

    Apoptosis has an important role in several key immunological phenomena such as regulation of the immune response, and deletion of auto-reactive cells. This phenomenon is induced following the interaction of several cell membrane receptors with their respective ligands or after cell activation. We have studied the possible effect of signaling through CD50/ICAM-3 and CD69/AIM on apoptosis of peripheral blood lymphocytes. Apoptosis was assessed by both flow cytometry analysis (content of cell DNA and binding to annexin V), and detection of DNA fragmentation by agarose gel electrophoresis. We found that a stimulatory anti-CD50 mAb was able to induce a small but significant degree of apoptosis in resting peripheral blood mononuclear cells from most donors; this effect was dose-dependent and was evident as early as at 12 h, with a maximal induction at 48 h. Studies with T and non-T cells showed that only the former cell population was sensitive to the induction of apoptosis through CD50. Further experiments revealed that the anti-ICAM-3 mAb preferentially induced apoptosis of TCR gamma delta-bearing cells. In addition, we found a significant increase in Cai2+ in PBMC stimulated with an anti-CD50 mAb, suggesting the involvement of this signaling pathway in the induction of apoptosis through this adhesion receptor. In contrast, under our experimental conditions, stimulation through CD69 did not have any effect on the induction of apoptosis on either cultured T lymphoblasts or PMA-stimulated PBMC. Our findings suggest that the interaction of CD50 with its natural ligand LFA-1 results in the induction of apoptosis in a significant fraction of resting PBMC. This phenomenon may be involved in immune regulation, lymphocyte turnover and peripheral deletion of auto-reactive cells.

  1. A Semi-automated Approach to Preparing Antibody Cocktails for Immunophenotypic Analysis of Human Peripheral Blood

    PubMed Central

    Koguchi, Yoshinobu; Gonzalez, Iliana L.; Meeuwsen, Tanisha L.; Miller, William L.; Haley, Daniel P.; Tanibata-Branham, Alice N.; Bahjat, Keith S.

    2016-01-01

    Immunophenotyping of peripheral blood by flow cytometry determines changes in the frequency and activation status of peripheral leukocytes during disease and treatment. It has the potential to predict therapeutic efficacy and identify novel therapeutic targets. Whole blood staining utilizes unmanipulated blood, which minimizes artifacts that can occur during sample preparation. However, whole blood staining must also be done on freshly collected blood to ensure the integrity of the sample. Additionally, it is best to prepare antibody cocktails on the same day to avoid potential instability of tandem-dyes and prevent reagent interaction between brilliant violet dyes. Therefore, whole blood staining requires careful standardization to control for intra and inter-experimental variability. Here, we report deployment of an automated liquid handler equipped with a two-dimensional (2D) barcode reader into a standard process of making antibody cocktails for flow cytometry. Antibodies were transferred into 2D barcoded tubes arranged in a 96 well format and their contents compiled in a database. The liquid handler could then locate the source antibody vials by referencing antibody names within the database. Our method eliminated tedious coordination for positioning of source antibody tubes. It provided versatility allowing the user to easily change any number of details in the antibody dispensing process such as specific antibody to use, volume, and destination by modifying the database without rewriting the scripting in the software method for each assay. A proof of concept experiment achieved outstanding inter and intra- assay precision, demonstrated by replicate preparation of an 11-color, 17-antibody flow cytometry assay. These methodologies increased overall throughput for flow cytometry assays and facilitated daily preparation of the complex antibody cocktails required for the detailed phenotypic characterization of freshly collected anticoagulated peripheral blood

  2. Adipose Tissue and Energy Expenditure: Central and Peripheral Neural Activation Pathways.

    PubMed

    Blaszkiewicz, Magdalena; Townsend, Kristy L

    2016-06-01

    Increasing energy expenditure is an appealing therapeutic target for the prevention and reversal of metabolic conditions such as obesity or type 2 diabetes. However, not enough research has investigated how to exploit pre-existing neural pathways, both in the central nervous system (CNS) and peripheral nervous system (PNS), in order to meet these needs. Here, we review several research areas in this field, including centrally acting pathways known to drive the activation of sympathetic nerves that can increase lipolysis and browning in white adipose tissue (WAT) or increase thermogenesis in brown adipose tissue (BAT), as well as other central and peripheral pathways able to increase energy expenditure of these tissues. In addition, we describe new work investigating the family of transient receptor potential (TRP) channels on metabolically important sensory nerves, as well as the role of the vagus nerve in regulating energy balance.

  3. Neutron scattering studies on protein dynamics using the human myelin peripheral membrane protein P2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laulumaa, Saara; Kursula, Petri; Natali, Francesca

    2015-01-01

    Myelin is a multilayered proteolipid membrane structure surrounding selected axons in the vertebrate nervous system, which allows the rapid saltatory conduction of nerve impulses. Deficits in myelin formation and maintenance may lead to chronic neurological disease. P2 is an abundant myelin protein from peripheral nerves, binding between two apposing lipid bilayers. We studied the dynamics of the human myelin protein P2 and its mutated P38G variant in hydrated powders using elastic incoherent neutron scattering. The local harmonic vibrations at low temperatures were very similar for both samples, but the mutant protein had increased flexibility and softness close to physiological temperatures. The results indicate that a drastic mutation of proline to glycine at a functional site can affect protein dynamics, and in the case of P2, they may explain functional differences between the two proteins.

  4. Grass immunotherapy induces inhibition of allergen-specific human peripheral blood mononuclear cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Baskar, S; Hamilton, R G; Norman, P S; Ansari, A A

    1997-02-01

    The peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from humans allergic to grass pollens (GR+ subjects) show strong in vitro proliferative responses to purified allergens from Lolium perenne pollen Lol p 1, and to a lesser extent to Lol p 2 and Lol p 3. By contrast, PBMC from grass allergic patients undergoing immunotherapy (GR + IT subjects) exhibit a very poor Lol p-specific proliferative response, similar to that observed in nongrass allergic subjects (GR-subjects). Unlike GR-subjects, both GR+ and GR + IT subjects have high levels of antigen-specific serum IgG and IgE antibodies to Lol p 1, Lol p 2 and Lol p 3. While GR+ subjects exhibit a significant correlation between antigen-specific serum antibody and PBMC responses, GR + IT subjects do not show a correlation between the two responses. The possible mechanisms by which immunotherapy may modulate allergen-specific T cell proliferative response are discussed.

  5. Critical role of peripheral vasoconstriction in fatal brain hyperthermia induced by MDMA (Ecstasy) under conditions that mimic human drug use.

    PubMed

    Kiyatkin, Eugene A; Kim, Albert H; Wakabayashi, Ken T; Baumann, Michael H; Shaham, Yavin

    2014-06-04

    MDMA (Ecstasy) is an illicit drug used by young adults at hot, crowed "rave" parties, yet the data on potential health hazards of its abuse remain controversial. Here, we examined the effect of MDMA on temperature homeostasis in male rats under standard laboratory conditions and under conditions that simulate drug use in humans. We chronically implanted thermocouple microsensors in the nucleus accumbens (a brain reward area), temporal muscle, and facial skin to measure temperature continuously from freely moving rats. While focusing on brain hyperthermia, temperature monitoring from the two peripheral locations allowed us to evaluate the physiological mechanisms (i.e., intracerebral heat production and heat loss via skin surfaces) that underlie MDMA-induced brain temperature responses. Our data confirm previous reports on high individual variability and relatively weak brain hyperthermic effects of MDMA under standard control conditions (quiet rest, 22-23°C), but demonstrate dramatic enhancements of drug-induced brain hyperthermia during social interaction (exposure to male conspecific) and in warm environments (29°C). Importantly, we identified peripheral vasoconstriction as a critical mechanism underlying the activity- and state-dependent potentiation of MDMA-induced brain hyperthermia. Through this mechanism, which prevents proper heat dissipation to the external environment, MDMA at a moderate nontoxic dose (9 mg/kg or ~1/5 of LD50 in rats) can cause fatal hyperthermia under environmental conditions commonly encountered by humans. Our results demonstrate that doses of MDMA that are nontoxic under cool, quiet conditions can become highly dangerous under conditions that mimic recreational use of MDMA at rave parties or other hot, crowded venues.

  6. Thymosin increases production of T-cell growth factor by normal human peripheral blood lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Zatz, M M; Oliver, J; Samuels, C; Skotnicki, A B; Sztein, M B; Goldstein, A L

    1984-01-01

    The in vitro incubation of phytohemagglutinin-stimulated peripheral blood lymphocytes with thymosin results in a marked and reproducible increase in production of T-cell growth factor, which is dose dependent and most pronounced in the first 24 hr of culture. Incubation of lymphocytes with thymosin alone failed to induce any production of T-cell growth factor. The biological activity of thymosin fraction 5 cannot be attributed to the activity of thymosin alpha 1, one of the well-characterized peptide components of fraction 5. These data provide the basis for (i) a potential mechanism for the in vivo immunorestorative effects of thymosin in primary and secondary immunodeficiencies and (ii) identification of an additional, but as yet undefined, immunoregulatory component of thymosin fraction 5. PMID:6609371

  7. Peltatoside Isolated from Annona crassiflora Induces Peripheral Antinociception by Activation of the Cannabinoid System.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Cristina da Costa; Veloso, Clarice de Carvalho; Ferreira, Renata Cristina Mendes; Lage, Gisele Avelar; Pimenta, Lúcia Pinheiro Santos; Duarte, Igor Dimitri Gama; Romero, Thiago Roberto Lima; Perez, Andrea de Castro

    2017-02-01

    Peltatoside is a natural compound isolated from leaves of Annona crassiflora Mart., a plant widely used in folk medicine. This substance is an analogue of quercetin, a flavonoid extensively studied because of its diverse biological activities, including analgesic effects. Besides, a previous study suggested, by computer structure analyses, a possible quercetin-CB1 cannabinoid receptor interaction. Thus, the aim of this work was to assess the antinociceptive effect of peltatoside and analyze the cannabinoid system involvement in this action. The mouse paw pressure test was used and hyperalgesia was induced by intraplantar injection of carrageenan (200 µg/paw). All used drugs were administered by intraplantar administration in Swiss male mice (n = 6). Peltatoside (100 µg/paw) elicited a local inhibition of hyperalgesia. The peripheral antinociceptive action of peltatoside was antagonized by the CB1 cannabinoid antagonist AM251 (160 µg/paw), but not by CB2 cannabinoid antagonist AM630 (100 µg/paw). In order to assess the role of endocannabinoids in this peripheral antinociceptive effect, we used (i) [5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z]-5,8,11,14-eicosatetraenyl-methyl ester phosphonofluoridic acid, an inhibitor of anandamide amidase; (ii) JZL184, an inhibitor for monoacylglycerol lipase, the primary enzyme responsible for degrading the endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoylglycerol; and (iii) VDM11, an endocannabinoid reuptake inhibitor. MAFP, JZL184, and VDM11 did not induce antinociception, respectively, at the doses 0.5, 3.8, and 2.5 µg/paw, however, these three drugs were able to potentiate the peripheral antinociceptive effect of peltatoside at an intermediary dose (50 µg/paw). Our results suggest that this natural substance is capable of inducing analgesia through the activation of peripheral CB1 receptors, involving endocannabinoids in this process.

  8. Activation of peripheral nerve fibers by electrical stimulation in the sole of the foot

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Human nociceptive withdrawal reflexes (NWR) can be evoked by electrical stimulation applied to the sole of the foot. However, elicitation of NWRs is highly site dependent, and NWRs are especially difficult to elicit at the heel. The aim of the present study was to investigate potential peripheral mechanisms for any site dependent differences in reflex thresholds. Results The first part of the study investigated the neural innervation in different sites of the sole of the foot using two different staining techniques. 1) Staining for the Nav1.7 antigen (small nociceptive fibers) and 2) the Sihler whole nerve technique (myelinated part of the nerve). No differences in innervation densities were found across the sole of the foot using the two staining techniques: Nav1.7 immunochemistry (small nociceptive fibers (1-way ANOVA, NS)) and the Sihler’s method (myelinated nerve fibers (1-way ANOVA, NS)). However, the results indicate that there are no nociceptive intraepidermal nerve fibers (IENFs) innervating the heel. Secondly, mathematical modeling was used to investigate to what degree differences in skin thicknesses affect the activation thresholds of Aδ and Aβ fibers in the sole of the foot. The modeling comprised finite element analysis of the volume conduction combined with a passive model of the activation of branching cutaneous nerve fibers. The model included three different sites in the sole of the foot (forefoot, arch and heel) and three different electrode sizes (diameters: 9.1, 12.9, and 18.3 mm). For each of the 9 combinations of site and electrode size, a total of 3000 Aβ fibers and 300 Aδ fibers was modeled. The computer simulation of the effects of skin thicknesses and innervation densities on thresholds of modeled Aδ and Aβ fibers did not reveal differences in pain and perception thresholds across the foot sole as have been observed experimentally. Instead a lack of IENFs at the heel decreased the electrical activation thresholds

  9. Differential expression of intracellular and extracellular CB(2) cannabinoid receptor protein by human peripheral blood leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Castaneda, Julie T; Harui, Airi; Kiertscher, Sylvia M; Roth, Jeffrey D; Roth, Michael D

    2013-03-01

    mRNA encoding for the CB(2) cannabinoid receptor is expressed by many subsets of human peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL), but little is known about the resulting protein expression and function. Employing clones from the A549 and 293T cell lines that were constructed to express both full-length human CB(2) and GFP, we developed a flow cytometry assay for characterizing CB(2) protein expression. A monoclonal antibody directed against human CB(2) selectively stained the surface of transduced but not parental cell lines. When cells were fixed and permeabilized, imaging flow cytometry identified large stores of intracellular protein. Total cellular staining for CB(2) corresponded closely with the level of GFP expression. When exposed to Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol, CB(2)-expressing cells internalized cell surface CB(2) receptors in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Applying these approaches to human PBL, CB(2) protein was identified on the surface of human B cells but not on T cells or monocytes. In contrast, when PBL were fixed and permeabilized, intracellular CB(2) expression was readily detected in all three subsets by both conventional and imaging flow cytometry. Similar to the protein expression pattern observed in fixed and permeabilized PBL, purified B cells, T cells, and monocytes expressed relatively equal levels of CB(2) mRNA by quantitative real-time RT-PCR. Our findings confirm that human PBL express CB(2) protein but that its distribution is predominantly intracellular with only B cells expressing CB(2) protein at the extracellular membrane. The differential role of intracellular and extracellular CB(2) receptors in mediating ligand signaling and immune function remains to be determined.

  10. Flow cytometric assay for analysis of cytotoxic effects of potential drugs on human peripheral blood leukocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieschke, Kathleen; Mittag, Anja; Golab, Karolina; Bocsi, Jozsef; Pierzchalski, Arkadiusz; Kamysz, Wojciech; Tarnok, Attila

    2014-03-01

    Toxicity test of new chemicals belongs to the first steps in the drug screening, using different cultured cell lines. However, primary human cells represent the human organism better than cultured tumor derived cell lines. We developed a very gentle toxicity assay for isolation and incubation of human peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL) and tested it using different bioactive oligopeptides (OP). Effects of different PBL isolation methods (red blood cell lysis; Histopaque isolation among others), different incubation tubes (e.g. FACS tubes), anticoagulants and blood sources on PBL viability were tested using propidium iodide-exclusion as viability measure (incubation time: 60 min, 36°C) and flow cytometry. Toxicity concentration and time-depended effects (10-60 min, 36 °C, 0-100 μg /ml of OP) on human PBL were analyzed. Erythrocyte lysis by hypotonic shock (dH2O) was the fastest PBL isolation method with highest viability (>85%) compared to NH4Cl-Lysis (49%). Density gradient centrifugation led to neutrophil granulocyte cell loss. Heparin anticoagulation resulted in higher viability than EDTA. Conical 1.5 mL and 2 mL micro-reaction tubes (both polypropylene (PP)) had the highest viability (99% and 97%) compared to other tubes, i.e. three types of 5.0 mL round-bottom tubes PP (opaque-60%), PP (blue-62%), Polystyrene (PS-64%). Viability of PBL did not differ between venous and capillary blood. A gentle reproducible preparation and analytical toxicity-assay for human PBL was developed and evaluated. Using our assay toxicity, time-course, dose-dependence and aggregate formation by OP could be clearly differentiated and quantified. This novel assay enables for rapid and cost effective multiparametric toxicological screening and pharmacological testing on primary human PBL and can be adapted to high-throughput-screening.°z

  11. Immunostimulatory acivity of Calophyllum brasiliense, Ipomoea pes-caprae and Matayba elaeagnoides demonstrated by human peripheral blood mononuclear cells proliferation.

    PubMed

    Philippi, Marina Elisa; Duarte, Bruna Momm; Da Silva, Carolina Vieira; De Souza, Michel Thomaz; Niero, Rivaldo; Cechinel Filho, Valdir; Bueno, Edneia Casagranda

    2010-01-01

    This study evaluates the effect of methanol extracts of three Brazilian medicinal plants on in vitro proliferation of human mononuclear cells. Lymphoproliferation assay was carried out by incubating human peripheral blood mononuclear cells from healthy donors (1 x 10(6) cells/mL) with extracts of Calophyllum brasiliense (roots), Ipomoea pes-caprae (whole plant) and Matayba elaeagnoides (bark), both at 10, 50, 100 and 200 microg/mL, alone or with phytohemagglutinin (PHA, 5 microg/mL), in 96-well microplates at 37 degrees C with 5% CO2, for 72 h. The quantification of cell proliferation assay was performed by blue tetrazolium (MTT) reduction with reading at 540 nm. Cells incubated with only the culture medium were used as negative control for cell proliferation, while the positive control consisted of cells and PHA. The results suggest that the extracts of all three studied plants induce T lymphocyte proliferation. I. pes-caprae showed immunostimulatory activity three times higher than the C. brasiliense extract, while that of the M. elaeagnoides extract was 1.5 times higher. The results demonstrate immunostimulatory effects of these three plants, therefore the continuity of these studies is recommended, in order to determine the active principles.

  12. Deoxynivalenol induced oxidative stress and genotoxicity in human peripheral blood lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wei; Yu, Miao; Fu, Juan; Bao, Wei; Wang, Di; Hao, Liping; Yao, Ping; Nüssler, Andreas K; Yan, Hong; Liu, Liegang

    2014-02-01

    Deoxynivalenol (DON) is one of the most common mycotoxins. The aim of this study consists in using diverse cellular and molecular assays to evaluate cytotoxicity, genotoxicity as well as oxidative damage and to investigate their mechanisms in human peripheral blood lymphocytes. The human lymphocytes were cultured in eight different doses of DON (0, 6.25, 12.5, 25, 50, 100, 250 and 500 ng/mL) during 6, 12 and 24 h. DON was able to decrease cell viability and cause damage to the membrane, the chromosomes or the DNA at all times of culture. It was also able to induce lipid peroxidation and raise the levels of 8-OHdG and ROS in 6, 12 and 24 h. The results of the RT-PCR and the Western Blot indicated that DON is able to enhance mRNA or protein expressions of DNA repair genes and HO-1 in 6 h and to inhibit these expressions in 24 h. DON potentially triggers genotoxicity in human lymphocytes. This mechanism is probably related to depletion of antioxidase and oxidative damage to the DNA that reduced expression of HO-1, thereby inhibiting the ability of DNA repair.

  13. Geno- and cytotoxicity of salinomycin in human nasal mucosa and peripheral blood lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Scherzad, Agmal; Hackenberg, Stephan; Schramm, Carolin; Froelich, Katrin; Ginzkey, Christian; Hagen, Rudolf; Kleinsasser, Norbert

    2015-06-01

    Salinomycin is usually applied in stock breading but has also been described as a promising agent against cancer stem cells (CSC). However, knowledge about the toxicity of this ionophor substance is incomplete. The aim of this study was to investigate cyto- and genotoxic effects of salinomycin in human non-malignant cells. Primary human nasal mucosa cells (monolayer and mini organ cultures) and peripheral blood lymphocytes from 10 individuals were used to study the cytotoxic effects of salinomycin (0.1-175 μM) by annexin-propidiumiodide- and MTT-test. The comet assay was performed to evaluate DNA damage. Additionally, the secretion of interleukin-8 was analyzed by ELISA. Flow cytometry and MTT assay revealed significant cytotoxic effects in nasal mucosa cells and lymphocytes at low salinomycin concentrations of 10-20 μM. No genotoxic effects could be observed. IL-8 secretion was elevated at 5 μM. Salinomycin-induced cytotoxic and pro-inflammatory effects were seen at concentrations relevant for anti-cancer treatment. Concurrent to the evaluation of salinomycin application in experimental oncology, adverse effects in non-malignant cells need to be monitored and reduced as much as possible. Further studies are also warranted to evaluate the toxic effects in a variety of human cell systems, e.g., liver, kidney and muscle cells.

  14. A permethrin/allethrin mixture induces genotoxicity and cytotoxicity in human peripheral blood lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Ramos-Chavez, Lucio A; Sordo, Monserrat; Calderon-Aranda, Emma; Castañeda-Saucedo, Eduardo; Ostrosky-Wegman, Patricia; Moreno-Godinez, Ma Elena

    2015-01-01

    Two pyrethroids, permethrin and allethrin, are often combined for large-scale use in public health programs to control vector-borne diseases. In this study, the genotoxic potential of a commercial formulation of permethrin and allethrin was examined using cultured human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL). Genotoxicity was evaluated using the cytokinesis-block micronucleus cytome (CBMN cyt) assay by measuring the frequency of micronuclei (MN), nuclear division index (NDI), formation of nucleoplasmic bridges (NPB) and nuclear buds (NBUD), as well as apoptotic and necrotic cells. Human PBL were treated with different concentrations of a permethrin/allethrin mixture (1/0.01, 5/0.07, and 10/0.14 μg/ml) for 24 or 36 h. The highest concentration (10/0.14 μg/ml) of permethrin/allethrin mixture significantly increased MN frequency and percent apoptotic cells after incubations for 24 or 36 h. The NDI was markedly decreased in response to treatment with 5/0.07 or 10/0.14 μg/ml permethrin/allethrin for both 24 and 36 h. Exposure to the permethrin/allethrin mixture did not significantly alter formation of NBUD, NPB, or percent necrotic cells. The MN frequency was significantly correlated with the number of apoptotic and necrotic cells but inversely correlated with NDI. Data demonstrated that a mixture of permethrin and allethrin induced concentration- and time-dependent cytotoxic and genotoxic damage to human PBL in vitro.

  15. Cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of dioxacarb by human peripheral blood lymphocytes CAs and Allium test.

    PubMed

    Eren, Yasin; Erdoğmuş, Sevim Feyza; Akyıl, Dilek; Özkara, Arzu; Konuk, Muhsin; Sağlam, Esra

    2015-12-01

    Dioxacarb (Elecron, Famid) is a phenyl methylcarbamate insecticide and in vitro cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of this pesticide on human peripheral blood lymphocytes and Allium root meristematic cells were investigated by chromosomal aberrations (CAs) and Allium test. Human lymphocytes were treated with 62.5, 125, 250 and 500 ppm doses of dioxacarb for CAs. CA/cell, abnormal cell % and mitotic index % (MI %) data were obtained from these concentrations in 24 and 48 h treatment periods. Dioxacarb did not increase the CA/cell frequency significantly, so this insecticide was not identified as genotoxic. But it was found cytotoxic especially at 250 and 500 ppm concentrations because of the reduced the MI % and increased the abnormal cell %. In Allium test, 25 ppm (EC50/2), 50 ppm (EC50) and 100 ppm (EC50 × 2) concentrations were used for root growth inhibition (EC50 determination) and Allium mitotic index (MI) determination tests. The used concentrations of dioxacarb induced dose-dependent inhibition of MI and root growth on root meristems. Mitotic inhibition of dioxacarb was found significantly higher than for the positive control. These Allium results indicated the high cytotoxicity of dioxacarb. The present study is the first research on cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of dioxacarb by human lymphocyte CAs and Allium test.

  16. Influence of calorie reduction on DNA repair capacity of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Matt, Katja; Burger, Katharina; Gebhard, Daniel; Bergemann, Jörg

    2016-03-01

    Caloric restrictive feeding prolongs the lifespan of a variety of model organisms like rodents and invertebrates. It has been shown that caloric restriction reduces age-related as well as overall-mortality, reduces oxidative stress and influences DNA repair ability positively. There are numerous studies underlining this, but fewer studies involving humans exist. To contribute to a better understanding of the correlation of calorie reduction and DNA repair in humans, we adapted the host cell reactivation assay to an application with human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Furthermore, we used this reliable and reproducible assay to research the influence of a special kind of calorie reduction, namely F. X. Mayr therapy, on DNA repair capacity. We found a positive effect in all persons with low pre-existing DNA repair capacity. In individuals with normal pre-existing DNA repair capacity, no effect on DNA repair capacity was detectable. Decline of DNA repair, accumulation of oxidative DNA damages, mitochondrial dysfunction, telomere shortening as well as caloric intake are widely thought to contribute to aging. With regard to that, our results can be considered as a strong indication that calorie reduction may support DNA repair processes and thus contribute to a healthier aging.

  17. Development of methods to examine the effects of atmospheric particulate matter (PM) on human peripheral blood leukocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zussman, Lisa Ann

    In vitro methods to study the effect of atmospheric particulate matter (PM) on leukocyte function using human peripheral blood were developed. These methods were demonstrated using the blood of 1-5 individuals and National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) urban PM #1648, diesel PM #1650, silica PM, and a locally collected PM sample (New Jersey PM10). For the blood samples analyzed in this study NIST urban PM and New Jersey PM10 treatment mediated the release of granule contents from peripheral blood leukocytes and induced structural changes associated with degranulation. Flow cytometry revealed PM-induced changes in phagocytosis and cell structure associated with degranulation. Transmission electron microscopy confirmed NIST urban PM-induced cell structure changes were associated with PM internalization. Colorametric and electrophoretic methods showed no PM-induced release of primary granules and a slight PM-induced release of secondary granules associated with only NIST urban PM. Enzyme Immunosorbent Assays detected increased histamine release from basophils treated with NIST urban PM, a locally collected PM, and the soluble and insoluble components of these particles. NIST urban PM was found to be a potent inducer of histamine release in 4 out of 6 individuals tested. Fractionation studies revealed that soluble (aqueous) and insoluble fractions of NIST urban PM contain histamine-releasing activity. This was also demonstrated for the New Jersey PM10 sample for which the soluble fraction exhibited the most activity. Complementary studies with inhibitors of IgE-mediated histamine release conducted on one test subject suggest that PM-induced histamine release was partially mediated by IgE. A new hypothesis has been formed, suggesting that particle toxicity is related to PM-induced histamine release. Due to the bioactive nature of histamine and its association with many cardiopulmonary responses, the PM- mediated release of histamine should be investigated

  18. Quantitative peripheral blood perturbations of γδ T cells in human disease and their clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Bank, Ilan; Marcu-Malina, Victoria

    2014-12-01

    Human γδ T cells, which play innate and adaptive, protective as well as destructive, roles in the immune response, were discovered in 1986, but the clinical significance of alterations of the levels of these cells in the peripheral blood in human diseases has not been comprehensively reviewed. Here, we review patterns of easily measurable changes of this subset of T cells in peripheral blood from relevant publications in PubMed and their correlations with specific disease categories, specific diagnoses within disease categories, and prognostic outcomes. These collective data suggest that enumeration of γδ T cells and their subsets in the peripheral blood of patients could be a useful tool to evaluate diagnosis and prognosis in the clinical setting.

  19. Radiosensitizing activity and pharmacokinetics of multiple dose administered KU-2285 in peripheral nerve tissue in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Iwai, Hiroyuki; Matsuno, Etsuko ); Sasai, Keisuke; Abe, Mitsuyuki; Shibamoto, Yuta )

    1994-06-15

    In a clinical trial in which a 2-nitroimidazole radiosensitizer was administered repeatedly, the dose-limiting toxicity was found to be peripheral neuropathy. In the present study, the in vivo radiosensitizing activity of KU-2285 in combination with radiation dose fractionation, and the pharmacokinetics of cumulative dosing of KU-2285 in the peripheral nerves were examined. The ability of three nitroimidazoles, misonidazole (MISO), etanidazole (SR-2508) and KU-2285, to sensitize SCCVII tumors to radiation treatment has been compared for drug doses in the range 0-200 mg/kg. Single radiation doses or two different fractionation schedules (6 Gy/fractions [times] three fractions/48 h or 5 Gy/fractions [times] five fractions/48 h) were used; the tumor cell survival was determined using an in vivo/in vitro colony assay. The pharmacokinetics in the sciatic nerves were undertaken, when KU-2285 or etanidazole were injected at a dose of 200 mg/kg intravenously one, two, three, or four times at 2-h intervals. At less than 100 mg/kg, KU-2285 sensitized SCCVII tumors more than MISO and SR-2508 by fractionated irradiation. Evaluation of pharmacokinetics in the peripheral nerves showed that the apparent biological half-life of SR-2508 increased with the increases in the number of administrations, whereas that of KU-2285 became shorter. Since most clinical radiotherapy is given in small multiple fractions, KU-2285 appears to be a hypoxic cell radiosensitizer that could be useful in such regimens, and that poses no risk of chronic peripheral neurotoxicity. 12 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Growth and differentiation of eosinophils from human peripheral blood CD 34+ cells.

    PubMed

    Shalit, M

    1997-01-01

    Small numbers of CD34+ primitive hematopoietic progenitors are found in normal human peripheral blood. These cells differentiate to myeloid or lymphoid lineage under the influence of growth factors. We investigated the effects of IL5 and other growth factors on the production of eosinophils from peripheral blood CD34+ cells. CD34+ cells were plated in agarose with different combinations of cytokines. At 14 days of growth a triple stain technique was used to identify eosinophil, monocyte and neutrophil colonies. IL5 alone did not support colony growth. In contrast GM-CSF and IL3 alone or together supported the generation of more than 50% eosinophil colonies. Addition of IL5 increased the fraction of eosinophil colonies to over 70%. Under the best conditions (IL3 + GM-CSF + IL5), the addition of interferon-a or LPS inhibited colony growth by 51% and 58%, respectively. Since IL5 alone did not support colony growth from CD34+ cells, we determined when IL5 responsive cells appeared in culture. Cells were grown initially with IL3 + GM-CSF, washed, and plated with IL5 alone. Only when progenitors were grown at least 3 days, could IL5 serve as the single growth factor supporting pure eosinophil colony growth (47 colonies/104 cells plated at day 3 and 134 colonies/104 cells at day 7). Growth of CD34+ in liquid culture for 28 days in the presence of IL3, GM-CSF and IL5 resulted in almost 250 fold increase in cell number, yielding a population of 83% maturing eosinophils. We used our culture system and the sensitive technique of RT-PCR to analyze the kinetics of production of mRNA transcripts encoding several eosinophil proteins. Freshly isolated CD34+ cells contained no eosinophil granule protein transcripts and barely detectable amounts of some oxidase protein transcripts. At day 3 of culture no cells recognizable by histochemical staining as eosinophils could be detected, but transcripts for all five eosinophil granule proteins were present. These transcripts increased

  1. Physical activity, glycemic control, and diabetic peripheral neuropathy: a national sample.

    PubMed

    Loprinzi, Paul D; Hager, Kathy K; Ramulu, Pradeep Y

    2014-01-01

    To determine if physical activity and/or blood glycohemoglobin (HbA1c) are associated with the prevalence of peripheral neuropathy (PN) in a representative population of diabetics. Three hundred thirty-nine diabetic participants (40-85 yrs) taking part in 2003-2004 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey were studied. Participants were defined as having peripheral neuropathy if examination determined ≥1 insensate area in either foot. Moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) was objectively-measured using accelerometry. After adjustments, MVPA was not significantly associated with PN (OR=1.16; 95% CI: 0.48-2.78), nor was HbA1c (OR=0.55; 95% CI: 0.28-1.04). However, there was evidence of statistical interaction (OR=0.24; 95% CI: 0.06-0.87) between MVPA and HbA1c status, showing that diabetics engaging in higher levels of MVPA and having normal HgbA1c levels were less likely to have PN than what would be expected based on the individual effects of MVPA and HbA1c alone. Although MVPA was not directly associated with PN, these findings suggest that proper physical activity, coupled with good glycemic control, is associated with less neuropathy. Future longitudinal studies are required to evaluate whether physical activity and improved glycemic control may help prevent or slow the progression of diabetic end-organ damage, particularly diabetic neuropathy.

  2. Effect of BjcuL, a lectin isolated from Bothrops jararacussu, on human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Pires, Weverson Luciano; de Castro, Onassis Boeri; Kayano, Anderson Makoto; da Silva Setúbal, Sulamita; Pontes, Adriana Silva; Nery, Neriane Monteiro; Paloschi, Mauro Valentino; Dos Santos Pereira, Soraya; Stábeli, Rodrigo Guerino; Fernandes, Carla Freire Celedônio; Soares, Andreimar Martins; Zuliani, Juliana Pavan

    2017-02-08

    BjcuL is a C-type lectin with specificity for the binding of β-d-galactose units isolated from Bothrops jararacussu venom. It triggers cellular infiltration in post capillary venules, increases edema and vascular permeability in murine models, contributes to in vitro neutrophil activation and modulates macrophage functional activation towards an M1 state. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of BjcuL on human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) activation with a focus on PBMCs proliferation and inflammatory mediators release. Results showed that BjcuL is not toxic to PBMCs, that BjcuL inhibits PBMCs proliferation and that it stimulates PBMCs to produce superoxide anion and hydrogen peroxide, primarily via lymphocyte stimulation, but does not stimulate the production of nitric oxide and PGE2. These results demonstrate that BjcuL has an immunomodulatory effect on PBMCs. Further studies are needed to confirm the immunomodulatory effect of BjcuL, to elucidate the molecular mechanisms of action responsible for its effects and to determine its potential application as an immunopharmacological and biotechnological tool.

  3. Stability of Radiation Induced Chromosome Damage in Human Peripheral Blood Lymphocytes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, F. A.; George, K.; Willingham, V.

    2006-01-01

    Chromosome damage in an individual's peripheral blood lymphocytes can be an indicator of radiation exposure and this data can be used to evaluate dose after accidental or occupational exposure. Evidence suggests that the yield of chromosome damage in lymphocytes is also a relevant biomarker of cancer risk in humans that reflects individual cancer susceptibility. It follows that biomonitoring studies can be used to uncover subjects who are particularly susceptible to radiation damage and therefore at higher risk of cancer. Translocations and other stable aberrations are commonly believed to persist in peripheral blood cells for many years after exposure, and it has been suggested that translocations can be used for assessing retrospective radiation doses or chronic exposures. However, recent investigations suggest that translocations might not always persist indefinitely. We measured chromosome aberrations in the blood lymphocytes of six astronauts before their respective missions of approximately 3 to 6 months onboard the international space station, and again at various intervals up to 5 years after flight. In samples collected a few days after return to earth, the yield of chromosome translocations had significantly increased compared with preflight values, and results indicate that biodosimetry estimates lie within the range expected from physical dosimetry. However, for five of the astronauts, follow up analysis revealed a temporal decline in translocations with half-lives ranging from 10 to 58 months. The yield of exchanges remained unchanged for the sixth astronaut during an observation period of 5 months post-flight. These results may indicate complications with the use of stable aberrations for retrospective dose reconstruction and could affect cancer risk predictions that are estimated from yields of chromosome damage obtained shortly after exposure.

  4. Reversible Folding of Human Peripheral Myelin Protein 22, a Tetraspan Membrane Protein†

    PubMed Central

    Schlebach, Jonathan P.; Peng, Dungeng; Kroncke, Brett M.; Mittendorf, Kathleen F.; Narayan, Malathi; Carter, Bruce D.; Sanders, Charles R.

    2013-01-01

    Misfolding of the α-helical membrane protein peripheral myelin protein 22 (PMP22) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of the common neurodegenerative disease known as Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMTD) and also several other related peripheral neuropathies. Emerging evidence suggests that the propensity of PMP22 to misfold in the cell may be due to an intrinsic lack of conformational stability. Therefore, quantitative studies of the conformational equilibrium of PMP22 are needed to gain insight into the molecular basis of CMTD. In this work, we have investigated the folding and unfolding of wild type (WT) human PMP22 in mixed micelles. Both kinetic and thermodynamic measurements demonstrate that the denaturation of PMP22 by n-lauroyl sarcosine (LS) in dodecylphosphocholine (DPC) micelles is reversible. Assessment of the conformational equilibrium indicates that a significant fraction of unfolded PMP22 persists even in the absence of the denaturing detergent. However, we find the stability of PMP22 is increased by glycerol, which facilitates quantitation of thermodynamic parameters. To our knowledge, this work represents the first report of reversible unfolding of a eukaryotic multispan membrane protein. The results indicate that WT PMP22 possesses minimal conformational stability in micelles, which parallels its poor folding efficiency in the endoplasmic reticulum. Folding equilibrium measurements for PMP22 in mixed micelles may provide an approach to assess the effects of cellular metabolites or potential therapeutic agents on its stability. Furthermore, these results pave the way for future investigation of the effects of pathogenic mutations on the conformational equilibrium of PMP22. PMID:23639031

  5. Peripheral vasodilatation determines cardiac output in exercising humans: insight from atrial pacing.

    PubMed

    Bada, A A; Svendsen, J H; Secher, N H; Saltin, B; Mortensen, S P

    2012-04-15

    In dogs, manipulation of heart rate has no effect on the exercise-induced increase in cardiac output. Whether these findings apply to humans remain uncertain, because of the large differences in cardiovascular anatomy and regulation. To investigate the role of heart rate and peripheral vasodilatation in the regulation of cardiac output during steady-state exercise, we measured central and peripheral haemodynamics in 10 healthy male subjects, with and without atrial pacing (100–150 beats min(−1)) during: (i) resting conditions, (ii) one-legged knee extensor exercise (24 W) and (iii) femoral arterial ATP infusion at rest. Exercise and ATP infusion increased cardiac output, leg blood flow and vascular conductance (P < 0.05), whereas cerebral perfusion remained unchanged. During atrial pacing increasing heart rate by up to 54 beats min(−1), cardiac output did not change in any of the three conditions, because of a parallel decrease in stroke volume (P < 0.01). Atrial pacing increased mean arterial pressure (MAP) at rest and during ATP infusion (P < 0.05), whereas MAP remained unchanged during exercise. Atrial pacing lowered central venous pressure (P < 0.05) and pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (P < 0.05) in all conditions, whereas it did not affect pulmonary mean arterial pressure. Atrial pacing lowered the left ventricular contractility index (dP/dt) (P < 0.05) in all conditions and plasma noradrenaline levels at rest (P < 0.05), but not during exercise and ATP infusion. These results demonstrate that the elevated cardiac output during steady-state exercise is regulated by the increase in skeletal muscle blood flow and venous return to the heart, whereas the increase in heart rate appears to be secondary to the regulation of cardiac output.

  6. Effects of clinically relevant alumina ceramic wear particles on TNF-alpha production by human peripheral blood mononuclear phagocytes.

    PubMed

    Hatton, A; Nevelos, J E; Matthews, J B; Fisher, J; Ingham, E

    2003-03-01

    The recent introduction of microseparation of the components of ceramic-on-ceramic hip prostheses during hip simulations has produced clinically relevant wear rates, wear patterns and wear particles. This provided an opportunity to determine the response of primary human peripheral blood mononuclear cells to clinically relevant alumina ceramic wear particles in vitro. Alumina ceramic wear particles were generated in a hip joint simulator under microseparation conditions. The particles showed a bi-modal size distribution with nanometer sized (5-20nm) and larger particles (0.2->10 micrometer). The particles were cultured with human peripheral blood mononuclear cells obtained from six different donors at particle volume to cell number ratios of 1, 10, 100 and 500 micrometer(3). After 24h incubation the viability of the cells and the levels of TNF-alpha were determined. The response to the microseparation wear particles was compared to that of commercially available alumina powder with a uniform morphology and mean size of 0.5 micrometer. All six Donors PBMNC produced significantly elevated levels of TNF-alpha when stimulated with 100 micrometer(3) of the alumina powder per cell. Volumetric concentrations of 10 and 1.0 micrometer(3) per cell failed to stimulate a significant response by the cells from any of the six donors. Three of the six Donors PBMNC secreted significantly elevated levels of TNF-alpha when stimulated with 100 micrometer(3) of the microseparation wear particles, whereas the other three failed to respond to the wear debris at this concentration. All of the Donors PBMNC produced significantly elevated levels of TNF-alpha when stimulated with 500 micrometer(3) of the microseparation wear particles per cell. Thus, a greater volume of the microseparation wear particles was required to activate the PBMNC than the alumina powder. This was probably due to the microseparation wear particles having fewer particles in the critical size range (0.1-1 micrometer

  7. An implantable, designed-for-human-use peripheral nerve stimulation and recording system for advanced prosthetics.

    PubMed

    Lachapelle, John R; Bjune, Caroline K; Kindle, Alexander L; Czarnecki, Andrew; Burns, John R; Grainger, Julianne E; Segura, Carlos A; Nugent, Brian D; Sriram, Tirunelveli S; Parks, Philip D; Keefer, Edward; Cheng, Jonathan

    2016-08-01

    Complex suture prostheses that deliver sensory and position feedback require a more sophisticated integration with the human user. Here a micro-size active implantable system that provides many-degree-of-freedom neural feedback in both sensory stimulation and motor control is shown, as one potential human-use solution in DARPA's HAPTIX program. Various electrical and mechanical challenge and solutions in meeting both sensory /motor performance as well as ISO 14708 FDA-acceptable human use in an aspirin-size active implementation are discussed.

  8. CFTR targeting during activation of human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Ng, Hang Pong; Valentine, Vincent G; Wang, Guoshun

    2016-12-01

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), a cAMP-activated chloride channel, plays critical roles in phagocytic host defense. However, how activated neutrophils regulate CFTR channel distribution subcellularly is not well defined. To investigate, we tested multiple Abs against different CFTR domains, to examine CFTR expression in human peripheral blood neutrophils by flow cytometry. The data confirmed that resting neutrophils had pronounced CFTR expression. Activation of neutrophils with soluble or particulate agonists did not significantly increase CFTR expression level, but induced CFTR redistribution to cell surface. Such CFTR mobilization correlated with cell-surface recruitment of formyl-peptide receptor during secretory vesicle exocytosis. Intriguingly, neutrophils from patients with ΔF508-CF, despite expression of the mutant CFTR, showed little cell-surface mobilization upon stimulation. Although normal neutrophils effectively targeted CFTR to their phagosomes, ΔF508-CF neutrophils had impairment in that process, resulting in deficient hypochlorous acid production. Taken together, activated neutrophils regulate CFTR distribution by targeting this chloride channel to the subcellular sites of activation, and ΔF508-CF neutrophils fail to achieve such targeting, thus undermining their host defense function.

  9. Altered binding of thioflavin t to the peripheral anionic site of acetylcholinesterase after phosphorylation of the active site by chlorpyrifos oxon or dichlorvos

    SciTech Connect

    Sultatos, L.G. Kaushik, R.

    2008-08-01

    The peripheral anionic site of acetylcholinesterase, when occupied by a ligand, is known to modulate reaction rates at the active site of this important enzyme. The current report utilized the peripheral anionic site specific fluorogenic probe thioflavin t to determine if the organophosphates chlorpyrifos oxon and dichlorvos bind to the peripheral anionic site of human recombinant acetylcholinesterase, since certain organophosphates display concentration-dependent kinetics when inhibiting this enzyme. Incubation of 3 nM acetylcholinesterase active sites with 50 nM or 2000 nM inhibitor altered both the B{sub max} and K{sub d} for thioflavin t binding to the peripheral anionic site. However, these changes resulted from phosphorylation of Ser203 since increasing either inhibitor from 50 nM to 2000 nM did not alter further thioflavin t binding kinetics. Moreover, the organophosphate-induced decrease in B{sub max} did not represent an actual reduction in binding sites, but instead likely resulted from conformational interactions between the acylation and peripheral anionic sites that led to a decrease in the rigidity of bound thioflavin t. A drop in fluorescence quantum yield, leading to an apparent decrease in B{sub max}, would accompany the decreased rigidity of bound thioflavin t molecules. The organophosphate-induced alterations in K{sub d} represented changes in binding affinity of thioflavin t, with diethylphosphorylation of Ser203 increasing K{sub d}, and dimethylphosphorylation of Ser203 decreasing K{sub d}. These results indicate that chlorpyrifos oxon and dichlorvos do not bind directly to the peripheral anionic site of acetylcholinesterase, but can affect binding to that site through phosphorylation of Ser203.

  10. Hericium erinaceum induces maturation of dendritic cells derived from human peripheral blood monocytes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sun Kyung; Son, Chang Gue; Yun, Cheol-Heui; Han, Seung Hyun

    2010-01-01

    Hericium erinaceum, a medicinal mushroom, has long been used as a therapeutic due to its immuno-regulating potentials eliciting anticarcinogenic and antimicrobial efficacies. Since maturation of dendritic cells (DC) is an important process in the initiation and regulation of immune responses, the ability of water-soluble components from H. erinaceum (WEHE) to regulate DC maturation was investigated. Immature DC were prepared by differentiating human peripheral blood CD14-positive cells with GM-CSF and IL-4. DC were stimulated with WEHE at 2-20 microg/mL for 48 h and subjected to flow cytometric analysis to determine the expression of indicative maturation markers. The endocytic capacity of WEHE-stimulated DC was examined by a Dextran-FITC uptake assay. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was performed to examine the secretion of TNF-alpha and IL-12p40. DC stimulated with WEHE showed representative features upon DC maturation: enhanced expression of CD80, CD83 and CD86, and both MHC class I and II molecules, decreased endocytic capacity of DC, increased expression of CD205, and decreased expression of CD206. However, interestingly, WEHE could not induce the production of TNF-alpha and IL-12p40, whereas lipopolysaccharide substantially increased the production of both cytokines. Collectively, these results suggest that H. erinaceum induces the maturation of human DC, which might reinforce the host innate immune system.

  11. Widespread Decreased Expression of Immune Function Genes in Human Peripheral Blood Following Radiation Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Sunirmal; Smilenov, Lubomir B.; Amundson, Sally A.

    2014-01-01

    We report a large-scale reduced expression of genes in pathways related to cell-type specific immunity functions that emerges from microarray analysis 48 h after ex vivo γ-ray irradiation (0, 0.5, 2, 5, 8 Gy) of human peripheral blood from five donors. This response is similar to that seen in patients at 24 h after the start of total-body irradiation and strengthens the rationale for the ex vivo model as an adjunct to human in vivo studies. The most marked response was in genes associated with natural killer (NK) cell immune functions, reflecting a relative loss of NK cells from the population. T- and B-cell mediated immunity genes were also significantly represented in the radiation response. Combined with our previous studies, a single gene expression signature was able to predict radiation dose range with 97% accuracy at times from 6–48 h after exposure. Gene expression signatures that may report on the loss or functional deactivation of blood cell subpopulations after radiation exposure may be particularly useful both for triage biodosimetry and for monitoring the effect of radiation mitigating treatments. PMID:24168352

  12. In vitro transdifferentiation of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells to photoreceptor-like cells.

    PubMed

    Komuta, Yukari; Ishii, Toshiyuki; Kaneda, Makoto; Ueda, Yasuji; Miyamoto, Kiyoko; Toyoda, Masashi; Umezawa, Akihiro; Seko, Yuko

    2016-06-15

    Direct reprogramming is a promising, simple and low-cost approach to generate target cells from somatic cells without using induced pluripotent stem cells. Recently, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) have attracted considerable attention as a somatic cell source for reprogramming. As a cell source, PBMCs have an advantage over dermal fibroblasts with respect to the ease of collecting tissues. Based on our studies involving generation of photosensitive photoreceptor cells from human iris cells and human dermal fibroblasts by transduction of photoreceptor-related transcription factors via retrovirus vectors, we transduced these transcription factors into PBMCs via Sendai virus vectors. We found that retinal disease-related genes were efficiently detected in CRX-transduced cells, most of which are crucial to photoreceptor functions. In functional studies, a light-induced inward current was detected in some CRX-transduced cells. Moreover, by modification of the culture conditions including additional transduction of RAX1 and NEUROD1, we found a greater variety of retinal disease-related genes than that observed in CRX-transduced PBMCs. These data suggest that CRX acts as a master control gene for reprogramming PBMCs into photoreceptor-like cells and that our induced photoreceptor-like cells might contribute to individualized drug screening and disease modeling of inherited retinal degeneration.

  13. Alterations in Activation, Cytotoxic Capacity and Trafficking Profile of Peripheral CD8 T Cells in Young Adult Binge Drinkers

    PubMed Central

    Zaldivar Fujigaki, José Luis; Arroyo Valerio, América Guadalupe; López Alvarenga, Juan Carlos; Gutiérrez Reyes, Esperanza Gabriela; Kershenobich, David; Hernández Ruiz, Joselin

    2015-01-01

    Background Excess of alcohol consumption is a public health problem and has documented effects on the immune system of humans and animals. Animal and in vitro studies suggest that alcohol abuse changes CD8 T cell (CD8) characteristics, however it remains unknown if the CD8 profile of binge drinkers is different in terms of activation, trafficking and cytotoxic capacity. Aim To analyze the peripheral CD8 cytotoxic capacity, activation and trafficking phenotypic profile of Mexican young adults with regard to alcohol consumption pattern. Methods 55 Mexican young adults were stratified as Light (20), Intermediate (18) or Binge drinkers (17) according to their reported alcohol consumption pattern. Blood samples were obtained and hematic biometry and liver enzyme analysis were performed. Peripheral CD8 profile was established by expression of Granzyme B (GB), CD137, CD127, CD69, TLR4, PD1, CCR2, CCR4, CCR5 and CXCR4 by FACS. Data was analyzed by ANOVA, posthoc DMS and Tamhane, and principal component analysis (PCA) with varimax rotation, p<0.05. Results The Binge drinking group showed increased γGT together with increased expression of CD69 and reduced expression of TLR4, PD1, CCR2 and CXCR4 in peripheral CD8 cells. Other parameters were also specific to Binge drinkers. PCA established 3 factors associated with alcohol consumption: “Early Activation” represented by CD69 and TLR4 expression in the CD8 population; “Effector Activation” by CD69 expression in CD8 CD127+CD137+ and CD8 CD25+ CD137+; and Trafficking by CXCR4 expression on total CD8 and CD8 GB+CXCR4+, and CCR2 expression on total CD8. Binge drinking pattern showed low expression of Early Activation and Trafficking factors while Light drinking pattern exhibited high expression of Effector Activation factor. Conclusions Alcohol consumption affects the immune phenotype of CD8 cells since binge drinking pattern was found to be associated with high CD69 and low TLR4, CXCR4 and CCR2 expression, which suggest

  14. Amygdaloid signature of peripheral immune activation by bacterial lipopolysaccharide or staphylococcal enterotoxin B.

