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Sample records for activated immune cells

  1. Measurement of myeloid cell immune suppressive activity.

    PubMed

    Dolcetti, Luigi; Peranzoni, Elisa; Bronte, Vincenzo

    2010-11-01

    This unit presents simple methods to assess the immunosuppressive properties of immunoregulatory cells of myeloid origin, such as myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), both in vitro and in vivo. These methods are general and could be adapted to test the impact of different suppressive populations on T cell activation, proliferation, and cytotoxic activity; moreover they could be useful to assess the influence exerted on immune suppressive pathways by genetic modifications, chemical inhibitors, and drugs.

  2. In vitro amoebicidal activity of immune cells.

    PubMed Central

    Ghadirian, E; Meerovitch, E

    1982-01-01

    The amoebicidal activity of peripheral blood lymphocytes and spleen and peritoneal cells from hamsters vaccinated against or protected from hepatic amoebiasis and from those with hepatic amoebiasis was investigated. Peripheral blood lymphocytes and peritoneal and spleen cells from vaccinated or protected animals can kill trophozoites of Entamoeba histolytica in vitro. In contrast, spleen cells from infected hamsters showed no significant cytotoxic effect on the parasite. These data suggest that cellular immunity plays an important role in host defense against hepatic amoebiasis. PMID:6281189

  3. Immune activation: death, danger and dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Pulendran, Bali

    2004-01-06

    Dendritic cells are critical for host immunity, and sense microbes with pathogen recognition receptors. New evidence indicates that these cells also sense uric acid crystals in dead cells, suggesting that the immune system is conscious not only of pathogens, but also of death and danger.

  4. Reovirus activates human dendritic cells to promote innate antitumor immunity.

    PubMed

    Errington, Fiona; Steele, Lynette; Prestwich, Robin; Harrington, Kevin J; Pandha, Hardev S; Vidal, Laura; de Bono, Johann; Selby, Peter; Coffey, Matt; Vile, Richard; Melcher, Alan

    2008-05-01

    Oncolytic viruses can exert their antitumor activity via direct oncolysis or activation of antitumor immunity. Although reovirus is currently under clinical investigation for the treatment of localized or disseminated cancer, any potential immune contribution to its efficacy has not been addressed. This is the first study to investigate the ability of reovirus to activate human dendritic cells (DC), key regulators of both innate and adaptive immune responses. Reovirus induced DC maturation and stimulated the production of the proinflammatory cytokines IFN-alpha, TNF-alpha, IL-12p70, and IL-6. Activation of DC by reovirus was not dependent on viral replication, while cytokine production (but not phenotypic maturation) was inhibited by blockade of PKR and NF-kappaB signaling. Upon coculture with autologous NK cells, reovirus-activated DC up-regulated IFN-gamma production and increased NK cytolytic activity. Moreover, short-term coculture of reovirus-activated DC with autologous T cells also enhanced T cell cytokine secretion (IL-2 and IFN-gamma) and induced non-Ag restricted tumor cell killing. These data demonstrate for the first time that reovirus directly activates human DC and that reovirus-activated DC stimulate innate killing by not only NK cells, but also T cells, suggesting a novel potential role for T cells in oncolytic virus-induced local tumor cell death. Hence reovirus recognition by DC may trigger innate effector mechanisms to complement the virus's direct cytotoxicity, potentially enhancing the efficacy of reovirus as a therapeutic agent.

  5. Tim-3: an activation marker and activation limiter of innate immune cells.

    PubMed

    Han, Gencheng; Chen, Guojiang; Shen, Beifen; Li, Yan

    2013-12-10

    Tim-3 was initially identified on activated Th1, Th17, and Tc1 cells and induces T cell death or exhaustion after binding to its ligand, Gal-9. The observed relationship between dysregulated Tim-3 expression on T cells and the progression of many clinical diseases has identified this molecule as an important target for intervention in adaptive immunity. Recent data have shown that it also plays critical roles in regulating the activities of macrophages, monocytes, dendritic cells, mast cells, natural killer cells, and endothelial cells. Although the underlying mechanisms remain unclear, dysregulation of Tim-3 expression on these innate immune cells leads to an excessive or inhibited inflammatory response and subsequent autoimmune damage or viral or tumor evasion. In this review, we focus on the expression and function of Tim-3 on innate immune cells and discuss (1) how Tim-3 is expressed and regulated on different innate immune cells; (2) how it affects the activity of different innate immune cells; and (3) how dysregulated Tim-3 expression on innate immune cells affects adaptive immunity and disease progression. Tim-3 is involved in the optimal activation of innate immune cells through its varied expression. A better understanding of the physiopathological role of the Tim-3 pathway in innate immunity will shed new light on the pathogenesis of clinical diseases, such as autoimmune diseases, chronic viral infections, and cancer, and suggest new approaches to intervention.

  6. Metabolic pathways in immune cell activation and quiescence.

    PubMed

    Pearce, Erika L; Pearce, Edward J

    2013-04-18

    Studies of immune system metabolism ("immunometabolism") segregate along two paths. The first investigates the effects of immune cells on organs that regulate whole-body metabolism, such as adipose tissue and liver. The second explores the role of metabolic pathways within immune cells and how this regulates immune response outcome. Distinct metabolic pathways diverge and converge at many levels, and, therefore, cells face choices as to how to achieve their metabolic goals. There is interest in fully understanding how and why immune cells commit to particular metabolic fates and in elucidating the immunologic consequences of reaching a metabolic endpoint by one pathway versus another. This is particularly intriguing, given that metabolic commitment is influenced not only by substrate availability but also by signaling pathways elicited by metabolites. Thus, metabolic choices in cells enforce fate and function, and this area will be the subject of this review.

  7. An Engineered Herpesvirus Activates Dendritic Cells and Induces Protective Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yijie; Chen, Min; Jin, Huali; Prabhakar, Bellur S.; Valyi-Nagy, Tibor; He, Bin

    2017-01-01

    Herpes simplex viruses (HSV) are human pathogens that switch between lytic and latent infection. While attenuated HSV is explored for vaccine, the underlying event remains poorly defined. Here we report that recombinant HSV-1 with a mutation in the γ134.5 protein, a virulence factor, stimulates dendritic cell (DC) maturation which is dependent on TANK-binding kinase 1 (TBK1). When exposed to CD11+ DCs, the mutant virus that lacks the amino terminus of γ134.5 undergoes temporal replication without production of infectious virus. Mechanistically, this leads to sequential phosphorylation of interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) and p65/RelA. In correlation, DCs up-regulate the expression of co-stimulatory molecules and cytokines. However, selective inhibition of TBK1 precludes phosphorylation of IRF3 and subsequent DC activation by the γ134.5 mutant. Herein, the γ134.5 mutant is immune-stimulatory and non-destructive to DCs. Remarkably, upon immunization the γ134.5 mutant induces protection against lethal challenge by the wild type virus, indicative of its vaccine potential. Furthermore, CD11+ DCs primed by the γ134.5 mutant in vivo mediate protection upon adoptive transfer. These results suggest that activation of TBK1 by engineered HSV is crucial for DC maturation, which may contribute to protective immunity. PMID:28150813

  8. Immune cells recruitment and activation by Tityus serrulatus scorpion venom.

    PubMed

    Fialho, Eder M S; Maciel, Márcia C G; Silva, Arlley C B; Reis, Aramys S; Assunção, Anne Karine M; Fortes, Thiare S; Silva, Lucilene A; Guerra, Rosane N M; Kwasniewski, Fabio H; Nascimento, Flávia R F

    2011-11-01

    Despite several studies showed that the Tityus serrulatus scorpion venom (Tsv) induces an inflammatory response, just a few have investigated the effect of the venom on the immune response. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate alterations of venom application on lymphoid organs and on the recruitment and activation of cells and also on the cytokine production. Swiss male mice (2-3 months, 20-25 g) received a non-lethal dose of crude Tsv (200 μg/kg), diluted in sterile PBS by subcutaneous route. Control animals received only sterile PBS. The animals were sacrificed after 30, 120 and 360 min. The inflammatory parameters studied were skin histology at the site of venom application, leukocyte count, and blood cytokine levels (IL-6, IL-10, and TNF-α). Inguinal lymph node, spleen and bone marrow cellularity was determined for evaluation of the Tsv effect on immune system organs. The results showed that Tsv caused no local inflammation, but it induced an increase of blood neutrophils and serum IL-6, TNF-α and IL-10. After 360 min of envenomation there was a reduction in the cells number from peritoneum and spleen, but there was an increase in the cell number from lymph nodes. In conclusion, the Tsv induces systemic alterations characterized by changes in the cell number in lymphoid organs, increase pro and anti-inflammatory cytokines. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Transcriptomic and nuclear architecture of immune cells after LPS activation.

    PubMed

    Solinhac, Romain; Mompart, Florence; Martin, Pascal; Robelin, David; Pinton, Philippe; Iannuccelli, Eddie; Lahbib-Mansais, Yvette; Oswald, Isabelle P; Yerle-Bouissou, Martine

    2011-10-01

    Changes in the nuclear positioning of specific genes, depending on their expression status, have been observed in a large diversity of physiological processes. However, gene position is poorly documented for immune cells which have been subjected to activation following bacterial infection. Using a pig model, we focused our study on monocyte-derived macrophages and neutrophils, as they are the first lines of defence against pathogens. We examined whether changes in gene expression due to LPS activation imply that genes have repositioned in the nuclear space. We first performed a transcriptomic analysis to identify the differentially expressed genes and then analysed the networks involved during lypopolysaccharide/interferon gamma activation in monocyte-derived macrophages. This allowed us to select four up-regulated (IL1β, IL8, CXCL10 and TNFα) and four down-regulated (VIM, LGALS3, TUBA3 and IGF2) genes. Their expression statuses were verified by quantitative real-time RT-PCR before studying their behaviour in the nuclear space during macrophage activation by means of 3D fluorescence in situ hybridization. No global correlation was found between gene activity and radial positioning. Only TNFα belonging to the highly transcribed MHC region on chromosome 7 became more peripherally localized in relation to the less decondensed state of its chromosome territory (CT) in activated macrophages. The analysis of gene positioning towards their CT revealed that IL8 increases significantly its tendency to be outside its CT during the activation process. In addition, the gene to CT edge distances increase for the three up-regulated genes (IL8, CXCL10 and TNFα) among the four analysed. Contrarily, the four down-regulated genes did not change their position. The analysis of gene behaviour towards their CT was extended to include neutrophils for three (TNFα, IL8 and IL1β) up- and two (IGF2 and TUBA3) down-regulated genes, and similar results were obtained. The analysis was

  10. Protein Translation Activity: A New Measure of Host Immune Cell Activation

    PubMed Central

    Seedhom, Mina O.; Hickman, Heather D.; Wei, Jiajie; David, Alexandre; Yewdell, Jonathan W.

    2016-01-01

    We describe the in vivo ribopuromycylation method (RPM), which uses a puromycin-specific antibody to fluorescently label ribosome-bound puromycylated nascent chains, enabling measurement of translational activity via immunohistochemistry or flow cytometry. Tissue staining provides a unique view of virus-induced activation of adaptive, innate, and stromal immune cells. RPM flow precisely quantitates virus-induced activation of lymphocytes and innate immune cells, and provides a unique measure of immune cell deactivation and quiescence. Using RPM we find that high endothelial cells in draining lymph nodes rapidly increase translation in the first day of vaccinia virus infection. We also find a population of constitutively activated splenic T cells in naïve mice and further, that most bone marrow (BM) T cells activate 3 days post-vaccinia virus infection. BM T cell activation is non-specific, IL-12-dependent, and induces innate memory T cell phenotypic markers. Thus, RPM measures translational activity to uniquely identify cell populations that participate in the immune response to pathogens, other foreign substances, and auto-antigens. PMID:27385780

  11. The Fungal Quorum-Sensing Molecule Farnesol Activates Innate Immune Cells but Suppresses Cellular Adaptive Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Leonhardt, Ines; Spielberg, Steffi; Weber, Michael; Albrecht-Eckardt, Daniela; Bläss, Markus; Claus, Ralf; Barz, Dagmar; Scherlach, Kirstin; Hertweck, Christian; Löffler, Jürgen; Hünniger, Kerstin

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Farnesol, produced by the polymorphic fungus Candida albicans, is the first quorum-sensing molecule discovered in eukaryotes. Its main function is control of C. albicans filamentation, a process closely linked to pathogenesis. In this study, we analyzed the effects of farnesol on innate immune cells known to be important for fungal clearance and protective immunity. Farnesol enhanced the expression of activation markers on monocytes (CD86 and HLA-DR) and neutrophils (CD66b and CD11b) and promoted oxidative burst and the release of proinflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor alpha [TNF-α] and macrophage inflammatory protein 1 alpha [MIP-1α]). However, this activation did not result in enhanced fungal uptake or killing. Furthermore, the differentiation of monocytes to immature dendritic cells (iDC) was significantly affected by farnesol. Several markers important for maturation and antigen presentation like CD1a, CD83, CD86, and CD80 were significantly reduced in the presence of farnesol. Furthermore, farnesol modulated migrational behavior and cytokine release and impaired the ability of DC to induce T cell proliferation. Of major importance was the absence of interleukin 12 (IL-12) induction in iDC generated in the presence of farnesol. Transcriptome analyses revealed a farnesol-induced shift in effector molecule expression and a down-regulation of the granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) receptor during monocytes to iDC differentiation. Taken together, our data unveil the ability of farnesol to act as a virulence factor of C. albicans by influencing innate immune cells to promote inflammation and mitigating the Th1 response, which is essential for fungal clearance. PMID:25784697

  12. Effects of spaceflight on levels and activity of immune cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonnenfeld, Gerald; Berry, Wallace D.; Mandel, Adrian D.; Konstantinova, Irena V.; Taylor, Gerald R.

    1990-01-01

    Experiments were carried out on cells from rats that had been flown on Soviet Biosputnik Cosmos 1887 to explore the effects of speceflight on immune responses. Rat bone marrow cells were examined for their response to colony stimulating factor-M. Rat spleen and bone marrow cells were stained with antibodies directed against cell surface antigenic markers. The results of the studies indicate that bone marrow cells from flown rats showed a decreased response to colony stimulating factor. There was a higher percentage of spleen cells from flown rats staining positively for pan-T-cell, suppressor-T-cell, and interleukin-2 receptor cell surface antigens. A small increase in the percentage of cells staining positively for helper-T-cell antigens was also noted. In addition, a higher percentage of cells that appeared to be part of the myelogenous population of bone marrow cells from flown rats stained positively for surface immunoglobulin.

  13. Effects of spaceflight on levels and activity of immune cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonnenfeld, Gerald; Berry, Wallace D.; Mandel, Adrian D.; Konstantinova, Irena V.; Taylor, Gerald R.

    1990-01-01

    Experiments were carried out on cells from rats that had been flown on Soviet Biosputnik Cosmos 1887 to explore the effects of speceflight on immune responses. Rat bone marrow cells were examined for their response to colony stimulating factor-M. Rat spleen and bone marrow cells were stained with antibodies directed against cell surface antigenic markers. The results of the studies indicate that bone marrow cells from flown rats showed a decreased response to colony stimulating factor. There was a higher percentage of spleen cells from flown rats staining positively for pan-T-cell, suppressor-T-cell, and interleukin-2 receptor cell surface antigens. A small increase in the percentage of cells staining positively for helper-T-cell antigens was also noted. In addition, a higher percentage of cells that appeared to be part of the myelogenous population of bone marrow cells from flown rats stained positively for surface immunoglobulin.

  14. Cancer cell-binding peptide fused Fc domain activates immune effector cells and blocks tumor growth

    PubMed Central

    Mobergslien, Anne; Peng, Qian; Vasovic, Vlada; Sioud, Mouldy

    2016-01-01

    Therapeutic strategies aiming at mobilizing immune effector cells to kill tumor cells independent of tumor mutational load and MHC expression status are expected to benefit cancer patients. Recently, we engineered various peptide-Fc fusion proteins for directing Fcg receptor-bearing immune cells toward tumor cells. Here, we investigated the immunostimulatory and anti-tumor effects of one of the engineered Fc fusion proteins (WN-Fc). In contrast to the Fc control, soluble WN-Fc-1 fusion protein activated innate immune cells (e.g. monocytes, macrophages, dendritic cells, NK cells), resulting in cytokine production and surface display of the lytic granule marker CD107a on NK cells. An engineered Fc-fusion variant carrying two peptide sequences (WN-Fc-2) also activated immune cells and bound to various cancer cell types with high affinity, including the murine 4T1 breast carcinoma cells. When injected into 4T1 tumor-bearing BALB/c mice, both peptide-Fc fusions accumulated in tumor tissues as compared to other organs such as the lungs. Moreover, treatment of 4T1 tumor-bearing BALB/c mice by means of two intravenous injections of the WN-Fc fusion proteins inhibited tumor growth with WN-Fc-2 being more effective than WN-Fc-1. Treatment resulted in tumor infiltration by T cells and NK cells. These new engineered WN-Fc fusion proteins may be a promising alternative to existing immunotherapies for cancer. PMID:27713158

  15. IVIg immune reconstitution treatment alleviates the state of persistent immune activation and suppressed CD4 T cell counts in CVID.

    PubMed

    Paquin-Proulx, Dominic; Santos, Bianca A N; Carvalho, Karina I; Toledo-Barros, Myrthes; Barreto de Oliveira, Ana Karolina; Kokron, Cristina M; Kalil, Jorge; Moll, Markus; Kallas, Esper G; Sandberg, Johan K

    2013-01-01

    Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) is characterized by defective B cell function, impaired antibody production, and increased susceptibility to bacterial infections. Here, we addressed the hypothesis that poor antibody-mediated immune control of infections may result in substantial perturbations in the T cell compartment. Newly diagnosed CVID patients were sampled before, and 6-12 months after, initiation of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) therapy. Treatment-naïve CVID patients displayed suppressed CD4 T cell counts and myeloid dendritic cell (mDC) levels, as well as high levels of immune activation in CD8 T cells, CD4 T cells, and invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells. Expression of co-stimulatory receptors CD80 and CD83 was elevated in mDCs and correlated with T cell activation. Levels of both FoxP3+ T regulatory (Treg) cells and iNKT cells were low, whereas soluble CD14 (sCD14), indicative of monocyte activation, was elevated. Importantly, immune reconstitution treatment with IVIg partially restored the CD4 T cell and mDC compartments. Treatment furthermore reduced the levels of CD8 T cell activation and mDC activation, whereas levels of Treg cells and iNKT cells remained low. Thus, primary deficiency in humoral immunity with impaired control of microbial infections is associated with significant pathological changes in cell-mediated immunity. Furthermore, therapeutic enhancement of humoral immunity with IVIg infusions alleviates several of these defects, indicating a relationship between poor antibody-mediated immune control of infections and the occurrence of abnormalities in the T cell and mDC compartments. These findings help our understanding of the immunopathogenesis of primary immunodeficiency, as well as acquired immunodeficiency caused by HIV-1 infection.

  16. IVIg Immune Reconstitution Treatment Alleviates the State of Persistent Immune Activation and Suppressed CD4 T Cell Counts in CVID

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Karina I.; Toledo-Barros, Myrthes; Barreto de Oliveira, Ana Karolina; Kokron, Cristina M.; Kalil, Jorge; Moll, Markus; Kallas, Esper G.; Sandberg, Johan K.

    2013-01-01

    Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) is characterized by defective B cell function, impaired antibody production, and increased susceptibility to bacterial infections. Here, we addressed the hypothesis that poor antibody-mediated immune control of infections may result in substantial perturbations in the T cell compartment. Newly diagnosed CVID patients were sampled before, and 6–12 months after, initiation of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) therapy. Treatment-naïve CVID patients displayed suppressed CD4 T cell counts and myeloid dendritic cell (mDC) levels, as well as high levels of immune activation in CD8 T cells, CD4 T cells, and invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells. Expression of co-stimulatory receptors CD80 and CD83 was elevated in mDCs and correlated with T cell activation. Levels of both FoxP3+ T regulatory (Treg) cells and iNKT cells were low, whereas soluble CD14 (sCD14), indicative of monocyte activation, was elevated. Importantly, immune reconstitution treatment with IVIg partially restored the CD4 T cell and mDC compartments. Treatment furthermore reduced the levels of CD8 T cell activation and mDC activation, whereas levels of Treg cells and iNKT cells remained low. Thus, primary deficiency in humoral immunity with impaired control of microbial infections is associated with significant pathological changes in cell-mediated immunity. Furthermore, therapeutic enhancement of humoral immunity with IVIg infusions alleviates several of these defects, indicating a relationship between poor antibody-mediated immune control of infections and the occurrence of abnormalities in the T cell and mDC compartments. These findings help our understanding of the immunopathogenesis of primary immunodeficiency, as well as acquired immunodeficiency caused by HIV-1 infection. PMID:24130688

  17. The fungal quorum-sensing molecule farnesol activates innate immune cells but suppresses cellular adaptive immunity.

    PubMed

    Leonhardt, Ines; Spielberg, Steffi; Weber, Michael; Albrecht-Eckardt, Daniela; Bläss, Markus; Claus, Ralf; Barz, Dagmar; Scherlach, Kirstin; Hertweck, Christian; Löffler, Jürgen; Hünniger, Kerstin; Kurzai, Oliver

    2015-03-17

    Farnesol, produced by the polymorphic fungus Candida albicans, is the first quorum-sensing molecule discovered in eukaryotes. Its main function is control of C. albicans filamentation, a process closely linked to pathogenesis. In this study, we analyzed the effects of farnesol on innate immune cells known to be important for fungal clearance and protective immunity. Farnesol enhanced the expression of activation markers on monocytes (CD86 and HLA-DR) and neutrophils (CD66b and CD11b) and promoted oxidative burst and the release of proinflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor alpha [TNF-α] and macrophage inflammatory protein 1 alpha [MIP-1α]). However, this activation did not result in enhanced fungal uptake or killing. Furthermore, the differentiation of monocytes to immature dendritic cells (iDC) was significantly affected by farnesol. Several markers important for maturation and antigen presentation like CD1a, CD83, CD86, and CD80 were significantly reduced in the presence of farnesol. Furthermore, farnesol modulated migrational behavior and cytokine release and impaired the ability of DC to induce T cell proliferation. Of major importance was the absence of interleukin 12 (IL-12) induction in iDC generated in the presence of farnesol. Transcriptome analyses revealed a farnesol-induced shift in effector molecule expression and a down-regulation of the granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) receptor during monocytes to iDC differentiation. Taken together, our data unveil the ability of farnesol to act as a virulence factor of C. albicans by influencing innate immune cells to promote inflammation and mitigating the Th1 response, which is essential for fungal clearance. Farnesol is a quorum-sensing molecule which controls morphological plasticity of the pathogenic yeast Candida albicans. As such, it is a major mediator of intraspecies communication. Here, we investigated the impact of farnesol on human innate immune cells known to be

  18. Activated T cells sustain myeloid-derived suppressor cell-mediated immune suppression

    PubMed Central

    Damuzzo, Vera; Francescato, Samuela; Pozzuoli, Assunta; Berizzi, Antonio; Mocellin, Simone; Rossi, Carlo Riccardo; Bronte, Vincenzo; Mandruzzato, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    The expansion of myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), a suppressive population able to hamper the immune response against cancer, correlates with tumor progression and overall survival in several cancer types. We have previously shown that MDSCs can be induced in vitro from precursors present in the bone marrow and observed that these cells are able to actively proliferate in the presence of activated T cells, whose activation level is critical to drive the suppressive activity of MDSCs. Here we investigated at molecular level the mechanisms involved in the interplay between MDSCs and activated T cells. We found that activated T cells secrete IL-10 following interaction with MDSCs which, in turn, activates STAT3 phosphorylation on MDSCs then leading to B7-H1 expression. We also demonstrated that B7-H1+ MDSCs are responsible for immune suppression through a mechanism involving ARG-1 and IDO expression. Finally, we show that the expression of ligands B7-H1 and MHC class II both on in vitro-induced MDSCs and on MDSCs in the tumor microenvironment of cancer patients is paralleled by an increased expression of their respective receptors PD-1 and LAG-3 on T cells, two inhibitory molecules associated with T cell dysfunction. These findings highlight key molecules and interactions responsible for the extensive cross-talk between MDSCs and activated T cells that are at the basis of immune suppression. PMID:26700461

  19. Activated T cells sustain myeloid-derived suppressor cell-mediated immune suppression.

    PubMed

    Pinton, Laura; Solito, Samantha; Damuzzo, Vera; Francescato, Samuela; Pozzuoli, Assunta; Berizzi, Antonio; Mocellin, Simone; Rossi, Carlo Riccardo; Bronte, Vincenzo; Mandruzzato, Susanna

    2016-01-12

    The expansion of myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), a suppressive population able to hamper the immune response against cancer, correlates with tumor progression and overall survival in several cancer types. We have previously shown that MDSCs can be induced in vitro from precursors present in the bone marrow and observed that these cells are able to actively proliferate in the presence of activated T cells, whose activation level is critical to drive the suppressive activity of MDSCs. Here we investigated at molecular level the mechanisms involved in the interplay between MDSCs and activated T cells. We found that activated T cells secrete IL-10 following interaction with MDSCs which, in turn, activates STAT3 phosphorylation on MDSCs then leading to B7-H1 expression. We also demonstrated that B7-H1+ MDSCs are responsible for immune suppression through a mechanism involving ARG-1 and IDO expression. Finally, we show that the expression of ligands B7-H1 and MHC class II both on in vitro-induced MDSCs and on MDSCs in the tumor microenvironment of cancer patients is paralleled by an increased expression of their respective receptors PD-1 and LAG-3 on T cells, two inhibitory molecules associated with T cell dysfunction. These findings highlight key molecules and interactions responsible for the extensive cross-talk between MDSCs and activated T cells that are at the basis of immune suppression.

  20. Activated group 3 innate lymphoid cells promote T-cell-mediated immune responses.

    PubMed

    von Burg, Nicole; Chappaz, Stéphane; Baerenwaldt, Anne; Horvath, Edit; Bose Dasgupta, Somdeb; Ashok, Devika; Pieters, Jean; Tacchini-Cottier, Fabienne; Rolink, Antonius; Acha-Orbea, Hans; Finke, Daniela

    2014-09-02

    Group 3 innate lymphoid cells (ILC3s) have emerged as important cellular players in tissue repair and innate immunity. Whether these cells meaningfully regulate adaptive immune responses upon activation has yet to be explored. Here we show that upon IL-1β stimulation, peripheral ILC3s become activated, secrete cytokines, up-regulate surface MHC class II molecules, and express costimulatory molecules. ILC3s can take up latex beads, process protein antigen, and consequently prime CD4(+) T-cell responses in vitro. The cognate interaction of ILC3s and CD4(+) T cells leads to T-cell proliferation both in vitro and in vivo, whereas its disruption impairs specific T-cell and T-dependent B-cell responses in vivo. In addition, the ILC3-CD4(+) T-cell interaction is bidirectional and leads to the activation of ILC3s. Taken together, our data reveal a novel activation-dependent function of peripheral ILC3s in eliciting cognate CD4(+) T-cell immune responses.

  1. Improved cognitive and memory abilities in a patient with Alzheimer's disease treated with activated immune cells: Immune cell therapy may benefit more AD patients.

    PubMed

    Laumbacher, B; Fellerhoff-Loesch, B; Wank, R

    2017-02-01

    So far, the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) has not been clarified, nor has patient therapy been satisfactory. Although inheritance dominates the less frequent early-onset AD in young and middle-aged individuals, environmental and immunogenetic factors have been identified in the most frequently occurring late-onset AD of higher-aged individuals, comprising 90% of AD patients. Thorough investigations have detected a prevalence of certain microbes which are known to affect brain activities in the brains of AD patients. This microbial prevalence suggests failing immune responses by immune gene variants against specific microbes. In fact, some immune gene variants have been detected significantly more often in AD patients. Failing immune responses can be corrected by activating immune cells outside the body ("in vitro") for the subsequent therapeutical injections. Activated immune cells digest and present microbial peptides better and differentiate naïve/resting immune cells to powerful effector cells, which can be used for therapy. The patient's activated immune cells can pass the blood-brain barrier and overcome chronic infections in the brain. Furthermore, activated immune cells can secrete a series of neurotrophins for the restoration of neuronal circuits. Based on the encouraging results of immunotherapy in a patient with late-onset AD, we hypothesize that therapy with the patient's activated immune cells would safely benefit many AD patients. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. [Exosomes and Immune Cells].

    PubMed

    Seo, Naohiro

    2017-05-01

    In addition to the cytokines and cytotoxic granules, exosomes have been known as the intercellular communicator and cytotoxic missile of immune cells for the past decade. It has been well known that mature dendritic cell(DC)-derived exosomes participate in the T cell and natural killer(NK)cell activation, while immature DCs secrete tolerogenic exosomes for regulatory T(Treg)cell generation. Treg cell-derived EVs act as a suppressor against pathogenic type-1 T helper(Th1)cell responses. CD8+ T cells produce tumoricidal exosomes for preventing tumor invasion and metastasis transiently after T cell receptor(TCR)-mediated stimulation. Thus, immune cells produce functional exosomes in the activation state- and/or differentiation stage-dependent manner. In this review, the role of immune cell-derived exosomes will be introduced, focusing mainly on immune reaction against tumor.

  3. Dexamethasone effects on activation and proliferation of immune memory T cells.

    PubMed

    Gutsol, A A; Sokhonevich, N A; Seledtsov, V I; Litvinova, L S

    2013-08-01

    Dose-dependent effects of dexamethasone on activation and proliferation of donor immune memory T cells (CD45RO(+)) were studied. Activation of memory T cells associated with IL-2 production and membrane expression of CD25 molecule was resistant to dexamethasone. Proliferative activity of memory T cells associated with membrane expression of CD71 molecule was highly sensitive to dexamethasone. Hence, glucocorticoid hormones can maintain the clonal balance in the lymphoid tissue without preventing realization of the immune memory mechanism.

  4. Virulent Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Evades Adaptive Immunity by Preventing Dendritic Cells from Activating T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tobar, Jaime A.; Carreño, Leandro J.; Bueno, Susan M.; González, Pablo A.; Mora, Jorge E.; Quezada, Sergio A.; Kalergis, Alexis M.

    2006-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) constitute the link between innate and adaptive immunity by directly recognizing pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) in bacteria and by presenting bacterial antigens to T cells. Recognition of PAMPs renders DCs as professional antigen-presenting cells able to prime naïve T cells and initiate adaptive immunity against bacteria. Therefore, interfering with DC function would promote bacterial survival and dissemination. Understanding the molecular mechanisms that have evolved in virulent bacteria to evade activation of adaptive immunity requires the characterization of virulence factors that interfere with DC function. Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, the causative agent of typhoid-like disease in the mouse, can prevent antigen presentation to T cells by avoiding lysosomal degradation in DCs. Here, we show that this feature of virulent Salmonella applies in vivo to prevent activation of adaptive immunity. In addition, this attribute of virulent Salmonella requires functional expression of a type three secretion system (TTSS) and effector proteins encoded within the Salmonella pathogenicity island 2 (SPI-2). In contrast to wild-type virulent Salmonella, mutant strains carrying specific deletions of SPI-2 genes encoding TTSS components or effectors proteins are targeted to lysosomes and are no longer able to prevent DCs from activating T cells in vitro or in vivo. SPI-2 mutant strains are attenuated in vivo, showing reduced tissue colonization and enhanced T-cell activation, which confers protection against a challenge with wild-type virulent Salmonella. Our data suggest that impairment of DC function by the activity of SPI-2 gene products is crucial for Salmonella pathogenesis. PMID:17057096

  5. CIP2A Promotes T-Cell Activation and Immune Response to Listeria monocytogenes Infection

    PubMed Central

    Cvrljevic, Anna; Khan, Mohd Moin; Treise, Irina; Adler, Thure; Aguilar-Pimentel, Juan Antonio; Au-Yeung, Byron; Sittig, Eleonora; Laajala, Teemu Daniel; Chen, Yiling; Oeder, Sebastian; Calzada-Wack, Julia; Horsch, Marion; Aittokallio, Tero; Busch, Dirk H.; Ollert, Markus W.; Neff, Frauke; Beckers, Johannes; Gailus-Durner, Valerie; Fuchs, Helmut; de Angelis, Martin Hrabě; Chen, Zhi; Lahesmaa, Riitta; Westermarck, Jukka

    2016-01-01

    The oncoprotein Cancerous Inhibitor of Protein Phosphatase 2A (CIP2A) is overexpressed in most malignancies and is an obvious candidate target protein for future cancer therapies. However, the physiological importance of CIP2A-mediated PP2A inhibition is largely unknown. As PP2A regulates immune responses, we investigated the role of CIP2A in normal immune system development and during immune response in vivo. We show that CIP2A-deficient mice (CIP2AHOZ) present a normal immune system development and function in unchallenged conditions. However when challenged with Listeria monocytogenes, CIP2AHOZ mice display an impaired adaptive immune response that is combined with decreased frequency of both CD4+ T-cells and CD8+ effector T-cells. Importantly, the cell autonomous effect of CIP2A deficiency for T-cell activation was confirmed. Induction of CIP2A expression during T-cell activation was dependent on Zap70 activity. Thus, we reveal CIP2A as a hitherto unrecognized mediator of T-cell activation during adaptive immune response. These results also reveal CIP2AHOZ as a possible novel mouse model for studying the role of PP2A activity in immune regulation. On the other hand, the results also indicate that CIP2A targeting cancer therapies would not cause serious immunological side-effects. PMID:27100879

  6. CIP2A Promotes T-Cell Activation and Immune Response to Listeria monocytogenes Infection.

    PubMed

    Côme, Christophe; Cvrljevic, Anna; Khan, Mohd Moin; Treise, Irina; Adler, Thure; Aguilar-Pimentel, Juan Antonio; Au-Yeung, Byron; Sittig, Eleonora; Laajala, Teemu Daniel; Chen, Yiling; Oeder, Sebastian; Calzada-Wack, Julia; Horsch, Marion; Aittokallio, Tero; Busch, Dirk H; Ollert, Markus W; Neff, Frauke; Beckers, Johannes; Gailus-Durner, Valerie; Fuchs, Helmut; Hrabě de Angelis, Martin; Chen, Zhi; Lahesmaa, Riitta; Westermarck, Jukka

    2016-01-01

    The oncoprotein Cancerous Inhibitor of Protein Phosphatase 2A (CIP2A) is overexpressed in most malignancies and is an obvious candidate target protein for future cancer therapies. However, the physiological importance of CIP2A-mediated PP2A inhibition is largely unknown. As PP2A regulates immune responses, we investigated the role of CIP2A in normal immune system development and during immune response in vivo. We show that CIP2A-deficient mice (CIP2AHOZ) present a normal immune system development and function in unchallenged conditions. However when challenged with Listeria monocytogenes, CIP2AHOZ mice display an impaired adaptive immune response that is combined with decreased frequency of both CD4+ T-cells and CD8+ effector T-cells. Importantly, the cell autonomous effect of CIP2A deficiency for T-cell activation was confirmed. Induction of CIP2A expression during T-cell activation was dependent on Zap70 activity. Thus, we reveal CIP2A as a hitherto unrecognized mediator of T-cell activation during adaptive immune response. These results also reveal CIP2AHOZ as a possible novel mouse model for studying the role of PP2A activity in immune regulation. On the other hand, the results also indicate that CIP2A targeting cancer therapies would not cause serious immunological side-effects.

  7. Caerulomycin A Suppresses Immunity by Inhibiting T Cell Activity

    PubMed Central

    Chauhan, Arun; Khatri, Neeraj; Vohra, Rakesh M.; Jolly, Ravinder S.; Agrewala, Javed N.

    2014-01-01

    Background Caerulomycin A (CaeA) is a known antifungal and antibiotic agent. Further, CaeA is reported to induce the expansion of regulatory T cell and prolongs the survival of skin allografts in mouse model of transplantation. In the current study, CaeA was purified and characterized from a novel species of actinomycetes, Actinoalloteichus spitiensis. The CaeA was identified for its novel immunosuppressive property by inhibiting in vitro and in vivo function of T cells. Methods Isolation, purification and characterization of CaeA were performed using High Performance Flash Chromatography (HPFC), NMR and mass spectrometry techniques. In vitro and in vivo T cell studies were conducted in mice using flowcytometry, ELISA and thymidine-[methyl-3H] incorporation. Results CaeA significantly suppressed T cell activation and IFN-γ secretion. Further, it inhibited the T cells function at G1 phase of cell cycle. No apoptosis was noticed by CaeA at a concentration responsible for inducing T cell retardation. Furthermore, the change in the function of B cells but not macrophages was observed. The CaeA as well exhibited substantial inhibitory activity in vivo. Conclusion This study describes for the first time novel in vitro and in vivo immunosuppressive function of CaeA on T cells and B cells. CaeA has enough potential to act as a future immunosuppressive drug. PMID:25286329

  8. Suppression of Adaptive Immune Cell Activation Does Not Alter Innate Immune Adipose Inflammation or Insulin Resistance in Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Subramanian, Manikandan; Ozcan, Lale; Ghorpade, Devram Sampat; Ferrante, Anthony W.; Tabas, Ira

    2015-01-01

    Obesity-induced inflammation in visceral adipose tissue (VAT) is a major contributor to insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Whereas innate immune cells, notably macrophages, contribute to visceral adipose tissue (VAT) inflammation and insulin resistance, the role of adaptive immunity is less well defined. To address this critical gap, we used a model in which endogenous activation of T cells was suppressed in obese mice by blocking MyD88-mediated maturation of CD11c+ antigen-presenting cells. VAT CD11c+ cells from Cd11cCre+Myd88fl/fl vs. control Myd88fl/fl mice were defective in activating T cells in vitro, and VAT T and B cell activation was markedly reduced in Cd11cCre+Myd88fl/fl obese mice. However, neither macrophage-mediated VAT inflammation nor systemic inflammation were altered in Cd11cCre+Myd88fl/fl mice, thereby enabling a focused analysis on adaptive immunity. Unexpectedly, fasting blood glucose, plasma insulin, and the glucose response to glucose and insulin were completely unaltered in Cd11cCre+Myd88fl/fl vs. control obese mice. Thus, CD11c+ cells activate VAT T and B cells in obese mice, but suppression of this process does not have a discernible effect on macrophage-mediated VAT inflammation or systemic glucose homeostasis. PMID:26317499

  9. Immune suppressor factor confers stromal cell line with enhanced supporting activity for hematopoietic stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Nakajima, Hideaki . E-mail: hnakajim@ims.u-tokyo.ac.jp; Shibata, Fumi; Fukuchi, Yumi; Goto-Koshino, Yuko; Ito, Miyuki; Urano, Atsushi; Nakahata, Tatsutoshi; Aburatani, Hiroyuki; Kitamura, Toshio

    2006-02-03

    Immune suppressor factor (ISF) is a subunit of the vacuolar ATPase proton pump. We earlier identified a short form of ISF (ShIF) as a stroma-derived factor that supports cytokine-independent growth of mutant Ba/F3 cells. Here, we report that ISF/ShIF supports self-renewal and expansion of primary hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). Co-culture of murine bone marrow cells with a stromal cell line overexpressing ISF or ShIF (MS10/ISF or MS10/ShIF) not only enhanced their colony-forming activity and the numbers of long-term culture initiating cells, but also maintained the competitive repopulating activity of HSC. This stem cell supporting activity depended on the proton-transfer function of ISF/ShIF. Gene expression analysis of ISF/ShIF-transfected cell lines revealed down-regulation of secreted frizzled-related protein-1 and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-3, and the restoration of their expressions in MS10/ISF cells partially reversed its enhanced LTC-IC supporting activity to a normal level. These results suggest that ISF/ShIF confers stromal cells with enhanced supporting activities for HSCs by modulating Wnt-activity and the extracellular matrix.

  10. Alzheimer's Disease Variants with the Genome-Wide Significance are Significantly Enriched in Immune Pathways and Active in Immune Cells.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Qinghua; Jin, Shuilin; Jiang, Yongshuai; Liao, Mingzhi; Feng, Rennan; Zhang, Liangcai; Liu, Guiyou; Hao, Junwei

    2017-01-01

    The existing large-scale genome-wide association studies (GWAS) datasets provide strong support for investigating the mechanisms of Alzheimer's disease (AD) by applying multiple methods of pathway analysis. Previous studies using selected single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with several thresholds of nominal significance for pathway analysis determined that the threshold chosen for SNPs can reflect the disease model. Presumably, then, pathway analysis with a stringent threshold to define "associated" SNPs would test the hypothesis that highly associated SNPs are enriched in one or more particular pathways. Here, we selected 599 AD variants (P < 5.00E-08) to investigate the pathways in which these variants are enriched and the cell types in which these variants are active. Our results showed that AD variants are significantly enriched in pathways of the immune system. Further analysis indicated that AD variants are significantly enriched for enhancers in a number of cell types, in particular the B-lymphocyte, which is the most substantially enriched cell type. This cell type maintains its dominance among the strongest enhancers. AD SNPs also display significant enrichment for DNase in 12 cell types, among which the top 6 significant signals are from immune cell types, including 4 B cells (top 4 significant signals) and CD14+ and CD34+ cells. In summary, our results show that these AD variants with P < 5.00E-08 are significantly enriched in pathways of the immune system and active in immune cells. To a certain degree, the genetic predisposition for development of AD is rooted in the immune system, rather than in neuronal cells.

  11. Effects of immunomodulators on functional activity of innate immunity cells infected with Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Plekhova, N G; Kondrashova, N M; Somova, L M; Drobot, E I; Lyapun, I N

    2015-02-01

    Low activity of bactericidal enzymes was found in innate immunity cells infected with S. pneumonia. The death of these cells was fastened under these conditions. On the contrary, treatment with antibiotic maxifloxacin was followed by an increase in activity of bactericidal enzymes in phagocytes and induced their death via necrosis. Analysis of the therapeutic properties of immunomodulators tinrostim and licopid in combination with maxifloxacin showed that these combinations correct functional activity of cells infected with S. pneumonia.

  12. Activation of circulated immune cells and inflammatory immune adherence are involved in the whole process of acute venous thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Le-Min; Duan, Qiang-Lin; Yang, Fan; Yi, Xiang-Hua; Zeng, Yu; Tian, Hong-Yan; Lv, Wei; Jin, Yun

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To investigate localization and distribution of integrin subunit β1, β2 and β3 and morphological changes of ligand-recepter binding in thrombi of acute pulmonary embolism (PE) patients and explore activation of circulated immune cells, inflammatory immune adherence and coagulation response in acute venous thrombosis. Methods: Thrombi were collected from patients with acute PE. Immunohistochemistry was done to detect the expression and distribution of integrin β1, β2 and β3 in cells within thrombi, and ligands of integrin subunit β1, β2 and β3 were also determined by immunohistochemistry within the thrombi. Results: 1) Acute venous thrombi were red thrombi composed of skeletons and filamentous mesh containing large amounts of red blood cells and white blood cells; 2) Integrin subunit β1, β2 and β3 were expressed on lymphocytes, neutrophils and platelets; 3) No expression of integrin β1 ligands: Laminin, Fibronectin, Collagen I or Collagen-II on lymphocytes; integrin β2 ligands including ICAM, factor X and iC3b are distributed on neutrophils, and ligand fibrinogen bound to neutrophils; integrin β3 was expressed on platelets which form the skeleton of thrombi and bound to fibrinogen to construct mesh structure; 4) Factor Xa was expressed on the filamentous mesh; 5) Filamentous mesh was fully filled with red blood cell dominant blood cells. Conclusion: Acute venous thrombosis is an activation process of circulated lymphocytes, neutrophils and platelets mainly, and a whole process including integrin subunit β2 and β3 binding with their ligands. Activation of immune cells, inflammatory immune adherence and coagulation response are involved in the acute venous thrombosis. PMID:24753749

  13. Clinical regressions and broad immune activation following combination therapy targeting human NKT cells in myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Joshua; Neparidze, Natalia; Zhang, Lin; Nair, Shiny; Monesmith, Tamara; Sundaram, Ranjini; Miesowicz, Fred; Dhodapkar, Kavita M.

    2013-01-01

    Natural killer T (iNKT) cells can help mediate immune surveillance against tumors in mice. Prior studies targeting human iNKT cells were limited to therapy of advanced cancer and led to only modest activation of innate immunity. Clinical myeloma is preceded by an asymptomatic precursor phase. Lenalidomide was shown to mediate antigen-specific costimulation of human iNKT cells. We treated 6 patients with asymptomatic myeloma with 3 cycles of combination of α-galactosylceramide–loaded monocyte-derived dendritic cells and low-dose lenalidomide. Therapy was well tolerated and led to reduction in tumor-associated monoclonal immunoglobulin in 3 of 4 patients with measurable disease. Combination therapy led to activation-induced decline in measurable iNKT cells and activation of NK cells with an increase in NKG2D and CD56 expression. Treatment also led to activation of monocytes with an increase in CD16 expression. Each cycle of therapy was associated with induction of eosinophilia as well as an increase in serum soluble IL2 receptor. Clinical responses correlated with pre-existing or treatment-induced antitumor T-cell immunity. These data demonstrate synergistic activation of several innate immune cells by this combination and the capacity to mediate tumor regression. Combination therapies targeting iNKT cells may be of benefit toward prevention of cancer in humans (trial registered at clinicaltrials.gov: NCT00698776). PMID:23100308

  14. Clinical regressions and broad immune activation following combination therapy targeting human NKT cells in myeloma.

    PubMed

    Richter, Joshua; Neparidze, Natalia; Zhang, Lin; Nair, Shiny; Monesmith, Tamara; Sundaram, Ranjini; Miesowicz, Fred; Dhodapkar, Kavita M; Dhodapkar, Madhav V

    2013-01-17

    Natural killer T (iNKT) cells can help mediate immune surveillance against tumors in mice. Prior studies targeting human iNKT cells were limited to therapy of advanced cancer and led to only modest activation of innate immunity. Clinical myeloma is preceded by an asymptomatic precursor phase. Lenalidomide was shown to mediate antigen-specific costimulation of human iNKT cells. We treated 6 patients with asymptomatic myeloma with 3 cycles of combination of α-galactosylceramide-loaded monocyte-derived dendritic cells and low-dose lenalidomide. Therapy was well tolerated and led to reduction in tumor-associated monoclonal immunoglobulin in 3 of 4 patients with measurable disease. Combination therapy led to activation-induced decline in measurable iNKT cells and activation of NK cells with an increase in NKG2D and CD56 expression. Treatment also led to activation of monocytes with an increase in CD16 expression. Each cycle of therapy was associated with induction of eosinophilia as well as an increase in serum soluble IL2 receptor. Clinical responses correlated with pre-existing or treatment-induced antitumor T-cell immunity. These data demonstrate synergistic activation of several innate immune cells by this combination and the capacity to mediate tumor regression. Combination therapies targeting iNKT cells may be of benefit toward prevention of cancer in humans.

  15. Natural killer cell activation enhances immune pathology and promotes chronic infection by limiting CD8+ T-cell immunity.

    PubMed

    Lang, Philipp A; Lang, Karl S; Xu, Haifeng C; Grusdat, Melanie; Parish, Ian A; Recher, Mike; Elford, Alisha R; Dhanji, Salim; Shaabani, Namir; Tran, Charles W; Dissanayake, Dilan; Rahbar, Ramtin; Ghazarian, Magar; Brüstle, Anne; Fine, Jason; Chen, Peter; Weaver, Casey T; Klose, Christoph; Diefenbach, Andreas; Häussinger, Dieter; Carlyle, James R; Kaech, Susan M; Mak, Tak W; Ohashi, Pamela S

    2012-01-24

    Infections with HIV, hepatitis B virus, and hepatitis C virus can turn into chronic infections, which currently affect more than 500 million patients worldwide. It is generally thought that virus-mediated T-cell exhaustion limits T-cell function, thus promoting chronic disease. Here we demonstrate that natural killer (NK) cells have a negative impact on the development of T-cell immunity by using the murine lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus. NK cell-deficient (Nfil3(-/-), E4BP4(-/-)) mice exhibited a higher virus-specific T-cell response. In addition, NK cell depletion caused enhanced T-cell immunity in WT mice, which led to rapid virus control and prevented chronic infection in lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus clone 13- and reduced viral load in DOCILE-infected animals. Further experiments showed that NKG2D triggered regulatory NK cell functions, which were mediated by perforin, and limited T-cell responses. Therefore, we identified an important role of regulatory NK cells in limiting T-cell immunity during virus infection.

  16. Graded Foxo1 Activity in Regulatory T Cells Differentiates Tumor Immunity from Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Chong T.; Liao, Will; Dadi, Saida; Toure, Ahmed; Li, Ming O.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Regulatory T (Treg) cells expressing the transcription factor Foxp3 have a pivotal role in maintaining immunological self-tolerance1-5; yet, excessive Treg cell activities suppress anti-tumor immune responses6-8. Compared to resting phenotype Treg (rTreg) cells in the secondary lymphoid organs, Treg cells in non-lymphoid tissues including solid tumors exhibit an activated Treg (aTreg) cell phenotype9-11. However, aTreg cell function and whether its generation can be manipulated to promote tumor immunity without evoking autoimmunity are largely unexplored. Here we show that the transcription factor Foxo1, previously demonstrated to promote Treg cell suppression of lymphoproliferative diseases12,13, has an unexpected function in inhibiting aTreg cell-mediated immune tolerance. We found that aTreg cells turned over at a slower rate than rTreg cells, but were not locally maintained in tissues. Transcriptome analysis revealed that aTreg cell differentiation was associated with repression of Foxo1-dependent gene transcription, concomitant with reduced Foxo1 expression and enhanced Foxo1 phosphorylation at sites of the Akt kinase. Treg cell-specific expression of an Akt-insensitive Foxo1 mutant prevented downregulation of lymphoid organ homing molecules, and depleted aTreg cells, causing CD8+ T cell-mediated autoimmune diseases. Compared to Treg cells from healthy tissues, tumor-infiltrating Treg cells downregulated Foxo1 target genes more substantially. Expression of the Foxo1 mutant at a lower dose was sufficient to deplete tumor-associated Treg cells, activate effector CD8+ T cells, and inhibit tumor growth without inflicting autoimmunity. Thus, Foxo1 inactivation is essential for the generation of aTreg cells that have a crucial function in suppressing CD8+ T cell responses; and the Foxo signaling pathway in Treg cells can be titrated to preferentially break tumor immune tolerance. PMID:26789248

  17. Critical roles of co-activation receptor DNAX accessory molecule-1 in natural killer cell immunity

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Peng; Sang, Hai-Wei; Zhu, Min

    2015-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells, which can exert early and powerful anti-tumour and anti-viral responses, are important components of the innate immune system. DNAX accessory molecule-1 (DNAM-1) is an activating receptor molecule expressed on the surface of NK cells. Recent findings suggest that DNAM-1 is a critical regulator of NK cell biology. DNAM-1 is involved in NK cell education and differentiation, and also plays a pivotal role in the development of cancer, viral infections and immune-related diseases. However, tumours and viruses have developed multiple mechanisms to evade the immune system. They are able to impair DNAM-1 activity by targeting the DNAM-1 receptor–ligand system. We have reviewed the roles of DNAM-1, and its biological functions, with respect to NK cell biology and DNAM-1 chimeric antigen receptor-based immunotherapy. PMID:26235210

  18. Critical roles of co-activation receptor DNAX accessory molecule-1 in natural killer cell immunity.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Peng; Sang, Hai-Wei; Zhu, Min

    2015-11-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells, which can exert early and powerful anti-tumour and anti-viral responses, are important components of the innate immune system. DNAX accessory molecule-1 (DNAM-1) is an activating receptor molecule expressed on the surface of NK cells. Recent findings suggest that DNAM-1 is a critical regulator of NK cell biology. DNAM-1 is involved in NK cell education and differentiation, and also plays a pivotal role in the development of cancer, viral infections and immune-related diseases. However, tumours and viruses have developed multiple mechanisms to evade the immune system. They are able to impair DNAM-1 activity by targeting the DNAM-1 receptor-ligand system. We have reviewed the roles of DNAM-1, and its biological functions, with respect to NK cell biology and DNAM-1 chimeric antigen receptor-based immunotherapy. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Surfactant protein D induces immune quiescence and apoptosis of mitogen-activated peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Pandit, Hrishikesh; Thakur, Gargi; Koippallil Gopalakrishnan, Aghila Rani; Dodagatta-Marri, Eswari; Patil, Anushree; Kishore, Uday; Madan, Taruna

    2016-02-01

    Surfactant protein D (SP-D) is an integral molecule of the innate immunity secreted by epithelial cells lining the mucosal surfaces. The C-type lectin domain of SP-D performs pattern recognition functions while it binds to putative receptors on immune cells to modify cellular functions. Activation of immune cells and increased serum SP-D is observed in a range of patho-physiological conditions including infections. We speculated if SP-D can modulate systemic immune response via direct interaction with activated PBMCs. In this study, we examined interaction of a recombinant fragment of human SP-D (rhSP-D) on PHA-activated PBMCs. We report a significant downregulation of activation receptors such as TLR2, TLR4, CD11c and CD69 upon rhSP-D treatment. rhSP-D inhibited production of Th1 (TNF-α and IFN-γ) and Th17 (IL-17A) cytokines along with IL-6. Interestingly, levels of IL-2, Th2 (IL-4) and regulatory (IL-10 and TGF-β) cytokines remained unaltered. Analysis of co-stimulatory CD28 and co-inhibitory CTLA4 receptors along with their ligands CD80 and CD86 revealed a selective up-regulation of CTLA4 in the lymphocyte subset. rhSP-D induced apoptosis in the activated but not in non-activated lymphocytes. Blockade of CTLA4 inhibited rhSP-D mediated apoptosis of activated lymphocytes, confirming involvement of CTLA4. We conclude that SP-D restores immune homeostasis. It regulates expression of immunomodulatory receptors and cytokines, which is followed by induction of apoptosis in activated lymphocytes. These findings suggest a critical role of SP-D in immune surveillance against activated immune cells.

  20. Therapeutic Immunization with HIV-1 Tat Reduces Immune Activation and Loss of Regulatory T-Cells and Improves Immune Function in Subjects on HAART

    PubMed Central

    Ensoli, Barbara; Bellino, Stefania; Tripiciano, Antonella; Longo, Olimpia; Francavilla, Vittorio; Marcotullio, Simone; Cafaro, Aurelio; Picconi, Orietta; Paniccia, Giovanni; Scoglio, Arianna; Arancio, Angela; Ariola, Cristina; Ruiz Alvarez, Maria J.; Campagna, Massimo; Scaramuzzi, Donato; Iori, Cristina; Esposito, Roberto; Mussini, Cristina; Ghinelli, Florio; Sighinolfi, Laura; Palamara, Guido; Latini, Alessandra; Angarano, Gioacchino; Ladisa, Nicoletta; Soscia, Fabrizio; Mercurio, Vito S.; Lazzarin, Adriano; Tambussi, Giuseppe; Visintini, Raffaele; Mazzotta, Francesco; Di Pietro, Massimo; Galli, Massimo; Rusconi, Stefano; Carosi, Giampiero; Torti, Carlo; Di Perri, Giovanni; Bonora, Stefano; Ensoli, Fabrizio; Garaci, Enrico

    2010-01-01

    Although HAART suppresses HIV replication, it is often unable to restore immune homeostasis. Consequently, non-AIDS-defining diseases are increasingly seen in treated individuals. This is attributed to persistent virus expression in reservoirs and to cell activation. Of note, in CD4+ T cells and monocyte-macrophages of virologically-suppressed individuals, there is continued expression of multi-spliced transcripts encoding HIV regulatory proteins. Among them, Tat is essential for virus gene expression and replication, either in primary infection or for virus reactivation during HAART, when Tat is expressed, released extracellularly and exerts, on both the virus and the immune system, effects that contribute to disease maintenance. Here we report results of an ad hoc exploratory interim analysis (up to 48 weeks) on 87 virologically-suppressed HAART-treated individuals enrolled in a phase II randomized open-label multicentric clinical trial of therapeutic immunization with Tat (ISS T-002). Eighty-eight virologically-suppressed HAART-treated individuals, enrolled in a parallel prospective observational study at the same sites (ISS OBS T-002), served for intergroup comparison. Immunization with Tat was safe, induced durable immune responses, and modified the pattern of CD4+ and CD8+ cellular activation (CD38 and HLA-DR) together with reduction of biochemical activation markers and persistent increases of regulatory T cells. This was accompanied by a progressive increment of CD4+ T cells and B cells with reduction of CD8+ T cells and NK cells, which were independent from the type of antiretroviral regimen. Increase in central and effector memory and reduction in terminally-differentiated effector memory CD4+ and CD8+ T cells were accompanied by increases of CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses against Env and recall antigens. Of note, more immune-compromised individuals experienced greater therapeutic effects. In contrast, these changes were opposite, absent or partial in the

  1. 5-Azacytidine Promotes an Inhibitory T-Cell Phenotype and Impairs Immune Mediated Antileukemic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Stübig, Thomas; Luetkens, Tim; Hildebrandt, York; Atanackovic, Djordje; Binder, Thomas M. C.; Fehse, Boris; Kröger, Nicolaus

    2014-01-01

    Demethylating agent, 5-Azacytidine (5-Aza), has been shown to be active in treatment of myeloid malignancies. 5-Aza enhances anticancer immunity, by increasing expression of tumor-associated antigens. However, the impact of 5-Aza immune responses remains poorly understood. Here, T-cell mediated tumor immunity effects of 5-Aza, are investigated in vitro and in vivo. T-cells from healthy donors were treated with 5-Aza and analyzed by qRT-PCR and flow cytometry for changes in gene expression and phenotype. Functionality was assessed by a tumor lysis assay. Peripheral blood from patients treated with 5-Aza after alloSCT was monitored for changes in T-cell subpopulations. 5-Aza treatment resulted in a decrease in CD8+ T-cells, whereas CD4+ T-cells increased. Furthermore, numbers of IFN-γ+ T-helper 1 cells (Th1) were reduced, while Treg-cells showed substantial increase. Additionally, CD8+ T-cells exhibited limited killing capacity against leukemic target cells. In vivo data confirm the increase of Treg compartment, while CD8+ T-effector cell numbers were reduced. 5-Aza treatment results in a shift from cytotoxic to regulatory T-cells with a functional phenotype and a major reduction in proinflammatory Th1-cells, indicating a strong inhibition of tumor-specific T-cell immunity by 5-Aza. PMID:24757283

  2. Memory type 2 helper T cells induce long-lasting antitumor immunity by activating natural killer cells.

    PubMed

    Kitajima, Masayuki; Ito, Toshihiro; Tumes, Damon J; Endo, Yusuke; Onodera, Atsushi; Hashimoto, Kahoko; Motohashi, Shinichiro; Yamashita, Masakatsu; Nishimura, Takashi; Ziegler, Steven F; Nakayama, Toshinori

    2011-07-15

    Functionally polarized helper T cells (Th cells) play crucial roles in the induction of tumor immunity. There is considerable knowledge about the contributions of IFN-producing Th1 cells that supports the role of cytotoxic cluster of differentiation (CD8) T cells and natural killer (NK) cells, but much less is known about how IL-4-producing Th2 cells contribute to tumor immunity. In this study, we investigated the cellular and molecular mechanisms employed by memory Th2 cells in sustaining tumor immunity by using a mouse model system wherein ovalbumin (OVA) is used as a specific tumor antigen. In this model, we found that OVA-specific memory Th2 cells exerted potent and long-lasting antitumor effects against NK-sensitive OVA-expressing tumor cells, wherein antitumor effects were mediated by NK cells. Specifically, NK cell cytotoxic activity and expression of perforin and granzyme B were dramatically enhanced by the activation of memory Th2 cells. Interleukin 4 (IL-4) produced by memory Th2 cells in vivo was critical for the antitumor effects of the NK cells, which IL-4 directly stimulated to induce their perforin- and granzyme-B-dependent cytotoxic activity. Our findings show that memory Th2 cells can induce potent antitumor immunity through IL-4-induced activation of NK cells, suggesting potential applications in cellular therapy for cancer patients. ©2011 AACR.

  3. IgE epitope proximity determines immune complex shape and effector cell activation capacity

    PubMed Central

    Gieras, Anna; Linhart, Birgit; Roux, Kenneth H.; Dutta, Moumita; Khodoun, Marat; Zafred, Domen; Cabauatan, Clarissa R.; Lupinek, Christian; Weber, Milena; Focke-Tejkl, Margarete; Keller, Walter; Finkelman, Fred D.; Valenta, Rudolf

    2016-01-01

    Background IgE-allergen complexes induce mast cell and basophil activation and thus immediate allergic inflammation. They are also important for IgE-facilitated allergen presentation to T cells by antigen-presenting cells. Objective To investigate whether the proximity of IgE binding sites on an allergen affects immune complex shape and subsequent effector cell activation in vitro and in vivo. Methods We constructed artificial allergens by grafting IgE epitopes in different numbers and proximity onto a scaffold protein. The shape of immune complexes formed between artificial allergens and the corresponding IgE was studied by negative-stain electron microscopy. Allergenic activity was determined using basophil activation assays. Mice were primed with IgE, followed by injection of artificial allergens to evaluate their in vivo allergenic activity. Severity of systemic anaphylaxis was measured by changes in body temperature. Results We could demonstrate simultaneous binding of 4 IgE antibodies in close vicinity to each other. The proximity of IgE binding sites on allergens influenced the shape of the resulting immune complexes and the magnitude of effector cell activation and in vivo inflammation. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that the proximity of IgE epitopes on an allergen affects its allergenic activity. We thus identified a novel mechanism by which IgE-allergen complexes regulate allergic inflammation. This mechanism should be important for allergy and other immune complex–mediated diseases. PMID:26684291

  4. Immune cells and angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Ribatti, Domenico; Crivellato, Enrico

    2009-01-01

    Both innate and adaptive immune cells are involved in the mechanisms of endothelial cell proliferation, migration and activation, through the production and release of a large spectrum of pro-angiogenic mediators. These may create the specific microenvironment that favours an increased rate of tissue vascularization. In this review, we will focus on the immune cell component of the angiogenic process in inflammation and tumour growth. As angiogenesis is the result of a net balance between the activities exerted by positive and negative regulators, we will also provide information on some antiangiogenic properties of immune cells that may be utilized for a potential pharmacological use as antiangiogenic agents in inflammation as well as in cancer. PMID:19538473

  5. Immune cells and angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ribatti, Domenico; Crivellato, Enrico

    2009-09-01

    Both innate and adaptive immune cells are involved in the mechanisms of endothelial cell proliferation, migration and activation, through the production and release of a large spectrum of pro-angiogenic mediators. These may create the specific microenvironment that favours an increased rate of tissue vascularization. In this review, we will focus on the immune cell component of the angiogenic process in inflammation and tumour growth. As angiogenesis is the result of a net balance between the activities exerted by positive and negative regulators, we will also provide information on some antiangiogenic properties of immune cells that may be utilized for a potential pharmacological use as antiangiogenic agents in inflammation as well as in cancer.

  6. Anatomically restricted synergistic anti-viral activities of innate and adaptive immune cells in the skin

    PubMed Central

    Hickman, Heather D.; Reynoso, Glennys V.; Ngudiankama, Barbara F.; Rubin, Erica J.; Magadán, Javier G.; Cush, Stephanie S.; Gibbs, James; Molon, Barbara; Bronte, Vincenzo; Bennink, Jack R.; Yewdell, Jonathan W.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Despite extensive ex vivo investigation, the spatiotemporal organization of immune cells interacting with virus-infected cells in tissues remains uncertain. To address this, we used intravital multiphoton microscopy to visualize immune cell interactions with virus-infected cells following epicutaneous vaccinia virus (VV) infection of mice. VV infects keratinocytes in epidermal foci, and numerous migratory dermal inflammatory monocytes outlying the foci. We observed Ly6G+ innate immune cells infiltrating and controlling foci, while CD8+ T cells remained on the periphery killing infected monocytes. Most antigen-specific CD8+ T cells in the skin did not interact with virus-infected cells. Blocking the generation of reactive nitrogen species relocated CD8+ T cells into foci, modestly reducing viral titers. Depletion of Ly6G+ and CD8+ cells dramatically increased viral titers, consistent with their synergistic but spatially segregated viral clearance activities. These findings highlight previously unappreciated differences in the anatomic specialization of antiviral immune cell subsets. PMID:23414756

  7. Graded Foxo1 activity in Treg cells differentiates tumour immunity from spontaneous autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Luo, Chong T; Liao, Will; Dadi, Saida; Toure, Ahmed; Li, Ming O

    2016-01-28

    Regulatory T (Treg) cells expressing the transcription factor Foxp3 have a pivotal role in maintaining immunological self-tolerance; yet, excessive Treg cell activities suppress anti-tumour immune responses. Compared to the resting Treg (rTreg) cell phenotype in secondary lymphoid organs, Treg cells in non-lymphoid tissues exhibit an activated Treg (aTreg) cell phenotype. However, the function of aTreg cells and whether their generation can be manipulated are largely unexplored. Here we show that the transcription factor Foxo1, previously demonstrated to promote Treg cell suppression of lymphoproliferative diseases, has an unexpected function in inhibiting aTreg-cell-mediated immune tolerance in mice. We find that aTreg cells turned over at a slower rate than rTreg cells, but were not locally maintained in tissues. aTreg cell differentiation was associated with repression of Foxo1-dependent gene transcription, concomitant with reduced Foxo1 expression, cytoplasmic localization and enhanced phosphorylation at the Akt sites. Treg-cell-specific expression of an Akt-insensitive Foxo1 mutant prevented downregulation of lymphoid organ homing molecules, and impeded Treg cell homing to non-lymphoid organs, causing CD8(+) T-cell-mediated autoimmune diseases. Compared to Treg cells from healthy tissues, tumour-infiltrating Treg cells downregulated Foxo1 target genes more substantially. Expression of the Foxo1 mutant at a lower dose was sufficient to deplete tumour-associated Treg cells, activate effector CD8(+) T cells, and inhibit tumour growth without inflicting autoimmunity. Thus, Foxo1 inactivation is essential for the migration of aTreg cells that have a crucial function in suppressing CD8(+) T-cell responses; and the Foxo signalling pathway in Treg cells can be titrated to break tumour immune tolerance preferentially.

  8. Loss of Th22 cells is associated with increased immune activation and IDO-1 activity in HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Page, Emma E; Greathead, Louise; Metcalf, Rebecca; Clark, Sally-Ann; Hart, Melanie; Fuchs, Dietmar; Pantelidis, Panagiotis; Gotch, Frances; Pozniak, Anton; Nelson, Mark; Boasso, Adriano; Gazzard, Brian; Kelleher, Peter

    2014-11-01

    Immune activation plays a key role in the immunopathogenesis of HIV-1 infection. Microbial translocation, secondary to loss of epithelial integrity and mucosal immune deficiency, is believed to contribute to systemic immune activation. Interleukin 22 maintains intestinal epithelial barrier integrity and stimulates the secretion of antimicrobial peptides that limit bacterial dissemination and intestinal inflammation. Interleukin 22 is secreted by CD4 T-helper (Th)22 cells independently of interleukin 17A and interferon γ. Th22 cells are characterized by the expression of chemokine receptors (CCR)4, CCR6, and CCR10. We analyzed the frequency of Th22, Th17, Th1, and CD4 T regulatory (Treg) cells, markers of immune activation (expression of CD38 on CD8 T cells, neopterin, soluble CD14), microbial translocation (lipopolysaccharide-binding protein and 16s ribosomal DNA), and indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase 1 activity in peripheral blood of antiretroviral therapy (ART)-experienced and ART-naive HIV-1-infected patients and healthy controls. We showed a significant reduction in the frequency of Th22 cells in HIV ART-naive patients compared with the healthy controls and HIV ART-experienced patients. We observed a shift away from Th22 and Th17 to Treg cells, which was partially reversed by effective ART. Markers of immune activation negatively correlated with Th22 and Th17 proportions, and with Th22:Treg and Th17:Treg ratios in ART-naive patients. Increased indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase 1 activity negatively correlated with Th22:Treg and Th17:Treg ratios in the ART-naive group. Loss of Th22 cells and disruption in the balance of Th22 and Treg cells may contribute toward systemic immune activation and mucosal immune deficiency during HIV-1 infection.

  9. Immunization of stromal cell targeting fibroblast activation protein providing immunotherapy to breast cancer mouse model.

    PubMed

    Meng, Mingyao; Wang, Wenju; Yan, Jun; Tan, Jing; Liao, Liwei; Shi, Jianlin; Wei, Chuanyu; Xie, Yanhua; Jin, Xingfang; Yang, Li; Jin, Qing; Zhu, Huirong; Tan, Weiwei; Yang, Fang; Hou, Zongliu

    2016-08-01

    Unlike heterogeneous tumor cells, cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAF) are genetically more stable which serve as a reliable target for tumor immunotherapy. Fibroblast activation protein (FAP) which is restrictively expressed in tumor cells and CAF in vivo and plays a prominent role in tumor initiation, progression, and metastasis can function as a tumor rejection antigen. In the current study, we have constructed artificial FAP(+) stromal cells which mimicked the FAP(+) CAF in vivo. We immunized a breast cancer mouse model with FAP(+) stromal cells to perform immunotherapy against FAP(+) cells in the tumor microenvironment. By forced expression of FAP, we have obtained FAP(+) stromal cells whose phenotype was CD11b(+)/CD34(+)/Sca-1(+)/FSP-1(+)/MHC class I(+). Interestingly, proliferation capacity of the fibroblasts was significantly enhanced by FAP. In the breast cancer-bearing mouse model, vaccination with FAP(+) stromal cells has significantly inhibited the growth of allograft tumor and reduced lung metastasis indeed. Depletion of T cell assays has suggested that both CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells were involved in the tumor cytotoxic immune response. Furthermore, tumor tissue from FAP-immunized mice revealed that targeting FAP(+) CAF has induced apoptosis and decreased collagen type I and CD31 expression in the tumor microenvironment. These results implicated that immunization with FAP(+) stromal cells led to the disruption of the tumor microenvironment. Our study may provide a novel strategy for immunotherapy of a broad range of cancer.

  10. T cells in chronic lymphocytic leukemia display dysregulated expression of immune checkpoints and activation markers

    PubMed Central

    Palma, Marzia; Gentilcore, Giusy; Heimersson, Kia; Mozaffari, Fariba; Näsman-Glaser, Barbro; Young, Emma; Rosenquist, Richard; Hansson, Lotta; Österborg, Anders; Mellstedt, Håkan

    2017-01-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia is characterized by impaired immune functions largely due to profound T-cell defects. T-cell functions also depend on co-signaling receptors, inhibitory or stimulatory, known as immune checkpoints, including cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated antigen-4 (CTLA-4) and programmed death-1 (PD-1). Here we analyzed the T-cell phenotype focusing on immune checkpoints and activation markers in chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients (n=80) with different clinical characteristics and compared them to healthy controls. In general, patients had higher absolute numbers of CD3+ cells and the CD8+ subset was particularly expanded in previously treated patients. Progressive patients had higher numbers of CD4+ and CD8+ cells expressing PD-1 compared to healthy controls, which was more pronounced in previously treated patients (P=0.0003 and P=0.001, respectively). A significant increase in antigen-experienced T cells was observed in patients within both the CD4+ and CD8+ subsets, with a significantly higher PD-1 expression. Higher numbers of CD4+ and CD8+ cells with intracellular CTLA-4 were observed in patients, as well as high numbers of proliferating (Ki67+) and activated (CD69+) CD4+ and CD8+ cells, more pronounced in patients with active disease. The numbers of Th1, Th2, Th17 and regulatory T cells were substantially increased in patients compared to controls (P<0.05), albeit decreasing to low levels in pre-treated patients. In conclusion, chronic lymphocytic leukemia T cells display increased expression of immune checkpoints, abnormal subset distribution, and a higher proportion of proliferating cells compared to healthy T cells. Disease activity and previous treatment shape the T-cell profile of chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients in different ways. PMID:27927767

  11. T cells in chronic lymphocytic leukemia display dysregulated expression of immune checkpoints and activation markers.

