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Sample records for activated human protein

  1. Detection of protein C activation in humans.

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, K A; Kass, B L; Beeler, D L; Rosenberg, R D

    1984-01-01

    We have developed a radioimmunoassay (RIA) for the dodecapeptide that is liberated from protein C when this zymogen is activated by thrombin bound to thrombomodulin present on the vascular endothelium. The protein C activation peptide (PCP) was synthesized using the solid-phase method of Merrifield. Antisera were raised in rabbits to the synthetic analogue coupled to bovine serum albumin with glutaraldehyde. The antibody population obtained was used together with a 125I-labeled tyrosinated ligand and various concentrations of unlabeled PCP to construct a double antibody RIA capable of measuring as little as 10 pM of this component. We have established that the synthetic dodecapeptide has the same immunoreactivity as the native peptide and that the reactivity of protein C is less than 1/2,000 that of PCP on a molar basis. The extremely low levels of peptide in normal individuals as well as the nonspecific contributions of plasma constituents to the immunoreactive signal, necessitated the development of a procedure by which the PCP could be reproducibly extracted from plasma and concentrated approximately 20-fold. This methodology permitted us to demonstrate that the plasma PCP levels in 17 normal donors averaged 6.47 pM, and that elevations up to 180 pM were observed in individuals with evidence of disseminated intravascular coagulation. The validity of these measurements of protein C activation is supported by the fact that, in both of these situations, the RIA signal migrates on reverse-phase high pressure liquid chromatography in a manner identical to that of the native dodecapeptide. We have also noted that the mean PCP concentration in seven patients fully anticoagulated with warfarin averaged 2.61 pM. Our studies also show that PCP is cleared from the plasma of primates with a t1/2 of approximately 5 min. Given that the t1/2 of activated protein C is estimated to be 10-15 min, the latter enzyme appears to exert its effects on the activated cofactors of the

  2. Bryostatins activate protein kinase C in intact human platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J.B.; Tallant, E.A.; Pettit, G.R.; Wallace, R.W.

    1986-05-01

    Bryostatins, macrocyclic lactones isolated from a marine bryozoan, have antineoplastic activity in the P388 lymphocytic leukemia system. These compounds also stimulate growth in Swiss 3T3 cells, induce secretion in leukocytes, inhibit phorbol dibutyrate binding to a high affinity receptor, and activate the C-kinase in vitro. In human platelets, phorbol esters induce aggregation and activate protein kinase C, resulting in phosphorylation of a 47K protein and the 20K myosin light chain. The authors now show that bryostatin 7 (B-7) triggers platelet aggregation to the same rate and extent as phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA). B-7 also causes the in vivo activation of the C-kinase, resulting in phosphorylation of both the 47K and the 20K proteins; the time courses and dose-responses of these B-7-induced phosphorylations were similar to those found with PMA. In addition, B-7 increases the level of /sup 32/P-incorporation into the platelet polyphosphoinositides, which also occurs in response to PMA. Bryostatin 3 (B-3), which has been shown to be much less potent than B-7 in mimicking other PMA effects, was much less effective than PMA or B-7 in inducing platelet aggregation and in stimulating /sup 32/P-incorporation into both proteins and the phosphoinositides. These results demonstrate that, intact human platelets, bryostatins mimic the phorbol esters tumor promoters and directly activate protein kinase C.

  3. Oxidation of methionine residues in proteins of activated human neutrophils.

    PubMed Central

    Fliss, H; Weissbach, H; Brot, N

    1983-01-01

    A simple assay for the detection of 35S-labeled methionine sulfoxide residues in proteins is described. The assay, which is based on the ability of CNBr to react with methionine but not with methionine sulfoxide, requires the prelabeling of cellular proteins with [35S]methionine. The assay was used to study the extent of methionine oxidation in newly synthesized proteins of both activated and quiescent human neutrophils. In cells undergoing a phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate-induced respiratory burst, about 66% of all methionine residues in newly synthesized proteins were oxidized to the sulfoxide derivative, as compared with 9% in cells not treated with the phorbol ester. In contrast, quantitation of methionine sulfoxide content in the total cellular protein by means of amino acid analysis showed that only 22% of all methionine residues were oxidized in activated cells as compared with 9% in quiescent cells. It is proposed that methionine residues in nascent polypeptide chains are more susceptible to oxidation than those in completed proteins. PMID:6580633

  4. Human FGF-21 Is a Substrate of Fibroblast Activation Protein

    PubMed Central

    Coppage, Andrew L.; Heard, Kathryn R.; DiMare, Matthew T.; Liu, Yuxin; Wu, Wengen; Lai, Jack H.; Bachovchin, William W.

    2016-01-01

    FGF-21 is a key regulator of metabolism and potential drug candidate for the treatment of type II diabetes and other metabolic disorders. However, the half-life of active, circulating, human FGF-21 has recently been shown to be limited in mice and monkeys by a proteolytic cleavage between P171 and S172. Here, we show that fibroblast activation protein is the enzyme responsible for this proteolysis by demonstrating that purified FAP cleaves human FGF-21 at this site in vitro, and that an FAP-specific inhibitor, ARI-3099, blocks the activity in mouse, monkey and human plasma and prolongs the half-life of circulating human FGF-21 in mice. Mouse FGF-21, however, lacks the FAP cleavage site and is not cleaved by FAP. These findings indicate FAP may function in the regulation of metabolism and that FAP inhibitors may prove useful in the treatment of diabetes and metabolic disorders in humans, but pre-clinical proof of concept studies in rodents will be problematic. PMID:26962859

  5. Human FGF-21 Is a Substrate of Fibroblast Activation Protein.

    PubMed

    Coppage, Andrew L; Heard, Kathryn R; DiMare, Matthew T; Liu, Yuxin; Wu, Wengen; Lai, Jack H; Bachovchin, William W

    2016-01-01

    FGF-21 is a key regulator of metabolism and potential drug candidate for the treatment of type II diabetes and other metabolic disorders. However, the half-life of active, circulating, human FGF-21 has recently been shown to be limited in mice and monkeys by a proteolytic cleavage between P171 and S172. Here, we show that fibroblast activation protein is the enzyme responsible for this proteolysis by demonstrating that purified FAP cleaves human FGF-21 at this site in vitro, and that an FAP-specific inhibitor, ARI-3099, blocks the activity in mouse, monkey and human plasma and prolongs the half-life of circulating human FGF-21 in mice. Mouse FGF-21, however, lacks the FAP cleavage site and is not cleaved by FAP. These findings indicate FAP may function in the regulation of metabolism and that FAP inhibitors may prove useful in the treatment of diabetes and metabolic disorders in humans, but pre-clinical proof of concept studies in rodents will be problematic. PMID:26962859

  6. Recombinant Human Peptidoglycan Recognition Proteins Reveal Antichlamydial Activity.

    PubMed

    Bobrovsky, Pavel; Manuvera, Valentin; Polina, Nadezhda; Podgorny, Oleg; Prusakov, Kirill; Govorun, Vadim; Lazarev, Vassili

    2016-07-01

    Peptidoglycan recognition proteins (PGLYRPs) are innate immune components that recognize the peptidoglycan and lipopolysaccharides of bacteria and exhibit antibacterial activity. Recently, the obligate intracellular parasite Chlamydia trachomatis was shown to have peptidoglycan. However, the antichlamydial activity of PGLYRPs has not yet been demonstrated. The aim of our study was to test whether PGLYRPs exhibit antibacterial activity against C. trachomatis Thus, we cloned the regions containing the human Pglyrp1, Pglyrp2, Pglyrp3, and Pglyrp4 genes for subsequent expression in human cell lines. We obtained stable HeLa cell lines that secrete recombinant human PGLYRPs into culture medium. We also generated purified recombinant PGLYRP1, -2, and -4 and confirmed their activities against Gram-positive (Bacillus subtilis) and Gram-negative (Escherichia coli) bacteria. Furthermore, we examined the activities of recombinant PGLYRPs against C. trachomatis and determined their MICs. We also observed a decrease in the infectious ability of chlamydial elementary bodies in the next generation after a single exposure to PGLYRPs. Finally, we demonstrated that PGLYRPs attach to C. trachomatis elementary bodies and activate the expression of the chlamydial two-component stress response system. Thus, PGLYRPs inhibit the development of chlamydial infection. PMID:27160295

  7. Activation of a human chromosomal replication origin by protein tethering

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiaomi; Liu, Guoqi; Leffak, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The specification of mammalian chromosomal replication origins is incompletely understood. To analyze the assembly and activation of prereplicative complexes (pre-RCs), we tested the effects of tethered binding of chromatin acetyltransferases and replication proteins on chromosomal c-myc origin deletion mutants containing a GAL4-binding cassette. GAL4DBD (DNA binding domain) fusions with Orc2, Cdt1, E2F1 or HBO1 coordinated the recruitment of the Mcm7 helicase subunit, the DNA unwinding element (DUE)-binding protein DUE-B and the minichromosome maintenance (MCM) helicase activator Cdc45 to the replicator, and restored origin activity. In contrast, replication protein binding and origin activity were not stimulated by fusion protein binding in the absence of flanking c-myc DNA. Substitution of the GAL4-binding site for the c-myc replicator DUE allowed Orc2 and Mcm7 binding, but eliminated origin activity, indicating that the DUE is essential for pre-RC activation. Additionally, tethering of DUE-B was not sufficient to recruit Cdc45 or activate pre-RCs formed in the absence of a DUE. These results show directly in a chromosomal background that chromatin acetylation, Orc2 or Cdt1 suffice to recruit all downstream replication initiation activities to a prospective origin, and that chromosomal origin activity requires singular DNA sequences. PMID:23658226

  8. NRIP, a novel calmodulin binding protein, activates calcineurin to dephosphorylate human papillomavirus E2 protein.

    PubMed

    Chang, Szu-Wei; Tsao, Yeou-Ping; Lin, Chia-Yi; Chen, Show-Li

    2011-07-01

    Previously, we found a gene named nuclear receptor interaction protein (NRIP) (or DCAF6 or IQWD1). We demonstrate that NRIP is a novel binding protein for human papillomavirus 16 (HPV-16) E2 protein. HPV-16 E2 and NRIP can directly associate into a complex in vivo and in vitro, and the N-terminal domain of NRIP interacts with the transactivation domain of HPV-16 E2. Only full-length NRIP can stabilize E2 protein and induce HPV gene expression, and NRIP silenced by two designed small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) decreases E2 protein levels and E2-driven gene expression. We found that NRIP can directly bind with calmodulin in the presence of calcium through its IQ domain, resulting in decreased E2 ubiquitination and increased E2 protein stability. Complex formation between NRIP and calcium/calmodulin activates the phosphatase calcineurin to dephosphorylate E2 and increase E2 protein stability. We present evidences for E2 phosphorylation in vivo and show that NRIP acts as a scaffold to recruit E2 and calcium/calmodulin to prevent polyubiquitination and degradation of E2, enhancing E2 stability and E2-driven gene expression. PMID:21543494

  9. Production of biologically active human thioredoxin 1 protein in lettuce chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Lim, Soon; Ashida, Hiroki; Watanabe, Rie; Inai, Koji; Kim, Yun-Soo; Mukougawa, Keiko; Fukuda, Hirokazu; Tomizawa, Ken-ichi; Ushiyama, Kei-ichi; Asao, Hiroshi; Tamoi, Masahiro; Masutani, Hiroshi; Shigeoka, Shigeru; Yodoi, Junji; Yokota, Akiho

    2011-07-01

    The production of human therapeutic proteins in plants provides opportunities for low-cost production, and minimizes the risk of contamination from potential human pathogens. Chloroplast genetic engineering is a particularly promising strategy, because plant chloroplasts can produce large amounts of foreign target proteins. Oxidative stress is a key factor in various human diseases. Human thioredoxin 1 (hTrx1) is a stress-induced protein that functions as an antioxidant against oxidative stress, and overexpression of hTrx1 has been shown to suppress various diseases in mice. Therefore, hTrx1 is a prospective candidate as a new human therapeutic protein. We created transplastomic lettuce expressing hTrx1 under the control of the psbA promoter. Transplastomic plants grew normally and were fertile. The hTrx1 protein accumulated to approximately 1% of total soluble protein in mature leaves. The hTrx1 protein purified from lettuce leaves was functionally active, and reduced insulin disulfides. The purified protein protected mouse insulinoma line 6 cells from damage by hydrogen peroxide, as reported previously for a recombinant hTrx1 expressed in Escherichia coli. This is the first report of expression of the biologically active hTrx1 protein in plant chloroplasts. This research opens up possibilities for plant-based production of hTrx1. Considering that this expression host is an edible crop plant, this transplastomic lettuce may be suitable for oral delivery of hTrx1. PMID:21290168

  10. Activation of ERK mitogen-activated protein kinase in human cells by the mycotoxin patulin

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, T.-S.; Yu, F.-Y.; Su, C.-C.; Kan, J.-C.; Chung, C.-P.; Liu, B.-H. . E-mail: bingliu@csmu.edu.tw

    2005-09-01

    Patulin (PAT), a mycotoxin produced by certain species of Penicillium and Aspergillus, is often detectable in moldy fruits and their derivative products. PAT led to a concentration-dependent and time-dependent increase in phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated protein kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) in human embryonic kidney (HEK293) cells, human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), and Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells. Exposure of HEK293 cells to concentrations above 5 {mu}M PAT for 30 min induced ERK1/2 phosphorylation; activation of ERK1/2 was also observed after 24 h incubation with 0.05 {mu}M of PAT. Treatment of human PBMCs for 30 min with 30 {mu}M PAT dramatically increased the phosphorylated ERK1/2 levels. Both MEK1/2 inhibitors, U0126 and PD98059, suppressed ERK1/2 activation in either HEK293 or MDCK cells. In HEK293 cells, U0126-mediated inhibition of PAT-induced ERK1/2 phosphorylation resulted in a significant decrease in levels of DNA damage, expressed as tail moment values, in the single cell gel electrophoresis assay. Conversely, U0126 did not affect cell viability, lactate dehydrogenase release, and the DNA synthesis rate in PAT-treated cultures. Exposure of HEK293 cells for 90 min to 15 {mu}M PAT elevated the levels of early growth response gene-1 (egr-1) mRNA, but not of c-fos, fosB, and junB mRNAs. These results indicate that in human cells, PAT causes a rapid and persistent activation of ERK1/2 and this signaling pathway plays an important role in mediating PAT-induced DNA damage and egr-1 gene expression.

  11. Plasma protein adsorbed biomedical polymers: activation of human monocytes and induction of interleukin 1.

    PubMed

    Bonfield, T L; Colton, E; Anderson, J M

    1989-06-01

    These studies involved the evaluation of human monocyte/macrophage activation by biomedical polymers coated with human blood proteins. The biomedical polymers were polyethylene, polydimethylsiloxane, woven Dacron fabric, expanded polytetrafluoroethylene, Biomer, and tissue culture treated polystyrene as the control. They were adsorbed with human blood proteins: albumin, fibrinogen, fibronectin, hemoglobin, and gamma globulin. The protein adsorbed polymers were evaluated for their potential to activate the monocyte/macrophage cellular population in vitro as assessed by the induction of the monocyte/macrophage inflammatory mediator, Interleukin 1 (IL1). Suppression of IL1 was observed when protein adsorbed polymers were compared to the appropriate protein adsorbed control. Protein adsorbed polymers, when compared to polymers without protein adsorption, stimulated IL1 production. The data presented in this manuscript show the level of induction and secretion of IL1 was dependent on the biomedical polymer and the protein adsorbed, as well as the requirement of lipopolysaccharide. These results show differential interactions occur between the proteins, monocytes/macrophages, and biomedical polymers which alter activation and induction of IL1. PMID:2786877

  12. Human NAIP and mouse NAIP1 recognize bacterial type III secretion needle protein for inflammasome activation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jieling; Zhao, Yue; Shi, Jianjin; Shao, Feng

    2013-08-27

    Inflammasome mediated by central nucleotide-binding and oligomerization domain (NOD)-like receptor (NLR) protein is critical for defense against bacterial infection. Here we show that type III secretion system (T3SS) needle proteins from several bacterial pathogens, including Salmonella typhimurium, enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli, Shigella flexneri, and Burkholderia spp., can induce robust inflammasome activation in both human monocyte-derived and mouse bone marrow macrophages. Needle protein activation of human NRL family CARD domain containing 4 (NLRC4) inflammasome requires the sole human neuronal apoptosis inhibitory protein (hNAIP). Among the seven mouse NAIPs, NAIP1 functions as the mouse counterpart of hNAIP. We found that NAIP1 recognition of T3SS needle proteins was more robust in mouse dendritic cells than in bone marrow macrophages. Needle proteins, as well as flagellin and rod proteins from five different bacteria, exhibited differential and cell type-dependent inflammasome-stimulating activity. Comprehensive profiling of the three types of NAIP ligands revealed that NAIP1 sensing of the needle protein dominated S. flexneri-induced inflammasome activation, particularly in dendritic cells. hNAIP/NAIP1 and NAIP2/5 formed a large oligomeric complex with NLRC4 in the presence of corresponding bacterial ligands, and could support reconstitution of the NLRC4 inflammasome in a ligand-specific manner. PMID:23940371

  13. Multiple protein-protein interactions converging on the Prp38 protein during activation of the human spliceosome.

    PubMed

    Schütze, Tonio; Ulrich, Alexander K C; Apelt, Luise; Will, Cindy L; Bartlick, Natascha; Seeger, Martin; Weber, Gert; Lührmann, Reinhard; Stelzl, Ulrich; Wahl, Markus C

    2016-02-01

    Spliceosomal Prp38 proteins contain a conserved amino-terminal domain, but only higher eukaryotic orthologs also harbor a carboxy-terminal RS domain, a hallmark of splicing regulatory SR proteins. We show by crystal structure analysis that the amino-terminal domain of human Prp38 is organized around three pairs of antiparallel α-helices and lacks similarities to RNA-binding domains found in canonical SR proteins. Instead, yeast two-hybrid analyses suggest that the amino-terminal domain is a versatile protein-protein interaction hub that possibly binds 12 other spliceosomal proteins, most of which are recruited at the same stage as Prp38. By quantitative, alanine surface-scanning two-hybrid screens and biochemical analyses we delineated four distinct interfaces on the Prp38 amino-terminal domain. In vitro interaction assays using recombinant proteins showed that Prp38 can bind at least two proteins simultaneously via two different interfaces. Addition of excess Prp38 amino-terminal domain to in vitro splicing assays, but not of an interaction-deficient mutant, stalled splicing at a precatalytic stage. Our results show that human Prp38 is an unusual SR protein, whose amino-terminal domain is a multi-interface protein-protein interaction platform that might organize the relative positioning of other proteins during splicing. PMID:26673105

  14. Activation of human natural killer cells by the soluble form of cellular prion protein

    SciTech Connect

    Seong, Yeon-Jae; Sung, Pil Soo; Jang, Young-Soon; Choi, Young Joon; Park, Bum-Chan; Park, Su-Hyung; Park, Young Woo; Shin, Eui-Cheol

    2015-08-21

    Cellular prion protein (PrP{sup C}) is widely expressed in various cell types, including cells of the immune system. However, the specific roles of PrP{sup C} in the immune system have not been clearly elucidated. In the present study, we investigated the effects of a soluble form of recombinant PrP{sup C} protein on human natural killer (NK) cells. Recombinant soluble PrP{sup C} protein was generated by fusion of human PrP{sup C} with the Fc portion of human IgG{sub 1} (PrP{sup C}-Fc). PrP{sup C}-Fc binds to the surface of human NK cells, particularly to CD56{sup dim} NK cells. PrP{sup C}-Fc induced the production of cytokines and chemokines and the degranulation of granzyme B from NK cells. In addition, PrP{sup C}-Fc facilitated the IL-15-induced proliferation of NK cells. PrP{sup C}-Fc induced phosphorylation of ERK-1/2 and JNK in NK cells, and inhibitors of the ERK or the JNK pathways abrogated PrP{sup C}-Fc-induced cytokine production in NK cells. In conclusion, the soluble form of recombinant PrP{sup C}-Fc protein activates human NK cells via the ERK and JNK signaling pathways. - Highlights: • Recombinant soluble PrP{sup C} (PrP{sup C}-Fc) was generated by fusion of human PrP{sup C} with IgG1 Fc portion. • PrP{sup C}-Fc protein induces the production of cytokines and degranulation from human NK cells. • PrP{sup C}-Fc protein enhances the IL-15-induced proliferation of human NK cells. • PrP{sup C}-Fc protein activates human NK cells via the ERK and JNK signaling pathways.

  15. Crystallization of parasporin-2, a Bacillus thuringiensis crystal protein with selective cytocidal activity against human cells.

    PubMed

    Akiba, Toshihiko; Abe, Yuichi; Kitada, Sakae; Kusaka, Yoshitomo; Ito, Akio; Ichimatsu, Tokio; Katayama, Hideki; Akao, Tetsuyuki; Higuchi, Kazuhiko; Mizuki, Eiichi; Ohba, Michio; Kanai, Ryuta; Harata, Kazuaki

    2004-12-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis is a valuable source of protein toxins that are specifically effective against certain insects and worms but harmless to mammals. In contrast, a protein toxin obtained from B. thuringiensis strain A1547, designated parasporin-2, is not insecticidal but has a strong cytocidal activity against human cells with markedly divergent target specificity. The 37 kDa inactive protein is proteolytically activated to a 30 kDa active form. The active form of the recombinant protein toxin was crystallized in the presence of ethylene glycol and polyethylene glycol 8000 at neutral pH. The crystals belong to the hexagonal space group P6(1) or P6(5), with unit-cell parameters a = b = 134.37, c = 121.24 A. Diffraction data from a native crystal were collected to 2.75 A resolution using a synchrotron-radiation source. PMID:15583389

  16. Transcriptional activation of JC virus by human T-lymphotropic virus type I Tax protein in human neuronal cell lines.

    PubMed

    Okada, Y; Sawa, H; Tanaka, S; Takada, A; Suzuki, S; Hasegawa, H; Umemura, T; Fujisawa, J; Tanaka, Y; Hall, W W; Nagashima, K

    2000-06-01

    Polyomavirus JC (JCV) causes the human demyelinating disease, progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML). The recent demonstration of cases of PML in association with human T-lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I) infection prompted us to examine whether the HTLV-I-encoded regulatory protein Tax activates JCV transcription. By employing a dual luciferase assay, we initially found that the expression of Tax activated the transcriptional potential of both early and late promoters of JCV in human neuronal but not in non-neuronal cells. We subsequently analyzed the mechanism of Tax-induced activation of the JCV promoter in neuronal cells with the following results: 1) the JCV promoter that lacks the NF-kappaB-binding motif could not be activated by Tax; 2) the overexpression of IkappaBalpha abolished Tax-induced transcriptional activation of the JCV promoter; 3) a Tax mutant (M22) lacking the potential for activation via the NF-kappaB pathway did not activate the JCV promoter. Furthermore, Tax enhances the gene expression of JCV T antigen and VP1. We examined mechanisms of the cell-specific activation of the JCV promoter by Tax. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay demonstrated the presence of Tax-bound protein(s) that were specifically present in non-neuronal cells. This study is the first demonstration of the activation of JCV promoter by HTLV-I Tax in an NF-kappaB-dependent manner. PMID:10828075

  17. Identification of a novel human zinc finger protein that specifically interacts with the activation domain of lentiviral Tat proteins.

    PubMed

    Fridell, R A; Harding, L S; Bogerd, H P; Cullen, B R

    1995-06-01

    Transcriptional activation of HIV-1 gene expression by the viral Tat protein requires the interaction of a cellular cofactor with the Tat activation domain. This domain has been shown to consist of the cysteine-rich and core motifs of HIV-1 Tat and is functionally conserved in the distantly related Tat proteins of HIV-2 and EIAV. Using the yeast two-hybrid system, we have identified a novel human gene product, termed HT2A, that specifically and precisely binds to the activation domain of HIV-1 Tat and that can also interact with the HIV-2 and EIAV Tat proteins in vivo. We present data further demonstrating that the interaction between the activation domain of HIV-1 Tat and the HT2A protein can be readily detected in the mammalian cell nucleus. Sequence analysis demonstrates that HT2A is a novel member of the C3HC4 or ring finger family of zinc finger proteins that includes several known oncogenes and transcription factors. Overall, these data suggest that HT2A may play a significant role in mediating the biological activity of the HIV-1 Tat protein in vivo. PMID:7778269

  18. Expression, purification and crystallization of human 5-lipoxygenase-activating protein with leukotriene-biosynthesis inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Shihua; McKeever, Brian M.; Wisniewski, Douglas; Miller, Douglas K.; Spencer, Robert H.; Chu, Lin; Ujjainwalla, Feroze; Yamin, Ting-Ting; Evans, Jilly F.; Becker, Joseph W.; Ferguson, Andrew D.

    2007-12-01

    The expression, purification and crystallization of human 5-lipoxygenase-activating protein in complex with two leukotriene-biosynthesis inhibitors is decribed. The processes that were used to generate diffraction quality crystals are presented in detail. The nuclear membrane protein 5-lipoxygenase-activating protein (FLAP) plays an essential role in leukotriene synthesis. Recombinant full-length human FLAP with a C-terminal hexahistidine tag has been expressed and purified from the cytoplasmic membrane of Escherichia coli. Diffraction-quality crystals of FLAP in complex with leukotriene-synthesis inhibitor MK-591 and with an iodinated analogue of MK-591 have been grown using the sitting-drop vapor-diffusion method. The crystals exhibit tetragonal symmetry (P42{sub 1}2) and diffracted to a resolution limit of 4 Å.

  19. Intrinsic activity of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 protease heterologous fusion proteins in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Arrigo, S J; Haines, J K; Huffman, K M

    1995-01-01

    We have generated various mammalian expression constructs that produce fusion proteins of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) protease (PR) with the HIV-1 Nef protein. The expression of these proteins is inducible by the HIV-1 Tat protein. High-level expression of proteolytically active PR was produced from PR imbedded into Nef coding sequences, flanked by PR cleavage sites. The fusion protein was cleaved nearly to completion and did not exhibit the regulated processing that is seen with the virally encoded PR. No cytotoxic effect of PR expression was detected. The self-cleavage of PR could be inhibited by a specific inhibitor of HIV-1 PR (U75875). Elimination of the aminoterminal PR cleavage site did not have a measurable effect on cleavage of the precursor fusion protein. The cleaved fusion proteins appeared to be extremely unstable in the transfected cells. These findings demonstrate the intrinsic activity of HIV-1 PR in mammalian cells, in the context of a heterologous fusion protein. PMID:7832989

  20. The human hGSTA5 gene encodes an enzymatically active protein

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Sharda P.; Zimniak, Ludwika; Zimniak, Piotr

    2009-01-01

    Background Of the five human Alpha-class glutathione transferases, expression of hGSTA5 has not been experimentally documented, even though in silico the hGSTA5 sequence can be assembled into a mRNA and translated. The present work was undertaken to determine whether hGSTA5 is functional. Methods Human K562 cells were transfected with the hGSTA5 gene driven by the CMV promoter, and hGSTA5 cDNA was recovered from mature mRNA by reverse transcription. The cDNA was used in bacterial and eukaryotic protein expression systems. The resulting protein, after purification by glutathione affinity chromatography where appropriate, was tested for glutathione transferase activity. Results Human K562 cells transfected with the hGSTA5 gene under control of a CMV promoter produced a fully spliced mRNA which, after reverse transcription and expression in E. coli, yielded a protein that catalyzed the conjugation of the lipid peroxidation product 4-hydroxynonenal to glutathione. Similarly, transfection of human HEK-293 cells with the hGSTA5 gene driven by the CMV promoter led to an elevated 4-hydroxynonenal-conjugating activity in the cell lysate. In addition, translation of hGSTA5 cDNA in a cell-free eukaryotic system gave rise to a protein with 4-hydroxynonenal-conjugating activity. Conclusions hGSTA5 can be processed to a mature mRNA which is translation-competent, producing a catalytically active enzyme. General Significance Because a functional gene would not be maintained in the absence of selective pressure, we conclude that the native hGSTA5 promoter is active but has a spatially or temporally restricted expression pattern, and/or is expressed only under specific (patho)physiological conditions. PMID:19664689

  1. Uncovering the Basis of ATP Hydrolysis Activity in Purified Human p53 Protein: A Reinvestigation

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Shalini; Rao, Basuthkar J.

    2014-01-01

    p53 is one of the most well studied tumor suppressor proteins and regarded as the guardian of the genome. The protein mediates cell-cycle arrest, apoptosis in response to myriads of cellular stresses including DNA damage via its trascriptional as well as non-transcriptional roles. ATP binding/hydrolysis by p53 had been implicated in its DNA binding functions. However, till date, no ATP binding/hydrolysis domains have been mapped in p53. In the current study, we have reinvestigated the ATP hydrolysis activity associated with recombinant human p53 protein expressed and purified from E.coli. We confirmed the source of ATPase activity using various deletion constructs of p53 and an In-gel ATPase assay followed by LC-ESI-MS/MS analysis of the activity band. The activity was associated with Hsp70 homologue in E.coli, DnaK, a known interactor of p53. We clarify that wildtype human p53, expressed in E. coli BL21 (DE3) strain, carries no ATPase activity. PMID:24691158

  2. Human Endogenous Retrovirus Protein Activates Innate Immunity and Promotes Experimental Allergic Encephalomyelitis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Perron, Hervé; Dougier-Reynaud, Hei-Lanne; Lomparski, Christina; Popa, Iuliana; Firouzi, Reza; Bertrand, Jean-Baptiste; Marusic, Suzana; Portoukalian, Jacques; Jouvin-Marche, Evelyne; Villiers, Christian L.; Touraine, Jean-Louis; Marche, Patrice N.

    2013-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a complex multifactorial disease of the central nervous system (CNS) for which animal models have mainly addressed downstream immunopathology but not potential inducers of autoimmunity. In the absence of a pathogen known to cause neuroinflammation in MS, Mycobacterial lysate is commonly used in the form of complete Freund's adjuvant to induce autoimmunity to myelin proteins in Experimental Allergic Encephalomyelitis (EAE), an animal model for MS. The present study demonstrates that a protein from the human endogenous retrovirus HERV-W family (MSRV-Env) can be used instead of mycobacterial lysate to induce autoimmunity and EAE in mice injected with MOG, with typical anti-myelin response and CNS lesions normally seen in this model. MSRV-Env was shown to induce proinflammatory response in human macrophage cells through TLR4 activation pathway. The present results demonstrate a similar activation of murine dendritic cells and show the ability of MSRV-Env to trigger EAE in mice. In previous studies, MSRV-Env protein was reproducibly detected in MS brain lesions within microglia and perivascular macrophages. The present results are therefore likely to provide a model for MS, in which the upstream adjuvant triggering neuroinflammation is the one detected in MS active lesions. This model now allows pre-clinical studies with therapeutic agents targeting this endogenous retroviral protein in MS. PMID:24324591

  3. Parasite Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases as Drug Discovery Targets to Treat Human Protozoan Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Brumlik, Michael J.; Pandeswara, Srilakshmi; Ludwig, Sara M.; Murthy, Kruthi; Curiel, Tyler J.

    2011-01-01

    Protozoan pathogens are a highly diverse group of unicellular organisms, several of which are significant human pathogens. One group of protozoan pathogens includes obligate intracellular parasites such as agents of malaria, leishmaniasis, babesiosis, and toxoplasmosis. The other group includes extracellular pathogens such as agents of giardiasis and amebiasis. An unfortunate unifying theme for most human protozoan pathogens is that highly effective treatments for them are generally lacking. We will review targeting protozoan mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) as a novel drug discovery approach towards developing better therapies, focusing on Plasmodia, Leishmania, and Toxoplasma, about which the most is known. PMID:21637385

  4. Nonstructural Protein 1 of Influenza A Virus Interacts with Human Guanylate-Binding Protein 1 to Antagonize Antiviral Activity

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Wenjun; Wei, Jianchao; Shao, Donghua; Deng, Xufang; Wang, Shaohui; Li, Beibei; Tong, Guangzhi; Ma, Zhiyong

    2013-01-01

    Human guanylate-binding protein 1 (hGBP1) is an interferon-inducible protein involved in the host immune response against viral infection. In response to infection by influenza A virus (IAV), hGBP1 transcript and protein were significantly upregulated. Overexpression of hGBP1 inhibited IAV replication in a dose-dependent manner in vitro. The lysine residue at position 51 (K51) of hGBP1 was essential for inhibition of IAV replication. Mutation of K51 resulted in an hGBP1 that was unable to inhibit IAV replication. The viral nonstructural protein 1 (NS1) was found to interact directly with hGBP1. K51 of hGBP1 and a region between residues 123 and 144 in NS1 were demonstrated to be essential for the interaction between NS1 and hGBP1. Binding of NS1 to hGBP1 resulted in a significant reduction in both GTPase activity and the anti-IAV activity of hGBP1. These findings indicated that hGBP1 contributed to the host immune response against IAV replication and that hGBP1-mediated antiviral activity was antagonized by NS1 via binding to hGBP1. PMID:23405236

  5. Residual Endotoxin Contaminations in Recombinant Proteins Are Sufficient to Activate Human CD1c+ Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Schwarz, Harald; Schmittner, Maria; Duschl, Albert; Horejs-Hoeck, Jutta

    2014-01-01

    Many commercially available recombinant proteins are produced in Escherichia coli, and most suppliers guarantee contamination levels of less than 1 endotoxin unit (EU). When we analysed commercially available proteins for their endotoxin content, we found contamination levels in the same range as generally stated in the data sheets, but also some that were higher. To analyse whether these low levels of contamination have an effect on immune cells, we stimulated the monocytic cell line THP-1, primary human monocytes, in vitro differentiated human monocyte-derived dendritic cells, and primary human CD1c+ dendritic cells (DCs) with very low concentrations of lipopolysaccharide (LPS; ranging from 0.002–2 ng/ml). We show that CD1c+ DCs especially can be activated by minimal amounts of LPS, equivalent to the levels of endotoxin contamination we detected in some commercially available proteins. Notably, the enhanced endotoxin sensitivity of CD1c+ DCs was closely correlated with high CD14 expression levels observed in CD1c+ DCs that had been maintained in cell culture medium for 24 hours. When working with cells that are particularly sensitive to LPS, even low endotoxin contamination may generate erroneous data. We therefore recommend that recombinant proteins be thoroughly screened for endotoxin contamination using the limulus amebocyte lysate test, fluorescence-based assays, or a luciferase based NF-κB reporter assay involving highly LPS-sensitive cells overexpressing TLR4, MD-2 and CD14. PMID:25478795

  6. Synthesis and processing of sphingolipid activator protein-2 (SAP-2) in cultured human fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Fujibayashi, S.; Wenger, D.A.

    1986-11-15

    Sphingolipid activator proteins (SAP) are relatively small molecular weight proteins that stimulate the enzymatic hydrolysis of sphingolipids in the presence of specific lysosomal hydrolases. SAP-2 has previously been demonstrated to activate the hydrolysis of glucosylceramide, galactosylceramide, and, possibly, sphingomyelin. Using monospecific rabbit antibodies against human spleen SAP-2, the synthesis and processing of SAP-2 were studied in cultured human fibroblasts. When (/sup 35/S)methionine was presented in the medium to control human cells for 4 h, five major areas of radiolabeling were found. These had apparent molecular weights of 73,000, 68,000, 50,000, 12,000, and 9000. Further studies indicated that the major extracellular product in normal cells given NH4Cl along with the (/sup 35/S)methionine and in medium from cultures from patients with I cell disease had an apparent molecular weight of 73,000. The Mr = 68,000 and 73,000 species can be converted to a species with an apparent molecular weight of 50,000 by the action of endoglycosidase F. After labeling cells for 1 h followed by a 1-h chase, the Mr = 12,000 and 9000 species appear. Treatment of the immunoprecipitated mixture with endoglycosidase F resulted in conversion of these species to one band with an apparent molecular weight of 7600. These studies indicate that this relatively low molecular weight protein is rapidly synthesized from a relatively large molecular weight highly glycosylated precursor.

  7. Sodium arsenite induces chromosome endoreduplication and inhibits protein phosphatase activity in human fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Rong-Nan Huang; I-Ching Ho; Ling-Hui Yih

    1995-08-01

    Arsenic, strongly associated with increased risks of human cancers, is a potent clastogen in a variety of mammalian cell systems. The effect of sodium arsenite (a trivalent arsenic compound) on chromatid separation was studied in human skin fibroblasts (HFW). Human fibroblasts were arrested in S phase by the aid of serum starvation and aphidicolin blocking and then these cells were allowed to synchronously progress into G2 phase. Treatment of the G2-enriched HFW cells with sodium arsenite (0-200 {mu}M) resulted in arrest of cells in the G2 phase, interference with mitotic division, inhibition of spindle assembly, and induction of chromosome endoreduplication in their second mitosis. Sodium arsenite treatment also inhibited the activities of serine/threonine protein phosphatases and enhanced phosphorylation levels of a small heat shock protein (HSP27). These results suggest that sodium arsenite may mimic okadaic acid to induce chromosome endoreduplication through its inhibitory effect on protein phosphatase activity. 61 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Short communication: Bovine-derived proteins activate STAT3 in human skeletal muscle in vitro.

    PubMed

    Caldow, M K; Digby, M R; Cameron-Smith, D

    2015-05-01

    Bovine milk contains biologically active peptides that may modulate growth and development within humans. In this study, targeted bovine-derived proteins were evaluated for their effects on signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 (STAT3) phosphorylation in human skeletal muscle cells. Following an acute exposure, bovine-derived acidic fibroblast growth factor-1 (FGF) and leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) activated STAT3 in differentiating myotubes. Chronic exposure to FGF and LIF during the proliferative phase reduced myoblast proliferation and elevated MyoD and creatine kinase (CKM) mRNA expression without altering apoptotic genes. In mature myotubes, neither FGF nor LIF elicited any action. Together, these data indicate that a reduction in proliferation in the presence of bovine-derived FGF or LIF may stimulate early maturation of myoblasts. PMID:25726111

  9. High-Yield Expression of a Catalytically Active Membrane-Bound Protein: Human P450 Oxidoreductase

    PubMed Central

    Sandee, Duanpen

    2011-01-01

    P450 oxidoreductase (POR) is a two-flavin protein that reduces microsomal P450 enzymes and some other proteins. Preparation of active bacterially expressed human POR for biochemical studies has been difficult because membrane-bound proteins tend to interact with column matrices. To reduce column-protein interactions and permit more vigorous washing, human POR lacking 27 N-terminal residues (N-27 POR) was modified to carry a C-terminal Gly3His6-tag (N-27 POR-G3H6). When expressed in Escherichia coli, N-27 POR-G3H6 could be purified to apparent homogeneity by a modified, single-step nickel-nitrilotriacetic acid affinity chromatography, yielding 31 mg POR per liter of culture, whereas standard purification of native N-27 POR required multiple steps, yielding 5 mg POR per liter. Both POR proteins had absorption maxima at 375 and 453 nm and both reduced cytochrome c with indistinguishable specific activities. Using progesterone as substrate for bacterially expressed purified human P450c17, the Michaelis constant for 17α-hydroxylase activity supported by N-27 POR or N-27 POR-G3H6 were 1.73 or 1.49 μm, and the maximal velocity was 0.029 or 0.026 pmol steroids per picomole P450 per minute, respectively. Using 17-hydroxypregnenolone as the P450c17 substrate, the Michaelis constant for 17,20 lyase activity using N-27 POR or N-27 POR-G3H6 was 1.92 or 1.89 μm and the maximal velocity was 0.041 or 0.042 pmol steroid per picomole P450 per minute, respectively. Thus, N-27 POR-G3H6 is equally active as native N-27 POR. This expression and purification system permits the rapid preparation of large amounts of highly pure, biologically active POR and may be generally applicable for the preparation of membrane-bound proteins. PMID:21586563

  10. The HERV-K Human Endogenous Retrovirus Envelope Protein Antagonizes Tetherin Antiviral Activity

    PubMed Central

    Lemaître, Cécile; Harper, Francis; Pierron, Gérard

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Endogenous retroviruses are the remnants of past retroviral infections that are scattered within mammalian genomes. In humans, most of these elements are old degenerate sequences that have lost their coding properties. The HERV-K(HML2) family is an exception: it recently amplified in the human genome and corresponds to the most active proviruses, with some intact open reading frames and the potential to encode viral particles. Here, using a reconstructed consensus element, we show that HERV-K(HML2) proviruses are able to inhibit Tetherin, a cellular restriction factor that is active against most enveloped viruses and acts by keeping the viral particles attached to the cell surface. More precisely, we identify the Envelope protein (Env) as the viral effector active against Tetherin. Through immunoprecipitation experiments, we show that the recognition of Tetherin is mediated by the surface subunit of Env. Similar to Ebola glycoprotein, HERV-K(HML2) Env does not mediate Tetherin degradation or cell surface removal; therefore, it uses a yet-undescribed mechanism to inactivate Tetherin. We also assessed all natural complete alleles of endogenous HERV-K(HML2) Env described to date for their ability to inhibit Tetherin and found that two of them (out of six) can block Tetherin restriction. However, due to their recent amplification, HERV-K(HML2) elements are extremely polymorphic in the human population, and it is likely that individuals will not all possess the same anti-Tetherin potential. Because of Tetherin's role as a restriction factor capable of inducing innate immune responses, this could have functional consequences for individual responses to infection. IMPORTANCE Tetherin, a cellular protein initially characterized for its role against HIV-1, has been proven to counteract numerous enveloped viruses. It blocks the release of viral particles from producer cells, keeping them tethered to the cell surface. Several viruses have developed strategies to

  11. Content and activity of human liver microsomal protein and prediction of individual hepatic clearance in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Haifeng; Gao, Na; Tian, Xin; Liu, Tingting; Fang, Yan; Zhou, Jun; Wen, Qiang; Xu, Binbin; Qi, Bing; Gao, Jie; Li, Hongmeng; Jia, Linjing; Qiao, Hailing

    2015-01-01

    The lack of information concerning individual variation in content and activity of human liver microsomal protein is one of the most important obstacles for designing personalized medicines. We demonstrated that the mean value of microsomal protein per gram of liver (MPPGL) was 39.46 mg/g in 128 human livers and up to 19-fold individual variations existed. Meanwhile, the metabolic activities of 10 cytochrome P450 (CYPs) were detected in microsomes and liver tissues, respectively, which showed huge individual variations (200-fold). Compared with microsomes, the activities of liver tissues were much suitable to express the individual variations of CYP activities. Furthermore, individual variations in the in vivo clearance of tolbutamide were successfully predicted with the individual parameter values. In conclusion, we offer the values for MPPGL contents in normal liver tissues and build a new method to assess the in vitro CYP activities. In addition, large individual variations exist in predicted hepatic clearance of tolbutamide. These findings provide important physiological parameters for physiologically-based pharmacokinetics models and thus, establish a solid foundation for future development of personalized medicines. PMID:26635233

  12. Arachidonic acid pathway activates multidrug resistance related protein in cultured human lung cells.

    PubMed

    Torky, Abdelrahman; Raemisch, Anja; Glahn, Felix; Foth, Heidi

    2008-05-01

    Primary cultures of human lung cells can serve as a model system to study the mechanisms underlying the effects of irritants in air and to get a deeper insight into the (patho)physiological roles of the xenobiotic detoxification systems. For 99 human lung cancer cases the culture duration for bronchial epithelium and peripheral lung cells (PLC) are given in term of generations and weeks. Using this system, we investigated whether and how prostaglandins (PG) modify multidrug resistance related protein (MRP) function in normal human lung cells. PGF2alpha had no effect on MRP function, whereas PGE2 induced MRP activity in cultured NHBECs. The transport activity study of MRP in NHBEC, PLC, and A549 under the effect of exogenously supplied PGF2alpha (10 microM, 1 day) using single cell fluorimetry revealed no alteration in transport activity of MRP. PG concentrations were within the physiological range. COX I and II inhibitors indomethacin (5, 10 microM) and celecoxib (5, 10 microM) could substantially decrease the transport activity of MRP in NHBEC, PLC, and A549 in 1- and 4-day trials. Prostaglandin E2 did not change cadmium-induced caspase 3/7 activation in NHBECs and had no own effect on caspase 3/7 activity. Cadmium chloride (5, 10 microM) was an effective inducer of caspase 3/7 activation in NHBECs with a fivefold and ninefold rise of activity. In primary human lung cells arachidonic acid activates MRP transport function only in primary epithelial lung cells by prostaglandin E2 but not by F2alpha mediated pathways and this effect needs some time to develop. PMID:17943274

  13. High-level expression and characterization of a glycosylated human cementum protein 1 with lectin activity.

    PubMed

    Romo-Arévalo, Enrique; Arzate, Higinio; Montoya-Ayala, Gonzalo; Rodríguez-Romero, Adela

    2016-01-01

    This work aims to contribute to the knowledge of human cementum protein 1 (CEMP1), its conformational characteristics and influence during the biomineralization process. The results revealed that hrCEMP1 expressed in Pichia pastoris is a 2.4% glycosylated, thermostable protein which possesses a molecular mass of 28 770 Da. The circular dichroism spectrum indicated a secondary structure content of 28.6% of alpha-helix, 9.9% of beta-sheet and 61.5% of random-coil forms. Biological activity assays demonstrated that hrCEMP1 nucleates and regulates hydroxyapatite crystal growth. Hereby, it is demonstrated for the first time that CEMP1 has a (C-type) lectin-like activity and specifically recognizes mannopyranoside. The information produced by this biochemical and structural characterization may contribute to understand more fully the biological functions of CEMP1. PMID:26763148

  14. A 32-kDa protein associated with phospholipase A2-inhibitory activity from human placenta.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, H; Owada, M K; Sonobe, S; Kakunaga, T; Kawakatsu, H; Yano, J

    1987-11-01

    Two monomeric 32-kDa proteins, termed 32K-I (pI 5.8) and 32K-II (pI 5.1), were isolated from human placenta, which was solubilized by a Ca2+-chelator. Only 32K-I was associated with PLA2-inhibitory activity. CNBr peptide mapping indicated that 32K-I was distinct from 32K-II and two 36-kDa proteins, called calpactin I and II or lipocortin II and I, which have been shown to possess PLA2-inhibitory activity. 32K-I bound to PS in a Ca2+-dependent manner. 32K-I was detected in many tissues except brain, cardiac and skeletal muscle. PMID:3666152

  15. Autocitrullination of human peptidyl arginine deiminase type 4 regulates protein citrullination during cell activation

    PubMed Central

    Andrade, Felipe; Darrah, Erika; Gucek, Marjan; Cole, Robert N.; Rosen, Antony; Zhu, Xiaoming

    2010-01-01

    Objective To address mechanisms that control the activity of human peptidyl arginine deiminase type 4 (PAD-4). Methods PAD-4 autocitrullination was determined by anti–modified citrulline immunoblotting, using purified recombinant and endogenous PAD-4 from activated human primary neutrophils and cell lines expressing PAD-4. The citrullination sites in PAD-4 were determined by mass spectrometry. Mechanisms of autocitrullination-induced inactivation and the functional consequences of autocitrullination in PAD-4 polymorphic variants were addressed using purified components and cell lines expressing PAD-4 wild-type, PAD-4 mutant, and PAD-4 polymorphic variants relevant to rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Results PAD-4 is autocitrullinated in vitro and during activation of primary cells and cell lines expressing PAD-4. Interestingly, this modification inactivated the function of the enzyme. The efficiency of inactivation differed among genetically defined PAD-4 variants relevant to RA. PAD-4 was citrullinated at 10 sites, which are clustered into 3 distinct regions, including a cluster of arginines around the active site cleft where Arg-372 and -374 were identified as the potential autocitrullination targets that inactivate the enzyme. Autocitrullination also modified the structure of PAD-4, abrogating its recognition by multiple rabbit antibodies, but augmenting its recognition by human anti–PAD-4 autoantibodies. Conclusion Our findings suggest that autocitrullination regulates the production of citrullinated proteins during cell activation, and that this is affected by structural polymorphisms in PAD-4. Autocitrullination also influences PAD-4 structure and immune response. PMID:20201080

  16. INHIBITION OF PROTEIN TYROSINE PHOSPHATASE ACTIVITY MEDIATES EPIDERMAL GROWTH FACTOR RECEPTOR SIGNALING IN HUMAN AIRWAY EPITHELIAL CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Epidemiological studies have implicated zinc in the toxicity of ambient particulate matter (PM) inhalation. We previously showed that exposure to metal-laden PM inhibits protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) activity in human primary bronchial epithelial cells (HAEC) and leads t...

  17. Monosodium Urate Activates Src/Pyk2/PI3 Kinase and Cathepsin Dependent Unconventional Protein Secretion From Human Primary Macrophages*

    PubMed Central

    Välimäki, Elina; Miettinen, Juho J.; Lietzén, Niina; Matikainen, Sampsa; Nyman, Tuula A.

    2013-01-01

    Monosodium urate (MSU) is an endogenous danger signal that is crystallized from uric acid released from injured cells. MSU is known to activate inflammatory response in macrophages but the molecular mechanisms involved have remained uncharacterized. Activated macrophages start to secrete proteins to activate immune response and to recruit other immune cells to the site of infection and/or tissue damage. Secretome characterization after activation of innate immune system is essential to unravel the details of early phases of defense responses. Here, we have analyzed the secretome of human primary macrophages stimulated with MSU using quantitative two-dimensional gel electrophoresis based proteomics as well as high-throughput qualitative GeLC-MS/MS approach combining protein separation by SDS-PAGE and protein identification by liquid chromatography-MS/MS. Both methods showed that MSU stimulation induced robust protein secretion from lipopolysaccharide-primed human macrophages. Bioinformatic analysis of the secretome data showed that MSU stimulation strongly activates unconventional, vesicle mediated protein secretion. The unconventionally secreted proteins included pro-inflammatory cytokines like IL-1β and IL-18, interferon-induced proteins, and danger signal proteins. Also active forms of lysosomal proteases cathepsins were secreted on MSU stimulation, and cathepsin activity was essential for MSU-induced unconventional protein secretion. Additionally, proteins associated to phosphorylation events including Src family tyrosine kinases were increased in the secretome of MSU-stimulated cells. Our functional studies demonstrated that Src, Pyk2, and PI3 kinases act upstream of cathepsins to activate the overall protein secretion from macrophages. In conclusion, we provide the first comprehensive characterization of protein secretion pathways activated by MSU in human macrophages, and reveal a novel role for cathepsins and Src, Pyk2, PI3 kinases in the activation of

  18. [Isolation and characteristics of hexosaminidase A and activator protein from human kidney].

    PubMed

    Aronovich, E L; Akhunov, V S; Krasnopol'skaia, K D

    1990-01-01

    Hexosaminidase A (HA) was isolated from human kidney and purified to an electrophoretically homogeneous state. The purification procedure included ion-exchange chromatography on DEAE-cellulose, gel filtration on Toyopearl HW-55 and chromatofocusing on PBE 94 (enzyme yield 26.6%, 1133.6-fold purification). The physico-chemical and kinetic properties of HA are as follows: Mr of the purified enzyme is approximately 100,000; Km for 4-methylumbelliferyl-2-acetamido-2-deoxy-beta-D-glucopyranoside is 0.6 mM; pH optimum is at pH 4.4-4.6; pI is 5.0. The amino acid composition of the purified enzyme was determined. A specific anti-HA antiserum was raised, which did not immunoprecipitate with fibroblast extracts characterized by a mutational blockade of HA synthesis. GM2 was isolated and purified from murine liver as well as from the brain of a female patient who died of Tay-Sachs disease. The label was introduced by way of treatment of GM2 with tritiated acetic anhydride. The specific radioactivity of [3H]GM2 was 521 and 2065 Ci/M, respectively. The label was introduced into the N-acetylneuraminic acid and GalNAc residues of these GM2 preparations. An activator protein capable of solubilizing the natural substrate of HA was isolated from human kidney and partially purified (with a 19.9% yield and 480-fold purification). The Mr of the purified activator protein was approximately 21,000. Purified HA hydrolyzed [3H]GM2 only in the presence of the activator protein. An addition of the activator to the incubation medium containing normal fibroblast culture extracts and [3H]GM2 caused an increase in the rate of substrate hydrolysis, tenfold, on the average. PMID:2140519

  19. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Nef binds directly to Lck and mitogen-activated protein kinase, inhibiting kinase activity.

    PubMed Central

    Greenway, A; Azad, A; Mills, J; McPhee, D

    1996-01-01

    It is now well established that human immunodeficiency virus type I (HIV-1) Nef contributes substantially to disease pathogenesis by augmenting virus replication and markedly perturbing T-cell function. The effect of Nef on host cell activation could be explained in part by its interaction with specific cellular proteins involved in signal transduction, including at least a member of the src family kinase, Lck, and the serine/threonine kinase, mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). Recombinant Nef directly interacted with purified Lck and MAPK in coprecipitation experiments and binding assays. A proline-rich repeat sequence [(Pxx)4] in Nef occurring between amino acid residues 69 to 78 is highly conserved and bears strong resemblance to a defined consensus sequence identified as an SH3 binding domain present in several proteins which can interact with the SH3 domain of various signalling and cytoskeletal proteins. Binding and coprecipitation assays with short synthetic peptides corresponding to the proline-rich repeat sequence [(Pxx)4] of Nef and the SH2, SH3, or SH2 and SH3 domains of Lck revealed that the interaction between these two proteins is at least in part mediated by the proline repeat sequence of Nef and the SH3 domain of Lck. In addition to direct binding to full-length Nef, MAPK was also shown to bind the same proline repeat motif. Nef protein significantly decreased the in vitro kinase activity of Lck and MAPK. Inhibition of key members of signalling cascades, including those emanating from the T-cell receptor, by the HIV-1 Nef protein undoubtedly alters the ability of the infected T cell to respond to antigens or cytokines, facilitating HIV-1 replication and contributing to HIV-1-induced disease pathogenesis. PMID:8794306

  20. Absence of humoral mediated 5'AMP-activated protein kinase activation in human skeletal muscle and adipose tissue during exercise.

    PubMed

    Kristensen, Jonas Møller; Johnsen, Anders Bo; Birk, Jesper B; Nielsen, Jakob Nis; Jensen, Bente Rona; Hellsten, Ylva; Richter, Erik A; Wojtaszewski, Jørgen F P

    2007-12-15

    5'AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) exists as a heterotrimer comprising a catalytic alpha subunit and regulatory beta and gamma subunits. The AMPK system is activated under conditions of cellular stress, indicated by an increase in the AMP/ATP ratio, as observed, e.g. in muscles during contractile activity. AMPK was originally thought to be activated only by local intracellular mechanisms. However, recently it has become apparent that AMPK in mammals is also regulated by humoral substances, e.g. catecholamines. We studied whether humoral factors released during exercise regulate AMPK activity in contracting and resting muscles as well as in abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue in humans. In resting leg muscle and adipose tissue the AMPK activity was not up-regulated by humoral factors during one-legged knee extensor exercise even when arm cranking exercise, inducing a approximately 20-fold increase in plasma catecholamine level, was added simultaneously. In exercising leg muscle the AMPK activity was increased by one-legged knee extensor exercise eliciting a whole body respiratory load of only 30% .VO(2,peak) but was not further increased by adding arm cranking exercise. In conclusion, during exercise with combined leg kicking and arm cranking, the AMPK activity in human skeletal muscle is restricted to contracting muscle without influence of marked increased catecholamine levels. Also, with this type of exercise the catecholamines or other humoral factors do not seem to be physiological regulators of AMPK in the subcutaneous adipose tissue. PMID:17962330

  1. Quantitation of fibroblast activation protein (FAP)-specific protease activity in mouse, baboon and human fluids and organs.

    PubMed

    Keane, Fiona M; Yao, Tsun-Wen; Seelk, Stefanie; Gall, Margaret G; Chowdhury, Sumaiya; Poplawski, Sarah E; Lai, Jack H; Li, Youhua; Wu, Wengen; Farrell, Penny; Vieira de Ribeiro, Ana Julia; Osborne, Brenna; Yu, Denise M T; Seth, Devanshi; Rahman, Khairunnessa; Haber, Paul; Topaloglu, A Kemal; Wang, Chuanmin; Thomson, Sally; Hennessy, Annemarie; Prins, John; Twigg, Stephen M; McLennan, Susan V; McCaughan, Geoffrey W; Bachovchin, William W; Gorrell, Mark D

    2013-01-01

    The protease fibroblast activation protein (FAP) is a specific marker of activated mesenchymal cells in tumour stroma and fibrotic liver. A specific, reliable FAP enzyme assay has been lacking. FAP's unique and restricted cleavage of the post proline bond was exploited to generate a new specific substrate to quantify FAP enzyme activity. This sensitive assay detected no FAP activity in any tissue or fluid of FAP gene knockout mice, thus confirming assay specificity. Circulating FAP activity was ∼20- and 1.3-fold less in baboon than in mouse and human plasma, respectively. Serum and plasma contained comparable FAP activity. In mice, the highest levels of FAP activity were in uterus, pancreas, submaxillary gland and skin, whereas the lowest levels were in brain, prostate, leukocytes and testis. Baboon organs high in FAP activity included skin, epididymis, bladder, colon, adipose tissue, nerve and tongue. FAP activity was greatly elevated in tumours and associated lymph nodes and in fungal-infected skin of unhealthy baboons. FAP activity was 14- to 18-fold greater in cirrhotic than in non-diseased human liver, and circulating FAP activity was almost doubled in alcoholic cirrhosis. Parallel DPP4 measurements concorded with the literature, except for the novel finding of high DPP4 activity in bile. The new FAP enzyme assay is the first to be thoroughly characterised and shows that FAP activity is measurable in most organs and at high levels in some. This new assay is a robust tool for specific quantitation of FAP enzyme activity in both preclinical and clinical samples, particularly liver fibrosis. PMID:24371721

  2. Quantitation of fibroblast activation protein (FAP)-specific protease activity in mouse, baboon and human fluids and organs☆

    PubMed Central

    Keane, Fiona M.; Yao, Tsun-Wen; Seelk, Stefanie; Gall, Margaret G.; Chowdhury, Sumaiya; Poplawski, Sarah E.; Lai, Jack H.; Li, Youhua; Wu, Wengen; Farrell, Penny; Vieira de Ribeiro, Ana Julia; Osborne, Brenna; Yu, Denise M.T.; Seth, Devanshi; Rahman, Khairunnessa; Haber, Paul; Topaloglu, A. Kemal; Wang, Chuanmin; Thomson, Sally; Hennessy, Annemarie; Prins, John; Twigg, Stephen M.; McLennan, Susan V.; McCaughan, Geoffrey W.; Bachovchin, William W.; Gorrell, Mark D.

    2013-01-01

    The protease fibroblast activation protein (FAP) is a specific marker of activated mesenchymal cells in tumour stroma and fibrotic liver. A specific, reliable FAP enzyme assay has been lacking. FAP's unique and restricted cleavage of the post proline bond was exploited to generate a new specific substrate to quantify FAP enzyme activity. This sensitive assay detected no FAP activity in any tissue or fluid of FAP gene knockout mice, thus confirming assay specificity. Circulating FAP activity was ∼20- and 1.3-fold less in baboon than in mouse and human plasma, respectively. Serum and plasma contained comparable FAP activity. In mice, the highest levels of FAP activity were in uterus, pancreas, submaxillary gland and skin, whereas the lowest levels were in brain, prostate, leukocytes and testis. Baboon organs high in FAP activity included skin, epididymis, bladder, colon, adipose tissue, nerve and tongue. FAP activity was greatly elevated in tumours and associated lymph nodes and in fungal-infected skin of unhealthy baboons. FAP activity was 14- to 18-fold greater in cirrhotic than in non-diseased human liver, and circulating FAP activity was almost doubled in alcoholic cirrhosis. Parallel DPP4 measurements concorded with the literature, except for the novel finding of high DPP4 activity in bile. The new FAP enzyme assay is the first to be thoroughly characterised and shows that FAP activity is measurable in most organs and at high levels in some. This new assay is a robust tool for specific quantitation of FAP enzyme activity in both preclinical and clinical samples, particularly liver fibrosis. PMID:24371721

  3. The 29-kDa proteins phosphorylated ion thrombin-activated human platelets are forms of the estrogen receptor-related 27-kDa heat shock protein

    SciTech Connect

    Mendelsohn, M.E.; Yan Zhu; O'Neill, S. )

    1991-12-15

    Thrombin plays a critical role in platelet activation, hemostasis, and thrombosis. Cellular activation by thrombin leads to the phosphorylation of multiple proteins, most of which are unidentified. The authors have characterized several 29-kDa proteins that are rapidly phosphorylated following exposure of intact human platelets to thrombin. A murine monoclonal antibody raised to an unidentified estrogen receptor-related 29-kDa protein selectively recognized these proteins as well as a more basic, unphosphorylated 27-kDa protein. Cellular activation by thrombin led to a marked shift in the proportion of protein from the 27-kDa unphosphorylated form to the 29-kDa phosphoprotein species. Using this antibody, they isolated and sequenced a human cDNA clone encoding a protein that was identical to the mammalian 27-kDa heat shock protein (HSP27), a protein of uncertain function that is known to be phosphorylated to several forms and to be transcriptionally induced by estrogen. The 29-kDa proteins were confirmed to be phosphorylated forms of HSP27 by immunoprecipitation studies. Thus, the estrogen receptor-related protein is HSP27, and the three major 20-kDa proteins phosphorylated in thrombin-activated platelets are forms of HSP27. These data suggest a role for HSP27 in the signal transduction events of platelet activation.

  4. Human endogenous retrovirus envelope proteins target dendritic cells to suppress T-cell activation.

    PubMed

    Hummel, Jonas; Kämmerer, Ulrike; Müller, Nora; Avota, Elita; Schneider-Schaulies, Sibylle

    2015-06-01

    Though mostly defective, human endogenous retroviruses (HERV) can retain open reading frames, which are especially expressed in the placenta. There, the envelope (env) proteins of HERV-W (Syncytin-1), HERV-FRD (Syncytin-2), and HERV-K (HML-2) were implicated in tolerance against the semi-allogenic fetus. Here, we show that the known HERV env-binding receptors ASCT-1 and -2 and MFSD2 are expressed by DCs and T-cells. When used as effectors in coculture systems, CHO cells transfected to express Syncytin-1, -2, or HML-2 did not affect T-cell expansion or overall LPS-driven phenotypic DC maturation, however, promoted release of IL-12 and TNF-α rather than IL-10. In contrast, HERV env expressing choriocarcinoma cell lines suppressed T-cell proliferation and LPS-induced TNF-α and IL-12 release, however, promoted IL-10 accumulation, indicating that these effects might not rely on HERV env interactions. However, DCs conditioned by choriocarcinoma, but also transgenic CHO cells failed to promote allogenic T-cell expansion. This was associated with a loss of DC/T-cell conjugate frequencies, impaired Ca(2+) mobilization, and aberrant patterning of f-actin and tyrosine phosphorylated proteins in T-cells. Altogether, these findings suggest that HERV env proteins target T-cell activation indirectly by modulating the stimulatory activity of DCs. PMID:25752285

  5. Ex Vivo Chemical Cytometric Analysis of Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase Activity in Single Human Airway Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Ryan M.; Dailey, Lisa A.; Bair, Eric; Samet, James M.; Allbritton, Nancy L.

    2014-01-01

    We describe a novel method for the measurement of protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) activity in single human airway epithelial cells (hAECs) using capillary electrophoresis. This technique involved the microinjection of a fluorescent phosphopeptide that is hydrolyzed specifically by PTPs. Analyses in BEAS-2B immortalized bronchial epithelial cells showed rapid PTP-mediated dephosphorylation of the substrate (2.2 pmol min−1 mg−1) that was blocked by pretreatment of the cells with the PTP inhibitors pervanadate, Zn2+, and 1,2-naphthoquinone (76%, 69%, 100% inhibition relative to PTP activity in untreated controls, respectively). These studies were then extended to a more physiologically relevant model system: primary hAECs cultured from bronchial brushings of living human subjects. In primary hAECs, dephosphorylation of the substrate occurred at a rate of 2.2 pmol min−1 mg−1, and was also effectively inhibited by pre-incubation of the cells with the inhibitors pervanadate, Zn2+, and 1,2- naphthoquinone (91%, 88%, and 87% median PTP inhibition, respectively). Reporter proteolysis in single BEAS-2B cells occurred at a median rate of 43 fmol min−1 mg−1 resulting in a mean half-life of 20 min. The reporter displayed a similar median half-life of 28 min in these single primary cells. Finally, single viable epithelial cells (which were assayed for PTP activity immediately after collection by bronchial brushing of a human volunteer) showed dephosphorylation rates ranging from 0.34–36 pmol min−1 mg−1 (n = 6). These results demonstrate the utility and applicability of this technique for the ex vivo quantification of PTP activity in small, heterogeneous, human cells and tissues. PMID:24380370

  6. A Quantitative Proteomic Approach for Detecting Protein Profiles of Activated Human Myeloid Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Schlatzer, Daniela M; Sugalski, Julia; Dazard, Jean-Eudes; Chance, Mark R; Anthony, Donald D.

    2011-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) direct the magnitude, polarity and effector function of the adaptive immune response. DC express toll-like receptors (TLR), antigen capturing and processing machinery, and costimulatory molecules, which facilitate innate sensing and T cell activation. Once activated, DC can efficiently migrate to lymphoid tissue and prime T cell responses. Therefore, DC play an integral role as mediators of the immune response to multiple pathogens. Elucidating the molecular mechanisms involved in DC activation is therefore central in gaining an understanding of host response to infection. Unfortunately, technical constraints have limited system-wide ‘omic’ analysis of human DC subsets collected ex vivo. Here we have applied novel proteomic approaches to human myeloid dendritic cells (mDCs) purified from 100 milliliters of peripheral blood to characterize specific molecular networks of cell activation at the individual patient level, and have successfully quantified over 700 proteins from individual samples containing as little as 200,000 mDCs. The proteomic and network readouts after ex vivo stimulation of mDCs with TLR3 agonists is measured and verified using flow cytometry. PMID:21945394

  7. Curcumin increases gelatinase activity in human neutrophils by a p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-independent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Antoine, Francis; Girard, Denis

    2015-01-01

    Curcumin has been found to possess anti-inflammatory activities and neutrophils, key players in inflammation, were previously found to be important targets to curcumin in a few studies. For example, curcumin was found to induce apoptosis in neutrophils by a p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-dependent mechanism. However, the role of curcumin on the biology of neutrophils is still poorly defined. To study the role of curcumin on neutrophil degranulation and to determine the role of p38 MAPK, human neutrophils were freshly isolated from healthy individuals and incubated in vitro with curcumin. Degranulation was studied at three levels: surface expression of granule markers by flow cytometry; release of matrix metallopeptidase-9 (MMP-9 or gelatinase B) enzyme into supernatants by Western blot; and gelatinase B activity by zymography. Activation of p38 MAPK was studied by monitoring its tyrosine phosphorylation levels by western blot and its role by the utilization of a pharmacological inhibitor. The results indicate that curcumin increased the cell surface expression of CD35 (secretory vesicle), CD63 (azurophilic granules), and CD66b (gelatinase granules) in neutrophils. Also, curcumin increased the release and enzymatic activity of gelatinase B in the extracellular milieu and activated p38 MAP kinase in these cells. However, in contrast to fMLP, curcumin-induced enzymatic activity and secretion of gelatinase B were not reversed by use of a p38 inhibitor. Finally, it was found that curcumin was able to enhance phagocytosis. Taken together, the results here demonstrate that curcumin induced degranulation in human neutrophils and that the increased gelatinase activity is not dependent on p38 MAPK activation. Therefore, degranulation is another human neutrophil function that could be modulated by curcumin, as well as phagocytosis. PMID:24926560

  8. Regulation of human CYP2C9 expression by electrophilic stress involves activator protein 1 activation and DNA looping.

    PubMed

    Makia, Ngome L; Surapureddi, Sailesh; Monostory, Katalin; Prough, Russell A; Goldstein, Joyce A

    2014-08-01

    Cytochrome P450 (CYP)2C9 and CYP2C19 are important human enzymes that metabolize therapeutic drugs, environmental chemicals, and physiologically important endogenous compounds. Initial studies using primary human hepatocytes showed induction of both the CYP2C9 and CYP2C19 genes by tert-butylhydroquinone (tBHQ). As a pro-oxidant, tBHQ regulates the expression of cytoprotective genes by activation of redox-sensing transcription factors, such as the nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) and members of the activator protein 1 (AP-1) family of proteins. The promoter region of CYP2C9 contains two putative AP-1 sites (TGAGTCA) at positions -2201 and -1930, which are also highly conserved in CYP2C19. The CYP2C9 promoter is activated by ectopic expression of cFos and JunD, whereas Nrf2 had no effect. Using specific kinase inhibitors for mitogen-activated protein kinase, we showed that extracellular signal-regulated kinase and Jun N-terminal kinase are essential for tBHQ-induced expression of CYP2C9. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays demonstrate that cFos distinctly interacts with the distal AP-1 site and JunD with the proximal site. Because cFos regulates target genes as heterodimers with Jun proteins, we hypothesized that DNA looping might be required to bring the distal and proximal AP-1 sites together to activate the CYP2C9 promoter. Chromosome conformation capture analyses confirmed the formation of a DNA loop in the CYP2C9 promoter, possibly allowing interaction between cFos at the distal site and JunD at the proximal site to activate CYP2C9 transcription in response to electrophiles. These results indicate that oxidative stress generated by exposure to electrophilic xenobiotics and metabolites induces the expression of CYP2C9 and CYP2C19 in human hepatocytes. PMID:24830941

  9. Induction and antimicrobial activity of platelet basic protein derivatives in human monocytes.

    PubMed

    Schaffner, Andreas; King, Charles C; Schaer, Dominik; Guiney, Donald G

    2004-11-01

    The antimicrobial activity of a number of chemokines has recently come into focus of research about innate immunity. We have previously shown that platelet basic protein (PBP), which gives rise to several antimicrobial peptides of platelets, is also expressed in human monocytes. In the present studies, we show that exposure of human monocytes to bacteria or microbial components (lipopolysaccharide and zymosan) induces a several-fold greater expression of derivates of PBP. Also, activation of proteinase-activated receptors (PARs) by thrombin or the synthetic peptide ligand SFLLRN of PAR-1 significantly increased PBP expression, presumably on the transcriptional level, as evidenced by higher mRNA levels. Derivates of PBP appeared to reach phago-lysosomes, as higher concentration was found in latex phagosomes isolated by a flotation method. By the gel-overlay technique, two bactericidal derivatives of PBP could be visualized, which were immunoreactive with anti-PBP antibody in Western blots. By matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight and surface-enhanced laser desorption and ionization techniques, it was confirmed that the bands corresponded to PBP derivates. After immunofixation with a monoclonal antibody to PBP, the major peptide in zymosan-stimulated monocytes was identified to correspond by molecular weight to connective tissue-activating peptide III, which has been reported to be a major antimicrobial PBP derivate also in platelets. Our observations indicate that PBP and its derivates are constituents of the antimicrobial arsenal of human monocytes. Their increased expression after exposure to microorganisms allows a rapid host response to pathogens. PMID:15316029

  10. Activity of the Human Rhinovirus 3C Protease Studied in Various Buffers, Additives and Detergents Solutions for Recombinant Protein Production

    PubMed Central

    Tufail, Soban; Ismat, Fouzia; Imran, Muhammad; Iqbal, Mazhar; Mirza, Osman; Rhaman, Moazur

    2016-01-01

    Proteases are widely used to remove affinity and solubility tags from recombinant proteins to avoid potential interference of these tags with the structure and function of the fusion partner. In recent years, great interest has been seen in use of the human rhinovirus 3C protease owing to its stringent sequence specificity and enhanced activity. Like other proteases, activity of the human rhinovirus 3C protease can be affected in part by the buffer components and additives that are generally employed for purification and stabilization of proteins, hence, necessitate their removal by tedious and time-consuming procedures before proteolysis can occur. To address this issue, we examined the effect of elution buffers used for common affinity based purifications, salt ions, stability/solubility and reducing agents, and detergents on the activity of the human rhinovirus 3C protease using three different fusion proteins at 4°C, a temperature of choice for purification of many proteins. The results show that the human rhinovirus 3C protease performs better at 4°C than the frequently used tobacco etch virus protease and its activity was insensitive to most of the experimental conditions tested. Though number of fusion proteins tested is limited, we expect that these finding will facilitate the use of the human rhinovirus 3C protease in recombinant protein production for pharmaceutical and biotechnological applications. PMID:27093053

  11. Activity of the Human Rhinovirus 3C Protease Studied in Various Buffers, Additives and Detergents Solutions for Recombinant Protein Production.

    PubMed

    Ullah, Raheem; Shah, Majid Ali; Tufail, Soban; Ismat, Fouzia; Imran, Muhammad; Iqbal, Mazhar; Mirza, Osman; Rhaman, Moazur

    2016-01-01

    Proteases are widely used to remove affinity and solubility tags from recombinant proteins to avoid potential interference of these tags with the structure and function of the fusion partner. In recent years, great interest has been seen in use of the human rhinovirus 3C protease owing to its stringent sequence specificity and enhanced activity. Like other proteases, activity of the human rhinovirus 3C protease can be affected in part by the buffer components and additives that are generally employed for purification and stabilization of proteins, hence, necessitate their removal by tedious and time-consuming procedures before proteolysis can occur. To address this issue, we examined the effect of elution buffers used for common affinity based purifications, salt ions, stability/solubility and reducing agents, and detergents on the activity of the human rhinovirus 3C protease using three different fusion proteins at 4°C, a temperature of choice for purification of many proteins. The results show that the human rhinovirus 3C protease performs better at 4°C than the frequently used tobacco etch virus protease and its activity was insensitive to most of the experimental conditions tested. Though number of fusion proteins tested is limited, we expect that these finding will facilitate the use of the human rhinovirus 3C protease in recombinant protein production for pharmaceutical and biotechnological applications. PMID:27093053

  12. Human biliverdin reductase, a previously unknown activator of protein kinase C betaII.

    PubMed

    Maines, Mahin D; Miralem, Tihomir; Lerner-Marmarosh, Nicole; Shen, Jenny; Gibbs, Peter E M

    2007-03-16

    Human biliverdin reductase (hBVR), a dual specificity kinase (Ser/Thr/Tyr) is, as protein kinase C (PKC) betaII, activated by insulin and free radicals (Miralem, T., Hu, Z., Torno, M. D., Lelli, K. M., and Maines, M. D. (2005) J. Biol. Chem. 280, 17084-17092; Lerner-Marmarosh, N., Shen, J., Torno, M. D., Kravets, A., Hu, Z., and Maines, M. D. (2005) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 102, 7109-7114). Here, by using 293A cells co-transfected with pcDNA3-hBVR and PKC betaII plasmids, we report the co-immunoprecipitation of the proteins and co-purification in the glutathione S-transferase (GST) pulldown assay. hBVR and PKC betaII, but not the reductase and PKC zeta, transphosphorylated in assay systems supportive of activity of only one of the kinases. PKC betaII K371R mutant protein ("kinase-dead") was also a substrate for hBVR. The reductase increased the Vmax but not the apparent Km values of PKC betaII for myelin basic protein; activation was independent of phospholipids and extended to the phosphorylation of S2, a PKC-specific substrate. The increase in substrate phosphorylation was blocked by specific inhibitors of conventional PKCs and attenuated by sihBVR. The effect of the latter could be rescued by subsequent overexpression of hBVR. To a large extent, the activation was a function of the hBVR N-terminal chain of valines and intact ATP-binding site and the cysteine-rich C-terminal segment. The cobalt protoporphyrin-activated hBVR phosphorylated a threonine in a peptide corresponding to the Thr500 in the human PKC betaII activation loop. Neither serine nor threonine residues in peptides corresponding to other phosphorylation sites of the PKC betaII nor PKC zeta activation loop-derived peptides were substrates. The phosphorylation of Thr500 was confirmed by immunoblotting of hBVR.PKC betaII immunocomplex. The potential biological relevance of the hBVR activation of PKC betaII was suggested by the finding that in cells transfected with the PKC betaII, h

  13. Bitter melon juice activates cellular energy sensor AMP-activated protein kinase causing apoptotic death of human pancreatic carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Rajesh

    2013-01-01

    Prognosis of pancreatic cancer is extremely poor, suggesting critical needs for additional drugs to improve disease outcome. In this study, we examined efficacy and associated mechanism of a novel agent bitter melon juice (BMJ) against pancreatic carcinoma cells both in culture and nude mice. BMJ anticancer efficacy was analyzed in human pancreatic carcinoma BxPC-3, MiaPaCa-2, AsPC-1 and Capan-2 cells by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazole-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide, cell death enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and annexin/propidium iodide assays. BMJ effect on apoptosis regulators was assessed by immunoblotting. In vivo BMJ efficacy was evaluated against MiaPaCa-2 tumors in nude mice, and xenograft was analyzed for biomarkers by immunohistochemistry (IHC). Results showed that BMJ (2–5% v/v) decreases cell viability in all four pancreatic carcinoma cell lines by inducing strong apoptotic death. At molecular level, BMJ caused caspases activation, altered expression of Bcl-2 family members and cytochrome-c release into the cytosol. Additionally, BMJ decreased survivin and X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein but increased p21, CHOP and phosphorylated mitogen-activated protein kinases (extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 and p38) levels. Importantly, BMJ activated adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a biomarker for cellular energy status, and an AMPK inhibitor (Compound C) reversed BMJ-induced caspase-3 activation suggesting activated AMPK involvement in BMJ-induced apoptosis. In vivo, oral administration of lyophilized BMJ (5mg in 100 µl water/day/mouse) for 6 weeks inhibited MiaPaCa-2 tumor xenograft growth by 60% (P < 0.01) without noticeable toxicity in nude mice. IHC analyses of MiaPaCa-2 xenografts showed that BMJ also inhibits proliferation, induces apoptosis and activates AMPK in vivo. Overall, BMJ exerts strong anticancer efficacy against human pancreatic carcinoma cells, both in vitro and in vivo, suggesting its clinical

  14. Human Mitochondrial Protein Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 131 Human Mitochondrial Protein Database (Web, free access)   The Human Mitochondrial Protein Database (HMPDb) provides comprehensive data on mitochondrial and human nuclear encoded proteins involved in mitochondrial biogenesis and function. This database consolidates information from SwissProt, LocusLink, Protein Data Bank (PDB), GenBank, Genome Database (GDB), Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM), Human Mitochondrial Genome Database (mtDB), MITOMAP, Neuromuscular Disease Center and Human 2-D PAGE Databases. This database is intended as a tool not only to aid in studying the mitochondrion but in studying the associated diseases.

