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Sample records for activated human protein

  1. DNA helicase activity in purified human RECQL4 protein.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Takahiro; Kohno, Toshiyuki; Ishimi, Yukio

    2009-09-01

    Human RECQL4 protein was expressed in insect cells using a baculovirus protein expression system and it was purified to near homogeneity. The protein sedimented at a position between catalase (230 kDa) and ferritin (440 kDa) in glycerol gradient centrifugation, suggesting that it forms homo-multimers. Activity to displace annealed 17-mer oligonucleotide in the presence of ATP was co-sedimented with hRECQL4 protein. In ion-exchange chromatography, both DNA helicase activity and single-stranded DNA-dependent ATPase activity were co-eluted with hRECQL4 protein. The requirements of ATP and Mg for the helicase activity were different from those for the ATPase activity. The data suggest that the helicase migrates on single-stranded DNA in a 3'-5' direction. These results suggest that the hRECQL4 protein exhibits DNA helicase activity.

  2. Human lipopolysaccharide-binding protein potentiates bactericidal activity of human bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein.

    PubMed Central

    Horwitz, A H; Williams, R E; Nowakowski, G

    1995-01-01

    Human bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein (BPI) from neutrophils and a recombinant amino-terminal fragment, rBPI23, bind to and are cytotoxic for gram-negative bacteria both in vitro and ex vivo in plasma or whole blood. To function in vivo as an extracellular bactericidal agent, rBPI23 must act in the presence of the lipopolysaccharide-binding protein (LBP), which also binds to but has no reported cytotoxicity for gram-negative bacteria. LBP, which is present at 5 to 10 micrograms/ml in healthy humans and at much higher levels in septic patients, mediates proinflammatory host responses to gram-negative infection. On the basis of these previous observations, we have examined the effect of recombinant LBP (rLBP) on the bactericidal activity of rBPI23 against Escherichia coli J5 in vitro. Physiological concentrations of rLBP (5 to 20 micrograms/ml) had little or no bactericidal activity but reduced by up to approximately 10,000-fold the concentration of BPI required for bactericidal or related activities in assays which measure (i) cell viability as CFUs on solid media or growth in broth culture and (ii) protein synthesis following treatment with BPI. LBP also potentiated BPI-mediated permeabilization of the E. coli outer membrane to actinomycin D by about 100-fold but had no permeabilizing activity of its own. Under optimal conditions for potentiation, fewer than 100 BPI molecules were required to kill a single E. coli J5 bacterium. PMID:7822017

  3. Protein-Protein Interactions Suggest Novel Activities of Human Cytomegalovirus Tegument Protein pUL103

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz, Daniel A.; Glassbrook, James E.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is an enveloped double-stranded DNA virus that causes severe disease in newborns and immunocompromised patients. During infection, the host cell endosecretory system is remodeled to form the cytoplasmic virion assembly complex (cVAC). We and others previously identified the conserved, multifunctional HCMV virion tegument protein pUL103 as important for cVAC biogenesis and efficient secondary envelopment. To help define its mechanisms of action and predict additional functions, we used two complementary methods, coimmunoprecipitation (co-IP) and proximity biotinylation (BioID), to identify viral and cellular proteins that interact with pUL103. By using the two methods in parallel and applying stringent selection criteria, we identified potentially high-value interactions of pUL103 with 13 HCMV and 18 cellular proteins. Detection of the previously identified pUL103-pUL71 interaction, as well as verification of several interactions by reverse co-IP, supports the specificity of our screening process. As might be expected for a tegument protein, interactions were identified that suggest distinct roles for pUL103 across the arc of lytic infection, including interactions with proteins involved in cellular antiviral responses, nuclear activities, and biogenesis and transport of cytoplasmic vesicles. Further analysis of some of these interactions expands our understanding of the multifunctional repertoire of pUL103: we detected HCMV pUL103 in nuclei of infected cells and identified an ALIX-binding domain within the pUL103 sequence. IMPORTANCE Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is able to reconfigure the host cell machinery to establish a virion production factory, the cytoplasmic virion assembly complex (cVAC). cVAC biogenesis and operation represent targets for development of novel HCMV antivirals. We previously showed that the HCMV tegument protein pUL103 is required for cVAC biogenesis. Using pUL103 as bait, we investigated viral and

  4. Recombinant Human Peptidoglycan Recognition Proteins Reveal Antichlamydial Activity.

    PubMed

    Bobrovsky, Pavel; Manuvera, Valentin; Polina, Nadezhda; Podgorny, Oleg; Prusakov, Kirill; Govorun, Vadim; Lazarev, Vassili

    2016-07-01

    Peptidoglycan recognition proteins (PGLYRPs) are innate immune components that recognize the peptidoglycan and lipopolysaccharides of bacteria and exhibit antibacterial activity. Recently, the obligate intracellular parasite Chlamydia trachomatis was shown to have peptidoglycan. However, the antichlamydial activity of PGLYRPs has not yet been demonstrated. The aim of our study was to test whether PGLYRPs exhibit antibacterial activity against C. trachomatis Thus, we cloned the regions containing the human Pglyrp1, Pglyrp2, Pglyrp3, and Pglyrp4 genes for subsequent expression in human cell lines. We obtained stable HeLa cell lines that secrete recombinant human PGLYRPs into culture medium. We also generated purified recombinant PGLYRP1, -2, and -4 and confirmed their activities against Gram-positive (Bacillus subtilis) and Gram-negative (Escherichia coli) bacteria. Furthermore, we examined the activities of recombinant PGLYRPs against C. trachomatis and determined their MICs. We also observed a decrease in the infectious ability of chlamydial elementary bodies in the next generation after a single exposure to PGLYRPs. Finally, we demonstrated that PGLYRPs attach to C. trachomatis elementary bodies and activate the expression of the chlamydial two-component stress response system. Thus, PGLYRPs inhibit the development of chlamydial infection.

  5. Recombinant Human Peptidoglycan Recognition Proteins Reveal Antichlamydial Activity

    PubMed Central

    Manuvera, Valentin; Polina, Nadezhda; Podgorny, Oleg; Prusakov, Kirill; Govorun, Vadim; Lazarev, Vassili

    2016-01-01

    Peptidoglycan recognition proteins (PGLYRPs) are innate immune components that recognize the peptidoglycan and lipopolysaccharides of bacteria and exhibit antibacterial activity. Recently, the obligate intracellular parasite Chlamydia trachomatis was shown to have peptidoglycan. However, the antichlamydial activity of PGLYRPs has not yet been demonstrated. The aim of our study was to test whether PGLYRPs exhibit antibacterial activity against C. trachomatis. Thus, we cloned the regions containing the human Pglyrp1, Pglyrp2, Pglyrp3, and Pglyrp4 genes for subsequent expression in human cell lines. We obtained stable HeLa cell lines that secrete recombinant human PGLYRPs into culture medium. We also generated purified recombinant PGLYRP1, -2, and -4 and confirmed their activities against Gram-positive (Bacillus subtilis) and Gram-negative (Escherichia coli) bacteria. Furthermore, we examined the activities of recombinant PGLYRPs against C. trachomatis and determined their MICs. We also observed a decrease in the infectious ability of chlamydial elementary bodies in the next generation after a single exposure to PGLYRPs. Finally, we demonstrated that PGLYRPs attach to C. trachomatis elementary bodies and activate the expression of the chlamydial two-component stress response system. Thus, PGLYRPs inhibit the development of chlamydial infection. PMID:27160295

  6. Human carotid atherosclerotic plaque protein(s) change HDL protein(s) composition and impair HDL anti-oxidant activity.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Elad; Aviram, Michael; Khatib, Soliman; Volkova, Nina; Vaya, Jacob

    2016-01-01

    High density lipoprotein (HDL) anti-atherogenic functions are closely associated with cardiovascular disease risk factor, and are dictated by its composition, which is often affected by environmental factors. The present study investigates the effects of the human carotid plaque constituents on HDL composition and biological functions. To this end, human carotid plaques were homogenized and incubated with HDL. Results showed that after incubation, most of the apolipoprotein A1 (Apo A1) protein was released from the HDL, and HDL diameter increased by an average of approximately 2 nm. In parallel, HDL antioxidant activity was impaired. In response to homogenate treatment HDL could not prevent the accelerated oxidation of LDL caused by the homogenate. Boiling of the homogenate prior to its incubation with HDL abolished its effects on HDL composition changes. Moreover, tryptophan fluorescence quenching assay revealed an interaction between plaque component(s) and HDL, an interaction that was reduced by 50% upon using pre-boiled homogenate. These results led to hypothesize that plaque protein(s) interacted with HDL-associated Apo A1 and altered the HDL composition. Immuno-precipitation of Apo A1 that was released from the HDL after its incubation with the homogenate revealed a co-precipitation of three isomers of actin. However, beta-actin alone did not significantly affect the HDL composition, and yet the active protein within the plaque was elusive. In conclusion then, protein(s) in the homogenate interact with HDL protein(s), leading to release of Apo A1 from the HDL particle, a process that was associated with an increase in HDL diameter and with impaired HDL anti-oxidant activity.

  7. Modeling of human factor Va inactivation by activated protein C

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Because understanding of the inventory, connectivity and dynamics of the components characterizing the process of coagulation is relatively mature, it has become an attractive target for physiochemical modeling. Such models can potentially improve the design of therapeutics. The prothrombinase complex (composed of the protease factor (F)Xa and its cofactor FVa) plays a central role in this network as the main producer of thrombin, which catalyses both the activation of platelets and the conversion of fibrinogen to fibrin, the main substances of a clot. A key negative feedback loop that prevents clot propagation beyond the site of injury is the thrombin-dependent generation of activated protein C (APC), an enzyme that inactivates FVa, thus neutralizing the prothrombinase complex. APC inactivation of FVa is complex, involving the production of partially active intermediates and “protection” of FVa from APC by both FXa and prothrombin. An empirically validated mathematical model of this process would be useful in advancing the predictive capacity of comprehensive models of coagulation. Results A model of human APC inactivation of prothrombinase was constructed in a stepwise fashion by analyzing time courses of FVa inactivation in empirical reaction systems with increasing number of interacting components and generating corresponding model constructs of each reaction system. Reaction mechanisms, rate constants and equilibrium constants informing these model constructs were initially derived from various research groups reporting on APC inactivation of FVa in isolation, or in the presence of FXa or prothrombin. Model predictions were assessed against empirical data measuring the appearance and disappearance of multiple FVa degradation intermediates as well as prothrombinase activity changes, with plasma proteins derived from multiple preparations. Our work integrates previously published findings and through the cooperative analysis of in vitro

  8. p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase activation by ultraviolet A radiation in human dermal fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Le Panse, Rozen; Dubertret, Louis; Coulomb, Bernard

    2003-08-01

    UVA radiation penetrates deeply into the skin reaching both the epidermis and the dermis. We thus investigated the effects of naturally occurring doses of UVA radiation on mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activities in human dermal fibroblasts. We demonstrated that UVA selectively activates p38 MAPK with no effect on extracellular-regulated kinases (ERK1-ERK2) or JNK-SAPK (cJun NH2-terminal kinase-stress-activated protein kinase) activities. We then investigated the signaling pathway used by UVA to activate p38 MAPK. L-Histidine and sodium azide had an inhibitory effect on UVA activation of p38 MAPK, pointing to a role of singlet oxygen in transduction of the UVA effect. Afterward, using prolonged cell treatments with growth factors to desensitize their signaling pathways or suramin to block growth factor receptors, we demonstrated that UVA signaling pathways shared elements with growth factor signaling pathways. In addition, using emetine (a translation inhibitor altering ribosome functioning) we detected the involvement of ribotoxic stress in p38 MAPK activation by UVA. Our observations suggest that p38 activation by UVA in dermal fibroblasts involves singlet oxygen-dependent activation of ligand-receptor signaling pathways or ribotoxic stress mechanism (or both). Despite the activation of these two distinct signaling mechanisms, the selective activation of p38 MAPK suggests a critical role of this kinase in the effects of UVA radiation.

  9. Enhanced transcriptional activation by E2 proteins from the oncogenic human papillomaviruses.

    PubMed Central

    Kovelman, R; Bilter, G K; Glezer, E; Tsou, A Y; Barbosa, M S

    1996-01-01

    A systematic comparison of transcriptional activation by papillomavirus E2 proteins revealed that the E2 proteins from high-risk human papillomaviruses (human papillomavirus type 16 [HPV-16] and HPV-18) are much more active than are the E2 proteins from low-risk HPVs (HPV-6b and HPV-11). Despite the tropism of HPVs for particular epithelial cell types, this difference in transcriptional activation was observed in a number of different epithelial and nonepithelial cells. The enhanced activities of the E2 proteins from high-risk HPVs did not result from higher steady-state levels of protein in vivo, and in vitro DNA-binding assays revealed similar binding properties for these two classes of E2 proteins. These results demonstrate that the E2 proteins from high-risk HPVs have an intrinsically enhanced potential to activate transcription from promoters with E2-responsive elements. We found that there are also substantial differences between the activation properties of the bovine papillomavirus type 1 E2 protein and those of either of the two classes of HPV E2 proteins, especially with regard to requirements for particular configurations of E2 binding sites in the target promoter. Our results indicate that there are at least three distinct functional classes of E2 proteins and that these classes of E2 proteins may perform different roles during the respective viral life cycles. PMID:8892874

  10. Construction and genetic selection of small transmembrane proteins that activate the human erythropoietin receptor.

    PubMed

    Cammett, Tobin J; Jun, Susan J; Cohen, Emily B; Barrera, Francisco N; Engelman, Donald M; Dimaio, Daniel

    2010-02-23

    This work describes a genetic approach to isolate small, artificial transmembrane (TM) proteins with biological activity. The bovine papillomavirus E5 protein is a dimeric, 44-amino acid TM protein that transforms cells by specifically binding and activating the platelet-derived growth factor beta receptor (PDGFbetaR). We used the E5 protein as a scaffold to construct a retrovirus library expressing approximately 500,000 unique 44-amino acid proteins with randomized TM domains. We screened this library to select small, dimeric TM proteins that were structurally unrelated to erythropoietin (EPO), but specifically activated the human EPO receptor (hEPOR). These proteins did not activate the murine EPOR or the PDGFbetaR. Genetic studies with one of these activators suggested that it interacted with the TM domain of the hEPOR. Furthermore, this TM activator supported erythroid differentiation of primary human hematopoietic progenitor cells in vitro in the absence of EPO. Thus, we have changed the specificity of a protein so that it no longer recognizes its natural target but, instead, modulates an entirely different protein. This represents a novel strategy to isolate small artificial proteins that affect diverse membrane proteins. We suggest the word "traptamer" for these transmembrane aptamers.

  11. Human Plasma Protein C

    PubMed Central

    Kisiel, Walter

    1979-01-01

    Protein C is a vitamin K-dependent protein, which exists in bovine plasma as a precursor of a serine protease. In this study, protein C was isolated to homogeneity from human plasma by barium citrate adsorption and elution, ammonium sulfate fractionation, DEAE-Sephadex chromatography, dextran sulfate agarose chromatography, and preparative polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Human protein C (Mr = 62,000) contains 23% carbohydrate and is composed of a light chain (Mr = 21,000) and a heavy chain (Mr = 41,000) held together by a disulfide bond(s). The light chain has an amino-terminal sequence of Ala-Asn-Ser-Phe-Leu- and the heavy chain has an aminoterminal sequence of Asp-Pro-Glu-Asp-Gln. The residues that are identical to bovine protein C are underlined. Incubation of human protein C with human α-thrombin at an enzyme to substrate weight ratio of 1:50 resulted in the formation of activated protein C, an enzyme with serine amidase activity. In the activation reaction, the apparent molecular weight of the heavy chain decreased from 41,000 to 40,000 as determined by gel electrophoresis in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate. No apparent change in the molecular weight of the light chain was observed in the activation process. The heavy chain of human activated protein C also contains the active-site serine residue as evidenced by its ability to react with radiolabeled diisopropyl fluorophosphate. Human activated protein C markedly prolongs the kaolin-cephalin clotting time of human plasma, but not that of bovine plasma. The amidolytic and anticoagulant activities of human activated protein C were completely obviated by prior incubation of the enzyme with diisopropyl fluorophosphate. These results indicate that human protein C, like its bovine counterpart, exists in plasma as a zymogen and is converted to a serine protease by limited proteolysis with attendant anticoagulant activity. Images PMID:468991

  12. Activation of ERK mitogen-activated protein kinase in human cells by the mycotoxin patulin

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, T.-S.; Yu, F.-Y.; Su, C.-C.; Kan, J.-C.; Chung, C.-P.; Liu, B.-H. . E-mail: bingliu@csmu.edu.tw

    2005-09-01

    Patulin (PAT), a mycotoxin produced by certain species of Penicillium and Aspergillus, is often detectable in moldy fruits and their derivative products. PAT led to a concentration-dependent and time-dependent increase in phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated protein kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) in human embryonic kidney (HEK293) cells, human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), and Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells. Exposure of HEK293 cells to concentrations above 5 {mu}M PAT for 30 min induced ERK1/2 phosphorylation; activation of ERK1/2 was also observed after 24 h incubation with 0.05 {mu}M of PAT. Treatment of human PBMCs for 30 min with 30 {mu}M PAT dramatically increased the phosphorylated ERK1/2 levels. Both MEK1/2 inhibitors, U0126 and PD98059, suppressed ERK1/2 activation in either HEK293 or MDCK cells. In HEK293 cells, U0126-mediated inhibition of PAT-induced ERK1/2 phosphorylation resulted in a significant decrease in levels of DNA damage, expressed as tail moment values, in the single cell gel electrophoresis assay. Conversely, U0126 did not affect cell viability, lactate dehydrogenase release, and the DNA synthesis rate in PAT-treated cultures. Exposure of HEK293 cells for 90 min to 15 {mu}M PAT elevated the levels of early growth response gene-1 (egr-1) mRNA, but not of c-fos, fosB, and junB mRNAs. These results indicate that in human cells, PAT causes a rapid and persistent activation of ERK1/2 and this signaling pathway plays an important role in mediating PAT-induced DNA damage and egr-1 gene expression.

  13. Dengue Virus Type 2: Protein Binding and Active Replication in Human Central Nervous System Cells

    PubMed Central

    Salazar, Ma Isabel; Pérez-García, Marissa; Terreros-Tinoco, Marisol; Castro-Mussot, María Eugenia; Diegopérez-Ramírez, Jaime; Ramírez-Reyes, Alma Griselda; Aguilera, Penélope; Cedillo-Barrón, Leticia; García-Flores, María Martha

    2013-01-01

    An increased number of dengue cases with neurological complications have been reported in recent years. The lack of reliable animal models for dengue has hindered studies on dengue virus (DENV) pathogenesis and cellular tropism in vivo. We further investigate the tropism of DENV for the human central nervous system (CNS), characterizing DENV interactions with cell surface proteins in human CNS cells by virus overlay protein binding assays (VOPBA) and coimmunoprecipitations. In VOPBA, three membrane proteins (60, 70, and 130 kDa) from the gray matter bound the entire virus particle, whereas only a 70 kDa protein bound in white matter. The coimmunoprecipitation assays revealed three proteins from gray matter consistently binding virus particles, one clearly distinguishable protein (~32 kDa) and two less apparent proteins (100 and 130 kDa). Monoclonal anti-NS3 targeted the virus protein in primary cell cultures of human CNS treated with DENV-2, which also stained positive for NeuH, a neuron-specific marker. Thus, our results indicate (1) that DENV-2 exhibited a direct tropism for human neurons and (2) that human neurons sustain an active DENV replication as was demonstrated by the presence of the NS3 viral antigen in primary cultures of these cells treated with DENV-2. PMID:24302878

  14. Glycosylated human oxyhaemoglobin activates nuclear factor-κB and activator protein-1 in cultured human aortic smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Peiró, Concepción; Matesanz, Nuria; Nevado, Julián; Lafuente, Nuria; Cercas, Elena; Azcutia, Verónica; Vallejo, Susana; Rodríguez-Mañas, Leocadio; Sánchez-Ferrer, Carlos F

    2003-01-01

    Diabetic vessels undergo structural changes that are linked to a high incidence of cardiovascular diseases. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) mediate cell signalling in the vasculature, where they can promote cell growth and activate redox-regulated transcription factors, like activator protein-1 (AP-1) or nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), which are involved in remodelling and inflammation processes. Amadori adducts, formed through nonenzymatic glycosylation, can contribute to ROS formation in diabetes. In this study, we analysed whether Amadori-modified human oxyhaemoglobin, glycosylated at either normal (N-Hb) or elevated (E-Hb) levels, can induce cell growth and activate AP-1 and NF-κB in cultured human aortic smooth muscle cells (HASMC). E-Hb (1 nM–1 μM), but not N-Hb, promoted a concentration-dependent increase in cell size from nanomolar concentrations, although it failed to stimulate HASMC proliferation. At 10 nM, E-Hb stimulated both AP-1 and NF-κB activity, as assessed by transient transfection, electromobility shift assays or immunofluorescence staining. The effects of E-Hb resembled those of the proinflammatory cytokine tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α). E-Hb enhanced intracellular superoxide anions content and its effects on HASMC were abolished by different ROS scavengers. In conclusion, E-Hb stimulates growth and activates AP-1 and NF-κB in human vascular smooth muscle by redox-sensitive pathways, thus suggesting a possible direct role for Amadori adducts in diabetic vasculopathy. PMID:14504138

  15. Activation of human natural killer cells by the soluble form of cellular prion protein

    SciTech Connect

    Seong, Yeon-Jae; Sung, Pil Soo; Jang, Young-Soon; Choi, Young Joon; Park, Bum-Chan; Park, Su-Hyung; Park, Young Woo; Shin, Eui-Cheol

    2015-08-21

    Cellular prion protein (PrP{sup C}) is widely expressed in various cell types, including cells of the immune system. However, the specific roles of PrP{sup C} in the immune system have not been clearly elucidated. In the present study, we investigated the effects of a soluble form of recombinant PrP{sup C} protein on human natural killer (NK) cells. Recombinant soluble PrP{sup C} protein was generated by fusion of human PrP{sup C} with the Fc portion of human IgG{sub 1} (PrP{sup C}-Fc). PrP{sup C}-Fc binds to the surface of human NK cells, particularly to CD56{sup dim} NK cells. PrP{sup C}-Fc induced the production of cytokines and chemokines and the degranulation of granzyme B from NK cells. In addition, PrP{sup C}-Fc facilitated the IL-15-induced proliferation of NK cells. PrP{sup C}-Fc induced phosphorylation of ERK-1/2 and JNK in NK cells, and inhibitors of the ERK or the JNK pathways abrogated PrP{sup C}-Fc-induced cytokine production in NK cells. In conclusion, the soluble form of recombinant PrP{sup C}-Fc protein activates human NK cells via the ERK and JNK signaling pathways. - Highlights: • Recombinant soluble PrP{sup C} (PrP{sup C}-Fc) was generated by fusion of human PrP{sup C} with IgG1 Fc portion. • PrP{sup C}-Fc protein induces the production of cytokines and degranulation from human NK cells. • PrP{sup C}-Fc protein enhances the IL-15-induced proliferation of human NK cells. • PrP{sup C}-Fc protein activates human NK cells via the ERK and JNK signaling pathways.

  16. Promoter-specific trans activation and repression by human cytomegalovirus immediate-early proteins involves common and unique protein domains.

    PubMed Central

    Stenberg, R M; Fortney, J; Barlow, S W; Magrane, B P; Nelson, J A; Ghazal, P

    1990-01-01

    trans activation of promoters by viral regulatory proteins provides a useful tool to study coordinate control of gene expression. Immediate-early (IE) regions 1 and 2 of human cytomegalovirus (CMV) code for a series of proteins that originate from differentially spliced mRNAs. These IE proteins are proposed to regulate the temporal expression of the viral genome. To examine the structure and function of the IE proteins, we used linker insertion mutagenesis of the IE gene region as well as cDNA expression vector cloning of the abundant IE mRNAs. We showed that IE1 and IE2 proteins of CMV exhibit promoter-specific differences in their modes of action by either trans activating early and IE promoters or repressing the major IE promoter (MIEP). Transient cotransfection experiments with permissive human cells revealed a synergistic interaction between the 72- and the 86-kilodalton (kDa) IE proteins in trans activating an early promoter. In addition, transfection studies revealed that the 72-kDa protein was capable of trans activating the MIEP. In contrast, the 86-kDa protein specifically repressed the MIEP and this repression was suppressed by the 72-kDa protein. Furthermore, observations based on the primary sequence structure revealed a modular arrangement of putative regulatory motifs that could either potentiate or repress gene expression. These modular domains are either shared or unique among the IE proteins. From these data, we propose a model for IE protein function in the coordinate control of CMV gene expression. Images PMID:2157043

  17. Transcriptional activation of JC virus by human T-lymphotropic virus type I Tax protein in human neuronal cell lines.

    PubMed

    Okada, Y; Sawa, H; Tanaka, S; Takada, A; Suzuki, S; Hasegawa, H; Umemura, T; Fujisawa, J; Tanaka, Y; Hall, W W; Nagashima, K

    2000-06-02

    Polyomavirus JC (JCV) causes the human demyelinating disease, progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML). The recent demonstration of cases of PML in association with human T-lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I) infection prompted us to examine whether the HTLV-I-encoded regulatory protein Tax activates JCV transcription. By employing a dual luciferase assay, we initially found that the expression of Tax activated the transcriptional potential of both early and late promoters of JCV in human neuronal but not in non-neuronal cells. We subsequently analyzed the mechanism of Tax-induced activation of the JCV promoter in neuronal cells with the following results: 1) the JCV promoter that lacks the NF-kappaB-binding motif could not be activated by Tax; 2) the overexpression of IkappaBalpha abolished Tax-induced transcriptional activation of the JCV promoter; 3) a Tax mutant (M22) lacking the potential for activation via the NF-kappaB pathway did not activate the JCV promoter. Furthermore, Tax enhances the gene expression of JCV T antigen and VP1. We examined mechanisms of the cell-specific activation of the JCV promoter by Tax. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay demonstrated the presence of Tax-bound protein(s) that were specifically present in non-neuronal cells. This study is the first demonstration of the activation of JCV promoter by HTLV-I Tax in an NF-kappaB-dependent manner.

  18. Effects of butyltins on mitogen-activated-protein kinase kinase kinase and Ras activity in human natural killer cells.

    PubMed

    Celada, Lindsay J; Whalen, Margaret M

    2014-09-01

    Butyltins (BTs) contaminate the environment and are found in human blood. BTs, tributyltin (TBT) and dibutyltin (DBT) diminish the cytotoxic function and levels of key proteins of human natural killer (NK) cells. NK cells are an initial immune defense against tumors, virally infected cells and antibody-coated cells and thus critical to human health. The signaling pathways that regulate NK cell functions include mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs). Studies have shown that exposure to BTs leads to activation of specific MAPKs and MAPK kinases (MAP2Ks) in human NK cells. MAP2K kinases (MAP3Ks) are upstream activators of MAP2Ks, which then activate MAPKs. The current study examined if BT-induced activation of MAP3Ks was responsible for MAP2K and thus, MAPK activation. This study examines the effects of TBT and DBT on the total levels of two MAP3Ks, c-Raf and ASK1, as well as activating and inhibitory phosphorylation sites on these MAP3Ks. In addition, the immediate upstream activator of c-Raf, Ras, was examined for BT-induced alterations. Our results show significant activation of the MAP3K, c-Raf, in human NK cells within 10 min of TBT exposure and the MAP3K, ASK1, after 1 h exposures to TBT. In addition, our results suggest that both TBT and DBT affect the regulation of c-Raf.

  19. Effects of adherence, activation and distinct serum proteins on the in vitro human monocyte maturation process.

    PubMed

    Akiyama, Y; Griffith, R; Miller, P; Stevenson, G W; Lund, S; Kanapa, D J; Stevenson, H C

    1988-03-01

    Elutriator-purified human monocytes were cultured in a serum-free (SF) medium, and various serum proteins and functional activating agents were assessed for their effects on the in vitro maturation of human monocytes to macrophages. Following 3 days of suspension culture in Teflon labware, 60% of the monocytes were easily recovered. When varying concentrations of human AB serum (HuAB) were employed, human monocyte maturation progressed rapidly; the kinetics of this maturation process during cell suspension culture were very similar to the pattern observed following adherence culture. In contrast, when SF medium was employed, a marked retardation of the monocyte maturation process was observed; this could not be attributed to any changes in cell recovery and/or viability. Thus, cells could be maintained in their monocytoid form for 3 days when cultured in SF medium. When HuAB was added after 3 days of culture, human monocyte maturation into macrophages proceeded at a normal rate. We attempted to characterize certain of the serum protein(s) found in HuAB which promoted the monocyte maturation process. Human immunoglobulin G (IgG) was found to be the most potent serum protein in increasing 5'-N activity and decreasing peroxidase activity of suspension cultured monocytes. Immunoglobulin M (IgM) and albumin (Alb) were shown not to have significant monocyte maturation activity. Heat-treated human gamma globulin and IgG purified by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) were shown to have patterns identical with that of untreated HGG and IgG with regard to promoting monocyte maturation; F(ab')2 was not an active maturation promoter, indicating the need for an intact Fc portion of the IgG molecule. Fibrinogen and fibronectin also had maturation promoting activity. Finally, addition of the potent monocyte functional activators, muramyl dipeptide (MDP), polyriboinosinic:polyribocytidilic acid (Poly I:C), and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) had no effect on the monocyte

  20. Human Protein C produces anticoagulation and increased fibrinolytic activity in the cat

    SciTech Connect

    Burdick, M.D.; Schaub, R.G.

    1986-03-05

    The effect of activated human Protein C (PCa) infusion on the coagulation and fibrinolytic systems of the Nembutal anesthetized cat was assessed. Human Protein C was activated by incubation with thrombin or by passage over a column of thrombin immobilized on CNBr Sepharose 4B. Cats were given bolus i.v. injections of either vehicle or PCa in a dose range of 3-16 ..mu..g/mL of calculated whole body volume. Citrated blood samples (9:1) were taken from a femoral vein prior to and at 5, 10, 20, 30, 60, 120, and 180 min. after PCa. Activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), thrombin time (TT) euglobulin clot lysis (ECLT) and I-125 fibrin release (FR) was measured. Vehicle treated cats had no change in any parameter. PCa produced a dose and time dependent prolongation of APTT while TT was unchanged. Anticoagulation was evident immediately after PCa infusion and began to normalize within 20 min. Fibrinolytic activity measured by ECLT and FR was also stimulated by PCa but was not evident until 40-60 minutes after PCa injection. The results show that human PCa induces anticoagulation effects in the cat similar to other species. However, stimulation of fibrinolysis requires a longer period of time before expression. This delay of fibrinolytic stimulation should be considered when assessing the effects of human Protein C in other species.

  1. Activation of human natural killer cells by the soluble form of cellular prion protein.

    PubMed

    Seong, Yeon-Jae; Sung, Pil Soo; Jang, Young-Soon; Choi, Young Joon; Park, Bum-Chan; Park, Su-Hyung; Park, Young Woo; Shin, Eui-Cheol

    2015-08-21

    Cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) is widely expressed in various cell types, including cells of the immune system. However, the specific roles of PrP(C) in the immune system have not been clearly elucidated. In the present study, we investigated the effects of a soluble form of recombinant PrP(C) protein on human natural killer (NK) cells. Recombinant soluble PrP(C) protein was generated by fusion of human PrP(C) with the Fc portion of human IgG1 (PrP(C)-Fc). PrP(C)-Fc binds to the surface of human NK cells, particularly to CD56(dim) NK cells. PrP(C)-Fc induced the production of cytokines and chemokines and the degranulation of granzyme B from NK cells. In addition, PrP(C)-Fc facilitated the IL-15-induced proliferation of NK cells. PrP(C)-Fc induced phosphorylation of ERK-1/2 and JNK in NK cells, and inhibitors of the ERK or the JNK pathways abrogated PrP(C)-Fc-induced cytokine production in NK cells. In conclusion, the soluble form of recombinant PrP(C)-Fc protein activates human NK cells via the ERK and JNK signaling pathways.

  2. Both protein kinase A and exchange protein activated by cAMP coordinate adhesion of human vascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Netherton, Stuart J; Sutton, Jayda A; Wilson, Lindsay S; Carter, Rhonda L; Maurice, Donald H

    2007-10-12

    cAMP regulates integrin-dependent adhesions of vascular endothelial cells (VECs) to extracellular matrix proteins, their vascular endothelial cadherin-dependent intercellular adhesions, and their proliferation and migration in response to growth and chemotactic factors. Previously, we reported that cAMP-elevating agents differentially inhibited migration of human VECs isolated from large vascular structures (macro-VECs, human aortic endothelial cells [HAECs]) or small vascular structures (micro-VECs, human microvascular endothelial cells [HMVECs]) and that cAMP hydrolysis by phosphodiesterase (PDE)3 and PDE4 enzymes was important in coordinating this difference. Here we report that 2 cAMP-effector enzymes, namely protein kinase (PK)A and exchange protein activated by cAMP (EPAC), each regulate extracellular matrix protein-based adhesions of both macro- and micro-VECs. Of interest and potential therapeutic importance, we report that although specific pharmacological activation of EPAC markedly stimulated adhesion of micro-VECs to extracellular matrix proteins when PKA was inhibited, this treatment only modestly promoted adhesion of macro-VECs. Consistent with an important role for cAMP PDEs in this difference, PDE3 or PDE4 inhibitors promoted EPAC-dependent adhesions in micro-VECs when PKA was inhibited but not in macro-VECs. At a molecular level, we identify multiple, nonoverlapping, PKA- or EPAC-based signaling protein complexes in both macro- and micro-VECs and demonstrate that each of these complexes contains either PDE3B or PDE4D but not both of these PDEs. Taken together, our data support the concept that adhesion of macro- and micro-VECs is differentially regulated by cAMP and that these differences are coordinated through selective actions of cAMP at multiple nonoverlapping signaling complexes that contain PKA or EPAC and distinct PDE variants.

  3. Farnesoid X Receptor Inhibits the Transcriptional Activity of Carbohydrate Response Element Binding Protein in Human Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Caron, Sandrine; Huaman Samanez, Carolina; Dehondt, Hélène; Ploton, Maheul; Briand, Olivier; Lien, Fleur; Dorchies, Emilie; Dumont, Julie; Postic, Catherine; Cariou, Bertrand; Lefebvre, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    The glucose-activated transcription factor carbohydrate response element binding protein (ChREBP) induces the expression of hepatic glycolytic and lipogenic genes. The farnesoid X receptor (FXR) is a nuclear bile acid receptor controlling bile acid, lipid, and glucose homeostasis. FXR negatively regulates hepatic glycolysis and lipogenesis in mouse liver. The aim of this study was to determine whether FXR regulates the transcriptional activity of ChREBP in human hepatocytes and to unravel the underlying molecular mechanisms. Agonist-activated FXR inhibits glucose-induced transcription of several glycolytic genes, including the liver-type pyruvate kinase gene (L-PK), in the immortalized human hepatocyte (IHH) and HepaRG cell lines. This inhibition requires the L4L3 region of the L-PK promoter, known to bind the transcription factors ChREBP and hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α (HNF4α). FXR interacts directly with ChREBP and HNF4α proteins. Analysis of the protein complex bound to the L4L3 region reveals the presence of ChREBP, HNF4α, FXR, and the transcriptional coactivators p300 and CBP at high glucose concentrations. FXR activation does not affect either FXR or HNF4α binding to the L4L3 region but does result in the concomitant release of ChREBP, p300, and CBP and in the recruitment of the transcriptional corepressor SMRT. Thus, FXR transrepresses the expression of genes involved in glycolysis in human hepatocytes. PMID:23530060

  4. Human Endogenous Retrovirus Protein Activates Innate Immunity and Promotes Experimental Allergic Encephalomyelitis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Perron, Hervé; Dougier-Reynaud, Hei-Lanne; Lomparski, Christina; Popa, Iuliana; Firouzi, Reza; Bertrand, Jean-Baptiste; Marusic, Suzana; Portoukalian, Jacques; Jouvin-Marche, Evelyne; Villiers, Christian L.; Touraine, Jean-Louis; Marche, Patrice N.

    2013-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a complex multifactorial disease of the central nervous system (CNS) for which animal models have mainly addressed downstream immunopathology but not potential inducers of autoimmunity. In the absence of a pathogen known to cause neuroinflammation in MS, Mycobacterial lysate is commonly used in the form of complete Freund's adjuvant to induce autoimmunity to myelin proteins in Experimental Allergic Encephalomyelitis (EAE), an animal model for MS. The present study demonstrates that a protein from the human endogenous retrovirus HERV-W family (MSRV-Env) can be used instead of mycobacterial lysate to induce autoimmunity and EAE in mice injected with MOG, with typical anti-myelin response and CNS lesions normally seen in this model. MSRV-Env was shown to induce proinflammatory response in human macrophage cells through TLR4 activation pathway. The present results demonstrate a similar activation of murine dendritic cells and show the ability of MSRV-Env to trigger EAE in mice. In previous studies, MSRV-Env protein was reproducibly detected in MS brain lesions within microglia and perivascular macrophages. The present results are therefore likely to provide a model for MS, in which the upstream adjuvant triggering neuroinflammation is the one detected in MS active lesions. This model now allows pre-clinical studies with therapeutic agents targeting this endogenous retroviral protein in MS. PMID:24324591

  5. Thrombopoietin potentiates agonist-stimulated activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase in human platelets.

    PubMed

    Ezumi, Y; Nishida, E; Uchiyama, T; Takayama, H

    1999-07-22

    Thrombopoietin (TPO) plays a crucial role in megakaryocyte differentiation and platelet production. c-Mpl, a receptor for TPO, is also expressed in terminally differentiated platelets. We investigated the effects of TPO on activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase in human platelets. Thrombin, a thrombin receptor agonist peptide, a thromboxane A(2) analogue, collagen, crosslinking the glycoprotein VI, ADP, and epinephrine, but not phorbol 12, 13-dibutyrate activated p38. TPO did not activate p38 by itself, whereas TPO pretreatment potentiated the agonist-induced activation of p38. TPO did not promote phosphorylation of Hsp27 and cytosolic phospholipase A(2) by itself, but enhanced thrombin-induced phosphorylation of them. The specific p38 inhibitor SB203580 strongly inhibited such phosphorylation. Thus, TPO possesses the priming effect on p38 activation in human platelets and could affect platelet functions through the p38 pathway.

  6. Small molecule adenosine 5'-monophosphate activated protein kinase (AMPK) modulators and human diseases.

    PubMed

    Rana, Sandeep; Blowers, Elizabeth C; Natarajan, Amarnath

    2015-01-08

    Adenosine 5'-monophosphate activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a master sensor of cellular energy status that plays a key role in the regulation of whole-body energy homeostasis. AMPK is a serine/threonine kinase that is activated by upstream kinases LKB1, CaMKKβ, and Tak1, among others. AMPK exists as αβγ trimeric complexes that are allosterically regulated by AMP, ADP, and ATP. Dysregulation of AMPK has been implicated in a number of metabolic diseases including type 2 diabetes mellitus and obesity. Recent studies have associated roles of AMPK with the development of cancer and neurological disorders, making it a potential therapeutic target to treat human diseases. This review focuses on the structure and function of AMPK, its role in human diseases, and its direct substrates and provides a brief synopsis of key AMPK modulators and their relevance in human diseases.

  7. Proteome-wide analysis of nonsynonymous single-nucleotide variations in active sites of human proteins.

    PubMed

    Dingerdissen, Hayley; Motwani, Mona; Karagiannis, Konstantinos; Simonyan, Vahan; Mazumder, Raja

    2013-03-01

    An enzyme's active site is essential to normal protein activity such that any disruptions at this site may lead to dysfunction and disease. Nonsynonymous single-nucleotide variations (nsSNVs), which alter the amino acid sequence, are one type of disruption that can alter the active site. When this occurs, it is assumed that enzyme activity will vary because of the criticality of the site to normal protein function. We integrate nsSNV data and active site annotations from curated resources to identify all active-site-impacting nsSNVs in the human genome and search for all pathways observed to be associated with this data set to assess the likely consequences. We find that there are 934 unique nsSNVs that occur at the active sites of 559 proteins. Analysis of the nsSNV data shows an over-representation of arginine and an under-representation of cysteine, phenylalanine and tyrosine when comparing the list of nsSNV-impacted active site residues with the list of all possible proteomic active site residues, implying a potential bias for or against variation of these residues at the active site. Clustering analysis shows an abundance of hydrolases and transferases. Pathway and functional analysis shows several pathways over- or under-represented in the data set, with the most significantly affected pathways involved in carbohydrate metabolism. We provide a table of 32 variation-substrate/product pairs that can be used in targeted metabolomics experiments to assay the effects of specific variations. In addition, we report the significant prevalence of aspartic acid to histidine variation in eight proteins associated with nine diseases including glycogen storage diseases, lacrimo-auriculo-dento-digital syndrome, Parkinson's disease and several cancers.

  8. Expression and purification of active recombinant human bone morphogenetic 7-2 dimer fusion protein.

    PubMed

    Dang, Jianli; Jing, Lei; Shi, Weiwei; Qin, Ping; Li, Yuyin; Diao, Aipo

    2015-11-01

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) have been applied in bone regeneration therapy due to their significant osteogenic activity, however, the complicated processing and high cost in producing recombinant BMP have limited their use in the clinic. In this study, we have developed a simple method to prepare recombinant human BMP7-BMP2 fusion protein with a flexible peptide linker (rhBMP7-2). The rhBMP7-2 protein is expressed efficiently in Escherichia coli, and the denatured protein purified by anion exchange chromatography then refolded by dialysis. The yield was about 6.8 mg per gram of wet cell weight. The bioactivity of re-folded rhBMP7-2 was measured by alkaline phosphatase assay and alizarin red staining using both C2C12 and MC3T3-E1 cells, and also using the rat subcutaneous ectopic bone formation model. High level osteogenic activity was found in all the assays tested demonstrating the production of corrected folded and active rhBMP7-2 protein.

  9. Residual endotoxin contaminations in recombinant proteins are sufficient to activate human CD1c+ dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Harald; Schmittner, Maria; Duschl, Albert; Horejs-Hoeck, Jutta

    2014-01-01

    Many commercially available recombinant proteins are produced in Escherichia coli, and most suppliers guarantee contamination levels of less than 1 endotoxin unit (EU). When we analysed commercially available proteins for their endotoxin content, we found contamination levels in the same range as generally stated in the data sheets, but also some that were higher. To analyse whether these low levels of contamination have an effect on immune cells, we stimulated the monocytic cell line THP-1, primary human monocytes, in vitro differentiated human monocyte-derived dendritic cells, and primary human CD1c+ dendritic cells (DCs) with very low concentrations of lipopolysaccharide (LPS; ranging from 0.002-2 ng/ml). We show that CD1c+ DCs especially can be activated by minimal amounts of LPS, equivalent to the levels of endotoxin contamination we detected in some commercially available proteins. Notably, the enhanced endotoxin sensitivity of CD1c+ DCs was closely correlated with high CD14 expression levels observed in CD1c+ DCs that had been maintained in cell culture medium for 24 hours. When working with cells that are particularly sensitive to LPS, even low endotoxin contamination may generate erroneous data. We therefore recommend that recombinant proteins be thoroughly screened for endotoxin contamination using the limulus amebocyte lysate test, fluorescence-based assays, or a luciferase based NF-κB reporter assay involving highly LPS-sensitive cells overexpressing TLR4, MD-2 and CD14.

  10. The HERV-K Human Endogenous Retrovirus Envelope Protein Antagonizes Tetherin Antiviral Activity

    PubMed Central

    Lemaître, Cécile; Harper, Francis; Pierron, Gérard

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Endogenous retroviruses are the remnants of past retroviral infections that are scattered within mammalian genomes. In humans, most of these elements are old degenerate sequences that have lost their coding properties. The HERV-K(HML2) family is an exception: it recently amplified in the human genome and corresponds to the most active proviruses, with some intact open reading frames and the potential to encode viral particles. Here, using a reconstructed consensus element, we show that HERV-K(HML2) proviruses are able to inhibit Tetherin, a cellular restriction factor that is active against most enveloped viruses and acts by keeping the viral particles attached to the cell surface. More precisely, we identify the Envelope protein (Env) as the viral effector active against Tetherin. Through immunoprecipitation experiments, we show that the recognition of Tetherin is mediated by the surface subunit of Env. Similar to Ebola glycoprotein, HERV-K(HML2) Env does not mediate Tetherin degradation or cell surface removal; therefore, it uses a yet-undescribed mechanism to inactivate Tetherin. We also assessed all natural complete alleles of endogenous HERV-K(HML2) Env described to date for their ability to inhibit Tetherin and found that two of them (out of six) can block Tetherin restriction. However, due to their recent amplification, HERV-K(HML2) elements are extremely polymorphic in the human population, and it is likely that individuals will not all possess the same anti-Tetherin potential. Because of Tetherin's role as a restriction factor capable of inducing innate immune responses, this could have functional consequences for individual responses to infection. IMPORTANCE Tetherin, a cellular protein initially characterized for its role against HIV-1, has been proven to counteract numerous enveloped viruses. It blocks the release of viral particles from producer cells, keeping them tethered to the cell surface. Several viruses have developed strategies to

  11. Human papillomavirus type 16 E7 up-regulates AKT activity through the retinoblastoma protein.

    PubMed

    Menges, Craig W; Baglia, Laurel A; Lapoint, Randi; McCance, Dennis J

    2006-06-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPV) are small DNA tumor viruses causally associated with cervical cancer. The early gene product E7 from high-risk HPV is considered the major transforming protein expressed by the virus. Although many functions have been described for E7 in disrupting normal cellular processes, we describe in this study a new cellular target in primary human foreskin keratinocytes (HFK), the serine/threonine kinase AKT. Expression of HPV type 16 E7 in HFK caused inhibition of differentiation, hyperproliferation, and up-regulation of AKT activity in organotypic raft cultures. The ability of E7 to up-regulate AKT activity is dependent on its ability to bind to and inactivate the retinoblastoma (Rb) gene product family of proteins. Furthermore, we show that knocking down Rb alone, with short hairpin RNAs, was sufficient to up-regulate AKT activity in differentiated keratinocytes. Up-regulation of AKT activity and loss of Rb was also observed in HPV-positive cervical high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions when compared with normal cervical tissue. Together, these data provide evidence linking inactivation of Rb by E7 in the up-regulation of AKT activity during cervical cancer progression.

  12. Recombinant Ad35 adenoviral proteins as potent modulators of human T-cell activation

    PubMed Central

    Hay, Joanne; Carter, Darrick; Lieber, André; Astier, Anne L

    2015-01-01

    The protein CD46 protects cells from complement attack by regulating cleavage of C3b and C3d. CD46 also regulates the adaptive immune response by controlling T-cell activation and differentiation. Co-engagement of the T-cell receptor and CD46 notably drives T-cell differentiation by switching production of interferon-γ to secretion of anti-inflammatory interleukin-10. This regulatory pathway is altered in several chronic inflammatory diseases, highlighting its key role for immune homeostasis. The manipulation of the CD46 pathway may therefore provide a powerful means to regulate immune responses. Herein, we investigated the effect of recombinant proteins derived from the fibre knob of the adenovirus serotype 35 (Ad35) that uses CD46 as its entry receptor, on human T-cell activation. We compared the effects of Ad35K++, engineered to exhibit enhanced affinity to CD46, and of Ad35K−, mutated in the binding site for CD46. Ad35K++ profoundly affects T-cell activation by decreasing the levels of CD46 at the surface of primary T cells, and impairing T-cell co-activation, shown by decreased CD25 expression, reduced proliferation and lower secretion of interleukin-10 and interferon-γ. In contrast, Ad35K− acts a potent co-activator of T cells, enhancing T-cell proliferation and cytokine production. These data show that recombinant Ad35 proteins are potent modulators of human T-cell activation, and support their further development as potential drugs targeting T-cell responses. PMID:25251258

  13. Human pancreatic cancer tumors are nutrient poor and tumor cells actively scavenge extracellular protein.

    PubMed

    Kamphorst, Jurre J; Nofal, Michel; Commisso, Cosimo; Hackett, Sean R; Lu, Wenyun; Grabocka, Elda; Vander Heiden, Matthew G; Miller, George; Drebin, Jeffrey A; Bar-Sagi, Dafna; Thompson, Craig B; Rabinowitz, Joshua D

    2015-02-01

    Glucose and amino acids are key nutrients supporting cell growth. Amino acids are imported as monomers, but an alternative route induced by oncogenic KRAS involves uptake of extracellular proteins via macropinocytosis and subsequent lysosomal degradation of these proteins as a source of amino acids. In this study, we examined the metabolism of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), a poorly vascularized lethal KRAS-driven malignancy. Metabolomic comparisons of human PDAC and benign adjacent tissue revealed that tumor tissue was low in glucose, upper glycolytic intermediates, creatine phosphate, and the amino acids glutamine and serine, two major metabolic substrates. Surprisingly, PDAC accumulated essential amino acids. Such accumulation could arise from extracellular proteins being degraded through macropinocytosis in quantities necessary to meet glutamine requirements, which in turn produces excess of most other amino acids. Consistent with this hypothesis, active macropinocytosis is observed in primary human PDAC specimens. Moreover, in the presence of physiologic albumin, we found that cultured murine PDAC cells grow indefinitely in media lacking single essential amino acids and replicate once in the absence of free amino acids. Growth under these conditions was characterized by simultaneous glutamine depletion and essential amino acid accumulation. Overall, our findings argue that the scavenging of extracellular proteins is an important mode of nutrient uptake in PDAC.

  14. Human pancreatic cancer tumors are nutrient poor and tumor cells actively scavenge extracellular protein

    PubMed Central

    Kamphorst, Jurre J.; Nofal, Michel; Commisso, Cosimo; Hackett, Sean R.; Lu, Wenyun; Grabocka, Elda; Vander Heiden, Matthew G.; Miller, George; Drebin, Jeffrey A.; Bar-Sagi, Dafna; Thompson, Craig B.; Rabinowitz, Joshua D.

    2014-01-01

    Glucose and amino acids are key nutrients supporting cell growth. Amino acids are imported as monomers, but an alternative route induced by oncogenic KRAS involves uptake of extracellular proteins via macropinocytosis and subsequent lysosomal degradation of these proteins as a source of amino acids. In this study, we examined the metabolism of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), a poorly vascularized lethal KRAS-driven malignancy. Metabolomic comparisons of human PDAC and benign adjacent tissue revealed that tumor tissue was low in glucose, upper glycolytic intermediates, creatine phosphate and the amino acids glutamine and serine, two major metabolic substrates. Surprisingly, PDAC accumulated essential amino acids. Such accumulation could arise from extracellular proteins being degraded through macropinocytosis in quantities necessary to meet glutamine requirements, which in turn produces excess of most other amino acids. Consistent with this hypothesis, active macropinocytosis is observed in primary human PDAC specimens. Moreover, in the presence of physiological albumin, we found that cultured murine PDAC cells grow indefinitely in media lacking single essential amino acids, and replicate once in the absence of free amino acids. Growth under these conditions was characterized by simultaneous glutamine depletion and essential amino acid accumulation. Overall, our findings argue that the scavenging of extracellular proteins is an important mode of nutrient uptake in PDAC. PMID:25644265

  15. INHIBITION OF PROTEIN TYROSINE PHOSPHATASE ACTIVITY MEDIATES EPIDERMAL GROWTH FACTOR RECEPTOR SIGNALING IN HUMAN AIRWAY EPITHELIAL CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Epidemiological studies have implicated zinc in the toxicity of ambient particulate matter (PM) inhalation. We previously showed that exposure to metal-laden PM inhibits protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) activity in human primary bronchial epithelial cells (HAEC) and leads t...

  16. Zinc differentially regulates mitogen-activated protein kinases in human T cells.

    PubMed

    Hönscheid, Andrea; Dubben, Svenja; Rink, Lothar; Haase, Hajo

    2012-01-01

    Zinc is an essential nutrient with remarkable importance for immunity, in particular for T-cell function. This is, at least in part, based on an involvement of zinc ions in immune cell signal transduction; dynamic changes of the intracellular free zinc concentration have recently been recognized as signaling events. Because the molecular targets of zinc signals remain incompletely understood, we investigated the impact of elevated intracellular free zinc on mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activity and MAPK-dependent cytokine production in human T-cells. p38 was activated by treatment with zinc and the ionophore pyrithione, whereas ERK1/2 and c-Jun N-terminal kinases were unaffected. In contrast, after T-cell receptor stimulation with antibodies against CD3, ERK1/2-phosphorylation was selectively suppressed by intracellular zinc. Mechanisms that had been shown to mediate zinc-effects in other cells, such as activation of the Src kinase Lck, inhibition of the protein tyrosine phosphatase CD45 or MAPK phosphatases and cyclic nucleotide/protein kinase A signaling were not involved. This indicates that the differential impact of zinc on the MAPK families in T-cells is mediated by mechanisms that differ from the ones observed in other cell types. Further investigation of the activation of p38 by zinc demonstrated that this MAPK is responsible for the zinc-mediated activation of CREB and mRNA expression of the Th1 cytokines interferon-gamma and interleukin-2. In conclusion, regulation of MAPK activity contributes to the impact of zinc on T-cell function.

  17. Human eosinophil cationic protein. Molecular cloning of a cytotoxin and helminthotoxin with ribonuclease activity

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    We have isolated a 725-bp full-length cDNA clone for the human eosinophil cationic protein (ECP). ECP is a small, basic protein found in the matrix of the eosinophil's large specific granule that has cytotoxic, helminthotoxic, and ribonuclease activity, and is a member of the ribonuclease multigene family. The cDNA sequence shows 89% sequence identity with that reported for the related granule protein, eosinophil-derived neurotoxin (EDN). The open reading frame encodes a previously unidentified 27-amino acid leader sequence preceding a 133- residue mature ECP polypeptide with a molecular mass of 15.6 kD. The encoded amino acid sequence of ECP shows 66% identity to that of EDN and 31% identity to that of human pancreatic ribonuclease, including conservation of the essential structural cysteine and cataytic lysine and histidine residues. mRNA for ECP was detected in eosinophil- enriched peripheral granulocytes and in a subclone of the promyelocytic leukemia line, HL-60, induced toward eosinophilic differentiation with IL-5. No ECP mRNA was detected in uninduced HL-60 cells, or in HL-60 cells induced toward monocytic differentiation with vitamin D3 or toward neutrophilic differentiation with DMSO. In contrast, mRNA for EDN was detected in uninduced HL-60 cells and was upregulated in HL-60 cells induced with DMSO. Despite similarities in sequence and cellular localization, these results suggest that ECP and EDN are subject to different regulatory mechanisms. PMID:2473157

  18. Quantitation of fibroblast activation protein (FAP)-specific protease activity in mouse, baboon and human fluids and organs.

    PubMed

    Keane, Fiona M; Yao, Tsun-Wen; Seelk, Stefanie; Gall, Margaret G; Chowdhury, Sumaiya; Poplawski, Sarah E; Lai, Jack H; Li, Youhua; Wu, Wengen; Farrell, Penny; Vieira de Ribeiro, Ana Julia; Osborne, Brenna; Yu, Denise M T; Seth, Devanshi; Rahman, Khairunnessa; Haber, Paul; Topaloglu, A Kemal; Wang, Chuanmin; Thomson, Sally; Hennessy, Annemarie; Prins, John; Twigg, Stephen M; McLennan, Susan V; McCaughan, Geoffrey W; Bachovchin, William W; Gorrell, Mark D

    2013-01-01

    The protease fibroblast activation protein (FAP) is a specific marker of activated mesenchymal cells in tumour stroma and fibrotic liver. A specific, reliable FAP enzyme assay has been lacking. FAP's unique and restricted cleavage of the post proline bond was exploited to generate a new specific substrate to quantify FAP enzyme activity. This sensitive assay detected no FAP activity in any tissue or fluid of FAP gene knockout mice, thus confirming assay specificity. Circulating FAP activity was ∼20- and 1.3-fold less in baboon than in mouse and human plasma, respectively. Serum and plasma contained comparable FAP activity. In mice, the highest levels of FAP activity were in uterus, pancreas, submaxillary gland and skin, whereas the lowest levels were in brain, prostate, leukocytes and testis. Baboon organs high in FAP activity included skin, epididymis, bladder, colon, adipose tissue, nerve and tongue. FAP activity was greatly elevated in tumours and associated lymph nodes and in fungal-infected skin of unhealthy baboons. FAP activity was 14- to 18-fold greater in cirrhotic than in non-diseased human liver, and circulating FAP activity was almost doubled in alcoholic cirrhosis. Parallel DPP4 measurements concorded with the literature, except for the novel finding of high DPP4 activity in bile. The new FAP enzyme assay is the first to be thoroughly characterised and shows that FAP activity is measurable in most organs and at high levels in some. This new assay is a robust tool for specific quantitation of FAP enzyme activity in both preclinical and clinical samples, particularly liver fibrosis.

  19. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) regulates the insulin-induced activation of the nitric oxide synthase in human platelets.

    PubMed

    Fleming, Ingrid; Schulz, Christian; Fichtlscherer, Birgit; Kemp, Bruce E; Fisslthaler, Beate; Busse, Rudi

    2003-11-01

    Little is known about the signaling cascades that eventually regulate the activity of the endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) in platelets. Here, we investigated the effects of insulin on the phosphorylation and activation of eNOS in washed human platelets and in endothelial cells. Insulin activated the protein kinase Akt in cultured endothelial cells and increased the phosphorylation of eNOS on Ser(1177) but failed to increase endothelial cyclic GMP levels or to elicit the relaxation of endothelium-intact porcine coronary arteries. In platelets, insulin also elicited the activation of Akt as well as the phosphorylation of eNOS and initiated NO production which was associated with increased cyclic GMP levels and the inhibition of thrombin-induced aggregation. The insulin-induced inhibition of aggregation was accompanied by a decreased Ca(2+) response to thrombin and was also prevented by N(omega) nitro-L-arginine. In platelets, but not in endothelial cells, insulin induced the activation of the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a metabolic stress-sensing kinase which was sensitive to the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3-K) inhibitor wortmannin and the AMPK inhibitor iodotubercidin. Moreover, the insulin-mediated inhibition of thrombin-induced aggregation was prevented by iodotubercidin. Insulin-independent activation of the AMPK using 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleoside, increased platelet eNOS phosphorylation, increased cyclic GMP levels and attenuated platelet aggregation. These results highlight the differences in the signal transduction cascade activated by insulin in endothelial cells and platelets, and demonstrate that insulin stimulates the formation of NO in human platelets, in the absence of an increase in Ca(2+), by acti-vating PI3-K and AMPK which phosphorylates eNOS on Ser(1177).

  20. Intrinsic Relative Activities of Opioid Agonists in Activatingproteins and Internalizing Receptor: Differences between Human and Mouse Receptors

    PubMed Central

    DiMattio, Kelly M.; Ehlert, Frederick J.; Liu-Chen, Lee-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Several investigators recently identified biased opioid receptor (KOP receptor) agonists. However, no comprehensive study of the functional selectivity of available KOP receptor agonists at the human and mouse KOP receptors (hKOP receptor and mKOP receptor, respectively) has been published. Here we examined the ability of over 20 KOP receptor agonists to activate G proteins and to internalize the receptor. Clonal neuro-2a mouse neuroblastoma (N2a) cells stably transfected with the hKOP receptor or mKOP receptor were used. We employed agonist-induced [35S]GTPγS binding and KOP receptor internalization as measures of activation of G protein and β-arrestin pathways, respectively. The method of Ehlert and colleagues was used to quantify intrinsic relative activities at G protein activation (RAi−G) and receptor internalization (RAi−I) and the degree of functional selectivity between the two [Log RAi−G − Log RAi−I, RAi−G/RAi−I and bias factor]. The parameter, RAi, represents a relative estimate of agonist affinity for the active receptor state that elicits a given response. The endogenous ligand dynorphin A (1–17) was designated as the balanced ligand with a bias factor of 1. Interestingly, we found that there were species differences in functional selectivity. The most striking differences were for 12-epi-salvinorin A, U69,593, and ICI-199,441. 12-Epi-salvinorin A was highly internalization-biased at the mKOP receptor, but apparently G protein-biased at hKOP receptor. U69,593 was much more internalization-biased at mKOP receptor than hKOP receptor. ICI199,441 showed internalization-biased at the mKOP receptor and G protein-biased at the hKOP receptor. Possible mechanisms for the observed species differences are discussed. PMID:26057692

  1. Differential enzymatic activity of common haplotypic versions of the human acidic Mammalian chitinase protein.

    PubMed

    Seibold, Max A; Reese, Tiffany A; Choudhry, Shweta; Salam, Muhammad T; Beckman, Kenny; Eng, Celeste; Atakilit, Amha; Meade, Kelley; Lenoir, Michael; Watson, H Geoffrey; Thyne, Shannon; Kumar, Rajesh; Weiss, Kevin B; Grammer, Leslie C; Avila, Pedro; Schleimer, Robert P; Fahy, John V; Rodriguez-Santana, Jose; Rodriguez-Cintron, William; Boot, Rolf G; Sheppard, Dean; Gilliland, Frank D; Locksley, Richard M; Burchard, Esteban G

    2009-07-17

    Mouse models have shown the importance of acidic mammalian chitinase activity in settings of chitin exposure and allergic inflammation. However, little is known regarding genetic regulation of AMCase enzymatic activity in human allergic diseases. Resequencing the AMCase gene exons we identified 8 non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms including three novel variants (A290G, G296A, G339T) near the gene area coding for the enzyme active site, all in linkage disequilibrium. AMCase protein isoforms, encoded by two gene-wide haplotypes, and differentiated by these three single nucleotide polymorphisms, were recombinantly expressed and purified. Biochemical analysis revealed the isoform encoded by the variant haplotype displayed a distinct pH profile exhibiting greater retention of chitinase activity at acidic and basic pH values. Determination of absolute kinetic activity found the variant isoform encoded by the variant haplotype was 4-, 2.5-, and 10-fold more active than the wild type AMCase isoform at pH 2.2, 4.6, and 7.0, respectively. Modeling of the AMCase isoforms revealed positional changes in amino acids critical for both pH specificity and substrate binding. Genetic association analyses of AMCase haplotypes for asthma revealed significant protective associations between the variant haplotype in several asthma cohorts. The structural, kinetic, and genetic data regarding the AMCase isoforms are consistent with the Th2-priming effects of environmental chitin and a role for AMCase in negatively regulating this stimulus.

  2. Drugs designed to inhibit human p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase activation treat Toxoplasma gondii and Encephalitozoon cuniculi infection.

    PubMed

    Wei, Shuang; Daniel, Benjamin J; Brumlik, Michael J; Burow, Matthew E; Zou, Weiping; Khan, Imtiaz A; Wadsworth, Scott; Siekierka, John; Curiel, Tyler J

    2007-12-01

    We recently showed that the pyridinylimidazoles SB203580 and SB202190, drugs designed to block human p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activation, also inhibited replication of the medically important intracellular parasite Toxoplasma gondii in cultured human fibroblasts through a direct effect on the parasite. We now show that additional pyridinylimidazole and imidazopyrimidine p38 MAPK inhibitors inhibit intracellular T. gondii replication in vitro and protect mice against fatal T. gondii infection. Mice surviving infection following treatment with p38 MAPK inhibitors were resistant to subsequent T. gondii challenge, demonstrating induction of protective immunity. Thus, drugs originally developed to block human p38 MAPK activation are useful for treating T. gondii infection without inducing significant immunosuppression. MAPK inhibitors combined with either of the approved anti-Toxoplasma drugs sulfadiazine and pyrimethamine resulted in improved survival among mice challenged with a fatal T. gondii inoculum. A MAPK inhibitor also treated mice infected with the Microsporidium parasite Encephalitozoon cuniculi, suggesting that MAPK inhibitors represent a novel class of agents that may have a broad spectrum of antiparasitic activity. Preliminary studies implicate a T. gondii MAPK homologue as the target of drug action, suggesting possibilities for more-selective agents.

  3. Hepatitis B virus X protein activates human hepatic stellate cells through upregulating TGFβ1.

    PubMed

    Chen, H-Y; Chen, Z-X; Huang, R-F; Lin, N; Wang, X-Z

    2014-10-27

    We investigated the effects of the hepatitis B virus X gene (HBV X) on the activation of human hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) and the possible mechanisms underlying the pathway. Recombinant plasmid pHBV-X-IRES2-EGFP was constructed and transfected into HL-7702 cells using a lipid-mediated method. Transfected cells were screened by G418, which detected stable expression of the X gene by reverse transcription (RT)-PCR and Western blot analysis, and named L02/x. Cells not subjected to G418-selection were analyzed to confirm the transient expression of the X gene and named L02/48x. Subsequently, L02/x and L02/48x, together with non-HBx-expressing cells, were co-cultured with HSCs in a non-contact transwell system. After 36 h of co-culture, the proliferation and migration of HSCs was detected using different cell counting methods. Finally, the mRNA and protein levels of α-SMA, Col I, and TGFβ1 in HSCs were detected by real-time PCR and western blot analysis. RT-PCR and Western blot analysis showed that L02/x and L02/48x cells can express HBV X gene mRNA and protein. Additionally, HSCs co-cultured with L02/x or L02/48x cells showed significantly higher proliferation and migration levels than control groups. Real-time PCR and Western blot analysis showed that the mRNA and protein expressions of α-SMA, Col I, and TGFβ1 in HSCs co-cultured with HBx-expressing liver cells were higher than those in control groups. HBx protein activated HSCs in vitro, leading to increased proliferation and migration of HSCs and upregulation of α-SMA and Col I. The TGFβ1 gene may be involved in this pathway.

  4. Barrier-protective effects of activated protein C in human alveolar epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Puig, Ferranda; Fuster, Gemma; Adda, Mélanie; Blanch, Lluís; Farre, Ramon; Navajas, Daniel; Artigas, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) is a clinical manifestation of respiratory failure, caused by lung inflammation and the disruption of the alveolar-capillary barrier. Preservation of the physical integrity of the alveolar epithelial monolayer is of critical importance to prevent alveolar edema. Barrier integrity depends largely on the balance between physical forces on cell-cell and cell-matrix contacts, and this balance might be affected by alterations in the coagulation cascade in patients with ALI. We aimed to study the effects of activated protein C (APC) on mechanical tension and barrier integrity in human alveolar epithelial cells (A549) exposed to thrombin. Cells were pretreated for 3 h with APC (50 µg/ml) or vehicle (control). Subsequently, thrombin (50 nM) or medium was added to the cell culture. APC significantly reduced thrombin-induced cell monolayer permeability, cell stiffening, and cell contraction, measured by electrical impedance, optical magnetic twisting cytometry, and traction microscopy, respectively, suggesting a barrier-protective response. The dynamics of the barrier integrity was also assessed by western blotting and immunofluorescence analysis of the tight junction ZO-1. Thrombin resulted in more elongated ZO-1 aggregates at cell-cell interface areas and induced an increase in ZO-1 membrane protein content. APC attenuated the length of these ZO-1 aggregates and reduced the ZO-1 membrane protein levels induced by thrombin. In conclusion, pretreatment with APC reduced the disruption of barrier integrity induced by thrombin, thus contributing to alveolar epithelial barrier protection.

  5. Platelet-activating factor (PAF)-dependent biochemical, morphologic, and physiologic responses of human platelets: Demonstration of translocation of protein kinase C associated with protein phosphorylation

    SciTech Connect

    Block, L.H.; Abraham, W.M.; Groscurth, P.; Qiao, B.Y.; Perruchoud, A.P. )

    1989-10-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF) is a potent stimulus for platelet aggregation and secretion. PAF has been shown to stimulate the phosphatidylinositol (PI) pathway in platelets, which implies that PAF should activate protein kinase C. In this study, measurements of PI metabolites, the elevation of intracellular free calcium concentration, (Ca2+)i, the activation of protein kinase C, and the phosphorylation of platelet proteins (using a two-dimensional gel electrophoretic technique) were performed before and after the addition of 10(-8) M PAF to human platelets. These findings were correlated with morphologic changes in the platelets as determined by immunoelectron microscopic studies on the cytoskeleton and by X-ray analysis of dense bodies. The results show that PAF stimulates the production of PI metabolites and causes an increase in the membrane-associated activity of protein kinase C. These changes are accompanied by a rise in the (Ca2+)i and protein phosphorylation. The increase in protein kinase C activity reaches a maximum at approximately 60 s, a time frame that is consistent with the protein phosphorylation and the subsequent morphologic and secretory events. X-ray analysis revealed two types of dense bodies containing various amounts of calcium which appeared to be released sequentially after PAF activation. These results suggest that the protein phosphorylation that controls the physiologic events resulting from PAF activation of human platelets is catalyzed by protein kinase C.

  6. Platelet-activating factor (PAF)-dependent biochemical, morphologic, and physiologic responses of human platelets: demonstration of translocation of protein kinase C associated with protein phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Block, L H; Abraham, W M; Groscurth, P; Qiao, B Y; Perruchoud, A P

    1989-10-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF) is a potent stimulus for platelet aggregation and secretion. PAF has been shown to stimulate the phosphatidylinositol (PI) pathway in platelets, which implies that PAF should activate protein kinase C. In this study, measurements of PI metabolites, the elevation of intracellular free calcium concentration, (Ca2+)i, the activation of protein kinase C, and the phosphorylation of platelet proteins (using a two-dimensional gel electrophoretic technique) were performed before and after the addition of 10(-8) M PAF to human platelets. These findings were correlated with morphologic changes in the platelets as determined by immunoelectron microscopic studies on the cytoskeleton and by X-ray analysis of dense bodies. The results show that PAF stimulates the production of PI metabolites and causes an increase in the membrane-associated activity of protein kinase C. These changes are accompanied by a rise in the (Ca2+)i and protein phosphorylation. The increase in protein kinase C activity reaches a maximum at approximately 60 s, a time frame that is consistent with the protein phosphorylation and the subsequent morphologic and secretory events. X-ray analysis revealed two types of dense bodies containing various amounts of calcium which appeared to be released sequentially after PAF activation. These results suggest that the protein phosphorylation that controls the physiologic events resulting from PAF activation of human platelets is catalyzed by protein kinase C.

  7. Multiple protein–protein interactions converging on the Prp38 protein during activation of the human spliceosome

    PubMed Central

    Schütze, Tonio; Ulrich, Alexander K.C.; Apelt, Luise; Will, Cindy L.; Bartlick, Natascha; Seeger, Martin; Weber, Gert; Lührmann, Reinhard; Stelzl, Ulrich; Wahl, Markus C.

    2016-01-01

    Spliceosomal Prp38 proteins contain a conserved amino-terminal domain, but only higher eukaryotic orthologs also harbor a carboxy-terminal RS domain, a hallmark of splicing regulatory SR proteins. We show by crystal structure analysis that the amino-terminal domain of human Prp38 is organized around three pairs of antiparallel α-helices and lacks similarities to RNA-binding domains found in canonical SR proteins. Instead, yeast two-hybrid analyses suggest that the amino-terminal domain is a versatile protein–protein interaction hub that possibly binds 12 other spliceosomal proteins, most of which are recruited at the same stage as Prp38. By quantitative, alanine surface-scanning two-hybrid screens and biochemical analyses we delineated four distinct interfaces on the Prp38 amino-terminal domain. In vitro interaction assays using recombinant proteins showed that Prp38 can bind at least two proteins simultaneously via two different interfaces. Addition of excess Prp38 amino-terminal domain to in vitro splicing assays, but not of an interaction-deficient mutant, stalled splicing at a precatalytic stage. Our results show that human Prp38 is an unusual SR protein, whose amino-terminal domain is a multi-interface protein–protein interaction platform that might organize the relative positioning of other proteins during splicing. PMID:26673105

  8. Characterization of the DNA-unwinding activity of human RECQ1, a helicase specifically stimulated by human replication protein A.

    PubMed

    Cui, Sheng; Klima, Raffaella; Ochem, Alex; Arosio, Daniele; Falaschi, Arturo; Vindigni, Alessandro

    2003-01-17

    The RecQ helicases are involved in several aspects of DNA metabolism. Five members of the RecQ family have been found in humans, but only two of them have been carefully characterized, BLM and WRN. In this work, we describe the enzymatic characterization of RECQ1. The helicase has 3' to 5' polarity, cannot start the unwinding from a blunt-ended terminus, and needs a 3'-single-stranded DNA tail longer than 10 nucleotides to open the substrate. However, it was also able to unwind a blunt-ended duplex DNA with a "bubble" of 25 nucleotides in the middle, as previously observed for WRN and BLM. We show that only short DNA duplexes (<30 bp) can be unwound by RECQ1 alone, but the addition of human replication protein A (hRPA) increases the processivity of the enzyme (>100 bp). Our studies done with Escherichia coli single-strand binding protein (SSB) indicate that the helicase activity of RECQ1 is specifically stimulated by hRPA. This finding suggests that RECQ1 and hRPA may interact also in vivo and function together in DNA metabolism. Comparison of the present results with previous studies on WRN and BLM provides novel insight into the role of the N- and C-terminal domains of these helicases in determining their substrate specificity and in their interaction with hRPA.

  9. Evolutionarily conserved regions of the human c-myc protein can be uncoupled from transforming activity

    SciTech Connect

    Sarid, J.; Halazonetis, T.D.; Murphy, W.; Leder, P.

    1987-01-01

    The myc family of oncogenes contains coding sequences that have been preserved in different species for over 400 million years. This conservation (which implies functional selection) is broadly represented throughout the C-terminal portion of the human c-myc protein but is largely restricted to three cluster of amino acid sequences in the N-terminal region. The authors have examined the role that the latter three regions of the c-myc protein might play in the transforming function of the c-myc gene. Several mutations, deletions and frameshifts, were introduced into the c-myc gene, and these mutant genes were tested for their ability to collaborate with the EJ-ras oncogene to transform rat embryo fibroblasts. Complete elimination of the first two N-terminal conserved segments abolished transforming activity. In contrast, genes altered in a portion of the second or the entire third conserved segment retained their transforming activity. Thus, the latter two segments are not required for the transformation process, suggesting that they serve another function related only to the normal expression of the c-myc gene.

  10. Activity of the Human Rhinovirus 3C Protease Studied in Various Buffers, Additives and Detergents Solutions for Recombinant Protein Production

    PubMed Central

    Tufail, Soban; Ismat, Fouzia; Imran, Muhammad; Iqbal, Mazhar; Mirza, Osman; Rhaman, Moazur

    2016-01-01

    Proteases are widely used to remove affinity and solubility tags from recombinant proteins to avoid potential interference of these tags with the structure and function of the fusion partner. In recent years, great interest has been seen in use of the human rhinovirus 3C protease owing to its stringent sequence specificity and enhanced activity. Like other proteases, activity of the human rhinovirus 3C protease can be affected in part by the buffer components and additives that are generally employed for purification and stabilization of proteins, hence, necessitate their removal by tedious and time-consuming procedures before proteolysis can occur. To address this issue, we examined the effect of elution buffers used for common affinity based purifications, salt ions, stability/solubility and reducing agents, and detergents on the activity of the human rhinovirus 3C protease using three different fusion proteins at 4°C, a temperature of choice for purification of many proteins. The results show that the human rhinovirus 3C protease performs better at 4°C than the frequently used tobacco etch virus protease and its activity was insensitive to most of the experimental conditions tested. Though number of fusion proteins tested is limited, we expect that these finding will facilitate the use of the human rhinovirus 3C protease in recombinant protein production for pharmaceutical and biotechnological applications. PMID:27093053

  11. Activity of the Human Rhinovirus 3C Protease Studied in Various Buffers, Additives and Detergents Solutions for Recombinant Protein Production.

    PubMed

    Ullah, Raheem; Shah, Majid Ali; Tufail, Soban; Ismat, Fouzia; Imran, Muhammad; Iqbal, Mazhar; Mirza, Osman; Rhaman, Moazur

    2016-01-01

    Proteases are widely used to remove affinity and solubility tags from recombinant proteins to avoid potential interference of these tags with the structure and function of the fusion partner. In recent years, great interest has been seen in use of the human rhinovirus 3C protease owing to its stringent sequence specificity and enhanced activity. Like other proteases, activity of the human rhinovirus 3C protease can be affected in part by the buffer components and additives that are generally employed for purification and stabilization of proteins, hence, necessitate their removal by tedious and time-consuming procedures before proteolysis can occur. To address this issue, we examined the effect of elution buffers used for common affinity based purifications, salt ions, stability/solubility and reducing agents, and detergents on the activity of the human rhinovirus 3C protease using three different fusion proteins at 4°C, a temperature of choice for purification of many proteins. The results show that the human rhinovirus 3C protease performs better at 4°C than the frequently used tobacco etch virus protease and its activity was insensitive to most of the experimental conditions tested. Though number of fusion proteins tested is limited, we expect that these finding will facilitate the use of the human rhinovirus 3C protease in recombinant protein production for pharmaceutical and biotechnological applications.