    PubMed

    Palma, Marzia; Gentilcore, Giusy; Heimersson, Kia; Mozaffari, Fariba; Näsman-Glaser, Barbro; Young, Emma; Rosenquist, Richard; Hansson, Lotta; Österborg, Anders; Mellstedt, Håkan

    2017-03-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia is characterized by impaired immune functions largely due to profound T-cell defects. T-cell functions also depend on co-signaling receptors, inhibitory or stimulatory, known as immune checkpoints, including cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated antigen-4 (CTLA-4) and programmed death-1 (PD-1). Here we analyzed the T-cell phenotype focusing on immune checkpoints and activation markers in chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients (n=80) with different clinical characteristics and compared them to healthy controls. In general, patients had higher absolute numbers of CD3(+) cells and the CD8(+) subset was particularly expanded in previously treated patients. Progressive patients had higher numbers of CD4(+) and CD8(+) cells expressing PD-1 compared to healthy controls, which was more pronounced in previously treated patients (P=0.0003 and P=0.001, respectively). A significant increase in antigen-experienced T cells was observed in patients within both the CD4(+) and CD8(+) subsets, with a significantly higher PD-1 expression. Higher numbers of CD4(+) and CD8(+) cells with intracellular CTLA-4 were observed in patients, as well as high numbers of proliferating (Ki67(+)) and activated (CD69(+)) CD4(+) and CD8(+) cells, more pronounced in patients with active disease. The numbers of Th1, Th2, Th17 and regulatory T cells were substantially increased in patients compared to controls (P<0.05), albeit decreasing to low levels in pre-treated patients. In conclusion, chronic lymphocytic leukemia T cells display increased expression of immune checkpoints, abnormal subset distribution, and a higher proportion of proliferating cells compared to healthy T cells. Disease activity and previous treatment shape the T-cell profile of chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients in different ways. Copyright© Ferrata Storti Foundation.

  12. Activated group 3 innate lymphoid cells promote T-cell–mediated immune responses

    PubMed Central

    von Burg, Nicole; Chappaz, Stéphane; Baerenwaldt, Anne; Horvath, Edit; Bose Dasgupta, Somdeb; Ashok, Devika; Pieters, Jean; Tacchini-Cottier, Fabienne; Rolink, Antonius; Acha-Orbea, Hans; Finke, Daniela

    2014-01-01

    Group 3 innate lymphoid cells (ILC3s) have emerged as important cellular players in tissue repair and innate immunity. Whether these cells meaningfully regulate adaptive immune responses upon activation has yet to be explored. Here we show that upon IL-1β stimulation, peripheral ILC3s become activated, secrete cytokines, up-regulate surface MHC class II molecules, and express costimulatory molecules. ILC3s can take up latex beads, process protein antigen, and consequently prime CD4+ T-cell responses in vitro. The cognate interaction of ILC3s and CD4+ T cells leads to T-cell proliferation both in vitro and in vivo, whereas its disruption impairs specific T-cell and T-dependent B-cell responses in vivo. In addition, the ILC3–CD4+ T-cell interaction is bidirectional and leads to the activation of ILC3s. Taken together, our data reveal a novel activation-dependent function of peripheral ILC3s in eliciting cognate CD4+ T-cell immune responses. PMID:25136120

  13. Individual differences on immunostimulatory activity of raw and black garlic extract in human primary immune cells.

    PubMed

    Purev, Uranchimeg; Chung, Mi Ja; Oh, Deog-Hwan

    2012-08-01

    The immunostimulatory activities of garlic extract using a cell line or animal models have been reported; however, no previous studies have evaluated individual differences in regards to the immunostimulatory activities. The immunostimulatory activities such as cell proliferation, tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α) and nitric oxides (NO) production of raw garlic and black garlic extracts on individual primary lymphocytes or macrophages isolated from the blood of 21 volunteers were evaluated. The antioxidant and anticancer effects of raw garlic and black garlic ethanol extract was measured to determine the optimum conditions for extraction. The 70% ethanol black garlic extracts at 70°C for 12 h (70% BGE) showed the strongest antioxidant and anticancer activities. Immunostimulatory activities of garlic extracts extracted under optimal condition on primary immune cells obtained from 21 volunteers were analyzed. Results showed that the cell proliferation, TNF-α and NO production of primary immune cells treated with 70% raw garlic extract (70% RGE) were significantly different; however, little difference was observed for the 70% BGE treatment. BGE showed stronger immunostimulatory activities than RGE. These results indicate that the immunostimulatory activities of RGE and BGE can be strongly correlated with the antioxidant and anticancer activities. Determination of immunostimulatory activities of different types of garlic using immune cells isolated from volunteers was dependent on the individual constituents due to changes in the composition of garlic during processing. Individual primary immune cells might be used as important tools to determine individual differences in all food ingredients for the development of personalized immunostimulatory active foods.

  14. Human immunodeficiency virus-like particles activate multiple types of immune cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sailaja, Gangadhara; Skountzou, Ioanna; Quan, Fu-Shi; Compans, Richard W. . E-mail: compans@microbio.emory.edu; Kang, Sang-Moo . E-mail: skang2@emory.edu

    2007-06-05

    The rapid spread of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) worldwide makes it a high priority to develop an effective vaccine. Since live attenuated or inactivated HIV is not likely to be approved as a vaccine due to safety concerns, HIV virus like particles (VLPs) offer an attractive alternative because they are safe due to the lack of a viral genome. Although HIV VLPs have been shown to induce humoral and cellular immune responses, it is important to understand the mechanisms by which they induce such responses and to improve their immunogenicity. We generated HIV VLPs, and VLPs containing Flt3 ligand (FL), a dendritic cell growth factor, to target VLPs to dendritic cells, and investigated the roles of these VLPs in the initiation of adaptive immune responses in vitro and in vivo. We found that HIV-1 VLPs induced maturation of dendritic cells and monocyte/macrophage populations in vitro and in vivo, with enhanced expression of maturation markers and cytokines. Dendritic cells pulsed with VLPs induced activation of splenocytes resulting in increased production of cytokines. VLPs containing FL were found to increase dendritic cells and monocyte/macrophage populations in the spleen when administered to mice. Administration of VLPs induced acute activation of multiple types of cells including T and B cells as indicated by enhanced expression of the early activation marker CD69 and down-regulation of the homing receptor CD62L. VLPs containing FL were an effective form of antigen in activating immune cells via dendritic cells, and immunization with HIV VLPs containing FL resulted in enhanced T helper type 2-like immune responses.

  15. Dendritic cell-elicited B-cell activation fosters immune privilege via IL-10 signals in hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ouyang, Fang-Zhu; Wu, Rui-Qi; Wei, Yuan; Liu, Rui-Xian; Yang, Dong; Xiao, Xiao; Zheng, Limin; Li, Bo; Lao, Xiang-Ming; Kuang, Dong-Ming

    2016-01-01

    B cells are prominent components of human solid tumours, but activation status and functions of these cells in human cancers remain elusive. Here we establish that over 50% B cells in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) exhibit an FcγRIIlow/− activated phenotype, and high infiltration of these cells positively correlates with cancer progression. Environmental semimature dendritic cells, but not macrophages, can operate in a CD95L-dependent pathway to generate FcγRIIlow/− activated B cells. Early activation of monocytes in cancer environments is critical for the generation of semimature dendritic cells and subsequent FcγRIIlow/− activated B cells. More importantly, the activated FcγRIIlow/− B cells from HCC tumours, but not the resting FcγRIIhigh B cells, without external stimulation suppress autologous tumour-specific cytotoxic T-cell immunity via IL-10 signals. Collectively, generation of FcγRIIlow/− activated B cells may represent a mechanism by which the immune activation is linked to immune tolerance in the tumour milieu. PMID:27853178

  16. Galectin-8 activates dendritic cells and stimulates antigen-specific immune response elicitation.

    PubMed

    Carabelli, Julieta; Quattrocchi, Valeria; D'Antuono, Alejandra; Zamorano, Patricia; Tribulatti, María Virginia; Campetella, Oscar

    2017-08-15

    Galectin-8 (Gal-8) is a mammalian β-galactoside-binding lectin, endowed with proinflammatory properties. Given its capacity to enhance antigen-specific immune responses in vivo, we investigated whether Gal-8 was also able to promote APC activation to sustain T cell activation after priming. Both endogenous [dendritic cells (DCs)] and bone marrow-derived DCs (BMDCs) treated with exogenous Gal-8 exhibited a mature phenotype characterized by increased MHC class II (MHCII), CD80, and CD86 surface expression. Moreover, Gal-8-treated BMDCs (Gal-8-BMDCs) stimulated antigen-specific T cells more efficiently than immature BMDCs (iBMDCs). Proinflammatory cytokines IL-3, IL-2, IL-6, TNF, MCP-1, and MCP-5, as well as growth factor G-CSF, were augmented in Gal-8-BMDC conditioned media, with IL-6 as the most prominent. Remarkably, BMDCs from Gal-8-deficient mice (Lgals8(-/-) BMDC) displayed reduced CD86 and IL-6 expression and an impaired ability to promote antigen-specific CD4 T cell activation. To test if Gal-8-induced activation correlates with the elicitation of an effective immune response, soluble Gal-8 was coadministrated with antigen during immunization of BALB/cJ mice in the experimental foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) model. When a single dose of Gal-8 was added to the antigen formulation, an increased specific and neutralizing humoral response was developed, sufficient to enhance animal protection upon viral challenge. IL-6 and IFN-γ, as well as lymphoproliferative responses, were also incremented in Gal-8/antigen-immunized animals only at 48 h after immunization, suggesting that Gal-8 induces the elicitation of an inflammatory response at an early stage. Taking together, these findings argue in favor of the use of Gal-8 as an immune-stimulator molecule to enhance the adaptive immune response. © Society for Leukocyte Biology.

  17. Mycoplasma hyorhinis-Contaminated Cell Lines Activate Primary Innate Immune Cells via a Protease-Sensitive Factor

    PubMed Central

    Heidegger, Simon; Jarosch, Alexander; Schmickl, Martina; Endres, Stefan; Bourquin, Carole; Hotz, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Mycoplasma are a frequent and occult contaminant of cell cultures, whereby these prokaryotic organisms can modify many aspects of cell physiology, rendering experiments that are conducted with such contaminated cells problematic. Chronic Mycoplasma contamination in human monocytic cells lines has been associated with suppressed Toll-like receptor (TLR) function. In contrast, we show here that components derived from a Mycoplasma hyorhinis-infected cell line can activate innate immunity in non-infected primary immune cells. Release of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-6 by dendritic cells in response to Mycoplasma hyorhinis-infected cell components was critically dependent on the adapter protein MyD88 but only partially on TLR2. Unlike canonical TLR2 signaling that is triggered in response to the detection of Mycoplasma infection, innate immune activation by components of Mycoplasma-infected cells was inhibited by chloroquine treatment and sensitive to protease treatment. We further show that in plasmacytoid dendritic cells, soluble factors from Mycoplasma hyorhinis-infected cells induce the production of large amounts of IFN-α. We conclude that Mycoplasma hyorhinis-infected cell lines release protein factors that can potently activate co-cultured innate immune cells via a previously unrecognized mechanism, thus limiting the validity of such co-culture experiments. PMID:26565413

  18. Mycoplasma hyorhinis-Contaminated Cell Lines Activate Primary Innate Immune Cells via a Protease-Sensitive Factor.

    PubMed

    Heidegger, Simon; Jarosch, Alexander; Schmickl, Martina; Endres, Stefan; Bourquin, Carole; Hotz, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Mycoplasma are a frequent and occult contaminant of cell cultures, whereby these prokaryotic organisms can modify many aspects of cell physiology, rendering experiments that are conducted with such contaminated cells problematic. Chronic Mycoplasma contamination in human monocytic cells lines has been associated with suppressed Toll-like receptor (TLR) function. In contrast, we show here that components derived from a Mycoplasma hyorhinis-infected cell line can activate innate immunity in non-infected primary immune cells. Release of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-6 by dendritic cells in response to Mycoplasma hyorhinis-infected cell components was critically dependent on the adapter protein MyD88 but only partially on TLR2. Unlike canonical TLR2 signaling that is triggered in response to the detection of Mycoplasma infection, innate immune activation by components of Mycoplasma-infected cells was inhibited by chloroquine treatment and sensitive to protease treatment. We further show that in plasmacytoid dendritic cells, soluble factors from Mycoplasma hyorhinis-infected cells induce the production of large amounts of IFN-α. We conclude that Mycoplasma hyorhinis-infected cell lines release protein factors that can potently activate co-cultured innate immune cells via a previously unrecognized mechanism, thus limiting the validity of such co-culture experiments.

  19. Changes in T Cell and Dendritic Cell Phenotype from Mid to Late Pregnancy Are Indicative of a Shift from Immune Tolerance to Immune Activation

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Nishel Mohan; Herasimtschuk, Anna A.; Boasso, Adriano; Benlahrech, Adel; Fuchs, Dietmar; Imami, Nesrina; Johnson, Mark R.

    2017-01-01

    During pregnancy, the mother allows the immunologically distinct fetoplacental unit to develop and grow. Opinions are divided as to whether this represents a state of fetal-specific tolerance or of a generalized suppression of the maternal immune system. We hypothesized that antigen-specific T cell responses are modulated by an inhibitory T cell phenotype and modified dendritic cell (DC) phenotype in a gestation-dependent manner. We analyzed changes in surface markers of peripheral blood T cells, ex vivo antigen-specific T cell responses, indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) activity (kynurenine/tryptophan ratio, KTR), plasma neopterin concentration, and the in vitro expression of progesterone-induced blocking factor (PIBF) in response to peripheral blood mononuclear cell culture with progesterone. We found that mid gestation is characterized by reduced antigen-specific T cell responses associated with (1) predominance of effector memory over other T cell subsets; (2) upregulation of inhibitory markers (programmed death ligand 1); (3) heightened response to progesterone (PIBF); and (4) reduced proportions of myeloid DC and concurrent IDO activity (KTR). Conversely, antigen-specific T cell responses normalized in late pregnancy and were associated with increased markers of T cell activation (CD38, neopterin). However, these changes occur with a simultaneous upregulation of immune suppressive mechanisms including apoptosis (CD95), coinhibition (TIM-3), and immune regulation (IL-10) through the course of pregnancy. Together, our data suggest that immune tolerance dominates in the second trimester and that it is gradually reversed in the third trimester in association with immune activation as the end of pregnancy approaches. PMID:28966619

  20. Changes in T Cell and Dendritic Cell Phenotype from Mid to Late Pregnancy Are Indicative of a Shift from Immune Tolerance to Immune Activation.

    PubMed

    Shah, Nishel Mohan; Herasimtschuk, Anna A; Boasso, Adriano; Benlahrech, Adel; Fuchs, Dietmar; Imami, Nesrina; Johnson, Mark R

    2017-01-01

    During pregnancy, the mother allows the immunologically distinct fetoplacental unit to develop and grow. Opinions are divided as to whether this represents a state of fetal-specific tolerance or of a generalized suppression of the maternal immune system. We hypothesized that antigen-specific T cell responses are modulated by an inhibitory T cell phenotype and modified dendritic cell (DC) phenotype in a gestation-dependent manner. We analyzed changes in surface markers of peripheral blood T cells, ex vivo antigen-specific T cell responses, indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) activity (kynurenine/tryptophan ratio, KTR), plasma neopterin concentration, and the in vitro expression of progesterone-induced blocking factor (PIBF) in response to peripheral blood mononuclear cell culture with progesterone. We found that mid gestation is characterized by reduced antigen-specific T cell responses associated with (1) predominance of effector memory over other T cell subsets; (2) upregulation of inhibitory markers (programmed death ligand 1); (3) heightened response to progesterone (PIBF); and (4) reduced proportions of myeloid DC and concurrent IDO activity (KTR). Conversely, antigen-specific T cell responses normalized in late pregnancy and were associated with increased markers of T cell activation (CD38, neopterin). However, these changes occur with a simultaneous upregulation of immune suppressive mechanisms including apoptosis (CD95), coinhibition (TIM-3), and immune regulation (IL-10) through the course of pregnancy. Together, our data suggest that immune tolerance dominates in the second trimester and that it is gradually reversed in the third trimester in association with immune activation as the end of pregnancy approaches.

  1. Acupuncture May Stimulate Anticancer Immunity via Activation of Natural Killer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Michael Francis; Ortiz Sánchez, Elizabeth; Vujanovic, Nikola L.; Li, Wenhui

    2011-01-01

    This article presents the hypothesis that acupuncture enhances anticancer immune functions by stimulating natural killer (NK) cells. It provides background information on acupuncture, summarizes the current scientific understanding of the mechanisms through which NK cells act to eliminate cancer cells, and reviews evidence that acupuncture is associated with increases in NK cell quantity and function in both animals and humans. The key contribution of this article involves the use of cellular immunology and molecular biological theory to interpret and synthesize evidence from disparate animal and human studies in formulating the ‘acupuncture immuno-enhancement hypothesis': clinicians may use acupuncture to promote the induction and secretion of NK-cell activating cytokines that engage specific NK cell receptors that endogenously enhance anticancer immune function. PMID:21785626

  2. EV71-infected CD14(+) cells modulate the immune activity of T lymphocytes in rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jingjing; Pu, Jing; Huang, Hongtai; Zhang, Ying; Liu, Longding; Yang, Erxia; Zhou, Xiaofang; Ma, Na; Zhao, Hongling; Wang, Lichun; Xie, Zhenfeng; Tang, Donghong; Li, Qihan

    2013-07-01

    Preliminary studies of the major pathogen enterovirus 71 (EV71), a member of the Picornaviridae family, have suggested that EV71 may be a major cause of fatal hand, foot and mouth disease cases. Currently, the role of the pathological changes induced by EV71 infection in the immunopathogenic response remains unclear. Our study focused on the interaction between this virus and immunocytes and indicated that this virus has the ability to replicate in CD14(+) cells. Furthermore, these EV71-infected CD14(+) cells have the capacity to stimulate the proliferation of T cells and to enhance the release of certain functional cytokines. An adaptive immune response induced by the back-transfusion of EV71-infected CD14(+) cells was observed in donor neonatal rhesus monkeys. Based on these observations, the proposed hypothesis is that CD14(+) cells infected by the EV71 virus might modulate the anti-EV71 adaptive immune response by inducing simultaneous T-cell activation.

  3. Production of interferon-gamma by in vivo tumor-sensitized T cells: Association with active antitumor immunity

    SciTech Connect

    Bursuker, I.; Pearce, M.T. )

    1990-02-01

    The state of active immunity to Meth A fibrosarcoma in mice immunized with an admixture of Meth A cells and Propionibacterium acnes is associated with possession by the host of spleen cells capable of producing interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) upon in vitro restimulation with irradiated tumor cells. The ability of spleen cells from immunized mice to produce IFN-gamma in response to irradiated Meth A cells decays as active antitumor immunity is replaced by a state of immunological memory. The IFN-producing cells are L3T4+Ly2+, cyclophosphamide-sensitive and radiosensitive T cells, as determined by their sensitivity to corresponding monoclonal antibodies and complement. The induction of IFN-gamma production by in vivo tumor-sensitized T cells is tumor specific, in that spleen cells from mice immunized against Meth A fibrosarcoma can produce IFN in response to irradiated Meth A cells but not in response to another syngeneic tumor M109 lung carcinoma.

  4. RAC1 activation drives pathologic interactions between the epidermis and immune cells

    PubMed Central

    Winge, Mårten C.G.; Ohyama, Bungo; Dey, Clara N.; Boxer, Lisa M.; Li, Wei; Ehsani-Chimeh, Nazanin; Truong, Allison K.; Wu, Diane; Armstrong, April W.; Makino, Teruhiko; Davidson, Matthew; Starcevic, Daniela; Nguyen, Ngon T.; Hashimoto, Takashi; Homey, Bernard; Khavari, Paul A.; Bradley, Maria; Waterman, Elizabeth A.; Marinkovich, M. Peter

    2016-01-01

    Interactions between the epidermis and the immune system govern epidermal tissue homeostasis. These epidermis-immune interactions are altered in the inflammatory disease psoriasis; however, the pathways that underlie this aberrant immune response are not well understood. Here, we determined that Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1 (RAC1) is a key mediator of epidermal dysfunction. RAC1 activation was consistently elevated in psoriatic epidermis and primary psoriatic human keratinocytes (PHKCs) exposed to psoriasis-related stimuli, but not in skin from patients with basal or squamous cell carcinoma. Expression of a constitutively active form of RAC1 (RACV12) in mice resulted in the development of lesions similar to those of human psoriasis that required the presence of an intact immune system. RAC1V12-expressing mice and human psoriatic skin showed similar RAC1-dependent signaling as well as transcriptional overlap of differentially expressed epidermal and immune pathways. Coculture of PHKCs with immunocytes resulted in the upregulation of RAC1-dependent proinflammatory cytokines, an effect that was reproduced by overexpressing RAC1 in normal human keratinocytes. In keratinocytes, modulating RAC1 activity altered differentiation, proliferation, and inflammatory pathways, including STAT3, NFκB, and zinc finger protein 750 (ZNF750). Finally, RAC1 inhibition in xenografts composed of human PHKCs and immunocytes abolished psoriasiform hyperplasia and inflammation in vivo. These studies implicate RAC1 as a potential therapeutic target for psoriasis and as a key orchestrator of pathologic epidermis-immune interactions. PMID:27294528

  5. RAC1 activation drives pathologic interactions between the epidermis and immune cells.

    PubMed

    Winge, Mårten C G; Ohyama, Bungo; Dey, Clara N; Boxer, Lisa M; Li, Wei; Ehsani-Chimeh, Nazanin; Truong, Allison K; Wu, Diane; Armstrong, April W; Makino, Teruhiko; Davidson, Matthew; Starcevic, Daniela; Kislat, Andreas; Nguyen, Ngon T; Hashimoto, Takashi; Homey, Bernard; Khavari, Paul A; Bradley, Maria; Waterman, Elizabeth A; Marinkovich, M Peter

    2016-07-01

    Interactions between the epidermis and the immune system govern epidermal tissue homeostasis. These epidermis-immune interactions are altered in the inflammatory disease psoriasis; however, the pathways that underlie this aberrant immune response are not well understood. Here, we determined that Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1 (RAC1) is a key mediator of epidermal dysfunction. RAC1 activation was consistently elevated in psoriatic epidermis and primary psoriatic human keratinocytes (PHKCs) exposed to psoriasis-related stimuli, but not in skin from patients with basal or squamous cell carcinoma. Expression of a constitutively active form of RAC1 (RACV12) in mice resulted in the development of lesions similar to those of human psoriasis that required the presence of an intact immune system. RAC1V12-expressing mice and human psoriatic skin showed similar RAC1-dependent signaling as well as transcriptional overlap of differentially expressed epidermal and immune pathways. Coculture of PHKCs with immunocytes resulted in the upregulation of RAC1-dependent proinflammatory cytokines, an effect that was reproduced by overexpressing RAC1 in normal human keratinocytes. In keratinocytes, modulating RAC1 activity altered differentiation, proliferation, and inflammatory pathways, including STAT3, NFκB, and zinc finger protein 750 (ZNF750). Finally, RAC1 inhibition in xenografts composed of human PHKCs and immunocytes abolished psoriasiform hyperplasia and inflammation in vivo. These studies implicate RAC1 as a potential therapeutic target for psoriasis and as a key orchestrator of pathologic epidermis-immune interactions.

  6. Prolonged Activation of Invariant Natural Killer T Cells and TH2-Skewed Immunity in Stroke Patients.

    PubMed

    Wong, Connie H Y; Jenne, Craig N; Tam, Patrick P; Léger, Caroline; Venegas, Andres; Ryckborst, Karla; Hill, Michael D; Kubes, Paul

    2017-01-01

    Infection is highly prevalent and contribute significantly to mortality of stroke patients. In addition to the well described robust systemic lymphocytopenia and skewed T helper 2 (TH2)-immunity after stroke, emerging experimental evidence demonstrate that the development of infection poststroke is attributed by the activation of invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells. In this prospective study, we examined the levels of a broad spectrum of inflammatory mediators, the activation status of iNKT cell in the blood of patients with various degree of stroke severity, and investigate whether these parameters differ in patients who later develop poststroke infections. We obtained blood from stroke patients and matching controls to perform flow cytometry and multiplex measurement of inflammatory mediators. Our data suggest a pronounced activation of iNKT cells in stroke patients as compared with matched Healthy and Hospital control patients. The magnitude of iNKT activation is positively correlated with the severity of stroke, supporting the hypothesis that iNKT cells may contribute in the modulation of the host immune response after stroke-associated brain injury. In addition, stroke severity is closely correlated with decreased TH1/TH2 ratio, increased production of interleukin (IL)-10, with infected stroke patients showing exacerbated production of IL-10. Stroke triggers a robust and sustained shift in systemic immunity in patients, including specific lymphopenia, robust activation of iNKT cells, systemic production of IL-10, and a prolonged TH2-skewed immunity, all are potential contributors to severe immune suppression seen in patients after stroke. Future studies with large sample size will provide potential causality relationship insights.

  7. Allelic Dependent Expression of an Activating Fc receptor on B cells Enhances Humoral Immune Responses

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xinrui; Wu, Jianming; Ptacek, Travis; Redden, David T; Brown, Elizabeth E; Alarcón, Graciela S; Ramsey-Goldman, Rosalind; Petri, Michelle A; Reveille, John D.; Kaslow, Richard A; Kimberly, Robert P; Edberg, Jeffrey C

    2014-01-01

    B cells are pivotal regulators of acquired immune responses and recent work in both experimental murine models and humans has demonstrated that subtle changes in the regulation of B cell function can significantly alter immunological responses. The balance of negative and positive signals in maintaining an appropriate B cell activation threshold is critical in B lymphocyte immune tolerance and autoreactivity. FcγRIIb (CD32B), the only recognized Fcγ receptor on B cells, provides IgG-mediated negative modulation through a tyrosine-based inhibition motif which down-regulates B cell receptor initiated signaling. These properties make FcγRIIb a promising target for antibody-based therapy. Here we report the discovery of allele-dependent expression of the activating FcγRIIc on B cells. Identical to FcγRIIb in the extracellular domain, FcγRIIc has a tyrosine-based activation motif in its cytoplasmic domain. In both human B cells and in B cells from mice transgenic for human FcγRIIc, FcγRIIc expression counterbalances the negative feedback of FcγRIIb and enhances humoral responses to immunization in mice and to BioThrax® vaccination in a human Anthrax vaccine trial. Moreover, the FCGR2C-ORF allele is associated with the risk of development of autoimmunity in humans. FcγRIIc expression on B cells challenges the prevailing paradigm of uni-directional negative feedback by IgG immune complexes via the inhibitory FcγRIIb, is a previously unrecognized determinant in human antibody/autoantibody responses, and opens the opportunity for more precise personalized use of B cell targeted antibody-based therapy. PMID:24353158

  8. Allelic-dependent expression of an activating Fc receptor on B cells enhances humoral immune responses.

    PubMed

    Li, Xinrui; Wu, Jianming; Ptacek, Travis; Redden, David T; Brown, Elizabeth E; Alarcón, Graciela S; Ramsey-Goldman, Rosalind; Petri, Michelle A; Reveille, John D; Kaslow, Richard A; Kimberly, Robert P; Edberg, Jeffrey C

    2013-12-18

    B cells are pivotal regulators of acquired immune responses, and recent work in both experimental murine models and humans has demonstrated that subtle changes in the regulation of B cell function can substantially alter immunological responses. The balance of negative and positive signals in maintaining an appropriate B cell activation threshold is critical in B lymphocyte immune tolerance and autoreactivity. FcγRIIb (CD32B), the only recognized Fcγ receptor on B cells, provides immunoglobulin G (IgG)-mediated negative modulation through a tyrosine-based inhibition motif, which down-regulates B cell receptor-initiated signaling. These properties make FcγRIIb a promising target for antibody-based therapy. We report the discovery of allele-dependent expression of the activating FcγRIIc on B cells. Identical to FcγRIIb in the extracellular domain, FcγRIIc has a tyrosine-based activation motif in its cytoplasmic domain. In both human B cells and B cells from mice transgenic for human FcγRIIc, FcγRIIc expression counterbalances the negative feedback of FcγRIIb and enhances humoral responses to immunization in mice and to BioThrax vaccination in a human anthrax vaccine trial. Moreover, the FCGR2C-ORF allele is associated with the risk of development of autoimmunity in humans. FcγRIIc expression on B cells challenges the prevailing paradigm of unidirectional negative feedback by IgG immune complexes via the inhibitory FcγRIIb, is a previously unrecognized determinant in human antibody/autoantibody responses, and opens the opportunity for more precise personalized use of B cell-targeted antibody-based therapy.

  9. Activation and inhibition of adaptive immune response mediated by mast cells.

    PubMed

    Toniato, E; Frydas, I; Robuffo, I; Ronconi, G; Caraffa, Al; Kritas, S K; Conti, P

    Adaptive immune response plays an important role against bacteria and parasites, a reaction that also involves mast cell (MC) activation which participates in innate and adaptive immunity. In allergic reactions there is a TH2 immune response with generation of allergen-specific IgE antibodies. In MCs, IgE cross-link FcRI high affinity receptor and activate tyrosine kinase proteins, leading to stimulation of NF-κB and AP-1 resulting in the release of a number of cytokines/chemokines and other compounds. Through their proteolytic pathways, MCs may process the antigen for presentation to CD4+ cells which release TH2 cytokines and growth factors, which play an important role in asthma, allergy, anaphylaxis and inflammation. Thus, MCs can contribute to adaptive immunity. MCs may also be activated though the TLR-dependent pathway which is controlled by several proteins including myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88) which can be inhibited by interleukin (IL)-37. Here, we describe the participation of MCs in adaptive immunity and inflammation, an effect that may be inhibited by IL-37.

  10. CD8+ T Cell-Independent Immune-Mediated Mechanisms of Anti-Tumor Activity

    PubMed Central

    Pluhar, G. Elizabeth; Pennell, Christopher A.; Olin, Michael R.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the growing number of preclinical and clinical trials focused on immunotherapy for the treatment of malignant gliomas, the prognosis for this disease remains grim. Cancer immunotherapy seeks to recruit an effective immune response to eliminate tumor cells. To date, cancer vaccines have shown only limited effectiveness because of our incomplete understanding of the necessary effector cells and mechanisms that yield efficient tumor clearance. CD8+ T cell cytotoxic activity has long been proposed as the primary effector function necessary for tumor regression. However, there is increasing evidence that indicates that components of the immune system other than CD8+ T cells play important roles in tumor eradication and control. The following review should provide an understanding of the mechanisms involved in an effective antitumor response to guide future therapeutic designs. The information provided suggests an alternate means of effective tumor clearance in malignant glioma to the canonical CD8+ cytotoxic T cell mechanism. PMID:26351148

  11. 1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3 inhibits lipopolysaccharide-induced immune activation in human endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Equils, O; Naiki, Y; Shapiro, A M; Michelsen, K; Lu, D; Adams, J; Jordan, S

    2006-01-01

    In addition to its well-known role in mineral and skeletal homeostasis, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3[1,25-(OH)2, D3] regulates the differentiation, growth and function of a broad range of immune system cells, including monocytes, dendritic cells, T and B lymphocytes. Vascular endothelial cells play a major role in the innate immune activation during infections, sepsis and transplant rejection; however, currently there are no data on the effect of 1,25-(OH)2 D3 on microbial antigen-induced endothelial cell activation. Here we show that 1,25-(OH)2 D3 pretreatment of human microvessel endothelial cells (HMEC) inhibited the enteric Gram-negative bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) activation of transcription factor NF-κB and interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8 and regulated upon activation normal T cell exposed and secreted (RANTES) release. The effect of 1,25-(OH)2 D3 was not due to increased cell death or inhibition of endothelial cell proliferation. 1,25-(OH)2 D3 pretreatment of HMEC did not block MyD88-independent LPS-induced interferon (IFN)-β promoter activation. 1,25-(OH)2 D3 pretreatment of HMEC did not modulate Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) or MD-2 expression. These data suggest that 1,25-(OH)2 D3 may play a role in LPS-induced immune activation of endothelial cells during Gram-negative bacterial infections, and a suggest a potential role for 1,25-(OH)2 D3 and its analogues as an adjuvant in the treatment of Gram-negative sepsis. PMID:16367934

  12. Immune activation induces immortalization of HTLV-1 LTR-Tax transgenic CD4+ T cells

    PubMed Central

    Swaims, Alison Y.; Khani, Francesca; Zhang, Yingyu; Roberts, Arthur I.; Devadas, Satish

    2010-01-01

    Infection with the human T-cell leukemia virus-1 (HTLV-1) results in a variety of diseases including adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL). Although the pathogenesis of these disorders is poorly understood, it involves complex interactions with the host immune system. Activation of infected T cells may play an important role in disease pathogenesis through induction of the oncogenic HTLV-1 Tax transactivator protein. To test this hypothesis, we employed transgenic mice in which Tax is regulated by the HTLV-1 LTR. T-cell receptor stimulation of LTR-Tax CD4+ T cells induced Tax expression, hyper-proliferation, and immortalization in culture. The transition to cellular immortalization was accompanied by markedly increased expression of the antiapoptotic gene, mcl-1, previously implicated as important in T-cell survival. Immortalized cells exhibited a CD4+CD25+CD3− phenotype commonly observed in ATL. Engraftment of activated LTR-Tax CD4+ T cells into NOD/Shi-scid/IL-2Rγ null mice resulted in a leukemia-like phenotype with expansion and tissue infiltration of Tax+, CD4+ lymphocytes. We suggest that immune activation of infected CD4+ T cells plays an important role in the induction of Tax expression, T-cell proliferation, and pathogenesis of ATL in HTLV-1–infected individuals. PMID:20634377

  13. Isolation of diploid baker's yeast capable of strongly activating immune cells and analyses of the cell wall structure.

    PubMed

    Takada, Yuki; Mizobuchi, Ayano; Kato, Takayuki; Kasahara, Emiko; Ito, Chinatsu; Watanabe, Hajime; Kanzaki, Ken; Kitagawa, Seiichi; Tachibana, Taro; Azuma, Masayuki

    2014-01-01

    Diploid baker's yeast capable of strongly activating a mouse macrophage was constructed based on haploid mutant AQ-37 obtained previously. The obtained strain BQ-55 activated also human immune cells. To clarify a factor for the activation, the cell wall structure, especially the β-glucan structure, was analyzed, suggesting that the length of branching, β-1,6-glucan, may be one of the factors.

  14. A Novel Polysaccharide in Insects Activates the Innate Immune System in Mouse Macrophage RAW264 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ohta, Takashi; Ido, Atsushi; Kusano, Kie; Miura, Chiemi; Miura, Takeshi

    2014-01-01

    A novel water-soluble polysaccharide was identified in the pupae of the melon fly (Bactrocera cucurbitae) as a molecule that activates the mammalian innate immune response. We attempted to purify this innate immune activator using nitric oxide (NO) production in mouse RAW264 macrophages as an indicator of immunostimulatory activity. A novel acidic polysaccharide was identified, which we named “dipterose”, with a molecular weight of 1.01×106 and comprising nine monosaccharides. Dipterose was synthesized in the melon fly itself at the pupal stage. The NO-producing activity of dipterose was approximately equal to that of lipopolysaccharide, a potent immunostimulator. Inhibition of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) led to the suppression of NO production by dipterose. Furthermore, dipterose induced the expression of proinflammatory cytokines and interferon β (IFNβ) and promoted the activation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) in macrophages, indicating that it stimulates the induction of various cytokines in RAW264 cells via the TLR4 signaling pathway. Our results thus suggest that dipterose activates the innate immune response against various pathogenic microorganisms and viral infections. This is the first identification of an innate immune-activating polysaccharide from an animal. PMID:25490773

  15. Soluble CD80 restores T cell activation and overcomes tumor cell programmed death ligand 1-mediated immune suppression.

    PubMed

    Haile, Samuel T; Dalal, Sonia P; Clements, Virginia; Tamada, Koji; Ostrand-Rosenberg, Suzanne

    2013-09-01

    Many tumor cells escape anti-tumor immunity through their expression of programmed death ligand-1 (PDL1 or B7-H1), which interacts with T cell-expressed PD1 and results in T cell apoptosis. We previously reported that transfection of human tumor cells with a membrane-bound form of the human costimulatory molecule CD80 prevented PD1 binding and restored T cell activation. We now report that a membrane-bound form of murine CD80 similarly reduces PDL1-PD1-mediated suppression by mouse tumor cells and that a soluble protein consisting of the extracellular domains of human or mouse CD80 fused to the Fc domain of IgG1 (CD80-Fc) overcomes PDL1-mediated suppression by human and mouse tumor cells, respectively. T cell activation experiments with human and mouse tumor cells indicate that CD80-Fc facilitates T cell activation by binding to PDL1 to inhibit PDL1-PD1 interactions and by costimulating through CD28. CD80-Fc is more effective in preventing PD1-PDL1-mediated suppression and restoring T cell activation compared with treatment with mAb to either PD1 or PDL1. These studies identify CD80-Fc as an alternative and potentially more efficacious therapeutic agent for overcoming PDL1-induced immune suppression and facilitating tumor-specific immunity.

  16. Enhancing cancer immunotherapy through nanotechnology-mediated tumor infiltration and activation of immune cells.

    PubMed

    Shen, Haifa; Sun, Tong; Hoang, Hanh H; Burchfield, Jana S; Hamilton, Gillian F; Mittendorf, Elizabeth A; Ferrari, Mauro

    2017-09-22

    Cancer immunotherapy has become arguably the most promising advancement in cancer research and therapy in recent years. The efficacy of cancer immunotherapy is critically dependent on specific physiological and physical processes - collectively referred to as transport barriers - including the activation of T cells by antigen presenting cells, T cells migration to and penetration into the tumor microenvironment, and movement of nutrients and other immune cells through the tumor microenvironment. Nanotechnology-based approaches have great potential to help overcome these transport barriers. In this review, we discuss the ways that nanotechnology is being leveraged to improve the efficacy and potency of various cancer immunotherapies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. The activation of the adaptive immune system: cross-talk between antigen-presenting cells, T cells and B cells.

    PubMed

    den Haan, Joke M M; Arens, Ramon; van Zelm, Menno C

    2014-12-01

    The adaptive immune system consists of T and B cells that express clonally distributed antigen receptors. To achieve functional adaptive immune responses, antigen-specific T cell populations are stimulated by professional antigen-presenting cells like dendritic cells (DCs), which provide crucial stimulatory signals for efficient expansion and development of effector functions. Antigen-specific B cells receive costimulatory signals from helper T cells to stimulate affinity maturation and isotype switching. Here we elaborate on the interactions between DCs, T cells and B cells, and on the important signals for efficient induction of adaptive immune responses. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Attraction and activation of dendritic cells at the site of tumor elicits potent antitumor immunity.

    PubMed

    Lapteva, Natalia; Aldrich, Melissa; Rollins, Lisa; Ren, Wenhong; Goltsova, Tatiana; Chen, Si-Yi; Huang, Xue F

    2009-09-01

    Tumor cells harbor unique genetic mutations, which lead to the generation of immunologically foreign antigenic peptide repertoire with the potential to induce individual tumor-specific immune responses. Here, we developed an in situ tumor vaccine with the ability to elicit antitumor immunity. This vaccine comprised an E1B-deleted oncolytic adenovirus expressing beta-defensin-2 (Ad-BD2-E1A) for releasing tumor antigens, recruiting and activating plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs). Intratumoral injections of Ad-BD2-E1A vaccine inhibited primary breast tumor growth and blocked naturally occurring metastasis in mice. Ad-BD2-E1A vaccination induced potent tumor-specific T-cell responses. Splenic and intratumoral DCs isolated from Ad-BD2-E1A-immunized mice were able to stimulate or promote the differentiation of naive T cells into tumor-specific cytotoxic T cells. We further found that the increased numbers of mature CD45RA(+)CD8alpha(+)CD40(+) pDCs infiltrated into Ad-BD2-E1A-treated tumors. The antitumor effect of Ad-BD2-E1A vaccination was abrogated in toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) deficient mice, suggesting the critical role of TLR4 in the induction of antitumor immunity by Ad-BD2-E1A. The results of this study indicate that in situ vaccination with the oncolytic BD2-expressing adenovirus preferentially attracts pDCs and promotes their maturation, and thus elicits potent tumor-specific immunity. This vaccine represents an attractive therapeutic strategy for the induction of individualized antitumor immunity.

  19. BTLA exhibits immune memory for αβ T cells in patients with active pulmonary tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Jin-Cheng; Lin, Dong-Zi; Yi, Lai-Long; Liu, Gan-Bin; Zhang, Hui; Wang, Wan-Dang; Zhang, Jun-Ai; Wu, Xian-Jing; Xiang, Wen-Yu; Kong, Bin; Chen, Zheng W; Wang, Cong-Yi; Xu, Jun-Fa

    2014-01-01

    Despite past extensive studies, the role of B and T lymphocyte attenuator (BTLA) in αβ T cells in patients with active pulmonary tuberculosis (ATB) remains poorly understood. Here we demonstrate that BTLA expression on αβ T cells is decreased in patients with M. tuberculosis (Mtb) infection. Particularly, BTLA expression levels are likely critical for αβ T cells to manifest and maintain an active central memory phenotype with high capacity for secretion of IFN-γ and perforin, which are important for immune memory against TB infection. BTLA(high) αβ T cells also exhibited higher capacity in response to Mtb peptide stimulation. In contrast to the role of BTLA played for negative regulation of immune responses, our data in the current studies suggest that BTLA expression on αβ T cells is likely associated with protective immune memory against Mtb infection in the setting of patients with active pulmonary tuberculosis. This previous unappreciated role for BTLA may have implications for prevention and treatment of patients with Mtb infection.

  20. Activation of cell-mediated immunity by Morinda citrifolia fruit extract and its constituents.

    PubMed

    Murata, Kazuya; Abe, Yumi; Futamura-Masudaa, Megumi; Uwaya, Akemi; Isami, Fumiyuki; Matsuda, Hideaki

    2014-04-01

    Morinda citrifolia, commonly known as noni, is a traditional natural medicine in French Polynesia and Hawaii. Functional foods derived from M. citrifolia fruit have been marketed to help prevent diseases and promote good health. The objective of this study was to assess the effects of M. citrifolia fruit on cell-mediated immunity. In the picryl chloride-induced contact dermatitis test, M. citrifolia fruit extract (Noni-ext) inhibited the suppression of cell-mediated immunity by immunosuppressive substances isolated from freeze-dried ascites of Ehrlich carcinoma-bearing mice (EC-sup). In addition, Noni-ext inhibited reduction of IL-2 production in EC-sup-treated mice and activated natural killer cells in normal mice. These results suggest that Noni-ext has multiple effects on the recovery of cell-mediated immunity. Furthermore, we investigated the active principles of Noni-ext and identified an iridoid glycoside, deacetylasperulosidic acid. Oral administration of deacetylasperulosidic acid inhibited the reduction of ear swelling, and also cancelled the suppression of IL-2 production along with the activation of natural killer cells in the same manner as that of Noni-ext.

  1. BTLA exhibits immune memory for αβ T cells in patients with active pulmonary tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Jin-Cheng; Lin, Dong-Zi; Yi, Lai-Long; Liu, Gan-Bin; Zhang, Hui; Wang, Wan-Dang; Zhang, Jun-Ai; Wu, Xian-Jing; Xiang, Wen-Yu; Kong, Bin; Chen, Zheng W; Wang, Cong-Yi; Xu, Jun-Fa

    2014-01-01

    Despite past extensive studies, the role of B and T lymphocyte attenuator (BTLA) in αβ T cells in patients with active pulmonary tuberculosis (ATB) remains poorly understood. Here we demonstrate that BTLA expression on αβ T cells is decreased in patients with M. tuberculosis (Mtb) infection. Particularly, BTLA expression levels are likely critical for αβ T cells to manifest and maintain an active central memory phenotype with high capacity for secretion of IFN-γ and perforin, which are important for immune memory against TB infection. BTLAhigh αβ T cells also exhibited higher capacity in response to Mtb peptide stimulation. In contrast to the role of BTLA played for negative regulation of immune responses, our data in the current studies suggest that BTLA expression on αβ T cells is likely associated with protective immune memory against Mtb infection in the setting of patients with active pulmonary tuberculosis. This previous unappreciated role for BTLA may have implications for prevention and treatment of patients with Mtb infection. PMID:25360214

  2. Immunotropic influence of 900 MHz microwave GSM signal on human blood immune cells activated in vitro.

    PubMed

    Stankiewicz, Wanda; Dabrowski, Marek P; Kubacki, Roman; Sobiczewska, Elzbieta; Szmigielski, Stanisław

    2006-01-01

    In an earlier study we reported that G(o) phase peripheral blood mononulclear cells (PBMC) exposed to low-level (SAR = 0.18 W/kg) pulse-modulated 1300 MHz microwaves and subsequently cultured, demonstrate changed immune activity (Dabrowski et al., 2003). We investigated whether cultured immune cells induced into the active phases of cell cycle (G(1), S) and then exposed to microwaves will also be sensitive to electromagnetic field. An anechoic chamber of our design containing a microplate with cultured cells and an antenna emitting microwaves (900 MHz simulated GSM signal, 27 V/m, SAR 0.024 W/kg) was placed inside the ASSAB incubator. The microcultures of PBMC exposed to microwaves demonstrated significantly higher response to mitogens and higher immunogenic activity of monocytes (LM index) than control cultures. LM index, described in detail elsewhere (Dabrowski et al., 2001), represents the monokine influence on lymphocyte mitogenic response. The results suggest that immune activity of responding lymphocytes and monocytes can be additionally intensified by 900 MHz microwaves.

  3. Metal oxide nanoparticles interact with immune cells and activate different cellular responses

    PubMed Central

    Simón-Vázquez, Rosana; Lozano-Fernández, Tamara; Dávila-Grana, Angela; González-Fernández, Africa

    2016-01-01

    Besides cell death, nanoparticles (Nps) can induce other cellular responses such as inflammation. The potential immune response mediated by the exposure of human lymphoid cells to metal oxide Nps (moNps) was characterized using four different moNps (CeO2, TiO2, Al2O3, and ZnO) to study the three most relevant mitogen-activated protein kinase subfamilies and the nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of the activated B-cell inhibitor, IκBα, as well as the expression of several genes by immune cells incubated with these Nps. The moNps activated different signaling pathways and altered the gene expression in human lymphocyte cells. The ZnO Nps were the most active and the release of Zn2+ ions was the main mechanism of toxicity. CeO2 Nps induced the smallest changes in gene expression and in the IκBα protein. The effects of the particles were strongly dependent on the type and concentration of the Nps and on the cell activation status prior to Np exposure. PMID:27695324

  4. T-cell death following immune activation is mediated by mitochondria-localized SARM.

    PubMed

    Panneerselvam, P; Singh, L P; Selvarajan, V; Chng, W J; Ng, S B; Tan, N S; Ho, B; Chen, J; Ding, J L

    2013-03-01

    Following acute-phase infection, activated T cells are terminated to achieve immune homeostasis, failure of which results in lymphoproliferative and autoimmune diseases. We report that sterile α- and heat armadillo-motif-containing protein (SARM), the most conserved Toll-like receptors adaptor, is proapoptotic during T-cell immune response. SARM expression is significantly reduced in natural killer (NK)/T lymphoma patients compared with healthy individuals, suggesting that decreased SARM supports NK/T-cell proliferation. T cells knocked down of SARM survived and proliferated more significantly compared with wild-type T cells following influenza infection in vivo. During activation of cytotoxic T cells, the SARM level fell before rising, correlating inversely with cell proliferation and subsequent T-cell clearance. SARM knockdown rescued T cells from both activation- and neglect-induced cell deaths. The mitochondria-localized SARM triggers intrinsic apoptosis by generating reactive oxygen species and depolarizing the mitochondrial potential. The proapoptotic function is attributable to the C-terminal sterile alpha motif and Toll/interleukin-1 receptor domains. Mechanistically, SARM mediates intrinsic apoptosis via B cell lymphoma-2 (Bcl-2) family members. SARM suppresses B cell lymphoma-extra large (Bcl-xL) and downregulates extracellular signal-regulated kinase phosphorylation, which are cell survival effectors. Overexpression of Bcl-xL and double knockout of Bcl-2 associated X protein and Bcl-2 homologous antagonist killer substantially reduced SARM-induced apoptosis. Collectively, we have shown how T-cell death following infection is mediated by SARM-induced intrinsic apoptosis, which is crucial for T-cell homeostasis.

  5. Dendritic cell-induced activation of adaptive and innate antitumor immunity.

    PubMed

    van den Broeke, Leon T; Daschbach, Emily; Thomas, Elaine K; Andringa, Gerda; Berzofsky, Jay A

    2003-12-01

    While studying Ag-pulsed syngeneic dendritic cell (DC) immunization, we discovered that surprisingly, unpulsed DCs induced protection against tumor lung metastases resulting from i.v. injection of a syngeneic BALB/c colon carcinoma CT26 or a syngeneic C57BL/6 lung carcinoma LL/2. Splenocytes or immature splenic DCs did not protect. The protection was mediated by NK cells, in that it was abrogated by treatment with anti-asialo-GM1 but not anti-CD8, and was induced by CD1(-/-) DCs unable to stimulate NKT cells, but did not occur in beige mice lacking NK cells. Protection correlated with increased NK activity, and increased infiltration of NK but not CD8(+) cells in lungs of tumor-bearing mice. Protection depended on the presence of costimulatory molecules CD80, CD86, and CD40 on the DCs, but surprisingly did not require DCs that could make IL-12 or IL-15. Unexpectedly, protection sensitive to anti-asialo-GM1 and increased NK activity were still present 14 mo after DC injection. As NK cells lack memory, we found by depletion that CD4(+) not CD8(+) T cells were required for induction of the NK antitumor response. The role of DCs and CD4(+) T cells provides a novel mechanism for NK cell induction and innate immunity against cancer that may have potential in preventing clinical metastases.

  6. ATM kinase inhibition in glial cells activates the innate immune response and causes neurodegeneration in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Andrew J; Rimkus, Stacey A; Wassarman, David A

    2012-03-13

    To investigate the mechanistic basis for central nervous system (CNS) neurodegeneration in the disease ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T), we analyzed flies mutant for the causative gene A-T mutated (ATM). ATM encodes a protein kinase that functions to monitor the genomic integrity of cells and control cell cycle, DNA repair, and apoptosis programs. Mutation of the C-terminal amino acid in Drosophila ATM inhibited the kinase activity and caused neuron and glial cell death in the adult brain and a reduction in mobility and longevity. These data indicate that reduced ATM kinase activity is sufficient to cause neurodegeneration in A-T. ATM kinase mutant flies also had elevated expression of innate immune response genes in glial cells. ATM knockdown in glial cells, but not neurons, was sufficient to cause neuron and glial cell death, a reduction in mobility and longevity, and elevated expression of innate immune response genes in glial cells, indicating that a non-cell-autonomous mechanism contributes to neurodegeneration in A-T. Taken together, these data suggest that early-onset CNS neurodegeneration in A-T is similar to late-onset CNS neurodegeneration in diseases such as Alzheimer's in which uncontrolled inflammatory response mediated by glial cells drives neurodegeneration.

  7. Activation and Exhaustion of Adaptive Immune Cells in Hepatitis B Infection.

    PubMed

    Gogoi, Dimpu; Borkakoty, Biswajyoti; Biswas, Dipankar; Mahanta, Jagadish

    2015-09-01

    In hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection, the immune reaction is responsible for viral clearance and preventing their spread within the host. However, the immune system is dysfunctional in patients with chronic HBV infection, leading to an inadequate immune response against the virus. A major factor contributing to inefficient immune function is the phenomenon of immune exhaustion. Hence, understanding immune activation and exhaustion during HBV infection is important, as it would provide insight in developing immunotherapy to control chronic HBV infection. The aim of this review is to highlight the existing information on immune effector functions and immune exhaustion in response to HBV infection.

  8. Immunizations: Active vs. Passive

    MedlinePlus

    ... a few weeks before the antibodies are worn down and removed from the bloodstream. By contrast, active immunizations can produce antibodies that last a lifetime. Last Updated 11/21/2015 Source Immunizations & Infectious Diseases: An Informed Parent's ...

  9. Context-Specific and Immune Cell-Dependent Antitumor Activities of α1-Antitrypsin

    PubMed Central

    Guttman, Ofer; Freixo-Lima, Gabriella S.; Kaner, Ziv; Lior, Yotam; Rider, Peleg; Lewis, Eli C.

    2016-01-01

    α1-antitrypsin (AAT), a circulating glycoprotein that rises during acute phase responses and healthy pregnancies, exhibits immunomodulatory properties in several T-cell-dependent immune pathologies. However, AAT does not directly interfere with T-cell responses; instead, it facilitates polarization of macrophages and dendritic cells towards M2-like and tolerogenic cells, respectively. AAT also allows NK cell responses against tumor cells, while attenuating DC-dependent induction of autoimmune NK cell activities. Since AAT-treated macrophages bear resemblance to cancer-promoting tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs), it became imperative to examine the possible induction of tumor permissive conditions by AAT. Here, AAT treatment is examined for its effect on tumor development, metastatic spread, and tumor immunology. Systemic AAT treatment of mice inoculated with B16-F10 melanoma cells resulted in significant inhibition of tumor growth and metastatic spread. Using NK cell-resistant RMA cells, we show that AAT interferes with tumor development in a CD8+ T-cell-dependent manner. Unexpectedly, upon analysis of tumor cellular composition, we identified functional tumor-infiltrating CD8+ T-cells alongside M1-like TAMs in AAT-treated mice. Based on the ability of AAT to undergo chemical modifications, we emulated conditions of elevated reactive nitrogen and oxygen species. Indeed, macrophages were stimulated by treatment with nitrosylated AAT, and IFNγ transcripts were significantly elevated in tumors extracted soon after ischemia-reperfusion challenge. These context-specific changes may explain the differential effects of AAT on immune responses towards tumor cells versus benign antigenic targets. These data suggest that systemically elevated levels of AAT may accommodate its physiological function in inflammatory resolution, without compromising tumor-targeting immune responses. PMID:28003813

  10. Context-Specific and Immune Cell-Dependent Antitumor Activities of α1-Antitrypsin.

    PubMed

    Guttman, Ofer; Freixo-Lima, Gabriella S; Kaner, Ziv; Lior, Yotam; Rider, Peleg; Lewis, Eli C

    2016-01-01

    α1-antitrypsin (AAT), a circulating glycoprotein that rises during acute phase responses and healthy pregnancies, exhibits immunomodulatory properties in several T-cell-dependent immune pathologies. However, AAT does not directly interfere with T-cell responses; instead, it facilitates polarization of macrophages and dendritic cells towards M2-like and tolerogenic cells, respectively. AAT also allows NK cell responses against tumor cells, while attenuating DC-dependent induction of autoimmune NK cell activities. Since AAT-treated macrophages bear resemblance to cancer-promoting tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs), it became imperative to examine the possible induction of tumor permissive conditions by AAT. Here, AAT treatment is examined for its effect on tumor development, metastatic spread, and tumor immunology. Systemic AAT treatment of mice inoculated with B16-F10 melanoma cells resulted in significant inhibition of tumor growth and metastatic spread. Using NK cell-resistant RMA cells, we show that AAT interferes with tumor development in a CD8+ T-cell-dependent manner. Unexpectedly, upon analysis of tumor cellular composition, we identified functional tumor-infiltrating CD8+ T-cells alongside M1-like TAMs in AAT-treated mice. Based on the ability of AAT to undergo chemical modifications, we emulated conditions of elevated reactive nitrogen and oxygen species. Indeed, macrophages were stimulated by treatment with nitrosylated AAT, and IFNγ transcripts were significantly elevated in tumors extracted soon after ischemia-reperfusion challenge. These context-specific changes may explain the differential effects of AAT on immune responses towards tumor cells versus benign antigenic targets. These data suggest that systemically elevated levels of AAT may accommodate its physiological function in inflammatory resolution, without compromising tumor-targeting immune responses.

  11. STING activation of tumor endothelial cells initiates spontaneous and therapeutic antitumor immunity.

    PubMed

    Demaria, Olivier; De Gassart, Aude; Coso, Sanja; Gestermann, Nicolas; Di Domizio, Jeremy; Flatz, Lukas; Gaide, Olivier; Michielin, Olivier; Hwu, Patrick; Petrova, Tatiana V; Martinon, Fabio; Modlin, Robert L; Speiser, Daniel E; Gilliet, Michel

    2015-12-15

    Spontaneous CD8 T-cell responses occur in growing tumors but are usually poorly effective. Understanding the molecular and cellular mechanisms that drive these responses is of major interest as they could be exploited to generate a more efficacious antitumor immunity. As such, stimulator of IFN genes (STING), an adaptor molecule involved in cytosolic DNA sensing, is required for the induction of antitumor CD8 T responses in mouse models of cancer. Here, we find that enforced activation of STING by intratumoral injection of cyclic dinucleotide GMP-AMP (cGAMP), potently enhanced antitumor CD8 T responses leading to growth control of injected and contralateral tumors in mouse models of melanoma and colon cancer. The ability of cGAMP to trigger antitumor immunity was further enhanced by the blockade of both PD1 and CTLA4. The STING-dependent antitumor immunity, either induced spontaneously in growing tumors or induced by intratumoral cGAMP injection was dependent on type I IFNs produced in the tumor microenvironment. In response to cGAMP injection, both in the mouse melanoma model and an ex vivo model of cultured human melanoma explants, the principal source of type I IFN was not dendritic cells, but instead endothelial cells. Similarly, endothelial cells but not dendritic cells were found to be the principal source of spontaneously induced type I IFNs in growing tumors. These data identify an unexpected role of the tumor vasculature in the initiation of CD8 T-cell antitumor immunity and demonstrate that tumor endothelial cells can be targeted for immunotherapy of melanoma.

  12. STING activation of tumor endothelial cells initiates spontaneous and therapeutic antitumor immunity

    PubMed Central

    Demaria, Olivier; De Gassart, Aude; Coso, Sanja; Gestermann, Nicolas; Di Domizio, Jeremy; Flatz, Lukas; Gaide, Olivier; Michielin, Olivier; Hwu, Patrick; Petrova, Tatiana V.; Martinon, Fabio; Modlin, Robert L.; Speiser, Daniel E.; Gilliet, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Spontaneous CD8 T-cell responses occur in growing tumors but are usually poorly effective. Understanding the molecular and cellular mechanisms that drive these responses is of major interest as they could be exploited to generate a more efficacious antitumor immunity. As such, stimulator of IFN genes (STING), an adaptor molecule involved in cytosolic DNA sensing, is required for the induction of antitumor CD8 T responses in mouse models of cancer. Here, we find that enforced activation of STING by intratumoral injection of cyclic dinucleotide GMP-AMP (cGAMP), potently enhanced antitumor CD8 T responses leading to growth control of injected and contralateral tumors in mouse models of melanoma and colon cancer. The ability of cGAMP to trigger antitumor immunity was further enhanced by the blockade of both PD1 and CTLA4. The STING-dependent antitumor immunity, either induced spontaneously in growing tumors or induced by intratumoral cGAMP injection was dependent on type I IFNs produced in the tumor microenvironment. In response to cGAMP injection, both in the mouse melanoma model and an ex vivo model of cultured human melanoma explants, the principal source of type I IFN was not dendritic cells, but instead endothelial cells. Similarly, endothelial cells but not dendritic cells were found to be the principal source of spontaneously induced type I IFNs in growing tumors. These data identify an unexpected role of the tumor vasculature in the initiation of CD8 T-cell antitumor immunity and demonstrate that tumor endothelial cells can be targeted for immunotherapy of melanoma. PMID:26607445

  13. Maternal immune activation evoked by polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid does not evoke microglial cell activation in the embryo

    PubMed Central

    Smolders, Silke; Smolders, Sophie M. T.; Swinnen, Nina; Gärtner, Annette; Rigo, Jean-Michel; Legendre, Pascal; Brône, Bert

    2015-01-01

    Several studies have indicated that inflammation during pregnancy increases the risk for the development of neuropsychiatric disorders in the offspring. Morphological brain abnormalities combined with deviations in the inflammatory status of the brain can be observed in patients of both autism and schizophrenia. It was shown that acute infection can induce changes in maternal cytokine levels which in turn are suggested to affect fetal brain development and increase the risk on the development of neuropsychiatric disorders in the offspring. Animal models of maternal immune activation reproduce the etiology of neurodevelopmental disorders such as schizophrenia and autism. In this study the poly (I:C) model was used to mimic viral immune activation in pregnant mice in order to assess the activation status of fetal microglia in these developmental disorders. Because microglia are the resident immune cells of the brain they were expected to be activated due to the inflammatory stimulus. Microglial cell density and activation level in the fetal cortex and hippocampus were determined. Despite the presence of a systemic inflammation in the pregnant mice, there was no significant difference in fetal microglial cell density or immunohistochemically determined activation level between the control and inflammation group. These data indicate that activation of the fetal microglial cells is not likely to be responsible for the inflammation induced deficits in the offspring in this model. PMID:26300736

  14. Innate immune response during Yersinia infection: critical modulation of cell death mechanisms through phagocyte activation.

    PubMed

    Bergsbaken, Tessa; Cookson, Brad T

    2009-11-01

    Yersinia pestis, the etiological agent of plague, is one of the most deadly pathogens on our planet. This organism shares important attributes with its ancestral progenitor, Yersinia pseudotuberculosis, including a 70-kb virulence plasmid, lymphotropism during growth in the mammalian host, and killing of host macrophages. Infections with both organisms are biphasic, where bacterial replication occurs initially with little inflammation, followed by phagocyte influx, inflammatory cytokine production, and tissue necrosis. During infection, plasmid-encoded attributes facilitate bacterial-induced macrophage death, which results from two distinct processes and corresponds to the inflammatory crescendo observed in vivo: Naïve cells die by apoptosis (noninflammatory), and later in infection, activated macrophages die by pyroptosis (inflammatory). The significance of this redirected cell death for the host is underscored by the importance of phagocyte activation for immunity to Yersinia and the protective role of pyroptosis during host responses to anthrax lethal toxin and infections with Francisella, Legionella, Pseudomonas, and Salmonella. The similarities of Y. pestis and Y. pseudotuberculosis, including conserved, plasmid-encoded functions inducing at least two distinct mechanisms of cell death, indicate that comparative studies are revealing about their critical pathogenic mechanism(s) and host innate immune responses during infection. Validation of this idea and evidence of similar interactions with the host immune system are provided by Y. pseudotuberculosis-priming, cross-protective immunity against Y. pestis. Despite these insights, additional studies indicate much remains to be understood concerning effective host responses against Yersinia, including chromosomally encoded attributes that also contribute to bacterial evasion and modulation of innate and adaptive immune responses.

  15. Comparative Analysis of Immune Cells Activation and Cytotoxicity upon Exposure Pathogen and Glycoconjugates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saheb, Entsar; Tarasenko, Olga

    2010-04-01

    Peripheral mononuclear cells (PMNC) including macrophages are key players in the immune responses against pathogens. Any infection could be attenuated if PMNC would be activated and capable to kill pathogen on exposure. It was shown that glycoconjugates (GCs) play an important role in adhesion to, activation, and recognition of pathogens. Nitric oxide (NO) is a regulatory molecule released by immune cells against pathogens that include bacteria, protozoa, helminthes, and fungi. NO is a highly reactive and diffusible molecule that controls replication or intracellular killing of pathogens during infection and immune responses against infections caused by pathogens. Avirulent Bacillus anthracis Sterne spores were used as a model in our study. The purpose of this study was two-fold: A) to analyze PMNC activation through NO production and B) to determine the cytotoxicity effect based on lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) upon exposure to pathogen exerted by GCs. The latter were used "prior to," "during," and "following" PMNC exposure to pathogen in order to modulate immune responses to spores during phagocytosis. Post-phagocytosis study involved the assessment of NO and LDH release by macrophages upon exposure to spores. Results have shown that untreated PMNC released low levels of NO. However, in the presence of GCs, PMNC were activated and produced high levels of NO under all experimental conditions. In addition, the results showed that GC1, GC3 are capable of increasing PMNC activity as evidenced by higher NO levels under the "prior," "during" and "following" to pathogen exposure conditions. On the other hand, GCs were capable of controlling cytotoxicity and decreased LDH levels during phagocytosis of spores. Our findings suggest that GCs stimulate NO production by activating PMNC and decrease cytotoxicity caused by pathogens on PMNC.

  16. Dissecting the Tumor Myeloid Compartment Reveals Rare Activating Antigen Presenting Cells, Critical for T cell Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Broz, Miranda; Binnewies, Mikhail; Boldajipour, Bijan; Nelson, Amanda; Pollock, Joshua; Erle, David; Barczak, Andrea; Rosenblum, Michael; Daud, Adil; Barber, Diane; Amigorena, Sebastian; van’t Veer, Laura J.; Sperling, Anne; Wolf, Denise; Krummel, Matthew F.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY It is well understood that antigen-presenting cells (APC) within tumors typically do not maintain cytotoxic T cell (CTL) function, despite engaging them. Across multiple mouse tumor models and human tumor biopsies, we have delineated the intratumoral dendritic-cell (DC) populations as distinct from macrophage populations. Within these, CD103+ DCs are extremely sparse and yet remarkably capable CTL stimulators. These are uniquely dependent upon IRF8, Zbtb46 and Batf3 transcription factors and generated by GM-CSF and Flt3L cytokines. Regressing tumors have higher proportions of these cells, T-cell dependent immune clearance relies upon them, and abundance of their transcripts in human tumors correlates with clinical outcome. This cell type presents opportunities for prognostic and therapeutic approaches across multiple cancer types. PMID:25446897

  17. The innate immune response in fetal lung mesenchymal cells targets VEGFR2 expression and activity.

    PubMed

    Medal, Rachel M; Im, Amanda M; Yamamoto, Yasutoshi; Lakhdari, Omar; Blackwell, Timothy S; Hoffman, Hal M; Sahoo, Debashis; Prince, Lawrence S

    2017-06-01

    In preterm infants, soluble inflammatory mediators target lung mesenchymal cells, disrupting airway and alveolar morphogenesis. However, how mesenchymal cells respond directly to microbial stimuli remains poorly characterized. Our objective was to measure the genome-wide innate immune response in fetal lung mesenchymal cells exposed to the bacterial endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS). With the use of Affymetrix MoGene 1.0st arrays, we showed that LPS induced expression of unique innate immune transcripts heavily weighted toward CC and CXC family chemokines. The transcriptional response was different between cells from E11, E15, and E18 mouse lungs. In all cells tested, LPS inhibited expression of a small core group of genes including the VEGF receptor Vegfr2 Although best characterized in vascular endothelial populations, we demonstrated here that fetal mouse lung mesenchymal cells express Vegfr2 and respond to VEGF-A stimulation. In mesenchymal cells, VEGF-A increased cell migration, activated the ERK/AKT pathway, and promoted FOXO3A nuclear exclusion. With the use of an experimental coculture model of epithelial-mesenchymal interactions, we also showed that VEGFR2 inhibition prevented formation of three-dimensional structures. Both LPS and tyrosine kinase inhibition reduced three-dimensional structure formation. Our data suggest a novel mechanism for inflammation-mediated defects in lung development involving reduced VEGF signaling in lung mesenchyme. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  18. The impact of inflammation and immune activation on B cell differentiation during HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Ruffin, Nicolas; Thang, Pham Hong; Rethi, Bence; Nilsson, Anna; Chiodi, Francesca

    2011-01-01

    One important pathogenic feature of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 infection is chronic immune activation and impaired survival of T and B cells. A decline of resting memory B cells was reported to occur in both children and adults infected with HIV-1; these cells are responsible for maintaining an adequate serological response to antigens previously encountered in life through natural infection or vaccination. Further understanding of the mechanisms leading to impaired B cell differentiation and germinal center reaction might be essential to design new HIV vaccines and therapies that could improve humoral immune responses in HIV-1 infected individuals. In the present article we summarize the literature and present our view on critical mechanisms of B cell development impaired during HIV-1 infection. We also discuss the impact of microbial translocation, a driving force for persistent inflammation during HIV-1 infection, on survival of terminally differentiated B cells and how the altered expression of cytokines/chemokines pivotal for communication between T and B cells in lymphoid tissues may impair formation of memory B cells.

  19. The Impact of Inflammation and Immune Activation on B Cell Differentiation during HIV-1 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Ruffin, Nicolas; Thang, Pham Hong; Rethi, Bence; Nilsson, Anna; Chiodi, Francesca

    2012-01-01

    One important pathogenic feature of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 infection is chronic immune activation and impaired survival of T and B cells. A decline of resting memory B cells was reported to occur in both children and adults infected with HIV-1; these cells are responsible for maintaining an adequate serological response to antigens previously encountered in life through natural infection or vaccination. Further understanding of the mechanisms leading to impaired B cell differentiation and germinal center reaction might be essential to design new HIV vaccines and therapies that could improve humoral immune responses in HIV-1 infected individuals. In the present article we summarize the literature and present our view on critical mechanisms of B cell development impaired during HIV-1 infection. We also discuss the impact of microbial translocation, a driving force for persistent inflammation during HIV-1 infection, on survival of terminally differentiated B cells and how the altered expression of cytokines/chemokines pivotal for communication between T and B cells in lymphoid tissues may impair formation of memory B cells. PMID:22566879

  20. Glycoconjugates and polysaccharides of fungal cell wall and activation of immune system

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, M.R.; Barreto-Bergter, E.; Taborda, C.P.

    2008-01-01

    Glycoproteins, glycosphingolipids and polysaccharides exposed at the most external layers of the wall are involved in several types of interactions of fungal cells with the exocellular environment. These molecules are fundamental building blocks of organisms, contributing to the structure, integrity, cell growth, differentiation and signaling. Several of them are immunologically active compounds with potential as regulators of pathogenesis and the immune response of the host. Some of these structures can be specifically recognized by antibodies from patients’ sera, suggesting that they can be also useful in the diagnosis of fungal infections. PMID:24031202

  1. Control of immune ligands by members of a cytomegalovirus gene expansion suppresses natural killer cell activation

    PubMed Central

    Fielding, Ceri A; Weekes, Michael P; Nobre, Luis V; Ruckova, Eva; Wilkie, Gavin S; Paulo, Joao A; Chang, Chiwen; Suárez, Nicolás M; Davies, James A; Antrobus, Robin; Stanton, Richard J; Aicheler, Rebecca J; Nichols, Hester; Vojtesek, Borek; Trowsdale, John; Davison, Andrew J; Gygi, Steven P

    2017-01-01

    The human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) US12 family consists of ten sequentially arranged genes (US12-21) with poorly characterized function. We now identify novel natural killer (NK) cell evasion functions for four members: US12, US14, US18 and US20. Using a systematic multiplexed proteomics approach to quantify ~1300 cell surface and ~7200 whole cell proteins, we demonstrate that the US12 family selectively targets plasma membrane proteins and plays key roles in regulating NK ligands, adhesion molecules and cytokine receptors. US18 and US20 work in concert to suppress cell surface expression of the critical NKp30 ligand B7-H6 thus inhibiting NK cell activation. The US12 family is therefore identified as a major new hub of immune regulation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.22206.001 PMID:28186488

  2. Vaccines combined with immune checkpoint antibodies promote cytotoxic T cell activity and tumor eradication

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Omar A.; Lewin, Sarah A.; Dranoff, Glenn; Mooney, David J.