  15. Induction of the Gene Encoding Macrophage Chemoattractant Protein 1 by Orientia tsutsugamushi in Human Endothelial Cells Involves Activation of Transcription Factor Activator Protein 1

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Nam-Hyuk; Seong, Seung-Yong; Huh, Myung-Sook; Kim, Na-Hyun; Choi, Myung-sik; Kim, Ik-sang

    2002-01-01

    Human macrophage chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1) is a potent mediator of macrophage migration and therefore plays an essential role in early events of inflammation. In endothelial cells, at least three independent pathways regulate MCP-1 expression by NF-κB and AP-1. Orientia tsutsugamushi causes vasculitis in humans by replicating inside macrophages and endothelial cells. In the present study, we investigated the cis-acting and trans-acting elements involved in O. tsutsugamushi-induced MCP-1 gene expression in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). Although NF-κB activation was observed in HUVEC infected with O. tsutsugamushi, inhibition of NF-κB activation did not affect the MCP-1 expression. However, treatment of HUVEC with extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) kinase inhibitor or p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) inhibitor suppressed expression of MCP-1 mRNA concomitant with downregulation of activator protein 1 (AP-1) activation. Deletion of triphorbol acetate response elements (TRE) at position −69 to −63 of MCP-1 gene abolished inducible promoter activity. Deletion of TRE at position −69 to −63−96 to −90 or deletion of NF-κB-binding site at position −69 to −63−88 to −79 did not affect the inducibility of promoter. Site-directed mutagenesis of the NF-κB binding sites at positions −2640 to −2632, −2612 to −2603 in the enhancer region, or the AP-1 biding site at position −2276 to −2270 decreased the inducible activity of the promoter. Taken together, AP-1 activation by both the ERK pathway and the p38 MAPK pathway as well as their binding to TRE at position −69 to −63 in proximal promoter and TRE at position −2276 to −2270 in enhancer region is altogether essential in induction of MCP-1 mRNA in HUVEC infected with O. tsutsugamushi. Although NF-κB activation is not essential per se, the κB site in the enhancer region is important in MCP-1 induction of HUVEC. This discrepancy in the

  16. Cellular inhibitor of apoptosis protein 2 controls human colonic epithelial restitution, migration, and Rac1 activation.

    PubMed

    Seidelin, Jakob Benedict; Larsen, Sylvester; Linnemann, Dorte; Vainer, Ben; Coskun, Mehmet; Troelsen, Jesper Thorvald; Nielsen, Ole Haagen

    2015-01-15

    Identification of pathways involved in wound healing is important for understanding the pathogenesis of various intestinal diseases. Cellular inhibitor of apoptosis protein 2 (cIAP2) regulates proliferation and migration in nonepithelial cells and is expressed in human colonocytes. The aim of the study was to investigate the role of cIAP2 for wound healing in the normal human colon. Wound tissue was generated by taking rectosigmoidal biopsies across an experimental ulcer in healthy subjects after 5, 24, and 48 h. In experimental ulcers, the expression of cIAP2 in regenerating intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) was increased at the wound edge after 24 h (P < 0.05), returned to normal after reepithelialization, and correlated with the inflammatory reaction in the experimental wounds (P < 0.001). cIAP2 was induced in vitro in regenerating Caco2 IECs after wound infliction (P < 0.01). Knockdown of cIAP2 caused a substantial impairment of the IEC regeneration through inhibition of migration (P < 0.005). cIAP2 overexpression lead to formation of migrating IECs and upregulation of expression of RhoA and Rac1 as well as GTP-activation of Rac1. Transforming growth factor-β1 enhanced the expression of cIAP2 but was not upregulated in wounds in vivo and in vitro. NF-κB and MAPK pathways did not affect cIAP2 expression. cIAP2 is in conclusion a regulator of human intestinal wound healing through enhanced migration along with activation of Rac1, and the findings suggest that cIAP2 could be a future therapeutic target to improve intestinal wound healing. PMID:25394657

  17. Inhibition of Human Telomerase Activity by an Engineered Zinc Finger Protein that Binds G-Quadruplexes†

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Sachin D.; Isalan, Mark; Gavory, Gérald; Ladame, Sylvain; Choo, Yen; Balasubramanian, Shankar

    2007-01-01

    The G-quadruplex nucleic acid structural motif is a target for designing molecules that could potentially modulate telomere length or have anticancer properties. We have recently described an engineered zinc finger protein (Gq1) that binds with specificity to the intramolecular G-quadruplex formed by the human telomeric sequence 5′-(GGTTAG)5-3′ (Isalan et al. (2001) Biochemistry 40, 830-836). Here, we report that Gq1 is able to arrest the action of a DNA polymerase on a template-containing telomeric sequence. Inhibition occurs in a concentration-dependent manner, probably by forming a stabilized G-quadruplex·protein complex. Furthermore, Gq1 inhibits the apparent activity of the enzyme telomerase in vitro, with an IC50 value of 74.3 ± 11.1 nM. Possible molecular mechanisms of inhibition are discussed, together with the potential for using engineered zinc fingers to interfere with the cellular processes associated with telomere function. PMID:15491152

  18. Protein kinase C (PKC) activity and PKC messenger RNAs in human pituitary adenomas.

    PubMed

    Jin, L; Maeda, T; Chandler, W F; Lloyd, R V

    1993-02-01

    Protein kinase C (PKC) is involved in the differentiation and growth regulation of a variety of tissues including anterior pituitary gland cells. To determine the distribution of PKC in different types of adenomas, PKC activity was analyzed in human pituitary tumors and the effects of hypothalamic hormone stimulation on PKC activity were examined in cultured adenoma cells. Gonadotroph (LH/FSH) and null cell adenomas had significantly higher levels of particulate, soluble, and total PKC activity compared with growth hormone (GH) adenomas (P < 0.05). Chronic stimulation of null cell adenomas with gonadotropin hormone-releasing hormone or of one GH adenoma with GH-releasing hormone for 7 days did not significantly alter total PKC activity in pituitary cells cultured in serum-free medium. Localization of the calcium-dependent PKC isozymes (alpha, beta and gamma) by immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization revealed predominantly PKC alpha in all adenomas and variable expression of PKC beta and gamma in some tumors. When the calcium-independent PKC isozymes (delta, epsilon, and zeta) were localized by in situ hybridization, normal and neoplastic pituitaries expressed abundant mRNA for PKC epsilon, whereas some tumors and one normal pituitary had a few cells positive for PKC zeta mRNA as evaluated by grain density and the number of cells labeled. These results indicate that there is a variable distribution of PKC mRNA isozymes in human pituitary adenomas and that normal pituitaries and pituitary adenoma cells express the mRNA for both the calcium-dependent and some of the calcium-independent PKC isozymes. Chronic treatment with the hypothalamic gonadotropin hormone-releasing hormone and GH-releasing hormone, which increased LH/FSH and GH secretion, respectively, did not increase PKC activity in cultured adenoma cells. The presence of calcium-dependent and calcium-independent PKC isozymes in normal and neoplastic pituitary cells indicates that PKC probably plays a

  19. Activation of Protein C in Human Trophoblasts in Culture and Downregulation of Trophoblast Endothelial Protein C Receptor by TNF-α.

    PubMed

    Faioni, E M; Fontana, G; Razzari, C; Avagliano, L; Bulfamante, G; Calvi, E; Doi, P; Marconi, A M

    2015-08-01

    In mice, trophoblasts are equipped with a potent anticoagulant mechanism, the protein C pathway. In human placenta, no functional studies of the protein C pathway are available. Human first-trimester trophoblasts (CK(++) HLA-G(+/-) Vim(-)) were isolated and kept in culture for a maximum of 48 hours. Activation of protein C on trophoblasts was at least as efficient as in endothelial cells (4.43 × 10 (-) (7) nmol/L/min/cell). Endothelial protein C receptor (EPCR) was expressed in syncytiotrophoblasts and extravillous trophoblasts. Downregulation of the messenger RNA of trophoblast EPCR occurred when trophoblasts were challenged with tumor necrosis factor α, and it could be prevented by unfractionated heparin but not by low-molecular-weight heparin at therapeutic doses. In conclusion, there is a functional protein C pathway on human first-trimester trophoblasts which can be modulated by inflammation. This finding has implications for the pathogenesis and prevention of placenta-mediated obstetric complications. PMID:25667200

  20. Interaction of nuclear protein p140 with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 TAR RNA in mitogen-activated primary human T lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Rothblum, C J; Jackman, J; Mikovits, J; Shukla, R R; Kumar, A

    1995-01-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest that cellular proteins play a role during human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Tat-mediated trans activation. A recent report from this laboratory has shown that a 140-kDa HeLa nuclear protein (p140) binds specifically to the lower stem region of the Tat response element, TAR RNA. Since HIV-1 trans activation is most efficient in proliferating T cells, we investigated the binding of p140 to TAR RNA in unstimulated and mitogen-activated, G1-phase primary T lymphocytes. TAR RNA/protein-binding activity was low in resting cells but increased significantly within 2 h of activation and remained elevated for at least 48 h. Corresponding increases in p140 protein levels were observed with most but not all donors, suggesting that an additional nuclear factor(s) may be required for efficient binding of this protein to TAR RNA in activated T cells. PMID:7609087

  1. A Potent, Selective, and Cell-Active Inhibitor of Human Type I Protein Arginine Methyltransferases.

    PubMed

    Eram, Mohammad S; Shen, Yudao; Szewczyk, Magdalena M; Wu, Hong; Senisterra, Guillermo; Li, Fengling; Butler, Kyle V; Kaniskan, H Ümit; Speed, Brandon A; dela Seña, Carlo; Dong, Aiping; Zeng, Hong; Schapira, Matthieu; Brown, Peter J; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H; Barsyte-Lovejoy, Dalia; Liu, Jing; Vedadi, Masoud; Jin, Jian

    2016-03-18

    Protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs) play a crucial role in a variety of biological processes. Overexpression of PRMTs has been implicated in various human diseases including cancer. Consequently, selective small-molecule inhibitors of PRMTs have been pursued by both academia and the pharmaceutical industry as chemical tools for testing biological and therapeutic hypotheses. PRMTs are divided into three categories: type I PRMTs which catalyze mono- and asymmetric dimethylation of arginine residues, type II PRMTs which catalyze mono- and symmetric dimethylation of arginine residues, and type III PRMT which catalyzes only monomethylation of arginine residues. Here, we report the discovery of a potent, selective, and cell-active inhibitor of human type I PRMTs, MS023, and characterization of this inhibitor in a battery of biochemical, biophysical, and cellular assays. MS023 displayed high potency for type I PRMTs including PRMT1, -3, -4, -6, and -8 but was completely inactive against type II and type III PRMTs, protein lysine methyltransferases and DNA methyltransferases. A crystal structure of PRMT6 in complex with MS023 revealed that MS023 binds the substrate binding site. MS023 potently decreased cellular levels of histone arginine asymmetric dimethylation. It also reduced global levels of arginine asymmetric dimethylation and concurrently increased levels of arginine monomethylation and symmetric dimethylation in cells. We also developed MS094, a close analog of MS023, which was inactive in biochemical and cellular assays, as a negative control for chemical biology studies. MS023 and MS094 are useful chemical tools for investigating the role of type I PRMTs in health and disease. PMID:26598975

  2. Activation of death-associated protein kinase in human peritumoral tissue: A potential therapeutic target.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiang; Wang, Haiyan; Pollok, Karen E; Chen, Jinhui; Cohen-Gadol, Aaron A

    2015-10-01

    To further understand the molecular mechanisms of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor 2B (NR2B) phosphorylation and its contribution to glioma-related seizures, we investigated the expression of death-associated protein kinase-1 (DAPK1), which is a kinase known to phosphorylate NR2B at S1303 in glioma and peritumoral tissue. The molecular mechanisms leading to glioma-associated seizures are poorly understood. We recently discovered that NR2B is phosphorylated at S1303 in glioma peritumoral tissue. NR2B is an excitatory glutamate receptor, suggesting that glutamate released from glioma tumor cells may excite the neurons in the peritumoral tissue and contribute to glioma-associated epileptogenesis. DAPK1 levels were assessed in an intracranial mouse model of human glioma and in primary patient peritumoral and glioma tissues using immunohistochemistry. DAPK1 is highly expressed in the peritumoral region, but is poorly expressed in glioma tissues in both a mouse model of human glioma and in the primary patient glioma. In our previous report, we found that NR2B is also highly phosphorylated in the same region. Upregulation of DAPK1 in the peritumoral tissues suggests that DAPK1 can phosphorylate NR2B, increase its excitability, lead to glioma-induced seizures, and could potentially be an important therapeutic target. Furthermore, the xenograft model offers an opportunity to develop and test therapeutic approaches that can block DAPK1 activity in vivo. PMID:26165472

  3. Brominated Flame Retardants, Tetrabromobisphenol A and Hexabromocyclododecane, Activate Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases (MAPKs) in Human Natural Killer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cato, Anita; Celada, Lindsay; Kibakaya, Esther Caroline; Simmons, Nadia; Whalen, Margaret M.

    2014-01-01

    NK cells provide a vital surveillance against virally infected cells, tumor cells, and antibody-coated cells through the release of cytolytic mediators and gamma interferon (IFN-γ). Hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) is a brominated flame retardant used primarily in expanded (EPS) and extruded (XPS) polystyrene foams for thermal insulation in the building and construction industry. Tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA) is used both as a reactive and an additive flame retardant in a variety of materials. HBCD and TBBPA contaminate the environment and are found in human blood samples. In previous studies, we have shown that other environmental contaminants, such as the dibutyltin (DBT) and tributyltin (TBT), decrease NK lytic function by activating mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) in the NK cells. HBCD and TBBPA also interfere with NK cell(s) lytic function. The current study evaluates whether HBCD and/or TBBPA have the capacity to activate MAPKs and MAPK kinases (MAP2Ks). The effects of concentrations of HBCD and TBBPA that inhibited lytic function on the phosphorylation state and total levels of the MAPKs (p44/42, p38, and JNK) and the phosphorylation and total levels of the MAP2Ks (MEK1/2 and MKK3/6) were examined. Results indicate that exposure of human NK cells to 10-0.5 µM HBCD or TBBPA activate MAPKs and MAP2Ks. This HBCD and TBBPA-induced activation of MAPKs may leave them unavailable for activation by virally infected or tumor target cells and thus contributes to the observed decreases in lytic function seen in NK cells exposed to HBCD and TBBPA. PMID:25341744

  4. Sleep Loss Activates Cellular Inflammation and Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription (STAT) Family Proteins in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Irwin, Michael R.; Witarama, Tuff; Caudill, Marissa; Olmstead, Richard; Breen, Elizabeth Crabb

    2014-01-01

    Sleep disturbance and short sleep duration are associated with inflammation and related disorders including cardiovascular disease, arthritis, diabetes mellitus, and certain cancers. This study was undertaken to test the effects of experimental sleep loss on spontaneous cellular inflammation and activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) family proteins, which together promote an inflammatory microenvironment. In 24 healthy adults (16 females; 8 males), spontaneous production of IL-6 and TNF in monocytes and spontaneous intranuclear expression of activated STAT1, STAT3, and STAT5 in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), monocyte-, and lymphocyte populations were measured in the morning after uninterrupted baseline sleep, partial sleep deprivation (PSD, sleep period from 3 a.m. to 7 a.m.), and recovery sleep. Relative to baseline, spontaneous monocytic expression of IL-6 and TNF-α was significantly greater after PSD (P<0.02) and after recovery sleep (P<0.01). Relative to baseline, spontaneous monocytic expression of activated STAT 1 and STAT 5 was significantly greater after recovery sleep (P<0.007P<0.02, respectively) but not STAT 3 (P=0.09). No changes in STAT1, STAT3, or STAT5 were found in lymphocyte populations. Sleep loss induces activation of spontaneous cellular innate immunity and of STAT family proteins, which together map the dynamics of sleep loss on the molecular signaling pathways that regulate inflammatory and other immune responses. Treatments that target short sleep duration have the potential to constrain inflammation and reduce the risk for inflammatory disorders and some cancers in humans. PMID:25451613

  5. Human T-lymphotropic virus tax activates human cytomegalovirus major-immediate early promoter and improves production of recombinant proteins in HEK293 cells.

    PubMed

    Lwa, Teng Rhui; Lee, Jialing; Ng, Chew Har; Lew, Qiao Jing; Hia, Hui Ching; Chao, Sheng-Hao

    2011-01-01

    The human cytomegalovirus (CMV) major immediate-early (MIE) promoter is widely used in mammalian cells for production of recombinant proteins. It is of great interest to further enhance protein production driven by the CMV promoter. Here, we report that the Tax protein of human T-lymphotropic virus stimulates the transgene expression under the control of CMV MIE promoter in HEK293 cells. At least threefold increases in transient production of recombinant proteins, including luciferase and two biopharmaceutical proteins (erythropoietin and interferon-γ), were detected. Furthermore, cyclic adenosine monophosphate (AMP)-response element binding protein 2 (CREB2) was identified as a cellular cofactor, which might be responsible for Tax transactivation of the CMV MIE promoter. Our results not only demonstrate the potential use of this novel expression strategy for improvement of recombinant protein production in HEK293 cells but also provide the molecular mechanism for Tax-mediated activation of CMV MIE promoter. PMID:21425252

  6. Exploring the interaction between picoplatin and human serum albumin: The effects on protein structure and activity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanqing; Wu, Peirong; Zhou, Xinchun; Zhang, Hongmei; Qiu, Ligan; Cao, Jian

    2016-09-01

    For the first time, the effects of picoplatin on the structure and esterase-like catalytic activity of human serum albumin (HSA) have been investigated by spectroscopic approaches and molecular modeling. The circular dichroism (CD) spectral examinations indicated that the binding of picoplatin with HSA induced a slight decrease of a-helix content of protein and unfolded the constituent polypeptides of the protein. The synchronous fluorescence and three-dimensional fluorescence spectral methods were used to estimate the effect of picoplatin on the micro-environmental changes of the Trp and Tyr residues of HSA, indicating that the micro-environment around the Tyr and Trp residue is partly disturbed by picoplatin. UV-vis absorption spectral result indicated the formation of the ground state complex between picoplatin with HSA. The ANS binding assay indicated the existence of competitive combination of picoplatin and ANS with HSA. The studies on the effects of picoplatin on the binding of HSA with bilirubin and heme showed that picoplatin binding caused a change of angle between two chromophores of bound bilirubin and the binding site of picoplatin does not locate in subdomain IB in HSA that bound with heme. The molecular modeling results showed that picoplatin binds to the connection between domain I and domain II by hydrophobic, hydrogen bonds, and van der Waals forces. In addition, HSA maintains most of its esterase activity in the presence of picoplatin. The investigations on how picoplatin interacts with HSA are important for the understanding of the anticancer mechanism and toxicity of platinum-based anticancer drug. PMID:27484966

  7. Fibroblast Activation Protein Expression by Stromal Cells and Tumor-Associated Macrophages in Human Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Julia, Tchou; Zhang Paul, J; Yingtao, Bi; Celine, Satija; Rajrupa, Marjumdar; Stephen, TL; Lo, A; Haiying, Chen; Carolyn, Mies; June, Carl H; Jose, Conejo-Garcia; Ellen, Puré

    2013-01-01

    Summary Fibroblast activation protein (FAP) has long been known to be expressed in the stroma of breast cancer. However, very little is known if the magnitude of FAP expression within the stroma may have prognostic value and reflect the heterogeneous biology of the tumor cell. An earlier study had suggested that stromal FAP expression in breast cancer was inversely proportional to prognosis. We, therefore, hypothesized that stromal FAP expression may correlate with clinicopathologic variables and may serve as an adjunct prognostic factor in breast cancer. We evaluated the expression of FAP in a panel of breast cancer tissues (n=52) using a combination of immunostain analyses at the tissue and single cell level using freshly frozen or freshly digested human breast tumor samples respectively. Our results showed that FAP expression was abundantly expressed in the stroma across all breast cancer subtypes without significant correlation with clinicopathologic factors. We further identified a subset of FAP positive or FAP+ stromal cells that also expressed CD45, a pan-leukocyte marker. Using freshly dissociated human breast tumor specimens (n=5), we demonstrated that some of these FAP+ CD45+ cells were CD11b+CD14+MHC-II+ indicating that they were likely tumor associated macrophages (TAMs). Although FAP+CD45+ cells have been demonstrated in the mouse tumor stroma, our results demonstrating that human breast TAMs expressed FAP was novel and suggested that existing and future FAP directed therapy may have dual therapeutic benefits targeting both stromal mesenchymal cells and immune cells such as TAMs. More work is needed to explore the role of FAP as a potential targetable molecule in breast cancer treatment. PMID:24074532

  8. Phosphorylation of Human Choline Kinase Beta by Protein Kinase A: Its Impact on Activity and Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Ching Ching; Few, Ling Ling; Konrad, Manfred; See Too, Wei Cun

    2016-01-01

    Choline kinase beta (CKβ) is one of the CK isozymes involved in the biosynthesis of phosphatidylcholine. CKβ is important for normal mitochondrial function and muscle development as the lack of the ckβ gene in human and mice results in the development of muscular dystrophy. In contrast, CKα is implicated in tumorigenesis and has been extensively studied as an anticancer target. Phosphorylation of human CKα was found to regulate the enzyme’s activity and its subcellular location. This study provides evidence for CKβ phosphorylation by protein kinase A (PKA). In vitro phosphorylation of CKβ by PKA was first detected by phosphoprotein staining, as well as by in-gel kinase assays. The phosphorylating kinase was identified as PKA by Western blotting. CKβ phosphorylation by MCF-7 cell lysate was inhibited by a PKA-specific inhibitor peptide, and the intracellular phosphorylation of CKβ was shown to be regulated by the level of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), a PKA activator. Phosphorylation sites were located on CKβ residues serine-39 and serine-40 as determined by mass spectrometry and site-directed mutagenesis. Phosphorylation increased the catalytic efficiencies for the substrates choline and ATP about 2-fold, without affecting ethanolamine phosphorylation, and the S39D/S40D CKβ phosphorylation mimic behaved kinetically very similar. Remarkably, phosphorylation drastically increased the sensitivity of CKβ to hemicholinium-3 (HC-3) inhibition by about 30-fold. These findings suggest that CKβ, in concert with CKα, and depending on its phosphorylation status, might play a critical role as a druggable target in carcinogenesis. PMID:27149373

  9. Regulation of 5'AMP-activated protein kinase activity and substrate utilization in exercising human skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Wojtaszewski, Jorgen F P; MacDonald, Christopher; Nielsen, Jakob N; Hellsten, Ylva; Hardie, D Grahame; Kemp, Bruce E; Kiens, Bente; Richter, Erik A

    2003-04-01

    The metabolic role of 5'AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in regulation of skeletal muscle metabolism in humans is unresolved. We measured isoform-specific AMPK activity and beta-acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACCbeta) Ser(221) phosphorylation and substrate balance in skeletal muscle of eight athletes at rest, during cycling exercise for 1 h at 70% peak oxygen consumption, and 1 h into recovery. The experiment was performed twice, once in a glycogen-loaded (glycogen concentration approximately 900 mmol/kg dry wt) and once in a glycogen-depleted (glycogen concentration approximately 160 mmol/kg dry wt) state. At rest, plasma long-chain fatty acids (FA) were twofold higher in the glycogen-depleted than in the loaded state, and muscle alpha1 AMPK (160%) and alpha2 AMPK (145%) activities and ACCbeta Ser(221) phosphorylation (137%) were also significantly higher in the glycogen-depleted state. During exercise, alpha2 AMPK activity, ACCbeta Ser(221) phosphorylation, plasma catecholamines, and leg glucose and net FA uptake were significantly higher in the glycogen-depleted than in the glycogen-loaded state without apparent differences in muscle high-energy phosphates. Thus exercise in the glycogen-depleted state elicits an enhanced uptake of circulating fuels that might be associated with elevated muscle AMPK activation. It is concluded that muscle AMPK activity and ACCbeta Ser(221) phosphorylation at rest and during exercise are sensitive to the fuel status of the muscle. During exercise, this dependence may in part be mediated by humoral factors. PMID:12488245

  10. The human DNA-activated protein kinase, DNA-PK: Substrate specificity

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, C.W.; Connelly, M.A.; Zhang, H.; Sipley, J.A.; Lees-Miller, S.P.; Lintott, L.G.; Sakaguchi, Kazuyasu; Appella, E.

    1994-11-05

    Although much has been learned about the structure and function of p53 and the probable sequence of subsequent events that lead to cell cycle arrest, little is known about how DNA damage is detected and the nature of the signal that is generated by DNA damage. Circumstantial evidence suggests that protein kinases may be involved. In vitro, human DNA-PK phosphorylates a variety of nuclear DNA-binding, regulatory proteins including the tumor suppressor protein p53, the single-stranded DNA binding protein RPA, the heat shock protein hsp90, the large tumor antigen (TAg) of simian virus 40, a variety of transcription factors including Fos, Jun, serum response factor (SRF), Myc, Sp1, Oct-1, TFIID, E2F, the estrogen receptor, and the large subunit of RNA polymerase II (reviewed in Anderson, 1993; Jackson et al., 1993). However, for most of these proteins, the sites that are phosphorylated by DNA-PK are not known. To determine if the sites that were phosphorylated in vitro also were phosphorylated in vivo and if DNA-PK recognized a preferred protein sequence, the authors identified the sites phosphorylated by DNA-PK in several substrates by direct protein sequence analysis. Each phosphorylated serine or threonine is followed immediately by glutamine in the polypeptide chain; at no other positions are the amino acid residues obviously constrained.

  11. Decreased RB1 mRNA, Protein, and Activity Reflect Obesity-Induced Altered Adipogenic Capacity in Human Adipose Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Moreno-Navarrete, José María; Petrov, Petar; Serrano, Marta; Ortega, Francisco; García-Ruiz, Estefanía; Oliver, Paula; Ribot, Joan; Ricart, Wifredo; Palou, Andreu; Bonet, Mª Luisa; Fernández-Real, José Manuel

    2013-01-01

    Retinoblastoma (Rb1) has been described as an essential player in white adipocyte differentiation in mice. No studies have been reported thus far in human adipose tissue or human adipocytes. We aimed to investigate the possible role and regulation of RB1 in adipose tissue in obesity using human samples and animal and cell models. Adipose RB1 (mRNA, protein, and activity) was negatively associated with BMI and insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) while positively associated with the expression of adipogenic genes (PPARγ and IRS1) in both visceral and subcutaneous human adipose tissue. BMI increase was the main contributor to adipose RB1 downregulation. In rats, adipose Rb1 gene expression and activity decreased in parallel to dietary-induced weight gain and returned to baseline with weight loss. RB1 gene and protein expression and activity increased significantly during human adipocyte differentiation. In fully differentiated adipocytes, transient knockdown of Rb1 led to loss of the adipogenic phenotype. In conclusion, Rb1 seems to play a permissive role for human adipose tissue function, being downregulated in obesity and increased during differentiation of human adipocytes. Rb1 knockdown findings further implicate Rb1 as necessary for maintenance of adipogenic characteristics in fully differentiated adipocytes. PMID:23315497

  12. Bone morphogenetic protein 2-induced human dental pulp cell differentiation involves p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase-activated canonical WNT pathway

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jing; Ye, Ling; Hui, Tian-Qian; Yang, Dong-Mei; Huang, Ding-Ming; Zhou, Xue-Dong; Mao, Jeremy J; Wang, Cheng-Lin

    2015-01-01

    Both bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2) and the wingless-type MMTV integration site (WNT)/β-catenin signalling pathway play important roles in odontoblast differentiation and dentinogenesis. Cross-talk between BMP2 and WNT/β-catenin in osteoblast differentiation and bone formation has been identified. However, the roles and mechanisms of the canonical WNT pathway in the regulation of BMP2 in dental pulp injury and repair remain largely unknown. Here, we demonstrate that BMP2 promotes the differentiation of human dental pulp cells (HDPCs) by activating WNT/β-catenin signalling, which is further mediated by p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) in vitro. BMP2 stimulation upregulated the expression of β-catenin in HDPCs, which was abolished by SB203580 but not by Noggin or LDN193189. Furthermore, BMP2 enhanced cell differentiation, which was not fully inhibited by Noggin or LDN193189. Instead, SB203580 partially blocked BMP2-induced β-catenin expression and cell differentiation. Taken together, these data suggest a possible mechanism by which the elevation of β-catenin resulting from BMP2 stimulation is mediated by the p38 MAPK pathway, which sheds light on the molecular mechanisms of BMP2-mediated pulp reparative dentin formation. PMID:26047580

  13. Recombination Activator Function of the Novel RAD51- and RAD51B-binding Protein, Human EVL*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Takaku, Motoki; Machida, Shinichi; Hosoya, Noriko; Nakayama, Shugo; Takizawa, Yoshimasa; Sakane, Isao; Shibata, Takehiko; Miyagawa, Kiyoshi; Kurumizaka, Hitoshi

    2009-01-01

    The RAD51 protein is a central player in homologous recombinational repair. The RAD51B protein is one of five RAD51 paralogs that function in the homologous recombinational repair pathway in higher eukaryotes. In the present study, we found that the human EVL (Ena/Vasp-like) protein, which is suggested to be involved in actin-remodeling processes, unexpectedly binds to the RAD51 and RAD51B proteins and stimulates the RAD51-mediated homologous pairing and strand exchange. The EVL knockdown cells impaired RAD51 assembly onto damaged DNA after ionizing radiation or mitomycin C treatment. The EVL protein alone promotes single-stranded DNA annealing, and the recombination activities of the EVL protein are further enhanced by the RAD51B protein. The expression of the EVL protein is not ubiquitous, but it is significantly expressed in breast cancer-derived MCF7 cells. These results suggest that the EVL protein is a novel recombination factor that may be required for repairing specific DNA lesions, and that may cause tumor malignancy by its inappropriate expression. PMID:19329439

  14. Mutant Fusion Proteins with Enhanced Fusion Activity Promote Measles Virus Spread in Human Neuronal Cells and Brains of Suckling Hamsters

    PubMed Central

    Shirogane, Yuta; Suzuki, Satoshi O.; Ikegame, Satoshi; Koga, Ritsuko

    2013-01-01

    Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE) is a fatal degenerative disease caused by persistent measles virus (MV) infection in the central nervous system (CNS). From the genetic study of MV isolates obtained from SSPE patients, it is thought that defects of the matrix (M) protein play a crucial role in MV pathogenicity in the CNS. In this study, we report several notable mutations in the extracellular domain of the MV fusion (F) protein, including those found in multiple SSPE strains. The F proteins with these mutations induced syncytium formation in cells lacking SLAM and nectin 4 (receptors used by wild-type MV), including human neuronal cell lines, when expressed together with the attachment protein hemagglutinin. Moreover, recombinant viruses with these mutations exhibited neurovirulence in suckling hamsters, unlike the parental wild-type MV, and the mortality correlated with their fusion activity. In contrast, the recombinant MV lacking the M protein did not induce syncytia in cells lacking SLAM and nectin 4, although it formed larger syncytia in cells with either of the receptors. Since human neuronal cells are mainly SLAM and nectin 4 negative, fusion-enhancing mutations in the extracellular domain of the F protein may greatly contribute to MV spread via cell-to-cell fusion in the CNS, regardless of defects of the M protein. PMID:23255801

  15. Subnuclear localization of the trans-activating protein of human T-cell leukemia virus type I

    SciTech Connect

    Slamon, D.J.; Keith, D.E.; Golde, D.W. ); Boyle, W.J. ); Press, M.F. ); Souza, L.M. )

    1988-03-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type I is associated with human lymphoid malignancies. The p40{sup xI} protein encoded by the x gene of this virus is believed to play some role in virally mediated transformation. This gene is known to encode a transcriptional trans activator which previous studies have shown to be a nuclear protein. Further characterization of the intracellular kinetics of this protein showed that it migrated into the nucleus very soon after synthesis. Within the nucleus, p40{sup xI} was distributed almost equally between the nucleoplasm and the nuclear matrix. Given the proposed role of the nuclear matrix in RNA transcription, the association of p40{sup xI} with the matrix places it in an appropriate cellular compartment to exercise an effect on transcription.

  16. Subnuclear localization of the trans-activating protein of human T-cell leukemia virus type I.

    PubMed Central

    Slamon, D J; Boyle, W J; Keith, D E; Press, M F; Golde, D W; Souza, L M

    1988-01-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type I is associated with human lymphoid malignancies. The p40xI protein encoded by the x gene of this virus is believed to play some role in virally mediated transformation. This gene is known to encode a transcriptional trans activator which previous studies have shown to be a nuclear protein. Further characterization of the intracellular kinetics of this protein showed that it migrated into the nucleus very soon after synthesis. Within the nucleus, p40xI was distributed almost equally between the nucleoplasm and the nuclear matrix. Given the proposed role of the nuclear matrix in RNA transcription, the association of p40xI with the matrix places it in an appropriate cellular compartment to exercise an effect on transcription. Images PMID:2828664

  17. p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase mediates IL-8 induction by the ribotoxin deoxynivalenol in human monocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Islam, Zahidul; Gray, Jennifer S.; Pestka, James J. . E-mail: pestka@msu.edu

    2006-06-15

    The effects of the ribotoxic trichothecene deoxynivalenol (DON) on mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-mediated IL-8 expression were investigated in cloned human monocytes and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). DON (250 to 1000 ng/ml) induced both IL-8 mRNA and IL-8 heteronuclear RNA (hnRNA), an indicator of IL-8 transcription, in the human U937 monocytic cell line in a concentration-dependent manner. Expression of IL-8 hnRNA, mRNA and protein correlated with p38 phosphorylation and was completely abrogated by the p38 MAPK inhibitor SB203580. DON at 500 ng/ml similarly induced p38-dependent IL-8 protein and mRNA expression in PBMC cultures from healthy volunteers. Significantly increased IL-6 and IL-1{beta} intracellular protein and mRNA expression was also observed in PBMC treated with DON (500 ng/ml) which were also partially p38-dependent. Flow cytometry of PBMC revealed that DON-induced p38 phosphorylation varied among individuals relative to both threshold toxin concentrations (25-100 ng/ml) and relative increases in percentages of phospho-p38{sup +} cells. DON-induced p38 activation occurred exclusively in the CD14{sup +} monocyte population. DON was devoid of agonist activity for human Toll-like receptors 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8 and 9. However, two other ribotoxins, emetine and anisomycin, induced p38 phosphorylation in PBMC similarly to DON. Taken together, these data suggest that (1) p38 activation was required for induction of IL-8 and proinflammatory gene expression in the monocyte and (2) DON induced p38 activation in human monocytes via the ribotoxic stress response.

  18. Activated Protein C Enhances Human Keratinocyte Barrier Integrity via Sequential Activation of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor and Tie2*

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Meilang; Chow, Shu-Oi; Dervish, Suat; Chan, Yee-Ka Agnes; Julovi, Sohel M.; Jackson, Christopher J.

    2011-01-01

    Keratinocytes play a critical role in maintaining epidermal barrier function. Activated protein C (APC), a natural anticoagulant with anti-inflammatory and endothelial barrier protective properties, significantly increased the barrier impedance of keratinocyte monolayers, measured by electric cell substrate impedance sensing and FITC-dextran flux. In response to APC, Tie2, a tyrosine kinase receptor, was rapidly activated within 30 min, and relocated to cell-cell contacts. APC also increased junction proteins zona occludens, claudin-1 and VE-cadherin. Inhibition of Tie2 by its peptide inhibitor or small interfering RNA abolished the barrier protective effect of APC. Interestingly, APC did not activate Tie2 through its major ligand, angiopoietin-1, but instead acted by binding to endothelial protein C receptor, cleaving protease-activated receptor-1 and transactivating EGF receptor. Furthermore, when activation of Akt, but not ERK, was inhibited, the barrier protective effect of APC on keratinocytes was abolished. Thus, APC activates Tie2, via a mechanism requiring, in sequential order, the receptors, endothelial protein C receptor, protease-activated receptor-1, and EGF receptor, which selectively enhances the PI3K/Akt signaling to enhance junctional complexes and reduce keratinocyte permeability. PMID:21173154

  19. The active gene that encodes human High Mobility Group 1 protein (HMG1) contains introns and maps to chromosome 13

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrari, S.; Finelli, P.; Rocchi, M.

    1996-07-15

    The human genome contains a large number of sequences related to the cDNA for High Mobility Group 1 protein (HMG1), which so far has hampered the cloning and mapping of the active HMG1 gene. We show that the human HMG1 gene contains introns, while the HMG1-related sequences do not and most likely are retrotransposed pseudogenes. We identified eight YACs from the ICI and CEPH libraries that contain the human HMG1 gene. The HMG1 gene is similar in structure to the previously characterized murine homologue and maps to human chromosome 13 and q12, as determined by in situ hybridization. The mouse Hmg1 gene maps to the telomeric region of murine Chromosome 5, which is syntenic to the human 13q12 band. 18 refs., 3 figs.

  20. Identification of the human pim-1 gene product as a 33-kilodalton cytoplasmic protein with tyrosine kinase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Telerman, A.; Amson, R.; Zakut-Houri, R.; Givol, D.

    1988-04-01

    The human pim-1 gene was recently identified as a new putative oncogene located on chromosome 6p21, a region showing karyotypic abnormalities in particular leukemias. In the present work the authors characterized the pim protein product. In vitro translation of positively selected poly(A)/sup +/ mRNA indicates that this gene encodes a 33-kilodalton protein. Anti-pim antibodies were raised against a fused TrpE-pim protein induced in a bacterial expression vector. This antibody immunoprecipitated a 33-kilodalton protein from in vivo (/sup 35/S)methionine-labeled K562 and KCl myelogenous origin cell lines. This protein was localized to the cytoplasm, and in vivo labeling as well as in vitro kinase assay suggests that it is a phosphoprotein with tyrosine kinase activity. This was further confirmed by performing autophosphorylation directly on a p33/sup pim/-containing gel band cut out after sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrphoresis. The results imply that the tyrosine kinase activity of pim can be recovered after boiling the pim-1 protein in sample buffer: a feature not described yet for this class of protein. These results suggest that pim-1 is a new member of the subgroup of oncogenes encoding tyrosine kinases.

  1. PME-1 protects ERK pathway activity from protein phosphatase 2A-mediated inactivation in human malignant glioma

    PubMed Central

    Puustinen, Pietri; Junttila, Melissa R.; Vanhatupa, Sari; Sablina, Anna A.; Hector, Melissa E.; Teittinen, Kaisa; Raheem, Olayinka; Ketola, Kirsi; Lin, Shujun; Kast, Juergen; Haapasalo, Hannu; Hahn, William C.; Westermarck, Jukka

    2010-01-01

    ERK/MAPK pathway activity is regulated by the antagonist function of activating kinases and inactivating protein phosphatases. Sustained ERK pathway activity is commonly observed in human malignancies, however the mechanisms by which the pathway is protected from phosphatase-mediated inactivation in the tumor tissue remain obscure. Here we show that methylesterase PME-1-mediated inhibition of the protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) promotes basal ERK pathway activity, and is required for efficient growth factor response. Mechanistically PME-1 is shown to support ERK pathway signaling upstream of Raf, but downstream of growth factor receptors and PKC. In malignant glioblastoma, PME-1 expression levels correlate with both ERK activity and cell proliferation in vivo. Moreover, PME-1 expression significantly correlates with disease progression in human astrocytic gliomas (N=222). Together, these observations identify PME-1 expression as one mechanism by which ERK pathway activity is maintained in cancer cells, and suggest important functional role for PME-1 in the disease progression of human astrocytic gliomas. PMID:19293187

  2. In Vitro Oxidation of Collagen Promotes the Formation of Advanced Oxidation Protein Products and the Activation of Human Neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Bochi, Guilherme Vargas; Torbitz, Vanessa Dorneles; de Campos, Luízi Prestes; Sangoi, Manuela Borges; Fernandes, Natieli Flores; Gomes, Patrícia; Moretto, Maria Beatriz; Barbisan, Fernanda; da Cruz, Ivana Beatrice Mânica; Moresco, Rafael Noal

    2016-04-01

    The accumulation of advanced oxidation protein products (AOPPs) has been linked to several pathological conditions. Here, we investigated collagen as a potential source for AOPP formation and determined the effects of hypochlorous acid (HOCl)-treated collagen (collagen-AOPPs) on human neutrophil activity. We also assessed whether alpha-tocopherol could counteract these effects. Exposure to HOCl increased the levels of collagen-AOPPs. Collagen-AOPPs also stimulated the production of AOPPs, nitric oxide (NO), superoxide radicals (O2 (-)), and HOCl by neutrophils. Collagen-AOPPs induced apoptosis and decreased the number of viable cells. Alpha-tocopherol prevented the formation of collagen-AOPPs, strongly inhibited the collagen-AOPP-induced production of O2 (-) and HOCl, and increased the viability of neutrophils. Our results suggest that collagen is an important protein that interacts with HOCl to form AOPPs, and consequently, collagen-AOPP formation is related to human neutrophil activation and cell death. PMID:26920846

  3. Structural studies of human Naked2: A biologically active intrinsically unstructured protein

    SciTech Connect

    Hu Tianhui; Krezel, Andrzej M.; Li Cunxi; Coffey, Robert J. . E-mail: robert.coffey@vanderbilt.edu

    2006-12-01

    Naked1 and 2 are two mammalian orthologs of Naked Cuticle, a canonical Wnt signaling antagonist in Drosophila. Naked2, but not Naked1, interacts with transforming growth factor-{alpha} (TGF{alpha}) and escorts TGF{alpha}-containing vesicles to the basolateral membrane of polarized epithelial cells. Full-length Naked2 is poorly soluble. Since most functional domains, including the Dishevelled binding region, EF-hand, vesicle recognition, and membrane targeting motifs, reside in the N-terminal half of the protein, we expressed and purified the first 217 residues of human Naked2 and performed a functional analysis of this fragment. Its circular dichroism (CD) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra showed no evidence of secondary and/or tertiary structure. The fragment did not bind calcium or zinc. These results indicate that the N-terminal half of Naked2 behaves as an intrinsically unstructured protein.

  4. Reversible Cysteine Acylation Regulates the Activity of Human Palmitoyl-Protein Thioesterase 1 (PPT1)

    PubMed Central

    Segal-Salto, Michal; Sapir, Tamar; Reiner, Orly

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the depalmitoylating enzyme gene, PPT1, cause the infantile form of Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis (NCL), an early onset neurodegenerative disease. During recent years there have been different therapeutic attempts including enzyme replacement. Here we show that PPT1 is palmitoylated in vivo and is a substrate for two palmitoylating enzymes, DHHC3 and DHHC7. The palmitoylated protein is detected in both cell lysates and medium. The presence of PPT1 with palmitoylated signal peptide in the cell medium suggests that a subset of the protein is secreted by a nonconventional mechanism. Using a mutant form of PPT1, C6S, which was not palmitoylated, we further demonstrate that palmitoylation does not affect intracellular localization but rather that the unpalmitoylated form enhanced the depalmitoylation activity of the protein. The calculated Vmax of the enzyme was significantly affected by the palmitoylation, suggesting that the addition of a palmitate group is reminiscent of adding a noncompetitive inhibitor. Thus, we reveal the existence of a positive feedback loop, where palmitoylation of PPT1 results in decreased activity and subsequent elevation in the amount of palmitoylated proteins. This positive feedback loop is likely to initiate a vicious cycle, which will enhance disease progression. The understanding of this process may facilitate enzyme replacement strategies. PMID:26731412

  5. Tax-interacting protein 1 coordinates the spatiotemporal activation of Rho GTPases and regulates the infiltrative growth of human glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hailun; Han, Miaojun; Whetsell, William; Wang, Jialiang; Rich, Jeremy; Hallahan, Dennis; Han, Zhaozhong

    2014-01-01

    PDZ domains represent one group of the major structural units that mediate protein interactions in intercellular contact, signal transduction and assembly of biological machineries. TIP-1 protein is composed of a single PDZ domain that distinguishes TIP-1 from other PDZ domain proteins that more often contain multiple protein domains and function as scaffolds for protein complex assembly. However, the biological functions of TIP-1, especially in cell transformation and tumor progression, are still controversial as observed in a variety of cell types. In this study, we have identified ARHGEF7, a guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) for Rho GTPases, as one novel TIP-1 interacting protein in human glioblastoma cells. We found that the presence of TIP-1 protein is essential to the intracellular redistribution of ARHGEF7 and rhotekin, one Rho effector, and the spatiotemporally coordinated activation of Rho GTPases (RhoA, Cdc42 and Rac1) in migrating glioblastoma cells. TIP-1 knockdown resulted in both aberrant localization of ARHGEF7 and rhotekin, as well as abnormal activation of Rho GTPases that was accompanied with impaired motility of glioblastoma cells. Furthermore, TIP-1 knockdown suppressed tumor cell dispersal in orthotopic glioblastoma murine models. We also observed high levels of TIP-1 expression in human glioblastoma specimens, and the elevated TIP-1 levels are associated with advanced staging and poor prognosis in glioma patients. Although more studies are needed to further dissect the mechanism(s) by which TIP-1 modulates the intracellular redistribution and activation of Rho GTPases, this study suggests that TIP-1 holds potential as both a prognostic biomarker and a therapeutic target of malignant gliomas. PMID:23563176

  6. Requirement for the Kinase Activity of Human DNA-Dependent Protein Kinase Catalytic Subunit in DNA Strand Break Rejoining

    PubMed Central

    Kurimasa, Akihiro; Kumano, Satoshi; Boubnov, Nikolai V.; Story, Michael D.; Tung, Chang-Shung; Peterson, Scott R.; Chen, David J.

    1999-01-01

    The catalytic subunit of DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PKcs) is an enormous, 470-kDa protein serine/threonine kinase that has homology with members of the phosphatidylinositol (PI) 3-kinase superfamily. This protein contributes to the repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) by assembling broken ends of DNA molecules in combination with the DNA-binding factors Ku70 and Ku80. It may also serve as a molecular scaffold for recruiting DNA repair factors to DNA strand breaks. This study attempts to better define the role of protein kinase activity in the repair of DNA DSBs. We constructed a contiguous 14-kb human DNA-PKcs cDNA and demonstrated that it can complement the DNA DSB repair defects of two mutant cell lines known to be deficient in DNA-PKcs (M059J and V3). We then created deletion and site-directed mutations within the conserved PI 3-kinase domain of the DNA-PKcs gene to test the importance of protein kinase activity for DSB rejoining. These DNA-PKcs mutant constructs are able to express the protein but fail to complement the DNA DSB or V(D)J recombination defects of DNA-PKcs mutant cells. These results indicate that the protein kinase activity of DNA-PKcs is essential for the rejoining of DNA DSBs in mammalian cells. We have also determined a model structure for the DNA-PKcs kinase domain based on comparisons to the crystallographic structure of a cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase. This structure gives some insight into which amino acid residues are crucial for the kinase activity in DNA-PKcs. PMID:10207111

  7. A cytotoxic nonstructural protein, NS1, of human parvovirus B19 induces activation of interleukin-6 gene expression.

    PubMed Central

    Moffatt, S; Tanaka, N; Tada, K; Nose, M; Nakamura, M; Muraoka, O; Hirano, T; Sugamura, K

    1996-01-01

    We examined the biological function of a nonstructural regulatory protein, NS1, of human parvovirus B19. Because of the cytotoxic activity of NS1, human hematopoietic cell lines, K562, Raji, and THP-1, were established as transfectants which produce the viral NS1 protein upon induction by using bacterial lactose repressor/operator system. NS1 was significantly produced in the three transfectant cells in an inducer dose- and time-dependent manner. Surprisingly, these three transfectants secreted an inflammatory cytokine, interleukin-6 (IL-6), in response to induction. However, no production of other related cytokines, IL-1beta, IL-8, or tumor necrosis factor alpha, was seen. Moreover, NS1-primed IL-6 induction was transiently demonstrated in primary human endothelial cells. Analysis with luciferase reporter plasmids carrying IL-6 promoter mutant fragments demonstrated that NS1 effect is mediated by a NF-kappaB binding site in the IL-6 promoter region, strongly implying that NS1 functions as a trans-acting transcriptional activator on the IL-6 promoter. Our novel finding, IL-6 induction by NS1, supports the possible relationship between parvovirus B19 infection and polyclonal activation of B cells in rheumatoid arthritis and indicates that NS1 protein may play a significant role in the pathogenesis of some B19-associated diseases by modulating the expression of host cellular genes. PMID:8970971

  8. Inducing Acute Traumatic Coagulopathy In Vitro: The Effects of Activated Protein C on Healthy Human Whole Blood

    PubMed Central

    Howard, Benjamin M.; Kornblith, Lucy Z.; Cheung, Christopher K.; Kutcher, Matthew E.; Miyazawa, Byron Y.; Vilardi, Ryan F.; Cohen, Mitchell J.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Acute traumatic coagulopathy has been associated with shock and tissue injury, and may be mediated via activation of the protein C pathway. Patients with acute traumatic coagulopathy have prolonged PT and PTT, and decreased activity of factors V and VIII; they are also hypocoagulable by thromboelastometry (ROTEM) and other viscoelastic assays. To test the etiology of this phenomenon, we hypothesized that such coagulopathy could be induced in vitro in healthy human blood with the addition of activated protein C (aPC). Methods Whole blood was collected from 20 healthy human subjects, and was “spiked” with increasing concentrations of purified human aPC (control, 75, 300, 2000 ng/mL). PT/PTT, factor activity assays, and ROTEM were performed on each sample. Mixed effect regression modeling was performed to assess the association of aPC concentration with PT/PTT, factor activity, and ROTEM parameters. Results In all subjects, increasing concentrations of aPC produced ROTEM tracings consistent with traumatic coagulopathy. ROTEM EXTEM parameters differed significantly by aPC concentration, with stepwise prolongation of clotting time (CT) and clot formation time (CFT), decreased alpha angle (α), impaired early clot formation (a10 and a20), and reduced maximum clot firmness (MCF). PT and PTT were significantly prolonged at higher aPC concentrations, with corresponding significant decreases in factor V and VIII activity. Conclusion A phenotype of acute traumatic coagulopathy can be induced in healthy blood by the in vitro addition of aPC alone, as evidenced by viscoelastic measures and confirmed by conventional coagulation assays and factor activity. This may lend further mechanistic insight to the etiology of coagulation abnormalities in trauma, supporting the central role of the protein C pathway. Our findings also represent a model for future investigations in the diagnosis and treatment of acute traumatic coagulopathy. PMID:27008408

  9. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Integration Protein Expressed in Escherichia Coli Possesses Selective DNA Cleaving Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherman, Paula A.; Fyfe, James A.

    1990-07-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) integration protein, a potential target for selective antiviral therapy, was expressed in Escherichia coli. The purified protein, free of detectable contaminating endonucleases, selectively cleaved double-stranded DNA oligonucleotides that mimic the U3 and the U5 termini of linear HIV DNA. Two nucleotides were removed from the 3' ends of both the U5 plus strand and the U3 minus strand; in both cases, cleavage was adjacent to a conserved CA dinucleotide. The reaction was metal-ion dependent, with a preference for Mn2+ over Mg2+. Reaction selectivity was further demonstrated by the lack of cleavage of an HIV U5 substrate on the complementary (minus) strand, an analogous substrate that mimics the U3 terminus of an avian retrovirus, and an HIV U5 substrate in which the conserved CA dinucleotide was replaced with a TA dinucleotide. Such an integration protein-mediated cleavage reaction is expected to occur as part of the integration event in the retroviral life cycle, in which a double-stranded DNA copy of the viral RNA genome is inserted into the host cell DNA.

  10. Complex formation by the human Rad51B and Rad51C DNA repair proteins and their activities in vitro

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lio, Yi-Ching; Mazin, Alexander V.; Kowalczykowski, Stephen C.; Chen, David J.

    2003-01-01

    The human Rad51 protein is essential for DNA repair by homologous recombination. In addition to Rad51 protein, five paralogs have been identified: Rad51B/Rad51L1, Rad51C/Rad51L2, Rad51D/Rad51L3, XRCC2, and XRCC3. To further characterize a subset of these proteins, recombinant Rad51, Rad51B-(His)(6), and Rad51C proteins were individually expressed employing the baculovirus system, and each was purified from Sf9 insect cells. Evidence from nickel-nitrilotriacetic acid pull-down experiments demonstrates a highly stable Rad51B.Rad51C heterodimer, which interacts weakly with Rad51. Rad51B and Rad51C proteins were found to bind single- and double-stranded DNA and to preferentially bind 3'-end-tailed double-stranded DNA. The ability to bind DNA was elevated with mixed Rad51 and Rad51C, as well as with mixed Rad51B and Rad51C, compared with that of the individual protein. In addition, both Rad51B and Rad51C exhibit DNA-stimulated ATPase activity. Rad51C displays an ATP-independent apparent DNA strand exchange activity, whereas Rad51B shows no such activity; this apparent strand exchange ability results actually from a duplex DNA destabilization capability of Rad51C. By analogy to the yeast Rad55 and Rad57, our results suggest that Rad51B and Rad51C function through interactions with the human Rad51 recombinase and play a crucial role in the homologous recombinational repair pathway.

  11. Structural Basis for the Catalytic Activity of Human SER/THR Protein Phosphatase-5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swingle, M. R.; Honkanen, R.; Ciszak, E.

    2004-01-01

    Serinekhreonine protein phosphatase-5 (PP5) affects many signaling networks that regulate cell growth. Here we report the 1.6 Angstrom resolution crystal structure of PP5 catalytic domain with metal and phosphate ions in the active site. The structure reveals a mechanism for PPS-mediated catalysis that requires the precise positioning of two metal ions within a conserved Asp(sup 271)-M(sub 1),-M(sub 2)-His(sup 427)-W(sup 2)-His(sup 304)-Asp(sup 274) catalytic motif, and provides a structural basis for the exceptional catalytic proficiency of protein phosphatases placing them among the most powerful catalysts. Resolution of the entire C-terminus revealed a novel subdomain, and the structure of PP5 should aid development of specific inhibitors.

  12. Effects of oxaliplatin and oleic acid Gc-protein-derived macrophage-activating factor on murine and human microglia.

    PubMed

    Branca, Jacopo J V; Morucci, Gabriele; Malentacchi, Francesca; Gelmini, Stefania; Ruggiero, Marco; Pacini, Stefania

    2015-09-01

    The biological properties and characteristics of microglia in rodents have been widely described, but little is known about these features in human microglia. Several murine microglial cell lines are used to investigate neurodegenerative and neuroinflammatory conditions; however, the extrapolation of the results to human conditions is frequently met with criticism because of the possibility of species-specific differences. This study compares the effects of oxaliplatin and of oleic acid Gc-protein-derived macrophage-activating factor (OA-GcMAF) on two microglial cell lines, murine BV-2 cells and human C13NJ cells. Cell viability, cAMP levels, microglial activation, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression were evaluated. Our data demonstrate that oxaliplatin induced a significant decrease in cell viability in BV-2 and in C13NJ cells and that this effect was not reversed with OA-GcMAF treatment. The signal transduction pathway involving cAMP/VEGF was activated after treatment with oxaliplatin and/or OA-GcMAF in both cell lines. OA-GcMAF induced a significant increase in microglia activation, as evidenced by the expression of the B7-2 protein, in BV-2 as well as in C13NJ cells that was not associated with a concomitant increase in cell number. Furthermore, the effects of oxaliplatin and OA-GcMAF on coculture morphology and apoptosis were evaluated. Oxaliplatin-induced cell damage and apoptosis were nearly completely reversed by OA-GcMAF treatment in both BV-2/SH-SY5Y and C13NJ/SH-SY5Y cocultures. Our data show that murine and human microglia share common signal transduction pathways and activation mechanisms, suggesting that the murine BV-2 cell line may represent an excellent model for studying human microglia. PMID:25782915

  13. Borrelia burgdorferi lipoprotein BmpA activates pro-inflammatory responses in human synovial cells through a protein moiety

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiuli; Izadi, Hooman; Coleman, Adam S.; Wang, Penghua; Ma, Yongsheng; Fikrig, Erol; Anguita, Juan; Pal, Utpal

    2008-01-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi invasion of mammalian joints results in genesis of Lyme arthritis. Other than spirochete lipids, existence of protein antigens, which are abundant in joints and participate in B. burgdorferi-induced host inflammatory response, is unknown. Here, we report that major products of the B. burgdorferi basic membrane protein (bmp) A/B operon that are induced in murine and human joints, possess inflammatory properties. Compared to the wild type B. burgdorferi, an isogenic bmpA/B mutant induced significantly lower levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IL-1β in cultured human synovial cells, which could be restored using bmpA/B-complemented mutants, and more directly, upon addition of recombinant BmpA, but not BmpB or control spirochete proteins. Non-lipidated and lipidated versions of BmpA induced similar levels of cytokines, and remained unaffected by treatment with lipopolysaccharide inhibitor, polymyxin B. The bmpA/B mutant was also impaired in the induction of NF-κB and p38 MAP kinase signaling pathways in synovial cells, which were activated by non-lipidated BmpA. These results show that a protein moiety of BmpA can induce cytokine responses in synovial cells via activation of the NF-κB and p38 MAP kinase pathways and thus, could potentially contribute to the genesis of Lyme arthritis. PMID:18725314

  14. A Monoclonal IgM Protein with Antibody-like Activity for Human Albumin

    PubMed Central

    Hauptman, Stephen; Tomasi, Thomas B.

    1974-01-01

    The serum of a patient (L'ec) with an IgM lambda monoclonal protein was noted to bind albumin on immunoelectrophoresis. Analytical ultracentrifugation of the L'ec serum demonstrated 23S and 12S peaks, but no 4S (albumin) boundary. Immunologically identical 20S and 9S IgM proteins were isolated from the serum and the addition in vitro of either the patient's albumin or albumin isolated from normal serum was shown to reconstitute the 23S and 12S boundaries. The binding of high molecular weight IgM to albumin was demonstated by Sephadex G200 chromatography with 125I-labeled albumin and isolated IgM. Immunoelectrophoresis of the L'ec IgM developed with aggregated albumin (reverse immunoelectrophoresis) also demonstrated the binding of albumin to IgM. That all of the patient's IgM complexed with albumin was shown by affinity chromatography employing an aggregated albumin-immunoadsorbent column. Binding was shown to be of the noncovalent type by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in 8 M urea. With hot trypsin proteolysis, Fabμ and Fcμ5 fragments were isolated, and monomer albumin was shown to complex only with the Fabμ fragment by both analytical ultracentrifugation and molecular sieve chromatogaphy employing 125I-labeled Fab fragments. 1 mol of Fabμ fragment bound 1 mol of monomer albumin. Polymers of human albumin, produced by heat aggregation, precipitated with the isolated L'ec protein on gel diffusion analysis and, when coated on sheep red blood cells, gave a hemagglutination titer greater than 1 million with the whole L'ec serum. 50 additional monoclonal IgM, 33 IgA, and 80 IgG sera failed to show precipitation or hemagglutination with aggregated albumin. Native monomer albumin inhibited precipitation only at high concentrations (> 50 mg/ml); dimer albumin or fragments of albumin produced by trypsin digestion inhibited at low concentrations (0.4 mg/ml). No reactivity occurred with the albumin of five other mammalian species, including bovine. The L'ec protein

  15. Protein tyrosine kinase activity is essential for Fc gamma receptor-mediated intracellular killing of Staphylococcus aureus by human monocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, L; Nibbering, P H; Zomerdijk, T P; van Furth, R

    1994-01-01

    Our previous study revealed that the intracellular killing of Staphylococcus aureus by human monocytes after cross-linking Fc gamma receptor I (Fc gamma RI) or Fc gamma RII is a phospholipase C (PLC)-dependent process. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether protein tyrosine kinase (PTK) activity plays a role in the Fc gamma R-mediated intracellular killing of bacteria and activation of PLC in these cells. The results showed that phagocytosis of bacteria by monocytes was not affected by the PTK inhibitors genistein and tyrphostin-47. The intracellular killing of S. aureus by monocytes after cross-linking Fc gamma RII or Fc gamma RII with anti-Fc gamma R monoclonal antibody and a bridging antibody or with human immunoglobulin G (IgG) was inhibited by these compounds in a dose-dependent fashion. The production of O2- by monocytes after stimulation with IgG or IgG-opsonized S. aureus was almost completely blocked by the PTK inhibitor. These results indicate that inhibition of PTK impairs the oxygen-dependent bactericidal mechanisms of monocytes. Genistein and tyrphostin-47, which do not affect the enzymatic activity of purified PLC, prevented activation of PLC after cross-linking Fc gamma RI or Fc gamma RII, measured as an increase in the intracellular inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate concentration. Cross-linking Fc gamma RI or Fc gamma RII induced rapid tyrosine phosphorylation of several proteins in monocytes, one of which was identified as PLC-gamma 1, and the phosphorylation could be completely blocked by PTK inhibitors, leading to the conclusion that activation of PLC after cross-linking Fc gamma R in monocytes is regulated by PTK activity. Together, these results demonstrate that PTK activity is essential for the activation of PLC which is involved in the Fc gamma R-mediated intracellular killing of S. aureus by human monocytes. Images PMID:7927687

  16. Tyrosine phosphorylation and activation of a new mitogen-activated protein (MAP)-kinase cascade in human neutrophils stimulated with various agonists.

    PubMed Central

    Nahas, N; Molski, T F; Fernandez, G A; Sha'afi, R I

    1996-01-01

    The presence of a novel 38 kDa protein that is tyrosine phosphorylated in human neutrophils, a terminally differentiated cell, upon stimulation of these cells with low concentrations of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in combination with serum has been demonstrated. This 38 kDa protein was identified as the mammalian homologue of HOG1 in yeast, the p38 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase. This conclusion is based on the experimental findings that anti-phosphotyrosine (anti-PY) antibody immunoprecipitates a 38 kDa protein that is recognized by anti-p38 MAP kinase antibody, and conversely, anti-p38 MAP kinase antibody immunoprecipitates a 38 kDa protein that can be recognized by anti-PY antibody. Moreover, this tyrosine phosphorylated protein is found associated entirely with the cytosol. It was also found that this p38 MAP kinase is activated following stimulation of these cells with low concentrations of LPS in combination with serum. This conclusion is based on three experimental findings. First, soluble fractions isolated from LPS-stimulated cells phosphorylate heat shock protein 27 (hsp27) in an in vitro assay, and this effect is not inhibited by protein kinase C and protein kinase A inhibitor peptides. This effect is similar to the effect produced by the commercially available phosphorylated and activated MAPKAP kinase-2 (MAP kinase activated protein kinase-2). Secondly, a 27 kDa protein that aligns with a protein recognized by anti-hsp27 antibody is phosphorylated upon LPS stimulation of intact human neutrophils prelabelled with radioactive phosphate. Lastly, immune complex protein kinase assays, using [gamma-32P]ATP and activating transcription factor 2 (ATF2) as substrates, showed increased p38 MAP kinase activity from LPS-stimulated human neutrophils. The phosphorylation and activation of this p38 MAP kinase can be affected by both G-protein-coupled receptors such as platelet-activating factor (PAF) and non-G-protein-coupled receptors such as the cytokine

  17. Sperm-derived WW domain-binding protein, PAWP, elicits calcium oscillations and oocyte activation in humans and mice.

    PubMed

    Aarabi, Mahmoud; Balakier, Hanna; Bashar, Siamak; Moskovtsev, Sergey I; Sutovsky, Peter; Librach, Clifford L; Oko, Richard

    2014-10-01

    Mammalian zygotic development is initiated by sperm-mediated intracellular calcium oscillations, followed by activation of metaphase II-arrested oocytes. Sperm postacrosomal WW binding protein (PAWP) fulfils the criteria set for an oocyte-activating factor by inducing oocyte activation and being stored in the perinuclear theca, the sperm compartment whose content is first released into oocyte cytoplasm during fertilization. However, proof that PAWP initiates mammalian zygotic development relies on demonstration that it acts upstream of oocyte calcium oscillations. Here, we show that PAWP triggers calcium oscillations and pronuclear formation in human and mouse oocytes similar to what is observed during intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI). Most important, sperm-induced calcium oscillations are blocked by coinjection of a competitive inhibitor, derived from the WWI domain-binding motif of PAWP, implying the requirement of sperm PAWP and an oocyte-derived WWI domain protein substrate of PAWP for successful fertilization. Sperm-delivered PAWP is, therefore, a unique protein with a nonredundant role during human and mouse fertilization, required to trigger zygotic development. Presented data confirm our previous findings in nonmammalian models and suggest potential applications of PAWP in the diagnosis and treatment of infertility.- PMID:24970390

  18. Livin enhances tumorigenesis by regulating the mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway in human hypopharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sun-Ae; Yoon, Tae Mi; Lee, Dong Hoon; Lee, Joon Kyoo; Park, Young-Lan; Chung, Ik-Joo; Joo, Young-Eun; Lim, Sang Chul

    2016-07-01

    Livin, a member of the human inhibitor of apoptosis protein (IAP) family, is expressed at high levels in various human cancer tissues and may have prognostic significance. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of Livin on tumor cell behavior and oncogenic signaling pathways in human hypopharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (HSCC). Reverse transcription‑quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blot analyses were used to determine the mRNA and protein expression levels, respectively. A cell proliferation assay and cell cycle analysis were used to assess the functional effects of small interfering RNA‑mediated Livin knockdown. Livin was overexpressed in fresh HSCC tissues, compared with the adjacent normal mucosa. Livin knockdown led to significantly reduced cell proliferation and cell cycle arrest in the G1 phase of the human HSCC cells. The expression levels of c‑myc, cyclin D1, cyclin D3, cyclin‑dependent kinase (CDK)4 and CDK6 were decreased. The phosphorylation levels of extracellular signal‑regulated kinase 1/2, p38, c‑Jun N-terminal kinase and Akt were also decreased by Livin knockdown in the HSCC cells. Taken together, the results of the present study suggested that Livin may enhance tumorigenesis by modulating the mitogen‑activated/Akt signaling pathways in human HSCC. PMID:27175933

  19. EndoS, a novel secreted protein from Streptococcus pyogenes with endoglycosidase activity on human IgG

    PubMed Central

    Collin, Mattias; Olsén, Arne

    2001-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes is an important human pathogen that selectively interacts with proteins involved in the humoral defense system, such as immunoglobulins and complement factors. In this report we show that S.pyogenes has the ability to hydrolyze the chitobiose core of the asparagine-linked glycan on immuno globulin G (IgG) when bacteria are grown in the presence of human plasma. This activity is associated with the secretion of a novel 108 kDa protein denoted EndoS. EndoS has endoglycosidase activity on purified soluble IgG as well as IgG bound to the bacterial surface. EndoS is required for the activity on IgG, as an isogenic EndoS mutant could not hydrolyze the glycan on IgG. In addition, we show that the secreted streptococcal cysteine proteinase SpeB cleaves IgG in the hinge region in a papain-like manner. This is the first example of an endoglycosidase produced by a bacterial pathogen that selectively hydrolyzes human IgG, and reveals a novel mechanism which may contribute to S.pyogenes pathogenesis. PMID:11406581

  20. Protein Secretion in Human Mammary Epithelial Cells following HER1 Receptor Activation: Influence of HER2 and HER3 Expression

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yi; Gonzalez-Hernandez, Rachel M.; Zangar, Richard C.

    2011-02-14

    Background: Secretion of proteins by mammary cells results in autocrine and paracrine signaling that defines cell growth, migration and the extracellular environment. Even so, we have a very limited understanding of the cellular regulatory processes that regulate protein secretion. Method: In this study, we utilize an ELISA microarray platform to evaluate the effects of epidermal growth factor receptor (HER) expression on protein secretion in human epithelial mammary cells (HMEC). These secreted proteins included several HER1 ligands, interleukins 1α and 18, RANTES, vascular endothelial and platelet derived growth factors, matrix metalloproteases 1, 2 and 9, and the extracellular portion of the HER1 and HER2 proteins. Result: We utilized HMEC lines that were engineered to express different levels of HER1, HER2 and HER3. We determined the effects of these receptors on the secretion of a variety of growth factors, cytokines, and proteases. Conclusion: Overall, this study suggests that HER overexpression orchestrate broad affects on the tumor microenvironment by altering the secretion of a diverse group of biologically active proteins.

  1. Activities of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Integration Protein In vitro: Specific Cleavage and Integration of HIV DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bushman, Frederic D.; Craigie, Robert

    1991-02-01

    Growth of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) after infection requires the integration of a DNA copy of the viral RNA genome into a chromosome of the host. Here we present a simple in vitro system that carries out the integration reaction and the use of this system to probe the mechanism of integration. The only HIV protein necessary is the integration (IN) protein, which has been overexpressed in insect cells and then partially purified. DNA substrates are supplied as oligonucleotides that match the termini of the linear DNA product of reverse transcription. In the presence of HIV IN protein, oligonucleotide substrates are cleaved to generate the recessed 3' ends that are the precursor for integration, and the cleaved molecules are efficiently inserted into a DNA target. Analysis of reaction products reveals that HIV IN protein joins 3' ends of the viral DNA to 5' ends of cuts made by IN protein in the DNA target. We have also used this assay to characterize the sequences at the ends of the viral DNA involved in integration. The assay provides a simple screen for testing candidate inhibitors of HIV IN protein; some such inhibitors might have useful antiviral activity.

  2. Defect of vacuolar protein sorting stimulates proteolytic processing of human urokinase-type plasminogen activator in the yeast Hansenula polymorpha.

    PubMed

    Agaphonov, Michael; Romanova, Nina; Sokolov, Sviatoslav; Iline, Anna; Kalebina, Tatyana; Gellissen, Gerd; Ter-Avanesyan, Michael

    2005-11-01

    Human urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) is poorly secreted by yeast cells. Here, we have selected Hansenula polymorpha mutants with increased productivity of active extracellular uPA. Several of the obtained mutants also demonstrated a defect of sorting of carboxypeptidase Y to the vacuole and the mutant loci have been identified in six of them. All these mutations damaged genes involved in protein traffic between the Golgi apparatus and the vacuole, namely PEP3, VPS8, VPS10, VPS17, and VPS35. We have shown that inactivation of the VPS10 gene encoding the vacuolar protein sorting receptor does not increase uPA secretion but stimulates its proteolytic processing. PMID:16181812

  3. Notch1 Signaling Is Activated in Cells Expressing Embryonic Stem Cell Proteins in Human Primary Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yue; Peng, Jianhua; Zhang, Huxiang; Zhu, Yi; Wan, Li; Chen, Jianfu; Chen, Xiaoyun; Lin, Renyu; Li, He; Mao, XiaoOu; Jin, Kunlin

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To explore the expression of Notch1 signaling pathway in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Methods: We performed immunocytochemistry on surgically resected NPC using antibodies against embryonic stem (ES) cell proteins and against Notch1 signaling components. Results: We found that ES cell protein markers SOX2 and OCT4 were expressed in a subpopulation of cells for all three subtypes of NPC but barely in the normal control. Double immunostaining shows that SOX2- and OCT4-positive cells coexpressed proliferative markers, suggesting that human NPC may contain cancer stem–like cells. In addition, we found that Notch1 signaling was activated in NPC. Confocal images show that the Notch1 signaling activated form and Hes1, a downstream target of Notch1 signaling, was predominantly found in SOX2- and OCT4-positive cells. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that the Notch1 signaling pathway might be a regulator of cancer stem–like cells in NPC. PMID:20211102

  4. Characterization of and human serologic response to proteins in Helicobacter pylori broth culture supernatants with vacuolizing cytotoxin activity.

    PubMed Central

    Cover, T L; Dooley, C P; Blaser, M J

    1990-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is strongly associated with histologic gastritis and peptic ulcer disease. Broth culture supernatants from a subset of H. pylori strains induce vacuolization in cultured cells, a phenomenon that has been attributed to cytotoxin activity. Concentrated culture supernatants from 15 of 28 (53.6%) H. pylori strains tested induced vacuolization in HeLa cells in titers ranging from 1:10 to 1:180. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and silver staining of supernatants from these 28 strains and 2 control strains demonstrated an 82-kilodalton (kDa) protein band in 3 of 16 supernatants with vacuolizing activity, but in none of 14 supernatants without vacuolizing activity. By immunoblotting with human sera, a 128-kDa band was recognized in all 16 supernatants with vacuolizing activity, compared with 9 of 14 (64%) supernatants without vacuolizing activity (P = 0.014). Serologic recognition of the 128-kDa band in H. pylori culture supernatants was more prevalent among persons infected with vacuolizing H. pylori strains than among persons infected with nonvacuolizing strains, but the difference was not statistically significant (80 versus 45%; P = 0.079); human serologic recognition of the 82-kDa band was less common. The 128-kDa band was recognized by 100% of 31 serum samples from H. pylori-infected patients with duodenal ulcer disease, compared with 60.8% of 74 serum samples from H. pylori-infected persons without peptic ulcer disease (P = 0.0001). These data indicate that antigenic 128- and 82-kDa proteins are present in H. pylori broth culture supernatants with vacuolizing activity and that serologic responses to the 128-kDa protein are more prevalent among H. pylori-infected persons with duodenal ulceration than among infected persons without peptic ulceration. Images PMID:2307514

  5. Matrine-induced autophagy regulated by p53 through AMP-activated protein kinase in human hepatoma cells.

    PubMed

    Xie, Shan-Bu; He, Xing-Xing; Yao, Shu-Kun

    2015-08-01

    Matrine, one of the main extract components of Sophora flavescens, has been shown to exhibit inhibitory effects on some tumors through autophagy. However, the mechanism underlying the effect of matrine remains unclear. The cultured human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line HepG2 and SMMC‑7721 were treated with matrine. Signal transduction and gene expression profile were determined. Matrine stimulated autophagy in SMMC‑7721 cells in a mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR)-dependent manner, but in an mTOR-independent manner in HepG2 cells. Next, in HepG2 cells, autophagy induced by matrine was regulated by p53 inactivation through AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling transduction, then AMPK suppression switched autophagy to apoptosis. Furthermore, the interferon (IFN)-inducible genes, including interferon α-inducible protein 27 (IFI27) and interferon induced transmembrane protein 1 (IFITM1), which are downstream effector of p53, might be modulated by matrine-induced autophagy. In addition, we found that the p53 protein isoforms, p53β, p53γ, ∆133p53, and ∆133p53γ, due to alternative splicing of intron 9, might be regulated by the p53-mediated autophagy. These results show that matrine induces autophagy in human hepatoma cells through a novel mechanism, which is p53/AMPK signaling pathway involvement in matrine-promoted autophagy. PMID:26034977

  6. Calycosin induces apoptosis in human ovarian cancer SKOV3 cells by activating caspases and Bcl-2 family proteins.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yan; Liu, Qing-Hua; Liu, Chun-Lei; Lin, Li

    2015-07-01

    Calycosin is widely used as a natural active compound for its anti-oxidative and anti-inflammation activity. Recently, several studies have shown that calycosin can inhibit growth and induce apoptosis in human cancer cell lines; however, the mechanisms are not completely clarified yet. In this study, we investigated the effects of calycosin on human ovarian carcinoma SKOV3 cells, as well as the mechanisms. SKOV3 cells were treated with calycosin at a series of concentrations for different times. In vitro, the MTT assay showed that calycosin had obvious anti-proliferation effects on SKOV3 cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Cell morphological changes which expressed by Hoechst 33258 staining were compared with apoptotic changes detected by fluorescence microscope. Compared with control group, the group treated with calycosin showed a significant increase in apoptosis rate. Expression of apoptosis related Bax/Bcl-2 and caspases proteins were detected by Western blotting. The results demonstrated that calycosin up-regulated the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio and cleaved caspase-3, cleaved caspase-9 expression in a dose-dependent manner. In summary, calycosin might exert anti-growth and induce-apoptosis activity against ovarian cancer SKOV3 cells through activating caspases and Bcl-2 family proteins, therefore presenting as a promising therapeutic agent for the treatment of ovarian cancer. PMID:25672608

  7. 3K3A-activated protein C stimulates postischemic neuronal repair by human neural stem cells in mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yaoming; Zhao, Zhen; Rege, Sanket V; Wang, Min; Si, Gabriel; Zhou, Yi; Wang, Su; Griffin, John H; Goldman, Steven A; Zlokovic, Berislav V

    2016-09-01

    Activated protein C (APC) is a blood protease with anticoagulant activity and cell-signaling activities mediated by the activation of protease-activated receptor 1 (F2R, also known as PAR1) and F2RL1 (also known as PAR3) via noncanonical cleavage. Recombinant variants of APC, such as the 3K3A-APC (Lys191-193Ala) mutant in which three Lys residues (KKK191-193) were replaced with alanine, and/or its other mutants with reduced (>90%) anticoagulant activity, engineered to reduce APC-associated bleeding risk while retaining normal cell-signaling activity, have shown benefits in preclinical models of ischemic stroke, brain trauma, multiple sclerosis, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, sepsis, ischemic and reperfusion injury of heart, kidney and liver, pulmonary, kidney and gastrointestinal inflammation, diabetes and lethal body radiation. On the basis of proof-of-concept studies and an excellent safety profile in humans, 3K3A-APC has advanced to clinical trials as a neuroprotectant in ischemic stroke. Recently, 3K3A-APC has been shown to stimulate neuronal production by human neural stem and progenitor cells (NSCs) in vitro via a PAR1-PAR3-sphingosine-1-phosphate-receptor 1-Akt pathway, which suggests the potential for APC-based treatment as a strategy for structural repair in the human central nervous (CNS) system. Here we report that late postischemic treatment of mice with 3K3A-APC stimulates neuronal production by transplanted human NSCs, promotes circuit restoration and improves functional recovery. Thus, 3K3A-APC-potentiated neuronal recruitment from engrafted NSCs might offer a new approach to the treatment of stroke and related neurological disorders. PMID:27548576

  8. The Nek8 protein kinase, mutated in the human cystic kidney disease nephronophthisis, is both activated and degraded during ciliogenesis.