  12. Atorvastatin promotes human monocyte differentiation toward alternative M2 macrophages through p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase-dependent peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ activation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ou; Zhang, Jinying

    2015-05-01

    M1 and M2 macrophages are detectable in human atherosclerotic lesions, and M2 macrophages are present at locations distant from the lipid core in more stable zones of the plaque and appear to exert anti-inflammatory properties on M1 macrophages. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) γ promotes the differentiation of monocytes into anti-inflammatory M2 macrophages. Although both statins and PPARγ ligands have been reported to protect against the progression of atherosclerosis, no data are currently available regarding the implication of statins in the alternative differentiation of human monocytes. In the present study, we hypothesized that atorvastatin may exert novel effects to prime human monocytes toward an anti-inflammatory alternative M2 phenotype. To this aim, we first found that abundant M2 markers were expressed in human circulating monocytes after atorvastatin treatment. Moreover, atorvastatin was able to induce PPARγ expression and activation in human monocytes in vivo and in vitro, resulting in priming primary human monocytes differentiation into M2 macrophages with a more pronounced paracrine anti-inflammatory activity in M1 macrophages. Additional data with molecular approaches revealed that p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) but not extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 activation was involved in atorvastatin-mediated PPARγ activation and enhanced alternative M2 macrophage phenotype. Collectively, our data demonstrated that atorvastatin promotes human monocyte differentiation toward alternative M2 macrophages via p38 MAPK-dependent PPARγ activation.

  13. Human Mitochondrial Protein Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 131 Human Mitochondrial Protein Database (Web, free access)   The Human Mitochondrial Protein Database (HMPDb) provides comprehensive data on mitochondrial and human nuclear encoded proteins involved in mitochondrial biogenesis and function. This database consolidates information from SwissProt, LocusLink, Protein Data Bank (PDB), GenBank, Genome Database (GDB), Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM), Human Mitochondrial Genome Database (mtDB), MITOMAP, Neuromuscular Disease Center and Human 2-D PAGE Databases. This database is intended as a tool not only to aid in studying the mitochondrion but in studying the associated diseases.

  14. Characterization of phosphoproteins and protein kinase activity of virions, noninfectious enveloped particles, and dense bodies of human cytomegalovirus.

    PubMed Central

    Roby, C; Gibson, W

    1986-01-01

    Phosphorylation of the proteins of human cytomegalovirus (CMV) virions, noninfectious enveloped particles (NIEPs), and dense bodies was investigated. Analyses of particles phosphorylated in vivo showed the following. Virions contain three predominant phosphoproteins (i.e., basic phosphoprotein and upper and lower matrix proteins) and at least nine minor phosphorylated species. NIEPs contain all of these and one additional major species, the assembly protein. Dense bodies contain only one (i.e., lower matrix) of the predominant and four of the minor virion phosphoproteins. Two-dimensional (charge-size) separations in denaturing polyacrylamide gels showed that the relative net charges of the predominant phosphorylated species ranged from the basic phosphoprotein to the more neutral upper matrix protein. In vitro assays showed that purified virions of human CMV have an associated protein kinase activity. The activity was detected only after disrupting the envelope; it had a pH optimum of approximately 9 to 9.5 and required a divalent cation, preferring magnesium to manganese. In vitro, this activity catalyzed phosphorylation of the virion proteins observed to be phosphorylated in vivo. Peptide comparisons indicated that the sites phosphorylated in vitro are a subset of those phosphorylated in vivo, underscoring the probable biological relevance of the kinase activity. Casein, phosvitin, and to a minor extent lysine-rich histones served as exogenous phosphate acceptors. Arginine-rich and lysine-rich histones and protamine sulfate, as well as the polyamines spermine and spermidine, stimulated incorporation of phosphate into the endogenous viral proteins. Virions of all human and simian CMV strains tested showed this activity. Analyses of other virus particles, including three intracellular capsid forms (i.e., A, B, and C capsids), NIEPs, and dense bodies, indicated that the active enzyme was not present in the capsid. Rate-velocity sedimentation of disrupted virions

  15. Brominated Flame Retardants, Tetrabromobisphenol A and Hexabromocyclododecane, Activate Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases (MAPKs) in Human Natural Killer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cato, Anita; Celada, Lindsay; Kibakaya, Esther Caroline; Simmons, Nadia; Whalen, Margaret M.

    2014-01-01

    NK cells provide a vital surveillance against virally infected cells, tumor cells, and antibody-coated cells through the release of cytolytic mediators and gamma interferon (IFN-γ). Hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) is a brominated flame retardant used primarily in expanded (EPS) and extruded (XPS) polystyrene foams for thermal insulation in the building and construction industry. Tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA) is used both as a reactive and an additive flame retardant in a variety of materials. HBCD and TBBPA contaminate the environment and are found in human blood samples. In previous studies, we have shown that other environmental contaminants, such as the dibutyltin (DBT) and tributyltin (TBT), decrease NK lytic function by activating mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) in the NK cells. HBCD and TBBPA also interfere with NK cell(s) lytic function. The current study evaluates whether HBCD and/or TBBPA have the capacity to activate MAPKs and MAPK kinases (MAP2Ks). The effects of concentrations of HBCD and TBBPA that inhibited lytic function on the phosphorylation state and total levels of the MAPKs (p44/42, p38, and JNK) and the phosphorylation and total levels of the MAP2Ks (MEK1/2 and MKK3/6) were examined. Results indicate that exposure of human NK cells to 10-0.5 µM HBCD or TBBPA activate MAPKs and MAP2Ks. This HBCD and TBBPA-induced activation of MAPKs may leave them unavailable for activation by virally infected or tumor target cells and thus contributes to the observed decreases in lytic function seen in NK cells exposed to HBCD and TBBPA. PMID:25341744

  16. A Potent, Selective and Cell-active Inhibitor of Human Type I Protein Arginine Methyltransferases

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Hong; Senisterra, Guillermo; Li, Fengling; Butler, Kyle V.; Kaniskan, H. Ümit; Speed, Brandon A.; dela Seña, Carlo; Dong, Aiping; Zeng, Hong; Schapira, Matthieu; Brown, Peter J.; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H.; Barsyte-Lovejoy, Dalia; Liu, Jing; Vedadi, Masoud; Jin, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs) play a crucial role in a variety of biological processes. Overexpression of PRMTs has been implicated in various human diseases including cancer. Consequently, selective small-molecule inhibitors of PRMTs have been pursued by both academia and pharmaceutical industry as chemical tools for testing biological and therapeutic hypotheses. PRMTs are divided into three categories: type I PRMTs which catalyze mono- and asymmetric dimethylation of arginine residues, type II PRMTs which catalyze mono- and symmetric dimethylation of arginine residues, and type III PRMT which catalyzes only monomethylation of arginine residues. Here, we report the discovery of a potent, selective and cell-active inhibitor of human type I PRMTs, MS023, and characterization of this inhibitor in a battery of biochemical, biophysical and cellular assays. MS023 displayed high potency for type I PRMTs including PRMT1, 3, 4, 6 and 8, but was completely inactive against type II and type III PRMTs, protein lysine methyltransferases and DNA methyltransferases. A crystal structure of PRMT6 in complex with MS023 revealed that MS023 binds the substrate binding site. MS023 potently decreased cellular levels of histone arginine asymmetric dimethylation. It also reduced global levels of arginine asymmetric dimethylation and concurrently increased levels of arginine monomethylation and symmetric dimethylation in cells. We also developed MS094, a close analog of MS023, which was inactive in biochemical and cellular assays, as a negative control for chemical biology studies. MS023 and MS094 are useful chemical tools for investigating the role of type I PRMTs in health and disease. PMID:26598975

  17. cAMP and cAMP-dependent protein kinase regulate the human heat shock protein 70 gene promoter activity.

    PubMed

    Choi, H S; Li, B; Lin, Z; Huang, E; Liu, A Y

    1991-06-25

    The theme of this study is an evaluation of the involvement of cAMP and cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) in the regulation of the human heat shock protein (hsp) 70 gene promoter. Expression of a highly specific protein inhibitor of PKA (pRSVPKI) inhibited the basal as well as heat- and cadmium-induced expression of the cotransfected pHBCAT, a human hsp 70 promoter-driven reporter gene; this inhibition was dependent on the amount of pRSVPKI used. The effect of an expression vector of the RI regulatory subunit of PKA, pMTREV, was similar to that of pRSVPKI; pMTREV inhibited both the basal as well as the heat-induced expression of pHBCAT. The specificity of effects of these expression vectors was demonstrated by the lack of effect of a mutant PKI gene and by the unaffected expression of a reference gene (pRSV beta gal) under these conditions. Analysis of the effects of dibutyryl cAMP (1 mM), forskolin (10 microM), and 8-Br-cAMP (1 mM) on the transient expression of pHBCAT showed that these cAMP-elevating agents stimulated the hsp 70 promoter activity, whereas cAMP (1 mM) was without effect. Chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene constructs with truncated or mutated hsp 70 promoter were used to define the cis-acting DNA element(s) that confer this cAMP stimulation; the heat induced (42 degrees C) expression was used as a control. Mutation of the adenovirus transcription factor element (pLSN-40/-26) greatly reduced the basal level of expression; forskolin had little or no effect on this adenovirus transcription factor-minus promoter, although the promoter activity was very heat inducible. The absence of a functional heat shock consensus element (HSE) in the construct pLSPNWT rendered the promoter heat insensitive; this construct was forskolin responsive although the magnitude of this stimulation was reduced when compared with that of a control construct with HSE. These results were corroborated by studies using consensus sequence of ATF (ATFE) and HSE as competitors

  18. Definition of the transcriptional activation domains of three human HOX proteins depends on the DNA-binding context.

    PubMed

    Viganò, M A; Di Rocco, G; Zappavigna, V; Mavilio, F

    1998-11-01

    Hox proteins control developmental patterns and cell differentiation in vertebrates by acting as positive or negative regulators of still unidentified downstream target genes. The homeodomain and other small accessory sequences encode the DNA-protein and protein-protein interaction functions which ultimately dictate target recognition and functional specificity in vivo. The effector domains responsible for either positive or negative interactions with the cell transcriptional machinery are unknown for most Hox proteins, largely due to a lack of physiological targets on which to carry out functional analysis. We report the identification of the transcriptional activation domains of three human Hox proteins, HOXB1, HOXB3, and HOXD9, which interact in vivo with the autoregulatory and cross-regulatory enhancers of the murine Hoxb-1 and human HOXD9 genes. Activation domains have been defined both in a homologous context, i.e., within a HOX protein binding as a monomer or as a HOX-PBX heterodimer to the specific target, and in a heterologous context, after translocation to the yeast Gal4 DNA-binding domain. Transfection analysis indicates that activation domains can be identified in different regions of the three HOX proteins depending on the context in which they interact with the DNA target. These results suggest that Hox proteins may be multifunctional transcriptional regulators, interacting with different cofactors and/or components of the transcriptional machinery depending on the structure of their target regulatory elements.

  19. Sleep Loss Activates Cellular Inflammation and Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription (STAT) Family Proteins in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Irwin, Michael R.; Witarama, Tuff; Caudill, Marissa; Olmstead, Richard; Breen, Elizabeth Crabb

    2014-01-01

    Sleep disturbance and short sleep duration are associated with inflammation and related disorders including cardiovascular disease, arthritis, diabetes mellitus, and certain cancers. This study was undertaken to test the effects of experimental sleep loss on spontaneous cellular inflammation and activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) family proteins, which together promote an inflammatory microenvironment. In 24 healthy adults (16 females; 8 males), spontaneous production of IL-6 and TNF in monocytes and spontaneous intranuclear expression of activated STAT1, STAT3, and STAT5 in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), monocyte-, and lymphocyte populations were measured in the morning after uninterrupted baseline sleep, partial sleep deprivation (PSD, sleep period from 3 a.m. to 7 a.m.), and recovery sleep. Relative to baseline, spontaneous monocytic expression of IL-6 and TNF-α was significantly greater after PSD (P<0.02) and after recovery sleep (P<0.01). Relative to baseline, spontaneous monocytic expression of activated STAT 1 and STAT 5 was significantly greater after recovery sleep (P<0.007P<0.02, respectively) but not STAT 3 (P=0.09). No changes in STAT1, STAT3, or STAT5 were found in lymphocyte populations. Sleep loss induces activation of spontaneous cellular innate immunity and of STAT family proteins, which together map the dynamics of sleep loss on the molecular signaling pathways that regulate inflammatory and other immune responses. Treatments that target short sleep duration have the potential to constrain inflammation and reduce the risk for inflammatory disorders and some cancers in humans. PMID:25451613

  20. TAR RNA binding properties and relative transactivation activities of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 and 2 Tat proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Rhim, H; Rice, A P

    1993-01-01

    Using gel shift assays, we found that the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Tat protein (Tat-1) bound both HIV-1 and HIV-2 TAR RNAs with similar high affinities. In contrast, the HIV-2 Tat protein (Tat-2) bound only TAR-2 RNA with high affinity. We conclude that the weak in vivo activity of Tat-2 on the HIV-1 long terminal repeat that has been observed previously is likely the result of low affinity for TAR-1 RNA. Additionally, TAR-2 RNA was found to contain multiple specific binding sites for Tat proteins. GAL4-Tat fusion proteins were analyzed to compare the relative transactivation activities of Tat-1 and Tat-2 in the absence of requirements for binding to TAR RNAs. The GAL4-Tat-2 protein was found to transactivate synthetic promoters containing GAL4 binding sites at levels severalfold higher than did the GAL4-Tat-1 protein. Images PMID:8419640

  1. Phosphorylation of Human Choline Kinase Beta by Protein Kinase A: Its Impact on Activity and Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Ching Ching; Few, Ling Ling; Konrad, Manfred; See Too, Wei Cun

    2016-01-01

    Choline kinase beta (CKβ) is one of the CK isozymes involved in the biosynthesis of phosphatidylcholine. CKβ is important for normal mitochondrial function and muscle development as the lack of the ckβ gene in human and mice results in the development of muscular dystrophy. In contrast, CKα is implicated in tumorigenesis and has been extensively studied as an anticancer target. Phosphorylation of human CKα was found to regulate the enzyme’s activity and its subcellular location. This study provides evidence for CKβ phosphorylation by protein kinase A (PKA). In vitro phosphorylation of CKβ by PKA was first detected by phosphoprotein staining, as well as by in-gel kinase assays. The phosphorylating kinase was identified as PKA by Western blotting. CKβ phosphorylation by MCF-7 cell lysate was inhibited by a PKA-specific inhibitor peptide, and the intracellular phosphorylation of CKβ was shown to be regulated by the level of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), a PKA activator. Phosphorylation sites were located on CKβ residues serine-39 and serine-40 as determined by mass spectrometry and site-directed mutagenesis. Phosphorylation increased the catalytic efficiencies for the substrates choline and ATP about 2-fold, without affecting ethanolamine phosphorylation, and the S39D/S40D CKβ phosphorylation mimic behaved kinetically very similar. Remarkably, phosphorylation drastically increased the sensitivity of CKβ to hemicholinium-3 (HC-3) inhibition by about 30-fold. These findings suggest that CKβ, in concert with CKα, and depending on its phosphorylation status, might play a critical role as a druggable target in carcinogenesis. PMID:27149373

  2. Salvianolic Acid B Protects Normal Human Dermal Fibroblasts Against Ultraviolet B Irradiation-Induced Photoaging Through Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase and Activator Protein-1 Pathways.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhengwang; Park, Sang-Yong; Hwang, Eunson; Zhang, Mengyang; Jin, Fengxie; Zhang, Baochun; Yi, Tae Hoo

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to ultraviolet (UV) light causes increased matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity and decreased collagen synthesis, leading to skin photoaging. Salvianolic acid B (SAB), a polyphenol, was extracted and purified from salvia miltiorrhiza. We assessed effects of SAB on UVB-induced photoaging and investigated its molecular mechanism of action in UVB-irradiated normal human dermal fibroblasts. Our results show that SAB significantly inhibited the UVB-induced expression of metalloproteinases-1 (MMP-1) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) while promoting the production of type I procollagen and transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1). Moreover, treatment with SAB in the range of 1-100 μg/mL significantly inhibited UVB-induced extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 phosphorylation, which resulted in decreasing UVB-induced phosphorylation of c-Fos and c-Jun. These results indicate that SAB downregulates UV-induced MMP-1 expression by inhibiting Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways and activator protein-1 (AP-1) activation. Our results suggest a potential use for SAB in skin photoprotection.

  3. P-gp Protein Expression and Transport Activity in Rodent Seizure Models and Human Epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Hartz, Anika M S; Pekcec, Anton; Soldner, Emma L B; Zhong, Yu; Schlichtiger, Juli; Bauer, Bjoern

    2017-03-02

    A cure for epilepsy is currently not available, and seizure genesis, seizure recurrence, and resistance to antiseizure drugs remain serious clinical problems. Studies show that the blood-brain barrier is altered in animal models of epilepsy and in epileptic patients. In this regard, seizures increase expression of blood-brain barrier efflux transporters such as P-glycoprotein (P-gp), which is thought to reduce brain uptake of antiseizure drugs, and thus, contribute to antiseizure drug resistance. The goal of the current study was to assess the viability of combining in vivo and ex vivo preparations of isolated brain capillaries from animal models of seizures and epilepsy as well as from patients with epilepsy to study P-gp at the blood-brain barrier. Exposing isolated rat brain capillaries to glutamate ex vivo upregulated P-gp expression to levels that were similar to those in capillaries isolated from rats that had status epilepticus or chronic epilepsy. Moreover, the fold-increase in P-gp protein expression seen in animal models is consistent with the fold-increase in P-gp observed in human brain capillaries isolated from patients with epilepsy compared to age-matched control individuals. Overall, the in vivo/ex vivo approach presented here allows detailed analysis of the mechanisms underlying seizure-induced changes of P-gp expression and transport activity at the blood-brain barrier. This approach can be extended to other blood-brain barrier proteins that might contribute to drug-resistant epilepsy or other CNS disorders as well.

  4. p53 Degradation Activity, Expression, and Subcellular Localization of E6 Proteins from 29 Human Papillomavirus Genotypes

    PubMed Central

    Mesplède, Thibault; Gagnon, David; Bergeron-Labrecque, Fanny; Azar, Ibrahim; Sénéchal, Hélène; Coutlée, François

    2012-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are the etiological agents of cervical cancer and other human malignancies. HPVs are classified into high- and low-risk genotypes according to their association with cancer. Host cell transformation by high-risk HPVs relies in part on the ability of the viral E6 protein to induce the degradation of p53. We report the development of a cellular assay that accurately quantifies the p53 degradation activity of E6 in vivo, based on the fusion of p53 to Renilla luciferase (RLuc-p53). This assay was used to measure the p53 degradation activities of E6 proteins from 29 prevalent HPV types and variants of HPV type 16 (HPV16) and HPV33 by determining the amount of E6 expression vector required to reduce by half the levels of RLuc-p53 (50% effective concentration [EC50]). These studies revealed an unexpected variability in the p53 degradation activities of different E6 proteins, even among active types whose EC50s span more than 2 log units. Differences in activity were greater between types than between variants and did not correlate with differences in the intracellular localization of E6, with most being predominantly nuclear. Protein and mRNA expression of the 29 E6 proteins was also examined. For 16 high-risk types, spliced transcripts that encode shorter E6*I proteins of variable sizes and abundances were detected. Mutation of the splice donor site in five different E6 proteins increased their p53 degradation activity, suggesting that mRNA splicing can limit the activity of some high-risk E6 types. The quantification of p53 degradation in vivo represents a novel tool to systematically compare the oncogenic potentials of E6 proteins from different HPV types and variants. PMID:22013048

  5. The human DNA-activated protein kinase, DNA-PK: Substrate specificity

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, C.W.; Connelly, M.A.; Zhang, H.; Sipley, J.A.; Lees-Miller, S.P.; Lintott, L.G.; Sakaguchi, Kazuyasu; Appella, E.

    1994-11-05

    Although much has been learned about the structure and function of p53 and the probable sequence of subsequent events that lead to cell cycle arrest, little is known about how DNA damage is detected and the nature of the signal that is generated by DNA damage. Circumstantial evidence suggests that protein kinases may be involved. In vitro, human DNA-PK phosphorylates a variety of nuclear DNA-binding, regulatory proteins including the tumor suppressor protein p53, the single-stranded DNA binding protein RPA, the heat shock protein hsp90, the large tumor antigen (TAg) of simian virus 40, a variety of transcription factors including Fos, Jun, serum response factor (SRF), Myc, Sp1, Oct-1, TFIID, E2F, the estrogen receptor, and the large subunit of RNA polymerase II (reviewed in Anderson, 1993; Jackson et al., 1993). However, for most of these proteins, the sites that are phosphorylated by DNA-PK are not known. To determine if the sites that were phosphorylated in vitro also were phosphorylated in vivo and if DNA-PK recognized a preferred protein sequence, the authors identified the sites phosphorylated by DNA-PK in several substrates by direct protein sequence analysis. Each phosphorylated serine or threonine is followed immediately by glutamine in the polypeptide chain; at no other positions are the amino acid residues obviously constrained.

  6. Misfolded proteins activate Factor XII in humans, leading to kallikrein formation without initiating coagulation

    PubMed Central

    Maas, Coen; Govers-Riemslag, José W.P.; Bouma, Barend; Schiks, Bettina; Hazenberg, Bouke P.C.; Lokhorst, Henk M.; Hammarström, Per; ten Cate, Hugo; de Groot, Philip G.; Bouma, Bonno N.; Gebbink, Martijn F.B.G.

    2008-01-01

    When blood is exposed to negatively charged surface materials such as glass, an enzymatic cascade known as the contact system becomes activated. This cascade is initiated by autoactivation of Factor XII and leads to both coagulation (via Factor XI) and an inflammatory response (via the kallikrein-kinin system). However, while Factor XII is important for coagulation in vitro, it is not important for physiological hemostasis, so the physiological role of the contact system remains elusive. Using patient blood samples and isolated proteins, we identified a novel class of Factor XII activators. Factor XII was activated by misfolded protein aggregates that formed by denaturation or by surface adsorption, which specifically led to the activation of the kallikrein-kinin system without inducing coagulation. Consistent with this, we found that Factor XII, but not Factor XI, was activated and kallikrein was formed in blood from patients with systemic amyloidosis, a disease marked by the accumulation and deposition of misfolded plasma proteins. These results show that the kallikrein-kinin system can be activated by Factor XII, in a process separate from the coagulation cascade, and point to a protective role for Factor XII following activation by misfolded protein aggregates. PMID:18725990

  7. Structural characterization and biological activity of recombinant human epidermal growth factor proteins with different N-terminal sequences.

    PubMed

    Svoboda, M; Bauhofer, A; Schwind, P; Bade, E; Rasched, I; Przybylski, M

    1994-05-18

    The primary structures and molecular homogeneity of recombinant human epidermal growth factors from different suppliers were characterized and their biological activities evaluated by a standard DNA synthesis assay. Molecular weight determinations using 252Cf-plasma-desorption and electrospray mass spectrometry in combination with N- and C-terminal sequence analysis and determination of intramolecular disulfide bridges revealed that one recombinant protein had the correct human-identical structure (54 aa residues; 6347 Da). In contrast, a second recombinant protein (7020 Da) was found to contain a pentapeptide (KKYPR) insert following its N-terminal methionine. This structural variant showed a significant reduction in its capacity to stimulate DNA synthesis.

  8. Protein disulfide isomerase inhibition blocks thrombin generation in humans by interfering with platelet factor V activation

    PubMed Central

    Stopa, Jack D.; Neuberg, Donna; Puligandla, Maneka; Furie, Bruce; Zwicker, Jeffrey I.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) is required for thrombus formation. We previously demonstrated that glycosylated quercetin flavonoids such as isoquercetin inhibit PDI activity and thrombus formation in animal models, but whether extracellular PDI represents a viable anticoagulant target in humans and how its inhibition affects blood coagulation remain unknown. METHODS: We evaluated effects of oral administration of isoquercetin on platelet-dependent thrombin generation in healthy subjects and patients with persistently elevated anti-phospholipid antibodies. RESULTS: Following oral administration of 1,000 mg isoquercetin to healthy adults, the measured peak plasma quercetin concentration (9.2 μM) exceeded its IC50 for inhibition of PDI by isoquercetin in vitro (2.5 ± 0.4 μM). Platelet-dependent thrombin generation decreased by 51% in the healthy volunteers compared with baseline (P = 0.0004) and by 64% in the anti-phospholipid antibody cohort (P = 0.015) following isoquercetin ingestion. To understand how PDI affects thrombin generation, we evaluated substrates of PDI identified using an unbiased mechanistic-based substrate trapping approach. These studies identified platelet factor V as a PDI substrate. Isoquercetin blocked both platelet factor Va and thrombin generation with an IC50 of ~5 μM. Inhibition of PDI by isoquercetin ingestion resulted in a 53% decrease in the generation of platelet factor Va (P = 0.001). Isoquercetin-mediated inhibition was reversed with addition of exogenous factor Va. CONCLUSION: These studies show that oral administration of isoquercetin inhibits PDI activity in plasma and diminishes platelet-dependent thrombin generation predominantly by blocking the generation of platelet factor Va. These pharmacodynamic and mechanistic observations represent an important step in the development of a novel class of antithrombotic agents targeting PDI. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Clinicaltrials.gov (NCT01722669) FUNDING: National Heart

  9. A rapid and simple assay for growth hormone-binding protein activity in human plasma.

    PubMed

    Baumann, G; Shaw, M A; Amburn, K

    1988-12-01

    The newly discovered circulating growth hormone binding proteins dictate a re-evaluation of the state of GH in plasma in health and disease as the binding proteins are known to affect GH metabolism and action. We describe a rapid and simple GH-binding assay that allows determination of free and complexed plasma GH, as well as GH-binding protein activity as an index of GH-binding protein levels, with relative ease. The method is based on incubation of plasma with 125I-GH and separation of bound from free GH on small DEAE-cellulose columns; it can be used on a large scale for routine determinations. The results obtained by this method are comparable to those obtained with the previously used slow and more cumbersome gel filtration technique. Initial data obtained in normal subjects and certain disease states show that the bound fraction of plasma GH is similar in men, women and children, is unaffected by pregnancy or acute infection, but is marginally decreased in liver cirrhosis. In acromegaly, binding protein activity also appears normal when allowance is made for partial saturation of the binding proteins by the high prevailing GH levels. The technique we describe should facilitate investigations of normal and abnormal regulation of the GH binding proteins.

  10. Activity and specificity of the human SUV39H2 protein lysine methyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Schuhmacher, Maren Kirstin; Kudithipudi, Srikanth; Kusevic, Denis; Weirich, Sara; Jeltsch, Albert

    2015-01-01

    The SUV39H1 and SUV39H2 enzymes introduce H3K9me3, which is essential for the viability of mammalian cells. It was the aim of the present work to investigate the substrate specificity and product pattern of SUV39H2. Methylation of peptide SPOT arrays showed that SUV39H2 recognizes a long motif on H3 comprising T6-K14, with highly specific readout of R8, S10, T11 and G12 and partial specificity at T6, A7, G13 and K14. Modification of R8 and phosphorylation of S10 or T11 lead to a reduction or loss of SUV39H2 activity towards H3K9. The specificity of SUV39H2 differs from other H3K9 PKMTs, like Dim-5 or G9a, and these biochemical differences can be explained by the structures of the corresponding enzymes. Based on the specificity profile we identified additional non-histone candidate substrates in human proteins, but all of them were only weakly methylated by SUV39H2 at the peptide level. We conclude that SUV39H2 displays a high preference for the methylation of H3. Using the catalytic SET domain we show here that the enzyme prefers H3K9me0 as a substrate over H3K9me1 and H3K9me2 and it introduces the first two methyl groups into H3K9me0 in a processive reaction. SUV39H2 can transfer up to three methyl groups to lysine 9 of histone H3 but the last methylation reaction is much slower than the first two steps. We also demonstrate that the N324K mutant in the SET domain of SUV39H2 that has been shown to cause an inherited nasal skin disease in Labrador Retrievers renders SUV39H2 inactive. Differences in the circular dichroism spectra of wild type and mutant proteins indicated that the mutation causes slight structural changes.

  11. Altered CYP2C9 Activity Following Modulation of CYP3A4 Levels in Human Hepatocytes: an Example of Protein-Protein Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Tweedie, Donald J.; Chan, Tom S.; Tracy, Timothy S.

    2014-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 (P450) protein-protein interactions resulting in modulation of enzyme activities have been well documented using recombinant isoforms. This interaction has been less clearly demonstrated in a more physiologic in vitro system such as human hepatocytes. As an expansion of earlier work (Subramanian et al., 2010), in which recombinant CYP2C9 activity decreased with increasing levels of CYP3A4, the current study modulated CYP3A4 content in human hepatocytes to determine the impact on CYP2C9. Modulation of CYP3A4 levels in situ was enabled by the use of a long-term human hepatocyte culture model (HepatoPac) shown to retain phenotypic hepatocyte function over a number of weeks. The extended period of culture allowed time for knockdown of CYP3A4 protein by small interfering RNA (siRNA) with subsequent recovery, as well as upregulation through induction with a recovery period. CYP3A4 gene silencing resulted in a 60% decrease in CYP3A4 activity and protein levels with a concomitant 74% increase in CYP2C9 activity, with no change in CYP2C9 mRNA levels. Upon removal of siRNA, both CYP2C9 and CYP3A4 activities returned to pre-knockdown levels. Importantly, modulation of CYP3A4 protein levels had no impact on cytochrome P450 reductase activities or levels. However, the possibility for competition for limiting reductase cannot be ruled out. Interestingly, lowering CYP3A4 levels also increased UDP-glucuronosyltransferase 2B7 activity. These studies clearly demonstrate that alterations in CYP3A4 levels can modulate CYP2C9 activity in situ and suggest that further studies are warranted to evaluate the possible clinical consequences of these findings. PMID:25157098

  12. Multi-label ℓ2-regularized logistic regression for predicting activation/inhibition relationships in human protein-protein interaction networks

    PubMed Central

    Mei, Suyu; Zhang, Kun

    2016-01-01

    Protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks are naturally viewed as infrastructure to infer signalling pathways. The descriptors of signal events between two interacting proteins such as upstream/downstream signal flow, activation/inhibition relationship and protein modification are indispensable for inferring signalling pathways from PPI networks. However, such descriptors are not available in most cases as most PPI networks are seldom semantically annotated. In this work, we extend ℓ2-regularized logistic regression to the scenario of multi-label learning for predicting the activation/inhibition relationships in human PPI networks. The phenomenon that both activation and inhibition relationships exist between two interacting proteins is computationally modelled by multi-label learning framework. The problem of GO (gene ontology) sparsity is tackled by introducing the homolog knowledge as independent homolog instances. ℓ2-regularized logistic regression is accordingly adopted here to penalize the homolog noise and to reduce the computational complexity of the double-sized training data. Computational results show that the proposed method achieves satisfactory multi-label learning performance and outperforms the existing phenotype correlation method on the experimental data of Drosophila melanogaster. Several predictions have been validated against recent literature. The predicted activation/inhibition relationships in human PPI networks are provided in the supplementary file for further biomedical research. PMID:27819359

  13. Human pancreas-specific protein disulfide-isomerase (PDIp) can function as a chaperone independently of its enzymatic activity by forming stable complexes with denatured substrate proteins.

    PubMed

    Fu, Xin-Miao; Zhu, Bao Ting

    2010-07-01

    Members of the PDI (protein disulfide-isomerase) family are critical for the correct folding of secretory proteins by catalysing disulfide bond formation as well as by serving as molecular chaperones to prevent protein aggregation. In the present paper, we report that the chaperone activity of the human pancreas-specific PDI homologue (PDIp) is independent of its enzymatic activity on the basis of the following lines of evidence. First, alkylation of PDIp by iodoacetamide fully abolishes its enzymatic activity, whereas it still retains most of its chaperone activity in preventing the aggregation of reduced insulin B chain and denatured GAPDH (glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase). Secondly, mutation of the cysteine residues in PDIp's active sites completely abolishes its enzymatic activity, but does not affect its chaperone activity. Thirdly, the b-b' fragment of PDIp, which does not contain the active sites and is devoid of enzymatic activity, still has chaperone activity. Mechanistically, we found that both the recombinant PDIp expressed in Escherichia coli and the natural PDIp present in human or monkey pancreas can form stable complexes with thermal-denatured substrate proteins independently of their enzymatic activity. The high-molecular-mass soluble complexes between PDIp and GAPDH are formed in a stoichiometric manner (subunit ratio of 1:3.5-4.5), and can dissociate after storage for a certain time. As a proof-of-concept for the biological significance of PDIp in intact cells, we demonstrated that its selective expression in E. coli confers strong protection of these cells against heat shock and oxidative-stress-induced death independently of its enzymatic activity.

  14. Activated Protein C Enhances Human Keratinocyte Barrier Integrity via Sequential Activation of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor and Tie2*

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Meilang; Chow, Shu-Oi; Dervish, Suat; Chan, Yee-Ka Agnes; Julovi, Sohel M.; Jackson, Christopher J.

    2011-01-01

    Keratinocytes play a critical role in maintaining epidermal barrier function. Activated protein C (APC), a natural anticoagulant with anti-inflammatory and endothelial barrier protective properties, significantly increased the barrier impedance of keratinocyte monolayers, measured by electric cell substrate impedance sensing and FITC-dextran flux. In response to APC, Tie2, a tyrosine kinase receptor, was rapidly activated within 30 min, and relocated to cell-cell contacts. APC also increased junction proteins zona occludens, claudin-1 and VE-cadherin. Inhibition of Tie2 by its peptide inhibitor or small interfering RNA abolished the barrier protective effect of APC. Interestingly, APC did not activate Tie2 through its major ligand, angiopoietin-1, but instead acted by binding to endothelial protein C receptor, cleaving protease-activated receptor-1 and transactivating EGF receptor. Furthermore, when activation of Akt, but not ERK, was inhibited, the barrier protective effect of APC on keratinocytes was abolished. Thus, APC activates Tie2, via a mechanism requiring, in sequential order, the receptors, endothelial protein C receptor, protease-activated receptor-1, and EGF receptor, which selectively enhances the PI3K/Akt signaling to enhance junctional complexes and reduce keratinocyte permeability. PMID:21173154

  15. p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase mediates IL-8 induction by the ribotoxin deoxynivalenol in human monocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Islam, Zahidul; Gray, Jennifer S.; Pestka, James J. . E-mail: pestka@msu.edu

    2006-06-15

    The effects of the ribotoxic trichothecene deoxynivalenol (DON) on mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-mediated IL-8 expression were investigated in cloned human monocytes and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). DON (250 to 1000 ng/ml) induced both IL-8 mRNA and IL-8 heteronuclear RNA (hnRNA), an indicator of IL-8 transcription, in the human U937 monocytic cell line in a concentration-dependent manner. Expression of IL-8 hnRNA, mRNA and protein correlated with p38 phosphorylation and was completely abrogated by the p38 MAPK inhibitor SB203580. DON at 500 ng/ml similarly induced p38-dependent IL-8 protein and mRNA expression in PBMC cultures from healthy volunteers. Significantly increased IL-6 and IL-1{beta} intracellular protein and mRNA expression was also observed in PBMC treated with DON (500 ng/ml) which were also partially p38-dependent. Flow cytometry of PBMC revealed that DON-induced p38 phosphorylation varied among individuals relative to both threshold toxin concentrations (25-100 ng/ml) and relative increases in percentages of phospho-p38{sup +} cells. DON-induced p38 activation occurred exclusively in the CD14{sup +} monocyte population. DON was devoid of agonist activity for human Toll-like receptors 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8 and 9. However, two other ribotoxins, emetine and anisomycin, induced p38 phosphorylation in PBMC similarly to DON. Taken together, these data suggest that (1) p38 activation was required for induction of IL-8 and proinflammatory gene expression in the monocyte and (2) DON induced p38 activation in human monocytes via the ribotoxic stress response.

  16. The active gene that encodes human High Mobility Group 1 protein (HMG1) contains introns and maps to chromosome 13

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrari, S.; Finelli, P.; Rocchi, M.

    1996-07-15

    The human genome contains a large number of sequences related to the cDNA for High Mobility Group 1 protein (HMG1), which so far has hampered the cloning and mapping of the active HMG1 gene. We show that the human HMG1 gene contains introns, while the HMG1-related sequences do not and most likely are retrotransposed pseudogenes. We identified eight YACs from the ICI and CEPH libraries that contain the human HMG1 gene. The HMG1 gene is similar in structure to the previously characterized murine homologue and maps to human chromosome 13 and q12, as determined by in situ hybridization. The mouse Hmg1 gene maps to the telomeric region of murine Chromosome 5, which is syntenic to the human 13q12 band. 18 refs., 3 figs.

  17. Cloning and characterization of human IC53-2, a novel CDK5 activator binding protein.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yi Hu; He, Xiang Huo; Tang, Yun Tian; Li, Jin Jun; Pan, Zhi Mei; Qin, Wen Xin; Wan, Da Fang; Gu, Jian Ren

    2003-04-01

    We have identified IC53-2, a human homologue of the rat C53 gene from a human placenta cDNA library (GeneBank Accession No.AF217982). IC53-2 can bind to the CDK5 activator p35 by in vitro association assay. IC53-2 is mapped to human chromosome 17q21.31. The IC53-2 transcript is highly expressed in kidney, liver, skeletal muscle and placenta. It is abundantly expressed in SMMC-7721, C-33A, 3AO, A431 and MCF-7 cancer cell lines by RT-PCR assay. Stable transfection of IC53-2 cDNA into the hepatocellular carcinoma SMMC-7721 cell remarkably stimulates its growth in vitro. The above results indicate that IC53-2 is a novel human gene, which may be involved in the regulation of cell proliferation.

  18. Expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor and CCAAT/enhancer binding protein transcription factors in cultured human sebocytes.

    PubMed

    Chen, WenChieh; Yang, Chao-Chun; Sheu, Hamm-Ming; Seltmann, Holger; Zouboulis, Christos C

    2003-09-01

    Lipid synthesis and accumulation represent a major step in sebocyte differentiation and it may be of importance for sebocytes to express two families of transcription factors, CCAAT/enhancer binding proteins (c/EBPs) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs), which were found to play a crucial role in the differentiation of adipocytes. Using the immortalized human sebaceous gland cell line SZ95 we examined the expression of the molecules before and after treatment with testosterone, 5alpha-dihydrotestosterone, dexamethasone, 17beta-estradiol and genistein, at 6, 12, 24, and 48 h, respectively. Reverse transcription-PCR analysis showed expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors -alpha, -delta, -gamma1, -gamma2 and CCAAT/enhancer binding proteins-alpha, -beta, -gamma-delta in native SZ95 sebocytes. In western blot studies, high levels of CCAAT/enhancer binding proteins-alpha and -beta, and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors-gamma were expressed at 6, 24, and 12 h, respectively. Immunostaining of the cultured sebocytes showed the CCAAT/enhancer binding proteins-alpha and -beta mainly localized within nuclei, whereas peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors-gamma in the cytoplasm. Strong staining of sebocytes was immunohistochemically revealed in the basal layer of sebaceous glands in human scalp and sebaceous nevus. Genistein down-regulated the expression of CCAAT/enhancer binding proteins-alpha and -beta, and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors-gamma on the protein level. Treatment with linoleic acid for 48 h induced further differentiation of sebocytes leading to abundant lipid synthesis.

  19. S-Adenosylmethionine Regulates Dual-Specificity Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Phosphatase Expression in Mouse and Human Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Tomasi, Maria Lauda; Ramani, Komal; Lopitz-Otsoa, Fernando; Rodríguez, Manuel S.; Li, Tony W. H.; Ko, Kwangsuk; Yang, Heping; Bardag-Gorce, Fawzia; Iglesias-Ara, Ainhoa; Feo, Francesco; Pascale, Maria Rosa; Mato, José M.; Lu, Shelly C.

    2010-01-01

    Increased mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activity correlates with a more malignant hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) phenotype. There is a reciprocal regulation between p44/42 MAPK (extracellular signal-regulated kinase [ERK]1/2) and the dual-specificity MAPK phosphatase MKP-1/DUSP1. ERK phosphorylates DUSP1, facilitating its proteasomal degradation, whereas DUSP1 inhibits ERK activity. Methionine adenosyltransferase 1a (Mat1a) knockout (KO) mice express hepatic S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) deficiency and increased ERK activity and develop HCC. The aim of this study was to examine whether DUSP1 expression is regulated by SAM and if so, elucidate the molecular mechanisms. Studies were conducted using Mat1a KO mice livers, cultured mouse and human hepatocytes, and 20S and 26S proteasomes. DUSP1 messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein levels were reduced markedly in livers of Mat1a KO mice and in cultured mouse and human hepatocytes with protein falling to lower levels than mRNA. SAM treatment protected against the fall in DUSP1 mRNA and protein levels in mouse and human hepatocytes. SAM increased DUSP1 transcription, p53 binding to DUSP1 promoter, and stability of its mRNA and protein. Proteasomal chymotrypsin-like and caspase-like activities were increased in Mat1a KO livers and cultured hepatocytes, which was blocked by SAM treatment. SAM inhibited chymotrypsin-like and caspase-like activities by 40% and 70%, respectively, in 20S proteasomes and caused rapid degradation of some of the 26S proteasomal subunits, which was blocked by the proteasome inhibitor MG132. SAM treatment in Mat1a KO mice for 7 days raised SAM, DUSP1, mRNA and protein levels and lowered proteosomal and ERK activities. Conclusion DUSP1 mRNA and protein levels are lower in Mat1a KO livers and fall rapidly in cultured hepatocytes. SAM treatment increases DUSP1 expression through multiple mechanisms, and this may suppress ERK activity and malignant degeneration. PMID:20196119

  20. Reversible Cysteine Acylation Regulates the Activity of Human Palmitoyl-Protein Thioesterase 1 (PPT1)

    PubMed Central

    Segal-Salto, Michal; Sapir, Tamar; Reiner, Orly

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the depalmitoylating enzyme gene, PPT1, cause the infantile form of Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis (NCL), an early onset neurodegenerative disease. During recent years there have been different therapeutic attempts including enzyme replacement. Here we show that PPT1 is palmitoylated in vivo and is a substrate for two palmitoylating enzymes, DHHC3 and DHHC7. The palmitoylated protein is detected in both cell lysates and medium. The presence of PPT1 with palmitoylated signal peptide in the cell medium suggests that a subset of the protein is secreted by a nonconventional mechanism. Using a mutant form of PPT1, C6S, which was not palmitoylated, we further demonstrate that palmitoylation does not affect intracellular localization but rather that the unpalmitoylated form enhanced the depalmitoylation activity of the protein. The calculated Vmax of the enzyme was significantly affected by the palmitoylation, suggesting that the addition of a palmitate group is reminiscent of adding a noncompetitive inhibitor. Thus, we reveal the existence of a positive feedback loop, where palmitoylation of PPT1 results in decreased activity and subsequent elevation in the amount of palmitoylated proteins. This positive feedback loop is likely to initiate a vicious cycle, which will enhance disease progression. The understanding of this process may facilitate enzyme replacement strategies. PMID:26731412

  1. In Vitro Oxidation of Collagen Promotes the Formation of Advanced Oxidation Protein Products and the Activation of Human Neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Bochi, Guilherme Vargas; Torbitz, Vanessa Dorneles; de Campos, Luízi Prestes; Sangoi, Manuela Borges; Fernandes, Natieli Flores; Gomes, Patrícia; Moretto, Maria Beatriz; Barbisan, Fernanda; da Cruz, Ivana Beatrice Mânica; Moresco, Rafael Noal

    2016-04-01

    The accumulation of advanced oxidation protein products (AOPPs) has been linked to several pathological conditions. Here, we investigated collagen as a potential source for AOPP formation and determined the effects of hypochlorous acid (HOCl)-treated collagen (collagen-AOPPs) on human neutrophil activity. We also assessed whether alpha-tocopherol could counteract these effects. Exposure to HOCl increased the levels of collagen-AOPPs. Collagen-AOPPs also stimulated the production of AOPPs, nitric oxide (NO), superoxide radicals (O2(-)), and HOCl by neutrophils. Collagen-AOPPs induced apoptosis and decreased the number of viable cells. Alpha-tocopherol prevented the formation of collagen-AOPPs, strongly inhibited the collagen-AOPP-induced production of O2(-) and HOCl, and increased the viability of neutrophils. Our results suggest that collagen is an important protein that interacts with HOCl to form AOPPs, and consequently, collagen-AOPP formation is related to human neutrophil activation and cell death.

  2. Induced gene expression of the hypusine-containing protein eukaryotic initiation factor 5A in activated human T lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Bevec, D; Klier, H; Holter, W; Tschachler, E; Valent, P; Lottspeich, F; Baumruker, T; Hauber, J

    1994-01-01

    The hypusine-containing protein eukaryotic initiation factor 5A (eIF-5A) is a cellular cofactor critically required for the function of the Rev transactivator protein of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). eIF-5A localizes in the nuclear and cytoplasmic compartments of mammalian cells, suggesting possible activities on the level of regulated mRNA transport and/or protein translation. In this report we show that eIF-5A gene expression is constitutively low but inducible with T-lymphocyte-specific stimuli in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of healthy individuals. In contrast, eIF-5A is constitutively expressed at high levels in human cell lines as well as in various human organs. Comparison of eIF-5A levels in the PBMCs of uninfected and HIV-1-infected donors shows a significant upregulation of eIF-5A gene expression in the PBMCs of HIV-1 patients, compatible with a possible role of eIF-5A in HIV-1 replication during T-cell activation. Images PMID:7971969

  3. Controls of Nuclear Factor-Kappa B Signaling Activity by 5’-AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Activation With Examples in Human Bladder Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin

    2016-01-01

    Generally, both lipopolysaccharide (LPS)- and hypoxia-induced nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) effects are alleviated through differential posttranslational modification of NF-κB phosphorylation after pretreatment with 5´-AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activators such as 5´-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleotide (AICAR) or the hypoglycemic agent metformin. We found that AICAR or metformin acts as a regulator of LPS/NF-κB-or hypoxia/NF-κB-mediated cyclooxygenase induction by an AMPK-dependent mechanism with interactions between p65-NF-κB phosphorylation and acetylation, including in a human bladder cancer cell line (T24). In summary, we highlighted the regulatory interactions of AMPK activity on NF-κB induction, particularly in posttranslational phosphorylation and acetylation of NF-κB under inflammatory conditions or hypoxia environment. PMID:27706018

  4. The roles of AMY1 copies and protein expression in human salivary α-amylase activity.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ze-Min; Lin, Jing; Chen, Long-Hui; Zhang, Min; Chen, Wei-Wen; Yang, Xiao-Rong

    2015-01-01

    Salivary α-amylase (sAA) activity has been extensively investigated in nutrition and psychology. But few studies were performed to assess the role played by sAA gene (AMY1) copies and protein expression in basal and stimulus-induced sAA activity. The sAA activity, amount and AMY1 copy number were determined from 184 saliva samples pre- and post-citric acid stimulation. Our findings showed that citric acid could induce significant increase in sAA activity, total sAA amount, and glycosylated sAA amount, among which the glycosylated sAA amount had the largest response. The correlation analysis showed that AMY1 copy number, total sAA amount and AMY1 copy number×total sAA amount had significantly positive and successively increasing correlations with sAA activity in unstimulated and stimulated saliva, respectively, and furthermore, we observed higher correlations in unstimulated saliva when compared with the corresponding correlations in stimulated saliva. We also observed significant correlations between glycosylated sAA amount and sAA activity in unstimulated and stimulated saliva, respectively. Interestingly, the correlations were higher in stimulated saliva than in unstimulated saliva, and the correlations between glycosylated sAA amount and sAA activity were higher than that of between total sAA amount and sAA activity in stimulated saliva. Moreover, total sAA amount ratio and glycosylated sAA amount ratio showed significantly positive correlation with sAA activity ratio. AMY1 copy number had no correlation with sAA activity ratio. These findings suggested that AMY1 copy number and sAA amount played crucial roles in sAA activity; however, the roles were attenuated after stimulation due to fortified release of glycosylated sAA.

  5. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Integration Protein Expressed in Escherichia Coli Possesses Selective DNA Cleaving Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherman, Paula A.; Fyfe, James A.

    1990-07-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) integration protein, a potential target for selective antiviral therapy, was expressed in Escherichia coli. The purified protein, free of detectable contaminating endonucleases, selectively cleaved double-stranded DNA oligonucleotides that mimic the U3 and the U5 termini of linear HIV DNA. Two nucleotides were removed from the 3' ends of both the U5 plus strand and the U3 minus strand; in both cases, cleavage was adjacent to a conserved CA dinucleotide. The reaction was metal-ion dependent, with a preference for Mn2+ over Mg2+. Reaction selectivity was further demonstrated by the lack of cleavage of an HIV U5 substrate on the complementary (minus) strand, an analogous substrate that mimics the U3 terminus of an avian retrovirus, and an HIV U5 substrate in which the conserved CA dinucleotide was replaced with a TA dinucleotide. Such an integration protein-mediated cleavage reaction is expected to occur as part of the integration event in the retroviral life cycle, in which a double-stranded DNA copy of the viral RNA genome is inserted into the host cell DNA.

  6. Activation of Protein Kinase C and Protein Kinase D in Human Natural Killer Cells: Effects of Tributyltin, Dibutyltin, and Tetrabromobisphenol A

    PubMed Central

    Rana, Krupa; Whalen, Margaret M.

    2015-01-01

    Up to now, the ability of target cells to activate protein kinase C (PKC) and protein kinase D (PKD) (which is often a downstream target of PKC) has not been examined in natural killer (NK) lymphocytes. Here we examined whether exposure of human NK cells to lysis sensitive tumor cells activated PKC and PKD. The results of these studies show for the first time that activation of PKC and PKD occurs in response to target cell binding to NK cells. Exposure of NK cells to K562 tumor cells for 10 and 30 minutes increased phosphorylation/activation of both PKC and PKD by roughly 2 fold. Butyltins (tributyltin (TBT); dibutyltin (DBT)) and brominated compounds (tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA)) are environmental contaminants that are found in human blood. Exposures of NK cells to TBT, DBT or TBBPA decrease NK cell lytic function in part by activating the mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPKs) that are part of the NK lytic pathway. We established that PKC and PKD are part of the lytic pathway upstream of MAPKs and thus we investigated whether DBT, TBT, and TBBPA exposures activated PKC and PKD. TBT activated PKC by 2–3 fold at 10 min at concentrations ranging from 50–300 nM while DBT caused a 1.3 fold activation at 2.5 μM at 10 min. Both TBT and DBT caused an approximately 2 fold increase in phosphorylation/activation of PKC. Exposures to TBBPA caused no statistically significant changes in either PKC or PKD activation. PMID:26228090

  7. Activation of protein kinase C and protein kinase D in human natural killer cells: effects of tributyltin, dibutyltin, and tetrabromobisphenol A.

    PubMed

    Rana, Krupa; Whalen, Margaret

    2015-01-01

    Up to now, the ability of target cells to activate protein kinase C (PKC) and protein kinase D (PKD) (which is often a downstream target of PKC) has not been examined in natural killer (NK) lymphocytes. Here we examined whether exposure of human NK cells to lysis sensitive tumor cells activated PKC and PKD. The results of these studies show for the first time that activation of PKC and PKD occurs in response to target cell binding to NK cells. Exposure of NK cells to K562 tumor cells for 10 and 30 min increased phosphorylation/activation of both PKC and PKD by roughly 2-fold. Butyltins (tributyltin (TBT), dibutyltin (DBT)) and brominated compounds (tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA)) are environmental contaminants that are found in human blood. Exposures of NK cells to TBT, DBT, or TBBPA decrease NK cell lytic function in part by activating the mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) that are part of the NK lytic pathway. We established that PKC and PKD are part of the lytic pathway upstream of MAPKs and thus we investigated whether DBT, TBT, and TBBPA exposures activated PKC and PKD. TBT-activated PKC by 2-3-folds at 10 min at concentrations ranging from 50 to 300 nM while DBT caused a 1.3-fold activation at 2.5 µM at 10 min. Both TBT and DBT caused an approximately 2-fold increase in phosphorylation/activation of PKC. Exposures to TBBPA caused no statistically significant changes in either PKC or PKD activation.

  8. Structural Basis for the Catalytic Activity of Human SER/THR Protein Phosphatase-5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swingle, M. R.; Honkanen, R.; Ciszak, E.

    2004-01-01

    Serinekhreonine protein phosphatase-5 (PP5) affects many signaling networks that regulate cell growth. Here we report the 1.6 Angstrom resolution crystal structure of PP5 catalytic domain with metal and phosphate ions in the active site. The structure reveals a mechanism for PPS-mediated catalysis that requires the precise positioning of two metal ions within a conserved Asp(sup 271)-M(sub 1),-M(sub 2)-His(sup 427)-W(sup 2)-His(sup 304)-Asp(sup 274) catalytic motif, and provides a structural basis for the exceptional catalytic proficiency of protein phosphatases placing them among the most powerful catalysts. Resolution of the entire C-terminus revealed a novel subdomain, and the structure of PP5 should aid development of specific inhibitors.

  9. Complex formation by the human Rad51B and Rad51C DNA repair proteins and their activities in vitro

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lio, Yi-Ching; Mazin, Alexander V.; Kowalczykowski, Stephen C.; Chen, David J.

    2003-01-01

    The human Rad51 protein is essential for DNA repair by homologous recombination. In addition to Rad51 protein, five paralogs have been identified: Rad51B/Rad51L1, Rad51C/Rad51L2, Rad51D/Rad51L3, XRCC2, and XRCC3. To further characterize a subset of these proteins, recombinant Rad51, Rad51B-(His)(6), and Rad51C proteins were individually expressed employing the baculovirus system, and each was purified from Sf9 insect cells. Evidence from nickel-nitrilotriacetic acid pull-down experiments demonstrates a highly stable Rad51B.Rad51C heterodimer, which interacts weakly with Rad51. Rad51B and Rad51C proteins were found to bind single- and double-stranded DNA and to preferentially bind 3'-end-tailed double-stranded DNA. The ability to bind DNA was elevated with mixed Rad51 and Rad51C, as well as with mixed Rad51B and Rad51C, compared with that of the individual protein. In addition, both Rad51B and Rad51C exhibit DNA-stimulated ATPase activity. Rad51C displays an ATP-independent apparent DNA strand exchange activity, whereas Rad51B shows no such activity; this apparent strand exchange ability results actually from a duplex DNA destabilization capability of Rad51C. By analogy to the yeast Rad55 and Rad57, our results suggest that Rad51B and Rad51C function through interactions with the human Rad51 recombinase and play a crucial role in the homologous recombinational repair pathway.

  10. Activator protein-1 (AP-1) signalling in human atherosclerosis: results of a systematic evaluation and intervention study.

    PubMed

    Meijer, C Arnoud; Le Haen, Pum A A; van Dijk, Rogier A; Hira, Mitsuhisa; Hamming, Jaap F; van Bockel, J Hajo; Lindeman, Jan H

    2012-05-01

    Animal studies implicate the AP-1 (activator protein-1) pro-inflammatory pathway as a promising target in the treatment of atherosclerotic disease. It is, however, unclear whether these observations apply to human atherosclerosis. Therefore we evaluated the profile of AP-1 activation through histological analysis and tested the potential benefit of AP-1 inhibition in a clinical trial. AP-1 activation was quantified by phospho-c-Jun nuclear translocation (immunohistochemistry) on a biobank of aortic wall samples from organ donors. The effect of AP-1 inhibition on vascular parameters was tested through a double blind placebo-controlled cross-over study of 28 days doxycycline or placebo in patients with symptomatic peripheral artery disease. Vascular function was assessed by brachial dilation as well as by plasma samples analysed for hs-CRP (high-sensitivity C-reactive protein), IL-6 (interleukin-6), IL-8, ICAM-1 (intercellular adhesion molecule-1), vWF (von Willebrand factor), MCP-1 (monocyte chemoattractant protein-1), PAI-1 (plasminogen activator inhibitor-1) and fibrinogen. Histological evaluation of human atherosclerosis showed minimal AP-1 activation in non-diseased arterial wall (i.e. vessel wall without any signs of atherosclerotic disease). A gradual increase of AP-1 activation was found in non-progressive and progressive phases of atherosclerosis respectively (P<0.044). No significant difference was found between progressive and vulnerable lesions. The expression of phospho-c-Jun diminished as the lesion stabilized (P<0.016) and does not significantly differ from the normal aortic wall (P<0.33). Evaluation of the doxycycline intervention only revealed a borderline-significant reduction of circulating hs-CRP levels (-0.51 μg/ml, P=0.05) and did not affect any of the other markers of systemic inflammation and vascular function. Our studies do not characterize AP-1 as a therapeutic target for progressive human atherosclerotic disease.

  11. Effects of oxaliplatin and oleic acid Gc-protein-derived macrophage-activating factor on murine and human microglia.

    PubMed

    Branca, Jacopo J V; Morucci, Gabriele; Malentacchi, Francesca; Gelmini, Stefania; Ruggiero, Marco; Pacini, Stefania

    2015-09-01

    The biological properties and characteristics of microglia in rodents have been widely described, but little is known about these features in human microglia. Several murine microglial cell lines are used to investigate neurodegenerative and neuroinflammatory conditions; however, the extrapolation of the results to human conditions is frequently met with criticism because of the possibility of species-specific differences. This study compares the effects of oxaliplatin and of oleic acid Gc-protein-derived macrophage-activating factor (OA-GcMAF) on two microglial cell lines, murine BV-2 cells and human C13NJ cells. Cell viability, cAMP levels, microglial activation, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression were evaluated. Our data demonstrate that oxaliplatin induced a significant decrease in cell viability in BV-2 and in C13NJ cells and that this effect was not reversed with OA-GcMAF treatment. The signal transduction pathway involving cAMP/VEGF was activated after treatment with oxaliplatin and/or OA-GcMAF in both cell lines. OA-GcMAF induced a significant increase in microglia activation, as evidenced by the expression of the B7-2 protein, in BV-2 as well as in C13NJ cells that was not associated with a concomitant increase in cell number. Furthermore, the effects of oxaliplatin and OA-GcMAF on coculture morphology and apoptosis were evaluated. Oxaliplatin-induced cell damage and apoptosis were nearly completely reversed by OA-GcMAF treatment in both BV-2/SH-SY5Y and C13NJ/SH-SY5Y cocultures. Our data show that murine and human microglia share common signal transduction pathways and activation mechanisms, suggesting that the murine BV-2 cell line may represent an excellent model for studying human microglia.

  12. A monoclonal IgM protein with antibody-like activity for human albumin.

    PubMed

    Hauptman, S; Tomasi, T B

    1974-03-01

    The serum of a patient (L'ec) with an IgM lambda monoclonal protein was noted to bind albumin on immunoelectrophoresis. Analytical ultracentrifugation of the L'ec serum demonstrated 23S and 12S peaks, but no 4S (albumin) boundary. Immunologically identical 20S and 9S IgM proteins were isolated from the serum and the addition in vitro of either the patient's albumin or albumin isolated from normal serum was shown to reconstitute the 23S and 12S boundaries. The binding of high molecular weight IgM to albumin was demonstated by Sephadex G200 chromatography with (125)I-labeled albumin and isolated IgM. Immunoelectrophoresis of the L'ec IgM developed with aggregated albumin (reverse immunoelectrophoresis) also demonstrated the binding of albumin to IgM. That all of the patient's IgM complexed with albumin was shown by affinity chromatography employing an aggregated albumin-immunoadsorbent column. Binding was shown to be of the noncovalent type by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in 8 M urea. With hot trypsin proteolysis, Fabmu and Fcmu5 fragments were isolated, and monomer albumin was shown to complex only with the Fabmu fragment by both analytical ultracentrifugation and molecular sieve chromatogaphy employing (125)I-labeled Fab fragments. 1 mol of Fabmu fragment bound 1 mol of monomer albumin. Polymers of human albumin, produced by heat aggregation, precipitated with the isolated L'ec protein on gel diffusion analysis and, when coated on sheep red blood cells, gave a hemagglutination titer greater than 1 million with the whole L'ec serum. 50 additional monoclonal IgM, 33 IgA, and 80 IgG sera failed to show precipitation or hemagglutination with aggregated albumin. Native monomer albumin inhibited precipitation only at high concentrations (> 50 mg/ml); dimer albumin or fragments of albumin produced by trypsin digestion inhibited at low concentrations (0.4 mg/ml). No reactivity occurred with the albumin of five other mammalian species, including bovine. The L

  13. Characterization of the lymphocyte activation gene 3-encoded protein. A new ligand for human leukocyte antigen class II antigens

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    The lymphocyte activation gene 3 (LAG-3), expressed in human activated T and natural killer (NK) cells, is closely related to CD4 at the gene and protein levels. We report here the initial characterization of the LAG-3-encoded protein. We have generated two monoclonal antibodies after immunization of mice with a 30-amino acid peptide that corresponds to an exposed extra loop region present in the LAG-3 immunoglobulin-like first domain. The reactivity of these reagents is directed against LAG-3 since they recognize both membrane-expressed and soluble recombinant LAG-3 molecules produced in a baculovirus expression system. The two antibodies are likely to react with the same or closely related epitope (termed LAG-3.1) exposed on the LAG-3 first domain extra loop, as assessed in competition experiments on LAG-3- expressing activated lymphocytes. Cellular distribution analysis indicated that the LAG-3.1 epitope is expressed on activated T (both CD4+ and CD8+ subsets) and NK cells, and not on activated B cells or monocytes. In immunoprecipitation experiments performed on activated T and NK cell lysates, a 70-kD protein was detected after SDS-PAGE analysis. 45-kD protein species were also immunoprecipitated. Both the 70- and 45-kD proteins were shown to be N-glycosylated. In Western blot analysis, only the former molecule was recognized by the anti-LAG-3 antibodies, demonstrating that it is LAG-3 encoded. These anti-LAG-3 antibodies were used to investigate whether the LAG-3 protein interacts with the CD4 ligands. By using a high-level expression cellular system based on COS-7 cell transfection with recombinant CDM8 vectors and a quantitative cellular adhesion assay, we demonstrate that rosette formation between LAG-3-transfected COS-7 cells and human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class II-bearing B lymphocytes is specifically dependent on LAG-3/HLA class II interaction. In contrast to CD4, LAG-3 does not bind the human immunodeficiency virus gp120. This initial

  14. Human protein-disulfide isomerase is a redox-regulated chaperone activated by oxidation of domain a'.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao; Yu, Jiang; Huo, Lin; Wang, Lei; Feng, Wei; Wang, Chih-chen

    2012-01-06

    Protein-disulfide isomerase (PDI), with domains arranged as abb'xa'c, is a key enzyme and chaperone localized in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) catalyzing oxidative folding and preventing misfolding/aggregation of proteins. It has been controversial whether the chaperone activity of PDI is redox-regulated, and the molecular basis is unclear. Here, we show that both the chaperone activity and the overall conformation of human PDI are redox-regulated. We further demonstrate that the conformational changes are triggered by the active site of domain a', and the minimum redox-regulated cassette is located in b'xa'. The structure of the reduced bb'xa' reveals for the first time that domain a' packs tightly with both domain b' and linker x to form one compact structural module. Oxidation of domain a' releases the compact conformation and exposes the shielded hydrophobic areas to facilitate its high chaperone activity. Thus, the study unequivocally provides mechanistic insights into the redox-regulated chaperone activity of human PDI.

  15. Human Protein-disulfide Isomerase Is a Redox-regulated Chaperone Activated by Oxidation of Domain a′*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chao; Yu, Jiang; Huo, Lin; Wang, Lei; Feng, Wei; Wang, Chih-chen

    2012-01-01

    Protein-disulfide isomerase (PDI), with domains arranged as abb′xa′c, is a key enzyme and chaperone localized in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) catalyzing oxidative folding and preventing misfolding/aggregation of proteins. It has been controversial whether the chaperone activity of PDI is redox-regulated, and the molecular basis is unclear. Here, we show that both the chaperone activity and the overall conformation of human PDI are redox-regulated. We further demonstrate that the conformational changes are triggered by the active site of domain a′, and the minimum redox-regulated cassette is located in b′xa′. The structure of the reduced bb′xa′ reveals for the first time that domain a′ packs tightly with both domain b′ and linker x to form one compact structural module. Oxidation of domain a′ releases the compact conformation and exposes the shielded hydrophobic areas to facilitate its high chaperone activity. Thus, the study unequivocally provides mechanistic insights into the redox-regulated chaperone activity of human PDI. PMID:22090031

  16. Alpha7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptors affect growth regulation of human mesothelioma cells: role of mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway.

    PubMed

    Trombino, Sonya; Cesario, Alfredo; Margaritora, Stefano; Granone, PierLuigi; Motta, Giovanni; Falugi, Carla; Russo, Patrizia

    2004-01-01

    This study presents data suggesting that both human mesothelioma (cell lines and human mesothelioma biopsies) and human normal mesothelial cells express receptors for acetylcholine and that stimulation of these receptors by nicotine prompted cell growth via activation of nicotinic cholinergic receptors. Thus, these data demonstrate that: (a) human mesothelioma cells and human biopsies of mesothelioma as well as of normal pleural mesothelial cells express functionally alpha-7 nicotinic acethlycholine receptors, evaluated by alpha-bungarotoxin-FITC binding, receptor binding assay, Western blot, and reverse transcription-PCR; (b) choline acetyltransferase immunostaining is present in mesothelioma cells; (c) mesothelioma cell growth is modulated by the cholinergic system in which agonists (i.e., nicotine) has a proliferative effect, and antagonists (i.e., curare) has an inhibitory effect, evaluated by cell cloning, DNA synthesis and cell cycle; (d) nicotine induces Ca(+2) influx, evaluated by [(45)Ca(2+)] uptake, and consequently activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway (extracellular signal-regulated kinase and p90(RSK) phosphorylation), evaluated by Western blot; and (e) apoptosis mechanisms in mesothelioma cells are under the control of the cholinergic system (nicotine antiapoptotic via induction of nuclear factor-kappaB complexes and phosphorylation of Bad at Ser(112); curare proapoptotic via G(0)-G(1) arrest p21(waf-1) dependent but p53 independent). The involvement of the nonneuronal cholinergic system in mesothelioma appears reasonable and open up new therapeutic strategies.

  17. Mu and Delta opioid receptors activate the same G proteins in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells

    PubMed Central

    Alt, A; Clark, M J; Woods, J H; Traynor, J R

    2002-01-01

    There is evidence for interactions between mu and delta opioid systems both in vitro and in vivo. This work examines the hypothesis that interaction between these two receptors can occur intracellularly at the level of G protein in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells.The [35S]GTPγS binding assay was used to measure G protein activation following agonist occupation of opioid receptors. The agonists DAMGO (EC50, 45 nM) and SNC80 (EC50, 32 nM) were found to be completely selective for stimulation of [35S]-GTPγS binding through mu and delta opioid receptors respectively. Maximal stimulation of [35S]-GTPγS binding produced by SNC80 was 57% of that seen with DAMGO. When combined with a maximally effective concentration of DAMGO, SNC80 caused no additional [35S]-GTPγS binding. This effect was also seen when measured at the level of adenylyl cyclase.Receptor activation increased the dissociation of pre-bound [35S]-GTPγS. In addition, the delta agonist SNC80 promoted the dissociation of [35S]-GTPγS from G proteins initially labelled using the mu agonist DAMGO. Conversely, DAMGO promoted the dissociation of [35S]-GTPγS from G proteins initially labelled using SNC80.Tolerance to DAMGO and SNC80 in membranes from cells exposed to agonist for 18 h was homologous and there was no evidence for alteration in G protein activity.The findings support the hypothesis that mu- and delta-opioid receptors share a common G protein pool, possibly through a close organization of the two receptors and G protein at the plasma membrane. PMID:11786497

  18. Open reading frame UL26 of human cytomegalovirus encodes a novel tegument protein that contains a strong transcriptional activation domain.

    PubMed

    Stamminger, Thomas; Gstaiger, Matthias; Weinzierl, Konstanze; Lorz, Kerstin; Winkler, Michael; Schaffner, Walter

    2002-05-01

    A selection strategy, the activator trap, was used in order to identify genes of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) that encode strong transcriptional activation domains in mammalian cells. This approach is based on the isolation of activation domains from a GAL4 fusion library by means of selective plasmid replication, which is mediated in transfected cells by a GAL4-inducible T antigen gene. With this screening strategy, we were able to isolate two types of plasmids encoding transactivating fusion proteins from a library of random HCMV DNA inserts. One plasmid contained the exon 3 of the HCMV IE-1/2 gene region, which has previously been identified as a strong transcriptional activation domain. In the second type of plasmid, the open reading frame (ORF) UL26 of HCMV was fused to the GAL4 DNA-binding domain. By quantitative RNA mapping using S1 nuclease analysis, we were able to classify UL26 as a strong enhancer-type activation domain with no apparent homology to characterized transcriptional activators. Western blot analysis with a specific polyclonal antibody raised against a prokaryotic UL26 fusion protein revealed that two protein isoforms of 21 and 27 kDa are derived from the UL26 ORF in both infected and transfected cells. Both protein isoforms, which arise via alternative usage of two in-frame translational start codons, showed a nuclear localization and could be detected as early as 6 h after infection of primary human fibroblasts. By performing Western blot analysis with purified virions combined with fractionation experiments, we provide evidence that pUL26 is a novel tegument protein of HCMV that is imported during viral infection. Furthermore, we observed transactivation of the HCMV major immediate-early enhancer-promoter by pUL26, whereas several early and late promoters were not affected. Our data suggest that pUL26 is a novel tegument protein of HCMV with a strong transcriptional activation domain that could play an important role during initiation of

  19. Developmental regulation of the adhesive and enzymatic activity of vascular adhesion protein-1 (VAP-1) in humans.

    PubMed

    Salmi, Marko; Jalkanen, Sirpa

    2006-09-01

    Vascular adhesion protein-1 (VAP-1) is a homodimeric glycoprotein that belongs to a unique subgroup of cell-surface-expressed oxidases. In adults, endothelial VAP-1 supports leukocyte rolling, firm adhesion, and transmigration in both enzyme activity-dependent and enzyme activity-independent manner. Here we studied the induction and function of VAP-1 during human ontogeny. We show that VAP-1 is already found in the smooth muscle at embryonic week 7. There are marked time-dependent switches in VAP-1 expression in the sinusoids of the liver, in the peritubular capillaries of the kidney, in the capillaries of the heart, and in the venules in the lamina propria of the gut. Fetal VAP-1 is dimerized, and it is enzymatically active. VAP-1 in fetal-type venules is able to bind cord blood lymphocytes. Also, adenovirally transfected VAP-1 on human umbilical vein endothelial cells is involved in rolling and firm adhesion of cord blood lymphocytes under conditions of physiologic shear stress. We conclude that VAP-1 is synthesized from early on in human vessels and it is functionally intact already before birth. Thus, VAP-1 may contribute critically to the oxidase activities in utero, and prove important for lymphocyte trafficking during human ontogeny.

  20. Activities of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Integration Protein In vitro: Specific Cleavage and Integration of HIV DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bushman, Frederic D.; Craigie, Robert

    1991-02-01

    Growth of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) after infection requires the integration of a DNA copy of the viral RNA genome into a chromosome of the host. Here we present a simple in vitro system that carries out the integration reaction and the use of this system to probe the mechanism of integration. The only HIV protein necessary is the integration (IN) protein, which has been overexpressed in insect cells and then partially purified. DNA substrates are supplied as oligonucleotides that match the termini of the linear DNA product of reverse transcription. In the presence of HIV IN protein, oligonucleotide substrates are cleaved to generate the recessed 3' ends that are the precursor for integration, and the cleaved molecules are efficiently inserted into a DNA target. Analysis of reaction products reveals that HIV IN protein joins 3' ends of the viral DNA to 5' ends of cuts made by IN protein in the DNA target. We have also used this assay to characterize the sequences at the ends of the viral DNA involved in integration. The assay provides a simple screen for testing candidate inhibitors of HIV IN protein; some such inhibitors might have useful antiviral activity.

  1. Human Salivary Protein Histatin 5 Has Potent Bactericidal Activity against ESKAPE Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Du, Han; Puri, Sumant; McCall, Andrew; Norris, Hannah L.; Russo, Thomas; Edgerton, Mira

    2017-01-01

    ESKAPE (Enterococcus faecium, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumanni, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Enterobacter species) pathogens have characteristic multiple-drug resistance and cause an increasing number of nosocomial infections worldwide. Peptide-based therapeutics to treat ESKAPE infections might be an alternative to conventional antibiotics. Histatin 5 (Hst 5) is a salivary cationic histidine-rich peptide produced only in humans and higher primates. It has high antifungal activity against Candida albicans through an energy-dependent, non-lytic process; but its bactericidal effects are less known. We found Hst 5 has bactericidal activity against S. aureus (60–70% killing) and A. baumannii (85–90% killing) in 10 and 100 mM sodium phosphate buffer (NaPB), while killing of >99% of P. aeruginosa, 60–80% E. cloacae and 20–60% of E. faecium was found in 10 mM NaPB. Hst 5 killed 60% of biofilm cells of P. aeruginosa, but had reduced activity against biofilms of S. aureus and A. baumannii. Hst 5 killed 20% of K. pneumonia biofilm cells but not planktonic cells. Binding and uptake studies using FITC-labeled Hst 5 showed E. faecium and E. cloacae killing required Hst 5 internalization and was energy dependent, while bactericidal activity was rapid against P. aeruginosa and A. baumannii suggesting membrane disruption. Hst 5-mediated killing of S. aureus was both non-lytic and energy independent. Additionally, we found that spermidine conjugated Hst 5 (Hst5-Spd) had improved killing activity against E. faecium, E. cloacae, and A. baumannii. Hst 5 or its derivative has antibacterial activity against five out of six ESKAPE pathogens and may be an alternative treatment for these infections. PMID:28261570

  2. Metabolism of the c-Fos/activator protein-1 inhibitor T-5224 by multiple human UDP-glucuronosyltransferase isoforms.

    PubMed

    Uchihashi, Shinsuke; Fukumoto, Hiroyuki; Onoda, Makoto; Hayakawa, Hiroyoshi; Ikushiro, Shin-ichi; Sakaki, Toshiyuki

    2011-05-01

    We developed 3-{5-[4-(cyclopentyloxy)-2-hydroxybenzoyl]-2-[(3-hydroxy-1,2-benzisoxazol-6-yl)methoxy]phenyl} propionic acid (T-5224) as a novel inhibitor of the c-Fos/activator protein-1 for rheumatoid arthritis therapy. We predicted the metabolism of T-5224 in humans by using human liver microsomes (HLM), human intestinal microsomes (HIM), recombinant human cytochrome P450 (P450), and UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs). T-5224 was converted to its acyl O-glucuronide (G2) by UGT1A1 and UGT1A3 and to its hydroxyl O-glucuronide (G3) by several UGTs, but it was not metabolized by the P450s. A comparison of the intrinsic clearances (CL(int)) between HLM and HIM suggested that the glucuronidation of T-5224 occurs predominantly in the liver. UGT1A1 showed a higher k(cat)/K(m) value than UGT1A3 for G2 formation, but a lower k(cat)/K(m) value than UGT1A3 for G3 formation. A high correlation was observed between G2 formation activity and UGT1A1-specific activity (β-estradiol 3-glucuronidation) in seven individual HLM. A high correlation was also observed between G2 formation activity and UGT1A1 content in the HLM. These results strongly suggest that UGT1A1 is responsible for G2 formation in human liver. In contrast, no such correlation was observed with G3 formation, suggesting that multiple UGT isoforms, including UGT1A1 and UGT1A3, are involved in G3 formation. G2 is also observed in rat and monkey liver microsomes as a major metabolite of T-5224, suggesting that G2 is not a human-specific metabolite. In this study, we obtained useful information on the metabolism of T-5224 for its clinical use.