    PubMed

    Prager, Geraldine; Hadamitzky, Martin; Engler, Andrea; Doenlen, Raphael; Wirth, Timo; Pacheco-López, Gustavo; Krügel, Ute; Schedlowski, Manfred; Engler, Harald

    2013-03-01

    Activated immune cells produce soluble mediators that not only coordinate local and systemic immune responses but also act on the brain to initiate behavioral, neuroendocrine and metabolic adaptations. Earlier studies have shown that the amygdala, a group of nuclei located in the medial temporal lobe, is engaged in the central processing of afferent signals from the peripheral immune system. Here, we compared amygdaloid responses to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB), two prototypic bacterial products that elicit distinct immune responses. Intraperitoneal administration of LPS (0.1 mg/kg) or SEB (1 mg/kg) in adult rats induced substantial increases in amygdaloid neuronal activity as measured by intracerebral electroencephalography and c-fos gene expression. Amygdaloid neuronal activation was accompanied by an increase in anxiety-related behavior in the elevated plus-maze test. However, only treatment with LPS, but not SEB, enhanced amygdaloid IL-1β and TNF-α mRNA expression. This supports the view of the immune system as a sensory organ that recognizes invading pathogens and rapidly relays this information to the brain, independent of the nature of the immune response induced. The observation that neuronal and behavioral responses to peripheral immune challenges are not necessarily accompanied by increased brain cytokine expression suggests that cytokines are not the only factors driving sickness-related responses in the CNS.

  15. Docking and molecular dynamics studies of peripheral site ligand-oximes as reactivators of sarin-inhibited human acetylcholinesterase.

    PubMed

    de Almeida, Joyce S F D; Cuya Guizado, Teobaldo R; Guimarães, Ana P; Ramalho, Teodorico C; Gonçalves, Arlan S; de Koning, Martijn C; França, Tanos C C

    2016-12-01

    In the present work, we performed docking and molecular dynamics simulations studies on two groups of long-tailored oximes designed as peripheral site binders of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and potential penetrators on the blood brain barrier. Our studies permitted to determine how the tails anchor in the peripheral site of sarin-inhibited human AChE, and which aminoacids are important to their stabilization. Also the energy values obtained in the docking studies corroborated quite well with the experimental results obtained before for these oximes.

  16. Rifampin Increases Cytokine-Induced Expression of the CD1b Molecule in Human Peripheral Blood Monocytes

    PubMed Central

    Tentori, L.; Graziani, G.; Porcelli, S. A.; Sugita, M.; Brenner, M. B.; Madaio, R.; Bonmassar, E.; Giuliani, A.; Aquino, A.

    1998-01-01

    In recent years, it has been shown that a nonclassical, major histocompatibility complex-independent system (i.e., CD1-restricted T-cell responses) is involved in T-cell immunity against nonpeptide antigens. The CD1 system appears to function by presenting microbial lipid antigens to specific T cells, and the antigens so far identified include several known constituents of mycobacterial cell walls. Among the four known human CD1 isoforms, the CD1b protein is the best characterized with regard to its antigen-presenting function. Expression of CD1b is upregulated on human blood monocytes upon exposure to granulocyte/macrophage-colony stimulating factor, alone or in combination with interleukin-4 (IL-4) (S. A. Porcelli, Adv. Immunol. 59:1–98, 1995). Rifampin (RFP) and its derivatives are widely used for chemoprophylaxis or chemotherapy against Mycobacterium tuberculosis. However, this agent was found to reduce the mitogen responsiveness of human B and T lymphocytes, chemotaxis, and delayed-type hypersensitivity. The present study extends the immunopharmacological profile of RFP by examining its effects on CD1b expression by human peripheral blood monocytes exposed to GM-CSF plus IL-4. The results showed that clinically attainable concentrations (i.e., 2 or 10 μg/ml for 24 h) of the agent produced a marked increase in CD1b expression on the plasma membrane, as evaluated by fluorescence-activated cell sorter analysis, whereas it had no effect on cytosolic fractions, as indicated by Western blot analysis. This was found to be the result of increased CD1b gene expression, as shown by Northern blot analysis of CD1b mRNA. These results suggest that RFP could be of potential value in augmenting the CD1b-restricted antigen recognition system, thereby enhancing protective cellular immunity to M. tuberculosis. PMID:9517931

  17. Extended Interferon-Alpha Therapy Accelerates Telomere Length Loss in Human Peripheral Blood T Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    O'Bryan, Joel M.; Potts, James A.; Bonkovsky, Herbert L.; Mathew, Anuja; Rothman, Alan L.

    2011-01-01

    Background Type I interferons have pleiotropic effects on host cells, including inhibiting telomerase in lymphocytes and antiviral activity. We tested the hypothesis that long-term interferon treatment would result in significant reduction in average telomere length in peripheral blood T lymphocytes. Methods/Principal Findings Using a flow cytometry-based telomere length assay on peripheral blood mononuclear cell samples from the Hepatitis-C Antiviral Long-term Treatment against Cirrhosis (HALT-C) study, we measured T cell telomere lengths at screening and at months 21 and 45 in 29 Hepatitis-C virus infected subjects. These subjects had failed to achieve a sustained virologic response following 24 weeks of pegylated-interferon-alpha plus ribavirin treatment and were subsequently randomized to either a no additional therapy group or a maintenance dose pegylated-IFNα group for an additional 3.5 years. Significant telomere loss in naïve T cells occurred in the first 21 months in the interferon-alpha group. Telomere losses were similar in both groups during the final two years. Expansion of CD8+CD45RA+CD57+ memory T cells and an inverse correlation of alanine aminotransferase levels with naïve CD8+ T cell telomere loss were observed in the control group but not in the interferon-alpha group. Telomere length at screening inversely correlated with Hepatitis-C viral load and body mass index. Conclusions/Significance Sustained interferon-alpha treatment increased telomere loss in naïve T cells, and inhibited the accumulation of T cell memory expansions. The durability of this effect and consequences for immune senescence need to be defined. PMID:21829595

  18. In vitro expansion of Lin+ and Lin- mononuclear cells from human peripheral blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norhaiza, H. Siti; Rohaya, M. A. W.; Zarina, Z. A. Intan; Hisham, Z. A. Shahrul

    2013-11-01

    Haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are used in the therapy of blood disorders due to the ability of these cells to reconstitute haematopoietic lineage cells when transplanted into myeloablative recipients. However, substantial number of cells is required in order for the reconstitution to take place. Since HSCs present in low frequency, larger number of donor is required to accommodate the demand of transplantable HSCs. Therefore, in vitro expansion of HSCs will have profound impact on clinical purposes. The aim of this study was to expand lineage negative (Lin-) stem cells from human peripheral blood. Total peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMNCs) were fractionated from human blood by density gradient centrifugation. Subsequently, PBMNCs were subjected to magnetic assisted cell sorter (MACS) which depletes lineage positive (Lin+) mononuclear cells expressing lineage positive markers such as CD2, CD3, CD11b, CD14, CD15, CD16, CD19, CD56, CD123, and CD235a to obtained Lin- cell population. The ability of Lin+ and Lin- to survive in vitro was explored by culturing both cell populations in complete medium consisting of Alpha-Minimal Essential Medium (AMEM) +10% (v/v) Newborn Calf Serum (NBCS)+ 2% (v/v) pen/strep. In another experiment, Lin+ and Lin- were cultured with complete medium supplemented with 10ng/mL of the following growth factors: stem cell factor (SCF), interleukin (IL)-3, granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF), 2IU/mL of Erythropoietin (Epo) and 20ng/mL of IL-6. Three samples were monitored in static culture for 22 days. The expansion potential was assessed by the number of total viable cells, counted by trypan blue exclusion assay. It was found that Lin+ mononuclear cells were not able to survive either in normal proliferation medium or proliferation medium supplemented with cytokines. Similarly, Lin- stem cells were not able to survive in proliferation medium however, addition of cytokines into the proliferation medium support Lin

  19. Lithium Enhances Axonal Regeneration in Peripheral Nerve by Inhibiting Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3β Activation

    PubMed Central

    Su, Huanxing; Yuan, Qiuju; Qin, Dajiang; Yang, Xiaoying; So, Kwok-Fai; Wu, Wutian

    2014-01-01

    Brachial plexus injury often involves traumatic root avulsion resulting in permanent paralysis of the innervated muscles. The lack of sufficient regeneration from spinal motoneurons to the peripheral nerve (PN) is considered to be one of the major causes of the unsatisfactory outcome of various surgical interventions for repair of the devastating injury. The present study was undertaken to investigate potential inhibitory signals which influence axonal regeneration after root avulsion injury. The results of the study showed that root avulsion triggered GSK-3β activation in the injured motoneurons and remaining axons in the ventral funiculus. Systemic application of a clinical dose of lithium suppressed activated GSK-3β in the lesioned spinal cord to the normal level and induced extensive axonal regeneration into replanted ventral roots. Our study suggests that GSK-3β activity is involved in negative regulation for axonal elongation and regeneration and lithium, the specific GSK-3β inhibitor, enhances motoneuron regeneration from CNS to PNS. PMID:24967390

  20. Persistent alterations of gene expression profiling of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells from smokers.

    PubMed

    Weng, Daniel Y; Chen, Jinguo; Taslim, Cenny; Hsu, Ping-Ching; Marian, Catalin; David, Sean P; Loffredo, Christopher A; Shields, Peter G

    2016-10-01

    The number of validated biomarkers of tobacco smoke exposure is limited, and none exist for tobacco-related cancer. Additional biomarkers for smoke, effects on cellular systems in vivo are needed to improve early detection of lung cancer, and to assist the Food and Drug Administration in regulating exposures to tobacco products. We assessed the effects of smoking on the gene expression using human cell cultures and blood from a cross-sectional study. We profiled global transcriptional changes in cultured smokers' peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) treated with cigarette smoke condensate (CSC) in vitro (n = 7) and from well-characterized smokers' blood (n = 36). ANOVA with adjustment for covariates and Pearson correlation were used for statistical analysis in this study. CSC in vitro altered the expression of 1 178 genes (177 genes with > 1.5-fold-change) at P < 0.05. In vivo, PBMCs of heavy and light smokers differed for 614 genes (29 with > 1.5-fold-change) at P < 0.05 (309 remaining significant after adjustment for age, race, and gender). Forty-one genes were persistently altered both in vitro and in vivo, 22 having the same expression pattern reported for non-small cell lung cancer. Our data provides evidence that persistent alterations of gene expression in vitro and in vivo may relate to carcinogenic effects of cigarette smoke, and the identified genes may serve as potential biomarkers for cancer. The use of an in vitro model to corroborate results from human studies provides a novel way to understand human exposure and effect. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Persistent Alterations of Gene Expression Profiling of Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells From Smokers

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Daniel Y.; Chen, Jinguo; Taslim, Cenny; Hsu, Ping-Ching; Marian, Catalin; David, Sean P.; Loffredo, Christopher A.; Shields, Peter G.

    2016-01-01

    The number of validated biomarkers of tobacco smoke exposure is limited, and none exist for tobacco-related cancer. Additional biomarkers for smoke, effects on cellular systems in vivo are needed to improve early detection of lung cancer, and to assist the Food and Drug Administration in regulating exposures to tobacco products. We assessed the effects of smoking on the gene expression using human cell cultures and blood from a cross-sectional study. We profiled global transcriptional changes in cultured smokers’ peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) treated with cigarette smoke condensate (CSC) in vitro (n = 7) and from well-characterized smokers’ blood (n = 36). ANOVA with adjustment for covariates and Pearson correlation were used for statistical analysis in this study. CSC in vitro altered the expression of 1 178 genes (177 genes with > 1.5-fold-change) at P < 0.05. In vivo, PBMCs of heavy and light smokers differed for 614 genes (29 with > 1.5-fold-change) at P < 0.05 (309 remaining significant after adjustment for age, race, and gender). Forty-one genes were persistently altered both in vitro and in vivo, 22 having the same expression pattern reported for non-small cell lung cancer. Our data provides evidence that persistent alterations of gene expression in vitro and in vivo may relate to carcinogenic effects of cigarette smoke, and the identified genes may serve as potential biomarkers for cancer. The use of an in vitro model to corroborate results from human studies provides a novel way to understand human exposure and effect. PMID:26294040

  2. Selected scorpion toxin exposures induce cytokine release in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Corzo, Gerardo; Espino-Solis, Gerardo Pavel

    2017-03-01

    A cytokine screening on human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) stimulated with selected scorpion toxins (ScTx's) was performed in order to evaluate their effect on human immune cells. The ScTx's chosen for this report were three typical buthid scorpion venom peptides, one with lethal effects on mammals Centruroides suffussus suffusus toxin II (CssII), another, with lethal effects on insects and crustaceans Centruroides noxius toxin 5 (Cn5), and one more without lethal effects Tityus discrepans toxin (Discrepin). A Luminex multiplex analysis was performed in order to determine the amounts chemokines and cytokines IL-1β, IL-2, IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, IL-10, IL-12-p40, IL-13, interferon alpha (IFN-α), interferon gamma (IFN-γ), tumor necrosis factor alpha TNF-α, and interferon-inducible protein-10 (IP-10) secreted from human PBMCs exposed to these toxins. Although, the ScTx Cn5 is not lethal for mammals, it was able to induce the secretion of cytokines IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α, IL-10 and IP-10 in comparison to the lethal CssII, which was able to induce only IP-10 secretion. Discrepin also was able to induce only IP-10. Interestingly, only low amounts of interferons α and β were induced in the presence of the ScTx's assayed. In a synergic experiment, the combination of Discrepin and Cn5 displayed considerable reverse effects on induction of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-10 and TNF-α, but they had a slight synergic effect on IP-10 cytokine production in comparison with the single effect obtained with the Cn5 alone. Thus, the results obtained suggest that the profile of secreted cytokines promoted by ScTx Cn5 is highly related with a cytokine storm event, and also it suggests that the mammalian lethal neurotoxins are not solely responsible of the scorpion envenomation symptomatology.

  3. Human peripheral blood granulocytes and myeloid leukemic cell lines express both transcripts encoding for stem cell factor.

    PubMed

    Ramenghi, U; Ruggieri, L; Dianzani, I; Rosso, C; Brizzi, M F; Camaschella, C; Pietsch, T; Saglio, G

    1994-09-01

    Stem cell factor (SCF), the ligand for the c-kit proto-oncogene, has been shown to play a critical role in the migration of melanocytes and germ cells during embryogenesis as well as in the proliferative control of the hematopoietic compartment. In this study we investigated the expression of both the soluble and transmembrane SCF forms in purified peripheral blood populations and in several hematopoietic cell lines. Expression of both transcripts, though in different ratios, was identified in whole bone marrow, in bone marrow stromal cells and in human peripheral blood. In peripheral blood, SCF expression could be ascribable to polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN), whereas no SCF expression was detected in isolated lymphocytes, monocytes and in some T lymphoid cell lines. Conversely, some hematopoietic myeloid cell lines, such as HL-60, KG1 and K562, express SCF with similar patterns.

  4. Red wine consumption and prevention of atherosclerosis: an in vitro model using human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Magrone, T; Tafaro, A; Jirillo, F; Panaro, M A; Cuzzuol, P; Cuzzuol, A C; Pugliese, V; Amati, L; Jirillo, E; Covelli, V

    2007-01-01

    Evidence has been provided that red wine possesses antiatherogenic activities in virtue of its content in polyphenols (flavonoids and non-flavonoids substances). Here, some red wines (Negroamaro, Primitivo and Lambrusco) were tested for their ability to trigger nitric oxide (NO) production from human healthy peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). Negroamaro was the strongest inducer of NO from PBMC and deprivation of polyphenols did not influence its NO generation capacity. This fact supports the involvement of polyphenols in the NO production even in the absence of alcohol, which also per se does not exert any significant activity. These results are also corroborated by the evidence that PBMC inducible-nitric oxide synthase expression occurred by the effect of samples containing polyphenols but this expression was very weak when polyphenols were removed from the whole Negroamaro. In synthesis, flavonoids and resveratrol, major constituents of red wine, once absorbed at intestinal level, enter circulation and trigger monocytes for NO production. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of a direct effect of red wine on monocytes for NO release to occur. On the other hand, also the macrophage contingent from gut-associated lymphoid tissue can contribute to NO generation, besides the aliquot produced by endothelial cells, as previously demonstrated by various authors. Taken together, these results support the concept that moderate intake of red wine can prevent atherosclerosis via production of NO, a potent vasodilator of terminal vessels.

  5. [Enrichment of extracellular DNA from the cultivation medium of human peripheral blood mononuclears with genomic CpG rich fragments results in increased cell production of IL-6 and TNF-a via activation of the NF-kB signaling pathway].

    PubMed

    Speranskii, A I; Kostyuk, S V; Kalashnikova, E A; Veiko, N N

    2016-03-01

    Previously, it was found that blood plasma extracellular DNA (ecDNA) of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is enriched with CpG-rich genomic DNA fragments, which contain TLR9 ligands (Veiko et al., 2006). In this study we have demonstrated that ecDNA of a RA patient and model fragments added to a cultivation medium of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of healthy donors stimulate expression of genes for the TLR9-MyD88-NF-kB signaling pathway; this leads to a significant increase in concentrations of the proinflammatory cytokines IL-6 and TNF-a in the cultivation medium. Human genomic DNA non-enriched with the CpG sequences did not stimulate IL-6 and TNF-a synthesis in PBMC. A scheme explaining the potential role ecDNA in the induction and maintenance of increased levels of the proinflammatory cytokines under conditions damaging the human cells has been proposed.

  6. Coproporphyrinogen oxidase activity and porphyrin concentrations in peripheral red blood cells in hereditary sideroblastic anaemia.

    PubMed

    Pasanen, A V; Eklöf, M; Tenhunen, R

    1985-03-01

    The activity of coproporphyrinogen oxidase and the concentrations of coproporphyrin and protoporphyrin (measured by HPLC) in peripheral red blood cells were established in 2 families with different types of hereditary sideroblastic anaemia. 2 males and 4 females were members of a family with an X-chromosome-linked and pyridoxine-responsive HSA, and 3 females were members of another family where the mode of inheritance is not clear and where pyridoxine did not produce a haematological response. Coproporphyrinogen oxidase activity was normal in 8 of 9 patients and slightly decreased only in 1 patient. All patients had normal red cell coproporphyrin concentrations, but red cell protoporphyrin concentration was decreased in 4 patients. These findings indicate that in vivo haem synthesis was not impaired at the step of coproporphyrinogen oxidase, hence enzymatic defects in earlier steps of haem synthesis are more evident. Earlier suggestions of impaired haem synthesis at this level, based on observed increased concentrations of coproporphyrin in peripheral red blood cells might be explained by the use of unspecific methods.

  7. NOD-scid IL2R γnull mice engrafted with human peripheral blood mononuclear cells as a model to test therapeutics targeting human signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Animal models of human inflammatory diseases have limited predictive quality for human clinical trials for various reasons including species specific activation mechanisms and the immunological background of the animals which markedly differs from the genetically heterogeneous and often aged patient population. Objective Development of an animal model allowing for testing therapeutics targeting pathways involved in the development of Atopic Dermatitis (AD) with better translatability to the patient. Methods NOD-scid IL2R γnull mice engrafted with human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (hPBMC) derived from patients suffering from AD and healthy volunteers were treated with IL-4 and the antagonistic IL-4 variant R121/Y124D (Pitrakinra). Levels of human (h)IgE, amount of B-, T- and plasma- cells and ratio of CD4 : CD8 positive cells served as read out for induction and inhibition of cell proliferation and hIgE secretion. Results were compared to in vitro analysis. Results hIgE secretion was induced by IL-4 and inhibited by the IL-4 antagonist Pitrakinra in vivo when formulated with methylcellulose. B-cells proliferated in response to IL-4 in vivo; the effect was abrogated by Pitrakinra. IL-4 shifted CD4 : CD8 ratios in vitro and in vivo when hPBMC derived from healthy volunteers were used. Pitrakinra reversed the effect. Human PBMC derived from patients with AD remained inert and engrafted mice reflected the individual responses observed in vitro. Conclusion NOD-scid IL2R γnull mice engrafted with human PBMC reflect the immunological history of the donors and provide a complementary tool to in vitro studies. Thus, studies in this model might provide data with better translatability from bench to bedside. PMID:23294516

  8. Differences in vanadocene dichloride and cisplatin effect on MOLT-4 leukemia and human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Havelek, Radim; Siman, Pavel; Cmielova, Jana; Stoklasova, Alena; Vavrova, Jirina; Vinklarek, Jaromir; Knizek, Jiri; Rezacova, Martina

    2012-07-01

    Modern chemotherapy is interested in developing new agents with high efficiency of treatment in low-dose medication strategies, lower side toxicity and stronger specificity to the tumor cells. Vanadocene dichloride (VDC) belongs to the group of the most promising metallocene antitumor agents; however, its mechanism of action and cytotoxicity profile are not fully understood. In this paper we assess cytotoxic effects of VDC in comparison to cisplatin using opposite prototype of cells; human peripheral blood mononuclear (PBMCs) cells and human acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell line (MOLT-4). Our findings showed cytotoxic effect of VDC on leukemia cells, but unfortunately on human peripheral blood mononuclear cells as well. VDC induces apoptosis in leukemia cells; the induction is, however, lower than that of cisplatin, and in contrary to cisplatin, VDC does not induce p53 up-regulation. Cytotoxic effect of VDC on leukemia cells is less pronounced than that of cisplatin and more pronounced in PBMCs than in MOLT-4 cells.

  9. Behavioral effects of peripheral corticotropin-releasing factor during maternal separation may be mediated by proinflammatory activity

    PubMed Central

    Hennessy, Michael B.; Fitch, Christopher; Jacobs, Sarah; Deak, Terrence; Schiml, Patricia A.

    2013-01-01

    Summary When guinea pig pups are separated from their mothers in a novel environment, an initial period of active behavior (vocalizing, locomotor activity) wanes after an hour or so and is replaced by a second, passive stage characterized by a crouched stance, closed eyes, and extensive piloerection. If pups are given a peripheral injection of 7–14 μg of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) prior to testing, the passive behaviors occur immediately upon separation. We found that intracerebroventricular infusion of 1–10 μg of CRF did not increase passive behavior relative to vehicle infusion, but that peripheral injection of the anti-inflammatory cytokine, Interleukin-10, attenuated the passive behavior induced by peripheral CRF injection. These results together with previous findings suggest that peripheral CRF administration affects behavior of separated guinea pig pups through a mechanism that involves peripheral proinflammatory activity. The possible role of endogenous peripheral CRF in the behavioral response of untreated pups during maternal separation is considered. PMID:21255937

  10. Regulation of Energy Stores and Feeding by Neuronal and Peripheral CREB Activity in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Iijima, Koichi; Zhao, LiJuan; Shenton, Christopher; Iijima-Ando, Kanae

    2009-01-01

    The cAMP-responsive transcription factor CREB functions in adipose tissue and liver to regulate glycogen and lipid metabolism in mammals. While Drosophila has a homolog of mammalian CREB, dCREB2, its role in energy metabolism is not fully understood. Using tissue-specific expression of a dominant-negative form of CREB (DN-CREB), we have examined the effect of blocking CREB activity in neurons and in the fat body, the primary energy storage depot with functions of adipose tissue and the liver in flies, on energy balance, stress resistance and feeding behavior. We found that disruption of CREB function in neurons reduced glycogen and lipid stores and increased sensitivity to starvation. Expression of DN-CREB in the fat body also reduced glycogen levels, while it did not affect starvation sensitivity, presumably due to increased lipid levels in these flies. Interestingly, blocking CREB activity in the fat body increased food intake. These flies did not show a significant change in overall body size, suggesting that disruption of CREB activity in the fat body caused an obese-like phenotype. Using a transgenic CRE-luciferase reporter, we further demonstrated that disruption of the adipokinetic hormone receptor, which is functionally related to mammalian glucagon and β-adrenergic signaling, in the fat body reduced CRE-mediated transcription in flies. This study demonstrates that CREB activity in either neuronal or peripheral tissues regulates energy balance in Drosophila, and that the key signaling pathway regulating CREB activity in peripheral tissue is evolutionarily conserved. PMID:20041126

  11. Mechanism of human natural killer cell activation by Haemophilus ducreyi.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Janowicz, Diane M; Fortney, Kate R; Katz, Barry P; Spinola, Stanley M

    2009-08-15

    The role of natural killer (NK) cells in the host response to Haemophilus ducreyi infection is unclear. In pustules obtained from infected human volunteers, there was an enrichment of CD56bright NK cells bearing the activation markers CD69 and HLA-DR, compared with peripheral blood. To study the mechanism by which H. ducreyi activated NK cells, we used peripheral blood mononuclear cells from uninfected volunteers. H. ducreyi activated NK cells only in the presence of antigen-presenting cells. H. ducreyi-infected monocytes and monocyte-derived macrophages activated NK cells in a contact- and interleukin-18 (IL-18)-dependent manner, whereas monocyte-derived dendritic cells induced NK activation through soluble IL-12. More lesional NK cells than peripheral blood NK cells produced IFN-gamma in response to IL-12 and IL-18. We conclude that NK cells are recruited to experimental lesions and likely are activated by infected macrophages and dendritic cells. IFN-gamma produced by lesional NK cells may facilitate phagocytosis of H. ducreyi.

  12. Antigenotoxic Properties of Agaricus blazei against Hydrogen Peroxide in Human Peripheral Blood Cells

    PubMed Central

    Borozan, Sunčica; Topalović, Dijana; Ciptasari, Ummi; Bajić, Vladan

    2017-01-01

    The ability of Agaricus blazei mushroom in its dried and powdered mycelial form was evaluated for its antigenotoxic properties for the first time. Antigenotoxic effects in human peripheral blood cells against H2O2-induced DNA damage were examined in pretreatment and posttreatment protocol by comet assay. The results showed better antigenotoxic properties of Agaricus blazei on the interventional level, respectively, after treatment. Agaricus blazei in concentration of 250 μg/mL after treatment was most efficient in regard to its action against DNA damage. The evaluation of repair kinetics showed decrease in H2O2 induced DNA damage 15 min after the application of A. blazei, reaching the maximum potency after 30 min. Analysis of antioxidant properties of Agaricus blazei revealed strong •OH scavenging properties and moderate reducing power, while its DPPH scavenging ability was weak. In regard to our findings, we can conclude that our preliminary results demonstrated antigenotoxic properties of Agaricus blazei and its strong •OH scavenging ability. Mechanisms underlying its properties should be further evaluated in in vivo studies. PMID:28316757

  13. Allograft inflammatory factor-1 stimulates chemokine production and induces chemotaxis in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Kadoya, Masatoshi; Yamamoto, Aihiro; Hamaguchi, Masahide; Obayashi, Hiroshi; Mizushima, Katsura; Ohta, Mitsuhiro; Seno, Takahiro; Oda, Ryo; Fujiwara, Hiroyoshi; Kohno, Masataka; Kawahito, Yutaka

    2014-06-06

    Allograft inflammatory factor-1 (AIF-1) is expressed by macrophages, fibroblasts, endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells in immune-inflammatory disorders such as systemic sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis and several vasculopathies. However, its molecular function is not fully understood. In this study, we examined gene expression profiles and induction of chemokines in monocytes treated with recombinant human AIF (rhAIF-1). Using the high-density oligonucleotide microarray technique, we compared mRNA expression profiles of rhAIF-1-stimulated CD14(+) peripheral blood mononuclear cells (CD14(+) PBMCs) derived from healthy volunteers. We demonstrated upregulation of genes for several CC chemokines such as CCL1, CCL2, CCL3, CCL7, and CCL20. Next, using ELISAs, we confirmed that rhAIF-1 promoted the secretion of CCL3/MIP-1α and IL-6 by CD14(+) PBMCs, whereas only small amounts of CCL1, CCL2/MCP-1, CCL7/MCP-3 and CCL20/MIP-3α were secreted. Conditioned media from rhAIF-1stimulated CD14(+) PBMCs resulted in migration of PBMCs. These findings suggest that AIF-1, which induced chemokines and enhanced chemotaxis of monocytes, may represent a molecular target for the therapy of immune-inflammatory disorders.

  14. Recombinant human endostatin in combination with CHOP regimen for peripheral T cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qunling; Cao, Junning; Xue, Kai; Liu, Xiaojian; Ji, Dongmei; Guo, Ye; Hong, Xiaonan

    2017-01-01

    Peripheral T cell lymphoma (PTCL) has a poor prognosis. Overexpression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) might contribute to the poor prognosis of PTCL and could be the target of novel therapy. The efficacy and safety of recombinant human endostatin (Endostar) in combination with cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine and prednisone (ECHOP) have been explored in 15 PTCL patients. The objective response rate was 80%, with 53.3% patients having achieved complete response (CR) rate. The CR rate was 100% (3/3) in angioimmunoblastic T cell lymphoma (AITL) patients compared to only 36.4% (4/11) in PTCL not otherwise specified (PTCL-NOS) patients. With a median follow-up of 69 months, the 5-year progression-free survival and overall survival (OS) were 53% and 60%, respectively. The 5-year OS was 100% in AITL but was only 45% in PTCL-NOS. Seven out of 11 patients showed overexpression of VEGFR2 in their tumor vessels and had a better efficacy than those with low expression of VEGFR2. Grade 3 or 4 neutropenia is the most common toxicity observed. ECHOP was safe and might display potential benefit in AITL patients. PMID:28053548

  15. Anterior corneal and internal contributions to peripheral aberrations of human eyes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atchison, David A.

    2004-03-01

    Anterior corneal and internal component contributions to overall peripheral aberrations of five human eyes were determined, based on corneal topography and overall aberration measurements. Anterior corneal position and orientation (tilt) were referenced to the line of sight. Ray tracing was performed through the anterior cornea for 6-mm-diameter pupils at angles out to 40° in both the temporal and the nasal visual fields. In general, both component and overall Zernike aberrations were greater for the nasal than for the temporal visual field. In general, the anterior corneal aberration components were considerably higher than the overall aberrations across the visual field and were balanced to a considerable degree by the internal ocular aberration components. The component and overall levels of Zernike third-order aberrations showed linear trends away from the fixation axis, and the component levels of Zernike fourth-order aberrations showed quadratic trends away from the fixation axis. The second-order, but not higher-order, aberration components were susceptible to the choice of image radius of curvature, while disregarding corneal position and orientation affected second- and higher-order aberration components.

  16. Chromosomal Aberrations in Human Peripheral Blood Lymphocytes after Exposure to Ionizing Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Tae Ho; Kim, Jin-Hong; Kim, Jin Kyu

    2016-01-01

    Biological dosimetry using chromosome aberration analyses in human peripheral blood lymphocytes is suitable and useful tool for estimating the dose when a nuclear or radiological emergency is investigated. Blood samples from five healthy donors were obtained to establish dose-response calibration curves for chromosomal aberrations after exposure to ionizing radiation. In this work, dicentric assay and CBMN assay were compared considering the sensitivity and accuracy of dose estimation. In a total of 21,688 analyzed metaphase spreads, 10,969 dicentric chromosomes, 563 centric rings and 11,364 acentric chromosomes were found. The number of metaphase cells decreased with increasing radiation dose. The centric rings were not found in the non-irradiated control. There was no relationship between radiation dose and acentric ring induction. The frequency of total MN increased in a dose-dependent manner. In comparison with the control value, MN increased about 9, 32, 75, 87, and 52 fold higher after treatment with 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 Gy, respectively. The results revealed that the mean frequency of chromosomal aberrations, both in dicentric and in micronuclei analyses increased with increasing radiation dose. PMID:28217281

  17. Methamidophos induces cytotoxicity and oxidative stress in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Ramirez-Vargas, Marco Antonio; Huerta-Beristain, Gerardo; Guzman-Guzman, Iris Paola; Alarcon-Romero, Luz Del Carmen; Flores-Alfaro, Eugenia; Rojas-Garcia, Aurora Elizabeth; Moreno-Godinez, Ma Elena

    2017-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that organophosphate pesticide (OP) exposure is associated with oxidative stress. Methamidophos (MET) is an OP widely used in agriculture, which is regarded as a highly toxic pesticide and it is a potent inhibitor of acetylcholinesterase. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether MET can induce oxidative stress at low concentrations in primary cultures of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). PBMCs from healthy individuals were exposed to MET (0-80 mg/L) for 0-72 h. We performed the MTT and neutral-red assays to assess the cytotoxicity. As indicators of oxidative stress, the levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) were assessed using flow cytometry, and the malondialdehyde (MDA) and reduced glutathione (GSH) levels were determined. MET decreased the viability of PBMCs in a dose-dependent manner. At concentrations of 3, 10, or 20 mg/L for 24 h, MET increased the ROS production significantly compared with the vehicle control. Similarly, MET increased the levels of MDA at the same concentrations that increased ROS (10 and 20 mg/L); however, no changes in GSH levels were observed. These results suggest that MET increased the generation of oxidative stress in PBMCs. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol 32: 147-155, 2017.

  18. Defining the restriction point in normal asynchronous human peripheral blood lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jianwu; Liu, Liang; Li, Xiaolan; Tao, Deding; Hu, Junbo; Qin, Jichao

    2013-10-01

    Although the restriction point (R-point) was proposed in animal cells several decades ago, its existence in normal cells is still controversial, because, in most studies, long-term cultured cell lines rather than primary normal cells were used. Furthermore, cell synchronization was generally applied, resulting in growth imbalance between DNA synthesis and protein expression in cells. Finally, R-point was originally proposed as a unique arrest point that may be in G0 phase; however, generally believed R-point locates within G1 phase. Thus, up to now, there is no solid experimental evidence that supports the existence of R-point in asynchronous primary normal cells. In this study, we used freshly purified peripheral human blood lymphocytes, as asynchronous primary normal cells, to confirm the existence of restriction point in G1 not G0 phase. Our findings may help uncover the mystery of the deregulation of cell cycle progression in malignant tumors. © 2013 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry.

  19. Separation of hematopoietic stem cells from human peripheral blood through modified polyurethane foaming membranes.

    PubMed

    Higuchi, Akon; Sekiya, Mayu; Gomei, Yumiko; Sakurai, Masaru; Chen, Wen-Yih; Egashira, Satsuki; Matsuoka, Yuki

    2008-06-15

    Cell separation from peripheral blood was investigated using polyurethane (PU) foam membranes having 5.2 mum pore size and coated with Pluronic F127 or hyaluronic acid. The permeation ratio of hematopoietic stem cells (CD34(+) cells) and lymphocytes through the membranes was lower than for red blood cells and platelets. Adhered cells were detached from membrane surfaces using human serum albumin (HSA) solution after permeation of blood through the membranes, allowing isolation of CD34(+) cells in the permeate (recovery) solution. High-yield isolation of CD34(+) cells was achieved using Pluronic-coated membranes. This was because the Pluronic coating dissolved into the recovery solution at 4 degrees C, releasing adhered cells from the surfaces of the membranes during permeation of HSA solution through these membranes. Dextran and/or bovine serum albumin solutions were also evaluated for use as recovery solutions after blood permeation. A high recovery ratio of CD34(+) cells was achieved at 4 degrees C in a process using 20% dextran solution through PU membranes having carboxylic acid groups.

  20. Induction of sister chromatid exchanges by coal dust and tobacco snuff extracts in human peripheral lymphocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Tucker, J.D.; Ong, T.

    1985-01-01

    The organic solvent extracts of sub-bituminous coal dust and tobacco snuff, both together and separately, were tested for the induction of sister chromatid exchanges (SCEs) in human peripheral lymphocytes. The results indicate that these extracts induced SCEs, and that when tested together synergistically induced SCEs in two of three donors. Studies with the organic solvent extracts of all five ranks of coal indicate that the extracts of bituminous, lignite, and peat, but not anthracite, induced SCEs. Similar experiments conducted with water extracts, induced SCEs, and that anthracite was equivocal. To determine whether individuals differed in their SCE responses to coal dust extracts, lymphocytes from five donors were tested with organic solvent extracts of bituminous and sub-bituminous coal. An analysis of variance indicates that the SCE response was significantly influenced by the donor and each of the two coal extracts. The findings presented here suggest that coal dust, with or without tobacco snuff, may play a role in the elevated incidence of gastric cancer in coal miners. Because water extracts of some ranks of coal induced SCEs, there exists the possibility of adverse environmental effects due to coal leachates.

  1. Dose rate effect of pulsed electron beam on micronucleus frequency in human peripheral blood lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Acharya, Santhosh; Sanjeev, Ganesh; Bhat, Nagesh N; Narayana, Yerol

    2010-03-01

    The micronucleus assay in human peripheral blood lymphocytes is a sensitive indicator of radiation damage and could serve as a biological dosimeter in evaluating suspected overexposure to ionising radiation. Micronucleus (MN) frequency as a measure of chromosomal damage has also extensively been employed to quantify the effects of radiation dose rate on biological systems. Here we studied the effects of 8 MeV pulsed electron beam emitted by Microtron electron accelerator on MN induction at dose rates between 35 Gy min-1 and 352.5 Gy min-1. These dose rates were achieved by varying the pulse repetition rate (PRR). Fricke dosimeter was employed to measure the absorbed dose at different PRR and to ensure uniform dose distribution of the electron beam. To study the dose rate effect, blood samples were irradiated to an absorbed dose of (4.7+/-0.2) Gy at different rates and cytogenetic damage was quantified using the micronucleus assay. The obtained MN frequency showed no dose rate dependence within the studied dose rate range. Our earlier dose effect study using 8 MeV electrons revealed that the response of MN was linear-quadratic. Therefore, in the event of an accident, dose estimation can be made using linear-quadratic dose response parameters, without adding dose rate as a correction factor.

  2. Human peripheral blood monocytes display surface antigens recognized by monoclonal antinuclear antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Holers, V.M.; Kotzin, B.L.

    1985-09-01

    The authors used monoclonal anti-nuclear autoantibodies and indirect immunofluorescence to examine normal human peripheral blood mononuclear leukocytes for the presence of cell surface nuclear antigens. Only one monoclonal anti-histone antibody (MH-2) was found to bind to freshly isolated PBL, staining approximately 10% of large cells. However, after cells were placed into culture for 16-24 h, a high percentage (up to 60%) of large-sized cells were recognized by an anti-DNA (BWD-1) and several different antihistone monoclonal antibodies (BWH-1, MH-1, and MH-2). These antibodies recognize separate antigenic determinants on chromatin and histones extracted from chromatin. The histone antigen-positive cells were viable, and the monoclonal antibodies could be shown to be binding to the cell surface and not to the nucleus. Using monoclonal antibodies specific for monocytes and T cells, and complement-mediated cytotoxicity, the cells bearing histone antigens were shown to be primarily monocytes. The appearance of histone and DNA antigen-positive cells was nearly completely inhibited by the addition of low concentrations of cycloheximide at initiation of the cultures. In contrast, little effect on the percentage of positive cells was detected if cells were exposed to high doses of gamma irradiation before culture. These data further support the existence of cell surface nuclear antigens on selected cell subsets, which may provide insight into the immunopathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus and related autoimmune diseases.

  3. Cardiotrophin-1 induces tumor necrosis factor alpha synthesis in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Fritzenwanger, Michael; Meusel, Katharina; Jung, Christian; Franz, Marcus; Wang, Zhenhua; Foerster, Martin; Figulla, Hans-R

    2009-01-01

    Chronic heart failure (CHF) is associated with elevated concentrations of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) alpha and cardiotrophin-1 (CT-1) and altered peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) function. Therefore, we tested whether CT-1 induces TNFalpha in PBMC of healthy volunteers. CT-1 induced in PBMC TNFalpha protein in the supernatant and TNFalpha mRNA in a concentration- and time-dependent manner determined by ELISA and real-time PCR, respectively. Maximal TNFalpha protein was achieved with 100 ng/mL CT-1 after 3-6 hours and maximal TNFalpha mRNA induction after 1 hour. ELISA data were confirmed using immunofluorescent flow cytometry. Inhibitor studies with actinomycin D and brefeldin A showed that both protein synthesis and intracellular transport are essential for CT-1 induced TNFalpha expression. CT-1 caused a dose dependent nuclear factor (NF) kappaB translocation. Parthenolide inhibited both NFkappaB translocation and TNFalpha protein expression indicating that NFkappaB seems to be necessary. We revealed a new mechanism for elevated serum TNFalpha concentrations and PBMC activation in CHF besides the hypothesis of PBMC activation by bacterial translocation from the gut.

  4. VLA-4 integrin concentrates at the peripheral supramolecular activation complex of the immune synapse and drives T helper 1 responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mittelbrunn, María; Molina, Ana; Escribese, María M.; Yáñez-Mó, María; Escudero, Ester; Ursa, Ángeles; Tejedor, Reyes; Mampaso, Francisco; Sánchez-Madrid, Francisco

    2004-07-01

    The integrin 41 (VLA-4) not only mediates the adhesion and transendothelial migration of leukocytes, but also provides costimulatory signals that contribute to the activation of T lymphocytes. However, the behavior of 41 during the formation of the immune synapse is currently unknown. Here, we show that 41 is recruited to both human and murine antigen-dependent immune synapses, when the antigen-presenting cell is a B lymphocyte or a dendritic cell, colocalizing with LFA-1 at the peripheral supramolecular activation complex. However, when conjugates are formed in the presence of anti-4 antibodies, VLA-4 colocalizes with the CD3- chain at the center of the synapse. In addition, antibody engagement of 4 integrin promotes polarization toward a T helper 1 (Th1) response in human in vitro models of CD4+ T cell differentiation and naïve T cell priming by dendritic cells. The in vivo administration of anti-4 integrin antibodies also induces an immune deviation to Th1 response that dampens a Th2-driven autoimmune nephritis in Brown Norway rats. These data reveal a regulatory role of 4 integrins on T lymphocyte-antigen presenting cell cognate immune interactions.

  5. VLA-4 integrin concentrates at the peripheral supramolecular activation complex of the immune synapse and drives T helper 1 responses.

    PubMed

    Mittelbrunn, María; Molina, Ana; Escribese, María M; Yáñez-Mó, María; Escudero, Ester; Ursa, Angeles; Tejedor, Reyes; Mampaso, Francisco; Sánchez-Madrid, Francisco

    2004-07-27

    The integrin alpha 4 beta 1 (VLA-4) not only mediates the adhesion and transendothelial migration of leukocytes, but also provides costimulatory signals that contribute to the activation of T lymphocytes. However, the behavior of alpha 4 beta 1 during the formation of the immune synapse is currently unknown. Here, we show that alpha 4 beta 1 is recruited to both human and murine antigen-dependent immune synapses, when the antigen-presenting cell is a B lymphocyte or a dendritic cell, colocalizing with LFA-1 at the peripheral supramolecular activation complex. However, when conjugates are formed in the presence of anti-alpha 4 antibodies, VLA-4 colocalizes with the CD3-zeta chain at the center of the synapse. In addition, antibody engagement of alpha 4 integrin promotes polarization toward a T helper 1 (Th1) response in human in vitro models of CD4(+) T cell differentiation and naïve T cell priming by dendritic cells. The in vivo administration of anti-alpha 4 integrin antibodies also induces an immune deviation to Th1 response that dampens a Th2-driven autoimmune nephritis in Brown Norway rats. These data reveal a regulatory role of alpha 4 integrins on T lymphocyte-antigen presenting cell cognate immune interactions.

  6. Fetal nicotine exposure produces postnatal up-regulation of adenylate cyclase activity in peripheral tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Slotkin, T.A.; Navarro, H.A.; McCook, E.C.; Seidler, F.J. )

    1990-01-01

    Gestational exposure to nicotine has been shown to affect development of noradrenergic activity in both the central and peripheral nervous systems. In the current study, pregnant rats received nicotine infusions of 6 mg/kg/day throughout gestation, administered by osmotic minipump implants. After birth, offspring of the nicotine-infused dams exhibited marked increases in basal adenylate cyclase activity in membranes prepared from kidney and heart, as well as supersensitivity to stimulation by either a {beta}-adrenergic agonist, isoproterenol, or by forskolin. The altered responses were not accompanied by up-regulation of {beta}-adrenergic receptors: in fact, ({sup 125}I)pindolol binding was significantly decreased in the nicotine group. These results indicate that fetal nicotine exposure affects enzymes involved in membrane receptor signal transduction, leading to altered responsiveness independently of changes at the receptor level.

  7. Study of the Peripheral Nerve Fibers Myelin Structure Changes during Activation of Schwann Cell Acetylcholine Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Verdiyan, Ekaterina E.; Allakhverdiev, Elvin S.; Maksimov, Georgy V.

    2016-01-01

    In the present paper we consider a new type of mechanism by which neurotransmitter acetylcholine (ACh) regulates the properties of peripheral nerve fibers myelin. Our data show the importance of the relationship between the changes in the number of Schwann cell (SC) acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) and the axon excitation (different intervals between action potentials (APs)). Using Raman spectroscopy, an effect of activation of SC AChRs on the myelin membrane fluidity was investigated. It was found, that ACh stimulates an increase in lipid ordering degree of the myelin lipids, thus providing evidence for specific role of the “axon-SC” interactions at the axon excitation. It was proposed, that during the axon excitation, the SC membrane K+- depolarization and the Ca2+—influx led to phospholipase activation or exocytosis of intracellular membrane vesicles and myelin structure reorganization. PMID:27455410

  8. Human Enterovirus in the Gastrocnemius of Patients With Peripheral Arterial Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Julian K. S.; Zhu, Zhen; Casale, George; Koutakis, Panagiotis; McComb, Rodney D.; Swanson, Stanley; Thompson, Jonathan; Miserlis, Dimitrios; Johanning, Jason M.; Haynatzki, Gleb; Pipinos, Iraklis I.

    2013-01-01

    Background Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is characterized by myofiber degeneration and loss of function in muscles of the lower limbs. Human enterovirus (HEV) infection has been implicated in the pathogenesis of a number of muscle diseases. However, its association with PAD has not been studied. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that infectious HEV is present in skeletal muscle of patients with PAD and is associated with severity of disease. Methods and Results Gastrocnemius biopsies from 37 patients with PAD and 14 controls were examined for the presence of HEV RNA, viral capsid protein, viral RNA copy number, and viral infectivity. HEV RNA was detected in 54% of the biopsies from patients with PAD but was not detected in muscle biopsies from control patients. This difference in prevalence among PAD and control patients was significant at P<0.001. Viral RNA copy numbers were increased significantly at the later stages of disease; Fontaine Stage IV (105.50 copies/mg muscle wet weight, at P<0.005) and Stage III (104.87 copies/mg, at P<0.010) compared to Stage II (102.50 copies/mg). Viral replication was confirmed by the presence of the negative‐strand of viral RNA in all specimens positive for HEV RNA. Cultures of HeLa and human skeletal muscle cells treated with muscle homogenates showed HEV replication and the presence of HEV capsid protein. Conclusion Our data identified infectious HEV in the gastrocnemius of PAD patients but not in controls. Viral copy number and prevalence of infection were higher in the later stages of disease. Our data point to the need for further studies to determine the contribution of HEV infection to the pathophysiology of PAD. PMID:23920231

  9. The effect of catechol on human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (in vitro study).

    PubMed

    Bukowska, Bożena; Michałowicz, Jaromir; Marczak, Agnieszka

    2015-01-01

    Catechol also known as pyrocatechol or 1,2-dihydroxybenzene is formed endogenously in the organism from neurotransmitters including adrenaline, noradrenaline, and dopamine. It is also a metabolite of many drugs like DOPA, isoproterenol or aspirin and it is also formed in the environment during transformation of various xenobiotics. We evaluated in vitro the effect of catechol on the structure and function of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). The cells were incubated with xenobiotic at concentration range from 2 to 500μg/mL for 1h. Human blood mononuclear cells were obtained from leucocyte-platelet buffy coat taken from healthy donors in the Blood Bank of Łódź, Poland. Using flow cytometry we have evaluated necrotic, apoptotic and morphological changes in PBMCs incubated with catechol. Moreover, we have estimated changes in reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, protein carbonylation and lipid peroxidation in the cells studied. The compound studied provoked necrotic (from 250μg/mL), apoptotic (from 100μg/mL), and morphological changes (from 250μg/mL) in the incubated cells. We have also noted that catechol decreased H2DCF oxidation at 2 and 10μg/mL but at higher concentrations of 250 and 500μg/mL it caused statistically significant increase in the oxidation of this probe. We also observed an increase in lipid peroxidation (from 250μg/mL) and protein carbonylation (from 50μg/mL) of PBMCs. It was observed that catechol only at high concentrations was capable of inducing changes in PBMCs. The obtained results clearly showed that catechol may induce change in PBMCs only in the caste of poisoning with this compound.