    PubMed

    Zalli, Detina; Bayliss, Richard; Fry, Andrew M

    2012-03-01

    Mutations in the never-in-mitosis A-related kinase, Nek8, are associated with cystic kidney disease in both humans and mice, with Nek8 being the NPHP9 gene in the human juvenile cystic kidney disease, nephronophthisis. Human Nek8/NPHP9 localizes to centrosomes and the proximal region of cilia in dividing and ciliated cells, respectively. However, the regulation of Nek8 kinase activity, as well as its role in ciliogenesis, remains to be defined. Here, by establishing Nek8 kinase assays, we first demonstrate that the localization of Nek8 to centrosomes and cilia is dependent on both kinase activity and the C-terminal non-catalytic RCC1 domain. The kinase domain alone is active, but does not localize correctly, while the RCC1 domain localizes correctly and can be phosphorylated by Nek8. We propose that centrosome recruitment is mediated by the RCC1 domain, but requires a conformational change in the full-length protein that is promoted by autophosphorylation. Interestingly, three human NPHP9-associated mutants retain full kinase activity. However, only two of these, L330F and A497P, localize correctly, suggesting that the third mutant, H425Y, disrupts a centrosome targeting sequence in the RCC1 domain. Importantly, we find that induction of ciliogenesis upon cell cycle exit is accompanied by both activation and proteasomal degradation of Nek8, and that activation is dependent upon phosphorylation within the catalytic domain. Taken together, these findings reveal important insights into the mechanisms through which Nek8 activity and localization are regulated during ciliogenesis. PMID:22106379

  9. Mechanism of activation and functional role of protein kinase Ceta in human platelets.

    PubMed

    Bynagari, Yamini S; Nagy, Bela; Tuluc, Florin; Bhavaraju, Kamala; Kim, Soochong; Vijayan, K Vinod; Kunapuli, Satya P

    2009-05-15

    The novel class of protein kinase C (nPKC) isoform eta is expressed in platelets, but not much is known about its activation and function. In this study, we investigated the mechanism of activation and functional implications of nPKCeta using pharmacological and gene knock-out approaches. nPKCeta was phosphorylated (at Thr-512) in a time- and concentration-dependent manner by 2MeSADP. Pretreatment of platelets with MRS-2179, a P2Y1 receptor antagonist, or YM-254890, a G(q) blocker, abolished 2MeSADP-induced phosphorylation of nPKCeta. Similarly, ADP failed to activate nPKCeta in platelets isolated from P2Y1 and G(q) knock-out mice. However, pretreatment of platelets with P2Y12 receptor antagonist, AR-C69331MX did not interfere with ADP-induced nPKCeta phosphorylation. In addition, when platelets were activated with 2MeSADP under stirring conditions, although nPKCeta was phosphorylated within 30 s by ADP receptors, it was also dephosphorylated by activated integrin alpha(IIb)beta3 mediated outside-in signaling. Moreover, in the presence of SC-57101, a alpha(IIb)beta3 receptor antagonist, nPKCeta dephosphorylation was inhibited. Furthermore, in murine platelets lacking PP1cgamma, a catalytic subunit of serine/threonine phosphatase, alpha(IIb)beta3 failed to dephosphorylate nPKCeta. Thus, we conclude that ADP activates nPKCeta via P2Y1 receptor and is subsequently dephosphorylated by PP1gamma phosphatase activated by alpha(IIb)beta3 integrin. In addition, pretreatment of platelets with eta-RACK antagonistic peptides, a specific inhibitor of nPKCeta, inhibited ADP-induced thromboxane generation. However, these peptides had no affect on ADP-induced aggregation when thromboxane generation was blocked. In summary, nPKCeta positively regulates agonist-induced thromboxane generation with no effects on platelet aggregation. PMID:19286657

  10. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Tat-Activated Expression of Poliovirus Protein 2A Inhibits mRNA Translation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xiao-Hong; Baltimore, David

    1989-04-01

    To study the effect of poliovirus protein 2A on cellular RNA translation, the tat control system of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) was used. Protein 2A was expressed from a plasmid construct (pHIV/2A) incorporating the HIV long terminal repeat. Protein synthesis was measured by using chloramphenicol acetyltransferase as a reporter gene driven by the Rous sarcoma virus long terminal repeat. When HIV/2A was contransfected with the reporter, addition of a tat-producing plasmid caused at least a 50-fold drop in chloramphenicol acetyltransferase synthesis. A HeLa cell line carrying HIV/2A was established. In it, tat expression caused more than a 10-fold drop in chloramphenicol acetyltransferase synthesis from the reporter plasmid. Furthermore, 2A induction by tat caused cleavage of the cellular translation factor P220, a part of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4F. Thus protein 2A can, by itself, carry out the inhibition of cellular protein synthesis characteristic of a poliovirus infection. Also, the HIV tat activation provides a very effective method to control gene expression in mammalian cells.

  11. Expression of mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase-1 in the early phases of human epithelial carcinogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Loda, M.; Capodieci, P.; Mishra, R.; Yao, H.; Corless, C.; Grigioni, W.; Wang, Y.; Magi-Galluzzi, C.; Stork, P. J.

    1996-01-01

    Many mitogens and human oncogenes activate extracellular regulated kinases (ERKs), which in turn convey proliferation signals. ERKs or mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases are inactivated in vitro by MAP kinase phosphatases (MKPs). The gene encoding one of these MKPs, MKP-1, is a serum-inducible gene and is transcriptionally activated by mitogenic signals in cultured cells. As MKP-1 has been shown to block DNA synthesis by inhibiting ERKs when expressed at elevated levels in cultured cells, it has been suggested that it may act as a tumor suppressor. MKP-1 mRNA and MAP kinase (ERK-1 and -2) protein expression was assessed in 164 human epithelial tumors of diverse tissue origin by in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry. MKP-1 was overexpressed in the early phases of prostate, colon, and bladder carcinogenesis, with progressive loss of expression with higher histological grade and in metastases. In contrast, breast carcinomas showed significant MKP-1 expression even when poorly differentiated or in late stages of the disease. MKP-1, ERK-1, and ERK-2 were co-expressed in most tumors examined. In a subset of 15 tumors, ERK-1 enzymatic activity as well as structural alterations that might be responsible for loss of function of MKP-1 during tumor progression, were examined. ERK-1 enzymatic activity was found to be elevated despite MKP-1 overexpression. No loss of 5q35-ter (containing the MKP-1 locus) was detected by polymerase chain reaction in metastases compared with primary tumors. Finally, no mutations were found in the catalytic domain of MKP-1. These data indicate that MKP-1 is an early marker for a wide range of human epithelial tumors and suggest that MKP-1 does not behave as a tumor suppressor in epithelial tumors. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:8909245

  12. Endosomolytic activity of cationic liposomes enhances the delivery of human immunodeficiency virus-1 trans-activator protein (TAT) to mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, L; Farhood, H; Serbina, N; Teepe, A G; Barsoum, J

    1995-12-26

    We have explored the use of cationic liposomes to deliver the human immunodeficiency virus-1 trans-activator protein tat using a reporter gene expression assay. The human epidermoid carcinoma cell A431 stably transfected with a reporter gene under the control of human immunodeficiency virus-1 promoter was used as a target cell. Phosphatidylcholine-containing cationic liposomes had no detectable tat delivery activity. In contrast, delivery of tat was enhanced by up to 150-fold using cationic liposomes enriched with dioleoyl phosphatidylethanolamine (DOPE), a lipid which readily transforms a bilayer into a nonbilayer structure. Enhanced delivery of tat by DOPE-containing liposomes was most likely the result of the endosomolytic activity of the liposome. This phospholipid-rich formulation showed no toxicity at concentrations sufficient for maximal delivery of tat. A variety of cationic liposome formulations which contain DOPE were tested successfully for tat delivery. PMID:8554596

  13. Aluminum Activates PERK-EIF2α Signaling and Inflammatory Proteins in Human Neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y Cells.

    PubMed

    Rizvi, Syed Husain Mustafa; Parveen, Arshiya; Ahmad, Israr; Ahmad, Iqbal; Verma, Anoop K; Arshad, Md; Mahdi, Abbas Ali

    2016-07-01

    Aluminum is the third most abundant element present in the earth's crust and human exposure to it is possible due to industrialization, utensils, medicines, antiperspirants, etc. Evidences suggest involvement of aluminum in a variety of neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer's disease. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress has been implicated in various neurological disorders. ER stress may be a result of impaired calcium homeostasis due to perturbed redox balance and is known to elicit inflammation through the activation of unfolded protein response (UPR). In the present study, we aimed to investigate the role of aluminum in ER stress-mediated activation of inflammatory responses in neuroblastoma cells. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release assay revealed that aluminum compromised the membrane integrity of neuroblastoma cells, probably due to membrane damage, as indicated by enhanced levels of lipid peroxidation (LPO). Besides this, our results clearly demonstrated elevated reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels and a weakened antioxidant defence system manifested by decrease in catalase (CAT) activity and cellular glutathione (GSH). Moreover, we studied the expression of key apoptosis-related proteins, ER stress-mediated activation of UPR, and its downstream inflammatory pathway. It was observed that aluminum potentially enhanced protein levels of PERK, EIF2α, caspase 9, caspase 3, and inflammatory markers like NF-κB, NLRP3, HMGB1, and nitric oxide (NO). Furthermore, aluminum altered TNFα, IL1β, IL6, and IL10 mRNA levels as well. The overall findings indicated that aluminum mediates UPR activation through ER stress, which results in induction of inflammatory pathway and apoptotic proteins in neuronal cells. PMID:26546554

  14. Cooperative activation of human papillomavirus type 8 gene expression by the E2 protein and the cellular coactivator p300.

    PubMed

    Müller, Andreas; Ritzkowsky, Andreas; Steger, Gertrud

    2002-11-01

    The E2 proteins of papillomaviruses (PV) bind to the coactivator CBP/p300 as do many other transcription factors, but the precise role of CBP/p300 in E2-specific functions is not yet understood. We show that the E2 protein of human PV type 8 (HPV8) directly binds to p300. Activation of HPV8 gene expression by low amounts of HPV8 E2 was stimulated up to sevenfold by coexpression of p300. The interaction between E2 and p300 may play a role in differentiation-dependent activation of PV gene expression, since we can show that the expression level of p300 increases during keratinocyte differentiation. Surprisingly, sequence-specific binding of E2 to its recognition sites within the regulatory region of HPV8 is not necessary for this cooperation, indicating that E2 can be recruited to the promoter via protein-protein interaction. HPV8 E2 binds via its N-terminal activation domain (AD), its C-terminal DNA binding domain (DBD), and its internal hinge region to p300 in vitro. Transient-transfection assays revealed that the AD is necessary and sufficient for cooperative activation with p300. However, we provide evidence that the interaction of the hinge and the DBD of HPV8 E2 with p300 may contribute. Our data suggest an important role of p300 in regulation of HPV8 gene expression and reveal a new mechanism by which E2 may be recruited to a promoter to activate transcription without sequence specific DNA binding. PMID:12368347

  15. Betulinic Acid Suppresses STAT3 Activation Pathway Through Induction of Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase SHP-1 in Human Multiple Myeloma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Manoj K.; Sung, Bokyung; Aggarwal, Bharat B.

    2009-01-01

    STAT3 activation has been associated with survival, proliferation and invasion of various human cancers. Whether betulinic acid, a pentacyclic triterpene, can modulates the STAT3 pathway, was investigated in human multiple myeloma (MM) cells. We found that betulinic acid inhibited constitutive activation of STAT3, Src kinase, JAK1 and JAK2. Pervanadate reversed the betulinic acid -induced down regulation of STAT3 activation, suggesting the involvement of a protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP). Furthermore, betulinic acid induced the expression of the PTP SHP-1 and silencing of the SHP-1 gene abolished the ability of betulinic acid to inhibit STAT3 activation and rescues betulinic acid-induced cell death. Betulinic acid also downregulated the expression of STAT3-regulated gene products such as bcl-xL, bcl-2, cyclin D1, and survivin. This correlated with an increase in apoptosis as indicated by an increase in the sub-G1 cell population and an increase in caspase-3–induced PARP cleavage. Consistent with these results, over expression of constitutive active STAT3 significantly reduced the betulinic acid-induced apoptosis. Betulinic acid also enhanced the apoptosis induced by thalidomide (from 10% to 55%) and bortezomib (from 5% to 70%) in MM cells. Overall, our results suggest that betulinic acid down regulates STAT3 activation through upregulation of SHP-1 and this may have potential in sensitization of STAT3 over expressing tumors to chemotherapeutic agents. PMID:19937797

  16. Human cellular retinaldehyde-binding protein has secondary thermal 9-cis-retinal isomerase activity.

    PubMed

    Bolze, Christin S; Helbling, Rachel E; Owen, Robin L; Pearson, Arwen R; Pompidor, Guillaume; Dworkowski, Florian; Fuchs, Martin R; Furrer, Julien; Golczak, Marcin; Palczewski, Krzysztof; Cascella, Michele; Stocker, Achim

    2014-01-01

    Cellular retinaldehyde-binding protein (CRALBP) chaperones 11-cis-retinal to convert opsin receptor molecules into photosensitive retinoid pigments of the eye. We report a thermal secondary isomerase activity of CRALBP when bound to 9-cis-retinal. UV/vis and (1)H NMR spectroscopy were used to characterize the product as 9,13-dicis-retinal. The X-ray structure of the CRALBP mutant R234W:9-cis-retinal complex at 1.9 Å resolution revealed a niche in the binding pocket for 9-cis-aldehyde different from that reported for 11-cis-retinal. Combined computational, kinetic, and structural data lead us to propose an isomerization mechanism catalyzed by a network of buried waters. Our findings highlight a specific role of water molecules in both CRALBP-assisted specificity toward 9-cis-retinal and its thermal isomerase activity yielding 9,13-dicis-retinal. Kinetic data from two point mutants of CRALBP support an essential role of Glu202 as the initial proton donor in this isomerization reaction. PMID:24328211

  17. Dynamic correlation networks in human peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ nuclear receptor protein.

    PubMed

    Fidelak, Jeremy; Ferrer, Silvia; Oberlin, Michael; Moras, Dino; Dejaegere, Annick; Stote, Roland H

    2010-10-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ nuclear receptor (PPAR-γ) belongs to the superfamily of nuclear receptor proteins that function as ligand-dependent transcription factors and plays a specific physiological role as a regulator of lipid metabolism. A number of experimental studies have suggested that allostery plays an important role in the functioning of PPAR-γ. Here we use normal-mode analysis of PPAR-γ to characterize a network of dynamically coupled amino acids that link physiologically relevant binding surfaces such as the ligand-dependent activation domain AF-2 with the ligand binding site and the heterodimer interface. Multiple calculations were done in both the presence and absence of the agonist rosiglitazone, and the differences in dynamics were characterized. The global dynamics of the ligand binding domain were affected by the ligand, and in particular, changes to the network of dynamically correlated amino acids were observed with only small changes in conformation. These results suggest that changes in dynamic couplings can be functionally significant with respect to the transmission of allosteric signals. PMID:20496064

  18. Characterization of a Novel Hemolytic Activity of Human IgG Fractions Arising from Diversity in Protein and Oligosaccharide Components

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yueling; Ye, Xiangqun; Zhong, Mingqi; Cao, Jinsong; Zou, Haiying; Chen, Jiehui

    2014-01-01

    Human IgG is a well-established multifunctional antigen specific immunoglobulin molecule of the adaptive immune system. However, an antigen nonspecific immunological function of human IgG has never been reported. In this study, human IgG was isolated using ammonium sulfate fractional precipitation and diethylaminoethanol (DEAE) cellulose 52 ion exchange chromatography, from which h-IgG and hs-IgG fractions were purified on the basis of their differential binding to rabbit anti-shrimp hemocyanin antibody (h) and rabbit anti-shrimp hemocyanin's small subunit antibody (hs), respectively. We found that h-IgG had a higher hemolytic activity than hs-IgG against erythrocytes from humans, rabbits, mice and chickens, whereas the control IgG showed negligible activity. h-IgG could interact directly with erythrocyte membranes, and this interaction was suppressed by high molecular weight osmoprotectants, showing that it may follow a colloid-osmotic mechanism. In comparative proteomics and glycomics studies, h-IgG and hs-IgG yielded 20 and 5 significantly altered protein spots, respectively, on a 2-D gel. The mean carbohydrate content of h-IgG and hs-IgG was approximately 3.6- and 2-fold higher than that of IgG, respectively, and the α-d-mannose/α-d-glucose content was in the order of h-IgG>hs-IgG>IgG. In this study, a novel antigen nonspecific immune property of human IgG was investigated, and the diversity in the protein constituents and glycosylation levels may have functional signficance. PMID:24465658

  19. Protein Inhibitor of NOS1 Plays a Central Role in the Regulation of NOS1 Activity in Human Dilated Hearts

    PubMed Central

    Roselló-Lletí, Esther; Tarazón, Estefanía; Ortega, Ana; Gil-Cayuela, Carolina; Carnicer, Ricardo; Lago, Francisca; González-Juanatey, Jose Ramón; Portolés, Manuel; Rivera, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    An essential factor for the production of nitric oxide by nitric oxide synthase 1 (NOS1), major modulator of cardiac function, is the cofactor tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4). BH4 is regulated by GTP cyclohydrolase 1, the rate-limiting enzyme in BH4 biosynthesis which catalyses the formation of dihydroneopterin 3′triphosfate from GTP, producing BH4 after two further steps catalyzed by 6-pyruvoyltetrahydropterin synthase and sepiapterin reductase. However, there are other essential factors involved in the regulation of NOS1 activity, such as protein inhibitor of NOS1 (PIN), calmodulin, heat shock protein 90, and NOS interacting protein. All these molecules have never been analysed in human non-ischemic dilated hearts (DCM). In this study we demonstrated that the upregulation of cardiac NOS1 is not accompanied by increased NOS1 activity in DCM, partly due to the elevated PIN levels and not because of alterations in biopterin biosynthesis. Notably, the PIN concentration was significantly associated with impaired ventricular function, highlighting the importance of this NOS1 activity inhibitor in Ca2+ homeostasis. These results take a central role in the current list of targets for future studies focused on the complex cardiac dysfunction processes through more efficient harnessing of NOS1 signalling. PMID:27481317

  20. JAB1 regulates unphosphorylated STAT3 DNA-binding activity through protein–protein interaction in human colon cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Nishimoto, Arata; Kugimiya, Naruji; Hosoyama, Toru; Enoki, Tadahiko; Li, Tao-Sheng; Hamano, Kimikazu

    2013-08-30

    Highlights: •JAB1 interacted with unphosphorylated STAT3 in the nucleus. •JAB1 knockdown tended to increase nuclear STAT3 expression. •JAB1 knockdown significantly decreased unphosphorylated STAT3 DNA-binding activity. •JAB1 knockdown significantly decreased MDR1, NANOG, and VEGF expressions. •Nuclear JAB1, but not nuclear STAT3, correlated with STAT3 DNA-binding activity. -- Abstract: Recent studies have revealed that unphosphorylated STAT3 forms a dimer, translocates to the nucleus, binds to the STAT3 binding site, and activates the transcription of STAT3 target genes, thereby playing an important role in oncogenesis in addition to phosphorylated STAT3. Among signaling steps of unphosphorylated STAT3, nuclear translocation and target DNA-binding are the critical steps for its activation. Therefore, elucidating the regulatory mechanism of these signaling steps of unphosphorylated STAT3 is a potential step in the discovery of a novel cancer drug. However, the mechanism of unphosphorylated STAT3 binding to the promoter of target genes remains unclear. In this study, we focused on Jun activation domain-binding protein 1 (JAB1) as a candidate protein that regulates unphosphorylated STAT3 DNA-binding activity. Initially, we observed that both unphosphorylated STAT3 and JAB1 existed in the nucleus of human colon cancer cell line COLO205 at the basal state (no cytokine stimulation). On the other hand, phosphorylated STAT3 did not exist in the nucleus of COLO205 cells at the basal state. Immunoprecipitation using nuclear extract of COLO205 cells revealed that JAB1 interacted with unphosphorylated STAT3. To investigate the effect of JAB1 on unphosphorylated STAT3 activity, RNAi studies were performed. Although JAB1 knockdown tended to increase nuclear STAT3 expression, it significantly decreased unphosphorylated STAT3 DNA-binding activity. Subsequently, JAB1 knockdown significantly decreased the expression levels of MDR1, NANOG, and VEGF, which are STAT3 target

  1. Multiplexed Activity-based Protein Profiling of the Human Pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus Reveals Large Functional Changes upon Exposure to Human Serum

    SciTech Connect

    Wiedner, Susan D.; Burnum, Kristin E.; Pederson, Leeanna M.; Anderson, Lindsey N.; Fortuin, Suereta; Chauvigne-Hines, Lacie M.; Shukla, Anil K.; Ansong, Charles; Panisko, Ellen A.; Smith, Richard D.; Wright, Aaron T.

    2012-08-03

    Environmental and metabolic adaptability is critical for survival of the fungal human pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus in the immunocompromised lung. We employed an activity-based protein profiling (ABPP) approach utilizing a new aryl vinyl sulfonate probe and a serine hydrolase probe combined with quantitative LC-MS based accurate mass and time (AMT) tag proteomics for the identification of functional pathway adaptation of A. fumigatus to environmental variability relevant to pulmonary Invasive Aspergillosis. When the fungal pathogen was grown with human serum, metabolism and energy processes were markedly decreased compared to no serum culture. Additionally, functional pathways associated with amino acid and protein biosynthesis were limited as the fungus scavenged from the serum to obtain essential nutrients. Our approach revealed significant metabolic adaptation by A. fumigatus, and provides direct insight into this pathogen’s ability to survive and proliferate.

  2. Surfactant Protein A Prevents IFN-γ/IFN-γ Receptor Interaction and Attenuates Classical Activation of Human Alveolar Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Minutti, Carlos M; García-Fojeda, Belén; Sáenz, Alejandra; de Las Casas-Engel, Mateo; Guillamat-Prats, Raquel; de Lorenzo, Alba; Serrano-Mollar, Anna; Corbí, Ángel L; Casals, Cristina

    2016-07-15

    Lung surfactant protein A (SP-A) plays an important function in modulating inflammation in the lung. However, the exact role of SP-A and the mechanism by which SP-A affects IFN-γ-induced activation of alveolar macrophages (aMϕs) remains unknown. To address these questions, we studied the effect of human SP-A on rat and human aMϕs stimulated with IFN-γ, LPS, and combinations thereof and measured the induction of proinflammatory mediators as well as SP-A's ability to bind to IFN-γ or IFN-γR1. We found that SP-A inhibited (IFN-γ + LPS)-induced TNF-α, iNOS, and CXCL10 production by rat aMϕs. When rat macrophages were stimulated with LPS and IFN-γ separately, SP-A inhibited both LPS-induced signaling and IFN-γ-elicited STAT1 phosphorylation. SP-A also decreased TNF-α and CXCL10 secretion by ex vivo-cultured human aMϕs and M-CSF-derived macrophages stimulated by either LPS or IFN-γ or both. Hence, SP-A inhibited upregulation of IFN-γ-inducible genes (CXCL10, RARRES3, and ETV7) as well as STAT1 phosphorylation in human M-CSF-derived macrophages. In addition, we found that SP-A bound to human IFN-γ (KD = 11 ± 0.5 nM) in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner and prevented IFN-γ interaction with IFN-γR1 on human aMϕs. We conclude that SP-A inhibition of (IFN-γ + LPS) stimulation is due to SP-A attenuation of both inflammatory agents and that the binding of SP-A to IFN-γ abrogates IFN-γ effects on human macrophages, suppressing their classical activation and subsequent inflammatory response. PMID:27271568

  3. Human papillomavirus 16 E2 stability and transcriptional activation is enhanced by E1 via a direct protein-protein interaction

    SciTech Connect

    King, Lauren E.; Dornan, Edward S.; Donaldson, Mary M.; Morgan, Iain M.

    2011-05-25

    Human papillomavirus 16 E1 and E2 interact with cellular factors to replicate the viral genome. E2 forms homodimers and binds to 12 bp palindromic sequences adjacent to the viral origin and recruits E1 to the origin. E1 forms a di-hexameric helicase complex that replicates the viral genome. This manuscript demonstrates that E1 stabilises the E2 protein, increasing the half life in both C33a and 293 T cells respectively. This stabilisation requires a direct protein--protein interaction. In addition, the E1 protein enhances E2 transcription function in a manner that suggests the E1 protein itself can contribute to transcriptional regulation not simply by E2 stabilisation but by direct stimulation of transcription. This activation of E2 transcription is again dependent upon an interaction with E1. Overall the results suggest that in the viral life cycle, co-expression of E1 with E2 can increase E2 stability and enhance E2 function.

  4. Repression in vitro, by human adenovirus E1A protein domains, of basal or Tat-activated transcription of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 long terminal repeat.

    PubMed Central

    Song, C Z; Loewenstein, P M; Green, M

    1995-01-01

    Human adenovirus E1A proteins can repress the expression of several viral and cellular genes. By using a cell-free transcription system, we demonstrated that the gene product of the E1A 12S mRNA, the 243-residue protein E1A243R, inhibits basal transcription from the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) long terminal repeat (LTR). The HIV-1 transactivator protein Tat greatly stimulates transcription from the viral promoter in vitro. However, E1A243R can repress Tat-activated transcription in vitro. Strong repression of both basal and Tat-activated transcriptions requires only E1A N-terminal amino acid residues 1 to 80. Deletion analysis showed that E1A N-terminal amino acids 4 to 25 are essential for repression, whereas amino acid residues 30 to 49 and 70 to 80 are dispensable. Transcriptional repression by E1A in the cell-free transcription system is promoter specific, since under identical conditions, transcription of the adenovirus major late promoter and the Rous sarcoma virus LTR promoter was unaffected. The repression of transcription by small E1A peptides in vitro provides an assay for investigation of molecular mechanisms governing E1A-mediated repression of both basal and Tat-activated transcriptions of the HIV-1 LTR promoter. PMID:7707515

  5. Human Genetic Relevance and Potent Antitumor Activity of Heat Shock Protein 90 Inhibition in Canine Lung Adenocarcinoma Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Clemente-Vicario, Francisco; Alvarez, Carlos E.; Rowell, Jennie L.; Roy, Satavisha; London, Cheryl A.; Kisseberth, William C.; Lorch, Gwendolen

    2015-01-01

    Background It has been an open question how similar human and canine lung cancers are. This has major implications in availability of human treatments for dogs and in establishing translational models to test new therapies in pet dogs. The prognosis for canine advanced lung cancer is poor and new treatments are needed. Heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) is an ATPase-dependent molecular chaperone ubiquitously expressed in eukaryotic cells. HSP90 is essential for posttranslational conformational maturation and stability of client proteins including protein kinases and transcription factors, many of which are important for the proliferation and survival of cancer cells. We investigated the activity of STA-1474, a HSP90 inhibitor, in two canine lung cancer cell lines, BACA and CLAC. Results Comparative genomic hybridization analysis of both cell lines revealed genetic relevance to human non-small cell lung cancer. STA-1474 inhibited growth and induced apoptosis of both cell lines in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The ICs50 after 72 h treatment with STA-1474 were 0.08 and 0.11 μM for BACA and CLAC, respectively. When grown as spheroids, the IC50 of STA-1474 for BACA cells was approximately two-fold higher than when grown as a monolayer (0.348 μM vs. 0.168 μM), whereas CLAC spheroids were relatively drug resistant. Treatment of tumor-stromal fibroblasts with STA-1474 resulted in a dose-dependent decrease in their relative cell viability with a low IC50 of 0.28 μM. Conclusions Here we first established that lung adenocarcinoma in people and dogs are genetically and biochemically similar. STA1474 demonstrated biological activity in both canine lung cancer cell lines and tumor-stromal fibroblasts. As significant decreases in relative cell viability can be achieved with nanomolar concentrations of STA-1474, investigation into the clinical efficacy of this drug in canine lung cancer patients is warranted. PMID:26560147

  6. TNF Regulates Essential Alternative Complement Pathway Components and Impairs Activation of Protein C in Human Glomerular Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Sartain, Sarah E; Turner, Nancy A; Moake, Joel L

    2016-01-15

    Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) is a thrombotic microangiopathy with severe renal injury secondary to an overactive alternative complement pathway (AP). aHUS episodes are often initiated or recur during inflammation. We investigated gene expression of the surface complement regulatory proteins (CD55, CD59, CD46, and CD141 [thrombomodulin]) and AP components in human glomerular microvascular endothelial cells (GMVECs) and in HUVECs, a frequently used investigational model of endothelial cells. Surface complement regulatory proteins were also quantified by flow cytometry. All experiments were done with and without exposure to IL-1β or TNF. Without cytokine stimulation, we found that GMVECs had greater AP activation than did HUVECs. With TNF stimulation, THBD gene expression and corresponding CD141 surface presence in HUVECs and GMVECs were reduced, and gene expression of complement components C3 (C3) and factor B (CFB) was increased. Consequently, AP activation, measured by Ba production, was increased, and conversion of protein C (PC) to activated PC by CD141-bound thrombin was decreased, in GMVECs and HUVECs exposed to TNF. IL-1β had similar, albeit lesser, effects on HUVEC gene expression, and it only slightly affected GMVEC gene expression. To our knowledge, this is the first detailed study of the expression/display of AP components and surface regulatory proteins in GMVECs with and without cytokine stimulation. In aHUS patients with an underlying overactive AP, additional stimulation of the AP and inhibition of activated PC-mediated anticoagulation in GMVECs by the inflammatory cytokine TNF are likely to provoke episodes of renal failure. PMID:26673143

  7. Yeast RNC1 encodes a chimeric protein, RhoNUC, with a human rho motif and deoxyribonuclease activity.

    PubMed Central

    Chow, T Y; Perkins, E L; Resnick, M A

    1992-01-01

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae contains an endoexonuclease yNucR that has been implicated in both recombination and repair. We describe the isolation and characterization of the corresponding gene. Within the predicted N-terminal half of the protein there is extensive homology (approximately 50%) with human rho genes, which are related to the ras oncogene, particularly in the proposed GTP-binding region. The C-terminal region, which is related to the Escherichia coli recC protein, presumably encodes the endoexonuclease activity. The yNucR may thus represent a new class of GTP-binding proteins. Because of the chimeric nature of the polypeptide, this protein is renamed RhoNUC (rather than the original yNucR) and the gene is RNC1 for Rho-associated-NuClease. Over expression of the gene leads to altered cell growth and nuclear morphology. We propose that the gene plays an important role in cell development as well as DNA repair/recombination. Images PMID:1408836

  8. Tyrosine phosphorylation is a mandatory proximal step in radiation-induced activation of the protein kinase C signaling pathway in human B-lymphocyte precursors.

    PubMed Central

    Uckun, F M; Schieven, G L; Tuel-Ahlgren, L M; Dibirdik, I; Myers, D E; Ledbetter, J A; Song, C W

    1993-01-01

    Ionizing radiation triggers a signal in human B-lymphocyte precursors that is intimately linked to an active protein-tyrosine kinase regulatory pathway. We show that in B-lymphocyte precursors, irradiation with gamma-rays leads to (i) stimulation of phosphatidylinositol turnover; (ii) downstream activation by covalent modification of multiple serine-specific protein kinases, including protein kinase C; and (iii) activation of nuclear factor kappa B. All of the radiation-induced signals were effectively prevented by the protein-tyrosine kinase inhibitors genistein and herbimycin A. Thus, tyrosine phosphorylation is an important and perhaps mandatory proximal step in the activation of the protein kinase C signaling cascade in human B-lymphocyte precursors. Our report expands current knowledge of the radiation-induced signaling cascade by clarifying the chronological sequence of biochemical events that follow irradiation. Images PMID:8419931

  9. Expression and targeting of human fibroblast activation protein in a human skin/severe combined immunodeficient mouse breast cancer xenograft model.

    PubMed

    Tahtis, Kiki; Lee, Fook-Thean; Wheatley, Jennifer M; Garin-Chesa, Pilar; Park, John E; Smyth, Fiona E; Obata, Yuichi; Stockert, Elisabeth; Hall, Cathrine M; Old, Lloyd J; Rettig, Wolfgang J; Scott, Andrew M

    2003-08-01

    Antigens and receptors that are highly expressed on tumor stromal cells, such as fibroblast activation protein (FAP), are attractive targets for antibody-based therapies because the supporting stroma and vessel network is essential for a solid neoplasm to grow beyond a size of 1-2 mm. The in vivo characterization of antibodies targeting human stromal or vessel antigens is hindered by the lack of an appropriate mouse model system because xenografts in standard mouse models express stromal and vessels elements of murine origin. This limitation may be overcome by the development of a human skin/mouse chimeric model, which is established by transplanting human foreskin on to the lateral flank of severe combined immunodeficient mice. The subsequent inoculation of breast carcinoma MCF-7 cells within the dermis of the transplanted human skin resulted in the production of xenografts expressing stromal and vessel elements of human origin. Widespread expression of human FAP-positive reactive stromal fibroblasts within xenografts was seen up to 2 months posttransplantation and postinjection of cells. Human blood vessel antigen expression also persisted at 2 months posttransplantation and postinjection of cells with murine vessels coexisting with the human vascular supply. The model was subsequently used to evaluate the biodistribution properties of an iodine-131-labeled humanized anti-FAP monoclonal antibody (BIBH-7). The results showed high specific targeting of the stromal compartment of the xenograft, indicating that the model provides a useful and novel approach for the in vivo assessment of the immunotherapeutic potential of molecules targeting human stroma and angiogenic systems. PMID:12939462

  10. Multiplexed Activity-based Protein Profiling of the Human Pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus Reveals Large Functional Changes upon Exposure to Human Serum*

    PubMed Central

    Wiedner, Susan D.; Burnum, Kristin E.; Pederson, LeeAnna M.; Anderson, Lindsey N.; Fortuin, Suereta; Chauvigné-Hines, Lacie M.; Shukla, Anil K.; Ansong, Charles; Panisko, Ellen A.; Smith, Richard D.; Wright, Aaron T.

    2012-01-01

    Environmental adaptability is critical for survival of the fungal human pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus in the immunocompromised host lung. We hypothesized that exposure of the fungal pathogen to human serum would lead to significant alterations to the organism's physiology, including metabolic activity and stress response. Shifts in functional pathway and corresponding enzyme reactivity of A. fumigatus upon exposure to the human host may represent much needed prognostic indicators of fungal infection. To address this, we employed a multiplexed activity-based protein profiling (ABPP) approach coupled to quantitative mass spectrometry-based proteomics to measure broad enzyme reactivity of the fungus cultured with and without human serum. ABPP showed a shift from aerobic respiration to ethanol fermentation and utilization over time in the presence of human serum, which was not observed in serum-free culture. Our approach provides direct insight into this pathogen's ability to survive, adapt, and proliferate. Additionally, our multiplexed ABPP approach captured a broad swath of enzyme reactivity and functional pathways and provides a method for rapid assessment of the A. fumigatus response to external stimuli. PMID:22865858

  11. Human Astrovirus Coat Protein Inhibits Serum Complement Activation via C1, the First Component of the Classical Pathway▿

    PubMed Central

    Bonaparte, Rheba S.; Hair, Pamela S.; Banthia, Deepa; Marshall, Dawn M.; Cunnion, Kenji M.; Krishna, Neel K.

    2008-01-01

    Human astroviruses (HAstVs) belong to a family of nonenveloped, icosahedral RNA viruses that cause noninflammatory gastroenteritis, predominantly in infants. Eight HAstV serotypes have been identified, with a worldwide distribution. While the HAstVs represent a significant public health concern, very little is known about the pathogenesis of and host immune response to these viruses. Here we demonstrate that HAstV type 1 (HAstV-1) virions, specifically the viral coat protein (CP), suppress the complement system, a fundamental component of the innate immune response in vertebrates. HAstV-1 virions and purified CP both suppress hemolytic complement activity. Hemolytic assays utilizing sera depleted of individual complement factors as well as adding back purified factors demonstrated that HAstV CP suppresses classical pathway activation at the first component, C1. HAstV-1 CP bound the A chain of C1q and inhibited serum complement activation, resulting in decreased C4b, iC3b, and terminal C5b-9 formation. Inhibition of complement activation was also demonstrated for HAstV serotypes 2 to 4, suggesting that this phenomenon is a general feature of these human pathogens. Since complement is a major contributor to the initiation and amplification of inflammation, the observed CP-mediated inhibition of complement activity may contribute to the lack of inflammation associated with astrovirus-induced gastroenteritis. Although diverse mechanisms of inhibition of complement activation have been described for many enveloped animal viruses, this is the first report of a nonenveloped icosahedral virus CP inhibiting classical pathway activation at C1. PMID:17959658

  12. Protein kinase C activity is not involved in N-formylmethionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine-induced phospholipase D activation in human neutrophils, but is essential for concomitant NADPH oxidase activation: studies with a staurosporine analogue with improved selectivity for protein kinase C.

    PubMed

    Kessels, G C; Krause, K H; Verhoeven, A J

    1993-06-15

    Stimulation of human neutrophils by the receptor agonist N-formylmethionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP) results in a respiratory burst, catalysed by an NADPH oxidase. Concomitantly, phospholipase D (PLD) is activated. To investigate the role of protein kinase C (PKC) in these neutrophil responses, we have compared the effects of staurosporine and a structural analogue of staurosporine (cgp41251), that reflects a higher selectivity towards PKC [Meyer, Regenass, Fabbro, Alteri, Rösel, Müller, Caravatti and Matter (1989) Int. J. Cancer 43, 851-856]. Both staurosporine and cgp41251 dose-dependently inhibited the production of superoxide induced by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA). Both compounds also caused inhibition of the fMLP-induced respiratory burst, but with a lower efficacy during the initiation phase of this response. This latter observation cannot be taken as evidence against PKC involvement in the activation of the respiratory burst, because pretreatment of neutrophils with ionomycin before PMA stimulation also results in a lower efficacy of inhibition. Activation of PLD by fMLP was enhanced in the presence of staurosporine, but not in the presence of cgp41251. Enhancement of PLD activation was also observed in the presence of H-89, an inhibitor of cyclic-AMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA). Both staurosporine and H-89 reversed the dibutyryl-cyclic-AMP-induced inhibition of PLD activation, whereas cgp41251 was without effect. These results indicate that the potentiating effect of staurosporine on PLD activation induced by fMLP does not reflect a feedback inhibition by PKC activation, but instead a feedback inhibition by PKC activation. Taken together, our results indicate that in human neutrophils: (i) PKC activity is not essential for fMLP-induced activation of PLD; (ii) PKC activity does play an essential role in the activation of the respiratory burst by fMLP, other than mediating or modulating PLD activation; (iii) there exists a negative

  13. Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor α Activates Human Multidrug Resistance Transporter 3/ATP-Binding Cassette Protein Subfamily B4 Transcription and Increases Rat Biliary Phosphatidylcholine Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Ghonem, Nisanne S.; Ananthanarayanan, Meenakshisundaram; Soroka, Carol J.; Boyer, James L.

    2014-01-01

    Multidrug resistance transporter 3/ATP-binding cassette protein subfamily B4 (MDR3/ABCB4) is a critical determinant of biliary phosphatidylcholine (PC) secretion. Clinically, mutations and partial deficiencies in MDR3 result in cholestatic liver injury. Thus, MDR3 is a potential therapeutic target for cholestatic liver disease. Fenofibrate is a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) α ligand that has antiinflammatory actions and regulates bile acid detoxification. Here we examined the mechanism by which fenofibrate regulates MDR3 gene expression. Fenofibrate significantly up-regulated MDR3 messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein expression in primary cultured human hepatocytes, and stimulated MDR3 promoter activity in HepG2 cells. In silico analysis of 5′-upstream region of human MDR3 gene revealed a number of PPARα response elements (PPRE). Electrophoretic mobility shift (EMSA) and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays demonstrated specific binding of PPARα to the human MDR3 promoter. Targeted mutagenesis of three novel PPREs reduced inducibility of the MDR3 promoter by fenofibrate. In collagen sandwich cultured rat hepatocytes, treatment with fenofibrate increased secretion of fluorescent PC into bile canaliculi. Conclusion Fenofibrate transactivates MDR3 gene transcription by way of the binding of PPARα to three novel and functionally critical PPREs in the MDR3 promoter. Fenofibrate treatment further stimulates biliary phosphatidylcholine secretion in rat hepatocytes, thereby providing a functional correlate. We have established a molecular mechanism that may contribute to the beneficial use of fenofibrate therapy in human cholestatic liver disease. PMID:24122873

  14. Subunits of the Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Cluster of Mycoplasma pneumoniae Are Surface-Displayed Proteins that Bind and Activate Human Plasminogen

    PubMed Central

    Gründel, Anne; Friedrich, Kathleen; Pfeiffer, Melanie; Jacobs, Enno; Dumke, Roger

    2015-01-01

    The dual role of glycolytic enzymes in cytosol-located metabolic processes and in cell surface-mediated functions with an influence on virulence is described for various micro-organisms. Cell wall-less bacteria of the class Mollicutes including the common human pathogen Mycoplasma pneumoniae possess a reduced genome limiting the repertoire of virulence factors and metabolic pathways. After the initial contact of bacteria with cells of the respiratory epithelium via a specialized complex of adhesins and release of cell-damaging factors, surface-displayed glycolytic enzymes may facilitate the further interaction between host and microbe. In this study, we described detection of the four subunits of pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDHA-D) among the cytosolic and membrane-associated proteins of M. pneumoniae. Subunits of PDH were cloned, expressed and purified to produce specific polyclonal guinea pig antisera. Using colony blotting, fractionation of total proteins and immunofluorescence experiments, the surface localization of PDHA-C was demonstrated. All recombinant PDH subunits are able to bind to HeLa cells and human plasminogen. These interactions can be specifically blocked by the corresponding polyclonal antisera. In addition, an influence of ionic interactions on PDHC-binding to plasminogen as well as of lysine residues on the association of PDHA-D with plasminogen was confirmed. The PDHB subunit was shown to activate plasminogen and the PDHB-plasminogen complex induces degradation of human fibrinogen. Hence, our data indicate that the surface-associated PDH subunits might play a role in the pathogenesis of M. pneumoniae infections by interaction with human plasminogen. PMID:25978044

  15. Redox Control of the Human Iron-Sulfur Repair Protein MitoNEET Activity via Its Iron-Sulfur Cluster.

    PubMed

    Golinelli-Cohen, Marie-Pierre; Lescop, Ewen; Mons, Cécile; Gonçalves, Sergio; Clémancey, Martin; Santolini, Jérôme; Guittet, Eric; Blondin, Geneviève; Latour, Jean-Marc; Bouton, Cécile

    2016-04-01

    Human mitoNEET (mNT) is the first identified Fe-S protein of the mammalian outer mitochondrial membrane. Recently, mNT has been implicated in cytosolic Fe-S repair of a key regulator of cellular iron homeostasis. Here, we aimed to decipher the mechanism by which mNT triggers its Fe-S repair capacity. By using tightly controlled reactions combined with complementary spectroscopic approaches, we have determined the differential roles played by both the redox state of the mNT cluster and dioxygen in cluster transfer and protein stability. We unambiguously demonstrated that only the oxidized state of the mNT cluster triggers cluster transfer to a generic acceptor protein and that dioxygen is neither required for the cluster transfer reaction nor does it affect the transfer rate. In the absence of apo-acceptors, a large fraction of the oxidized holo-mNT form is converted back to reduced holo-mNT under low oxygen tension. Reduced holo-mNT, which holds a [2Fe-2S](+)with a global protein fold similar to that of the oxidized form is, by contrast, resistant in losing its cluster or in transferring it. Our findings thus demonstrate that mNT uses an iron-based redox switch mechanism to regulate the transfer of its cluster. The oxidized state is the "active state," which reacts promptly to initiate Fe-S transfer independently of dioxygen, whereas the reduced state is a "dormant form." Finally, we propose that the redox-sensing function of mNT is a key component of the cellular adaptive response to help stress-sensitive Fe-S proteins recover from oxidative injury. PMID:26887944

  16. Disparate Proteome Responses of Pathogenic and Non-pathogenic Aspergilli to Human Serum Measured by Activity-Based Protein Profiling (ABPP)

    SciTech Connect

    Wiedner, Susan D.; Ansong, Charles; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Pederson, Leeanna M.; Fortuin, Suereta; Hofstad, Beth A.; Shukla, Anil K.; Panisko, Ellen A.; Smith, Richard D.; Wright, Aaron T.

    2013-07-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus is the primary pathogen causing the devastating pulmonary disease Invasive Aspergillosis in immunocompromised individuals. Genomic analysis shows high synteny between A. fumigatus and closely related rarely pathogenic Neosartorya fischeri and Aspergillus clavatus genomes. To investigate the presence of unique or highly inducible protein reactivity in the pathogen, we applied activity-based protein profiling to compare protein reactivity of all three fungi over time in minimal media growth and in response to human serum. We found 350 probe-reactive proteins exclusive to A. fumigatus, including known virulence associated proteins, and 13 proteins associated with stress response exclusive to A. fumigatus culture in serum. Though the fungi are highly orthologous, A. fumigatus has significantly more activity across varied biological process. Only 50% of expected orthologs of measured A. fumigatus reactive proteins were observed in N. fischeri and A. clavatus. Human serum induced processes uniquely or significantly represented in A. fumigatus include actin organization and assembly, transport, and fatty acid, cell membrane, and cell wall synthesis. Additionally, signaling proteins regulating vegetative growth, conidiation, and cell wall integrity, required for appropriate cellular response to external stimuli, had higher reactivity over time in A. fumigatus and N. fisheri, but not in A. clavatus. Together, we show that measured proteins and physiological processes identified solely or significantly over-represented in A. fumigatus reveal a unique adaptive response to human protein not found in closely related, but rarely aspergilli. These unique protein reactivity responses may reveal how A. fumigatus initiates pulmonary invasion leading to Invasive Aspergillosis.

  17. Human protein reference database--2006 update.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Gopa R; Suresh, M; Kumaran, K; Kannabiran, N; Suresh, Shubha; Bala, P; Shivakumar, K; Anuradha, N; Reddy, Raghunath; Raghavan, T Madhan; Menon, Shalini; Hanumanthu, G; Gupta, Malvika; Upendran, Sapna; Gupta, Shweta; Mahesh, M; Jacob, Bincy; Mathew, Pinky; Chatterjee, Pritam; Arun, K S; Sharma, Salil; Chandrika, K N; Deshpande, Nandan; Palvankar, Kshitish; Raghavnath, R; Krishnakanth, R; Karathia, Hiren; Rekha, B; Nayak, Rashmi; Vishnupriya, G; Kumar, H G Mohan; Nagini, M; Kumar, G S Sameer; Jose, Rojan; Deepthi, P; Mohan, S Sujatha; Gandhi, T K B; Harsha, H C; Deshpande, Krishna S; Sarker, Malabika; Prasad, T S Keshava; Pandey, Akhilesh

    2006-01-01

    Human Protein Reference Database (HPRD) (http://www.hprd.org) was developed to serve as a comprehensive collection of protein features, post-translational modifications (PTMs) and protein-protein interactions. Since the original report, this database has increased to >20 000 proteins entries and has become the largest database for literature-derived protein-protein interactions (>30 000) and PTMs (>8000) for human proteins. We have also introduced several new features in HPRD including: (i) protein isoforms, (ii) enhanced search options, (iii) linking of pathway annotations and (iv) integration of a novel browser, GenProt Viewer (http://www.genprot.org), developed by us that allows integration of genomic and proteomic information. With the continued support and active participation by the biomedical community, we expect HPRD to become a unique source of curated information for the human proteome and spur biomedical discoveries based on integration of genomic, transcriptomic and proteomic data. PMID:16381900

  18. Mutation of the protein-O-mannosyltransferase enhances secretion of the human urokinase-type plasminogen activator in Hansenula polymorpha.

    PubMed

    Agaphonov, Michael O; Sokolov, Sviatoslav S; Romanova, Nina V; Sohn, Jung-Hoon; Kim, So-Young; Kalebina, Tatyana S; Choi, Eui-Sung; Ter-Avanesyan, Michael D

    2005-10-15

    Human urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) is poorly secreted and aggregates in the endoplasmic reticulum of yeast cells due to inefficient folding. A screen for Hansenula polymorpha mutants with improved uPA secretion revealed a gene encoding a homologue of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae protein-O-mannosyltransferase Pmt1p. Expression of the H. polymorpha PMT1 gene (HpPMT1) abolished temperature sensitivity of the S. cerevisiae pmt1 pmt2 double mutant. As in S. cerevisiae, inactivation of the HpPMT1 gene affected electrophoretic mobility of the O-glycosylated protein, extracellular chitinase. In contrast to S. cerevisiae, disruption of HpPMT1 alone caused temperature sensitivity. Inactivation of the HpPMT1 gene decreased intracellular aggregation of uPA, suggesting that enhanced secretion of uPA was due to improvement of its folding in the endoplasmic reticulum. Unlike most of the endoplasmic reticulum membrane proteins, HpPmt1p possesses the C-terminal KDEL retention signal. PMID:16200504

  19. AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Interacts with the Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor Delta to Induce Genes Affecting Fatty Acid Oxidation in Human Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Kemmerer, Marina; Finkernagel, Florian; Cavalcante, Marcela Frota; Abdalla, Dulcineia Saes Parra; Müller, Rolf; Brüne, Bernhard; Namgaladze, Dmitry

    2015-01-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) maintains energy homeostasis by suppressing cellular ATP-consuming processes and activating catabolic, ATP-producing pathways such as fatty acid oxidation (FAO). The transcription factor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor δ (PPARδ) also affects fatty acid metabolism, stimulating the expression of genes involved in FAO. To question the interplay of AMPK and PPARδ in human macrophages we transduced primary human macrophages with lentiviral particles encoding for the constitutively active AMPKα1 catalytic subunit, followed by microarray expression analysis after treatment with the PPARδ agonist GW501516. Microarray analysis showed that co-activation of AMPK and PPARδ increased expression of FAO genes, which were validated by quantitative PCR. Induction of these FAO-associated genes was also observed upon infecting macrophages with an adenovirus coding for AMPKγ1 regulatory subunit carrying an activating R70Q mutation. The pharmacological AMPK activator A-769662 increased expression of several FAO genes in a PPARδ- and AMPK-dependent manner. Although GW501516 significantly increased FAO and reduced the triglyceride amount in very low density lipoproteins (VLDL)-loaded foam cells, AMPK activation failed to potentiate this effect, suggesting that increased expression of fatty acid catabolic genes alone may be not sufficient to prevent macrophage lipid overload. PMID:26098914

  20. AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Interacts with the Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor Delta to Induce Genes Affecting Fatty Acid Oxidation in Human Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Kemmerer, Marina; Finkernagel, Florian; Cavalcante, Marcela Frota; Abdalla, Dulcineia Saes Parra; Müller, Rolf; Brüne, Bernhard; Namgaladze, Dmitry

    2015-01-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) maintains energy homeostasis by suppressing cellular ATP-consuming processes and activating catabolic, ATP-producing pathways such as fatty acid oxidation (FAO). The transcription factor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor δ (PPARδ) also affects fatty acid metabolism, stimulating the expression of genes involved in FAO. To question the interplay of AMPK and PPARδ in human macrophages we transduced primary human macrophages with lentiviral particles encoding for the constitutively active AMPKα1 catalytic subunit, followed by microarray expression analysis after treatment with the PPARδ agonist GW501516. Microarray analysis showed that co-activation of AMPK and PPARδ increased expression of FAO genes, which were validated by quantitative PCR. Induction of these FAO-associated genes was also observed upon infecting macrophages with an adenovirus coding for AMPKγ1 regulatory subunit carrying an activating R70Q mutation. The pharmacological AMPK activator A-769662 increased expression of several FAO genes in a PPARδ- and AMPK-dependent manner. Although GW501516 significantly increased FAO and reduced the triglyceride amount in very low density lipoproteins (VLDL)-loaded foam cells, AMPK activation failed to potentiate this effect, suggesting that increased expression of fatty acid catabolic genes alone may be not sufficient to prevent macrophage lipid overload. PMID:26098914

  1. Molecular Basis of the Interaction of the Human Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase Non-receptor Type 4 (PTPN4) with the Mitogen-activated Protein Kinase p38γ.

    PubMed

    Maisonneuve, Pierre; Caillet-Saguy, Célia; Vaney, Marie-Christine; Bibi-Zainab, Edoo; Sawyer, Kristi; Raynal, Bertrand; Haouz, Ahmed; Delepierre, Muriel; Lafon, Monique; Cordier, Florence; Wolff, Nicolas

    2016-08-01

    The human protein tyrosine phosphatase non-receptor type 4 (PTPN4) prevents cell death induction in neuroblastoma and glioblastoma cell lines in a PDZ·PDZ binding motifs-dependent manner, but the cellular partners of PTPN4 involved in cell protection are unknown. Here, we described the mitogen-activated protein kinase p38γ as a cellular partner of PTPN4. The main contribution to the p38γ·PTPN4 complex formation is the tight interaction between the C terminus of p38γ and the PDZ domain of PTPN4. We solved the crystal structure of the PDZ domain of PTPN4 bound to the p38γ C terminus. We identified the molecular basis of recognition of the C-terminal sequence of p38γ that displays the highest affinity among all endogenous partners of PTPN4. We showed that the p38γ C terminus is also an efficient inducer of cell death after its intracellular delivery. In addition to recruiting the kinase, the binding of the C-terminal sequence of p38γ to PTPN4 abolishes the catalytic autoinhibition of PTPN4 and thus activates the phosphatase, which can efficiently dephosphorylate the activation loop of p38γ. We presume that the p38γ·PTPN4 interaction promotes cellular signaling, preventing cell death induction. PMID:27246854

  2. Activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase by celecoxib oppositely regulates survivin and gamma-H2AX in human colorectal cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hsiao, P.-W.; Chang, C.-C.; Liu, H.-F.; Tsai, C.-M.; Chiu, Ted H.; Chao, J.-I . E-mail: chaoji@mail.tcu.edu.tw

    2007-07-01

    Cancer cells express survivin that facilitates tumorigenesis. Celecoxib has been shown to reduce human colorectal cancers. However, the role and regulation of survivin by celecoxib in colorectal carcinoma cells remain unclear. Treatment with 40-80 {mu}M celecoxib for 24 h induced cytotoxicity and proliferation inhibition via a concentration-dependent manner in RKO colorectal carcinoma cells. Celecoxib blocked the survivin protein expression and increased the phosphorylation of H2AX at serine-193 ({gamma}-H2AX). The survivin gene knockdown by transfection with a survivin siRNA revealed that the loss of survivin correlated with the expression of {gamma}-H2AX. Meanwhile, celecoxib increased caspase-3 activation and apoptosis. Celecoxib activated the phosphorylation of p38 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase. The phosphorylated proteins of p38 MAP kinase and {gamma}-H2AX were observed in the apoptotic cells. SB203580, a specific p38 MAP kinase inhibitor, protected the survivin protein expression and decreased the levels of {gamma}-H2AX and apoptosis in the celecoxib-exposed cells. The blockade of survivin expression increased the celecoxib-induced cytotoxicity; conversely, overexpression of survivin by transfection with a survivin-expressing vector raised the cancer cell proliferation and resisted the celecoxib-induced cell death. Our results provide for the first time that p38 MAP kinase participates in the down-regulation of survivin and subsequently induces the activation of {gamma}-H2AX for mediating apoptosis following treatment with celecoxib in human colorectal cancer cells.

  3. The low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein/alpha2-macroglobulin receptor regulates cell surface plasminogen activator activity on human trophoblast cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, J C; Sakthivel, R; Kniss, D; Graham, C H; Strickland, D K; McCrae, K R

    1998-11-27

    The low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein/alpha2-macroglobulin receptor (LRP/alpha2MR) mediates the internalization of numerous ligands, including prourokinase (pro-UK) and complexes between two-chain urokinase (tc-u-PA) and plasminogen activator inhibitor type-1 (PAI-1). It has been suggested that through its ability to internalize these ligands, LRP/alpha2MR may regulate the expression of plasminogen activator activity on cell surfaces; this hypothesis, however, has not been experimentally confirmed. To address this issue, we assessed the ability of LRP/alpha2MR to regulate plasminogen activator activity on human trophoblast cells, which express both LRP/alpha2MR and the urokinase receptor (uPAR). Trophoblasts internalized and degraded exogenous 125I-pro-UK (primarily following its conversion to tc-u-PA and incorporation into tc-u-PA.PAI complexes) in an LRP/alpha2MR-dependent manner, which was inhibited by the LRP/alpha2MR receptor-associated protein. Receptor-associated protein also caused a approximately 50% reduction in cell surface plasminogen activator activity and delayed the regeneration of unoccupied uPAR by cells on which uPAR were initially saturated with pro-UK. Identical effects were caused by anti-LRP/alpha2MR antibodies. These results demonstrate that LRP/alpha2MR promotes the expression of cell surface plasminogen activator activity on trophoblasts by facilitating the clearance of tc-u-PA.PAI complexes and regeneration of unoccupied cell surface uPAR. PMID:9822706

  4. Human peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor mRNA and protein expression during development

    EPA Science Inventory

    The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR) are nuclear hormone receptors that regulate lipid and glucose homeostasis and are important in reproduction and development. PPARs are targets ofpharmaceuticals and are also activated by environmental contaminants, including ...

  5. AMP-activated protein kinase: a key regulator of energy balance with many roles in human disease.

    PubMed

    Grahame Hardie, D

    2014-12-01

    The AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a sensor of cellular energy status that regulates cellular and whole-body energy balance. A recently reported crystal structure has illuminated the complex regulatory mechanisms by which AMP and ADP cause activation of AMPK, involving phosphorylation by the upstream kinase LKB1. Once activated by falling cellular energy status, AMPK activates catabolic pathways that generate ATP whilst inhibiting anabolic pathways and other cellular processes that consume ATP. A role of AMPK is implicated in many human diseases. Mutations in the γ2 subunit cause heart disease due to excessive glycogen storage in cardiac myocytes, leading to ventricular pre-excitation. AMPK-activating drugs reverse many of the metabolic defects associated with insulin resistance, and recent findings suggest that the insulin-sensitizing effects of the widely used antidiabetic drug metformin are mediated by AMPK. The upstream kinase LKB1 is a tumour suppressor, and AMPK may exert many of its antitumour effects. AMPK activation promotes the oxidative metabolism typical of quiescent cells, rather than the aerobic glycolysis observed in tumour cells and cells involved in inflammation, explaining in part why AMPK activators have both antitumour and anti-inflammatory effects. Salicylate (the major in vivo metabolite of aspirin) activates AMPK, and this could be responsible for at least some of the anticancer and anti-inflammatory effects of aspirin. In addition to metformin and salicylates, novel drugs that modulate AMPK are likely to enter clinical trials soon. Finally, AMPK may be involved in viral infection: downregulation of AMPK during hepatitis C virus infection appears to be essential for efficient viral replication. PMID:24824502

  6. 5′-AMP-activated Protein Kinase (AMPK) Supports the Growth of Aggressive Experimental Human Breast Cancer Tumors*

    PubMed Central

    Laderoute, Keith R.; Calaoagan, Joy M.; Chao, Wan-ru; Dinh, Dominc; Denko, Nicholas; Duellman, Sarah; Kalra, Jessica; Liu, Xiaohe; Papandreou, Ioanna; Sambucetti, Lidia; Boros, Laszlo G.

    2014-01-01

    Rapid tumor growth can establish metabolically stressed microenvironments that activate 5′-AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a ubiquitous regulator of ATP homeostasis. Previously, we investigated the importance of AMPK for the growth of experimental tumors prepared from HRAS-transformed mouse embryo fibroblasts and for primary brain tumor development in a rat model of neurocarcinogenesis. Here, we used triple-negative human breast cancer cells in which AMPK activity had been knocked down to investigate the contribution of AMPK to experimental tumor growth and core glucose metabolism. We found that AMPK supports the growth of fast-growing orthotopic tumors prepared from MDA-MB-231 and DU4475 breast cancer cells but had no effect on the proliferation or survival of these cells in culture. We used in vitro and in vivo metabolic profiling with [13C]glucose tracers to investigate the contribution of AMPK to core glucose metabolism in MDA-MB-231 cells, which have a Warburg metabolic phenotype; these experiments indicated that AMPK supports tumor glucose metabolism in part through positive regulation of glycolysis and the nonoxidative pentose phosphate cycle. We also found that AMPK activity in the MDA-MB-231 tumors could systemically perturb glucose homeostasis in sensitive normal tissues (liver and pancreas). Overall, our findings suggest that the contribution of AMPK to the growth of aggressive experimental tumors has a critical microenvironmental component that involves specific regulation of core glucose metabolism. PMID:24993821

  7. An Alteration in ELMOD3, an Arl2 GTPase-Activating Protein, Is Associated with Hearing Impairment in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Ivanova, Anna A.; Giese, Arnaud P. J.; Choo, Daniel I.; Khan, Shaheen N.; Riazuddin, Sheikh; Kahn, Richard A.; Riazuddin, Saima

    2013-01-01

    Exome sequencing coupled with homozygosity mapping was used to identify a transition mutation (c.794T>C; p.Leu265Ser) in ELMOD3 at the DFNB88 locus that is associated with nonsyndromic deafness in a large Pakistani family, PKDF468. The affected individuals of this family exhibited pre-lingual, severe-to-profound degrees of mixed hearing loss. ELMOD3 belongs to the engulfment and cell motility (ELMO) family, which consists of six paralogs in mammals. Several members of the ELMO family have been shown to regulate a subset of GTPases within the Ras superfamily. However, ELMOD3 is a largely uncharacterized protein that has no previously known biochemical activities. We found that in rodents, within the sensory epithelia of the inner ear, ELMOD3 appears most pronounced in the stereocilia of cochlear hair cells. Fluorescently tagged ELMOD3 co-localized with the actin cytoskeleton in MDCK cells and actin-based microvilli of LLC-PK1-CL4 epithelial cells. The p.Leu265Ser mutation in the ELMO domain impaired each of these activities. Super-resolution imaging revealed instances of close association of ELMOD3 with actin at the plasma membrane of MDCK cells. Furthermore, recombinant human GST-ELMOD3 exhibited GTPase activating protein (GAP) activity against the Arl2 GTPase, which was completely abolished by the p.Leu265Ser mutation. Collectively, our data provide the first insights into the expression and biochemical properties of ELMOD3 and highlight its functional links to sound perception and actin cytoskeleton. PMID:24039609

  8. Self-cleavage of Human CLCA1 Protein by a Novel Internal Metalloprotease Domain Controls Calcium-activated Chloride Channel Activation*♦

    PubMed Central

    Yurtsever, Zeynep; Sala-Rabanal, Monica; Randolph, David T.; Scheaffer, Suzanne M.; Roswit, William T.; Alevy, Yael G.; Patel, Anand C.; Heier, Richard F.; Romero, Arthur G.; Nichols, Colin G.; Holtzman, Michael J.; Brett, Tom J.

    2012-01-01

    The chloride channel calcium-activated (CLCA) family are secreted proteins that regulate both chloride transport and mucin expression, thus controlling the production of mucus in respiratory and other systems. Accordingly, human CLCA1 is a critical mediator of hypersecretory lung diseases, such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and cystic fibrosis, that manifest mucus obstruction. Despite relevance to homeostasis and disease, the mechanism of CLCA1 function remains largely undefined. We address this void by showing that CLCA proteins contain a consensus proteolytic cleavage site recognized by a novel zincin metalloprotease domain located within the N terminus of CLCA itself. CLCA1 mutations that inhibit self-cleavage prevent activation of calcium-activated chloride channel (CaCC)-mediated chloride transport. CaCC activation requires cleavage to unmask the N-terminal fragment of CLCA1, which can independently gate CaCCs. Gating of CaCCs mediated by CLCA1 does not appear to involve proteolytic cleavage of the channel because a mutant N-terminal fragment deficient in proteolytic activity is able to induce currents comparable with that of the native fragment. These data provide both a mechanistic basis for CLCA1 self-cleavage and a novel mechanism for regulation of chloride channel activity specific to the mucosal interface. PMID:23112050

  9. Structural Basis for the Catalytic Activity of Human Serine/Threonine Protein Phosphatase-5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swingle, M. R.; Honkanen, R.; Ciszak, E. M.

    2004-01-01

    Serinehhreonine protein phosphatase-5 (PP5) affects many signaling networks that regulate cell growth and cellular responses to stress. Here we report the crystal structure of the PP5 catalytic domain (PP5c) at a resolution of 1.6 A. From this structure we resolved the mechanism for PP5-mediated hydrolysis of phosphoprotein substrates, which requires the precise positioning of two metal ions within a con served Aspn-271-M(sub 1):M(sub 2)-W(sup 1)-His-427-His-304-Asp-274 catalytic motif. The structure of PPSc provides a structural basis for explaining the exceptional catalytic proficiency of protein phosphatases, which are among the most powerful known catalysts. Resolution of the entire C-terminus revealed a novel subdomain, and the structure of the PP5c should also aid development of type-specific inhibitors.

  10. Metformin inhibits growth of human non-small cell lung cancer cells via liver kinase B-1-independent activation of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase

    PubMed Central

    GUO, QIANQIAN; LIU, ZHIYAN; JIANG, LILI; LIU, MENGJIE; MA, JIEQUN; YANG, CHENGCHENG; HAN, LILI; NAN, KEJUN; LIANG, XUAN

    2016-01-01

    Metformin, the most widely administered oral anti-diabetic therapeutic agent, exerts its glucose-lowering effect predominantly via liver kinase B1 (LKB1)-dependent activation of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK). Accumulating evidence has demonstrated that metformin possesses potential antitumor effects. However, whether the antitumor effect of metformin is via the LKB1/AMPK signaling pathway remains to be determined. In the current study, the effects of metformin on proliferation, cell cycle progression, and apoptosis of human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) H460 (LKB1-null) and H1299 (LKB1-positive) cells were assessed, and the role of LKB1/AMPK signaling in the anti-growth effects of metformin were investigated. Cell viability was determined using a 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay, cell cycle distribution and apoptosis were assessed by flow cytometry, and protein expression levels were measured by western blotting. Metformin inhibited proliferation, induced significant cell cycle arrest at the G0–G1 phase and increased apoptosis in NSCLC cells in a time- and concentration-dependent manner, regardless of the level of LKB1 protein expression. Furthermore, knockdown of LKB1 with short hairpin RNA (shRNA) did not affect the antiproliferative effect of metformin in the H1299 cells. Metformin stimulated AMPK phosphorylation and subsequently suppressed the phosphorylation of mammalian target of rapamycin and its downstream effector, 70-kDa ribosomal protein S6 kinase in the two cell lines. These effects were abrogated by silencing AMPK with small interfering RNA (siRNA). In addition, knockdown of AMPK with siRNA inhibited the effect of metformin on cell proliferation in the two cell lines. These results provide evidence that the growth inhibition of metformin in NSCLC cells is mediated by LKB1-independent activation of AMPK, indicating that metformin may be a potential therapeutic agent for the treatment of

  11. Cadmium-induced apoptosis and necrosis in human osteoblasts: role of caspases and mitogen-activated protein kinases pathways.

    PubMed

    Brama, M; Politi, L; Santini, P; Migliaccio, S; Scandurra, R

    2012-02-01

    Cadmium is a widespread environmental pollutant which induces severe toxic alterations, including osteomalacia and osteoporosis, likely by estrogen receptor-dependent mechanisms. Indeed, cadmium has been described to act as an endocrine disruptor and its toxicity is exerted both in vivo and in vitro through induction of apoptosis and/or necrosis by not fully clarified intracellular mechanism(s) of action. Aim of the present study was to further investigate the molecular mechanism by which cadmium might alter homeostasis of estrogen target cells, such as osteoblast homeostasis, inducing cell apoptosis and/or necrosis. Human osteoblastic cells (hFOB 1.19) in culture were used as an in vitro model to characterize the intracellular mechanisms induced by this heavy metal. Cells were incubated in the presence/ absence of 10-50 μM cadmium chloride at different times and DNA fragmentation and activation of procaspases- 8 and -3 were induced upon CdCl(2) treatment triggering apoptotic and necrotic pathways. Addition of caspase-8 and -3 inhibitors (Z-IETD-FMK and Z-DQMD-FMK) partially blocked these effects. No activation of procaspase-9 was observed. To determine the role of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) in these events, we investigated c-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), p38 and extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK1/2) phosphorylation which were activated by 10 μM CdCl(2). Chemical inhibitors of JNK, p38, and ERK1/2, SP600125, SB202190, and PD98059, significantly reduced the phosphorylation of the kinases and blunted apoptosis. In contrast, caspase inhibitors did not reduce the cadmium-induced MAPK phosphorylation, suggesting an independent activation of these pathways. In conclusion, at least 2 pathways appear activated by cadmium in osteoblasts: a direct induction of caspase-8 followed by activation of caspase-3 and an indirect induction by phosphorylation of ERK1/2, p38, and JNK MAPK triggering activation of caspase-8 and -3. PMID:21697648

  12. Identification and characterization of a HeLa nuclear protein that specifically binds to the trans-activation-response (TAR) element of human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed Central

    Marciniak, R A; Garcia-Blanco, M A; Sharp, P A

    1990-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 RNAs contain a sequence, trans-activation-response (TAR) element, which is required for tat protein-mediated trans-activation of viral gene expression. We have identified a nuclear protein from extracts of HeLa cells that binds to the TAR element RNA in a sequence-specific manner. The binding of this 68-kDa polypeptide was detected by UV cross-linking proteins to TAR element RNA transcribed in vitro. Competition experiments were performed by using a partially purified preparation of the protein to quantify the relative binding affinities of TAR element RNA mutants. The binding affinity of the TAR mutants paralleled the reported ability of those mutants to support tat trans-activation in vivo. We propose that this cellular protein moderates TAR activity in vivo. Images PMID:2333305

  13. Body weight management effect of burdock (Arctium lappa L.) root is associated with the activation of AMP-activated protein kinase in human HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Daih-Huang; Hung, Ming-Chi; Hung, Chao-Ming; Liu, Li-Min; Chen, Fu-An; Shieh, Po-Chuen; Ho, Chi-Tang; Way, Tzong-Der

    2012-10-01

    Burdock (Arcticum lappa L.) root is used in folk medicine and also as a vegetable in Asian countries. In the present study, burdock root treatment significantly reduced body weight in rats. To evaluate the bioactive compounds, we successively extracted the burdock root with ethanol (AL-1), and fractionated it with n-hexane (AL-2), ethyl acetate (AL-3), n-butanol (AL-4), and water (AL-5). Among these fractions, AL-2 contained components with the most effective hypolipidemic potential in human hepatoma HepG2 cells. AL-2 decreased the expression of fatty acid synthase (FASN) and inhibited the activity of acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase (ACC) by stimulating AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) through the LKB1 pathway. Three active compounds were identified from the AL-2, namely α-linolenic acid, methyl α-linolenate, and methyl oleate. These results suggest that burdock root is expected to be useful for body weight management. PMID:25005949

  14. Activation of group IV cytosolic phospholipase A2 in human eosinophils by phosphoinositide 3-kinase through a mitogen-activated protein kinase-independent pathway.

    PubMed

    Myou, Shigeharu; Leff, Alan R; Myo, Saori; Boetticher, Evan; Meliton, Angelo Y; Lambertino, Anissa T; Liu, Jie; Xu, Chang; Munoz, Nilda M; Zhu, Xiangdong

    2003-10-15

    Activation of group IV cytosolic phospholipase A(2) (gIV-PLA(2)) is the essential first step in the synthesis of inflammatory eicosanoids and in integrin-mediated adhesion of leukocytes. Prior investigations have demonstrated that phosphorylation of gIV-PLA(2) results from activation of at least two isoforms of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). We investigated the potential role of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) in the activation of gIV-PLA(2) and the hydrolysis of membrane phosphatidylcholine in fMLP-stimulated human blood eosinophils. Transduction into eosinophils of Deltap85, a dominant negative form of class IA PI3K adaptor subunit, fused to an HIV-TAT protein transduction domain (TAT-Deltap85) concentration dependently inhibited fMLP-stimulated phosphorylation of protein kinase B, a downstream target of PI3K. FMLP caused increased arachidonic acid (AA) release and secretion of leukotriene C(4) (LTC(4)). TAT-Deltap85 and LY294002, a PI3K inhibitor, blocked the phosphorylation of gIV-PLA(2) at Ser(505) caused by fMLP, thus inhibiting gIV-PLA(2) hydrolysis and production of AA and LTC(4) in eosinophils. FMLP also caused extracellular signal-related kinases 1 and 2 and p38 MAPK phosphorylation in eosinophils; however, neither phosphorylation of extracellular signal-related kinases 1 and 2 nor p38 was inhibited by TAT-Deltap85 or LY294002. Inhibition of 1) p70 S6 kinase by rapamycin, 2) protein kinase B by Akt inhibitor, or 3) protein kinase C by Ro-31-8220, the potential downstream targets of PI3K for activation of gIV-PLA(2), had no effect on AA release or LTC(4) secretion caused by fMLP. We find that PI3K is required for gIV-PLA(2) activation and hydrolytic production of AA in activated eosinophils. Our data suggest that this essential PI3K independently activates gIV-PLA(2) through a pathway that does not involve MAPK. PMID:14530366

  15. Recombinant Expression of a Novel Fungal Immunomodulatory Protein with Human Tumor Cell Antiproliferative Activity from Nectria haematococca

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shuying; Nie, Ying; Ding, Yang; Shi, Lijun; Tang, Xuanming

    2014-01-01

    To our best knowledge, all of the fungal immunomodulatory proteins (FIPs) have been successfully extracted and identified in Basidomycetes, with only the exception of FIP from ascomycete Nectria haematococca (FIP-nha) discovered through homology alignment most recently. In this work, a gene encoding FIP-nha was synthesized and recombinantly expressed in an Escherichia coli expression system. SDS-PAGE and MALDI-MS analyses of recombinant FIP-nha (rFIP-nha) indicated that the gene was successfully expressed. The yield of the bioactive FIP-nha protein was 42.7 mg/L. In vitro assays of biological activity indicated that the rFIP-nha caused hemagglutination of human and rabbit red blood cells, significantly stimulated mouse spleen lymphocyte proliferation, and enhanced expression of interleukin-2 (IL-2) released from mouse splenocytes, revealing a strong antitumor effect against HL60, HepG2 and MGC823. Through this work, we constructed a rapid and efficient method of FIP production, and suggested that FIP-nha is a valuable candidate for use in future medical care and pharmaceutical products. PMID:25272229

  16. Quick method of multimeric protein production for biologically active substances such as human GM-CSF (hGM-CSF).

    PubMed

    Shinya, Eiji; Owaki, Atsuko; Norose, Yoshihiko; Sato, Shigeru; Takahashi, Hidemi

    2009-08-14

    The C-terminal fragment of C4b-binding protein (C4BP)-based multimerizing system was applied to hGM-CSF to induce dendritic cells (DCs) from peripheral blood monocytes (PBMCs), to see whether the C4BP could stimulate immature DCs, since DCs, equipped with pattern recognition receptors such as toll-like receptors (TLRs), are hypersensitive to various immunologically active molecules like LPS. hGM-CSF gene was merged to the 3'-terminal region of the C4BPalpha-chain gene, and the transfected human 293FT cells produced sufficient amount of octameric hGM-CSF, which resulted in iDCs with the same phenotype and the same response to a TRL4 ligand, LPS and a TLR3 ligand, poly I:C, as those induced with authentic monomeric hGM-CSF. These results suggest that the C4BP-based multimerizing system could facilitate the design of self-associating multimeric recombinant proteins without stimulating iDCs, which might be seen with the other multimerizing systems such as that using Fc fragment of IgM. PMID:19497303

  17. Recombinant expression of a novel fungal immunomodulatory protein with human tumor cell antiproliferative activity from Nectria haematococca.

    PubMed

    Li, Shuying; Nie, Ying; Ding, Yang; Shi, Lijun; Tang, Xuanming

    2014-01-01

    To our best knowledge, all of the fungal immunomodulatory proteins (FIPs) have been successfully extracted and identified in Basidomycetes, with only the exception of FIP from ascomycete Nectria haematococca (FIP-nha) discovered through homology alignment most recently. In this work, a gene encoding FIP-nha was synthesized and recombinantly expressed in an Escherichia coli expression system. SDS-PAGE and MALDI-MS analyses of recombinant FIP-nha (rFIP-nha) indicated that the gene was successfully expressed. The yield of the bioactive FIP-nha protein was 42.7 mg/L. In vitro assays of biological activity indicated that the rFIP-nha caused hemagglutination of human and rabbit red blood cells, significantly stimulated mouse spleen lymphocyte proliferation, and enhanced expression of interleukin-2 (IL-2) released from mouse splenocytes, revealing a strong antitumor effect against HL60, HepG2 and MGC823. Through this work, we constructed a rapid and efficient method of FIP production, and suggested that FIP-nha is a valuable candidate for use in future medical care and pharmaceutical products. PMID:25272229

  18. Peroxisome Proliferator Activated Receptors Alpha, Beta, and Gamma mRNA and protein expression in human fetal tissues

    EPA Science Inventory

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) regulate lipid and glucose homeostasis, are targets of pharmaceuticals, and are also activated by environmental contaminants. Almost nothing is known about expression of PPARs during human fetal development. This study examine...

  19. Apoptosis and melanogenesis in human melanoma cells induced by anthrax lethal factor inactivation of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koo, Han-Mo; Vanbrocklin, Matt; McWilliams, Mary Jane; Leppla, Stephan H.; Duesbery, Nicholas S.; Vande Woude, George F.

    2002-03-01

    Lethal factor, the principal virulence factor of Bacillus anthracis, inhibits mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling by proteolytically cleaving MAPK kinases. Edema factor, another component of anthrax toxin, is an adenylate cyclase, which increases intracellular cAMP. Inhibition of MAPK signaling with either anthrax lethal toxin (LeTx) or small molecule MAPK kinase inhibitors triggers apoptosis in human melanoma cells. Normal melanocytes do not undergo apoptosis in response to MAPK inhibition but arrest in the G1 phase of the cell cycle. Importantly, in vivo treatment of human melanoma xenograft tumors in athymic nude mice with LeTx results in significant or complete tumor regression without apparent side effects, suggesting that inhibiting the MAPK signaling pathway may be a useful strategy for treating melanoma. Additionally, interrupting MAPK signaling with LeTx and elevating cAMP with anthrax edema toxin in both melanoma cells and melanocytes lead to dramatic melanin production, perhaps explaining the formation of blackened eschars in cutaneous anthrax.

  20. Human protein reference database—2006 update

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Gopa R.; Suresh, M.; Kumaran, K.; Kannabiran, N.; Suresh, Shubha; Bala, P.; Shivakumar, K.; Anuradha, N.; Reddy, Raghunath; Raghavan, T. Madhan; Menon, Shalini; Hanumanthu, G.; Gupta, Malvika; Upendran, Sapna; Gupta, Shweta; Mahesh, M.; Jacob, Bincy; Mathew, Pinky; Chatterjee, Pritam; Arun, K. S.; Sharma, Salil; Chandrika, K. N.; Deshpande, Nandan; Palvankar, Kshitish; Raghavnath, R.; Krishnakanth, R.; Karathia, Hiren; Rekha, B.; Nayak, Rashmi; Vishnupriya, G.; Kumar, H. G. Mohan; Nagini, M.; Kumar, G. S. Sameer; Jose, Rojan; Deepthi, P.; Mohan, S. Sujatha; Gandhi, T. K. B.; Harsha, H. C.; Deshpande, Krishna S.; Sarker, Malabika; Prasad, T. S. Keshava; Pandey, Akhilesh

    2006-01-01

    Human Protein Reference Database (HPRD) () was developed to serve as a comprehensive collection of protein features, post-translational modifications (PTMs) and protein–protein interactions. Since the original report, this database has increased to >20 000 proteins entries and has become the largest database for literature-derived protein–protein interactions (>30 000) and PTMs (>8000) for human proteins. We have also introduced several new features in HPRD including: (i) protein isoforms, (ii) enhanced search options, (iii) linking of pathway annotations and (iv) integration of a novel browser, GenProt Viewer (), developed by us that allows integration of genomic and proteomic information. With the continued support and active participation by the biomedical community, we expect HPRD to become a unique source of curated information for the human proteome and spur biomedical discoveries based on integration of genomic, transcriptomic and proteomic data. PMID:16381900

  1. XBP-1, a novel human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) tax binding protein, activates HTLV-1 basal and tax-activated transcription.