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate that a poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLG) cancer vaccine can be used in combination with immune checkpoint antibodies, anti–CTLA-4 or anti–PD-1, to enhance cytotoxic T cell (CTL) activity and induce the regression of solid B16 tumors in mice. Combination therapy obviated the need for vaccine boosting and significantly skewed intratumoral reactions toward CTL activity, resulting in the regression of B16 tumors up to 50mm2 in size and 75% survival rates. These data suggests that combining material-based cancer vaccines with checkpoint antibodies has the potential to mediate tumor regression in humans. PMID:26669718

  3. T-cell activation is an immune correlate of risk in BCG vaccinated infants

    PubMed Central

    Fletcher, Helen A.; Snowden, Margaret A.; Landry, Bernard; Rida, Wasima; Satti, Iman; Harris, Stephanie A.; Matsumiya, Magali; Tanner, Rachel; O'Shea, Matthew K.; Dheenadhayalan, Veerabadran; Bogardus, Leah; Stockdale, Lisa; Marsay, Leanne; Chomka, Agnieszka; Harrington-Kandt, Rachel; Manjaly-Thomas, Zita-Rose; Naranbhai, Vivek; Stylianou, Elena; Darboe, Fatoumatta; Penn-Nicholson, Adam; Nemes, Elisa; Hatherill, Mark; Hussey, Gregory; Mahomed, Hassan; Tameris, Michele; McClain, J Bruce; Evans, Thomas G.; Hanekom, Willem A.; Scriba, Thomas J.; McShane, Helen

    2016-01-01

    Vaccines to protect against tuberculosis (TB) are urgently needed. We performed a case–control analysis to identify immune correlates of TB disease risk in Bacille Calmette–Guerin (BCG) immunized infants from the MVA85A efficacy trial. Among 53 TB case infants and 205 matched controls, the frequency of activated HLA-DR+ CD4+ T cells associates with increased TB disease risk (OR=1.828, 95% CI=1.25–2.68, P=0.002, FDR=0.04, conditional logistic regression). In an independent study of Mycobacterium tuberculosis-infected adolescents, activated HLA-DR+ CD4+ T cells also associate with increased TB disease risk (OR=1.387, 95% CI=1.068–1.801, P=0.014, conditional logistic regression). In infants, BCG-specific T cells secreting IFN-γ associate with reduced risk of TB (OR=0.502, 95% CI=0.29–0.86, P=0.013, FDR=0.14). The causes and impact of T-cell activation on disease risk should be considered when designing and testing TB vaccine candidates for these populations. PMID:27068708

  4. Depot Medroxyprogesterone Acetate Increases Immune Cell Numbers and Activation Markers in Human Vaginal Mucosal Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Chandra, Neelima; Anderson, Sharon; Cunningham, Tina Duong; Yousefieh, Nazita; Mauck, Christine; Doncel, Gustavo F.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The relationship between exogenous contraceptive hormones and permissiveness of the female genital tract to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is the subject of renewed debate. To better characterize the effect of depot medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA) on HIV-1 cellular targets and epithelial integrity in the vagina, we compared leukocyte populations, markers of activation and proliferation, and the density of intercellular junctional proteins in the vaginal epithelium of women during the follicular and luteal phases of the menstrual cycle and approximately 12 weeks after receiving a DMPA injection. This prospective cohort study involved 15 healthy women. Vaginal biopsies were obtained in the follicular and luteal phases of the menstrual cycle, and approximately 12 weeks following a 150-mg intramuscular injection of DMPA. Leukocyte populations, activation phenotype, and epithelial tight junction and adherens proteins were evaluated by immunohistochemistry. After receiving DMPA, the numbers of CD45, CD3, CD8, CD68, HLA-DR, and CCR5 bearing immune cells were significantly (p<0.05) increased in vaginal tissues, compared to the follicular and/or luteal phases of untreated cycles. There were no significant differences in immune cell populations between the follicular and luteal phases of the control cycle. There were also no statistically significant differences in epithelial thickness and density of epithelial tight junction and adherens proteins among the follicular, luteal, and post-DMPA treatment sampling points. In this pilot study, vaginal immune cell populations were significantly altered by exogenous progesterone, resulting in increased numbers of T cells, macrophages, and HLA-DR- and CCR5-positive cells. PMID:23189932

  5. Human Epidermal Langerhans Cells Maintain Immune Homeostasis in Skin by Activating Skin Resident Regulatory T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Seneschal, Julien; Clark, Rachael A.; Gehad, Ahmed; Baecher-Allan, Clare M.; Kupper, Thomas S.

    2013-01-01

    Recent discoveries indicate that the skin of a normal individual contains 10-20 billion resident memory T cells ( which include various T helper, T cytotoxic, and T regulatory subsets, that are poised to respond to environmental antigens. Using only autologous human tissues, we report that both in vitro and in vivo, resting epidermal Langerhan cells (LC) selectively and specifically induced the activation and proliferation of skin resident regulatory T cells (Treg), a minor subset of skin resident memory T cells. In the presence of foreign pathogen, however, the same LC activated and induced proliferation of effector memory T (Tem) cells and limited Treg cells activation. These underappreciated properties of LC: namely maintenance of tolerance in normal skin, and activation of protective skin resident memory T cells upon infectious challenge, help clarify the role of LC in skin. PMID:22560445

  6. Transcriptomic profiling of microglia reveals signatures of cell activation and immune response, during experimental cerebral malaria

    PubMed Central

    Capuccini, Barbara; Lin, Jingwen; Talavera-López, Carlos; Khan, Shahid M.; Sodenkamp, Jan; Spaccapelo, Roberta; Langhorne, Jean

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral malaria is a pathology involving inflammation in the brain. There are many immune cell types activated during this process, but there is little information on the response of microglia, in this severe complication. We examined microglia by genome wide transcriptomic analysis in a model of experimental cerebral malaria (ECM), in which C57BL/6 mice are infected with Plasmodium berghei ANKA. Thousands of transcripts were differentially expressed in microglia at two different time points during infection. Proliferation of microglia was a dominant feature before the onset of ECM, and supporting this, we observed an increase in numbers of these cells in the brain. When cerebral malaria symptoms were manifest, genes involved in immune responses and chemokine production were upregulated, which were possibly driven by Type I Interferon. Consistent with this hypothesis, in vitro culture of a microglial cell line with Interferon-β, but not infected red blood cells, resulted in production of several of the chemokines shown to be upregulated in the gene expression analysis. It appears that these responses are associated with ECM, as microglia from mice infected with a mutant P. berghei parasite (ΔDPAP3), which does not cause ECM, did not show the same level of activation or proliferation. PMID:27991544

  7. Transcriptomic profiling of microglia reveals signatures of cell activation and immune response, during experimental cerebral malaria.

    PubMed

    Capuccini, Barbara; Lin, Jingwen; Talavera-López, Carlos; Khan, Shahid M; Sodenkamp, Jan; Spaccapelo, Roberta; Langhorne, Jean

    2016-12-19

    Cerebral malaria is a pathology involving inflammation in the brain. There are many immune cell types activated during this process, but there is little information on the response of microglia, in this severe complication. We examined microglia by genome wide transcriptomic analysis in a model of experimental cerebral malaria (ECM), in which C57BL/6 mice are infected with Plasmodium berghei ANKA. Thousands of transcripts were differentially expressed in microglia at two different time points during infection. Proliferation of microglia was a dominant feature before the onset of ECM, and supporting this, we observed an increase in numbers of these cells in the brain. When cerebral malaria symptoms were manifest, genes involved in immune responses and chemokine production were upregulated, which were possibly driven by Type I Interferon. Consistent with this hypothesis, in vitro culture of a microglial cell line with Interferon-β, but not infected red blood cells, resulted in production of several of the chemokines shown to be upregulated in the gene expression analysis. It appears that these responses are associated with ECM, as microglia from mice infected with a mutant P. berghei parasite (ΔDPAP3), which does not cause ECM, did not show the same level of activation or proliferation.

  8. Circumvention of regulatory CD4(+) T cell activity during cross-priming strongly enhances T cell-mediated immunity.

    PubMed

    Heit, Antje; Gebhardt, Friedemann; Lahl, Katharina; Neuenhahn, Michael; Schmitz, Frank; Anderl, Florian; Wagner, Hermann; Sparwasser, Tim; Busch, Dirk H; Kastenmüller, Kathrin

    2008-06-01

    Immunization with purified antigens is a safe and practical vaccination strategy but is generally unable to induce sustained CD8(+) T cell-mediated protection against intracellular pathogens. Most efforts to improve the CD8(+) T cell immunogenicity of these vaccines have focused on co-administration of adjuvant to support cross-presentation and dendritic cell maturation. In addition, it has been shown that CD4(+) T cell help during the priming phase contributes to the generation of protective CD8(+) memory T cells. In this report we demonstrate that the depletion of CD4(+) T cells paradoxically enhances long-lasting CD8-mediated protective immunity upon protein vaccination. Functional and genetic in vivo inactivation experiments attribute this enhancement primarily to MHC class II-restricted CD4(+) regulatory T cells (Treg), which appear to physiologically suppress the differentiation process towards long-living effector memory T cells. Since, in functional terms, this suppression by Treg largely exceeds the positive effects of conventional CD4(+) T cell help, even the absence of all CD4(+) T cells or lack of MHC class II-mediated interactions on priming dendritic cells result in enhanced CD8(+) T cell immunogenicity. These findings have important implications for the improvement of vaccines against intracellular pathogens or tumors, especially in patients with highly active Treg.

  9. Effect of liposomal antigens on the priming and activation of the immune system by dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Shahum, Eliane; Thérien, Hélène-Marie

    2002-03-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are recognized as the sole professional antigen-presenting cells capable of priming naive T cells of the helper and cytotoxic phenotypes. This property is presently exploited with success in vaccinal strategies against pathogens or tumor cells that otherwise escape immune recognition, but the repeated infusions of ex vivo expanded and sensitized DCs are usually required to achieve protection. In this paper, we demonstrate that liposomal antigens can efficiently relay and propagate the action of DCs, inducing a strong long-term response against their associated antigen. Their effect is mainly achieved by improving the ex vivo loading of DCs and by efficiently channeling the activation stimulus into the induction of effector function. This is demonstrated by the sustained immunoglobulin production as well as by the sustained lymphoproliferation and the increased cytokine secretion that can be achieved upon restimulation of DC-primed immune cells with limited amount of liposomal antigenic material. Being well-tolerated and easily prepared, liposomal antigens could therefore be expected to significantly contribute to the efficiency and to a more general utilization of the highly promising but rather cumbersome DC-based immunotherapies.

  10. Activity-based probes for detection of active MALT1 paracaspase in immune cells and lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Eitelhuber, Andrea C; Vosyka, Oliver; Nagel, Daniel; Bognar, Miriam; Lenze, Dido; Lammens, Katja; Schlauderer, Florian; Hlahla, Daniela; Hopfner, Karl-Peter; Lenz, Georg; Hummel, Michael; Verhelst, Steven H L; Krappmann, Daniel

    2015-01-22

    MALT1 paracaspase is activated upon antigen receptor stimulation to promote lymphocyte activation. In addition, deregulated MALT1 protease activity drives survival of distinct lymphomas such as the activated B cell type of diffuse large B cell lymphoma (ABC-DLBCL). Here, we designed fluorophore or biotin-coupled activity based-probes (ABP) that covalently modify the active center of MALT1. MALT1-ABPs are exclusively labeling an active modified full length form of MALT1 upon T cell stimulation. Further, despite the CARMA1 requirement for initial MALT1 activation, the MALT1-ABPs show that protease activity is not confined to the high-molecular CARMA1-BCL10-MALT1 (CBM) complex. Using biotin-coupled ABPs, we developed a robust assay for sensitive and selective detection of active MALT1 in cell lines, primary lymphocytes, and DLBCL tumor biopsies. Taken together, MALT1-ABPs represent powerful chemical tools to measure cellular MALT1 activation, determine efficacy of small molecule inhibitors, and classify lymphomas based on MALT1 activity status.

  11. Enveloped Viruses Disable Innate Immune Responses in Dendritic Cells by Direct Activation of TAM Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharyya, Suchita; Zagórska, Anna; Lew, Erin D.; Shrestha, Bimmi; Rothlin, Carla V.; Naughton, John; Diamond, Michael S.; Lemke, Greg; Young, John A.T.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Upon activation by the ligands Gas6 and Protein S, TAM receptor tyrosine kinases promote phagocytic clearance of apoptotic cells and downregulate immune responses initiated by Toll-like receptors and type I interferons (IFNs). Many enveloped viruses display the phospholipid phosphatidylserine on their membranes, through which they bind Gas6 and Protein S and engage TAM receptors. We find that ligand-coated viruses activate TAM receptors on dendritic cells (DCs), dampen type I IFN signaling, and thereby evade host immunity and promote infection. Upon virus challenge, TAM-deficient DCs display type I IFN responses that are elevated in comparison to wild-type cells. As a consequence, TAM-deficient DCs are relatively resistant to infection by flaviviruses and pseudotyped retroviruses, but infection can be restored with neutralizing type I IFN antibodies. Correspondingly, a TAM kinase inhibitor antagonizes the infection of wild-type DCs. Thus, TAM receptors are engaged by viruses in order to attenuate type I IFN signaling and represent potential therapeutic targets. PMID:23954153

  12. Lower Affinity T Cells are Critical Components and Active Participants of the Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Ryan J.; Evavold, Brian D.

    2015-01-01

    Kinetic and biophysical parameters of T cell receptor (TCR) and peptide:MHC (pMHC) interaction define intrinsic factors required for T cell activation and differentiation. Although receptor ligand kinetics are somewhat cumbersome to assess experimentally, TCR:pMHC affinity has been shown to predict peripheral T cell functionality and potential for forming memory. Multimeric forms of pMHC monomers have often been used to provide an indirect readout of higher affinity T cells due to their availability and ease of use while allowing simultaneous definition of other functional and phenotypic characteristics. However, multimeric pMHC reagents have introduced a bias that underestimates the lower affinity components contained in the highly diverse TCR repertoires of all polyclonal T cell responses. Advances in the identification of lower affinity cells have led to the examination of these cells and their contribution to the immune response. In this review, we discuss the identification of high- vs. low-affinity T cells as well as their attributed signaling and functional differences. Lastly, mechanisms are discussed that maintain a diverse range of low- and high-affinity T cells. PMID:26441973

  13. Analysing immune cell migration.

    PubMed

    Beltman, Joost B; Marée, Athanasius F M; de Boer, Rob J

    2009-11-01

    The visualization of the dynamic behaviour of and interactions between immune cells using time-lapse video microscopy has an important role in modern immunology. To draw robust conclusions, quantification of such cell migration is required. However, imaging experiments are associated with various artefacts that can affect the estimated positions of the immune cells under analysis, which form the basis of any subsequent analysis. Here, we describe potential artefacts that could affect the interpretation of data sets on immune cell migration. We propose how these errors can be recognized and corrected, and suggest ways to prevent the data analysis itself leading to biased results.

  14. Effect of mucilage from yam on activation of lymphocytic immune cells

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Cheol-Min; Kweon, Dae-Hyuk

    2007-01-01

    The immunostimulating activities of mucilage fraction from yam were investigated. The proliferation of BSA-primed lymph node cells was enhanced between 4.1- to 10.9-fold compare to control, when cultured with 1 to 25 µg/mL of yam-mucilage fraction. It showed strong immunopotentiating activity than ginseng extract and as remarkable as Bifidobacterium adolescentis M101-4 known as a positive immunostimulator. Mitogenicity to lymph node cells was fully induced by concanavalin A and lipopolysaccharide. The proliferation of splenocytes and Peyer's patch cells was enhanced between 5.0- to 14.1-fold and 2.4- to 6.4-fold, respectively, when cultured with 1 to 25 µg/mL of yam-mucilage fraction. It enhanced the production of cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-α and IL-6 in the culture of RAW 264.7 macrophage cells. In the culture of lipopolysaccharide-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells, production of cytokines was as similar as compared to controls. In unstimulated RAW 264.7 cells, both tumor necrosis factor-α and IL-6 production were enhanced between 15.6- to 60.1-fold and 2.3- to 9.1-fold, respectively. Mucilage fraction from yam is expected to be a safe immunopotentiator to maintain the host immunity and develop a physiologically functional food. PMID:20535393

  15. Dendritic cell editing by activated natural killer cells results in a more protective cancer-specific immune response.

    PubMed

    Morandi, Barbara; Mortara, Lorenzo; Chiossone, Laura; Accolla, Roberto S; Mingari, Maria Cristina; Moretta, Lorenzo; Moretta, Alessandro; Ferlazzo, Guido

    2012-01-01

    Over the last decade, several studies have extensively reported that activated natural killer (NK) cells can kill autologous immature dendritic cells (DCs) in vitro, whereas they spare fully activated DCs. This led to the proposal that activated NK cells might select a more immunogenic subset of DCs during a protective immune response. However, there is no demonstration that autologous DC killing by NK cells is an event occurring in vivo and, consequently, the functional relevance of this killing remains elusive. Here we report that a significant decrease of CD11c(+) DCs was observed in draining lymph nodes of mice inoculated with MHC-devoid cells as NK cell targets able to induce NK cell activation. This in vivo DC editing by NK cells was perforin-dependent and it was functionally relevant, since residual lymph node DCs displayed an improved capability to induce T cell proliferation. In addition, in a model of anti-cancer vaccination, the administration of MHC-devoid cells together with tumor cells increased the number of tumor-specific CTLs and resulted in a significant increase in survival of mice upon challenge with a lethal dose of tumor cells. Depletion of NK cells or the use of perforin knockout mice strongly decreased the tumor-specific CTL expansion and its protective role against tumor cell challenge. As a whole, our data support the hypothesis that NK cell-mediated DC killing takes place in vivo and is able to promote expansion of cancer-specific CTLs. Our results also indicate that cancer vaccines could be improved by strategies aimed at activating NK cells.

  16. Inflammation and bone destruction in arthritis: synergistic activity of immune and mesenchymal cells in joints.

    PubMed

    Komatsu, Noriko; Takayanagi, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an immune-mediated disease of the joints that is characterized by chronic inflammation and synovial hyperplasia that eventually lead to cartilage and bone destruction. Synovial fibroblasts are mesenchymal cells recognized as a key cell population in RA due to their hyperproliferative and hypersensitive properties in the inflammatory milieu and hyperproduction of both inflammatory cytokines and matrix-degrading enzymes. On the immune cell side, a wealth of evidence has shown that CD4(+)T-cells, especially IL-17 producing helper T (Th17) cells, play a prominent role, particularly in the initiation of systemic immune response in RA. However, it is still unclear how the local chronic inflammation in the joint is elicited by a systemic immune response. Recent studies have shed light on the importance of the interaction between immune and mesenchymal cells in joints including synovial fibroblasts. In particular, mesenchymal cells contribute to the Th17-mediated chronic inflammation in RA by promoting the migration of Th17 cells to the inflamed site and then the homeostatic proliferation and concomitant increase in IL-17 production. In addition, recent progress in osteoimmunology has provided new insight into the pathogenesis of the bone destruction which takes place in RA. Th17-related cytokines have been shown to enhance osteoclastogenesis, mainly via synovial fibroblasts. Thus, mesenchymal cells are a determinant of the development of RA that links the systemic immune response and the local disorder in the joints. In addition, the interaction of immune and mesenchymal cells plays a key role in both the chronic inflammation and bone destruction seen in RA. Elucidation of the precise events involved in this interaction will lead to a better understanding of the mechanisms by which chronic inflammation and bone destruction in joint results from a systemic immune response, and also will help provide a molecular basis for novel therapeutic

  17. Inflammation and Bone Destruction in Arthritis: Synergistic Activity of Immune and Mesenchymal Cells in Joints

    PubMed Central

    Komatsu, Noriko; Takayanagi, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an immune-mediated disease of the joints that is characterized by chronic inflammation and synovial hyperplasia that eventually lead to cartilage and bone destruction. Synovial fibroblasts are mesenchymal cells recognized as a key cell population in RA due to their hyperproliferative and hypersensitive properties in the inflammatory milieu and hyperproduction of both inflammatory cytokines and matrix-degrading enzymes. On the immune cell side, a wealth of evidence has shown that CD4+T-cells, especially IL-17 producing helper T (Th17) cells, play a prominent role, particularly in the initiation of systemic immune response in RA. However, it is still unclear how the local chronic inflammation in the joint is elicited by a systemic immune response. Recent studies have shed light on the importance of the interaction between immune and mesenchymal cells in joints including synovial fibroblasts. In particular, mesenchymal cells contribute to the Th17-mediated chronic inflammation in RA by promoting the migration of Th17 cells to the inflamed site and then the homeostatic proliferation and concomitant increase in IL-17 production. In addition, recent progress in osteoimmunology has provided new insight into the pathogenesis of the bone destruction which takes place in RA. Th17-related cytokines have been shown to enhance osteoclastogenesis, mainly via synovial fibroblasts. Thus, mesenchymal cells are a determinant of the development of RA that links the systemic immune response and the local disorder in the joints. In addition, the interaction of immune and mesenchymal cells plays a key role in both the chronic inflammation and bone destruction seen in RA. Elucidation of the precise events involved in this interaction will lead to a better understanding of the mechanisms by which chronic inflammation and bone destruction in joint results from a systemic immune response, and also will help provide a molecular basis for novel therapeutic

  18. Lipopolysaccharide Increases Immune Activation and Alters T Cell Homeostasis in SHIVB'WHU Chronically Infected Chinese Rhesus Macaque

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Gao-Hong; Wu, Run-Dong; Zheng, Hong-Yi; Zhang, Xiao-Liang; Zhang, Ming-Xu; Tian, Ren-Rong; Liu, Guang-Ming; Pang, Wei; Zheng, Yong-Tang

    2015-01-01

    Immune activation plays a significant role in the disease progression of HIV. Microbial products, especially bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS), contribute to immune activation. Increasing evidence indicates that T lymphocyte homeostasis disruptions are associated with immune activation. However, the mechanism by which LPS affects disruption of immune response is still not fully understood. Chronically SHIVB'WHU-infected Chinese rhesus macaques received 50 μg/kg body weight LPS in this study. LPS administration affected the virus/host equilibrium by elevating the levels of viral replication and activating T lymphocytes. LPS induced upregulation of CD8+ naïve T cells and downregulated the number of CD4+ and CD8+ T effector memory cells. The downregulated effector memory cells are associated with a lower frequency of monofunctional and polyfunctional cells, and an upregulated programmed cell death-1 (PD-1) expression on CD4+ and CD8+ T cells was observed in monkeys after LPS stimulation. Our data provide new insights into the function of LPS in the immune activation in SHIV/HIV infection. PMID:26713320

  19. Metronomic cyclophosphamide eradicates large implanted GL261 gliomas by activating antitumor Cd8(+) T-cell responses and immune memory.

    PubMed

    Wu, Junjie; Waxman, David J

    2015-04-01

    Cancer chemotherapy using cytotoxic drugs can induce immunogenic tumor cell death; however, dosing regimens and schedules that enable single-agent chemotherapy to induce adaptive immune-dependent ablation of large, established tumors with activation of long-term immune memory have not been identified. Here, we investigate this issue in a syngeneic, implanted GL261 glioma model in immune-competent mice given cyclophosphamide on a 6-day repeating metronomic schedule. Two cycles of metronomic cyclophosphamide treatment induced sustained upregulation of tumor-associated CD8(+) cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) cells, natural killer (NK) cells, macrophages, and other immune cells. Expression of CTL- and NK-cell-shared effectors peaked on Day 6, and then declined by Day 9 after the second cyclophosphamide injection and correlated inversely with the expression of the regulatory T cell (Treg) marker Foxp3. Sustained tumor regression leading to tumor ablation was achieved after several cyclophosphamide treatment cycles. Tumor ablation required CD8(+) T cells, as shown by immunodepletion studies, and was associated with immunity to re-challenge with GL261 glioma cells, but not B16-F10 melanoma or Lewis lung carcinoma cells. Rejection of GL261 tumor re-challenge was associated with elevated CTLs in blood and increased CTL infiltration in tumors, consistent with the induction of long-term, specific CD8(+) T-cell anti-GL261 tumor memory. Co-depletion of CD8(+) T cells and NK cells did not inhibit tumor regression beyond CD8(+) T-cell depletion alone, suggesting that the metronomic cyclophosphamide-activated NK cells function via CD8a(+) T cells. Taken together, these findings provide proof-of-concept that single-agent chemotherapy delivered on an optimized metronomic schedule can eradicate large, established tumors and induce long-term immune memory.

  20. Inhibition of STAT3 activity re-activates anti-tumor immunity but fails to restore the immunogenicity of tumor cells in a B-cell lymphoma model

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Yang; Zhou, Xiaoxi; Zhou, Mi; Xu, Danmei; Ma, Quanfu; Zhang, Peilin; Huang, Xiaoyuan; Li, Qinlu; Ma, Ding; Zhou, Jianfeng

    2014-01-01

    A large number of patients with advanced lymphoma become refractory or relapse after initial treatment due to the persistence of minimal residual disease. Ideal immunotherapy strategy for eradicating the minimal residual disease of lymphoma and preventing the tendency to relapse need to be developed. Here, we use a mice model mimicked the disease entities of aggressive B-cell lymphoma dynamically to analyze the host anti-lymphoma immunity during the progression of lymphoma. We have shown that STAT3 activity was gradually enhanced in host immune effector cells with the progression of lymphoma. Inhibition of the STAT3 activity with a small molecule inhibitor was able to effectively enhance the function of both host innate and adaptive immunity, and thereby delayed the progression of lymphoma. Despite the therapeutic benefits were achieved by using of the STAT3 inhibitor, disrupting of STAT3 pathway did not prevent the eventual development of lymphoma due to the presence of point mutation of β2M, which controls immune recognition by T cells. Our findings highlight the complexity of the mechanism of immune evasion; therefore a detailed analysis of genes involved in the immune recognition process should be essential before an elegant immunotherapy strategy could be conducted. PMID:24915165

  1. Macrophages enhance the radiosensitizing activity of lipid A: A novel role for immune cells in tumor cell radioresponse

    SciTech Connect

    Ridder, Mark de . E-mail: Mark.De.Ridder@vub.ac.be; Verovski, Valeri N.; Darville, Martine I.; Berge, Dirk L. van den; Monsaert, Christinne; Eizirik, Decio L.; Storme, Guy A.

    2004-10-01

    Purpose: This study examines whether activated macrophages may radiosensitize tumor cells through the release of proinflammatory mediators. Methods and materials: RAW 264.7 macrophages were activated by lipid A, and the conditioned medium (CM) was analyzed for the secretion of cytokines and the production of nitric oxide (NO) through inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). EMT-6 tumor cells were exposed to CM and analyzed for hypoxic cell radiosensitivity. The role of nuclear factor (NF)-{kappa}B in the transcriptional activation of iNOS was examined by luciferase reporter gene assay. Results: Clinical immunomodulator lipid A, at a plasma-relevant concentration of 3 {mu}g/mL, stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophages to release NO, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-{alpha}, and other cytokines. This in turn activated iNOS-mediated NO production in EMT-6 tumor cells and drastically enhanced their radiosensitivity. Radiosensitization was abrogated by the iNOS inhibitor aminoguanidine but not by a neutralizing anti-TNF-{alpha} antibody. The mechanism of iNOS induction was linked to NF-{kappa}B but not to JAK/STAT signaling. Interferon-{gamma} further increased the NO production by macrophages to a level that caused radiosensitization of EMT-6 cells through the bystanding effect of diffused NO. Conclusions: We demonstrate for the first time that activated macrophages may radiosensitize tumor cells through the induction of NO synthesis, which occurs in both tumor and immune cells.

  2. Photodynamic-therapy Activates Immune Response by disrupting Immunity Homeostasis of Tumor Cells, which Generates Vaccine for Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Yuanhong; Yin, Guifang; Le, Vanminh; Zhang, Anle; Chen, Siyu; Liang, Xin; Liu, Jianwen

    2016-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT), a regulatory approved cancer treatment, is reported to be capable of causing immunogenic apoptosis. The current data reveal PDT can cause the dysregulation of “eat me” and “don't eat me” signal by generating reactive oxygen species (ROS) -mediated endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. This dysregulation probably contribute to the increased uptake of PDT-killed Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) cells by homologous dendritic cells (DCs), accompanied by phenotypic maturation (CD80high, CD86high, and CD40high) and functional stimulation (NOhigh, IL-10absent) of dendritic cells as well as subsequent T-cell responses. Morevover, C57BL/6 mice vaccinated with dendritic cells (DCs) pulsed with PDT-treated LLCs (PDT-DCs) or PDT-treated LLCs alone (PDT-LLCs) exhibited potent immunity against LLC tumors. In the current study, the PDT-induced immune response was characterized as a process related with the dysregulation of “eat me” signal and “don't eat me” signal, revealing the possibility for developing PDT into an antitumor vaccination strategy for personalized cancer immunotherapy. PMID:26722223

  3. Dendritic Cell-Mediated Phagocytosis but Not Immune Activation Is Enhanced by Plasmin

    PubMed Central

    Borg, Rachael J.; Samson, Andre L.; Au, Amanda E.-L.; Scholzen, Anja; Fuchsberger, Martina; Kong, Ying Y.; Freeman, Roxann; Mifsud, Nicole A.; Plebanski, Magdalena; Medcalf, Robert L.

    2015-01-01

    Removal of dead cells in the absence of concomitant immune stimulation is essential for tissue homeostasis. We recently identified an injury-induced protein misfolding event that orchestrates the plasmin-dependent proteolytic degradation of necrotic cells. As impaired clearance of dead cells by the innate immune system predisposes to autoimmunity, we determined whether plasmin could influence endocytosis and immune cell stimulation by dendritic cells – a critical cell that links the innate and adaptive immune systems. We find that plasmin generated on the surface of necrotic cells enhances their phagocytic removal by human monocyte-derived dendritic cells. Plasmin also promoted phagocytosis of protease-resistant microparticles by diverse mouse dendritic cell sub-types both in vitro and in vivo. Together with an increased phagocytic capacity, plasmin-treated dendritic cells maintain an immature phenotype, exhibit reduced migration to lymph nodes, increase their expression/release of the immunosuppressive cytokine TGF-β, and lose their capacity to mount an allogeneic response. Collectively, our findings support a novel role for plasmin formed on dead cells and other phagocytic targets in maintaining tissue homeostasis by increasing the phagocytic function of dendritic cells while simultaneously decreasing their immunostimulatory capacity consistent with producing an immunosuppressive state. PMID:26132730

  4. Active Immunization with Extracellular Vesicles Derived from Staphylococcus aureus Effectively Protects against Staphylococcal Lung Infections, Mainly via Th1 Cell-Mediated Immunity.

    PubMed

    Choi, Seng Jin; Kim, Min-Hye; Jeon, Jinseong; Kim, Oh Youn; Choi, Youngwoo; Seo, Jihye; Hong, Sung-Wook; Lee, Won-Hee; Jeon, Seong Gyu; Gho, Yong Song; Jee, Young-Koo; Kim, Yoon-Keun

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is an important pathogenic bacterium that causes various infectious diseases. Extracellular vesicles (EVs) released from S. aureus contain bacterial proteins, nucleic acids, and lipids. These EVs can induce immune responses leading to similar symptoms as during staphylococcal infection condition and have the potential as vaccination agent. Here, we show that active immunization (vaccination) with S. aureus-derived EVs induce adaptive immunity of antibody and T cell responses. In addition, these EVs have the vaccine adjuvant ability to induce protective immunity such as the up-regulation of co-stimulatory molecules and the expression of T cell polarizing cytokines in antigen-presenting cells. Moreover, vaccination with S. aureus EVs conferred protection against lethality induced by airway challenge with lethal dose of S. aureus and also pneumonia induced by the administration of sub-lethal dose of S. aureus. These protective effects were also found in mice that were adoptively transferred with splenic T cells isolated from S. aureus EV-immunized mice, but not in serum transferred mice. Furthermore, this protective effect of S. aureus EVs was significantly reduced by the absence of interferon-gamma, but not by the absence of interleukin-17. Together, the study herein suggests that S. aureus EVs are a novel vaccine candidate against S. aureus infections, mainly via Th1 cellular response.

  5. Markers of endothelial cell activation and immune activation are increased in patients with severe leptospirosis and associated with disease severity.

    PubMed

    Goeijenbier, Marco; Gasem, M Hussein; Meijers, Joost C M; Hartskeerl, Rudy A; Ahmed, Ahmed; Goris, Marga G A; Isbandrio, Bambang; Schuller, Simone S; Osterhaus, Albert D M E; Martina, Byron E E; van Gorp, Eric C M; Nally, Jarlath E; Wagenaar, Jiri F P

    2015-10-01

    Previous studies concluded that haemorrhage is one of the most accurate prognostic factors of mortality in leptospirosis. Therefore, endothelial cell activation was investigated in relation to disease severity in severe leptospirosis. Prospective cohort study of severe leptospirosis patients. Plasma levels of sE-selectin and Von Willebrand factor (VWF) were determined. Consequently, an in vitro endothelial cell model was used to assess endothelial activation after exposure to virulent Leptospira. Finally, immune activation, as a potential contributing factor to endothelial cell activation, was determined by soluble IL2-receptor (sIL-2r) and soluble Fas-ligand (sFasL) levels. Plasma levels of sE-selectin and VWF strongly increased in patients compared to healthy controls. Furthermore, sE-selectin was significantly elevated (203 ng/ml vs. 157 ng/ml, p < 0.05) in survivors compared to non-survivors. Endothelial cells exposed to virulent Leptospira showed increased VWF expression. E-selectin and ICAM-1 expression did not change. Immunohistochemistry revealed the presence of intracellular Leptospira and qPCR suggested replication. In vivo analysis showed that increased levels of sFasL and sIL-2r were both strongly associated with mortality. Furthermore sIL-2r levels were increased in patients that developed bleeding and significantly correlated to duration of hospital stay. Markers of endothelial activation and immune activation were associated with disease severity in leptospirosis patients. Copyright © 2015 The British Infection Association. All rights reserved.

  6. Increased numbers of monocyte-derived dendritic cells during successful tumor immunotherapy with immune-activating agents.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, Sabine; Hyde, Evelyn J; Yang, Jianping; Rich, Fenella J; Harper, Jacquie L; Kirman, Joanna R; Ronchese, Franca

    2013-08-15

    Local treatment with selected TLR ligands or bacteria such as bacillus Calmette-Guérin increases antitumor immune responses and delays tumor growth. It is thought that these treatments may act by activating tumor-associated dendritic cells (DCs), thereby supporting the induction of antitumor immune responses. However, common parameters of successful immune activation have not been identified. We used mouse models to compare treatments with different immune-activating agents for the ability to delay tumor growth, improve priming of tumor-specific T cells, and induce early cytokine production and DC activation. Treatment with polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid or a combination of monosodium urate crystals and Mycobacterium smegmatis was effective at delaying the growth of s.c. B16 melanomas, orthotopic 4T1 mammary carcinomas, and reducing 4T1 lung metastases. In contrast, LPS, monosodium urate crystals, or M. smegmatis alone had no activity. Effective treatments required both NK1.1(+) and CD8(+) cells, and resulted in increased T cell priming and the infiltration of NK cells and CD8(+) T cells in tumors. Unexpectedly, both effective and ineffective treatments increased DC numbers and the expression of costimulatory molecules in the tumor-draining lymph node. However, only effective treatments induced the rapid appearance of a population of monocyte-derived DCs in the draining lymph node, early release of IL-12p70 and IFN-γ, and low IL-10 in the serum. These results suggest that the activation of existing DC subsets is not sufficient for the induction of antitumor immune responses, whereas early induction of Th1 cytokines and monocyte-derived DCs are features of successful activation of antitumor immunity.

  7. Immune modulation of T-cell and NK (natural killer) cell activities by TEXs (tumour-derived exosomes)

    PubMed Central

    Whiteside, Theresa L.

    2013-01-01

    Body fluids of cancer patients contain TEXs (tumour-derived exosomes). Tumours release large quantities of TEXs, and the protein content of exosome or MV (microvesicle) fractions isolated from patients’ sera is high. TEXs down-regulate functions of immune cells, thus promoting tumour progression. We isolated TEXs from tumour cell supernatants and sera of patients with solid tumours or AML (acute myelogenous leukaemia). The molecular profile of TEXs was distinct from that of circulating exosomes derived from normal cells. TEXs were co-incubated with activated T-cells, conventional CD4 +CD25neg T-cells or CD56 +CD16 + NK (natural killer) cells respectively. TEXs down-regulated CD3ζ and JAK3 (Janus kinase 3) expression in primary activated T-cells and mediated Fas/FasL (Fas ligand)-driven apoptosis of CD8 + T-cells. TEXs promoted CD4 +CD25neg T-cell proliferation and their conversion into CD4 +CD25hiFOXP3 + (FOXP3 is forkhead box P3) Treg cells (regulatory T-cells), which also expressed IL-10 (interleukin 10), TGFβ1 (transforming growth factor β1), CTLA-4 (cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4), GrB (granzyme B)/perforin and effectively mediated suppression. Neutralizing antibodies specific for TGFβ1 and/or IL-10 inhibited the ability of TEXs to expand Treg cells. TEXs obtained at diagnosis from AML patients’ sera were positive for blast-associated markers CD33, CD34, CD117 and TGFβ1, and they decreased cytotoxic activity of NK cells isolated from NC (normal control) donors, induced Smad phosphorylation and down-regulated NKG2D receptor expression. Correlations between the TEX molecular profile or TEX protein levels and clinical data in cancer patients suggest that TEX-mediated effects on immune cells are prognostically important. In contrast with exosomes released by normal cells, TEXs have immunosuppressive properties and are involved in regulating peripheral tolerance in patients with cancer. PMID:23356291

  8. A dystrophic muscle broadens the contribution and activation of immune cells reacting to rAAV gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Ferrand, M; Galy, A; Boisgerault, F

    2014-09-01

    Recombinant adeno-associated viral vectors (rAAVs) are used for therapeutic gene transfer in skeletal muscle, but it is unclear if immune reactivity to gene transfer and persistence of transgene are affected by pathologic conditions such as muscular dystrophy. Thus, we compared dystrophic mice devoid of α-sarcoglycan with healthy mice to characterize immune cell activation and cellular populations contributing to the loss of gene-modified myofibers. Following rAAV2/1 delivery of an immunogenic α-sarcoglycan reporter transgene in the muscle, both strains developed strong CD4 and CD8 T-cell-mediated immune responses in lymphoid organs associated with muscle CD3+ T and CD11b+ mononuclear cell infiltrates. Selective cell subset depletion models revealed that CD4+ T cells were essential for transgene rejection in both healthy and pathologic mice, but macrophages and CD8+ T cells additionally contributed as effector cells of transgene rejection only in dystrophic mice. Vectors restricting transgene expression in antigen-presenting cells showed that endogenous presentation of transgene products was the sole mechanism responsible for T-cell priming in normal mice, whereas additional and protracted antigenic presentation occurred in dystrophic animals, leading to secondary CD4+ T-cell activation and failure to maintain transgene expression. Therefore, the dystrophic environment diversifies cellular immune response mechanisms induced by gene transfer, with a negative outcome.

  9. Inflammasome Activation Is Critical to the Protective Immune Response during Chemically Induced Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Gasparoto, Thais Helena; de Oliveira, Carine Ervolino; de Freitas, Luisa Thomazini; Pinheiro, Claudia Ramos; Hori, Juliana Issa; Garlet, Gustavo Pompermaier; Cavassani, Karen Angélica; Schillaci, Roxana; da Silva, João Santana; Zamboni, Dario Simões; Campanelli, Ana Paula

    2014-01-01

    Chronic inflammation affects most stages of tumorigenesis, including initiation, promotion, malignant differentiation, invasion and metastasis. Inflammasomes have been described as involved with persistent inflammation and are known to exert both pro and antitumour effects. We evaluated the influence of apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a caspase recruitment domain (ASC) and caspase (CASP)-1 in the antitumor immune response using a multistage model of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) development. Absence of ASC and CASP-1 resulted in an earlier incidence and increased number of papilloma. Loss of inflammassome function in mice resulted in decreased presence of natural killer (NK), dendritic (DC), CD4+, CD8+ and CD45RB+ T cells in the tumor lesions as well as in lymph nodes (LN) compared with WT mice. Increased percentage of CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ T cells was associated with association with inflammasome loss of function. Moreover, significant differences were also found with neutrophils and macrophage infiltrating the lesions. Myeloperoxidase (MPO), but not elastase (ELA), activity oscillated among the groups during the SCC development. Levels of proinflammatory cytokines IL-1β, IL-18, Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF)-α and Interferon (IFN)-γ were decreased in the tumor microenvironment in the absence of inflammasome proteins. These observations suggest a link between inflammasome function and SCC tumorigenesis, indicating an important role for inflammasome activation in the control of SCC development. PMID:25268644

  10. Inflammasome activation is critical to the protective immune response during chemically induced squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Gasparoto, Thais Helena; de Oliveira, Carine Ervolino; de Freitas, Luisa Thomazini; Pinheiro, Claudia Ramos; Hori, Juliana Issa; Garlet, Gustavo Pompermaier; Cavassani, Karen Angélica; Schillaci, Roxana; da Silva, João Santana; Zamboni, Dario Simões; Campanelli, Ana Paula

    2014-01-01

    Chronic inflammation affects most stages of tumorigenesis, including initiation, promotion, malignant differentiation, invasion and metastasis. Inflammasomes have been described as involved with persistent inflammation and are known to exert both pro and antitumour effects. We evaluated the influence of apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a caspase recruitment domain (ASC) and caspase (CASP)-1 in the antitumor immune response using a multistage model of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) development. Absence of ASC and CASP-1 resulted in an earlier incidence and increased number of papilloma. Loss of inflammassome function in mice resulted in decreased presence of natural killer (NK), dendritic (DC), CD4(+), CD8(+) and CD45RB(+) T cells in the tumor lesions as well as in lymph nodes (LN) compared with WT mice. Increased percentage of CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) T cells was associated with association with inflammasome loss of function. Moreover, significant differences were also found with neutrophils and macrophage infiltrating the lesions. Myeloperoxidase (MPO), but not elastase (ELA), activity oscillated among the groups during the SCC development. Levels of proinflammatory cytokines IL-1β, IL-18, Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF)-α and Interferon (IFN)-γ were decreased in the tumor microenvironment in the absence of inflammasome proteins. These observations suggest a link between inflammasome function and SCC tumorigenesis, indicating an important role for inflammasome activation in the control of SCC development.

  11. Changes in cellular immune activation and memory T-cell subsets in HIV-infected Zambian children receiving HAART.

    PubMed

    Rainwater-Lovett, Kaitlin; Nkamba, Hope; Mubiana-Mbewe, Mwangelwa; Moore, Carolyn B; Margolick, Joseph; Moss, William J

    2014-12-15

    Increased exposure to a broad array of pathogens in children residing in sub-Saharan Africa may lead to heightened immune activation and increased proportions of memory T cells. Changes in the size of these cellular subsets have implications for restoration of normal immune function after treatment with highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) and are not well characterized in young sub-Saharan African children. CD4⁺ and CD8⁺ T-cell subsets were measured by flow cytometry in 157 HIV-infected Zambian children before and at 3-month intervals during HAART for up to 30 months and in 34 control children at a single study visit. Before HAART, HIV-infected children had higher levels of activated and effector memory (EM) CD4⁺ and CD8⁺ T cells, and lower levels of naive T cells and CD8⁺ T cells expressing IL-7Rα, compared with control children. The median duration of follow-up was 14.9 months (interquartile range, 6.4-23.2) among 120 HIV-infected children with at least 1 study follow-up visit. Levels of immune activation and EM CD4⁺ T cells declined within 6 months of HAART, but the percentages of EM CD4 T cells and effector CD8⁺ T cells remained elevated through 30 months of HAART. IL-7Rα-expressing CD8⁺ T cells increased with HAART, suggesting expansion of memory capacity. HAART significantly reduced levels of immune activation and EM CD4⁺ T cells, and promoted reconstitution of naive T cells and IL-7Rα-expressing CD8⁺ T cells. However, persistently high levels of EM CD4⁺ T cells in HIV-infected children may reflect chronic perturbations in T-cell subset composition.

  12. Toll-Like Receptor 8 Agonist and Bacteria Trigger Potent Activation of Innate Immune Cells in Human Liver

    PubMed Central

    Ussher, James E.; Sandalova, Elena; Tang, Xin-Zi; Tan-Garcia, Alfonso; To, Natalie; Hong, Michelle; Chia, Adeline; Gill, Upkar S.; Kennedy, Patrick T.; Tan, Kai Chah; Lee, Kang Hoe; De Libero, Gennaro; Gehring, Adam J.; Willberg, Christian B.; Klenerman, Paul; Bertoletti, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    The ability of innate immune cells to sense and respond to impending danger varies by anatomical location. The liver is considered tolerogenic but is still capable of mounting a successful immune response to clear various infections. To understand whether hepatic immune cells tune their response to different infectious challenges, we probed mononuclear cells purified from human healthy and diseased livers with distinct pathogen-associated molecules. We discovered that only the TLR8 agonist ssRNA40 selectively activated liver-resident innate immune cells to produce substantial quantities of IFN-γ. We identified CD161Bright mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT) and CD56Bright NK cells as the responding liver-resident innate immune cells. Their activation was not directly induced by the TLR8 agonist but was dependent on IL-12 and IL-18 production by ssRNA40-activated intrahepatic monocytes. Importantly, the ssRNA40-induced cytokine-dependent activation of MAIT cells mirrored responses induced by bacteria, i.e., generating a selective production of high levels of IFN-γ, without the concomitant production of TNF-α or IL-17A. The intrahepatic IFN-γ production could be detected not only in healthy livers, but also in HBV- or HCV-infected livers. In conclusion, the human liver harbors a network of immune cells able to modulate their immunological responses to different pathogen-associated molecules. Their ability to generate a strong production of IFN-γ upon stimulation with TLR8 agonist opens new therapeutic opportunities for the treatment of diverse liver pathologies. PMID:24967632

  13. Effects of microwave exposure on the hamster immune system. I. Natural killer cell activity

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, H.K.; Cain, C.A.; Lockwood, J.; Tompkins, W.A.

    1983-01-01

    Hamsters were exposed to repeated or single doses of microwave energy and monitored for changes in core body temperature, circulating leukocyte profiles, serum corticosteroid levels, and natural killer (NK) cell activity in various tissues. NK cytotoxicity was measured in a /sup 51/Cr-release assay employing baby hamster kidney (BHK) targets or BHK infected with herpes simplex virus. Repeated exposure of hamsters at 15 mW/cm2 for 60 min/day had no significant effect on natural levels of spleen-cell NK activity against BHK targets. Similarly, repeated exposure at 15 mW/cm2 over a 5-day period had no demonstrable effect on the induction of spleen NK activity by vaccinia virus immunization, that is, comparable levels of NK were induced in untreated and microwave-treated animals. In contrast, treatment of hamsters with a single 60-min microwave exposure at 25 mW/cm2 caused a significant suppression in induced spleen NK activity. A similar but less marked decrease in spleen NK activity was observed in sham-exposed animals. Moreover, the sham effects on NK activity were not predictable and appeared to represent large individual animal variations in the response to stress factors. Depressed spleen NK activity was evident as early as 4 h postmicrowave treatment and returned to normal levels by 8 h. Hamsters exposed at 25 mW/cm2 showed an elevated temperature of 3.0-3.5 degrees C that returned to normal within 60 min after termination of microwave exposure. These animals also showed a marked lymphopenia and neutrophilia by 1 h posttreatment that returned to normal by 8-10 h. Serum glucocorticosteroids were elevated between 1 aNd 8 h after microwave treatment. Sham-exposed animals did not demonstrate significant changes in core body temperature, peripheral blood leukocyte (PBL) profile, or glucocorticosteroid levels as compared to minimum-handling controls.

  14. Cell-Free DNA and DNase Activity in Dogs with Immune-Mediated Hemolytic Anemia.

    PubMed

    Jeffery, U; Ruterbories, L; Hanel, R; LeVine, D N

    2017-09-01

    Immune-mediated hemolytic anemia (IMHA) in dogs has a high risk of thrombosis and is associated with marked neutrophilia and necrosis. Cell death and release of neutrophil extracellular traps contribute to increased serum concentrations of cell-free DNA, and in human autoimmune disease reduced DNase activity further increases cell-free DNA. Free DNA in blood has prothrombotic properties and could contribute to hypercoagulability in IMHA. Cell-free DNA is elevated and DNase activity reduced in dogs with IMHA compared to healthy dogs. Dogs presenting to two referral hospitals with IMHA (n = 28) and healthy controls (n = 20). Prospective observational study. Blood was collected and death and thrombotic events occurring in the first 14 days after hospitalization recorded. DNA was extracted from plasma with a commercial kit and quantified by PicoGreen fluorescence. DNase activity of serum was measured by radial diffusion assay. Cell-free DNA was significantly higher in cases (median: 45 ng/mL, range: 10-2334 ng/mL) than controls (26 ng/mL, range 1-151 ng/mL, P = 0.0084). DNase activity was not different between cases and controls (P = 0.36). Four cases died and there were five suspected or confirmed thrombotic events. Cell-free DNA concentration was associated with death (odds ratio for upper quartile versus lower 3 quartiles: 15; 95% confidence interval 1.62-201; P = 0.03) but not thrombosis (P = 0.57). Cell-free DNA is elevated in dogs with IMHA and likely reflects increased release rather than impaired degradation of DNA. Cell-free DNA concentration is potentially associated with death and might be a prognostic indicator, but this requires confirmation in a larger population. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  15. Deposition of idiotype-anti-idiotype immune complexes in renal glomeruli after polyclonal B cell activation

    SciTech Connect

    Goldman, M.; Rose, L.M.; Hochmann, A.; Lambert, P.H.

    1982-05-01

    We investigated the possible role of idiotypic interactions in the pathogenesis of the glomerular lesions observed in mice undergoing polyclonal B cell activation. BALB/c mice were studied for the presence of renal deposits of T15 idiotype-anti-T15 idiotype-immune complexes (IC) after injection of bacterial lipopolysaccharides (LPS). The T15 idiotype is the major idiotype of BALB/c mice anti-phosphorylcholine (PC) antibodies, which are cross-reactive with the idiotype of the TEPC-15 myeloma protein. This model was used because T15 idiotype-anti-T15 idiotype IC have been detected in the circulation of BALB/c mice after polyclonal B cell activation. First, an idiotype-specific immunofluorescence technique allowed us to detect T15 idiotype-bearing immunoglobulins in glomeruli from day 6 to day 28 after LPS injection. Second, fluorescein isothiocyanate-conjugated TEPC-15 myeloma protein was found to localize in the glomeruli after in vivo injection 18 d after LPS administration. This renal localization was shown to be idiotype-specific and could be quantified in a trace-labeling experiment. Third, kidney-deposited immunoglobulins of mice injected with LPS were eluted, radiolabeled, and analyzed by radioimmunoassay. Both T15 idiotype-bearing immunoglobulins and anti-T15 idiotype antibodies were detected in the eluates, providing further evidence for a renal deposition of T15 idiotype-anti-T15 idiotype IC. Polyclonal B cell activation is likely to result in a simultaneous triggering of many idiotypic clones and of corresponding anti-idiotypic clones represented in the B cell repertoire. This could lead to the formation of a variety of idiotype-anti-idiotype IC that could participate in the development of glomerular lesions.

  16. Plasmacytoid dendritic cells are recruited to the colorectum and contribute to immune activation during pathogenic SIV infection in rhesus macaques

    PubMed Central

    Kwa, Suefen; Kannanganat, Sunil; Nigam, Pragati; Siddiqui, Mariam; Shetty, Ravi Dyavar; Armstrong, Wendy; Ansari, Aftab; Bosinger, Steven E.; Silvestri, Guido

    2011-01-01

    In SIV/HIV infection, the gastrointestinal tissue dominates as an important site because of the impact of massive mucosal CD4 depletion and immune activation-induced tissue pathology. Unlike AIDS-susceptible rhesus macaques, natural hosts do not progress to AIDS and resolve immune activation earlier. Here, we examine the role of dendritic cells (DCs) in mediating immune activation and disease progression. We demonstrate that plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs) in the blood up-regulate β7-integrin and are rapidly recruited to the colorectum after a pathogenic SIV infection in rhesus macaques. These pDCs were capable of producing proinflammatory cytokines and primed a T cytotoxic 1 response in vitro. Consistent with the up-regulation of β7-integrin on pDCs, in vivo blockade of α4β7-integrin dampened pDC recruitment to the colorectum and resulted in reduced immune activation. The up-regulation of β7-integrin expression on pDCs in the blood also was observed in HIV-infected humans but not in chronically SIV-infected sooty mangabeys that show low levels of immune activation. Our results uncover a new mechanism by which pDCs influence immune activation in colorectal tissue after pathogenic immunodeficiency virus infections. PMID:21693759

  17. Circulating myeloid-derived suppressor cells predict disease activity and treatment response in patients with immune thrombocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, J.; Zhou, Y.; Wen, J.; Sun, X.; Zhang, X.

    2017-01-01

    Immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) is a disease characterized by isolated thrombocytopenia. Abnormal effector T cell activation is an important mechanism in the pathogenesis of ITP. Regulatory T cells (Treg) have a strong immunosuppressive function for T cell activation and their importance in the pathophysiology and clinical treatment of ITP has been confirmed. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) are other immunosuppressive cells, which can also suppress T cell activation by secreting arginase, iNOS and ROS, and are essential for Treg cells’ differentiation and maturation. Therefore, we speculate that MDSCs might also be involved in the immune-dysregulation mechanism of ITP. In this study, we tested MDSCs and Treg cells in peripheral blood samples of twenty-five ITP patients and ten healthy donors. We found that MDSCs and Treg cells decreased simultaneously in active ITP patients. Relapsed ITP patients showed lower MDSCs levels compared with new patients. All patients received immunosuppressive treatment including dexamethasone alone or in combination with intravenous immune globulin. We found that MDSCs’ level after treatment correlated with platelet recovery. Our study is the first that focused on MDSCs’ role in ITP. Based on our results, we concluded that circulating MDSCs could predict disease activity and treatment response in ITP patients. This preliminary conclusion indicates a substantial significance of MDSCs in the pathophysiology and clinical treatment of ITP, which deserves further investigation. PMID:28225866

  18. T helper 1 immunity requires complement-driven NLRP3 inflammasome activity in CD4⁺ T cells.

    PubMed

    Arbore, Giuseppina; West, Erin E; Spolski, Rosanne; Robertson, Avril A B; Klos, Andreas; Rheinheimer, Claudia; Dutow, Pavel; Woodruff, Trent M; Yu, Zu Xi; O'Neill, Luke A; Coll, Rebecca C; Sher, Alan; Leonard, Warren J; Köhl, Jörg; Monk, Pete; Cooper, Matthew A; Arno, Matthew; Afzali, Behdad; Lachmann, Helen J; Cope, Andrew P; Mayer-Barber, Katrin D; Kemper, Claudia

    2016-06-17

    The NLRP3 inflammasome controls interleukin-1β maturation in antigen-presenting cells, but a direct role for NLRP3 in human adaptive immune cells has not been described. We found that the NLRP3 inflammasome assembles in human CD4(+) T cells and initiates caspase-1-dependent interleukin-1β secretion, thereby promoting interferon-γ production and T helper 1 (T(H)1) differentiation in an autocrine fashion. NLRP3 assembly requires intracellular C5 activation and stimulation of C5a receptor 1 (C5aR1), which is negatively regulated by surface-expressed C5aR2. Aberrant NLRP3 activity in T cells affects inflammatory responses in human autoinflammatory disease and in mouse models of inflammation and infection. Our results demonstrate that NLRP3 inflammasome activity is not confined to "innate immune cells" but is an integral component of normal adaptive T(H)1 responses.

  19. Polyclonal B cell activation, circulating immune complexes and autoimmunity in human american visceral leishmaniasis.

    PubMed Central

    Galvão-Castro, B; Sá Ferreira, J A; Marzochi, K F; Marzochi, M C; Coutinho, S G; Lambert, P H

    1984-01-01

    In a prospective study, serum and plasma samples from 17 patients with kala-azar were collected in Rio de Janeiro. High levels of immune complexes (IC) were detected in serum by means of 125I-Clq and conglutinin binding assays. The Clq binding material had a sedimentation coefficient of 19-25S, as determined by ultracentrifugation on sucrose gradient. Plasma levels of C3 and C3 breakdown products were measured and the C3d levels were increased in six out of 11 patients. The occurrence of polyclonal B cell activation was suggested by (a) a marked increase of serum IgG and IgM levels and (b) of the presence of antibodies against various proteins and haptens (SRBC, DNP-BSA, FITC-BSA,KLH). There was a close association between the presence of IC and anti-immunoglobulin antibodies. Anti-smooth muscle antibodies were also observed. These data are consistent with a major role of polyclonal B cell activation in the induction of IC during visceral leishmaniasis. PMID:6424987

  20. Short Communication: Low Immune Activation Is Associated with Higher Frequencies of Central Memory T Cell Subset in a Cohort of Indian Long-Term Nonprogressors.

    PubMed

    Saxena, Vandana; Bichare, Shubhangi; Singh, Dharmendra; Ghate, Manisha; Godbole, Sheela; Kulkarni, Smita; Gangakhedkar, Raman; Paranjape, Ramesh; Thakar, Madhuri

    2017-02-01

    Persistent immune activation in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is responsible for alterations in immune system such as activation, apoptosis, and reduced frequencies. Reduced immune activation is known to be associated with virus control. Limited information is available on the influence of pan-immune activation on memory responses. Hence, we compared the T cell activation and memory profile in HIV-infected individuals exhibiting disease control such as long-term nonprogressors (LTNPs) and progressors. The activated CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells were significantly lower and the CD4(+) and CD8(+) central memory T cell phenotypes were significantly higher in the LTNPs compared to the progressors. In addition, we observed significant inverse association between the T cell activation and frequencies of central memory T cells. Our findings indicate that patients with absence of disease progression have preserved central memory T cell population associated with lesser immune activation.

  1. Host-cell sensors for Plasmodium activate innate immunity against liver-stage infection.

    PubMed

    Liehl, Peter; Zuzarte-Luís, Vanessa; Chan, Jennie; Zillinger, Thomas; Baptista, Fernanda; Carapau, Daniel; Konert, Madlen; Hanson, Kirsten K; Carret, Céline; Lassnig, Caroline; Müller, Mathias; Kalinke, Ulrich; Saeed, Mohsan; Chora, Angelo Ferreira; Golenbock, Douglas T; Strobl, Birgit; Prudêncio, Miguel; Coelho, Luis P; Kappe, Stefan H; Superti-Furga, Giulio; Pichlmair, Andreas; Vigário, Ana M; Rice, Charles M; Fitzgerald, Katherine A; Barchet, Winfried; Mota, Maria M

    2014-01-01

    Before they infect red blood cells and cause malaria, Plasmodium parasites undergo an obligate and clinically silent expansion phase in the liver that is supposedly undetected by the host. Here, we demonstrate the engagement of a type I interferon (IFN) response during Plasmodium replication in the liver. We identified Plasmodium RNA as a previously unrecognized pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP) capable of activating a type I IFN response via the cytosolic pattern recognition receptor Mda5. This response, initiated by liver-resident cells through the adaptor molecule for cytosolic RNA sensors, Mavs, and the transcription factors Irf3 and Irf7, is propagated by hepatocytes in an interferon-α/β receptor-dependent manner. This signaling pathway is critical for immune cell-mediated host resistance to liver-stage Plasmodium infection, which we find can be primed with other PAMPs, including hepatitis C virus RNA. Together, our results show that the liver has sensor mechanisms for Plasmodium that mediate a functional antiparasite response driven by type I IFN.

  2. Salidroside liposome formulation enhances the activity of dendritic cells and immune responses.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiaojuan; Lu, Yu; Tao, Yang; Huang, Yee; Wang, Deyun; Hu, Yuanliang; Liu, Jiaguo; Wu, Yi; Yu, Yun; Liu, Cui

    2013-12-01

    Salidroside, the important composition, of Rhodiola rosea L. has been reported to have various pharmacological properties. Liposome is known to be effective as drug carriers and immune adjuvant. Therefore, the aim of this study is to investigate immunological adjuvant activity of salidroside liposome. Here we reported the preparation, the effect on DCs in vitro and the immune response in vivo. The immunological adjuvant activity of salidroside liposome formulation was compared with that of salidroside and liposome. The result showed that salidroside liposome formulation not only could promote the maturation of DCs, the stimulation of DCs on MLR proliferation and the antigen presenting ability, but also induced the sustained cellular immune and humoral immune response. Overall, the results showed that salidroside liposome formulation had the potential to act as effective sustained release vaccine delivery systems. © 2013.

  3. The p50 Subunit of NF-κB Orchestrates Dendritic Cell Lifespan and Activation of Adaptive Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Larghi, Paola; Porta, Chiara; Riboldi, Elena; Totaro, Maria Grazia; Carraro, Lorenzo; Orabona, Ciriana; Sica, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Dendritic cells play a central role in keeping the balance between immunity and immune tolerance. A key factor in this equilibrium is the lifespan of DC, as its reduction restrains antigen availability leading to termination of immune responses. Here we show that lipopolysaccharide-driven DC maturation is paralleled by increased nuclear levels of p50 NF-κB, an event associated with DC apoptosis. Lack of p50 in murine DC promoted increased lifespan, enhanced level of maturation associated with increased expression of the proinflammatory cytokines IL-1, IL-18 and IFN-β, enhanced capacity of activating and expanding CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in vivo and decreased ability to induce differentiation of FoxP3+ regulatory T cells. In agreement, vaccination of melanoma-bearing mice with antigen-pulsed LPS-treated p50−/− BM-DC boosted antitumor immunity and inhibition of tumor growth. We propose that nuclear accumulation of the p50 NF-κB subunit in DC, as occurring during lipopolysaccharide-driven maturation, is a homeostatic mechanism tuning the balance between uncontrolled activation of adaptive immunity and immune tolerance. PMID:23049782

  4. Antitumor immunity. A shed NKG2D ligand that promotes natural killer cell activation and tumor rejection.

    PubMed

    Deng, Weiwen; Gowen, Benjamin G; Zhang, Li; Wang, Lin; Lau, Stephanie; Iannello, Alexandre; Xu, Jianfeng; Rovis, Tihana L; Xiong, Na; Raulet, David H

    2015-04-03

    Immune cells, including natural killer (NK) cells, recognize transformed cells and eliminate them in a process termed immunosurveillance. It is thought that tumor cells evade immunosurveillance by shedding membrane ligands that bind to the NKG2D-activating receptor on NK cells and/or T cells, and desensitize these cells. In contrast, we show that in mice, a shed form of MULT1, a high-affinity NKG2D ligand, causes NK cell activation and tumor rejection. Recombinant soluble MULT1 stimulated tumor rejection in mice. Soluble MULT1 functions, at least in part, by competitively reversing a global desensitization of NK cells imposed by engagement of membrane NKG2D ligands on tumor-associated cells, such as myeloid cells. The results overturn conventional wisdom that soluble ligands are always inhibitory and suggest a new approach for cancer immunotherapy. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  5. Early activation of mucosal mast cells during the primary immune response in a rodent model of neonatal asthma.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shuang; Shudou, Masachika; Maeyama, Kazutaka

    2011-02-01

    During an allergic inflammatory response in the airway, if a failure of the epithelial cell barrier occurs before the systemic immune response is triggered by allergens, more allergens can invade. Using a rat model of asthma, we previously found that mucosal mast cells, which localise to the epithelial layer of the airways, are activated to promote a pro-asthmatic immune response. In this study, we developed a neonatal rat model of allergic airway hypersensitivity that mimics some features of childhood asthma. Airway hypersensitivity was measured using unrestrained whole-body plethysmography after analysis of the serum IgE titre. Inflammatory cells and inflammatory mediators in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid samples were examined. Two mast cell-specific proteases were detected using PCR. In addition, we analysed the phenotype and the number of mast cells in the airways by immunohistochemistry, and we found that the number of mucosal mast cells and the expression level of the proteases increased 2 weeks after sensitisation. Changes in the IgE titre, airway hypersensitivity and the activation of other inflammatory cells were delayed, appearing during the 4 weeks after sensitisation. Our results indicate that the activation of mucosal mast cells contributes to the pro-asthmatic immune response. This activation may be a biomarker allowing early intervention that could help prevent allergic airway inflammation.

  6. Vaccine with beta-defensin 2-transduced leukemic cells activates innate and adaptive immunity to elicit potent antileukemia responses.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiao-Tong; Xu, Bin; An, Li-Li; Dong, Cheng-Ya; Lin, Yong-Min; Shi, Yang; Wu, Ke-Fu

    2006-01-15

    Murine beta-defensin 2 (MBD2) is a small antimicrobial peptide of the innate immune system. Recent study showed that MBD2 could not only recruit immature dendritic cells but also activate them by Toll-like receptor 4 and thus may provide a critical link between the innate immune system and the adaptive immune response. In this report, we examined the antileukemia activity of MBD2 in a murine model of acute lymphoid leukemia (ALL) L1210. L1210 cells were engineered to secrete biologically functional MBD2. MBD2-modified L1210 (L1210-MBD2) showed significantly reduced leukemogenecity, resulting in a 80% rate of complete leukemia rejection. Inoculation of mice with L1210-MBD2 induced enhanced CTL and natural killer (NK) activity and augmented interleukin-12 and IFN-gamma production. All the recovered mice from the inoculation showed a protective immunity to the following challenge with parental L1210 cells and generate leukemia-specific memory CTL. Vaccines with irradiated L1210-MBD2 cells could cure 50% leukemia-bearing mice. Depletion of CD8+ T cells but not CD4+ T cells completely abrogated the antileukemia activity of MBD2. Interestingly, NK cells were also required for the MBD2-mediated antileukemia response, although ALL generally display a high degree of resistance to NK-mediated lysis. Our results suggest that MBD2 can activate both innate and adaptive immunity to generate potent antileukemia response, and MBD2 immunotherapy warrants further evaluation as a potential treatment for ALL.

  7. Association of interleukin-15-induced peripheral immune activation with hepatic stellate cell activation in persons coinfected with hepatitis C virus and HIV.

    PubMed

    Allison, Robert D; Katsounas, Antonios; Koziol, Deloris E; Kleiner, David E; Alter, Harvey J; Lempicki, Richard A; Wood, Brad; Yang, Jun; Fullmer, Brandie; Cortez, Karoll J; Polis, Michael A; Kottilil, Shyam

    2009-08-15

    Hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) mediate hepatitis C virus (HCV)-related liver fibrosis, and increased HSC activation in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/HCV coinfection may be associated with accelerated fibrosis. We examined the level of HSC activation in HIV/HCV-coinfected and HCV-monoinfected subjects and its relationship to the level of activation and gene expression of peripheral immune cells in coinfected subjects. HSC activation levels positively correlated with peripheral CD4+ and CD8+ T cell immune activation and were associated with enhanced interleukin-15 (IL-15) gene expression, suggesting a pathogenic role for IL-15-driven immunomediated hepatic fibrosis. Future strategies that reduce immune activation and HSC activation may delay progression of liver fibrosis.

  8. Differential regulation of innate immune cytokine production through pharmacological activation of Nuclear Factor-Erythroid-2-Related Factor 2 (NRF2) in burn patient immune cells and monocytes.

    PubMed

    Eitas, Timothy K; Stepp, Wesley; Sjeklocha, Lucas; Long, Clayton; Riley, Caitlin; Callahan, James; Sanchez, Yolanda; Gough, Peter; Knowlin, Laquanda; van Duin, David; Ortiz-Pujols, Shiara; Jones, Samuel; Maile, Robert; Hong, Zhi; Berger, Scott; Cairns, Bruce

    2017-01-01

    Burn patients suffer from immunological dysfunction for which there are currently no successful interventions. Similar to previous observations, we find that burn shock patients (≥15% Total Burn Surface Area (TBSA) injury) have elevated levels of the innate immune cytokines Interleukin-6 (IL-6) and Monocyte Chemoattractant Protein-1 (MCP-1)/CC-motif Chemokine Ligand 2(CCL2) early after hospital admission (0-48 Hours Post-hospital Admission (HPA). Functional immune assays with patient Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells (PBMCs) revealed that burn shock patients (≥15% TBSA) produced elevated levels of MCP-1/CCL2 after innate immune stimulation ex vivo relative to mild burn patients. Interestingly, treatment of patient PBMCs with the Nuclear Factor-Erythroid-2-Related Factor 2 (NRF2) agonist, CDDO-Me(bardoxolone methyl), reduced MCP-1 production but not IL-6 or Interleukin-10 (IL-10) secretion. In enriched monocytes from healthy donors, CDDO-Me(bardoxolone methyl) also reduced LPS-induced MCP1/CCL2 production but did not alter IL-6 or IL-10 secretion. Similar immunomodulatory effects were observed with Compound 7, which activates the NRF2 pathway through a different and non-covalent Mechanism Of Action (MOA). Hence, our findings with CDDO-Me(bardoxolone methyl) and Compound 7 are likely to reflect a generalizable aspect of NRF2 activation. These observed effects were not specific to LPS-induced immune responses, as NRF2 activation also reduced MCP-1/CCL2 production after stimulation with IL-6. Pharmacological NRF2 activation reduced Mcp-1/Ccl2 transcript accumulation without inhibiting either Il-6 or Il-10 transcript levels. Hence, we describe a novel aspect of NRF2 activation that may contribute to the beneficial effects of NRF2 agonists during disease. Our work also demonstrates that the NRF2 pathway is retained and can be modulated to regulate important immunomodulatory functions in burn patient immune cells.

  9. Linking Transcriptional Changes over Time in Stimulated Dendritic Cells to Identify Gene Networks Activated during the Innate Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Ashwini; Kumagai, Yutaro; Liang, Kuo-ching; Suzuki, Yutaka; Nakai, Kenta

    2013-01-01

    The innate immune response is primarily mediated by the Toll-like receptors functioning through the MyD88-dependent and TRIF-dependent pathways. Despite being widely studied, it is not yet completely understood and systems-level analyses have been lacking. In this study, we identified a high-probability network of genes activated during the innate immune response using a novel approach to analyze time-course gene expression profiles of activated immune cells in combination with a large gene regulatory and protein-protein interaction network. We classified the immune response into three consecutive time-dependent stages and identified the most probable paths between genes showing a significant change in expression at each stage. The resultant network contained several novel and known regulators of the innate immune response, many of which did not show any observable change in expression at the sampled time points. The response network shows the dominance of genes from specific functional classes during different stages of the immune response. It also suggests a role for the protein phosphatase 2a catalytic subunit α in the regulation of the immunoproteasome during the late phase of the response. In order to clarify the differences between the MyD88-dependent and TRIF-dependent pathways in the innate immune response, time-course gene expression profiles from MyD88-knockout and TRIF-knockout dendritic cells were analyzed. Their response networks suggest the dominance of the MyD88-dependent pathway in the innate immune response, and an association of the circadian regulators and immunoproteasomal degradation with the TRIF-dependent pathway. The response network presented here provides the most probable associations between genes expressed in the early and the late phases of the innate immune response, while taking into account the intermediate regulators. We propose that the method described here can also be used in the identification of time-dependent gene sub

  10. Linking transcriptional changes over time in stimulated dendritic cells to identify gene networks activated during the innate immune response.

    PubMed

    Patil, Ashwini; Kumagai, Yutaro; Liang, Kuo-Ching; Suzuki, Yutaka; Nakai, Kenta

    2013-01-01

    The innate immune response is primarily mediated by the Toll-like receptors functioning through the MyD88-dependent and TRIF-dependent pathways. Despite being widely studied, it is not yet completely understood and systems-level analyses have been lacking. In this study, we identified a high-probability network of genes activated during the innate immune response using a novel approach to analyze time-course gene expression profiles of activated immune cells in combination with a large gene regulatory and protein-protein interaction network. We classified the immune response into three consecutive time-dependent stages and identified the most probable paths between genes showing a significant change in expression at each stage. The resultant network contained several novel and known regulators of the innate immune response, many of which did not show any observable change in expression at the sampled time points. The response network shows the dominance of genes from specific functional classes during different stages of the immune response. It also suggests a role for the protein phosphatase 2a catalytic subunit α in the regulation of the immunoproteasome during the late phase of the response. In order to clarify the differences between the MyD88-dependent and TRIF-dependent pathways in the innate immune response, time-course gene expression profiles from MyD88-knockout and TRIF-knockout dendritic cells were analyzed. Their response networks suggest the dominance of the MyD88-dependent pathway in the innate immune response, and an association of the circadian regulators and immunoproteasomal degradation with the TRIF-dependent pathway. The response network presented here provides the most probable associations between genes expressed in the early and the late phases of the innate immune response, while taking into account the intermediate regulators. We propose that the method described here can also be used in the identification of time-dependent gene sub

  11. T helper 1 immunity requires complement-driven NLRP3 inflammasome activity in CD4+ T cells

    PubMed Central

    Spolski, Rosanne; Robertson, Avril A. B.; Klos, Andreas; Rheinheimer, Claudia; Dutow, Pavel; Woodruff, Trent M.; Yu, Zu Xi; O'Neill, Luke A.; Coll, Rebecca C.; Sher, Alan; Leonard, Warren J.; Köhl, Jörg; Monk, Pete; Cooper, Matthew A.; Arno, Matthew; Afzali, Behdad; Lachmann, Helen J.; Cope, Andrew P.; Mayer-Barber, Katrin D.; Kemper, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    The NLRP3 inflammasome controls interleukin-1β maturation in antigen-presenting cells, but a direct role for NLRP3 in human adaptive immune cells has not been described. We found that the NLRP3 inflammasome assembles in human CD4+ T cells and initiates caspase-1–dependent interleukin-1β secretion, thereby promoting interferon-γ production and T helper 1 (TH1) differentiation in an autocrine fashion. NLRP3 assembly requires intracellular C5 activation and stimulation of C5a receptor 1 (C5aR1), which is negatively regulated by surface-expressed C5aR2. Aberrant NLRP3 activity in T cells affects inflammatory responses in human autoinflammatory disease and in mouse models of inflammation and infection. Our results demonstrate that NLRP3 inflammasome activity is not confined to “innate immune cells” but is an integral component of normal adaptive TH1 responses. PMID:27313051

  12. Sirtuin 1 Regulates Dendritic Cell Activation and Autophagy during Respiratory Syncytial Virus-Induced Immune Responses.