  10. Identification of Lactobacillus plantarum genes modulating the cytokine response of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Modulation of the immune system is one of the most plausible mechanisms underlying the beneficial effects of probiotic bacteria on human health. Presently, the specific probiotic cell products responsible for immunomodulation are largely unknown. In this study, the genetic and phenotypic diversity of strains of the Lactobacillus plantarum species were investigated to identify genes of L. plantarum with the potential to influence the amounts of cytokines interleukin 10 (IL-10) and IL-12 and the ratio of IL-10/IL-12 produced by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Results A total of 42 Lactobacillus plantarum strains isolated from diverse environmental and human sources were evaluated for their capacity to stimulate cytokine production in PBMCs. The L. plantarum strains induced the secretion of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 over an average 14-fold range and secretion of the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-12 over an average 16-fold range. Comparisons of the strain-specific cytokine responses of PBMCs to comparative genome hybridization profiles obtained with L. plantarum WCFS1 DNA microarrays (also termed gene-trait matching) resulted in the identification of 6 candidate genetic loci with immunomodulatory capacities. These loci included genes encoding an N-acetyl-glucosamine/galactosamine phosphotransferase system, the LamBDCA quorum sensing system, and components of the plantaricin (bacteriocin) biosynthesis and transport pathway. Deletion of these genes in L. plantarum WCFS1 resulted in growth phase-dependent changes in the PBMC IL-10 and IL-12 cytokine profiles compared with wild-type cells. Conclusions The altered PBMC cytokine profiles obtained with the L. plantarum WCFS1 mutants were in good agreement with the predictions made by gene-trait matching for the 42 L. plantarum strains. This study therefore resulted in the identification of genes present in certain strains of L. plantarum which might be responsible for the stimulation of anti

  11. Effects of strenuous exercise on Th1/Th2 gene expression from human peripheral blood mononuclear cells of marathon participants.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Lianbin; Rehm, Kristina E; Marshall, Gailen D

    2014-08-01

    Physical stressors, such as strenuous exercise, can have numerous effects on the human body including the immune system. The aim of this study was to evaluate the gene expression profile of Th1/Th2 cytokines and related transcription factor genes in order to investigate possible immune imbalances before and after a marathon. Blood samples were collected from 16 normal volunteers 24-48 h before and one week after completing a marathon race. Gene expression of Th1 and Th2 related cytokines from human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) was analyzed using Human Th1-Th2-Th3 RT(2) Profiler PCR Array and qRT-PCR that measured the transcript levels of 84 genes related to T cell activation. We found that PBMC express a characteristic Th2-like gene profile one week post-marathon compared to pre-marathon. The majority of genes up-regulated one week post-marathon such as IL-4, GATA3, and CCR4 were Th2 associated. For Th1-related genes, CXCR3 and IRF1 were up-regulated one week post-marathon. There was a trend of down-regulation of two Th1 related genes, T-bet and STAT1. Th3-related gene expression patterns did not change in the study. The ratios of both IFN-γ/IL-4 and T-bet/GATA3 gene expressions were significantly lower one week after marathon. These findings suggest that a Th1/Th2 immune imbalance persisted at least 1 week after completion of a marathon which offers a mechanistic rationale for the increased risk of upper respiratory tract infections often reported after strenuous exercise.

  12. Motor cortex activation in Parkinson's disease: dissociation of electrocortical and peripheral measures of response generation.

    PubMed

    Praamstra, P; Plat, E M; Meyer, A S; Horstink, M W

    1999-09-01

    This study investigated characteristics of motor cortex activation and response generation in Parkinson's disease with measures of electrocortical activity (lateralized readiness potential [LRP]), electromyographic activity (EMG), and isometric force in a noise-compatibility task. When presented with stimuli consisting of incompatible target and distractor elements asking for responses of opposite hands, patients were less able than control subjects to suppress activation of the motor cortex controlling the wrong response hand. This was manifested in the pattern of reaction times and in an incorrect lateralization of the LRP. Onset latency and rise time of the LRP did not differ between patients and control subjects, but EMG and response force developed more slowly in patients. Moreover, in patients but not in control subjects, the rate of development of EMG and response force decreased as reaction time increased. We hypothesize that this dissociation between electrocortical activity and peripheral measures in Parkinson's disease is the result of changes in motor cortex function that alter the relation between signal-related and movement-related neural activity in the motor cortex. In the LRP, this altered balance may obscure an abnormal development of movement-related neural activity.

  13. The search of the target of promotion: Phenylbenzoate esterase activities in hen peripheral nerve

    SciTech Connect

    Moretto, A. . E-mail: angelo.moretto@icps.it; Nicolli, A.; Lotti, M.

    2007-03-15

    Certain esterase inhibitors, such as carbamates, phosphinates and sulfonyl halides, do not cause neuropathy as some organophosphates, but they may exacerbate chemical or traumatic insults to axons. This phenomenon is called promotion of axonopathies. Given the biochemical and toxicological characteristics of these compounds, the hypothesis was made that the target of promotion is a phenyl valerate (PV) esterase similar to neuropathy target esterase (NTE), the target of organophosphate induced delayed polyneuropathy. However, attempts to identify a PV esterase in hen peripheral nerve have been, so far, unsuccessful. We tested several esters, other than PV, as substrates of esterases from crude homogenate of the hen peripheral nerve. The ideal substrate should be poorly hydrolysed by NTE but extensively by enzyme(s) that are insensitive to non-promoters, such as mipafox, and sensitive to promoters, such as phenyl methane sulfonyl fluoride (PMSF). When phenyl benzoate (PB) was used as substrate, about 65% of total activity was resistant to the non-promoter mipafox (up to 0.5 mM, 20 min, pH 8.0), that inhibits NTE and other esterases. More than 90% of this resistant activity was sensitive to the classical promoter PMSF (1 mM, 20 min, pH 8.0) with an IC{sub 50} of about 0.08 mM (20 min, pH 8.0). On the contrary, the non-promoter p-toluene sulfonyl fluoride caused only about 10% inhibition at 0.5 mM. Several esterase inhibitors including, paraoxon, phenyl benzyl carbamate, di-n-butyl dichlorovinyl phosphate and di-isopropyl fluorophosphate, were tested both in vitro and in vivo for inhibition of this PB activity. Mipafox-resistant PMSF-sensitive PB esterase activity(ies) was inhibited by promoters but not by non promoters and neuropathic compounds.

  14. Relationship between free-living daily physical activity and peripheral circulation in patients with intermittent claudication.

    PubMed

    Gardner, A W; Killewich, L A; Katzel, L I; Womack, C J; Montgomery, P S; Otis, R B; Fonong, T

    1999-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between free-living daily physical activity and peripheral circulation under resting, reactive hyperemia, and maximal exercise conditions in peripheral arterial occlusive disease (PAOD) patients with intermittent claudication. Sixty-one PAOD patients (age = 70 +/- 6 years, ankle/brachial index [ABI] = 0.57 +/- 0.24) were recruited from the Vascular Clinic at the Baltimore Veterans Affairs Medical Center and from radio and newspaper advertisements. Free-living daily physical activity was measured as the energy expenditure of physical activity (EEPA), determined from doubly labeled water and indirect calorimetry. Patients also were characterized on ankle/brachial index, calf blood flow, calf transcutaneous oxygen tension (TcPO2), and calf transcutaneous heating power (TcHP). ABI and calf blood flow served as markers of the macrocirculation of the lower extremity, while TcPO2 and TcHP served as markers of the microcirculation. The claudication patients were sedentary, reflected by a mean EEPA value of 486 +/- 274 kcal/day. EEPA was related to calf TcHP at rest (282 +/- 24 mW; r = -0.413, p = 0.002), after postocclusion reactive hyperemia (275 +/- 22 mW; r = -0.381, p = 0.004), and after maximal exercise (276 +/- 20 mW; r = -0.461, p<0.001). ABI, calf blood flow, and calf TcPO2 were not related to EEPA under any condition. In conclusion, higher levels of free-living daily physical activity were associated with better microcirculation of the calf musculature in older PAOD patients with intermittent claudication.

  15. Post-irradiation viability and cytotoxicity of natural killer cells isolated from human peripheral blood using different methods.

    PubMed

    Hietanen, Tenho; Pitkänen, Maunu; Kapanen, Mika; Kellokumpu-Lehtinen, Pirkko-Liisa

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We compared the pre- and post-irradiation viability and cytotoxicity of human peripheral natural killer cell (NK) populations obtained using different isolation methods. Material and methods Three methods were used to enrich total NK cells from buffy coats: (I) a Ficoll-Paque gradient, plastic adherence and a nylon wool column; (II) a discontinuous Percoll gradient; or (III) the Dynal NK cell isolation kit. Subsequently, CD16(+) and CD56(+) NK cell subsets were collected using (IV) flow cytometry or (V) magnetic-activated cell sorting (MACS) NK cell isolation kits. The yield, viability, purity and cytotoxicity of the NK cell populations were measured using trypan blue exclusion, flow cytometry using propidium iodide and (51)Cr release assays after enrichments as well as viability and cytotoxicity after a single radiation dose. Results The purity of the preparations, as measured by the CD16(+) and CD56(+) cell content, was equally good between methods I-III (p = 0.323), but the content of CD16(+) and CD56(+) cells using these methods was significantly lower than that using methods IV and V (p = 0.005). The viability of the cell population enriched via flow cytometry (85.5%) was significantly lower than that enriched via other methods (99.4-98.0%, p = 0.003). The cytotoxicity of NK cells enriched using methods I-III was significantly higher than that of NK cells enriched using methods IV and V (p = 0.000). In vitro the NK cells did not recover cytotoxic activity following irradiation. In addition, we detected considerable inter-individual variation in yield, cytotoxicity and radiation sensitivity between the NK cells collected from different human donors. Conclusions The selection of the appropriate NK cell enrichment method is very important for NK cell irradiation studies. According to our results, the Dynal and MACS NK isolation kits best retained the killing capacity and the viability of irradiated NK cells.

  16. Early effects of low dose 12C6+ ion or X-ray irradiation on human peripheral blood lymphocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yingtai; Li, Yumin; Zhang, Hong; Xie, Yi; Chen, Xuezhong; Ren, Jinyu; Zhang, Xiaowei; Zhu, Zijiang; Liu, Hongliang; Zhang, Yawei

    2010-04-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate the acute effects of low dose 12C6+ ions or X-ray radiation on human immune function. The human peripheral blood lymphocytes (HPBL) of seven healthy donors were exposed to 0.05 Gy 12C6+ ions or X-ray radiation and cell responses were measured at 24 h after exposure. The cytotoxic activities of HPBL were determined by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT); the percentages of T and NK cells subsets were detected by flow cytometry; mRNA expression of interleukin (IL)-2, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interferon (IFN)-γ were examined by real time quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR); and these cytokines protein levels in supernatant of cultured cells were assayed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA). The results showed that the cytotoxic activity of HPBL, mRNA expression of IL-2, IFN-γ and TNF-α in HPBL and their protein levels in supernatant were significantly increased at 24 h after exposure to 0.05 Gy 12C6+ ions radiation and the effects were stronger than observed for X-ray exposure. However, there was no significant change in the percentage of T and NK cells subsets of HPBL. These results suggested that 0.05 Gy high linear energy transfer (LET) 12C6+ radiation was a more effective approach to host immune enhancement than that of low LET X-ray. We conclude that cytokines production might be used as sensitive indicators of acute response to LDI.

  17. Comprehensive assessment of peripheral blood TCRβ repertoire in infectious mononucleosis and chronic active EBV infection patients.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shenglin; Zhang, Qian; Huang, Dongli; Zhang, Wenli; Zhong, Fengluan; Feng, Jia; Chen, Xueru; Meng, Qingxiang; Chen, Xiaofan; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Hongyu

    2017-04-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) primary infection is usually asymptomatic, but it sometimes progresses to infectious mononucleosis (IM). Occasionally, some people develop chronic active EBV infection (CAEBV) with underlying immunodeficiency, which belongs to a continuous spectrum of EBV-associated lymphoproliferative disorders (EBV(+) LPD) with heterogeneous clinical presentations and high mortality. It has been well established that T cell-mediated immune response plays a critical role in the disease evolution of EBV infection. Recently, high-throughput sequencing of the hypervariable complementarity-determining region 3 (CDR3) segments of the T cell receptor (T cell receptor β (TCRβ)) has emerged as a sensitive approach to assess the T cell repertoire. In this study, we fully characterized the diversity of peripheral blood TCRβ repertoire in IM (n = 6) and CAEBV patients (n = 5) and EBV-seropositive controls (n = 5). Compared with the healthy EBV-seropositive controls, both IM and CAEBV patients demonstrate a significant decrease in peripheral blood TCRβ repertoire diversity, basically, including narrowed repertoire breadth, highly expanded clones, and skewed CDR3 length distribution. However, there is no significant difference between IM and CAEBV patients. Furthermore, we observed some disease-related preferences in TRBV/TRBJ usage and combinations, as well as lots of T cell clones shared by different groups (unique or overlapped) involved in public T cell responses, which provide more detailed insights into the divergent disease evolution.

  18. IL-7 enhances thymic human T cell development in "human immune system" Rag2-/-IL-2Rgammac-/- mice without affecting peripheral T cell homeostasis.

    PubMed

    van Lent, Anja U; Dontje, Wendy; Nagasawa, Maho; Siamari, Rachida; Bakker, Arjen Q; Pouw, Stephan M; Maijoor, Kelly A; Weijer, Kees; Cornelissen, Jan J; Blom, Bianca; Di Santo, James P; Spits, Hergen; Legrand, Nicolas

    2009-12-15

    IL-7 is a central cytokine in the development of hematopoietic cells, although interspecies discrepancies have been reported. By coculturing human postnatal thymus hematopoietic progenitors and OP9-huDL1 stromal cells, we found that murine IL-7 is approximately 100-fold less potent than human IL-7 for supporting human T cell development in vitro. We investigated the role of human IL-7 in newborn BALB/c Rag2(-/-)gamma(c)(-/-) mice transplanted with human hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) as an in vivo model of human hematopoiesis using three approaches to improve IL-7 signaling: administration of human IL-7, ectopic expression of human IL-7 by the transplanted human HSC, or enforced expression of a murine/human chimeric IL-7 receptor binding murine IL-7. We show that premature IL-7 signaling at the HSC stage, before entrance in the thymus, impeded T cell development, whereas increased intrathymic IL-7 signaling significantly enhanced the maintenance of immature thymocytes. Increased thymopoiesis was also observed when we transplanted BCL-2- or BCL-x(L)-transduced human HSC. Homeostasis of peripheral mature T cells in this humanized mouse model was not improved by any of these strategies. Overall, our results provide evidence for an important role of IL-7 in human T cell development in vivo and highlight the notion that IL-7 availability is but one of many signals that condition peripheral T cell homeostasis.

  19. Transcriptome analysis of the human T lymphocyte cell line Jurkat and human peripheral blood mononuclear cells exposed to deoxynivalenol (DON): New mechanistic insights

    SciTech Connect

    Katika, Madhumohan R.; Hendriksen, Peter J.M.; Shao, Jia; Loveren, Henk van; Peijnenburg, Ad

    2012-10-01

    Deoxynivalenol (DON) or vomitoxin is a commonly encountered type-B trichothecene mycotoxin, produced by Fusarium species predominantly found in cereals and grains. DON is known to exert toxic effects on the gastrointestinal, reproductive and neuroendocrine systems, and particularly on the immune system. Depending on dose and exposure time, it can either stimulate or suppress immune function. The main objective of this study was to obtain a deeper insight into DON-induced effects on lymphoid cells. For this, we exposed the human T-lymphocyte cell line Jurkat and human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) to various concentrations of DON for various times and examined gene expression changes by DNA microarray analysis. Jurkat cells were exposed to 0.25 and 0.5 μM DON for 3, 6 and 24 h. Biological interpretation of the microarray data indicated that DON affects various processes in these cells: It upregulates genes involved in ribosome structure and function, RNA/protein synthesis and processing, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, calcium-mediated signaling, mitochondrial function, oxidative stress, the NFAT and NF-κB/TNF-α pathways, T cell activation and apoptosis. The effects of DON on the expression of genes involved in ER stress, NFAT activation and apoptosis were confirmed by qRT-PCR. Other biochemical experiments confirmed that DON activates calcium-dependent proteins such as calcineurin and M-calpain that are known to be involved in T cell activation and apoptosis. Induction of T cell activation was also confirmed by demonstrating that DON activates NFATC1 and induces its translocation from the cytoplasm to the nucleus. For the gene expression profiling of PBMCs, cells were exposed to 2 and 4 μM DON for 6 and 24 h. Comparison of the Jurkat microarray data with those obtained with PBMCs showed that most of the processes affected by DON in the Jurkat cell line were also affected in the PBMCs. -- Highlights: ► The human T cell line Jurkat and human

  20. Mammalian Target of Rapamycin (mTOR) Activation Increases Axonal Growth Capacity of Injured Peripheral Nerves*

    PubMed Central

    Abe, Namiko; Borson, Steven H.; Gambello, Michael J.; Wang, Fan; Cavalli, Valeria

    2010-01-01

    Unlike neurons in the central nervous system (CNS), injured neurons in the peripheral nervous system (PNS) can regenerate their axons and reinnervate their targets. However, functional recovery in the PNS often remains suboptimal, especially in cases of severe damage. The lack of regenerative ability of CNS neurons has been linked to down-regulation of the mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin) pathway. We report here that PNS dorsal root ganglial neurons (DRGs) activate mTOR following damage and that this activity enhances axonal growth capacity. Furthermore, genetic up-regulation of mTOR activity by deletion of tuberous sclerosis complex 2 (TSC2) in DRGs is sufficient to enhance axonal growth capacity in vitro and in vivo. We further show that mTOR activity is linked to the expression of GAP-43, a crucial component of axonal outgrowth. However, although TSC2 deletion in DRGs facilitates axonal regrowth, it leads to defects in target innervation. Thus, whereas manipulation of mTOR activity could provide new strategies to stimulate nerve regeneration in the PNS, fine control of mTOR activity is required for proper target innervation. PMID:20615870

  1. Identification of Immunopotentiating Lactic Acid Bacteria that Induce Antibody Production by in vitro Stimulated Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Makiko; Hitaka, Akira; Fujino, Himiko; Matsumoto, Takashi; Hasegawa, Takanori; Morimatsu, Fumiki; Fujiki, Tsukasa; Katakura, Yoshinori

    2012-01-01

    L-leucyl-L-leucine methyl ester (LLME) is known to remove lysosome-rich cells from human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). To evaluate the immunopotentiating ability of lactic acid bacteria (LAB), we adopted the in vitro stimulation protocol of LLME-treated PBMCs as a model assay system and monitored the level of antibody produced by stimulated PBMCs. The results indicated that several LAB strains have immunopotentiating ability against PBMCs, as evidenced by the enhanced antibody production and increased number of antigen-specific B cells. Next, we identified T cells as the direct target cells of the immunopotentiating LAB strain L32, suggesting that L32 induced antibody production by PBMCs through T-cell activation. Finally, we tested the immunopotentiating ability of ligands for Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2), which is known to mediate the LAB signal, and observed that both L32 and one of the TLR2 ligands, LTA-BS, induced antigen-specific antibody production by in vitro stimulated PBMC. This suggests that L32 and LTA-BS can be used as an adjuvant for stimulating immune reaction in PBMCs.

  2. Mechanism and role of MCP-1 upregulation upon chikungunya virus infection in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Ruiz Silva, Mariana; van der Ende-Metselaar, Heidi; Mulder, H Lie; Smit, Jolanda M; Rodenhuis-Zybert, Izabela A

    2016-08-25

    Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1/CCL2)-mediated migration of monocytes is essential for immunological surveillance of tissues. During chikungunya virus (CHIKV) infection however, excessive production of MCP-1 has been linked to disease pathogenesis. High MCP-1 serum levels are detected during the viremic phase of CHIKV infection and correlate with the virus titre. In vitro CHIKV infection was also shown to stimulate MCP-1 production in whole blood; yet the role and the mechanism of MCP-1 production upon infection of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells remain unknown. Here we found that active CHIKV infection stimulated production of MCP-1 in monocytes. Importantly however, we found that communication with other leukocytes is crucial to yield MCP-1 by monocytes upon CHIKV infection. Indeed, blocking interferon-α/β receptor or the JAK1/JAK2 signalling downstream of the receptor abolished CHIKV-mediated MCP-1 production. Additionally, we show that despite the apparent correlation between IFN type I, CHIKV replication and MCP-1, modulating the levels of the chemokine did not influence CHIKV infection. In summary, our data disclose the complexity of MCP-1 regulation upon CHIKV infection and point to a crucial role of IFNβ in the chemokine secretion. We propose that balance between these soluble factors is imperative for an appropriate host response to CHIKV infection.

  3. Effect of subcutaneous treatment with human umbilical cord blood-derived multipotent stem cells on peripheral neuropathic pain in rats

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Min Ju; Yoon, Tae Gyoon; Kang, Moonkyu

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we aim to determine the in vivo effect of human umbilical cord blood-derived multipotent stem cells (hUCB-MSCs) on neuropathic pain, using three, principal peripheral neuropathic pain models. Four weeks after hUCB-MSC transplantation, we observed significant antinociceptive effect in hUCB-MSC–transplanted rats compared to that in the vehicle-treated control. Spinal cord cells positive for c-fos, CGRP, p-ERK, p-p 38, MMP-9 and MMP 2 were significantly decreased in only CCI model of hUCB-MSCs-grafted rats, while spinal cord cells positive for CGRP, p-ERK and MMP-2 significantly decreased in SNL model of hUCB-MSCs-grafted rats and spinal cord cells positive for CGRP and MMP-2 significantly decreased in SNI model of hUCB-MSCs-grafted rats, compared to the control 4 weeks or 8weeks after transplantation (p<0.05). However, cells positive for TIMP-2, an endogenous tissue inhibitor of MMP-2, were significantly increased in SNL and SNI models of hUCB-MSCs-grafted rats. Taken together, subcutaneous injection of hUCB-MSCs may have an antinociceptive effect via modulation of pain signaling during pain signal processing within the nervous system, especially for CCI model. Thus, subcutaneous administration of hUCB-MSCs might be beneficial for improving those patients suffering from neuropathic pain by decreasing neuropathic pain activation factors, while increasing neuropathic pain inhibition factor. PMID:28280408

  4. Mechanism and role of MCP-1 upregulation upon chikungunya virus infection in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz Silva, Mariana; van der Ende-Metselaar, Heidi; Mulder, H. Lie; Smit, Jolanda M.; Rodenhuis-Zybert, Izabela A.

    2016-01-01

    Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1/CCL2)-mediated migration of monocytes is essential for immunological surveillance of tissues. During chikungunya virus (CHIKV) infection however, excessive production of MCP-1 has been linked to disease pathogenesis. High MCP-1 serum levels are detected during the viremic phase of CHIKV infection and correlate with the virus titre. In vitro CHIKV infection was also shown to stimulate MCP-1 production in whole blood; yet the role and the mechanism of MCP-1 production upon infection of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells remain unknown. Here we found that active CHIKV infection stimulated production of MCP-1 in monocytes. Importantly however, we found that communication with other leukocytes is crucial to yield MCP-1 by monocytes upon CHIKV infection. Indeed, blocking interferon-α/β receptor or the JAK1/JAK2 signalling downstream of the receptor abolished CHIKV-mediated MCP-1 production. Additionally, we show that despite the apparent correlation between IFN type I, CHIKV replication and MCP-1, modulating the levels of the chemokine did not influence CHIKV infection. In summary, our data disclose the complexity of MCP-1 regulation upon CHIKV infection and point to a crucial role of IFNβ in the chemokine secretion. We propose that balance between these soluble factors is imperative for an appropriate host response to CHIKV infection. PMID:27558873

  5. RANK Expression and Osteoclastogenesis in Human Monocytes in Peripheral Blood from Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kobashigawa, Tsuyoshi

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) appears as inflammation of synovial tissue and joint destruction. Receptor activator of NF-κB (RANK) is a member of the TNF receptor superfamily and a receptor for the RANK ligand (RANKL). In this study, we examined the expression of RANKhigh and CCR6 on CD14+ monocytes from patients with RA and healthy volunteers. Peripheral blood samples were obtained from both the RA patients and the healthy volunteers. Osteoclastogenesis from monocytes was induced by RANKL and M-CSF in vitro. To study the expression of RANKhigh and CCR6 on CD14+ monocytes, two-color flow cytometry was performed. Levels of expression of RANK on monocytes were significantly correlated with the level of osteoclastogenesis in the healthy volunteers. The expression of RANKhigh on CD14+ monocyte in RA patients without treatment was elevated and that in those receiving treatment was decreased. In addition, the high-level expression of RANK on CD14+ monocytes was correlated with the high-level expression of CCR6 in healthy volunteers. Monocytes expressing both RANK and CCR6 differentiate into osteoclasts. The expression of CD14+RANKhigh in untreated RA patients was elevated. RANK and CCR6 expressed on monocytes may be novel targets for the regulation of bone resorption in RA and osteoporosis. PMID:27822475

  6. Effect of stress and peripheral immune activation on astrocyte activation in transgenic bioluminescent Gfap-luc mice.

    PubMed

    Biesmans, Steven; Acton, Paul D; Cotto, Carlos; Langlois, Xavier; Ver Donck, Luc; Bouwknecht, Jan A; Aelvoet, Sarah-Ann; Hellings, Niels; Meert, Theo F; Nuydens, Rony

    2015-07-01

    Neuroinflammation and the accompanying activation of glial cells is an important feature of many neurodegenerative conditions. It is known that factors such as peripheral infections and stress can influence immune processes in the brain. However, the effect of these stressors on astrocyte activation in vivo remains elusive. In this study, transgenic Gfap-luc mice expressing the luciferase gene under the transcriptional control of the glial fibrillary acidic protein promoter were used to quantify the kinetics of in vivo astrocyte activation following immune challenges relevant to clinical inflammation. It was found that astrocytes respond rapidly to peripheral immune activation elicited by either bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or the viral mimetic polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid (poly(I:C)). By measuring bioluminescence and 18-kDa translocator protein radioligand binding in the same animal it was observed that LPS induces both astrocyte as well as microglial activation at 6 h post-administration. Furthermore, the astrocyte response decreased upon repeated systemic LPS injections, indicating development of tolerance to the LPS challenge. Finally, restraining Gfap-luc mice for 1 h daily on 5 consecutive days did not affect brain bioluminescence, thereby indicating that sub-chronic stress does not influence astrocyte activation under unchallenged conditions. However, stressed animals showed a reduced response to a subsequent systemic LPS injection, suggesting that the immune system is compromised in these animals. Here, we demonstrate that Gfap-luc mice can be used to study astrocyte activation in response to stimuli relevant for clinical inflammation and that this approach may provide a more complete characterization of existing and novel models of neuroinflammation

  7. Sensitivity of PCR and real-time PCR for the diagnosis of human visceral leishmaniasis using peripheral blood

    PubMed Central

    da Costa Lima, Manoel Sebastião; Zorzenon, Denielly Christina Rodrigues; Dorval, Maria Elizabeth Cavalheiros; Pontes, Elenir Rose Jardim Cury; Oshiro, Elisa Teruya; Cunha, Rodrigo; Andreotti, Renato; Matos, Maria de Fatima Cepa

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effectiveness of PCR and real-time PCR for the diagnosis of human visceral leishmaniasis using peripheral blood samples. Methods DNA extraction was performed using Promega Wizard® Genomic kits. PCR employing RV1/RV2 primers yielded 145-bp amplicons. Real-time PCR was performed with the same primers and SYBR Green ROX Plus mix. These techniques were used to analyze 100 peripheral blood samples from patients with clinical signs of the disease. Results The sensitivity and specificity levels were 91,3%% and 29,6%, respectively, for real-time PCR and 97.78% and 61.82%, respectively, for PCR. Conclusions Real-time PCR proved to be a satisfactory method for the diagnosis of human visceral leishmaniasis.

  8. Salient sounds activate human visual cortex automatically

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, John J.; Störmer, Viola S.; Martinez, Antigona; Feng, Wenfeng; Hillyard, Steven A.

    2013-01-01

    Sudden changes in the acoustic environment enhance perceptual processing of subsequent visual stimuli that appear in close spatial proximity. Little is known, however, about the neural mechanisms by which salient sounds affect visual processing. In particular, it is unclear whether such sounds automatically activate visual cortex. To shed light on this issue, the present study examined event-related brain potentials (ERPs) that were triggered either by peripheral sounds that preceded task-relevant visual targets (Experiment 1) or were presented during purely auditory tasks (Experiments 2, 3, and 4). In all experiments the sounds elicited a contralateral ERP over the occipital scalp that was localized to neural generators in extrastriate visual cortex of the ventral occipital lobe. The amplitude of this cross-modal ERP was predictive of perceptual judgments about the contrast of co-localized visual targets. These findings demonstrate that sudden, intrusive sounds reflexively activate human visual cortex in a spatially specific manner, even during purely auditory tasks when the sounds are not relevant to the ongoing task. PMID:23699530

  9. Intrinsic Patterns of Human Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Kun; Ivanov, Plamen Ch.; Chen, Zhi; Hilton, Michael; Stanley, H. Eugene; Shea, Steven

    2003-03-01

    Activity is one of the defining features of life. Control of human activity is complex, being influenced by many factors both extrinsic and intrinsic to the body. The most obvious extrinsic factors that affect activity are the daily schedule of planned events, such as work and recreation, as well as reactions to unforeseen or random events. These extrinsic factors may account for the apparently random fluctuations in human motion observed over short time scales. The most obvious intrinsic factors are the body clocks including the circadian pacemaker that influences our sleep/wake cycle and ultradian oscillators with shorter time scales [2, 3]. These intrinsic rhythms may account for the underlying regularity in average activity level over longer periods of up to 24 h. Here we ask if the known extrinsic and intrinsic factors fully account for all complex features observed in recordings of human activity. To this end, we measure activity over two weeks from forearm motion in subjects undergoing their regular daily routine. Utilizing concepts from statistical physics, we demonstrate that during wakefulness human activity possesses previously unrecognized complex dynamic patterns. These patterns of activity are characterized by robust fractal and nonlinear dynamics including a universal probability distribution and long-range power-law correlations that are stable over a wide range of time scales (from minutes to hours). Surprisingly, we find that these dynamic patterns are unaffected by changes in the average activity level that occur within individual subjects throughout the day and on different days of the week, and between subjects. Moreover, we find that these patterns persist when the same subjects undergo time-isolation laboratory experiments designed to account for the phase of the circadian pacemaker, and control the known extrinsic factors by restricting behaviors and manipulating scheduled events including the sleep/wake cycle. We attribute these newly

  10. Role of Carum copticum seeds in modulating chromium-induced toxicity on human bronchial epithelial cells and human peripheral blood lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Deb, Dipanwita Dutta; Parimala, G; Devi, S Saravana; Chakrabarti, T

    2012-11-01

    Carum copticum seeds are well known for ailment of various diseases since ancient times. The present study pertains to investigate modulatory effects of methanolic extract of C. copticum seeds (MCE) against hexavalent chromium induced cytotoxicity, genotoxicity, apoptosis and oxidative stress on human bronchial epithelial cells (BEAS-2B) and isolated human peripheral blood lymphocyte (PBL) in vitro. Treatment of BEAS-2B and PBL with MCE prior to potassium dichromate (K(2)Cr(2)O(7)) treatment exhibited an increase in cell viability and decrease of DNA damage as compared to K(2)Cr(2)O(7) treatment alone, as evaluated by WST-8 and Comet assay respectively. Further, MCE administration 1h prior to graded doses of K(2)Cr(2)O(7) significantly decreased reactive oxygen species (ROS) level, increased the mitochondrial membrane potential, reduced apoptosis and caspase 3 activity. MCE also ameliorated K(2)Cr(2)O(7) induced decrease in superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) antioxidant enzyme levels in BEAS-2B and PBL cells accompanied by reduction in lipid peroxides with maximum effect at 50 μg/ml. Thus, this study provides strong evidence to support the beneficial effect of MCE in preventing Cr(VI) induced toxicity in BEAS-2B and PBL cells.

  11. Butyrylcholinesterase activity and lymphocyte subpopulations in peripheral blood of Kuwaiti women experiencing recurrent spontaneous abortion.

    PubMed

    Mahmoud, F F; Abul, H T; Haines, D D; Omu, A E; Diejomaoh, M; Wise, J A; Abu Donia, M B

    2008-04-01

    This study has evaluated the hypothesis that activity of the detoxifying enzyme butyrylcholinesterase (BuChE) correlates with levels of serum anti-cardiolipin antibodies (ACA) and T lymphocytes in peripheral blood of women experiencing recurrent spontaneous abortion (RSA). Peripheral venous blood from 16 non-pregnant, RSA-afflicted women and 8 healthy non-pregnant women was analyzed for frequency of T lymphocyte subpopulations by two-color flow cytometry and for serum BuChE using butyrylthiocholine iodide/spectrophotometry. RSA-afflicted women with high serum ACA, but not those with normal ACA levels, exhibited significantly increased percentages of CD4+CD25+ cells (p<0.01) and CD4+HLA-DR+ cells (p<0.05) relative to healthy women. CD4+CD25+(high) cells were significantly lower (p<0.05), while CD4+CD25+(low) cells were significantly higher (p<0.01), in women with elevated ACA compared to healthy women and to RSA women with normal ACA. Relative to healthy, non-pregnant subjects, serum BuChE activity in RSA patients was elevated, both for those with normal ACA (p<0.001) and elevated ACA levels (p<0.01). Among healthy controls, a significant positive correlation was observed between frequency of CD3+NK cells and BuChE activity (p<0.01), but not for RSA-afflicted subjects. A positive correlation between BuChE activity and frequency of CD4+CD25+ cells, as well as CD4+CD25+(high) cells, was observed in the RSA-afflicted subject group with elevated ACA (p<0.05), which may be related to induction of BuChE by toxic metabolites resulting from pathogenic T cell activity. It is concluded that, among RSA patients, high serum ACA correlates with elevated levels of activated T cells and reduced CD4+CD25+(high)/CD4+CD25+(low) cells in comparison to healthy women or those afflicted with RSA but with normal ACA. BuChE activity is observed to be elevated in RSA patients irrespective of serum ACA status.

  12. Electrical Stimulation to Enhance Axon Regeneration After Peripheral Nerve Injuries in Animal Models and Humans.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Tessa

    2016-04-01

    Injured peripheral nerves regenerate their lost axons but functional recovery in humans is frequently disappointing. This is so particularly when injuries require regeneration over long distances and/or over long time periods. Fat replacement of chronically denervated muscles, a commonly accepted explanation, does not account for poor functional recovery. Rather, the basis for the poor nerve regeneration is the transient expression of growth-associated genes that accounts for declining regenerative capacity of neurons and the regenerative support of Schwann cells over time. Brief low-frequency electrical stimulation accelerates motor and sensory axon outgrowth across injury sites that, even after delayed surgical repair of injured nerves in animal models and patients, enhances nerve regeneration and target reinnervation. The stimulation elevates neuronal cyclic adenosine monophosphate and, in turn, the expression of neurotrophic factors and other growth-associated genes, including cytoskeletal proteins. Electrical stimulation of denervated muscles immediately after nerve transection and surgical repair also accelerates muscle reinnervation but, at this time, how the daily requirement of long-duration electrical pulses can be delivered to muscles remains a practical issue prior to translation to patients. Finally, the technique of inserting autologous nerve grafts that bridge between a donor nerve and an adjacent recipient denervated nerve stump significantly improves nerve regeneration after delayed nerve repair, the donor nerves sustaining the capacity of the denervated Schwann cells to support nerve regeneration. These reviewed methods to promote nerve regeneration and, in turn, to enhance functional recovery after nerve injury and surgical repair are sufficiently promising for early translation to the clinic.

  13. Dysregulation of the peripheral and adipose tissue endocannabinoid system in human abdominal obesity.

    PubMed

    Blüher, Matthias; Engeli, Stefan; Klöting, Nora; Berndt, Janin; Fasshauer, Mathias; Bátkai, Sándor; Pacher, Pál; Schön, Michael R; Jordan, Jens; Stumvoll, Michael

    2006-11-01

    The endocannabinoid system has been suspected to contribute to the association of visceral fat accumulation with metabolic diseases. We determined whether circulating endocannabinoids are related to visceral adipose tissue mass in lean, subcutaneous obese, and visceral obese subjects (10 men and 10 women in each group). We further measured expression of the cannabinoid type 1 (CB(1)) receptor and fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) genes in paired samples of subcutaneous and visceral adipose tissue in all 60 subjects. Circulating 2-arachidonoyl glycerol (2-AG) was significantly correlated with body fat (r = 0.45, P = 0.03), visceral fat mass (r = 0.44, P = 0.003), and fasting plasma insulin concentrations (r = 0.41, P = 0.001) but negatively correlated to glucose infusion rate during clamp (r = 0.39, P = 0.009). In visceral adipose tissue, CB(1) mRNA expression was negatively correlated with visceral fat mass (r = 0.32, P = 0.01), fasting insulin (r = 0.48, P < 0.001), and circulating 2-AG (r = 0.5, P < 0.001), whereas FAAH gene expression was negatively correlated with visceral fat mass (r = 0.39, P = 0.01) and circulating 2-AG (r = 0.77, P < 0.001). Our findings suggest that abdominal fat accumulation is a critical correlate of the dysregulation of the peripheral endocannabinoid system in human obesity. Thus, the endocannabinoid system may represent a primary target for the treatment of abdominal obesity and associated metabolic changes.

  14. Ex Vivo Expansion of Human Mobilized Peripheral Blood Stem Cells Using Epigenetic Modifiers

    PubMed Central

    Saraf, Santosh; Araki, Hiroto; Petro, Benjamin; Park, Youngmin; Taioli, Simona; Yoshinaga, Kazumi G; Koca, Emre; Rondelli, Damiano; Mahmud, Nadim

    2014-01-01

    Background Epigenetic modifications likely control fate of hematopoietic stem cells (HSC). The chromatin modifying agents (CMA), 5-aza-2’-deoxyctidine (5azaD) and trichostatin A (TSA) have previously been shown to expand HSC from cord blood and bone marrow. Here we assessed whether CMA can also expand HSCs present in growth factor mobilized human peripheral blood (MPB). Study Design & Methods 5azaD and TSA were sequentially added to CD34+ MPB cells in the presence of cytokines and the cells were cultured for nine days. Results Following culture, a 3.6 ± 0.5 fold expansion of CD34+CD90+ cells, a 10.1 ± 0.5 fold expansion of primitive colony forming unit (CFU)-mix, and a 2.2 ± 0.5 fold expansion of long-term cobble stone-area forming cells (CAFC) was observed in 5azaD/TSA expanded cells. By contrast, cells cultured in cytokines without 5azaD/TSA displayed no expansion; rather a reduction in CD34+CD90+ cells (0.7 ± 0.1 fold) and CAFCs (0.3 ± 0.1) from their initial numbers was observed. Global hypomethylation corresponding with increased transcript levels of several genes implicated in HSC self-renewal, including HOXB4, GATA2, and EZH2, was observed in 5azaD/TSA expanded MPB cells in contrast to controls. 5azaD/TSA expanded MPB cells retained in vivo hematopoietic engraftment capacity. Conclusion MPB CD34+ cells from donors can be expanded using 5azaD/TSA and these expanded cells retain in vivo hematopoietic reconstitution capacity. This strategy may prove to be potentially useful to augment HSCs numbers for patients who fail to mobilize. PMID:25363624

  15. Comparative genotoxicity of cobalt nanoparticles and ions on human peripheral leukocytes in vitro.

    PubMed

    Colognato, R; Bonelli, A; Ponti, J; Farina, M; Bergamaschi, E; Sabbioni, E; Migliore, L

    2008-09-01

    Owing to the increasing development of nanotechnology, there is a need to assess how engineered nanomaterials can interact with living cells. The main purpose of the present study was to assess whether metal cobalt nanoparticles (CoNP 100-500 nm) are genotoxic compared to cobalt ions (Co(2+)). Uptake experiments were carried out by incubating peripheral blood leukocytes (PBLs) with (57)Co(2+) (added to stable Co(2+) 10(-2) M to obtain concentrations in the range of 10(-5) to 10(-4) M) or with (60)CoNP for 24 and 48 h. Whereas intracellular Co(2+) showed slight or no variations over the baseline levels, CoNP were taken up efficiently leading to intracellular CoNP concentrations of 485 +/- 106.1 and 970 +/- 99 fg per cell after 24 and 48 h, respectively. The genotoxicity end points considered in this study were the frequency of binucleated micronucleated (BNMN) cells and the percentage of tail DNA (% Tail DNA) fragmentation by means of the comet assay. Genotoxic effects were evaluated by incubating PBLs of three healthy donors with subtoxic concentrations (10(-5) to 8 x 10(-5)M) of Co(2+) in the form of cobalt chloride, CoNP and 'washed' CoNP, the latter to exclude any interference by Co(2+). On a group basis, Co(2+) induced a clear trend in the increase of the BNMN frequency, whereas CoNP showed only minor changes. Moreover, we observed a high variability among donors in the induction of micronuclei. The comet assay showed a statistically significant dose-related increase in % Tail DNA for CoNP (P < 0,001), whereas Co(2+) did not induce significant changes over control values. These findings suggest that nanosized Co can be internalized by human leukocytes and can interact with DNA leading to the observed genotoxic effects, which are, however, modulated both by donor's characteristics and/or by Co(2+) release.

  16. Sodium tungstate (Na2WO4) exposure increases apoptosis in human peripheral blood lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Osterburg, Andrew R; Robinson, Chad T; Schwemberger, Sandy; Mokashi, Vishwesh; Stockelman, Michael; Babcock, George F

    2010-01-01

    The potential for adverse health effects of using tungsten and its alloys in military munitions are an important concern to both civilians and the US military. The toxicological implications of exposure to tungsten, its alloys, and the soluble tungstate (Na(2)WO(4)) are currently under investigation. To examine tungstate toxicity, a series of experiments to determine its in vitro effects on cells of the immune system were performed. We identified alterations in isolated human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) treated in vitro with sodium tungstate (0.01, 0.1, 1.0, and 10 mM). Analyses of apoptosis with annexin V and propidium iodide revealed a dose- and time-dependent increase in the quantity of cells in early apoptosis after tungstate exposure. Reductions in the number of cells entering into the cell cycle were also noted. Exposure of PBL to tungstate (1 mM) and Concanavalin A (ConA) for 72 h reduced the number of cells in S and G(2)/M phases of the cell cycle. There were alterations in the numbers of cells in G(0)/G(1), S, and G(2)/M phases of the cell cycle in long-term THP-1 (acute leukemic monocytes) cultures treated with tungstate (0.01, 0.1, 1.0, and 10 mM). Gel electrophoresis, silver staining, and LC-MS/MS showed the cytoplasmic presence of histone H1b and H1d after 72 h of tungstate exposure. The addition of tungstate to cultures resulted in significant reductions in the quantity of interleukin-10 (IL-10), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), and IL-6 produced by stimulated [CD3/CD28, ConA, or lipopolysaccharide (LPS)] and tungstate-treated lymphocytes. Taken together, these data indicate that tungstate increases apoptosis of PBL, alters cell cycle progression, reduces cytokine production, and therefore warrants further investigation.

  17. Impact of Neutron Exposure on Global Gene Expression in a Human Peripheral Blood Model.

    PubMed

    Broustas, Constantinos G; Xu, Yanping; Harken, Andrew D; Chowdhury, Mashkura; Garty, Guy; Amundson, Sally A

    2017-04-01

    The detonation of an improvised nuclear device would produce prompt radiation consisting of both photons (gamma rays) and neutrons. While much effort in recent years has gone into the development of radiation biodosimetry methods suitable for mass triage, the possible effect of neutrons on the endpoints studied has remained largely uninvestigated. We have used a novel neutron irradiator with an energy spectrum based on that 1-1.5 km from the epicenter of the Hiroshima blast to begin examining the effect of neutrons on global gene expression, and the impact this may have on the development of gene expression signatures for radiation biodosimetry. We have exposed peripheral blood from healthy human donors to 0.1, 0.3, 0.5 or 1 Gy of neutrons ex vivo using our neutron irradiator, and compared the transcriptomic response 24 h later to that resulting from sham exposure or exposure to 0.1, 0.3, 0.5, 1, 2 or 4 Gy of photons (X rays). We identified 125 genes that responded significantly to both radiation qualities as a function of dose, with the magnitude of response to neutrons generally being greater than that seen after X-ray exposure. Gene ontology analysis suggested broad involvement of the p53 signaling pathway and general DNA damage response functions across all doses of both radiation qualities. Regulation of immune response and chromatin-related functions were implicated only following the highest doses of neutrons, suggesting a physiological impact of greater DNA damage. We also identified several genes that seem to respond primarily as a function of dose, with less effect of radiation quality. We confirmed this pattern of response by quantitative real-time RT-PCR for BAX, TNFRSF10B, ITLN2 and AEN and suggest that gene expression may provide a means to differentiate between total dose and a neutron component.

  18. Peripherally detectable hormones--their relation to the increased uterine activity during standing in pregnant women.

    PubMed

    von Mandach, U; Schneider, K T; Huch, A; Huch, R

    1987-01-01

    Two-thirds of women in late pregnancy in standing position show marked cyclic accelerations in heart rate with concomitant increase in the uterine activity. As the regulating mechanism of these contractions has not been investigated the aim of the present study is to see if variations in the concentrations of peripheral venous circulating hormones could account for the accelerations of the heart rate and the uterine contractions. In four healthy pregnant women, 25 to 27 years old and in the 33rd-38th weeks of gestation, and in three healthy nonpregnant women, 29 to 30 years old, venous blood was intermittently collected from a cubital vein. The women were investigated in the left lateral as well as in the standing postures. The plasma concentrations of norepinephrine (NE), prostaglandin E2(PGE2), prostaglandin F2 alpha (PGF2 alpha), 6-k-prostaglandin F1 alpha (6-k-PGF1 alpha) thromboxane B2 (TxB2), aldosterone (A), and the plasma renin activity (PRA) were measured by specific and sensitive assays. Significant differences in level and dynamics of the various substances were found between pregnant and nonpregnant subjects. However, no correlation could be found between the fluctuations in the concentration of hormones and heart rate accelerations and the occurrence of uterine contractions, respectively. Local changes of these substances in the uterus may not be reflected in the peripheral venous blood. Therefore our measurements can neither prove nor disprove the hypothesis that these hormonal substances are involved in the regulatory mechanism of uterine contractions occurring in standing.

  19. Tumoricidal activity of human monocytes activated in vitro by free and liposome-encapsulated human lymphokines.

    PubMed Central

    Kleinerman, E S; Schroit, A J; Fogler, W E; Fidler, I J

    1983-01-01

    Human peripheral blood mononuclear cells from normal donors obtained by separation on a Percoll gradient were incubated with free or liposome-entrapped lymphokines produced from concanavalin A-stimulated lymphocytes and then were tested for cytotoxic activity against tumor cells. The treated monocytes lysed tumorigenic melanoma and glioblastoma target cells, but had no effect on three types of nontumorigenic target cells. The activation of monocytes to become tumoricidal was caused by macrophage-activating factor (MAF) and not by contamination with endotoxins, concanavalin A, or interferon. The endocytosis of liposomes containing MAF, but not of those containing control supernatants, led to the activation of cytotoxic properties in the monocytes. Activation by liposome-encapsulated MAF was very efficient and required less than 1/800th of the amount of free MAF necessary to achieve the same levels of cytotoxicity. Thus, the encapsulation of mitogen-induced MAF in liposomes could provide an effective approach for the activation of blood monocytes in situ. Images FIGURE 2 PMID:6348087

  20. Altered Cytokine Production By Specific Human Peripheral Blood Cell Subsets Immediately Following Spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crucian, Brian E.; Cubbage, Michael L.; Sams, Clarence F.