    PubMed

    Ku, Sebastian C Y; Lee, Jialing; Lau, Joanne; Gurumurthy, Meera; Ng, Raymond; Lwa, Siew Hui; Lee, Joseph; Klase, Zachary; Kashanchi, Fatah; Chao, Sheng-Hao

    2008-05-01

    X-box binding protein 1 (XBP-1), a basic leucine zipper transcription factor, plays a key role in the cellular unfolded protein response (UPR). There are two XBP-1 isoforms in cells, spliced XBP-1S and unspliced XBP-1U. XBP-1U has been shown to bind to the 21-bp Tax-responsive element of the human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) long terminal repeat (LTR) in vitro and transactivate HTLV-1 transcription. Here we identify XBP-1S as a transcription activator of HTLV-1. Compared to XBP-1U, XBP-1S demonstrates stronger activating effects on both basal and Tax-activated HTLV-1 transcription in cells. Our results show that both XBP-1S and XBP-1U interact with Tax and bind to the HTLV-1 LTR in vivo. In addition, elevated mRNA levels of the gene for XBP-1 and several UPR genes were detected in the HTLV-1-infected C10/MJ and MT2 T-cell lines, suggesting that HTLV-1 infection may trigger the UPR in host cells. We also identify Tax as a positive regulator of the expression of the gene for XBP-1. Activation of the UPR by tunicamycin showed no effect on the HTLV-1 LTR, suggesting that HTLV-1 transcription is specifically regulated by XBP-1. Collectively, our study demonstrates a novel host-virus interaction between a cellular factor XBP-1 and transcriptional regulation of HTLV-1. PMID:18287238

  2. All-trans retinoic acid modulates mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway activation in human scleral fibroblasts through retinoic acid receptor beta

    PubMed Central

    Huo, Lijun; Cui, Dongmei; Yang, Xiao; Gao, Zhenya; Trier, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    Purpose All-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) is known to inhibit the proliferation of human scleral fibroblasts (HSFs) and to modulate the scleral intercellular matrix composition, and may therefore serve as a mediator for controlling eye growth. Cell proliferation is regulated by the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway. The aim of the current study was to investigate whether changed activation of the MAPK pathway could be involved in the response of HSFs exposed to ATRA. Methods HSFs were cultured in Dulbecco Modified Eagle's Medium/F12 (DMEM/F12) and exposed to 1 μmol/l ATRA for 10 min, 30 min, 1 h, 8 h, or 24 h. The activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK 1/2), p38, and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) in HSFs was assessed with western blot analysis and immunocytofluorescence. Results After exposure to ATRA for 24 h, the HSFs appeared shrunken and thinner than the control cells. The intercellular spaces were wider, and the HSFs appeared less numerous than in the control culture. Western blot showed decreased activation of ERK 1/2 in the HSFs from 30 min (p=0.01) to 24 h (p<0.01) after the start of exposure to ATRA, and increased activation of the JNK protein from 10 to 30 min (p<0.01) after the start of exposure to ATRA. Indirect immunofluorescence confirmed changes in activation of ERK 1/2 and JNK in HSFs exposed to ATRA. No change in activation of p38 in HSFs was observed after exposure to ATRA. Pretreatment of the HSFs with LE135, an antagonist of retinoic acid receptor beta (RARβ), abolished the ATRA-induced changes inactivation of ERK 1/2 and JNK. Conclusions ATRA inhibits HSF proliferation by a mechanism associated with modulation of ERK 1/2 and JNK activation and depends on stimulation of retinoic acid receptor beta. PMID:23946634

  3. Inhibition of protein kinase C catalytic activity by additional regions within the human protein kinase Calpha-regulatory domain lying outside of the pseudosubstrate sequence.

    PubMed

    Kirwan, Angie F; Bibby, Ashley C; Mvilongo, Thierry; Riedel, Heimo; Burke, Thomas; Millis, Sherri Z; Parissenti, Amadeo M

    2003-07-15

    The N-terminal pseudosubstrate site within the protein kinase Calpha (PKCalpha)-regulatory domain has long been regarded as the major determinant for autoinhibition of catalytic domain activity. Previously, we observed that the PKC-inhibitory capacity of the human PKCalpha-regulatory domain was only reduced partially on removal of the pseudosubstrate sequence [Parissenti, Kirwan, Kim, Colantonio and Schimmer (1998) J. Biol. Chem. 273, 8940-8945]. This finding suggested that one or more additional region(s) contributes to the inhibition of catalytic domain activity. To assess this hypothesis, we first examined the PKC-inhibitory capacity of a smaller fragment of the PKCalpha-regulatory domain consisting of the C1a, C1b and V2 regions [GST-Ralpha(39-177): this protein contained the full regulatory domain of human PKCalpha fused to glutathione S-transferase (GST), but lacked amino acids 1-38 (including the pseudosubstrate sequence) and amino acids 178-270 (including the C2 region)]. GST-Ralpha(39-177) significantly inhibited PKC in a phorbol-independent manner and could not bind the peptide substrate used in our assays. These results suggested that a region within C1/V2 directly inhibits catalytic domain activity. Providing further in vivo support for this hypothesis, we found that expression of N-terminally truncated pseudosubstrate-less bovine PKCalpha holoenzymes in yeast was capable of inhibiting cell growth in a phorbol-dependent manner. This suggested that additional autoinhibitory force(s) remained within the truncated holoenzymes that could be relieved by phorbol ester. Using tandem PCR-mediated mutagenesis, we observed that mutation of amino acids 33-86 within GST-Ralpha(39-177) dramatically reduced its PKC-inhibitory capacity when protamine was used as substrate. Mutagenesis of a broad range of sequences within C2 (amino acids 159-242) also significantly reduced PKC-inhibitory capacity. Taken together, these observations support strongly the existence of

  4. PDIP46 (DNA polymerase δ interacting protein 46) is an activating factor for human DNA polymerase δ

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Rong; Yue, Fu; Lin, Szu Hua Sharon; Rahmeh, Amal A.; Lee, Ernest Y. C.; Zhang, Zhongtao; Lee, Marietta Y. W. T.

    2016-01-01

    PDIP46 (SKAR, POLDIP3) was discovered through its interaction with the p50 subunit of human DNA polymerase δ (Pol δ). Its functions in DNA replication are unknown. PDIP46 associates with Pol δ in cell extracts both by immunochemical and protein separation methods, as well as by ChIP analyses. PDIP46 also interacts with PCNA via multiple copies of a novel PCNA binding motif, the APIMs (AlkB homologue-2 PCNA-Interacting Motif). Sites for both p50 and PCNA binding were mapped to the N-terminal region containing the APIMs. Functional assays for the effects of PDIP46 on Pol δ activity on singly primed ssM13 DNA templates revealed that it is a novel and potent activator of Pol δ. The effects of PDIP46 on Pol δ in primer extension, strand displacement and synthesis through simple hairpin structures reveal a mechanism where PDIP46 facilitates Pol δ4 synthesis through regions of secondary structure on complex templates. In addition, evidence was obtained that PDIP46 is also capable of exerting its effects by a direct interaction with Pol δ, independent of PCNA. Mutation of the Pol δ and PCNA binding region resulted in a loss of PDIP46 functions. These studies support the view that PDIP46 is a novel accessory protein for Pol δ that is involved in cellular DNA replication. This raises the possibility that altered expression of PDIP46 or its mutation may affect Pol δ functions in vivo, and thereby be a nexus for altered genomic stability. PMID:26819372

  5. Structure and chromosomal localization of the human gene of the phosphotyrosyl phosphatase activator (PTPA) of protein phosphatase 2A

    SciTech Connect

    Van Hoof, C.; Cayla, X.; Merlevede, W.; Goris, J.

    1995-07-20

    The PTPA gene encodes a specific phosphotyrosyl phosphatase activator of the dimeric form of protein phosphatase 2A. PTPA, cloned from human genomic libraries, is encoded by one single-copy gene, composed of 10 exons and 9 introns with a total length of about 60 kb. The transcription start site was determined, and the 5{prime} flanking sequence was analyzed for its potential as a promotor. This region lacks a TATA sequence in the appropriate position relative to the transcription start, is very GC-rich, and contains upstream of the transcription start four Sp1 sites, a feature common to many TATA-less promotors. Based on the homology with DNA binding consensus sequences of transcription factors, we identified in this promotor region several putative DNA binding sites for transcription factors, such as NF-{kappa}B, Myb, Ets-1, Myc, and ATF. Transfection experiments with a construct containing the PTPA promotor region inserted 5{prime} of a luciferase reporter gene revealed that the 5{prime} flanking sequence of the PTPA gene indeed displayed promotor activity that seems to be cell-line dependent. By fluorescence in situ hybridization and G-banding, the PTPA gene was localized to the 9q34 region. The PTPA gene is positioned centromeric of c-abl in a region embracing several genes implicated in oncogenesis. 28 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Antiviral activities of whey proteins.

    PubMed

    Ng, Tzi Bun; Cheung, Randy Chi Fai; Wong, Jack Ho; Wang, Yan; Ip, Denis Tsz Ming; Wan, David Chi Cheong; Xia, Jiang

    2015-09-01

    Milk contains an array of proteins with useful bioactivities. Many milk proteins encompassing native or chemically modified casein, lactoferrin, alpha-lactalbumin, and beta-lactoglobulin demonstrated antiviral activities. Casein and alpha-lactalbumin gained anti-HIV activity after modification with 3-hydroxyphthalic anhydride. Many milk proteins inhibited HIV reverse transcriptase. Bovine glycolactin, angiogenin-1, lactogenin, casein, alpha-lactalbumin, beta-lactoglobulin, bovine lactoferrampin, and human lactoferrampin inhibited HIV-1 protease and integrase. Several mammalian lactoferrins prevented hepatitis C infection. Lactoferrin, methylated alpha-lactalbumin and methylated beta-lactoglobulin inhibited human cytomegalovirus. Chemically modified alpha-lactalbumin, beta-lactoglobulin and lysozyme, lactoferrin and lactoferricin, methylated alpha-lactalbumin, methylated and ethylated beta-lactoglobulins inhibited HSV. Chemically modified bovine beta-lactoglobulin had antihuman papillomavirus activity. Beta-lactoglobulin, lactoferrin, esterified beta-lactoglobulin, and esterified lactoferrindisplayed anti-avian influenza A (H5N1) activity. Lactoferrin inhibited respiratory syncytial virus, hepatitis B virus, adenovirus, poliovirus, hantavirus, sindbis virus, semliki forest virus, echovirus, and enterovirus. Milk mucin, apolactoferrin, Fe(3+)-lactoferrin, beta-lactoglobulin, human lactadherin, bovine IgG, and bovine kappa-casein demonstrated antihuman rotavirus activity. PMID:26198883

  7. Toxicity challenges in environmental chemicals: Prediction of human plasma protein binding through quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) models

    EPA Science Inventory

    The present study explores the merit of utilizing available pharmaceutical data to construct a quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) for prediction of the fraction of a chemical unbound to plasma protein (Fub) in environmentally relevant compounds. Independent model...

  8. Activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase and nuclear factor-kappaB in tumour necrosis factor-induced eotaxin release of human eosinophils

    PubMed Central

    WONG, C K; ZHANG, J P; IP, W K; LAM, C W K

    2002-01-01

    The CC chemokine eotaxin is a potent eosinophil-specific chemoattractant that is crucial for allergic inflammation. Allergen-induced tumour necrosis factor (TNF) has been shown to induce eotaxin synthesis in eosinophils. Nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) have been found to play an essential role for the eotaxin-mediated eosinophilia. We investigated the modulation of NF-κB and MAPK activation in TNF-induced eotaxin release of human eosinophils. Human blood eosinophils were purified from fresh buffy coat using magnetic cell sorting. NF-κB pathway-related genes were evaluated by cDNA expression array system. Degradation of IκBα and phosphorylation of MAPK were detected by Western blot. Activation of NF-κB was determined by electrophoretic mobility shift assay. Eotaxin released into the eosinophil culture medium was measured by ELISA. TNF was found to up-regulate the gene expression of NF-κB and IκBα in eosinophils. TNF-induced IκBα degradation was inhibited by the proteasome inhibitor N-cbz-Leu-Leu-leucinal (MG-132) and a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug sodium salicylate (NaSal). Using EMSA, both MG-132 and NaSal were found to suppress the TNF-induced NF-κB activation in eosinophils. Furthermore, TNF was shown to induce phosphorylation of p38 MAPK time-dependently but not extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK). Inhibition of NF-κB activation and p38 MAPK activity decreased the TNF-induced release of eotaxin from eosinophils. These results indicate that NF-κB and p38 MAPK play an important role in TNF-activated signalling pathway regulating eotaxin release by eosinophils. They have also provided a biochemical basis for the potential of using specific inhibitors of NF-κB and p38 MAPK for treating allergic inflammation. PMID:12067303

  9. Protein phosphorylation systems in postmortem human brain

    SciTech Connect

    Walaas, S.I.; Perdahl-Wallace, E.; Winblad, B.; Greengard, P. )

    1989-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation systems regulated by cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cyclic AMP), or calcium in conjunction with calmodulin or phospholipid/diacylglycerol, have been studied by phosphorylation in vitro of particulate and soluble fractions from human postmortem brain samples. One-dimensional or two-dimensional gel electrophoretic protein separations were used for analysis. Protein phosphorylation catalyzed by cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase was found to be highly active in both particulate and soluble preparations throughout the human CNS, with groups of both widely distributed and region-specific substrates being observed in different brain nuclei. Dopamine-innervated parts of the basal ganglia and cerebral cortex contained the phosphoproteins previously observed in rodent basal ganglia. In contrast, calcium/phospholipid-dependent and calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein phosphorylation systems were less prominent in human postmortem brain than in rodent brain, and only a few widely distributed substrates for these protein kinases were found. Protein staining indicated that postmortem proteolysis, particularly of high-molecular-mass proteins, was prominent in deeply located, subcortical regions in the human brain. Our results indicate that it is feasible to use human postmortem brain samples, when obtained under carefully controlled conditions, for qualitative studies on brain protein phosphorylation. Such studies should be of value in studies on human neurological and/or psychiatric disorders.

  10. Anticoagulant dysfunction of human Arg352Trp-activated protein C caused by defective factor Va inactivation.

    PubMed

    Rintelen, C; Yegneswaran, S; Griffin, J H

    2001-02-01

    The dysfunctional mutant R352W-protein C was found in two patients with venous thrombosis. The mutant R352A-protein C was constructed to define the contribution of charge/size of the residue at 352 on protein C (chymotrypsin numbering 187). Compared with wild type-protein C, R352W-protein C showed no difference in activation by thrombin-thrombomodulin or alpha-thrombin. However, R352W-activated protein C (APC) anticoagulant activity (aPTT assay) was reduced to approximately 65%. Although the catalytic efficiency of R352W-APC towards the oligopeptide substrate S-2366 was unperturbed, factor Va and R506Q-factor Va were not efficiently inactivated by R352W-APC compared with wild type-APC. R352A-APC showed reduced anticoagulant activity and reduced efficiency in factor Va inactivation and in factor VIIIa-inactivation in the presence of protein S. These observations suggest that the dysfunction of R352W-APC in factor Va inactivation may be one of the mechanisms leading to venous thrombosis in affected patients and that R352 plays an important role in the physiological functioning of APC. PMID:11246547

  11. Activation of AMP-Activated Protein Kinase by Adenine Alleviates TNF-Alpha-Induced Inflammation in Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yi-Fang; Young, Guang-Huar; Lin, Jiun-Tsai; Jang, Hyun-Hwa; Chen, Chin-Chen; Nong, Jing-Yi; Chen, Po-Ku; Kuo, Cheng-Yi; Kao, Shao-Hsuan; Liang, Yao-Jen; Chen, Han-Min

    2015-01-01

    The AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling system plays a key role in cellular stress by repressing the inflammatory responses induced by the nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) system. Previous studies suggest that the anti-inflammatory role of AMPK involves activation by adenine, but the mechanism that allows adenine to produce these effects has not yet been elucidated. In human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), adenine was observed to induce the phosphorylation of AMPK in both a time- and dose-dependent manner as well as its downstream target acetyl Co-A carboxylase (ACC). Adenine also attenuated NF-κB targeting of gene expression in a dose-dependent manner and decreased monocyte adhesion to HUVECs following tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α) treatment. The short hairpin RNA (shRNA) against AMPK α1 in HUVECs attenuated the adenine-induced inhibition of NF-κB activation in response to TNF-α, thereby suggesting that the anti-inflammatory role of adenine is mediated by AMPK. Following the knockdown of adenosyl phosphoribosyl transferase (APRT) in HUVECs, adenine supplementation failed to induce the phosphorylation of AMPK and ACC. Similarly, the expression of a shRNA against APRT nullified the anti-inflammatory effects of adenine in HUVECs. These results suggested that the role of adenine as an AMPK activator is related to catabolism by APRT, which increases the cellular AMP levels to activate AMPK. PMID:26544976

  12. Phosphorylation of human link proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Oester, D.A.; Caterson, B.; Schwartz, E.R.

    1986-06-13

    Three link proteins of 48, 44 and 40 kDa were purified from human articular cartilage and identified with monoclonal anti-link protein antibody 8-A-4. Two sets of lower molecular weight proteins of 30-31 kDa and 24-26 kDa also contained link protein epitopes recognized by the monoclonal antibody and were most likely degradative products of the intact link proteins. The link proteins of 48 and 40 kDa were identified as phosphoproteins while the 44 kDa link protein did not contain /sup 32/P. The phosphorylated 48 and 40 kDa link proteins contained approximately 2 moles PO/sub 4//mole link protein.

  13. The type 1 human immunodeficiency virus Tat binding protein is a transcriptional activator belonging to an additional family of evolutionarily conserved genes.

    PubMed Central

    Ohana, B; Moore, P A; Ruben, S M; Southgate, C D; Green, M R; Rosen, C A

    1993-01-01

    The type 1 human immunodeficiency virus Tat protein is a powerful transcriptional activator when bound to an RNA structure (TAR) present at the extreme 5' terminus of viral mRNA. Since transcriptional activation requires binding of Tat to RNA, it has been suggested that Tat enhances initiation or elongation through a direct interaction with cellular transcription factors. Here we show through protein fusion experiments that the previously identified cellular Tat binding protein, TBP-1, although unable to bind DNA, is a strong transcriptional activator when brought into proximity of several promoter elements. Transcriptional activity depends upon the integrity of at least two highly conserved domains: one resembling a nucleotide-binding motif and the other motif common to proteins with helicase activity. Our studies further reveal that TBP-1 represents one member of a large, highly conserved gene family that encodes proteins demonstrating strong amino acid conservation across species. Finally, we identified a second family member that, although 77% similar to TBP-1, does not activate transcription from the promoters examined. This finding, together with the observation that TBP-1 does not activate each promoter examined, suggests that this gene family may encode promoter-specific transcriptional activators. Images PMID:8419915

  14. Angiotensin I-Converting Enzyme (ACE) Inhibitory Activity and ACE Inhibitory Peptides of Salmon (Salmo salar) Protein Hydrolysates Obtained by Human and Porcine Gastrointestinal Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Darewicz, Małgorzata; Borawska, Justyna; Vegarud, Gerd E.; Minkiewicz, Piotr; Iwaniak, Anna

    2014-01-01

    The objectives of the present study were two-fold: first, to detect whether salmon protein fractions possess angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory properties and whether salmon proteins can release ACE inhibitory peptides during a sequential in vitro hydrolysis (with commercial porcine enzymes) and ex vivo digestion (with human gastrointestinal enzymes). Secondly, to evaluate the ACE inhibitory activity of generated hydrolysates. A two-step ex vivo and in vitro model digestion was performed to simulate the human digestion process. Salmon proteins were degraded more efficiently by porcine enzymes than by human gastrointestinal juices and sarcoplasmic proteins were digested/hydrolyzed more easily than myofibrillar proteins. The ex vivo digested myofibrillar and sarcoplasmic duodenal samples showed IC50 values (concentration required to decrease the ACE activity by 50%) of 1.06 and 2.16 mg/mL, respectively. The in vitro hydrolyzed myofibrillar and sarcoplasmic samples showed IC50 values of 0.91 and 1.04 mg/mL, respectively. Based on the results of in silico studies, it was possible to identify 9 peptides of the ex vivo hydrolysates and 7 peptides of the in vitro hydrolysates of salmon proteins of 11 selected peptides. In both types of salmon hydrolysates, ACE-inhibitory peptides IW, IY, TVY and VW were identified. In the in vitro salmon protein hydrolysates an ACE-inhibitory peptides VPW and VY were also detected, while ACE-inhibitory peptides ALPHA, IVY and IWHHT were identified in the hydrolysates generated with ex vivo digestion. In our studies, we documented ACE inhibitory in vitro effects of salmon protein hydrolysates obtained by human and as well as porcine gastrointestinal enzymes. PMID:25123137

  15. A novel human BTB-kelch protein KLHL31, strongly expressed in muscle and heart, inhibits transcriptional activities of TRE and SRE.

    PubMed

    Yu, Weishi; Li, Yongqing; Zhou, Xijin; Deng, Yun; Wang, Zequn; Yuan, Wuzhou; Li, Dali; Zhu, Chuanbing; Zhao, Xueying; Mo, Xiaoyang; Huang, Wen; Luo, Na; Yan, Yan; Ocorr, Karen; Bodmer, Rolf; Wang, Yuequn; Wu, Xiushan

    2008-11-30

    The Bric-a-brac, Tramtrack, Broad-complex (BTB) domain is a protein-protein interaction domain that is found in many zinc finger transcription factors. BTB containing proteins play important roles in a variety of cellular functions including regulation of transcription, regulation of the cytoskeleton, protein ubiquitination, angiogenesis, and apoptosis. Here, we report the cloning and characterization of a novel human gene, KLHL31, from a human embryonic heart cDNA library. The cDNA of KLHL31 is 5743 bp long, encoding a protein product of 634 amino acids containing a BTB domain. The protein is highly conserved across different species. Western blot analysis indicates that the KLHL31 protein is abundantly expressed in both embryonic skeletal and heart tissue. In COS-7 cells, KLHL31 proteins are localized to both the nucleus and the cytoplasm. In primary cultures of nascent mouse cardiomyocytes, the majority of endogenous KLHL31 proteins are localized to the cytoplasm. KLHL31 acts as a transcription repressor when fused to GAL4 DNA-binding domain and deletion analysis indicates that the BTB domain is the main region responsible for this repression. Overexpression of KLHL31 in COS-7 cells inhibits the transcriptional activities of both the TPA-response element (TRE) and serum response element (SRE). KLHL31 also significantly reduces JNK activation leading to decreased phosphorylation and protein levels of the JNK target c-Jun in both COS-7 and Hela cells. These results suggest that KLHL31 protein may act as a new transcriptional repressor in MAPK/JNK signaling pathway to regulate cellular functions. PMID:18719355

  16. Potent antitumor activities of recombinant human PDCD5 protein in combination with chemotherapy drugs in K562 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Lin; Song, Quansheng; Zhang, Yingmei; Lou, Yaxin; Wang, Yanfang; Tian, Linjie; Zheng, Yi; Ma, Dalong; Ke, Xiaoyan; Wang, Ying

    2010-05-28

    Conventional chemotherapy is still frequently used. Programmed cell death 5 (PDCD5) enhances apoptosis of various tumor cells triggered by certain stimuli and is lowly expressed in leukemic cells from chronic myelogenous leukemia patients. Here, we describe for the first time that recombinant human PDCD5 protein (rhPDCD5) in combination with chemotherapy drugs has potent antitumor effects on chronic myelogenous leukemia K562 cells in vitro and in vivo. The antitumor efficacy of rhPDCD5 protein with chemotherapy drugs, idarubicin (IDR) or cytarabine (Ara-C), was examined in K562 cells in vitro and K562 xenograft tumor models in vivo. rhPDCD5 protein markedly increased the apoptosis rates and decreased the colony-forming capability of K562 cells after the combined treatment with IDR or Ara-C. rhPDCD5 protein by intraperitoneal administration dramatically improved the antitumor effects of IDR treatment in the K562 xenograft model. The tumor sizes and cell proliferation were significantly decreased; and TUNEL positive cells were significantly increased in the combined group with rhPDCD5 protein and IDR treatment compared with single IDR treatment groups. rhPDCD5 protein, in combination with IDR, has potent antitumor effects on chronic myelogenous leukemia K562 cells and may be a novel and promising agent for the treatment of chronic myelogenous leukemia.

  17. Enediyne lidamycin induces apoptosis in human multiple myeloma cells through activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase and c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase.

    PubMed

    Zhen, Yong-Zhan; Lin, Ya-Jun; Shang, Bo-Yang; Zhen, Yong-Su

    2009-07-01

    In the present study, the effects of lidamycin (LDM), a member of the enediyne antibiotic family, on two human multiple myeloma (MM) cell lines, U266 and SKO-007, were evaluated. In MTS assay, LDM showed much more potent cytotoxicity than conventional anti-MM agents to both cell lines. The IC(50) values of LDM for the U266 and SKO-007 cells were 0.0575 +/- 0.0015 and 0.1585 +/- 0.0166 nM, respectively, much lower than those of adriamycin, dexamethasone, and vincristine. Mechanistically, LDM triggered MM cells apoptosis by increasing the levels of cleaved poly ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP) and caspase-3/7. In addition, activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) was a critical mediator in LDM-induced cell death. Inhibition of the expression of p38 MAPK and JNK by pharmacological inhibitors reversed the LDM-induced apoptosis through decreasing the level of cleaved PARP and caspase-3/7. Interestingly, phosphorylation of extracellular signal-related kinase was increased by LDM; conversely, MEK inhibitor synergistically enhanced LDM-induced cytotoxicity and apoptosis in MM cells. The results demonstrated that LDM suppresses MM cell growth through the activation of p38 MAPK and JNK, with the potential to be developed as a chemotherapeutic agent for MM. PMID:19468799

  18. Effects of a single exposure to UVB radiation on the activities and protein levels of copper-zinc and manganese superoxide dismutase in cultured human keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, H; Akamatsu, H; Horio, T

    1997-04-01

    Ultraviolet B irradiation has been believed to decrease or impair the activity of reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging enzymes such as superoxide dismutase (SOD) in the skin. It has been recently reported that two isozymes of SOD, namely copper-zinc SOD (Cu-Zn SOD) and manganese SOD (Mn SOD), exist in mammalian cells and that the two enzymes play different roles in living systems. The aim of this study was to investigate changes in SOD activities and protein levels in cultured human keratinocytes after acute UVB irradiation. In addition, the protein levels of Cu-Zn SOD and Mn SOD were quantified separately. A single exposure to UVB irradiation produced an increase in SOD activity and protein level that peaked immediately after UVB irradiation, after which a decline was observed, with subsequent recovery to baseline levels 24 h after irradiation. In individual assays of Mn SOD and Cu-Zn SOD, the amount of Mn SOD protein decreased and then gradually recovered 24 h after irradiation. In contrast, the amount of Cu-Zn SOD protein increased immediately after UVB irradiation, and then gradually declined. To evaluate the mechanisms of these changes, we examined the effects of the cytokines, interleukin-1 alpha (IL-1 alpha) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), which can be secreted from keratinocytes after UVB irradiation, on the SOD activity and protein levels in keratinocytes. Interleukin-1 alpha and TNF-alpha enhanced both the SOD activity and protein level of Mn SOD, while these cytokines had no effect on Cu-Zn SOD protein levels in cultured human keratinocytes after incubation for 24 h. Furthermore, when neutralizing antibodies against IL-1 alpha and TNF-alpha were added separately or together to the culture medium before UVB irradiation, the recovery of total SOD activity and Mn SOD protein level were markedly inhibited 24 h after irradiation. Our results suggest that significant increases in SOD activity and protein level occur as a cutaneous antioxidant

  19. Recombinant human activated protein C resets thrombin generation in patients with severe sepsis – a case control study

    PubMed Central

    de Pont, Anne-Cornélie JM; Bakhtiari, Kamran; Hutten, Barbara A; de Jonge, Evert; Vroom, Margreeth B; Meijers, Joost CM; Büller, Harry R; Levi, Marcel

    2005-01-01

    Introduction Recombinant human activated protein C (rhAPC) is the first drug for which a reduction of mortality in severe sepsis has been demonstrated. However, the mechanism by which this reduction in mortality is achieved is still not clearly defined. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the dynamics of the anticoagulant, anti-inflammatory and pro-fibrinolytic action of rhAPC in patients with severe sepsis, by comparing rhAPC-treated patients with case controls. Methods In this prospectively designed multicenter case control study, 12 patients who were participating in the ENHANCE study, an open-label study of rhAPC in severe sepsis, were treated intravenously with rhAPC at a constant rate of 24 μg/kg/h for a total of 96 h. Twelve controls with severe sepsis matching the inclusion criteria received standard therapy. The treatment was started within 48 h after the onset of organ failure. Blood samples were taken before the start of the infusion and at 4, 8, 24, 48, 96 and 168 h, for determination of parameters of coagulation and inflammation. Results Sepsis-induced thrombin generation as measured by thrombin-antithrombin complexes and prothrombin fragment F1+2, was reset by rhAPC within the first 8 h of infusion. The administration of rhAPC did not influence parameters of fibrinolysis and inflammation. There was no difference in outcome or occurrence of serious adverse events between the treatment group and the control group. Conclusion Sepsis-induced thrombin generation in severely septic patients is reset by rhAPC within the first 8 h of infusion without influencing parameters of fibrinolysis and inflammation. PMID:16277710

  20. HUMAN EXPOSURE ACTIVITY PATTERNS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Human activity/uptake rate data are necessary to estimate potential human exposure and intake dose to environmental pollutants and to refine human exposure models. Personal exposure monitoring studies have demonstrated the critical role that activities play in explaining and pre...

  1. Human Antimicrobial Peptides and Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guangshun

    2014-01-01

    As the key components of innate immunity, human host defense antimicrobial peptides and proteins (AMPs) play a critical role in warding off invading microbial pathogens. In addition, AMPs can possess other biological functions such as apoptosis, wound healing, and immune modulation. This article provides an overview on the identification, activity, 3D structure, and mechanism of action of human AMPs selected from the antimicrobial peptide database. Over 100 such peptides have been identified from a variety of tissues and epithelial surfaces, including skin, eyes, ears, mouths, gut, immune, nervous and urinary systems. These peptides vary from 10 to 150 amino acids with a net charge between −3 and +20 and a hydrophobic content below 60%. The sequence diversity enables human AMPs to adopt various 3D structures and to attack pathogens by different mechanisms. While α-defensin HD-6 can self-assemble on the bacterial surface into nanonets to entangle bacteria, both HNP-1 and β-defensin hBD-3 are able to block cell wall biosynthesis by binding to lipid II. Lysozyme is well-characterized to cleave bacterial cell wall polysaccharides but can also kill bacteria by a non-catalytic mechanism. The two hydrophobic domains in the long amphipathic α-helix of human cathelicidin LL-37 lays the basis for binding and disrupting the curved anionic bacterial membrane surfaces by forming pores or via the carpet model. Furthermore, dermcidin may serve as ion channel by forming a long helix-bundle structure. In addition, the C-type lectin RegIIIα can initially recognize bacterial peptidoglycans followed by pore formation in the membrane. Finally, histatin 5 and GAPDH(2-32) can enter microbial cells to exert their effects. It appears that granulysin enters cells and kills intracellular pathogens with the aid of pore-forming perforin. This arsenal of human defense proteins not only keeps us healthy but also inspires the development of a new generation of personalized medicine to

  2. The transducible TAT-RIZ1-PR protein exerts histone methyltransferase activity and tumor-suppressive functions in human malignant meningiomas.

    PubMed

    Ding, Mao-Hua; Wang, Zhen; Jiang, Lei; Fu, Hua-Lin; Gao, Jie; Lin, Xian-Bin; Zhang, Chun-Lei; Liu, Zhen-Yang; Shi, Yi-Fei; Qiu, Guan-Zhong; Ma, Yue; Cui, Da-Xiang; Hu, Guo-Han; Jin, Wei-Lin

    2015-07-01

    Malignant meningiomas are a rare meningioma subtype and tend to have post-surgical recurrence. Significant endeavors have been taken to identify functional therapeutic targets to halt the growth of this aggressive cancer. We have recently discovered that RIZ1 is downregulated in high-grade meningiomas, and RIZ1 overexpression inhibits proliferation while promoting cell apoptosis of the IOMM-Lee malignant meningioma cell line. In this report, we show that the N-terminal PR domain of RIZ1 alone possessed growth-inhibitory activity and anticancer activity in primary human meningioma cells. Interestingly, the effects seem to be dependent on differential RIZ1 protein levels. Transducible TAT-RIZ1-PR protein could also inhibit meningioma tumor growth in nude mice models. We further demonstrate that PR protein exerts histone methyltransferase activity. A microarray analysis of TAT-RIZ1-PR-treated human malignant meningioma cells reveals 969 differentially expressed genes and 848 alternative splicing exons. Moreover, c-Myc and TXNIP, two putative downstream targets of H3K9 methylation, may be involved in regulating RIZ1 tumor-suppressive effects. The reciprocal relationship between RIZ1 and c-Myc was then validated in primary meningioma cells and human tumor samples. These findings provide insights into RIZ1 tumor suppression mechanisms and suggest that TAT-RIZ1-PR protein is a potential new epigenetic therapeutic agent for advanced meningiomas. PMID:25934289

  3. Human MSH2 protein

    DOEpatents

    Chapelle, A. de la; Vogelstein, B.; Kinzler, K.W.

    1997-01-07

    The human MSH2 gene, responsible for hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer, was identified by virtue of its homology to the MutS class of genes, which are involved in DNA mismatch repair. The sequence of cDNA clones of the human gene are provided, and the sequence of the gene can be used to demonstrate the existence of germ line mutations in hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) kindreds, as well as in replication error{sup +} (RER{sup +}) tumor cells. 19 figs.

  4. Human MSH2 protein

    DOEpatents

    de la Chapelle, Albert; Vogelstein, Bert; Kinzler, Kenneth W.

    1997-01-01

    The human MSH2 gene, responsible for hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer, was identified by virtue of its homology to the MutS class of genes, which are involved in DNA mismatch repair. The sequence of cDNA clones of the human gene are provided, and the sequence of the gene can be used to demonstrate the existence of germ line mutations in hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) kindreds, as well as in replication error.sup.+ (RER.sup.+) tumor cells.

  5. Suppressive effects of anti-inflammatory agents on human endothelial cell activation and induction of heat shock proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Amberger, A.; Hala, M.; Saurwein-Teissl, M.; Metzler, B.; Grubeck-Loebenstein, B.; Xu, Q.; Wick, G.

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Studies from our laboratory have shown that the earliest stages of atherosclerosis may be mediated by an autoimmune reaction against heat shock protein 60 (Hsp60). The interactions of Hsp60-specific T cells with arterial endothelial cells (EC) require expression of both Hsp60 and certain adhesion molecules shown to be induced simultaneously in EC by mechanical and other types of stress. Recently, it was shown that suppression of T cell-mediated immune responses by cyclosporin A (CyA) enhanced atherosclerotic lesion formation in mice. In contrast, aspirin was found to lower the risk of myocardial infarction in men. These conflicting observations may be due to different effects of anti-inflammatory agents on adhesion molecule and Hsp expression in EC, respectively. MATERIAL AND METHODS: In the present study, we analyzed the effects of CyA, aspirin, and indomethacin on T cell proliferation using a proliferation assay. To explore the expression of adhesion molecules, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), and Hsp60 in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), Northern blot analyses were used. To examine the activation status of the transcription factors nuclear factor kappaB (NF-kappaB) and heat shock factor-1 (HSF-1), electrophoretic mobility shift assays were performed. RESULTS: With the exception of indomethacin, the used immunosuppressive and anti-inflammatory agents significantly inhibited T cell proliferation in response to influenza virus antigen in a dose-dependent manner. Interestingly, CyA and indomethacin did not suppress tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha)-induced adhesion molecule expression on HUVECs, whereas aspirin had an inhibitory effect. These observations correlated with the modulation of NF-kappaB activity in EC. All agents tested induced expression of Hsp60 6 hr after application. In addition, aspirin and indomethacin, but not CyA, induced Hsp70 expression in HUVECs that correlated with induction of HSF-1 activity

  6. Correlation of Organic Cation/Carnitine Transporter 1 and Multidrug Resistance-Associated Protein 1 Transport Activities With Protein Expression Levels in Primary Cultured Human Tracheal, Bronchial, and Alveolar Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Atsushi; Suzuki, Shinobu; Matsumaru, Takehisa; Yamamura, Norio; Uchida, Yasuo; Tachikawa, Masanori; Terasaki, Tetsuya

    2016-02-01

    Understanding how transporters contribute to the distribution of inhaled drugs in the lung is important for the discovery and development of such drugs. Protein expression levels may be useful to predict and understand drug distribution. As previously reported, organic cation/carnitine transporter 1 (OCTN1) and multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 (MRP1) have higher levels of protein expression among transporters in primary cultured human lung cells. Nevertheless, it is unclear to what extent transport activity correlates with transporter protein expression. The purpose is to evaluate whether differences in OCTN1 and MRP1 protein expression govern the respective transport activity in primary cultured human lung cells. The model substrates of 4-[4-(dimethylamino) styryl]-N-methylpyridinium iodide (ASP(+)) and carboxy-dichlorofluorescein (CDF) for OCTN1 and MRP1, respectively, were used in the lung cells from five donors. Significant correlation was found between the kinetic parameter Vmax for ASP(+) and OCTN1 protein expression in plasma membrane of tracheal, bronchial, and alveolar cells (r(2) = 0.965, 0.834, and 0.877, respectively), and between the efflux of CDF and MRP1 protein expression in plasma membrane of tracheal, bronchial, and alveolar cells (r(2) = 0.800, 0.904, and 0.790, respectively). These findings suggest that OCTN1 and MRP1 protein concentrations are determinants for drug distribution in the lung. PMID:26429295

  7. cDNA cloning and chromosomal mapping of a novel human GAP (GAP1M), GTPase-activating protein of Ras

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Shaowei; Nakamura, Shun; Hattori, Seisuke

    1996-08-01

    We have previously isolated a novel Ras GTPase-activating protein (Ras GAP), Gapl{sup m}, from rat brain. Gap1{sup m} is considered to be a negative regulator of the Ras signaling pathways, like other Ras GAPs, neurofibromin, which is a gene product of the neurofibromatosis type I gene, and p120GAP. In this study we have isolated a human cDNA of this Gap and mapped the gene. The gene encodes a protein of 853 amino acids that shows 89% sequence identity to rat Gapl{sup m}. The human gene was mapped to chromosome 3 by PCR analysis on a panel of human-mouse hybrid cells. FISH analysis refined the location of the gene further to 3q22-q23. 11 refs., 2 figs.

  8. The solid phase synthesis of a protein activator for lecithin-cholesterol acyltransferase corresponding to human plasma apoC-I.

    PubMed Central

    Sigler, G F; Soutar, A K; Smith, L C; Gotto, A M; Sparrow, J T

    1976-01-01

    Apolipoprotein C-I, a protein constituent of the very low density lipoproteins of human plasma, consists of a single chain of 57 amino acids. The total synthesis of a protein corresponding to apolipoprotein C-I in physical properties and compositions was accomplished by solid phase techniques employing a modified polystrene incorporating spacer groups between the point of attachment of the first residue and the polymer matrix. The synthetic apoprotein was shown to activate lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase to the same extent as the native protein. Comparative lipid-binding studies with dimyristoyl phosphatidylcholine gave complexes for native and synthetic apoprotein which floated at the same density after ultracentrifugation in KBr gradients and had virtually the same lipid:protein ratios. Images PMID:179085

  9. The solid phase synthesis of a protein activator for lecithin-cholesterol acyltransferase corresponding to human plasma apoC-I.

    PubMed

    Sigler, G F; Soutar, A K; Smith, L C; Gotto, A M; Sparrow, J T

    1976-05-01

    Apolipoprotein C-I, a protein constituent of the very low density lipoproteins of human plasma, consists of a single chain of 57 amino acids. The total synthesis of a protein corresponding to apolipoprotein C-I in physical properties and compositions was accomplished by solid phase techniques employing a modified polystrene incorporating spacer groups between the point of attachment of the first residue and the polymer matrix. The synthetic apoprotein was shown to activate lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase to the same extent as the native protein. Comparative lipid-binding studies with dimyristoyl phosphatidylcholine gave complexes for native and synthetic apoprotein which floated at the same density after ultracentrifugation in KBr gradients and had virtually the same lipid:protein ratios. PMID:179085

  10. Hypolipidemic activity of Taraxacum mongolicum associated with the activation of AMP-activated protein kinase in human HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan-Jin; Shieh, Po-Chuen; Lee, Jang-Chang; Chen, Fu-An; Lee, Chih-Hung; Kuo, Sheng-Chu; Ho, Chi-Tang; Kuo, Daih-Huang; Huang, Li-Jiau; Way, Tzong-Der

    2014-08-01

    This study investigated the hypolipidemic effect and potential mechanisms of T. mongolicum extracts. T. mongolicum was extracted by refluxing three times with water (TM-1), 50% ethanol (TM-2) and 95% ethanol (TM-3). TM-2 contained components with the most effective hypolipidemic potentials in HepG2 cells. Extended administration of TM-2 stimulated a significant reduction in body weight and levels of serum triglyceride LDL-C and total cholesterol in rats. To evaluate the bioactive compounds, we successively fractionated TM-2 with n-hexane (TM-4), dichloromethane (TM-5), ethyl acetate (TM-6), and water (TM-7). TM-4 fraction had the most effective hypolipidemic potential in HepG2 cells, and it decreased the expression of fatty acid synthase (FASN) and inhibited the activity of acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase (ACC) through the phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). Linoleic acid, phytol and tetracosanol are bioactive compounds identified from TM-4. These results suggest that T. mongolicum is expected to be useful for hypolipidemic effects. PMID:24903219

  11. Proteins aggregation and human diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Chin-Kun

    2015-04-01

    Many human diseases and the death of most supercentenarians are related to protein aggregation. Neurodegenerative diseases include Alzheimer's disease (AD), Huntington's disease (HD), Parkinson's disease (PD), frontotemporallobar degeneration, etc. Such diseases are due to progressive loss of structure or function of neurons caused by protein aggregation. For example, AD is considered to be related to aggregation of Aβ40 (peptide with 40 amino acids) and Aβ42 (peptide with 42 amino acids) and HD is considered to be related to aggregation of polyQ (polyglutamine) peptides. In this paper, we briefly review our recent discovery of key factors for protein aggregation. We used a lattice model to study the aggregation rates of proteins and found that the probability for a protein sequence to appear in the conformation of the aggregated state can be used to determine the temperature at which proteins can aggregate most quickly. We used molecular dynamics and simple models of polymer chains to study relaxation and aggregation of proteins under various conditions and found that when the bending-angle dependent and torsion-angle dependent interactions are zero or very small, then protein chains tend to aggregate at lower temperatures. All atom models were used to identify a key peptide chain for the aggregation of insulin chains and to find that two polyQ chains prefer anti-parallel conformation. It is pointed out that in many cases, protein aggregation does not result from protein mis-folding. A potential drug from Chinese medicine was found for Alzheimer's disease.

  12. Differential subcellular targeting of recombinant human α₁-proteinase inhibitor influences yield, biological activity and in planta stability of the protein in transgenic tomato plants.

    PubMed

    Jha, Shweta; Agarwal, Saurabh; Sanyal, Indraneel; Jain, G K; Amla, D V

    2012-11-01

    The response of protein accumulation site on yield, biological activity and in planta stability of therapeutic recombinant human proteinase inhibitor (α₁-PI) was analyzed via targeting to different subcellular locations, like endoplasmic reticulum (ER), apoplast, vacuole and cytosol in leaves of transgenic tomato plants. In situ localization of the recombinant α₁-PI protein in transgenic plant cells was monitored by immunohistochemical staining. Maximum accumulation of recombinant α₁-PI in T₀ and T₁ transgenic tomato plants was achieved from 1.5 to 3.2% of total soluble protein (TSP) by retention in ER lumen, followed by vacuole and apoplast, whereas cytosolic targeting resulted into degradation of the protein. The plant-derived recombinant α₁-PI showed biological activity for elastase inhibition, as monitored by residual porcine pancreatic elastase (PPE) activity assay and band-shift assay. Recombinant α₁-PI was purified from transgenic tomato plants with high yield, homogeneity and biological activity. Purified protein appeared as a single band of ∼48-50 kDa on SDS-PAGE with pI value ranging between 5.1 and 5.3. Results of mass spectrometry and optical spectroscopy of purified recombinant α₁-PI revealed the structural integrity of the recombinant protein comparable to native serum α₁-PI. Enzymatic deglycosylation and lectin-binding assays with the purified recombinant α₁-PI showed compartment-specific N-glycosylation of the protein targeted to ER, apoplast and vacuole. Conformational studies based on urea-induced denaturation and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy revealed relatively lower stability of the recombinant α₁-PI protein, compared to its serum counterpart. Pharmacokinetic evaluation of plant derived recombinant and human plasma-purified α₁-PI in rat, by intravenous route, revealed significantly faster plasma clearance and lower area under curve (AUC) of recombinant protein. Our data suggested significance of

  13. Characterization of the single transmembrane domain of human receptor activity-modifying protein 3 in adrenomedullin receptor internalization

    SciTech Connect

    Kuwasako, Kenji; Kitamura, Kazuo; Nagata, Sayaka; Nozaki, Naomi; Kato, Johji

    2012-04-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RAMP3 mediates CLR internalization much less effectively than does RAMP2. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The RAMP3 TMD participates in the negative regulation of CLR/RAMP3 internalization. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A new strategy of promoting internalization and resensitization of the receptor was found. -- Abstract: Two receptor activity-modifying proteins (RAMP2 and RAMP3) enable calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CLR) to function as two heterodimeric receptors (CLR/RAMP2 and CLR/RAMP3) for adrenomedullin (AM), a potent cardiovascular protective peptide. Following AM stimulation, both receptors undergo rapid internalization through a clathrin-dependent pathway, after which CLR/RAMP3, but not CLR/RAMP2, can be recycled to the cell surface for resensitization. However, human (h)RAMP3 mediates CLR internalization much less efficiently than does hRAMP2. Therefore, the molecular basis of the single transmembrane domain (TMD) and the intracellular domain of hRAMP3 during AM receptor internalization was investigated by transiently transfecting various RAMP chimeras and mutants into HEK-293 cells stably expressing hCLR. Flow cytometric analysis revealed that substituting the RAMP3 TMD with that of RAMP2 markedly enhanced AM-induced internalization of CLR. However, this replacement did not enhance the cell surface expression of CLR, [{sup 125}I]AM binding affinity or AM-induced cAMP response. More detailed analyses showed that substituting the Thr{sup 130}-Val{sup 131} sequence in the RAMP3 TMD with the corresponding sequence (Ile{sup 157}-Pro{sup 158}) from RAMP2 significantly enhanced AM-mediated CLR internalization. In contrast, substituting the RAMP3 target sequence with Ala{sup 130}-Ala{sup 131} did not significantly affect CLR internalization. Thus, the RAMP3 TMD participates in the negative regulation of CLR/RAMP3 internalization, and the aforementioned introduction of the Ile-Pro sequence into the RAMP3 TMD may be a

  14. Human genome protein function database.

    PubMed Central

    Sorenson, D. K.

    1991-01-01

    A database which focuses on the normal functions of the currently-known protein products of the Human Genome was constructed. Information is stored as text, figures, tables, and diagrams. The program contains built-in functions to modify, update, categorize, hypertext, search, create reports, and establish links to other databases. The semi-automated categorization feature of the database program was used to classify these proteins in terms of biomedical functions. PMID:1807638

  15. Survivin enhances telomerase activity via up-regulation of specificity protein 1- and c-Myc-mediated human telomerase reverse transcriptase gene transcription

    SciTech Connect

    Endoh, Teruo; Tsuji, Naoki; Asanuma, Koichi; Yagihashi, Atsuhito; Watanabe, Naoki . E-mail: watanabn@sapmed.ac.jp

    2005-05-01

    Suppression of apoptosis is thought to contribute to carcinogenesis. Survivin, a member of the inhibitor-of-apoptosis family, blocks apoptotic signaling activated by various cellular stresses. Since elevated expression of survivin observed in human cancers of varied origin was associated with poor patient survival, survivin has attracted growing attention as a potential target for cancer treatment. Immortalization of cells also is required for carcinogenesis; telomere length maintenance by telomerase is required for cancer cells to proliferate indefinitely. Yet how cancer cells activate telomerase remains unclear. We therefore examined possible interrelationships between survivin expression and telomerase activity. Correlation between survivin and human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) expression was observed in colon cancer tissues, and overexpression of survivin enhanced telomerase activity by up-regulation of hTERT expression in LS180 human colon cancer cells. DNA-binding activities of specificity protein 1 (Sp1) and c-Myc to the hTERT core promoter were increased in survivin gene transfectant cells. Phosphorylation of Sp1 and c-Myc at serine and threonine residues was enhanced by survivin, while total amounts of these proteins were unchanged. Further, 'knockdown' of survivin by a small inhibitory RNA decreased Sp1 and c-Myc phosphorylation. Thus survivin participates not only in inhibition of apoptosis, but also in prolonging cellular lifespan.

  16. [Prokaryotic expression and antigenic activity analysis on the matrix protein genes of two strains of human metapneumovirus recently identified in Beijing].

    PubMed

    Cao, Shou-Chun; Qian, Yuan; Li, Guo-Hua; Zhu, Ru-Nan; Zhao, Lin-Qing; Ding, Ya-Xin

    2007-01-01

    Human metapneumovirus (hMPV) is a recently identified respiratory virus more like human respiratory syncytial virus in clinical symptoms. Matrix protein (M) is one of the most important structural proteins. For further studying of hMPV, the full length of M genes from the recombinant plasmid pUCm-M1816 and pUCmM1817 were cloned by PCR and sub-cloned into the pET30a(+) vector, which is a prokaryotic expression vector, after dual-enzyme digestion with Bam HI and Xho I. The positive recombinated plasmids were transformed into E. coli BL21 (DE3) and expressed under the inducing of IPTG. Target proteins were characterized by SDS-PAGE and Western blotting. In this article, we' ve successfully constructed the recombinated plasmids pET30a-M1816 and pET30a-M1817 which have correct open reading frames confirmed by dual-enzyme digestion analysis and sequencing. The fusion proteins with 6 x His-N were highly produced after inducing by 1mmol/ L IPTG at 37 degrees C. A unique protein band with approximate 27.6 kD was characterized by SDS-PAGE. Most of the target protein existed in inclusion body. Western blot analysis showed that the target protein has specific binding reaction to rabbit antiserum against polypeptides of the matrix protein of hMPV. So the M genes were highly expressed in the prokaryotic system and the expressed M proteins have specific antigenic activities. It can be used for further studying of hMPV infections in Beijing. PMID:17886723

  17. Oxidation of heat shock protein 60 and protein disulfide isomerase activates ERK and migration of human hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chung-Yi; Hu, Chi-Tan; Cheng, Chuan-Chu; Lee, Ming-Che; Pan, Siou-Mei; Lin, Teng-Yi; Wu, Wen-Sheng

    2016-03-01

    Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) and its receptor c-Met were frequently deregulated in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Signaling pathways activated by HGF-c-Met are promising targets for preventing HCC progression. HGF can induce the reactive oxygen species (ROS) signaling for cell adhesion, migration and invasion of tumors including HCC. On the other hand, extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK), member of mitogen activated kinase, can be activated by ROS for a lot of cellular processes. As expected, HGF-induced phosphorylation of ERK and progression of HCC cell HepG2 were suppressed by ROS scavengers. By N-(biotinoyl)-N'-(iodoacetyl)-ethylenediamine (BIAM) labeling method, a lot of cysteine (-SH)-containing proteins with M.W. 50-75 kD were decreased in HepG2 treated with HGF or two other ROS generators, 12-O-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate (TPA) and phenazine methosulfate. These redox sensitive proteins were identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry. Among them, two chaperones, heat shock protein 60 (HSP60) and protein disulfide isomerase (PDI), were found to be the most common redox sensitive proteins in responding to all three agonists. Affinity blot of BIAM-labeled, immunoprecipitated HSP60 and PDI verified that HGF can decrease the cysteine (-SH) containing HSP60 and PDI. On the other hand, HGF and TPA increased cysteinyl glutathione-containing HSP60, consistent with the decrease of cysteine (-SH)-containing HSP60. Moreover, depletion of HSP60 and PDI or expression of dominant negative mutant of HSP60 with alteration of Cys, effectively prevented HGF-induced ERK phosphorylation and HepG2 migration.In conclusion, the redox sensitive HSP60 and PDI are required for HGF-induced ROS signaling and potential targets for preventing HCC progressions. PMID:26840563

  18. Oxidation of heat shock protein 60 and protein disulfide isomerase activates ERK and migration of human hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chung-Yi; Hu, Chi-Tan; Cheng, Chuan-Chu; Lee, Ming-Che; Pan, Siou-Mei; Lin, Teng-Yi; Wu, Wen-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) and its receptor c-Met were frequently deregulated in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Signaling pathways activated by HGF-c-Met are promising targets for preventing HCC progression. HGF can induce the reactive oxygen species (ROS) signaling for cell adhesion, migration and invasion of tumors including HCC. On the other hand, extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK), member of mitogen activated kinase, can be activated by ROS for a lot of cellular processes. As expected, HGF-induced phosphorylation of ERK and progression of HCC cell HepG2 were suppressed by ROS scavengers. By N-(biotinoyl)-N′-(iodoacetyl)-ethylenediamine (BIAM) labeling method, a lot of cysteine (−SH)-containing proteins with M.W. 50–75 kD were decreased in HepG2 treated with HGF or two other ROS generators, 12-O-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate (TPA) and phenazine methosulfate. These redox sensitive proteins were identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry. Among them, two chaperones, heat shock protein 60 (HSP60) and protein disulfide isomerase (PDI), were found to be the most common redox sensitive proteins in responding to all three agonists. Affinity blot of BIAM-labeled, immunoprecipitated HSP60 and PDI verified that HGF can decrease the cysteine (−SH) containing HSP60 and PDI. On the other hand, HGF and TPA increased cysteinyl glutathione-containing HSP60, consistent with the decrease of cysteine (−SH)-containing HSP60. Moreover, depletion of HSP60 and PDI or expression of dominant negative mutant of HSP60 with alteration of Cys, effectively prevented HGF-induced ERK phosphorylation and HepG2 migration. In conclusion, the redox sensitive HSP60 and PDI are required for HGF-induced ROS signaling and potential targets for preventing HCC progressions. PMID:26840563

  19. Protein Crystal Recombinant Human Insulin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The comparison of protein crystal, Recombiant Human Insulin; space-grown (left) and earth-grown (right). On STS-60, Spacehab II indicated that space-grown crystals are larger and of greater optical clarity than their earth-grown counterparts. Recombiant Human Insulin facilitates the incorporation of glucose into cells. In diabetics, there is either a decrease in or complete lack of insulin, thereby leading to several harmful complications. Principal Investigator is Larry DeLucas.

  20. A Single Amino Acid Difference between Mouse and Human 5-Lipoxygenase Activating Protein (FLAP) Explains the Speciation and Differential Pharmacology of Novel FLAP Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Blevitt, Jonathan M; Hack, Michael D; Herman, Krystal; Chang, Leon; Keith, John M; Mirzadegan, Tara; Rao, Navin L; Lebsack, Alec D; Milla, Marcos E

    2016-06-10

    5-Lipoxygenase activating protein (FLAP) plays a critical role in the metabolism of arachidonic acid to leukotriene A4, the precursor to the potent pro-inflammatory mediators leukotriene B4 and leukotriene C4 Studies with small molecule inhibitors of FLAP have led to the discovery of a drug binding pocket on the protein surface, and several pharmaceutical companies have developed compounds and performed clinical trials. Crystallographic studies and mutational analyses have contributed to a general understanding of compound binding modes. During our own efforts, we identified two unique chemical series. One series demonstrated strong inhibition of human FLAP but differential pharmacology across species and was completely inactive in assays with mouse or rat FLAP. The other series was active across rodent FLAP, as well as human and dog FLAP. Comparison of rodent and human FLAP amino acid sequences together with an analysis of a published crystal structure led to the identification of amino acid residue 24 in the floor of the putative binding pocket as a likely candidate for the observed speciation. On that basis, we tested compounds for binding to human G24A and mouse A24G FLAP mutant variants and compared the data to that generated for wild type human and mouse FLAP. These studies confirmed that a single amino acid mutation was sufficient to reverse the speciation observed in wild type FLAP. In addition, a PK/PD method was established in canines to enable preclinical profiling of mouse-inactive compounds. PMID:27129215

  1. Human T-cell leukemia virus type-1-encoded protein HBZ represses p53 function by inhibiting the acetyltransferase activity of p300/CBP and HBO1

    PubMed Central

    Hoang, Kimson; Ankney, John A.; Nguyen, Stephanie T.; Rushing, Amanda W.; Polakowski, Nicholas; Miotto, Benoit; Lemasson, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    Adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) is an often fatal malignancy caused by infection with the complex retrovirus, human T-cell Leukemia Virus, type 1 (HTLV-1). In ATL patient samples, the tumor suppressor, p53, is infrequently mutated; however, it has been shown to be inactivated by the viral protein, Tax. Here, we show that another HTLV-1 protein, HBZ, represses p53 activity. In HCT116 p53+/+ cells treated with the DNA-damaging agent, etoposide, HBZ reduced p53-mediated activation of p21/CDKN1A and GADD45A expression, which was associated with a delay in G2 phase-arrest. These effects were attributed to direct inhibition of the histone acetyltransferase (HAT) activity of p300/CBP by HBZ, causing a reduction in p53 acetylation, which has be linked to decreased p53 activity. In addition, HBZ bound to, and inhibited the HAT activity of HBO1. Although HBO1 did not acetylate p53, it acted as a coactivator for p53 at the p21/CDKN1A promoter. Therefore, through interactions with two separate HAT proteins, HBZ impairs the ability of p53 to activate transcription. This mechanism may explain how p53 activity is restricted in ATL cells that do not express Tax due to modifications of the HTLV-1 provirus, which accounts for a majority of patient samples. PMID:26625199

  2. The Human Asparaginase-Like Protein 1 hASRGL1is an Ntn Hydrolase with β-aspartyl Peptidase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Cantor, Jason R.; Stone, Everett M.; Chantranupong, Lynne; Georgiou, George

    2009-01-01

    Herein we report the bacterial expression, purification, and enzymatic characterization of the human asparaginase-like protein 1 (hASRGL1). We present evidence that hASRGL1 exhibits β-aspartyl peptidase activity consistent with enzymes designated as plant-type asparaginases, which had thus far only been found in plants and bacteria. Similar to non-mammalian plant-type asparaginases, hASRGL1 is shown to be an Ntn hydrolase for which Thr168 serves as the essential N-terminal nucleophile for intramolecular processing and catalysis, corroborated in part by abolishment of both activities through the point-mutation Thr168Ala. In light of the activity profile reported here, ASRGL1s may act synergistically with protein L-isoaspartyl methyl transferase to relieve accumulation of potentially toxic isoaspartyl peptides in mammalian brain and other tissues. PMID:19839645

  3. Exposure of aconitase to smoking-related oxidants results in iron loss and increased iron response protein-1 activity: potential mechanisms for iron accumulation in human arterial cells.

    PubMed

    Talib, Jihan; Davies, Michael J

    2016-06-01

    Smokers have an elevated risk of cardiovascular disease, but the origin(s) of this increased risk are incompletely defined. Evidence supports an accumulation of the oxidant-generating enzyme myeloperoxidase (MPO) in the inflamed artery wall, and smokers have high levels of SCN(-), a preferred MPO substrate, with this resulting in HOSCN formation. We hypothesised that HOSCN, a thiol-specific oxidant may target the iron-sulphur cluster of aconitase (both isolated, and within primary human coronary artery endothelial cells; HCAEC) resulting in enzyme dysfunction, release of iron, and conversion of the cytosolic isoform to iron response protein-1, which regulates intracellular iron levels. We show that exposure of isolated aconitase to increasing concentrations of HOSCN releases iron from the aconitase [Fe-S]4 cluster, and decreases enzyme activity. This is associated with protein thiol loss and modification of specific Cys residues in, and around, the [Fe-S]4 cluster. Exposure of HCAEC to HOSCN resulted in increased intracellular levels of chelatable iron, loss of aconitase activity and increased iron response protein-1 (IRP-1) activity. These data indicate HOSCN, an oxidant associated with oxidative stress in smokers, can induce aconitase dysfunction in human endothelial cells via Cys oxidation, damage to the [Fe-S]4 cluster, iron release and generation of IRP-1 activity, which modulates ferritin protein levels and results in dysregulation of iron metabolism. These data may rationalise, in part, the presence of increased levels of iron in human atherosclerotic lesions and contribute to increased oxidative damage and endothelial cell dysfunction in smokers. Similar reactions may occur at other sites of inflammation. PMID:26837749

  4. Physical interactions between Ets and NF-kappaB/NFAT proteins play an important role in their cooperative activation of the human immunodeficiency virus enhancer in T cells.

    PubMed Central

    Bassuk, A G; Anandappa, R T; Leiden, J M

    1997-01-01

    The transcriptional regulatory elements of many inducible T-cell genes contain adjacent or overlapping binding sites for the Ets and NF-kappaB/NFAT families of transcription factors. Similar arrays of functionally important NF-kappaB/NFAT and Ets binding sites are present in the transcriptional enhancers of human immunodeficiency viruses types 1 and 2 (HIV-1 and HIV-2), suggesting that this pattern of nuclear protein binding sites reflects an evolutionarily conserved mechanism for regulating inducible T-cell gene expression that has been co-opted during HIV evolution. Despite these findings, the molecular mechanisms by which Ets and NF-kappaB/NFAT proteins cooperatively regulate inducible T-cell gene expression remained unknown. In the studies described in this report, we demonstrated a physical interaction between multiple Ets and NF-kappaB/NFAT proteins both in vitro and in activated normal human T cells. This interaction is mediated by the Ets domain of Ets proteins and the C-terminal region of the Rel homology domains of NF-kappaB/NFAT proteins. In addition, the Ets-NF-kappaB/NFAT interaction requires the presence of DNA binding sites for both proteins, as it is abolished by the DNA intercalating agents propidium iodide and ethidium bromide and enhanced by the presence of synthetic oligonucleotides containing binding sites for Ets and NF-kappaB proteins. A dominant-negative mutant of NF-kappaB p50 that binds DNA but fails to interact with Ets proteins inhibits the synergistic activation of the HIV-1 and HIV-2 enhancers by NF-kappaB (p50 + p65) and Ets-1, suggesting that physical interaction between Ets and NF-kappaB proteins is required for the transcriptional activity of the HIV-1 and HIV-2 enhancers. Taken together, these findings suggest that evolutionarily conserved physical interactions between Ets and NF-kappaB/NFAT proteins are important in regulating the inducible expression of T-cell genes and viruses. These interactions represent a potential target

  5. Cell cycle regulation of the activity and subcellular localization of Plk1, a human protein kinase implicated in mitotic spindle function.

    PubMed

    Golsteyn, R M; Mundt, K E; Fry, A M; Nigg, E A

    1995-06-01

    Correct assembly and function of the mitotic spindle during cell division is essential for the accurate partitioning of the duplicated genome to daughter cells. Protein phosphorylation has long been implicated in controlling spindle function and chromosome segregation, and genetic studies have identified several protein kinases and phosphatases that are likely to regulate these processes. In particular, mutations in the serine/threonine-specific Drosophila kinase polo, and the structurally related kinase Cdc5p of Saccharomyces cerevisae, result in abnormal mitotic and meiotic divisions. Here, we describe a detailed analysis of the cell cycle-dependent activity and subcellular localization of Plk1, a recently identified human protein kinase with extensive sequence similarity to both Drosophila polo and S. cerevisiae Cdc5p. With the aid of recombinant baculoviruses, we have established a reliable in vitro assay for Plk1 kinase activity. We show that the activity of human Plk1 is cell cycle regulated, Plk1 activity being low during interphase but high during mitosis. We further show, by immunofluorescent confocal laser scanning microscopy, that human Plk1 binds to components of the mitotic spindle at all stages of mitosis, but undergoes a striking redistribution as cells progress from metaphase to anaphase. Specifically, Plk1 associates with spindle poles up to metaphase, but relocalizes to the equatorial plane, where spindle microtubules overlap (the midzone), as cells go through anaphase. These results indicate that the association of Plk1 with the spindle is highly dynamic and that Plk1 may function at multiple stages of mitotic progression. Taken together, our data strengthen the notion that human Plk1 may represent a functional homolog of polo and Cdc5p, and they suggest that this kinase plays an important role in the dynamic function of the mitotic spindle during chromosome segregation. PMID:7790358

  6. Activation of human monocytes by streptococcal rhamnose glucose polymers is mediated by CD14 antigen, and mannan binding protein inhibits TNF-alpha release.

    PubMed

    Soell, M; Lett, E; Holveck, F; Schöller, M; Wachsmann, D; Klein, J P

    1995-01-15

    The present work was initiated to define mechanisms that account for the binding on human monocytes of streptococcal cell wall polysaccharides formed by rhamnose glucose polymers (RGPs), and subsequent stimulatory activities. We show here that RGPs bind to and stimulate human monocytes to produce TNF-alpha in a dose-dependent manner. To detect cell surface RGPs binding proteins, intact monocytes were biotinylated before lysis with Nonidet P-40 and solubilized proteins were incubated with RGPs Affi-Prep beads. One major membrane protein of 55 kDa was specifically detected and identified as CD14 because it reacted with anti-CD14 mAbs. Furthermore, anti-CD14 mAbs were able to perform a dose-dependent inhibition of RGPs binding, and suppressed TNF-alpha release from RGPs-stimulated monocytes. Moreover, we demonstrated that RGPs also bind to CD11b; however, this binding is not implicated in synthesis of TNF-alpha. Interestingly, RGPs binding to monocytes was enhanced by human normal serum (HNS) whereas HNS inhibits the TNF-alpha-stimulating activity of RGPs. Western blotting analysis of HNS proteins purified on RGPs Affi-prep beads revealed three specific bands of 75, 55, and 32 kDa reactive with anti-C3 Abs, anti-CD14 mAbs (TUK4), and anti-human mannan binding protein (hMBP)-derived peptide IgG, respectively. These results suggest that C3, soluble CD14, and hMBP form complexes that are probably active in enhancing the binding of RGPs to monocytes. Additional studies have shown that hMBP that recognizes RGPs prevents, unlike the LPS binding protein, TNF-alpha release by inhibiting the binding of RGPs to CD14 Ag. By incubating cells with a constant amount of RGPs-hMBP complexes in the presence or absence of increasing concentrations of C1q, we also demonstrated that C1q receptor mediates the binding and probably the uptake of RGPs-hMBP complexes by human monocytes. PMID:7529289

  7. Requirement of T-lymphokine-activated killer cell-originated protein kinase for TRAIL resistance of human HeLa cervical cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, Hyeok-Ran; Lee, Ki Won; Dong, Zigang; Lee, Kyung Bok; Oh, Sang-Muk

    2010-01-01

    T-lymphokine-activated killer cell-originated protein kinase (TOPK) appears to be highly expressed in various cancer cells and to play an important role in maintaining proliferation of cancer cells. However, the underlying mechanism by which TOPK regulates growth of cancer cells remains elusive. Here we report that upregulated endogenous TOPK augments resistance of cancer cells to apoptosis induced by tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL). Stable knocking down of TOPK markedly increased TRAIL-mediated apoptosis of human HeLa cervical cancer cells, as compared with control cells. Caspase 8 or caspase 3 activities in response to TRAIL were greatly incremented in TOPK-depleted cells. Ablation of TOPK negatively regulated TRAIL-mediated NF-{kappa}B activity. Furthermore, expression of NF-{kappa}B-dependent genes, FLICE-inhibitory protein (FLIP), inhibitor of apoptosis protein 1 (c-IAP1), or X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP) was reduced in TOPK-depleted cells. Collectively, these findings demonstrated that TOPK contributed to TRAIL resistance of cancer cells via NF-{kappa}B activity, suggesting that TOPK might be a potential molecular target for successful cancer therapy using TRAIL.

  8. Chemical synthesis of human papillomavirus type 16 E7 oncoprotein: autonomous protein domains for induction of cellular DNA synthesis and for trans activation.

    PubMed

    Rawls, J A; Pusztai, R; Green, M

    1990-12-01

    The human papillomavirus type 16 E7 protein belongs to a family of nuclear oncoproteins that share amino acid sequences and functional homology. To localize biochemical activities associated with E7, we chemically synthesized the full-length 98-amino-acid polypeptide and several deletion mutant peptides. We show that the E7 polypeptide is biologically active and possesses at least two functional domains; the first induces cellular DNA synthesis in quiescent rodent cells, and the second trans activates the adenovirus E1A-inducible early E2 promoter and binds zinc. Further, each domain is autonomous and can function on separate peptides. DNA synthesis induction activity maps within the N-terminal portion of the molecule, which contains sequences related to adenovirus E1A conserved domains 1 and 2 required for cell transformation and binding of the retinoblastoma gene product. trans-Activation and Zn-binding activities map within the C-terminal portion of the molecule, a region which contains Cys-X-X-Cys motifs. trans Activation does not require protein synthesis, implying a mechanism that involves interaction with a preexisting cellular factor(s). E7 trans activates the adenovirus E2 promoter but not other E1A-inducible viral promoters, suggesting the possibility that E7 trans activation involves interaction, directly or indirectly, with cellular transcription factor E2F. PMID:2173783

  9. Multifunctional human transcriptional coactivator protein PC4 is a substrate of Aurora kinases and activates the Aurora enzymes.

    PubMed

    Dhanasekaran, Karthigeyan; Kumari, Sujata; Boopathi, Ramachandran; Shima, Hiroki; Swaminathan, Amrutha; Bachu, Mahesh; Ranga, Udaykumar; Igarashi, Kazuhiko; Kundu, Tapas K

    2016-03-01

    Positive coactivator 4 (PC4), a human transcriptional coactivator, is involved in diverse processes like chromatin organization and transcription regulation. It is hyperphosphorylated during mitosis, with unknown significance. For the first time, we demonstrate the function of PC4 outside the nucleus upon nuclear envelope breakdown. A fraction of PC4 associates with Aurora A and Aurora B and undergoes phosphorylation, following which PC4 activates both Aurora A and B to sustain optimal kinase activity to maintain the phosphorylation gradient for the proper functioning of the mitotic machinery. This mitotic role is evident in PC4 knockdown cells where the defects are rescued only by the catalytically active Aurora kinases, but not the kinase-dead mutants. Similarly, the PC4 phosphodeficient mutant failed to rescue such defects. Hence, our observations establish a novel mitotic function of PC4 that might be dependent on Aurora kinase-mediated phosphorylation. PMID:26777301

  10. Transforming growth factor beta 1 increases the stability of p21/WAF1/CIP1 protein and inhibits CDK2 kinase activity in human colon carcinoma FET cells.

    PubMed

    Gong, JianGen; Ammanamanchi, Sudhakar; Ko, Tien C; Brattain, Michael G

    2003-06-15

    We examined transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-beta 1) effects on cell cycle progression of human colon carcinoma FET cells. TGF-beta 1 inhibited DNA synthesis and cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) activity after release from growth arrest in association with induction of the p21 CDK inhibitor, whereas cyclins, CDKs, and p27 protein levels remained relatively unchanged. The decrease in CDK2 kinase activity was the result of increased p21 association with cyclin A-CDK2 and cyclin E-CDK2. TGF-beta 1 treatment in late G(1) showed reduced induction of p21 protein levels in association with increased DNA synthesis. Consequently, p21 induction in early G(1) is critical for TGF-beta 1 inhibition of CDK2 kinase activity. Although TGF-beta 1 treatments in late G(1) failed to induce p21 protein, p21 mRNA induction was observed in late G(1) and in S phase. Further analysis showed that TGF-beta 1 treatment in early G(1) increases p21 protein stability throughout the G(1) and S phases of the cell cycle. Our results demonstrate that TGF-beta 1 stimulation of p21 is regulated at the posttranscriptional and transcriptional levels. This is a novel mechanism of TGF-beta 1 inhibition requiring early G(1) induction and stabilization of p21 protein, which binds to and inhibits cyclin E-CDK2 and cyclin A-CDK2 kinase activity rather than direct modulation of cyclin or CDK protein levels as seen in other systems. PMID:12810668

  11. Transcriptional activation of RNA polymerase III-dependent genes by the human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 tax protein.

    PubMed Central

    Gottesfeld, J M; Johnson, D L; Nyborg, J K

    1996-01-01

    The human T-cell leukemia virus-encoded tax protein is a potent activator of many viral and cellular genes transcribed by RNA polymerase II. We find that both chromatin and cell extracts derived from human T-cell leukemia virus type 1-infected human T lymphocytes support higher levels of 5S rRNA and tRNA gene transcription than chromatin or extracts from uninfected T lymphocytes. The viral protein Tax was likely responsible for this higher level of class II gene transcription, as purified Tax was found to stimulate both genes when added to the uninfected cell extract or in reconstituted systems. Both limiting-component transcription assays and DNA binding assays identified the class III gene transcription factor TFIIIB as the principle target of Tax activity. Surprisingly, we find that Tax increases the effective concentration of active TFIIIB molecules. These data suggest that Tax stimulates RNA polymerase III-dependent gene expression by accelerating the rate and/or extent of transcription initiation complex assembly. PMID:8657153

  12. Preparation and functional characterization of human vascular endothelial growth factor-melittin fusion protein with analysis of the antitumor activity in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dingding; Hu, Lili; Su, Manman; Wang, Ju; Xu, Tianmin

    2015-09-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor and its tyrosine kinase receptors have been identified as key mediators of the regulation of pathologic blood vessel growth and maintenance in the promotion of angiogenesis and tumor growth. Therefore, an alternative approach to destroying tumor endothelium would be to make this tissue particularly sensitive to VEGF-mediated drug delivery. To verify this hypothesis, we generated a protein containing VEGF165 fused to melittin. Melittin is a small linear peptide composed of 26 amino acid residues that can exert toxic or inhibitory effects on many types of tumor cells. This protein is a cytolytic peptide that attacks lipid membranes, leading to significant toxicity. In the present study, the Pichia pastoris expression system was used to express the fusion protein. Under optimal conditions, stable VEGF165-melittin production was achieved using a series of purification steps. The activity of VEGF165-melittin fusion protein was compared with melittin for its ability to suppress the growth of tumor cell line in vitro. The fusion toxin selectively inhibited growth of human hepatocellular carcinoma HepG-2 cell line with high expression of VEGFR-2. We found that sensitivity of VEGFR-2 transfected 293 cells to VEGF165-melittin enhanced as the cellular VEGFR-2 density increased. In an in vivo initial experiment, the fusion protein inhibited tumor growth in xenografts assays. Furthermore, successful expression and characterization of the fusion protein demonstrated its efficacy for use as a novel treatment strategy for cancer. PMID:26166416

  13. Structure and expression of human thrombomodulin, a thrombin receptor on endothelium acting as a cofactor for protein C activation.

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, K; Kusumoto, H; Deyashiki, Y; Nishioka, J; Maruyama, I; Zushi, M; Kawahara, S; Honda, G; Yamamoto, S; Horiguchi, S

    1987-01-01

    We have deduced the entire 575-amino acid sequence of the human thrombomodulin precursor from cDNA clones. The precursor starts with an 18-residue signal peptide domain, followed by the NH2-terminal domain, a domain with six epidermal growth factor-like structures, an O-glycosylation site-rich domain, a 24-residue transmembrane domain and a cytoplasmic domain. Simian COS cells transfected with the expression vector pSV2 containing thrombomodulin cDNA synthesized immunoreactive and functionally active thrombomodulin. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 7. PMID:2820710

  14. Optimization of expression and purification of two biologically active chimeric fusion proteins that consist of human interleukin-13 and Pseudomonas exotoxin in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Bharat H; Puri, Raj K

    2005-02-01

    We have previously reported that a variety of solid human tumor cell lines express a large number of receptors for interleukin-13 (IL-13). These receptors could be targeted with a chimeric fusion protein consisting of human IL-13 and a truncated form of Pseudomonas exotoxin (PE). We describe here optimization of critical steps involved in high yield expression of two recombinant chimeric fusion proteins for obtaining highly purified and biologically active cytotoxins in Escherichia coli. The chimeric constructs of human IL-13 and two 38 kDa truncated PEs: (i) PE38 and (ii) PE38QQR, (three lysine residues in PE38 at 590, 606, and 613 substituted with two glutamine and one arginine) were used for protein expression in pET prokaryotic expression vector system with kanamycin as a selection antibiotic. Our results suggest that fresh transformation of E. coli and induction by isopropyl-beta-D-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG) for 6 h resulted in maximum protein expression. To further improve the yield, we used a genetically modified E. coli strain, BL21(DE3)pLysS, which carries a plasmid for lysozyme with a weak promoter that inhibits T7 RNA polymerase and minimizes protein production in the absence of IPTG. Use of this strain eliminated the need for lysozyme digestion of the induced bacteria to release inclusion bodies, which resulted in expression of purer protein as compared to the conventional BL21(DE3) strain. Additional protocol optimizations included 16 h solubilization of inclusion bodies, constitution of refolding buffer, and timing of dialysis. These proteins were finally purified by Q-Sepharose, mono-Q, and gel filtration chromatography. Between 14-22 and 21-28 mg highly purified and biologically active protein was obtained from 1L of BL21 (DE3) and BL21 (DE3) pLysS bacteria culture, respectively. As IL-13R targeting for brain tumor therapy offers an exciting treatment option, optimization of production of IL-13PE will enhance production of clinical grade material

  15. Oncogenic Activities of Human Papillomaviruses

    PubMed Central

    McLaughlin-Drubin, Margaret E.; Münger, Karl

    2009-01-01

    Infectious etiologies for certain human cancers have long been suggested by epidemiological studies and studies with animals. Important support for this concept came from the discovery by Harald zur Hausen’s group that human cervical carcinoma almost universally contains certain “high-risk” human papillomavirus (HPV) types. Over the years, much has been learned about the carcinogenic activities of high-risk HPVs. These studies have revealed that two viral proteins, E6 and E7, that are consistently expressed in HPV-associated carcinomas, are necessary for induction and maintenance of the transformed phenotype. Hence, HPV-associated tumors are unique amongst human solid tumors in that they are universally caused by exposure to the same, molecularly defined oncogenic agents, and the molecular signal transduction pathways subverted by these viral transforming agents are frequently disrupted in other, non-virus associated human cancers. PMID:19540281

  16. Human adenosine A1 receptor and P2Y2-purinoceptor-mediated activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase cascade in transfected CHO cells

    PubMed Central

    Dickenson, John M; Blank, Jonathan L; Hill, Stephen J

    1998-01-01

    The mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase signalling pathway can be activated by a variety of heterotrimeric Gi/Go protein-coupled and Gq/G11 protein-coupled receptors. The aims of the current study were: (i) to investigate whether the Gi/Go protein-coupled adenosine A1 receptor activates the MAP kinase pathway in transfected Chinese hamster ovary cells (CHO-A1) and (ii) to determine whether adenosine A1 receptor activation would modulate the MAP kinase response elicited by the endogenous P2Y2 purinoceptor.The selective adenosine A1 receptor agonist N6-cyclopentyladenosine (CPA) stimulated time and concentration-dependent increases in MAP kinase activity in CHO-A1 cells (EC50 7.1±0.4 nM). CPA-mediated increases in MAP kinase activity were blocked by PD 98059 (50 μM; 89±4% inhibition), an inhibitor of MAP kinase kinase 1 (MEKI) activation, and by pre-treating cells with pertussis toxin (to block Gi/Go-dependent pathways).Adenosine A1 receptor-mediated activation of MAP kinase was abolished by pre-treatment with the protein tyrosine inhibitor, genistein (100 μM; 6±10% of control). In contrast, daidzein (100 μM), the inactive analogue of genistein had no significant effect (96±12 of control). MAP kinase responses to CPA (1 μM) were also sensitive to the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibitors wortmannin (100 nM; 55±8% inhibition) and LY 294002 (30 μM; 40±5% inhibition) but not to the protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor Ro 31-8220 (10 μM).Activation of the endogenous P2Y2 purinoceptor with UTP also stimulated time and concentration-dependent increases in MAP kinase activity in CHO-A1 cells (EC50=1.6±0.3 μM). The MAP kinase response to UTP was partially blocked by pertussis toxin (67±3% inhibition) and by the PKC inhibitor Ro 31-8220 (10 μM; 45±5% inhibition), indicating the possible involvement of both Gi/Go protein and Gq protein-dependent pathways in the overall response to UTP.CPA and UTP stimulated concentration

  17. Trans-activation of the JC virus late promoter by the tat protein of type 1 human immunodeficiency virus in glial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Tada, Hiroomi; Lashgari, M.; Amini, S.; Khalili, K. ); Rappaport, J.; Wong-Staal, F. )

    1990-05-01

    Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) is a demyelinating disease of the central nervous system caused by the JC virus (JCV), a human papovavirus. PML is a relatively rare disease seen predominantly in immunocompromised individuals and is a frequent complication observed in AIDS patients. The significantly higher incidence of PML in AIDS patients than in other immunosuppressive disorders has suggested that the presence of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) in the brain may directly or indirectly contribute to the pathogenesis of this disease. In the present study the authors have examined the expression of the JCV genome in both glial and non-glial cells in the presence of HIV-1 regulatory proteins. They find that the HIV-1-encoded trans-regulatory protein tat increases the basal activity of the JCV late promoter, JCV{sub L}, in glial cells. They conclude that the presence of the HIV-1-encoded tat protein may positively affect the JCV lytic cycle in glial cells by stimulating JCV gene expression. The results suggest a mechanism for the relatively high incidence of PML in AIDS patients than in other immunosuppressive disorders. Furthermore, the findings indicate that the HIV-1 regulatory protein tat may stimulate other viral and perhaps cellular promoters, in addition to its own.