    PubMed

    Owczarczyk, Anna B; Schaller, Matthew A; Reed, Michelle; Rasky, Andrew J; Lombard, David B; Lukacs, Nicholas W

    2015-08-15

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the major cause of lower respiratory tract infection in children worldwide. Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1), an NAD(+)-dependent deacetylase, has been associated with the induction of autophagy and the regulation of inflammatory mediators. We found that Sirt1 was upregulated in mouse lung after RSV infection. Infected animals that received EX-527, a selective SIRT1 inhibitor, displayed exacerbated lung pathology, with increased mucus production, elevated viral load, and enhanced Th2 cytokine production. Gene expression analysis of isolated cell populations revealed that Sirt1 was most highly upregulated in RSV-treated dendritic cells (DCs). Upon RSV infection, EX-527-treated DCs, Sirt1 small interfering RNA-treated DCs, or DCs from conditional knockout (Sirt1(f/f)-CD11c-Cre(+)) mice showed downregulated inflammatory cytokine gene expression and attenuated autophagy. Finally, RSV infection of Sirt1(f/f)-CD11c-Cre(+) mice resulted in altered lung and lymph node cytokine responses, leading to exacerbated pathology. These data indicate that SIRT1 promotes DC activation associated with autophagy-mediated processes during RSV infection, thereby directing efficient antiviral immune responses.

  13. Role of cellular density, in vitro, in anti-tumor activity of CFA-treated and immunized cells.

    PubMed

    Uyeki, E M; Truitt, G A; Bisel, T U

    1976-11-01

    Incorporation of tritiated deoxythymidine (3HdT) into DNA was used to measure growth, in vitro, of P815 tumor cells admixed with spleen and peritoneal effector cells. At a high tumor cell density ((1x10(5) cells per dish), using anti-theta and anti-macrophage sera, T-cells and macrophages from the peritoneum of immunized mice could be identified as cells possessing anti-tumor activity. A nonspecific inhibition by normal effector cells, which occurred at the high tumor cell density, did not occur at a lower tumor cell density (1x10(4) cells per dish). Therefore, the effects of immunization and Freund's adjuvant treatment on the anti-tumor activity of effector cells were determined more accurately when normal cells were no longer inhibitory. Thus, experimental variables dealing with cellular density (cells/mm2 of the culture vessel surface) and effector:tumor cell ratios play an important role in the anti-proliferative capacity of effector cells.

  14. I kappa B kinase alpha (IKKα) activity is required for functional maturation of dendritic cells and acquired immunity to infection.

    PubMed

    Mancino, Alessandra; Habbeddine, Mohamed; Johnson, Ella; Luron, Lionel; Bebien, Magali; Memet, Sylvie; Fong, Carol; Bajenoff, Marc; Wu, Xuefeng; Karin, Michael; Caamano, Jorge; Chi, Hongbo; Seed, Michael; Lawrence, Toby

    2013-03-20

    Dendritic cells (DC) are required for priming antigen-specific T cells and acquired immunity to many important human pathogens, including Mycobacteriuim tuberculosis (TB) and influenza. However, inappropriate priming of auto-reactive T cells is linked with autoimmune disease. Understanding the molecular mechanisms that regulate the priming and activation of naïve T cells is critical for development of new improved vaccines and understanding the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases. The serine/threonine kinase IKKα (CHUK) has previously been shown to have anti-inflammatory activity and inhibit innate immunity. Here, we show that IKKα is required in DC for priming antigen-specific T cells and acquired immunity to the human pathogen Listeria monocytogenes. We describe a new role for IKKα in regulation of IRF3 activity and the functional maturation of DC. This presents a unique role for IKKα in dampening inflammation while simultaneously promoting adaptive immunity that could have important implications for the development of new vaccine adjuvants and treatment of autoimmune diseases.

  15. Nanoparticles, [Gd@C82(OH)22]n, induces dendritic cell maturation and activates Th1 immune responses

    PubMed Central

    Yang, De; Zhao, Yuliang; Guo, Hua; Li, Yana; Tewary, Poonam; Xing, Gengmei; Hou, Wei; Oppenheim, Joost J.; Zhang, Ning

    2010-01-01

    Dendritic cells play a pivotal role in host immune defense, such as elimination of foreign pathogen and inhibition of tumorigenesis. In this paper, we report that [Gd@C82(OH)22]n could induce phenotypic maturation of dendritic cells by stimulating DC production of cytokines including IL-12p70, upregulating DC costimulatory (CD80, CD83, and CD86) and MHC (HLA-A,B,C and HLA-DR) molecules, and switching DCs from a CCL5-responsive to a CCL19-responsive phenotype. We found that [Gd@C82(OH)22]n can induce dendritic cells to become functionally mature as illustrated by their capacity to activate allogeneic T cells. Mice immunized with ovalbumin in the presence of [Gd@C82(OH)22]n exhibit enhanced ovalbumin-specific Th1-polarized immune response as evidenced by the predominantly increased production of IFNγ, IL-1β, and IL-2. The [Gd@C82(OH)22]n nanoparticle is a potent activator of dendritic cells and Th1 immune responses. These new findings also provide a rational understanding of the potent anticancer activities of [Gd@C82(OH)22]n nanoparticles reported previously. PMID:20121217

  16. Parallels between immune driven-hematopoiesis and T cell activation: 3 signals that relay inflammatory stress to the bone marrow

    SciTech Connect

    Libregts, Sten F.W.M.; Nolte, Martijn A.

    2014-12-10

    Quiescence, self-renewal, lineage commitment and differentiation of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) towards fully mature blood cells are a complex process that involves both intrinsic and extrinsic signals. During steady-state conditions, most hematopoietic signals are provided by various resident cells inside the bone marrow (BM), which establish the HSC micro-environment. However, upon infection, the hematopoietic process is also affected by pathogens and activated immune cells, which illustrates an effective feedback mechanism to hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) via immune-mediated signals. Here, we review the impact of pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs), damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs), costimulatory molecules and pro-inflammatory cytokines on the quiescence, proliferation and differentiation of HSCs and more committed progenitors. As modulation of HSPC function via these immune-mediated signals holds an interesting parallel with the “three-signal-model” described for the activation and differentiation of naïve T-cells, we propose a novel “three-signal” concept for immune-driven hematopoiesis. In this model, the recognition of PAMPs and DAMPs will activate HSCs and induce proliferation, while costimulatory molecules and pro-inflammatory cytokines confer a second and third signal, respectively, which further regulate expansion, lineage commitment and differentiation of HSPCs. We review the impact of inflammatory stress on hematopoiesis along these three signals and we discuss whether they act independently from each other or that concurrence of these signals is important for an adequate response of HSPCs upon infection. - Highlights: • Inflammation and infection have a direct impact on hematopoiesis in the bone marrow. • We draw a striking parallel between immune-driven hematopoiesis and T cell activation. • We review how PAMPs and DAMPs, costimulation and cytokines influence HSPC function.

  17. Titanium dioxide nanoparticles stimulate sea urchin immune cell phagocytic activity involving TLR/p38 MAPK-mediated signalling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Pinsino, Annalisa; Russo, Roberta; Bonaventura, Rosa; Brunelli, Andrea; Marcomini, Antonio; Matranga, Valeria

    2015-01-01

    Titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2NPs) are one of the most widespread-engineered particles in use for drug delivery, cosmetics, and electronics. However, TiO2NP safety is still an open issue, even for ethical reasons. In this work, we investigated the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus immune cell model as a proxy to humans, to elucidate a potential pathway that can be involved in the persistent TiO2NP-immune cell interaction in vivo. Morphology, phagocytic ability, changes in activation/inactivation of a few mitogen-activated protein kinases (p38 MAPK, ERK), variations of other key proteins triggering immune response (Toll-like receptor 4-like, Heat shock protein 70, Interleukin-6) and modifications in the expression of related immune response genes were investigated. Our findings indicate that TiO2NPs influence the signal transduction downstream targets of p38 MAPK without eliciting an inflammatory response or other harmful effects on biological functions. We strongly recommend sea urchin immune cells as a new powerful model for nano-safety/nano-toxicity investigations without the ethical normative issue. PMID:26412401

  18. Silymarin suppresses basal and stimulus-induced activation, exhaustion, differentiation, and inflammatory markers in primary human immune cells.

    PubMed

    Lovelace, Erica S; Maurice, Nicholas J; Miller, Hannah W; Slichter, Chloe K; Harrington, Robert; Magaret, Amalia; Prlic, Martin; De Rosa, Stephen; Polyak, Stephen J

    2017-01-01

    Silymarin (SM), and its flavonolignan components, alter cellular metabolism and inhibit inflammatory status in human liver and T cell lines. In this study, we hypothesized that SM suppresses both acute and chronic immune activation (CIA), including in the context of HIV infection. SM treatment suppressed the expression of T cell activation and exhaustion markers on CD4+ and CD8+ T cells from chronically-infected, HIV-positive subjects. SM also showed a trend towards modifying CD4+ T cell memory subsets from HIV+ subjects. In the HIV-negative setting, SM treatment showed trends towards suppressing pro-inflammatory cytokines from non-activated and pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP)-activated primary human monocytes, and non-activated and cytokine- and T cell receptor (TCR)-activated mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells. The data suggest that SM elicits broad anti-inflammatory and immunoregulatory activity in primary human immune cells. By using novel compounds to alter cellular inflammatory status, it may be possible to regulate inflammation in both non-disease and disease states.

  19. Silymarin suppresses basal and stimulus-induced activation, exhaustion, differentiation, and inflammatory markers in primary human immune cells

    PubMed Central

    Lovelace, Erica S.; Maurice, Nicholas J.; Miller, Hannah W.; Slichter, Chloe K.; Harrington, Robert; Magaret, Amalia; Prlic, Martin; De Rosa, Stephen; Polyak, Stephen J.

    2017-01-01

    Silymarin (SM), and its flavonolignan components, alter cellular metabolism and inhibit inflammatory status in human liver and T cell lines. In this study, we hypothesized that SM suppresses both acute and chronic immune activation (CIA), including in the context of HIV infection. SM treatment suppressed the expression of T cell activation and exhaustion markers on CD4+ and CD8+ T cells from chronically-infected, HIV-positive subjects. SM also showed a trend towards modifying CD4+ T cell memory subsets from HIV+ subjects. In the HIV-negative setting, SM treatment showed trends towards suppressing pro-inflammatory cytokines from non-activated and pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP)-activated primary human monocytes, and non-activated and cytokine- and T cell receptor (TCR)-activated mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells. The data suggest that SM elicits broad anti-inflammatory and immunoregulatory activity in primary human immune cells. By using novel compounds to alter cellular inflammatory status, it may be possible to regulate inflammation in both non-disease and disease states. PMID:28158203

  20. Deconvoluting Post-Transplant Immunity: Cell Subset-Specific Mapping Reveals Pathways for Activation and Expansion of Memory T, Monocytes and B Cells

    PubMed Central

    Grigoryev, Yevgeniy A.; Kurian, Sunil M.; Avnur, Zafi; Borie, Dominic; Deng, Jun; Campbell, Daniel; Sung, Joanna; Nikolcheva, Tania; Quinn, Anthony; Schulman, Howard; Peng, Stanford L.; Schaffer, Randolph; Fisher, Jonathan; Mondala, Tony; Head, Steven; Flechner, Stuart M.; Kantor, Aaron B.; Marsh, Christopher; Salomon, Daniel R.

    2010-01-01

    A major challenge for the field of transplantation is the lack of understanding of genomic and molecular drivers of early post-transplant immunity. The early immune response creates a complex milieu that determines the course of ensuing immune events and the ultimate outcome of the transplant. The objective of the current study was to mechanistically deconvolute the early immune response by purifying and profiling the constituent cell subsets of the peripheral blood. We employed genome-wide profiling of whole blood and purified CD4, CD8, B cells and monocytes in tandem with high-throughput laser-scanning cytometry in 10 kidney transplants sampled serially pre-transplant, 1, 2, 4, 8 and 12 weeks. Cytometry confirmed early cell subset depletion by antibody induction and immunosuppression. Multiple markers revealed the activation and proliferative expansion of CD45RO+CD62L− effector memory CD4/CD8 T cells as well as progressive activation of monocytes and B cells. Next, we mechanistically deconvoluted early post-transplant immunity by serial monitoring of whole blood using DNA microarrays. Parallel analysis of cell subset-specific gene expression revealed a unique spectrum of time-dependent changes and functional pathways. Gene expression profiling results were validated with 157 different probesets matching all 65 antigens detected by cytometry. Thus, serial blood cell monitoring reflects the profound changes in blood cell composition and immune activation early post-transplant. Each cell subset reveals distinct pathways and functional programs. These changes illuminate a complex, early phase of immunity and inflammation that includes activation and proliferative expansion of the memory effector and regulatory cells that may determine the phenotype and outcome of the kidney transplant. PMID:20976225

  1. Deconvoluting post-transplant immunity: cell subset-specific mapping reveals pathways for activation and expansion of memory T, monocytes and B cells.

    PubMed

    Grigoryev, Yevgeniy A; Kurian, Sunil M; Avnur, Zafi; Borie, Dominic; Deng, Jun; Campbell, Daniel; Sung, Joanna; Nikolcheva, Tania; Quinn, Anthony; Schulman, Howard; Peng, Stanford L; Schaffer, Randolph; Fisher, Jonathan; Mondala, Tony; Head, Steven; Flechner, Stuart M; Kantor, Aaron B; Marsh, Christopher; Salomon, Daniel R

    2010-10-14

    A major challenge for the field of transplantation is the lack of understanding of genomic and molecular drivers of early post-transplant immunity. The early immune response creates a complex milieu that determines the course of ensuing immune events and the ultimate outcome of the transplant. The objective of the current study was to mechanistically deconvolute the early immune response by purifying and profiling the constituent cell subsets of the peripheral blood. We employed genome-wide profiling of whole blood and purified CD4, CD8, B cells and monocytes in tandem with high-throughput laser-scanning cytometry in 10 kidney transplants sampled serially pre-transplant, 1, 2, 4, 8 and 12 weeks. Cytometry confirmed early cell subset depletion by antibody induction and immunosuppression. Multiple markers revealed the activation and proliferative expansion of CD45RO(+)CD62L(-) effector memory CD4/CD8 T cells as well as progressive activation of monocytes and B cells. Next, we mechanistically deconvoluted early post-transplant immunity by serial monitoring of whole blood using DNA microarrays. Parallel analysis of cell subset-specific gene expression revealed a unique spectrum of time-dependent changes and functional pathways. Gene expression profiling results were validated with 157 different probesets matching all 65 antigens detected by cytometry. Thus, serial blood cell monitoring reflects the profound changes in blood cell composition and immune activation early post-transplant. Each cell subset reveals distinct pathways and functional programs. These changes illuminate a complex, early phase of immunity and inflammation that includes activation and proliferative expansion of the memory effector and regulatory cells that may determine the phenotype and outcome of the kidney transplant.

  2. Microbial Activation of Gut Dendritic Cells and the Control of Mucosal Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Owen, Jennifer L.

    2013-01-01

    Current data support a role for gut colonization in maintaining balanced mucosal and systemic immune responses and have suggested aberrant innate immune recognition of enteric bacteria as an initiator of the adaptive immune damage associated with inflammatory bowel disease (Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis). In fact, data from human studies and experimental mouse models have implicated transformation of the gut microbiota from a beneficial symbiotic state to one of imbalance or “dysbiosis” in the pathogenesis of several autoinflammatory diseases, including allergic skin and respiratory disorders, rheumatoid arthritis, type I diabetes, and colorectal cancer. The host has evolved to co-exist and maintain a mutualistic relationship with the commensal microbes of the gut, and it is the function of the host innate immune system to initiate and maintain this homeostasis, while retaining the ability to respond appropriately to pathogenic organisms. In this review, we discuss the molecular and cellular interactions of the mucosal immune system that decide this delicate balance of mutualism. Furthermore, we will highlight the role of dendritic cells in preserving this precarious balance and how gene products of commensal microbes may play an integral role in re-establishing this balance once it has gone awry. PMID:23962004

  3. CsBAFF, a Teleost B Cell Activating Factor, Promotes Pathogen-Induced Innate Immunity and Vaccine-Induced Adaptive Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yun; Sun, Li

    2015-01-01

    B cell activating factor (BAFF) is a member of the tumor necrosis factor family that is known to play an important role in B cell activation, proliferation, and differentiation in mammals. However, studies of BAFF in teleosts are very limited and its function, in particular that under in vivo conditions, is essentially unknown. In this study, we conducted in vivo as well as in vitro functional analyses of a BAFF homologue (CsBAFF) from the teleost fish tongue sole (Cynoglossus semilaevis). CsBAFF is composed of 261 residues and shares moderate sequence identities with known BAFFs of other teleosts. CsBAFF expression was most abundant in immune organs and was upregulated during bacterial infection. Purified recombinant CsBAFF (rCsBAFF) bound to tongue sole lymphocytes and promoted cellular proliferation and survival. The results of an in vivo study showed that CsBAFF overexpression in tongue sole significantly enhanced macrophage activation and reduced bacterial infection in fish tissues, whereas knockdown of CsBAFF expression resulted in increased bacterial dissemination and colonization in fish tissues. Furthermore, vaccination studies showed that CsBAFF enhanced the immunoprotection of a DNA vaccine and augmented the production of specific serum antibodies. Taken together, these results provide the first in vivo evidence to indicate that teleost BAFF is an immunostimulator that significantly contributes to the innate antibacterial immune response and vaccine-induced adaptive immune response. PMID:26295165

  4. The flavonoid fisetin attenuates postischemic immune cell infiltration, activation and infarct size after transient cerebral middle artery occlusion in mice

    PubMed Central

    Gelderblom, Mathias; Leypoldt, Frank; Lewerenz, Jan; Birkenmayer, Gabriel; Orozco, Denise; Ludewig, Peter; Thundyil, John; Arumugam, Thiruma V; Gerloff, Christian; Tolosa, Eva; Maher, Pamela; Magnus, Tim

    2012-01-01

    The development of the brain tissue damage in ischemic stroke is composed of an immediate component followed by an inflammatory response with secondary tissue damage after reperfusion. Fisetin, a flavonoid, has multiple biological effects, including neuroprotective and antiinflammatory properties. We analyzed the effects of fisetin on infarct size and the inflammatory response in a mouse model of stroke, temporary middle cerebral artery occlusion, and on the activation of immune cells, murine primary and N9 microglial and Raw264.7 macrophage cells and human macrophages, in an in vitro model of inflammatory immune cell activation by lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Fisetin not only protected brain tissue against ischemic reperfusion injury when given before ischemia but also when applied 3 hours after ischemia. Fisetin also prominently inhibited the infiltration of macrophages and dendritic cells into the ischemic hemisphere and suppressed the intracerebral immune cell activation as measured by intracellular tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) production. Fisetin also inhibited LPS-induced TNFα production and neurotoxicity of macrophages and microglia in vitro by suppressing nuclear factor κB activation and JNK/Jun phosphorylation. Our findings strongly suggest that the fisetin-mediated inhibition of the inflammatory response after stroke is part of the mechanism through which fisetin is neuroprotective in cerebral ischemia. PMID:22234339

  5. Relationship between Regulatory T Cells and Immune Activation in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Patients Interrupting Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Laurence; Piketty, Christophe; Assoumou, Lambert; Didier, Céline; Caccavelli, Laure; Donkova-Petrini, Vladimira; Levy, Yves; Girard, Pierre-Marie; Burgard, Marianne; Viard, Jean-Paul; Rouzioux, Christine; Costagliola, Dominique

    2010-01-01

    Persistent immune activation plays a central role in driving Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) disease progression. Whether CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) are harmful by suppressing HIV-specific immune responses and/or beneficial through a decrease in immune activation remains debatable. We analysed the relationship between proportion and number of regulatory T cells (Tregs) and immune activation in HIV-infected patients interrupting an effective antiretroviral therapy (ART). Twenty-five patients were included in a substudy of a prospective multicenter trial of treatment interruption (TI) (ANRS 116). Proportions and numbers of Tregs and the proportion of activated CD4 and CD8 T cells were assessed at baseline and month 12 (M12) of TI. Specific anti-HIV CD4 and CD8 responses were investigated at baseline and M12. Non parametric univariate analyses and multivariate linear regression models were conducted. At baseline, the proportion of Tregs negatively correlated with the proportion of HLA-DR+CD8+T cells (r = −0.519). Following TI, the proportion of Tregs increased from 6.3% to 7.2% (p = 0.029); absolute numbers of Tregs decreased. The increase in the proportion of HLA-DR+CD38+CD8+T cells was significantly related to the increase in proportion of Tregs (p = 0.031). At M12, the proportion of Tregs did not negatively correlate with CD8 T-cell activation. Nevertheless, Tregs retain a suppressive function since depletion of Treg-containing CD4+CD25+ cells led to an increase in lymphoproliferative responses in most patients studied. Our data suggest that Tregs are efficient in controlling residual immune activation in patients with ART-mediated viral suppression. However, the insufficient increase in the proportion and/or the decrease in the absolute number of Tregs result in a failure to control immune activation following TI. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00118677 PMID:20657770

  6. Measuring polio immunity to plan immunization activities.

    PubMed

    Voorman, Arend; Lyons, Hil M

    2016-11-21

    The Global Polio Eradication Initiative is closer than ever to achieving a polio-free world. Immunization activities must still be carried out in non-endemic countries to maintain population immunity at levels which will stop poliovirus from spreading if it is re-introduced from still-infected areas. In areas where there is no active transmission of poliovirus, programs must rely on surrogate indicators of population immunity to determine the appropriate immunization activities, typically caregiver-reported vaccination history obtained from non-polio acute flaccid paralysis patients identified through polio surveillance. We used regression models to examine the relationship between polio vaccination campaigns and caregiver-reported polio vaccination history. We find that in many countries, vaccination campaigns have a surprisingly weak impact on these commonly used indicators. We conclude that alternative criteria and data, such as routine immunization indicators from vaccination records or household surveys, should be considered for planning polio vaccination campaigns, and that validation of such surrogate indicators is necessary if they are to be used as the basis for program planning and risk assessment. We recommend that the GPEI and similar organizations consider or continue devoting additional resources to rigorously study population immunity and campaign effectiveness in at-risk countries.

  7. Dendritic cells and parasites: from recognition and activation to immune response instruction.

    PubMed

    Motran, Claudia Cristina; Ambrosio, Laura Fernanda; Volpini, Ximena; Celias, Daiana Pamela; Cervi, Laura

    2017-02-01

    The effective defense against parasite infections requires the ability to mount an appropriate and controlled specific immune response able to eradicate the invading pathogen while limiting the collateral damage to self-tissues. Dendritic cells are key elements for the development of immunity against parasites; they control the responses required to eliminate these pathogens while maintaining host homeostasis. Ligation of dendritic cell pattern recognition receptors by pathogen-associated molecular pattern present in the parasites initiates signaling pathways that lead to the production of surface and secreted proteins that are required, together with the antigen, to induce an appropriate and timely regulated immune response. There is evidence showing that parasites can influence and regulate dendritic cell functions in order to promote a more permissive environment for their survival. In this review, we will focus on new insights about the ability of protozoan and helminth parasites or their products to modify dendritic cell function and discuss how this interaction is crucial in shaping the host response.

  8. The effect of surface modification of mesoporous silica micro-rod scaffold on immune cell activation and infiltration

    PubMed Central

    Li, Weiwei Aileen; Lu, Beverly Ying; Gu, Luo; Choi, Youngjin; Kim, Jaeyun; Mooney, David J

    2016-01-01

    Biomaterial scaffold based vaccines show significant potential in generating potent antigen-specific immunity. However, the role of the scaffold surface chemistry in initiating and modulating the immune response is not well understood. In this study, a mesoporous silica micro-rod (MSR) scaffold was modified with PEG, PEG-RGD and PEG-RDG groups. PEG modification significantly enhanced BMDC activation marker up-regulation and IL-1β production in vitro, and innate immune cell infiltration in vivo. PEG-RGD MSRs and PEG-RDG MSRs displayed decreased inflammation compared to PEG MSRs, and the effect was not RGD specific. Finally, the Nlrp3 inflammasome was found to be necessary for MSR stimulated IL-1β production in vitro and played a key role in regulating immune cell infiltration in vivo. These findings suggest that simply modulating the surface chemistry of a scaffold can regulate its immune cell infiltration profile and have implications for the design and development of new material based vaccines. PMID:26784009

  9. Key Immune Cell Cytokines Affects the Telomere Activity of Cord Blood Cells In vitro

    PubMed Central

    Brazvan, Balal; Farahzadi, Raheleh; Mohammadi, Seyede Momeneh; Montazer Saheb, Soheila; Shanehbandi, Dariush; Schmied, Laurent; Soleimani Rad, Jafar; Darabi, Masoud; Nozad Charoudeh, Hojjatollah

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Telomere is a nucleoprotein complex at the end of eukaryotic chromosomes and its length is regulated by telomerase. The number of DNA repeat sequence (TTAGGG)n is reduced with each cell division in differentiated cells. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of SCF (Stem Cell Factor), Flt3 (Fms- Like tyrosine kinase-3), Interleukin-2, 7 and 15 on telomere length and hTERT gene expression in mononuclear and umbilical cord blood stem cells (CD34+ cells) during development to lymphoid cells. Methods: The mononuclear cells were isolated from umbilical cord blood by Ficoll-Paque density gradient. Then cells were cultured for 21 days in the presence of different cytokines. Telomere length and hTERT gene expression were evaluated in freshly isolated cells, 7, 14 and 21 days of culture by real-time PCR. The same condition had been done for CD34+ cells but telomere length and hTERT gene expression were measured at initial and day 21 of the experiment. Results: Highest hTERT gene expression and maximum telomere length were measured at day14 of MNCs in the presence of IL-7 and IL-15. Also, there was a significant correlation between telomere length and telomerase gene expression in MNCs at 14 days in a combination of IL-7 and IL-15 (r = 0.998, p =0.04). In contrast, IL-2 showed no distinct effect on telomere length and hTERT gene expression in cells. Conclusion: Taken together, IL-7 and IL-15 increased telomere length and hTERT gene expression at 14 day of the experiment. In conclusion, it seems likely that cells maintain naïve phenotype due to prolonged exposure of IL-7 and IL-15. PMID:27478776

  10. TLR-mediated activation of NK cells and their role in bacterial/viral immune responses in mammals.

    PubMed

    Adib-Conquy, Minou; Scott-Algara, Daniel; Cavaillon, Jean-Marc; Souza-Fonseca-Guimaraes, Fernando

    2014-03-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are important in innate immunity, first described as guardians for the detection and clearance of transformed or virus-infected cells. Later, this cell type was revealed to be also able to recognize and respond to bacteria-infected cells. NK cells possess receptors allowing them to sense and respond to viral and bacterial patterns, including Toll-like receptors (TLRs). Initially described in other innate immune cells, particularly monocytes/macrophages, TLRs have more recently been characterized in NK cells. Controversies remain regarding the TLR expression in NK cells and their responsiveness to agonists, specifically the requirement for the presence of accessory cells, such as dendritic cells, or of accessory cytokines (IL-2, IL-12, IL-15 and IL-18) to respond to TLR agonists. Upon TLR activation, NK cells are an important source of IFN-γ and granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor, cytokines necessary to fight infection but that can also contribute to deleterious inflammation if produced in excessive amounts. Here, we review the current knowledge concerning the expression of TLRs in and on NK cells and the responsiveness to their agonists and review the literature on the role of NK cells in the sensing of bacterial or viral patterns and in combatting infection.

  11. Enhanced acid sphingomyelinase activity drives immune evasion and tumor growth in non-small cell lung carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kachler, Katerina; Bailer, Maximilian; Heim, Lisanne; Schumacher, Fabian; Reichel, Martin; Holzinger, Corinna; Trump, Sonja; Mittler, Susanne; Monti, Juliana; Trufa, Denis I; Rieker, Ralf Joachim; Hartmann, Arndt; Sirbu, Horia; Kleuser, Burkhard; Kornhuber, Johannes; Finotto, Susetta

    2017-09-07

    The lipid hydrolase enzyme acid sphingomyelinase (ASM) is required for the conversion of the lipid cell membrane component sphingomyelin into ceramide. In cancer cells, ASM-mediated ceramide production is important for apoptosis, cell proliferation and immune modulation, highlighting ASM as a potential multimodal therapeutic target. In this study, we demonstrate elevated ASM activity in the lung tumor environment and blood serum of patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). RNAi-mediated attenuation of SMPD1 in human NSCLC cells rendered them resistant to serum starvation-induced apoptosis. In a murine model of lung adenocarcinoma, ASM deficiency reduced tumor development in a manner associated with significant enhancement of Th1-mediated and cytotoxic T cell-mediated antitumor immunity. Our findings indicate that targeting ASM in NSCLC can act by tumor cell intrinsic and extrinsic mechanisms to suppress tumor cell growth, most notably by enabling an effective antitumor immune response by the host. Copyright ©2017, American Association for Cancer Research.

  12. Human mucosal-associated invariant T cells contribute to antiviral influenza immunity via IL-18–dependent activation

    PubMed Central

    Loh, Liyen; Wang, Zhongfang; Sant, Sneha; Koutsakos, Marios; Jegaskanda, Sinthujan; Liu, Ligong; Fairlie, David P.; Crowe, Jane; Rossjohn, Jamie; Xu, Jianqing; Doherty, Peter C.; Kedzierska, Katherine

    2016-01-01

    Mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells are innate-like T lymphocytes known to elicit potent immunity to a broad range of bacteria, mainly via the rapid production of inflammatory cytokines. Whether MAIT cells contribute to antiviral immunity is less clear. Here we asked whether MAIT cells produce cytokines/chemokines during severe human influenza virus infection. Our analysis in patients hospitalized with avian H7N9 influenza pneumonia showed that individuals who recovered had higher numbers of CD161+Vα7.2+ MAIT cells in peripheral blood compared with those who succumbed, suggesting a possible protective role for this lymphocyte population. To understand the mechanism underlying MAIT cell activation during influenza, we cocultured influenza A virus (IAV)-infected human lung epithelial cells (A549) and human peripheral blood mononuclear cells in vitro, then assayed them by intracellular cytokine staining. Comparison of influenza-induced MAIT cell activation with the profile for natural killer cells (CD56+CD3−) showed robust up-regulation of IFNγ for both cell populations and granzyme B in MAIT cells, although the individual responses varied among healthy donors. However, in contrast to the requirement for cell-associated factors to promote NK cell activation, the induction of MAIT cell cytokine production was dependent on IL-18 (but not IL-12) production by IAV-exposed CD14+ monocytes. Overall, this evidence for IAV activation via an indirect, IL-18–dependent mechanism indicates that MAIT cells are protective in influenza, and also possibly in any human disease process in which inflammation and IL-18 production occur. PMID:27543331

  13. Distinct and Synergistic Contributions of Epithelial Stress and Adaptive Immunity to Functions of Intraepithelial Killer Cells and Active Celiac Disease.

    PubMed

    Setty, Mala; Discepolo, Valentina; Abadie, Valérie; Kamhawi, Sarah; Mayassi, Toufic; Kent, Andrew; Ciszewski, Cezary; Maglio, Maria; Kistner, Emily; Bhagat, Govind; Semrad, Carol; Kupfer, Sonia S; Green, Peter H; Guandalini, Stefano; Troncone, Riccardo; Murray, Joseph A; Turner, Jerrold R; Jabri, Bana

    2015-09-01

    The mechanisms of tissue destruction during progression of celiac disease are poorly defined. It is not clear how tissue stress and adaptive immunity contribute to the activation of intraepithelial cytotoxic T cells and the development of villous atrophy. We analyzed epithelial cells and intraepithelial cytotoxic T cells in family members of patients with celiac disease, who were without any signs of adaptive antigluten immunity, and in potential celiac disease patients, who have antibodies against tissue transglutaminase 2 in the absence of villous atrophy. We collected blood and intestinal biopsy specimens from 268 patients at tertiary medical centers in the United States and Italy from 2004 to 2012. All subjects had normal small intestinal histology. Study groups included healthy individuals with no family history of celiac disease or antibodies against tissue transglutaminase 2 (controls), healthy family members of patients with celiac disease, and potential celiac disease patients. Intraepithelial cytotoxic T cells were isolated and levels of inhibitory and activating natural killer (NK) cells were measured by flow cytometry. Levels of heat shock protein (HSP) and interleukin 15 were measured by immunohistochemistry, and ultrastructural alterations in intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) were assessed by electron microscopy. IECs from subjects with a family history of celiac disease, but not from subjects who already had immunity to gluten, expressed higher levels of HS27, HSP70, and interleukin-15 than controls; their IECs also had ultrastructural alterations. Intraepithelial cytotoxic T cells from relatives of patients with celiac disease expressed higher levels of activating NK receptors than cells from controls, although at lower levels than patients with active celiac disease, and without loss of inhibitory receptors for NK cells. Intraepithelial cytotoxic T cells from potential celiac disease patients failed to up-regulate activating NK receptors. A

  14. Ginseng (Panax ginseng Meyer) oligopeptides regulate innate and adaptive immune responses in mice via increased macrophage phagocytosis capacity, NK cell activity and Th cells secretion.

    PubMed

    He, Li-Xia; Ren, Jin-Wei; Liu, Rui; Chen, Qi-He; Zhao, Jian; Wu, Xin; Zhang, Zhao-Feng; Wang, Jun-Bo; Pettinato, Giuseppe; Li, Yong

    2017-09-06

    Traditionally used as a restorative medicine, ginseng (Panax ginseng Meyer) has been the most widely used and acclaimed herb in Chinese communities for thousands of years. To investigate the immune-modulating activity of ginseng oligopeptides (GOP), 420 healthy female BALB/c mice were intragastrically administered distilled water (control), whey protein (0.15 g per kg body weight (BW)), and GOP 0.0375, 0.075, 0.15, 0.3 and 0.6 g per kg BW for 30 days. Blood samples from mice were collected from the ophthalmic venous plexus and then sacrificed by cervical dislocation. Seven assays were conducted to determine the immunomodulatory effects of GOP on innate and adaptive immune responses, followed by flow cytometry to investigate spleen T lymphocyte sub-populations, multiplex sandwich immunoassays to investigate serum cytokine and immunoglobulin levels, and ELISA to investigate intestinally secreted immunoglobulin to study the mechanism of GOP affecting the immune system. Our results showed that GOP was able to enhance innate and adaptive immune responses in mice by improving cell-mediated and humoral immunity, macrophage phagocytosis capacity and NK cell activity. Notably, the use of GOP revealed a better immune-modulating activity compared to whey protein. We conclude that the immune-modulating activity might be due to the increased macrophage phagocytosis capacity and NK cell activity, and the enhancement of T and Th cells, as well as IL-2, IL-6 and IL-12 secretion and IgA, IgG1 and IgG2b production. These results indicate that GOP could be considered a good candidate that may improve immune functions if used as a dietary supplement, with a dosage that ranges from 0.3 to 0.6 g per kg BW.

  15. Immune cells in term and preterm labor.

    PubMed

    Gomez-Lopez, Nardhy; StLouis, Derek; Lehr, Marcus A; Sanchez-Rodriguez, Elly N; Arenas-Hernandez, Marcia

    2014-11-01

    Labor resembles an inflammatory response that includes secretion of cytokines/chemokines by resident and infiltrating immune cells into reproductive tissues and the maternal/fetal interface. Untimely activation of these inflammatory pathways leads to preterm labor, which can result in preterm birth. Preterm birth is a major determinant of neonatal mortality and morbidity; therefore, the elucidation of the process of labor at a cellular and molecular level is essential for understanding the pathophysiology of preterm labor. Here, we summarize the role of innate and adaptive immune cells in the physiological or pathological activation of labor. We review published literature regarding the role of innate and adaptive immune cells in the cervix, myometrium, fetal membranes, decidua and the fetus in late pregnancy and labor at term and preterm. Accumulating evidence suggests that innate immune cells (neutrophils, macrophages and mast cells) mediate the process of labor by releasing pro-inflammatory factors such as cytokines, chemokines and matrix metalloproteinases. Adaptive immune cells (T-cell subsets and B cells) participate in the maintenance of fetomaternal tolerance during pregnancy, and an alteration in their function or abundance may lead to labor at term or preterm. Also, immune cells that bridge the innate and adaptive immune systems (natural killer T (NKT) cells and dendritic cells (DCs)) seem to participate in the pathophysiology of preterm labor. In conclusion, a balance between innate and adaptive immune cells is required in order to sustain pregnancy; an alteration of this balance will lead to labor at term or preterm.

  16. Immune cells in term and preterm labor

    PubMed Central

    Gomez-Lopez, Nardhy; StLouis, Derek; Lehr, Marcus A; Sanchez-Rodriguez, Elly N; Arenas-Hernandez, Marcia

    2014-01-01

    Labor resembles an inflammatory response that includes secretion of cytokines/chemokines by resident and infiltrating immune cells into reproductive tissues and the maternal/fetal interface. Untimely activation of these inflammatory pathways leads to preterm labor, which can result in preterm birth. Preterm birth is a major determinant of neonatal mortality and morbidity; therefore, the elucidation of the process of labor at a cellular and molecular level is essential for understanding the pathophysiology of preterm labor. Here, we summarize the role of innate and adaptive immune cells in the physiological or pathological activation of labor. We review published literature regarding the role of innate and adaptive immune cells in the cervix, myometrium, fetal membranes, decidua and the fetus in late pregnancy and labor at term and preterm. Accumulating evidence suggests that innate immune cells (neutrophils, macrophages and mast cells) mediate the process of labor by releasing pro-inflammatory factors such as cytokines, chemokines and matrix metalloproteinases. Adaptive immune cells (T-cell subsets and B cells) participate in the maintenance of fetomaternal tolerance during pregnancy, and an alteration in their function or abundance may lead to labor at term or preterm. Also, immune cells that bridge the innate and adaptive immune systems (natural killer T (NKT) cells and dendritic cells (DCs)) seem to participate in the pathophysiology of preterm labor. In conclusion, a balance between innate and adaptive immune cells is required in order to sustain pregnancy; an alteration of this balance will lead to labor at term or preterm. PMID:24954221

  17. HMGB1 enhances immune suppression by facilitating the differentiation and suppressive activity of myeloid-derived suppressor cells.

    PubMed

    Parker, Katherine H; Sinha, Pratima; Horn, Lucas A; Clements, Virginia K; Yang, Huan; Li, Jianhua; Tracey, Kevin J; Ostrand-Rosenberg, Suzanne

    2014-10-15

    Chronic inflammation often precedes malignant transformation and later drives tumor progression. Likewise, subversion of the immune system plays a role in tumor progression, with tumoral immune escape now well recognized as a crucial hallmark of cancer. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) are elevated in most individuals with cancer, where their accumulation and suppressive activity are driven by inflammation. Thus, MDSCs may define an element of the pathogenic inflammatory processes that drives immune escape. The secreted alarmin HMGB1 is a proinflammatory partner, inducer, and chaperone for many proinflammatory molecules that MDSCs develop. Therefore, in this study, we examined HMGB1 as a potential regulator of MDSCs. In murine tumor systems, HMGB1 was ubiquitous in the tumor microenvironment, activating the NF-κB signal transduction pathway in MDSCs and regulating their quantity and quality. We found that HMGB1 promotes the development of MDSCs from bone marrow progenitor cells, contributing to their ability to suppress antigen-driven activation of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells. Furthermore, HMGB1 increased MDSC-mediated production of IL-10, enhanced crosstalk between MDSCs and macrophages, and facilitated the ability of MDSCs to downregulate expression of the T-cell homing receptor L-selectin. Overall, our results revealed a pivotal role for HMGB1 in the development and cancerous contributions of MDSCs. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  18. Tumor STAT1 transcription factor activity enhances breast tumor growth and immune suppression mediated by myeloid-derived suppressor cells.

    PubMed

    Hix, Laura M; Karavitis, John; Khan, Mohammad W; Shi, Yihui H; Khazaie, Khashayarsha; Zhang, Ming

    2013-04-26

    Previous studies had implicated the IFN-γ transcription factor signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1) as a tumor suppressor. However, accumulating evidence has correlated increased STAT1 activation with increased tumor progression in multiple types of cancer, including breast cancer. Indeed, we present evidence that tumor up-regulation of STAT1 activity in human and mouse mammary tumors correlates with increasing disease progression to invasive carcinoma. A microarray analysis comparing low aggressive TM40D and highly aggressive TM40D-MB mouse mammary carcinoma cells revealed significantly higher STAT1 activity in the TM40D-MB cells. Ectopic overexpression of constitutively active STAT1 in TM40D cells promoted mobilization of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) and inhibition of antitumor T cells, resulting in aggressive tumor growth in tumor-transplanted, immunocompetent mice. Conversely, gene knockdown of STAT1 in the metastatic TM40D-MB cells reversed these events and attenuated tumor progression. Importantly, we demonstrate that in human breast cancer, the presence of tumor STAT1 activity and tumor-recruited CD33(+) myeloid cells correlates with increasing disease progression from ductal carcinoma in situ to invasive carcinoma. We conclude that STAT1 activity in breast cancer cells is responsible for shaping an immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment, and inhibiting STAT1 activity is a promising immune therapeutic approach.

  19. Inhibition of circulating immune cell activation: a molecular antiinflammatory effect of the Mediterranean diet.

    PubMed

    Mena, Mari-Pau; Sacanella, Emilio; Vazquez-Agell, Mónica; Morales, Mercedes; Fitó, Montserrat; Escoda, Rosa; Serrano-Martínez, Manuel; Salas-Salvadó, Jordi; Benages, Neus; Casas, Rosa; Lamuela-Raventós, Rosa M; Masanes, Ferran; Ros, Emilio; Estruch, Ramon

    2009-01-01

    Adherence to the Mediterranean diet (Med-Diet) is associated with a reduced risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). However, the molecular mechanisms involved are not fully understood. The objective was to compare the effects of 2 Med-Diets with those of a low-fat diet on immune cell activation and soluble inflammatory biomarkers related to atherogenesis in subjects at high risk of CVD. In a controlled study, we randomly assigned 112 older subjects with diabetes or > or =3 CVD risk factors to 3 dietary intervention groups: Med-Diet with supplemental virgin olive oil (VOO), Med-Diet with supplemental nuts, and low-fat diet. Changes from baseline in cellular and serum inflammatory biomarkers were assessed at 3 mo. One hundred six participants (43% women; average age: 68 y) completed the study. At 3 mo, monocyte expression of CD49d, an adhesion molecule crucial for leukocyte homing, and of CD40, a proinflammatory ligand, decreased (P < 0.05) after both Med-Diets but not after the low-fat diet. Serum interleukin-6 and soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1, inflammatory mediators crucial in firm adhesion of leukocytes to endothelial surfaces, decreased (P < 0.05) in both Med-Diet groups. Soluble vascular cellular adhesion molecule-1 and C-reactive protein decreased only after the Med-Diet with VOO (P < 0.05), whereas interleukin-6, soluble vascular cellular adhesion molecule-1, and soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 increased (P < 0.05) after the low-fat diet. Med-Diets supplemented with VOO or nuts down-regulate cellular and circulating inflammatory biomarkers related to atherogenesis in subjects at high risk of CVD. The results support the recommendation of the Med-Diet as a useful tool against CVD.

  20. DNA damage, apoptosis and langerhans cells--Activators of UV-induced immune tolerance.

    PubMed

    Timares, Laura; Katiyar, Santosh K; Elmets, Craig A

    2008-01-01

    Solar UVR is highly mutagenic but is only partially absorbed by the outer stratum corneum of the epidermis. UVR can penetrate into the deeper layers of the epidermis, depending on melanin content, where it induces DNA damage and apoptosis in epidermal cells, including those in the germinative basal layer. The cellular decision to initiate either cellular repair or undergo apoptosis has evolved to balance the acute need to maintain skin barrier function with the long-term risk of retaining precancerous cells. Langerhans cells (LCs) are positioned suprabasally, where they may sense UV damage directly, or indirectly through recognition of apoptotic vesicles and soluble mediators derived from surrounding keratinocytes. Apoptotic vesicles will contain UV-induced altered proteins that may be presented to the immune system as foreign. The observation that UVR induces immune tolerance to skin-associated antigens suggests that this photodamage response has evolved to preserve the skin barrier by protecting it from autoimmune attack. LC involvement in this process is not clear and controversial. We will highlight some basic concepts of photobiology and review recent advances pertaining to UV-induced DNA damage, apoptosis regulation, novel immunomodulatory mechanisms and the role of LCs in generating antigen-specific regulatory T cells.

  1. LPS-activated monocytes suppress T-cell immune responses and induce FOXP3+ T cells through a COX-2-PGE2-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Bryn, Tone; Yaqub, Sheraz; Mahic, Milada; Henjum, Karen; Aandahl, Einar M; Taskén, Kjetil

    2008-02-01

    Monocytes initiate innate immune responses and interact with T cells to induce antigen-specific immune responses by antigen presentation and secretion of humoral factors. We have previously shown that adaptive regulatory T cells inhibit T-cell effector functions in a cyclooxygenase (COX)-2-prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2))-dependent manner and that PGE(2) converts resting CD4+CD25- T cells into FOXP3+ T cells with a suppressive phenotype. Here, we demonstrate that stimulation of monocytes with LPS leads to suppression of T-cell immune responses by a COX-2-PGE(2)-dependent mechanism that is reversible with COX-2 inhibitors as well as PGE(2)-neutralizing antibody and cAMP antagonist. Furthermore, we show that LPS-activated monocytes induce FOXP3 expression in resting CD4+CD25- T cells by the same pathway. These results suggest that monocytes are able to efficiently suppress T-cell immune responses in a regulatory manner and elicit an inhibitory immune profile.

  2. How do plants achieve immunity? Defence without specialized immune cells.

    PubMed

    Spoel, Steven H; Dong, Xinnian

    2012-01-25

    Vertebrates have evolved a sophisticated adaptive immune system that relies on an almost infinite diversity of antigen receptors that are clonally expressed by specialized immune cells that roam the circulatory system. These immune cells provide vertebrates with extraordinary antigen-specific immune capacity and memory, while minimizing self-reactivity. Plants, however, lack specialized mobile immune cells. Instead, every plant cell is thought to be capable of launching an effective immune response. So how do plants achieve specific, self-tolerant immunity and establish immune memory? Recent developments point towards a multilayered plant innate immune system comprised of self-surveillance, systemic signalling and chromosomal changes that together establish effective immunity.

  3. Calcium-Modulating Cyclophilin Ligand Is Essential for the Survival of Activated T Cells and for Adaptive Immunity.

    PubMed

    Chan, Siaw-Li; Lindquist, Lonn D; Hansen, Michael J; Girtman, Megan A; Pease, Larry R; Bram, Richard J

    2015-12-15

    Calcium-modulating cyclophilin ligand (CAML) is an endoplasmic reticulum resident protein that is widely expressed. Although it has been demonstrated to participate in the tail-anchored protein insertion pathway, its physiological role in the mature immune system is unknown. In this work, we show that mature, peripheral T cells require CAML for survival specifically following TCR-induced activation. In this study, we examined mature T cells from spleen and lymph nodes of tamoxifen-inducible CAML knockout mice (tCAML(-/-)). Whereas CAML-deficient T cells were able to express the early activation markers CD25 and CD69, and produce IL-2 normally upon stimulation, deficient cells proliferated less and died. Cells did not require CAML for entry into the S phase of the cell cycle, thus implicating its survival function at a relatively late step in the T cell activation sequence. In addition, CAML was required for homeostatic proliferation and for Ag-dependent cell killing in vivo. These results demonstrate that CAML critically supports T cell survival and cell division downstream of T cell activation. Copyright © 2015 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  4. HCV coinfection does not alter the frequency of regulatory T cells or CD8+ T cell immune activation in chronically infected HIV+ Chinese subjects.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Yan; Wei, Xiaoyan; Li, Yuan; Zhao, Ke; Zhang, Jiucong; Kang, Wenzhen; Sun, Yongtao

    2012-09-01

    Regulatory T cell (Treg) is a subset of CD4(+) T cells that play a critical role in regulating the immune responses. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is associated with T cell abnormalities and alters effector T cell function. There are a large number of patients coinfected with HIV and hepatitis C virus (HCV). Here, we evaluated the proportion of CD4(+) Treg cells expressing CD25 and FOXP3, and the status of immune activation of CD8(+) T cells in 60 Chinese patients chronically infected with HIV and/or HCV. Furthermore, we investigated the influence of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) on the level of Treg cells and immune activated CD8(+) T cells. We observed that the Treg level was upregulated in HIV infection and HCV infection could not enhance this kind of upregulation significantly. The level of Treg cells was negatively correlated with CD4(+) T cell counts and positively correlated with HIV viral loads. We observed considerably elevated CD38 and HLA-DR expression in CD8(+) T cells in HIV-infected subjects but not in HCV-infected patients in comparison to that in healthy controls. There is no significant difference concerning the proportion of CD8(+) T cells expressing CD38 or HLA-DR between HIV-1-monoinfected and HIV/HCV-coinfected patients. After 12-week HAART, the proportion of Treg cells dropped, but still more than the level in healthy controls. HAART could reverse the abnormal immune activation of CD8(+) T cells. The decrease of Tregs did not alter the downregulation of HIV-1-specific CTL responses in these HIV-infected patients after HAART therapy. The level of HIV virus might be the key point for the decline of CTL responses.

  5. CD4 T-Cell Responses in Primary HIV Infection: Interrelationship with Immune Activation and Virus Burden

    PubMed Central

    Chevalier, Mathieu F.; Didier, Céline; Girard, Pierre-Marie; Manea, Maria E.; Campa, Pauline; Barré-Sinoussi, Françoise; Scott-Algara, Daniel; Weiss, Laurence

    2016-01-01

    Early events during primary HIV infection (PHI) are thought to influence disease outcome. Although a growing body of evidence suggests a beneficial role of HIV-specific CD4 help in HIV infection, it is unclear how early viral replication, systemic immune activation, and antiretroviral therapy (ART) may shape CD4 T-cell responses during PHI, and whether HIV-specific CD4 responses contribute to the high immune activation observed in PHI. Twenty-seven patients with early PHI were included in a prospective longitudinal study and 12 of them received ART after enrollment. Fresh peripheral blood mononuclear cells were used for measurement of ex vivo T-cell activation and of cytokine-producing CD4 T-cells following stimulation with PMA/ionomycin or HIV-1-gag-p24 antigen. Patients were segregated based on CD8 T-cell activation level (i.e., % HLA-DR+CD38+ CD8 T-cells) at baseline (BL). Patients with lower immune activation exhibited higher frequency of bulk CD4 T-cells producing IFN-γ or IL-17 and higher effector-to-regulatory cell ratios. No differences were found in HIV-specific CD4 T-cell frequencies. In contrast, segregation of patients based on plasma viral load (pVL) revealed that patients with higher pVL showed higher cytokine-producing HIV-specific CD4 responses. Of note, the frequency of IFN-γ+ HIV-specific CD4 T cells significantly diminished between BL and month 6 only in ART-treated patients. However, early treatment initiation was associated with better maintenance of HIV-specific IFN-γ+ CD4 T-cells. These data suggest that HIV-specific CD4 responses do not fuel systemic T-cell activation and are driven by viral replication but not able to contribute to its control in the early phase of infection. Moreover, our data also suggest a benefit of early treatment for the maintenance of HIV-specific CD4 T-cell help. PMID:27746782

  6. Plasmid Vector-Linked Maturation of Natural Killer (NK) Cells Is Coupled to Antigen-Dependent NK Cell Activation during DNA-Based Immunization in Mice ▿

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Ren; Mancini-Bourgine, Maryline; Zhang, Xiao Ming; Bayard, Florence; Deng, Qiang; Michel, Marie-Louise

    2011-01-01

    Plasmid DNA vaccines serve in a wide array of applications ranging from prophylactic vaccines to potential therapeutic tools against infectious diseases and cancer. In this study, we analyzed the mechanisms underlying the activation of natural killer (NK) cells and their potential role in adaptive immunity during DNA-based immunization against hepatitis B virus surface antigen in mice. We observed that the mature Mac-1+ CD27− NK cell subset increased in the liver of mice early after DNA injection, whereas the number of the less mature Mac-1+ CD27+ NK cells in the liver and spleen was significantly reduced. This effect was attributed to bacterial sequences present in the plasmid backbone rather than to the encoded antigen and was not observed in immunized MyD88-deficient mice. The activation of NK cells by plasmid-DNA injection was associated with an increase in their effector functions that depended on the expressed antigen. Maturation of NK cells was abrogated in the absence of T cells, suggesting that cross talk exists between NK cells and antigen-specific T cells. Taken together, our data unravel the mechanics of plasmid vector-induced maturation of NK cells and plasmid-encoded antigen-dependent activation of NK cells required for a crucial role of NK cells in DNA vaccine-induced immunogenicity. PMID:21775455

  7. Rabies Virus Expressing Dendritic Cell-Activating Molecules Enhances the Innate and Adaptive Immune Response to Vaccination ▿

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Yongjun; Wang, Hualei; Wu, Hua; Yang, Fuhe; Tripp, Ralph A.; Hogan, Robert J.; Fu, Zhen F.

    2011-01-01

    Our previous studies indicated that recruitment and/or activation of dendritic cells (DCs) is important in enhancing the protective immune responses against rabies virus (RABV) (L. Zhao, H. Toriumi, H. Wang, Y. Kuang, X. Guo, K. Morimoto, and Z. F. Fu, J. Virol. 84:9642-9648). To address the importance of DC activation for RABV vaccine efficacy, the genes for several DC recruitment and/or activation molecules, e.g., granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), macrophage-derived chemokine (MDC), and macrophage inflammatory protein 1α (MIP-1α), were individually cloned into RABV. The ability of these recombinant viruses to activate DCs was determined in vitro and in vivo. Infection of mouse bone marrow-derived DCs with each of the recombinant viruses resulted in DC activation, as shown by increased surface expression of CD11c and CD86 as well as an increased level of alpha interferon (IFN-α) production compared to levels observed after infection with the parent virus. Intramuscular infection of mice with each of the viruses recruited and/or activated more DCs and B cells in the periphery than infection with the parent virus, leading to the production of higher levels of virus-neutralizing antibodies. Furthermore, a single immunization with recombinant RABV expressing GM-CSF or MDC protected significantly more mice against intracerebral challenge with virulent RABV than did immunization with the parental virus. Yet, these viruses did not show more virulence than the parent virus, since direct intracerebral inoculation with each virus at up to 1 × 107 fluorescent focus units each did not induce any overt clinic symptom, such as abnormal behavior, or any neurological signs. Together, these data indicate that recombinant RABVs expressing these molecules activate/recruit DCs and enhance protective immune responses. PMID:21106736

  8. Xenobiotic pregnane X receptor (PXR) regulates innate immunity via activation of NLRP3 inflammasome in vascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shaolan; Lei, Ting; Zhang, Kang; Zhao, Wenxiang; Fang, Li; Lai, Baochang; Han, Jie; Xiao, Lei; Wang, Nanping

    2014-10-24

    Pregnane X receptor (PXR) is a member of nuclear receptor superfamily and responsible for the detoxification of xenobiotics. Our previously study demonstrated that PXR is expressed in endothelial cells (ECs) and acts as a master regulator of detoxification genes to protect ECs against xenobiotics. Vascular endothelial cells are key sentinel cells to sense the pathogens and xenobiotics. In this study, we examined the potential function of PXR in the regulation of innate immunity in vasculatures. Treatments with PXR agonists or overexpression of a constitutively active PXR in cultured ECs increased gene expression of the key pattern recognition receptors, including Toll-like receptors (TLR-2, -4, -9) and NOD-like receptors (NOD-1 and -2 and NLRP3). In particular, PXR agonism triggered the activation of NLRP3 inflammasome and the ensuing cleavage and maturation of caspase-1 and interleukin-1β (IL-1β). Conversely, selective antagonism or gene silencing of PXR abrogated NLRP3 inflammasome activation. In addition, we identified NLRP3 as a transcriptional target of PXR by using the promoter-reporter and ChIP assays. In summary, our findings revealed a novel regulatory mechanism of innate immune by PXR, which may act as a master transcription factor controlling the convergence between the detoxification of xenobiotics and the innate immunity against them.

  9. Molecular and Cellular Mechanisms of Antitumor Immune Response Activation by Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Markov, O. V.; Mironova, N. L.; Vlasov, V. V.; Zenkova, M. A.

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) play a crucial role in the initiation and regulation of the antitumor immune response. Already , DC-based antitumor vaccines have been thoroughly explored both in animal tumor models and in clinical trials. DC-based vaccines are commonly produced from DC progenitors isolated from peripheral blood or bone marrow by culturing in the presence of cytokines, followed by loading the DCs with tumor-specific antigens, such as DNA, RNA, viral vectors, or a tumor cell lysate. However, the efficacy of DC-based vaccines remains low. Undoubtedly, a deeper understanding of the molecular mechanisms by which DCs function would allow us to enhance the antitumor efficacy of DC-based vaccines in clinical applications. This review describes the origin and major subsets of mouse and human DCs, as well as the differences between them. The cellular mechanisms of presentation and cross-presentation of exogenous antigens by DCs to T cells are described. We discuss intracellular antigen processing in DCs, cross-dressing, and the acquisition of the antigen cross-presentation function. A particular section in the review describes the mechanisms of tumor escape from immune surveillance through the suppression of DCs functions. PMID:27795841

  10. Glucocorticoid effects on immune cell activation by staphylococcal exotoxins and lipopolysaccharide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapes, S. K.; Kopydlowski, K. M.; Fleming, S. D.; Iandolo, J. J.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1992-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to determine the effects of physiologically elevated corticosterone on the activation of macrophages and T cells. These studies find that the elevation of corticosterone does not affect the expression of membrane receptors on macrophages and does not affect the activation of macrophages to produce cytokines. In contrast, elevated corticosterone levels correlate with enhanced T cell proliferation to both mitogens and superantigens.

  11. Glucocorticoid effects on immune cell activation by staphylococcal exotoxins and lipopolysaccharide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapes, S. K.; Kopydlowski, K. M.; Fleming, S. D.; Iandolo, J. J.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1992-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to determine the effects of physiologically elevated corticosterone on the activation of macrophages and T cells. These studies find that the elevation of corticosterone does not affect the expression of membrane receptors on macrophages and does not affect the activation of macrophages to produce cytokines. In contrast, elevated corticosterone levels correlate with enhanced T cell proliferation to both mitogens and superantigens.

  12. Immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibition motif-bearing receptors regulate the immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif-induced activation of immune competent cells.

    PubMed

    Gergely, J; Pecht, I; Sármay, G

    1999-05-03

    ITIM-bearing receptors, a family which only recently has been recognized, play a key role in the regulation of the ITAM-induced activation of immune competent cells. The mechanism of ITM-mediated regulation in various cells was recently clarified. The present review focuses on ITIM bearing membrane proteins that negatively regulate the activation of cells when co-crosslinked with ITAM containing receptors, illustrates the inhibitory processes by the negative regulation of B-, NK-, T-cells and mast cells and summarizes current views on the mechanism of ITIM-mediated inhibition.

  13. Mast cells in innate immunity.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Jean S; Jawdat, Dunia M

    2004-07-01

    Mast cells have been most extensively studied in their traditional role as an early effector cell of allergic disease. However, in the majority of individuals, it might be the role of this cell as a sentinel in host defense that is most important. Mast cells have been repeatedly demonstrated to play a critical role in defense against bacterial infections, and evidence for their involvement in early responses to viral and fungal pathogens is growing. Mast cells are activated during innate immune responses by multiple mechanisms, including well-established responses to complement components. In addition, novel mechanisms have emerged as a result of the explosion of knowledge in our understanding of pattern-recognition receptors. The mast cell shares many features with other innate immune effector cells, such as neutrophils and macrophages. However, a unique role for mast cells is defined not only by their extensive mediator profile but also by their ability to interact with the vasculature, to expedite selective cell recruitment, and to set the stage for an appropriate acquired response. Copyright 2004 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology

  14. Immunocytokines and bispecific antibodies: two complementary strategies for the selective activation of immune cells at the tumor site

    PubMed Central

    Kiefer, Jonathan D.; Neri, Dario

    2016-01-01

    Summary The activation of the immune system for a selective removal of tumor cells represents an attractive strategy for the treatment of metastatic malignancies, which cannot be cured by existing methodologies. In this review, we examine the design and therapeutic potential of immunocytokines and bispecific antibodies, two classes of bifunctional products which can selectively activate the immune system at the tumor site. Certain protein engineering aspects, such as the choice of the antibody format, are common to both classes of therapeutic agents and can have a profound impact on tumor homing performance in vivo of individual products. However, immunocytokines and bispecific antibodies display different mechanisms of action. Future research activities will reveal whether an additive of even synergistic benefit can be obtained from the judicious combination of these two types of biopharmaceutical agents. PMID:26864112

  15. Generation of cellular immune responses to HCV NS5 protein through in vivo activation of dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Wintermeyer, P.; Gehring, S.; Eken, A.; Wands, J. R.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Chronic hepatitis C (HCV) infection is a substantial medical problem that leads to progressive liver disease, cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The aim of this study was to achieve sustained cellular immune responses in vivo to a HCV nonstructural protein using dendritic cell (DC)-based immunization approach. We targeted the HCV NS5 protein to DCs in vivo by injecting microparticles loaded with this antigen. The DC population was expanded in BALB/C mice (H-2d) by hydrodynamic injection of a plasmid pUMVC3-hFLex expressing the secreted portion of the human Fms-like tyrosine kinase receptor-3 ligand (hFlt3). Mice were subsequently injected with microparticles coated with HCV NS5 protein via the tail vein. Cellular immune responses were determined with respect to secretion of INFγ and IL2 by CD4+ cells and cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) assays in vitro; inhibition of tumour cell growth was employed for the assessment of CD8+ generated activity in vivo. We found that Flt3L treatment expanded the DC population in the spleen to 43%, and such cells displayed a striking upregulation of CD86 as well as CD80 and CD40 co-stimulating molecules. Viral antigen-specific TH1 cytokine secretion by splenocytes was generated, and CTL activity against syngeneic NS5 expressing myeloma target cells was observed. In addition, these cells inhibited tumour growth indicating that NS5-specific robust CTL activity was operative in vivo. Thus, the capability of activating DCs in vivo using the methods described is valuable as a therapeutic vaccine strategy for chronic HCV infection. PMID:20002303

  16. Interferon-inducible guanylate-binding proteins at the interface of cell-autonomous immunity and inflammasome activation.

    PubMed

    Man, Si Ming; Place, David E; Kuriakose, Teneema; Kanneganti, Thirumala-Devi

    2017-01-01

    Guanylate-binding proteins (GBPs) are essential components of cell-autonomous immunity. In response to IFN signaling, GBPs are expressed in the cytoplasm of immune and nonimmune cells, where they unleash their antimicrobial activity toward intracellular bacteria, viruses, and parasites. Recent studies have revealed that GBPs are essential for mediating activation of the caspase-1 inflammasome in response to the gram-negative bacteria Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, Francisella novicida, Chlamydia muridarum, Chlamydia trachomatis, Legionella pneumophila, Vibrio cholerae, Enterobacter cloacae, and Citrobacter koseri During infection with vacuolar-restricted gram-negative bacteria, GBPs disrupt the vacuolar membrane to ensure liberation of LPS for cytoplasmic detection by caspase-11 and the noncanonical NLRP3 inflammasome. In response to certain cytosolic bacteria, GBPs liberate microbial DNA for activation of the DNA-sensing AIM2 inflammasome. GBPs also promote the recruitment of antimicrobial proteins, including NADPH oxidase subunits and autophagy-associated proteins to the Mycobacterium-containing vacuole to mediate intracellular bacterial killing. Here, we provide an overview on the emerging relationship between GBPs and activation of the inflammasome in innate immunity to microbial pathogens.

  17. Effects of intravenous glucose and lipids on innate immune cell activation in healthy, obese, and type 2 diabetic subjects

    PubMed Central

    Horvath, Peter; Oliver, Stacy R; Zaldivar, Frank P; Radom-Aizik, Shlomit; Galassetti, Pietro R

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerosis/cardiovascular disease are major causes of morbidity/mortality in obesity and type 2 diabetes (T2D), and have been associated with activation of innate immune cells, their diapedesis to the arterial intima and formation of the atherosclerotic plaque. While in obesity/T2D immune cell activation likely depends on dysregulated metabolism, the interaction between individual metabolic factors typical of these conditions (hyperglycemia, hyperlipidemia), innate immune cell activation, and the progression of atherosclerosis remains unclear. We, therefore, measured by flow cytometry cell surface expression of CD11b, CD14, CD16, CD62L, and CD66b, known markers of granulocyte (Gc) and monocyte (Mc) activation, in five healthy, five obese, and five T2D subjects, during 4-h i.v. infusions of 20% dextrose (raising blood sugar levels to ∼220 mg/dL), 20% Intralipid (raising trygliceride levels to ∼6 mmol/L), or a combination of the two. We hypothesized that both glucose and lipids would increase Gc/Mc surface marker expression, and simultaneous infusion would have an additive or synergistic effect. Surprisingly, though, infusion of glucose alone had little effect, while lipids, alone or combined with glucose, significantly increased expression of several markers (such as CD11b in Gc and Mc, and CD66 b in GC) within 60–90 min. Less pronounced increases in systemic inflammatory cytokines also occurred in obese and T2D subject, with no acute changes in gene expression of the the proinflammatory genes NFκB and CCR2. Our results suggest that lipids may be stronger acute contributors to innate cell activation than acute hyperglycemia per se, possibly helping shape more effective preventive dietary guidelines in T2D. PMID:25677544

  18. THE INITIAL PHASE OF AN IMMUNE RESPONSE FUNCTIONS TO ACTIVATE REGULATORY T CELLS

    PubMed Central

    O’Gorman, William E.; Dooms, Hans; Thorne, Steve H.; Kuswanto, Wilson F.; Simonds, Erin F.; Krutzik, Peter O.; Nolan, Garry P.; Abbas, Abul K.

    2009-01-01

    An early reaction of CD4+ T lymphocytes to antigen is the production of cytokines, notably IL-2. In order to detect cytokine dependent responses, naive antigen-specific T cells were stimulated in vivo and the presence of phosphorylated STAT5 molecules was used to identify the cell populations responding to IL-2. Within hours of T-cell priming, IL-2-dependent STAT5 phosphorylation occurred primarily in Foxp3+ regulatory T cells. In contrast, the antigen-specific T cells received STAT5 signals only after repeated antigen exposure or memory differentiation. Regulatory T cells receiving IL-2 signals proliferated and developed enhanced suppressive activity. These results indicate that one of the earliest events in a T cell response is the activation of endogenous regulatory cells, potentially to prevent autoimmunity. PMID:19542444

  19. Intestinal cell damage and systemic immune activation in individuals reporting sensitivity to wheat in the absence of coeliac disease.

    PubMed

    Uhde, Melanie; Ajamian, Mary; Caio, Giacomo; De Giorgio, Roberto; Indart, Alyssa; Green, Peter H; Verna, Elizabeth C; Volta, Umberto; Alaedini, Armin

    2016-12-01

    Wheat gluten and related proteins can trigger an autoimmune enteropathy, known as coeliac disease, in people with genetic susceptibility. However, some individuals experience a range of symptoms in response to wheat ingestion, without the characteristic serological or histological evidence of coeliac disease. The aetiology and mechanism of these symptoms are unknown, and no biomarkers have been identified. We aimed to determine if sensitivity to wheat in the absence of coeliac disease is associated with systemic immune activation that may be linked to an enteropathy. Study participants included individuals who reported symptoms in response to wheat intake and in whom coeliac disease and wheat allergy were ruled out, patients with coeliac disease and healthy controls. Sera were analysed for markers of intestinal cell damage and systemic immune response to microbial components. Individuals with wheat sensitivity had significantly increased serum levels of soluble CD14 and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-binding protein, as well as antibody reactivity to bacterial LPS and flagellin. Circulating levels of fatty acid-binding protein 2 (FABP2), a marker of intestinal epithelial cell damage, were significantly elevated in the affected individuals and correlated with the immune responses to microbial products. There was a significant change towards normalisation of the levels of FABP2 and immune activation markers in a subgroup of individuals with wheat sensitivity who observed a diet excluding wheat and related cereals. These findings reveal a state of systemic immune activation in conjunction with a compromised intestinal epithelium affecting a subset of individuals who experience sensitivity to wheat in the absence of coeliac disease. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  20. Intestinal cell damage and systemic immune activation in individuals reporting sensitivity to wheat in the absence of coeliac disease

    PubMed Central

    Uhde, Melanie; Ajamian, Mary; Caio, Giacomo; De Giorgio, Roberto; Indart, Alyssa; Green, Peter H; Verna, Elizabeth C; Volta, Umberto; Alaedini, Armin

    2016-01-01

    Objective Wheat gluten and related proteins can trigger an autoimmune enteropathy, known as coeliac disease, in people with genetic susceptibility. However, some individuals experience a range of symptoms in response to wheat ingestion, without the characteristic serological or histological evidence of coeliac disease. The aetiology and mechanism of these symptoms are unknown, and no biomarkers have been identified. We aimed to determine if sensitivity to wheat in the absence of coeliac disease is associated with systemic immune activation that may be linked to an enteropathy. Design Study participants included individuals who reported symptoms in response to wheat intake and in whom coeliac disease and wheat allergy were ruled out, patients with coeliac disease and healthy controls. Sera were analysed for markers of intestinal cell damage and systemic immune response to microbial components. Results Individuals with wheat sensitivity had significantly increased serum levels of soluble CD14 and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-binding protein, as well as antibody reactivity to bacterial LPS and flagellin. Circulating levels of fatty acid-binding protein 2 (FABP2), a marker of intestinal epithelial cell damage, were significantly elevated in the affected individuals and correlated with the immune responses to microbial products. There was a significant change towards normalisation of the levels of FABP2 and immune activation markers in a subgroup of individuals with wheat sensitivity who observed a diet excluding wheat and related cereals. Conclusions These findings reveal a state of systemic immune activation in conjunction with a compromised intestinal epithelium affecting a subset of individuals who experience sensitivity to wheat in the absence of coeliac disease. PMID:27459152

  1. Crosstalk between intestinal epithelial cell and adaptive immune cell in intestinal mucosal immunity.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jun Tao; Xu, An Tao; Shen, Jun; Ran, Zhi Hua

    2017-05-01

    Constantly challenged by luminal bacteria, intestinal epithelium forms both a physical and biochemical defense against pathogens. Besides, intestinal epithelium senses dynamic and continuous changes in luminal environment and transmits signals to subjacent immune cells accordingly. It has been long accepted that adaptive immune cells fulfill their roles partly by modulating function of intestinal epithelial cells. Recent studies have brought up the proposal that intestinal epithelial cells also actively participate in the regulation of adaptive immunity, especially CD4+ adaptive T cells, which indicates that there is reciprocal crosstalk between intestinal epithelial cells and adaptive immune cells, and the crosstalk may play important role in intestinal mucosal immunity. This Review makes a comprehensive summary about crosstalk between intestinal epithelial cells and CD4+ adaptive T cells in intestinal immunity. Special attention would be given to their implications in inflammatory bowel disease pathogenesis and potential therapeutic targets. © 2017 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  2. Temporal anomaly detection: an artificial immune approach based on T cell activation, clonal size regulation and homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Antunes, Mário J; Correia, Manuel E

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents an artificial immune system (AIS) based on Grossman's tunable activation threshold (TAT) for temporal anomaly detection. We describe the generic AIS framework and the TAT model adopted for simulating T Cells behaviour, emphasizing two novel important features: the temporal dynamic adjustment of T Cells clonal size and its associated homeostasis mechanism. We also present some promising results obtained with artificially generated data sets, aiming to test the appropriateness of using TAT in dynamic changing environments, to distinguish new unseen patterns as part of what should be detected as normal or as anomalous. We conclude by discussing results obtained thus far with artificially generated data sets.