    1999-01-01

    In this study, we have attempted to combine standard immunological assays with the cellular resolving power of the flow cytometer to positively identify the specific cell types involved in spaceflight-induced immune alterations. We have obtained whole blood samples from 27 astronauts collected at three timepoints (L-10, R+0 and R+3) surrounding four recent space shuttle missions. The duration of these missions ranged from 10 to 18 days. Assays performed included serum/urine cortisol, comprehensive subset phenotyping, assessment of cellular activation markers and intracellular cytokine production following mitogenic stimulation. Absolute levels of peripheral granulocytes were significantly elevated following spaceflight, but the levels of circulating lymphocytes and monocytes were unchanged. Lymphocyte subset analysis demonstrated trends towards a decreased percentage of T cells and an increased percentage of B cells. Nearly all of the astronauts exhibited an increased CD4:CD8 ratio, which was dramatic in some individuals. Assessment of memory (CD45RA+) vs. naive (CD45RO+) CD4+ T cell subsets was more ambiguous, with subjects tending to group more as a flight crew. All subjects from one mission demonstrated an increased CD45RA:CD45RO ratio, while all subjects from another Mission demonstrated a decreased ratio. While no significant trend was seen in the monocyte population as defined by scatter, a decreased percentage of the CD14+ CD16+ monocyte subset was seen following spaceflight in all subjects tested. In general, most of the cellular changes described above which were assessed at R+O and compared to L-10 trended to pre-flight levels by R+3. Although no significant differences were seen in the expression of the cellular activation markers CD69 and CD25 following exposure to microgravity, significant alterations were seen in cytokine production in response to mitogenic activation for specific subsets. T cell (CD3+) production of IL-2 was significantly decreased

  1. Xanthine Oxidase Activity in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Patients with and without Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Filipovic-Danic, Snezana; Miric, Marko B.; Puhalo-Sladoje, Dragana

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between serum xanthine oxidase (XOD) activity and the occurrence of diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients. Serum XOD activity, ischemia-modified albumin (IMA), uric acid (UA), albumin, glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), advanced glycation end products (AGE), total free thiols, atherogenic index of plasma (AIP), and body mass index (BMI) were measured in 80 T2DM patients (29 with and 51 without DPN), and 30 nondiabetic control subjects. Duration of diabetes, hypertension, medication, and microalbuminuria was recorded. Serum XOD activities in controls, non-DPN, and DPN were 5.7 ± 2.4 U/L, 20.3 ± 8.6 U/L, and 27.5 ± 10.6 U/L (p < 0.01), respectively. XOD activity was directly correlated to IMA, UA, BMI, HbA1c, and AGE, while inversely correlated to serum total free thiols. A multivariable logistic regression model, which included duration of diabetes, hypertension, AIP, HbA1c, UA, and XOD activity, revealed HbA1c [OR = 1.03 (1.00–1.05); p = 0.034] and XOD activity [OR = 1.07 (1.00–1.14); p = 0.036] as independent predictors of DPN. Serum XOD activity was well correlated to several other risk factors. These results indicate the role of XOD in the development of DPN among T2DM patients. PMID:27965983

  2. Impaired NADPH oxidase activity in peripheral blood lymphocytes of galactosemia patients.

    PubMed

    Al-Essa, Mazen; Dhaunsi, Gursev S; Al-Qabandi, Wafa'a; Khan, Islam

    2013-07-01

    Galactosemia is an autosomal recessive disorder with a wide range of clinical abnormalities. Cellular oxidative stress is considered as one of the pathogenic mechanisms of galactosemia. In this study, we examined the activity of NADPH oxidase (NOX), a major superoxide-generating enzyme system, in peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) from galactosemia patients. PBL were isolated from galactosemia patients and healthy control subjects and used for cell culture studies and biochemical assays. PBL were cultured in the presence or absence of galactose or galactose-1-phosphate (Gal-1-P), and enzyme activities and/or gene expression of NOX, catalase, superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) were measured in the cell homogenates. PBL isolated from galactosemia patients showed significantly reduced (P < 0.01) activities of catalase and GPx; however SOD activity remained unaltered. Galactosemia patients were found to have significantly (P < 0.01) increased levels of malondialdehyde (MDA) in blood lymphocytes. Enzymatic activity of NOX was significantly (P < 0.001) reduced in galactosemia patients; however, Western blotting revealed that NOX-1 protein was not significantly altered. Interestingly, levels of NOX activity in lymphocytes isolated from galactosemia patients significantly increased but remained subnormal when cultured in galactose-deficient medium for two weeks, indicating a galactose-mediated inhibition of NOX. Lymphocytes isolated from control subjects were found to have significantly (P < 0.01) reduced NOX activity when cultured in the presence of galactose or Gal-1-P for two weeks. These results show that galactose-induced cellular oxidative stress is not NOX mediated. However, impairment of the NOX system might be responsible for some of the clinical complications in galactosemia patients.

  3. Treatment of human immunodeficiency virus-related peripheral neuropathy with Scrambler Therapy: a case report.

    PubMed

    Smith, Thomas J; Auwaerter, Paul; Knowlton, Amy; Saylor, Deanna; McArthur, Justin

    2017-02-01

    Peripheral neuropathy is one of the most common neurological complications of HIV infection with a 30-60% lifetime prevalence. Newer HIV drugs cause less peripheral neuropathy, but patients are now living long enough to develop concomitant diabetes-related, vascular-related, and chemotherapy-related neuropathy so it continues as a major debilitating issue. Recent national CDC guidelines have stressed the importance of non-opioid therapies, especially in this population that may have had drug abuse problems. We treated a 52-year-old man who had severe disabling classic peripheral neuropathy since 1998 with Scrambler Therapy (Calmare), an FDA-cleared peripheral non-invasive neuromodulation device. His pain rapidly improved, as did his motor and sensory function, with just four 45-min treatments, and he was able to come off opioids for the first time in years. When his pain returned six months later, only two treatments were needed to resolve it. This represents the first published use of this novel, inexpensive, and non-invasive pain modality in HIV peripheral neuropathy, and should engender further trials.

  4. Comparison of central and peripheral pharmacologic effects of biperiden and trihexyphenidyl in human volunteers.

    PubMed

    Guthrie, S K; Manzey, L; Scott, D; Giordani, B; Tandon, R

    2000-02-01

    In this double-blind, randomized study, indices of central (memory, sedation) and peripheral (salivation, ratio of R-R interval on electrocardiogram) muscarinic function were evaluated in 14 healthy volunteers who received trihexyphenidyl, biperiden, and placebo. Additionally, serum drug levels were obtained 2 hours after oral administration. All subjects participated in three study sessions. During each session, subjects received two doses of biperiden (4 mg), trihexyphenidyl (5 mg), or placebo, and four series of tests were administered. The tests included the determination of cardiac response to standing (R-R ratio), mouth salivation, finger-tapping speed, digit span (forward and backward), a selective reminding task, and visual analog scales (VAS). On the VAS, subjects rated biperiden as significantly more sedating than either trihexyphenidyl or placebo, and both biperiden and trihexyphenidyl were associated with more dizziness than was placebo. Saliva production was significantly reduced by both trihexyphenidyl and biperiden compared with placebo. Digit span performance was significantly decreased in only the backward direction. The selective reminding task revealed highly significant decrements in the number of words recalled and consistent long-term retrieval after both biperiden and trihexyphenidyl. Delayed recall was significantly decreased by both active drugs. Both trihexyphenidyl and biperiden caused a significant increase in the R-R ratio comparison with placebo. With the exception of the VAS measurement of sedation, the effects caused by biperiden and trihexyphenidyl did not differ. The results of this study do not support the hypothesis that the side effect profile of biperiden is significantly different from that of trihexyphenidyl.

  5. Increased basal production of interleukin-10 by peripheral blood mononuclear cells in human alveolar echinococcosis.

    PubMed

    Godot, V; Harraga, S; Deschaseaux, M; Bresson-Hadni, S; Gottstein, B; Emilie, D; Vuitton, D A

    1997-12-01

    The secretion of IL-10 by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and the expression of IL-10 mRNA in fractionated CD4+ and CD8+ lymphocyte subsets and non-B-non-T cells, with and without stimulation by the mitogen phytohemagglutinin-C (PHA-C) and specific Echinococcus multilocularis (E. multilocularis) antigens, were assessed in 7 patients with alveolar echinococcosis (AE) and 6 healthy subjects. Results of studies on IL-10 were compared to those on IFN-gamma, IL-4 and IL-5 in the same patients and control subjects. IL-10 production was significantly higher in patient PBMC-culture supernatants than in the control group supernatants, both at the basal level and after mitogen or specific E. multilocularis antigen stimulation. Both CD4+ and CD8+ lymphocyte populations and non-B-non-T cells of AE patients and controls expressed IL-10 mRNA. Semi-quantification of IL-10 mRNA revealed a significantly higher transcript level in unstimulated-CD8+ T cells from AE patients in comparison with CD8+ T cells of healthy donors. PBMC from patients produced very low levels of IL-4 but the production of IFN-gamma was not significantly depressed compared to the controls. PBMC, isolated from 4 AE patients and 4 control subjects stimulated with specific E. multilocularis antigens, secreted IL-5; IL-5 mRNA was only detected in the CD4+ lymphocyte subset. The secretion of IL-5 and the expression of IL-5 mRNA in healthy subjects could be due to the presence of non-specific mitogenic parasitic factors. This non-specific mitogenic activity of the parasite, besides inducing a high secretion of IL-10 in patients with evolutive AE, may contribute to the lack of host control of parasite growth and to the persistence of granulomatous lesions, due to the inhibition of an efficient Th1 immune response.

  6. Inflammation and activity augment brain-derived neurotrophic factor peripheral release.

    PubMed

    Qiao, L Y; Shen, S; Liu, M; Xia, C; Kay, J C; Zhang, Q L

    2016-03-24

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) release to nerve terminals in the central nervous system is crucial in synaptic transmission and neuronal plasticity. However, BDNF release peripherally from primary afferent neurons has not been investigated. In the present study, we show that BDNF is synthesized by primary afferent neurons located in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) in rat, and releases to spinal nerve terminals in response to depolarization or visceral inflammation. In two-compartmented culture that separates DRG neuronal cell bodies and spinal nerve terminals, application of 50mM K(+) to either the nerve terminal or the cell body evokes BDNF release to the terminal compartment. Inflammatory stimulation of the visceral organ (e.g. the urinary bladder) also facilitates an increase in spontaneous BDNF release from the primary afferent neurons to the axonal terminals. In the inflamed viscera, we show that BDNF immunoreactivity is increased in nerve fibers that are immuno-positive to the neuronal marker PGP9.5. Both BDNF and pro-BDNF levels are increased, however, pro-BDNF immunoreactivity is not expressed in PGP9.5-positive nerve-fiber-like structures. Determination of receptor profiles in the inflamed bladder demonstrates that BDNF high affinity receptor TrkB and general receptor p75 expression levels are elevated, with an increased level of TrkB tyrosine phosphorylation/activity. These results suggest a possibility of pro-proliferative effect in the inflamed bladder. Consistently we show that the proliferation marker Ki67 expression levels are enhanced in the inflamed organ. Our results imply that in vivo BDNF release to the peripheral organ is an important event in neurogenic inflammatory state.

  7. Cordyceps sinensis: Genotoxic Potential in Human Peripheral Blood Cells and Antigenotoxic Properties Against Hydrogen Peroxide by Comet Assay.

    PubMed

    Vasiljevic, Jovana D; Zivkovic, Lada P; Cabarkapa, Andrea M; Bajic, Vladan P; Djelic, Ninoslav J; Spremo-Potparevic, Biljana M

    2016-06-01

    Context • Cordyceps sinensis (C sinensis) is a well-known, traditional, Chinese medicinal mushroom, valued for its beneficial properties for human health. C sinensis has been reported to have immunomodulatory, anticancer, antiaging, antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activity. Despite potential medicinal benefits, no previously published reports are available about the genotoxicity or antigenotoxicity of C sinensis, as detected by comet assay. Objective • The objective of the study was to evaluate both the genotoxic and antigenotoxic potential of an extract of C sinensis (CS extract) in human peripheral blood cells. Design • The research team designed a pilot study. Setting •The study was conducted at the Center for Biological Research, University of Belgrade, in Belgrade, Serbia. Participants • Participants were 6 healthy individuals (2 males and 4 females), between the ages of 20 and 45 y, recruited on a voluntary basis, who provided heparinized, peripheral blood samples. Intervention • Four concentrations of the CS extract-125 μg/mL, 250 μg/mL, 500 μg/mL, and 1000 μg/mL-were used in the treatment of tested blood cells from the blood samples. Three independent procedures were performed: (1) a genotoxicity assessment, (2) an antigenotoxicity assessment for pretreatment of human cells with the CS extract prior to their exposure to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) (ie, an evaluation of the benefits of the CS extract as a preventive agent); and (3) posttreatment of human cells with the CS extract after their exposure to H2O2 (ie, an evaluation of the benefits of the CS extract as an interventional agent). Outcome Measures • Cells were graded by eye inspection into 5 classes, depending on the extent of DNA damage, representing: (1) class A-undamaged cells with no tail (<5% damaged DNA); (2) class B-low-level damage (5%-20%); (3) class C-medium-level damage (20%-40%); (4) class D-high-level damage (40%-95%), and (5) class E-total destruction (>95%).Results

  8. Exercise performance and peripheral vascular insufficiency improve with AMPK activation in high-fat diet-fed mice.

    PubMed

    Baltgalvis, Kristen A; White, Kathy; Li, Wei; Claypool, Mark D; Lang, Wayne; Alcantara, Raniel; Singh, Baljit K; Friera, Annabelle M; McLaughlin, John; Hansen, Derek; McCaughey, Kelly; Nguyen, Henry; Smith, Ira J; Godinez, Guillermo; Shaw, Simon J; Goff, Dane; Singh, Rajinder; Markovtsov, Vadim; Sun, Tian-Qiang; Jenkins, Yonchu; Uy, Gerald; Li, Yingwu; Pan, Alison; Gururaja, Tarikere; Lau, David; Park, Gary; Hitoshi, Yasumichi; Payan, Donald G; Kinsella, Todd M

    2014-04-15

    Intermittent claudication is a form of exercise intolerance characterized by muscle pain during walking in patients with peripheral artery disease (PAD). Endothelial cell and muscle dysfunction are thought to be important contributors to the etiology of this disease, but a lack of preclinical models that incorporate these elements and measure exercise performance as a primary end point has slowed progress in finding new treatment options for these patients. We sought to develop an animal model of peripheral vascular insufficiency in which microvascular dysfunction and exercise intolerance were defining features. We further set out to determine if pharmacological activation of 5'-AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) might counteract any of these functional deficits. Mice aged on a high-fat diet demonstrate many functional and molecular characteristics of PAD, including the sequential development of peripheral vascular insufficiency, increased muscle fatigability, and progressive exercise intolerance. These changes occur gradually and are associated with alterations in nitric oxide bioavailability. Treatment of animals with an AMPK activator, R118, increased voluntary wheel running activity, decreased muscle fatigability, and prevented the progressive decrease in treadmill exercise capacity. These functional performance benefits were accompanied by improved mitochondrial function, the normalization of perfusion in exercising muscle, increased nitric oxide bioavailability, and decreased circulating levels of the endogenous endothelial nitric oxide synthase inhibitor asymmetric dimethylarginine. These data suggest that aged, obese mice represent a novel model for studying exercise intolerance associated with peripheral vascular insufficiency, and pharmacological activation of AMPK may be a suitable treatment for intermittent claudication associated with PAD.

  9. Expression of T-cell-activating protein in peripheral lymphocyte subsets.

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, E T; Reiser, H; Benacerraf, B; Rock, K L

    1986-01-01

    T-cell-activating protein (TAP) is an allelic 12-kDa membrane protein that participates in T-cell activation. Soluble anti-TAP monoclonal antibodies can trigger antigen-specific, major histocompatibility complex-restricted T-cell hybridomas to produce interleukin 2 and are mitogenic for normal T cells and thymocytes. TAP is expressed on 10% of thymocytes, which are mainly cortisone-resistant and mature. In the periphery, TAP is expressed on 70% of resting T cells but not on resting B cells. In this report, we analyze in detail the nature of TAP expression on peripheral lymphocyte subsets by immunofluorescence techniques. We show that all inducer (L3T4+) T cells are TAP+. In contrast, only 50% of Lyt-2+ T cells express detectable TAP. Functional studies demonstrated that at least part of the heterogeneity of TAP expression is present in the Lyt-2+ cytolytic T-cell (CTL) subset. Unstimulated CTL precursors are TAP- but are induced to express TAP in the effector state. Furthermore, this reflects actual synthesis of TAP, as TAP is detectable on activated Lyt-2+ CTLs passaged in vitro under conditions where passive acquisition can be ruled out. To extend this observation, we have studied the expression of TAP on activated T and B cells. Upon activation, all T and B cells became TAP+. Furthermore, the TAP molecules on B and T cells are indistinguishable by NaDodSO4/polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. This suggests that TAP expression defines further heterogeneity of lymphocytes, with activation being one parameter influencing its expression. Images PMID:3020545

  10. The modulating effect of royal jelly consumption against radiation-induced apoptosis in human peripheral blood leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Rafat, Navid; Monfared, Ali Shabestani; Shahidi, Maryam; Pourfallah, Tayyeb Allahverdi

    2016-01-01

    The present work was designed to assess the radioprotective effect of royal jelly (RJ) against radiation-induced apoptosis in human peripheral blood leukocytes. In this study, peripheral blood samples were obtained on days 0, 4, 7, and 14 of the study from six healthy male volunteers taking a 1000 mg RJ capsule orally per day for 14 consecutive days. On each sampling day, all collected whole blood samples were divided into control and irradiated groups which were then exposed to the selected dose of 4 Gy X-ray. Percentage of apoptotic cells (Ap %) was evaluated for all samples immediately after irradiation (Ap0) and also after a 24 h postirradiation incubation at 37°C in 5% CO2 (Ap24) by the use of neutral comet assay. Concerning Ap0, collected data demonstrated that the percentage of apoptotic cells in both control and irradiated groups did not significantly change during the study period. However, with respect to Ap24, the percentage of apoptotic cells in irradiated groups gradually reduced during the experiment, according to which a significant decrease was found after 14 days RJ consumption (P = 0.002). In conclusion, the present study revealed the protective role of 14 days RJ consumption against radiation-induced apoptosis in human peripheral blood leukocytes.

  11. [Age-dependent characteristics of the skin peripheral blood flow oscillations by nonlinear dynamics methods in humans].

    PubMed

    Tankanag, A V; Tikhonova, I V; Chemeris, N K

    2008-03-01

    Study of peripheral microhaemodynamics was carried out with laser Doppler flowmetry in healthy volunteers of different age groups. The ageing changes in the state of the skin peripheral blood flow, in the functioning of separate links and regulatory systems ofmicrovascular bed have been estimated in terms of relative entropy and fractal dimension values. The revealed significant age-dependent decrease of relative entropy values in the respiratory rhythm ranges, the neurogenic and myogenic activities yielded some evidence concerning the reduction of the microcirculation system chaotic changes within these frequency ranges during the ageing. The significant increase of fractal dimension values in the ranges of cardio-rhythm and the endothelial activity in the oldest group with the mean age of 77 years indicated that the structural complexity of the oscillations in these frequency ranges increased during ageing.

  12. Influence of GSM signals on human peripheral lymphocytes: study of genotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Waldmann, Petra; Bohnenberger, Susanne; Greinert, Rüdiger; Hermann-Then, Beate; Heselich, Anja; Klug, Stefanie J; Koenig, Jochem; Kuhr, Kathrin; Kuster, Niels; Merker, Mandy; Murbach, Manuel; Pollet, Dieter; Schadenboeck, Walter; Scheidemann-Wesp, Ulrike; Schwab, Britt; Volkmer, Beate; Weyer, Veronika; Blettner, Maria

    2013-02-01

    Exposure to radiofrequency (RF) electromagnetic fields (EMF) is continuously increasing worldwide. Yet, conflicting results of a possible genotoxic effect of RF EMF continue to be discussed. In the present study, a possible genotoxic effect of RF EMF (GSM, 1,800 MHz) in human lymphocytes was investigated by a collaboration of six independent institutes (institutes a, b, c, d, e, h). Peripheral blood of 20 healthy, nonsmoking volunteers of two age groups (10 volunteers 16-20 years old and 10 volunteers 50-65 years old) was taken, stimulated and intermittently exposed to three specific absorption rates (SARs) of RF EMF (0.2 W/kg, 2 W/kg, 10 W/kg) and sham for 28 h (institute a). The exposures were performed in a setup with strictly controlled conditions of temperature and dose, and randomly and automatically determined waveguide SARs, which were designed and periodically maintained by ITIS (institute h). Four genotoxicity tests with different end points were conducted (institute a): chromosome aberration test (five types of structural aberrations), micronucleus test, sister chromatid exchange test and the alkaline comet assay (Olive tail moment and % DNA). To demonstrate the validity of the study, positive controls were implemented. The genotoxicity end points were evaluated independently by three laboratories blind to SAR information (institute c = laboratory 1; institute d = laboratory 2; institute e = laboratory 3). Statistical analysis was carried out by institute b. Methods of primary statistical analysis and rules to adjust for multiple testing were specified in a statistical analysis plan based on a data review before unblinding. A linear trend test based on a linear mixed model was used for outcomes of comet assay and exact permutation test for linear trend for all other outcomes. It was ascertained that only outcomes with a significant SAR trend found by at least two of three analyzing laboratories indicated a substantiated suspicion of an exposure effect

  13. Modeling leukocyte trafficking at the human blood-nerve barrier in vitro and in vivo geared towards targeted molecular therapies for peripheral neuroinflammation.

    PubMed

    Greathouse, Kelsey M; Palladino, Steven P; Dong, Chaoling; Helton, Eric S; Ubogu, Eroboghene E

    2016-01-06

    Peripheral neuroinflammation is characterized by hematogenous mononuclear leukocyte infiltration into peripheral nerves. Despite significant clinical knowledge, advancements in molecular biology and progress in developing specific drugs for inflammatory disorders such as rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, and multiple sclerosis, there are currently no specific therapies that modulate pathogenic peripheral nerve inflammation. Modeling leukocyte trafficking at the blood-nerve barrier using a reliable human in vitro model and potential intravital microscopy techniques in representative animal models guided by human observational data should facilitate the targeted modulation of the complex inflammatory cascade needed to develop safe and efficacious therapeutics for immune-mediated neuropathies and chronic neuropathic pain.

  14. Neuroprotective activity of thioctic acid in central nervous system lesions consequent to peripheral nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Tomassoni, Daniele; Amenta, Francesco; Di Cesare Mannelli, Lorenzo; Ghelardini, Carla; Nwankwo, Innocent E; Pacini, Alessandra; Tayebati, Seyed Khosrow

    2013-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathies are heterogeneous disorders presenting often with hyperalgesia and allodynia. This study has assessed if chronic constriction injury (CCI) of sciatic nerve is accompanied by increased oxidative stress and central nervous system (CNS) changes and if these changes are sensitive to treatment with thioctic acid. Thioctic acid is a naturally occurring antioxidant existing in two optical isomers (+)- and (-)-thioctic acid and in the racemic form. It has been proposed for treating disorders associated with increased oxidative stress. Sciatic nerve CCI was made in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs) and in normotensive reference cohorts. Rats were untreated or treated intraperitoneally for 14 days with (+/-)-, (+)-, or (-)-thioctic acid. Oxidative stress, astrogliosis, myelin sheets status, and neuronal injury in motor and sensory cerebrocortical areas were assessed. Increase of oxidative stress markers, astrogliosis, and neuronal damage accompanied by a decreased expression of neurofilament were observed in SHR. This phenomenon was more pronounced after CCI. Thioctic acid countered astrogliosis and neuronal damage, (+)-thioctic acid being more active than (+/-)- or (-)-enantiomers. These findings suggest a neuroprotective activity of thioctic acid on CNS lesions consequent to CCI and that the compound may represent a therapeutic option for entrapment neuropathies.

  15. Are the changes in the peripheral brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels due to platelet activation?

    PubMed Central

    Serra-Millàs, Montserrat

    2016-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) plays an important role in central nervous system development, neurogenesis and neuronal plasticity. BDNF is also expressed in several non-neuronal tissues, and it could play an important role in other processes, such as cancer, angiogenesis, etc. Platelets are the major source of peripheral BDNF. However, platelets also contain high amounts of serotonin; they express specific surface receptors during activation, and a multitude of pro-inflammatory and immunomodulatory bioactive compounds are secreted from the granules. Until recently, there was insufficient knowledge regarding the relationship between BDNF and platelets. Recent studies showed that BDNF is present in two distinct pools in platelets, in α-granules and in the cytoplasm, and only the BDNF in the granules is secreted following stimulation, representing 30% of the total BDNF in platelets. BDNF has an important role in the pathophysiology of depression. Low levels of serum BDNF have been described in patients with major depressive disorder, and BDNF levels increased with chronic antidepressant treatment. Interestingly, there is an association between depression and platelet function. This review analyzed studies that evaluated the relationship between BDNF and platelet activation and the effect of treatments on both parameters. Only a few studies consider this possible confounding factor, and it could be very important in diseases such as depression, which show changes in both parameters. PMID:27014600

  16. Neuroprotective Activity of Thioctic Acid in Central Nervous System Lesions Consequent to Peripheral Nerve Injury

    PubMed Central

    Ghelardini, Carla; Nwankwo, Innocent E.; Pacini, Alessandra

    2013-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathies are heterogeneous disorders presenting often with hyperalgesia and allodynia. This study has assessed if chronic constriction injury (CCI) of sciatic nerve is accompanied by increased oxidative stress and central nervous system (CNS) changes and if these changes are sensitive to treatment with thioctic acid. Thioctic acid is a naturally occurring antioxidant existing in two optical isomers (+)- and (−)-thioctic acid and in the racemic form. It has been proposed for treating disorders associated with increased oxidative stress. Sciatic nerve CCI was made in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs) and in normotensive reference cohorts. Rats were untreated or treated intraperitoneally for 14 days with (+/−)-, (+)-, or (−)-thioctic acid. Oxidative stress, astrogliosis, myelin sheets status, and neuronal injury in motor and sensory cerebrocortical areas were assessed. Increase of oxidative stress markers, astrogliosis, and neuronal damage accompanied by a decreased expression of neurofilament were observed in SHR. This phenomenon was more pronounced after CCI. Thioctic acid countered astrogliosis and neuronal damage, (+)-thioctic acid being more active than (+/−)- or (−)-enantiomers. These findings suggest a neuroprotective activity of thioctic acid on CNS lesions consequent to CCI and that the compound may represent a therapeutic option for entrapment neuropathies. PMID:24527432

  17. Effects of oral eicosapentaenoic acid versus docosahexaenoic acid on human peripheral blood mononuclear cell gene expression

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objective: Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) have beneficial effects on inflammation and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Our aim was to assess the effect of a six-week supplementation with either olive oil, EPA, or DHA on gene expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (...

  18. Induction of chromosome aberrations by Fusarium T-2 toxin in cultured human peripheral blood lymphocytes and Chinese hamster fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Hsia, C.C.; Gao, Y.; Wu, J.L.; Tzian, B.

    1986-01-01

    T-2 toxin is an important representative of trichothecenes produced by various species of imperfect fungi, mainly Fusarium genus. No definite data demonstrating the carcinogenic potential of T-2 toxin had been reported up to now. The authors demonstrated that T-2 toxin reproducibly induced chromosomal structural aberrations both in cultured human peripheral blood lymphocytes as well as in V/sub 79/ Chinese hamster fibroblasts. The mean percentage of cells with aberration of human lymphocytes from normal individuals induced by T-2 toxin is 49-fold (9.8%) of the mean percentage of corresponding control cultures without T-2 toxin (0.2%). T-2 toxin induced chromosome type (76%) as well as chromatid type (24%) of aberrations; among them, acentric fragment (46%) was the most common type, and chromatid gap, deletion, and chromosome gap were the next most common. T-2 toxin can induce aberrations in cells at different phases of the cell cycle. There are definite dose-effect relationships within a certain range of dosage of T-2 toxin in experiments with both human peripheral blood lymphocytes and V/sub 79/ cells. T-2 toxin exhibited three types of effects on cells, namely, mitogenic at lowest concentration, clastogenic (chromosome aberration) at median concentration, and cytotoxic at higher concentration. The dose-effect curves of these three effects are partly overlapping. Sex or age effect was not observed. The results suggest that T-2 toxin has carcinogenic potentials. The dosage of aflatoxin that can induce chromosomal aberration of human peripheral blood lymphocytes is thousands-fold of the dosage of T-2 toxin as shown in this report.

  19. Peripheral CD4+ T cell cytokine responses following human challenge and re-challenge with Campylobacter jejuni.

    PubMed

    Fimlaid, Kelly A; Lindow, Janet C; Tribble, David R; Bunn, Janice Y; Maue, Alexander C; Kirkpatrick, Beth D

    2014-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is a leading cause of human gastroenteritis worldwide; however, our understanding of the human immune response to C. jejuni infection is limited. A previous human challenge model has shown that C. jejuni elicits IFNγ production by peripheral blood mononuclear cells, a response associated with protection from clinical disease following re-infection. In this study, we investigate T lymphocyte profiles associated with campylobacteriosis using specimens from a new human challenge model in which C. jejuni-naïve subjects were challenged and re-challenged with C. jejuni CG8421. Multiparameter flow cytometry was used to investigate T lymphocytes as a source of cytokines, including IFNγ, and to identify cytokine patterns associated with either campylobacteriosis or protection from disease. Unexpectedly, all but one subject evaluated re-experienced campylobacteriosis after re-challenge. We show that CD4+ T cells make IFNγ and other pro-inflammatory cytokines in response to infection; however, multifunctional cytokine response patterns were not found. Cytokine production from peripheral CD4+ T cells was not enhanced following re-challenge, which may suggest deletion or tolerance. Evaluation of alternative paradigms or models is needed to better understand the immune components of protection from campylobacteriosis.

  20. Fuel feeds function: Energy balance and bovine peripheral blood mononuclear cell activation.

    PubMed

    Schwarm, A; Viergutz, T; Kuhla, B; Hammon, H M; Schweigel-Röntgen, M

    2013-01-01

    A general phenomenon in peripartum mammals is the breakdown of (acquired) immunity. The incidence of parasite load, disease and inflammation often rise during the specific energetically demanding time of pregnancy and lactation. In this period, blood leukocytes display decreased DNA synthesis in response to mitogens in vitro. Leukocyte activation, the phase of the cell cycle preceding the DNA synthetic phase has hardly been investigated, but the few studies suggest that leukocyte activation may also be impaired by the limited energy/nutrient availability. Leukocyte activation is characterized by manifold processes, thus, we used the cellular oxygen consumption rate (OCR) as a measure of ATP turnover to support all these processes. We hypothesized that the activation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) - in terms of oxygen consumed over basal levels after in vitro stimulation - is altered by energy balance around parturition. We studied peripartum high-yielding dairy cows because they undergo substantial fluctuations in energy intake, energy output and body fat mass. We established a fluorescence-based test strategy allowing for long-term (≥24h) quantification of O(2)-consumption and studied the peripartum period from 5 weeks ante partum to 5 weeks postpartum. In addition, we determined cellular lactate production, DNA/RNA synthesis and cell size and zoo-technical parameters such as animal energy intake and milk yield were assessed, as well as selected plasma parameters, e.g. glucose concentration. The basal OCR of PBMC from pregnant, non-lactating cows (n=6, -5 weeks ante partum) was 1.19±0.15 nmol min(-1) (10(7)cells)(-1) and increased to maximum levels of 2.54±0.49 nmol min(-1) (10(7)cells)(-1) in phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-stimulated PBMC. The basal OCR did not change over the peripartum period. Whereas the activation indices, herein defined as the PHA-induced 24h-increase of OCR above baseline, amounted to 1.1±0.3, 4.2±0.3, 4.1±1.1, 2.1±0.3, and

  1. Peripherally injected CCK-8S activates CART positive neurons of the paraventricular nucleus in rats

    PubMed Central

    Noetzel, Steffen; Inhoff, Tobias; Goebel, Miriam; Taché, Yvette; Veh, Rüdiger W.; Bannert, Norbert; Grötzinger, Carsten; Wiedenmann, Bertram; Klapp, Burghard F.; Mönnikes, Hubert; Kobelt, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Cholecystokinin (CCK) plays a role in the short-term inhibition of food intake. Cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) peptide has been observed in neurons of the paraventricular nucleus (PVN). It has been reported that intracerebroventricular injection of CART peptide inhibits food intake in rodents. The aim of the study was to determine whether intraperitoneally (ip) injected CCK-8S affects neuronal activity of PVN-CART neurons. Ad libitum fed male Sprague-Dawley rats received 6 or 10 μg/kg CCK-8S or 0.15 M NaCl ip (n = 4/group). The number of c-Fos-immunoreactive neurons was determined in the PVN, arcuate nucleus (ARC), and the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS). CCK-8S dose-dependently increased the number of c-Fos-immunoreactive neurons in the PVN (mean ± SEM: 102 ± 6 vs. 150 ± 5 neurons/section, p < 0.05) and compared to vehicle treated rats (18 ± 7, p < 0.05 vs. 6 and 10 μg/kg CCK-8S). CCK-8S at both doses induced an increase in the number of c-Fos-immunoreactive neurons in the NTS (65 ± 13, p < 0.05, and 182 ± 16, p < 0.05). No effect on the number of c-Fos neurons was observed in the ARC. Immunostaining for CART and c-Fos revealed a dose-dependent increase of activated CART neurons (19 ± 3 vs. 29 ± 7; p < 0.05), only few activated CART neuron were observed in the vehicle group (1 ± 0). The present observation shows that CCK-8S injected ip induces an increase in neuronal activity in PVN-CART neurons and suggests that CART neurons in the PVN may play a role in the mediation of peripheral CCK-8S's anorexigenic effects. PMID:20307613

  2. Angiogenic response to passive movement and active exercise in individuals with peripheral arterial disease.

    PubMed

    Hoier, B; Walker, M; Passos, M; Walker, P J; Green, A; Bangsbo, J; Askew, C D; Hellsten, Y

    2013-12-01

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is caused by atherosclerosis and is associated with microcirculatory impairments in skeletal muscle. The present study evaluated the angiogenic response to exercise and passive movement in skeletal muscle of PAD patients compared with healthy control subjects. Twenty-one PAD patients and 17 aged control subjects were randomly assigned to either a passive movement or an active exercise study. Interstitial fluid microdialysate and tissue samples were obtained from the thigh skeletal muscle. Muscle dialysate vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) levels were modestly increased in response to either passive movement or active exercise in both subject groups. The basal muscle dialysate level of the angiostatic factor thrombospondin-1 protein was markedly higher (P < 0.05) in PAD patients compared with the control subjects, whereas soluble VEGF receptor-1 dialysate levels were similar in the two groups. The basal VEGF protein content in the muscle tissue samples was ∼27% lower (P < 0.05) in the PAD patients compared with the control subjects. Analysis of mRNA expression for a range of angiogenic and angiostatic factors revealed a modest change with active exercise and passive movement in both groups, except for an increase (P < 0.05) in the ratio of angiopoietin-2 to angiopoietin-1 mRNA in the PAD group with both interventions. PAD patients and aged individuals showed a similar limited angiogenic response to active exercise and passive movement. The limited increase in muscle extracellular VEGF combined with an elevated basal level of thrombospondin-1 in muscle extracellular fluid of PAD patients may restrict capillary growth in these patients.

  3. Angiogenic response to passive movement and active exercise in individuals with peripheral arterial disease

    PubMed Central

    Hoier, B.; Walker, M.; Passos, M.; Walker, P. J.; Green, A.; Bangsbo, J.; Askew, C. D.

    2013-01-01

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is caused by atherosclerosis and is associated with microcirculatory impairments in skeletal muscle. The present study evaluated the angiogenic response to exercise and passive movement in skeletal muscle of PAD patients compared with healthy control subjects. Twenty-one PAD patients and 17 aged control subjects were randomly assigned to either a passive movement or an active exercise study. Interstitial fluid microdialysate and tissue samples were obtained from the thigh skeletal muscle. Muscle dialysate vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) levels were modestly increased in response to either passive movement or active exercise in both subject groups. The basal muscle dialysate level of the angiostatic factor thrombospondin-1 protein was markedly higher (P < 0.05) in PAD patients compared with the control subjects, whereas soluble VEGF receptor-1 dialysate levels were similar in the two groups. The basal VEGF protein content in the muscle tissue samples was ∼27% lower (P < 0.05) in the PAD patients compared with the control subjects. Analysis of mRNA expression for a range of angiogenic and angiostatic factors revealed a modest change with active exercise and passive movement in both groups, except for an increase (P < 0.05) in the ratio of angiopoietin-2 to angiopoietin-1 mRNA in the PAD group with both interventions. PAD patients and aged individuals showed a similar limited angiogenic response to active exercise and passive movement. The limited increase in muscle extracellular VEGF combined with an elevated basal level of thrombospondin-1 in muscle extracellular fluid of PAD patients may restrict capillary growth in these patients. PMID:24157526

  4. Levoprotiline ((-)-oxaprotiline) effects on inositol phosphate generation in human peripheral lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Schubert, T; Müller, W E

    1991-01-01

    The effects of the atypical antidepressant levoprotiline (LPT) on inositol phosphate metabolism were investigated in N-formyl-methionyl-leucylphenylalanine (fMLP) activated human lymphocytes. In the presence of LPT, stimulation of phosphoinositide hydrolysis by fMLP lead to an increased accumulation of inositol bisphosphates, an effect which could be detected within the range of therapuetic plasma concentrations and which is exerted by lithium in a similar way. Furthermore, incubation of lymphocytes with LPT and subsequent stimulation with fMLP lead to a pronounced decrease in the level of free intracellular [3H]inositol. Both LPT effects, the increased accumulation of inositol bisphosphates and the reduction of free intracellular [3H]inositol, were found to be more pronounced for LPT than for its enantiomer (+)-oxaprotiline. The results are discussed in view of a possible biochemical mechanism which may contribute to the antidepressive activity of LPT.

  5. Peripheral Neuropathy

    MedlinePlus

    Peripheral neuropathy Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Peripheral neuropathy, a result of damage to your peripheral nerves, often causes weakness, numbness and pain, usually in your hands and feet. It can also ...

  6. Extracellular matrix from human umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells as a scaffold for peripheral nerve regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Bo; Rao, Feng; Guo, Zhi-yuan; Sun, Xun; Wang, Yi-guo; Liu, Shu-yun; Wang, Ai-yuan; Guo, Quan-yi; Meng, Hao-ye; Zhao, Qing; Peng, Jiang; Wang, Yu; Lu, Shi-bi

    2016-01-01

    The extracellular matrix, which includes collagens, laminin, or fibronectin, plays an important role in peripheral nerve regeneration. Recently, a Schwann cell-derived extracellular matrix with classical biomaterial was used to mimic the neural niche. However, extensive clinical use of Schwann cells remains limited because of the limited origin, loss of an autologous nerve, and extended in vitro culture times. In the present study, human umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hUCMSCs), which are easily accessible and more proliferative than Schwann cells, were used to prepare an extracellular matrix. We identified the morphology and function of hUCMSCs and investigated their effect on peripheral nerve regeneration. Compared with a non-coated dish tissue culture, the hUCMSC-derived extracellular matrix enhanced Schwann cell proliferation, upregulated gene and protein expression levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor, glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor, and vascular endothelial growth factor in Schwann cells, and enhanced neurite outgrowth from dorsal root ganglion neurons. These findings suggest that the hUCMSC-derived extracellular matrix promotes peripheral nerve repair and can be used as a basis for the rational design of engineered neural niches. PMID:27630705

  7. Homeostatic 'bystander' proliferation of human peripheral blood B cells in response to polyclonal T-cell stimulation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Jasiulewicz, Aleksandra; Lisowska, Katarzyna A; Pietruczuk, Krzysztof; Frąckowiak, Joanna; Fulop, Tamas; Witkowski, Jacek M

    2015-11-01

    The mechanisms of maintenance of adequate numbers of B lymphocytes and of protective levels of immunoglobulins in the absence of antigenic (re)stimulation remain not fully understood. Meanwhile, our results presented here show that both peripheral blood naive and memory B cells can be activated strongly and non-specifically (in a mitogen-like fashion) in 5-day in vitro cultures of anti-CD3- or concanavalin A (Con A)-stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells of healthy people. This polyclonal, bystander activation of the B cells includes multiple divisions of most of them (assessed here by the flow cytometric technique of dividing cell tracking) and significant antibody [immunoglobulin M (IgM) and IgG] secretion. Observed proliferation of the CD19(+) B cells depends on contact with stimulated T helper (Th) cells (via CD40-CD40L interaction) and on the response of B cells to secreted interleukins IL-5, IL-10 and IL-4, and is correlated with the levels of these Th-derived molecules, while it does not involve the ligation of the BCR/CD19 complex. We suggest that the effect might reflect the situation occurring in vivo as the homeostatic proliferation of otherwise non-stimulated, peripheral B lymphocytes, providing an always ready pool for efficient antibody production to any new (or cognate) antigen challenge.

  8. Effects of Dietary n-3 Fatty Acids on Hepatic and Peripheral Insulin Sensitivity in Insulin-Resistant Humans

    PubMed Central

    Lalia, Antigoni Z.; Johnson, Matthew L.; Jensen, Michael D.; Hames, Kazanna C.; Port, John D.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Dietary n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, including eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), prevent insulin resistance and stimulate mitochondrial biogenesis in rodents, but the findings of translational studies in humans are thus far ambiguous. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of EPA and DHA on insulin sensitivity, insulin secretion, and muscle mitochondrial function in insulin-resistant, nondiabetic humans using a robust study design and gold-standard measurements. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Thirty-one insulin-resistant adults received 3.9 g/day EPA+DHA or placebo for 6 months in a randomized double-blind study. Hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp with somatostatin was used to assess hepatic and peripheral insulin sensitivity. Postprandial glucose disposal and insulin secretion were measured after a meal. Measurements were performed at baseline and after 6 months of treatment. Abdominal fat distribution was evaluated by MRI. Muscle oxidative capacity was measured in isolated mitochondria using high-resolution respirometry and noninvasively by magnetic resonance spectroscopy. RESULTS Compared with placebo, EPA+DHA did not alter peripheral insulin sensitivity, postprandial glucose disposal, or insulin secretion. Hepatic insulin sensitivity, determined from the suppression of endogenous glucose production by insulin, exhibited a small but significant improvement with EPA+DHA compared with placebo. Muscle mitochondrial function was unchanged by EPA+DHA or placebo. CONCLUSIONS This study demonstrates that dietary EPA+DHA does not improve peripheral glucose disposal, insulin secretion, or skeletal muscle mitochondrial function in insulin-resistant nondiabetic humans. There was a modest improvement in hepatic insulin sensitivity with EPA+DHA, but this was not associated with any improvements in clinically meaningful outcomes. PMID:25852206

  9. Central and peripheral antinociceptive activity of 3-(2-oxopropyl)-3-hydroxy-2-oxindoles.

    PubMed

    Giorno, Thais Biondino Sardella; Ballard, Yáskara L L; Cordeiro, Millena Santos; Silva, Bárbara V; Pinto, Angelo C; Fernandes, Patricia Dias

    2015-08-01

    Convolutamydine A has been shown to develop a significant antinociceptive effect. Here we demonstrated that new analogues (5-iodo-3-(2-oxopropyl)-3-hydroxy-2-oxindole (5-Iisa), 5-fluoro-3-(2-oxopropyl)-3-hydroxy-2-oxindole (5-Fisa), 5-chloro-3-(2-oxopropyl)-3-hydroxy-2-oxindole (5-Clisa) and 5-methyl-3-(2-oxopropyl)-3-hydroxy-2-oxindole (5-Meisa)), at 0.1-10mg/kg doses, have significant peripheral and central antinociceptive effects in thermal and chemical models of nociception. Oral administered analogues demonstrated more pronounced antinociceptive effects than that obtained with the classical opioid drug morphine (5mg/kg) in the first and second phases of formalin-induced licking. In the tail flick model, 5-Clisa and 5-Meisa antinociceptive effect was almost twice as that observed with the same dose of morphine. The concomitant administration of diverse antagonists and the analogues indicates that 5-Iisa effects involve the activation of opioid pathway. On the other hand, 5-Fisa and 5-Clisa have the participation of opioid, nitrergic, cholinergic adrenergic and serotoninergic pathways and 5-Meisa has the involvement of opioid, serotoninergic and cholinergic pathways. In conclusion, our results suggest that the new four analogues from Convolutamydine A have significant antinociceptive effects in thermal and chemical induced nociception and could be used in development of new drugs to be used in pain treatment with reduced side effects.

  10. Hyaluronan modulates TRPV1 channel opening, reducing peripheral nociceptor activity and pain

    PubMed Central

    Caires, Rebeca; Luis, Enoch; Taberner, Francisco J.; Fernandez-Ballester, Gregorio; Ferrer-Montiel, Antonio; Balazs, Endre A.; Gomis, Ana; Belmonte, Carlos; de la Peña, Elvira

    2015-01-01

    Hyaluronan (HA) is present in the extracellular matrix of all body tissues, including synovial fluid in joints, in which it behaves as a filter that buffers transmission of mechanical forces to nociceptor nerve endings thereby reducing pain. Using recombinant systems, mouse-cultured dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons and in vivo experiments, we found that HA also modulates polymodal transient receptor potential vanilloid subtype 1 (TRPV1) channels. HA diminishes heat, pH and capsaicin (CAP) responses, thus reducing the opening probability of the channel by stabilizing its closed state. Accordingly, in DRG neurons, HA decreases TRPV1-mediated impulse firing and channel sensitization by bradykinin. Moreover, subcutaneous HA injection in mice reduces heat and capsaicin nocifensive responses, whereas the intra-articular injection of HA in rats decreases capsaicin joint nociceptor fibres discharge. Collectively, these results indicate that extracellular HA reduces the excitability of the ubiquitous TRPV1 channel, thereby lowering impulse activity in the peripheral nociceptor endings underlying pain. PMID:26311398

  11. Plastic Changes in Human Motor Cortical Output Induced by Random but not Closed-Loop Peripheral Stimulation: the Curse of Causality

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Kenneth I.; Williams, Elizabeth R.; de Carvalho, Felipe; Baker, Stuart N.

    2016-01-01

    Previous work showed that repetitive peripheral nerve stimulation can induce plastic changes in motor cortical output. Triggering electrical stimulation of central structures from natural activity can also generate plasticity. In this study, we tested whether triggering peripheral nerve stimulation from muscle activity would likewise induce changes in motor output. We developed a wearable electronic device capable of recording electromyogram (EMG) and delivering electrical stimulation under closed-loop control. This allowed paired stimuli to be delivered over longer periods than standard laboratory-based protocols. We tested this device in healthy human volunteers. Motor cortical output in relaxed thenar muscles was first assessed via the recruitment curve of responses to contralateral transcranial magnetic stimulation. The wearable device was then configured to record thenar EMG and stimulate the median nerve at the wrist (intensity around motor threshold, rate ~0.66 Hz). Subjects carried out normal daily activities for 4–7 h, before returning to the laboratory for repeated recruitment curve assessment. Four stimulation protocols were tested (9–14 subjects each): No Stim, no stimuli delivered; Activity, stimuli triggered by EMG activity above threshold; Saved, stimuli timed according to a previous Activity session in the same subject; Rest, stimuli given when EMG was silent. As expected, No Stim did not modify the recruitment curve. Activity and Rest conditions produced no significant effects across subjects, although there were changes in some individuals. Saved produced a significant and substantial increase, with average responses 2.14 times larger at 30% stimulator intensity above threshold. We argue that unavoidable delays in the closed loop feedback, due mainly to central and peripheral conduction times, mean that stimuli in the Activity paradigm arrived too late after cortical activation to generate consistent plastic changes. By contrast, stimuli

  12. Plastic Changes in Human Motor Cortical Output Induced by Random but not Closed-Loop Peripheral Stimulation: the Curse of Causality.

    PubMed

    Brown, Kenneth I; Williams, Elizabeth R; de Carvalho, Felipe; Baker, Stuart N

    2016-01-01

    Previous work showed that repetitive peripheral nerve stimulation can induce plastic changes in motor cortical output. Triggering electrical stimulation of central structures from natural activity can also generate plasticity. In this study, we tested whether triggering peripheral nerve stimulation from muscle activity would likewise induce changes in motor output. We developed a wearable electronic device capable of recording electromyogram (EMG) and delivering electrical stimulation under closed-loop control. This allowed paired stimuli to be delivered over longer periods than standard laboratory-based protocols. We tested this device in healthy human volunteers. Motor cortical output in relaxed thenar muscles was first assessed via the recruitment curve of responses to contralateral transcranial magnetic stimulation. The wearable device was then configured to record thenar EMG and stimulate the median nerve at the wrist (intensity around motor threshold, rate ~0.66 Hz). Subjects carried out normal daily activities for 4-7 h, before returning to the laboratory for repeated recruitment curve assessment. Four stimulation protocols were tested (9-14 subjects each): No Stim, no stimuli delivered; Activity, stimuli triggered by EMG activity above threshold; Saved, stimuli timed according to a previous Activity session in the same subject; Rest, stimuli given when EMG was silent. As expected, No Stim did not modify the recruitment curve. Activity and Rest conditions produced no significant effects across subjects, although there were changes in some individuals. Saved produced a significant and substantial increase, with average responses 2.14 times larger at 30% stimulator intensity above threshold. We argue that unavoidable delays in the closed loop feedback, due mainly to central and peripheral conduction times, mean that stimuli in the Activity paradigm arrived too late after cortical activation to generate consistent plastic changes. By contrast, stimuli delivered

  13. Antigen exposure shapes the ratio between antigen-specific Tregs and conventional T cells in human peripheral blood

    PubMed Central

    Su, Laura F.; del Alcazar, Daniel; Stelekati, Erietta; Wherry, E. John; Davis, Mark M.

    2016-01-01

    The T-cell receptor (TCR) is required for maturation and function of regulatory T cells (Tregs), but the ligand specificities of Tregs outside the context of transgenic TCRs are largely unknown. Using peptide–MHC tetramers, we isolated rare specific Foxp3+ cells directly ex vivo from adult peripheral blood and defined their frequency and phenotype. We find that a proportion of circulating Tregs recognize foreign antigens and the frequency of these cells are similar to that of self-reactive Tregs in the absence of cognate infection. In contrast, the frequencies of Tregs that recognize some common microbial antigens are significantly reduced in the blood of most adults. Exposure to peripheral antigens likely has a major influence on the balance between Tregs and conventional T-cell subsets because a larger proportion of flu-specific T cells has a regulatory cell phenotype in the cord blood. Consistent with this finding, we show that lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus infection can directly modulate the ratio of virus-specific effectors and Tregs in mice. The resulting change in the balance within an antigen-specific T-cell population further correlates with the magnitude of effector response and the chronicity of infection. Taken together, our data highlight the importance of antigen specificity in the functional dynamics of the T-cell repertoire. Each specific population of CD4+ T cells in human peripheral blood contains a subset of Tregs at birth, but the balance between regulatory and effector subsets changes in response to peripheral antigen exposure and this could impact the robustness of antipathogen immunity. PMID:27681619

  14. Frequency and genetic characterization of V(DD)J recombinants in the human peripheral blood antibody repertoire.

    PubMed

    Briney, Bryan S; Willis, Jordan R; Hicar, Mark D; Thomas, James W; Crowe, James E

    2012-09-01

    Antibody heavy-chain recombination that results in the incorporation of multiple diversity (D) genes, although uncommon, contributes substantially to the diversity of the human antibody repertoire. Such recombination allows the generation of heavy chain complementarity determining region 3 (HCDR3) regions of extreme length and enables junctional regions that, because of the nucleotide bias of N-addition regions, are difficult to produce through normal V(D)J recombination. Although this non-classical recombination process has been observed infrequently, comprehensive analysis of the frequency and genetic characteristics of such events in the human peripheral blood antibody repertoire has not been possible because of the rarity of such recombinants and the limitations of traditional sequencing technologies. Here, through the use of high-throughput sequencing of the normal human peripheral blood antibody repertoire, we analysed the frequency and genetic characteristics of V(DD)J recombinants. We found that these recombinations were present in approximately 1 in 800 circulating B cells, and that the frequency was severely reduced in memory cell subsets. We also found that V(DD)J recombination can occur across the spectrum of diversity genes, indicating that virtually all recombination signal sequences that flank diversity genes are amenable to V(DD)J recombination. Finally, we observed a repertoire bias in the diversity gene repertoire at the upstream (5') position, and discovered that this bias was primarily attributable to the order of diversity genes in the genomic locus.