  18. Induction of Macrophage Function in Human THP-1 Cells Is Associated with Rewiring of MAPK Signaling and Activation of MAP3K7 (TAK1) Protein Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Erik; Ventz, Katharina; Harms, Manuela; Mostertz, Jörg; Hochgräfe, Falko

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages represent the primary human host response to pathogen infection and link the immediate defense to the adaptive immune system. Mature tissue macrophages convert from circulating monocyte precursor cells by terminal differentiation in a process that is not fully understood. Here, we analyzed the protein kinases of the human monocytic cell line THP-1 before and after induction of macrophage differentiation by using kinomics and phosphoproteomics. When comparing the macrophage-like state with the monocytic precursor, 50% of the kinome was altered in expression and even 71% of covered kinase phosphorylation sites were affected. Kinome rearrangements are for example characterized by a shift of overrepresented cyclin-dependent kinases associated with cell cycle control in monocytes to calmodulin-dependent kinases and kinases involved in proinflammatory signaling. Eventually, we show that monocyte-to-macrophage differentiation is associated with major rewiring of mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling networks and demonstrate that protein kinase MAP3K7 (TAK1) acts as the key signaling hub in bacterial killing, chemokine production and differentiation. Our study proves the fundamental role of protein kinases and cellular signaling as major drivers of macrophage differentiation and function. The finding that MAP3K7 is central to macrophage function suggests MAP3K7 and its networking partners as promising targets in host-directed therapy for macrophage-associated disease. PMID:27066479

  19. Dietary protein intake and human health.

    PubMed

    Wu, Guoyao

    2016-03-16

    A protein consists of amino acids (AA) linked by peptide bonds. Dietary protein is hydrolyzed by proteases and peptidases to generate AA, dipeptides, and tripeptides in the lumen of the gastrointestinal tract. These digestion products are utilized by bacteria in the small intestine or absorbed into enterocytes. AA that are not degraded by the small intestine enter the portal vein for protein synthesis in skeletal muscle and other tissues. AA are also used for cell-specific production of low-molecular-weight metabolites with enormous physiological importance. Thus, protein undernutrition results in stunting, anemia, physical weakness, edema, vascular dysfunction, and impaired immunity. Based on short-term nitrogen balance studies, the Recommended Dietary Allowance of protein for a healthy adult with minimal physical activity is currently 0.8 g protein per kg body weight (BW) per day. To meet the functional needs such as promoting skeletal-muscle protein accretion and physical strength, dietary intake of 1.0, 1.3, and 1.6 g protein per kg BW per day is recommended for individuals with minimal, moderate, and intense physical activity, respectively. Long-term consumption of protein at 2 g per kg BW per day is safe for healthy adults, and the tolerable upper limit is 3.5 g per kg BW per day for well-adapted subjects. Chronic high protein intake (>2 g per kg BW per day for adults) may result in digestive, renal, and vascular abnormalities and should be avoided. The quantity and quality of protein are the determinants of its nutritional values. Therefore, adequate consumption of high-quality proteins from animal products (e.g., lean meat and milk) is essential for optimal growth, development, and health of humans. PMID:26797090

  20. Neuropeptide Y1 receptor inhibits cell growth through inactivating mitogen-activated protein kinase signal pathway in human hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lv, Xiufang; Zhao, Fengbo; Huo, Xisong; Tang, Weidong; Hu, Baoying; Gong, Xiu; Yang, Juan; Shen, Qiujin; Qin, Wenxin

    2016-07-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common cancers, and its incidence is increasing worldwide. Neuropeptide Y (NPY) broadly expressed in the central and peripheral nervous system. It participates in multiple physiological and pathological processes through specific receptors. Evidences are accumulating that NPY is involved in development and progression in neuro- or endocrine-related cancers. However, little is known about the potential roles and underlying mechanisms of NPY receptors in HCC. In this study, we analyzed the expression of NPY receptors by real-time polymerase chain reaction, Western blot, and immunohistochemical staining. Correlation between NPY1R levels and clinicopathological characteristics, and survival of HCC patients were explored, respectively. Cell proliferation was researched by CCK-8 in vitro, and tumor growth was studied by nude mice xenografts in vivo. We found that mRNA and protein level of NPY receptor Y1 subtype (NPY1R) significantly decreased in HCC tissues. Low expression of NPY1R closely correlated with poor prognosis in HCC patients. Proliferation of HCC cells was significantly inhibited by recombinant NPY protein in vitro. This inhibitory effect could be blocked by selected NPY1R antagonist BIBP3226. Furthermore, overexpression of NPY1R could significantly inhibit HCC cell proliferation. Knockdown of NPY1R promoted cell multiplication in vitro and increased tumorigenicity and tumor growth in vivo. NPY1R was found to participate in the inhibition of cell proliferation via inactivating mitogen-activated protein kinase signal pathway in HCC cells. Collectively, NPY1R plays an inhibitory role in tumor growth and may be a promising therapeutic target for HCC. PMID:27262566

  1. Dioscin-induced apoptosis of human LNCaP prostate carcinoma cells through activation of caspase-3 and modulation of Bcl-2 protein family.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jing; Li, Hui-min; Zhang, Xue-nong; Xiong, Chao-mei; Ruan, Jin-lan

    2014-02-01

    Dioscin is a natural steroid saponin derived from several plants, showing potent anti-cancer effect against a variety of tumor cell lines. In the present study, we investigated the anti-cancer activity of dioscin against human LNCaP cells, and evaluated the possible mechanism involved in its antineoplastic action. It was found that dioscin (1, 2 and 4 μmol/L) could significantly inhibit the viability of LNCaP cells in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. Flow cytometry revealed that the apoptosis rate was increased after treatment of LNCaP cells with dioscin for 24 h, indicating that apoptosis was an important mechanism by which dioscin inhibited cancer. Western blotting was employed to detect the expression of caspase-3, Bcl-2 and Bax in LNCaP cells. The expression of cleaved caspase-3 was significantly increased, and meanwhile procaspase-3 was markedly decreased. The expression of anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 was down-regulated, whereas the pro-apoptotic protein Bax was up-regulated. Moreover, the Bcl-2/Bax ratio was drastically decreased. These results suggested that dioscin possessed potential anti-tumor activity in human LNCaP cells through the apoptosis pathway, which might be associated with caspase-3 and Bcl-2 protein family. PMID:24496691

  2. Local anesthetics induce apoptosis in human thyroid cancer cells through the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yuan-Ching; Hsu, Yi-Chiung; Liu, Chien-Liang; Huang, Shih-Yuan; Hu, Meng-Chun; Cheng, Shih-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Local anesthetics are frequently used in fine-needle aspiration of thyroid lesions and locoregional control of persistent or recurrent thyroid cancer. Recent evidence suggests that local anesthetics have a broad spectrum of effects including inhibition of cell proliferation and induction of apoptosis in neuronal and other types of cells. In this study, we demonstrated that treatment with lidocaine and bupivacaine resulted in decreased cell viability and colony formation of both 8505C and K1 cells in a dose-dependent manner. Lidocaine and bupivacaine induced apoptosis, and necrosis in high concentrations, as determined by flow cytometry. Lidocaine and bupivacaine caused disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential and release of cytochrome c, accompanied by activation of caspase 3 and 7, PARP cleavage, and induction of a higher ratio of Bax/Bcl-2. Based on microarray and pathway analysis, apoptosis is the prominent transcriptional change common to lidocaine and bupivacaine treatment. Furthermore, lidocaine and bupivacaine attenuated extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) activity and induced activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and c-jun N-terminal kinase. Pharmacological inhibitors of MAPK/ERK kinase and p38 MAPK suppressed caspase 3 activation and PARP cleavage. Taken together, our results for the first time demonstrate the cytotoxic effects of local anesthetics on thyroid cancer cells and implicate the MAPK pathways as an important mechanism. Our findings have potential clinical relevance in that the use of local anesthetics may confer previously unrecognized benefits in the management of patients with thyroid cancer. PMID:24586874

  3. Activation-dependent expression of the insulin-like growth factor binding protein-2 in human lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Föll, J L; Dannecker, L; Zehrer, C; Hettmer, S; Berger, J; Elmlinger, M; Niethammer, D; Ranke, M B; Dannecker, G E

    1998-01-01

    The expression of the insulin-like growth factor binding protein-2 (IGFBP-2) was assayed in mononuclear cells originating from different organs of the immune system. All mononuclear cells studied did express IGFBP-2, but the expression level was found to be dependent on the cell type and origin of the cell. T cells showed a higher expression of IGFBP-2 mRNA than did B cells, and CD34+ stem cells expressed IGFBP-2 mRNA at a high level. Expression was highest in bone marrow and thymus. Stimulation of peripheral mononuclear cells resulted in a marked increase of IGFBP-2 mRNA and also intracellular IGFBP-2, as analysed by fluorescence staining. This increase parallels the increase of other known T-cell activation markers. Furthermore, the increase of intracellular IGFBP-2 seems to precede T-cell blast formation and all T cells in active phases of the cell cycle have high levels of IGFBP-2. Our results provide a basis for further investigations on the contribution of the IGF-system to the regulation of T-cell proliferation and differentiation. IGFBP-2, in particular, may have an important influence in the regulation of T-cell activation and proliferation. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 6 PMID:9741338

  4. Involvement of mitogen-activated protein kinases and NF{kappa}B in LPS-induced CD40 expression on human monocytic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Weidong | Alexis, Neil E. |; Chen Xian |; Bromberg, Philip A. |; Peden, David B. ||

    2008-04-15

    CD40 is a costimulatory molecule linking innate and adaptive immune responses to bacterial stimuli, as well as a critical regulator of functions of other costimulatory molecules. The mechanisms regulating lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced CD40 expression have not been adequately characterized in human monocytic cells. In this study we used a human monocytic cell line, THP-1, to investigate the possible mechanisms of CD40 expression following LPS exposure. Exposure to LPS resulted in a dose- and time-dependent increase in CD40 expression. Further studies using immunoblotting and pharmacological inhibitors revealed that mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and NF{kappa}B were activated by LPS exposure and involved in LPS-induced CD40 expression. Activation of MAPKs was not responsible for LPS-induced NF{kappa}B activation. TLR4 was expressed on THP-1 cells and pretreatment of cells with a Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) neutralizing antibody (HTA125) significantly blunted LPS-induced MAPK and NF{kappa}B activation and ensuing CD40 expression. Additional studies with murine macrophages expressing wild type and mutated TLR4 showed that TLR4 was implicated in LPS-induced ERK and NF{kappa}B activation, and CD40 expression. Moreover, blockage of MAPK and NF{kappa}B activation inhibited LPS-induced TLR4 expression. In summary, LPS-induced CD40 expression in monocytic cells involves MAPKs and NF{kappa}B.

  5. Copper inhibits activated protein C: protective effect of human albumin and an analogue of its high-affinity copper-binding site, d-DAHK.

    PubMed

    Bar-Or, David; Rael, Leonard T; Winkler, James V; Yukl, Richard L; Thomas, Gregory W; Shimonkevitz, Richard P

    2002-02-01

    Activated protein C (APC) is useful in the treatment of sepsis. Ischemia and acidosis, which often accompany sepsis, cause the release of copper from loosely bound sites. We investigated (i) whether physiological concentrations of copper inhibit APC anticoagulant activity and (ii) if any copper-induced APC inhibition is reversible by human serum albumin (HSA) or a high-affinity copper-binding analogue of the human albumin N-terminus, d-Asp-d-Ala-d-His-d-Lys (d-DAHK). APC activity after 30 min of incubation with CuCl2 (10 microM) was decreased 26% below baseline. HSA, both alone and when combined with various ratios of CuCl2, increased APC activity significantly above baseline. d-DAHK alone and 2:1 and 4:1 ratios of d-DAHK:CuCl2 also increased APC activity. APC contained 1.4 microM copper, which helps explain the increased APC activity with HSA and d-DAHK alone. These in vitro results indicate that copper inhibits APC activity and that albumin and d-DAHK reverse the copper-induced APC deactivation. PMID:11820775

  6. Chemical Polysialylation of Recombinant Human Proteins.

    PubMed

    Smirnov, Ivan V; Vorobiev, Ivan I; Belogurov, Alexey A; Genkin, Dmitry D; Deyev, Sergey M; Gabibov, Alexander G

    2015-01-01

    Design of drug with prolonged therapeutic action is one of the rapid developing fields of modern medical science and required implementation of different methods of protein chemistry and molecular biology. There are several therapeutic proteins needing increasing of their stability, pharmacokinetic, and pharmacodynamics parameters. To make long-live DNA-encoded drug PEGylation was proposed. Alternatively polysialic (colominic) acid, extracted from the cell wall of E. coli, fractionated to the desired size by anion-exchange chromatography and chemically activated to the amine-reactive aldehyde form, may be chemically attached to the polypeptide chain. Conjugates of proteins and polysialic acid generally resemble properties of protein-PEG conjugates, but possess significant negative net charge and are thought to be fully degradable after endocytosis due to the presence of intracellular enzymes, hydrolyzing the polysialic acid. Complete biodegradation of the polysialic acid moiety makes this kind of conjugates preferable for creation of drugs, intended for chronic use. Here, we describe two different protocols of chemical polysialylation. First protocol was employed for the CHO-derived human butyrylcholinesterase with optimized for recovery of specific enzyme activity. Polysialic acid moieties are attached at various lysine residues. Another protocol was developed for high-yield conjugation of human insulin; major conjugation point is the N-terminal residue of the insulin's light chain. These methods may allow to produce polysialylated conjugates of various proteins or polypeptides with reasonable yield and without significant loss of functional activity. PMID:26082236

  7. PAR-1 activation by thrombin is protective in human pulmonary artery endothelial cells if endothelial protein C receptor is occupied by its natural ligand

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Jong-Sup; Rezaie, Alireza R.

    2008-01-01

    Summary We recently demonstrated that the occupancy of endothelial protein C receptor (EPCR) by its natural ligand activated protein C (APC)/protein C switches the protease activated receptor 1 (PAR-1)-dependent signaling specificity of thrombin from a disruptive to a protective effect in cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Given the phenotypic differences between endothelial cells in venular and arterial beds, in this study we evaluated the signaling function of thrombin in human pulmonary artery endothelial cells (HPAECs) before and after treating them with PC-S195A which lacks catalytic activity but exhibits a normal affinity for EPCR. As expected, both thrombin and thrombin receptor agonist peptide (TRAP) enhanced the permeability barrier of HPAECs, however, both PAR-1 agonists exhibited a potent barrier protective effect when the cells were treated with PC-S195A prior to stimulation by the agonists. Interestingly, similar to APC, thrombin exhibited a potent cytoprotective activity in the LPS-induced permeability and TNF-α-induced apoptosis and adhesion assays in the PC-S195A treated HPAECs. Treatment of HPAECs with the cholesterol depleting molecule methyl-β-cyclodextrin eliminated the protective effect of both APC and thrombin. These results suggest that the occupancy of EPCR by its natural ligand recruits PAR-1 to a protective signaling pathway within lipid rafts of HPAECs. Based on these results we conclude that the activation of PAR-1 by thrombin would initiate a protective response in intact arterial vascular cells expressing EPCR. These findings may have important ramifications for understanding the mechanism of the participation of the vascular PAR-1 in pathophysiology of the inflammatory disorders. PMID:18612544

  8. Reversal of efflux of an anticancer drug in human drug-resistant breast cancer cells by inhibition of protein kinase Cα (PKCα) activity.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chan Woo; Asai, Daisuke; Kang, Jeong-Hun; Kishimura, Akihiro; Mori, Takeshi; Katayama, Yoshiki

    2016-02-01

    P-glycoprotein (Pgp) is a 170-kDa transmembrane protein that mediates the efflux of anticancer drugs from cells. Pgp overexpression has a distinct role in cells exhibiting multidrug resistance (MDR). We examined reversal of drug resistance in human MDR breast cancer cells by inhibition of protein kinase Cα (PKCα) activity, which is associated with Pgp-mediated efflux of anticancer drugs. PKCα activity was confirmed by measurement of phosphorylation levels of a PKCα-specific peptide substrate (FKKQGSFAKKK-NH2), showing relatively higher basal activity in drug-resistant MCF-7/ADR cells (84 %) than that in drug-sensitive MCF-7 cells (63 %). PKCα activity was effectively suppressed by the PKC inhibitor, Ro-31-7549, and reversal of intracellular accumulation of doxorubicin was observed by inhibition of PKCα activity in MCF-7/ADR cells compared with their intrinsic drug resistance. Importantly, increased accumulation of doxorubicin could enhance the therapeutic efficacy of doxorubicin in MDR cells significantly. These results suggest a potential for overcoming MDR via inhibition of PKCα activity with conventional anticancer drugs. PMID:26323260

  9. Keratinocyte sensitization to tumour necrosis factor-induced nuclear factor kappa B activation by the E2 regulatory protein of human papillomaviruses.

    PubMed

    Boulabiar, Manel; Boubaker, Samir; Favre, Michel; Demeret, Caroline

    2011-10-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) life cycle requires extensive manipulation of cell signalling to provide conditions adequate for viral replication within the stratified epithelia. In this regard, we show that the E2 regulatory protein of α, β and μ-HPV genotypes enhances tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-induced activation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB). This activation is mediated by the N-terminal domain of E2, but does not rely on its transcriptional properties. It is independent of the NF-κB regulator Tax1BP1, which nevertheless interacts with all the E2 proteins. E2 specifically activates NF-κB pathways induced by TNF, while interleukin-1-induced pathways are not affected. E2 stimulates the activating K63-linked ubiquitination of TRAF5, and interacts with both TRAF5 and TRAF6. Our data suggest that E2 potentiates TNF-induced NF-κB signalling mediated by TRAF5 activation through direct binding. Since NF-κB controls epithelial differentiation, this activity may be involved in the commitment of infected keratinocytes to proliferation arrest and differentiation, both required for the implementation of the productive viral cycle. PMID:21715600

  10. Effect of corticotropin-releasing factor-binding protein on prostaglandin release from cultured maternal decidua and on contractile activity of human myometrium in vitro.

    PubMed

    Petraglia, F; Benedetto, C; Florio, P; D'Ambrogio, G; Genazzani, A D; Marozio, L; Vale, W

    1995-10-01

    Human placenta and uterine tissues are sites of production and local action of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF). The recent evidence that CRF-binding protein (CRF-BP), a protein that blocks CRF-induced pituitary ACTH release, is produced by placental tissues suggested the present study to investigate the effects of CRF-BP on prostaglandin release and contractile activity of myometrial strips. Primary cultures of decidual cells were prepared using tissue collected from healthy women undergoing cesarean delivery at term. Mechanical and enzymatic cell dispersions were carried out, and experiments were performed 24-28 h after cell plating. The prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) concentration in cultured medium was measured by RIA. Myometrial strips were obtained from the upper edge of the uterine incision during elective cesarean section at term. Dissected free of connective tissue, strips were mounted in a 30-mL two-chamber organ bath containing oxygenated Tyrode's buffer (37 C) and connected to a two-channel isometric smooth muscle transducer. Cultured decidual cells collected at term significantly increased the release of PGE2 in the presence of CRF (P < 0.01). The addition of CRF-BP did not significantly modify PGE2 release, but completely reversed the effect of CRF. When human myometrial strips were incubated in the presence of CRF and PGF2 alpha, a significant increase in contractile activity was observed (P < 0.01); preincubation with CRF-BP prevented the increased contractile activity induced by CRF. The present data show that CRF-BP is able to counteract the biological effect of CRF on human pregnancy endometrium and myometrium and suggest that CRF-BP may be a regulatory protein that plays a role in the local function of uterine tissues during pregnancy. PMID:7559899

  11. First evidence of sphingosine 1-phosphate lyase protein expression and activity downregulation in human neoplasm: implication for resistance to therapeutics in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Brizuela, Leyre; Ader, Isabelle; Mazerolles, Catherine; Bocquet, Magalie; Malavaud, Bernard; Cuvillier, Olivier

    2012-09-01

    This is the first report of sphingosine 1-phosphate lyase (SPL) protein expression and enzymatic activity in human neoplasm. This enzyme drives irreversible degradation of sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P), a bioactive lipid associated with resistance to therapeutics in various cancers, including prostate adenocarcinoma. In fresh human prostatectomy specimens, a remarkable decrease in SPL enzymatic activity was found in tumor samples, as compared with normal adjacent tissues. A significant relationship between loss of SPL expression and higher Gleason score was confirmed in tissue microarray (TMA) analysis. Moreover, SPL protein expression and activity were inversely correlated with those of sphingosine kinase-1 (SphK1), the enzyme producing S1P. SPL and SphK1 expressions were independently predictive of aggressive cancer on TMA, supporting the relevance of S1P in prostate cancer. In human C4-2B and PC-3 cell lines, silencing SPL enhanced survival after irradiation or chemotherapy by decreasing expression of proteins involved in sensing and repairing DNA damage or apoptosis, respectively. In contrast, enforced expression of SPL sensitized cancer cells to irradiation or docetaxel by tilting the ceramide/S1P balance toward cell death. Interestingly, the S1P degradation products failed to sensitize to chemo- and radiotherapy, supporting the crucial role of ceramide/S1P balance in cancer. Of note, the combination of SPL enforced expression with a SphK1 silencing strategy by further decreasing S1P content made prostate cancer cells even more sensitive to anticancer therapies, suggesting that a dual strategy aimed at stimulating SPL, and inhibiting SphK1 could represent a future approach to sensitize cancer cells to cancer treatments. PMID:22784711

  12. Surfactant protein D in human lung diseases.

    PubMed

    Hartl, D; Griese, M

    2006-06-01

    The lung is continuously exposed to inhaled pollutants, microbes and allergens. Therefore, the pulmonary immune system has to defend against harmful pathogens, while an inappropriate inflammatory response to harmless particles must be avoided. In the bronchoalveolar space this critical balance is maintained by innate immune proteins, termed surfactant proteins. Among these, surfactant protein D (SP-D) plays a central role in the pulmonary host defence and the modulation of allergic responses. Several human lung diseases are characterized by decreased levels of bronchoalveolar SP-D. Thus, recombinant SP-D has been proposed as a therapeutical option for cystic fibrosis, neonatal lung disease and smoking-induced emphysema. Furthermore, SP-D serum levels can be used as disease activity markers for interstitial lung diseases. This review illustrates the emerging role of SP-D translated from in vitro studies to human lung diseases. PMID:16684127

  13. Dengue Virus Nonstructural Protein 1-Induced Antibodies Cross-React with Human Plasminogen and Enhance Its Activation.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Yung-Chun; Lin, Jessica; Lin, Yee-Shin; Wang, Shuying; Yeh, Trai-Ming

    2016-02-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) infection is the most common mosquito-borne viral disease, and it can cause life-threatening dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) and dengue shock syndrome (DSS). Abnormal activation of the coagulation and fibrinolysis system is one of the hallmarks of DHF/DSS. However, the mechanism underlying hemorrhage in DHF/DSS remains elusive. In previous studies, plasminogen (Plg) cross-reactive Abs, which can recognize DENV nonstructural protein (NS) 1, have been found in dengue patients. However, it is unclear whether these Abs are indeed induced by DENV NS1. Thus, we immunized mice with recombinant NS1 from both bacteria and drosophila to determine whether NS1 can induce Plg cross-reactive Abs. The results from the NS1-immunized mouse sera indicated that NS1 immunization induced Abs that could cross-react with Plg. To study the effects of these NS1-induced Plg cross-reactive Abs on fibrinolysis, we isolated several Plg cross-reactive anti-NS1 mAbs from these mice and found that some of them could enhance Plg activation. In addition, epitope mapping with a phage-displayed random peptide library revealed that one of these mAbs (2A5) could recognize NS1 C-terminal residues 305-311, which share sequence homology with Plg residues 590-597. A synthetic peptide of NS1 residues 305-311 could inhibit the binding of both 2A5 and its Fab to Plg and its enhanced activation. Thus, our results suggest that DENV NS1 can induce Plg cross-reactive Abs through molecular mimicry, which can enhance Plg activation and may contribute to the pathogenesis of DHF/DSS. PMID:26712948

  14. Nuclear export of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 nucleocytoplasmic shuttle protein Rev is mediated by its activation domain and is blocked by transdominant negative mutants.

    PubMed Central

    Szilvay, A M; Brokstad, K A; Kopperud, R; Haukenes, G; Kalland, K H

    1995-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 nucleocytoplasmic shuttle protein Rev moves repeatedly between the cytoplasm, a perinuclear zone, the nucleoli, and nucleoplasmic speckles. In this study, we demonstrated by both indirect immunofluorescence and Western immunoblot analysis that nuclear exit of Rev transdominant negative mutants was defective compared with that of wild-type Rev. The basic and activation domains of Rev signal import and export, respectively, of Rev across the nuclear membrane. In cotransfection experiments, mutants containing mutations of Rev inhibited the nuclear egress of wild-type Rev, thus revealing a novel transdominant negative phenotype. PMID:7745679

  15. A direct thrombin inhibitor suppresses protein C activation and factor Va degradation in human plasma: Possible mechanisms of paradoxical enhancement of thrombin generation.

    PubMed

    Kamisato, Chikako; Furugohri, Taketoshi; Morishima, Yoshiyuki

    2016-05-01

    We have demonstrated that antithrombin (AT)-independent thrombin inhibitors paradoxically increase thrombin generation (TG) in human plasma in a thrombomodulin (TM)- and protein C (PC)-dependent manner. We determined the effects of AT-independent thrombin inhibitors on the negative-feedback system, activation of PC and production and degradation of factor Va (FVa), as possible mechanisms underlying the paradoxical enhancement of TG. TG in human plasma containing 10nM TM was assayed by means of the calibrated automated thrombography. As an index of PC activation, plasma concentration of activated PC-PC inhibitor complex (aPC-PCI) was measured. The amounts of FVa heavy chain and its degradation product (FVa(307-506)) were examined by western blotting. AT-independent thrombin inhibitors, melagatran and dabigatran (both at 25-600nM) and 3-30μg/ml active site-blocked thrombin (IIai), increased peak levels of TG. Melagatran, dabigatran and IIai significantly decreased plasma concentration of aPC-PCI complex at 25nM or more, 75nM or more, and 10 and 30μg/ml, respectively. Melagatran (300nM) significantly increased FVa and decreased FVa(307-506). In contrast, a direct factor Xa inhibitor edoxaban preferentially inhibited thrombin generation (≥25nM), and higher concentrations were required to inhibit PC activation (≥150nM) and FVa degradation (300nM). The present study suggests that the inhibitions of protein C activation and subsequent degradation of FVa and increase in FVa by antithrombin-independent thrombin inhibitors may contribute to the paradoxical TG enhancement, and edoxaban may inhibit PC activation and FVa degradation as a result of TG suppression. PMID:26974491

  16. Functional Analysis of Genetic Variation in Catechol-O-Methyltransferase (COMT): Effects on mRNA, Protein, and Enzyme Activity in Postmortem Human Brain

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jingshan; Lipska, Barbara K.; Halim, Nader; Ma, Quang D.; Matsumoto, Mitsuyuki; Melhem, Samer; Kolachana, Bhaskar S.; Hyde, Thomas M.; Herman, Mary M.; Apud, Jose; Egan, Michael F.; Kleinman, Joel E.; Weinberger, Daniel R.

    2004-01-01

    Catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) is a key enzyme in the elimination of dopamine in the prefrontal cortex of the human brain. Genetic variation in the COMT gene (MIM 116790) has been associated with altered prefrontal cortex function and higher risk for schizophrenia, but the specific alleles and their functional implications have been controversial. We analyzed the effects of several single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within COMT on mRNA expression levels (using reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction analysis), protein levels (using Western blot analysis), and enzyme activity (using catechol methylation) in a large sample (n = 108) of postmortem human prefrontal cortex tissue, which predominantly expresses the -membrane-bound isoform. A common coding SNP, Val158Met (rs4680), significantly affected protein abundance and enzyme activity but not mRNA expression levels, suggesting that differences in protein integrity account for the difference in enzyme activity between alleles. A SNP in intron 1 (rs737865) and a SNP in the 3′ flanking region (rs165599)—both of which have been reported to contribute to allelic expression differences and to be associated with schizophrenia as part of a haplotype with Val—had no effect on mRNA expression levels, protein immunoreactivity, or enzyme activity. In lymphocytes from 47 subjects, we confirmed a similar effect on enzyme activity in samples with the Val/Met genotype but no effect in samples with the intron 1 or 3′ SNPs. Separate analyses revealed that the subject's sex, as well as the presence of a SNP in the P2 promoter region (rs2097603), had small effects on COMT enzyme activity. Using site-directed mutagenesis of mouse COMT cDNA, followed by in vitro translation, we found that the conversion of Leu at the homologous position into Met or Val progressively and significantly diminished enzyme activity. Thus, although we cannot exclude a more complex genetic basis for functional effects of COMT, Val is a

  17. Artocarpin Induces Apoptosis in Human Cutaneous Squamous Cell Carcinoma HSC-1 Cells and Its Cytotoxic Activity Is Dependent on Protein-Nutrient Concentration

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chi-Ling; Chen, Gwo-Shing; Lee, Chiang-Wen; Yen, Feng-Lin

    2015-01-01

    Artocarpin, a natural prenylated flavonoid, has been shown to have various biological properties. However, its effects on human cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) have not been previously investigated. We set out to determine whether artocarpin has cytotoxic effects on SCC cells and whether its pharmacological activity is dependent on protein-nutrient concentration. Our results showed that treatment of HSC-1 cells (a human cutaneous SCC cell line) with artocarpin decreased cell viability and induced cell apoptosis by increasing caspase 3/7 activity. These effects were more pronounced at low fetal bovine serum (FBS) concentrations. Artocarpin induced an increase in the level of phospho-p38 and a decrease in the levels of phospho-ERK, phospho-JNK, phospho-Akt, phospho-mTOR, and phospho-S6K. High FBS concentrations in the culture media inhibited and delayed the uptake of artocarpin from the extracellular compartment (culture media) into the intracellular compartment, as determined by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis. In conclusion, artocarpin induces apoptosis in HSC-1 cells through modulation of MAPK and Akt/mTOR pathways. Binding of artocarpin to proteins in the FBS may inhibit cellular uptake and reduce the cytotoxic activity of artocarpin on HSC-1 cells. Therefore, artocarpin may have potential use in the future as a form of treatment for cutaneous SCC. PMID:25648333

  18. Lysophosphatidic acid induces reactive oxygen species generation by activating protein kinase C in PC-3 human prostate cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Chu-Cheng; Lin, Chuan-En; Lin, Yueh-Chien; Ju, Tsai-Kai; Huang, Yuan-Li; Lee, Ming-Shyue; Chen, Jiun-Hong; Lee, Hsinyu

    2013-11-01

    Highlights: •LPA induces ROS generation through LPA{sub 1} and LPA{sub 3}. •LPA induces ROS generation by activating PLC. •PKCζ mediates LPA-induced ROS generation. -- Abstract: Prostate cancer is one of the most frequently diagnosed cancers in males, and PC-3 is a cell model popularly used for investigating the behavior of late stage prostate cancer. Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a lysophospholipid that mediates multiple behaviors in cancer cells, such as proliferation, migration and adhesion. We have previously demonstrated that LPA enhances vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-C expression in PC-3 cells by activating the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which is known to be an important mediator in cancer progression. Using flow cytometry, we showed that LPA triggers ROS generation within 10 min and that the generated ROS can be suppressed by pretreatment with the NADPH oxidase (Nox) inhibitor diphenylene iodonium. In addition, transfection with LPA{sub 1} and LPA{sub 3} siRNA efficiently blocked LPA-induced ROS production, suggesting that both receptors are involved in this pathway. Using specific inhibitors and siRNA, phospholipase C (PLC) and protein kinase C (PKC) were also suggested to participate in LPA-induced ROS generation. Overall, we demonstrated that LPA induces ROS generation in PC-3 prostate cancer cells and this is mediated through the PLC/PKC/Nox pathway.

  19. Evidence of a retinoid signaling alteration involving the activator protein 1 complex in tumorigenic human bronchial epithelial cells and non-small cell lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, H Y; Dawson, M I; Claret, F X; Chen, J D; Walsh, G L; Hong, W K; Kurie, J M

    1997-03-01

    Retinoids, including retinol and retinoic acid derivatives, inhibit the growth of normal human bronchial epithelial (HBE) cells. Using a lung carcinogenesis model consisting of normal, immortalized, and tumorigenic HBE cells, we showed previously that, compared to normal HBE cells, the tumorigenic HBE cell line 11701 is resistant to the growth-inhibitory effects of all-trans-retinoic acid (t-RA). Retinoid receptor function is preserved in tumorigenic 11701 cells, suggesting that other retinoid signaling components are altered. The activator protein 1 (AP-1) complex is a component of the retinoid signaling pathway and has demonstrated importance in cellular growth and differentiation. Therefore, we investigated whether AP-1 is involved in a retinoid signaling defect in tumorigenic 11701 cells and in retinoid-resistant non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines. We found that t-RA treatment inhibited AP-1 transcriptional activity in normal HBE cells but not in tumorigenic 11701 cells nor in the NSCLC cell lines Calu-1, Calu-6, SKMES-1, and ChaGo K1. We sought mechanisms for this retinoid signaling alteration involving AP-1 in tumorigenic 11701 cells. Basal AP-1 transcriptional activity; AP-1 DNA-binding activity; and the mRNA levels of c-fos, the AP-1 coactivator Jun activation domain-binding protein 1, and the retinoid receptor corepressor, the silencing mediator for retinoid and thyroid hormone receptors (SMRT), were lower in tumorigenic 11701 cells than in normal HBE cells. Transient transfection of tumorigenic 11701 cells with c-fos or CREB binding protein, which is a coactivator of AP-1 and retinoid receptors, enhanced basal AP-1 transcriptional activity but did not alter the effects of t-RA on AP-1 transcriptional activity. These findings provide evidence of a retinoid signaling alteration involving AP-1 in tumorigenic 11701 and NSCLC cells. Furthermore, the inhibitory effect of t-RA on AP-1 transcriptional activity was not restored in tumorigenic 11701

  20. Suppressor of Ty homolog-5, a novel tumor-specific human telomerase reverse transcriptase promoter-binding protein and activator in colon cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Yong; He, Chao; Hu, Xiaotong

    2015-01-01

    The human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) promoter promotes differential hTERT gene expression in tumor cells and normal cells. However, information on the mechanisms underlying the differential hTERT transcription and induction of telomerase activity in tumor cells is limited. In the present study, suppressor of Ty homolog-5 (SPT5), a protein encoded by the SUPT5H gene, was identified as a novel tumor-specific hTERT promoter-binding protein and activator in colon cancer cells. We verified the tumor-specific binding activity of SPT5 to the hTERT promoter in vitro and in vivo and detected high expression levels of SUPT5H in colorectal cancer cell lines and primary human colorectal cancer tissues. SUPT5H was more highly expressed in colorectal cancer cases with distant metastasis than in cases without distant metastasis. Inhibition of endogenous SUPT5H expression by SUPT5H gene-specific short hairpin RNAs effectively attenuated hTERT promoter-driven green fluorescent protein (GFP) expression, whereas no detectable effects on CMV promoter-driven GFP expression in the same cells were observed. In addition, inhibition of SUPT5H expression not only effectively repressed telomerase activity, accelerated telomere shortening, and promoted cell senescence in colon cancer cells, but also suppressed cancer cell growth and migration. Our results demonstrated that SPT5 contributes to the up-regulation of hTERT expression and tumor development, and SUPT5H may potentially be used as a novel tumor biomarker and/or cancer therapeutic target. PMID:26418880

  1. The human complement regulatory factor-H-like protein 1, which represents a truncated form of factor H, displays cell-attachment activity.

    PubMed Central

    Hellwage, J; Kühn, S; Zipfel, P F

    1997-01-01

    Complement factor H (FH) and factor-H-like protein 1 (FHL-1) are human plasma proteins with regulatory functions in the alternative pathway of complement activation. FH and FHL-1 are organized in repetitive elements termed short consensus repeats (SCRs) and the seven SCRs of FHL-1 are identical with the N-terminal domain of the 20 SCRs of FH. The fourth SCR of both proteins (SCR 4) includes the sequence Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD), a motif that is responsible for the major adhesive activity of matrix proteins like fibronectin. A synthetic hexapeptide with the sequence ERGDAV derived from the RGD domain of FH/FHL-1 interferes with cell attachment to a fibronectin matrix. Although the identical motif is present in both FH and FHL-1, only FHL-1 acts as a matrix for cell spreading and attachment, thus the two proteins differ in function. The adhesive activity of FHL-1 is localized to the RGD-containing SCR 4 by the use of recombinant fragments. All three analysed anchorage-dependent cell lines (CCl64, C32 and MRC-5) adhere to an FHL-1 matrix. The use of synthetic peptides in competition assays, on either FHL-1-derived or fibronectin matrices, shows that the cellular receptors binding to the FH/FHL-1-derived RGD motif are related to or identical with integrin receptors which interact with fibronectin. The identification of a functional adhesive domain in the FH/FHL-1 sequence demonstrates, at least for FHL-1, a role in cell attachment and adhesion. PMID:9291099

  2. The extracellular matrix proteins laminin and fibronectin contain binding domains for human plasminogen and tissue plasminogen activator.

    PubMed

    Moser, T L; Enghild, J J; Pizzo, S V; Stack, M S

    1993-09-01

    This study describes the binding of plasminogen and tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) to the extracellular matrix proteins fibronectin and laminin. Plasminogen bound specifically and saturably to both fibronectin and laminin immobilized on microtiter wells, with Kd(app) values of 115 and 18 nM, respectively. Limited proteolysis by endoproteinase V8 coupled with ligand blotting analysis showed that both plasminogen and t-PA preferentially bind to a 55-kDa fibronectin fragment and a 38-kDa laminin fragment. Amino acid sequence analysis demonstrated that the 5-kDa fragment originates with the fibronectin amino terminus whereas the laminin fragment was derived from the carboxyl-terminal globular domain of the laminin A chain. Ligand blotting experiments using isolated plasminogen domains were also used to identify distinct regions of the plasminogen molecule involved in fibronectin and laminin binding. Solution phase fibronectin binding to immobilized plasminogen was mediated primarily via lysine binding site-dependent interactions with plasminogen kringles 1-4. Lysine binding site-dependent binding of soluble laminin to immobilized plasminogen kringles 1-5 as well as an additional lysine binding site-independent interaction between mini-plasminogen and the 38-kDa laminin A chain fragment were also observed. These studies demonstrate binding of plasminogen and tissue-type plasminogen activator to specific regions of the extracellular matrix glycoproteins laminin and fibronectin and provide further insight into the mechanism of regulation of plasminogen activation by components of the extracellular matrix. PMID:8360181

  3. A rare variant in human fibroblast activation protein associated with ER stress, loss of enzymatic function and loss of cell surface localisation.

    PubMed

    Osborne, Brenna; Yao, Tsun-Wen; Wang, Xin Maggie; Chen, Yiqian; Kotan, L Damla; Nadvi, Naveed A; Herdem, Mustafa; McCaughan, Geoffrey W; Allen, John D; Yu, Denise M T; Topaloglu, A Kemal; Gorrell, Mark D

    2014-07-01

    Fibroblast activation protein (FAP) is a focus of interest as a potential cancer therapy target. This membrane bound protease possesses the unique catalytic activity of hydrolysis of the post-proline bond two or more residues from the N-terminus of substrates. FAP is highly expressed in activated fibroblastic cells in tumours, arthritis and fibrosis. A rare, novel, human polymorphism, C1088T, encoding Ser363 to Leu, occurring in the sixth blade of the β propeller domain, was identified in a family. Both in primary human fibroblasts and in Ser363LeuFAP transfected cells, we showed that this single substitution ablates FAP dimerisation and causes loss of enzyme activity. Ser363LeuFAP was detectable only in endoplasmic reticulum (ER), in contrast to the distribution of wild-type FAP on the cell surface. The variant FAP showed decreased conformational antibody binding, consistent with an altered tertiary structure. Ser363LeuFAP expression was associated with upregulation of the ER chaperone BiP/GRP78, ER stress sensor ATF6, and the ER stress response target phospho-eIF2α, all indicators of ER stress. Proteasomal inhibition resulted in accumulation of Ser363LeuFAP, indicating the involvement of ER associated degradation (ERAD). Neither CHOP expression nor apoptosis was elevated, so ERAD is probably important for protecting Ser363LeuFAP expressing cells. These data on the first loss of function human FAP gene variant indicates that although the protein is vulnerable to an amino acid substitution in the β-propeller domain, inactive, unfolded FAP can be tolerated by cells. PMID:24717288

  4. Thiazide-like diuretic drug metolazone activates human pregnane X receptor to induce cytochrome 3A4 and multidrug-resistance protein 1

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Monimoy; Chen, Taosheng

    2014-01-01

    Human pregnane X receptor (hPXR) regulates the expression of drug-metabolizing enzyme cytochrome P450 3A4 (CYP3A4) and drug transporters such as multidrug-resistance protein 1 (MDR1). PXR can be modulated by small molecules, including Federal Drug Administration (FDA)–approved drugs, thus altering drug metabolism and causing drug-drug interactions. To determine the role of FDA-approved drugs in PXR-mediated regulation of drug metabolism and clearance, we screened 1481 FDA-approved small-molecule drugs by using a luciferase reporter assay in HEK293T cells and identified the diuretic drug metolazone as an activator of PXR. Our data showed that metolazone activated hPXR-mediated expression of CYP3A4 and MDR1 in human hepatocytes and intestine cells and increased CYP3A4 promoter activity in various cell lines. Mammalian two-hybrid assays showed that hPXR recruits its co-activator SRC-1 upon metolazone binding in HepG2 cells, explaining the mechanism of hPXR activation. To understand the role of other commonly-used diuretics in PXR activation and the structure-activity relationship of metolazone, thiazide and non-thiazide diuretics drugs were also tested but only metolazone activates PXR. To understand the molecular mechanism, docking studies and mutational analysis were carried out and showed that metolazone binds in the ligand-binding pocket and interacts with mostly hydrophobic amino acid residues. This is the first report showing that metolazone activates PXR. Because activation of hPXR might cause drug-drug interactions, metolazone should be used with caution for drug treatment in patients undergoing combination therapy. PMID:25181459

  5. Carbon Monoxide Signaling in Human Red Blood Cells: Evidence for Pentose Phosphate Pathway Activation and Protein Deglutathionylation

    PubMed Central

    Metere, Alessio; Iorio, Egidio; Scorza, Giuseppe; Camerini, Serena; Casella, Marialuisa; Crescenzi, Marco; Minetti, Maurizio

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Aims: The biochemistry underlying the physiological, adaptive, and toxic effects of carbon monoxide (CO) is linked to its affinity for reduced transition metals. We investigated CO signaling in the vasculature, where hemoglobin (Hb), the CO most important metal-containing carrier is highly concentrated inside red blood cells (RBCs). Results: By combining NMR, MS, and spectrophotometric techniques, we found that CO treatment of whole blood increases the concentration of reduced glutathione (GSH) in RBC cytosol, which is linked to a significant Hb deglutathionylation. In addition, this process (i) does not activate glycolytic metabolism, (ii) boosts the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP), (iii) increases glutathione reductase activity, and (iv) decreases oxidized glutathione concentration. Moreover, GSH concentration was partially decreased in the presence of 2-deoxyglucose and the PPP antagonist dehydroepiandrosterone. Our MS results show for the first time that, besides Cys93, Hb glutathionylation occurs also at Cys112 of the β-chain, providing a new potential GSH source hitherto unknown. Innovation: This work provides new insights on the signaling and antioxidant-boosting properties of CO in human blood, identifying Hb as a major source of GSH release and the PPP as a metabolic mechanism supporting Hb deglutathionylation. Conclusions: CO-dependent GSH increase is a new RBC process linking a redox-inactive molecule, CO, to GSH redox signaling. This mechanism may be involved in the adaptive responses aimed to counteract stress conditions in mammalian tissues. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 403–416. PMID:23815439

  6. Human Cementum Protein 1 induces expression of bone and cementum proteins by human gingival fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Carmona-Rodriguez, Bruno; Alvarez-Perez, Marco Antonio; Narayanan, A. Sampath; Zeichner-David, Margarita; Reyes-Gasga, Jose; Molina-Guarneros, Juan; Garcia-Hernandez, Ana Lilia; Suarez-Franco, Jose Luis; Chavarria, Ivet Gil; Villarreal-Ramirez, Eduardo; Arzate, Higinio . E-mail: harzate@servidor.unam.mx

    2007-07-06

    We recently presented evidence showing that a human cementoblastoma-derived protein, named Cementum Protein 1 (CEMP1) may play a role as a local regulator of cementoblast differentiation and cementum-matrix mineralization. This protein was shown to be expressed by cementoblasts and progenitor cells localized in the periodontal ligament. In this study we demonstrate that transfection of CEMP1 into human gingival fibroblasts (HGF) induces mineralization and expression of bone and cementum-matrix proteins. The transfected HGF cells had higher alkaline phosphatase activity and proliferation rate and they expressed genes for alkaline phosphatase, bone sialoprotein, osteocalcin, osteopontin, the transcription factor Runx2/Cbfa1, and cementum attachment protein (CAP). They also produced biological-type hydroxyapatite. These findings indicate that the CEMP1 might participate in differentiation and mineralization of nonosteogenic cells, and that it might have a potential function in cementum and bone formation.

  7. Protein kinase C (PKC) phosphorylates human platelet inositol trisphosphate 5/sup +/-/-phosphomonoesterase (IP/sub 3/ 5'-p'tase) increasing phosphatase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Connolly, T.M.; Majerus, P.W.

    1986-05-01

    Phosphoinositide breakdown in response to thrombin stimulation of human platelets generates messenger molecules that activate PKC (diglyceride) and mobilize Ca/sup + +/ (inositol tris-phosphates). The water soluble products of phospholipase C-mediated metabolism of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-diphosphate are inositol 1,4,5 P/sub 3/ (IP/sub 3/) and inositol 1:2-cyclic 4,5 P/sub 3/ (cIP/sub 3/). A specific phosphatase, IP/sub 3/ 5'-p'tase, cleaves the 5 phosphate from IP/sub 3/ or cIP/sub 3/ to form IP/sub 2/ or cIP/sub 2/ and P/sub i/, none of which mobilizes Ca/sup + +/. Thus, the IP/sub 3/ 5'-p'tase may regulate cellular responses to IP/sub 3/ or cIP/sub 3/. The authors find that IP/sub 3/ 5'-p'tase isolated from human platelets is phosphorylated by rat brain PKC, resulting in a 4-fold increase in IP/sub 3/ 5'-p'tase activity. The authors phosphorylated IP/sub 3/ 5'-p'tase using ..gamma.. /sup 32/P-ATP and found that the labeled enzyme comigrated on SDS-PAGE with the previously described 40K protein phosphorylated in response to thrombin stimulation of platelets. The similarity of the PKC-phosphorylated IP/sub 3/ 5'-p'tase observed in vitro and the thrombin-stimulated phosphorylated 40K protein known to be phosphorylated by PKC in vivo, suggests that these proteins may be the same. These results suggest that platelet Ca/sup + +/ mobilization maybe regulated by PKC phosphorylation of the IP/sub 3/ 5'-p'tase and can explain the observation that phorbol ester treatment of intact human platelets results in decreased production of IP/sub 3/ and decreased Ca/sup + +/ mobilization upon subsequent thrombin addition.

  8. Heterologous expression and purification of biologically active domains 3 and 4 of human polymeric immunoglobulin receptor and its interaction with choline binding protein A of Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Venables, Luanne; Govender, Sharlene; Oosthuizen, Vaughan

    2013-10-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae, one of the common causes of pneumonia, colonises the epithelium via the interaction between a choline binding protein of S. pneumoniae and the human polymeric immunoglobulin receptor (pIgR). One of the functions of pIgR is to mediate the transcytosis of polymeric immunoglobulins from the basolateral to the apical surface of epithelial cells. S. pneumoniae invades human epithelial cells by exploiting the transcytosis machinery. Due to an increase in the prevalence of antibiotic resistant strains of S. pneumoniae, and the limitations and expense of the vaccines available, extensive research may provide insights into the potential of new therapeutic regimes. This study investigated the potential of pIgR domains as an alternative non-antibiotic immune therapy for treating pneumonia. The aim was to determine the binding affinity of recombinant D3D4 protein, the domains of pIgR responsible for binding S. pneumoniae, to recombinant R1R2 repeat domains of choline binding protein A of S. pneumoniae. Biologically active recombinant D3D4 was produced in Escherichia coli using a gel filtration chromatography refolding method, a novel approach for the refolding of pIgR domains, after the purification of inclusion bodies using nickel affinity chromatography. Surface Plasmon resonance (SPR) spectroscopy showed that purified recombinant D3D4 binds recombinant R1R2 with an equilibrium dissociation constant (KD) of 3.36×10(-7)M. PMID:23973337

  9. Isolation and characterization of an outer membrane protein of Salmonella paratyphi B: a mitogen and polyclonal activator of human B lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Sager, S; Virella, G; Chen, W Y; Fudenberg, H H

    1984-01-01

    Salmonella paratyphi B (S. paratyphi B) has been previously characterized as a human T-independent polyclonal B cell activator. To define further the nature of the bacterial structure responsible for these properties, we studied the effects of autoclaving and enzyme treatment of S. paratyphi B on its stimulatory capacity. We found that both autoclaving and papain treatment decreased the ability of S. paratyphi B to induce B cell activation, while trypsin treatment did not affect this capacity. Neither type of treatment affected the binding of S. paratyphi B to lymphocytes, suggesting that binding and B cell stimulation are mediated by different structures. The observation that B cell stimulation was significantly reduced by papain treatment led us to attempt to purify membrane proteins so that we could investigate whether they shared the stimulating capacity of S. paratyphi B. A water-insoluble, 43-45,000 mol. wt. protein, rich in aspartic acid, glutamine, glycine, alanine and leucine, similar in mol. wt. and physicochemical chemical properties to the porins of other gram negative bacteria, was isolated and designated as outer membrane protein (OMP). This protein was equally efficient to S. paratyphi B in inducing T-independent B cell activation. By performing time-course studies of [3H]-thymidine incorporation we observed a burst of mitogenic activity after stimulation of PBL or purified B cells with both S. paratyphi B and OMP peaking at 48-96 hr of culture (compared to 96-120 hr for the PWM proliferation peak), and with a magnitude of roughly 10% of that observed after PWM stimulation. Given the fact that the proportion of B lymphocytes in PBL is 4-12%, it appears likely that the proliferation burst seen with S. paratyphi B and OMP corresponds to a mitogenic effect mainly restricted to the B cell population. Images Figure 1 PMID:6370841

  10. The 6-Aminoquinolone WC5 Inhibits Human Cytomegalovirus Replication at an Early Stage by Interfering with the Transactivating Activity of Viral Immediate-Early 2 Protein ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Loregian, Arianna; Mercorelli, Beatrice; Muratore, Giulia; Sinigalia, Elisa; Pagni, Silvana; Massari, Serena; Gribaudo, Giorgio; Gatto, Barbara; Palumbo, Manlio; Tabarrini, Oriana; Cecchetti, Violetta; Palù, Giorgio

    2010-01-01

    WC5 is a 6-aminoquinolone that potently inhibits the replication of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) but has no activity, or significantly less activity, against other herpesviruses. Here we investigated the nature of its specific anti-HCMV activity. Structure-activity relationship studies on a small series of analogues showed that WC5 possesses the most suitable pattern of substitutions around the quinolone scaffold to give potent and selective anti-HCMV activity. Studies performed to identify the possible target of WC5 indicated that it prevents viral DNA synthesis but does not significantly affect DNA polymerase activity. In yield reduction experiments with different multiplicities of infection, the anti-HCMV activity of WC5 appeared to be highly dependent on the viral inoculum, suggesting that WC5 may act at an initial stage of virus replication. Consistently, time-of-addition and time-of-removal studies demonstrated that WC5 affects a phase of the HCMV replicative cycle that precedes viral DNA synthesis. Experiments to monitor the effects of the compound on virus attachment and entry showed that it does not inhibit either process. Evaluation of viral mRNA and protein expression revealed that WC5 targets an event of the HCMV replicative cycle that follows the transcription and translation of immediate-early genes and precedes those of early and late genes. In cell-based assays to test the effects of WC5 on the transactivating activity of the HCMV immediate-early 2 (IE2) protein, WC5 markedly interfered with IE2-mediated transactivation of viral early promoters. Finally, WC5 combined with ganciclovir in checkerboard experiments exhibited highly synergistic activity. These findings suggest that WC5 deserves further investigation as a candidate anti-HCMV drug with a novel mechanism of action. PMID:20194695

  11. Piperine activates human pregnane X receptor to induce the expression of cytochrome P450 3A4 and multidrug resistance protein 1

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yue-Ming; Lin, Wenwei; Chai, Sergio C.; Wu, Jing; Ong, Su Sien; Schuetz, Erin G.; Chen, Taosheng

    2013-01-01

    Activation of the pregnane X receptor (PXR) and subsequently its target genes, including those encoding drug transporters and metabolizing enzymes, while playing substantial roles in xenobiotics detoxification, might cause undesired drug-drug interactions. Recently, an increased awareness has been given to dietary components for potential induction of diet-drug interactions through activation of PXR. Here, we studied, whether piperine (PIP), a major component extracted from the widely-used daily spice black pepper, could induce PXR-mediated expression of cytochrome P450 3A4 (CYP3A4) and multidrug resistance protein 1 (MDR1). Our results showed that PIP activated human PXR (hPXR)-mediated CYP3A4 and MDR1 expression in human hepatocytes, intestine cells, and a mouse model; PIP activated hPXR by recruiting its coactivator SRC-1 in both cellular and cell-free systems; PIP bound to the hPXR ligand binding domain in a competitive ligand binding assay in vitro. The dichotomous effects of PIP on induction of CYP3A4 and MDR1 expression observed here and inhibition of their activity reported elsewhere challenges the potential use of PIP as a bioavailability enhancer and suggests that cautions should be taken for PIP consumption during drug treatment in patients, particularly those who favor daily pepper spice or rely on certain pepper remedies. PMID:23707768

  12. Protein Evolution of Human Milk.

    PubMed

    Thakkar, Sagar K; Giuffrida, Francesca; Bertschy, Emmanuelle; De Castro, Antonio; Destaillats, Frédéric; Lee, Le Ye

    2016-01-01

    Given the documented short- and long-term advantages of breastfeeding, human milk (HM) as a sole source of nutrition for the first few months of newborn life is considered a normative standard. Each macroconstituent of HM plays a crucial role in the growth and development of the baby. Lipids are largely responsible for providing more than 50% of the energy as well as providing essential fatty acids and minor lipids that are integral to all cell membranes. Carbohydrates can be broadly divided into lactose and oligosaccharides, which are a readily digestible source of glucose and indigestible nonnutritive components, respectively. Proteins in HM provide essential amino acids indispensable for the growth of infants. What is more interesting is that protein concentration profoundly changes from colostrum to mature milk. In this report, we share data from an observatory, single-center, longitudinal trial assessing the constituents of HM collected 30, 60 and 120 days postpartum from 50 mothers (singleton deliveries: 25 male and 25 female infants). The protein content decreased with evolving stages of lactation from an average of 1.45 to 1.38 g/100 ml. The data did not show any gender differences as it was reported for lipid content at 120 days postpartum by our group. Additionally, we also share consolidated literature data on protein evolution of HM during the first year of lactation. PMID:27336906

  13. The human interferon-regulated ISG95 protein interacts with RNA polymerase II and shows methyltransferase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Haline-Vaz, Thais; Lima Silva, Tereza Cristina; Zanchin, Nilson I.T.

    2008-08-08

    A major mechanism of cellular resistance to viral invasion involves genes from the interferon signaling pathway, called ISGs (interferon stimulated genes). Global transcriptional profiling studies have linked increased expression of ISG95 (KIAA0082) to response to interferon treatment and viral infection, suggesting that it may be part of the cellular defense against viral replication. In this work, we show that the ISG95 promoter can drive interferon-induced transcription of a reporter gene in Vero cells. Recombinant ISG95 shows RNA- and S-adenosyl-methionine binding and protein methyltransferase activity in vitro. ISG95 interacts with the C-terminal domain of RNA polymerase II, which is consistent with its nuclear localization and with the predicted function of the WW domain found in the C-terminal region of ISG95. The results presented in this work indicate that ISG95 is part of the interferon response pathway and functions in the pre-mRNA processing events mediated by the C-terminal domain of the RNA polymerase II.

  14. Separating proteins with activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Stone, Matthew T; Kozlov, Mikhail

    2014-07-15

    Activated carbon is applied to separate proteins based on differences in their size and effective charge. Three guidelines are suggested for the efficient separation of proteins with activated carbon. (1) Activated carbon can be used to efficiently remove smaller proteinaceous impurities from larger proteins. (2) Smaller proteinaceous impurities are most efficiently removed at a solution pH close to the impurity's isoelectric point, where they have a minimal effective charge. (3) The most efficient recovery of a small protein from activated carbon occurs at a solution pH further away from the protein's isoelectric point, where it is strongly charged. Studies measuring the binding capacities of individual polymers and proteins were used to develop these three guidelines, and they were then applied to the separation of several different protein mixtures. The ability of activated carbon to separate proteins was demonstrated to be broadly applicable with three different types of activated carbon by both static treatment and by flowing through a packed column of activated carbon. PMID:24898563

  15. A Δ38 Deletion Variant of Human Transketolase as a Model of Transketolase-Like Protein 1 Exhibits No Enzymatic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Stefan; Lüdtke, Stefan; Schröder-Tittmann, Kathrin; Wechsler, Cindy; Meyer, Danilo; Tittmann, Kai

    2012-01-01

    Besides transketolase (TKT), a thiamin-dependent enzyme of the pentose phosphate pathway, the human genome encodes for two closely related transketolase-like proteins, which share a high sequence identity with TKT. Transketolase-like protein 1 (TKTL1) has been implicated in cancerogenesis as its cellular expression levels were reported to directly correlate with invasion efficiency of cancer cells and patient mortality. It has been proposed that TKTL1 exerts its function by catalyzing an unusual enzymatic reaction, a hypothesis that has been the subject of recent controversy. The most striking difference between TKTL1 and TKT is a deletion of 38 consecutive amino acids in the N-terminal domain of the former, which constitute part of the active site in authentic TKT. Our structural and sequence analysis suggested that TKTL1 might not possess transketolase activity. In order to test this hypothesis in the absence of a recombinant expression system for TKTL1 and resilient data on its biochemical properties, we have engineered and biochemically characterized a “pseudo-TKTL1” Δ38 deletion variant of human TKT (TKTΔ38) as a viable model of TKTL1. Although the isolated protein is properly folded under in vitro conditions, both thermal stability as well as stability of the TKT-specific homodimeric assembly are markedly reduced. Circular dichroism and NMR spectroscopic analysis further indicates that TKTΔ38 is unable to bind the thiamin cofactor in a specific manner, even at superphysiological concentrations. No transketolase activity of TKTΔ38 can be detected for conversion of physiological sugar substrates thus arguing against an intrinsically encoded enzymatic function of TKTL1 in tumor cell metabolism. PMID:23118983

  16. The protein pheromone Er-1 of the ciliate Euplotes raikovi stimulates human T-cell activity: Involvement of interleukin-2 system

    SciTech Connect

    Cervia, Davide; Catalani, Elisabetta; Belardinelli, Maria Cristina; Perrotta, Cristiana; Picchietti, Simona; Alimenti, Claudio; Casini, Giovanni; Fausto, Anna Maria; Vallesi, Adriana

    2013-02-01

    Water-soluble protein signals (pheromones) of the ciliate Euplotes have been supposed to be functional precursors of growth factors and cytokines that regulate cell–cell interaction in multi-cellular eukaryotes. This work provides evidence that native preparations of the Euplotes raikovi pheromone Er-1 (a helical protein of 40 amino acids) specifically increases viability, DNA synthesis, proliferation, and the production of interferon-γ, tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-2, and IL-13 in human Jurkat T-cells. Also, Er-1 significantly decreases the mRNA levels of the β and γ subunits of IL-2 receptor (IL-2R), while the mRNA levels of the α subunit appeared to be not affected. Jurkat T-cell treatments with Er-1 induced the down-regulation of the IL-2Rα subunit by a reversible and time-dependent endocytosis, and increased the levels of phosphorylation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK). The cell-type specificity of these effects was supported by the finding that Er-1, although unable to directly influence the growth of human glioma U-373 cells, induced Jurkat cells to synthesize and release factors that, in turn, inhibited the U-373 cell proliferation. Overall, these findings imply that Er-1 coupling to IL-2R and ERK immuno-enhances T-cell activity, and that this effect likely translates to an inhibition of glioma cell growth. -- Highlights: ► Euplotes pheromone Er-1 increases the growth of human Jurkat T-cells. ► Er-1 increases the T-cell production of specific cytokines. ► Er-1 activates interleukin-2 receptor and extracellular signal-regulated kinases. ► The immuno-enhancing effect of Er-1 on Jurkat cells translates to an inhibition of human glioma cell growth.

  17. Characterization of the human activator protein-2gamma (AP-2gamma) gene: control of expression by Sp1/Sp3 in breast tumour cells.

    PubMed Central

    Hasleton, Mark D; Ibbitt, J Claire; Hurst, Helen C

    2003-01-01

    The activator protein-2 (AP-2) family of DNA-binding transcription factors are developmentally regulated and also play a role in human neoplasia. In particular, the AP-2gamma protein has been shown to be overexpressed in a high percentage of breast tumours. In the present study, we report the complete sequence determination of the human TFAP2C gene encoding the AP-2gamma transcription factor plus the mapping of the transcription start site used in breast tumour-derived cells. The 5'-end of the gene lies within a CpG island and transcription is initiated at a single site within a classical initiator motif. We have gone on to investigate why some breast tumour-derived cell lines readily express AP-2gamma, whereas others do not, and show that the proximal promoter (+191 to -312) is differentially active in the two cell phenotypes. DNase footprinting led to the identification of three Sp1/Sp3-binding sites within this region, two of which are absolutely required both for promoter function and cell-type-specific activity. By Western blotting a panel of expressing and non-expressing breast tumour lines we show that the latter have higher levels of Sp3. Furthermore, increasing Sp3 levels in AP-2gamma-expressing cells led to the repression of AP-2gamma promoter activity, particularly when Sp3 inhibitory function was maximized through sumoylation. We propose that differences in the level and activity of Sp3 between breast tumour lines can determine the expression level of their AP-2gamma gene. PMID:12733991

  18. Nitric oxide modulates chromatin folding in human endothelial cells via protein phosphatase 2A activation and class II histone deacetylases nuclear shuttling.

    PubMed

    Illi, Barbara; Dello Russo, Claudio; Colussi, Claudia; Rosati, Jessica; Pallaoro, Michele; Spallotta, Francesco; Rotili, Dante; Valente, Sergio; Ragone, Gianluca; Martelli, Fabio; Biglioli, Paolo; Steinkuhler, Christian; Gallinari, Paola; Mai, Antonello; Capogrossi, Maurizio C; Gaetano, Carlo

    2008-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) modulates important endothelial cell (EC) functions and gene expression by a molecular mechanism which is still poorly characterized. Here we show that in human umbilical vein ECs (HUVECs) NO inhibited serum-induced histone acetylation and enhanced histone deacetylase (HDAC) activity. By immunofluorescence and Western blot analyses it was found that NO induced class II HDAC4 and 5 nuclear shuttling and that class II HDACs selective inhibitor MC1568 rescued serum-dependent histone acetylation above control level in NO-treated HUVECs. In contrast, class I HDACs inhibitor MS27-275 had no effect, indicating a specific role for class II HDACs in NO-dependent histone deacetylation. In addition, it was found that NO ability to induce HDAC4 and HDAC5 nuclear shuttling involved the activation of the protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A). In fact, HDAC4 nuclear translocation was impaired in ECs expressing small-t antigen and exposed to NO. Finally, in cells engineered to express a HDAC4-Flag fusion protein, NO induced the formation of a macromolecular complex including HDAC4, HDAC3, HDAC5, and an active PP2A. The present results show that NO-dependent PP2A activation plays a key role in class II HDACs nuclear translocation. PMID:17975112

  19. Protein extraction from activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Denecke, M

    2006-01-01

    Two methods for the separation of protein originating from activated sludge were compared. In one method, the total protein was isolated out of the activated sludge (crude extract). These samples included all dissolved proteins originating from the bacterial cells and biofilm made up of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS). Every time polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) was done, the protein bands from samples of crude extract were covered by polymeric substances including carbohydrates, uronic acids or humic compounds. Using the immunoblot technique it was possible to demonstrate the presence of the heat shock protein HSP70 in crude extracts of activated sludge. The comparison of protein fingerprints required that clear and distinct bands appear on the PAGE analysis. To this end, a procedure to separates bacterial cells from the EPS was developed. Bacterial cells were separated by incubation with EDTA and subsequent filtration. The isolated cells were directly incubated in a sample buffer. PMID:16898150

  20. Dehydroepiandrosterone Activation of G-protein-coupled Estrogen Receptor Rapidly Stimulates MicroRNA-21 Transcription in Human Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Teng, Yun; Radde, Brandie N; Litchfield, Lacey M; Ivanova, Margarita M; Prough, Russell A; Clark, Barbara J; Doll, Mark A; Hein, David W; Klinge, Carolyn M

    2015-06-19

    Little is known about the regulation of the oncomiR miR-21 in liver. Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) regulates gene expression as a ligand for a G-protein-coupled receptor and as a precursor for steroids that activate nuclear receptor signaling. We report that 10 nm DHEA increases primary miR-21 (pri-miR-21) transcription and mature miR-21 expression in HepG2 cells in a biphasic manner with an initial peak at 1 h followed by a second, sustained response from 3-12 h. DHEA also increased miR-21 in primary human hepatocytes and Hep3B cells. siRNA, antibody, and inhibitor studies suggest that the rapid DHEA-mediated increase in miR-21 involves a G-protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPER/GPR30), estrogen receptor α-36 (ERα36), epidermal growth factor receptor-dependent, pertussis toxin-sensitive pathway requiring activation of c-Src, ERK1/2, and PI3K. GPER antagonist G-15 attenuated DHEA- and BSA-conjugated DHEA-stimulated pri-miR-21 transcription. Like DHEA, GPER agonists G-1 and fulvestrant increased pri-miR-21 in a GPER- and ERα36-dependent manner. DHEA, like G-1, increased GPER and ERα36 mRNA and protein levels. DHEA increased ERK1/2 and c-Src phosphorylation in a GPER-responsive manner. DHEA increased c-Jun, but not c-Fos, protein expression after 2 h. DHEA increased androgen receptor, c-Fos, and c-Jun recruitment to the miR-21 promoter. These results suggest that physiological concentrations of DHEA activate a GPER intracellular signaling cascade that increases pri-miR-21 transcription mediated at least in part by AP-1 and androgen receptor miR-21 promoter interaction. PMID:25969534

  1. Binding of tissue-type plasminogen activator to the glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78) modulates plasminogen activation and promotes human neuroblastoma cell proliferation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Gronow, Mario; Gomez, Cristian Farias; de Ridder, Gustaaf G; Ray, Rupa; Pizzo, Salvatore V

    2014-09-01

    The glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78) is a plasminogen (Pg) receptor on the cell surface. In this study, we demonstrate that GRP78 also binds the tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA), which results in a decrease in K(m) and an increase in the V(max) for both its amidolytic activity and activation of its substrate, Pg. This results in accelerated Pg activation when GRP78, t-PA, and Pg are bound together. The increase in t-PA activity is the result of a mechanism involving a t-PA lysine-dependent binding site in the GRP78 amino acid sequence (98)LIGRTWNDPSVQQDIKFL(115). We found that GRP78 is expressed on the surface of neuroblastoma SK-N-SH cells where it is co-localized with the voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC), which is also a t-PA-binding protein in these cells. We demonstrate that both Pg and t-PA serve as a bridge between GRP78 and VDAC bringing them together to facilitate Pg activation. t-PA induces SK-N-SH cell proliferation via binding to GRP78 on the cell surface. Furthermore, Pg binding to the COOH-terminal region of GRP78 stimulates cell proliferation via its microplasminogen domain. This study confirms previous findings from our laboratory showing that GRP78 acts as a growth factor-like receptor and that its association with t-PA, Pg, and VDAC on the cell surface may be part of a system controlling cell growth. PMID:25059665

  2. Detection of UV-induced activation of NF-kappaB in a recombinant human cell line by means of Enhanced Green Fluorescent Protein (EGFP).

    PubMed

    Hellweg, Christine E; Baumstark-Khan, Christa

    2007-08-01

    The cellular protection reaction known as ultraviolet (UV) response leads to increased transcription of several genes. Parts of this transcriptional response are transmitted via activation of the Nuclear factor kappaB (NF-kappaB). The contribution of different UV radiation qualities to this process is not yet known. In a previous work, a stably transfected human cell line was developed which indicates activation of the NF-kappaB pathway by fluorescence of the reporters Enhanced Green Fluorescent Protein (EGFP) and its destabilized variant (d2EGFP) thereby allowing a fast and reliable monitoring of UV effects on the NF-kappaB pathway. Cells were exposed to a mercury low-pressure lamp or to simulated sunlight of different wavelength ranges and subjected to flow cytometric analysis after different post-irradiation periods. Growth capacity of cells after UV irradiation was quantified using a luminance measurement of crystal violet stained cell layers. In contrast to UVC and UVB, UVA radiation induced d2EGFP expression and NF-kappaB activation in a non-cytotoxic dose range. These results show that NF-kappaB plays a role in the UVA-induced gene activation in a non-cytotoxic dose range in a human epithelial cell line. PMID:17429671

  3. Human Bocavirus NS1 and NS1-70 Proteins Inhibit TNF-α-Mediated Activation of NF-κB by targeting p65

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qingshi; Zhang, Zhenfeng; Zheng, Zhenhua; Zheng, Caishang; Liu, Yan; Hu, Qinxue; Ke, Xianliang; Wang, Hanzhong

    2016-01-01

    Human bocavirus (HBoV), a parvovirus, is a single-stranded DNA etiologic agent causing lower respiratory tract infections in young children worldwide. Nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) transcription factors play crucial roles in clearance of invading viruses through activation of many physiological processes. Previous investigation showed that HBoV infection could significantly upregulate the level of TNF-α which is a strong NF-κB stimulator. Here we investigated whether HBoV proteins modulate TNF-α–mediated activation of the NF-κB signaling pathway. We showed that HBoV NS1 and NS1-70 proteins blocked NF-κB activation in response to TNF-α. Overexpression of TNF receptor-associated factor 2 (TRAF2)-, IκB kinase alpha (IKKα)-, IκB kinase beta (IKKβ)-, constitutively active mutant of IKKβ (IKKβ SS/EE)-, or p65-induced NF-κB activation was inhibited by NS1 and NS1-70. Furthermore, NS1 and NS1-70 didn’t interfere with TNF-α-mediated IκBα phosphorylation and degradation, nor p65 nuclear translocation. Coimmunoprecipitation assays confirmed the interaction of both NS1 and NS1-70 with p65. Of note, NS1 but not NS1-70 inhibited TNF-α-mediated p65 phosphorylation at ser536. Our findings together indicate that HBoV NS1 and NS1-70 inhibit NF-κB activation. This is the first time that HBoV has been shown to inhibit NF-κB activation, revealing a potential immune-evasion mechanism that is likely important for HBoV pathogenesis. PMID:27329558

  4. Human Bocavirus NS1 and NS1-70 Proteins Inhibit TNF-α-Mediated Activation of NF-κB by targeting p65.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qingshi; Zhang, Zhenfeng; Zheng, Zhenhua; Zheng, Caishang; Liu, Yan; Hu, Qinxue; Ke, Xianliang; Wang, Hanzhong

    2016-01-01

    Human bocavirus (HBoV), a parvovirus, is a single-stranded DNA etiologic agent causing lower respiratory tract infections in young children worldwide. Nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) transcription factors play crucial roles in clearance of invading viruses through activation of many physiological processes. Previous investigation showed that HBoV infection could significantly upregulate the level of TNF-α which is a strong NF-κB stimulator. Here we investigated whether HBoV proteins modulate TNF-α-mediated activation of the NF-κB signaling pathway. We showed that HBoV NS1 and NS1-70 proteins blocked NF-κB activation in response to TNF-α. Overexpression of TNF receptor-associated factor 2 (TRAF2)-, IκB kinase alpha (IKKα)-, IκB kinase beta (IKKβ)-, constitutively active mutant of IKKβ (IKKβ SS/EE)-, or p65-induced NF-κB activation was inhibited by NS1 and NS1-70. Furthermore, NS1 and NS1-70 didn't interfere with TNF-α-mediated IκBα phosphorylation and degradation, nor p65 nuclear translocation. Coimmunoprecipitation assays confirmed the interaction of both NS1 and NS1-70 with p65. Of note, NS1 but not NS1-70 inhibited TNF-α-mediated p65 phosphorylation at ser536. Our findings together indicate that HBoV NS1 and NS1-70 inhibit NF-κB activation. This is the first time that HBoV has been shown to inhibit NF-κB activation, revealing a potential immune-evasion mechanism that is likely important for HBoV pathogenesis. PMID:27329558

  5. Protein Phosphatase 1α Interacting Proteins in the Human Brain

    PubMed Central

    Esteves, Sara L.C.; Domingues, Sara C.; da Cruz e Silva, Odete A.B.; da Cruz e Silva, Edgar F.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Protein Phosphatase 1 (PP1) is a major serine/threonine-phosphatase whose activity is dependent on its binding to regulatory subunits known as PP1 interacting proteins (PIPs), responsible for targeting PP1 to a specific cellular location, specifying its substrate or regulating its action. Today, more than 200 PIPs have been described involving PP1 in panoply of cellular mechanisms. Moreover, several PIPs have been identified that are tissue and event specific. In addition, the diversity of PP1/PIP complexes can further be achieved by the existence of several PP1 isoforms that can bind preferentially to a certain PIP. Thus, PP1/PIP complexes are highly specific for a particular function in the cell, and as such, they are excellent pharmacological targets. Hence, an in-depth survey was taken to identify specific PP1α PIPs in human brain by a high-throughput Yeast Two-Hybrid approach. Sixty-six proteins were recognized to bind PP1α, 39 being novel PIPs. A large protein interaction databases search was also performed to integrate with the results of the PP1α Human Brain Yeast Two-Hybrid and a total of 246 interactions were retrieved. PMID:22321011

  6. Glomerular expression of myxovirus resistance protein 1 in human mesangial cells: possible activation of innate immunity in the pathogenesis of lupus nephritis.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Shojiro; Imaizumi, Tadaatsu; Tsuruga, Kazushi; Aizawa, Tomomi; Ito, Tatsuya; Matsumiya, Tomoh; Yoshida, Hidemi; Joh, Kensuke; Ito, Etsuro; Tanaka, Hiroshi

    2013-12-01

    Since viral infections activate type I interferon (IFN) pathways and cause subsequent release of IFN-dependent proinflammatory chemokines and cytokines, the innate immune system plays an important role in the pathogenesis of lupus nephritis (LN). It has been reported that human myxovirus resistance protein 1 (Mx1), a type I IFN-dependent transcript, acts against a wide range of RNA viruses. Although the expression of Mx1 in biopsy specimens obtained from patients with dermatomyositis and cutaneous lupus has been described, the expression of Mx1 in human mesangial cells (MCs) has remained largely unknown. We treated normal human MCs in culture with polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid (poly IC), an authentic double-stranded RNA, and analyzed the expression of Mx1 by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and western blotting. To elucidate the poly IC-signalling pathway, we subjected the cells to RNA interference against IFN-β. We also conducted an immunofluorescence study to examine mesangial Mx1 expression in biopsy specimens from patients with LN. Poly IC-induced Mx1 expression in MCs are shown both time- and dose-dependently, and RNA interference against IFN-β inhibited poly IC-induced Mx1 expression. Intense glomerular Mx1 expression was observed in biopsy specimens from patients with LN, whereas negative staining occurred in specimens from patients with IgA nephropathy or purpura nephritis. These preliminary observations support, at least in part, the theory of innate immune system activation in the pathogenesis of LN. PMID:24674141

  7. Role of positively charged residues of the second transmembrane domain in the ion transport activity and conformation of human uncoupling protein-2.