  3. Dendritic cell-targeted lentiviral vector immunization uses pseudotransduction and DNA-mediated STING and cGAS activation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jocelyn T; Liu, Yarong; Kulkarni, Rajan P; Lee, Kevin K; Dai, Bingbing; Lovely, Geoffrey; Ouyang, Yong; Wang, Pin; Yang, Lili; Baltimore, David

    2017-07-21

    Dendritic cell (DC) activation and antigen presentation are critical for efficient priming of T cell responses. Here, we study how lentiviral vectors (LVs) deliver antigen and activate DCs to generate T cell immunization in vivo. We report that antigenic proteins delivered in vector particles via pseudotransduction were sufficient to stimulate an antigen-specific immune response. The delivery of the viral genome encoding the antigen increased the magnitude of this response in vivo but was irrelevant in vitro. Activation of DCs by LVs was independent of MyD88, TRIF, and MAVS, ruling out an involvement of Toll-like receptor or RIG-I-like receptor signaling. Cellular DNA packaged in LV preparations induced DC activation by the host STING (stimulator of interferon genes) and cGAS (cyclic guanosine monophosphate-adenosine monophosphate synthase) pathway. Envelope-mediated viral fusion also activated DCs in a phosphoinositide 3-kinase-dependent but STING-independent process. Pseudotransduction, transduction, viral fusion, and delivery of cellular DNA collaborate to make the DC-targeted LV preparation an effective immunogen. Copyright © 2017 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.

  4. Neuropeptide NGF mediates neuro-immune response and inflammation through mast cell activation.

    PubMed

    Kritas, S K; Saggini, A; Cerulli, G; Caraffa, A; Antinolfi, P; Pantalone, A; Frydas, S; Rosati, M; Tei, M; Speziali, A; Saggini, R; Pandolfi, F; Conti, P

    2014-01-01

    Human mast cells (first described in 1879 by Paul Ehrlich) develop from committed precursors in the bone marrow expressing the differentiation marker CD34+ and distinct from the three other myeloid cells. Mast cells are present in various tissues especially near blood vessels, epithelia and nerves and they are activated by cross-linking of FcεRI, but also by a number of neuropeptides. NGF mediates a number of inflammatory and autoimmune states in conjunction with an increased accumulation of mast cells which appear to be involved in neuroimmune interactions and tissue inflammation. Here we report some relationships between mast cells and nerve growth factor (NGF).

  5. Involvement of Activating NK Cell Receptors and Their Modulation in Pathogen Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Marras, Francesco; Bozzano, Federica; De Maria, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    Natural Killer (NK) cells are endowed with cell-structure-sensing receptors providing inhibitory protection from self-destruction (inhibitory NK receptors, iNKRs, including killer inhibitory receptors and other molecules) and rapid triggering potential leading to functional cell activation by Toll-like receptors (TLRs), cytokine receptors, and activating NK cell receptors including natural cytotoxicity receptors (NCRs, i.e., NKp46, NKp46, and NKp44). NCR and NKG2D recognize ligands on infected cells which may be endogenous or may directly bind to some structures derived from invading pathogens. In this paper, we address the known direct or indirect interactions between activating receptors and pathogens and their expression during chronic HIV and HCV infections. PMID:21860586

  6. Blockade of MCP-1/CCR4 signaling-induced recruitment of activated regulatory cells evokes an antitumor immune response in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Wei; Li, Wei-Jin; Wei, Fan-Qin; Wong, Thian-Sze; Lei, Wen-Bin; Zhu, Xiao-Lin; Li, Jian; Wen, Wei-Ping

    2016-01-01

    FoxP3+ regulatory T (Treg) cells have diverse functions in the suppression of antitumor immunity. We show that FoxP3hiCD45RA−CD4+ Treg cells [activated Treg (aTreg) cells] are the predominant cell population among tumor-infiltrating FoxP3+ T cells, and that high aTreg cell-infiltrating content is associated with reduced survival in patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). In vitro studies have demonstrated that aTreg cells can suppress tumor-associated antigen (TAA) effector T cell immune responses in HNSCC. Moreover, C-C chemokine receptor 4 (CCR4) was specifically expressed by aTreg cells in the peripheral blood of HNSCC patients. Using a RayBiotech human chemokine antibody array, we showed that monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), an endogenous CCR4-binding ligand, was specifically upregulated in the HNSCC microenvironment compared to the other four CCR4-binding ligands. Blocking MCP-1/CCR4 signaling-induced aTreg cell recruitment using a CCR4 antagonist evoked antitumor immunity in mice, and lead to inhibition of tumor growth and prolonged survival. Therefore, blocking aTreg cell trafficking in tumors using CCR4-binding agents may be an effective immunotherapy for HNSCC. PMID:27177223

  7. Immune Response to Snake Envenoming and Treatment with Antivenom; Complement Activation, Cytokine Production and Mast Cell Degranulation

    PubMed Central

    Stone, Shelley F.; Isbister, Geoffrey K.; Shahmy, Seyed; Mohamed, Fahim; Abeysinghe, Chandana; Karunathilake, Harendra; Ariaratnam, Ariaranee; Jacoby-Alner, Tamara E.; Cotterell, Claire L.; Brown, Simon G. A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Snake bite is one of the most neglected public health issues in poor rural communities worldwide. In addition to the clinical effects of envenoming, treatment with antivenom frequently causes serious adverse reactions, including hypersensitivity reactions (including anaphylaxis) and pyrogenic reactions. We aimed to investigate the immune responses to Sri Lankan snake envenoming (predominantly by Russell's viper) and antivenom treatment. Methodology/Principal Findings Plasma concentrations of Interleukin (IL)-6, IL-10, tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα), soluble TNF receptor I (sTNFRI), anaphylatoxins (C3a, C4a, C5a; markers of complement activation), mast cell tryptase (MCT), and histamine were measured in 120 Sri Lankan snakebite victims, both before and after treatment with antivenom. Immune mediator concentrations were correlated with envenoming features and the severity of antivenom-induced reactions including anaphylaxis. Envenoming was associated with complement activation and increased cytokine concentrations prior to antivenom administration, which correlated with non-specific systemic symptoms of envenoming but not with coagulopathy or neurotoxicity. Typical hypersensitivity reactions to antivenom occurred in 77/120 patients (64%), satisfying criteria for a diagnosis of anaphylaxis in 57/120 (48%). Pyrogenic reactions were observed in 32/120 patients (27%). All patients had further elevations in cytokine concentrations, but not complement activation, after the administration of antivenom, whether a reaction was noted to occur or not. Patients with anaphylaxis had significantly elevated concentrations of MCT and histamine. Conclusions/Significance We have demonstrated that Sri Lankan snake envenoming is characterized by significant complement activation and release of inflammatory mediators. Antivenom treatment further enhances the release of inflammatory mediators in all patients, with anaphylactic reactions characterised by high levels of mast

  8. The profile of immune modulation by cannabidiol (CBD) involves deregulation of nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT).

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Barbara L F; Springs, Alison E B; Kaminski, Norbert E

    2008-09-15

    Cannabidiol (CBD) is a cannabinoid compound derived from Cannabis Sativa that does not possess high affinity for either the CB1 or CB2 cannabinoid receptors. Similar to other cannabinoids, we demonstrated previously that CBD suppressed interleukin-2 (IL-2) production from phorbol ester plus calcium ionophore (PMA/Io)-activated murine splenocytes. Thus, the focus of the present studies was to further characterize the effect of CBD on immune function. CBD also suppressed IL-2 and interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) mRNA expression, proliferation, and cell surface expression of the IL-2 receptor alpha chain, CD25. While all of these observations support the fact that CBD suppresses T cell function, we now demonstrate that CBD suppressed IL-2 and IFN-gamma production in purified splenic T cells. CBD also suppressed activator protein-1 (AP-1) and nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) transcriptional activity, which are critical regulators of IL-2 and IFN-gamma. Furthermore, CBD suppressed the T cell-dependent anti-sheep red blood cell immunoglobulin M antibody forming cell (anti-sRBC IgM AFC) response. Finally, using splenocytes derived from CB1(-/-)/CB2(-/-) mice, it was determined that suppression of IL-2 and IFN-gamma and suppression of the in vitro anti-sRBC IgM AFC response occurred independently of both CB1 and CB2. However, the magnitude of the immune response to sRBC was significantly depressed in CB1(-/-)/CB2(-/-) mice. Taken together, these data suggest that CBD suppresses T cell function and that CB1 and/or CB2 play a critical role in the magnitude of the in vitro anti-sRBC IgM AFC response.

  9. Replication of HIV-1 deleted Nef mutants in chronically immune activated human T cells.

    PubMed

    Shapira-Nahor, Orit; Maayan, Shlomo; Peden, Keith W C; Rabinowitz, Ruth; Schlesinger, Michael; Alian, Akram; Panet, Amos

    2002-11-10

    Lymphocytes (PBMC) obtained from blood of HIV-sera negative Ethiopian immigrants (ETH) were highly susceptible to HIV-1 infection in vitro with no need for stimulation by mitogens. As the HIV nef gene product has been shown to enhance viral replication in stimulated primary lymphocytes, we investigated in this work the role of Nef in viral replication in the ETH cells. Lymphocytes obtained from ETH individuals supported high replication of wild-type HIV-1 and low but significant replication level of the two deleted Nef mutants (encode truncated Nef proteins consisting only of either the first 35 or the first 86 amino acids of Nef). In contrast, no replication was observed in nonactivated cells obtained from non-ETH individuals. After activation of the PBMC from ETH individuals with PHA, replication of both wild-type strains and the two deleted Nef mutant viruses further increased. The CD4(+) T cells of ETH individuals exhibited elevated levels of the surface activation markers CD45RO and HLA-DR, compared with T cells derived from non-ETH group. Likewise, expression of the chemokine receptors CCR5 and CXCR4 on these cells was higher in the ETH group than in the non-ETH group. Replication of HIV-1 wild-type and the isogenic-deleted Nef mutants was significantly correlated with the proportion of ETH cells expressing CD45RO and the chemokine receptors. This study suggests that HIV-1 may respond differently to several activation states characteristic of T cells. One activation state, defined by chronically activated lymphocytes from ETH individuals, is permissive to the wild-type HIV-1 and, to a lesser degree, to the Nef mutants. Further activation of these cells by exogenous stimuli enhances replication of the virus. Our results support the notion that Nef enhances the basal level of T cell activation and consequently, viral replication.

  10. Targeted delivery of tumor antigens to activated dendritic cells via CD11c molecules induces potent antitumor immunity in mice.

    PubMed

    Wei, Huafeng; Wang, Suhui; Zhang, Dapeng; Hou, Sheng; Qian, Weizhu; Li, Bohua; Guo, Huaizu; Kou, Geng; He, Jinqiu; Wang, Hao; Guo, Yajun

    2009-07-15

    CD11c is an antigen receptor predominantly expressed on dendritic cells (DC), to which antigen targeting has been shown to induce robust antigen-specific immune responses. To facilitate targeted delivery of tumor antigens to DCs, we generated fusion proteins consisting of the extracellular domain of human HER or its rat homologue neu, fused to the single-chain fragment variable specific for CD11c (scFv(CD11c)-HER2/neu). Induction of cellular and humoral immune responses and antitumoral activity of the fusion proteins admixed with DC-activating CpG oligonucleotides (scFv(CD11c)-HER2/neu(CpG)) were tested in transplantable HER2/neu-expressing murine tumor models and in transgenic BALB-neuT mice developing spontaneous neu-driven mammary carcinomas. Vaccination of BALB/c mice with scFv(CD11c)-HER2(CpG) protected mice from subsequent challenge with HER2-positive, but not HER2-negative, murine breast tumor cells, accompanied by induction of strong HER2-specific T-cell and antibody responses. In a therapeutic setting, injection of scFv(CD11c)-HER2(CpG) caused rejection of established HER2-positive tumors. Importantly, antitumoral activity of such a fusion protein vaccine could be reproduced in immunotolerant BALB-neuT mice, where scFv(CD11c)-neu(CpG) vaccination significantly protected against a subsequent challenge with neu-expressing murine breast tumor cells and markedly delayed the onset of spontaneous mammary carcinomas. CD11c-targeted protein vaccines for in vivo delivery of tumor antigens to DCs induce potent immune responses and antitumoral activities and provide a rationale for further development of this approach for cancer immunotherapy.

  11. Antioxidant activity of phenolic extracts from different cultivars of Italian onion (Allium cepa) and relative human immune cell proliferative induction.

    PubMed

    Lisanti, Antonella; Formica, Vincenzo; Ianni, Federica; Albertini, Barbara; Marinozzi, Maura; Sardella, Roccaldo; Natalini, Benedetto

    2016-01-01

    The total antioxidant activity (TAC) may vary considerably between onion cultivars. Immunological effects of onion phenolic compounds are still underestimated. The objective of this study is to determine the total phenol content (TPC) and the relative TAC of three Allium cepa L. (Liliaceae) onion cultivars cultivated in Cannara (Italy): Rossa di Toscana, Borettana di Rovato, and Dorata di Parma, and to evaluate the phenol extracts ability to induce human immune cell proliferation. TPC was determined by the Folin-Ciocalteu method, TAC with FRAP, TEAC/ABTS, and DPPH methods. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells from healthy human donors were incubated for 24 h at 37 °C with 1 ng/mL of phenolic extract in PBS, immunostained, and then analyzed by 4-color flow cytometry for the phenotypic characterization of T helper cells (CD4+ cells), cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CD8+ cells), T regulatory cells (CD25high CD4+ cells), and natural killer cells/monocytes (CD16+ cells). Rossa di Toscana displayed the highest TPC (6.61 ± 0.87 mg GA equivalents/g onion bulb DW) and the highest TAC with the experienced methods: FRAP, 9.19 ± 2.54 μmol Trolox equivalents/g onion bulb DW; TEAC/ABTS, 21.31 ± 0.41 μmol Trolox equivalents/g onion bulb DW; DPPH, 22.90 ± 0.01 μmol Trolox equivalents/g onion bulb DW. Incubation with Rossa di Toscana extract determined an increase in the frequency of the antitumor/anti-infection NK CD16+ immune cells (23.0 ± 0.4%). Content of health-promoting phenols and the deriving antioxidant and immunostimulating activity vary considerably among the investigated cultivars. Rossa di Toscana can be considered as a potential functional food.

  12. IL-25 promotes Th2 immunity responses in airway inflammation of asthmatic mice via activation of dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Hongjia, Li; Caiqing, Zhang; Degan, Lu; Fen, Liu; Chao, Wang; Jinxiang, Wu; Liang, Dong

    2014-08-01

    Allergic asthma occurs as a consequence of inappropriate immunologic inflammation to allergens and characterized by Th2 adaptive immune response. Recent studies indicated that interleukin (IL)-25, a member of the IL-17 cytokine family, had been implicated in inducing Th2 cell-dependent inflammation in airway epithelium and IL-25-deficient mice exhibit impaired Th2 immunity responses; however, how these cytokines influence innate immune responses remains poorly understood. In this study, we used ovalbumin (OVA) sensitization and challenge to induce the murine asthmatic model and confirmed by histological analysis of lung tissues and serum levels of total and OVA-specific immunoglobulin (Ig)-E. The expression of IL-25 was detected by quantitative real-time PCR and immunohistochemistry, respectively, and the dendritic cells (DCs) activation was detected by levels of CD80 and CD86 in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) by flow cytometry. The mice sensitized and challenged with OVA showed high expression of IL-25 in both mRNA and protein levels in lungs. We detected the expression of CD80 and CD86 in BALF was also increased. A tight correlation between IL-25 mRNA and other Th2 cells producing cytokines such as IL-4, IL-5, and IL-13 in BALF was identified. Furthermore, when the asthmatic mice were treated with inhaled corticosteroids, the inflammatory cells infiltration and the inflammatory cytokines secretion were significantly decreased. In this study, we show that IL-25 promoted the accumulation of co-stimulatory molecules of CD80 and CD86 on DCs and then induced the differentiation of prime naive CD4(+) T cells to become proinflammatory Th2 cells and promoted Th2 cytokine responses in OVA-induced airway inflammation. The ability of IL-25 to promote the activation and differentiation of DCs population was identified as a link between the IL-17 cytokine family and the innate immune response and suggested a previously unrecognized innate immune pathway that promotes Th2

  13. Protein-DNA complex is the exclusive malaria parasite component that activates dendritic cells and triggers innate immune responses.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xianzhu; Gowda, Nagaraj M; Kumar, Sanjeev; Gowda, D Channe

    2010-04-15

    Dendritic cells (DCs) play a crucial role in the development of protective immunity to malaria. However, it remains unclear how malaria parasites trigger immune responses in DCs. In this study, we purified merozoites, food vacuoles, and parasite membrane fragments released during the Plasmodium falciparum schizont burst to homogeneity and tested for the activation of bone marrow-derived DCs from wild-type and TLR2(-/-), TLR4(-/-), TLR9(-/-), and MyD88(-/-) C57BL/6J mice. The results demonstrate that a protein-DNA complex is the exclusive parasite component that activates DCs by a TLR9-dependent pathway to produce inflammatory cytokines. Complex formation with proteins is essential for the entry of parasite DNA into DCs for TLR9 recognition and, thus, proteins convert inactive DNA into a potent immunostimulatory molecule. Exogenous cationic polymers, polylysine and chitosan, can impart stimulatory activity to parasite DNA, indicating that complex formation involves ionic interactions. Merozoites and DNA-protein complex could also induce inflammatory cytokine responses in human blood DCs. Hemozoin is neither a TLR9 ligand for DCs nor functions as a carrier of DNA into cells. Additionally, although TLR9 is critical for DCs to induce the production of IFN-gamma by NK cells, this receptor is not required for NK cells to secret IFN-gamma, and cell-cell contact among myeloid DCs, plasmacytoid DCs, and NK cells is required for IFN-gamma production. Together, these results contribute substantially toward the understanding of malaria parasite-recognition mechanisms. More importantly, our finding that proteins and carbohydrate polymers are able to confer stimulatory activity to an otherwise inactive parasite DNA have important implications for the development of a vaccine against malaria.

  14. Crohn's Disease Disturbs the Immune Properties of Human Adipose-Derived Stem Cells Related to Inflammasome Activation.

    PubMed

    Serena, Carolina; Keiran, Noelia; Madeira, Ana; Maymó-Masip, Elsa; Ejarque, Miriam; Terrón-Puig, Margarida; Espin, Eloy; Martí, Marc; Borruel, Natalia; Guarner, Francisco; Menacho, Margarida; Zorzano, Antonio; Millan, Monica; Fernández-Veledo, Sonia; Vendrell, Joan

    2017-08-09

    Crohn's disease (CD) is characterized by the expansion of mesenteric fat, also known as "creeping fat." We explored the plasticity and immune properties of adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) in the context of CD as potential key players in the development of creeping fat. Mesenteric CD-derived ASCs presented a more proliferative, inflammatory, invasive, and phagocytic phenotype than equivalent cells from healthy donors, irrespective of the clinical stage. Remarkably, ASCs from the subcutaneous depot of patients with CD also showed an activated immune response that was associated with a reduction in their immunosuppressive properties. The invasive phenotype of mesenteric CD ASCs was governed by an inflammasome-mediated inflammatory state since blocking inflammasome signaling, mainly the secretion of interleukin-1β, reversed this characteristic. Thus, CD alters the biological functions of ASCs as adipocyte precursors, but also their immune properties. Selection of ASCs with the best immunomodulatory properties is advocated for the success of cell-based therapies. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Nitric oxide signaling pathway activation inhibits the immune escape of pancreatic carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    LU, YEBIN; HU, JUANJUAN; SUN, WEIJIA; DUAN, XIAOHUI; CHEN, XIONG

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of the nitric oxide signaling pathway on immune escape; thus, a tumorigenesis model was established using nude mice. The mice were inoculated with pancreatic carcinoma cells and divided into two groups, a glyceryl trinitrate (GTN) and a placebo group. When tumor volumes reached 150 mm3, the mice in the GTN group were treated with GTN transdermal patches (dose, 7.3 μg/h) while the mice in the placebo group were administered untreated patches. Following treatment, the tumor volume was recorded every 3–4 days and after 28 days, the tumors were analyzed. The results indicated that GTN treatment may reduce the levels of soluble major histocompatibility complex class I chain-related molecules, and natural killer group 2 member D, as well as inhibiting tumor growth. PMID:25364398

  16. Follicular B cell trafficking within the spleen actively restricts humoral immune responses

    PubMed Central

    Hoek, Kristen L.; Gordy, Laura E.; Collins, Patrick L.; Parekh, Vrajesh V.; Aune, Thomas M.; Joyce, Sebastian; Thomas, James W.; Van Kaer, Luc; Sebzda, Eric

    2010-01-01

    Summary Follicular (FO) and marginal zone (MZ) B cells are maintained in distinct locations within the spleen but the genetic basis for this separation is still enigmatic. We now report that B cell sequestration requires lineage-specific regulation of migratory receptors by the transcription factor, Klf2. Moreover, using gene-targeted mice we show that altered splenic B cell migration confers a significant in vivo gain-of-function phenotype to FO B cells, including the ability to quickly respond to MZ-associated antigens and pathogens in a T cell-dependent manner. This work demonstrates that in wild-type animals, naïve FO B cells are actively removed from the MZ, thus restricting their capacity to respond to blood-borne pathogens. PMID:20691614

  17. Immunoglobulin D enhances immune surveillance by activating antimicrobial, proinflammatory and B cell-stimulating programs in basophils.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kang; Xu, Weifeng; Wilson, Melanie; He, Bing; Miller, Norman W; Bengtén, Eva; Edholm, Eva-Stina; Santini, Paul A; Rath, Poonam; Chiu, April; Cattalini, Marco; Litzman, Jiri; B Bussel, James; Huang, Bihui; Meini, Antonella; Riesbeck, Kristian; Cunningham-Rundles, Charlotte; Plebani, Alessandro; Cerutti, Andrea

    2009-08-01

    Immunoglobulin D (IgD) is an enigmatic antibody isotype that mature B cells express together with IgM through alternative RNA splicing. Here we report active T cell-dependent and T cell-independent IgM-to-IgD class switching in B cells of the human upper respiratory mucosa. This process required activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) and generated local and circulating IgD-producing plasmablasts reactive to respiratory bacteria. Circulating IgD bound to basophils through a calcium-mobilizing receptor that induced antimicrobial, opsonizing, inflammatory and B cell-stimulating factors, including cathelicidin, interleukin 1 (IL-1), IL-4 and B cell-activating factor (BAFF), after IgD crosslinking. By showing dysregulation of IgD class-switched B cells and 'IgD-armed' basophils in autoinflammatory syndromes with periodic fever, our data indicate that IgD orchestrates an ancestral surveillance system at the interface between immunity and inflammation.

  18. CD8+ T cells Are Preferentially Activated during Primary Low Dose Leishmania major Infection but Are Completely Dispensable during Secondary Anti-Leishmania Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Okwor, Ifeoma B.; Jia, Ping; Mou, Zhirong; Onyilagha, Chukwunonso; Uzonna, Jude E.

    2014-01-01

    We previously showed that CD8+ T cells are required for optimal primary immunity to low dose Leishmania major infection. However, it is not known whether immunity induced by low dose infection is durable and whether CD8+ T cells contribute to secondary immunity following recovery from low dose infection. Here, we compared primary and secondary immunity to low and high dose L. major infections and assessed the influence of infectious dose on the quality and magnitude of secondary anti-Leishmania immunity. In addition, we investigated the contribution of CD8+ T cells in secondary anti-Leishmania immunity following recovery from low and high dose infections. We found that the early immune response to low and high dose infections were strikingly different: while low dose infection preferentially induced proliferation and effector cytokine production by CD8+ T cells, high dose infection predominantly induced proliferation and cytokine production by CD4+ T cells. This differential activation of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells by high and low dose infections respectively, was imprinted during in vitro and in vivo recall responses in healed mice. Both low and high dose-infected mice displayed strong infection-induced immunity and were protected against secondary L. major challenge. While depletion of CD4+ cells in mice that healed low and high dose infections abolished resistance to secondary challenge, depletion of CD8+ cells had no effect. Collectively, our results show that although CD8+ T cells are preferentially activated and may contribute to optimal primary anti-Leishmania immunity following low dose infection, they are completely dispensable during secondary immunity. PMID:25412267

  19. Gastrodin stimulates anticancer immune response and represses transplanted H22 hepatic ascitic tumor cell growth: Involvement of NF-κB signaling activation in CD4 + T cells

    SciTech Connect

    Shu, Guangwen; Yang, Tianming; Wang, Chaoyuan; Su, Hanwen; Xiang, Meixian

    2013-06-15

    Gastrodia elata Blume (G. elata) is a famous restorative food in East Asia. It can be used as an auxiliary reagent in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) treatment. Previous studies unveiled that G. elata exhibited immunomodulatory activities. To explore the active ingredients contributing to its immunomodulatory activities, gastrodin, vanillin, and parishin B were purified from G. elata and their anti-HCC effects were assessed in vivo. Among these compounds, only gastrodin was capable of repressing transplanted H22 ascitic hepatic tumor cell growth in vivo with low toxicity. Further investigations were designed to explore the effects of gastrodin on the immune system of tumor-bearing mice and potential molecular mechanisms underlying these effects. Our data showed that gastrodin ameliorated tumor cell transplantation-induced activation of endogenous pro-apoptotic pathway in CD4 + T cells and abnormalities in serum cytokine profiles in host animals. These events enhanced cytotoxic activities of natural killer and CD8 + T cells against H22 hepatic cancer cells. Gastrodin administration specifically upregulated mRNA levels of several nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) responsive genes in CD4 + T cells but not in CD8 + T cells. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assay showed that gastrodin increased the association of NF-κB p65 subunit to the promoter regions of IL-2 and Bcl-2 encoding genes in CD4 + T cells. Our investigations demonstrated that gastrodin is the main active ingredient contributing to the anticancer immunomodulatory properties of G. elata. Promoting NF-κB-mediated gene transcription in CD4 + T cells is implicated in its immunomodulatory activity. - Highlights: • Gastrodin stimulates anticancer immune response. • Gastrodin represses tumor transplantation-induced CD4 + T cell apoptosis. • Gastrodin activates NF-κB activity in CD4 + T cells.

  20. Cetuximab therapy in head and neck cancer: immune modulation with interleukin-12 and other natural killer cell-activating cytokines.

    PubMed

    Luedke, Eric; Jaime-Ramirez, Alena Cristina; Bhave, Neela; Roda, Julie; Choudhary, Moaz Maqbool; Kumar, Bhavna; Teknos, Theodoros N; Carson, William E

    2012-09-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN) is the sixth most common cancer worldwide. Greater than 90% of SCCHN of the oropharynx overexpress the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR or HER1). Cetuximab (Erbitux-TM) is a humanized anti-HER1 monoclonal antibody (mAb) that binds to HER1 overexpressing tumor cells. Cetuximab has a direct effect on HER1-positive cancer cells, but it also can activate immune cells that bear receptors for the Fc (constant portion) of IgG such as natural killer (NK) cells. NK cells have an activating Fc receptor for IgG (FcγRIIIa), which mediates Ab dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) and enhances production of interferon-γ (IFN-γ) in response to Ab-coated targets. Interleukin-12 (IL-12) is a cytokine produced by antigen-presenting cells that stimulates IFN-γ production from NK cells. We hypothesized that IL-12 would enhance the anti-tumor activity of cetuximab by activating the FcR effector mechanisms of NK cells. Expression of HER1 was measured on human papilloma virus (HPV)-positive (UD-SCC2, UM-SCC47) and HPV-negative (Cal27, UM-SCC74B) SCCHN cell lines by immunoblot analysis and flow cytometry. NK cells from normal donors were treated overnight with IL-2 (100 U), IL-12, IL-15, or IL-21 (all 10 ng/mL) and tested for ADCC versus cetuximab-coated cancer cells in a 4 hr (51)Cr assay. Release of cytokines by NK cells in response to cetuximab-coated cells was measured by ELISA. Phosphorylation of the ERK transcription factor in NK cells was measured by flow cytometry. The efficacy of combination therapy with cetuximab plus IL-12 was evaluated in a murine tumor model of head and neck cancer. All cell lines showed >99% expression of HER1 by flow cytometry and immunoblot analysis except UM-SCC74B (73%). Normal NK cells mediated 49.4% lysis of cetuximab-coated SCCHN cell lines as compared to 7.6% lysis of cells treated with control IgG (P = .0002). NK cell lysis of cetuximab-coated SCCHN cells was markedly enhanced by 12 hr

  1. Induced keratinocyte hyper-proliferation in alpha2beta1 integrin transgenic mice results in systemic immune cell activation.

    PubMed

    Teige, Ingrid; Bäcklund, Alexandra; Svensson, Lars; Kvist, Peter Helding; Petersen, Thomas Kongstad; Kemp, Kåre

    2010-01-01

    alpha2beta1 integrins are normally confined to the proliferating basal layers of the epidermis. However, during wound healing and in psoriasis, these integrins are expressed on keratinocytes in suprabasal layers correlating with a less differentiated phenotype. Transgenic mice expressing alpha2beta1 integrins under the involucrine promoter have previously been demonstrated, to various degrees, spontaneously develop a skin disorder resembling psoriasis. Herein, we show that a mild epidermal wounding induces a uniform acanthosis together with an influx of immune cells. The disease initiates as a normal wound healing process and is completely restored in wildtype mice by day 14. However, in the integrin transgenic mice a chronic inflammation develops, a process that can be compared to the Koebner phenomenon in psoriatic patients. In this study, we have followed the integrin transgenic mice for five weeks, where substantial keratinocyte hyper-proliferation, inflammatory infiltration and high cytokine levels within the skin can still be observed. In addition, draining lymph nodes were dramatically increased in size and contained highly activated T cells, as well as APCs secreting large amounts of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Furthermore, the systemic immune response was affected with increased spleen size, elevated cytokine levels in the serum and altered lymphocyte trafficking patterns, very much resembling what is seen in psoriasis patients. Finally, CD4(+) T cell depletion was not able to affect the onset or progression of skin inflammation. This suggests that altered keratinocyte differentiation and proliferation can drive a skin inflammation and cause chronic immune cell activation both at a local and systemic level.

  2. Cytotoxic activity of immune cells following administration of xenogeneic cancer vaccine in mice with melanoma B-16.

    PubMed

    Fedosova, N I; Voeykova, I M; Karaman, О М; Symchych, T V; Didenko, G V; Lisovenko, G S; Evstratieva, L М; Potebnia, G P

    2015-06-01

    To study the effects of xenogeneic cancer vaccine (XCV) developed on the basis of nervous tissue antigen from rat embryo of late gestation period and protein-containing metabolite of Bacillus subtilis with molecular weight of 70 kDa, on specific and unspecific antitumor reactions of cellular and humoral chains of immune system, and to analyze possible mechanisms of its antimetastatic action. XCV was administered triply with 3-day intervals after surgical removal of experimental melanoma В-16 in C57Bl/6 mice. Cytotoxic activity (CTA) of splenocytes against target cells К-562 as well as CTA of splenocytes, peritoneal macrophages (PM) and blood serum against melanoma В-16 target cells were determined using МТТ test. The content of circulating immune complexes (CIC) in blood serum was evaluated by precipitation reaction. Immunologic effects of XCV vaccination in experimental animals with surgically removed melanoma B-16 in comparison with similarly treated unvaccinated mice were as follows: prevention of medium molecular weight CIC accumulation in blood serum during all observation period, significant increase (р < 0.05) of CTA of effectors of unspecific antitumor immunity (natural killer cells - NK - by 25.5 ± 1.7 vs 12.5 ± 5.4%, and PM - by 37.3 ± 0.6 vs 32.0 ± 0.9%, respectively) at 37(th) day after the surgery, and also preservation of functional activity of specific cytotoxic lymphocytes at the level of intact control. The results of the study allow propose that antimetastatic effect of XCV vaccination could be based on increased CTA of NK and PM, and preservation of CTL functional activity at late terms after surgical removal of B-16 primary tumors.

  3. Immune privilege of stem cells.

    PubMed

    Ichiryu, Naoki; Fairchild, Paul J

    2013-01-01

    Immune privilege provides protection to vital tissues or cells of the body when foreign antigens are introduced into these sites. The modern concept of relative immune privilege applies to a variety of tissues and anatomical structures, including the hair follicles and mucosal surfaces. Even sites of chronic inflammation and developing tumors may acquire immune privilege by recruiting immunoregulatory effector cells. Adult stem cells are no exception. For their importance and vitality, many adult stem cell populations are believed to be immune privileged. A preimplantation-stage embryo that derives from a totipotent stem cell (i.e., a fertilized oocyte) must be protected from maternal allo-rejection for successful implantation and development to occur. Embryonic stem cells, laboratory-derived cell lines of preimplantation blastocyst-origin, may, therefore, retain some of the immunological properties of the developing embryo. However, embryonic stem cells and their differentiated tissue derivatives transplanted into a recipient do not necessarily have an ability to subvert immune responses to the extent required to exploit their pluripotency for regenerative medicine. In this review, an extended definition of immune privilege is developed and the capacity of adult and embryonic stem cells to display both relative and acquired immune privilege is discussed. Furthermore, we explore how these intrinsic properties of stem cells may one day be harnessed for therapeutic gain.

  4. Experimentally-induced immune activation in natural hosts of SIV induces significant increases in viral replication and CD4+ T cell depletion

    SciTech Connect

    Ribeiro, Ruy M

    2008-01-01

    Chronically SIVagm-infected African green monkeys (AGMs) have a remarkably stable non-pathogenic disease course, with levels of immune activation in chronic SIVagm infection similar to those observed in uninfected monkeys and stable viral loads (VLs) for long periods of time. In vivo administration of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or an IL-2/diphtheria toxin fusion protein (Ontak) to chronically SIVagm-infected AGMs triggered increases in immune activation and subsequently of viral replication and depletion of intestinal CD4{sup +} T cells. Our study indicates that circulating microbial products can increase viral replication by inducing immune activation and increasing the number of viral target cells, thus demonstrating that immune activation and T cell prolifeation are key factors in AIDS pathogenesis.

  5. Selective CB2 receptor activation ameliorates EAE by reducing Th17 differentiation and immune cell accumulation in the CNS

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Weimin; Li, Hongbo; Tuma, Ronald F.; Ganea, Doina

    2013-01-01

    CB2, the cannabinoid receptor expressed primarily on hematopoietic cells and activated microglia, mediates the immunoregulatory functions of cannabinoids. The involvement of CB2 in EAE has been demonstrated by using both endogenous and exogenous ligands. We showed previously that CB2 selective agonists inhibit leukocyte rolling and adhesion to CNS microvasculature and ameliorate clinical symptom in both chronic and remitting-relapsing EAE models. Here we showed that Gp1a, a highly selective CB2 agonist, with a four log higher affinity for CB2 than CB1, reduced clinical scores and facilitated recovery in EAE in conjunction with long term reduction in demyelination and axonal loss. We also established that Gp1a affected EAE through at least two different mechanisms, i.e. an early effect on Th1/Th17 differentiation in peripheral immune organs, and a later effect on the accumulation of pathogenic immune cells in the CNS, associated with reductions in the expression of CNS and T cell chemokine receptors, chemokines and adhesion molecules. This is the first report on the in vivo CB2-mediated Gp1a inhibition of Th17/Th1 differentiation. We also confirmed the Gp1a-induced inhibition of Th17/Th1 differentiation in vitro, both in non-polarizing and polarizing conditions. The CB2-induced inhibition of Th17 differentiation is highly relevant in view of recent studies emphasizing the importance of pathogenic self-reactive Th17 cells in EAE/MS. In addition, the combined effect on Th17 differentiation and immune cell accumulation into the CNS, emphasize the relevance of CB2 selective ligands as potential therapeutic agents in neuroinflammation. PMID:24342422

  6. Fetal Immune Activation to Malaria Antigens Enhances Susceptibility to In Vitro HIV Infection in Cord Blood Mononuclear Cells

    PubMed Central

    Steiner, Kevin; Myrie, Latoya; Malhotra, Indu; Mungai, Peter; Muchiri, Eric; Dent, Arlene; King, Christopher L.

    2010-01-01

    Mother-to-child-transmission (MTCT) of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) remains a significant cause of new HIV infections in many countries. To examine whether fetal immune activation as a consequence of prenatal exposure to parasitic antigens increases the risk of MTCT, cord blood mononuclear cells (CBMCs) from Kenyan and North American newborns were examined for relative susceptibility to HIV infection in vitro. Kenyan CBMCs were 3-fold more likely to be infected with HIV than were North American CBMCs (P = .03). Kenyan CBMCs with recall responses to malaria antigens demonstrated enhanced susceptibility to HIV when compared with Kenyan CBMCs lacking recall responses to malaria (P = .03). CD4+ T cells from malaria-sensitized newborns expressed higher levels of CD25 and human leukocyte antigen DR ex vivo, which is consistent with increased immune activation. CD4+ T cells were the primary reservoir of infection at day 4 after virus exposure. Thus, prenatal exposure and in utero priming to malaria may increase the risk of MTCT. PMID:20687848

  7. Dual B- and T-cell de-immunization of recombinant immunotoxin targeting mesothelin with high cytotoxic activity

    PubMed Central

    Mazor, Ronit; Onda, Masanori; Park, Dong; Addissie, Selamawit; Xiang, Laiman; Zhang, Jingli; Hassan, Raffit; Pastan, Ira

    2016-01-01

    Recombinant immunotoxins (RITs) are genetically engineered proteins being developed to treat cancer. They are composed of an Fv that targets a cancer antigen and a portion of a protein toxin. Their clinical success is limited by their immunogenicity. Our goal is to produce a new RIT that targets mesothelin and is non-immunogenic by combining mutations that decrease B- and T-cell epitopes. Starting with an immunotoxin that has B-cell epitopes suppressed, we added mutations step-wise that suppress T-cell epitopes. The final protein (LMB-T14) has greatly reduced antigenicity as assessed by binding to human anti-sera and a greatly decreased ability to activate helper T-cells evaluated in a T-cell activation assay. It is very cytotoxic to mesothelioma cells from patients, and to cancer cell lines. LMB-T14 produces complete remissions of a mesothelin expressing cancer (A431/H9) xenograft. The approach used here can be used to de-immunize other therapeutic foreign proteins. PMID:27167198

  8. In vivo targeting of dendritic cells for activation of cellular immunity using vaccine carriers based on pH-responsive microparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Young Jik; James, Edward; Shastri, Nilabh; Fréchet, Jean M. J.

    2005-12-01

    Activating the immune system to trigger a specific response is a major challenge in vaccine development. In particular, activating sufficient cytotoxic T lymphocyte-mediated cellular immunity, which is crucial for the treatment of many diseases including cancer and AIDS, has proven to be especially challenging. In this study, antigens were encapsulated in acid-degradable polymeric particle carriers to cascade cytotoxic T lymphocyte activation. To target dendritic cells, the most potent antigen-presenting cells, the particle carriers, were further conjugated with monoclonal antibodies. A series of ex vivo and in vivo studies have shown increased receptor-mediated uptake of antibody-conjugated particles by dendritic cells as well as migration of particle-carrying dendritic cells to lymph nodes and stimulation of naïve T cells leading to enhanced cellular immune response as confirmed by specific cell lysis and IFN- secretion. acid-degradable particle | drug delivery | targeted vaccine

  9. Modeling Immune Response to Leishmania Species Indicates Adenosine As an Important Inhibitor of Th-Cell Activation.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Henrique A L; Maioli, Tatiani U; de Freitas, Leandro M; Tieri, Paolo; Castiglione, Filippo

    2017-01-01

    Infection by Leishmania protozoan parasites can cause a variety of disease outcomes in humans and other mammals, from single self-healing cutaneous lesions to a visceral dissemination of the parasite. The correlation between chronic lesions and ecto-nucleotidase enzymes activity on the surface of the parasite is addressed here using damage caused in epithelial cells by nitric oxide. In order to explore the role of purinergic metabolism in lesion formation and the outcome of the infection, we implemented a cellular automata/lattice gas model involving major immune characters (Th1 and Th2 cells, IFN-γ, IL-4, IL-12, adenosine-Ado-, NO) and parasite players for the dynamic analysis of the disease progress. The model were analyzed using partial ranking correlation coefficient (PRCC) to indicate the components that most influence the disease progression. Results show that low Ado inhibition rate over Th-cells is shared by L. major and L. braziliensis, while in L. amazonensis infection the Ado inhibition rate over Th-cells reaches 30%. IL-4 inhibition rate over Th-cell priming to Th1 independent of IL-12 are exclusive of L. major. The lesion size and progression showed agreement with published biological data and the model was able to simulate cutaneous leishmaniasis outcomes. The sensitivity analysis suggested that Ado inhibition rate over Th-cells followed by Leishmania survival probability were the most important characteristics of the process, with PRCC of 0.89 and 0.77 respectively. The simulations also showed a non-linear relationship between Ado inhibition rate over Th-cells and lesion size measured as number of dead epithelial cells. In conclusion, this model can be a useful tool for the quantitative understanding of the immune response in leishmaniasis.

  10. Modeling Immune Response to Leishmania Species Indicates Adenosine As an Important Inhibitor of Th-Cell Activation

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, Henrique A. L.; Maioli, Tatiani U.; de Freitas, Leandro M.; Tieri, Paolo; Castiglione, Filippo

    2017-01-01

    Infection by Leishmania protozoan parasites can cause a variety of disease outcomes in humans and other mammals, from single self-healing cutaneous lesions to a visceral dissemination of the parasite. The correlation between chronic lesions and ecto-nucleotidase enzymes activity on the surface of the parasite is addressed here using damage caused in epithelial cells by nitric oxide. In order to explore the role of purinergic metabolism in lesion formation and the outcome of the infection, we implemented a cellular automata/lattice gas model involving major immune characters (Th1 and Th2 cells, IFN-γ, IL-4, IL-12, adenosine−Ado−, NO) and parasite players for the dynamic analysis of the disease progress. The model were analyzed using partial ranking correlation coefficient (PRCC) to indicate the components that most influence the disease progression. Results show that low Ado inhibition rate over Th-cells is shared by L. major and L. braziliensis, while in L. amazonensis infection the Ado inhibition rate over Th-cells reaches 30%. IL-4 inhibition rate over Th-cell priming to Th1 independent of IL-12 are exclusive of L. major. The lesion size and progression showed agreement with published biological data and the model was able to simulate cutaneous leishmaniasis outcomes. The sensitivity analysis suggested that Ado inhibition rate over Th-cells followed by Leishmania survival probability were the most important characteristics of the process, with PRCC of 0.89 and 0.77 respectively. The simulations also showed a non-linear relationship between Ado inhibition rate over Th-cells and lesion size measured as number of dead epithelial cells. In conclusion, this model can be a useful tool for the quantitative understanding of the immune response in leishmaniasis. PMID:28775959

  11. Immune cell promotion of metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Kitamura, Takanori; Qian, Bin-Zhi; Pollard, Jeffrey W.

    2015-01-01

    Metastatic disease is the major cause of death from cancer, and immunotherapy and chemotherapy have had limited success in reversing its progression. Data from mouse models suggest that the recruitment of immunosuppressive cells to tumours protects metastatic cancer cells from surveillance by killer cells, which nullifies the effects of immunotherapy and thus establishes metastasis. Furthermore, in most cases, tumour-infiltrating immune cells differentiate into cells that promote each step of the metastatic cascade and thus are novel targets for therapy. In this Review, we describe how tumour-infiltrating immune cells contribute to the metastatic cascade and we discuss potential therapeutic strategies to target these cells. PMID:25614318

  12. Squamous cell carcinomas escape immune surveillance via inducing chronic activation and exhaustion of CD8+ T Cells co-expressing PD-1 and LAG-3 inhibitory receptors

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Ameet K.; Kadoishi, Tanya; Wang, Xiaoguang; Driver, Emily; Chen, Zhangguo; Wang, Xiao-Jing; Wang, Jing H.

    2016-01-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is the second commonest type of skin cancer. Moreover, about 90% of head and neck cancers are SCCs. SCCs develop at a significantly higher rate under chronic immunosuppressive conditions, implicating a role of immune surveillance in controlling SCCs. It remains largely unknown how SCCs evade immune recognition. Here, we established a mouse model by injecting tumor cells derived from primary SCCs harboring KrasG12D mutation and Smad4 deletion into wild-type (wt) or CD8−/− recipients. We found comparable tumor growth between wt and CD8−/− recipients, indicating a complete escape of CD8+ T cell-mediated anti-tumor responses by these SCCs. Mechanistically, CD8+ T cells apparently were not defective in infiltrating tumors given their relatively increased percentage among tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs). CD8+ TILs exhibited phenotypes of chronic activation and exhaustion, including overexpression of activation markers, co-expression of programmed cell death 1 (PD-1) and lymphocyte activation gene-3 (LAG-3), as well as TCRβ downregulation. Among CD4+ TILs, T regulatory cells (Tregs) were preferentially expanded. Contradictory to prior findings in melanoma, Treg expansion was independent of CD8+ T cells in our SCC model. Unexpectedly, CD8+ T cells were required for promoting NK cell infiltration within SCCs. Furthermore, we uncovered AKT-dependent lymphocyte-induced PD-L1 upregulation on SCCs, which was contributed greatly by combinatorial effects of CD8+ T and NK cells. Lastly, dual blockade of PD-1 and LAG-3 inhibited the tumor growth of SCCs. Thus, our findings identify novel immune evasion mechanisms of SCCs and suggest that immunosuppressive mechanisms operate in a cancer-type specific and context-dependent manner. PMID:27835902

  13. Squamous cell carcinomas escape immune surveillance via inducing chronic activation and exhaustion of CD8+ T Cells co-expressing PD-1 and LAG-3 inhibitory receptors.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Ameet K; Kadoishi, Tanya; Wang, Xiaoguang; Driver, Emily; Chen, Zhangguo; Wang, Xiao-Jing; Wang, Jing H

    2016-12-06

    Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is the second commonest type of skin cancer. Moreover, about 90% of head and neck cancers are SCCs. SCCs develop at a significantly higher rate under chronic immunosuppressive conditions, implicating a role of immune surveillance in controlling SCCs. It remains largely unknown how SCCs evade immune recognition. Here, we established a mouse model by injecting tumor cells derived from primary SCCs harboring KrasG12D mutation and Smad4 deletion into wild-type (wt) or CD8-/- recipients. We found comparable tumor growth between wt and CD8-/- recipients, indicating a complete escape of CD8+ T cell-mediated anti-tumor responses by these SCCs. Mechanistically, CD8+ T cells apparently were not defective in infiltrating tumors given their relatively increased percentage among tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs). CD8+ TILs exhibited phenotypes of chronic activation and exhaustion, including overexpression of activation markers, co-expression of programmed cell death 1 (PD-1) and lymphocyte activation gene-3 (LAG-3), as well as TCRβ downregulation. Among CD4+ TILs, T regulatory cells (Tregs) were preferentially expanded. Contradictory to prior findings in melanoma, Treg expansion was independent of CD8+ T cells in our SCC model. Unexpectedly, CD8+ T cells were required for promoting NK cell infiltration within SCCs. Furthermore, we uncovered AKT-dependent lymphocyte-induced PD-L1 upregulation on SCCs, which was contributed greatly by combinatorial effects of CD8+ T and NK cells. Lastly, dual blockade of PD-1 and LAG-3 inhibited the tumor growth of SCCs. Thus, our findings identify novel immune evasion mechanisms of SCCs and suggest that immunosuppressive mechanisms operate in a cancer-type specific and context-dependent manner.

  14. Role of Hcp, a type 6 secretion system effector, of Aeromonas hydrophila in modulating activation of host immune cells.

    PubMed

    Suarez, Giovanni; Sierra, Johanna C; Kirtley, Michelle L; Chopra, Ashok K

    2010-12-01

    Recently, we reported that the type 6 secretion system (T6SS) of Aeromonas hydrophila SSU plays an important role in bacterial virulence in a mouse model, and immunization of animals with the T6SS effector haemolysin co-regulated protein (Hcp) protected them against lethal infections with wild-type bacteria. Additionally, we showed that the mutant bacteria deleted for the vasH gene within the T6SS gene cluster did not express the hcp gene, while the vasK mutant could express and translocate Hcp, but was unable to secrete it into the extracellular milieu. Both of these A. hydrophila SSU mutants were readily phagocytosed by murine macrophages, pointing to the possible role of the secreted form of Hcp in the evasion of the host innate immunity. By using the ΔvasH mutant of A. hydrophila, our in vitro data showed that the addition of exogenous recombinant Hcp (rHcp) reduced bacterial uptake by macrophages. These results were substantiated by increased bacterial virulence when rHcp was added along with the ΔvasH mutant in a septicaemic mouse model of infection. Analysis of the cytokine profiling in the intraperitoneal lavage as well as activation of host cells after 4 h of infection with the ΔvasH mutant supplemented with rHcp indicated that this T6SS effector inhibited production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and induced immunosuppressive cytokines, such as interleukin-10 and transforming growth factor-β, which could circumvent macrophage activation and maturation. This mechanism of innate immune evasion by Hcp possibly inhibited the recruitment of cellular immune components, which allowed bacterial multiplication and dissemination in animals, thereby leading to their mortality.

  15. Role of Hcp, a type 6 secretion system effector, of Aeromonas hydrophila in modulating activation of host immune cells

    PubMed Central

    Suarez, Giovanni; Sierra, Johanna C.; Kirtley, Michelle L.; Chopra, Ashok K.

    2010-01-01

    Recently, we reported that the type 6 secretion system (T6SS) of Aeromonas hydrophila SSU plays an important role in bacterial virulence in a mouse model, and immunization of animals with the T6SS effector haemolysin co-regulated protein (Hcp) protected them against lethal infections with wild-type bacteria. Additionally, we showed that the mutant bacteria deleted for the vasH gene within the T6SS gene cluster did not express the hcp gene, while the vasK mutant could express and translocate Hcp, but was unable to secrete it into the extracellular milieu. Both of these A. hydrophila SSU mutants were readily phagocytosed by murine macrophages, pointing to the possible role of the secreted form of Hcp in the evasion of the host innate immunity. By using the ΔvasH mutant of A. hydrophila, our in vitro data showed that the addition of exogenous recombinant Hcp (rHcp) reduced bacterial uptake by macrophages. These results were substantiated by increased bacterial virulence when rHcp was added along with the ΔvasH mutant in a septicaemic mouse model of infection. Analysis of the cytokine profiling in the intraperitoneal lavage as well as activation of host cells after 4 h of infection with the ΔvasH mutant supplemented with rHcp indicated that this T6SS effector inhibited production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and induced immunosuppressive cytokines, such as interleukin-10 and transforming growth factor-β, which could circumvent macrophage activation and maturation. This mechanism of innate immune evasion by Hcp possibly inhibited the recruitment of cellular immune components, which allowed bacterial multiplication and dissemination in animals, thereby leading to their mortality. PMID:20798163

  16. Cimetidine synergizes with Praziquantel to enhance the immune response of HBV DNA vaccine via activating cytotoxic CD8(+) T cell.

    PubMed

    Xie, Xiaoping; Geng, Shuang; Liu, Hu; Li, Chaofan; Yang, Yuqin; Wang, Bin

    2014-01-01

    Previously, we have reported that either CIM or PZQ, 2 clinical drugs, could be used to develop as adjuvants on HBV DNA vaccine to elicit both humoral and cellular immune responses. Here, we demonstrate that combinations of CIM and PZQ as adjuvants for a HBV DNA vaccine, could induce much stronger antigen specific CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell responses compared either with CIM or PZQ alone. The synergistic effects of CIM plus PZQ to HBV DNA vaccine were observed on a higher IgG2a/IgG1 ratio, an increase of HBsAg-specific CD4(+) T cells capable of producing IFN-γ or IL-17A and a robust IFN-γ-, IL-17A-, or TNF-α-producing CD8(+) T cells to HBsAg. Most importantly, the antigen-specific CTL response was also elevated significantly, which is critical for the eradication of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infected cells. Using an HBsAg transgenic mouse model, the expression of HBsAg in the hepatic cells was also significantly reduced after immunized with pCD-S 2 in the presence of 0.5% CIM and 0.25% PZQ. Further investigations demonstrated that the synergistic effects of combination of CIM and PZQ were dependent on enhanced cytotoxic CD8(+) T cells, which was correlated with impaired activities of regulatory T cells. Therefore, combinations of CIM and PZQ have great potential to be used as effective adjuvants on DNA-based vaccinations for the treatment of chronic hepatitis B.

  17. Expression and regulation of immune-modulatory enzyme indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) by human airway epithelial cells and its effect on T cell activation

    PubMed Central

    Sewell, Herb F.; Knox, Alan; Ghaemmaghami, Amir M.

    2016-01-01

    Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) catalyzes the degradation of tryptophan, which plays a critical role in immune suppression through regulating the production of a series of metabolites that are generally referred to as kynurenines. It has become increasingly clear that epithelial cells (ECs) play an active role in maintaining lung homeostasis by modulating the function of immune cells via producing cytokines, chemokines, and anti-microbial mediators. In this study we assessed the regulation of IDO activity and expression in human primary ECs and EC lines under steady state conditions and in response to bacterial and allergenic stimuli. We also investigated the potential immune modulatory functions of IDO expression in human airway ECs. Our data clearly show that airway ECs produce IDO, which is down-regulated in response to allergens and TLR ligands while up-regulated in response to IFN-γ. Using gene silencing, we further demonstrate that IDO plays a key role in the EC-mediated suppression of antigen-specific and polyclonal proliferation of T cells. Interestingly, our data also show that ECs lose their inhibitory effect on T cell activation in response to different TLR agonists mimicking bacterial or viral infections. In conclusion, our work provides an understanding of how IDO is regulated in ECs as well as demonstrates that “resting” ECs can suppress T cell activation in an IDO dependent manner. These data provide new insight into how ECs, through the production of IDO, can influence downstream innate and adaptive responses as part of their function in maintaining immune homeostasis in the airways. PMID:27613847

  18. Defective disposal of immune complexes and polyclonal B cell activation persist long after exposure to bacterial lipopolysaccharide in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Granholm, N.A.; Cavallo, T. )

    1989-11-01

    Patients with systemic lupus erythematosus experience clinical exacerbation during superimposed bacterial infection. Previous studies in mice indicated that heightened immune phenomena during exposure to bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) appear to be related, in part, to polyclonal B cell activation, to abnormal disposal of immune complexes (IC), and to increased localization of IC in tissues. To investigate whether such effects were reversible, we administered bacterial LPS to C57BL/6 mice for 5 weeks. Control mice received vehicle alone. We then discontinued LPS, and 6 weeks later LPS and control mice were challenged with a subsaturating dose of radiolabeled IC; the removal of IC from the circulation, their localization in the liver, spleen, and kidney were determined. In comparison to values in control mice, in mice previously exposed to LPS, serologic features of polyclonal B cell activation persisted; liver uptake of pathogenic IC (greater than Ag2Ab2) was normal, but removal of small size IC (less than or equal to Ag2Ab2) from the circulation was delayed; localization of IC in the kidneys was enhanced, and pathologic proteinuria developed. The effects of repeated exposure to bacterial LPS are partially reversible, but they last long after LPS is discontinued and may contribute to altered disposal of IC, enhanced organ localization of IC, and organ dysfunction.

  19. Bisphosphonate-induced differential modulation of immune cell function in gingiva and bone marrow in vivo: role in osteoclast-mediated NK cell activation.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Han-Ching; Kanayama, Keiichi; Kaur, Kawaljit; Park, So-Hyun; Park, Sil; Kozlowska, Anna; Sun, Shuting; McKenna, Charles E; Nishimura, Ichiro; Jewett, Anahid

    2015-08-21

    The aim of this study is to establish osteoclasts as key immune effectors capable of activating the function of Natural Killer (NK) cells, and expanding their numbers, and to determine in vivo and in vitro effect of bisphosphonates (BPs) during NK cell interaction with osteoclasts and on systemic and local immune function. The profiles of 27 cytokines, chemokines and growth factors released from osteoclasts were found to be different from dendritic cells and M1 macrophages but resembling to untreated monocytes and M2 macrophages. Nitrogen-containing BPs Zoledronate (ZOL) and Alendronate (ALN), but not non-nitrogen-containing BPs Etidronate (ETI), triggered increased release of pro-inflammatory mediators from osteoclasts while all three BPs decreased pit formation by osteoclasts. ZOL and ALN mediated significant release of IL-6, TNF-` and IL-1β, whereas they inhibited IL-10 secretion by osteoclasts. Treatment of osteoclasts with ZOL inhibited NK cell mediated cytotoxicity whereas it induced significant secretion of cytokines and chemokines. NK cells lysed osteoclasts much more than their precursor cells monocytes, and this correlated with the decreased expression of MHC class I expression on osteoclasts. Intravenous injection of ZOL in mice induced pro-inflammatory microenvironment in bone marrow and demonstrated significant immune activation. By contrast, tooth extraction wound of gingival tissues exhibited profound immune suppressive microenvironment associated with dysregulated wound healing to the effect of ZOL which could potentially be responsible for the pathogenesis of Osteonecrosis of the Jaw (ONJ). Finally, based on the data obtained in this paper we demonstrate that osteoclasts can be used as targets for the expansion of NK cells with superior function for immunotherapy of cancer.

  20. 2-Methoxyestradiol inhibits experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis through suppression of immune cell activation

    PubMed Central

    Duncan, Gordon S.; Brenner, Dirk; Tusche, Michael W.; Brüstle, Anne; Knobbe, Christiane B.; Elia, Andrew J.; Mock, Thomas; Bray, Mark R.; Krammer, Peter H.; Mak, Tak W.

    2012-01-01

    The endogenous metabolite of estradiol, 2-Methoxyestradiol (2ME2), is an antimitotic and antiangiogenic cancer drug candidate that also exhibits disease-modifying activity in animal models of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We found that 2ME2 dramatically suppresses development of mouse experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), a rodent model of multiple sclerosis (MS). 2ME2 inhibits in vitro lymphocyte activation, cytokine production, and proliferation in a dose-dependent fashion. 2ME2 treatment of lymphocytes specifically reduced the nuclear translocation and transcriptional activity of nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NFAT) c1, whereas NF-κB and activator protein 1 (AP-1) activation were not adversely affected. We therefore propose that 2ME2 attenuates EAE through disruption of the NFAT pathway and subsequent lymphocyte activation. By extension, our findings provide a molecular rationale for the use of 2ME2 as a tolerable oral immunomodulatory agent for the treatment of autoimmune disorders such as MS in humans. PMID:23213242

  1. Role of Wnt3a expressed by dendritic cells in the activation of canonical Wnt signaling and generation of memory T cells during primary immune responses.

    PubMed

    Luo, Lei; Li, Zhengyu; Luo, Guangheng; Zhao, Yingting; Yang, Jing; Chen, Hui

    2016-12-01

    The presence of memory T cells (TMs) hinders transplant survival. Dendritic cells (DCs) induce the generation of TMs during primary immune responses. However, the specific mechanisms are unclear. In this study, we constructed a Wnt3a-expressing adenovirus and used small interfering RNA (siRNA) targeting Wnt3a to investigate the influence of Wnt3a expression in DCs on the generation of TMs during primary immune responses. Our results demonstrated that the Wnt3a expression levels in DCs influenced the generation of TMs after 5days in co-culture with naïve T cells through activation of the Wnt canonical pathway. Interleukin-7 secretion levels in supernatants of DC/TNs co-cultures showed a similar pattern of Wnt3a expression levels in DCs. These findings provide a better understanding of TMs generation mechanisms that might be useful to improve transplant outcomes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Osteoarthritis-associated basic calcium phosphate crystals activate membrane proximal kinases in human innate immune cells.

    PubMed

    Corr, Emma M; Cunningham, Clare C; Helbert, Laura; McCarthy, Geraldine M; Dunne, Aisling

    2017-02-07

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a chronic debilitating joint disorder of particularly high prevalence in the elderly population. Intra-articular basic calcium phosphate (BCP) crystals are present in the majority of OA joints and are associated with severe degeneration. They are known to activate macrophages, synovial fibroblasts, and articular chondrocytes, resulting in increased cell proliferation and the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and matrix metalloproteases (MMPs). This suggests a pathogenic role in OA by causing extracellular matrix degradation and subchondral bone remodelling. There are currently no disease-modifying drugs available for crystal-associated OA; hence, the aim of this study was to explore the inflammatory pathways activated by BCP crystals in order to identify potential therapeutic targets to limit crystal-induced inflammation. Primary human macrophages and dendritic cells were stimulated with BCP crystals, and activation of spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk), phosphoinositide-3 kinase (PI3K), and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) was detected by immunoblotting. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-primed macrophages were pre-treated with inhibitors of Syk, PI3K, and MAPKs prior to BCP stimulation, and cytokine production was quantified by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Aa an alternative, cells were treated with synovial fluid derived from osteoarthritic knees in the presence or absence of BCP crystals, and gene induction was assessed by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). We demonstrate that exposure of primary human macrophages and dendritic cells to BCP crystals leads to activation of the membrane-proximal tyrosine kinases Syk and PI3K. Furthermore, we show that production of the pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-1α and IL-1β and phosphorylation of downstream MEK and ERK MAPKs is suppressed following treatment with inhibitors of Syk or PI3K. Finally, we demonstrate that treatment of macrophages with BCP crystals

  3. Markers of endothelial cell activation and immune activation are increased in patients with severe leptospirosis and associated with disease severity

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Objectives: Previous studies concluded that haemorrhage is one of the most accurate prognostic factors of mortality in leptospirosis. Therefore, endothelial cell activation was investigated in relation to disease severity in severe leptospirosis. Methods: Prospective cohort study of severe leptospi...

  4. B Cell Immunity in Solid Organ Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Karahan, Gonca E.; Claas, Frans H. J.; Heidt, Sebastiaan

    2017-01-01

    The contribution of B cells to alloimmune responses is gradually being understood in more detail. We now know that B cells can perpetuate alloimmune responses in multiple ways: (i) differentiation into antibody-producing plasma cells; (ii) sustaining long-term humoral immune memory; (iii) serving as antigen-presenting cells; (iv) organizing the formation of tertiary lymphoid organs; and (v) secreting pro- as well as anti-inflammatory cytokines. The cross-talk between B cells and T cells in the course of immune responses forms the basis of these diverse functions. In the setting of organ transplantation, focus has gradually shifted from T cells to B cells, with an increased notion that B cells are more than mere precursors of antibody-producing plasma cells. In this review, we discuss the various roles of B cells in the generation of alloimmune responses beyond antibody production, as well as possibilities to specifically interfere with B cell activation. PMID:28119695

  5. T cell immunity using transgenic B lymphocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerloni, Mara; Rizzi, Marta; Castiglioni, Paola; Zanetti, Maurizio

    2004-03-01

    Adaptive immunity exists in all vertebrates and plays a defense role against microbial pathogens and tumors. T cell responses begin when precursor T cells recognize antigen on specialized antigen-presenting cells and differentiate into effector cells. Currently, dendritic cells are considered the only cells capable of stimulating T lymphocytes. Here, we show that mature naïve B lymphocytes can be genetically programmed by using nonviral DNA and turned into powerful antigen-presenting cells with a dual capacity of synthesis and presentation of antigen to T cells in vivo. A single i.v. injection of transgenic lymphocytes activates T cell responses reproducibly and specifically even at very low cell doses (102). We also demonstrate that T cell priming can occur in the absence of dendritic cells and results in immunological memory with protective effector functions. These findings disclose aspects in the regulation of adaptive immunity and indicate possibilities for vaccination against viruses and cancer in humans.

  6. Distinct regions of the Phytophthora essential effector Avh238 determine its function in cell death activation and plant immunity suppression.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bo; Wang, Qunqing; Jing, Maofeng; Guo, Baodian; Wu, Jiawei; Wang, Haonan; Wang, Yang; Lin, Long; Wang, Yan; Ye, Wenwu; Dong, Suomeng; Wang, Yuanchao

    2017-04-01

    Phytophthora pathogens secrete effectors to manipulate host innate immunity, thus facilitating infection. Among the RXLR effectors highly induced during Phytophthora sojae infection, Avh238 not only contributes to pathogen virulence but also triggers plant cell death. However, the detailed molecular basis of Avh238 functions remains largely unknown. We mapped the regions responsible for Avh238 functions in pathogen virulence and plant cell death induction using a strategy that combines investigation of natural variation and large-scale mutagenesis assays. The correlation between cellular localization and Avh238 functions was also evaluated. We found that the 79(th) residue (histidine or leucine) of Avh238 determined its cell death-inducing activity, and that the 53 amino acids in its C-terminal region are responsible for promoting Phytophthora infection. Transient expression of Avh238 in Nicotiana benthamiana revealed that nuclear localization is essential for triggering cell death, while Avh238-mediated suppression of INF1-triggered cell death requires cytoplasmic localization. Our results demonstrate that a representative example of an essential Phytophthora RXLR effector can evolve to escape recognition by the host by mutating one nucleotide site, and can also retain plant immunosuppressive activity to enhance pathogen virulence in planta.

  7. Immunization of allogeneic bone marrow transplant recipients with tumor cell vaccines enhances graft-versus-tumor activity without exacerbating graft-versus-host disease.

    PubMed

    Anderson, L D; Savary, C A; Mullen, C A

    2000-04-01

    Allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT) induces 2 closely associated immune responses: graft-versus-tumor (GVT) activity and graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). We have previously shown that pretransplant immunization of allogeneic BMT donors with a recipient-derived tumor cell vaccine increases both GVT activity and lethal GVHD because of the priming of donor T cells against putative minor histocompatibility antigens (mHAgs) on the tumor vaccine cells. The work reported here tested the hypothesis that tumor cell vaccination after BMT would produce an increase in GVT activity without exacerbating GVHD. C3H.SW donor bone marrow and splenocytes were transplanted into major histocompatibility complex-matched, mHAg-mismatched C57BL/6 recipients. One month after BMT, recipients were immunized against either a C57BL/6 myeloid leukemia (C1498) or fibrosarcoma (205). Immunized recipients had a significant increase in survival and protection against tumor growth in both tumor models, and significant tumor protection was seen even in recipients with preexisting micrometastatic cancer before immunization. Alloreactivity appeared to contribute to the in vitro anti-tumor cytolytic activity, but in vivo immunity was tumor specific, and no exacerbation of GVHD was observed. Although the immunodominant mHAg B6(dom1) was shown to be expressed by all B6 tumors tested and was largely responsible for the alloreactivity resulting from tumor immunization of donors, the in vitro alloreactivity of immune recipients was more restricted and was not mediated by recognition of B6(dom1). In conclusion, post-transplant tumor immunization of allogeneic BMT recipients against either a leukemia or a solid tumor can increase GVT activity and survival without exacerbating GVHD.

  8. Differential expression and biochemical activity of the immune receptor Tim-3 in healthy and malignant human myeloid cells.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves Silva, Isabel; Gibbs, Bernhard F; Bardelli, Marco; Varani, Luca; Sumbayev, Vadim V

    2015-10-20

    The T cell immunoglobulin and mucin domain 3 (Tim-3) is a plasma membrane-associated receptor which is involved in a variety of biological responses in human immune cells. It is highly expressed in most acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) cells and therefore may serve as a possible target for AML therapy. However, its biochemical activities in primary human AML cells remain unclear. We therefore analysed the total expression and surface presence of the Tim-3 receptor in primary human AML blasts and healthy primary human leukocytes isolated from human blood. We found that Tim-3 expression was significantly higher in primary AML cells compared to primary healthy leukocytes. Tim-3 receptor molecules were distributed largely on the surface of primary AML cells, whereas in healthy leukocytes Tim-3 protein was mainly expressed intracellularly. In primary human AML blasts, both Tim-3 agonistic antibody and galectin-9 (a Tim-3 natural ligand) significantly upregulated mTOR pathway activity. This was in line with increased accumulation of hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha (HIF-1α) and secretion of VEGF and TNF-α. Similar results were obtained in primary human healthy leukocytes. Importantly, in both types of primary cells, Tim-3-mediated effects were compared with those induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and stem cell factor (SCF). Tim-3 induced comparatively moderate responses in both AML cells and healthy leukocytes. However, Tim-3, like LPS, mediated the release of both TNF-α and VEGF, while SCF induced mostly VEGF secretion and did not upregulate TNF-α release.

  9. Ablation of interaction between IL-33 and ST2+ regulatory T cells increases immune cell-mediated hepatitis and activated NK cell liver infiltration.

    PubMed

    Noel, Gregory; Arshad, Muhammad Imran; Filliol, Aveline; Genet, Valentine; Rauch, Michel; Lucas-Clerc, Catherine; Lehuen, Agnès; Girard, Jean-Philippe; Piquet-Pellorce, Claire; Samson, Michel

    2016-08-01

    The IL-33/ST2 axis plays a protective role in T-cell-mediated hepatitis, but little is known about the functional impact of endogenous IL-33 on liver immunopathology. We used IL-33-deficient mice to investigate the functional effect of endogenous IL-33 in concanavalin A (Con A)-hepatitis. IL-33(-/-) mice displayed more severe Con A liver injury than wild-type (WT) mice, consistent with a hepatoprotective effect of IL-33. The more severe hepatic injury in IL-33(-/-) mice was associated with significantly higher levels of TNF-α and IL-1β and a larger number of NK cells infiltrating the liver. The expression of Th2 cytokines (IL-4, IL-10) and IL-17 was not significantly varied between WT and IL-33(-/-) mice following Con A-hepatitis. The percentage of CD25(+) NK cells was significantly higher in the livers of IL-33(-/-) mice than in WT mice in association with upregulated expression of CXCR3 in the liver. Regulatory T cells (Treg cells) strongly infiltrated the liver in both WT and IL-33(-/-) mice, but Con A treatment increased their membrane expression of ST2 and CD25 only in WT mice. In vitro, IL-33 had a significant survival effect, increasing the total number of splenocytes, including B cells, CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells, and the frequency of ST2(+) Treg cells. In conclusion, IL-33 acts as a potent immune modulator protecting the liver through activation of ST2(+) Treg cells and control of NK cells. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  10. Nuclear Factor of Activated T Cells and Cytokines Gene Expression of the T Cells in AIDS Patients with Immune Reconstitution Inflammatory Syndrome during Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Heling; Xie, Yirui; Su, Junwei; Huang, Ying; Xu, Lijun; Yin, Michael; Zhou, Qihui

    2017-01-01

    Background. The etiology of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) in AIDS patients after the initiation of HAART remains unknown. Several researches indicated that the development of IRIS is associated with the production and variation of cytokines, whose gene expression are closely related to the Ca2+/CN-nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) pathway. Methods. We studied the expression of NFAT isoforms and their major target cytokines genes in peripheral blood CD3+ T cells of subjects through fluorescence quantitative PCR and explored the expression changes of these genes before and after HAART. Results. After the initiation of HARRT, NFAT1, IL-6, and IL-8 gene expression showed a reversal trend in the CD3+ T cells of the IRIS group and changed from low expression before HARRT to high expression after HARRT. In particular, the relative gene expression of NFAT1 was markedly higher compared with the other three isoforms. The IRIS group also showed higher NFAT4, NFAT2, NFAT1, IL-1β, IL-10, IL-2, IL-18, and TNF-α gene expression than the non-IRIS group. Conclusion. This study suggested that high expression levels of IL-2, IL-6, IL-8, TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-10, IL-12, and IL-18 can predict the risk of IRIS. The increased expression of NFAT1 and NFAT4 may promote the expression of cytokines, such as IL-6, IL-8, and TNF-α, which may promote the occurrence of IRIS. PMID:28316373

  11. Low Double-Negative CD3(+)CD4(-)CD8(-) T Cells Are Associated with Incomplete Restoration of CD4(+) T Cells and Higher Immune Activation in HIV-1 Immunological Non-Responders.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xiaofan; Su, Bin; Xia, Huan; Zhang, Xin; Liu, Zhiying; Ji, Yunxia; Yang, Zixuan; Dai, Lili; Mayr, Luzia M; Moog, Christiane; Wu, Hao; Huang, Xiaojie; Zhang, Tong

    2016-01-01

    Failure of immune reconstitution increases the risk of AIDS or non-AIDS related morbidity and mortality in HIV-1-infected patients. CD3(+)CD4(-)CD8(-) T cells, which are usually described as double-negative (DN) T cells, display CD4-like helper and immunoregulatory functions. Here, we have measured the percentage of DN T cells in the immune reconstituted vs. non-immune reconstituted HIV-1-infected individuals. We observed that immunological non-responders (INRs) had a low number of DN T cells after long-term antiretroviral therapy (ART), and the number of these cells positively correlated with the CD4(+) T cell count. The ART did not result in complete suppression of immune activation recorded by the percentage of CD38(+)HLA-DR(+)CD8(+) T cells in INRs, and a strong inverse correlation was observed between DN T cells and immune activation. A low proportion of TGF-β1(+)DN T cells was found in INRs. Further mechanism study demonstrated that the level of TGF-β1-producing DN T cells and immune activation had a negative correlation after ART. Taken together, our study suggests that DN T cells control the immunological response in HIV-1-infected patients. These findings expand our understanding of the mechanism of immune reconstitution and could develop specific treatments to return the immune system to homeostasis following initiation of HIV-1 therapy.