  3. Mechanism of activation and functional role of protein kinase Ceta in human platelets.

    PubMed

    Bynagari, Yamini S; Nagy, Bela; Tuluc, Florin; Bhavaraju, Kamala; Kim, Soochong; Vijayan, K Vinod; Kunapuli, Satya P

    2009-05-15

    The novel class of protein kinase C (nPKC) isoform eta is expressed in platelets, but not much is known about its activation and function. In this study, we investigated the mechanism of activation and functional implications of nPKCeta using pharmacological and gene knock-out approaches. nPKCeta was phosphorylated (at Thr-512) in a time- and concentration-dependent manner by 2MeSADP. Pretreatment of platelets with MRS-2179, a P2Y1 receptor antagonist, or YM-254890, a G(q) blocker, abolished 2MeSADP-induced phosphorylation of nPKCeta. Similarly, ADP failed to activate nPKCeta in platelets isolated from P2Y1 and G(q) knock-out mice. However, pretreatment of platelets with P2Y12 receptor antagonist, AR-C69331MX did not interfere with ADP-induced nPKCeta phosphorylation. In addition, when platelets were activated with 2MeSADP under stirring conditions, although nPKCeta was phosphorylated within 30 s by ADP receptors, it was also dephosphorylated by activated integrin alpha(IIb)beta3 mediated outside-in signaling. Moreover, in the presence of SC-57101, a alpha(IIb)beta3 receptor antagonist, nPKCeta dephosphorylation was inhibited. Furthermore, in murine platelets lacking PP1cgamma, a catalytic subunit of serine/threonine phosphatase, alpha(IIb)beta3 failed to dephosphorylate nPKCeta. Thus, we conclude that ADP activates nPKCeta via P2Y1 receptor and is subsequently dephosphorylated by PP1gamma phosphatase activated by alpha(IIb)beta3 integrin. In addition, pretreatment of platelets with eta-RACK antagonistic peptides, a specific inhibitor of nPKCeta, inhibited ADP-induced thromboxane generation. However, these peptides had no affect on ADP-induced aggregation when thromboxane generation was blocked. In summary, nPKCeta positively regulates agonist-induced thromboxane generation with no effects on platelet aggregation.

  4. Extracellular human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Tat protein is associated with an increase in both NF-kappa B binding and protein kinase C activity in primary human astrocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Conant, K; Ma, M; Nath, A; Major, E O

    1996-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection has been associated with an increase in the binding of the transcription factor NF-kappa B to its consensus sequence in the viral promoter. Using cultures of primary human fetal astrocytes, we show that exogenous HIV-1 Tat protein, which has been demonstrated to be released from infected cells, is associated with an increase in the binding of this transcription factor to an HIV-1 long terminal repeat kappa B sequence. This effect occurs rapidly and is independent of new protein synthesis. We also demonstrate that extracellular Tat protein is associated with an increase in protein kinase C activity. If Tat functions similarly in other cell types, such findings could relate to some of this protein's previously described physiological effects. These effects include Tat's ability to upregulate the synthesis of specific cytokines and to act as a growth factor. PMID:8627654

  5. Effect of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) US27 on CXCR4 receptor internalization measured by fluorogen-activating protein (FAP) biosensors.

    PubMed

    Boeck, Jordan M; Spencer, Juliet V

    2017-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is a widespread pathogen and a member of the Herpesviridae family. HCMV has a large genome that encodes many genes that are non-essential for virus replication but instead play roles in manipulation of the host immune environment. One of these is the US27 gene, which encodes a protein with homology to the chemokine receptor family of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). The US27 protein has no known chemokine ligands but can modulate the signaling activity of host receptor CXCR4. We investigated the mechanism for enhanced CXCR4 signaling in the presence of US27 using a novel biosensor system comprised of fluorogen activating proteins (FAPs). FAP-tagged CXCR4 and US27 were used to explore receptor internalization and recovery dynamics, and the results demonstrate that significantly more CXCR4 internalization was observed in the presence of US27 compared to CXCR4 alone upon stimulation with CXCL12. While ligand-induced endocytosis rates were higher, steady state internalization of CXCR4 was not affected by US27. Additionally, US27 underwent rapid endocytosis at a rate that was independent of either CXCR4 expression or CXCL12 stimulation. These results demonstrate that one mechanism by which US27 can enhance CXCR4 signaling is to alter receptor internalization dynamics, which could ultimately have the effect of promoting virus dissemination by increasing trafficking of HCMV-infected cells to tissues where CXCL12 is highly expressed.

  6. Effect of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) US27 on CXCR4 receptor internalization measured by fluorogen-activating protein (FAP) biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Boeck, Jordan M.; Spencer, Juliet V.

    2017-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is a widespread pathogen and a member of the Herpesviridae family. HCMV has a large genome that encodes many genes that are non-essential for virus replication but instead play roles in manipulation of the host immune environment. One of these is the US27 gene, which encodes a protein with homology to the chemokine receptor family of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). The US27 protein has no known chemokine ligands but can modulate the signaling activity of host receptor CXCR4. We investigated the mechanism for enhanced CXCR4 signaling in the presence of US27 using a novel biosensor system comprised of fluorogen activating proteins (FAPs). FAP-tagged CXCR4 and US27 were used to explore receptor internalization and recovery dynamics, and the results demonstrate that significantly more CXCR4 internalization was observed in the presence of US27 compared to CXCR4 alone upon stimulation with CXCL12. While ligand-induced endocytosis rates were higher, steady state internalization of CXCR4 was not affected by US27. Additionally, US27 underwent rapid endocytosis at a rate that was independent of either CXCR4 expression or CXCL12 stimulation. These results demonstrate that one mechanism by which US27 can enhance CXCR4 signaling is to alter receptor internalization dynamics, which could ultimately have the effect of promoting virus dissemination by increasing trafficking of HCMV-infected cells to tissues where CXCL12 is highly expressed. PMID:28207860

  7. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Tat-Activated Expression of Poliovirus Protein 2A Inhibits mRNA Translation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xiao-Hong; Baltimore, David

    1989-04-01

    To study the effect of poliovirus protein 2A on cellular RNA translation, the tat control system of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) was used. Protein 2A was expressed from a plasmid construct (pHIV/2A) incorporating the HIV long terminal repeat. Protein synthesis was measured by using chloramphenicol acetyltransferase as a reporter gene driven by the Rous sarcoma virus long terminal repeat. When HIV/2A was contransfected with the reporter, addition of a tat-producing plasmid caused at least a 50-fold drop in chloramphenicol acetyltransferase synthesis. A HeLa cell line carrying HIV/2A was established. In it, tat expression caused more than a 10-fold drop in chloramphenicol acetyltransferase synthesis from the reporter plasmid. Furthermore, 2A induction by tat caused cleavage of the cellular translation factor P220, a part of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4F. Thus protein 2A can, by itself, carry out the inhibition of cellular protein synthesis characteristic of a poliovirus infection. Also, the HIV tat activation provides a very effective method to control gene expression in mammalian cells.

  8. Renal Dnase1 Enzyme Activity and Protein Expression Is Selectively Shut Down in Murine and Human Membranoproliferative Lupus Nephritis

    PubMed Central

    Rekvig, Ole Petter

    2010-01-01

    Background Deposition of chromatin-IgG complexes within glomerular membranes is a key event in the pathogenesis of lupus nephritis. We recently reported an acquired loss of renal Dnase1 expression linked to transformation from mild to severe membranoproliferative lupus nephritis in (NZBxNZW)F1 mice. As this may represent a basic mechanism in the progression of lupus nephritis, several aspects of Dnase1 expression in lupus nephritis were analyzed. Methodology/Principal Findings Total nuclease activity and Dnase1 expression and activity was evaluated using in situ and in vitro analyses of kidneys and sera from (NZBxNZW)F1 mice of different ages, and from age-matched healthy controls. Immunofluorescence staining for Dnase1 was performed on kidney biopsies from (NZBxNZW)F1 mice as well as from human SLE patients and controls. Reduced serum Dnase1 activity was observed in both mesangial and end-stage lupus nephritis. A selective reduction in renal Dnase1 activity was seen in mice with massive deposition of chromatin-containing immune complexes in glomerular capillary walls. Mice with mild mesangial nephritis showed normal renal Dnase1 activity. Similar differences were seen when comparing human kidneys with severe and mild lupus nephritis. Dnase1 was diffusely expressed within the kidney in normal and mildly affected kidneys, whereas upon progression towards end-stage renal disease, Dnase1 was down-regulated in all renal compartments. This demonstrates that the changes associated with development of severe nephritis in the murine model are also relevant to human lupus nephritis. Conclusions/Significance Reduction in renal Dnase1 expression and activity is limited to mice and SLE patients with signs of membranoproliferative nephritis, and may be a critical event in the development of severe forms of lupus nephritis. Reduced Dnase1 activity reflects loss in the expression of the protein and not inhibition of enzyme activity. PMID:20856893

  9. AMP-activated protein kinase supports the NGF-induced viability of human HeLa cells to glucose starvation.

    PubMed

    Ting, Luo; Bo, Wan; Li, Ruwei; Chen, Xinya; Wang, Yingli; Jun, Zhou; Yu, Long

    2010-07-01

    As an important cellular energy regulation kinase, AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) has been demonstrated as a key molecule in the development of tolerance to nutrient starvation. Activation of AMPK includes the phosphorylation of Thr172 of the alpha-subunit. Nerve growth factor (NGF) was originally isolated for its ability to stimulate both survival and differentiation in peripheral neurons, but many investigations have shown that the NGF also plays an important role in survival, growth and invasion of many human cancers. In this study, we used CCK-8 cell viability assay to find that NGF could facilitate the viability of HeLa cells following glucose deprivation while not in glucose-normal control groups. This effect of NGF-induced viability promotion to glucose starvation can be suppressed by Compound C, a specific inhibitor of AMPK. Meanwhile, western blot analysis showed that AMPKalpha1/alpha2 Thr172 phosphorylation level in HeLa cells was up-regulated after NGF treatment under glucose starvation, and Compound C was able to reduce the AMPKalpha1/alpha2 Thr172 phosphorylation level which was up-regulated by NGF in HeLa cells. Taken together, these results indicate that AMP-activated protein kinase supports the NGF-induced viability of human HeLa cells to glucose starvation.

  10. JAB1 regulates unphosphorylated STAT3 DNA-binding activity through protein–protein interaction in human colon cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Nishimoto, Arata; Kugimiya, Naruji; Hosoyama, Toru; Enoki, Tadahiko; Li, Tao-Sheng; Hamano, Kimikazu

    2013-08-30

    Highlights: •JAB1 interacted with unphosphorylated STAT3 in the nucleus. •JAB1 knockdown tended to increase nuclear STAT3 expression. •JAB1 knockdown significantly decreased unphosphorylated STAT3 DNA-binding activity. •JAB1 knockdown significantly decreased MDR1, NANOG, and VEGF expressions. •Nuclear JAB1, but not nuclear STAT3, correlated with STAT3 DNA-binding activity. -- Abstract: Recent studies have revealed that unphosphorylated STAT3 forms a dimer, translocates to the nucleus, binds to the STAT3 binding site, and activates the transcription of STAT3 target genes, thereby playing an important role in oncogenesis in addition to phosphorylated STAT3. Among signaling steps of unphosphorylated STAT3, nuclear translocation and target DNA-binding are the critical steps for its activation. Therefore, elucidating the regulatory mechanism of these signaling steps of unphosphorylated STAT3 is a potential step in the discovery of a novel cancer drug. However, the mechanism of unphosphorylated STAT3 binding to the promoter of target genes remains unclear. In this study, we focused on Jun activation domain-binding protein 1 (JAB1) as a candidate protein that regulates unphosphorylated STAT3 DNA-binding activity. Initially, we observed that both unphosphorylated STAT3 and JAB1 existed in the nucleus of human colon cancer cell line COLO205 at the basal state (no cytokine stimulation). On the other hand, phosphorylated STAT3 did not exist in the nucleus of COLO205 cells at the basal state. Immunoprecipitation using nuclear extract of COLO205 cells revealed that JAB1 interacted with unphosphorylated STAT3. To investigate the effect of JAB1 on unphosphorylated STAT3 activity, RNAi studies were performed. Although JAB1 knockdown tended to increase nuclear STAT3 expression, it significantly decreased unphosphorylated STAT3 DNA-binding activity. Subsequently, JAB1 knockdown significantly decreased the expression levels of MDR1, NANOG, and VEGF, which are STAT3 target

  11. Human parainfluenza virus infection of the airway epithelium: viral hemagglutinin-neuraminidase regulates fusion protein activation and modulates infectivity.

    PubMed

    Palermo, Laura M; Porotto, Matteo; Yokoyama, Christine C; Palmer, Samantha G; Mungall, Bruce A; Greengard, Olga; Niewiesk, Stefan; Moscona, Anne

    2009-07-01

    Three discrete activities of the paramyxovirus hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) protein, receptor binding, receptor cleaving (neuraminidase), and triggering of the fusion protein, each affect the promotion of viral fusion and entry. For human parainfluenza virus type 3 (HPIV3), the effects of specific mutations that alter these functions of the receptor-binding protein have been well characterized using cultured monolayer cells, which have identified steps that are potentially relevant to pathogenesis. In the present study, proposed mechanisms that are relevant to pathogenesis were tested in natural host cell cultures, a model of the human airway epithelium (HAE) in which primary HAE cells are cultured at an air-liquid interface and retain functional properties. Infection of HAE cells with wild-type HPIV3 and variant viruses closely reflects that seen in an animal model, the cotton rat, suggesting that HAE cells provide an ideal system for assessing the interplay of host cell and viral factors in pathogenesis and for screening for inhibitory molecules that would be effective in vivo. Both HN's receptor avidity and the function and timing of F activation by HN require a critical balance for the establishment of ongoing infection in the HAE, and these HN functions independently modulate the production of active virions. Alterations in HN's F-triggering function lead to the release of noninfectious viral particles and a failure of the virus to spread. The finding that the dysregulation of F triggering prohibits successful infection in HAE cells suggests that antiviral strategies targeted to HN's F-triggering activity may have promise in vivo.

  12. Novel nuclear matrix protein HET binds to and influences activity of the HSP27 promoter in human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Oesterreich, S; Lee, A V; Sullivan, T M; Samuel, S K; Davie, J R; Fuqua, S A

    1997-11-01

    Since the small heat shock protein hsp27 enhances both growth and drug resistance in breast cancer cells, and is a bad prognostic factor in certain subsets of breast cancer patients, we have characterized the transcriptional regulation of hsp27, with the long-term goal of targeting its expression clinically. The majority of the promoter activity resides in the most proximal 200 bp. This region contains an imperfect estrogen response element (ERE) that is separated by a 13-bp spacer that contains a TATA box. Gel-shift analysis revealed the binding of a protein (termed HET for Hsp27-ERE-TATA-binding protein) to this region that was neither the estrogen receptor nor TATA-binding protein. We cloned a complete cDNA (2.9 kb) for HET from an MCF-7 cDNA library. To confirm the identity of the HET clone, we expressed a partial HET clone as a glutathione S-transferase fusion protein, and showed binding to the hsp27 promoter fragment in gel-retardation assays. The HET clone is almost identical to a recently published scaffold attachment factor (SAF-B) cloned from a HeLa cell cDNA library. Scaffold attachment factors are a subset of nuclear matrix proteins (NMP) that interact with matrix attachment regions. Analyzing how HET could act as a regulator of hsp27 transcription and as a SAF/NMP, we studied its subnuclear localization and its effect on hsp27 transcription in human breast cancer cells. We were able to show that HET is localized in the nuclear matrix in various breast cancer cell lines. Furthermore, in transient transfection assays using hsp27 promoter-luciferase reporter constructs, HET overexpression resulted in a dose-dependent decrease of hsp27 promoter activity in several cell lines.

  13. Human coronavirus 229E nonstructural protein 13: characterization of duplex-unwinding, nucleoside triphosphatase, and RNA 5'-triphosphatase activities.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, Konstantin A; Ziebuhr, John

    2004-07-01

    The human coronavirus 229E (HCoV-229E) replicase gene-encoded nonstructural protein 13 (nsp13) contains an N-terminal zinc-binding domain and a C-terminal superfamily 1 helicase domain. A histidine-tagged form of nsp13, which was expressed in insect cells and purified, is reported to unwind efficiently both partial-duplex RNA and DNA of up to several hundred base pairs. Characterization of the nsp13-associated nucleoside triphosphatase (NTPase) activities revealed that all natural ribonucleotides and nucleotides are substrates of nsp13, with ATP, dATP, and GTP being hydrolyzed most efficiently. Using the NTPase active site, HCoV-229E nsp13 also mediates RNA 5'-triphosphatase activity, which may be involved in the capping of viral RNAs.

  14. Overexpression of SERBP1 (Plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 RNA binding protein) in human breast cancer is correlated with favourable prognosis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1) overexpression is an important prognostic and predictive biomarker in human breast cancer. SERBP1, a protein that is supposed to regulate the stability of PAI-1 mRNA, may play a role in gynaecological cancers as well, since upregulation of SERBP1 was described in ovarian cancer recently. This is the first study to present a systematic characterisation of SERBP1 expression in human breast cancer and normal breast tissue at both the mRNA and the protein level. Methods Using semiquantitative realtime PCR we analysed SERBP1 expression in different normal human tissues (n = 25), and in matched pairs of normal (n = 7) and cancerous breast tissues (n = 7). SERBP1 protein expression was analysed in two independent cohorts on tissue microarrays (TMAs), an initial evaluation set, consisting of 193 breast carcinomas and 48 normal breast tissues, and a second large validation set, consisting of 605 breast carcinomas. In addition, a collection of benign (n = 2) and malignant (n = 6) mammary cell lines as well as breast carcinoma lysates (n = 16) were investigated for SERBP1 expression by Western blot analysis. Furthermore, applying non-radioisotopic in situ hybridisation a subset of normal (n = 10) and cancerous (n = 10) breast tissue specimens from the initial TMA were analysed for SERBP1 mRNA expression. Results SERBP1 is not differentially expressed in breast carcinoma compared to normal breast tissue, both at the RNA and protein level. However, recurrence-free survival analysis showed a significant correlation (P = 0.008) between abundant SERBP1 expression in breast carcinoma and favourable prognosis. Interestingly, overall survival analysis also displayed a tendency (P = 0.09) towards favourable prognosis when SERBP1 was overexpressed in breast cancer. Conclusions The RNA-binding protein SERBP1 is abundantly expressed in human breast cancer and may represent a novel breast tumour

  15. Multiplexed Activity-based Protein Profiling of the Human Pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus Reveals Large Functional Changes upon Exposure to Human Serum

    SciTech Connect

    Wiedner, Susan D.; Burnum, Kristin E.; Pederson, Leeanna M.; Anderson, Lindsey N.; Fortuin, Suereta; Chauvigne-Hines, Lacie M.; Shukla, Anil K.; Ansong, Charles; Panisko, Ellen A.; Smith, Richard D.; Wright, Aaron T.

    2012-08-03

    Environmental and metabolic adaptability is critical for survival of the fungal human pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus in the immunocompromised lung. We employed an activity-based protein profiling (ABPP) approach utilizing a new aryl vinyl sulfonate probe and a serine hydrolase probe combined with quantitative LC-MS based accurate mass and time (AMT) tag proteomics for the identification of functional pathway adaptation of A. fumigatus to environmental variability relevant to pulmonary Invasive Aspergillosis. When the fungal pathogen was grown with human serum, metabolism and energy processes were markedly decreased compared to no serum culture. Additionally, functional pathways associated with amino acid and protein biosynthesis were limited as the fungus scavenged from the serum to obtain essential nutrients. Our approach revealed significant metabolic adaptation by A. fumigatus, and provides direct insight into this pathogen’s ability to survive and proliferate.

  16. Defined amino acids in the gag proteins of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 are functionally active during virus assembly.

    PubMed

    Kattenbeck, B; Rohrhofer, A; Niedrig, M; Wolf, H; Modrow, S

    1996-01-01

    A structurally highly ordered arrangement of the polyprotein precursor, Pr55gag is a necessary prerequisite for assembly, budding and maturation of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). In particular, distinct regions of the matrix protein (p17) and the capsid protein (p24) contained within Pr55gag are functionally active during these processes. In order to determine such regions we exchanged amino acid triplets within p17 (amino acids 46-61) and p24 (amino acids 341-352) for alanine residues and deleted the whole regions. Synthetic peptides derived from these regions had been shown previously to inhibit the production of infectious virus. The effect of the mutations on the release of viral particles was investigated by using recombinant baculoviruses for the expression of mutated Pr55gag as virus-like particles and by use of the respective HI proviruses for monitoring the production of infectious particles.

  17. Improved efficacy of soluble human receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B (RANK) fusion protein by site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Son, Young Jun; Han, Jihye; Lee, Jae Yeon; Kim, HaHyung; Chun, Taehoon

    2015-06-01

    Soluble human receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B fusion immunoglobulin (hRANK-Ig) has been considered as one of the therapeutic agents to treat osteoporosis or diseases associated with bone destruction by blocking the interaction between RANK and the receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B ligand (RANKL). However, no scientific record showing critical amino acid residues within the structural interface between the human RANKL and RANK complex is yet available. In this study, we produced several mutants of hRANK-Ig by replacement of amino acid residue(s) and tested whether the mutants had increased binding affinity to human RANKL. Based on the results from flow cytometry and surface plasmon resonance analyses, the replacement of E(125) with D(125), or E(125) and C(127) with D(125) and F(127) within loop 3 of cysteine-rich domain 3 of hRANK-Ig increases binding affinity to human RANKL over the wild-type hRANK-Ig. This result may provide the first example of improvement in the efficacy of hRANK-Ig by protein engineering and may give additional information to understand a more defined structural interface between hRANK and RANKL.

  18. Human papillomavirus 16 E2 stability and transcriptional activation is enhanced by E1 via a direct protein-protein interaction

    SciTech Connect

    King, Lauren E.; Dornan, Edward S.; Donaldson, Mary M.; Morgan, Iain M.

    2011-05-25

    Human papillomavirus 16 E1 and E2 interact with cellular factors to replicate the viral genome. E2 forms homodimers and binds to 12 bp palindromic sequences adjacent to the viral origin and recruits E1 to the origin. E1 forms a di-hexameric helicase complex that replicates the viral genome. This manuscript demonstrates that E1 stabilises the E2 protein, increasing the half life in both C33a and 293 T cells respectively. This stabilisation requires a direct protein--protein interaction. In addition, the E1 protein enhances E2 transcription function in a manner that suggests the E1 protein itself can contribute to transcriptional regulation not simply by E2 stabilisation but by direct stimulation of transcription. This activation of E2 transcription is again dependent upon an interaction with E1. Overall the results suggest that in the viral life cycle, co-expression of E1 with E2 can increase E2 stability and enhance E2 function.

  19. The BAH domain facilitates the ability of human Orc1 protein to activate replication origins in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Noguchi, Kohji; Vassilev, Alex; Ghosh, Soma; Yates, John L; DePamphilis, Melvin L

    2006-01-01

    Selection of initiation sites for DNA replication in eukaryotes is determined by the interaction between the origin recognition complex (ORC) and genomic DNA. In mammalian cells, this interaction appears to be regulated by Orc1, the only ORC subunit that contains a bromo-adjacent homology (BAH) domain. Since BAH domains mediate protein–protein interactions, the human Orc1 BAH domain was mutated, and the mutant proteins expressed in human cells to determine their affects on ORC function. The BAH domain was not required for nuclear localization of Orc1, association of Orc1 with other ORC subunits, or selective degradation of Orc1 during S-phase. It did, however, facilitate reassociation of Orc1 with chromosomes during the M to G1-phase transition, and it was required for binding Orc1 to the Epstein–Barr virus oriP and stimulating oriP-dependent plasmid DNA replication. Moreover, the BAH domain affected Orc1's ability to promote binding of Orc2 to chromatin as cells exit mitosis. Thus, the BAH domain in human Orc1 facilitates its ability to activate replication origins in vivo by promoting association of ORC with chromatin. PMID:17066079

  20. Expression of 5-lipoxygenase and 5-lipoxygenase-activating protein in human fetal membranes throughout pregnancy and at term.

    PubMed

    Brown, N L; Slater, D M; Alvi, S A; Elder, M G; Sullivan, M H; Bennett, P R

    1999-07-01

    Lipoxygenase metabolites may be involved in human parturition. 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) catalyses the first steps in the synthesis of leukotrienes from arachidonic acid, and its activity is dependent on 5-LOX activating protein (FLAP). The expression of 5-LOX and FLAP were investigated in fetal membranes to determine whether there are changes with gestational age or at term with the onset of labour. No significant differences were found in the expression of 5-LOX or FLAP mRNA in the amnion at different gestational ages or at term. In the chorion-decidua, 5-LOX mRNA expression was significantly higher in the first trimester of pregnancy than in the second and third trimesters. At term, there was a significant increase in both 5-LOX mRNA and protein expression in the chorion-decidua in the time after labour, compared with the time before labour. The expression of FLAP mRNA was also significantly higher in the chorion-decidua in the first trimester of pregnancy compared with the third trimester, and at term in the time after labour compared with the time before labour. Expression of FLAP protein was not studied, as an antibody is not currently available. These results are consistent with a role for 5-LOX and FLAP in the control of parturition at term, and also suggest an involvement earlier in pregnancy.

  1. Enhancement of human DNA polymerase η activity and fidelity is dependent upon a bipartite interaction with the Werner syndrome protein.

    PubMed

    Maddukuri, Leena; Ketkar, Amit; Eddy, Sarah; Zafar, Maroof K; Griffin, Wezley C; Eoff, Robert L

    2012-12-07

    We have investigated the interaction between human DNA polymerase η (hpol η) and the Werner syndrome protein (WRN). Functional assays revealed that the WRN exonuclease and RecQ C-terminal (RQC) domains are necessary for full stimulation of hpol η-catalyzed formation of correct base pairs. We find that WRN does not stimulate hpol η-catalyzed formation of mispairs. Moreover, the exonuclease activity of WRN prevents stable mispair formation by hpol η. These results are consistent with a proofreading activity for WRN during single-nucleotide additions. ATP hydrolysis by WRN appears to attenuate stimulation of hpol η. Pre-steady-state kinetic results show that k(pol) is increased 4-fold by WRN. Finally, pulldown assays reveal a bipartite physical interaction between hpol η and WRN that is mediated by the exonuclease and RQC domains. Taken together, these results are consistent with alteration of the rate-limiting step in polymerase catalysis by direct protein-protein interactions between WRN and hpol η. In summary, WRN improves the efficiency and fidelity of hpol η to promote more effective replication of DNA.

  2. Reduction of transition metals by human (THP-1) monocytes is enhanced by activators of protein kinase C.

    PubMed

    Wood, J L; Graham, A

    1999-11-01

    Macrophages oxidize low density lipoprotein (LDL) by enzymatic and non-enzymatic mechanisms; however, it is evident that macrophage reduction of transition metals can accelerate LDL oxidation in vitro, and possibly in vivo. Distinct cellular pathways contribute to this process, including trans-plasma membrane electron transport (TPMET), and production of free thiols or superoxide. Here, we explore the role of protein kinase C (PKC) in regulating transition metal reduction by each of these redox-active pathways, in human (THP-1) monocytes. We demonstrate that PKC agonists and/or inhibitors modulate reduction of transition metals by monocytes: both thiol-independent (direct) and thiol-dependent (indirect) pathways for transition metal reduction are enhanced by PKC activation, suggesting a potential strategy for therapeutic intervention.

  3. Visiting a forest, but not a city, increases human natural killer activity and expression of anti-cancer proteins.

    PubMed

    Li, Q; Morimoto, K; Kobayashi, M; Inagaki, H; Katsumata, M; Hirata, Y; Hirata, K; Suzuki, H; Li, Y J; Wakayama, Y; Kawada, T; Park, B J; Ohira, T; Matsui, N; Kagawa, T; Miyazaki, Y; Krensky, A M

    2008-01-01

    We previously reported that a forest bathing trip enhanced human NK activity, number of NK cells, and intracellular anti-cancer proteins in lymphocytes. In the present study, we investigated how long the increased NK activity lasts and compared the effect of a forest bathing trip on NK activity with a trip to places in a city without forests. Twelve healthy male subjects, age 35-56 years, were selected with informed consent. The subjects experienced a three-day/two-night trip to forest fields and to a city, in which activity levels during both trips were matched. On day 1, subjects walked for two hours in the afternoon in a forest field; and on day 2, they walked for two hours in the morning and afternoon, respectively, in two different forest fields; and on day 3, the subjects finished the trip and returned to Tokyo after drawing blood samples and completing the questionnaire. Blood and urine were sampled on the second and third days during the trips, and on days 7 and 30 after the trip, and NK activity, numbers of NK and T cells, and granulysin, perforin, and granzymes A/B-expressing lymphocytes in the blood samples, and the concentration of adrenaline in urine were measured. Similar measurements were made before the trips on a normal working day as the control. Phytoncide concentrations in forest and city air were measured. The forest bathing trip significantly increased NK activity and the numbers of NK, perforin, granulysin, and granzyme A/B-expressing cells and significantly decreased the concentration of adrenaline in urine. The increased NK activity lasted for more than 7 days after the trip. In contrast, a city tourist visit did not increase NK activity, numbers of NK cells, nor the expression of selected intracellular anti-cancer proteins, and did not decrease the concentration of adrenaline in urine. Phytoncides, such as alpha-pinene and beta-pinene were detected in forest air, but almost not in city air. These findings indicate that a forest bathing

  4. Phosphorylation of human hnRNP protein A1 abrogates in vitro strand annealing activity.

    PubMed Central

    Cobianchi, F; Calvio, C; Stoppini, M; Buvoli, M; Riva, S

    1993-01-01

    In HeLa cells metabolically labeled in vivo with [32P] orthophosphate in the presence of okadaic acid the concentration of phosphorylated A1 protein was increased significantly as compared to controls. Purified recombinant hnRNP protein A1 served as an excellent substrate in vitro for the catalytic subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) and for casein kinase II (CKII). Thin layer electrophoresis of A1 acid hydrolysates showed the protein to be phosphorylated exclusively on serine residue by both kinases. V8 phosphopeptide maps revealed that the target site(s) of in vitro phosphorylation are located in the C-terminal region of A1. Phosphoamino acid sequence analysis and site directed mutagenesis identified Ser 199 as the sole phosphoamino acid in the protein phosphorylated by PKA. Phosphorylation introduced by PKA resulted in the suppression of the ability of protein A1 to promote strand annealing in vitro, without any detectable effect on its nucleic acid binding capacity. This finding indicates that phosphorylation of a single serine residue in the C-terminal domain may significantly alter the properties of protein A1. Images PMID:8451194

  5. Distribution of phospholipid transfer protein in human plasma: presence of two forms of phospholipid transfer protein, one catalytically active and the other inactive.

    PubMed

    Oka, T; Kujiraoka, T; Ito, M; Egashira, T; Takahashi, S; Nanjee, M N; Miller, N E; Metso, J; Olkkonen, V M; Ehnholm, C; Jauhiainen, M; Hattori, H

    2000-10-01

    Plasma phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP) plays an important role in the maintenance of plasma high-density lipoprotein (HDL) content and remodeling of HDL in the circulation. In the present study we have used different fractionation methods to investigate the distribution of PLTP in human plasma. A novel enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay developed during the study allowed for simultaneous assessment of both PLTP mass and activity in the fractions obtained. Size-exclusion chromatography and plasma fractionation by nondenaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) yielded similar results demonstrating that PLTP associates in native plasma with two distinct particle populations, while ultracentrifugation with high salt leads to detachment of PLTP from lipoprotein particles and loss of a majority of its phospholipid transfer activity. Interestingly, analysis of the size-exclusion chromatography fractions demonstrated that PLTP exists in the circulation as an active population that elutes in the position of HDL corresponding to an average molecular mass of 160+/-40 kDa and an inactive form with an average mass of 520+/-120 kDa. The inactive fraction containing approximately 70% of the total PLTP protein eluted between HDL and low density lipoprotein (LDL). Thus, the two PLTP pools are associated with different types of lipoprotein particles, suggesting that the PLTP activity in circulation is modulated by the plasma lipoprotein profile and lipid composition.

  6. meso-Dihydroguaiaretic acid inhibits hepatic lipid accumulation by activating AMP-activated protein kinase in human HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Myoung-Su; Kim, Kyung Jin; Kim, Daeyoung; Lee, Kyung-Eun; Hwang, Jae-Kwan

    2011-01-01

    Hepatic lipid accumulation is a major risk factor for dyslipidemia, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, and insulin resistance. The present study was conducted to evaluate hypolipidemic effects of meso-dihydroguaiaretic acid (MDA), anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory compound isolated from the Myristica fragrans HOUTT., by oil red O staining, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), and Western blot. MDA significantly inhibited insulin-induced hepatic lipid accumulation in a dose-dependent manner. The lipid-lowering effect of MDA was accompanied by increased expression of proteins involved in fatty acid oxidation and decreased expression of lipid synthetic proteins. In addition, MDA activated AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) as determined by phosphorylation of acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC), a downstream target of AMPK. The effects of MDA on lipogenic protein expression were suppressed by pretreatment with compound C, an AMPK inhibitor. Taken together, these findings show that MDA inhibits insulin-induced lipid accumulation in human HepG2 cells by suppressing expression of lipogenic proteins through AMPK signaling, suggesting a potent lipid-lowering agent.

  7. Redox Control of the Human Iron-Sulfur Repair Protein MitoNEET Activity via Its Iron-Sulfur Cluster*

    PubMed Central

    Golinelli-Cohen, Marie-Pierre; Lescop, Ewen; Mons, Cécile; Gonçalves, Sergio; Clémancey, Martin; Santolini, Jérôme; Guittet, Eric; Blondin, Geneviève; Latour, Jean-Marc; Bouton, Cécile

    2016-01-01

    Human mitoNEET (mNT) is the first identified Fe-S protein of the mammalian outer mitochondrial membrane. Recently, mNT has been implicated in cytosolic Fe-S repair of a key regulator of cellular iron homeostasis. Here, we aimed to decipher the mechanism by which mNT triggers its Fe-S repair capacity. By using tightly controlled reactions combined with complementary spectroscopic approaches, we have determined the differential roles played by both the redox state of the mNT cluster and dioxygen in cluster transfer and protein stability. We unambiguously demonstrated that only the oxidized state of the mNT cluster triggers cluster transfer to a generic acceptor protein and that dioxygen is neither required for the cluster transfer reaction nor does it affect the transfer rate. In the absence of apo-acceptors, a large fraction of the oxidized holo-mNT form is converted back to reduced holo-mNT under low oxygen tension. Reduced holo-mNT, which holds a [2Fe-2S]+ with a global protein fold similar to that of the oxidized form is, by contrast, resistant in losing its cluster or in transferring it. Our findings thus demonstrate that mNT uses an iron-based redox switch mechanism to regulate the transfer of its cluster. The oxidized state is the “active state,” which reacts promptly to initiate Fe-S transfer independently of dioxygen, whereas the reduced state is a “dormant form.” Finally, we propose that the redox-sensing function of mNT is a key component of the cellular adaptive response to help stress-sensitive Fe-S proteins recover from oxidative injury. PMID:26887944

  8. Role of AMP-activated protein kinase in cross-talk between apoptosis and autophagy in human colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Song, X; Kim, S-Y; Zhang, L; Tang, D; Bartlett, D L; Kwon, Y T; Lee, Y J

    2014-01-01

    Unresectable colorectal liver metastases remain a major unresolved issue and more effective novel regimens are urgently needed. While screening synergistic drug combinations for colon cancer therapy, we identified a novel multidrug treatment for colon cancer: chemotherapeutic agent melphalan in combination with proteasome inhibitor bortezomib and mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin) inhibitor rapamycin. We investigated the mechanisms of synergistic antitumor efficacy during the multidrug treatment. All experiments were performed with highly metastatic human colon cancer CX-1 and HCT116 cells, and selected critical experiments were repeated with human colon cancer stem Tu-22 cells and mouse embryo fibroblast (MEF) cells. We used immunochemical techniques to investigate a cross-talk between apoptosis and autophagy during the multidrug treatment. We observed that melphalan triggered apoptosis, bortezomib induced apoptosis and autophagy, rapamycin caused autophagy and the combinatorial treatment-induced synergistic apoptosis, which was mediated through an increase in caspase activation. We also observed that mitochondrial dysfunction induced by the combination was linked with altered cellular metabolism, which induced adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activation, resulting in Beclin-1 phosphorylated at Ser 93/96. Interestingly, Beclin-1 phosphorylated at Ser 93/96 is sufficient to induce Beclin-1 cleavage by caspase-8, which switches off autophagy to achieve the synergistic induction of apoptosis. Similar results were observed with the essential autophagy gene, autophagy-related protein 7, -deficient MEF cells. The multidrug treatment-induced Beclin-1 cleavage was abolished in Beclin-1 double-mutant (D133A/D146A) knock-in HCT116 cells, restoring the autophagy-promoting function of Beclin-1 and suppressing the apoptosis induced by the combination therapy. These observations identify a novel mechanism for AMPK-induced apoptosis through interplay

  9. Role of AMP-activated protein kinase in cross-talk between apoptosis and autophagy in human colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Song, X; Kim, S-Y; Zhang, L; Tang, D; Bartlett, D L; Kwon, Y T; Lee, Y J

    2014-10-30

    Unresectable colorectal liver metastases remain a major unresolved issue and more effective novel regimens are urgently needed. While screening synergistic drug combinations for colon cancer therapy, we identified a novel multidrug treatment for colon cancer: chemotherapeutic agent melphalan in combination with proteasome inhibitor bortezomib and mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin) inhibitor rapamycin. We investigated the mechanisms of synergistic antitumor efficacy during the multidrug treatment. All experiments were performed with highly metastatic human colon cancer CX-1 and HCT116 cells, and selected critical experiments were repeated with human colon cancer stem Tu-22 cells and mouse embryo fibroblast (MEF) cells. We used immunochemical techniques to investigate a cross-talk between apoptosis and autophagy during the multidrug treatment. We observed that melphalan triggered apoptosis, bortezomib induced apoptosis and autophagy, rapamycin caused autophagy and the combinatorial treatment-induced synergistic apoptosis, which was mediated through an increase in caspase activation. We also observed that mitochondrial dysfunction induced by the combination was linked with altered cellular metabolism, which induced adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activation, resulting in Beclin-1 phosphorylated at Ser 93/96. Interestingly, Beclin-1 phosphorylated at Ser 93/96 is sufficient to induce Beclin-1 cleavage by caspase-8, which switches off autophagy to achieve the synergistic induction of apoptosis. Similar results were observed with the essential autophagy gene, autophagy-related protein 7, -deficient MEF cells. The multidrug treatment-induced Beclin-1 cleavage was abolished in Beclin-1 double-mutant (D133A/D146A) knock-in HCT116 cells, restoring the autophagy-promoting function of Beclin-1 and suppressing the apoptosis induced by the combination therapy. These observations identify a novel mechanism for AMPK-induced apoptosis through interplay

  10. Disparate Proteome Responses of Pathogenic and Non-pathogenic Aspergilli to Human Serum Measured by Activity-Based Protein Profiling (ABPP)

    SciTech Connect

    Wiedner, Susan D.; Ansong, Charles; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Pederson, Leeanna M.; Fortuin, Suereta; Hofstad, Beth A.; Shukla, Anil K.; Panisko, Ellen A.; Smith, Richard D.; Wright, Aaron T.

    2013-07-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus is the primary pathogen causing the devastating pulmonary disease Invasive Aspergillosis in immunocompromised individuals. Genomic analysis shows high synteny between A. fumigatus and closely related rarely pathogenic Neosartorya fischeri and Aspergillus clavatus genomes. To investigate the presence of unique or highly inducible protein reactivity in the pathogen, we applied activity-based protein profiling to compare protein reactivity of all three fungi over time in minimal media growth and in response to human serum. We found 350 probe-reactive proteins exclusive to A. fumigatus, including known virulence associated proteins, and 13 proteins associated with stress response exclusive to A. fumigatus culture in serum. Though the fungi are highly orthologous, A. fumigatus has significantly more activity across varied biological process. Only 50% of expected orthologs of measured A. fumigatus reactive proteins were observed in N. fischeri and A. clavatus. Human serum induced processes uniquely or significantly represented in A. fumigatus include actin organization and assembly, transport, and fatty acid, cell membrane, and cell wall synthesis. Additionally, signaling proteins regulating vegetative growth, conidiation, and cell wall integrity, required for appropriate cellular response to external stimuli, had higher reactivity over time in A. fumigatus and N. fisheri, but not in A. clavatus. Together, we show that measured proteins and physiological processes identified solely or significantly over-represented in A. fumigatus reveal a unique adaptive response to human protein not found in closely related, but rarely aspergilli. These unique protein reactivity responses may reveal how A. fumigatus initiates pulmonary invasion leading to Invasive Aspergillosis.

  11. Human peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor mRNA and protein expression during development

    EPA Science Inventory

    The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR) are nuclear hormone receptors that regulate lipid and glucose homeostasis and are important in reproduction and development. PPARs are targets ofpharmaceuticals and are also activated by environmental contaminants, including ...

  12. Activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase by celecoxib oppositely regulates survivin and gamma-H2AX in human colorectal cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hsiao, P.-W.; Chang, C.-C.; Liu, H.-F.; Tsai, C.-M.; Chiu, Ted H.; Chao, J.-I . E-mail: chaoji@mail.tcu.edu.tw

    2007-07-01

    Cancer cells express survivin that facilitates tumorigenesis. Celecoxib has been shown to reduce human colorectal cancers. However, the role and regulation of survivin by celecoxib in colorectal carcinoma cells remain unclear. Treatment with 40-80 {mu}M celecoxib for 24 h induced cytotoxicity and proliferation inhibition via a concentration-dependent manner in RKO colorectal carcinoma cells. Celecoxib blocked the survivin protein expression and increased the phosphorylation of H2AX at serine-193 ({gamma}-H2AX). The survivin gene knockdown by transfection with a survivin siRNA revealed that the loss of survivin correlated with the expression of {gamma}-H2AX. Meanwhile, celecoxib increased caspase-3 activation and apoptosis. Celecoxib activated the phosphorylation of p38 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase. The phosphorylated proteins of p38 MAP kinase and {gamma}-H2AX were observed in the apoptotic cells. SB203580, a specific p38 MAP kinase inhibitor, protected the survivin protein expression and decreased the levels of {gamma}-H2AX and apoptosis in the celecoxib-exposed cells. The blockade of survivin expression increased the celecoxib-induced cytotoxicity; conversely, overexpression of survivin by transfection with a survivin-expressing vector raised the cancer cell proliferation and resisted the celecoxib-induced cell death. Our results provide for the first time that p38 MAP kinase participates in the down-regulation of survivin and subsequently induces the activation of {gamma}-H2AX for mediating apoptosis following treatment with celecoxib in human colorectal cancer cells.

  13. Role of activator protein-1 in the down-regulation of the human CYP2J2 gene in hypoxia.

    PubMed Central

    Marden, Nicole Y; Fiala-Beer, Eva; Xiang, Shi-Hua; Murray, Michael

    2003-01-01

    The cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2J2 arachidonic acid epoxygenase gene was down-regulated at a pre-translational level in human hepatoma-derived HepG2 cells incubated in a hypoxic environment; under these conditions, the expression of c-Jun and c-Fos mRNA and protein was increased. The 5'-upstream region of the CYP2J2 gene was isolated by amplification of a 2341 bp fragment and putative regulatory elements that resembled activator protein-1 (AP-1)-like sequences were identified. From transient transfection analysis, c-Jun was found to strongly activate a CYP2J2 -luciferase reporter construct, but co-transfection with plasmids encoding c-Fos or c-Fos-related antigens, Fra-1 and -2, abrogated reporter activity. Using a series of deletion-reporter constructs, a c-Jun-responsive module was identified between bp -152 and -50 in CYP2J2 : this region contained an AP-1-like element between bp -56 and -63. The capacity of this element to interact directly with c-Jun, but not c-Fos, was confirmed by electromobility-shift assay analysis. Mutagenesis of the -56/-63 element abolished most, but not all, of the activation of CYP2J2 by c-Jun, thus implicating an additional site within the c-Jun-responsive region. The present results establish an important role for c-Jun in the control of CYP2J2 expression in liver cells. Activation of c-Fos expression by hypoxia promotes the formation of c-Jun/c-Fos heterodimers, which decrease the binding of c-Jun to the CYP2J2 upstream region, leading to gene down-regulation. PMID:12737630

  14. Activating human genes with zinc finger proteins, transcription activator-like effectors and CRISPR/Cas9 for gene therapy and regenerative medicine.

    PubMed

    Gersbach, Charles A; Perez-Pinera, Pablo

    2014-08-01

    New technologies have recently been developed to control the expression of human genes in their native genomic context by engineering synthetic transcription factors that can be targeted to any DNA sequence. The ability to precisely regulate any gene as it occurs naturally in the genome provides a means to address a variety of diseases and disorders. This approach also circumvents some of the traditional challenges of gene therapy. In this editorial, we review the technologies that have enabled targeted human gene activation, including the engineering of transcription factors based on zinc finger proteins, transcription activator-like effectors and the CRISPR/Cas9 system. Additionally, we highlight examples in which these methods have been developed for therapeutic applications and discuss challenges and opportunities.

  15. Diverse activation states of RhoA in human lung cancer cells: contribution of G protein coupled receptors.

    PubMed

    Touge, Hirokazu; Chikumi, Hiroki; Igishi, Tadashi; Kurai, Jun; Makino, Haruhiko; Tamura, Yoshisato; Takata, Miyako; Yoneda, Kazuhiko; Nakamoto, Masaki; Suyama, Hisashi; Gutkind, J Silvio; Shimizu, Eiji

    2007-03-01

    Rho GTPases play an essential role in the control of various cellular functions. Accumulating evidence suggests that RhoA overexpression contributes to human cancer development. However, the activation states of RhoA are poorly defined in cancer cells. In this study, we examined both the expression levels and the activation states of RhoA in various lung cancer cells by quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and in vivo Rho guanine nucleotide exchange assay, respectively. Moreover, we dissected the signaling pathway from the cell surface receptors to RhoA using a broad-spectrum G protein coupled receptor (GPCR) antagonist, [D-Arg1,D-Trp5,7,9,Leu11]Substance P (SP), and a recently reported Galphaq/11-selective inhibitor, YM-254890. We found that RhoA was expressed highly in large cell carcinoma cells but only weakly in adenocarcinoma cells. The activation states of RhoA are considerably different from its expression profiles. We found that four of six small cell lung carcinoma (SCLC) cell lines exhibited a moderate to high activation rate of RhoA. The addition of [D-Arg1,D-Trp5,7,9,Leu11]SP reduced RhoA activity by almost 60% in H69 SCLC cells. The addition of YM-254890 had no effect on RhoA activity in H69 cells. Our results suggest that RhoA is activated in various lung cancer cells independent of its expression levels, and the high activation state of RhoA in SCLC cells mainly depends on a neuroendocrine peptide autocrine system which signals through Galpha12 coupled GPCR to RhoA. This study provides new insights into RhoA signaling in lung cancer cells and may help in developing novel therapeutic strategies against lung cancer.

  16. 5′-AMP-activated Protein Kinase (AMPK) Supports the Growth of Aggressive Experimental Human Breast Cancer Tumors*

    PubMed Central

    Laderoute, Keith R.; Calaoagan, Joy M.; Chao, Wan-ru; Dinh, Dominc; Denko, Nicholas; Duellman, Sarah; Kalra, Jessica; Liu, Xiaohe; Papandreou, Ioanna; Sambucetti, Lidia; Boros, Laszlo G.

    2014-01-01

    Rapid tumor growth can establish metabolically stressed microenvironments that activate 5′-AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a ubiquitous regulator of ATP homeostasis. Previously, we investigated the importance of AMPK for the growth of experimental tumors prepared from HRAS-transformed mouse embryo fibroblasts and for primary brain tumor development in a rat model of neurocarcinogenesis. Here, we used triple-negative human breast cancer cells in which AMPK activity had been knocked down to investigate the contribution of AMPK to experimental tumor growth and core glucose metabolism. We found that AMPK supports the growth of fast-growing orthotopic tumors prepared from MDA-MB-231 and DU4475 breast cancer cells but had no effect on the proliferation or survival of these cells in culture. We used in vitro and in vivo metabolic profiling with [13C]glucose tracers to investigate the contribution of AMPK to core glucose metabolism in MDA-MB-231 cells, which have a Warburg metabolic phenotype; these experiments indicated that AMPK supports tumor glucose metabolism in part through positive regulation of glycolysis and the nonoxidative pentose phosphate cycle. We also found that AMPK activity in the MDA-MB-231 tumors could systemically perturb glucose homeostasis in sensitive normal tissues (liver and pancreas). Overall, our findings suggest that the contribution of AMPK to the growth of aggressive experimental tumors has a critical microenvironmental component that involves specific regulation of core glucose metabolism. PMID:24993821

  17. Self-cleavage of Human CLCA1 Protein by a Novel Internal Metalloprotease Domain Controls Calcium-activated Chloride Channel Activation*♦

    PubMed Central

    Yurtsever, Zeynep; Sala-Rabanal, Monica; Randolph, David T.; Scheaffer, Suzanne M.; Roswit, William T.; Alevy, Yael G.; Patel, Anand C.; Heier, Richard F.; Romero, Arthur G.; Nichols, Colin G.; Holtzman, Michael J.; Brett, Tom J.

    2012-01-01

    The chloride channel calcium-activated (CLCA) family are secreted proteins that regulate both chloride transport and mucin expression, thus controlling the production of mucus in respiratory and other systems. Accordingly, human CLCA1 is a critical mediator of hypersecretory lung diseases, such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and cystic fibrosis, that manifest mucus obstruction. Despite relevance to homeostasis and disease, the mechanism of CLCA1 function remains largely undefined. We address this void by showing that CLCA proteins contain a consensus proteolytic cleavage site recognized by a novel zincin metalloprotease domain located within the N terminus of CLCA itself. CLCA1 mutations that inhibit self-cleavage prevent activation of calcium-activated chloride channel (CaCC)-mediated chloride transport. CaCC activation requires cleavage to unmask the N-terminal fragment of CLCA1, which can independently gate CaCCs. Gating of CaCCs mediated by CLCA1 does not appear to involve proteolytic cleavage of the channel because a mutant N-terminal fragment deficient in proteolytic activity is able to induce currents comparable with that of the native fragment. These data provide both a mechanistic basis for CLCA1 self-cleavage and a novel mechanism for regulation of chloride channel activity specific to the mucosal interface. PMID:23112050

  18. Self-cleavage of human CLCA1 protein by a novel internal metalloprotease domain controls calcium-activated chloride channel activation.

    PubMed

    Yurtsever, Zeynep; Sala-Rabanal, Monica; Randolph, David T; Scheaffer, Suzanne M; Roswit, William T; Alevy, Yael G; Patel, Anand C; Heier, Richard F; Romero, Arthur G; Nichols, Colin G; Holtzman, Michael J; Brett, Tom J

    2012-12-07

    The chloride channel calcium-activated (CLCA) family are secreted proteins that regulate both chloride transport and mucin expression, thus controlling the production of mucus in respiratory and other systems. Accordingly, human CLCA1 is a critical mediator of hypersecretory lung diseases, such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and cystic fibrosis, that manifest mucus obstruction. Despite relevance to homeostasis and disease, the mechanism of CLCA1 function remains largely undefined. We address this void by showing that CLCA proteins contain a consensus proteolytic cleavage site recognized by a novel zincin metalloprotease domain located within the N terminus of CLCA itself. CLCA1 mutations that inhibit self-cleavage prevent activation of calcium-activated chloride channel (CaCC)-mediated chloride transport. CaCC activation requires cleavage to unmask the N-terminal fragment of CLCA1, which can independently gate CaCCs. Gating of CaCCs mediated by CLCA1 does not appear to involve proteolytic cleavage of the channel because a mutant N-terminal fragment deficient in proteolytic activity is able to induce currents comparable with that of the native fragment. These data provide both a mechanistic basis for CLCA1 self-cleavage and a novel mechanism for regulation of chloride channel activity specific to the mucosal interface.

  19. Mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase-1 inhibition and sustained extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 activation in camptothecin-induced human colon cancer cell death

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Minyoung; Young Kim, Sun; Kim, JongGuk; Kim, Hak-Su; Kim, Sang-Man; Kim, Eun Ju

    2013-01-01

    Camptothecins are commonly used chemotherapeutics; in some models, they enhance signaling via the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway through effects on upstream kinases. To evaluate the impact of camptothecin (CPT) on MAPKs in human colon cancer, we studied HCT116 and CaCo2 colon cancer cells. We found that HCT116 cells highly express mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase-1 (MKP1), which selectively inactivates extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), whereas MKP1 levels were undetectable in CaCo2 cells. CPT did not affect ERK activity in CaCo2 cells, but did induce a striking increase in ERK activity in HCT116 cells in association with a corresponding decrease in MKP1. The reduction in MKP1 expression occurred at a posttranscriptional level and was blocked by the proteasome inhibitor MG132, whereas that CPT-induced downregulation of MKP1 was not due to proteasome-mediated degradation. Treatment of HCT116 cells with CPT induced a sustained activation of nuclear ERK, which was required for CPT-induced apoptosis. P38 and JNK activity were unaffected by CPT, suggesting that the effects of CPT are mediated specifically by ERK. These results suggest that targeting dual-specificity MAPK phosphatases in colon cancer cells may be a viable strategy for optimizing camptothecin-based therapeutic protocols. PMID:24005240

  20. Structural Basis for the Catalytic Activity of Human Serine/Threonine Protein Phosphatase-5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swingle, M. R.; Honkanen, R.; Ciszak, E. M.

    2004-01-01

    Serinehhreonine protein phosphatase-5 (PP5) affects many signaling networks that regulate cell growth and cellular responses to stress. Here we report the crystal structure of the PP5 catalytic domain (PP5c) at a resolution of 1.6 A. From this structure we resolved the mechanism for PP5-mediated hydrolysis of phosphoprotein substrates, which requires the precise positioning of two metal ions within a con served Aspn-271-M(sub 1):M(sub 2)-W(sup 1)-His-427-His-304-Asp-274 catalytic motif. The structure of PPSc provides a structural basis for explaining the exceptional catalytic proficiency of protein phosphatases, which are among the most powerful known catalysts. Resolution of the entire C-terminus revealed a novel subdomain, and the structure of the PP5c should also aid development of type-specific inhibitors.

  1. Metformin inhibits growth of human non-small cell lung cancer cells via liver kinase B-1-independent activation of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase

    PubMed Central

    GUO, QIANQIAN; LIU, ZHIYAN; JIANG, LILI; LIU, MENGJIE; MA, JIEQUN; YANG, CHENGCHENG; HAN, LILI; NAN, KEJUN; LIANG, XUAN

    2016-01-01

    Metformin, the most widely administered oral anti-diabetic therapeutic agent, exerts its glucose-lowering effect predominantly via liver kinase B1 (LKB1)-dependent activation of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK). Accumulating evidence has demonstrated that metformin possesses potential antitumor effects. However, whether the antitumor effect of metformin is via the LKB1/AMPK signaling pathway remains to be determined. In the current study, the effects of metformin on proliferation, cell cycle progression, and apoptosis of human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) H460 (LKB1-null) and H1299 (LKB1-positive) cells were assessed, and the role of LKB1/AMPK signaling in the anti-growth effects of metformin were investigated. Cell viability was determined using a 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay, cell cycle distribution and apoptosis were assessed by flow cytometry, and protein expression levels were measured by western blotting. Metformin inhibited proliferation, induced significant cell cycle arrest at the G0–G1 phase and increased apoptosis in NSCLC cells in a time- and concentration-dependent manner, regardless of the level of LKB1 protein expression. Furthermore, knockdown of LKB1 with short hairpin RNA (shRNA) did not affect the antiproliferative effect of metformin in the H1299 cells. Metformin stimulated AMPK phosphorylation and subsequently suppressed the phosphorylation of mammalian target of rapamycin and its downstream effector, 70-kDa ribosomal protein S6 kinase in the two cell lines. These effects were abrogated by silencing AMPK with small interfering RNA (siRNA). In addition, knockdown of AMPK with siRNA inhibited the effect of metformin on cell proliferation in the two cell lines. These results provide evidence that the growth inhibition of metformin in NSCLC cells is mediated by LKB1-independent activation of AMPK, indicating that metformin may be a potential therapeutic agent for the treatment of

  2. Degradation of Activated Protein Kinases by Ubiquitination

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Zhimin; Hunter, Tony

    2009-01-01

    Protein kinases are important regulators of intracellular signal transduction pathways and play critical roles in diverse cellular functions. Once a protein kinase is activated, its activity is subsequently downregulated through a variety of mechanisms. Accumulating evidence indicates that the activation of protein kinases commonly initiates their downregulation via the ubiquitin/proteasome pathway. Failure to regulate protein kinase activity or expression levels can cause human diseases. PMID:19489726

  3. Resveratrol serves as a protein-substrate interaction stabilizer in human SIRT1 activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Xuben; Rooklin, David; Fang, Hao; Zhang, Yingkai

    2016-11-01

    Resveratrol is a natural compound found in red wine that has been suggested to exert its potential health benefit through the activation of SIRT1, a crucial member of the mammalian NAD+-dependent deacetylases. SIRT1 has emerged as an attractive therapeutic target for many aging related diseases, however, how its activity can only be activated toward some specific substrates by resveratrol has been poorly understood. Herein, by employing extensive molecular dynamics simulations as well as fragment-centric topographical mapping of binding interfaces, we have clarified current controversies in the literature and elucidated that resveratrol plays an important activation role by stabilizing SIRT1/peptide interactions in a substrate-specific manner. This new mechanism highlights the importance of the N-terminal domain in substrate recognition, explains the activity restoration role of resveratrol toward some “loose-binding” substrates of SIRT1, and has significant implications for the rational design of new substrate-specific SIRT1 modulators.

  4. Temporal expression of the human alcohol dehydrogenase gene family during liver development correlates with differential promoter activation by hepatocyte nuclear factor 1, CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein alpha, liver activator protein, and D-element-binding protein.

    PubMed Central

    van Ooij, C; Snyder, R C; Paeper, B W; Duester, G

    1992-01-01

    The human class I alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) gene family consists of ADH1, ADH2, and ADH3, which are sequentially activated in early fetal, late fetal, and postnatal liver, respectively. Analysis of ADH promoters revealed differential activation by several factors previously shown to control liver transcription. In cotransfection assays, the ADH1 promoter, but not the ADH2 or ADH3 promoter, was shown to respond to hepatocyte nuclear factor 1 (HNF-1), which has previously been shown to regulate transcription in early liver development. The ADH2 promoter, but not the ADH1 or ADH3 promoter, was shown to respond to CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein alpha (C/EBP alpha), a transcription factor particularly active during late fetal liver and early postnatal liver development. The ADH1, ADH2, and ADH3 promoters all responded to the liver transcription factors liver activator protein (LAP) and D-element-binding protein (DBP), which are most active in postnatal liver. For all three promoters, the activation by LAP or DBP was higher than that seen by HNF-1 or C/EBP alpha, and a significant synergism between C/EBP alpha and LAP was noticed for the ADH2 and ADH3 promoters when both factors were simultaneously cotransfected. A hierarchy of ADH promoter responsiveness to C/EBP alpha and LAP homo- and heterodimers is suggested. In all three ADH genes, LAP bound to the same four sites previously reported for C/EBP alpha (i.e., -160, -120, -40, and -20 bp), but DBP bound strongly only to the site located at -40 bp relative to the transcriptional start. Mutational analysis of ADH2 indicated that the -40 bp element accounts for most of the promoter regulation by the bZIP factors analyzed. These studies suggest that HNF-1 and C/EBP alpha help establish ADH gene family transcription in fetal liver and that LAP and DBP help maintain high-level ADH gene family transcription in postnatal liver. Images PMID:1620113

  5. Neuropeptide Y, substance P, and human bone morphogenetic protein 2 stimulate human osteoblast osteogenic activity by enhancing gap junction intercellular communication

    PubMed Central

    Ma, W.H.; Liu, Y.J.; Wang, W.; Zhang, Y.Z.

    2015-01-01

    Bone homeostasis seems to be controlled by delicate and subtle “cross talk” between the nervous system and “osteo-neuromediators” that control bone remodeling. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of interactions between neuropeptides and human bone morphogenetic protein 2 (hBMP2) on human osteoblasts. We also investigated the effects of neuropeptides and hBMP2 on gap junction intercellular communication (GJIC). Osteoblasts were treated with neuropeptide Y (NPY), substance P (SP), or hBMP2 at three concentrations. At various intervals after treatment, cell viability was measured by the MTT assay. In addition, cellular alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and osteocalcin were determined by colorimetric assay and radioimmunoassay, respectively. The effects of NPY, SP and hBMP on GJIC were determined by laser scanning confocal microscopy. The viability of cells treated with neuropeptides and hBMP2 increased significantly in a time-dependent manner, but was inversely associated with the concentration of the treatments. ALP activity and osteocalcin were both reduced in osteoblasts exposed to the combination of neuropeptides and hBMP2. The GJIC of osteoblasts was significantly increased by the neuropeptides and hBMP2. These results suggest that osteoblast activity is increased by neuropeptides and hBMP2 through increased GJIC. Identification of the GJIC-mediated signal transduction capable of modulating the cellular activities of bone cells represents a novel approach to studying the biology of skeletal innervation. PMID:25714881

  6. Cadmium-induced apoptosis and necrosis in human osteoblasts: role of caspases and mitogen-activated protein kinases pathways.

    PubMed

    Brama, M; Politi, L; Santini, P; Migliaccio, S; Scandurra, R

    2012-02-01

    Cadmium is a widespread environmental pollutant which induces severe toxic alterations, including osteomalacia and osteoporosis, likely by estrogen receptor-dependent mechanisms. Indeed, cadmium has been described to act as an endocrine disruptor and its toxicity is exerted both in vivo and in vitro through induction of apoptosis and/or necrosis by not fully clarified intracellular mechanism(s) of action. Aim of the present study was to further investigate the molecular mechanism by which cadmium might alter homeostasis of estrogen target cells, such as osteoblast homeostasis, inducing cell apoptosis and/or necrosis. Human osteoblastic cells (hFOB 1.19) in culture were used as an in vitro model to characterize the intracellular mechanisms induced by this heavy metal. Cells were incubated in the presence/ absence of 10-50 μM cadmium chloride at different times and DNA fragmentation and activation of procaspases- 8 and -3 were induced upon CdCl(2) treatment triggering apoptotic and necrotic pathways. Addition of caspase-8 and -3 inhibitors (Z-IETD-FMK and Z-DQMD-FMK) partially blocked these effects. No activation of procaspase-9 was observed. To determine the role of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) in these events, we investigated c-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), p38 and extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK1/2) phosphorylation which were activated by 10 μM CdCl(2). Chemical inhibitors of JNK, p38, and ERK1/2, SP600125, SB202190, and PD98059, significantly reduced the phosphorylation of the kinases and blunted apoptosis. In contrast, caspase inhibitors did not reduce the cadmium-induced MAPK phosphorylation, suggesting an independent activation of these pathways. In conclusion, at least 2 pathways appear activated by cadmium in osteoblasts: a direct induction of caspase-8 followed by activation of caspase-3 and an indirect induction by phosphorylation of ERK1/2, p38, and JNK MAPK triggering activation of caspase-8 and -3.

  7. Nitric oxide stimulates human sperm motility via activation of the cyclic GMP/protein kinase G signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Miraglia, Erica; De Angelis, Federico; Gazzano, Elena; Hassanpour, Hossain; Bertagna, Angela; Aldieri, Elisabetta; Revelli, Alberto; Ghigo, Dario

    2011-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO), a modulator of several physiological processes, is involved in different human sperm functions. We have investigated whether NO may stimulate the motility of human spermatozoa via activation of the soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC)/cGMP pathway. Sperm samples obtained by masturbation from 70 normozoospermic patients were processed by the swim-up technique. The kinetic parameters of the motile sperm-rich fractions were assessed by computer-assisted sperm analysis. After a 30-90  min incubation, the NO donor S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO) exerted a significant enhancing effect on progressive motility (77, 78, and 78% vs 66, 65, and 62% of the control at the corresponding time), straight linear velocity (44, 49, and 48 μm/s vs 34, 35, and 35.5 μm/s), curvilinear velocity (81, 83, and 84 μm/s vs 68 μm/s), and average path velocity (52, 57, and 54 μm/s vs 40, 42, and 42 μm/s) at 5 μM but not at lower concentrations, and in parallel increased the synthesis of cGMP. A similar effect was obtained with the NO donor spermine NONOate after 30 and 60  min. The GSNO-induced effects on sperm motility were abolished by 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo-[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (a specific sGC inhibitor) and mimicked by 8-bromo-cGMP (8-Br-cGMP; a cell-permeating cGMP analog); the treatment with Rp-8-Br-cGMPS (an inhibitor of cGMP-dependent protein kinases) prevented both the GSNO- and the 8-Br-cGMP-induced responses. On the contrary, we did not observe any effect of the cGMP/PRKG1 (PKG) pathway modulators on the onset of hyperactivated sperm motility. Our results suggest that NO stimulates human sperm motility via the activation of sGC, the subsequent synthesis of cGMP, and the activation of cGMP-dependent protein kinases.

  8. Body weight management effect of burdock (Arctium lappa L.) root is associated with the activation of AMP-activated protein kinase in human HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Daih-Huang; Hung, Ming-Chi; Hung, Chao-Ming; Liu, Li-Min; Chen, Fu-An; Shieh, Po-Chuen; Ho, Chi-Tang; Way, Tzong-Der

    2012-10-01

    Burdock (Arcticum lappa L.) root is used in folk medicine and also as a vegetable in Asian countries. In the present study, burdock root treatment significantly reduced body weight in rats. To evaluate the bioactive compounds, we successively extracted the burdock root with ethanol (AL-1), and fractionated it with n-hexane (AL-2), ethyl acetate (AL-3), n-butanol (AL-4), and water (AL-5). Among these fractions, AL-2 contained components with the most effective hypolipidemic potential in human hepatoma HepG2 cells. AL-2 decreased the expression of fatty acid synthase (FASN) and inhibited the activity of acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase (ACC) by stimulating AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) through the LKB1 pathway. Three active compounds were identified from the AL-2, namely α-linolenic acid, methyl α-linolenate, and methyl oleate. These results suggest that burdock root is expected to be useful for body weight management.

  9. Resveratrol serves as a protein-substrate interaction stabilizer in human SIRT1 activation

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Xuben; Rooklin, David; Fang, Hao; Zhang, Yingkai

    2016-01-01

    Resveratrol is a natural compound found in red wine that has been suggested to exert its potential health benefit through the activation of SIRT1, a crucial member of the mammalian NAD+-dependent deacetylases. SIRT1 has emerged as an attractive therapeutic target for many aging related diseases, however, how its activity can only be activated toward some specific substrates by resveratrol has been poorly understood. Herein, by employing extensive molecular dynamics simulations as well as fragment-centric topographical mapping of binding interfaces, we have clarified current controversies in the literature and elucidated that resveratrol plays an important activation role by stabilizing SIRT1/peptide interactions in a substrate-specific manner. This new mechanism highlights the importance of the N-terminal domain in substrate recognition, explains the activity restoration role of resveratrol toward some “loose-binding” substrates of SIRT1, and has significant implications for the rational design of new substrate-specific SIRT1 modulators. PMID:27901083

  10. Human mesenchymal stem cell differentiation to the osteogenic or adipogenic lineage is regulated by AMP-activated protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eung-Kyun; Lim, Seyoung; Park, Ji-Man; Seo, Jeong Kon; Kim, Jae Ho; Kim, Kyong Tai; Ryu, Sung Ho; Suh, Pann-Ghill

    2012-04-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is an energy-sensing kinase that has recently been shown to regulate the differentiation of preadipocytes and osteoblasts. However, the role of AMPK in stem cell differentiation is largely unknown. Using in vitro culture models, the present study demonstrates that AMPK is a critical regulatory factor for osteogenic differentiation. We observed that expression and phosphorylation of AMPK were increased during osteogenesis in human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hAMSC). To elucidate the role of AMPK in osteogenic differentiation, we investigated the effect of AMPK inhibition or knockdown on mineralization of hAMSC. Compound C, an AMPK inhibitor, reduced mineralized matrix deposition and suppressed the expression of osteoblast-specific genes, including alkaline phosphatase (ALP), runt-related transcription factor 2 (RUNX2), and osteocalcin (OCN). Knockdown of AMPK by shRNA-lentivirus infection also reduced osteogenesis. In addition, inhibition or knockdown of AMPK during osteogenesis inhibited ERK phosphorylation, which is required for osteogenesis. Interestingly, inhibition of AMPK induced adipogenic differentiation of hAMSC, even in osteogenic induction medium (OIM). These results provide a potential mechanism involving AMPK activation in osteogenic differentiation of hAMSC and suggest that commitment of hAMSC to osteogenic or adipogenic lineage is governed by activation or inhibition of AMPK, respectively.

  11. AMP-activated protein kinase mediates T cell activation-induced expression of FasL and COX-2 via protein kinase C theta-dependent pathway in human Jurkat T leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung Yeon; Choi, A-Young; Oh, Young Taek; Choe, Wonchae; Yeo, Eui-Ju; Ha, Joohun; Kang, Insug

    2012-06-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), an important regulator of energy homeostasis, is known to be activated during T cell activation. T cell activation by T cell receptor (TCR) engagement or its pharmacological mimics, PMA plus ionomycin (PMA/Io), induces immunomodulatory FasL and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression. In this study, we examined the role and mechanisms of AMPK in PMA/Io-induced expression of FasL and COX-2 in Jurkat T human leukemic cells. Inhibition of AMPK by a pharmacological agent, compound C, or AMPKα1 siRNA suppressed expression of FasL and COX-2 mRNAs and proteins in PMA/Io-activated Jurkat cells. It also reduced secretion of FasL protein and prostaglandin E2, a main product of COX-2, in Jurkat cells and peripheral blood lymphocytes activated with PMA/Io or monoclonal anti-CD3 plus anti-CD28. Consistently, inhibition of AMPK blocked promoter activities of FasL and COX-2 in activated Jurkat cells. As protein kinase C theta (PKCθ) is a central molecule for TCR signaling, we examined any possible cross-talk between AMPK and PKCθ in activated T cells. Of particular importance, we found that inhibition of AMPK blocked phosphorylation and activation of PKCθ, suggesting that AMPK is an upstream kinase of PKCθ. Moreover, we showed that AMPK was directly associated with PKCθ and phosphorylated Thr538 of PKCθ in PMA/Io-stimulated Jurkat cells. We also showed that inhibition of PKCθ by rottlerin or dominant negative PKCθ reduced AMPK-mediated transcriptional activation of NF-AT and AP-1 in activated Jurkat cells. Taken together, these results suggest that AMPK regulates expression of FasL and COX-2 via the PKCθ and NF-AT and AP-1 pathways in activated Jurkat cells.

  12. Heparin binding carboxypeptidase E protein exhibits antibacterial activity in human semen.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sanjay; Tomar, Anil Kumar; Singh, Sudhuman; Gill, Kamaldeep; Dey, Sharmistha; Singh, Sarman; Yadav, Savita

    2014-03-01

    Carboxypeptidase E (CPE) cleaves basic amino acid residues at the C-terminal end and involves in the biosynthesis of numerous peptide hormones and neurotransmitters. It was purified from human seminal plasma by ion exchange, heparin affinity and gel filtration chromatography followed by identification through SDS-PAGE and MALDI-TOF/MS analysis, which was further confirmed by western blotting. CPE was characterized as glycoprotein by Periodic Acid Schiff (PAS) staining and treating with deglycosylating enzyme N-glycosidase F. The interaction of CPE with heparin was illustrated by surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and in silico interaction analysis. The association constant (KA) and dissociation constant (KD) of CPE with heparin was determined by SPR and found to be 1.06 × 10(5)M and 9.46 × 10(-6)M, respectively. It was detected in human spermatozoa also by western blotting using mouse anti-CPE primary antibody. 20-100 μg/ml concentration of CPE was observed as highly effective in killing Escherichia coli by colony forming unit (CFU) assay. We suggest that CPE might act not only in the innate immunity of male reproductive tract but also regulate sperm fertilization process by interacting heparin.

  13. UVB-mediated activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase enhances resistance of normal human keratinocytes to apoptosis by stabilizing cytoplasmic p53.

    PubMed

    Chouinard, Nadine; Valerie, Kristoffer; Rouabhia, Mahmoud; Huot, Jacques

    2002-07-01

    Human keratinocytes respond to UV rays by developing a fast adaptive response that contributes to maintaining their functions and survival. We investigated the role of the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways in transducing the UV signals in normal human keratinocytes. We found that UVA, UVB or UVC induced a marked and persistent activation of p38, whereas c-Jun N-terminal kinase or extracellular signal-regulated kinase were less or not activated respectively. Inhibition of p38 activity by expression of a dominant-negative mutant of p38 or with SB203580 impaired cell viability and led to an increase in UVB-induced apoptosis. This sensitization to apoptosis was independent of caspase activities. Inhibition of p38 did not sensitize transformed HaCaT keratinocytes to UVB-induced apoptosis. In normal keratinocytes, expression of a dominant-negative mutant of p53 increased UVB-induced cell death, pointing to a role for p53. In these cells, UVB triggered a p38-dependent phosphorylation of p53 on Ser-15. This phosphorylation was associated with an SB203580-sensitive accumulation of p53, even in the presence of a serine phosphatase inhibitor. Accumulated p53 was localized mainly in the cytoplasm, independently of CRM1 nuclear export. In HaCaT cells, p53 was localized exclusively in the nucleus and its distribution and level were not affected by UVB or p38 inhibition. However, UVB induced an SB203580-insensitive phosphorylation on Ser-15 of mutated p53. Overall, our results suggest that, in normal human keratinocytes, protection against UVB depends on p38-mediated phosphorylation and stabilization of p53 and is tightly associated with the cytoplasmic sequestration of wild-type p53. We conclude that the p38/p53 pathway plays a key role in the adaptive response of normal human keratinocytes against UV stress.

  14. Peroxisome Proliferator Activated Receptors Alpha, Beta, and Gamma mRNA and protein expression in human fetal tissues

    EPA Science Inventory

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) regulate lipid and glucose homeostasis, are targets of pharmaceuticals, and are also activated by environmental contaminants. Almost nothing is known about expression of PPARs during human fetal development. This study examine...

  15. Some Effects of Calcium on the Activation of Human Factor VIII/Von Willebrand Factor Protein by Thrombin

    PubMed Central

    Switzer, Mary Ellen; McKee, Patrick A.