  15. Magnetic stimulation of the human brain and peripheral nervous system: an introduction and the results of an initial clinical evaluation.

    PubMed

    Barker, A T; Freeston, I L; Jalinous, R; Jarratt, J A

    1987-01-01

    This report describes a novel method of stimulating the motor cortex and deep peripheral nerves in humans. The technique, developed in the Department of Medical Physics of Sheffield University, uses a large pulse of magnetic field to induce currents within the body and is painless. The basic principles of magnetic stimulation are described, and the technique is compared with conventional electrical stimulation. Safety aspects are discussed with reference to established clinical electrical and magnetic procedures. The results of the first clinical study using magnetic stimulation are described and show clear central motor pathway slowing in multiple sclerosis patients.

  16. Infliximab reduces CD147, MMP-3, and MMP-9 expression in peripheral blood monocytes in patients with active rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jianlin; Xie, Baozhao; Li, Qiuxia; Xie, Xujing; Zhu, Shangling; Wang, Mingxia; Peng, Weixiang; Gu, Jieruo

    2013-01-05

    Recent studies have reported elevated expression levels in active rheumatoid arthritis patients of the cluster of differentiation (CD) 147 on CD14(+) peripheral blood monocytes and as a result, CD147 may be a target for the development of a novel rheumatoid arthritis therapy. This report describes the inhibitory effects of infliximab on CD147 and metalloproteinases (MMP)-3 and MMP-9 overexpression in peripheral blood monocytes obtained from patients with active rheumatoid arthritis. Thirty patients with active rheumatoid arthritis that were refractory to methotrexate therapy were randomized at a 4:1 ratio into groups A and B, respectively. Group A received three to four infusions of infliximab (3mg/kg) and group B participants received four infusions of placebo. Both groups were also treated with a stable background dose of methotrexate. The CD147 expression levels on CD14(+) peripheral blood monocytes of rheumatoid arthritis patients was detected by flow cytometry. The expression of CD147, MMP-3, and, MMP-9 mRNA in peripheral blood mononuclear cells was assayed by real-time quantitative PCR, and the expression of MMP-3 and MMP-9 in serum was measured by a multiplexed microsphere-based flow assay. Results showed that the expression of CD147 and MMP-9 mRNA in group A decreased compared to group B. Expression of CD147 on CD14(+) monocytes was reduced (P<0.05), and serum MMP-3 and -9 levels in group A were decreased by week 18. These data suggested that infliximab could inhibit CD147 expression on CD14(+) monocytes as well as reduce the levels of MMP-3 and MMP-9 in peripheral blood monocytes.

  17. Effect of oxidatively modified and non-modified human serum albumin on luminol-dependent chemiluminescence of human peripheral blood leukocytes stimulated with opsonized zymosan.

    PubMed

    Piryazev, A P; Azizova, A P; Aseichev, A V; Sergienko, V I

    2014-07-01

    We studied the effects of native and oxidized human serum albumin on luminol-dependent chemiluminescence of human peripheral blood leukocytes stimulated with opsonized zymosan. Human serum albumin was added simultaneously with opsonized zymosan at the beginning of the chemiluminescent reaction. Otherwise, leukocytes were incubated with human serum albumin at 37°C for various periods before addition of opsonized zymosan. Oxidized human serum albumin was obtained by the method of metal-catalyzed oxidation. In control to non-modified albumin, oxidized albumin produced an inhibitory effect on luminol-dependent chemiluminescence of leukocytes. These changes were observed in experiments with addition of oxidized albumin at the beginning of a chemiluminescent reaction and after incubation of study agent with cells.

  18. Changes of human plasma dopamine-beta-hydroxylase activity after intravenous administration of theophylline.

    PubMed Central

    Aunis, D; Mandel, P; Miras-Portugal, M T; Coquillat, G; Rohmer, F; Warter, J M

    1975-01-01

    The intravenous administration of theophylline to ten healthy human subjects produced either an increase of circulating plasma dopamine-beta-hydroxylase or no change. The rise of plasma enzyme activity may reflect the increased peripheral catecholamine release induced by theophylline. PMID:1137731

  19. The role of active muscle mass in determining the magnitude of peripheral fatigue during dynamic exercise.

    PubMed

    Rossman, Matthew J; Garten, Ryan S; Venturelli, Massimo; Amann, Markus; Richardson, Russell S

    2014-06-15

    Greater peripheral quadriceps fatigue at the voluntary termination of single-leg knee-extensor exercise (KE), compared with whole-body cycling, has been attributed to confining group III and IV skeletal muscle afferent feedback to a small muscle mass, enabling the central nervous system (CNS) to tolerate greater peripheral fatigue. However, as task specificity and vastly differing systemic challenges may have complicated this interpretation, eight males were studied during constant workload trials to exhaustion at 85% of peak workload during single-leg and double-leg KE. It was hypothesized that because of the smaller muscle mass engaged during single-leg KE, a greater magnitude of peripheral quadriceps fatigue would be present at exhaustion. Vastus lateralis integrated electromyogram (iEMG) signal relative to the first minute of exercise, preexercise to postexercise maximal voluntary contractions (MVCs) of the quadriceps, and twitch-force evoked by supramaximal magnetic femoral nerve stimulation (Qtw,pot) quantified peripheral quadriceps fatigue. Trials performed with single-leg KE (8.1 ± 1.2 min; 45 ± 4 W) resulted in significantly greater peripheral quadriceps fatigue than double-leg KE (10 ± 1.3 min; 83 ± 7 W), as documented by changes in the iEMG signal (147 ± 24 vs. 85 ± 13%), MVC (-25 ± 3 vs. -12 ± 3%), and Qtw,pot (-44 ± 6 vs. -33 ± 7%), for single-leg and double-leg KE, respectively. Therefore, avoiding concerns over task specificity and cardiorespiratory limitations, this study reveals that a reduction in muscle mass permits the development of greater peripheral muscle fatigue and supports the concept that the CNS tolerates a greater magnitude of peripheral fatigue when the source of group III/IV afferent feedback is limited to a small muscle mass.

  20. [Effect of adrenaline on the succinate dehydrogenase activity of peripheral blood lymphocytes of rats following exposure to ionizing radiation].

    PubMed

    Koroleva, L V; Vasin, M V

    1988-01-01

    In experiments with albino mongrel female rats, the influence of adrenaline on succinate dehydrogenase (SDG) activity in the peripheral blood lymphocytes of irradiated and intact animals has been investigated. Two minutes after the intraperitoneal administration of adrenaline (1 mg/kg) to intact rats SDG activity sharply rises and 3-4 min it drastically falls. In 6 to 8 min the second peak in the enzyme activity is registered. Twenty minutes after irradiation of rats in the cranio-caudal direction with a dose of 75 Gy delivered to head, the reaction to adrenaline, manifested by the rise in SDG activity, is absent.

  1. Baclofen, an agonist at peripheral GABAB receptors, induces antinociception via activation of TEA-sensitive potassium channels

    PubMed Central

    Reis, G M L; Duarte, I D G

    2006-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Central anti-nociceptive actions of baclofen involve activation of K+ channels. Here we assessed what types of K+ channel might participate in the peripheral anti-nociception induced by baclofen. Experimental approach: Nociceptive thresholds to mechanical stimulation in rat paws treated with intraplantar prostaglandin E2.(PGE2) to induce hyperalgesia were measured 3h after PGE2 injection. Other agents were also given by intraplantar injection Key results: Baclofen elicited a dose-dependent (15 - 240 μg per paw) anti-nociceptive effect. An intermediate dose of baclofen (60 μg) did not produce antinociception in the contralateral paw, showing its peripheral site of action. The GABAB receptor antagonist saclofen (12.5 - 100 μg per paw) antagonized, in a dose-dependent manner, peripheral antinociception induced by baclofen (60 μg), suggesting a specific effect. This antinociceptive action of baclofen was unaffected by bicuculline, GABAA receptor antagonist (80 μg per paw), or by (1,2,5,6 tetrahydropyridin-4-yl) methylphosphinic acid, GABAC receptor antagonist (20 μg per paw). The peripheral antinociception induced by baclofen (60 μg) was reversed, in a dose-dependent manner, by the voltage-dependent K+ channel blockers tetraethylammonium (7.5 - 30 μg per paw) and 4-aminopyridine (2.5 - 10 μg per paw). The blockers of other K+ channels, glibenclamide (160 μg), tolbutamide (320 μg), charybdotoxin (2 μg), dequalinium (50 μg) and caesium (500 μg) had no effect. Conclusions and Implications: This study provides evidence that the peripheral antinociceptive effect of the GABAB receptor agonist baclofen results from the activation of tetraethylammonium-sensitive K+ channels. Other K+ channels appear not to be involved. PMID:17016510

  2. Telomerase activity in human cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Griffith, J.

    2000-10-01

    The overall goal of this collaborative project was to investigate the role in malignant cells of both chromosome telomeres, and telomerase, the enzyme that replicates telomeres. Telomeres are highly conserved nucleoprotein complexes located at the ends of eucaryotic chromosomes. Telomere length in somatic cells is reduced by 40--50 nucleotide pairs with every cell division due to incomplete replication of terminal DNA sequences and the absence of telomerase, the ribonucleoprotein that adds telomere DNA to chromosome ends. Although telomerase is active in cells with extended proliferative capacities, including more than 85% of tumors, work performed under this contract demonstrated that the telomeres of human cancer cells are shorter than those of paired normal cells, and that the length of the telomeres is characteristic of particular types of cancers. The extent of telomere shortening ostensibly is related to the number of cell divisions the tumor has undergone. It is believed that ongoing cell proliferation leads to the accumulation and fixation of new mutations in tumor cell lineages.Therefore, it is not unreasonable to assume that the degree of phenotypic variability is related to the proliferative history of the tumor, and therefore to telomere length, implying a correlation with prognosis. In some human tumors, short telomeres are also correlated with genomic instabilities, including interstitial chromosome translocation, loss of heterozygosity, and aneuoploidy. Moreover, unprotected chromosome ends are highly recombinogenic and telomere shortening in cultured human cells correlates with the formation of dicentric chromosomes, suggesting that critically short telomeres not only identify, but also predispose, cells to genomic instability, again implying a correlation with prognosis. Therefore, telomere length or content could be an important predictor of metastatic potential or responsiveness to various therapeutic modalities.

  3. X-ray-induced changes in the expression of inflammation-related genes in human peripheral blood.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ping; Guo, Fei; Han, Lin; Wang, Xi'ai; Li, Jie; Guo, Yan; Lü, Yumin

    2014-10-27

    Using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) array, we explored and compared the expression changes of inflammation-related genes in human peripheral blood irradiated with 0.5, 3, and 10 Gy doses of X-rays 24 h after exposure. Results indicated that the expression of 62 out of 84 genes was significantly altered after X-ray radiation. Among these 62 genes, 35 (such as TNFSF4) are known to be associated with radiation response, but others are novel. At a low radiation dose (0.5 Gy), 9 genes were up-regulated and 19 were down-regulated. With further increased dose to 3 Gy, 8 unique genes were up-regulated and 19 genes were down-regulated. We also identified 48 different genes that were differentially expressed significantly after 10 Gy of irradiation, and among these transcripts, up-regulated genes accounted for only one-third (16 genes) of the total. Of the 62 genes, 31 were significantly altered only at a specific dose, and a total of 10 genes were significantly expressed at all 3 doses. The dose- and time-dependent expression of CCL2 was confirmed by quantitative real-time reverse-transcription PCR. A number of candidate genes reported herein may be useful molecular biomarkers of radiation exposure in human peripheral blood.

  4. Barriers of the peripheral nerve

    PubMed Central

    Peltonen, Sirkku; Alanne, Maria; Peltonen, Juha

    2013-01-01

    This review introduces the traditionally defined anatomic compartments of the peripheral nerves based on light and electron microscopic topography and then explores the cellular and the most recent molecular basis of the different barrier functions operative in peripheral nerves. We also elucidate where, and how, the homeostasis of the normal human peripheral nerve is controlled in situ and how claudin-containing tight junctions contribute to the barriers of peripheral nerve. Also, the human timeline of the development of the barriers of the peripheral nerve is depicted. Finally, potential future therapeutic modalities interfering with the barriers of the peripheral nerve are discussed. PMID:24665400

  5. Peripheral venous congestion causes time- and dose-dependent release of endothelin-1 in humans.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jeffrey; Chudasama, Neelesh; Hayashi, Yacki; Hawk, Christopher; Ramnauth, Sahadeo D; Wong, Ka Yuk; Harxhi, Ante; Onat, Duygu; Wakabayashi, Michiyori; Uriel, Nir; Jorde, Ulrich P; LeJemtel, Thierry H; Sabbah, Hani N; Demmer, Ryan T; Colombo, Paolo C

    2017-03-01

    Endothelin-1 (ET-1) is a pivotal mediator of vasoconstriction and inflammation in congestive states such as heart failure (HF) and chronic kidney disease (CKD). Whether peripheral venous congestion (VC) increases plasma ET-1 at pressures commonly seen in HF and CKD patients is unknown. We seek to characterize whether peripheral VC promotes time- and dose-dependent increases in plasma ET-1 and whether these changes are sustained after decongestion. We used a randomized, cross-over design in 20 healthy subjects (age 30 ± 7 years). To experimentally model VC, venous pressure was increased to either 15 or 30 mmHg (randomized at first visit) above baseline by inflating a cuff around the subject's dominant arm; the nondominant arm served as a noncongested control. We measured plasma ET-1 at baseline, after 20, 60 and 120 min of VC, and finally at 180 min (60 min after cuff release and decongestion). Plasma ET-1 progressively and significantly increased over 120 min in the congested arm relative to the control arm and to baseline values. This effect was dose-dependent: ET-1 increased by 45% and 100% at VC doses of 15 and 30 mmHg, respectively (P < 0.05), and declined after 60 min of decongestion though remaining significantly elevated compared to baseline. In summary, peripheral VC causes time- and dose-dependent increases in plasma ET-1. Of note, the lower dose of 15 mmHg (more clinically relevant to HF and CKD patients) was sufficient to raise ET-1. These findings support the potentially contributory, not merely consequential, role of VC in the pathophysiology of HF and CKD.

  6. Docosahexanoic acid diet supplementation attenuates the peripheral mononuclear cell inflammatory response to exercise following LPS activation.

    PubMed

    Capó, X; Martorell, M; Llompart, I; Sureda, A; Tur, J A; Pons, A

    2014-10-01

    Exercise induces changes in circulating pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines. The aim was to investigate the effect of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) diet supplementation on the plasma cytokine levels and on the peripheral mononuclear (PBMCs) cells cytokine production after a training season or an acute bout of exercise. Fifteen male soccer players were randomly assigned to a placebo or an experimental group. The experimental group consumed an almond-based beverage enriched with DHA, whereas the placebo group consumed the same beverage without DHA. Three blood samples were taken: in basal conditions at the beginning of the nutritional intervention and after eight weeks of training season in basal and post-exercise conditions. The DHA content increased in erythrocytes after 8weeks of training and supplementation. Neither diet supplementation with DHA nor training season altered the basal plasma cytokines and growth factors. Only acute exercise significantly increased plasma IL6 in experimental and placebo groups. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) activation induced the inflammatory response in PBMCs, with a significant production rate of TNFα, IL6 and IL8 mainly after acute exercise. DHA supplementation significantly reduced the rate of TNFα and IL6 production by stimulated PBMCs. Acute exercise increased the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) protein levels in PBMCs, although the increase was only statistically significant in the placebo group. In conclusion, a training season does not induce significant changes in the circulating cytokine profile in well-trained soccer players. Exercise increases the PBMCs cell capabilities to produce cytokines after TLR4 stimulation with LPS and this rate of cytokine production is attenuated by diet DHA supplementation.

  7. An evaluation of the putative human mammary tumour retrovirus associated with peripheral blood monocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Kahl, L. P.; Carroll, A. R.; Rhodes, P.; Wood, J.; Read, N. G.

    1991-01-01

    The primary aims of this study were purification and molecular cloning of a putative retrovirus designated human mammary tumour virus (HMTV). However, our preliminary unpublished data of negative reverse transcriptase (RT) activity in ostensibly 'infected' cells led us to re-examine the evidence for this virus; namely multinucleate giant cell (MNGC) formation and RT activity in cultured blood monocytes from breast cancer patients versus benign breast tumour and normal control subjects. MNGCs from by fusion of monocytes and we estimated the total number of cell fusions which had occurred after 10 days of culture in vitro by counting cells with two, three, four and five or more nuclei (n) and by measuring the density of adherent mononuclear cells for each subject studied. We found no clear-cut difference in MNGC formation between the three subject groups. Moreover, a substantial number of cultures, encompassing the three groups, showed far more MNGCs per 10(5) monocytes than previously reported. Various parametric and nonparametric statistical analyses were performed on the multinucleate cell data and only one parametric test, which utilised the density of monolayers as a co-variate, showed a statistically significant difference at the 5% level between the breast cancer and the normal subject groups. We observed marked subject-to-subject variation in multinucleate cell formation and we suggest that the evidence for a difference between the breast cancer and the normal groups is marginal. Further, MNGC formation by breast cancer monocytes may not be attributed to the presence of a retrovirus since 5'-Azacytidine (AZA), an agent known to stimulate replication of latent retroviruses showed no effect on the MNGC formation. In addition, culture supernatants from the three groups were assayed for RT activity and no test sample gave a significant signal above background. Preliminary transmission electron microscopy analysis failed to identify viral particles in MNGCs

  8. Enhanced Th1 and Th17 responses in peripheral blood in active non-segmental vitiligo.

    PubMed

    Zhen, Yu; Yao, Lei; Zhong, Shuxia; Song, Yang; Cui, Yan; Li, Shanshan

    2016-12-01

    Accumulating studies have indicated that vitiligo, especially non-segmental vitiligo (NSV), is one kind of autoimmune diseases and CD4(+) T cells play important roles in the pathogenesis. However, there have been very limited data on the detailed changes of each of the CD4(+) T cell subsets in periphery in active NSV. To clarify this issue, we collected the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from 30 patients with active NSV and 30 age- and sex-matched healthy controls. The percentages of circulating Th1, Th2, Th17 and Tregs were evaluated using flow cytometry and the expressions of their specific transcription factors T-bet, GATA3, RORγt and FOXP3 at mRNA level and protein levels were qualified by qPCR and flow cytometry, respectively. Meanwhile, the expression levels of IFN-γ, IL-4, TGF-β, and IL-17A in serum were measured. We found that in patients with NSV, the percentages and absolute numbers of circulating Th1 and Th17 were both significantly higher than those of healthy controls, while the percentages of Th2 and Tregs and absolute numbers showed no significant difference compared to healthy controls. Moreover, the ratios of Th1/Tregs and Th17/Tregs in circulation were both statistically elevated in active NSV. Similar results were got in qualification of their corresponding transcription factors at mRNA level and protein levels. Compared with healthy controls, the expression level of IL-17A was significantly increased in serum of patients with NSV, while the productions of IFN-γ, IL-4, TGF-β had no significant change. These data suggested that in circulating CD4(+) T cell subsets, Th1 and Th17 played the major role in cellular immunity in the progression of vitiligo. The immune lever in circulation was inclined to effector CD4(+) T cells not suppressor CD4(+) T cells that may result in the loss of self-tolerance to melanocytes.

  9. Comparative study of the effect of chloro-, dichloro-, bromo-, and dibromoacetic acid on necrotic, apoptotic and morphological changes in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (in vitro study).

    PubMed

    Michałowicz, Jaromir; Wróblewski, Wojciech; Mokra, Katarzyna; Maćczak, Aneta; Kwiatkowska, Marta

    2015-10-01

    In this study, the effect of monochloroacetic acid (MCAA), dichloroacetic acid (DCAA), monobromoacetic acid (MBAA) and dibromoacetic acid (DBAA) on human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) was assessed. HAAs studied induced at millimolar concentrations necrotic alterations in PBMCs with the strongest effect noted for MBAA and DBAA. Chloro- and bromoacetic acids also provoked changes in PBMCs morphology because they caused a strong decrease in cell size (particularly DCAA and DBAA) and increase in cell granulation (mainly MBAA and DBAA). All HAAs studied, and DCAA and DBAA in particular (at lower concentrations than those, which caused necrosis) induced apoptotic changes, which was confirmed by analysis of alterations in cell membrane permeability and caspase 8, 9 and 3 activation. Moreover, HAAs examined (mainly dihalogenated acids) strongly increased transmembrane mitochondrial potential and enhanced ROS (mainly hydroxyl radical) formation, which was possibly associated with apoptotic changes provoked by those substances. The results showed that DBAA exhibited the strongest effects on PBMCs.

  10. Integrative genomic analysis implicates limited peripheral adipose storage capacity in the pathogenesis of human insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Lotta, Luca A; Gulati, Pawan; Day, Felix R; Payne, Felicity; Ongen, Halit; van de Bunt, Martijn; Gaulton, Kyle J; Eicher, John D; Sharp, Stephen J; Luan, Jian'an; De Lucia Rolfe, Emanuella; Stewart, Isobel D; Wheeler, Eleanor; Willems, Sara M; Adams, Claire; Yaghootkar, Hanieh; Forouhi, Nita G; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Johnson, Andrew D; Semple, Robert K; Frayling, Timothy; Perry, John R B; Dermitzakis, Emmanouil; McCarthy, Mark I; Barroso, Inês; Wareham, Nicholas J; Savage, David B; Langenberg, Claudia; O'Rahilly, Stephen; Scott, Robert A

    2017-01-01

    Insulin resistance is a key mediator of obesity-related cardiometabolic disease, yet the mechanisms underlying this link remain obscure. Using an integrative genomic approach, we identify 53 genomic regions associated with insulin resistance phenotypes (higher fasting insulin levels adjusted for BMI, lower HDL cholesterol levels and higher triglyceride levels) and provide evidence that their link with higher cardiometabolic risk is underpinned by an association with lower adipose mass in peripheral compartments. Using these 53 loci, we show a polygenic contribution to familial partial lipodystrophy type 1, a severe form of insulin resistance, and highlight shared molecular mechanisms in common/mild and rare/severe insulin resistance. Population-level genetic analyses combined with experiments in cellular models implicate CCDC92, DNAH10 and L3MBTL3 as previously unrecognized molecules influencing adipocyte differentiation. Our findings support the notion that limited storage capacity of peripheral adipose tissue is an important etiological component in insulin-resistant cardiometabolic disease and highlight genes and mechanisms underpinning this link.

  11. Reliability, Validity, and Sensitivity to Change of Turkish Activities-Specific Balance Confidence Scale in Patients with Unilateral Peripheral Vestibular Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karapolat, Hale; Eyigor, Sibel; Kirazli, Yesim; Celebisoy, Nese; Bilgen, Cem; Kirazli, Tayfun

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the internal consistency, test-retest reliability, construct validity, and sensitivity to change of the Activities-specific Balance Confidence Scale (ABC) in people with peripheral vestibular disorder. Thirty-three patients with unilateral peripheral vestibular disease were included in the study. Patients were…

  12. Human plasma enhances the infectivity of primary human immunodeficiency virus type 1 isolates in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and monocyte-derived macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, S C; Spouge, J L; Conley, S R; Tsai, W P; Merges, M J; Nara, P L

    1995-01-01

    Physiological microenvironments such as blood, seminal plasma, mucosal secretions, or lymphatic fluids may influence the biology of the virus-host cell and immune interactions for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). Relative to media, physiological levels of human plasma were found to enhance the infectivity of HIV-1 primary isolates in both phytohemagglutinin-stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells and monocyte-derived macrophages. Enhancement was observed only when plasma was present during the virus-cell incubation and resulted in a 3- to 30-fold increase in virus titers in all of the four primary isolates tested. Both infectivity and virion binding experiments demonstrated a slow, time-dependent process generally requiring between 1 and 10 h. Human plasma collected in anticoagulants CPDA-1 and heparin, but not EDTA, exhibited this effect at concentrations from 90 to 40%. Furthermore, heat-inactivated plasma resulted in a loss of enhancement in peripheral blood mononuclear cells but not in monocyte-derived macrophages. Physiological concentrations of human plasma appear to recruit additional infectivity, thus increasing the infectious potential of the virus inoculum. PMID:7666510

  13. Reactive Oxygen Species Formation and Apoptosis in Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cell Induced by 900 MHz Mobile Phone Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yao-Sheng; Huang, Bao-Tian; Huang, Yao-Xiong

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate that reactive oxygen species (ROS) plays an important role in the process of apoptosis in human peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) which is induced by the radiation of 900 MHz radiofrequency electromagnetic field (RFEMF) at a specific absorption rate (SAR) of ~0.4 W/kg when the exposure lasts longer than two hours. The apoptosis is induced through the mitochondrial pathway and mediated by activating ROS and caspase-3, and decreasing the mitochondrial potential. The activation of ROS is triggered by the conformation disturbance of lipids, protein, and DNA induced by the exposure of GSM RFEMF. Although human PBMC was found to have a self-protection mechanism of releasing carotenoid in response to oxidative stress to lessen the further increase of ROS, the imbalance between the antioxidant defenses and ROS formation still results in an increase of cell death with the exposure time and can cause about 37% human PBMC death in eight hours. PMID:22778799

  14. Surfactant protein D induces immune quiescence and apoptosis of mitogen-activated peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Pandit, Hrishikesh; Thakur, Gargi; Koippallil Gopalakrishnan, Aghila Rani; Dodagatta-Marri, Eswari; Patil, Anushree; Kishore, Uday; Madan, Taruna

    2016-02-01

    Surfactant protein D (SP-D) is an integral molecule of the innate immunity secreted by epithelial cells lining the mucosal surfaces. The C-type lectin domain of SP-D performs pattern recognition functions while it binds to putative receptors on immune cells to modify cellular functions. Activation of immune cells and increased serum SP-D is observed in a range of patho-physiological conditions including infections. We speculated if SP-D can modulate systemic immune response via direct interaction with activated PBMCs. In this study, we examined interaction of a recombinant fragment of human SP-D (rhSP-D) on PHA-activated PBMCs. We report a significant downregulation of activation receptors such as TLR2, TLR4, CD11c and CD69 upon rhSP-D treatment. rhSP-D inhibited production of Th1 (TNF-α and IFN-γ) and Th17 (IL-17A) cytokines along with IL-6. Interestingly, levels of IL-2, Th2 (IL-4) and regulatory (IL-10 and TGF-β) cytokines remained unaltered. Analysis of co-stimulatory CD28 and co-inhibitory CTLA4 receptors along with their ligands CD80 and CD86 revealed a selective up-regulation of CTLA4 in the lymphocyte subset. rhSP-D induced apoptosis in the activated but not in non-activated lymphocytes. Blockade of CTLA4 inhibited rhSP-D mediated apoptosis of activated lymphocytes, confirming involvement of CTLA4. We conclude that SP-D restores immune homeostasis. It regulates expression of immunomodulatory receptors and cytokines, which is followed by induction of apoptosis in activated lymphocytes. These findings suggest a critical role of SP-D in immune surveillance against activated immune cells.

  15. A new machine classification method applied to human peripheral blood leukocytes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rorvig, Mark E.; Fitzpatrick, Steven J.; Vitthal, Sanjay; Ladoulis, Charles T.

    1994-01-01

    Human beings judge images by complex mental processes, whereas computing machines extract features. By reducing scaled human judgments and machine extracted features to a common metric space and fitting them by regression, the judgments of human experts rendered on a sample of images may be imposed on an image population to provide automatic classification.

  16. Induction of RET Dependent and Independent Pro-Inflammatory Programs in Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells from Hirschsprung Patients

    PubMed Central

    Rusmini, Marta; Griseri, Paola; Lantieri, Francesca; Matera, Ivana; Hudspeth, Kelly L.; Roberto, Alessandra; Mikulak, Joanna; Avanzini, Stefano; Rossi, Valentina; Mattioli, Girolamo; Jasonni, Vincenzo; Ravazzolo, Roberto; Pavan, William J.; Pini-Prato, Alessio

    2013-01-01

    Hirschsprung disease (HSCR) is a rare congenital anomaly characterized by the absence of enteric ganglia in the distal intestinal tract. While classified as a multigenic disorder, the altered function of the RET tyrosine kinase receptor is responsible for the majority of the pathogenesis of HSCR. Recent evidence demonstrate a strong association between RET and the homeostasis of immune system. Here, we utilize a unique cohort of fifty HSCR patients to fully characterize the expression of RET receptor on both innate (monocytes and Natural Killer lymphocytes) and adaptive (B and T lymphocytes) human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and to explore the role of RET signaling in the immune system. We show that the increased expression of RET receptor on immune cell subsets from HSCR individuals correlates with the presence of loss-of-function RET mutations. Moreover, we demonstrate that the engagement of RET on PBMCs induces the modulation of several inflammatory genes. In particular, RET stimulation with glial-cell line derived neurotrophic factor family (GDNF) and glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol membrane anchored co-receptor α1 (GFRα1) trigger the up-modulation of genes encoding either for chemokines (CCL20, CCL2, CCL3, CCL4, CCL7, CXCL1) and cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-8) and the down-regulation of chemokine/cytokine receptors (CCR2 and IL8-Rα). Although at different levels, the modulation of these “RET-dependent genes” occurs in both healthy donors and HSCR patients. We also describe another set of genes that, independently from RET stimulation, are differently regulated in healthy donors versus HSCR patients. Among these “RET-independent genes”, there are CSF-1R, IL1-R1, IL1-R2 and TGFβ-1, whose levels of transcripts were lower in HSCR patients compared to healthy donors, thus suggesting aberrancies of inflammatory responses at mucosal level. Overall our results demonstrate that immune system actively participates in the physiopathology of

  17. Selective release of excreted DNA sequences from phytohemagglutinin-stimulated human peripheral blood lymphocytes. Effects of trypsin and divalent cations.

    PubMed Central

    Distelhorst, C W; Cramer, K; Rogers, J C

    1978-01-01

    We studied the synthesis of excreted DNA sequences and their release from phytohemagglutinin-stimulated human peripheral blood lymphocytes under conditions permitting optimal cell growth. Cells were labeled by constant exposure to low specific activity [3H]thymidine. Excreted DNA sequences were synthesized during the period of logarithmic cell growth and moved slowly from the high molecular weight chromosomal DNA fraction into the low molecular weight cell DNA fraction (Hirt supernate) from which they could be specifically released by treating the cells briefly with small amounts of various proteases; 1 microgram/ml trypsin for 5 min was optimal. On day 5 of culture, 13.3 +/- 6.9% of the total cellular acid-precipitable [3H]thymidine was released by this treatment. Trypsin-induced release was partially and reversibly inhibited by incubating the cells for 16 h with 5 mM dibutyryl-cyclic AMP. Cells incubated in the absence of divalent cations spontaneously released this Hirt supernatant DNA; after maximal release had occurred under these circumstances, additional trypsin treatment caused no further release of DNA. Trypsin-induced DNA release could be completely and reversibly inhibited by incubating the cells in the presence of 10 mM calcium. Trypsin-released DNA was isolated and analyzed by reassociation kinetics. A major component, representing 54% of the DNA, reassociated with a C0t1/2 of 68 mol.s/liter (the value at which DNA association is 50% complete). The reassociation of this DNA was studied in the presence of an excess of DNA isolated from stimulated lymphocytes on day 3 in culture, and in the presence of an excess of resting lymphocyte DNA. The high molecular weight fraction of day-3 cell DNA contained three times more copies of the trypsin-released DNA major component as compared to resting lymphocyte DNA. Hirt supernatant DNA isolated from day-5 stimulated lymphocytes reassociated in an intermediate component representing 34% of the DNA with a Cot1/2 of

  18. Increased intracellular levels of lysosomal beta-glucuronidase in peripheral blood PMNs from humans with rapidly progressive periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Pippin, D J; Cobb, C M; Feil, P

    1995-01-01

    Release of potent lysosomal enzymes by degranulation of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) in host gingiva may contribute significantly to tissue destruction and the pathogenesis of periodontal disease. A pilot study established that peripheral blood PMNs from humans with rapidly progressive periodontitis (RPP) contained significantly increased amounts of intracellular lysosomal beta-glucuronidase as compared to healthy controls. This investigation gained insight into the question: are the increased levels of beta-glucuronidase in persons with RPP an a priori genetically determined PMN characteristic, or a reactive phenomenon induced by the periodontal disease process during granulopoiesis? Twelve healthy controls and twelve otherwise healthy individuals with RPP participated in a repeated measures design to T0 (initial, baseline), T1 (four weeks after disease control therapy), and T2 (two months later). At each visit clinical indices (GI, pocket depths, GCF flow, plaque index) were performed and peripheral blood obtained. PMNs were isolated and suspended as 5 x 10(6) cells in 2.0 ml of HBSS. PMN suspensions were tested for total intracellular beta-glucuronidase, degranulation induced by 1 x 10(-6)M and 5 x 10(-7) M FMLP challenges, and unchallenged for non-specific enzyme release. PMNs from individuals with RPP contained significantly higher absolute amounts of beta-glucuronidase and released greater absolute amounts at FMLP challenge at T0, T1, and T2 compared to controls. No relationship was found between any of the clinical indices and beta-glucuronidase levels and no pattern was discovered relating to the repeated measures over time. We conclude that RPP peripheral blood PMNs contain elevated levels of beta-glucuronidase that are not induced by the periodontal disease process.

  19. Contribution of central vs. peripheral factors to the force loss induced by passive stretch of the human plantar flexors.

    PubMed

    Trajano, Gabriel S; Seitz, Laurent; Nosaka, Kasunori; Blazevich, Anthony J

    2013-07-15

    The purpose of the present research was to identify the contribution of central vs. peripheral factors to the force loss after passive muscle stretching. Thirteen men randomly performed both a 5-min constant-torque stretch of the plantar flexors on an isokinetic dynamometer and a resting condition on 2 separate days. The triceps surae electromyogram (EMG) was recorded simultaneously with plantar flexor isometric torque. Measures of central drive, including the EMG amplitude normalized to the muscle compound action potential amplitude (EMG/M), percent voluntary activation and first volitional wave amplitude, and measures of peripheral function, including the twitch peak torque, 20-to-80-Hz tetanic torque ratio and torque during 20-Hz stimulation preceded by a doublet, were taken before and immediately and 15 min after each condition. Peak torque (-15.7%), EMG/M (-8.2%), and both twitch (-9.4%) and 20-Hz peak torques (-11.5%) were reduced immediately after stretch but recovered by 15 min. There were strong correlations between the torque loss and the reductions in central drive parameters (r = 0.65-0.93). Torque recovery was also strongly correlated with the recovery in EMG/M and percent voluntary activation (r = 0.77-0.81). The moderate decreases in measures of peripheral function were not related to the torque loss or recovery. These results suggest that 1) central factors were strongly related to the torque reduction immediately after stretch and during torque recovery; and 2) the muscle's contractile capacity was moderately reduced, although these changes were not associated with the torque reduction, and changes in excitation-contraction coupling efficiency were not observed.

  20. Human central nervous system response to peripheral action of low-intensity millimeter waves

    SciTech Connect

    Lebedeva, N.N.

    1994-07-01

    We employ a modification of a psychophysical method developed by Kholodov to study electromagnetic field induced skin sensations. The main part of the setup is a program controller, which provides for the timed delivery of EMF signals and also false presentations. The EMF signals are fed in random order with a uniform distribution. The response-strength index and the false-alarm level were used to evaluate MF sensitivity. In addition, the subjects determined the presence or absence of a field according to four criteria. Forty healthy subjects ages 17 to 35 were tested on their right and left hands. Sensory data was analyzed via computer. EEG responses to peripheral action were studied in depth.

  1. Impairment of peripheral Vdelta2 T cells in human cystic echinococcosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hao; Li, Ming; Zhang, Xiaoxia; He, Fang; Zhang, Shengbin; Zhao, Jiaqing

    2017-03-01

    Cystic echinococcosis (CE) induced by metacestodes (larval stages) of Echinococcus granulosus (E.granulosus) represents a severe endemic disease worldwide. Gamma delta (γδ) T cells, one of innate immune cells, play pivotal role in pathogenic infections. However, whether γδ T cells are involved in CE remains unclear. This study firstly investigated the role of peripheral γδ T cells in CE. The results showed that the percentage of peripheral γδ T cells from CE patients was decreased, compared with healthy controls (HC) (p < 0.01). This decrease was primarily due to a reduction in Vδ2 subset. Furthermore, Vδ2 T cells in CE expressed lower Natural Killer Group 2D (NKG2D) (p < 0.01). The abundance of Vδ2 T cells correlated negatively with cyst burden. To further identify the function of decreased Vδ2 T cells in CE, proliferation rate, cytokine secretion and cytotoxin were detected subsequently in vitro. As a result, the proliferation rate of Vδ2 cells in CE patients was lower than that in HC (p < 0.01). Meanwhile, Vδ2 T cells from CE patients released significantly decreased interferon (IFN)-γ, compared with HC (p < 0.05). Moreover, the levels of perforin and granzyme B of Vδ2 T cells from the patients were decreased significantly (p < 0.05), suggesting impaired cytotoxin generation of Vδ2 cells in CE. Collectively, our findings indicated that circulating Vδ2 T cells in CE was impaired, and these aberrations may contribute to disease pathogenesis.

  2. Effect of 900 MHz Electromagnetic Radiation on the Induction of ROS in Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kazemi, E.; Mortazavi, S. M. J.; Ali-Ghanbari, A.; Sharifzadeh, S.; Ranjbaran, R.; Mostafavi-pour, Z.; Zal, F.; Haghani, M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite numerous studies over a decade, it still remains controversial about the biological effects of RF EMF emitted by mobile phone telephony. Objective Here we investigated the effect of 900 MHz GSM on the induction of oxidative stress and the level of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) in human mononuclear cells, monocytes and lymphocytes as defence system cells. Method 6 ml Peripheral Blood samples were obtained from 13 healthy volunteers (21-30 year-old). Each sample was devided into 2 groups: one was exposed RF radiation emitted from a mobile phone simulator for 2 hour and the other used as control group which was not exposed to any fields. After that, mononuclear cells were isolated from peripheral blood by density gradient centrifugation in Ficoll-Paque. The intracellular ROS content in monocytes and lymphocytes was measured by the CM-H2DCFDA fluorescence probe using flowcytometry technique. Results Our results showed significant increase in  ROS production after exposure in population rich in monocytes. This effect was not significant in population rich in lymphocytes in comparison with non exposed cells. Conclusion The results obtained in this study clearly showed the oxidative stress induction capability of RF electromagnetic field in the portion of PBMCs mostly in monocytes, like the case of exposure to micro organisms, although the advantages or disadvantages of this effect should be evaluated. PMID:26396966

  3. The “Intermediate” CD14++CD16+ monocyte subset increases in severe peripheral artery disease in humans

    PubMed Central

    Wildgruber, Moritz; Aschenbrenner, Teresa; Wendorff, Heiko; Czubba, Maria; Glinzer, Almut; Haller, Bernhard; Schiemann, Matthias; Zimmermann, Alexander; Berger, Hermann; Eckstein, Hans-Henning; Meier, Reinhard; Wohlgemuth, Walter A.; Libby, Peter; Zernecke, Alma

    2016-01-01

    Monocytes are key players in atherosclerotic. Human monocytes display a considerable heterogeneity and at least three subsets can be distinguished. While the role of monocyte subset heterogeneity has already been well investigated in coronary artery disease (CAD), the knowledge about monocytes and their heterogeneity in peripheral artery occlusive disease (PAOD) still is limited. Therefore, we aimed to investigate monocyte subset heterogeneity in patients with PAOD. Peripheral blood was obtained from 143 patients suffering from PAOD (Rutherford stage I to VI) and three monocyte subsets were identified by flow cytometry: CD14++CD16− classical monocytes, CD14+CD16++ non-classical monocytes and CD14++CD16+ intermediate monocytes. Additionally the expression of distinct surface markers (CD106, CD162 and myeloperoxidase MPO) was analyzed. Proportions of CD14++CD16+ intermediate monocyte levels were significantly increased in advanced stages of PAOD, while classical and non-classical monocytes displayed no such trend. Moreover, CD162 and MPO expression increased significantly in intermediate monocyte subsets in advanced disease stages. Likewise, increased CD162 and MPO expression was noted in CD14++CD16− classical monocytes. These data suggest substantial dynamics in monocyte subset distributions and phenotypes in different stages of PAOD, which can either serve as biomarkers or as potential therapeutic targets to decrease the inflammatory burden in advanced stages of atherosclerosis. PMID:27991581

  4. Atomic resolution view into the structure–function relationships of the human myelin peripheral membrane protein P2

    PubMed Central

    Ruskamo, Salla; Yadav, Ravi P.; Sharma, Satyan; Lehtimäki, Mari; Laulumaa, Saara; Aggarwal, Shweta; Simons, Mikael; Bürck, Jochen; Ulrich, Anne S.; Juffer, André H.; Kursula, Inari; Kursula, Petri

    2014-01-01

    P2 is a fatty acid-binding protein expressed in vertebrate peripheral nerve myelin, where it may function in bilayer stacking and lipid transport. P2 binds to phospholipid membranes through its positively charged surface and a hydrophobic tip, and accommodates fatty acids inside its barrel structure. The structure of human P2 refined at the ultrahigh resolution of 0.93 Å allows detailed structural analyses, including the full organization of an internal hydrogen-bonding network. The orientation of the bound fatty-acid carboxyl group is linked to the protonation states of two coordinating arginine residues. An anion-binding site in the portal region is suggested to be relevant for membrane interactions and conformational changes. When bound to membrane multilayers, P2 has a preferred orientation and is stabilized, and the repeat distance indicates a single layer of P2 between membranes. Simulations show the formation of a double bilayer in the presence of P2, and in cultured cells wild-type P2 induces membrane-domain formation. Here, the most accurate structural and functional view to date on P2, a major component of peripheral nerve myelin, is presented, showing how it can interact with two membranes simultaneously while going through conformational changes at its portal region enabling ligand transfer. PMID:24419389

  5. Peripheral blood morphologic changes after high-dose antineoplastic chemotherapy and recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor administration.

    PubMed

    Kerrigan, D P; Castillo, A; Foucar, K; Townsend, K; Neidhart, J

    1989-09-01

    The peripheral blood morphologic findings in 17 patients with cancer who had received high-dose cytotoxic chemotherapy followed by recombinant human-granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (rh-GCSF) were reviewed and compared with a control group of patients who received only high-dose chemotherapy. Both groups showed dysmyelopoiesis (abnormal granulation and nuclear lobulation) in the granulocytic series during the period of bone marrow recovery that followed the cytotoxic chemotherapy. Most of these morphologic abnormalities were more prominent in the rh-GCSF-treated group. Monocytic cells in both groups showed prominent vacuolation and immature nuclei. The percentages and absolute numbers of large granular lymphocytes were increased in the rh-GCSF group compared with the control group. No quantitative or qualitative abnormalities of eosinophilic or basophilic granulocytes were detected in either group. Both groups showed nonspecific red blood cell abnormalities, and large platelets were present in half of the control group smears. This report provides the first detailed peripheral blood morphologic description in patients treated with rh-GCSF and high-dose chemotherapy.

  6. KANK1 inhibits cell growth by inducing apoptosis though regulating CXXC5 in human malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Zhibin; Shen, Yingjia; Chen, Kenny H.; Mittal, Suresh K.; Yang, Jer-Yen; Zhang, GuangJun

    2017-01-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) are a type of rare sarcomas with a poor prognosis due to its highly invasive nature and limited treatment options. Currently there is no targeted-cancer therapy for this type of malignancy. Thus, it is important to identify more cancer driver genes that may serve as targets of cancer therapy. Through comparative oncogenomics, we have found that KANK1 was a candidate tumor suppressor gene (TSG) for human MPNSTs. Although KANK1 is known as a cytoskeleton regulator, its tumorigenic function in MPNSTs remains largely unknown. In this study, we report that restoration of KANK1 in human MPNST cells inhibits cell growth both in human cell culture and xenograft mice by increasing apoptosis. Consistently, knockdown of KANK1 in neurofibroma cells promoted cell growth. Using RNA-seq analysis, we identified CXXC5 and other apoptosis-related genes, and demonstrated that CXXC5 is regulated by KANK1. Knockdown of CXXC5 was found to diminish KANK1-induced apoptosis in MPNST cells. Thus, KANK1 inhibits MPNST cell growth though CXXC5 mediated apoptosis. Our results suggest that KANK1 may function as a tumor suppressor in human MPNSTs, and thus it may be useful for targeted therapy. PMID:28067315

  7. Cytogenetic comparison of the responses of mouse and human peripheral blood lymphocytes to /sup 60/Co gamma radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Kligerman, A.D.; Halperin, E.C.; Erexson, G.L.; Honore, G.; Westbrook-Collins, B.; Allen, J.W.

    1988-08-01

    Experiments were conducted to compare the chromosome damaging effects of /sup 60/Co gamma radiation on mouse and human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs). Either whole blood or isolated and pelleted mononuclear leucocytes (MNLs) were irradiated with a /sup 60/Co unit to yield exposures of 1, 2, 3, or 4 Gy. In addition, mice were whole-body irradiated in vivo with the same doses so that an in vitro-in vivo comparison could be made. The results indicate that mouse PBLs irradiated in whole blood, whether in vivo or in vitro, respond similarly to /sup 60/Co gamma rays as measured by dicentric chromosome formation. In addition, mouse and human PBLs showed a similar radiosensitivity, but because the mouse PBL data were best fitted to an exponential function and the human PBL data to a quadratic function, direct comparisons were difficult to make. Pelleted MNLs from mice were much less sensitive to the clastogenic effects of gamma radiation than whole blood. This is believed to be due to hypoxic conditions that developed during irradiation and transport. Human PBLs did not show a marked difference whether irradiated in whole blood or as pelleted MNLs in tissue culture medium.

  8. Cytogenetic observations in human peripheral blood leukocytes following in vitro exposure to THz radiation: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Zeni, O; Gallerano, G P; Perrotta, A; Romanò, M; Sannino, A; Sarti, M; D'Arienzo, M; Doria, A; Giovenale, E; Lai, A; Messina, G; Scarfì, M R

    2007-04-01

    Emerging technologies are considering the possible use of Terahertz radiation in different fields ranging from telecommunications to biology and biomedicine. The study of the potential effects of Terahertz radiation on biological systems is therefore an important issue in order to safely develop a variety of applications. This paper describes a pilot study devoted to determine if Terahertz radiation could induce genotoxic effects in human peripheral blood leukocytes. For this purpose, human whole blood samples from healthy donors were exposed for 20 min to Terahertz radiation. Since, to our knowledge, this is the first study devoted to the evaluation of possible genotoxic effects of such radiation, different electromagnetic conditions were considered. In particular, the frequencies of 120 and 130 GHz were chosen: the first one was tested at a specific absorption rate (SAR) of 0.4 mW g-1, while the second one was tested at SAR levels of 0.24, 1.4, and 2 mW g-1. Chromosomal damage was evaluated by means of the cytokinesis block micronucleus technique, which also gives information on cell cycle kinetics. Moreover, human whole blood samples exposed to 130 GHz at SAR levels of 1.4 and 2 mW g-1 were also tested for primary DNA damage by applying the alkaline comet assay immediately after exposure. The results obtained indicate that THz exposure, in the explored electromagnetic conditions, is not able to induce either genotoxicity or alteration of cell cycle kinetics in human blood cells from healthy subjects.

  9. Identification of a Peripheral Nerve Neurite Growth-Promoting Activity by Development and Use of an in vitro Bioassay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandrock, Alfred W.; Matthew, William D.

    1987-10-01

    The effective regeneration of severed neuronal axons in the peripheral nerves of adult mammals may be explained by the presence of molecules in situ that promote the effective elongation of neurites. The absence of such molecules in the central nervous system of these animals may underlie the relative inability of axons to regenerate in this tissue after injury. In an effort to identify neurite growth-promoting molecules in tissues that support effective axonal regeneration, we have developed an in vitro bioassay that is sensitive to substrate-bound factors of peripheral nerve that influence the growth of neurites. In this assay, neonatal rat superior cervical ganglion explants are placed on longitudinal cryostat sections of fresh-frozen sciatic nerve, and the regrowing axons are visualized by catecholamine histofluorescence. Axons are found to regenerate effectively over sciatic nerve tissue sections. When ganglia are similarly explanted onto cryostat sections of adult rat central nervous system tissue, however, axonal regeneration is virtually absent. We have begun to identify the molecules in peripheral nerve that promote effective axonal regeneration by examining the effect of antibodies that interfere with the activity of previously described neurite growth-promoting factors. Axonal elongation over sciatic nerve tissue was found to be sensitive to the inhibitory effects of INO (for inhibitor of neurite outgrowth), a monoclonal antibody that recognizes and inhibits a neurite growth-promoting activity from PC-12 cell-conditioned medium. The INO antigen appears to be a molecular complex of laminin and heparan sulfate proteoglycan. In contrast, a rabbit antiserum that recognizes laminin purified from mouse Engelbreth-Holm-Swarm (EHS) sarcoma, stains the Schwann cell basal lamina of peripheral nerve, and inhibits neurite growth over purified laminin substrata has no detectable effect on the rate of axonal regeneration in our assay.