  12. Low Double-Negative CD3+CD4−CD8− T Cells Are Associated with Incomplete Restoration of CD4+ T Cells and Higher Immune Activation in HIV-1 Immunological Non-Responders

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xiaofan; Su, Bin; Xia, Huan; Zhang, Xin; Liu, Zhiying; Ji, Yunxia; Yang, Zixuan; Dai, Lili; Mayr, Luzia M.; Moog, Christiane; Wu, Hao; Huang, Xiaojie; Zhang, Tong

    2016-01-01

    Failure of immune reconstitution increases the risk of AIDS or non-AIDS related morbidity and mortality in HIV-1-infected patients. CD3+CD4−CD8− T cells, which are usually described as double-negative (DN) T cells, display CD4-like helper and immunoregulatory functions. Here, we have measured the percentage of DN T cells in the immune reconstituted vs. non-immune reconstituted HIV-1-infected individuals. We observed that immunological non-responders (INRs) had a low number of DN T cells after long-term antiretroviral therapy (ART), and the number of these cells positively correlated with the CD4+ T cell count. The ART did not result in complete suppression of immune activation recorded by the percentage of CD38+HLA-DR+CD8+ T cells in INRs, and a strong inverse correlation was observed between DN T cells and immune activation. A low proportion of TGF-β1+DN T cells was found in INRs. Further mechanism study demonstrated that the level of TGF-β1-producing DN T cells and immune activation had a negative correlation after ART. Taken together, our study suggests that DN T cells control the immunological response in HIV-1-infected patients. These findings expand our understanding of the mechanism of immune reconstitution and could develop specific treatments to return the immune system to homeostasis following initiation of HIV-1 therapy. PMID:28018346

  13. Use of flameless atomic absorption spectroscopy in immune cytolysis for nonradioactive determination of killer cell activity.

    PubMed

    Borella, P; Bargellini, A; Salvioli, S; Cossarizza, A

    1996-02-01

    We describe here a novel method to evaluate natural killer (NK) cytolytic activity by use of flameless atomic absorption spectroscopy (GF-AAS). This technique may be adopted for use in laboratories equipped with electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometers. Nonradioactive Cr as Na2CrO4 was used to label target cells (K562), and cell lysis was evaluated by measuring Cr released after 4 h of incubation with the effectors. We selected 520 micrograms/L as the optimal dose for labeling targets, between 12 and 20 h as the optimal incubation time, and 10(4) cells as the optimal target size. Advantages of this method include: (a) exclusion of radioactive tracer, with no risk for workers; (b) limited costs; (c) high sensitivity and reproducibility; (d) possibility to store samples; and (e) better control of Cr used for labeling cells due to well-determined, fixed Cr concentrations in the range of nontoxic and linear cellular uptake. Comparison with data obtained by conventional 51Cr labeling of targets killed by the same effectors was excellent, yielding comparable results and corroborating the method.

  14. Innate immune system cells in atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Chávez-Sánchez, Luis; Espinosa-Luna, Jose E; Chávez-Rueda, Karina; Legorreta-Haquet, María V; Montoya-Díaz, Eduardo; Blanco-Favela, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease of the arterial wall characterized by innate and adaptive immune system involvement. A key component of atherosclerotic plaque inflammation is the persistence of different innate immune cell types including mast cells, neutrophils, natural killer cells, monocytes, macrophages and dendritic cells. Several endogenous signals such as oxidized low-density lipoproteins, and exogenous signals such as lipopolysaccharides, trigger the activation of these cells. In particular, these signals orchestrate the early and late inflammatory responses through the secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines and contribute to plaque evolution through the formation of foam cells, among other events. In this review we discuss how innate immune system cells affect atherosclerosis pathogenesis.

  15. Targeted activation of innate immunity for therapeutic induction of autophagy and apoptosis in melanoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Tormo, Damià; Chęcińska, Agnieszka; Alonso-Curbelo, Direna; Pérez-Guijarro, Eva; Cañón, Estela; Riveiro-Falkenbach, Erica; Calvo, Tonantzin G.; Larribere, Lionel; Megías, Diego; Mulero, Francisca; Piris, Miguel A.; Dash, Rupesh; Barral, Paola M.; Rodríguez-Peralto, José L; Ortiz-Romero, Pablo; Tüting, Thomas; Fisher, Paul B.; Soengas, María S.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Inappropriate drug delivery, secondary toxicities and persistent chemo- and immuno-resistance have traditionally compromised treatment response in melanoma. Using cellular systems and genetically engineered mouse models, we show that melanoma cells retain an innate ability to recognize cytosolic dsRNA and mount persistent stress response programs able to block tumor growth, even in highly immunosuppressed backgrounds. The dsRNA mimic polyinosine-polycytidylic acid (pIC), coadministered with polyethyleneimine (PEI) as a carrier, was identified as an unanticipated inducer of autophagy downstream of an exacerbated endosomal maturation program. A concurrent activity of the dsRNA helicase MDA-5 driving the proapoptotic protein NOXA resulted in an efficient autodigestion of melanoma cells. These results reveal tractable links for therapeutic intervention among dsRNA helicases, endo/lysosomes and apoptotic factors. PMID:19647221

  16. Targeted activation of innate immunity for therapeutic induction of autophagy and apoptosis in melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Tormo, Damià; Checińska, Agnieszka; Alonso-Curbelo, Direna; Pérez-Guijarro, Eva; Cañón, Estela; Riveiro-Falkenbach, Erica; Calvo, Tonantzin G; Larribere, Lionel; Megías, Diego; Mulero, Francisca; Piris, Miguel A; Dash, Rupesh; Barral, Paola M; Rodríguez-Peralto, José L; Ortiz-Romero, Pablo; Tüting, Thomas; Fisher, Paul B; Soengas, María S

    2009-08-04

    Inappropriate drug delivery, secondary toxicities, and persistent chemo- and immunoresistance have traditionally compromised treatment response in melanoma. Using cellular systems and genetically engineered mouse models, we show that melanoma cells retain an innate ability to recognize cytosolic double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) and mount persistent stress response programs able to block tumor growth, even in highly immunosuppressed backgrounds. The dsRNA mimic polyinosine-polycytidylic acid, coadministered with polyethyleneimine as carrier, was identified as an unanticipated inducer of autophagy downstream of an exacerbated endosomal maturation program. A concurrent activity of the dsRNA helicase MDA-5 driving the proapoptotic protein NOXA resulted in an efficient autodigestion of melanoma cells. These results reveal tractable links for therapeutic intervention among dsRNA helicases, endo/lysosomes, and apoptotic factors.

  17. Immune cell activation from multivalent interactions with liquid-crystalline polycation-DNA complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Nathan; Jin, Fan; Lande, Roberto; Curk, Tine; Xian, Wujing; Frasca, Loredana; Dobnikar, Jure; Frenkel, Daan; Gilliet, Michel; Wong, Gerard

    2014-03-01

    Microbial DNA can trigger type I interferon (IFN) production in plasmacytoid cells (pDCs) by binding to endosomal toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9). TLR9 in pDCs do not normally respond to self-DNA, but in certain autoimmune diseases self-DNA can complex with the polycationic antimicrobial peptide LL37 into condensed structures which allow DNA to access endosomal compartments and stimulate TLR9 in pDCs. We use x-ray studies and cell measurements of IFN secretion by pDCs to show that a broad range of polycation-DNA complexes stimulate pDCs and elucidate the criterion for high IFN production. Furthermore, we show via experiments and computer simulations that the distinguishing factor for why certain complexes activate pDCs while others do not is the self-assembled structure of the liquid-crystalline polycation-DNA complex.

  18. Comparative analysis of transcriptional profiling of CD3+, CD4+ and CD8+ T cells identifies novel immune response players in T-Cell activation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Min; Windgassen, Dirk; Papoutsakis, Eleftherios T

    2008-01-01

    Background T-cell activation is an essential step of the immune response and relies on the tightly controlled orchestration of hundreds of genes/proteins, yet the cellular and molecular events underlying this complex process are not fully understood, especially at the genome-scale. Significantly, a comparative genome-scale transcriptional analysis of two T-cell subsets (CD4+ and CD8+) against each other and against the naturally mixed population (CD3+ cells) remains unexplored. Results Comparison of the microarray-based gene expression patterns between CD3+ T cells, and the CD4+ and CD8+ subsets revealed largely conserved, but not identical, transcriptional patterns. We employed a Gene-Ontology-driven transcriptional analysis coupled with protein abundance assays in order to identify novel T-cell activation genes and cell-type-specific genes associated with the immune response. We identified potential genes involved in the communication between the two subsets (including IL23A, NR4A2, CD83, PSMB2, -8, MIF, IFI16, TNFAIP1, POU2AF1, and OTUB1) and would-be effector-function-specific genes (XCL2, SLAMF7, TNFSF4, -5, -9, CSF3, CD48 and CD244). Chemokines induced during T-cell activation, but not previously identified in T cells, include CCL20, CXCL9, -10, -11 (in all three populations), and XCL2 (preferentially in CD8+ T cells). Increased expression of other unexpected cytokines (GPI, OSM and MIF) suggests their involvement in T-cell activation with their functions yet to be examined. Differential expression of many receptors, not previously reported in the context of T-cell activation, including CCR5, CCR7, IL1R2, IL1RAP, IL6R, TNFRSF25 and TNFRSF1A, suggests their role in this immune process. Several receptors involved in TCR activation (CD3D, CD3G, TRAT1, ITGAL, ITGB1, ITGB2, CD8A and B (CD8+ T-cell specific) along with LCK, ZAP70 and TYROBP were synchronously downregulated. Members of cell-surface receptors (HLA-Ds and KLRs), none previously identified in the

  19. Comparative analysis of transcriptional profiling of CD3+, CD4+ and CD8+ T cells identifies novel immune response players in T-cell activation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Min; Windgassen, Dirk; Papoutsakis, Eleftherios T

    2008-05-16

    T-cell activation is an essential step of the immune response and relies on the tightly controlled orchestration of hundreds of genes/proteins, yet the cellular and molecular events underlying this complex process are not fully understood, especially at the genome-scale. Significantly, a comparative genome-scale transcriptional analysis of two T-cell subsets (CD4+ and CD8+) against each other and against the naturally mixed population (CD3+ cells) remains unexplored. Comparison of the microarray-based gene expression patterns between CD3+ T cells, and the CD4+ and CD8+ subsets revealed largely conserved, but not identical, transcriptional patterns. We employed a Gene-Ontology-driven transcriptional analysis coupled with protein abundance assays in order to identify novel T-cell activation genes and cell-type-specific genes associated with the immune response. We identified potential genes involved in the communication between the two subsets (including IL23A, NR4A2, CD83, PSMB2, -8, MIF, IFI16, TNFAIP1, POU2AF1, and OTUB1) and would-be effector-function-specific genes (XCL2, SLAMF7, TNFSF4, -5, -9, CSF3, CD48 and CD244). Chemokines induced during T-cell activation, but not previously identified in T cells, include CCL20, CXCL9, -10, -11 (in all three populations), and XCL2 (preferentially in CD8+ T cells). Increased expression of other unexpected cytokines (GPI, OSM and MIF) suggests their involvement in T-cell activation with their functions yet to be examined. Differential expression of many receptors, not previously reported in the context of T-cell activation, including CCR5, CCR7, IL1R2, IL1RAP, IL6R, TNFRSF25 and TNFRSF1A, suggests their role in this immune process. Several receptors involved in TCR activation (CD3D, CD3G, TRAT1, ITGAL, ITGB1, ITGB2, CD8A and B (CD8+ T-cell specific) along with LCK, ZAP70 and TYROBP were synchronously downregulated. Members of cell-surface receptors (HLA-Ds and KLRs), none previously identified in the context of T-cell

  20. The dominant roles of ICAM-1-encoding gene in DNA vaccination against Japanese encephalitis virus are the activation of dendritic cells and enhancement of cellular immunity.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Yong-Zhen; Zhou, Yan; Ma, Li; Feng, Guo-He

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the cellular immune responses elicited by a plasmid DNA vaccine encoding prM-E protein from the Japanese encephalitis (JE) virus (JEV) with or without various forms of intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1 gene to maximize the immune responses evoked by the JE DNA vaccine. We observed that co-immunization with the construct containing murine ICAM-1 gene (pICAM-1) resulted in a significant increase in the percentage of CD4(+)T cells, high level of JEV-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte response, and high production of T helper 1 (Th1)-type cytokines in splenic T cells. Furthermore, the co-expression of ICAM-1 and DNA immunogens was found to be more effective in generating T cell-mediated immune responses than those induced by immunization with pJME in combination with pICAM-1. Our results suggested that ICAM-1 enhanced T cell receptor signaling and activated Th1 immune responses in the JEV model system by increasing the induction of CD4(+)Th1 cell subset and activating dendritic cells. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Sequential actions of immune effector cells induced by viral activation of dendritic cells to eliminate murine neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Kawakubo, Naonori; Tanaka, Sakura; Kinoshita, Yoshiaki; Tajiri, Tatsuro; Yonemitsu, Yoshikazu; Taguchi, Tomoaki

    2017-08-26

    In preclinical trails, we reported the antitumor effect of dendritic cells activated with Sendai virus (rSeV/DC) combined with γ-irradiation against neuroblastoma. However, what kind of effector cells for the combined therapy were used to show the antitumor effect was unclear. In this study, we performed radiation and rSeV/DC therapy in vivo and examined the effector cells involved. Dendritic cells were cultured from bone marrow cells, activated with SeV and administered intratumorally at 10(6) weekly for 3weeks. Radiation was administered at 4Gy/time × 3 times. During the treatment, CD4+ and CD8+ cells and natural killer (NK) cells were removed by antibodies. Complete remission of neuroblastoma was observed in 62.5% of individuals in the combined therapy group. By depleting the effector cells using antibodies, the tumor increased in size from an early stage of treatment in the CD4+ and NK cell-depleted group. In contrast, the tumor increased in size in the late stage of treatment in the CD8+ cell-depleted group. The combination of radiation and rSeV/DC therapy induces different effector cells, depending on the time point during treatment. V. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Nocardia rubra cell-wall skeleton promotes CD4(+) T cell activation and drives Th1 immune response.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guangchuan; Wu, Jie; Miao, Miao; Dou, Heng; Nan, Ning; Shi, Mingsheng; Yu, Guang; Shan, Fengping

    2017-03-15

    Several lines of evidences have shown that Nocardia rubra cell wall skeleton (Nr-CWS) has immunoregulatory and anti-tumor activities. However, there is no information about the effect of Nr-CWS on CD4(+) T cells. The aim of this study was to explore the effect of Nr-CWS on the phenotype and function of CD4(+) T cells. Our results of in vitro experiments showed that Nr-CWS could significantly up-regulate the expression of CD69 and CD25 on CD4(+) T cells, promote the proliferation of CD4(+) T cells, increase the production of IFN-γ, TNF-α and IL-2 in the supernatants, but has no significant effect on the apoptosis and death of CD4(+) T cells. Results of in vivo experiments showed that Nr-CWS could promote the proliferation of CD4(+) T cells, and increase the production of IL-2, IFN-γ and TNF-α (Th1 type cytokines). These data suggest that Nr-CWS can enhance the activation of CD4(+) T cells, promote the proliferation of CD4(+) T cells and the differentiation of CD4(+) T cells to Th1 cells.

  3. The in vivo and in vitro effects of caffeine on rat immune cells activities: B, T and NK cells.

    PubMed

    Kantamala, D; Vongsakul, M; Satayavivad, J

    1990-12-01

    The effect of caffeine (naturally occurring plant methylxanthine) on immunological cell activities in Sprague-Dawley rat both in vivo and in vitro was studied. A cytotoxic assay was done to study natural killer (NK) cells and a proliferation assay was performed for T and B cell activities. Three different doses of caffeine i.e., 2, 6 and 18 mg/kg/day were administered chronically to Sprague-Dawley rats to assess the effects in vivo. Both NK cell cytotoxicity and B cell proliferative response to pokeweed mitogen (PWM) showed significant decreases (P less than 0.05) in rats treated with 6 mg/kg/day, whereas the T cell proliferative response to phytohemagglutinin-P (PHA-P) was significantly increased (P less than 0.05) in the rats treated with 18 mg/kg/day. In vitro, caffeine significantly decreases (P less than 0.05) B and T cell proliferative responses to PWM and PHA-P at added caffeine concentrations of 10, 20 and 40 micrograms/ml. However, no effect was observed on NK cells activity. Furthermore, in vitro, a broader dose range of caffeine (1, 10, 100 and 1,000 micrograms/ml) exhibited dose-dependent inhibition of both B and T cell proliferative responses.

  4. Purification of soluble beta-glucan with immune-enhancing activity from the cell wall of yeast.

    PubMed

    Lee, J N; Lee, D Y; Ji, I H; Kim, G E; Kim, H N; Sohn, J; Kim, S; Kim, C W

    2001-04-01

    Beta-glucan, one of the major cell wall components of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, has been found to enhance immune functions, especially by activating macrophages. However, a major obstacle to the clinical application of beta-(1-->3)-glucan is its low solubility in aqueous media. In this study, soluble beta-glucan, free of mannoprotein, was prepared, and its effects on TNF-alpha secretion and phagocytosis by macrophages were evaluated. Beta-glucan was first rendered soluble from the yeast cell wall by alkaline extraction (glucan-p1). The extract contained 2.8% of protein which was subsequently removed by successive DEAE-cellulose and ConA chromatography. Beta-glucan thus prepared was completely free of mannoprotein and was soluble at neutral pH (glucan-p3). The effects of beta-glucan on phagocytosis and TNF-alpha release activity were investigated. While glucan-p1 moderately induced TNF-alpha secretion at 200 microg/ml (550 pg of TNF-alpha/5 x 10(5) cells), glucan-p3 markedly stimulated macrophages at 200 microg/ml (2,860 pg of TNF-alpha/5 x 10(5) cells). Furthermore, glucan-p3 stimulated phagocytosis about 20% more than glucan-p1 did. In conclusion, we purified water-soluble beta-glucan which was completely devoid of mannoprotein and effectively stimulated the macrophage function, enabling it to be used as an intravenous injection for sepsis.

  5. Periodic-shRNA molecules are capable of gene silencing, cytotoxicity and innate immune activation in cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Shopsowitz, Kevin E.; Wu, Connie; Liu, Gina; Dreaden, Erik C.; Hammond, Paula T.

    2016-01-01

    Large dsRNA molecules can cause potent cytotoxic and immunostimulatory effects through the activation of pattern recognition receptors; however, synthetic versions of these molecules are mostly limited to simple sequences like poly-I:C and poly-A:U. Here we show that large RNA molecules generated by rolling circle transcription fold into periodic-shRNA (p-shRNA) structures and cause potent cytotoxicity and gene silencing when delivered to cancer cells. We determined structural requirements for the dumbbell templates used to synthesize p-shRNA, and showed that these molecules likely adopt a co-transcriptionally folded structure. The cytotoxicity of p-shRNA was robustly observed across four different cancer cell lines using two different delivery systems. Despite having a considerably different folded structure than conventional dsRNA, the cytotoxicity of p-shRNA was either equal to or substantially greater than that of poly-I:C depending on the delivery vehicle. Furthermore, p-shRNA caused greater NF-κB activation in SKOV3 cells compared to poly-I:C, indicating that it is a powerful activator of innate immunity. The tuneable sequence and combined gene silencing, immunostimulatory and cytotoxic capacity of p-shRNA make it an attractive platform for cancer immunotherapy. PMID:26704983

  6. Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Induce Peculiar Alternatively Activated Macrophages Capable of Dampening Both Innate and Adaptive Immune Responses.

    PubMed

    Chiossone, Laura; Conte, Romana; Spaggiari, Grazia Maria; Serra, Martina; Romei, Cristina; Bellora, Francesca; Becchetti, Flavio; Andaloro, Antonio; Moretta, Lorenzo; Bottino, Cristina

    2016-07-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) support hematopoiesis and exert immunoregulatory activities. Here, we analyzed the functional outcome of the interactions between MSCs and monocytes/macrophages. We showed that MSCs supported the survival of monocytes that underwent differentiation into macrophages, in the presence of macrophage colony-stimulating factor. However, MSCs skewed their polarization toward a peculiar M2-like functional phenotype (M(MSC) ), through a prostaglandin E2-dependent mechanism. M(MSC) were characterized by high expression of scavenger receptors, increased phagocytic capacity, and high production of interleukin (IL)-10 and transforming growth factor-β. These cytokines contributed to the immunoregulatory properties of M(MSC) , which differed from those of typical IL-4-induced macrophages (M2). In particular, interacting with activated natural killer (NK) cells, M(MSC) inhibited both the expression of activating molecules such as NKp44, CD69, and CD25 and the production of IFNγ, while M2 affected only IFNγ production. Moreover, M(MSC) inhibited the proliferation of CD8(+) T cells in response to allogeneic stimuli and induced the expansion of regulatory T cells (Tregs). Toll-like receptor engagement reverted the phenotypic and functional features of M(MSC) to those of M1 immunostimulatory/proinflammatory macrophages. Overall our data show that MSCs induce the generation of a novel type of alternatively activated macrophages capable of suppressing both innate and adaptive immune responses. These findings may help to better understand the role of MSCs in healthy tissues and inflammatory diseases including cancer, and provide clues for novel therapeutic approaches. Stem Cells 2016;34:1909-1921.

  7. Glycosylation in immune cell trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Sperandio, Markus; Gleissner, Christian A.; Ley, Klaus

    2009-01-01

    Summary Leukocyte recruitment encompasses cell adhesion and activation steps that enable circulating leukocytes to roll, arrest, and firmly adhere on the endothelial surface before they extravasate into distinct tissue locations. This complex sequence of events relies on adhesive interactions between surface structures on leukocytes and endothelial cells and also on signals generated during the cell-cell contacts. Cell surface glycans play a crucial role in leukocyte recruitment. Several glycosyltransferases such as α1,3 fucosyltransferases, α2,3 sialyltransferases, core 2 N-acetylglucosaminlytransferases, β1,4 galactosyltransferases and polypeptide N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferases have been implicated in the generation of functional selectin ligands that mediate leukocyte rolling via binding to selectins. Recent evidence also suggests a role of α2,3 sialylated carbohydrate determinants in triggering chemokine-mediated leukocyte arrest and influencing β1 integrin function. Additional mechanisms by galectin- and siglec-dependent processes contribute to the growing number of reports emphasizing the significant role of glycans for the successful recruitment of leukocytes into tissues. Advancing the knowledge on glycan function into appropriate pathology models is likely to suggest interesting new therapeutic strategies in the treatment of immune- and inflammation-mediated diseases. PMID:19594631

  8. In vivo multiphoton imaging of immune cell dynamics.

    PubMed

    Okada, Takaharu; Takahashi, Sonoko; Ishida, Azusa; Ishigame, Harumichi

    2016-11-01

    Multiphoton imaging has been utilized to analyze in vivo immune cell dynamics over the last 15 years. Particularly, it has deepened the understanding of how immune responses are organized by immune cell migration and interactions. In this review, we first describe the following technical advances in recent imaging studies that contributed to the new findings on the regulation of immune responses and inflammation. Improved multicolor imaging of immune cell behavior has revealed that their interactions are spatiotemporally coordinated to achieve efficient and long-term immunity. The use of photoactivatable and photoconvertible fluorescent proteins has increased duration and volume of cell tracking, even enabling the analysis of inter-organ migration of immune cells. In addition, visualization of immune cell activation using biosensors for intracellular calcium concentration and signaling molecule activities has started to give further mechanistic insights. Then, we also introduce recent imaging analyses of interactions between immune cells and non-immune cells including endothelial, fibroblastic, epithelial, and nerve cells. It is argued that future imaging studies that apply updated technical advances to analyze interactions between immune cells and non-immune cells will be important for thorough physiological understanding of the immune system.

  9. Adipocytes as immune regulatory cells

    PubMed Central

    Vielma, Silvana A.; Klein, Richard L.; Levingston, Corinne A.; Young, M. Rita I.

    2013-01-01

    Obesity is a chronic inflammatory state and adipocytes are capable of contributing to this inflammation by their production of inflammatory mediators. The present study used fibroblast-derived adipocytes and normal spleen cells as a model to determine if adipocytes can also serve as immune regulatory cells by modulating the functions of conventional immune cells. Media conditioned by the adipocytes stimulated release of the Th1-type cytokines IL-2, IFN-γ and GM-CSF from cultures of normal spleen cells. The adipocytes also stimulated spleen cell release of inhibitory cytokines, although to varying degrees. This included IL-10, IL-13 and, to a lesser extent, IL-4. Spleen cell production of the inflammatory cytokines IL-6, TNF-α and IL-9 was stimulated by adipocytes, although production of the Th17-derived cytokine, IL-17, was not stimulated. The adipocyte-conditioned medium did not stimulate production of predominantly monocytes-derived chemokines CXCL9, CCL2, CCL3, CCL4, but stimulated production of the predominantly T-cell-derived chemokine CCL5. In all cases where cytokine/chemokine production from spleen cells was stimulated by adipocytes, it was to a far greater level than was produced by the adipocytes themselves. Studies initiated to determine the identity of the adipocyte-derived mediators showed that the spleen cell modulation could not be attributed to solely adiponectin or leptin. Studies to determine the source of some of the cytokines whose production was stimulated by adipocytes showed that expression of the inflammatory cytokine IL-6 was not increased in either CD4+ or CD8+ T-cell. When the splenic T-cells were examined for IFN-γ, the adipocyte stimulation of IFN-γ was within CD8+ T-cells, not CD4+ T-cells. These studies show that adipocytes may be able to serve as immune regulatory cells to stimulate conventional immune cells to release a spectrum of immune mediators. PMID:23587489

  10. CsMAP34, a teleost MAP with dual role: A promoter of MASP-assisted complement activation and a regulator of immune cell activity

    PubMed Central

    Li, Mo-fei; Li, Jun; Sun, Li

    2016-01-01

    In teleost fish, the immune functions of mannan-binding lectin (MBL) associated protein (MAP) and MBL associated serine protease (MASP) are scarcely investigated. In the present study, we examined the biological properties both MAP (CsMAP34) and MASP (CsMASP1) molecules from tongue sole (Cynoglossus semilaevis). We found that CsMAP34 and CsMASP1 expressions occurred in nine different tissues and were upregulated by bacterial challenge. CsMAP34 protein was detected in blood, especially during bacterial infection. Recombinant CsMAP34 (rCsMAP34) bound C. semilaevis MBL (rCsBML) when the latter was activated by bacteria, while recombinant CsMASP1 (rCsMASP1) bound activated rCsBML only in the presence of rCsMAP34. rCsMAP34 stimulated the hemolytic and bactericidal activities of serum complement, whereas anti-CsMAP34 antibody blocked complement activities. Knockdown of CsMASP1 in C. semilaevis resulted in significant inhibition of complement activities. Furthermore, rCsMAP34 interacted directly with peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL) and enhanced the respiratory burst, acid phosphatase activity, chemotactic activity, and gene expression of PBL. These results indicate for the first time that a teleost MAP acts one hand as a regulator that promotes the lectin pathway of complement activation via its ability to recruit MBL to MASP, and other hand as a modulator of immune cell activity. PMID:28008939

  11. Cetuximab-activated natural killer and dendritic cells collaborate to trigger tumor antigen-specific T-cell immunity in head and neck cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Raghvendra M; Lee, Steve C; Andrade Filho, Pedro A; Lord, Christopher A; Jie, Hyun-Bae; Davidson, H Carter; López-Albaitero, Andrés; Gibson, Sandra P; Gooding, William E; Ferrone, Soldano; Ferris, Robert L

    2013-04-01

    Tumor antigen-specific monoclonal antibodies (mAb) block oncogenic signaling and induce Fcγ receptor (FcγR)-mediated cytotoxicity. However, the role of CD8(+) CTL and FcγR in initiating innate and adaptive immune responses in mAb-treated human patients with cancer is still emerging. FcγRIIIa codon 158 polymorphism was correlated with survival in 107 cetuximab-treated patients with head and neck cancer (HNC). Flow cytometry was carried out to quantify EGF receptor (EGFR)-specific T cells in cetuximab-treated patients with HNC. The effect of cetuximab on natural killer (NK) cell, dendritic cell (DC), and T-cell activation was measured using IFN-γ release assays and flow cytometry. FcγRIIIa polymorphism did not predict clinical outcome in cetuximab-treated patients with HNC; however, elevated circulating EGFR(853-861)-specific CD8(+) T cells were found in cetuximab-treated patients with HNC (P < 0.005). Cetuximab promoted EGFR-specific cellular immunity through the interaction of EGFR(+) tumor cells and FcγRIIIa on NK cells but not on the polymorphism per se. Cetuximab-activated NK cells induced IFN-γ-dependent expression of DC maturation markers, antigen processing machinery components such as TAP-1/2 and T-helper cell (T(H)1) chemokines through NKG2D/MICA binding. Cetuximab initiated adaptive immune responses via NK cell-induced DC maturation, which enhanced cross-presentation to CTL specific for EGFR as well as another tumor antigen, MAGE-3. Cetuximab-activated NK cells promote DC maturation and CD8(+) T-cell priming, leading to tumor antigen spreading and TH1 cytokine release through "NK-DC cross-talk." FcγRIIIa polymorphism did not predict clinical response to cetuximab but was necessary for NK-DC interaction and mAb-induced cross-presentation. EGFR-specific T cells in cetuximab-treated patients with HNC may contribute to clinical response. ©2013 AACR.

  12. The surfactant protein C mutation A116D alters cellular processing, stress tolerance, surfactant lipid composition, and immune cell activation

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Surfactant protein C (SP-C) is important for the function of pulmonary surfactant. Heterozygous mutations in SFTPC, the gene encoding SP-C, cause sporadic and familial interstitial lung disease (ILD) in children and adults. Mutations mapping to the BRICHOS domain located within the SP-C proprotein result in perinuclear aggregation of the proprotein. In this study, we investigated the effects of the mutation A116D in the BRICHOS domain of SP-C on cellular homeostasis. We also evaluated the ability of drugs currently used in ILD therapy to counteract these effects. Methods SP-CA116D was expressed in MLE-12 alveolar epithelial cells. We assessed in vitro the consequences for cellular homeostasis, immune response and effects of azathioprine, hydroxychloroquine, methylprednisolone and cyclophosphamide. Results Stable expression of SP-CA116D in MLE-12 alveolar epithelial cells resulted in increased intracellular accumulation of proSP-C processing intermediates. SP-CA116D expression further led to reduced cell viability and increased levels of the chaperones Hsp90, Hsp70, calreticulin and calnexin. Lipid analysis revealed decreased intracellular levels of phosphatidylcholine (PC) and increased lyso-PC levels. Treatment with methylprednisolone or hydroxychloroquine partially restored these lipid alterations. Furthermore, SP-CA116D cells secreted soluble factors into the medium that modulated surface expression of CCR2 or CXCR1 receptors on CD4+ lymphocytes and neutrophils, suggesting a direct paracrine effect of SP-CA116D on neighboring cells in the alveolar space. Conclusions We show that the A116D mutation leads to impaired processing of proSP-C in alveolar epithelial cells, alters cell viability and lipid composition, and also activates cells of the immune system. In addition, we show that some of the effects of the mutation on cellular homeostasis can be antagonized by application of pharmaceuticals commonly applied in ILD therapy. Our findings shed new

  13. The surfactant protein C mutation A116D alters cellular processing, stress tolerance, surfactant lipid composition, and immune cell activation.

    PubMed

    Zarbock, Ralf; Woischnik, Markus; Sparr, Christiane; Thurm, Tobias; Kern, Sunčana; Kaltenborn, Eva; Hector, Andreas; Hartl, Dominik; Liebisch, Gerhard; Schmitz, Gerd; Griese, Matthias

    2012-03-29

    Surfactant protein C (SP-C) is important for the function of pulmonary surfactant. Heterozygous mutations in SFTPC, the gene encoding SP-C, cause sporadic and familial interstitial lung disease (ILD) in children and adults. Mutations mapping to the BRICHOS domain located within the SP-C proprotein result in perinuclear aggregation of the proprotein. In this study, we investigated the effects of the mutation A116D in the BRICHOS domain of SP-C on cellular homeostasis. We also evaluated the ability of drugs currently used in ILD therapy to counteract these effects. SP-CA116D was expressed in MLE-12 alveolar epithelial cells. We assessed in vitro the consequences for cellular homeostasis, immune response and effects of azathioprine, hydroxychloroquine, methylprednisolone and cyclophosphamide. Stable expression of SP-CA116D in MLE-12 alveolar epithelial cells resulted in increased intracellular accumulation of proSP-C processing intermediates. SP-CA116D expression further led to reduced cell viability and increased levels of the chaperones Hsp90, Hsp70, calreticulin and calnexin. Lipid analysis revealed decreased intracellular levels of phosphatidylcholine (PC) and increased lyso-PC levels. Treatment with methylprednisolone or hydroxychloroquine partially restored these lipid alterations. Furthermore, SP-CA116D cells secreted soluble factors into the medium that modulated surface expression of CCR2 or CXCR1 receptors on CD4+ lymphocytes and neutrophils, suggesting a direct paracrine effect of SP-CA116D on neighboring cells in the alveolar space. We show that the A116D mutation leads to impaired processing of proSP-C in alveolar epithelial cells, alters cell viability and lipid composition, and also activates cells of the immune system. In addition, we show that some of the effects of the mutation on cellular homeostasis can be antagonized by application of pharmaceuticals commonly applied in ILD therapy. Our findings shed new light on the pathomechanisms underlying SP

  14. Integrative Analysis of Immunological Data to Explore Chronic Immune T-Cell Activation in Successfully Treated HIV Patients

    PubMed Central

    Picat, Marie-Quitterie; Pellegrin, Isabelle; Bitard, Juliette; Wittkop, Linda; Proust-Lima, Cécile; Liquet, Benoît; Moreau, Jean-François; Bonnet, Fabrice; Blanco, Patrick; Thiébaut, Rodolphe

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To unravel the complex relationships between cytomegalovirus-induced-, autoimmune-induced responses, microbial translocation and chronic immune activation (CIA) in successfully treated HIV-infected patients and to explore the mediating role of alpha-interferon in these processes. Design Cross-sectional study nested in the ANRS CO3 Aquitaine Cohort, a prospective hospital-based cohort of HIV-1-infected patients in South-Western France. Methods Patients initiated antiretroviral therapy between 2005 and 2008 and were treated with sustained virological suppression for at least two years. CIA was defined by the percentage of HLA-DR+/CD38+ among CD8+T-cells. Integrative analyses were performed using structural equation modelling (SEM). Results The main analysis was performed in 57 HLA-A*0201 positive patients, due to availability of percentages of actin-, vimentin-, lamin-specific CD8+T-cells (HLA-A2-restricted tests) to further characterize autoimmune response. Cytomegalovirus-induced response was assessed by Quantiferon and pp-65 ELISPOT. SEM revealed a direct effect of cytomegalovirus-induced response on CIA (standardized estimate βstd = 0.56, p-value = 0.0004). The effect of autoimmune-induced response on CIA was indirect through alpha-interferon pathway, assessed by expression levels of 5 alpha-interferon-stimulated genes ADAR, ISG15, IFIT1, Mx1 and OAS1 (effect of autoimmune response on alpha-interferon: βstd = 0.36, p-value = 0.0401; effect of alpha-interferon on CIA: βstd = 0.39, p-value = 0.0044). There was no direct effect of autoimmune-induced response on CIA (p-value = 0.3169). Microbial translocation as measured by 16SrDNA and sCD14 in plasma was not associated with CIA. Results were consistent in 142 patients in whom cytomegalovirus and auto-immunity responses were measured by Quantiferon and anti-nuclear antibodies, respectively. All analyses performed in HLA-A*0201 positive patients and in the overall population revealed a significant effect

  15. Integrative Analysis of Immunological Data to Explore Chronic Immune T-Cell Activation in Successfully Treated HIV Patients.

    PubMed

    Picat, Marie-Quitterie; Pellegrin, Isabelle; Bitard, Juliette; Wittkop, Linda; Proust-Lima, Cécile; Liquet, Benoît; Moreau, Jean-François; Bonnet, Fabrice; Blanco, Patrick; Thiébaut, Rodolphe

    2017-01-01

    To unravel the complex relationships between cytomegalovirus-induced-, autoimmune-induced responses, microbial translocation and chronic immune activation (CIA) in successfully treated HIV-infected patients and to explore the mediating role of alpha-interferon in these processes. Cross-sectional study nested in the ANRS CO3 Aquitaine Cohort, a prospective hospital-based cohort of HIV-1-infected patients in South-Western France. Patients initiated antiretroviral therapy between 2005 and 2008 and were treated with sustained virological suppression for at least two years. CIA was defined by the percentage of HLA-DR+/CD38+ among CD8+T-cells. Integrative analyses were performed using structural equation modelling (SEM). The main analysis was performed in 57 HLA-A*0201 positive patients, due to availability of percentages of actin-, vimentin-, lamin-specific CD8+T-cells (HLA-A2-restricted tests) to further characterize autoimmune response. Cytomegalovirus-induced response was assessed by Quantiferon and pp-65 ELISPOT. SEM revealed a direct effect of cytomegalovirus-induced response on CIA (standardized estimate βstd = 0.56, p-value = 0.0004). The effect of autoimmune-induced response on CIA was indirect through alpha-interferon pathway, assessed by expression levels of 5 alpha-interferon-stimulated genes ADAR, ISG15, IFIT1, Mx1 and OAS1 (effect of autoimmune response on alpha-interferon: βstd = 0.36, p-value = 0.0401; effect of alpha-interferon on CIA: βstd = 0.39, p-value = 0.0044). There was no direct effect of autoimmune-induced response on CIA (p-value = 0.3169). Microbial translocation as measured by 16SrDNA and sCD14 in plasma was not associated with CIA. Results were consistent in 142 patients in whom cytomegalovirus and auto-immunity responses were measured by Quantiferon and anti-nuclear antibodies, respectively. All analyses performed in HLA-A*0201 positive patients and in the overall population revealed a significant effect of IFN-α latent variable on CIA

  16. Polysaccharide-Containing Macromolecules in a Kampo (Traditional Japanese Herbal) Medicine, Hochuekkito: Dual Active Ingredients for Modulation of Immune Functions on Intestinal Peyer's Patches and Epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Kiyohara, Hiroaki; Nonaka, Kazuki; Sekiya, Michiko; Matsumoto, Tsukasa; Nagai, Takayuki; Tabuchi, Yoshiaki; Yamada, Haruki

    2011-01-01

    A traditional Japanese herbal (Kampo) medicine, Hochuekkito (Bu-Zhong-Yi-Qi-Tang in Chinese, TJ-41) is a well-known Kampo formula, and has been found to enhance antigen-specific antibody response in not only local mucosal immune system in upper respiratory tract, but also systemic immune system through upper respiratory mucosal immune system. Although this immunopharmacological effect has been proposed to express by modulation of intestinal immune system including Peyer's patches and intestinal epithelial cells, active ingredients are not known. TJ-41 directly affected the production of bone marrow cell-proliferative growth factors from murine Peyer's patch immunocompetent cells in vitro. Among low molecular, intermediate size and macromolecular weight fractions prepared from TJ-41, only fraction containing macromolecular weight ingredients showed Peyer's patch-mediated bone marrow cell-proliferation enhancing activity. Anion-exchange chromatography and gel filtration gave 17 subfractions comprising polysaccharides and lignins from the macromolecular weight fraction of TJ-41, and some of the subfractions showed significant enhancing activities having different degrees. Some of the subfractions also expressed stimulating activity on G-CSF-production from colonic epithelial cells, and statistically significant positive correlation was observed among enhancing activities of the subfractions against Peyer's patch immunocompetent cells and epithelial cells. Among the fractions from TJ-41 oral administration of macromolecular weight ingredient fraction to mice succeeded to enhance antigen-specific antibody response in systemic immune system through upper respiratory mucosal immune system, but all the separated fractions failed to enhance the in vivo antibody response in upper respiratory tract. PMID:19965961

  17. Polysaccharide-Containing Macromolecules in a Kampo (Traditional Japanese Herbal) Medicine, Hochuekkito: Dual Active Ingredients for Modulation of Immune Functions on Intestinal Peyer's Patches and Epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Kiyohara, Hiroaki; Nonaka, Kazuki; Sekiya, Michiko; Matsumoto, Tsukasa; Nagai, Takayuki; Tabuchi, Yoshiaki; Yamada, Haruki

    2011-01-01

    A traditional Japanese herbal (Kampo) medicine, Hochuekkito (Bu-Zhong-Yi-Qi-Tang in Chinese, TJ-41) is a well-known Kampo formula, and has been found to enhance antigen-specific antibody response in not only local mucosal immune system in upper respiratory tract, but also systemic immune system through upper respiratory mucosal immune system. Although this immunopharmacological effect has been proposed to express by modulation of intestinal immune system including Peyer's patches and intestinal epithelial cells, active ingredients are not known. TJ-41 directly affected the production of bone marrow cell-proliferative growth factors from murine Peyer's patch immunocompetent cells in vitro. Among low molecular, intermediate size and macromolecular weight fractions prepared from TJ-41, only fraction containing macromolecular weight ingredients showed Peyer's patch-mediated bone marrow cell-proliferation enhancing activity. Anion-exchange chromatography and gel filtration gave 17 subfractions comprising polysaccharides and lignins from the macromolecular weight fraction of TJ-41, and some of the subfractions showed significant enhancing activities having different degrees. Some of the subfractions also expressed stimulating activity on G-CSF-production from colonic epithelial cells, and statistically significant positive correlation was observed among enhancing activities of the subfractions against Peyer's patch immunocompetent cells and epithelial cells. Among the fractions from TJ-41 oral administration of macromolecular weight ingredient fraction to mice succeeded to enhance antigen-specific antibody response in systemic immune system through upper respiratory mucosal immune system, but all the separated fractions failed to enhance the in vivo antibody response in upper respiratory tract.

  18. Critical role of dendritic cell-derived IL-27 in antitumor immunity through regulating the recruitment and activation of NK and NKT cells.

    PubMed

    Wei, Jun; Xia, Siyuan; Sun, Huayan; Zhang, Song; Wang, Jingya; Zhao, Huiyuan; Wu, Xiaoli; Chen, Xi; Hao, Jianlei; Zhou, Xinglong; Zhu, Zhengmao; Gao, Xiang; Gao, Jian-xin; Wang, Puyue; Wu, Zhenzhou; Zhao, Liqing; Yin, Zhinan

    2013-07-01

    Critical roles of IL-27 in autoimmune diseases and infections have been reported; however, the contribution of endogenous IL-27 to tumor progression remains elusive. In this study, by using IL-27p28 conditional knockout mice, we demonstrate that IL-27 is critical in protective immune response against methyl-cholanthrene-induced fibrosarcoma and transplanted B16 melanoma, and dendritic cells (DCs) are the primary source. DC-derived IL-27 is required for shaping tumor microenvironment by inducing CXCL-10 expression in myeloid-derived suppressor cells and regulating IL-12 production from DCs, which lead to the recruitment and activation of NK and NKT cells resulting in immunological control of tumors. Indeed, reconstitution of IL-27 or CXCL-10 in tumor site significantly inhibits tumor growth and restores the number and activation of NK and NKT cells. In summary, our study identifies a previous unknown critical role of DC-derived IL-27 in NK and NKT cell-dependent antitumor immunity through shaping tumor microenvironment, and sheds light on developing novel therapeutic approaches based on IL-27.

  19. Phospholipase C-β in immune cells.

    PubMed

    Kawakami, Toshiaki; Xiao, Wenbin

    2013-09-01

    Great progress has recently been made in structural and functional research of phospholipase C (PLC)-β. We now understand how PLC-β isoforms (β1-β4) are activated by GTP-bound Gαq downstream of G protein-coupled receptors. Numerous studies indicate that PLC-βs participate in the differentiation and activation of immune cells that control both the innate and adaptive immune systems. The PLC-β3 isoform also interplays with tyrosine kinase-based signaling pathways, to inhibit Stat5 activation by recruiting the protein-tyrosine phosphatase SHP-1, with which PLC-β3 and Stat5 form a multi-molecular signaling platform, named SPS complex. The SPS complex has important regulatory roles in tumorigenesis and immune cell activation.

  20. Phospholipase C-β in Immune Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kawakami, Toshiaki; Xiao, Wenbin

    2013-01-01

    Great progress has recently been made in structural and functional research of phospholipase C (PLC)-β. We now understand how PLC-β isoforms (β1-β4) are activated by GTP-bound Gαq downstream of G protein-coupled receptors. Numerous studies indicate that PLC-βs participate in the differentiation and activation of immune cells that control both the innate and adaptive immune systems. The PLC-β3 isoform also interplays with tyrosine kinase-based signaling pathways, to inhibit Stat5 activation by recruiting the protein-tyrosine phosphatase SHP-1, with which PLC-β3 and Stat5 form a multi-molecular signaling platform, named SPS complex. The SPS complex has important regulatory roles in tumorigenesis and immune cell activation. PMID:23981313

  1. Cytomegalovirus Infection of the Rat Developing Brain In Utero Prominently Targets Immune Cells and Promotes Early Microglial Activation

    PubMed Central

    Cloarec, Robin; Bauer, Sylvian; Luche, Hervé; Buhler, Emmanuelle; Pallesi-Pocachard, Emilie; Salmi, Manal; Courtens, Sandra; Massacrier, Annick; Grenot, Pierre; Teissier, Natacha; Watrin, Françoise; Schaller, Fabienne; Adle-Biassette, Homa; Gressens, Pierre; Malissen, Marie; Stamminger, Thomas; Streblow, Daniel N.; Bruneau, Nadine; Szepetowski, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Background Congenital cytomegalovirus infections are a leading cause of neurodevelopmental disorders in human and represent a major health care and socio-economical burden. In contrast with this medical importance, the pathophysiological events remain poorly known. Murine models of brain cytomegalovirus infection, mostly neonatal, have brought recent insights into the possible pathogenesis, with convergent evidence for the alteration and possible involvement of brain immune cells. Objectives and Methods In order to confirm and expand those findings, particularly concerning the early developmental stages following infection of the fetal brain, we have created a model of in utero cytomegalovirus infection in the developing rat brain. Rat cytomegalovirus was injected intraventricularly at embryonic day 15 (E15) and the brains analyzed at various stages until the first postnatal day, using a combination of gene expression analysis, immunohistochemistry and multicolor flow cytometry experiments. Results Rat cytomegalovirus infection was increasingly seen in various brain areas including the choroid plexi and the ventricular and subventricular areas and was prominently detected in CD45low/int, CD11b+ microglial cells, in CD45high, CD11b+ cells of the myeloid lineage including macrophages, and in CD45+, CD11b– lymphocytes and non-B non-T cells. In parallel, rat cytomegalovirus infection of the developing rat brain rapidly triggered a cascade of pathophysiological events comprising: chemokines upregulation, including CCL2-4, 7 and 12; infiltration by peripheral cells including B-cells and monocytes at E17 and P1, and T-cells at P1; and microglia activation at E17 and P1. Conclusion In line with previous findings in neonatal murine models and in human specimen, our study further suggests that neuroimmune alterations might play critical roles in the early stages following cytomegalovirus infection of the brain in utero. Further studies are now needed to determine which

  2. Characterization of a novel maitake (Grifola frondosa) protein that activates natural killer and dendritic cells and enhances antitumor immunity in mice.

    PubMed

    Tsao, Yao-Wei; Kuan, Yen-Chou; Wang, Jia-Lin; Sheu, Fuu

    2013-10-16

    Grifola frondosa, also known as maitake, is a culinary mushroom with immune-enhancing and antitumor effects. Numerous studies have investigated the activity of maitake polysaccharide extracts, but studies of maitake proteins are scarce. In this study, we purified and characterized a new G. frondosa protein, GFP, from maitake fruiting bodies. GFP is a nonglucan heterodimeric 83 kDa protein that consists of two 41 kDa subunits. GFP induced interferon-γ secretion by murine splenocytes and natural killer cells and activated the maturation of bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDCs) via a TLR4-dependent mechanism. GFP-treated BMDCs promoted a Th1 response and exhibited significant antitumor activity when transferred into tumor-bearing mice. In conclusion, we are the first to reveal the critical role of GFP in modulating the immune response and to link the immune-enhancing effects of maitake to its antitumor activities.

  3. Bone-immune cell crosstalk: bone diseases.

    PubMed

    Mori, Giorgio; D'Amelio, Patrizia; Faccio, Roberta; Brunetti, Giacomina

    2015-01-01

    Bone diseases are associated with great morbidity; thus, the understanding of the mechanisms leading to their development represents a great challenge to improve bone health. Recent reports suggest that a large number of molecules produced by immune cells affect bone cell activity. However, the mechanisms are incompletely understood. This review aims to shed new lights into the mechanisms of bone diseases involving immune cells. In particular, we focused our attention on the major pathogenic mechanism underlying periodontal disease, psoriatic arthritis, postmenopausal osteoporosis, glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis, metastatic solid tumors, and multiple myeloma.

  4. Exosomes secreted by human placenta carry functional Fas ligand and TRAIL molecules and convey apoptosis in activated immune cells, suggesting exosome-mediated immune privilege of the fetus.

    PubMed

    Stenqvist, Ann-Christin; Nagaeva, Olga; Baranov, Vladimir; Mincheva-Nilsson, Lucia

    2013-12-01

    Apoptosis is crucially important in mediating immune privilege of the fetus during pregnancy. We investigated the expression and in vitro apoptotic activity of two physiologically relevant death messengers, the TNF family members Fas ligand (FasL) and TRAIL in human early and term placentas. Both molecules were intracellularly expressed, confined to the late endosomal compartment of the syncytiotrophoblast, and tightly associated to the generation and secretion of placental exosomes. Using immunoelectron microscopy, we show that FasL and TRAIL are expressed on the limiting membrane of multivesicular bodies where, by membrane invagination, intraluminal microvesicles carrying membranal bioactive FasL and TRAIL are formed and released in the extracellular space as exosomes. Analyzing exosomes secreted from placental explant cultures, to our knowledge, we demonstrate for the first time that FasL and TRAIL are clustered on the exosomal membrane as oligomerized aggregates ready to form death-inducing signaling complex. Consistently, placental FasL- and TRAIL-carrying exosomes triggered apoptosis in Jurkat T cells and activated PBMC in a dose-dependent manner. Limiting the expression of functional FasL and TRAIL to exosomes comprise a dual benefit: 1) storage of exosomal FasL and TRAIL in multivesicular bodies is protected from proteolytic cleavage and 2) upon secretion, delivery of preformed membranal death molecules by exosomes rapidly triggers apoptosis. Our results suggest that bioactive FasL- and TRAIL-carrying exosomes, able to convey apoptosis, are secreted by the placenta and tie up the immunomodulatory and protective role of human placenta to its exosome-secreting ability.

  5. IgA1 immune complexes from pediatric patients with IgA nephropathy activate cultured human mesangial cells

    PubMed Central

    Raskova Kafkova, Leona; Suzuki, Hitoshi; Tomana, Milan; Matousovic, Karel; Brown, Rhubell; Hall, Stacy; Sanders, John T.; Eison, T. Matthew; Moldoveanu, Zina; Novak, Lea; Novak, Zdenek; Mayne, Richard; Julian, Bruce A.; Mestecky, Jiri; Wyatt, Robert J.

    2011-01-01

    Background. Circulating immune complexes (CIC) containing galactose (Gal)-deficient IgA1 from adults with IgA nephropathy (IgAN) induce proliferation of cultured mesangial cells, but activities of CIC from pediatric patients with the disease have not been studied. Methods. CIC of different sizes were isolated from sera of pediatric and adult IgAN patients and their effects on cultured human mesangial cells (MC) were assessed by measuring cellular proliferation, expression of IL-6 and IL-8 and laminin and phosphotyrosine signaling. Results. Large CIC from pediatric IgAN patients (>800 kDa) containing Gal-deficient IgA1 stimulated cellular proliferation, whereas in some patients, smaller CIC were inhibitory. Addition of stimulatory and inhibitory CIC to MC differentially altered phosphorylation patterns of three major tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins of molecular mass 37, 60 and 115 kDa. The stimulatory CIC transiently increased tyrosine-phosphorylation of the 37-kDa protein and decreased phosphorylation of the other two proteins, whereas the inhibitory CIC increased phosphorylation of all three proteins. Furthermore, we investigated the influence of IgA1-containing CIC from sera of children with IgAN with clinically active disease (i.e., abnormal urinalysis and/or serum creatinine concentration) or inactive disease (i.e., normal urinalysis and serum creatinine concentration) on the expression of IL-6 and IL-8 genes by mesangial cells. Real-time reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction results showed that the CIC from a patient with active disease stimulated MC to express the two cytokine genes at higher levels than did the CIC from a patient with inactive disease. Moreover, stimulatory CIC increased production of the extracellular matrix protein laminin. Conclusion. These data indicate that sera of pediatric IgAN patients contain biologically active CIC with Gal-deficient IgA1. PMID:21828345

  6. Atorvastatin reduces T-cell activation and exhaustion among HIV-infected cART-treated suboptimal immune responders in Uganda: a randomised crossover placebo-controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Nakanjako, Damalie; Ssinabulya, Isaac; Nabatanzi, Rose; Bayigga, Lois; Kiragga, Agnes; Joloba, Moses; Kaleebu, Pontiano; Kambugu, Andrew D; Kamya, Moses R; Sekaly, Rafick; Elliott, Alison; Mayanja-Kizza, Harriet

    2015-03-01

    T-cell activation independently predicts mortality, poor immune recovery and non-AIDS illnesses during combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). Atorvastatin showed anti-immune activation effects among HIV-infected cART-naïve individuals. We investigated whether adjunct atorvastatin therapy reduces T-cell activation among cART-treated adults with suboptimal immune recovery. A randomised double-blind placebo-controlled crossover trial, of atorvastatin 80 mg daily vs. placebo for 12 weeks, was conducted among individuals with CD4 increase <295 cells/μl after seven years of suppressive cART. Change in T-cell activation (CD3 + CD4 + /CD8 + CD38 + HLADR+) and in T-cell exhaustion (CD3 + CD4 + /CD8 + PD1 + ) was measured using flow cytometry. Thirty patients were randomised, 15 to each arm. Atorvastatin resulted in a 28% greater reduction in CD4 T-cell activation (60% reduction) than placebo (32% reduction); P = 0.001. Atorvastatin also resulted in a 35% greater reduction in CD8-T-cell activation than placebo (49% vs. 14%, P = 0.0009), CD4 T-cell exhaustion (27% vs. 17% in placebo), P = 0.001 and CD8 T-cell exhaustion (27% vs. 16%), P = 0.004. There was no carry-over/period effect. Expected adverse events were comparable in both groups, and no serious adverse events were reported. Atorvastatin reduced T-cell immune activation and exhaustion among cART-treated adults in a Ugandan cohort. Atorvastatin adjunct therapy should be explored as a strategy to improve HIV treatment outcomes among people living with HIV in sub-Saharan Africa. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. miR-424(322) reverses chemoresistance via T-cell immune response activation by blocking the PD-L1 immune checkpoint

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Shaohua; Tao, Zhen; Hai, Bo; Liang, Huagen; Shi, Ying; Wang, Tao; Song, Wen; Chen, Yong; OuYang, Jun; Chen, Jinhong; Kong, Fanfei; Dong, Yishan; Jiang, Shi-Wen; Li, Weiyong; Wang, Ping; Yuan, Zhiyong; Wan, Xiaoping; Wang, Chenguang; Li, Wencheng; Zhang, Xiaoping; Chen, Ke

    2016-01-01

    Immune checkpoint blockade of the inhibitory immune receptors PD-L1, PD-1 and CTLA-4 has emerged as a successful treatment strategy for several advanced cancers. Here we demonstrate that miR-424(322) regulates the PD-L1/PD-1 and CD80/CTLA-4 pathways in chemoresistant ovarian cancer. miR-424(322) is inversely correlated with PD-L1, PD-1, CD80 and CTLA-4 expression. High levels of miR-424(322) in the tumours are positively correlated with the progression-free survival of ovarian cancer patients. Mechanistic investigations demonstrated that miR-424(322) inhibited PD-L1 and CD80 expression through direct binding to the 3′-untranslated region. Restoration of miR-424(322) expression reverses chemoresistance, which is accompanied by blockage of the PD-L1 immune checkpoint. The synergistic effect of chemotherapy and immunotherapy is associated with the proliferation of functional cytotoxic CD8+ T cells and the inhibition of myeloid-derived suppressive cells and regulatory T cells. Collectively, our data suggest a biological and functional interaction between PD-L1 and chemoresistance through the microRNA regulatory cascade. PMID:27147225

  8. Cellular immune responses towards regulatory cells.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Stine Kiær

    2016-01-01

    This thesis describes the results from two published papers identifying spontaneous cellular immune responses against the transcription factors Foxp3 and Foxo3. The tumor microenvironment is infiltrated by cells that hinder effective tumor immunity from developing. Two of these cell types, which have been linked to a bad prognosis for patients, are regulatory T cells (Treg) and tolerogenic dendritic cells (DC). Tregs inhibit effector T cells from attacking the tumor through various mechanisms, including secreted factors and cell-to-cell contact. Tregs express the transcription factor Foxp3, which is necessary for their development and suppressive activities. Tolerogenic DCs participate in creating an environment in the tumor where effector T cells become tolerant towards the tumor instead of attacking it. The transcription factor Foxo3 was recently described to be highly expressed by tolerogenic DCs and to programme their tolerogenic influence. This thesis describes for the first time the existence of spontaneous cellular immune responses against peptides derived from Foxp3 and Foxo3. We have detected the presence of cytotoxic T cells that recognise these peptides in an HLA-A2 restricted manner in cancer patients and for Foxp3 in healthy donors as well. In addition, we have demonstrated that the Foxp3- and Foxo3-specific CTLs recognize Foxp3- and Foxo3-expressing cancer cell lines and importantly, suppressive immune cells, namely Tregs and in vitro generated DCs. Cancer immunotherapy is recently emerging as an important treatment modality improving the survival of selected patients. The current progress is largely owing to targeting of the immune suppressive milieu that is dominating the tumor microenvironment. This is being done through immune checkpoint blockade with CTLA-4 and PD-1/PD-L1 antibodies and through lymphodepleting conditioning of patients and ex vivo activation of TILs in adoptive cell transfer. Several strategies are being explored for depletion of

  9. The immune microenvironment in Hodgkin lymphoma: T cells, B cells, and immune checkpoints.

    PubMed

    Vardhana, Santosha; Younes, Anas

    2016-07-01

    Classical Hodgkin lymphoma is curable in the majority of cases with chemotherapy and/or radiation. However, 15-20% of patients ultimately relapse and succumb to their disease. Pathologically, classical Hodgkin lymphoma is characterized by rare tumor-initiating Reed-Sternberg cells surrounded by a dense immune microenvironment. However, the role of the immune microenvironment, particularly T and B cells, in either promoting or restricting Classical Hodgkin lymphoma growth remains undefined. Recent dramatic clinical responses seen using monoclonal antibodies against PD-1, a cell surface receptor whose primary function is to restrict T cell activation, have reignited questions regarding the function of the adaptive immune system in classical Hodgkin lymphoma. This review summarizes what is known regarding T cells, B cells, and immune checkpoints in classical Hodgkin lymphoma. Copyright© Ferrata Storti Foundation.

  10. The immune microenvironment in Hodgkin lymphoma: T cells, B cells, and immune checkpoints

    PubMed Central

    Vardhana, Santosha; Younes, Anas

    2016-01-01

    Classical Hodgkin lymphoma is curable in the majority of cases with chemotherapy and/or radiation. However, 15–20% of patients ultimately relapse and succumb to their disease. Pathologically, classical Hodgkin lymphoma is characterized by rare tumor-initiating Reed-Sternberg cells surrounded by a dense immune microenvironment. However, the role of the immune microenvironment, particularly T and B cells, in either promoting or restricting Classical Hodgkin lymphoma growth remains undefined. Recent dramatic clinical responses seen using monoclonal antibodies against PD-1, a cell surface receptor whose primary function is to restrict T cell activation, have reignited questions regarding the function of the adaptive immune system in classical Hodgkin lymphoma. This review summarizes what is known regarding T cells, B cells, and immune checkpoints in classical Hodgkin lymphoma. PMID:27365459

  11. Immunomodulatory effect of Parsley (Petroselinum crispum) essential oil on immune cells: mitogen-activated splenocytes and peritoneal macrophages.

    PubMed

    Yousofi, Alireza; Daneshmandi, Saeed; Soleimani, Neda; Bagheri, Kambiz; Karimi, Mohammad Hossein

    2012-04-01

    Parsley (Petroselinum crispum) has been traditionally used for the treatment of allergy, autoimmune and chronic inflammatory disorders. The present study aims to investigate the suppressive effects of parsley essential oil on mouse splenocytes and macrophages cells. Parsley essential oil was harvested. It was treated on splenocytes and phytohemagglutinin (PHA) (5 μg/mL) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) (10 μg/mL) activated splenocytes in different concentrations (0.01-100 μg/mL); then, proliferation was assayed by methyl tetrazolium (MTT) method. Treatment was also performed on the macrophages and LPS-stimulated macrophages (10 μg/ml) and the nitrite levels were measured using the diazotization method based on the Griess reaction and MTT assay for evaluation of the viability of the macrophages. Proliferation of splenocytes in all the treated groups was suppressed. In PHA-stimulated splenocytes, the suppression was seen in all the examined concentrations (0.01-100 μg/mL), while in the unstimulated and LPS-stimulated groups suppression was relatively dose dependent and in high concentration (10 and100 μg/mL).The viability of the macrophages in all groups was the same and in the unstimulated groups; NO suppression was significant in all the concentrations but in LPS-stimulated groups, it was significant in the three higher concentrations (1, 10, and100 μg/mL). The results of this study indicate that parsley essential oil may be able to suppress the cellular and humoral immune response. It can also suppress both NO production and the functions of macrophages as the main innate immune cells. These results may suggest that parsley essential oil is a proper suppressant for different applications.

  12. Comparison of the proliferation, cytotoxic activity and cytokine secretion function of cascade primed immune cells and cytokine-induced killer cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Li, Gui-Xin; Zhao, Shu-Shu; Zhang, Xu-Guang; Wang, Wen-Hao; Liu, Jin; Xue, Ke-Wei; Li, Xiao-Yan; Guo, Ying-Xue; Wang, Li-Hua

    2015-08-01

    The present study aimed to compare the antitumor effects of cascade primed immune (CAPRI) cells and cytokine-induced killer (CIK) cells in vitro, through investigating cell morphology, proliferation, cytotoxic activity to tumor cells and the ability of these cells to secrete cytokines. Peripheral blood samples (50 ml) were obtained from three healthy volunteers and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were obtained from each via Ficoll-Conray density gradient centrifugation. Each suspension of PBMCs (1 x 10(6)/ml) was divided into two parts; CAPRI cells were obtained from one part through a series of induction, amplification and cytokine cultures, while CIK cells were obtained from the other part through induction with different cytokines. During the culture process, the proliferation and morphological changes were observed for the two cell types using Trypan blue staining. At day 14, the cytotoxic activity of the two cell types was examined through determining lactate dehydrogenase release in the presence of K562 leukemia cells and MCF-7 breast cancer cells. In addition, secretory levels of interferon (IFN)-γ and interleukin (IL)-2 were detected using enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT) technology. The results revealed that at day 5 and 14 of culture, there were significantly fewer CAPRI cells compared with CIK cells (P<0.001), although the survival rate of each cell type was >95%. The cytotoxic activity of CAPRI cells towards the K562 cell line was effector-target ratio-dependent (40:1 and 20:1) with values of 55.1 ± 3.25 and 35.0 ± 2.65%, respectively, which were significantly reduced compared with the corresponding data in CIK cells, 60.0 ± 3.03 and 39.7 ± 3.42% (P=0.004 and 0.005, respectively). Furthermore, the cytotoxic activity of CAPRI cells towards MCF-7 cells were 71.5 ± 3.06, 56.0 ± 3.76 and 40.2 ± 2.90% at effector-target ratios 40:1, 20:1 and 10:1, respectively. These data were significantly higher than the corresponding values in CIK

  13. Immune stimulatory receptor CD40 is required for T-cell suppression and T regulatory cell activation mediated by myeloid-derived suppressor cells in cancer.

    PubMed

    Pan, Ping-Ying; Ma, Ge; Weber, Kaare J; Ozao-Choy, Junko; Wang, George; Yin, Bingjiao; Divino, Celia M; Chen, Shu-Hsia

    2010-01-01

    Immune tolerance to tumors is often associated with accumulation of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) and an increase in the number of T-regulatory cells (Treg). In tumor-bearing mice, MDSCs can themselves facilitate the generation of tumor-specific Tregs. In this study, we demonstrate that expression of the immune stimulatory receptor CD40 on MDSCs is required to induce T-cell tolerance and Treg accumulation. In an immune reconstitution model, adoptive transfer of Gr-1+CD115+ monocytic MDSCs derived from CD40-deficient mice failed to recapitulate the ability of wild-type MDSCs to induce tolerance and Treg development in vivo. Agonistic anti-CD40 antibodies phenocopied the effect of CD40 deficiency and also improved the therapeutic efficacy of IL-12 and 4-1BB immunotherapy in the treatment of advanced tumors. Our findings suggest that CD40 is essential not only for MDSC-mediated immune suppression but also for tumor-specific Treg expansion. Blockade of CD40-CD40L interaction between MDSC and Treg may provide a new strategy to ablate tumoral immune suppression and thereby heighten responses to immunotherapy.

  14. Transforming growth factor beta-activated kinase 1 (TAK1)-dependent checkpoint in the survival of dendritic cells promotes immune homeostasis and function.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanyan; Huang, Gonghua; Vogel, Peter; Neale, Geoffrey; Reizis, Boris; Chi, Hongbo

    2012-02-07

    Homeostatic control of dendritic cell (DC) survival is crucial for adaptive immunity, but the molecular mechanism is not well defined. Moreover, how DCs influence immune homeostasis under steady state remains unclear. Combining DC-specific and -inducible deletion systems, we report that transforming growth factor beta-activated kinase 1 (TAK1) is an essential regulator of DC survival and immune system homeostasis and function. Deficiency of TAK1 in CD11c(+) cells induced markedly elevated apoptosis, leading to the depletion of DC populations, especially the CD8(+) and CD103(+) DC subsets in lymphoid and nonlymphoid tissues, respectively. TAK1 also contributed to DC development by promoting the generation of DC precursors. Prosurvival signals from Toll-like receptors, CD40 and receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB (RANK) are integrated by TAK1 in DCs, which in turn mediated activation of downstream NF-κB and AKT-Foxo pathways and established a gene-expression program. TAK1 deficiency in DCs caused a myeloid proliferative disorder characterized by expansion of neutrophils and inflammatory monocytes, disrupted T-cell homeostasis, and prevented effective T-cell priming and generation of regulatory T cells. Moreover, TAK1 signaling in DCs was required to prevent myeloid proliferation even in the absence of lymphocytes, indicating a previously unappreciated regulatory mechanism of DC-mediated control of myeloid cell-dependent inflammation. Therefore, TAK1 orchestrates a prosurvival checkpoint in DCs that affects the homeostasis and function of the immune system.

  15. Osteopontin Expression in the Brain Triggers Localized Inflammation and Cell Death When Immune Cells Are Activated by Pertussis Toxin

    PubMed Central

    Marcondes, Maria Cecilia Garibaldi; Ojakian, Ryan; Bortell, Nikki; Flynn, Claudia; Conti, Bruno; Fox, Howard S.

    2014-01-01

    Upregulation of osteopontin (OPN) is a characteristic of central nervous system pathologies. However, the role of OPN in inflammation is still controversial, since it can both prevent cell death and induce the migration of potentially damaging inflammatory cells. To understand the role of OPN in inflammation and cell survival, we expressed OPN, utilizing an adenoviral vector, in the caudoputamen of mice deficient in OPN, using beta-galactosidase- (β-gal-) expressing vector as control. The tissue pathology and the expression of proinflammatory genes were compared in both treatments. Interestingly, inflammatory infiltrate was only found when the OPN-vector was combined with a peripheral treatment with pertussis toxin (Ptx), which activated peripheral cells to express the OPN receptor CD44v6. Relative to β-gal, OPN increased the levels of inflammatory markers, including IL13Rα1, CXCR3, and CD40L. In Ptx-treated OPN KOs, apoptotic TUNEL+ cells surrounding the OPN expression site increased, compared to β-gal. Together, these results show that local OPN expression combined with a peripheral inflammatory stimulus, such as Ptx, may be implicated in the development of brain inflammation and induction of cell death, by driving a molecular pattern characteristic of cytotoxicity. These are characteristics of inflammatory pathologies of the CNS in which OPN upregulation is a hallmark. PMID:25525298

  16. Isolation, antiproliferation on tumor cell and immunomodulatory activity of BSP-I, a novel bursal peptide from chicken humoral immune system.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xiuli; Liu, Taoqing; Wang, Fangquan; Cao, Ruibing; Zhou, Bin; Zhang, Yu; Mao, Xiang; Chen, Puyan; Zhang, Hui

    2011-06-01

    The bursa of Fabricius (BF) is acknowledged as central humoral immune organ unique to birds. Our purpose was to identify the potential function of a novel bursal-derived bioactive peptide. A bursal septpeptide (BSP-I), EPASGMM, first isolated from BF, reduced MCF and Hela tumor cells proliferation, and enhanced antitumor factor p53 luciferase activity and protein expression. Further, we found the significantly immune inducing function of BSP-I on antigen-specific immune response in BALB/c mice intraperitoneally immunized with inactivated avian influence virus (AIV, H(9)N(2) subtype) vaccine, including of enhancing the antibody (IgG, the isotypes IgG1 and IgG2a) production, and stimulating cytokines IL-4 and IFN-γ level, and inducing T cell immunophenotyping and lymphocyte proliferation. These results suggested that as the bioactive peptide from avian humoral immune system, various biological function of BSP-I may have far-reaching implication on immune system significance, which might provide novel insight on linking between humoral immune system and development of effective immunotherapeutic strategies for treating human cancers diseases.

  17. Evolution of B Cell Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Sunyer, J. Oriol

    2013-01-01

    Two types of adaptive immune strategies are known to have evolved in vertebrates: the VLR-based system, which is present in jawless organisms and is mediated by VLRA and VLRB lymphocytes, and the BCR/TCR-based system, which is present in jawed species and is provided by B and T cell receptors expressed on B and T cells, respectively. Here we summarize features of B cells and their predecessors in the different animal phyla, focusing the review on B cells from jawed vertebrates. We point out the critical role of nonclassical species and comparative immunology studies in the understanding of B cell immunity. Because nonclassical models include species relevant to veterinary medicine, basic science research performed in these animals contributes to the knowledge required for the development of more efficacious vaccines against emerging pathogens. PMID:25340015

  18. Dendritic cells and immunity against cancer

    PubMed Central

    Palucka, Karolina; Ueno, Hideki; Fay, Joseph; Banchereau, Jacques

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY T cells can reject established tumors when adoptively transferred into patients, thereby demonstrating the power of the immune system for cancer therapy. However, it has proven difficult to maintain adoptively transferred T cells in the long term. Vaccines have the potential to induce tumor-specific effector and memory T cells. However, clinical efficacy of current vaccines is limited, possibly because tumors skew the immune system by means of myeloid-derived suppressor cells, inflammatory type 2 T cells and regulatory T cells (Tregs), all of which prevent the generation of effector cells. To improve the clinical efficacy of cancer vaccines in patients with metastatic disease, we need to design novel and improved strategies that can boost adaptive immunity to cancer, help overcome Tregs and allow the breakdown of the immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment. This can be achieved by exploiting the fast increasing knowledge about the dendritic cell (DC) system, including the existence of distinct DC subsets which respond differentially to distinct activation signals, (functional plasticity), both contributing to the generation of unique adaptive immune responses. We foresee that these novel cancer vaccines will be used as monotherapy in patients with resected disease, and in combination with drugs targeting regulatory/suppressor pathways in patients with metastatic disease. PMID:21158979

  19. Mast cell-orchestrated immunity to pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, Soman N.; St John, Ashley L.