    1977-01-01

    When Factor VIII/von Willebrand factor (FVIII/vWF) protein is rechromatographed on 4% agarose in 0.25 M CaCl2, the protein and vWF activity appear in the void volume, but most of the FVIII procoagulant activity elutes later. Recent evidence suggests that the delayed FVIII procoagulant activity is a proteolytically modified form of FVIII/vWF protein that filters anomalously from agarose in 0.25 M CaCl2. To test whether or not thrombin is the protease involved, the effect of 0.25 M CaCl2 on FVIII/vWF and its reaction with thrombin was examined. About 30% of the FVIII procoagulant activity was lost immediately when solutions of FVIII/vWF protein were made 0.25 M in CaCl2. When FVIII in 0.15 M NaCl was activated with 0.04 U thrombin/ml and then made 0.25 M in CaCl2, the procoagulant activity of a broad range of FVIII/vWF protein concentrations remained activated for at least 6 h. But, in 0.25 M CaCl2, the increase in FVIII procoagulant activity in response to thrombin was much more gradual and once activated, the procoagulant activity was stabilized by 0.25 M CaCl2. When thrombin-activated FVIII/vWF protein was filtered on 4% agarose in 0.15 M NaCl, there was considerable inactivation of FVIII procoagulant activity; however, the procoagulant activity that did remain eluted in the void volume. In contrast, when thrombin-activated FVIII/vWF protein was filtered in 0.25 M CaCl2, the FVIII procoagulant activity eluted well after the void volume and remained activated for 6 h. The procoagulant peak isolated by filtering nonthrombin-activated FVIII/vWF protein on agarose in 0.25 M CaCl2 was compared to that isolated from thrombin-activated FVIII/vWF protein. Both procoagulant activity peak proteins had about the same specific vWF activity as the corresponding void volume protein. Before reduction, the sodium dodecyl sulfate gel patterns for the two procoagulant activity peak proteins were the same. After reduction, the gel pattern for the nonthrombin-activated procoagulant

  16. Analysis of the unwinding activity of the dimeric RECQ1 helicase in the presence of human replication protein A.

    PubMed

    Cui, Sheng; Arosio, Daniele; Doherty, Kevin M; Brosh, Robert M; Falaschi, Arturo; Vindigni, Alessandro

    2004-01-01

    RecQ helicases are required for the maintenance of genome stability. Characterization of the substrate specificity and identification of the binding partners of the five human RecQ helicases are essential for understanding their function. In the present study, we have developed an efficient baculovirus expression system that allows us to obtain milligram quantities of recombinant RECQ1. Our gel filtration and dynamic light scattering experiments show that RECQ1 has an apparent molecular mass of 158 kDa and a hydrodynamic radius of 5.4 +/- 0.6 nm, suggesting that RECQ1 forms dimers in solution. The oligomeric state of RECQ1 remains unchanged upon binding to a single-stranded (ss)DNA fragment of 50 nt. We show that RECQ1 alone is able to unwind short DNA duplexes (<110 bp), whereas considerably longer substrates (501 bp) can be unwound only in the presence of human replication protein A (hRPA). The same experiments with Escherichia coli SSB show that RECQ1 is specifically stimulated by hRPA. However, hRPA does not affect the ssDNA-dependent ATPase activity of RECQ1. In addition, our far western, ELISA and co-immunoprecipitation experiments demonstrate that RECQ1 physically interacts with the 70 kDa subunit of hRPA and that this interaction is not mediated by DNA.

  17. Activated Notch signaling is required for hepatitis B virus X protein to promote proliferation and survival of human hepatic cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fan; Zhou, Haiyan; Xia, Xiumei; Sun, Qian; Wang, Ying; Cheng, Bin

    2010-12-01

    Hepatitis B virus X protein (HBx) is a multifunctional oncoprotein which plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). However, the exact mechanisms remain controversial. Here we show that HBx strongly stimulated cell growth, promoted cell cycle progression and inhibited apoptosis of human non-tumor hepatic cell line L02 cells. It also accelerated tumor formation of L02 cells in BALB/c nude mice. Furthermore, Notch signaling components were upregulated in HBx-expressing L02 cells compared to normal L02 cells. However, blocking Notch signaling with a γ-secretase inhibitor N-[N-(3,5-difluorophenacetyl)-l-alanyl]-S-phenylglycine t-butyl ester (DAPT) attenuated cell growth, shortened the S phase of cell cycle and promoted apoptosis of HBx-expressing L02 cell in a dose- and time-dependent manner, but normal L02 cells were not significantly affected by Notch signaling blocking. Therefore, our findings demonstrate that HBx could promote the growth of human non-tumor hepatic cell line L02 cells both in vitro and in vivo, which may require the activation of Notch signaling pathway.

  18. Apoptosis and melanogenesis in human melanoma cells induced by anthrax lethal factor inactivation of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koo, Han-Mo; Vanbrocklin, Matt; McWilliams, Mary Jane; Leppla, Stephan H.; Duesbery, Nicholas S.; Vande Woude, George F.

    2002-03-01

    Lethal factor, the principal virulence factor of Bacillus anthracis, inhibits mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling by proteolytically cleaving MAPK kinases. Edema factor, another component of anthrax toxin, is an adenylate cyclase, which increases intracellular cAMP. Inhibition of MAPK signaling with either anthrax lethal toxin (LeTx) or small molecule MAPK kinase inhibitors triggers apoptosis in human melanoma cells. Normal melanocytes do not undergo apoptosis in response to MAPK inhibition but arrest in the G1 phase of the cell cycle. Importantly, in vivo treatment of human melanoma xenograft tumors in athymic nude mice with LeTx results in significant or complete tumor regression without apparent side effects, suggesting that inhibiting the MAPK signaling pathway may be a useful strategy for treating melanoma. Additionally, interrupting MAPK signaling with LeTx and elevating cAMP with anthrax edema toxin in both melanoma cells and melanocytes lead to dramatic melanin production, perhaps explaining the formation of blackened eschars in cutaneous anthrax.

  19. Nicotine stimulates adhesion molecular expression via calcium influx and mitogen-activated protein kinases in human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yajing; Wang, Zhaoxia; Zhou, Ying; Liu, Liming; Zhao, Yangxing; Yao, Chenjiang; Wang, Lianyun; Qiao, Zhongdong

    2006-02-01

    To evaluate the effect of nicotine on endothelium dysfunction and development of vascular diseases, we investigated the influence on adhesion molecular expression mediated by nicotine and the mechanism of this effect in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). The result showed that nicotine could induce surface/soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM-1) and endothelial selectin (E-selectin) expression in a time-response decline manner and the peak appeared at 15 min. This action could be mediated by mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal regulated kinase 1/2 (MAPK/ERK1/2) and MAPK/p38 because their activation could be distinctly blocked by MAPK inhibitors, PD098059 or SB203580. Mecamylamine (non-selective nicotinic receptor inhibitor), alpha-bungarotoxin (alpha7 nicotinic receptor inhibitor) could block Ca2+ accumulation, and then, prevented the phosphorylation on ERK1/2 and p38. They also inhibited the surface/soluble VCAM-1, E-selectin production of HUVECs modulated by nicotine. Therefore, we concluded that: (i) nicotine obviously up-regulates VCAM-1 and E-selectin expression at 15 min in HUVECs, (ii) nicotine activates HUVECs triggered by the ERK1/2 and p38 phosphorylation with an involvement of intracellular calcium mobilization chiefly mediated by alpha7 nicotinic receptor, (iii) intracellular Ca2+ activates a sequential pathway from alpha7 nicotinic receptor to the phosphorylation of ERK1/2, p38. These elucidate that nicotine activates HUVECs through fast signal transduction pathway and arguments their capacity of adhesion molecular production. Further more nicotine may contribute its influence to the progression of vascular disease such as atherosclerotic lesion.

  20. Hydrogen peroxide stimulates proliferation and migration of human prostate cancer cells through activation of activator protein-1 and up-regulation of the heparin affin regulatory peptide gene.

    PubMed

    Polytarchou, Christos; Hatziapostolou, Maria; Papadimitriou, Evangelia

    2005-12-09

    It is becoming increasingly recognized that hydrogen peroxide (HP) plays a role in cell proliferation and migration. In the present study we found that exogenous HP significantly induced human prostate cancer LNCaP cell proliferation and migration. Heparin affin regulatory peptide (HARP) seems to be involved in the stimulatory effect of HP, because the latter had no effect on stably transfected LNCaP cells that did not express HARP. Moreover, HP significantly increased HARP mRNA and protein amounts in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. Curcumin and activator protein-1 (AP-1) decoy oligonucleotides abrogated both HP-induced HARP expression and LNCaP cell proliferation and migration. HP increased luciferase activity of the 5'-flanking region of the HARP gene introduced in a reporter gene vector, an effect that was abolished when even one of the two putative AP-1 binding sites of the HARP promoter was mutated. The effect of HP seems to be due to the binding of Fra-1, JunD, and phospho-c-Jun to the HARP promoter. These results support the notion that HARP is important for human prostate cancer cell proliferation and migration, establish the role of AP-1 in the up-regulation of HARP expression by low concentrations of HP, and characterize the AP-1 dimers involved.

  1. EXTRACTS OF IRRADIATED MATURE HUMAN TOOTH CROWNS CONTAIN MMP-20 PROTEIN AND ACTIVITY

    PubMed Central

    MCGUIRE, J.D.; MOUSA, A.A.; ZHANG, BO J.; TODOKI, L.S.; HUFFMAN, N.T.; CHANDRABABU, K.B.; MORADIAN-OLDAK, J.; KEIGHTLEY, A.; WANG, Y.; WALKER, M.P.; GORSKI, J.P.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives We recently demonstrated a significant correlation between enamel delamination and tooth-level radiation dose in oral cancer patients. Since radiation can induce the synthesis and activation of matrix metalloproteinases, we hypothesized that irradiated teeth may contain active matrix metalloproteinases. Materials and Methods Extracted teeth from oral cancer patients treated with radiotherapy and from healthy subjects were compared. Extracted mature third molars from healthy subjects were irradiated in vitro and/or incubated for 0 to 6 months at 37°C. All teeth were then pulverized, extracted, and extracts subjected to proteomic and enzymatic analyses. Results Screening of irradiated crown extracts using mass spectrometry identified MMP-20 (enamelysin) which is expressed developmentally in dentin and enamel but believed to be removed prior to tooth eruption. MMP-20 was composed of catalytically active forms at Mr=43, 41, 24 and 22 kDa and was immunolocalized predominantly to the morphological dentin enamel junction. The proportion of different sized MMP-20 forms changed with incubation and irradiation. While the pattern was not altered directly by irradiation of healthy teeth with 70 G, subsequent incubation at 37°C for 3–6 months with or without prior irradiation caused the proportion of Mr=24–22 kDa MMP-20 bands to increase dramatically. Extracts of teeth from oral cancer patients who received >70 Gy radiation also contained relatively more 24 and 22 kDa MMP-20 than those of healthy age-related teeth. Conclusion MMP-20 is a radiation-resistant component of mature tooth crowns enriched in the dentin-enamel. We speculate that MMP-20 catalyzed degradation of organic matrix at this site could lead to enamel delamination associated with oral cancer radiotherapy. PMID:24607847

  2. Rac2 GTPase activation by angiotensin II is modulated by Ca2+/calcineurin and mitogen-activated protein kinases in human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    El Bekay, Rajaa; Alba, Gonzalo; Reyes, M Edith; Chacón, Pedro; Vega, Antonio; Martín-Nieto, José; Jiménez, Juan; Ramos, Eladio; Oliván, Josefina; Pintado, Elízabeth; Sobrino, Francisco

    2007-11-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) highly stimulates superoxide anion production by neutrophils. The G-protein Rac2 modulates the activity of NADPH oxidase in response to various stimuli. Here, we describe that Ang II induced both Rac2 translocation from the cytosol to the plasma membrane and Rac2 GTP-binding activity. Furthermore, Clostridium difficile toxin A, an inhibitor of the Rho-GTPases family Rho, Rac and Cdc42, prevented Ang II-elicited O2-/ROS production, phosphorylation of the mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) p38, extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) and c-Jun N-terminal kinase 1/2, and Rac2 activation. Rac2 GTPase inhibition by C. difficile toxin A was accompanied by a robust reduction of the cytosolic Ca(2)(+) elevation induced by Ang II in human neutrophils. Furthermore, SB203580 and PD098059 act as inhibitors of p38MAPK and ERK1/2 respectively, wortmannin, an inhibitor of phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase, and cyclosporin A, a calcineurin inhibitor, hindered both translocation of Rac2 from the cytosol to the plasma membrane and enhancement of Rac2 GTP-binding elicited by Ang II. These results provide evidence that the activation of Rac2 by Ang II is exerted through multiple signalling pathways, involving Ca(2)(+)/calcineurin and protein kinases, the elucidation of which should be insightful in the design of new therapies aimed at reversing the inflammation of vessel walls found in a number of cardiovascular diseases.

  3. PDIP46 (DNA polymerase δ interacting protein 46) is an activating factor for human DNA polymerase δ.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoxiao; Zhang, Sufang; Zheng, Rong; Yue, Fu; Lin, Szu Hua Sharon; Rahmeh, Amal A; Lee, Ernest Y C; Zhang, Zhongtao; Lee, Marietta Y W T

    2016-02-02

    PDIP46 (SKAR, POLDIP3) was discovered through its interaction with the p50 subunit of human DNA polymerase δ (Pol δ). Its functions in DNA replication are unknown. PDIP46 associates with Pol δ in cell extracts both by immunochemical and protein separation methods, as well as by ChIP analyses. PDIP46 also interacts with PCNA via multiple copies of a novel PCNA binding motif, the APIMs (AlkB homologue-2 PCNA-Interacting Motif). Sites for both p50 and PCNA binding were mapped to the N-terminal region containing the APIMs. Functional assays for the effects of PDIP46 on Pol δ activity on singly primed ssM13 DNA templates revealed that it is a novel and potent activator of Pol δ. The effects of PDIP46 on Pol δ in primer extension, strand displacement and synthesis through simple hairpin structures reveal a mechanism where PDIP46 facilitates Pol δ4 synthesis through regions of secondary structure on complex templates. In addition, evidence was obtained that PDIP46 is also capable of exerting its effects by a direct interaction with Pol δ, independent of PCNA. Mutation of the Pol δ and PCNA binding region resulted in a loss of PDIP46 functions. These studies support the view that PDIP46 is a novel accessory protein for Pol δ that is involved in cellular DNA replication. This raises the possibility that altered expression of PDIP46 or its mutation may affect Pol δ functions in vivo, and thereby be a nexus for altered genomic stability.

  4. PDIP46 (DNA polymerase δ interacting protein 46) is an activating factor for human DNA polymerase δ

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Rong; Yue, Fu; Lin, Szu Hua Sharon; Rahmeh, Amal A.; Lee, Ernest Y. C.; Zhang, Zhongtao; Lee, Marietta Y. W. T.

    2016-01-01

    PDIP46 (SKAR, POLDIP3) was discovered through its interaction with the p50 subunit of human DNA polymerase δ (Pol δ). Its functions in DNA replication are unknown. PDIP46 associates with Pol δ in cell extracts both by immunochemical and protein separation methods, as well as by ChIP analyses. PDIP46 also interacts with PCNA via multiple copies of a novel PCNA binding motif, the APIMs (AlkB homologue-2 PCNA-Interacting Motif). Sites for both p50 and PCNA binding were mapped to the N-terminal region containing the APIMs. Functional assays for the effects of PDIP46 on Pol δ activity on singly primed ssM13 DNA templates revealed that it is a novel and potent activator of Pol δ. The effects of PDIP46 on Pol δ in primer extension, strand displacement and synthesis through simple hairpin structures reveal a mechanism where PDIP46 facilitates Pol δ4 synthesis through regions of secondary structure on complex templates. In addition, evidence was obtained that PDIP46 is also capable of exerting its effects by a direct interaction with Pol δ, independent of PCNA. Mutation of the Pol δ and PCNA binding region resulted in a loss of PDIP46 functions. These studies support the view that PDIP46 is a novel accessory protein for Pol δ that is involved in cellular DNA replication. This raises the possibility that altered expression of PDIP46 or its mutation may affect Pol δ functions in vivo, and thereby be a nexus for altered genomic stability. PMID:26819372

  5. MicroRNAs function primarily in the pathogenesis of human anencephaly via the mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhang, W D; Yu, X; Fu, X; Huang, S; Jin, S J; Ning, Q; Luo, X P

    2014-02-20

    Anencephaly is one of the most serious forms of neural tube defects (NTDs), a group of congenital central nervous system (CNS) malformations. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are involved in diverse biological processes via the post-transcriptional regulation of target mRNAs. Although miRNAs play important roles in the development of mammalian CNS, their function in human NTDs remains unknown. Using a miRNA microarray, we identified a unique expression profile in fetal anencephalic brain tissues, characterized by 70 upregulated miRNAs (ratio ≥ 2) and 7 downregulated miRNAs (ratio ≤ 0.5) compared with healthy human samples. Ten miRNAs with altered expression were selected from the microarray findings for validation with real-time quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. We found that in anencephalic tissues, miR-22, miR-23a, miR-34a, miR-103, miR-125a, miR-132, miR-134, miR-138, and miR-185 were significantly upregulated, while miR-149 was significantly downregulated. Furthermore, 459 potential target genes within the validated miRNAs were revealed using combined four target prediction algorithms in the human genome, and subsequently analyzed with the Molecule Annotation System 3.0. A total of 119 target genes were ultimately identified, including those involved in 22 singular annotations (i.e., transcription, signal transduction, and cell cycle) and 55 functional pathways [i.e., mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway, and actin cytoskeleton regulation]. Six target genes (HNRPU, JAG1, FMR1, EGR3, RUNX1T1, and NDEL1) were chosen as candidate genes and associated with congenital birth abnormalities of the brain structure. Our results, therefore, suggest that miRNA maladjustment mainly contributes to the etiopathogenesis of anencephaly via the MAPK signaling pathway.

  6. The cystine/glutamate antiporter regulates indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase protein levels and enzymatic activity in human dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Mattox, Mildred L; D'Angelo, June A; Grimes, Zachary M; Fiebiger, Edda; Dickinson, Bonny L

    2012-11-30

    Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) is the rate-limiting enzyme in the tryptophan-catabolizing pathway and a key regulator of peripheral immune tolerance. As the suppressive effects of IDO are predominantly mediated by dendritic cells (DCs) and IDO-competent DCs promote long-term immunologic tolerance, a detailed understanding of how IDO expression and activity is regulated in these cells is central to the rational design of therapies to induce robust immune tolerance. We previously reported that the cystine/glutamate antiporter modulates the functional expression of IDO in human monocyte-derived DCs. Specifically, we showed that blocking antiporter uptake of cystine significantly increased both IDO mRNA and IDO enzymatic activity and that this correlated with impaired DC presentation of exogenous antigen to T cells via MHC class II and the cross-presentation pathway. The antiporter regulates intracellular and extracellular redox by transporting cystine into the cell in exchange for glutamate. Intracellular cystine is reduced to cysteine to support biosynthesis of the major cellular antioxidant glutathione and cysteine is exported from the cell where it functions as an extracellular antioxidant. Here we show that antiporter control of IDO expression in DCs is reversible, independent of interferon-γ, regulated by redox, and requires active protein synthesis. These findings highlight a role for antiporter regulation of cellular redox as a critical control point for modulating IDO expression and activity in DCs. Thus, systemic disease and aging, processes that perturb redox homeostasis, may adversely affect immunity by promoting the generation of IDO-competent DCs.

  7. Toxicity challenges in environmental chemicals: Prediction of human plasma protein binding through quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) models

    EPA Science Inventory

    The present study explores the merit of utilizing available pharmaceutical data to construct a quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) for prediction of the fraction of a chemical unbound to plasma protein (Fub) in environmentally relevant compounds. Independent model...

  8. PME-1 protects extracellular signal-regulated kinase pathway activity from protein phosphatase 2A-mediated inactivation in human malignant glioma.

    PubMed

    Puustinen, Pietri; Junttila, Melissa R; Vanhatupa, Sari; Sablina, Anna A; Hector, Melissa E; Teittinen, Kaisa; Raheem, Olayinka; Ketola, Kirsi; Lin, Shujun; Kast, Juergen; Haapasalo, Hannu; Hahn, William C; Westermarck, Jukka

    2009-04-01

    Extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)/mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway activity is regulated by the antagonist function of activating kinases and inactivating protein phosphatases. Sustained ERK pathway activity is commonly observed in human malignancies; however, the mechanisms by which the pathway is protected from phosphatase-mediated inactivation in the tumor tissue remain obscure. Here, we show that methylesterase PME-1-mediated inhibition of the protein phosphatase 2A promotes basal ERK pathway activity and is required for efficient growth factor response. Mechanistically, PME-1 is shown to support ERK pathway signaling upstream of Raf, but downstream of growth factor receptors and protein kinase C. In malignant gliomas, PME-1 expression levels correlate with both ERK activity and cell proliferation in vivo. Moreover, PME-1 expression significantly correlates with disease progression in human astrocytic gliomas (n=222). Together, these observations identify PME-1 expression as one mechanism by which ERK pathway activity is maintained in cancer cells and suggest an important functional role for PME-1 in the disease progression of human astrocytic gliomas.

  9. Autophagy-related proteins are functionally active in human spermatozoa and may be involved in the regulation of cell survival and motility

    PubMed Central

    Aparicio, I. M.; Espino, J.; Bejarano, I.; Gallardo-Soler, A.; Campo, M. L.; Salido, G. M.; Pariente, J. A.; Peña, F. J.; Tapia, J. A.

    2016-01-01

    Macroautophagy (hereafter autophagy) is an evolutionarily highly conserved cellular process that participates in the maintenance of intracellular homeostasis through the degradation of most long-lived proteins and entire organelles. Autophagy participates in some reproductive events; however, there are not reports regarding the role of autophagy in the regulation of sperm physiology. Hence, the aim of this study was to investigate whether autophagy-related proteins are present and functionally active in human spermatozoa. Proteins related to autophagy/mitophagy process (LC3, Atg5, Atg16, Beclin 1, p62, m-TOR, AMPKα 1/2, and PINK1) were present in human spermatozoa. LC3 colocalized with p62 in the middle piece of the spermatozoa. Autophagy activation induced a significant increase in motility and a decrease in PINK1, TOM20 expression and caspase 3/7 activation. In contrast, autophagy inhibition resulted in decreased motility, viability, ATP and intracellular calcium concentration whereas PINK1, TOM20 expression, AMPK phosphorylation and caspase 3/7 activation were significantly increased. In conclusion our results show that autophagy related proteins and upstream regulators are present and functional in human spermatozoa. Modification of mitochondrial proteins expression after autophagy activation/inhibition may be indicating that a specialized form of autophagy named mitophagy may be regulating sperm function such as motility and viability and may be cooperating with apoptosis. PMID:27633131

  10. Oral glucosamine sulfate supplementation does not induce endoplasmic reticulum stress or activate the unfolded protein response in circulating leukocytes of human subjects.

    PubMed

    McAlpine, Cameron S; Beriault, Daniel R; Behdinan, Tina; Shi, Yuanyuan; Werstuck, Geoff H

    2014-04-01

    Glucosamine sulfate is a dietary supplement that is marketed as a treatment for osteoarthritis. Recent evidence from animal and cell culture models have suggested that glucosamine treatment can promote the misfolding of proteins and the activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR). We investigated whether glucosamine sulfate supplementation activates the UPR in circulating leukocytes of human subjects. Cultured Thp1 human monocytes were exposed to increasing concentrations of glucosamine (0, 0.25, 1.0, 4.0 mmol · L(-1)) for 18 h. We observed a dose-dependent increase in intracellular glucosamine levels as well as the activation of UPR. To test the effect of glucosamine sulfate supplementation in humans, 14 healthy human subjects took 1500 mg · day(-1) glucosamine sulfate for 14 days. Metabolic parameters and blood samples were collected before and after supplementation. In humans, glucosamine sulfate supplementation did not alter metabolic parameters including lipid levels and glucose tolerance. Further, glucosamine sulfate supplementation did not affect intracellular glucosamine levels or activate the UPR in the leukocytes of human subjects. Our results indicate that in healthy human subjects, the recommended dose of glucosamine sulfate (1500 mg · day(-1)) for 14 days does not significantly alter intracellular glucosamine levels and does not activate the UPR in circulating leukocytes.

  11. Comparative effects of the human protein C activator, Protac, on the activated partial thromboplastin clotting times of plasmas, with special reference to the dog.

    PubMed Central

    Johnstone, I B; Martin, C A

    2000-01-01

    The commercial snake venom extract, Protac, is a specific activator of the anticoagulant zymogen, protein C (PC) in human plasma. This specific action has led to its use in developing coagulation-based and amidolytic-based assays for the diagnosis of quantitative and/or qualitative PC deficiency states in human beings. The purpose of the present study was to compare the effects of Protac on the activated partial thromboplastin times (APTT) of human, bovine, equine, and canine plasmas in order to determine the potential value of this venom extract as an activator in functional PC assays in these domestic animal species. As expected, Protac significantly prolonged the APTT of normal human plasma, but had no effect on plasma known to be devoid of PC. Clotting times were prolonged by 34%-214% with concentrations of venom activator ranging from 0.1-1.0 U/mL. Under identical conditions, Protac prolonged the APTT of equine plasma by 11%-98% over control times. Even more dramatic was the inhibitory effect of Protac on the clotting of bovine plasma, extending the APTT more than 3-fold at a venom concentration of 0.1 U/mL. At higher venom concentrations, most bovine plasmas remained unclotted after 300 s (control time 34.1 s). Under similar conditions, the canine APTT was unaffected by Protac, even when the venom concentration was increased to 3 U/mL. In order to determine the reason for the lack in response of canine plasma, the concentration of the APTT reagent was altered (decreased), exposure time of the plasma to the Protac was increased from 2 min to 9 min, and the plasma was diluted to assess for the potential existence of plasma PC inhibitors. Protac caused an unexpected shortening of the APTT when the contact activator reagent was diluted. Increasing the exposure time had no effect. Although a slight prolongation of the canine APTT was detected when the plasma was diluted, the presence of strong plasma PC inhibition was considered an unlikely cause of the lack of

  12. Activation of AMP-Activated Protein Kinase by Adenine Alleviates TNF-Alpha-Induced Inflammation in Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yi-Fang; Young, Guang-Huar; Lin, Jiun-Tsai; Jang, Hyun-Hwa; Chen, Chin-Chen; Nong, Jing-Yi; Chen, Po-Ku; Kuo, Cheng-Yi; Kao, Shao-Hsuan; Liang, Yao-Jen; Chen, Han-Min

    2015-01-01

    The AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling system plays a key role in cellular stress by repressing the inflammatory responses induced by the nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) system. Previous studies suggest that the anti-inflammatory role of AMPK involves activation by adenine, but the mechanism that allows adenine to produce these effects has not yet been elucidated. In human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), adenine was observed to induce the phosphorylation of AMPK in both a time- and dose-dependent manner as well as its downstream target acetyl Co-A carboxylase (ACC). Adenine also attenuated NF-κB targeting of gene expression in a dose-dependent manner and decreased monocyte adhesion to HUVECs following tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α) treatment. The short hairpin RNA (shRNA) against AMPK α1 in HUVECs attenuated the adenine-induced inhibition of NF-κB activation in response to TNF-α, thereby suggesting that the anti-inflammatory role of adenine is mediated by AMPK. Following the knockdown of adenosyl phosphoribosyl transferase (APRT) in HUVECs, adenine supplementation failed to induce the phosphorylation of AMPK and ACC. Similarly, the expression of a shRNA against APRT nullified the anti-inflammatory effects of adenine in HUVECs. These results suggested that the role of adenine as an AMPK activator is related to catabolism by APRT, which increases the cellular AMP levels to activate AMPK.

  13. Activation of AMP-Activated Protein Kinase by Adenine Alleviates TNF-Alpha-Induced Inflammation in Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jiun-Tsai; Jang, Hyun-Hwa; Chen, Chin-Chen; Nong, Jing-Yi; Chen, Po-Ku; Kuo, Cheng-Yi; Kao, Shao-Hsuan; Liang, Yao-Jen; Chen, Han-Min

    2015-01-01

    The AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling system plays a key role in cellular stress by repressing the inflammatory responses induced by the nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) system. Previous studies suggest that the anti-inflammatory role of AMPK involves activation by adenine, but the mechanism that allows adenine to produce these effects has not yet been elucidated. In human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), adenine was observed to induce the phosphorylation of AMPK in both a time- and dose-dependent manner as well as its downstream target acetyl Co-A carboxylase (ACC). Adenine also attenuated NF-κB targeting of gene expression in a dose-dependent manner and decreased monocyte adhesion to HUVECs following tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α) treatment. The short hairpin RNA (shRNA) against AMPK α1 in HUVECs attenuated the adenine-induced inhibition of NF-κB activation in response to TNF-α, thereby suggesting that the anti-inflammatory role of adenine is mediated by AMPK. Following the knockdown of adenosyl phosphoribosyl transferase (APRT) in HUVECs, adenine supplementation failed to induce the phosphorylation of AMPK and ACC. Similarly, the expression of a shRNA against APRT nullified the anti-inflammatory effects of adenine in HUVECs. These results suggested that the role of adenine as an AMPK activator is related to catabolism by APRT, which increases the cellular AMP levels to activate AMPK. PMID:26544976

  14. Antigenic polymorphism of human very late activation protein-2 (platelet glycoprotein Ia-IIa). Platelet alloantigen Hca.

    PubMed Central

    Woods, V L; Pischel, K D; Avery, E D; Bluestein, H G

    1989-01-01

    We have found evidence for a human alloantigenic system on the very late activation protein -2 (VLA-2) heterodimer (platelet GPIa/IIa). Sera from two patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) contained antibodies that immunoprecipitated surface molecules from platelets and fibroblasts that comigrated on SDS-PAGE and two-dimensional O'Farrell gels with platelet GPIa (VLA-alpha2 chain) and platelet GPIIa (VLA-beta chain). These SLE antibodies were alloreactive as they precipitated VLA molecules from only 5 of 22 normal donors' platelets and did not react with the lupus patients' own platelets, despite the expression of apparently normal amounts of VLA on the donors' cells. Two-dimensional O'Farrell analysis demonstrated no differences in the molecular weight or isoelectric point of GPIa and GPIIa obtained from platelets of alloantibody reactive or unreactive donors. Sequential immunoprecipitation experiments with VLA chain-specific monoclonal antibodies, and the pattern of immunoprecipitation of several different VLA heterodimers demonstrated that the alloantibody-reactive determinant was present on the VLA-2 heterodimer, and not other VLA molecules. Thus, these SLE sera demonstrate a previously unrecognized antigenic polymorphism of the VLA-2 (platelet GPIa/IIa) heterodimer, platelet alloantigen Hca. Images PMID:2646323

  15. Two distinct forms of Factor VIII coagulant protein in human plasma. Cleavage by thrombin, and differences in coagulant activity and association with von Willebrand factor.

    PubMed Central

    Weinstein, M J; Chute, L E

    1984-01-01

    We have characterized Factor VIII coagulant protein, present in normal human plasma, that reacts with a specific human 125I-labeled anti-human VIII:C antigen Fab antibody fragment. Two major Factor VIII coagulant antigen populations were present. The first, approximately 85% of the total antigen, was bound to von Willebrand factor and when tested in a standard one-stage assay had Factor VIII coagulant activity. The second antigenic population, eluting near fibrinogen when plasma was gel filtered, was not bound to von Willebrand protein, did not have Factor VIII coagulant activity unless activated, but did block anti-VIII:C Fab neutralization of clotting activity. The two antigenic populations were separable by cryoprecipitation and agarose gel electrophoresis. Although the two antigenic populations differed in their Factor VIII coagulant activity and in their binding to von Willebrand factor, the principal member of both populations is of mol wt 2.4 X 10(5). Both antigens, when proteolyzed by thrombin, were quickly converted to a 1 X 10(5)-mol wt form in association with the appearance of VIII:C activity. The 1 X 10(5)-mol wt antigen was further slowly degraded to an 8 X 10(4)-mol wt form while Factor VIII coagulant activity declined. These results demonstrate the presence of an inactive Factor VIII coagulant protein in plasma, not associated with von Willebrand factor, that can react with thrombin to yield Factor VIII coagulant activity. Images PMID:6421875

  16. Activity and regulation by growth factors of calmodulin-dependent protein kinase III (elongation factor 2-kinase) in human breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Parmer, T G; Ward, M D; Yurkow, E J; Vyas, V H; Kearney, T J; Hait, W N

    1999-01-01

    Calmodulin-dependent protein kinase III (CaM kinase III, elongation factor-2 kinase) is a unique member of the Ca2+/CaM-dependent protein kinase family. Activation of CaM kinase III leads to the selective phosphorylation of elongation factor 2 (eEF-2) and transient inhibition of protein synthesis. Recent cloning and sequencing of CaM kinase III revealed that this enzyme represents a new superfamily of protein kinases. The activity of CaM kinase III is selectively activated in proliferating cells; inhibition of the kinase blocked cells in G0/G1-S and decreased viability. To determine the significance of CaM kinase III in breast cancer, we measured the activity of the kinase in human breast cancer cell lines as well as in fresh surgical specimens. The specific activity of CaM kinase III in human breast cancer cell lines was equal to or greater than that seen in a variety of cell lines with similar rates of proliferation. The specific activity of CaM kinase III was markedly increased in human breast tumour specimens compared with that of normal adjacent breast tissue. The activity of this enzyme was regulated by breast cancer mitogens. In serum-deprived MDA-MB-231 cells, the combination of insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) and epidermal growth factor (EGF) stimulated cell proliferation and activated CaM kinase III to activities observed in the presence of 10% serum. Inhibition of enzyme activity blocked cell proliferation induced by growth factors. In MCF-7 cells separated by fluorescence-activated cell sorting, CaM kinase III was increased in S-phase over that of other phases of the cell cycle. In summary, the activity of Ca2+/CaM-dependent protein kinase III is controlled by breast cancer mitogens and appears to be constitutively activated in human breast cancer. These results suggest that CaM kinase III may contribute an important link between growth factor/receptor interactions, protein synthesis and the induction of cellular proliferation in human breast

  17. Mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 activation is required for the stimulation of human skeletal muscle protein synthesis by essential amino acids.

    PubMed

    Dickinson, Jared M; Fry, Christopher S; Drummond, Micah J; Gundermann, David M; Walker, Dillon K; Glynn, Erin L; Timmerman, Kyle L; Dhanani, Shaheen; Volpi, Elena; Rasmussen, Blake B

    2011-05-01

    The relationship between mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling and muscle protein synthesis during instances of amino acid surplus in humans is based solely on correlational data. Therefore, the goal of this study was to use a mechanistic approach specifically designed to determine whether increased mTORC1 activation is requisite for the stimulation of muscle protein synthesis following L-essential amino acid (EAA) ingestion in humans. Examination of muscle protein synthesis and signaling were performed on vastus lateralis muscle biopsies obtained from 8 young (25 ± 2 y) individuals who were studied prior to and following ingestion of 10 g of EAA during 2 separate trials in a randomized, counterbalanced design. The trials were identical except during 1 trial, participants were administered a single oral dose of a potent mTORC1 inhibitor (rapamycin) prior to EAA ingestion. In response to EAA ingestion, an ~60% increase in muscle protein synthesis was observed during the control trial, concomitant with increased phosphorylation of mTOR (Ser(2448)), ribosomal S6 kinase 1 (Thr(389)), and eukaryotic initiation factor 4E binding protein 1 (Thr(37/46)). In contrast, prior administration of rapamycin completely blocked the increase in muscle protein synthesis and blocked or attenuated activation of mTORC1-signaling proteins. The inhibition of muscle protein synthesis and signaling was not due to differences in either extracellular or intracellular amino acid availability, because these variables were similar between trials. These data support a fundamental role for mTORC1 activation as a key regulator of human muscle protein synthesis in response to increased EAA availability. This information will be useful in the development of evidence-based nutritional therapies targeting mTORC1 to counteract muscle wasting associated with numerous clinical conditions.

  18. A zinc-dependent DNA-binding activity co-operates with cAMP-responsive-element-binding protein to activate the human thyroglobulin enhancer.

    PubMed Central

    Berg, V; Vassart, G; Christophe, D

    1997-01-01

    Footprinting experiments involving the human thyroglobulin gene enhancer and thyroid nuclear extracts revealed a protected region called X2, containing an incomplete cAMP-responsive element (CRE). Band-shift experiments identified two binding activities recognizing the X2 element: a CRE-binding protein (CREB)/activating transcription factor (ATF) relative that binds the half CRE motif and a second factor that interacts with a G-rich motif located just upstream from the CRE. The first factor appears to be CREB itself, as indicated by the supershifting when using an antibody directed against CREB, and the second DNA-binding activity involved was shown to be zinc-dependent and exhibited an apparent molecular mass of 42-44 kDa in South-Western blotting experiments. This factor may represent a novel entity, which we named CAF, for 'CREB Associated Factor'. Three copies of X2 sequence conferred a strong cAMP-dependent transcriptional activation to a heterologous promoter in transient transfection assay in cAMP-stimulated primary thyrocytes and HeLa cells. Transfection experiments of constructs containing the X2 element mutated in either the CRE or the G-rich site showed that both motifs were required for this transcription activating function. Moreover, the combination of several individual X2 elements mutated in either the CRE or the G-rich motif did not exhibit full transcriptional activity. This suggests that, in the context of the X2 element, CREB requires a close interaction with CAF to achieve both basal and cAMP-dependent transcriptional activation. PMID:9163323

  19. c-Kit-kinase induces a cascade of protein tyrosine phosphorylation in normal human melanocytes in response to mast cell growth factor and stimulates mitogen-activated protein kinase but is down-regulated in melanomas.

    PubMed Central

    Funasaka, Y; Boulton, T; Cobb, M; Yarden, Y; Fan, B; Lyman, S D; Williams, D E; Anderson, D M; Zakut, R; Mishima, Y

    1992-01-01

    The proto-oncogene c-Kit, a transmembrane receptor tyrosine kinase, is an important regulator of cell growth whose constitutively active oncogenic counterpart, v-kit, induces sarcomas in cats. Mutations in murine c-kit that reduce the receptor tyrosine kinase activity cause deficiencies in the migration and proliferation of melanoblasts, hematopoietic stem cells, and primordial germ cells. We therefore investigated whether c-Kit regulates normal human melanocyte proliferation and plays a role in melanomas. We show that normal human melanocytes respond to mast cell growth factor (MGF), the Kit-ligand that stimulates phosphorylation of tyrosyl residues in c-Kit and induces sequential phosphorylation of tyrosyl residues in several other proteins. One of the phosphorylated intermediates in the signal transduction pathway was identified as an early response kinase (mitogen-activated protein [MAP] kinase). Dephosphorylation of a prominent 180-kDa protein suggests that MGF also activates a phosphotyrosine phosphatase. In contrast, MGF did not induce proliferation, the cascade of protein phosphorylations, or MAP kinase activation in the majority of cells cultured from primary nodular and metastatic melanomas that grow independently of exogenous factors. In the five out of eight human melanoma lines expressing c-kit mRNAs, c-Kit was not constitutively activated. Therefore, although c-Kit-kinase is a potent growth regulator of normal human melanocytes, its activity is not positively associated with malignant transformation. Images PMID:1372524

  20. Human Phosphatidylethanolamine-Binding Protein 4 Promoted the Radioresistance of Human Rectal Cancer by Activating Akt in an ROS-Dependent Way

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Jianming; Yang, Guangen; Lin, Ali; Shen, Zhong; Wang, Dong; Ding, Lei

    2014-01-01

    Human phosphatidylethanolamine-binding protein 4(hPEBP4) is a novel anti-apoptosis molecule associated with the resistance of tumors to apoptotic agents. Here we sought to investigate the role of hPEBP4 in the radioresistance of rectal cancer. Immunohistochemistry analysis showed hPEBP4 was expressed in 27/33 of rectal cancer specimens, but only in 2/33 of neighboring normal mucosa. Silencing the expression of hPEBP4 with siRNA significantly reduced the clonogenic survival and enhanced the apoptosis of rectal cancer cells on irradiation. Instead, forced overexpression of hPEBP4 promoted its survival and decreased the apoptosis. Western blot showed hPEBP4 could increase the radiation-induced Akt activation, for which reactive oxygen specimen(ROS) was required. The radioresistance effect of hPEBP4 was reversed after given LY-294002 to inhibit Akt activation or antioxidant to abolish the ROS production. We also confirmed that effect of hPEBP4 in vivo with nude mice. Thus we concluded that hPEBP4, specifically expressed in rectal cancer cells, is associated with radioresistance of rectal cancer, implying that modulation of hPEBP4 may have important therapeutic implications in radiotherapy of rectal cancer. PMID:24594691

  1. Angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory activity and ACE inhibitory peptides of salmon (Salmo salar) protein hydrolysates obtained by human and porcine gastrointestinal enzymes.

    PubMed

    Darewicz, Małgorzata; Borawska, Justyna; Vegarud, Gerd E; Minkiewicz, Piotr; Iwaniak, Anna

    2014-08-13

    The objectives of the present study were two-fold: first, to detect whether salmon protein fractions possess angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory properties and whether salmon proteins can release ACE inhibitory peptides during a sequential in vitro hydrolysis (with commercial porcine enzymes) and ex vivo digestion (with human gastrointestinal enzymes). Secondly, to evaluate the ACE inhibitory activity of generated hydrolysates. A two-step ex vivo and in vitro model digestion was performed to simulate the human digestion process. Salmon proteins were degraded more efficiently by porcine enzymes than by human gastrointestinal juices and sarcoplasmic proteins were digested/hydrolyzed more easily than myofibrillar proteins. The ex vivo digested myofibrillar and sarcoplasmic duodenal samples showed IC50 values (concentration required to decrease the ACE activity by 50%) of 1.06 and 2.16 mg/mL, respectively. The in vitro hydrolyzed myofibrillar and sarcoplasmic samples showed IC50 values of 0.91 and 1.04 mg/mL, respectively. Based on the results of in silico studies, it was possible to identify 9 peptides of the ex vivo hydrolysates and 7 peptides of the in vitro hydrolysates of salmon proteins of 11 selected peptides. In both types of salmon hydrolysates, ACE-inhibitory peptides IW, IY, TVY and VW were identified. In the in vitro salmon protein hydrolysates an ACE-inhibitory peptides VPW and VY were also detected, while ACE-inhibitory peptides ALPHA, IVY and IWHHT were identified in the hydrolysates generated with ex vivo digestion. In our studies, we documented ACE inhibitory in vitro effects of salmon protein hydrolysates obtained by human and as well as porcine gastrointestinal enzymes.

  2. Nintedanib modulates surfactant protein-D expression in A549 human lung epithelial cells via the c-Jun N-terminal kinase-activator protein-1 pathway.

    PubMed

    Kamio, Koichiro; Usuki, Jiro; Azuma, Arata; Matsuda, Kuniko; Ishii, Takeo; Inomata, Minoru; Hayashi, Hiroki; Kokuho, Nariaki; Fujita, Kazue; Saito, Yoshinobu; Miya, Toshimichi; Gemma, Akihiko

    2015-06-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a progressive disease with a high mortality rate. Signalling pathways activated by several tyrosine kinase receptors are known to be involved in lung fibrosis, and this knowledge has led to the development of the triple tyrosine kinase inhibitor nintedanib, an inhibitor of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR), platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR), and fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR), for the treatment of IPF. Pulmonary surfactant protein D (SP-D), an important biomarker of IPF, reportedly attenuates bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis in mice. In this study, we investigated whether nintedanib modulates SP-D expression in human lung epithelial (A549) cells using quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction and western blotting. To investigate the mechanisms underlying the effects of nintedanib, we evaluated the phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and its downstream target c-Jun. The effect of the JNK inhibitor SP600125 on c-Jun phosphorylation was also tested. Activation of activator protein-1 (AP-1) was examined using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay-based test, and cell proliferation assays were performed to estimate the effect of nintedanib on cell proliferation. Furthermore, we treated mice with nintedanib to examine its in vivo effect on SP-D levels in lungs. These experiments showed that nintedanib up-regulated SP-D messenger RNA expression in a dose-dependent manner at concentrations up to 5 μM, with significant SP-D induction observed at concentrations of 3 μM and 5 μM, in comparison with that observed in vehicle controls. Nintedanib stimulated a rapid increase in phosphorylated JNK in A549 cells within 30 min of treatment and stimulated c-Jun phosphorylation, which was inhibited by the JNK inhibitor SP600125. Additionally, nintedanib was found to activate AP-1. A549 cell proliferation was not affected by nintedanib at any of the tested

  3. Ubiquitination of Lysine 867 of the Human SETDB1 Protein Upregulates Its Histone H3 Lysine 9 (H3K9) Methyltransferase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Ishimoto, Kenji; Kawamata, Natsuko; Uchihara, Yoshie; Okubo, Moeka; Fujimoto, Reiko; Gotoh, Eiko; Kakinouchi, Keisuke; Mizohata, Eiichi; Hino, Nobumasa; Okada, Yoshiaki; Mochizuki, Yasuhiro; Tanaka, Toshiya; Hamakubo, Takao; Sakai, Juro; Kodama, Tatsuhiko; Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Tachibana, Keisuke; Doi, Takefumi

    2016-01-01

    Posttranslational modifications (PTMs) of proteins play a crucial role in regulating protein-protein interactions, enzyme activity, subcellular localization, and stability of the protein. SET domain, bifurcated 1 (SETDB1) is a histone methyltransferase that regulates the methylation of histone H3 on lysine 9 (H3K9), gene silencing, and transcriptional repression. The C-terminal region of SETDB1 is a key site for PTMs, and is essential for its enzyme activity in mammalian and insect cells. In this study, we aimed to evaluate more precisely the effect of PTMs on the H3K9 methyltransferase activity of SETDB1. Using mass spectrometry analysis, we show that the C-terminal region of human SETDB1 purified from insect cells is ubiquitinated. We also demonstrate that the ubiquitination of lysine 867 of the human SETDB1 is necessary for full H3K9 methyltransferase activity in mammalian cells. Finally, we show that SETDB1 ubiquitination regulates the expression of its target gene, serpin peptidase inhibitor, clade E, member 1 (SERPINE1) by methylating H3K9. These results suggest that the ubiquitination of SETDB1 at lysine 867 controls the expression of its target gene by activating its H3K9 methyltransferase activity. PMID:27798683

  4. Regulators of G protein signalling proteins in the human myometrium.

    PubMed

    Ladds, Graham; Zervou, Sevasti; Vatish, Manu; Thornton, Steven; Davey, John

    2009-05-21

    The contractile state of the human myometrium is controlled by extracellular signals that promote relaxation or contraction. Many of these signals function through G protein-coupled receptors at the cell surface, stimulating heterotrimeric G proteins and leading to changes in the activity of effector proteins responsible for bringing about the response. G proteins can interact with multiple receptors and many different effectors and are key players in the response. Regulators of G protein signalling (RGS) proteins are GTPase activating proteins for heterotrimeric G proteins and help terminate the signal. Little is known about the function of RGS proteins in human myometrium and we have therefore analysed transcript levels for RGS proteins at various stages of pregnancy (non-pregnant, preterm, term non-labouring, term labouring). RGS2 and RGS5 were the most abundantly expressed isolates in each of the patient groups. The levels of RGS4 and RGS16 (and to a lesser extent RGS2 and RGS14) increased in term labouring samples relative to the other groups. Yeast two-hybrid analysis and co-immunoprecipitation in myometrial cells revealed that both RGS2 and RGS5 interact directly with the cytoplasmic tail of the oxytocin receptor, suggesting they might help regulate signalling through this receptor.

  5. Potent antitumor activities of recombinant human PDCD5 protein in combination with chemotherapy drugs in K562 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Lin; Song, Quansheng; Zhang, Yingmei; Lou, Yaxin; Wang, Yanfang; Tian, Linjie; Zheng, Yi; Ma, Dalong; Ke, Xiaoyan; Wang, Ying

    2010-05-28

    Conventional chemotherapy is still frequently used. Programmed cell death 5 (PDCD5) enhances apoptosis of various tumor cells triggered by certain stimuli and is lowly expressed in leukemic cells from chronic myelogenous leukemia patients. Here, we describe for the first time that recombinant human PDCD5 protein (rhPDCD5) in combination with chemotherapy drugs has potent antitumor effects on chronic myelogenous leukemia K562 cells in vitro and in vivo. The antitumor efficacy of rhPDCD5 protein with chemotherapy drugs, idarubicin (IDR) or cytarabine (Ara-C), was examined in K562 cells in vitro and K562 xenograft tumor models in vivo. rhPDCD5 protein markedly increased the apoptosis rates and decreased the colony-forming capability of K562 cells after the combined treatment with IDR or Ara-C. rhPDCD5 protein by intraperitoneal administration dramatically improved the antitumor effects of IDR treatment in the K562 xenograft model. The tumor sizes and cell proliferation were significantly decreased; and TUNEL positive cells were significantly increased in the combined group with rhPDCD5 protein and IDR treatment compared with single IDR treatment groups. rhPDCD5 protein, in combination with IDR, has potent antitumor effects on chronic myelogenous leukemia K562 cells and may be a novel and promising agent for the treatment of chronic myelogenous leukemia.

  6. Protein Analysis with Human Hair

    ScienceCinema

    Hart, Brad; Anex, Deon; Parker, Glendon

    2016-09-09

    In an important breakthrough for the forensic science community, researchers have developed the first-ever biological identification method that exploits the information encoded in proteins of human hair.

  7. Protein Analysis with Human Hair

    SciTech Connect

    Hart, Brad; Anex, Deon; Parker, Glendon

    2016-09-07

    In an important breakthrough for the forensic science community, researchers have developed the first-ever biological identification method that exploits the information encoded in proteins of human hair.

  8. Activation of nematode G protein GOA-1 by the human muscarinic acetylcholine receptor M2 subtype. Functional coupling of G-protein-coupled receptor and G protein originated from evolutionarily distant animals.

    PubMed

    Minaba, Masaomi; Ichiyama, Susumu; Kojima, Katsura; Ozaki, Mamiko; Kato, Yusuke

    2006-12-01

    Signal transduction mediated by heterotrimeric G proteins regulates a wide variety of physiological functions. We are interested in the manipulation of G-protein-mediating signal transduction using G-protein-coupled receptors, which are derived from evolutionarily distant organisms and recognize unique ligands. As a model, we tested the functionally coupling GOA-1, G alpha(i/o) ortholog in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, with the human muscarinic acetylcholine receptor M2 subtype (M2), which is one of the mammalian G alpha(i/o)-coupled receptors. GOA-1 and M2 were prepared as a fusion protein using a baculovirus expression system. The affinity of the fusion protein for GDP was decreased by addition of a muscarinic agonist, carbamylcholine and the guanosine 5'-[3-O-thio]triphosphate ([35S]GTPgammaS) binding was increased with an increase in the carbamylcholine concentrations in a dose-dependent manner. These effects evoked by carbamylcholine were completely abolished by a full antagonist, atropine. In addition, the affinity for carbamylcholine decreased under the presence of GTP as reported for M2-G alpha(i/o) coupling. These results indicate that the M2 activates GOA-1 as well as G alpha(i/o).

  9. Regulator of G protein signaling 1 suppresses CXCL12-mediated migration and AKT activation in RPMI 8226 human plasmacytoma cells and plasmablasts.

    PubMed

    Pak, Hyo-Kyung; Gil, Minchan; Lee, Yoonkyung; Lee, Hyunji; Lee, A-Neum; Roh, Jin; Park, Chan-Sik

    2015-01-01

    Migration of plasma cells to the bone marrow is critical factor to humoral immunity and controlled by chemokines. Regulator of G protein signaling 1 (RGS1) is a GTPase-activating protein that controls various crucial functions such as migration. Here, we show that RGS1 controls the chemotactic migration of RPMI 8226 human plasmacytoma cells and human plasmablasts. LPS strongly increased RGS1 expression and retarded the migration of RPMI 8226 cells by suppressing CXCL12-mediated AKT activation. RGS1 knockdown by siRNA abolished the retardation of migration and AKT suppression by LPS. RGS1-dependent regulation of migration via AKT is also observed in cultured plasmablasts. We propose novel functions of RGS1 that suppress AKT activation and the migration of RPMI 8226 cells and plasmablasts in CXCL12-mediated chemotaxis.

  10. Vinculin and cellular retinol-binding protein-1 are markers for quiescent and activated hepatic stellate cells in formalin-fixed paraffin embedded human liver.

    PubMed

    Van Rossen, Elke; Vander Borght, Sara; van Grunsven, Leo Adrianus; Reynaert, Hendrik; Bruggeman, Veerle; Blomhoff, Rune; Roskams, Tania; Geerts, Albert

    2009-03-01

    Hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) have important roles in the pathogenesis of liver fibrosis and cirrhosis. As response to chronic injury HSCs are activated and change from quiescent into myofibroblast-like cells. Several HSC-specific markers have been described in rat or mouse models. The aim of our work was to identify the best marker(s) for human HSCs. To this end we used the automated high throughput NexES IHC staining device (Ventana Medical Systems) to incubate sections under standardized conditions. Formalin fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) normal and diseased human livers were studied. With immunohistochemistry we examined the expression of synemin, desmin, vimentin, vinculin, neurotrophin-3 (NT-3), alpha-smooth muscle actin (alpha-SMA), cellular retinol-binding protein-1 (CRBP-1), glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), cysteine- and glycine-rich protein 2 (CRP2), and cytoglobin/stellate cell activation-associated protein (cygb/STAP). This is the first study in which a series of HSC markers is compared on serial FFPE human tissues. CRBP-1 clearly stains lobular HSCs without reacting with smooth muscle cells (SMCs) and shows variable cholangiocyte positivity. Vinculin has a similar staining pattern as CRBP-1 but additionally stains SMCs, and (myo)fibroblasts. In conclusion, we therefore propose to use CRBP-1 and/or vinculin to stain HSCs in human liver tissues.

  11. Post-transcriptional induction of p21cip1 protein in condylomata and dysplasias is inversely related to human papillomavirus activities.

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt-Grimminger, D. C.; Wu, X.; Jian, Y.; Broker, T. R.; Chow, L. T.

    1998-01-01

    Infections of the genital and oral epithelia by human papillomaviruses cause condylomata, papillomas, and squamous intraepithelial neoplasms, some of which can progress to invasive cancers. We describe an induction of p21cip1/WAF1/sdi1 protein in a fraction of the spinous cells in benign lesions and in cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grades I and II. The induction appears to be post-transcriptional and independent of p53. p21cip1 antigen-positive cells were sporadic in cervical intraepithelial neoplasia III and rare and focal in carcinomas. In contrast, p21cip1 protein was below or at the threshold of detection in the differentiated cells of normal squamous epithelia from different body sites despite an up-regulation of p21cip1 RNA. In cervical intraepithelial neoplasias from patients who were also positive for the human immunodeficiency virus, there was an additional increase in p21cip1 RNA in the upper spinous cells without concomitant p21cip1 protein induction. A consistent inverse relationship was observed between the p21cip1 protein induction and abundant human papillomavirus DNA and RNAs. We propose that p21cip1 protein induction is a novel host response that inhibits viral DNA replication and thus prevents elevated viral transcription. This hypothesis can partly account for the heterogeneity and the differentiation-dependent viral activities commonly observed in benign human papillomavirus lesions. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:9546362

  12. Human Antimicrobial Peptides and Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guangshun

    2014-01-01

    As the key components of innate immunity, human host defense antimicrobial peptides and proteins (AMPs) play a critical role in warding off invading microbial pathogens. In addition, AMPs can possess other biological functions such as apoptosis, wound healing, and immune modulation. This article provides an overview on the identification, activity, 3D structure, and mechanism of action of human AMPs selected from the antimicrobial peptide database. Over 100 such peptides have been identified from a variety of tissues and epithelial surfaces, including skin, eyes, ears, mouths, gut, immune, nervous and urinary systems. These peptides vary from 10 to 150 amino acids with a net charge between −3 and +20 and a hydrophobic content below 60%. The sequence diversity enables human AMPs to adopt various 3D structures and to attack pathogens by different mechanisms. While α-defensin HD-6 can self-assemble on the bacterial surface into nanonets to entangle bacteria, both HNP-1 and β-defensin hBD-3 are able to block cell wall biosynthesis by binding to lipid II. Lysozyme is well-characterized to cleave bacterial cell wall polysaccharides but can also kill bacteria by a non-catalytic mechanism. The two hydrophobic domains in the long amphipathic α-helix of human cathelicidin LL-37 lays the basis for binding and disrupting the curved anionic bacterial membrane surfaces by forming pores or via the carpet model. Furthermore, dermcidin may serve as ion channel by forming a long helix-bundle structure. In addition, the C-type lectin RegIIIα can initially recognize bacterial peptidoglycans followed by pore formation in the membrane. Finally, histatin 5 and GAPDH(2-32) can enter microbial cells to exert their effects. It appears that granulysin enters cells and kills intracellular pathogens with the aid of pore-forming perforin. This arsenal of human defense proteins not only keeps us healthy but also inspires the development of a new generation of personalized medicine to

  13. Signal transduction of receptor-mediated antiproliferative action of melatonin on human prostate epithelial cells involves dual activation of Gα(s) and Gα(q) proteins.

    PubMed

    Shiu, Stephen Y W; Pang, Bo; Tam, Chun W; Yao, Kwok-Ming

    2010-10-01

    Melatonin has been shown to inhibit the proliferation of malignant and transformed human prostate epithelial cells by transcriptional up-regulation of p27(Kip1) expression via MTNR1A receptor-mediated activation of protein kinase A (PKA) and protein kinase C (PKC) in parallel. Given that melatonin MTNR1A receptor is a G protein-coupled receptor, this study was conducted to identify the specific G proteins that mediate the antiproliferative action of melatonin on human prostate epithelial cells. In 22Rv1 and RWPE-1 cells, knockdown of either Gα(s) or Gα(q) , but not Gα(i2) expression by RNA interference, abrogated the effects of melatonin on p27(Kip1) and cell proliferation. Conversely, cellular overexpression of activated mutants of Gα(s) and Gα(q) in 22Rv1 and RWPE-1 cells mimicked the effects of melatonin on prostate epithelial cell antiproliferation by increasing p27(Kip1) expression through downstream activation of PKA and PKC in parallel. Moreover, melatonin or 2-iodomelatonin induced elevation of adenosine-3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) in 22Rv1 and RWPE-1 cells. The effects of 2-iodomelatonin on cAMP were blocked by the nonselective MTNR1A/MTNR1B receptor antagonist luzindole but were not affected by the selective MTNR1B receptor antagonist 4-phenyl-2-propionamidotetraline (4-P-PDOT). Furthermore, knockdown of Gα(s) mitigated the stimulatory effects of 2-iodomelatonin on cAMP. Collectively, the data demonstrated, for the first time, functional coupling of MTNR1A receptor to Gα(s) in cancerous or transformed human cells expressing endogenous melatonin receptors. Our results also showed that dual activation of Gα(s) and Gα(q) proteins is involved in the signal transduction of MTNR1A receptor-mediated antiproliferative action of melatonin on human prostate epithelial cells.

  14. Bavachalcone-induced manganese superoxide dismutase expression through the AMP-activated protein kinase pathway in human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Dang, Yanqi; Ling, Shuang; Duan, Ju; Ma, Jing; Ni, Rongzhen; Xu, Jin-Wen

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial oxidative stress has been suggested as a major etiological factor in cardiovascular diseases. Manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) is an essential antioxidant mitochondrial enzyme. Although polyphenols can induce MnSOD expression, their mechanism of action remains unclear. We examined the effect of bavachalcone, a bioactive compound isolated from Psoralea corylifolia, on MnSOD protein expression and explored whether this effect is mediated through the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling pathway. Our data showed that bavachalcone enhanced the luciferase activity of the MnSOD promoter and increased MnSOD mRNA and protein expressions. Moreover, bavachalcone suppressed the mitochondrial superoxide production in endothelial cells. Conversely, bavachalcone stimulated liver kinase B1 and AMPKα phosphorylation. mRNA interference by using short hairpin RNA (shRNA) of AMPK inhibited bavachalcone-induced MnSOD expression. A-769662, an AMPK activator, also stimulated AMPK activity and increased MnSOD expression. Furthermore, AMPK knockdown by shRNA-AMPK reversed the inhibitory effects of bavachalcone on mitochondrial superoxide production in endothelial cells. These findings indicate that bavachalcone can protect the endothelial function by increasing AMPK activity and MnSOD expression and reducing mitochondrial oxidative stress. .

  15. Human MSH2 protein

    DOEpatents

    de la Chapelle, Albert; Vogelstein, Bert; Kinzler, Kenneth W.

    1997-01-01

    The human MSH2 gene, responsible for hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer, was identified by virtue of its homology to the MutS class of genes, which are involved in DNA mismatch repair. The sequence of cDNA clones of the human gene are provided, and the sequence of the gene can be used to demonstrate the existence of germ line mutations in hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) kindreds, as well as in replication error.sup.+ (RER.sup.+) tumor cells.

  16. Human MSH2 protein

    DOEpatents

    Chapelle, A. de la; Vogelstein, B.; Kinzler, K.W.

    1997-01-07

    The human MSH2 gene, responsible for hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer, was identified by virtue of its homology to the MutS class of genes, which are involved in DNA mismatch repair. The sequence of cDNA clones of the human gene are provided, and the sequence of the gene can be used to demonstrate the existence of germ line mutations in hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) kindreds, as well as in replication error{sup +} (RER{sup +}) tumor cells. 19 figs.

  17. Structural characterization of single nucleotide variants at ligand binding sites and enzyme active sites of human proteins

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Kazunori D.; Nishi, Hafumi; Nakata, Junichi; Kinoshita, Kengo

    2016-01-01

    Functional sites on proteins play an important role in various molecular interactions and reactions between proteins and other molecules. Thus, mutations in functional sites can severely affect the overall phenotype. Progress of genome sequencing projects has yielded a wealth of information on single nucleotide variants (SNVs), especially those with less than 1% minor allele frequency (rare variants). To understand the functional influence of genetic variants at a protein level, we investigated the relationship between SNVs and protein functional sites in terms of minor allele frequency and the structural position of variants. As a result, we observed that SNVs were less abundant at ligand binding sites, which is consistent with a previous study on SNVs and protein interaction sites. Additionally, we found that non-rare variants tended to be located slightly apart from enzyme active sites. Examination of non-rare variants revealed that most of the mutations resulted in moderate changes of the physico-chemical properties of amino acids, suggesting the existence of functional constraints. In conclusion, this study shows that the mapping of genetic variants on protein structures could be a powerful approach to evaluate the functional impact of rare genetic variations. PMID:27924270

  18. Yessotoxin activates cell death pathways independent of Protein Kinase C in K-562 human leukemic cell line.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Araujo, Andrea; Alfonso, Amparo; Vieytes, Mercedes R; Botana, Luis M

    2015-10-01

    Protein Kinase C (PKC) is a group of enzymes involved in pro-survival or pro-apoptotic events depending on the cellular model. Moreover, Yessotoxin (YTX) modulates its expression and activates different cell death pathways. In K-562 tumor cell line, YTX induces apoptosis and autophagy after 24 and 48 h of incubation, respectively, and the toxin carries out its action through the phosphodiesterase 4A (PDE4A). Therefore, the levels of two subtypes of PKC, conventional (cPKC) and δ isotype of novel PKC (PKCδ) were studied at these times after YTX incubation. Also their involvement in the cell death activated by the toxin and their relationship with PDE4A was checked. The expression of cPKC and PKCδ in cytosol, plasma membrane and nucleus was studied in normal and PDE4A-silenced cells. Furthermore, cell viability of normal cells, as well as cPKC-, PKCδ- and PDE4A-silenced cells was tested by Lactate Dehydrogenase (LDH) assay. As a result, PKCδ showed a key role in K-562 cell survive, since without this protein, K-562 cell decreased their viability. Furthermore, modulation of PKCs by YTX treatment was observed, however, the changes in the expression of these proteins are independent of cell death activated by the toxin. In addition, the modulation of PKCs detected is PDE4A-dependent, since the silencing of this protein change PKC expression pattern.

  19. CA150, a nuclear protein associated with the RNA polymerase II holoenzyme, is involved in Tat-activated human immunodeficiency virus type 1 transcription.

    PubMed Central

    Suñé, C; Hayashi, T; Liu, Y; Lane, W S; Young, R A; Garcia-Blanco, M A

    1997-01-01

    Maximal human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) gene expression requires specific cellular factors in addition to the virus-encoded trans-activator protein Tat and the RNA element TAR. We developed a functional assay, based on transcriptional activation in vitro, to identify these cellular factors. Here, we describe the purification and molecular cloning of CA150, a nuclear protein that is associated with the human RNA polymerase II holoenzyme and is involved in Tat-dependent HIV-1 transcriptional activation. The sequence of CA150 contains an extensive glutamine- and alanine-rich repeat that is found in transcriptional modulators such as GAL11 and SSN6 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Zeste in Drosophila melanogaster. Immunodepletion of CA150 abolished Tat trans activation in vitro. Moreover, overexpression of a mutant CA150 protein specifically and dramatically decreased Tat-mediated activation of the HIV-1 promoter in vivo, strongly suggesting a role for CA150 in HIV-1 gene regulation. Immunoprecipitation experiments demonstrated that both CA150 and Tat associate with the RNA polymerase II holoenzyme. Furthermore, we found that functional Tat associates with the holoenzyme whereas activation-deficient Tat mutants do not. Thus, we propose that Tat action is transduced via an RNA polymerase II holoenzyme that contains CA150. PMID:9315662

  20. Bactericidal activity of synthetic peptides based on the structure of the 55-kilodalton bactericidal protein from human neutrophils.

    PubMed Central

    Gray, B H; Haseman, J R

    1994-01-01

    Short (10- to 11-mer) hydrophilic peptides based on the structure of the 55-kDa bactericidal protein (BP55, B/PI, and CAP57) from human neutrophil granules were identified from the hydropathy plot of the 456-amino-acid sequence predicted from the nucleotide sequences of cDNA clones for BP55 and B/PI. Peptides corresponding to amino acid residues 90 to 99 (peptide #90-99), 86 to 99, or 90 to 102 of BP55 were bactericidal toward 5 x 10(6) Pseudomonas aeruginosa cells at 0.6 x 10(-5) to 1.5 x 10(-5) M and killed an Escherichia coli rough strain at 3 x 10(-5) M. The #90-99 peptide with a cysteine added at the amino terminus (C#90-99) was approximately 10 times more active than #90-99, killing P. aeruginosa at 1.5 x 10(-6) M. Peptides representing amino acid residues 27 to 37, 118 to 127, and 160 to 170 and the first 10 amino acids of the signal sequence for BP55 were not bactericidal. When coupled to either keyhole limpet hemocyanin or ovalbumin protein carriers through the thiol group, the C#90-99 peptide was not diminished on a molar basis in its capacity for killing of P. aeruginosa. Two other relatively hydrophilic peptides with an added amino-terminal cysteine, peptides C#227-236 and C#418-427, were not bactericidal at 1.2 x 10(-4) M or at 100 times the effective bactericidal concentration of C#90-99. The C#90-99 peptide killed E. coli at 1.5 x 10(-5) M, or at 10 times the concentration required to kill an equal number of P. aeruginosa cells. Although Pseudomonas cepacia and Staphylococcus aureus were resistent to killing by the parent BP55 molecule, they were susceptible to the C#90-99 and #90-99 peptides in the same concentration range as was E. coli. When all peptides were compared for the ability to neutralize E. coli O55:B5 endotoxin in a Limulus amoebocyte lysate assay, the C#227-236, C#418-427, and #160-170 peptides completely inhibited gelation at a 10(-4) M concentration. All other synthetic peptides, including bactericidal peptide #90-99 and its

  1. cDNA cloning and chromosomal mapping of a novel human GAP (GAP1M), GTPase-activating protein of Ras

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Shaowei; Nakamura, Shun; Hattori, Seisuke

    1996-08-01

    We have previously isolated a novel Ras GTPase-activating protein (Ras GAP), Gapl{sup m}, from rat brain. Gap1{sup m} is considered to be a negative regulator of the Ras signaling pathways, like other Ras GAPs, neurofibromin, which is a gene product of the neurofibromatosis type I gene, and p120GAP. In this study we have isolated a human cDNA of this Gap and mapped the gene. The gene encodes a protein of 853 amino acids that shows 89% sequence identity to rat Gapl{sup m}. The human gene was mapped to chromosome 3 by PCR analysis on a panel of human-mouse hybrid cells. FISH analysis refined the location of the gene further to 3q22-q23. 11 refs., 2 figs.

  2. Factor H and factor H-related protein 1 bind to human neutrophils via complement receptor 3, mediate attachment to Candida albicans, and enhance neutrophil antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Losse, Josephine; Zipfel, Peter F; Józsi, Mihály

    2010-01-15

    The host complement system plays an important role in protection against infections. Several human-pathogenic microbes were shown to acquire host complement regulators, such as factor H (CFH), that downregulate complement activation at the microbial surface and protect the pathogens from the opsonic and lytic effects of complement. Because CFH can also bind to host cells, we addressed the role of CFH and CFH-related proteins as adhesion ligands in host-pathogen interactions. We show that the CFH family proteins CFH, CFH-like protein 1 (CFHL1), CFH-related protein (CFHR) 1, and CFHR4 long isoform bind to human neutrophil granulocytes and to the opportunistic human-pathogenic yeast Candida albicans. Two major binding sites, one within the N-terminus and one in the C-terminus of CFH, were found to mediate binding to neutrophils. Complement receptor 3 (CD11b/CD18; alpha(M)beta2 integrin) was identified as the major cellular receptor on neutrophils for CFH, CFHL1, and CFHR1, but not for CFHR4 long isoform. CFH and CFHR1 supported cell migration. Furthermore, CFH, CFHL1, and CFHR1 increased attachment of neutrophils to C. albicans. Adhesion of neutrophils to plasma-opsonized yeasts was reduced when CFH binding was inhibited by specific Abs or when using CFH-depleted plasma. Yeast-bound CFH and CFHR1 enhanced the generation of reactive oxygen species and the release of the antimicrobial protein lactoferrin by human neutrophils, and resulted in a more efficient killing of the pathogen. Thus, CFH and CFHR1, when bound on the surface of C. albicans, enhance antimicrobial activity of human neutrophils.

  3. Activation of platelet-activating factor (PAF) receptor stimulates nitric oxide (NO) release via protein kinase C-alpha in HEC-1B human endometrial epithelial cell line.

    PubMed Central

    Dearn, S.; Rahman, M.; Lewis, A.; Ahmed, Z.; Eggo, M. C.; Ahmed, A.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Impairment of the fertility in the platelet-activating factor (PAF) receptor transgenic female mice suggests changes in PAF functions can influence uterine receptivity. We hypothesized that vasodilatory actions of PAF in the uterus was exerted by PAF-mediated nitric oxide (NO) release via activation of isoenzyme-specific protein kinase C (PKC). MATERIALS AND METHODS: Inducible and endothelial NOS was shown by Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction RT-PCR in cDNA synthesized from RNA extract of proliferative and secretory endometrium as well endometrial epithelial cell lines HEC-1B. The effect of WEB2170, N(G)-monomethyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA) and Ro31-8220 on PAF mediated NO release by HEC-1B cell was determined. PAF induced translocation of PKCalpha in HEC-1B cell and its antagonist effect by Ro 31-8220 was studied by Western immunoblot analysis. PKC isoenzyme regulated by PAF was determined in HEC-1B cell lysate by immunoprecipitation. RESULTS: PAF-evoked a rapid and concentration-dependent biphasic increase in total NO in human HEC-1B endometrial epithelial cell line [as measured by a Sievers NOA 280A NO Chemiluminescent Analyser.] This increase in NO release was attenuated by the PAF receptor antagonist, WEB2170. Inhibition of NO synthesis by N(G)-monomethyl-L-arginine produced marked dose-dependent attenuation of PAF-mediated NO release, indicating nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activation. PAF-mediated NO release was also inhibited by the PKC inhibitor Ro 31-8220 and by the removal of extracellular calcium, suggesting a dependency on PKC and calcium, respectively. RT-PCR analysis showed expression of inducible NOS and endothelial NOS in human endometrium, myometrium and HEC-1B cells. Western immunoblot analysis showed PKCalpha, betaII and iota were the principal isozymes present in the HEC-1B cell line and normal endometrium, suggesting that both HEC-1B cells and normal endometrium have similar PKC isozymes. PAF induced the translocation of

  4. Functional requirements for interactions between CD84 and Src homology 2 domain-containing proteins and their contribution to human T cell activation.

    PubMed

    Tangye, Stuart G; Nichols, Kim E; Hare, Nathan J; van de Weerdt, Barbara C M

    2003-09-01

    Cell surface receptors belonging to the CD2 subset of the Ig superfamily of molecules include CD2, CD48, CD58, 2B4, signaling lymphocytic activation molecule (SLAM), Ly9, CD84, and the recently identified molecules NTB-A/Ly108/SLAM family (SF) 2000, CD84H-1/SF2001, B lymphocyte activator macrophage expressed (BLAME), and CRACC (CD2-like receptor-activating cytotoxic cells)/CS-1. Some of these receptors, such as CD2, SLAM, 2B4, CRACC, and NTB-A, contribute to the activation and effector function of T cells and NK cells. Signaling pathways elicited via some of these receptors are believed to involve the Src homology 2 (SH2) domain-containing cytoplasmic adaptor protein SLAM-associated protein (SAP), as it is recruited to SLAM, 2B4, CD84, NTB-A, and Ly-9. Importantly, mutations in SAP cause the inherited human immunodeficiency X-linked lymphoproliferative syndrome (XLP), suggesting that XLP may result from perturbed signaling via one or more of these SAP-associating receptors. We have now studied the requirements for SAP recruitment to CD84 and lymphocyte activation elicited following ligation of CD84 on primary and transformed human T cells. CD84 was found to be rapidly tyrosine phosphorylated following receptor ligation on activated T cells, an event that involved the Src kinase Lck. Phosphorylation of CD84 was indispensable for the recruitment of SAP, which was mediated by Y(262) within the cytoplasmic domain of CD84 and by R(32) within the SH2 domain of SAP. Furthermore, ligating CD84 enhanced the proliferation of anti-CD3 mAb-stimulated human T cells. Strikingly, this effect was also apparent in SAP-deficient T cells obtained from patients with XLP. These results reveal a novel function of CD84 on human lymphocytes and suggest that CD84 can activate human T cells via a SAP-independent mechanism.

  5. Characterization of the single transmembrane domain of human receptor activity-modifying protein 3 in adrenomedullin receptor internalization

    SciTech Connect

    Kuwasako, Kenji; Kitamura, Kazuo; Nagata, Sayaka; Nozaki, Naomi; Kato, Johji

    2012-04-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RAMP3 mediates CLR internalization much less effectively than does RAMP2. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The RAMP3 TMD participates in the negative regulation of CLR/RAMP3 internalization. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A new strategy of promoting internalization and resensitization of the receptor was found. -- Abstract: Two receptor activity-modifying proteins (RAMP2 and RAMP3) enable calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CLR) to function as two heterodimeric receptors (CLR/RAMP2 and CLR/RAMP3) for adrenomedullin (AM), a potent cardiovascular protective peptide. Following AM stimulation, both receptors undergo rapid internalization through a clathrin-dependent pathway, after which CLR/RAMP3, but not CLR/RAMP2, can be recycled to the cell surface for resensitization. However, human (h)RAMP3 mediates CLR internalization much less efficiently than does hRAMP2. Therefore, the molecular basis of the single transmembrane domain (TMD) and the intracellular domain of hRAMP3 during AM receptor internalization was investigated by transiently transfecting various RAMP chimeras and mutants into HEK-293 cells stably expressing hCLR. Flow cytometric analysis revealed that substituting the RAMP3 TMD with that of RAMP2 markedly enhanced AM-induced internalization of CLR. However, this replacement did not enhance the cell surface expression of CLR, [{sup 125}I]AM binding affinity or AM-induced cAMP response. More detailed analyses showed that substituting the Thr{sup 130}-Val{sup 131} sequence in the RAMP3 TMD with the corresponding sequence (Ile{sup 157}-Pro{sup 158}) from RAMP2 significantly enhanced AM-mediated CLR internalization. In contrast, substituting the RAMP3 target sequence with Ala{sup 130}-Ala{sup 131} did not significantly affect CLR internalization. Thus, the RAMP3 TMD participates in the negative regulation of CLR/RAMP3 internalization, and the aforementioned introduction of the Ile-Pro sequence into the RAMP3 TMD may be a

  6. Recombinant human activated protein C attenuates cardiovascular and microcirculatory dysfunction in acute lung injury and septic shock

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction This prospective, randomized, controlled, experimental animal study looks at the effects of recombinant human activated protein C (rhAPC) on global hemodynamics and microcirculation in ovine acute lung injury (ALI) and septic shock, resulting from smoke inhalation injury. Methods Twenty-one sheep (37 ± 2 kg) were operatively prepared for chronic study and randomly allocated to either the sham, control, or rhAPC group (n = 7 each). The control and rhAPC groups were subjected to insufflation of four sets of 12 breaths of cotton smoke followed by instillation of live Pseudomonas aeruginosa into both lung lobes, according to an established protocol. Healthy sham animals were not subjected to the injury and received only four sets of 12 breaths of room air and instillation of the vehicle (normal saline). rhAPC (24 μg/kg/hour) was intravenously administered from 1 hour post injury until the end of the 24-hour experiment. Regional microvascular blood flow was analyzed using colored microspheres. All sheep were mechanically ventilated with 100% oxygen, and fluid resuscitated with lactated Ringer's solution to maintain hematocrit at baseline levels. Results The rhAPC-associated reduction in heart malondialdehyde (MDA) and heart 3-nitrotyrosine (a reliable indicator of tissue injury) levels occurred parallel to a significant increase in mean arterial pressure and to a significant reduction in heart rate and cardiac output compared with untreated controls that showed a typical hypotensive, hyperdynamic response to the injury (P < 0.05). In addition, rhAPC significantly attenuated the changes in microvascular blood flow to the trachea, kidney, and spleen compared with untreated controls (P < 0.05 each). Blood flow to the ileum and pancreas, however, remained similar between groups. The cerebral blood flow as measured in cerebral cortex, cerebellum, thalamus, pons, and hypothalamus, was significantly increased in untreated controls, due to a loss of cerebral

  7. Human cytomegalovirus and mucoepidermoid carcinoma of salivary glands: cell-specific localization of active viral and oncogenic signaling proteins is confirmatory of a causal relationship.