  10. Derivation of transgene-free human induced pluripotent stem cells from human peripheral T cells in defined culture conditions.

    PubMed

    Kishino, Yoshikazu; Seki, Tomohisa; Fujita, Jun; Yuasa, Shinsuke; Tohyama, Shugo; Kunitomi, Akira; Tabei, Ryota; Nakajima, Kazuaki; Okada, Marina; Hirano, Akinori; Kanazawa, Hideaki; Fukuda, Keiichi

    2014-01-01

    Recently, induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) were established as promising cell sources for revolutionary regenerative therapies. The initial culture system used for iPSC generation needed fetal calf serum in the culture medium and mouse embryonic fibroblast as a feeder layer, both of which could possibly transfer unknown exogenous antigens and pathogens into the iPSC population. Therefore, the development of culture systems designed to minimize such potential risks has become increasingly vital for future applications of iPSCs for clinical use. On another front, although donor cell types for generating iPSCs are wide-ranging, T cells have attracted attention as unique cell sources for iPSCs generation because T cell-derived iPSCs (TiPSCs) have a unique monoclonal T cell receptor genomic rearrangement that enables their differentiation into antigen-specific T cells, which can be applied to novel immunotherapies. In the present study, we generated transgene-free human TiPSCs using a combination of activated human T cells and Sendai virus under defined culture conditions. These TiPSCs expressed pluripotent markers by quantitative PCR and immunostaining, had a normal karyotype, and were capable of differentiating into cells from all three germ layers. This method of TiPSCs generation is more suitable for the therapeutic application of iPSC technology because it lowers the risks associated with the presence of undefined, animal-derived feeder cells and serum. Therefore this work will lead to establishment of safer iPSCs and extended clinical application.

  11. Activation of Peripheral κ-Opioid Receptors Normalizes Caffeine Effects Modified in Nicotine-Dependent Rats during Nicotine Withdrawal.

    PubMed

    Sudakov, S K; Bogdanova, N G

    2016-10-01

    The study examined the effect of peripheral (intragastric) ICI-204,448, an agonist of gastric κ-opioid receptors, on the psychostimulating and anxiolytic effects of caffeine in nicotinedependent rats at the stage of nicotine withdrawal. In these rats, the effects of caffeine (10 mg/kg) were perverted. In nicotine-dependent rats, caffeine produced an anxiolytic effect accompanied by pronounced stimulation of motor activity, in contrast to anxiogenic effect induced by caffeine in intact rats without nicotine dependence. During nicotine withdrawal, nicotine-dependent rats demonstrated enhanced sensitivity to nicotine. Intragastric administration of κ-opioid receptor agonist ICI-204,448 normalized the effect of caffeine in nicotinedependent rats. We have previously demonstrated that activation of peripheral κ-opioid receptors inhibited central κ-opioid activity and eliminated manifestations of nicotine withdrawal syndrome in nicotine-dependent rats, e.g. metabolism activation, stimulation of motor activity, and enhancement of food consumption. In its turn, inhibition of central κ-opioid structures activates the brain adenosine system, which can attenuate the caffeine-induced effects in nicotine-dependent rats.

  12. Clinical trials for human T-cell lymphotropic virus type I-associated peripheral T-cell lymphoma in Japan.

    PubMed

    Tobinai, Kensei

    2010-04-01

    The most common subtype of T-/natural killer (NK) cell lymphoma in Japan is adult T-cell leukemia-lymphoma (ATL), which is associated with the human T-cell lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-1). The investigators in Japan have conducted several clinical trials on multi-agent chemotherapy and stem cell transplantation for patients with ATL. They have also initiated several new clinical trials with a number of agents: an anti-CCR4 antibody, KW-0761; forodesine, a purine nucleoside phosphorylase inhibitor; and lenalidomide, an immunomodulatory agent. Clinical trials with pralatrexate, a folate analog, and denileukin diftitox, an immunoconjugate, are under discussion for patients with ATL and peripheral T-cell lymphoma (PTCL).

  13. Relation between clinical mature and immature lymphocyte cells in human peripheral blood and their spatial label free scattering patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lu; Zhao, Xin; Zhang, Zhenxi; Zhao, Hong; Chen, Wei; Yuan, Li

    2016-07-01

    A single living cell's light scattering pattern (LSP) in the horizontal plane, which has been denoted as the cell's "2D fingerprint," may provide a powerful label-free detection tool in clinical applications. We have recently studied the LSP in spatial scattering planes, denoted as the cell's "3D fingerprint," for mature and immature lymphocyte cells in human peripheral blood. The effects of membrane size, morphology, and the existence of the nucleus on the spatial LSP are discussed. In order to distinguish clinical label-free mature and immature lymphocytes, the special features of the spatial LSP are studied by statistical method in both the spatial and frequency domains. Spatial LSP provides rich information on the cell's morphology and contents, which can distinguish mature from immature lymphocyte cells and hence ultimately it may be a useful label-free technique for clinical leukemia diagnosis.

  14. The effect of age, gender, diet and lifestyle on DNA damage measured using micronucleus frequency in human peripheral blood lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Fenech, Michael; Bonassi, Stefano

    2011-01-01

    Micronucleus (MN) frequency in cytokinesis-blocked peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) has become one of the best-established biomarkers for studying DNA damage occurring in vivo in humans. The application of this method in population biomonitoring studies requires a deep understanding of how lifestyle and common host variables may influence MN frequency in PBL. In this mini-review, an update is provided on results from studies reporting on the impact of age, gender, diet and lifestyle factors (e.g. exercise, alcohol, smoking and recreational drugs) on this biomarker. Evidence from these studies shows that each of these factors, either in isolation or in combination, can significantly influence MN frequency. Proper control for these factors is required to enable better measurement of the impact of other conditions, such as environmental exposure to genotoxins or a susceptible genetic background, on MN frequency in PBL.

  15. Inhibition of HBV Replication in HepG2.2.15 Cells by Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cell-Derived Dendritic Cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tao; Song, Hong-Li; Zheng, Wei-Ping; Shen, Zhong-Yang

    2015-01-01

    Anti-HBV therapy is essential for patients awaiting liver transplantation. This study aimed to explore the effects of dendritic cells (DCs) derived from the peripheral blood of hepatitis B patients on the replication of HBV in vivo and to evaluate the biosafety of DCs in clinical therapy. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were isolated from HBV-infected patients and maturation-promoting factors and both HBsAg and HBcAg were used to induce DC maturation. Mature DCs and lymphocytes were co-cultured with human hepatocyte cell HL-7702 or HBV-producing human hepatocellular carcinoma cell HepG2.2.15. We found that mature lymphocytes exposed to DCs in vitro did not influence morphology or activities of HL-7702 and HepG2.2.15 cells. Liver function indexes and endotoxin levels in the cell supernatants did not change in these co-cultures. Additionally, supernatant and intracellular HBV DNA levels were reduced when HepG2.2.15 cells were co-cultured with mature lymphocytes that had been cultured with DCs, and HBV covalently closed circular DNA (cccDNA) levels in HepG2.2.15 cells also decreased. Importantly, DC-mediated immunotherapy had no mutagenic effect on HBV genomic DNA by gene sequencing of the P, S, X, and C regions of HBV genomic DNA. We conclude that PBMC-derived DCs from HBV-infected patients act on autologous lymphocytes to suppress HBV replication and these DC clusters showed favorable biosafety.

  16. Altered cytokine production by specific human peripheral blood cell subsets immediately following space flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crucian, B. E.; Cubbage, M. L.; Sams, C. F.

    2000-01-01

    In this study, flow cytometry was used to positively identify the specific lymphocyte subsets exhibiting space flight-induced alterations in cytokine production. Whole blood samples were collected from 27 astronauts at three points (one preflight, two postflight) surrounding four space shuttle missions. Assays performed included serum/urine stress hormones, white blood cell (WBC) phenotyping, and intracellular cytokine production following mitogenic stimulation. Absolute levels of peripheral granulocytes were significantly elevated following space flight, but the levels of circulating lymphocytes and monocytes were unchanged. Lymphocyte subset analysis demonstrated a decreased percentage of T cells, whereas percentages of B cells and natural killer (NK) cells remained unchanged after flight. Nearly all the astronauts exhibited an increased CD4/CD8 T cell ratio. Assessment of naive (CD45RA+) vs. memory (CD45RO+) CD4+ T cell subsets was ambiguous, and subjects tended to group within specific missions. Although no significant trend was seen in absolute monocyte levels, a significant decrease in the percentage of the CD14+ CD16+ monocytes was seen following space flight in all subjects tested. T cell (CD3+) production of interleukin-2 (IL-2) was significantly decreased after space flight, as was IL-2 production by both CD4+ and CD8+ T cell subsets. Production of interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) was not altered by space flight for the CD8+ cell subset, but there was a significant decrease in IFN-gamma production for the CD4+ T cell subset. Serum and urine stress hormone analysis indicated significant physiologic stresses in astronauts following space flight. Altered peripheral leukocyte subsets, altered serum and urine stress hormone levels, and altered T cell cytokine secretion profiles were all observed postflight. In addition, there appeared to be differential susceptibility to space flight regarding cytokine secretion by T cell subsets. These alterations may be the

  17. Expression of doublecortin in tumours of the central and peripheral nervous system and in human non-neuronal tissues.

    PubMed

    Bernreuther, Christian; Salein, Nora; Matschke, Jakob; Hagel, Christian

    2006-03-01

    Doublecortin is a microtubule-associated phosphoprotein involved in neuronal migration and differentiation expressed in migrating neuroblasts in the central nervous system. We systematically analysed doublecortin expression in 179 tumours of the central and 65 tumours of peripheral nervous system as well as in 74 different non-neuronal tissues to evaluate the specificity of doublecortin as a marker for neuronal differentiation in glioneuronal tumours. Glioneuronal tumours and oligodendrogliomas grade II and III uniformly showed a high intensity and frequency of doublecortin staining, whereas intermediate doublecortin expression was observed in astrocytic tumours of grade II-IV. In pilocytic astrocytomas and ependymomas only scattered doublecortin positive cells were detected. In the peripheral nervous system, doublecortin expression was found in neurofibroma but was absent in schwannoma. Double staining of tumour tissue revealed co-expression of doublecortin and neurofilament in cells of gangliocytomas and gangliogliomas and co-expression of doublecortin with S100 protein or GFAP in glial tumours, respectively. In a tissue array comprised of 74 different normal non-neuronal human tissues, doublecortin expression was demonstrated in epithelia of the kidney, liver, salivary glands and duodenum among others. Interestingly, doublecortin expression could not be shown in brain metastases of tumours originating from these tissues. Immunohistochemical data was further corroborated by Western blot analysis and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. In conclusion, doublecortin can be regarded as specific neuronal marker only in normal developing brain, but lacks specificity in glioneuronal and glial tumours and other non-neuronal human tissues where it is expressed in a wide variety of tumours and tissues.

  18. Short-term in vitro responses of human peripheral blood monocytes to ferritic stainless steel fiber networks.

    PubMed

    Spear, Rose L; Brooks, Roger A; Markaki, Athina E

    2013-05-01

    Beneficial effects on bone-implant bonding may accrue from ferromagnetic fiber networks on implants which can deform in vivo inducing controlled levels of mechanical strain directly in growing bone. This approach requires ferromagnetic fibers that can be implanted in vivo without stimulating undue inflammatory cell responses or cytotoxicity. This study examines the short-term in vitro responses, including attachment, viability, and inflammatory stimulation, of human peripheral blood monocytes to 444 ferritic stainless steel fiber networks. Two types of 444 networks, differing in fiber cross section and thus surface area, were considered alongside austenitic stainless steel fiber networks, made of 316L, a widely established implant material. Similar high percent seeding efficiencies were measured by CyQuant® on all fiber networks after 48 h of cell culture. Extensive cell attachment was confirmed by fluorescence and scanning electron microscopy, which showed round monocytes attached at various depths into the fiber networks. Medium concentrations of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) were determined as indicators of viability and inflammatory responses, respectively. Percent LDH concentrations were similar for both 444 fiber networks at all time points, whereas significantly lower than those of 316L control networks at 24 h. All networks elicited low-level secretions of TNF-α, which were significantly lower than that of the positive control wells containing zymosan. Collectively, the results indicate that 444 networks produce comparable responses to medical implant grade 316L networks and are able to support human peripheral blood monocytes in short-term in vitro cultures without inducing significant inflammatory or cytotoxic effects.

  19. Modulation of Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cell Signaling by Medicinal Cannabinoids

    PubMed Central

    Utomo, Wesley K.; de Vries, Marjan; Braat, Henri; Bruno, Marco J.; Parikh, Kaushal; Comalada, Mònica; Peppelenbosch, Maikel P.; van Goor, Harry; Fuhler, Gwenny M.

    2017-01-01

    Medical marijuana is increasingly prescribed as an analgesic for a growing number of indications, amongst which terminal cancer and multiple sclerosis. However, the mechanistic aspects and properties of cannabis remain remarkably poorly characterized. In this study we aimed to investigate the immune-cell modulatory properties of medical cannabis. Healthy volunteers were asked to ingest medical cannabis, and kinome profiling was used to generate comprehensive descriptions of the cannabis challenge on inflammatory signal transduction in the peripheral blood of these volunteers. Results were related to both short term and long term effects in patients experimentally treated with a medical marijuana preparation for suffering from abdominal pain as a result of chronic pancreatitis or other causes. The results reveal an immunosuppressive effect of cannabinoid preparations via deactivation of signaling through the pro-inflammatory p38 MAP kinase and mTOR pathways and a concomitant deactivation of the pro-mitogenic ERK pathway. However, long term cannabis exposure in two patients resulted in reversal of this effect. While these data provide a powerful mechanistic rationale for the clinical use of medical marijuana in inflammatory and oncological disease, caution may be advised with sustained use of such preparations. PMID:28174520

  20. Associating peripheral and foveal visual input across saccades: a default mode of the human visual system?

    PubMed

    Weiß, Katharina; Schneider, Werner X; Herwig, Arvid

    2014-09-09

    Spatial processing resolution of a particular object in the visual field can differ considerably due to eye movements. The same object will be represented with high acuity in the fovea but only coarsely in periphery. Herwig and Schneider (in press) proposed that the visual system counteracts such resolution differences by predicting, based on previous experience, how foveal objects will look in the periphery and vice versa. They demonstrated that previously learned transsaccadic associations between peripheral and foveal object information facilitate performance in visual search, irrespective of the correctness of these associations. False associations were learned by replacing the presaccadic object with a slightly different object during the saccade. Importantly, participants usually did not notice this object change. This raises the question of whether perception of object continuity is a critical factor in building transsaccadic associations. We disturbed object continuity during learning with a postsaccadic blank or a task-irrelevant shape change. Interestingly, visual search performance revealed that neither disruption of temporal object continuity (blank) nor disruption of spatial object continuity (shape change) impaired transsaccadic learning. Thus, transsaccadic learning seems to be a very robust default mechanism of the visual system that is probably related to the more general concept of action-effect learning.

  1. Inflammatory and neuropathic pain are rapidly suppressed by peripheral block of hyperpolarisation-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated ion channels.

    PubMed

    Young, Gareth T; Emery, Edward C; Mooney, Elizabeth R; Tsantoulas, Christoforos; McNaughton, Peter A

    2014-09-01

    Previous studies have shown that hyperpolarisation-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN)-2 ion channels regulate the firing frequency of nociceptive sensory neurons and thus play a central role in both inflammatory and neuropathic pain conditions. Here we use ivabradine, a clinically approved anti-anginal agent that blocks all HCN channel isoforms approximately equally, to investigate the effect on inflammatory and neuropathic pain of HCN ion channel block. We show that ivabradine does not have major off-target effects on a sample group of Na, Ca, and K ion channels, and that it is peripherally restricted because it is a substrate for the P-glycoprotein (PgP) multidrug transporter that is expressed in the blood-brain barrier. Its effects are therefore likely to be due to an action on HCN ion channels in peripheral sensory neurons. Using patch clamp electrophysiology, we found that ivabradine was a use-dependent blocker of native HCN channels expressed in small sensory neurons. Ivabradine suppressed the action potential firing that is induced in nociceptive neurons by elevation of intracellular cAMP. In the formalin model of inflammatory pain, ivabradine reduced pain behaviour only in the second (inflammatory) phase. In nerve injury and chemotherapy models of neuropathic pain, we observed rapid and effective analgesia as effective as that with gabapentin. We conclude that both inflammatory and neuropathic pain are rapidly inhibited by blocking HCN-dependent repetitive firing in peripheral nociceptive neurons.

  2. Microarray Analysis of Differential Gene Expression Profile in Peripheral Blood Cells of Patients with Human Essential Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Korkor, Melvin T.; Meng, Fan Bo; Xing, Shen Yang; Zhang, Mu Chun; Guo, Jin Rui; Zhu, Xiao Xue; Yang, Ping

    2011-01-01

    The polygenic nature of essential hypertension and its dependence on environmental factors pose a challenge for biomedical research. We hypothesized that the analysis of gene expression profiles from peripheral blood cells would distinguish patients with hypertension from normotensives. In order to test this, total RNA from peripheral blood cells was isolated. RNA was reversed-transcribed and labeled and gene expression analyzed using significance Analysis Microarrays (Stanford University, CA, USA). Briefly, Significance Analysis Microarrays (SAM) thresholding identified 31 up-regulated and 18 down-regulated genes with fold changes of ≥2 or≤0.5 and q-value ≤5 % in expression. Statistically significantly gene ontology (GO) function and biological process differentially expressed in essential hypertension were MHC class II receptor activity and immune response respectively. Biological pathway analysis identified several related pathways which are associated with immune/inflammatory responses. Quantitative Real- Time RT-PCR results were consistent with the microarray results. The levels of C - reactive protein were higher in hypertensive patients than normotensives and inflammation-related genes were increased as well. In conclusion, genes enriched for “immune/inflammatory responses” may be associated with essential hypertension. In addition, there is a correlation between systemic inflammation and hypertension. It is anticipated that these findings may provide accurate and efficient strategies for prevention, diagnosis and control of this disorder. PMID:21369372

  3. Gene expression profiling in peripheral blood leukocytes as a new approach for assessment of human stress response.

    PubMed

    Rokutan, Kazuhito; Morita, Kyoko; Masuda, Kiyoshi; Tominaga, Kumiko; Shikishima, Michiyo; Teshima-Kondo, Shigetada; Omori, Tetsuro; Sekiyama, Atsuo

    2005-08-01

    Stress is the coordinated physiological processes to maintain a dynamic equilibrium under stressful conditions. The equilibrium is threatened by certain physiological and psychological stressors. Stressors trigger physiological, behavioural, and metabolic responses that are aimed at reinstating homeostasis. The hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and the sympathetic nervous system play an essential role in the stress response. Excessive,prolonged, or inadequate response that is termed as "allostasis" or "allostatic load" leads to pathological outcomes. Dysregulation of the HPA axis activity is involved in the pathogenesis of stress-related disorders including major depression. The complex brain-immune-endocrine network regulates the HPA axis, and hereditary predisposition as well as environmental factors such as traumatic experiences in early life also modifies the capacity of an individual to cope. Therefore, it is difficult to correctly assess the complex stress response. We have developed a microarray carrying 1,467 cDNAs that were selected to specifically measure stress response in peripheral blood leukocytes. Using this tool, we have succeeded to objectively assess individual response to acute psychological stress and to detect unique expression profiles in patients with depression. Gene expression profile in peripheral blood leukocytes may be a potentially useful for the detection of disease-associated, abnormal stress responses.

  4. HSP27 modulates survival signaling in endosulfan-exposed human peripheral blood mononuclear cells treated with curcumin.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, T; Banerjee, B D

    2016-07-01

    Endosulfan, a well-known organochlorine pesticide, induces apoptosis and depletion of reduced glutathione (GSH) in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). Thus, for the amelioration of its effect, antioxidant and antiapoptotic potential of curcumin was evaluated. For ascertaining the attenuating effect of curcumin, various biochemical indices of cell damage such as cytotoxicity, oxidative stress, apoptosis (phosphatidylserine externalization, DNA fragmentation, and cytochrome c) in human PBMC was evaluated following endosulfan exposure (0-100 µM). To assess the role of HSP27 on endosulfan-induced apoptosis, the expression of HSP27 was examined. Curcumin (25 µM) increased cell viability significantly. As evident from the restoration of GSH, antiapoptotic potential was directly proportional to their antioxidant nature of curcumin. The present study indicates that the beneficial effect of curcumin on endosulfan-induced cytotoxicity is related to the induced synthesis of HSP27, emphasizing its antioxidant and therapeutic potential as well as underscoring the mechanism of pesticide-induced toxicity at cellular level. Taken together, these findings suggest that curcumin protects against endosulfan-induced immunotoxicity in human PBMC by attenuating apoptosis.

  5. Gene expression profiles in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells as biomarkers for nutritional in vitro and in vivo investigations

    PubMed Central

    Klenow, Stefanie; Borowicki, Anke; Gill, Chris I. R.; Pool-Zobel, Beatrice L.; Glei, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Identification of chemopreventive substances may be achieved by measuring biological endpoints in human cells in vitro. Since generally only tumour cells are available for such investigations, our aim was to test the applicability of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) as an in vitro primary cell model since they mimic the human in vivo situation and are relatively easily available. Cell culture conditions were refined, and the basal variation of gene expression related to drug metabolism and stress response was determined. Results were compared with profiles of an established human colon cell line (HT29) as standard. For biomarker development of nutritional effects, PBMC and HT29 cells were treated with potentially chemopreventive substances (chrysin and butyrate), and gene expression was determined. Key results were that relevant stress response genes, such as glutathione S-transferase T2 (GSTT2) and GSTM2, were modulated by butyrate in PBMC as in HT29 cells, but the blood cells were less sensitive and responded with high individual differences. We conclude that these cells may serve as a surrogate tissue in dietary investigations and the identified differentially expressed genes have the potential to become marker genes for population studies on biological effects. PMID:21189867

  6. Phenotyping of leukocytes and granulocyte and monocyte phagocytic activity in the peripheral blood and uterus of cows with endometritis.

    PubMed

    Brodzki, P; Kostro, K; Brodzki, A; Lisiecka, U; Kurek, L; Marczuk, J

    2014-08-01

    This study was a comparative evaluation of selected immunological parameters in peripheral blood and uterine wash samples from cows with a normal postpartum period compared with cows with endometritis. We aimed to determine the usefulness of these parameters in monitoring the puerperium. In total, 40 cows were included in the study: 20 had endometritis (experimental group), and 20 did not have uterine inflammation (control group). Animals were chosen on the basis of cytological and bacteriological test results. The tests were conducted 5, 22, and 40 days postpartum. In both groups, flow cytometric analysis of the surface molecules CD4, CD8, CD21, CD25, and CD14 in the peripheral blood and uterine washings was performed. Granulocyte and monocyte phagocytic activity was determined using a commercial Phagotest kit that was adapted for flow cytometry. The percentage of phagocytic granulocytes and monocytes in both the peripheral blood and the uterine washings was significantly lower for cows in the experimental group compared with the control group (P < 0.01). A significant decrease (P < 0.01) in the percentage of CD4+, CD25+, CD14+, and CD4 + CD25(high) leukocyte subpopulations was also observed in the peripheral blood of cows with endometritis. A significant decrease (P < 0.01) in CD21+ lymphocytes and an increase in CD8+ lymphocytes was detected in uterine washings. The results of this work indicate that cell immunity dysfunction may be the main factor causing advanced inflammation of the uterus in endometritis. Knowledge of the immunological mechanisms observed in cows with endometritis might aid in choosing the correct immunomodulating agent-based adjuvant therapy.

  7. Differential Phasing between Circadian Clocks in the Brain and Peripheral Organs in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Hughey, Jacob J.; Butte, Atul J.

    2016-01-01

    The daily timing of mammalian physiology is coordinated by circadian clocks throughout the body. Although measurements of clock gene expression indicate that these clocks in mice are normally in phase with each other, the situation in humans remains unclear. We used publicly available data from five studies, comprising over 1000 samples, to compare the phasing of circadian gene expression in human brain and human blood. Surprisingly, after controlling for age, clock gene expression in brain was phase-delayed by ~8.5 h relative to that of blood. We then examined clock gene expression in two additional human organs and in organs from nine other mammalian species, as well as in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). In most tissues outside the SCN, the expression of clock gene orthologs showed a phase difference of ~12 h between diurnal and nocturnal species. The exception to this pattern was human brain, whose phasing resembled that of the SCN. Our results highlight the value of a multi-tissue, multi-species meta-analysis, and have implications for our understanding of the human circadian system. PMID:27702781

  8. Differential regulation of toll-like receptor-2, toll-like receptor-4, CD16 and human leucocyte antigen-DR on peripheral blood monocytes during mild and severe dengue fever

    PubMed Central

    Azeredo, Elzinandes L; Neves-Souza, Patrícia C; Alvarenga, Allan R; Reis, Sônia R N I; Torrentes-Carvalho, Amanda; Zagne, Sonia-Maris O; Nogueira, Rita M R; Oliveira-Pinto, Luzia M; Kubelka, Claire F

    2010-01-01

    Dengue fever (DF), a public health problem in tropical countries, may present severe clinical manifestations as result of increased vascular permeability and coagulation disorders. Dengue virus (DENV), detected in peripheral monocytes during acute disease and in in vitro infection, leads to cytokine production, indicating that virus–target cell interactions are relevant to pathogenesis. Here we investigated the in vitro and in vivo activation of human peripheral monocytes after DENV infection. The numbers of CD14+ monocytes expressing the adhesion molecule intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) were significantly increased during acute DF. A reduced number of CD14+ human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-DR+ monocytes was observed in patients with severe dengue when compared to those with mild dengue and controls; CD14+ monocytes expressing toll-like receptor (TLR)2 and TLR4 were increased in peripheral blood from dengue patients with mild disease, but in vitro DENV-2 infection up-regulated only TLR2. Increased numbers of CD14+ CD16+ activated monocytes were found after in vitro and in vivo DENV-2 infection. The CD14high CD16+ monocyte subset was significantly expanded in mild dengue, but not in severe dengue. Increased plasma levels of tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interferon-γ (IFN-γ) and interleukin (IL)-18 in dengue patients were inversely associated with CD14high CD16+, indicating that these cells might be involved in controlling exacerbated inflammatory responses, probably by IL-10 production. We showed here, for the first time, phenotypic changes on peripheral monocytes that were characteristic of cell activation. A sequential monocyte-activation model is proposed in which DENV infection triggers TLR2/4 expression and inflammatory cytokine production, leading eventually to haemorrhagic manifestations, thrombocytopenia, coagulation disorders, plasmatic leakage and shock development, but may also produce factors that act in order to control both intense

  9. Decrease of fibrinolytic activity in human endothelial cells by arsenite.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Shinn-Jong; Lin, Tsun-Mei; Wu, Hua-Lin; Han, Huai-Song; Shi, Guey-Yueh

    2002-01-01

    Blackfoot disease (BFD) is an endemic peripheral vascular occlusive disease that occurred in the southwest coast of Taiwan. It is believed that arsenic in the drinking water from artesian wells plays an important role in the development of the disease. We have previously shown that BFD patients had significant lower tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) antigen level and higher plasminogen activator inhibitor, Type 1 (PAI-1) antigen level than normal controls. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of arsenite on the fibrinolytic and anticoagulant activities of cultured macrovascular and microvascular endothelial cells. Incubation of human microvascular endothelial cells (HMEC-1), but not human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), with arsenite caused a decrease of t-PA mRNA level, a rise of both PAI-1 mRNA level and PAI activity. Arsenite could also inhibit the thrombomodulin (TM) mRNA expression and reduce the TM antigen level in HMEC-1. In conclusion, arsenite had a greater effect on HMEC-1 as compared to HUVECs in lowering the fibrinolytic activity and may be responsible for the reduced capacity of fibrinolysis associated with BFD.

  10. Human Development Program: Level V Activity Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ball, Geraldine

    The curriculum guide presents the activities component of the Human Development Program for grade 5. The Human Development Program (HDP) is an affective curricular approach developed by psychologists to help teachers instill responsibility and self-confidence in children. The activity guide presents topics and directions for 180 sequential Human…

  11. Id1 expression promotes peripheral CD4{sup +} T cell proliferation and survival upon TCR activation without co-stimulation

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Chen; Jin, Rong; Wang, Hong-Cheng; Tang, Hui; Liu, Yuan-Feng; Qian, Xiao-Ping; Sun, Xiu-Yuan; Ge, Qing; Sun, Xiao-Hong; Zhang, Yu

    2013-06-21

    Highlights: •Id1 expression enables naïve T cell proliferation without anti-CD28 co-stimulation. •Id1 expression facilitates T cells survival when stimulated with anti-CD3. •Elevation of IL-2 production by Id1 contributes increased proliferation and survival. •Id1 potentiates NF-κB activation by anti-CD3 stimulation. -- Abstract: Although the role of E proteins in the thymocyte development is well documented, much less is known about their function in peripheral T cells. Here we demonstrated that CD4 promoter-driven transgenic expression of Id1, a naturally occurring dominant-negative inhibitor of E proteins, can substitute for the co-stimulatory signal delivered by CD28 to facilitate the proliferation and survival of naïve CD4{sup +} cells upon anti-CD3 stimulation. We next discovered that IL-2 production and NF-κB activity after anti-CD3 stimulation were significantly elevated in Id1-expressing cells, which may be, at least in part, responsible for the augmentation of their proliferation and survival. Taken together, results from this study suggest an important role of E and Id proteins in peripheral T cell activation. The ability of Id proteins to by-pass co-stimulatory signals to enable T cell activation has significant implications in regulating T cell immunity.

  12. Cinnamamide Derivatives for Central and Peripheral Nervous System Disorders--A Review of Structure-Activity Relationships.

    PubMed

    Gunia-Krzyżak, Agnieszka; Pańczyk, Katarzyna; Waszkielewicz, Anna M; Marona, Henryk

    2015-08-01

    The cinnamamide scaffold has been incorporated in to the structure of numerous organic compounds with therapeutic potential. The scaffold enables multiple interactions, such as hydrophobic, dipolar, and hydrogen bonding, with important molecular targets. Additionally, the scaffold has multiple substitution options providing the opportunity to optimize and modify the pharmacological activity of the derivatives. In particular, cinnamamide derivatives have exhibited therapeutic potential in animal models of both central and peripheral nervous system disorders. Some have undergone clinical trials and were introduced on to the pharmaceutical market. The diverse activities observed in the nervous system included anticonvulsant, antidepressant, neuroprotective, analgesic, anti-inflammatory, muscle relaxant, and sedative properties. Over the last decade, research has focused on the molecular mechanisms of action of these derivatives, and the data reported in the literature include targeting the γ-aminobutyric acid type A (GABAA ) receptors, N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors, transient receptor potential (TRP) cation channels, voltage-gated potassium channels, histone deacetylases (HDACs), prostanoid receptors, opioid receptors, and histamine H3 receptors. Here, the literature data from reports evaluating cinnamic acid amide derivatives for activity in target-based or phenotypic assays, both in vivo and in vitro, relevant to disorders of the central and peripheral nervous systems are analyzed and structure-activity relationships discussed.

  13. Human Peripheral Clocks: Applications for Studying Circadian Phenotypes in Physiology and Pathophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Saini, Camille; Brown, Steven A.; Dibner, Charna

    2015-01-01

    Most light-sensitive organisms on earth have acquired an internal system of circadian clocks allowing the anticipation of light or darkness. In humans, the circadian system governs nearly all aspects of physiology and behavior. Circadian phenotypes, including chronotype, vary dramatically among individuals and over individual lifespan. Recent studies have revealed that the characteristics of human skin fibroblast clocks correlate with donor chronotype. Given the complexity of circadian phenotype assessment in humans, the opportunity to study oscillator properties by using cultured primary cells has the potential to uncover molecular details difficult to assess directly in humans. Since altered properties of the circadian oscillator have been associated with many diseases including metabolic disorders and cancer, clock characteristics assessed in additional primary cell types using similar technologies might represent an important tool for exploring the connection between chronotype and disease, and for diagnostic purposes. Here, we review implications of this approach for gathering insights into human circadian rhythms and their function in health and disease. PMID:26029154

  14. MHC-unrestricted lysis of MUC1-expressing cells by human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Wright, Stephen E; Rewers-Felkins, Kathleen A; Quinlin, Imelda S; Fogler, William E; Phillips, Catherine A; Townsend, Mary; Robinson, William; Philip, Ramila

    2008-01-01

    Many human adenocarcinomas can be killed in vitro by targeted cytotoxic T-lymphocytes (CTL); however, major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-restrictions are typically required. The MUC1 antigen is common in many human adenocarcinomas, and is associated with a variable number of tandem repeats. It has been proposed that antigens with such repeated epitopes may be vulnerable to cytotoxic T-lymphocyte killing without MHC-restriction. Therefore, it is possible that MUC1-expressing malignant cells may be killed by targeted cytotoxic T-lymphocyte in the absence of MHC-restriction. In this study, a human MUC1-expressing murine mammary carcinoma cell line was used to determine if cytotoxic T-lymphocyte killing of MUC1-expressing adenocarcinoma cells requires MHC-restriction. Specifically, MUC1-stimulated human mononuclear cells (M1SMC) were observed to kill human MUC1-transfected, MUC1-expressing murine mammary carcinoma cells, but not the mock-transfected, non-MUC1-expressing murine mammary carcinoma cells. Furthermore, the killing was blocked by antibody to MUC1, indicating MUC1-specific killing. In conclusion, cytotoxic T-lymphocyte killing of MUC1-expressing adenocarcinoma cells can be MHC-unrestricted.

  15. Oxazolone and ethanol induce colitis in non-obese diabetic-severe combined immunodeficiency interleukin-2Rγnull mice engrafted with human peripheral blood mononuclear cells

    PubMed Central

    Nolte, T; Zadeh-Khorasani, M; Safarov, O; Rueff, F; Gülberg, V; Herbach, N; Wollenberg, A; Mueller, T; Siebeck, M; Wolf, E; Gropp, R

    2013-01-01

    Oxazolone-induced colitis in mice has become a recognized model to study the efficacy of therapeutics targeting the immunological response underlying the development of inflammatory bowel disease. However, this model cannot be used when therapeutics designed to address human targets do not interact with the respective murine counterpart. In this study, we examined the induction of oxazolone mediated colitis in non-obese diabetic-severe combined immunodeficiency interleukin-2Rγnull (NOD-SCID IL2Rγnull) mice engrafted with human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (hPBMC) derived from patients suffering from ulcerative colitis (UC), atopic dermatitis (AD) and healthy volunteers. NOD-SCID IL2Rγ null mice were engrafted with hPBMC followed by challenge with oxazolone or ethanol vehicle. Mice developed the same symptoms as observed previously in immunocompetent mice. The clinical activity score increased and the colon architecture was characterized by the development of oedema, fibrosis, crypt loss and dense infiltration of predominantly T cells into the lamina propria. Fluorescence activated cell sorter (FACS) analysis of lymphocytes in the colon identified natural killer (NK) T cells as a major constituent. In contrast to studies with immunocompetent mice, we observed the same phenotype in the group challenged with ethanol vehicle. The phenotype was most pronounced in mice engrafted with PBMC derived from a patient suffering from UC, suggesting that the immunological history of the donors predisposes the engrafted mice to react to ethanol. The model described here has the potential to study the efficacy of therapeutics targeting human lymphocytes in a model which is more reflective of the human disease. In addition, it might be developed to elucidate molecular mechanisms underlying the disease. PMID:23574330

  16. Oxazolone and ethanol induce colitis in non-obese diabetic-severe combined immunodeficiency interleukin-2Rγ(null) mice engrafted with human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Nolte, T; Zadeh-Khorasani, M; Safarov, O; Rueff, F; Gülberg, V; Herbach, N; Wollenberg, A; Mueller, T; Siebeck, M; Wolf, E; Gropp, R

    2013-05-01

    Oxazolone-induced colitis in mice has become a recognized model to study the efficacy of therapeutics targeting the immunological response underlying the development of inflammatory bowel disease. However, this model cannot be used when therapeutics designed to address human targets do not interact with the respective murine counterpart. In this study, we examined the induction of oxazolone mediated colitis in non-obese diabetic-severe combined immunodeficiency interleukin-2Rγ(null) (NOD-SCID IL2Rγ(null)) mice engrafted with human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (hPBMC) derived from patients suffering from ulcerative colitis (UC), atopic dermatitis (AD) and healthy volunteers. NOD-SCID IL2Rγ (null) mice were engrafted with hPBMC followed by challenge with oxazolone or ethanol vehicle. Mice developed the same symptoms as observed previously in immunocompetent mice. The clinical activity score increased and the colon architecture was characterized by the development of oedema, fibrosis, crypt loss and dense infiltration of predominantly T cells into the lamina propria. Fluorescence activated cell sorter (FACS) analysis of lymphocytes in the colon identified natural killer (NK) T cells as a major constituent. In contrast to studies with immunocompetent mice, we observed the same phenotype in the group challenged with ethanol vehicle. The phenotype was most pronounced in mice engrafted with PBMC derived from a patient suffering from UC, suggesting that the immunological history of the donors predisposes the engrafted mice to react to ethanol. The model described here has the potential to study the efficacy of therapeutics targeting human lymphocytes in a model which is more reflective of the human disease. In addition, it might be developed to elucidate molecular mechanisms underlying the disease.

  17. Effects of bright light exposure during daytime on peripheral clock gene expression in humans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Maki; Wakamura, Tomoko; Morita, Takeshi; Okamoto, Akihiko; Akashi, Makoto; Matsui, Takuya; Sato, Motohiko

    2016-12-01

    Light is the strongest synchronizer controlling circadian rhythms. The intensity and duration of light change throughout the year, thereby influencing body weight, food preferences, and melatonin secretion in humans and animals. Although the expression of clock genes has been examined using human samples, it currently remains unknown whether bright light during the daytime affects the expression of these genes in humans. Therefore, we herein investigated the effects of bright light exposure during the daytime on clock gene expression in the hair follicular and root cells of the human scalp. Seven healthy men (20.4 ± 2.2 years old; 172.3 ± 5.8 cm; 64.3 ± 8.5 kg; BMI 21.7 ± 3.1 kg/m2, mean ± SD) participated in this study. Subjects completed 3-day experimental sessions twice in 1 month during which they were exposed to bright and dim light conditions. The mRNA expression of Per1-3, Cry1-2, Rev-erb-α (Nr1d1), Rev-erb-β (Nr1d2), and Dec1 was analyzed using branched DNA probes. No significant changes were observed in the expression of Per1, Per2, Per3, Cry1, Cry2, Rev-erb-α (Nr1d1), or Dec1 following exposure to bright light conditions. However, the expression of Rev-erb-β (Nr1d2) tended to be stronger under bright light than dim light conditions. These results suggest that the bright light stimulus did not influence the expression of clock genes in humans. Long-lasting bright light exposure during the daytime may be required to change the expression of clock genes in humans.

  18. Translating transitions – how to decipher peripheral human B cell development

    PubMed Central

    Bemark, Mats

    2015-01-01

    Abstract During the last two decades our understanding of human B cell differentiation has developed considerably. Our understanding of the human B cell compartment has advanced from a point where essentially all assays were based on the presence or not of class-switched antibodies to a level where a substantial diversity is appreciated among the cells involved. Several consecutive transitional stages that newly formed IgM expressing B cells go through after they leave the bone marrow, but before they are fully mature, have been described, and a significant complexity is also acknowledged within the IgM expressing and class-switched memory B cell compartments. It is possible to isolate plasma blasts in blood to follow the formation of plasma cells during immune responses, and the importance and uniqueness of the mucosal IgA system is now much more appreciated. Current data suggest the presence of at least one lineage of human innate-like B cells akin to B1 and/or marginal zone B cells in mice. In addition, regulatory B cells with the ability to produce IL-10 have been identified. Clinically, B cell depletion therapy is used for a broad range of conditions. The ability to define different human B cell subtypes using flow cytometry has therefore started to come into clinical use, but as our understanding of human B cell development further progresses, B cell subtype analysis will be of increasing importance in diagnosis, to measure the effect of immune therapy and to understand the underlying causes for diseases. In this review the diversity of human B cells will be discussed, with special focus on current data regarding their phenotypes and functions. PMID:26243514

  19. Transient Peripheral Immune Activation follows Elective Sigmoidoscopy or Circumcision in a Cohort Study of MSM at Risk of HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Lama, Javier R.; Karuna, Shelly T.; Grant, Shannon P.; Swann, Edith M.; Ganoza, Carmela; Segura, Patricia; Montano, Silvia M.; Lacherre, Martin; De Rosa, Stephen C.; Buchbinder, Susan; Sanchez, Jorge; McElrath, M. Juliana; Lemos, Maria P.

    2016-01-01

    Background Rectal and genital sampling in HIV prevention trials permits assessments at the site of HIV entry. Yet the safety and acceptability of circumcision and sigmoidoscopy (and associated abstinence recommendations) are unknown in uncircumcised men who have sex with men (MSM) at high risk of HIV infection. Methods Twenty-nine HIV-seronegative high-risk Peruvian MSM agreed to elective sigmoidoscopy biopsy collections (weeks 2 and 27) and circumcision (week 4) in a 28-week cohort study designed to mimic an HIV vaccine study mucosal collection protocol. We monitored adherence to abstinence recommendations, procedure-related complications, HIV infections, peripheral immune activation, and retention. Results Twenty-three (79.3%) underwent a first sigmoidoscopy, 21 (72.4%) were circumcised, and 16 (55.2%) completed a second sigmoidoscopy during the study period. All who underwent procedures completed the associated follow-up safety visits. Those completing the procedures reported they were well tolerated, and complication rates were similar to those reported in the literature. Immune activation was detected during the healing period (1 week post-sigmoidoscopy, 6 weeks post-circumcision), including increases in CCR5+CD4+T cells and α4β7+CD4+T cells. Most participants adhered to post-circumcision abstinence recommendations whereas reduced adherence occurred post-sigmoidoscopy. Conclusion Rectosigmoid mucosal and genital tissue collections were safe in high-risk MSM. Although the clinical implications of the post-procedure increase in peripheral immune activation markers are unknown, they reinforce the need to provide ongoing risk reduction counseling and support for post-procedure abstinence recommendations. Future HIV vaccine studies should also consider the effects of mucosal and tissue collections on peripheral blood endpoints in trial design and analysis. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02630082 PMID:27536938

  20. Whole blood tissue factor procoagulant activity remains detectable during severe aplasia following bone marrow and peripheral blood stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Ozcan, M; Morton, C T; Solovey, A; Dandelet, L; Bach, R R; Hebbel, R P; Slungaard, A; Key, N S

    2001-02-01

    Using a novel whole blood assay, we recently demonstrated that tissue factor procoagulant activity (TF PCA) is present in normal individuals. Preliminary experiments suggested that this activity is localized in the mononuclear cell fraction. Postulating that whole blood TF PCA would therefore be undetectable when monocytes and neutrophils are absent from peripheral blood, we assayed TF PCA during the peri-transplant period in 15 consecutive patients undergoing allogeneic (n = 12) or autologous (n = 3) bone marrow transplantation (BMT) or peripheral blood stem cell transplantation (PBSCT). Baseline (pre-transplant) mean TF PCA was higher in patients compared to normal controls (P <0.005). Unexpectedly, although TF PCA during the period of profound aplasia was significantly reduced compared to baseline (p <0.05), fully 55% of the initial activity remained detectable. During the engraftment phase, TF PCA returned to pre-transplant levels, with a linear correlation between monocyte counts and TF PCA (r = 0.63). In contrast to normal whole blood, incubation of aplastic samples with E. Coli lipopolysaccharide ex vivo failed to induce TF PCA. Throughout the period of study--but especially during the aplastic phase--the absolute number of circulating endothelial cells (CECs) that were TF antigen-positive was increased compared to normals (P <0.001). However, removal of these cells from whole blood samples failed to significantly diminish total TF PCA indicating that CECs alone could not account for the detectable TF PCA during aplasia. We conclude that neither circulating mature myelo-monocytic cells nor endothelial cells can account for all the functionally intact TF in peripheral blood. Further studies are needed to identify the other source(s) of TF PCA.

  1. Progesterone reverts LPS-reduced FAAH activity in murine peripheral blood mononuclear cells by a receptor-mediated fashion.

    PubMed

    Wolfson, Manuel L; Aisemberg, Julieta; Salazar, Ana I; Domínguez Rubio, Ana P; Vercelli, Claudia A; Franchi, Ana M

    2013-12-05

    Increased anandamide concentrations are associated with pregnancy failure. Anandamide levels are regulated by the fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH). The aim of the study was to investigate the role of progesterone (P) on FAAH modulation in murine peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) under septic conditions. We observed that in vivo administration of LPS to non-pregnant (NP) mice decreased FAAH activity of PBMC while in pregnant mice no changes in FAAH activity were observed. NP animals administered with P had a similar response to LPS as the pregnant animals. Also, NP mice injected with P antagonist and P showed that the effect of P on LPS-reduced FAAH activity was impaired. Furthermore, LPS produced a decrease in the ratio of PR-B/PR-A in NP animals. Our results showed that, in our model the endotoxin decreased PBMC's FAAH activity and this condition was reverted by P in a receptor-mediated fashion.

  2. Peripheral Mechanisms for Vocal Production in Birds--Differences and Similarities to Human Speech and Singing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riede, Tobias; Goller, Franz

    2010-01-01

    Song production in songbirds is a model system for studying learned vocal behavior. As in humans, bird phonation involves three main motor systems (respiration, vocal organ and vocal tract). The avian respiratory mechanism uses pressure regulation in air sacs to ventilate a rigid lung. In songbirds sound is generated with two independently…

  3. A New Machine Classification Method Applied to Human Peripheral Blood Leukocytes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rorvig, Mark E.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Discusses pattern classification of images by computer and describes the Two Domain Method in which expert knowledge is acquired using multidimensional scaling of judgments of dissimilarities and linear mapping. An application of the Two Domain Method that tested its power to discriminate two patterns of human blood leukocyte distribution is…

  4. The effects of physical activity and exercise on brain-derived neurotrophic factor in healthy humans: A review.

    PubMed

    Huang, T; Larsen, K T; Ried-Larsen, M; Møller, N C; Andersen, L B

    2014-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to summarize the effects of physical activity and exercise on peripheral brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in healthy humans. Experimental and observational studies were identified from PubMed, Web of Knowledge, Scopus, and SPORT Discus. A total of 32 articles met the inclusion criteria. Evidence from experimental studies suggested that peripheral BDNF concentrations were elevated by acute and chronic aerobic exercise. The majority of the studies suggested that strength training had no influence on peripheral BDNF. The results from most observational studies suggested an inverse relationship between the peripheral BDNF level and habitual physical activity or cardiorespiratory fitness. More research is needed to confirm the findings from the observational studies.

  5. Anticancer activities of bovine and human lactoferricin-derived peptides.

    PubMed

    Arias, Mauricio; Hilchie, Ashley L; Haney, Evan F; Bolscher, Jan G M; Hyndman, M Eric; Hancock, Robert E W; Vogel, Hans J

    2017-02-01

    Lactoferrin (LF) is a mammalian host defense glycoprotein with diverse biological activities. Peptides derived from the cationic region of LF possess cytotoxic activity against cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. Bovine lactoferricin (LFcinB), a peptide derived from bovine LF (bLF), exhibits broad-spectrum anticancer activity, while a similar peptide derived from human LF (hLF) is not as active. In this work, several peptides derived from the N-terminal regions of bLF and hLF were studied for their anticancer activities against leukemia and breast-cancer cells, as well as normal peripheral blood mononuclear cells. The cyclized LFcinB-CLICK peptide, which possesses a stable triazole linkage, showed improved anticancer activity, while short peptides hLF11 and bLF10 were not cytotoxic to cancer cells. Interestingly, hLF11 can act as a cell-penetrating peptide; when combined with the antimicrobial core sequence of LFcinB (RRWQWR) through either a Pro or Gly-Gly linker, toxicity to Jurkat cells increased. Together, our work extends the library of LF-derived peptides tested for anticancer activity, and identified new chimeric peptides with high cytotoxicity towards cancerous cells. Additionally, these results support the notion that short cell-penetrating peptides and antimicrobial peptides can be combined to create new adducts with increased potency.

  6. Peripheral insertion modulates the editing activity of the isolated CP1 domain of leucyl-tRNA synthetase.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ru-Juan; Tan, Min; Du, Dao-Hai; Xu, Bei-Si; Eriani, Gilbert; Wang, En-Duo

    2011-12-01

    A large insertion domain called CP1 (connective peptide 1) present in class Ia aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases is responsible for post-transfer editing. LeuRS (leucyl-tRNA synthetase) from Aquifex aeolicus and Giardia lamblia possess unique 20 and 59 amino acid insertions respectively within the CP1 that are crucial for editing activity. Crystal structures of AaLeuRS-CP1 [2.4 Å (1 Å=0.1 nm)], GlLeuRS-CP1 (2.6 Å) and the insertion deletion mutant AaLeuRS-CP1Δ20 (2.5 Å) were solved to understand the role of these insertions in editing. Both insertions are folded as peripheral motifs located on the opposite side of the proteins from the active-site entrance in the CP1 domain. Docking modelling and site-directed mutagenesis showed that the insertions do not interact with the substrates. Results of molecular dynamics simulations show that the intact CP1 is more dynamic than its mutant devoid of the insertion motif. Taken together, the data show that a peripheral insertion without a substrate-binding site or major structural role in the active site may modulate catalytic function of a protein, probably from protein dynamics regulation in two respective LeuRS CP1s. Further results from proline and glycine mutational analyses intended to reduce or increase protein flexibility are consistent with this hypothesis.