    2015-01-01

    Although mast cells were discovered more than a century ago, their functions beyond their role in allergic responses remained elusive until recently. However, there is a growing appreciation that an important physiological function of these cells is the recognition of pathogens and modulation of appropriate immune responses. Because of their ability to instantly release several pro-inflammatory mediators from intracellular stores and their location at the host–environment interface, mast cells have been shown to be crucial for optimal immune responses during infection. Mast cells seem to exert these effects by altering the inflammatory environment after detection of a pathogen and by mobilizing various immune cells to the site of infection and to draining lymph nodes. Interestingly, the character and timing of these responses can vary depending on the type of pathogen stimulus, location of pathogen recognition and sensitization state of the responding mast cells. Recent studies using mast cell activators as effective vaccine adjuvants show the potential of harnessing these cells to confer protective immunity against microbial pathogens. PMID:20498670

  20. Innate Immune Activation in Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Lumeng, Carey N.

    2014-01-01

    The innate immune system is a prewired set of cellular and humoral components that has developed to sense perturbations in normal physiology and trigger responses to restore the system back to baseline. It is now understood that many of these components can also sense the physiologic changes that occur with obesity and be activated. While the exact reasons for this chronic immune response to obesity are unclear, there is strong evidence to suggest that innate inflammatory systems link obesity and disease. Based on this, anti-inflammatory therapies for diseases like type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome may form the core of future treatment plans. This review will highlight the components involved in the innate immune response and discuss the evidence that they contribute to the pathogenesis of obesity-associated diseases. PMID:23068074

  1. Secretome identification of immune cell factors mediating metastatic cell homing

    PubMed Central

    Aguado, Brian A.; Wu, Jia J.; Azarin, Samira M.; Nanavati, Dhaval; Rao, Shreyas S.; Bushnell, Grace G.; Medicherla, Chaitanya B.; Shea, Lonnie D.

    2015-01-01

    Metastatic cell homing is a complex process mediated in part by diffusible factors secreted from immune cells found at a pre-metastatic niche. We report on connecting secretomics and TRanscriptional Activity CEll aRray (TRACER) data to identify functional paracrine interactions between immune cells and metastatic cells as novel mediators of homing. Metastatic breast cancer mouse models were used to generate a diseased splenocyte conditioned media (D-SCM) containing immune cell secreted factors. MDA-MB-231 metastatic cell activity including cell invasion, migration, transendothelial migration, and proliferation were increased in D-SCM relative to control media. Our D-SCM secretome analysis yielded 144 secreted factor candidates that contribute to increased metastatic cell activity. The functional mediators of homing were identified using MetaCore software to determine interactions between the immune cell secretome and the TRACER-identified active transcription factors within metastatic cells. Among the 5 candidate homing factors identified, haptoglobin was selected and validated in vitro and in vivo as a key mediator of homing. Our studies demonstrate a novel systems biology approach to identify functional signaling factors associated with a cellular phenotype, which provides an enabling tool that complements large-scale protein identification provided by proteomics. PMID:26634905

  2. Protection Versus Pathology in Aviremic and High Viral Load HIV-2 Infection—The Pivotal Role of Immune Activation and T-cell Kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Hegedus, Andrea; Nyamweya, Samuel; Zhang, Yan; Govind, Sheila; Aspinall, Richard; Mashanova, Alla; Jansen, Vincent A. A.; Whittle, Hilton; Jaye, Assan; Flanagan, Katie L.; Macallan, Derek C.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Many human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)–2-infected individuals remain aviremic and behave as long-term non-progressors but some progress to AIDS. We hypothesized that immune activation and T-cell turnover would be critical determinants of non-progressor/progressor status. Methods. We studied 37 subjects in The Gambia, West Africa: 10 HIV-negative controls, 10 HIV-2-infected subjects with low viral loads (HIV-2-LV), 7 HIV-2-infected subjects with high viral loads (HIV-2-HV), and 10 with HIV-1 infection. We measured in vivo T-cell turnover using deuterium-glucose labeling, and correlated results with T-cell phenotype (by flow cytometry) and T-cell receptor excision circle (TREC) abundance. Results. Immune activation (HLA-DR/CD38 coexpression) differed between groups with a significant trend: controls cell types). A similar trend was observed in the pattern of in vivo turnover of memory CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells and TREC depletion in naive CD4+ T-cells, although naive T-cell turnover was relatively unaffected by either infection. T-cell turnover, immune activation, and progressor status were closely associated. Conclusions. HIV-2 non-progressors have low rates of T-cell turnover (both CD4+ and CD8+) and minimal immune activation; high viral load HIV-2 progressors had high values, similar to or exceeding those in HIV-1 infection. PMID:24803534

  3. High-risk oncogenic HPV genotype infection associates with increased immune activation and T cell exhaustion in ART-suppressed HIV-1-infected women

    PubMed Central

    Papasavvas, Emmanouil; Surrey, Lea F.; Glencross, Deborah K.; Azzoni, Livio; Joseph, Jocelin; Omar, Tanvier; Feldman, Michael D.; Williamson, Anna-Lise; Siminya, Maureen; Swarts, Avril; Yin, Xiangfan; Liu, Qin; Firnhaber, Cynthia; Montaner, Luis J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Persistence of human papillomavirus (HPV) and cervical disease in the context of HIV co-infection can be influenced by introduction of antiretroviral therapy (ART) and sustained immune activation despite ART. We conducted a cross-sectional study in order to evaluate immune activation/exhaustion in ART-suppressed HIV+ women with or without high-risk (HR) HPV-related cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN). 55 South African women were recruited in three groups: HR (-) (n = 16) and HR (+) (n = 15) HPV with negative cervical histopathology, and HR (+) HPV with CIN grade 1/2/3 (n = 24). Sampling included endocervical brushing (HPV DNA genotyping), Pap smear (cytology), colposcopic punch biopsy (histopathology, histochemical evaluation of immune cells), and peripheral blood (clinical assessment, flow cytometry-based immune subset characterization). Statistics were done using R2.5.1. Irrespective of the presence of CIN, HR (+) HPV women had higher circulating levels of T cells expressing markers of activation/exhaustion (CD38, PD1, CTLA-4, BTLA, CD160), Tregs, and myeloid subsets expressing corresponding ligands (PDL1, PDL2, CD86, CD40, HVEM) than HR (-) HPV women. A decrease in circulating NK cells was associated with CIN grade. CD4+ T cell count associated negatively with T cell exhaustion and expression of negative regulators on myeloid cells. Women with CIN when compared to HR (-) HPV women, had higher cervical cell density in stroma and epithelium for CD4+, CD68+, and CD11c+ cells, and only in stroma for CD8+ cells. We conclude that in ART-suppressed HIV-infected women with HPV co-infection the levels of T and myeloid cell activation/exhaustion are associated with the presence of HR HPV genotypes. PMID:27467943

  4. Downregulation of mucosal mast cell activation and immune response in diarrhoea-irritable bowel syndrome by oral disodium cromoglycate: A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Lobo, Beatriz; Ramos, Laura; Martínez, Cristina; Guilarte, Mar; González-Castro, Ana M; Alonso-Cotoner, Carmen; Pigrau, Marc; de Torres, Inés; Rodiño-Janeiro, Bruno K; Salvo-Romero, Eloisa; Fortea, Marina; Pardo-Camacho, Cristina; Guagnozzi, Danila; Azpiroz, Fernando

    2017-01-01

    Background and goal Diarrhoea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome (IBS-D) exhibits intestinal innate immune and mucosal mast cell (MC) activation. MC stabilisers have been shown to improve IBS symptoms but the mechanism is unclear. Our primary aim was to investigate the effect of oral disodium cromoglycate (DSCG) on jejunal MC activation and specific innate immune signalling pathways in IBS-D, and secondarily, its potential clinical benefit. Study Mucosal MC activation (by ultrastructural changes, tryptase release and gene expression) and innate immune signalling (by protein and gene expression) were quantified in jejunal biopsies from healthy (HS; n = 16) and IBS-D subjects after six months of either treatment with DSCG (600 mg/day, IBS-D-DSCG group; n = 18) or without treatment (IBS-D-NT group; n = 25). All IBS-D patients recorded abdominal pain and bowel habits at baseline and in the last 10 days prior to jejunal sampling. Results IBS-D-NT exhibited significant MC activation and over-expression of immune-related genes as compared to HS, whereas in IBS-D-DSCG MC activity and gene expression were similar to HS. Furthermore, DSCG significantly reduced abdominal pain and improved stool consistency. Conclusion Oral DSCG modulates mucosal immune activity and improves gut symptoms in IBS-D patients. Future placebo-controlled clinical trials are needed for confirmation of clinical benefit of DSCG for IBS-D.

  5. Bovine colostrum enhances natural killer cell activity and immune response in a mouse model of influenza infection and mediates intestinal immunity through toll-like receptors 2 and 4.

    PubMed

    Wong, Eric B; Mallet, Jean-François; Duarte, Jairo; Matar, Chantal; Ritz, Barry W

    2014-04-01

    Oral administration of bovine colostrum affects intestinal immunity, including an increased percentage of natural killer (NK) cells. However, effects on NK cell cytotoxic activity and resistance to infection as well as a potential mechanism remain unclear. Therefore, we investigated the effects of bovine colostrum (La Belle, Inc, Bellingham, WA) on the NK cytotoxic response to influenza infection and on toll-like receptor (TLR) activity in a primary intestinal epithelial cell culture. We hypothesized that colostrum would increase NK cell activity and that TLR-2 and TLR-4 blocking would reduce interleukin 6 production by epithelial cells in response to contact stimulation with colostrum. Four-month-old female C57BL/6 mice were supplemented with 1 g of colostrum per kilogram of body weight before and after infection with influenza A virus (H1N1). Animals were assessed for weight loss, splenic NK cell activity, and lung virus titers. Colostrum-supplemented mice demonstrated less reduction in body weight after influenza infection, indicating a less severe infection, increased NK cell cytotoxicity, and less virus burden in the lungs compared with controls. Colostrum supplementation enhanced NK cell cytotoxicity and improved the immune response to primary influenza virus infection in mice. To investigate a potential mechanism, a primary culture of small intestine epithelial cells was then stimulated with colostrum. Direct activation of epithelial cells resulted in increased interleukin 6 production, which was inhibited with TLR-2 and TLR-4 blocking antibodies. The interaction between colostrum and immunity may be dependent, in part, on the interaction of colostrum components with innate receptors at the intestinal epithelium, including TLR-2 and TLR-4. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Mycobacterium tuberculosis PE25/PPE41 protein complex induces activation and maturation of dendritic cells and drives Th2-biased immune responses.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei; Bao, Yige; Chen, Xuerong; Burton, Jeremy; Gong, Xueli; Gu, Dongqing; Mi, Youjun; Bao, Lang

    2016-04-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis evades innate host immune responses by parasitizing macrophages and causes significant morbidity and mortality around the world. A mycobacterial antigen that can activate dendritic cells (DCs) and elicit effective host innate immune responses will be vital to the development of an effective TB vaccine. The M. tuberculosis genes PE25/PPE41 encode proteins which have been associated with evasion of the host immune response. We constructed a PE25/PPE41 complex gene via splicing by overlapping extension and expressed it successfully in E. coli. We investigated whether this protein complex could interact with DCs to induce effective host immune responses. The PE25/PPE41 protein complex induced maturation of isolated mouse DCs in vitro, increasing expression of cell surface markers (CD80, CD86 and MHC-II), thereby promoting Th2 polarization via secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-4 and IL-10. In addition, PE25/PPE41 protein complex-activated DCs induced proliferation of mouse CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells, and a strong humoral response in immunized mice. The sera of five TB patients were also highly reactive to this antigen. These findings suggest that interaction of the PE25/PPE41 protein complex with DCs may be of great immunological significance.

  7. Gut Mesenchymal Stromal Cells in Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Messina, Valeria; Buccione, Carla; Marotta, Giulia; Ziccheddu, Giovanna; Signore, Michele; Mattia, Gianfranco; Puglisi, Rossella; Sacchetti, Benedetto; Biancone, Livia

    2017-01-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs), first found in bone marrow (BM), are the structural architects of all organs, participating in most biological functions. MSCs possess tissue-specific signatures that allow their discrimination according to their origin and location. Among their multiple functions, MSCs closely interact with immune cells, orchestrating their activity to maintain overall homeostasis. The phenotype of tissue MSCs residing in the bowel overlaps with myofibroblasts, lining the bottom walls of intestinal crypts (pericryptal) or interspersed within intestinal submucosa (intercryptal). In Crohn's disease, intestinal MSCs are tightly stacked in a chronic inflammatory milieu, which causes their enforced expression of Class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC). The absence of Class II MHC is a hallmark for immune-modulator and tolerogenic properties of normal MSCs and, vice versa, the expression of HLA-DR is peculiar to antigen presenting cells, that is, immune-activator cells. Interferon gamma (IFNγ) is responsible for induction of Class II MHC expression on intestinal MSCs. The reversal of myofibroblasts/MSCs from an immune-modulator to an activator phenotype in Crohn's disease results in the formation of a fibrotic tube subverting the intestinal structure. Epithelial metaplastic areas in this context can progress to dysplasia and cancer. PMID:28337224

  8. Environmental and genetic activation of hypothalamic BDNF modulates T-cell immunity to exert an anticancer phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wei; Slater, Andrew M.; Liu, Xianglan; Judd, Ryan T; Lin, En-Ju D.; Widstrom, Kyle J.; Scoville, Steven D; Yu, Jianhua; Caligiuri, Michael A.; Cao, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Macro-environmental factors, including a patient’s physical and social environment, play a role in cancer risk and progression. Our previous studies show that living in an enriched environment (EE) providing complex stimuli confers an anticancer phenotype in mice mediated in part by a specific neuroendocrine axis, with brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) as the key brain mediator. Here we investigated how an EE modulated T-cell immunity and its role in the EE-induced anticancer effects. Our data demonstrated that CD8 T cells were required to mediate the anticancer effects of an EE in an orthotropic model of melanoma. In secondary lymphoid tissue (SLT), an EE induced early changes in the phenotype of T-cell populations, characterized by a decrease in the ratio of CD4 T helper to CD8 cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs). Overexpression of hypothalamic BDNF reproduced EE-induced T-cell phenotypes in SLT whereas knockdown of hypothalamic BDNF inhibited EE-induced immune modulation in SLT. Both propranolol and mifepristone blocked the EE-associated modulation of CTLs in SLT suggesting both the sympathetic nervous system and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis were involved. Our results demonstrated that enhanced anticancer effect of an EE was mediated at least in part through modulation of T-cell immunity and provided support to the emerging concept of manipulating a single gene in the brain to improve cancer immunotherapy. PMID:27045020

  9. FOXP1 suppresses immune response signatures and MHC class II expression in activated B-cell-like diffuse large B-cell lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    Brown, P J; Wong, K K; Felce, S L; Lyne, L; Spearman, H; Soilleux, E J; Pedersen, L M; Møller, M B; Green, T M; Gascoyne, D M; Banham, A H

    2016-01-01

    The FOXP1 (forkhead box P1) transcription factor is a marker of poor prognosis in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). Here microarray analysis of FOXP1-silenced DLBCL cell lines identified differential regulation of immune response signatures and major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC II) genes as some of the most significant differences between germinal center B-cell (GCB)-like DLBCL with full-length FOXP1 protein expression versus activated B-cell (ABC)-like DLBCL expressing predominantly short FOXP1 isoforms. In an independent primary DLBCL microarray data set, multiple MHC II genes, including human leukocyte antigen DR alpha chain (HLA-DRA), were inversely correlated with FOXP1 transcript expression (P<0.05). FOXP1 knockdown in ABC-DLBCL cells led to increased cell-surface expression of HLA-DRA and CD74. In R-CHOP (rituximab, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine and prednisone)-treated DLBCL patients (n=150), reduced HLA-DRA (<90% frequency) expression correlated with inferior overall survival (P=0.0003) and progression-free survival (P=0.0012) and with non-GCB subtype stratified by the Hans, Choi or Visco–Young algorithms (all P<0.01). In non-GCB DLBCL cases with <90% HLA-DRA, there was an inverse correlation with the frequency (P=0.0456) and intensity (P=0.0349) of FOXP1 expression. We propose that FOXP1 represents a novel regulator of genes targeted by the class II MHC transactivator CIITA (MHC II and CD74) and therapeutically targeting the FOXP1 pathway may improve antigen presentation and immune surveillance in high-risk DLBCL patients. PMID:26500140

  10. Divergent response profile in activated cord blood T cells from first-born child implies birth-order-associated in utero immune programming.

    PubMed

    Kragh, M; Larsen, J M; Thysen, A H; Rasmussen, M A; Wolsk, H M; Bisgaard, H; Brix, S

    2016-03-01

    First-born children are at higher risk of developing a range of immune-mediated diseases. The underlying mechanism of 'birth-order effects' on disease risk is largely unknown, but in utero programming of the child's immune system may play a role. We studied the association between birth order and the functional response of stimulated cord blood T cells. Purified cord blood T cells were polyclonally activated with anti-CD3-/anti-CD28-coated beads in a subgroup of 28 children enrolled in the COPSAC2010 birth cohort. Expression levels of seven activation markers on helper and cytotoxic T cells as well as the percentage of CD4(+) CD25(+) T cells were assessed by flow cytometry. Production of IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-17, IL-4, IL-5, IL-13, and IL-10 was measured in the supernatants. IL-10 secretion (P = 0.007) and CD25 expression on CD4(+) helper T cells (P = 0.0003) in the activated cord blood T cells were selectively reduced in first-born children, while the percentage of circulating CD4(+) CD25(+) cord blood T cells was independent of birth order. First-born infants display a reduced anti-inflammatory profile in T cells at birth. This possible in utero 'birth-order' T-cell programming may contribute to later development of immune-mediated diseases by increasing overall immune reactivity in first-born children as compared to younger siblings. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Immune Cells in Blood Recognize Tumors

    Cancer.gov

    NCI scientists have developed a novel strategy for identifying immune cells circulating in the blood that recognize specific proteins on tumor cells, a finding they believe may have potential implications for immune-based therapies.

  12. A new cell line from the fat body of Spodoptera litura (Lepidoptera, Noctuidae) and detection of lysozyme activity release upon immune stimulation.

    PubMed

    Tateishi, Ken; Kasahara, Yuichi; Watanabe, Kazuyo; Hosokawa, Nobuo; Doi, Hiroyasu; Nakajima, Kaori; Adachi, Hayamitsu; Nomoto, Akio

    2015-01-01

    A new cell line, designated NIAS-SL64, was established from the fat body of the fifth instar larvae of the common cutworm Spodoptera litura. NIAS-SL64 cells grew as spindle-shaped and non-adherent cells in the insect-specific cell culture medium MGM-450 supplemented with 10% fetal bovine serum. Criterions for the establishment of the NIAS-SL64 cell line is spindle shape and length (30~90 μm) stabilized after 100 passages. The doubling time of the cells was 24 h at 25°C. Lipopolysaccharide significantly stimulated the release of lysozyme activity by NIAS-SL64 cells. Lysozyme is one of the components of the innate immunity and plays important role as lytic enzyme in infection. Lysozyme activity released from NIAS-SL64 would be a marker for immune response. The released lysozyme activity critically depends on morphology of the cells and would be a criterion of the establishment of the cell line. Lysozyme activity was suppressed in a dose-dependent manner by the immunosuppressive agent cyclosporin A.

  13. The Human Natural Killer Cell Immune Synapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Daniel M.; Chiu, Isaac; Fassett, Marlys; Cohen, George B.; Mandelboim, Ofer; Strominger, Jack L.

    1999-12-01

    Inhibitory killer Ig-like receptors (KIR) at the surface of natural killer (NK) cells induced clustering of HLA-C at the contacting surface of target cells. In this manner, inhibitory immune synapses were formed as human NK cells surveyed target cells. At target/NK cell synapses, HLA-C/KIR distributed into rings around central patches of intercellular adhesion molecule-1/lymphocyte function-associated antigen-1, the opposite orientation to mature murine T cell-activating synapses. This organization of protein was stable for at least 20 min. Cells could support multiple synapses simultaneously, and clusters of HLA-C moved as NK cells crawled over target cells. Clustering required a divalent metal cation, explaining how metal chelators inhibit KIR function. Surprisingly, however, formation of inhibitory synapses was unaffected by ATP depletion and the cytoskeletal inhibitors, colchicine and cytochalsins B and D. Clearly, supramolecular organization within plasma membranes is critical for NK cell immunosurveillance.

  14. Differential effects of myelin basic protein-activated Th1 and Th2 cells on the local immune microenvironment of injured spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jian-Guo; Shi, Ling-Ling; Chen, Yue-Juan; Xie, Xiu-Mei; Zhang, Nan; Zhu, An-You; Jiang, Zheng-Song; Feng, Yi-Fan; Zhang, Chen; Xi, Jin; Lü, He-Zuo

    2016-03-01

    Myelin basic protein (MBP) activated T cells (MBP-T) play an important role in the damage and repair process of the central nervous system (CNS). However, whether these cells play a beneficial or detrimental role is still a matter of debate. Although some studies showed that MBP-T cells are mainly helper T (Th) cells, their subtypes are still not very clear. One possible explanation for MBP-T immunization leading to conflicting results may be the different subtypes of T cells are responsible for distinct effects. In this study, the Th1 and Th2 type MBP-T cells (MBP-Th1 and -Th2) were polarized in vitro, and their effects on the local immune microenvironment and tissue repair of spinal cord injury (SCI) after adoptive immunization were investigated. In MBP-Th1 cell transferred rats, the high levels of pro-inflammatory cells (Th1 cells and M1 macrophages) and cytokines (IFN-γ, TNF-α, -β, IL-1β) were detected in the injured spinal cord; however, the anti-inflammatory cells (Th2 cells, regulatory T cells, and M2 macrophages) and cytokines (IL-4, -10, and -13) were found in MBP-Th2 cell transferred animals. MBP-Th2 cell transfer resulted in decreased lesion volume, increased myelination of axons, and preservation of neurons. This was accompanied by significant locomotor improvement. These results indicate that MBP-Th2 adoptive transfer has beneficial effects on the injured spinal cord, in which the increased number of Th2 cells may alter the local microenvironment from one primarily populated by Th1 and M1 cells to another dominated by Th2, Treg, and M2 cells and is conducive for SCI repair.

  15. Alcohol consumption and antitumor immunity: dynamic changes from activation to accelerated deterioration of the immune system.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui; Zhu, Zhaohui; Zhang, Faya; Meadows, Gary G

    2015-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms of how alcohol and its metabolites induce cancer have been studied extensively. However, the mechanisms whereby chronic alcohol consumption affects antitumor immunity and host survival have largely been unexplored. We studied the effects of chronic alcohol consumption on the immune system and antitumor immunity in mice inoculated with B16BL6 melanoma and found that alcohol consumption activates the immune system leading to an increase in the proportion of IFN-γ-producing NK, NKT, and T cells in mice not injected with tumors. One outcome associated with enhanced IFN-γ activation is inhibition of melanoma lung metastasis. However, the anti-metastatic effects do not translate into increased survival of mice bearing subcutaneous tumors. Continued growth of the subcutaneous tumors and alcohol consumption accelerates the deterioration of the immune system, which is reflected in the following: (1) inhibition in the expansion of memory CD8+ T cells, (2) accelerated decay of Th1 cytokine-producing cells, (3) increased myeloid-derived suppressor cells, (4) compromised circulation of B cells and T cells, and (5) increased NKT cells that exhibit an IL-4 dominant cytokine profile, which is inhibitory to antitumor immunity. Taken together, the dynamic effects of alcohol consumption on antitumor immunity are in two opposing phases: the first phase associated with immune stimulation is tumor inhibitory and the second phase resulting from the interaction between the effects of alcohol and the tumor leads to immune inhibition and resultant tumor progression.

  16. Ability of Interleukin-33- and Immune Complex-Triggered Activation of Human Mast Cells to Down-Regulate Monocyte-Mediated Immune Responses.

    PubMed

    Rivellese, Felice; Suurmond, Jolien; Habets, Kim; Dorjée, Annemarie L; Ramamoorthi, Nandhini; Townsend, Michael J; de Paulis, Amato; Marone, Gianni; Huizinga, Tom W J; Pitzalis, Costantino; Toes, René E M

    2015-09-01

    Mast cells have been implicated in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In particular, their activation by interleukin-33 (IL-33) has been linked to the development of arthritis in animal models. The aim of this study was to evaluate the functional responses of human mast cells to IL-33 in the context of RA. Human mast cells were stimulated with IL-33 combined with plate-bound IgG or IgG anti-citrullinated protein antibodies (ACPAs), and their effects on monocyte activation were evaluated. Cellular interactions of mast cells in RA synovium were assessed by immunofluorescence analysis, and the expression of messenger RNA (mRNA) for mast cell-specific genes was evaluated in synovial biopsy tissue from patients with early RA who were naive to treatment with disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs. IL-33 induced the up-regulation of Fcγ receptor type IIa and enhanced the activation of mast cells by IgG, including IgG ACPAs, as indicated by the production of CXCL8/IL-8. Intriguingly, mast cell activation triggered with IL-33 and IgG led to the release of mediators such as histamine and IL-10, which inhibited monocyte activation. Synovial mast cells were found in contact with CD14+ monocyte/macrophages. Finally, mRNA levels of mast cell-specific genes were inversely associated with disease severity, and IL-33 mRNA levels showed an inverse correlation with the levels of proinflammatory markers. When human mast cells are activated by IL-33, an immunomodulatory phenotype develops, with human mast cells gaining the ability to suppress monocyte activation via the release of IL-10 and histamine. These findings, together with the presence of synovial mast cell-monocyte interactions and the inverse association between the expression of mast cell genes at the synovial level and disease activity, suggest that these newly described mast cell-mediated inhibitory pathways might have a functional relevance in the pathogenesis of RA. © 2015, American College of Rheumatology.

  17. Monocytic CCR2+ Myeloid Derived Suppressor Cells Promote Immune Escape By Limiting Activated CD8 T Cell Infiltration Into The Tumor Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Lesokhin, Alexander M.; Hohl, Tobias M.; Kitano, Shigehisa; Cortez, Czrina; Hirschhorn-Cymerman, Daniel; Avogadri, Francesca; Rizzuto, Gabrielle A.; Lazarus, John J.; Pamer, Eric G.; Houghton, Alan N.; Merghoub, Taha; Wolchok, Jedd D.

    2011-01-01

    Myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSC) are a heterogeneous population of cells that accumulate during tumor formation, facilitate immune escape and enable tumor progression. MDSC are important contributors to the development of an immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment that blocks the action of cytotoxic anti-tumor T effector cells. Heterogeneity in these cells poses a significant barrier to studying the in vivo contributions of individual MDSC subtypes. Herein, we demonstrate that granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF), a cytokine critical for the numeric and functional development of MDSC populations, promotes expansion of a monocyte-derived MDSC population characterized by expression of CD11b and the chemokine receptor CCR2. Utilizing a toxin mediated ablation strategy to target CCR2-expressing cells, we show that these monocytic MDSCs regulate entry of activated CD8 T cells into the tumor site, thereby limiting the efficacy of immunotherapy. Our results argue that therapeutic targeting of monocytic MDSCs would enhance outcomes in immunotherapy. PMID:22174368

  18. Mesenchymal stem cells and adaptive immune responses.

    PubMed

    Cao, Wei; Cao, Kai; Cao, Jianchang; Wang, Ying; Shi, Yufang

    2015-12-01

    Over the past decade, our understanding of the regulatory role of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in adaptive immune responses through both preclinical and clinical studies has dramatically expanded, providing great promise for treating various inflammatory diseases. Most studies are focused on the modulatory effects of these cells on the properties of T cell-mediated immune responses, including activation, proliferation, survival, and subset differentiation. Interestingly, the immunosuppressive function of MSCs was found to be licensed by IFN-γ and TNF-α produced by T cells and that can be further amplified by cytokines such as IL-17. However, the immunosuppressive function of MSCs can be reversed in certain situation, such as suboptimal levels of inflammatory cytokines, or in the presence of immunosuppressive molecules. Here we review the influence of MSCs on adaptive immune system, especially their bidirectional interaction in tuning the immune microenvironment and subsequently repairing damaged tissue. Understanding MSC-mediated regulation of T cells is expected to provide fundamental information for guiding appropriate applications of MSCs in clinical settings. Copyright © 2015 European Federation of Immunological Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Enhancement of BCG-induced Th1 immune response through Vgamma9Vdelta2 T cell activation with non-peptidic drugs.

    PubMed

    Martino, Angelo; Casetti, Rita; Poccia, Fabrizio

    2007-01-22

    Since drug-activated gammadelta T cells promote dendritic cell (DC) maturation, we analyzed the effect of combining gammadelta T cell specific drugs with BCG in vitro. BCG-induced DC maturation was increased by bromohydrin-pirophosphate (BrHPP) or zoledronate (Zol)-activated gammadelta T cells. Specifically, the co-culture with activated Vgamma9Vdelta2 T cells with BCG-infected DC resulted in a significant increase of the expression of CD80, CD86, CD40 and CD25 molecules on DC. Moreover, DC were able to produce increased levels of TNF-alpha and synthesize ex novo IL-15 without altering the IL-10/IL-12 immunoregulatory pathway. Finally, the Th1 immunity induced by BCG-infected DC on naïve CD4 T cells was increased by gammadelta T cell activation with BrHpp or Zol. These data indicate that gammadelta T cell triggering drugs could be used to enhance the BCG induced Th1 immunity.

  20. Immune gene expression profiling of Proliferative Kidney Disease in rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss reveals a dominance of anti-inflammatory, antibody and T helper cell-like activities

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The myxozoan Tetracapsuloides bryosalmonae is the causative agent of Proliferative Kidney Disease (PKD) targeting primarily the kidney of infected fish where it causes a chronic lymphoid immunopathology. Although known to be associated with suppression of some cellular aspects of innate immunity and a prominent lymphocytic hyperplasia, there remains a considerable knowledge gap in our understanding of the underlying immune mechanisms driving PKD pathogenesis. To provide further insights, the expression profiles of a panel of innate / inflammatory and adaptive immune molecules were examined in rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss following a natural exposure to the parasite. Relative to controls, fish with early to advanced stages of kidney pathology exhibited up-regulation of the inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-11, although remaining refractory towards genes indicative of macrophage activity. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) and anti-inflammatory markers, including cathelicidin (CATH) and IL-10 were markedly up-regulated during clinical disease. Up-regulation of adaptive immune molecules, including cell markers and antibody genes reflect the lymphocytic dominance of this disease and the likely importance of lymphocyte subsets in PKD pathogenesis. Up-regulation of T helper (TH) cell-like response genes and transcription factors implies that T. bryosalmonae may elicit a complex interplay between TH cell subsets. This work, for the first time in the study of fish-myxozoan interactions, suggests that PKD pathogenesis is shaped by an anti-inflammatory phenotype, a profound B cell / antibody response and dysregulated TH cell-like activities. A better understanding of the functional roles of fish immune cells and molecules in PKD pathogenesis may facilitate future development of control measures against this disease. PMID:23865616

  1. Immune gene expression profiling of Proliferative Kidney Disease in rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss reveals a dominance of anti-inflammatory, antibody and T helper cell-like activities.

    PubMed

    Gorgoglione, Bartolomeo; Wang, Tiehui; Secombes, Christopher J; Holland, Jason W

    2013-07-16

    The myxozoan Tetracapsuloides bryosalmonae is the causative agent of Proliferative Kidney Disease (PKD) targeting primarily the kidney of infected fish where it causes a chronic lymphoid immunopathology. Although known to be associated with suppression of some cellular aspects of innate immunity and a prominent lymphocytic hyperplasia, there remains a considerable knowledge gap in our understanding of the underlying immune mechanisms driving PKD pathogenesis. To provide further insights, the expression profiles of a panel of innate/inflammatory and adaptive immune molecules were examined in rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss following a natural exposure to the parasite. Relative to controls, fish with early to advanced stages of kidney pathology exhibited up-regulation of the inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-11, although remaining refractory towards genes indicative of macrophage activity. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) and anti-inflammatory markers, including cathelicidin (CATH) and IL-10 were markedly up-regulated during clinical disease. Up-regulation of adaptive immune molecules, including cell markers and antibody genes reflect the lymphocytic dominance of this disease and the likely importance of lymphocyte subsets in PKD pathogenesis. Up-regulation of T helper (TH) cell-like response genes and transcription factors implies that T. bryosalmonae may elicit a complex interplay between TH cell subsets. This work, for the first time in the study of fish-myxozoan interactions, suggests that PKD pathogenesis is shaped by an anti-inflammatory phenotype, a profound B cell/antibody response and dysregulated TH cell-like activities. A better understanding of the functional roles of fish immune cells and molecules in PKD pathogenesis may facilitate future development of control measures against this disease.

  2. Dendritic cells: sentinels of immunity and tolerance.

    PubMed

    Kubach, Jan; Becker, Christian; Schmitt, Edgar; Steinbrink, Kerstin; Huter, Eva; Tuettenberg, Andrea; Jonuleit, Helmut

    2005-04-01

    The induction of effective antigen-specific T-cell immunity to pathogens without the initiation of autoimmunity has evolved as a sophisticated and highly balanced immunoregulatory mechanism. This mechanism assures the generation of antigen-specific effector cells as well as the induction and maintenance of antigen-specific tolerance to self-structures of the body. As professional antigen-presenting cells of the immune system, dendritic cells (DC) are ideally positioned throughout the entire body and equipped with a unique capability to transport antigens from the periphery to lymphoid tissues. There is growing evidence that DC, besides their well-known immunostimulatory properties, also induce and regulate T-cell tolerance in the periphery. This regulatory function of DC is strictly dependent on their different stages of maturation and activation. Additionally, immunosuppressive agents and cytokines further influence the functions of maturing DC. The regulatory properties of DC include induction of T-cell anergy, apoptosis, and the generation of T-cells with regulatory capacities. This brief review summarizes the current knowledge about the immunoregulatory role of DC as guardians for the induction of T-cell immunity and tolerance.

  3. Immune cell trafficking from the brain maintains CNS immune tolerance.

    PubMed

    Mohammad, Mohammad G; Tsai, Vicky W W; Ruitenberg, Marc J; Hassanpour, Masoud; Li, Hui; Hart, Prue H; Breit, Samuel N; Sawchenko, Paul E; Brown, David A

    2014-03-01

    In the CNS, no pathway dedicated to immune surveillance has been characterized for preventing the anti-CNS immune responses that develop in autoimmune neuroinflammatory disease. Here, we identified a pathway for immune cells to traffic from the brain that is associated with the rostral migratory stream (RMS), which is a forebrain source of newly generated neurons. Evaluation of fluorescently labeled leukocyte migration in mice revealed that DCs travel via the RMS from the CNS to the cervical LNs (CxLNs), where they present antigen to T cells. Pharmacologic interruption of immune cell traffic with the mononuclear cell-sequestering drug fingolimod influenced anti-CNS T cell responses in the CxLNs and modulated experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) severity in a mouse model of multiple sclerosis (MS). Fingolimod treatment also induced EAE in a disease-resistant transgenic mouse strain by altering DC-mediated Treg functions in CxLNs and disrupting CNS immune tolerance. These data describe an immune cell pathway that originates in the CNS and is capable of dampening anti-CNS immune responses in the periphery. Furthermore, these data provide insight into how fingolimod treatment might exacerbate CNS neuroinflammation in some cases and suggest that focal therapeutic interventions, outside the CNS have the potential to selectively modify anti-CNS immunity.

  4. Individuals with inherited chromosomally integrated human herpes virus 6 (ciHHV-6) have functionally active HHV-6 specific T-cell immunity.

    PubMed

    Strenger, V; Kayser, S; Witte, K-E; Lassner, D; Schwinger, W; Jahn, G; Urban, C; Feuchtinger, T

    2016-02-01

    To evaluate the human herpes virus 6 (HHV-6) -specific immune response in individuals with chromosomally integrated HHV-6 (ciHHV-6), we measured HHV-6-antigen-specific cytokine responses (interferon-γ, interleukin-2, tumour necrosis factor-α) in T cells by flow cytometry in 12 and 16 individuals with and without ciHHV-6, respectively. All individuals with ciHHV-6 showed HHV-6-specific T cells with higher frequencies of HHV-6-specific CD8(+) cells (0.03-14.93, median 2.15% of CD8(+) cells) compared with non-ciHHV-6 (0.0-10.67, median 0.36%, p 0.026). The observed increased HHV-6-specific functionally active responses in individuals with ciHHV-6 clearly disprove speculations on immune tolerance in ciHHV-6 and indicate clinical and immunological implications of ciHHV-6.

  5. B cell function in the immune response to helminths

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Nicola

    2010-01-01

    Similar T helper (Th)2-type immune responses are generated against different helminths parasites, but the mechanisms that initiate Th2 immunity, and the specific immune components that mediate protection against these parasites, can vary greatly. B cells are increasingly recognized as important during the Th2-type immune response to helminths, and B cell activation might be a target for effective vaccine development. Antibody production is a function of B cells during helminth infection and understanding how polyclonal and antigen-specific antibodies contribute should provide important insights into how protective immunity develops. In addition, B cells might also contribute to the host response against helminths through antibody-independent functions including, antigen-presentation, as well as regulatory and effector activity. In this review, we examine the role of B cells during Th2-type immune response to these multicellular parasites. PMID:21159556

  6. In Situ complement activation and T-cell immunity in leprosy spectrum: An immunohistological study on leprosy lesional skin.

    PubMed

    Bahia El Idrissi, Nawal; Iyer, Anand M; Ramaglia, Valeria; Rosa, Patricia S; Soares, Cleverson T; Baas, Frank; Das, Pranab K

    2017-01-01

    Mycobacterium leprae (M. leprae) infection causes nerve damage and the condition worsens often during and long after treatment. Clearance of bacterial antigens including lipoarabinomannan (LAM) during and after treatment in leprosy patients is slow. We previously demonstrated that M. leprae LAM damages peripheral nerves by in situ generation of the membrane attack complex (MAC). Investigating the role of complement activation in skin lesions of leprosy patients might provide insight into the dynamics of in situ immune reactivity and the destructive pathology of M. leprae. In this study, we analyzed in skin lesions of leprosy patients, whether M. leprae antigen LAM deposition correlates with the deposition of complement activation products MAC and C3d on nerves and cells in the surrounding tissue. Skin biopsies of paucibacillary (n = 7), multibacillary leprosy patients (n = 7), and patients with erythema nodosum leprosum (ENL) (n = 6) or reversal reaction (RR) (n = 4) and controls (n = 5) were analyzed. The percentage of C3d, MAC and LAM deposition was significantly higher in the skin biopsies of multibacillary compared to paucibacillary patients (p = <0.05, p = <0.001 and p = <0.001 respectively), with a significant association between LAM and C3d or MAC in the skin biopsies of leprosy patients (r = 0.9578, p< 0.0001 and r = 0.8585, p<0.0001 respectively). In skin lesions of multibacillary patients, MAC deposition was found on axons and co-localizing with LAM. In skin lesions of paucibacillary patients, we found C3d positive T-cells in and surrounding granulomas, but hardly any MAC deposition. In addition, MAC immunoreactivity was increased in both ENL and RR skin lesions compared to non-reactional leprosy patients (p = <0.01 and p = <0.01 respectively). The present findings demonstrate that complement is deposited in skin lesions of leprosy patients, suggesting that inflammation driven by complement activation might contribute to nerve damage in the lesions of

  7. Activation of Akt as a mechanism for tumor immune evasion.

    PubMed

    Noh, Kyung Hee; Kang, Tae Heung; Kim, Jin Hee; Pai, Sara I; Lin, Ken Y; Hung, Chien-Fu; Wu, T-C; Kim, Tae Woo

    2009-03-01

    Immune evasion is an important reason why the immune system cannot control tumor growth. To elucidate the mechanism for tumor immune evasion, we generated an immune-resistant human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV-16) E7-expressing tumor cell line by subjecting a susceptible tumor cell line to multiple rounds of in vivo immune selection with an E7-specific vaccine. Comparison of parental and immune-resistant tumors revealed that Akt is highly activated in the immune-resistant tumors. Retroviral transfer of a constitutively active form of Akt into the parental tumor significantly increased its resistance against E7-specific CD8(+) T-cell mediated apoptosis. The observed resistance against apoptosis was found to be associated with the upregulation of antiapoptotic molecules. We also observed that intratumoral injection of an Akt inhibitor enhanced the therapeutic efficacy of E7-specific vaccine or E7-specific CD8(+) T-cell adoptive transfer against the immune-resistant tumors. Thus, our data indicate that the activation of PI3K/Akt pathway represents a new mechanism of immune escape and has important implications for the development of a novel strategy in cancer immunotherapy against immune-resistant tumor cells.

  8. Immune cell phenotype and function in sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Rimmelé, Thomas; Payen, Didier; Cantaluppi, Vincenzo; Marshall, John; Gomez, Hernando; Gomez, Alonso; Murray, Patrick; Kellum, John A.

    2015-01-01

    Cells of the innate and adaptive immune systems play a critical role in the host response to sepsis. Moreover, their accessibility for sampling and their capacity to respond dynamically to an acute threat increases the possibility that leukocytes might serve as a measure of a systemic state of altered responsiveness in sepsis. The working group of the 14th Acute Dialysis Quality Initiative (ADQI) conference sought to obtain consensus on the characteristic functional and phenotypic changes in cells of the innate and adaptive immune system in the setting of sepsis. Techniques for the study of circulating leukocytes were also reviewed and the impact on cellular phenotypes and leukocyte function of non extracorporeal treatments and extracorporeal blood purification therapies proposed for sepsis was analyzed. A large number of alterations in the expression of distinct neutrophil and monocyte surface markers have been reported in septic patients. The most consistent alteration seen in septic neutrophils is their activation of a survival program that resists apoptotic death. Reduced expression of HLA-DR is a characteristic finding on septic monocytes but monocyte antimicrobial function does not appear to be significantly altered in sepsis. Regarding adaptive immunity, sepsis-induced apoptosis leads to lymphopenia in patients with septic shock and it involves all types of T cells (CD4, CD8 and Natural Killer) except T regulatory cells, thus favoring immunosuppression. Finally, numerous promising therapies targeting the host immune response to sepsis are under investigation. These potential treatments can have an effect on the number of immune cells, the proportion of cell subtypes and the cell function. PMID:26529661

  9. Structure-Function Analysis of Barley NLR Immune Receptor MLA10 Reveals Its Cell Compartment Specific Activity in Cell Death and Disease Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Shiwei; Liu, Jie; Chang, Cheng; Zhang, Ling; Maekawa, Takaki; Wang, Qiuyun; Xiao, Wenkai; Liu, Yule; Chai, Jijie; Takken, Frank L. W.; Schulze-Lefert, Paul; Shen, Qian-Hua

    2012-01-01

    Plant intracellular immune receptors comprise a large number of multi-domain proteins resembling animal NOD-like receptors (NLRs). Plant NLRs typically recognize isolate-specific pathogen-derived effectors, encoded by avirulence (AVR) genes, and trigger defense responses often associated with localized host cell death. The barley MLA gene is polymorphic in nature and encodes NLRs of the coiled-coil (CC)-NB-LRR type that each detects a cognate isolate-specific effector of the barley powdery mildew fungus. We report the systematic analyses of MLA10 activity in disease resistance and cell death signaling in barley and Nicotiana benthamiana. MLA10 CC domain-triggered cell death is regulated by highly conserved motifs in the CC and the NB-ARC domains and by the C-terminal LRR of the receptor. Enforced MLA10 subcellular localization, by tagging with a nuclear localization sequence (NLS) or a nuclear export sequence (NES), shows that MLA10 activity in cell death signaling is suppressed in the nucleus but enhanced in the cytoplasm. By contrast, nuclear localized MLA10 is sufficient to mediate disease resistance against powdery mildew fungus. MLA10 retention in the cytoplasm was achieved through attachment of a glucocorticoid receptor hormone-binding domain (GR), by which we reinforced the role of cytoplasmic MLA10 in cell death signaling. Together with our data showing an essential and sufficient nuclear MLA10 activity in disease resistance, this suggests a bifurcation of MLA10-triggered cell death and disease resistance signaling in a compartment-dependent manner. PMID:22685408

  10. Purified Dendritic Cell-Tumor Fusion Hybrids Supplemented with Non-Adherent Dendritic Cells Fraction Are Superior Activators of Antitumor Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yucai; Liu, Yunyan; Zheng, Lianhe

    2014-01-01

    Background Strong evidence supports the DC-tumor fusion hybrid vaccination strategy, but the best fusion product components to use remains controversial. Fusion products contain DC-tumor fusion hybrids, unfused DCs and unfused tumor cells. Various fractions have been used in previous studies, including purified hybrids, the adherent cell fraction or the whole fusion mixture. The extent to which the hybrids themselves or other components are responsible for antitumor immunity or which components should be used to maximize the antitumor immunity remains unknown. Methods Patient-derived breast tumor cells and DCs were electro-fused and purified. The antitumor immune responses induced by the purified hybrids and the other components were compared. Results Except for DC-tumor hybrids, the non-adherent cell fraction containing mainly unfused DCs also contributed a lot in antitumor immunity. Purified hybrids supplemented with the non-adherent cell population elicited the most powerful antitumor immune response. After irradiation and electro-fusion, tumor cells underwent necrosis, and the unfused DCs phagocytosed the necrotic tumor cells or tumor debris, which resulted in significant DC maturation. This may be the immunogenicity mechanism of the non-adherent unfused DCs fraction. Conclusions The non-adherent cell fraction (containing mainly unfused DCs) from total DC/tumor fusion products had enhanced immunogenicity that resulted from apoptotic/necrotic tumor cell phagocytosis and increased DC maturation. Purified fusion hybrids supplemented with the non-adherent cell population enhanced the antitumor immune responses, avoiding unnecessary use of the tumor cell fraction, which has many drawbacks. Purified hybrids supplemented with the non-adherent cell fraction may represent a better approach to the DC-tumor fusion hybrid vaccination strategy. PMID:24466232

  11. Immune complexes inhibit interleukin-1 secretion and inflammasome activation

    PubMed Central

    Janczy, John R.; Ciraci, Ceren; Haasken, Stefanie; Iwakura, Yoichiro; Olivier, Alicia K.; Cassel, Suzanne L.; Sutterwala, Fayyaz S.

    2014-01-01

    Immunoglobulin G (IgG) immune complexes have been shown to modify immune responses driven by antigen presenting cells in either a pro- or anti-inflammatory direction depending upon the context of stimulation. However, the ability of immune complexes to modulate the inflammasome-dependent innate immune response is unknown. Here we show that IgG immune complexes suppress IL-1α and IL-1β secretion through inhibition of inflammasome activation. The mechanism by which this inhibition occurs is via immune complex ligation of activating Fcγ receptors (FcγR), resulting in prevention of both activation and assembly of the inflammasome complex in response to NLRP3, NLRC4, or AIM2 agonists. In vivo, administration of antigen in the form of an immune complex during priming of the immune response inhibited resultant adaptive immune responses in a NLRP3 dependent model of allergic airway disease. Our data reveal an unexpected mechanism regulating CD4+ T cell differentiation, whereby immune complexes suppress inflammasome activation and the generation of IL-1α and IL-1β from antigen presenting cells, which are critical for the antigen-driven differentiation of CD4+ T cells. PMID:25320279

  12. Chemoattraction, adhesion and activation of natural killer cells are involved in the antitumor immune response induced by fractalkine/CX3CL1.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jun; Chen, Taoyong; Wang, Baocheng; Zhang, Minghui; An, Huazhang; Guo, Zhenhong; Yu, Yizhi; Qin, Zhihai; Cao, Xuetao

    2003-10-09

    Fractalkine (FK, also called neurotactin or CX3CL1) is a CX3C chemokine that can chemoattract T lymphocytes, monocytes, dendritic cells (DC) and natural killer (NK) cells. One of our previous studies demonstrated that FK in soluble form can chemoattract T cells and DC and membrane-bound FK can adhere T cells and DC. Vaccination with 3LL lung carcinoma cells gene-modified with FK (3LL-FK) induces potent antitumor CTL response. The aim of the present study is to investigate whether NK cells participate in FK-induced antitumor immunity. We found that NK activity was increased in mice inoculated with 3LL-FK and in vivo depletion of NK cells resulted in the decreased tumor growth inhibition of 3LL-FK, indicating that NK cells play an important role in the antitumor immunity induced by FK. Further studies showed 3LL-FK could chemoattract, adhere NK cells and attract more NK cells to infiltrate into tumor tissue. Incubation of NK cells with 3LL-FK could increase the cytotoxicity of NK cells against YAC-1 cells and even against NK-resistant parental 3LL cells. IL-12 production increased more significantly in the 3LL-FK tumor nodules. Taken together with CTL response induced by 3LL-FK, our data demonstrate that FK, expressed by gene-modified tumor cells, can induce potent antitumor effect through different mechanisms, one of which involves chemoattraction of NK cells into tumor sites and activation of NK cells.

  13. Mumps virus induces innate immune responses in mouse ovarian granulosa cells through the activation of Toll-like receptor 2 and retinoic acid-inducible gene I.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qing; Wu, Han; Cheng, Lijing; Yan, Keqin; Shi, Lili; Zhao, Xiang; Jiang, Qian; Wang, Fei; Chen, Yongmei; Li, Qihan; Han, Daishu

    2016-11-15

    Mumps virus (MuV) infection may lead to oophoritis and perturb ovarian function. However, the mechanisms underlying the activation of innate immune responses to MuV infection in the ovary have not been investigated. This study showed that Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) and retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I) cooperatively initiate innate immune responses to MuV infection in mouse ovarian granulosa cells. Ovarian granulosa cells infected with MuV significantly produced pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, including interleukin-1β (IL-1β), tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (MCP-1), and type 1 interferons (IFN-α and IFN-β). Knockdown of RIG-I significantly decreased MuV-induced cytokine expression. TLR2 deficiency reduced the expression of IL-1β, TNF-α, and MCP-1 but did not affect the expression of IFN-α and IFN-β in granulosa cells after infection with MuV. Intraperitoneal injection of MuV induced the ovarian innate immune responses in vivo, which suppressed estradiol synthesis and induced granulosa cell apoptosis. The results provide novel insights into the mechanisms underlying MuV-induced innate immune responses in the mouse ovary. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Lower activation-induced T-cell apoptosis is related to the pathological immune response in secondary infection with hetero-serotype dengue virus.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wang; Yan, Huacheng; Ma, Yuling; Yu, Tiantian; Guo, Hongxia; Kuang, Yuchan; Ren, Ruiwen; Li, Jintao

    2016-03-01

    The available evidence suggests that dengue virus-specific T lymphocytes and cytokine storm play a pivotal role in the immunopathogenesis of plasma leakage. Investigations are underway to identify the immune profiles associated with increased or decreased risk for severe disease. In this study, CD14+ cells from the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of patients who recovered from DENV-1 infection were infected with DENV-1 or DENV-2 and co-cultured with memory T cells. We found that secondary infection with DENV-2 suppresses the cell reproductive capacity but forms more cell clones and more functional cells to produce more proinflammatory factors (IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-6, IL-8, IL-12 and IL-17) and less regulatory cytokines (IL-10, TGF-β) which results in higher viral replication compared to secondary infection with DENV-1. Memory dengue virus-specific T cells which are induced in a primary dengue virus infection are reactivated by the heterologous serotype of dengue virus and antigen-presenting cells (APCs) during a secondary infection. Dramatically, less apoptosis and more continuous activation of T cells in secondary infection with hetero-serotype DENV were observed. This discovery which has not been reported previously may be the reasonable and vital interpretation for the cytokine storm and severe symptoms observed in secondary infection with DENV. In summary, secondary infection with hetero-serotype DENV elicits the relatively pathological immune response while secondary infection with homologous-serotype DENV induces the relatively protective immune response by activation-induced cell death (AICD) of T cells.

  15. Comparative activity of biodegradable nanoparticles with aluminum adjuvants: antigen uptake by dendritic cells and induction of immune response in mice.

    PubMed

    Uto, Tomofumi; Akagi, Takami; Toyama, Masaaki; Nishi, Yosuke; Shima, Fumiaki; Akashi, Mitsuru; Baba, Masanori

    2011-10-30

    Biodegradable poly(γ-glutamic acid) (γ-PGA) nanoparticles (NPs) are considered to be an excellent antigen carrier. Antigen-carrying γ-PGA NPs were examined for their uptake by murine dendritic cells (DCs) and subsequent induction of antigen-specific immune responses in mice and compared with aluminum (AL) adjuvants. Ovalbumin (OVA)-carrying NPs (FITC-OVA-NPs) were taken up much more efficiently by DCs than OVA alone or its AL-associated form. Both OVA-NPs and OVA+AL were detected in an intracellular lysosome compartment of DCs. Furthermore, the uptake of γ-PGA NPs was inhibited in the presence of pinocytosis and phagocytosis inhibitors. Significantly higher induction of antigen-specific CD8(+) T cells was observed in mice immunized with OVA-carrying γ-PGA NPs than in those immunized with OVA alone, OVA+AL, OVA+3-O-desacyl-4'-monophosphoryl lipid A (MPL), and OVA+AL+MPL. Thus, γ-PGA NPs may have great potential as an effective vaccine carrier and adjuvant for clinical use.

  16. Immunity Related GTPase Irgm1 promotes expansion of activated CD4+ T cell populations by preventing interferon-γ-induced cell death

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Carl G.; Zheng, Lixin; Jankovic, Dragana; Báfica, André; Cannons, Jennifer L.; Watford, Wendy T.; Chaussabel, Damien; Hieny, Sara; Caspar, Patricia; Schwartzberg, Pamela L.; Lenardo, Michael J.; Sher, Alan

    2008-01-01

    Summary Mice deficient in interferon-γ (IFN-γ) inducible immunity-related GTPase, Irgm1, display defective host resistance to a variety of intracellular pathogens. This increased susceptibility to infection is associated with impaired IFN-γ-dependent macrophage microbicidal activity in vitro. Here, we show that Irgm1 also regulated the survival of mature effector CD4+ T lymphocytes by protecting them from IFN-γ-induced autophagic cell death. Mice deficient in both IFN-γ and Irgm1 were rescued from the lymphocyte depletion and increased mortality that occurs in single Irgm1–/– animals following mycobacterial infection. These studies reveal a feedback mechanism in the TH1 response that limits the detrimental effects of IFN-γ on effector T lymphocyte survival while promoting the anti-microbial functions of IFN-γ. PMID:18806793

  17. HIV immune activation drives increased Eomes expression in memory CD8 T cells in association with transcriptional downregulation of CD127.

    PubMed

    Hasley, Rebecca B; Hong, Changwan; Li, Wenqing; Friesen, Travis; Nakamura, Yoriko; Kim, Grace Y; Park, Jung-Hyun; Hixon, Julie A; Durum, Scott; Hu, Zonghui; Sneller, Michael C; Oguariri, Raphael; Imamichi, Tomozumi; Lane, H Clifford; Catalfamo, Marta

    2013-07-31

    During HIV infection distinct mechanisms drive immune activation of the CD4 and CD8 T cells leading to CD4 T-cell depletion and expansion of the CD8 T-cell pool. This immune activation is polyclonal and extends beyond HIV-specific T cells. One consequence of this immune activation is a profound decrease in IL-7Rα (CD127) expression on memory CD8 T cells. The mechanisms leading to this are unknown and because of the potential impact of reduced IL-7 signaling in memory T cells specific to HIV and other pathogens, in the present study we examined the molecular mechanisms implicated in this downregulation of CD127. Membrane bound (mIL7RA) and soluble (sIL7RA) mRNA expression was determined by qRT-PCR. CD127, Eomesodermin (Eomes) and T-bet expression in healthy controls and HIV-infected patients were studied by flow cytometry. CD127 downregulation occurs at the transcriptional level for both mIL7RA and sIL7RA alternative spliced forms in the CD127 memory CD8 T cells. CD127 memory CD8 T cells exhibited increased Eomes expression and an 'effector-like' gene profile. These changes were associated with higher HIV-RNA levels. Following combination antiretroviral therapy (cART), there was an increase in CD127 expression over an extended period of time (>5 months) which was associated with decreased Eomes expression. CD127 is downregulated at a transcriptional level in memory CD8 T cells in association with upregulation of Eomes expression.

  18. [Understanding of immune system by visualization of spatiotemporal regulation of immune cells in the entire body].

    PubMed

    Tomura, Michio

    2013-01-01

    Immune system is high-dimensional integrated system distributed in the whole body. Many kinds of, total 10(11) of immune cells are regulated by receiving appropriate signals in appropriate places. We have been attempting to understand immune system by revealing spatiotemporal regulation of immune cells at the whole body level by "Visualization of immune response in vivo". Photoconvertible protein, "Kaede"-Tg mice allowed us to monitor cell-replacement and cell-movement in the whole body by marking cells with color of Kaede from green to red with exposure to violet light. It is applicable to small cell number populations in both lymphoid organs and also peripheral tissues under both normal and pathophysiological conditions. By using this system, we have demonstrated novel findings that "Naive CD4(+) T cell recirculation is an active process that they recirculate through lymphoid organs to seek limited niche for interacting with endogenous antigens and upregulate their function." and "Activated regulatory T cells emigrating from cutaneous immune response is responsible for termination of immune reponse." I will introduce these new tools of us and would like to discuss what is needed to understand immune system in the entire body.

  19. Effects of Lactobacillus plantarum Strain OLL2712 Culture Conditions on the Anti-inflammatory Activities for Murine Immune Cells and Obese and Type 2 Diabetic Mice.

    PubMed

    Toshimitsu, T; Ozaki, S; Mochizuki, J; Furuichi, K; Asami, Y

    2017-04-01

    Studies on the health-promoting effects of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are numerous, but few provide examples of the relationship between LAB function and culture conditions. We verified the effect of differences in culture conditions on Lactobacillus plantarum OLL2712 functionality; this strain exhibits anti-inflammatory activity and preventive effects against metabolic disorders. We measured interleukin-10 (IL-10) and IL-12 production in murine immune cells treated with OLL2712 cells prepared under various culture conditions. The results showed that the IL-10-inducing activities of OLL2712 cells on murine immune cells differed dramatically between OLL2712 groups at different culture phases and using different culture medium components, temperatures, and neutralizing pHs. In particular, exponential-phase cells had much more IL-10-inducing activity than stationary-phase cells. We confirmed that the Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) stimulation activity of OLL2712 cells depended on culture conditions in conjunction with IL-10-inducing activity. We also demonstrated functional differences by culture phases in vivo; OLL2712 cells at exponential phase had more anti-inflammatory activity and anti-metabolic-disorder effects on obese and diabetic mice than those by their stationary-phase counterparts. These results suggest that culture conditions affect the functionality of anti-inflammatory LAB.IMPORTANCE While previous studies demonstrated that culture conditions affected the immunomodulatory properties of lactic acid bacteria (LAB), few have comprehensively investigated the relationship between culture conditions and LAB functionality. In this study, we demonstrated several culture conditions of Lactobacillus plantarum OLL2712 for higher anti-inflammatory activity. We also showed that culture conditions concretely influenced the health-promoting functions of OLL2712 in vivo, particularly against metabolic disorders. Further, we characterized a novel mechanism by which

  20. Innate immune cell response upon Candida albicans infection

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Yulin; Zhang, Lulu; Xu, Zheng; Zhang, Jinyu; Jiang, Yuan-ying; Cao, Yongbing; Yan, Tianhua

    2016-01-01

    abstract Candida albicans is a polymorphic fungus which is the predominant cause of superficial and deep tissue fungal infections. This microorganism has developed efficient strategies to invade the host and evade host defense systems. However, the host immune system will be prepared for defense against the microbe by recognition of receptors, activation of signal transduction pathways and cooperation of immune cells. As a consequence, C. albicans could either be eliminated by immune cells rapidly or disseminate hematogenously, leading to life-threatening systemic infections. The interplay between Candida albicans and the host is complex, requiring recognition of the invaded pathogens, activation of intricate pathways and collaboration of various immune cells. In this review, we will focus on the effects of innate immunity that emphasize the first line protection of host defense against invaded C. albicans including the basis of receptor-mediated recognition and the mechanisms of cell-mediated immunity. PMID:27078171

  1. Innate immune cell response upon Candida albicans infection.

    PubMed

    Qin, Yulin; Zhang, Lulu; Xu, Zheng; Zhang, Jinyu; Jiang, Yuan-Ying; Cao, Yongbing; Yan, Tianhua

    2016-07-03

    Candida albicans is a polymorphic fungus which is the predominant cause of superficial and deep tissue fungal infections. This microorganism has developed efficient strategies to invade the host and evade host defense systems. However, the host immune system will be prepared for defense against the microbe by recognition of receptors, activation of signal transduction pathways and cooperation of immune cells. As a consequence, C. albicans could either be eliminated by immune cells rapidly or disseminate hematogenously, leading to life-threatening systemic infections. The interplay between Candida albicans and the host is complex, requiring recognition of the invaded pathogens, activation of intricate pathways and collaboration of various immune cells. In this review, we will focus on the effects of innate immunity that emphasize the first line protection of host defense against invaded C. albicans including the basis of receptor-mediated recognition and the mechanisms of cell-mediated immunity.

  2. Polyclonal Activation of the Murine Immune System by an Antibody to IgD. 2. Generation of Polyclonal Antibody Production and Cells with Surface IgG

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-08-01

    TO IGD , II. GENERATION OF POLYCLONAL ANTIBODY PRODUCTION AND CELLS WITH SURFACE IGG. F.DFINKELMANi I.SCHER, J,JoMOND, S.KESSLER, J.T.KUNG, AND E...1982 by The Ameuican Assoclari of irturlogists Prined in U.S.A POLYCLONAL ACTIVATION OF THE MURINE IMMUNE SYSTEM BY AN ANTIBODY TO IgD II. Generation...of the A linking of B cell surface IgD by ligand leads to 1) direct second wave of lymphocyte proliferation suggested that the in * activation of B

  3. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1 Vpr induces differential regulation of T cell costimulatory molecules: Direct effect of Vpr on T cell activation and immune function

    SciTech Connect

    Venkatachari, Narasimhan J.; Majumder, Biswanath; Ayyavoo, Velpandi . E-mail: velpandi@pitt.edu

    2007-02-20

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) viral proteins disrupt the normal host cellular immune pathways thus exploiting the cellular machinery for replication, survival and to escape host immune attack. Here we evaluated the direct effects of HIV-1 Vpr-mediated immune modulation of infected T cells. Vpr specifically downregulated the expression of CD28 and increased the expression of CTLA-4, whereas no significant difference in the expression of CD25 and HLA-DR was observed. Interferon gamma (IFN-{gamma}) production in T cells was evaluated as a measure of the downstream effector functions. Results indicate that Vpr significantly inhibited IFN-{gamma} production and this may, in part, due to Vpr's ability to inhibit the nuclear translocation of NF-{kappa}B, and its transcriptional regulation. Together these results support that HIV-1 Vpr selectively dysregulates the immune functions at multiple levels and exerts its inhibitory effects in the presence of other viral proteins.

  4. Immune Surveillance of Unhealthy Cells by Natural Killer cells

    PubMed Central

    Iannello, Alexandre; Raulet, David H.

    2014-01-01

    Pathogenic and oncogenic insults result in the induction of intrinsic defense mechanisms such as cell death pathways and senescence, and extrinsic pathways that mobilize immune responses to destroy unhealthy cells. Both protective mechanisms presumably evolved to limit the damage these insults could inflict on the host. After viral infection or malignant transformation, unhealthy cells can be directly sensed by natural killer (NK) and some T cells via the activating receptor NKG2D. All NK cells and subsets of T cells express NKG2D. The NKG2D/ligand system represents a major recognition mechanism for detection and elimination of unhealthy cells. Here we discuss different pathways, including stress pathways, that are responsible for cell surface display of ligands for NKG2D, which are self-proteins that are minimally expressed by normal cells. We also discuss new results indicating that efficient elimination of tumor cells that display NKG2D ligands depends on the recruitment of NK cells and other immune cells to the tumor, which can be regulated by distinct mechanisms, including the p53-dependent production of chemokines by senescent tumors. The cooperative effect of pathways that induce the display NKG2D ligands and distinct pathways that mobilize immune cells provides a higher degree of specificity to the NK cell response. PMID:24135717

  5. Endogenous opioid peptides in regulation of innate immunity cell functions.

    PubMed

    Gein, S V; Baeva, T A

    2011-03-01

    Endogenous opioid peptides comprise a group of bioregulatory factors involved in regulation of functional activity of various physiological systems of an organism. One of most important functions of endogenous opioids is their involvement in the interaction between cells of the nervous and immune systems. Summary data on the effects of opioid peptides on regulation of functions of innate immunity cells are presented.

  6. Apoplastic Venom Allergen-like Proteins of Cyst Nematodes Modulate the Activation of Basal Plant Innate Immunity by Cell Surface Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Lozano-Torres, Jose L.; Wilbers, Ruud H. P.; Warmerdam, Sonja; Finkers-Tomczak, Anna; Diaz-Granados, Amalia; van Schaik, Casper C.; Helder, Johannes; Bakker, Jaap; Goverse, Aska; Schots, Arjen; Smant, Geert

    2014-01-01

    Despite causing considerable damage to host tissue during the onset of parasitism, nematodes establish remarkably persistent infections in both animals and plants. It is thought that an elaborate repertoire of effector proteins in nematode secretions suppresses damage-triggered immune responses of the host. However, the nature and mode of action of most immunomodulatory compounds in nematode secretions are not well understood. Here, we show that venom allergen-like proteins of plant-parasitic nematodes selectively suppress host immunity mediated by surface-localized immune receptors. Venom allergen-like proteins are uniquely conserved in secretions of all animal- and plant-parasitic nematodes studied to date, but their role during the onset of parasitism has thus far remained elusive. Knocking-down the expression of the venom allergen-like protein Gr-VAP1 severely hampered the infectivity of the potato cyst nematode Globodera rostochiensis. By contrast, heterologous expression of Gr-VAP1 and two other venom allergen-like proteins from the beet cyst nematode Heterodera schachtii in plants resulted in the loss of basal immunity to multiple unrelated pathogens. The modulation of basal immunity by ectopic venom allergen-like proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana involved extracellular protease-based host defenses and non-photochemical quenching in chloroplasts. Non-photochemical quenching regulates the initiation of the defense-related programmed cell death, the onset of which was commonly suppressed by venom allergen-like proteins from G. rostochiensis, H. schachtii, and the root-knot nematode Meloidogyne incognita. Surprisingly, these venom allergen-like proteins only affected the programmed cell death mediated by surface-localized immune receptors. Furthermore, the delivery of venom allergen-like proteins into host tissue coincides with the enzymatic breakdown of plant cell walls by migratory nematodes. We, therefore, conclude that parasitic nematodes most likely utilize

  7. Apoplastic venom allergen-like proteins of cyst nematodes modulate the activation of basal plant innate immunity by cell surface receptors.

    PubMed

    Lozano-Torres, Jose L; Wilbers, Ruud H P; Warmerdam, Sonja; Finkers-Tomczak, Anna; Diaz-Granados, Amalia; van Schaik, Casper C; Helder, Johannes; Bakker, Jaap; Goverse, Aska; Schots, Arjen; Smant, Geert

    2014-12-01

    Despite causing considerable damage to host tissue during the onset of parasitism, nematodes establish remarkably persistent infections in both animals and plants. It is thought that an elaborate repertoire of effector proteins in nematode secretions suppresses damage-triggered immune responses of the host. However, the nature and mode of action of most immunomodulatory compounds in nematode secretions are not well understood. Here, we show that venom allergen-like proteins of plant-parasitic nematodes selectively suppress host immunity mediated by surface-localized immune receptors. Venom allergen-like proteins are uniquely conserved in secretions of all animal- and plant-parasitic nematodes studied to date, but their role during the onset of parasitism has thus far remained elusive. Knocking-down the expression of the venom allergen-like protein Gr-VAP1 severely hampered the infectivity of the potato cyst nematode Globodera rostochiensis. By contrast, heterologous expression of Gr-VAP1 and two other venom allergen-like proteins from the beet cyst nematode Heterodera schachtii in plants resulted in the loss of basal immunity to multiple unrelated pathogens. The modulation of basal immunity by ectopic venom allergen-like proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana involved extracellular protease-based host defenses and non-photochemical quenching in chloroplasts. Non-photochemical quenching regulates the initiation of the defense-related programmed cell death, the onset of which was commonly suppressed by venom allergen-like proteins from G. rostochiensis, H. schachtii, and the root-knot nematode Meloidogyne incognita. Surprisingly, these venom allergen-like proteins only affected the programmed cell death mediated by surface-localized immune receptors. Furthermore, the delivery of venom allergen-like proteins into host tissue coincides with the enzymatic breakdown of plant cell walls by migratory nematodes. We, therefore, conclude that parasitic nematodes most likely utilize

  8. Prenatal alcohol exposure potentiates chronic neuropathic pain, spinal glial and immune cell activation and alters sciatic nerve and DRG cytokine levels.

    PubMed

    Noor, Shahani; Sanchez, Joshua J; Vanderwall, Arden G; Sun, Melody S; Maxwell, Jessie R; Davies, Suzy; Jantzie, Lauren L; Petersen, Timothy R; Savage, Daniel D; Milligan, Erin D

    2017-03-01

    A growing body of evidence indicates that prenatal alcohol exposure (PAE) may predispose individuals to secondary medical disabilities later in life. Animal models of PAE reveal neuroimmune sequelae such as elevated brain astrocyte and microglial activation with corresponding region-specific changes in immune signaling molecules such as cytokines and chemokines. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of moderate PAE on the development and maintenance of allodynia induced by chronic constriction injury (CCI) of the sciatic nerve in adult male rat offspring. Because CCI allodynia requires the actions of glial cytokines, we analyzed lumbar spinal cord glial and immune cell surface markers indicative of their activation levels, as well as sciatic nerve and dorsal root ganglia (DRG) cytokines in PAE offspring in adulthood. While PAE did not alter basal sensory thresholds before or after sham manipulations, PAE significantly potentiated adult onset and maintenance of allodynia. Microscopic analysis revealed exaggerated astrocyte and microglial activation, while flow cytometry data demonstrated increased proportions of immune cells with cell surface major histocompatibility complex II (MHCII) and β-integrin adhesion molecules, which are indicative of PAE-induced immune cell activation. Sciatic nerves from CCI rats revealed that PAE potentiated the proinflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFα) protein levels with a simultaneous robust suppression of the anti-inflammatory cytokine, IL-10. A profound reduction in IL-10 expression in the DRG of PAE neuropathic rats was also observed. Taken together, our results provide novel insights into the vulnerability that PAE produces for adult-onset central nervous system (CNS) pathological conditions from peripheral nerve injury.