    PubMed

    Hoang, Tuan; Matovic, Tijana; Parker, James; Smith, Matthew D; Jelokhani-Niaraki, Masoud

    2015-04-14

    Residing at the inner mitochondrial membrane, uncoupling protein-2 (UCP2) mediates proton transport from the intermembrane space (IMS) to the mitochondrial matrix and consequently reduces the rate of ATP synthesis in the mitochondria. The ubiquitous expression of UCP2 in humans can be attributed to the protein's multiple physiological roles in tissues, including its involvement in protective mechanisms against oxidative stress, as well as glucose and lipid metabolisms. Currently, the structural properties and ion transport mechanism of UCP2 and other UCP homologues remain poorly understood. UCP2-mediated proton transport is activated by fatty acids and inhibited by di- and triphosphate purine nucleotides. UCP2 also transports chloride and some other small anions. Identification of key amino acid residues of UCP2 in its ion transport pathway can shed light on the protein's ion transport function. On the basis of our previous studies, the second transmembrane helix segment (TM2) of UCP2 exhibited chloride channel activity. In addition, it was suggested that the positively charged residues on TM2 domains of UCPs 1 and 2 were important for their chloride transport activity. On this basis, to further understand the role of these positively charged residues on the ion transport activity of UCP2, we recombinantly expressed four TM2 mutants: R76Q, R88Q, R96Q, and K104Q. The wild type UCP2 and its mutants were purified and reconstituted into liposomes, and their conformation and ion (proton and chloride) transport activity were studied. TM2 Arg residues at the matrix interface of UCP2 proved to be crucial for the protein's anion transport function, and their absence resulted in highly diminished Cl(-) transport rates. On the other hand, the two other positively charged residues of TM2, located at the UCP2-IMS interface, could participate in the salt-bridge formation in the protein and promote the interhelical tight packing in the UCP2. Absence of these residues did not

  8. The HIV Matrix Protein p17 Promotes the Activation of Human Hepatic Stellate Cells through Interactions with CXCR2 and Syndecan-2

    PubMed Central

    Renga, Barbara; Francisci, Daniela; Schiaroli, Elisabetta; Carino, Adriana; Cipriani, Sabrina; D'Amore, Claudio; Sidoni, Angelo; Sordo, Rachele Del; Ferri, Ivana; Lucattelli, Monica; Lunghi, Benedetta; Baldelli, Franco; Fiorucci, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    Background The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) p17 is a matrix protein involved in virus life's cycle. CXCR2 and Syndecan-2, the two major coreceptors for the p17 protein, are expressed in hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), a key cell type involved in matrix deposition in liver fibrotic disorders. Aim In this report we have investigated the in vitro impact of p17 on HSCs transdifferentiation and function and underlying signaling pathways involved in these processes. Methods LX-2 cells, a human HSC line, and primary HSC were challenged with p17 and expressions of fibrogenic markers and of p17 receptors were assessed by qRT-PCR and Western blot. Downstream intracellular signaling pathways were evaluated with qRT-PCR and Western blot as well as after pre-treatment with specific pathway inhibitors. Results Exposure of LX2 cells to p17 increases their contractile force, reshapes the cytoskeleton fibers and upregulates the expression of transdifferentiation markers including αSMA, COL1α1 and endothelin-1 through the activation of Jak/STAT and Rho signaling pathways. These effects are lost in HSCs pre-incubated with a serum from HIV positive person who underwent a vaccination with a p17 peptide. Confocal laser microscopy studies demonstrates that CXCR2 and syndecan-2 co-associate at the plasma membrane after exposure to p17. Immunostaining of HIV/HCV liver biopsies from co-infected patients reveals that the progression of liver fibrosis correlates with a reduced expression of CXCR2. Conclusions The HIV matrix protein p17 is pro-fibrogenic through its interactions both with CXCR2 and syndecan-2 on activated HSCs. PMID:24736615

  9. Piperine activates human pregnane X receptor to induce the expression of cytochrome P450 3A4 and multidrug resistance protein 1

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yue-Ming; Lin, Wenwei; Chai, Sergio C.; Wu, Jing; Ong, Su Sien; Schuetz, Erin G.; Chen, Taosheng

    2013-10-01

    Activation of the pregnane X receptor (PXR) and subsequently its target genes, including those encoding drug transporters and metabolizing enzymes, while playing substantial roles in xenobiotic detoxification, might cause undesired drug-drug interactions. Recently, an increased awareness has been given to dietary components for potential induction of diet–drug interactions through activation of PXR. Here, we studied, whether piperine (PIP), a major component extracted from the widely-used daily spice black pepper, could induce PXR-mediated expression of cytochrome P450 3A4 (CYP3A4) and multidrug resistance protein 1 (MDR1). Our results showed that PIP activated human PXR (hPXR)-mediated CYP3A4 and MDR1 expression in human hepatocytes, intestine cells, and a mouse model; PIP activated hPXR by recruiting its coactivator SRC-1 in both cellular and cell-free systems; PIP bound to the hPXR ligand binding domain in a competitive ligand binding assay in vitro. The dichotomous effects of PIP on induction of CYP3A4 and MDR1 expression observed here and inhibition of their activity reported elsewhere challenges the potential use of PIP as a bioavailability enhancer and suggests that caution should be taken in PIP consumption during drug treatment in patients, particularly those who favor daily pepper spice or rely on certain pepper remedies. - Highlights: • Piperine induces PXR-mediated CYP3A4 and MDR1 expression. • Piperine activates PXR by binding to PXR and recruiting coactivator SRC-1. • Piperine induces PXR activation in vivo. • Caution should be taken in piperine consumption during drug treatment.

  10. Inhibition of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase, DNA methyltransferase, and transforming growth factor-β promotes differentiation of human induced pluripotent stem cells into enterocytes.

    PubMed

    Kodama, Nao; Iwao, Takahiro; Kabeya, Tomoki; Horikawa, Takashi; Niwa, Takuro; Kondo, Yuki; Nakamura, Katsunori; Matsunaga, Tamihide

    2016-06-01

    We previously reported that small-molecule compounds were effective in generating pharmacokinetically functional enterocytes from human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. In this study, to determine whether the compounds promote the differentiation of human iPS cells into enterocytes, we investigated the effects of a combination of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK), DNA methyltransferase (DNMT), and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β inhibitors on intestinal differentiation. Human iPS cells cultured on feeder cells were differentiated into endodermal cells by activin A. These endodermal-like cells were then differentiated into intestinal stem cells by fibroblast growth factor 2. Finally, the cells were differentiated into enterocyte cells by epidermal growth factor and small-molecule compounds. After differentiation, mRNA expression levels and drug-metabolizing enzyme activities were measured. The mRNA expression levels of the enterocyte marker sucrase-isomaltase and the major drug-metabolizing enzyme cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A4 were increased by a combination of MEK, DNMT, and TGF-β inhibitors. The mRNA expression of CYP3A4 was markedly induced by 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3. Metabolic activities of CYP1A1/2, CYP2B6, CYP2C9, CYP2C19, CYP3A4/5, UDP-glucuronosyltransferase, and sulfotransferase were also observed in the differentiated cells. In conclusion, MEK, DNMT, and TGF-β inhibitors can be used to promote the differentiation of human iPS cells into pharmacokinetically functional enterocytes. PMID:27161454

  11. The Bel1 protein of human foamy virus contains one positive and two negative control regions which regulate a distinct activation domain of 30 amino acids.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, C W; Chang, J; Lee, K J; Sung, Y C

    1994-01-01

    The Bel1 transactivator is essential for the replication of human foamy virus (HFV). To define the functional domains of HFV Bel1, we generated random missense mutations throughout the entire coding sequence of Bel1. Functional analyses of 24 missense mutations have revealed the presence of at least two functional domains in Bel1. One domain corresponds to a basic amino acid-rich motif which acts as a bipartite nuclear targeting sequence. A second, central domain corresponds to a presumed effector region which, when mutated, leads to dominant-negative mutants and/or lacks transactivating ability. In addition, deletion analyses and domain-swapping experiments further showed that Bel1 protein contains a strong carboxy-terminal activation domain. The activating region is also capable of functioning as a transcription-activating domain in yeast cells, although it does not bear any significant sequence homology to the well-characterized acidic activation domain which is known to function only in yeast and mammalian cells. We also demonstrated that the regions of Bel1 from residues 1 to 76 and from residues 153 to 225 repressed transcriptional activation exerted by the Bel1 activation domain. In contrast, the region from residues 82 to 150 appears to overcome an inhibitory effect. These results indicate that Bel1 contains one positive and two negative regulatory domains that modulate a distinct activation domain of Bel1. These regulatory domains of Bel1 cannot affect the function of the VP16 activation domain, suggesting that these domains specifically regulate the activation domain of Bel1. Furthermore, in vivo competition experiments showed that the positive regulatory domain acts in trans. Thus, our results demonstrate that Bel1-mediated transactivation appears to undergo a complex regulatory pathway which provides a novel mode of regulation for a transcriptional activation domain. Images PMID:8139046

  12. Overexpression of myristoylated alanine-rich C-kinase substrate enhances activation of phospholipase D by protein kinase C in SK-N-MC human neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed Central

    Morash, S C; Rosé, S D; Byers, D M; Ridgway, N D; Cook, H W

    1998-01-01

    Signal transduction can involve the activation of protein kinase C (PKC) and the subsequent phosphorylation of protein substrates, including myristoylated alanine-rich C kinase substrate (MARCKS). Previously we showed that stimulation of phosphatidylcholine (PtdCho) synthesis by PMA in SK-N-MC human neuroblastoma cells required overexpression of MARCKS, whereas PKCalpha alone was insufficient. We have now investigated the role of MARCKS in PMA-stimulated PtdCho hydrolysis by phospholipase D (PLD). Overexpression of MARCKS enhanced PLD activity 1.3-2.5-fold compared with vector controls in unstimulated cells, and 3-4-fold in cells stimulated with 100 nM PMA. PMA-stimulated PLD activity was blocked by the PKC inhibitor bisindolylmaleimide. Activation of PLD by PMA was linear with time to 60 min, whereas stimulation of PtdCho synthesis by PMA in clones overexpressing MARCKS was observed after a 15 min time lag, suggesting that the hydrolysis of PtdCho by PLD preceded synthesis. The formation of phosphatidylbutanol by PLD was greatest when PtdCho was the predominantly labelled phospholipid, indicating that PtdCho was the preferred, but not the only, phospholipid substrate for PLD. Cells overexpressing MARCKS had 2-fold higher levels of PKCalpha than in vector control cells analysed by Western blot analysis; levels of PKCbeta and PLD were similar in all clones. The loss of both MARCKS and PKCalpha expression at higher subcultures of the clones was paralleled by the loss of stimulation of PLD activity and PtdCho synthesis by PMA. Our results show that MARCKS is an essential link in the PKC-mediated activation of PtdCho-specific PLD in these cells and that the stimulation of PtdCho synthesis by PMA is a secondary response. PMID:9601059

  13. A gene-centric analysis of activated partial thromboplastin time and activated protein C resistance using the HumanCVD focused genotyping array

    PubMed Central

    Gaunt, Tom R; Lowe, Gordon DO; Lawlor, Debbie A; Casas, Juan-Pablo; Day, Ian NM

    2013-01-01

    Activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) is an important routine measure of intrinsic blood coagulation. Addition of activated protein C (APC) to the aPTT test to produce a ratio, provides one measure of APC resistance. The associations of some genetic mutations (eg, factor V Leiden) with these measures are established, but associations of other genetic variations remain to be established. The objective of this work was to test for association between genetic variants and blood coagulation using a high-density genotyping array. Genetic association with aPTT and APC resistance was analysed using a focused genotyping array that tests approximately 50 000 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in nearly 2000 cardiovascular candidate genes, including coagulation pathway genes. Analyses were conducted on 2544 European origin women from the British Women's Heart and Health Study. We confirm associations with aPTT at the coagulation factor XII (F12)/G protein-coupled receptor kinase 6 (GRK6) and kininogen 1 (KNG1)/histidine-rich glycoprotein (HRG) loci, and identify novel SNPs at the ABO locus and novel locus kallikrein B (KLKB1)/F11. In addition, we confirm association between APC resistance and factor V Leiden mutation, and identify novel SNP associations with APC resistance in the HRG and F5/solute carrier family 19 member 2 (SLC19A2) regions. In conclusion, variation at several genetic loci influences intrinsic blood coagulation as measured by both aPTT and APC resistance. PMID:23188048

  14. A milk protein gene promoter directs the expression of human tissue plasminogen activator cDNA to the mammary gland in transgenic mice

    SciTech Connect

    Pittius, C.W.; Hennighausen, L.; Lee, E.; Westphal, H.; Nicols, E.; Vitale, J.; Gordon, K. )

    1988-08-01

    Whey acidic protein (WAP) is a major whey protein in mouse milk. Its gene is expressed in the lactating mammary gland and is inducible by steroid and peptide hormones. A series of transgenic mice containing a hybrid gene in which human tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) cDNA is under the control of the murine WAP gene promoter had previously been generated. In this study, 21 tissues from lactating and virgin transgenic female mice containing the WAP-tPA hybrid gene were screened for the distribution of murine WAP and human tPA transcripts. Like the endogenous WAP RNA, WAP-tPA RNA was expressed predominantly in mammary gland tissue and appeared to be inducible by lactation. Whereas WAP transcripts were not detected in 22 tissues of virgin mice, low levels of WAP-tPA RNA, which were not modulated during lactation, were found in tongue, kidney, and sublingual gland. These studies demonstrate that the WAP gene promoter can target the expression of a transgene to the mammary gland and that this expression is inducible during lactation.

  15. Canine distemper virus neutralization activity is low in human serum and it is sensitive to an amino acid substitution in the hemagglutinin protein

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xinsheng; Wallace, Olivia L.; Domi, Arban; Wright, Kevin J.; Driscoll, Jonathan; Anzala, Omu; Sanders, Eduard J.; Kamali, Anatoli; Allen, Susan; Fast, Pat; Gilmour, Jill; Price, Matt A.; Parks, Christopher L.

    2015-08-15

    Serum was analyzed from 146 healthy adult volunteers in eastern Africa to evaluate measles virus (MV) and canine distemper virus (CDV) neutralizing antibody (nAb) prevalence and potency. MV plaque reduction neutralization test (PRNT) results indicated that all sera were positive for MV nAbs. Furthermore, the 50% neutralizing dose (ND50) for the majority of sera corresponded to antibody titers induced by MV vaccination. CDV nAbs titers were low and generally were detected in sera with high MV nAb titers. A mutant CDV was generated that was less sensitive to neutralization by human serum. The mutant virus genome had 10 nucleotide substitutions, which coded for single amino acid substitutions in the fusion (F) and hemagglutinin (H) glycoproteins and two substitutions in the large polymerase (L) protein. The H substitution occurred in a conserved region involved in receptor interactions among morbilliviruses, implying that this region is a target for cross-reactive neutralizing antibodies. - Highlights: • Screened 146 serum samples for measles virus (MV) and canine distemper virus (CDV) neutralizing antibody (nAb). • MV nAb is prevalent in the sera. • CDV neutralizing activity is generally low or absent and when detected it is present in sera with high MV nAb titers. • A neutralization-resistant CDV mutant was isolated using human serum selection. • A mutation was identified in the receptor-binding region of CDV hemagglutinin protein that confers the neutralization resistance.

  16. Immune Response to Recombinant Capsid Proteins of Adenovirus in Humans: Antifiber and Anti-Penton Base Antibodies Have a Synergistic Effect on Neutralizing Activity

    PubMed Central

    Gahéry-Ségard, Hanne; Farace, Françoise; Godfrin, Dominique; Gaston, Jesintha; Lengagne, Renée; Tursz, Thomas; Boulanger, Pierre; Guillet, Jean-Gérard

    1998-01-01

    Replication-deficient adenovirus used in humans for gene therapy induces a strong immune response to the vector, resulting in transient recombinant protein expression and the blocking of gene transfer upon a second administration. Therefore, in this study we examined in detail the capsid-specific humoral immune response in sera of patients with lung cancer who had been given one dose of a replication-defective adenovirus. We analyzed the immune response to the three major components of the viral capsid, hexon (Hx), penton base (Pb), and fiber (Fi). A longitudinal study of the humoral response assayed on adenovirus particle-coated enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay plates showed that patients had preexisting immunity to adenovirus prior to the administration of adenovirus–β-gal. The level of the response increased in three patients after adenovirus administration and remained at a maximum after three months. One patient had a strong immune response to adenovirus prior to treatment, and this response was unaffected by adenovirus administration. Sera collected from the patients were assayed for recognition of each individual viral capsid protein to determine more precisely the molecular basis of the humoral immune response. Clear differences existed in the humoral response to the three major components of the viral capsid in serum from humans. Sequential appearance of these antibodies was observed: anti-Fi antibodies appeared first, followed by anti-Pb antibodies and then by anti-Hx antibodies. Moreover, anti-Fi antibodies preferentially recognized the native trimeric form of Fi protein, suggesting that they recognized conformational epitopes. Our results showed that sera with no neutralizing activity contained only anti-Fi antibodies. In contrast, neutralizing activity was only obtained with sera containing anti-Fi and anti-Pb antibodies. More importantly, we showed that anti-native Fi and anti-Pb antibodies had a synergistic effect on neutralization. The

  17. Human hsp27, Drosophila hsp27 and human alphaB-crystallin expression-mediated increase in glutathione is essential for the protective activity of these proteins against TNFalpha-induced cell death.

    PubMed Central

    Mehlen, P; Kretz-Remy, C; Préville, X; Arrigo, A P

    1996-01-01

    Expression of small stress proteins (shsp) enhances the survival of mammalian cells exposed to heat or oxidative injuries. Recently, we have shown that the expression of shsp from different species, such as human hsp27, Drosophila hsp27 or human alphaB-crystallin protected murine L929 cells against cell death induced by tumor necrosis factor (TNFalpha), hydrogen peroxide or menadione. Here, we report that, in growing L929 cell lines, the presence of these shsp decreased the intracellular level of reactive oxygen species (ROS). shsp expression also abolished the burst of intracellular ROS induced by TNFalpha. Several downstream effects resulting from the TNFalpha-mediated ROS increment, such as NF-kappaB activation, lipid peroxidation and protein oxidation, were inhibited by shsp expression. We also report that the expression of these different shsp raised the total glutathione level in both L929 cell lines and transiently transfected NIH 3T3-ras cells. This phenomenon was essential for the shsp-mediated decrease in ROS and resistance against TNFalpha. Our results therefore suggest that the protective activity shared by human hsp27, Drosophila hsp27 and human alphaB-crystallin against TNFalpha-mediated cell death and probably other types of oxidative stress results from their conserved ability to raise the intracellular concentration of glutathione. Images PMID:8654367

  18. Insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase signals inversely regulate signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 activity to control human dental pulp stem cell quiescence, propagation, and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Vandomme, Jerome; Touil, Yasmine; Ostyn, Pauline; Olejnik, Cecile; Flamenco, Pilar; El Machhour, Raja; Segard, Pascaline; Masselot, Bernadette; Bailliez, Yves; Formstecher, Pierre; Polakowska, Renata

    2014-04-15

    Dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) remain quiescent until activated in response to severe dental pulp damage. Once activated, they exit quiescence and enter regenerative odontogenesis, producing reparative dentin. The factors and signaling molecules that control the quiescence/activation and commitment to differentiation of human DPSCs are not known. In this study, we determined that the inhibition of insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF-1R) and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK) signaling commonly activates DPSCs and promotes their exit from the G0 phase of the cell cycle as well as from the pyronin Y(low) stem cell compartment. The inhibition of these two pathways, however, inversely determines DPSC fate. In contrast to p38 MAPK inhibitors, IGF-1R inhibitors enhance dental pulp cell sphere-forming capacity and reduce the cells' colony-forming capacity without inducing cell death. The inverse cellular changes initiated by IGF-1R and p38 MAPK inhibitors were accompanied by inverse changes in the levels of active signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) factor, inactive glycogen synthase kinase 3, and matrix extracellular phosphoglycoprotein, a marker of early odontoblast differentiation. Our data suggest that there is cross talk between the IGF-1R and p38 MAPK signaling pathways in DPSCs and that the signals provided by these pathways converge at STAT3 and inversely regulate its activity to maintain quiescence or to promote self-renewal and differentiation of the cells. We propose a working model that explains the possible interactions between IGF-1R and p38 MAPK at the molecular level and describes the cellular consequences of these interactions. This model may inspire further fundamental study and stimulate research on the clinical applications of DPSC in cellular therapy and tissue regeneration. PMID:24266654

  19. Insulin-Like Growth Factor 1 Receptor and p38 Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Signals Inversely Regulate Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 3 Activity to Control Human Dental Pulp Stem Cell Quiescence, Propagation, and Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Vandomme, Jerome; Touil, Yasmine; Ostyn, Pauline; Olejnik, Cecile; Flamenco, Pilar; El Machhour, Raja; Segard, Pascaline; Masselot, Bernadette; Bailliez, Yves; Formstecher, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    Dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) remain quiescent until activated in response to severe dental pulp damage. Once activated, they exit quiescence and enter regenerative odontogenesis, producing reparative dentin. The factors and signaling molecules that control the quiescence/activation and commitment to differentiation of human DPSCs are not known. In this study, we determined that the inhibition of insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF-1R) and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK) signaling commonly activates DPSCs and promotes their exit from the G0 phase of the cell cycle as well as from the pyronin Ylow stem cell compartment. The inhibition of these two pathways, however, inversely determines DPSC fate. In contrast to p38 MAPK inhibitors, IGF-1R inhibitors enhance dental pulp cell sphere-forming capacity and reduce the cells' colony-forming capacity without inducing cell death. The inverse cellular changes initiated by IGF-1R and p38 MAPK inhibitors were accompanied by inverse changes in the levels of active signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) factor, inactive glycogen synthase kinase 3, and matrix extracellular phosphoglycoprotein, a marker of early odontoblast differentiation. Our data suggest that there is cross talk between the IGF-1R and p38 MAPK signaling pathways in DPSCs and that the signals provided by these pathways converge at STAT3 and inversely regulate its activity to maintain quiescence or to promote self-renewal and differentiation of the cells. We propose a working model that explains the possible interactions between IGF-1R and p38 MAPK at the molecular level and describes the cellular consequences of these interactions. This model may inspire further fundamental study and stimulate research on the clinical applications of DPSC in cellular therapy and tissue regeneration. PMID:24266654

  20. Structural Basis for the Catalytic Activity of Human Serine/Threonine Protein Phosphatase type 5 (PP5)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swingle, Mark R.; Ciszak, Ewa M.; Honkanen, Richard E.

    2004-01-01

    Serine/threonine protein phosphatase-5 (PP5) is a member of the PPP-gene family of protein phosphatases that is widely expressed in mammalian tissues and is highly conserved among eukaryotes. PP5 associates with several proteins that affect signal transduction networks, including the glucocorticoid receptor (GR)-heat shock protein-90 (Hsp90)-heterocomplex, the CDC16 and CDC27 subunits of the anaphase-promoting complex, elF2alpha kinase, the A subunit of PP2A, the G12-alpha / G13-alpha subunits of heterotrimeric G proteins and DNA-PK. The catalytic domain of PP5 (PP5c) shares 35-45% sequence identity with the catalytic domains of other PPP-phosphatases, including protein phosphatase-1 (PP1), -2A (PP2A), -2B / calcineurin (PP2B), -4 (PP4), -6 (PP6), and -7 (PP7). Like PP1, PP2A and PP4, PP5 is also sensitive to inhibition by okadaic acid, microcystin, cantharidin, tautomycin, and calyculin A. Here we report the crystal structure of the PP5 catalytic domain (PP5c) at a resolution of 1.6 angstroms. From this structure we propose a mechanism for PP5-mediated hydrolysis of phosphoprotein substrates, which requires the precise positioning of two metal ions within a conserved Asp(sup 271)-M(sub 1):M(sub 2)-W(sup 1)-His(sup 304)-Asp(sup 274) catalytic motif. The structure of PP5c provides a possible structural basis for explaining the exceptional catalytic proficiency of protein phosphatases, which are among the most powerful known catalysts. Resolution of the entire C-terminus revealed a novel subdomain, and the structure of the PP5c should also aid development of type-specific inhibitors.

  1. The crystal structure of human IRE1 luminal domain reveals a conserved dimerization interface required for activation of the unfolded protein response

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Jiahai; Liu, Chuan Yin; Back, Sung Hoon; Clark, Robert L.; Peisach, Daniel; Xu, Zhaohui; Kaufman, Randal J.

    2010-03-08

    The unfolded protein response (UPR) is an evolutionarily conserved mechanism by which all eukaryotic cells adapt to the accumulation of unfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Inositol-requiring kinase 1 (IRE1) and PKR-related ER kinase (PERK) are two type I transmembrane ER-localized protein kinase receptors that signal the UPR through a process that involves homodimerization and autophosphorylation. To elucidate the molecular basis of the ER transmembrane signaling event, we determined the x-ray crystal structure of the luminal domain of human IRE1{alpha}. The monomer of the luminal domain comprises a unique fold of a triangular assembly of {beta}-sheet clusters. Structural analysis identified an extensive dimerization interface stabilized by hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interactions. Dimerization creates an MHC-like groove at the interface. However, because this groove is too narrow for peptide binding and the purified luminal domain forms high-affinity dimers in vitro, peptide binding to this groove is not required for dimerization. Consistent with our structural observations, mutations that disrupt the dimerization interface produced IRE1{alpha} molecules that failed to either dimerize or activate the UPR upon ER stress. In addition, mutations in a structurally homologous region within PERK also prevented dimerization. Our structural, biochemical, and functional studies in vivo altogether demonstrate that IRE1 and PERK have conserved a common molecular interface necessary and sufficient for dimerization and UPR signaling.

  2. The protein interaction landscape of the human CMGC kinase group.

    PubMed

    Varjosalo, Markku; Keskitalo, Salla; Van Drogen, Audrey; Nurkkala, Helka; Vichalkovski, Anton; Aebersold, Ruedi; Gstaiger, Matthias

    2013-04-25

    Cellular information processing via reversible protein phosphorylation requires tight control of the localization, activity, and substrate specificity of protein kinases, which to a large extent is accomplished by complex formation with other proteins. Despite their critical role in cellular regulation and pathogenesis, protein interaction information is available for only a subset of the 518 human protein kinases. Here we present a global proteomic analysis of complexes of the human CMGC kinase group. In addition to subgroup-specific functional enrichment and modularity, the identified 652 high-confidence kinase-protein interactions provide a specific biochemical context for many poorly studied CMGC kinases. Furthermore, the analysis revealed a kinase-kinase subnetwork and candidate substrates for CMGC kinases. Finally, the presented interaction proteome uncovered a large set of interactions with proteins genetically linked to a range of human diseases, including cancer, suggesting additional routes for analyzing the role of CMGC kinases in controlling human disease pathways. PMID:23602568

  3. AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Attenuates High Salt-Induced Activation of Epithelial Sodium Channels (ENaC) in Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xin-Yuan; Hu, Qing-Qing; Ma, He-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) is expressed in the endothelial cells. To test whether high salt affects the NO production via regulation of endothelial ENaC, human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were incubated in solutions containing either normal or high sodium (additional 20 mM NaCl). Our data showed that high sodium treatment significantly increased α-, β-, and γ-ENaC expression levels in HUVECs. Using the cell-attached patch-clamp technique, we demonstrated that high sodium treatment significantly increased ENaC open probability (PO). Moreover, nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) phosphorylation (Ser 1177) levels and NO production were significantly decreased by high sodium in HUVECs; the effects of high sodium on eNOS phosphorylation and NO production were inhibited by a specific ENaC blocker, amiloride. Our results showed that high sodium decreased AMP-activated kinase (AMPK) phosphorylation in endothelial cells. On the other hand, metformin, an AMPK activator, prevented high sodium-induced upregulation of ENaC expression and PO. Moreover, metformin prevented high salt-induced decrease in NO production and eNOS phosphorylation. These results suggest that high sodium stimulates ENaC activation by negatively modulating AMPK activity, thereby leading to reduction in eNOS activity and NO production in endothelial cells.

  4. Characterization of the human CD4 gene promoter: transcription from the CD4 gene core promoter is tissue-specific and is activated by Ets proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Salmon, P; Giovane, A; Wasylyk, B; Klatzmann, D

    1993-01-01

    We analyzed the 5' transcription control sequences of the human CD4 gene. We located the transcription initiation site and showed that the CD4 core promoter (positions -40 to +16) lacks a classical "TATA" or initiator positioning consensus sequence but directs precise and efficient transcription when coupled to the ubiquitously active simian virus 40 enhancer. The transcriptional activity of the CD4 gene promoter correlated with CD4 expression in various cell types. Interestingly, the CD4 core promoter also displayed a tissue-specific transcriptional activity. Within this fragment, three nucleic acid sequences are completely conserved in the murine CD4 gene. One of these sequences contains a perfect ETS consensus sequence. Another ETS consensus sequence is located 1060 nt upstream. Electrophoretic-mobility-shift assays showed that the core promoter ETS motif binds an Ets-related protein specifically expressed at high levels in CD4+ cells. Moreover, in CD4- cells, overexpression of Ets-1 or Ets-2 efficiently and specifically activated transcription from the CD4 promoter and core promoter. These data indicate that Ets transcription factors play a central role in controlling CD4 gene expression, by binding to both a classical remote site and an unusual proximal activator sequence. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 4 PMID:8356078

  5. Graphene Nanoribbons Elicit Cell Specific Uptake and Delivery Via Activation of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Enhanced by Human PapillomaVirus E5 Protein

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, Sayan Mullick; Mannepalli, Prady; Sitharaman, Balaji

    2014-01-01

    Ligands such as peptides, antibodies or other epitopes bind and activate specific cell receptors, and are employed for targeted cellular delivery of pharmaceuticals such as drugs, genes and imaging agents. Herein, we show that oxidized graphene nanoribbons, non-covalently functionalized with PEG-DSPE (1, 2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine-N[amino(polyethyleneglycol)]) (O-GNR-PEG-DSPE) activate epidermal growth factor receptors (EGFRs). This activation generates predominantly dynamin-dependent macropinocytosis-like response, and results in significant O-GNR-PEG-DSPE uptake into cells with high EGFR expression. Cells with an integrated human papillomavirus (HPV) genome also show increased uptake due to the modulation of the activated EFGR by the viral protein E5. We demonstrate that this cell specific uptake of O-GNR-PEG-DSPE can be exploited to achieve significantly enhanced drug efficacies even in drug resistant cells. These results have implications towards the development of active targeting and delivery agents without ligand functionalization for use in the diagnosis and treatment of pathologies that overexpress EGFR or mediated by HPV. PMID:24980059

  6. Inhibition of protein tyrosine phosphatase activity mediates epidermal growth factor receptor signaling in human airway epithelial cells exposed to Zn{sup 2+}

    SciTech Connect

    Tal, T.L.; Graves, L.M.; Silbajoris, R.; Bromberg, P.A.; Wu, W.; Samet, J.M. . E-mail: samet.james@epa.gov

    2006-07-01

    Epidemiological studies have implicated zinc (Zn{sup 2+}) in the toxicity of ambient particulate matter (PM) inhalation. We previously showed that exposure to metal-laden PM inhibits protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) activity in human primary bronchial epithelial cells (HAEC) and leads to Src-dependent activation of EGFR signaling in B82 and A431 cells. In order to elucidate the mechanism of Zn{sup 2+}-induced EGFR activation in HAEC, we treated HAEC with 500 {mu}M ZnSO{sub 4} for 5-20 min and measured the state of activation of EGFR, c-Src and PTPs. Western blots revealed that exposure to Zn{sup 2+} results in increased phosphorylation at both trans- and autophosphorylation sites in the EGFR. Zn{sup 2+}-mediated EGFR phosphorylation did not require ligand binding and was ablated by the EGFR kinase inhibitor PD153035, but not by the Src kinase inhibitor PP2. Src activity was inhibited by Zn{sup 2+} treatment of HAEC, consistent with Src-independent EGFR transactivation in HAEC exposed to Zn{sup 2+}. The rate of exogenous EGFR dephosphorylation in lysates of HAEC exposed to Zn{sup 2+} or V{sup 4+} was significantly diminished. Moreover, exposure of HAEC to Zn{sup 2+} also resulted in a significant impairment of dephosphorylation of endogenous EGFR. These data show that Zn{sup 2+}-induced activation of EGFR in HAEC involves a loss of PTP activities whose function is to dephosphorylate EGFR in opposition to baseline EGFR kinase activity. These findings also suggest that there are marked cell-type-specific differences in the mechanism of EGFR activation induced by Zn{sup 2+} exposure.

  7. An ent-kaurane diterpenoid from Croton tonkinensis induces apoptosis by regulating AMP-activated protein kinase in SK-HEP1 human hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Sul, Young Hoon; Lee, Myung Sun; Cha, Eun Young; Thuong, Phuong Thien; Khoi, Nguyen Minh; Song, In Sang

    2013-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the most common type of liver cancer with high mortality worldwide. Traditional chemotherapy for HCC is not widely accepted by clinical practitioners because of its toxic side effects. Thus, there is a need to identify chemotherapeutic drugs against HCC. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a biologic sensor for cellular energy status that acts a tumor suppressor and a potential cancer therapeutic target. The traditional Vietnamese medicinal plant Croton tonkinensis shows cytotoxicity in various cancer cells; however, its anticancer mechanism remains unclear. In this study, we determined whether the ent-kaurane diterpenoid ent-18-acetoxy-7β-hydroxy kaur-15-oxo-16-ene (CrT1) isolated from this plant plays a role as a chemotherapeutic drug targeting AMPK. CrT1 blocked proliferation in dose- and time-dependent manners in human hepatocellular carcinoma SK-HEP1 cells. CrT1 induced sub-G(1) arrest and caspase-dependent apoptosis. CrT1 activated caspase-3, -7, -8, -9, and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase, and its effect was inhibited by z-VAD-fmk suppressing caspase-3 cleavage. CrT1 induced increases in p53 and Bax levels but decreased Bcl(2) levels. In addition, CrT1 resulted in increased translocation of cytochrome c into the cytoplasm. We showed that CrT1-activated AMPK activation was followed by modulating the mammalian target of rapamycin/p70S6K pathway and was inactivated by treating cells with compound C. Treatment with CrT1 and aminoimidazole carboxamide ribonucleotide (AICAR) synergistically activated AMPK. CrT1-induced AMPK activation regulated cell viability and apoptosis. These results suggest that CrT1 is a novel AMPK activator and that AMPK activation in SK-HEP1 cells is responsible for CrT1-induced anticancer activity including apoptosis. PMID:23302650

  8. Borrelia burgdorferi outer membrane protein A induces nuclear translocation of nuclear factor-kappa B and inflammatory activation in human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Wooten, R M; Modur, V R; McIntyre, T M; Weis, J J

    1996-11-15

    Lyme disease is caused by infection with Borrelia burgdorferi, and is characterized by bacterial persistence and inflammation in a number of host tissues. B. burgdorferi outer surface lipoproteins possess cytokine stimulatory properties that may be responsible for localized inflammation. B. burgdorferi presence is correlated with severity of disease, and the pathology of many tissues, particularly the arthritic joint, is consistent with localized cytokine production. Spirochete invasion of tissues requires interaction with and penetration of vascular endothelium, suggesting endothelial cells may participate in the inflammation of Lyme disease. In this study, outer surface protein A (OspA), a model B. burgdorferi lipoprotein, was found to be a potent stimulant of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-kappa B) nuclear translocation in human endothelial cells, resulting in nuclear levels similar to those seen in response to known inflammatory mediators. Only the lipid-modified OspA had activity, and activity was not due to contamination with LPS. Nuclear NF-kappa B was detectable within 15 min, suggesting that OspA directly mediates NF-kappa B nuclear translocation. OspA also rapidly up-regulated endothelial cell production of several proteins whose transcription is dependent on NF-kappa B: the cytokine IL-6; the chemokine IL-8; and the adhesion molecules E-selectin, VCAM-1, and ICAM-1. The adhesion molecules were functional, as demonstrated by enhanced binding of neutrophils to OspA-stimulated endothelial monolayers. These data suggest that OspA may initiate synthesis of many proteins essential for localized inflammation via the direct activation of NF-kappa B-dependent transcription. These observations suggest that the interaction of B. burgdorferi lipoproteins with the endothelium may directly induce the inflammation responsible for the symptoms of Lyme disease. PMID:8906837

  9. Investigating the role of ankyrin-rich membrane spanning protein in Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type-1 Tat-induced microglia activation

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Vir B.; Wooten, Alicia K.; Jackson, Joseph W.; Maggirwar, Sanjay B.; Kiebala, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    Long-term persistence of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type-1 (HIV) in the central nervous system (CNS) results in mild to severe neurocognitive impairment in a significant proportion of the HIV infected population. These neurological deficits are known as HIV-Associated Neurocognitive Disorders (HAND). Microglia are CNS resident immune cells that are directly infected by HIV, and consequently secrete proinflammatory molecules that contribute to HIV-induced neuroinflammation. Indeed, the number of activated macrophage and microglia in the brain is more highly correlated with cognitive impairment than the amount of neuronal apoptosis. Ankyrin–rich membrane spanning protein (ARMS/Kidins220) is a multidomain transmembrane protein that is involved with neurotrophin signaling in the CNS. We have previously established the role of ARMS in mediating neuronal survival via a neurotrophin-dependent mechanism. Recent reports also have suggested that ARMS is involved with cell signaling in multiple immune cell types. In this study we aim to investigate the role of ARMS in HIV Tat-mediated microglial cell activation by employing in vitro methods. Following ARMS depletion by a lentivirus encoding ARMS-specific shRNA, we observed a marked reduction in the HIV Tat-induced proinflammatory response, associated with loss of tumor necrosis factor alpha production and nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) activation. Furthermore, co-immunoprecipitation studies suggested that ARMS physically interacts with inhibitory kappa B kinase subunits in order to facilitate NF-κB activation. Our results establish the role of ARMS in microglial activation by HIV Tat and warrant additional studies to better understand these molecular mechanisms, which may uncover novel therapeutic targets for the treatment of HAND. PMID:25636783

  10. TsAg5, a Taenia solium cysticercus protein with a marginal trypsin-like activity in the diagnosis of human neurocysticercosis

    PubMed Central

    Rueda, Analiz; Sifuentes, Cecilia; Gilman, Robert H.; Gutiérrez, Andrés H.; Piña, Ruby; Chile, Nancy; Carrasco, Sebastián; Larson, Sandra; Mayta, Holger; Verástegui, Manuela; Rodriguez, Silvia; Gutiérrez-Correa, Marcel; García, Héctor H.; Sheen, Patricia; Zimic, Mirko

    2011-01-01

    Neurocysticercosis is an endemic parasitic disease caused by Taenia solium larva. Although the mechanism of infection is not completely understood, it is likely driven by proteolytic activity that degrades the intestinal wall to facilitate oncosphere penetration and further infection. We analyzed the publicly available Taenia solium EST/DNA library and identified two contigs comprising a full-length cDNA fragment very similar to E. granulosus Ag5 protein. The Taenia solium cDNA sequence included a proteolytic trypsin-like-domain in the C-terminal region, and a thrombospondin type-1 adherence-domain in the N-terminal region. Both the trypsin-like and adherence domains were expressed independently as recombinant proteins in bacterial systems. TsAg5 showed marginal trypsin-like activity and high sequence similarity to Ag5. The purified antigens were tested in a Western immunoblot assay to diagnose human neurocysticercosis. The sensitivity of the trypsin-like-domain was 96.36% in patients infected with extraparenchymal cysts, 75.44% in patients infected with multiple cysts, and 39.62% in patients with a single cyst. Specificity was 76.70%. The thrombospondin type-1 adherence-domain was not specific for neurocysticercosis. PMID:21893105

  11. The Silk-protein Sericin Induces Rapid Melanization of Cultured Primary Human Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells by Activating the NF-κB Pathway.

    PubMed

    Eidet, J R; Reppe, S; Pasovic, L; Olstad, O K; Lyberg, T; Khan, A Z; Fostad, I G; Chen, D F; Utheim, T P

    2016-01-01

    Restoration of the retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells to prevent further loss of vision in patients with age-related macular degeneration represents a promising novel treatment modality. Development of RPE transplants, however, requires up to 3 months of cell differentiation. We explored whether the silk protein sericin can induce maturation of primary human retinal pigment epithelial (hRPE) cells. Microarray analysis demonstrated that sericin up-regulated RPE-associated transcripts (RPE65 and CRALBP). Upstream analysis identified the NF-κB pathway as one of the top sericin-induced regulators. ELISA confirmed that sericin stimulates the main NF-κB pathway. Increased levels of RPE-associated proteins (RPE65 and the pigment melanin) in the sericin-supplemented cultures were confirmed by western blot, spectrophotometry and transmission electron microscopy. Sericin also increased cell density and reduced cell death following serum starvation in culture. Inclusion of NF-κB agonists and antagonists in the culture medium showed that activation of the NF-κB pathway appears to be necessary, but not sufficient, for sericin-induced RPE pigmentation. We conclude that sericin promotes pigmentation of cultured primary hRPE cells by activating the main NF-κB pathway. Sericin's potential role in culture protocols for rapid differentiation of hRPE cells derived from embryonic or induced pluripotent stem cells should be investigated. PMID:26940175

  12. The Silk-protein Sericin Induces Rapid Melanization of Cultured Primary Human Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells by Activating the NF-κB Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Eidet, J. R.; Reppe, S.; Pasovic, L.; Olstad, O. K.; Lyberg, T.; Khan, A. Z.; Fostad, I. G.; Chen, D. F.; Utheim, T. P.

    2016-01-01

    Restoration of the retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells to prevent further loss of vision in patients with age-related macular degeneration represents a promising novel treatment modality. Development of RPE transplants, however, requires up to 3 months of cell differentiation. We explored whether the silk protein sericin can induce maturation of primary human retinal pigment epithelial (hRPE) cells. Microarray analysis demonstrated that sericin up-regulated RPE-associated transcripts (RPE65 and CRALBP). Upstream analysis identified the NF-κB pathway as one of the top sericin-induced regulators. ELISA confirmed that sericin stimulates the main NF-κB pathway. Increased levels of RPE-associated proteins (RPE65 and the pigment melanin) in the sericin-supplemented cultures were confirmed by western blot, spectrophotometry and transmission electron microscopy. Sericin also increased cell density and reduced cell death following serum starvation in culture. Inclusion of NF-κB agonists and antagonists in the culture medium showed that activation of the NF-κB pathway appears to be necessary, but not sufficient, for sericin-induced RPE pigmentation. We conclude that sericin promotes pigmentation of cultured primary hRPE cells by activating the main NF-κB pathway. Sericin’s potential role in culture protocols for rapid differentiation of hRPE cells derived from embryonic or induced pluripotent stem cells should be investigated. PMID:26940175

  13. Intrinsic resistance to selumetinib, a selective inhibitor of MEK1/2, by cAMP-dependent protein kinase A activation in human lung and colorectal cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Troiani, T; Vecchione, L; Martinelli, E; Capasso, A; Costantino, S; Ciuffreda, L P; Morgillo, F; Vitagliano, D; D'Aiuto, E; De Palma, R; Tejpar, S; Van Cutsem, E; De Lorenzi, M; Caraglia, M; Berrino, L; Ciardiello, F

    2012-01-01

    Background: MEK is activated in ∼40% colorectal cancer (CRC) and 20–30% non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Selumetinib is a selective inhibitor of MEK1/2, which is currently in clinical development. Methods: We evaluated the effects of selumetinib in vitro and in vivo in CRC and NSCLC cell lines to identify cancer cell characteristics correlating with sensitivity to MEK inhibition. Results: Five NSCLC and six CRC cell lines were treated with selumetinib and classified according to the median inhibitory concentration (IC50) values as sensitive (⩽1 μℳ) or resistant (>1 μℳ). In selumetinib-sensitive cancer cell lines, selumetinib treatment induced G1 cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis and suppression of tumour growth as xenografts in immunodeficient mice. Evaluation of intracellular effector proteins and analysis of gene mutations showed no correlation with selumetinib sensitivity. Microarray gene expression profiles revealed that the activation of cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA) was associated with MEK inhibitor resistance. Combined targeting of both MEK and PKA resulted in cancer cell growth inhibition of MEK inhibitor-resistant cancer cell lines in vitro and in vivo. Conclusion: This study provides molecular insights to explain resistance to an MEK inhibitor in human cancer cell lines. PMID:22569000

  14. Pregnancy-associated plasma protein-A promotes TF procoagulant activity in human endothelial cells by Akt-NF-κB axis.

    PubMed

    Cirillo, Plinio; Conte, Stefano; Pellegrino, Grazia; Ziviello, Francesca; Barra, Giusi; De Palma, Raffaele; Leonardi, Antonio; Trimarco, Bruno

    2016-08-01

    Pregnancy-associated plasma protein-A (PAPP-A) is a metalloproteinase with a controversial role in pathophysiology of cardiovascular disease. It seems involved in progression of atherosclerosis and is widely represented in atherosclerotic plaque. PAPP-A plasma levels are elevated in patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACS), thus it has been suggested that it might be a prognostic marker for developing major cardiovascular events. However, the pathophysiological link(s) between PAPP-A and ACS are still unknown. Several studies have indicated that tissue factor (TF) plays a pivotal role in the pathophysiology of ACS by triggering the formation of intracoronary thrombi following endothelial injury. This study investigates whether PAPP-A, at concentrations measurable in ACS patients, might induce TF expression in human endothelial cells in culture (HUVEC). In HUVEC, PAPP-A induced TF-mRNA transcription as demonstrated by real time PCR and expression of functionally active TF as demonstrated by FACS analysis and pro-coagulant activity assay. PAPP-A induced TF expression through the activation of Akt/NF-κB axis, as demonstrated by luciferase assay and by suppression of TF-mRNA transcription as well as of TF expression/activity by Akt and NF-κB inhibitors. These data indicate that PAPP-A promotes TF expression in human endothelial cells and support the hypothesis that this proteinase, besides being involved in progression of atherosclerosis, does not represent an independent risk factor for adverse cardiovascular events, but it rather might play an "active" role in the pathophysiology of ACS as an effector molecule able to induce a pro-thrombotic phenotype in endothelial cells. PMID:27007282

  15. Functional Activities and Epitope Specificity of Human and Murine Antibodies against the Class 4 Outer Membrane Protein (Rmp) of Neisseria meningitidis

    PubMed Central

    Rosenqvist, Einar; Musacchio, Alexis; Aase, Audun; Høiby, E. Arne; Namork, Ellen; Kolberg, Jan; Wedege, Elisabeth; Delvig, Alexei; Dalseg, Rolf; Michaelsen, Terje E.; Tommassen, Jan

    1999-01-01

    Antibodies against the class 4 outer membrane protein (OMP) from Neisseria meningitidis have been purified from sera from vaccinees immunized with the Norwegian meningococcal group B outer membrane vesicle vaccine. The human sera and purified antibodies reacted strongly with the class 4 OMP in immunoblots, whereas experiments with whole bacteria showed only weak reactions, indicating that the antibodies mainly reacted with parts of the class 4 molecule that were not exposed. The purified human anti-class 4 OMP antibodies and the monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) were neither bactericidal nor opsonic against live meningococci. Three new MAbs against the class 4 OMP were generated and compared with other, previously described MAbs. Three linear epitopes in different regions of the class 4 OMP were identified by the reaction of MAbs with synthetic peptides. The MAbs showed no blocking effect on bactericidal activity of MAbs against other OMPs. However, one of the eight purified human anti-class 4 OMP antibody preparations, selected from immunoblot reactions among sera from 27 vaccinees, inhibited at high concentrations the bactericidal effect of a MAb against the class 1 OMP. However, these antibodies were not vaccine induced, as they were present also before vaccination. Therefore, this study gave no evidence that vaccination with a meningococcal outer membrane vesicle vaccine containing the class 4 OMP induces blocking antibodies. Our data indicated that the structure of class 4 OMP does not correspond to standard β-barrel structures of integral OMPs and that no substantial portion of the OmpA-like C-terminal region of this protein is located at the surface of the outer membrane. PMID:10024570

  16. Angiotensin II type 1 receptor antagonists inhibit basal as well as low-density lipoprotein and platelet-activating factor-stimulated human monocyte chemoattractant protein-1.

    PubMed

    Proudfoot, Julie M; Croft, Kevin D; Puddey, Ian B; Beilin, Lawrence J

    2003-06-01

    Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) is a potent chemotactic agent for monocytes and other cells and is thought to be involved in atherosclerosis, recruiting monocytes to the subendothelial space or to the site of inflammation. Angiotensin II has been demonstrated, at least in animal models, to stimulate MCP-1 expression. We investigated the effect of the angiotensin II type 1 (AT1) receptor antagonists irbesartan and losartan on MCP-1 production by freshly isolated human monocytes. Irbesartan and losartan inhibited basal MCP-1 production in a dose-dependent manner. Low-density lipoprotein (LDL) stimulated MCP-1 in a concentration-dependent manner, with 200 microg/ml LDL protein giving a 2-fold increase in MCP-1. Irbesartan and losartan dose dependently blocked LDL-stimulated MCP-1. An angiotensin II type 2 receptor antagonist, S-(+)-1-([4-(dimethylamino)-3-methylphenyl]methyl)-5-(diphenylacetyl)-4,5,6,7-tetrahydro-1H-imidazo(4,5-c)pyridine-6-carboxylic acid (PD123319), had no significant effect on basal MCP-1 levels or LDL-stimulated MCP-1. After noting homology between the AT1 receptor and the platelet-activating factor (PAF) receptor, we showed that irbesartan inhibited both [3H]PAF binding to human monocytes and carbamyl-PAF stimulation of MCP-1. However, irbesartan affinity for the PAF receptor was 700 times less than PAF, suggesting that there may be another mechanism for irbesartan inhibition of PAF-stimulated MCP-1. This is the first report showing that AT1 receptor antagonists inhibit basal as well as LDL- and PAF-stimulated MCP-1 production in freshly isolated human monocytes. PMID:12626661

  17. GPNMB/OA protein increases the invasiveness of human metastatic prostate cancer cell lines DU145 and PC3 through MMP-2 and MMP-9 activity

    SciTech Connect

    Fiorentini, Chiara; Bodei, Serena; Bedussi, Francesca; Fragni, Martina; Bonini, Sara Anna; Simeone, Claudio; Zani, Danilo; Berruti, Alfredo; Missale, Cristina; Memo, Maurizio; Spano, PierFranco; Sigala, Sandra

    2014-04-15

    Non-metastatic glycoprotein melanoma protein B (GPNMB), also known as osteoactivin (OA) is expressed in a wide array of tumors and represents an emerging target for drug development. In this study, we investigated the role of GPNMB/OA in the progression of human metastatic DU145 and PC3 prostate cancer cells. GPNMB/OA contribution in PCa malignant phenotype has been analyzed by small interfering RNA-induced GPNMB/OA silencing. We found that following GPNMB/OA silencing the migration capability of both DU145 and PC3 cells, evaluated by using in vitro invasivity assay, as well as the metalloproteinases MMP-2 and MMP-9 activity were equally strongly inhibited. By contrast knocking down GPNMB/OA weakly attenuated cell proliferation rate of DU145, an effect that paralleled with an increase number of apoptotic cells. However, PC3 cell growth seems to be not affected by GPNMB/OA. Together, these data reveal that GPNMB/OA acts as a critical molecular mediator promoting the acquisition of the more aggressive, pro-metastatic phenotype distinctive of human DU145 and PC3 cell lines. - Highlights: • GPNMB/OA expression correlates with DU145 and PC3 cells malignant phenotype. • GPNMB/OA silencing affects the migration capability of both DU145 and PC3 cells. • GPNMB/OA increases invasiveness by up-regulating MMPs activity. • GPNMB/OA promotes DU145 and PC3 cells progression into a more aggressive phenotype.

  18. Activation pathways and human immunodeficiency virus type 1 replication are not altered in CD4+ T cells expressing the nef protein.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, O; Arenzana-Seisdedos, F; Heard, J M; Danos, O

    1992-05-01

    While recent studies in Rhesus monkeys have pointed out the importance of an intact nef gene for the development of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), no biological function has been so far unambiguously attributed to its product. Since Nef has been described to possess GTP-binding properties and to down-regulate CD4 cell surface expression, we looked for evidences of Nef interfering with the transduction of activating signals in human CD4+ T cells. We used a murine leukemia retroviral vector to express the HIV-1BRU nef gene in two permanent tumoral T-cell lines (CEM and Jurkat) and in two nonimmortalized, interleukin-2 (IL2)-dependent, T-cell clones. The single copy recombinant provirus integrated in the genome of these cells directed the synthesis of a 27-kD protein with a half-life greater than 5 h. The levels of expression of cell surface molecules involved in T-cell functions (CD4, CD3, CD28, CD29, IL-2 receptor) were not modified in cell populations expressing Nef. In immunocompetent T-cell clones, cell proliferation and lymphokine production in response to activating stimuli (IL-2, alloantigens, phorbol esters, or antibodies directed against CD2, CD3, CD4, CD28) remained unmodified. Moreover, the presence of Nef did not change the kinetics of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. PMID:1355346

  19. Extreme multifunctional proteins identified from a human protein interaction network

    PubMed Central

    Chapple, Charles E.; Robisson, Benoit; Spinelli, Lionel; Guien, Céline; Becker, Emmanuelle; Brun, Christine

    2015-01-01

    Moonlighting proteins are a subclass of multifunctional proteins whose functions are unrelated. Although they may play important roles in cells, there has been no large-scale method to identify them, nor any effort to characterize them as a group. Here, we propose the first method for the identification of ‘extreme multifunctional' proteins from an interactome as a first step to characterize moonlighting proteins. By combining network topological information with protein annotations, we identify 430 extreme multifunctional proteins (3% of the human interactome). We show that the candidates form a distinct sub-group of proteins, characterized by specific features, which form a signature of extreme multifunctionality. Overall, extreme multifunctional proteins are enriched in linear motifs and less intrinsically disordered than network hubs. We also provide MoonDB, a database containing information on all the candidates identified in the analysis and a set of manually curated human moonlighting proteins. PMID:26054620

  20. Cytotoxic Effects and Osteogenic Activity of Calcium Sulfate with and without Recombinant Human Bone Morphogenetic Protein 2 and Nano-Hydroxyapatite Adjacent to MG-63 Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Ghorbanzadeh, Abdollah; Aminsobhani, Mohsen; Khoshzaban, Ahad; Abbaszadeh, Armin; Ghorbanzadeh, Atiyeh; Shamshiri, Ahmad Reza

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to assess the cytotoxic effects and osteogenic activity of recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein (rhBMP2) and nano-hydroxyapatite (n-HA) adjacent to MG-63 cell line. Materials and Methods: To assess cytotoxicity, the 4,5-dimethyl thiazolyl-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay was used. Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and osteogenic activity were evaluated using Alizarin red and the von Kossa staining and analyzed by one-way ANOVA followed by Tukey’s post hoc test. Results: The n-HA/calcium sulfate (CS) mixture significantly promoted cell growth in comparison to pure CS. Moreover, addition of rhBMP2 to CS (P=0.02) and also mixing CS with n-HA led to further increase in extracellular calcium production and ALP activity (P=0.03). Conclusion: This in vitro study indicates that a scaffold material in combination with an osteoinductive material is effective for bone matrix formation. PMID:26877731

  1. Human biliverdin reductase is a leucine zipper-like DNA-binding protein and functions in transcriptional activation of heme oxygenase-1 by oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Zulfiqar; Salim, Mohammad; Maines, Mahin D

    2002-03-15

    Human biliverdin reductase (hBVR) is a serine/threonine kinase that catalyzes reduction of the heme oxygenase (HO) activity product, biliverdin, to bilirubin. A domain of biliverdin reductase (BVR) has primary structural features that resemble leucine zipper proteins. A heptad repeat of five leucines (L(1)--L(5)), a basic domain, and a conserved alanine characterize the domain. In hBVR, a lysine replaces L(3). The secondary structure model of hBVR predicts an alpha-helix-turn-beta-sheet for this domain. hBVR translated by the rabbit reticulocyte lysate system appears on a nondenaturing gel as a single band with molecular mass of approximately 69 kDa. The protein on a denaturing gel separates into two anti-hBVR immunoreactive proteins of approximately 39.9 + 34.6 kDa. The dimeric form, but not purified hBVR, binds to a 100-mer DNA fragment corresponding to the mouse HO-1 (hsp32) promoter region encompassing two activator protein (AP-1) sites. The specificity of DNA binding is suggested by the following: (a) hBVR does not bind to the same DNA fragment with one or zero AP-1 sites; (b) a 56-bp random DNA with one AP-1 site does not form a complex with hBVR; (c) in vitro translated HO-1 does not interact with the 100-mer DNA fragment with two AP-1 sites; (d) mutation of Lys(143), Leu(150), or Leu(157) blocks both the formation of the approximately 69-kDa specimens and hBVR DNA complex formation; and (e) purified preparations of hBVR or hHO-1 do not bind to DNA with two AP-1 sites. The potential significance of the AP-1 binding is suggested by the finding that the response of HO-1, in COS cells stably transfected with antisense hBVR, with 66% reduced BVR activity, to superoxide anion (O(2)()) formed by menadione is attenuated, whereas induction by heme is not affected. We propose a role for BVR in the signaling cascade for AP-1 complex activation necessary for HO-1 oxidative stress response. PMID:11773068

  2. Arsenite and Cadmium Activate MAPK/ERK via Membrane Estrogen Receptors and G-Protein Coupled Estrogen Receptor Signaling in Human Lung Adenocarcinoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Huff, Mary O; Todd, Sarah L; Smith, Aaron L; Elpers, Julie T; Smith, Alexander P; Murphy, Robert D; Bleser-Shartzer, Allison S; Hoerter, Jacob E; Radde, Brandie N; Klinge, Carolyn M

    2016-07-01

    Epidemiological evidence indicates that cadmium and arsenic exposure increase lung cancer risk. Cadmium and arsenic are environmental contaminants that act as endocrine disruptors (EDs) by activating estrogen receptors (ERs) in breast and other cancer cell lines but their activity as EDs in lung cancer is untested. Here, we examined the effect of cadmium chloride (CdCl2) and sodium arsenite (NaAsO2) on the proliferation of human lung adenocarcinoma cell lines. Results demonstrated that both CdCl2 and NaAsO2 stimulated cell proliferation at environmentally relevant nM concentrations in a similar manner to 17β-estradiol (E2) in H1793, H2073, and H1944 cells but not in H1792 or H1299 cells. Further studies in H1793 cells showed that 100 nM CdCl2 and NaAsO2 rapidly stimulated mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK, extracellular-signal-regulated kinases) phosphorylation with a peak detected at 15 min. Inhibitor studies suggest that rapid MAPK phosphorylation by NaAsO2, CdCl2, and E2 involves ER, Src, epidermal growth factor receptor, and G-protein coupled ER (GPER) in a pertussis toxin-sensitive pathway. CdCl2 and E2 activation of MAPK may also involve ERβ. This study supports the involvement of membrane ER and GPER signaling in mediating cellular responses to environmentally relevant nM concentrations of CdCl2 and NaAsO2 in lung adenocarcinoma cells. PMID:27071941

  3. Human holocarboxylase synthetase with a start site at methionine-58 is the predominant nuclear variant of this protein and has catalytic activity

    SciTech Connect

    Bao, Baolong; Wijeratne, Subhashinee S.K.; Rodriguez-Melendez, Rocio; Zempleni, Janos

    2011-08-19

    Highlights: {yields} Unambiguous evidence is provided that methionine-58 serves as an in-frame alternative translation site for holocarboxylase synthetase (HLCS58). {yields} Full-length HLCS and HLCS58 enter the nucleus, but HLCS58 is the predominant variant. {yields} HLCS58 has biological activity as biotin protein ligase. -- Abstract: Holocarboxylase synthetase (HLCS) catalyzes the covalent binding of biotin to both carboxylases in extranuclear structures and histones in cell nuclei, thereby mediating important roles in intermediary metabolism, gene regulation, and genome stability. HLCS has three putative translational start sites (methionine-1, -7, and -58), but lacks a strong nuclear localization sequence that would explain its participation in epigenetic events in the cell nucleus. Recent evidence suggests that small quantities of HLCS with a start site in methionine-58 (HLCS58) might be able to enter the nuclear compartment. We generated the following novel insights into HLCS biology. First, we generated a novel HLCS fusion protein vector to demonstrate that methionine-58 is a functional translation start site in human cells. Second, we used confocal microscopy and western blots to demonstrate that HLCS58 enters the cell nucleus in meaningful quantities, and that full-length HLCS localizes predominantly in the cytoplasm but may also enter the nucleus. Third, we produced recombinant HLCS58 to demonstrate its biological activity toward catalyzing the biotinylation of both carboxylases and histones. Collectively, these observations are consistent with roles of HLCS58 and full-length HLCS in nuclear events. We conclude this report by proposing a novel role for HLCS in epigenetic events, mediated by physical interactions between HLCS and other chromatin proteins as part of a larger multiprotein complex that mediates gene repression.

  4. Mitochondrial Respiratory Defect Causes Dysfunctional Lactate Turnover via AMP-activated Protein Kinase Activation in Human-induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-derived Hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Im, Ilkyun; Jang, Mi-Jin; Park, Seung Ju; Lee, Sang-Hee; Choi, Jin-Ho; Yoo, Han-Wook; Kim, Seyun; Han, Yong-Mahn

    2015-12-01

    A defective mitochondrial respiratory chain complex (DMRC) causes various metabolic disorders in humans. However, the pathophysiology of DMRC in the liver remains unclear. To understand DMRC pathophysiology in vitro, DMRC-induced pluripotent stem cells were generated from dermal fibroblasts of a DMRC patient who had a homoplasmic mutation (m.3398T→C) in the mitochondrion-encoded NADH dehydrogenase 1 (MTND1) gene and that differentiated into hepatocytes (DMRC hepatocytes) in vitro. DMRC hepatocytes showed abnormalities in mitochondrial characteristics, the NAD(+)/NADH ratio, the glycogen storage level, the lactate turnover rate, and AMPK activity. Intriguingly, low glycogen storage and transcription of lactate turnover-related genes in DMRC hepatocytes were recovered by inhibition of AMPK activity. Thus, AMPK activation led to metabolic changes in terms of glycogen storage and lactate turnover in DMRC hepatocytes. These data demonstrate for the first time that energy depletion may lead to lactic acidosis in the DMRC patient by reduction of lactate uptake via AMPK in liver. PMID:26491018

  5. Expression of Ribosomal RNA and Protein Genes in Human Embryonic Stem Cells Is Associated With the Activating H3K4me3 Histone Mark.

    PubMed

    Zaidi, Sayyed K; Boyd, Joseph R; Grandy, Rodrigo A; Medina, Ricardo; Lian, Jane B; Stein, Gary S; Stein, Janet L

    2016-09-01

    Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) exhibit unrestricted and indefinite, but stringently controlled, proliferation, and can differentiate into any lineage in the body. In the current study, we test the hypothesis that expression of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) and ribosomal protein genes (RPGs) contribute to the ability of hESCs to proliferate indefinitely. Consistent with the accelerated growth rate of hESCs, we find that hESC lines H1 and H9 both exhibit significantly higher levels of rRNA when compared to a panel of normal and cancer human cell lines. Although many RPGs are expressed at levels that comparable to other human cell lines, a few RPGs also exhibit higher expression levels. In situ nuclear run-on assays reveal that both nucleoli in hESCs actively transcribe nascent rRNA. Employing genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation-deep sequencing and bioinformatics approaches, we discovered that, RPGs are dominantly marked by the activating H3K4me3 histone mark in the G1, M, and G2 phases of the cell cycle. Interestingly, the rDNA repeats are marked by the activating H3K4me3 only in the M phase, and repressive H3K27me3 histone mark in all three cell cycle phases. Bioinformatics analyses also reveal that Myc, a known regulator of cell growth and proliferation, occupies both the rRNA genes and RPGs. Functionally, down-regulation of Myc expression by siRNA results in a concomitant decrease in rRNA levels. Together, our results show that expression of rRNA, which is regulated by the Myc pluripotency transcription factor, and of RPGs in hESCs is associated with the activating H3K4me3 modification. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2007-2013, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26755341

  6. Expression of human papilloma virus type 16 E5 protein in amelanotic melanoma cells regulates endo-cellular pH and restores tyrosinase activity

    PubMed Central

    Di Domenico, Fabio; Foppoli, Cesira; Blarzino, Carla; Perluigi, Marzia; Paolini, Francesca; Morici, Salvatrice; Coccia, Raffaella; Cini, Chiara; De Marco, Federico

    2009-01-01

    Background Melanin synthesis, the elective trait of melanocytes, is regulated by tyrosinase activity. In tyrosinase-positive amelanotic melanomas this rate limiting enzyme is inactive because of acidic endo-melanosomal pH. The E5 oncogene of the Human Papillomavirus Type 16 is a small transmembrane protein with a weak transforming activity and a role during the early steps of viral infections. E5 has been shown to interact with 16 kDa subunit C of the trans-membrane Vacuolar ATPase proton pump ultimately resulting in its functional suppressions. However, the cellular effects of such an interaction are still under debate. With this work we intended to explore whether the HPV16 E5 oncoprotein does indeed interact with the vacuolar ATPase proton pump once expressed in intact human cells and whether this interaction has functional consequences on cell metabolism and phenotype. Methods The expression of the HPV16-E5 oncoproteins was induced in two Tyrosinase-positive amelanotic melanomas (the cell lines FRM and M14) by a retroviral expression construct. Modulation of the intracellular pH was measured with Acridine orange and fluorescence microscopy. Expression of tyrosinase and its activity was followed by RT-PCR, Western Blot and enzyme assay. The anchorage-independence growth and the metabolic activity of E5 expressing cells were also monitored. Results We provide evidence that in the E5 expressing cells interaction between E5 and V-ATPase determines an increase of endo-cellular pH. The cellular alkalinisation in turn leads to the post-translational activation of tyrosinase, melanin synthesis and phenotype modulation. These effects are associated with an increased activation of tyrosine analogue anti-blastic drugs. Conclusion Once expressed within intact human cells the HPV16-E5 oncoprotein does actually interact with the vacuolar V-ATPase proton pump and this interaction induces a number of functional effects. In amelanotic melanomas these effects can modulate the

  7. Arsenite induces apoptosis in human mesenchymal stem cells by altering Bcl-2 family proteins and by activating intrinsic pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Yadav, Santosh; Shi Yongli; Wang Feng; Wang He

    2010-05-01

    Purpose: Environmental exposure to arsenic is an important public health issue. The effects of arsenic on different tissues and organs have been intensively studied. However, the effects of arsenic on bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have not been reported. This study is designed to investigate the cell death process caused by arsenite and its related underlying mechanisms on MSCs. The rationale is that absorbed arsenic in the blood circulation can reach to the bone marrow and may affect the cell survival of MSCs. Methods: MSCs of passage 1 were purchased from Tulane University, grown till 70% confluency level and plated according to the experimental requirements followed by treatment with arsenite at various concentrations and time points. Arsenite (iAs{sup III}) induced cytotoxic effects were confirmed by cell viability and cell cycle analysis. For the presence of canonic apoptosis markers; DNA damage, exposure of intramembrane phosphotidylserine, protein and m-RNA expression levels were analyzed. Results: iAs{sup III} induced growth inhibition, G2-M arrest and apoptotic cell death in MSCs, the apoptosis induced by iAs{sup III} in the cultured MSCs was, via altering Bcl-2 family proteins and by involving intrinsic pathway. Conclusion: iAs{sup III} can induce apoptosis in bone marrow-derived MSCs via Bcl-2 family proteins, regulating intrinsic apoptotic pathway. Due to the multipotency of MSC, acting as progenitor cells for a variety of connective tissues including bone, adipose, cartilage and muscle, these effects of arsenic may be important in assessing the health risk of the arsenic compounds and understanding the mechanisms of arsenic-induced harmful effects.

  8. Effects of Payena dasyphylla (Miq.) on hyaluronidase enzyme activity and metalloproteinases protein expressions in interleukin-1β stimulated human chondrocytes cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Hyaluronidases have been found as the target enzymes in the development of osteoarthritis (OA) disease. While there is still no curative treatment for this disease, recent studies on the treatment of OA were focused on the effectiveness of natural products which are expected to improve the symptoms with minimal side effects. The aim of this study was to screen selected Malaysian plants on their anti-hyaluronidase activity as well as to evaluate the active plant and its derived fractions on its potential anti-arthritic and antioxidant activities. Methods A total of 20 methanolic crude extracts (bark and leaf) from ten different plants were screened using a colorimetric hyaluronidase enzymatic assay. The active plant extract (Payena dasyphylla) was then studied for its hyaluronidase inhibitory activity in the interleukin-1β (IL-1β) stimulated human chondrocytes cell line (NHAC-kn) using zymography method. The Payena dasyphylla methanolic bark extract was then fractionated into several fractions in where the ethyl acetate (EA) fraction was evaluated for its inhibitory effects on the HYAL1 and HYAL2 gene expressions using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) technique. While the MMP-3 and MMP-13 protein expressions were evaluated using western blot method. The phenolic and flavonoid contents of the three fractions as well as the antioxidant property of the EA fraction were also evaluated. Results Bark extract of Payena dasyphylla (100 μg/ml) showed the highest inhibitory activity against bovine testicular hyaluronidase with 91.63%. The plant extract also inhibited hyaluronidase expression in the cultured human chondrocyte cells in response to IL-1β (100 ng/ml). Similarly, treatment with Payena dasyphylla ethyl acetate (EA) fraction (100 μg/ml) inhibited the HYAL1 and HYAL2 mRNA gene expressions as well as MMP-3 and MMP-13 protein expression in a dose dependent manner. Payena dasyphylla EA fraction has demonstrated the highest

  9. Immunoregulatory activities of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) proteins: Effect of HIV recombinant and synthetic peptides on immunoglobulin synthesis and proliferative responses by normal lymphocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Nair, M.P.N.; Pottathil, R.; Heimer, E.P.; Schwartz, S.A.

    1988-09-01

    Recombinant and synthetic peptides corresponding to envelope proteins of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) were examined for their effects on the activities of lymphocytes from normal donors in vitro. Although lymphocytes cultured with env-gag peptides produced significant amounts of IgG, addition of env-gag peptides to a pokeweed mitogen-induced B-cell activation system resulted in suppression of immunoglobulin synthesis by normal lymphocytes. Recombinant antigens, env-gag and env-80 dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR), produced a substantial proliferative response by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) as determined by (/sup 3/H)thymidine incorporation. PBMC precultured with HIV synthetic peptide env 578-608 also manifested significant proliferative responses as compared to control cultures. CD3/sup +/ lymphocytes precultured with recombinant HIV antigens, env-gag and env-80 DHFR, and synthetic HIV peptide, env 487-511, showed moderate but significant proliferative responses. Both recombinant antigens and synthetic peptides also produced a dose-dependent stimulatory effect on proliferation by CD3/sup /minus// lymphocytes. These studies demonstrate that recombinant and synthetic peptides of the HIV genome express immunoregulatory T- and B-cell epitopes. Identification of unique HIV epitopes with immunogenic and immunoregulatory activities is necessary for the development of an effective vaccine against HIV infection.

  10. Protective Effects of Ferulic Acid on High Glucose-Induced Protein Glycation, Lipid Peroxidation, and Membrane Ion Pump Activity in Human Erythrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Sompong, Weerachat; Cheng, Henrique; Adisakwattana, Sirichai

    2015-01-01

    Ferulic acid (FA) is the ubiquitous phytochemical phenolic derivative of cinnamic acid. Experimental studies in diabetic models demonstrate that FA possesses multiple mechanisms of action associated with anti-hyperglycemic activity. The mechanism by which FA prevents diabetes-associated vascular damages remains unknown. The aim of study was to investigate the protective effects of FA on protein glycation, lipid peroxidation, membrane ion pump activity, and phosphatidylserine exposure in high glucose-exposed human erythrocytes. Our results demonstrated that FA (10-100 μM) significantly reduced the levels of glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) whereas 0.1-100 μM concentrations inhibited lipid peroxidation in erythrocytes exposed to 45 mM glucose. This was associated with increased glucose consumption. High glucose treatment also caused a significant reduction in Na+/K+-ATPase activity in the erythrocyte plasma membrane which could be reversed by FA. Furthermore, we found that FA (0.1-100 μM) prevented high glucose-induced phosphatidylserine exposure. These findings provide insights into a novel mechanism of FA for the prevention of vascular dysfunction associated with diabetes. PMID:26053739

  11. Receptor activating NF-κB ligand (RANKL) is a constitutive intracellular protein in resting human basophils and is strongly induced on their surface by interleukin 3.

    PubMed

    Poli, Caroline; Martin, Jérôme C; Braudeau, Cécile; Bériou, Gaelle; Hémont, Caroline; Charrier, Céline; Guérin, Sarah; Heslan, Michèle; Josien, Régis

    2015-05-01

    Receptor activating NF-κB ligand (RANKL) is a member of the TNF superfamily that plays a pivotal role in bone homeostasis as being the major osteoclastogenesis factor. RANKL also has pleiotropic effects in the immune system in which it is expressed by activated T and B cells and some innate lymphoid cells. RANKL-RANK interactions mediate lymph node organogenesis and immunoregulatory functions in autoimmune disease and carcinogenesis as well as cross talk between the immune system and bone. In this study, we show that basophils were the strongest RANKL mRNA-expressing cells amongst major leukocyte subsets in human blood. RANKL was preformed as an intracellular protein in resting basophils and was rapidly and strongly expressed on their surface upon stimulation with IL-3, but not other stimuli. This expression was stable for at least 6 days. Activated basophils could also release soluble RANKL in small quantities upon interaction with DCs or monocytes. In the blood, basophils were the sole cells to express membrane RANKL in response to IL-3. This study indicates that basophils should be considered as new players in the pleiotropic and complex RANKL-RANK interaction system and suggests a role for RANKL in the interaction between basophils and immune cells in inflammatory allergic tissues and secondary lymphoid organs. PMID:25433635

  12. Correlation between cell-cell contact formation and activation of protein kinase C in a human squamous cell carcinoma cell line.

    PubMed

    Nagao, S; Kitajima, Y; Nagata, K; Inoue, S; Yaoita, H; Nozawa, Y

    1989-02-01

    Formation of desmosomal cell-cell contact associated with reorganization of keratin intermediate filaments (KIFs) was observed when cultured cells of a cell line of human skin squamous cell carcinoma were transferred from low (0.07 mM) calcium to high (1.87 mM) calcium medium. At low calcium, cells were dispersed without desmosomal cell-cell contact and the KIFs were mostly concentrated around the nucleus. After 15 min of the transfer, cells contacted each other and formed small colonies and the KIFs initiated to show a radial arrangement. In addition to the cell-cell contact formation and rearrangement of KIFs, the transfer induced fourfold increase of particulate-associated protein kinase C (C-kinase) activity. When 12-O-tetradecanoyl phorbol-13-acetate (PMA), which specifically activates C-kinase, was added to the cells grown at low calcium medium, cell-cell contact formation and radial arrangement of KIF bundles almost identical to those induced by the transfer to high calcium medium were observed. These data suggest a correlation between an increase in C-kinase activity and formation of cell-cell contacts associated with rearrangements of KIFs. PMID:2465349

  13. Bacterial Heat Shock Protein Activity

    PubMed Central

    Maleki, Farajollah; Khosravi, Afra; Nasser, Ahmad; Taghinejad, Hamid

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria are exposed to different types of stress in their growth conditions. They have developed appropriate responses, modulated by the re-modeling of protein complexes and by phosphorylation dependent signal transduction systems, to adapt and to survive in a variety range of nature. Proteins are essential components for biologic activity in the eukaryotic and prokaryotic cell. Heat Shock Proteins (HSP) have been identified from various organisms and have critical role in cell hemostasis. Chaperone can sense environment and have different potential role in the organism evolution. PMID:27134861

  14. Structural insights and in vitro reconstitution of membrane targeting and activation of human PI4KB by the ACBD3 protein

    PubMed Central

    Klima, Martin; Tóth, Dániel J.; Hexnerova, Rozalie; Baumlova, Adriana; Chalupska, Dominika; Tykvart, Jan; Rezabkova, Lenka; Sengupta, Nivedita; Man, Petr; Dubankova, Anna; Humpolickova, Jana; Nencka, Radim; Veverka, Vaclav; Balla, Tamas; Boura, Evzen

    2016-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase beta (PI4KB) is one of four human PI4K enzymes that generate phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate (PI4P), a minor but essential regulatory lipid found in all eukaryotic cells. To convert their lipid substrates, PI4Ks must be recruited to the correct membrane compartment. PI4KB is critical for the maintenance of the Golgi and trans Golgi network (TGN) PI4P pools, however, the actual targeting mechanism of PI4KB to the Golgi and TGN membranes is unknown. Here, we present an NMR structure of the complex of PI4KB and its interacting partner, Golgi adaptor protein acyl-coenzyme A binding domain containing protein 3 (ACBD3). We show that ACBD3 is capable of recruiting PI4KB to membranes both in vitro and in vivo, and that membrane recruitment of PI4KB by ACBD3 increases its enzymatic activity and that the ACBD3:PI4KB complex formation is essential for proper function of the Golgi. PMID:27009356

  15. Studies of the Interaction between Isoimperatorin and Human Serum Albumin by Multispectroscopic Method: Identification of Possible Binding Site of the Compound Using Esterase Activity of the Protein

    PubMed Central

    Ranjbar, Samira; Shokoohinia, Yalda; Ghobadi, Sirous; Gholamzadeh, Saeed; Moradi, Nastaran; Ashrafi-Kooshk, Mohammad Reza; Aghaei, Abbas

    2013-01-01

    Isoimperatorin is one of the main components of Prangos ferulacea as a linear furanocoumarin and used as anti-inflammatory, analgesic, antispasmodic, and anticancer drug. Human serum albumin (HSA) is a principal extracellular protein with a high concentration in blood plasma and carrier for many drugs to different molecular targets. Since the carrying of drug by HSA may affect on its structure and action, we decided to investigate the interaction between HSA and isoimperatorin using fluorescence and UV spectroscopy. Fluorescence data indicated that isoimperatorin quenches the intrinsic fluorescence of the HSA via a static mechanism and hydrophobic interaction play the major role in the drug binding. The binding average distance between isoimperatorin and Trp 214 of HSA was estimated on the basis of the theory of Förster energy transfer. Decrease of protein surface hydrophobicity (PSH) was also documented upon isoimperatorin binding. Furthermore, the synchronous fluorescence spectra show that the microenvironment of the tryptophan residues does not have obvious changes. Site marker compettive and fluorescence experiments revealed that the binding of isoimperatorin to HSA occurred at or near site I. Finally, the binding details between isoimperatorin and HSA were further confirmed by molecular docking and esterase activity inhibition studies which revealed that drug was bound at subdomain IIA. PMID:24319355

  16. Human Papillomaviruses Activate and Recruit SMC1 Cohesin Proteins for the Differentiation-Dependent Life Cycle through Association with CTCF Insulators

    PubMed Central

    Satsuka, Ayano; Laimins, Laimonis A.