    PubMed

    Melnick, Michael; Sedghizadeh, Parish P; Allen, Carl M; Jaskoll, Tina

    2012-02-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (hCMV) infection is common. Although still controversial, there is growing evidence that active hCMV infection is associated with a variety of malignancies, including brain, breast, lung, colon, and prostate. Given that hCMV is frequently resident in salivary gland (SG) ductal epithelium, we hypothesized that hCMV would be important to the pathogenesis of SG mucoepidermoid carcinoma (MEC). This was initially supported by our finding that purified CMV induces malignant transformation in SG cells in an in vitro mouse model, and utilizes a pathogenic pathway previously reported for human MEC. Here we present the histologic and molecular characterizations of 39 human SG MECs selected randomly from a repository of cases spanning 2004-2011. Serial sections were obtained from formalin-fixed, paraffin embedded, tissue blocks from previous incisional or excisional biopsies. Immunohistochemical assays were performed for active hCMV proteins (IE1 and pp65) and the activated COX/AREG/EGFR/ERK signaling pathway. All four prospective causal criteria for viruses and cancer are fully satisfied: (1) protein markers for active hCMV are present in 97% of MECs; (2) markers of active hCMV are absent in non-neoplastic SG tissues; (3) hCMV-specific proteins (IE1, pp65) are in specific cell types and expression is positively correlated with severity; (4) hCMV correlates and colocalizes with an upregulation and activation of an established oncogenic signaling pathway (COX/AREG/EGFR/ERK). Thus, the evidential support reported here and previously in a mouse model is strongly confirmatory of a causal relationship between hCMV and SG mucoepidermoid carcinoma. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of hCMV's role in human oncogenesis that fully responds to all of Koch's Postulates as revised for viruses and cancer. In the absence of any contrary evidence, hCMV can reasonably be designated an "oncovirus."

  8. Complement-activated oligodendroglia: a new pathogenic entity identified by immunostaining with antibodies to human complement proteins C3d and C4d.

    PubMed

    Yamada, T; Akiyama, H; McGeer, P L

    1990-05-04

    Clusters of oligodendroglial fibers were identified immunohistochemically in human brain tissue with antibodies to the complement proteins C3d and C4d in several neurological disorders. These included Pick's, Huntington's, Parkinson's and Alzheimer's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, progressive supranuclear palsy and Shy-Drager syndrome. These complement-activated oligodendroglia occurred in selected areas of gray and white matter. They were rarely observed in control tissue. Immunogold electron microscopy established that the C4d antibody was attached to degenerating myelin sheaths. These data indicate attachment of classical complement pathway proteins to selective oligodendroglia in several neurological disorders.

  9. Activation of ERK1/2 by protein kinase C-alpha in response to hydrogen peroxide-induced cell death in human gingival fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Venegas, Gloria; Arreguín-Cano, Juan Antonio; Arroyo-Cruz, Rita; Villeda-Navarro, Mónica; Méndez-Mejía, José Antonio

    2010-02-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) increases protein tyrosine phosphorylation of numerous proteins in human gingival fibroblasts (HGFs). Two main proteins, with an apparent molecular weight of 44 and 42kDa, were phosphorylated after hydrogen peroxide stimulation of the human gingival fibroblasts. Further analysis identified these two proteins as ERK1/2. Maximum phosphorylation was detected at 10min post-H(2)O(2) treatment. Pretreatment with an MEK inhibitor, PD98059, inhibited H(2)O(2)-stimulated ERK1/2 phosphorylation in a dose-dependent manner. Treatment with H(2)O(2) also induced phosphorylation of protein kinase C-alpha (PKCalpha). Staurosporine, a PKC inhibitor, blocked ERK1/2 phosphorylation induced by H(2)O(2). In addition, H(2)O(2)-induced cell death was prevented by PD98059, SB203580, and calphostin C, which are MEK, p38 and PKC inhibitors, respectively. These results suggest that H(2)O(2) leads to the phosphorylation and activation of ERK1/2 in a PKC-dependent manner. These findings demonstrate that the MAPK signaling pathway plays an active role in mediating the H(2)O(2)-induced decrease in HGF cell viability and ATP depletion.

  10. Survivin enhances telomerase activity via up-regulation of specificity protein 1- and c-Myc-mediated human telomerase reverse transcriptase gene transcription

    SciTech Connect

    Endoh, Teruo; Tsuji, Naoki; Asanuma, Koichi; Yagihashi, Atsuhito; Watanabe, Naoki . E-mail: watanabn@sapmed.ac.jp

    2005-05-01

    Suppression of apoptosis is thought to contribute to carcinogenesis. Survivin, a member of the inhibitor-of-apoptosis family, blocks apoptotic signaling activated by various cellular stresses. Since elevated expression of survivin observed in human cancers of varied origin was associated with poor patient survival, survivin has attracted growing attention as a potential target for cancer treatment. Immortalization of cells also is required for carcinogenesis; telomere length maintenance by telomerase is required for cancer cells to proliferate indefinitely. Yet how cancer cells activate telomerase remains unclear. We therefore examined possible interrelationships between survivin expression and telomerase activity. Correlation between survivin and human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) expression was observed in colon cancer tissues, and overexpression of survivin enhanced telomerase activity by up-regulation of hTERT expression in LS180 human colon cancer cells. DNA-binding activities of specificity protein 1 (Sp1) and c-Myc to the hTERT core promoter were increased in survivin gene transfectant cells. Phosphorylation of Sp1 and c-Myc at serine and threonine residues was enhanced by survivin, while total amounts of these proteins were unchanged. Further, 'knockdown' of survivin by a small inhibitory RNA decreased Sp1 and c-Myc phosphorylation. Thus survivin participates not only in inhibition of apoptosis, but also in prolonging cellular lifespan.

  11. Proteins aggregation and human diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Chin-Kun

    2015-04-01

    Many human diseases and the death of most supercentenarians are related to protein aggregation. Neurodegenerative diseases include Alzheimer's disease (AD), Huntington's disease (HD), Parkinson's disease (PD), frontotemporallobar degeneration, etc. Such diseases are due to progressive loss of structure or function of neurons caused by protein aggregation. For example, AD is considered to be related to aggregation of Aβ40 (peptide with 40 amino acids) and Aβ42 (peptide with 42 amino acids) and HD is considered to be related to aggregation of polyQ (polyglutamine) peptides. In this paper, we briefly review our recent discovery of key factors for protein aggregation. We used a lattice model to study the aggregation rates of proteins and found that the probability for a protein sequence to appear in the conformation of the aggregated state can be used to determine the temperature at which proteins can aggregate most quickly. We used molecular dynamics and simple models of polymer chains to study relaxation and aggregation of proteins under various conditions and found that when the bending-angle dependent and torsion-angle dependent interactions are zero or very small, then protein chains tend to aggregate at lower temperatures. All atom models were used to identify a key peptide chain for the aggregation of insulin chains and to find that two polyQ chains prefer anti-parallel conformation. It is pointed out that in many cases, protein aggregation does not result from protein mis-folding. A potential drug from Chinese medicine was found for Alzheimer's disease.

  12. SLC24A5 encodes a trans-Golgi network protein with potassium-dependent sodium-calcium exchange activity that regulates human epidermal melanogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ginger, Rebecca S; Askew, Sarah E; Ogborne, Richard M; Wilson, Stephen; Ferdinando, Dudley; Dadd, Tony; Smith, Adrian M; Kazi, Shubana; Szerencsei, Robert T; Winkfein, Robert J; Schnetkamp, Paul P M; Green, Martin R

    2008-02-29

    A non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphism in the human SLC24A5 gene is associated with natural human skin color variation. Multiple sequence alignments predict that this gene encodes a member of the potassium-dependent sodium-calcium exchanger family denoted NCKX5. In cultured human epidermal melanocytes we show using affinity-purified antisera that native human NCKX5 runs as a triplet of approximately 43 kDa on SDS-PAGE and is partially localized to the trans-Golgi network. Removal of the NCKX5 protein through small interfering RNA-mediated knockdown disrupts melanogenesis in human and murine melanocytes, causing a significant reduction in melanin pigment production. Using a heterologous expression system, we confirm for the first time that NCKX5 possesses the predicted exchanger activity. Site-directed mutagenesis of NCKX5 and NCKX2 in this system reveals that the non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphism in SLC24A5 alters a residue that is important for NCKX5 and NCKX2 activity. We suggest that NCKX5 directly regulates human epidermal melanogenesis and natural skin color through its intracellular potassium-dependent exchanger activity.

  13. Pb2+ induces gastrin gene expression by extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 and transcription factor activator protein 1 in human gastric carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Chan, Chien-Pin; Tsai, Yao-Ting; Chen, Yao-Li; Hsu, Yu-Wen; Tseng, Joseph T; Chuang, Hung-Yi; Shiurba, Robert; Lee, Mei-Hsien; Wang, Jaw-Yuan; Chang, Wei-Chiao

    2015-02-01

    Divalent lead ions (Pb(2+) ) are toxic environmental pollutants known to cause serious health problems in humans and animals. Absorption of Pb(2+) from air, water, and food takes place in the respiratory and digestive tracts. The ways in which absorbed Pb(2+) affects cell physiology are just beginning to be understood at the molecular level. Here, we used reverse transcription PCR and Western blotting to analyze cultures of human gastric carcinoma cells exposed to 10 μM lead nitrate. We found that Pb(2+) induces gastrin hormone gene transcription and translation in a time-dependent manner. Promoter deletion analysis revealed that activator protein 1 (AP1) was necessary for gastrin gene transcription in cells exposed to Pb(2+) . MitogIen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)/ERK kinase inhibitor PD98059 suppressed the Pb(2+) -induced increase in messenger RNA. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitors AG1478 and PD153035 reduced both transcription and phosphorylation by extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2). Cells exposed to Pb(2+) also increased production of c-Jun protein, a component of AP1, and over-expression of c-Jun enhanced activation of the gastrin promoter. In sum, the findings suggest the EGFR-ERK1/2-AP1 pathway mediates the effects of Pb(2+) on gastrin gene activity in cell culture.

  14. Fc Receptor-Mediated Activities of Env-Specific Human Monoclonal Antibodies Generated from Volunteers Receiving the DNA Prime-Protein Boost HIV Vaccine DP6-001.

    PubMed

    Costa, Matthew R; Pollara, Justin; Edwards, Regina Whitney; Seaman, Michael S; Gorny, Miroslaw K; Montefiori, David C; Liao, Hua-Xin; Ferrari, Guido; Lu, Shan; Wang, Shixia

    2016-11-15

    HIV-1 is able to elicit broadly potent neutralizing antibodies in a very small subset of individuals only after several years of infection, and therefore, vaccines that elicit these types of antibodies have been difficult to design. The RV144 trial showed that moderate protection is possible and that this protection may correlate with antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) activity. Our previous studies demonstrated that in an HIV vaccine phase I trial, the DP6-001 trial, a polyvalent Env DNA prime-protein boost formulation could elicit potent and broadly reactive, gp120-specific antibodies with positive neutralization activities. Here we report on the production and analysis of HIV-1 Env-specific human monoclonal antibodies (hMAbs) isolated from vaccinees in the DP6-001 trial. For this initial report, 13 hMAbs from four vaccinees in the DP6-001 trial showed broad binding to gp120 proteins of diverse subtypes both autologous and heterologous to vaccine immunogens. Equally cross-reactive Fc receptor-mediated functional activities, including ADCC and antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis (ADCP) activities, were present with both immune sera and isolated MAbs, confirming the induction of nonneutralizing functional hMAbs by the DNA prime-protein boost vaccination. Elicitation of broadly reactive hMAbs by vaccination in healthy human volunteers confirms the value of the polyvalent formulation in this HIV vaccine design.

  15. Protein Crystal Recombinant Human Insulin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The comparison of protein crystal, Recombiant Human Insulin; space-grown (left) and earth-grown (right). On STS-60, Spacehab II indicated that space-grown crystals are larger and of greater optical clarity than their earth-grown counterparts. Recombiant Human Insulin facilitates the incorporation of glucose into cells. In diabetics, there is either a decrease in or complete lack of insulin, thereby leading to several harmful complications. Principal Investigator is Larry DeLucas.

  16. NOA36/ZNF330 is a conserved cystein-rich protein with proapoptotic activity in human cells.

    PubMed

    de Melo, Ivan S; Iglesias, Concepción; Benítez-Rondán, Alicia; Medina, Francisco; Martínez-Barberá, Juan Pedro; Bolívar, Jorge

    2009-12-01

    Translocations of regulator proteins from or to the mitochondria are key events in apoptosis regulation. NOA36/ZNF330 is a highly evolutionary conserved protein with a characteristic cystein-rich domain. In this work we address its mitochondrial localization and we demonstrate that a blockage of endogenous NOA36/ZNF330 expression by small-interfering RNA (siRNA) reduced apoptotic response to etoposide (ETO), camptothecin (CPT) and staurosporine (STS) but not to CH11 anti-Fas antibody or tumour-necrosis-factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) in HeLa cells. In contrast, when ectopically expressed in the cytoplasm, NOA36/ZNF330 induces apoptotic cell death. We also found that the domain responsible for this proapoptotic activity is located its cystein-rich region. We propose that NOA36/ZNF330 is translocated from the mitochondria to the cytoplasm when apoptosis is induced and that it contributes to cytochrome c release.

  17. Identification of novel in vivo phosphorylation sites of the human proapoptotic protein BAD: pore-forming activity of BAD is regulated by phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Polzien, Lisa; Baljuls, Angela; Rennefahrt, Ulrike E E; Fischer, Andreas; Schmitz, Werner; Zahedi, Rene P; Sickmann, Albert; Metz, Renate; Albert, Stefan; Benz, Roland; Hekman, Mirko; Rapp, Ulf R

    2009-10-09

    BAD is a proapoptotic member of the Bcl-2 protein family that is regulated by phosphorylation in response to survival factors. Although much attention has been devoted to the identification of phosphorylation sites in murine BAD, little data are available with respect to phosphorylation of human BAD protein. Using mass spectrometry, we identified here besides the established phosphorylation sites at serines 75, 99, and 118 several novel in vivo phosphorylation sites within human BAD (serines 25, 32/34, 97, and 124). Furthermore, we investigated the quantitative contribution of BAD targeting kinases in phosphorylating serine residues 75, 99, and 118. Our results indicate that RAF kinases represent, besides protein kinase A, PAK, and Akt/protein kinase B, in vivo BAD-phosphorylating kinases. RAF-induced phosphorylation of BAD was reduced to control levels using the RAF inhibitor BAY 43-9006. This phosphorylation was not prevented by MEK inhibitors. Consistently, expression of constitutively active RAF suppressed apoptosis induced by BAD and the inhibition of colony formation caused by BAD could be prevented by RAF. In addition, using the surface plasmon resonance technique, we analyzed the direct consequences of BAD phosphorylation by RAF with respect to association with 14-3-3 and Bcl-2/Bcl-X(L) proteins. Phosphorylation of BAD by active RAF promotes 14-3-3 protein association, in which the phosphoserine 99 represented the major binding site. Finally, we show here that BAD forms channels in planar bilayer membranes in vitro. This pore-forming capacity was dependent on phosphorylation status and interaction with 14-3-3 proteins. Collectively, our findings provide new insights into the regulation of BAD function by phosphorylation.

  18. Multifunctional human transcriptional coactivator protein PC4 is a substrate of Aurora kinases and activates the Aurora enzymes.

    PubMed

    Dhanasekaran, Karthigeyan; Kumari, Sujata; Boopathi, Ramachandran; Shima, Hiroki; Swaminathan, Amrutha; Bachu, Mahesh; Ranga, Udaykumar; Igarashi, Kazuhiko; Kundu, Tapas K

    2016-03-01

    Positive coactivator 4 (PC4), a human transcriptional coactivator, is involved in diverse processes like chromatin organization and transcription regulation. It is hyperphosphorylated during mitosis, with unknown significance. For the first time, we demonstrate the function of PC4 outside the nucleus upon nuclear envelope breakdown. A fraction of PC4 associates with Aurora A and Aurora B and undergoes phosphorylation, following which PC4 activates both Aurora A and B to sustain optimal kinase activity to maintain the phosphorylation gradient for the proper functioning of the mitotic machinery. This mitotic role is evident in PC4 knockdown cells where the defects are rescued only by the catalytically active Aurora kinases, but not the kinase-dead mutants. Similarly, the PC4 phosphodeficient mutant failed to rescue such defects. Hence, our observations establish a novel mitotic function of PC4 that might be dependent on Aurora kinase-mediated phosphorylation.

  19. Requirement of T-lymphokine-activated killer cell-originated protein kinase for TRAIL resistance of human HeLa cervical cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, Hyeok-Ran; Lee, Ki Won; Dong, Zigang; Lee, Kyung Bok; Oh, Sang-Muk

    2010-01-01

    T-lymphokine-activated killer cell-originated protein kinase (TOPK) appears to be highly expressed in various cancer cells and to play an important role in maintaining proliferation of cancer cells. However, the underlying mechanism by which TOPK regulates growth of cancer cells remains elusive. Here we report that upregulated endogenous TOPK augments resistance of cancer cells to apoptosis induced by tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL). Stable knocking down of TOPK markedly increased TRAIL-mediated apoptosis of human HeLa cervical cancer cells, as compared with control cells. Caspase 8 or caspase 3 activities in response to TRAIL were greatly incremented in TOPK-depleted cells. Ablation of TOPK negatively regulated TRAIL-mediated NF-{kappa}B activity. Furthermore, expression of NF-{kappa}B-dependent genes, FLICE-inhibitory protein (FLIP), inhibitor of apoptosis protein 1 (c-IAP1), or X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP) was reduced in TOPK-depleted cells. Collectively, these findings demonstrated that TOPK contributed to TRAIL resistance of cancer cells via NF-{kappa}B activity, suggesting that TOPK might be a potential molecular target for successful cancer therapy using TRAIL.

  20. The Human SWI-SNF Complex Protein p270 Is an ARID Family Member with Non-Sequence-Specific DNA Binding Activity

    PubMed Central

    Dallas, Peter B.; Pacchione, Stephen; Wilsker, Deborah; Bowrin, Valerie; Kobayashi, Ryuji; Moran, Elizabeth

    2000-01-01

    p270 is an integral member of human SWI-SNF complexes, first identified through its shared antigenic specificity with p300 and CREB binding protein. The deduced amino acid sequence of p270 reported here indicates that it is a member of an evolutionarily conserved family of proteins distinguished by the presence of a DNA binding motif termed ARID (AT-rich interactive domain). The ARID consensus and other structural features are common to both p270 and yeast SWI1, suggesting that p270 is a human counterpart of SWI1. The approximately 100-residue ARID sequence is present in a series of proteins strongly implicated in the regulation of cell growth, development, and tissue-specific gene expression. Although about a dozen ARID proteins can be identified from database searches, to date, only Bright (a regulator of B-cell-specific gene expression), dead ringer (a Drosophila melanogaster gene product required for normal development), and MRF-2 (which represses expression from the cytomegalovirus enhancer) have been analyzed directly in regard to their DNA binding properties. Each binds preferentially to AT-rich sites. In contrast, p270 shows no sequence preference in its DNA binding activity, thereby demonstrating that AT-rich binding is not an intrinsic property of ARID domains and that ARID family proteins may be involved in a wider range of DNA interactions. PMID:10757798

  1. Variants of the protein PRDM9 differentially regulate a set of human meiotic recombination hotspots highly active in African populations.

    PubMed

    Berg, Ingrid L; Neumann, Rita; Sarbajna, Shriparna; Odenthal-Hesse, Linda; Butler, Nicola J; Jeffreys, Alec J

    2011-07-26

    PRDM9 is a major specifier of human meiotic recombination hotspots, probably via binding of its zinc-finger repeat array to a DNA sequence motif associated with hotspots. However, our view of PRDM9 regulation, in terms of motifs defined and hotspots studied, has a strong bias toward the PRDM9 A variant particularly common in Europeans. We show that population diversity can reveal a second class of hotspots specifically activated by PRDM9 variants common in Africans but rare in Europeans. These African-enhanced hotspots nevertheless share very similar properties with their counterparts activated by the A variant. The specificity of hotspot activation is such that individuals with differing PRDM9 genotypes, even within the same population, can use substantially if not completely different sets of hotspots. Each African-enhanced hotspot is activated by a distinct spectrum of PRDM9 variants, despite the fact that all are predicted to bind the same sequence motif. This differential activation points to complex interactions between the zinc-finger array and hotspots and identifies features of the array that might be important in controlling hotspot activity.

  2. Lipoarabinomannan of Mycobacterium tuberculosis promotes protein tyrosine dephosphorylation and inhibition of mitogen-activated protein kinase in human mononuclear phagocytes. Role of the Src homology 2 containing tyrosine phosphatase 1.

    PubMed

    Knutson, K L; Hmama, Z; Herrera-Velit, P; Rochford, R; Reiner, N E

    1998-01-02

    Lipoarabinomannan (LAM) is a putative virulence factor of Mycobacterium tuberculosis that inhibits monocyte functions, and this may involve antagonism of cell signaling pathways. The effects of LAM on protein tyrosine phosphorylation in cells of the human monocytic cell line THP-1 were examined. LAM promoted tyrosine dephosphorylation of multiple cell proteins and attenuated phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate-induced activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase. To examine whether these effects of LAM could be related to activation of a phosphatase, fractions from LAM-treated cells were analyzed for dephosphorylation of para-nitrophenol phosphate. The data show that LAM induced increased phosphatase activity associated with the membrane fraction. The Src homology 2 containing tyrosine phosphatase 1 (SHP-1) is important for signal termination and was examined as a potential target of LAM. Exposure of cells to LAM brought about (i) an increase in tyrosine phosphorylation of SHP-1, and (ii) translocation of the phosphatase to the membrane. Phosphatase assay of SHP-1 immunoprecipitated from LAM-treated cells, using phosphorylated mitogen-activated protein kinase as substrate, indicated that LAM promoted increased activity of SHP-1 in vivo. LAM also activated SHP-1 directly in vitro. Exposure of cells to LAM also attenuated the expression of tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin-12, and major histocompatibility class II molecules. These results suggest that one mechanism by which LAM deactivates monocytes involves activation of SHP-1.

  3. Role of protein kinase C in TBT-induced inhibition of lytic function and MAPK activation in human natural killer cells.

    PubMed

    Abraha, Abraham B; Rana, Krupa; Whalen, Margaret M

    2010-11-01

    Human natural killer (NK) cells are lymphocytes that destroy tumor and virally infected cells. Previous studies have shown that exposure of NK cells to tributyltin (TBT) greatly diminishes their ability to destroy tumor cells (lytic function) while activating mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) (p44/42, p38, and JNK) in NK cells. The signaling pathway that regulates NK lytic function appears to include activation of protein kinase C(PKC) as well as MAPK activity. TBT-induced activation of MAPKs would trigger a portion of the NK lytic signaling pathway, which would then leave the NK cell unable to trigger this pathway in response to a subsequent encounter with a target cell. In the present study we evaluated the involvement of PKC in inhibition of NK lysis of tumor cells and activation of MAPKs caused by TBT exposure. TBT caused a 2–3-fold activation of PKC at concentrations ranging from 50 to 300 nM (16–98 ng/ml),indicating that activation of PKC occurs in response to TBT exposure. This would then leave the NK cell unable to respond to targets. Treatment with the PKC inhibitor, bisindolylmaleimide I, caused an 85% decrease in the ability of NK cells to lyse tumor cells, validating the involvement of PKC in the lytic signaling pathway. The role of PKC in the activation of MAPKs by TBT was also investigated using bisindolylmaleimide I. The results indicated that, in NK cells where PKC activation was blocked, there was no activation of the MAPK, p44/42 in response to TBT.However, TBT-induced activation of the MAPKs, p38 and JNK did not require PKC activation. These results indicate the pivotal role of PKC in the TBT-induced loss of NK lytic function including activation of p44/42 by TBT in NK cells.

  4. Transcriptional activation of RNA polymerase III-dependent genes by the human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 tax protein.

    PubMed Central

    Gottesfeld, J M; Johnson, D L; Nyborg, J K

    1996-01-01

    The human T-cell leukemia virus-encoded tax protein is a potent activator of many viral and cellular genes transcribed by RNA polymerase II. We find that both chromatin and cell extracts derived from human T-cell leukemia virus type 1-infected human T lymphocytes support higher levels of 5S rRNA and tRNA gene transcription than chromatin or extracts from uninfected T lymphocytes. The viral protein Tax was likely responsible for this higher level of class II gene transcription, as purified Tax was found to stimulate both genes when added to the uninfected cell extract or in reconstituted systems. Both limiting-component transcription assays and DNA binding assays identified the class III gene transcription factor TFIIIB as the principle target of Tax activity. Surprisingly, we find that Tax increases the effective concentration of active TFIIIB molecules. These data suggest that Tax stimulates RNA polymerase III-dependent gene expression by accelerating the rate and/or extent of transcription initiation complex assembly. PMID:8657153

  5. The human telomerase RNA component, hTR, activates the DNA-dependent protein kinase to phosphorylate heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A1.

    PubMed

    Ting, Nicholas S Y; Pohorelic, Brant; Yu, Yaping; Lees-Miller, Susan P; Beattie, Tara L

    2009-10-01

    Telomere integrity in human cells is maintained by the dynamic interplay between telomerase, telomere associated proteins, and DNA repair proteins. These interactions are vital to suppress DNA damage responses and unfavorable changes in chromosome dynamics. The DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) is critical for this process. Cells deficient for functional DNA-PKcs show increased rates of telomere loss, accompanied by chromosomal fusions and translocations. Treatment of cells with specific DNA-PK kinase inhibitors leads to similar phenotypes. These observations indicate that the kinase activity of DNA-PK is required for its function at telomeres possibly through phosphorylation of essential proteins needed for telomere length maintenance. Here we show that the heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A1 (hnRNP A1) is a direct substrate for DNA-PK in vitro. Phosphorylation of hnRNP A1 is stimulated not only by the presence of DNA but also by the telomerase RNA component, hTR. Furthermore, we show that hnRNP A1 is phosphorylated in vivo in a DNA-PK-dependent manner and that this phosphorylation is greatly reduced in cell lines which lack hTR. These data are the first to report that hTR stimulates the kinase activity of DNA-PK toward a known telomere-associated protein, and may provide further insights into the function of DNA-PK at telomeres.

  6. Structural Requirements for the Antiviral Activity of the Human MxA Protein against Thogoto and Influenza A Virus*

    PubMed Central

    Patzina, Corinna; Haller, Otto; Kochs, Georg

    2014-01-01

    The interferon-induced dynamin-like MxA protein has broad antiviral activity against many viruses, including orthomyxoviruses such as influenza A and Thogoto virus and bunyaviruses such as La Crosse virus. MxA consists of an N-terminal globular GTPase domain, a connecting bundle signaling element, and the C-terminal stalk that mediates oligomerization and antiviral specificity. We previously reported that the disordered loop L4 that protrudes from the compact stalk is a key determinant of antiviral specificity against influenza A and Thogoto virus. However, the role of individual amino acids for viral target recognition remained largely undefined. By mutational analyses, we identified two regions in the C-terminal part of L4 that contribute to an antiviral interface. Mutations in the proximal motif, at positions 561 and 562, abolished antiviral activity against orthomyxoviruses but not bunyaviruses. In contrast, mutations in the distal motif, around position 577, abolished antiviral activity against both viruses. These results indicate that at least two structural elements in L4 are responsible for antiviral activity and that the proximal motif determines specificity for orthomyxoviruses, whereas the distal sequence serves a conserved structural function. PMID:24448803

  7. Rational Design of Protein C Activators

    PubMed Central

    Barranco-Medina, Sergio; Murphy, Mary; Pelc, Leslie; Chen, Zhiwei; Di Cera, Enrico; Pozzi, Nicola

    2017-01-01

    In addition to its procoagulant and proinflammatory functions mediated by cleavage of fibrinogen and PAR1, the trypsin-like protease thrombin activates the anticoagulant protein C in a reaction that requires the cofactor thrombomodulin and the endothelial protein C receptor. Once in the circulation, activated protein C functions as an anticoagulant, anti-inflammatory and regenerative factor. Hence, availability of a protein C activator would afford a therapeutic for patients suffering from thrombotic disorders and a diagnostic tool for monitoring the level of protein C in plasma. Here, we present a fusion protein where thrombin and the EGF456 domain of thrombomodulin are connected through a peptide linker. The fusion protein recapitulates the functional and structural properties of the thrombin-thrombomodulin complex, prolongs the clotting time by generating pharmacological quantities of activated protein C and effectively diagnoses protein C deficiency in human plasma. Notably, these functions do not require exogenous thrombomodulin, unlike other anticoagulant thrombin derivatives engineered to date. These features make the fusion protein an innovative step toward the development of protein C activators of clinical and diagnostic relevance. PMID:28294177

  8. Predictors of Variation in CYP2A6 mRNA, Protein, and Enzyme Activity in a Human Liver Bank: Influence of Genetic and Nongenetic Factors.

    PubMed

    Tanner, Julie-Anne; Prasad, Bhagwat; Claw, Katrina G; Stapleton, Patricia; Chaudhry, Amarjit; Schuetz, Erin G; Thummel, Kenneth E; Tyndale, Rachel F

    2017-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 2A6 CYP2A6: metabolizes several clinically relevant substrates, including nicotine, the primary psychoactive component in cigarette smoke. Smokers vary widely in their rate of inactivation and clearance of nicotine, altering numerous smoking phenotypes. We aimed to characterize independent and shared impact of genetic and nongenetic sources of variation in CYP2A6 mRNA, protein, and enzyme activity in a human liver bank (n = 360). For the assessment of genetic factors, we quantified levels of CYP2A6, cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase (POR), and aldo-keto reductase 1D1 (AKR1D1) mRNA, and CYP2A6 and POR proteins. CYP2A6 enzyme activity was determined through measurement of cotinine formation from nicotine and 7-hydroxycoumarin formation from coumarin. Donor DNA was genotyped for CYP2A6, POR, and AKR1D1 genetic variants. Nongenetic factors assessed included gender, age, and liver disease. CYP2A6 phenotype measures were positively correlated to each other (r values ranging from 0.47-0.88, P < 0.001). Female donors exhibited higher CYP2A6 mRNA expression relative to males (P < 0.05). Donor age was weakly positively correlated with CYP2A6 protein (r = 0.12, P < 0.05) and activity (r = 0.20, P < 0.001). CYP2A6 reduced-function genotypes, but not POR or AKR1D1 genotypes, were associated with lower CYP2A6 protein (P < 0.001) and activity (P < 0.01). AKR1D1 mRNA was correlated with CYP2A6 mRNA (r = 0.57, P < 0.001), protein (r = 0.30, P < 0.001), and activity (r = 0.34, P < 0.001). POR protein was correlated with CYP2A6 activity (r = 0.45, P < 0.001). Through regression analyses, we accounted for 17% (P < 0.001), 37% (P < 0.001), and 77% (P < 0.001) of the variation in CYP2A6 mRNA, protein, and activity, respectively. Overall, several independent and shared sources of variation in CYP2A6 activity in vitro have been identified, which could translate to variable hepatic clearance of nicotine.

  9. A high throughput system for the evaluation of protein kinase C inhibitors based on Elk1 transcriptional activation in human astrocytoma cells.

    PubMed

    Sharif, T R; Sharif, M

    1999-02-01

    Protein kinase C (PKC) designates a family of kinases that regulate many essential functions including cell growth and differentiation. The tight regulation of PKC activity is crucial for maintaining normal cellular proliferation and excessive activity leads to abnormal or uncontrolled cell growth. Recent reports indicate that malignant glioma cell lines express 100 to 1000-fold higher PKC activity when compared to non-neoplastic astrocytes. This high activity correlates well with the proliferation of tumor cells in vitro. We recently reported on the anti-proliferative properties of selective PKC inhibitors on the growth of U-373MG human astrocytoma cell line, and their ability to block mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase pathway activated by substance P (SP) neuropeptide receptor signaling via a PKC-dependent mechanism. Therefore, inhibiting PKC activity by selective PKC inhibitors may present a promising approach for improving astroglial brain tumor therapy. For this purpose, we constructed a high throughput model cell system to evaluate the efficacy of PKC inhibitors. This system is based on the measurement of light production in U-373MG cells stably transfected with the luciferase reporter gene whose expression depends on the transcriptional activation of GAL4-Elk1 fusion protein by enzyme components of the MAP kinase pathway and the upstream activation of PKC (PKC activation-->MAP kinases-->GAL4-Elk1 phosphorylation-->luciferase expression-->luciferase activity). In brief, we have demonstrated that the PKC activator 12-O-tetradecanoyl phorbol 13-acetate (TPA)-induced luciferase activity in this cell system is mediated via the MAP kinase pathway and can be blocked in the presence of MEK1 selective inhibitors (PD 098059 or U0126). We also demonstrated that TPA-induced luciferase activity in U-373MG stable clones can be blocked by PKC inhibitors (CGP 41251, Go 6976, and GF 109203X) in a concentration dependent manner. In contrast, epidermal growth factor (EGF

  10. Protein aggregation profile of the human kinome

    PubMed Central

    Graña-Montes, Ricardo; Sant'Anna de Oliveira, Ricardo; Ventura, Salvador

    2012-01-01

    Protein aggregation into amyloid fibrils is associated with the onset of an increasing number of human disorders, including Alzheimer's disease, diabetes, and some types of cancer. The ability to form toxic amyloids appears to be a property of most polypeptides. Accordingly, it has been proposed that reducing aggregation and its effect in cell fitness is a driving force in the evolution of proteins sequences. This control of protein solubility should be especially important for regulatory hubs in biological networks, like protein kinases. These enzymes are implicated in practically all processes in normal and abnormal cell physiology, and phosphorylation is one of the most frequent protein modifications used to control protein activity. Here, we use the AGGRESCAN algorithm to study the aggregation propensity of kinase sequences. We compared them with the rest of globular proteins to decipher whether they display differential aggregation properties. In addition, we compared the human kinase complement with the kinomes of other organisms to see if we can identify any evolutionary trend in the aggregational properties of this protein superfamily. Our analysis indicates that kinase domains display significant aggregation propensity, a property that decreases with increasing organism complexity. PMID:23181023

  11. Reduction of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase and cyclooxygenase-2 signaling by isoflurane inhibits proliferation and apoptosis evasion in human papillomavirus-infected laryngeal papillomas

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Hongbo; Shi, Xiaojuan; Li, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Human laryngeal papilloma (LP) is a human papillomavirus-induced hyperplastic tumor of the respiratory tract, which is characterized by rapid growth and apoptosis resistance. Isoflurane (ISO) inhibits proliferation and elicits apoptosis in cancer cells. The results of the present study found that the mRNA and protein levels of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX2) were higher in LP tissues than in normal laryngeal samples, and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) production was increased in LP cells, as determined by quantitative polymerase chain reaction, western blot and radioimmunoassay analyses. Notably, the increase in COX2 and PGE2 levels was significantly abrogated in the ISO-treated LP cells. The inhibitory effects of ISO on COX2 expression and activity depended on the inactivation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) in LP cells. By inhibiting the COX2 activity of LP cells, ISO treatment markedly suppressed cell viability and proliferation, as determined using Cell Counting Kit-8, flow cytometry and 5-ethynyl-20-deoxyuridine incorporation assays. Furthermore, ISO treatment promoted cell apoptosis, as demonstrated by flow cytometry, nucleosomal fragmentation and caspase-3 activity assays. Collectively, the present results suggest that COX2 is critical in the progression of LP, and ISO is a potential agent for LP therapy by impeding p38 MAPK/COX2 signaling. PMID:27882174

  12. Local anesthetics induce apoptosis in human thyroid cancer cells through the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yuan-Ching; Hsu, Yi-Chiung; Liu, Chien-Liang; Huang, Shih-Yuan; Hu, Meng-Chun; Cheng, Shih-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Local anesthetics are frequently used in fine-needle aspiration of thyroid lesions and locoregional control of persistent or recurrent thyroid cancer. Recent evidence suggests that local anesthetics have a broad spectrum of effects including inhibition of cell proliferation and induction of apoptosis in neuronal and other types of cells. In this study, we demonstrated that treatment with lidocaine and bupivacaine resulted in decreased cell viability and colony formation of both 8505C and K1 cells in a dose-dependent manner. Lidocaine and bupivacaine induced apoptosis, and necrosis in high concentrations, as determined by flow cytometry. Lidocaine and bupivacaine caused disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential and release of cytochrome c, accompanied by activation of caspase 3 and 7, PARP cleavage, and induction of a higher ratio of Bax/Bcl-2. Based on microarray and pathway analysis, apoptosis is the prominent transcriptional change common to lidocaine and bupivacaine treatment. Furthermore, lidocaine and bupivacaine attenuated extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) activity and induced activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and c-jun N-terminal kinase. Pharmacological inhibitors of MAPK/ERK kinase and p38 MAPK suppressed caspase 3 activation and PARP cleavage. Taken together, our results for the first time demonstrate the cytotoxic effects of local anesthetics on thyroid cancer cells and implicate the MAPK pathways as an important mechanism. Our findings have potential clinical relevance in that the use of local anesthetics may confer previously unrecognized benefits in the management of patients with thyroid cancer.

  13. Induction of Macrophage Function in Human THP-1 Cells Is Associated with Rewiring of MAPK Signaling and Activation of MAP3K7 (TAK1) Protein Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Erik; Ventz, Katharina; Harms, Manuela; Mostertz, Jörg; Hochgräfe, Falko

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages represent the primary human host response to pathogen infection and link the immediate defense to the adaptive immune system. Mature tissue macrophages convert from circulating monocyte precursor cells by terminal differentiation in a process that is not fully understood. Here, we analyzed the protein kinases of the human monocytic cell line THP-1 before and after induction of macrophage differentiation by using kinomics and phosphoproteomics. When comparing the macrophage-like state with the monocytic precursor, 50% of the kinome was altered in expression and even 71% of covered kinase phosphorylation sites were affected. Kinome rearrangements are for example characterized by a shift of overrepresented cyclin-dependent kinases associated with cell cycle control in monocytes to calmodulin-dependent kinases and kinases involved in proinflammatory signaling. Eventually, we show that monocyte-to-macrophage differentiation is associated with major rewiring of mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling networks and demonstrate that protein kinase MAP3K7 (TAK1) acts as the key signaling hub in bacterial killing, chemokine production and differentiation. Our study proves the fundamental role of protein kinases and cellular signaling as major drivers of macrophage differentiation and function. The finding that MAP3K7 is central to macrophage function suggests MAP3K7 and its networking partners as promising targets in host-directed therapy for macrophage-associated disease. PMID:27066479

  14. Trans-activation of the JC virus late promoter by the tat protein of type 1 human immunodeficiency virus in glial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Tada, Hiroomi; Lashgari, M.; Amini, S.; Khalili, K. ); Rappaport, J.; Wong-Staal, F. )

    1990-05-01

    Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) is a demyelinating disease of the central nervous system caused by the JC virus (JCV), a human papovavirus. PML is a relatively rare disease seen predominantly in immunocompromised individuals and is a frequent complication observed in AIDS patients. The significantly higher incidence of PML in AIDS patients than in other immunosuppressive disorders has suggested that the presence of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) in the brain may directly or indirectly contribute to the pathogenesis of this disease. In the present study the authors have examined the expression of the JCV genome in both glial and non-glial cells in the presence of HIV-1 regulatory proteins. They find that the HIV-1-encoded trans-regulatory protein tat increases the basal activity of the JCV late promoter, JCV{sub L}, in glial cells. They conclude that the presence of the HIV-1-encoded tat protein may positively affect the JCV lytic cycle in glial cells by stimulating JCV gene expression. The results suggest a mechanism for the relatively high incidence of PML in AIDS patients than in other immunosuppressive disorders. Furthermore, the findings indicate that the HIV-1 regulatory protein tat may stimulate other viral and perhaps cellular promoters, in addition to its own.

  15. Involvement of mitogen-activated protein kinases and NF{kappa}B in LPS-induced CD40 expression on human monocytic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Weidong | Alexis, Neil E. |; Chen Xian |; Bromberg, Philip A. |; Peden, David B. ||

    2008-04-15

    CD40 is a costimulatory molecule linking innate and adaptive immune responses to bacterial stimuli, as well as a critical regulator of functions of other costimulatory molecules. The mechanisms regulating lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced CD40 expression have not been adequately characterized in human monocytic cells. In this study we used a human monocytic cell line, THP-1, to investigate the possible mechanisms of CD40 expression following LPS exposure. Exposure to LPS resulted in a dose- and time-dependent increase in CD40 expression. Further studies using immunoblotting and pharmacological inhibitors revealed that mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and NF{kappa}B were activated by LPS exposure and involved in LPS-induced CD40 expression. Activation of MAPKs was not responsible for LPS-induced NF{kappa}B activation. TLR4 was expressed on THP-1 cells and pretreatment of cells with a Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) neutralizing antibody (HTA125) significantly blunted LPS-induced MAPK and NF{kappa}B activation and ensuing CD40 expression. Additional studies with murine macrophages expressing wild type and mutated TLR4 showed that TLR4 was implicated in LPS-induced ERK and NF{kappa}B activation, and CD40 expression. Moreover, blockage of MAPK and NF{kappa}B activation inhibited LPS-induced TLR4 expression. In summary, LPS-induced CD40 expression in monocytic cells involves MAPKs and NF{kappa}B.

  16. Targeting protein neddylation with an NEDD8-activating enzyme inhibitor MLN4924 induced apoptosis or senescence in human lymphoma cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanchun; Luo, Zhongguang; Pan, Yongfu; Wang, Weige; Zhou, Xiaoyan; Jeong, Lak Shin; Chu, Yiwei; Liu, Jie; Jia, Lijun

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies indicate that post-translational protein neddylation is required for the maintenance of cell viability in several lymphoma cell lines, while inhibition of the neddylation pathway with an NEDD8-activating enzyme (NAE) inhibitor MLN4924 induces apoptosis in lymphoma cells. However, the mechanism by which neddylation inhibition induces apoptosis in lymphoma cells has not been fully elucidated. Moreover, it is unknown whether neddylation inhibition triggers non-apoptotic cell-killing responses, such as cell senescence, in lymphoma cells. Here, we report that MLN4924 specifically inhibited protein neddylation, inactivated cullin-RING E3 ligase (CRL), the best-known neddylation substrate, and induced the accumulation of tumor-suppressive CRL substrates in lymphoma cells. Moreover, MLN4924 potently suppressed the growth of lymphoma cells by inducing G2 cell-cycle arrest, followed by apoptosis or senescence in a cell line-dependent manner. MLN4924-induced apoptosis was mediated by intrinsic apoptotic signaling with substantial up-regulation of pro-apoptotic Bik and Noxa as well as down-regulation of anti-apoptotic XIAP, c-IAP1 and c-IAP2, while senescence induction upon neddylation inhibition seemed dependent on the expression of tumor suppressor p21/p27. Together, these findings expand our understanding on how lymphoma cells respond to neddylation inhibition and support the development of neddylation inhibitors (e.g. MLN4924) for the treatment of lymphoma.

  17. Thyroid hormones directly activate the expression of the human and mouse uncoupling protein-3 genes through a thyroid response element in the proximal promoter region

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    The transcription of the human UCP3 (uncoupling protein-3) gene in skeletal muscle is tightly regulated by metabolic signals related to fatty acid availability. However, changes in thyroid status also modulate UCP3 gene expression, albeit by unknown mechanisms. We created transgenic mice bearing the entire human UCP3 gene to investigate the effect of thyroid hormones on human UCP3 gene expression. Treatment of human UCP3 transgenic mice with thyroid hormones induced the expression of the human gene in skeletal muscle. In addition, transient transfection experiments demonstrate that thyroid hormones activate the transcription of the human UCP3 gene promoter when MyoD and the TR (thyroid hormone receptor) were co-transfected. The action of thyroid hormones on UCP3 gene transcription is mediated by the binding of the TR to a proximal region in the UCP3 gene promoter that contains a direct repeat structure. An intact DNA sequence of this site is required for thyroid hormone responsiveness and TR binding. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays revealed that the TR binds this element in vivo. The murine Ucp3 gene promoter was also dependent on MyoD and responsive to thyroid hormone in transient transfection assays. However, it was much less sensitive to thyroid hormone than the human UCP3 promoter. In summary, UCP3 gene transcription is activated by thyroid hormone treatment in vivo, and this activation is mediated by a TRE (thyroid hormone response element) in the proximal promoter region. Such regulation suggests a link between UCP3 gene expression and the effects of thyroid hormone on mitochondrial function in skeletal muscle. PMID:15496137

  18. The Chlamydomonas reinhardtii Molybdenum Cofactor Enzyme crARC Has a Zn-Dependent Activity and Protein Partners Similar to Those of Its Human Homologue ▿

    PubMed Central

    Chamizo-Ampudia, Alejandro; Galvan, Aurora; Fernandez, Emilio; Llamas, Angel

    2011-01-01

    The ARC (amidoxime reducing component) proteins are molybdenum cofactor (Moco) enzymes named hmARC1 and hmARC2 (human ARCs [hmARCs]) in humans and YcbX in Escherichia coli. They catalyze the reduction of a broad range of N-hydroxylated compounds (NHC) using reducing power supplied by other proteins. Some NHC are prodrugs or toxic compounds. YcbX contains a ferredoxin (Fd) domain and requires the NADPH flavin reductase CysJ to reduce NHC. In contrast, hmARCs lack the Fd domain and require a human cytochrome b5 (hCyt b5) and a human NADH Cyt b5 reductase (hCyt b5-R) to reduce NHC. The ARC proteins in the plant kingdom are uncharacterized. We demonstrate that Chlamydomonas reinhardtii mutants defective in Moco biosynthesis genes are sensitive to the NHC N6-hydroxylaminopurine (HAP). The Chlamydomonas reinhardtii ARC protein crARC has been purified and characterized. The six Chlamydomonas Fds were isolated, but none of them are required by crARC to reduce HAP. We have also purified and characterized five C. reinhardtii Cyt b5 (crCyt b5) and two flavin reductases, one that is NADPH dependent (crCysJ) and one that is NADH dependent (crCyt b5-R). The data show that crARC uses crCyt b5-1 and crCyt b5-R to reduce HAP. The crARC has a Zn-dependent activity, and the presence of Zn increases its Vmax more than 14-fold. In addition, all five cysteines of crARC were substituted by alanine, and we demonstrate that the fully conserved cysteine 252 is essential for both Moco binding and catalysis. Therefore, it is proposed that crARC belongs to the sulfite oxidase family of Moco enzymes. PMID:21803866

  19. High D-glucose reduces SLC29A1 promoter activity and adenosine transport involving specific protein 1 in human umbilical vein endothelium.

    PubMed

    Puebla, Carlos; Farías, Marcelo; González, Marcelo; Vecchiola, Andrea; Aguayo, Claudio; Krause, Bernardo; Pastor-Anglada, Marçal; Casanello, Paola; Sobrevia, Luis

    2008-06-01

    High D-glucose reduces human equilibrative nucleoside transporter 1 (hENT1)-mediated adenosine uptake involving endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase kinases 1 and 2/MAP kinases p42/44 (MEK/ERKs), and protein kinase C (PKC) activation in human umbilical vein endothelium (HUVEC). Since NO represses SLC29A1 gene (hENT1) promoter activity we studied whether D-glucose-reduced hENT1-adenosine transport results from lower SLC29A1 expression in HUVEC primary cultures. HUVEC incubation (24 h) with high D-glucose (25 mM) reduced hENT1-adenosine transport and pGL3-hENT1(-1114) construct SLC29A1 reporter activity compared with normal D-glucose (5 mM). High D-glucose also reduced pGL3-hENT1(-1114) reporter activity compared with cells transfected with pGL3-hENT1(-795) construct. N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME, NOS inhibitor), PD-98059 (MEK1/2 inhibitor), and/or calphostin C (PKC inhibitor) blocked D-glucose effects. Insulin (1 nM) and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA, 100 nM, PKC activator), but not 4alpha-phorbol 12,13-didecanoate (4alphaPDD, 100 nM, PMA less active analogue) reduced hENT1-adenosine transport. L-NAME and PD-98059 blocked insulin effects. L-NAME, PD-98059, and calphostin C increased hENT1 expression without altering protein or mRNA stability. High D-glucose increased Sp1 transcription factor protein abundance and binding to SLC29A1 promoter, phenomena blocked by L-NAME, PD-98059, and calphostin C. Sp1 overexpression reduced SLC29A1 promoter activity in normal D-glucose, an effect reversed by L-NAME and further reduced by S-nitroso-N-acetyl-L,D-penicillamine (SNAP, NO donor) in high D-glucose. Thus, reduced hENT1-mediated adenosine transport in high D-glucose may result from increased Sp1 binding to SLC29A1 promoter down-regulating hENT1 expression. This phenomenon depends on eNOS, MEK/ERKs, and PKC activity, suggesting potential roles for these molecules in hyperglycemia-associated endothelial

  20. Enterovirus 71 VP1 activates calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II and results in the rearrangement of vimentin in human astrocyte cells.

    PubMed

    Haolong, Cong; Du, Ning; Hongchao, Tian; Yang, Yang; Wei, Zhang; Hua, Zhang; Wenliang, Zhang; Lei, Song; Po, Tien

    2013-01-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is one of the main causative agents of foot, hand and mouth disease. Its infection usually causes severe central nervous system diseases and complications in infected infants and young children. In the present study, we demonstrated that EV71 infection caused the rearrangement of vimentin in human astrocytoma cells. The rearranged vimentin, together with various EV71 components, formed aggresomes-like structures in the perinuclear region. Electron microscopy and viral RNA labeling indicated that the aggresomes were virus replication sites since most of the EV71 particles and the newly synthesized viral RNA were concentrated here. Further analysis revealed that the vimentin in the virus factories was serine-82 phosphorylated. More importantly, EV71 VP1 protein is responsible for the activation of calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMK-II) which phosphorylated the N-terminal domain of vimentin on serine 82. Phosphorylation of vimentin and the formation of aggresomes were required for the replication of EV71 since the latter was decreased markedly after phosphorylation was blocked by KN93, a CaMK-II inhibitor. Thus, as one of the consequences of CaMK-II activation, vimentin phosphorylation and rearrangement may support virus replication by playing a structural role for the formation of the replication factories. Collectively, this study identified the replication centers of EV71 in human astrocyte cells. This may help us understand the replication mechanism and pathogenesis of EV71 in human.

  1. Dengue Virus Nonstructural Protein 1-Induced Antibodies Cross-React with Human Plasminogen and Enhance Its Activation.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Yung-Chun; Lin, Jessica; Lin, Yee-Shin; Wang, Shuying; Yeh, Trai-Ming

    2016-02-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) infection is the most common mosquito-borne viral disease, and it can cause life-threatening dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) and dengue shock syndrome (DSS). Abnormal activation of the coagulation and fibrinolysis system is one of the hallmarks of DHF/DSS. However, the mechanism underlying hemorrhage in DHF/DSS remains elusive. In previous studies, plasminogen (Plg) cross-reactive Abs, which can recognize DENV nonstructural protein (NS) 1, have been found in dengue patients. However, it is unclear whether these Abs are indeed induced by DENV NS1. Thus, we immunized mice with recombinant NS1 from both bacteria and drosophila to determine whether NS1 can induce Plg cross-reactive Abs. The results from the NS1-immunized mouse sera indicated that NS1 immunization induced Abs that could cross-react with Plg. To study the effects of these NS1-induced Plg cross-reactive Abs on fibrinolysis, we isolated several Plg cross-reactive anti-NS1 mAbs from these mice and found that some of them could enhance Plg activation. In addition, epitope mapping with a phage-displayed random peptide library revealed that one of these mAbs (2A5) could recognize NS1 C-terminal residues 305-311, which share sequence homology with Plg residues 590-597. A synthetic peptide of NS1 residues 305-311 could inhibit the binding of both 2A5 and its Fab to Plg and its enhanced activation. Thus, our results suggest that DENV NS1 can induce Plg cross-reactive Abs through molecular mimicry, which can enhance Plg activation and may contribute to the pathogenesis of DHF/DSS.

  2. Exercise training decreases activation of the mitochondrial fission protein dynamin-related protein-1 in insulin-resistant human skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Fealy, Ciaran E.; Mulya, Anny; Lai, Nicola

    2014-01-01

    Defects in mitochondrial dynamics, the processes of fission, fusion, and mitochondrial autophagy, may contribute to metabolic disease including type 2 diabetes. Dynamin-related protein-1 (Drp1) is a GTPase protein that plays a central role in mitochondrial fission. We hypothesized that aerobic exercise training would decrease Drp1 Ser616 phosphorylation and increase fat oxidation and insulin sensitivity in obese (body mass index: 34.6 ± 0.8 kg/m2) insulin-resistant adults. Seventeen subjects performed supervised exercise for 60 min/day, 5 days/wk at 80–85% of maximal heart rate for 12 wk. Insulin sensitivity was measured by hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp, and fat oxidation was determined by indirect calorimetry. Skeletal muscle biopsies were obtained from the vastus lateralis muscle before and after the 12-wk program. The exercise intervention increased insulin sensitivity 2.1 ± 0.2-fold (P < 0.01) and fat oxidation 1.3 ± 0.3-fold (P < 0.01). Phosphorylation of Drp1 at Ser616 was decreased (pre vs. post: 0.81 ± 0.15 vs. 0.58 ± 0.14 arbitrary units; P < 0.05) following the intervention. Furthermore, reductions in Drp1 Ser616 phosphorylation were negatively correlated with increases in fat oxidation (r = −0.58; P < 0.05) and insulin sensitivity (rho = −0.52; P < 0.05). We also examined expression of genes related to mitochondrial dynamics. Dynamin1-like protein (DNM1L; P < 0.01), the gene that codes for Drp1, and Optic atrophy 1 (OPA1; P = 0.05) were significantly upregulated following the intervention, while there was a trend towards an increase in expression of both mitofusin protein MFN1 (P = 0.08) and MFN2 (P = 0.07). These are the first data to suggest that lifestyle-mediated improvements in substrate metabolism and insulin sensitivity in obese insulin-resistant adults may be regulated through decreased activation of the mitochondrial fission protein Drp1. PMID:24947026

  3. Synergistic trans-activation of the human C-reactive protein promoter by transcription factor HNF-1 binding at two distinct sites.

    PubMed Central

    Toniatti, C; Demartis, A; Monaci, P; Nicosia, A; Ciliberto, G

    1990-01-01

    The promoter region of the human C-reactive protein (CRP) gene comprises two distinct regions (APREs, for Acute Phase Responsive Elements) each one containing information necessary and sufficient for liver specific and IL-6 inducible expression in human hepatoma Hep3B cells. In this paper we show that both APREs contain a low affinity binding site for the liver specific transcription factor HNF-1/LF-B1. The two sites are separated by approximately 80 bp. Mutations in either of the two sites abolish inducible expression. The same effect is specifically obtained in cotransfection competition experiments when the human albumin HNF-1 site is used as competitor. However, HNF-1 is not the intranuclear mediator of IL-6 because synthetic promoters formed by multimerized copies of different HNF-1 binding sites are not transcriptionally activated by this cytokine. An expression vector encoding full length HNF-1 is capable of trans-activating transcription from the wild-type CRP promoter but not from mutants which have lost the ability to bind HNF-1. Moreover, the level of trans-activation observed with the natural promoter containing both HNF-1 binding sites is far greater than the level of mutated variants containing only one of the two sites. This result strongly suggests that two HNF-1 molecules bound simultaneously to sites distant from each other can act synergistically to activate gene expression. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 7. PMID:2265613

  4. Lysophosphatidic acid induces reactive oxygen species generation by activating protein kinase C in PC-3 human prostate cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Chu-Cheng; Lin, Chuan-En; Lin, Yueh-Chien; Ju, Tsai-Kai; Huang, Yuan-Li; Lee, Ming-Shyue; Chen, Jiun-Hong; Lee, Hsinyu

    2013-11-01

    Highlights: •LPA induces ROS generation through LPA{sub 1} and LPA{sub 3}. •LPA induces ROS generation by activating PLC. •PKCζ mediates LPA-induced ROS generation. -- Abstract: Prostate cancer is one of the most frequently diagnosed cancers in males, and PC-3 is a cell model popularly used for investigating the behavior of late stage prostate cancer. Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a lysophospholipid that mediates multiple behaviors in cancer cells, such as proliferation, migration and adhesion. We have previously demonstrated that LPA enhances vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-C expression in PC-3 cells by activating the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which is known to be an important mediator in cancer progression. Using flow cytometry, we showed that LPA triggers ROS generation within 10 min and that the generated ROS can be suppressed by pretreatment with the NADPH oxidase (Nox) inhibitor diphenylene iodonium. In addition, transfection with LPA{sub 1} and LPA{sub 3} siRNA efficiently blocked LPA-induced ROS production, suggesting that both receptors are involved in this pathway. Using specific inhibitors and siRNA, phospholipase C (PLC) and protein kinase C (PKC) were also suggested to participate in LPA-induced ROS generation. Overall, we demonstrated that LPA induces ROS generation in PC-3 prostate cancer cells and this is mediated through the PLC/PKC/Nox pathway.

  5. The Natural Stilbenoid Piceatannol Decreases Activity and Accelerates Apoptosis of Human Neutrophils: Involvement of Protein Kinase C

    PubMed Central

    Nosal, Radomir; Svitekova, Klara; Drabikova, Katarina

    2013-01-01

    Neutrophils are able to release cytotoxic substances and inflammatory mediators, which, along with their delayed apoptosis, have a potential to maintain permanent inflammation. Therefore, treatment of diseases associated with chronic inflammation should be focused on neutrophils; formation of reactive oxygen species and apoptosis of these cells represent two promising targets for pharmacological intervention. Piceatannol, a naturally occurring stilbenoid, has the ability to reduce the toxic action of neutrophils. This substance decreased the amount of oxidants produced by neutrophils both extra- and intracellularly. Radicals formed within neutrophils (fulfilling a regulatory role) were reduced to a lesser extent than extracellular oxidants, potentially dangerous for host tissues. Moreover, piceatannol did not affect the phosphorylation of p40phox—a component of NADPH oxidase, responsible for the assembly of functional oxidase in intracellular (granular) membranes. The stilbenoid tested elevated the percentage of early apoptotic neutrophils, inhibited the activity of protein kinase C (PKC)—the main regulatory enzyme in neutrophils, and reduced phosphorylation of PKC isoforms α, βII, and δ on their catalytic region. The results indicated that piceatannol may be useful as a complementary medicine in states associated with persisting neutrophil activation and with oxidative damage of tissues. PMID:24288583

  6. Functional Analysis of Genetic Variation in Catechol-O-Methyltransferase (COMT): Effects on mRNA, Protein, and Enzyme Activity in Postmortem Human Brain

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jingshan; Lipska, Barbara K.; Halim, Nader; Ma, Quang D.; Matsumoto, Mitsuyuki; Melhem, Samer; Kolachana, Bhaskar S.; Hyde, Thomas M.; Herman, Mary M.; Apud, Jose; Egan, Michael F.; Kleinman, Joel E.; Weinberger, Daniel R.

    2004-01-01

    Catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) is a key enzyme in the elimination of dopamine in the prefrontal cortex of the human brain. Genetic variation in the COMT gene (MIM 116790) has been associated with altered prefrontal cortex function and higher risk for schizophrenia, but the specific alleles and their functional implications have been controversial. We analyzed the effects of several single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within COMT on mRNA expression levels (using reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction analysis), protein levels (using Western blot analysis), and enzyme activity (using catechol methylation) in a large sample (n = 108) of postmortem human prefrontal cortex tissue, which predominantly expresses the -membrane-bound isoform. A common coding SNP, Val158Met (rs4680), significantly affected protein abundance and enzyme activity but not mRNA expression levels, suggesting that differences in protein integrity account for the difference in enzyme activity between alleles. A SNP in intron 1 (rs737865) and a SNP in the 3′ flanking region (rs165599)—both of which have been reported to contribute to allelic expression differences and to be associated with schizophrenia as part of a haplotype with Val—had no effect on mRNA expression levels, protein immunoreactivity, or enzyme activity. In lymphocytes from 47 subjects, we confirmed a similar effect on enzyme activity in samples with the Val/Met genotype but no effect in samples with the intron 1 or 3′ SNPs. Separate analyses revealed that the subject's sex, as well as the presence of a SNP in the P2 promoter region (rs2097603), had small effects on COMT enzyme activity. Using site-directed mutagenesis of mouse COMT cDNA, followed by in vitro translation, we found that the conversion of Leu at the homologous position into Met or Val progressively and significantly diminished enzyme activity. Thus, although we cannot exclude a more complex genetic basis for functional effects of COMT, Val is a

  7. Genistein regulates the IL-1 beta induced activation of MAPKs in human periodontal ligament cells through G protein-coupled receptor 30.

    PubMed

    Luo, Li-Jun; Liu, Feng; Lin, Zhi-Kai; Xie, Yu-Feng; Xu, Jia-Li; Tong, Qing-Chun; Shu, Rong

    2012-06-01

    Periodontal ligament (PDL) cells are fibroblasts that play key roles in tissue integrity, periodontal inflammation and tissue regeneration in the periodontium. The periodontal tissue destruction in periodontitis is mediated by host tissue-produced inflammatory cytokines, including interleukin-1β (IL-1β). Here, we report the expression of G protein-coupled receptor 30 (GPR30, also known as G protein-coupled estrogen receptor 1 GPER) in human PDL cells and its regulation by IL-1β. IL-1β-induced GPR30 expression in human PDL cells leads to the activation of multiple signaling pathways, including MAPK, NF-κB and PI3K. In contrast, genistein, an estrogen receptor ligand, postpones the activation of MAPKs induced by IL-1β. Moreover, the inhibition of GPR30 by G15, a GPR30-specific antagonist, eliminates this delay. Thus, genistein plays a role in the regulation of MAPK activation via GPR30, and GPR30 represents a novel target regulated by steroid hormones in PDL cells.

  8. Human Pif1 helicase is a G-quadruplex DNA-binding protein with G-quadruplex DNA-unwinding activity.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Cyril M

    2010-08-15

    Pif1 proteins are helicases that in yeast are implicated in the maintenance of genome stability. One activity of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Pif1 is to stabilize DNA sequences that could otherwise form deleterious G4 (G-quadruplex) structures by acting as a G4 resolvase. The present study shows that human Pif1 (hPif1, nuclear form) is a G4 DNA-binding and resolvase protein and that these activities are properties of the conserved helicase domain (amino acids 206-620 of 641, hPifHD). hPif1 preferentially bound synthetic G4 DNA relative to ssDNA (single-stranded DNA), dsDNA (double-stranded DNA) and a partially single-stranded duplex DNA helicase substrate. G4 DNA unwinding, but not binding, required an extended (>10 nucleotide) 5' ssDNA tail, and in competition assays, G4 DNA was an ineffective suppressor of helicase activity compared with ssDNA. These results suggest a distinction between the determinants of G4 DNA binding and the ssDNA interactions required for helicase action and that hPif1 may act on G4 substrates by binding alone or as a resolvase. Human Pif1 could therefore have a role in processing G4 structures that arise in the single-stranded nucleic acid intermediates formed during DNA replication and gene expression.

  9. Linkage of protein kinase C-beta activation and intracellular interleukin-2 accumulation in human naive CD4 T cells.

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, J; Rainsford, E; Reen, D J

    1997-01-01

    A critical role for protein kinase C (PKC) in signal transduction events has been well established. Moreover, studies of regulation in PKC levels suggest participation in mediating long-term cellular functions. Protein kinase C-beta (PKC-beta) has been reported to be involved in interleukin-2 (IL-2) synthesis in T lymphocytes. In this study, the role of PKC-beta in intracellular accumulation of IL-2 was investigated using specific inhibitors. Preincubation with two different PKC inhibitors, one specific for classical isotypes (alpha and beta I) Go6976, and one which inhibits both classical and non-classical isotypes, GF109203X, caused a complete block in cytoplasmic IL-2 accumulation when naive CD4 T cells were stimulated in the presence of CD2+CD28+phorbol myristate acetate (PMA). In contrast, preincubation with up to 1000 ng/ml of cyclosporin A (CsA) resulted in a reduction in the intracellular IL-2 detected, as observed by a decrease in the proportion of positive cells as well as a fall in the mean fluorescence intensity (MFI). CsA did not influence PKC-beta translocation. Flow cytometric assessments of PKC-beta and its isoforms beta I and beta II correlated with Western blotting analysis and these results were further supported by the use of PKC-beta-positive (HUT 78) and -negative (BW5147) T-cell lines. Using the specific inhibitors, Go6976 and GF109203X, the findings in this study suggest that activation and translocation of PKC-beta is critical for accumulation of intracellular IL-2. The influence of CsA in reducing but not blocking IL-2 synthesis is discussed. PMA-induced down-regulation of the CD4 antigen was observed in the presence of Go6976 and but not GF109203X, suggesting regulation by non-classical PKC isoforms. Images Figure 4 PMID:9497487

  10. TLR4 Signaling Is Coupled to SRC Family Kinase Activation, Tyrosine Phosphorylation of Zonula Adherens Proteins, and Opening of the Paracellular Pathway in Human Lung Microvascular Endothelia*

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Ping; Angelini, Daniel J.; Yang, Shiqi; Xia, Guanjun; Cross, Alan S.; Mann, Dean; Bannerman, Douglas D.; Vogel, Stefanie N.; Goldblum, Simeon E.

    2008-01-01

    Bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is a key mediator in the vascular leak syndromes associated with Gram-negative bacterial infections. LPS opens the paracellular pathway in pulmonary vascular endothelia through protein tyrosine phosphorylation. We now have identified the protein-tyrosine kinases (PTKs) and their substrates required for LPS-induced protein tyrosine phosphorylation and opening of the paracellular pathway in human lung microvascular endothelial cells (HMVEC-Ls). LPS disrupted barrier integrity in a dose- and time-dependent manner, and prior broad spectrum PTK inhibition was protective. LPS increased tyrosine phosphorylation of zonula adherens proteins, VE-cadherin, γ-catenin, and p120ctn. Two SRC family PTK (SFK)-selective inhibitors, PP2 and SU6656, blocked LPS-induced increments in tyrosine phosphorylation of VE-cadherin and p120ctn and paracellular permeability. In HMVEC-Ls, c-SRC, YES, FYN, and LYN were expressed at both mRNA and protein levels. Selective small interfering RNA-induced knockdown of c-SRC, FYN, or YES diminished LPS-induced SRC Tyr416 phosphorylation, tyrosine phosphorylation of VE-cadherin and p120ctn, and barrier disruption, whereas knockdown of LYN did not. For VE-cadherin phosphorylation, knockdown of either c-SRC or FYN provided total protection, whereas YES knockdown was only partially protective. For p120ctn phosphorylation, knockdown of FYN, c-SRC, or YES each provided comparable but partial protection. Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) was expressed both on the surface and intracellular compartment of HMVEC-Ls. Prior knockdown of TLR4 blocked both LPS-induced SFK activation and barrier disruption. These data indicate that LPS recognition by TLR4 activates the SFKs, c-SRC, FYN, and YES, which, in turn, contribute to tyrosine phosphorylation of zonula adherens proteins to open the endothelial paracellular pathway. PMID:18326860

  11. Thiazide-like diuretic drug metolazone activates human pregnane X receptor to induce cytochrome 3A4 and multidrug-resistance protein 1.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Monimoy; Chen, Taosheng

    2014-11-15

    Human pregnane X receptor (hPXR) regulates the expression of drug-metabolizing enzyme cytochrome P450 3A4 (CYP3A4) and drug transporters such as multidrug-resistance protein 1 (MDR1). PXR can be modulated by small molecules, including Federal Drug Administration (FDA)-approved drugs, thus altering drug metabolism and causing drug-drug interactions. To determine the role of FDA-approved drugs in PXR-mediated regulation of drug metabolism and clearance, we screened 1481 FDA-approved small-molecule drugs by using a luciferase reporter assay in HEK293T cells and identified the diuretic drug metolazone as an activator of hPXR. Our data showed that metolazone activated hPXR-mediated expression of CYP3A4 and MDR1 in human hepatocytes and intestine cells and increased CYP3A4 promoter activity in various cell lines. Mammalian two-hybrid assays showed that hPXR recruits its co-activator SRC-1 upon metolazone binding in HepG2 cells, explaining the mechanism of hPXR activation. To understand the role of other commonly-used diuretics in hPXR activation and the structure-activity relationship of metolazone, thiazide and non-thiazide diuretics drugs were also tested but only metolazone activates hPXR. To understand the molecular mechanism, docking studies and mutational analysis were carried out and showed that metolazone binds in the ligand-binding pocket and interacts with mostly hydrophobic amino acid residues. This is the first report showing that metolazone activates hPXR. Because activation of hPXR might cause drug-drug interactions, metolazone should be used with caution for drug treatment in patients undergoing combination therapy.

  12. Antibiotic proteins of human polymorphonuclear leukocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Gabay, J E; Scott, R W; Campanelli, D; Griffith, J; Wilde, C; Marra, M N; Seeger, M; Nathan, C F

    1989-01-01

    Nine polypeptide peaks with antibiotic activity were resolved from human polymorphonuclear leukocyte azurophil granule membranes. All but 1 of the 12 constituent polypeptides were identified by N-terminal sequence analysis. Near quantitative recovery of protein and activity permitted an assessment of the contribution of each species to the overall respiratory-burst-independent antimicrobial capacity of the cell. Three uncharacterized polypeptides were discovered, including two broad-spectrum antibiotics. One of these, a defensin that we have designated human neutrophil antimicrobial peptide 4, was more potent than previously described defensins but represented less than 1% of the total protein. The other, named azurocidin, was abundant and comparable to bactericidal permeability-increasing factor in its contribution to the killing of Escherichia coli. Images PMID:2501794

  13. Long interspersed nucleotide acid element-1 ORF-1 protein promotes proliferation and invasion of human colorectal cancer LoVo cells through enhancing ETS-1 activity.

    PubMed

    Li, M Y; Zhu, M; Feng, F; Cai, F Y; Fan, K C; Jiang, H; Wang, Z Q; Linghu, E Q

    2014-04-14

    The human proto-oncogene long interspersed nucleotide acid element-1 (LINE-1) open reading frame-1 protein (ORF-1p) is involved in the progress of several cancers. The transcription factor ETS-1 can mediate the transcription of some downstream genes that play specific roles in the regulation of cancerous cell invasion and metastasis. In this study, the effects of LINE-1 ORF-1p on ETS-1 activity and on the proliferation and invasion of human colorectal cancer LoVo cells were investigated. Results showed that the overexpression of LINE-1 ORF-1p enhanced the transcription of ETS-1 downstream genes and increased their protein levels, and downregulation of the LINE-1 ORF-1p level by small interfering RNA (siRNA) reduced the transcriptional activation of ETS-1. In addition, overexpression of LINE-1 ORF-1p promoted LoVo cell proliferation and anchor-independent growth, and a knockdown of the LINE-1 protein level by siRNA reduced the proliferation and anchor-independent growth ability of LoVo cells. In vivo data revealed that LINE-1 ORF-1p overexpression increased LoVo tumor growth in nude mice, whereas the siRNA knockdown of endogenous LINE-1 ORF-1p expression decreased LoVo cell growth in nude mice. Therefore, LINE- 1 ORF-1p could promote LoVo cell proliferation and invasion both in vitro and in vivo, indicating that it might be a useful molecular target for the treatment of human colorectal cancer.

  14. Isolation and characterization of an outer membrane protein of Salmonella paratyphi B: a mitogen and polyclonal activator of human B lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Sager, S; Virella, G; Chen, W Y; Fudenberg, H H

    1984-01-01

    Salmonella paratyphi B (S. paratyphi B) has been previously characterized as a human T-independent polyclonal B cell activator. To define further the nature of the bacterial structure responsible for these properties, we studied the effects of autoclaving and enzyme treatment of S. paratyphi B on its stimulatory capacity. We found that both autoclaving and papain treatment decreased the ability of S. paratyphi B to induce B cell activation, while trypsin treatment did not affect this capacity. Neither type of treatment affected the binding of S. paratyphi B to lymphocytes, suggesting that binding and B cell stimulation are mediated by different structures. The observation that B cell stimulation was significantly reduced by papain treatment led us to attempt to purify membrane proteins so that we could investigate whether they shared the stimulating capacity of S. paratyphi B. A water-insoluble, 43-45,000 mol. wt. protein, rich in aspartic acid, glutamine, glycine, alanine and leucine, similar in mol. wt. and physicochemical chemical properties to the porins of other gram negative bacteria, was isolated and designated as outer membrane protein (OMP). This protein was equally efficient to S. paratyphi B in inducing T-independent B cell activation. By performing time-course studies of [3H]-thymidine incorporation we observed a burst of mitogenic activity after stimulation of PBL or purified B cells with both S. paratyphi B and OMP peaking at 48-96 hr of culture (compared to 96-120 hr for the PWM proliferation peak), and with a magnitude of roughly 10% of that observed after PWM stimulation. Given the fact that the proportion of B lymphocytes in PBL is 4-12%, it appears likely that the proliferation burst seen with S. paratyphi B and OMP corresponds to a mitogenic effect mainly restricted to the B cell population. Images Figure 1 PMID:6370841

  15. Ca2+ signalling in K562 human erythroleukaemia cells: effect of dimethyl sulphoxide and role of G-proteins in thrombin- and thromboxane A2-activated pathways.

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, C P; Dunn, M J; Mattera, R

    1995-01-01

    The human leukaemic cell line K562 is a pluripotent stem cell with the potential to mature along a megakaryocytic or erythroid line. In these cells, thrombin and U46619 (9,11-dideoxy-9 alpha, 11 alpha-methanoepoxy prostaglandin F2 alpha), a thromboxane A2 analogue, increased intracellular Ca2+ in a rapid and concentration-dependent manner. The peak transient observed with both thrombin and U46619 was preserved upon stimulation in the absence of extracellular calcium and blunted with phorbol myristate acetate, suggestive of activation of phospholipase C. Short-term treatment with leupeptin abolished the calcium response to thrombin, but did not alter that to U46619. Both pertussis toxin (PT) and DMSO pretreatment inhibited thrombin- but not U46619-stimulated intracellular calcium elevation, indicating that these agonists signal through different G-proteins. Western blot analysis of crude membranes from K562 cells revealed the presence of G12 alpha and G13 alpha; the other known PT-substrates, Gi1 alpha and G0 alpha, were not detected. Consistent with this observation, ADP-ribosylation experiments revealed the presence of two PT substrates which co-migrated with human erythrocyte G12 alpha and G13 alpha. An antibody raised against Gq/11 alpha, a subfamily of G-protein alpha subunits unmodified by PT, specifically recognized 42 kDa protein(s) in K562 cells. PCR amplification of reverse-transcribed K562 RNA followed by DNA sequencing showed that these cells express messages for both Gq alpha and G11 alpha. Treatment of K562 cells with DMSO reduced the levels of thrombin receptor mRNA, without simultaneous changes in the expression of G12 alpha and G13 alpha. We have thus identified Ca(2+)-mobilizing agonists and related G-proteins in K562 cells, together with changes induced by DMSO in this signalling pathway. Images Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 9 PMID:7492305

  16. Separating proteins with activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Stone, Matthew T; Kozlov, Mikhail

    2014-07-15

    Activated carbon is applied to separate proteins based on differences in their size and effective charge. Three guidelines are suggested for the efficient separation of proteins with activated carbon. (1) Activated carbon can be used to efficiently remove smaller proteinaceous impurities from larger proteins. (2) Smaller proteinaceous impurities are most efficiently removed at a solution pH close to the impurity's isoelectric point, where they have a minimal effective charge. (3) The most efficient recovery of a small protein from activated carbon occurs at a solution pH further away from the protein's isoelectric point, where it is strongly charged. Studies measuring the binding capacities of individual polymers and proteins were used to develop these three guidelines, and they were then applied to the separation of several different protein mixtures. The ability of activated carbon to separate proteins was demonstrated to be broadly applicable with three different types of activated carbon by both static treatment and by flowing through a packed column of activated carbon.