  9. Tricking the balance: NK cells in anti-cancer immunity.

    PubMed

    Pahl, Jens; Cerwenka, Adelheid

    2017-01-01

    Natural Killer (NK) cells are classically considered innate immune effector cells involved in the first line of defense against infected and malignant cells. More recently, NK cells have emerged to acquire properties of adaptive immunity in response to certain viral infections such as expansion of specific NK cell subsets and long-lasting virus-specific responses to secondary challenges. NK cells distinguish healthy cells from abnormal cells by measuring the net input of activating and inhibitory signals perceived from target cells through NK cell surface receptors. Acquisition of activating ligands in combination with reduced expression of MHC class I molecules on virus-infected and cancer cells activates NK cell cytotoxicity and release of immunostimulatory cytokines like IFN-γ. In the cancer microenvironment however, NK cells become functionally impaired by inhibitory factors produced by immunosuppressive immune cells and cancer cells. Here we review recent progress on the role of NK cells in cancer immunity. We describe regulatory factors of the tumor microenvironment on NK cell function which determine cancer cell destruction or escape from immune recognition. Finally, recent strategies that focus on exploiting NK cell anti-cancer responses for immunotherapeutic approaches are outlined. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  10. Grp94 in complexes with IgG is a soluble diagnostic marker of gastrointestinal tumors and displays immune-stimulating activity on peripheral blood immune cells

    PubMed Central

    Tramentozzi, Elisa; Ruli, Erlis; Angriman, Imerio; Bardini, Romeo; Campora, Michela; Guzzardo, Vincenza; Zamarchi, Rita; Rossi, Elisabetta; Rugge, Massimo; Finotti, Paola

    2016-01-01

    Glucose-regulated protein94 (Grp94), the most represented endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-resident heat shock protein (HSP), is a tumor antigen shared by different types of solid and hematological tumors. The tumor-specific feature of Grp94 is its translocation from the ER to the cell surface where it displays pro-oncogenic functions. This un-physiological location has important implications for both the tumor pathology and anti-tumor therapy. We wanted to address the question of whether Grp94 could be measured as liquid marker in cancer patients in order to make predictions of diagnostic and therapeutic relevance for the tumor. To this aim, we performed an in-depth investigation on patients with primary tumors of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, using different methodological approaches to detect Grp94 in tumor tissues, plasma and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Results indicate that Grp94 is not only the antigen highly expressed in any tumor tissue and in cells of tumor infiltrates, mostly B lymphocytes, but it is also found in the circulation. However, the only form in which Grp94 was detected in the plasma of any patients and in B lymphocytes induced to proliferate, was that of stable complexes with Immunoglobulin (Ig)G. Using a specific immune-enzyme assay to measure plasma Grp94-IgG complexes, we showed that Grp94-IgG complexes were significantly increased in cancer patients compared to healthy control subjects, serving as diagnostic tumor biomarker. Results also demonstrate that the stimulation of patient PBMCs with Grp94-IgG complexes led to an increased secretion of inflammatory cytokines that might drive a potentially beneficial anti-tumor effect. PMID:27662661

  11. Systemic activation of the immune system in HIV infection: The role of the immune complexes (hypothesis).

    PubMed

    Korolevskaya, Larisa B; Shmagel, Konstantin V; Shmagel, Nadezhda G; Saidakova, Evgeniya V

    2016-03-01

    Currently, immune activation is proven to be the basis for the HIV infection pathogenesis and a strong predictor of the disease progression. Among the causes of systemic immune activation the virus and its products, related infectious agents, pro-inflammatory cytokines, and regulatory CD4+ T cells' decrease are considered. Recently microbial translocation (bacterial products yield into the bloodstream as a result of the gastrointestinal tract mucosal barrier integrity damage) became the most popular hypothesis. Previously, we have found an association between immune complexes present in the bloodstream of HIV infected patients and the T cell activation. On this basis, we propose a significantly modified hypothesis of immune activation in HIV infection. It is based on the immune complexes' participation in the immunocompetent cells' activation. Immune complexes are continuously formed in the chronic phase of the infection. Together with TLR-ligands (viral antigens, bacterial products coming from the damaged gut) present in the bloodstream they interact with macrophages. As a result macrophages are transformed into the type II activated forms. These macrophages block IL-12 production and start synthesizing IL-10. High level of this cytokine slows down the development of the full-scale Th1-response. The anti-viral reactions are shifted towards the serogenesis. Newly synthesized antibodies' binding to viral antigens leads to continuous formation of the immune complexes capable of interacting with antigen-presenting cells.

  12. The Crosstalk between Myeloid Derived Suppressor Cells and Immune Cells: To Establish Immune Tolerance in Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shuo; Yang, Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) are a heterogeneous population of myeloid precursor and progenitor cells and endowed with a robust immunosuppressive activity in multiple pathophysiological conditions. Recent studies have uncovered the crosstalk between MDSCs and immune cells (i.e., natural killer cells, dendritic cells, macrophages, natural killer T cells, and regulatory T cells) and its role in the establishment and maintenance of immune tolerant microenvironment in transplantation. Considering their strong immunosuppressive capability, MDSCs could become a prospective clinical regimen during transplantation tolerance induction, resulting in long-term graft survival with decreased or without immunosuppressive drugs. The review summarized recent research advances in this field and looked ahead at the research directions in the future. PMID:27868073

  13. Intralesional rose bengal in melanoma elicits tumor immunity via activation of dendritic cells by the release of high mobility group box 1

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hao; Innamarato, Pasquale Patrick; Kodumudi, Krithika; Weber, Amy; Nemoto, Satoshi; Robinson, John L.; Crago, Georgina; McCardle, Timothy; Royster, Erica; Sarnaik, Amod A.; Pilon-Thomas, Shari

    2016-01-01

    Intralesional (IL) therapy is under investigation to treat dermal and subcutaneous metastatic cancer. Rose bengal (RB) is a staining agent that was originally used by ophthalmologists and in liver function studies. IL injection of RB has been shown to induce regression of injected and uninjected tumors in murine models and clinical trials. In this study, we have shown a mechanism of tumor-specific immune response induced by IL RB. In melanoma-bearing mice, IL RB induced regression of injected tumor and inhibited the growth of bystander lesions mediated by CD8+ T cells. IL RB resulted in necrosis of tumor cells and the release of High Mobility Group Box 1 (HMGB1), with increased dendritic cell (DC) infiltration into draining lymph nodes and the activation of tumor-specific T cells. Treatment of DC with tumor supernatants increased the ability of DCs to stimulate T cell proliferation, and blockade of HMGB1 in the supernatants suppressed DC activity. Additionally, increased HMGB1 levels were measured in the sera of melanoma patients treated with IL RB. These results support the role of IL RB to activate dendritic cells at the site of tumor necrosis for the induction of a systemic anti-tumor immune response. PMID:27177220

  14. Influence of Blockade of beta-Adrenoreceptors and Acute Stress on Antibody Formation, Delayed Type of Hypersensitivity, Phagocytic Cell Activity in Local Immune Response.

    PubMed

    Shilov, Juri I.; Gein, Sergei V.; Chereshnev, Valery A.

    2001-10-01

    In the experiments on male Wistar rats a study was made on the effect of acute 6-h immobilization stress on antibody formation, delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH), functional activity of phagocytes in the case of a local form of immune response to sheep red blood cells at the background of beta-adrenergic receptor blockade. It was established that immobilization stress resulted in substantial inhibition of the expressibility of immune inflammation in the case of DTH, cancellation of an increase of the phagocytic activity of macrophages of the regional lymph node and the level of antibodies. The blockade of the beta-adrenergic receptors with propranolol antagonized with these effects of stress. After termination of the immobilization, activation of neutrophil phagocytosis was detected, this being related to an increase of neutrophil immigration from the bone marrow. Eosinophilic phagocytosis at the early period of stress was inhibited, the blockade of beta-adrenergic receptors canceled this effect.

  15. HEPATITIS B VIRUS-INDUCED ALTERATIONS IN HEPATOCYTE CD1D LIPID ANTIGENS ACTIVATE NATURAL KILLER T CELLS AND CONTRIBUTE TO PROTECTIVE IMMUNITY

    PubMed Central

    Zeissig, Sebastian; Murata, Kazumoto; Sweet, Lindsay; Publicover, Jean; Hu, Zongyi; Kaser, Arthur; Bosse, Esther; Iqbal, Jahangir; Hussain, M. Mahmood; Balschun, Katharina; Röcken, Christoph; Arlt, Alexander; Günther, Rainer; Hampe, Jochen; Schreiber, Stefan; Baron, Jody L.; Moody, D. Branch; Liang, T. Jake; Blumberg, Richard S.

    2012-01-01

    In most adult patients, hepatitis B is a self-limiting disease leading to life-long protective immunity, which is the consequence of a robust adaptive immune response occurring weeks after HBV infection. Intriguingly, HBV-specific T cells can be detected shortly after infection but the mechanisms underlying this early immune priming and its consequences for subsequent control of viral replication are poorly understood. Using primary human and murine hepatocytes and mouse models of transgenic and adenoviral HBV expression, we show that HBV-expressing hepatocytes produce endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-associated endogenous antigenic lipids including lysophospholipids that are generated by HBV-induced secretory phospholipases and lead to activation of natural killer T (NKT) cells. The absence of NKT cells, CD1d or a defect in ER-associated transfer of lipids onto CD1d results in diminished HBV-specific T and B cell responses and delayed viral control. NKT cells may therefore contribute to control of HBV infection through sensing of HBV-induced modified self-lipids. PMID:22706385

  16. Immune complexes inhibit IL-1 secretion and inflammasome activation.

    PubMed

    Janczy, John R; Ciraci, Ceren; Haasken, Stefanie; Iwakura, Yoichiro; Olivier, Alicia K; Cassel, Suzanne L; Sutterwala, Fayyaz S

    2014-11-15

    IgG immune complexes have been shown to modify immune responses driven by APCs in either a pro- or anti-inflammatory direction depending upon the context of stimulation. However, the ability of immune complexes to modulate the inflammasome-dependent innate immune response is unknown. In this study, we show that IgG immune complexes suppress IL-1α and IL-1β secretion through inhibition of inflammasome activation. The mechanism by which this inhibition occurs is via immune complex ligation of activating FcγRs, resulting in prevention of both activation and assembly of the inflammasome complex in response to nucleotide-binding domain leucine-rich repeat (NLR) P3, NLRC4, or AIM2 agonists. In vivo, administration of Ag in the form of an immune complex during priming of the immune response inhibited resultant adaptive immune responses in an NLRP3-dependent model of allergic airway disease. Our data reveal an unexpected mechanism regulating CD4(+) T cell differentiation, by which immune complexes suppress inflammasome activation and the generation of IL-1α and IL-1β from APCs, which are critical for the Ag-driven differentiation of CD4(+) T cells.

  17. ``Backpack'' Functionalized Living Immune Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swiston, Albert; Um, Soong Ho; Irvine, Darrell; Cohen, Robert; Rubner, Michael

    2009-03-01

    We demonstrate that functional polymeric ``backpacks'' built from polyelectrolyte multilayers (PEMs) can be attached to a fraction of the surface area of living, individual lymphocytes. Backpacks containing fluorescent polymers, superparamagnetic nanoparticles, and commercially available quantum dots have been attached to B and T-cells, which may be spatially manipulated using a magnetic field. Since the backpack does not occlude the entire cellular surface from the environment, this technique allows functional synthetic payloads to be attached to a cell that is free to perform its native functions, thereby synergistically utilizing both biological and synthetic functionalities. For instance, we have shown that backpack-modified T-cells are able to migrate on surfaces for several hours following backpack attachment. Possible payloads within the PEM backpack include drugs, vaccine antigens, thermally responsive polymers, nanoparticles, and imaging agents. We will discuss how this approach has broad potential for applications in bioimaging, single-cell functionalization, immune system and tissue engineering, and cell-based therapeutics where cell-environment interactions are critical.

  18. Comparative Analysis of Immune Activation Markers of CD8+ T Cells in Lymph Nodes of Different Origins in SIV-Infected Chinese Rhesus Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jinbiao; Xiao, Qianhao; Zhou, Runhong; Wang, Yong; Xian, Qiaoyang; Ma, Tongcui; Zhuang, Ke; Zhou, Li; Guo, Deyin; Wang, Xu; Ho, Wen-Zhe; Li, Jieliang

    2016-01-01

    Altered T-cell homeostasis, such as expansion of CD8+ T cells to the secondary lymphatic compartments, has been suggested as a mechanism of HIV/simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)-pathogenesis. However, the role of immune activation of CD8+ T cells in the CD4/CD8 turnover and viral replication in these tissues is not completely understood. In this study, we compared the expression of immune activation markers (CD69 and HLA-DR) on CD8+ T cells in the peripheral blood and lymph nodes (LNs) of SIV-infected/uninfected Chinese rhesus macaques. SIV-infected macaques had significantly higher percentages of CD8+CD69+ and CD8+HLA-DR+ T cells in all these anatomical compartments than uninfected macaques. LNs that located close to the gastrointestinal (GI) tract (colon, mesenteric, and iliac LNs) of SIV-infected macaques had profoundly lower numbers of CD4+ T cells, but no significant difference in expression of activation marker (CD8+CD69+ and CD8+HLA-DR+) as compared with the peripheral lymphatic tissues (axillary and inguinal LNs). The CD4/CD8 ratios were negatively correlated with the activation of CD8+ T cells in the overall LNs, with further associations with CD8+HLA-DR+ in GI LNs while CD8+CD69+ in peripheral LNs. These observations demonstrate that the increase of CD8+ T cell activation is a contributing factor for the decline of CD4/CD8 ratios in GI system. PMID:27708644

  19. Immune-associated proteins with potential in vivo anti-tumor activities are upregulated in lung cancer cells treated with umbelliprenin: A proteomic approach

    PubMed Central

    Khaghanzadeh, Narges; Nakamura, Kazuyuki; Kuramitsu, Yasuhiro; Ghaderi, Abbas; Mojtahedi, Zahra

    2016-01-01

    Umbelliprenin (Umb), a natural coumarin, has demonstrated anti-tumor activities, both in vitro and particularly in vivo, in several types of cancer, including lung cancer. The present study aimed to identify molecular targets of Umb using a high-throughput approach. Lung cancer cell lines, QU-DB (large-cell lung carcinoma) and A549 (adenocarcinoma), were treated with Umb. Differentially-expressed proteins were identified using two-dimensional electrophoresis coupled to mass spectrometry. In the QU-DB cells, differential expression of proteins, including downregulation of the tumorigenic protein heat shock protein 90 kDa and upregulation of the potential anti-tumor proteins Nipsnap1 and glycine-tRNA ligase (GRS), suggested that Umb is a strong anti-tumor compound. In the A549 cells, differential expression of proteins indicated possible contradictory effects of Umbregarding tumorigenesis, which included downregulation of the tumorigenic protein cyclophilin and the tumor suppressor MST, and upregulation of stathmin (tumorigenic) and calreticulin. Calreticulun, in addition to GRS in QU-DB cells, stimulates anti-tumor immune responses in vivo. To the best of our knowledge, the present study is the first to use a high-throughput approach to identify targets of Umb in cancer. These molecular targets suggested that Umb may exhibit stronger in vitro anti-tumor activity against the large-cell carcinoma model than the adenocarcinoma model. Furthermore, it has been reported that Umb exhibits higher cytotoxicity against QU-DB cells than A549 cells in vitro, and significant Umb anti-tumor activity against lung cancer in vivo, which is consistent with previously published literature. In each cell type, immune-associated molecules were upregulated, indicating that this naturally occurring compound exhibits marked anti-tumor activity in vivo. However, further studies that investigate the effect of Umb in different in vitro models of cancer are required. PMID:28105238

  20. Direct regulatory immune activity of lactic acid bacteria on Der p 1-pulsed dendritic cells from allergic patients.

    PubMed

    Pochard, Pierre; Hammad, Hamida; Ratajczak, Céline; Charbonnier-Hatzfeld, Anne-Sophie; Just, Nicolas; Tonnel, André-Bernard; Pestel, Joël

    2005-07-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are suggested to play a regulatory role in the development of allergic reactions. However, their potential effects on dendritic cells (DCs) directing the immune polarization remain unclear. The immunologic effect of Lactobacillus plantarum NCIMB 8826 (LAB1) on monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MD-DCs) from patients allergic to house dust mite was evaluated. MD-DCs were stimulated for 24 hours with the related allergen Der p 1 in the presence or absence of LAB1. Cell-surface markers were assessed by means of FACS analysis, and the key polarizing cytokines IL-12 and IL-10 were quantified. The subsequent regulatory effect of pulsed MD-DCs on naive or memory T cells was evaluated by determining the T-cell cytokine profile. LAB1 induced the maturation of MD-DCs, even if pulsed with Der p 1. Interestingly, after incubation with LAB1 and Der p 1, MD-DCs produced higher amounts of IL-12 than Der p 1-pulsed DCs. Indeed, the T H 2 cytokine (IL-4 and IL-5) production observed when naive or memory autologous T cells were cocultured with Der p 1-pulsed MD-DCs was highly reduced in the presence of LAB1. Finally, in contrast to naive or memory T cells exposed once to Der p 1-pulsed DCs, T cells stimulated by MD-DCs pulsed with Der p 1 and LAB1 failed to produce T H 2 cytokines in response to a new stimulation with Der p 1-pulsed DCs. Thus in the presence of LAB1, MD-DCs from allergic patients tend to reorientate the T-cell response toward a beneficial T H 1 profile.

  1. Human coronary transplantation-associated arteriosclerosis. Evidence for a chronic immune reaction to activated graft endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Salomon, R. N.; Hughes, C. C.; Schoen, F. J.; Payne, D. D.; Pober, J. S.; Libby, P.

    1991-01-01

    Occlusive disease of coronary arteries of engrafted hearts is the major obstacle to long-term survival of human cardiac allografts. The pathogenesis of this process remains uncertain. The identity and localization of cells found in transplantation-associated arteriosclerosis lesions from human cardiac allografts were evaluated, and their expression of class II major histocompatibility complex (human leukocyte antigen-DR [HLA-DR]), surface molecules required for recognition of foreign cells by CD4+ T lymphocytes, was noted. Expanded intimas of transplanted coronary arteries contain T lymphocytes (both CD4+ and CD8+ in approximately equal number) and HLA-DR+ macrophages, both localized primarily in a ring immediately below the luminal endothelium, a distribution strikingly different from that in typical atherosclerosis. Coronary arterial endothelium from six of six transplanted hearts studied bore high levels of HLA-DR. Normal human arteries or usual atherosclerotic lesions have few if any HLA-DR+ endothelial cells. The significance of these findings was tested by evaluating the ability of HLA-DR+ arterial cells to interact with allogeneic T cells in vitro. Endothelial cells (but not smooth muscle cells) cultured from human arteries stimulated foreign CD4+ T cells to proliferate and augmented their secretion of interleukin-2. These findings suggest that ongoing stimulation of recipient T lymphocytes by HLA-DR+ endothelium of donor coronary arteries contributes to a sustained regional immune response. Consequent local release of cytokines may regulate smooth muscle cell proliferation and matrix accumulation within the coronary arteries of allografted hearts. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:2012171

  2. Interactions of immune cells and lymphatic vessels.

    PubMed

    Kataru, Raghu P; Lee, Yulia G; Koh, Gou Young

    2014-01-01

    In addition to fluid and lipid absorption, immune cell trafficking has now become recognized as one of the major functions of the lymphatic system. Recently, several critical roles of the lymphatic vessels (LVs) in modulating immune reactions during both physiological and pathological conditions have been emerging. As LVs serve as conduits for immune cells, they come to closely interact with macrophages/monocytes, dendritic cells, and T and B lymphocytes. Accumulating evidences indicate that reciprocal interactions between the LVs and immune cells exist which cause considerable influence over the process of immune cell migration, LV growth, and ultimately certain immune reactions. This chapter discusses on the interactions of macrophages/monocytes and dendritic cells with peripheral LVs and on those of sinusoidal macrophages and T and B lymphocytes with lymph node LVs.

  3. Targeting Ewing sarcoma with activated and GD2-specific chimeric antigen receptor-engineered human NK cells induces upregulation of immune-inhibitory HLA-G.

    PubMed

    Kailayangiri, Sareetha; Altvater, Bianca; Spurny, Christian; Jamitzky, Silke; Schelhaas, Sonja; Jacobs, Andreas H; Wiek, Constanze; Roellecke, Katharina; Hanenberg, Helmut; Hartmann, Wolfgang; Wiendl, Heinz; Pankratz, Susann; Meltzer, Jutta; Farwick, Nicole; Greune, Lea; Fluegge, Maike; Rossig, Claudia

    2017-01-01

    Activated and in vitro expanded natural killer (NK) cells have substantial cytotoxicity against many tumor cells, but their in vivo efficacy to eliminate solid cancers is limited. Here, we used chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) to enhance the activity of NK cells against Ewing sarcomas (EwS) in a tumor antigen-specific manner. Expression of CARs directed against the ganglioside antigen GD2 in activated NK cells increased their responses to GD2+ allogeneic EwS cells in vitro and overcame resistance of individual cell lines to NK cell lysis. Second-generation CARs with 4-1BB and 2B4 co-stimulatory signaling and third-generation CARs combining both co-stimulatory domains were all equally effective. By contrast, adoptive transfer of GD2-specific CAR gene-modified NK cells both by intratumoral and intraperitoneal delivery failed to eliminate GD2-expressing EwS xenografts. Histopathology review revealed upregulation of the immunosuppressive ligand HLA-G in tumor autopsies from mice treated with NK cells compared to untreated control mice. Supporting the relevance of this finding, in vitro co-incubation of NK cells with allogeneic EwS cells induced upregulation of the HLA-G receptor CD85j, and HLA-G1 expressed by EwS cells suppressed the activity of NK cells from three of five allogeneic donors against the tumor cells in vitro. We conclude that HLA-G is a candidate immune checkpoint in EwS where it can contribute to resistance to NK cell therapy. HLA-G deserves evaluation as a potential target for more effective immunotherapeutic combination regimens in this and other cancers.

  4. Activity of Uncleaved Caspase-8 Controls Anti-bacterial Immune Defense and TLR-Induced Cytokine Production Independent of Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    DeLaney, Alexandra; Santos-Marrero, Melanie; Grier, Jennifer T.; Sun, Yan; Zwack, Erin E.; Hu, Baofeng; Olsen, Tayla M.; Rongvaux, Anthony; López, Carolina B.; Oberst, Andrew; Beiting, Daniel P.; Brodsky, Igor E.

    2016-01-01

    Caspases regulate cell death programs in response to environmental stresses, including infection and inflammation, and are therefore critical for the proper operation of the mammalian immune system. Caspase-8 is necessary for optimal production of inflammatory cytokines and host defense against infection by multiple pathogens including Yersinia, but whether this is due to death of infected cells or an intrinsic role of caspase-8 in TLR-induced gene expression is unknown. Caspase-8 activation at death signaling complexes results in its autoprocessing and subsequent cleavage and activation of its downstream apoptotic targets. Whether caspase-8 activity is also important for inflammatory gene expression during bacterial infection has not been investigated. Here, we report that caspase-8 plays an essential cell-intrinsic role in innate inflammatory cytokine production in vivo during Yersinia infection. Unexpectedly, we found that caspase-8 enzymatic activity regulates gene expression in response to bacterial infection as well as TLR signaling independently of apoptosis. Using newly-generated mice in which caspase-8 autoprocessing is ablated (Casp8DA/DA), we now demonstrate that caspase-8 enzymatic activity, but not autoprocessing, mediates induction of inflammatory cytokines by bacterial infection and a wide variety of TLR stimuli. Because unprocessed caspase-8 functions in an enzymatic complex with its homolog cFLIP, our findings implicate the caspase-8/cFLIP heterodimer in control of inflammatory cytokines during microbial infection, and provide new insight into regulation of antibacterial immune defense. PMID:27737018

  5. [Influence of immunoregulatory cytokines (IL-2, IL-7 and IL-15) in vitro upon activation, proliferation and apoptosis of immune memory T-cells].

    PubMed

    Litvinova, L S; Sokhonevich, N A; Gutsol, A A; Kofanova, K A

    2013-01-01

    Under the experimental conditions in vitro the effects of immunoregulatory cytokines (IL-2, IL-7 and IL-15) on the activation, proliferation and apoptosis of different subpopulations of immune memory T-cell (Cd45RO+) were investigated in healthy donors. It was demonstrated that the effects of rlL-2 in vitro equally affect the activation and proliferation of CD4+ and CD8+ subpopulations of memory T cells. It has been shown that high concentrations of rIL-2 lead to an increase in the number of CD8+ memory cells expressing apoptotic molecule CD95. Different effect of rIL-7 and rIL-15 on the activation and proliferation of cytotoxic CD8+ memory ells has been revealed in vitro. CD4+ memory lymphocytes have relative resistance to the activation and proliferative effect of rlL-7 and rlL-15, if compared with the effects of rIL-2, which can provide their relative resistance to the activation apoptosis as well as create the necessary conditions for the accelerated implementation of their functional capacity in the development of a secondary immune response.

  6. INNATE IMMUNITY. Cytosolic detection of the bacterial metabolite HBP activates TIFA-dependent innate immunity.

    PubMed

    Gaudet, Ryan G; Sintsova, Anna; Buckwalter, Carolyn M; Leung, Nelly; Cochrane, Alan; Li, Jianjun; Cox, Andrew D; Moffat, Jason; Gray-Owen, Scott D

    2015-06-12

    Host recognition of pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) initiates an innate immune response that is critical for pathogen elimination and engagement of adaptive immunity. Here we show that mammalian cells can detect and respond to the bacterial-derived monosaccharide heptose-1,7-bisphosphate (HBP). A metabolic intermediate in lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis, HBP is highly conserved in Gram-negative bacteria, yet absent from eukaryotic cells. Detection of HBP within the host cytosol activated the nuclear facto κB pathway in vitro and induced innate and adaptive immune responses in vivo. Moreover, we used a genome-wide RNA interference screen to uncover an innate immune signaling axis, mediated by phosphorylation-dependent oligomerization of the TRAF-interacting protein with forkhead-associated domain (TIFA) that is triggered by HBP. Thus, HBP is a PAMP that activates TIFA-dependent immunity to Gram-negative bacteria.

  7. Homing of immune cells: role in homeostasis and intestinal inflammation.

    PubMed

    Hart, Ailsa L; Ng, Siew C; Mann, Elizabeth; Al-Hassi, Hafid Omar; Bernardo, David; Knight, Stella C

    2010-11-01

    Rather like a satellite navigation system directing a vehicle to a particular destination defined by post-code, immune cells have homing molecules or "immune post-codes" enabling them to be recruited to specific organs, such as the intestine or skin. An efficient system would be designed such that the site of entry of an antigen influences the homing of effector T cells back to the appropriate organ. For example, to mount an immune response against an intestinal pathogen, T cells with a propensity to home to the gut to clear the infection would be induced. In health, there is such a sophisticated and finely tuned system in operation, enabling an appropriate balance of immune activity in different anatomical compartments. In disease states such as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), which is characterized by intestinal inflammation and often an inflammatory process involving other organs such as skin, joints, liver, and eye, there is accumulating evidence that there is malfunction of this immune cell trafficking system. The clinical importance of dysregulated immune cell trafficking in IBD is reflected in recently proven efficacious therapies that target trafficking pathways such as natalizumab, an α4 integrin antibody, and Traficet-EN, a chemokine receptor-9 (CCR9) antagonist. Here we review the mechanisms involved in the homing of immune cells to different tissues, in particular the intestine, and focus on alterations in immune cell homing pathways in IBD. Unraveling the mechanisms underlying the immune post-code system would assist in achieving the goal of tissue-specific immunotherapy.

  8. Activation of the MDA-5-IPS-1 Viral Sensing Pathway Induces Cancer Cell Death and Type I IFN-Dependent Antitumor Immunity.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiaofei; Wang, Hongxia; Li, Xia; Guo, Chunqing; Yuan, Fang; Fisher, Paul B; Wang, Xiang-Yang

    2016-04-15

    Melanoma differentiation-associated gene 5 (MDA-5, IFIH1), a cytosolic innate pattern recognition receptor, functions as a first line of defense against viral infection by sensing double-stranded RNA. Ectopic expression of MDA-5 has been shown to induce cancer cell death, but the mechanism of action by which MDA-5 exerts these cytotoxic effects is unclear. Here, we demonstrate that ectopic expression of MDA-5 via replication-incompetent adenovirus (Ad.Mda-5) initiates multiple signaling cascades, culminating in cytotoxicity and type I IFN production in mouse and human prostate cancer cells. This intrinsic dual activity of MDA-5 required the adaptor protein IFNβ promoter stimulator 1 (IPS-1, MAVS) and could be functionally uncoupled. MDA-5 lacking N-terminal caspase recruitment domains (CARD) engaged an intracellular death program in cancer cells but was unable to efficiently stimulate the expression of IFNβ. In contrast to cancer cells susceptible to MDA-5-mediated cytotoxicity, normal cells were highly resistant and instead developed a robust type I IFN response. Strikingly, intratumoral delivery of Ad.Mda-5 led to regression of preestablished prostate cancers and development of long-lasting antitumor immune memory, which was primarily attributed to the activation of tumor-reactive cytotoxic T lymphocytes and/or natural killer cells. Using the CARD-truncated MDA-5 mutant, silencing of IPS-1, and antibody blockade of the IFNα/β receptor, we further demonstrate that type I IFN signaling was crucial for in situ MDA-5-induced protective antitumor immunity. Therefore, deliberately targeting the evolutionarily conserved MDA-5-IPS-1 antiviral pathway in tumors can provoke parallel tumoricidal and immunostimulatory effects that bridge innate and adaptive immune responses for the therapeutic treatment of cancer. Cancer Res; 76(8); 2166-76. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  9. Transient expansion of activated CD8+ T cells characterizes tuberculosis-associated immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome in patients with HIV: a case control study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background CD4+ T cell activation indicators have been reported to be a common phenomenon underlying diverse manifestations of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS). However, we have found that a high frequency of circulating CD8+ T cells is a specific risk factor for mycobacterial IRIS. Therefore, we investigated whether CD8+ T cells from patients who develop TB IRIS were specifically activated. Methods We obtained PBMCs from HIV+ patients prior to and 4, 8, 12, 24, 52 and 104 weeks after initiating antiretroviral therapy. CD38 and HLADR expression on naive, central memory and effector memory CD8+ and CD4+ T cells were determined by flow cytometry. Absolute counts and frequencies of CD8+ T cell subsets were compared between patients who developed TB IRIS, who developed other IRIS forms and who remained IRIS-free. Results TB IRIS patients showed significantly higher counts of naive CD8+ T cells than the other groups at most time points, with a contraction of the effector memory subpopulation occurring later in the follow-up period. Activated (CD38+ HLADR+) CD8+ T cells from all groups decreased with treatment but transiently peaked in TB IRIS patients. This increase was due to an increase in activated naive CD8+ T cell counts during IRIS. Additionally, the CD8+ T cell subpopulations of TB IRIS patients expressed HLADR without CD38 more frequently and expressed CD38 without HLADR less frequently than cells from other groups. Conclusions CD8+ T cell activation is specifically relevant to TB IRIS. Different IRIS forms may involve different alterations in T cell subsets, suggesting different underlying inflammatory processes. PMID:23688318

  10. Mast cells as effector cells of innate immunity and regulators of adaptive immunity.

    PubMed

    Cardamone, Chiara; Parente, Roberta; Feo, Giulia De; Triggiani, Massimo

    2016-10-01

    Mast cells are widely distributed in human organs and tissues and they are particularly abundant at major body interfaces with the external environment such as the skin, the lung and the gastrointestinal tract. Moreover, mast cells are located around blood vessels and are highly represented within central and peripheral lymphoid organs. The strategic distribution of mast cells closely reflects the primary role of these cells in providing first-line defense against environmental dangers, in regulating local and systemic inflammatory reactions and in shaping innate and adaptive immune responses. Human mast cells have pleiotropic and multivalent functions that make them highly versatile cells able to rapidly adapt responses to microenvironmental changes. They express a wide variety of surface receptors including immunoglobulin receptors, pathogen-associated molecular pattern receptors and danger signal receptors. The abundance of these receptors makes mast cells unique and effective surveillance cells able to detect promptly aggression by viral, bacterial and parasitic agents. In addition, mast cells express multiple receptors for cytokines and chemokines that confer them the capacity of being recruited and activated at sites of inflammation. Once activated by immunological or nonimmunological stimuli mast cells secrete a wide spectrum of preformed (early) and de novo synthesized (late) mediators. Preformed mediators are stored within granules and are rapidly released in the extracellular environment to provide a fast vascular response that promotes inflammation and local recruitment of other innate immunity cells such as neutrophils, eosinophils, basophils and monocyte/macrophages. Later on, delayed release of multiple cytokines and chemokines from mast cells further induce modulation of cells of adaptive immunity and regulates tissue injury and, eventually, resolution of inflammation. Finally, mast cells express several costimulatory and inhibitory surface molecules

  11. Tumor's other immune targets: dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Esche, C; Lokshin, A; Shurin, G V; Gastman, B R; Rabinowich, H; Watkins, S C; Lotze, M T; Shurin, M R

    1999-08-01

    The induction of apoptosis in T cells is one of several mechanisms by which tumors escape immune recognition. We have investigated whether tumors induce apoptosis in dendritic cells (DC) by co-culture of murine or human DC with different tumor cell lines for 4-48 h. Analysis of DC morphological features, JAM assay, TUNEL, caspase-3-like and transglutaminase activity, Annexin V binding, and DNA fragmentation assays revealed a time- and dose-dependent induction of apoptosis in DC by tumor-derived factors. This finding is both effector and target specific. The mechanism of tumor-induced DC apoptosis involved regulation of Bcl-2 and Bax expression. Double staining of both murine and human tumor tissues confirmed that tumor-associated DC undergo apoptotic death in vivo. DC isolated from tumor tissue showed significantly higher levels of apoptosis as determined by TUNEL assay when compared with DC isolated from spleen. These findings demonstrate that tumors induce apoptosis in DC and suggest a new mechanism of tumor escape from immune recognition. DC protection from apoptosis will lead to improvement of DC-based immunotherapies for cancer and other immune diseases.

  12. Toll-like receptor-dependent IL-12 production by dendritic cells is required for activation of natural killer cell-mediated Type-1 immunity induced by Chrysanthemum coronarium L.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Sachi; Koizumi, Shin-ichi; Masuko, Kazutaka; Makiuchi, Naoko; Aoyagi, Yuka; Quivy, Emi; Mitamura, Rieko; Kano, Tsutomu; Ohkuri, Takayuki; Wakita, Daiko; Chamoto, Kenji; Kitamura, Hidemitsu; Nishimura, Takashi

    2011-02-01

    Type-1 immunity has an essential role for our host defenses against cancer and outer pathogens such as bacteria and virus. We demonstrated here that the edible plant extract of Chrysanthemum coronarium L. (C. coronarium) remarkably activates Type-1 immunity in a Toll-like receptor (TLR)2-, TLR4-, and TLR9-dependent manner. In the present experiments, the extract of C. coronarium significantly induces interferon (IFN)-γ production by mouse spleen cells. In addition, the IFN-γ production by spleen cells was completely blocked by the addition of anti-Interleukin (IL)-12 monoclonal antibodies. We confirmed that NK1.1(+) natural killer (NK) cells, NKT cells, and CD11c(+) dendritic cells (DC) were immediately activated after the stimulation with the extract of C. coronarium and the IFN-γ production was abolished in NK1.1(+) cell-depleted spleen cells. The stimulation with the extract of C. coronarium caused DC maturation involving with up-regulations of surface expression levels of MHC class I, MHC class II, CD40, and CD86 as well as induction of IL-12 production. The IFN-γ production induced by the extract was significantly reduced in the spleen cells depleted CD11c(+) cells. Furthermore, the IFN-γ production after the stimulation was strongly reduced in TLR4- and partially in TLR2- and TLR9-deficient spleen cells. Thus, we demonstrated the cellular mechanism for the activation of Type-1 immunity via NK cells, NKT cells, and DC by the extract of C. coronarium. These findings strongly suggest that C. coronarium would be a promising immuno-improving adjuvant, which might be useful for prevention of infectious, cancer, and allergic diseases through the activation of Type-1 immunity. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Commensal bacteria calibrate the activation threshold of innate antiviral immunity.

    PubMed

    Abt, Michael C; Osborne, Lisa C; Monticelli, Laurel A; Doering, Travis A; Alenghat, Theresa; Sonnenberg, Gregory F; Paley, Michael A; Antenus, Marcelo; Williams, Katie L; Erikson, Jan; Wherry, E John; Artis, David

    2012-07-27

    Signals from commensal bacteria can influence immune cell development and susceptibility to infectious or inflammatory diseases. However, the mechanisms by which commensal bacteria regulate protective immunity after exposure to systemic pathogens remain poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that antibiotic-treated (ABX) mice exhibit impaired innate and adaptive antiviral immune responses and substantially delayed viral clearance after exposure to systemic LCMV or mucosal influenza virus. Furthermore, ABX mice exhibited severe bronchiole epithelial degeneration and increased host mortality after influenza virus infection. Genome-wide transcriptional profiling of macrophages isolated from ABX mice revealed decreased expression of genes associated with antiviral immunity. Moreover, macrophages from ABX mice exhibited defective responses to type I and type II IFNs and impaired capacity to limit viral replication. Collectively, these data indicate that commensal-derived signals provide tonic immune stimulation that establishes the activation threshold of the innate immune system required for optimal antiviral immunity.

  14. Commensal Bacteria Calibrate the Activation Threshold of Innate Antiviral Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Abt, Michael C.; Osborne, Lisa C.; Monticelli, Laurel A.; Doering, Travis A.; Alenghat, Theresa; Sonnenberg, Gregory F.; Paley, Michael A.; Antenus, Marcelo; Williams, Katie L.; Erikson, Jan; Wherry, E. John; Artis, David

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Signals from commensal bacteria can influence immune cell development and susceptibility to infectious or inflammatory diseases. However, the mechanisms by which commensal bacteria regulate protective immunity after exposure to systemic pathogens remain poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that antibiotic-treated (ABX) mice exhibit impaired innate and adaptive antiviral immune responses and substantially delayed viral clearance after exposure to systemic LCMV or mucosal influenza virus. Furthermore, ABX mice exhibited severe bronchiole epithelial degeneration and increased host mortality after influenza virus infection. Genome-wide transcriptional profiling of macrophages isolated from ABX mice revealed decreased expression of genes associated with antiviral immunity. Moreover, macrophages from ABX mice exhibited defective responses to type I and type II IFNs and impaired capacity to limit viral replication. Collectively, these data indicate that commensal-derived signals provide tonic immune stimulation that establishes the activation threshold of the innate immune system required for optimal antiviral immunity. PMID:22705104

  15. Innate and adaptive immune cells in the tumor microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Gajewski, Thomas F; Schreiber, Hans; Fu, Yang-Xin

    2014-01-01

    Most tumor cells express antigens that can mediate recognition by host CD8+ T cells. Cancers that are detected clinically must have evaded antitumor immune responses to grow progressively. Recent work has suggested two broad categories of tumor escape based on cellular and molecular characteristics of the tumor microenvironment. One major subset shows a T cell–inflamed phenotype consisting of infiltrating T cells, a broad chemokine profile and a type I interferon signature indicative of innate immune activation. These tumors appear to resist immune attack through the dominant inhibitory effects of immune system–suppressive pathways. The other major phenotype lacks this T cell–inflamed phenotype and appears to resist immune attack through immune system exclusion or ignorance. These two major phenotypes of tumor microenvironment may require distinct immunotherapeutic interventions for maximal therapeutic effect. PMID:24048123

  16. Mast cell: an emerging partner in immune interaction.

    PubMed

    Gri, Giorgia; Frossi, Barbara; D'Inca, Federica; Danelli, Luca; Betto, Elena; Mion, Francesca; Sibilano, Riccardo; Pucillo, Carlo

    2012-01-01

    Mast cells (MCs) are currently recognized as effector cells in many settings of the immune response, including host defense, immune regulation, allergy, chronic inflammation, and autoimmune diseases. MC pleiotropic functions reflect their ability to secrete a wide spectrum of preformed or newly synthesized biologically active products with pro-inflammatory, anti-inflammatory and/or immunosuppressive properties, in response to multiple signals. Moreover, the modulation of MC effector phenotypes relies on the interaction of a wide variety of membrane molecules involved in cell-cell or cell-extracellular-matrix interaction. The delivery of co-stimulatory signals allows MC to specifically communicate with immune cells belonging to both innate and acquired immunity, as well as with non-immune tissue-specific cell types. This article reviews and discusses the evidence that MC membrane-expressed molecules play a central role in regulating MC priming and activation and in the modulation of innate and adaptive immune response not only against host injury, but also in peripheral tolerance and tumor-surveillance or -escape. The complex expression of MC surface molecules may be regarded as a measure of connectivity, with altered patterns of cell-cell interaction representing functionally distinct MC states. We will focalize our attention on roles and functions of recently discovered molecules involved in the cross-talk of MCs with other immune partners.

  17. Orchestrating Lymphocyte Polarity in Cognate Immune Cell–Cell Interactions

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The immune synapse (IS) is a specialized structure established between different immune cells that fulfills several functions, including a role as a communication bridge. This intimate contact between a T cell and an antigen-presenting cell promotes the proliferation and differentiation of lymphocytes involved in the contact. T-cell activation requires the specific triggering of the T-cell receptor (TCR), which promotes the activation of different signaling pathways inducing the polarization of the T cell. During this process, different adhesion and signaling receptors reorganize at specialized membrane domains, concomitantly to the polarization of the tubulin and actin cytoskeletons, forming stable polarization platforms. The centrosome also moves toward the IS, driving the movement of different organelles, such as the biosynthetic, secretory, degrading machinery, and mitochondria, to sustain T-cell activation. A proper orchestration of all these events is essential for T-cell effector functions and the accomplishment of a complete immune response. PMID:27692176

  18. Chronic active hepatitis induced by Helicobacter hepaticus in the A/JCr mouse is associated with a Th1 cell-mediated immune response.

    PubMed

    Whary, M T; Morgan, T J; Dangler, C A; Gaudes, K J; Taylor, N S; Fox, J G

    1998-07-01

    Helicobacter hepaticus infection in A/JCr mice results in chronic active hepatitis characterized by perivascular, periportal, and parenchymal infiltrates of mononuclear and polymorphonuclear cells. This study examined the development of hepatitis and the immune response of A/JCr mice to H. hepaticus infection. The humoral and cell-mediated T helper immune response was profiled by measuring the postinfection (p.i.) antibody response in serum, feces, and bile and by the production of cytokines and proliferative responses by splenic mononuclear cells to H. hepaticus antigens. Secretory immunoglobulin A (IgA) and systemic IgG2a antibody developed by 4 weeks p.i. and persisted through 12 months. Splenocytes from infected mice proliferated and produced more gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) than interleukin-4 (IL-4) or IL-5 when cultured with H. hepaticus outer membrane proteins. The predominantly IgG2a antibody response in serum and the in vitro production of IFN-gamma in excess of IL-4 or IL-5 are consistent with a Th1 immune response reported in humans and mice infected with Helicobacter pylori and Helicobacter felis, respectively. Mice infected with H. hepaticus developed progressively severe perivascular, periportal, and hepatic parenchymal lesions consisting of lymphohistiocytic and plasmacytic cellular infiltrates. In addition, transmural typhlitis was observed at 12 months p.i. The characterization of a cell-mediated Th1 immune response to H. hepaticus infection in the A/JCr mouse should prove valuable as a model for experimental regimens which manipulate the host response to Helicobacter.

  19. Chronic Active Hepatitis Induced by Helicobacter hepaticus in the A/JCr Mouse Is Associated with a Th1 Cell-Mediated Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    Whary, M. T.; Morgan, T. J.; Dangler, C. A.; Gaudes, K. J.; Taylor, N. S.; Fox, J. G.

    1998-01-01

    Helicobacter hepaticus infection in A/JCr mice results in chronic active hepatitis characterized by perivascular, periportal, and parenchymal infiltrates of mononuclear and polymorphonuclear cells. This study examined the development of hepatitis and the immune response of A/JCr mice to H. hepaticus infection. The humoral and cell-mediated T helper immune response was profiled by measuring the postinfection (p.i.) antibody response in serum, feces, and bile and by the production of cytokines and proliferative responses by splenic mononuclear cells to H. hepaticus antigens. Secretory immunoglobulin A (IgA) and systemic IgG2a antibody developed by 4 weeks p.i. and persisted through 12 months. Splenocytes from infected mice proliferated and produced more gamma interferon (IFN-γ) than interleukin-4 (IL-4) or IL-5 when cultured with H. hepaticus outer membrane proteins. The predominantly IgG2a antibody response in serum and the in vitro production of IFN-γ in excess of IL-4 or IL-5 are consistent with a Th1 immune response reported in humans and mice infected with Helicobacter pylori and Helicobacter felis, respectively. Mice infected with H. hepaticus developed progressively severe perivascular, periportal, and hepatic parenchymal lesions consisting of lymphohistiocytic and plasmacytic cellular infiltrates. In addition, transmural typhlitis was observed at 12 months p.i. The characterization of a cell-mediated Th1 immune response to H. hepaticus infection in the A/JCr mouse should prove valuable as a model for experimental regimens which manipulate the host response to Helicobacter. PMID:9632578

  20. Pro-inflammatory caspase-1 activation during the immune response in cells from rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss (Walbaum 1792) challenged with pathogen-associated molecular patterns.

    PubMed

    Rojas, V; Camus-Guerra, H; Guzmán, F; Mercado, L

    2015-11-01

    In response to pathogens, the higher vertebrate innate immune system activates pro-inflammatory caspase-1 which is responsible for the processing and secretion of several important cytokines involved in the host's defence against infection. To date, caspase-1 has been described in few teleost fish, and its activity has been demonstrated through substrate cleavage and inhibition by pharmacological agents. In this study, the detection of the active form of caspase-1 during the immune response in salmonid fish is described, where two antibodies were produced. These antibodies differentially recognize the structural epitopes of the inactive pro-caspase-1 and the processed active form of the caspase. Firstly, caspase-1 activation was demonstrated in vitro by ELISA, Western blotting and immunocytochemistry in rainbow trout macrophages exposed to different pathogen-associated molecular patterns plus the pathogen Aeromonas hydrophila. This activity was clearly abrogated by a caspase inhibitor and seems to be unrelated to IL-1β secretion. Caspase-1 activation was then validated in vivo in gill cells from fish challenged with Aeromonas salmonicida. These results represent the first demonstration of caspase-1 activation in salmonids, and the first evidence of the putative regulatory role which this protease plays in inflammatory response in this fish group, as described for some other teleosts and mammals.

  1. [Ag85B and BCG enhance immune activity of dendritic cells in patients with initially treated tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Guo, Yun; Su, Yuanyuan; Sun, Yang; Guan, Weiwei; Yang, Li; Zhang, Zhi; Wang, Yuling; Dai, Erhei

    2016-06-01

    Objective To investigate the regulatory effects of Mycobacterium tuberculosis major secreted protein Ag85B and Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) on the immune function of dendritic cells (DCs) in the patients with tuberculosis who have received an initial treatment. Methods The peripheral blood mononuclear cells were collected and separated in 26 healthy subjects and 31 patients with tuberculosis who had been treated initially. Every specimen was divided into 4 groups and DCs were induced and cultured. On the 6th day, the DCs in the three experimental groups were treated by lipopolysaccharide (LPS), BCG, Ag85B, respectively and no-treated DCs served as a control group. After 24-hour treatment, DCs were collected and examined for the levels of CD83, CD86, HLA-DR and CD11c using flow cytometry. Moreover, the levels of interleukin 12 (IL-12), IL-10 and interferon γ (IFN-γ) in the supernatants were measured by ELISA. Results The expression levels of CD83 and IL-10 in the patient control group were significantly lower than those in healthy subject control group. The levels of CD83, CD86 and IFN-γ in the Ag85B treated group were obviously high than those in the control group. The level of IFN-γ in the BCG treated group was significantly high than that in the control group. The levels of CD83, CD86, HLA-DR and IL-10 in the LPS treated group were remarkably higher than those in the control group. The levels of CD83, CD86 and IL-10 in the healthy subject LPS treated group were significantly higher than those in the healthy subject control group. Conclusion The immune-enhancing effect of Ag85B on DCs is superior to that of BCG in the patients with initially treated tuberculosis.

  2. Flexible cytokine production by macrophages and T cells in response to probiotic bacteria: a possible mechanism by which probiotics exert multifunctional immune regulatory activities.

    PubMed

    Shida, Kan; Nanno, Masanobu; Nagata, Satoru

    2011-01-01

    Probiotics have been reported to be efficacious against cancers, infections, allergies, inflammatory bowel diseases and autoimmune diseases, and it is important to explain how such multifunctional activities are realized. Lactobacillus casei Shirota (LcS) is one of these multifunctional probiotics, and its ability to augment the host immune system has been extensively examined. We have shown that the cell wall structure of this probiotic strain is responsible for potently inducing IL-12 production. In addition, we have recently found that LcS differentially controls the inflammatory cytokine responses of macrophages and T cells in either Peyer's patches or the spleen. Other studies revealed that LcS-induced IL-12 production by macrophages is modified when other bacteria or their cell components are simultaneously present. These findings can provide a theoretical basis for understanding the multifunctional activities of specific probiotics.

  3. Host's innate immune response to fungal and bacterial agents in vitro: up-regulation of interleukin-15 gene expression resulting in enhanced natural killer cell activity

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Phay; Ahmad, Rasheed; Xu, Jingwu; Ahmad, Ali; Menezes, José

    2003-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells play an important role in the first line of defence against viral infections. We have shown earlier that exposure of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) to viruses results in rapid up-regulation of NK cell activity via interleukin-15 (IL-15) induction, and that this mechanism curtails viral infection in vitro. By using Candida albicans, Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus, we now show here that exposure of PBMC to fungi and bacteria also results in an immediate increase of NK cytotoxicity. Reverse transcriptase–polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analyses as well as the use of antibodies against different cytokines revealed that IL-15 induction played a predominant role in this NK activation. These results indicate that IL-15 is also involved in the innate immune response against fungal and bacterial agents. PMID:12757622

  4. Cell-Cell Communication Via Extracellular Membrane Vesicles and Its Role in the Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Inkyu

    2013-01-01

    The host immune response involves a variety of cell types, including specialized immune and non-immune cells. The delicate coordination among these cells via close communication is central for the proper operation of immune system. Cell-cell communication is mediated by a complex network that includes soluble factors such as cytokines, chemokines, and metabolites exported from cells, as well as membrane-bound receptors and their ligands. Cell-cell communication is also mediated by membrane vesicles (e.g., exosomes, ectosomes), which are either shed by distant cells or exchanged by cells that are making direct contact. Intercellular communication via extracellular membrane vesicles has drawn much attention recently, as they have been shown to carry various biomolecules that modulate the activities of recipient cells. In this review, I will discuss current views on cell-cell communication via extra-cellular membrane vesicles, especially shedded membrane vesicles, and their effects on the control of the immune system. PMID:23807045

  5. Immune cell interplay in colorectal cancer prognosis.

    PubMed

    Norton, Samuel E; Ward-Hartstonge, Kirsten A; Taylor, Edward S; Kemp, Roslyn A

    2015-10-15

    The immune response to colorectal cancer has proven to be a reliable measure of patient outcome in several studies. However, the complexity of the immune response in this disease is not well understood, particularly the interactions between tumour-associated cells and cells of the innate and adaptive immune system. This review will discuss the relationship between cancer associated fibroblasts and macrophages, as well as between macrophages and T cells, and demonstrate how each population may support or prevent tumour growth in a different immune environment.

  6. Rifaximin has a marginal impact on microbial translocation, T-cell activation and inflammation in HIV-positive immune non-responders to antiretroviral therapy - ACTG A5286.

    PubMed

    Tenorio, Allan R; Chan, Ellen S; Bosch, Ronald J; Macatangay, Bernard J C; Read, Sarah W; Yesmin, Suria; Taiwo, Babafemi; Margolis, David M; Jacobson, Jeffrey M; Landay, Alan L; Wilson, Cara C

    2015-03-01

    Rifaximin, a nonabsorbable antibiotic that decreases lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in cirrhotics, may decrease the elevated levels of microbial translocation, T-cell activation and inflammation in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive immune nonresponders to antiretroviral therapy (ART). HIV-positive adults receiving ART for ≥96 weeks with undetectable viremia for ≥48 weeks and CD4(+) T-cell counts <350 cells/mm(3) were randomized 2:1 to rifaximin versus no study treatment for 4 weeks. T-cell activation, LPS, and soluble CD14 were measured at baseline and at weeks 2, 4, and 8. Wilcoxon rank sum tests compared changes between arms. Compared with no study treatment (n = 22), rifaximin (n = 43) use was associated with a significant difference between study arms in the change from baseline to week 4 for CD8(+)T-cell activation (median change, 0.0% with rifaximin vs +0.6% with no treatment; P = .03). This difference was driven by an increase in the no-study-treatment arm because there was no significant change within the rifaximin arm. Similarly, although there were significant differences between study arms in change from baseline to week 2 for LPS and soluble CD14, there were no significant changes within the rifaximin arm. In immune nonresponders to ART, rifaximin minimally affected microbial translocation and CD8(+)T-cell activation. Trial registration number. NCT01466595. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Exosomes and nanotubes: Control of immune cell communication.

    PubMed

    McCoy-Simandle, Kessler; Hanna, Samer J; Cox, Dianne

    2016-02-01

    Cell-cell communication is critical to coordinate the activity and behavior of a multicellular organism. The cells of the immune system not only must communicate with similar cells, but also with many other cell types in the body. Therefore, the cells of the immune system have evolved multiple ways to communicate. Exosomes and tunneling nanotubes (TNTs) are two means of communication used by immune cells that contribute to immune functions. Exosomes are small membrane vesicles secreted by most cell types that can mediate intercellular communication and in the immune system they are proposed to play a role in antigen presentation and modulation of gene expression. TNTs are membranous structures that mediate direct cell-cell contact over several cell diameters in length (and possibly longer) and facilitate the interaction and/or the transfer of signals, material and other cellular organelles between connected cells. Recent studies have revealed additional, but sometimes conflicting, structural and functional features of both exosomes and TNTs. Despite the new and exciting information in exosome and TNT composition, origin and in vitro function, biologically significant functions are still being investigated and determined. In this review, we discuss the current field regarding exosomes and TNTs in immune cells providing evaluation and perspectives of the current literature.

  8. Stem Cell-Derived Extracellular Vesicles and Immune-Modulation.

    PubMed

    Burrello, Jacopo; Monticone, Silvia; Gai, Chiara; Gomez, Yonathan; Kholia, Sharad; Camussi, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Extra-cellular vesicles (EVs) are bilayer membrane structures enriched with proteins, nucleic acids, and other active molecules and have been implicated in many physiological and pathological processes over the past decade. Recently, evidence suggests EVs to play a more dichotomic role in the regulation of the immune system, whereby an immune response may be enhanced or supressed by EVs depending on their cell of origin and its functional state. EVs derived from antigen (Ag)-presenting cells for instance, have been involved in both innate and acquired (or adaptive) immune responses, as Ag carriers or presenters, or as vehicles for delivering active signaling molecules. On the other hand, tumor and stem cell derived EVs have been identified to exert an inhibitory effect on immune responses by carrying immuno-modulatory effectors, such as transcriptional factors, non-coding RNA (Species), and cytokines. In addition, stem cell-derived EVs have also been reported to impair dendritic cell maturation and to regulate the activation, differentiation, and proliferation of B cells. They have been shown to control natural killer cell activity and to suppress the innate immune response (IIR). Studies reporting the role of EVs on T lymphocyte modulation are controversial. Discrepancy in literature may be due to stem cell culture conditions, methods of EV purification, EV molecular content, and functional state of both parental and target cells. However, mesenchymal stem cell-derived EVs were shown to play a more suppressive role by shifting T cells from an activated to a T regulatory phenotype. In this review, we will discuss how stem cell-derived EVs may contribute toward the modulation of the immune response. Collectively, stem cell-derived EVs mainly exhibit an inhibitory effect on the immune system.

  9. Stem Cell-Derived Extracellular Vesicles and Immune-Modulation

    PubMed Central

    Burrello, Jacopo; Monticone, Silvia; Gai, Chiara; Gomez, Yonathan; Kholia, Sharad; Camussi, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Extra-cellular vesicles (EVs) are bilayer membrane structures enriched with proteins, nucleic acids, and other active molecules and have been implicated in many physiological and pathological processes over the past decade. Recently, evidence suggests EVs to play a more dichotomic role in the regulation of the immune system, whereby an immune response may be enhanced or supressed by EVs depending on their cell of origin and its functional state. EVs derived from antigen (Ag)-presenting cells for instance, have been involved in both innate and acquired (or adaptive) immune responses, as Ag carriers or presenters, or as vehicles for delivering active signaling molecules. On the other hand, tumor and stem cell derived EVs have been identified to exert an inhibitory effect on immune responses by carrying immuno-modulatory effectors, such as transcriptional factors, non-coding RNA (Species), and cytokines. In addition, stem cell-derived EVs have also been reported to impair dendritic cell maturation and to regulate the activation, differentiation, and proliferation of B cells. They have been shown to control natural killer cell activity and to suppress the innate immune response (IIR). Studies reporting the role of EVs on T lymphocyte modulation are controversial. Discrepancy in literature may be due to stem cell culture conditions, methods of EV purification, EV molecular content, and functional state of both parental and target cells. However, mesenchymal stem cell-derived EVs were shown to play a more suppressive role by shifting T cells from an activated to a T regulatory phenotype. In this review, we will discuss how stem cell-derived EVs may contribute toward the modulation of the immune response. Collectively, stem cell-derived EVs mainly exhibit an inhibitory effect on the immune system. PMID:27597941

  10. Acute lymphoid changes and ongoing immune activation in SIV infection.

    PubMed

    Popov, J; McGraw, T; Hofmann, B; Vowels, B; Shum, A; Nishanian, P; Fahey, J L

    1992-01-01

    Two features of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infection are emphasized: a transitory decrease in CD4 T cells in the first 2 weeks of infection followed by CD8 T-cell rise, and immune cell activation occurring by 4 weeks and persisting throughout the illness. The short-term changes included a fall in CD4 T cells by 2 weeks with partial recovery by 4 weeks and a CD8 rise that starts at 2 weeks. Subsequent characterization of CD4 T cells showed reduced expression of HLA-DR and CD25 (IL-2 receptor alpha chain) antigens later in SIV infection. Immune cell activation is evident in increased serum levels of neopterin and soluble CD8 antigen. Serum beta 2-microglobulin changes are less marked. Activation of CD8 T cells is reflected by increased percentages of cells expressing HLA-DR antigen. The B-cell numbers increased late in the course of SIV infection. Increased expression of the CD78 (Leu 21) activation phenotype was also seen in some monkeys. The immune activation changes (serum neopterin levels) induced by SIV infection in rhesus macaques appear to be associated with duration of illness, although the number of monkeys observed until death were too few for conclusive data. Thus, immune activation as well as T-cell deficiency may reflect significant immunopathogenic processes in SIV-induced disease.

  11. Immune Influence on Adult Neural Stem Cell Regulation and Function

    PubMed Central

    Carpentier, Pamela A.; Palmer, Theo D.

    2009-01-01

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) lie at the heart of central nervous system development and repair, and deficiency or dysregulation of NSCs or their progeny can have significant consequences at any stage of life. Immune signaling is emerging as one of the influential variables that define resident NSC behavior. Perturbations in local immune signaling accompany virtually every injury or disease state and signaling cascades that mediate immune activation, resolution, or chronic persistence influence resident stem and progenitor cells. Some aspects of immune signaling are beneficial, promoting intrinsic plasticity and cell replacement, while others appear to inhibit the very type of regenerative response that might restore or replace neural networks lost in injury or disease. Here we review known and speculative roles that immune signaling plays in the postnatal and adult brain, focusing on how environments encountered in disease or injury may influence the activity and fate of endogenous or transplanted NSCs. PMID:19840551

  12. Imprime PGG-Mediated Anti-Cancer Immune Activation Requires Immune Complex Formation

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Xiaohong; Ottoson, Nadine R.; Walsh, Richard M.; Gorden, Keith B; Harrison, Ben; Maimonis, Peter J.; Leonardo, Steven M.; Ertelt, Kathleen E.; Danielson, Michael E.; Michel, Kyle S.; Nelson, Mariana; Graff, Jeremy R.; Patchen, Myra L.; Bose, Nandita

    2016-01-01

    Imprime PGG (Imprime), an intravenously-administered, soluble β-glucan, has shown compelling efficacy in multiple phase 2 clinical trials with tumor targeting or anti-angiogenic antibodies. Mechanistically, Imprime acts as pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP) directly activating innate immune effector cells, triggering a coordinated anti-cancer immune response. Herein, using whole blood from healthy human subjects, we show that Imprime-induced anti-cancer functionality is dependent on immune complex formation with naturally-occurring, anti-β glucan antibodies (ABA). The formation of Imprime-ABA complexes activates complement, primarily via the classical complement pathway, and is opsonized by iC3b. Immune complex binding depends upon Complement Receptor 3 and Fcg Receptor IIa, eliciting phenotypic activation of, and enhanced chemokine production by, neutrophils and monocytes, enabling these effector cells to kill antibody-opsonized tumor cells via the generation of reactive oxygen species and antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis. Importantly, these innate immune cell changes were not evident in subjects with low ABA levels but could be rescued with exogenous ABA supplementation. Together, these data indicate that pre-existing ABA are essential for Imprime-mediated anti-cancer immune activation and suggest that pre-treatment ABA levels may provide a plausible patient selection biomarker to delineate patients most likely to benefit from Imprime-based therapy. PMID:27812183

  13. Imprime PGG-Mediated Anti-Cancer Immune Activation Requires Immune Complex Formation.

    PubMed

    Chan, Anissa S H; Jonas, Adria Bykowski; Qiu, Xiaohong; Ottoson, Nadine R; Walsh, Richard M; Gorden, Keith B; Harrison, Ben; Maimonis, Peter J; Leonardo, Steven M; Ertelt, Kathleen E; Danielson, Michael E; Michel, Kyle S; Nelson, Mariana; Graff, Jeremy R; Patchen, Myra L; Bose, Nandita

    2016-01-01

    Imprime PGG (Imprime), an intravenously-administered, soluble β-glucan, has shown compelling efficacy in multiple phase 2 clinical trials with tumor targeting or anti-angiogenic antibodies. Mechanistically, Imprime acts as pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP) directly activating innate immune effector cells, triggering a coordinated anti-cancer immune response. Herein, using whole blood from healthy human subjects, we show that Imprime-induced anti-cancer functionality is dependent on immune complex formation with naturally-occurring, anti-β glucan antibodies (ABA). The formation of Imprime-ABA complexes activates complement, primarily via the classical complement pathway, and is opsonized by iC3b. Immune complex binding depends upon Complement Receptor 3 and Fcg Receptor IIa, eliciting phenotypic activation of, and enhanced chemokine production by, neutrophils and monocytes, enabling these effector cells to kill antibody-opsonized tumor cells via the generation of reactive oxygen species and antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis. Importantly, these innate immune cell changes were not evident in subjects with low ABA levels but could be rescued with exogenous ABA supplementation. Together, these data indicate that pre-existing ABA are essential for Imprime-mediated anti-cancer immune activation and suggest that pre-treatment ABA levels may provide a plausible patient selection biomarker to delineate patients most likely to benefit from Imprime-based therapy.

  14. The role of SLAM family receptors in immune cell signaling.

    PubMed

    Ostrakhovitch, Elena A; Li, Shawn S-C

    2006-12-01

    The signaling lymphocyte-activating molecule (SLAM) family immunoreceptors are expressed in a wide array of immune cells, including both T and B lymphocytes. By virtue of their ability to transduce tyrosine phosphorylation signals through the so-called ITSM (immunoreceptor tyrosine-based switch motif) sequences, they play an important part in regulating both innate and adaptive immune responses. The critical role of the SLAM immunoreceptors in mediating normal immune reactions was highlighted in recent findings that SAP, a SLAM-associated protein, modulates the activities of various immune cells through interactions with different members of the SLAM family expressed in these cells. Importantly, mutations or deletions of the sap gene in humans result in the X-linked lymphoproliferative syndrome. In this review, we summarize current knowledge and survey the latest developments in signal transduction events triggered by the activation of SLAM family receptors in different cell types.

  15. Immunostimulation by cytomegalovirus (CMV): helper T cell-dependent activation of immunoglobulin production in vitro by lymphocytes from CMV-immune donors

    SciTech Connect

    Yachie, A.; Tosato, G.; Straus, S.E.; Blaese, R.M.

    1985-08-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is the cause of a number of different diseases ranging from self-limited benign infections in healthy adults to life threatening illnesses among immunocompromised hosts and newborns. Suppression of cell-mediated immunity is often found in cases of acute CMV infection, and in addition, the virus may also be a potent stimulant of lymphoid cells in vivo. The authors studied cellular proliferation and immunoglobulin (Ig) production induced by CMV to determine its effect on human lymphocytes in vitro. The CMV that was added to cultures of lymphocytes from CMV-seronegative donors failed to induce either significant cellular proliferation or Ig production. By contrast, CMV-stimulated cultures from CMV-seropositive donors induced both prominent cellular proliferation and Ig production. B cell differentiation into Ig-secreting cells required the presence of T cells, and this T cell help was sensitive to irradiation with 2000 rad and to treatment with cyclosporin A. When T cells were depleted of OKT4+ cells with monoclonal antibody and complement, the co-cultured B cells failed to produce Ig, whereas the depletion of OKT8+ cells had no effect on the Ig-secreting cell response. Inactivation of CMV before culture did not result in a reduction of either cellular proliferation or Ig production. Thus, infection of target cells is not required for in vitro lymphocyte activation by CMV. These results demonstrate that CMV is a potent activator of B cells inducing Ig production in vitro, and that this process requires the presence of virus-specific memory T cells.

  16. Innate Immune Pattern Recognition: A Cell Biological Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Brubaker, Sky W.; Bonham, Kevin S.; Zanoni, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    Receptors of the innate immune system detect conserved determinants of microbial and viral origin. Activation of these receptors initiates signaling events that culminate in an effective immune response. Recently, the view that innate immune signaling events rely on and operate within a complex cellular infrastructure has become an important framework for understanding the regulation of innate immunity. Compartmentalization within this infrastructure provides the cell with the ability to assign spatial information to microbial detection and regulate immune responses. Several cell biological processes play a role in the regulation of innate signaling responses; at the same time, innate signaling can engage cellular processes as a form of defense or to promote immunological memory. In this review, we highlight these aspects of cell biology in pattern-recognition receptor signaling by focusing on signals that originate from the cell surface, from endosomal compartments, and from within the cytosol. PMID:25581309

  17. A novel dendritic-cell-targeting DNA vaccine for hepatitis B induces T cell and humoral immune responses and potentiates the antivirus activity in HBV transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Yu, Debin; Liu, Hong; Shi, Shuai; Dong, Liwei; Wang, Hongge; Wu, Nuoting; Gao, Hui; Cheng, Zhaojun; Zheng, Qun; Cai, Jiaojiao; Zou, Libo; Zou, Zhihua

    2015-12-01

    Strategies for inducing an effective immune response following vaccination have focused on targeting antigens to dendritic cells (DCs) through the DC-specific surface molecule DEC-205. The immunogenicity and efficacy of DNA vaccination can also be enhanced by fusing the encoded antigen to single-chain antibodies directed against DEC-205. Here, we investigated this promising approach for its enhancement of hepatitis B virus (HBV)-specific cellular and humoral immune responses and its antiviral effects in HBV transgenic mice. A plasmid DNA vaccine encoding mouse DEC-205 single-chain fragment variable (mDEC-205-scFv) linked with the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) was constructed. Vaccination with this fusion DNA vaccine in HBV transgenic mice induced robust antiviral T cell and antibody immunity against HBsAg. The levels of serum-circulating HBsAg and the HBV DNA copy number were downregulated by the induction of a higher HBsAg-specific response. Thus, in this study, we demonstrated the therapeutic efficacy of the novel mDEC-205-scFv-fused DNA vaccine in a mouse model of immune-tolerant, chronic HBV infection.

  18. Disruption of Early Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha Signaling Prevents Classical Activation of Dendritic Cells in Lung-Associated Lymph Nodes and Development of Protective Immunity against Cryptococcal Infection

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jintao; Eastman, Alison J.; Flaczyk, Adam; Neal, Lori M.; Zhao, Guolei; Carolan, Jacob; Malachowski, Antoni N.; Stolberg, Valerie R.; Yosri, Mohammed; Chensue, Stephen W.; Curtis, Jeffrey L.; Osterholzer, John J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha (anti-TNF-α) therapies have been increasingly used to treat inflammatory diseases and are associated with increased risk of invasive fungal infections, including Cryptococcus neoformans infection. Using a mouse model of cryptococcal infection, we investigated the mechanism by which disruption of early TNF-α signaling results in the development of nonprotective immunity against C. neoformans. We found that transient depletion of TNF-α inhibited pulmonary fungal clearance and enhanced extrapulmonary dissemination of C. neoformans during the adaptive phase of the immune response. Higher fungal burdens in TNF-α-depleted mice were accompanied by markedly impaired Th1 and Th17 responses in the infected lungs. Furthermore, early TNF-α depletion also resulted in disrupted transcriptional initiation of the Th17 polarization program and subsequent upregulation of Th1 genes in CD4+ T cells in the lung-associated lymph nodes (LALN) of C. neoformans-infected mice. These defects in LALN T cell responses were preceded by a dramatic shift from a classical toward an alternative activation of dendritic cells (DC) in the LALN of TNF-α-depleted mice. Taken together, our results indicate that early TNF-α signaling is required for optimal DC activation, and the initial Th17 response followed by Th1 transcriptional prepolarization of T cells in the LALN, which further drives the development of protective immunity against cryptococcal infection in the lungs. Thus, administration of anti-TNF-α may introduce a particularly greater risk for newly acquired fungal infections that require generation of protective Th1/Th17 responses for their containment and clearance. PMID:27406560

  19. Fixed drug eruption: the dark side of activation of intraepidermal CD8+ T cells uniquely specialized to mediate protective immunity.

    PubMed

    Shiohara, Tetsuo; Mizukawa, Yoshiko

    2012-01-01

    Fixed drug eruption (FDE) is generally regarded as representing the mild end of drug-induced dermatitis, but the clinical importance of recognizing this disease as an abortive, localized variant of toxic epidermal necrolysis has received increasing attention in recent years. FDE often presents with a wide spectrum of clinical manifestations indistinguishable from those of other skin diseases, such as erythema multiforme, Stevens-Johnson syndrome /toxic epidermal necrolysis, cellulitis, paronychia, lichen planus, and parapsoriasis en plaques. These unusual forms of FDE are likely to be overlooked unless the possibility of a drug etiology is routinely considered in the differential diagnosis of any patient with these diseases. Clinical awareness and recognition of these unique forms are essential for avoiding a misdiagnosis. Intraepidermal CD8+ T cells resident in the FDE lesions that have the capacity to rapidly produce large amounts of IFN-γ are likely to have a key role in mediating localized epidermal injury, while they may represent a T cell subset uniquely specialized to mediate protective immunity against various pathogens. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. Expansion and Activation Kinetics of Immune Cells during Early Phase of GVHD in Mouse Model Based on Chemotherapy Conditioning

    PubMed Central

    Sadeghi, Behnam; Al-Hashmi, Suleiman; Hassan, Zuzana; Rozell, Bjorn; Concha, Hernan; Lundmark, Carin; Grönvik, Kjell-Olov; Abedi-Valugerdi, Manuchehr; Hassan, Moustapha

    2010-01-01

    In the present paper, we have investigated early pathophysiological events in graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), a major complication to hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). BLLB/c female mice conditioned with busulfan/cyclophosphamide (Bu-Cy) were transplanted with allogeneic male C57BL/6. Control group consisted of syngeneic transplanted Balb/c mice. In allogeneic settings, significant expansion and maturation of donor dendritic cells (DCs) were observed at day +3, while donor T-cells CD8+ were increased at day +5 (230%) compared to syngeneic HSCT. Highest levels of inflammatory cytokines IL-2, IFN-gamma, and TNF-alfa at day +5 matched T-cell activation. Concomitantly naïve T-cells gain effecr-memory phenotype and migrated from spleen to peripheral lymphoid organs. Thus, in the very early phase of GHVD following Bu-Cy conditioning donor, DCs play an important role in the activation of donor T cells. Subsequently, donor naïve T-cells gain effector-memory phenotype and initiate GVHD. PMID:21197273

  1. Inhibition of NF-κB by a PXR-dependent pathway mediates counter-regulatory activities of rifaximin on innate immunity in intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Mencarelli, Andrea; Renga, Barbara; Palladino, Giuseppe; Claudio, D'Amore; Ricci, Patrizia; Distrutti, Eleonora; Barbanti, Miriam; Baldelli, Franco; Fiorucci, Stefano

    2011-10-01

    A dysregulated interaction between intestinal epithelial cells (IEC) and components of innate immunity is a hallmark of inflammatory bowel diseases. Rifaximin is a poorly absorbed oral antimicrobial agent increasingly used in the treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases that has been demonstrated to act as a gut-specific ligand for the human nuclear receptor pregnane-X receptor (PXR). In the present study we investigated, whether