  7. Influence of coding region polymorphism on the peripheral expression of a human TCR V[beta] gene

    SciTech Connect

    Vissinga, C.S.; Charmley, P.; Concannon, P. )

    1994-02-01

    A number of human TCR V[beta] gene segments are reported to be polymorphic, with alleles differing by one or a small number of amino acid substitutions. In the absence of detailed structural information regarding the interaction of specific positions in the TCR with Ag or MHC, the significance of such variation is difficult to assess. In this report the relative use of the two common alleles of the human V[beta]6.7 gene, 6.7a and 6.7b, which differ by two nonconservative amino acid substitutions, and the use of two common alleles of the V[beta]12.2 gene, which differ by only silent substitutions, were measured in PBL derived from individuals heterozygous for these alleles. Equal use of V[beta]12.2 alleles was observed, consistent with the inability of selection mechanisms to discriminate between the products of these alleles that are indistinguishable at the amino acid level. However, statistically significant skewing in the use of V[beta]6.7 alleles was observed in 15 of 16 individuals studied. Expression levels for each allele ranged from 16 to 84% of the total V[beta]6.7 signal in heterozygous individuals, with either the 6.7a or the 6.7b allele predominant in different individuals. Based on segregation studies in families, it seems unlikely that other unidentified polymorphism in the TCR[beta] locus, such as in the V[beta]6.7 promoter, was responsible for the differential allele expression. Family studies provided no evidence for an association between specific HLA haplotypes and V[beta]6.7 allele use. These results indicate that even modest allelic variation in human TCR V[beta] coding regions can have a significant impact on the expression of human V[beta] genes in the peripheral repertoire. 29 refs., 4 figs.

  8. Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells Cultured in Normal and Hyperglycemic Media in Simulated Microgravity Using NASA Bioreactors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawless, DeSales

    2003-01-01

    We sought answers to several questions this summer at NASA Johnson Space Center. Initial studies involved the in vitro culture of human peripheral blood mononuclear in cells in different conditioned culture media. Several human cancer clones were similarly studied to determine responses to aberrant glycosylation by the argon laser. The cells were grown at unit gravity in flasks and in simulated microgravity using NASA bioreactors. The cells in each instance were analyzed by flow cytometry. Cell cycle analysis was acquired by staining nuclear DNA with propidium iodide. Responses to the laser stimulation was measured by observing autofluorescence emitted in the green and red spectra after stimulation. Extent of glycosylation correlated with the intensity of the laser stimulated auto-fluorescence. Our particular study was to detect and monitor aberrant glycosylation and its role in etiopathogenesis. Comparisons were made between cells known to be neoplastic and normal cell controls using the same Laser Induced Autofluorescence technique. Studies were begun after extensive literature searches on using the antigen presenting potential of dendritic cells to induce proliferation of antigen specific cytotoxic T-cells. The Sendai virus served as the antigen. Our goal is to generate sufficient numbers of such cells in the simulated microgravity environment for use in autologous transplants of virally infected individuals including those positive for hepatitis and HIV.

  9. Quiescent human peripheral blood lymphocytes do not contain a sizable amount of preexistent DNA single-strand breaks

    SciTech Connect

    Boerrigter, M.E.; Mullaart, E.; van der Schans, G.P.; Vijg, J.

    1989-02-01

    Sedimentation of nucleoids through neutral sucrose density gradients has shown that nucleoids isolated from phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-stimulated human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) sediment faster than nucleoids derived from quiescent lymphocytes, which was attributed to rejoining of DNA single-strand breaks (SSB) present in the resting cells. We isolated PBL from donors and determined the amount of SSB in nonradiolabeled, untreated resting and PHA-stimulated cells by applying the alkaline filter elution technique. Calibration was based on dose-dependent induction of SSB by /sup 60/Co-gamma-radiation. Quiescent cells did not contain a sizable amount of SSB. Mitogen-stimulated cells showed equally low amounts of SSB per cell. The present study indicates that the interpretation of the results obtained with the nucleoid sedimentation technique concerning the supposed rejoining of SSB in PHA-stimulated human lymphocytes is incorrect. Other, equally sensitive, techniques such as alkaline filter elution appear to be preferable for studies on DNA damage and repair.

  10. Syzygium cumini (Jamun) reduces the radiation-induced DNA damage in the cultured human peripheral blood lymphocytes: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Jagetia, Ganesh Chandra; Baliga, Manjeshwar Shrinath

    2002-06-07

    The effects of various concentrations (0.0, 1.56, 3.125, 6.25, 12.5, 25, 50 and 100 microg/ml) of the leaf extract of Syzygium cumini Linn. or Eugenia cumini (SC; black plum, Jamun, family Myrtaceae) was studied on the alteration in the radiation-induced micronuclei formation in the cultured human peripheral blood lymphocytes. Treatment of lymphocytes to various concentrations of SC resulted in a dose dependent increase in the micronuclei-induction, especially after 25-100 microg/ml extract. The exposure of human lymphocytes to various concentrations of SC extract before 3 Gy gamma-irradiation resulted in a significant decline in the micronuclei-induction at all the drug doses when compared with the non-drug treated irradiated cultures. A nadir in MNBNC frequency was observed for 12.5 microg/ml drug concentration, where the MNBNC frequency was approximately fourfold lower than that of the non-drug treated irradiated cultures. Therefore, this dose may be considered as an optimum dose for radiation protection. Our study demonstrates that the leaf extract of S. cumini, a plant traditionally used to treat diabetic disorders protects against the radiation-induced DNA damage.

  11. The 4q subtelomere harboring the FSHD locus is specifically anchored with peripheral heterochromatin unlike most human telomeres.

    PubMed

    Tam, Rose; Smith, Kelly P; Lawrence, Jeanne B

    2004-10-25

    This paper investigates the nuclear localization of human telomeres and, specifically, the 4q35 subtelomere mutated in facioscapulohumeral dystrophy (FSHD). FSHD is a common muscular dystrophy that has been linked to contraction of D4Z4 tandem repeats, widely postulated to affect distant gene expression. Most human telomeres, such as 17q and 17p, avoid the nuclear periphery to reside within the internal, euchromatic compartment. In contrast, 4q35 localizes at the peripheral heterochromatin with 4p more internal, generating a reproducible chromosome orientation that we relate to gene expression profiles. Studies of hybrid and translocation cell lines indicate this localization is inherent to the distal tip of 4q. Investigation of heterozygous FSHD myoblasts demonstrated no significant displacement of the mutant allele from the nuclear periphery. However, consistent association of the pathogenic D4Z4 locus with the heterochromatic compartment supports a potential role in regulating the heterochromatic state and makes a telomere positioning effect more likely. Furthermore, D4Z4 repeats on other chromosomes also frequently organize with the heterochromatic compartment at the nuclear or nucleolar periphery, demonstrating a commonality among chromosomes harboring this subtelomere repeat family.

  12. A dendritic cell-based assay for measuring memory T cells specific to dengue envelope proteins in human peripheral blood.

    PubMed

    Sun, Peifang; Beckett, Charmagne; Danko, Janine; Burgess, Timothy; Liang, Zhaodong; Kochel, Tadeusz; Porter, Kevin

    2011-05-01

    Dengue envelope (E) protein is a dominant immune inducer and E protein-based vaccines elicited partial to complete protection in non-human primates. To study the immunogenicity of these vaccines in humans, an enzyme linked immunospot (ELISPOT) assay for measuring interferon gamma (IFN-γ) production was developed. Cells from two subject groups, based on dengue-exposure, were selected for assay development. The unique feature of the IFN-γ ELISPOT assay is the utilization of dendritic cells pulsed with E proteins as antigen presenting cells. IFN-γ production, ranging from 53-513 spot forming units per million peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), was observed in dengue-exposed subjects as compared to 0-45 IFN-γ spot forming units in dengue-unexposed subjects. Further, both CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells, and cells bearing CD45RO memory marker, were the major sources of IFN-γ production. The assay allowed quantification of E-specific IFN-γ-secreting memory T cells in subjects 9 years after exposure to a live-attenuated virus vaccine and live-virus challenge. Results suggested that the dendritic cell-based IFN-γ assay is a useful tool for assessing immunological memory for clinical research.

  13. Attachment, ingestion and intracellular killing of Helicobacter pylori by human peripheral blood mononuclear leukocytes and mouse peritoneal inflammatory macrophages.

    PubMed

    Chmiela, M; Paziak-Domanska, B; Wadström, T

    1995-02-01

    The different steps of phagocytosis, attachment, ingestion and intracellular killing of cells of Helicobacter pylori strain 17874 (expressing sialic acid-specific haemagglutinin) and cells of H. pylori strain 17875 (expressing non-sialic acid-specific haemagglutinin) have been studied. More cells of sialopositive H. pylori strain 17874 have been found attached to human peripheral blood mononuclear leukocytes (PBM) and mouse peritoneal inflammatory macrophages (PIM) than cells of sialonegative H. pylori strain 17875. Binding of cells of H. pylori strain 17874 has been significantly inhibited by treatment of phagocytes with neuraminidase. Inhibition of adhesion of these bacteria preincubated with foetuin to normal phagocytic cells has also been found. Well adhering cells of H. pylori strain 17874 were more resistant to killing mechanisms of human PBM and mouse PIM than cells of strain 17875. Good, probably sialic acid-specific haemagglutinin dependent, adhesion of H. pylori bacteria to phagocytes can be considered as an important virulence factor which facilitates the pathogen to avoid the defence mechanisms.

  14. Intestinal, portal, and peripheral profiles of daikenchuto (TU-100)'s active ingredients after oral administration

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Junko; Kaifuchi, Noriko; Kushida, Hirotaka; Matsumoto, Takashi; Fukutake, Miwako; Nishiyama, Mitsue; Yamamoto, Masahiro; Kono, Toru

    2015-01-01

    A pharmaceutical grade Japanese traditional medicine, daikenchuto (TU-100), consisting of Japanese pepper, processed ginger, and ginseng, has been widely used for various intestinal disorders in Japan and now under development as a new therapeutic drug in the US. It is suggested that TU-100 ingredients exert pharmacological effects on intestines via two routes, from the luminal side before absorption and the peripheral blood stream after absorption. Therefore, in order to fully understand the pharmacological actions of TU-100, it is critically important to know the intraluminal amounts and forms of ingested TU-100 ingredients. In the present study, after administrating TU-100 to rats, the concentrations of TU-100 ingredients and their conjugates in the peripheral and portal blood and ileal contents were determined by LC-MS/MS. Next, TU-100 was administered to patients with ileostomy bags, but whose small intestines are diagnosed as healthy, and the ingredients/conjugates in the ileal effluent were analyzed. The results suggest that: (1) Pepper ingredients hydroxysanshools are rapidly absorbed and enter systemic circulation, (2) Ginseng ingredients ginsenosides are transported to the colon with the least absorption, (3) Ginger ingredients gingerols are absorbed and some conjugated in the small intestine and transported via the portal vein. While only a small amount of gingerols/gingerol conjugates enter systemic circulation, considerable amounts reappear in the small intestine. Thus, the effect of TU-100 on the intestines is believed to be a composite of multiple actions by multiple compounds supplied via multiple routes. PMID:26516578

  15. Silicon-substrate microelectrode arrays for parallel recording of neural activity in peripheral and cranial nerves.

    PubMed

    Kovacs, G T; Storment, C W; Halks-Miller, M; Belczynski, C R; Della Santina, C C; Lewis, E R; Maluf, N I

    1994-06-01

    A new process for the fabrication of regeneration microelectrode arrays for peripheral and cranial nerve applications is presented. This type of array is implanted between the severed ends of nerves, the axons of which regenerate through via holes in the silicon and are thereafter held fixed with respect to the microelectrodes. The process described is designed for compatibility with industry-standard CMOS or BiCMOS processes (it does not involve high-temperature process steps nor heavily-doped etch-stop layers), and provides a thin membrane for the via holes, surrounded by a thick silicon supporting rim. Many basic questions remain regarding the optimum via hole and microelectrode geometries in terms of both biological and electrical performance of the implants, and therefore passive versions were fabricated as tools for addressing these issues in on-going work. Versions of the devices were implanted in the rat peroneal nerve and in the frog auditory nerve. In both cases, regeneration was verified histologically and it was observed that the regenerated nerves had reorganized into microfascicles containing both myelinated and unmyelinated axons and corresponding to the grid pattern of the via holes. These microelectrode arrays were shown to allow the recording of action potential signals in both the peripheral and cranial nerve setting, from several microelectrodes in parallel.

  16. Intestinal, portal, and peripheral profiles of daikenchuto (TU-100)'s active ingredients after oral administration.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Junko; Kaifuchi, Noriko; Kushida, Hirotaka; Matsumoto, Takashi; Fukutake, Miwako; Nishiyama, Mitsue; Yamamoto, Masahiro; Kono, Toru

    2015-10-01

    A pharmaceutical grade Japanese traditional medicine, daikenchuto (TU-100), consisting of Japanese pepper, processed ginger, and ginseng, has been widely used for various intestinal disorders in Japan and now under development as a new therapeutic drug in the US. It is suggested that TU-100 ingredients exert pharmacological effects on intestines via two routes, from the luminal side before absorption and the peripheral blood stream after absorption. Therefore, in order to fully understand the pharmacological actions of TU-100, it is critically important to know the intraluminal amounts and forms of ingested TU-100 ingredients. In the present study, after administrating TU-100 to rats, the concentrations of TU-100 ingredients and their conjugates in the peripheral and portal blood and ileal contents were determined by LC-MS/MS. Next, TU-100 was administered to patients with ileostomy bags, but whose small intestines are diagnosed as healthy, and the ingredients/conjugates in the ileal effluent were analyzed. The results suggest that: (1) Pepper ingredients hydroxysanshools are rapidly absorbed and enter systemic circulation, (2) Ginseng ingredients ginsenosides are transported to the colon with the least absorption, (3) Ginger ingredients gingerols are absorbed and some conjugated in the small intestine and transported via the portal vein. While only a small amount of gingerols/gingerol conjugates enter systemic circulation, considerable amounts reappear in the small intestine. Thus, the effect of TU-100 on the intestines is believed to be a composite of multiple actions by multiple compounds supplied via multiple routes.

  17. Dynamic analysis of mental sweating and the peripheral vessels for the activity of the autonomic nervous system by optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohmi, Masato; Takada, Daisuke; Wada, Yuki; Haruna, Masamitsu

    2012-01-01

    OCT is highly potential for dynamic analysis of physiological functions of mental sweating and peripheral vessels as demonstrated by the authors. Both mental sweating and the peripheral vessels reflect the activity of the sympathetic nerve of the autonomic nervous system (ANS). The sympathetic nerve also exhibits the LF/HF ratio of the heart rate variability (HRV). In this paper, we demonstrate dynamic analysis of mental sweating and the peripheral vessels for the external stimulus by SS-OCT. In the experiment, the Kraepelin test as a continuous stimulus was applied to the volunteer to discuss in detail dynamics of the physiological function of such small organs in response to the HRV.

  18. Transcriptional Profiling of Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells Exposed to Bacillus anthracis in vitro

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-11

    variability. Male volunteers, who had been screened to be HIV and Hepatitis B negative ranged from 19-61 years of age. Human monocytes and lymphocytes...generation anthrax vaccines [62]. Addressing this concern , our study identified a host of potential targets associated with biofunctions, such as... b . ABSTRACT c. THIS PAGE 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE PERSON 19b. TELEPHONE NUMBER (Include area

  19. Association between peripheral muscle strength, exercise performance, and physical activity in daily life in patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Resistance training of peripheral muscles has been recommended in order to increase muscle strength in patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD). However, whether peripheral muscle strength is associated with exercise performance (EP) and physical activity in daily life (PADL) in these patients needs to be investigated. The aim of this study is to evaluate whether strength of the quadriceps muscle (QS) is associated with EP and daily PADL in patients with COPD. Methods We studied patients with COPD (GOLD A-D) and measured maximal isometric strength of the left QS. PADL was measured for 7 days with a SenseWear-Pro® accelerometer. EP was quantified by the 6-minute walk distance (6MWD), the number of stands in the Sit-to-Stand Test (STST), and the handgrip-strength. Univariate and multivariate analyses were used to examine possible associations between QS, PADL and EP. Results In 27 patients with COPD with a mean (SD) FEV1 of 37.6 (17.6)% predicted, QS was associated with 6MWD, STST, and handgrip-strength but not with PADL. Multiple linear regression analyses showed that QS was independently associated with the 6MWD (β = 0.42, 95% CI 0.09 to 0.84, p = 0.019), STST (β = 0.50, 95% CI 0.11 to 0.86, p = 0.014) and with handgrip-strength (β = 0.45, 95% CI 0.05 to 0.84, p = 0.038). Conclusions Peripheral muscle strength may be associated with exercise performance but not with physical activity in daily life. This may be due to the fact that EP tests evaluate patients’ true abilities while PADL accelerometers may not. PMID:25013723

  20. Peripheral mechanisms for vocal production in birds - differences and similarities to human speech and singing

    PubMed Central

    Riede, Tobias; Goller, Franz

    2010-01-01

    Song production in songbirds is considered a model system for studying learned vocal behavior. As in humans, bird phonation involves three main motor systems (respiration, vocal organ and vocal tract). The avian respiratory mechanism uses pressure regulation in air sacs to ventilate a rigid lung. In songbirds sound is generated with two independently controlled sound sources, which reside in a uniquely avian vocal organ, the syrinx. However, the physical sound generation mechanism in the syrinx shows strong analogies to that in the human larynx. Differences in the functional morphology of the sound producing system between birds and humans require specific motor control patterns. The songbird vocal apparatus is adapted for high speed, suggesting that temporal patterns and fast modulation of sound features are important in acoustic communication. Rapid respiratory patterns determine the coarse temporal structure of song and maintain gas exchange even during very long songs. The respiratory system also contributes to the fine control of airflow. Muscular control of the vocal organ regulates airflow and acoustic features. The upper vocal tract of birds plays a role in filtering the sounds generated in the syrinx, but source-filter interactions may also play a role. The unique morphology and biomechanical system for sound production in birds presents an interesting model for exploring parallels in control mechanisms that give rise to highly convergent physical patterns of sound generation. More comparative work should provide a rich source for our understanding of the evolution of complex sound producing systems. PMID:20153887

  1. Differentiation of human peripheral blood Vδ1+ T cells expressing the natural cytotoxicity receptor NKp30 for recognition of lymphoid leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Correia, Daniel V; Fogli, Manuela; Hudspeth, Kelly; da Silva, Maria Gomes; Mavilio, Domenico; Silva-Santos, Bruno

    2011-07-28

    The success of cancer immunotherapy depends on productive tumor cell recognition by killer lymphocytes. γδ T cells are a population of innate-like lymphocytes endowed with strong, MHC-unrestricted cytotoxicity against tumor cells. This notwithstanding, we recently showed that a large proportion of human hematologic tumors is resistant to γδ peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) activated with specific agonists to the highly prevalent Vγ9Vδ2 TCR. Although this probably constitutes an important limitation to current γδ T cell-mediated immunotherapy strategies, we describe here the differentiation of a novel subset of Vδ2(-) Vδ1(+) PBLs expressing natural cytotoxicity receptors (NCRs) that directly mediate killing of leukemia cell lines and chronic lymphocytic leukemia patient neoplastic cells. We show that Vδ1(+) T cells can be selectively induced to express NKp30, NKp44 and NKp46, through a process that requires functional phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI-3K)/AKT signaling on stimulation with γ(c) cytokines and TCR agonists. The stable expression of NCRs is associated with high levels of granzyme B and enhanced cytotoxicity against lymphoid leukemia cells. Specific gain-of-function and loss-of-function experiments demonstrated that NKp30 makes the most important contribution to TCR-independent leukemia cell recognition. Thus, NKp30(+) Vδ1(+) T cells constitute a novel, inducible and specialized killer lymphocyte population with high potential for immunotherapy of human cancer.

  2. Proliferation and TH1/TH2 cytokine production in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells after treatment with cypermethrin and mancozeb in vitro.

    PubMed

    Mandarapu, Rajesh; Ajumeera, Rajanna; Venkatesan, Vijayalakshmi; Prakhya, Balakrishna Murthy

    2014-01-01

    In recent times, human cell-based assays are gaining attention in assessments of immunomodulatory effects of chemicals. In the study here, the possible effects of cypermethrin and mancozeb on lymphocyte proliferation and proinflammatory (tumor necrosis factor (TNF-) α) and immunoregulatory cytokine (interferon- (IFN-) γ, interleukins (IL) 2, 4, 6, and 10) formation in vitro were investigated. Human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were isolated and exposed for 6 hr to noncytotoxic doses (0.45-30 µM) of cypermethrin or mancozeb in the presence of activating rat S9 fraction. Cultures were then further incubated for 48 or 72 hr in fresh medium containing phytohemagglutinin (10 µg/mL) to assess, respectively, effects on cell proliferation (BrdU-ELISA method) and cytokine formation (flow cytometric bead immunoassays). Mancozeb induced dose-dependent increases in lymphocyte proliferation, inhibition of production of TNFα and the TH2 cytokines IL-6 and IL-10, and an increase in IFNγ (TH1 cytokine) production (at least 2-fold compared to control); mancozeb also induced inhibition of IL-4 (TH2) and stimulated IL-2 (TH1) production, albeit only in dose-related manners for each. In contrast, cypermethrin exposure did not cause significant effects on proliferation or cytokine profiles. Further studies are needed to better understand the functional significance of our in vitro findings.

  3. Investigating the specific core genetic-and-epigenetic networks of cellular mechanisms involved in human aging in peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Cheng-Wei; Wang, Wen-Hsin; Chen, Bor-Sen

    2016-02-23

    Aging is an inevitable part of life for humans, and slowing down the aging process has become a main focus of human endeavor. Here, we applied a systems biology approach to construct protein-protein interaction networks, gene regulatory networks, and epigenetic networks, i.e. genetic and epigenetic networks (GENs), of elderly individuals and young controls. We then compared these GENs to extract aging mechanisms using microarray data in peripheral blood mononuclear cells, microRNA (miRNA) data, and database mining. The core GENs of elderly individuals and young controls were obtained by applying principal network projection to GENs based on Principal Component Analysis. By comparing the core networks, we identified that to overcome the accumulated mutation of genes in the aging process the transcription factor JUN can be activated by stress signals, including the MAPK signaling, T-cell receptor signaling, and neurotrophin signaling pathways through DNA methylation of BTG3, G0S2, and AP2B1 and the regulations of mir-223 let-7d, and mir-130a. We also address the aging mechanisms in old men and women. Furthermore, we proposed that drugs designed to target these DNA methylated genes or miRNAs may delay aging. A multiple drug combination comprising phenylalanine, cholesterol, and palbociclib was finally designed for delaying the aging process.

  4. WNK1/HSN2 mutation in human peripheral neuropathy deregulates KCC2 expression and posterior lateral line development in zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    PubMed

    Bercier, Valérie; Brustein, Edna; Liao, Meijiang; Dion, Patrick A; Lafrenière, Ronald G; Rouleau, Guy A; Drapeau, Pierre

    2013-01-01

    Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type 2 (HSNAII) is a rare pathology characterized by an early onset of severe sensory loss (all modalities) in the distal limbs. It is due to autosomal recessive mutations confined to exon "HSN2" of the WNK1 (with-no-lysine protein kinase 1) serine-threonine kinase. While this kinase is well studied in the kidneys, little is known about its role in the nervous system. We hypothesized that the truncating mutations present in the neural-specific HSN2 exon lead to a loss-of-function of the WNK1 kinase, impairing development of the peripheral sensory system. To investigate the mechanisms by which the loss of WNK1/HSN2 isoform function causes HSANII, we used the embryonic zebrafish model and observed strong expression of WNK1/HSN2 in neuromasts of the peripheral lateral line (PLL) system by immunohistochemistry. Knocking down wnk1/hsn2 in embryos using antisense morpholino oligonucleotides led to improper PLL development. We then investigated the reported interaction between the WNK1 kinase and neuronal potassium chloride cotransporter KCC2, as this transporter is a target of WNK1 phosphorylation. In situ hybridization revealed kcc2 expression in mature neuromasts of the PLL and semi-quantitative RT-PCR of wnk1/hsn2 knockdown embryos showed an increased expression of kcc2 mRNA. Furthermore, overexpression of human KCC2 mRNA in embryos replicated the wnk1/hsn2 knockdown phenotype. We validated these results by obtaining double knockdown embryos, both for wnk1/hsn2 and kcc2, which alleviated the PLL defects. Interestingly, overexpression of inactive mutant KCC2-C568A, which does not extrude ions, allowed a phenocopy of the PLL defects. These results suggest a pathway in which WNK1/HSN2 interacts with KCC2, producing a novel regulation of its transcription independent of KCC2's activation, where a loss-of-function mutation in WNK1 induces an overexpression of KCC2 and hinders proper peripheral sensory nerve development, a

  5. The human thalamic somatic sensory nucleus [ventral caudal (Vc)] shows neuronal mechanoreceptor-like responses to optimal stimuli for peripheral mechanoreceptors.

    PubMed

    Weiss, N; Ohara, S; Johnson, K O; Lenz, F A

    2009-02-01

    Although the response of human cutaneous mechanoreceptors to controlled stimuli is well studied, it is not clear how these peripheral signals may be reflected in neuronal activity of the human CNS. We now test the hypothesis that individual neurons in the human thalamic principal somatic sensory nucleus [ventral caudal (Vc)] respond selectively to the optimal stimulus for one of the four mechanoreceptors. The optimal stimuli for particular mechanoreceptors were defined as follows: Pacinian corpuscles (PC), vibration at 128 Hz; rapidly adapting (RA), vibration at 32 or 64 Hz; slowly adapting type 1 (SA1), edge; slowly adapting type 2 (SA2), skin stretch. Nineteen neurons had a significant response to at least one optimal stimulus, and 17 had a significantly greater response to one stimulus than to the other three, including 7 PC-related, 7 RA-like, 3 SA1-like, and 2 SA2-like neurons. One of each of the SA1- and SA2-like thalamic neurons responded to vibration with firing rates that were lower than those to edge or stretch but not significantly. Except in the case of PC-related neurons, the receptive field (RF) sizes were larger for these thalamic neurons than for the corresponding mechanoreceptor. Von Frey thresholds were higher than those for the corresponding human RA and SA1 mechanoreceptors. These results suggest that there is a convergence of pathways transmitting input from multiple mechanoreceptors of one type on single thalamic neurons via the dorsal columns. They are also consistent with the presence of primate thalamic elements of modality and somatotopic isorepresentation.

  6. Increased Tim-3 expression in peripheral NK cells predicts a poorer prognosis and Tim-3 blockade improves NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity in human lung adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Xu, Liyun; Huang, Yanyan; Tan, Linlin; Yu, Wei; Chen, Dongdong; Lu, ChangChang; He, Jianying; Wu, Guoqing; Liu, Xiaoguang; Zhang, Yongkui

    2015-12-01

    T cell immunoglobulin- and mucin-domain-containing molecule-3 (Tim-3) has been shown to play an important role in mediating NK-cell function in human diseases. However, the relationship between Tim-3 expression in natural killer (NK) cells and human lung adenocarcinoma remains unclear. We therefore investigated the expression of Tim-3 in NK cells and explored the effect of Tim-3 blockade on NK cell-mediated activity in human lung adenocarcinoma. Upregulated expression of Tim-3 on CD3-CD56+ cells (P<0.05) and CD3-CD56(dim) cells (P<0.05) of patients with lung adenocarcinoma was detected by flow cytometry. Moreover, Tim-3 expression in CD3-CD56+ NK cells was higher in patients with lung adenocarcinoma with lymph node metastasis (LNM) (P<0.05) or with tumor stage T3-T4 (P<0.05). Tim-3 expression in CD56(dim) NK-cell subset was higher in patients with tumor size ≥3cm (P<0.05), or LNM (P<0.05) or with tumor stage T3-T4 (P<0.05). Further analysis showed that higher expressions of Tim-3 on both CD3-CD56+ NK cells and CD56(dim) NK-cell subset were independently correlated with shorter overall survival of patients with lung adenocarcinoma (log-rank test, P=0.0418, 0.0406, respectively). Importantly, blockade of Tim-3 signaling with anti-Tim-3 antibodies resulted in the increased cytotoxicity and IFN-γ production of peripheral NK cells from patients with lung adenocarcinoma. Our data indicate that Tim-3 expression in NK cells can function as a prognostic biomarker in human lung adenocarcinoma and support that Tim-3 could be a new target for an immunotherapeutic strategy.

  7. In vitro expansion of Lin{sup +} and Lin{sup −} mononuclear cells from human peripheral blood

    SciTech Connect

    Norhaiza, H. Siti; Zarina, Z. A. Intan; Hisham, Z. A. Shahrul; Rohaya, M. A. W.

    2013-11-27

    Haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are used in the therapy of blood disorders due to the ability of these cells to reconstitute haematopoietic lineage cells when transplanted into myeloablative recipients. However, substantial number of cells is required in order for the reconstitution to take place. Since HSCs present in low frequency, larger number of donor is required to accommodate the demand of transplantable HSCs. Therefore, in vitro expansion of HSCs will have profound impact on clinical purposes. The aim of this study was to expand lineage negative (Lin{sup −}) stem cells from human peripheral blood. Total peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMNCs) were fractionated from human blood by density gradient centrifugation. Subsequently, PBMNCs were subjected to magnetic assisted cell sorter (MACS) which depletes lineage positive (Lin{sup +}) mononuclear cells expressing lineage positive markers such as CD2, CD3, CD11b, CD14, CD15, CD16, CD19, CD56, CD123, and CD235a to obtained Lin{sup −} cell population. The ability of Lin{sup +} and Lin{sup −} to survive in vitro was explored by culturing both cell populations in complete medium consisting of Alpha-Minimal Essential Medium (AMEM) +10% (v/v) Newborn Calf Serum (NBCS)+ 2% (v/v) pen/strep. In another experiment, Lin{sup +} and Lin{sup −} were cultured with complete medium supplemented with 10ng/mL of the following growth factors: stem cell factor (SCF), interleukin (IL)-3, granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF), 2IU/mL of Erythropoietin (Epo) and 20ng/mL of IL-6. Three samples were monitored in static culture for 22 days. The expansion potential was assessed by the number of total viable cells, counted by trypan blue exclusion assay. It was found that Lin{sup +} mononuclear cells were not able to survive either in normal proliferation medium or proliferation medium supplemented with cytokines. Similarly, Lin{sup −} stem cells were not able to survive in proliferation medium however

  8. CD99 expressed on human mobilized peripheral blood CD34+ cells is involved in transendothelial migration.

    PubMed

    Imbert, Anne-Marie; Belaaloui, Ghania; Bardin, Florence; Tonnelle, Cecile; Lopez, Marc; Chabannon, Christian

    2006-10-15

    Hematopoietic progenitor cell trafficking is an important phenomenon throughout life. It is thought to occur in sequential steps, similar to what has been described for mature leukocytes. Molecular actors have been identified for each step of leukocyte migration; recently, CD99 was shown to play a part during transendothelial migration. We explored the expression and role of CD99 on human hematopoietic progenitors. We demonstrate that (1) CD34+ cells express CD99, albeit with various intensities; (2) subsets of CD34+ cells with high or low levels of CD99 expression produce different numbers of erythroid, natural killer (NK), or dendritic cells in the in vitro differentiation assays; (3) the level of CD99 expression is related to the ability to differentiate toward B cells; (4) CD34+ cells that migrate through an endothelial monolayer in response to SDF-1alpha and SCF display the highest level of CD99 expression; (5) binding of a neutralizing antibody to CD99 partially inhibits transendothelial migration of CD34+ progenitors in an in vitro assay; and (6) binding of a neutralizing antibody to CD99 reduces homing of CD34+ progenitors xenotransplanted in NOD-SCID mice. We conclude that expression of CD99 on human CD34+ progenitors has functional significance and that CD99 may be involved in transendothelial migration of progenitors.

  9. Effects of alcohol-induced human peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) pretreated whey protein concentrate (WPC) on oxidative damage.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Yang-Ming; Chen, Sheng-Yi; Chen, Chien-Hung; Jin, Yi-Ru; Tsai, Shih-Meng; Chen, Ing-Jun; Lee, Jang-Hwa; Chiu, Chzng-Cheng; Tsai, Li-Yu

    2008-09-10

    Excessive alcohol consumption can induce apoptosis in a variety of tissues and influence the antioxidant status in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). This paper investigates the effects of whey protein concentrate (WPC) pretreated in PBMC on the apoptosis and antioxidant status after the treatment of alcohol. The results show that the percentages of apoptotic cells in the alcohol-treated group were higher than those in the group without alcohol treatment. Additionally, there was higher glutathione (GSH) peroxidase (GPx) activity when the PBMC were treated with 300 mg/dL of alcohol. With regard to the activity of GSH reductase (GRx), there was higher activity in the group pretreated with WPC than in the group with the treatment of alcohol only. On the contrary, the levels of GSH were reduced after the treatment of alcohol, but there was a higher level of GSH in the group pretreated with WPC. In this study, it was found that the increased level of GSH in PBMC might not be attributed to the effect of GRx because there was still a higher level of GSH in the group with the treatment of WPC and BCNU (a GRx inhibitor) in this study. The results indicated that PBMC pretreated with WPC might ameliorate alcohol-induced effects such as imbalance of the antioxidant status.

  10. Monoclonal antibody to a subset of human monocytes found only in the peripheral blood and inflammatory tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Zwadlo, G.; Schlegel, R.; Sorg, C.

    1986-07-15

    A monoclonal antibody is described that was generated by immunizing mice with cultured human blood monocytes. The antibody (27E10) belongs to the IgG1 subclass and detects a surface antigen at M/sub r/ 17,000 that is found on 20% of peripheral blood monocytes. The antigen is increasingly expressed upon culture of monocytes, reaching a maximum between days 2 and 3. Stimulation of monocytes with interferon-..gamma.. (IFN-..gamma..), 12-O-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate (TPA), and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) Ylalanine (fMLP) increased the 27E10 antigen density. The amount of 27E10-positive cells is not or is only weakly affected. The antigen is absent from platelets, lymphotyces, and all tested human cell lines, yet it cross-reacts with 15% of freshly isolated granulocytes. By using the indirect immunoperoxidase technique, the antibody is found to be negative on cryostat sections of normal human tissue (skin, lung, and colon) and positive on only a few monocyte-like cells in liver and on part of the cells of the splenic red pulp. In inflammatory tissue, however, the antibody is positive on monocytes/macrophages and sometimes on endothelial cells and epidermal cells, depending on the stage and type of inflammation, e.g., BCG ranulomas are negative, whereas psoriasis vulgaris, atopic dermatitis, erythrodermia, pressure urticaria, and periodontitis contain positively staining cells. In contact eczemas at different times after elicitation (6 hr, 24 hr, and 72 hr), the 27E10 antigen is seen first after 24 hr on a few infiltrating monocytes/macrophages, which increase in numbers after 72 hr.

  11. Normalization of the peripheral blood T cell receptor V beta repertoire after cultured postnatal human thymic transplantation in DiGeorge syndrome.

    PubMed

    Davis, C M; McLaughlin, T M; Watson, T J; Buckley, R H; Schiff, S E; Hale, L P; Haynes, B F; Markert, M L

    1997-03-01

    Complete DiGeorge syndrome is an immunodeficiency disease characterized by thymic aplasia and the absence of functioning peripheral T cells. A patient with this syndrome was transplanted with cultured postnatal human thymic tissue. Within 5 weeks of transplantation, flow cytometry, T cell receptor V beta sequence analysis, and cell function studies showed the presence of oligoclonal populations of nonfunctional clonally expanded peripheral T cells that were derived from pretransplantation T cells present in the skin. However, at 3 months posttransplantation, a biopsy of the transplanted thymus showed normal intrathymic T cell maturation of host T cells with normal TCR V beta expression on thymocytes. By 9 months postransplantation, peripheral T cell function was restored and the TCR V beta repertoire became polyclonal, coincident with the appearance of normal T cell function. These data suggest that the transplanted thymus was responsible for the establishment of a new T cell repertoire via thymopoiesis in the chimeric thymic graft.

  12. Human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from smokers release higher levels of IL-1-like cytokines after exposure to combustion-generated ultrafine particles.

    PubMed

    De Falco, Gianluigi; Terlizzi, Michela; Sirignano, Mariano; Commodo, Mario; D'Anna, Andrea; Aquino, Rita P; Pinto, Aldo; Sorrentino, Rosalinda

    2017-02-22

    Ultrafine particles (UFP) generated by combustion processes are often associated with adverse health effects. However, little is known about the inflammatory processes generated by UFP that may underlie their toxicological activity. Murine macrophages (J774.1 cells) and human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were used to evaluate the molecular mechanism underlying the pro-inflammatory activity of UFP. The addition of soot particles to J774.1 cells induced a concentration-dependent release of IL-1α, IL-1β and IL-33 This effect was not associated with cell death and, in contrast to literature, was pronounced at very low concentrations (5-100 pg/ml). Similarly, UFP induced the release of IL-1α, IL-18 and IL-33 by PBMCs. However, this effect was solely observed in PBMCs obtained from smokers, as the PBMCs from non-smokers instead released higher levels of IL-10. The release of these cytokines after UFP exposure was caspase-1- and NLRP3 inflammasome-dependent in PBMCs from healthy smokers, whereas IL-1α release was calpain-dependent. These results show that UFP at very low concentrations are able to give rise to an inflammatory process that is responsible for IL-1α, IL-18 and IL-33 release, which is pronounced in PBMCs from smokers, confirming that these individuals are especially susceptible to inflammatory-based airway diseases once exposed to air pollution.

  13. Human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from smokers release higher levels of IL-1-like cytokines after exposure to combustion-generated ultrafine particles

    PubMed Central

    De Falco, Gianluigi; Terlizzi, Michela; Sirignano, Mariano; Commodo, Mario; D’Anna, Andrea; Aquino, Rita P.; Pinto, Aldo; Sorrentino, Rosalinda

    2017-01-01

    Ultrafine particles (UFP) generated by combustion processes are often associated with adverse health effects. However, little is known about the inflammatory processes generated by UFP that may underlie their toxicological activity. Murine macrophages (J774.1 cells) and human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were used to evaluate the molecular mechanism underlying the pro-inflammatory activity of UFP. The addition of soot particles to J774.1 cells induced a concentration-dependent release of IL-1α, IL-1β and IL-33 This effect was not associated with cell death and, in contrast to literature, was pronounced at very low concentrations (5–100 pg/ml). Similarly, UFP induced the release of IL-1α, IL-18 and IL-33 by PBMCs. However, this effect was solely observed in PBMCs obtained from smokers, as the PBMCs from non-smokers instead released higher levels of IL-10. The release of these cytokines after UFP exposure was caspase-1- and NLRP3 inflammasome-dependent in PBMCs from healthy smokers, whereas IL-1α release was calpain-dependent. These results show that UFP at very low concentrations are able to give rise to an inflammatory process that is responsible for IL-1α, IL-18 and IL-33 release, which is pronounced in PBMCs from smokers, confirming that these individuals are especially susceptible to inflammatory-based airway diseases once exposed to air pollution. PMID:28223692

  14. A quasi-quantitative dual multiplexed immunoblot method to simultaneously analyze ATM and H2AX Phosphorylation in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Bakkenist, Christopher J; Czambel, R Kenneth; Hershberger, Pamela A; Tawbi, Hussein; Beumer, Jan H; Schmitz, John C

    2015-01-01

    Pharmacologic inhibition of DNA repair may increase the efficacy of many cytotoxic cancer agents. Inhibitors of DNA repair enzymes including APE1, ATM, ATR, DNA-PK and PARP have been developed and the PARP inhibitor olaparib is the first-in-class approved in Europe and the USA for the treatment of advanced BRCA-mutated ovarian cancer. Sensitive pharmacodynamic (PD) biomarkers are needed to further evaluate the efficacy of inhibitors of DNA repair enzymes in clinical trials. ATM is a protein kinase that mediates cell-cycle checkpoint activation and DNA double-strand break repair. ATM kinase activation at DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) is associated with intermolecular autophosphorylation on serine-1981. Exquisite sensitivity and high stoichiometry as well as facile extraction suggest that ATM serine-1981 phosphorylation may be a highly dynamic PD biomarker for both ATM kinase inhibitors and radiation- and chemotherapy-induced DSBs. Here we report the pre-clinical analytical validation and fit-for-purpose biomarker method validation of a quasi-quantitative dual multiplexed immunoblot method to simultaneously analyze ATM and H2AX phosphorylation in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). We explore the dynamics of these phosphorylations in PBMCs exposed to chemotherapeutic agents and DNA repair inhibitors in vitro, and show that ATM serine-1981 phosphorylation is increased in PBMCs in sarcoma patients treated with DNA damaging chemotherapy.

  15. Epstein-Barr Virus Encoded dUTPase Containing Exosomes Modulate Innate and Adaptive Immune Responses in Human Dendritic Cells and Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ariza, Maria Eugenia; Rivailler, Pierre; Glaser, Ronald; Chen, Min; Williams, Marshall V.

    2013-01-01

    We have recently demonstrated that Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-encoded deoxyuridine triphosphate nucleotidohydrolase (dUTPase) modulates innate immunity in human primary monocyte-derived macrophages through toll-like receptor (TLR) 2 leading to NF-κB activation and the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Our previous depletion studies indicated that dendritic cells (DCs) may also be a target of the EBV-encoded dUTPase. However, the role of EBV-encoded dUTPase in DC activation/function and its potential contribution to the inflammatory cellular milieu characteristic of EBV-associated diseases remains poorly understood. In the present study, we demonstrate that EBV-encoded dUTPase significantly altered the expression of genes involved in oncogenesis, inflammation and viral defense mechanisms in human primary DCs by microarray analysis. Proteome array studies revealed that EBV-encoded dUTPase modulates DC immune responses by inducing the secretion of pro-inflammatory TH1/TH17 cytokines. More importantly, we demonstrate that EBV-encoded dUTPase is secreted in exosomes from chemically induced Raji cells at sufficient levels to induce NF-κB activation and cytokine secretion in primary DCs and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Interestingly, the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines in DCs and PBMCs was TLR2-dependent. Together these findings suggest that the EBV-encoded dUTPase may act as an intercellular signaling molecule capable of modulating the cellular microenvironment and thus, it may be important in the pathophysiology of EBV related diseases. PMID:23894549

  16. Epstein-Barr virus encoded dUTPase containing exosomes modulate innate and adaptive immune responses in human dendritic cells and peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Ariza, Maria Eugenia; Rivailler, Pierre; Glaser, Ronald; Chen, Min; Williams, Marshall V

    2013-01-01

    We have recently demonstrated that Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-encoded deoxyuridine triphosphate nucleotidohydrolase (dUTPase) modulates innate immunity in human primary monocyte-derived macrophages through toll-like receptor (TLR) 2 leading to NF-κB activation and the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Our previous depletion studies indicated that dendritic cells (DCs) may also be a target of the EBV-encoded dUTPase. However, the role of EBV-encoded dUTPase in DC activation/function and its potential contribution to the inflammatory cellular milieu characteristic of EBV-associated diseases remains poorly understood. In the present study, we demonstrate that EBV-encoded dUTPase significantly altered the expression of genes involved in oncogenesis, inflammation and viral defense mechanisms in human primary DCs by microarray analysis. Proteome array studies revealed that EBV-encoded dUTPase modulates DC immune responses by inducing the secretion of pro-inflammatory TH1/TH17 cytokines. More importantly, we demonstrate that EBV-encoded dUTPase is secreted in exosomes from chemically induced Raji cells at sufficient levels to induce NF-κB activation and cytokine secretion in primary DCs and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Interestingly, the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines in DCs and PBMCs was TLR2-dependent. Together these findings suggest that the EBV-encoded dUTPase may act as an intercellular signaling molecule capable of modulating the cellular microenvironment and thus, it may be important in the pathophysiology of EBV related diseases.

  17. Flow cytometric assessment of activation of peripheral blood platelets in dogs with normal platelet count and asymptomatic thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Żmigrodzka, M; Guzera, M; Winnicka, A

    2016-01-01

    Platelets play a crucial role in hemostasis. Their activation has not yet been evaluated in healthy dogs with a normal and low platelet count. The aim of this study was to determine the influence of activators on platelet activation in dogs with a normal platelet count and asymptomatic thrombocytopenia. 72 clinically healthy dogs were enrolled. Patients were allocated into three groups. Group 1 consisted of 30 dogs with a normal platelet count, group 2 included 22 dogs with a platelet count between 100 and 200×109/l and group 3 consisted of 20 dogs with a platelet count lower than 100×109/l. Platelet rich-plasma (PRP) was obtained from peripheral blood samples using tripotassium ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (K3-EDTA) as anticoagulant. Next, platelets were stimulated using phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate or thrombin, stabilized using procaine or left unstimulated. The expression of CD51 and CD41/CD61 was evaluated. Co-expression of CD41/CD61 and Annexin V served as a marker of platelet activation. The expression of CD41/CD61 and CD51 did not differ between the 3 groups. Thrombin-stimulated platelets had a significantly higher activity in dogs with a normal platelet count than in dogs with asymptomatic thrombocytopenia. Procaine inhibited platelet activity in all groups. In conclusion, activation of platelets of healthy dogs in vitro varied depending on the platelet count and platelet activator.

  18. Peripheral mechanisms of thermoregulatory control of skin blood flow in aged humans

    PubMed Central

    Kenney, W. Larry

    2010-01-01

    Human skin blood flow is controlled via dual innervation from the sympathetic nervous system. Reflex cutaneous vasoconstriction and vasodilation are both impaired with primary aging, rendering the aged more vulnerable to hypothermia and cardiovascular complications from heat-related illness. Age-related alterations in the thermoregulatory control of skin blood flow occur at multiple points along the efferent arm of the reflex, including 1) diminished sympathetic outflow, 2) altered presynaptic neurotransmitter synthesis, 3) reduced vascular responsiveness, and 4) impairments in downstream (endothelial and vascular smooth muscle) second-messenger signaling. This mechanistic review highlights some of the recent findings in the area of aging and the thermoregulatory control of skin blood flow. PMID:20413421

  19. Peripheral nerve conduction recorded by a micro gradiometer system (micro-SQUID) in humans.

    PubMed

    Hoshiyama, M; Kakigi, R; Nagata, O

    1999-09-17

    We developed a new multi (twelve) -channel gradiometer system with the smallest and highest quality superconducting quantum interference device (micro-SQUID). A very small distance (3.80 mm) between the sensor coils and the skin provides quite high spatial resolution. The actual whole image of the sensory nerve action fields (NAF) of the human median nerve at the wrist were successfully recorded following digital nerve stimulation by using the micro-SQUID. The NAF showed the biphasic waveform at each of the 12 channels, and the isomagnetic field map clearly showed the moving quadrupole pattern. The quadrupole comprised a dipole for depolarization followed by another dipole with the opposite direction for repolarization. The polarized length of the nerve obtained by reconstructing the magnetic field maps was approximately 17 cm, and the magnetic field complex moved along the nerve from the distal to the proximal part of the wrist at 58.7 m/s.

  20. Sensing Human Activity: GPS Tracking

    PubMed Central

    van der Spek, Stefan; van Schaick, Jeroen; de Bois, Peter; de Haan, Remco

    2009-01-01

    The enhancement of GPS technology enables the use of GPS devices not only as navigation and orientation tools, but also as instruments used to capture travelled routes: as sensors that measure activity on a city scale or the regional scale. TU Delft developed a process and database architecture for collecting data on pedestrian movement in three European city centres, Norwich, Rouen and Koblenz, and in another experiment for collecting activity data of 13 families in Almere (The Netherlands) for one week. The question posed in this paper is: what is the value of GPS as ‘sensor technology’ measuring activities of people? The conclusion is that GPS offers a widely useable instrument to collect invaluable spatial-temporal data on different scales and in different settings adding new layers of knowledge to urban studies, but the use of GPS-technology and deployment of GPS-devices still offers significant challenges for future research. PMID:22574061

  1. Peripheral Adenosine A3 Receptor Activation Causes Regulated Hypothermia in Mice That Is Dependent on Central Histamine H1 Receptors.

    PubMed

    Carlin, Jesse Lea; Tosh, Dilip K; Xiao, Cuiying; Piñol, Ramón A; Chen, Zhoumou; Salvemini, Daniela; Gavrilova, Oksana; Jacobson, Kenneth A; Reitman, Marc L

    2016-02-01

    Adenosine can induce hypothermia, as previously demonstrated for adenosine A1 receptor (A1AR) agonists. Here we use the potent, specific A3AR agonists MRS5698, MRS5841, and MRS5980 to show that adenosine also induces hypothermia via the A3AR. The hypothermic effect of A3AR agonists is independent of A1AR activation, as the effect was fully intact in mice lacking A1AR but abolished in mice lacking A3AR. A3AR agonist-induced hypothermia was attenuated by mast cell granule depletion, demonstrating that the A3AR hypothermia is mediated, at least in part, via mast cells. Central agonist dosing had no clear hypothermic effect, whereas peripheral dosing of a non-brain-penetrant agonist caused hypothermia, suggesting that peripheral A3AR-expressing cells drive the hypothermia. Mast cells release histamine, and blocking central histamine H1 (but not H2 or H4) receptors prevented the hypothermia. The hypothermia was preceded by hypometabolism and mice with hypothermia preferred a cooler environmental temperature, demonstrating that the hypothermic state is a coordinated physiologic response with a reduced body temperature set point. Importantly, hypothermia is not required for the analgesic effects of A3AR agonists, which occur with lower agonist doses. These results support a mechanistic model for hypothermia in which A3AR agonists act on peripheral mast cells, causing histamine release, which stimulates central histamine H1 receptors to induce hypothermia. This mechanism suggests that A3AR agonists will probably not be useful for clinical induction of hypothermia.