  17. Hypertonicity regulates the function of human neutrophils by modulating chemoattractant receptor signaling and activating mitogen-activated protein kinase p38.

    PubMed Central

    Junger, W G; Hoyt, D B; Davis, R E; Herdon-Remelius, C; Namiki, S; Junger, H; Loomis, W; Altman, A

    1998-01-01

    Excessive neutrophil activation causes posttraumatic complications, which may be reduced with hypertonic saline (HS) resuscitation. We tested if this is because of modulated neutrophil function by HS. Clinically relevant hypertonicity (10-25 mM) suppressed degranulation and superoxide formation in response to fMLP and blocked the activation of the mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPK) ERK1/2 and p38, but did not affect Ca2+ mobilization. HS did not suppress oxidative burst in response to phorbol myristate acetate (PMA). This indicates that HS suppresses neutrophil function by intercepting signal pathways upstream of or apart from PKC. HS activated p38 by itself and enhanced degranulation in response to PKC activation. This enhancement was reduced by inhibition of p38 with SB203580, suggesting that p38 up-regulation participates in HS-induced enhancements of degranulation. HS had similar effects on the degranulation of cells that were previously stimulated with fMLP, but had no effect on its own, suggesting that HS enhancement of degranulation requires another signal. We conclude that depending on other stimuli, HS can suppress neutrophil activation by intercepting multiple receptor signals or augment degranulation by enhancing p38 signaling. In patients HS resuscitation may reduce posttraumatic complications by preventing neutrophil activation via chemotactic factors released during reperfusion. PMID:9637711

  18. The protein pheromone Er-1 of the ciliate Euplotes raikovi stimulates human T-cell activity: Involvement of interleukin-2 system

    SciTech Connect

    Cervia, Davide; Catalani, Elisabetta; Belardinelli, Maria Cristina; Perrotta, Cristiana; Picchietti, Simona; Alimenti, Claudio; Casini, Giovanni; Fausto, Anna Maria; Vallesi, Adriana

    2013-02-01

    Water-soluble protein signals (pheromones) of the ciliate Euplotes have been supposed to be functional precursors of growth factors and cytokines that regulate cell–cell interaction in multi-cellular eukaryotes. This work provides evidence that native preparations of the Euplotes raikovi pheromone Er-1 (a helical protein of 40 amino acids) specifically increases viability, DNA synthesis, proliferation, and the production of interferon-γ, tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-2, and IL-13 in human Jurkat T-cells. Also, Er-1 significantly decreases the mRNA levels of the β and γ subunits of IL-2 receptor (IL-2R), while the mRNA levels of the α subunit appeared to be not affected. Jurkat T-cell treatments with Er-1 induced the down-regulation of the IL-2Rα subunit by a reversible and time-dependent endocytosis, and increased the levels of phosphorylation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK). The cell-type specificity of these effects was supported by the finding that Er-1, although unable to directly influence the growth of human glioma U-373 cells, induced Jurkat cells to synthesize and release factors that, in turn, inhibited the U-373 cell proliferation. Overall, these findings imply that Er-1 coupling to IL-2R and ERK immuno-enhances T-cell activity, and that this effect likely translates to an inhibition of glioma cell growth. -- Highlights: ► Euplotes pheromone Er-1 increases the growth of human Jurkat T-cells. ► Er-1 increases the T-cell production of specific cytokines. ► Er-1 activates interleukin-2 receptor and extracellular signal-regulated kinases. ► The immuno-enhancing effect of Er-1 on Jurkat cells translates to an inhibition of human glioma cell growth.

  19. The cAMP-producing agonist beraprost inhibits human vascular smooth muscle cell migration via exchange protein directly activated by cAMP

    PubMed Central

    McKean, Jenny S.; Murray, Fiona; Gibson, George; Shewan, Derryck A.; Tucker, Steven J.; Nixon, Graeme F.

    2015-01-01

    Aims During restenosis, vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) migrate from the vascular media to the developing neointima. Preventing VSMC migration is therefore a therapeutic target for restenosis. Drugs, such as prostacyclin analogues, that increase the intracellular concentration of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) can inhibit VSMC migration, but the mechanisms via which this occurs are unknown. Two main downstream mediators of cAMP are protein kinase A (PKA) and exchange protein directly activated by cAMP (Epac). This study has examined the effects of the prostacyclin analogue beraprost on VSMC migration and investigated the intracellular pathways involved. Methods and results In a chemotaxis chamber, human saphenous vein VSMC migrated towards a platelet-derived growth-factor-BB (PDGF) chemogradient. Incubation with therapeutically relevant concentrations of cAMP-producing agonist beraprost significantly decreased PDGF-induced migration. Direct activation of either PKA or Epac inhibited migration whereas inhibition of PKA did not prevent the anti-migratory effect of beraprost. Direct activation of Epac also prevented hyperplasia in ex vivo serum-treated human veins. Using fluorescence resonance energy transfer, we demonstrated that beraprost activated Epac but not PKA. The mechanisms of this Epac-mediated effect involved activation of Rap1 with subsequent inhibition of RhoA. Cytoskeletal rearrangement at the leading edge of the cell was consequently inhibited. Interestingly, Epac1 was localized to the leading edge of migrating VSMC. Conclusions These results indicate that therapeutically relevant concentrations of beraprost can inhibit VSMC migration via a previously unknown mechanism involving the cAMP mediator Epac. This may provide a novel target that could blunt neointimal formation. PMID:26092100

  20. Human Cementum Protein 1 induces expression of bone and cementum proteins by human gingival fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Carmona-Rodríguez, Bruno; Alvarez-Pérez, Marco Antonio; Narayanan, A Sampath; Zeichner-David, Margarita; Reyes-Gasga, José; Molina-Guarneros, Juan; García-Hernández, Ana Lilia; Suárez-Franco, José Luis; Chavarría, Ivet Gil; Villarreal-Ramírez, Eduardo; Arzate, Higinio

    2007-07-06

    We recently presented evidence showing that a human cementoblastoma-derived protein, named Cementum Protein 1 (CEMP1) may play a role as a local regulator of cementoblast differentiation and cementum-matrix mineralization. This protein was shown to be expressed by cementoblasts and progenitor cells localized in the periodontal ligament. In this study we demonstrate that transfection of CEMP1 into human gingival fibroblasts (HGF) induces mineralization and expression of bone and cementum-matrix proteins. The transfected HGF cells had higher alkaline phosphatase activity and proliferation rate and they expressed genes for alkaline phosphatase, bone sialoprotein, osteocalcin, osteopontin, the transcription factor Runx2/Cbfa1, and cementum attachment protein (CAP). They also produced biological-type hydroxyapatite. These findings indicate that the CEMP1 might participate in differentiation and mineralization of nonosteogenic cells, and that it might have a potential function in cementum and bone formation.

  1. Human Cementum Protein 1 induces expression of bone and cementum proteins by human gingival fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Carmona-Rodriguez, Bruno; Alvarez-Perez, Marco Antonio; Narayanan, A. Sampath; Zeichner-David, Margarita; Reyes-Gasga, Jose; Molina-Guarneros, Juan; Garcia-Hernandez, Ana Lilia; Suarez-Franco, Jose Luis; Chavarria, Ivet Gil; Villarreal-Ramirez, Eduardo; Arzate, Higinio . E-mail: harzate@servidor.unam.mx

    2007-07-06

    We recently presented evidence showing that a human cementoblastoma-derived protein, named Cementum Protein 1 (CEMP1) may play a role as a local regulator of cementoblast differentiation and cementum-matrix mineralization. This protein was shown to be expressed by cementoblasts and progenitor cells localized in the periodontal ligament. In this study we demonstrate that transfection of CEMP1 into human gingival fibroblasts (HGF) induces mineralization and expression of bone and cementum-matrix proteins. The transfected HGF cells had higher alkaline phosphatase activity and proliferation rate and they expressed genes for alkaline phosphatase, bone sialoprotein, osteocalcin, osteopontin, the transcription factor Runx2/Cbfa1, and cementum attachment protein (CAP). They also produced biological-type hydroxyapatite. These findings indicate that the CEMP1 might participate in differentiation and mineralization of nonosteogenic cells, and that it might have a potential function in cementum and bone formation.

  2. Thapsigargin suppresses phorbol ester-dependent human involucrin promoter activity by suppressing CCAAT-enhancer-binding protein alpha (C/EBPalpha) DNA binding.

    PubMed Central

    Balasubramanian, S; Agarwal, C; Efimova, T; Dubyak, G R; Banks, E; Welter, J; Eckert, R L

    2000-01-01

    Human involucrin (hINV) is a keratinocyte differentiation marker expressed in the suprabasal epidermal layers. In cultured keratinocytes hINV mRNA levels are increased 10-fold by a 24-h treatment with 50 ng/ml PMA, an agent that promotes keratinocyte differentiation. Previous studies show that thapsigargin (TGN), an agent that depletes intracellular calcium stores, inhibits keratinocyte differentiation. In the present study we show that TGN inhibits the PMA-dependent, differentiation-associated, increase in hINV mRNA levels and hINV promoter activity. Inhibition is half-maximal at 10 nM and maximal at 100 nM TGN. Neither basal hINV promoter activity nor glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase mRNA levels are inhibited. Mutation of a functionally important CAATT-enhancer-binding protein (C/EBP) site within the hINV promoter proximal regulatory region eliminates the regulation, suggesting that TGN may effect C/EBP-dependent promoter activation. Consistent with this hypothesis, TGN inhibits C/EBPalpha-dependent promoter activation via a mechanism that involves inhibition of C/EBPalpha binding to DNA without changing C/EBPalpha protein levels. These results suggest that TGN interferes with hINV expression by interfering with C/EBP transcription-factor function. PMID:10970794

  3. Nitric oxide modulates chromatin folding in human endothelial cells via protein phosphatase 2A activation and class II histone deacetylases nuclear shuttling.

    PubMed

    Illi, Barbara; Dello Russo, Claudio; Colussi, Claudia; Rosati, Jessica; Pallaoro, Michele; Spallotta, Francesco; Rotili, Dante; Valente, Sergio; Ragone, Gianluca; Martelli, Fabio; Biglioli, Paolo; Steinkuhler, Christian; Gallinari, Paola; Mai, Antonello; Capogrossi, Maurizio C; Gaetano, Carlo

    2008-01-04

    Nitric oxide (NO) modulates important endothelial cell (EC) functions and gene expression by a molecular mechanism which is still poorly characterized. Here we show that in human umbilical vein ECs (HUVECs) NO inhibited serum-induced histone acetylation and enhanced histone deacetylase (HDAC) activity. By immunofluorescence and Western blot analyses it was found that NO induced class II HDAC4 and 5 nuclear shuttling and that class II HDACs selective inhibitor MC1568 rescued serum-dependent histone acetylation above control level in NO-treated HUVECs. In contrast, class I HDACs inhibitor MS27-275 had no effect, indicating a specific role for class II HDACs in NO-dependent histone deacetylation. In addition, it was found that NO ability to induce HDAC4 and HDAC5 nuclear shuttling involved the activation of the protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A). In fact, HDAC4 nuclear translocation was impaired in ECs expressing small-t antigen and exposed to NO. Finally, in cells engineered to express a HDAC4-Flag fusion protein, NO induced the formation of a macromolecular complex including HDAC4, HDAC3, HDAC5, and an active PP2A. The present results show that NO-dependent PP2A activation plays a key role in class II HDACs nuclear translocation.

  4. Binding of Tissue-type Plasminogen Activator to the Glucose-regulated Protein 78 (GRP78) Modulates Plasminogen Activation and Promotes Human Neuroblastoma Cell Proliferation in Vitro*

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Gronow, Mario; Gomez, Cristian Farias; de Ridder, Gustaaf G.; Ray, Rupa; Pizzo, Salvatore V.

    2014-01-01

    The glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78) is a plasminogen (Pg) receptor on the cell surface. In this study, we demonstrate that GRP78 also binds the tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA), which results in a decrease in Km and an increase in the Vmax for both its amidolytic activity and activation of its substrate, Pg. This results in accelerated Pg activation when GRP78, t-PA, and Pg are bound together. The increase in t-PA activity is the result of a mechanism involving a t-PA lysine-dependent binding site in the GRP78 amino acid sequence 98LIGRTWNDPSVQQDIKFL115. We found that GRP78 is expressed on the surface of neuroblastoma SK-N-SH cells where it is co-localized with the voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC), which is also a t-PA-binding protein in these cells. We demonstrate that both Pg and t-PA serve as a bridge between GRP78 and VDAC bringing them together to facilitate Pg activation. t-PA induces SK-N-SH cell proliferation via binding to GRP78 on the cell surface. Furthermore, Pg binding to the COOH-terminal region of GRP78 stimulates cell proliferation via its microplasminogen domain. This study confirms previous findings from our laboratory showing that GRP78 acts as a growth factor-like receptor and that its association with t-PA, Pg, and VDAC on the cell surface may be part of a system controlling cell growth. PMID:25059665

  5. Protein kinase A and regulation of neonatal Nav1.5 expression in human breast cancer cells: activity-dependent positive feedback and cellular migration.

    PubMed

    Chioni, Athina-Myrto; Shao, Dongmin; Grose, Richard; Djamgoz, Mustafa B A

    2010-02-01

    Voltage-gated Na(+) channels (VGSCs) are expressed in excitable cells (e.g. neurons and muscles), as well as in some classically 'non-excitable' cells (e.g. fibroblasts), and in carcinomas. In general, functional expression of VGSCs in plasma membrane (PM) is hierarchical and dynamic. Previously, we have shown that an activity-dependent positive feedback mechanism involving cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA) plays a significant role in upregulation of VGSCs in strongly metastatic rat prostate cancer Mat-LyLu cells expressing Nav1.7. Here, we investigated the possible role of PKA in VGSC regulation and its functional consequences in strongly metastatic human breast cancer (BCa) MDA-MB-231 cells, where the neonatal splice form of Nav1.5 (nNav1.5) is the predominant VGSC present. Treatment with the PKA activator forskolin for 24h increased mRNA and PM protein levels of nNav1.5, without changing the total VGSC protein level. Opposite effects were obtained by application of the PKA inhibitor KT5720 or the highly specific VGSC blocker tetrodotoxin (TTX), the latter implying activity-dependent upregulation. We tested the possibility, therefore, that the activity dependence of VGSC (nNav1.5) expression involved PKA. Indeed, TTX pretreatment reduced the level of phosphorylated PKA and eliminated basal and PKA-stimulated cellular migration. These data suggested that activity-dependent positive feedback mediated by PKA plays an important role in the functional expression of nNav1.5 in BCa, and in turn, this enhances the cells' metastatic potential.

  6. A human centromere protein, CENP-B, has a DNA binding domain containing four potential alpha helices at the NH2 terminus, which is separable from dimerizing activity

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    The alphoid DNA-CENP-B (centromere protein B) complex is the first sequence-specific DNA/protein complex detected in the centromeric region of human chromosomes. In the reaction, CENP-B recognizes a 17-bp sequence (CENP-B box) and assembles two alphoid DNA molecules into a complex, which is designated complex A (Muro, Y., H. Masumoto, K. Yoda, N. Nozaki, M. Ohashi, and T. Okazaki. 1992. J. Cell Biol. 116:585-596). Since CENP-B gene is conserved in mammalian species and CENP-B boxes are found also in mouse centromere satellite DNA (minor satellite), this sequence-specific DNA-protein interaction may be important for some kind of common centromere function. In this study we have characterized the structure of CENP-B and CENP-B-alphoid DNA complex. We have shown by chemical cross-linking that CENP-B formed a dimer, and have estimated by molecular weight determination the composition of complex A to be a CENP-B dimer and two molecules of alphoid DNA. The DNA binding domain has been delimited within the NH2-terminal 125-amino acid region containing four potential alpha-helices using truncated CENP-B made in Escherichia coli cells. We have shown that CENP-B had sites highly sensitive to proteases and that the DNA binding domain was separable from the dimerizing activity by the proteolytic cleavage at 20 kD from the COOH terminus of the molecule. Thus, CENP-B may organize a higher order structure in the centromere by juxtaposing two CENP-B boxes in the alphoid DNA repeat through both the DNA-protein and protein-protein interactions. PMID:1469042

  7. Dehydroepiandrosterone Activation of G-protein-coupled Estrogen Receptor Rapidly Stimulates MicroRNA-21 Transcription in Human Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Teng, Yun; Radde, Brandie N; Litchfield, Lacey M; Ivanova, Margarita M; Prough, Russell A; Clark, Barbara J; Doll, Mark A; Hein, David W; Klinge, Carolyn M

    2015-06-19

    Little is known about the regulation of the oncomiR miR-21 in liver. Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) regulates gene expression as a ligand for a G-protein-coupled receptor and as a precursor for steroids that activate nuclear receptor signaling. We report that 10 nm DHEA increases primary miR-21 (pri-miR-21) transcription and mature miR-21 expression in HepG2 cells in a biphasic manner with an initial peak at 1 h followed by a second, sustained response from 3-12 h. DHEA also increased miR-21 in primary human hepatocytes and Hep3B cells. siRNA, antibody, and inhibitor studies suggest that the rapid DHEA-mediated increase in miR-21 involves a G-protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPER/GPR30), estrogen receptor α-36 (ERα36), epidermal growth factor receptor-dependent, pertussis toxin-sensitive pathway requiring activation of c-Src, ERK1/2, and PI3K. GPER antagonist G-15 attenuated DHEA- and BSA-conjugated DHEA-stimulated pri-miR-21 transcription. Like DHEA, GPER agonists G-1 and fulvestrant increased pri-miR-21 in a GPER- and ERα36-dependent manner. DHEA, like G-1, increased GPER and ERα36 mRNA and protein levels. DHEA increased ERK1/2 and c-Src phosphorylation in a GPER-responsive manner. DHEA increased c-Jun, but not c-Fos, protein expression after 2 h. DHEA increased androgen receptor, c-Fos, and c-Jun recruitment to the miR-21 promoter. These results suggest that physiological concentrations of DHEA activate a GPER intracellular signaling cascade that increases pri-miR-21 transcription mediated at least in part by AP-1 and androgen receptor miR-21 promoter interaction.

  8. Dehydroepiandrosterone Activation of G-protein-coupled Estrogen Receptor Rapidly Stimulates MicroRNA-21 Transcription in Human Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Yun; Radde, Brandie N.; Litchfield, Lacey M.; Ivanova, Margarita M.; Prough, Russell A.; Clark, Barbara J.; Doll, Mark A.; Hein, David W.; Klinge, Carolyn M.

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about the regulation of the oncomiR miR-21 in liver. Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) regulates gene expression as a ligand for a G-protein-coupled receptor and as a precursor for steroids that activate nuclear receptor signaling. We report that 10 nm DHEA increases primary miR-21 (pri-miR-21) transcription and mature miR-21 expression in HepG2 cells in a biphasic manner with an initial peak at 1 h followed by a second, sustained response from 3–12 h. DHEA also increased miR-21 in primary human hepatocytes and Hep3B cells. siRNA, antibody, and inhibitor studies suggest that the rapid DHEA-mediated increase in miR-21 involves a G-protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPER/GPR30), estrogen receptor α-36 (ERα36), epidermal growth factor receptor-dependent, pertussis toxin-sensitive pathway requiring activation of c-Src, ERK1/2, and PI3K. GPER antagonist G-15 attenuated DHEA- and BSA-conjugated DHEA-stimulated pri-miR-21 transcription. Like DHEA, GPER agonists G-1 and fulvestrant increased pri-miR-21 in a GPER- and ERα36-dependent manner. DHEA, like G-1, increased GPER and ERα36 mRNA and protein levels. DHEA increased ERK1/2 and c-Src phosphorylation in a GPER-responsive manner. DHEA increased c-Jun, but not c-Fos, protein expression after 2 h. DHEA increased androgen receptor, c-Fos, and c-Jun recruitment to the miR-21 promoter. These results suggest that physiological concentrations of DHEA activate a GPER intracellular signaling cascade that increases pri-miR-21 transcription mediated at least in part by AP-1 and androgen receptor miR-21 promoter interaction. PMID:25969534

  9. Selective amplification of an mRNA and related pseudogene for a human ADP-ribosylation factor, a guanine nucleotide-dependent protein activator of cholera toxin

    SciTech Connect

    Monaco, L.; Murtagh, J.J.; Newman, K.B.; Tsai, Su-Chen; Moss, J.; Vaughan, M. )

    1990-03-01

    ADP-ribosylation factors (ARFs) are {approx}20-kDa proteins that act as GTP-dependent allosteric activators of cholera toxin. With deoxyinosine-containing degenerate oligonucleotide primers corresponding to conserved GTP-binding domains in ARFs, the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to amplify simultaneously from human DNA portions of three ARF genes that include codons for 102 amino acids, with intervening sequences. Amplification products that differed in size because of differences in intron sizes were separated by agarose gel electrophoresis. One amplified DNA contained no introns and had a sequence different from those of known AFRs. Based on this sequence, selective oligonucleotide probes were prepared and used to isolate clone {Psi}ARF 4, a putative ARF pseudogene, from a human genomic library in {lambda} phage EMBL3. Reverse transcription-PCR was then used to clone from human poly(A){sup +} RNA the cDNA corresponding to the expressed homolog of {Psi}ARF 4, referred to as human ARF 4. It appears that {Psi}ARF 4 arose during human evolution by integration of processed ARF 4 mRNA into the genome. Human ARF 4 differs from previously identified mammalian ARFs 1, 2, and 3. Hybridization of ARF 4-specific oligonucleotide probes with human, bovine, and rat RNA revealed a single 1.8-kilobase mRNA, which was clearly distinguished from the 1.9-kilobase mRNA for ARF 1 in these tissues. The PCR provides a powerful tool for investigating diversity in this and other multigene families, especially with primers targeted at domains believed to have functional significance.

  10. Bifunctional homodimeric triokinase/FMN cyclase: contribution of protein domains to the activities of the human enzyme and molecular dynamics simulation of domain movements.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Joaquim Rui; Couto, Ana; Cabezas, Alicia; Pinto, Rosa María; Ribeiro, João Meireles; Canales, José; Costas, María Jesús; Cameselle, José Carlos

    2014-04-11

    Mammalian triokinase, which phosphorylates exogenous dihydroxyacetone and fructose-derived glyceraldehyde, is neither molecularly identified nor firmly associated to an encoding gene. Human FMN cyclase, which splits FAD and other ribonucleoside diphosphate-X compounds to ribonucleoside monophosphate and cyclic X-phosphodiester, is identical to a DAK-encoded dihydroxyacetone kinase. This bifunctional protein was identified as triokinase. It was modeled as a homodimer of two-domain (K and L) subunits. Active centers lie between K1 and L2 or K2 and L1: dihydroxyacetone binds K and ATP binds L in different subunits too distant (≈ 14 Å) for phosphoryl transfer. FAD docked to the ATP site with ribityl 4'-OH in a possible near-attack conformation for cyclase activity. Reciprocal inhibition between kinase and cyclase reactants confirmed substrate site locations. The differential roles of protein domains were supported by their individual expression: K was inactive, and L displayed cyclase but not kinase activity. The importance of domain mobility for the kinase activity of dimeric triokinase was highlighted by molecular dynamics simulations: ATP approached dihydroxyacetone at distances below 5 Å in near-attack conformation. Based upon structure, docking, and molecular dynamics simulations, relevant residues were mutated to alanine, and kcat and Km were assayed whenever kinase and/or cyclase activity was conserved. The results supported the roles of Thr(112) (hydrogen bonding of ATP adenine to K in the closed active center), His(221) (covalent anchoring of dihydroxyacetone to K), Asp(401) and Asp(403) (metal coordination to L), and Asp(556) (hydrogen bonding of ATP or FAD ribose to L domain). Interestingly, the His(221) point mutant acted specifically as a cyclase without kinase activity.

  11. Human Bocavirus NS1 and NS1-70 Proteins Inhibit TNF-α-Mediated Activation of NF-κB by targeting p65

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qingshi; Zhang, Zhenfeng; Zheng, Zhenhua; Zheng, Caishang; Liu, Yan; Hu, Qinxue; Ke, Xianliang; Wang, Hanzhong

    2016-01-01

    Human bocavirus (HBoV), a parvovirus, is a single-stranded DNA etiologic agent causing lower respiratory tract infections in young children worldwide. Nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) transcription factors play crucial roles in clearance of invading viruses through activation of many physiological processes. Previous investigation showed that HBoV infection could significantly upregulate the level of TNF-α which is a strong NF-κB stimulator. Here we investigated whether HBoV proteins modulate TNF-α–mediated activation of the NF-κB signaling pathway. We showed that HBoV NS1 and NS1-70 proteins blocked NF-κB activation in response to TNF-α. Overexpression of TNF receptor-associated factor 2 (TRAF2)-, IκB kinase alpha (IKKα)-, IκB kinase beta (IKKβ)-, constitutively active mutant of IKKβ (IKKβ SS/EE)-, or p65-induced NF-κB activation was inhibited by NS1 and NS1-70. Furthermore, NS1 and NS1-70 didn’t interfere with TNF-α-mediated IκBα phosphorylation and degradation, nor p65 nuclear translocation. Coimmunoprecipitation assays confirmed the interaction of both NS1 and NS1-70 with p65. Of note, NS1 but not NS1-70 inhibited TNF-α-mediated p65 phosphorylation at ser536. Our findings together indicate that HBoV NS1 and NS1-70 inhibit NF-κB activation. This is the first time that HBoV has been shown to inhibit NF-κB activation, revealing a potential immune-evasion mechanism that is likely important for HBoV pathogenesis. PMID:27329558

  12. Human Infrastructure & Human Activity Detection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-07-01

    researchers are developing sensors systems that detect footfalls (or gait ) [1, 2], speech, the spectral response of human skin, etc [3]. Little work has...cone shaped field of view. • Visible imagers can capture color or grayscale video for human gait detection and object recognition. • Infrared...his/her gait produces a unique signature [13]. Indirect means of detecting personnel include the usage of acoustic, seismic, magnetic, passive

  13. Human papillomaviruses activate and recruit SMC1 cohesin proteins for the differentiation-dependent life cycle through association with CTCF insulators.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Kavi; Gunasekharan, Vignesh; Satsuka, Ayano; Laimins, Laimonis A

    2015-04-01

    Human papillomaviruses infect stratified epithelia and link their productive life cycle to the differentiation state of the host cell. Productive viral replication or amplification is restricted to highly differentiated suprabasal cells and is dependent on the activation of the ATM DNA damage pathway. The ATM pathway has three arms that can act independently of one another. One arm is centered on p53, another on CHK2 and a third on SMC1/NBS1 proteins. A role for CHK2 in HPV genome amplification has been demonstrated but it was unclear what other factors provided important activities. The cohesin protein, SMC1, is necessary for sister chromatid association prior to mitosis. In addition the phosphorylated form of SMC1 plays a critical role together with NBS1 in the ATM DNA damage response. In normal cells, SMC1 becomes phosphorylated in response to radiation, however, in HPV positive cells our studies demonstrate that it is constitutively activated. Furthermore, pSMC1 is found localized in distinct nuclear foci in complexes with γ-H2AX, and CHK2 and bound to HPV DNA. Importantly, knockdown of SMC1 blocks differentiation-dependent genome amplification. pSMC1 forms complexes with the insulator transcription factor CTCF and our studies show that these factors bind to conserved sequence motifs in the L2 late region of HPV 31. Similar motifs are found in most HPV types. Knockdown of CTCF with shRNAs blocks genome amplification and mutation of the CTCF binding motifs in the L2 open reading frame inhibits stable maintenance of viral episomes in undifferentiated cells as well as amplification of genomes upon differentiation. These findings suggest a model in which SMC1 factors are constitutively activated in HPV positive cells and recruited to viral genomes through complex formation with CTCF to facilitate genome amplification. Our findings identify both SMC1 and CTCF as critical regulators of the differentiation-dependent life cycle of high-risk human papillomaviruses.

  14. p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase-dependent and -independent intracellular signal transduction pathways leading to apoptosis in human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Frasch, S C; Nick, J A; Fadok, V A; Bratton, D L; Worthen, G S; Henson, P M

    1998-04-03

    Human neutrophils undergo apoptosis spontaneously when cultured in vitro; however, the signal transduction pathways involved remain largely unknown. In some cell types, c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) have been implicated in the pathways leading to stress-induced apoptosis. In this study, we begin to define two pathways leading to apoptosis in the neutrophil induced either by stress stimuli (UV, hyperosmolarity, sphingosine) or by anti-Fas antibody or overnight culture in vitro (spontaneous apoptosis). Apoptosis induced by stress stimuli activated p38 MAPK, and apoptosis was inhibited by the specific p38 MAPK inhibitor, 6-(4-Fluorophenyl)-2.3-dihydro-5-(4-puridinyl)imidazo(2, 1-beta)thiazole dihydrochloride. Furthermore, differentiation of HL-60 cells toward the neutrophil phenotype resulted in a loss in c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase activation with concomitant acquisition of formylmethionylleucylphenylalanine-stimulatable and stress-inducible p38 MAPK activity as well as apoptosis blockade by the p38 MAPK inhibitor. In contrast, anti-Fas-induced or spontaneous apoptosis occurred independent of p38 MAPK activation and was not blocked by the inhibitor. Both pathways appear to utilize member(s) of the caspase family, since pretreatment with either Val-Ala-Asp-fluoromethyl ketone or Asp-Glu-Val-Asp-fluoromethyl ketone inhibited apoptosis induced by each of the stimuli. We propose the presence of at least two pathways leading to apoptosis in human neutrophils, a stress-activated pathway that is dependent on p38 MAPK activation and an anti-FAS/spontaneous pathway that is p38 MAPK-independent.

  15. Piperine activates human pregnane X receptor to induce the expression of cytochrome P450 3A4 and multidrug resistance protein 1

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yue-Ming; Lin, Wenwei; Chai, Sergio C.; Wu, Jing; Ong, Su Sien; Schuetz, Erin G.; Chen, Taosheng

    2013-10-01

    Activation of the pregnane X receptor (PXR) and subsequently its target genes, including those encoding drug transporters and metabolizing enzymes, while playing substantial roles in xenobiotic detoxification, might cause undesired drug-drug interactions. Recently, an increased awareness has been given to dietary components for potential induction of diet–drug interactions through activation of PXR. Here, we studied, whether piperine (PIP), a major component extracted from the widely-used daily spice black pepper, could induce PXR-mediated expression of cytochrome P450 3A4 (CYP3A4) and multidrug resistance protein 1 (MDR1). Our results showed that PIP activated human PXR (hPXR)-mediated CYP3A4 and MDR1 expression in human hepatocytes, intestine cells, and a mouse model; PIP activated hPXR by recruiting its coactivator SRC-1 in both cellular and cell-free systems; PIP bound to the hPXR ligand binding domain in a competitive ligand binding assay in vitro. The dichotomous effects of PIP on induction of CYP3A4 and MDR1 expression observed here and inhibition of their activity reported elsewhere challenges the potential use of PIP as a bioavailability enhancer and suggests that caution should be taken in PIP consumption during drug treatment in patients, particularly those who favor daily pepper spice or rely on certain pepper remedies. - Highlights: • Piperine induces PXR-mediated CYP3A4 and MDR1 expression. • Piperine activates PXR by binding to PXR and recruiting coactivator SRC-1. • Piperine induces PXR activation in vivo. • Caution should be taken in piperine consumption during drug treatment.

  16. Role of positively charged residues of the second transmembrane domain in the ion transport activity and conformation of human uncoupling protein-2.

    PubMed

    Hoang, Tuan; Matovic, Tijana; Parker, James; Smith, Matthew D; Jelokhani-Niaraki, Masoud

    2015-04-14

    Residing at the inner mitochondrial membrane, uncoupling protein-2 (UCP2) mediates proton transport from the intermembrane space (IMS) to the mitochondrial matrix and consequently reduces the rate of ATP synthesis in the mitochondria. The ubiquitous expression of UCP2 in humans can be attributed to the protein's multiple physiological roles in tissues, including its involvement in protective mechanisms against oxidative stress, as well as glucose and lipid metabolisms. Currently, the structural properties and ion transport mechanism of UCP2 and other UCP homologues remain poorly understood. UCP2-mediated proton transport is activated by fatty acids and inhibited by di- and triphosphate purine nucleotides. UCP2 also transports chloride and some other small anions. Identification of key amino acid residues of UCP2 in its ion transport pathway can shed light on the protein's ion transport function. On the basis of our previous studies, the second transmembrane helix segment (TM2) of UCP2 exhibited chloride channel activity. In addition, it was suggested that the positively charged residues on TM2 domains of UCPs 1 and 2 were important for their chloride transport activity. On this basis, to further understand the role of these positively charged residues on the ion transport activity of UCP2, we recombinantly expressed four TM2 mutants: R76Q, R88Q, R96Q, and K104Q. The wild type UCP2 and its mutants were purified and reconstituted into liposomes, and their conformation and ion (proton and chloride) transport activity were studied. TM2 Arg residues at the matrix interface of UCP2 proved to be crucial for the protein's anion transport function, and their absence resulted in highly diminished Cl(-) transport rates. On the other hand, the two other positively charged residues of TM2, located at the UCP2-IMS interface, could participate in the salt-bridge formation in the protein and promote the interhelical tight packing in the UCP2. Absence of these residues did not

  17. The HIV Matrix Protein p17 Promotes the Activation of Human Hepatic Stellate Cells through Interactions with CXCR2 and Syndecan-2

    PubMed Central

    Renga, Barbara; Francisci, Daniela; Schiaroli, Elisabetta; Carino, Adriana; Cipriani, Sabrina; D'Amore, Claudio; Sidoni, Angelo; Sordo, Rachele Del; Ferri, Ivana; Lucattelli, Monica; Lunghi, Benedetta; Baldelli, Franco; Fiorucci, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    Background The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) p17 is a matrix protein involved in virus life's cycle. CXCR2 and Syndecan-2, the two major coreceptors for the p17 protein, are expressed in hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), a key cell type involved in matrix deposition in liver fibrotic disorders. Aim In this report we have investigated the in vitro impact of p17 on HSCs transdifferentiation and function and underlying signaling pathways involved in these processes. Methods LX-2 cells, a human HSC line, and primary HSC were challenged with p17 and expressions of fibrogenic markers and of p17 receptors were assessed by qRT-PCR and Western blot. Downstream intracellular signaling pathways were evaluated with qRT-PCR and Western blot as well as after pre-treatment with specific pathway inhibitors. Results Exposure of LX2 cells to p17 increases their contractile force, reshapes the cytoskeleton fibers and upregulates the expression of transdifferentiation markers including αSMA, COL1α1 and endothelin-1 through the activation of Jak/STAT and Rho signaling pathways. These effects are lost in HSCs pre-incubated with a serum from HIV positive person who underwent a vaccination with a p17 peptide. Confocal laser microscopy studies demonstrates that CXCR2 and syndecan-2 co-associate at the plasma membrane after exposure to p17. Immunostaining of HIV/HCV liver biopsies from co-infected patients reveals that the progression of liver fibrosis correlates with a reduced expression of CXCR2. Conclusions The HIV matrix protein p17 is pro-fibrogenic through its interactions both with CXCR2 and syndecan-2 on activated HSCs. PMID:24736615

  18. The functional importance of a cap site-proximal region of the human prointerleukin 1 beta gene is defined by viral protein trans-activation.

    PubMed Central

    Hunninghake, G W; Monks, B G; Geist, L J; Monick, M M; Monroy, M A; Stinski, M F; Webb, A C; Dayer, J M; Auron, P E; Fenton, M J

    1992-01-01

    Prointerleukin 1 beta (IL-1 beta) is a cytokine that mediates a broad range of biological activities. Genomic sequences that regulate IL-1 beta transcription include both inducible regulatory elements located more than 2,700 bp upstream of the transcriptional start site (cap site) and proximal elements located near the TATA box of this gene. In this study, we focused on the identification and characterization of trans-acting nuclear regulatory proteins that bind to the cap site-proximal region of the human IL-1 beta gene. We identified a protein, termed NFIL-1 beta A (NF beta A), that binds to a highly conserved 12-bp DNA sequence (-49 to -38) located upstream of the TATA box motif in both the human and murine IL-1 beta genes. The IL-1 alpha gene, which lacks a TATA motif, does not possess an NF beta A-binding sequence within the promoter region, suggesting that NF beta A may selectively regulate IL-1 beta expression. Using electrophoretic mobility shift assays, we identified several distinct DNA-protein complexes that are expressed in a cell-type-specific manner. In monocytic cell lines, the relative abundance of these complexes varies rapidly following stimulation of the cells with phorbol esters or lipopolysaccharide. UV cross-linking analysis identified two distinct DNA-binding polypeptides that comprise distinct complexes. The functional role of NF beta A was assessed in transient transfection assays. These data indicate that NF beta A is required for both basal and inducible promoter activity in monocytic cells. Furthermore, the human cytomegalovirus immediate-early 1 gene product requires the presence of NF beta A in order to trans-activate the proximal IL-1 beta promoter in a monocytic cell line. We propose that NF beta A is a factor that mediates either direct or indirect activation by the immediate-early 1 gene product. The proximity of this essential factor to the TATA motif suggests a possible role in transcriptional initiation. Images PMID:1630455

  19. Activating mutation of the stimulatory G protein (gsp) as a putative cause of ovarian and testicular human stromal Leydig cell tumors.

    PubMed

    Fragoso, M C; Latronico, A C; Carvalho, F M; Zerbini, M C; Marcondes, J A; Araujo, L M; Lando, V S; Frazzatto, E T; Mendonca, B B; Villares, S M

    1998-06-01

    Activating mutations of the G protein genes have been associated with the development of several endocrine neoplasms. Such activating mutations, gip2, affecting the alpha-subunit of the G alpha i2 protein were previously described by a single group in 30% of ovarian sex cord stromal tumors. Other activating mutations of the alpha-subunit of the Gs (gsp) have been identified in GH-secreting and nonfunctioning pituitary tumors, autonomous thyroid adenomas, and all affected McCune-Albright tissues, but not in sex cord stromal tumors. In the present study, we investigated the presence of gip2 and gsp mutations in 14 human sex cord stromal tumors. Six Leydig cell tumors (4 ovaries and 2 testes), 2 thecomas, 2 granulosa cell tumors, 3 androblastomas, and 1 gonadoblastoma (sex cord and germ cell) were included in this study. Genomic DNA was obtained from either fresh-frozen tumor tissues or paraffin-embedded sections and in some cases from blood samples. Using PCR, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, and direct sequencing, we detected 4 tumors (66.6%) with the gsp mutation (R201C) in our series of ovarian and testicular Leydig cell tumors. In contrast, no gip2 mutations were found in any of the sex cord stromal tumors studied. In conclusion, our findings suggest that the putative oncogene gsp may play a significant role in the molecular mechanism of these tumors.

  20. Polyphyllin G induce apoptosis and autophagy in human nasopharyngeal cancer cells by modulation of AKT and mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jui-Chieh; Hsieh, Ming-Ju; Chen, Chih-Jung; Lin, Jen-Tsun; Lo, Yu-Sheng; Chuang, Yi-Ching; Chien, Su-Yu; Chen, Mu-Kuan

    2016-10-25

    Polyphyllin G (also call polyphyllin VII), extract from rhizomes of Paris yunnanensis Franch, has been demonstrated to have strong anticancer activities in a wide variety of human cancer cell lines. Previous studies found that Polyphyllin G induced apoptotic cell death in human hepatoblastoma cancer and lung cancer cells. However, the underlying mechanisms of autophagy in human nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) remain unclear. In this study, Polyphyllin G can potently induced apoptosis dependent on the activations of caspase-8, -3, and -9 and the changes of Bcl-2, Bcl-xL and Bax protein expression in different human NPC cell lines (HONE-1 and NPC-039). The amount of both LC3-II and Beclin-1 was intriguingly increased suggest that autophagy was induced in Polyphyllin G-treated NPC cells. To further clarify whether Polyphyllin G-induced apoptosis and autophagy depended on AKT/ERK/JNK/p38 MAPK signaling pathways, cells were combined treated with AKT inhibitor (LY294002), ERK1/2 inhibitor (U0126), p38 MAPK inhibitor (SB203580), or JNK inhibitor (SP600125). These results demonstrated that Polyphyllin G induced apoptosis in NPC cells through activation of ERK, while AKT, p38 MAPK and JNK were responsible for Polyphyllin G-induced autophagy. Finally, an administration of Polyphyllin G effectively suppressed the tumor growth in the NPC carcinoma xenograft model in vivo. In conclusion, our results reveal that Polyphyllin G inhibits cell viability and induces apoptosis and autophagy in NPC cancer cells, suggesting that Polyphyllin G is an attractive candidate for tumor therapies. Polyphyllin G may promise candidate for development of antitumor drugs targeting nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

  1. Polyphyllin G induce apoptosis and autophagy in human nasopharyngeal cancer cells by modulation of AKT and mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chih-Jung; Lin, Jen-Tsun; Lo, Yu-Sheng; Chuang, Yi-Ching; Chien, Su-Yu; Chen, Mu-Kuan

    2016-01-01

    Polyphyllin G (also call polyphyllin VII), extract from rhizomes of Paris yunnanensis Franch, has been demonstrated to have strong anticancer activities in a wide variety of human cancer cell lines. Previous studies found that Polyphyllin G induced apoptotic cell death in human hepatoblastoma cancer and lung cancer cells. However, the underlying mechanisms of autophagy in human nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) remain unclear. In this study, Polyphyllin G can potently induced apoptosis dependent on the activations of caspase-8, -3, and -9 and the changes of Bcl-2, Bcl-xL and Bax protein expression in different human NPC cell lines (HONE-1 and NPC-039). The amount of both LC3-II and Beclin-1 was intriguingly increased suggest that autophagy was induced in Polyphyllin G-treated NPC cells. To further clarify whether Polyphyllin G-induced apoptosis and autophagy depended on AKT/ERK/JNK/p38 MAPK signaling pathways, cells were combined treated with AKT inhibitor (LY294002), ERK1/2 inhibitor (U0126), p38 MAPK inhibitor (SB203580), or JNK inhibitor (SP600125). These results demonstrated that Polyphyllin G induced apoptosis in NPC cells through activation of ERK, while AKT, p38 MAPK and JNK were responsible for Polyphyllin G-induced autophagy. Finally, an administration of Polyphyllin G effectively suppressed the tumor growth in the NPC carcinoma xenograft model in vivo. In conclusion, our results reveal that Polyphyllin G inhibits cell viability and induces apoptosis and autophagy in NPC cancer cells, suggesting that Polyphyllin G is an attractive candidate for tumor therapies. Polyphyllin G may promise candidate for development of antitumor drugs targeting nasopharyngeal carcinoma. PMID:27602962

  2. Protein Phosphatase 1α Interacting Proteins in the Human Brain

    PubMed Central

    Esteves, Sara L.C.; Domingues, Sara C.; da Cruz e Silva, Odete A.B.; da Cruz e Silva, Edgar F.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Protein Phosphatase 1 (PP1) is a major serine/threonine-phosphatase whose activity is dependent on its binding to regulatory subunits known as PP1 interacting proteins (PIPs), responsible for targeting PP1 to a specific cellular location, specifying its substrate or regulating its action. Today, more than 200 PIPs have been described involving PP1 in panoply of cellular mechanisms. Moreover, several PIPs have been identified that are tissue and event specific. In addition, the diversity of PP1/PIP complexes can further be achieved by the existence of several PP1 isoforms that can bind preferentially to a certain PIP. Thus, PP1/PIP complexes are highly specific for a particular function in the cell, and as such, they are excellent pharmacological targets. Hence, an in-depth survey was taken to identify specific PP1α PIPs in human brain by a high-throughput Yeast Two-Hybrid approach. Sixty-six proteins were recognized to bind PP1α, 39 being novel PIPs. A large protein interaction databases search was also performed to integrate with the results of the PP1α Human Brain Yeast Two-Hybrid and a total of 246 interactions were retrieved. PMID:22321011

  3. A gene-centric analysis of activated partial thromboplastin time and activated protein C resistance using the HumanCVD focused genotyping array.

    PubMed

    Gaunt, Tom R; Lowe, Gordon D O; Lawlor, Debbie A; Casas, Juan-Pablo; Day, Ian N M

    2013-07-01

    Activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) is an important routine measure of intrinsic blood coagulation. Addition of activated protein C (APC) to the aPTT test to produce a ratio, provides one measure of APC resistance. The associations of some genetic mutations (eg, factor V Leiden) with these measures are established, but associations of other genetic variations remain to be established. The objective of this work was to test for association between genetic variants and blood coagulation using a high-density genotyping array. Genetic association with aPTT and APC resistance was analysed using a focused genotyping array that tests approximately 50 000 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in nearly 2000 cardiovascular candidate genes, including coagulation pathway genes. Analyses were conducted on 2544 European origin women from the British Women's Heart and Health Study. We confirm associations with aPTT at the coagulation factor XII (F12)/G protein-coupled receptor kinase 6 (GRK6) and kininogen 1 (KNG1)/histidine-rich glycoprotein (HRG) loci, and identify novel SNPs at the ABO locus and novel locus kallikrein B (KLKB1)/F11. In addition, we confirm association between APC resistance and factor V Leiden mutation, and identify novel SNP associations with APC resistance in the HRG and F5/solute carrier family 19 member 2 (SLC19A2) regions. In conclusion, variation at several genetic loci influences intrinsic blood coagulation as measured by both aPTT and APC resistance.

  4. AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Attenuates High Salt-Induced Activation of Epithelial Sodium Channels (ENaC) in Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Wei-Wan; Li, Xin-Yuan; Liu, Hui-Bin; Wang, Zi-Rui; Hu, Qing-Qing; Li, Yu-Xia; Song, Bin-Lin; Lou, Jie; Wang, Qiu-Shi; Ma, He-Ping; Zhang, Zhi-Ren

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) is expressed in the endothelial cells. To test whether high salt affects the NO production via regulation of endothelial ENaC, human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were incubated in solutions containing either normal or high sodium (additional 20 mM NaCl). Our data showed that high sodium treatment significantly increased α-, β-, and γ-ENaC expression levels in HUVECs. Using the cell-attached patch-clamp technique, we demonstrated that high sodium treatment significantly increased ENaC open probability (P O ). Moreover, nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) phosphorylation (Ser 1177) levels and NO production were significantly decreased by high sodium in HUVECs; the effects of high sodium on eNOS phosphorylation and NO production were inhibited by a specific ENaC blocker, amiloride. Our results showed that high sodium decreased AMP-activated kinase (AMPK) phosphorylation in endothelial cells. On the other hand, metformin, an AMPK activator, prevented high sodium-induced upregulation of ENaC expression and P O . Moreover, metformin prevented high salt-induced decrease in NO production and eNOS phosphorylation. These results suggest that high sodium stimulates ENaC activation by negatively modulating AMPK activity, thereby leading to reduction in eNOS activity and NO production in endothelial cells.

  5. AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Attenuates High Salt-Induced Activation of Epithelial Sodium Channels (ENaC) in Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xin-Yuan; Hu, Qing-Qing; Ma, He-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) is expressed in the endothelial cells. To test whether high salt affects the NO production via regulation of endothelial ENaC, human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were incubated in solutions containing either normal or high sodium (additional 20 mM NaCl). Our data showed that high sodium treatment significantly increased α-, β-, and γ-ENaC expression levels in HUVECs. Using the cell-attached patch-clamp technique, we demonstrated that high sodium treatment significantly increased ENaC open probability (PO). Moreover, nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) phosphorylation (Ser 1177) levels and NO production were significantly decreased by high sodium in HUVECs; the effects of high sodium on eNOS phosphorylation and NO production were inhibited by a specific ENaC blocker, amiloride. Our results showed that high sodium decreased AMP-activated kinase (AMPK) phosphorylation in endothelial cells. On the other hand, metformin, an AMPK activator, prevented high sodium-induced upregulation of ENaC expression and PO. Moreover, metformin prevented high salt-induced decrease in NO production and eNOS phosphorylation. These results suggest that high sodium stimulates ENaC activation by negatively modulating AMPK activity, thereby leading to reduction in eNOS activity and NO production in endothelial cells. PMID:27635187

  6. Cultured Human Periosteum-Derived Cells Can Differentiate into Osteoblasts in a Perioxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor Gamma-Mediated Fashion via Bone Morphogenetic Protein signaling

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Jin-Eun; Park, Jin-Ho; Yun, Jeong-Won; Kang, Young-Hoon; Park, Bong-Wook; Hwang, Sun-Chul; Cho, Yeong-Cheol; Sung, Iel-Yong; Woo, Dong Kyun; Byun, June-Ho

    2016-01-01

    The differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells towards an osteoblastic fate depends on numerous signaling pathways, including activation of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling components. Commitment to osteogenesis is associated with activation of osteoblast-related signal transduction, whereas inactivation of this signal transduction favors adipogenesis. BMP signaling also has a critical role in the processes by which mesenchymal stem cells undergo commitment to the adipocyte lineage. In our previous study, we demonstrated that an agonist of the perioxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ), a master regulator of adipocyte differentiation, stimulates osteoblastic differentiation of cultured human periosteum-derived cells. In this study, we used dorsomorphin, a selective small molecule inhibitor of BMP signaling, to investigate whether BMP signaling is involved in the positive effects of PPARγ agonists on osteogenic phenotypes of cultured human periosteum-derived cells. Both histochemical detection and bioactivity of ALP were clearly increased in the periosteum-derived cells treated with the PPARγ agonist at day 10 of culture. Treatment with the PPARγ agonist also caused an increase in alizarin red S staining and calcium content in the periosteum-derived osteoblasts at 2 and 3 weeks of culture. In contrast, dorsomorphin markedly decreased ALP activity, alizarin red S staining and calcium content in both the cells treated with PPARγ agonist and the cells cultured in osteogenic induction media without PPARγ agonist during the culture period. In addition, the PPARγ agonist clearly increased osteogenic differentiation medium-induced BMP-2 upregulation in the periosteum-derived osteoblastic cells at 2 weeks of culture as determined by quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), immunoblotting, and immunocytochemical analyses. Although further study will be needed to clarify the mechanisms of PPARγ-regulated osteogenesis

  7. Cultured Human Periosteum-Derived Cells Can Differentiate into Osteoblasts in a Perioxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor Gamma-Mediated Fashion via Bone Morphogenetic Protein signaling.

    PubMed

    Chung, Jin-Eun; Park, Jin-Ho; Yun, Jeong-Won; Kang, Young-Hoon; Park, Bong-Wook; Hwang, Sun-Chul; Cho, Yeong-Cheol; Sung, Iel-Yong; Woo, Dong Kyun; Byun, June-Ho

    2016-01-01

    The differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells towards an osteoblastic fate depends on numerous signaling pathways, including activation of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling components. Commitment to osteogenesis is associated with activation of osteoblast-related signal transduction, whereas inactivation of this signal transduction favors adipogenesis. BMP signaling also has a critical role in the processes by which mesenchymal stem cells undergo commitment to the adipocyte lineage. In our previous study, we demonstrated that an agonist of the perioxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ), a master regulator of adipocyte differentiation, stimulates osteoblastic differentiation of cultured human periosteum-derived cells. In this study, we used dorsomorphin, a selective small molecule inhibitor of BMP signaling, to investigate whether BMP signaling is involved in the positive effects of PPARγ agonists on osteogenic phenotypes of cultured human periosteum-derived cells. Both histochemical detection and bioactivity of ALP were clearly increased in the periosteum-derived cells treated with the PPARγ agonist at day 10 of culture. Treatment with the PPARγ agonist also caused an increase in alizarin red S staining and calcium content in the periosteum-derived osteoblasts at 2 and 3 weeks of culture. In contrast, dorsomorphin markedly decreased ALP activity, alizarin red S staining and calcium content in both the cells treated with PPARγ agonist and the cells cultured in osteogenic induction media without PPARγ agonist during the culture period. In addition, the PPARγ agonist clearly increased osteogenic differentiation medium-induced BMP-2 upregulation in the periosteum-derived osteoblastic cells at 2 weeks of culture as determined by quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), immunoblotting, and immunocytochemical analyses. Although further study will be needed to clarify the mechanisms of PPARγ-regulated osteogenesis

  8. The protein pheromone Er-1 of the ciliate Euplotes raikovi stimulates human T-cell activity: involvement of interleukin-2 system.

    PubMed

    Cervia, Davide; Catalani, Elisabetta; Belardinelli, Maria Cristina; Perrotta, Cristiana; Picchietti, Simona; Alimenti, Claudio; Casini, Giovanni; Fausto, Anna Maria; Vallesi, Adriana

    2013-02-01

    Water-soluble protein signals (pheromones) of the ciliate Euplotes have been supposed to be functional precursors of growth factors and cytokines that regulate cell-cell interaction in multi-cellular eukaryotes. This work provides evidence that native preparations of the Euplotes raikovi pheromone Er-1 (a helical protein of 40 amino acids) specifically increases viability, DNA synthesis, proliferation, and the production of interferon-γ, tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-2, and IL-13 in human Jurkat T-cells. Also, Er-1 significantly decreases the mRNA levels of the β and γ subunits of IL-2 receptor (IL-2R), while the mRNA levels of the α subunit appeared to be not affected. Jurkat T-cell treatments with Er-1 induced the down-regulation of the IL-2Rα subunit by a reversible and time-dependent endocytosis, and increased the levels of phosphorylation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK). The cell-type specificity of these effects was supported by the finding that Er-1, although unable to directly influence the growth of human glioma U-373 cells, induced Jurkat cells to synthesize and release factors that, in turn, inhibited the U-373 cell proliferation. Overall, these findings imply that Er-1 coupling to IL-2R and ERK immuno-enhances T-cell activity, and that this effect likely translates to an inhibition of glioma cell growth.

  9. A milk protein gene promoter directs the expression of human tissue plasminogen activator cDNA to the mammary gland in transgenic mice

    SciTech Connect

    Pittius, C.W.; Hennighausen, L.; Lee, E.; Westphal, H.; Nicols, E.; Vitale, J.; Gordon, K. )

    1988-08-01

    Whey acidic protein (WAP) is a major whey protein in mouse milk. Its gene is expressed in the lactating mammary gland and is inducible by steroid and peptide hormones. A series of transgenic mice containing a hybrid gene in which human tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) cDNA is under the control of the murine WAP gene promoter had previously been generated. In this study, 21 tissues from lactating and virgin transgenic female mice containing the WAP-tPA hybrid gene were screened for the distribution of murine WAP and human tPA transcripts. Like the endogenous WAP RNA, WAP-tPA RNA was expressed predominantly in mammary gland tissue and appeared to be inducible by lactation. Whereas WAP transcripts were not detected in 22 tissues of virgin mice, low levels of WAP-tPA RNA, which were not modulated during lactation, were found in tongue, kidney, and sublingual gland. These studies demonstrate that the WAP gene promoter can target the expression of a transgene to the mammary gland and that this expression is inducible during lactation.

  10. Canine distemper virus neutralization activity is low in human serum and it is sensitive to an amino acid substitution in the hemagglutinin protein

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xinsheng; Wallace, Olivia L.; Domi, Arban; Wright, Kevin J.; Driscoll, Jonathan; Anzala, Omu; Sanders, Eduard J.; Kamali, Anatoli; Allen, Susan; Fast, Pat; Gilmour, Jill; Price, Matt A.; Parks, Christopher L.

    2015-08-15

    Serum was analyzed from 146 healthy adult volunteers in eastern Africa to evaluate measles virus (MV) and canine distemper virus (CDV) neutralizing antibody (nAb) prevalence and potency. MV plaque reduction neutralization test (PRNT) results indicated that all sera were positive for MV nAbs. Furthermore, the 50% neutralizing dose (ND50) for the majority of sera corresponded to antibody titers induced by MV vaccination. CDV nAbs titers were low and generally were detected in sera with high MV nAb titers. A mutant CDV was generated that was less sensitive to neutralization by human serum. The mutant virus genome had 10 nucleotide substitutions, which coded for single amino acid substitutions in the fusion (F) and hemagglutinin (H) glycoproteins and two substitutions in the large polymerase (L) protein. The H substitution occurred in a conserved region involved in receptor interactions among morbilliviruses, implying that this region is a target for cross-reactive neutralizing antibodies. - Highlights: • Screened 146 serum samples for measles virus (MV) and canine distemper virus (CDV) neutralizing antibody (nAb). • MV nAb is prevalent in the sera. • CDV neutralizing activity is generally low or absent and when detected it is present in sera with high MV nAb titers. • A neutralization-resistant CDV mutant was isolated using human serum selection. • A mutation was identified in the receptor-binding region of CDV hemagglutinin protein that confers the neutralization resistance.

  11. Structural Basis for the Catalytic Activity of Human Serine/Threonine Protein Phosphatase type 5 (PP5)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swingle, Mark R.; Ciszak, Ewa M.; Honkanen, Richard E.

    2004-01-01

    Serine/threonine protein phosphatase-5 (PP5) is a member of the PPP-gene family of protein phosphatases that is widely expressed in mammalian tissues and is highly conserved among eukaryotes. PP5 associates with several proteins that affect signal transduction networks, including the glucocorticoid receptor (GR)-heat shock protein-90 (Hsp90)-heterocomplex, the CDC16 and CDC27 subunits of the anaphase-promoting complex, elF2alpha kinase, the A subunit of PP2A, the G12-alpha / G13-alpha subunits of heterotrimeric G proteins and DNA-PK. The catalytic domain of PP5 (PP5c) shares 35-45% sequence identity with the catalytic domains of other PPP-phosphatases, including protein phosphatase-1 (PP1), -2A (PP2A), -2B / calcineurin (PP2B), -4 (PP4), -6 (PP6), and -7 (PP7). Like PP1, PP2A and PP4, PP5 is also sensitive to inhibition by okadaic acid, microcystin, cantharidin, tautomycin, and calyculin A. Here we report the crystal structure of the PP5 catalytic domain (PP5c) at a resolution of 1.6 angstroms. From this structure we propose a mechanism for PP5-mediated hydrolysis of phosphoprotein substrates, which requires the precise positioning of two metal ions within a conserved Asp(sup 271)-M(sub 1):M(sub 2)-W(sup 1)-His(sup 304)-Asp(sup 274) catalytic motif. The structure of PP5c provides a possible structural basis for explaining the exceptional catalytic proficiency of protein phosphatases, which are among the most powerful known catalysts. Resolution of the entire C-terminus revealed a novel subdomain, and the structure of the PP5c should also aid development of type-specific inhibitors.

  12. A specific protein, p92, detected in flat revertants derived from NIH/3T3 transformed by human activated c-Ha-ras oncogene.

    PubMed

    Fujita, H; Suzuki, H; Kuzumaki, N; Müllauer, L; Ogiso, Y; Oda, A; Ebisawa, K; Sakurai, T; Nonomura, Y; Kijimoto-Ochiai, S

    1990-01-01

    Total proteins from a mouse embryo fibroblast cell line NIH/3T3, NIH/3T3 cells transformed by human activated c-Ha-ras (EJ-ras) oncogene (EJ-NIH/3T3), and the two flat revertant cell lines, R1 and R2, were analyzed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (IEF and NEPHGE). Several hundred polypeptides were resolved as seen by silver staining. Common alterations in four polypeptide spots were observed in the revertants when compared with NIH/3T3 and EJ-NIH/3T3 cells. In these alterations, a new polypeptide spot p92-5.7 (designated by molecular weight x 10(-3) and pI) was detected only in the revertants and not in NIH/3T3 and EJ-NIH/3T3 cells. Furthermore, the expression level of p92-5.7 seemed to be associated with the flat morphology and the reduced tumorigenicity of the revertants. Polypeptide p92-5.7 was also not detected in the total proteins extracted from BALB/3T3 cells, NIH Swiss mouse primary embryo fibroblasts, NRK (normal rat kidney) cells, and L6 (rat myoblast). Subcellular fractionation of total protein from R1 cells revealed that the p92-5.7 was present in the cytosol. Western blot analysis using an anti-gelsolin antibody demonstrated that the p92-5.7 might be a variant form of gelsolin which is thought to be an actin regulatory protein or a gelsolin-like polypeptide. These results may suggest that the expression of p92-5.7 detected only in the revertants is associated, at least in part, with the reversion. This may be the first demonstration of specific protein expression in the flat revertants.

  13. Inhibition of protein tyrosine phosphatase activity mediates epidermal growth factor receptor signaling in human airway epithelial cells exposed to Zn{sup 2+}

    SciTech Connect

    Tal, T.L.; Graves, L.M.; Silbajoris, R.; Bromberg, P.A.; Wu, W.; Samet, J.M. . E-mail: samet.james@epa.gov

    2006-07-01

    Epidemiological studies have implicated zinc (Zn{sup 2+}) in the toxicity of ambient particulate matter (PM) inhalation. We previously showed that exposure to metal-laden PM inhibits protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) activity in human primary bronchial epithelial cells (HAEC) and leads to Src-dependent activation of EGFR signaling in B82 and A431 cells. In order to elucidate the mechanism of Zn{sup 2+}-induced EGFR activation in HAEC, we treated HAEC with 500 {mu}M ZnSO{sub 4} for 5-20 min and measured the state of activation of EGFR, c-Src and PTPs. Western blots revealed that exposure to Zn{sup 2+} results in increased phosphorylation at both trans- and autophosphorylation sites in the EGFR. Zn{sup 2+}-mediated EGFR phosphorylation did not require ligand binding and was ablated by the EGFR kinase inhibitor PD153035, but not by the Src kinase inhibitor PP2. Src activity was inhibited by Zn{sup 2+} treatment of HAEC, consistent with Src-independent EGFR transactivation in HAEC exposed to Zn{sup 2+}. The rate of exogenous EGFR dephosphorylation in lysates of HAEC exposed to Zn{sup 2+} or V{sup 4+} was significantly diminished. Moreover, exposure of HAEC to Zn{sup 2+} also resulted in a significant impairment of dephosphorylation of endogenous EGFR. These data show that Zn{sup 2+}-induced activation of EGFR in HAEC involves a loss of PTP activities whose function is to dephosphorylate EGFR in opposition to baseline EGFR kinase activity. These findings also suggest that there are marked cell-type-specific differences in the mechanism of EGFR activation induced by Zn{sup 2+} exposure.

  14. Investigating the role of ankyrin-rich membrane spanning protein in Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type-1 Tat-induced microglia activation

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Vir B.; Wooten, Alicia K.; Jackson, Joseph W.; Maggirwar, Sanjay B.; Kiebala, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    Long-term persistence of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type-1 (HIV) in the central nervous system (CNS) results in mild to severe neurocognitive impairment in a significant proportion of the HIV infected population. These neurological deficits are known as HIV-Associated Neurocognitive Disorders (HAND). Microglia are CNS resident immune cells that are directly infected by HIV, and consequently secrete proinflammatory molecules that contribute to HIV-induced neuroinflammation. Indeed, the number of activated macrophage and microglia in the brain is more highly correlated with cognitive impairment than the amount of neuronal apoptosis. Ankyrin–rich membrane spanning protein (ARMS/Kidins220) is a multidomain transmembrane protein that is involved with neurotrophin signaling in the CNS. We have previously established the role of ARMS in mediating neuronal survival via a neurotrophin-dependent mechanism. Recent reports also have suggested that ARMS is involved with cell signaling in multiple immune cell types. In this study we aim to investigate the role of ARMS in HIV Tat-mediated microglial cell activation by employing in vitro methods. Following ARMS depletion by a lentivirus encoding ARMS-specific shRNA, we observed a marked reduction in the HIV Tat-induced proinflammatory response, associated with loss of tumor necrosis factor alpha production and nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) activation. Furthermore, co-immunoprecipitation studies suggested that ARMS physically interacts with inhibitory kappa B kinase subunits in order to facilitate NF-κB activation. Our results establish the role of ARMS in microglial activation by HIV Tat and warrant additional studies to better understand these molecular mechanisms, which may uncover novel therapeutic targets for the treatment of HAND. PMID:25636783

  15. The Silk-protein Sericin Induces Rapid Melanization of Cultured Primary Human Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells by Activating the NF-κB Pathway.

    PubMed

    Eidet, J R; Reppe, S; Pasovic, L; Olstad, O K; Lyberg, T; Khan, A Z; Fostad, I G; Chen, D F; Utheim, T P

    2016-03-04

    Restoration of the retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells to prevent further loss of vision in patients with age-related macular degeneration represents a promising novel treatment modality. Development of RPE transplants, however, requires up to 3 months of cell differentiation. We explored whether the silk protein sericin can induce maturation of primary human retinal pigment epithelial (hRPE) cells. Microarray analysis demonstrated that sericin up-regulated RPE-associated transcripts (RPE65 and CRALBP). Upstream analysis identified the NF-κB pathway as one of the top sericin-induced regulators. ELISA confirmed that sericin stimulates the main NF-κB pathway. Increased levels of RPE-associated proteins (RPE65 and the pigment melanin) in the sericin-supplemented cultures were confirmed by western blot, spectrophotometry and transmission electron microscopy. Sericin also increased cell density and reduced cell death following serum starvation in culture. Inclusion of NF-κB agonists and antagonists in the culture medium showed that activation of the NF-κB pathway appears to be necessary, but not sufficient, for sericin-induced RPE pigmentation. We conclude that sericin promotes pigmentation of cultured primary hRPE cells by activating the main NF-κB pathway. Sericin's potential role in culture protocols for rapid differentiation of hRPE cells derived from embryonic or induced pluripotent stem cells should be investigated.

  16. The Silk-protein Sericin Induces Rapid Melanization of Cultured Primary Human Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells by Activating the NF-κB Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Eidet, J. R.; Reppe, S.; Pasovic, L.; Olstad, O. K.; Lyberg, T.; Khan, A. Z.; Fostad, I. G.; Chen, D. F.; Utheim, T. P.

    2016-01-01

    Restoration of the retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells to prevent further loss of vision in patients with age-related macular degeneration represents a promising novel treatment modality. Development of RPE transplants, however, requires up to 3 months of cell differentiation. We explored whether the silk protein sericin can induce maturation of primary human retinal pigment epithelial (hRPE) cells. Microarray analysis demonstrated that sericin up-regulated RPE-associated transcripts (RPE65 and CRALBP). Upstream analysis identified the NF-κB pathway as one of the top sericin-induced regulators. ELISA confirmed that sericin stimulates the main NF-κB pathway. Increased levels of RPE-associated proteins (RPE65 and the pigment melanin) in the sericin-supplemented cultures were confirmed by western blot, spectrophotometry and transmission electron microscopy. Sericin also increased cell density and reduced cell death following serum starvation in culture. Inclusion of NF-κB agonists and antagonists in the culture medium showed that activation of the NF-κB pathway appears to be necessary, but not sufficient, for sericin-induced RPE pigmentation. We conclude that sericin promotes pigmentation of cultured primary hRPE cells by activating the main NF-κB pathway. Sericin’s potential role in culture protocols for rapid differentiation of hRPE cells derived from embryonic or induced pluripotent stem cells should be investigated. PMID:26940175

  17. TsAg5, a Taenia solium cysticercus protein with a marginal trypsin-like activity in the diagnosis of human neurocysticercosis.

    PubMed

    Rueda, Analiz; Sifuentes, Cecilia; Gilman, Robert H; Gutiérrez, Andrés H; Piña, Ruby; Chile, Nancy; Carrasco, Sebastián; Larson, Sandra; Mayta, Holger; Verástegui, Manuela; Rodriguez, Silvia; Gutiérrez-Correa, Marcel; García, Héctor H; Sheen, Patricia; Zimic, Mirko

    2011-12-01

    Neurocysticercosis is an endemic parasitic disease caused by Taenia solium larva. Although the mechanism of infection is not completely understood, it is likely driven by proteolytic activity that degrades the intestinal wall to facilitate oncosphere penetration and further infection. We analyzed the publicly available T. solium EST/DNA library and identified two contigs comprising a full-length cDNA fragment very similar to Echinococcus granulosus Ag5 protein. The T. solium cDNA sequence included a proteolytic trypsin-like-domain in the C-terminal region, and a thrombospondin type-1 adherence-domain in the N-terminal region. Both the trypsin-like and adherence domains were expressed independently as recombinant proteins in bacterial systems. TsAg5 showed marginal trypsin-like activity and high sequence similarity to Ag5. The purified antigens were tested in a Western immunoblot assay to diagnose human neurocysticercosis. The sensitivity of the trypsin-like-domain was 96.36% in patients infected with extraparenchymal cysts, 75.44% in patients infected with multiple cysts, and 39.62% in patients with a single cyst. Specificity was 76.70%. The thrombospondin type-1 adherence-domain was not specific for neurocysticercosis.

  18. Ascorbate does not act as a pro-oxidant towards lipids and proteins in human plasma exposed to redox-active transition metal ions and hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Suh, Jung; Zhu, Ben-Zhan; Frei, Balz

    2003-05-15

    The combination of ascorbate, transition metal ions, and hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) is an efficient hydroxyl radical generating system called "the Udenfriend system." Although the pro-oxidant role of ascorbate in this system has been well characterized in vitro, it is uncertain whether ascorbate also acts as a pro-oxidant under physiological conditions. To address this question, human plasma, used as a representative biological fluid, was either depleted of endogenous ascorbate with ascorbate oxidase, left untreated, or supplemented with 25 microM-1 mM ascorbate. Subsequently, the plasma samples were incubated at 37 degrees C with 50 microM-1 mM iron (from ferrous ammonium sulfate), 60 or 100 microM copper (from cupric sulfate), and/or 200 microM or 1 mM H(2)O(2). Although endogenous and added ascorbate was depleted rapidly in the presence of transition metal ions and H(2)O(2), no cholesterol ester hydroperoxides or malondialdehyde were formed, i.e., ascorbate protected against, rather than promoted, lipid peroxidation. Conversely, depletion of endogenous ascorbate was sufficient to cause lipid peroxidation, the rate and extent of which were enhanced by the addition of metal ions but not H(2)O(2). Ascorbate also did not enhance protein oxidation in plasma exposed to metal ions and H(2)O(2), as assessed by protein carbonyl formation and depletion of reduced thiols. Interestingly, neither the rate nor the extent of endogenous alpha-tocopherol oxidation in plasma was affected by any of the treatments. Our data show that even in the presence of redox-active iron or copper and H(2)O(2), ascorbate acts as an antioxidant that prevents lipid peroxidation and does not promote protein oxidation in human plasma in vitro.

  19. Bioactive proteins in human milk: mechanisms of action.

    PubMed

    Lönnerdal, Bo

    2010-02-01

    Human milk contains a multitude of bioactive proteins, with very diverse functions. Some of these proteins are involved in the synthesis and expression of milk, but the majority appears to have evolved to provide physiological activities in the breast-fed infant. These activities are exerted by a wide variety of mechanisms and have largely been unraveled by in vitro studies. To be active in the gastrointestinal tract, these proteins must be able to resist proteolytic degradation, at least for some time. We have evaluated the human milk proteins lactoferrin, haptocorrin, alpha(1)-antitrypsin, and transforming growth factor -beta in an in vitro digestion model, mimicking the conditions of the infant gastrointestinal milieu. These bioactive proteins are resistant against proteolysis and can remain intact or as larger fragments through passage of the gastrointestinal tract. In vitro digestibility assays can be helpful to assess which human milk proteins can resist proteolysis and to what extent.

  20. Methyl-CpG-Binding Protein MeCP2 Represses Sp1-Activated Transcription of the Human Leukosialin Gene When the Promoter Is Methylated

    PubMed Central

    Kudo, Shinichi

    1998-01-01

    Human leukosialin (CD43) is expressed in a cell lineage-specific as well as a differentiation stage-specific fashion. The leukosialin promoter, made up of an Sp1 binding site and a sequence similar to that of an initiator, possesses high transcriptional potential. Previous data have demonstrated that the leukosialin gene is down-regulated in nonproducing cells by DNA methylation. In this paper the repressive mechanism of DNA methylation in expression systems is reported. In vitro DNA methylation with SssI (CpG) methylase of leukosialin-chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) constructs drastically reduced transcriptional activities in stable transfection systems with the human HeLa and Jurkat cell lines. On the other hand, the transcriptional repression by in vitro methylation was less pronounced in Drosophila melanogaster cells, which lack genomic methylation. In these cells, Sp1 could transactivate equally well both the unmethylated and methylated leukosialin promoter. In order to test whether one of the methyl-CpG-binding proteins, MeCP2, is responsible for transcriptional repression of the leukosialin gene, I isolated the human MeCP2 cDNA (encoding 486 amino acid residues) and expressed it in Drosophila cells. I found that MeCP2 substantially inhibited Sp1-activated transcription when the leukosialin promoter was methylated. The level of repression was directly proportional to the amount of MeCP2 expression vector transfected. Analysis of C-terminal deletion mutants of MeCP2 showed that repressive activity of Sp1 transactivation is localized to the N-terminal region consisting of amino acid residues 1 to 193, which encompass the methyl-binding domain. These results suggest that interference with Sp1 transactivation by MeCP2 is an important factor in the down-regulation of leukosialin gene expression by DNA methylation. PMID:9710633

  1. The inverse agonist effect of rimonabant on G protein activation is not mediated by the cannabinoid CB1 receptor: evidence from postmortem human brain.

    PubMed

    Erdozain, A M; Diez-Alarcia, R; Meana, J J; Callado, L F

    2012-01-15

    Rimonabant (SR141716) was the first potent and selective cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonist synthesized. Several data support that rimonabant behaves as an inverse agonist. Moreover, there is evidence suggesting that this inverse agonism may be CB1 receptor-independent. The aim of the present study was to elucidate whether the effect of rimonabant over G protein activation in postmortem human brain is CB1 dependent or independent. [(35)S]GTPγS binding assays and antibody-capture [(35)S]GTPγS scintillation proximity assays (SPA) were performed in human and mice brain. [(3)H]SR141716 binding characteristics were also studied. Rimonabant concentration-dependently decreased basal [(35)S]GTPγS binding to human cortical membranes. This effect did not change in the presence of either the CB1 receptor agonist WIN 55,212-2, the CB1 receptor neutral antagonist O-2050, or the CB1 allosteric modulator Org 27569. [(35)S]GTPγS binding assays performed in CB1 knockout mice brains revealed that rimonabant inhibited the [(35)S]GTPγS binding in the same manner as it did in wild-type mice. The SPA combined with the use of specific antibody-capture of G(α) specific subunits showed that rimonabant produces its inverse agonist effect through G(i3), G(o) and G(z) subtypes. This effect was not inhibited by the CB1 receptor antagonist O-2050. Finally, [(3)H]SR141716 binding assays in human cortical membranes demonstrated that rimonabant recognizes an additional binding site other than the CB1 receptor orthosteric binding site recognized by O-2050. This study provides new data demonstrating that at least the inverse agonist effect observed with >1μM concentrations of rimonabant in [(35)S]GTPγS binding assays is not mediated by the CB1 receptor in human brain.

  2. The protein interaction landscape of the human CMGC kinase group.

    PubMed

    Varjosalo, Markku; Keskitalo, Salla; Van Drogen, Audrey; Nurkkala, Helka; Vichalkovski, Anton; Aebersold, Ruedi; Gstaiger, Matthias

    2013-04-25

    Cellular information processing via reversible protein phosphorylation requires tight control of the localization, activity, and substrate specificity of protein kinases, which to a large extent is accomplished by complex formation with other proteins. Despite their critical role in cellular regulation and pathogenesis, protein interaction information is available for only a subset of the 518 human protein kinases. Here we present a global proteomic analysis of complexes of the human CMGC kinase group. In addition to subgroup-specific functional enrichment and modularity, the identified 652 high-confidence kinase-protein interactions provide a specific biochemical context for many poorly studied CMGC kinases. Furthermore, the analysis revealed a kinase-kinase subnetwork and candidate substrates for CMGC kinases. Finally, the presented interaction proteome uncovered a large set of interactions with proteins genetically linked to a range of human diseases, including cancer, suggesting additional routes for analyzing the role of CMGC kinases in controlling human disease pathways.