    2015-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses infect stratified epithelia and link their productive life cycle to the differentiation state of the host cell. Productive viral replication or amplification is restricted to highly differentiated suprabasal cells and is dependent on the activation of the ATM DNA damage pathway. The ATM pathway has three arms that can act independently of one another. One arm is centered on p53, another on CHK2 and a third on SMC1/NBS1 proteins. A role for CHK2 in HPV genome amplification has been demonstrated but it was unclear what other factors provided important activities. The cohesin protein, SMC1, is necessary for sister chromatid association prior to mitosis. In addition the phosphorylated form of SMC1 plays a critical role together with NBS1 in the ATM DNA damage response. In normal cells, SMC1 becomes phosphorylated in response to radiation, however, in HPV positive cells our studies demonstrate that it is constitutively activated. Furthermore, pSMC1 is found localized in distinct nuclear foci in complexes with γ-H2AX, and CHK2 and bound to HPV DNA. Importantly, knockdown of SMC1 blocks differentiation-dependent genome amplification. pSMC1 forms complexes with the insulator transcription factor CTCF and our studies show that these factors bind to conserved sequence motifs in the L2 late region of HPV 31. Similar motifs are found in most HPV types. Knockdown of CTCF with shRNAs blocks genome amplification and mutation of the CTCF binding motifs in the L2 open reading frame inhibits stable maintenance of viral episomes in undifferentiated cells as well as amplification of genomes upon differentiation. These findings suggest a model in which SMC1 factors are constitutively activated in HPV positive cells and recruited to viral genomes through complex formation with CTCF to facilitate genome amplification. Our findings identify both SMC1 and CTCF as critical regulators of the differentiation-dependent life cycle of high-risk human papillomaviruses

  17. New invMED1 element cis-activates human multidrug-related MDR1 and MVP genes, involving the LRP130 protein.

    PubMed

    Labialle, Stéphane; Dayan, Guila; Gayet, Landry; Rigal, Dominique; Gambrelle, Joël; Baggetto, Loris G

    2004-01-01

    The MDR1 gene is a key component of the cytotoxic defense network and its overexpression results in the multidrug resistance (MDR) phenotype. However, the molecular mechanisms that regulate the MDR1 gene and coordinate multiple MDR-related genes expression are poorly understood. In a previous study, we identified a new 12 bp cis-activating region in the 5'-flanking region of the human MDR1 gene, which we called inverted MED1. In the present study, we characterized the precise binding element, which we named invMED1, and revealed the presence of the LRP130 protein as the nuclear factor. Its binding intensity increases with the endogenous MDR1 geneexpression and with the MDR level of CEM leukemia cells. Interestingly, the LRP130 level did not vary with the chemoresistance level. We observed the involvement of LRP130 in the transcriptional activity of the MDR1 gene promoter, and moreover, in that of the MDR-related, invMED1-containing, MVP gene promoter. We used siRNAs and transcriptional decoys in two unrelated human cancer cell lines to show the role of the invMED1/LRP130 couple in both MDR1 and MVP endogenous genes activities. We showed that invMED1 was localized in the -105/-100 and -148/-143 regions of the MDR1 and MVP gene promoters, respectively. In addition, since the invMED1 sequence is primarily located in the -160/-100 bp region of mammalian MDR-related genes, our results present the invMED1/LRP130 couple as a potential central regulator of the transcription of these genes. PMID:15272088

  18. Glucocorticoid regulation of human pulmonary surfactant protein-B (SP-B) mRNA stability is independent of activated glucocorticoid receptor.

    PubMed

    Tillis, Ceá C; Huang, Helen W; Bi, Weizhen; Pan, Su; Bruce, Shirley R; Alcorn, Joseph L

    2011-06-01

    Adequate expression of surfactant protein-B (SP-B) is critical in the function of pulmonary surfactant to reduce alveolar surface tension. Expression of SP-B mRNA is restricted to specific lung-airway epithelial cells, and human SP-B mRNA stability is increased in the presence of the synthetic glucocorticoid dexamethasone (DEX). Although the mechanism of SP-B mRNA stabilization by DEX is unknown, studies suggest involvement of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR). We developed a dual-cistronic plasmid-based expression assay in which steady-state levels of SP-B mRNA, determined by Northern analysis, reproducibly reflect changes in SP-B mRNA stability. Using this assay, we found that steady-state levels of SP-B mRNA increased greater than twofold in transfected human-airway epithelial cells (A549) incubated with DEX (10(-7) M). DEX-mediated changes in SP-B mRNA levels required the presence of the SP-B mRNA 3'-untranslated region but did not require ongoing protein synthesis. The effect of DEX on SP-B mRNA levels was dose dependent, with maximal effect at 10(-7) M. DEX increased levels of SP-B mRNA in cells lacking GR, and the presence of the GR antagonist RU486 did not interfere with the effect of DEX. Surprisingly, other steroid hormones (progesterone, estradiol, and vitamin D; 10(-7) M) significantly increased SP-B mRNA levels, suggesting a common pathway of steroid hormone action on SP-B mRNA stability. These results indicate that the effect of DEX to increase SP-B mRNA stability is independent of activated GR and suggests that the mechanism is mediated by posttranscriptional or nongenomic effects of glucocorticoids. PMID:21398497

  19. The mRNA level of Charcot-Leyden crystal protein/galectin-10 is a marker for CRTH2 activation in human whole blood in vitro.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tai-An; Kourteva, Galina; Hilton, Holly; Li, Hongli; Tare, Nadine S; Carvajal, Valerie; Hang, Julie S; Wei, Xin; Renzetti, Louis M

    2010-11-01

    CRTH2 is one of the prostaglandin D₂ receptors and plays a proinflammatory role in allergic diseases. Gene expression markers in whole blood induced by CRTH2 activation have not previously been reported. Using microarray analyses of 54 675 genes, we revealed modest gene expression changes in human whole blood stimulated in vitro by a selective CRTH2 agonist, DK-PGD₂. Five genes were found to exhibit 1.5- to 2.6-fold changes in expression. The expression of Charcot-Leyden crystal protein/galectin-10 (CLC/Gal-10) in particular was consistently enhanced in human whole blood stimulated by DK-PGD₂, as confirmed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction analyses. DK-PGD(2)-induced increases in blood CLC/Gal-10 mRNA levels were largely attenuated by the CRTH2 antagonist CAY10471.Thus, the DK-PGD₂-induced CLC/Gal-10 mRNA level can serve as a potential marker for monitoring pharmacodynamic effects of blood exposure to CRTH2 modulating agents. PMID:20858065

  20. Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) has a potential role in CAPE-induced apoptosis of CCRF-CEM cells via effecting human telomerase reverse transcriptase activity.

    PubMed

    Avci, Cigir Biray; Sahin, Fahri; Gunduz, Cumhur; Selvi, Nur; Aydin, Hikmet Hakan; Oktem, Gulperi; Topcuoglu, Nejat; Saydam, Guray

    2007-12-01

    Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) is one of the most effective components of propolis which is collected by honey bees. The aim of this study was to investigate the cytotoxic and apoptotic effects of CAPE in the CCRF-CEM cell line and to clarify the role of serine/threonine protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) and human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) activity as an underlining mechanism of CAPE-induced apoptosis. Trypan blue dye exclusion test and XTT methods were used to evaluate the cytotoxicity and ELISA based oligonucleotide detection, which can be seen during apoptosis, was used to determine apoptosis. Acridine orange/ethidium bromide dye technique was also used to evaluate apoptosis. The cytotoxic effect of CAPE was detected in a dose and time dependent manner with the IC(50) of 1 muM. ELISA and acridine orange/ethidium bromide methods have shown remarkable apoptosis at 48th hour in CAPE treated cells. To investigate the role of PP2A in CAPE-induced apoptosis of CCRF-CEM cells, we performed combination studies with CAPE and, Calyculin A and Okadaic acid, which are very well known inhibitors of PP2A, in IC(20) of inhibitors and IC(50) of CAPE. Combination studies revealed synergistic effect of both drugs by concomitant use. Western blot analyses of PP2A catalytic and regulatory subunits showed down-regulation of expression of PP2A catalytic subunit in CAPE treated cells at 48th hour. Since, PP2A is important in hTERT (telomerase catalytic subunit) activation and deactivation, we also performed hTERT activity in CAPE treated cells simultaneously. Treating cells with IC(50) of CAPE for 96 h with the intervals of 24 h showed marked reduction of hTERT activity. The reduction of hTERT activity in CAPE treated CCRF-CEM cells was more prominent in the initial 48 h. The variation of hTERT activity in CAPE treated CCRF-CEM cells may be the reason for the protein phosphatase interaction that occurred after treatment with CAPE. PMID:17852432

  1. Human umbilical cord blood mononuclear cells activate the survival protein Akt in cardiac myocytes and endothelial cells that limits apoptosis and necrosis during hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Henning, Robert J; Dennis, Steve; Sawmiller, Darrell; Hunter, Lorynn; Sanberg, Paul; Miller, Leslie

    2012-06-01

    We have previously reported that human umbilical cord blood mononuclear cells (HUCBC), which contain hematopoietic, mesenchymal, and endothelial stem cells, can significantly reduce acute myocardial infarction size. To determine the mechanism whereby HUCBC increase myocyte and vascular endothelial cell survival, we treated cardiac myocytes and coronary artery endothelial cells in separate experiments with HUCBC plus culture media or culture media alone and subjected the cells to 24 h of hypoxia or normoxia. We then determined in myocytes and endothelial cells activation of the cell survival protein Akt by Western blots. We also determined in these cells apoptosis by annexin V staining and necrosis by propidium iodide staining. Thereafter, we inhibited with API, a specific and sensitive Akt inhibitor, Akt activation in myocytes and endothelial cells cultured with HUCBC during hypoxia and determined cell apoptosis and necrosis. In cells cultured without HUCBC, hypoxia only slightly activated Akt. Moreover, hypoxia increased myocyte apoptosis by ≥ 226% and necrosis by 58% in comparison with myocytes in normoxia. Hypoxic treatment of endothelial cells without HUCBC increased apoptosis by 94% and necrosis by 59%. In contrast, hypoxia did not significantly affect HUCBC. Moreover, in myocyte + HUCBC cultures in hypoxia, HUCBC induced a ≥ 135% increase in myocyte phospho-Akt. Akt activation decreased myocyte apoptosis by 76% and necrosis by 35%. In endothelial cells, HUCBC increased phospho-Akt by 116%. HUCBC also decreased endothelial cell apoptosis by 58% and necrosis by 42%. Inhibition of Akt with API in myocytes and endothelial cells cultured with HUCBC during hypoxia nearly totally prevented the HUCBC-induced decrease in apoptosis and necrosis. We conclude that HUCBC can significantly decrease hypoxia-induced myocyte and endothelial cell apoptosis and necrosis by activating Akt in these cells and in this manner HUCBC can limit myocardial ischemia and injury. PMID

  2. Chromosomal assignment of the gene encoding the human 58-kDa inhibitor (PRKRI) of the interferon-induced dsRNA-activated protein kinase to chromosome 13q32

    SciTech Connect

    Korth, M.J.; Katze, M.G.; Edelhoff, S.; Disteche, C.M.

    1996-01-15

    The 58-kDa inhibitor (p58) of the interferon-induced dsRNA-activated protein kinase (PKR) is a cellular protein recruited by the influenza virus to down-regulate the activity of PKR during virus infection. The inhibitor also appears to play a role in the regulation of cellular gene expression in the absence of viral infection and has oncogenic properties when overexpressed. Using fluorescence in situ hybridization, we have mapped the p58 gene (PRKRI) to human chromosome 13 band q32. Aberrations in the structure or number of chromosome 13 have been identified in a variety of human cancers, particularly in acute leukemia. 15 refs., 1 fig.

  3. Hypoxia and Leucine Deprivation Induce Human Insulin-Like Growth Factor Binding Protein-1 Hyperphosphorylation and Increase Its Biological Activity

    PubMed Central

    Seferovic, Maxim D.; Ali, Rashad; Kamei, Hiroyasu; Liu, Suya; Khosravi, Javad M.; Nazarian, Steven; Han, Victor K. M.; Duan, Cunming; Gupta, Madhulika B.

    2009-01-01

    Fetal growth restriction is often caused by uteroplacental insufficiency that leads to fetal hypoxia and nutrient deprivation. Elevated IGF binding protein (IGFBP)-1 expression associated with fetal growth restriction has been documented. In this study we tested the hypothesis that hypoxia and nutrient deprivation induce IGFBP-1 phosphorylation and increase its biological potency in inhibiting IGF actions. HepG2 cells were subjected to hypoxia and leucine deprivation to mimic the deprivation of metabolic substrates. The total IGFBP-1 levels measured by ELISA were approximately 2- to 2.5-fold higher in hypoxia and leucine deprivation-treated cells compared with the controls. Two-dimensional immunoblotting showed that whereas the nonphosphorylated isoform is the predominant IGFBP-1 in the controls, the highly phosphorylated isoforms were dominant in hypoxia and leucine deprivation-treated cells. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry analysis revealed four serine phosphorylation sites: three known sites (pSer 101, pSer 119, and pSer 169); and a novel site (pSer 98). Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry was used to estimate the changes of phosphorylation upon treatment. Biacore analysis indicated that the highly phosphorylated IGFBP-1 isoforms found in hypoxia and leucine deprivation-treated cells had greater affinity for IGF-I [dissociation constant 5.83E (times 10 to the power)−10 m and 6.40E−09 m] relative to the IGFBP-1 from the controls (dissociation constant ∼1.54E−07 m). Furthermore, the highly phosphorylated IGFBP-1 had a stronger effect in inhibiting IGF-I-stimulated cell proliferation. These findings suggest that IGFBP-1 phosphorylation may be a novel mechanism of fetal adaptive response to hypoxia and nutrient restriction. PMID:18772238

  4. Hemoglobin Receptor Protein from Porphyromonas gingivalis Induces Interleukin-8 Production in Human Gingival Epithelial Cells through Stimulation of the Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase and NF-κB Signal Transduction Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Yuki; Nakayama, Masaaki; Naito, Mariko; Yamachika, Eiki; Inoue, Tetsuyoshi; Nakayama, Koji; Iida, Seiji

    2014-01-01

    Periodontitis is an inflammatory disease of polymicrobial origin affecting the tissues supporting the tooth. The oral anaerobic bacterium Porphyromonas gingivalis, which is implicated as an important pathogen for chronic periodontitis, triggers a series of host inflammatory responses that promote the destruction of periodontal tissues. Among the virulence factors of P. gingivalis, hemoglobin receptor protein (HbR) is a major protein found in culture supernatants. In this study, we investigated the roles of HbR in the production of inflammatory mediators. We found that HbR induced interleukin-8 (IL-8) production in the human gingival epithelial cell line Ca9-22. p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and extracellular signal-related kinase 1/2 (Erk1/2) were activated in HbR-stimulated Ca9-22 cells. Inhibitors of p38 MAPK (SB203580) and Erk1/2 (PD98059) blocked HbR-induced IL-8 production. Additionally, HbR stimulated the translocation of NF-κB-p65 to the nucleus, consistent with enhancement of IL-8 expression by activation of the NF-κB pathway. In addition, small interfering RNA (siRNA) targeting activating transcription factor 2 (ATF-2) or cyclic AMP-response element-binding protein (CREB) inhibited HbR-induced IL-8 production. Moreover, pretreatment with SB203580 and PD98059 reduced HbR-induced phosphorylation of CREB and ATF-2, respectively. Combined pretreatment with an inhibitor of NF-κB (BAY11-7082) and SB203580 was more efficient in inhibiting the ability of HbR to induce IL-8 production than pretreatment with either BAY11-7082 or SB203580 alone. Thus, in Ca9-22 cells, the direct activation of p38 MAPK and Erk1/2 by HbR caused the activation of the transcription factors ATF-2, CREB, and NF-κB, thus resulting in the induction of IL-8 production. PMID:24126532

  5. The generation of germline transgenic silkworms for the production of biologically active recombinant fusion proteins of fibroin and human basic fibroblast growth factor.

    PubMed

    Hino, Rika; Tomita, Masahiro; Yoshizato, Katsutoshi

    2006-11-01

    We generated germline transgenic silkworms bearing a fibroin light chain (FL) promoter-driven FL gene whose 3'-end was flanked with human basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) gene, FL/bFGF gene. The cocoons from transgenic worms were trypsinized to remove sericin layers, and treated with solution containing CaCl(2), ethanol, and water at a molar ratio of 1:2:8 (CaCl(2)/ethanol/water) to solubilize fibroin layers. Western blot analysis showed that the recombinant protein, r(FL/bFGF), was solubilized with CaCl(2)/ethanol/water, but not with trypsin, indicating that r(FL/bFGF) was in fibroin layers. Thus, it was concluded that the worms spun cocoons whose fibroin layers were composed of the inherent gene-derived natural fibroin (nF) and r(FL/bFGF). The mixture of nF and r(FL/bFGF) was dubbed r(FL/bFGF)nF. The solubilized r(FL/bFGF)nF was refolded using the glutathione redox system. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) grew in the refolded r(FL/bFGF)nF-containing culture media, showing that bFGF in r(FL/bFGF) was biologically active. r(FL/bFGF)nF immobilized on a culture dish also supported the growth of HUVECs in bFGF-free media, suggesting the usefulness of r(FL/bFGF)nF as a new biomaterial for tissue engineering. The currently developed transgenic silkworms will be suitable for mass production of fibroins bearing a variety of biological activities. PMID:16905183

  6. The centrality of cancer proteins in human protein-protein interaction network: a revisit.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Wei; Xie, Luyu; Zhou, Shuigeng; Liu, Hui; Guan, Jihong

    2014-01-01

    Topological analysis of protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks has been widely applied to the investigation on cancer mechanisms. However, there is still a debate on whether cancer proteins exhibit more topological centrality compared to the other proteins in the human PPI network. To resolve this debate, we first identified four sets of human proteins, and then mapped these proteins into the yeast PPI network by homologous genes. Finally, we compared these proteins' properties in human and yeast PPI networks. Experiments over two real datasets demonstrated that cancer proteins tend to have higher degree and smaller clustering coefficient than non-cancer proteins. Experimental results also validated that cancer proteins have larger betweenness centrality compared to the other proteins on the STRING dataset. However, on the BioGRID dataset, the average betweenness centrality of cancer proteins is larger than that of disease and control proteins, but smaller than that of essential proteins. PMID:24878726

  7. Production of soluble recombinant proteins with Kell, Duffy and Lutheran blood group antigen activity, and their use in screening human sera for Kell, Duffy and Lutheran antibodies.

    PubMed

    Ridgwell, K; Dixey, J; Scott, M L

    2007-10-01

    The aim of this study was to show that soluble recombinant (sr) proteins can mimic blood group antigens and be used to screen human sera for blood-group-specific antibodies. The blood of all pregnant women and pretransfusion patients should be screened for blood-group-specific antibodies to identify and monitor pregnancies at risk of haemolytic disease of the foetus and newborn (HDFN), and to prevent haemolytic transfusion reactions. Current antibody screening and identification methods use human red blood cell panels, which can complicate antibody identification if more than one antibody specificity is present. COS-7 cells were transfected to produce sr forms of the extracellular domains of the red blood cell membrane proteins that express Kell, Duffy or Lutheran blood group antigens. These sr proteins were used to screen for and identify anti-Kell, anti-Duffy or anti-Lutheran blood-group-specific allo-antibodies in human sera by haemagglutination inhibition and in solid-phase enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs). There is a positive correlation (correlation coefficient 0.605, P value 0.002) between antibody titre by standard indirect antiglobulin test (IAT) and signal intensity in the ELISA test. This work shows that sr proteins can mimic blood group antigens and react with human allogeneic antibodies, and that such proteins could be used to develop solid-phase, high-throughput blood group antibody screening and identification platforms. PMID:17725551

  8. Intron-exon organization of the active human protein S gene PS. alpha. and its pseudogene PS. beta. : Duplication and silencing during primate evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Ploos van Amstel, H.; Reitsma, P.H.; van der Logt, C.P.; Bertina, R.M. )

    1990-08-28

    The human protein S locus on chromosome 3 consists of two protein S genes, PS{alpha} and PS{beta}. Here the authors report the cloning and characterization of both genes. Fifteen exons of the PS{alpha} gene were identified that together code for protein S mRNA as derived from the reported protein S cDNAs. Analysis by primer extension of liver protein S mRNA, however, reveals the presence of two mRNA forms that differ in the length of their 5{prime}-noncoding region. Both transcripts contain a 5{prime}-noncoding region longer than found in the protein S cDNAs. The two products may arise from alternative splicing of an additional intron in this region or from the usage of two start sites for transcription. The intron-exon organization of the PS{alpha} gene fully supports the hypothesis that the protein S gene is the product of an evolutional assembling process in which gene modules coding for structural/functional protein units also found in other coagulation proteins have been put upstream of the ancestral gene of a steroid hormone binding protein. The PS{beta} gene is identified as a pseudogene. It contains a large variety of detrimental aberrations, viz., the absence of exon I, a splice site mutation, three stop codons, and a frame shift mutation. Overall the two genes PS{alpha} and PS{beta} show between their exonic sequences 96.5% homology. Southern analysis of primate DNA showed that the duplication of the ancestral protein S gene has occurred after the branching of the orangutan from the African apes. A nonsense mutation that is present in the pseudogene of man also could be identified in one of the two protein S genes of both chimpanzee and gorilla. This implicates that silencing of one of the two protein S genes must have taken place before the divergence of the three African apes.

  9. N-Farnesyloxy-norcantharimide inhibits progression of human leukemic Jurkat T cells through regulation of mitogen-activated protein kinase and interleukin-2 production

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Ming-Che; Wu, Jin-Yi; Liao, Hui-Fen; Chen, Yu-Jen

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the anticancer effects of N-farnesyloxy-norcantharimide (NOC15), a newly synthesized norcantharidin (NCTD) analogue, on human leukemic Jurkat T cells and the signaling pathway underlying its effects. We found that the half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) of NOC15 on Jurkat T cells is 1.4 μmol/l, which is 11.14-fold (=15.6÷1.4) smaller than the 15.6 μmol/l of NCTD on Jurkat T cells, whereas the IC50 of NOC15 on human normal lymphoblast (HNL) is 207.9 μmol/l, which is 8.17-fold (=1698.0÷207.8) smaller than the 1698.0 μmol/l of NCTD on HNL cells. These results indicated that NOC15 exerts a higher anticancer effect on Jurkat T cells and has higher toxicity toward HNL cells than NCTD. Thus, NOC15 is 1.36-fold (=11.14÷8.17) beneficial as an anticancer agent toward Jurkat T cells compared with NCTD. Moreover, NOC15 can increase the percentage of cells in the sub-G1 phase and reduce the cell viability of Jurkat T cells, stimulate p38 and extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) signaling pathway, and inhibit calcineurin expression and interleukin-2 (IL-2) production. However, NOC15 exerted no effects on the Jun-N-terminal kinase 1/2 (JNK1/2) signaling pathway, the production of IL-8, and tumor necrosis factor-α. We conclude that the anticancer activity of the newly synthesized NOC15 is 1.36-fold beneficial than NCTD as an anticancer agent and that NOC15 can increase the percentage of cells in the sub-G1 phase through the stimulation of p38 and ERK1/2 of the MAPK signaling pathway and the inhibition of calcineurin expression and IL-2 production. The NOC15 may have the potential of being developed into an anticancer agent in the future. PMID:26288134

  10. Human Protein and Amino Acid Requirements.

    PubMed

    Hoffer, L John

    2016-05-01

    Human protein and amino acid nutrition encompasses a wide, complex, frequently misunderstood, and often contentious area of clinical research and practice. This tutorial explains the basic biochemical and physiologic principles that underlie our current understanding of protein and amino acid nutrition. The following topics are discussed: (1) the identity, measurement, and essentiality of nutritional proteins; (2) the definition and determination of minimum requirements; (3) nutrition adaptation; (4) obligatory nitrogen excretion and the minimum protein requirement; (5) minimum versus optimum protein intakes; (6) metabolic responses to surfeit and deficient protein intakes; (7) body composition and protein requirements; (8) labile protein; (9) N balance; (10) the principles of protein and amino acid turnover, including an analysis of the controversial indicator amino acid oxidation technique; (11) general guidelines for evaluating protein turnover articles; (12) amino acid turnover versus clearance; (13) the protein content of hydrated amino acid solutions; (14) protein requirements in special situations, including protein-catabolic critical illness; (15) amino acid supplements and additives, including monosodium glutamate and glutamine; and (16) a perspective on the future of protein and amino acid nutrition research. In addition to providing practical information, this tutorial aims to demonstrate the importance of rigorous physiologic reasoning, stimulate intellectual curiosity, and encourage fresh ideas in this dynamic area of human nutrition. In general, references are provided only for topics that are not well covered in modern textbooks. PMID:26796095

  11. Human telomeric proteins occupy selective interstitial sites

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Dong; Xiong, Yuanyan; Kim, Hyeung; He, Quanyuan; Li, Yumei; Chen, Rui; Songyang, Zhou

    2011-01-01

    Human telomeres are bound and protected by protein complexes assembled around the six core telomeric proteins RAP1, TRF1, TRF2, TIN2, TPP1, and POT1. The function of these proteins on telomeres has been studied extensively. Recently, increasing evidence has suggested possible roles for these proteins outside of telomeres. However, the non-canonical (extra-telomeric) function of human telomeric proteins remains poorly understood. To this end, we systematically investigated the binding sites of telomeric proteins along human chromosomes, by performing whole-genome chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) for RAP1 and TRF2. ChIP sequencing (ChIP-seq) revealed that RAP1 and TRF2 could be found on a small number of interstitial sites, including regions that are proximal to genes. Some of these binding sites contain short telomere repeats, suggesting that telomeric proteins could directly bind to interstitial sites. Interestingly, only a small fraction of the available interstitial telomere repeat-containing regions were occupied by RAP1 and TRF2. Ectopically expressed TRF2 was able to occupy additional interstitial telomere repeat sites, suggesting that protein concentration may dictate the selective targeting of telomeric proteins to interstitial sites. Reducing RAP1 and TRF2 expression by RNA interference led to altered transcription of RAP1- and TRF2-targeted genes. Our results indicate that human telomeric proteins could occupy a limited number of interstitial sites and regulate gene transcription. PMID:21423278

  12. Elicited antibody nature of human monoclonal protein with anti-streptolysin O activity--analysis with monoclonal anti-idiotype antibody.

    PubMed

    Sawada, S; Shida, M; Suenaga, R; Mizuma, H; Karasaki, M; Hashimoto, M; Kawano, K; Amaki, I

    1986-01-01

    Sera from 7 patients with multiple myeloma having antistreptolysin O (ASO) activity in high titers were detected by a streptolysin O (SLO) inhibition assay. However, activity was in low titer when assayed by a passive agglutination assay. The discrepancy between these 2 assays raised some doubts as to whether these monoclonal proteins (M.protein) bond to SLO in the same manner as elicited antibodies. Immunochemical analysis and idiotope analysis using monoclonal antibody to one of these M.proteins strongly suggest that M.protein with ASO activity bind to SLO in a manner similar to elicited antibody. The discrepancy between the 2 assays might be due to differences in the antigenic structure of different forms of the SLO molecule. PMID:2422380

  13. IGF-IR Signal Transduction Protein Content and Its Activation by IGF-I in Human Placentas: Relationship with Gestational Age and Birth Weight

    PubMed Central

    Iñiguez, Germán; Castro, Juan José; Garcia, Mirna; Kakarieka, Elena; Johnson, M. Cecilia; Cassorla, Fernando; Mericq, Verónica

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The human placenta expresses the IGF-I and IGF-IR proteins and their intracellular signal components (IRS-1, AKT and mTOR). The aim of this study was to assess the IGF-IR content and activation of downstream signaling molecules in placentas from newborns who were classified by gestational age and birth weight. We studied placentas from 25 term appropriate (T-AGA), 26 term small (T-SGA), 22 preterm AGA (PT-AGA), and 20 preterm SGA (PT-SGA) newborns. The total and phosphorylated IGF-IR, IRS-1, AKT, and mTOR contents were determined by Western Blot and normalized by actin or with their respective total content. The effect of IGF-I was determined by stimulating placental explants with recombinant IGF-I 10-8 mol/L for 15, 30, and 60 minutes. Results The IGF-IR content was higher in T-SGA compared to T-AGA placentas, and the IRS-1 content was higher in PT-placentas compared with their respective T-placentas. The effect of IGF-I on the phosphorylated forms of IGF-IR was increased in T-SGA (150%) and PT-SGA (300%) compared with their respective AGA placentas. In addition, AKT serine phosphorylation was higher in PT-SGA compared to PT-AGA and T-SGA placentas (90% and 390% respectively). Conclusion The higher protein content and response to IGF-I of IGF-IR, IRS-1, and AKT observed in SGA placentas may represent a compensatory mechanism in response to fetal growth restriction. PMID:25050889

  14. Antibodies against small heat-shock proteins in Alzheimer's disease as a part of natural human immune repertoire or activation of humoral response?

    PubMed

    Papuć, Ewa; Krupski, Witold; Kurys-Denis, Ewa; Rejdak, Konrad

    2016-04-01

    Characterization of autoantibodies specific for some disease-related proteins, would allow to better assess their role as diagnostic and prognostic markers. In the light of increasing evidence for both humoral and cellular adaptive immune responses in the pathophysiology of Alzheimer's disease (AD), and data on the increased small heat-shock proteins (sHSP) expression in this disease, it seemed justified to assess humoral response against sHSP in AD patients. The aim of the study was to check whether AD has the ability to elicit immune response against small HSP, which could also serve as disease biomarkers. IgG and IgM autoantibodies against alpha B-crystallin and anti-HSP 60 IgG autoantibodies were assessed in 59 AD patients and 59 healthy subjects. Both IgM and IgG autoantibodies against alpha B-crystallin in AD patients were significantly higher compared to healthy controls (p < 0.05). No statistically significant differences were found between AD patients and healthy subjects were found in anti-HSP60 IgG autoantibody titers (p = 0.29). Anti-HSP60 antibodies present in AD patients may indeed belong to natural human immune repertoire, and chronic neurodegenerative process does not have significant inducing effect on the systemic immunoreactivity against HSP60. Increased titers of IgM and IgG autoantibodies against alpha B-crystallin in AD patients may reflect activation of humoral immune response in the course of this chronic disease, probably secondary to its increased expression. Further prospective studies, on larger group of AD patients and measuring a change in antibodies titers with disease progression are necessary to assess the exact role of these antibodies in AD. PMID:26566902

  15. The human "magnesome": detecting magnesium binding sites on human proteins

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Magnesium research is increasing in molecular medicine due to the relevance of this ion in several important biological processes and associated molecular pathogeneses. It is still difficult to predict from the protein covalent structure whether a human chain is or not involved in magnesium binding. This is mainly due to little information on the structural characteristics of magnesium binding sites in proteins and protein complexes. Magnesium binding features, differently from those of other divalent cations such as calcium and zinc, are elusive. Here we address a question that is relevant in protein annotation: how many human proteins can bind Mg2+? Our analysis is performed taking advantage of the recently implemented Bologna Annotation Resource (BAR-PLUS), a non hierarchical clustering method that relies on the pair wise sequence comparison of about 14 millions proteins from over 300.000 species and their grouping into clusters where annotation can safely be inherited after statistical validation. Results After cluster assignment of the latest version of the human proteome, the total number of human proteins for which we can assign putative Mg binding sites is 3,751. Among these proteins, 2,688 inherit annotation directly from human templates and 1,063 inherit annotation from templates of other organisms. Protein structures are highly conserved inside a given cluster. Transfer of structural properties is possible after alignment of a given sequence with the protein structures that characterise a given cluster as obtained with a Hidden Markov Model (HMM) based procedure. Interestingly a set of 370 human sequences inherit Mg2+ binding sites from templates sharing less than 30% sequence identity with the template. Conclusion We describe and deliver the "human magnesome", a set of proteins of the human proteome that inherit putative binding of magnesium ions. With our BAR-hMG, 251 clusters including 1,341 magnesium binding protein structures

  16. Inverse association between gluthathione peroxidase activity and both selenium-binding protein 1 levels and gleason score in human prostate tissue

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    BACKGROUND. Data from human epidemiological studies, cultured mammalian cells, and animal models have supported a potentially beneficial role of selenium (Se) in prostate cancer prevention. In addition, Se-containing proteins including members of the gutathione peroxidase (GPx) family and Selenium-B...

  17. Activation of S6 kinase in human neutrophils by calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate crystals: protein kinase C-dependent and phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase-independent pathways.

    PubMed Central

    Tudan, C; Jackson, J K; Charlton, L; Pelech, S L; Sahl, B; Burt, H M

    1998-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI 3-kinase) has been shown previously to be a central enzyme in crystal-induced neutrophil activation. Since activation of the 70 kDa S6 kinase (p70S6K) has been shown to be dependent on PI 3-kinase activation in mammalian cells, and since the former is a key enzyme in the transmission of signals to the cell nucleus, activation of p70(S6K) was investigated in crystal-stimulated neutrophils. Cytosolic fractions from calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate (CPPD)-crystal-activated neutrophils were separated by Mono Q chromatography and analysed for phosphotransferase activity using a range of substrates and probed by Western analysis using antibodies to p70(S6K) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAP kinase). CPPD crystals induced a robust, transient activation (peak activity at 2 min) of p70(S6K) that was fully inhibited by pretreatment with rapamycin. This is the first report of the activation of p70(S6K) in neutrophil signal transduction pathways induced by an agonist. This crystal-induced activation of p70(S6K) could also be inhibited by a protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor (Compound 3), but not by the PI 3-kinase inhibitor wortmannin. CPPD crystals also activated the ERK1 and ERK2 forms of MAP kinase (wortmannin insensitive), PKC (Compound 3 sensitive) and protein kinase B (wortmannin sensitive) in neutrophils. These data suggest that activation of p70(S6K) may proceed through a PI 3-kinase- and protein kinase B-independent but PKC-dependent pathway in crystal-activated neutrophils. PMID:9531494

  18. The human papillomavirus type 16 L1 protein directly interacts with E2 and enhances E2-dependent replication and transcription activation

    PubMed Central

    Siddiqa, Abida; Léon, Karen Campos; James, Claire D.; Bhatti, Muhammad Faraz; Roberts, Sally

    2015-01-01

    The human papillomavirus (HPV) E2 protein is a multifunctional protein essential for the control of virus gene expression, genome replication and persistence. E2 is expressed throughout the differentiation-dependent virus life cycle and is functionally regulated by association with multiple viral and cellular proteins. Here, we show for the first time to our knowledge that HPV16 E2 directly associates with the major capsid protein L1, independently of other viral or cellular proteins. We have mapped the L1 binding region within E2 and show that the α-2 helices within the E2 DNA-binding domain mediate L1 interaction. Using cell-based assays, we show that co-expression of L1 and E2 results in enhanced transcription and virus origin-dependent DNA replication. Upon co-expression in keratinocytes, L1 reduces nucleolar association of E2 protein, and when co-expressed with E1 and E2, L1 is partially recruited to viral replication factories. Furthermore, co-distribution of E2 and L1 was detected in the nuclei of upper suprabasal cells in stratified epithelia of HPV16 genome-containing primary human keratinocytes. Taken together, our findings suggest that the interaction between E2 and L1 is important for the regulation of E2 function during the late events of the HPV life cycle. PMID:25911730

  19. The human papillomavirus type 16 L1 protein directly interacts with E2 and enhances E2-dependent replication and transcription activation.

    PubMed

    Siddiqa, Abida; Léon, Karen Campos; James, Claire D; Bhatti, Muhammad Faraz; Roberts, Sally; Parish, Joanna L

    2015-08-01

    The human papillomavirus (HPV) E2 protein is a multifunctional protein essential for the control of virus gene expression, genome replication and persistence. E2 is expressed throughout the differentiation-dependent virus life cycle and is functionally regulated by association with multiple viral and cellular proteins. Here, we show for the first time to our knowledge that HPV16 E2 directly associates with the major capsid protein L1, independently of other viral or cellular proteins. We have mapped the L1 binding region within E2 and show that the α-2 helices within the E2 DNA-binding domain mediate L1 interaction. Using cell-based assays, we show that co-expression of L1 and E2 results in enhanced transcription and virus origin-dependent DNA replication. Upon co-expression in keratinocytes, L1 reduces nucleolar association of E2 protein, and when co-expressed with E1 and E2, L1 is partially recruited to viral replication factories. Furthermore, co-distribution of E2 and L1 was detected in the nuclei of upper suprabasal cells in stratified epithelia of HPV16 genome-containing primary human keratinocytes. Taken together, our findings suggest that the interaction between E2 and L1 is important for the regulation of E2 function during the late events of the HPV life cycle. PMID:25911730

  20. Genetic engineering, expression, and activity of a chimeric monoclonal antibody-avidin fusion protein for receptor-mediated delivery of biotinylated drugs in humans.

    PubMed

    Boado, Ruben J; Zhang, Yufeng; Zhang, Yun; Xia, Chun-fang; Wang, Yuntao; Pardridge, William M

    2008-03-01

    The genetic engineering, expression, and validation of a fusion protein of avidin (AV) and a chimeric monoclonal antibody (mAb) to the human insulin receptor (HIR) is described. The 15 kDa avidin monomer was fused to the carboxyl terminus of the heavy chain of the HIRMAb. The fusion protein heavy chain reacted with antibodies specific for human IgG and avidin, and had the same affinity for binding to the HIR extracellular domain as the original chimeric HIRMAb. The fusion protein qualitatively bound biotinylated ligands, but was secreted fully saturated with biotin by COS cells, owing to the high level of biotin in tissue culture medium. Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells were permanently transfected with a tandem vector expressing the fusion protein genes, and high expressing cell lines were isolated by methotrexate amplification and dilutional cloning. The product expressed by CHO cells had high binding to the HIR, and migrated as a homogeneous species in size exclusion HPLC and native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The CHO cells were adapted to a 4 week culture in biotin depleted medium, and the HIRMAb-AV fusion protein expressed under these conditions had 1 unoccupied biotin binding site per molecule, based on a [3H]-biotin ultrafiltration assay. The HIRMAb-AV increased biotin uptake by human cells >15-fold, and mediated the endocytosis of fluorescein-biotin, as demonstrated by confocal microscopy. In summary, the HIRMAb-AV fusion protein is a new drug targeting system for humans that can be adapted to monobiotinylated drugs or nucleic acids. PMID:18278853

  1. Increased Adipose Protein Carbonylation in Human Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Frohnert, Brigitte I.; Sinaiko, Alan R.; Serrot, Federico J.; Foncea, Rocio E.; Moran, Antoinette; Ikramuddin, Sayeed; Choudry, Umar; Bernlohr, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Insulin resistance is associated with obesity but mechanisms controlling this relationship in humans are not fully understood. Studies in animal models suggest a linkage between adipose reactive oxygen species (ROS) and insulin resistance. ROS oxidize cellular lipids to produce a variety of lipid hydroperoxides that in turn generate reactive lipid aldehydes that covalently modify cellular proteins in a process termed carbonylation. Mammalian cells defend against reactive lipid aldehydes and protein carbonylation by glutathionylation using glutathione-S-transferase A4 (GSTA4) or carbonyl reduction/oxidation via reductases and/or dehydrogenases. Insulin resistance in mice is linked to ROS production and increased level of protein carbonylation, mitochondrial dysfunction, decreased insulin-stimulated glucose transport, and altered adipokine secretion. To assess protein carbonylation and insulin resistance in humans, eight healthy participants underwent subcutaneous fat biopsy from the periumbilical region for protein analysis and frequently sampled intravenous glucose tolerance testing to measure insulin sensitivity. Soluble proteins from adipose tissue were analyzed using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and the major carbonylated proteins identified as the adipocyte and epithelial fatty acid–binding proteins. The level of protein carbonylation was directly correlated with adiposity and serum free fatty acids (FFAs). These results suggest that in human obesity oxidative stress is linked to protein carbonylation and such events may contribute to the development of insulin resistance. PMID:21593812

  2. Shigella flexneri 3a Outer Membrane Protein C Epitope Is Recognized by Human Umbilical Cord Sera and Associated with Protective Activity

    PubMed Central

    Jarząb, Anna; Witkowska, Danuta; Ziomek, Edmund; Dąbrowska, Anna; Szewczuk, Zbigniew; Gamian, Andrzej

    2013-01-01

    Shigella flexneri 3a is one of the five major strains of the Shigella genus responsible for dysentery, especially among children, in regions of high poverty and poor sanitation. The outer membrane proteins (OMP) of this bacterium elicit immunological responses and are considered a prime target for vaccine development. When injected into mice they elicit a protective immunological response against a lethal dose of the pathogen. The OMPs from S. flexneri 3a were isolated and resolved by two-dimension-SDS-PAGE. Two 38-kDa spots were of particular interest since in our earlier studies OMPs of such molecular mass were found to interact with umbilical cord sera. These two spots were identified as OmpC by ESI-MS/MS spectrometry. By DNA sequencing, the ompC gene from S. flexneri 3a was identical to ompC from S. flexneri 2a [Gene Bank: 24113600]. A 3D model of OmpC was built and used to predict B-cell type (discontinuous) antigenic epitopes. Six epitopes bearing the highest score were selected and the corresponding peptides were synthesized. Only the peptides representing loop V of OmpC reacted strongly with the umbilical cord serum immunoglobulins. To determine which amino acids are essential for the antigenic activity of the epitope, the loop V was scanned with a series of dodecapeptides. The peptide RYDERY was identified as a minimal sequence for the loop V epitope. Truncation at either the C- or N-terminus rendered this peptide inactive. Apart from C-terminal tyrosine, substitution of each of the remaining five amino acids with glycine, led to a precipitous loss of immunological activity. This peptide may serve as a ligand in affinity chromatography of OmpC-specific antibodies and as a component of a vaccine designed to boost human immune defenses against enterobacterial infections. PMID:23940590

  3. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Enters Brain Microvascular Endothelia by Macropinocytosis Dependent on Lipid Rafts and the Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Nancy Q.; Lossinsky, Albert S.; Popik, Waldemar; Li, Xia; Gujuluva, Chandrasekhar; Kriederman, Benjamin; Roberts, Jaclyn; Pushkarsky, Tatania; Bukrinsky, Michael; Witte, Marlys; Weinand, Martin; Fiala, Milan

    2002-01-01

    Brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMVECs) present an incomplete barrier to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) neuroinvasion. In order to clarify the mechanisms of HIV-1 invasion, we have examined HIV-1 uptake and transcellular penetration in an in vitro BMVEC model. No evidence of productive infection was observed by luciferase, PCR, and reverse transcriptase assays. Approximately 1% of viral RNA and 1% of infectious virus penetrated the BMVEC barrier without disruption of tight junctions. The virus upregulated ICAM-1 on plasma membranes and in cytoplasmic vesiculotubular structures. HIV-1 virions were entangled by microvilli and were taken into cytoplasmic vesicles through surface invaginations without fusion of the virus envelope with the plasma membrane. Subsequently, the cytoplasmic vesicles fused with lysosomes, the virions were lysed, and the vesicles diminished in size. Upon cell entry, HIV-1 colocalized with cholera toxin B, which targets lipid raft-associated GM1 ganglioside. Cholesterol-extracting agents, cyclodextrin and nystatin, and polyanion heparin significantly inhibited virus entry. Anti-CD4 had no effect and the chemokine AOP-RANTES had only a slight inhibitory effect on virus entry. HIV-1 activated the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway, and inhibition of MAPK/Erk kinase inhibited virus entry. Entry was also blocked by dimethylamiloride, indicating that HIV-1 enters endothelial cells by macropinocytosis. Therefore, HIV-1 penetrates BMVECs in ICAM-1-lined macropinosomes by a mechanism involving lipid rafts, MAPK signaling, and glycosylaminoglycans, while CD4 and chemokine receptors play limited roles in this process. PMID:12050382

  4. Shigella flexneri 3a outer membrane protein C epitope is recognized by human umbilical cord sera and associated with protective activity.

    PubMed

    Jarząb, Anna; Witkowska, Danuta; Ziomek, Edmund; Dąbrowska, Anna; Szewczuk, Zbigniew; Gamian, Andrzej

    2013-01-01

    Shigella flexneri 3a is one of the five major strains of the Shigella genus responsible for dysentery, especially among children, in regions of high poverty and poor sanitation. The outer membrane proteins (OMP) of this bacterium elicit immunological responses and are considered a prime target for vaccine development. When injected into mice they elicit a protective immunological response against a lethal dose of the pathogen. The OMPs from S. flexneri 3a were isolated and resolved by two-dimension-SDS-PAGE. Two 38-kDa spots were of particular interest since in our earlier studies OMPs of such molecular mass were found to interact with umbilical cord sera. These two spots were identified as OmpC by ESI-MS/MS spectrometry. By DNA sequencing, the ompC gene from S. flexneri 3a was identical to ompC from S. flexneri 2a [Gene Bank: 24113600]. A 3D model of OmpC was built and used to predict B-cell type (discontinuous) antigenic epitopes. Six epitopes bearing the highest score were selected and the corresponding peptides were synthesized. Only the peptides representing loop V of OmpC reacted strongly with the umbilical cord serum immunoglobulins. To determine which amino acids are essential for the antigenic activity of the epitope, the loop V was scanned with a series of dodecapeptides. The peptide RYDERY was identified as a minimal sequence for the loop V epitope. Truncation at either the C- or N-terminus rendered this peptide inactive. Apart from C-terminal tyrosine, substitution of each of the remaining five amino acids with glycine, led to a precipitous loss of immunological activity. This peptide may serve as a ligand in affinity chromatography of OmpC-specific antibodies and as a component of a vaccine designed to boost human immune defenses against enterobacterial infections. PMID:23940590

  5. Abrogation of fibroblast activation protein enzymatic activity attenuates tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jonathan D; Valianou, Matthildi; Canutescu, Adrian A; Jaffe, Eileen K; Lee, Hyung-Ok; Wang, Hao; Lai, Jack H; Bachovchin, William W; Weiner, Louis M

    2005-03-01

    Tumor-associated fibroblasts are functionally and phenotypically distinct from normal fibroblasts that are not in the tumor microenvironment. Fibroblast activation protein is a 95 kDa cell surface glycoprotein expressed by tumor stromal fibroblasts, and has been shown to have dipeptidyl peptidase and collagenase activity. Site-directed mutagenesis at the catalytic site of fibroblast activation protein, Ser624 --> Ala624, resulted in an approximately 100,000-fold loss of fibroblast activation protein dipeptidyl peptidase (DPP) activity. HEK293 cells transfected with wild-type fibroblast activation protein, enzymatic mutant (S624A) fibroblast activation protein, or vector alone, were inoculated subcutaneously into immunodeficient mouse to assess the contribution of fibroblast activation protein enzymatic activity to tumor growth. Overexpression of wild-type fibroblast activation protein showed growth potentiation and enhanced tumorigenicity compared with both fibroblast activation protein S624A and vector-transfected HEK293 xenografts. HEK293 cells transfected with fibroblast activation protein S624A showed tumor growth rates and tumorigenicity potential similar only to vector-transfected HEK293. In vivo assessment of fibroblast activation protein DPP activity of these tumors showed enhanced enzymatic activity of wild-type fibroblast activation protein, with only baseline levels of fibroblast activation protein DPP activity in either fibroblast activation protein S624A or vector-only xenografts. These results indicate that the enzymatic activity of fibroblast activation protein is necessary for fibroblast activation protein-driven tumor growth in the HEK293 xenograft model system. This establishes the proof-of-principle that the enzymatic activity of fibroblast activation protein plays an important role in the promotion of tumor growth, and provides an attractive target for therapeutics designed to alter fibroblast activation protein-induced tumor growth by targeting

  6. Daedalus: a robust, turnkey platform for rapid production of decigram quantities of active recombinant proteins in human cell lines using novel lentiviral vectors

    PubMed Central

    Bandaranayake, Ashok D.; Correnti, Colin; Ryu, Byoung Y.; Brault, Michelle; Strong, Roland K.; Rawlings, David J.

    2011-01-01

    A key challenge for the academic and biopharmaceutical communities is the rapid and scalable production of recombinant proteins for supporting downstream applications ranging from therapeutic trials to structural genomics efforts. Here, we describe a novel system for the production of recombinant mammalian proteins, including immune receptors, cytokines and antibodies, in a human cell line culture system, often requiring <3 weeks to achieve stable, high-level expression: Daedalus. The inclusion of minimized ubiquitous chromatin opening elements in the transduction vectors is key for preventing genomic silencing and maintaining the stability of decigram levels of expression. This system can bypass the tedious and time-consuming steps of conventional protein production methods by employing the secretion pathway of serum-free adapted human suspension cell lines, such as 293 Freestyle. Using optimized lentiviral vectors, yields of 20–100 mg/l of correctly folded and post-translationally modified, endotoxin-free protein of up to ~70 kDa in size, can be achieved in conventional, small-scale (100 ml) culture. At these yields, most proteins can be purified using a single size-exclusion chromatography step, immediately appropriate for use in structural, biophysical or therapeutic applications. PMID:21911364

  7. Nucleolar localization of Small G protein RhoA is associated with active RNA synthesis in human carcinoma HEp-2 cells

    PubMed Central

    LI, YUEYING; HU, YONG; CHE, LILONG; JIA, JUNHAI; CHEN, MIN

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that the nuclear localization of ras homolog family member A (RhoA), with prominent concentration in the nucleolus, is a common feature in human cancer tissues and cancer cell lines. Although a previous study has demonstrated that the nuclear translocation of RhoA occurs via active transport, a process that occurs through importin α in a nuclear factor-κB-dependent manner, the mechanism, biological function and pathological meaning of the nucleolar residency of RhoA remain to be elucidated. As the cell nucleolus is the site of ribosome biosynthesis, the aim of the present study was to investigate the association between RNA synthesis and the nucleolar localization of RhoA, as well as the molecular mechanisms underlying the residency of RhoA in the nucleolus of HEp-2 (human larynx epithelial carcinoma) cells. Indirect immunofluorescence microscopy was used to evaluate the subcellular distribution of nuclear RhoA, and immunoblotting analysis was used to determine the total cellular protein level of RhoA. Consistent with the results of previous studies, untreated HEp-2 cells exhibited bright nucleolar staining, indicating an increased concentration of RhoA in the nucleoli. Treatment with actinomycin D for the inhibition of RNA synthesis caused a redistribution of RhoA from the nucleoli to the nucleoplasm with a speckled staining pattern. Immunoblotting revealed that neither the total cellular amount of RhoA nor the integrity of RhoA was affected by treatment with actinomycin D. In cells that were treated at a decreased concentration (0.05 mg/l) of actinomycin D, the redistribution of RhoA was reversible following the removal of the drug from the culture medium. However, this reversal was not observed at an increased drug concentration (1 mg/l). Overall, to the best of our knowledge, the results of the present study provide the first in situ evidence that the inhibition of RNA synthesis induces a redistribution of nucleolar RhoA to

  8. Mucin1 mediates autocrine transforming growth factor beta signaling through activating the c-Jun N-terminal kinase/activator protein 1 pathway in human hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Qiongshu; Liu, Guomu; Shao, Dan; Wang, Juan; Yuan, Hongyan; Chen, Tanxiu; Zhai, Ruiping; Ni, Weihua; Tai, Guixiang

    2015-02-01

    In a previous study, we observed by global gene expression analysis that oncogene mucin1 (MUC1) silencing decreased transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) signaling in the human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cell line SMMC-7721. In this study, we report that MUC1 overexpression enhanced the levels of phosphorylated Smad3 linker region (p-Smad3L) (Ser-213) and its target gene MMP-9 in HCC cells, suggesting that MUC1 mediates TGF-β signaling. To investigate the effect of MUC1 on TGF-β signaling, we determined TGF-β secretion in MUC1 gene silencing and overexpressing cell lines. MUC1 expression enhanced not only TGF-β1 expression at the mRNA and protein levels but also luciferase activity driven by a TGF-β promoter, as well as elevated the activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and c-Jun, a member of the activation protein 1 (AP-1) transcription factor family. Furthermore, pharmacological reduction of TGF-β receptor (TβR), JNK and c-Jun activity inhibited MUC1-induced autocrine TGF-β signaling. Moreover, a co-immunoprecipitation assay showed that MUC1 directly bound and activated JNK. In addition, both MUC1-induced TGF-β secretion and exogenous TGF-β1 significantly increased Smad signaling and cell migration, which were markedly inhibited by either TβR inhibitor or small interfering RNA silencing of TGF-β1 gene in HCC cells. The high correlation between MUC1 and TGF-β1 or p-Smad3L (Ser-213) expression was shown in tumor tissues from HCC patients by immunohistochemical staining analysis. Collectively, these results indicate that MUC1 mediates autocrine TGF-β signaling by activating the JNK/AP-1 pathway in HCC cells. Therefore, MUC1 plays a key role in HCC progression and could serve as an attractive target for HCC therapy. PMID:25526895

  9. Structure of mutant human oncogene protein determined

    SciTech Connect

    Baum, R.

    1989-01-16

    The protein encoded by a mutant human oncogene differs only slightly in structure from the native protein that initiates normal cell division, a finding that may complicate efforts to develop inhibitors of the mutant protein. Previously, the x-ray structure of the protein encoded by the normal c-Ha-ras gene, a protein believed to signal cells to start or stop dividing through its interaction with guanosine triphosphate (GTP), was reported. The structure of the protein encoded by a transforming c-Ha-ras oncogene, in which a valine codon replaces the normal glycine codon at position 12 in the gene, has now been determined. The differences in the structures of the mutant and normal proteins are located primarily in a loop that interacts with the /beta/-phosphate of a bound guanosine diphosphate (GDP) molecule.

  10. The role of mitogen-activated protein kinase in insulin and insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) signaling cascades for progesterone and IGF-binding protein-1 production in human granulosa cells.

    PubMed

    Seto-Young, Donna; Zajac, Jacek; Liu, Hung-Ching; Rosenwaks, Zev; Poretsky, Leonid

    2003-07-01

    Insulin and IGF-I participate in the regulation of ovulation, steroidogenesis, and IGF-binding protein (IGFBP) production in the ovary. Insulin and IGF-I actions in the ovary are closely related. For example, insulin may amplify IGF-I action in the ovary by up-regulating type I IGF receptors and inhibiting IGFBP-1 production, thus increasing the bioavailability of IGF-I. It is hypothesized that ovarian effects of insulin in insulin-resistant states are mediated via an insulin action pathway(s) distinct from those involved in glucose transport. We previously reported that insulin-induced stimulation of progesterone and inhibition of IGFBP-1 production in the human ovary are mediated by signaling pathways that are independent of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, the enzyme whose activation is crucial for glucose transport. We now examined whether activation of MAPK is necessary to mediate insulin-induced or IGF-I-induced stimulation of progesterone or inhibition of IGFBP-1 production in human granulosa cells. Human granulosa cells were obtained during in vitro fertilization. Cells (0.5-1 x 10(5)) were incubated for 24 h in the presence of 0, 10, 10(2), or 10(3) ng/ml insulin or 0, 0.5, 1, 2.5, or 5 ng/ml IGF-I and in the presence or absence of 1 micro M PD98059, a specific inhibitor of ERK1/2 MAPK. The progesterone concentration in the tissue culture medium was measured by RIA (Pantex, Santa Monica, CA), and the IGFBP-1 concentration was measured by immunoradiometric assay (DSL-7800, Diagnostic Systems Laboratories, Inc., Webster, TX). MAPK activity was assessed using the MAPK IP-Kinase assay kit (Upstate Biotechnology, Inc., Lake Placid, NY). ANOVA was used to compare mean values of progesterone or IGFBP-1 concentrations. MAPK was stimulated by insulin up to 350% of the baseline value. Progesterone production in human granulosa cells was stimulated by insulin in a dose-related manner to 123% of the control value (P < 0.001), and IGFBP-1 production was inhibited to 25

  11. The potent activation of Ca(2+)-activated K(+) current by NVP-AUY922 in the human pancreatic duct cell line (PANC-1) possibly independent of heat shock protein 90 inhibition.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Nai-Jung; Wu, Sheng-Nan; Chen, Li-Tzong

    2015-04-01

    NVP-AUY922 (AUY) is a potent inhibitor of heat shock protein 90 (HSP90). Whether this compound can exert additional effects on membrane ion channels remains elusive. We investigated the effect of AUY on ion currents in human pancreatic duct epithelial cells (PDECs), including PANC-1 and MIA PaCa-2. AUY increased the amplitude of the K(+) current (IK) in PANC-1 cells shown by whole-cell configuration. Single-channel recordings revealed a large-conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) (BKCa) channel in PANC-1, but not in MIA PaCa-2. In cell-attached mode, AUY increased the probability of BKCa channel opening and also potentiated the activity of stretch-induced channels. However, other HSP inhibitors, 17-AAG or BIIB021 only slightly increased the activity of BKCa channels. In inside-out recordings, sodium hydrosulphide or caffeic acid phenethyl ester increased the activity of BKCa channels, but AUY did not. We further evaluated whether conductance of Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels (IK(Ca)) influenced secretion of HCO3(-) and fluid in PDECs by using a modified Whitcomb-Ermentrout model. Simulation studies showed that an increase in IK(Ca) resulted in additional secretion of HCO3(-) and fluid by mimicking the effect of AUY in PDECs. Collectively, AUY can interact with the BKCa channel to largely increase IK(Ca) in PDECs. PMID:25953267

  12. Activation of protein phosphatase 2A is responsible for increased content and inactivation of respiratory chain complex i induced by all-trans retinoic acid in human keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Papa, F; Sardaro, N; Lippolis, R; Panelli, D; Scacco, S

    2016-01-01

    This study presents the effect of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) on cell growth and respiratory chain complex I in human keratinocyte cultures. Keratinocyte treatment results in increased level of GRIM-19 and other subunits of complex I, in particular of their carbonylated forms, associated with inhibition of its enzymatic activity. The results show that in keratinocytes ATRA-promoted phosphatase activity controls the proteostasis and activity of complex I. PMID:27358125

  13. The Effect of Walterinnesia aegyptia Venom Proteins on TCA Cycle Activity and Mitochondrial NAD+-Redox State in Cultured Human Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Ghneim, Hazem K.; Al-Sheikh, Yazeed A.; Aboul-Soud, Mourad A. M.

    2015-01-01

    Fibroblast cultures were used to study the effects of crude Walterinnesia aegyptia venom and its F1–F7 protein fractions on TCA cycle enzyme activities and mitochondrial NAD-redox state. Confluent cells were incubated with 10 μg of venom proteins for 4 hours at 37°C. The activities of all studied TCA enzymes and the non-TCA mitochondrial NADP+-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase underwent significant reductions of similar magnitude (50–60% of control activity) upon incubation of cells with the crude venom and fractions F4, F5, and F7 and 60–70% for fractions F3 and F6. In addition, the crude and fractions F3–F7 venom proteins caused a drop in mitochondrial NAD+ and NADP+ levels equivalent to around 25% of control values. Whereas the crude and fractions F4, F5, and F7 venom proteins caused similar magnitude drops in NADH and NADPH (around 55% of control levels), fractions F3 and F6 caused a more drastic drop (60–70% of control levels) of both reduced coenzymes. Results indicate that the effects of venom proteins could be directed at the mitochondrial level and/or the rates of NAD+ and NADP+ biosynthesis. PMID:25705684

  14. The effect of Walterinnesia aegyptia venom proteins on TCA cycle activity and mitochondrial NAD(+)-redox state in cultured human fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Ghneim, Hazem K; Al-Sheikh, Yazeed A; Aboul-Soud, Mourad A M

    2015-01-01

    Fibroblast cultures were used to study the effects of crude Walterinnesia aegyptia venom and its F1-F7 protein fractions on TCA cycle enzyme activities and mitochondrial NAD-redox state. Confluent cells were incubated with 10 μg of venom proteins for 4 hours at 37°C. The activities of all studied TCA enzymes and the non-TCA mitochondrial NADP(+)-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase underwent significant reductions of similar magnitude (50-60% of control activity) upon incubation of cells with the crude venom and fractions F4, F5, and F7 and 60-70% for fractions F3 and F6. In addition, the crude and fractions F3-F7 venom proteins caused a drop in mitochondrial NAD(+) and NADP(+) levels equivalent to around 25% of control values. Whereas the crude and fractions F4, F5, and F7 venom proteins caused similar magnitude drops in NADH and NADPH (around 55% of control levels), fractions F3 and F6 caused a more drastic drop (60-70% of control levels) of both reduced coenzymes. Results indicate that the effects of venom proteins could be directed at the mitochondrial level and/or the rates of NAD(+) and NADP(+) biosynthesis. PMID:25705684

  15. Exceptional overproduction of a functional human membrane protein.

    PubMed

    Nyblom, Maria; Oberg, Fredrik; Lindkvist-Petersson, Karin; Hallgren, Karin; Findlay, Heather; Wikström, Jennie; Karlsson, Anders; Hansson, Orjan; Booth, Paula J; Bill, Roslyn M; Neutze, Richard; Hedfalk, Kristina

    2007-11-01

    Eukaryotic--especially human--membrane protein overproduction remains a major challenge in biochemistry. Heterologously overproduced and purified proteins provide a starting point for further biochemical, biophysical and structural studies, and the lack of sufficient quantities of functional membrane proteins is frequently a bottleneck hindering this. Here, we report exceptionally high production levels of a correctly folded and crystallisable recombinant human integral membrane protein in its active form; human aquaporin 1 (hAQP1) has been heterologously produced in the membranes of the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris. After solubilisation and a two step purification procedure, at least 90 mg hAQP1 per liter of culture is obtained. Water channel activity of this purified hAQP1 was verified by reconstitution into proteoliposomes and performing stopped-flow vesicle shrinkage measurements. Mass spectrometry confirmed the identity of hAQP1 in crude membrane preparations, and also from purified protein reconstituted into proteoliposomes. Furthermore, crystallisation screens yielded diffraction quality crystals of untagged recombinant hAQP1. This study illustrates the power of the yeast P. pastoris as a host to produce exceptionally high yields of a functionally active, human integral membrane protein for subsequent functional and structural characterization. PMID:17869538

  16. Enriched inorganic compounds in diesel exhaust particles induce mitogen-activated protein kinase activation, cytoskeleton instability, and cytotoxicity in human bronchial epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Seriani, Robson; Junqueira, Mara S; Carvalho-Sousa, Claudia E; Arruda, Alessandra C T; Martinez, Diana; Alencar, Adriano M; Garippo, Ana L; Brito, Jôse Mara; Martins, Milton A; Saldiva, Paulo H N; Negri, Elnara M; Mauad, Thais; Macchione, Mariangela

    2015-04-01

    This study assessed the effects of the diesel exhaust particles on ERK and JNK MAPKs activation, cell rheology (viscoelasticity), and cytotoxicity in bronchial epithelial airway cells (BEAS-2B). Crude DEP and DEP after extraction with hexane (DEP/HEX) were utilized. The partial reduction of some DEP/HEX organics increased the biodisponibility of many metallic elements. JNK and ERK were activated simultaneously by crude DEP with no alterations in viscoelasticity of the cells. Mitochondrial activity, however, revealed a decrease through the MTT assay. DEP/HEX treatment increased viscoelasticity and cytotoxicity (membrane damage), and also activated JNK. Our data suggest that the greater bioavailability of metals could be involved in JNK activation and, consequently, in the reduction of fiber coherence and increase in the viscoelasticity and cytotoxicity of BEAS cells. The adverse findings detected after exposure to crude DEP and to DEP/HEX reflect the toxic potential of diesel compounds. Considering the fact that the cells of the respiratory epithelium are the first line of defense between the body and the environment, our data contribute to a better understanding of the pathways leading to respiratory cell injury and provide evidence for the onset of or worsening of respiratory diseases caused by inorganic compounds present in DEP. PMID:25769681

  17. Human CAP18: a novel antimicrobial lipopolysaccharide-binding protein.

    PubMed Central

    Larrick, J W; Hirata, M; Balint, R F; Lee, J; Zhong, J; Wright, S C

    1995-01-01

    CAP18 (18-kDa cationic antimicrobial protein) is a protein originally identified and purified from rabbit leukocytes on the basis of its capacity to bind and inhibit various activities of lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Here we report the cloning of human CAP18 and characterize the anti-LPS activity of the C-terminal fragment. Oligonucleotide probes designed from the rabbit CAP18 cDNA were used to identify human CAP18 from a bone marrow cDNA library. The cDNA encodes a protein composed of a 30-amino-acid signal peptide, a 103-amino-acid N-terminal domain of unknown function, and a C-terminal domain of 37 amino acids homologous to the LPS-binding antimicrobial domain of rabbit CAP18, designated CAP18(104-140). A human CAP18-specific antiserum was generated by using CAP18 expressed as a fusion protein with the maltose-binding protein. Western blots (immunoblots) with this antiserum showed specific expression of human CAP18 in granulocytes. Synthetic human CAP18(104-140) and a more active truncated fragment, CAP18(104-135), were shown to (i) bind to erythrocytes coated with diverse strains of LPS, (ii) inhibit LPS-induced release of nitric oxide from macrophages, (iii) inhibit LPS-induced generation of tissue factor, and (iv) protect mice from LPS lethality. CAP18(104-140) may have therapeutic utility for conditions associated with elevated concentrations of LPS. PMID:7890387

  18. Function of the cytoplasmic tail of human calcitonin receptor-like receptor in complex with receptor activity-modifying protein 2

    SciTech Connect

    Kuwasako, Kenji; Kitamura, Kazuo; Nagata, Sayaka; Hikosaka, Tomomi; Kato, Johji

    2010-02-12

    Receptor activity-modifying protein 2 (RAMP2) enables calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CRLR) to form an adrenomedullin (AM)-specific receptor. Here we investigated the function of the cytoplasmic C-terminal tail (C-tail) of human (h)CRLR by co-transfecting its C-terminal mutants into HEK-293 cells stably expressing hRAMP2. Deleting the C-tail from CRLR disrupted AM-evoked cAMP production or receptor internalization, but did not affect [{sup 125}I]AM binding. We found that CRLR residues 428-439 are required for AM-evoked cAMP production, though deleting this region had little effect on receptor internalization. Moreover, pretreatment with pertussis toxin (100 ng/mL) led to significant increases in AM-induced cAMP production via wild-type CRLR/RAMP2 complexes. This effect was canceled by deleting CRLR residues 454-457, suggesting Gi couples to this region. Flow cytometric analysis revealed that CRLR truncation mutants lacking residues in the Ser/Thr-rich region extending from Ser{sup 449} to Ser{sup 467} were unable to undergo AM-induced receptor internalization and, in contrast to the effect on wild-type CRLR, overexpression of GPCR kinases-2, -3 and -4 failed to promote internalization of CRLR mutants lacking residues 449-467. Thus, the hCRLR C-tail is crucial for AM-evoked cAMP production and internalization of the CRLR/RAMP2, while the receptor internalization is dependent on the aforementioned GPCR kinases, but not Gs coupling.

  19. FAP-α (Fibroblast activation protein-α) is involved in the control of human breast cancer cell line growth and motility via the FAK pathway

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Fibroblast Activation Protein alpha (FAP-α) or seprase is an integral membrane serine peptidase. Previous work has not satisfactorily explained both the suppression and promotion effects that have been observed in cancer. The purpose of this work was to investigate the role of FAP-α in human breast cancer. Expression of FAP-α was characterized in primary tumour samples and in cell lines, along with the effects of FAP-α expression on in vitro growth, invasion, attachment and migration. Furthermore the potential interaction of FAP-α with other signalling pathways was investigated. Results FAP-α was significantly increased in patients with poor outcome and survival. In vitro results showed that breast cancer cells over expressing FAP-α had increased growth ability and impaired migratory ability. The growth of MDA-MB-231 cells and the adhesion and invasion ability of both MCF-7 cells and MDA-MB-231 cells were not dramatically influenced by FAP-α expression. Over-expression of FAP-α resulted in a reduction of phosphorylated focal adhesion kinase (FAK) level in both cells cultured in normal media and serum-free media. An inhibitor to FAK restored the reduced motility ability of both MCF-7exp cells and MDA-MB-231exp cells and prevented the change in phosphorylated FAK levels. However, inhibitors to PI3K, ERK, PLCϒ, NWASP, ARP2/3, and ROCK had no influence this. Conclusions FAP-α in significantly associated with poor outcome in patients with breast cancer. In vitro, FAP-α promotes proliferation and inhibits migration of breast cancer cells, potentially by regulating the FAK pathway. These results suggest FAP-α could be a target for future therapies. PMID:24885257

  20. Human cytotoxic T lymphocytes against the Plasmodium falciparum circumsporozoite protein.

    PubMed Central

    Malik, A; Egan, J E; Houghten, R A; Sadoff, J C; Hoffman, S L

    1991-01-01

    Cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) against the circumsporozoite (CS) protein of malaria sporozoites protect against malaria in rodents. Although there is interest in developing human vaccines that induce CTL against the Plasmodium falciparum CS protein, humans have never been shown to produce CTL against any Plasmodium species protein or other parasite protein. We report that when peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from three of four volunteers immunized with irradiated P. falciparum sporozoites were stimulated in vitro with a recombinant vaccinia virus expressing the P. falciparum CS protein or a peptide including only amino acids 368-390 of the P. falciparum CS protein [CS-(368-390)], the PBMC lysed autologous Epstein-Barr virus-transformed B cells transfected with the P. falciparum CS protein gene or incubated with CS-(368-390) tricosapeptide. Activity was antigen specific, genetically restricted, and dependent on CD8+ T cells. In one volunteer, seven peptides reflecting amino acids 311-400 were tested, and, as in B10.BR mice, CTL activity was only associated with the CS-(368-390) peptide. Development of an assay for studying human CTL against the CS and other malaria proteins and a method for constructing target cells by direct gene transfection provide a foundation for studying the role of CTL in protection against malaria. PMID:1707538

  1. GDP beta S enhances the activation of phospholipase C caused by thrombin in human platelets: evidence for involvement of an inhibitory GTP-binding protein

    SciTech Connect

    Oberdisse, E.; Lapetina, E.G.

    1987-05-14

    Guanosine 5'-O-thiotriphosphate (GTP gamma S) and thrombin stimulate the activity of phospholipase C in platelets that have been permeabilized with saponin and whose inositol phospholipids have been prelabeled with (/sup 3/H)inositol. Ca/sup 2 +/ has opposite effects on the formation of (/sup 3/H)inositol phosphates induced by thrombin or GTP gamma S. While the action of GTP gamma S on the formation of (/sup 3/H)inositol phosphates is inhibited by Ca/sup 2 +/, action of thrombin is stimulated by Ca/sup 2 +/. Guanosine 5'-O-(2-thiodiphosphate) (GDP beta S), which inhibits the function of GTP-binding proteins, also inhibits the effect of GTP gamma S on phospholipase C stimulation but, surprisingly, increases the effect of thrombin. Ca/sup 2 +/ increases the inhibitory effect of GDP beta S on GTP gamma S activation of phospholipase C, but Ca/sup 2 +/ further enhances the stimulatory effect of GDP beta S on the thrombin activation of phospholipase C. This indicates that two mechanisms are responsible for the activation of phospholipase C in platelets. A GTP-binding protein is responsible for regulation of phospholipase C induced by GTP gamma S, while the effect of thrombin on the stimulation of phospholipase C is independent of GTP-binding proteins. However, the effect of thrombin may be modulated by the action of an inhibitory GTP-binding protein.

  2. Adiponectin promotes hyaluronan synthesis along with increases in hyaluronan synthase 2 transcripts through an AMP-activated protein kinase/peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{alpha}-dependent pathway in human dermal fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Yamane, Takumi; Kobayashi-Hattori, Kazuo; Oishi, Yuichi

    2011-11-18

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Adiponectin promotes hyaluronan synthesis along with an increase in HAS2 transcripts. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Adiponectin also increases the phosphorylation of AMPK. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A pharmacological activator of AMPK increases mRNA levels of PPAR{alpha} and HAS2. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Adiponectin-induced HAS2 mRNA expression is blocked by a PPAR{alpha} antagonist. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Adiponectin promotes hyaluronan synthesis via an AMPK/PPAR{alpha}-dependent pathway. -- Abstract: Although adipocytokines affect the functions of skin, little information is available on the effect of adiponectin on the skin. In this study, we investigated the effect of adiponectin on hyaluronan synthesis and its regulatory mechanisms in human dermal fibroblasts. Adiponectin promoted hyaluronan synthesis along with an increase in the mRNA levels of hyaluronan synthase 2 (HAS2), which plays a primary role in hyaluronan synthesis. Adiponectin also increased the phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). A pharmacological activator of AMPK, 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-1{beta}-ribofuranoside (AICAR), increased mRNA levels of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{alpha} (PPAR{alpha}), which enhances the expression of HAS2 mRNA. In addition, AICAR increased the mRNA levels of HAS2. Adiponectin-induced HAS2 mRNA expression was blocked by GW6471, a PPAR{alpha} antagonist, in a concentration-dependent manner. These results show that adiponectin promotes hyaluronan synthesis along with increases in HAS2 transcripts through an AMPK/PPAR{alpha}-dependent pathway in human dermal fibroblasts. Thus, our study suggests that adiponectin may be beneficial for retaining moisture in the skin, anti-inflammatory activity, and the treatment of a variety of cutaneous diseases.

  3. Inferring high-confidence human protein-protein interactions

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background As numerous experimental factors drive the acquisition, identification, and interpretation of protein-protein interactions (PPIs), aggregated assemblies of human PPI data invariably contain experiment-dependent noise. Ascertaining the reliability of PPIs collected from these diverse studies and scoring them to infer high-confidence networks is a non-trivial task. Moreover, a large number of PPIs share the same number of reported occurrences, making it impossible to distinguish the reliability of these PPIs and rank-order them. For example, for the data analyzed here, we found that the majority (>83%) of currently available human PPIs have been reported only once. Results In this work, we proposed an unsupervised statistical approach to score a set of diverse, experimentally identified PPIs from nine primary databases to create subsets of high-confidence human PPI networks. We evaluated this ranking method by comparing it with other methods and assessing their ability to retrieve protein associations from a number of diverse and independent reference sets. These reference sets contain known biological data that are either directly or indirectly linked to interactions between proteins. We quantified the average effect of using ranked protein interaction data to retrieve this information and showed that, when compared to randomly ranked interaction data sets, the proposed method created a larger enrichment (~134%) than either ranking based on the hypergeometric test (~109%) or occurrence ranking (~46%). Conclusions From our evaluations, it was clear that ranked interactions were always of value because higher-ranked PPIs had a higher likelihood of retrieving high-confidence experimental data. Reducing the noise inherent in aggregated experimental PPIs via our ranking scheme further increased the accuracy and enrichment of PPIs derived from a number of biologically relevant data sets. These results suggest that using our high-confidence protein interactions

  4. Identification of RFPL3 Protein as a Novel E3 Ubiquitin Ligase Modulating the Integration Activity of Human Immunodeficiency Virus, Type 1 Preintegration Complex Using a Microtiter Plate-based Assay*

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Beng Hui; Suzuki, Yasutsugu; Takahashi, Hirotaka; Ying, Pamela Ho Rui; Takahashi, Chikako; Han, Qi'En; Chin, Wei Xin; Chao, Sheng-Hao; Sawasaki, Tatsuya; Yamamoto, Naoki; Suzuki, Youichi

    2014-01-01

    Integration, one of the hallmarks of retrovirus replication, is mediated by a nucleoprotein complex called the preintegration complex (PIC), in which viral DNA is associated with many protein components that are required for completion of the early phase of infection. A striking feature of the PIC is its powerful integration activity in vitro. The PICs from a freshly isolated cytoplasmic extract of infected cells are able to insert viral DNA into exogenously added target DNA in vitro. Therefore, a PIC-based in vitro assay is a reliable system for assessing protein factors influencing retroviral integration. In this study, we applied a microtiter plate-based in vitro assay to a screening study using a protein library that was produced by the wheat germ cell-free protein synthesis system. Using a library of human E3 ubiquitin ligases, we identified RFPL3 as a potential stimulator of human immunodeficiency virus, type 1 (HIV-1) PIC integration activity in vitro. This enhancement of PIC activity by RFPL3 was likely to be attributed to its N-terminal RING domain. To further understand the functional role of RFPL3 in HIV infection, we created a human cell line overexpressing RFPL3. Immunoprecipitation analysis revealed that RFPL3 was associated with the human immunodeficiency virus, type 1 PICs in infected cells. More importantly, single-round HIV-1 infection was enhanced significantly by RFPL3 expression. Our proteomic approach displays an advantage in the identification of new cellular proteins affecting the integration activity of the PIC and, therefore, contributes to the understanding of functional interaction between retroviral integration complexes and host factors. PMID:25107902

  5. Human βA3/A1-crystallin splicing mutation causes cataracts by activating the unfolded protein response and inducing apoptosis in differentiating lens fiber cells.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zhiwei; Yao, Wenliang; Chan, Chi-Chao; Kannabiran, Chitra; Wawrousek, Eric; Hejtmancik, J Fielding

    2016-06-01

    βγ-Crystallins, having a uniquely stable two domain four Greek key structure, are crucial for transparency of the eye lens,. Mutations in lens crystallins have been proposed to cause cataract formation by a variety of mechanisms most of which involve destabilization of the protein fold. The underlying molecular mechanism for autosomal dominant zonular cataracts with sutural opacities in an Indian family caused by a c.215+1G>A splice mutation in the βA3/A1-crystallin gene CRYBA1 was elucidated using three transgenic mice models. This mutation causes a splice defect in which the mutant mRNA escapes nonsense mediated decay by skipping both exons 3 and 4. Skipping these exons results in an in-frame deletion of the mRNA and synthesis of an unstable p.Ile33_Ala119del mutant βA3/A1-crystallin protein. Transgenic expression of mutant βA3/A1-crystallin but not the wild type protein results in toxicity and abnormalities in the maturation and orientation of differentiating lens fibers in c.97_357del CRYBA1 transgenic mice, leading to a small spherical lens, cataract, and often lens capsule rupture. On a cellular level, the lenses accumulated p.Ile33_Ala119del βA3/A1-crystallin with resultant activation of the stress signaling pathway - unfolded protein response (UPR) and inhibition of normal protein synthesis, culminating in apoptosis. This highlights the mechanistic contrast between mild mutations that destabilize crystallins and other proteins, resulting in their being bound by the α-crystallins that buffer lens cells against damage by denatured proteins, and severely misfolded proteins that are not bound by α-crystallin but accumulate and have a direct toxic effect on lens cells, resulting in early onset cataracts. PMID:26851658

  6. trans activation of the tumor necrosis factor alpha promoter by the human T-cell leukemia virus type I Tax1 protein.

    PubMed Central

    Albrecht, H; Shakhov, A N; Jongeneel, C V

    1992-01-01

    In a cotransfection assay, the human T-cell leukemia virus type I Tax1 gene product specifically activated transcription from the mouse tumor necrosis factor alpha promoter. The activation patterns of 5' deletion mutants, artificial enhancer constructs, and point mutations in the promoter indicate that the major Tax1-responsive element is a site at position -655 which binds the NF-kappa B/rel and NF-GMa transcription factors. Images PMID:1527856

  7. (PCG) Protein Crystal Growth Human Serum Albumin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    (PCG) Protein Crystal Growth Human Serum Albumin. Contributes to many transport and regulatory processes and has multifunctional binding properties which range from various metals, to fatty acids, hormones, and a wide spectrum of therapeutic drugs. The most abundant protein of the circulatory system. It binds and transports an incredible variety of biological and pharmaceutical ligands throughout the blood stream. Principal Investigator on STS-26 was Larry DeLucas.

  8. Activation of RNA polymerase III transcription of human Alu repetitive elements by adenovirus type 5: Requirement for the E1b 58-Kilodalton protein and the products of E4 open reading frames 3 and 6

    SciTech Connect

    Panning, B.; Smiley, J.R. )

    1993-06-01

    Alu elements are the single most abundant class of dispersed repeated sequences in the human genome, comprising 5-10% of the mass of human DNA. This report demonstrates that Ad5 infection strongly stimulates Pol III transcription of human Alu elements in HeLa and 293 cells. In contrast to the cases of Ad5-induced Pol III transcriptional activation, this process requires the E1b 58-kDa protein and the products of E4 open reading frames (ORFs) 3 and 6 in addition to the E1a 289-residue product. These findings suggest novel regulatory properties of the Ad5 E1b and E4 proteins and raise the possibility that analogous cellular trans-acting factors serve to modulate Alu expression in vivo.