  2. Peripheral Adenosine A3 Receptor Activation Causes Regulated Hypothermia in Mice That Is Dependent on Central Histamine H1 Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Carlin, Jesse Lea; Tosh, Dilip K.; Xiao, Cuiying; Piñol, Ramón A.; Chen, Zhoumou; Salvemini, Daniela; Gavrilova, Oksana; Jacobson, Kenneth A.

    2016-01-01

    Adenosine can induce hypothermia, as previously demonstrated for adenosine A1 receptor (A1AR) agonists. Here we use the potent, specific A3AR agonists MRS5698, MRS5841, and MRS5980 to show that adenosine also induces hypothermia via the A3AR. The hypothermic effect of A3AR agonists is independent of A1AR activation, as the effect was fully intact in mice lacking A1AR but abolished in mice lacking A3AR. A3AR agonist–induced hypothermia was attenuated by mast cell granule depletion, demonstrating that the A3AR hypothermia is mediated, at least in part, via mast cells. Central agonist dosing had no clear hypothermic effect, whereas peripheral dosing of a non–brain-penetrant agonist caused hypothermia, suggesting that peripheral A3AR-expressing cells drive the hypothermia. Mast cells release histamine, and blocking central histamine H1 (but not H2 or H4) receptors prevented the hypothermia. The hypothermia was preceded by hypometabolism and mice with hypothermia preferred a cooler environmental temperature, demonstrating that the hypothermic state is a coordinated physiologic response with a reduced body temperature set point. Importantly, hypothermia is not required for the analgesic effects of A3AR agonists, which occur with lower agonist doses. These results support a mechanistic model for hypothermia in which A3AR agonists act on peripheral mast cells, causing histamine release, which stimulates central histamine H1 receptors to induce hypothermia. This mechanism suggests that A3AR agonists will probably not be useful for clinical induction of hypothermia. PMID:26606937

  3. Changes in Transcriptional Output of Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells Following Resistance Exercise

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    Dubois et al. 1999). MMP9 is quite complex and elicits a widespread effect , including activation of other MMPs, regulating gene transcription and...immunodeficiency virus ( HIV ), or had been diagnosed with acquired immune deficiency syndrome ( AIDS ). Participants were also excluded if they were...1.79 or greater. Results Lactate and immune response A significant effect (P \\ 0.05) for time was observed for lactate. The resistance exercise induced a

  4. Short-Term Aerobic Exercise Training in Obese Humans with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Improves Whole-Body Insulin Sensitivity through Gains in Peripheral, not Hepatic Insulin Sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Winnick, Jason J.; Sherman, W. Michael; Habash, Diane L.; Stout, Michael B.; Failla, Mark L.; Belury, Martha A.; Schuster, Dara P.

    2008-01-01

    Context: Short-term aerobic exercise training can improve whole-body insulin sensitivity in humans with type 2 diabetes mellitus; however, the contributions of peripheral and hepatic tissues to these improvements are not known. Objective: Our objective was to determine the effect of 7-d aerobic exercise training on peripheral and hepatic insulin sensitivity during isoglycemic/hyperinsulinemic clamp conditions. Design: Subjects were randomly assigned to one of two groups. The energy balance group consumed an isocaloric diet consisting of 50% carbohydrate, 30% fat, and 20% protein for 15 d. The energy balance plus exercise group consumed a similar diet over the 15 d and performed 50-min of treadmill walking at 70% of maximum oxygen consumption maximum during the second 7 d of the 15-d study period. Each subject underwent an initial isoglycemic/hyperinsulinemic clamp after 1-wk dietary control and a second clamp after completing the study. Setting: The study was performed at Ohio State University’s General Clinical Research Center. Participants: There were 18 obese, mildly diabetic humans included in the study. Intervention: Aerobic exercise training was performed for 7 d. Main Outcome Measures: Whole-body, peripheral, and hepatic insulin sensitivity were measured. Results: Exercise training did not have an impact on peripheral glucose uptake or endogenous glucose production during the basal state or low-dose insulin. Likewise, it did not alter endogenous glucose production during high-dose insulin. However, 1-wk of exercise training increased both whole-body (P < 0.05) and peripheral insulin sensitivity (P < 0.0001) during high-dose insulin. Conclusion: Improvements to whole body insulin sensitivity after short-term aerobic exercise training are due to gains in peripheral, not heptic insulin sensitivity. PMID:18073312

  5. Evaluation of peripheral versus central effects of GABAB receptor activation using a novel, positive allosteric modulator of the GABAB receptor ADX71943, a pharmacological tool compound with a fully peripheral activity profile

    PubMed Central

    Kalinichev, M; Donovan-Rodriguez, T; Girard, F; Riguet, E; Rouillier, M; Bournique, B; Haddouk, H; Mutel, V; Poli, S

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose The GABAB receptor agonist, baclofen, has shown promising effects in patients suffering from pain, post-traumatic stress disorder, alcoholism, overactive bladder and gastroesophageal reflux disease. However, baclofen's short duration of action and side effects limit its wider use. Here we characterized a novel, GABAB receptor positive allosteric modulator (PAM) ADX71943. Experimental Approach In vitro, ADX71943 was assessed for pharmacological activity and selectivity using recombinant and native GABAB receptors. In vivo ADX71943 was assessed in the acetic acid-induced writhing (AAW) test in mice and formalin tests (FTs) in mice and rats. Marble burying (MB) and elevated plus maze (EPM) tests, rotarod, spontaneous locomotor activity (sLMA) and body temperature (BT) tests in mice and rats were used to investigate centrally-mediated effects. Key Results In vitro, in the presence of GABA, ADX71943 increased the potency and efficacy of agonists and showed selectivity at the GABAB receptor. ADX71943 reduced pain-associated behaviours in AAW; an effect blocked by GABAB receptor antagonist CGP63360. ADX71943 reduced pain in the FT in mice and rats, but was inactive in the MB and EPM despite reaching high concentrations in plasma. ADX71943 had no effect on BT, rotarod and sLMA. Conclusions and Implications ADX71943 showed consistent and target-related efficacy in tests of disorders that have a significant peripheral component (acute and chronic pain), while having no effect in those associated with centrally-mediated anxiety-like reactivity and side effects. Thus, ADX71943 is a useful pharmacological tool for delineation of peripherally- versus centrally-mediated effects of GABAB receptor activation. PMID:24923436

  6. TLR7 Agonist GS-9620 Is a Potent Inhibitor of Acute HIV-1 Infection in Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bam, Rujuta A.; Hansen, Derek; Irrinki, Alivelu; Mulato, Andrew; Jones, Gregg S.; Hesselgesser, Joseph; Frey, Christian R.; Cihlar, Tomas

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT GS-9620 is a potent and selective oral Toll-like receptor 7 (TLR7) agonist that directly activates plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs). GS-9620 suppressed hepatitis B virus (HBV) in animal models of chronic infection and transiently activated HIV expression ex vivo in latently infected peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from virally suppressed patients. Currently, GS-9620 is under clinical evaluation for treating chronic HBV infection and for reducing latent reservoirs in virally suppressed HIV-infected patients. Here, we investigated the in vitro anti-HIV-1 activity of GS-9620. GS-9620 potently inhibited viral replication in PBMCs, particularly when it was added 24 to 48 h prior to HIV infection (50% effective concentration = 27 nM). Depletion of pDCs but not other immune cell subsets from PBMC cultures suppressed GS-9620 antiviral activity. Although GS-9620 was inactive against HIV in purified CD4+ T cells and macrophages, HIV replication was potently inhibited by conditioned medium derived from GS-9620-treated pDC cultures when added to CD4+ T cells prior to infection. This suggests that GS-9620-mediated stimulation of PBMCs induced the production of a soluble factor(s) inhibiting HIV replication in trans. GS-9620-treated PBMCs primarily showed increased production of interferon alpha (IFN-α), and cotreatment with IFN-α-blocking antibodies reversed the HIV-1-inhibitory effect of GS-9620. Additional studies demonstrated that GS-9620 inhibited a postentry event in HIV replication at a step coincident with or prior to reverse transcription. The simultaneous activation of HIV-1 expression and inhibition of HIV-1 replication are important considerations for the clinical evaluation of GS-9620 since these antiviral effects may help restrict potential local HIV spread upon in vivo latency reversal. PMID:27799218

  7. Interaction between human peripheral blood monocytes and tumor promoters: Effect on growth differentiation and function in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Keisari, Y.; Bucana, C.; Markovich, S.; Campbell, D.E. )

    1990-08-01

    Studies on the differentiation and activation of human monocytes in tissue cultures have usually been limited by the deterioration of human monocytes and macrophages in long-term cultures. In this study, we attempted to establish long-term human monocyte/macrophage cultures using the phorbol ester 12-0 tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate (TPA), and we studied the morphology, function, and biochemical properties of such treated human blood monocytes. Enriched suspensions of monocytes were obtained using Ficoll-Hypaque gradient and cultured in the absence or presence of various concentrations of TPA. Samples were removed at different times and processed for scanning electron microscopy. Parallel samples were examined for numbers of adherent cells, phagocytosis, oxidative burst, beta-galactosidase assays, and lectin-mediated erythrolysis. TPA-treated monocytes survived in larger numbers in culture for up to 7 weeks and were more pleomorphic and exhibited higher beta-galactosidase activities after 14 days in culture than untreated monocytes. TPA-treated cells and untreated cells in long-term cultures showed a decrease in their oxidative burst activity while their phagocytic activity was not affected, and the TPA treatment augmented the lysis of wheat germ agglutinin-opsonized erythrocytes by the cultured monocytes. TPA treatment of adherent human monocytes resulted in cell cultures with increased numbers of viable and functionally adherent cells for extended periods of time and does not seem to interfere with the differentiation and maturation of the cells in culture.

  8. Central and peripheral hemodynamics in exercising humans: leg vs arm exercise.

    PubMed

    Calbet, J A L; González-Alonso, J; Helge, J W; Søndergaard, H; Munch-Andersen, T; Saltin, B; Boushel, R

    2015-12-01

    In humans, arm exercise is known to elicit larger increases in arterial blood pressure (BP) than leg exercise. However, the precise regulation of regional vascular conductances (VC) for the distribution of cardiac output with exercise intensity remains unknown. Hemodynamic responses were assessed during incremental upright arm cranking (AC) and leg pedalling (LP) to exhaustion (Wmax) in nine males. Systemic VC, peak cardiac output (Qpeak) (indocyanine green) and stroke volume (SV) were 18%, 23%, and 20% lower during AC than LP. The mean BP, the rate-pressure product and the associated myocardial oxygen demand were 22%, 12%, and 14% higher, respectively, during maximal AC than LP. Trunk VC was reduced to similar values at Wmax. At Wmax, muscle mass-normalized VC and fractional O2 extraction were lower in the arm than the leg muscles. However, this was compensated for during AC by raising perfusion pressure to increase O2 delivery, allowing a similar peak VO2 per kg of muscle mass in both extremities. In summary, despite a lower Qpeak during arm cranking the cardiovascular strain is much higher than during leg pedalling. The adjustments of regional conductances during incremental exercise to exhaustion depend mostly on the relative intensity of exercise and are limb-specific.

  9. Estimation methods for human circadian phase by use of peripheral tissues.

    PubMed

    Matsumura, Ritsuko; Node, Koichi; Akashi, Makoto

    2016-09-01

    Almost all living organisms, including humans, exhibit diurnal rhythms of physiology and behavior, which are driven by the circadian clock. Many studies have found that chronic misalignment between circadian and environmental/social rhythms carries a significant risk of various disorders, including sleep disorders, metabolic syndrome, cardiovascular diseases and cancer. However, irregular sleep-wake cycles and circadian maladjustment often cause 'social jet lag', which is minor but chronic jet-lag in our daily lives. Establishment of objective and convenient circadian-phase estimation methods in the clinical setting would therefore greatly contribute not only to resolving this global health problem but also to developing chronomedicine, a clinical approach for optimizing the time of day of treatments. Traditional melatonin-based methods have limitations with respect to circadian-phase evaluation; however, estimation methods based on clock gene expression may be able to compensate for these limitations. As a representative application of circadian-phase estimation based on clock gene expression, our method of using hair follicle cells may aid in the rapid clinical detection of circadian-related sleep problems, especially circadian rhythm sleep disorders that are masked because of forced adaptation to social time schedules.

  10. Quercetin protects human peripheral blood mononuclear cells from OTA-induced oxidative stress, genotoxicity, and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Periasamy, Ramyaa; Kalal, Iravathy Goud; Krishnaswamy, Rajashree; Viswanadha, VijayaPadma

    2016-07-01

    Ochratoxin A (OTA) is one of the most abundant food-contaminating mycotoxins world wide, and is detrimental to human and animal health. This study evaluated the protective effect of quercetin against OTA-induced cytotoxicity, genotoxicity, and inflammatory response in lymphocytes. Cytotoxicity determined by MTT assay revealed IC20 value of OTA to be 20 µM, which was restored to near control values by pretreatment with quercetin. Oxidative stress parameters such as antioxidant enzymes, LPO and PCC levels indicated that quercetin exerted a protective effect on OTA-induced oxidative stress. Quercetin exerted an antigenotoxic effect on OTA-induced genotoxicity, by significantly reducing the number of structural aberrations in chromosomes and comet parameters like, % olive tail moment from 2.76 ± 0.02 to 0.56 ± 0.02 and % tail DNA from 56.23 ± 2.56 to 12.36 ± 0.56 as determined by comet assay. OTA-induced NO, TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-8 were significantly reduced in the quercetin pretreated samples indicating its anti-inflammatory role. Our results demonstrate for the first time that quercetin exerts a cytoprotective effect against OTA-induced oxidative stress, genotoxicity, and inflammation in lymphocytes. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol 31: 855-865, 2016.

  11. Associations between whole peripheral blood fatty acids and DNA methylation in humans

    PubMed Central

    de la Rocha, Carmen; Pérez-Mojica, J. Eduardo; León, Silvia Zenteno-De; Cervantes-Paz, Braulio; Tristán-Flores, Fabiola E.; Rodríguez-Ríos, Dalia; Molina-Torres, Jorge; Ramírez-Chávez, Enrique; Alvarado-Caudillo, Yolanda; Carmona, F. Javier; Esteller, Manel; Hernández-Rivas, Rosaura; Wrobel, Katarzyna; Wrobel, Kazimierz; Zaina, Silvio; Lund, Gertrud

    2016-01-01

    Fatty acids (FA) modify DNA methylation in vitro, but limited information is available on whether corresponding associations exist in vivo and reflect any short-term effect of the diet. Associations between global DNA methylation and FAs were sought in blood from lactating infants (LI; n = 49) and adult males (AMM; n = 12) equally distributed across the three conventional BMI classes. AMM provided multiple samples at 2-hour intervals during 8 hours after either a single Western diet-representative meal (post-prandial samples) or no meal (fasting samples). Lipid/glucose profile, HDAC4 promoter and PDK4 5’UTR methylation were determined in AMM. Multiple regression analysis revealed that global (in LI) and both global and PDK4-specific DNA methylation (in AMM) were positively associated with eicosapentaenoic and arachidonic acid. HDAC4 methylation was inversely associated with arachidonic acid post-prandially in AMM. Global DNA methylation did not show any defined within-day pattern that would suggest a short-term response to the diet. Nonetheless, global DNA methylation was higher in normal weight subjects both post-prandially and in fasting and coincided with higher polyunsaturated relative to monounsaturated and saturated FAs. We show for the first time strong associations of DNA methylation with specific FAs in two human cohorts of distinct age, diet and postnatal development stage. PMID:27181711

  12. Effects of folic acid deficiency and MTHFRC677T polymorphisms on cytotoxicity in human peripheral blood lymphocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Xiayu; Liang Ziqing; Zou Tianning; Wang Xu

    2009-02-13

    Apoptosis (APO) and necrosis (NEC) are two different types of cell death occurring in response to cellular stress factors. Cells with DNA damage may undergo APO or NEC. Folate is an essential micronutrient associated with DNA synthesis, repair and methylation. Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) regulates intracellular folate metabolism. Folate deficiency and MTHFR C677T polymorphisms have been shown to be related to DNA damage. To verify the cytotoxic effects of folate deficiency on cells with different MTHFR C677T genotypes, 15 human peripheral lymphocyte cases with different MTHFR C677T genotypes were cultured in folic acid (FA)-deficient and -sufficient media for 9 days. Cytotoxicity was quantified using the frequencies of APO and NEC as endpoints, the nuclear division index (NDI), and the number of viable cells (NVC). These results showed that FA is an important factor in reducing cytotoxicity and increasing cell proliferation. Lymphocytes with the TT genotype proliferated easily under stress and exhibited different responses to FA deficiency than lymphocytes with the CC and CT genotypes. A TT individual may accumulate more cytotoxicity under cytotoxic stress, suggesting that the effects of FA deficiency on cytotoxicity are greater than the effects in individuals with the other MTHFR C677T variants.

  13. Induction and disappearance of DNA strand breaks in human peripheral blood lymphocytes and fibroblasts treated with methyl methanesulfonate

    SciTech Connect

    Boerrigter, M.E.T.I.; Mullaart, E.; Vijg, J. )

    1991-01-01

    The induction and disappearance of DNA single-strand breaks (SSB) in human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) and fibroblasts exposed to methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) were investigated by using the alkaline filter elution assay. In the two cell types, identical amounts of SSB were induced during a 45-minute treatment with a given dose of MMS. In quiescent PBL only 9{plus minus}4% (mean {plus minus} SD) of the induced SSB had disappeared at 1 hour after exposure, whereas in phytohemagglutinin-stimulated PBL, 23 {plus minus} 12% disappeared within the same repair period. The accumulation of SSB in PBL, but not in fibroblasts, during MMS exposure in the presence of the excision-repair inhibitor 1-{beta}-D-arabinofuranosylcytosine indicated the utilization of different repair pathways in these two cell types. The generally lower rate of disappearance of MMS-induced SSB in PBL as compared to fibroblasts correlated with an increased loss of cell viability, measured by determining the incorporation of ({sup 3}H)thymidine.

  14. Micronuclei in human peripheral blood lymphocytes exposed to mixed beams of X-rays and alpha particles.

    PubMed

    Staaf, Elina; Brehwens, Karl; Haghdoost, Siamak; Nievaart, Sander; Pachnerova-Brabcova, Katerina; Czub, Joanna; Braziewicz, Janusz; Wojcik, Andrzej

    2012-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyse the cytogenetic effect of exposing human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) to a mixed beam of alpha particles and X-rays. Whole blood collected from one donor was exposed to different doses of alpha particles ((241)Am), X-rays and a combination of both. All exposures were carried out at 37 °C. Three independent experiments were performed. Micronuclei (MN) in binucleated PBL were scored as the endpoint. Moreover, the size of MN was measured. The results show that exposure of PBL to a mixed beam of high and low linear energy transfer radiation led to significantly higher than expected frequencies of MN. The measurement of MN size did not reveal any differences between the effect of alpha particles and mixed beam. In conclusion, a combined exposure of PBL to alpha particles and X-rays leads to a synergistic effect as measured by the frequency of MN. From the analysis of MN distributions, we conclude that the increase was due to an impaired repair of X-ray-induced DNA damage.

  15. Dry olive leaf extract counteracts L-thyroxine-induced genotoxicity in human peripheral blood leukocytes in vitro.

    PubMed

    Topalović, Dijana Žukovec; Živković, Lada; Čabarkapa, Andrea; Djelić, Ninoslav; Bajić, Vladan; Dekanski, Dragana; Spremo-Potparević, Biljana

    2015-01-01

    The thyroid hormones change the rate of basal metabolism, modulating the consumption of oxygen and causing production of reactive oxygen species, which leads to the development of oxidative stress and DNA strand breaks. Olive (Olea europaea L.) leaf contains many potentially bioactive compounds, making it one of the most potent natural antioxidants. The objective of this study was to evaluate the genotoxicity of L-thyroxine and to investigate antioxidative and antigenotoxic potential of the standardized oleuropein-rich dry olive leaf extract (DOLE) against hydrogen peroxide and L-thyroxine-induced DNA damage in human peripheral blood leukocytes by using the comet assay. Various concentrations of the extract were tested with both DNA damage inducers, under two different experimental conditions, pretreatment and posttreatment. Results indicate that L-thyroxine exhibited genotoxic effect and that DOLE displayed protective effect against thyroxine-induced genotoxicity. The number of cells with DNA damage, was significantly reduced, in both pretreated and posttreated samples (P < 0.05). Comparing the beneficial effect of all tested concentrations of DOLE, in both experimental protocols, it appears that extract was more effective in reducing DNA damage in the pretreatment, exhibiting protective role against L-thyroxine effect. This feature of DOLE can be explained by its capacity to act as potent free radical scavenger.

  16. Dry Olive Leaf Extract Counteracts L-Thyroxine-Induced Genotoxicity in Human Peripheral Blood Leukocytes In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Žukovec Topalović, Dijana; Živković, Lada; Čabarkapa, Andrea; Djelić, Ninoslav; Bajić, Vladan; Spremo-Potparević, Biljana

    2015-01-01

    The thyroid hormones change the rate of basal metabolism, modulating the consumption of oxygen and causing production of reactive oxygen species, which leads to the development of oxidative stress and DNA strand breaks. Olive (Olea europaea L.) leaf contains many potentially bioactive compounds, making it one of the most potent natural antioxidants. The objective of this study was to evaluate the genotoxicity of L-thyroxine and to investigate antioxidative and antigenotoxic potential of the standardized oleuropein-rich dry olive leaf extract (DOLE) against hydrogen peroxide and L-thyroxine-induced DNA damage in human peripheral blood leukocytes by using the comet assay. Various concentrations of the extract were tested with both DNA damage inducers, under two different experimental conditions, pretreatment and posttreatment. Results indicate that L-thyroxine exhibited genotoxic effect and that DOLE displayed protective effect against thyroxine-induced genotoxicity. The number of cells with DNA damage, was significantly reduced, in both pretreated and posttreated samples (P < 0.05). Comparing the beneficial effect of all tested concentrations of DOLE, in both experimental protocols, it appears that extract was more effective in reducing DNA damage in the pretreatment, exhibiting protective role against L-thyroxine effect. This feature of DOLE can be explained by its capacity to act as potent free radical scavenger. PMID:25789081

  17. The "killer cell story" in recurrent miscarriage: Association between activated peripheral lymphocytes and uterine natural killer cells.

    PubMed

    Kuon, R J; Vomstein, K; Weber, M; Müller, F; Seitz, C; Wallwiener, S; Strowitzki, T; Schleussner, E; Markert, U R; Daniel, V; Toth, B

    2017-02-01

    Peripheral and uterine NK cells (pNK, uNK) can be distinguished according to their receptor expression. Recent studies indicate an association of elevated pNK and uNK with recurrent miscarriage (RM). This study aimed to analyze pNK and uNK in patients with RM and healthy controls. Out of n=590 RM patients screened according to a standard diagnostic protocol, n=268 couples with ≥3 consecutive RM were identified. Subgroups consisted of n=151 primary RM (pRM), n=85 secondary RM (sRM), n=32 tertiary RM (tRM) and n=42 healthy controls. Finally, n=147 idiopathic RM (iRM) and n=121 non-iRM patients were identified. Peripheral blood levels of CD45+CD3-CD56+CD16+ NK cells were determined in non-pregnant patients and controls in the mid-luteal phase by FACS. In n=129 RM patients a uterine biopsy was taken to evaluate CD56+ NK cells by immunohistochemistry. PRM showed higher absolute pNK than sRM (median/μl (Q1;Q3): 234 (147;306) vs 176 (128;245), p=0.02). Further a trend towards higher pNK percentages in pRM was detected. UNK numbers did not differ between RM subgroups and did not correlate with pNK. However, the rate of highly elevated uNK was increased in iRM compared to non-iRM patients (p=0.04). Further, higher numbers of CD45+CD3-DR+ (p<0.01) and CD45+CD3+CD8+DR+ (p=0.04) peripheral lymphocytes were associated with higher uNK numbers. In conclusion, elevated pNK were present in pRM patients. Although pNK and uNK numbers did not correlate, the association between high CD45+CD3-DR+ and CD45+CD3+CD8+DR+ peripheral lymphocytes and uNK might indicate that activated NK, B and T cells provide cytokines for the differentiation of uNK.

  18. Prevalence, self-care behaviors, and self-care activities for peripheral neuropathy symptoms of HIV/AIDS.

    PubMed

    Nicholas, Patrice K; Voss, Joachim; Wantland, Dean; Lindgren, Teri; Huang, Emily; Holzemer, William L; Cuca, Yvette; Moezzi, Shahnaz; Portillo, Carmen; Willard, Suzanne; Arudo, John; Kirksey, Kenn; Corless, Inge B; Rosa, María E; Robinson, Linda; Hamilton, Mary J; Sefcik, Elizabeth; Human, Sarie; Rivero-Mendez, Marta; Maryland, Mary; Nokes, Kathleen M; Eller, Lucille; Kemppainen, Jeanne; Dawson-Rose, Carol; Brion, John M; Bunch, Elli H; Shannon, Maureen; Nicholas, Thomas P; Viamonte-Ros, Ana; Bain, Catherine A

    2010-03-01

    As part of a larger randomized controlled trial examining the efficacy of an HIV/AIDS symptom management manual (n = 775), this study examined the prevalence of peripheral neuropathy in HIV-infected individuals at 12 sites in the USA, Puerto Rico, and Africa. Neuropathy was reported by 44% of the sample; however, only 29.4% reported initiating self-care behaviors to address the neuropathy symptoms. Antiretroviral therapy was found to increase the frequency of neuropathy symptoms, with an increased mean intensity of 28%. A principal axis factor analysis with Promax rotation was used to assess the relationships in the frequency of use of the 18 self-care activities for neuropathy, revealing three distinct factors: (i) an interactive self-care factor; (ii) a complementary medicine factor; and (iii) a third factor consisting of the negative health items of smoking, alcohol, and street drugs. The study's results suggest that peripheral neuropathy is a common symptom and the presence of neuropathy is associated with self-care behaviors to ameliorate HIV symptoms. The implications for nursing practice include the assessment and evaluation of nursing interventions related to management strategies for neuropathy.

  19. Slit-Robo GTPase-activating proteins are differentially expressed in murine dorsal root ganglia: modulation by peripheral nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhi-Bing; Zhang, Hai-Ying; Zhao, Jiu-Hong; Zhao, Wei; Zhao, Dan; Zheng, Lin-Feng; Zhang, Xian-Fang; Liao, Xiao-Ping; Yi, Xi-Nan

    2012-04-01

    The Slit-Robo GTPase-activating proteins (srGAPs) play an important role in neurite outgrowth and axon guidance; however, little is known about its role in nerve regeneration after injury. Here, we studied the expression of srGAPs in mouse dorsal root ganglia (DRG) following sciatic nerve transection (SNT) using morphometric and immunohistochemical techniques. Reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analysis indicated that srGAP1 and srGAP3, but not srGAP2, were expressed in normal adult DRG. Following unilateral SNT, elevated mRNA and protein levels of srGAP1 and srGAP3 were detected in the ipsilateral relative to contralateral L(3-4) DRGs from day 3 to day 14. Immunohistochemical results showed that srGAP1 and srGAP3 were largely expressed in subpopulations of DRG neurons in naïve DRGs. However, after SNT, srGAP3 in neurons was significantly increased in the ipsilateral relative to contralateral DRGs, which peaked at day 7 to day 14. Interestingly, DRG neurons with strong srGAP3 labeling also coexpressed Robo2 after peripheral nerve injury. These results suggest that srGAPs are differentially expressed in murine DRG and srGAP3 are the predominant form. Moreover, srGAP3 may participate in Slit-Robo signaling in response to peripheral nerve injury or the course of nerve regeneration.

  20. TT virus (TTV) loads associated with different peripheral blood cell types and evidence for TTV replication in activated mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Maggi, F; Fornai, C; Zaccaro, L; Morrica, A; Vatteroni, M L; Isola, P; Marchi, S; Ricchiuti, A; Pistello, M; Bendinelli, M

    2001-06-01

    TT virus (TTV) loads associated with the peripheral blood cells of seven patients known to carry the virus in plasma were investigated by real-time PCR. Whereas red cells/platelets were uniformly negative, six and four patients yielded positive peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and polymorphonuclear leukocytes, respectively, but viral titres were generally low. Fractionation of PBMCs into monocyte- and B, T4, and T8 lymphocyte-enriched subpopulations showed no pattern in the viral loads that might suggest the preferential association of TTV to one or more specific cell types. TTV-negative PBMCs absorbed measurable amounts of virus when incubated with infected plasma at 4 degrees C. Furthermore, cultures of TTV-negative phytohaemagglutinin-stimulated PBMCs exposed in vitro to virus-positive plasma and faecal extracts released considerable levels of infectious TTV into the supernatant fluid and the same was true for TTV-positive stimulated PBMCs. These results indicate that, whereas freshly harvested resting PBMCs seem to produce little, if any TTV, stimulated PBMCs actively replicate the virus.

  1. Human T cell priming assay: depletion of peripheral blood lymphocytes in CD25(+) cells improves the in vitro detection of weak allergen-specific T cells.

    PubMed

    Vocanson, Marc; Achachi, Amine; Mutez, Virginie; Cluzel-Tailhardat, Magalie; Varlet, Béatrice Le; Rozières, Aurore; Fournier, Philippe; Nicolas, Jean-François

    2014-01-01

    To develop an in vitro assay that recapitulates the key event of allergic contact dermatitis (ACD), that is the priming of effector T cells by hapten-presenting dendritic cells, and then allows for the sensitive detection of chemical allergens represents a major challenge. Classical human T cell priming assays (hTCPA) that have been developed in the past, using hapten-loaded monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MDDCs) as antigen-presenting cells and peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) as responding cells, were not efficient to prime T cells to common allergens with moderate/weak sensitizing properties. Recent progress in the understanding of the effector and regulatory mechanisms of ACD have shown that T cell priming requires efficient uptake of allergens by immunogenic DCs and that it is controlled by several subsets of regulatory cells including CD25(+) Tregs. We therefore analyzed various parameters involved in allergen-specific T cell activation in vitro and showed that priming of allergen-specific T cells is hampered by several subsets of immune cells comprising CD1a(neg) DCs, CD25(+) T cells, and CD56(+) regulatory cells.CD4(+)CD25(+)FoxP3(+) Tregs prevented the in vitro T cell priming to moderate/weak allergens, and depletion of human PBLs in CD25(+) cells significantly increased specific T cell proliferation and IFN-γ secretion. CD56(+) cells exerted an additional control of T cell priming since co-depletion of both CD56(+) and CD25(+) cells improved the magnitude of chemical-specific T cell activation. Finally, CD1a(low) MDDCs were able to inhibit T cell activation obtained by allergen-pulsed CD1a(high) MDDC. Moreover, we showed that uptake by DC of allergen-encapsulated nanoparticles significantly increased their activation status and their ability to prompt specific T cell activation. Hence, by combining the different strategies, i.e., depletion of CD25(+) and CD56(+) cells, use of CD1a(high) MDDC, and nanoparticle encapsulation of allergens, it was

  2. Cerebral Apolipoprotein-D Is Hypoglycosylated Compared to Peripheral Tissues and Is Variably Expressed in Mouse and Human Brain Regions

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hongyun; Ruberu, Kalani; Karl, Tim; Garner, Brett

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that cerebral apoD levels increase with age and in Alzheimer’s disease (AD). In addition, loss of cerebral apoD in the mouse increases sensitivity to lipid peroxidation and accelerates AD pathology. Very little data are available, however, regarding the expression of apoD protein levels in different brain regions. This is important as both brain lipid peroxidation and neurodegeneration occur in a region-specific manner. Here we addressed this using western blotting of seven different regions (olfactory bulb, hippocampus, frontal cortex, striatum, cerebellum, thalamus and brain stem) of the mouse brain. Our data indicate that compared to most brain regions, the hippocampus is deficient in apoD. In comparison to other major organs and tissues (liver, spleen, kidney, adrenal gland, heart and skeletal muscle), brain apoD was approximately 10-fold higher (corrected for total protein levels). Our analysis also revealed that brain apoD was present at a lower apparent molecular weight than tissue and plasma apoD. Utilising peptide N-glycosidase-F and neuraminidase to remove N-glycans and sialic acids, respectively, we found that N-glycan composition (but not sialylation alone) were responsible for this reduction in molecular weight. We extended the studies to an analysis of human brain regions (hippocampus, frontal cortex, temporal cortex and cerebellum) where we found that the hippocampus had the lowest levels of apoD. We also confirmed that human brain apoD was present at a lower molecular weight than in plasma. In conclusion, we demonstrate apoD protein levels are variable across different brain regions, that apoD levels are much higher in the brain compared to other tissues and organs, and that cerebral apoD has a lower molecular weight than peripheral apoD; a phenomenon that is due to the N-glycan content of the protein. PMID:26829325

  3. In vitro expression of hard metal dust (WC-Co) - responsive genes in human peripheral blood mononucleated cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lombaert, Nooemi Lison, Dominique; Van Hummelen, Paul; Kirsch-Volders, Micheline

    2008-03-01

    Hard metals consist of tungsten carbide (WC) and metallic cobalt (Co) particles and are important industrial materials produced for their extreme hardness and high wear resistance properties. While occupational exposure to metallic Co alone is apparently not associated with an increased risk of cancer, the WC-Co particle mixture was shown to be carcinogenic in exposed workers. The in vitro mutagenic/apoptogenic potential of WC-Co in human peripheral blood mononucleated cells was previously demonstrated by us. This study aimed at obtaining a broader view of the pathways responsible for WC-Co induced carcinogenicity, and in particular genotoxicity and apoptosis. We analyzed the profile of gene expression induced in vitro by WC-Co versus control (24 h treatment) in human PBMC and monocytes using microarrays. The most significantly up-regulated pathways for WC-Co treated PBMC were apoptosis and stress/defense response; the most down-regulated was immune response. For WC-Co treated monocytes the most significantly up- and down-regulated pathways were nucleosome/chromatin assembly and immune response respectively. Quantitative RT-PCR data for a selection of the most strongly modulated genes (HMOX1, HSPA1A, HSPA1L, BNIP3, BNIP3L, ADORA2B, MT3, PLA2G7, TNFAIP6), and some additionally chosen apoptosis related genes (BCL2, BAX, FAS, FASL, TNF{alpha}), confirmed the microarray data after WC-Co exposure and demonstrated limited differences between the Co-containing compounds. Overall, this study provides the first analysis of gene expression induced by the WC-Co mixture showing a large profile of gene modulation and giving a preliminary indication for a hypoxia mimicking environment induced by WC-Co exposure.

  4. Cultured human peripheral blood mononuclear cells alter their gene expression when challenged with endocrine-disrupting chemicals.

    PubMed

    Wens, B; De Boever, P; Verbeke, M; Hollanders, K; Schoeters, G

    2013-01-07

    Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) have the potential to interfere with the hormonal system and may negatively influence human health. Microarray analysis was used in this study to investigate differential gene expression in human peripheral blood cells (PBMCs) after in vitro exposure to EDCs. PBMCs, isolated from blood samples of four male and four female healthy individuals, were exposed in vitro for 18h to either a dioxin-like polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB126, 1μM), a non-dioxin-like polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB153, 10μM), a brominated flame retardant (BDE47, 10μM), a perfluorinated alkyl acid (PFOA, 10μM) or bisphenol (BPA, 10μM). ANOVA analysis revealed a significant change in the expression of 862 genes as a result of EDC exposure. The gender of the donors did not affect gene expression. Hierarchical cluster analysis created three groups and clustered: (1) PCB126-exposed samples, (2) PCB153 and BDE47, (3) PFOA and BPA. The number of differentially expressed genes varied per compound and ranged from 60 to 192 when using fold change and multiplicity corrected p-value as filtering criteria. Exposure to PCB126 induced the AhR signaling pathway. BDE47 and PCB153 are known to disrupt thyroid metabolism and exposure influenced the expression of the nuclear receptors PPARγ and ESR2, respectively. BPA and PFOA did not induce significant changes in the expression of known nuclear receptors. Overall, each compound produced a unique gene expression signature affecting pathways and GO processes linked to metabolism and inflammation. Twenty-nine genes were significantly altered in expression under all experimental conditions. Six of these genes (HSD11B2, MMP11, ADIPOQ, CEL, DUSP9 and TUB) could be associated with obesity and metabolic syndrome. In conclusion, microarray analysis identified that PBMCs altered their gene expression response in vitro when challenged with EDCs. Our screening approach has identified a number of gene candidates that warrant further

  5. Effects of peripheral μ, δ, and Κ-opioid receptor agonists on the levels of anxiety and motor activity of rats.

    PubMed

    Alexeeva, E V; Nazarova, G A; Sudakov, S K

    2012-09-01

    The effects of intragastric administration of μ-, δ, and Κ-opioid receptor agonists DAMGO, DADLE, and ICI 204,448, respectively, on the anxiety and motor activity of rats in an elevated plus-maze were studied. Peripheral administration of ICI 204,448 produced an anxiolytic effect, but had no effect on motor activity of rats. DAMGO and DADLE reduced motor activity; DADLE also increased anxiety. The data on the opposite effects of ICI 204,448 and DADLE on anxiety confirmed our previous hypothesis on the interactions between the central and peripheral components of the endogenous opioid system.

  6. Exposure to cypermethrin and mancozeb alters the expression profile of THBS1, SPP1, FEZ1 and GPNMB in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Mandarapu, Rajesh; Prakhya, Balakrishna Murthy

    2016-07-01

    The complex immune system displays a coordinated transcriptional response to xenobiotic exposure by altering expression of designated transcription factors that, in turn, trigger immune responses. Despite the identification of several transcription factors that contribute to regulatory response, very little is known about the specific role of factors that are triggered due to exposure to obnoxious pesticides. Here, for the first time, alterations in human peripheral blood lymphocyte expression of transcriptional factors - thrombospondin-1 (THBS-1), secretory phospho-protein-1 (SPP-1), glycoprotein non-metastatic-β (GPNMB) and fasciculation and elongation factor ζ-1 (FEZ-1), due to in vitro exposure to the crop protection chemicals cypermethrin and mancozeb are reported. Results revealed significant changes in expression profiles due to mancozeb exposure, supporting its immune dysfunction potential; in contrast, cypermethrin exposure did not cause significant changes. Based on these effects on gene expression across the doses tested, it was likely key components of immune mechanisms such as proliferation, cell adhesion, apoptosis and cell activation in human PBMC were affected. Although these data are from in vitro experiments, the results point out the potential role for changes in these factors in the etiology of defective T-cell immune function seen in humans occupationally exposed to crop protection chemicals like mancozeb. These studies suggest the involvement of transcription factors in regulation of pesticide-induced immune dysfunction; these studies also represent a novel approach for identifying potential immune-related dysfunctions due to exposure to pesticides. Further studies are needed to better understand the functional significance of these in vitro findings.

  7. Can Melatonin Act as an Antioxidant in Hydrogen Peroxide-Induced Oxidative Stress Model in Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells?

    PubMed Central

    Emamgholipour, Solaleh; Hossein-Nezhad, Arash; Ansari, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. We aimed to investigate the possible effects of melatonin on gene expressions and activities of MnSOD and catalase under conditions of oxidative stress induced by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Materials and Methods. PBMCs were isolated from healthy subjects and treated as follows: (1) control (only with 0.1% DMSO for 12 h); (2) melatonin (1 mM) for 12 h; (3) H2O2 (250 μM) for 2 h; (4) H2O2 (250 μM) for 2 h following 10 h pretreatment with melatonin (1 mM). The gene expression was evaluated by real-time PCR. MnSOD and catalase activities in PBMCs were determined by colorimetric assays. Results. Pretreatment of PBMCs with melatonin significantly augmented expression and activity of MnSOD which were diminished by H2O2. Melatonin treatment of PBMCs caused a significant upregulation of catalase by almost 2-fold in comparison with untreated cells. However, activity and expression of catalase increased by 1.5-fold in PBMCs under H2O2-induced oxidative stress compared with untreated cell. Moreover, pretreatment of PBMCs with melatonin resulted in a significant 1.8-fold increase in catalase expression compared to PBMCs treated only with H2O2. Conclusion. It seems that melatonin could prevent from undesirable impacts of H2O2-induced oxidative stress on MnSOD downregulation. Moreover, melatonin could promote inductive effect of H2O2 on catalase mRNA expression. PMID:26881079

  8. Human body contour data based activity recognition.

    PubMed

    Myagmarbayar, Nergui; Yuki, Yoshida; Imamoglu, Nevrez; Gonzalez, Jose; Otake, Mihoko; Yu, Wenwei

    2013-01-01

    This research work is aimed to develop autonomous bio-monitoring mobile robots, which are capable of tracking and measuring patients' motions, recognizing the patients' behavior based on observation data, and providing calling for medical personnel in emergency situations in home environment. The robots to be developed will bring about cost-effective, safe and easier at-home rehabilitation to most motor-function impaired patients (MIPs). In our previous research, a full framework was established towards this research goal. In this research, we aimed at improving the human activity recognition by using contour data of the tracked human subject extracted from the depth images as the signal source, instead of the lower limb joint angle data used in the previous research, which are more likely to be affected by the motion of the robot and human subjects. Several geometric parameters, such as, the ratio of height to weight of the tracked human subject, and distance (pixels) between centroid points of upper and lower parts of human body, were calculated from the contour data, and used as the features for the activity recognition. A Hidden Markov Model (HMM) is employed to classify different human activities from the features. Experimental results showed that the human activity recognition could be achieved with a high correct rate.

  9. Lymphocyctes Tgammadelta in clinically normal skin and peripheral blood of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and their correlation with disease activity.

    PubMed Central

    Robak, E; Niewiadomska, H; Robak, T; Bartkowiak, J; Błoński, J Z; Woźniacka, A; Pomorski, L; Sysa-Jedrezejowska, A

    2001-01-01

    Human Tgammadelta lymphocytes constitute from 1 to 15% of all peripheral blood lymphocytes. Recent work has demonstrated that this population plays a major role in the pathogenesis of infectious and immune diseases. Increased numbers of gammadelta T cells have been found in affected skin from systemic sclerosis and chronic cutaneous lupus erythematosus patients. In our study, we have determined the numbers of Tgammadelta lymphocytes and their subpopulations in peripheral blood from 29 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and in 19 healthy volunteers using flow cytometry and specific monoclonal antibodies. The same cells in uninvolved skin from SLE patients and human controls using immunohistochemical analysis were estimated. T-Cell receptor (TCR) delta chain gene rearrangement was identified with primers for Vdelta1, Vdelta2 and Vdelta3 by the polymerase chain reaction. Statistical analysis showed a significantly decreased number of gammadelta T cells in SLE patients (26.4+/-16.9/microl) compared with the control group (55.3+/-20.6/microl (p < 0.001). The number of Vdelta2 TCR+ and Vgamma9 TCR+ subpopulations was also lower in SLE patients than in healthy persons. No statistical correlation between disease activity and the number of gammadelta T cells was demonstrated. The percentage of Tgammadelta lymphocytes in clinically normal skin from SLE patients was twice (22.0+/-9.4%) that found in the skin from healthy persons (11.1+/-5.5%) (p < 0.002). Higher percentages of the Vdelta2 TCR+ and Vgamma9 TCR+ subpopulation of lymphocytes were found in the skin from SLE patients. We have also found positive correlation between the percentage of Tgammadelta lymphocytes in skin and the activity of SLE (r=0.594, p < 0.001), and between subpopulation Vdelta3 TCR+ and disease activity (r=0.659, p< 0.001). In conclusion, the results of our studies demonstrate that, in patients with SLE, accumulation of Tgammadelta lymphocytes can be seen in clinically normal skin, and

  10. Classification of Activity Engagement in Individuals with Severe Physical Disabilities Using Signals of the Peripheral Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Kushki, Azadeh; Andrews, Alexander J.; Power, Sarah D.; King, Gillian; Chau, Tom

    2012-01-01

    Communication barriers often result in exclusion of children and youth with disabilities from activities and social settings that are essential to their psychosocial development. In particular, difficulties in describing their experiences of activities and social settings hinder our understanding of the factors that promote inclusion and participation of this group of individuals. To address this specific communication challenge, we examined the feasibility of developing a language-free measure of experience in youth with severe physical disabilities. To do this, we used the activity of the peripheral nervous system to detect patterns of psychological arousal associated with activities requiring different patterns of cognitive/affective and interpersonal involvement (activity engagement). We demonstrated that these signals can differentiate among patterns of arousal associated with these activities with high accuracy (two levels: 81%, three levels: 74%). These results demonstrate the potential for development of a real-time, motor- and language-free measure for describing the experiences of children and youth with disabilities. PMID:22363432

  11. Lower stress system activity and higher peripheral inflammation in competitive ballroom dancers.

    PubMed

    Berndt, Christiane; Strahler, Jana; Kirschbaum, Clemens; Rohleder, Nicolas

    2012-12-01

    Although regular physical exercise is beneficial for health, competitive ballroom dancers anecdotally report increased disease susceptibility. This study aims to uncover possible biological mechanisms and pathways that may lead to higher disease susceptibility in a population of otherwise healthy young athletes. Experienced ballroom dancers and healthy controls provided blood and saliva samples in order to assess diurnal cortisol and alpha-amylase (sAA) output as well as inflammatory parameters interleukin (IL)-6 and C-reactive protein (CRP). We found diurnal cortisol and sAA output to be significantly lower in dancers. Additionally, higher levels in IL-6 but not in CRP were shown in dancers. Dancers described themselves as being more anxious and reported more physical health complaints. Competitive ballroom dancers show evidence for hypoactivity in stress systems and peripheral inflammation along with more self-reported physical complaints. Therefore, competitive ballroom dancing represents a chronic stressor that can lead to important functional consequences. It remains to be investigated whether these alterations are causally related to health.

  12. Nerve compression activates selective nociceptive pathways and upregulates peripheral sodium channel expression in Schwann cells.

    PubMed

    Frieboes, Laura Rummler; Palispis, Winnie Anne; Gupta, Ranjan

    2010-06-01

    Chronic nerve compression (CNC) injuries, such as carpal tunnel syndrome, are common musculoskeletal conditions that affect patients with debilitating loss of sensory function and pain. Although early detection and treatment are important, our understanding of pain-related molecular mechanisms remains largely unclear. Here we investigate these mechanisms using an animal model for CNC injury. To confirm that CNC injury induces pain, we assessed expression of c-fos, a gene that is rapidly expressed in spinal sensory afferents in response to painful peripheral stimuli, and TNF-alpha and IL-6, two proinflammatory cytokines that are crucial to development of inflammatory-mediated pain. Results show c-fos upregulation 1-2 weeks postinjury in the absence of TNF-alpha or IL-6 expression, indicating increased neural sensitivity without an inflammatory response. This is consistent with previous studies that showed no morphologic evidence of inflammation in the CNC model. Surprisingly, we also found de novo expression of Na(V)1.8, a sodium channel linked to the development of neuropathic pain, in endoneurial Schwann cells following injury. Until now, Na(V)1.8 expression was thought to be restricted to sensory neurons. CNC injury appears to be a unique model of noninflammatory neuropathic pain. Further investigation of the underlying molecular basis could yield promising targets for early diagnosis and treatment.

  13. S-Nitrosylation Proteome Profile of Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells in Human Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Spratt, Heidi M.; Gupta, Shivali; Petersen, John R.; Kuyumcu-Martinez, Muge N.

    2016-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) protects the heart against ischemic injury; however, NO- and superoxide-dependent S-nitrosylation (S-NO) of cysteines can affect function of target proteins and play a role in disease outcome. We employed 2D-GE with thiol-labeling FL-maleimide dye and MALDI-TOF MS/MS to capture the quantitative changes in abundance and S-NO proteome of HF patients (versus healthy controls, n = 30/group). We identified 93 differentially abundant (59-increased/34-decreased) and 111 S-NO-modified (63-increased/48-decreased) protein spots, respectively, in HF subjects (versus controls, fold-change | ≥1.5|, p ≤ 0.05). Ingenuity pathway analysis of proteome datasets suggested that the pathways involved in phagocytes' migration, free radical production, and cell death were activated and fatty acid metabolism was decreased in HF subjects. Multivariate adaptive regression splines modeling of datasets identified a panel of proteins that will provide >90% prediction success in classifying HF subjects. Proteomic profiling identified ATP-synthase, thrombospondin-1 (THBS1), and vinculin (VCL) as top differentially abundant and S-NO-modified proteins, and these proteins were verified by Western blotting and ELISA in different set of HF subjects. We conclude that differential abundance and S-NO modification of proteins serve as a mechanism in regulating cell viability and free radical production, and THBS1 and VCL evaluation will potentially be useful in the prediction of heart failure. PMID:27635260

  14. A Long-Gap Peripheral Nerve Injury Therapy Using Human Skeletal Muscle-Derived Stem Cells (Sk-SCs): An Achievement of Significant Morphological, Numerical and Functional Recovery

    PubMed Central

    Hirata, Maki; Nakajima, Nobuyuki; Saito, Kosuke; Hashimoto, Hiroyuki; Soeda, Shuichi; Uchiyama, Yoshiyasu; Watanabe, Masahiko

    2016-01-01

    Losses in vital functions of the somatic motor and sensory nervous system are induced by severe long-gap peripheral nerve transection injury. In such cases, autolo