  3. Cellular uptake, stability, visualization by 'Naturstoff reagent A', and multidrug resistance protein 1 gene-regulatory activity of cyanidin in human keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Ernst, I M A; Wagner, A E; Lipinski, S; Skrbek, S; Ruefer, C E; Desel, C; Rimbach, G

    2010-03-01

    There is increasing interest in the role of anthocyanidins as potential skin protective phytochemicals. However, little is known if and to what extent anthocyanidins are taken up by the human skin. In the present study cellular uptake (as determined by HPLC), stability, and gene-regulatory activity of cyanidin were determined in human HaCaT keratinocytes in culture. Using the fluorescent dye Naturstoff reagent A cyanidin was visualized in order to determine its cellular accumulation via flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy. Cyanidin was rapidly taken up by HaCaT cells at relatively low concentrations. Following incubation, cellular cyanidin levels decreased time-dependently most likely due to degradation into protocatechuic acid and phloroglucinol aldehyde. Confocal laser scanning microscopy data demonstrated that cyanidin was mainly present in the cytoplasm. Cellular uptake of cyanidin was accompanied by an inhibition of multidrug resistance protein 1 (involved in cellular efflux of flavonoids) mRNA-levels indicating its gene-regulatory activity. Naturstoff reagent A seems to be a promising fluorescent dye to visualize cyanidin in keratinocytes.

  4. GPNMB/OA protein increases the invasiveness of human metastatic prostate cancer cell lines DU145 and PC3 through MMP-2 and MMP-9 activity

    SciTech Connect

    Fiorentini, Chiara; Bodei, Serena; Bedussi, Francesca; Fragni, Martina; Bonini, Sara Anna; Simeone, Claudio; Zani, Danilo; Berruti, Alfredo; Missale, Cristina; Memo, Maurizio; Spano, PierFranco; Sigala, Sandra

    2014-04-15

    Non-metastatic glycoprotein melanoma protein B (GPNMB), also known as osteoactivin (OA) is expressed in a wide array of tumors and represents an emerging target for drug development. In this study, we investigated the role of GPNMB/OA in the progression of human metastatic DU145 and PC3 prostate cancer cells. GPNMB/OA contribution in PCa malignant phenotype has been analyzed by small interfering RNA-induced GPNMB/OA silencing. We found that following GPNMB/OA silencing the migration capability of both DU145 and PC3 cells, evaluated by using in vitro invasivity assay, as well as the metalloproteinases MMP-2 and MMP-9 activity were equally strongly inhibited. By contrast knocking down GPNMB/OA weakly attenuated cell proliferation rate of DU145, an effect that paralleled with an increase number of apoptotic cells. However, PC3 cell growth seems to be not affected by GPNMB/OA. Together, these data reveal that GPNMB/OA acts as a critical molecular mediator promoting the acquisition of the more aggressive, pro-metastatic phenotype distinctive of human DU145 and PC3 cell lines. - Highlights: • GPNMB/OA expression correlates with DU145 and PC3 cells malignant phenotype. • GPNMB/OA silencing affects the migration capability of both DU145 and PC3 cells. • GPNMB/OA increases invasiveness by up-regulating MMPs activity. • GPNMB/OA promotes DU145 and PC3 cells progression into a more aggressive phenotype.

  5. A homology-based model of the human 5-HT2A receptor derived from an in silico activated G-protein coupled receptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chambers, James J.; Nichols, David E.

    2002-07-01

    A homology-based model of the 5-HT2A receptor was produced utilizing an activated form of the bovine rhodopsin (Rh) crystal structure [1,2]. In silico activation of the Rh structure was accomplished by isomerization of the 11- cis-retinal (1) chromophore, followed by constrained molecular dynamics to relax the resultant high energy structure. The activated form of Rh was then used as a structural template for development of a human 5-HT2A receptor model. Both the 5-HT2A receptor and Rh are members of the G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) super-family. The resulting homology model of the receptor was then used for docking studies of compounds representing a cross-section of structural classes that activate the 5-HT2A receptor, including ergolines, tryptamines, and amphetamines. The ligand/receptor complexes that ensued were refined and the final binding orientations were observed to be compatible with much of the data acquired through both diversified ligand design and site directed mutagenesis.

  6. MYST protein acetyltransferase activity requires active site lysine autoacetylation.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Hua; Rossetto, Dorine; Mellert, Hestia; Dang, Weiwei; Srinivasan, Madhusudan; Johnson, Jamel; Hodawadekar, Santosh; Ding, Emily C; Speicher, Kaye; Abshiru, Nebiyu; Perry, Rocco; Wu, Jiang; Yang, Chao; Zheng, Y George; Speicher, David W; Thibault, Pierre; Verreault, Alain; Johnson, F Bradley; Berger, Shelley L; Sternglanz, Rolf; McMahon, Steven B; Côté, Jacques; Marmorstein, Ronen

    2012-01-04

    The MYST protein lysine acetyltransferases are evolutionarily conserved throughout eukaryotes and acetylate proteins to regulate diverse biological processes including gene regulation, DNA repair, cell-cycle regulation, stem cell homeostasis and development. Here, we demonstrate that MYST protein acetyltransferase activity requires active site lysine autoacetylation. The X-ray crystal structures of yeast Esa1 (yEsa1/KAT5) bound to a bisubstrate H4K16CoA inhibitor and human MOF (hMOF/KAT8/MYST1) reveal that they are autoacetylated at a strictly conserved lysine residue in MYST proteins (yEsa1-K262 and hMOF-K274) in the enzyme active site. The structure of hMOF also shows partial occupancy of K274 in the unacetylated form, revealing that the side chain reorients to a position that engages the catalytic glutamate residue and would block cognate protein substrate binding. Consistent with the structural findings, we present mass spectrometry data and biochemical experiments to demonstrate that this lysine autoacetylation on yEsa1, hMOF and its yeast orthologue, ySas2 (KAT8) occurs in solution and is required for acetylation and protein substrate binding in vitro. We also show that this autoacetylation occurs in vivo and is required for the cellular functions of these MYST proteins. These findings provide an avenue for the autoposttranslational regulation of MYST proteins that is distinct from other acetyltransferases but draws similarities to the phosphoregulation of protein kinases.

  7. MYST protein acetyltransferase activity requires active site lysine autoacetylation

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Hua; Rossetto, Dorine; Mellert, Hestia; Dang, Weiwei; Srinivasan, Madhusudan; Johnson, Jamel; Hodawadekar, Santosh; Ding, Emily C; Speicher, Kaye; Abshiru, Nebiyu; Perry, Rocco; Wu, Jiang; Yang, Chao; Zheng, Y George; Speicher, David W; Thibault, Pierre; Verreault, Alain; Johnson, F Bradley; Berger, Shelley L; Sternglanz, Rolf; McMahon, Steven B; Côté, Jacques; Marmorstein, Ronen

    2012-01-01

    The MYST protein lysine acetyltransferases are evolutionarily conserved throughout eukaryotes and acetylate proteins to regulate diverse biological processes including gene regulation, DNA repair, cell-cycle regulation, stem cell homeostasis and development. Here, we demonstrate that MYST protein acetyltransferase activity requires active site lysine autoacetylation. The X-ray crystal structures of yeast Esa1 (yEsa1/KAT5) bound to a bisubstrate H4K16CoA inhibitor and human MOF (hMOF/KAT8/MYST1) reveal that they are autoacetylated at a strictly conserved lysine residue in MYST proteins (yEsa1-K262 and hMOF-K274) in the enzyme active site. The structure of hMOF also shows partial occupancy of K274 in the unacetylated form, revealing that the side chain reorients to a position that engages the catalytic glutamate residue and would block cognate protein substrate binding. Consistent with the structural findings, we present mass spectrometry data and biochemical experiments to demonstrate that this lysine autoacetylation on yEsa1, hMOF and its yeast orthologue, ySas2 (KAT8) occurs in solution and is required for acetylation and protein substrate binding in vitro. We also show that this autoacetylation occurs in vivo and is required for the cellular functions of these MYST proteins. These findings provide an avenue for the autoposttranslational regulation of MYST proteins that is distinct from other acetyltransferases but draws similarities to the phosphoregulation of protein kinases. PMID:22020126

  8. Mitochondrial Respiratory Defect Causes Dysfunctional Lactate Turnover via AMP-activated Protein Kinase Activation in Human-induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-derived Hepatocytes*

    PubMed Central

    Im, Ilkyun; Jang, Mi-jin; Park, Seung Ju; Lee, Sang-Hee; Choi, Jin-Ho; Yoo, Han-Wook; Kim, Seyun; Han, Yong-Mahn

    2015-01-01

    A defective mitochondrial respiratory chain complex (DMRC) causes various metabolic disorders in humans. However, the pathophysiology of DMRC in the liver remains unclear. To understand DMRC pathophysiology in vitro, DMRC-induced pluripotent stem cells were generated from dermal fibroblasts of a DMRC patient who had a homoplasmic mutation (m.3398T→C) in the mitochondrion-encoded NADH dehydrogenase 1 (MTND1) gene and that differentiated into hepatocytes (DMRC hepatocytes) in vitro. DMRC hepatocytes showed abnormalities in mitochondrial characteristics, the NAD+/NADH ratio, the glycogen storage level, the lactate turnover rate, and AMPK activity. Intriguingly, low glycogen storage and transcription of lactate turnover-related genes in DMRC hepatocytes were recovered by inhibition of AMPK activity. Thus, AMPK activation led to metabolic changes in terms of glycogen storage and lactate turnover in DMRC hepatocytes. These data demonstrate for the first time that energy depletion may lead to lactic acidosis in the DMRC patient by reduction of lactate uptake via AMPK in liver. PMID:26491018

  9. Human holocarboxylase synthetase with a start site at methionine-58 is the predominant nuclear variant of this protein and has catalytic activity

    SciTech Connect

    Bao, Baolong; Wijeratne, Subhashinee S.K.; Rodriguez-Melendez, Rocio; Zempleni, Janos

    2011-08-19

    Highlights: {yields} Unambiguous evidence is provided that methionine-58 serves as an in-frame alternative translation site for holocarboxylase synthetase (HLCS58). {yields} Full-length HLCS and HLCS58 enter the nucleus, but HLCS58 is the predominant variant. {yields} HLCS58 has biological activity as biotin protein ligase. -- Abstract: Holocarboxylase synthetase (HLCS) catalyzes the covalent binding of biotin to both carboxylases in extranuclear structures and histones in cell nuclei, thereby mediating important roles in intermediary metabolism, gene regulation, and genome stability. HLCS has three putative translational start sites (methionine-1, -7, and -58), but lacks a strong nuclear localization sequence that would explain its participation in epigenetic events in the cell nucleus. Recent evidence suggests that small quantities of HLCS with a start site in methionine-58 (HLCS58) might be able to enter the nuclear compartment. We generated the following novel insights into HLCS biology. First, we generated a novel HLCS fusion protein vector to demonstrate that methionine-58 is a functional translation start site in human cells. Second, we used confocal microscopy and western blots to demonstrate that HLCS58 enters the cell nucleus in meaningful quantities, and that full-length HLCS localizes predominantly in the cytoplasm but may also enter the nucleus. Third, we produced recombinant HLCS58 to demonstrate its biological activity toward catalyzing the biotinylation of both carboxylases and histones. Collectively, these observations are consistent with roles of HLCS58 and full-length HLCS in nuclear events. We conclude this report by proposing a novel role for HLCS in epigenetic events, mediated by physical interactions between HLCS and other chromatin proteins as part of a larger multiprotein complex that mediates gene repression.

  10. Expression of human papilloma virus type 16 E5 protein in amelanotic melanoma cells regulates endo-cellular pH and restores tyrosinase activity

    PubMed Central

    Di Domenico, Fabio; Foppoli, Cesira; Blarzino, Carla; Perluigi, Marzia; Paolini, Francesca; Morici, Salvatrice; Coccia, Raffaella; Cini, Chiara; De Marco, Federico

    2009-01-01

    Background Melanin synthesis, the elective trait of melanocytes, is regulated by tyrosinase activity. In tyrosinase-positive amelanotic melanomas this rate limiting enzyme is inactive because of acidic endo-melanosomal pH. The E5 oncogene of the Human Papillomavirus Type 16 is a small transmembrane protein with a weak transforming activity and a role during the early steps of viral infections. E5 has been shown to interact with 16 kDa subunit C of the trans-membrane Vacuolar ATPase proton pump ultimately resulting in its functional suppressions. However, the cellular effects of such an interaction are still under debate. With this work we intended to explore whether the HPV16 E5 oncoprotein does indeed interact with the vacuolar ATPase proton pump once expressed in intact human cells and whether this interaction has functional consequences on cell metabolism and phenotype. Methods The expression of the HPV16-E5 oncoproteins was induced in two Tyrosinase-positive amelanotic melanomas (the cell lines FRM and M14) by a retroviral expression construct. Modulation of the intracellular pH was measured with Acridine orange and fluorescence microscopy. Expression of tyrosinase and its activity was followed by RT-PCR, Western Blot and enzyme assay. The anchorage-independence growth and the metabolic activity of E5 expressing cells were also monitored. Results We provide evidence that in the E5 expressing cells interaction between E5 and V-ATPase determines an increase of endo-cellular pH. The cellular alkalinisation in turn leads to the post-translational activation of tyrosinase, melanin synthesis and phenotype modulation. These effects are associated with an increased activation of tyrosine analogue anti-blastic drugs. Conclusion Once expressed within intact human cells the HPV16-E5 oncoprotein does actually interact with the vacuolar V-ATPase proton pump and this interaction induces a number of functional effects. In amelanotic melanomas these effects can modulate the

  11. Arsenite induces apoptosis in human mesenchymal stem cells by altering Bcl-2 family proteins and by activating intrinsic pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Yadav, Santosh; Shi Yongli; Wang Feng; Wang He

    2010-05-01

    Purpose: Environmental exposure to arsenic is an important public health issue. The effects of arsenic on different tissues and organs have been intensively studied. However, the effects of arsenic on bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have not been reported. This study is designed to investigate the cell death process caused by arsenite and its related underlying mechanisms on MSCs. The rationale is that absorbed arsenic in the blood circulation can reach to the bone marrow and may affect the cell survival of MSCs. Methods: MSCs of passage 1 were purchased from Tulane University, grown till 70% confluency level and plated according to the experimental requirements followed by treatment with arsenite at various concentrations and time points. Arsenite (iAs{sup III}) induced cytotoxic effects were confirmed by cell viability and cell cycle analysis. For the presence of canonic apoptosis markers; DNA damage, exposure of intramembrane phosphotidylserine, protein and m-RNA expression levels were analyzed. Results: iAs{sup III} induced growth inhibition, G2-M arrest and apoptotic cell death in MSCs, the apoptosis induced by iAs{sup III} in the cultured MSCs was, via altering Bcl-2 family proteins and by involving intrinsic pathway. Conclusion: iAs{sup III} can induce apoptosis in bone marrow-derived MSCs via Bcl-2 family proteins, regulating intrinsic apoptotic pathway. Due to the multipotency of MSC, acting as progenitor cells for a variety of connective tissues including bone, adipose, cartilage and muscle, these effects of arsenic may be important in assessing the health risk of the arsenic compounds and understanding the mechanisms of arsenic-induced harmful effects.

  12. Proteolytic Inhibition of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium-Induced Activation of the Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases ERK and JNK in Cultured Human Intestinal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mynott, Tracey L.; Crossett, Ben; Prathalingam, S. Radhika

    2002-01-01

    Bromelain, a mixture of cysteine proteases from pineapple stems, blocks signaling by the mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases extracellular regulated kinase 1 (ERK-1) and ERK-2, inhibits inflammation, and protects against enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli infection. In this study, we examined the effect of bromelain on Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium infection, since an important feature of its pathogenesis is its ability to induce activation of ERK-1 and ERK-2, which leads to internalization of bacteria and induction of inflammatory responses. Our results show that bromelain dose dependently blocks serovar Typhimurium-induced ERK-1, ERK-2, and c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) activation in Caco-2 cells. Bromelain also blocked signaling induced by carbachol and anisomycin, pharmacological MAP kinase agonists. Despite bromelain inhibition of serovar Typhimurium-induced MAP kinase signaling, it did not prevent subsequent invasion of the Caco-2 cells by serovar Typhimurium or alter serovar Typhimurium -induced decreases in resistance across Caco-2 monolayers. Surprisingly, bromelain also did not block serovar Typhimurium-induced interleukin-8 (IL-8) secretion but synergized with serovar Typhimurium to enhance IL-8 production. We also found that serovar Typhimurium does not induce ERK phosphorylation in Caco-2 cells in the absence of serum but that serovar Typhimurium-induced invasion and decreases in monolayer resistance are unaffected. Collectively, these data indicate that serovar Typhimurium-induced invasion of Caco-2 cells, changes in the resistance of epithelial cell monolayers, and IL-8 production can occur independently of the ERK and JNK signaling pathways. Data also confirm that bromelain is a novel inhibitor of MAP kinase signaling pathways and suggest a novel role for proteases as inhibitors of signal transduction pathways in intestinal epithelial cells. PMID:11748167

  13. Proteolytic inhibition of Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium-induced activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinases ERK and JNK in cultured human intestinal cells.

    PubMed

    Mynott, Tracey L; Crossett, Ben; Prathalingam, S Radhika

    2002-01-01

    Bromelain, a mixture of cysteine proteases from pineapple stems, blocks signaling by the mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases extracellular regulated kinase 1 (ERK-1) and ERK-2, inhibits inflammation, and protects against enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli infection. In this study, we examined the effect of bromelain on Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium infection, since an important feature of its pathogenesis is its ability to induce activation of ERK-1 and ERK-2, which leads to internalization of bacteria and induction of inflammatory responses. Our results show that bromelain dose dependently blocks serovar Typhimurium-induced ERK-1, ERK-2, and c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase (JNK) activation in Caco-2 cells. Bromelain also blocked signaling induced by carbachol and anisomycin, pharmacological MAP kinase agonists. Despite bromelain inhibition of serovar Typhimurium-induced MAP kinase signaling, it did not prevent subsequent invasion of the Caco-2 cells by serovar Typhimurium or alter serovar Typhimurium -induced decreases in resistance across Caco-2 monolayers. Surprisingly, bromelain also did not block serovar Typhimurium-induced interleukin-8 (IL-8) secretion but synergized with serovar Typhimurium to enhance IL-8 production. We also found that serovar Typhimurium does not induce ERK phosphorylation in Caco-2 cells in the absence of serum but that serovar Typhimurium-induced invasion and decreases in monolayer resistance are unaffected. Collectively, these data indicate that serovar Typhimurium-induced invasion of Caco-2 cells, changes in the resistance of epithelial cell monolayers, and IL-8 production can occur independently of the ERK and JNK signaling pathways. Data also confirm that bromelain is a novel inhibitor of MAP kinase signaling pathways and suggest a novel role for proteases as inhibitors of signal transduction pathways in intestinal epithelial cells.

  14. Ceramide Mediates Ox-LDL-Induced Human Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Calcification via p38 Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Song, Yan; Wu, Weikang; Yu, Huimin; Wang, Sheng; Chen, Yanling; Ye, Meihong; Lu, Lihe

    2013-01-01

    Vascular calcification is associated with significant cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, and has been demonstrated as an actively regulated process resembling bone formation. Oxidized low density lipoprotein (Ox-LDL) has been identified as a regulatory factor involved in calcification of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Additionally, over-expression of recombinant human neutral sphingomyelinase (N-SMase) has been shown to stimulate VSMC apoptosis, which plays an important role in the progression of vascular calcification. The aim of this study is to investigate whether ceramide regulates Ox-LDL-induced calcification of VSMCs via activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway. Ox-LDL increased the activity of N-SMase and the level of ceramide in cultured VSMCs. Calcification and the osteogenic transcription factor, Msx2 mRNA expression were reduced by N-SMase inhibitor, GW4869 in the presence of Ox-LDL. Usage of GW4869 inhibited Ox-LDL-induced apoptosis in VSMCs, an effect which was reversed by C2-ceramide. Additionally, C2-ceramide treatment accelerated VSMC calcification, with a concomitant increase in ALP activity. Furthermore, C2-ceramide treatment enhanced Ox-LDL-induced VSMC calcification. Addition of caspase inhibitor, ZVAD-fmk attenuated Ox-LDL-induced calcification. Both Ox-LDL and C2-ceramide treatment increased the phosphorylation of p38 MAPK. Inhibition of p38 MAPK by SB203580 attenuated Ox-LDL-induced calcification of VSMCs. These data suggest that Ox-LDL activates N-SMase-ceramide signaling pathway, and stimulates phosphorylation of p38 MAPK, leading to apoptosis in VSMCs, which initiates VSMC calcification. PMID:24358176

  15. The Human Mixed Lineage Leukemia 5 (MLL5), a Sequentially and Structurally Divergent SET Domain-Containing Protein with No Intrinsic Catalytic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Teyssier, Catherine; Déméné, Hélène; Carvalho, João E.; Bird, Louise E.; Lebedev, Andrey; Fattori, Juliana; Schubert, Michael; Dumas, Christian; Bourguet, William; le Maire, Albane

    2016-01-01

    Mixed Lineage Leukemia 5 (MLL5) plays a key role in hematopoiesis, spermatogenesis and cell cycle progression. Chromatin binding is ensured by its plant homeodomain (PHD) through a direct interaction with the N-terminus of histone H3 (H3). In addition, MLL5 contains a Su(var)3-9, Enhancer of zeste, Trithorax (SET) domain, a protein module that usually displays histone lysine methyltransferase activity. We report here the crystal structure of the unliganded SET domain of human MLL5 at 2.1 Å resolution. Although it shows most of the canonical features of other SET domains, both the lack of key residues and the presence in the SET-I subdomain of an unusually large loop preclude the interaction of MLL5 SET with its cofactor and substrate. Accordingly, we show that MLL5 is devoid of any in vitro methyltransferase activity on full-length histones and histone H3 peptides. Hence, the three dimensional structure of MLL5 SET domain unveils the structural basis for its lack of methyltransferase activity and suggests a new regulatory mechanism. PMID:27812132

  16. Immunoregulatory activities of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) proteins: Effect of HIV recombinant and synthetic peptides on immunoglobulin synthesis and proliferative responses by normal lymphocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Nair, M.P.N.; Pottathil, R.; Heimer, E.P.; Schwartz, S.A.

    1988-09-01

    Recombinant and synthetic peptides corresponding to envelope proteins of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) were examined for their effects on the activities of lymphocytes from normal donors in vitro. Although lymphocytes cultured with env-gag peptides produced significant amounts of IgG, addition of env-gag peptides to a pokeweed mitogen-induced B-cell activation system resulted in suppression of immunoglobulin synthesis by normal lymphocytes. Recombinant antigens, env-gag and env-80 dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR), produced a substantial proliferative response by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) as determined by (/sup 3/H)thymidine incorporation. PBMC precultured with HIV synthetic peptide env 578-608 also manifested significant proliferative responses as compared to control cultures. CD3/sup +/ lymphocytes precultured with recombinant HIV antigens, env-gag and env-80 DHFR, and synthetic HIV peptide, env 487-511, showed moderate but significant proliferative responses. Both recombinant antigens and synthetic peptides also produced a dose-dependent stimulatory effect on proliferation by CD3/sup /minus// lymphocytes. These studies demonstrate that recombinant and synthetic peptides of the HIV genome express immunoregulatory T- and B-cell epitopes. Identification of unique HIV epitopes with immunogenic and immunoregulatory activities is necessary for the development of an effective vaccine against HIV infection.

  17. Suppression of 5'-nucleotidase enzymes promotes AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) phosphorylation and metabolism in human and mouse skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Sameer S; Karlsson, Håkan K R; Szekeres, Ferenc; Chibalin, Alexander V; Krook, Anna; Zierath, Juleen R

    2011-10-07

    The 5'-nucleotidase (NT5) family of enzyme dephosphorylates non-cyclic nucleoside monophosphates to produce nucleosides and inorganic phosphates. We hypothesized that gene silencing of NT5 enzymes to increase the intracellular availability of AMP would increase AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activity and metabolism. We determined the role of cytosolic NT5 in metabolic responses linked to the development of insulin resistance in obesity and type 2 diabetes. Using siRNA to silence NT5C2 expression in cultured human myotubes, we observed a 2-fold increase in the AMP/ATP ratio, a 2.4-fold increase in AMPK phosphorylation (Thr(172)), and a 2.8-fold increase in acetyl-CoA carboxylase phosphorylation (Ser(79)) (p < 0.05). siRNA silencing of NT5C2 expression increased palmitate oxidation by 2-fold in the absence and by 8-fold in the presence of 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide 1-β-d-ribofuranoside. This was paralleled by an increase in glucose transport and a decrease in glucose oxidation, incorporation into glycogen, and lactate release from NT5C2-depleted myotubes. Gene silencing of NT5C1A by shRNA injection and electroporation in mouse tibialis anterior muscle reduced protein content (60%; p < 0.05) and increased phosphorylation of AMPK (60%; p < 0.05) and acetyl-CoA carboxylase (50%; p < 0.05) and glucose uptake (20%; p < 0.05). Endogenous expression of NT5C enzymes inhibited basal lipid oxidation and glucose transport in skeletal muscle. Reduction of 5'-nucleotidase expression or activity may promote metabolic flexibility in type 2 diabetes.

  18. Ethanol Impairs Intestinal Barrier Function in Humans through Mitogen Activated Protein Kinase Signaling: A Combined In Vivo and In Vitro Approach

    PubMed Central

    Elamin, Elhaseen; Masclee, Ad; Troost, Freddy; Pieters, Harm-Jan; Keszthelyi, Daniel; Aleksa, Katarina; Dekker, Jan; Jonkers, Daisy

    2014-01-01

    Background Ethanol-induced gut barrier disruption is associated with several gastrointestinal and liver disorders. Aim Since human data on effects of moderate ethanol consumption on intestinal barrier integrity and involved mechanisms are limited, the objectives of this study were to investigate effects of a single moderate ethanol dose on small and large intestinal permeability and to explore the role of mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway as a primary signaling mechanism. Methods Intestinal permeability was assessed in 12 healthy volunteers after intraduodenal administration of either placebo or 20 g ethanol in a randomised cross-over trial. Localization of the tight junction (TJ) and gene expression, phosphorylation of the MAPK isoforms p38, ERK and JNK as indicative of activation were analyzed in duodenal biopsies. The role of MAPK was further examined in vitro using Caco-2 monolayers. Results Ethanol increased small and large intestinal permeability, paralleled by redistribution of ZO-1 and occludin, down-regulation of ZO-1 and up-regulation of myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) mRNA expression, and increased MAPK isoforms phosphorylation. In Caco-2 monolayers, ethanol increased permeability, induced redistribution of the junctional proteins and F-actin, and MAPK and MLCK activation, as indicated by phosphorylation of MAPK isoforms and myosin light chain (MLC), respectively, which could be reversed by pretreatment with either MAPK inhibitors or the anti-oxidant L-cysteine. Conclusions Administration of moderate ethanol dosage can increase both small and colon permeability. Furthermore, the data indicate a pivotal role for MAPK and its crosstalk with MLCK in ethanol-induced intestinal barrier disruption. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00928733 PMID:25226407

  19. Galectin-3 Protein Modulates Cell Surface Expression and Activation of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor 2 in Human Endothelial Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Markowska, Anna I.; Jefferies, Kevin C.; Panjwani, Noorjahan

    2011-01-01

    Angiogenesis is heavily influenced by VEGF-A and its family of receptors, particularly VEGF receptor 2 (VEGF-R2). Like most cell surface proteins, VEGF-R2 is glycosylated, although the function of VEGF-R2 with respect to its glycosylation pattern is poorly characterized. Galectin-3, a glycan binding protein, interacts with the EGF and TGFβ receptors, retaining them on the plasma membrane and altering their signal transduction. Because VEGF-R2 is glycosylated and both galectin-3 and VEGF-R2 are involved with angiogenesis, we hypothesized that galectin-3 binds VEGF-R2 and modulates its signal transduction as well. Employing a Western blot analysis approach, we found that galectin-3 induces phosphorylation of VEGF-R2 in endothelial cells. Knockdown of galectin-3 and Mgat5, an enzyme that synthesizes high-affinity glycan ligands of galectin-3, reduced VEGF-A mediated angiogenesis in vitro. A direct interaction on the plasma membrane was detected between galectin-3 and VEGF-R2, and this interaction was dependent on the expression of Mgat5. Using immunofluorescence and cell surface labeling, we found an increase in the level of internalized VEGF-R2 in both Mgat5 and galectin-3 knockdown cells, suggesting that galectin-3 retains the receptor on the plasma membrane. Finally, we observed reduced suture-induced neovascularization in the corneas of Gal3−/− and Mgat5−/− mice. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that, like its role with the EGF and TGFβ receptors, galectin-3 contributes to the plasma membrane retention and proangiogenic function of VEGF-R2. PMID:21715322

  20. Studies of the Interaction between Isoimperatorin and Human Serum Albumin by Multispectroscopic Method: Identification of Possible Binding Site of the Compound Using Esterase Activity of the Protein

    PubMed Central

    Ranjbar, Samira; Shokoohinia, Yalda; Ghobadi, Sirous; Gholamzadeh, Saeed; Moradi, Nastaran; Ashrafi-Kooshk, Mohammad Reza; Aghaei, Abbas

    2013-01-01

    Isoimperatorin is one of the main components of Prangos ferulacea as a linear furanocoumarin and used as anti-inflammatory, analgesic, antispasmodic, and anticancer drug. Human serum albumin (HSA) is a principal extracellular protein with a high concentration in blood plasma and carrier for many drugs to different molecular targets. Since the carrying of drug by HSA may affect on its structure and action, we decided to investigate the interaction between HSA and isoimperatorin using fluorescence and UV spectroscopy. Fluorescence data indicated that isoimperatorin quenches the intrinsic fluorescence of the HSA via a static mechanism and hydrophobic interaction play the major role in the drug binding. The binding average distance between isoimperatorin and Trp 214 of HSA was estimated on the basis of the theory of Förster energy transfer. Decrease of protein surface hydrophobicity (PSH) was also documented upon isoimperatorin binding. Furthermore, the synchronous fluorescence spectra show that the microenvironment of the tryptophan residues does not have obvious changes. Site marker compettive and fluorescence experiments revealed that the binding of isoimperatorin to HSA occurred at or near site I. Finally, the binding details between isoimperatorin and HSA were further confirmed by molecular docking and esterase activity inhibition studies which revealed that drug was bound at subdomain IIA. PMID:24319355

  1. New invMED1 element cis-activates human multidrug-related MDR1 and MVP genes, involving the LRP130 protein

    PubMed Central

    Labialle, Stéphane; Dayan, Guila; Gayet, Landry; Rigal, Dominique; Gambrelle, Joël; Baggetto, Loris G.

    2004-01-01

    The MDR1 gene is a key component of the cytotoxic defense network and its overexpression results in the multidrug resistance (MDR) phenotype. However, the molecular mechanisms that regulate the MDR1 gene and coordinate multiple MDR-related genes expression are poorly understood. In a previous study, we identified a new 12 bp cis-activating region in the 5′-flanking region of the human MDR1 gene, which we called inverted MED1. In the present study, we characterized the precise binding element, which we named invMED1, and revealed the presence of the LRP130 protein as the nuclear factor. Its binding intensity increases with the endogenous MDR1 geneexpression and with the MDR level of CEM leukemia cells. Interestingly, the LRP130 level did not vary with the chemoresistance level. We observed the involvement of LRP130 in the transcriptional activity of the MDR1 gene promoter, and moreover, in that of the MDR-related, invMED1-containing, MVP gene promoter. We used siRNAs and transcriptional decoys in two unrelated human cancer cell lines to show the role of the invMED1/LRP130 couple in both MDR1 and MVP endogenous genes activities. We showed that invMED1 was localized in the −105/−100 and −148/−143 regions of the MDR1 and MVP gene promoters, respectively. In addition, since the invMED1 sequence is primarily located in the −160/−100 bp region of mammalian MDR-related genes, our results present the invMED1/LRP130 couple as a potential central regulator of the transcription of these genes. PMID:15272088

  2. The in vitro ejection of zinc from human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1 nucleocapsid protein by disulfide benzamides with cellular anti-HIV activity.

    PubMed Central

    Tummino, P J; Scholten, J D; Harvey, P J; Holler, T P; Maloney, L; Gogliotti, R; Domagala, J; Hupe, D

    1996-01-01

    Several disulfide benzamides have been shown to possess wide-spectrum antiretroviral activity in cell culture at low micromolar to submicromolar concentrations, inhibiting human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1 (HIV-1) clinical and drug-resistant strains along with HIV-2 and simian immunodeficiency virus [Rice, W. G., Supko, J. G., Malspeis, L., Buckheit, R. W., Jr., Clanton, D., Bu, M., Graham, L., Schaeffer, C. A., Turpin, J. A., Domagala, J., Gogliotti, R., Bader, J. P., Halliday, S. M., Coren, L., Sowder, R. C., II, Arthur, L. O. & Henderson, L. E. (1995) Science 270, 1194-1197]. Rice and coworkers have proposed that the compounds act by "attacking" the two zinc fingers of HIV nucleocapsid protein. Shown here is evidence that low micromolar concentrations of the anti-HIV disulfide benzamides eject zinc from HIV nucleocapsid protein (NCp7) in vitro, as monitored by the zinc-specific fluorescent probe N-(6-methoxy-8-quinoyl)-p-toluenesulfonamide (TSQ). Structurally similar disulfide benzamides that do not inhibit HIV-1 in culture do not eject zinc, nor do analogs of the antiviral compounds with the disulfide replaced with a methylene sulfide. The kinetics of NCp7 zinc ejection by disulfide benzamides were found to be nonsaturable and biexponential, with the rate of ejection from the C-terminal zinc finger 7-fold faster than that from the N-terminal. The antiviral compounds were found to inhibit the zinc-dependent binding of NCp7 to HIV psi RNA, as studied by gel-shift assays, and the data correlated well with the zinc ejection data. Anti-HIV disulfide benzamides specifically eject NCp7 zinc and abolish the protein's ability to bind psi RNA in vitro, providing evidence for a possible antiretroviral mechanism of action of these compounds. Congeners of this class are under advanced preclinical evaluation as a potential chemotherapy for acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. Images Fig. 7 PMID:8577770

  3. High Estradiol Concentrations Induce Heat Shock Protein 70 Expression and Suppress Nuclear Factor Kappa B Activation in Human Endometrial Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chin-Der; Chen, Shee-Uan; Chou, Chia-Hung; Chen, Mei-Jou; Wen, Wen-Fen; Wu, Szu-Yuan; Yang, Yu-Shih; Yang, Jehn-Hsiahn

    2016-09-07

    The high serum estradiol (E2) concentrations induced during in vitro fertilization are detrimental to endometrial receptivity and may result in lower embryo implantation rates. We have previously found that high E2 concentrations inhibit the activation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kappa B), which led to endometrial epithelial cells (EECs) apoptosis. The objective of this study is to investigate the signaling pathways through which high E2 results in NF-kappa B downregulation in EECs. Isolated human EECs were cultured in different concentrations of E2 (10(-10), 10(-9), 10(-8), 10(-7) M). The expression of heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) and heat shock factor 1 (HSF-1) were upregulated under supraphysiological E2 (10(-7) M) concentration, whereas phosphorylated inhibitory kappa B-alpha (pI kappa B-alpha) and NF-kappa B p65 subunits were downregulated. Immunohistochemistry of C57BL/6 mouse EECs, that were exposed in vivo to high serum E2 from the administration of 20 IUs of equine chorionic gonadotropin, also demonstrated the same increase in HSF-1 and Hsp70 expression, and decrease in NF-kappa B. Immunoprecipitation of the induced Hsp70 proteins was achieved with the addition of inhibitory kappa B kinase gamma (IKK-gamma) antibodies, and elimination of this reaction occurred after addition of hsp70 siRNA. In conclusion, high E2 concentrations enhance HSF-1 and Hsp70 expression in EECs. The induced Hsp70 forms a complex with IKK-gamma and inhibits pI kappa B-alpha, which consequently suppresses NF-kappa B activation.

  4. Hemoglobin receptor protein from Porphyromonas gingivalis induces interleukin-8 production in human gingival epithelial cells through stimulation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase and NF-κB signal transduction pathways.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Yuki; Nakayama, Masaaki; Naito, Mariko; Yamachika, Eiki; Inoue, Tetsuyoshi; Nakayama, Koji; Iida, Seiji; Ohara, Naoya

    2014-01-01

    Periodontitis is an inflammatory disease of polymicrobial origin affecting the tissues supporting the tooth. The oral anaerobic bacterium Porphyromonas gingivalis, which is implicated as an important pathogen for chronic periodontitis, triggers a series of host inflammatory responses that promote the destruction of periodontal tissues. Among the virulence factors of P. gingivalis, hemoglobin receptor protein (HbR) is a major protein found in culture supernatants. In this study, we investigated the roles of HbR in the production of inflammatory mediators. We found that HbR induced interleukin-8 (IL-8) production in the human gingival epithelial cell line Ca9-22. p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and extracellular signal-related kinase 1/2 (Erk1/2) were activated in HbR-stimulated Ca9-22 cells. Inhibitors of p38 MAPK (SB203580) and Erk1/2 (PD98059) blocked HbR-induced IL-8 production. Additionally, HbR stimulated the translocation of NF-κB-p65 to the nucleus, consistent with enhancement of IL-8 expression by activation of the NF-κB pathway. In addition, small interfering RNA (siRNA) targeting activating transcription factor 2 (ATF-2) or cyclic AMP-response element-binding protein (CREB) inhibited HbR-induced IL-8 production. Moreover, pretreatment with SB203580 and PD98059 reduced HbR-induced phosphorylation of CREB and ATF-2, respectively. Combined pretreatment with an inhibitor of NF-κB (BAY11-7082) and SB203580 was more efficient in inhibiting the ability of HbR to induce IL-8 production than pretreatment with either BAY11-7082 or SB203580 alone. Thus, in Ca9-22 cells, the direct activation of p38 MAPK and Erk1/2 by HbR caused the activation of the transcription factors ATF-2, CREB, and NF-κB, thus resulting in the induction of IL-8 production.

  5. Electrostatic stabilization and general base catalysis in the active site of the human protein disulfide isomerase a domain monitored by hydrogen exchange.

    PubMed

    Hernández, Griselda; Anderson, Janet S; LeMaster, David M

    2008-03-25

    The nucleophilic Cys36 thiol of the human protein disulfide isomerase a domain is positioned over the N terminus of the alpha(2) helix. Amides in the active site exhibit diffusion-limited, hydroxide-catalyzed exchange, indicating that the local positive electrostatic potential decreases the pK value for peptide anion formation by at least 2 units so as to equal or exceed the acidity of water. In stark contrast to the pH dependence of exchange for simple peptides, the His38 amide in the reduced enzyme exhibits a maximum rate of exchange at pH 5 due to efficient general base catalysis by the neutral imidazole of its own side chain and suppression of its exchange by the ionization of the Cys36 thiol. Ionization of this thiol and deprotonation of the His38 side chain suppress the Cys39 amide hydroxide-catalyzed exchange by a million-fold. The electrostatic potential within the active site monitored by these exchange experiments provides a means of stabilizing the two distinct transition states that lead to substrate reduction and oxidation. Molecular modeling offers a role for the conserved Arg103 in coordinating the oxidative transition-state complex, thus providing further support for mechanisms of disulfide isomerization that utilize enzymatic catalysis at each step of the overall reaction.

  6. The Werner syndrome protein limits the error-prone 8-oxo-dG lesion bypass activity of human DNA polymerase kappa

    PubMed Central

    Maddukuri, Leena; Ketkar, Amit; Eddy, Sarah; Zafar, Maroof K.; Eoff, Robert L.

    2014-01-01

    Human DNA polymerase kappa (hpol κ) is the only Y-family member to preferentially insert dAMP opposite 7,8-dihydro-8-oxo-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-oxo-dG) during translesion DNA synthesis. We have studied the mechanism of action by which hpol κ activity is modulated by the Werner syndrome protein (WRN), a RecQ helicase known to influence repair of 8-oxo-dG. Here we show that WRN stimulates the 8-oxo-dG bypass activity of hpol κ in vitro by enhancing the correct base insertion opposite the lesion, as well as extension from dC:8-oxo-dG base pairs. Steady-state kinetic analysis reveals that WRN improves hpol κ-catalyzed dCMP insertion opposite 8-oxo-dG ∼10-fold and extension from dC:8-oxo-dG by 2.4-fold. Stimulation is primarily due to an increase in the rate constant for polymerization (kpol), as assessed by pre-steady-state kinetics, and it requires the RecQ C-terminal (RQC) domain. In support of the functional data, recombinant WRN and hpol κ were found to physically interact through the exo and RQC domains of WRN, and co-localization of WRN and hpol κ was observed in human cells treated with hydrogen peroxide. Thus, WRN limits the error-prone bypass of 8-oxo-dG by hpol κ, which could influence the sensitivity to oxidative damage that has previously been observed for Werner's syndrome cells. PMID:25294835

  7. ATP Induces Disruption of Tight Junction Proteins via IL-1 Beta-Dependent MMP-9 Activation of Human Blood-Brain Barrier In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fuxing; Zhao, Kai; Zhang, Xiufeng; Zhang, Jun; Xu, Bainan

    2016-01-01

    Disruption of blood-brain barrier (BBB) follows brain trauma or central nervous system (CNS) stress. However, the mechanisms leading to this process or the underlying neural plasticity are not clearly known. We hypothesized that ATP/P2X7R signaling regulates the integrity of BBB. Activation of P2X7 receptor (P2X7R) by ATP induces the release of interleukin-1β (IL-1β), which in turn enhances the activity of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9). Degradation of tight junction proteins (TJPs) such as ZO-1 and occludin occurs, which finally contributes to disruption of BBB. A contact coculture system using human astrocytes and hCMEC/D3, an immortalized human brain endothelial cell line, was used to mimic BBB in vitro. Permeability was used to evaluate changes in the integrity of TJPs. ELISA, Western blot, and immunofluorescent staining procedures were used. Our data demonstrated that exposure to the photoreactive ATP analog, 3'-O-(4-benzoyl)benzoyl adenosine 5'-triphosphate (BzATP), induced a significant decrease in ZO-1 and occludin expression. Meanwhile, the decrease of ZO-1 and occludin was significantly attenuated by P2X7R inhibitors, as well as IL-1R and MMP antagonists. Further, the induction of IL-1β and MMP-9 was closely linked to ATP/P2X7R-associated BBB leakage. In conclusion, our study explored the mechanism of ATP/P2X7R signaling in the disruption of BBB following brain trauma/stress injury, especially focusing on the relationship with IL-1β and MMP-9.

  8. The Werner syndrome protein limits the error-prone 8-oxo-dG lesion bypass activity of human DNA polymerase kappa.

    PubMed

    Maddukuri, Leena; Ketkar, Amit; Eddy, Sarah; Zafar, Maroof K; Eoff, Robert L

    2014-10-29

    Human DNA polymerase kappa (hpol κ) is the only Y-family member to preferentially insert dAMP opposite 7,8-dihydro-8-oxo-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxo-dG) during translesion DNA synthesis. We have studied the mechanism of action by which hpol κ activity is modulated by the Werner syndrome protein (WRN), a RecQ helicase known to influence repair of 8-oxo-dG. Here we show that WRN stimulates the 8-oxo-dG bypass activity of hpol κ in vitro by enhancing the correct base insertion opposite the lesion, as well as extension from dC:8-oxo-dG base pairs. Steady-state kinetic analysis reveals that WRN improves hpol κ-catalyzed dCMP insertion opposite 8-oxo-dG ∼10-fold and extension from dC:8-oxo-dG by 2.4-fold. Stimulation is primarily due to an increase in the rate constant for polymerization (kpol), as assessed by pre-steady-state kinetics, and it requires the RecQ C-terminal (RQC) domain. In support of the functional data, recombinant WRN and hpol κ were found to physically interact through the exo and RQC domains of WRN, and co-localization of WRN and hpol κ was observed in human cells treated with hydrogen peroxide. Thus, WRN limits the error-prone bypass of 8-oxo-dG by hpol κ, which could influence the sensitivity to oxidative damage that has previously been observed for Werner's syndrome cells.

  9. ATP Induces Disruption of Tight Junction Proteins via IL-1 Beta-Dependent MMP-9 Activation of Human Blood-Brain Barrier In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Kai

    2016-01-01

    Disruption of blood-brain barrier (BBB) follows brain trauma or central nervous system (CNS) stress. However, the mechanisms leading to this process or the underlying neural plasticity are not clearly known. We hypothesized that ATP/P2X7R signaling regulates the integrity of BBB. Activation of P2X7 receptor (P2X7R) by ATP induces the release of interleukin-1β (IL-1β), which in turn enhances the activity of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9). Degradation of tight junction proteins (TJPs) such as ZO-1 and occludin occurs, which finally contributes to disruption of BBB. A contact coculture system using human astrocytes and hCMEC/D3, an immortalized human brain endothelial cell line, was used to mimic BBB in vitro. Permeability was used to evaluate changes in the integrity of TJPs. ELISA, Western blot, and immunofluorescent staining procedures were used. Our data demonstrated that exposure to the photoreactive ATP analog, 3′-O-(4-benzoyl)benzoyl adenosine 5′-triphosphate (BzATP), induced a significant decrease in ZO-1 and occludin expression. Meanwhile, the decrease of ZO-1 and occludin was significantly attenuated by P2X7R inhibitors, as well as IL-1R and MMP antagonists. Further, the induction of IL-1β and MMP-9 was closely linked to ATP/P2X7R-associated BBB leakage. In conclusion, our study explored the mechanism of ATP/P2X7R signaling in the disruption of BBB following brain trauma/stress injury, especially focusing on the relationship with IL-1β and MMP-9. PMID:27795859

  10. RAS–Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Signal Is Required for Enhanced PD-L1 Expression in Human Lung Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Sumimoto, Hidetoshi; Takano, Atsushi; Teramoto, Koji; Daigo, Yataro

    2016-01-01

    Ectopic programmed cell death ligand 1 (PD-L1) expression in non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLCs) is related to immune evasion by cancer, and it is a molecular target of immune checkpoint therapies. Although some altered signals in NSCLCs are responsible for ectopic PD-L1 expression, the precise mechanisms remain obscure. Because we found a higher frequency of EGFR/KRAS mutations in NSCLC cell lines with high PD-L1 expression (p < 0.001), we evaluated the relationships between downstream signals and PD-L1 expression, particularly in three KRAS-mutant adenocarcinoma cell lines. The MEK inhibitor U0126 (20 μM) significantly decreased the surface PD-L1 levels by 50–60% compared with dimethyl sulfoxide (p < 0.0001). Phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate stimulation (100 nM, 15 min) increased (p < 0.05) and two ERK2 siRNAs as well as KRAS siRNAs decreased (p < 0.05) PD-L1 expression. The transcriptional activity of the potential AP-1 site (+4785 to +5056 from the transcription start site) in the PD-L1 gene was demonstrated by luciferase assays, which was inhibited by U0126. The chromatin immunoprecipitation assay demonstrated the binding of cJUN to the AP-1 site. Two STAT3 siRNAs decreased PD-L1 expression by 10–32% in two of the three KRAS-mutant lung adenocarcinoma cell lines (p < 0.05), while the PI3K inhibitor LY294002 (40 μM) did not change the expression level. Supervised cluster analysis and gene set enrichment analysis between the PD-L1-high and -low NSCLCs revealed a correlation between PD-L1 expression and genes/pathways related to cell motility/adhesion. These results indicate that MAPK signaling is the dominant downstream signal responsible for ectopic PD-L1 expression, in which STAT3 is also involved to some extent. Furthermore, MAPK signaling may control the expression of PD-L1 and several genes related to enhanced cell motility. Our findings suggest that MAPK, along with STAT3, is important for determining PD-L1 expression, which could be useful for

  11. Intron-exon organization of the active human protein S gene PS. alpha. and its pseudogene PS. beta. : Duplication and silencing during primate evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Ploos van Amstel, H.; Reitsma, P.H.; van der Logt, C.P.; Bertina, R.M. )

    1990-08-28

    The human protein S locus on chromosome 3 consists of two protein S genes, PS{alpha} and PS{beta}. Here the authors report the cloning and characterization of both genes. Fifteen exons of the PS{alpha} gene were identified that together code for protein S mRNA as derived from the reported protein S cDNAs. Analysis by primer extension of liver protein S mRNA, however, reveals the presence of two mRNA forms that differ in the length of their 5{prime}-noncoding region. Both transcripts contain a 5{prime}-noncoding region longer than found in the protein S cDNAs. The two products may arise from alternative splicing of an additional intron in this region or from the usage of two start sites for transcription. The intron-exon organization of the PS{alpha} gene fully supports the hypothesis that the protein S gene is the product of an evolutional assembling process in which gene modules coding for structural/functional protein units also found in other coagulation proteins have been put upstream of the ancestral gene of a steroid hormone binding protein. The PS{beta} gene is identified as a pseudogene. It contains a large variety of detrimental aberrations, viz., the absence of exon I, a splice site mutation, three stop codons, and a frame shift mutation. Overall the two genes PS{alpha} and PS{beta} show between their exonic sequences 96.5% homology. Southern analysis of primate DNA showed that the duplication of the ancestral protein S gene has occurred after the branching of the orangutan from the African apes. A nonsense mutation that is present in the pseudogene of man also could be identified in one of the two protein S genes of both chimpanzee and gorilla. This implicates that silencing of one of the two protein S genes must have taken place before the divergence of the three African apes.

  12. Activation of G-Protein-Coupled Estrogen Receptor Inhibits the Migration of Human Nonsmall Cell Lung Cancer Cells via IKK-β/NF-κB Signals.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Guangfa; Huang, Yan; Wu, Chunting; Wei, Dong; Shi, Yingxin

    2016-08-01

    Estrogen signals have been suggested to modulate the progression and metastasis of nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC), which is one of the leading causes of cancer deaths worldwide. While there are limited data concerning the roles and effects of G-protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPER) on the progression of NSCLC, our present study reveals that the expression of GPER in NSCLC cells is obviously greater than that in lung fibroblast cell line MRC-5. Activation of GPER via its specific agonist G-1 decreases the in vitro motility of A549 and H358 cells and the expression of matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2) and MMP-9. Further, G-1 treatment can rapidly decrease the phosphorylation, nuclear translocation, and promoter activities of NF-κB in NSCLC cells. BAY 11-7082, the inhibitor of NF-κB, also inhibits the expression of MMP-2/9, while overexpression of p65 significantly attenuates G-1-induced downregulation of MMP-2/9. It suggests that inhibition of NF-κB mediates G-1-induced MMP-2/9 downregulation. G-1 treatment significantly down regulates the phosphorylation of IκB kinase β (IKK-β) and IκBα, while not IKK-α, in both 549 and H358 cells. ACHP, the specific inhibitor of IKK-β, can reinforce G-1-induced MMP-2/9 downregulation and invasion suppression of A549 cells. Collectively, our results suggest that activation of GPER can inhibit the migration of human NSCLC cells via suppression of IKK-β/NF-κB signals. These findings will help to better understand the roles and mechanisms of GPER as a potential therapy target for NSCLC patients.

  13. Effects of fucoidan on proliferation, AMP-activated protein kinase, and downstream metabolism- and cell cycle-associated molecules in poorly differentiated human hepatoma HLF cells.

    PubMed

    Kawaguchi, Takumi; Hayakawa, Masako; Koga, Hironori; Torimura, Takuji

    2015-05-01

    Survival rates are low in patients with poorly differentiated hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Fucoidan, a sulfated polysaccharide derived from brown seaweed, has anticancer activity; however, the effects of fucoidan on poorly differentiated HCC remain unclear. In this study, we investigated the effects of fucoidan on AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a proliferation regulator, and its downstream metabolism- and cell cycle-related molecules in a poorly differentiated human hepatoma HLF cell line. HLF cells were treated with fucoidan (10, 50, or 100 µg/ml; n=4) or phosphate buffered saline (control; n=4) for 96 h. Proliferation was evaluated by counting cells every 24 h. AMPK, TSC2, mTOR, GSK3β, acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC), ATP-citrate lyase, p53, cyclin D1, cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) 4, and CDK6 expression and/or phosphorylation were examined by immunoblotting 24 h after treatment with 100 µg/ml fucoidan. Cell cycle progression was analyzed by fluorescence-activated cell sorter 48 h after treatment. Treatment with 50 or 100 µg/ml fucoidan significantly and dose- and time-dependently suppressed HLF cell proliferation (P<0.0001). Fucoidan induced AMPK phosphorylation on Ser172 24 h after treatment. Although no differences were seen in expression and phosphorylation levels of TSC2, mTOR, GSK3β, ATP-citrate lyase, and p53 between the control and fucoidan-treated HLF cells, fucoidan induced ACC phosphorylation on Ser79. Moreover, fucoidan decreased cyclin D1, CDK4 and CDK6 expression 24 h after treatment. Furthermore, HLF cells were arrested in the G1/S phase 48 h after fucoidan treatment. We demonstrated that fucoidan suppressed HLF cell proliferation with AMPK phosphorylation. We showed that fucoidan phosphorylated ACC and downregulated cyclin D1, CDK4 and CDK6 expression. Our findings suggest that fucoidan inhibits proliferation through AMPK-associated suppression of fatty acid synthesis and G1/S transition in HLF cells.

  14. Cytoskeletal protein Flightless (Flii) is elevated in chronic and acute human wounds and wound fluid: neutralizing its activity in chronic but not acute wound fluid improves cellular proliferation.

    PubMed

    Ruzehaji, Nadira; Grose, Randall; Krumbiegel, Doreen; Zola, Heddy; Dasari, Pallave; Wallace, Hilary; Stacey, Michael; Fitridge, Robert; Cowin, Allison J

    2012-01-01

    Chronic non-healing wounds form a medical need which will expand as the population ages and the obesity epidemic grows. Whilst the complex mechanisms underlying wound repair are not fully understood, remodelling of the actin cytoskeleton plays a critical role. Elevated expression of the actin cytoskeletal protein Flightless I (Flii) is known to impair wound outcomes. To determine if Flii is involved in the impaired healing observed in chronic wounds, its expression in non-healing human wounds from patients with venous leg ulcers was determined and compared to its expression in acute wounds and unwounded skin. Increased expression of Flii was observed in both chronic and acute wounds with wound fluid and plasma also containing secreted Flii protein. Inflammation is a key aspect of wound repair and fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) analysis revealed Flii was located in neutrophils within the blood and that it co-localised with CD16+ neutrophils in chronic wounds. The function of secreted Flii was investigated as both chronic wound fluid and Flii have previously been shown to inhibit fibroblast proliferation. To determine if the inhibitory effect of wound fluid was due in part to the presence of Flii, wound fluids were depleted of Flii using Flii-specific neutralizing antibodies (FnAb). Flii depleted chronic wound fluid no longer inhibited fibroblast proliferation, suggesting that Flii may contribute to the inhibitory effect of chronic wound fluid on fibroblast function. Application of FnAbs to chronic wounds may therefore be a novel approach used to improve the local environment of non-healing wounds and potentially improve healing outcomes.

  15. p38 Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Mediates Lipopolysaccharide and Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha Induction of Shiga Toxin 2 Sensitivity in Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Stone, Matthew K.; Kolling, Glynis L.; Lindner, Matthew H.; Obrig, Tom G.

    2008-01-01

    Escherichia coli O157:H7 Shiga toxin 2 (Stx2), one of the causative agents of hemolytic-uremic syndrome, is toxic to endothelial cells, including primary cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). This sensitivity of cells to Stx2 can be increased with either lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α). The goal of the present study was to identify the intracellular signaling pathway(s) by which LPS and TNF-α sensitize HUVEC to the cytotoxic effects of Stx2. To identify these pathways, specific pharmacological inhibitors and small interfering RNAs were tested with cell viability endpoints. A time course and dose response experiment for HUVEC exposure to LPS and TNF-α showed that a relatively short exposure to either agonist was sufficient to sensitize the cells to Stx2 and that both agonists stimulated intracellular signaling pathways within a short time. Cell viability assays indicated that the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) inhibitors SB202190 and SB203580 and the general protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide inhibited both the LPS and TNF-α sensitization of HUVEC to Stx2, while all other inhibitors tested did not inhibit this sensitization. Additionally, SB202190 reduced the cellular globotriaosylceramide content under LPS- and TNF-α-induced conditions. In conclusion, our results show that LPS and TNF-α induction of Stx2 sensitivity in HUVEC is mediated through a pathway that includes p38 MAPK. These results indicate that inhibition of p38 MAPK in endothelial cells may protect a host from the deleterious effects of Stx2. PMID:18086809

  16. The IgD-binding domain of the Moraxella IgD-binding protein MID (MID962-1200) activates human B cells in the presence of T cell cytokines.

    PubMed

    Nordström, Therése; Jendholm, Johan; Samuelsson, Martin; Forsgren, Arne; Riesbeck, Kristian

    2006-02-01

    Moraxella catarrhalis immunoglobulin D (IgD)-binding protein (MID) is an outer membrane protein with specific affinity for soluble and cell-bound human IgD. Here, we demonstrate that mutated M. catarrhalis strains devoid of MID show a 75% decreased activation of human B cells as compared with wild-type bacteria. In contrast to MID-expressing Moraxella, the MID-deficient Moraxella mutants did not bind to human CD19+ IgD+ B cells. The smallest MID fragment with preserved IgD-binding capacity comprises 238 amino acids (MID(962-1200)). To prove the specificity of MID(962-1200) for IgD, a Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell line expressing membrane-anchored human IgD was manufactured. MID(962-1200) bound strongly to the recombinant IgD on CHO cells. Moreover, MID(962-1200) stimulated peripheral blood lymphocyte (PBL) proliferation 5- and 15-fold at 0.1 and 1.0 microg/ml, respectively. This activation could be blocked completely by antibodies directed against the CD40 ligand (CD154). MID(962-1200) also activated purified B cells in the presence of interleukin (IL)-2 or IL-4. An increased IL-6 production was seen after stimulation with MID(962-1200), as revealed by a human cytokine protein array. MID(962-1200) fused to green fluorescent protein (GFP) bound to human B cells and activated PBL to the same degree as MID(962-1200). Taken together, MID is the only IgD-binding protein in Moraxella. Furthermore, the novel T cell-independent antigen MID(962-1200) may, together with MID(962-1200)-GFP, be considered as promising reagents in the study of IgD-dependent B cell activation.

  17. Inverse association between gluthathione peroxidase activity and both selenium-binding protein 1 levels and gleason score in human prostate tissue

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    BACKGROUND. Data from human epidemiological studies, cultured mammalian cells, and animal models have supported a potentially beneficial role of selenium (Se) in prostate cancer prevention. In addition, Se-containing proteins including members of the gutathione peroxidase (GPx) family and Selenium-B...

  18. Activation of S6 kinase in human neutrophils by calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate crystals: protein kinase C-dependent and phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase-independent pathways.

    PubMed Central

    Tudan, C; Jackson, J K; Charlton, L; Pelech, S L; Sahl, B; Burt, H M

    1998-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI 3-kinase) has been shown previously to be a central enzyme in crystal-induced neutrophil activation. Since activation of the 70 kDa S6 kinase (p70S6K) has been shown to be dependent on PI 3-kinase activation in mammalian cells, and since the former is a key enzyme in the transmission of signals to the cell nucleus, activation of p70(S6K) was investigated in crystal-stimulated neutrophils. Cytosolic fractions from calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate (CPPD)-crystal-activated neutrophils were separated by Mono Q chromatography and analysed for phosphotransferase activity using a range of substrates and probed by Western analysis using antibodies to p70(S6K) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAP kinase). CPPD crystals induced a robust, transient activation (peak activity at 2 min) of p70(S6K) that was fully inhibited by pretreatment with rapamycin. This is the first report of the activation of p70(S6K) in neutrophil signal transduction pathways induced by an agonist. This crystal-induced activation of p70(S6K) could also be inhibited by a protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor (Compound 3), but not by the PI 3-kinase inhibitor wortmannin. CPPD crystals also activated the ERK1 and ERK2 forms of MAP kinase (wortmannin insensitive), PKC (Compound 3 sensitive) and protein kinase B (wortmannin sensitive) in neutrophils. These data suggest that activation of p70(S6K) may proceed through a PI 3-kinase- and protein kinase B-independent but PKC-dependent pathway in crystal-activated neutrophils. PMID:9531494

  19. Nuclear Matrix Proteins in Human Colon Cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keesee, Susan K.; Meneghini, Marc D.; Szaro, Robert P.; Wu, Ying-Jye

    1994-03-01

    The nuclear matrix is the nonchromatin scaffolding of the nucleus. This structure confers nuclear shape, organizes chromatin, and appears to contain important regulatory proteins. Tissue specific nuclear matrix proteins have been found in the rat, mouse, and human. In this study we compared high-resolution two-dimensional gel electropherograms of nuclear matrix protein patterns found in human colon tumors with those from normal colon epithelia. Tumors were obtained from 18 patients undergoing partial colectomy for adenocarcinoma of the colon and compared with tissue from 10 normal colons. We have identified at least six proteins which were present in 18 of 18 colon tumors and 0 of 10 normal tissues, as well as four proteins present in 0 of 18 tumors and in 10 of 10 normal tissues. These data, which corroborate similar findings of cancer-specific nuclear matrix proteins in prostate and breast, suggest that nuclear matrix proteins may serve as important markers for at least some types of cancer.

  20. Disease-associated glycosylated molecular variants of human C-reactive protein activate complement-mediated hemolysis of erythrocytes in tuberculosis and Indian visceral leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Ansar, Waliza; Mukhopadhyay, Sumi; Habib, S K Hasan; Basu, Shyamasree; Saha, Bibhuti; Sen, Asish Kumar; Mandal, C N; Mandal, Chitra

    2009-12-01

    Human C-reactive protein (CRP), as a mediator of innate immunity, removed damaged cells by activating the classical complement pathway. Previous studies have successfully demonstrated that CRPs are differentially induced as glycosylated molecular variants in certain pathological conditions. Affinity-purified CRPs from two most prevalent diseases in India viz. tuberculosis (TB) and visceral leishmaniasis (VL) have differential glycosylation in their sugar composition and linkages. As anemia is a common manifestation in TB and VL, we assessed the contributory role of glycosylated CRPs to influence hemolysis via CRP-complement-pathway as compared to healthy control subjects. Accordingly, the specific binding of glycosylated CRPs with erythrocytes was established by flow-cytometry and ELISA. Significantly, deglycosylated CRPs showed a 7-8-fold reduced binding with erythrocytes confirming the role of glycosylated moieties. Scatchard analysis revealed striking differences in the apparent binding constants (10(4)-10(5) M(-1)) and number of binding sites (10(6)-10(7)sites/erythrocyte) for CRP on patients' erythrocytes as compared to normal. Western blotting along with immunoprecipitation analysis revealed the presence of distinct molecular determinants on TB and VL erythrocytes specific to disease-associated CRP. Increased fragility, hydrophobicity and decreased rigidity of diseased-erythrocytes upon binding with glycosylated CRP suggested membrane damage. Finally, the erythrocyte-CRP binding was shown to activate the CRP-complement-cascade causing hemolysis, even at physiological concentration of CRP (10 microg/ml). Thus, it may be postulated that CRP have a protective role towards the clearance of damaged-erythrocytes in these two diseases.

  1. A novel initiation mechanism of death in Streptococcus pneumoniae induced by the human milk protein-lipid complex HAMLET and activated during physiological death.

    PubMed

    Clementi, Emily A; Marks, Laura R; Duffey, Michael E; Hakansson, Anders P

    2012-08-03

    To cause colonization or infection, most bacteria grow in biofilms where differentiation and death of subpopulations is critical for optimal survival of the whole population. However, little is known about initiation of bacterial death under physiological conditions. Membrane depolarization has been suggested, but never shown to be involved, due to the difficulty of performing such studies in bacteria and the paucity of information that exists regarding ion transport mechanisms in prokaryotes. In this study, we performed the first extensive investigation of ion transport and membrane depolarization in a bacterial system. We found that HAMLET, a human milk protein-lipid complex, kills Streptococcus pneumoniae (the pneumococcus) in a manner that shares features with activation of physiological death from starvation. Addition of HAMLET to pneumococci dissipated membrane polarity, but depolarization per se was not enough to trigger death. Rather, both HAMLET- and starvation-induced death of pneumococci specifically required a sodium-dependent calcium influx, as shown using calcium and sodium transport inhibitors. This mechanism was verified under low sodium conditions, and in the presence of ionomycin or monensin, which enhanced pneumococcal sensitivity to HAMLET- and starvation-induced death. Pneumococcal death was also inhibited by kinase inhibitors, and indicated the involvement of Ser/Thr kinases in these processes. The importance of this activation mechanism was made evident, as dysregulation and manipulation of physiological death was detrimental to biofilm formation, a hallmark of bacterial colonization. Overall, our findings provide novel information on the role of ion transport during bacterial death, with the potential to uncover future antimicrobial targets.

  2. Integrated omic analysis of oropharyngeal carcinomas reveals human papillomavirus (HPV)-dependent regulation of the activator protein 1 (AP-1) pathway.

    PubMed

    Sepiashvili, Lusia; Waggott, Daryl; Hui, Angela; Shi, Wei; Su, Susie; Ignatchenko, Alex; Ignatchenko, Vladimir; Laureano, Marissa; Huang, Shao Hui; Xu, Wei; Weinreb, Ilan; Waldron, John; O'Sullivan, Brian; Irish, Jonathan C; Boutros, Paul C; Liu, Fei-Fei; Kislinger, Thomas

    2014-12-01

    HPV-positive oropharyngeal carcinoma (OPC) patients have superior outcomes relative to HPV-negative patients, but the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. We conducted a proteomic investigation of HPV-positive (n = 27) and HPV-negative (n = 26) formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded OPC biopsies to acquire insights into the biological pathways that correlate with clinical behavior. Among the 2,633 proteins identified, 174 were differentially abundant. These were enriched for proteins related to cell cycle, DNA replication, apoptosis, and immune response. The differential abundances of cortactin and methylthioadenosine phosphorylase were validated by immunohistochemistry in an independent cohort of 29 OPC samples (p = 0.023 and p = 0.009, respectively). An additional 1,124 proteins were independently corroborated through comparison to a published proteomic dataset of OPC. Furthermore, utilizing the Cancer Genome Atlas, we conducted an integrated investigation of OPC, attributing mechanisms underlying differential protein abundances to alterations in mutation, copy number, methylation, and mRNA profiles. A key finding of this integration was the identification of elevated cortactin oncoprotein levels in HPV-negative OPCs. These proteins might contribute to reduced survival in these patients via their established role in radiation resistance. Through interrogation of Cancer Genome Atlas data, we demonstrated that activation of the β1-integrin/FAK/cortactin/JNK1 signaling axis and associated differential regulation of activator protein 1 transcription factor target genes are plausible consequences of elevated cortactin protein levels.

  3. Alpha 2-chimerin, an SH2-containing GTPase-activating protein for the ras-related protein p21rac derived by alternate splicing of the human n-chimerin gene, is selectively expressed in brain regions and testes.

    PubMed Central

    Hall, C; Sin, W C; Teo, M; Michael, G J; Smith, P; Dong, J M; Lim, H H; Manser, E; Spurr, N K; Jones, T A

    1993-01-01

    n-Chimerin (alpha 1-chimerin) is a brain GTPase-activating protein (GAP) for the ras-related p21rac. We now report the occurrence of another form of chimerin, termed alpha 2-chimerin. This is the product of an alternately spliced transcript of the human n-chimerin gene encoding an N-terminal SH2 (src homology 2) domain in addition to the phorbol ester receptor and GAP domains. alpha 1- and alpha 2-chimerin mRNAs were expressed differently. In the rat brain, only alpha 1-chimerin mRNA was expressed in cerebellar Purkinje cells, although both alpha 1- and alpha 2-chimerin mRNAs occurred in neurons in the cerebral cortex, hippocampus, and thalamus. Only alpha 2-chimerin RNA was expressed in rat testes, in early pachytene spermatocytes. A 45-kDa SH2-containing chimerin corresponding to the alpha 2 form was purified from rat brain. As with Escherichia coli 45-kDa recombinant alpha 2-chimerin, purified brain alpha 2-chimerin exhibited racGAP activity which was stimulated by phosphatidylserine. The recombinant SH2 domain bound several 32P-labelled phosphoproteins of PC12 cells, whose phosphorylation increased in response to trophic factors, including nerve growth factor. To examine the relationships of alpha 1- and alpha 2-chimerin transcripts, human genomic DNA clones were characterized. In alpha 2-chimerin mRNA, a 3' splice acceptor site within exon 1 of alpha 1-chimerin mRNA was used, replacing its 5' untranslated region and N-terminal coding sequence. The single human n-chimerin gene was mapped to chromosome 2q31-q32.1, colocalizing with the CRE-BP1 transcription factor gene (2q32). It contained several splice junctions conserved with the sequence-related protein kinase C and bcr genes. alpha 2-Chimerin is only the second SH2-containing GAP and the first example of an SH2 domain generated by alternate splicing. Images PMID:8336731

  4. Mucin1 mediates autocrine transforming growth factor beta signaling through activating the c-Jun N-terminal kinase/activator protein 1 pathway in human hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Qiongshu; Liu, Guomu; Shao, Dan; Wang, Juan; Yuan, Hongyan; Chen, Tanxiu; Zhai, Ruiping; Ni, Weihua; Tai, Guixiang

    2015-02-01

    In a previous study, we observed by global gene expression analysis that oncogene mucin1 (MUC1) silencing decreased transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) signaling in the human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cell line SMMC-7721. In this study, we report that MUC1 overexpression enhanced the levels of phosphorylated Smad3 linker region (p-Smad3L) (Ser-213) and its target gene MMP-9 in HCC cells, suggesting that MUC1 mediates TGF-β signaling. To investigate the effect of MUC1 on TGF-β signaling, we determined TGF-β secretion in MUC1 gene silencing and overexpressing cell lines. MUC1 expression enhanced not only TGF-β1 expression at the mRNA and protein levels but also luciferase activity driven by a TGF-β promoter, as well as elevated the activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and c-Jun, a member of the activation protein 1 (AP-1) transcription factor family. Furthermore, pharmacological reduction of TGF-β receptor (TβR), JNK and c-Jun activity inhibited MUC1-induced autocrine TGF-β signaling. Moreover, a co-immunoprecipitation assay showed that MUC1 directly bound and activated JNK. In addition, both MUC1-induced TGF-β secretion and exogenous TGF-β1 significantly increased Smad signaling and cell migration, which were markedly inhibited by either TβR inhibitor or small interfering RNA silencing of TGF-β1 gene in HCC cells. The high correlation between MUC1 and TGF-β1 or p-Smad3L (Ser-213) expression was shown in tumor tissues from HCC patients by immunohistochemical staining analysis. Collectively, these results indicate that MUC1 mediates autocrine TGF-β signaling by activating the JNK/AP-1 pathway in HCC cells. Therefore, MUC1 plays a key role in HCC progression and could serve as an attractive target for HCC therapy.

  5. Enriched inorganic compounds in diesel exhaust particles induce mitogen-activated protein kinase activation, cytoskeleton instability, and cytotoxicity in human bronchial epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Seriani, Robson; Junqueira, Mara S; Carvalho-Sousa, Claudia E; Arruda, Alessandra C T; Martinez, Diana; Alencar, Adriano M; Garippo, Ana L; Brito, Jôse Mara; Martins, Milton A; Saldiva, Paulo H N; Negri, Elnara M; Mauad, Thais; Macchione, Mariangela

    2015-04-01

    This study assessed the effects of the diesel exhaust particles on ERK and JNK MAPKs activation, cell rheology (viscoelasticity), and cytotoxicity in bronchial epithelial airway cells (BEAS-2B). Crude DEP and DEP after extraction with hexane (DEP/HEX) were utilized. The partial reduction of some DEP/HEX organics increased the biodisponibility of many metallic elements. JNK and ERK were activated simultaneously by crude DEP with no alterations in viscoelasticity of the cells. Mitochondrial activity, however, revealed a decrease through the MTT assay. DEP/HEX treatment increased viscoelasticity and cytotoxicity (membrane damage), and also activated JNK. Our data suggest that the greater bioavailability of metals could be involved in JNK activation and, consequently, in the reduction of fiber coherence and increase in the viscoelasticity and cytotoxicity of BEAS cells. The adverse findings detected after exposure to crude DEP and to DEP/HEX reflect the toxic potential of diesel compounds. Considering the fact that the cells of the respiratory epithelium are the first line of defense between the body and the environment, our data contribute to a better understanding of the pathways leading to respiratory cell injury and provide evidence for the onset of or worsening of respiratory diseases caused by inorganic compounds present in DEP.

  6. The potent activation of Ca(2+)-activated K(+) current by NVP-AUY922 in the human pancreatic duct cell line (PANC-1) possibly independent of heat shock protein 90 inhibition.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Nai-Jung; Wu, Sheng-Nan; Chen, Li-Tzong

    2015-04-01

    NVP-AUY922 (AUY) is a potent inhibitor of heat shock protein 90 (HSP90). Whether this compound can exert additional effects on membrane ion channels remains elusive. We investigated the effect of AUY on ion currents in human pancreatic duct epithelial cells (PDECs), including PANC-1 and MIA PaCa-2. AUY increased the amplitude of the K(+) current (IK) in PANC-1 cells shown by whole-cell configuration. Single-channel recordings revealed a large-conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) (BKCa) channel in PANC-1, but not in MIA PaCa-2. In cell-attached mode, AUY increased the probability of BKCa channel opening and also potentiated the activity of stretch-induced channels. However, other HSP inhibitors, 17-AAG or BIIB021 only slightly increased the activity of BKCa channels. In inside-out recordings, sodium hydrosulphide or caffeic acid phenethyl ester increased the activity of BKCa channels, but AUY did not. We further evaluated whether conductance of Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels (IK(Ca)) influenced secretion of HCO3(-) and fluid in PDECs by using a modified Whitcomb-Ermentrout model. Simulation studies showed that an increase in IK(Ca) resulted in additional secretion of HCO3(-) and fluid by mimicking the effect of AUY in PDECs. Collectively, AUY can interact with the BKCa channel to largely increase IK(Ca) in PDECs.

  7. Computational Prediction of Protein-Protein Interactions of Human Tyrosinase

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Su-Fang; Oh, Sangho; Si, Yue-Xiu; Wang, Zhi-Jiang; Han, Hong-Yan; Lee, Jinhyuk; Qian, Guo-Ying

    2012-01-01

    The various studies on tyrosinase have recently gained the attention of researchers due to their potential application values and the biological functions. In this study, we predicted the 3D structure of human tyrosinase and simulated the protein-protein interactions between tyrosinase and three binding partners, four and half LIM domains 2 (FHL2), cytochrome b-245 alpha polypeptide (CYBA), and RNA-binding motif protein 9 (RBM9). Our interaction simulations showed significant binding energy scores of −595.3 kcal/mol for FHL2, −859.1 kcal/mol for CYBA, and −821.3 kcal/mol for RBM9. We also investigated the residues of each protein facing toward the predicted site of interaction with tyrosinase. Our computational predictions will be useful for elucidating the protein-protein interactions of tyrosinase and studying its binding mechanisms. PMID:22577521

  8. The Effect of Walterinnesia aegyptia Venom Proteins on TCA Cycle Activity and Mitochondrial NAD+-Redox State in Cultured Human Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Ghneim, Hazem K.; Al-Sheikh, Yazeed A.; Aboul-Soud, Mourad A. M.