  9. Systematic Characterization of Human Protein Complexes Identifies Chromosome Segregation Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Hutchins, James R.A.; Toyoda, Yusuke; Hegemann, Björn; Poser, Ina; Hériché, Jean-Karim; Sykora, Martina M.; Augsburg, Martina; Hudecz, Otto; Buschhorn, Bettina A.; Bulkescher, Jutta; Conrad, Christian; Comartin, David; Schleiffer, Alexander; Sarov, Mihail; Pozniakovsky, Andrei; Slabicki, Mikolaj Michal; Schloissnig, Siegfried; Steinmacher, Ines; Leuschner, Marit; Ssykor, Andrea; Lawo, Steffen; Pelletier, Laurence; Stark, Holger; Nasmyth, Kim; Ellenberg, Jan; Durbin, Richard; Buchholz, Frank; Mechtler, Karl; Hyman, Anthony A.; Peters, Jan-Michael

    2010-01-01

    Chromosome segregation and cell division are essential, highly ordered processes that depend on numerous protein complexes. Results from recent RNA interference (RNAi) screens indicate that the identity and composition of these protein complexes is incompletely understood. Using gene tagging on bacterial artificial chromosomes, protein localization and tandem affinity purification-mass spectrometry, the MitoCheck consortium has analyzed about 100 human protein complexes, many of which had not or only incompletely been characterized. This work has led to the discovery of previously unknown, evolutionarily conserved subunits of the anaphase-promoting complex (APC/C) and the γ-tubulin ring complex (γ-TuRC), large complexes which are essential for spindle assembly and chromosome segregation. The approaches we describe here are generally applicable to high throughput follow-up analyses of phenotypic screens in mammalian cells. PMID:20360068

  10. Systematic analysis of human protein complexes identifies chromosome segregation proteins.

    PubMed

    Hutchins, James R A; Toyoda, Yusuke; Hegemann, Björn; Poser, Ina; Hériché, Jean-Karim; Sykora, Martina M; Augsburg, Martina; Hudecz, Otto; Buschhorn, Bettina A; Bulkescher, Jutta; Conrad, Christian; Comartin, David; Schleiffer, Alexander; Sarov, Mihail; Pozniakovsky, Andrei; Slabicki, Mikolaj Michal; Schloissnig, Siegfried; Steinmacher, Ines; Leuschner, Marit; Ssykor, Andrea; Lawo, Steffen; Pelletier, Laurence; Stark, Holger; Nasmyth, Kim; Ellenberg, Jan; Durbin, Richard; Buchholz, Frank; Mechtler, Karl; Hyman, Anthony A; Peters, Jan-Michael

    2010-04-30

    Chromosome segregation and cell division are essential, highly ordered processes that depend on numerous protein complexes. Results from recent RNA interference screens indicate that the identity and composition of these protein complexes is incompletely understood. Using gene tagging on bacterial artificial chromosomes, protein localization, and tandem-affinity purification-mass spectrometry, the MitoCheck consortium has analyzed about 100 human protein complexes, many of which had not or had only incompletely been characterized. This work has led to the discovery of previously unknown, evolutionarily conserved subunits of the anaphase-promoting complex and the gamma-tubulin ring complex--large complexes that are essential for spindle assembly and chromosome segregation. The approaches we describe here are generally applicable to high-throughput follow-up analyses of phenotypic screens in mammalian cells. PMID:20360068

  11. Protein Kinase C-mediated Phosphorylation and Activation of PDE3A Regulate cAMP Levels in Human Platelets*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, Roger W.; MacKintosh, Carol; Hers, Ingeborg

    2009-01-01

    The elevation of [cAMP]i is an important mechanism of platelet inhibition and is regulated by the opposing activity of adenylyl cyclase and phosphodiesterase (PDE). In this study, we demonstrate that a variety of platelet agonists, including thrombin, significantly enhance the activity of PDE3A in a phosphorylation-dependent manner. Stimulation of platelets with the PAR-1 agonist SFLLRN resulted in rapid and transient phosphorylation of PDE3A on Ser312, Ser428, Ser438, Ser465, and Ser492, in parallel with the PKC (protein kinase C) substrate, pleckstrin. Furthermore, phosphorylation and activation of PDE3A required the activation of PKC, but not of PI3K/PKB, mTOR/p70S6K, or ERK/RSK. Activation of PKC by phorbol esters also resulted in phosphorylation of the same PDE3A sites in a PKC-dependent, PKB-independent manner. This was further supported by the finding that IGF-1, which strongly activates PI3K/PKB, but not PKC, did not regulate PDE3A. Platelet activation also led to a PKC-dependent association between PDE3A and 14-3-3 proteins. In contrast, cAMP-elevating agents such as PGE1 and forskolin-induced phosphorylation of Ser312 and increased PDE3A activity, but did not stimulate 14-3-3 binding. Finally, complete antagonism of PGE1-evoked cAMP accumulation by thrombin required both Gi and PKC activation. Together, these results demonstrate that platelet activation stimulates PKC-dependent phosphorylation of PDE3A on Ser312, Ser428, Ser438, Ser465, and Ser492 leading to a subsequent increase in cAMP hydrolysis and 14-3-3 binding. PMID:19261611

  12. NF-kappa B activity in T cells stably expressing the Tax protein of human T cell lymphotropic virus type I

    SciTech Connect

    Lacoste, J.; Cohen, L.; Hiscott, J. )

    1991-10-01

    The effect of constitutive Tax expression on the interaction of NF-{kappa} B with its recognition sequence and on NF-{kappa} B-dependent gene expression was examined in T lymphoid Jurkat cell lines (19D and 9J) stably transformed with a Tax expression vector. Tax expressing T cell lines contained a constitutive level of NF-{kappa} B binding activity, detectable by mobility shift assay and uv cross-linking using a palindromic NF-{kappa} B probe homologous to the interferon beta PRDII site. In Jurkat and NC2.10 induction with phorbol esters resulted in the appearance of new DNA binding proteins of 85, 75, and 54 kDa, whereas in Tax expressing cells the 85-kDa protein and a 92-kDa DNA binding protein were constitutively induced. Expression of Tax protein in 19D and 9J resulted in transcription of the endogenous NF-kappa B-dependent granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor gene and increased basal level expression of transfected NF-kappa B-regulated promoters. Nonetheless transcription of both the endogenous and the transfected gene was inducible by PMA treatment. Tax expression in Jurkat T cells may alter the stoichiometry of NF-kappa B DNA binding proteins and thus change the expression of NF-kappa B-regulated promoters.

  13. [Cow's milk protein allergy through human milk].

    PubMed

    Denis, M; Loras-Duclaux, I; Lachaux, A

    2012-03-01

    Cow's milk protein allergy (CMPA) is the first allergy that affects infants. In this population, the incidence rate reaches 7.5%. The multiplicity and aspecificity of the symptoms makes its diagnosis sometimes complicated, especially in the delayed type (gastrointestinal, dermatological, and cutaneous). CMPA symptoms can develop in exclusively breastfed infants with an incidence rate of 0.5%. It, therefore, raises questions about sensitization to cow's milk proteins through breast milk. Transfer of native bovine proteins such as β-lactoglobulin into the breast milk is controversial: some authors have found bovine proteins in human milk but others point to cross-reactivity between human milk proteins and cow's milk proteins. However, it seems that a small percentage of dietary proteins can resist digestion and become potentially allergenic. Moreover, some authors suspect the transfer of some of these dietary proteins from the maternal bloodstream to breast milk, but the mechanisms governing sensitization are still being studied. Theoretically, CMPA diagnosis is based on clinical observations, prick-test or patch-test results, and cow's milk-specific IgE antibody concentration. A positive food challenge test usually confirms the diagnosis. No laboratory test is available to make a certain diagnosis, but the detection of eosinophil cationic protein (ECP) in the mother's milk, for example, seems to be advantageous since it is linked to CMA. Excluding cow's milk from the mother's diet is the only cure when she still wants to breastfeed. Usually, cow's milk proteins are reintroduced after 6 months of exclusion. Indeed, the prognosis for infants is very good: 80% acquire a tolerance before the age of 3 or 4 years. Mothers should not avoid dairy products during pregnancy and breastfeeding as preventive measures against allergy. PMID:22226014

  14. The copper(II) adduct of the unstructured region of the amyloidogenic fragment derived from the human prion protein is redox-active at physiological pH.

    PubMed

    Shearer, Jason; Soh, Pamela

    2007-02-01

    Prion diseases are caused by the misfolding and aggregation of the prion protein (PrP). Herein we provide evidence that the CuII adduct of the unstructured amyloidogenic fragment of the human PrP (PrP(91-126)) is redox active under physiological conditions. We have identified that the relevant high-affinity CuII binding region of PrP(91-126) is contained between residues 106 and 114. Both [CuII(PrP(91-126))] and [CuII(PrP(106-114))] have CuII Kd values of approximately 90 microM. Furthermore, the smaller PrP fragment PrP(106-114) coordinates CuII producing an electronic absorption spectrum nearly identical with [CuII(PrP(91-126))] (lambda max approximately 610 nm (epsilon approximately 125 M-1 cm-1)) suggesting a similar coordination environment for CuII. Cu K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) reveals a nearly identical CuN(N/O)2S coordination environment for these two metallopeptides (2N/O at approximately 1.97 A; 1S at approximately 2.30 A; 1 imidazole N at approximately 1.95 A). Both display quasireversible CuII/CuI redox couples at approximately -350 mV vs Ag/AgCl. ESI-MS indicates that both peptides will coordinate CuI. However, XAS indicates differential coordination environments between [CuI(PrP(91-126))] and [CuI(PrP(106-114))]. These data indicate that [CuI(PrP(91-126))] contains Cu in a four coordinate (N/O)2S2 environment with similar (N/O)-Cu bond distances (Cu-(N/O) r = 2.048(4) A), while [CuI(PrP(106-114))] contains Cu in a four coordinate (N/O)2S2 environment with differential (N/O)-Cu bond distances (Cu-(N/O) r1 = 2.057(6) A; r2 = 2.159(3) A). Despite the differential coordination environments both Cu-metallopeptides will catalytically reduce O2 to O2*- at comparable rates. PMID:17257012

  15. Human and rat hepatocyte toxicity and protein phosphatase 1 and 2A inhibitory activity of naturally occurring desmethyl-microcystins and nodularins.

    PubMed

    Ufelmann, Helena; Krüger, Thomas; Luckas, Bernd; Schrenk, Dieter

    2012-03-11

    Contamination of water, foods and food supplements by various genera of cyanobacteria is a serious health problem worldwide for humans and animals, largely due to the toxic effects of microcystins (MCs) and nodularin (NOD), a group of hepatotoxic cyclic peptides. The toxins occur in variable structures resulting in more than 90 different MCs and 8 different NODs, many of them not having been investigated for their toxic potency. Potent MCs such as MC-LR have been shown to elicit their hepatotoxic potency via inhibition of hepatic protein phosphatases (PP) 1 and 2A leading to over-phosphorylation of vital cellular proteins. This mechanism of action is also thought to be responsible for the long term tumor promoting action of certain MCs and NOD in the liver. Here, we report on the isolation of certain MCs and NOD as well as a number of their desmethylated derivatives from algae bloom. Subsequently, we determined the cytotoxicity of these compounds in isolated primary human and rat hepatocytes in culture. In parallel experiments, we analyzed the inhibitory potency of these congeners on PP1 and 2A using commercially available enzymes. We found in primary rat hepatocytes that MC-LR, -YR and NOD were cytotoxic, namely in the 10 to >50 nM range, while MC-RR was not. The desmethylated congeners of MC-LR, -YR, and NOD were equally or more-toxic as/than their fully methylated counterparts. In primary human hepatocytes we could show that MC-LR, NOD and the desmethylated variants [³Asp]MC-LR, [⁷Dha]MC-LR and [¹Asp]NOD were cytotoxic in the 20 to >600 nM range. Inhibition data with human, bovine and rabbit protein phosphatases 1 and 2A were roughly in accordance with the cytotoxicity findings in human and rat hepatocytes, i.e. desmethylation had no pronounced effects on the inhibitory potencies. Thus, a variety of naturally occurring desmethylated MC and NOD congeners have to be considered as being at least as toxic as the corresponding fully methylated derivatives. PMID

  16. HIV-1 Tat Protein Induces Production of Proinflammatory Cytokines by Human Dendritic Cells and Monocytes/Macrophages through Engagement of TLR4-MD2-CD14 Complex and Activation of NF-κB Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Leghmari, Kaoutar; Serrero, Manutea; Delobel, Pierre; Izopet, Jacques; BenMohamed, Lbachir; Bahraoui, Elmostafa

    2015-01-01

    We recently reported that the human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) Tat protein induced the expression of programmed death ligand-1 (PD-L1) on dendritic cells (DCs) through a TLR4 pathway. However, the underlying mechanisms by which HIV-1 Tat protein induces the abnormal hyper-activation of the immune system seen in HIV-1 infected patients remain to be fully elucidated. In the present study, we report that HIV-1 Tat protein induced the production of significant amounts of the pro-inflammatory IL-6 and IL-8 cytokines by DCs and monocytes from both healthy and HIV-1 infected patients. Such production was abrogated in the presence of anti-TLR4 blocking antibodies or soluble recombinant TLR4-MD2 as a decoy receptor, suggesting TLR4 was recruited by Tat protein. Tat-induced murine IL-6 and CXCL1/KC a functional homologue of human IL-8 was abolished in peritoneal macrophages derived from TLR4 KO but not from Wt mice, confirming the involvement of the TLR4 pathway. Furthermore, the recruitment of TLR4-MD2-CD14 complex by Tat protein was demonstrated by the activation of TLR4 downstream pathways including NF-κB and SOCS-1 and by down-modulation of cell surface TLR4 by endocytosis in dynamin and lipid-raft-dependent manners. Collectively, these findings demonstrate, for the first time, that HIV-1 Tat interacts with TLR4-MD2-CD14 complex and activates the NF-κB pathway, leading to overproduction of IL-6 and IL-8 pro-inflammatory cytokines by myeloid cells from both healthy and HIV-1 infected patients. This study reveals a novel mechanism by which HIV-1, via its early expressed Tat protein, hijacks the TLR4 pathway, hence establishing abnormal hyper-activation of the immune system. PMID:26090662

  17. Molecular interactions of graphene oxide with human blood plasma proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenry, Affa Affb Affc; Loh, Kian Ping; Lim, Chwee Teck

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the molecular interactions between graphene oxide (GO) and human blood plasma proteins. To gain an insight into the bio-physico-chemical activity of GO in biological and biomedical applications, we performed a series of biophysical assays to quantify the molecular interactions between GO with different lateral size distributions and the three essential human blood plasma proteins. We elucidate the various aspects of the GO-protein interactions, particularly, the adsorption, binding kinetics and equilibrium, and conformational stability, through determination of quantitative parameters, such as GO-protein association constants, binding cooperativity, and the binding-driven protein structural changes. We demonstrate that the molecular interactions between GO and plasma proteins are significantly dependent on the lateral size distribution and mean lateral sizes of the GO nanosheets and their subtle variations may markedly influence the GO-protein interactions. Consequently, we propose the existence of size-dependent molecular interactions between GO nanosheets and plasma proteins, and importantly, the presence of specific critical mean lateral sizes of GO nanosheets in achieving very high association and fluorescence quenching efficiency of the plasma proteins. We anticipate that this work will provide a basis for the design of graphene-based and other related nanomaterials for a plethora of biological and biomedical applications.

  18. Ligand-dependent serum response factor activation by the human CC chemokine receptors CCR2a and CCR2b is mediated by G proteins of the Gq family.

    PubMed

    Vatter, Petra; Schuhholz, Julia; Koenig, Carolin; Pfreimer, Mariana; Moepps, Barbara

    2016-06-01

    Expression of the human CCR2 receptors, CCR2a and CCR2b, in mammalian cells results in ligand-dependent changes in the activity of multiple cellular signal transduction pathways, mediated in most cases by pertussis toxin-sensitive heterotrimeric G proteins of the Gi/o subfamily. In addition, CCR2a and CCR2b receptors have been shown to couple to Gq family members, triggering the canonical activation of phospholipase Cβ isoenzymes. Activation of pertussis toxin-insensitive Gq proteins by cell-surface receptors is not only coupled to activation of phospholipase isoenzymes but also to Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factors, which in turn mediate activation of the Rho GTPases. Activated Rho GTPases regulate numerous cellular functions, including the organization of the actin cytoskeleton and gene transcription, such as the transcription factor serum response factor. These findings prompted us to investigate whether CCR2a and/or CCR2b stimulate serum response factor activity. The results presented herein demonstrate that stimulation of human CCR2a- or CCR2b-expressing COS-7 cells caused a vigorous induction of serum response factor activity. This effect was specifically mediated by Gq and/or G14, as well as Rho A and/or a closely related Rho GTPase. Furthermore, the stimulatory effect of CCR2a and CCR2b and Gαq was sensitive to coexpression of the Gαq-interacting leukemia-associated Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor. The findings of the work indicate a role for Gαq and/or Gα14 and in CCR2a/CCR2b-stimulated Rho A GTPase-mediated serum response factor activation and introduce a noncanonical pathway activated by CCR2 receptors by coupling to Gq proteins. PMID:26823487

  19. Protein Needs of Physically Active Children.

    PubMed

    Volterman, Kimberly A; Atkinson, Stephanie A

    2016-05-01

    Current Dietary Reference Intakes (DRI) for protein for children and youth require revision as they were derived primarily on nitrogen balance data in young children or extrapolated from adult values; did not account for the possible influence of above average physical activity; and did not set an upper tolerable level of intake. Revision of the protein DRIs requires new research that investigates: 1) long-term dose-response to identify protein and essential amino acid requirements of both sexes at various pubertal stages and under differing conditions of physical activity; 2) the acute protein needs (quantity and timing) following a single bout of exercise; 3) the potential adverse effects of chronic high intakes of protein; and 4) new measurement techniques (i.e., IAAO or stable isotope methodologies) to improve accuracy of protein needs. While active individuals may require protein in excess of current DRIs, most active Canadian children and youth have habitual protein intakes that exceed current recommendations. PMID:27137165

  20. Essential role of an activator protein-2 (AP-2)/specificity protein 1 (Sp1) cluster in the UVB-mediated induction of the human vascular endothelial growth factor in HaCaT keratinocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Brenneisen, Peter; Blaudschun, Ralf; Gille, Jens; Schneider, Lars; Hinrichs, Ralf; Wlaschek, Meinhard; Eming, Sabine; Scharffetter-Kochanek, Karin

    2003-01-01

    Chronic sun exposure of the skin has long been postulated to enhance cutaneous angiogenesis, resulting in highly vascularized skin cancers. As the UVB component of sunlight is a major contributor to photocarcinogenesis, we aimed to explore the effects of UVB radiation on vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) gene expression, using the immortalized keratinocyte cell line HaCaT as a model for transformed premalignant epithelial cells. In the present paper, we studied the molecular mechanism of UVB-induced VEGF providing a major angiogenic activity in tumour progression and invasion. After 12-24 h of UVB irradiation, a 2.4- to 2.7-fold increase in endogenous VEGF protein level was measured, correlating with an up to 2.5-fold induction of promoter-based reporter gene constructs of VEGF. Furthermore, we identified a GC-rich UVB-responsive region between -87 and -65 bp of the VEGF promoter. In electrophoretic mobility-shift assays, this region binds Sp1-dependent protein complexes constitutively and an additional UVB-inducible protein complex distinct from Sp1 protein. The transcription factor AP-2 (activator protein-2) was detected as a component of the UVB-inducible protein complex. The critical role of the AP-2/Sp1 (specificity protein 1) cluster was supported by demonstration of a significant reduction of UVB-mediated promoter activity upon deletion of this recognition site. The specificity of this region for UVB irradiation was demonstrated using PMA, which increased VEGF activity in HaCaT cells after transient transfection of the deleted promoter construct. In conclusion, our data clarified regulatory mechanisms of UVB-dependent VEGF stimulation which may be critical for angiogenic processes in the skin. PMID:12358602

  1. Breast milk jaundice: in vitro inhibition of rat liver bilirubin-uridine diphosphate glucuronyltransferase activity and Z protein-bromosulfophthalein binding by human breast milk.

    PubMed

    Foliot, A; Ploussard, J P; Housset, E; Christoforov

    1976-06-01

    Twenty-four samples of breast milk from nine mothers of infants suffering from breast milk jaundice were studied. Eight samples of milk from mothers of nonjaundiced infants, along with five formula milks enriched with polyunsaturated fatty acids, served as controls. Milks from mothers with jaundiced infants had no inhibitory effect when assayed immediately after thawing. However, after these milk samples were stores at 4 degrees, they strongly inhibited bilirubin conjugation (80.3% inhibition of uridine diphosphate glucuronyltransferase (UDPGT) activity) and bromosulfophthalein (BSP) binding to cytoplasmic Z protein (dye binding inhibited 82.1%). There was no effect on BSP binding to Y protein (see Table 1). Heating the milk to 56 degrees modified the results in the following manner; when the milk was heated immediately after thawing, no inhibitory effect was seen, even after storage for 96 hr. On the other hand, when the milk was first stored at 96 hr and then heated, it had the same inhibitory effects as the milks which were stored without heating. The present study shows that pathologic breast milk will inhibit BSP-Z protein binding only when stored under conditions that also cause the appearance of the capacity to inhibit bilirubin conjugation in vitro, as well as causing the liberation of nonesterified fatty acids. Thus, the appearance of this inhibitory capacity in vitro seems linked to the lipolytic activity particular to pathologic milks. PMID:818610

  2. Immune function of patients receiving recombinant human interleukin-6 (IL-6) in a phase I clinical study: induction of C-reactive protein and IgE and inhibition of natural killer and lymphokine-activated killer cell activity.

    PubMed

    Scheid, C; Young, R; McDermott, R; Fitzsimmons, L; Scarffe, J H; Stern, P L

    1994-02-01

    Interleukin-6 (IL-6) is a cytokine that acts on a variety of cell types, including myeloid progenitor cells and B and T lymphocytes. It has been found to activate cytotoxic T cells and natural killer (NK) cells and to induce T-cell-mediated antitumour effects in animal models. In a phase I clinical trial of recombinant human IL-6, 20 patients with advanced cancer were entered to receive daily subcutaneous injections of IL-6 over 7 days followed by a 2-week observation period and another 4 weeks of daily IL-6 injections. Doses varied between 0.5 microgram/kg and 20 micrograms/kg body weight and immune functions were monitored throughout. At all dose levels IL-6 administration led to a marked increase in serum levels of C-reactive protein and a moderate rise in complement factor C3. The proportions of CD4, CD8 or HLA-DR lymphocytes in peripheral blood did not alter with IL-6 treatment nor did the in vitro proliferation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells induced by either phytohaemagglutinin, pokeweed mitogen or fixed Staphylococcus aureus. By contrast, NK cell activity, lymphokine-activated killer (LAK) cell activity and proliferation induced by in vitro culture with interleukin-2 (IL-2) were suppressed at doses exceeding 2.5 micrograms/kg. Serum IgE levels were consistently elevated over the IL-6 dose range but IgM, IgG and IgA levels were unaffected. In summary there is a dose-dependent induction of acute-phase proteins by in vivo IL-6 treatment. At higher IL-6 doses there is a suppressive effect on NK and LAK activity measured in vitro. IL-6 may thus be useful in combination cytokine therapies that seek to suppress LAK and favour cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses. The rise in IgE levels in response to IL-6 was unexpected and suggests a more pivotal role than previously known for the control of IgE production; this could include IgE-related diseases. PMID:8306367

  3. Luteolin prevents solar radiation-induced matrix metalloproteinase-1 activation in human fibroblasts: a role for p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase and interleukin-20 released from keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Wölfle, Ute; Heinemann, Anja; Esser, Philipp R; Haarhaus, Birgit; Martin, Stefan F; Schempp, Christoph M

    2012-10-01

    Human skin is continuously exposed to solar radiation, which can result in photoaging, a process involving both dermal and, to a lesser extent, epidermal structures. Previously, we have shown that the flavonoid luteolin protects the epidermis from ultraviolet (UV)-induced damage by a combination of UV-absorbing, antioxidant, and antiinflammatory properties. The aim of the present study was to determine direct and indirect effects of luteolin on dermal fibroblasts as major targets of photoaging. Stimulation of fibroblasts with UVA light or the proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-20 (IL-20) is associated with wrinkled skin, increased IL-6 secretion, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-1) expression, and hyaluronidase activity. All of these targets were inhibited by luteolin via interference with the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway. Next, we assessed the role of conditioned supernatants from keratinocytes irradiated with solar-simulated radiation (SSR) on nonirradiated dermal fibroblasts. In keratinocytes, luteolin inhibited SSR-induced production of IL-20, also via interference with the p38 MAPK pathway. Similarly, keratinocyte supernatant-induced IL-6 and MMP-1 expression in fibroblasts was reduced by pretreatment of keratinocytes with luteolin. Finally, these results were confirmed ex vivo on skin explants treated with luteolin before UV irradiation. Our results suggest that SSR-mediated production of soluble factors in keratinocytes is modulated by luteolin and may attenuate photoaging in dermal fibroblasts. PMID:23004935

  4. Luteolin Prevents Solar Radiation-Induced Matrix Metalloproteinase-1 Activation in Human Fibroblasts: A Role for p38 Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase and Interleukin-20 Released from Keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Heinemann, Anja; Esser, Philipp R.; Haarhaus, Birgit; Martin, Stefan F.; Schempp, Christoph M.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Human skin is continuously exposed to solar radiation, which can result in photoaging, a process involving both dermal and, to a lesser extent, epidermal structures. Previously, we have shown that the flavonoid luteolin protects the epidermis from ultraviolet (UV)-induced damage by a combination of UV-absorbing, antioxidant, and antiinflammatory properties. The aim of the present study was to determine direct and indirect effects of luteolin on dermal fibroblasts as major targets of photoaging. Stimulation of fibroblasts with UVA light or the proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-20 (IL-20) is associated with wrinkled skin, increased IL-6 secretion, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-1) expression, and hyaluronidase activity. All of these targets were inhibited by luteolin via interference with the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway. Next, we assessed the role of conditioned supernatants from keratinocytes irradiated with solar-simulated radiation (SSR) on nonirradiated dermal fibroblasts. In keratinocytes, luteolin inhibited SSR-induced production of IL-20, also via interference with the p38 MAPK pathway. Similarly, keratinocyte supernatant-induced IL-6 and MMP-1 expression in fibroblasts was reduced by pretreatment of keratinocytes with luteolin. Finally, these results were confirmed ex vivo on skin explants treated with luteolin before UV irradiation. Our results suggest that SSR-mediated production of soluble factors in keratinocytes is modulated by luteolin and may attenuate photoaging in dermal fibroblasts. PMID:23004935

  5. Proteome-scale purification of human proteins from bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Braun, Pascal; Hu, Yanhui; Shen, Binghua; Halleck, Allison; Koundinya, Malvika; Harlow, Ed; LaBaer, Joshua

    2002-01-01

    The completion of the human genome project and the development of high-throughput approaches herald a dramatic acceleration in the pace of biological research. One of the most compelling next steps will be learning the functional roles of all proteins. Achievement of this goal depends in part on the rapid expression and isolation of proteins at large scale. We exploited recombinational cloning to facilitate the development of methods for the high-throughput purification of human proteins. cDNAs were introduced into a master vector from which they could be rapidly transferred into a variety of protein expression vectors for further analysis. A test set of 32 sequence-verified human cDNAs of various sizes and activities was moved into four different expression vectors encoding different affinity-purification tags. By means of an automatable 2-hr protein purification procedure, all 128 proteins were purified and subsequently characterized for yield, purity, and steps at which losses occurred. Under denaturing conditions when the His6 tag was used, 84% of samples were purified. Under nondenaturing conditions, both the glutathione S-transferase and maltose-binding protein tags were successful in 81% of samples. The developed methods were applied to a larger set of 336 randomly selected cDNAs. Sixty percent of these proteins were successfully purified under denaturing conditions and 82% of these under nondenaturing conditions. A relational database, FLEXProt, was built to compare properties of proteins that were successfully purified and proteins that were not. We observed that some domains in the Pfam database were found almost exclusively in proteins that were successfully purified and thus may have predictive character. PMID:11880620

  6. Redox activity distinguishes solid-state electron transport from solution-based electron transfer in a natural and artificial protein: cytochrome C and hemin-doped human serum albumin.

    PubMed

    Amdursky, Nadav; Ferber, Doron; Pecht, Israel; Sheves, Mordechai; Cahen, David

    2013-10-28

    Integrating proteins in molecular electronic devices requires control over their solid-state electronic transport behavior. Unlike "traditional" electron transfer (ET) measurements of proteins that involve liquid environments and a redox cycle, no redox cofactor is needed for solid-state electron transport (ETp) across the protein. Here we show the fundamental difference between these two approaches by macroscopic area measurements, which allow measuring ETp temperature dependence down to cryogenic temperatures, via cytochrome C (Cyt C), an ET protein with a heme (Fe-porphyrin) prosthetic group as a redox centre. We compare the ETp to electrochemical ET measurements, and do so also for the protein without the Fe (with metal-free porphyrin) and without porphyrin. As removing the porphyrin irreversibly alters the protein's conformation, we repeat these measurements with human serum albumin (HSA), 'doped' (by non-covalent binding) with a single hemin equivalent, i.e., these natural and artificial proteins share a common prosthetic group. ETp via Cyt C and HSA-hemin are very similar in terms of current magnitude and temperature dependence, which suggests similar ETp mechanisms via these two systems, thermally activated hopping (with ~0.1 eV activation energy) >190 K and tunneling by superexchange <190 K. Also, ET rates to and from the Fe redox centres (Fe(2+) <=> Fe(3+) + e(-)), measured by electrochemistry of HSA-hemin are only 4 times lower than those for Cyt C. However, while removing the Fe redox centre from the porphyrin ring markedly affects the ET rate, it hardly changes the ETp currents through these proteins, while removing the macrocycle (from HSA, which retains its conformation) significantly reduces ETp efficiency. These results show that solid-state ETp across proteins does not require the presence of a redox cofactor, and that while for ET the Fe ion is the main electron mediator, for ETp the porphyrin ring has this function. PMID:24008341

  7. Curcumin decreases the expression of Pokemon by suppressing the binding activity of the Sp1 protein in human lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Cui, Jiajun; Meng, Xianfeng; Gao, Xudong; Tan, Guangxuan

    2010-03-01

    Pokemon, which stands for POK erythroid myeloid ontogenic factor, can regulate expression of many genes and plays an important role in tumorigenesis. Curcumin, a natural and non-toxic yellow compound, has capacity for antioxidant, free radical scavenger, anti-inflammatory properties. Recent studies shows it is a potential inhibitor of cell proliferation in a variety of tumour cells. To investigate whether curcumin can regulate the expression of Pokemon, a series of experiments were carried out. Transient transfection experiments demonstrated that curcumin could decrease the activity of the Pokemon promoter. Western blot analysis suggested that curcumin could significantly decrease the expression of the Pokemon. Overexpression of Sp1 could enhance the activity of the Pokemon promoter, whereas knockdown of Sp1 could decrease its activity. More important, we also found that curcumin could decrease the expression of the Pokemon by suppressing the stimulation of the Sp1 protein. Therefore, curcumin is a potential reagent for tumour therapy which may target Pokemon. PMID:19444642

  8. Protein-water dynamics in antifreeze protein III activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yao; Bäumer, Alexander; Meister, Konrad; Bischak, Connor G.; DeVries, Arthur L.; Leitner, David M.; Havenith, Martina

    2016-03-01

    We combine Terahertz absorption spectroscopy (THz) and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to investigate the underlying molecular mechanism for the antifreeze activity of one class of antifreeze protein, antifreeze protein type III (AFP-III) with a focus on the collective water hydrogen bond dynamics near the protein. After summarizing our previous work on AFPs, we present a new investigation of the effects of cosolutes on protein antifreeze activity by adding sodium citrate to the protein solution of AFP-III. Our results reveal that for AFP-III, unlike some other AFPs, the addition of the osmolyte sodium citrate does not affect the hydrogen bond dynamics at the protein surface significantly, as indicated by concentration dependent THz measurements. The present data, in combination with our previous THz measurements and molecular simulations, confirm that while long-range solvent perturbation is a necessary condition for the antifreeze activity of AFP-III, the local binding affinity determines the size of the hysteresis.

  9. Propeptide of human protein C is necessary for. gamma. -carboxylation

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, D.C.; Rudinski, M.S.; Schach, B.G.; Berkner, K.L.; Kumar, A.A.; Hagen, F.S.; Sprecher, C.A.; Insley, M.Y.; Davie, E.W.

    1987-11-03

    Protein C is one of a family of vitamin K dependent proteins, including blood coagulation factors and bone proteins, that contains ..gamma..-carboxyglutamic acid. Sequence analysis of the cDNAs for these proteins has revealed the presence of a prepro leader sequence that contains a pre sequence or hydrophobic signal sequence and a propeptide containing a number of highly conserved amino acids. The pre region is removed from the growing polypeptide chain by signal peptidase, while the pro region is subsequently removed from the protein prior to secretion. In the present study, deletion mutants have been constructed in the propeptide region of the cDNA for human protein C, and the cDNAs were then expressed in mammalian cell culture. These deletions included the removal of 4, 9, 12, 15, 16, or 17 amino acids comprising the carboxyl end of the leader sequence of 42 amino acids. The mutant proteins were then examined by Western blotting, barium citrate adsorption and precipitation, amino acid sequence analysis, and biological activity and compared with the native protein present in normal plasma. These experiments have shown that protein C is readily synthesized in mammalian cell cultures, processed, and secreted as a two-chain molecule with biological activity. Furthermore, the pre portion or signal sequence in human protein C is 18 amino acids in length, and the pro portion of the leader sequence is 24 amino acids in length. Also, during biosynthesis and secretion, the amino-terminal region of the propeptide (residues from about -12 through -17) is important for ..gamma..-carboxylation of protein C, while the present data and those of others indicate that the carboxyl-terminal portion of propeptide (residues -1 through -4) is important for the removal of the pro leader sequence by proteolytic processing.

  10. Thrombin produces phosphorylation of cytosolic phospholipase A2 by a mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase-independent mechanism in the human astrocytoma cell line 1321N1.

    PubMed Central

    Hernández, M; Bayón, Y; Sánchez Crespo, M; Nieto, M L

    1997-01-01

    The release of [3H]arachidonic acid was studied in the 1321N1 astrocytoma cell line upon stimulation with thrombin. The effect of thrombin was antagonized by hirudin only when both compounds were added simultaneously, which suggests activation of thrombin receptor. Evidence that the cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2) takes part in thrombin-induced arachidonate release was provided by the finding that thrombin induced retardation of the mobility of cPLA2 in SDS/polyacrylamide gels, which is a feature of the activation of cPLA2 by mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases. Thrombin induced activation of two members of the MAP kinase family whose consensus primary sequence appears in cPLA2, namely p42-MAP kinase and c-Jun kinase. However, the activation of c-Jun kinase preceded the phosphorylation of cPLA2 more clearly than the activation of p42-MAK kinase did. Both cPLA2 and c-Jun kinase activation were not affected by PD-98059, a specific inhibitor of MAP kinase kinases, which indeed completely blocked p42-MAP kinase shift. Heat shock, a well-known activator of c-Jun kinase, also phosphorylated cPLA2 but not p42-MAP kinase. These data indicate the existence in astrocytoma cells of a signalling pathway triggered by thrombin receptor stimulation that activates a kinase cascade acting on the Pro-Leu-Ser-Pro consensus primary sequence, activates cPLA2, and associates the release of arachidonate with nuclear signalling pathways. PMID:9359863

  11. Recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein induces bone formation.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, E A; Rosen, V; D'Alessandro, J S; Bauduy, M; Cordes, P; Harada, T; Israel, D I; Hewick, R M; Kerns, K M; LaPan, P

    1990-01-01

    We have purified and characterized active recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) 2A. Implantation of the recombinant protein in rats showed that a single BMP can induce bone formation in vivo. A dose-response and time-course study using the rat ectopic bone formation assay revealed that implantation of 0.5-115 micrograms of partially purified recombinant human BMP-2A resulted in cartilage by day 7 and bone formation by day 14. The time at which bone formation occurred was dependent on the amount of BMP-2A implanted; at high doses bone formation could be observed at 5 days. The cartilage- and bone-inductive activity of the recombinant BMP-2A is histologically indistinguishable from that of bone extracts. Thus, recombinant BMP-2A has therapeutic potential to promote de novo bone formation in humans. Images PMID:2315314

  12. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK)–dependent and –independent pathways regulate hypoxic inhibition of transepithelial Na+ transport across human airway epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Tan, CD; Smolenski, RT; Harhun, MI; Patel, HK; Ahmed, SG; Wanisch, K; Yáñez-Muñoz, RJ; Baines, DL

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Pulmonary transepithelial Na+ transport is reduced by hypoxia, but in the airway the regulatory mechanisms remain unclear. We investigated the role of AMPK and ROS in the hypoxic regulation of apical amiloride-sensitive Na+ channels and basolateral Na+K+ ATPase activity. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH H441 human airway epithelial cells were used to examine the effects of hypoxia on Na+ transport, AMP : ATP ratio and AMPK activity. Lentiviral constructs were used to modify cellular AMPK abundance and activity; pharmacological agents were used to modify cellular ROS. KEY RESULTS AMPK was activated by exposure to 3% or 0.2% O2 for 60 min in cells grown in submerged culture or when fluid (0.1 mL·cm−2) was added to the apical surface of cells grown at the air–liquid interface. Only 0.2% O2 activated AMPK in cells grown at the air–liquid interface. AMPK activation was associated with elevation of cellular AMP : ATP ratio and activity of the upstream kinase LKB1. Hypoxia inhibited basolateral ouabain-sensitive Isc (Iouabain) and apical amiloride-sensitive Na+ conductance (GNa+). Modification of AMPK activity prevented the effect of hypoxia on Iouabain (Na+K+ ATPase) but not apical GNa+. Scavenging of superoxide and inhibition of NADPH oxidase prevented the effect of hypoxia on apical GNa+ (epithelial Na+ channels). CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Hypoxia activates AMPK-dependent and -independent pathways in airway epithelial cells. Importantly, these pathways differentially regulate apical Na+ channels and basolateral Na+K+ ATPase activity to decrease transepithelial Na+ transport. Luminal fluid potentiated the effect of hypoxia and activated AMPK, which could have important consequences in lung disease conditions. PMID:22509822

  13. The Activation-Induced Assembly of an RNA/Protein Interactome Centered on the Splicing Factor U2AF2 Regulates Gene Expression in Human CD4 T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Aarreberg, Lauren D.; Gao, Nina J.; Head, Steven R.; Ordoukhanian, Phillip; Williamson, Jamie R.; Salomon, Daniel R.

    2015-01-01

    Activation of CD4 T cells is a reaction to challenges such as microbial pathogens, cancer and toxins that defines adaptive immune responses. The roles of T cell receptor crosslinking, intracellular signaling, and transcription factor activation are well described, but the importance of post-transcriptional regulation by RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) has not been considered in depth. We describe a new model expanding and activating primary human CD4 T cells and applied this to characterizing activation-induced assembly of splicing factors centered on U2AF2. We immunoprecipitated U2AF2 to identify what mRNA transcripts were bound as a function of activation by TCR crosslinking and costimulation. In parallel, mass spectrometry revealed the proteins incorporated into the U2AF2-centered RNA/protein interactome. Molecules that retained interaction with the U2AF2 complex after RNAse treatment were designated as “central” interactome members (CIMs). Mass spectrometry also identified a second class of activation-induced proteins, “peripheral” interactome members (PIMs), that bound to the same transcripts but were not in physical association with U2AF2 or its partners. siRNA knockdown of two CIMs and two PIMs caused changes in activation marker expression, cytokine secretion, and gene expression that were unique to each protein and mapped to pathways associated with key aspects of T cell activation. While knocking down the PIM, SYNCRIP, impacts a limited but immunologically important set of U2AF2-bound transcripts, knockdown of U2AF1 significantly impairs assembly of the majority of protein and mRNA components in the activation-induced interactome. These results demonstrated that CIMs and PIMs, either directly or indirectly through RNA, assembled into activation-induced U2AF2 complexes and play roles in post-transcriptional regulation of genes related to cytokine secretion. These data suggest an additional layer of regulation mediated by the activation-induced assembly

  14. 21 CFR 640.90 - Plasma Protein Fraction (Human).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Plasma Protein Fraction (Human). 640.90 Section 640...) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Plasma Protein Fraction (Human) § 640.90 Plasma Protein Fraction (Human). (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of the product shall...

  15. 21 CFR 640.90 - Plasma Protein Fraction (Human).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Plasma Protein Fraction (Human). 640.90 Section...) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Plasma Protein Fraction (Human) § 640.90 Plasma Protein Fraction (Human). (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of the product shall...

  16. 21 CFR 640.90 - Plasma Protein Fraction (Human).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Plasma Protein Fraction (Human). 640.90 Section...) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Plasma Protein Fraction (Human) § 640.90 Plasma Protein Fraction (Human). (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of the product shall...

  17. 21 CFR 640.90 - Plasma Protein Fraction (Human).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Plasma Protein Fraction (Human). 640.90 Section...) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Plasma Protein Fraction (Human) § 640.90 Plasma Protein Fraction (Human). (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of the product shall...

  18. 21 CFR 640.90 - Plasma Protein Fraction (Human).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Plasma Protein Fraction (Human). 640.90 Section...) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Plasma Protein Fraction (Human) § 640.90 Plasma Protein Fraction (Human). (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of the product shall...

  19. Notum deacylates Wnt proteins to suppress signalling activity.

    PubMed

    Kakugawa, Satoshi; Langton, Paul F; Zebisch, Matthias; Howell, Steven A; Chang, Tao-Hsin; Liu, Yan; Feizi, Ten; Bineva, Ganka; O'Reilly, Nicola; Snijders, Ambrosius P; Jones, E Yvonne; Vincent, Jean-Paul

    2015-03-12

    Signalling by Wnt proteins is finely balanced to ensure normal development and tissue homeostasis while avoiding diseases such as cancer. This is achieved in part by Notum, a highly conserved secreted feedback antagonist. Notum has been thought to act as a phospholipase, shedding glypicans and associated Wnt proteins from the cell surface. However, this view fails to explain specificity, as glypicans bind many extracellular ligands. Here we provide genetic evidence in Drosophila that Notum requires glypicans to suppress Wnt signalling, but does not cleave their glycophosphatidylinositol anchor. Structural analyses reveal glycosaminoglycan binding sites on Notum, which probably help Notum to co-localize with Wnt proteins. They also identify, at the active site of human and Drosophila Notum, a large hydrophobic pocket that accommodates palmitoleate. Kinetic and mass spectrometric analyses of human proteins show that Notum is a carboxylesterase that removes an essential palmitoleate moiety from Wnt proteins and thus constitutes the first known extracellular protein deacylase. PMID:25731175

  20. Canine distemper virus neutralization activity is low in human serum and it is sensitive to an amino acid substitution in the hemagglutinin protein.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xinsheng; Wallace, Olivia L; Domi, Arban; Wright, Kevin J; Driscoll, Jonathan; Anzala, Omu; Sanders, Eduard J; Kamali, Anatoli; Karita, Etienne; Allen, Susan; Fast, Pat; Gilmour, Jill; Price, Matt A; Parks, Christopher L

    2015-08-01

    Serum was analyzed from 146 healthy adult volunteers in eastern Africa to evaluate measles virus (MV) and canine distemper virus (CDV) neutralizing antibody (nAb) prevalence and potency. MV plaque reduction neutralization test (PRNT) results indicated that all sera were positive for MV nAbs. Furthermore, the 50% neutralizing dose (ND50) for the majority of sera corresponded to antibody titers induced by MV vaccination. CDV nAbs titers were low and generally were detected in sera with high MV nAb titers. A mutant CDV was generated that was less sensitive to neutralization by human serum. The mutant virus genome had 10 nucleotide substitutions, which coded for single amino acid substitutions in the fusion (F) and hemagglutinin (H) glycoproteins and two substitutions in the large polymerase (L) protein. The H substitution occurred in a conserved region involved in receptor interactions among morbilliviruses, implying that this region is a target for cross-reactive neutralizing antibodies. PMID:25880113

  1. The Molecular Basis for Species-specific Activation of Human TRPA1 Protein by Protons Involves Poorly Conserved Residues within Transmembrane Domains 5 and 6*

    PubMed Central

    de la Roche, Jeanne; Eberhardt, Mirjam J.; Klinger, Alexandra B.; Stanslowsky, Nancy; Wegner, Florian; Koppert, Wolfgang; Reeh, Peter W.; Lampert, Angelika; Fischer, Michael J. M.; Leffler, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    The surveillance of acid-base homeostasis is concerted by diverse mechanisms, including an activation of sensory afferents. Proton-evoked activation of rodent sensory neurons is mainly mediated by the capsaicin receptor TRPV1 and acid-sensing ion channels. In this study, we demonstrate that extracellular acidosis activates and sensitizes the human irritant receptor TRPA1 (hTRPA1). Proton-evoked membrane currents and calcium influx through hTRPA1 occurred at physiological acidic pH values, were concentration-dependent, and were blocked by the selective TRPA1 antagonist HC030031. Both rodent and rhesus monkey TRPA1 failed to respond to extracellular acidosis, and protons even inhibited rodent TRPA1. Accordingly, mouse dorsal root ganglion neurons lacking TRPV1 only responded to protons when hTRPA1 was expressed heterologously. This species-specific activation of hTRPA1 by protons was reversed in both mouse and rhesus monkey TRPA1 by exchange of distinct residues within transmembrane domains 5 and 6. Furthermore, protons seem to interact with an extracellular interaction site to gate TRPA1 and not via a modification of intracellular N-terminal cysteines known as important interaction sites for electrophilic TRPA1 agonists. Our data suggest that hTRPA1 acts as a sensor for extracellular acidosis in human sensory neurons and should thus be taken into account as a yet unrecognized transduction molecule for proton-evoked pain and inflammation. The species specificity of this property is unique among known endogenous TRPA1 agonists, possibly indicating that evolutionary pressure enforced TRPA1 to inherit the role as an acid sensor in human sensory neurons. PMID:23709225

  2. Allicin induces apoptosis of the MGC-803 human gastric carcinoma cell line through the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase/caspase-3 signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuecheng; Zhu, Yong; Duan, Wei; Feng, Chen; He, Xuan

    2015-04-01

    Gastric cancer is one of the most common forms of malignant tumor, and the development of anti‑gastric cancer drugs with minimal toxicity is of clinical importance. Allicin is extracted from Allium sativum (garlic). Recent research, including clinical experiments, has shown that garlic has anticancer and tumor suppressive effects. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of allicin on the MGC‑803 human gastric carcinoma cell line, and to further explore the possible mechanisms of its tumor suppressor effects. The effects of allicin on the MGC‑803 cells were initially examined using an 3‑(4,5‑dimethylthiazol‑2‑yl)‑2,5‑diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay. Hoechst staining was also used, in order to demonstrate the impact of allicin on MGC‑803 cell apoptosis. In addition, western blot analysis was performed to determine the abnormal expression levels of apoptosis‑associated proteins, following the treatment of MGC‑803 cells with allicin. Western blotting was also used to investigate the specific mechanisms underlying allicin‑induced apoptosis of MGC‑803 cells. The rate of MGC‑803 apoptosis was significantly increased, when the concentration and treatment time of allicin were increased. Hoechst staining detected an enhanced rate of apoptosis, and enhanced expression levels of cleaved caspase 3 were determined by western blotting. Notably, the protein expression levels of p38 were increased when the MGC‑803 cells were treated with allicin. The results of the present study suggest that allicin may inhibit the proliferation and induce the apoptosis of MGC‑803 human gastric carcinoma cells, and this may partially be achieved through the enhanced expression of p38 and cleaved caspase 3. PMID:25523417

  3. Human neutrophil calmodulin-binding proteins: identification of the calmodulin-dependent protein phosphatase

    SciTech Connect

    Blackburn, W.D.; Tallant, E.A.; Wallace, R.W.

    1986-05-01

    The molecular events in linking neutrophil activation and ligand binding to specific membrane receptors are mediated in part by an increase in intracellular Ca/sup 2 +/. One mechanism by which Ca/sup 2 +/ may trigger neutrophil activation is through Ca/sup 2 +//calmodulin (CaM)-regulated proteins and enzymes. To determine which Ca/sup 2 +//CaM-regulated enzymes may be present in the neutrophil, they have used Western blotting techniques and /sup 125/I-CaM to identify neutrophil CaM-binding proteins. Eleven proteins with molecular weights ranging from 230K to 13.5K bound /sup 125/I-CaM in a Ca/sup 2 +/-dependent manner. One predominant region of /sup 125/I-Cam binding was to a 59K protein; a protein with an identical mobility was labeled by an antisera against brain CaM-dependent phosphatase. Ca/sup 2 +/-dependent phosphatase activity, which was inhibited by the CaM antagonist trifluoperazine, was detected in a neutrophil extract; a radioimmunoassay for the phosphatase indicated that it was present in the extract at approximately 0.2 ..mu..g/mg protein. Most of the CaM-binding proteins, including the 59K protein, were rapidly degraded upon lysis of the neutrophil. There was a close correlation between the degradation of the 59K protein and the loss of Ca/sup 2 +/-dependent phosphatase activity in the neutrophil extract. Thus, human neutrophils contain numerous CaM-binding proteins which are presumably Ca/sup 2 +//calmodulin-regulated enzymes and proteins; the 59K protein is a CaM-dependent phosphatase.

  4. PDGF-induced receptor phosphorylation and phosphoinositide hydrolysis are unaffected by protein kinase C activation in mouse swiss 3T3 and human skin fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Sturani, E.; Vicentini, L.M.; Zippel, R.; Toschi, L.; Pandiella-Alonso, A.; Comoglio, P.M.; Meldolesi, J.

    1986-05-29

    Short (1-10 min) pretreatment of intact cells with activators of protein kinase C (e.g. phorbol-12 myristate, 13-acetate, PMA) affects the activity of a variety of surface receptors (for growth factors, hormones and neurotransmitters), with inhibition of transmembrane signal generation. In two types of fibroblasts it is demonstrated that the PDGF receptor is unaffected by PMA. Exposure to PMA at concentrations up to 100 nM for 10 min failed to inhibit either one of the agonist-induced, receptor-coupled responses of PDGF: the autophosphorylation of receptor molecules at tyrosine residues, and the hydrolysis of membrane polyphosphoinositides. In contrast, the EGF receptor autophosphorylation (in A 431 cells) and the bombesin-induced phosphoinositide hydrolysis were readily inhibited by PMA.

  5. Novel Mechanism of Impaired Function of Organic Anion-Transporting Polypeptide 1B3 in Human Hepatocytes: Post-Translational Regulation of OATP1B3 by Protein Kinase C Activation

    PubMed Central

    Powell, John; Farasyn, Taleah; Köck, Kathleen; Meng, Xiaojie; Pahwa, Sonia; Brouwer, Kim L. R.

    2014-01-01

    The organic anion-transporting polypeptide (OATP) 1B3 is a membrane transport protein that mediates hepatic uptake of many drugs and endogenous compounds. Currently, determination of OATP-mediated drug-drug interactions in vitro is focused primarily on direct substrate inhibition. Indirect inhibition of OATP1B3 activity is under-appreciated. OATP1B3 has putative protein kinase C (PKC) phosphorylation sites. Studies were designed to determine the effect of PKC activation on OATP1B3-mediated transport in human hepatocytes using cholecystokinin-8 (CCK-8), a specific OATP1B3 substrate, as the probe. A PKC activator, phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA), did not directly inhibit [3H]CCK-8 accumulation in human sandwich-cultured hepatocytes (SCH). However, pretreatment with PMA for as little as 10 minutes rapidly decreased [3H]CCK-8 accumulation. Treatment with a PKC inhibitor bisindolylmaleimide (BIM) I prior to PMA treatment blocked the inhibitory effect of PMA, indicating PKC activation is essential for downregulating OATP1B3 activity. PMA pretreatment did not affect OATP1B3 mRNA or total protein levels. To determine the mechanism(s) underlying the indirect inhibition of OATP1B3 activity upon PKC activation, adenoviral vectors expressing FLAG-Myc-tagged OATP1B3 (Ad-OATP1B3) were transduced into human hepatocytes; surface expression and phosphorylation of OATP1B3 were determined by biotinylation and by an anti–phosphor-Ser/Thr/Tyr antibody, respectively. PMA pretreatment markedly increased OATP1B3 phosphorylation without affecting surface or total OATP1B3 protein levels. In conclusion, PKC activation rapidly decreases OATP1B3 transport activity by post-translational regulation of OATP1B3. These studies elucidate a novel indirect inhibitory mechanism affecting hepatic uptake mediated by OATP1B3, and provide new insights into predicting OATP-mediated drug interactions between OATP substrates and kinase modulator drugs/endogenous compounds. PMID:25200870

  6. Role of reactive oxygen species in brucein D-mediated p38-mitogen-activated protein kinase and nuclear factor-κB signalling pathways in human pancreatic adenocarcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Lau, S T; Lin, Z X; Leung, P S

    2010-01-01

    Background: In human pancreatic adenocarcinoma, nuclear factor-kappa-B (NF-κB) transcription factor is constitutively activated that contributes to the resistance of the tumour cells to induced apoptosis. In our earlier studies, we have shown that brucein D (BD) mediated apoptosis through activation of the p38-mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signalling pathway in pancreatic cancer cells. This study investigated the function of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in BD-mediated p38-MAPK and NF-κB signalling pathways in PANC-1 cells. Methods: Glutathione and dihydroethidium assays were used to measure the antioxidant and superoxide levels, respectively. The protein expression of p22phox, p67phox and p38-MAPK were examined by western blot. The NF-κB activity was evaluated by electrophoretic mobility shift assay. Results: Treatment with BD depleted the intracellular glutathione levels in PANC-1 cells. Brucein D triggered the activation of NADPH oxidase isoforms, p22phox and p67phox while enhancing the generation of superoxide. Increases in both intracellular ROS and NADPH oxidase activity were inhibited by an antioxidant, N-acetylcysteine (NAC). Brucein D-mediated activation of p38-MAPK was also inhibited by NAC. However, inhibition of NF-κB activity in BD-treated cells was independent of ROS. In vivo studies showed that BD treatment effectively reduced the rate of xenograft human pancreatic tumour in nude mice with no significant toxicity. Conclusion: These data suggest that BD is an apoptogenic agent for pancreatic cancer cells through activation of the redox-sensitive p38-MAPK pathway and inhibition of NF-κB anti-apoptotic activity in pancreatic cancer cells. PMID:20068565

  7. [Virucidal activity of disinfectants. Influence of the serum protein upon the virucidal activity of disinfectants].

    PubMed

    Noda, M; Matsuda, S; Kobayashi, M

    2000-08-01

    Five disinfectants were tested for virucidal activity on three DNA viruses and three RNA viruses in the presence or absence of serum protein. Disinfectants of the aldehyde and halogen groups had a virucidal activity on human herpes virus, bovine rhabdo virus, human immunodeficiency virus, human adeno virus, porcine parvo virus, and polio virus. Disinfectants of the invert and amphoteric soap groups, and biganide group had a destructive effect on RNA and DNA viruses possessing an envelope. The presence of serum protein exerted great influence upon the virucidal activity of disinfectants of the invert and amphoteric soap groups. PMID:11019515

  8. Recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-9 potently induces osteogenic differentiation of human periodontal ligament fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Fuchigami, Sawako; Nakamura, Toshiaki; Furue, Kirara; Sena, Kotaro; Shinohara, Yukiya; Noguchi, Kazuyuki

    2016-04-01

    To accomplish effective periodontal regeneration for periodontal defects, several regenerative methods using growth and differentiation factors, including bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs), have been developed. Bone morphogenetic protein-9 exhibits the most potent osteogenic activity of this growth factor family. However, it is unclear whether exogenous BMP-9 can induce osteogenic differentiation in human periodontal ligament (PDL) fibroblasts. Here, we examined the effects of recombinant human (rh) BMP-9 on osteoblastic differentiation in human PDL fibroblasts in vitro, compared with rhBMP-2. Recombinant human BMP-9 potently induced alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, mineralization, and increased expression of runt-related transcription factor-2/core binding factor alpha 1 (RUNX2/CBFA1), osterix, inhibitor of DNA binding/differentiation-1 (ID1), osteopontin, and bone sialoprotein genes, compared with rhBMP-2. The levels of rhBMP-9-induced osterix and ALP mRNA were significantly reduced in activin receptor-like kinase-1 and -2 small interfering RNA (siRNA)-transfected human PDL fibroblasts. Recombinant human BMP-9-induced ALP activity was not inhibited by noggin, in contrast to rhBMP-2 induced ALP activity, which was. Phosphorylation of SMAD1/5/8 in human PDL fibroblasts was induced by addition of rhBMP-9. Recombinant human BMP-9-induced ALP activity was suppressed by SB203580, SP600125, and U0126, which are inhibitors of p38, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2), respectively. Our data suggest that rhBMP-9 is a potent inducer of the differentiation of human PDL fibroblasts into osteoblast-like cells and that this may be mediated by the SMAD and mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38, ERK1/2, and JNK) pathways. PMID:26879145

  9. Carnosol, a dietary diterpene, displays growth inhibitory effects in human prostate cancer PC3 cells leading to G2-phase cell cycle arrest and targets the 5'-AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) pathway

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Jeremy J.; Syed, Deeba N.; Heren, Chenelle R.; Suh, Yewseok; Adhami, Vaqar M.; Mukhtar, Hasan

    2010-01-01

    Purpose The anti-cancer effect of carnosol was investigated in human prostate cancer PC3 cells. Methods Biochemical analysis and protein array data of carnosol treated PC3 cells were analyzed. Results We evaluated carnosol for its potential anti-cancer properties in the PC3 cells. Using an MTT assay we found that carnosol (10 – 70 µM) decreases cell viability in a time and dose dependent manner. Next, we evaluated the effect of carnosol (20–60 uM) effect using flow cytometry as well as biochemical analysis and found induction of G2-phase cell cycle arrest. To establish a more precise mechanism, we performed a protein array that evaluated 638 proteins involved in cell signaling pathways. The protein array identified 5'-AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a serine/threonine protein kinase involved in the regulation of cellular energy balance as a potential target. Further downstream effects consistent with cancer inhibition included the modulation of the mTOR/HSP70S6k/4E-BP1 pathway. Additionally, we found that carnosol targeted the PI3K/Akt pathway in a dose dependent manner. Conclusions These results suggest that carnosol targets multiple signaling pathways that include the AMPK pathway. The ability of carnosol to inhibit prostate cancer in vitro suggests carnosol may be a novel agent for the management of PCa. PMID:18286356

  10. Human testis expresses a specific poly(A)-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Féral, C; Guellaën, G; Pawlak, A

    2001-05-01

    In testis mRNA stability and translation initiation are extensively under the control of poly(A)-binding proteins (PABP). Here we have cloned a new human testis-specific PABP (PABP3) of 631 amino acids (70.1 kDa) with 92.5% identical residues to the ubiquitous PABP1. A northern blot of multiple human tissues hybridised with PABP3- and PABP1-specific oligonucleotide probes revealed two PABP3 mRNAs (2.1 and 2.5 kb) detected only in testis, whereas PABP1 mRNA (3.2 kb) was present in all tested tissues. In human adult testis, PABP3 mRNA expression was restricted to round spermatids, whereas PABP1 was expressed in these cells as well as in pachytene spermatocytes. PABP3-specific antibodies identified a protein of 70 kDa in human testis extracts. This protein binds poly(A) with a slightly lower affinity as compared to PABP1. The human PABP3 gene is intronless with a transcription start site 61 nt upstream from the initiation codon. A sequence of 256 bp upstream from the transcription start site drives the promoter activity of PABP3 and its tissue-specific expression. The expression of PABP3 might be a way to bypass PABP1 translational repression and to produce the amount of PABP needed for active mRNA translation in spermatids. PMID:11328870

  11. Cow's milk proteins in human milk.

    PubMed

    Coscia, A; Orrù, S; Di Nicola, P; Giuliani, F; Rovelli, I; Peila, C; Martano, C; Chiale, F; Bertino, E

    2012-01-01

    Cow's milk proteins (CMPs) are among the best characterized food allergens. Cow's milk contains more than twenty five different proteins, but only whey proteins alpha-lactalbumin, beta-lactoglobulin, bovine serum albumin (BSA), and lactoferrin, as well as the four caseins, have been identified as allergens. Aim of this study was to investigate by proteomics techniques cow's milk allergens in human colostrum of term and preterm newborns' mothers, not previously detected, in order to understand if such allergens could be cause of sensitization during lactation. Term colostrum samples from 62 healthy mothers and preterm colostrum samples from 11 healthy mothers were collected for this purpose. The most relevant finding was the detection of the intact bovine alpha-S1-casein in both term and preterm colostrum. Using this method, which allows direct proteins identification, beta-lactoglobulin was not detected in any of colostrum samples. According to our results bovine alpha 1 casein that is considered a major cow's milk allergen is readily secreted in human milk: further investigations are needed in order to clarify if alpha-1-casein has a major role in sensitization or tolerance to cow's milk of exclusively breastfed predisposed infants. PMID:23158513

  12. Hepatitis C virus core protein inhibits interferon production by a human plasmacytoid dendritic cell line and dysregulates interferon regulatory factor-7 and signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) 1 protein expression.

    PubMed

    Stone, Amy E L; Mitchell, Angela; Brownell, Jessica; Miklin, Daniel J; Golden-Mason, Lucy; Polyak, Stephen J; Gale, Michael J; Rosen, Hugo R

    2014-01-01

    Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells (pDCs) represent a key immune cell population in the defense against viruses. pDCs detect viral pathogen associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) through pattern recognition receptors (PRR). PRR/PAMP interactions trigger signaling events that induce interferon (IFN) production to initiate local and systemic responses. pDCs produce Type I and Type III (IFNL) IFNs in response to HCV RNA. Extracellular HCV core protein (Core) is found in the circulation in chronic infection. This study defined how Core modulates PRR signaling in pDCs. Type I and III IFN expression and production following exposure to recombinant Core or β-galactosiade was assessed in human GEN2.2 cells, a pDC cell line. Core suppressed type I and III IFN production in response to TLR agonists and the HCV PAMP agonist of RIG-I. Core suppression of IFN induction was linked with decreased IRF-7 protein levels and increased non-phosphorylated STAT1 protein. Circulating Core protein interferes with PRR signaling by pDCs to suppress IFN production. Strategies to define and target Core effects on pDCs may serve to enhance IFN production and antiviral actions against HCV. PMID:24788809

  13. Long Wavelength Monitoring of Protein Kinase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Oien, Nathan P.; Nguyen, Luong T.; Jernigan, Finith E.; Priestman, Melanie A.

    2014-01-01

    A family of long wavelength protein kinase fluorescent reporters is described in which the probing wavelength is pre-programmed using readily available fluorophores. These agents can assess protein kinase activity within the optical window of tissue, as exemplified by monitoring endogenous cAMP-dependent protein kinase activity (1) in erythrocyte lysates and (2) in intact erythrocytes using a light-activatable reporter. PMID:24604833

  14. IL-1-induced ERK1/2 activation up-regulates p21{sup Waf1/Cip1} protein by inhibition of degradation via ubiquitin-independent pathway in human melanoma cells A375

    SciTech Connect

    Arakawa, Tomohiro; Hayashi, Hidetoshi; Itoh, Saotomo; Takii, Takemasa; Onozaki, Kikuo

    2010-02-12

    IL-1 inhibits the proliferation of human melanoma cells A375 by arresting the cell cycle at G0/G1 phase, which accompanies the increase of p21{sup Waf1/Cip1} (p21) protein. Here, we demonstrate that IL-1 induces the stabilization of p21 protein via ERK1/2 pathway. The degradation of p21 was inhibited by IL-1, however the ubiquitination level of p21 was not affected. In addition, the degradation of non-ubiquitinated form of lysine less mutant p21-K6R was also inhibited by IL-1, suggesting that IL-1 stabilized p21 protein via ubiquitin-independent pathway. Furthermore, the inhibition of p21 protein degradation was prevented by a selective inhibitor of ERK1/2 pathway, PD98059. These results suggest that IL-1-induced ERK1/2 activation leads to the up-regulation of p21 by inhibiting degradation via ubiquitin-independent pathway in human melanoma cells A375.

  15. The human papillomavirus type 16 E7 protein complements adenovirus type 5 E1A amino-terminus-dependent transactivation of adenovirus type 5 early genes and increases ATF and Oct-1 DNA binding activity.

    PubMed Central

    Wong, H K; Ziff, E B

    1996-01-01

    We have previously shown that conserved region 1 (CR1) of the adenovirus type 5 (Ad5) E1A protein synergizes with CR3 in the transactivation of Ad5 early genes (H.K. Wong and E. B. Ziff, J. Virol. 68:4910-4920, 1994). CR1 lies within the E1A amino terminus and binds host regulatory proteins such as the RB protein, p107, p130, and p300. Since simian virus 40 (SV40) large T antigen and human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) E7 protein also bind host regulatory factors, we investigated whether these viral proteins can complement E1A mutants which are defective in early gene activation. We show that the HPV16 E7 protein but not SV40 T antigen can complement mutations in the Ad5 E1A CR1 in the transactivation of viral early promoters. The inability of SV40 T antigen to complement suggests that RB binding on its own is not sufficient for early promoter transactivation by the E1A amino terminus. Nuclear runoff assays show that complementation by HPV16 E7 restores the ability of the E1A mutants to stimulate early gene expression at the level of transcription. Furthermore, nuclear extracts from the E7-transformed cells show increased binding activity of ATF and Oct-1, factors that can recognize the elements of Ad5 early genes, consistent with gene activation by E1A and E7 at the transcriptional level. PMID:8523545

  16. Control of NF-kB activity in human melanoma by bromodomain and extra-terminal protein inhibitor I-BET151.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, Stuart J; Mijatov, Branka; Gunatilake, Dilini; Gowrishankar, Kavitha; Tiffen, Jessamy; James, Wilmott; Jin, Lei; Pupo, Gulietta; Cullinane, Carleen; McArthur, Grant A; Tummino, Peter J; Rizos, Helen; Hersey, Peter

    2014-11-01

    The transcription factor NF-kappaB (NF-kB) is a key regulator of cytokine and chemokine production in melanoma and is responsible for symptoms such as anorexia, fatigue, and weight loss. In addition, NF-kB is believed to contribute to progression of the disease by upregulation of cell cycle and anti-apoptotic genes and to contribute to resistance against targeted therapies and immunotherapy. In this study, we have examined the ability of the bromodomain and extra-terminal (BET) protein inhibitor I-BET151 to inhibit NF-kB in melanoma cells. We show that I-BET151 is a potent, selective inhibitor of a number of NF-kB target genes involved in induction of inflammation and cell cycle regulation and downregulates production of cytokines such as IL-6 and IL-8. SiRNA studies indicate that BRD2 is the main BET protein involved in regulation of NF-kB and that I-BET151 caused transcriptional downregulation of the NF-kB subunit p105/p50. These results suggest that BET inhibitors may have an important role in treatment of melanoma where activation of NF-kB may have a key pathogenic role. PMID:24924589

  17. Yes-Associated Protein Contributes to the Development of Human Cutaneous Squamous Cell Carcinoma via Activation of RAS.

    PubMed

    Jia, Jinjing; Li, Changji; Luo, Suju; Liu-Smith, Feng; Yang, Jiao; Wang, Xin; Wang, Nanping; Lai, Baochang; Lei, Ting; Wang, Qiongyu; Xiao, Shengxiang; Shao, Yongping; Zheng, Yan

    2016-06-01

    Cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (cSCC) is one of the most common skin malignant tumors with an increasing incidence. Studies have shown that Yes-associated protein (YAP) participates in the development of a variety of tumors as an oncogene, but to our knowledge its role in cSCC has not been reported. In this study, we used immunohistochemistry to show that YAP expression was elevated in cSCC samples of different stages versus in normal skin and that it was well correlated with the progression of the disease. Down-regulation of YAP in cSCC cell lines A431 and SCL-1 inhibited cell proliferation by inducing growth arrest during the G1/S phase transition, promoted apoptosis, and reduced invasion and migration abilities in vitro. Conversely, overexpression of YAP promoted cell proliferation and protected cells against basal and chemotherapy-induced apoptosis. These oncogenic effects of YAP were associated with activation of the RAS protein and its downstream AKT and ERK. Using a mouse xenograft model, we further showed that YAP depletion inhibited cSCC tumor growth in vivo. Our results suggested that YAP is involved in the carcinogenesis and development of cSCC and that it may serve as a biomarker or therapeutic target of this disease. PMID:26902922

  18. Activity-Based Protein Profiling of Microbes

    SciTech Connect

    Sadler, Natalie C.; Wright, Aaron T.

    2015-02-01

    Activity-Based Protein Profiling (ABPP) in conjunction with multimodal characterization techniques has yielded impactful findings in microbiology, particularly in pathogen, bioenergy, drug discovery, and environmental research. Using small molecule chemical probes that react irreversibly with specific proteins or protein families in complex systems has provided insights in enzyme functions in central metabolic pathways, drug-protein interactions, and regulatory protein redox, for systems ranging from photoautotrophic cyanobacteria to mycobacteria, and combining live cell or cell extract ABPP with proteomics, molecular biology, modeling, and other techniques has greatly expanded our understanding of these systems. New opportunities for application of ABPP to microbial systems include: enhancing protein annotation, characterizing protein activities in myriad environments, and reveal signal transduction and regulatory mechanisms in microbial systems.

  19. CentrosomeDB: a human centrosomal proteins database

    PubMed Central

    Nogales-Cadenas, Rubén; Abascal, Federico; Díez-Pérez, Javier; Carazo, José María; Pascual-Montano, Alberto

    2009-01-01

    Active research on the biology of the centrosome during the past decades has allowed the identification and characterization of many centrosomal proteins. Unfortunately, the accumulated data is still dispersed among heterogeneous sources of information. Here we present centrosome:db, which intends to compile and integrate relevant information related to the human centrosome. We have compiled a set of 383 likely human centrosomal genes and recorded the associated supporting evidences. Centrosome:db offers several perspectives to study the human centrosome including evolution, function and structure. The database contains information on the orthology relationships with other species, including fungi, nematodes, arthropods, urochordates and vertebrates. Predictions of the domain organization of centrosome:db proteins are graphically represented at different sections of the database, including sets of alternative protein isoforms, interacting proteins, groups of orthologs and the homologs identified with blast. Centrosome:db also contains information related to function, gene–disease associations, SNPs and the 3D structure of proteins. Apart from important differences in the coverage of the set of centrosomal genes, our database differentiates from other similar initiatives in the way information is treated and analyzed. Centrosome:db is publicly available at http://centrosome.dacya.ucm.es. PMID:18971254

  20. Dual bradykinin B2 receptor signalling in A431 human epidermoid carcinoma cells: activation of protein kinase C is counteracted by a GS-mediated stimulation of the cyclic AMP pathway.

    PubMed Central

    Liebmann, C; Graness, A; Ludwig, B; Adomeit, A; Boehmer, A; Boehmer, F D; Nürnberg, B; Wetzker, R

    1996-01-01

    Cell membranes of the human epidermoid cell line A431 express classical bradykinin (BK) B2 receptors, as assessed by [3H]BK binding studies. Furthermore, stimulation by BK induced a time-dependent modulation of protein kinase C (PKC) activity in A431 cells: a rapid activation (t1/2 approximately 1 min) is followed by a slow inhibition (t1/2 approximately 20 min) of PKC translocation measured by [3H]phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate binding. In addition, BK stimulated both adenylate cyclase activity in A431 membranes and accumulation of intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP) in intact cells in a retarded manner. A possible BK-induced activation of the cAMP pathway mediated via PKC, phospholipase D, prostaglandins or Ca2+/calmodulin was excluded. A 35 kDa protein was found in A431 membranes to be specifically phosphorylated in the presence of both BK and protein kinase A (PKA). An anti-alpha s-antibody, AS 348, abolished stimulation of adenylate cyclase activity in response to BK, cholera toxin and isoprenaline, strongly suggesting the involvement of Gs proteins in the BK action. The BK-activated cAMP signalling system might be important for the observed inactivation of PKC slowly evoked by BK: the BK-induced rapid activation of PKC is decreased by dibutyryl cAMP, and the slow inhibition of PKC is prevented by an inhibitor of PKA, adenosine 3':5'-monophosphothioate (cyclic, Rp isomer). The inhibition of PKC translocation might be exerted directly at the level of PKC activation, since stimulation of phosphoinositide hydrolysis by BK was affected by neither dibutyryl cAMP nor forskolin. Thus our results provide the first evidence that A431 cells BK is able to activate two independent signal-transduction pathways via a single class of B2 receptors but two different G proteins. The lagging stimulation of the cAMP signalling pathway via Gs might serve to switch off PKC, which is rapidly activated via Gq-mediated stimulation of phosphoinositide hydrolysis. PMID:8546671

  1. Tregs utilize beta-galactoside-binding protein to transiently inhibit PI3K/p21ras activity of human CD8+ T cells to block their TCR-mediated ERK activity and proliferation.

    PubMed

    Baatar, Dolgor; Olkhanud, Purevdorj B; Wells, Valerie; Indig, Fred E; Mallucci, Livio; Biragyn, Arya

    2009-10-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) and beta-galactoside-binding protein (betaGBP), a regulatory protein often found expressed at sites of immunological privilege, have similar functions. Their presence affects the outcome of harmful autoimmunity and cancers, including experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis and malignant gliomas. Here we report a novel pathway by which Tregs express and utilize betaGBP to control CD8(+) T cell responses partially activating TCR signaling but blocking PI3K activity. As a result, this leads to a loss of p21(ras), ERK and Akt activities despite activation of TCR proximal signals, such as phosphorylation of CD3zeta, Zap70, Lat and PKCtheta. Although non-processive TCR signaling often leads to cell anergy, Tregs/betaGBP did not affect cell viability. Instead, betaGBP/Tregs transiently prevented activation of CD8(+) T cells with self-antigens, while keeping their responses to xenogeneic antigens unaffected. PMID:19520156

  2. NET amyloidogenic backbone in human activated neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Pulze, L; Bassani, B; Gini, E; D'Antona, P; Grimaldi, A; Luini, A; Marino, F; Noonan, D M; Tettamanti, G; Valvassori, R; de Eguileor, M

    2016-03-01

    Activated human neutrophils produce a fibrillar DNA network [neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs)] for entrapping and killing bacteria, fungi, protozoa and viruses. Our results suggest that the neutrophil extracellular traps show a resistant amyloidogenic backbone utilized for addressing reputed proteins and DNA against the non-self. The formation of amyloid fibrils in neutrophils is regulated by the imbalance of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the cytoplasm. The intensity and source of the ROS signal is determinant for promoting stress-associated responses such as amyloidogenesis and closely related events: autophagy, exosome release, activation of the adrenocorticotrophin hormone/α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (ACTH/α-MSH) loop and synthesis of specific cytokines. These interconnected responses in human activated neutrophils, that have been evaluated from a morphofunctional and quantitative viewpoint, represent primitive, but potent, innate defence mechanisms. In invertebrates, circulating phagocytic immune cells, when activated, show responses similar to those described previously for activated human neutrophils. Invertebrate cells within endoplasmic reticulum cisternae produce a fibrillar material which is then assembled into an amyloidogenic scaffold utilized to convey melanin close to the invader. These findings, in consideration to the critical role played by NET in the development of several pathologies, could explain the structural resistance of these scaffolds and could provide the basis for developing new diagnostic and therapeutic approaches in immunomediated diseases in which the innate branch of the immune system has a pivotal role. PMID:26462606

  3. Oxidative damage to human plasma proteins by ozone.

    PubMed

    Cross, C E; Reznick, A Z; Packer, L; Davis, P A; Suzuki, Y J; Halliwell, B

    1992-01-01

    Exposure of human plasma to ozone produces oxidative protein damage, measured as protein carbonyl formation. Isolated human albumin or creatine phosphokinase are oxidized much faster than are total proteins. Consideration must be given to proteins as targets of oxidative injury by ozone in vivo. PMID:1568641

  4. Hepatitis B virus X protein activates Notch signaling by its effects on Notch1 and Notch4 in human hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Gao, Juan; Xiong, Yimin; Wang, Yan; Wang, Yiming; Zheng, Guorong; Xu, Hualin

    2016-01-01

    Deregulated expression of Notch receptors and abnormal activity of Notch signaling have been observed in a growing number of malignant tumors, however, the expression and activity of Notch in hepatitis B virus (HBV)-associated hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and their relationship with HBV X protein (HBx) are still not fully elucidated. To address this, we examined the overall expression of Notch receptors in HBV-associated HCC tissues, analyzed their relationship with HBx, and further investigated the role of Notch signaling in HBx stable transfected HepG2 cells (HepG2X). The results showed that Notch signaling could be activated by HBx in HepG2 cells. The expression of cytoplasmic Notch1 or nuclear Notch4 was correlated with the expression of HBx in HBV-associated HCC tissues. The expression of cytoplasmic Notch1 or nuclear Notch4 could also be upregulated by HBx in HepG2X cells. The upregulation of Notch1 by HBx was through p38 MAPK pathway. Moreover, HBx was found to directly interact with Notch1, whereas, not with Notch4 in HepG2X cells. Suppression of Notch signaling by γ-secretase inhibitor (GSI) decreased cell growth, blocked cell cycle progression and induced cell apoptosis in HepG2X cells. The present study indicates that HBx activates Notch signaling by its effects on Notch1 and Notch4, and therefore, recruits Notch signaling as a downstream pathway contributing to its carcinogenic role in HBV-associated HCC. PMID:26530164

  5. Human Rad54 protein stimulates human Mus81–Eme1 endonuclease

    PubMed Central

    Mazina, Olga M.; Mazin, Alexander V.

    2008-01-01

    Rad54, a key protein of homologous recombination, physically interacts with a DNA structure-specific endonuclease, Mus81–Eme1. Genetic data indicate that Mus81–Eme1 and Rad54 might function together in the repair of damaged DNA. In vitro, Rad54 promotes branch migration of Holliday junctions, whereas the Mus81–Eme1 complex resolves DNA junctions by endonucleolytic cleavage. Here, we show that human Rad54 stimulates Mus81–Eme1 endonuclease activity on various Holliday junction-like intermediates. This stimulation is the product of specific interactions between the human Rad54 (hRad54) and Mus81 proteins, considering that Saccharomyces cerevisiae Rad54 protein does not stimulate human Mus81–Eme1 endonuclease activity. Stimulation of Mus81–Eme1 cleavage activity depends on formation of specific Rad54 complexes on DNA substrates occurring in the presence of ATP and, to a smaller extent, of other nucleotide cofactors. Thus, our results demonstrate a functional link between the branch migration activity of hRad54 and the structure-specific endonuclease activity of hMus81–Eme1, suggesting that the Rad54 and Mus81–Eme1 proteins may cooperate in the processing of Holliday junction-like intermediates during homologous recombination or DNA repair. PMID:19017809

  6. Nucleic acids encoding human trithorax protein

    DOEpatents

    Evans, Glen A.; Djabali, Malek; Selleri, Licia; Parry, Pauline

    2001-01-01

    In accordance with the present invention, there is provided an isolated peptide having the characteristics of human trithorax protein (as well as DNA encoding same, antisense DNA derived therefrom and antagonists therefor). The invention peptide is characterized by having a DNA binding domain comprising multiple zinc fingers and at least 40% amino acid identity with respect to the DNA binding domain of Drosophila trithorax protein and at least 70% conserved sequence with respect to the DNA binding domain of Drosophi