    2015-01-01

    Fibroblast cultures were used to study the effects of crude Walterinnesia aegyptia venom and its F1–F7 protein fractions on TCA cycle enzyme activities and mitochondrial NAD-redox state. Confluent cells were incubated with 10 μg of venom proteins for 4 hours at 37°C. The activities of all studied TCA enzymes and the non-TCA mitochondrial NADP+-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase underwent significant reductions of similar magnitude (50–60% of control activity) upon incubation of cells with the crude venom and fractions F4, F5, and F7 and 60–70% for fractions F3 and F6. In addition, the crude and fractions F3–F7 venom proteins caused a drop in mitochondrial NAD+ and NADP+ levels equivalent to around 25% of control values. Whereas the crude and fractions F4, F5, and F7 venom proteins caused similar magnitude drops in NADH and NADPH (around 55% of control levels), fractions F3 and F6 caused a more drastic drop (60–70% of control levels) of both reduced coenzymes. Results indicate that the effects of venom proteins could be directed at the mitochondrial level and/or the rates of NAD+ and NADP+ biosynthesis. PMID:25705684

  9. The effect of Walterinnesia aegyptia venom proteins on TCA cycle activity and mitochondrial NAD(+)-redox state in cultured human fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Ghneim, Hazem K; Al-Sheikh, Yazeed A; Aboul-Soud, Mourad A M

    2015-01-01

    Fibroblast cultures were used to study the effects of crude Walterinnesia aegyptia venom and its F1-F7 protein fractions on TCA cycle enzyme activities and mitochondrial NAD-redox state. Confluent cells were incubated with 10 μg of venom proteins for 4 hours at 37°C. The activities of all studied TCA enzymes and the non-TCA mitochondrial NADP(+)-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase underwent significant reductions of similar magnitude (50-60% of control activity) upon incubation of cells with the crude venom and fractions F4, F5, and F7 and 60-70% for fractions F3 and F6. In addition, the crude and fractions F3-F7 venom proteins caused a drop in mitochondrial NAD(+) and NADP(+) levels equivalent to around 25% of control values. Whereas the crude and fractions F4, F5, and F7 venom proteins caused similar magnitude drops in NADH and NADPH (around 55% of control levels), fractions F3 and F6 caused a more drastic drop (60-70% of control levels) of both reduced coenzymes. Results indicate that the effects of venom proteins could be directed at the mitochondrial level and/or the rates of NAD(+) and NADP(+) biosynthesis.

  10. Correlation between CYP1A1 transcript, protein level, enzyme activity and DNA adduct formation in normal human mammary epithelial cell strains exposed to benzo[a]pyrene

    PubMed Central

    Divi, Rao L.; Einem Lindeman, Tracey L.; Shockley, Marie E.; Keshava, Channa; Weston, Ainsley; Poirier, Miriam C.

    2014-01-01

    The polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) benzo(a)pyrene (BP) is thought to bind covalently to DNA, through metabolism by cytochrome P450 1A1 (CYP1A1) and CYP1B1, and other enzymes, to form r7, t8, t9-trihydroxy-c-10-(N 2-deoxyguanosyl)-7,8,9,10-tetrahydro-benzo[a]-pyrene (BPdG). Evaluation of RNA expression data, to understand the contribution of different metabolic enzymes to BPdG formation, is typically presented as fold-change observed upon BP exposure, leaving the actual number of RNA transcripts unknown. Here, we have quantified RNA copies/ng cDNA (RNA cpn) for CYP1A1 and CYP1B1, as well as NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1), which may reduce formation of BPdG adducts, using primary normal human mammary epithelial cell (NHMEC) strains, and the MCF-7 breast cancer cell line. In unexposed NHMECs, basal RNA cpn values were 58–836 for CYP1A1, 336–5587 for CYP1B1 and 5943–40112 for NQO1. In cells exposed to 4.0 µM BP for 12h, RNA cpn values were 251–13234 for CYP1A1, 4133–57078 for CYP1B1 and 4456–55887 for NQO1. There were 3.5 (mean, range 0.2–15.8) BPdG adducts/108 nucleotides in the NHMECs (n = 16), and 790 in the MCF-7s. In the NHMECs, BP-induced CYP1A1 RNA cpn was highly associated with BPdG (P = 0.002), but CYP1B1 and NQO1 were not. Western blots of four NHMEC strains, chosen for different levels of BPdG adducts, showed a linear correlation between BPdG and CYP1A1, but not CYP1B1 or NQO1. Ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD) activity, which measures CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 together, correlated with BPdG, but NQO1 activity did not. Despite more numerous levels of CYP1B1 and NQO1 RNA cpn in unexposed and BP-exposed NHMECs and MCF-7cells, BPdG formation was only correlated with induction of CYP1A1 RNA cpn. The higher level of BPdG in MCF-7 cells, compared to NHMECs, may have been due to a much increased induction of CYP1A1 and EROD. Overall, BPdG correlation was observed with CYP1A1 protein and CYP1A1/1B1 enzyme activity, but not with CYP1B1 or NQO

  11. Stable enhanced green fluorescent protein expression after differentiation and transplantation of reporter human induced pluripotent stem cells generated by AAVS1 transcription activator-like effector nucleases.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yongquan; Liu, Chengyu; Cerbini, Trevor; San, Hong; Lin, Yongshun; Chen, Guokai; Rao, Mahendra S; Zou, Jizhong

    2014-07-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem (hiPS) cell lines with tissue-specific or ubiquitous reporter genes are extremely useful for optimizing in vitro differentiation conditions as well as for monitoring transplanted cells in vivo. The adeno-associated virus integration site 1 (AAVS1) locus has been used as a "safe harbor" locus for inserting transgenes because of its open chromatin structure, which permits transgene expression without insertional mutagenesis. However, it is not clear whether targeted transgene expression at the AAVS1 locus is always protected from silencing when driven by various promoters, especially after differentiation and transplantation from hiPS cells. In this paper, we describe a pair of transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) that enable more efficient genome editing than the commercially available zinc finger nuclease at the AAVS1 site. Using these TALENs for targeted gene addition, we find that the cytomegalovirus-immediate early enhancer/chicken β-actin/rabbit β-globin (CAG) promoter is better than cytomegalovirus 7 and elongation factor 1α short promoters in driving strong expression of the transgene. The two independent AAVS1, CAG, and enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) hiPS cell reporter lines that we have developed do not show silencing of EGFP either in undifferentiated hiPS cells or in randomly and lineage-specifically differentiated cells or in teratomas. Transplanting cardiomyocytes from an engineered AAVS1-CAG-EGFP hiPS cell line in a myocardial infarcted mouse model showed persistent expression of the transgene for at least 7 weeks in vivo. Our results show that high-efficiency targeting can be obtained with open-source TALENs and that careful optimization of the reporter and transgene constructs results in stable and persistent expression in vitro and in vivo.

  12. Function of the cytoplasmic tail of human calcitonin receptor-like receptor in complex with receptor activity-modifying protein 2

    SciTech Connect

    Kuwasako, Kenji; Kitamura, Kazuo; Nagata, Sayaka; Hikosaka, Tomomi; Kato, Johji

    2010-02-12

    Receptor activity-modifying protein 2 (RAMP2) enables calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CRLR) to form an adrenomedullin (AM)-specific receptor. Here we investigated the function of the cytoplasmic C-terminal tail (C-tail) of human (h)CRLR by co-transfecting its C-terminal mutants into HEK-293 cells stably expressing hRAMP2. Deleting the C-tail from CRLR disrupted AM-evoked cAMP production or receptor internalization, but did not affect [{sup 125}I]AM binding. We found that CRLR residues 428-439 are required for AM-evoked cAMP production, though deleting this region had little effect on receptor internalization. Moreover, pretreatment with pertussis toxin (100 ng/mL) led to significant increases in AM-induced cAMP production via wild-type CRLR/RAMP2 complexes. This effect was canceled by deleting CRLR residues 454-457, suggesting Gi couples to this region. Flow cytometric analysis revealed that CRLR truncation mutants lacking residues in the Ser/Thr-rich region extending from Ser{sup 449} to Ser{sup 467} were unable to undergo AM-induced receptor internalization and, in contrast to the effect on wild-type CRLR, overexpression of GPCR kinases-2, -3 and -4 failed to promote internalization of CRLR mutants lacking residues 449-467. Thus, the hCRLR C-tail is crucial for AM-evoked cAMP production and internalization of the CRLR/RAMP2, while the receptor internalization is dependent on the aforementioned GPCR kinases, but not Gs coupling.

  13. Activated protein C: biased for translation

    PubMed Central

    Zlokovic, Berislav V.; Mosnier, Laurent O.

    2015-01-01

    The homeostatic blood protease, activated protein C (APC), can function as (1) an antithrombotic on the basis of inactivation of clotting factors Va and VIIIa; (2) a cytoprotective on the basis of endothelial barrier stabilization and anti-inflammatory and antiapoptotic actions; and (3) a regenerative on the basis of stimulation of neurogenesis, angiogenesis, and wound healing. Pharmacologic therapies using recombinant human and murine APCs indicate that APC provides effective acute or chronic therapies for a strikingly diverse range of preclinical injury models. APC reduces the damage caused by the following: ischemia/reperfusion in brain, heart, and kidney; pulmonary, kidney, and gastrointestinal inflammation; sepsis; Ebola virus; diabetes; and total lethal body radiation. For these beneficial effects, APC alters cell signaling networks and gene expression profiles by activating protease-activated receptors 1 and 3. APC’s activation of these G protein–coupled receptors differs completely from thrombin’s activation mechanism due to biased signaling via either G proteins or β-arrestin-2. To reduce APC-associated bleeding risk, APC variants were engineered to lack >90% anticoagulant activity but retain normal cell signaling. Such a neuroprotective variant, 3K3A-APC (Lys191-193Ala), has advanced to clinical trials for ischemic stroke. A rich data set of preclinical knowledge provides a solid foundation for potential translation of APC variants to future novel therapies. PMID:25824691

  14. Adiponectin promotes hyaluronan synthesis along with increases in hyaluronan synthase 2 transcripts through an AMP-activated protein kinase/peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{alpha}-dependent pathway in human dermal fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Yamane, Takumi; Kobayashi-Hattori, Kazuo; Oishi, Yuichi

    2011-11-18

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Adiponectin promotes hyaluronan synthesis along with an increase in HAS2 transcripts. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Adiponectin also increases the phosphorylation of AMPK. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A pharmacological activator of AMPK increases mRNA levels of PPAR{alpha} and HAS2. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Adiponectin-induced HAS2 mRNA expression is blocked by a PPAR{alpha} antagonist. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Adiponectin promotes hyaluronan synthesis via an AMPK/PPAR{alpha}-dependent pathway. -- Abstract: Although adipocytokines affect the functions of skin, little information is available on the effect of adiponectin on the skin. In this study, we investigated the effect of adiponectin on hyaluronan synthesis and its regulatory mechanisms in human dermal fibroblasts. Adiponectin promoted hyaluronan synthesis along with an increase in the mRNA levels of hyaluronan synthase 2 (HAS2), which plays a primary role in hyaluronan synthesis. Adiponectin also increased the phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). A pharmacological activator of AMPK, 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-1{beta}-ribofuranoside (AICAR), increased mRNA levels of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{alpha} (PPAR{alpha}), which enhances the expression of HAS2 mRNA. In addition, AICAR increased the mRNA levels of HAS2. Adiponectin-induced HAS2 mRNA expression was blocked by GW6471, a PPAR{alpha} antagonist, in a concentration-dependent manner. These results show that adiponectin promotes hyaluronan synthesis along with increases in HAS2 transcripts through an AMPK/PPAR{alpha}-dependent pathway in human dermal fibroblasts. Thus, our study suggests that adiponectin may be beneficial for retaining moisture in the skin, anti-inflammatory activity, and the treatment of a variety of cutaneous diseases.

  15. Activation of interleukin-6/signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 by human papillomavirus early proteins 6 induces fibroblast senescence to promote cervical tumourigenesis through autocrine and paracrine pathways in tumour microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Ren, Chunxia; Cheng, Xi; Lu, Bei; Yang, Gong

    2013-12-01

    Although it is reported that interleukin (IL)-6/signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) is activated by human papillomavirus (HPV) infection in cervical cancer cells, little is known about the role of IL-6/STAT3 in tumour microenvironment during development of the disease. In this study, we found that cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAF) but not normal fibroblasts (NF) secrete high level of IL-6 with activated STAT3 and appear senescent at early passages in culture or in cervical cancer tissues infected with high-risk HPV, and that treatment of NF with recombinant IL-6 or CAF conditioned medium (CM) induces activation of STAT3 and cellular senescence. IL-6 and STAT3 are either upregulated or activated in Siha and Hela cells infected with HPV 16 or 18, but not in C33A and ME180 cells without HPV 16 or 18 infection. Overexpression of HPV early proteins 6 (E6) activates STAT3, increases IL-6 expression and tumour burden in C33A and ME180 cells, while silencing of HPV E6 by specific shRNA reduces STAT3 activation, IL-6 expression, and tumour formation in Siha and HeLa cells, so does silencing of STAT3 by specific shRNA in HeLa and C33A/E6 cells. The tumour growth of cervical cancer cells reconstituted with CAF or NF is largely affected by inhibition of fibroblast senescence with STAT3 inhibitor or with IL-6 antibody treatment. Thus, we have uncovered a mechanism that fibroblast senescence promotes cervical cancer development through high-risk HPV E6-activated IL-6/STAT3 signalling in tumour microenvironment.

  16. Human tau protein forms complex with PrP and some GSS- and fCJD-related PrP mutants possess stronger binding activities with tau in vitro.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao-Fan; Dong, Chen-Fang; Zhang, Jin; Wan, Yan-Zhen; Li, Feng; Huang, Yin-Xia; Han, Lu; Shan, Bing; Gao, Chen; Han, Jun; Dong, Xiao-Ping

    2008-03-01

    Microtubule associated protein tau is considered to play roles in some types of human transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSE). In this study, the full-length and several truncated human tau proteins were expressed from E. coli and purified. Using GST pull down, co-immunoprecipitation assay and tau-coated ELISA, the molecular interaction between tau protein and PrP was confirmed in the context of the full-length human tau. The N terminus (amino acids 1-91) and tandem repeats region (amino acids 186-283) of tau protein were responsible for the interaction with PrP. The octapeptide repeats within PrP directly affected the binding activity of PrP with tau. GSS-related mutant PrP102L and fCJD- related mutants with two and seven extra octarepeats showed more active binding capacity with tau than wild-type PrP. The molecular interactions between PrP and tau protein highlight a potential role of tau in the biological function of PrP and the pathogenesis of TSE.

  17. Exceptional overproduction of a functional human membrane protein.

    PubMed

    Nyblom, Maria; Oberg, Fredrik; Lindkvist-Petersson, Karin; Hallgren, Karin; Findlay, Heather; Wikström, Jennie; Karlsson, Anders; Hansson, Orjan; Booth, Paula J; Bill, Roslyn M; Neutze, Richard; Hedfalk, Kristina

    2007-11-01

    Eukaryotic--especially human--membrane protein overproduction remains a major challenge in biochemistry. Heterologously overproduced and purified proteins provide a starting point for further biochemical, biophysical and structural studies, and the lack of sufficient quantities of functional membrane proteins is frequently a bottleneck hindering this. Here, we report exceptionally high production levels of a correctly folded and crystallisable recombinant human integral membrane protein in its active form; human aquaporin 1 (hAQP1) has been heterologously produced in the membranes of the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris. After solubilisation and a two step purification procedure, at least 90 mg hAQP1 per liter of culture is obtained. Water channel activity of this purified hAQP1 was verified by reconstitution into proteoliposomes and performing stopped-flow vesicle shrinkage measurements. Mass spectrometry confirmed the identity of hAQP1 in crude membrane preparations, and also from purified protein reconstituted into proteoliposomes. Furthermore, crystallisation screens yielded diffraction quality crystals of untagged recombinant hAQP1. This study illustrates the power of the yeast P. pastoris as a host to produce exceptionally high yields of a functionally active, human integral membrane protein for subsequent functional and structural characterization.

  18. Human CAP18: a novel antimicrobial lipopolysaccharide-binding protein.

    PubMed Central

    Larrick, J W; Hirata, M; Balint, R F; Lee, J; Zhong, J; Wright, S C

    1995-01-01

    CAP18 (18-kDa cationic antimicrobial protein) is a protein originally identified and purified from rabbit leukocytes on the basis of its capacity to bind and inhibit various activities of lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Here we report the cloning of human CAP18 and characterize the anti-LPS activity of the C-terminal fragment. Oligonucleotide probes designed from the rabbit CAP18 cDNA were used to identify human CAP18 from a bone marrow cDNA library. The cDNA encodes a protein composed of a 30-amino-acid signal peptide, a 103-amino-acid N-terminal domain of unknown function, and a C-terminal domain of 37 amino acids homologous to the LPS-binding antimicrobial domain of rabbit CAP18, designated CAP18(104-140). A human CAP18-specific antiserum was generated by using CAP18 expressed as a fusion protein with the maltose-binding protein. Western blots (immunoblots) with this antiserum showed specific expression of human CAP18 in granulocytes. Synthetic human CAP18(104-140) and a more active truncated fragment, CAP18(104-135), were shown to (i) bind to erythrocytes coated with diverse strains of LPS, (ii) inhibit LPS-induced release of nitric oxide from macrophages, (iii) inhibit LPS-induced generation of tissue factor, and (iv) protect mice from LPS lethality. CAP18(104-140) may have therapeutic utility for conditions associated with elevated concentrations of LPS. PMID:7890387

  19. Nuclear factor-I and activator protein-2 bind in a mutually exclusive way to overlapping promoter sequences and trans-activate the human growth hormone gene.

    PubMed Central

    Courtois, S J; Lafontaine, D A; Lemaigre, F P; Durviaux, S M; Rousseau, G G

    1990-01-01

    Transcription of the human growth hormone (hGH) gene and its regulation are controlled by trans-acting factors that bind to hGH gene promoter sequences. Several DNase I footprints have been described within 500 bp of this promoter, one of which (-289 to -267) has not yet been ascribed to a defined factor. By DNase I footprinting, gel mobility shift, and methylation interference assays with extracts from HeLa cells and GH-producing pituitary tumor (GC) cells, we show that this factor belongs to the NF-I family. When NF-I was competed out of the cell extracts, the trans-acting factor AP-2 bound to the same site as NF-I. AP-2 was present not only in HeLa cells, but also in GC cells albeit at a much lower concentration. Consistent with the mutually exclusive binding of NF-I and AP-2, their methylation interference patterns included four guanine residues that were crucial for binding of both NF-I and AP-2. Cell-free transcription from the hGH gene promoter showed that these two factors can transactivate this gene. Images PMID:2308836

  20. ATM-dependent telomere loss in aging human diploid fibroblasts and DNA damage lead to the post-translational activation of p53 protein involving poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase.

    PubMed Central

    Vaziri, H; West, M D; Allsopp, R C; Davison, T S; Wu, Y S; Arrowsmith, C H; Poirier, G G; Benchimol, S

    1997-01-01

    Telomere loss has been proposed as a mechanism for counting cell divisions during aging in normal somatic cells. How such a mitotic clock initiates the intracellular signalling events that culminate in G1 cell cycle arrest and senescence to restrict the lifespan of normal human cells is not known. We investigated the possibility that critically short telomere length activates a DNA damage response pathway involving p53 and p21(WAF1) in aging cells. We show that the DNA binding and transcriptional activity of p53 protein increases with cell age in the absence of any marked increase in the level of p53 protein, and that p21(WAF1) promoter activity in senescent cells is dependent on both p53 and the transcriptional co-activator p300. Moreover, we detected increased specific activity of p53 protein in AT fibroblasts, which exhibit accelerated telomere loss and undergo premature senescence, compared with normal fibroblasts. We investigated the possibility that poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase is involved in the post-translational activation of p53 protein in aging cells. We show that p53 protein can associate with PARP and inhibition of PARP activity leads to abrogation of p21 and mdm2 expression in response to DNA damage. Moreover, inhibition of PARP activity leads to extension of cellular lifespan. In contrast, hyperoxia, an activator of PARP, is associated with accelerated telomere loss, activation of p53 and premature senescence. We propose that p53 is post-translationally activated not only in response to DNA damage but also in response to the critical shortening of telomeres that occurs during cellular aging. PMID:9312059

  1. Pomegranate fruit extract modulates UV-B-mediated phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinases and activation of nuclear factor kappa B in normal human epidermal keratinocytes paragraph sign.

    PubMed

    Afaq, Farrukh; Malik, Arshi; Syed, Deeba; Maes, Daniel; Matsui, Mary S; Mukhtar, Hasan

    2005-01-01

    Excessive exposure of solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation, particularly its UV-B component, to humans causes many adverse effects that include erythema, hyperplasia, hyperpigmentation, immunosuppression, photoaging and skin cancer. In recent years, there is increasing use of botanical agents in skin care products. Pomegranate derived from the tree Punica granatum contains anthocyanins (such as delphinidin, cyanidin and pelargonidin) and hydrolyzable tannins (such as punicalin, pedunculagin, punicalagin, gallagic and ellagic acid esters of glucose) and possesses strong antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. Recently, we have shown that pomegranate fruit extract (PFE) possesses antitumor promoting effects in a mouse model of chemical carcinogenesis. To begin to establish the effect of PFE for humans in this study, we determined its effect on UV-B-induced adverse effects in normal human epidermal keratinocytes (NHEK). We first assessed the effect of PFE on UV-B-mediated phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) pathway in NHEK. Immunoblot analysis demonstrated that the treatment of NHEK with PFE (10-40 microg/mL) for 24 h before UV-B (40 mJ/cm(2)) exposure dose dependently inhibited UV-B-mediated phosphorylation of ERKl/2, JNK1/2 and p38 protein. We also observed that PFE (20 microg/mL) inhibited UV-B-mediated phosphorylation of MAPK in a time-dependent manner. Furthermore, in dose- and time-dependent studies, we evaluated the effect of PFE on UV-B-mediated activation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kappaB) pathway. Using Western blot analysis, we found that PFE treatment of NHEK resulted in a dose- and time-dependent inhibition of UV-B-mediated degradation and phosphorylation of IkappaBalpha and activation of IKKalpha. Using immunoblot analysis, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and electrophoretic mobility shift assay, we found that PFE treatment to NHEK resulted in a dose- and time-dependent inhibition of UV-B-mediated nuclear translocation and

  2. Gc protein (vitamin D-binding protein): Gc genotyping and GcMAF precursor activity.

    PubMed

    Nagasawa, Hideko; Uto, Yoshihiro; Sasaki, Hideyuki; Okamura, Natsuko; Murakami, Aya; Kubo, Shinichi; Kirk, Kenneth L; Hori, Hitoshi

    2005-01-01

    The Gc protein (human group-specific component (Gc), a vitamin D-binding protein or Gc globulin), has important physiological functions that include involvement in vitamin D transport and storage, scavenging of extracellular G-actin, enhancement of the chemotactic activity of C5a for neutrophils in inflammation and macrophage activation (mediated by a GalNAc-modified Gc protein (GcMAF)). In this review, the structure and function of the Gc protein is focused on especially with regard to Gc genotyping and GcMAF precursor activity. A discussion of the research strategy "GcMAF as a target for drug discovery" is included, based on our own research.

  3. Comparison of Metalloproteinase Protein and Activity Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Giricz, Orsi; Lauer, Janelle L.; Fields, Gregg B.

    2010-01-01

    Proteolytic enzymes play fundamental roles in many biological processes. Members of the matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) family have been shown to take part in processes crucial in disease progression. The present study used the ExcelArray Human MMP/TIMP Array to quantify MMP and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP) production in the lysates and media of 14 cancer and one normal cell line. The overall patterns were very similar in terms of which MMPs and TIMPs were secreted in the media versus associated with the cells in the individual samples. However, more MMP was found in the media, both in amount and in variety. TIMP-1 was produced in all cell lines. MMP activity assays with three different FRET substrates were then utilized to determine if protein production correlated with function for the WM-266-4 and BJ cell lines. Metalloproteinase activity was observed for both cell lines with a general MMP substrate (Knight SSP), consistent with protein production data. However, although both cell lines promoted the hydrolysis of a more selective MMP substrate (NFF-3), metalloproteinase activity was only confirmed in the BJ cell line. The use of inhibitors to confirm metalloproteinase activities pointed to the strengths and weaknesses of in situ FRET substrate assays. PMID:20920458

  4. (PCG) Protein Crystal Growth Human Serum Albumin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    (PCG) Protein Crystal Growth Human Serum Albumin. Contributes to many transport and regulatory processes and has multifunctional binding properties which range from various metals, to fatty acids, hormones, and a wide spectrum of therapeutic drugs. The most abundant protein of the circulatory system. It binds and transports an incredible variety of biological and pharmaceutical ligands throughout the blood stream. Principal Investigator on STS-26 was Larry DeLucas.

  5. [Proteins of human milk involved in immunological processes].

    PubMed

    Lis, Jolanta; Orczyk-Pawiłowicz, Magdalena; Kątnik-Prastowska, Iwona

    2013-05-31

    Human milk contains a lot of components (i.e. proteins, carbohydrates, lipids, inorganic elements) which provide basic nutrients for infants during the first period of their lives. Qualitative composition of milk components of healthy mothers is similar, but their levels change during lactation stages. Colostrum is the fluid secreted during the first days postpartum by mammary epithelial cells. Colostrum is replaced by transitional milk during 5-15 days postpartum and from 15 days postpartum mature milk is produced. Human milk, apart from nutritional components, is a source of biologically active molecules, i.e. immunoglobulins, growth factors, cytokines, acute phase proteins, antiviral and antibacterial proteins. Such components of human milk are responsible for specific biological activities of human milk. This secretion plays an important role in growth and development of newborns. Bioactive molecules present in the milk support the immature immune system of the newborn and also protect against the development of infection. In this article we describe the pathways involved in the production and secretion of human milk, the state of knowledge on the proteome of human milk, and the contents of components of milk during lactation. Moreover, some growth factors and proteins involved in innate and specific immunity, intercellular communication, immunomodulation, and inflammatory processes have been characterized.

  6. Interleukin-27-Mediated Suppression of Human Th17 Cells Is Associated with Activation of STAT1 and Suppressor of Cytokine Signaling Protein 1

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hong

    2011-01-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that interleukin (IL)-27, a member of the IL-12 family of cytokines, antagonizes pathological Th17 effector cell responses. Relatively little is known about the cytokines that regulate human Th17 cells. In this study, we investigated the effect of IL-27 on the differentiation of human Th17 cells and on committed memory Th17 cells. We demonstrate that IL-27 suppresses the development of human Th17 cells by downregulating retinoid orphan nuclear receptor C expression and that this inhibition is associated with the induction of the intracellular signaling factors STAT1 and induction of the suppressor of cytokine signaling protein 1. The IL-27-mediated inhibition of IL-17 is independent of IL-10. We show that IL-27 inhibits differentiation of naïve T cells into IL-17+ T cells under different Th17 polarizing conditions. IL-27 suppresses other Th17 subset cytokines such as IL-22 and IL-21 but not tumor necrosis factor-α. Moreover, we also show that IL-27 inhibits IL-17 production by committed Th17 memory cells, which is independent of IL-10. These studies show that IL-27 negatively regulates both the developing and committed human Th17 responses and therefore may be a promising therapeutic approach in the treatment of Th17-mediated diseases. PMID:21235411

  7. The human CFTR protein expressed in CHO cells activates aquaporin-3 in a cAMP-dependent pathway: study by digital holographic microscopy.

    PubMed

    Jourdain, Pascal; Becq, Frédéric; Lengacher, Sylvain; Boinot, Clément; Magistretti, Pierre J; Marquet, Pierre

    2014-02-01

    The transmembrane water movements during cellular processes and their relationship to ionic channel activity remain largely unknown. As an example, in epithelial cells it was proposed that the movement of water could be directly linked to cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein activity through a cAMP-stimulated aqueous pore, or be dependent on aquaporin. Here, we used digital holographic microscopy (DHM) an interferometric technique to quantify in situ the transmembrane water fluxes during the activity of the epithelial chloride channel, CFTR, measured by patch-clamp and iodide efflux techniques. We showed that the water transport measured by DHM is fully inhibited by the selective CFTR blocker CFTRinh172 and is absent in cells lacking CFTR. Of note, in cells expressing the mutated version of CFTR (F508del-CFTR), which mimics the most common genetic alteration encountered in cystic fibrosis, we also show that the water movement is profoundly altered but restored by pharmacological manipulation of F508del-CFTR-defective trafficking. Importantly, whereas activation of this endogenous water channel required a cAMP-dependent stimulation of CFTR, activation of CFTR or F508del-CFTR by two cAMP-independent CFTR activators, genistein and MPB91, failed to trigger water movements. Finally, using a specific small-interfering RNA against the endogenous aquaporin AQP3, the water transport accompanying CFTR activity decreased. We conclude that water fluxes accompanying CFTR activity are linked to AQP3 but not to a cAMP-stimulated aqueous pore in the CFTR protein.

  8. New Anthocyanin-Human Salivary Protein Complexes.

    PubMed

    Ferrer-Gallego, Raúl; Soares, Susana; Mateus, Nuno; Rivas-Gonzalo, Julián; Escribano-Bailón, M Teresa; de Freitas, Victor

    2015-08-04

    The interaction between phenolic compounds and salivary proteins is considered the basis of the poorly understood phenomenon of astringency. Furthermore, this interaction is an important factor in relation to their bioavailability. In this work, interactions between anthocyanin and human salivary protein fraction were studied by mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS and FIA-ESI-MS) and saturation-transfer difference (STD) NMR spectroscopy. Anthocyanins were able to interact with saliva proteins. The dissociation constant (KD) between malvidin 3-glucoside and salivary proline-rich proteins was 1.92 mM for the hemiketal form (pH 3.4) and 1.83 mM for the flavylium cation (pH 1.0). New soluble complexes between these salivary proteins and malvidin 3-glucoside were identified for the first time.

  9. Nuclear matrix proteins in human colon cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Keesee, S K; Meneghini, M D; Szaro, R P; Wu, Y J

    1994-01-01

    The nuclear matrix is the nonchromatin scaffolding of the nucleus. This structure confers nuclear shape, organizes chromatin, and appears to contain important regulatory proteins. Tissue specific nuclear matrix proteins have been found in the rat, mouse, and human. In this study we compared high-resolution two-dimensional gel electropherograms of nuclear matrix protein patterns found in human colon tumors with those from normal colon epithelia. Tumors were obtained from 18 patients undergoing partial colectomy for adenocarcinoma of the colon and compared with tissue from 10 normal colons. We have identified at least six proteins which were present in 18 of 18 colon tumors and 0 of 10 normal tissues, as well as four proteins present in 0 of 18 tumors and in 10 of 10 normal tissues. These data, which corroborate similar findings of cancer-specific nuclear matrix proteins in prostate and breast, suggest that nuclear matrix proteins may serve as important markers for at least some types of cancer. Images PMID:8127905

  10. [Cow's milk protein allergy through human milk].

    PubMed

    Denis, M; Loras-Duclaux, I; Lachaux, A

    2012-03-01

    Cow's milk protein allergy (CMPA) is the first allergy that affects infants. In this population, the incidence rate reaches 7.5%. The multiplicity and aspecificity of the symptoms makes its diagnosis sometimes complicated, especially in the delayed type (gastrointestinal, dermatological, and cutaneous). CMPA symptoms can develop in exclusively breastfed infants with an incidence rate of 0.5%. It, therefore, raises questions about sensitization to cow's milk proteins through breast milk. Transfer of native bovine proteins such as β-lactoglobulin into the breast milk is controversial: some authors have found bovine proteins in human milk but others point to cross-reactivity between human milk proteins and cow's milk proteins. However, it seems that a small percentage of dietary proteins can resist digestion and become potentially allergenic. Moreover, some authors suspect the transfer of some of these dietary proteins from the maternal bloodstream to breast milk, but the mechanisms governing sensitization are still being studied. Theoretically, CMPA diagnosis is based on clinical observations, prick-test or patch-test results, and cow's milk-specific IgE antibody concentration. A positive food challenge test usually confirms the diagnosis. No laboratory test is available to make a certain diagnosis, but the detection of eosinophil cationic protein (ECP) in the mother's milk, for example, seems to be advantageous since it is linked to CMA. Excluding cow's milk from the mother's diet is the only cure when she still wants to breastfeed. Usually, cow's milk proteins are reintroduced after 6 months of exclusion. Indeed, the prognosis for infants is very good: 80% acquire a tolerance before the age of 3 or 4 years. Mothers should not avoid dairy products during pregnancy and breastfeeding as preventive measures against allergy.

  11. A new splice variant of the human guanylate-binding protein 3 mediates anti-influenza activity through inhibition of viral transcription and replication.

    PubMed

    Nordmann, Alexandra; Wixler, Ludmilla; Boergeling, Yvonne; Wixler, Viktor; Ludwig, Stephan

    2012-03-01

    Guanylate-binding proteins (GBPs) belong to the family of large GTPases that are induced in response to interferons. GBPs contain an N-terminal globular GTPase domain and a C-terminal α-helical regulatory domain that are connected by a short middle domain. Antiviral activity against vesicular stomatitis virus and encephalomyocarditis virus has been shown for hGBP-1; however, no anti-influenza virus properties for GBPs have been described to date. Here we show that hGBP-1 and hGBP-3 possess anti-influenza viral activity. Furthermore, we have identified a novel splice variant of hGBP-3, named hGBP-3ΔC, with a largely modified C-terminal α-helical domain. While all three GBP isoforms were up-regulated on influenza virus infection, hGBP-3ΔC showed the most prominent antiviral activity in epithelial cells. Mutational analysis of hGBPs revealed that the globular domain is the principal antiviral effector domain, and GTP-binding, but not hydrolysis, is necessary for antiviral action. Furthermore, we showed that hGBP-3ΔC strongly represses the activity of the viral polymerase complex, which results in decreased synthesis of viral vRNA, cRNA, mRNA, and viral proteins, as well.

  12. Isolation of Phorbol Esters from Euphorbia grandicornis and Evaluation of Protein Kinase C- and Human Platelet-Activating Effects of Euphorbiaceae Diterpenes.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Ju-Ying; Rédei, Dóra; Forgo, Peter; Li, Yu; Vasas, Andrea; Hohmann, Judit; Wu, Chin-Chung

    2016-10-28

    Human platelets contain conventional (α and β) and novel isoforms of PKC (δ and θ), and PKC activation can result in platelet aggregation and secretion reaction that are important for thrombus formation. Several tumor-promoting Euphorbiaceae diterpenes are known to act as direct activators of PKC, but many types of such diterpenes have not been studied as platelet stimulators. In the present study, two new and five known phorbol esters were isolated from Euphorbia grandicornis. Two of the isolated phorbol esters together with compounds representing ingenane, jatrophane, and myrsinane structural types were studied on PKC activation and platelet stimulation. The investigated phorbol esters and ingenane esters induced blood platelet aggregation and ATP secretion. PKC activation was demonstrated by inducing membrane translocation of PKCs, phosphorylation of PKC substrates, and activation of PKC signaling pathways. The PKC-activating effect of the compounds correlated well with their efficacy to cause platelet stimulation. Moreover, by using an isoform-specific PKC inhibitor, it was found that besides conventional PKCs novel PKCs also play a positive role in platelet activation caused by phorbol/ingenane esters, especially in regulating platelet aggregation. The present results suggest that platelets afford a useful model for studying PKC activators of natural origin or their chemical derivatives.

  13. Breast milk jaundice: in vitro inhibition of rat liver bilirubin-uridine diphosphate glucuronyltransferase activity and Z protein-bromosulfophthalein binding by human breast milk.

    PubMed

    Foliot, A; Ploussard, J P; Housset, E; Christoforov

    1976-06-01

    Twenty-four samples of breast milk from nine mothers of infants suffering from breast milk jaundice were studied. Eight samples of milk from mothers of nonjaundiced infants, along with five formula milks enriched with polyunsaturated fatty acids, served as controls. Milks from mothers with jaundiced infants had no inhibitory effect when assayed immediately after thawing. However, after these milk samples were stores at 4 degrees, they strongly inhibited bilirubin conjugation (80.3% inhibition of uridine diphosphate glucuronyltransferase (UDPGT) activity) and bromosulfophthalein (BSP) binding to cytoplasmic Z protein (dye binding inhibited 82.1%). There was no effect on BSP binding to Y protein (see Table 1). Heating the milk to 56 degrees modified the results in the following manner; when the milk was heated immediately after thawing, no inhibitory effect was seen, even after storage for 96 hr. On the other hand, when the milk was first stored at 96 hr and then heated, it had the same inhibitory effects as the milks which were stored without heating. The present study shows that pathologic breast milk will inhibit BSP-Z protein binding only when stored under conditions that also cause the appearance of the capacity to inhibit bilirubin conjugation in vitro, as well as causing the liberation of nonesterified fatty acids. Thus, the appearance of this inhibitory capacity in vitro seems linked to the lipolytic activity particular to pathologic milks.

  14. [Protein nutrition and physical activity].

    PubMed

    Navarro, M P

    1992-09-01

    The relationship between physical exercise and diet in order to optimize performance is getting growing interest. This review examines protein needs and protein intakes as well as the role of protein in the body and the metabolic changes occurring at the synthesis and catabolic levels during exercise. Protein synthesis in muscle or liver, amino acids oxidation, glucose production via gluconeogenesis from amino acids, etc., are modified, and consequently plasma and urinary nitrogen metabolites are affected. A brief comment on the advantages, disadvantages and forms of different protein supplements for sportsmen is given.

  15. Molecular interactions of graphene oxide with human blood plasma proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenry, Affa Affb Affc; Loh, Kian Ping; Lim, Chwee Teck

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the molecular interactions between graphene oxide (GO) and human blood plasma proteins. To gain an insight into the bio-physico-chemical activity of GO in biological and biomedical applications, we performed a series of biophysical assays to quantify the molecular interactions between GO with different lateral size distributions and the three essential human blood plasma proteins. We elucidate the various aspects of the GO-protein interactions, particularly, the adsorption, binding kinetics and equilibrium, and conformational stability, through determination of quantitative parameters, such as GO-protein association constants, binding cooperativity, and the binding-driven protein structural changes. We demonstrate that the molecular interactions between GO and plasma proteins are significantly dependent on the lateral size distribution and mean lateral sizes of the GO nanosheets and their subtle variations may markedly influence the GO-protein interactions. Consequently, we propose the existence of size-dependent molecular interactions between GO nanosheets and plasma proteins, and importantly, the presence of specific critical mean lateral sizes of GO nanosheets in achieving very high association and fluorescence quenching efficiency of the plasma proteins. We anticipate that this work will provide a basis for the design of graphene-based and other related nanomaterials for a plethora of biological and biomedical applications.

  16. Protein-water dynamics in antifreeze protein III activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yao; Bäumer, Alexander; Meister, Konrad; Bischak, Connor G.; DeVries, Arthur L.; Leitner, David M.; Havenith, Martina

    2016-03-01

    We combine Terahertz absorption spectroscopy (THz) and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to investigate the underlying molecular mechanism for the antifreeze activity of one class of antifreeze protein, antifreeze protein type III (AFP-III) with a focus on the collective water hydrogen bond dynamics near the protein. After summarizing our previous work on AFPs, we present a new investigation of the effects of cosolutes on protein antifreeze activity by adding sodium citrate to the protein solution of AFP-III. Our results reveal that for AFP-III, unlike some other AFPs, the addition of the osmolyte sodium citrate does not affect the hydrogen bond dynamics at the protein surface significantly, as indicated by concentration dependent THz measurements. The present data, in combination with our previous THz measurements and molecular simulations, confirm that while long-range solvent perturbation is a necessary condition for the antifreeze activity of AFP-III, the local binding affinity determines the size of the hysteresis.

  17. Phenyl valerate esterase activity of human butyrylcholinesterase.

    PubMed

    Mangas, Iris; Vilanova, Eugenio; Estévez, Jorge

    2017-03-15

    Phenyl valerate is used for detecting and measuring neuropathy target esterase (NTE) and has been used for discriminating esterases as potential target in hen model of organophosphorus delayed neuropathy. In previous studies we observed that phenyl valerate esterase (PVase) activity of an enzymatic fraction in chicken brain might be due to a butyrylcholinesterase protein (BuChE), and it was suggested that this enzymatic fraction could be related to the potentiation/promotion phenomenon of the organophosphate-induced delayed neuropathy (OPIDN). In this work, PVase activity of purified human butyrylcholinesterase (hBuChE) is demonstrated and confirms the novel observation that a relationship of BuChE with PVase activities is also relevant for humans, as is, therefore the potential role in toxicity for humans. The KM and catalytic constant (kcat) were estimated as 0.52/0.72 µM and 45,900/49,200 min(-1) respectively. Furthermore, this work studies the inhibition by preincubation of PVase and cholinesterase activities of hBuChE with irreversible inhibitors (mipafox, iso-OMPA or PMSF), showing that these inhibitors interact similarly in both activities with similar second-order inhibition constants. Acethylthiocholine and phenyl valerate partly inhibit PVase and cholinesterase activities, respectively. All these observations suggest that both activities occur in the same active center. The interaction with a reversible inhibitor (ethopropazine) showed that the cholinesterase activity was more sensitive than the PVase activity, showing that the sensitivity for this reversible inhibitor is affected by the nature of the substrate. The present work definitively establishes the capacity of BuChE to hydrolyze the carboxylester phenyl valerate using a purified enzyme (hBuChE). Therefore, BuChE should be considered in the research of organophosphorus targets of toxicity related with PVase proteins.

  18. Human homologs of the putative G protein-coupled membrane progestin receptors (mPRalpha, beta, and gamma) localize to the endoplasmic reticulum and are not activated by progesterone.

    PubMed

    Krietsch, Tom; Fernandes, Maria Sofia; Kero, Jukka; Lösel, Ralf; Heyens, Maria; Lam, Eric W-F; Huhtaniemi, Ilpo; Brosens, Jan J; Gellersen, Birgit

    2006-12-01

    The steroid hormone progesterone exerts pleiotrophic functions in many cell types. Although progesterone controls transcriptional activation through binding to its nuclear receptors, it also initiates rapid nongenomic signaling events. Recently, three putative membrane progestin receptors (mPRalpha, beta, and gamma) with structural similarity to G protein-coupled receptors have been identified. These mPR isoforms are expressed in a tissue-specific manner and belong to the larger, highly conserved family of progestin and adiponectin receptors found in plants, eubacteria, and eukaryotes. The fish mPRalpha has been reported to mediate progesterone-dependent MAPK activation and inhibition of cAMP production through coupling to an inhibitory G protein. To functionally characterize the human homologs, we established human embryonic kidney 293 and MDA-MB-231 cell lines that stably express human mPRalpha, beta, or gamma. For comparison, we also established cell lines expressing the mPRalpha cloned from the spotted seatrout (Cynoscion nebulosus) and Japanese pufferfish (Takifugu rubripes). Surprisingly, we found no evidence that human or fish mPRs regulate cAMP production or MAPK (ERK1/2 or p38) activation upon progesterone stimulation. Furthermore, the mPRs did not couple to a highly promiscuous G protein subunit, Galpha(q5i), in transfection studies or provoke Ca(2+) mobilization in response to progesterone. Finally, we demonstrate that transfected mPRs, as well as endogenous human mPRalpha, localize to the endoplasmic reticulum, and that their expression does not lead to increased progestin binding either in membrane preparations or in intact cells. Our results therefore do not support the concept that mPRs are plasma membrane receptors involved in transducing nongenomic progesterone actions.

  19. Role of antigen-presenting cells in activation of human T cells by the streptococcal M protein superantigen: requirement for secreted and membrane-associated costimulatory factors.

    PubMed Central

    Majumdar, G; Ohnishi, H; Tomai, M A; Geller, A M; Wang, B; Dockter, M E; Kotb, M

    1993-01-01

    The requirements for T-cell activation by the streptococcal superantigen (SAg), pepsin-extracted M protein from type 5 streptococci (pep M5), were studied by monitoring Ca2+ influx and cell proliferation. Cells from a pep M5-specific T-cell line showed no change in intracellular Ca2+ levels in response to pep M5 when added alone or with freshly isolated autologous antigen-presenting cells (APC). However, after being incubated with pep M5 overnight, the APC secreted soluble factors that together with pep M5 induced a marked increase in intracellular Ca2+ levels in pep M5-specific T cells or freshly isolated, purified T cells. Removal of the SAg from the overnight APC-derived supernatants resulted in loss of the Ca(2+)-mobilizing activity, which was restored within seconds of addition of SAg, suggesting that both the SAg and the soluble factors synergize to induce the Ca2+ influx. Induction of cell proliferation required additional signals inasmuch as the activated APC-derived supernatant failed to synergize with pep M5 to induce the proliferation of purified T cells and required the presence of phorbol myristate acetate for this activity. Metabolically inactive, fixed APC were impaired in their ability to present pep M5 to T cells. Presentation of pep M5 by fixed APC was, however, restored when the APC-derived soluble costimulatory factors were added to the culture. Our data suggest that pep M5-induced activation of T cells is dependent on APC-derived soluble factors and an APC membrane-associated costimulatory molecule(s). These interactions may be important in regulating the in vivo responses to M proteins, could contribute to the severity or progression of infections with Streptococcus pyogenes, and may influence the susceptibility of individuals to its associated nonsuppurative autoimmune sequelae. PMID:8423107

  20. In Vitro Treatment of Human Monocytes/Macrophages with Myristoylated Recombinant Nef of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Leads to the Activation of Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases, IκB Kinases, and Interferon Regulatory Factor 3 and to the Release of Beta Interferon▿

    PubMed Central

    Mangino, Giorgio; Percario, Zulema A.; Fiorucci, Gianna; Vaccari, Gabriele; Manrique, Santiago; Romeo, Giovanna; Federico, Maurizio; Geyer, Matthias; Affabris, Elisabetta

    2007-01-01

    The viral protein Nef is a virulence factor that plays multiple roles during the early and late phases of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) replication. Nef regulates the cell surface expression of critical proteins (including down-regulation of CD4 and major histocompatibility complex class I), T-cell receptor signaling, and apoptosis, inducing proapoptotic effects in uninfected bystander cells and antiapoptotic effects in infected cells. It has been proposed that Nef intersects the CD40 ligand signaling pathway in macrophages, leading to modification in the pattern of secreted factors that appear able to recruit and activate T lymphocytes, rendering them susceptible to HIV infection. There is also increasing evidence that in vitro cell treatment with Nef induces signaling effects. Exogenous Nef treatment is able to induce apoptosis in uninfected T cells, maturation in dendritic cells, and suppression of CD40-dependent immunoglobulin class switching in B cells. Previously, we reported that Nef treatment of primary human monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs) induces a cycloheximide-independent activation of NF-κB and the synthesis and secretion of a set of chemokines/cytokines that activate STAT1 and STAT3. Here, we show that Nef treatment is capable of hijacking cellular signaling pathways, inducing a very rapid regulatory response in MDMs that is characterized by the rapid and transient phosphorylation of the α and β subunits of the IκB kinase complex and of JNK, ERK1/2, and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase family members. In addition, we have observed the activation of interferon regulatory factor 3, leading to the synthesis of beta interferon mRNA and protein, which in turn induces STAT2 phosphorylation. All of these effects require Nef myristoylation. PMID:17182689

  1. Biologically active proteins from natural product extracts.

    PubMed

    O'Keefe, B R

    2001-10-01

    The term "biologically active proteins" is almost redundant. All proteins produced by living creatures are, by their very nature, biologically active to some extent in their homologous species. In this review, a subset of these proteins will be discussed that are biologically active in heterologous systems. The isolation and characterization of novel proteins from natural product extracts including those derived from microorganisms, plants, insects, terrestrial vertebrates, and marine organisms will be reviewed and grouped into several distinct classes based on their biological activity and their structure.

  2. The Activation-Induced Assembly of an RNA/Protein Interactome Centered on the Splicing Factor U2AF2 Regulates Gene Expression in Human CD4 T Cells.

    PubMed

    Whisenant, Thomas C; Peralta, Eigen R; Aarreberg, Lauren D; Gao, Nina J; Head, Steven R; Ordoukhanian, Phillip; Williamson, Jamie R; Salomon, Daniel R

    2015-01-01

    Activation of CD4 T cells is a reaction to challenges such as microbial pathogens, cancer and toxins that defines adaptive immune responses. The roles of T cell receptor crosslinking, intracellular signaling, and transcription factor activation are well described, but the importance of post-transcriptional regulation by RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) has not been considered in depth. We describe a new model expanding and activating primary human CD4 T cells and applied this to characterizing activation-induced assembly of splicing factors centered on U2AF2. We immunoprecipitated U2AF2 to identify what mRNA transcripts were bound as a function of activation by TCR crosslinking and costimulation. In parallel, mass spectrometry revealed the proteins incorporated into the U2AF2-centered RNA/protein interactome. Molecules that retained interaction with the U2AF2 complex after RNAse treatment were designated as "central" interactome members (CIMs). Mass spectrometry also identified a second class of activation-induced proteins, "peripheral" interactome members (PIMs), that bound to the same transcripts but were not in physical association with U2AF2 or its partners. siRNA knockdown of two CIMs and two PIMs caused changes in activation marker expression, cytokine secretion, and gene expression that were unique to each protein and mapped to pathways associated with key aspects of T cell activation. While knocking down the PIM, SYNCRIP, impacts a limited but immunologically important set of U2AF2-bound transcripts, knockdown of U2AF1 significantly impairs assembly of the majority of protein and mRNA components in the activation-induced interactome. These results demonstrated that CIMs and PIMs, either directly or indirectly through RNA, assembled into activation-induced U2AF2 complexes and play roles in post-transcriptional regulation of genes related to cytokine secretion. These data suggest an additional layer of regulation mediated by the activation-induced assembly of RNA

  3. The Activation-Induced Assembly of an RNA/Protein Interactome Centered on the Splicing Factor U2AF2 Regulates Gene Expression in Human CD4 T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Aarreberg, Lauren D.; Gao, Nina J.; Head, Steven R.; Ordoukhanian, Phillip; Williamson, Jamie R.; Salomon, Daniel R.

    2015-01-01

    Activation of CD4 T cells is a reaction to challenges such as microbial pathogens, cancer and toxins that defines adaptive immune responses. The roles of T cell receptor crosslinking, intracellular signaling, and transcription factor activation are well described, but the importance of post-transcriptional regulation by RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) has not been considered in depth. We describe a new model expanding and activating primary human CD4 T cells and applied this to characterizing activation-induced assembly of splicing factors centered on U2AF2. We immunoprecipitated U2AF2 to identify what mRNA transcripts were bound as a function of activation by TCR crosslinking and costimulation. In parallel, mass spectrometry revealed the proteins incorporated into the U2AF2-centered RNA/protein interactome. Molecules that retained interaction with the U2AF2 complex after RNAse treatment were designated as “central” interactome members (CIMs). Mass spectrometry also identified a second class of activation-induced proteins, “peripheral” interactome members (PIMs), that bound to the same transcripts but were not in physical association with U2AF2 or its partners. siRNA knockdown of two CIMs and two PIMs caused changes in activation marker expression, cytokine secretion, and gene expression that were unique to each protein and mapped to pathways associated with key aspects of T cell activation. While knocking down the PIM, SYNCRIP, impacts a limited but immunologically important set of U2AF2-bound transcripts, knockdown of U2AF1 significantly impairs assembly of the majority of protein and mRNA components in the activation-induced interactome. These results demonstrated that CIMs and PIMs, either directly or indirectly through RNA, assembled into activation-induced U2AF2 complexes and play roles in post-transcriptional regulation of genes related to cytokine secretion. These data suggest an additional layer of regulation mediated by the activation-induced assembly

  4. Prediction of Extracellular Proteases of the Human Pathogen Helicobacter pylori Reveals Proteolytic Activity of the Hp1018/19 Protein HtrA

    PubMed Central

    Löwer, Martin; Weydig, Christiane; Metzler, Dirk; Reuter, Andreas; Starzinski-Powitz, Anna

    2008-01-01

    Exported proteases of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) are potentially involved in pathogen-associated disorders leading to gastric inflammation and neoplasia. By comprehensive sequence screening of the H. pylori proteome for predicted secreted proteases, we retrieved several candidate genes. We detected caseinolytic activities of several such proteases, which are released independently from the H. pylori type IV secretion system encoded by the cag pathogenicity island (cagPAI). Among these, we found the predicted serine protease HtrA (Hp1019), which was previously identified in the bacterial secretome of H. pylori. Importantly, we further found that the H. pylori genes hp1018 and hp1019 represent a single gene likely coding for an exported protein. Here, we directly verified proteolytic activity of HtrA in vitro and identified the HtrA protease in zymograms by mass spectrometry. Overexpressed and purified HtrA exhibited pronounced proteolytic activity, which is inactivated after mutation of Ser205 to alanine in the predicted active center of HtrA. These data demonstrate that H. pylori secretes HtrA as an active protease, which might represent a novel candidate target for therapeutic intervention strategies. PMID:18946507

  5. Prediction of extracellular proteases of the human pathogen Helicobacter pylori reveals proteolytic activity of the Hp1018/19 protein HtrA.

    PubMed

    Löwer, Martin; Weydig, Christiane; Metzler, Dirk; Reuter, Andreas; Starzinski-Powitz, Anna; Wessler, Silja; Schneider, Gisbert

    2008-01-01

    Exported proteases of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) are potentially involved in pathogen-associated disorders leading to gastric inflammation and neoplasia. By comprehensive sequence screening of the H. pylori proteome for predicted secreted proteases, we retrieved several candidate genes. We detected caseinolytic activities of several such proteases, which are released independently from the H. pylori type IV secretion system encoded by the cag pathogenicity island (cagPAI). Among these, we found the predicted serine protease HtrA (Hp1019), which was previously identified in the bacterial secretome of H. pylori. Importantly, we further found that the H. pylori genes hp1018 and hp1019 represent a single gene likely coding for an exported protein. Here, we directly verified proteolytic activity of HtrA in vitro and identified the HtrA protease in zymograms by mass spectrometry. Overexpressed and purified HtrA exhibited pronounced proteolytic activity, which is inactivated after mutation of Ser205 to alanine in the predicted active center of HtrA. These data demonstrate that H. pylori secretes HtrA as an active protease, which might represent a novel candidate target for therapeutic intervention strategies.

  6. Canine distemper virus neutralization activity is low in human serum and it is sensitive to an amino acid substitution in the hemagglutinin protein.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xinsheng; Wallace, Olivia L; Domi, Arban; Wright, Kevin J; Driscoll, Jonathan; Anzala, Omu; Sanders, Eduard J; Kamali, Anatoli; Karita, Etienne; Allen, Susan; Fast, Pat; Gilmour, Jill; Price, Matt A; Parks, Christopher L

    2015-08-01

    Serum was analyzed from 146 healthy adult volunteers in eastern Africa to evaluate measles virus (MV) and canine distemper virus (CDV) neutralizing antibody (nAb) prevalence and potency. MV plaque reduction neutralization test (PRNT) results indicated that all sera were positive for MV nAbs. Furthermore, the 50% neutralizing dose (ND50) for the majority of sera corresponded to antibody titers induced by MV vaccination. CDV nAbs titers were low and generally were detected in sera with high MV nAb titers. A mutant CDV was generated that was less sensitive to neutralization by human serum. The mutant virus genome had 10 nucleotide substitutions, which coded for single amino acid substitutions in the fusion (F) and hemagglutinin (H) glycoproteins and two substitutions in the large polymerase (L) protein. The H substitution occurred in a conserved region involved in receptor interactions among morbilliviruses, implying that this region is a target for cross-reactive neutralizing antibodies.

  7. PDGF-induced receptor phosphorylation and phosphoinositide hydrolysis are unaffected by protein kinase C activation in mouse swiss 3T3 and human skin fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Sturani, E.; Vicentini, L.M.; Zippel, R.; Toschi, L.; Pandiella-Alonso, A.; Comoglio, P.M.; Meldolesi, J.

    1986-05-29

    Short (1-10 min) pretreatment of intact cells with activators of protein kinase C (e.g. phorbol-12 myristate, 13-acetate, PMA) affects the activity of a variety of surface receptors (for growth factors, hormones and neurotransmitters), with inhibition of transmembrane signal generation. In two types of fibroblasts it is demonstrated that the PDGF receptor is unaffected by PMA. Exposure to PMA at concentrations up to 100 nM for 10 min failed to inhibit either one of the agonist-induced, receptor-coupled responses of PDGF: the autophosphorylation of receptor molecules at tyrosine residues, and the hydrolysis of membrane polyphosphoinositides. In contrast, the EGF receptor autophosphorylation (in A 431 cells) and the bombesin-induced phosphoinositide hydrolysis were readily inhibited by PMA.

  8. Occurrence of autoantibodies to intermediate filament proteins in human visceral leishmaniasis and their induction by experimental polyclonal B-cell activation.

    PubMed Central

    Böhme, M W; Evans, D A; Miles, M A; Holborow, E J

    1986-01-01

    Fifteen sera of patients with visceral leishmaniasis were investigated for the occurrence of autoantibodies. They were found in high incidence and titre, and with specificity to the intermediate filament (INFIL) proteins vimentin (12 out of 15 with a titre higher than 1:10) and keratin (9 out of 15 with a titre higher than 1:10) as well as to speckled anti-nuclear antigens (ANA). Additionally, supernatants of Leishmania major and Leishmania donovani cultures containing soluble parasite-derived antigens were mitogenic to cultures of mononuclear cells (MNC) obtained from healthy donors without specific antibodies to leishmanial antigens. The activation of MNC resulted in significant immunoglobulin production, some of which demonstrated autoantibody specificity to INFIL. The co-operation of monocytes, T cells and B cells was required in order to obtain maximal stimulation. The importance of polyclonal B-cell activation for the genesis and occurrence of autoantibodies in visceral leishmaniasis is discussed. PMID:3492440

  9. Cyclosporin A promotes proliferating cell nuclear antigen expression and migration of human cytotrophoblast cells via the mitgen-activated protein kinase-3/1-mediated nuclear factor-κB signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Wang, Song-Cun; Yu, Min; Li, Yan-Hong; Piao, Hai-Lan; Tang, Chuan-Lin; Sun, Chan; Zhu, Rui; Li, Ming Qing; Jin, Li-Ping; Li, Da-Jin; Du, Mei-Rong

    2013-01-01

    Our previous studies have demonstrated that cyclosporin A (CsA) promotes the proliferation and migration of human trophoblasts via the mitgen-activated protein kinase-3/1 (MAPK3/1) pathway. In the present study, we further investigated the role of nuclear factor (NF)-κB in the CsA-induced trophoblast proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) expression and migration, and its relationship to MAPK3/1 signal. Flow cytometry was used to analyze the expression of PCNA in trophoblasts. The migration of human primary trophoblasts was determined by wound-healing assay and transwell migration assay. Western blot analysis was performed to evaluate the activation of NF-κB p65 and NF-κB inhibitory protein I-κB in human trophoblasts. We found that treatment with CsA promotes PCNA expression and migration of human trophoblast in a dose-associated manner. Blocking of the MAPK3/1 signal abrogated the enhanced PCNA expression and migration in trophoblasts by CsA. In addition, CsA increased the phosphorylation of NF-κB p65 and the inhibitor I-κB in human trophoblasts in a time-related manner. Pretreatment with MAPK3/1 inhibitor U0126 abrogated the phosphorylation of NF-κB p65 and I-κB. Accordingly, the CsA-induced enhancement of PCNA expression and migration in trophoblasts was also decreased. This CsA-induced enhancement in the expression and migration of trophoblasts was abolished by pretreatment with pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate, a specific NF-κB inhibitor. Thus, our results suggest that CsA promotes PCNA expression and migration of human trophoblasts via MAPK-mediated NF-κB activation.

  10. Mitogen-activated protein kinases and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase are involved in Prevotella intermedia-induced proinflammatory cytokines expression in human periodontal ligament cells.

    PubMed

    Guan, Su-Min; Zhang, Ming; He, Jian-Jun; Wu, Jun-Zheng

    2009-08-28

    Chronic periodontitis is an inflammatory disease affecting periodontal connective tissues and alveolar bone. Proinflammatory mediators induced by periodontal pathogens play vital roles in the initiation and progression of the disease. In this study, we examined whether Prevotella intermedia induces proinflammatory cytokines expression in human periodontal ligament cells (hPDLs). The mRNA expression and protein production were determined by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay (ELISA) respectively. P. intermedia treatment dose- and time-dependently increased IL-6, IL-8 and M-CSF, but not IL-1beta and TNF-alpha mRNA expression and protein secretion. Preincubation of hPDLs with extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), p38 kinase and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitors PD98059, SP600125, SB203580 and LY294002 resulted in significant reduction in P. intermedia-induced IL-6, IL-8 and M-CSF expression. Blocking the synthesis of prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) by indomethacin also abolished the stimulatory effects of P. intermedia on cytokines expression. Our results indicate that P. intermedia induces proinflammatory cytokines through MAPKs and PI3K signaling pathways, and PGE(2) is involved in the P. intermedia-induced proinflammatory cytokines upregulation.

  11. [Virucidal activity of disinfectants. Influence of the serum protein upon the virucidal activity of disinfectants].

    PubMed

    Noda, M; Matsuda, S; Kobayashi, M

    2000-08-01

    Five disinfectants were tested for virucidal activity on three DNA viruses and three RNA viruses in the presence or absence of serum protein. Disinfectants of the aldehyde and halogen groups had a virucidal activity on human herpes virus, bovine rhabdo virus, human immunodeficiency virus, human adeno virus, porcine parvo virus, and polio virus. Disinfectants of the invert and amphoteric soap groups, and biganide group had a destructive effect on RNA and DNA viruses possessing an envelope. The presence of serum protein exerted great influence upon the virucidal activity of disinfectants of the invert and amphoteric soap groups.

  12. Determination of in vivo protein synthesis in human palatine tonsil.

    PubMed

    Januszkiewicz, Anna; Klaude, Maria; Loré, Karin; Andersson, Jan; Ringdén, Olle; Rooyackers, Olav; Wernerman, Jan

    2005-02-01

    The palatine tonsils are constantly exposed to ingested or inhaled antigens which, in turn, lead to a permanent activation of tonsillar immune cells, even in a basic physiological state. The aim of the present study was to investigate if the immunological activation of the human palatine tonsil is reflected by a high metabolic activity, as determined by in vivo measurement of protein synthesis. The protein synthesis rate of the tonsil was also compared with that of the circulating T-lymphocytes, the total blood mononuclear cells and the whole population of blood leucocytes. Phenotypic characterization of immune-competent cells in tonsil tissue and blood was performed by flow cytometry. Pinch tonsil biopsies were taken after induction of anaesthesia in healthy adult patients (n=12) scheduled for ear surgery, uvulopalatopharyngoplasty or nose surgery. Protein synthesis was quantitatively determined during a 90-min period by a flooding-dose technique. The in vivo protein synthesis rate in the palatine tonsils was 22.8+/-5.7%/24 h (mean+/-S.D.), whereas protein synthesis in the circulating T-lymphocytes was 10.7+/-3.4%/24 h, in mononuclear cells was 10.8+/-2.8%/24 h and in leucocytes was 3.2+/-1.2%/24 h. CD3+ lymphocytes were the most abundant cell population in the tonsil. The in vivo protein synthesis rate in human tonsils was higher compared with the circulating immune cells. This high metabolic rate may reflect the permanent immunological activity present in human tonsils, although cell phenotypes and activity markers do not explain the differences.

  13. Activation of protein kinase CK2 attenuates FOXO3a functioning in a PML-dependent manner: implications in human prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, A; Chatterjee, U; Ghosh, M K

    2013-01-01

    Protein kinase CK2 (also known as Caseine Kinase II) is an ubiquitous Ser/Thr protein kinase present in both the nucleus and cytoplasm of cells, targeting several key enzymes, growth factor receptors, transcription factors and cytoskeletal proteins. It is not only a key player in regulating cellular growth and proliferation, but also behaves as a potent suppressor of apoptosis. CK2 has been frequently found to be deregulated (mostly hyperactivated) in all cancers, prostate cancer being prominent of them. In the recent past, tumor suppressor PML (promyelocytic leukemia) has been shown to be a target of phosphorylation by CK2. This phosphorylation promotes the ubiquitin-mediated proteasomal degradation of PML thereby effectively curbing its role as a tumor suppressor. Among many others, PML has also been established to mediate its tumor suppressive role by mitigating the inactivation of active AKT (pAKT) inside the nucleus by assembling a dephosphorylating platform for nuclear pAKT. One of the immediate consequences, of this inactivation is the stabilization of FOXO3a, another well-established tumor suppressor, inside the nucleus and its downstream activities. Here, we propose a novel signaling axis apexed by deregulated CK2, dismantling the association of PML and PHLPP2 (we also report PHLPP2 to be a novel interacting partner of PML inside the nucleus), ultimately leading to the inactivation and nuclear exclusion of FOXO3a, thereby downregulating p21/p27/Bim in which degradation of PML and the concomitant stabilization of pAKT plays a cardinal part. PMID:23492774

  14. Chemoproteomic profiling and discovery of protein electrophiles in human cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, Megan L.; He, Lin; Horning, Benjamin D.; Olson, Erika J.; Correia, Bruno E.; Yates, John R.; Dawson, Philip E.; Cravatt, Benjamin F.

    2016-10-01

    Activity-based protein profiling (ABPP) serves as a chemical proteomic platform to discover and characterize functional amino acids in proteins on the basis of their enhanced reactivity towards small-molecule probes. This approach, to date, has mainly targeted nucleophilic functional groups, such as the side chains of serine and cysteine, using electrophilic probes. Here we show that 'reverse-polarity' (RP)-ABPP using clickable, nucleophilic hydrazine probes can capture and identify protein-bound electrophiles in cells. Using this approach, we demonstrate that the pyruvoyl cofactor of S-adenosyl-L-methionine decarboxylase (AMD1) is dynamically controlled by intracellular methionine concentrations. We also identify a heretofore unknown modification—an N-terminally bound glyoxylyl group—in the poorly characterized protein secernin-3. RP-ABPP thus provides a versatile method to monitor the metabolic regulation of electrophilic cofactors and discover novel types of electrophilic modifications on proteins in human cells.

  15. 21 CFR 640.90 - Plasma Protein Fraction (Human).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Plasma Protein Fraction (Human). 640.90 Section...) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Plasma Protein Fraction (Human) § 640.90 Plasma Protein Fraction (Human). (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of the product shall...

  16. 21 CFR 640.90 - Plasma Protein Fraction (Human).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Plasma Protein Fraction (Human). 640.90 Section 640...) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Plasma Protein Fraction (Human) § 640.90 Plasma Protein Fraction (Human). (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of the product shall...

  17. 21 CFR 640.90 - Plasma Protein Fraction (Human).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Plasma Protein Fraction (Human). 640.90 Section...) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Plasma Protein Fraction (Human) § 640.90 Plasma Protein Fraction (Human). (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of the product shall...

  18. 21 CFR 640.90 - Plasma Protein Fraction (Human).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Plasma Protein Fraction (Human). 640.90 Section...) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Plasma Protein Fraction (Human) § 640.90 Plasma Protein Fraction (Human). (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of the product shall...

  19. 21 CFR 640.90 - Plasma Protein Fraction (Human).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Plasma Protein Fraction (Human). 640.90 Section...) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Plasma Protein Fraction (Human) § 640.90 Plasma Protein Fraction (Human). (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of the product shall...

  20. Activated Protein C action in inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Sarangi, Pranita P.; Lee, Hyun-wook; Kim, Minsoo

    2010-01-01

    Summary Activated protein C (APC) is a natural anticoagulant that plays an important role in coagulation homeostasis by inactivating the procoagulation factor Va and VIIIa. In addition to its anticoagulation functions, APC also has cytoprotective effects such as anti-inflammatory, anti-apoptotic, and endothelial barrier protection. Recently, a recombinant form of human APC (rhAPC or drotrecogin alfa activated; known commercially as “Xigris”) was approved by the US Federal Drug Administration for treatment of severe sepsis associated with a high risk of mortality. Sepsis, also known as systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) resulting from infection, is a serious medical condition in critical care patients. In sepsis, hyperactive and dysregulated inflammatory responses lead to secretion of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines, activation and migration of leucocytes, activation of coagulation, inhibition of fibrinolysis, and increased apoptosis. Although initial hypotheses focused on antithrombotic and profibrinolytic functions of APC in sepsis, other agents with more potent anticoagulation functions were not effective in treating severe sepsis. Furthermore, APC therapy is also associated with the risk of severe bleeding in treated patients. Therefore, the cytoprotective effects, rather than the anticoagulant effect of APC are postulated to be responsible for the therapeutic benefit of APC in the treatment of severe sepsis. PMID:19995397

  1. Lack of Relationship between Cord Serum Angiopoietin-Like Protein 4 (ANGPTL4) and Lipolytic Activity in Human Neonates Born by Spontaneous Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Ortega-Senovilla, Henar; Schaefer-Graf, Ute; Meitzner, Katrin; Graf, Kristof; Abou-Dakn, Michael; Herrera, Emilio

    2013-01-01

    Background Ligands of peroxisome-proliferator activated receptors (PPARs), such as non-esterified fatty acids (NEFAs), induce expression of angiopoietin-like protein 4 (ANGPTL4). Recently ANGPTL4 has been reported to be a mediator of intracellular adipose lipolysis induced by glucocorticoids. Objective To determine the concentrations of ANGPTL4 in cord serum of neonates born by spontaneous vaginal delivery (SVD) and by pre-labor cesarean section (CS) from healthy women, and to relate them to parameters of neonatal lipolytic activity at birth. Measurements In 54 neonates born by SVD and in 56 neonates born by CS, arterial cord blood was drawn to determine insulin, cortisol, triacylglycerols (TAGs), glycerol, non-esterified fatty acids (NEFAs), individual fatty acids, ANGPTL4, adiponectin, retinol binding protein 4 (RBP4) and leptin. Results Birth weight and neonatal fat mass in SVD and CS showed no difference, but the concentrations of glycerol, adiponectin, RBP4, NEFAs and most individual fatty acids were higher in cord serum of neonates born by SVD compared to CS, indicating a higher adipose tissue breakdown in the SVD group. The concentrations of TAG and cortisol were also higher and that of insulin was lower in cord serum of SVD compared to the CS group. However, the concentration in cord serum of ANGPTL4 did not differ between the two groups and no positive correlation with either NEFA or glycerol concentrations were detected. Conclusion ANGPTL4 is known to stimulate lipolysis in adults, but does not appear to mediate the increased activity in SVD, indicating the presence of different regulatory inputs. PMID:24324678

  2. Expression and biochemical characterization of recombinant human epididymis protein 4.

    PubMed

    Hua, Ling; Liu, Yunhui; Zhen, Shuai; Wan, Deyou; Cao, Jiyue; Gao, Xin

    2014-10-01

    Whey acidic proteins (WAP) belong to a large gene family of antibacterial peptides that perform critical immune system functions. The function of human epididymis protein 4 (HE4), a 124-amino acid long polypeptide that has two whey acidic protein four-disulfide core (WFDC) domains, is not well studied. Here, a fusion gene encoding the HE4 protein fused to an IgG1 Fc domain was constructed. The recombinant HE4 protein was expressed as a secretory protein in Pichia pastoris and mammalian HEK293-F cells and was subsequently purified. Our data suggested that the HE4 protein produced by these two expression systems bound to both gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria, but demonstrated slightly inhibitory activity towards the growth of Staphylococcus aureus. Moreover, HE4 exhibited proteinase inhibitory activity towards trypsin, elastase, matrix metallopeptidase 9, and the secretory proteinases from Bacillus subtilis. The effects of glycosylation on the biochemical characterization of HE4 were also investigated. LC-ESI-MS glycosylation analysis showed that the high-mannose glycosylated form of HE4 expressed by P. pastoris has lower biological activity when compared to its complex-glycosylated form produced from HEK293-F cells. The implications of this are discussed, which may be provide theoretical basis for its important role in the development of cancer and innate immune system.

  3. Intrinsic Patterns of Human Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Kun; Ivanov, Plamen Ch.; Chen, Zhi; Hilton, Michael; Stanley, H. Eugene; Shea, Steven

    2003-03-01

    Activity is one of the defining features of life. Control of human activity is complex, being influenced by many factors both extrinsic and intrinsic to the body. The most obvious extrinsic factors that affect activity are the daily schedule of planned events, such as work and recreation, as well as reactions to unforeseen or random events. These extrinsic factors may account for the apparently random fluctuations in human motion observed over short time scales. The most obvious intrinsic factors are the body clocks including the circadian pacemaker that influences our sleep/wake cycle and ultradian oscillators with shorter time scales [2, 3]. These intrinsic rhythms may account for the underlying regularity in average activity level over longer periods of up to 24 h. Here we ask if the known extrinsic and intrinsic factors fully account for all complex features observed in recordings of human activity. To this end, we measure activity over two weeks from forearm motion in subjects undergoing their regular daily routine. Utilizing concepts from statistical physics, we demonstrate that during wakefulness human activity possesses previously unrecognized complex dynamic patterns. These patterns of activity are characterized by robust fractal and nonlinear dynamics including a universal probability distribution and long-range power-law correlations that are stable over a wide range of time scales (from minutes to hours). Surprisingly, we find that these dynamic patterns are unaffected by changes in the average activity level that occur within individual subjects throughout the day and on different days of the week, and between subjects. Moreover, we find that these patterns persist when the same subjects undergo time-isolation laboratory experiments designed to account for the phase of the circadian pacemaker, and control the known extrinsic factors by restricting behaviors and manipulating scheduled events including the sleep/wake cycle. We attribute these newly

  4. Hepatitis C virus core protein inhibits interferon production by a human plasmacytoid dendritic cell line and dysregulates interferon regulatory factor-7 and signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) 1 protein expression.

    PubMed

    Stone, Amy E L; Mitchell, Angela; Brownell, Jessica; Miklin, Daniel J; Golden-Mason, Lucy; Polyak, Stephen J; Gale, Michael J; Rosen, Hugo R

    2014-01-01

    Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells (pDCs) represent a key immune cell population in the defense against viruses. pDCs detect viral pathogen associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) through pattern recognition receptors (PRR). PRR/PAMP interactions trigger signaling events that induce interferon (IFN) production to initiate local and systemic responses. pDCs produce Type I and Type III (IFNL) IFNs in response to HCV RNA. Extracellular HCV core protein (Core) is found in the circulation in chronic infection. This study defined how Core modulates PRR signaling in pDCs. Type I and III IFN expression and production following exposure to recombinant Core or β-galactosiade was assessed in human GEN2.2 cells, a pDC cell line. Core suppressed type I and III IFN production in response to TLR agonists and the HCV PAMP agonist of RIG-I. Core suppression of IFN induction was linked with decreased IRF-7 protein levels and increased non-phosphorylated STAT1 protein. Circulating Core protein interferes with PRR signaling by pDCs to suppress IFN production. Strategies to define and target Core effects on pDCs may serve to enhance IFN production and antiviral actions against HCV.

  5. Phospholipid transfer protein in human plasma associates with proteins linked to immunity and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Marian C; Vaisar, Tomás; Han, Xianlin; Heinecke, Jay W; Albers, John J

    2010-08-31

    Phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP), which associates with apolipoprotein A-I (the major HDL protein), plays a key role in lipoprotein remodeling. Because its level in plasma increases during acute inflammation, it may also play previously unsuspected roles in the innate immune system. To gain further insight into its potential physiological functions, we isolated complexes containing PLTP from plasma by immunoaffinity chromatography and determined their composition. Shotgun proteomics revealed that only 6 of the 24 proteins detected in the complexes were apolipoproteins. The most abundant proteins were clusterin (apoJ), PLTP itself, coagulation factors, complement factors, and apoA-I. Remarkably, 20 of the 24 proteins had known protein-protein interactions. Biochemical studies confirmed two previously established interactions and identified five new ones between PLTP and proteins. Moreover, clusterin, apoA-I, and apoE preserved the lipid-transfer activity of recombinant PLTP in the absence of lipid, indicating that these interactions may have functional significance. Unexpectedly, lipids accounted for only 3% of the mass of the PLTP complexes. Collectively, our observations indicate that PLTP in human plasma resides on lipid-poor complexes dominated by clusterin and proteins implicated in host defense and inflammation. They further suggest that protein-protein interactions drive the formation of PLTP complexes in plasma.

  6. Cytochalasin B binding proteins in human erythrocyte membranes. Modulation of glucose sensitivity by site interaction and partial solubilization of binding activities.

    PubMed

    Pinkofsky, H B; Rampal, A L; Cowden, M A; Jung, C Y

    1978-07-25

    We have previously described three different cytochalasin B binding sites in human erythrocyte membranes, a D-glucose-sensitive site (Site I), a cytochalasin E-sensitive site (Site II), and a site (Site III) insensitive to both D-glucose and cytochalasin E. Ligand bindings to each of these sites were considered to be independent (Jung, C., and Rampal, A. (1977) J. Biol. Chem. 252, 5456-5463). However, we have obtained subsequently the following evidence which indicated that an interaction occurs between Sites II and III, and this modulates sensitivity of Site III to the sugar. The displacement of cytochalasin E greatly exceeds the sum of their independent displacements. This ghosts extracted with EDTA